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Spring

1967 <Jtie e~ oft 11 <J~ (jaJu

1867-1967--A Century of Service To Hiaher Education


Our Cover The changing face o1 the Peru State College campus is revealed in the cove~ aerial photo taken in late April by James D. Levitt, associate professor of English and speech. At top, the Missouri River stretches from left to right, with the Nishnabotna River joining from the Missouri side. A highlight of the changing campus is Peru State's dormitory complex rising at lower right. The 350-bed dormitory system, scheduled for .co-educational occupancy, is.slated for use in September of 1967. The main campus is at left of the new dormitories.

Centennial Summer School Offers Workshops, Seminars

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Eight special three-week seminars and workshops will highlight the 1967 summer offerings at Peru State College during the 1967 Centennial summer. . The seminars an~ workshops are a portion of 86 courses being offered during the C?llege's two five-we~k summer terms. Fortysix of the courses will be offered during the first five-week term. The first fiveweek session will open with counseling and registration on Monday, June 5, and classes will start Tuesday, June 6. The first session will close July 7 •.. Registration for the second five-week term may be completed on June 5 or July 6-7. Classes for the second term will begin Monday, July 10. The session will close Friday, August 11, with commencement exercises for summer degree candidates at 6 p.m. During the first five-week session, students will have the opportunity to help Peru State observe Charter Day. Ch June 20, the College will commemorate the June 20, 1867, legislative action which created Peru State College as the first state-supported institution of higher learning. Peru State's special three-week work_shops and sem.inars include: June 19-July 7--Diagnostic ttnd Remedial Reading; Principles and Practices of Guidance; Speech Correction; Process Approach to Science. July 10-July 28--Psychology of Exceptional Children; First Aid; Conservation of Natural Resources; Aerospace Science. On campus housing for summer session students will be in two recently remodeled dormitories--Eliza Mo~gan Women's Residence hall and W.N. Delzell Men's Residence hall. The 1967 Peru State College summer session students will be the first to hold classes in Peru State's remodeled and fully air conditioned Administration Building. Dr. and Mrs. Samuel (Esther Delzell) Brownell, former faculty, '23, New Haven Conn., were May Fete visitors. Dr. Brownell' former U.S. Commissioner of Education Superintendent of the Detroit public schools is the son of the late Prof. Herbert Brown: ell, Sr., faculty member from 1893 to 1910 Mrs. Brownell is the daughter of W.N. Del: zell, faculty member, 1905 to 1939. Dr. Brownell is professor of Urban Educational Administration at Yale University.

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Fall Enrollment Expected To Jump to About 1200 Officials at Peru State College are expecting a fall enrollment of between 1,200 and 1,250, a jump of some 15 per cent. The increase will be made possible by the addition of new student living quarters in the new dormitory complex now under construction south of the main campus. Indications are that two-thirds of the six structure dormitory complex will be completed by September, in addition to a food services building located in conjunction with the 342 bed complex. The remainder of the complex would then be ready for the 1968 spring semester. Two-thirds completion of the dormitory complex would make some 230 additional living spaces available for the 1967 fall semester. Conjecture for the fall enrollment is somewhat hazardous due to an impending hike in tuition rates at the tax supported Nebraska colleges. Apparently tuition will be increased, how much is not known, and this increase could affect enrollment. Enrollment continued to move forward during the spring semester. Final tabulation of the late January registration revealed an enrollment of 993 students. The spring 1967 total was a three per cent increase over the 962 enrolled for the 1966 spring term. The spring total is only 47 less than the 1,040 enrolled during the fal 1 term, a fewer-than-normal reduction between the two semester's totals. Represented in the enrollment are 293 freshmen, 231 sophomores, 228 juniors, and 217 seniors. Twenty-four are post graduates, and night class enrollment accounts for 105 students.

1890 MEMORABILIA RECEIVED The College has received a collection of Peruviana from Lillian Jones (Mrs. Glen) Auble of Ord. The memorabilia belonged to her late parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles S. Wyne) Jones, who were members of the class of 1893. Mr. Jones has been deceased for a number of years, and Mrs. Jones passed away March 14 at Ord. Included in the collection is a so·uvenir photo plate of Normal Hall and the Library, photographs of students, faculty, campus and town of Peru, catalogs and programs. The class history and class poem were written by Mrs. Jones and Mr. Jones, respectively.

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CENTENNIAL ROUNDUP IN LINCOLN A Centennial Round-up of Lincoln area Peru alumni and friends is scheduled for Saturday, May 20, at 6:30 p.m. at the Lindell Palace, Lindell Hotel, Lincoln. Reservations are being handled by Virg~nia Ann Porr, secretary, 4815 C street, Lincoln.

cche@ ~ill UJtslab4 Volume XVI Number 1 Spring, 1967 Official publication of Peru State College. Published and distributed in November and May. Please notify college of change of address.

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Peruvians Duerfeldt, Young, Pate

Final Centennial Speakers Announced Peru State's Centennial Year observance will be closed out in grand style as three prominent Peru State graduates return to their alma mater to deliver addresses at Baccala~reate, Commencement, and Charter Day ceremonies. Dr. Neal S. Gomon, Peru State president, has announced that Rever:end Ben L. Du~rfeldt, ninister of the First Christian Church, Manhattan, Kan., will be the minister for Campus High school and College Baccalaureate services, Sundar afternoon, May 28, at 4 p.m. On the f9 lowing day, Dr. Kenneth D. Young, chairman of the department of education, School of the Ozarks, Point Lookout, Mo., will deliver the main address at the College Commencement, starting at 10 a.m. Dr. Robert S. Pate, professor of mathematics at Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti, will be the main speaker at the Charter Day observance, June 20.

DUER FELDT

YOUNG

PATE

A 1934 graduate of Peru State College, Dr. Pate is the son of the late Walter R. Pate who served Peru State as president from 1923 to 1946, the longest tenure of any Peru State president. His mother, Mrs. Gertrude Sewell Pate, fs '98,still lives in Peru. The Charter Day observance is to commemorate the action of the first Nebraska

legislature which on June 20, 1867, created Peru State as a tax supported college, the first in Nebraska. Dr. Young, a 1937 Peru State graduate, is the great grandson of Major William Dailey, one of the early settlers of Peru and the man who is reported to have made the first contribution, $500, toward the college's first building. Major Dailey was instrlli~ental in securin9 the services of J.M. McKenzie as the school s first president. Rev. Duerfeldt, a 1954 graduate, will be serving his second Centennial duty. He delivered the meditation at the Centennial Thanksl:?iving Convocation last November. Since graduating from Peru State, Rev. Duerfeldt has lived in Manhattan where he served on the faculty at Manhattan Bible College as dean of students and professor of music for nine years. In addition to his degree from Peru State, he holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Manhattan Bible College and a Master of Science in music from Kansas State University, Manhattan. He is presently in doctoral study at Kansas State University. Rev. Duerfeldt has held part-time pastorates at Rossville, Kan.; Bolckow, Mo.; and Barnard, Mo. His wife, the former Carol McKee of Pawnee City, received a two-year diploma from Peru State in 1953. The Duerfeldts are the parents of three children, Danny, 10; Kristin, 8; and David, 4. Dr. Young, the Commencement speaker, was granted the Master's degree in education al administration by the University of Denver and the Doctoral degree from that same institution. He taught in Nebraska secondary schools for 14 years, most of that time at North Platte. From 1955 to 1958, he was assistant to the dean of the college of arts and sciences at the University of Denver. He served as dean of Oklahoma College for Women at Chickasha from 1958 to 1965, (continued on page 14)

100-Year Events Cover Varied Topics Since the. publication of the 1966 fall Peru Stater, the return of two illustrious Peru State alumni for major Centennial Convocation presentations has highlighted the College's birthday celebration. In all, 10 major events have been presented since our last publication. On February 1, Dr. E. C. Beck, class of 1912 and head of the Peru State English department from 1923 to 1927, presented an all-college convocation on Western Folklore. Then on March 9, Marion Marsh Brown, a 1927 Peru State graduate and student of Dr. Beck, delivered a Centennial lecture on Nebraska Authors. Dr. Beck is professor emeritus of English at Central Michigan State University, Mt. Pleasant, and a nationally known authority on Western Folklore. Since retiring from Central Michigan in 1958 after 30 years at that institution, Dr. and Mrs. Beck, the former Mae Miller, class of 1912, served eight years as chairman of the division of humanities, and English instructor, respect-

ively, at Stillman College, Tuscaloosa, Ala. Dr. Beck's second retirement which started last June was interrupted again this year to teach a trimester at Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton. Recent word from the Becks indicates that by the time we go to press, they' 11 be in Europe touring Poland, Hungary, Germany, and Russia. In his February lecture to Peru State students and faculty, Dr. Beck colorfully covered Nebraska's folklore heritage. Dr. Beck has authored several volumes of ballads and folklore, including Songs of the Michigan Lumberjacks, Lore of the Lumber Camp, and They Knew Paul Bunyan. Marion Marsh Brown, professor of English at the University of Omaha and widely known authoress, paid tribute to Nebraska Authors during her March 9 lecture. She gave tribute to Mari Sandoz, John G. Neihardt, and Willa Cather. Mrs. Brown also honored her former teacher, Dr. E. C. Beck, and she said "It was his contribution to my educa' (continued on page 14)

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Gatherings at Hayward, Westminster

California Grads Celebrate Centennial Peruvians in Northern and Southern California gath~red in Hayward and Westminster March 4 and 11, res2ectively, to observe the lOOth birthday of Peru State College. The Northern California meeting was the tenth such event for the group, and-the Southern Californians met for their seventh. At the Westminster meeting, the chapter selected a seascape watercolor painting by Milford Zornes of Pasadena to be presented to the College as a Centennial gift. The purchase was made from the Oak Leaf fund established at the first meeting of the chapter. The watercolor is of Woods Cove, painted on the Pacific Coast near Laguna Beach. Mr. Zornes, a nationalll known artist, has exhibited at the Metropo itan Art Gallery in New York City, and his works are among the permanent collections at the Los Angeles Art Museum and at the Pentagon in Washington. The formal presentation is scheduled for one of the Centennial events at Peru State later in the school year. At the Northern California meeting in Hayward, Miss Susan Norton, class of 1894, daughter of W.W. Norton, president of Peru State from 1893 to 1896, was the earliest graduate present. She resides at Stockton. Two 1906 class members--Miss Vanche Plumb, Santa Ana, and Maude Boyd Oglesby, Porterville, and Dr. J. Harold Williams, '08, Los Angeles, were the earliest graduates at the Southern California meeting. Present at both meetings were Miss Nona Palmer, a 1915 graduate and professor emeritus of commerce who divides her residence between Whittier, Calif., and Bradshaw. She was accompanied by her niece Virginia Simmons (Mrs. Winston) Stoody, 2 yr. '27, Whittier. Five other former faculty members attended the Westminster meeting--Alice Swenson Giesecke, San Bernardino, math instructor from 1943-45; Mrs. Iva Dunn Wiley, Santa Ana, speech instructor from 1915-21; Wa~do Willhoft San Bernardino,a 1926 grad and instructor' of English and history from 192628; Glen Gilkeson, Riverside, a 1925 grad and football coach from 1930-37; and Cecile Sheely (Mrs. W.A.) Kelly, Long Beach, secretary to the late J.W. Crabtree, president, from 1904-10. Donald K. Carlile, director of special services and alumni secretary, presented a narrated slide program, "Peru's Pr~ud Past," which highlighted th~ 100-year his~ory of Peru State. The 30-minute presentation was first presented as a Centennial year convocation in November. . John L. Lewis,of Peru, president of the Peru Achievement Foundation, addr~s~ed the Southern California chapter, outlinmg t~e objectives and accompli~hmen ts of. the organization since its establishment in 1955. The Northern California chapter elected W. Hubert Johnson, '37, Modesto, ~residen~; J. B. Johnson, '49, Sunnyvale, vic.e-fresident; Genevieve McFadden (Mrs. Bil ) McNal 1y 1 '57, Hayward, secretary-treasurer, . and A.3. Clayburn, Stockton, professor emeritus of geography, corresponding secretary.

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The Southern California chapter elected Homer Hatcher, '33, Glendale, president; Dean Grass, '32, Canoga Park. vice-president, and William Quentin Pharaoh, '56, Los Alamitos, secretary-treasurer. Phy 11 is De Long (Mrs â&#x20AC;˘ Guy ) Hal fer t y , 2 yr. '43, Pomona, chairman of the Oak Leaf fund of the Southern California chapter, was in charge of the selection of the painting. She conducted balloting on seven of Mr. Zornes' work before final selection was made by the chapter. The two meetings attracted 99 Peruvians and guests--30 at Northern California and 69 at the Southern California meeting.

Longfellow Writes 100-Year History of Peru State College A history of 100-year-old Peru State College, written by Ernest Longfellow, is scheduled to come off the press in mid-May in conjunction with Peru St~te's Centennial celebration. Inspired by the twin Centennials of the State of Nebraska and Peru State College, Longfellow's history is entitled, The Normal

on the Hill: One Hundred Years of Peru State College. Later, Longfellow, who is employed by the College as a carpenter, hopes to expand this work into a history of the town of Peru. Longfellow, a 1921 Peru State graduate, writes a weekly sportsman's column for the Auburn Newspapers, and he has published articles in various lliagazines. Recently he wrote an article for the U.S. Travel Service on Nebraska for inclusion in overseas publications outlining tourist attractions in the United States. Longfellow has also written a section on sports and recreation for inclusion in a Centennial history of Nemaha County. The volume on Peru State College history is being published by The Augustine Company of Grand Island. Upon its completion, the book may be purchased at the Office of Special Services at Peru State College. The price is $2.75 if purchased at the office or $3.00 by mail. Only 1,000 copies are being published. If interested, contact the office of Special Services, Peru State College, Peru, Nebraska 68421.

1967 Yearbook on Sale C. James Keck, instructor of English and journalism, has announced that extra copies of the 1967 Centennial Peruvian, college yearbook, will be available for purchase by alurmii, former students, and friends of the college. Delivery of the yearbooks to the college is expected in the second half of May. Price of the yearbook is set at $7.00 and may be purchased by sending remittance to Mr. C. James Keck, Peruvian sponsor, Peru State College, Peru, Nebr., 68421.


Placement Bureau Report

Nebraska Salary Increases Pass Neighbors In figures through April 18, Harold W. Johnson, director of placement, has announced 98 job placements, involving January and May candidates for graduation and Peru State alumni. The total includes 29 January and 35 May candidates for graduation, and 34 graduates. All but one of the placements involves the teaching ~rofession. Mr. Johnson indicated that the teaching field this year in Nebraska offers the best opportunity in many years for the teacher. He cited salary increases across the state which have brought the average salary in Nebraska public schools above the averages ~f both Kansas and Missouri. As a result, the competition for good teachers and especially good experienced teachers is even more keen than in the past. The critical areas which need more teachers than are in supply, Johnson said, are English, mathematics, the sciences, music, elementary education, and w~men's physical education. Those accepting positions, thtir home towns or present teaching location in the case of alumni, and their new locations include: Mid-academic year placements: Elementary candidates--Lola Baker, Auburn, to Auburn; Angela Furnas, Brownville, to Auburn; Eugene Smith, Auburn, to Southeast Nebraska Consolidated at Stella; Robert Lierz, Peru, to Nebraska City; Myrtle Diest, Elk Creek, to Tecumseh; Pamela Lett, Nebraska City, to Sarasota, Fla,; Cheryl Armstrong, Nebraska City, to Fullerton; Bonnie Anderson, Omaha, to Superior; Kathy Black, Omaha, to Omaha; Jackie Dodson, Plattsmouth, to Fullerton; Teri Kisby Steen, Council Bluffs, Iowa, to Council Bluffs, Iowa; Susan Kenworthy, Villisca, Iowa, to Council Bluffs, Iowa. Secondary candidates--Leland Schneider, Auburn, to Humboldt; Donald Stuart, Auburn, to Hebron; Melvin Hester, Auburn, to Central City; Larry Christensen, Nebraska City, to Bellevue; Richard Berthold, Nebraska City, to Tabor, Iowa; Frank Ruecker, Omaha, to Omaha. Beverly Kitelinger, Omaha, to Woman's Job Corps, Omaha; David Perry, Goff, Kan., to Yutan; LaVera Bennett, Sabetha, Kan., to Baileyville, Kan.; William Anderson, Chester, Pa., to Friend; Wesley Dickey, Benedict, to St. Paul; Robert Peck, Peru, toHorton, Kan.; Ronald Robbins, Fairless Hills, Pa., to Valley; Charles Stoner, Tecumseh, to Moravia, Iowa; Philip Dorssom, Lancaster, Kan., to Baileyville, Kan.; Dan Strecker, Preston, to Elk Creek. Non-teaching placement--Wil 1 iam Mc Vickâ&#x20AC;˘ er, Millard, to co~nercial "department of General Telephone and Telegraph, Grinnell, Iowa. ¡ May candidates: Elementary--Harold Hylton, Sabetha , Kan . , to Lee' s Summit, Mo. ; Roger Hein, Fairbury, to Gothenburg; Richard Dorsch, Auburn, to Gretna; Nancy Vanderbeek, Adams, to Holland, Mich.; Donna Kohrs, Johnson, to Johnson; Ronald Broers, Nebraska City, to Alliance; Patricia Corrigan, Casey, Iowa, to Williamsburg, Iowa; Pat Knippel-_

mier, Auburn to Des Moines, Iowa; Sally Kelly, Falls City, to Bellevue; Nancy Larson, Villisca, Iowa, to Beatrice. Bonita Jacobsen, Otoe, to Valparaiso. Secondary--Gayle Ellison, Holmesville, to Superior; Roger Lucas, Dawson, to Arcadia; Lonnie Bohling, Tecumseh, to Treynor, Iowa; Rodger Bassett, Syracuse, to Giltner; Palma Holding, Burt, Iowa, to Lourdes Central of Nebraska City; Gary Young, Adams, to Lewiston; Elizabeth Cook, Sabetha, Kan., to Sabetha, Kan.;Regina Stalder, Sabetha, Kan., to Sabetha, Kan.; Devon Adams, Peru, to Villisca, Iowa; Gary Mendenhall, Morrill, Kan., to Axtell, Kan.; Robert Uhri, Table Rock, to Table Rock; John Witler, Auburn, to Table Rock; Margaret Albin, Humboldt, to Pawnee City; Dave Shuey, Lewiston, to Prague; Dale Allensworth, Auburn, to Jefferso~ Iowa; Roger Slaughter, Glenwood, Iowa, to Farragut, Iowa; Vernon Krenzer, Tecumseh, to Tecumseh; Dean Cain, Thurman, Iowa, to Shenandoah, Iowa; John Patterson, Peru, to Wolbach; Richard Casady, Lewis, Iowa, to Atlantic, Iowa; Larry Rhoten, Syracuse, to Valparaiso; Jerry Marks, Sullivan, Mo., to Laddonia, Mo.; Connie Radamacher, Johnson, to Essex, Iowa; Joseph Smith, Mt. Holly, N.J., to Des Moines, Iowa. Alumni placerrents--Terry Harlow, Lewiston, to Pawnee City; Marjorie Viets, Rulo, to Mound City, Mo.; Floey Thomas, Sabetha, Kan., Rural, to Baileyville, Kan.; Bertis Adams, Grinnell, Iowa, to Des Moines, Iowa; Cheryl Armstrong, Fullerton, to Nebraska City; Opal Bohl, Nemaha County Rural, to Southeast Nebraska Consolidated at Stella; Victor Graham, Meadow Grove, to Southeast Nebraska Consolidated at Stella; Jerry Beck.,. mann, Fullerton, to Lincoln; Nancy Broers, Nebraska City, to Alliance; Lucille Ruffner, Otoe County Rural, to Nebraska City; Darrel 1 Brown, Carlton, Ore., to Port Orford, Ore.; Philip Rihner, Dow City, Iowa, to Lineville, Iowa. Roger Killion, Lafayette, Ind., to West Lafarette, Ind.; Nile McCoy, Walnut, Iowa, to C arence, Iowa; Donna Van Buskirk, Oakland, Iowa, to Clarence, Iowa; Bonnie Linderman, Adams, to Humboldt; Roger Crook, Diller, to Southeast Nebraska Consolidated at Stella; Alan Lavigne, Huntington Beach, Calif., to Homer; Alicia Andrews, Millard, to Hilcomb, Kan.; Marian Brammer, Humboldt, to Henderson; Richard Gerber, Johnson, to Hastings; Roy F. Laue, Venango, to Harvard; Robert Jennings, Ruskin, to Sabetha, Kan.; Luke Cox, Uehling, to Aurora; Karen Mcintire Hamm, Lewiston, to Tecumseh; Virginia Jones, Johnson County Rural, to Tecumseh; Louise G. Dusenb~ry, Pawnee City Rural, to Humboldt; Mr. and Mrs. John (Sara Lyons)Hippe, Springfield, to Council Bluffs, Iowa. Richard Kennedy, Shenandoah, Iowa, to Savannah, Mo.; Phil Niemann, Kansas City, Mo., to Shawnee Mission, Kan.; Donald Stange, Stanton, to Shenandoah, Iowa; Mr. and Mrs. Harvey (Madelyn Bleach) Fraser, Genoa, to Gothenburg. Remember! 1967 Homecoming Saturday 1 October 14


Damp Season for Spring Sports Quartet Weather has plagued the four-pronged spring sports season at Peru State. Rain and cold weather forced the cancellation of one baseball double header and the postponement of three twin bills until a later date. One track meet was postponed and a tennis match suffered the same fate. Coach Joe Pelisek's Peru State baseball team, through April 28, had run into tough luck in winning four and dropping eight games in the first portion of the 28-game schedule. Through the first twelve games, the Bobcats were stymied in sweeping any of the six twin bills. Splits were earned with Crowder College, Neosho, Mo.; John F. Ken~ nedy College, ,Wahoo; Washburn University, and Kearney State. Double header losses were inflicted by Creighton University and Northwest Missouri State. A second double header against Crowder College was cancelled and twin bills with Wayne State, Hastings, and St. Benedict's were moved back in the schedule due to rain-caused postponements. The Bobcat baseball team, hopeful of an NCC championship when the season started, have had their hopes threatened by the late rescheduling which may take its toll on the Peru State pitching staff. Coach Jack Mcintire's track and field team has shown marked improvement since the season started indoors in mid February. Indoors, Peru defeated Omaha University and Nebraska Wesleyan in a triangular and participated in the Kearney State and Kansas State University relays. Outdoors, Peru defeated Tarkio 98-38; placed second in a triangular at Northwest Missouri State (N\\M 86, Peru 80, Clarinda, Iowa, JuCo 14); edged Wayne State 76-69; and Nebraska Wesleyan 92-

.5.8. â&#x20AC;˘.

Still rema1n1ng on the schedule are the Drake Relays, a triangular with Tarkio and Concordia, the Wayne State Invitationa~ the Howard Wood Relays at Sioux Falls, S.u., a dual with Qnaha University, and the NCX: meet at Oiadron. Two freshmen have turned in outstanding performances. Mike Mulvaney, Independence, _Iowa. bettered Peru State's discus record of

Five Home Grid Conflicts Wayne is Homecoming Foe The 1967 football schedule released by head coach Dr. Ervin Pitts reveals five home games and four engagements on the road. The schedule includes the same nine opponents that furnished the 1966 opposition. Homecoming will be celebrated October 14. Wayne State College will furnish the opposition that afternoon. The complete schedule: Sep. Sep. Sep. Sep. Oct. Oct. Oct. . Oct. Nov.

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9 16 23 30

7 14 21 28 4

Tarkio College at Peru St. Mary of the Plains at Peru Northwest Missouri at Maryville Kearney State at Peru Chadron State at Chadron Wayne State (Homecoming) at Peru Hastings College at Hastings Doane Colle~ at Peru Missouri Valley at Marshall

158'6W' set by Gner Meeker in 1947 with a toss of 160'6X". Sprinter Rich Rech, Grand Island, equalled the 27 year-old 100 yard dash mark of Jim Mather of :09.7. Peru's distance medlay team clipped :03.2 seconds off the one year-old record. This year's team of Jim Watson, Red Cloud; Jim O'Donoghue, Worcester, Mass.; Roger Neujahr, Gresham; and Tim Hendricks, Omaha, ran the distance medlay in 10:50.8 for the record. During the indoor segment of the season, five new marks were set for future 'Peruvians to shoot at. Tim Hendricks turned in mile and two mile standards (4:23.9 and 9:44 times, respectively); George Goepfert, Rockford, Ill., high jumped 6' l" ; Gerald Wilson, Cleves, Ohio, vaulted 13'W'; and Mike Mulvaney put the shot 46'9". In golf and tennis, success has been spotty. Coach Ervin Pitts' golfers have won one and lost three while Coach Darrell Wininger' s tennis team has won one and lost one.

So-So Hoop Campaign Harvests 12-13 Record For only the third time in the past 11 years, Peru State College suffered a losing basketball season during the 1966-67 campaign, posting 12 victories and 13 losses. Biggest disappointment was the 2-6 Nebraska College Conference record which slid the Peruvians from the 1966 championship to a 1967 tie for the bottom rung on the loop ladder. Chadron State captured the title. Two bright spots in the season were tournament victories at the McPherson (Kan.) College Tournament and at the Simpson College Tournament at Indianola, Iowa. Unfortunately, the tournament success didn't last as the Bobcats lost out in the championship game of their own Holiday Tournament, hosted this year at Tecumseh. Three lettermen were lost this year ~raduation: Dean Cain, Thurman, Iowa; Bil Rinne, Burchard; Ron Snodgrass,Seward. Snodgrass became the second highest scorer in all-time Peru records with 1,369 points, and Cain.the fifth best scorer in history with a career total of 1,132 points. Scores of games: Peru score first column. 82 Tarkio College 96 84 Kearney State 65 65 McPherson 60 76 N.W. Missouri 69 83 St. Mary 81 77 Doane College 84 67 Emporia State 65 57 Tarkio College 50 64 St. Benedict's 93 78 Hastings College 64 70 Washburn U. 86 86 Wayne State 98 77 Huron College 80 73 Kearney State 81 75 Southern S.D. 70 93 Doane College 84 61 General B'dle 71 85 Chadron State 114 83 Cul.-Stockton 81 79 Chadron State 103 85 Baker U. 73 73 Hastings College 86 103 Cul.-Stockton 95 84 Wayne State 89 74 N.W. Missouri 77

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James Blake, history instructor at Peru for the 1946-47 year, is currently with the foreign service in Tripoli, Libya.


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Grads, Former Students Continue Support The first four months of 1967 indicate that the Peru Achievement Foundation may have difficulty matching the record-setting year of 1966. During 1966, PAF receipts were $14,464, coming from 665 alumni, 46 friends, 72 pr~s­ ent and former staff members, and 26 civic, educational, service, and fraternal groups. In the first four months of 1967, receipts have been $4,864. During the same period last year, receipts were $6, 635. Records reveal that the Foundation has ~rovided $17,970 in matching funds for the National Defense Student Loan program since 1959. These funds have made possible loans totaling $179,702 to worthy students. During the 1966-67 academic year, the PAF provided $3,698 in matching NDSL funds. In the same period, scholarship awards totaled $6,171. Unless more res_ponse is realized, it appears likely that 1967 receipts will trail those of last year. Only you can help re-

1890s A.O. MAJORS. "96 WALTER P. CAMPBELL. "98 ADDIE CRANMER (MRs. J.W.) Coo INGTON. 3-YR. - 9.5 ANDREW J. Wt LSON·. • 97 H. CLYDE FILLEY, "99 I. HOMER WATT. "98 WARREN B. CATLIN. '99 SUSAN NORTON, • 94 1900s CORA CHITTENDEN (MRS. 0.S.) DUFFENBACK, '09 MAY FRANK (MRS. J. H.) RHOADS, • 09 ELIZABETH L. MALLALIEU, '05 LENA HALLETT (MRS. S. J.) ELLENBERGER, '08 EMILY REDFORD (MRS. C. W.) Gooo. '04 ALTA GRAY (MRS. LLOYD) DENSLOW, '06 ROBERT B. RAY, "06 MR. & MRs. FRED (AGNES BLANK) PAGE. FS • 07, • 09 IVA GLASGOW (MRS. GEORGE) HANSEN. "08 GLEN 0. JENKINS. "09 CLAIRE McDERMET NICHOLLS '09 MyRTLE KJLMER (MRS. EARL) WINTERMUTE, • 09 MyRTLE YOCUM COMSTOCK, • 09 DR. HENRY J. BRO,,ERSON, • 06 MAT M. MURPHY, '03 MAUDE BOYD (MRS. C. K.) OGLESBY, '06 STELLA M. HARRISS, "08 MR.& MRS. HOMER (CLARA HOSTERMAN) MATTHEWS. FS "O'i, • 07 EMMA MARQUARDT ROWALT, • 05 ELLEN WAHLSTROM (MRS. PHIL) EKBLAD, "09 BENJAMIN HARRISON, '07 LULU PASCO, '05 GUSSIE KOEHLER, "07 ROSA LEE (MRS. J.E.) CLARKE. FS "06 IONE CHAPPEL (MRS. C.C.) PAXTON, '06 ETHEL PEARCE (MRS. H.R.) ZIMMERMAN, FS '09 CRENE KULP (MRs. H.E.) DIXON. '07 DR. CLYDE B. MOORE, '09 MARY Jo ANDERSON, "08 OLGA GEREKE (MRS. 0.L.) WEBB, "09 DAVID L. CARLSON, "08 GLADYS MAJORS (MRS. C.W.) GALE, '07

J. HAROLD WtLLIAMS. '08 CHAUNCEY W. SMITH, "09 LILLIE WAHLSTROM (MRS. HERBERT) JOHNSON. "07 ARTHUR J. WICKLAND, "07 1910s FRANKE. Hosie. ·15 MR. & MRS. B.F. (BERTHA TRANMER) DALLAM,BOTH "16 EROINE BARNARD PEASE, '17 HATTIE LILLY (MRS. R. H,) SLAGLE, '13 GLADYS A. BoYo. "16 ETTA ARNDT PASCO, "18 ALICE C. GRIESS, "16 LAURA KRAUSE DAVIES, "15 IRENE FERNEAU (MRs. L.E.) WYLIE. "15 HELEN MAJORS (MRS. J. HOWARD) RIDDLE. '15 FRANCES CHEZ (MRs. PAUL) KINGSTON, '1 l CHARLES ANDREWS, "14 HANNA JENSEN. '15 MR.& MRS. CLARENCE A. (AUDREY CHASE) HOWIE, '15.'18 Roy B. COEUR, "15 E. ALTA GARRISON, "15 FLOYD J. STEPHENSON, "16 EULALIE SHAFFER OHLSSON. FS '11 NELL KELLEY (MRS. PAUL) RosEAN "17 GRAYCE TEICH (MRs. G.V.) CASTER, "15 MAIE OSBORN (MRS. W. J.) LEVERENZ, "17 MILDRED GAMBELL (MRS. CHESTER) WEAVER, • 17 MARY OGG (MRS. W. N.) DELZELL, "17 LI LL IE E. PARSON (MRs. C.A.) WEEKLY, "17 ESTHER MURDOCK STOKES, FS '19 EBBA WAHLSTROM (MRS. ROBERT) EDSTROM, '12 LAURA SALZMANN (MRS. W .G.} Fr ROVED. '16 BERTHA M. BLOSS, '15 LENYCE BURNEY MARSH, '1 7 ALICE HUNT (MRS. R.C.) HARRISS,"10 ELIZABETH SCHELKOPF (MRS. HENRY) DRAKE, '13 ETHEL KELLY (MRS. R.M.) HANSON, "15 EDNA MCKIBBON (MRS. ANSON) MURPHY, '17 CORRINE WHITFIELD SMITH, • 15 ELLA T. BICKERT, '18 ESTHER ANDERSON WELLS,'12

verse this trend. The PAF is apEreciative of those who have contributed. It is hoped many others may find it possible to do so during this the lOOth birthdar of Peru State College. A gift of $ ,000 from Mrs. Inice Dunning of Forest Hill Manor, Pacific Grove, Calif., has been received by the PAF. The gift, to establish a scholarship in industrial arts, is in memory of Mrs. Dunning's son, Mac, a 1930 Peru Prep graduate and' a former student at Peru State in 1930-31 who died while continuing his studies at the University of Nebraska. Mrs. Dunning, a 1925 graduate and former Dean of Women at Peru State, is now blind and lives in a retirement home. It was Mrs. Dunning's wish to establish an I.A. scholarship because, "It was in that field that Mac found such pleasure," she said. Below are listed the contributors to the Peru Achieveme~t Foundation from November 1, 1966, through April 20, 1967. EVA PICKWELL (MRS. R.C.) McRAE, "16 FLO ANDERSON FEISTNER, '17 BEULAH A. HARRISS. '11 CORA WRIGHT KOENIG, '17 JOE E. GLASGOW, FS "17 MINNIE BAYER MCFARLAND, '14 LYDIA l. ADAMS, '12 BERTHA POTEET (MRS. FRED· ERIC W.) KUHLMAN, "17 CARR IE C. HANSEN, '10 MR. & MRS. CARROLL LEWIS, HE '17 Lours R. KILZER, '15 CATHER !NE GREENLEE, 12 BERTHA DETWILER, '12 MARYE. FISHER, '15 MILLIE GILBERT CHRISTY, 0

'13 CECELIA WEHRS FORELL,'11 DELIA TARTSCH, '10 LILLIAN PORTENIER, '17 HAZEL f·lARSHA LL (MRS. J.B. ) COOK '16 ETHEL JOHNSON (MRS. HENRY) ARKELL, '11 ELLA V. ANDERSON, '15 BESS IE FROST GETTERT, '13 MILDRED HUFFER (MRS. ALFRED) NIELSEN, '17 RALPH W. WAYBRIGHT, '15 1920s NEVA HOAK (MRS. LYLE) NICHOLS, '21 MYRTLE MAXWELL, '26 LEONA VANCE HANNAFORD,'10 ERMA GUYOT (MRS. ELMER) KIRBY, 2 YR. '29 ELLA WOODWARD (MRS. ERNEST) GRIFF IN, '20 DR. JERE C. MICKEL, '26 MONA KE I TH (MRS. GERA LO M.) FRANC IS, "21 ELLA TEICH (MRS. HERBERT) RILEY, 2 YR. '24 IVA REAGAN (MRS. HARRY H.) HUSTON, '25 MR. & MRS. L.W. (WJNN IFRED TEICH) BUISING, 2 YR. '25, 26: 2 YR. '25 DR. GLEN H. JODER, '28 L. V. PRANTE, '20 MR. & MRS. ELDRED 0. (THELMA HowE) MORTON, 1 YR '22, 2 YR. '23 RUTH BLOMQUIST RUMLEY, 2 YR. '24 MR. & MRS. JAMES W. (LUCILLE NEWyOMER)DELZELl, "29, FS 29 KATHARINE SCHILL, '20 HAZEL HUTCHINSON (MRS. JACK) ANDERSON. 2 YR. "27 DR. & MRS. ROBERT H. (MYRTLE LAW) KNAPP, '27, 2 YR 0 "27

!SABEL HARTLEY (MRS. C.H.) PEDEN, '26 ERNESTINE ROBERTSON (MRS. KENNETH) STILES, 2 YR. "25 MARY SUE MOORE (MRS. DONNELL) POWER, 2 YR. '26 MR. & MRS. WALTER (ELIZABETH SAVIDGE) BUETTGENBACH, '26 "28 IRENE VEAL KUCERA,'26 LIBBY KUKRAL, '27 MR. & MRS. P,a.uL V. (MARGARET THOMAS) WILCOX, '22, '27 DR. INEZ RAY WELLS, '27 HARRIET GLASGOW (MRS. GEORGE W.) HOLTHUSEN, '23 RUTH KELL I GAR , '2 1 EXHA AKINS (MRS. WALTER). SADILEK, "27 FAYE EMERICK LAUGHLIN, '25 MARJE A. LE Po!DEVIN, '24 WALDO WiLLHOFT, '26 GENEVIEVE NICHOLAS (MRS. W1 LLARD) HAYWARD, "29 LAURA COLL INS (MRS. LELAND) JOHNSON, 2 YR. '27 LORENE E. PARSONS, '29 LOLA COE, '25 MR. & MRS. ROY L. (ERMAL GRAFF) KLAURENS, '28, FS '28 1 930s MARVEL LUCAS DODSON, FS '39 DR. JAMES E. PERDUE, '37 MR. & MRs. ARTHUR (ETHEL FLICK) BRUCE, '38, FS '30 BERNARD BARISAS, '38 JOE H. HALTERMAN, '38 ALPHADEEN CAMPBELL NORRIS, FS '37 CHRISTINE SoENNJCHSEN (MRs. EDWARD) LOOMIS, FS '30 JESS IE M. JOY, '33 MARY HERVEY WOLF, '33 GERALDINE RUSSELL (MRS. HARVEY) APPLEGATE, 2 YR '31 DR. & MRS. WAYNE 0. (ADELE PENTERMAN) REED, '35,'36 CLARENCE CR ANOE LL, '35 DR. LLOYD E. MCCANN, "35 ERWIN JUILFS, '38 MUSA WAGONER MALDE, FS '39 PAUL LANDOLT, '33 MR. & MRS. FREDERICK (DOR· OTHY COATNEY) WOLTER, '32 '39 HAZEL BROADY (MRS. ALBERT) LAMPE , 2 YR • ' 32 LANGFORD A. WAGGONER, '34 SuE WESNER ALLISON, 2 YR. '30 RUTH NAVIAUX (MRS. ROBERT) HAN;5EN, '35

F.


Murphy is the father of two sons, a medical doctor and a certified public accountant. Mary Jo Anderson, 08, is now living at Acacia apartments, 762 Mendecino avenue, Santa Rosa, Calif. Arthur J. Wickland, '07, 463 Atchison, street, Pasadena, Calif.,. notes that he was the first psychology laboratory assistant under Professor Hoyt, and was first tenor on Peru's first men's quartet. The group worked together from 1905 through the summer of 1908 and appeared at all colleges in the state. After playing basketball with Bert Swenson, '09, Mr. Wickland and Bert taught at River Falls (Wis.) State Normal from 1912 until 1916 under President J. W. Crabtree. Mr. Wickland, now 84, reports that he and Mrs. Wickland have been married 57 years. Lauren Steven, '04, notes that I'ary Crawford, '04, is a resident of Forest Hill Manor in Pacific Grove, Calif., as well as Peruvians Urs. Inice Dunnine, '25, former dean of wo,nen, and Frank Stock ton, '01. Miss Steven lives at 70() North Stoneman, Alhambra, Calif. Ora Jndrews Farrett, '09, writes from her home at 337 East Olive, Fort Collins, Colo., that she hopes to be presellt for the Centennial year commencement, May 29. Vanche E. Plumb, ;06, 1717 Sydney street, Santa Ana, Calif., has been retired from teaching since 1944, but keeps busy with work in National Audubon society, United Nations, conservation, and church activities. Fthel Pearce (Mrs. f!.R.) Zimmerman, fs '09, writes from 1319 Calder road, McLean, Va., that she is pleased to know of Peru State's progress and sends best wishes for a successful Centennial.

1890s Bertha M. Spearman Burbank, 1800 Sharon place, San Marino, Calif., completed the two year elementary course in 1899. She notes that J. A. Beattie was the principal of Peru Normal at that time. In sending his thanks for the Centennial brochure, "The first 100 years," I. Homer Watt, 'QB, Green Ridge, Pa., notes there have been many improvements since his graduation. Ile reports he is quite well even thoughhesuffered a stroke in 1960. He lives with his dau5hter. Addie Belle Cranmer (Mrs. John) Codinrrton, '93, 446 Sycamore, Pleasanton, Calif., writes that she recalls with pleasure the beloved President W. W. Norton and many of her classmates at Peru.

1900s Dr. Clyde B. Moore, '09, professor of education emeritus, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., is the author of Robert Godard: Pioneer Racket Box, published in November, 1966, by Bobbs-Merrill. In 1963, he was elected chairman emeritus of the New York State Educational Conference Board. Dr. Moore's home is at 230 Waite avenue, Ithaca. M. M. Murphy, '03, a teacher for 65 years, matriculated at Peru in 1898 and completed the ·one-year trainer course. After one year of teaching in a rural Johnson county school, he re-entered Peru in 1900 and received his Life Certificate in 1903. He was principal at Axtell for one year and then became associated with business colleges. In 1910, he was co-founder of the Griffin-Murphy Business College, Fifth and Virginia, Seattle. During the time of its operation, more than _60,000 students have been enrolled. A widower since 195 7 , Mr.

Lillie Wahlstrom (Mrs. Herbert) Johnson, '07, writes that she hopes to attend

some of the events of the Centennial year .

Story Relates Homestead Life of Peruvian Family Appearing serially in the Springview (Nebr.) Herald is "End of No Where," a special Centennial feature written by the late Mamie Mutz, '04, art teac~er from 1905 until 1913. The story, according to her sister, Eunice Mutz Heard, '16, ~f 4527 Beaver, Des Moines, relates the childhood of the Mutz children on the homestead of Mr. and r&s. Otto Mutz at Burton, near Springview. Purchased in the middle eighties, for 25 years the Mut;i;;es "ranched"and raised a ·family of 10 children. Mr. Mutz was an early day graduate of Peru. According to Mrs. Heard, whose husband is C. H. Heard, a biology teacher at Peru at the time she was a student, "we are all graduates of Peru." The family remained on the ranch until 1910 when they left, mainly because the children needed more schooling. The story was started Ly Mamie Mutz about 1936 when she was in New York on a sabbatical leave from Stout Institute at Menomonie, Wis. While in New York she was involved in an accident and was hospitalize~

8

for three years. It was during this time she started writing of the years on the ranch. Mrs. Heard helped research the information, and with the assistance of her sister, Hofe (Mrs. W. H.) Young, '15, 3434 North Mil brook avenue, Fresno, Calif., the story was organized into twenty chapters. Miss Mutz remained an invalid and was blind until her death in 195Q. The editors of the Peru Stater feel that this work is a fitting tribute to the pioneers of Nebraska, and predict that it will be published later in book form. In the chapter dealing with the Fourth of July celebration, she relates the introduction of the speaker of the day--her father: "He told the people that her father had been educated at the State Normal School in Peru, that he had taught school, but had recently brought his family to make their home in Keya Paha County. Chris said they were lucky to have a man who could make an address Ii ving among them."


She notes that her sisters, Ellen Wahlstrom (Mrs. Phil) Ekblad, '09, and Ebba Wahlstrom (Mrs. Robert) Edstrom, '12, still live in the home town of Wahoo. Mrs. Johnson's home is at 724 Vattier, Manhattan, Kan.

1910s Uelen Courtright, '18, has been retired from teaching after 35 years in Mt. Diablo High school in Concord, Calif., where she resides at 1025 Ridgepark drive. She makes frequent trips to Nebraska. Alta Williams Casselberry, '16, taught in Nebraska for five years after graduation. In 1948 she retired from the Long Beach City schools after serving as a supervisor of guidance and later as senior high principal. &1e received her bachelor's degree from Stanford. Iler address is 852 East Ocean boulevard, Long¡ Beach. Fern Huston Rlair, '18, 2247 Earl avenue, Lont:;¡ Beach, Cal if., taught in the Long f~ach Public schools ur1til her retirement in 195Q, Flo yd T. Doane, '18, is teaching part time at Michigan Technol ogica 1 University at Houghton after retiring as associate professor of physical chemistry in 1Q64. Mrs. Doane is a tOeological engineer in mining research. The Doanes live at 1210 East fifth avenue, Houghton, Mich. i'vfr. and Mrs. Floyd (Ida Maude Aegerter) Stephenson, '16, fs '16, 3905 West FiftyEight street, Minneapolis, Minn., regret they were unable to be present for the 50year reunion of their class last May. Mrs. Hazel Marshall Cook, '16, is now living at 20900 Homestead road, C-7, Cupertino, Calif. She reports the death of her husband, J. B. Cook, February 27, 1967,

Miss Anne M. Goshen Claimed by Death Miss Anne Goshen, a member of the faculty of Peru State from 1899 to 1913 as superintendent of the Training School and teacher of psychology and pedagogy, died December 13. She was 101 years old. She resigned her position at Peru to join the faculty of West Chester Normal School, her alma mater, where she served until her retirement in 1928. On October 30, 1966, she witnessed the dedication of the new seven-story women's residence hall named for her.

Semi-Centennial Year Class Reunion on Baccalaureate

For the second time in their relationship with Peru State College, the class of 191~ will be on hand as Peru State celebrates its founding. This time, May 28, the 1917 graduates will return to the Campus of a Thousand Oaks for the 50-year reunion of their graduating class in this the Centennial Year of Peru St ate Co 11 e ge . Fifty years ago, this same class took part in the semi-centennial of the College with a pageant and other observances of the founding of Nebraska's first College. This year they'll watch as the 98th graduating class of Peru State College observes the Centennial Year Baccalaureat:_e ceremony. The Golden Anniversary gathering of the class of 1917 will begin with a 9:30 a.m. coffee hour and class meeting. At 1:30 p.m., luncheon will be served in the west dining room of the Student Center. The 1917 returnees will be special guests at the 4 p.m. Baccalaureate. Rev. Ben Duerfeldt will deliver the sermon. Immediately following the Baccalaureate services, the 1917 and 1967 graduates, their guests, and the Peru State faculty and staff will then be guests of th~ college at a tea

NCATE Visitation Team Pays March Campus Visit Seven representatives of the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) visited the Peru State campus March 19-22, to evaluate the under-graduat~ erogram of .teacher education. NCATE periodically reviews programs of its accredited institutions as a part of its accreditation program. The college was last visited by an NCATE committee in 1958. In preparation for the NCATE visit, the entire faculty of Peru State participated in a self-study culminating in a 150 page report, 'Teacher Education at Peru State College," which was used as a guideline for the visitation. The visiting team made no j udgmen ts as to the effectiveness of the program, but reported its findin_gs to the accreditation committee of NCATE who in turn will make the decision on continuation of accreditation. While on campus, the NC.ATE visitors talked with administrative officers, college committees, student organizations, faculty member~~ students and graduates. Tue committee was composed of Dr. George M. Christensen, Winona State College, Winona, Minn.; Dr. O.C. Kjosness, Western State College, Gunnison, Colo.; Dr. Lucille Klauser, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, Ill.; Dr. Burdette W. Eagon, Wisconsin State University, Stevens Point; Dr. C.M. Clarhe, North Texas State University, Denton; Mr. Leonard Skov,State Department of Education, Lincoln; Miss Thresa Clark 1 Nebraska State Education Association. J\1rs. Clark received a two year diploma from Peru State in 1Q32. She is principal of Benson West Elementary school, Omaha. The visiting committee each received Peru State Centennial plaques from President Neal S. Gomon in recognition of their visit during the lOOth birthday of the college.

9


Wilcox has been retired from teaching in the Kansas City schools since 1963.

Mary Sue Moore (Mrs. Donnell) Power, 2-

(continued from preceding page)

1920s Donald I â&#x20AC;˘... Wilson, '25, was a campus visitor in mid-April. He is interested in locating a copy of the 1921 Peruvian. If anyone can locate one for him, write to 729 South Spring, Sioux Falls, S. D. Ernestine Robertson (Mrs. Kenneth P.) Stiles, 2 yr. '25, 286 Kent place, Summit, N. J., was re-united with Peru State through a Centennial brochure sent to her by a classmate.

Virginia Simmons (Mrs. Winston F.) Stoody, 2-yr. '27, resides at 4046 South Workman Mill road, maker, Mrs. Stoody children, travel, lecting, gardening

Whittier, Calif. A homeis kept busy with grandbook and porcelain coland antiques. Claire Codington Warman, '29, teaches in the Children's Center in San Leandro, Calif., where she resides at 1150 139th avenue. Waldo Willhoft, '26, has practiced civil law in San Bernardino, Calif., since 1930, when he was graduated from the University of Michigan Law school. Former city attorney of San Bernardino, he now serves as special counsel. He has twice been to the U. S. Supreme Court. An avid golfer, Mr. Willhoft has played 233 courses throughout the world, including Switzerland and Bangkok.

Mr. and Mrs. Paul V. (Margaret Thomas) Wilcox, '27, 2-yr. '~, live at 26331 Via

~alifornia,

Capistrano Beach, Calif. Mr.

yr. '26, writes from 30 Country lane, Bask-

ing Ridge, N.J., that she feels the changes on the Peru campus are wonderful and she is looking forward to seeing them in person this year. Marie Le Poidevin, '24, writes from 1218 Ella, Beatrice, that she is now 82, but has a great deal of determination. Active in church, woman's club and the retired teachers, she walked two miles to the polling place to vote. Honored at a meeting of the York County Education Association was Hazel Quick Comstock, '22, '24. Mrs. Comstock was honored for her many years of service to education. She retired recently as York county superintendent. Philip F. Hoyt, '27, is manager of an electronics laboratory with the Paisley Products Co. of Toronto, Canada. tlis address is 15 Lillian drive Scarborough, Ontario.

Mr. and Mrs. Roy L. (Ermal Graff) Klaurens, '28, fs '28, live at 4948 Fremont avenue South, Minneapolis, Minn. Mr. Klaurens notes he will retire in September after 18Yi years of teaching in Nebraska and 23Yi years as textbook representative for Merrill The Klaurens' el~est daughte7,_ Mary Kathryn, who attended kindergarte~ in the Campus School at Peru, will receive her doctorate from the University of Minnesota in August. Esther Louise Hoyt, '22, '25, has been retired since 1962 after 38 years of teaching, the last 16 in the Girls Vocational School in Tullahoma, Tenn. Her address is 908 East Lincoln street, Tullahoma. She reports her sight has improved so that she is

Dean Miller, ,51, Heads Exer-Genie Firm Physical fitness and Dean D. Miller go hand-in-hand, especially if Miller's exercising device, the Exer-Genie is in one of the hands. Miller, a 1951 graduate of Peru State College and a veteran of 14 years coaching in both high school and college, is president of Physical Fitness, Inc., manufacturer and distributor of Exer-Genie Exerciser which has received nation-wide publicity of late as an answer to those who want to gain or retain physical fitness. So effective has been the Exer¡Genie, that it is being used by some 5 000 high schools, 700 colleges, professional athlete~ and private citizens. Miller's Exer-Genie, the result of lJ years of research and study, consists of ~ 10-f oot length of rope, its mid-portio1 twisted around a shaft inside a 7 3/4-incl. by 1 3/4-inch metal cylinder. The ends of the rope protrude fro~ one end of the cylinder. The other end has a hook which can be attached to a wall. Tension is exerted on the r~pe by the cylinder. The Exer-Genie is used for both isometric exercises, or exercises without movement aimed at building muscle strength, and isotonic exercises, 'those with movement to increase agility and endurance. Used at first primarily by athletes, Miller is now spreading the popularity of the less-than-two-pound Exer-Genie. He has

10

developed a special six-minute routine for non-athletic exercisers. Miller, who coached two successive National Collegiate Athletic Association chamP.ionships in cross country at San Jose (Calif.). State, d_id not invent the exercise machine, but his research and promotion have been l~rgely responsible for the current popularity of the exerciser. . The company has over 1,200 dealers, J?bbers and dist~ibuto~s who are all profess1o~al people, including 700 physical education teachers and some 400 doctors ExerGenie is not sold in stores nor is itLadvertised ~n the accepted sense of the word. Miller, the company president, acts as a consultant for the company. He has traveled a quarter-m~llion miles a year arou~d the. world lecturing and demonstrating the device. Among professional users of the ExerGenie are professional football teams: Atla~ta Falcons, Los Angeles Rams, Kansas City Chiefs, Dallas Cowboys, Pittsburgh Steelers Oakland Raiders, and Green Bay Packers. Th~ Denver Broncos will begin to use i t this season. In addition to its use in athletics the Exer-Genie has been tested for use as ~ me~ns of ~xercise for future outerspace flights. Miller, when he is not traveling to demonstrate the exerciser, which he calls "A Revolution in Fitness and Form" lives at 408 Dorsey Avenue, Aptos, Calif.


able to read, write and carry on her interests in poetry, sketching, astronomy, space science, and nature. Three of her recent poems have been published in The Swordsman Review, a new poetry publication in California. Katharine Schill, '20, 911 Box Butte, Alliance, is_ retired after teaching 45 _years--18~ as elementary school principal.

Henrietta Fleck (Mrs. Dale) Houghton, 2-yr. '23, received her Ph.D. from Ohio State University in 1944, and is serving as chairman of the home economics department at New York University. She is an editor for Macmillan and Co. for a series of textbooks in home economics. Her husband is professor of marketing in the school of commerce at New York University and an executive in a management consultant firm. The Houghtons live at 157 East 18th street, New York, N.Y. Irene Veal (Mrs. Otto) Kucera, '26, retired from teaching in May, 1966, and is now living with her son, Richard, at 1626 Arapahoe, Lincoln.

Dr. and Mrs. James M. (Wanna Metcalf) McGuire, '30, live at 3110 East Kessler

boulevard, Indianapolis, Ind., where Dr. McGuire is with the research staff of Eli Lilly and Co., as administrative assistant to the executive director of research and development. He has been associated with the firm for the past 27 years after receiving his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University_ of Iowa: The McGu~res have two gro'Wn children, Bill and Patrice.

1930s Jessie Joy, '33, writes from Cedar Point, Mackinac Isl and, Mich., that she is making plans to be present for the 1967 commencement. Her grandmother, Anna Morehead Joy, was the college's first woman graduate in 1870. Miss Joy is the third generation of her family to have been graduated, and her nephew, Leon Joy, '51, Falls City is the fourth. Greetings have been received from Musa Wagoner (Mrs. Roland) Malde, 2 yr. '39. Her husband is a printer with the Bremerton (Wash.) Sun and the Mauldes and their daughter, Marianna, an 8th grader, live in nearby Silverdale, Rt. 1. Glen Sheely, '39, assistant professor of education and director of audio-visual at Peru State, has been named president-elect of the Nebraska State Audio-Visual Association.

Friday the 13th, a day feared by the faint-hearted, should be a memorable and enjoyable day for the Peru State class of 1942. On Friday, October 13, 1967, the class of 1942 will hold their 25-year reunion with a dinner and "gab-fest" at Arbor Manor Steak House in Auburn. The¡ annual reunion of the 25-year-ago graduating class started in 1965. The two silver anniversary gatherings have been unqualified successes. Donald K. Carlile, director of Special Services and exec- ¡ utive secretary of the Peru Alumni Association, is handling arrangements. Members of the 1942 class are eager to surpass the record attendance of last year's 25-year class which had 18 members in attendance'. 'Th.ere were 49 known living members of the 1941 class, and there are 54 known living members of the class of 1942. The October 13 reunion will be the lead event in the activity-filled Homecoming weekend. Saturday. Oct.ober 14, is officially designated 1967 Homecoming with alumni and college events scheduled throughout the day. Wayne State will furnish the afternoon football ppposition following the morning's aluuni coffee and the noon all-alunmi luncheon. At night will be the Homecoming play and the Homecoming dance. Graduates of 1942, color October 13 red, and all Peruvians make October 14 a Red Letter Day. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~alif.,

Muriel Sugden (Mrs. Herman.) Newhauser,

notes she is an elementary teacher in the Los Angeles schools, and a master teacher for the University of Southern California department of education. . . Chloe Pate (Mrs. George) Lehman, '36, is in her seventeenth year of teaching fourth grade in the Jefferson school in Riverside, Calif. She notes that two granddaughters, 4, and 5, keep her and her husband, George, young in sp,irit. Stella V. Hindenach, 38, began teaching at Columbus after receiving her two-year diploma in 1922. Retired since 1957, Miss Hindenach lives at 1563 Twenty-ninth avenue, Columbus. Dean E. Grass, '32, has written a book, entitled The Learning Block, which introduces a new techni~ue of teaching through mind conditioning. Mr. Grass lives at 21801 Lanark, Canoga Park, Calif. Margaret Grafft (Mrs. Ward) Dickey, fs '30, and her husband have lived in Idaho since 1935. She taught three years in Nebraska and received her bachelor's degree from Idaho State University. She is in her twelfth year of teaching in Idaho Falls, where they reside at 952 Eleventh street. The Dickeys have two children, Dr. Gene, of Bend, Ore., and Mrs. Carol Morgan, a registered nurse in Pocatello, Ida. Julia Jeanne Plasters (Mrs. G.M.) Wilson, '39, 24802 Parchman, Newhall, Calif., writes that she enjoys the Peru Stater. Since her marriage in 1939, Geneva Ullsperger (Mrs. Elvo) Pratt, fs '31, has lived in Cook where they have operated a grocery.

12923 South Daphne avenue, Gardena,

(continued on next page)

Mr. and Mrs. Frne.s t (Evelyn Holtz) Rawson, '38, '46, and.their sons, 16, and 14, live at 11380 Loch Lomond mitos, Calif. Mr. Rawson is fessor of industrial arts State College at Long Beach teaches sewing at Roosevelt Bellflower.

road, Los Alaassociate proat California and Mrs. Rawson Junior High in

Mrs. Pauline Lyle Scott, '30, 2323 Ocean street, Carlsbad, Calif., teaches junior English at Oceanside High. A widow since 1961, Mrs. Scott's son and daughter are married and she is grandmother of three. Harvey F. Michels, '36, 1213 Sheridan avenue, Cody, Wyo., has been in the jewelry business the past 21 years after 10 years of teaching. The Michels have a married daughter and two grandsons. '~6,

Friday, October 13-Lucky Day for Returning '42 Graduates

11


(continued from preceding page) They have two daughters, Ardi~h Pratt (Mrs. Don) Rut, '63, a teacher at Utica, and Shirley, a Peru State fre~hrnan.

1940s

I

I

I.

I

Dr. Walter W. Buettg~nbach, J.r •. , _fs '46, is director of educational fa?ili~ies at the Torrance (Calif.) School di~trict. Married and the father of three _child~en, the Buettgenbachs live at 1725 Via Arriba, Palos Verdes Estates. , . Dr. Clifford H. Harding, 44, is professor of history at West Oiester State Co~­ lege. He received his master's ~rom the University of Iowa in 1945 and his doctorate from New York University in 1953, when ~e assumed his present post at the Pennsylvania school. Merritt B. Jensen, , 4 o, was e l ecte d t o

the board of directors of the Na~ion.al Association of Secondary School Principals at its annual convention in Dallas. Mr. Jensen is principal of East High school in Oieyenneh Wyo. He and his wife, the former Mary Be~ Collin, '42, have a daughter, ~enny~, in high school, and a son, Merrill, in ~he fifth grade. They live at 1812 Oxford drive, Cheyenne.

Helen Janecek (Mrs. Harmon) Clark, 2-

Marrie·d Virginia Elifritz to Stanley E. Johnson, '66, March 18, Edgar Presbyterian Church. At home: Dannebrog. Betty Flack Marquez, fs '52, to Jim Hutton, fs '57, November 30, National City, Calif. At home: Jim on military duty in Vietnam, and Betty in Auburn. Robin Cockerill to Dean D. Miller, '51, Manhattan Be~~h Community Church, Redondo Beach, Calif., July 23. At home: 408 Dorsey avenue, Aptos, Calif. Dianne R. Gates to Larry L. Rathe, '63, November 25, St. John's Lutheran Church, Tecumseh. At home: Sterling. Carol Sue Carsey to Richard Kennedy, '6~ December 27, Lutheran Church of Our Redeemer, Omaha. At home: 603~ West Sheridan, Shenandoah. Marcia Jean Miller to Gary Neddenriep, '64, December 30, First Methodist Church, Waukegan, Ill. A_t home: Pueblo, Colo. Judy Lynn Casteel to Phi lie C. Stroy, fs '65, January 6, First Methodist Church, Louisville. At home: Murdock. . Diana M. Oestmann to Samuel W. Rankin, '64, December 26, St. Paul Luther~n Church, Auburn, At home: North Mankato, Min~. Martha Cox, '58, to Kenn~th ~instrom, Rapid City S. D. At home: Rapid City, S: D. Loren~ Kostal, '65, to Richard Pruitt, January 28, First Methodist Church, Wymore. At home: Clarinda,Iowa. , Fidelia J. Hall to Roger Ray_, 63, December 23, First Presbyterian C~urch, Tecumseh At home: 1049 Walnut, Millard. K~ron Kay Rathe, :66, to Richard P. Estes, senior, March 3, Zion Lutheran Church, Johnson. At home: Johnson 12

yr. '42, is doing part time teaching at Long Beach City College. Her husband is dean of business services at the same institution. The Clarks have two sons, a Stanford freshman, and high school junior. L ayd Bue t tgf!nbach, fs '48, is teaching biology at Palos Verdes, Calif. The Buettgenbachs, their son, 17, and daughter, 14, live at 21105 Madrona avenue, Torrance. Elsie Parret Grunwaldt, '40, 2660 Chatwin avenue, Long Beach, Calif., teaches in the Long Beach Unified district. She has been a widow since 1960. Maj. Rex W. Floyd, '46, writes that he will retire from the Air Force October 31, 1967, after 20 years of active duty. He is director of personnel services at Headquarters Amarillo Technical Training Center, Amarillo (Texas) Air Force Base. Irma S. Nispe l, '42, 14001 Yukon avenue, Hawthorne, Calif., retired in 1966 after 20 years as a correctional officer for the U.S. Department of Justice at the Federal Reformatory for Women, Alderson, W. Va. Elaine Brier Gleason, '48, 5210 Gladstone, Lincoln, is girls physical education instructor at Dawes Junior High in Lincoln. Ruth McDonald Swanson, 2-yr.'41, writes that her husband, Wayne R. Swanson, was elected Treasurer of the State of Nebraska in November. Mrs. Swanson teaches piano and organ privately and through ,,the adult education programofthe Lincoln Public schools. 1be Swansons live at 1809 South 53rd street, Lincoln. Bob B. Ashton, '42, 3595 South Washington, En~lewood, Colo. reports recording two 1 new Capitol records, ·'Songs of Living Hope," and "A Cozy Christmas," to be released :in early su!IlfOOr and early fall, respectively. •· Dr. Robert H. McAlexander, '4~, served on a six-month assignment in Taiwan with the Food and Agricultural organization of the United Nations in 1965. Professor of agricnltural economics at Pennsy 1van ia State University, Dr. McAlexander was in charge of developing and directing a farm management res~arch program within the newly-established agricultural economics division of the Taiwan Provincial department_of agriculture and forestry in Taichung, Taiwan. Dr. McAlexander received his Ph.D. from Iowa State University at Ames.Dr. and Mrs. McAlexander, the former LaVara Oakley, '43, and their two childred live at 120 East Mitchell, State.Coll~g.e, Pa. Ralf 0. Graham, '48, will leave May z for six weeks in Nigeria where he will conduct a communications workshop for Nigerian educators and extension workers. Ralf is with the extension information service at Kansas State University, Manhattan, which is conducting a pilot program in Nigeria. Mrs. Graham is the former Aileen Wheeldon, '48. They live at 1636 Leavenworth, Manhattan with their daughters, Gay and Dawn.

Dr. and Mrs. Armon F. (Evelyn Gatz) Yanders, both '48, will return to the United

States from Australia in mid-May. Dr. Yanders, professor of biology and assistant dean of the college of natural science at University of Michigan, will complete a sixmonth sabbatical leave at the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research organization in Canberra, where he has been doing research in genetics. Ille Yanders and their two sons, Mark and Kent, live at 1311 Bayshore drive, Haslett, Mich.

·•


1950s Dorothy Erhart (Mrs. Jerome) Harvey, '53, is doing substitute teaching in the Deadwood (S.D.) Public schools, while her husband is attending Black Hills State College at Spearfish. The Harveys have a daughter, Michell Annette, 4, and a son, Jerome Forrest, 1.

Lcdr. and Mrs. D. H. (Mary Moore) Gress, '52, 2 yr. '54, and son, Bruce, are now at home at 6809 Cedral place, Lemon Grove, Calif. Mary and Bruce made their home in Auburn while Don was on duty in Vietnam. Chester Berger, '54, is teaching at Klawock, Alaska, a fishing village on the west coast of Prince of Wales Island. He reports the four-year-old elementary school is a well-equipped facility.

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence A, (Ruth Watkins) Miller, '51, 2 yr. '38, live at Grundy Center, Iowa, where they have taught for 11 years--Mrs. Miller in the third grade and f\.ir, Miller high school science.

Mr. and Mrs. Dale (Ann Fellows) Moore, '54, '56, live at 720 DeVinney street, Golden, Colo., where Dale is assistant principal of the Lakewood schools. The Moores have three children, Lyi;n, Martin,and Paula. Darrell Mudra, 51, has resigned as coach of the Montreal Alouettes to become head football coach at the University of Arizona. He coached at Huron (S.D.) College, Colorado State College, and Adams (Colo.) State before becoming head coach at North Dakota State College. At North Dakota he compiled a 24-6 record in three seasons and his 1965 team was narood the No. 1 small college squad in the nation. William D. Hervey, '59, is teaching business education at Huenrne High in Oxnard, Calif. W. Quentin Pharaoh, '57, 2821 Shakespeare drive, Los Alamitos, Calif., is a chemist with Douglas Aircraft. Roger Kuhlmann, '58, teaches :in the science department in Riverside (Calif.) High school. He lives at 3633 Mt. Vernon avenue, Riverside. PN/1 Ralph Good, fs '53, 1016 East Elm, Olathe, Kans., is attached to the Olathe Naval Air Station. In two years he will retire after 20 years of military service. The Goods have two sons and two daughters.

Mr. and Mrs. Hichard (Elinor Majors) McGee, '56, '36, 2505 Jefferson avenue, Redwood City, Calif., write that son, Howard, 14, will be ready for attendance at Peru in three years. Dick operates an import-export business in addition to working as a recreation leader in summers and assistant junior high coach during the winter. Dr. John R. Vacek, '50, Littleton, Colo., was chairman of a December seminar of the Colorado Dental Association. The seminar explored means of ensuring quality dental service to constantly increasing numbers of people who will he served under existing and planned governrrent-sponsored dental programs. Dr. Harvey S. Ideus, '56, MS '59, director of placement at LaCrosse (Wis.) State University, was in charge of the American Personnel and Guidance Association's placement center during the March convention in Dallas. More than 1100 candidates and 600 employers used the services. In a March address before a businessmen's meeting in La-

( continued on next page)

Born To James Rosenquist, '59,and Joyce Barnhart Rosenquist, fs '5 7 , Stromsburg, a son, Todd James, February 8. To Guilford Thomas, '58, and Norma Armstrong ThC?mas, '59, Redding, Kans., a daughter, Donn1ta Rae, February 20. To liene Leber, '56, and Mary Sherrod Leber, '56, 3807 West Golden lane., Phoenix Ariz., a son, Ray Allen, December 10. ' To Gary Moore, fs '63, and Bobbie Thomas Moore, fs '62, Nemaha, a son, David Wayne, March 1. To P.O. Settell and Mary Lou Anderson Settell, former staff,10040 Nicollet avenue, Minneapolis, Minn., Michelle Leigh,March 22. To Richard Schoeppner, '60, and Mrs. Schoeppner, 801 Harrison, Council Bluffs, Iowa, a daughter, Diane Marie, November 9. To Jim O'Harra, fs '60, and Susan Schneider O'Harra, fs '59, Phoenix, Ariz., a daughter, Shannon Lee, November 13. To Albert Eggen and Connie Sayer Eggen, fs '59, Omaha, a son, Robert Jon, November 11. To Richard Adams, ' 56, and Mrs. Adams, Toms River, N.J., a son, Patrick Wittrock, November 23. To Galen Conn '63 and Marna Conn, DeWitt, a daughter, tara Dene, December 1. To Dan Knudsen, '66, and Judy Knudsen, '66, Honolulu, Hawaii, a son, Eugene David, November 25. To Richard Flake, '63, and Norma Blake, former staff~ Auburn, a daughter, Sharla Jo, November :.:::9. To Duaine McKnight, fs '57, and Susan Crooker lfcl{night, fs '60, former staff, Auburn, a daughter, Lynne Renee, Dece;nber 7, To \oordon ~avin, fac, and Mrs. Gavin, Peru, a daughter, Kay Jeanne, December 11. To Charles Tillman, '60, and Monica Zach Tillman, fs '57, Ogallala, a son, December 25. To Leo Dietrich, '66, and Connie Hoschar Dietrich, fs '66, Auburn, a daughter, January 2. To Arlan Biere, '64, and Carolyn Timmerman, fs '56, Creston, Iowa, a son, Darrin Jar, December 25. To Ernie Ridgeway, '61, and Mrs. Ridgeway, Wymore, a daughter, January 11. To Jerry Mullins, '58, and Mrs. Mullins, Valparaiso, a son, Brian Jerry, January 12. To James Shown, fs '66, and Mrs. Shown, Plattsmouth, a daughter, Kristina Lynne, January 14. To Robert Henry, '59 and Carolyn Schacht Henry, '58, Peru, a son, Mark Patrick, April 20. To Lanny DeMott and Janet Beemer DeMott, '65, Rt. 1, Platteville, Colo., a daughter, Tracey Lynn, March 31. To Harvey Fraser, '65, and Madelyn Bleach Fraser, '65, Genoa, a daughter, Kristine Renee, February 28. To Junior Karas, '56, and Virginia Ruzicka Karas, '58, Woodrow, Colo., a daughter, Janelle Lynn, March 24. To David N. Coman, '65, and Linda Stephens Gamon, '64, Harrison, Ohio, a son, Mat thew Thomas, April 2.S,

1 :i


'51, is head librarian at Manhattan (Kan.) Senior High. She notes that the library ~as been designated one of two demons~ration libraries in Kansas and has received an $18,000 grant under Title II. , . Mildred E. Spencer Stew_ar t, M~ 59 '¡ is librarian at Plattsmouth Junior-Senior High, a position she has held for the past five years. She is secretary of the Ak-Sar-Ben conference Library section. May Stewart, 'SO, 821 South Fifteenth,

Lincoln, teaches mathematics at Whittier Junior High, Lincoln. Maj. Richard Rosendahl, '5S, will complete a year's tour of duty in Vietnam in mid-summer, at which time he will be assigned to the Army Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kan. While in Vietnam with the First Infantry Division, he was awarded the Bronze Star, Air Medal, and the Army Commendation medal with the first and second oak leaf clusters. Stanley L. Stukenholtz, 'SO, received the MS in education degree from Wayne State College at the April 19 commencement. Dr. L. Fred Thomas, '51, is assistant professor of secondary education at North Texas State University, Denton, Tex. He received his Ph.D. in 1963 from the University of Arizona. Ronald Kucera, fs '51, is serving as U.S. Naval Advisor to the Paraguan Navy and is residing in Asuncion, Paraguay, S.A. Gerald G. Carnes, '57, has resigned his superintendency at Waco to become superintendent of schools at Ashland, effective July 1.

Centennial Observances

Centennial Observances

(continued from preceding page) Crosse, !deus received state-wide publicity when he declared that 30 per cent of college students approaching graduation are unprepared for the responsibility of earning a living. Ted McCartney, 'Sl,140 East Cherrywood, Lincoln, has been guidance counselor at Dawes Junior high in Lincoln for the past four vears.

Evelyn Boeseck (Mrs. John P.) Brown,

PAST

(continued from page 3)

tion which has carried me through to become a teacher of English and a writer." Mrs. Brown has authored eight books, including Young Nathan, Swamp Fox, Prairie Teacher, and Silent Storm, the latter in collaboration with Ruth Crone, 1942 graduate. Mrs. Brown announced that she is presently working with Miss Crone on a second volume, a hook on Willa Cather. In other special Centennial programs since November, the Peru State Dramatic Club presented a special Christmas program, December 7. A Christmas Vespers program was presented by the music deEartment on December 18. The Dana College Folksingers and Dancers presented a January 10 program on Nebraska laud folk heritage. Wor Id renowned pianist Theodore Ullman was in concert February 20. The Dramatic Club presented "The Vigil" on March 16, and the Division of Fine Arts presented "The Seven Last Words of Christ," on March 22, as Easter productions. Dr. John Helm, director of Friends of Art, College of Architecture and Design, Kansas State University, Manhattan, lectured on Midwestern Art at an April S program. Dr. Helm was accompanied by Mrs. Helm, the former Mary B. Brownell, daughter of the late Prof. and Mrs. Herbert Brownell, Sr. Professor Brownell was head of Peru's science department from 1893 until ~910, when he joined the faculty of the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. Mrs. Mildred R. Bennett, Eresident, 'Willa Cather Pioneer Memorial, Red Cloud, delivered the most recent Centennial program, Ap~il 20, when she s~oke on Willa Cather, in a topic entitled, Catherland." As we go to press, preparati?ns are being made for the ~ay S_Centennial May Fete celebration which will carry out a Centennial theme. Then, three day~ later, Mr. James M. Knapp, Kearney, president of the Board of Education of State N~rmal Schools will deliver an address entitled ''Peru State and the Future. "

.

14

FUTURE

(continued from page 3)

when he accepted his preJ;ent position a::s_ chairman of the department of education at School of the Ozarks. Dr. Young was president of the Oklahoma College and University Deans Association during the 1962-63 academic year. He served a three-year term on the Oklahoma Commission on Teacher Education and Professional Standards, and while at Oklahoma College for WomenJ he was named "Faculty Member of the Year,' in 1964-65. He is the only administrator ever to receive that recognition. Dr. Young is married to the former Roxanna Carpenter of Lexington. They are the parents of a son and daughter, both of college age. Dr. Pate received his Master's degree from the University of Nebraska in 1936, and t~e ~h.D. i~ 1940 from the University of Illinois. _During the 1940-41 academic year he was an instructor of mathematics at the Uni~ersi ty of Illinois. The next year he served in the same capacity at the University of Kansas. In 1942-43, he served as an engineer for the Boeing Airplane Company, before returning to academic pursuits in apyl ied physics at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, from 1943-1946. The 1946-1947 year saw him as an associate professor of mathematics at the University of South Carolina. From there he moved to Eastern Michigan University in 1947 where he remains today as professor of mathematics and head of the department of mathematics. Dr. Pate is a member of the Mathematics Association of America of which he was chairman of the Michigan section in 1957. He is also a member of the Michigan Council of Teachers and numerous other professional organizations. Dr. Pate is married to the former L. Louise Foster, of Union. The Pates have two children, Mary Louise of Washington, D.C., and Marcia Anne, a student at the University of Michigan.


-~-

Irene F. Frink (Mrs. Grover) Brown,

1960s Karen Cahow, '65, girls physical education instructor in the Omaha schools since graduation, is planning to begin work on a master's degree in her field next fall. Donald I. Glaesesann, '65, is with the claims department of the social security administration in Kansas City. Don and his wife, Nancy, live at 722 Walnut, apt. 403, Kansas City, Mo. Ken Rhodus, '62, is attending Omaha University under an assistantship working toward his master's in guidance. He will remain on the OU staff as an instructor and guidance counselor. Mrs. Rhodus, the former Jane Kunkel, '64, who this year started a langtiage program in the elementary schools at Plattsmouth, is planning to retire from teaching at the end of this year. Mr. and Mrs. James E. (Marian Weber) Thompson, '!)2, '63, reside atHi~hland, ~an., where Jim is head of the physical science department at High!and Juni?r C?llege ~nd Marian teaches special education in the Midway School district.

Mr. and Mrs. David L. (Rae Henry) Fulton , ' 6 0 , 2 yr . ' 6 0 , l iv e at 710 Quest over drive, Carthage, Ill. Dave is assistant professor of his~ory at ~obert Morris ~olle&e• He received his master s from the University of Missouri in 1964. The Fultons have two children, Scott, 4, and Shelley, 1. Alan J. Kreglo, '60, has been promoted to captain in the U.S. Air Force. He was commissioned in 1963 upon completion of officers training school at Lackland AFB, Tex., and is currently information officer at the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colo. . Jerry Littell, 63, a teacher of history at Beatrice High since graduation, has accepted a graduate as_sistant for the_ 196768 academic year at Kearney State College, where he will work toward his master's. Gar~ Schlange, '63, 90-11, 211 street, Queens Village, N. Y., writes that he is enjoyinq teaching and is grateful to Peru State 'for giving me my excellent educational background." M-s. Schlange is in graduate study at Hunter College. Stanley H. Johnson, '66, is librarian at the.documents department at the University of California, Berkeley. Howard Boyer, fs '63, 5193 Dailey street, San Diego, is a student at San Diego State College.

Died Information comes to _the Per~ Stater of the deaths of these alumni and friends: O. Homer Schwentker, '17, Rapid City, S.D., December 9, of injuries received in a fall. He had taught 42 years. He had served as band director of the high school band, the city_ band and for 15 years d~rected t~e School of Mines band. At the time of his death he was comptroller of the Black Hills Racin~ Association. Survivors include his wife, Hazel Frye Schwentker, '17. Erma Nicholson, '15, Monroe, September 18. Alice Wright, '16, Filley, December 21. Louis J. Knoll, '07, Omaha, November

19.

'17, Shenandoah, Iowa.

Anna Hahn (Mrs • Frank) Starratt,' 11), Concord, N. H.

Dr. Walter W. Hansen, '27, head of the department of botany and plant pathology and vice-dean of the Oklahoma State University college of arts and sciences, Oklahoma City, January 16. A member of the OSU staff since 1947, survivors include his wife, Gertrude Zabel Hansen, 2 yr. '27. Maude James Hollabaugh, fs '23, Hiawatha, Kans., December 11. An elementary teacher for 43Yz years, she had taught 17 years in the Salem schools. Doris P. Frye Steele, '18, Scottsbluff, May 5. Henry J. (Ding) Hofmann, '30, Wahoo, August 12. Teacher and coach in Nebraska for 15 years, he had been a civil service employee for 21 years. Survivors include his wife, Marguerite Deerson, 2 yr. '30. Dr. William H. Linn, 1890' s, first graduate of the college of dentistry of the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, December 31. Myrna Brandt (Mrs. Paul) Whipple, fs '29, Reseda, Calif., January. Venus Mueller (Mrs. George) Campbell, '10, '34, Kansas City, Mo., May, 1966. Arthur L. Klima, '09, February 11. Verna Snell, '17, Lincoln.

Florence Fairchild (Mrs. J.H.) Hendrickson, '04, 1966. Ethel Hummel, '07, Seattle, Wash., June 9, 1966.

Mamie Hauser VJrs. Vincent J.) Heine, '12, Grand Is land,_ November 17. Lewis Edie, '25, '33, Roseburg, Ore., November. A teacher for 34 years, he taught in the Roseburg Senior High school the past 14 years. W. A. Kelly, Long Beach, Calif., May, 1966. Bryan Emmert, '17, Paw Paw, Mich. Elizabeth Barrett (Mrs. John) Meyer, fs '16, Couer d'Alene, Ida. She retired from teaching in the Coeur d'Alene schools in 1965. Lee West, 2-yr. '46, York, October 31. Clyde E. Ivers, 2-yr. '21, '25, Grand Island, September, 1962. Bertha A. Linger, '16, Omaha, March 23. Byron Ludington, fs '58, Story City, Iowa, as the result of injuries in an automobile accident, November 5, 1965.

Helen Williams (Mrs. C. Elmer) Graham, fs '21, Glendale, Calif., March, 1967, A substitute teacher in the Glendale schools for a number of years, she served for more than 20 years as wedding hostess at the First-Methodist Church of Glendale. Esther Anderson Nauman, '17. Victor Ashley, 2-yr. '22, June 28, 1962 Selma Reasouer (Mrs. W.H.) Quade, 'OS, Santa Barbara, Calif., April 2, 1966. Mina L. Perrin Collart, '10, Topeka, Kan., January 11. Jessie Wass (Mrs. Frank C.) Duff, • U7, Gnaha, January 8, 1966. Charles Allen Tucker, '97, Claremont, Calif., October 6. Until recently he had been actively engaged in the real estate business. He was present for the 1961 meeting of the Southern California chapter of the Peru Alumni Association. Leta Marshall, '12, Fremont. Pauline Ranney Menaker, '15, El Granada, Cal if. 15


Non-Profit Org4niJ:ation

PERU STATE COLLEGE Campus of a Thousand Oaks Peru, Nebraska 68421

US Postaqe PAID Permit No. 4 Peru. Nebraska llEn:llN llEQUESTED

Peruvians 'Send 'Happy Birthday' Wishes (continued from page 7) STELLA V. HtNDENACH, '38 HARVEY F. MICHELS. "36 HOWARD A. BATH, "30 IRWIN C. WILLIAMS, '33 HELEN M. KUCERA, '30 JEAN BLANKENSHIP (MRS. C. T.) MORGAN ,2YR. '32 IVA SHUBERT (MRS. CLYDE) MARTIN, "34 E.G. VICKERS, '36 GENEVA ULLSPERGER (MRS. ELVO) PRATT, FS '31 JULIA JEAN PLASTERS (MRS. GERALD) WILSON, '38 H.B. GROOTHUIS, '31 MURIEL SUGDEN (MRS. HER· MAN) NEWHAUSER, FS '36 PAULINE LYLE SCOTT, '30 MARGARET GRAFFT DICKEY, "30 Luci LLE BICKNELL SMITH, '36 IDA HARRISON, '36 MR. & MRS. JOHN (VIRGINIA MUNCY) WHEATLEY, '34, FS '34

1950s

EUGENE S. McMULLEN. '58 DR. L. FRED THOMAS, "51 GERALD W, KERR, "55 BESS IE HUSA. "51 WILLIAM ALEXANDER, '50 MARVIDENE SHOWN (MRS. GERALD) WARWICK·, 2 YR. "58 MR. & MRS. WARD (ELLEN BROYLES) HARPER, FS '57, • 54 WILMA KLEIN (MRS. GENE) KELLY, 2 YR • '55 CARLOS HARRISON, "51 DOROTHY ERHART HARVEY, '53 MAY STEWART, '50 JULIA WHITNEY CHASE, '59 DR. HARVEYS, IDEUS, '56, MS '59 TOM W. RYAN. '50 MR. & MRS. BILL D. (SHARON REAGAN) BECK, '57,FS '57 MR. & MRS. DEAN (EILEEN BEET HE ) TH IE S FE LO '52, 2 YR. '51 1940s TED McCARTNEY, '51 MR. & MRS, BOYD B, ( 1 LENE MR. & MRS. ALVIN (MAXINE THtLTGES) GOOD. '55, '53 BLINDE) HAACK, "47; 2 YR. JUNE SLATER JANETZKE, '55 '45. "64 OSCAR GROVES, '56 MR. & MRS. W. HUBERT (WINI· WANDA NE LS ON CONKLIN, '55 FRED HALL) JOHNSON, '40,'57 EVELYN HACKER (MRS. RICHA.RD B) MR. & MRS. RAYMOND (ROSE EDELMAN) Ruz ICKA, '59, '58 READ, 2 YR, '42 CONSTANCE FRANCOIS, '58 PEDRO J. MERIDA, JR., FS '48 MILDRED E. SPENCER STEWART, DR. & MRs. Ross F. (GRACE MS '59 MuENCHAU) RUSSELL. '41, '42 MR. & MRS. RICHARD (ELINOR MAE JANE YOUNG (MRS. ROBERT) MAJORS) MCGEE, '56, '36 BERGERON, 2YR. '42 WILMA HEISER, '55 DEAN KARR, '41 EDMUND W. BRISSETTE, '56 PHYLLIS BENSON (MRS. WALTER) HOWARD NI CHE LS 01•, '53 HOFFMAN, JR., '41 PAUL CLARK MAXWELL, FS '57 RUTH WALKER (MRs.T.W.) HOWE, EVELYN BOESECK (MRS. JOHN) 2 YR. '49 BR OWN, '51 DR. & MRS. C. THOMAS (MARJOR· LORRAINE L. HAACK, '58 IE KENNEDY) DEAN, BOTH '42 CL I FF ORD H. STOKES, '57 LAWRENCE D. GOOD, FS '42 DR. & MRS. DONALD D. (VIVIAN JOHN RHODUS, "42 SHEW) WENDT, '55, MA '55: CLEO CLARK (MRS. ALVIN) FS '51 ROETTGER, FS '44 GEORGIA KLASEK, '50 DOROTHY STEPAN, '47 DR. & MRS. DONALD D. (BETTY 1960s JOHNS ON) SM I TH, '48 MR. & MRS. GARY (MARY Boe B. ASHTON, '42 JARVIS) SCHLANGE, '63, FS ANNA LOUISE SHORT, '41 '63 HAZEL M. PALMER. '44 MARGARET SPELLMAN (MRS. ALLEN) STEPHEN R. PARKER, '63 LONN PRESSNALL, '65 HARROLD, '47 MR. & MRS. FAY (MAXINE RUTH McDONALD (MRS. WAYNE) RUSSELL) MOORE, SHE '63 SWANSON, '41 THELMA CLINKENBEARD, '63 NINA KANEL (MRS.E.R.)KLAUDT, '43 MR. & MRS. DON (ARDITH PRATT) RUT, '64, '63 RITA RUSSELL SOLINSKI, '40 MR. & MRS. MILAN (CAROLYN DELZENE POTTER (MRS. C.H.) PARLI) HAWXBY, '60, '61 PETTET, FS • 41 DONALD I. GLAESEMANN, '65 CLARA EYRE (MRS. E.L.) DAN LEUENBERGER, '65 JACKSON, '4 1 ANNA BAKER, '63 MR. & MRS. PAUL 0. (RUTH ELLEN HALLENBECK MERITT, ELOISE SOUDER) BLAIR. FS '63 • 41. '36

16

MR. & MRS. HAROLD PATTERSON BOTH STAFF SILAS E. SUMMERS. FACULTY MRS. FA YE BRANJi>T. '48. MS "59, FACULTY RosE UL LS PER GER (MRS .LAW· RENCE) BERNARD. '58. MS "61. FACULTY IN MEMORY OF GERALD TYLER, 2 YR· '34, BY FR !ENDS & RELATIVES IN MEMORY OF CLARA M Mc· CLATCHEY, "51, BY FR !ENDS & RELATIVES IN MEMORY OF MAMIE E HAUSLR (MRS V J ) HEINE, '12. BY HER HUSBAND, VINCENT J HEINE IN MEMORY OF MAC DUNNING. FS "31. BY HIS MOTHER. MRS INICE M DUNN ING, '25, FORMER FACULTY ANNA MARIE KREIFELS, '52, FORMER FA CUL TY MR & MRS W S RANKIN, FORMER FACULTY, '63 CALISTA COOPER HUGHES, FRIEND OF COLLEGE IN MEMORY OF JOHN W WEAR, '14, BY FRIENDS & RELATIVES IN MEMORY OF ELSIE JENSEN. '54 FRIENDS, FACULTY, & STAFF BY MERNA JENSEN, '38 MARY CLARKE, '45, FORMER FAC. MR. & MRS. DAVID (CHARLOTTE IN MEMORY OF HELEN WILLIAMS JONES) DUEY, '51, FORMER GRAHAM, FS '21, BY HER HUS· STAFF BAND, C. ELMER GRAHAM MR. & MRS. F. H. LARSON IN MEMORY OF SPENCER LEGER, HE FACULTY '14. '24, BY MRS. FLORENCE M. MR. & MRS. FRED STEPHENS, LEGER SHE STAFF MRS. G. MEL.VIN Ross. NORMAL. DIDDLE, FORMER FRIEND OF 'COLLEGE. FACULTY IN MEMORY OF HER FATHER, MR. & MRS. ROBERT T. BEN· CHARLES ALLEN TUCKER, FORD, '28, FACULTY, FS • 51 '97. BY MRS. VIVIEN MRS. W.R. PATE, WIDOW OF THE TUCKER D'ESTOURNELLES LATE W.R. PATE, PRESIDENT DE CONSTANT OF PERU STATE MRS. MAUDE J. STEVENSON, FRIEND FRIEDA D. RowOLDT. FACULTY. IN HONOR OF HER MOTHER, OF COL LE GE MRS, PAUL ROWOLDT, 90 YRS MR. & MRS. GEORGE (LETA BALD· OF AGE , APRIL 7 WIN) DEVORE, FORMER STAFF, BEATRICE PATE YANDERS, DAUGHTER FS '15 OF WALTER R. PATE, FORMER DOROTHY KEYS (MRS. CLARENCE) PRESIDENT OF PERU STATE IVERSEN, '33, FACULTY MRS. LEONE HILL, FS '23, JAMES BLAKE. FORMER FACULTY WIDOW OF ARTHUR HILL, FOR· JUANITA BRADLEY, FACULTY MER FACULTY CHARLES A. SPACHT, '17. FOR· MR. & MRS. HAROLD W. (ALICE MER FACULTY GRUSH) JOHNSON, '38, MARY ANNA GNADE, STAFF FACULTY; '57 MR. & MRS. ERNEST LONGFELLOW MR. AND MRS. R.C. MAJORS, '30, '22, BOTH STAFF STAFF ELMER J. NEMEC, FACULTY MR. & MRS. LON (MILDRED DR. & MRS. l<EITH L. MELVIN, TIBBETS) GRAF, FS '28 '32, FACULTY; '55 FORMER FACULTY; '25, '28 DR. & MRS. JOHN C. CHRIST. MRS. ALICE MAXWELL, WIDOW BOTH FACULTY, SHE '53, OF P. A MAXWELL, FORMER MS '60 FACULTY LYLE G. STROM, FACULTY MR. '& MRS. ROBERT (MARY MR. & MRS. LYLE MCKERCHER, RILEY) BOHLKEN, '59, FACULTY, "65 FACULTY: '66 RAYMOND W. GLATHAR, STAFF KIRKPATRICK PETTIS Co. WAYNE C. SAYER, STAFF, FS AIR PRODUCTS & CHEMICALS '49

JANET BEEMER (MRS. LANNY) DEMOTT, '65 MARILYN ROBERTSON, '66 WILLIAM KLABUNDE, '65 MIKE ROACH, '62 RONA LO COTTON, '64 FRANCES SANDERS (MRS. GORDON) STEINBROOK, '64 MARIE ANTALEK, '60 MR. & MRS·. KEN (JANE KUNKEL) RHODUS, '62, "64 JAMES L. AGNEW, JR. '65 VIRGIN IA FRANCOIS, '62 MR. & MRS. DAVID (RAE HENRY) FULTON, '60, 2 YR. "60 Mt LAN EUGENE KLOE PPFER, '63 MR. & MRS. JAMES E. (MAR !AN WE BER) THOMPSON, '62. '63 EDNA L. HALL (MRS. GERALD) MOORE, '60 SHARYLIN VRTISKA (MRS. LA· VERNE) KNOCK, '63 SHIRLEY P. WALTERS FLESNER, '66 KATHLEEN HENNIG, '66 CHRISTINE NAVRKAL, FS '66 RICHARD SCHOEPPNER, '60 LUCILLE RUSSELL (MRS. EARL) HICKS, '60


CL.be

Fall 1967

[p[E!ffil]] d~

<Jtte e~

11

o/

<J~ (ja}u


1967 Fall Semester Brings

Legislative Action

14 Newcomers to Faculty

Closes Campus School

Peru

I

I

I 1·

State College opened its lOlst ~c~d~mic year with 14 new faculty members Joining the ranks as replacements or additions to the staff. The staff changes also include the return of two faculty members who were on leave during the 1966-67 academic year. fi?bert Bohlken, ~ssistan t professor of Engh sh, returned this fall after spending a year of doctoral study at the University o! Kansas, Lawrenc~. Gilbert Wilson, associate professor of instrumental music, al so returned after spen<;Iing the 1967 spring and summer semesters in doctoral studies at the University of Missouri at Kansas City. On l ~ave of a.bsence during the current year is W. Austin Van Pelt, assistant Professor of sociology, who is at the University of Denver. Newcomers to the Peru State faculty include: . Donnell Cattle, instructor of industrial arts, replacing Gordon Gavin who resigned to accept a similar po si ti on at Mankato (Minn.) State College. Edward B. Chenette, di rector of financial. aids and instructor of psychology, replacing Dr. Gal en W. Dodge who joined the faculty at the University of Nebraska. Tom Fitzgerald, assistant professor of heal th and ph~sical education, assuming part of the duties of Dr. H.E. Meyers director of ins ti tu ti on al studies and j ames W. .Pilkington,. associate pr~fessor of p~ysi.cal ed~cation, who are spending half tim~ in curriculum development for the U.S. Office of Education. Davi.cl A. Gunders<?n, assistant professor o~ busine~s education, replacing Vernon Kiely, resigned. Miss Lucy Hovey, instructor of home e~onomics, replacing Mrs. Ina Sproul, retired. Mrs. Sproul now lives at 123Yi Sou th Race, El Dorado, Kans, Sarni Kaloti, assistant professor of government and economics, an addition to the staff. . Victor N.. Kingery, instructor of physics, replacing Erwin Selleck, resigned. Ken '.f· Kreisher, assistant professor of English and German, replacing Elmer Nemec, resigned. Loren F. Mc:Keown, assistant professor o~ English, replacing Stephen Shafer, resi gt!ed. David A. Riegal, instructor of English replacing Mrs. George Schottenhamel wh~ taught part time .1 ast year. Dr. Rex R. Shelley, head of the divis~oi:i of education, replacing Dr. Darrell Wininger, who became director of federal programs. Thomas L. Sorensen, instructor of sociology, one year appointment to replace Austin Van Pelt, who is on leave of absence. Geor~ L. Wells instructor of art repl ac_ii:g Donald Roller Wilson, who resigned to JOin the faculty of the University of Arkansas, Fayett~vill e. M~s. Scott Williams, laboratory assistant in geography, replacing Harold Whiteman, resigned.

2

By action of the Legi sl a tu re of the State of Nebraska in .1 ate spring, the campus element~ry and high school, located in the T.J. Majors Campus School building at Peru State, was dissolved by passage of an amenanent attached to LB546. a bill introduced by State Senator Calista Cooper Hughes. Thus ended the 1 aboratory school on the Peru State campus which had existed sp asmodi call y almost since Peru State Col1 ege was founded. Wi ~h the pas sage .of the bill, District 3, which had contracted with Peru State Coll e~e to provide educational facilities and instruction for its children was merged by order of Nemaha county su'perint~nde::it with District 29, the Auburn School Di strict. To avert a crisis caused by the unexpected dosing. of. the Campus school and t~e C?rrespond1ng increase in students in Distric.t 29 facilities, District 'Z) leased ~pace in the T. J. Majors Campus School for one year, and Peru. students, kindergarten through grade six, are bein;: instructed there. · With the overtaxing of facilities in Auburn and a desire to m'ti.intain an attendance cen~er ~n Peru for students in this area of District 29, a $1.8 million issue was voted upon and passed on November 21 As .a .result, a senior high school and~· !iddi ti~:m t~ Calvert Elementary school will be built in Auburn. A part of the bond issue will furnish funds to construct an elementary attendance center in Peru. The present Auburn senior high building will be used as a junior high. With the closing of the Peru State campus ?chool, thirteen faculty members saw their employment terminated by the Col~ ege. Those former ~acul ty members and their employment locations include: Glen Sheely, ' 39, District .'29 . High school, A'!burn; .B. A.. Eddy, principal, Nebr; ska C'_i ty Junior High school; Genevieve Parriott (Mrs. Jacob) Gergen, ' 38 MS • 58 Business College, Chillicothe, Mo.; Dor-' othy Keys (Mrs. Clarence) Iversen • 33 Nebraska City elementary; Miss Glady~ Grush, '40, MS '59, District 29 elementary Auburn; Maryon Thomas(Mrs. Ross) Adams' '55, MS' 59, District 29 elementary, Peru~ L~ll i ~ (Mrs. John) Christ; ' 53, MS '60: District 29 elementary, Peru; Mrs. Faith Friest, District 29 elementary Peru· Wayne Pres~nall, '. 59, Schuyler; 'Lynn 'Doxon, Holtville, Cali£.; Paul Sorensen, Campus High school, Western Illinois University, Macomb; Rose Ul 1 sperger (Mrs. Lawrence) Bernard, '58,. MS '61, Nebraska School for Visually Handicapped, Nebraska City; Mrs. Ru th Rouse Ho 1 t vi 11 e, Cal i £. ' 1

Volume XVI Number 1 Fall, 19o7 Official publication of Peru State College. Published and distributed in November and May. Please notify college of change

of address.


Rocky Mountain Peruvians

Grads Celebrate Centennial Meet in Denver Eighty- t"WO alumni, former students, and friends of Peru State met in Denver, October 7, for a Centennial birthday dinner honoring their alma mater. Meeting at the Tiffin Inn, the ten th annual meeting of the Rocky Mountain chapter of the Peru Alumni Association attracted Peruvians from Wyoming, Western Nel;lraska, and 15 Colorado commun:i, ties·. John L. Lewis, Peru, president-of the Peru Achievement Foundation, explained the workings of the 12-year-old organization which provides scholarships, loans, and other financial aid for Peru students. Don Carlile, director of special services md alumni secretary, reviewed the College' s Centennial year acti vi ti es and told of recent developments on the Campus of a Thousand Oaks. He showed the tapenarrated slide presentation of Peru's Proud Past, a story of the college's first 100 years. Betty Parriott Oliver, '58, 3291 South Willow Crt., Denver, was elected chapter secretary. Edi th Straube Sykes, '48, 4360 Oak, \\heatridge, was elevated to the presidency, and Patricia Benford Bornemeier, 2636 13th avenue, Greeley, became vice president. Boyd Good, 916 South Elmira, Denver, is the out-going president. Jack Ash ton, ' 35, 30 45 Sou th Monroe, Denver, was master of ceremonies. Musical entertainment was provided by Harry G. Graham of Denver. The invocation was given by the Rev. Dale Falk, Bridgeport, Nebr., minister of Duane Noell, fs '56 (left) introduces h ! s wi f e Gl o r i a o • Har ra No el 1 , • 61 , (at h1s left), Jack Ashton, master of ceremonies, stands at right. The cover shows the birthday cake served at the eel eb rat ion.

the Peru Baptist church from 1954 until 1964. Mrs. Falk is a member of the 1964 cl ass. Earliest graduate in attendance was Guy H. Willi ams, '06, former! y of Omaha, and now of Estes Park. Hugh B. Terry, fs '26, speaker for the dedication of the Fine Arts Center and the Centennial Residence Complex, was present with Mrs. Terry. At tending the meeting from Peru, in addition to Mr. Lewis and Mr.Carlile, were Mrs. Lewis and J. D. Levitt, associate professor of speech and English.

1967 Fall Enrollment to 1,183 As expected, enrollment at Peru State reached another all- time high with Fall r'egistration. Final tabulations revealed 1, 18 3 students· had enrolled for the 10 1st academic fall semester. The figure topped last fall' s 1, 041 students by 142 students an increase of 13.2 per cent. ' Completion and occupan,,Gy of ClayburnMathews Men' s Hall and Davidson-Pal mer Women's hall made possible the increase in enrollment by increasing student living space. A total of 715 students are residing in residence halls, compared with 545 one year ago. · The freshman cl ass of 413 students- -256 men and 157 women..;-is the largest. Other classes include 281 sophomores, 246 juniors, and 229 seniors. Fourteen students are unclassified. In the total enrollment, men outnumber women 7 25 to 458. Forty-one Nebraska counties are represented in the fall enrollment total. Students are enrolled froin 21 other states, pl us American Samo a, Germany, Japan, Korea, West Indies, and Peru, South America.

3


203 Candidates

Degrees Awarded During 1967 Dr. Kenneth D. Young Speaks Peru Stat~ College granted baccalaureate degrees to 203 students during May and August, 1967, Commencement ceremonies. The total includes 135 who completed degree require.men ts in January and May and 68 summer graduates. The May ceremonies were highlighted by the return of two Peru State graduates who delivered key addresses for the Q8 th annual graduation. Dr. Kenneth D. Young, chai nnan of the de.eartment of education, School of Ozarks, Point Lookout, Mo.;delivered the main commencement address on May 29. A 1Q37 graduate of Peru State, Dr. Young is the great grandson of Maj or Wil 1 i am Dailey, one of the early settlers of Peru and the man who is reported to have made the first contribution, a gift of $5<)0, toward the co st of construction of the college' s first building com_I?l eted in 1867. The Reverend Ben L. Duerfel dt, mini st er of the First Christian Church, Manhattan, Kans., was minister for the Sunday Bacca l au re ate services, May 28, Duerfel dt is a 1Q54 graduate of the college. The 1967 degree recipients include: Spring Candidates

Bachelor of Arts (liberal arts) -Rodger A. Bassett, Syracuse; John F. Bstandi~, Burchard; Richard J. Duponcheel, Omaha; Erik L. Foged, Papillion; JerryV. Jacobson, Nebraska City; Nancy E. Jarvis, Peru. Dennis R. Kennedy, Worcester, Mass.; Ronald J. Kroll, Steinauer; Bruce A. Larson, Nebraska City; Virginia I. Miles, F~ls City; Leonard T. Tomlyn, Nebraska City; Alan D. Zipper, Hillside, N.J. Bachelor of Science Garth L. Adams, Peru; William A. DePetro, Omaha; Lawrence J. Duder, Table Rock; Kenneth L. Gayer, Madrid, Iowa; Richard L. Hamer, Beatrice; Danny R. Kellenberger, Sabetha, Kans.; Michael J. Noyes, Ralston; Alfred C. Rirrmer, Mechanicsburg, Pa.; Ronald W. Robbins,Fairless Hills, Pa.; Leonard T. Tomlyn, Nebraska City. Bachelor of Fine Arts In Education-Devon E. Adams, l>eru; Paul H. Fell, Worcester, Mass.; Mary E. Oestmann, Peru. Bachelor of Arts In Education -- Dale L. Allensworth, Auburn; Larry D. Anderson, Pawnee City; Rodger A. Bassett, Syracuse; LaVera D. Bennett, Sabetha, Kans.; Richard W. Berthold, Nebraska City; John J. Chasse, Worcester, Mass.; Steven A. Colerick, Falls City; Phil~p R. Dorssom, Lancaster, Kans.; Melvin G. Hester, Auburn; Erik L. Foged, Papillion; Gordon A. Jackson, Lenox, Iowa. Nancy E. Jarvis, Peru; Terry L. Kuenning, Auburn;Roger J. Lucas, Dawson; Gary D. Mendenhall, Morrill, Kans.; Gary L. Neumann, Tecumseh; Steven C. Pattison, Gering; Donald O. Pieper, DeWitt; Darrell J. Plumb, Macedonia, Iowa; Larry G. Rhoten, Syracuse; Katherine B. Shaw, Sabetha, Kans.; James B. Stanosheck, Qiell; Daniel L. Strecker, Preston; Ruth S. Stunz, Hiawatha, Kans.; Mary L. Tackett, Tabor, Iowa. Bd~helor of Science In Education Margaret M. Albin. Humboldt; Bonnie L. Ander-

4

son, Omaha; William D. Anderson, Chester, Pa.; Cheryl K. Armstrong, Nebraska City; Rogine A. Bang, Omaha; Katherine M. Black, Omaha; Lonnie R. Bohling, Tecumseh; Donna R. Boren, Ham.bur~, Iowa; Arlene M. Borcher, Steinauer; Marian R. Brammer, Dawson;Barbara A. Brandt, Hamburg, Iowa; Ronald V. Broers, Nebraska City; Bernard L. Brown, Nebraska City; Lowell E. Brown, East Alton, Ill. Ray D. Cain, Thurman, Iowa; Richard D. Casady, Lewis, Iowa; Dean E. Cerny, Nebraska City; Larry L. Christensen, Casey, Iowa; Wayne O. Christen.sen, Valparaiso; Dolores M. Clark, Peru; Elizabeth W. Cook, Sabetha, (continued on page 19)

Placement Bureau Report . . .

Teacher Supply Short of Demand Eighty per cent of Peru State's 1967 graduates are now engaged in the teaching profession, according to figures rel eased by Harold W. Johnson, director of placement. Twelve per cent of the graduates a-re employed in non- teaching occupations, five per cent are enrolled in graduate schools, ahd three per cent are in the armed forces. Of those in the teaching profession 64 per cent are teaching in Nebraska. ' Mr. Johnson reports a growing trend of representatives of business, industry and allied occupations to visit the Campus' of a Thousand Oaks in search of college graduates. Johnson reports that these representatives . care Ii ttl e whether the graduate has liberal arts or an edu ca ti on degree they are looking for good people people who they can train," he said. ' In line with the growing demands for Peru State graduates in non- teaching fields Johnson's placement office has on hand ~ gro~i:ig fi_l e of ~i terature ~oncerning opportunities in business and industry areas. Johnson is quick to point out that despite the growing interest in Peru graduates by employers in non- teaching fa el ds, the tremendous demand for Peru trained teachers continues with far mo re demand than the supply can meet. The following report of those accepting P?sitions, _their home towns or present teaching location, and their new location con~i~~s of 139 job placements. In last spring s Peru Stater, 98 placements were reported. Secondary education- - Steve Pat ti son Gering, to Bagley, Iowa; Wayne Christen: sen, Val_paraiso, to Murray, Iowa; Ruth Stun~. Hiawatha, Kans., to Harl an, Iowa; D~nnis Fl attre, Lancaster, Kans., to Louisville; Larry Anderson, Pawnee City to Tecumseh. ' 9erald Laflin, Crab Orc~ard, to College Springs, Iowa; Steven Col en ck, Falls City, (continued on page 8)


Cross Country Success Cross country continues to dominate the sports success picture at Peru State C.01 l ege. On November 26, the Bobcat longdistance runners raced to a national seven th pl ace finish in the. champion ship run of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics held at Omaha. It was the Bobcats third strai~ht year in the top 10. In 1965 Peru was third, and last year it was another seventh pl ace finish. Freshman Jack Weyers paced the Bobcats in the national meet, pl acing 14th in the fi el d of 20 5 runn e rs. For Coach Jim Pilkington' s charges, the season was filled with success as only twice, including the national meet, did the Bobcats finish out of first pl ace. Peru pl aced fifth in a nine team field in the season opener at South Dakota State University, Brookings, for their other out of the money run. Peru captured victory in nine of the 11 outings. One of the big victories came in the Nebraska C.011 ege C.On ference meet where Peru dethroned Kearney State, loop champion for the 1 ast 14 years. The Bobcats were al so champion of the Midwest AAU Meet held at Kearney. Other victories were in the District 11 NAIA meet; over Omaha University and Wayne in a triangular; over Doane in a dual; over Tarkio in a dual; over John F. Kennedy and Midwestern in a triangular; over Oinaha U. in a dual; and over Tarkio and C.Oncordi a in a triangular. Weyers and senior Tim Hendricks were the big guns. Weyers 1 ed the Peru con tingent in seven meets, Hendricks twice, and in two meets Hendricks and Weyers ran dead heats. Three seniors- -Hendricks, Jim Watson, and Dick Zaparanick--closed out illustrious careers this year for the Bobcats. Weyers' 14th pl ace finish in the national meet will earn him NAIA Al 1-Ameri can honors. Louis Fritz, 1966 graduate, earned similar honors for his performance in the 1965 meet.

Track Team Places Third In NCC; Nine Records Fall Coach Jack Mcintire' s 1967 track team pl aced third in the Nebraska College Conference track and field meet held in May at Chadron and Kearney. A freak spring snow storm wiped out the second.day of the meet scheduled for Chadron and the meet' s final day was moved to Kearney. Kearney again cap tu red the championship, Chadron was second, Wayne fourth and Hastings fifth. ' ;In other meets not reported in the Spring Peru Stater, Peru downed Concordia and Tarkio in a triangular; captured the championship of the five team Wayne State Relays; defeated Omaha University in a dual; and pl aced midway in the five- team NCC meet. Peru State al so p arti cip ated in the Midland Relays, Kearney Relays, Drake Relays, and Howard Wood Relays, meets in which no team scoring is kept. Diring the 1967 campaign, nine new Peru State track records were set and one was tied by the Bobcats.

Cages Roll to Six Straight Wins After Initial Set-Back Coach Jack Mcintire' s Peru State basketball team absorbed a season-opening loss to Tarkio (Mo.) College and then surprised everyone (except for themselves) as they rolled to six straight victories to give Bobcat hoop fandom bright hopes for the 1967-68 26 game schedule. Scores of games played through Decemrer 9, Peru score first, include: Tarkio ( 56 71); McPherson C.Oll ege (92-64}; Kansas Wes1 eyan (97-87); Concordia (92:87); Southern S.D. State (70-1)9); General Beadle (70-67); Northwest Missouri (83-69) The victories over McPherson and Kansas Wesleyan gained the Bobcats the championship of the McPherson, Kans , Jaycee Tournament for the second straight year. Still facing the Bobcats are 19 games, including the Tarkio (Mo.) College Holiday tournament, December 22-23. ¡ Early season guesses about the Nebraska C.Ollege _Conference show Peru only in the role of a dark horse contender. Defending champion Chadron State should be the favorite with both Wayne State and Hastings as title threats. If progress continues, Peru State could fool them al I. The remainder of the schedule, foll owing the Tarkio tournament, in~l udes: Jan, 5, Kearney; Jan. 8, at Northwest Missouri; Jan. 13, Doane; Jan. 18, at Tarkio; Jan. 19, at Hastings; Jan. 23, St. Benedict's; Jan. 'l:', Wayne; Feb. 2, at Kearney; Feb.6, Simpson; Feb. 9, Chadron; Feb. 10, Chadron; Feb. 13, at Doane; Feb. 17, Hastings; Feb. 21, at Wayne.

'67 Grid Record at 1-7-1 For Worst Season Since 1938 Football fortunes at Peru State continued dark during the 1967 season as the Bobcats compiled a 1-7-1 record and a fourth pl ace finish in the Nebraska College Conference, the worst season since the Bobcats won only one of eight games in 1938. As disappointing as any game was Peru' s 7 -14 loss on Homecoming Day to Wayne State C.011 e~e. It was the second consecutive alumni day loss for the Peruvians. The only bright spot on the 1967 record was a 23 to 7 verdict over NO::: foe Hastings College, a victory which enabled Peru to gain fourth spot in the conference by shoving Hastings in to the basement. Peru's tie game came in the second. game of the season, ~ 7 - 7 deadlock against St. Mary of the Plains of Dodge City, Kans., at Peru. In post season honors, Shenandoah, Iowa senior John Gilmore, offensive tackle and defensive rard, was named to the District 11 Nationa Association of Intercollegiate Athletics all-star team. Gilmore and teammates Mike Mulvaney, sophomore from Independence, Iowa, and senior Tim Logsdon, Macomb, Ill., were named to the coach's allconference team. Season's scores, Peru score first column: 6 Tarkio 7 St. Mary 0 N. W. Missouri 0 Kearney q Chadron

20 7 27

42 26

7 Wayne 23 Hastings 0 Doane .20 Mo. Vall ey

14 7

38 21

5


Launching a

second century

~Twas

/

,•

a Real Fine Homecoming

Peru State's action-packed October 13-15 homecoming week end focused on the Second Century. The Industrial Arts Club's Century II computer, "'Programed to Win" won first in the organization displays at the 46th annual grad day event. Alpha MuOmega, math fraternity, pl aced second, and Centennial Residence Complex won third. Alumni from Okl ah om a, Colorado, New York, Missouri, Minnesota, Michigan, Kansas, California, South Dakota, New Jersey, and Iowa joined those from throughout Nebr ask a for the three- day event, which was climaxed with dedication of the Fine Arts Center and the Centennial ResidenceComplex on Sunday. During day-long balloting for new alumni officers on Saturday, Marvin Gerdes, '53, Auburn, was elected president of the Peru Alumni Association. Other officers elected were Ken Cl ark, '58, Nebr ask a City, first vice-president; Mary Riley Bohlken, • 66, Peru, second vice-president; Tom Aitken, '64, Fal 1 s City, secretary; and Carolyn Parli Hawxby, '61, Nemaha, treasurer. Halftime of the Wayne State-Peru State football game saw Miss Ihnita Speckmann, Elk Creek, presented as homecoming qu~en. Her attendants were Mary Mowry, Beatrice; Lola Morrissy, Omaha; JulietHa_rrison, Wood River Ill., and Linda Knippelm1er, Johnson. Miss Ceci Evangelist, '67, the 1966 queen,

a second grade teacher at Sodus, N. Y., crowned the gueen at the homecoming dance. The 7-14 loss to the Wayne Wildcats was the cloud which darkened the otherwise perfect day. An alumni coffee followed the game, with the Dramatic Club's presentation of two one-act plays, "Ralph Roister Ih i st er, " and " Ma cBe th" at 7 p , m , an d the ~Of!!ecoming dance closing Saturday's activities. Sun day's dedication of the Fine Arts Center and Centennial Residence Complex are reported elsewhere in this issue.

Lyle G. Strom Receives PSEA 'Teacher' Award Lyle G. Strom, Peru State's tireless and popular associate professor of social stud· ies, was last spring named Teacher of the Year by the Peru State Student Education Association, The honor, highest bestowed upon faculty members by student groups was. announc_ed at the Spring Honors Convo~ cation by Bill Bowen, PSEA president. Named as outstanding teachers by the P_SEA were Jerry_ Stemper, associate professor of physical educationJohn C. Christ, head of the division "of ~cience and mathematics; Leland Sherwood, assistant p:i;-ofessor of art; and Albert Brady, asso ciate professor of biological science.

The only gift too small... CONTRIBUTORS FROM APRIL 21. 1967 TO NOVEMBER 2. 1967 1890S A. D. MAJORS, '96 ANDREW J. WILSON, '97 FANNY MOORE SMITH, '99 ADDIE CRANMER CODINGTON, 3YR '95 IN MEMORY OF EMMA A. HART FULLER, '95, BY HER DAUGHTER, HELEN H. FULLER, '19 BERTHA M. SPEARMAN BURBANK, '98 DR. H. CLYDE FILLEY, '99

1900S DR.HENRY J. BRODERSON,'06 IN MEMORY OF HIS PARENTS, MR. & MRS. BEN B. (LUCILE WALWORTH) HURST, '04. '05, BY CHARLES W. HURST (2) MRS. ELSIE Guss JONES, ·09 (2)

EDNA PARSONS (MRS. W. G.) CLARK, '09 (2) EARL CLINE, 2YRS. '07 MARTHA E. MUMFORD, '08 LILL I AN JEWELL (MRS. W.W.) BARNES, '03 DORA B. (MRS. B. H.) ZOOK ROWAN, '09 MAUDE MOSELY CARTNEY, '09 CARRIE HESSELTINE, '04 GUY H. WILLIAMS, '06 IN MEMORY OF GLENN D. JENK I NS. '09 , BY FAM I LY AND FRIENDS MRS. MAUDE WATKINS MICHAEL, ·05 BERNICE MAcHIRRON (MRS. CHARLES P.). WEIGAND, '06 EMILY REDFORD (MRS. C. W.) GooD, '04 MYRTLE D. KILMER (MRS. EARL)

WINTERMUTE, '00 GERTRUDE L. COON '07 IN MEMORY OF ARTHUR E. HILDE· BRAND, '01. BY HIS DAUGHTER AGNES HILDEBRAND LEONARD, RELATIVES, AND FRIENDS LILLIE M. WAHLSTROM (MRS. HERBERT) JOHNSON, '07 AL TA GRAY (MRS. LLOYD) DENSLOW, '06 LAURENE STEVEN, '04 DoRA E. ANDRUS, '09 J. HAROLD WILLIAMS, '08 ORAM. ANDREWS (MRS. EARL) BARRETT, '09 LAURA PORTER (MRS. G.L.) CARLSON, "08 MARY JO ANDERSON, '08 E. R. GROSS, '08 ETHEL WILL I AMSON (MRS. JAMES) KILBOURN, '04 HOPE ABBOTT (MRS FRANK) DORLAND, '06 MRS. MYRTLE YOCUM COMSTOCK, '09 SARAH JOY (MRS. OLIVER F,) CLEVELAND, '03 LULU PASCO, '05 LENA HALLETT (MRS. S.J.) ELLENBERGER, '08 F A¥E HANKS, '07 1910 s IN MEMORY OF DR. JOHN W. WEAR, '14, BY FRIENDS VERNE H. WRIGHT, '16(2) CHARLES A. SPACHT, '17 EDNA E. JEPPSON, '11 H. L. SCHWENKER, '15 MRS. EULALIE SHAFFER OHLSON, • 11 (2) L. A. WETMORE, 2 YR. '17 MARY ANN HOGARTH, '13 JOY ELMER MoRGAN, ' 1 I MAUD LAWRENCE HESKETT, '14, (2)

OLIVE JACKSON WHITE. '15

CATHARINE KELLEY (MRS. GLEN A.) GALT, '17 PEARL SHEPHARDSON WESTGATE, '14 NETTIE PRELL (MRS. REX D.) BAILEY,"13 ROSALINE KOHN (MRS. C.E.) Fl SHER, '17 AMEL I A CLARY YOUNG, '14 MRS. ANNA HAZEN WOOD, ~12 EDNA MARIE GABUS, '17 ELIZAPETH CURRY (MRS. CLIFFORD B.) HENDRICKS, '12 VESTA LEWIS COMER, '15 GRAYCE TEICH (MRS. GROVER) CASTER, '16 MYRTLE L. DONAHOO, '17 EMMA J. ST. JOHN NUTZMAN, '17 CECILIA M. PETERSON. '17 EUGEN I A MoORE, '14 MARIE 0. FORSYTHE (MRS. FLETCHER) NEAL, ' 11 AMY APPLEGATE, '18 HALLIE GATES (MRS. WAYNE) GOOD, '18 MABLE SPAFFORD (MRS. EVERETT) SMITH, '10 MARYL. HIBLER BOWERSOX, '17 MRS. ANNA HORAK LEWIS, '14 KATHRYN M. ELLIS, FORMER CAMPUS SCHOOL STUDENT '11-'18 DR. AND MRS. E. C. (MAE MILLER) BECK, BOTH '12 J.J. KLIMA, '15 MR. AND MRS, CARROLL LEWIS, HE ' 17, BED ' 19 IDA P. NICKEL, '15. BED '16 S. L. CLEMENTS, '12 ELLA V. ANDERSON, '15 ESTHER MURDOCK STOKES, FS ' 19 1-IATTI E LILLY (MRS. R.H.) SLAGLE, '13 DR. LILLIAN PORTENIER, '17 L ILL I AN HANK"$, ' 1 3 SUSIE PowELL HAVERKAMP, FS '15 LILLIAN VIOLA ENGEL, '18 MRS. MAUDE PAGE EBERT. FS 'll

MAE TRUE RICHARDSON, '12 KAREN BLAIR (MRS. HOWARD F.) ROWLEY, '17 BETTY HILEMAN POWELL, ' 15 MARIE FINLEY (MRS. LEO F.) POST, '16 BERTHA M. BLOSS, '15 !RENE FERNEAU WYLIE, '15 VERNA SN I DER (MRS. WALTER D.) KIRTLEY, ' 14 PRUDENCE STILES (MRS. H.C,) DALLAM, '15, '45 HANNA JENSEN, '13 ROSE BANKS (MRS. ARTHUE L.) EMBREE, 'JO ORA SPENCER (MRS. E.M.) CHAPIN, '10 ROSEL. HANSON, '12 MARGUARITE A. MOULTON PEEBL ER, '16 DR. VICTOR 0. Roos' 1 3 MARGARET MITCHELL (M~S. C.A. PALMER, '18 BERTHA POTEET (MRS. F,) KUHL MANN, '17 MINNIE C, BAYER (MRS. W. A.) MCFARLAND, '14 GLADYS TAYLOR (MRS. GENE) ALLEN, '13 C. VERNON KREBS, '13 CECELIA WEHRS FORELL, '11 MARY OGG (MRS. W. N.) DELZELL. '17 FRANCES CHEZ (MRS. PAUL) K ! NGSTON, ' 11 CORINNE WHITFIELD (MRS. GE OR GE ) SM I TH , ' 1 5 EBBA WAHLSTROM (MRS. ROBERT) EDSTROM, '12 CHARLES E. ANDREWS, '14 EFFIE SWANHOLM, '18 HELEN MAJORS (MRS. J. H.) RI ODLE, '15 NELL KELLEY (MRS. P,,(LJL) ROSE AN. ' 17 LAURA MACKPRANG (MRS.


Two permanent scholarships established

Foundation's Fund. Year Nears End John L.

Lewis heads re-elected officers

The announcement of the establishment of two new annµal scholarship funds, the appointment of seven new trustees, the reelection of Peru Achievement Foundation officers for another tenn and the fall fund c001paign are the top newsmakers since the Spring edition of the Peru St·ater. At the annual May meeting, the board of trustees re-elected John L. Lewis to his third term as PAF president; L. B. Mathews as vice-president; DonaldK. Carlile, secretary; ·and A. V. Larson, treasurer. Mr. Lewis announced the appointment of seven new trustees. They included: Mrs. Caryll Ubben, Peru; Mrs. Jeanne Tynon, Peru; fuss Adams, Peru; Di ck Blake, Auburn; John Stevenson, Peru; Mrs. Wilma Simon, Auburn; and Bob lienry. Peru. The Foundation received funds which will permit the granting of two scholarshi2s annually to qualified students. Family and friends of GlPnn D. Jenkins, member of the class of 1909 and late resident of Humboldt, contributed $1,564 for a Memorial Scholarship to provide an annual scholarship to a Humboldt High school graduate or a Richardson county resident. An anonymous donor has given the Foundation a grant of $1, 000 to be used as an annual scholarship for a student in busi-

... 18

ness education. The contribution was given in honor of Miss Nona Palmer, professor emeritus of business education, who lives in Bradshaw and \\bittier, Calif. The Fall fund drive, which began about October 1, . has resulted in contributions totaling more than $3,000 to December 1. Peru vi ans may expect to receive the 19 68 Foundation appeal sometime in March. Contributions from Peruvians during this year which in part are used for matching funds for the National Defense Student Loan program will make available $46, 800 in loans to students. Average gift in the fall campaign to date is between six and seven dol 1 ars with the largest being $1, 000 and the smal 1 est $1. 00. About 300 of the 7, 500 on the Peru Stater rolls answered the Fall appeal . Peru State College, with the largest enrollment in history, needs more support from more of its graduates and former students. Foundation o ffi ci al s are, however, heartened by the interest of many to make the PAF a part of their estate plans. Those interested in this line of giving should write the office of Special Services at Peru State for the infonnation booklet "Effective Giving through· your Will," which will be sent upon request .

no gift at all

HAROLD) CUTLER, '16, BED '17 FLOYD T. DOANE, '18. B.ED. '19 EDNA BARNES (MRS. FRITIOF) JOHANSON , ' 10 LOURE SALZMANN (MRS. W. G.) Fl ROVED, '16 EDITH GRAMLICH, '18 1920 s RUTH LAWRENCE (MRS. NORRI~) READ, '21 FRANK L. SIEVERS. '28 MR. & MRS. WILBERT L, (SHIRLEY SKADEN) ZORN, '28, '26 HELEN BERNICE WILLIAMS (MRS. A. E.) CARESS, '26 BETTY GRAYES OSGOOD, '27 ETHEL GUNDERSON, '2G ( 2) ERNA WOITZEL (MRS. JULIAN) DUNCAN, '27 ( 2) J. HAROLD MARREN, '29 DULCIE MoRRIS (MRS. R.A.) BARBER. FS '29 (2) MR. & MRS. C. E. (JULIA SKEEN) MATTHEWS, '29, '62 HELEN B. CARESS. '26 MR. & MRS. CLEO (VEDA RHODUS) McNEELY, '23. 2 YRS. '23 HAZEL OSBORN WALKER, '26 HENRIETTA FLECK (MRS. DALE) HOUGHTON, 2-YR, '23 (2) MRS. NEVA HOAK NICHOLS. '21 W. G. JANTZEN, FS '22-26 (SUMMERS) PAUL W. LAMB, 2 YR. '23 GERTRUDE CONGER DELANO, 2 YR. '22 DR. JOSEPH H. ROBERTSON, '28 IN MEMORY OF GERALD A. WARMAN, FS '29. BY HIS WIFE, CLAIRE CODINGTON WARMAN, 2 YR. '29 VIRGINIA SIMMONS (MRS. WINSTON) STOODY, 2 YR. '27

MR. AND MRS. FRED A. RoTHERT, HE '28 GENEVIEVE NICHOLAS (MRS. WILL ARD) HAYWARD, '29 HAZEL HUTCHINSON (MRS. JOHN) ANDERSON, 2 YR, '28, '67 RutH PHILBROOK (MRS. GLEN) THOMAS, 2 YR. '26 MARGARET MILLER (MRS. RALPH) JOHNSTON, '24 (2) YRSA HANSEN, 2 YR. '22 MR. & MRS. FLOYD (ALICE BRANDT) CHASE, '29, '28 ALBERTA HEBARD, '24 LEONA VANCE HANNAFORD, 2 YR. '20, '60 . MRS. FAYE GAISFORD KUPER, FS '28 HELEN DYE (MRS. CHARLES) SHERROD, FS '2! MARIE LE POIDEYIN, 2 YR. '24 MRS. RALPH OLSON, FS '21 MR. AND MRS. l.W. (WINNIFRED TEICH) BUISING, '26. '25 H. H. WHITWELL, '25 MR. AND MRS. ELDRED 0. (THELMA HOWE) MORTON, '22. '23 MYRTLE MAXWELL. '26 BLANCHE SAGESER, '26 ELLA WOODWARD (MRS. E.F.) GRIFFIN. '20 ZELDA P. REDDING (MRS. 'CARL) STEGEMAN, '21 (2) LEONA (MRS. ARTHUR) HILL. FS '23 (VA REAGAN (MRS. HARRY) HUSTON, '25 EDNA HALL (MRS. GERALD) MOORE, 2 YR. '25. '60

1930s STERLING BOTTCHER, FS '39 (2)

RUTH BEAUCHAMP (MRS. ED) LI ND ELL, '32 EVEA RUSE (MRS. DALE) BLACK, FS '39 W.E. SUGDEN, 32 CONSTANCE BRIGHT RANDALL RODAWAY, '3! (2) MARJORIE YOUNG (MRS. CLOYD) "'1YERS. '34 AYER'r ~~. STEVENS, '32 (2) PAULINE Ali::, '38 CORINNE FRYE ROOT, '31 MRS. LELIA FRAZER HELMS, '35 BETTY PANCAKE, '34 ELEANOR E. HEMPHILL (MRS. J. P. ) BROOKS , ' 39 EARL G. WHIPPLE, '38 CHLOE PATE (MRS. GEORGE) LEHMAN, '36 JOSEPHINE BRISSEY (MRS. LUCIAN E.} SMITH, '36 MR. & MRS. GLEN (EVELYN WILL IAMS) SHELLY, '39, FS '37 ANNA MAY SANDIN BREITENBACH, •37 MARGARET GRAYES THOMPSON WINTER, '30 MARGARET ALBERT, '33 (2) S. KENNETH LILLY, '31 HELEN M. KUCERA, '30 (2) MR. & MRS. TOM G. (Eous HAHN) GOLDENSTEIN, FS. '39, FS. '38 MR. & MRS. STEPHEN 0. (COLEATA CRINK) GAINES, '34. '32 ETTA F. NEUNABER, '39 MR. & MRS. WALTER (CARYLL BOHL) UBBEN, '35, FS '35 WILLIAM OKRENT, '30 (2) DR. & MRS. JAMES M. (WANNA METCALF) MCGUIRE, '30. '31 GRACE REIFF, '37 NINA MAUDE JONES WHITNEY, FS '31 JOYCE E. GRUBB, '34 MR. & MRS. R. L. (JUNE

K. BRICKELL) RIGGINS, '39 . • 31 MILDRED HANKS (MRS. W. S.) ABBEY, '31 HERBERT E. [YENS, '31 MR. AND MRS. GEORGE A. (ETHEL FLICK) BRUCE, '38, FS '30 (2)

NOLA ANN (MRS. C.J.) PETERS, FS '31 LANGFORD WAGGONER, '34 ARCH L. MARTIN, '30 MARY ELLEN NAY I AUX (MRS. W. F.) WIGNALL, 2 YR. '34 -.bHN W. STAHN, '3 I I DA HARR I SON, '36 ELBERTA SCHINDLER (MRS. H.C.) ELLIOTT, '30 MERL B. P~EK, '35 THRESA CLARK, 2 YR. '32 NELLIE L. MILLER MOREHOUSE, FS '35 FREDA IHRIG, '32 IRVIN C. WILLIAMS, '33 MRS. LORRAINE FLAU COATES, 2 YR. '39 HELEN MARGARET LARSON (MRS. JOE) SEIGER, '39 CLARENCE CRANDELL, '35 EVERETT E. BEAUCHARD, '35 WILMA SILENCE (MRS. CHRI~) SIMON, '34 RALPH E. SCHOLL, '38 ERNEST E. ROTHERT, '30 ISABELLE MAJORS (MRS. WARREN) HAYS, '39 LEONA OHLER (MRS. J. F.) MILULAS 2 YR. '33 MR. AND MRS. JACK (KATHRYN ROSZELL) ASHTON, '35. 2 YR. '39 WAYNE L. RIGGS, '37 BERN ARD BAR I SAS. '38 (CONTINUED ON PAGE 20.

7


Placement Bureau Report (continued fro'!'- page 4) . . to Shenandoah, Iowa; Wesley Dickey, St. Paul, to Fullerton; Dean Cerny, Nebraska City, to Minden; Carol Henderson, Brock, to Shelby; Tom Morrison, Papillion, to Sargent. Mary Tackett, Tabor, Iowa, to Wood River; Don Pieper, DeWitt, to Cl~rks; Eddie Shafer, Shubert, to McCool Junction; Larry Christensen, Nebr ask a City, to Neal a, Iowa; James Stanosheck, Odel 1, to Hartington; Joe Keys, Westvil 1 e, N .J., to Deptford, N.J.; Charles Pratt, Westville, N.J., to Berlin, N.J.; Marcia Reeves, Peru, to Au~rn.

.

Robert Gates, Shenandoah, Iowa, to Lewis Central of Council Bluffs, Iowa; Bill Rinne, Burchard, to Ayrshire, Iowa; Mary Ell en Oestmann, Peru, to Syracuse; Darrell Plumb, Macedonia, Iowa, to Logan, Iowa. . Mary Leigh Smith, Nebraska City,. to Hastings; Carol Hawley, Brock, to Ste~l ing; Sheryl Barrett, Nebraska City, to Sidney, Iowa· Nancy Jarvis, Peru, to Treynor, Iowa; Erik' Foged, Papillion, to Call away; Mike Guilliatt Auburn, to Treynor, Iowa; Joe Kuttler, Shubert, to Rising City; Ron Snodgrass, Seward, to Gree} ey, Arlene Borcher Fell Steinauer and Paul Fell, Worcester, Mass:, to East Jordan, "Aich.; Gordon Jackson Lenox Iowa, to GI enwood, Iowa; Robert ' ' . I owa. Urwin Rockaway, N.J., to 0 rient, Ez'emen tary educ a tion-.-Boni ta -! acobson, Otoe, to Valparaiso; Ceci Evangelist, Newark to Sodus Center, N. Y.; Glenda Hays, Bro~ville, to Red Oak, Iowa; Nancy McGillough, Aurora, to Red Oak, Iowa; H~rol d f~yl­ ton Sabetha to Sabetha, Kans.; Daisy Sti tzer: Auburn, to Johnson; Rogine Felton, Omaha, to Ralston; Dolo~es Cl ar.b, Peru, to Auburn; Ken Dodge, Fairbury, to Jansen. Jean Hawley, Auburn, to Valley; Esther Schaffer, Tecumseh, to Elk Creek; Lucy ~o rer, Murray, to Hamburg, Io"'!a; Sheryl John son, Syracuse, to Nebr ask a City; Nancy Muse Auburn to North Platte; Kay Jackson, Red Io~a, to Glenwood, Iowa; .Richard Connole, Worcester, Mass., to Leicester, Mass. . Non- teaching placemen.ts- -Ter.ry Ku~nning, Auburn to assist an tshi_p, University of Denver; Katherine Shaw, Sabetha, Kans., to assistantship, Kansas State Tea.chers ~11 ege, Fmpori a; ~on McQ:>y, F::l ~ s City, tra_ining progr~, M;i.ssouri Pacific, St. Lo1:1is, Mo.; GaryViterise, Newark, N.Y., to assistantship, Kansas State Teachers College, Emporia. Alumni Placements Shirley Grafton, Peru, to. Tarkio, Mo.; Dean Thiesfeld, Wahoo, to Lincoln; Larry Phillips, Minden, to Harl an, Io:-va; Ro?ert Reitz 1 Vermillion, S.D., t_o S;i.oux City, Iowa; Roger Eshelman, (pll ege Sp:i:;i._ri_gs,_ lo_:va, to Clarinda, Iowa; Mr. and M~s. Don Kristine Wewel) LaRocca, Hallsville, Mo., to North Platte; Adrian Bartek, Pilger,_ to Gresham; Keith Richey, Winnebago, to Sioux Center, Iowa; Mr. and Mrs. Joe (Susan) McKee)1 Council Bluffs, Iowa, to Shel don, Iowa; Kenneth Hartman, Lincoln, to Ames, Iowa. Gale Pickard, Canton, S.D., to Shenandoah, Iowa; Dean Mei singer, Plattsmou th, to Omaha; Samuel Carneal, Hamburg, Iowa, to St. Joseph, Mo.; Mr. and Mrs. Ted (Karen) Compton, Stella, to Lenora, Kans.;

Oak,

8

Daniel Coffey, Chester, to Albion; Leland Vrooman Decatur, to Harvard; Mr. and Mrs. David (Maxine) Sampson, Frankfort, Kans., to Marysville, Kans. Cloyce Abel, Omaha, to Murray, Iowa; Karol yne Gibson, Cl arks, to Oma!1a; Harold Schmitz Jr., Omaha, to Guthrie Center, Iowa· Michael Chu University of Missouri at Kansas City, to Kansas City, Mo.; Mr. and Mrs. Lee (Peggy Eickhoff) Norris, Augusta, Kans., to TC?peka, Kans.; Barney Mcllvoy, College Springs, Iowa, to Belle Plaine, Iowa; Gordon Ohnou tka, North Bend, to Valparaiso. Tom Sewell, Beatrice, to Omaha; LeRoy L. Scheele, Rocky Ford, Colo., to Las Vegas, Nev.; Arthur Anderson, Fr~mont, to 1:-os Banos Calif.; Arthur Howe, Diller, to Brimfield: Ill.; Bud Kirby, Pilger, to Davenport· Joan Dickman, Humboldt, to Arapahoe; Ralph Neumann, Ft. Morgan, COlo., to Bellevue; Richard Ferron, Fullerton, to Crawford. Edward Hohman, Ann Arbor, Mich., to Elmhurst, Ill.; Ruth Young, Firth, to Hi~k­ man· Sharon Fike, Malvern, Iowa, to Tarkio, Mo.; Judy Wolfe Weible, Tecumseh, to Johnson County. rural; Ron Pethoud, Al bu querque, N.M., to Jefferso:r:i Co., Colo.; JoAnn Hauptman, York, to Grinnel 1, Iowa; Thelma Barr, Nebraska City, to Bellevue. Rosemary Robbins, Bal dy;in, Kans. , to Topeka, Kans.; Norma M~ercher, Pe.ru, to District 29, Peru; Elaine Hays, Milford, to LacLa Canada· Raylene Curnes, Auburn, to Elk Cr~ek; Mr. 'and Mrs. Melvin ( Fran~es) Nelson, Clovis, N.M., to Guadalupe, C.alif.; Mary Anne Bi ere, Auburn, to Huntington Beach Calif.· Fay Hazen, Avoca, to Nemaha County rural;' Mary Spaulding, Friend, to Treynor, Iowa. Jerry Partridge, Medicine Lake, Mont., to Mil es City, Mont,; Mr. and Mrs. J?at (Karen Mcln tire) Hamm, Tecumseh and Lewiston to.Ehxana, Ill.; Lonn Pressnall, Ch?ffipai~ Ill. to Illinois State University at No ~al; fubert Scudder, Council Bluffs, Iowa to Ashland; Elmer An tons, Holmesvill ~ to Barneston; Eva Pilch, Ne\\})ort, Ore.,' to Sabetha, Kans.; Roger Ray, Springfield, to Kearney. Evelyn Bebb, Nemaha, to Tarkio, Mo.; Jam es Porter, Omaha, to Fremont; Richard Floerchinger, Beatrice, to Seattle, Wash.; Darrell Wright, Lewiston, to Tabor, Iowa; Robert Hinks, Air Force, to Chambers; Eleanor Frandsen, Ord, to Valley; Jim Dovel Scott,sbluff, to Omaha; Roy Windhorst, Glen~od, Iowa, to Cl.inton, Wis.; Larry Kuenning, Alamosa, Colo., to Kansas Wesleyan, Salina, Kans. Bill Hultquist, Holmesvi 11 e, t!=> Mal calm; Gary Anderson, Elmwood, to Westside~ Iowa; Winifred Hall Johnson, Modesto, Calif., to Las Vegas, Nev.; Wayne Gumaer, Napo!lee, to Nelson- Robert Hoback, Pender, to Utica; Mary Lou Minneman, Falls City, to Powhattan, Kans.; Bill Beck, Fremont, to_ Elkhorn; Alvin Haack Tecumseh, to Sterling; Ralph Mason, Los Angeles, Calif., to Brookings , Ore.; Gerald Strecker, Malvern, Iowa, to Beemer. · L M"l Non-teaching P.lacements--Mar,:iqn . .1 ler, Fairfield, Con~., to adminis~ra~ive trainee, State National Bf!I1k, Fairfi~lcl, Conn.; Bob Gibson,_ Central City, to assistan tship, University of . Omaha; •. Wende~ 1 Mohling Scribner, to assistantship, University' of Oklahoma.


Dr.

Robert

Keynote

. in

S. Pate Delivers Centennial Finale

Dr. Robert S. Pate, a 19 34 Peru State graduate and son of the late Walter R. Pate, college .. president from 1923 until 1946 delivered the keynote address at Peru 1 s final centennial c·onvocation on June

20.

Dr. Pate, head of the department of mathematics at Eastern Michigan University, Yp sal an ti ,addressed the con vo ca ti on on the 100 th anniversary of the enabling l egi sl ation passed by the first Nebr ask a l egi s1 ature which created Peru State as th€ state• s first institution of higher learn1ng. In his remarks, which in effect launched Peru State on her second century and ended the year-ion~ observance of the college's centennial, Dr. Pate pointed out the need for specialization in an age when the changes of civilization have m~de great demands upon the individual. He pointed out that the population explosion .has ma.de no longer poss1ble t.he past s.olu.tions. of conquest, colonizat1on and 1mmigration. ~n­ stead of moving to new lands and competing against nature, people must. stay put and compete with each other. This fact. te~ ls the teacher that he must be a specialist. or an expert in !iis teachinl;? field if he is to lrep·are this new society for these chal enges. Dr. Neal S. Gomon, college pr_esident, presented Dr. Pate a commemmorati ve centennial plaque followi.ng the addres~. In addition John L. Lewis, Peru, president of the Peru Achievement Foundation, made the fonnal presentation to the college of the Centennial Gift pain ting of the South-: ern C:=tlifornia chapte_r o_f the .Peru Alumni Associat1on. The painting! From Woods Cave--Laguna Beadi" by Mil fo!"d Zornes, Claremont, Calif., was made pos~ible through the Oak Leaf fund of the al umn! chapter. Dr. Pate's mother, Gertrude Sewell Pate, '98, wholivesin Peru, attended.the convocation with her daughter, Mildred Pate Iverson, '26, Cape May Court House, New Jersey.

Centennial Souvenirs Available Jbe Peru Achievement Foundation, en trepreneur of the decorative and commemmorative Centennial plates, has re-ordered a limited supply which can be purchased fo r $3. 50 by mail from the Office of 8pecial Services. The gold rimmed ten-inch pl ates are in brown tones on a cream background. A series of sketches of familiar buildings of Peru State's past surround Sil as Barton' s be1oved poem, "If I Could Paint a Picture."" Building sketches are by Norma l. Diddel, professor emeritus of art, and Leland Sherwood, '57, assistant professor of art, lettered the poem. Ernest Longfellow, author, and Peru State College, joint copyri~ht ho l de rs, have for sale Longfellow's history of the lO"D-year-old college. The title of the book is The Normal on the Hill: One Hundred Years o.f Peru State College. Published by The Augustine Company of Grand Isl and, the purchase _price at the Offi.ce _of 8pe cial Services l.S $2.82 or $3.00 1f mal.l ordered. In addition, the commemmorati ve Centennial coins are still available for purchase. The coins, made of an alloy called ~ol dine, are 1 3/8" in diameter. Des~ gns in bas rel i ef are imprinted with a gJ. ant oak tree and "Centennial, 1867-1967" on one side and the seal of the''Coll ege on the other. The medallions are $1. 03 at the Office of Special Services. Following selection of the Centennial gift painting at the birthday party of the Southern California chapter of the Peru Alumni Association last March, in westmi nster, Calif., the officers made the formal presentation to John L. Lewis (right), Peru, president of the Peru Achievement Foundation. The painting, which was presented to the college at the June· 20 Charter Day convocation, now hangs in the reception room of the office of the president of the college. Others. (from left) are Don Carlile, Peru, alumni secretary; Phyllis Delong Halfe~ty, 2 yr~ '43, Pomona, Oak Leaf fund committee cha1 rrnan; Stan Cameron, •43, Buena Park, vice-president, and Chuck Smith, • 51, Garden Grove, president.

9


Dedication ...

/

Dedication of Peru State's $2. 3 million new constructipn climaxed homecoming weekend on the Campus of a Thousand Oaks. Mr. Hugh B. Terry, president and general manager of Time-Life Broadcast, Denver, was principal speaker at the 1: 30 p.m. dedication of the Centennial Residence Comp! ex and the Fine Arts Center. ~eaking on "Three Explosions, Plus One, Mr. Terry, a Peru student during the 1925-26 academic year, called for the dedication of "ourselves for some great purposes." Through the communication exp! osion we have the opportunity of understanding one another. The population explosion must. be slowed down, and the knowledge expl os1on must be speeded up, Mr. Terry said. "It is alarming--yes--frightening also to 1 i ve in the age of a possible fourth explosion, which in one blinding, searing fl ash, could terminate civilization." Dedication is essential if we want for ourselves and future gene:tations--the opportunity to 1 i ve wit~ the benef~ ts of the other three explos1ons--and without Commemorative plaques were presented at the aeaication of the Fine Arts Center ana Centennial Complex October 15. The honorees or their representatives (from left) include: front rovr-Mi ss Bonnie Rutz, accepting for Miss Phyllis D~vidso.n; Miss Nor:iaPalmer, Bradshaw; Mrs. Edith Nicholas, York; Mrs. Gertrude L. Pate, Peru; back row,,--Leland Sherwood, accepting for Miss Norma L. Di ddel, Texas Col 1 ege, Tyl er, Texas; Mrs. Fletcher Neal, Nebraska City;· and Mrs. 1. w. Eberhart, Peru accepting fo-r the late Dr. J. F. Neal; L. B. Mathews, Peru; VictorH. Jindra, Peru; R. T. Benford, Peru; A. s. Clayburn, Stock ton, Cal i fo rn i a

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Fine Arts Center Centennial Residence Complex the finality of the fourth, Mr. Terry continued. "We must dedicate ourselves to a greater search for know! edge, making every effort to be sure that know! edge becomes the benefit of all in stead of the few. We can dedicate ourselves to I earning how to be wrong as well as how to be right. We must dedicate ourselves to better communications with our fellow man wherever he may live--next door--or on the opposite side of the earth," he urged. It is necessary not mere! y to dare to know, but to have the courage to use our own intelligence, he concluded. Five of the seven 1 i ving honorees for whom buildings were named were present: Victor H. Jindra, Peru, Fine Arts Center; R. T. Benford, '28, the Reci ta! Hall in the Fine Arts Center; A. B. Clayburn, 1309 North San Juan avenue, Stock ton, Calif., residence hall; L. B. Mathews, '15, Peru, residence hall; Nona M. Palmer, '10, Bradshaw, residence hall. All are long- time faculty members. _, Commemorative plaques were presented to the honorees or their representatives by Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of Peru s·tate, who presided. The others honored and their representatives: Norma L. Diddel, Texas College, Tyler, Texas, Exhibition Court in the Fine Arts Center, accepted by Leland Sherwood, '57, assi-stant professor of art and former student of Miss Diddel. Miss Phyllis Davidson; 74 Plaza way, Chico, Calif., residence hall, accepted by Miss Bonnie Rutz, '57, instructor of physical education and former student of Miss Davidson. The late Dr. WilliamL. Nicholas, president from 1946 until 1950, residence hall, (continued on page 19)


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Victor H. Jindra Fine Arts Center Victor H. Jindra, professor emeritus of music, retired from the Peru State faculty in 1961, after serving the college on the music faculty since 1923. From 1952 until his retirement he was head of the division of fine arts. His duties have included the direction of band, orchestra, and other musical groups, although his specialty is violin and other string instruments. Many of his students, some of whom he started in early elementary, have continued with their study, and are members of symphony orchestras throughout the country. A 1923 University of Nebraska graduate, Mr. Jindra has had additional study at the Chicago Musical College. Before coming to Peru, he was principal at Linwood and Bruno High Schools and superintendent at Brainard and Firth. He resides at Peru and gives private string instruction.

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R. T. Benford Recital Hall Robert 'Ted" Benford, professor emeritus of piano and organ, served Peru State's music faculty for 35 years before retiring at the end of the 1964-65 academic year. A 1928 gJ;aduate of Peru State, Mr. Benford taught At Central Michigan State College, Mount Pleasant, before coming to Peru where he taught while completing his degree. He earned his master's degree from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and taught one year at Iowa Wesleyan University, Mount Pleasant, during an absence from Peru from 1944 until 1948. He was head of the division of fine arts from 1961 until his retirement. A composor and arranger, Mr. Benford's works are both choral and piano numbers, primarily in the area of compositions for piano students. Mr. Benford and his wife, Jennie, reside in Peru, where he gives private lessons in piano and organ.

Norma L. Diddel

Exhibition Court Miss Norma L. Diddel, professor emeritus of art, was a member of the Peru Stat.e College art faculty for 37 years. She came to Peru in 1929 and was in continuous service until her retirement at the close of the 196~-66 ~cademic year with the exception of a summer spent at Harvard University and a leave of absence in 1963-64 when she traveled and ta~ght ~dult educati~n classes in Denver. She was graduated from the University of Denver in 1926 and was granted the master of arts degree from Colorado ~tate.College, ~reel~y, in 1929. Other graduate study was done at the.University of California at Los Angeles. She taught in the Denver Pub~1c s~hool~ and a~ Adams State, Alamosa, Colo., before coming to Peru. Miss Diddel s retirement lasted only one year; this fall she accepted a position as art instructor at Texas College, Tyler, Texas. . A. B. Clay burn

Residence Hall A. B. Clayburn, professor emeritus of geography, retired from the Peru State College faculty at the close of the 1962 summer session, culminating 40 years of teaching on the Campus of a Thousand Oaks. Professor of geofraphy and geology since 1923, Mr. Clayburn holds bachelor's and master s degrees from the University of Nebraska. He has completed additional study at the University of Nebraska and the University of Chicago. He is author of Our Nebraska, a geography text for elementary grades, and Nebraska Cities in the Grolier Encyclopedia. With a s;;outing career dating back to 1919, Mr. Clayburn served as scoutmaster of Peru Troop 325 throughout his Peru career, producing more than 25 Eagle Scouts. Since retirement from Peru, Mr. Clayburn and his wife, Ethel, have resided at 1309 North San Juan avenue, Stockton, Calif., where he is a part-time instructor of geography at the University of the Pacific.

Phyllis Davidson Residence Hall Miss Phyllis Davidson, professor emeritus of women's physical education, taught at Peru State from 1929 until her retirement in 1957 as head of the women's physical education department. She earned her baccalaureate degree from Kansas State Teachers College at Emporia. She was granted the master's degree from Columbia University. Before joining the Peru State faculty, Miss Davidson taught at Louisiana Polytechnic Institute, Ruston, La., and Dickinson State College, Dickinson, N.D. She was the originator and director of the annual Peru State College High School Girls Volleyball Tournament in 1946. Since her retirement, Miss Davidson has resided in Chico, Calif., where she has been a realtor. She returned in August from an eight-month European visit. Her address is 74 Plaza Way, Chico.


L. B. Mathews

Residence Hall

A 1915 graduate of Peru State, L. B. Mathews, professor emeritus of physics, returned to his alma mater in 1927 and served until his retirement in 1961. His duties included principal of the Campus School, science supervisor, registrar, director of the placement bure~u, and at his retirement was associate profess9r of physics. During 19 years of his Peru service, his wife, tlie late Ruth Vernon Mathews, .,.18, was a member of the Peru State faculty family. At. the time of her retirement in 1961, she was assistant professor of health education. Mr. Mathews received his bachelor's degree from the University of Nebraska in 1920 and was granted the mast"er of arts degree from Columbia University in 1924. He taught previously in Gage county,David City and Columbus. His retirement home is Mount Vernon Heights east of Peru overlooking the Missouri.

William L. Nicholas

Residence Hall

Dr. William L. Nicholas served Peru State as president from 1946 until April 25, 1950, when he was shot to death at his desk by a distrau~ht faculty member. A graduate of Kearner State College, Dr. Nicholas recei.ved his master's and doctorate. from Co orado State College,Greeley. Before coming to Peru State, Dr. Nicholas taught at Dutch Flats, was principal of Tryon High school, and was superintendent at Oshkosh. He was Dean of Men at Kearney State and then joined the State Department of Vocational Education as Director of Occupational Information and Guidance, the position he held prior to his appointment as president of Peru State. His widow, Mrs. Edith Nicholas, resides at York.

John F. Neal, M.D.

Dining Hall

Peru State College owes its existence to that hardy ~oup of early settlers who established its predecessor Mount Vernon Semi.nary in 1866, and to John F. Neal, M. D., who led the way once the idea was proposed. When ·subscriptions were solicited for the funds to build the first building, Dr. Neal promised financial support, "as much as any man"would give. He spearheaded the real estate transaction which gave the Seminary 60 acres of campus, which a year later would be deeded to the State of Nebraska when the school became the first tax-supported institution of hi~her learning~ ~hio-~orn, Dr. N~al came ~o.Peru in 1859 after study.at Ohi.o Wesleyan Un1vers1ty and medical traini.ng at Keokuk, Iowa. An influential resident of Peru, he later moved to the south edge of town and became one of the largest land owners in the Peru precinct, owning some 2,000 acres of land.

Nona M.

Residence Hall

Pal~er

A 1910 graduate of Peru State, Nona M. Palmer, professor emeritus of conunerce, returned to Peru State in 1915 to join the faculty, where she remained until her retirement in 1950. In 1962, she received Peru State's highest honor, the Distinguished Educational Service Award, in recognition of her service to education. Miss Palmer was instrumental in organizing the Peru chapter of the American Association of University Women and active in community as well as college organizations. Since her retirement, Miss Palmer has been active in the Southern California chapter of the Peru Alumni Association, which she helped organize. Miss Palmer received her master's degree from the University of Nebraska and is a graduate of the Gregg School of Shorthand, Chicago. She has completed additional study at the University of Denver and Colorado State College, Greeley. Her home is Bradshaw, although she spends her winters in Southern California.

Walter R. Pate

Residence Hall

Walter R. Pate, Peru State president from 1923 until 1946, had the longest tenure of any Peru State administrative head. A native of Indiana, Mr. Pate received his bachelor's degree from the University of Nebraska and·his master's degree from Columbia University. His fifty years of service to Nebraska education included experience as a rural school teacher in Furnas county, superintendencies at Danbury, Trenton.Grafton, and Sidney; instructorships in North Platte and Alliance Junior Normals, and 13 years as school administrator at Alliance, from where he came to Peru !-O head th~ coll~ge i~ 1923. I_Iis. 23-year tenure seanned the roaring twenties, the depressi.on ... ridden thirties, and the tragic war years of the forties. Yet through all this, Peru State moved forward. Following his retirement, Mr. Pate lived in Peru until his death, October 19, 1952. His widow, Mrs. Gertrude Pate, resides in Peru.


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Returning 1917 members to Peru State Col 1 ege for their 50 th anniversary, Sunday, May 28, (from left) were front row--Edna McKibben Murphy, Long Beach, Calif.; Alma Ludwig wash i ngton, Newark, Ark.; Bel 1 Meyer Sandberg, San Bern.ardi no, Calif.; Li 11 i an Young Pettit, Peru; Karen Blair Rowley, Omaha; second row--Mary Clary McKee, Orov ill e, Calif., Mary Boyd Kiechel, Lincoln; Myrtle Harris Meissner, Omaha; Cecilia Petersen, Omaha; third row--Flo Anderson Feistner, Lincoln; Emma st. John Nutzman, Nehawka; Hetty Evans, Alhambra, Calif.; Edna Gabus, Nebraska city; Rosaline Kohn Fi sher, wash i ngton, o. c.; fourth ro1N- Myrtle Donahoo, Nebraska City; Erdi ne Barnard Pease, Des Moines, Iowa; Lenyce Burney Marsh, ·Hartington; Emma Hauptman Swan, Broken Bow; f1 fth row--Cl arence Russell, Nemaha; Mary Ogg Delzell, Hastings; Dessie wright Lederer, Neb.raska city; Norma Fausch Norenberg, Wahoo; back row--Joe Glasgow, Humboldt; Helen Parker Hanika, Falls City; Dr. Lillian Portenier, Laramie, Wyo.; carrol l Lewis, Peru; Charles Spacht, Rome city, Ind.; Arthur Longfellow, Mena, Ark.; Mildred Monia Kleppinger, Lincoln.

Fanny Moore Smith, Riverton, lo!"a, notes that sfie wa:s graduated from kindergarten department.·at Peru in 1899. She recently observed her 93rd birthday.

1890s Sarah Joy (Mrs. Oliver H.) Cleveland, '03, who lives at the Episcopal home, 1428 Marengo avenue, Alhambra, Calif., notes that she and her brother, Guy Albert Joy, '97, 5243 North Walnut Grove avenue, San Gabriel, Calif., and sister, Jennielee Joy, '()6, 4900 Telegraph road, apartment 219, Ventura, Calif., are three of the children of Anna Moorhead (Mrs. W. A.) Joy, the first woman graduate of Peru State in 1870 . All three went on to complete bachelor's degrees. Mrs. Guy Joy is the former Edith Hutchinson, '9f).

1900s

Maude M. Moseley Cartney, '()9, Reed apartments, Twin Falls, l.da., writes of • fond memories spent in Peru." A resident of Idaho since short! y after her graduation, she was married to ThomasCartn ey, a Peru vi an who received his degree in dentistry from Creighton. A widow since 1949, she has a son who is a dentist in San Mateo, Calif. Elsie Guss Jones, '09 lives at 411 North Kendrick, GI endive, Mont., near her son, daughter, three grandchildren, and and great granddaughter. . . Dra M. Andrews Barrett, '09, is spending the winter in Mesa, Ariz. , at 701 South (continued on next page)


(Mrs. Harold L.)

Delano,

2

yr.

'22,

827

All en avenue, St. Paul, Minn. Mrs. DeLano (continued from preceding page) ibbson Road, No. 322. Be_fo re i eaving her home at 337 East Olive, Fort Collins, Colo., she wrote that she was looking forward to a reunion with Winnie Del zel 1 Fram, '09, in Tempe.

Laura Porter (Mrs. George L.) Carlson, '08, Geneva, notes that " school days at Peru were happy ones. Soon the cl ass of 19Q8 wil 1 be eel ebrating a special anni versary." Bertha Reed Swan, '08, is a patient in the Park Marino Convalescent Center, 2585 East Washix:igton boulevard, Pasadena, accord.:. ing to her husband, Jesse R. Swan. Myrtle Kilmer Wintermute, '09, who 1 i ves at Friendship Te.l'race in Friend, notes that her sister, Mabel Kil mer Miner, '09, has been a patient at Warren Memorial Hospital, Friend, since July, 1966. Guy H. Williams, Sr., '06, is now retired and lives at Estes Park, Colo. After graduation from Peru, he served as principal of Alliance High school under both D. W. Hayes and W. R. Pate, both of whom later served as president of Peru State. After graduation from the University of Nebraska, he became_ president of Corn States Laboratories, in Omaha. Mr. and Mrs. Willians were present for the Centennial birthday party of the Rocky Mountain chapter of the Peru Alumni Association in Denver in October. They had been regular attendants at meetings of the Omaha alumni chapter when residents of Omaha. · Wesley L. Dun ten, '07, and Mrs. Dun ten have been living in Woodland, Calif., since 1963. He reports enjoying good. heal th in his retirement and bowls weekly in his 89th year.

1910s Henry H. •Sharkey• Moyer, ' 12, Kemmerer, Wyo., is retired from teaching, but n?t from big game hunting, which prevented him from being in Peru for Homecoming. Present for the 60-year reunion of the Fairbury H~gh school class 1 ast May were two Peruvians, Eulalie Shafer Ohlsson, 1910-H, Laguna Hills, Calif.; and Mae True Richardson, '12, Boulder, Colo. Greetings fo:r the occasion came from ~nother Peruvian member of the cl ass, Beul ah Harriss,· ' 11, Den ton, Texas. Nettie Prell Bailey, '13, is retired from teaching home economics at Northeast High in Lincoln. Her husband, the late Rex D. Bailey, '13, was principal of Everett Junior High at the time of his death in 1947. Mrs. Bailey's son, Robert, is an engineer in Denver. Kathryn M. Ellis, a campus school student from lQll-18, writes that Maude C, ·Carpenter, 97 years young on March 30, is sti_ll teaching music pupil. s. Miss Carpenter, a former Peru teacher, lives at 222 Hish1 and street, Owatonna, Minn. Miss Ellis, a resident of Weeping Water, writes that she enjoyed the Centennial brochure which "brou_ght back many pleasant memories." Hal fie Gates (Mrs. Wayne) Good, '18, 13436 Vall eyheart drive, Sherman Oaks, Calif., had as a visitor Gertrude Conger

had been " lost" from the alumni files since her graduation, but is now back in the fold. The York Daily News-Times reported in July that when a new building on the Central Michigan University campus was named for Dr. E.G. Beck, '12, it was the second time that a person with Waco connections was honored by the school. Not long ago, according to the report, a building was named for Jesse B. Thorpe, '34. Mr. Thorpe was recommended to CMU by Dr.Beck who had worked with him as a boy scout and had taught him at Peru State. Brother of Dr. Norman Thorpe, '29, assistant dean of the teachers college at the University of Nebraska, he was cl aimed by death in 19 58. Dr. Beck, English faculty member from 1924 until 1Q28, and a Centennial year speaker, is married to the former Mae Mill er, '12, of Waco. L. D. Clements, '18, is now retired from the Nebraska State Department of Education. He and Mrs. 0 em en ts live at 2226 Woodscrest, Lincoln. Mrs. Maude Page Ebert, f s ' 11, Syracuse, notes that her granddaughter, Elaine Grundman, sophomore and Ak-Sar-Ben scholarship recipient, is the third generation of the family to be a Peruvian;'' Elaine's mother is the former Rubl Ebert (Mrs. Ralph) Grundman, f s '49, Ta mage. Mrs. Ebert has two other daughters who are former Peru students. Dr. GlintonI. Winslow, '14, was awarded the honorary doctor of 1 aws degree at the June 11 commencement at Goucher Col 1 ege, Towson, Md., where he is professor emeritus of political science. Cited for stimulating and responsible contributions to college presidents, public officials coll ~agues and students, Dr. Winslow i's considered t? be an outstand~ng authority o~ state l~gislatures and legislative com~ mittees. His book, State Legislative Committees--A Study in Procedures is a classic ~n his f~el d. He was chairman of the poli ti cal science department at Goucher for 33 years and was given emeritus rank in 1Qfi2. ~ June 13, he was elected a delegate to the Maryland State Constitutional Convention, which will convene in September tO revise the state's 100-year-ol d consti tution. Mrs. Anna Hazen Wood, '12, 931 Highland avenue, Bremerton, Wash., notes that she has returned to the campus only once since her graduation. She notes "I still have a wann spot for Peru and feel proud of the growth of the school. n Edward B. Gross, '08, BEd '13, is professor emeritus of agricultural en~ineering at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, N.J. He joined the faculty in 1922 as head of the department and retired in 1946. Before going to Rutgers, he was on the faculties at Colorado State University and Mi ssissippi State University. He received ·his bachelor's degree from the University of Nebraska and completed graduate study at Colorado State University. He attended the first International Congress of Agricultural Engineers at Liege, Belgium, in 19 30, and represented Rutgers University at the 19 35 Congress in Madrid, ~ain. He presented papers at both meetings. He estab-


l i shed the Agri cul tu·ral Engineering Museum at Rutgers in 19 29, served as secretary of t~e S~ate.Ha_rdw_are. and Imple!llent Association in Mississippi, and during World War II supervised the U.S. Department of Agriculture grain storage project at Hutcliinson, Kans, Since his retirement he has served as s~cretary of the Planning Board of North Brunswick, N. J., was active in scouting! and the United Fund. He resides at 33 Cl eremon t avenue, North Brunswick, N.J. Eugenia Moore, '14 spent the 1966 winter in Long Beach, Cai i fo rnia, where she attended the institute of Lifetime Learning, co- sponsored by the National Retired Teachers Association. In 1965 Miss Moore went on a world cruise from San Francisco to Lon_ don, via Hawaii, Jaean, Philippines, Thai1 and, India, Egypt, Italy, Spain and ~gland, w~ere she was an exchange teacher in 1950. Miss Moore's _f>ermanent address is Oak. She is a retired Omaha teacher. Wauneta Williams Ray' 17, 5610 Glade Lincoln, is an artist. Her works have bee~ exhibited at Shel don Memorial Gallery at the University of Nebraska. She notes that her son, Bill, is on the staff of Life magazine as a photographer; Web Ray, is a Journal-Star photographer and her son, J.im Ray, fs '42, is head of the art department at the State hospi ta1, and her <laughter Bess Ray Cline, fs '41, Jives at Spring: field, Mo. Florence J. Atwood, '13, is now retired after serving as state home extension 1 eader at the University of Nebraska. She resides at 1130 H street, Lincoln.

1920s Alice Glasgow (Mrs. Ronald) Sharp, '22, "found" recent) y at 1421 Tasso street , Pal9 Al to, Calif. After her graduation, she taught in Hawaii and China where she was married. After evacuation in 1941, the Sharps have 1ive<l in San Diego and Montreal until their retirement in Palo Al to. She is a great granddaughter of T.J. Majors, one of Peru' s founders. ' Philena 'Uhlig Esmay, 2 yr. '28, 3668 Grand View, Los Angeles, Calif., last visited the campus in August, 1965. Despite the changes, she found many familiar pl aces which "brought back fond memories." Mr. and Mrs. Warren D. (Christine Rasmussen) McMahon, '27, '28, 1382 South Humboldt, both retired recently from the Denver (Colo.) Public schools. Dr. and Mrs. Robert H. (Myrtle Law) Knapp, '27, 2 yr. '27, 303 Linden, Vermillion, S. D., were homecoming visitors. Dr. Knapp·, professor of education at the University of South Dakota, reports his latest book, Guidance in the Elementary School is soon to be released in a Portuguese edition. Mrs. Knapp is an elementary teacher. W.G. Jantzen, fs '·26, 1115 Fifth avenue, Neb_ras.ka City, writes that he is a regular 1i'stener of the week- day broadcasts "From the Campus of a Thousand Oaks" over KNCY, Nebraska City. The news-interview show by Robert Henry, '59, of the office of special services is at 8: 45 a. m. Tuesday through Fridays. J. Harold Marren, • 29, 1123 Ella Street, wa~

Beatrice, reminds that "our 40th anni versary is on~ y two years away. Let' s a11 start planning now to return to '01 d Peru' in 1969 for the biggest and best reunion of all time. I'd like to hear from you, and we' 11 get the bal 1 to rolling on pl ans for that reunion." HarlandH. Whitwell, '25,is a chemistry instructor in Hibbing (Minn.) Junior College, a position he has held for the east 21 years. The school is Isl ated to move in to a new four-building campus in the near future. Dr. Frank L. Sievers, '28, 1101 Third street, S. W., Washington, D. C. has been apJ?ointed principal specialist, in the guidance and personnel services of the Department of Heal th, Education and Welfare of the U. S. Office of Education. Formerly Chief of the Guidance and Personnel Services branch, Dr. Sievers will be responsible for initiating, coordinating, and evaluating office of education policy and practices in guidance and personnel services. Hazel Osborne Walker, '26, resides at 2018 Seventeenth avenue, Forest Grove, Ore. She and her husband, an educational representative for Portland General Electric Co,, have two married daughters and a married son. . Barba;a Scovil Z_e .(Mrs.·' Howard L .} Mc-; K enney, 20, has retired from .. teaching in the Omaha schools. She resides at 1819 Sou th 58 th. Maxine Garrett Willi ams, 2 yr. '27, lives at 5625 Glade in·Lincoln. She has been a widow since the death of her husband .L_amb ert Williams, '27, i_n March 1964. The Willi ams' five children live in North Carolina, Minnesota, Pertnsyl vania and Nebraska. Edna Ruyle, fs '28, resides at 502 North Seventh in Beatrice. After teaching for several years, she took care of her invalid mother. . Ethel Harmon (Mrs. Joe) McConney, '20, 1 i ves at 2609 Sou th 97 th avenue, Omaha. She :i;eti red in 19 58 after 37~ years of teaching in the Omaha schools.· Miss Elma I. Gockley, bursar 1922-1949, has been working part· time in the registrar's office at Boise (Ida, )College, since her retirementin February, 1957, as registrar at the Idaho State Historical Society. She 1 i ves. at 1815 Yale court, Boise, A poem by Esther Louise Hoyt, '25, entitled "Opportunities" has been set to music and re co rd ed. Miss Hoyt is a retired teacher and lives at 908 East Lincoln, Tullahoma, . 'I:~nn. Dr. and Mrs. Norman F. (Goldie Creech) Thorpe, '29, '30, 1 i ve at 2410 Park avenue, Linc_oln. Dr. Thorpe is assistant dean at the. Teach~rs Col 1 ege at the University of Nebraska and Mrs. Thorpe is assistant supervisor of pre- col 1 ege ad vi semen t at the University of Nebraska extension division. Dr. Joseph H. Robertson, '28, has been professor of range management at the University of Nevada since 1947. Previous] y he spent eight years in the U.S. Forest service. In 1965 he was in Kenya to establish a range management curriculum and serve as chief of party for the West Vi rgini a University USAID team. The Robertsons, their three daughters and son, live at 9 20 Evans avenue, Reno, Nev. (continued on next page)

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(continued from preceding page)

1930s

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Cecil G. Caulk, '32, 1 eft the teaching field in 1941 and is in personnel administration with the federal government. He is with Edwards Air Force Base and visits colleges and universities to recruit scientists and engineers for flight tes tiDg. Mr. and Mrs. Caulk live at 1232 West Ivy ton, Lancaster, CaliÂŁ. Moras L. Shubert, '34, associate professor of botany at the University of Denver, has been named president of the Colorado-Wyoming Academy of Science. Stephen Gaines, '34, is director of community services at Central Nebraska Technical School at Hastings, a position he has held since September, 19ri6. Previously he was director of adult education and ath1 eti cs at Grand Isl and. Mrs. Gaines the former Col eata Cr ink, '32, is teaching in the Hastings elementary schools. _ The Denver Post sports editor 1 ee Meade devoted his "For the Record" column of October 31, to Jack Ash ton, '35 and hi s efforts in bringing the Denver Rockets to town. Ashton was "more responsible than any other person for the new professional bas ketball franchise remaining in Denver. A Denverite for 24 years, Ashton is an agent with the New York life Insurance Co. He became a member of the "Mill ion Dollar Round Table'' in 19 57 after toppinl$ a mil 1 ion dollars in sales for six consecutive years. When the _Denv~r pro basketball franchise was on the verge of being moved 1 ast spring, i_ t . was Ash ton who pursuaded a Den-ver trucking magnate to purchase control of the team. Ashton is now a member of the board of directors. He is chairman of the Denver Chamber of Commerce's sports committee and was a leader in formation of the Colorado Sports Hall of Fame. The columnist noted that Ashton ''comes by his interest in sf or ts quite naturally. He played basebal , basketball and track at Dmbar, (Nebr.) High school and at Peru State College." . Ruth Stukenhol tz (Mrs. Cl en) Garrabrant, '32, teaches math at Hugo, Colo. She and her husband, a sales rep resen tati ve for a scientific company, have two married daughters and four grandchildren. Ruth has taken up painting in recent years and pl ans to have ru:i art show at Steinhart lodge in Nebraska City with her sister, Helen Stuk enho l t z, '28, Fairhope, Al a. L. W. Hefti e, '38, has been suf erintendent of the Three Forks (Mont. City schools for seven years. He has taught since graduation in Montana. The Hefties have a married daughter. EdnaMaystrick (Mrs. E.W.) Fitch, '34, 613S Janice way, Arvada, Colo., teaches third grade at Hoskinson Cottage school in Arvada. L au r en a Yo es el Fe l l i s, f s ' 36 , 1 i ve s at 9032 West Twenty-Seventh street, Brookfield, Ill. She does substitute teaching in the 1 ocal school di_stri ct. Eugene L. Rarick, '32, is in his fourth year as principal of the Loveland (Colo.) High school. Mr. and Mrs. Rarick, the for-

12

mer Zoe Nicholas, '32, live at 2606 Cedar drive, Loveland. ffowardHatcher, '33, is elementary principal at Sheridan School district No. 2, Fort Logan, Colo. Mr. and Mrs. Ed (Rose McGinnis) Wiltse, fs '39, '42, live at Paola, Kans., where Ed is postmaster and Rose teaches English in the h~gh school. Last year Ed was president of Kansas Postmasters. Their children include daughters Sue Ann, 21, and Kristin,

15. Ruth V. Kurtz (Mrs. Hugh E.) Johnson, '33, 2249 Percy, Denver, is retired from the Jefferson county schools. Her husband is retired from the Mountain States Tele phone Co. Gladys V. Andersen (Mrs. William H.) Sorensen, '36, retired from teaching a year ago after 37 years of service in Nebraska. She faun d time last year to take some graduate work in business at the University of Nebraska. 0. H. Witt, fs '34, is a maJor in general adnini st ration of the Nebraska Safety Patrol. Major Witt and Mrs. Witt, the foriller Inez Peterson, fs '32, live at 430 Redwood drive, Lincoln. Helen M. Kucera, '30, 516 North Hastings, retired in June, 1967. She had been teaching home economics in junior high at Hastings. â&#x20AC;˘' Marguerite Graves Thompson Winter, '30, has operated a rest home at 741)1 ~yview drive, Riverside, Calif., for the past 10 years. She wrote of a planned reunion with Elsie Wallin Miller '31, 507 Berkeley avenue, Menlo Park, Cali"f., and Helen Kal tenborn Powell, '31, 14<)0 Randolph, Topeka Kansas. She notes "we have remained friends all these years .. , have very warm spot in our hearts for beloved Peru." Leone Ohl er Mikul as, 2 yr. '33, is a medical secretary at the Foote Clinic in Hastings. She 1 i ves at 8 31 North Brigg~ Hastings. Mary Dall as (Mrs. Amon) L. Sanders, 1 38, claims th~ distinction of bringing the youngest f'uture Peruvian to a Peru State alumni activity. Her granddaughter, Jeanne, attended the Lincoln alumni meeting 1 ast spring. Annie Laurie Smith, fs '37, is information librarian and cataloger at the University of Nebraska Library. She is president of the Lincoln branch of the American Association of University Women. Laveta Knox (Mrs. Edwin T.)P.entley, fs '37, is now a resident of Cook and teaching English in Johnson High school. She completed her bachelor's degree from the University of Missouri in June. Her husband, Edwin T. Bentley, fs '40, died in 1961. The Bentleys have three married daughters. Herbert E. Evans, '31, is pastor of the Tyndall (S.D.) Presbyterian church, supply pastor of Trinity Presbyterian at Avon, S. D. , and moderator of the Sioux Fal 1 s Presbytery of the United Presbyterian church.

1940s Dr. Tom Hallstrom '49 coordinator of physical education for the Omaha Public Schools received the honor award of the Central District Association for Heal th, Phy~ical Educaticn and Recreation last spring.


Ella Mae Hurlburt, '42, has lived in her home town of Fairbury for the past 13 years, where .:;he cares . for her ~~val id mother. She is active in the Jefferson County Historical. Society,. does re~ear~h and writing, and is an active lobbyist in the unicameral. Mr. and Mrs. Clyde M. (Ina Schoenthal) Hannan fs '27, '42, Ii ve at 5608 Hartley, Lineal;. Clyde is in the con.struction bus~­ ness and Ina is math and science teacherin the high school area of the Extension Di vision of the University of Nebraska. Nedra Jane Shafer (Mrs. Stanley) Clay, '42, teaches math at the h.igh .school ~t Lafayette, La. ~er husband is vi ce-p_residen t and chief pilot of Petroleum Hel i copter Inc. Clairon Smith, '42, has completed ~ years with the state department of public welfare. He is pres en tl y a field. rep res en tati ve. The Smiths and their 10-year.old son live at 2435 Winthrop road, Lincoln. Lt. Col. Rex W. Floyd, '46, has retired from the U.S. Air Force at Atnariilo AFB, Texas, after 20years of military duty. At the time of his retirement he was director of personnel services at Amarillo. Lt. C.ol. and Mrs. Floyd, the fonner Hope Carter, 2 yr. '42, were November Peru visitors, cailing on their dau~hter, Sherry Floyd (Mrs. Daryl) Wolken, a Junior, and her husband, a senior. The Floyds have not yet selected a permanent I oca ti on. Frances F. Fields, a member of the music faculty from 1946 until 1949, is substitute teaching in the Glendale (Calif.) Public schools and teaching pri v'ate piano students. Her address is 7150 North FiftySeven th drive, GI endal e. Myrton L. Hall, '47, has been named head of business services for the Omaha Public schools. Formerly principal of McMiII an Junior High, his new title is administrative assistant in charge of business services. A member of the Omaha schools faculty since 1955, he fonnerly was in the FaII s City schools. Mrs. Hall, the former Doro thy Leonard, 2 yr. '42, teaches in the Omaha schools. W. Hubert Johnson, '40, is coordinator of summer session and evening di vision at Nevada Southern University, Las Vegas. Mrs. Johhson, the former Winifred L. Hall, '57, teaches in an elementary school. The Johnsons former I y taught in the Modesto (Calif.) Public schools. Dr. Armon F. Yanders, '48, professor of zoology and assistant dean of natural science at Michigan State University, has been elected to the board of trustees of the Argonne Universities Association, policymaking body for Argonne National Labotatory near Oii cago. He wi11 serve a two-year term. John Rhodus, '42, is in his 22nd year in the Syracuse Public Schools, where he is high school principal. Betty Cole (Mrs. Tom) Cooper, '42, does some substitute teaching in the KnoxviIIe <Iowa) Community schools, where her lusband is instrumental music director. The Coopers have a daughter, 11, and a son, 8. Charles Q. Rogers, '48, is dean of students at Eastern Wyoming College at Torrington. After the death of her husband·, Shirley Hoover Boyce, 2 yr. '47, completed her bach( continued on next page)

Born To Larry A. Berg and Marilyn Wright Berg, fs '60, 4318 llidge, Omaha, a son Nathan James, November 8. To Dave Stiteler and Judi th Mill er Stiteler, '61, 1816 Nakomis court Northeast, Albuquerque, N.M., a son Adrian Critchfield, October 5. To Clifford Privatt and Mary Ann Graham Privatt, '63, 3101 Washington St., Bellevue, a son, Jon Alan, May 4. To Edwin .Groth and Elinor Keef er Groth, '62, West Point, a son, Steven Joseph, Sep tem.Per 14. To llin Schwertley and Donna Francis Schwertley, '61, 480 M.ount Vernon drive, Coun-cil Bluffs, Iowa, a son John Francis,' January 23. To Lee Norris, '55, MS '60, and Peggy Eickhoff Norris, '56, 3109 Atwood, Topeka, Kans., a daughter, Linda Kay, June 12. To William Galbraith, fs '61, and Doris Kresak Galbraith, '63, 450 Eastridge road, Crete, a <laughter, Brenda Sue, September 14. To Larry Clinton, fs '64, and Jec:n Reiman Clinton, '64, Box 284, Eloy, Ariz., a son, James Scott, June 17. To Merlin Kastens, '65, and Diane Manhardt Kastens, 1813 Pondera sa pl ace, Mi 11 ard, a son Mi ch ael L. , November 23 , '1966. To Wayne Wright and Betty Sedlacek Wri~ht, '59, 4709 Wooldridge road, Corpus Christi, Tex., twins, David Scott and Deborah Jean, June 13. To Carroll Johnson, '60 and Martha Sue Moore John·son, '60, 6038 Southwest View, Littleton, Colo., a daughter, SaraKath1 een November 8. To Joe f!oach, fs '61, and Mrs. Roach, 28 East Princeton street, Orlan do Fl a., a daughter, Amy Sue, August, 1967. To Keith F. Niss and Beverly Rist Niss, fs '54, 59 45 Hudson, San Bernardino, Calif., a son, Jeffry Kent, October 7. By adoption November 3. To Jerry Sayer, '66, and Mrs. Sarer, Sterling, a daughter, Sherri Miehe le, April ll. To Mr. & Mrs. Guy Rosenberg, faculty, Peru, a son, Guy John, May 7. To Mr. and Mrs. Daryl Long, faculty, Peru, a son, Daryl Clyde, June 5. To Jerry Partridge, '61, and Mrs. Partridge, Medicine Lake, Montana, a son, Jay Wil 1 i ams, May 14. To Mr. and Mrs. James Keck, faculty, Peru, a son, Christopher James, June 11~ To Marvin Hopper '66, .and Phyllis Rebuck Hopper, '66, kansas City, Mo., a daughter, Annette Renae, June 13. To Jim Cotton, '56, and Margaret Ulbri_ck Cotton, '57, Woodbine, Iowa, a son, Olns Lynn, May 16. _ . To David Wick ham, f s '65, and Myra Murren Wickham, '66, Salem, a daughter, Elizabeth Ann, August 17. To Bernard Meyer and Norma Pugsley Meyer, '60, Scotia, a daughter, Celinda Renee, August 17. To G. Wayne Kerr, '55, and Mrs. Kerr, 509 Lynch street, Rockvil 1 e, Md., a son, Boger Al an, August 19. To John Hultquist, '62, and Mrs. Hultquist, Lincoln, a son, Steven John, June 1.

13


(continued from preceding page) el or' .s degree at the University of Colorado in 1966 ...She teaches first grade in the J ef fer son county schools. She has seven children. ~ayne A. fi lmer, '42,. is teaching at Washington High school in Kansas City, Kans., where he has been sponsor of the National Honor Society for the past 10 years. He received his master' s from Kansas State Teachers College at Fmporia in 1953 Mrs. Filmer is the former Ruth Marshall. ÂŁs '40. The Filmers Ii ve at 7 228 Lafayette' Kansas City, Kansas. ' Dr. Lois E. Christensen, '48, professor of history at Chico (Calif.) State College, became dean of the school of humanities an_d perfo.rming arts ill; September. A member of theduco faculty since 1957. Dr. Christensen is chief administrative officer for seven departments and 110 faculty members. Sie was on sabbatical leav.e in England from February through August where she studied public and private documents in the field o_f 18th cent_ury British colonial policy before and after 1776. Dr. Christensen was acc<?mpanied to England by Miss Phyllis Davidson, Peru State professor emeritus of women's physical education. . DeanJ. Slagle, '42, is in his 22nd year with Salsbury La_borato!"ies, Cha~l es City, Iowa, where he is assistant scientist in the chemical process department. The SI agl es have two sons and a daughter. Beuni ce Doty, '4Q 502 Sou th 12th, Lin coln, teaches business education at the extension division of the University of Nebraska. . Gi_lbert Puruck.er, '40, elementary school principal at Elk ridge Elementary school in suburban Baltimore, Md., and his "Star tl ing Reading Method" was the subject of a feature story in the February 26 San Francisco Sunday Examiner & Chronicle. The story concerns his reading method which employs a unique cornlJina ti on of phonetic analysis skills, training in visual perception and providing the child with successful experiences in dealing with words. According . t_o the article. i t is a method that re qui res the chi 1 d to th ink. -It re.i e~t s "!lotions about lingJ,J.istics, shibboleth, fun- and- games readiness periods, group reading bromides and emotional involvements. This method puts the child to work immediately to learn what he doesn't know, rather than spending time on what he does." At the Elkridge Elementary school, youngs-ters in kind~rgarten through fifth grade analyze the sounds of vowels and consonants to produce words. They can sound out hundreds of words on their own, read elementary school versions of novels on their own, look up words in dictionaries designed for older students, know basic parts of speech, check facts in encyclo p.edia, rattle off nine rules that help them to read qo percent of the words ther come across, and write script or cursive etters rather than the manuscript printing common in the first three years of school. Purucker' s method is published under the title, "Phonetic Analysis and Pronunciation

14

S<ill s," copyrighted in 1965. Zola Gardner, '42, 502 South 12th, is an elementary teacher at Holmes school in Lincoln. Bill M. Woods, '45, executive director of special libraries Association since 1959, has resigned the post to become management planner for Engineering Index, 345 East 47 th street, New York. He will be a consultant on a project "Information System Development: Phase I Management Planning," sup eorted by the National Science Foundation. During the summer of 1967 he taught in the graduate school of I ibrary science at Drexel Institute of Technology, Philadelphia, and worked on a special Ii brari es study for the National Advisory Commission on Libraries. He was chairman of the council of Na ti on al Library Associations from 1964 until 1967, and is currently a trustee and secretary of the New york Metropolitan Reference and Research Library Agency, Inc. Doro thy Teachman (Mrs. Carl) Bachenberg, '52, 7713 South Thirty-Ninth avenue, Omaha, reports that her daughter, Joan, a senior at Bryan High is planning to attend Peru State next fal 1. Her husband is with Western Electric. Dorothy is active with PTA, pol itics and church activities. Arthur W. Brophy, '49, 1835 Ryons, Lincoln, is teaching sixth grade at Hawthorne school in Lincoln. ActiveiR scouting work, Art received the scouting wood badge heeds, and has served on the Cornhusker council and a scout camp di rector. He received the Phi Epsilon Kapp a Dis tin gui shed Ser vice award in 1965. The Brophys have three sons and two daughters. James Bruce Steele, '48, has been app_ointed assistant professor of English at Metropolitan State College in Denver. H e has been a technical editor for Lear, Inc., and the Martin Marietta Corp. Mrs. Steele is the fomier Ru th Ann Crook, '48. The Steel es live at 7325 South Bannock drive, Littleton, Colo. Barbara Beal Hays, '42 is teaching at the Ogal 1 al a Junior High school. Her husband, Harold, who was superintendent of schools at Dawson from 1949 until 196(), died March 12. She has three sons.

1950s W. H. Scheitel, '52, a chiropractor at Columbia, Tenn., visited the campus over the Fourth of July week end. His wife is the form er Barbara Griffing, fs '51. Emil Dobrovolny, '52, 8205 West 66th avenue, Arvada, Colo., is associated with Coor~ Porcelain Co., Golden, and is in resid~nti~ construction. His family includes his wife, Darlene, and five children. , Dorothy L. Meister. (Mrs. Orr) Kinman, 52, is on leave of absence from the Long B~ach (Calif.) .Unified schools. Mr. and Mrs. Kinman, who live at 420. Linares avenue , Long Beach, have an adopted daughter, Stacey Lynn, Yi. Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. (Arlyss Wilson) Kechely, '53, '52, live on route 8, Lincoln. Bob is a phys ed teacher at Charles Culler Junior high and Arlyss is an elementary teacher in the Lincoln Public schools. They have two sons and two daughters. Irene Schom.erus Heng '58, teaches in the Nebraska School for the Visually Handicapped, Nebraska City. Fred Clements, '56, is a partner in a


music store at Denison, Iowa. The Clements reside at 424 North Fourteenth street, Denison. Mrs. Clements is the former Marilyn Hawxby, 'SS. M:. and Mrs; Lee (Peggy_ Eickhoff) Norris, 1 SS, MS 60, and '56, have moved from Augusta, Kans., to Topeka, where Lee is in admini strati on at Highland Park High school, and Peggy is teaching business at Seaman High school . Gene McMullen, 'S8, is teaching business education in Fairview Hi~h school in the Jennings (Mo.) School district, a suburb of St. Louis. His address is 67 Joyce Ellen 1 ane, Apartrnen t A, Ferguson, Mo. William Reese, '50, is superintendent of schools at Diller. He received his master' s from the University of Nebraska in 19 S7 and the Ed. D. degree from the Uni versi ty of Wyoming in 1966. Evelyn Stirba Hermsmeier Rahe, 'S8, has returned to Nebraska since the death of her husband, Kenneth Hermsmeier, 'SO. She has re-married and is teaching at Clatonia.Her address is Box 236, DeWitt. Marlene A. Hartzell Fraser Taylor, fs 'S4, is now living at North S715 Fleming, Spokane, Wash. After the death of her first husband, Ken Fraser in 1962, she was inarried to Leigh Taylor, minister at Knox Presbyterian church in Spokane, Wash. The Taylors children include Steven, 6, Beth, 4, and Torn, 2. Ned V. Eckman, 'SS, is head basketball coach at Fairbury High school. Marvin Brown, 'SO, 1300. Sycamore, Lincoln, is professional service rep re sen tati ve for Snith, Cline and French 1 aborato ri es of Philadelphia. Sharon Ocker, '59, received his Ed. D. from_ the Univers~ty of Nebraska in August and is now teaching secondary education at Morningside College, Sioux City, Iowa. Velma Fulton McMullen, '52, 2141 Ryans, Lincoln, has been a teacher in the Lincoln elementary schools since 1949. Her sister, Maude Fulton Grace, who received her. degree in 19SO, is teaching in Ogden, Utah. May St ew a r t, ' SO , 1i v es a t 160 1 F street, Lincoln. She teaches math at Whittier Junior High school. Dorothy Tiller, 'Sl, 1340 J, is teaching at Randolph school in Lincoln. She has taken additional study at Nebraska and the University of Kansas. Gwen Shuster Marchand, '56, is county superintendent of Nemaha county, Kansas. She taught for 13 years in the el ernentary grades in Kansas schools. Mr. and Mrs. Ro b er t W. (Hes t er Fri e d l y) Clark, 'SO. '47, live at 8733 Fairbend, Houston, Texas, where Bob is manager of Texas Photo Supply Co., Inc. Hester "is manager of the house and keeps active in Girl Scouts, PTA and church work." The Cl arks have three daughters, lS, 12, and 10, and one son, 4. Dr. Roger M. Haigh, 'S7, cornpl eted a Ford Foundation- sponsored year of research and study in San ti ago, Chile, and joined the faculty of Texas Christian University in September as assistant professor of history. He earned gis M.A. and Ph.D. degrees at the University of Florida. Formerly he was an assistant profu ssor at North Texas State University and the University of Utah. John Christ, Jr., 'SS, MS '60, instructor of science at the College of the Sis-

kiyous, Weed, .C~lif., since 1961, was a July campus visitor. He has served four years as a member of the elementary school board and a year as president of the acadern~ c senate of the. coll ~ge and representat~ ve to the California Juco COuncil. (continued on next page)

Janice Jones '64, to Charles Bradbury Nehawka <Kans. 5 Meth_odi ~t chu~ch, August 5. At home: 3330 Eveningside drive, apartment 3, Topeka, Kans. Sall Y L. Wademan to Gary L. Vi ter ise '?7, St. Mary's Catholic church, Nebrask ~ City, June. At home: 1201 Triplett drive Emporia, Kans. ' Carol Sue Davis to Wendell Armstrong fs 6S, June. At home: Stell a, Nebraska. ' Arlene Rorch er, 'f,7, to Paul f!. Fell Jr.,_ '67, St. Bernard's Catholic church, Julian, June 2. At home: East Jordan, Mich. Judi th Fo ck en, f s '66, to Darrell J Sch'!'idt, fs '66, Hope Lutheran church, Bur~, April 2. At home: Sterling. El eta Snyder, f s '66 to David Eisenhauer, Grace Lutheran church, Cook, June 23. At home: Cook. Nichol a E. Gress to John F. Rarton '6 5 S~. Benedict's Catholic chi.i'rch, Nebrask'~ City, June 3. At home: 150S North 13th st., Nebr ask a City. Linda Rogers, ,.61), to Stuart Gayle loseke, Community chu.rch, Stel 1 a, April 23. At home: R. R., Columbus. Janice Ann Wilkinson, '65, to Larry K. Weast, St. Joseph's Catholic church, Auburn. July 29. At home: Hiawatha, Kans. Beverly Joyce Parde, '64, to Dean F. Drummond, June 30. At home: Adams, Nebr. Karen Marie Quinn, '66, to Robert P. Di.Cesare, St. Timothy's church, Oimberl and, Iowa, May 27. At home: Peru. Nancx Vanderbeek, '67, to David fl ens l ey '66, Pell a Reformed church, Panama. At home; 349~ College ave., Holl and, Mi ch. Judy Byrom to Larry Franke, '67, Christ Lutheran church, Falls City, July 23. At home: 10~1 Seventh avenue, Sidney, Nebr. Joanne Mary Lutz to James Edward Hanks '66, St. Mary's Catholic church. At home; Nebr ask a City. Sandra Eichhorn to Warren R. Etter, '64, June 17. At home: 334 Mel ind a, Sou th El gin, Illinois. Connie Rademacher, '()7, to Ray Dean Cain, 'f,7, Martin Luther Lutheran church, Auburn, August 12. At home: Q()I) Page, Shenandoah, Iowa. Gloria Sue Rean, fs '67, to Garth L, Adams, '1)7, Broadway Methodist church, Council Bluffs, June 16¡. At home: 4512 Bedford, apt. 7, Omaha. Jacqueline Dodson, '67, to Wesley E. Dickey, '67, First Methodist church, Plattsmouth, July 8. At home: Fullerton. Patricia Faye Knippelmier, '67, to JosephCorradoSmith, '6'1, St. Joseph's Catholic church, Auburn, August S. At home: 2901 70 th street, apt. 3, Des Mo in e,s, I a. Janice Johnson, fs '67, to William E. Rinne, '67, Grace Methodist church, Glenwood, Iowa, July 30. At home: Ay shire, I a. Harri et Ann Shi el ds to L aVel le P. Cl ark fs '66, First Christian church, Cl arinda Iowa, June 4. At home: Clarinda Iowa. 1

,

'

lS


(continued from preceding page) Mr. and Mrs. Christ and their four children, Randy, 10, Dennis, 9, Mark, 4, and Katherine, 3", live at Rt. 1, Box 369 C, Weed. Four Peruvians received master's degrees. from Kearney State last summer. Leslie A. James, '56, Grand Island, Larry Curnes,, '62t Auburn, and Del ynn Ki enk er, '60, Hastin gs, received majors in counseling and suidance and John Werner, '61, Loup City, in secondary school principalship. Dale A. Johnson, '57, is principal of tf?.e high school at G~idden 1 Iowa, a position lie has held since 1966. Previous} y he taught and coached football at Gut~rie Center and Manning, Iowa, and South Sioux City. Dale received his master's from the University of Nebraska last June. Dale and Mrs. Johnson, the former Sharon Kay Freeman f s ' 56 l i ve at 30 6 Utah, Gl i dden, I a. ,Major James • F. Fink z e, ' 51, was gra duated from the U.S. Air Force Air Command and Staff Col I ege at Maxwel 1 AFB, Al a. , June 9. He has been assigned to the Penta~n for duty as a mathematician. Mrs. Finkle is the former Phyllis Rogers, 2 yr. '50. Nels Overgaard, .. Jr., .' 56, received his MA from Chapman Coi'lege in February, 1?67. Nels a member of the faculty at Cerritos Coll ~ge, Norwalk, lives at 127 59 Qi ail lane, Norwalk. Robert D. Haile, '50, has been appointed advertising manager of Crown Zell erbach Corp., consumer products sales di viSi x 1942 cl ass members attended a pre-homecoming reunion at Arbor Manor in Auburn on October 13 to eel ebrate their 25th anniversary of graduation. Three other mem~ers joined. them for Saturday •s homecoming. Attending the Friday get-to-gether "".ere (from left) Wayne A. Filmer, Kansas City, Kans.; Dorothy Teachman Bachenberg, Omaha; Ell a Mae Hurl bu rt, Fairbury; Anna Mangold (Mrs. Lester) Nelson, Fal 1 s City; Rosa McGinnis (Mrs. Ed) Wiltse, Pao}a, Kans.; and John Rhodus, Syracuse. Attending Saturday's festivities were Manna Lee Morelock (Mrs. Robert) Gubser, Sidney, Iowa; Althea Ni spel (Mrs. N. R.) Mohar, Oma~a, and Betty Co 1 e (Mrs. Tom) Cooper, Knoxv 111 e, Iowa.

16

sion. Formerly he was advertising manager for Kaiser Aluminum for· four years, and was with General Mills for the previous nine years. Arnold B. Ehlers, '59, is art department chairman at Kennedy High School. The Ehlers: live at 6066 S~ Remo Way, Buena Park, Calif. Mrs. Ehlers is the former Sharon Grieninger, fs '58. Mr. and Mrs. Robert (Boni ta Brunsdon) Duey, fs '55, fs '56, live at _540 Cary, Winston, Ore., where Bob teaches sixth grade and Boni ta teaches first and second. They have three daughters, Nael, lQ, Dawn, 8, and Kris, 6 . . Dr. Kent H. King, a. member of _the Peru. facultr from 1954-56, is now professor of psycho ogy at Mankato St~te College. He joined the staff of the Minnesota college when he left Peru State. Eva Knape (Mrs. Fr:znk) Watland,.' writes from Saukv:dle, Wis., of her fannly s many activities. Her children, ranging from grades K-9, are busy v.:i th music and 4-H work. Eva is drama and chi! d care lea~­ er. She notes that her mother,. Mrs. Mane Knape, '48, taught in the Blue SpringsWymore schools last year. Mary Ann Smejdir· (Mrs. Robe.rt) Webe~, '54, is teaching at Centennial Pu~lic schools the result of the merger of Utica, Waco and Beaver Crossing. 'Mary Ann and her family 1i ve at Friend. Mr. and Mrs. Marshall (Lois Bus~) Norris, '57, '58, liv_e at Hudson, Colo. Lois is head of the English department at Weld Central High school at Keenesburg, Colo., and Marshall is principal of Hudson elementary. The Norrises have one daughter, Eleanor 9 and three foster daughters. Mr. 'and Mrs. Robert B. (Maxine Lawritson) Moore '57, '59, live at 2321 South Race Denv'er where Bob is teaching and doing graduate study at the University of Denver and Maxine is teaching in Jefferson county schools. . . Mr. an.d Mrs. Loren D. (Lorraine Bipp es) Schuler, '57, fs '57, live at.12306 West Texas drive in Denver. Loren .is a survey engineer for the U. S .. Geological SuryeY,. TI1eir daughters are Lorrie Denise and Lind.a Diane. Mr. and Mrs. Merlin (Norm.a. a·zz i i·z an d) Vice, '55, 2 yr. '55, are h ving at. 241'4 South Race in Denver, where Merlin is associated w:i th the Lana Co., manufacturers of children' s clothing.

S?,


Bernard A. Willi am son, 'SS, 4666 Sou th Badger lane, Littleton, CDlo., is in his 12th year as sixth grade teacher in the Cherry Creek district of Denver. He is working on his master, s at Colorado State at Greeley. The Williamsons have three daughters, 16, 12, ll. Charlotte Meritt Tarr, 'S4, 17 W Wynkoop drive, -Colorado ~rings, is in her fifth year of teaching fourth grade in the Colorado ~rings Public schools. Phil N euhal fen, 'S8, is training di rector for May-DF in Denver. Phil does some writing, lecturing and entertaining in his free moments. His address is 636 York sc:.1·eet, Denver. Mrs. Bess Snide Jacquot, 'S8, 855 Gray street, Denver, retired from teaching in the Jefferson county schools in 1964, but is still doing subs ti tu te teaching. Last June she attended the SO th anniversary reunion of her high school cl ass at ~ rin gfi el d, Nebr., which was attended by all living members of the cl ass. Ell a Mei st er (Mrs. Jim) Johnson, '5S, lives near Verdon where her husband farms. The John sons have two <laughters and a son. Jim and Flora Stal tz, '52, Staff, Rt. 1, Box 313, C$lby, Ore., last visited the campus in August, 1966. Jim, who received his master's from the University of Washington in June, is a librarian at Marylhurst Col-

Miss Cheryl Clayburn (standing left) enrolled as a Peru State Col 1 ege freshman in Sep~anber, the fourth generation of her fanll y to attend the 10 1-year-ol d col 1 ege. Mrs. Martha Aldrich,(seated) Peru State's f.07-year-young _oldest former co-ed who 1 i ves 1 n Brock, and 1s Cheryl• s Qreat grandmother started the fanily tradition when she attended, Peru Normal from 1878 until 1881. Cheryl s grandmother, Mrs. El i zabeth Dougherty of Brock (standing center), was a Peru student during 1918-20 and attended several summer sessions, while Cheryl• s mother Rut~ Dougherty Clayburn, (right) Brentwood: Cal 1f., received a t'l.0-year from Peru in 1946. In addition, Cheryl's father 1 Gerald Clayburn, is a 1949 Peru State g raduate, and her grandfather, A. B. Clayburn 1 professor emeritus o.f geography, tau ght at Peru from 1922 unt 1l 1962. Professor Clayburn•. s wi f.e, Ethel, attended in 1921.J.. Mrs. Aldrich will celebrate her 108th birthday January 28, 1968.

lege near Portland, and Flora, former Peru assistant librarian, is with the dackamas County Library in Oregon City. The Stol tzes have two daughters and a son.

1960s

f!~k e Dono van, '62, 1717 CD rdo va, Pomona, Calif., h?s been ~lected vice-president of the Associated Chino Teachers which has a membership of more than 350. ' Donna Francis (Mrs. Don) Schwertl ey '6~, 480 Mt. Vernon drive, C.Ouncil Bluffs' ~rites that :3he' s retired. from both tea ch~ ing and working at Brandeis to devote full time to care of their new son, John Francis, born January 23. . Steve !Jates, '61, received his MA degree in edu~atio:r:ial psychology and guidance from the University of Sou th Dakota Vermi 11 ion and his continuing graduate st~dy on a NDEA fellowship. Steve and Mrs. Bates, the former Phyllis Grube, fs '63, and their three children, Elizabeth, 4, Catherine, 2~ and Onistopher, 16 months, live at 1012 East Main, Vermillion. . Lonn A. Pressnal l, '65, has been named in~truc~br of speech at Illinois State Uni ve~si ~y, N~nmal ! wh_ere part of his work is in conjunction with the children's the?-t!'.'e· Lonn was a _1966 master's degree recipient from the University of Illinois where he was a teaching ,.a_ssi st ant. Th~ Pressnall ~Ii ve at Rt. 3, Bloomington, Ill. Lonn received the $700 second prize for his Nebraska Centennial play "You've Met Charlie, Haven' t You?" ' Mike Roach, '62, Wahoo, is mid-western region rep resen ta ti ve for the American Book CD. Mary_ Trail (Mrs~ A.W.) Mason, '60, 3256 East Fair place, Littleton, teaches in the Denver Public schools. Her husband is sales representative for a computer manufacturer. James Lyons, '66, 8422 Highland avenue is teaching in Center School district of:· Kansas City, Mo. Jerry D. Beckman, '60, is ch ai nnan of the mathematics department at the new East High school in Lincoln. Mrs. Beckmann is t~e former Vi rgir;i a Garton, 2 yr.' 60. They live at 7630 Steinway road, Lincoln Mr. and Mrs. Bob (Mary Lynne Hannah) Mathews, '63, '65, live at Kokomo Ind. where Bob is Bunker Hill AFB libra~ian. ' . Ruby Taylor (Mrs. Don) Eschen, MS '61, is an intermediate grade instructor at the Nebraska School for the Visually Handicapped in Nebraska City. Mr. and Mrs. Ray (Myrna Bohling) Meister, '62, fs '60, live at 318 Birchwood Fremont, ~ay teaches English, speech and speed readin~g at Fremont High school . Jack M. Head, '61, is biology instructor at So1;1th Pl~ins College, Levelland, Texas. He is wor.lnng toward his MS degree at Texas Technological College at Lubbock. Dr. Gary Olson, '60, received his doctorate from Illinois State University at Normal last summer and is now assistant dean of instruction at Kearney State College. Merl in Kastens, '65, 1813 Ponderosa pl ace, Millard, is an insurance salesman for Lu the ran Brotherhood. Gr.etchen Foxal Mattes, '62, teaches in the Sidney (Iowa) Community schools . . John W. Bookwalter, '60, has been appointed an account executive with the (continued on next page)


(continued from preceding page)

Visalia, Calif., office of Dean Witter & Co. Formerly with New York Life Insurance Co., he will rervice individual brokerage accounts j.n his new position. Puddy and wife, the fonner Beverly Mehl in, fs '58, and their two sons live at 1834 Terrace in Visalia. Lois J. Fritz, '63, 5716 Camden avenue, Omaha, is in her fifth year of teaching in the Omaha Public schools. After one year in an elementary school, she is now at her alma mater, North High, teaching special education. She completed her master's with a remedial reading major at the University of Qnaha 1 a'8t summer. Raymond N. Hunzeker, '62, is working on his master's degree at Pennsylvania State University under a National Science Foundation scholarship. His address is En try 11, Apartment 8-D, University Park, Pa.

Everywhere you go . . . Peruvians follow you! '"Hal fwar, around the world, and Peruvians meet,¡' writes Ruby Koontz Baker, 2 yr. ' 22, 405 Riverview Terrace, Nebraska City. She received word from Emma Kelly Musson, f s '20, Ai ea, Hawaii, of meeting Anne Epley, '.66, on the same Hawai~ Education Association 'tour of the Orient. Mrs. Musson was accompanying her daughter, Marjorie, and g:i:-andchil dren Tom and Irene, on the tour. Mrs. Musson is one of the four Kelly girls who have attended Peru-Nellie Kelly Rosean, '16, Columbus, Mont., Catherine Kelly Galt, '17, Stanford, Mont., and Jeanne Kel 1 y Lambert sen, fs ' 25, Raw1 ins, Wyo. Anne Epley, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dale (Ruth Chatelain) Epley, 2-yr. '34, '37, has many relatives who have attended Peru. On Okinawa she met her cousin, Vern Chatelain, son of Dr. and Mrs. Vern (Cecile Group) Chatelain, '14, '15, Silver Springs, Md. Anne is on a leave of absence the first semester caring for her grandmother, Mrs. Lottie Chatelain of Peru. She pl ans to resume teaching in Hawaii the second semester. As Mrs. Baker noted, "Peru students may be found most anywhere-where teachers are necessary!"

Died Information coaes to .the Per~ Stater of the deaths of these alumni and friends: Dr. Price Doyle, fa~ul_ty '27-' 30, ~urray, Ky., spring. He retired from the music faculty at Murray, (Ky.) State University in 1957. Davida Monfort, '14, Long Beach, Calif., June, 1966. Dr. A, Crago, faculty 1918-1929, Gainesville, Fl a. Clement A. Leger, fs '00, Lincoln, August 1, after a two year illness. Adah Lonnek er, '07, Earl ham, Iowa. 196 S. R. Mae Medley, '02, '25, Lincoln, March 25. ~ Mrs. Eva Venus Cook Leeper, '38, Oklahoma City. 18

Lawrence A. Wickland, fs ' 12, Al tadena, Cal i f. , June 2 2. William G. Thomp_son, '47, Hillsboro, Ore. , November 16. He is survived by hi s widow, Jean Holman Thompson, '59. L. Blanche Johnson Schetze[., '18, Omaha, November 12, following a year's illness. Darrell Boatman, fs '41, Lincoln. Arthur E. Hildebrand, '01, Shawnee, Kans., Oc_tober 7. From 1903 until 1907 he was superin ten dent of the Gretna schools where he first sponsored consolidation of Nebraska rural schools. He was manager of national tractor demonstrations by tractor manufacturers to convince fanners to use the machines. He began publishing Hildy's Blue Book for the Ford Motor Co. in 19"22. Richard Juilfs, fs '45, Royal Oak Mi ch., June 4. ' KennethHermsmei er, '50. Howard L. McKenney, '21, Omaha, August, 1965. Mary K. Smith, '07, Denver, Colo., July 19. A regl:stered nurse and resident of Denver for 40 years, Miss Smith received her nurse' s training at Cl ark son hospital, Omaha .. She served as superintendent of nurses at Bethel Hospital, Colorado Springs, for 13 years. Gerald A. Warman, '2Q, Oakland, Calif., August 25. Otto Kohler, fs '13,, Sutton. Lou.is Jorgensen, '32, Manhattan, Kans., July 29, 1966. He was a druggist. Dorothy Nicholas, 2 yr. '25, 'SQ, Nebraska City, August 2. She had taught 41 years in the Nebraska City public schools, Flora Wirth (Mrs. A.) Joseph, '18. Maude Rousseau, '18, February 8, 1961. A teacher in the Lincoln Public schools, an elementary school was named for her. Beulah Bloss Morse, '13, North Platte, May 19. Lambert Williams, 'Z7, March 19. 1964. Ell en Nystrom Webb, fs '10. Edith L. Phillips (Mrs. George P.) Higgins, ' 11, San Luis Obispo, Calif., ApnJ 14. Augie McCarro ll, ' UL Irene F. Bern (Mrs. O.F.) Johnson, '18, Sacramento, Calif. Mary McCune [Mrs. Robert) Drum, '04, East St. Louis, 11., May, 19n6. Effie Zimmerman {Mrs. Ouincy) Williamson, 'OS, Berthoud, Colo., .lune 15, 1Q65. Ethelyn West Fleming, '04, Norfolk, 1965. Laura Joekel (Mrs. H.F.) Sallenbach,

'18. J,

Duvall McMillen, '11, Lake Worth, Fl a., May ll. He retired 11 years ago as a colonel in the U.S. Anny. Through reports received from postal authorities, the Peru Stater has learned of the death of the following: Dr. Denver D. Ro o s, ' 20 , Coron a, Cal i f. LeolaH. France (Mrs. A. C.) Bloomquist, ' 10, Wilmar, Minn. Pearl S. Carsch (Mrs. Paul) Fieselman, '37, Lincoln. Mary D. Freiburgho1JSe, '11, Sabetha, Kans. Bess Ertel Ashton, '15, Redlands, California, August 31. Mae C. Geick, ' 51, Gering. Dorris V. Webb Halik, fs '40, Pawnee City. Genevieve Berg, '51, Shubert.


Dedication (continued fro• page 9) accepted by his widow, Mrs. Edi th Nichol as,

York. · · l 'Ihe late John F. Neal, M.D., principa donor of the land for Mount Vernon Seminary, predecessor -0f 101-year-ol d Peru State College Centennial Complex Dining hallI accepted by his ~anddaughter, He. len Nea (Mrs. I. W.) Eberhart, 2 yr. '25 1 Peru, and his granddaughter-in-law, Marie F(Jrsythe (Mrs. Fletcher) Neal, · 11, Nebraska City. The late Walter R. Pate, president from 1923 until 1946, residence hall, accepted by his widow, Mrs. Gertrude L. Pate, Peru. The symbolic key to the buildings was presented to Bernard L. SJ;>encer, Nebraska City, member of the governing board of the State Colleges, by Lawrence A. En er sen, member, architectural firm of Clark and Enersen, 01 sson, Burroughs and Thomsen, Lincoln. Greetings were extended by Ron Jones, Red Oak, Iowa, president of the Student Governing Association; Sil as Summers, £resident of the Faculty Association; Dr. Kenneth Sand, '58, MS '61, suferintendent of the Shenandoah (Iowa) Pub ic Schools, president of the Peru Alumni Association; Dr. Floyd A. Mill er, • 31, member of the Ehard of Education of State Normal Schools and State Commissioner of Education; State Senator Calista Cooper Hughes, Humboldt. The dedicated structures and the recently remodeled Acininistration building were open for visitors following the program.

Degrees Awarded (continued from page 4) Kans.; Patricia A. Corrigan, Casey, Iowa; Jeanne J. Cummins Falls City; Michael J. Damiano, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Wesley E. Dickey, Benedict; Kenneth Dodge, Fairbury; Jacqueline R. Dodson, Plattsmouth; Richard J. Duponcheel, Omaha; Gayle L. Ellison, Holmesville. Cecilia L. Evangelist, Newark, N.Y.; Larry L. Franke, Falls City; Angela S. F~r­ nas, Brownville; Robert L. Gates, Shenandoah, Iowa; Grace A. Haneline, Nebraska City; Glenda K. Hayes, Brownville; Robert L. Hayn, East Alton, Ill.; Carol J. Henderson, Brock; Blanche Highfield, Plattsmouth; Palma J. Holding, Burt, Iowa; Thelma A. Hoschar, Murray; Kay J. Jackson, Red Oak, Iowa; Bonita R. Jacobson, Otoe; Jerry V. Jacobson, Nebra~ka City; Nancy E. Jarvis, Peru. Sheryl S. Johnson, Omaha; Sally A. Kelly, Falls City;Susan Kenworthy, Villisca; Teri A. Kisby, Council Bluffs, Iowa; Beverly A. Kitelinger, Omaha; Patricia Knippelmie~, Auburn; Donna J. Kohrs, Johnson; Vernon W. Krenzerl Tecumseh; Judy Kuenning, Auburn; Gerald • Laflin, Crab Orchard; Nancy E. Larson, Villisca, Iowa; Pamela J. Lett, Nebraska City; Robert R. Lier~ 1 Wetmore, Kans.; Gerald Marks, Sullivan Mo.; Nancy A. McCullough, Aurora; Ronald L. McCoy, Falls City. .. William R. McVicker, Millard; Nancy L. Muse, Auburn; John H. Patterson, Peru; David L. Perry, Goff, Kans.; Connie R. Rademacher, Johnson; Marcia B. Reeves, Peru; William E.

Rinne, Burchard; 1homas C. Rosengren, Omaha; Frank J. Ruecker, Onaha; Lucille J. Ruffner, Nebraska City; Leland C. Schneider. Auburn; Eddie Shafer, Shubert; Roberta Shaffer, Farragut, Iowa; David Shuey, Lewiston~ Roger D. Slaughter, Glenwood, Iowa; Eugene W. Smith, Auburn; RonaldE. Snodgrass, Seward; Lucy M. Sporer, Murray; Regina G. Stalder, Sabetha, Kans.; Charles E. Steen, Sullivan, Mo.; Daisy Stitzer, Auburn;Charles H. Stoner, Tecumseh; Donald L. Stuart, Auburn; Robert L. Uhri, Table Rock; Robert J. Urwin, Rockaway, N.J.; Nancy J. Vanderbeek, Adams; Patrick L. Venditte, Omaha; Gary L. Viterise, Newark, N.Y.; Marilyn K. Wellensiek, Table Rock; John F. Witler, Auburn; Gerald A. Yoong, Adams. Summer Candidates Bachelor of Arts (liberal arts) -Sheryl G. Barrett, Nebraska City; Robert L. Conradt, Steinauer;Qpal Davenport, Robinsonp Kans.; Phyllis B. Greedy, Sidney, Iowa. Bachelor of Science -- Timothy J.Gilli~ g_an, Gretna; Joseph H. Kuttler, Shubert; Thomas A. Saunders, Columbus; Bradford A. Waggoner, Johnson. Bachelor of Fine Arts in Education -Lola W. Baker, Auburn; Gary Pummel, Nebraska City. Bachelor of Arts in Education -· Sheryl G. Barrett, Nebraska Ci~y; Michael D. Guilliatt, Au~urn; Geo~ge R. Kalil, Worcester, Mass.; ,Joseph T. Keys, Westville, New Jersey; Robert R. Peck, Stanton, Iowa. Bachelor o{ Science in Education -Velma Adam, Odel ; Anna M. Albrecht, Shubert; Hazel L. Anderson, Albion; Marianne Applegate, Louisville; Naomi W. Ballard, Douglas; Thelma Barr, Nebraska City; Leona I.Burd, Fairbury. William V. Carlson, Falls City; Marie A. Carnazzo, Omaha; Barbara Church, Dawson; Richard J. Connole, Worcester, Mass.; Opal Davenport, Robinson, Kans.; Richatd D. Dorsch, Auburn; Irene A. Eisenhauer, Syra~ cuse; Berta Ewing, Oquawka, Ill. Dennis Flattre, Lancaster, Kans.; Mary Garner, Falls City; P}1yllis Greedy, Sidney~ Iowa; Janis Grimes, Julian; Lois Grote, Sabetha, Kans.; Carol J. Hawley, Brock; Jean G. Hawl~y, Auburn; Roger L. Hein, Fairbury; Elva M. Hoover, Malvern, Iowa. Louise &; Howe, Humboldt; Harold L. Hylton, Sabetha, Kans.; Lillian Jacobitz, Stella; Virginia S. Jones, Tecumseh; Barbara A. Kendall, Union; Betty K. Lambert, Murray; Betty A. Mahoney, Tecumseh; RuthE. Marshall, Pawnee City; Eoma L. Masonbrink, Omaha; Mildred A. Mastin, Tecumseh; Marleen D. Mehlin, Humboldt; Dennis E. Michal 1 Blockton, Iowa. Thomas B. Morrison, Papillion; Carol J. Nanninga, Humboldt; Helen M. Nixon, Auburn; Charles F. Pratt, Bridgeport, New Jersey; Hilka K. Rippe, Odell; Vinita F. Rockeyp Robinson, Kans.; Doris M. Schacht, Springfield; Esther S. Schafer, Tecumseh; Edna R. Schuler, Falls City; Mary L. Smith, Nebraska City. Vera M. Smith, Auburn; Alan F. Sullivan, Jr., Worcester, Mass.; D. Jean Tippin, Fairbury; Marjorie B. Viets, Corning, Iowa; Edus Volkmer, Red Oak, Iowa; Gloria J. Walker, Beatrice; Ruth J. Weber, Cook; Irene C. Wilkinson, Humboldt; Kathryn E. Wing, Farragut, Iowa; Josephine M. Zumbahlen, Odell.

19


Non-Profit OrgClft-bction

PERU STATE COLLEGE Campus of a Thousand Oaks Peru, Nebraska 68421

U.S. Postage

PA ID Permit No. 4 Peru. Nebraska

STA-TEii Grads, Former Students Continue Support (CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7)

1940S MR. & MRS. NEIL G. (MARGARET GooDRIDGE) GooD, '41. '42 MR • .Be MRS. LEROY (NANCY ELLEN JONES) REDFERN, '41. '42 MAX A. BuRROUGHS, FS '42 MARYL. ACCORD, '48 MR. & MRS. E. (WILMA MILLER) JACKSON, '42 WALTER H. BURNS, FS '40 0RIVELL YOCUM, '47 RICHARD W. PASCAL, ''fl

w:x

J. A. Ft,.O't'D, •40

ZETA FEIGHNER HANNA, '47BETTY KENNEDY (MRS. JOHN) LEEDS, '43 DON C. WAGNER '49 (2) MRS. DE>,N SEYMOUR, ATT. '43 RICHARD H. GooD, FS '48 ARTHUR BROPHY, '49 FREDDIE DREXLER, '46 JAMES A. WATKINS, '47 MR. AND MRS. W.H. (WINIFRED HALL) JOHNSON, '40, '57 ELAINE MILLER (MRS. VINCENT B.) NELSON, FS '44 JUNE KE IL (MRS. FRED) WEHRBEIN, 2 YR. '40 GERTRUDE HILL (MRS. GEORGE TRIPLETT, '49 FERNE E. PETERSON (MRS. CARL) MAILEY, '42 CLARA EYRE (MRS. E. L.) JACK~ON, '41 ANNA LOUISE SHORT, '41 DR, FRANK·C. LARSON, '41 LEONORE LARSON (MRS. ROBERT) GRAF, '45 PHYLLIS STEEVER (MRS. CARL T.) REDEMANN, '49 MARY A. HACKER (MRS. ROBERT) THRENN, 2 YR. '43 DR. BILL M. WOODS, •45 ANNA HROMADKA (MRS. R.G.) SEIDELMAN, FS '41 1950S LAVON R. COVAULT, '53 DOROTHY TILLER, '51 EVA MARIE KNAPE WATLAND. '52 SHARON OCKER, "59 MR. & MRS. ARNOLD (SHARON GRIENINGER) EHLERS, ·'59, 2 YRS. '58 DR. FRANKLIN D. PEDERSON, '59 MR. & MRS. BOB (BONITA DUEY) BRUNSDON. FS '55. FS '56 MR. & MRS. LEE (PEGGY EICKHOFF) NORRIS. '59, MS '60: • 56 (2) MARY ANN SMEJDIR WEBER, "54 GwEN SHUSTER MARCHAND, '56 MR. & MRS. ROBERT W. (HESTER FRIEDLY) CLARK, '50, '47 MR. & MRS. DALE A. (SHARON

MR. & MRS.

KENNETH (JOYCE ALEXANDER) TAYLOR, '51: ATT. 50 JOHN CHRIST, JR. '55 MR. & MRS. DEAN (MABEL NEDVED) SCOGGIN. '58, FS • 53 (2) IN MEMORY OF DoROTHY NICH· OLAS, '59, BY HER SISTER GENEVIEVE NICHOLA.S HAY• WARD, '29 RUTH A. DUDER (MR. RAYMOND) FINCK, FS '58 _ MR, & MRS. FRED (MARILYN HA WXBY) CL EM EN TS , ' 56 , ' !: EUGENE Md\.1ULLEN, '58 JOHNIELEE C. HENNiNG, '58 MR. AND MRS. DEAN (EILEEN BEETHE) THIESFELD, '52. 2 YR, ;51 EUARDA HUNTSMAN, '50 BARBARA MILLER (MRS. BILL) RAWSON, '53 JULIA WHITNEY CHASE, 2 YR.

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'56, •59 CLIFFORD STOKES, ''57 ROBERT MoORE, '51. SAM BUCKMINSTER, 2 YR. ''57, •59 JUNE SLATER (MRS, JAMES) JANETZKE, '55 CLARICE CHRISTENSEN, FS '51 MR. & MRS. BOYD (ILENE THIL· TGES) GoOD, '55. '53 WILMA KLEIN (MRS. GENE) KELLEY, 2 YR. '55 MR. AND MRS. RAY (ROSE EDELMAN) RUZICKA, '59, '58 J. A. WoPATA, FS '52 MR. AND MRS. RoN (MARY ANN NUTZMAN) WENNINGHOFF, '57, MS '60: '57 MADGE CASEY (MRS. WILBER) BROADY, '57 DR. AND MRS. KENNETH (BLANCHE) SAND, '58, '59 (2) JO COLBY (MRS. FRED) KAFFEN· BERGER, FS '55 GERALD W. KERR, '55 DARLENE JANSEN (MRS. ROBERT) ANDERSON, 2 YR, '58 MAY STEWART, '50 PAUL C. MAXWELL, FS ''57 MONICA ZEINER (MRS. ROBERT) PRIM, '53 MR. AND MRS. MARVIN (RUTH JOHNSON) GERDES, '53. MS '60: 2 YR. '53 MILDRED SPENCER STEWART, MS '59 PAUL E. KAUFMAN, '53 DR. AND MRS. DONALD (VIVIAN SHEW) WENDT, '55. MS '59: FS '50

1960S KAREN S. CAHOW. "65 MR. & MRS. LONNIE (NANCY) l-ln11r1-1IN

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DOYLE L. GUMP. '52. MS '62 MR. & MRS. LARRY (JANICE TUCKER) RAINS-. FS '64 . ."64 MR. & MRS. MICHAEL LAROCCA. PARENTS OF DoN LAROCCA. '66 GRETCHEN MATTES, '62 MERLIN KASTENS. '65 MR. & MRS. DAVID (LINDA STEPHENS) GoMON, '65, "64 ALICE SHULENBERG HAEFFELE, FS '65 DEVA H. ARMSTRONG, '38, MA '62 MRS. AUDREY WHITNEY KIEGER, FS '63MRS. BETTY (HOBBIE) CoGDILL, '63 LOIS J. FRITZ, '63 NEOMA BESSE (MRS. ADOLPH) EICHENBERGER, '63 DONNA FRANCIS (MRS. DON) SCHWERTL EY, '61 JOYCE ANN CARMAN, '61 C. THOMAS ROSENGREN, '67 WILLIAM H. TULK, '60 JOHN HUNZEKER, '66 MRS. VIOLET M. RICHES, '60 TOM SAUNDERS, '67 RUBY E. LOCKWOOD, FS '63 MR. & MRS. LELAND (WILMA JOHNSON) SCHMIT, JR., '60. '61 SHARLYN VRTISKA (MRS. LAVERNE) KNOCK, '63 ELDON BAKER, FS '63 FRANCES SANDERS (MRS. GoRDON) STE I NB ROOK, '64 MR. & MRS. LARRY (JEAN REIMAN) CLINTON, FS '64. '64 MRS. FRANK NAVRKAL, FS '60 MR. AND MRS. DARYL BONOW, '64 FORMER STAFF DR. GARY F. OLSON, '60 DR. & MRS. FREDDIE (LINDA MOORE) REGNIER, BOTH "60 MR. & MRS. DON R. (GLENNA J.) SCOBY, JS '60: '60 FACULTY, ST,ltFF-. FRIENDS ORGANIZATIONS, FIRMS WOMEN'S DIVISION OF NEBRASKA CITY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE (2) ROBERT E. PRESTON, FRIEND AND MRS . LYLE (NORMA) M::KERCHER, FAC,'65 MR. & MRS. HAROLD W. (ALICE GRUSH) JOHNSON, '38. FAC: ''57 DR. AND MRS. JOHN C. (LILLIAN) CHRIST, FAC: '53. MS '60 WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOC. MR. & MRS. HARVEY C. JOHNSON, STAFF DR. AND MRS. KEITH L. (MARTHA MCDOUGAL) MELVIN, '32, FAC: 2 YR. '32, '55 MR. & MRS. FRED STEPHENS. SHE STAFF STATE SENATOR CALISTA COOPER HUGHES LYLE G. STROM, FAC DR. & MRS. REX SHELLEY, HE F .t.Clll TY

MR:

FORMER FACULTY WALDO W!LLHOFT, '26. FORMER FACULTY MARY CLARKE, '45. FORMER FACULTY DR. KENT H. KING. FORMER FACULTY PERU KtVl'A"N!S Que FRANCES F. FIELDS, FORMER FACULTY MR. & MRS. SILAS E. SUMMERS, HE FACULTY MR.·& MRS. F.H. LARSON, HE FACULTY [DA MAE BRACKNEY. FORMER FACULTY A. V. LARSON, FORMER FACULTY BEATRICE PATE YANDERS. DAUGHTER OF FORMER PREStDE"NT W. R. PATE OKLAHOMA GAS & ELECTRIC CO. FOUNDATION, INC. LOUISE SHELDON ( MRS. ARTHUR) KREGEL, '31: FAC. INA DAVIDSON SPROUL, FAC. '58· '67 MRS. MYRTLE E. CoOK, FORMER FAC, '46-.' 58 MR. & MRS. DUAINE (SUSAN CROOKER) MCKNIGHT, FS '57: '60, FORMER STAFF MR. & MRS. Ross (MARYON THOMAS) ADAMS, '41. '59: FAC. • 55· '67 DR. & MRS. SAMUEL M. (ESTHER DELZELL) BROWNELL: '23. FORMER FAC. IN MEMORY OF CLARA McCLATCHEY, '51, FORMER FAC.: MRS. STEWART P. LINSCHEID; MRS. C. H. MARCH, FORMER FAC., BY FACULTY WOMAN'S CLUB MR. & MRS. JOHN W. (DELORES) CLARK,, FAC. DR. LESTER N. DOWNING, FORMER DEAN OF COLLEGE FRANCES FIELDS, FORMER FAC. •45.•49 (2) IN MEMORY OF MR, & MRS. S. P. LINSCHEID BY RESIDENTS OF DEL ZELL HALL MR. & MRS. PHIL IP RIHNER, '58: FORMER STAFF GLADYS GRUSH. '4(), MS '59: FAC. '59· '67 NORMAL. DIDDEL, FORMER FACULTY MARJORIE WEST (MRS. EARL HART, • 28. FORMER FACULTY CECIL SHEELY (MRS. W.A.) KELLY, STAFF '05- '09 THOMAS J. LIPTON FOUNDATION MRS. MAUDE J. STEVENSON, FRIEND MORTON HOUSE KITCHENS, INC, OF NEBRASKA Ct TY PERU UNIT NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION MU "EPSILON Nu KNIGHTS OF AK·SAR·BEN PERU VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS AUX! LI ARY ANDREA GRAINGER MEMORIAL O.F LIN· COLN SOUTHEAST HIGH SCHOOLS

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Profile for Peru State College Library

1967 The Peru Stater (Nebraska)  

1967 issues of the Peru Stater, Peru State College (Nebraska)

1967 The Peru Stater (Nebraska)  

1967 issues of the Peru Stater, Peru State College (Nebraska)

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