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ISSUe 121

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GreenFleet DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS

ELECTRIC VEHICLES MOBILITY & CONNECTIVITY REPORT

CHANGING THE WAY PEOPLE & GOODS MOVE

ACCREDITATION FOR EV SELLERS Drivers can now buy an electric vehicle with confidence from retailers with EVA Accreditation

How new mobility models can reduce congestion, improve air quality and make the UK more productive

PLUS: MOBILITY CREDITS | VOLVO V60 ROAD TEST | HONDA CR-V HYBRID ROAD TEST


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ISSUe 121

www.greenfleet.net

GreenFleet DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS

ELECTRIC VEHICLES MOBILITY & CONNECTIVITY REPORT

CHANGING THE WAY PEOPLE & GOODS MOVE

ACCREDITATION FOR EV SELLERS Drivers can now buy an electric vehicle with confidence from retailers with EVA Accreditation

How new mobility models can reduce congestion, improve air quality and make the UK more productive

Travel is changing direction The concept of ‘mobility’ has really taken off in the government agenda. New ways of travelling and transporting goods, such as car clubs, autonomous vehicles and cargo bikes, are believed to solve some of the most pressing urban challenges.

PLUS: MOBILITY CREDITS | VOLVO V60 ROAD TEST | HONDA CR-V HYBRID ROAD TEST

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Follow and interact with us on Twitter: @GreenFleetNews

These include congestion and poor air quality. It is also hoped to make the UK more productive and bring societal benefits too, such as opening up travel options for older people and those with disabilities. A review of the legislation will be fundamental to achieving the desired changes. The strategy outlines how it will look at how taxis and private hire vehicles are regulated, how traffic regulation and street design may need to evolve, as well as the rules around data sharing. Money will also continue to be pumped into trialling and researching innovative transport solutions. A recent GreenFleet Roundtable assessed these concepts and concluded that changing the mindset of people is one of the crucial challenges government faces for mobility-as-a-service to take off. Read the review on page 33. In this Mobility & Connectivity themed GreenFleet, we examine the government’s mobility strategy, the BVRLA shares the proposals of its Mobility Credits Scrappage Scheme, and we look at the Centre for London’s report suggesting that road users in the capital are charged on a per-mile basis. Angela Pisanu, editor

P ONLINE P IN PRINT P MOBILE P FACE-TO-FACE If you would like to receive 6 issues of GreenFleet magazine for £150 a year, please contact Public Sector Information Limited, 226 High Road, Loughton, Essex IG10 1ET. Tel: 020 8532 0055

GreenFleet DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS

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226 High Rd, Loughton, Essex IG10 1ET. Tel: 020 8532 0055 Fax: 020 8532 0066 Web: www.psi-media.co.uk EDITOR Angela Pisanu PRODUCTION MANAGER Dan Kanolik PRODUCTION CONTROL Lucy Maynard PRODUCTION DESIGN Sophia Mew WEB PRODUCTION Victoria Casey PUBLISHER George Petrou ACCOUNT MANAGER Kylie Glover REPRODUCTION & PRINT Argent Media

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© 2019 Public Sector Information Limited. No part of this publication can be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any other means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise) without the prior written permission of the publisher. Whilst every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of the editorial content the publisher cannot be held responsible for errors or omissions. The views expressed are not necessarily those of the publisher. ISSN 2399-4940

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DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net


Contents

Contents GreenFleet 121 07 News

13

New scheme to recognise EV approved dealerships; Glasgow seeks to be the UK’s first ‘net-zero’ city; Idling vehicles could face instant fines; Mercedes-Benz to produce carbon neutral cars by 2039

13 Electric Vehicles

Poppy Welch, head of the Go Ultra Low campaign, explains why London’s Ultra Low Emission Zone marks the moment for motorists and businesses alike to choose an electric vehicle

17 Panel of Experts: Leasing & Rental

With the ULEZ scheme now operational in London and other clean air zones coming into place in the next couple of years, now is the time for businesses to make the switch to a cleaner, emission-compliant fleet. What are the benefits of using the leasing or rental model to make the switch?

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24 Mobility & Connectivity: Mobility Strategy New ways of travelling and transporting goods, such as car clubs, autonomous vehicles and cargo bikes for city centre deliveries, are believed to solve some of the most pressing urban challenges We look at how the government hopes to transform transport and travel outlined in its Future of Mobility strategy

27 Mobility & Connectivity: Mobility Credits

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BVRLA’s proposal for a Mobility Credits Scrappage Scheme suggests providing credits to those getting rid of polluting vehicles, to be used on more sustainable ‘pay-as-you-go’ transport modes, including car and bike hire, car clubs, trams, buses and trains

30 Mobility & Connectivity: Road Charging

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By 2025, London could have at least five separate road user charging schemes with different requirements. A new report by Centre for London has called for the adoption of a new scheme which charges drivers on a per-mile basis for their journeys

GreenFleet magazine

33 Mobility & Connectivity: GF Roundtable The quest for less congested roads and healthier air, as well as improved productivity, is driving the government and industry to look at alternative ways to travel and transport goods. The recent GreenFleet roundtable concluded that leadership, a clear strategy, and investment is key to making these changes work for both consumers and the business sector

38 Public Sector Panel

A significant amount of business travel in the public sector is undertaken by drivers in their own vehicles. But with ‘grey fleet’ vehicles generally being older, more polluting and potentially more dangerous than their counterparts, what can the public sector do to manage the issue? Our panelists discuss

41 Road test: Honda CR-V Hybrid EX AWD CVT Richard Gooding discovers Honda’s first European-bound SUV with a hybrid powertrain impresses with its technology, space and efficiency

42 Road test: Volvo V60 D3 Inscription Plus

The new V60 reinvents the mid-size Volvo estate for a new generation. Richard Gooding finds that a range of efficient engines, premium features and luxurious finishes enhances its appeal

45 Events calendar

A round-up of the upcoming GreenFleet events touring the country

47 GREENFLEET Scotland: Aberdeen

Supported by Transport Scotland, Energy Saving Trust and Aberdeen City Council, GreenFleet comes to Aberdeen on 21 June.

48 GREENFLEET Cymru Swansea City Council and Swansea University, together with support from the Welsh Government, are co‑hosting GreenFleet Cymru in Swansea’s Guildhall on 27 June.

www.greenfleet.net Issue 121 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

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News

ELECTRIC VEHICLES

New scheme to recognise EV approved dealerships A new government-backed scheme is aiming to create a trusted brand and increase the confidence of drivers looking to buy an electric vehicle. With uncertainty and poor advice having been identified as a key barrier to electric vehicle ownership, the initiative means that car dealerships with staff skilled in selling and servicing electric vehicles will be formally approved and promoted. The scheme will therefore create a trusted brand, increasing the confidence of drivers looking to buy an electric vehicle. This will then also encourage car dealers to develop their expertise in servicing electric vehicles, as the country continues

to move towards a zero-emission future. Following a successful pilot scheme, in which the electric vehicle skills of 12 dealerships were audited, it is already estimated there will be 130 Electric Vehicle Approved sites across the UK by the end of 2019. Jesse Norman, Future of Mobility Minister, said: “Record levels of ultra-low emission vehicles on our roads are good news, as we seek to end the sale of new conventional diesel and petrol cars and vans by 2040. The accreditation recognises businesses with knowledge, capability and commitment to electric vehicles, and will help to encourage more car owners to switch to a greener alternative.”

MOBILITY

EMISSIONS

Older people and those with disabilities must be central to new transport tech

Idling vehicles could face instant fines

Transport Minister Jesse Norman has stated that new transport technology must consider older people and those with mobility issues. The government has reiterated that new modes of transport and pioneering technologies should transform travel for older people and those with disabilities, understanding that those with disabilities or mobility issues can sometimes face unacceptable barriers to travel. Speaking at the final media and showcase event for FLOURISH, a self-driving car project in Bristol aimed at improving the mobility of older people and those with mobilityrelated needs, Norman outlined that new technologies, including self-driving vehicles and the increased use of mobile apps, have the potential to revolutionise everyday journeys for people with mobility issues, and this must be a key consideration for those companies developing future transport. The Future of Mobility Minister said: “Self-driving technologies could greatly improve the mobility of vulnerable user groups, helping to address problems of isolation and loneliness across the country. The needs of older people, and those with visible or hidden disabilities, must be at the heart of all new modes of transport.”

READ MORE tinyurl.com/y6raauou

Michael Gove has said that drivers who repeatedly leave their car engine running while parked could be given instant fines under potential plans to give councils stronger powers to tackle pollution from idling vehicles. Writing in The Times, the Environment Secretary supported Westminster City Council’s call to be given the power to fine drivers without warning if they have previously been caught with an idling engine, but warned that any new powers, currently being considered by the government, should be ‘used proportionately’ by councils. Westminster Council, which claims that the borough suffers from the worst air pollution in the country, says that an idling car produces enough exhaust emissions to fill 150 balloons a minute. It has therefore

The standard for electric vehicle dealer accreditation has been developed by the National Franchised Dealers Association (NFDA) and the Energy Saving Trust (EST).

READ MORE tinyurl.com/y3wus8fl

called on the public to report unnecessary engine idling through its website. To date, 18 local authorities in London have been involved in ‘idling action events’, with drivers asked to switch off their engines when parked. Islington council said 80 per cent of drivers switch off if requested in a friendly and non-judgmental manner. But, Nickie Aiken, leader of Westminster Councils, warned that nothing less than a four-figure sum would serve as a ‘sufficient deterrent’ for large companies whose drivers continue ‘widespread and persistent idling even after being asked’. Under existing regulations, fines can range from £20 to £80. READ MORE tinyurl.com/y5fufhtq

NEW TECHNOLOGY

£25 million to fund zero-emission transport innovations The government has awarded £25 million to projects across the country to develop ground-breaking zero emission technologies for new vehicles. Part of the government’s Industrial Strategy, the government’s ambition is for all new cars and vans to be effectively zero emission by 2040. The numbers of ultra-low emission vehicles on UK roads is currently at record levels, with around 200,000 ultralow emission vehicles registered in the UK. Among the projects to receive funding, Triumph Motorcycles will develop innovative, new electric motorcycle technology lowering vehicle emissions and noise, with faster battery charge times and making electric motorbikes attractive to the market.

Elsewhere, a project that will add an electric drive axle to a conventional diesel-powered truck, creating a hybrid engine which will store and reuse the electrical energy on the trailer, will also benefit from the investment. Future of Mobility Minister Jesse Norman said: “The government continues to invest in technologies and innovation that help the UK to a zero emission future. This is a central part of our Future of Mobility Grand Challenge. It is great to see such enthusiasm and imagination from industry, as we work together with them to realise the environmental, health and wellbeing benefits of greener transport.” READ MORE tinyurl.com/yxuguot8

Issue 121 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

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News INFRASTRUCTURE

Glasgow seeks to be the UK’s first ‘net-zero’ city

Glasgow has unveiled plans to become the first UK city to reduce its greenhouse emissions to net-zero, hoping to reach the target before 2045. Glasgow City Council and Scottish Power say they will work on a range of programmes to help the city reach the target, including mass charging points for electric vehicles. Currently, more than 70 per cent of the

city’s residents living in flats are unable to charge electric cars as they have no off-street parking. As part of potential plans, Scottish Power says it is planning a charging system where people can rapidly charge their vehicles away from home - at work or at public charging locations. With the UK’s largest onshore wind farm, Whitelee, on the outskirts of the city, Glasgow will now turn other parts of the city’s economy that can be decarbonised, such as transport and heating. It was the first location in Scotland to have a low emission zone (LEZ), which intends to phase out the dirtiest buses from the city centre over five years. The council hopes that the announcement will kickstart a ‘race to zero’ with other cities like Edinburgh, with both regions hoping

to beat the Scotland-wide ambition of being net zero by 2045, announced by the Scottish government earlier this month. The Committee on Climate Change recently urged Scotland to set the target five years ahead of the UK as a whole because of its potential for planting trees. Susan Aitken, Glasgow City Council leader, said: “We simply have to act now and the Glasgow city government will develop those partnerships necessary to get to where we simply have to be. We need to be a net-zero city. And we need to be the UK’s first net-zero city.” READ MORE tinyurl.com/y5t2z9vb

HYBRIDS

Vauxhall launches PHEV version of Grandland X Vauxhall has given the Grandland X a plug-in hybrid electric powertrain, as part of its journey to electrify its entire product portfolio by 2024. The new Grandland X Hybrid4 is Vauxhall’s first-ever plug-in hybrid the car and has an electric range of 30 miles (according to WLTP). The car’s powertrain comprises a 200hp, 1.6-litre turbocharged direct injection four-cylinder petrol engine and an electric drive system with two electric motors (combined output 109hp), all-wheel drive and a 13.2kWh lithium-ion battery. Together, the petrol engine and electric motors produce up to 300hp, and offer a combined fuel consumption (preliminary WLTP1/NEDC2) of 128mpg, emitting just 49g/km CO2. The petrol engine is Euro 6d-TEMP-compliant, and has been specially engineered

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for the hybrid powertrain. The Grandland X Hybrid4 offers four driving modes – electric, hybrid, AWD and Sport. In pure electric mode, the car has a range of 30 miles (according to WLTP). In hybrid mode, the car automatically selects the most efficient method of propulsion. When travelling at low speeds within cities, for example, the system switches to electric mode for zero-emission driving. The Grandland X Hybrid4 comes with a 3.3kW on-board charger, with an optional 6.6kW version also available. Vauxhall will also offer devices for fast charging at public stations, as well as wallboxes at home. With a 7.4kW wallbox, customers can fully charge the battery in less than two hours. READ MORE tinyurl.com/y2sxh5ps

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

INRASTRUCTURE

Google Maps show real-time usage of charge points Google Maps is now allowing drivers see the real time availability of charging ports in the UK and US. Google Maps now includes up to date information from networks like Chargemaster, EVgo, SemaConnect and soon, Chargepoint. It will show how many ports are currently available, along with other helpful details, like the business where the station is located, port types and charging speeds. It also allows you to see information about the station from other drivers, including photos, ratings, reviews and questions. Google said: “If you’ve ever

driven to an electric vehicle (EV) charging station only to find that all ports are occupied, you know that you could end up waiting in line for anywhere between minutes to hours – which can really put a damper on your day when you have places to go and things to do. “Now you can see the real time availability of charging ports in the US and UK, right from Google Maps – so you can know if chargers are available before you head to a station.” READ MORE tinyurl.com/yxc6ahgk


News

LEASING

Lex Autolease cashback offer sees surge in EV orders

Lex Autolease has reported a surge in pure electric vehicle (EV) orders since the launch of its £1m fund at the start the year, which will increase the size of its EV fleet by more than 67 per cent. The £1m fund aims to accelerate uptake of EVs by providing cashback of £1,000 against the first 1,000 eligible orders. 467 qualifying orders were placed in the first four months of 2019 alone, set to receive contributions of £467,000 in total. The business predicts that once the funds have been fully allocated, there will be an overall increase of at least eight per cent in the number

of pure EVs on the UK’s roads. The fund has also generated significant interest in EVs from both business and personal customers, with a further 530 orders placed in three months, taking the total to 997. Of the total EVs ordered in 2019 to date, 80 per cent are cars and 20 per cent are light commercial vehicles (LCVs). Business contracts account for 80 per cent of orders, and personal contracts account for 20 per cent. The new vehicles will eliminate an estimated 8,400 tonnes of carbon from roadside emissions and will cover more than 42m zero emission miles over the duration of their contracts. The fund is open to individual and business customers, and will close once the full £1m has been allocated. To find out more, visit www.lexautolease.co.uk. READ MORE tinyurl.com/y4mwwh5p

FUEL CARDS

New BP fuel card to include EV charging BP is launching a new Fuel & Charge card, giving fleets access to both BP petrol and diesel as well as electric vehicle charging through the polar network. Due to launch later this summer, the BP Plus cross acceptance network is comprised of over 3,600 fuel sites, and the 7,000 charge points that make up the polar network. Drivers can check the BP Fuel & Charge Card App to find the closest available EV charging point or BP forecourt. As well as access to these nationwide networks, BP can also offer customers fully integrated support, through the installation of home and office charging via BP Chargemaster. The combination of an extensive public charging network with work and home charging solutions, demonstrates BP’s commitment to ensuring EV is a viable option for more fleet customers. Additionally, BP will begin rolling out ultra-fast charge

points on BP forecourts in the coming months. These ultra-fast chargers will provide a 150kW charge, meaning drivers will be able to charge in 10 minutes. The BP Fuel & Charge card dashboard provides an overview of expenses for both fuel and EV charging in one place, saving admin time so that fleet managers can focus on running their business. This data also allows a comparison of the total cost of ownership between the different fuel types of a fleet. READ MORE tinyurl.com/y4snhp8w

LowCVP’s Andy Eastlake

The tools for transport in responding to the Climate Emergency It feels like the tectonic plates may be shifting on climate change policy. The ‘school strike’ protests led by the extraordinary Swedish schoolgirl Greta Thunberg, gave way to the Extinction Rebellion direct actions in London and elsewhere; the Attenborough TV documentary confronted a mainstream audience with the imperative for action on climate change. The Committee on Climate Change, with impeccable timing, launched the ‘Net Zero’ report which further ‘ups the ante’ on climate action, prescribing a more stretching target for emissions reduction than had already been agreed under the UK’s 2008 Climate Change Act. This ‘perfect storm’ culminated in the government declaring a ‘climate and environment emergency’, as MPs from all parties agreed that more must be done, and cities are clamouring to declare local ambitious targets for zero climate impact. But what does the declaration of a ‘climate emergency’ mean for the fleet sector and what more will be done to drive change in fleets? It’s likely that there will be policy changes and there’s certainly an opening now for that change to happen more rapidly than would otherwise have been the case. (The withdrawal of the Scottish Government’s plans to abolish Air Passenger Duty in Scotland was an early indication that policy makers will be wary of making decisions that appear incongruous – at best – in the face of their support for the emergency declaration; and there are plenty of people who will call them out if they don’t). Road transport was again highlighted (rightly) by the Committee on Climate Change as a ‘problem’ sector, along with the decarbonisation of heat. The Committee sees bringing forward the electrification of as much of road transport as possible to be a major part of the answer. (Rather than a 2040 end date for sale of conventional ICEs, they’re proposing 2035, or even 2030) Producers are responding and this year will see a doubling in the number of models of plug-in cars on the market (with, hopefully, at least a halving of delivery times). This will provide options for some operators, but not all. (Policy changes will be aimed at moving to more ‘electric miles’ where practical.) But, however much we all want to use zero emission solutions, it’s very clear that road transport will still be burning liquid fuels in internal combustion engines for a significant time to come. There are practical, technical decarbonisation options for operators apart from electrification; more and more fleets are using sustainable biofuel alternatives as a step change reduction from fossil fuels (to complement electrification), particularly for heavy duty fleets. Hydrogen, too, seems to be making serious impact now with Transport for London investing £12m to introduce the first 20 double-deck hydrogen fuel cell-powered buses to the capital and Liverpool working to match this. It’s heartening that the buses to be adopted are made by British companies (Wrights and ADL). But not all the options involve adopting new technology. Operators should also be considering advanced logistical solutions which could include closer collaboration with other parties, even competitors. New, ‘smart’ technologies are rapidly transforming the opportunities for innovative solutions to come forward. Driver training must also be part of the mix; significant fuel and cost savings can come from not just training – but engaging and inspiring – drivers to do the right thing and drive more efficiently. As an engineer, I know there are times you need a sledgehammer – or at other times a jeweller’s screwdriver can fix the problem. The real art is picking the right one. So yes, let’s accelerate the drive for electrification but, until we get there, let’s use all the ‘tools in the box’ for operational efficiency, low carbon energy and vehicle technology to ensure that road transport does everything possible, as soon as possible, in response to the climate emergency we all face. The LowCVP Conference in London on July 8 will address many of these issues. Visit the website below.

FURTHER INFORMATION www.lowcvp.org.uk/events/conference/2019

Issue 121 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

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News ELECTRIC VEHICLES

ELECTRIC VEHICLES

Mercedes-Benz to produce carbon neutral cars by 2039

Volkswagen’s creates I.D HUB online for information on new EVs

Mercedes-Benz Cars has committed to only producing carbon-neutral cars by 2039, with plug-in hybrids or all-electric vehicles to make up more than 50 per cent of its car sales by 2030. The company is also looking to electrify its vans, trucks and buses. Presenting its “Ambition2039” strategy at a press conference, Ola Källenius from Daimler AG, said: “We aim to have a carbonneutral new passenger car fleet in 20 years. Let’s be clear what this means for us: a fundamental transformation of our company within less than three product cycles. That’s not much time when you consider that fossil fuels have dominated our business since the invention of the car by Carl Benz and Gottlieb Daimler some 130 years ago. But as a company founded by engineers, we believe technology can also help to engineer a better future. Our way to sustainable mobility is innovation – in a holistic approach along the entire value chain.” The company says that while its focus is on battery-electric mobility, it will also be looking at other solutions, such as fuel cells or eFuels. Ola Källenius said: “Today, no one knows for sure which drivetrain mix will best serve our customers’ needs 20 years from now.

That’s why we encourage policy makers to pave the way for tech neutrality: Let’s fix the target, but not the means to achieve it.” Daimler is also striving to be carbon‑neutral in the production of vehicles, with renewable energy and recycling being adopted in its plants. The company also wants its customers to charge their vehicles with green energy, using Mercedes Me Charge, for example, which uses renewable sources wherever possible. Ola Källenius said: “The transformation to a sustainable mobility of the future will only succeed if the auto industry, energy suppliers and policy makers are working hand in hand. It requires massive investments and tangible action also beyond the auto sector. Carbonneutral energy and a comprehensive infrastructure are indispensable for this system change. And we are open to a discussion on effective CO2 pricing as well as incentives for low/ no carbon technology - preferably on a global scale.” READ MORE tinyurl.com/y6783xvz

LEASING

Pod Point home charger included in VWFS Fleet lease deals Customers leasing an electric vehicle through Volkswagen Financial Services Fleet (VWFS Fleet) can now get a Pod Point charging solution at home as part of their lease cost, thanks to a new partnership between the two companies. Tom Brewer, head of sales and marketing at VWFS Fleet, commented: “With the increasing development of electric vehicles, charging was always going to be the next big challenge. We’re keen to support the industry and education around EV is the key. Not everyone will be a good fit for EV, but for those who are, it’s crucial to have a home charging solution. We can offer

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these charge points and installation as part of the cost of the lease, making the shift to EV as smooth as possible.” Erik Fairbairn, Pod Point CEO and Founder, said: “This is a landmark partnership that will deliver home charging to VWFS’s customers in the most straightforward, efficient way. Drivers will benefit from Pod Point’s easyto-use smart chargepoints along with our app, which allows drivers to track their charging activity at home and en-route.” READ MORE tinyurl.com/y3tldn2e

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

Volkswagen has launched a dedicated area of its website with information on its upcoming ID. family of electric vehicles. Called ID. HUB, the website provides wider information about EV ownership, and allows customers to pre‑order the new ID. hatchback as its debut approaches. The Hub also offers information about the rest of the ID. range, including the ID. CROZZ which is set to enter production in 2021, and ID. BUZZ and ID. VIZZION, which are planned for 2022. It also allows visitors to register their interest in the vehicles and receive updates and exclusive images. This follows the recent addition of an ‘Electric Cars’ section to the volkswagen.co.uk site, as the brand’s electrification strategy gears up. READ MORE tinyurl.com/y2md7ha2

AIR QUALITY

Rise in renting-out driveways since ULEZ introduced Online parking portal YourParkingSpace. co.uk has seen a 34 per cent increase in driveway and empty parking space owners close to London’s ULEZ registering their spaces on its website the week after the zone was introduced. The ULEZ has been recently introduced in central London to help cut air pollution from vehicles and now means the owners of cars that don’t meet emission standards will have to pay £12.50 per day to drive in the centre of the capital, as well as pay the congestion charge. YourParkingSpace.co.uk also reports that actual bookings for driveways on the outskirts of London has also increased week-on-week since the introduction of the ULEZ, indicating that the ULEZ introduced in early April is working and that motorists are increasingly turning to public transport to enter the centre of the city. Harrison Woods, managing director at YourParkingSpace.co.uk, said: “Our research shows that bookings for driveways on the outskirts of the city have increased since the introduction of the ULEZ as motorists leave their vehicles and continue their journeys into the centre of London on public transport. “It is also interesting to see the spike in savvy property owners registering their driveways and empty spaces near the ULEZ, making it easier for motorists to find a parking space near a bus stop, train or underground station.” READ MORE tinyurl.com/y7h9ys2b


News

HYBRIDS

PHEVs are used how they are intended, survey shows A new survey of Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV drivers in the UK has shown that 90 per cent charge their vehicles at least two to three times per week, with 68 per cent charging every day. This shows that PHEVs are being used in the most efficient way and in the way they were intended - in electric mode for most every day journeys. It counters the myth that plug-in hybrids are only driven by people looking to lower their tax bills and are never actually plugged in. The research by Kadence International on behalf of Mitsubishi Motors in the UK was conducted following the government’s withdrawal of incentives for PHEVs in form of the Plug-in Car Grant and VED benefits.

The survey also revealed that 25 per cent of Outlander PHEV owners are most likely to consider a pure electric vehicle for their potential next purchase. The survey showed that fuel economy was amongst the most important deciding factors for 86 per cent of Outlander PHEV owners, closely followed by running costs for 85 per cent of drivers and environmental friendliness for 81 per cent. Mitsubishi Motors in the UK is calling on the government to be more inclusive of gateway technologies and to incentivise private buyers to make the first step away from pure petrol or diesel power by lowering running costs and rolling out more on-street and residential charging for people without driveways.

The survey sample was chosen entirely at random from the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV customer base, meaning the results are a realistic reflection of how these vehicles are used.

READ MORE tinyurl.com/yx99bxtf

INFRASTRUCTURE

Pub company Ei Group joins GeniePoint network GeniePoint charging bays will be installed in selected Ei Group pubs, as well as the company’s Pub Support Centre in Solihull. The first phase will see free-to-use 7kW and 22kW charging installed for the company’s field-based drivers. Phase two will see the installation of GeniePoint Network rapid chargers in car parks at selected sites across the Ei Managed Operations business, for pub customers. This will then be rolled out across further pubs in the division. Paul Harbottle, group commercial director at Ei Group, said: “ We have a growing number of plug-in hybrid electric cars as part of our company car fleet, so this investment in installing the charge

points makes sound business sense. “Electric cars are the future, so as a forward-thinking company, rolling out the installation of charge points across our managed estate gives customers another reason to visit our pubs and lets them charge up while enjoying a great experience with us. As the scheme progresses, we will also look to support publicans interested in this technology within our Ei Publican Partnerships business through fully leveraging our buying power, as we do for them across many other areas.” READ MORE tinyurl.com/y63998dp

ELECTRIC VEHICLES

EDF searches for start-ups that can drive forward EV innovation EDF Energy is encouraging companies and entrepreneurs to find new ideas that could spark innovation in the energy sector, including products and ideas for businesses and consumers transitioning to electric vehicles. Part of EDF Group’s Pulse Awards, young companies with the best ideas will have the chance to gain expert support and advice, as well as attract investment, to help develop their concepts for the mass market. The company’s innovation accelerator, Blue Lab, is on the lookout for entries to fit key areas of focus for the organisation. As well as products to do with electric vehicles, EDF are looking for ways to make life better for EDF Energy customers, innovation using artificial intelligence, and fresh ideas that have the potential to energise the sector.

Start-ups with the best ideas to meet the challenge will gain access to EDF Energy’s scale and network to help develop business opportunities. The challenge gives start-ups the chance to gain investment from EDF Energy, along with a £10,000 cash prize for one overall winner.

READ MORE tinyurl.com/y4pu4lba

EV CHARGING

Rolec EV launches new solar electric vehicle charging unit Charge point manufacturers Rolec EV has launched WallPod:EV SolarCharge – a new solar powered electric vehicle charging unit. WallPod:EV SolarCharge is designed to benefit homeowners who have solar panels, or who are planning to. The product not only displays the charging activity, but also highlights whether the charging is coming from the National Grid, exclusively from the home’s solar panels, or a combination of both. “The standout features of EV SolarCharge include two unique charging modes and a summary data screen,” explains Frankie Mellon, Rolec’s national EV sales manager. “The first of the two charging modes is the Solar + Grid Charge, which monitors the solar power being generated, highlights it on the data screen, and tops up any shortfall with power from the Grid. “The second is Solar Only mode, which monitors and tracks the power being generated by the home’s solar array and limits the charge provided to the EV, matching exactly the amount of power produced by the panels. In effect, the EV is now running on the sun.” READ MORE tinyurl.com/y3wnndwb

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Poppy Welch, head of the Go Ultra Low campaign, explains why London’s Ultra Low Emission Zone marks the moment for motorists and businesses alike to choose an electric vehicle

Get in the Zone The ULEZ, which came into force on 8 April, is the first initiative of its kind in the UK. Covering the same area as the London congestion charge zone, it aims to help improve local air quality by charging older, more polluting, vehicles to enter. However, all pure electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles along with the latest diesel and petrol models are exempt from paying. The daily charge for entering the ULEZ is set at £12.50, meaning that if you enter the zone every day for a year you could save a potential £4,562.50 by making the switch. And when factoring in the congestion charge, the savings become even higher. Travelling in the congestion charge zone at peak times on weekdays would cost you £2,909.50 per year, meaning that switching to an electric or

plug-in hybrid car can help London motorists avoid spending nearly £7,500 a year. Savings from the start Even for those not driving in the ULEZ, the savings for electric vehicle drivers still add up. Thanks to government grants, you can start to save as soon as you purchase your new vehicle. The plug-in car grant gives up to £3,500 off the price of an eligible zero emission electric car and up to £8,000 off the price of a new electric van using the plug-in van grant. Looking beyond the initial purchase cost, electric vehicles also offer great day-today savings too, with lower maintenance costs, reduced or free road tax, free parking in many areas and cheaper fuel costs. In fact, fully electric cars can cost from as little as 3p per mile in fuel, compared to 8-11p for even the most fuel-efficient petrol and diesel cars. Meanwhile, maintenance costs can be around 70 per cent cheaper when compared to the petrol or diesel-powered alternatives.

Join the movement If you think that an electric car is an unusual choice, then think again – the number of electric cars and vans on the roads is growing rapidly. There are more than 40 pure electric and plug-in hybrid cars on sale and 10 vans, with another 20 new cars due to be released this year. London is already a leader when it comes to low emission transport, with the most electric cars, taxis and buses in the country. In the first quarter of this year, plug-in car registrations were up an More than just money incredible 43 per cent in the capital. The benefits of electric cars and vans While London is leading the charge, go far beyond just financial motorists and businesses The savings. Pure electric cars around the country are plug-in making the switch to grants g electric cars. More than 200,000 have been to £3,5 ives up registered in the UK price of 00 off the a zero e to date and 2018 m electric marked a record year car and ission for the market – with £8,000 up to off the a seventh consecutive price of a new year of growth. Almost electric 60,000 pure electric and van plug-in hybrid vehicles took to the roads, with a new car registered every nine minutes.

Written by Poppy Welch, head of Go Ultra Low

With the introduction of the Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) in London, now could be the perfect time for motorists and businesses alike in the capital to start thinking about whether an electric vehicle could be right for them. As well as being exempt from the daily charge, there’s a raft of financial and environmental benefits that come with choosing an electric model.

Electric Vehicles

Time to switch?

and vans, and plug-in hybrids driven in electric mode, produce no tailpipe emissions, which can dramatically improve local air quality. What’s more, choosing a car that helps the environment doesn’t mean you have to make a sacrifice when it comes to quality or choice. Almost all pure electric cars can easily drive 100 miles on just a single charge and the latest models have a range of more than 200 miles. Plug-in hybrid models can cover the majority of shorter journeys in electric mode, but also have an internal combustion engine for longer journeys. Charging is becoming easier all the time. According to Zap-Map, there are more than 22,000 charge point connectors in over 8,000 locations, as well as this there are more than 1,700 rapid chargers, meaning the UK has one of the largest rapid charge networks in Europe.

Time to switch? While a number of other cities due to follow suit over the coming years, what is clear is that the move to electric vehicles isn’t slowing down anytime soon. For those deciding between a new 100 per cent electric, plug-in hybrid, petrol or diesel car, the number of factors to consider and information to take in can sometimes be overwhelming. It’s important companies choose the right vehicle for their own needs. For those that are considering the benefits of switching to an electric vehicle, have your questions answered and see which model is best for you by visiting the Go Ultra Low website below. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.goultralow.com

Issue 121 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

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Electric Vehicles

Instilling confidence in potential EV buyers Uncertainty and poor advice from vehicle dealerships has been identified as a key barrier to electric vehicle ownership. To tackle the problem, retailers can now achieve Electric Vehicle Approved status if they can demonstrate that their staff are skilled in selling and servicing electric vehicles Following the creation of a new governmentbacked accreditation scheme, potential electric vehicle buyers will soon be able to visit an Electric Vehicle Approved dealership. This shows that they have the skills and knowledge to confidently sell electric vehicles. Uncertainty and poor advice has been identified as a key barrier to electric vehicle ownership.

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Whilst electric and plug-in hybrid vehicle sales are growing, the amount of such vehicles on the roads only represent a small proportion of the UK car parc. Potential EV buyers tend to find buying an alternatively fuelled vehicle more complex than purchasing an internal combustion engine vehicle. Motorists need to consider different elements when purchasing an

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

alternatively fuelled vehicle as opposed to a petrol or diesel one, for instance, battery range and the availability of charge points. Indeed, at a GreenFleet roundtable, some fleet managers opened up about their experiences of actively wanting to buy an electric vehicle, only to be talked out of it at the dealership, or told that they don’t stock any.


EVA accreditation This government initiative, called ‘EVA accreditation’ means that car dealerships with staff skilled in selling and servicing electric vehicles will be formally accredited and promoted, and known as ‘Electric Vehicle Approved’. The scheme will therefore create a trusted brand, increasing the confidence of drivers looking to buy an electric vehicle. This will then also encourage car dealers to develop their expertise in servicing electric vehicles, as the country continues to move towards a zero-emission future. It follows a successful pilot phase that ran from November 2018 to February 2019 where the electric vehicle skills of 12 dealerships were audited. It is already estimated there will be

EVA accreditation is open to all retailers and is awarded to individual dealership locations that are independently audited by the Energy Saving Trust. 130 Electric Vehicle Approved sites across the UK by the end of 2019. Jesse Norman, Future of Mobility Minister, said: “Record levels of ultra-low emission vehicles on our roads are good news, as we seek to end the sale of new conventional diesel and petrol cars and vans by 2040. The accreditation recognises businesses with knowledge, capability and commitment to electric vehicles, and will help to encourage more car owners to switch to a greener alternative.” The standard for electric vehicle dealer accreditation has been developed by the National Franchised Dealers Association (NFDA) and the Energy Saving Trust (EST).

Electric Vehicles

Retailers therefore need to be able to answer all the questions a customer may have, explain the benefits of owning an electric vehicle and clarify any possible confusion.

It is open to all retailers and is awarded to individual dealership locations that are independently audited by the Energy Saving Trust. The independence of this process will give consumers the certainty that a retailer with the EVA accreditation is a leader in the sector. Recognising efforts NFDA’s director, Sue Robinson, said: “It is extremely positive to join forces with the Government’s Office for Low Emission Vehicles and the Energy Saving Trust to develop EVA, an initiative which we expect to play a key role in the market transition to electric vehicles. “EVA will certify the efforts franchised retailers are making in the EV sector to meet the fast-growing consumer demand and will enable them to clearly communicate to their customers their expertise in the sector.” Matthew Eastwood, head of transport at Energy Saving Trust said, “EVA accredited dealers possess the knowledge and expertise necessary to ensure their customers have a positive and well informed experience when buying new or used plug in vehicles. It gives consumers confidence and supporting the growing uptake of ultra-low and zero emission vehicles. “With transport generating 26 per cent of the UK’s greenhouse gas emissions, increasing the sale of ultra-low and zero emission vehicles is critical in the efforts to reduce carbon emissions in line with government targets.” Skills for mechanics Once the electric fleet is purchased, drivers and fleet managers will want the reassurance that those tasked to repair the vehicles have the right skills. The government’s Road to Zero strategy commits to improving the skills of mechanics, ensuring they are “well trained and have the skills they need to repair these vehicles safely.” Recently, the MIRA Technology Institute unveiled a new series of short courses, designed for fleets with newlyadopted EVs and vehicle technicians after it was highlighted that there is a significant shortfall in the number of technicians that are currently trained in electric vehicle technology. The Institute is offering a range of short courses designed to plug this gap and provide accredited training that covers topics including safety, hazard management, maintenance, and system repair and replacement. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.nfda-uk.co.uk

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Advertisement Feature

Are low emission policies driving recruitment strategies forward? Patricia Wolfe from Daimler Fleet Management shares her views on how your company car policy could have more of an impact on recruitment and staff retention than you might have thought

Patricia Wolfe

Managing director, Daimler Fleet Management UK

Do you remember when fresh muffins on a Monday and drinks on a Friday were enough to attract top talent? When prospective employees were more concerned with the size of their pay check rather than their carbon footprint? We are moving into an era where the Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) policy of a potential employer is scrutinised with equal tooth-comb to that of the benefits and remuneration policy. Cleaner cars for rising stars Having a happy and motivated workforce is a key factor in differentiating yourself from competitors. When you take a happy employee and turn them into an advocate, and in‑turn into an ambassador, that is when the real benefits occur. Your employees become walking sandwich boards for your business, loyally endorsing you as an employer and less likely to leave the organisation. ‘Where I work says something about who I am’. So whilst the days of the shiniest cars attracting the brightest stars may be behind us, your company car policy still plays an important role in attracting and retaining top talent for your business. Taking the concept further - the installation of charging points on company property will also have a positive impact on your EV driving workforce. Under current tax law the fuel benefit charge in ‘s149 ITEPA 2003’ does not apply to any electricity supplied by an

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employer, meaning no benefit in kind arises if an employer pays to charge a pure-electric company car. A ‘full tank’ at work, is putting money straight back into your employee’s pockets. Aligning your fleet and CSR policies shows a true commitment to building an environmentally conscious company culture from the inside out. Running a fleet of electric vehicles says something about your business and in the same way that this would have a positive impression of perspective employees, the same applies to the environmentally conscious customer. And it doesn’t stop with the car. Thinking outside of the driving seat Daimler Fleet Management is also taking steps to limit single-use plastic in its supply chain. There are many marginal gains available such as replacing the plastic used to produce number plates with recyclable materials and moving away from large plastic bottles of screen wash in favour of concentrated tablets no larger than an extra strong mint – reducing the use of plastic as well as the effort required to transport heavy bottles of liquid. Upon request, items such as plastic car mats can be replaced with more eco-friendly alternates and in the future customers will be given the option to go paperless.

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

Patricia Wolfe has worked for MercedesBenz Financial Services for 22 years. She has been responsible for a number of large strategic programmes including new project launches, infrastructure and IT installations and internal alignment projects across the Daimler group of companies. As Managing Director of Daimler Fleet Management UK, Patricia has cultivated their multi-marque contract hire and leasing business and taken strides towards building a low emissions focus within the organisation. Patricia was recognised this year in the GreenFleet 100 most influential figures in environmental fleet management. With the UK government embarking on their road to zero and the new generation of employee as concerned with the size of the company’s conscience as they are the size of their salary – do you have the right business partners in place? Do you have the tools you need to transform your business, retain your best employees and attract fresh talent for the future? Daimler Fleet Management can help craft an attractive, appropriate and cost effective fleet policy with lower emissions at the heart of its objectives; a policy that is fit for today’s workforce and tomorrow’s mobility landscape. L FURTHER INFORMATION Talk to us about future proofing your fleet, or challenge us to meet your fleet objectives by completing the sixty second challenge at www.daimlersixty.co.uk


With the ULEZ scheme now operational in London and other clean air zones coming into place in the next couple of years, now is the time for businesses to make the switch to a cleaner, emissioncompliant fleet. What are the benefits of using the leasing or rental model to make the switch?

Mark Gallagher, green fleet specialist, Grosvenor Leasing Mark has over 15 years’ industry experience and has worked with a variety of corporate and public sector fleets. He has been with Grosvenor Leasing for six years, and heads up the company’s award-winning 0Zone green solution. Mark was recently presented with a BVRLA Industry Hero award for his contribution towards the green agenda.

Dan Hawkes, head of sales performance, corporate mobility and market intelligence, Europcar Mobility Group UK With over 15 years’ experience in the automotive industry, Dan was appointed to his current role in 2018 with a focus on developing new mobility solutions. Prior to joining Europcar, Dan had an extended career in the motor industry.

London’s Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) came into force in central London on 8 April. Drivers of older vehicles with engines that do not comply with the required emissions standard are now charged £12.50 each day to enter the zone at any time. Anybody who does not pay the charge will face a fine of £160. Lorries meanwhile could face £1,000 fine. The scheme is said to affect around 40,000 vehicles, and aims to reduce toxic emissions by around 45 per cent within two years. Whilst London is the forerunner in England, clean air zones are due to be introduced in many towns and cities across the country in the next couple of years. Scotland meanwhile already has its first Low Emission Zone (LEZ) in Glasgow city centre.

Rob Mills, sales operation manager, Daimler Fleet Management Rob has 30 years’ industry experience, with the last 20 being with Daimler in various management roles across both the Daimler Fleet Management & CharterWay (van & truck) divisions. He currently heads up the sales operations function covering pricing & risk management, plus consultative support to sales management.

For unprepared businesses with fleets, air quality measures could cause disruption. Earlier this year, Europcar Mobility Group UK researched businesses that use vans to find out about their anticipated priorities and challenges for 2019 and beyond. Dan Hawkes comments on the research: “The resounding response was that the ULEZ was going to catch a lot of organisations out. Over a quarter of businesses said that they travel into London on a regular basis, yet 92 per cent admitted that there were vehicles on their fleet that were more than three years old. With over a quarter (28 per cent) saying that between 26 per cent and 50 per cent of their fleet was made up of vans more than three year old, this presents a huge financial burden

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LEASING AND RENTAL

Expert Panel: Leasing & Rental

EXPERT PANEL

Stephen Greenstreet, MD, Greenfleets Vehicle Leasing Stephen Greenstreet has been working in the vehicle finance and leasing industry for over 30 years. He is passionate about customer service and customer retention and always keeps up to date with industry changes and developments. He sits on the Leasing Broker committee of the BVRLA and is recognised as an expert within the leasing industry.

if long term lease or outright acquisition is considered as the only option. “And while this research focused on van users, we actually feel that the car situation is likely to be a similar story.” While Euro 6 diesel and Euro 4 petrol engines are ULEZ compliant, now may be a good time for fleets to switch to alternatively fuelled vehicles and different mobility solutions, to future proof their fleet for any future, even stricter rules. However, some may struggle to afford the switch to expensive new low emission vans and trucks and may be able to manage their costs better by leasing or hiring a compliant car, van or truck. Mark Gallagher from Grosvenor Leasing comments: “EVs can be more expensive to buy, and the forecasted resale values are  Issue 121 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

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Expert Panel: Leasing & Rental  more difficult to predict, which means it may be seen as a risky option for companies to buy them. Leasing transfers that risk of ownership to the contract hire company and enables you to fix your costs, which makes it potentially more attractive. “Realistically, however, now may not be the right time for higher mileage drivers to even consider an EV and are better off with a very low emission petrol or diesel car.” Mark adds. Rob Mills from Daimler Fleet Management added: “Fleet Managers should certainly start to replace older vehicles that will be banned in ULEZ areas. They should be looking to ensure their fleet replacement policy is reviewed and fit for purpose as we will experiencing more change over the next five years than we have seen over the past 20.” Stephen Greenstreet from Greenfleets points out that companies that already use leasing as their method of obtaining cars or commercial vehicles, will already be operating ULEZ compliant vehicles. He says: “Leasing enables companies to obtain the latest engine technology with the lowest CO2 emissions. With the average contract being approximately three years, this enables companies to continue to obtain the lowest CO2 vehicles and keep up with the everdecreasing targets set by the government, in ULEZ zones and BIK taxation.” Rob believes that giving fleets flexibility in changeable times is key. He says: “Leasing companies are increasingly looking at more flexible funding options so fleet managers are not necessarily locked into long term leases. This will also enable fleet managers to take advantage of

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further advancements in EV technologies as and when they become available.” Dan Hawkes echoes this thought and speaks of Europcar’s own position: “In the last couple of years, Europcar Mobility Group UK has been focusing more and more on how to help businesses keep up with legislation as well as the moveable feast of the Benefit-inKind tax regime. Instead of firms having to invest outright in ULEZ-complaint models, we have developed a long-term rental offer that gives both flexibility and certainty. “Europcar Advantage provides a really important solution for businesses that want to future-proof their operations without tying up capital on outright vehicle purchases or committing to a long-term lease deal. With access to brand new, and therefore compliant, cars and vans, Europcar Advantage enables firms to test the suitability of alternative fuelled vehicles before investing in them for their own fleet.” Mobility credits There have been calls from the BVRLA, the association that represents the leasing and rental industry, to include ‘mobility’ credits in future scrappage schemes, which could be used on car hire and car clubs, as well as public transport. This would reduce car ownership and lead to reduced emissions and congestion. Commenting on this concept, Dan Hawkes said: “The introduction of ‘mobility’ credits is a tremendously exciting opportunity for businesses. Delivered in the right way, it could boost more sustainable journeys across all areas of mobility. Not only would mobility credits remove older and more polluting

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

vehicles from the roads, but they would promote urban vehicle mobility as a whole through the increase of space in urban areas. “At Europcar Mobility Group UK, we see real value in supporting initiatives that address the reduction of emissions and promote positive change in behaviours. “However, in order for a mobility credit scheme to reach its full potential, it’s important that it is implemented through a consolidated MaaS platform. This would tackle the challenge of usership vs ownership when it comes to driving and provide users with the option of a car when they need it, therefore reducing unnecessary car ownership.” If some businesses are ready for a more flexible approach to meeting their mobility needs and do not just want to replace their vehicle with another, then the opportunity to use the scrappage scheme to fund other initiatives should be welcomed, believes Rob Mills. He says: “Businesses can look to use the grant to best effect whether that’s to support the development of their charging infrastructure or to switch their drivers into car clubs or promote the use of public transport. Perhaps any scheme could look to have a sliding scale that values for instance the use of public transport higher than acquiring another new vehicle.” Mark Gallagher meanwhile believes that it is still early days for a scheme like this, as the infrastructure and technology to support it is in its infancy. He said: “Its valid that there should be incentives, such as mobility credits. But for drivers to come out of polluting cars in cities, you need the car clubs and infrastructure to make this work – and even in the cities,


The future of travel The government’s recent ‘future of mobility: urban strategy’ examines transport innovation in cities and towns. Jesse Norman, Minister of State for Transport says in the foreword that “radical new technologies are emerging that within a generation will transform everyday journeys.” The strategy says that new types of travel and new business models, enabled by data and connectivity, automation and electrification, are starting to transform how people and goods move. If the transition is well managed, it could help tackle urban challenges such as congestion and air pollution. It can also widen access to mobility for disabled people and older people. “We find ourselves on the cusp of a mobility revolution, where advances in technology are bringing together numerous forms of transport, enabling better journey optimisation than ever before,” comments Dan Hawkes. “Consumer trends are also moving away from ownership to usership, influenced not only by developments in technology but also by other external pressures such as limitations on parking spaces, insurance premium increases and more of a conscience around our impact on the environment.

Whilst London is the forerunner in England, clean air zones are due to be introduced in many towns and cities across the country in the next couple of years. Scotland meanwhile already has its first Low Emission Zone (LEZ) in Glasgow city centre. “Technology is certainly conducive to the progression of mobility in urban areas and already plays a large role in how we think, live and travel. Our focus is to capitalise on new technologies to give organisations an integrated mobility solution that can offer the best customer experience across a multitude of travel options, with an underlying commitment to increased sustainability.” Pointing out that the technical elements have to be joined up before mobility as a concept can fully take off, Mark Gallagher says: “Technology will only ‘fully’ revolutionise the way we travel once it’s joined up. This is what MaaS is all about - the separate elements are all working well. “The converged model whereby you can enter two destinations and the App will work out the modes of transport and provide one ‘ticket’ for taxis, buses, trains etc is still in its infancy, but won’t be long before its part of our everyday lives.” Rob Mills echoes this thought: “Technological developments that can seamlessly connect and book multiple

Expert Panel: Leasing & Rental

its still early days. When it comes to mobility credits for things, like car hire, we also have to be realistic about the value of the credits and how much car hire time you could utilise. “It’s the classic ‘product lifecycle’. There will be some early adopters for this type of scheme, but the whole area needs to become more mature and robust to appeal to a mass market.”

modes of transport including public transport will drive a more seismic change to how we approach our lives. Our cars are un-utilised for over 80 per cent of the time so the opportunity to only pay for mobility when needed will become an ever increasing popular option.” Stephen Greenstreet says: “We are currently going in to a stage of massive change with the way we use vehicles. It is very early days but one day we will look back on how we once used vehicles and it will look like life without mobile phones.” When it comes to acceptance of technology, Mark believes that there is a generation divide. He says: “In terms of the way we think, this is very much down to how old you are! At Grosvenor, our in-house software and App development team is very much focused on the new way of thinking of the Millennials, who by 2025 will make up 75 per cent of the workforce. “They are tech-dependent, with it being an integrated part of their everyday life. So, when the older generation still has a sense 

Issue 121 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

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Expert Panel: Leasing & Rental

Final thoughts Rob Mills Fleet managers should certainly start to replace older vehicles that will be banned in ULEZ areas and be looking to ensure their fleet replacement policy is reviewed and fit for purpose as we will be experiencing more change over the next five years than we have seen over the past 20. The benefits of a leasing scheme is that it supports a structured replacement policy to ensure vehicles are reviewed and potentially replaced on a regular basis.

 of wonder that an App can enable them to book a taxi which they never had growing up, the millennials are saying, ‘that’s fine, but why can’t it do this? – because that’s what I need it to do.’ Its them that will drive change.” Flexible mobility solutions may also benefit employers due to the “transient nature of the UK workforce”, believes Dan. He says “Firms aren’t always sure of what employees they will have in the future – and what their mobility needs will be. That’s where car share fits in.” Other services Aside from the vehicles themselves, what other services can leasing and rental companies offer fleet operators in the area of low / zero emission vehicles? With so many different products on the market, Stephen Greenstreet believes that offering trusted advice and consultation to the customer is key. He says “Our customers are not all experts on EVs or ULEVs but we are, so the value we can add to a vehicle fleet is invaluable. It is about supplying the right vehicle for the job/person based on CO2 emissions, type of usage and annual mileage, to ensure the company taking the lease is reducing their whole life costs and their employees are mitigating their BIK implications as much as possible.” Stephen warns that some companies might just supply a plug-in hybrid vehicle with an electric range of 25 miles to a company car driver with an annual mileage of 25K plus, just to save them BIK taxation. “This is completely wrong,” says Stephen, “and is a very good reason why companies should seek the correct advice from professionals in this market and not just take a lease from the company that offers the easiest route to a deal” Rob Mills agrees that the consultative nature of leasing companies is important. He says: “Services like fleet management, driver training, telematics, and downtime management are all just as important when running a fleet of low emission vehicles as they are for a fleet of combustion vehicles.

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“The pace of change and uncertainty over the future development of both vehicle technologies and the legislative environment is causing many businesses to delay further investment, therefore our role as advisors and educators is paramount.” Explaining why Grosvenor launched its 0Zone service, Mark Gallagher said: “We recognised that companies needed pro-active advice and support to help them navigate their way smoothly towards ULEVs and EVs.” “Over time it has evolved significantly. For instance, we can now provide ‘funded’ installations of EV charging points supported by consultancy and advice. “0zone has become an award winning service, providing customers with support in reaching timely decisions about when their green strategy should begin, budgeting advice, forecasts and help with the financial implications of choosing EVs and ULEVs.” Technology that gives insight into business mobility is valuable for businesses. Dan Hawkes explains: “Insight on mobility usage has to be at the heart of firms successfully managing and reducing their emissions over time. Europcar Mobility Group UK has, therefore, focused considerable investment in our portal – Europcar One – that provides a 360 degree view of the mobility solutions being used by our customers. “Not only does Europcar One streamline the process of booking and monitoring mobility usage for the best journey optimisation, but it delivers valuable MI to help fleet operators better understand the use of their vehicles and the movement of their staff. This provision of data helps inform decisions that then drive efficiencies which can reduce both the overall cost and the environmental impact of an organisation’s fleet.” With the sizeable changes happening with environmental legislation, the restrictions and requirements of vehicles will no doubt get stricter. All our panelists agree that using the leasing or rental model, or using different mobility solutions, can help stay compliant and ahead of the game. L

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

Stephen Greenstreet Our customers are not all experts on EVs or ULEVs but we are, so the value we can add to a vehicle fleet is invaluable. It is about supplying the right vehicle for the job/person based on Co2 emissions, type of usage and annual mileage, to ensure the company taking the lease is reducing their whole life costs and their employees are mitigating their BIK implications as much as possible. Companies should seek the correct advice from professionals in this market and not just taking a lease from the leasing company/broker that offers the easiest route to a ‘deal’. Mark Gallagher Through our 0Zone solution, the advice and support we give our customers is invaluable as they venture into the EV market, and we can hold their hands through the process, give them sound advice and keep them updated of developments to help shape their fleet procurement policy. We are also here to help companies find a good fit, and offer very realistic and practical advice. Realistically, now may not be the right time for higher mileage drivers to even consider an EV and are better off with a very low emission petrol or diesel car. We will look at all options. Dan Hawkes On day one of the ULEZ coming into force in London, we held a clinic for businesses at our Kings Cross branch to help them identify what options are available to them to reduce the impact of the change on their business operations. In particular, how the role of rental, as well as car share, can help organisations transition their fleet to comply with the clean air zones.


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Business travel down and EVs on the rise: it could be an interesting road ahead According to the ‘British Business and Mobility Study’ by Sewells, the UK could see a 25 per cent reduction in both business travel and commuting. This could spark a major shift in the company car sector – a change that the Grosvenor Group has embraced already At a time when businesses are also looking at ultra-low emission and electric vehicles (EVS), the combination of less driving and the rise of EVs, could lead to a potentially major shift in the company car sector. The Grosvenor Group is an example of a contract hire and fleet management specialist that has embraced this already. With video conferencing facilities in its main meeting room, and a company-wide ambition to reduce its carbon footprint through less unnecessary travel, it has also become well-known for its award winning 0Zone solution which helps companies with cars and light commercial vehicles go green. At Grosvenor, the average CO2 for new vehicles delivered in 2018 was 102 gsm/ km, and its overall average is now 104 gsm/ km CO2. Hybrid and electric vehicles now make up 26 per cent of order intake (this used to be five per cent) demonstrating the company’s commitment to driving towards lower emission vehicles. “Many companies are looking at how they can lower their CO2 emissions with ULEVs and electric vehicles,” said Mark Gallagher, Grosvenor’s green fleet specialist and winner of this year’s BVRLA industry hero award for his contribution towards the green agenda in the fleet sector. “However, as well as introducing lower emission vehicles, the simple fix is to travel less. By using technology you can have virtual ‘face to face’ meetings with customers, prospects and suppliers saving everyone time and money, and helping the environment too.” Reducing business travel The aim to reduce business travel, combined with the rise of electric vehicles, will have an impact on how we travel at work in the coming years. But is this a practical option for everyone? Or are electric vehicles still only suitable for those living in major towns and cities? Research suggests that 55 per cent of the global population are living in urban areas and by 2050 projections suggest it could reach 68 per cent. Air quality and congestion measures will continue to discourage drivers from using their vehicles in urban areas, while the technology to help make choices about how to travel and have meetings is coming together rapidly.

Curent limitations Perhaps unsurprisingly, recent road tests of pure electric vehicles conducted with members of Grosvenor’s sales team concluded that, at the moment, they are less well suited for those who travel extensively with work – simply due to their battery range and the availability of charging points. Two members of the sales team, who typically do high mileage, had an EV for a week and ended up using them for local and urban travel, but resorted to their traditional diesel and petrol company cars for longer journeys across their sales territories of Yorkshire and Lincolnshire. However, with the number of charging points increasing nationwide week on week and battery ranges improving, this is likely to change in the coming years – and the overall feedback from the drivers was very positive regarding their EVs. Customer advice All Grosvenor sales personnel are also being encouraged to think about the journeys they make, and use the video conferencing facilities where possible. Grosvenor has a panel of experts within the business advising customers on a wide range of issues including compliance, CO2, taxation, legal, technical, policy, and health and safety. An advantage of video conferencing is that any one of the panel can be easily brought into conference call meetings, which is a benefit to customers. For many companies, it feels like there is a lot to consider at the moment, however

Mark explains that this is why Grosvenor set up its 0Zone solution over two years ago – to help with the transition towards ULEVs and EVs and to also look more broadly at how businesses could reduce emissions. “0Zone is the Grosvenor Group’s award winning, and unique, solution to help companies navigate their way smoothly towards ultra-low emission and electric vehicles,” explains Mark. “It offers companies with cars and light commercial vehicles an assessment of their environmental impact and defines a clear pathway to convert the fleet, over time, towards ultra-low emission and electric vehicles. “The 0Zone team also offers advice in reaching timely decisions about when your green strategy should begin. This includes tailored budgeting, forecasts and help with the financial implications of choosing EVs and ULEVs. We also develop low emission vehicle policies and provide practical advice on the steps required to move smoothly towards Electric Vehicles and Ultra Low Emission Vehicles. “The 0Zone team also assists with plug-in and hybrid demonstration vehicles (subject to availability), the cultural change involved in encouraging drivers into a new era of company vehicle, green fleet reviews, and grey fleet reviews.” L FURTHER INFORMATION grosvenor-leasing.co.uk

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Changing the way people and goods move

MOBILITY & CONNECTIVITY

Report

24 Mobility strategy New ways of travelling and transporting goods, such as car clubs, autonomous vehicles and cargo bikes for city centre deliveries, are believed to solve some of the most pressing urban challenges. We look at how the government hopes to transform transport and travel outlined in its Future of Mobility strategy 27 Mobility credits BVRLA’s proposal for a Mobility Credits Scrappage Scheme suggests providing credits to those getting rid of polluting vehicles, to be used on more sustainable ‘pay-as-you-go’ transport modes, including car and bike hire, car clubs, trams, buses and trains

30 Road charging By 2025, London could have at least five separate road user charging schemes with different requirements. A new report by Centre for London has called for the adoption of a new scheme which charges drivers on a permile basis for their journeys 42 Roundtable The quest for less congested roads and healthier air, as well as improved productivity, is driving the government and industry to look at alternative ways to travel and transport goods. The recent GreenFleet roundtable concluded that leadership, a clear strategy, and investment is key to making these changes work for both consumers and the business sector

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Mobility & Connectivity Report

MOBILITY STRATEGY

Transforming the way people and goods move New ways of travelling and transporting goods, such as car clubs, autonomous vehicles and cargo bikes for city centre deliveries, are believed to solve some of the most pressing urban challenges. We look at how the government hopes to transform transport and travel outlined in its Future of Mobility strategy

Transforming the way people and goods move, such as through car clubs, autonomous vehicles and cargo bikes for city centre deliveries, are believed to solve some of the most pressing urban challenges, namely congestion and poor air quality. It is also hoped to make the UK more productive and bring societal benefits too, such as opening up travel options for older people and those with disabilities. The government’s recent ‘future of mobility: urban strategy’ examines this subject. It says that new types of travel and new business models, enabled by data and connectivity, automation and electrification, are starting to transform how people and goods move. If the transition is well managed, it could help tackle urban challenges such as congestion and air pollution. It can also widen access to mobility for disabled people and older people. Jesse Norman, Minister of State for Transport says in the foreword that “radical new technologies are emerging that within a generation will transform everyday journeys.” The review explores regulations around new types of vehicles including e-scooters and e-cargo bike trailers, how sharing data can improve services by reducing congestion, and how journey planning and payment can be made more simple. The strategy sets out how the government is planning to achieve these ambitions with nine key principles that will guide government decision-making going forward;

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miles in urban areas. This could alleviate congestion, reduce noise and emissions, and improve traffic flow. For example, trials of electric cargo bikes showed that they have the potential to increase road speeds in congested areas as well as reducing emissions, costs and delivery time when compared to van-based last mile delivery services. Drones could also take the place of vans for some types of urban deliveries. The government also believes that there is strong economic benefit to new mobility solutions. Improving the flow of people and goods around the country can raise economic productivity and support the government’s Industrial Strategy. In addition, self-driving vehicles could free up travel time for work or leisure. The average driver in England currently spends 236 hours behind the wheel per year, equivalent to over six working weeks.

Achieving the ambitions A review of the legislation will be fundamental to achieving the desired changes. The strategy outlines how it will look at how taxis and private hire vehicles are regulated, with laws dating back to the 1800s currently stifling innovation. Traffic regulation and street design may also need to evolve to accommodate new vehicles and new ways of using roads. The review will also consider if regulation around sharing transport data needs the change, as this is crucial for mobility as a service to work. Supporting local areas with the changes is also key. The strategy says “it will continue and expand upon efforts to understand and address the ensuring that emerging challenges local areas face, transport technologies I f the strengthening their capacity are safe, accessible transitio to prepare for and shape and green. n to mobilit the future of mobility”. The report says manag y is well Money will continue that much of the ed, it co to be pumped technology required help ta uld into trialling and for new travel c k l e urban challen researching innovative modes, new business transport solutions. models, automation conges ges such as tion Future Mobility and electrification pollutioand air Zones for example, are is available today n cities given funding to and is already having test a range of new mobility an impact on people’s services, modes and models. mobility choices. The West Midlands has been With 80 per cent of people in chosen as the UK’s first Future Mobility the UK now using smartphones, funding Area and will see money invested in new will be put into ideas to find smoother innovative new transport schemes to make payment systems, more up-to-date travel journeys quicker, cheaper and cleaner. information and the use of innovative Transport for West Midlands (TfWM) forms of transport. This is hoped to will work with companies to trial and make travel in towns and cities more demonstrate new modes of transport, convenient, more reliable and cheaper. services and technologies, like mobility as a service, car sharing, electric bikes and using The benefits of mobility data to bust congestion on our roads. New mobility models could reduce Mayor of the West Midlands, Andy Street dependency on car ownership, therefore said: “Technology is going to completely removing car parks and allowing urban space change the way people get around, to be used more efficiently. This could allow and we’re pleased the West Midlands for more green space, with associated benefits is at the forefront of this revolution. including improved physical and mental health “The West Midlands is already the and mitigating the higher temperatures and beating heart of Britain’s self-driving air pollution of urban areas. vehicle testing, competing with Silicon There is significant potential for new modes Valley, Germany and China. of transport to replace traditional vehicle

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“As the UK’s first ever future mobility area we are already developing these new technologies to help people get around more quickly and easily, and to build the next billion-dollar company like Uber or Tesla right here in Birmingham, Binley or Brierley.” Industry efforts Commenting for the automotive industry, Mike Hawes, SMMT chief executive, said: “The automotive industry is responding to perhaps the most significant change since the invention of the car. Mobility as we know it is evolving, improving people’s day-today lives with implications for all of society. This strategy offers important guidance on the objectives and principles underpinning the future of mobility in towns and cities, while giving industry scope to invest and innovate, developing exciting new services. “We look forward to working closely with government and local authorities to shape the strategy’s implementation, helping to position the UK as a global leader in future mobility.” Future of Mobility Grand Challenge business champion and former board member of BMW, Ian Robertson said: “With a long history of transport innovation, a worldclass research base and many established technology leaders, the UK is in prime position for a transport revolution. “The government’s vision as set out in the ‘Future of mobility: urban strategy’ will ensure that going forward, all businesses within the transport industry create technology that is accessible to everyone,

environmentally friendly and economically worthwhile. In doing so, the industry can ensure it harnesses its domestic expertise to profit from a growing market for cleaner, safer and more efficient transport.” Cargo bikes The government has published its response to the Last Mile call for evidence, outlining a range of measures to support cleaner and more sustainable last mile deliveries. These include increasing the uptake of e-cargo bikes and e-vans. In addition, working with the Energy Saving Trust, the government is also now inviting expressions of interest for £2 million of funding to support the uptake of e-cargo bikes. Matthew Eastwood, head of transport at Energy Saving Trust commented: “The Department for Transport’s eCargo Bike Grant Fund will support the adoption of ecargo bikes by businesses in England. An ecargo bike has the potential to be faster through traffic than a van and offer much lower operating costs. They are a practical sustainable transport solution for urban deliveries, generating zero emissions therefore contributing to improved air quality. “Successful applicants will access grant funding for up to 20 per cent of the cost of a new ecargo bike up to the value of £1,000 per bike and must sign up to an agreed code of practice.” L FURTHER INFORMATION

SPONSOR’S COMMENT

Telematics: driving the future of mobility John Watkins, Executive Chairman, Trakm8

Mobility & Connectivity Report

Much of the technology required for new travel modes, new business models, automation and electrification is available today and is already having an impact on people’s daily lives and mobility choices

The UK has the potential to become a world leader in shaping the future of mobility. Our government has ambitious plans to transform how we move people and goods around our urban and rural areas, outlined in its Future of Mobility Grand Challenge. As the UK’s largest manufacturer of telematics devices, Trakm8 is already embracing this challenge. We invest heavily in research and development; and Trakm8 is the partner of choice for a wide range of R&D projects in the connected car, mobility and transport sectors. Trakm8’s technology is driving research in vital areas such as improving machine learning for connected autonomous vehicles; creating algorithms for more efficient pothole detection; and enhancing the capabilities of all-electric refrigerated delivery vehicles. However, one of the biggest challenges facing fleet managers today is keeping up with the pace of technological change. For any organisation which owns and operates vehicles, the connected car presents huge opportunities to reduce road risk, improve efficiencies and cut carbon emissions. Yet at the same time, connected vehicles can generate substantial amounts of data, which can be time-consuming to analyse. This is why Trakm8 has developed Insight, a unique and customisable telematics and business intelligence platform. Insight enables fleet managers to view data from a variety of sources all within one web portal. This additional level of integration will ensure that fleet managers don’t drown in data, and instead use it to create actionable insights around key metrics such as vehicle utilisation, fuel expenditure and driver behaviour. Connected cars have the capability to change our lives for the better – which is why Trakm8 develops technology to harness Big Data in a way that is user-friendly and beneficial. FURTHER INFORMATION www.trakm8.com

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0330 311 5157

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Pay-as-you-go can drive future mobility With the UK Government devolving responsibility to the regions to tackle air quality, it now falls to local authorities to find a solution that doesn’t adversely impact residents, small businesses and local economies. Having set out ambitions to see the complete decarbonisation of road transport by 2040, government has tasked local authorities with the challenge of reducing nitrogen dioxide in our most polluting towns and cities. The BVRLA and its members have been engaging for some time with local and national policymakers to set out the role that BVRLA members can play in delivering the benefits promised by new mobility technologies and business models. In London, where the pollution and congestion problems are so visible, and its public transport provision so excellent, it has been possible to introduce a congestion charging zone with relatively little backlash. However, in other UK cities charging zones are politically much more difficult and are only being considered as a last resort. New technological innovations are guiding solutions, with emerging modes of transport like electric vans and e-cargo bikes having the potential to transform the way goods are delivered.

Behaviour change The benefits for local authorities are clear. By incentivising long-term behaviour change, a scheme like this would limit congestion, reduce roadside air pollution Smart technology and would encourage individuals to The advent of the sharing economy has also embrace efficient, healthier and more opened up new ideas and a culture sustainable forms of transport. has evolved where people are Additional benefits would increasingly expecting to be also be felt amongst local A able to plan, book and residents and business Mobilit y pay for transport on owners, who would face Credits s their smart phone. increasing costs if an c h e me can be This ‘pay-as-you-go’ alternative solution like u s e d in conjun approach is increasingly Clean Air Zones were new te ction with part of the fabric of to be put in place. life in the UK. From We know that by such as chnologies M streamlining services nudging behaviour o b i l a Servic it to gym membership change, we can derive e (Maay as and transportation, long-term benefits. This platform S) s people are increasingly can be demonstrated by using a service-based model the introduction of car clubs, for meeting their needs. which have reported findings to It is this combination of culture suggest that their members have change and technological advancement directly contributed towards reducing that provides the backdrop for the BVRLA’s the number of privately-owned Mobility Credits Scrappage Scheme proposal. cars on the road. E It makes the case for a nationally funded, locally targeted vehicle scrappage scheme that provides Mobility Credits to those getting rid of older, more polluting vehicle. Mobility Credits would be spent on more sustainable ‘pay-as-you-go’ private and public transport modes, including car and bike hire, car clubs, trams, buses and trains, reducing

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Written by the BVRLA

BVRLA’s proposal for a Mobility Credits Scrappage Scheme suggests providing credits to those getting rid of polluting vehicles, to be used on more sustainable ‘pay-as-you-go’ transport modes, including car and bike hire, car clubs, trams, buses and trains

emissions and advancing the shift away from vehicle ownership to usership. A scheme like this is mostly suited to an urban area that has strong transport links and is under pressure to introduce measures to improve air quality. The infrastructure would need to be in place to enable people to fulfil all their transport needs without using their own private vehicle. A Mobility Credits scheme can be used in conjunction with new technologies such as integrated Mobility as a Service (MaaS) platforms to incentivise more sustainable journeys involving public, shared and active transport.

Mobility & Connectivity Report

MOBILITY CREDITS

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Mobility & Connectivity Report

 A Mobility Credits scheme that utilises not only car clubs, but a range of other modes of shared transport would multiply the number of journeys available and have a huge impact on driving behaviour change. Leading the way In October 2018, Mayor of the West Midlands, Andy Street announced that the region is to become the UK’s first Future Mobility city with £20m being invested to enable Transport West Midlands to work with companies to trial and demonstrate new modes of transport, services and technology. This will include investment in mobility as a service, car sharing, electric bikes and using data to tackle congestion. Welcoming West Midlands Mayor Andy Street’s announcement, BVRLA chief executive, Gerry Keaney said: “The fleet sector is determined to play a lead role in tackling air pollution and this announcement, which must be the start of a wider transition in urban transport, has the potential to dramatically improve the sustainability of road transport in the West Midlands. “We look forward to collaborating with authorities and government to deliver solutions that ensure customer safety and provide a fair and level playing field for service providers who will rely on having equal rights to access data.

The BVRLA believes that the scope of a Mobility Credits scheme can go far beyond local authorities giving credits to residents scrapping older, more polluting vehicles. It could also be deployed as a method for businesses to give employees credits to help reduce their business grey fleet. Protecting consumers and businesses must remain at the heart of this evolution.” The BVRLA believes that the scope of a Mobility Credits scheme can go far beyond local authorities giving credits to residents scrapping older, more polluting vehicles. It could also be deployed as an effective method for businesses to give employees credits to help reduce their business grey fleet. Unlike a diesel scrappage scheme, which continues to promote vehicle ownership by incentivising the purchase of loweremission vehicles, Mobility Credits really takes advantage of our changing cultural behaviours and advances in technology to derive much longer-term societal and environmental benefits.

Be part of the Future of Mobility The BVRLA Future Mobility Congress taking place in Birmingham on 4 July will explore the way new technology, supply chains and business models are tackling today’s urban transport challenges. The event will provide plenty of opportunities to share new policy thinking, hear about innovative urban mobility solutions and explore opportunities for future collaboration. Find out more at BVRLA.co.uk/events L FURTHER INFORMATION www.bvrla.co.uk

What are mobility credits? A mobility credits scheme is a targeted and progressive modification of previous diesel vehicle scrappage schemes. Instead of receiving a one-off payment towards the purchase of a new car after scrapping their polluting vehicle, participants are given ‘mobility credits’ which can be spent on more sustainable, ‘pay-as-you-go’ private and public transport modes such as car and bike hire, car clubs, trams, buses and trains. A mobility credits scrappage scheme is the only clean air measure that inspires long-term behaviour change. By incentivising individuals to give up private car ownership and use other shared forms of transport new travel habits are created. The result is that participants adjust to using more sustainable forms of transport regularly and rapidly reduce their contribution to roadside pollution and congestion. For local authorities this results in less congestion and pollution and healthier residents who embrace more efficient and sustainable forms of transport. It also places their cities at the forefront of the ongoing revolution in transport. Individuals do not suffer the economic hardship they often experience under alternative air quality policies.

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Stuart Thomas, director of fleet and SME at the AA, outlines why the advent of new technologies is revolutionising the way in which business drivers and fleet managers need to think about travel

Fleets are facing an increasingly complex environment when it comes to the future of mobility. ‘Mobility as a Service’ (MaaS) – where consumers are shifting away from personally-owned modes of transportation and towards mobility solutions that are consumed as a service – is becoming a common-place industry discussion. Connected car technology As is connected car technology, which is likely to be shaped by a number of new vehicle safety systems soon to be mandated across the European Union (EU). These should be welcomed, with emphasis placed on explaining why these systems will be of benefit for drivers, fleets and businesses. We can all agree that cutting traffic collisions by 30 per cent and potentially saving up to 25,000 lives over 15 years is a positive goal. However, we need to ensure that those buying and driving vehicles from 2022 understand what all this new technology can do for them – and, if relevant, how they can advocate for it with their customers and fleet drivers. All new vehicles will be fitted with Electronic Data Recorders (EDRs) and compulsory Intelligent Speed Assistance (ISA) systems. Existing optional Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS), such as autonomous emergency braking (AEB), lane keep assist, driver fatigue detection and a reversing camera or sensor, will also be essential. AA Populus data Indeed, AA Populus data from January this year showed that drivers are looking for increased technology, with three fifths

wanting adaptive cruise control and AEB, while just under half would like lane keep assist on their next car. There has also been a lot of support for systems that warn drivers of speed limits; however the mandatory ISA systems have caused some contention as 64% stated that while ‘cars should know the speed limit at all times, drivers should be able to decide whether they are prevented from exceeding the speed limit or warned only’. Over a quarter of the AA Populus panel agree their current vehicle has safety features they don’t know are there (February 2019). It is likely, therefore, that fleet and company car drivers could also benefit from a little education in how to make the most of their vehicles. In the same survey, almost half of respondents said they wished they had a better understanding about existing safety technologies, providing a massive opportunity for business owners and fleet managers to add value to their fleet management and driver training programmes. For example, while an initial furore about ISA systems focused on the potential dangers if drivers are not able to override the system, the reality is somewhat different. Combatting such misperceptions is a vital part of the fleet sector’s responsibilities to those on the road. It should be reassuring for fleets to know that the ISA will use traffic sign recognition cameras and GPS to calculate speed limits – and ensure the vehicle does not exceed them by automatically limiting engine power. If conditions dictate, drivers will be able to override deceleration if necessary, by pushing further on the accelerator. It has also been suggested that additional

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Mobility and connected cars: The great transport revolution warnings such as dashboard lights and an increasing audible warning should continue to alert the driver until the vehicle is travelling below the limit, however the EU are still in the early stages of discussion on how ISA will look and feel for drivers. Advanced Driver Assistance Systems The introduction of these compulsory Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) is paving the way towards fully autonomous vehicles. According to the AA’s 2018 Operational Fleet Report, created in partnership with BT Fleet, fleet managers felt that autonomous vehicles will roll-out with certainty once practical considerations have been addressed. However, many remain sceptical, with just 29 per cent stating they would expect vehicles with autonomous capabilities to be used in operational fleets within five years. Almost two thirds (63 per cent) agreed that autonomous vehicles would represent a positive opportunity for operational fleets, offering safety benefits as well as a reputational effect of being seen as innovative, while 67 per cent of fleet managers believe autonomous vehicles would represent a threat to fleet management, with job losses for drivers topping the list of concerns. Use the terminology around vehicle safety, mobility, connectivity and ADAS, and that response might be different. The language of autonomy remains tinged with some scepticism, but we can all agree that safety should be a key priority. Indeed, the AA welcomes any technology that will make UK roads safer, with significant impact on freedom or mobility. We just need to ensure that dialogue is open on the potentially controversial topic of autonomous vehicles in fleets. Aspirations for future transport The aspirations for future transport infrastructure are laudable – zero-emission, low carbon, pollution-free intelligent and connected vehicles, operating within a safe environment. Bringing together functions such as customer information and payments across different transport modes will eventually means a vast expansion of services – more choice, more reliability and accountability, greener journeys and lower cost. That can’t be bad for business! L FURTHER INFORMATION www.theaa.com/business

Issue 121 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

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Mobility & Connectivity Report

ROAD CHARGING

Moving in the city

rate regardless of how much they drive in a zone, the scheme would consider the impact of individual journeys in terms of journey length, road surface damage, economic costs and environmental damage. Charging drivers on the most congested By 2025, London could have at least five separate road user roads the equivalent of a cup of coffee or charging schemes with different requirements. A new report by a bus ticket could reduce total emissions Centre for London has called for the adoption of a new scheme and air pollution levels across the whole of London by up to a fifth (over and above the which charges drivers on a per-mile basis for their journeys anticipated impact of the current ULEZ). A new report by Centre for London has called The report emphasises the need to update This idea would also reduce congestion for the adoption of a new road user charging the existing system; while the new Ultra and make for a healthier, more liveable city. scheme in the capital, which charges drivers Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) is a much-needed The report recommends that the Mayor of on a per-mile basis, rather than a complicated environmental measure, it comes on London should ask Transport for myriad of charges with different requirements. top of the existing Congestion London to develop options Costs of the proposed ‘per mile’ charge Charge, and proposed charges for a new approach to City would vary by vehicle emissions, local levels for the new Silvertown and road user charging, with Move of congestion and pollution and availability Blackwall tunnels. This a view to introducing would of public transport alternatives – and prices means that by 2025, the first version of London give would be set before the journey begins. London could have a scheme by the e travel in rs all their The scheme would be integrated with at least five separate end of the 2020formati London’s wider transport system via a road user charging 2024 Mayoral o o n n in e place new app and digital platform, which schemes – each term. This would them to , allowing the report proposes would be run by featuring different include developing Transport for London. The scheme, vehicle standards, a customer platform, plan an  compare, d pay f which the report calls City Move, would hours of operation, upgrading the required journey or provide Londoners with more choice charge amounts and GPS and mobile s about how they travel around the city. payment arrangements. network capacity, and a City Move would use the technology to This has created a confusing trial to test the technology. give Londoners all their travel information system for drivers to navigate. Silviya Barrett, research in one place, allowing them to compare, manager at Centre for London said: plan and pay for journeys. Drivers, for The impact of a journey “The Congestion Charge was pioneering example, would be presented with costs The City Move app would be fairer than the when it was introduced 16 years ago, and impacts of using their vehicle versus Congestion Charge and ULEZ, the report and the ULEZ is desperately needed to alternative modes of transport. says. Rather than charging drivers a flat daily address a growing air quality crisis.

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Mobility & Connectivity Report

“But new technologies are rapidly transforming the way people travel – and how they pay for their journeys. “It is time for London’s approach to road user charging to keep up with the pace of change. “The Mayor should move towards embracing new technology and create a simpler and smarter approach to road user charging. This would be both fairer for drivers and better for the city overall.” A fairer and simpler way to travel City Move has the potential to make life simpler and fairer for people and businesses traveling around London, believes Anthony Alicastro, chief executive officer of emovis, a global electronic tolling solution provider, which runs the Dart Charge scheme in London. He said: “The technology exists – we are currently involved in Road User Charging pilots in the USA, and the concept of mobility credits makes this an innovative proposal that policy makers in London should be backing. City Move will make travelling through London smarter and fairer and maintain London’s position as a world leader in this field.” Cllr Julian Bell, Chair of London Councils’ Transport and Environment Committee, said: “London boroughs are keen to promote, cleaner, greener, more active forms of travel in order to clean up our city’s dirty air, improve people’s wellbeing and reduce congestion. Centre for London’s report makes a welcome contribution to the debate on road user charging, which can have a positive impact on a city but also needs to keep pace with the changing needs of our residents. “That is why any scheme should use digital innovation and help Londoners make better-informed travel decisions.” For a system like this to work, it would need to be simple to understand and easy to use, believes Steve Gooding, director of the RAC Foundation. He said: “As this report rightly highlights, to have any chance of working smoothly and attracting public support, rules and regulations need to be simple to understand and easy to plan for. “One wonders whether this is the case in London – and increasingly in other towns and cities across the country – where drivers are confronted with an array of charges designed to do different things across different geographical areas. Many could be forgiven for confusing their CCs, CAZs and ULEZs. “No one would challenge the urgent need to tackle congestion and reduce emissions so the easier things are made for drivers to comply the quicker change will be accepted.”

The scheme would be integrated with London’s wider transport system via a new app and digital platform, which the report proposes would be run by TfL. The scheme, which the report calls City Move, would provide Londoners with more choice about how they travel around the city. Tackling urban challenges Helping millions of people move around the city in an sustainable and efficient way is a necessary and positive step, Will Judge, Vice President of Urban Mobility at Mastercard, believes. He said: “By 2050, more than 70 per cent of the world’s population will live in urban areas, yet partly due to congestion, cities already account for this same percentage of global CO2 emissions. So the recommended creation of an integrated transport charging model is a sustainable and efficient way for London to tackle its challenge of moving millions of people around the city. “Helping residents and visitors plan, book and buy their journeys through one digital platform, would reduce complexity but also aid people’s understanding of the environmental impact of their travel.” Looking back at the congestion zone, Richard Dilks, Transport Director at London First, said: “London paved the way for congestion charging 16 years ago and, as charging for road use becomes more common-place in big cities across the world, we need to plan to stay one step ahead. “With the city now boasting various charges designed to tackle congestion and emissions, more than six in ten (63 per cent) of Londoners support a simpler combination of these charges in future. “In order to keep London an attractive place to visit, live and work we need to modernise and cohere our charges as part of a package of measures to effectively tackle congestion and air quality.” A change to charging A radical overhaul of the growing number of road user charges is needed, says Caroline Pidgeon, Liberal Democrat Assembly Member. She said: “An intelligent use of our crowded roads must involve moving to a system of

charging per mile for trips made in areas of high demand and poor air quality. “We need a radical overhaul of the growing number of road user charges and instead move to a single comprehensive system that directly tackles congestion and air pollution wherever it occurs in the capital.” Stephen Edwards, director of policy and communications at Living Streets said: “Centre for London’s report is a welcome and authoritative guide to the issues that will need to be considered in relation to road charging. Whilst positive progress has been made, more needs to be done urgently to address poor air quality, climate change, safety and traffic congestion throughout the Greater London area. “Electric vehicles will reduce some, but not all, kinds of vehicle emissions. And they won’t solve the congestion problem. The potential of modern technology and the phasing out of oil-fuelled vehicles means that a more sophisticated version of road charging than the Congestion Charge should be worked upon to be an option for London’s future.” Robert Molteno, vice-chairman of London Living Streets, said: “This report details the principles on which any road user charging scheme for London should be based. Its proposal for a single, multi-modal London transport platform (smartphone app and website) will make it possible for Londoners to choose for the first time the best way they want to make each particular journey. “All candidates standing to be Mayor of London next year need to have the courage to commit to develop a single, distance-based road user charging scheme. It is the only effective way of making a real difference to London’s transport challenges.” L FURTHER INFORMATION www.centreforlondon.org Supported by

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SAFER DRIVERS AND REDUCED COSTS WITH VOLVO It’s no accident that we’re leaders in protecting drivers. In our 40 years of collecting real life accident data, we’ve looked at safety from every angle and put collision prevention at the heart of our vision. With innovations such as pioneering City Safety technology, 360° Camera and Run-off Road Protection, you can be sure that your fleet is secure, while the financial benefits of reduced insurance and accident costs will be clear to see on your balance sheet. CONTACT THE VOLVO CAR BUSINESS CENTRE ABOUT OUR RANGE ON 0345 600 4027 VOLVO BUSINESS SALES YOUR BUSINESS. OUR EXPERTISE

Fuel consumption and CO 2* figures for the Volvo Cars range, in MPG (l/100km): WLTP Combined 26.2 – 176.5 (10.8 – 1.6). NEDC CO 2 emissions 192 – 39g/km. Twin Engine WLTP electric energy consumption 3.1 – 3.6 miles/kWh. Twin Engine WLTP all electric range 23.0 – 36.6 miles. Figures shown are for comparability purposes; only compare fuel consumption and CO2

figures with other cars tested to the same technical procedures. These figures may not reflect real life driving results, which will depend upon a number of factors including the accessories fitted (post-registration), variations in weather, driving styles and vehicle load. *There is a new test used for fuel consumption and CO2 figures. The CO2 figures shown, however, are based on the outgoing test cycle and will be used to calculate vehicle tax on first registration. Preliminary data. Please contact your retailer for latest information.


ROUNDTABLE The future of mobility & Connectivity

At the recent GreenFleet roundtable on the future of mobility and connectivity, the collective opinion of delegates was that the road to flexible mobility solutions, facilitated through connected and autonomous systems, was worth the considerable effort of investment. The journey to better transport, less congestion and healthier air will be long and hard won, but the collected wisdom was that we must succeed. The roundtable was held on 14 May at the Connected Places Catapult in Milton Keynes. It was attended by businesses, vehicle manufacturers, infrastructure experts and technology specialists, who explored the future landscape of transport.

Will it be possible to break away from the reliance on vehicle ownership and embrace multi-modes of transport? Will disjointed modes of transport be unified to create a world where you can move around for a fixed or variable fee, bought as a service? It is a vision that is challenging both conceptually and in practice. It was agreed that leadership, a clear strategy and investment are key to embedding the necessary behaviour changes. The day kicked off by looking at the current policy landscape for low emission and electric vehicles, in both the consumer and business car markets, as well as for commercial and heavy goods vehicles.

Written by John Curtis

The quest for less congested roads and healthier air, as well as improved productivity, is driving the government and industry to look at alternative ways to travel and transport goods. The recent GreenFleet roundtable concluded that leadership, a clear strategy, investment, and incentives to change mindsets is key to making these changes work for both consumers and the business sector

Mobility & Connectivity Report

With support from

Understanding business needs As the old adage goes, knowledge is power, and one of the major challenges faced by any fleets operator is understanding exactly what their needs are to deliver the people and products required in a timely and efficient way. Chris Evans from Trakm8 set out how route optimisation can play a part in helping fleet managers to understand and improve fleet performance. It enables managers to be able to increase vehicle utilisation and identify vehicles that are surplus to requirements, as well as reducing mileage by optimising routes, providing a typical cost saving of up to 30 per cent. The software can also help fleets identify which vehicles and routes are most suitable for switching to electric vehicles. E

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Mobility & Connectivity Report GF Roundtable GF Roundtable

GreenFleet roundtable delegates Sponsors

Steve Beattie Head of Business Sales Volvo Car UK Chris Evans Corporate Sales Manager Trakm8

Delegates

Chris Rimmer Infrastructure Strategy Lead Cenex Andrew Green Project Manager Catapult Gary Bowling Project Engineer Babcock Fleet Management Chris Smith Transport Manager Ringway Jacobs Tom Gadsby Technologist Freight & Logistics Catapult Marcus Helliwell Sustainability Developer IKEA Jethro Punter Associate WYG Group

Event chair

John Curtis, motoring journalist

 Chris continued: “With route optimisation we can analyse data in order to improve vehicle utilisation, and introduce electric vehicles, whilst taking account of the loads carried, topography, and so on.” Trakm8 also designs and manufactures a full suite of telematics products, which can provide vital data on vehicle status and driver performance, through deep connectivity with a vehicle’s CAN bus system. “Most vehicles have some form of telematics; but the data can be hard to access by third parties. This data is incredibly valuable to fleets, and we have several ways in which we can connect to vehicles to gather it. Generally we collect data via the OnBoard Diagnostic port.”   Chris Smith, fleet manager at Ringway Jacobs uses another telematics system, but such data can be readily used as a source, as Trakm8’s Insight telematics platform can utilise data from third parties as well as data gathered by its own telematics devices.

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Will it be possible to break away from the reliance on vehicle ownership and embrace multi-modes of transport? Will disjointed modes of transport be unified to create a world where you can move around for a fixed fee, bought as a service? It is a vision that is challenging both conceptually and in practice. The commercial dilemma Where possible hydrogen transport The significant lack of technology, clusters are being established to provide apart from Euro 6 compliant diesel a collaborative resource for multiple engines, for heavy goods vehicles, businesses, as with the increased range was discussed around the table. of hydrogen over electric, there is no Andrew Green from the Connected need for fuelling stations everywhere. Places Catapult believes that Euro 6 This approach can spread cost and risk. compliant engines are currently slowing the Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) could be a development of alternatively powered HGVs. solution but needs significant infrastructure, With barriers to entry high with whilst only reducing emissions enormous capital investment by half. Biofuels may also required, government support have a place in reducing L e adershi was felt to be necessary in emissions from HGVs p and inv order to encourage the use but the volume estmen of hydrogen and CNG. of biomass is a t are key t Refuelling infrastructure limiting factor. o e m beddin is key, yet it was felt that The road to low g necessa investment by government emission HGVs was ry behathe was tough to justify for change felt to be amongst viour s to ma things that may happen the hardest to ke mobilit in three parliaments time. achieve, worthwhile Additionally businesses are but a real challenge. service y as a work managing expenditure carefully IKEA’s Marcus Helliwell in a period of heightened added to the challenges business and political uncertainty. by taking us back a step. Grid

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net


capacity continues to be a major issue. Whilst smaller vehicles, cars and light commercials can be bought, and charging infrastructure is available to buy, getting a grid connection of a sufficient size remains a limiting factor. In a number of locations IKEA have paid for an upgraded sub station which benefits other businesses who have not contributed and whilst the greater good is a positive for IKEA, other businesses may not sanction what is significant infrastructure investment. IKEA has an aspiration to make all last mile deliveries by electric vehicle by 2025, which, whilst challenging, is going to deliver on their core sustainable business model. Last mile logistics and solutions such as electric vans, cargo bikes, walking deliveries, coupled with shared centralised and local distribution centres are all part of a rich tapestry of changes required to decarbonise deliveries in city and town centres. Electric future Low emission and electric cars have become very much part of life for many, with up to 70 per cent of drivers now considering an electric car as their next vehicle. Steve Beattie from Volvo said that many customers have accepted that they want an EV. Key to adoption is sufficient battery range to cover the customer’s needs, and a vehicle that’s not necessarily differentiated from other cars aesthetically. Manufacturers are responding with new products and technologies launched almost every week. Hybrid technology continues to be the way for many to start the journey.

Andrew Green from Catapult observed that from his research, “plug in hybrids cars have proved to be a company car winner with low benefits in kind tax but have had little effect on the majority of driver’s behaviour, with most miles still done on petrol or diesel.” We returned to the issue of driver data as a way to influence behaviour change. Data has a key role in developing successful commercial alternatives to Event Sponsor Event Sponsor

Mobility & Connectivity Report

With support from

vehicle ownership. The vehicle owner is the owner of any data and so the task seems to capture and share the data. The same is true of fleets who often resist sharing data outside of their organisation, for the greater good. As Andrew succinctly put it, the catapult do the “thinking and the linking” bringing the fleet owners and support functions together to support data sharing and analysis. E Event Sponsor

Steve Beattie, Head of Business Sales, Volvo Car UK

Chris Evans, Corporate Sales Manager, Trakm8

Steve Beattie is head of business sales of Volvo Car UK and is responsible for overseeing all of Volvo’s fleet and corporate sales. Steve has considerable sector experience and heads up the team at Volvo as they grow sales volumes within the business sales market in the UK.

Chris is a corporate sales manager at Trakm8, the UK’s largest manufacturer of telematics devices and a leading provider of vehicle cameras, route optimisation and fleet management solutions. Chris works closely with major fleets to help them improve safety and efficiency through implementing telematics and related technologies.

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Mobility & Connectivity Report

With support from

Central to reducing transport emissions is behaviour change; getting people who have a job to do, to do something different, in the knowledge that the positives will outweigh any initial negatives caused by the change.  Mixed fleet requirements Gary Bowling from Babcock spoke about Heathrow and the challenges faced by operating the BA fleet. The fleet uses unique specialist vehicles, many of which are are large and made overseas. The vehicles do not do many miles but operate for many hours. Heathrow do operate many electric vehicles but prices are increasing and replacement of these vehicles can be after 15 years of service so replacement is not always a speedy option when looking to decarbonise or introduce new technologies. Collaboration may be key to working in a more sustainable way. Vehicles at Heathrow are currently owned by separate airlines and not shared. A shared ownership model may reap rewards. However, It can be difficult to get collaboration to work across airlines with competing agendas. Tom Gadsby outlined the challenges of shared ownership, experienced through the catapult operated “freight share lab”. Difficulties have emerged in apportioning savings, sharing insurance cover, and having different business models across participants. Finding a way forward across companies is difficult and for many, with competing demands, can prove almost impossible. Chris Rimmer from Cenex noted that car clubs and e-car clubs are now available but shared ownership is far from truly embedded in most domestic or business users.

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Tom went on to suggest that appropriate legislation is key to overcoming the challenges of reducing emissions and having a better environment. If government, for instance, mandated that every vehicle needed telematics, an immediate effect would be seen in reducing emissions. Government can and should act to provide certainty and set challenging targets, coupled with the necessary incentives and financial support. Marcus Helliwell from IKEA pointed out that Client Earth, amongst others, are holding the government to account over poor air quality and this will continue to drive new legislation and provide the certainty necessary to secure investment for major infrastructure projects. The younger generation Andrew Green from Catapult has observed the phenomenon of young millennials not owning cars, and forecasts that shared ownership is a natural development. Taxis and ride hire companies like Uber have become a way of life, rather than the luxury they used to be. This shift to shared ownership is what has influenced car manufacturers to look more holistically at mobility or movement as a service. We are clearly a long way from achieving or, some might say, truly starting the transition

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

to zero emission cities and there appears to be a lack of strategy about how we really achieve this, beyond vision and warm words. It was agreed that leadership and investment are key to embedding the necessary behaviour changes. Central to reducing transport emissions is behaviour change; getting people who have a job to do, to do something different, in the knowledge that the positives will outweigh any initial negatives. Future of mobility and connectivity Autonomous and connected vehicles will enable people to reclaim time they currently waste travelling, as well as make things more efficient for the driver, such as pre-warmed or cooled vehicles, or a satnav already programmed from diary commitments. Volvo will be making such technologies available from the early 2020s. Reliability is key to mobility as well as removing the hassle out of modal connections. But as Chris Rimmer posited, the increasing personalisation of travel could lead to increasing isolation? Chris Evans from Trakm8 summed the day up succinctly when he said “there is no one single simple solution. It is only by really understanding your business that you can be sure of making informed choices and equipping your business for what will, undoubtedly, be an everchanging transport landscape.” L

To view the video of the roundtable event which took place on 14 May, including individual interviews with Steve Beattie (Volvo) and Chris Evans (Trakm8), visit www.greenfleet.net/roundtables


Telematics can provide a vast array of vehicle and driver data to fleet managers. However, it needs to be filtered, presented and analysed in the right way in order to maximise its value. Nickie Hunt-Mason, sales and marketing director for fleet and optimisation at Trakm8, explains how to get the best out of Big Data Advances in connected car technology, the Internet of Things and Big Data all mean that we now have richer and deeper insight into driver and vehicle performance than ever before. However, without the right systems and processes in place to analyse that data, fleet managers are at risk of being swamped with too much information. Here are some Trakm8’s recommendations on how to make the most of the wealth of information you can access from connected vehicles. Integrated systems Fleets can often end up with a mixed bag of telematics due to acquisitions, or onboarding new technologies. This can create data silos, meaning fleet managers are unable to see the big picture and have to use multiple web portals to view key metrics. This is why Trakm8 has developed Insight; a unique and highly-customisable telematics and business intelligence platform. User-friendly dashboards display data on the metrics which matter to you the most, such as real-time location, driver behaviour, and vehicle health and maintenance information. Alternatively you can easily build your own dashboards for a personalised overview of your fleet. Insight’s comprehensive reporting suite includes time sheets, expenses, league tables, journey details, and vehicle status.

Our user‑friendly, step-by-step report builder enables you to build personalised reports to deliver data in the way you want it packaged. Video technology Trakm8’s award-winning RH600 telematics camera is already established with major fleets such as Iceland Foods and Calor Gas. These cameras combine full telematics capabilities with the additional benefits of vehicle cameras, including live-streaming of footage over the 4G network. The RH600 is proven to cut accident rates by up to 39 per cent and incidences of speeding by up to 35 per cent. It can also cut fuel expenditure by up to 10 per cent. Trakm8 is adding advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) to the RH600, which include the ability to monitor distracted driving or driver drowsiness. If the driver looks away for a few seconds, for example to check a mobile phone or is nodding off, the RH600 will issue an audible alert. The device can also send footage or photographs of the incident to the fleet manager. Connectedcare Trakm8 Connectedcare provides in-depth vehicle health and status information, helping to improve road safety and reduce the risk of a costly breakdown. With a recent study placing the daily cost of a van being off the road at £800, the return on investment is clear.

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Getting the best out of Big Data For example, Connectedcare provides a true ODO reading, delivering the most accurate possible information on mileage. It can also inform the fleet manager when a service is due, or a warning light illuminates on a vehicle’s dashboard. This means that you are no longer reliant on the driver telling you about these issues – and can act before they become major problems. Connectedcare also provides insights into actual fuel tank levels, and can detect a rapid decrease in fuel levels caused by siphoning off fuel. In addition, Connectedcare can monitor tyre pressure and send alerts back to base. Correct tyre pressure reduces wear and tear, improves vehicle safety, and also optimises fuel consumption. Route optimisation Along with telematics and cameras, Trakm8 is a leading provider of route optimisation and fleet scheduling software, sold under the Route Monkey brand. Going beyond basic journey planners, Route Monkey is proven to cut fuel expenditure by 20 per cent and increase productivity by up to 33 per cent. Trakm8 also now offers full ePod integration with Route Monkey. ePods help to further reduce paperwork and speed up invoicing by providing proof of delivery or job completion. Plug n Play For smaller companies that are not ready to make a two or three-year commitment to a telematics provider, there are now more flexible options. Trakm8 Prime is the UK’s first fully online vehicle tracking solution – customers can order from the website, receive the devices the next day, install the units themselves, and be up and running in minutes. For added flexibility, Trakm8 Prime is now available on a 30-day rolling contract, which provides customers with complete control over their telematics requirements. Trakm8 Prime is also competitively-priced, available from £6.99 per device per month. Trakm8 is the UK’s largest manufacturer of telematics devices, which are designed and produced at its headquarters in the West Midlands. The company is proud to hold the Made in Britain marque. Currently it has more than 250,000 units in play. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.trakm8.com

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Public Sector Panel

EXPERT PANEL PUBLIC SECTOR A significant amount of business travel in the public sector is undertaken by drivers in their own vehicles. But with ‘grey fleet’ vehicles generally being older, more polluting and potentially more dangerous than their counterparts, what can the public sector do to manage the issue? Our panelists discuss The average grey fleet car is older, more polluting and potentially more dangerous than its counterparts, according to research by the Energy Saving Trust. Grey fleet is the term for private cars being used for business purposes. The Urban Mobility Partnership has recently called on public bodies in Wales to ban grey fleet usage, saying that by using lease cars and car clubs instead, Wales could reduce the amount of emissions from those journeys by 42 per cent. The Urban Mobility Partnership also backs using mobility credits for use on buses, trains and daily car and bike hire, a similar proposal to the BVRLA’s Mobility Credit Scrappage Scheme. Four years ago, research from Alphabet revealed that 55 per cent of business travel in the public sector is undertaken by drivers in grey fleet vehicles. However, the research revealed that concerns around mileage costs (39 per cent), administration (36 per cent), environmental impact (34 per cent) and health and safety (33 per cent), are making organisations explore a range of alternative mobility solutions. “Grey fleet can prove problematic for organisations when it comes to duty of care and the administration of ensuring that employee’s cars are roadworthy, have comprehensive and business use insurance and road-tax,” comments Alison Argall from Tusker. “It’s a growing problem with grey fleet on the rise as the take up of car allowances increases or access to a Company Car is reduced. “Alternatives can include offering a company car, however fleet management can be problematic for organisations, as it can be a time-consuming task to manage. Another option is to offer a car benefit scheme, which provides reassurances to organisations and drivers by providing brand new cars which are guaranteed to be roadworthy, insured, taxed, maintained, with the scheme fully managed by the provider. To reduce reliance on grey fleet, public sector organisations can also consider

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Sean Maher, UK field sales manager, Quartix Sean Maher is UK field sales manager at Quartix. He has been with Quartix for 11 years and in vehicle tracking for 18 years. Sean’s experience enables him to understand customer needs and help companies realise the savings that can been seen from operating a vehicle tracking system. Martin Evans, managing director, Jaama Martin Evans is managing director of the industry’s leading fleet management software innovator Jaama. Evans is a well-known industry figure having spent nearly 30 years in the fleet and leasing sector. Prior to joining Jaama in 2005 as sales director, he was customer relations director at cfc solutions and held various operational roles within Overdrive/FCM which was taken over by Arval in 1999. Alison Argall, director, Tusker With 14 years of experience at Tusker, Alison is a lady of rare abilities and was a key part of the team to first launch salary sacrifice car schemes to the market place in 2008. Since then she has been instrumental in the implementation of over 400 salary sacrifice car schemes; utilising her encyclopaedic knowledge to generate the best benefit opportunities for Tusker’s customers introducing pool vehicles or car sharing and cycle-to-work schemes and initiatives. Martin Evans from Jaama said: “Pool vehicles provide staff members safe and maintained vehicles to perform business journeys. Jaama’s online pool car booking module allows organisations to effectively manage pool vehicles.” When companies do offer company cars, it’s important to have a solution in place to differentiate business and personal mileage, believes Sean Maher from Quartix. He explains: “Not only is it necessary to capture the benefit-in-kind mileage and separate this clearly from company

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mileage, the organisation also needs to understand how its vehicles are being used. “This is where vehicle tracking can make the task of managing a grey fleet or company cars easier. Relying on manual records for HMRC audits can present risks and an extra administrative burden, so it’s vital that company cars are fitted with a tracking system that can categorise business vs private mileage easily. “A tracking system, such as Quartix’s, records the type of trip (business or private), the mileage information and the dates and locations travelled to. The tracking system provides reliable evidence and allows


Electric vehicles With the responsibility of improving air quality being passed down to local authorities, the pressure is on for them to encourage local residents into greener vehicles and more sustainable forms of transport. And they should lead by example, and drive cleaner vehicles themselves. The Renewable Energy Association’s EV group developed a report called ‘Taking Charge: How Local Authorities can champion electric vehicles’. It was written to support council officers, councillors, developers, and individuals who seek to support this transition. When it comes to electric vehicles, the development of the right type of infrastructure, particularly in terms of where charging bays are located, is critical. Operating electric vehicles needs to be as easy as the current system. The report proposes a range of actions for local authorities, including appointing

Public Sector Panel

organisations to quickly determine how much tax they are due to pay. By working in partnership with Fleetcheck, it also integrates fuel card data, to split fuel costs across your fleet and better establish how much tax you owe for business miles. “A reliable vehicle tracking system will do the hard work for you, meaning you can submit your figures to HMRC with confidence.” Technology is critical to help public sector organisations have a cohesive, auditable and systemised approach in place to manage ‘grey fleet’ drivers and their vehicles, believes Martin Evans. “Employers should make the same amount of time available to manage ‘grey fleet’ as they do company-provided vehicles, but too many organisations have a varied approach to the challenge. “Introducing technology and asset management software, such as Jaama’s, can enable public sector fleets to track, measure and manage all duty of care information. “Software can offer a number of modules focused on ‘grey fleet’ management including recording vehicle-related information and vehicle and driver documentation. In addition, it can validate documents and provide a robust audit trail and drivers can use apps to perform vehicle condition checks.” Grey fleet policies must be communicated, understood and accepted by all - from the drivers to executives at the top of the business, believes Martin Evans. He says: “It is important that public sector organisations ensure ‘grey fleet’ drivers buy-in to management policies and that those policies are supported by executives. “It is really important that driving policies and risk management tools – licence checking and driver profiling – are not just rolled out to the company car community but are promoted across an organisation’s entire employee car use base. “Furthermore, there should be no business journeys unless critical policies are in place, they have been complied with and drivers have signed up to them. Communication must come from the top of a business.”

an ‘EV Car Czar’ from the council body to make it easier for charge point developers to rapidly install the equipment needed. It urges local authorities to ensure that on-street charge points are made available near to those who own EVs. Other recommendations include making it easier for residents to request on-street charge points, investigating how solar and energy storage technologies can power our cars, and creating an ‘EV Plan’ within the local authority, which allocates a budget and identifies clear deliverables. Giving benefits for early EV drivers, such as free parking or allowing EVs to use bus lanes is also proposed, as is committing to purchasing EVs as part of the council’s transport fleet, and working with bus service operators and contractors to encourage their fleets to go electric. Picking up the point about infrastructure, Alison Argall believes that the amount of charging bays installed to support electric vehicles has been slower in keeping pace with adoption levels. However, most local authorities are working on policy to offer increased numbers of charging points in more car parks and council-run facilities as part of their sustainability projects. “One area of focus needs to be access to roadside charging for those without a driveway,” says Alison. “This is currently not clear for a lot of electric vehicle drivers, and acts as a deterrent for some who can’t find clear information on the options available to them. “In cities where clean air zones are in place or imminent, local authorities are concentrating on ensuring there is a comprehensive charging infrastructure, together with other incentives like free parking, to increase take-up levels amongst local drivers.” Better driving for less emissions While electric vehicles are growing in popularity, they may not be an option for everyone due to costs and budget availability, believes Sean Maher from Quartix, who points out that there are

other ways to reduce emissions. He explains: “Being conscious not to leave a stationary vehicle idling and focussing on smoother braking and acceleration are all effective ways to reduce your fuel spend and vehicle emissions. “A tracking system can monitor emission levels and analyse your driving style, meaning you can easily see which driving habits need to change. The Quartix system displays this on a map view as well as in a report, so you can pinpoint where and when fuel-thirsty behaviour took place and acknowledge any patterns that emerge. “Studies have shown that fuel spend can be reduced by 25 per cent just by applying the changes indicated by a vehicle tracking system, which really puts the impact of our driving styles into perspective.” Examining the type of routes and whether any journeys cross over can also help reduce emissions. Sean says: “A GPS tracking device will allow you to easily see a trip log and assess this over time to modify your behaviour. Quartix shows you exactly what routes drivers are taking every day, letting you see where they overlap or involve avoidable areas of congestion. Armed with this knowledge, our customers can ensure jobs are completed efficiently, at lower costs and in less time.” ULEZ and Clean Air Zones London’s Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) is now operational and means that drivers with non-compliant vehicles in terms of emissions will be charged £12.50 each day to enter the zone at any time. Anybody who does not pay the charge will face a fine of £160. Lorries meanwhile could face £1,000 fine. The scheme is said to affect around 40,000 vehicles, and aims to reduce toxic emissions by around 45 per cent within two years. What’s more, clean air zones are due to be introduced in many towns and cities across the country in the next couple of years. For any public sector organisations that are not prepared, they could rack up costly fines, which is not an option for those spending public money. E Issue 121 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

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Public Sector Panel

The Urban Mobility Partnership has recently called on public bodies in Wales to ban grey fleet usage, saying that by using lease cars and car clubs instead, Wales could reduce the amount of emissions from those journeys by 42 per cent.  So how can organisations prepare themselves for future clean air measures? While Euro 4 petrol and Euro 6 diesel vehicles are permitted in the ULEZ, the future is uncertain, and so a switch to alternatively fuelled vehicles is a good option, if viable. But there are still a lot of misunderstandings surrounding electric vehicles, believes Alison. She says: “There is a common misconception that charging is difficult, takes a long time, that cars can’t go very far between charges, and that ULEVs are expensive. Some of these used to be true, but with the improvement of the charging infrastructure and the range of vehicles now available on the market, many of the concerns that drivers had about electric vehicles, are no longer the case.” Alison continues: “If fleet managers continue to provide information to their drivers about the options available and compliance with ULEZ requirements, adoption levels will increase. Government incentives to support the lowest carbon emitting vehicles sees significant reductions in Benefit in Kind on company cars from April 2020 which will benefit both organisations, company car drivers and the environment. This is already starting to create greater interest and confidence when considering a car for a three or four year period. “If organisations opt to offer Car Benefit Schemes, such as the one from Tusker, drivers will have access to a range of ULEVs which are compliant.” For those organisations where updating the fleet is not yet feasible, then avoiding clean air zones could be done with geofencing. Sean explains: “For vehicles that aren’t compliant with the criteria for clean air zones, a useful feature that Quartix offers is Geofencing.

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Geographic zones can be defined in the system with alerts automatically sent when a vehicle crosses the boundary, notifying the company or the driver. Managers can define clean air zones as no-go areas for certain vehicles to ensure compliance without additional administration. You simply mark out the desired zone on our maps with an easy drawing tool, and you can set up as many zones and alerts as you need.” Mobility solutions The government’s recent ‘future of mobility: urban strategy’ says that new types of travel and new business models, enabled by data and connectivity, automation and electrification, are starting to transform how people and goods move. If the transition is well managed, it could help tackle urban challenges such as congestion and air pollution. It can also widen access to mobility for disabled people and older people. How can local authorities use technology to change the way we think and travel, as well as improve some of the issues in city centres? Sean Maher said: “The key to changing attitudes is awareness of our current behaviours and, with that, we can look at changing them for the better. Our experience is that big improvements can be made with small modifications and minimal inconvenience to users, be they members of the public or employees of an organisation. “Local authorities can take the lead in the move towards greener, more efficient transport and provide an example for their residents to follow. One of the easiest ways to do this is to use a good vehicle tracking system which provides insights into how we drive, the miles we accumulate and the impact that has on both the environment and the vehicle running costs. Once you have this data you can see where improvement is needed.” L

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

Final thoughts Sean Maher Local Authorities can take the lead in the move towards greener, more efficient transport and provide an example for their residents to follow. One of the easiest ways to do this is to use a good vehicle tracking system which provides insights into how we drive, the miles we accumulate and the impact that has on both the environment and the vehicle running costs. Once you have this data you can see where improvement is needed. With the Quartix system, it is simple to see where driving styles can be improved. Martin Evans Technology is critical to help public sector organisations have a cohesive, auditable and systemised approach in place to manage grey fleet drivers and their vehicles. Introducing technology such as Jaama’s multi award-winning Key2 fleet and asset management software, can enable public sector fleets to track, measure and manage all duty of care information. Software can offer a number of modules focused on ‘grey fleet’ management including recording vehicle-related information and vehicle and driver documentation. In addition, it can validate documents and provide a robust audit trail and drivers can use apps to perform vehicle condition checks. Alison Argall, If organisations opt to offer Car Benefit Schemes, such as the one from Tusker, drivers will have access to a range of ULEVs which are compliant with London’s ULEZ and other clean air zones. The website has a search function to show vehicles which are lower-emitting for those who are interested. Tusker also regularly has offers surrounding charging points which are supplied at a discount or during promotions, free of charge.


Honda CR-V Hybrid EX AWD CVT

Road Test

FIRST DRIVE

Richard Gooding discovers Honda’s first European-bound SUV with a hybrid powertrain impresses with its technology, space and efficiency

How does it drive? The latest Honda CR-V takes cues styling cues from previous models, but updates them with broader wheel arches and sharper contours, as well as distinctive L-shaped LED tail lamps. A 30mm longer wheelbase means improved interior accommodation and the cabin itself is more premium-feeling than before, the horizontally-designed layout and soft-touch materials creating a more upmarket ambience. There are clever touches, too, such as the threemode centre console and a programmable tailgate opening height. Hands-free tailgate opening on the EX model allows access to the 497 litres of space. The CR-V Hybrid’s i-MMD powertrain uses a 2.0-litre petrol engine running on the Atkinson Cycle, two electric motors, and a lithium-ion battery. One motor is used for propulsion, with the other being a generator. Controlled by the i-MMD software, three driving modes alternate depending on the car’s driving conditions. Hybrid Drive uses excess energy from the petrol engine to recharge the battery via the generator motor, while EV mode allows for around 1.2 miles of zero-emissions range depending on battery charge and driving conditions. When cruising, the Engine Drive mode is the most efficient, and can be ‘boosted’ by the electric propulsion motor. It’s also the only mode which engages the petrol engine to drive the wheels directly. On the move the

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i-MMD shuffles the modes imperceptibly to maximise efficiency and the CR-V Hybrid moves along in a very serene style. Sport, Normal, Economy and EV-only modes can be selected by the single-speed eCVT gear controls, which are located on the centre console. Regenerative braking can also be modulated by paddles on either side of the steering wheel. It’s easy to achieve good economy, too, and the car has a relaxing and calming gait with a comfortable ride and failsafe handling. The Vehicle Driver Information Interface displays the car’s drive status at any given time and shows how the energy sources combine to produce the power, while readouts show the lithium-­ion battery’s charge, power flow and the overall system’s recharging status. Honda has kept things simple, and there is no plug-in option. How economical is it? Honda quotes an official combined cycle fuel economy figure of 38.2mpg on the new WLTP testing programme for the CR-V Hybrid EX along with similar values for the other four-wheel drive models. Under the same regime, the two-wheel drive S, SE and SR record an average of 40.9mpg. What does it cost? Available in four trim levels, the S kicks off the Honda CR-V Hybrid range at £30,130 is only available with two-wheel drive. Moving up the range, the SE starts at £31,990 and the SR begins at £34,470. The range-topping EX model tested is priced from £38,280 and is only available with all-wheel drive. SE and SR models can also be specified with all-wheel drive at an £1,100 premium. All models come with a DAB radio with Bluetooth connectivity, LED lighting, wooden interior decor trim and 18-inch alloy wheels. Over the entry-level S, SE trim adds a seven-inch Honda Connect touchscreen infotainment system with Garmin

navigation, an auto-dimming mirror, auto wipers, parking sensors, a rear view camera and four USB ports. SR cars gain heated front seats, keyless start as well as a blind spot and cross traffic monitoring system. Top of the range EX CR-V Hybrids add a heated steering wheel and rear seats, a head-up display and a panoramic glass roof. Honda’s Sensing safety technology suite is standard on all models.

Written by Richard Gooding

What is it? Honda’s CR-V first burst onto the new car scene in 1995 and has since become the world’s bestselling SUV. The fifth-generation of the Japanese ‘Comfortable Runabout Vehicle’ was launched in the UK during the summer of 2018 and the Hybrid model joined the range in the autumn. The first step in achieving Honda’s objective of electrified powertrains for 100 per cent of its European sales by 2025, the CR-V Hybrid employs the company’s Intelligent Multi Mode Drive (i-MMD) hybrid technology and is the first Honda hybrid SUV available in Europe.

How much does it cost to tax? CO2 emissions are 120g/km for two-wheel drive CR-V Hybrid models and 126g/km for the four-wheel drive specification cars, although it makes no difference to Vehicle Excise Duty. All versions of the Honda CR-V Hybrid cost £160 to tax in the first year, dropping to £145 thereafter. In terms of company car taxation, the rangetopping EX will cost drivers £184 or £368 per month, at 20 or 40 per cent rates respectively. Why does my fleet need one? Spacious, comfortable and efficient, the Honda CR-V Hybrid is a sign of things to come from the Japanese brand. Offering a relaxing and calming driving experience with impressive economy, the new family-friendly Honda Hybrid is a stylish, practical and pragmatic choice in the world of self-charging hybrid SUVs. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.honda.co.uk

Honda CR-V Hybrid EX AWD CVT ENGINE: 1,993cc 143bhp four-cylinder petrol / 181bhp/135kW electric motor / lithium-ion battery CO2*:

126g/km

NOx:

27mg/km

MPG (Combined, WLTP): VED: BIK:

38.2

£170 first-year, £145 thereafter 29%

PRICE (OTR): £38,280 (including VAT, £38,830 as tested) *NEDC equivalent

Issue 121 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

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Road Test

FIRST DRIVE

Volvo V60 D3 Inscription Plus

Written by Richard Gooding

The new V60 reinvents the mid-size Volvo estate for a new generation. Richard Gooding finds that a range of efficient engines, premium features and luxurious finishes enhances its appeal What is it? Volvo has a long tradition of estate cars, stretching back to the Amazon Station Wagon of 1962. Subequent models were traditional box-shaped cars, but this changed with the first V60 in 2010. Introduced at a pivotal time in ‘new’ Volvo’s lifetime, the company was bought by the Chinese Zhejiang Geely Holding Group. The second-generation V60 arrived in 2018 and like the 2014 XC90 before it, married sleek looks and a premium finish. How does it drive? The new V60 is based on a version of Volvo’s new Scalable Product Architecture (SPA) platform, one of the first developments under Geely’s ownership. Also underpinning the S90, V90, new S60, XC60 and XC90, the platform allows for next-generation electrification, connectivity and safety technologies. It’s a big change for the future, and one Volvo is committed to. In 2017 it announced its new electrification strategy which dictated that every new Volvo launched from 2019 will be electrified, and Volvo’s first all-electric model is expected to arrive this year, too. The V60 range includes T8 Twin Engine Hybrid models. Volvo’s

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current range of petrol and diesel engines are all Drive-E units, and the all-aluminium units employ injection and boosting technology for both power and efficiency. Diesel-engined model designations started with ‘D’ and those powered by petrol by a ‘T’. Two-litre 148bhp D3 and 187bhp D4 engines make up the diesel V60 range and even though it has the smallest of the two units, the D3 Inscription Plus performs well. On the move, the V60 is very refined and has a calm atmosphere. That peacefulness is helped by the sumptuous cabin. As with the current wave of new Volvos, the V60’s interior features beautifully made and chosen materials, with a 9.0-inch ‘Sensus’ colour touchscreen at its heart. Its portrait orientation works well with clear graphics. A larger 12.3-inch TFT crystal driver display replaces conventional dials for a wholly-digital set-up. The minimalist design creates a largely button-free environment and aluminium

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

or wood inlays add to the premium ambience. Premium also sits alongside practicality, as the V60 has 529 litres of luggage space with the seats in place. How economical is it? Volvo quotes an official range of between 48.7 and 55.4mpg under new WLTP combined cycle fuel economy testing conditions for its D3 engine when fitted with a six-speed manual gearbox, dipping slightly to between 45.6 and 51.4mpg when an eight-speed automatic transmission is chosen. What does it cost? The luxurious D3 Inscription Plus sits near the top of the Volvo’s ‘regular’ V60 range – only the raised up Cross Country Plus and T8 Twin Engine Plug-in Hybrid models sit above it in terms of price. The D3 Inscription Plus as tested starts at £37,565 with a six-speed manual gearbox, rising to £38,215 with the eight-speed automatic.

The D3 is be t to forecas popular st the mo choice of engine et-biased the fle nge ra


Road Test

Standard equipment includes Nappa leather upholstery, active bending headlights, ambient door lighting, power-adjustable front seats and 18-inch multi-spoke alloy wheels. The V60 range starts with the diesel-powered £34,315 D3 Momentum Plus and the cheapest petrol-engined car is the T4 Momentum Plus at £34,685. Moving up the range, the R-Design Plus begins at £36,665 with the D3-engined car and the all-wheel drive Cross Country Plus is priced from £40,435. The T8 Twin Engine Hybrid is available in two trims, the R-Design Plus car at £50,905 and the Polestar Engineered version from £57,205. All Volvo V60s are well-equipped. Standard equipment includes adaptive brake lights, 2-zone climate control, cruise control, heated front seats, keyless start, LED headlights and 18-inch alloy wheels. Being a Volvo, safety kit is also comprehensive. Highlights include an oncoming lane and road run-off mitigation system, full-length side impact inflation curtains and whiplash protection.

How much does it cost to tax? Selected versions of the D3 and D4 diesel variants are Volvo’s lowest-emitting non-hybrid V60 models, topped only by the pair of much more expensive T8 Twin Engine plug-in cars. The V60 D3 Inscription Plus has CO2 emissions of 119g/km, attracting a £210 first-year VED rate, decreasing to £140 thereafter. The T8 Twin Engine Hybrid emits 39-46g/km of CO2 and has an all-electric range of 31.0-36.6 miles, but costs £13,000 more than the D3 Inscription Plus tested here. Why does my fleet need one? Reinventing Volvo’s heartland, the mid-size estate, the new V60 is a beautifully designed and built machine. The D3 is forecast to be the most popular engine choice of the fleet-biased range. Practical, well-equipped and owner of a stunning interior, the V60 showcases what ‘new’ Volvo does best. It deserves a place at the top of every fleet manager’s mid-size estate shortlist. L

FURTHER INFORMATION www.volvocars.com/uk

Volvo V60 D3 Inscription Plus ENGINE:

1,969cc four-cylinder diesel

CO2:

119g/km

NOX:

52mg/km

MPG (combined WLTP):

48.7-55.4

GF MPG: VED:

60.8

£210 first-year, £145 thereafter

BIK:

31%

PRICE (OTR):

£37,565 (including VAT, £39,915 as tested)

Issue 121 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

43


GF

14TH NOVEMBER BRITISH MOTOR MUSEUM GAYDON, WARWICK

GreenFleet

SPONSORED BY

AWArDS

2019

PRE-DINNER RECEPTION SPONSORED BY

RECOGNISING CLEAN FLEET INNOVATION

Join us on the fleet industry’s big night: Book a place, just £195 + VAT pp... Or book a table for 10 for just £1,495 + VAT To book your places and for other options, call Colin Boyton 020 8532 5704 or email colin.boyton@psigroupltd.co.uk

Closing date for entries: 20 September 2019

www.greenfleetAwArDS.CO.UK


Calendar GREENFLEET COVENTRY

GREENFLEET SCOTLAND: ABERDEEN

GREENFLEET CYMRU: SWANSEA

21 June 2019, Pittodrie Stadium, Aberdeen events.greenfleet.net/scotland/ aberdeen

27 June 2019, Guildhall, Swansea events.greenfleet.net/r2z/ swansea

Hosted by Coventry City Council, GREENFLEET  Coventry is being held at the Transport Museum on 31 May and is free to attend for fleet professionals looking to explore the very latest in ultra-low emission vehicle technology. Supported by the Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV), Crown Commercial Service (CCS) and Society of Motor Manufacturers & Traders (SMMT), this will be the most important clean fleet event the region has seen. Delegates will also be able to test drive the latest electric and ultra-low emission vehicles. 

For the first time ever, Aberdeen will have its own GREENFLEET Scotland event this year. Event Partners Transport Scotland, Energy Saving Trust and Aberdeen City Council will deliver keynote presentations and discuss their vision for a cleaner future, on both a local and national level. The majority of the event will be structured in 30-minute sessions where delegates have the opportunity to network with experts in legislation, vehicle technology, charging solutions, leasing and financing and innovative technology and testdrive ULEVs from exhibiting manufacturers.

GREENFLEET will be returning to Wales this summer as part of the ROAD-2-ZERO ROADSHOW. The free one-day event will include keynote presentations from Partners including the Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV), The Society of Motor Manufacturers & Traders (SMMT) and Crown Commercial Service (CCS). Following a seminar session, delegates will have the opportunity to take part in roundtable discussions with experts from across the industry as well as test-drive some of the latest EVs and ULEVs on the market.

GREENFLEET GLASGOW

GREENFLEET BATH

23 August 2019, Council City Chambers, Glasgow events.greenfleet.net/r2z/ glasgow

3 October 2019, Bath Racecourse, Bath events.greenfleet.net/r2z/ bath

31 May 2019, Transport Museum, Coventry events.greenfleet.net/r2z/ coventry

bATH IMPROVING AIR QUALITY ACROSS UK CITIES Hosted By:

The Scottish Government has outlined plans to have four Low Emission Zones (LEZ) in operation by 2020, with the first established in Glasgow at the end of 2018. Hosted in association with Glasgow City Council, the event will give them a platform to outline their strategy as well as offer information to local businesses on how to transition to an environmentally friendly transport operation. The event, sponsored by Arnold Clark, will also allow visitors to hear from Transport Scotland and the Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) on the latest grants and schemes available.

With

In Association with:

BATH RACECOURSE: 3RD OCTOBER 2019

Hosted by Bath and North East Somerset Council and held under the Go Ultra Low West (GULW) banner, this event will be a key date in the calendar for those in the West of England looking for the latest on the GULW project or advice on transitioning to a ULEV fleet. Like at other ROAD-2-ZERO events, delegates will hear from Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV), The Society of Motor Manufacturers & Traders (SMMT) EV Group and the Crown Commercial Service (CCS).

Events Calendar

GreenFleet eVeNTS

Exhibitors The following organisations will be exhibiting at all or some of the GreenFleet events: Nissan Arnold Clark Automobiles Limited Co-wheels Car Club BMW Mini eVolt LDV Renault Toyota Lexus Trakm8 Vattenfall ElectrAssure Arnold Clark Vehicle Management SG Fleet Volvo LeasePlan The Algorithm People Elmtronics Kia Hyundai

Issue 121 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

45


Advertisment Feature

Easing the pressure to reduce transport emissions and clean up the air Energy Saving Trust provides guidance, support and workshops for businesses and local authorities to help them reach air quality and carbon reduction targets. Here’s how: Transport is the largest contributor to air pollution in the UK, and to reach air quality targets and comply with Clean Air Zones across the country, organisations and local authorities are under pressure to reduce emissions and reinforce clean transport strategies. Funded by the Department for Transport in England, and Transport Scotland in Scotland, Energy Saving Trust provides guidance, support and workshops for businesses and local authorities to help them reach these targets. Scotland Scotland is reaching the milestone of 1,000 publicly available charge points, and boasts an average distance of 2.78 miles between these charging stations, compared to an average of four miles in the rest of the UK. Looking to lower your transport and travel costs? If so, we can help. Free Sustainable Transport Reviews help organisations in Scotland become more efficient with their transport and travel arrangements. By becoming more efficient you are likely to save money and cut your carbon emissions too. Using your fleet data, Energy Saving Trust can calculate your fleet’s current carbon footprint, and look at the potential for the integration of ultra-low emission vehicles, active travel, and reduction of grey fleet. Our specialist transport coordinators have worked with more than 2,000 Scottish organisations, providing tailored and expert advice leading to a total annual saving of £3,619,198 since 2015, saving 6,187 tonnes of CO2. If you are considering the purchase of a new electric vehicle, either as an individual or as a business, but the higher purchase price is putting you off, EST offers a Low Carbon

Transport Loan which is interest‑free and payable over six years. If you are considering two wheels rather than four, EST also offers a four year interest-free loan for new ebikes and ecargo bikes to help individuals and businesses make the step-change to more sustainable transport choices. England Energy Saving Trust in England offers a Local Government Support Programme. Dedicated Relationship Managers (RMs) focus on building and strengthening relationships with local authorities to improve local air quality and reduce CO2 emissions. By sharing best practice, identifying local and regional transport programmes, and linking existing initiatives for broader regional plans, the RMs are able to provide the most effective and tailored support possible. Recent workshops across England attracted 100 local authorities to discuss key issues and facilitate discussions on what support is available and how Energy Saving Trust can support them in these efforts. The new eCargo Bike Grant Fund, funded by the Department for Transport and delivered by Energy Saving Trust, has made £2 million funding available for the acquisition of ecargo bikes to support green last mile delivery. eCargo bikes provide a greener alternative to conventional delivery vehicles, generating lower carbon emissions and easing traffic congestion. With the recent introduction of the Ultra Low Emission Zone in central London, the adoption of ecargo bikes can help organisations continue delivering and transporting in the capital without incurring costs and producing harmful emissions. The grant covers up to 20 per cent of the total cost of an ecargo bike, up to a maximum

of £1,000 per bike, and is available to limited companies, sole traders, partnerships, charities, not-for-profit organisations, public, community and third sector organisations. Energy Saving Trust also offers ecodriving training. It’s no longer just about what you drive, but how you drive, that can save fuel or battery range, reduce emissions and cut costs. Subsidised ecodriving training, funded by Department for Transport approved by the Energy Saving Trust, delivers an average fuel saving of 15 per cent on the day of training and up to six per cent in the long-term for fleets. More than 70,000 drivers have been trained since 2008. The training is available in England for both conventional vehicles and electric vehicles, and is delivered by DVSA-registered fleet trainers who have attended one of EST’s ecodriving ‘train-the-trainer’ courses. Ecodriving training encourages safer and more efficient driving. Upcoming events This year marks the tenth anniversary of the GreetFleet event for Scotland, bringing together more than 3,000 fleet, transport, environmental and sustainability professionals to hear about the latest Scottish transport and emissions legislations, and to find suitable solutions to help them run a more efficient transport operation. Greenfleet Aberdeen will take place at Pittodrie Stadium in Aberdeen on Friday 1 June 2019. Energy Saving Trust is supporting with Transport Scotland, and will deliver keynote speeches. The event will bring together low emission transport professionals from all across Scotland, and will discuss local council clean air strategies, emerging vehicle technologies and the financial support available for your business. Who is eligible for Energy Saving Trust’s support, and how will they benefit? Our transport support is available for all organisations in the UK, private or public sector, and is funded by the Department for Transport in England and Transport Scotland in Scotland. Our support and advice can save organisations up to £145,000 and 235 tonnes of CO2 per year, and is free and impartial. L FURTHER INFORMATION To find out more about how we can help, contact us on the details below: www.energysavingtrust.org.uk/transport Call 0800 0931 669 E-mail: transportadvice@est.org.uk

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DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net


GREENFLEET Scotland : Aberdeen

GREENFLEET Scotland: Aberdeen Supported by Transport Scotland, Energy Saving Trust and Aberdeen City Council, GREENFLEET comes to Aberdeen on 21 June to showcase the latest zero and ultra-low emission vehicles and share knowledge on measures to improve air quality

Supported by partners Transport Scotland and Energy Saving Trust, GREENFLEET returns to Scotland on 21 June for the second time this year. Taking place at Aberdeen’s Pittodrie Stadium, the event will be packed with test drives of electric and ultra-low emission vehicles, as well as roundtable discussions and seminar sessions. Over 38 Scottish zones have air quality safety standards regularly broken, and according to Friends of the Earth Scotland, air pollution contributes to 2,500 early deaths in Scotland each year. A major contributor to air pollution is vehicle emissions. Scotland is taking action to combat air pollution, and at the beginning of the year, Scotland’s first Low Emission Zone became operational in Glasgow. Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Dundee are also set to have Low Emission Zones by 2020. Delegates will be able to hear from keynote speakers on the latest national and local strategies to improve air quality, as well as grants and schemes to help fleets make the switch to a cleaner fleet. In the afternoon, there will be break-out group sessions and the opportunity to test drive the latest green vehicles and see the products and solutions on offer for fleets. Speaker line-up Transport Scotland and Energy Saving Trust will deliver keynotes on Scottish

Van manufacturers LDV will be allowing efforts to decarbonise transport. From a more local perspective, Aberdeen City visitors to test drive its electric EV80. Councils’ Cllr Philip Bell will be outlining With an 120-mile range, the EV80 looks, the city’s vision for a cleaner future. works and feels just like the current V80 For public sector delegates, panel van and comes in the same three representatives from government buying variants. LDV will be showcasing its EV80 agencies Crown Commercial Service in Panel, Tipper, Minibus and wheelchairand Scotland Excel will talk accessible variants on the day. through the very latest The new Renault MASTER Z.E. on fleet framework electric van will be present, Delega t agreements and which offers 124 miles of e s will be how they can help range and a charge time a b le to hear purchasers make of just six hours with a 7 from keynot green choices. kW Wallbox. Renault’s Ellie Grebenik Kangoo Z.E, ZOE and on the e speakers latest n from Energy Twizy will also be and loc ational Saving Trust available on the day. al will be giving The new Toyota Corolla to impr strategies practical advice will be at the event, which ove on how fleets can has a choice of two selfquality air make to switch to charging hybrid powertrains: zero and ultra-low an improved 1.8-litre with emission vehicles. 120bhp and a new 2.0-litre system The event is being supported developing 178bhp. In addition, the Saloon by EST Scotland; Transport Scotland; is available with hybrid power for the first Aberdeen City Council; ChargePlace time, adopting the 1.8-litre hybrid powertrain. Scotland; Home Energy Scotland; . Toyota’s Mirai will also be available for those curious about how hydrogen-fuelled Test drives vehicles perform on the road, as will the Some of the world’s leading vehicle RAV4 hybrid and Lexus hybrid UX SUV. manufacturers will be showcasing their Trakm8 will be present to explain how vehicles, as will representatives from other telematics, connected cameras and fleet fleet suppliers. They will offer an insight into optimisation can help fleets to improve what innovative vehicle technology is on efficiency, cut carbon emissions and reduce the market now, and what’s in the pipeline. risk. Its enhanced RH600 telematics camera for example, now has the ability to monitor distracted driving or driver drowsiness. National car share club Co-Wheels will be present to explain how its electric, hybrid and low emission cars are helping businesses with their mobility needs. LeasePlan meanwhile will be sharing its leasing, fleet management and low emission vehicle expertise. L

Scotland is taking action to combat air pollution, and at the beginning of the year, Scotland’s first Low Emission Zone became operational in Glasgow. Edinburgh, Aberdeen and Dundee are also set to have Low Emission Zones by 2020

FURTHER INFORMATION events.greenfleet.net Issue 121 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

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GREENFLEET Cymru

GREENFLEET Cymru Swansea City Council and Swansea University, together with support from the Welsh Government, are co-hosting GREENFLEET Cymru in Swansea’s Guildhall on 27 June. As well as the opportunity to test drive electric and ultra low emission vehicles, delegates will learn about local and national efforts to decarbonise transport

Taking place on 27 June, GREENFLEET Cymru will be held in Swansea, which is an exemplary city for green transport. Co-hosted by Swansea City Council and Swansea University, together with support from the Welsh Government, the event will allow fleet and transport managers to learn about the latest measures to decarbonise transport and improve air quality, as well as gain advice on making the transition to a cleaner fleet. Delegates will also be able to get behind the wheels of some of the latest electric and ultra-low emission vehicles on the market. An electric fleet Electric vehicles are a familiar sight in Swansea after the council adopted 40 Peugeot Partner electric vans, making it the largest EV fleet in Wales. Recognising this achievement, Swansea Council scooped the Public Sector Fleet of the Year award in November 2018. In the previous year, Swansea University picked up the same accolade, in recognition of the university’s growing zero emission fleet which is improving air quality, saving money, and reducing carbon emissions. Andrea Lewis, Cabinet Member for Homes and Energy at the council, said: “We are delighted to host this important event in Swansea. Organisers approached the Council, clearly recognising the strides we have made in recent years towards zero emissions in the city. I

look forward to meeting and discussing these important green energy plans with organisations across Wales. “Swansea Council currently has the largest fleet of electric vehicles in Wales after we introduced 40 electric vans into our fleet in 2018. This has resulted in the Council being named the ‘Public Sector Fleet of the Year’ at the recently held GREENFLEET Awards. “Working alongside Swansea University is also helping us to push further forward with city wide plans to decarbonise Swansea. The University is also playing its part by introducing electric vehicles in the city. “Looking further forward we want to focus on developing electric charging infrastructure which can assist the public in making the switch to greener transport methods. Cycling infrastructure has also been increased in Swansea in recent years boosting our cycle network and making it a serious alternative to cars.” Sharing EV experiences Nigel Morris, electric vehicle integration manager at Swansea University said: “Swansea City Council and Swansea University co-hosting GREENFLEET Cymru in Swansea with support from Welsh Government is another example of the collaboration going on throughout Wales to decarbonise transport. “Both Swansea City and Swansea University have won their respective

The late morning and afternoon elements of the event will be structured in private, 30-minute sessions, allowing delegates to engage with experts and drive some of the latest EVs and ULEVs on the market. 48

DRIVING THE SWITCH TO CLEANER FLEETS | www.greenfleet.net

GREENFLEET of the Year Categories over the last two years. We have a role to play in sharing our EV experiences to raise awareness, stimulate interest and promote uptake to the benefit of the regional economy and air quality.” Keynote speakers GREENFLEET Cymru will feature keynote presentations and group sessions to enable attending fleet and transport managers to find out more about zero and ULTRA-Low emission vehicles. The day begins with a series of keynote presentations from event partners Swansea Council, the Swansea University, the Welsh Government, and the Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV). Talks will cover the UK government’s Road to Zero strategy, and the latest on grants and schemes, as well as sharing best practice. The Society of Motor Manufacturers & Traders (SMMT) EV Group will be there, offering an insight in to what innovative vehicle technology is on the market now and in the pipeline. Public sector organisations meanwhile will benefit from hearing the latest on the Frameworks for the Crown Commercial Service (CCS). The late morning and afternoon elements of the event will be structured in private, 30-minute sessions, allowing delegates to engage with experts and drive some of the electric and ultra-low emission vehicles on the market. There will be vehicles from Volvo, Toyota, Lexus, and LDV to drive, as well as product updates and expertise from tracking and telematics pros Trakm8, EV charging infrastructure specialists Elmtronics and Vattenfall, and leasing and fleet management experts LeasePlan. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.events.greenfleet.net/r2z/swansea


EV RECHARGING

EV RECHARGING

EV RECHARGING

Bradshaw Electric Vehicles

Mr Electric

Rigfone Electrics

Tel: +44 (0)1780 782621 Email: enquiries@bradshawev.com Website: www.bradshawev.com

Tel: 0800 7311 606 Email: enquiries@mrelectric.com Website: www.mr-electric.co.uk

Email: enquiries@rigfone.co.uk Tel: 023 8021 5100 Fax: 023 8021 5101

Bradshaw is a leading manufacturer of electric vehicles for industry and distributor for Goupil, all-electric, light commercial, zero-emission vehicles. Homologated for road use the Goupil range is suited to low emission zones, towns and cities. With 11 body configurations, the vehicles are designed for last mile delivery and service operations.

Mr. Electric is the UK’s leading electrical franchise brand. Approved OLEV installer, trusted electrical experts. A proven track record of being reliable with over 17 years of experience in electrical installation and maintenance. National coverage allows us to take care of EV Charge Point installation and maintenance across the UK.

Rigfone Electrics is an OLEV approved EV Installation Contractor offering innovative cost effective installation solutions across the South of the UK. Established in 1963 we have built a strong reputation for both reliability and quality with our clients in industry, commerce and public sector. We offer tailor made best value solutions for all your EV charge point requirements.

EV RECHARGING

EV RECHARGING

LCS Energy

Pencol Electrical Ltd

Tel: 01480 470064 Web: www.lcsenergy.co.uk Email: office@lcsenergy.co.uk

Tel: 023 92 484333 Website: www.pencolelectrical.co.uk Email: roger@pencolelectrical.co.uk

LCS Energy, an OLEV and Carbon Trust Accredited Installer, engineer the right solutions to manage your energy. An established background in efficiency, ensures that the right solution for your business needs today and tomorrow. Our experience and focus on Workplace Charging provides you with the confidence in hassle free installations.

Offering our services throughout Hampshire, Pencol Electrical Ltd, install EV charge points for Domestic and Commercial clients. Fully OLEV approved for grant applications, we are registered installers of Rolec and CityEV. We also offer a free no obligation site survey and quote. See our website for further details.

EV RECHARGING

Jupiter Engineering Tel: 01245 424882 Website: www.jupiterengineering.co.uk Email: david@jupiterengineering.co.uk Jupiter Engineering are NICEIC registered electricians; we are OLEV accredited to install a variety of EV charging units, providing a bespoke service to our clients for both Homecharge and Workplace installations. Approved to install Rolec, Pod Point, Chargemaster, myenergi & Andersen charging units covering the South East and London.

EV CHARGE POINTS

EV CHARGE POINTS

Qerb Electric Vehicle Charging 01752 546160 charge@qerb.uk www.qerbcharge.uk 21 Sisna Park, Sisna Park Road, Estover, Plymouth, PL6 7AE QERB Charge, Electric Vehicle Charging, Electric Vehicle Chargers for Home, Workplace, SME, Garages, Car Parks, Large Commercial and Public Sector, Fleet Electric Vehicle Charging, Electric Vehicle Charging Facilities, OLEV Electric Vehicle Charging, UK Wide Installations, Smart Electric Vehicle Charging. EV RECHARGING

Plug It In Group Ltd

SRG Electrical

www.plugitingroup.co.uk Tel: 01535 601466 Email: info@plugitingroup.co.uk

Phone: 0845 644 8209 Website: www.srgelectrical.co.uk

Plug it in Group Ltd are an Electrical contracting company specialising in the installation of Rolec EV charging points, we offer a full package from design through to completion for all of your EV needs. We are OLEV approved and pride ourselves on first class customer service.

SRG Electrical Ltd, are an independent EV design, installation, maintenance and civils capable contractor. We are OLEV approved for domestic and workplace charging and remain one of the leading installers in the country. With nationwide coverage, from home charging to rapid chargers our portfolio is one not to be overlooked.

Issue 121 | GREENFLEET MAGAZINE

49


EV RECHARGING

JPS Renewable Energy Ltd www.jpsrenewableenergy.co.uk enquiries@jpsrenewableenergy.co.uk JPS Renewable Energy’s OLEV approved EV Installation Team provide impartial customer focused EV charging solutions to domestic, commercial and public-sector clients. We offer a hand in hand approach to our clients, from technical advice through to product selection, design and installation of the chosen solution. We are based in Kent, providing EV solutions across the South of England.

EV RECHARGING

EV RECHARGING

EV RECHARGING

Sintec UK Ltd West & West Ltd

Phone: +44 (0) 20 7139 7777 Email: rfq@sintec.uk.com Website: www.sintec.uk.com

www.west-west.co.uk Tel: 01869 241024 West & West Ltd are OLEV, Rolec, Smart EV, EO and EV Box‑approved installers of workplace EV charge points. As exporters in all types of commercial electrical installations, we can give you technical advice, sales information and ongoing service support. We install charge points to meet any budget, timescale and specification throughout London and the Home Counties.

EV RECHARGING

EV RECHARGING

SJK Electrical Stratford Energy Solutions www.stratfordenergy.co.uk 01789 262411 Whether you are looking to install a domestic charging point or multiple workplace charging units we provide a full design & installation service for all electric vehicle charging needs. Working with leading manufacturers we are OLEV‑accredited so relevant grants can be claimed.

“Sintec UK is a leading electrical installer of automotive systems, an approved installer of OLEV chargepoints under the Electric Vehicle Homecharge and Workplace Charging Schemes. We are NICEIC Approved contractor, a registered member of ECA and a proud member of the British Safety Council. We operate nationwide aiming to provide a state of the art service to all customers.”

Saliis

www.sjkelectrical.com Tel: 01924 377641 Mobile: 07734 101674 SJK Electrical are commercial and domestic NICEIC registered electricians, specialising in electric vehicle charging installations, based in Wakefield. All installation needs addressed with the growing adoption of electric vehicles. We are OLEV approved for installations under the EVHS (domestic) and WCS (workplace) schemes, and available to assist in obtaining grants under this scheme.

www.saliis.com Telephone: 028 90 455136 Email: info@saliis.com SALIIS Ltd is one of the leading suppliers and installers, approved by OLEV, of Electric Vehicle (EV) charging units on commercial and private properties across Northern Ireland. Specialising in the renewables industry, SALIIS also installs and maintains large public and private sector contracts in Solar PV across the United Kingdom.

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