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The GCSE results are out At the time of writing, results from the new-style GCSE exams in England, which have been called the most difficult since the end of O-levels in the 1980s, have come out.

SCHOOL TRIPS

PLAN A WINTER TRIP How trips in the winter months can

boost relationships and enhance learning for the rest of the year FINANCE

THINKING OUTSIDE THE BOX

From hosting weddings to setting up nurseries, we examine how schools are raising much-needed funds

PLUS: SECURITY | DESIGN & BUILD | TRAVEL PLANNING | STATIONERY | WINTER SAFETY

51,100 pupils were awarded the top 9 grade for English, English literature and maths. Two thousand pupils got 9s in all of those subjects, which was actually far more than was predicted (but far fewer than the 6,500 pupils who got A* in all their core subjects last year). Interestingly, out of the pupils achieving grade 9, around two thirds were girls. But analysing and comparing the data is a difficult one, given that the exams were harder and the grading system is different. Adding to the confused picture, Wales and Northern Ireland did not reform their subjects, making analysis on the whole of the UK tricky, and non-core subjects remain graded from A*-G. Read our coverage of the GCSE results on page 7. Meanwhile, our alternative funding feature on page 15 examines how schools are thinking outside of the box when it comes to raising funds during times of budget cuts. Ideas include hosting weddings, opening up nurseries, sharing staff and services, and holding cinema nights.

Follow and interact with us on Twitter: @EducationBizz

One way schools can make savings when procuring property-related services is to buy through the new Estates Professional Services framework from the Crown Commercial Service. We take at look at the framework on page 23. Angela Pisanu, editor

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Contents

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION – www.educationbusinessuk.net

CONTENTS EDUCATION BUSINESS 22.7 29

07 EDUCATION BRIEFER

Pass rates for GCSEs fall slightly following exam reforms; Education and Skills Funding Agency has new CEO appointed; Ofsted to be investigated by the National Audit Office; one in four parents move house to be in desired school catchment area

15 FINANCE

Technology is changing all the time. But what remains the same is the need for an IT strategy that considers the desired outcomes for learners and teachers, writes Neil Watkins from Think IT

21 TRAVEL MANAGEMENT

Many primary schools in London are located in areas where NO2 pollution exceed EU limits. With particular health risks for children, Hackney Council has started a new School Street initiative to encourage walking and cycling to school

49 SCHOOL TRIPS: RISK ASSESSMENTS

Following the tragic events in London and Manchester, schools have been cancelling school trips, both nationally and abroad. This has prompted the National Governance Association to issue guidance on trip planning and risk assessments

22 DESIGN & BUILD

57

Schools will be able to save money when buying property-related services through the Crown Commercial Service’s new estates framework. Education Business explains how it will work

53 SCHOOL TRIPS: RESIDENTIALS

Kim Somerville, campaign coordinator for Learning Away, explains what pupils, teachers and schools can gain from high-quality residential experiences over the winter months

29 SECURITY

With the threat level in the United Kingdom remaining high, James Kelly, chief executive of the British Security Industry Association, discusses one particularly increasing trend in school security – lockdown procedures

61

57 WINTER SAFETY

32 CYBER SECURITY

The recent cyber attack on the NHS showed the disruption that can be caused when systems go down. With schools increasingly relying on technology and the internet, what can they do to protect themselves and the data they hold? www.educationbusinessuk.net

The start of a new school year is a favourable time to review technology trends in education and consider those that will help you achieve your learning and teaching goals, writes Caroline Wright, director general for BESA

45 IT & COMPUTING: AV & MOBILE TECHNOLOGY

Many schools are having to think of alternative ways to generate funds into schools amid budget cuts, from hosting weddings to setting up nurseries. Education Business explores this trend

49

39 IT & COMPUTING: EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY

As the summer weather begins to fade to make way for winter months, the important role that safety plays in schools will become ever more apparent, writes RoSPA’s Nathan Davies

61 STATIONERY

BESA’s Cleo Fatoorehchi examines how shifts in the education market are affecting the way stationery is purchased

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TECH-ENABLED CLASSROOMS

How to prioritise your spending for ‘must-have’ new technology

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5


GCSE RESULTS

GCSE RESULTS

Entries in the newly reformed GCSE subjects have risen from last year

GCSE pass rates fall slightly following exam reforms English literature pass-rates have declined by 2.5 percentage points to 72 per cent, following new, tougher exams. However, the pass rate for maths, which has also been made harder, has risen from 61.5 per cent to 68.9 per cent, the BBC has reported. Overall, in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, passes (grades

C/4 and above) have dropped by 0.6 percentage points to 66.3 per cent. Exam boards have also stated that 2,000 candidates achieved a 9 (the highest grade under the new system) in all new three exams and that there was 50,000 grade 9s overall. READ MORE: tinyurl.com/ydcpa8ud

GCSE RESULTS

Two-thirds of GCSE grade 9s awarded to girls Two-thirds of girls have received the highest grade of 9 in the new, tougher GCSEs. Nearly 51,000 grade 9s were given across the three reformed subjects, maths, English literature and English language and around 30,000 were given to girls. Over 2,000 pupils in England were awarded a grade 9 in all three of the subjects, which is less than a third of

the 6,500 straight A*s candidates from last year, according to Datalab. In maths, nearly 20,000 entries scored a 9 and over 31,000 achieved this grade in the two English GCSEs combined. However, overall, GCSE pass rates have fallen this year following the exam reforms.

The number of pupils entered in the reformed GCSE subjects of English language, English literature and maths have increased from last year. There have also been record entries into geography GCSEs this year. GCSE results also show that across the reformed subjects, 51,257 grade 9s have been awarded and attainment for a standard pass in English has risen from 24.4 per cent last year, to 31.1 per cent in England. More pupils appear to be taking their maths GCSEs at a time that is right for them as early entries in maths reduced by 64.6 per cent, but the number of entries gaining a grade 9 is at 13.3 per cent, compared to 3.5 per cent overall Minister of state for school standards, Nick Gibb has congratulated pupils. He said: “The government’s new gold‑standard GCSEs in English and maths have been benchmarked against the best in the world, raising academic standards for pupils. These reforms represent another step in our drive to raise standards, so that pupils have the knowledge and skills they need to compete in a global workplace. “The fruits of these reforms will be seen in the years to come, but already pupils and teachers are rising to the challenge with more than 50,000 top 9 grades awarded across the new GCSEs and more than two-thirds of entries sitting the tougher English and maths exams securing a grade 4 or C and above – a standard pass.”

READ MORE: tinyurl.com/yavojz63

READ MORE: tinyurl.com/y8bvxcxh

GCSE RESULTS

STEM

Reformed English GCSE could be putting pupils off reading

Science GCSE entries decline

Changes to the new English Literature GCSE may be putting pupils off reading, research shows. As reported by Tes, respondents to a survey conducted by John Gordon of the University of East Anglia’s school of education have said that the approach of analysing a novel in school has distracted pupils from engaging with the story and characters. The research also found that respondents thought the new GCSE’s emphasis on studying a novel’s literary features was off-putting and confusing.

This comes following changes to the English Literature GCSE, which has scrapped coursework and ruled that exams become closed-book assessments. Instead, pupils are required to memorise details of texts and remember key quotations. The study of 165 current pupils, adults and teachers, also found that teenagers approach reading exam texts very differently from reading for pleasure. READ MORE: tinyurl.com/y8nyf3wt

Education Briefer

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION – www.educationbusinessuk.net

The number of pupils entered for the combined science GCSE this year has fallen by 27.6 per cent. There were only 960 entries for pupils aged 15 and under for GCSE sciences in comparison to 141,414 last year – showing a drop of 99.3 per cent. Schools used to enter pupils for combined science at the end of Year 10 and additional science at the end of Year 11. However, Ofqual said this summer that many pupils who would normally have sat the exam at the age of 15 were waiting until next year to take the new 9 to 1 combined science or 9 to 1 separate sciences. Figures also show that the proportion of A* to C grades in GCSE science has fallen by 4.9 percentage points compared to last year. The proportion of A* to A grades dropped by 1.8 percentage points compared to 2016. READ MORE: tinyurl.com/y9u78lgk

Volume 22.7 | EDUCATION BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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NEW APPOINTMENT

Education and Skills Funding Agency has new CEO appointed Eileen Milner has been appointed the new Chief Executive of the Education and Skills Funding Agency (ESFA). She will replace Peter Lauener, who has been in post since April, and will take over at the end of November. The ESFA is an executive agency of the DfE that is accountable for funding education and training for children, young people and adults. Eileen began her career in education and according to the Department for Education (DfE), she is a proven leader who brings extensive skills and experience gained from working in a range of roles across government as well as the public and private sector. This includes experience at a senior level at the Care Quality

Commission, where she is currently the executive director of customer and corporate services, as well as Northgate Information Solutions – a software and

services business with a large presence in UK public services. READ MORE: tinyurl.com/ya7vax2j

ADMISSIONS

One in four parents move house to be in desired school catchment area Twenty-four per cent of parents with school age children have either bought or rented a new property in order to obtain an address within their chosen school catchment area. According to new research from Santander Mortgages, one in five (20 per cent) of these parents have had to change jobs in order to get their children into the school of their choice. In addition, the research shows that families are prepared to spend an extra 12 per cent for their chosen school catchment address, adding £26,800 to the average UK property price.

Forty-four per cent of all families who move to a certain catchment area say they will leave as soon as a school place is secured. This figure rises to two-thirds (66 per cent) for parents in London. One in four (25 per cent) admit they overstretched themselves, paying more for the property than they could realistically afford and 26 per cent moved to a location that was far away from family or friends. The bank’s study suggests that the moves made by many of these families are temporary, with only 26 per cent planning to

continue living in the area once their child leaves school. Amongst families who have moved to be within their desired catchment area, 51 per cent said they had sold their previous property and purchased a new one within their chosen area. Three in 10 (30 per cent) said they purchased a second home in the catchment area, while 19 per cent secured their desired address by renting a property. Miguel Sard, managing director of mortgages, Santander UK said: “Living within a certain school catchment area is top of the wish list for many families but often these addresses come at a premium. Our study highlights the significant financial and lifestyle sacrifices that parents are making to be within the catchment area of a desired school.” READ MORE: tinyurl.com/ybu732qx

GRADES

England’s GCSE pass marks need to be pushed upwards to compete

Education Briefer

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION – www.educationbusinessuk.net

Researchers from the Education Policy Institute have said that England’s GCSE pass marks need to change in order to match achievement in Asia. Changes to the GCSE grading system means that, for the first time, pupils will be graded numerically – 9 to 1 – opposed to the traditional A* to G. However, there will be two different pass marks with grade 4 as a “standard” pass and grade 5 as a “strong” pass. Researchers say that pupils will need to be getting a grade 5 in order to match global rivals such as Singapore, Hong Kong, Japan and South Korea. At the moment, researchers state that only 40 per cent of pupils in state schools have achieved this “world‑class standard”. In order to keep up in maths, over a third of pupil will need to get high grades and an average above grade 5. READ MORE: tinyurl.com/ybuu2nlq

QUALIFICATIONS

Reformed GCSEs could benefit boys over girls Changes to GCSEs could push boys further ahead in maths and close the gap with girls in English. According to leading academic, Professor Smithers, director of the Centre for Education and Employment Research and the University of Buckingham, the gap between boys and girls could become smaller in the reformed English GCSE. Professor Smithers also states that boys could pull further ahead of girls in the new maths GCSE. Pupils collecting their GCSE results this year will now be graded from nine to one, opposed to A* to G. Last years results showed that boys had a slight lead of 0.5 percentage points over girls at A* to C in maths. However, girls were 15.9 percentage points in front of boys in English. READ MORE: tinyurl.com/y96d8xfs

Volume 22.7 | EDUCATION BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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INSPECTIONS

Ofsted to be investigated by the National Audit Office

An investigation assessing whether the watchdog Ofsted inspects schools efficiently and effectively is being conducted by the National Audit Office (NAO). The investigation will conclude in spring next year, Tes has reported, and will also look at how the extent which Ofsted’s approach to school inspection is providing taxpayers with value for money. The NAO will look at if the watchdog inspects its schools in an efficient manner, knows whether its inspections

are having a positive impact and will see if Ofsted is well-placed to inspect schools efficiently and effectively. In regards to the investigation, an Ofsted spokesperson told Tes: “As an inspectorate and regulator ourselves, Ofsted values independent scrutiny. We welcome the study, and look forward to working closely with the NAO.” READ MORE: tinyurl.com/y8opsgph

ADULT LEARNING

Government set to cancel Learndirect contracts The Department for Education has said that it will withdraw all funding from the adult training provider Learndirect following a report into its poor standards. According to The Guardian, the firm has paid out tens of millions of pounds to its owners despite a decline in standards since it was privatised by David Cameron’s coalition government in 2011. Learndirect had sought a court injunction to prevent the publication of a highly critical report by Ofsted. In its application, the firm stated that the publication could lead to the withdrawal of government funding which could collapse the firm into administration. However, FE Week successfully had the reporting restriction lifted and the government plan to cancel all contracts as a result. Angela Rayner, shadow education secretary, told The Guardian: “It is clear that something has gone seriously wrong since the coalition government privatised this service, and the future education and training of thousands is now at risk. “If necessary, ministers should be prepared to step in directly and ensure that trainees and apprentices are protected, their courses are completed and adult education is placed on a sustainable footing. Relentless cuts and incompetence by successive Tory governments have left adult education in a mess.” Learndirect, however, challenged its Ofsted inspections over concerns that it did not give a true reflection of the company’s training quality and performance. A spokesman for the firm told The Guardian: “Learndirect Limited’s underlying business remains stable and we continue to be focused on supporting our learners as usual.”

Education Briefer

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION – www.educationbusinessuk.net

READ MORE: tinyurl.com/y95k93na

GCSE SUBJECTS

Vocational GCSEs may be leaving girls at an “educational disadvantage” Girls who take applied subjects like health and social care at GCSE may be facing educational disadvantage as a result, research shows. According to researchers from the Centre for Longitudinal Studies and the UCL Institute of Education, young people who took applied GCSEs were less likely to stay on at A-level and to take ‘facilitating’ A-levels favoured by prestigious universities. Vocational subjects appeared to put both boys and girls at a disadvantage, even after taking into account the fact that less privileged young people and those with lower prior Key Stage test scores were more likely to take applied subjects at GCSE. The figures come from analysis from a Next Steps study of 16,000 people born

in England in 1989-90, and from the National Pupil Database. The research was funded by the Nuffield Foundation and the Economic and Social Research Council. This disadvantage linked to applied GCSEs was particularly strong for girls. In particular, the researchers found that girls studying applied GCSEs were less likely to take ‘facilitating’ A-levels such as the sciences and maths. These findings suggest that girls could be held back if their schools encourage them to take those options. Vanessa Moulton, the lead author of the research paper, published by CLS, said applied subjects can be particularly unhelpful for girls who want to progress in education: “Applied subjects are particularly

strongly gendered, with girls and boys taking completely different subjects. “Essentially what you see is predominantly working class girls taking subjects such as health and social care, which do not necessarily enhance their future prospects. Boys are more likely to take subjects such as engineering or information and communication technology, which may be less limiting post-16.” The research also examined whether pupils had taken ‘EBacc’ subjects for GCSE, and found pupils studying them were more likely to stay in education after 16. This was particularly true for girls. READ MORE: tinyurl.com/ya76hksn

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SCHOOL BUILDINGS

Funding for new schools in Scotland announced

A £28 million investment will be shared between four new schools in Scotland as part of the fifth phase of the £1.8 billion ‘Schools for the Future’ programme. This will take the overall number of schools being delivered to 116 and benefit over 60,000 pupils across Scotland. The programme has become available due to the Scottish Futures Trust’s (SFT) management and monitoring of the programme budget and contingency, enabling more schools to be built for the same Scottish government funding. Deputy First Minister John Swinney made the announcement during a visit to Jedburgh Grammar School, one of the schools which will be replaced. The proposals for the new

Jedburgh Intergenerational Campus include sports facilities and a community hub, alongside education provision for two to 18 year-olds. Mr Swinney said: “We originally aimed to build or refurbish 55 schools across Scotland at the outset of the programme in 2009 and have now more than doubled that commitment. “These new buildings will provide children and young people with inspiring learning environments and some also include facilities for wider community benefit and use that will be enjoyed by generations to come.” The four new school projects will see Jedburgh Intergenerational Campus replace Jedburgh Grammar School,

Parkside and Howdenburn Primary Schools, in the Scottish Borders; Sighthill Community Campus will replace St Stephen’s Primary School and St Kevin’s Primary School in Glasgow; and Underbank Primary School and Lanarkshire will both be replaced. Deputy First Minister John Swinney

READ MORE: tinyurl.com/yb6jwxet

MENTAL HEALTH

School exclusion could lead to mental health problems Pupils who have been excluded can develop a range of disorders such as anxiety, depression and behavioural problems, a new study shows. According to research from the University of Exeter, students who have faced exclusion can also be subject to long-term

psychiatric problems and distress. The research, which was published in the journal ‘Psychological Medicine’, found that over 5,000 pupils had a “bi-directional association” between psychological distress and exclusion meaning that pupils with health problems like

depression, ADHD and anxiety were more likely to be excluded. However, pupils who had no previous record of mental health issues, but had been excluded, were more likely than their classmate to experience psychological stress later in life. One of the researchers, Claire Parker, commented: “Although an exclusion from school may only last for a day or two, the impact and repercussions for the child and parents are much wider. “Exclusion often marks a turning point during an ongoing difficult time for the child, parent and those trying to support the child in school.” The report concluded that support for pupils whose “behaviour challenges school systems is important” and that “timely intervention may prevent exclusion from school, as well as future psychopathology”. READ MORE: tinyurl.com/ydgyrc46

SALARIES

Teachers claiming in‑work support could lose out following benefit changes

Education Briefer

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION – www.educationbusinessuk.net

A single parent-of-two claiming in-work support and working full-time as a teacher could be over £3,700 worse off a year in 2018-19, research shows. This is compared with 2011‑12, Tes has reported. The research conducted by the House of Commons Library shows that workers in the public and private sector are experiencing stagnating wages and a reduction of in-work benefits. It shows that a single parent to two who works full-time as a teacher and is a new claimant to universal credit will be nearly £4,000 worse off in 2018-19. Universal credit brings a number of welfare payments together into one social security payment in order to make the system easier to use. However, it has had a number of changes since 2013 including cuts to work allowances and a four-year freeze on rates paid to claimants. READ MORE: tinyurl.com/yc628kwv

CURRICULUM

Boost in popularity for Chemistry A Level Chemistry has now overtaken history as the fourth most popular A Level subject. According to the Royal Society of Chemistry, chemistry has moved up the popularity chart in A Levels, with 6.3 per cent of the total number of entrants. However, AS Levels have dropped significantly following reforms to 13 subjects which began in 2015, resulting in an average of 39.1 per cent of fewer entrants across all subjects. Changes to the system mean that 13 A Level subjects were decided by final exams, with no link to coursework or AS Levels and as a result has led to many schools choosing not to offer AS Levels or have not entered as many pupils for that qualification. A dramatic fall in entries for AS-levels across the reformed subjects includes a 55 per cent drop in entries for chemistry. READ MORE: tinyurl.com/y9svjw2m

Volume 22.7 | EDUCATION BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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The true meaning of ‘inspiring improvement’ in food procurement As a genuinely independent, family-owned and run business, allmanhall’s team provide an agile and incredibly personal approach to food procurement, specialising in Independent Education. Established 11 years ago, allmanhall apply their thorough understanding of supply chain management, commodity market movement, food inflation and market trends to benefit clients, achieving value, cost savings and efficiencies without reducing quality.

“I would like to record my gratitude for all that allmanhall does: I am so pleased they manage our catering purchasing and support us in a number of other ways in addition.”

Quite the opposite in fact; allmanhall’s hands-on approach and expert advice can improve and develop foodservice offerings and help clients win awards!

From bespoke reports and analysis to in-depth market updates and blog posts, the team’s expertise ensures market-leading insights. Clients benefit from regular updates and trends, enabling them to be aware of food pricing trends and outlooks.

Many of allmanhall’s Senior and Client Relationship Management Team come from a catering background. Their many years of experience provide unsurpassed knowledge of Schools’ foodservice needs, refined and appropriate price files, and a fully empathetic approach. The company’s approach is centred around a four-pillar structure. In addition to negotiating the best prices, whilst maintaining strong supplier relationships (value), allmanhall help clients ensure cost and administrative efficiencies are optimised through the use of a market-leading catering control platform (control).

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The final area in which allmanhall seeks to always improve things for their clients and consistently deliver is through support - something which has not gone unnoticed. The company recently won an award for its customer and staff care and has a client retention rate of over 98%.

“The mobilisation process was faultless.” - Graeme Edmonds, Head Chef

Are you ready to understand how allmanhall can help inspire improvement in food and cateringrelated procurement for your School?

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ALTERNATIVE FUNDING

s the bi g ggest challen ge

Written by Andrea Pluck

Finding new ways to boost school funds

to share catering or cleaning contracts. Not only this, the report acknowledges that schools are having to go as far as sharing staff, furniture, minibuses, as well as using qualified staff to provide fitness classes to the wider community for a fee. Speaking about the findings, Fergal Roche, CEO of The Key, commented: “These findings shed new light on the potential impact of the savings that many schools need to make. “In every area, from staffing to stationary, school leaders are having to make difficult decisions about where to cut and restrict resources to balance their Many schools are having to think of alternative ways to generate budgets, and it’s clear they anticipate funds into schools amid budget cuts, from hosting weddings to further financial challenges ahead”. Pupils at St Peter’s Catholic Primary setting up nurseries. Education Business explores this trend School, in Shoreham, is a prime example of teachers and children working together Research conducted by The Key has found been letting out their school building. One to manage the school’s finances. Reported that schools are having to think outside headteacher of a primary school in Kent by the Shoreham Herald, on one particular the box in order to generate funds into stated that the school hall is rented out most day, pupils were allowed to come in schools as budget cuts surface. Some schools nights of the week for “anything from church wearing their own clothes in exchange have hosted weddings, set up nurseries and groups to weddings, to birthday for donating classroom necessities, let out their facilities in order to fundraise. parties or language schools”. which would have otherwise Researc The Key report also shows been funded by the school. FUNDRAISING that 10 per cent of Among the items from Th h e The survey carried out by The Key shows respondents admitted donated included glue Key rev that more than two-thirds of schools are to setting up on‑site sticks, colouring pencils, 51 per c eals that facing budget cuts across England and as a nursery provision in handwriting pens, ent of s chool l e a d e rs result plan to reduce their number of support order to keep cash tissues, whiteboard c o staff. However, other schools are coming flowing and a further pens and paper. n s i d b er udget p up with other money-making tactics. 35 per cent state that Head teacher, Kate and lac ressures For example, the report reveals that they are teaming up Crees told the Shoreham k of fund 43 per cent of schools leaders say they have with nearby schools Herald that they “had E in a

Finance

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION – www.educationbusinessuk.net

Photo by Scott Webb on Unsplash

Volume 22.7 | EDUCATION BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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ednex

education career network

Ednex, The Education Career Network It’s safe to say that our education system is going through some recruitment and retention struggles right now. This has driven us to find a solution. Ednex is an innovative professional network for teachers and schools, supporting our education system for a better future. A platform to enable efficient connection between teachers and schools, in time, eliminating the need for agencies, reducing the cost to schools and increasing the available funds to pay supply to the correct scale. FIND OUT MORE If you would like more information on Ednex please visit www.ednex.co.uk or email info@ednex.co.uk

Some facts from the National Association of Head Teachers (NAHT) Conference •

For posts with a teaching and learning responsibility payment (TLR) and Special Educational Needs Coordinators (SENCOs), only 14% of respondents filled their vacancies with ease.

The growing struggle to recruit means that nearly half of schools now use recruitment agencies to recruit their permanent roles, and 69% of those said that they do so as they have failed to recruit previously. This is adding to schools’ recruitment costs which average £3,000 per vacancy but can run up to £10,000.

Overall a very high proportion (79%) of those who had advertised vacancies said recruitment was problematical; 59% recruited with a struggle and 20% were not able to recruit at all.

The main reasons given why schools struggle to recruit are the overall shortage of staff (in 52% of cases) and the suitability of staff applying for vacancies (47%).

www.ednex.co.uk


ALTERNATIVE FUNDING  to fundraise to cover a budget shortfall of approximately 4.5 per cent” and that “any final formula funding agreement will need to take this into account”. FINANCIAL CONCERN According to The Key’s findings, financial worry has spread significantly among school leaders in the last year with 51 per cent considering budget pressures and lack of funding as the biggest challenge for the coming academic year. This is in comparison to 31 per cent in 2016. In addition to this, almost half (48 per cent) of school leaders stated that they lacked confidence in their school’s ability to cover staffing costs in the next one to two years. Furthermore, 47 per cent noted that they are not confident they will be able to “resource the curriculum adequately”. Despite this, 45 per cent believe that as a result of budget constraints, it will enable “more resourcefulness in their school”. CEO Fergal Roche went on to say that “while the school funding system should not rely on entrepreneurial efforts in schools to make ends meet” there has been “more and more school leaders looking for ways to generate extra income and make better use of their funding”. He added: “What all schools can do is play to their strengths and have the confidence to think creatively about the opportunities available in their different contexts.” Respondents to The Keys survey were also asked which school funding change would have the most positive impact over the next three years. The top response was higher base‑funding rates with 29 per cent, followed by higher levels of funding for special education needs (22 per cent), and higher capital funding (15 per cent). SCHOOL ADVICE In light of the struggles that schools are experiencing financially, The Key has issued advice to schools on how they can generate additional income and make better financial decisions. According to school business manager Nazli Hussein, schools need to consider being resourceful with their staff. Hussein suggests working with schools to share services such as site finances and human resources teams with other schools – which has been taken on board by a number of schools as they begin to share catering and cleaning contracts. Employing a timetabling consultant could be helpful in maximising the efficiency of staff and room timetables, thus also making savings. In addition, he suggests outsourcing staff with specialist skills to schools that need the support but cannot afford full-time staff, and hiring volunteers. Hussein also states that schools can maximise income from the school site by hiring out school spaces. He recommends

Schools could rent out empty parking spaces to plug funding gaps

Finance

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION – www.educationbusinessuk.net

Schools that are close to public transport or local amenities are being urged to rent out spare parking spaces during the summer holidays by the online parking portal, Yourparkingspace.co.uk The firm says this will help plug any a parking goldmine. With budget school funding gaps and motorists restraints hitting hard on the in need. It believes that in England public purse strings, this could be there will be approximately 25,000 the ideal way to earn additional schools full of vacant spaces revenue from land that is effectively between July and August. vacant for six weeks or more. Yourparkingspace.co.uk estimates “And when you consider how many that if each of these schools rented out thousands of schools there are across two parking spaces from Monday to the UK, then this potentially equates Friday, for six weeks for £7 a day each, to hundreds of thousands of spare then it would raise £10.5 million over car parking spaces in July and August the summer holidays. It claims that which could be a rich source of income. this is the equivalent to the annual “Many schools are located in salary of 467 new qualified teachers. urban areas and close to town Yourparkingspace.co.uk managing centres and railway stations, making director Harrison Woods said: them ideal for car owners looking “Cash-strapped schools in the right for somewhere cheaper to park locations are potentially sitting on than a traditional car park.”

Selling items to pupils and parents can generate revenue through yearly school photos and one-off promotions of items such as hooded jumpers with pupils names on the back at the end of the school year that schools consider hiring out their car parks, IT equipment and catering facilities. Schools can create a document for marketing the facilities that they are offering for hire, and can source a database of local organisations to send the documents to in order to drum up interest in its services. For example, Cotgrave Candleby Lane Primary School hosts activities from Scouts, training sessions for local sports teams, monthly cinema nights and business meetings. Teaming up with a car boot sale organiser can help generate extra funds by charging a percentage from the earnings of car entry fees, and a varied timetable of evening and weekend adult educational classes can also bring in some much-needed cash. Hussein notes that parents can play a significant role in fundraising through participation in school fairs or other fundraising events, that also appeal to the wider community. For example, selling items to pupils and parents can generate revenue through

yearly school photos and one-off promotions of items such as hooded jumpers with pupil names on the back at the end of the school year. Hussein adds that allowing pupils to help with the design and colours may encourage them to buy the items. Emma Williams, executive director of PTA UK, added that parents can help in practical ways through volunteering to help with DIY projects over the weekend, which could remove the need to bring in contractors of more members of staff. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.thekeysupport.com

Photo by Fabian Blank on Unsplash

17


With education budget cuts and rising expenses, schools and colleges, all over the country, are struggling to manage the expense of document creation and in-house printing. Implementing a print management solution will allow your school or college to make huge savings, every month, by helping you gain a complete picture of your costs and enabling your departments and students to make better printing decisions.


£ We specialise in reducing our customers’ spend on all copying and print output. By highlighting the true costs of your school’s printing we will make recommendations on where significant savings and efficiency improvements can be made.

By carrying out a non-intrusive audit of your school’s current print resources, it is possible for us to prove how we can save you money in the long and short-term, while improving your school’s equipment reliability, staff productivity and print quality.

Our evaluations are tried and trusted, with no obligation to you.

The procedure is simple and does not take up much of your valuable time.

By assessing your print infrastructure your school or college will be able to save hundreds of pounds every month by providing a detailed overview of your costs which will enable your departments to make better printing decisions.

What is more, it makes expensive long-term contracts a thing of the past because managing your print provides flexibility. You can keep a constant check on your print equipment at all times.

The initial print audit (which is free of charge) provides a report which will identify which of your printers are being under-utilised or over-worked, allowing you to relocate your printers and multifunctional machines and improve efficiency . We can arrange for any new equipment to be installed on a rolling basis, to prevent disruption and respect your routines.

Once installed the equipment maintenance can be managed by us, through regular checks on consumables and up to date reports on usage; ideal for managing your school’s short-term to long-term print costs.

To find your local Authorised Olivetti Supplier please contact us, quoting reference: EB1

01933 420565

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STAFF PERFORMANCE

STANDARDS TRACKER – MAKING PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT EASY

Performance management should be ongoing, strategic and meaningful, therefore having a simple, easy to administer and engaging system which is also robust and transparent is paramount Drawing on nearly 20 years of experience in appraisal and performance management in schools, Educate School Services understand the changes that have seen the need for PM processes to be reviewed and enhanced. Through understanding the changes and needs of school leaders for a simple, yet effective PM solution, rather than a meaningless, once a year tick box exercise, the company discovered there was a need for a solution that ensures schools and organisations can: strategically target development priorities; provide governors and Ofsted with simple, effective summaries; make robust performance related pay decisions; and show impact of progress in the quality of teaching and learning, and school improvement targets. Educate realised it was hard to find, especially something simple and easy to use, whilst still being effective and impactful on school improvement and staff performance; and also, not too time consuming or too complex. STANDARDS TRACKER Educate wanted to make performance management easy, so they created Standards Tracker. Standards Tracker is now one of the leading online staff performance and school improvement management systems. Staff are the biggest cost of any school, upwards of 80 per cent of the budget. Protect and get the best out of your investment in them with a robust and transparent tool that transforms performance management and goes beyond appraisal. All too often, performance management and appraisal is seen by teachers as an exercise that is done to them, that doesn’t provide effective feedback or result in any career development. Standards Tracker readdresses that balance and makes performance management a two‑way process where staff feel empowered and in control of their career development. SAVE MONEY ON CPD Standards Tracker enables you to see where different strengths and weaknesses occur within all your staff – teaching, support,

20

EDUCATION BUSINESS MAGAZINE | Volume 22.7

office and operations. Good practice is shared and staff can be paired for mentoring purposes. Standards Tracker can help you to easily support your staff using the skills and talent within your own organisation. Using Standards Tracker enables you to easily identify staff with excellent practice to use the skills and talent within your school to better implement personalised and whole school CPD for other staff. As part of their own development, your strong staff members can mentor, coach and lead individuals, groups or run whole school training sessions at zero cost.  By utilising the existing talent already in your school, your CPD budget can be protected for when external provision is required. SAVE MONEY BY RETAINING STAFF  OECD studies show that 71 per cent of teachers reported a moderate or large change in their confidence as a result of feedback, and over 60 per cent reported a moderate or large change in their teaching practices and levels of job satisfaction. Standards Tracker provides a tangible source of support and guidance to staff; meaning there is no second guessing, trying to remember what was said, not knowing what is expected when and by whom, or surprises for anyone in the process. Staff feel more valued and the culture in school becomes more enabling and rewarding. Levels of job satisfaction and staff morale increase. Staff are more likely to remain in post and seek additional responsibilities in a nurturing and comfortable environment. Feedback is key, as is support when needed. Standards Tracker enables these opportunities

continuously throughout the school year and appraisal/performance management cycle. SAVE TIME Save hours and even days of administration time for your staff and school leaders, meaning they can focus on other important priorities. One headteacher told Educate that within just a few months of using Standards Tracker, they had saved over 14 hours per team leader.  Another headteacher said that Standard Tracker has saved six hours when reporting internally, and four hours when reporting to governors every time. DEMONSTRATE IMPACT The quality of teaching and learning, and effectiveness and impact of leadership and management decisions are evidenced through triangulation, assessment and feedback; matching school requirements with staff talent and expertise, as well as informing SEFs and SIPs / SDPs. The reporting functions within Standards Tracker give you solid evidence to show governors, boards and inspectors on how the school is progressing and improving against key performance indicators. Provide visual representation and evidence for the impact of CPD and performance management of staff. Request a free online demonstration and consultation to see how Standards Tracker can impact your school.L FURTHER INFORMATION Tel: 0203 422 6500 www.standardstracker.co.uk info@standardstracker.co.uk


TRAVEL PLANNING

Improving air quality around schools Many primary schools in London are located in areas where NO2 pollution exceed EU limits. With particular health risks for children, Hackney Council has started a new School Street initiative to encourage walking and cycling to school Air quality in London has improved in recent years as a result of policies to reduce emissions, primarily from road transport. However, ‘Analysing Air Pollution Exposure in London’, an independent air quality report commissioned in early 2013 by the Greater London Authority, found that there is currently significant exposure of the London population to levels of NO2 above the EU limit value.   Children are particularly at risk given their greater susceptibility to the health impact from excessive vehicular pollution, such as developing asthma. Average pollution levels within a radius of 150m around each primary school were measured, showing that a total of 433 of London’s 1,777 primary schools were located in areas where NO2 pollution exceeded EU limits. Of those 433 schools, 27 were in Hackney. MINIMISING TRAFFIC St John the Baptist Primary School was in the top 100 worst hit schools for nitrogen dioxide levels in the capital. It has been selected to launch a new scheme to remove the majority of traffic from around the school

entrance, so cutting pollution and making it safer and easier to walk and cycle to school. The vast majority of pupils already walk and cycle to school, but too many still make the journey by car. The street outside the school in Hoxton has been closed to most of the traffic in the mornings and afternoons. A street party was held on the launch day, 26 June, to show how the space can be reclaimed from the cars. It becomes a pedestrian and cycle zone from 8.30-9.15am and 3.15-4.00pm during term time. The signs fold to become covered when the zone is not in operation, i.e. during school holidays.   The scheme is supported by the majority of parents and residents who responded to the public consultation. People who live and have businesses on the street are still able to drive down the street if they register their vehicle with the council. Non‑registered vehicles entering the

street during the closures will be identified by camera and issued a fixed penalty notice. It is too early yet to have any results, but talking to parents and pupils, they are very positive about the effect of having less traffic around the school. As part of the monitoring of the scheme, the council is collecting data on how parents and pupils travel to school and taking air quality readings. An additional four more primary schools will participate in the pilot in September.

Travel Management

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION – www.educationbusinessuk.net

POSITIVE FEEDBACK Councillor Feryal Demirci, cabinet member for neighbourhoods, transport and parks, said: “I’m delighted that the majority of parents and local residents agree with our proposal to close Crondall Street during school pick‑up and drop‑off times.The vast majority of children in Hackney walk or cycle to school, but too many children still make the journey by car.” Demirci continued: “Driving children to school is bad for air quality and bad for children’s health. I hope Crondall Street will be the first of many School Streets in the borough – just one of the things thing we’re doing to try to make it safer and easier for children to walk and cycle to school.” CLEANER ROADS The road is visibly calmer, safer and cleaner during the School Street times. The council will be collecting data on how parents and pupils travel to school and taking air quality readings.  Three more School Street pilots will be consulted on later this year. One of these will be outside Tyssen Community School on Oldhill Street in Stamford Hill. CCTV footage released earlier this year shows irresponsible drivers putting pedestrians at risk by mounting the pavement right outside the school entrance. Jackie Benjamin, head teacher of Tyssen Community School, said:“Our school has, over the years, been working tirelessly to improve the safety in Oldhill Street. It has been high on the school council agenda for the last two years, as the children and their parents do not feel safe on the road outside of the school. “At pick‑up and drop‑off times there are daily altercations and also drivers will drive on to the pavement to avoid traffic which adds to our frustrations. This is the reason we welcome this initiative which could keep our community safe.” When the council has evaluated the success of the pilots, it will decide whether to roll out the scheme to other schools in the borough, although not all schools will be suitable for School Streets. L

The council be colle will c on how ting data and pup parents school ils travel to and air qual taking readingity s

FURTHER INFORMATION www.hackney.gov.uk/school‑streets

Volume 22.7 | EDUCATION BUSINESS MAGAZINE

21


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PROCUREMENT

Shopping for property services

Design & Build

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION – www.educationbusinessuk.net

Schools will be able to save money when buying property-related services through the Crown Commercial Service’s new estates framework. Education Business explains how it will work The Crown Commercial Service’s new Estates targets for reduced property occupancy. Professional Services framework agreement The framework will also allow schools to (RM3816) will enable public sector bodies, commission reports, studies and strategies such as schools, to save money to assist in the management of their estate, when buying services and help them to deliver social value. relating to their estates The framework offers a mix of The and properties. 34 national suppliers and local es t a A procurement expertise, with 35 per cent t s e new framework is an of suppliers being SMEs. k r o agreement put Lot 1 has national scope framewmplified i s in place with a s e l enab r schools to suppliers that enables buyers to way fo ices to help v place orders for buy ser to manage services without them tates and having to go through a lengthy their es sets tendering exercise. as The new estates framework enables a simplified way for schools to buy services to help them to manage their estates and assets, reduce property costs, release unwanted property assets, and identify savings and opportunities to generate income from land and buildings. The framework contains multiple lots delivered across all regions. It is expected that £430 million will be spent through the framework over the next four years by the public sector and that £35 million will be saved on procured services. Aside from schools, the framework can be used by local councils, NHS trusts, the emergency services and housing associations.

and offers access to suppliers with the capability and capacity to deliver large programmes across the UK, using in‑house resources or via a supply chain. Lot 2 consists of eight regional panels offering direct access to regional suppliers with local knowledge. Lot 3 meanwhile includes suppliers that offer services for Vertical Real Estates (VRE). This includes the administration, management, E

ONE-STOP-SHOP The new Estates Professional Services Framework Agreement replaces the previous one (RM928) and aims to provide public sector buyers with a one-stop-shop solution for professional property related services. The agreement will complement other CCS property frameworks – including project management, full design team services, facilities management, and construction – and enables CCS to provide a comprehensive offering for property management solutions. Schools will benefit by using the framework by reducing property costs, releasing unwanted property assets, identifying savings and opportunities to generate income from land and buildings, as well as meet central

Volume 22.7 | EDUCATION BUSINESS MAGAZINE

23


S+B UK Ltd, winners of The Queens Award for Enterprise

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PROCUREMENT  advice and guidance for new VRE projects or existing VRE installations. VRE is real estate comprising the space on or above a building, mast or structure that may be used for antennas, solar panels or other appliances. It also includes surfaces of the building, mast or structure that may be used for signage, advertising and other purposes, along with those services needed to support the commercial exploitation of such spaces. Lot 4 focuses on facilities management and property services (procurement managed services). This includes full end-to-end managed procurement services, procurement strategy development, and related advice. WHAT’S DIFFERENT? The new framework offers a wider range of services and provides access to vertical real estate suppliers for the first time, as well as a managed procurement offering. More SMEs have won places to supply estates services to the public sector than ever before, with a new focus on regional expertise. It also offers a more flexible pricing model than before, with various options

available to customers such as incentivised, gainshare, hourly/daily rates, and lump sum, enabling customers to tailor their contracts to meet their needs. FURTHER BENEFITS The free-to-use framework provides a streamlined route for all customers to access a comprehensive range of external suppliers through a Further Competition process or Direct Award. Further competition is estimated to take around four weeks, depending on the size and scale of the requirement. The delivery of savings is embedded into the pricing models through competitive rates and continuous improvement measures. Some of the services are incentivised based on the level of savings or additional income achieved. The quality of service delivery is another major draw. Suppliers and supplier sub contractors as part of the CCS evaluation stages have completed a financial and professional compliance review. In the case of sub‑contractors, these will be evaluated by CCS to ensure financial and professional compliance.

The new Estates Professional Services Framework Agreement replaces the previous one (RM928) and aims to provide public sector buyers with a one-stop-shop solution for professional property related services

Design & Build

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION – www.educationbusinessuk.net

Conflict of interest clauses have been enhanced in both the framework and call-off terms and conditions. This offers customers greater protection where conflicts may exist, especially where suppliers may be acting on behalf of a customer and landlord in a proposed same transaction. A robust set of Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) measure the supplier’s’ performance across time, cost and quality, and can be used to influence the fee if required. Specific KPI measures can be determined by the customer, and can be tailored to each individual customer’s specific requirements, including social value. THE CROWN COMMERCIAL SERVICE The Crown Commercial Service (CCS) was established to bring together policy, advice E

Funding for new schools in Scotland A £28 million investment will be shared between four new schools in Scotland as part of the fifth phase of the £1.8 billion ‘Schools for the Future’ programme. This will take the overall number of schools being delivered to 116 and benefit over 60,000 pupils across Scotland. Deputy First Minister John Swinney made the announcement during a visit to Jedburgh Grammar School, one of the schools which will be replaced. The proposals for the new Jedburgh Intergenerational Campus include sports facilities and a community hub, alongside education provision for two to 18 year-olds. Swinney said: “We originally aimed to build or refurbish 55 schools across Scotland at the outset of the programme in 2009 and have now more than doubled that commitment. “These new buildings will provide children and young people with inspiring learning environments and some also include facilities for wider community benefit and use that will be enjoyed by generations to come.” The four new school projects will see Jedburgh Intergenerational Campus replace Jedburgh Grammar School, Parkside and Howdenburn Primary Schools, in the Scottish Borders; Sighthill Community Campus will replace St Stephen’s Primary School and St Kevin’s Primary School in Glasgow; and Underbank Primary School and Walston Primary School in South Lanarkshire will both be replaced.

Volume 22.7 | EDUCATION BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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Design & Build Photo by Scott Webb on Unsplash

PROCUREMENT

î † and direct buying so that commercial services and goods could become available to the public sector at a reduced cost. The CCS is responsible for managing the procurement of common goods and services, so public sector organisations with similar

needs can achieve value by buying as a single customer. It improves supplier and contract management across government and increases savings for the taxpayer by centralising buying requirements for common

goods and services. The CCS also leads on procurement policy on behalf of the UK government. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.gov.uk

Exceptionally high standards Extremely tight deadlines That all-important personal touch For some this may sound like an unachievable wish list. To us it is just business as usual. To find out more about how Crystal can help you prepare and maintain your school facilities for the new educational year, call us on 0845 459 3157 or email us at info@crystal services.uk.com

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Volume 22.7 | EDUCATION BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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COMPLETE LOCKER SOLUTIONS FOR A EDUCATION

Garran Lockers has been designing, manufacturing and supplying storage lockers for Education for many years, where the quality of fully welded construction stand the test of time. The application of SteriTouch antimicrobial powder coat as a standard prevents the growth of bacteria and biofilm for the lifetime of the locker. Independently tested to be 99.99%

effective against MRSA and E.Coli.

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LOCKDOWNS

With the threat level in the United Kingdom remaining high, James Kelly, chief executive of the British Security Industry Association, discusses one particularly increasing trend in school security – lockdown procedures As staff and pupils get ready to return to school from the summer holidays, ensuring that the security procedures in place are fit for purpose should be at the top of any key decision maker’s agenda. With the threat level in the United Kingdom remaining at SEVERE, coupled with the variety of threats that schools face year round, it is absolutely essential that careful thought and planning has gone into the security measures in use within the educational establishment. Security and safety in schools is a key subject for parents and staff alike, with school officials having a duty of care and a legal responsibility to provide a safe environment. Ofsted are also taking the matter of security seriously, having placed various schools into special measures earlier this year due to lax security measures. According to BSIA member Controlsoft, Ofsted provide recommendations in ways schools should consider their security requirements and how to achieve it. One of those recommendations happens to be the use of lockdown procedures in order to provide robust security at a moment’s notice.

means the push of a panic button can send a signal to lock all doors and windows. LOCKDOWN IN ACTION As a result of this growing trend, members of the BSIA’s Access and Asset Protection Section are finding their own lockdown technology being used within a school environment. Controlsoft incorporate a lockdown function into their identity access software, which prohibits authorised users from accessing doors, as well as a sophisticated function that can allow for multiple levels of lockdown depending on the scenario. For schools, they have found that there can be a number of benefits for lockdown facilities, not just in terms of emergency situations, but for providing additional protection for the children and staff at the school, or using lockdown outside of hours in

In 20 the Nat 15, Counte ional r SecurityTerrorism provide Office to the d d guidance ev of lockdelopment proceduowns res

order to ensure that the building is safe and on site assets are protected around the clock. They have two key levels to their software: Level 1 – which suspends access rights except for authorised user groups (such as staff), and Level 2 – which suspends all access rights, and optionally, exit rights as well. The operator of the software can activate a level by the simple click of a button on the screen or by pressing a physical push‑button which can be mounted on, or under, a desk. That way, if a dangerous situation unfolds, the school can be put into Level 2 lockdown immediately and the authorities notified. BSIA member Remsdaq have seen their own lockdown technology being used internationally. After Remsdaq’s integration partner in Dubai, Leisure Secure, were awarded a contract to supply, install and commission a new integrated access control system at the Jumeirah English Speaking School (JESS) in the UAE, Remsdaq’s EntroWatch access control software was selected as a key security measure. E

Written by James Kelly, chief executive, BSIA

Does your school have a lockdown procedure?

Security

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION – www.educationbusinessuk.net

DYNAMIC LOCKDOWNS In November 2015, the National Counter Terrorism Security Office (NaCTSO) provided some official guidance in relation to the development of dynamic lockdown procedures, which are triggered in response to a fast moving incident such as a firearms or weapons attack, either directly on site or close by. The aim of such a lockdown is to restrict access and egress to a building – or areas of it – through physical measures. This requires identifying all access and exit points, which can be more than just doors and gates, and integrating them with access control technology in order to secure these areas as quickly as possible. Panic hardware can be fitted to doors and windows throughout a school’s premises, with the hardware being capable of self‑locking or self-latching. If a lockdown is then required, the integration of the hardware with access control technology

Volume 22.7 | EDUCATION BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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Keeping children safe in education with STANLEY Security responsive lockdown solution Teaching unions are now urging schools to be prepared for emergency situations. Typically, incidents are over in five minutes, school leaders need a solution that allows them to respond rapidly to a situation to safeguard students and staff before help can arrive. Providing a safe, secure learning environment within the constraints of today’s budgets and regulations is a challenge, STANLEY Security offers integrated state of the art security solutions that help meet that challenge.

For more information visit - stanleysecurity.co.uk or call 0844 254 0032

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LOCKDOWNS  The software itself was chosen for its comprehensive management suite, which includes the reporting of pupil attendance as well as total security management from a single software platform. Biometric technology is used to permit access, with fingerprint templates and point-of-entry controllers being used at access controlled turnstile entrances, staff rooms and classrooms. A key feature of the EntroWatch is its global lockdown facility, which allows for the securing of a combination of doors instantly at the click of a button. Remsdaq developed this feature in response to the increase in demand for enhanced building security in schools and universities. In order for lockdown procedures to be efficient, the establishment must have an access control system that is able to rapidly react to, and contain, a breach or threat. Remsdaq’s lockdown feature overrides any current door states – such as those that are open during school hours – and prohibits the selected doors from being released locally by either card, request to exit devices or remotely via Entrowatch control until the lockdown is completely reset. A SAFE ENVIRONMENT Another BSIA member, Gallagher Security, have also seen their lockdown technology being used internationally in the Harrisburg school district in South Dakota, USA, which educates almost 4,000 students across eight schools. Gallagher’s central management platform, Command Centre, was selected as the only solution that could meet the district’s security requirements. Command Centre was put to the test in October 2015 when the local high school was the target of a shooting. The incident resulted in one staff member being injured, but luckily was prevented from escalating further due to Command Centre being activated by staff. Logs from the incident confirm that from the time the emergency

Security

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One of the most important factors of the security procurement process is that the solution is chosen from a reputable supplier that meets with the relevant British and European standards for their products and services button was pressed, it took just four seconds for Command Centre to lock all outside doors, notify district authorities and limit building access to emergency responders only. Harrisburg understood their responsibility to provide a safe and secure environment, and partnering with Gallagher provided them with the flexibility to employ customised features tailored to their specific requirements. Gallagher and South Dakota based company, Integrated Technology & Security, installed a fully integrated, digitally based, user-friendly system that assisted – not replaced – their existing manual security procedures. Key features of the security solution included an outlook calendar integration to enable scheduling of access for special events, intercom / phone integration to control doors from a desktop icon or smartphone, strobe light control to provide lockdown notifications in hearing impaired areas such as deaf education, shops and the gym, and an intercom integration for lockdown announcements. Command Centre provides enterprise level lockdown controls which limit access to buildings, control fire doors and send notifications, while providing an audit trail and video alerts. While initially only office and administrative staff were trained in the use of lockdown systems, as the system developed, all members of staff are now able to control access in individual school buildings. If a lockdown has been activated, a notification is automatically

issued to district authorities, immediately alerting emergency services if required. CHOOSING A QUALITY PRODUCT With effective access control and lockdown measures being of such high importance in today’s day and age, perhaps one of the most important factors of the security procurement process is that the solution is chosen from a reputable supplier that meets with the relevant British and European standards for their products and / or services. Members of the BSIA’S Access and Asset Protection Section all offer a reputable service and have a wealth of experience in providing their products within the education sector. In fact, the section will shortly be publishing a guide to aid key decision makers in fully understanding the capabilities and added value benefits of installing electronic and physical access control measures in schools. The guide provides school officials with a useful summary of the options available, as well as real world examples of where access control measures have proven instrumental in schools. In addition, the guide also contains a helpful floorplan to demonstrate key areas within a school where physical and electronic access control measures can be best placed. The guide will soon be available to download free of charge on the BSIA’s website. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.bsia.co.uk

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DATA PROTECTION

The recent cyber attack on the NHS showed the disruption that can be caused when systems go down. With schools increasingly relying on technology and the internet, what can they do to protect themselves and the data they hold? Picture the scene. It’s Tuesday morning and provide services to our clients – children – we your highest performing students have just need to ensure that our computer systems left on a school trip. Across the rest of the and data storage methods are resilient. school, it’s business-as-usual. Your staff and What it all really comes down to is; when pupils are being registered for the day. something goes wrong, how long will Your office administrator comes in. it take you to resolve the issue and get They can’t access the School Information your systems back up and running? Management System (SIMS). Children start arriving. They say their teacher WHAT ARE THE THREATS? can’t login and register them. In information security we talk Never mind, you’ll switch about threats not risks. A e r o M to manual. Your office threat is a potential cause , r e administrator goes to of an unwanted incident than evt the a print out the sheets. which may result in s i data ur world. They return shortly harm to a system fo o t e after – they can’t login or organisation. r e t n n ce n inter to their computer to Broadly speaking, o y l e r o t We s access the printouts and threats fall under one n o i t connec rvices and of these categories: when you try, the printer se won’t print them. Then non-malicious, meaning deliver mation to you get locked out too. user error through r info You then get a call from being careless or poor people your staff member who’s training; or malicious, with the children on a trip. Can meaning a wide range of you get in touch with Crystal’s mum threats such as fraud, sabotage, – Crystal’s not feeling well? Well. Can you? cyber-crime and phishing etc. What about if someone (an Ofsted There are natural threats such as inspector for example) needs access to earthquakes, floods and fires; man-made some data on pupil performance? Can threats such as civil disorders, wars and you provide this if all your workstations terrorist attacks. As well as technology are locked and cannot be unlocked? specific vulnerabilities through software, The above scenario could easily hardware and networking equipment. occur if a ransomware, or other A vulnerability can happen in any one of cyber-attack was successful. these threat categories. In the case of the WannaCry HOW RESILIENT IS YOUR SCHOOL? attack, the software (Windows In tackling cyber-risk, resilience is a key word. XP) had a security ‘flaw’ Resilience is the capacity to recover (vulnerability) and the attack quickly from difficulties; toughness. exploited that flaw to gain access to Many of you may recall the recent the system and encrypt users’ data. WannaCry attack on the NHS, which may It doesn’t take long for this topic to have personally affected you, in the form get complicated, does it? The language of of a delay or cancellation to an operation information security and data protection is or medical support. This wide‑scale bewildering for some. This can make it difficult global attack had an impact on many to know which way to turn and what to do. organisations, not just the NHS. It’s for this reason that South West Grid Whilst the NHS may have been able to for Learning (SWGfL) created 360data. recover, in this instance relatively rapidly, for 360data builds on the success of SWGfL’s a period services were seriously impacted. multi-award winning self-review tools to Now, more than ever before, data is at guide you step by step through the journey to the centre of our world. We often rely on data compliance and beyond. It enables you technology and internet connections to deliver to rate where your organisation is against a services and information to people. In order to maturing set of descriptors for each aspect; it

then shows you how to make the next steps and provides the resources to make it happen. It becomes a living, breathing, development plan that maps your strategy towards the safe and responsible use of information and data. Find out more at 360data.org.uk.

Written by South West Grid for Learning

Is your school resilient to cyber risk?

Cyber Security

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WHAT CAN I DO ABOUT IT? There are many different approaches to securing data for your organisation or school. Unfortunately a one-size-fits-all approach doesn’t really work. All schools have a variety of technology, policy, infrastructure and contractual relationships. However, there are some things all schools can do to begin an improvement journey in data protection. To help you build a package that protects your school, its 360data tool and soon‑to‑be‑launched information security micro-site bring together many ideas, solutions. PREVENTATIVE Training in our sister tool 360safe, schools in 2016 recorded that a consistently weak area of online safety is staff training. It could be argued that this can be applied to data protection too. Have you ever trained your staff with regards to their obligations under the data protection act? Your staff have access to, arguably, some E

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Cyber Security

www.educationbusinessuk.net – THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION

DATA PROTECTION  of the most sensitive data about children. With this level of access to data, it’s easy to become blasé about its value. Staff need regular training to re-enforce the importance of good data protection procedures. Auditing also helps data security. Do you know where you data is? Whilst we may think we know, when was the last time you asked your staff where they store data? With the range of cloud storage solutions available it’s easy to unintentionally share data. If you know what data goes where, then you can begin to control the risk of that data being shared. Policy is also important. SWGfL’s annual report highlighted that 34 per cent of UK schools do not have a data protection policy. A clear data protection policy that helps staff know what their obligations are and how to perform them can be invaluable in securely protecting your data. Do you have a policy? When was it last reviewed? Have all staff be trained on it? Have all staff read it? Another important aspect is to involve governors. This can be a great source of support and expertise. Not only that, but as part of the senior leadership team, they too have a responsibility for school data. Looking at the technological side, this section covers a wide range of areas, passwords, anti-virus/malware, monitoring of hacking attempts, asset management, encryption. It’s here that having a good, supportive and responsive technology partner is vital. What percentage of your annual budget do you allocate to technology? Is that sufficient? Think about this. If your bank spent that percentage on protecting your data, would you be satisfied with your bank? It’s worthwhile mentioning backup processes here too. A carefully considered backup routine cannot be over emphasised. If all else fails, a good, off-site backup copy (that has been tested) can literally save the day. REACTIVE Disaster recovery should be considered. There are a variety of disaster recovery plans in schools right now, but all too often these overlook your data. Perhaps more importantly when it comes to data protection, they’ve never been tested. Again, imagine the situation we started with – you go to your backup provider and restore. Only when you look at the data you realise that for the last six months there has been an error and only 25 per cent of your data is backed up. Now you have a potential disaster. Of course disaster recovery is more than that, it’s also about your servers, the ability of the school to recover from a flood, or a serious fire. It’s about recognising which of your systems are ‘core’ (you cannot run a school without them) and which are less important. It’s hard to see an argument that can explain why your pupil information is not core? Another important area is incident management. Once you’ve reached crisis point, how do you manage that? It may seem silly, but creating a press plan and a response process can avoid a lot of stress and headaches. Consider the difference between a school that refers all queries to one, well-briefed person and the school where every staff member comments and voices an opinion. Finally, please remember insurance. Whilst this may also fit in the preventative section, it’s worth checking if you have cyber-risk insurance that works for you. Check the policy wording covers what you need it to and that the amount underwritten is sufficient for your school or organisation. Using a large, reputable firm is a good idea. MOVING ON Of course, in an article like this, it’s only really possible to scratch the surface of a topic as broad, complicated and varied as data protection. We haven’t covered topics like mobile devices, paper systems, appropriate transfer to third parties – just to name a few. But the above list is a good starting point for discussion and action planning. NEW DATA PROTECTION REGULATION It’s imperative to understand the impending shift in legislation. By May 2018 the UK will have new data protection regulations.

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EDUCATION BUSINESS MAGAZINE | Volume 22.7

By May 2018 the UK will have new data protection regulations and will apply to schools. Although the UK legislation has not yet been passed, broadly speaking we know what to expect This will apply to schools. Although the UK legislation has not yet been passed, broadly speaking we know what to expect. The advice above remains sound advice, even in the light of GDPR. The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) is working hard to raise awareness of GDPR and the shift in expectations. BACK TO SCHOOL Returning to the scenario we started with, but this time in a better prepared school, we might begin to see a change in response. Firstly, we’d hope that the improvement in systems would better insulate against an attack and that staff training would further reduce the likelihood. But if this better prepared school did find themselves in the situation, there would be; an incident response toolkit directing their decisions, a sound backup routine protecting data, a technology partner that is there for them when they need them. In short a more resilient environment. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.swgfl.org.uk

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INTERNET SAFETY

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There are specific requirements in the curriculum statements that cover all aspects of e-safety, but these permeate into other computing requirements, and indeed across the whole curriculum With the advent of the 2014 computing curriculum, the issue of e-safety has been brought sharply into focus. The National Curriculum for England states that KS1 should use technology safelty and respectfully, keeping personal information private and identifying where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies. KS2 should use search technologies effectively and appreciate how esults are selected and ranked, while be descerning in evaluation digital content. For KS3, pupils need to understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; recognising inappropriate content, contact and conduct and knowing how to report concerns. KS4 should understand how changes in technology affect safety, including new ways to protect their online privacy and identity, and how to identify and report a range of concerns. E-SAFETY IN SCHOOLS The delivery of e-safety in schools should happen more than for just a few days each February. This E-Safety week is a good time to focus on certain aspects of e-safety, and to run a series of dedicated activities, but the day-to-day messages need to be getting through to the children every time they use technology. If children are creating mobile apps that will be downloadable by parents, what are the e-safety implications? If they are creating a narrated slideshow about World War II, do they understand about copyright when saving images from the Internet? Outside organisations can help with this, and teachers will discover a wealth of resources from groups such as CEOP or the NSPCC. We must realize, though, that e-safety is a broad church, covering everything from sexual exploitation and online grooming, to discerning Internet research and copyright issues. This does not necessarily mean that teaching e-safety should be done in isolation, but that the message relevant to what the children are doing across the wider curriculum. Attendees at EduTech 2017 will discover

a wealth of resources and practical advice for strengthening their e-safety messages and delivery in school. There are no fewer than nine e-safety themed sessions across the two days of the conference. The speakers and workshop leaders come from a range of organisations and associations, including: NAHT, ChildNet, E-Safety Training, Engage E-Safety and Gooseberry Planet. We will also hear from practitioner Laura Knight of Birkhamstead School. WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS Those who are looking to further strengthen their policies and practice will do well to attend as many of these sessions as they can. Topics and themes will include: delivering the National Curriculum requirements; involving, engaging and supporting parents; current union advice; empowering children and teachers with a common sense approach; developing links between practical strategies and safeguarding principles moving beyong ‘box-ticking’; peer-to-peer strategies; supporting young people with sexting and cyberbullying; moving towards Ofsted ‘Outstanding’; and addressing online-safety though gamification and mobile apps. In addition, there will be a sesson on compliance with Keeping Children Safe

in Education (KCSIE) (www.gov.uk/ government/uploads/system/uploads/ attachment_data/file/550511/Keeping_ children_safe_in_education.pdf) What is clear is that, as we move further and further towards digital learning environments, where our students are encouraged to create and publish digital content, in environments which utilise the power of the Internet in such a way that it becomes commonplace, the need for them to become responsible digital citizens becomes stronger. Children are far more comfortable using new and emerging technology than are many teachers. What they rarely do, however, is question what the implications are of what they are doing. Teachers have the job to encourage this questioning so that children have a greater understanding and are equipped with the tools they need to help them deal with uncomfortable or tricky situations which may arise, both in and out of school. The seminars, workshops and master classes at EduTech 2017 seek to address many issues surrounding e-safety in both primary and secondary schools and are expected to be some of the stand-out sessions of the event. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.edutechshow.co.uk

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IT & Computing

EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY

Written by Caroline Wright, director general for BESA

Unleashing the potential of EdTech The start of a new school year is a favourable time to review technology trends in education and consider those that will help you achieve your learning and teaching goals, writes Caroline Wright, director general for BESA September. It can feel a bit nostalgic, can’t it? Summer holidays are over, children and teachers back at school. An opportune time to reflect on what has been achieved and what is yet to be done. It’s a favourable moment to review technology trends in education, trends that can help you achieve your teaching and learning goals. Growing in stature in the last few years, education technology (EdTech) is here to stay. And it has to answer some pretty hard questions and solve some pretty real issues: is EdTech easy for teachers to use? Is it reducing the attainment gap? Is it introducing new methods of learning? And, crucially, is it working – is EdTech helping drive school improvement? For more than 25 years, the British Educational Suppliers Association (BESA) has carried out annual surveys on ICT use in UK schools. The 2017 report, published in June, focused on the types of EdTech used in English-maintained schools and the

impact they have on management, teaching and learning.

them also use cross-curricular EdTech content solutions. The secondary schools overwhelmingly (81 per cent) use EdTech content solutions for maths, 58 per cent for reading and 47 per cent for modern languages. While 42 per cent of the secondary schools say the benefits of content solutions are “very important”, not all of the schools reported seeing time and cost benefits from using EdTech. The lack of connectivity and budget represent common barriers to using EdTech solutions. The survey highlighted a different challenge, too. Senior leaders and headteachers identified willingness to use EdTech and teacher understanding of the benefits of EdTech solutions as the main issues facing the implementation of EdTech in the classroom. This finding sheds light on the need for more CPD for teachers, as many teachers do not feel confident enough using new technology with children. It is vital that schools invest time in allowing staff to get to grips with tech. E

Growin in statu g USING EDUCATIONAL educati re, TECHNOLOGY on technol The research found o g y is here to stay that almost all a n d i (96.5 per cent) t that sch i ools invs vital of the 545 t e ime to primary schools allow s st in and all of the 252 ta to get t secondary schools o grips ff who responded to the with it survey use a management information system. Among those secondary schools, 89 per cent use a learning management solution and 85 per cent use a parental communications solution and an assessment system. Primary schools mostly use EdTech content solutions for reading (70 per cent) and maths (67 per cent); 86 per cent of

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EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY

BESA’s resource our schools campaign

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The British Educational Suppliers Association (BESA) has launched a campaign to highlight the impact of the sharp drop in resources expenditure in UK schools over the past two years. The Resource Our Schools initiative, which has already attracted support from the National Association of Head Teachers (NAHT) and numerous subject associations, comes following procurement research published by BESA that shows that primary schools are spending 3.7 per cent less on resources than last year. It also shows that secondary schools are spending 5.7 per cent less. ICT in secondary schools is being hit the hardest, with a year‑on-year decline in expenditure of 7.5 per cent. The research, undertaken with a representative sample of 906 school leaders by the National Education Research Panel (NERP), reveals that 53 per cent of primary schools and 52 per cent of secondary schools say their school is not adequately funded to provide a suitable teaching and learning environment. Seventy-nine per cent of primary leaders and 92 per cent of secondary leaders also say they are not optimistic about future funding for their schools. The campaign is intended to highlight the importance of ensuring that every school has access to the resources they need to deliver the education that children deserve. Schools, parents, suppliers and general election candidates will be encouraged to sign up to the Resource Our Schools statement, available here; www.besa.org.uk

Children with dyslexia can now use a range of technological solutions to help them read, without being at a disadvantage against other students  Another solution to increase the effective use of EdTech in the classroom is the presence of an EdTech champion in schools: someone to act as an in-house advocate of technology and its trouble-shooter, leading technology adoption across the school. With the capacity to reduce teachers’ workload and increase their teaching capacity, as well as improve children’s learning experience and their educational outcomes, EdTech can, when used to support school’s strategy

and vision, lead to workload efficiencies. However, with their ever-shrinking budgets, schools must be sure of the efficacy of EdTech before investing, in order not to waste money that could be better used elsewhere. ASSESSING THE EFFICACY OF EDTECH And there’s the challenge, our research shows, that teachers felt they lacked information about what EdTech solutions are available and how to assess the efficacy of EdTech.

Only 11 per cent of the primary and 10 per cent of the secondary schools said they “definitely” have sufficient information to assess the efficacy of EdTech systems or content solutions. Most turn to teachers in and outside of their school to ask for recommendations on using an EdTech solution or another. Currently, suppliers are trying to fill the gap by investing in stronger, long-term relationships with schools. This way they can ask schools for constructed feedback and improve their offer regularly, a virtuous circle of schools and industry working together. EDTECH TO SUPPORT LEARNING Exploring EdTech and the need to assess its efficacy prompts broader questions relating to how we measure learning, which is a process E

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EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY  that EdTech has the power to radically change. Many EdTech solutions give teachers the opportunity to record children in real time, so that they can see learning as it happens and input that in their assessment of the child. For exams, too, we could make better use of EdTech. While exams are still taken using pen and paper – which is archaic in our digital world – including technology in exam sittings could massively reduce administrative time and make marking quicker and more efficient. In addition, EdTech resources can help reduce the stress levels of disadvantaged children and children with disability during exams. The Joint Council for Qualifications recognised this and included EdTech solutions in the Access Arrangements and Reasonable Adjustments in 2015. For example, children with dyslexia can now use a range of technological solutions to help them read, without being at a disadvantage against other students. Homework represents another area of children’s lives where EdTech could improve their experience. Instead of doing their homework alone, children could work together through collaborative online platforms. They would then be helping each other rather than reproducing inequalities – some having help from their parents. Of course, schools and government will need to address social inequalities by ensuring

Many EdTech solutions give teachers the opportunity to record children in real time, so that they can see learning as it happens and input that in their assessment of the child, and including technology in exam sittings could massively reduce administrative time disadvantaged pupils have access to tech outside of school, another challenge in itself. WHAT’S NEXT FOR BESA AND EDTECH? I look forward to the day we stop talking about EdTech. That day will be when these challenges have been addressed and when schools feel confident enough to use EdTech, both in supporting back-office functions to reduce workload and across the range of teaching and learning at all ages and in all subjects. That day is some way away. In the meantime, at BESA, we are committed to working with members of the global EdTech eco-system, UK EdTech suppliers, the Department for Education’s EdTech team, the Department for International Trade and school leaders to help ensure that technology that supports teaching and learning is given the attention it deserves. Last month, we became delivery

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partners of the EU-funded EDUCATE project, based at the University College London. Bringing together educators, researchers and the EdTech industry, it aims to help companies use research evidence to inform the design of their products and services and demonstrate their effectiveness. We at BESA are passionate about helping to improve educational outcomes for children across the country and around the world. And we will do everything we can to help showcase and work with suppliers of educational technology that share that ethos and are committed to driving school improvement. To work with us, see below for more information. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.besa.org.uk

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AV & MOBILE TECHNOLOGY

Technology is changing all the time. But what remains the same is the need for an IT strategy that considers the desired outcomes for learners and teachers, writes Neil Watkins from Think IT As the former programme manager for Every Child Matters (ECM), I’m a great believer in ‘outcomes’. And I also believe that technology can improve these outcomes, not just for learners, but also for teachers. However, not everyone shares my belief. I was recently told by the chief executive of a Multi-Academy Trust (MAT) that technology in the classroom was a waste of time; a distraction that had no influence on learner outcomes. His view was that only teachers can improve outcomes. To a certain extent, I agreed with him, but the important point he was missing is that you have to give teachers the tools to do the job. And these tools are changing daily. It was around 2007 that there was an injection of ring fenced funding from the government to implement audio visual (AV) technology into classrooms. Today, much of this technology is still in place; which is part of the problem. KEYSTONE SETTINGS We’ve all walked into a classroom which has an old projector mounted on the ceiling; its fan noisily whirring away, pumping out lots of heat but not much light. Old bulbs lose up to 50 per cent of their brightness over time, but because it’s a gradual degradation this is not always noticed. In other schools, we often see that the image on the screen is slightly blurred, or not square and in a trapezoid shape. This is purely because schools have not received the correct training of how to follow the simple steps to change the keystone settings. If you are a teacher struggling to get the screens to work because the technologies are incompatible (new laptops won’t work with old screens or projectors because the software hasn’t been updated), you are not alone.

I’ve even seen classrooms where the wires are hanging down from the ceiling. On top of this, the cost of getting an AV engineer to visit the school, and the cost of replacement bulbs can be more than the price of a new projector and therefore poor projected images is something schools have grown to accept as ‘normal’. TECHNOLOGY CHANGES But technology is changing all the time. If you think about the mobile phones of ten years ago compared to today, the difference in size, speed and usability is tremendous. The same is true with AV. Sadly though, people don’t think about technology improvements in the same way. The developments in wireless technology means those dangling cables are no longer required, and multiple devices can be connected at the same time. Interactive technologies (whether this is wall‑mounted screens, interactive tables or even interactive projectors) have changed how teachers teach and how learners both learn and collaborate. And it’s not just the hardware that is evolving. The software is also refining at an incredible pace. New features including seamless integration with learner devices are enabling co-creation, collaboration and formative assessments, all of which are designed to save teachers’ time and help them to be more creative in how they teach. I believe teachers will continue to develop their classroom teaching and learning practice as the technology develops; this is both a development of good pedagogy alongside a fundamental paradigm shift due to the changes in technology in the classroom.

Written by Neil Watkins, Think IT

Equipping teachers with tech tools

AV TECHNOLOGY When we talk about AV, most people only think about projectors and interactive boards. What schools need to start thinking about is the latest AV technology which is taking learning by storm: virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR). Google Explore is one of Google’s latest releases that is set to become a staple in most schools. This new tool is already creating the ‘wow’ factor whenever it’s used for the first time. The excitement it causes will undoubtedly inspire growth in schools in the coming years. Microsoft is taking a different approach, with its HoloLens headset which blends real and virtual realities in what they call Mixed Reality (MR). At present, many senior leaders in education see VR, AR and MR as a distraction, because the learning benefits are yet to be proven, but what is clear, is that there will be a push‑pull effect that makes their introduction into mainstream teaching almost inevitable; the ‘push’ from the software giants, wanting to promote the take-up of their products, and the ‘pull’ of learners keen to use “cool stuff” in their school. Look out for Google Explore. If we look slightly wider than the world of AV, mobile technology is also rapidly evolving.

IT & Computing

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION – www.educationbusinessuk.net

PURCHASING Two to three years ago, we saw a massive rise in the number of tablets, including the iPad, in schools. Today, that number has fallen significantly, with most schools buying Chromebooks: these are effectively laptops with a cut-down operating system that makes them much cheaper. Feedback from schools is that there are two main reasons for this shift in purchasing. The first is cost. Technologies from Apple are perceived to be expensive to buy and to repair. They are also a target for theft because they’re seen to be so desirable. In comparison, Chromebooks are priced at approximately £200 per device and are therefore perceived to be better value.

Technol o is alwaygy changin s you thin g. If the mo k about b of ten y ile phones the diff ears ago, er tremen ence is dous

SKILLS The second reason for the shift is functionality. Children arrive at primary school knowing how to use touchscreens because they grow up using smartphones and tablets to play games and watch videos. However, they lack keyboard and mouse skills. Schools therefore prefer Chromebooks because they teach these skills along with standard applications such as word processing, spreadsheets and presentations. But there’s a new player looming on the horizon of devices in the shape of Microsoft. To date, Windows devices have been seen as very expensive, often four or five times more expensive than Chromebooks. Microsoft is responding with what it calls Windows 10 S devices; available at Chromebook‑type E

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Case Study

www.educationbusinessuk.net – THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION

Supporting schools with ICT solutions specifically geared for the education sector Atomwide is now in its 30th year of supplying ICT solutions for schools and the wider education sector. Back in 1987, BBC Micros and Acorns were the computers of choice for schools, and Atomwide built and developed solutions for them. Things have changed since then, and Atomwide is now an award‑winning company that designs, develops and supports a range of over 50 products and services specifically geared for education and now in use by over two million staff, pupils and parents in over 3,000 schools nationwide. Technology has a growing role to play in schools, helping prepare pupils for their future careers, driving pupil outcomes and the quality of teaching. Not just for the classroom though, the right communication and administration tools can greatly help in the school office too. When creating new products and services, the customer is at the heart of what Atomwide does, thereby ensuring that its products and services continue to meet the needs of schools and colleges. Atomwide maintain strong dialogue with teachers, SLT members and local authority advisors to ensure they are kept up-to-date

with the latest school requirements and that their ever-expanding product range continues to be relevant. This includes web filtering; email filtering; wireless networking; VoIP telephony; CCTV and ANPR; audio visual; antivirus; remote backups; school technicians; SIMS services; and network management and more. As a very customer-focused operation, Atomwide is proud of the outstanding service delivered to its customers, who rightfully have high standards and expectations and limited budgets. Atomwide present a simple model to help schools here, the more services you

bundle together, the more savings can be made. What’s more – it works! Atomwide’s ongoing Customer Support Survey yields a constant supply of positive feedback and shows a current, very high Net Promoter Score of 89. To give a flavour of the great IT services and exceptional value offered by Atomwide, they suggest schools set up OpenCheck - a free service available for all UK schools from Atomwide. Undoubtedly many schools will have experienced the frustration of needing to close in the event of an emergency or bad weather. OpenCheck gives schools a variety of ways to conveniently and quickly let parents know if a school has had to close for any reason, via a dedicated website or a push notification sent straight to a parent’s mobile, helping reduce the burden on the office when the phones are likely ringing off the hook. To find out more about OpenCheck or any of Atomwide’s proven IT services, see below. FURTHER INFORMATION Tel: 01689 814700 www.atomwide.com info@atomwide.com @Atomwide

SAVING SCHOOLS MONEY by bundling ESSENTIAL IT SERVICES together Safeguarding services

Cloud resources

Audio visual

Communication tools

MAT services

Help & support

www.atomwide.com

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EDUCATION BUSINESS MAGAZINE | Volume 22.7

01689 814700

info@atomwide.com

@atomwide


AV & MOBILE TECHNOLOGY  prices, in the autumn. Windows S devices will have a cut-down operating system to reduce cost, but in addition to the usual keyboard and mouse features, they will also offer touchscreens and a stylus. The cost and features will make Windows 10 S devices very attractive to all schools, and when packaged with device management software, learning tools and Minecraft, I predict they will quickly make an impact in the market. TEACHER BENEFITS Moving on from the technology, what about the teachers? Given teacher retention is a massive issue at the current time, I was particularly interested in the views of newly qualified teachers. I therefore went to the University of Cumbria, one of the biggest providers of Initial Teacher Education in England, to meet Kathryn Fox, head of school partnership at the Institute of Education. Kathryn’s view is clear, she believes that AV can be beneficial in the classroom, as long as it properly linked to the way that teachers teach. “AV tools, approaches and technologies have the potential to open up spaces for learning opportunities in the classroom for learners at all levels. I would suggest that the use of audio-visual tools in the classroom can best support learners to make progress when this is aligned to the overall pedagogy of the classroom,” she said.

Kathryn went on to say that “AV tools provide a multimodal space for learning, with expanded potential for communication and representation, in comparison with less expansive spaces. Technology, including AV technologies can, for example, illustrate concepts in ways that words on a page may not. They can take students to places that they may not be able to go themselves and elicit an emotional response. AV technologies have the potential to evoke, provoke, scaffold and stimulate learning.“ If teachers ask, ‘what do I want my pupils to learn?’ rather than ‘how do I want them to be engaged?’ then the focus of the technology is that of a learning tool for pedagogy. In other words, the technology has a purpose that moves beyond engagement and is integrated with the approach and purpose of the learning. Who will be using the AV resource, teacher or learner? Where will they use this? Who will create the resource – teacher, learner or collaborative learning? These are key considerations for classroom practitioners. MOTIVATING PUPILS Teaching standards set out the expectations of teachers in England. This includes laying out high expectations, which inspire, motivate and challenge pupils. This requires and expects a commitment to continued professional development (CPD). In the

same way that teachers have a range of classroom, pedagogical and subject experiences to bring to bear on their planning and lesson design they also draw on a range of experience of AV technology. New technologies open up new classroom possibilities. This presents the profession with challenges to keep apace of both developments in the technology itself and also the need for critical consideration of its potential to support learning. The fact that the pace of technology is increasing rapidly, and that new tools and technologies will be incorporated into teaching and learning is not up for question. The question is, how do schools decide what to buy and what will achieve the greatest learning return on investment? To do this, and to truly transform teaching and classrooms with audio visual and mobile technology, an IT strategy is vital. Most schools don’t have one, and without one they make reactive or poor buying decisions. At Think IT, we recommend starting your IT strategy with the desired outcomes (remember them) that you want for your learners and teachers. With this in mind, you will make undoubtedly make better investment decisions. L

IT & Computing

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION – www.educationbusinessuk.net

FURTHER INFORMATION www.think-it.org.uk

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Champions of Minibus Safety

Over 1,250 educational establishments have now chosen Castle to provide a risk free, fully managed minibus leasing solution.

When you hire from Castle Rentals you can choose from our range of 9 to 17 seat minibuses, cars & vans for a day, a term or a year.

We can help you manage your Section 19 obligations to help you stay compliant.

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DON’T TAKE RISKS GET A D1

In September, Castle Minibus is launching their ‘Greater than 8’ national safety campaign and online government petition. Our aim is to end the confusion and close loop-holes by changing the law, so that all drivers of vehicles with 8+ passengers are required to pass the full D1 driver training test. To support the campaign, sign the petition and for further information visit the website

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RISK ASSESSMENTS

Following the tragic events in London and Manchester, schools have been cancelling school trips, both nationally and abroad. This has prompted the National Governance Association to issue guidance on trip planning and risk assessments Schools will understandably be concerned about taking pupils on school trips to places like central London and other large cities, events and attractions, and as a result, may be seeking advice and guidance. This in itself does not mean that trips should be cancelled – school trips can be hugely beneficial for pupils – but schools should seek specific advice where this is genuine concern, and ensure that their risk assessment procedure is being closely followed before going ahead with a planned trip. At the time of writing, the threat level (which signals the likelihood of a terrorist attack in the UK) is being held at severe i.e. an attack is highly likely. Governing

boards have a responsibility for ensuring that neither pupils nor employees are put at unnecessary risk while at school or on school business – this includes school trips.

Written by the National Governance Association

Trip guidance in the wake of terror attacks

any suspicious activity. The metropolitan police have advised that crowded places, events, public transport, and iconic locations are some examples of locations that could be potential targets for terrorists. At the time of writing, the Metropolitan Police have also advised the public to avoid visiting London Bridge and the Borough Market areas of south London, with barriers being installed in various places across London as a precaution “to make the capital a safe place for people to live, work and visit”.   Geoff Barton, general secretary of ASCL, was quoted in The Guardian on 6 June saying: “Our advice to schools concerned about planned trips to London is to review and amend risk assessments as necessary, and to talk to parents to gauge their views. “Where school trips go ahead, parents who are concerned can withdraw their children. If schools choose to cancel trips, we would ask that people respect that decision, which will have been made after full discussion and in light of the individual circumstances.” The National Governance Association (NGA) would echo this advice. 

School Trips

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION – www.educationbusinessuk.net

REMAIN VIGILANT There is no formal government PLANNING g n i advice against school trips Regardless of the heightened n r e v Go to specific locations and risk of terrorist attacks, all e v ha attractions in the UK. The school trips should be well boards sibility n government advice is planned and be guided o p a res suring that the public should by an appropriate risk n for e pupils nor assessment. This will remain vigilant and should always be help ensure that the trip ither that neoyees are put alert to the danger of will be a success and sk terrorism and report that staff have peace E empl ssary ri

ce at unne at school while trips or on

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School Trips

RISK ASSESSMENTS

 of mind beforehand, as well as crucially providing that same reassurance to parents and carers as well as to the pupils themselves. However, while preparation is key to any school trip, not every eventuality can be prepared for. It is important to weigh up the risk, in relation to the purpose of the trip and its specific location, while being sensitive to the views of both concerned parents and pupils. It is a requirement of health and safety law for employers to assess the risks to pupils and staff in terms of health and safety. Governing boards should seek assurance that full risk assessments have been carried out and all possible precautions have been taken prior to any trip going ahead. Governing boards should also assurance themselves that the views of all stakeholders (parents, pupils and staff) are being taken into account and senior staff are ensuring that there are clear communication strategies in place. EMERGENCY PROCEDURES Finally, governing boards should ensure that emergency procedures are in place,

“Where school trips go ahead, parents who are concerned can withdraw their children. If schools choose to cancel trips, we would ask that people respect that decision” Geoff Barton, general secretary, ASCL both for use in school premises, but also specifically while on school trips, and that these have been explained to all staff and that staff understand the expectations placed upon them for the health and safety of pupils while on school trips. The role of the governing board is to ensure that a robust risk management strategy is in place – not to actually carry it out. This is the operational role of the school staff and needs to be done in line with the wider role of the school senior leadership team. As part of their risk assessment, schools should contact both the local authority and where appropriate, the police for advice where they have concerns. Governing

boards should also ensure that necessary insurance cover has been arranged. The Department for Education has existing general advice on health and safety for local authorities, school leaders, school staff and governing bodies and for more specific information on the operational duties of school staff for school trips, Hampshire County Council has recently provided some advice to schools and Outdoor Education Advisors’ Panel have provided specific guidance on visits and the threat from terrorism. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.nga.org.uk/Guidance

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Advertisement Feature

www.educationbusinessuk.net – THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION

SCHOOL TRIPS

TOP TIPS FOR PLANNING AN EDUCATION OR SPORTS TOUR A rise in tour prices, last minute drop-outs and unforeseen changes are just a few challenges teachers and schools face when booking a school trip. Travel Places looks at what schools need to consider when planning a school tour Unforseen increases in tour prices, last minute drop outs and unavoidable changes are just a few challenges that teachers and schools face when trying to book a school trip. Budget cuts and financial worries are also a major concern, especially for those booking tours abroad, multiple years in advance. Travel Places’ team of education and sports specialists have been involved in school travel for over 50 years and know what it takes to give students and tour leaders the experience they’re after. So here are Travel Places’ top tips on what to consider when planning your tour.

VALUE IS KING When comparing tour quotes from tour providers look carefully at what is included in the cost and what isn’t. Meals, venue entrance fees, guides, local transport, and local tourist taxes are all costs that soon add up and mean your tour price is higher than you think. Be careful when companies include insurance as these are often the lowest level of cover available and your own school travel insurance will, in almost every case, be a better policy. Ask to see a copy of the insurance schedule and compare it with what your school already has.

and there are so many options to consider and often these can be better value than destinations already busy with school groups during the popular travel periods. Travel Places have arranged education and sports tours to places such as Japan, Finland and Malaysia. This year, Travel Places have groups booked on all types of experiences from scuba diving in Croatia, to watching the 2017 Solar Eclipse in Wyoming, to riding the Trans-Siberian Express to Mongolia, exploring Ghana, as well as the classic destinations to Iceland, Berlin, Krakow and Bay of Naples. The possibilities are endless.

FINANCIAL STABILITY & ATOL PROTECTED Picking a company that is financially stable and has a current and valid ATOL licence are two fundamentals. Unfortunately, we’ve heard horror stories of schools booking tours with companies who have filed for bankruptcy before they can deliver the purchased tours, only to discover the company’s licence had expired and therefore the schools were unable to claim their money back. You can check online if a company’s ATOL licence is up to date at www.caa.co.uk/ atoll-protection – and don’t be afraid to question tour providers on their financial stability during your initial consultation.

DO THE FLIGHTS ACTUALLY EXIST? Some companies have been known to provide quotes on flights using estimated prices which are based on the lowest season cost and in some circumstances, do not actually exist. As a result schools have been asked to pay a supplement due to increased flight costs or their departure airport was changed to one elsewhere in the country. To avoid this, ask your provider to detail the flight they are booking for you, preferably with airline details, route, times and flight numbers – these should all be available nine to 11 months before departure.

DON’T PANIC Follow the tips above and make sure you pick a company who you feel is as passionate and dedicated as you are in providing your students with a fantastic tour. L

CLEAR PLANS Take a clean piece of paper and write down your tour objectives. What do you want to deliver to your students? Do you want to focus on one key area of your curriculum or combine a sporting tour with insights into a new culture? Do you want to provide a broader understanding of a subject or combine cross-curricular subjects? Aside from learning, what else are you constrained by – does it have to be within a certain budget, leave from a certain airport, etc? During your first contact with your tour provider, ensure these objectives are passed on and that both you and the tour operator are happy and confident that your tour can be delivered exactly as you want it and within your budget.

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EDUCATION BUSINESS MAGAZINE | Volume 22.7

THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX Why go to the same place year after year? We live in an accessible world

* Travel Places is a family owned business with over 40 years’ experience providing travel solutions for the world’s leading athletes and sports teams. By operating in association with American Express Global Business Travel they are able to provide financial security as well as competitive prices and terms for its customers. FURTHER INFORMATION Tel: 01903 823 861 www.travelplaces.co.uk info@travelplaces.co.uk


RESIDENTIALS

School Trips

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION – www.educationbusinessuk.net

Written by Kim Somerville, campaign coordinator for Learning Away

Set up great relationships for the rest of the year Kim Somerville, campaign coordinator for Learning Away, explains what pupils, teachers and schools can gain from high-quality residential experiences over the winter months Residentials are often the most memorable experience of pupils’ school days; for their teachers, they are rewarding, if exhausting. Learning Away’s previous research has declared them as “providing opportunities and benefits/impacts that cannot be achieved in any other educational context or setting. The impact is greater when they are fully integrated with a school’s curriculum and ethos.” They have been described by teachers as “worth half a term in school”. Learning Away’s compelling action research, spanning five years with 60 secondary, primary and special schools discovered that the impact of a residential is even greater when schools follow a set of guiding principles which can transform residentials into highly effective, ‘Brilliant Residentials’. These principles include residentials being led by teachers, co-designed with students, fully integrated into the curriculum, and affordable for all. If schools follow these principles, teachers have acknowledged they can improve pupils’ resilience, achievement, relationships and

engagement with learning, often playing a “transformational role” in re-engaging some of the most disadvantaged pupils with their studies.

ask for help, push themselves and participate in class. Imagine teaching a class with more self-belief for the rest of the school year after going on a winter residential. Eighty-seven per cent of secondary students felt more confident to try new things after a residential The second benefit to a winter residential is that it will increase engagement, including positive changes in behaviour and attendance. Going on a residential in the winter months will give them a passion for learning which can live on throughout the year. Seventy-two per cent of primary pupils said that their behaviour at school is better after a residential and 71 per cent of secondary pupils felt more strongly motivated to learn. E

Seventy per censeven t of pupils s a i d t they we he way on the re taught will hel residential pt better i hem do nt subject he

A WINTER GETAWAY The transformation is greater the sooner a residential takes place in the school year. Yet residentials in schools are more likely to take place in the summer term, just as the class teacher is saying goodbye to their class. Here are six benefits of taking your students’ on a winter residential supported by the evidence collected through the Learning Away action research. The first is that it boosts resilience and wellbeing. Residentials improve students’ resilience, self‑confidence and wellbeing. Students are more willing to try something new and

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www.educationbusinessuk.net – THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION

Inspirational Opportunities Outside the Classroom Set in 75 acres of ancient woodland we specialise in creating bespoke packages tailored to school improvement and development priorities. • KS1 to A-Level • Residential and day visits • School holiday activity days • Adventure camping for schools • Family events and camping

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Prices from as li ttle as £75 fo r 2 nights Travel outside of the busy summer months and see all the benefits from a residential trip come to life back in the classroom. • Increased retention from skills learned on the trip • Better relationships with peers and teachers • Expanding teaching opportunities • Flexibility and exclusivity • Character building

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RESIDENTIALS  BACK AT SCHOOL The third benefit of a winter residential is that it allows time for learning and development to be embedded back in school. We know residentials have a long term impact on students’ progress and attainment when followed up on their return to school. Seventy-seven per cent of pupils said the way they were taught on the residential will help them do better in the subject in question. The fourth benefit is that a winter residential will foster deeper relationships, which are sustained back in school. The sooner a teacher gets to know their pupils, the sooner they can ‘set them up for success’. Winter residentials allow relationships between staff and students to become more trusting and respectful back in the classroom. Students get to know teachers as individuals; staff gain a better understanding of their students and how to respond to them. Seventy-nine per cent of primary pupils said they know their teacher better as a result of their residential and 84 per cent of secondary students said they get on better with others in their class. SHORTER DAYS, LONGER NIGHTS Another benefit to a winter residential

School Trips

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION – www.educationbusinessuk.net

The final benefit of a winter residential is that it offers greater return on investment, as often the winter months can be more affordable. Why not have a sleep-over in the school hall or within the school grounds to keep costs low? is that you can discover new learning opportunities outdoors, thanks to the longer nights and shorter day. For example, you could try out astronomy, take a night walk, go exploring in the dark, and enjoy exhilarating winter weather. The beginning of the school year is also a great time of year to kick start key subjects with inspiring hands on learning indoors. This includes exploring art galleries and museums, experiencing historical re-enactments, and learning about local traditions . The final benefit of a winter residential is that it offers greater return on investment, as often the winter months can be more affordable. Why not have a sleep-over in the school hall or within the school grounds to keep costs low? Many residentials

providers have reduced rates, or offer discounts over the winter period. CAMPAIGN FOR WINTER RESIDENTIALS Learning Away is working collaboratively with residential providers to raise awareness about the benefits of residentials for schools in the winter months through a new #WinterResidentials campaign. The campaign will be an extension to the successful #BrilliantResidentials campaign and will launch in Autumn 2017, it will offer schools free resources to help plan and deliver inclusive residential experiences for children of all ages from all backgrounds. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.learningaway.org.uk

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Marwood Group The snow shovel comes with a of winter produc 48” metal shaft complete with Snow Shovel Marwood Group Ltd can now offer you a select range safer when the sn ergonomically designed PD The snow shovel comes with a 48” metal shaft complete of winter products, designed to make easier and with ergonomically designed handle. The tough plastic handle. The toughPDlife plastic blade blade is reinforced with an aluminium stripselect to maximise range Marwood Group Ltd can now offer you a longevity. is reinforced with an aluminium safer when the snow and ice arrive. Ideal for forecourts, pavements & driveways with its strip to maximise Idealand of winter products, designed to makelongevity. life easier strong plastic blade it will cut through snow easily. for forecourts, pavements & safer when the snow and ice arrive. Hard Hard driveways with its strong plastic wearing wearing blade it will cut through snow and and reusable reusable easily.

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Itaccess easily clears vehicle The fork mounted Plough isGrit. very & pedestrian i.e. car access roads and service areas when used & pedestrian access i.e. car parks, The fork mounted Plough isparks, veryaccess compacted snow. ItSnow easily clears vehicle Clears effective when clearing freshly fallen &Clears pedestrian access i.e. car parks, access effective when clearing freshly fallen or orin roads and service areas when conjunction with Rock Salt or Grit. The fork mounted Snow Plough isused very roads and service areas when used effective when clearing freshly fallen or in & pedestrian access i.e. car parks, access compacted snow. It easily clears vehicle roads and service areas when used in fresh fresh and and compacted snow. It easily clears vehicle conjunction with Rock Salt or Grit. effective when clearing freshly fallen or conjunction with Rock Salt orvehicle Grit. The forkservice mounted Snow Plough isinaccess very compacted snow. 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Ideal for forecourts, pavements & driveways with its strong plastic blade it will cut through snow easily.

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Snow Shovel The snow shovel comes with a 48” metal shaft complete with ergonomically designed PD handle. The tough plastic blade is reinforced with an aluminium strip to maximise longevity.

NON-MECHANICAL PLANT HIRE, SALES & SERVICE

Available various sizes AvailableGrit/Salt equipment in variousEssential extremely durable an Available in various s Marwood Group Ltd can now offer you a select range sizes personalisation and l Strong in plastic blade to cut through snow easily

Winter is fast approaching... Snow Shovel

of winter products, designed to make life easier and safer when the snow and ice arrive.

with ergonomically designed PD handle. The tough plastic Clears is reinforced with an aluminium strip to maximise conjunction Salt or Grit. Clears compacted Clears fresh and with Rockblade longevity. Clears fresh and snow Clears fresh and compacted Ideal for forecourts, pavements & driveways with its fresh and strong plastic blade it will cut through snow easily. compacted Clears fresh and Clears compacted snow compacted Clears Call 0800 snow fresh and compacted Clears fresh and snow snow fresh and Clears compacted snow fresh and compacted compacted fresh and snow Clears compacted snow snow compacted fresh and snow snow compacted A65523 Marwood Winter Product Flyer_P2.indd 1 snow Strong

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and snow Melts ice sizes Rock Salt and snow Melts ice and snow fast! and snow fast! Melts ice Rock Salt and snow Melts ice fast! Melts ice Grit/Salt Bins Melts ice and snow fast. Ideal for Car Parks and haulage fast! Melts ice Rock Salt Rock and snow fast! Melts ice and snow yards. CanSalt alsoSalt be used on Driveways, Roads, Paths, Patios, Rock and snow and Melts ice andSalt snow fast. Ideal for Car Parks and haulage Rock Melts ice fast! Walkways, Steps & Stairways. and snow fast! Melts iceand and snowon fast. Ideal forCar CarParks Parks andhaulage haulage yards. Can ice also be snow used Driveways, Roads, Paths, Patios, fast! Marwood Marwood Group Group Ltd. Ltd. 72 72 Roding Roding Road, Road, Beckton, Beckton, London London E6E6 6JG 6JG Melts fast. Ideal for and Rock Salt Essential equipment in inclement weather our Grit Bins are highly visible, fast Rock Salt Melts ice and snow fast. Ideal for Car Parks and haulage and snow Melts fast! yards.Can Can also usedon onDriveways, Driveways,Roads, Roads,Paths, Paths,Patios, Patios,ice Walkways, Steps & Stairways. Rock Salt yards. also bebeused Melts ice and snow fast. Ideal for Car Parks and haulage Call Call 0800 0800 050 050 2012 2012 Visit Visit www.marwoodgroup.co.uk www.marwoodgroup.co.uk yards. Can alsoSalt be used&on Driveways, Roads, Paths, Patios, Rock Walkways, Steps Stairways. fast! extremely durable and completely rot proof. and snow Walkways, Steps & Stairways. yards. Can also be on Driveways, Roads, Paths, Patios, Melts ice and snow fast. Ideal for Car Parks and haulage Walkways, Steps &used Stairways. Melts ice and snow fast. Ideal for Car Parks and haulage Rock Salt Melts iceCan and snow fast. IdealDriveways, for Car Parks and Paths, haulage Walkways, Steps &be Stairways. fast! yards. also used Roads, Patios, yards. Can be used onon Driveways, Paths, Patios, Melts ice and snow Ideal for Call 0800 050 2012 Visi Melts icealso and snow fast. Ideal forfast. CarRoads, Parks and haulage Available in various sizes embossed with the word “Grit”, further yards. Can also be used on Driveways, Roads, Paths, Patios, The fork mounted Snow Plough Rock Salt Walkways, Steps &used Stairways. Walkways, Steps &beStairways. yards. Can also Driveways, Roads, Paths, Patios, Melts ice and snow fast.on Ideal for Car Parks and haulage Walkways, Steps & Stairways.

Grit/Salt Bins

CarWalkways, ParksStepsand haulage yards. Can personalisation Marwood Group Ltd. 72 Roding Road, Beckton, London E6 6JG Stairways. is very effective when clearingand logos’ are available if required. Standard colour is yards. Can also be&used on Driveways, Roads, Paths, Patios, for Car Parks and haulage 30/09/2015 30/09/2015 11:43 11:43 Call 0800 050 2012 Visit www.marwoodgroup.co.uk Stepsbe&used Stairways. yellow with other colours available, on request. alsoWalkways, beCanused ononDriveways, Roads, Marwood Group Ltd. 72 Roding Road, Beckton, London E6 6JG Essential equipment weather our Grit Bins are highly visible, yards. also Driveways, Roads, Paths, Patios, freshly fallen or compacted snow. Itin inclement Marwood Group Ltd.Visit 72Roding Roding Road,Beckton, Beckton,London LondonE6 E66JG 6JG Walkways, Steps & Stairways. Marwood Group Ltd. Road, Call 0800 050 2012 www.marwoodgroup.co.uk Paths, Patios, Walkways, Steps & Marwood Group Ltd. 72 72 Roding Road, Beckton, London E6 6JG extremely durable and completely rot proof. easily vehicle & pedestrian Call 0800050 0502012 2012 Visit www.marwoodgroup.co.uk Marwood Group Ltd. 72 Roding Road, Beckton,clears London E6 6JG A65523 Marwood Winter Product Flyer_P2.indd 1 Call 0800 Visit www.marwoodgroup.co.uk Call 0800 050 2012 Visit www.marwoodgroup.co.uk Grit/Salt Bins Stairways. Marwood Ltd. 72 Roding Road, Beckton,i.e. London E6parks, 6JG Call 0800Group 050 2012 Visit www.marwoodgroup.co.uk Marwood Beckton, E6 access car access roads in various sizes embossed with the word “Grit”, further Marwood Group Group Ltd. Ltd. 72 72 Roding Roding Road, Road, Beckton, London London E6 6JG 6JGAvailable Essential equipment in inclement weather our Grit Bins are highly visible, Call 0800 050 2012 Visit www.marwoodgroup.co.uk Marwood Group Ltd. 72 Roding Road, Beckton, London E6 6JG Call 0800 050 2012 Visit www.marwoodgroup.co.uk A65523 Marwood Winter Product Flyer_P2.indd 2 30/09/2015 11:43 and service areas when used in Call 0800 050 2012 Visit www.marwoodgroup.co.uk extremely durableif andrequired. completely rot proof. personalisation and logos’ are available Standard colour is Marwood Group 72 Roding Road, Beckton, London E6 6JG Call 0800 050 Ltd. 2012 Visit www.marwoodgroup.co.uk equipment in“Grit”, inclement A65523 Marwood Winter Product Flyer_P2.indd 2 30/09/2015 11:43 Essential Available in various sizes embossed with the word further conjunction with Rock Salt or Grit. yellow with other colours available, on and request. Call 0800 050 Ltd. 2012 Visit www.marwoodgroup.co.uk personalisation logos’ are available if required. Standard colour is Group 72 Roding Road, Beckton, London E6 6JG A65523Marwood MarwoodWinter WinterProduct ProductFlyer_P2.indd Flyer_P2.indd 2 2 Marwood 30/09/2015 11:43 11:43 A65523 30/09/2015 A65523 Marwood Winter Product Flyer_P2.indd 2 30/09/2015 11:43 weather yellow with otherour colours available, on request. are highly Grit Bins Call 0800 050 2012 Visit www.marwoodgroup.co.uk A65523 Marwood Winter Product Flyer_P2.indd 2 30/09/2015 11:43 A65523 Marwood Winter Product Flyer_P2.indd 30/09/2015 11:43visible, extremely durable and A65523 Marwood Winter Product Flyer_P2.indd 2 2 30/09/2015 11:43 A65523 Marwood Winter Product Flyer_P2.indd 2 30/09/2015 11:43 A65523 Marwood Winter Product Flyer_P2.indd 2 30/09/2015 11:43completely rot proof. Melts iceProduct and snow fast. 2Ideal A65523 A65523 Marwood Marwood Winter Winter Product Flyer_P2.indd Flyer_P2.indd 2

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A65523 Marwood Winter Product Flyer_P2.indd 1

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30/09/2015 11:43


HEALTH & SAFETY

p Ltd can now offer you a select range cts, designed to make life easier and now and ice arrive.

As the summer weather begins to fade to make way for winter NON-MECHANICAL PLANT HIRE, SALES & SERVICE months, the important role that safety plays in schools will become ever more apparent, writes RoSPA’s Nathan Davies

snow and ice, therefore headteachers Months before the autumn leaves need to be sensitive to the dangers winter fall, many schools will have devised a weather can pose to children and most winter safety plan in order to safeguard importantly they need to be prepared to the young people in their care. prevent significant problems arising and to all,Ltdensuring staffrange safety MarwoodAfter Group can nowstudent offer youand a select Available of winterhas products, designed to make lifeframework easier and have arrangements to deal with periods of been part of the ethical inice various safer when snow and arrive. also have legal extreme weather, when it is unacceptable forthe decades and schools sizes for normal activities to continue. responsibilities for safety as an integral That’s why it is essential for weather part of the Ofsted framework. procedures and practices to be established In order to keep children safe during the before the winter season arrives – usually winter months, schools need to be prepared during the first term of each school year – and for adverse weather conditions, such as that they take into account all the situations heavy rain, flooding and cold temperatures. that may arise during this period, such as School winter safety arrangements need to slippery ice on the school grounds for example. be implemented now. These arrangements should be designed to protect everyone ISSUES TO THINK ABOUT on school property from injury, and help Schools should think about Bins to prevent potentially unsafe situations Available the following: being allowed to occur on and off site. in various in inclement weather our Grit Bins are highly visible, nd completely rotSo, proof. sizes how do schools ensure their pupils sizes embossed with the word “Grit”, further School are safe during the iscold snap? Well, logos’ are available if required. Standard colour w lours available, on request. i nter first of all they need to have a functional plan of what is needed arrange safety ments to make the school safe. sho

t approaching...

CONTINGENCY PLANS What, if any, situations will require full closure of the school? What, if any, situations will require partial closure of the school? Is a system in place for quickly notifying parents and carers in good time of any school closures? What, if any, amendments for first aiders and equipment need to be made? What, if any, additional supervision arrangements are required for lessons, breaks and lunchtimes etc in bad weather. Also think about supervising crossing and drop-off areas. Are teachers/carers and students reminded in good time about expected weather conditions, clothing to be worn etc. especially for sports and off-site visits.

Written by Nathan Davies, education principal consultant, RoSPA

Keeping pupils safe during the roaching... winter months

HANICAL PLANT HIRE, SALES & SERVICE

Slips and trips inside from items of clothing and wet floors; and slips on ice and snow, falling and decaying leaves, and of course, rainfall. Is the external lighting suitable and has it been checked recently? Other issues to consider is if vehicle transport standards have been checked; increased risk of traffic/ parking congestion and traffic accidents during bad weather; and if safety/ snow clearance arrangements are in place or planned – e.g. local sport centres.

Winter Safety

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION – www.educationbusinessuk.net

SLIPS AND TRIPS Among the most common health and safety risks during the winter months are slips and trips on ice or wet ground, be they on the playground or other routes on the school grounds. Unfortunately, thousands of people have been admitted to hospital with serious E

uld to protebe designed on scho ct everyone As you may know, schools have a legal duty to carry out ‘suitable from in ol property and sufficient’ risk assessments. ju to prev ry, and help The risk assessment should detail ent uns Grit/Salt Bins risks that are the foreseeable s i t u ations afe significant and that are associated with the schools facilities or activities.

woodgroup.co.uk RISK ASSESSMENTS

30/09/2015 11:43

Essential equipment in inclement weather our Grit Bins are highly visible, extremely durable and completely rot proof. Available in various sizes embossed with the word “Grit”, further personalisation and logos’ are available if required. Standard colour is yellow with other colours available, on request.

The main element of the assessment is to make provision for the precautions needed to minimise the risks identified. There is no need to document each and every hazard that exists, but you should it www.marwoodgroup.co.uk think about the likelihood and effects of, ice, snow, excessive water and high winds, and the effect of these, e.g. tree and branch 30/09/2015 11:43 falls, excessive leaf fall in walkways and damage to buildings. More unusual hazards can exist, such as ice and snow sliding from pitched roofs that are poorly insulated, or roof collapses on poorly constructed or maintained structures. Only local knowledge and a keen eye can decide if this is a real issue for you. With every winter comes the chance of

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Volume 22.7 | EDUCATION BUSINESS MAGAZINE

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EDUCATION BUSINESS MAGAZINE | Volume 22.7

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HEALTH & SAFETY  injuries after falls during wintry weather. Figures from the Hospital Episode Statistics for England show that there were 7,031 admissions to hospital in 2012/13 as a result of people falling over on snow or ice. We encourage school leaders and assessors to consider the real risks, is it appropriate for a school to close due to 75mm of snow on the playground, when all teaching staff and parents know full well that 80 per cent of the pupils will take the free day to go sledging and snowballing while carers will have to take an enforced days leave of work, or other planned activities (and hopefully go sledging and snowballing with the kids). While everyone may enjoy the seasonal, unplanned break, fear of litigation or prosecution shouldn’t be used as the cause without very good reasons. So, to prevent accidents from happening during icy conditions, it is essential that schools stock up on salt or grit and arrange for preventative gritting and clearance prior to prevent ice and snow settling, rather than relying on post ‘fall’ gritting and clearance, which is much less effective (and much harder physical work). There is no absolute duty to clear paths or routes and liability is not increased unless an unsafe situation is actually created or made worse. Preventative work needs to be a priority when frost, ice and snow are forecast, when walkways are likely to be damp or wet, or the ground temperatures are at or below freezing. RoSPA encourages children to get outside and to enjoy the wintry weather, wrapping up well to keep warm and dry. Therefore, if conditions are not too dangerous, there is nothing to stop children from playing outside, so long as there is plenty of supervision. But

Winter Safety

THE BUSINESS MAGAZINE FOR EDUCATION – www.educationbusinessuk.net

Schools have a statutory duty to take all reasonably practicable steps to ensure the safey of pupils and staff on school premises we do advise that a consistent approach is taken to deciding when it is appropriate not to allow play externally and when out of school activities should be rearranged or curtailed. BECOMING MORE RISK AWARE Reminding children and carers that additional cold weather sports equipment is required is always useful to ensure that exercise can be conducted as planned. This is because it is important for schools to help pupils become more “risk aware” as opposed to “risk averse” and equip them with the skills and knowledge they need to keep themselves and others safe. Nevertheless perhaps a short assembly session on not playing on ice might be prudent. As an employer, schools should treat risk assessment and risk management as important tools to enable children to undertake activities safely but ‘elf and safety’ should not be used as an excuse to cancel activities that can be conducted perfectly safely with a bit of pre planning. All of these things can leave head teachers with a difficult decision on their hands – whether or not to close due to the weather. Head teachers should arrange for consultation about potentially contentious issues with those affected e.g. teachers, student representatives, the PTA, sports teachers and the maintenance staff. This will give all parties confidence that the right approach is being taken.

STAYING SAFE All in all, schools have a statutory duty to take all reasonably practicable steps to ensure the safety of pupils and staff on school premises. However, it is also vital to share with pupils the skills of recognising hazards, assessing risks and taking steps to control risks. Otherwise we all run the risk of promoting a culture where fear of litigation and criticism restricts learning, growth and enjoyment. This has fundamental issues for individuals, schools and society at large. Schools play a crucial role in preparing children and young people to recognise and manage risk and should have a strong commitment to the aims of keeping pupils safe and helping them to learn how to adopt safe practices. When it comes to health and safety management in schools, RoSPA recommends a whole school approach to teaching safely – ensuring that facilities and activities are suitably safe – and teaching safety – preparing children for adult life by teaching them to understand and manage risk. These are all issues that are within the scope of scrutiny by other partners such as Ofsted, insurers, professional bodies, and of course parents. L FURTHER INFORMATION www.rospa.com/schoolandcollegesafety educationhelp@rospa.com Photo by David Beale on Unsplash

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Exclusive Discount at

Office Outlet has transformed your local Staples store! We now sell an even wider range of great value school supplies and teaching aids – including art & craft materials, writing ranges, office stationery, business machines, technology and support materials for left-handed students. We’re committed to bringing you the products and services you need at the lowest prices. We’re so confident that you’ll find the best range of quality teaching materials at the lowest prices in our stores, that we make our Price Match Promise.* Our in-store Print Centre team can print a range of outdoor banners, posters, brochures and stationery, incorporating your school logo and images, to promote your school to parents, prospective families and the wider community.

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Visit www.officeoutlet.com to find your nearest store – over 90 stores nationwide Term & Conditions: To receive your discount, please quote the appropriate code above or present this page (photocopies accepted) and school/college identification eg. a letterhead or business card, at the till before you pay for your order. * Price Match Promise. Office Outlet will NOT be beaten on price. If you find a lower advertised price on a new or identical item in stock from another multichannel retailer within a 10 mile radius, we will match it. For more information please visit www.officeoutlet.com/pricematch ** Offer valid at any Office Outlet store until 6pm on 30th September 2017. Offer open to employees of the school/college. Offer not available to students. Discount not valid on warranties, stamps or DHL delivery services. *** Offer valid on all Print Centre purchases, excluding extended print, DHL and crystals, until 6pm on 30th September 2017. Offer open to employees of the school/ college. Offer not available to students.


RESOURCES

BESA’s Cleo Fatoorehchi examines how shifts in the education market are affecting the way stationery is purchased In mid-July, the education sector received some good news: schools are to receive an additional £1.3bn over the next two years. However, the Institute for Fiscal Studies brought us back to reality when it announced the next day that the additional funding meant a real terms cut of nearly five per cent until 2019. This comes after schools have had to consistently reduce their resources expenditures over recent years. The latest BESA research found that, in 2017, school leaders are expecting to cut a further 5.5 per cent from their spending on resources. SCHOOL BUDGET BESA’s 2017 Resources in English‑Maintained Schools report revealed that, on average, schools only dedicate five per cent of their budget to resources. This has been decreasing over the last few years by 3.7 per cent in primaries and 5.2 per cent in secondaries between 2015/16 and 2016/17.  Within the resources budget, stationery is far behind ICT and teaching aids and equipment. In 2016/17, primary schools spent £4,590 on stationery, secondary schools £17,520.  However, stationery spending has been consistent over the years, barely registering the drop in funding. Primary schools are expecting a 1.5 per cent increase in stationery expenditures in 2017/18 and secondary schools a 2.1 per cent decrease – far from the 8.7 per cent decline expected for teaching aids and equipment spending. NEED FOR RESOURCES Martin Armytage, head of sales and customer experience of BESA member YPO, said YPO’s experience was aligned with the findings. “We have not seen an impact [of school funding cuts] on selling stationery to schools,” she said. “Stationery is an everyday consumable which will always need replacing, so the sales have remained steady.” Natalie Walker, senior marketing manager at GLS Educational Supplies, and Wendy Vickery, marketing manager at Pentel, two other BESA members, concurred. “Stationery resources will always be required for the day‑to-day

running of any school,” Walker said. Vickery echoed this sentiment: “Stationery is a core resource for schools and demand for certain products, or pack sizes, is actually growing.” However, educational suppliers have sensed a shift in the market as schools are now moving away from branded products. MAKING SAVINGS According to Walker, the lower school budgets are impacting stationery in value more than volume. She said: “The biggest change we have seen is a switch to smaller pack sizes, as schools are also looking at ways of saving money, and a move to using more traditional methods, such as PVA and glue spreaders – essentially getting more value from their resources.” She continued: “Own brands, such as our Classmates range, are fast becoming an alternative to big brands due to the savings a school can make. By switching from big brands to Classmates, schools can save up to 40 per cent off their stationery basket.” BESA’s procurement research in authority schools and academies, published in late 2016, confirms Walker’s analysis. It found that primary authority schools are most likely to try and secure cost-savings by purchasing non-branded products.

Written by Cleo Fatoorehchi, communications coordinator, BESA

Stationery: the core resource for schools

procurement, they exercise a real influence on the way schools buy their resources. Indeed, cooperation is straightforward in two-and three-school MATs, which then tend to centralise their purchases. This is becoming common practice in MATs of nine schools and more, too, since centralisation of procurement allows cost savings. Kris Wagland, head of marketing at BESA member KCS, observed this evolution. “With the rise of MATs, consolidated, centralised procurement has become far more common,” he said, emphasising that this required KCS to adopt a different approach to schools. “This has meant a change in marketing strategy, with MAT communications now aimed at single organisational buyers rather than the individual units (schools),” he explained. “School personnel are more commercially and financially astute, and expect a more business-focussed approach.” Indeed, our research showed that MATs – particularly those with nine schools or more – hire dedicated business managers to focus on cost savings. They have become the new gatekeepers to resources, enforcing a business approach to procurement.  And since most MAT trustees come from the business world, value for money is the new schools motto. Education suppliers have therefore had to adapt how they engage with schools. GOING DIGITAL Education companies have also had to strengthen their digital offer, since MAT procurement officers favour going directly to online retailers and purchasing online, according to our research. Wagland confirmed the trend: “With time and resource ever tighter, quick and easy ordering is key; more and more customers are moving to online ordering and e-procurement.” Walker added: “Digital is a fast growing channel and more and more customers are switching to this channel to place orders, so [we need] new ways of supporting the customer in this move to make ordering via this channel as quick and seamless as possible.” Nonetheless, the human, face-to-face connection between business managers and education companies remains relevant. For Pentel, exhibitions are important because they give the opportunity to meet with customers and know what they want. Another helpful tool is to look out for BESA members, as its strict Code of Practice assures schools of the company’s high-quality standard in both product and customer service. L

Stationery

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Since MAT tr most come fr ustees om busines s world the , value for mon e y i s the new sch o o l s ’ m when it o comes ttto o procure ment

PROCUREMENT The other shift education companies have witnessed is how schools procure resources. Over 60 per cent of secondary schools have converted to academies and most of them are part of Multi Academy Trusts (MATs). A BESA report on MATs, released in November last year, identified 738 MATs in England. As MATs are increasingly responsible for

FURTHER INFORMATION www.besa.org.uk

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IT

AUDIOVISUAL

Plum Innovations is a London‑based IT consulting and services provider. The company is dedicated to exceptional customer service, working with leading organisations across both public and private sectors. With deep functional and industry expertise, Plum Innovations is passionate about taking on immense technical challenges and can address problems swiftly with efficient solutions. The firm’s vision is to assist teachers succeeding in their professional fields with an efficient and solid IT platform by providing a stress-free IT experience. Plum Innovations deliver top-class services and support through user friendly and cutting edge technology with cost-effective solutions. Plum Innovations goes the extra mile to ensure excellent services are always delivered in terms of quality work, timely delivery, professional

Avocor creates solutions which are designed to enhance collaborative learning in the classroom. It’s award-winning, interactive displays combine market leading technology with revolutionary educational software which are simple to use and easy to understand. Avocor puts teachers and students at the forefront of its product development and specialises in providing solutions that enable a deeper level of collaboration, embracing modern classroom technology such as personal devices and online content. With a range of sizes available from 65” to 84”, its solutions meet every need and budget and are all built with high quality design and functionality in mind. Avocor is proud to place its customers at the heart of its innovation and this is the fundamental principle behind

Providing teachers with a stress-free IT experience

behaviour, and value for money. The company continually strives to better its services by employing innovative solutions and partnering with top organisations to meet the growing and changing needs from schools and teachers. Plum Innovations works with BESA, NAACE and London Grid for Learning to help ensure its clients are able to explore new technologies in an adaptive, modern, stress‑free environment. The firm supports teachers throughout their IT experience, ranging from procurement to classroom applications. FURTHER INFORMATION www.pluminnovations.co.uk

AV

3D PRINTING

Integrex Limited has been supplying the education sector with innovative and exciting interactive classroom solutions since it started trading in 1969. As well as manufacturing and creating its very own range of special needs interactive audio visual equipment, Integrex has consistently kept up with the ever-changing face of technology within the everyday classrooms. Interactive teaching and learning has become an integral part of every school across the country for both children and staff. From interactive whiteboards to interactive panels, collaborative solutions and BYOD (bring your own device), the modern-day classroom is changing and Integrex is here to support and help you implement classroom technology. Over the years the company has built strong relationships with suppliers and manufacturers, allowing it to be able to find

Awesome Apps Ltd provides software applications and systems based around engineering, artistic and science applications using scanning and 3D printing techniques. Productive use of scanning and 3D printing depends substantially on the use of embedded and networked software. The company provides a range of both CAD and CAM software as well as scanners ranging from automatic geometric capture to hand held metrology class systems. Using the MoonRay 3D printer at its core, the system provides a flexible but professional unit for team designs in the STEAM subjects. As well as being very precise and of solid design, this robust system has a low lifetime cost thanks to the UV LED projector, long life resin tank and as an open system can employ both industry standard and bio medical grade resins. Supports for the part are automatically

Audio visual solutions for every classroom

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Solutions to enhance collaborative learning

the best classroom solutions at the best prices and provide whatever you are looking for, whether it’s a projector in your hall or an interactive screen in your classroom. From the installation to the handover and training, Integrex has the staff and the know-how to provide the best solution for your environment. Current and past clients include a number schools all over the country, including Derby City Council and more. FURTHER INFORMATION Tel: 01283551551 da@integrex.co.uk www.integrex.co.uk

EDUCATION BUSINESS MAGAZINE | Volume 22.7

the company’s product design and customer engagement. Avocor solutions are available from Pure Audio Visual, specialists in creating educational facilities to attract and inspire students. Whether you’re a school, a further education college or a university, Pure AV can help you develop the audio-visual systems in your teaching spaces to support innovative teaching and meet the technological expectations of today’s learners. FURTHER INFORMATION 0845 602 2861 www.pureav.co.uk/avocor www.avocor.com

Systems to support team designs in STEAM subjects produced and based on optimal support patterns. A wireless application enables the MoonRay to be linked or managed externally while the 20 micron layer thickness assures the finest detail production. Available in different versions aimed at the professional artistic and jewellery applications as well as dental or medical and the engineering sectors, the versatile Moonray has proprietary smoothing routines adapted for specific applications and resins. With over 30 years of CAD/ CAM/CAE experience Awesome Apps has ample abilities to provide advice and consultancy in a range of applications and across many sectors. FURTHER INFORMATION www.awe-apps.com


SCHOOL TRIPS

SCHOOL TRIPS

Beamish Wild offers a complete range of outdoor activities and prides itself in tailoring every single visit to ensure young people get the most out of the day. Some of the activities available at the centre range from the 25 element High Ropes Course, Abseil Platforms and Climbing Towers to the equally popular Archery, Shelter Building and Scavenger Hunts. Every group has a dedicated member of staff allocated for the duration of the visit to ensure the day is enjoyed by students and teachers alike. Beamish Wild is located on the grounds of Best Western Beamish Hall and is easily accessible from Newcastle, Durham and Sunderland. Beamish Wild is the ideal venue for outdoor learning and team building events. Its activities have an inherent focus on teamwork and communication with an emphasis on reinforcing

The MAD Museum does what it says on the tin. The quirky attraction, located in the centre of Stratford upon Avon, houses around 60 interactive pieces of kinetic art and automata. ‘MAD’ stands for Mechanical Art and Design and as the UK’s only museum of its kind; it’s one to be seen to be believed. The hands-on hideaway combines inspirational creativity, witty design and engineering ingenuity. The pieces on display have all been sourced from creators around the world, and nearly everything is interactive, meaning kids (and big kids) can get stuck in. Visitors to the museum are encouraged to press buttons and release their inner inventor.   Come rain or shine this summer, The MAD Museum has something to entertain the whole family. For the very young visitor, there are plenty of lights, colours and sounds to watch (plus under five year‑olds are completely free).

Teaching pupils through adventurous activities

positive learning experiences. Beamish Wild strongly believes in experiential learning and prides itself in facilitating young people’s access to adventurous activities that will result in a positive and memorable experience. Beamish Wild offers a safe and controlled environment where young people can develop their risk management skills and re‑discover the great outdoors. FURTHER INFORMATION Tel: 01207 233 733 www.beamishwild.co.uk

Interactive art that keeps all children entertained

SCHOOL TRIPS

TRANSPORT & TRAVEL

Bentley Copse Activity Centre is an Outdoor Activity Centre with over 15 adventurous activities and offers a range of residential accommodation for groups, such as camping, as well as twenty-eight acres of natural Hurtwood forest. As a not-for-profit organisation, the centre can offer high quality adventurous activities at a lower cost than commercial providers can, and have been inspiring and educating children for the last 93 years. The centre offers a range of adventurous activity programmes for schools, youth groups, scouts, guides, children’s parties, outdoor activity days and much more. Bentley Copse is open all year round to any group wishing to book in for a residential or activity day. Any groups of over 160 people will have sole use of the centres school packages deal, to which Bentley Copse create

Trusted UK design specialists Gtech have transformed the UK cycling market with the introduction of its Gtech eBike range. Put off by the thought of struggling up hills? Worried about making the distance? The new Gtech eBike, a powerful electric bike with pedal assist, will let you fall in love with cycling again. Ride it like a normal bike, but as soon as you pedal, you’ll feel the difference as a powerful lithiumion battery and motor give you a boost whenever you need it. Hills will feel flatter, you’ll be able to explore further and arrive fresher with the Gtech electric bike. Eco-friendly, low maintenance

Inspiring and educating pupils through adventure

your personal programme to suit your student’s needs. The centre also have staff residents available 24/7 to assist you throughout your stay at Bentley Copse. For more information, see below.

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The kids will no doubt enjoy interacting with the different machines and making marble runs. Visitors are encouraged to press buttons and figure machines out, so for those a bit older, The MAD Museum demonstrates art in action (and some engineering and physics principals along the way). And for the big kids out there, this eccentric little museum is a bizarre treasure-trove of hands-on contraptions. FURTHER INFORMATION www.themadmuseum.co.uk

Giving cyclists the electric boost to travel further and perfect for the daily commute or travelling around campus, the Gtech eBike battery has a range of up to 30 miles. With an easy to read display, the battery removes from the frame for easy charging and recharges fully from flat in just three hours. Available in the Sport, the City and the eScent Mountain Bike, there is a style to suit every cyclist and riding style, with prices starting at £995. For more details on Gtech eBikes and the full range of products, see below. FURTHER INFORMATION Tel: 01905 345 891 www.gtech.co.uk

FURTHER INFORMATION Tel: 01483 202 424 http://www.bentleycopse.org admin@bentleycopse.org

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MUSIC

SCHOOL TRIPS

Rocksteady is on a mission to empower as many children as possible through rock and pop music. Rocksteady currently teach over 10,000 kids per week and deliver free music assemblies to hundreds of thousands of children each year. In the free 30 minute live music assembly, children experience an inspiring musical performance, learn about instruments and the important components of a band, like timing and beat. The assembly covers key stages one and two and can be delivered to the whole school. Availability is based on the dates that Rocksteady is in your area and assemblies are on a first come, first served basis. Rocksteady also offers weekly band lessons which dramatically build confidence, team work, listening skills and academic progress. These are also free

The South Downs Planetarium and Science Centre was established to provide a facility where people of all ages could learn about science in a very visual and exciting way. Encircled by the stars in the centre’s 11-metre diameter auditorium, it will feel as though you are sitting beneath a fabulous, clear night sky. It is a truly ‘Big Sky’ experience. Its fulldome shows feature stunning immersive video and breathtaking colour images that completely surround the audience. Presentations can be made to suit specific requirements, for different key stages or for different curriculum topics, or tailored to the needs of a specific group. The Planetarium welcomes around 10,000 children of school age every year. In 2015/16 a total of 164 schools and colleges visited the centre. Through its colourful displays, demonstrations and presentations in the main

Empowering pupils with rock and pop music

to schools, but the free music assembly is offered without any further commitment. Monica Paines, head teacher at Long Ditton Infant School in Surrey, commented on the experience her school had: “The Rocksteady day in our school was a wow. I had several parents say to me how inspired their children were.” Book your free assembly by emailing Rocksteady your name, school name and postcode. FURTHER INFORMATION ben.millier@rocksteady musicschool.com www.rocksteady musicschool.com

SCHOOL TRIPS

Providing school trips with a difference The Gordon Brown Centre, located at junction 5 of the M3 in the historic village of Rotherwick, provides residential and day visit opportunities for schools set in 25 acres of a conservation area which benefits from a wealth of natural charms and designed facilities that provide children with a lifelong experience. GBC can fully cater for up to 114 children in its two buildings with a brand new facility being built and available from January 2018, plus up to 80 in the camping village. Children have been supported by a team of dedicated staff and have received high quality services since 1976 at GBC. The company prides itself on providing visitors with a personalised visit built around their requirements. With a mix of environmental and outdoor education programmes

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available, plus the opportunity to get involved with feeding and caring for our onsite goats, pigs, chickens, donkeys, rabbits, GBC is more than just an outdoor centre. Facilities include: high and low rope courses; a laser gun village; archery; pond and river studies; history walks off-site; and water sports, to name just a few. For more information on GBC’s please visit the website or contact the team for a visit. The centre is owned and operated by Brent Council. FURTHER INFORMATION Tel: 01256762824 www.thegordonbrown centre.org.uk

EDUCATION BUSINESS MAGAZINE | Volume 22.7

Teaching science in a visual and exciting way

auditorium, education room and foyer areas, young people of all ages are introduced to the awe and wonder of the universe around us and are inspired to want to learn more. The Planetarium is an educational charity managed and operated by a large team of volunteers and enthusiasts, who have a passion for science and believe that learning should be fun.This enthusiasm is clearly infectious because many of its school groups and visitors come back time and time again. The centre also has the Learning Outside the Classroon (LOtC) Quality Badge. FURTHER INFORMATION www.southdowns.org.uk

SCHOOL TRIPS

Giving pupils the space to explore and be creative Ringsfield Hall EcoActivity Centre is set in 14.5 acres of woods and meadow with a large homely Victorian house on site. Thousands of children of all key stages visit for day and residential programmes throughout the year. Ringsfield is one of only a few Centres in the UK running adapted residential ‘Earth Education’ programmes alongside a Forest School ethos, drawing on child-led approaches to craft imaginative programmes. Each are tailored and differentiated according to the needs of a wide range of cohorts, and to suit curriculum goals. The physical ‘space’ is certainly quite unique, and feels pretty

magical: freedom to explore 14.5 acres, an art barn, music studio, sports pitches, Tree House, farm animals to feed, good home-cooked food, and a really homely place to stay. But what makes Ringsfield special is the emotional and experiential ‘space’ they create for students and teachers alike: respectful and child-led; educating the whole child; providing the freedom to explore and be creative; to build character; and to reconnect with ourselves, each other and the wider world. FURTHER INFORMATION Tel: 01502 713020 www.ringsfield-hall.co.uk


SCHOOL TRIPS

DESIGN & BUILD

Beaudesert Outdoor Activity Centre has just achieved its Learning Outside the Classroom Quality badge and Adventuremark, which now complements its AALA accreditation.   Beaudesert is set in the fantastic Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty of Cannock Chase. With a variety of lodge accommodation, tented villages and a hammock camp, a variety of residential experiences can be offered. Set in 120 acres of mixed parkland and woodland, with a wide range of lodge accommodation and activities, the centre offers outstanding residential experiences. Its cafeteria serves home-cooked food to keep everyone full of energy. But more importantly, the thing that sets Beaudesert Outdoor Activity Centre out above the rest is its team of staff who love what they do. If you haven’t visited Beaudesert before, they welcome teachers

Dancestudiomirrors. co.uk and gymmirror. co.uk are owned and operated by Aspect Safety Mirrors Ltd (ASM), a family run business based in Cambridge, undertaking contracts throughout the UK. ASM have been supplying and installing shatter‑resistant and unbreakable mirror products for over 10 years. ASM are the preferred mirror supplier and installer for many of the UK’s schools, colleges and universities. Last year ASM completed over 300 installations throughout the UK. Head of Installations, Alex Day said: “We had our best ever year in 2016 with studio and gym installations, working for a wide range of customers within the education sector. “Our ‘Pilkington Optimirror’ is a quality product that works brilliantly for functional dance

Providing quality learning Providing schools with outside the classroom dance and gym mirrors

to come and visit and look around. The grounds are steeped in history and the ruins of the great Beaudesert Hall still stand. The residential experiences provide lasting memories for the children. Give them a call and its guest services team will look after you all the way. If you are looking for additional value, they also have some fantastic winter discounts on residential packages to help make your trip even better value for money. FURTHER INFORMATION Tel: 01543 682278 info@beaudesert.org.uk

DESIGN & BUILD

Not all danger is visible to the human eye Breathing in fumes from solvents and aerosols can have adverse effects on health. For people who are more sensitive to certain chemicals, the impact can be serious. Unfortunately, you can’t completely eliminate them as they’re present in many arts and science materials including adhesives, paints, lacquers, varnishes, and most aerosol sprays. But you can give your students the best protection by providing local exhaust ventilation units, like fume cupboards or extraction cabinets to use when working with solvents. These units capture, contain, and expel fumes, over-sprays and dusts produced during practical lessons. Without them, your school can’t fully deliver the National Curricula and most exam specification for practical science, design and technology and art. BenchVent offers ready-made

or bespoke units to meet your school requirements. BenchVent’s fume cupboards and extraction cabinets are used worldwide in science labs, design and technology, and arts departments of secondary schools, colleges and universities. If you are unsure of your requirements or simply want to know if you are following health and safety good practice regarding use of LEV units, get in contact with BenchVent. FURTHER INFORMATION Tel: 01423 790039 lev@benchvent.com

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studio and training purposes. “We have also had great success with our ballet barres incorporated into mirrors and our portable mirrors, which are a fantastic alternative when mirrors cannot be wall mounted.” Call for a free competitive quotation, advice and information on ASM products or visit their website. FURTHER INFORMATION Tel: 01223 2635555 www.aspectsafetymirrors.co.uk www.gymmirror.co.uk www.portablemirrors.co.uk info@aspectsafetymirrors.co.uk

DESIGN & BUILD

Providing a healthy and natural playing space Covering sports facilities to provide protection from inclement weather would clearly increase the value of your current student offering. But have you considered, perhaps even more importantly, how such investment will also open up huge potential opportunities for health and wellbeing within your local community? The Lawn Tennis Association already recognises the value of this and is encouraging clubs, schools and other community organisations to work together to bid for funding. Through its Transforming British Tennis Together initiative, the association has committed £125m over the next 10 years to encourage more people to play more tennis, more of the time. This will need to be match funded with a further £125m to enable the covering and lighting of hundreds of tennis courts across the UK and making them

genuinely accessible to all. A sports canopy is significantly more affordable than an enclosed building, but will enable you to maintain a healthy natural playing environment in all weathers and massively increase usage, particularly during evenings and in wintertime. Streetspace All-Weather Sports Canopies are covered by a 20 year warranty and require only minimal maintenance, and of course it’s not just tennis, they are ideal for all sports, including five-aside football pitches and cricket nets. FURTHER INFORMATION Tel: 0845 0750 760 www.streetspacegroup.co.uk

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SCHOOL TRIPS

SCHOOL TRIPS

OPEN Youth Trust, based in the centre of Norwich, now offers a varied Enrichment Programme suited to both primary and secondary school groups. Its flexible approach ensures that what the Trust offers is appropriate to the needs of students and many of the activities will fit well alongside your curriculum. OPEN Youth Trust can even support students to gain an accreditation such as Arts, ASDAN or Norfolk Youth Awards. Its Enrichment Programme is ideal for pupils who are finding it difficult to engage in school or in need of some extra support to develop their confidence and self-esteem. The Trust also offers Activity Days which work well for end of year celebrations or for students in transition. OPEN Youth Trust is able to tailor any activity day to suit your needs and ensure

Walton Firs has been welcoming young people for almost 80 years. The activity centre prides itself in helping visitors develop their self‑confidence, team‑working skills, overcoming personal challenges and creating some fantastic positive memories. A hidden gem nestled in 36 acres of Surrey countryside, just two miles inside the M25 - and charity owned which means terrific value. There are a diverse range of activities available for day visitors, and accommodation for residential trips in dormitory style huts or camping for the more adventurous. Staff can help you to arrange your visit and bespoke your programme to suit specific learning objectives and to fit your budget. The visitor return rate is among the best; here’s what Walton Firs’ guests have said: “We love bringing our children here as there is so much room

Developing confidence and self-esteem in pupils

Providing pupils with educational outdoor fun

each student has a fantastic time. Want to try before you buy? Throughout September and October, OPEN is offering free one hour taster sessions for school groups on days and times that suit your timetable and also has a free mini bus service. To take advantage of this fantastic offer, see below. FURTHER INFORMATION Tel: 01603 774350 charlene.ledgard@ opennorwich.org.uk www.opennorwich. org.uk/youth-activities/ schools-enrichment

for them to have fun, so much on offer for them to do and most importantly, it’s safe.” “.. took a trip to Walton Firs last week to take part in some archery and climbing sessions. The girls had so much fun they asked if they could return before the end of the year!” “A brilliant couple of days at Walton Firs. Lots of happy children!” FURTHER INFORMATION Tel: 01932 863243 www.waltonfirs.co.uk info@waltonfirs.co.uk

ADVERTISERS INDEX

The publishers accept no responsibility for errors or omissions in this free service Allmanhall Aspect Safety Mirrors Astar Education Atomwide Awesome Apps Beaudesert Park Campsite Bench Vent Bentley Copse Activity Centre Best Western Beamish Hall Bosse Interspice Broadway Events Castle Minibus Crystal Facility Mangement Data Solutions Ednex Educate School Services Efteling Elite Systems Equity School Travel Frontier Fireworks G-Tech Garran Lockers Gordon Brown Outdoor Holt Hall Enviromental Integrex Marwood Group Nec Display Solutions New Market Group Olivetti

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EDUCATION BUSINESS MAGAZINE | Volume 22.7

14 65 38 46 62 65 65 63 63 36 8 48 27 34 16 20 4 22 54 58 63 28 64 54 62 56 BC 50 18

Open Youth Trust 66 Plum Innovations 62 Pure Audio Visual 62 RedboxVR 47 Ringsfield Hall 64 Rocksteady Music School 64 S.H Goss&Co 58 S+B Uk 24 Safety Technology 32 Sajas Group 58 Seebox Uk 40 South Bounds Planitarium 64 SQuidcard 6 Stanley Security 30 Streetspace 65 SUK Retail 60 Synel Industries 42 The Kings Ferry IBC The MAD 63 The Rain Forest Cafe 12 The Snugg 44 Totnes Rare Breed Farm 54 Travel Class 54 Travel Places 10, 52 Ultimaker IFC VAB Events 35 Wakefield-Smith 43 Walton Firs Activity Centre 66 Yeoman Shield 26


SCHOOL SMART

TRAVEL Get smart with your educational trips. ‘The School’s Pack’ service we offer takes care of every aspect concerning coach hire for your next school trip. What’s more is it’ll save you money too.

For many teachers, organising a school trip is often a very demanding task, but with ‘The School’s Pack’ all you’ll have to worry about is getting the children to the coach on time! All of The Kings Ferry’s drivers are DBS checked as standard and we can also provide your party with professional Blue Badge tour guides who’ll accompany the group on the coach and share educational and informative commentary. If your’re not sure on a venue or would like preferrential rates on your venue ticket prices then look no further! The Kings Ferry can provide pre-packaged transport and venue solutions often with discounted entry. See our website for more details. For more information about our Schools’ Pack you can download the latest version from our website.

Top Large Coach Operator of the Year 2017 www.thekingsferry.co.uk/schools-pack | 01634 377 577

Schools Pack • Pre-packaged transport and venue solutions • Risk assessment • Health & safety declaration • Legal compliance • Letter templates for parents • DBS checked drivers Try our Schools Pack for great ideas and resources for your educational trip


NEC Laser Projectors – Install & Forget LASER PROJECTORS ARE MAINTENANCE FREE, AND COUPLED WITH LOWER POWER CONSUMPTION, THE TOTAL COST OF OWNERSHIP (TCO) CALCULATION BECOMES EVEN MORE ATTRACTIVE. Offering up to 20,000 hours of operation, equating to nine lamp changes in a traditional lamp-based projector, laser technology delivers long lasting, consistent brightness with no lamp change required. With the addition of the filter-free dust-shielded design for both DLP and also brand new for LCD laser technology, with integrated liquid cooling system, eliminates air filter replacement for a significant reduction in maintenance. Call NEC: +44 (0) 870 120 1160 or for more information visit: www.nec-displays.co.uk www.ssl-nec.com @NEC_Display_UK

Education Business 22.7  

Business Information for Education Decision Makers