Page 1


Preliininary Plans F_or Centennial Prelimina~y planning for Peru State's lOOth anniversary is underway. A faculty committee, which included a number of Peru grads, came up with a list of tentative suggestions for observances to pay tribute to Peru State--Nebraska's first college. The observances are planned to coincide with the lOOth academic year--1966-67. Since this is something that will happen only once in our lifetime, the College would appreciate receiving other suggestions for observances besides those mentioned. So, if you have ideas, please send them to the Centennial Commnttee, Peru State College. Three major events will highlight Peru State's lOOth birthday--the Centennial Homecoming in October, presentation of an adaptation of the Semi-Centennial Pageant as a part of the May Fete, and the Charter Day Centennial Convocation, June 20, 1967. Sandwiched among these college-wide observances will be Distinguished Graduates Lectures by Peruvians. The Committee has expressed the hope that many fields of study will be represented. These visiting lecturers will he requested to appear at convocations, seminars, workshops, at fraternity, departmental, service, religious student groups throughout the year. Their return to the campus not only will enrich the intellectual atmosphere, but also will spotlight Peru graduates who have made contributions not only to educational fields, but to others as well. Other suggestions in the Centennial hopper include: a complete up-dated history o~ Peru State; a directory of alumni, an historical centennial movie or slide collection from photographs of campus scenes and events of the past; honor Peruvian families which have had three or more genera tions in attendance at Peru.

Observes lOOth Birthday

East Coast Tour

Offered Among Summer Sessions Two short terms, a field trif to the East, and two five-week sessions wi 1 be the 1965 Summer School offering at Peru State College. More than 100 course offerings will be available during the five-week sessions-June 14 to July 16 and July 19 to August 20. By enrolling for both five-week sessions, a student may earn up to 12 hours of credit. The three-week short courses offered will include: June 28 to July 16 -- Diagnostic and Remedial Reading, Techniques of Counseling, Speech Correction . July 19 to August 6 -- Psychology of Exceptional Children, Philosophy of Education, Audio Visual Materials, Art Exploration, First Aid, Conservation of Natural Resources, Aerospace Science. Peru State's 1965 travel-study opportunity is scheduled from July 17 to August 8. The New York World's Fair wil,~ be a bonus of the 23-day trip which also will include Niagara Falls, Gloucester, Boston, Washington, D.C., and the Lake of the Ozarks. Up to five hours of college credit may be earned in history or social science. The $324 cost includes air conditioned charter bus transportation, hotel, tips, incidentals, with meals and tuition extra. Repeated in 1965 will be the Aerospace Science short course, which proved to be so popular last summer. Taught by air force instructors, the course considers the aerospace age from a non-technical standpoint. Included in the course will be a tour of the Strategic Air Command, Offutt Air Force Base; Omaha, and an airlift field trip to an air force installation outside Nebraska. Complete information about the 1965 summer sessions at Peru State may be secured by reguesting a bulletin from the Registrar, Peru State College, Peru, Nebr. 68421.

Miss Anna Goshen, a member of the facul-

~y of Peru State from 1899·to 1913, as super-

intendent of the Training School and teacher of courses in psychology and pedagogy, observed her lOOth birthday, March 5, at her home at 7209 Elmwood avenue, Philadelphia. . . She resigned her position at Peru to Join the faculty of West Chester State Normal. School, her alma mater;, where she served until her retirement in 1928. A new residence hall on the campus of· West Chester State College has been naned in her honor. ~iss qo~hen"s feelings concerning being a senior citizen were expressed in her letter to the class. o:( 1904 at the time of the SO-year reunion in .1954: · "As you face the future, don't let the ·spectre of •old age' get you down. People of your ~nergy ~nd id~als do not stagnate. T~ere is a fair margin of time. left for you; time to gratify latent ambitions, to relax and to have fun. In fact, barrin~ serious illness, the Indian Summer of life often pro!es it's the most rewarding and satisfying period. May that be your experience."

Peruvians to Congress Two freshman members of the U.S. Congress list Peru State Coilege as their alma mater. Nebraska's first district congressman is Clair Callan, '42, a native of Odell. William D. Ford, who attended Peru State for pre-law in 1946-47, was elected from the 15th district of Michigan. Mr. Callan is an Odell and Beatrice businessman. Mr. Ford an attorney at Taylor, Mich., served previ~usly in the Michigan State Senate.

Volume XIV Number 1 Spring, 1965 Official publication of Peru State College. Published and distributed in November and April. Please notify the College of changes of address.


Cornerstone Ceremony Is Milestone In $1 Million Building Program April 29 was a milestone in ~he current $1 million building program now in progress on the Campus of a Thousand Oaks. On that date, the Grand Lodge A.F .. & A.M. ofN~braska conducted cornerstone laying ceremonies for the college's newest academic building--the Fine Arts Center . Dr. Freeman B. Decker, coordinator for state colleges of Nebraska and orator for the occasion, urge~ the wide use of the building for the enjoyment of young and old alike. Judge Harry Spencer, Lincoln, G~and Master, presided at the colo~ful ceremo~ies. Attending the event, which began with a luncheon for visiting dignitaries at noon, were four state senators--Calista Co~per Hughes, Humboldt; Rick Bud_d, Nebraska City; William Hasebrook, West Point; and George C. Gerdes, Alliance. Representing the Board of Education of State Normal Schools was Bernard M. Spencer, Nebraska City, board p~esid~nt. In his address Dr. Decker paid tribute to the people who nearly ~00 years ago estab1ished the first college in Nebraska and the third of its kind west of the Missouri river . The Fine Arts Center, which will include a 214-seat recital hall, will enable those who wish to enrich themselves to live a more purposeful life, ~ .. D~cker said. The building will house facilities for music, art, speech and drama. Music for the ceremonies were provided by the Peru State College Concert Band Ensemble the Men's Octet. Members of Jobs Daught~rs Bethel 14 of Nebraska City decorated the cornerstone at the conclusion of the ceremony . Visitors attendin$ the April 29 ceremonies had an opportunity to see two other building projects underway on th~ campus--a $400 000 addition to A. D. Majors Men's Residence Hall, and a $100,000 ~in~ng ball addition to the Student Center building. All three projects are sch~duled for completion in time for the opening of the 99th academic year in September, 1965. Distinguished guests Senators Hasebr~ok, Budd, Gerdes, Mr. Hughes, and Senator Cal 1 sta Cooper Hughes •

The cornerstone with Orator Decker, Dr. Gomon and Judge Spencer following ceremony ••

96th Commencement Week Highlight

1915 Reuniojn (See Photo on page 13)

An advance guard of 1915 class members met on campus early in May to plan what they hope will be the biggest return of 50year graduates when the golden anniversary class meets May 30- -Baccalaureate Sunday. Peru State's 96th commencement week will begin the night before with the traditional faculty reception for spring graduates in the Student Center. Many 1915 returnees have indicated they plan to be here for the reception. Arriving May 4 for the pre-planning session were class prexy M.C. Bloss, Lincoln; Prudence Stiles (Mrs. Clay) Dallam, J. H .. Adee, and L. B. Mathews, all of Peru. Ruth Courtright Kennedy, unable to be present, sent her husband, Cassius Kennedy, '14, as her emissary. The 1915 class hopes to shatter attendance records for 50-year reunions--outnumbering the 30 members present in 1959 when the 1909 class returned to the Campus of a Thousand Oaks. The program of events will begin at 9:30 a.m. with registration, roll call, coffee hour and class meeting. The Golden Anniversary reunion luncheon is scheduled for 1:30, the class picture at 2:30, reunion visit and free time until the 4 p.m. Baccalaureate services when members of the SO-year class will be given recognition. Dr. Clarence J. Forsberg, minister, St. Paul Methodist church, Lincoln, will be the Baccalaureate speaker. Dr. Louis R. Kilzer, '15, professor emeritus of education, University of '.Yyorning, will deliver the commencement address on June 4 at 10 a.m. The spring commencement will honor 123 graduates. Dr. Kilzer will use as his topic, "A Time For Inventory," touching on the past, present and future. 3


Testimonia Is Honor Retiring Benford, Wheelers The retirerren t of two long-time faculty members at the close of the spring semester have been announced by Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of Peru State. The retiring faculty members--R. T. Benford, a member of the mu~.ic department for 35 years, and Alfred G. Wheeler, physical education faculty member since 1938--stepped down as heads of their respective divisions last year in keeping with retirement policies of the Normal Board. Mrs. Frances Wheeler, who has been associated with the women's physical education department since 1951, has resigned. The Wheelers plan to move to Rt. 1, Matthews, N.C., to make their home. The Benf ords plan to remain in Peru, where Ted will continue to give private piano and organ instruction. Coach Al and Fran were feted by members of the Omaha area chapter of the Peru Alumni Association at the spring dinner meeting at Marchio's in Omaha, March 20. Jack Hallstrom, principal of Monroe Junior High school, former basketball player from Avoca who was graduated in 1950, and Chuck Krumme, former football player who was graduated in 1957, and is now administrative intern at Horace Mann Junior High, gave tributes to their for mer coach. The division of fine arts honored R.T. and Jennie Benford at a recognition dinner April 24 in the Student Center. Students Gary Schmucker, Brock, and William Carlson, Falls City, in a comedy sketch, demonstrated a beginning ''Benford pianist;' and Mary Lu

Fran and Al Wheeler receive best wishes from Peru grads following the dinner meeting of the Omaha chapter of the Peru Alumni Association. Jack Hallstrom (left), gave one of the tributes to Coach Al. Lynn Osterholm and Ken Dostal, teachers at Benson and Tech, add their congratulations. Hicks, Auburn, veteran pupil of R.T., demonstrated the proficiency of an advanced student. A set of luggage was given to the Benfords with the best wishes of those present and many unable to attend. Many of Ted's piano students of former years were present. Mr. Wheeler has coached all sports at Peru during his service to the college. He has compiled an enviable record as a teacher and coach. His teams in football have won 133 games, lost 51, and tied 12, while his basketball record includes 95 wins and 65 losses. Coach Wheeler revived baseball in 1958 after an absence of three decades, winning 64 and losing 57 at the start of the 1965 season. Through Mr. Benford's years of service to Peru, he has taught piano, organ, theory, has directed the choir and band and supervised vocal music in the campus school He was acting head of the division of fine arts for three years. He has been arranger and composer for numerous piano and choral selections. The Peru Stater joins the many friends of the Benf ords and Wheelers in wishing them well in their retirement.

Ted and Jennie Benford are greeted by Lola and Korah Baker of Auburn at the dinner in their honor. Daughters Pat (Mrs. Mark) Bornemeier and Kathlyn (Mrs. Harold) Reed, and Sharon Reed. Others waiting to greet the Benfords Mary Lu Hicks, James Wi 1 son, Mary Ellen Wilson Oestmann.


Grads Praise Alma Mater,

Make Suggestions

Report on DOCTORAT That Peru State graduates and former students hold their alma mater in high regard is a well-known fact. For most Peruvians the college years, indeed, were "the best years of our lives:' This, in part, accounts for the esteem in which the college is held by those uloyal sons and daughters who call themselves Peru." Another--and probably more important reason--is the preparation which was receiYed for the life's work ahead. The responses to the questionnaire sent to Peruvians whose names were contained in the publication, Doctorate Production in United States Universities, 1920-1962, bears testimony to this reason. The Peru Stater is pleased to report addresses have been located for all grad-

the other activities in music, theatre, the school paper, played an important role in the general cultural formation with which I 1 i ve and work." "I have never had any complaints or felt anything but proud of Peru State." "The academic atmosphere at Peru was esp,ecially wholesome. There was no snobbery or 'elite class," but among students as well as faculty, there seemed to be respect for achievement in intellectual areas." "My years at the college were rich and rewarding ones for me and were largely instrumental in motivating me to do graduate work ... Opportunities were more than adequate, even though the small size rif Peru, i.e., the town, prohibited cultural advantages that would have benefitted undergraduate activities~·

Of interest to students, faculty and visitors on the Peru State campus this year has been a bulletin board series in the College Library, entitled: "Peruvian of the Week." The easel diselay features a different Peruvian ~Doctor" from the series described in the article, with a sheet of information from the survey together with a Peruvian opened to the page where the Peru graduate appears. Librarian Faye Prandt reports that from the cownents she has overheard the series is providing a great deal of inspiration for present day Peruvians. uates listed in the publication. Resfonse to the questionnaire have come from al but 10 contained in the report--plus some who have received doctorates since 1962 . A number of Peruvians from classes prior to 1921 with earned doctorates are not listed in the publication. Undoubtedly, this is because their bachelor's degrees were completed at another institution. Also not included in the National Research Council publication are doctors of medicine, dentistry, or veterinary medicine. In addition to information contained below--present position, advanced degrees, and granting institutions, three questions ~ed: What influenced you to continue ~"1>W:aird your terminal degree? Did your · a:te work at Peru State provide ent or inspiration for advanced work? r undergraduate opportunities at been improved, and how? :i:Qim samples of the replies to the f ir~t,. 9i~s~ipn: · .,Desi:1re for further specialization. Desi:f~;c,t;tfi<~t into college teaching. Inspired ·te ·· · various Peru teachers. In many idual teachers were named- -in · oi.,Ler' . ····.. • it was a general statement like Pe:Etu professors was used. ~her statements concerning their regar(I Peru State: · . oodergraduate experience at Peru has. contributed very much to my life and my career. Not only the academic experience, but

'Veru created a desire and also provided the encouragement to go on for a doctorate and to make teaching my lifetime profession." "Always in a small sch·eol there should be more courses offered, more laboratories, better library facilities, etc. To offset these needs, there are closer contacts between faculty and students. More opportunities to participate in leadership roles in social opportunities and the like ... The direct or indirect influence of these is most difficult to evaluate." "Peru provided a good undergraduate education at reasonable cost. Too, I met there the best professor I have ever had ..." "Peru's major advantage is its size. None of my classes went over 30 people ... Even though there are twice as many students now, you still don't have lectures with 600 people ... Many students get a degree never having been in a course with less than 100, or having the same instructor twice. Frankly, I don't think I'd have gotten a B.S. if I d had to cope with a situation like that ... Peru's major virtue is an interest in the individual student--or should be. And an opportunity for the student to identify with the school itself, not simply a fraternity or a dorm or a society ... " "Since the 1860's Peru has been noted for the continuing stream of educational leaders which the college has supplied. This is the strongest reason for its existence. It is still far more important to keep them coming than to plan to graduate as many as possible with whatever program a minimum cost wil 1 buy." "I have always felt that Peru had something to offer in a student's over-all program., ..Even its geographical location is an advantage?' ''In my judgment it would be most difficult to be a 9raduate of Peru and not realize that the highest calling' is that of a a teacher." "I'd like to write a book about my early days in Peru and call it 'The Right (continued on next page)

s


Alumni Association Activities Association Officers: Bob Norvell, ~58, Adams, President; Robert Bohlken, ~9, Peru First Vice-President; Lester Miller,' :60, Beatrice, Second Vice-President ¡ Karen M. Hamm, '63, Tecumseh, Secr:tary; Carol Ann Sudik, '63, Treasurer. Chapter Presidents: Omaha, Richard D. Slagle, fs '37, Bellevue; Lincoln, Dr. Norman Thorpe, '29, Lincoln; Rocky Mountain Junior Karas, '56, Woodrow, Colo.; No~thern California, A. B. Clayburn, professor emer~tus~ 1922-62. Stockton; Southern California, Charles E. Smith, '51, Garden Grove.

Californians Meet Sixty-five California graduates, former students and friends of Peru State attend~d luncheon meetin~s the firs~ two Saturdays in April. The meetings were in Los Angele~ and Hayward. . . Meeting April 3 for t~eir ~ixth annual gathering, th~ Sou\hern Californians elect~d Charles E. Smith, 51, Garden Grove, president; Stanley Cameron~ '49., Buena Park, vice-~resident. Katherine Lash Donaldson, '33, Torrance, was re-elected secretarytreasurer. Rains the week preceding the meetinp, plus a downpour on the meeting date, cut the usual lar&"e attendance to 20, r_ep_orts Orv~l Rodgers, 38, Bellflower, retiring president. The Northern California chapter had as their guest Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of the college who was conducting ~nterviews for prospective faculty members in the Bay area. Meeting April 10 for their eighth annual meeting, members re-elected the present officers--A.B~ Clayburn, Stockton, president; Paul 0. Blair, Oakland, vice-president; Genevieve McNally, Hayward, secretary. Fortyfi ve attended the Hayward meeting. A color slide program showing familiar Peru scenes and new construction on the Peru State College campus, and taped music by the College Band Ensemble and the Men's Octet were used at both meetings. Dr. Gomon addressed the Northern California chapter, outlining the college's achievements and plans for the future programs.

At Omaha R. D. Slagle, chapter president, who presided at the dinner honorinq A.G. Wheeler and Mrs. Wheeler, visits with his parents, R. H. and Hattie Lilly Slagle, '13, of Falls City, and his cousins Marilyn Slagle, '58, Greeley, Colo., and. Evelyn Slagle (Mrs. Ross) Garrett, 'lJ.lJ., G1 enwood, Iowa. Mari 1 yn and Evelyn also attended the dinner honoring R.T. Benford and Mrs. Benford.

Rocky Mountain Meet in Cheyenne The Hitching Post in Cheyen~e was the site of the annual luncheon meeting of the Rocky Mountain area chapter ~f the P~ru Alumni Association May 2. according to Junior Karas, '56, Woodrow, Co~o-~ pre~ident. Other officers assisting with the meeting were Robert B. ÂĽoore, '57, Arvada, and Alice DeVore Organ, 39. . Recorded music by the College Symphonic Band Ensemble and the Men's Octet provided the musical entertainment. A presentatio~ of color slides from the personal collections of present faculty members were shown. The chapter deferre~ e!ec~ion of new officers until the fall picnic in September.

Doctoral Report (continued from preceding page) Side of Main Street' .'' "Peru ranks with the best when compared to other colleges.'' ; "I regard my years at Peru always with the deepest appreciation. There were some very great teachers there--among the best I have ever had." "Every opportunity was afforded me to pursue the courses I needed, the instruction was excellent, and the atmosphere such that it stimulated accomplishment." "At the time I was pursuing my undergraduate degree, I believe Peru was doing a superior job."

Peru-Graduated Doctorates Verne E. Chatelain, '18, professor of history, University of Ma~yland, Silver Spring. M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. Genevieve Gregg Hubbard, '18, private piano teacher, Washington, D. C. M.A., George Washington University; Ph.D., American University. Omer E. Sperry, '25, professor, range (continued on page 9)


Sophomores Dominate

1964-65 Cage Acti n Peru State's cagers wound up their 1964-65 season*with a 9-11 record, as sophomores dominated a "building' year on the Bobcat hardwoods. Coach Jack Mcintire seasoned 12 lettermen during varsity action with no senior among the monogram winners. This marks the first season in his nine years at Peru that at least one senior has not dropped from the roster due to graduation. The season was not without its highlights as scoring records were set and All Conference honors were earned. The all-time team scoring record was set December 28 as Peru rolled over Tarkio College 119-81 in the first round of the Holiday Tournament at Beatrice. This bettered the 118-58 mark set against Doane College during the 1959-60 season. Peru State's 6' 8" center Ron Snodgrass, Seward, led the individual game scoring effort as he rolled in 42 points against Wayne State. This marks the individual high score since Omar Meeker tallied 57 points against Midland College in 1951. Sophomore guard Dean Cain, Thurman, Ia., led the NAIA District 11 throughout the

season in freethrows. Dean dropped in 79 of 93 attempts this season for an .85 per cent average. Mike Harmon of Wood River, Ill., gave the Peruvians an all-out effort through the season to lead his team in both scoring and rebounds. Mike averaged 17 points and 14.3 rebounds per game to help him grab an All Conference forward position. This talented nucleus, plus several other good looking players make the coming round ball season at Peru State appear to be on the way up again. Scores of Games: (Peru score first column) 94 87 63 83 73 119 78 78 66 70

Tarkio NW Missouri St. Benedict's Washburn Dana Tarkio Doane Kearney NW Missouri Doane

84 72 75

86 97 81 85 81 64 71

99 78 76 68 77 62 64 76 87 98

Tarkio Hastings Wayne Kearney Doane Chadron Chadron Hastings C<>ncordia Wayne

87 80 70

80 72 57 74 80

76

104

Track, Baseball Season Brings Wins

.-

As track and baseball teams closed out the month of April, onlookers have witnessed several new records set in track and field events and Al Wheeler's diamond men post an 8-4 record. Coach Jack Mcintire, in his second year at the track helm has seen his team develop into a conference contender, winning five of six dual meets and setting six new records. The 880-yard relay team composed of David Seward, Rockford, Ill.; Roger Crook, Salem; Jim Hagemeier, Beatrice; and Narva Brye, Omaha, shaved two tenths off the old 1:28.6 mark set in 1934byRobert Carmichael, Berdette Cowell, Raymond Moore and Wayne Riggs. The sprint medley record set in 1959 of 3:42.4 by John Werner, Gary Adams, Bob Gibson and Hon Callan was slashed to 3:35.2 by Roger Crook, Jim Hagemeier, Narva Brye, and Louis Fritz, Verdon. Fritz also lowered Frank Graham's 4:30.6 mile record to 4:25.7 and Graham's 10:01.3 two mile record to 9:58.2. The triple jump mark of 41'3" set by

Sports Booklet Wins Again For the second year, the football brochure prepared in the offices of special services has received an All-America award of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. Edited by Leland Sherwood, the publication is distributed to press, radio and television. The booklet was in the category of duplicated and placed with Pacific Lutheran, Southern Connecticut State, and Howard Payne (Texas).

Lowell Brown, '64, fell to freshman Buddy McCrea who jull}ped 45'9W'. Charles Niemeyer, Deshler, raised his own '64 pole vault mark of 12'10" to 13'3" against Tarkio and Northwest Missouri. ' In baseball, the Bobcats have lost some heartbreakers in conference play, splitting three double headers with Wayne State, Hastings College, and Kearney State to stand 3-3. Outside the conference the 'Cats are boasting_ a five and one record, their only loss coming at the hands of St. Benedict's College at Atchison, Kans. Both Coach Mcintire and Wheeler are busy putting the final polish on their teams for the home stretch action.

1965 Grid Schedule Peru State College Bobcats Sept. 11 Sept. 18 Sept. 25 Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Nov.

2 9 16 23 30 6

TARKIO COLLEGE LINCOLN U

7:30 7:30

at NW Missouri State at Chadron State WAYNE STAIB

8:00 7:30 7:30

at Hastings College

7:30

OOANE (HOMEffi'L1NG)

2:00

KEARNEY STAIB at Washburn U

7:30 7:30

Dr. Harold Hutcheson, head of the education department and director of the campus school at Peru State, 1957-1959, has been named vice-president at Wisconsin State Uni~ersity at Platteville.,

7


.:..

Challenge for 1965

Year-End Foundation Report 1964 saw a total of 627 contributions to the Peru Achievement Foundation • .. .. which included 546 alumni and 81 gifts from business, industry, civic, educational. fraternal groups, present faculty and staff. Total gifts for 1964 were $10,165.75. 1963 brought a response from 547 contributors, including Peruvians and non-alumni ••• producing total receipts of $11,016.64. Despite greater alumni participation in 19641 total receipts declined. IF every alumnus and former student had contributed at least ONE DOLLAR-the 1964 total would have been at least $7 000 more. 1

1965 is here. Peru State will soon be celebrating her I OOth birthday. If the Foundation is to be able to continue scholarship and National Defense Student loan support, plus assist in financing Centennial observances, your help is needed. Won t you stand up and be counted for Peru State? 1

IF THE ABOVE MESSAGE SOUNDS FAMILIAR, YOU DID READ THE APRIL MESSAGE FROM THE FOUNDA· TION. IF IT'S NEWS TO YOU, OR IF YOU READ IT AND FAILED TO RESPOND, WE HOPE THAT YOU WILL ADD YOUR SUPPORT TO THOSE WHO HAVE ALREADY MADE THEIR ANNUAL GIFT FOR 1965.

Below are contributors from November 10, 1964, through March 30,1965: 1900' s J. HAROLD WILLIAMS, '08 IN MEMORY OF BERT E. SWENSON, '09, BY NORTHERN CALIFORNIA CHAPTER OF THE: PERU ALUMNI ASSOCIATION STELLA M. HARRISS, '08 ETHEL WILLIAMSON (MRS. JAMES) KILBOURNE, '04 IVA GLASGOW (MRS. GEORGE) H HANSEN, 2 YR. '08 MYRTLE KILMER (MRS. EARL) WI NTE RM UTE, '09 EMILY ERICKSON ANDERSON,'08 DR. CLYDE B. MOORE, '09 BESSIE MANUEL, '06 MAUDE BOYD OGLESBY, '06 1910's EVA WITTY GREEN, '16 JOSEPH J. KLIMA, '15 LINNEA LUNDBERG BETTS, '15 GRAYCE TEICH (MRs. GROVER) CASTER, 2 YR'15, '16 MR. & MRs. CHARLES (MARGARET MITCHELL) PALMER, '18, '16 LYLLIS ANN WETMORE, 2 YR. '17 DR. & MRS. F. G. (IRENE CLAY· BAUGH) MESERVE, 2 YR.'15, FS '15 HANNA JENSEN, '15 BEULAH BLASS MORSE, '13 DR. & MRS. VERN (CELIA GROUP) CHATE LA IN , ' 17, ' 1 5 ANNA HAZEN WOOD, '12 EBBA WAHLSTROM (MRS. ROBERT) EDSTROM, '12 VERA HUDSON (MRS.. HIRAM) MANVILLE, '15 PEARL BURCH (MRS. RoscoE) ANDERSON, '17 NELL KELLY (fvlRs. PAUL) ROSE AN, '16 1920' s YRSA HANSEN,

8

'22

RUTH KELLIGAR, 2 YR. '21 MR. & ~s. A.B. (RUTH G. CALDWELL) RITCHIE, JR., '27, 2 YR. '26 DULCIE MORRIS (tvRs. R.A.) BARKER, '29 MR. & tvRs. G.V. (LOIS GRIFFIN) CASLER, '26, '36 HELEN STUKENHOLTZ, '28 MARION MARSH BROWN, '27 HARRIETT NELSON (MRS. RAY) HALL, FS '27 1930' s RALPH E. SCHOLL, '38 MRS. KENNETH LI LL Y, '31 DR. CHARLES PARNELL, '38 CLARA HICKS (MRS. HAROLD) DAVISSON, '30 CLARENCE CRANDELL, '35 MRS. LAMBERT (EVELYN WENZL) COLLIN, '31 ELEANOR HEMPHILL (MRS. JOHN) BROOKS, '39 MAYBELLE T. GORDER, FS '30 DOROTHY KEYS (MRS. CLARENCE) IVERSEN, '33, FACULTY MR. & fv'IRS. C. DANA (FLORA DASHER) NIXON, '36, '34 LEONA JOHNSON EADS, '39 HELEN LARSON (MRS. JOSEPH) SEIGER, '39 MR. & MRS. GERALD (HELEN HALL) FICHTER, '39. '38 ANNA MAY SANDIN (MRS. JOHN) BREITENBACH, '37 DOROTHY HURD (fv'IRs. DONALD) CHAMBERS, FS '35 BERNICE MILLER WARNER,'34 MR. & MRS. KENNETH L. (KATHERINE BERGMAN) PACE, '35, 2 YR. '32 MR. & MRS. CHESTER (HELEN EHMEN) BOWEN, '36, '36 ZELMA SIMON(MRS. CLEVE W~) CLARK , 2 YR . '3 1

1940's WALTER H. BURNS, '40 MR. & MRS. Ross F. (GRACE MUENCHAM) RussE LL • • 41.

'42 HAZEL M. PALMER, '44 RICHARD W. PASCAL, '47 IRENE WESTERMAN (MRS. MASON) MILLER, '40 1950' s GEORGIA KLASEK, '50 MR.&MRS.DEAN (MARILYN) STOEHR) MEISINGER, '55,54 SHIRLEY STUTHEIT (MRS. ALLAN) KREJC IA, 2 YR. '53, '56 EUARDA HUNTSMAN, '50 EDNA JEAN WETENKAMP (MRS. WAYNE) SCHNEIDER, FS '54 BOBBY DEAN LIVINGSTON,'50 LOUISE MARSHALL (fv'IRs. LARRY) SEARCY, '58 ESTHER KRE I FE LS, '53 EDYTH HAMILTON (MRS. PAUL) CLAYTON, FS '56 ARNOLD L. BRADLEY, '55 MR. & MRS. PHIL RIHNER, '58, FORMER STAFF MR. & MRS. DONALD (MARY H. MOORE) GRESS, '52, 2 YR.'54 HOWARD NICHELSON, '53

1960' s l!NDA STEPHENS, '64 MRS. !VAN C. HAITH, FS FRIENDS,

'62

FACULTY, AND STAFF

MRS. G. MERVIN Ross. FR! END IN MEMORY OF HER SISTER, MRS. ALBIN ANDERSON, BY MISS FRIEDA ROWOLDT, FACULTY AND FRIENDS. JUANITA BRADLEY, FACULTY AIR PRODUCTS CHEMICALS, INC.


1900' s Bessie Manuel, '06, was honored by the Palo Alto (Calif,.) branch of American Association of University Women by having ~ $500 gift to the Fellowships Program named in h~r honor. The gift was a part of the Aurelia Henry Reinhardt Internati?nal Endowment. !fle pre sen tat ion was made in May~ 1964. Miss Manuel for many years was with rood Research Institute, Stanford University. A copy of a pictorial article which appeared in a January, 1942, issue of the Sunday World-Herald Magazine has been received by the College. The article which shows a number of pictures from the past as well as an informal group of coeds with housemother Inice Dunning, commemorated the 75th anniversary of Peru State. The article was sent by Millicent M. Slaby, '01, a retired librarian. She notes: "Peru will always have a very special place in my heart and memory." Ada O'Connor Niquette, '09, 721 East Seventh, Long Beach, Calif., sent greetings with her regrets in being unable to attend the April 3 meeting of Southern California Peruvians. She noted: "I will always remember the pleasant years when I attended Peru State Normal School."

Doctoral Report (continued from page 6) and forestry, Texas A&M University, College Station. M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska. Mark W. Delzell,'25, dean, school of education, University of South Dakota, Vermillion. M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., University of Nebraska. David F. Costello, '25, chief, division of range management, w~l~life habitat and recreation research, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Portland, Oregon. M.S., Ph.D., University ?f Chicago. Millard D. Bell, '26, superintendent of Wilmette Public Schools, Wilmette, Illinois. M.A., University of Nebraska; Ed.D., Columbia University. Roy Dahls tram, '26, di~ector of research, National Lead Co., Westfield, New Jersey. Ph.D., University of Chicago. Jere C. Mickel, • 26, professor of speech, chairman of department, Millikin Uni versii:;y, Decatur, Illinois. M.A , University of Nebraska; Ph.D., University of Denver. Richard Madden, '26, professor of education, San Diego State College. M.A., Ph.D .• Columbia University. Inez R. Wells, '27, professor of education Ohio State University, Columnus. M.A., Stat~ University of Iowa; Ph.D., Ohio State University. Richard T. Hartley, '27, professor of biology Wisconsin State University, LaCrosse. M.A.~ Ph.D., State University of Iowa. Erland Nelson, '27, professor of psycholo~~'Y· University o_f So'l!-th Carolina, Columbia. M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska. Rebert ff. Knapp, '27, director of stu-

Iva Glasgow {Mrs. George) Hansen, '08, writes that wliile visiting her brother. Joe, fs '16, in Humboldt last sununer she drove to Peru and noted many changes since the 1908 50-year reunion. Mrs. Hansen lives at 7550 North Sixteenth street, Phoenix. Ethel Williamson Kilbourn, '04, now lives at 814 Utah, Gooding, Ida. She taught in Nebraska for several years. Clyde B. Moore, '09,· professor emeritus of education, Cornell University, was elected chairman emeritus of New York State Educational Conference Board. Author of a recent book, J. Sterling Morton: Arbor Day Boy, published by Bobbs-Merrill, Dr. Moore also was senior author of Scribners Social Studies Series of eight volumes, plus film strips and other aids. In October, 1964, Dr. Moore completed his sixteenth Atlantic crossing. His most recent visit to Ireland and London has increased the number of schools visited to more than 25 countries. He has lectured at 25 colleges and published more than 125 titles. Dr. Moore's home is at 230 Waite avenue, Ithaca, N. Y.

1910's Elnora Toft {Mrs. L.A.) Pirtle, '19, (continued on next page)

dent guidance and counseling; professor of education, University of South Dakota, Vermillion. M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska. , Walter W. Hansen, '27, vice-dean, college of arts and science, professor and he.ad of botany and plant pathology department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater. M.A., University of Michigan;Ph.D.~ni­ yersity of Nebraska. Frank P. Bogle, '27, superintendent of schools, Millville Public Schools, Millville, New Jersey. M.A., Ed.D., Colorado State College. Floyd A. Miller, '28, commissioner of education, State Department of Education, Lincoln. M.A., Ph.D., UniversityofNebraska. Frank L. Sievers,• 28, director. guidance and counseling programs branch, U. S. Office of Education, Washington, D.C. M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska Joseph H. Robertson, '28, chairman, division of plant science, University of Nevada, Reno. M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska. Warren W. Nedrow, '28, head, department of science, Arkansas State College, State College. M.A., Denver University; Ph.D., University of Nebraska. E l z ad a U. C Zover , ' 3 0 , profess or of botany and curator in the Botanical Gardens, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. M.A., Ph.D .• University of Michigan. Elmer W. Hertel, '31, chairman, division of biological sciences, Wartbur~ College, Waverly, Iowa . M.A., Denver University; Ph.D., University of Nebraska,

(continued on next

pag~)

9


(continued from preceding page)

is now living in Seward, ~las~a, where her address is Box 1091. Married in 1961, Mrs. Pirtle served in intellige~ce of t~e U.S. Army during World War II in Washington, Tokyo and Frankfurt. Before moving to her prese~t location, she tau~ht at Fallon, ~ev. Dr. G. 0. Kelley, '17, ~ho was ret~r~d last summer from chairmanship of the division of language and literature at Northern State College, Aberdeen, S.D., after 27 years of service is now head of the department of English ; t Dakota Wesleyan University, Mitchell, S.D. Beulah Blass Morse, '13, writes that she enjoyed Silas Barton's poem on the cover of the fall Peru Stater. She has had it frarn~d and proudly displays it in her home at 505 South Chestnut, North Platte. Nellie Kelly Rosean, '16, writes from her home in Columbus, Mont., of a pleasant . h driveHaround the campus" two years ago wit her friend, Lou Hibler Bowersox, '16, Fremont. She notes "my sisters and I are grateful for the education we received at Peru." Mrs. Rosean retired in 1963 and her sister, Catharine Kelly Galt, '17, Stanford, Mont., retired last year. Robert O. Vernon, '14, manager of the Foreign Trade Association of Southern Cal~­ fornia for 12 years, was honor~d at a testimonial luncheon in the Hotel Biltmore May 6.

A native of Trenton, Mr. Vernon became associated with Dollar Steamship Line. He has been a member of the Foreign Trade Asso~iation for 40 years and is a past president. In speaking of Mr. Vernon's contributions, Mr. Edward N. Glad, ITA president, said: "The growth of our Associat.ion and its achievements are directly related to his efforts." Lulu Pritchard, '16, is retired from teaching in the Omaha schools, and devotes her time to YMCA, PEO, AAUW, Delta Kappa Gamma and church activities. When not engaged in her hobby of traveling, she is at home at 122 South Thirty-Ninth street,Omaha. Basil Sims, '13, 2420 Begole, Flint, Mich., writes that he hopes to be present for some of Peru State's centennial observances in '66 and '67. He noted his diploma of 1913 bears the number 1867. Hattie Lilly (Mrs. R.H.) Slagle, '13, a teacher in Nebraska schools for 20 years, does special education work in Falls City.

1920' s

Yrsa Hansen, fs '22, lives at 1417 Fifth street, Aurora, and is retired from teaching, but keeps in contact with education by doing substitute teaching. Helen Staffsmith Terkelsen, '29, taught six years before her marriage and ten since. Now retired, Mrs. Terkelse~ and her husband live at 7412 Pratt street, Omaha. Irene Veal (Mrs. Otto) Kucera,

'26,

teaches math at Kimball. Son Ronald, fs '51, left December 26 to assume duties at the U.

Doctoral Report (continued from preceding page) Leo M. Hauptaan, '32, registrar, Ball

State Teachers Colle~e, Muncie, Indiana. M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska. John A. Bath, '33, professor of psychology, Iowa State University, Ames. M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska. Paul A. Landolt, '33, assistant professor of physiology, Uni"!"ersi!-Y of Nebraska, Lincoln. M .S., Ph.D., University of Nebraska. Moras L. Shubert, '34, acting chairman, department of botany, University of Denver. Ph.D., Iowa State University. Robert S. Pate, '34, head, department of mathematics, Eastern Michigan University, Ypsilanti. M.A., University of Nebraska. Ph.D., University of Illinois. Lloy# E. fl.{cCann, '35, professor of education, University of Arizona. M.A., Ed.D., Colorado State College, Greeley. Wayne 0. Reed, '35, DepuLy Commissioner of Education, Washington, D.C. M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebra~ka. . . Dwight Wald~, 35, p~ofe~sor of political science hlld director, institute of governmental studies, University of California, Berkeley. M.A., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Yale. James E. Perdue, '37, dean, college of arts and sciences, University of Denver. Will assume presidency of State University College Oswego, N.Y., July 1. M.A., Colorado St~te College; Ph.D., Stanford University. Russell W. McCreight, '37, associate professor of element.ary education~. Uni v~rsity 1 of Nebraska, Lincoln. 1â&#x20AC;˘LEd., University of

10

Nebraska. Ph.D., State University of Iowa, Iowa City. Leo H. Petri, '37, professor of biology, Wartburg College, Waverly, Iowa. M.A., University of Nebraska. Ph.D., Kansas State University, Manhattan. Arthur Reynolds, '37, professor of American history, chairman, division of social sciences, Colorado State College, Greeley. M.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota. Wayne L. Riggs, '37, superintendent of schools, president of Scottsbluff College, Scottsbluff, Nebraska. M.A., Colorado State College. Ed.D., University of Nebraska. Kenneth D. Young, '37, dean of the college, Oklahoma College for Women, Chickasha. M.A., Ph.D., University of Denver. William K. Plucknett, '37, professor of chemistry, University of Kentu_cky, _Lexington. M.A., Ph.D.~ Iowa State University. FrederickJ. Wolter, '38, market research chairman, E.I. DuPont De Nemours and Co., Wilmington, Del aware. M.A., Ph.D., Iowa State University. Charles E. Parnell, '38, assistant professor of modern languages, University of Notre Dame, Indiana. M.A., University of Nebraska; Ph.D., Yale. Erwin Juilfs, '38, director, secondary education, Eugene Public Schools. Eugene, Oregon. M.A., Colorado State College of Education; Ed.D., University of Oregon. Lloyd K. Johnson, 40, specialist for science, U.S. Office of Education, Washington, D.C. M.A., Ph.D. University of Nebraska. James F. Crawford, '41, chairman and


S. Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina, as assistant naval attache. Helen Stukenholtz, '28, won third prize for her painting, "Day in. J_une", at the eighth annual Beaux Arts exhibit of the Arts and Designs Society of Fort Walton Beach, Fla. An art major at Peru, Miss Stukenholtz taught in the . commercial field until her retirement in 1962. She lives at 56 Fairhoge avenue, Fairhope, Ala., which she calls a beautiful city on Mobile bay." Glenn H. Frary, '27, will retire after 41 years of service to education at the end of this school year. Principal at Douglas High school, Ellsworth Air Force Base, S.D., since 1959, previously he was in the ~ot~ Springs schools for 30 years, and earlier taught at Sutton, Peru and Nebraska City. Mrs. Frary, the former Verda Hauptmann, '27, and Mr. Frary plan to continue to make their home at 215 Cleveland, Rapid City. Ernest Longfellow, '21, authored a story in Nebraskaland magazine concerning "The Half Breed Tract," an Indian reservation established in 1830 which is now parts of Nemaha, Otoe, Johnson and Richardson counties between the Big and Little Nemahas. A longtime college employee, Ernie is a oneman chamber of commerce for Peru and a regular columnist for the Auburn Newspapers. Dora O'Dell Reagan, fs '27, is in her 15th year of teaching in Bellevue, where she is now second grade instructor at E~tz Elementary school.

Dr. Neal s. Gornon, Peru State's prexy, talks with Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Nelson of Ralston during the Omaha area chapter meeting of the Peru Alumni Association. "Specâ&#x20AC;˘ is superintendent of schools at Ralston. Mrs. Nelson, is the former Marjorie Trenholm, 2 yr. '39. Mr. Nelson is a '39 graduate.

1930' s Fred Rohrs '36 is Ontario-Pomona Valley Editor of the Go,lden Wes't Golf News. The December 4 issue carries a story by Mr. Rohrs which concerns the Golf-0-Mat golf machine. Mr. Rohrs lives at 134 Annapolis drive, Claremont, Calif.

~~~~~~~~~~--~~Doctoral Report 11rofessor of economics at Georgia State University,Atlanta. M.A., University of Colorado; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. RossF. Russell, '41, process supervisor, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., Chattanooga, Tennessee. Ph.D., Iowa State University, Ames. Cecil E. Walker,' 41, chairman, professional education division, Midland College, Fremont. M.A., Ed.D., University of Nebraska. Ruth Crone, '42, assistant professor of English and Journalism, Wisconsin State College, Superior. M.A., George Washington University; Ph.D., New York University. C. Thomas Dean, '42, chairman, division of applied arts and sciences, California State College, Long Beach. M.S., Ph.D., Iowa State University. Cl if ford Parding, '44, professor, State College, West Chester, Pennsylvania.M.A., State University of Iowa; Ph.D., New York University. Joseph J. Littrell, '47, professor of industrial education, Arizona State University, Tempe. M.A., University of Minnesota. Ed.D., University of Missouri. Hubert L. Hunzeker, '48, associate ~rofessor and head, department of ma the ma tics, University of Omaha. M.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., University of Michi~an. Nurvel E. Annan, '48, professor of biWagner College, Staten Is land, N. Y. * Ph.D., University of Nebraska. lliam E. Saul, '48, associate prochairman of botany department, Idaho ,~~ llJftiversity, Pocatello. M.S., Ph.D., of Utah. F. Yanders, '48, assistant dean, natural science, Mtchigan State

University, Ann Arbor. M.S., Ph.D., Universit~ of Nebraska. Lois E. Christensen, '48, associate pr?fessor ?f hi~tory, Chico State College, Chico, California. M.A., Ph.D., Universj tyof Nebraska. DonaldD. Smith, '48, associate professor of educational psychology, Northwest Missouri State College, Maryville. Ed.M., Whittier College; Ed. M., University of Southern California; Ed.D., University of Southern California. Bryce E. Adkins, '49, associate professor of education, Utah State University, Logan. M.A., Ph.D., State University of Iowa. JohnM. f.lcQuinn, '50, principal, William Jennings Bryan School, Omaha. M.S., University of Omaha; Ed.D., University of Nebraska. David L. Williamson, '51, assistant professor of research, Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. M.A., Ph.D., University of Nebraska. Bill I:l. Schulte, '53, curriculum coordinator in a curriculum demonstration project, Southern Illinois University, Quincy. Ed.M., Ed.D., University of Nebraska. Donald D. Wendt, 55, associate professor of industrial arts, Western Kentucky State College, Bowling Green. M.A., Peru State College; Ph.D., University of Missouri. Roger M. Haigh,'51, assistant professor of history, University of Utah, Salt Lake City. M.A., Ph.D., University of Florida. Dwight Safar, '57, director of guidance and testing, Wyoming State Department of Education, Cheyenne. M.Ed., Ph.D., University of Wyoming. 1 1


(conttnued from preceding page)

·""""

.. -

/'

Dr. Jaaes E. Perdue, '37, a member of the faculty of Denver University and currently dean of the college of arts and sciences, will become president of State University College, Oswego, N. Y., July 1. Dr. Perdue holds master's from Colorado State and Ph.D. from Stanford University. The Oswe~o school has a projected enrollment of 5,00u by 1970 and is engaged in a $35.5 million building program. Berniece Miller Warner, '34, lives at 3018 Monroe avenue, El Paso, Texas, where she is in her sixth year as a caseworker for family service and Travelers Aid. She is interested in forming a Southwestern area chapter of Peru Alunmi, and would like to hear from Peruvians in the area. Reba Yeakle, '38, 516 North Hastings, Hastings, has retired from teaching. Mrs. Marjorie Mendenhall Humphrey, '34, art teacher at U.S. Grant High school, Oklahoma City, exhibited 37 pieces of jewelry in December at the Museum of Art at the University of Oklahoma, Norman. Sam Lewis, '31, Daykin dairy farmer, has been re-elected president of Norris Public Power District which includes Jefferson, Thayer, Saline, Lancaster and Gage counties. He also is state manager of the American Dairy Association of Nebraska. Zelma Simon (Mrs. Cleve W.) Clark, 2-yr. '31, Ster ling road, Armonk, N. Y., is secretary to a United States District Judge, a position she has held for 21 years. A civil service employee since 1933, Mrs. Clark is looking forward to retirement in a year or two. Mr. Clark is general office manager for Lever Brothers, New York. Mrs. Clark is a volunteer braillist for the blind. Mr. and Mrs. Harold (Louise Scott) Luttman, • 35, '50, live at Springfield, where Harold is superintendent and Louise is a social science teacher. This is their ninth year in the Platteview schools. • Ray Trenholm, '30, is associate professor of music education at the University vf Omaha. His home address is 6542 North Thirtysecond street, Omaha. Joyce Grubb, '34, 730 Lindbergh drive, Council Bluffs, is guidance director at Thomas Jefferson High school. Anna May Sandin Breitenbach, '37, holds an M.A. degree from Columbia University and is a first grade teacher at Bethpage, N. Y., Her school has four rooms each for grades one through six. She also supervises student teachers from State University College, Oswego, N. Y. Mrs. Breitenbach, her husband and son, John, 11, enjoy suburbia living near the World's Fair.

1940's Charles Gabus, '40, Holdrege, is spearheading a 25-year class reunion for the 1940 Peruvians. Planned for the week end of homecoming, which will be October 23. Mr. Gabus has asked Frances Wrightiman Rarick,, Auburn, to assist with arrangements for a homecoming eve get-to-gether in an area steak house, with other events scheduled for homecoming

12

day. The class needs help in locating these members --Gladys Marie Grahan, Roy Kellogg, Patricia Lundy, Elsie Viola Parret. If you can help locate these folks, write to the Alumni Office, Peru State College. Reuben H. Fanciers, '43. is drama te.acher at Thomas Jefferson High, Council Bluffs,, and supervises drama at four junior high schools. The Fanders live at 2212 Avenue IL Ruth Patterson, '40, received her doctorate from Washington State University,

Born To Lee Norris, '55, and Peggy Eickhoff Norris, '56, 2017 Cron, Augusta, Kans. a daughter, Sheri Lin, February 2. ' To Dean Meisinger, '55, and Marilynn Stoehr Meisinger, 2 yr. '54, Plattsmouth a son, Kurt William, October 27. ' To Charles Aufenkamp and Petty Hill Aufenkamp, 2 yr. '56, 4316 Grover, Omaha, a son, Paul Scott, February 3. To Kenneth Hartman, fs '65, and Mrs. Hartman, 800 Manes court, Lincoln a daughter Julie Lynn, March 11. ' ' To Tom Aitken, '64, and Mrs. Aitken, Mead, a daughter, September 22. To Ronald Bath, fs '54, and Mrs. Bath Auburn, a son, Stephen Robe~t, December 14. To Don Bedea, fs '60, and Carolyn Armstrong Bedea, fs '61, Kansas City, Mo., a son, Steven Scott, January 1. To Kenneth Dostal, '63, and Leona Christen Dostal, '61, Omaha, a son Stephen Christen, September 19. ' To Kenneth Majors '59, and Mrs. Majors, Elmwood, a son, Wade Philip, November 30. To John Curtwright and Bette Coulter Curtwright, fs '61, Auburn, a daughter, Jody Lynn, January ~ . To Gene Leber, '56, and Mary Sherrod Leber, '56, 3807 West Golden lane Phoenix a son, Tom Francis, November 20. ' ~ To Russel Floerke and Carol Kuenning Floerke, fs '64, Lincoln, a son, Lance E., December 12. To James Janetzke and Estellene June Slater Janetzke, '55, Des Plaines, Ill., a son, Mark Joseph, December 22. To Ronald Ahl, • 56, andAnita Vanderford Ahl, 2 yr. '55, Springfield, a son, Jeffery Lynn, J~nuary 20. To Marion Piper and Margaret Christy Piper, fs '54, Brock, a daughter, Christy, March 22. To Marlin Danielson, '60, and Nadine Knople Danielson, '59, Plattsmouth, a son, March 11. To Stephen Bates, '61, andPhyllis Grube Bates, fs '63, Bassett, a daughter, Catherine Ann, December 12. To Jerry Martin, '62, and Mrs. Martin, Cook, a son, March 14. To Don Ramold and Patricia Simpson Ramold, fs '62, Nebraska City, a daughter, March 5. To Pat Martin, '62, and Mrs. Martin, Bellevue, a son, March 22. To Ronald Oestmann, '63, and Mrs. Oestmann, Neligh, a daughter, Brenda Sue, March 21. To Dennis Horns and Cry s t a l Se e g Ze Horns, fs '62, Syracuse, a daughter, Denise Dee, November 16, 1964. 1


Pullman, and is now teaching at Frostburg (Md.) State College. Her address is 7 Park street. Frostburg. Esther Wick, '49, is girls counselor at Technical Junior high, Omaha, where her home address is 3717 Marcy. · Duane Jones, fs '49, resides at 206 Fillmore avenue, Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, where he is an assistant editor for Good Year Air Craft Co., Akron. Ernest E. Horacek, '48, 8304 Hills~de drive, Omaha, is in his fifth year as principal at Westbrook Junior high, in the Omaha Westside District 66 system. Ruth Neil McQuin, 2 yr. '40, has writ• ten the Peru Stater for information about her roommate of the summer of '39, Janice Shuler. Janice is missing from the alumni files, so anyone who can help Ruth locate her are requested to write to her at 46299 Arabia, Apt. 2A, Indio, Calif. Ruth recalls living at the home of the late President and Mrs. Pate. Murton W. Campbell, '48, teaches woodworking at Waite High school, Toledo, Ohio, and lives at 1601 Wilderness drive, Maumee, Ohio. Murton was remarried in 1960 after the death of his wife, the former Dorothy Roberts, 2 yr. '39. The Campbells are expecting their ninth child. Evelyn Slagle (Mrs. Ross) Garrett '44 keeps busy with her family of five--Karen' 16, Jeffrey, 13, Julia, 10, Mark. 9 Matt --and directing two children's choi~s at the Congregational Church. Mr. Garrett is postmaster at Glenwood, Iowa.

4

1915'ers who met to help plan for the Goldenann iversary reunion oft heir cl ass on May 30: J.H. Adee, Prudence Stiles Dallam, both of Peruj M.C. Bloss, Lincoln, and L.B.Mathews Peru.

Ernest E. R~binson, '49, teaches sheet metal and drafting and is cross country coach at Thomas Jef~erson High, Council Bluffs,_Iowa. J?ie Robinsons and their children, Diane::, a high. school junior, and Ernie, Jr., and Richard, Junior high students live at 2428 Seventh avenue. ' (continued on next page)

J\I~1rrie<l Linda Kienker, fs' 64, to Gerold Koehler, September 5, Zion Lutheran Church, Johnson. At home: 923 East avenue, York. Ruth Ann Rogge to Jerry Jacobson,fs '64, September 3, St. Matthew's Lutheran Church, Johnson. At home: 3559 South 51, Lincoln. Nora Lee Bohlingtoflenry Hinrichs, '60, December 30, First Presbyterian Church, Edgar. At home: 1400 North 44th street, Lincoln. Barbara Bohlingto.Maurice Oestmann, fs '60, November 8, St. Paul's Hickory Grove Lutheran Church, Auburn. At home: Johnson. Dorothy Engler to Marvin Wuster, '58, December 26, Grace Methodist Church, Davenport, Ia. At home: 1443 West 10th street Davenport. ' Charlotte Graham to L'&Verne Orton fs '64, December 19, Methodist Church, Sid~ey Ia. At home: Milford. ' Linda Berry, '63, to Richard L. Baker '65, November 26, Ames Avenue Meth~disf Church, Omaha. At home: 11600 W. Dodge, Box D-22, Omaha. Judy Bower.~oLyndon Wederquist, fs '64, November 27, hillsdale Methodist Church Randolph, Ia. At home: 6331 Bedford avenue' Omaha. ' Joan K. Cleal to Jack M. Pead '61 December 20, First United Presbyterian Church' Rolfe, Ia. At home: Bellevue. ' Marilyn C. Wriaht, fs '60, to Larry A. Berg, December 20, First Methodist Church, Table Rock. At home: 116 North 49th street Omaha. ' B:osemary Grundmann, '62, to Rev. William E. Whittaker, October 16, Methodist Church Springfield. At home: Springfield. ' Myrna Hous-h to Roland W. Sohnholz '63 September 25, First Methodist Church, kaven~ worth, Kans. At home: 621 Kickapoo street, Leavenworth. , Virginia Adkin~, '64, to Michael Janis, 65, February 28, ~irst Evangelical Lutheran Church, Nebraska City. At home: Arlington. Sheryl Wurtele to Larry L. Morrissey '65, February 13, St. Mary's Catholic Church' Nebraska City. At home: Omaha. ' Judit_h Wolf, '63, ~o Lt. John Lockwood, March 6, Fir.st Presbyterian Church, Beatrice. At home: Enid, Oklahoma. Ca;o l Thornton, fs '65, to Daniel Coffey, 65, March 6, St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran _Church, Falls City. At home: Chester. Judith Hubk~ to Dennis Crawford, '64, December 20, United Presbyterian Church Pawnee City. At home: Byron. ' . . Judy Strang~, fs '65, to Terry Kuenning, JUnior, St. Paul s Lutheran Church Auburn At home: Auburn. ' · 'feresa Hermanson to Riley Ruby, '58, St. Vincent DePaul Catholic Church, Denver, C?lo ., October 3, 1964. At home: 2780 Eliiot Circle, Apt. 1, Westminster, Colo. 13


(continued.from preceding page)

A member of the Omaha Pub lie schools faculty for the past 13 years Tom. I!a l ls trom, '49, is currently supervisor of health. Mrs . Hallstrom is tile forirer Dorothy Maynard, 2yr. '49. The Hallstroms live at 1522 Pinewood circle, Omaha. John A. Hippe, Jr., '49, is in special education at Platteview of Springfield. M.rs. Hippe is the former Sara Jan~ Lyons, fs '49. Wilber Ege, '48, 3323 Sixteenth avenue, Council Bluffs, is in his ninth year as vocational auto instructor at Thomas Jefferson High, Council Bluffs. Recalled for the Korean conflict in 1952, Wilber served as a carrier pilot. After separation from service, the Ege family lived for a time in Anchorage, Alaska. Mr. and Mrs. Ege are parents of four 1

....

News About Yourself Blank How long has it been since we have heard from you? Die Alumni office likes to receive letters from alumni and former students telling of promotions, family, graduate work, orabout other alums. We would like for you to send information to the Peru Stater. Present position or occupation------Married-------When----------Position of husband or w i f e - - - - - - - - Additicnal study since graduation _ _ _ __ Children~-----------------~

News of yourself or other grads _______

Name~---------------------(Marr ied women should give aaiden naae also) Degree Last Year at Peru _ _ _ or Diploma ____

14

children--three of whom are in high school. A new record, "Songs of Living Faith," by Bob Ashton, '42, Englewood, Colo., has been recorded on the Stylist label,. featuring the Ralph Carmichael Singers and orchestra eight of the 10 numbers are Ashton's ori~inals, with the other two his arrangements of other religious numbers. A Denver

.....

Johnson Reports Placements Harold Johnson, director of placement, reports the following placements for fall, their home town or former teaching location, and new position: Secondary alumni candidate.s--Janet Lillethorup Krakow, Kenosha, Wis., to Madison, Wis.; Richard Blake, Springfield Platteview, to Auburn; Jerry Martin, Cook, to Louisville; Paul Bodtke> Douglas, to Palmer; Gary Richey, Nemaha, to Malvern, Iowa. Arlin Stuhr, Minden, to Wilcox; Wiley Sandusky, Palmyra, to Table Rock; Tom Higgins, North Bend, to Spirit Lake, Iowa; Don Stange, Polk; to Stanton; Mildred Haynes, Rising City, to New Market. Iowa; Lester Miller, Clatonia, to Odell; Tim Hollinger, Coyina, Calif., to Sa~born Iowa; Keith Richey, graduate school, Omaha University, to Papillion; James Simones, Exeter, to Shelton; Richard Kiger, Prescott, Iowa, to Carson, Iowa; Thomas D. Aitken, Jr., Mead, to falls City; Darlene Wright, Brock, to Cook. Elementary alumni candidates--Bonnie Linderman, Salem, to Adams; Carol Vogele, Red Oak, Iowa, to Ralston; Margaret Pilch, Pilot Rock, Ore., to Pilot Rock, Ore. 1965 secondary candidates--Robert Jennings, Reserve, Kans., toRuskin; Ruth Rulla, Sterling, to ~ook; Harvey Fraser, Humboldt, to Genoa; Georg~ Weiss, Virginia, to Filley; Douglas Hunzeker, Sew.ard, to Filley; Larry Johnson, Tecumseh, to Exeter; Alfred Eickhoff, Falls City, to Bern, Kans.; Harvey Fisher, Tecumseh, to Pr~gue; Roger Crook, Salem, to Diller; Donald Mach, Pawnee City, to Plymouth; Tom Majors, Peru, to Atkinson. Jim Kant~r. East Alton, Ill., to Farragut, Iowa; Judy Beran, Odell, to Genoa; Charles Niemeyer, Deshler, to Prague; Tom Castle, Falls City, to Weeping Water; Merron Kay Camden, Council Bluffs, Iowa, to Colorado Springs, Colo.; Janice Wilkinson, Humboldt, to Hiawatha, Kans.; Larry Hart, Burchard, to Edgar; John Barton, Essex, Iowa; to Nebraska City; George Zwickel, Shenandoah, Iowa, to Syracuse . 1965 elementary graduates--Sharon Fike, Peru, to Malvern, Iowa; Marvin Corbin, Fairbury, to Chino, Calif.; Suzan McKee, Emerson, Iowa, to Malvern, Iowa; Madelyn Bleach Fraser, Omaha, to Genoa; Mary Ann Biere, Auburn, to Auburn; Thelma McNergney,Elk Creek, to Gretna; Gary Manning, Cook, to Ralston; Elaine Muller, Falls City, to Millard; Norma Wood, Beatrice, to Beatrice; Carolyn Mercer, Malvern, Iowa, to Millard; Penny Edwards, Elk Creek, to Table Rock. Non-teaching placements-.Joe Ward, Weeping Water, to Allied Chemical Co., Omaha; Robert Sporhase, Nebraska City, to Abel Investment Co., Nebraska City.

~¡¡


Post review describes the work as "appealing music inspired by various Biblical texts with his lyrics it is exalting without being funereal." Bob teaches music at Thomas Jefferson High School. He has taught music for 14 years in Nebraska, Iowa and Colorado. An arranger for radio, television and recording artists, Bob directed the Youth for Christ Music Society in Denver. The record is being distributed by Ashton Publishing Co., P.O. Box 6032, Cherry Creek Station, Denver. The album is $3.95 in mono and $4.98 in stereo. Bob's brother, Jack, '35, insurance executive, is president of Ashton Publishing

Co.

1950' s

Mr. and Mrs. Don (Mary Moore) Gress,

'52, 2 yr. '54, 2 East Van Buren road, Newport, R.I., are the parents of one son, Bruce, 5. Don is a lieutenant commander attached to the staff of the Naval War College and is enrolled in George Washington University working towards an M.A. in international affairs. Leland Sherwood, '57, assistant director of special services, was a member of the Helpmobile sponsored by the Nebraska State Education Association at Beatrice and North Platte in February. His subject was art in the elementary schools. Richard L. Steiner, '54, is co-ordinator

of biology student teaching at Purdue University while working on his Ph.D. in biology education. Rich's address is 2219 Sycamore lane, West Lafayette, Ind. Robert L. Faunce, '52, is principal of the hi~h school at Sanders, Ariz., his location since graduation from Peru. The F~unces have four sons. Lucille White Grubb, '56, is director of the culinary arts department, Technical High, Omaha. Her home address is 8910 Bellevue boulevard. Arnold L. Bradley, '55, is principal of the high school at Wapello, Iowa. The Bradleys have two sons, Michael, 5, Jeffery, 8 months, and daughter, Linda, 3.

Mr. and Mrs. William H. (Laverna Roos) Sayer, '55, '63, live in Springfield where Bill is industrial arts instructor and Laverna teaches home economics. Mrs. Jayne Monroe, '58, writes to give credit to Victor H. Jindra, professor emeritus of music, for the knowledge she received from Music Appreciation to be able to answer a question to win 9,950 trading stamps from an Omaha radio station. The Falls Citian was able to answer "Aida" to the question: "What was the opera written in 1869 to be used in the celebration of the opening of the Suez Canal?"

(continued on next page)

I Died Syencer M. Leger, '14, '24, Omaha, April 25. A Lincoln resident, Mr. Leger had retired as superintendent of schools at Walton. He taught 50 years in the Nebraska ~hlic schools. His death occurred on his 73rd birthday. Mr. Leger was present for the 50-year reunion of his class last May. . Louise W. ~ears, '95, Nebraska City," April 17. A patient at St. Mary's hospital for many months, Miss Mears had made her home in Nebraska City. She taught at Peru from 1?06 to_l912 when she joined the faculty of Wisconsin State Teachers College, Milwaukee, a position she held until retirement in 1940. Author of a number of books, including Hills of Peru, a collection of Peru lore. Copies of Miss Mears' book have been presented to the Peru Achievement Foundation for sale with the revenue to be used for scholarship~ in geography • Clarence Hysl'!P• '15, East St. Louis, Ill •• November 17. leacher for 15 years, Mr. Hyslop later was an analytical and research chemist for an a 1um in um company . Last June he wrote to express the hope he would be able to attend the SO-year reunion of his class in May, 1965. Mollie Hannaford (Mrs. Hobart) Freeman

*14. Nebraska City, April 8.

'

B. Clifford Hendricks, '06, March 25 l..migview, Wash., in an automobile accident: Professor emeritus of chemistry, University of Nebraska, he held a M.S. from the lhiversity of Chicago, and Ph.D. from Nehraska. In answer to a questionnaire concera~I his advance~ s_tudy '· Dr. Hendricks at.l&-'• Why I am prejudiced in favor of Peru as 11J ~.a.t _beloved alma mater: A twenty year ~l-.t.1aaah1p: 10 years (1898-08) as a" time ~ gj..r student. 10 years (1908-18) with J~t;,;I' autas. Two leaves of absence £or

l

graduate study: 1910-11 at Nebraska and 1914 at Chicago. And a lasting tendency to treat me as one of her favored sons." Charles W. Buckley, '02, Eugene, Ore., August 5.

Hazel Miller (Mrs. Clarence) Carter, '14, January 7, York. With her husband, also a 1914 class member, she attended the SO-year class reunion in May, 1964. Mrs. Sadie Wilk ins on, '50, Crowell Home, Blair, January 30. H. Dale Bugbee, '22, '25, McAllen, Texas, February 20. Nemaha county superintendent of schools from 1952 to 1960, he had taught in the public schools, in the Philippines, and in Japanese Relocation schools during World II.

Fairy Garrison (Mrs. Isaac) Robirds, Jr., '17, Omaha, November 17. Evelyn E. Duncan (Mrs. Eldon) Davis, '50, Red Oak, Iowa.

Grace Allison Clineburg, fs '97, for many years city clerk of Peru, February 1, Auburn. Ruth G. Brandt, '07, '30, January 17, Syr~cuse. She taught a total of 45~ years, during which time she was a junior high supervisor at the T. J. Majors Campus School at Peru State from 1922 until 1944. F. T. Campbell, fs '13, January 7, Toledo, Ohio. He was present for the 1963 reunion of the 1913 class. Dr. Marcellus C. Shurtleff, fs '33, August, 1964, Denver, Colo. Robert E. Sayer, maintenance employee, Peru State, February 8. Hulda Woods, about 1909, a retired Denver teacher, October 23, 1964. ~essie Jewell Creamer, fs '18, January 23, Lincoln. Mrs. Creamer taught in Cass County Rural and EllllW'ood Public Schools.

15


u::rr

PERU STATE COLLEGE Campus of a Thousand Oaks Peru, Nebraska

~~4:

~.~

68421

icmm·~

LeRoy F. Wilson, '51, is associated with Russell Sporting Goods, Omaha. His home address is 12208 Pederson drive, Omaha. Barbara Bragg (Mrs. Ansel E.) Clayburn, '51, authored a story in January·Nebraskaland magazine entitled, .. Nathan's Chancer"

which told of an incident in .her father s boyhood at Culbertson. Barbara's father and mother, former Peru residents, live at Trenton, where Mrs. Bragg, the former Mary Wright, 2 yr. '22, AB '48, is Hitchcock county sup~rintendent. Mrs. Clayburn, her husband, Ansel E •• '52, and sons live at 1908 Porter way, Stockton, Calif., near Ansel's parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Clayburn, 1309 North San Juan. The senior Mr. Clayburn was professor of geography at Peru State from 1922 t-0 1962. The North Ward school at Superior has been presented a clock for the activity room as a memorial to Marguerite DeKalb (Mrs. Joe) Standley, '57, by her fromer students. Mrs. Standley was in her eleventh year of teaching at Superior at the time of her death in March, 1964.

Mr. and Mrs. J. Wendell (Patricia Lincoln) Holmes, '54, 2 yr. '54, Pacific Junc-

.. ·

tion, Iowa, are the p,arents of a daughter, 9, and a son, 4. "Red 'operates a ready mix concrete plant and Pat teaches second grade ·in the Glenwood schools. Bess B. Suide Jacquot, '58, retired from teaching in the Jefferson county (Colo.) schools last spring. Her address is 855 Gr-ay, Denver.

Mr. and Mrs. Charles (Elaine Spier) Krumme, '57, '58, live at 11815 Francis, Omaha. Chuck teaches at Horace Mann Junior High and Elaine is counselor and advanced Spanish instructor at Beveridge High. Both have earned master's degrees·from Omaha U.

Louise Marshall (Mrs. Larry) Searcey, '58, writes that she has moved from Wymore to 423 South Twelfth, Beatrice. Curt,is Olson, '50, principal at St. Paul for the fast 11 years, is now a junior high principa in the Omaha Westside District 66 schools. The Olsons live at 8325 Parker court, Omaha.

Mr. and Mrs. Dean (Marilynn Stoehr) Meisinger, '55, 2 yr. '54, are living at 629 Oakmont drive, Plattsmouth. Dean, teacher of mat.h and fre,shman guidance counselor at

16

Plattsmouth High., received his M.S from <lnaha University last June. Dorothy L. Erhat-t llar'lf!ey, •53• 520 West Addie, Apt. 4, Lead, S. D., has been doing substitute teaching in the Deadwood Public schools. The Harveys have one daughter, Michelle, 20-months.

1960' s Mr. andMrs. Jere (Jan Lillethorup) Krakow, both '60, are living at 3909 ltonona drive, Madison, Wisc.,where Jere is in graduate school at the University of Wisconsin, and Jan teaches women's physical education at Schenk school. Rosalie Baehr, fs '61, a hostess with United Air Lines, was on a jet charter during the presidential campaign tour of President Johnson in October. She was in the company of the White House staff and newsmen on a flight from Washington to Ohio cities. Delynn Kienker, '60, a member of the f~cul~y.of Wood River.High since graduation, will J01n the Auburn lhgh faculty as guidance counselor and head basketball coach in September. JeaTUline Ehiers, '62, is in her third year, and Sharon Donlan, '63, in her second year of teaching women's physical education at South High, Omaha. M. Hazel Ste~ens, '63, 2402 Jackson Bellevue, teaches seventh grade core course~ at Bellevue Junior High school.

Mr. and Mrs. Lynn (Pauline Kish) Oster.' 61,. '59, 5131 Map!~, Omaha, are

1!0 lm.,

in their third year of teaching in the Gnaha schools--Lynn in math at Benson High and Pauline in third grade at Boyd.

Mr. and Mrs. Leland (Wilma Johnson) Schait, Jr •• '60, '61, 903 Hopkins drive

Bellevue, are both enrolled in graduat~ school at Creighton. Larry W. Morgan, '61, 601 Yale boulevard, St. Charles, Mo., teaches at Duchesne High in the St . Louis suburb. The Morgans have a daughter, Laura Anne, l~.

Mr. and Mrs. Larry (Raylene Miller) Curnes, '62, 2 yr. '62, live in Wood River where Larry is in his third year of teach: ing in high school. Raylene teaches at Alda. The Curneses have a daughter, Lorrie, 3~, and a son, Lance Edward, 1.

-


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Peru's First Distinguished Award Recipient Claimed by Death Dr. Alexander J. Stoddard, '10, the first recipient of Peru State's Distinguished Education Award, died October 18 in Glendale, Calif. Dr. Stoddard was known nationally for his work as superintendent of schools from coast to coa:·s t • A native of Nemaha county, Stoddard rose in educational prominence, serving as superintendent of schools in Newman Grove, Beatrice, Bronxville and Sche.r;iectedy 1 .N. Y., Providence, R _ L, Denver, Philadelpnia, and Los Angeles, the latter from 1948 until his retirement in 1954. He received honorary doctorate degrees from eight universities, andinl960 was presented Peru State's highest honor, the Distinguished Edueation Award during ceremonies when he delivered the Commencement address to the 1960 Peru State graduates. Dr. Stoddard received his bachelor's degree from the University of Nebraska and his M.A. from Columbia . Stoddard, 76, served as a member of the United States Education Mission to Japan after World War II and upon his retirement as Los Angeles superintendent of schools 1 became a consultant to the Ford Foundation on educational television. Dr . Stoddard leaves his wife., 5508 Vil lage Green, Los Angeles, two children~ Eleanor F· Schultz of Los Angeles and Huoson G. Stoddard, New Cannan, Conn., and four grandchildren.

Campus School to Remain For two months last summer it appeared the Peru State Campus School would be closed permanently by 1968, but in mid-July the Nebraska Legislature partially reversed themselves to allow the Campus School to remain in operation for an indefinite period. In mid-May a legislative resolution ordered Peru to disband her last remaining Campus Sch Jl on the _:State College campuses, before 1968. State Senator Calista Cooper Hughes cast the only dissenting vote. Mrs. Hughes, followin5 the first vote, went to work to change the resolution. As a result, on July 15, approval was received to amend the resolution. The amendment, in effect, said if and when Peru State needs more space, it use the Campus School building rather than erect new structures. The resolution thus gives the Peru community time to plan for the day when they will of necessity provide their own school facilities. The City of Peru has no ~ublic school system, and the campus school is Used by the college as a laboratory school as well as to provide educational facilities for the city's youth. Of Senator Hughes efforts, President Neal S. Gomon said: "Senator Hughes is deserving of our.~ratitude f~r the passage of Resolution 73. ,rHomecoming -- October 22

I Alumni Association Activities Alumni Association Officers: Clyde Barrett, '56, Peru, president; JoAnn Parriott Russell, '59, NebraskaCity; first vicepresident; Mary Jarvis Morton, '50, Hamburg, Iowa, second vice-president· Troy Lyon, '64, Brock, secretary; Judy Adams Allgood, '62, Omaha, treasurer. Chapter Presidents: Omaha, Richard D. "Slagle, fs '37, Bellevue; Lincoln, Dr. Norman F. Thorpe, '29, Lincoln· Rocky M~untain, Alice DeVore Organ, '39,Westminster, Colo.; Northern California, A. B. Clayburn, professor emeritus, 1922-62, Stockton; Southern California, Charles E. Smith, '51, Garden Grove.

Onaha, Rocky Mountain Picnics Alumni former students and friends of Peru State College met September 12 in Denver a~d ~eptember 19 in Omaha for annual fall picnics. Rocky Mountain Peruvians elected Alice DeVore Organ,8040 Stuart Place, Westminster Colo., president; Boyd Good, 1360 S. Grape; Denver, vice-president; Edith Straube Sykes 4360 O~k, Whe_atridge, secretary-treasurer: at their Washington Park gathering. Earliest grad present was Clarence Howie '15 1 Denver. Arthur L. Hill, math prof f;om '2 3-'41 and Mrs. Hill also were present. ' The Omaha Peruvians at Riverview Park re-elected R. D. Slagle, 511 West Mission, Bellevue, and Mrs. Virginia Lazzaro, 5636

2

Leavenworth, respectively. bers were in sor Erner i tus

president and vice-president, A number of Peru faculty memat ten dance, including Prof esEdna V!e are .

Spring Lincoln "Pow lVow" Planned Dr. and Mrs. Norman F. (Goldie Creech) Thorpe, '29, '30, and Fern Schmidt Gottula '~l, prexy, v-p, and secretary of th~ Lincoln chapter of the Peru Alumni Association are making plans for a Spring Pow-Wow of Peru Alumni in Luncoln. They would welcome su_ggestioi:is and volunteers to "help make this the biggest Peru gathering in the Capital ~ity" as a kick-off to the College's Centennial. Send your suggestions to Dr. and Mrs. Thorpe at 2410 Park avenue

Our Cover Shown on our cover is the new west wing and entrance to A.O. Majors Men's Residence Hall opened last September. See story on this and other projects starting on page 3.

Volume XIV

Number 2 Fall, 1965 Official publication of Peru State College. Published and distributed in November and April. Please notify the College of changes of address.

*' ~


Normal Board Fetes College at

Enroll1nent Milestone Peru State College reached a milestone this fall when 1,041 students enrolled for classes. In response to the accomplishment, President Neal S. Gomon, the faculty and staff were feted by the Board of Education of State Normal Schools at a dinner in the Student Center October 31. At the dinner, State Senator Calista Cooper Hughes, main speaker, predicted that with an enrollment beyond the ranks of the "really small school, •t Peru State will attract increasing attention and respect. Two years ago the Board of Education of State Normal Schools established a goal of 1,000 students by Peru's Centennial year and Peru responded a year early in reaching the goal. . In addition to the honorees mentioned, Miss Martha Ann Mullen, freshman from Nebras"" ka City, was a guest and received recogniti<;>n as being the l,OOOth student to enroll this fall. Master of ceremonies was Bernard M. Spencer, Nebraska City, president of the Normal Board. President Gamon was presented a "gold-plated bottomless cream can" and 1,041 uncirculated pennies from the Normal Board. At board meetings Dr. Gomon has referred to "cream cans" as the pla~e to get various funds for improvements . In response and thanks to the Normal Board, Dr. Gamon said, "Through 98 years Peru has produced thousands who have made a great impact on young people in the state and nation." He pledged continued efforts to make Peru State an even greater institution of higher learning. Greetings to the guests were extend~d by Bill Rinne, junior from Burchard, president of the Student Governing Association; Miss Gladys Grush, assistant professor of education and president ~f the facul~y association; and John L. Lewis, Peru,_ presi dent of the Peru Achievement Foundation.

Other guests were trustees of the Peru Achievement Foundation; professors emeritus; presidents of other S~ate Colleges, Dr. F. Clark Elkins, Chadron State; Dr. Milton Hassel, Kearney State, and Dr. William Brandenberg, Wayne State. In addition to Mr. Spencer, other Normal Board members present were A. D. Majors, Omaha; E. K. Yanney, Lodgepole; Henry I. Freed, Chadron; Dr . Gordon W. Shupe, Wayne; Dr. Floyd Miller, State Commissioner of Education; E. Albin Larson, Lincoln~ secretary, and Dr. F. B. Decker, Lincoln, coordinator. . In other.remarks, Senator Hughes predicted a glowing picture of the future for the immediate area served by Peru State. '~ith gogressj.ve towns like Auburn, Nebraska City, Yalls City, Tecumseh, Syracuse, Humboldt, Brock, Johnson, we have the making of a Southeastern Nebraska we can be proud to share," she said . The 1965 fall enrollment of 1,041 repsen ted an increase of 20. 2 per cent over last fall's 866. Full-time enrollment increased even more sharp} Y from 723 a year ago t1o 943 this fall up 30~ 4 per cent . Part-time enrollment drop: ped from 143 to 9&. 1he freshman class leads with 376 fulltime students compared with 263 a year ago . There a~e 211 sophomores, 164 juniors, and 188 seniors. Four are special students. .

Board Members Majors and Yanney prepare the gift presented to Dr. Gamon as a tribute to his leadership--the "bottomless cream can" and 1,041 new pennies ••• Miss Mullen,

the 1.oooth student enrolled for the fall semester, with Mr. Yanney, Dr. Gamon, and Mr. Spencer, prepares to serve the 1,041 student cake.

New Facilities In Use; Other Improvements on Campus Horizon As 1,041 students filled Peru State classrooms, dormitories and other facilities to the brim this fall, Peru State's newest building projects were pressed into service. Part of the additional enrollment moved into the new west wing of A.D. Majors Men's (continued on page 10)


Placement Bureazt Announ.ces Fall Teaching Positions Harold W. Johnson, director of placement has announced additional positions a~­ cepted by ~=>eruvians for the 1965-66 academic year. In making his final placement report, Mr. Johnson noted that approximately 73 per cent of Peru's graduates in teacher education accepted positions in. Nebr~ska .. Placements since the spring issue of The Peru Stater include: Elementary alumni candidat~s--Barbara Snow, Elmo, Mo., to College Springs, Iowa; Bonnie Kite Red Oak, Iowa, to Bellevue; Linda Janso;, Lincoln, to Superior; Melvin Nelson, Papillion, to Clovis, N.M.; Frances Nelson, Papillion, to Clovis, N.M.; Mary_ P. Sheehan Tekamah, to Elko Nev.; Maxine Sampson', Palis..ade, to Goff, Kans.; Eva Pilch, Auburn, to Depoe Bay, Ore. Elizabeth Dotson, Carter Lake, Iowa, to Campbell; Zeoma ~irl, Wymore, to Ash Fork, Ariz.; Leora May, Granite Falls, Wash., to Loveland. Colo.; Loyal Torkelson, Atchison, Kans., to Holton, Kans.; Ruby Lockwood, Johnson, to Cook.. . Secondary alumni candidates--Ken Rhodus, Nebraska City, to Neligh; Jane Rhodus, Nebraska City, to Neligh; Winnie Anderson, Talmage, to Brock; James McGinnis, Stapleton, to Gothenburg; Gordon Ohnoutka, Sargent, to North Bend; Carrol Engdahl, Morrill, to Atkinson; William Maness, Liberty Center, Iowa, to Walnut, Iowa; Virgil Skipton, Belleville, Kans.; to Muriden, Kans. Virginia Janis, Arlington, to Bennington; James Wilson, Ignacio, Colo., to Lakewood, Colo.; Robert Reitz, University of South Dakota Grad school, to Martin, S.D.; John Werner, Nelson, to Loup City; Joyce Carman, Colorado State College Grad school, to Fontanelle, Iowa; Richard Engle, Stella, to Gering; Duane Birginal, Yutan, to Omaha. Johnielee Henning, Brownville, to Beatrice; Bill Hunsaker, Winnebago, to Hebron; Gary Adams, Castle Rock, Colo., to Colorado Springs; Willard Jensen, Eagle, to Osceola; Nels Overgaard, Artesia, Calif., to Norwalk, Calif.; James Bohlken, Omaha, to Norfolk; L. B. Mathews, Peru, to Malvern, Iowa; Josie Lutz, Essex, Iowa, to Pawnee City. Bill Tynon, Atkinson, to Fremont; Glen Steward, Missouri Valley, Iowa, to Gowrie, Iowa; Robert Hoback, Tilden, to Cairo; Donald Reed, Albion, toNorth .Platte Junior College; Terry Forney, Horton, Kans., to Malvern, Iowa; Paul Bodtke, Douglas, to Palmer; Jim Kelly, Table Rock, to Stanton, Iowa; Clyde Heaton, Nebraska City, to Griswold, Iowa. Larry Hennerberg, Central City, to Beatrice; James Meacham, Minden, to Wilcox; Gaylin Sudik, Brock, to Villisca, Iowa; Donald Weeks, Pierce, to Lewiston; Anthony DeMaro, Grinnell, Iowa, to Rapid City, S.D.; Halden Br own , Geno a , t o Le i g h ; Ric ha rd Carlson, Pierce, to Exeter. Ed Pharoah, Brainard, to Springfield; Ron Kelley, Weeping Water, to Tabor, Iowa; Larry Vice, Lawrence, to McCook; Ernest Ridgeway, Uehling, to Omaha; Tom Vincent, Kearney, to Centerville, Iowa; Donald Clark, Clatonia, to Wilber; Ida May Heywood, Auburn, to Bratton Union of Humboldt; Tom Stevenson, Dannebrog, to Walnut. Iowa . Ron Oestmann, Neligh, to Eagle; Vernon Aylor, Holmesville, to Odell; Leroy Scheele, Sutton, to Rocky Ford, Colo.; Bonnie Rutz,

4

Plattsmouth, to Peru State College; Joseph Perina Armour & Co., Omaha, to Omaha; James Yelne~, Albion, to Omaha; David Sampson, Palisade, to Vermillion, Kans.; James Boatman, Stanton, Iowa, to Exira, Iowa; R.amona Boatman, Stanton, Iowa, to Exira, Iowa . John Okerlin, Bedford, Iowa, to Payson, Ill.; Gary Anderson, Missouri Valley, Iowa, to Elmwood; Mary Mullens, Clearwater, to Lewellyn; Linda Stephens, Bellevue, to Harrison, Ohio; Richard Campbell, Geneva, to Lovelock, Nev.; Jerry Partridge, Sandpoint, Ida., to Medicine Lake, Mont. 1965 elementary candidates--Carol Kennedy, Papillion, to Loveland, Colo.; (continued on page 6)

Colorful 1heatrical Career (Nan Bartos Fitz-Patrick, class of 1903, was the subject of a feature story in The Beltline Newspapers, Minneapolis, Minn., in May, 1965. Her colorful career as an actress is told by Beatrice Morosco.) Mrs. A. H. Fitz-Patrick of 8048 Vincent avenue, S., has led a life as colorful as the flowers that grow in her garden. For many years Mrs. Fiâ&#x20AC;˘tz-Patrick, then known as Nan Winters, was a dramatic actress who toured the country from San Francisco to Hoboken/. N. J. Her favorite role was the lead in 'The Squawman," during the period of World War I when road shows reached their apogee in theatrical entertainment. While Nan was not actually born in a trunk, it was the next thing to i t . She :::.tarted her career at the age of two and onehalf when she left her native state of Nebraska to play the role of the kidnapped child in a road company of "Esmeralda'.' Small of stature, she was able to play child roles long past the customary age for child actresses. In those halcyon days of the theatre when stock companies blossomed in every town worthy of the name, so many plays required child actresses that it was necessary to have one on a permanent basis. Nan has the distinction of being one of the few actresses who started by playing child roles, then ingenues, graduating into leads, and finally character parts. Shakespeare would call it the seven ages of woman. In those days, even the brightest stars in the theatrical galaxy deserted Broadway while they went on tour or played a season of stock in one of the top companies. Sucp Qrime favorites as Anna Held, Jane Cowl, Emily Stevens, Lenore Ulric, Laurette Taylor and Charlotte Greenwood frequently played in the same city as Nan. For the past 30 years Mrs. Fitz-Patrich whose husband is a retired Minneapolis busi: nessman, although born in New York has been a resident in the area. Not cont~nt to rest on her laurels, she has written two books of P?etry and is a member of both the League of Min~esota Poets and the Minneapolis Poetry Society. !he days of trouping as a juvenile thespian seem very remote. It is only when she browses through her press clippings, progr~ms an1 old photos or takes a peek at the tiny white shoes she wore in her first play that her stage life seems a reality.


ak,§(~,/~~~

Sports Round-up Improved Grid Season Brings Share of NCC Championship

Roundball Off to Good Start

Coach Ervin Pitts' Bobcat football team improved greatly this year to notch a four win and five loss season. Last year the Peruvians were two and seven . Highlight of the year was Peru's 14-13 victory over powerful Kearney State, a victory which gave the Bobcats a third of the NCC crown--shared with Wayne and Kearney with identical 3-1 records.. In recording the improved season, Peru fought back after dropping the first three contests. Then came a win over Chadron, a loss to Wayne, and three straight wins over Hastings, Doane, and Kearney. The season ended in a blood-spattered 15-7 loss to Washburn at Topeka. Key to the improvement was a stingy defense which allowed the opponents only 99 points in the nine games . A year ago Peru op ponents rambled for 280 points. Peru this year outscored their foes with 113 points, more respectable than the 69 tallied a year ago. Nine seniors will be lost next year, but the nucleus should be there for an improved 1966 season. 1965 Scores: 6 Tarkio 0 Lincoln U. 18 Northwest Mo. 21 Chadron 7 Wayne

Third In

7 20 6 20 28 14 7 0 17

Hastings Doane Kearney Washburn

I

6 7 13 15

National Meet

Climaxes Cross Country Season Coach Jim Pilkington's Peru State cross country runners climaxed the greatest harrier season in the school's history, November 27, when they ran to a third place finish in the national NAIA meet in Omaha. Twenty-two of the nation's finest NAIA teams competed and representatives of 26 additional colleges competed in the meet. The third place finish marks a high mark for any Bobcat team in national sports competition. During the season tlie Peru State cross country team notched thirteen meet victories, being tied once, taking second place during a surrising collapse in the conference meet, and o course ending up third in the national championships. Dual victories came over Lincoln U ., two over Northwest Missouri, Omaha U., John F. Kennedy College and Doane College. The '9at~ copped triangula_r wins from Tarkio and William Jewell, Tarkio and Northwest Missouri, Midwestern and Dana, Doane and Midland, and Concordia and John F. Kennedy.. In ad<;lition, the Peruvians annexed the championship of the Nebraska Wesleyan Invitational. Veteran Louis Fritz, Verdon, has set Peru records all season by lowering his own marks. the three-mile Peru course record has been lowered to 15:21 and the four mile mark to 20:17. Fritz established a new Peru State t~ee-mile record when he ran 15:00 on the Tarkio College course.

A band of inspired Peru State alumni battled the Bobcat varsity down to the wire November 22 before losing 94-95 in a two overtime basketball game which tipped-off the 1965-66 basketball season. Coach Jack Mcintire has 10 lettermen returning from last year and a crop of fine lookin~ freshman prospects from which to choose his starting lineup. The Mcintiremen are dedicated to the idea that they must and can improve last year's 9-11 record and last place standing in the Nebraska College Conference. This year's schedule lists 11 home games, seven road tests, 2nd a three-day trip to Alamosa, Colo., durint;;· the Christmas holidays to play in the Top of the Nation Tourney. 1965-66 Basketball Schedule Nov. 22 Alumni Jan. Nov. 30 Tarkio Jan. Dec. 3 N.W. Mo. Jan. Jan·'. Dec. 8 at Washburn Dec. 10 St. Benedict's Jan. Dec. 14 Dana Feb. Dec. 16 Simpson Feb. Dec. 27-29 Top of the Feb. Nation Tourney Feb. J "ln. 4 at N. W. Mo. Feb.

8 Kearney 15 Doane 21 at Tarkio 22 Hastings 29 Wayne 5 at Kearney 8 at Doane 11-12 Chadron 19 at Hastings 23 at Wayne

Track Shows Gain in '65 In a ~965 s_pring_ sports season void of t~am championships, Peru State's track and

field team made th~ biggest jump, moving from next-to-last in the NCC in 1964 to second. Sprinter Jim Hagemeier evened an old NCC record in winning the 220-yard dash in :21.8. 9ther NCC first place finishes were earned in the broad jump, triple jump, and 880 relay. The NCC discus standard of 158' 6~' set.by Orv Yo.cum, '47, Wood River, Ill., was eclipsed by a Kearney thrower . The thinclads ran to five dual or triangula_r meet victories against one loss and one. tie. New records not reported in the Spring Peru Stater: TimHendricks Omaha set a new outdoor mile mark of 4:26:7, bre~king Frank Graham'~, fs '64, Pawnee City, mark of 4: 30 .6. Hendricks also bettered Graham's twomi le ma_rk of 10:01.3 with a 9:51.3 reading. Hagemeier set a new quarter~mile ma~k of :50.0, breaking the old time of :50.3 set by Ron Callan, '61, Columbus. Charles Niemeyer pushed his own vault record to 13'3". Sprint medlay and 880 relay teams set new records of 3:35.2 and 1:27.6, respectively, breaking old standards of 3:42 .4 and 1:28 .6. In baseball, Al Wheeler's diamondmen split six games in NCC action and finished the season with an 11-8 record, winning eight and dropping five non-conference goes. The season saw the last coaching of Al Wheeler who retjred ~rom Peru State after 27 years of service. His baseball shoes will be filled (continued on page 17)


~Twas

a Real Fine Homecoming

Return of one-fifth of the members of the 25th anniversary class kicked off Peru State's 44th annual homecoming. Eleven of the 57 living members of '40 met for a homecoming eve dinner, October 22, at Arbor Manor Ste:.:i-k.House, Auburn.A twelfth member--Beulah Livingston (Mrs. Clayton) Evans and husband of North Bend, Wash .--experienced flight delay in Seattle and did not arrive until Saturday s luncheon. Those present for the homecoming eve dinner are pie: tured in the Peruviana section. On Homecoming Saturday, Marilyn Masters, senior from Nebraska City, was presented at halftime of the Doane-Peru football game as the 26th homecoming queen. Attendants were Ka thy Francis senior from Council Bluffs Iowa· Patrici~ Knippelmier junior from Au: burn: Ceci Evangelist sophomore from Newark ' I t N. Y. and Mary Mowry sophomore from Beatrice.• · 'The homecoming football game, a 2 p.m. clash with Doane, was played under perfect wea ther conditions and the Bobcats responded wi th a sound 20-7 win over the Tigers. The victory brought an end to two straight homecoming football defeats for the Peruvians and ended thoughts that old grads were hex-

ing the blue and white's football performance. During balloting for alumni officers the following were elected: Clyde Barrett, '56, Peru, president; JoAnn Parriott Russell, '59, Nebraska City, first vice-president; Mary J~rvis Mo~ton, '50, Hamburgf Iowa, se .. cond vice-president; Troy Lyon, 64, Brock, secretary; Judy Adams Allgood, '62, 6551 Pac ific, Omal_ia, treasurer. . . Peruvians from as far away as California and Florida registere~. The all-aluI1B1i lunch attracted representatives of the years end~ni:; in" 5" and "O". Athletes of former years Joined the '65 football team at the P-Club luncheo~. . . . Prior to th~ hom~coming-concluding evening dance at which time the queen was presented, the Peru Dramatic Club's presentati on of 'Nilliam Inge's "Bus Stop" met with h • • en t usias tic response. The prize-winning homecoming display was the work of a group of unaffiliated students called the "Independents." A huge Bobcat with open mouth was created at the entrance to the Gym, site of the homecoming dance. Other winners were Alpha Mu Omega, second, and Wesley Foundation, third.

Placement Bureau Annou1ices Fall Teach.ing Positions

.. ·

(continued from page 4) Alvin Henrichs, Wymore, to Decatur, Ill.; Richard Sims, Quenemo, Kans., to Medicine Lake, Mont.; Janet Bierman, Peru, to Hiawatha, Kans.; Barbara Wheeldon, Council Bluffs, to Elk Creek; Loretta Kratochvil, Raymond, to York; JoAnn Hauptman, Harvard, to York; George Bleich, Crete, toBellevue; Lucille Christensen, Valparaiso, to Millard; Karlene Sherwood, Peru, to Auburn; Jeneveia Ballue, Peru, to Dawson; Pat Thomas, Bellevue, to Bellevue. 1965 secondary candidates--Jack Roper, Eagle Grove, Iowa, to Aurora; Larry Hershberger, Falls City, to Douglas; Linda Bartels, Tobias, to Palmer; Jan Beemer, Bedford, Iowa, to Omaha Westside; Duane Haith, Plattsmouth, to Omaha; James Felten, Bellevue, to Omaha; Dan Leuenberger, Tecumseh, to Summerfield, Kans.; Don McCord, Firth, to Fairmont; David Gowon, Peru, to Harrison, Ohio; Mariedith Greenlee, Atlantic, Iowa, to Valley; Gary Dedea, Table Rock, to Bloomfield; Dick Ferron, Omaha, to Fullerton; Linda O'Hara, Council Bluffs, to Tecumseh; Billy D. Russell, Peru, to Nebraska City; Gary Holthus, Auburn, to Wolbach. Jim Ramsey, Tecumseh, to Ord; Glenda Rima, Farragut, Iowa, to Bellevue; Larry Phillips, Nebraska City, to Minden; Judy Whigham Finke, Blanchard, Iowa, to Summerfield, Kans.; Merton Finke, Tecumseh, to Summerfield, Kans.; Richard Kennedy, Pawnee City, to Shenandoah, Iowa; S. G. Compton, Muscotah,. Kans ., to Nemaha. Frank Teleen, Lincoln, to Cook; Dick Floerchinger, Omaha, to Horton, Kans.; Bruce McCoy, Tecumseh, Brownell-Talbot, Omaha; Luke Cox, Lincoln, to Uehling; Don Wright, Table Rock, to Exeter; Linnea Ingwerson Baney, Plattsmouth, to Plattsmouth; Linda Elliott, Omaha, to Talmage. Larry Piper, St. Joseph, Mo., to Coun-

cil Bluffs, Iowa; Larry Trimble, Omaha, ~o Madison Heights, Mich.; JoAnn Schultz, Burchard, to Tobias; Eleanor Fransen, Falls City, to Ord; David Albert, Plattsmouth, to Nebraska City; G. Jane Moore Hayes, Hampton, Va., to Talmage; Davis Gerdes, Auburn, to Emerson; Keith Rawson, Villisca, Iowa, to Tabor, Iowa. . Larry Morrissey, Tecumseh, to Loup City; Marion Miller, Wymore, to Trenton; David Wil~on, Plattsmouth,_to South Page, College Springs, Iowa; Lonnie Shafer, Shubert, to Orleans; Mike Troester, Hampton, to Lincoln; Ruth Schnute, Falls City, to Davenport, Iowa; Leroy Leonard, Albany, N. Y , to Albany, N. Y.; Lester Turner, Nehawka, to Farragut, Iowa; Edwin Meyer, Imogene, Iowa, to Red Oak, Iowa. Gary Schmucker, Brock, to Exeter; Robert Sporhase, Nebraska City, to Nebraska City; Peggy O'Ne_ill Till, Va~entine, to Rapid City, SD.; David Vondra, Lincoln, to Estes Park Colo.; Don Weiner, Odell, to Peru State Col: lege; Karen Cahow, Omaha, to Om.aha. Non-Teaching placerrents--Donald Glaesemann, Hebron, to social insurance claims examiner, Kansas City, Mo.; Phil Niemann 1 Nebrask~ City, to manager, Roxy Theatre, Kansas City, Mo.; Ronald Foreman, Beatrice, to manual arts therapist, Veterans Administration hospital, Wadsworth, Kans.; Ca.rl Stukenholtz, Nebraska City, to Production Credit Perry, Iowa; Larry Giesmann, Sterling t~ Union Pacific, Omaha. ' ~radua_te study:·Micha~l Chu, Hong K~:mg, to University of Missouri at Kansas City; Eric Dorf, Lincoln, University of Nebraska; Robert Kepler, Otoe, University of Nebraska; Edwin Loontjer, Deshler, Ball State University; Lonn Pressnall, Wymore, to University of Illinois; C. Chan Redfield, Newark, N .Y. t? University of Missouri; Don Schmidt, Ster~ ling, to Oklahoma State University •


Oldest Ex-Coed Honored

Peru Degrees

Mrs. Martha Campbell Aldrich, '81, of Brock, and 172 degree candidates were honored at commencement ceremonies on the Peru State campus .this year. In June, 123 students were graduated and 49 in August. . At the Jrin~ceremoni~s, ~flag which had flown over the nation's capitol February 1 in honor of Mrs. Aldrich's 105th birthday, was flown over the Campus of a Thousand Oaks. Mrs. Aldrich is Peru's oldest known ex-coe~. The flag was flown by arrangements of Senator Roman Hruska on information from Miss Betty Harpham, Washington, D.C., an.d formerly of Brock. It could not be flown on Mrs. Aldrich's birthday, Jan. 28, because no flags were flown during the mourning period following Winston Churchill's death. The following received degrees during 1965: June 4 degree candidates: Bachelor pf Arts (liberal arts)--James Agnew, Omaha; Richard Baker, Omaha; William Fournell, Tecumseh; Larry Giesmann, Sterling; David N. Gomon, Peru; Donald Glaesemann, Hebron; Ronald J. Grant, Madrid, Iowa; Jimmy Jicha, Lawrence; Wayne B. Kellogg, Hiawatha, Kans.; Robert Kepler, Otoe; William Klabunde, Papillion; Donald Schmidt, Sterling. Bachelor of Arts in Education--John F. Bartont. Essex, Iowa; Phillip Bateman, Sidney, Iowa; Merron Camden, Council Bluffs, Iowa; Thomas Castle, Falls City; Michael Chu, Hong Kong, B.C.; Virginia Cockerham, Peru; Daniel Donovan, Peru; Eric Dorf, Lincoln, Judith Whigham Finke, Blanchard, Iowa; Harvey A. Fisher, Tecumseh; David N. Gomon, Peru; Larry W. Hershberger, Falls City. Lawrence L. Johnson, Tecumseh; Thomas M. Majors, Peru; Jane Moore, Hampton, Va.; William McCoy, Tecumseh; Linda O'Hara, Council Bluffs, Iowa; Larry Phillips, Nebraska City; Lonnie Pressnall, Wymore; Garr Schmuckerl Brock; Frank Teleen, Linco n; Michae Troester, Hampton; Lester Turner, Nehawka; Janice Wilkinson, Humboldt; Wendell Wiksell, Omaha; George Zwickel, Shenandoah, Iowa. Bachelor of Fine Arts in Educati~n-­ William J. Bouton, Amsterdam, N.Y.; Michael Janis, Skokie, Ill. Bachelor of Science in Education--Linda Bartels, Tobias; Gary Bedea, Table Rock; Judith Beran, Odell; Janet Bierman, Hastings; Karen Cahow, Omaha; Lucille Christensen, Valparaiso; Roger Crook, Salem; Daniel Coffey, Stamford; S. G. Compton, Muscotah, Kans.; Marvin W. Corbin, Fairbury; Luke Cox, Lincoln. Hazel Denison, Hiawatha, Kans.; Penelofe Edwa;r-ds, Table Rock; Alfred Eickhoff, Fal s City; Linda Elliott, Omaha; James Felten, Bellevue; Sharon Fike, Peru; Merton Finke, Tecumseh; Richard Floerchinger, Omaha; Ronald Foreman, I3eatricc; Eleanor Frandsen, Falls City; Madelyn Fraser, Omaha; Harvey Fraser, Humboldt. Margaret L. Gigax, Fremont; Carol Glather, Humboldt; I lma Gottula, Elk Creek; Marion Gomon, Peru; Mariedith Greenlee, Atlantic, Iowa;-Duane Haith, Plattsmouth; Mary Hannah, Omaha; Larry Hart, Burchard; Alice Haxton, Sabetha, Kans.; Alvin Henrichs, Wymore; Douglas Hunzeker, Seward; Linnea A. Ingwerson, Plattsmouth. hobert Jennings, Reserve, Kans.; Jerry Joy, Shubert; James Kanter, East Alton,

to 172 in 1965

Ill.; Merlin Kastens, Otoe; Richard M. Kennedy, Pawnee City; Darlene Kent, Auburn; Lorene Kostal, Odell; Leroy Leonard, Albany, N.Y.; Daniel Leuenberger, Tecumseh; Edwin Loontjer, Deshler; David Malmberg, Nebraska City; Gary Manning, Hubbell; Janis Mayer, Auburn. Carolyn Mercer, Malvern, Iowa; Larry Morrissey, Tecumseh; Elaine Muller, Falls City; Donald McCord, Firth; Suzan McKee, Villisca, Iowa; Norma McKercher, Peru; Charles Niemeyer, Deshler; Ronald Pethoud, Beatrice; Larry Piper, St. Joseph, Mo.; Keith L. Rawson, Villisca, Iowa; Channing Redfield, Newark, N .Y.; Glenda Rima, Farragut, Iowa. Ruth Rulla, Sterling; William Scott, Malvern, Iowa; Ruth Schnute, Falls City; Lonnie Shafer, Shubert; Karlene Sherwood, Peru; Richard Sims, Quenemo, Kans.; Alice Sloan, Hiawatha, Kans.; Robert Sporhase, Nebraska City; Mabel Tanking, Sabetha, Kans . Lawrence Trimble, Omaha; Jeanne Rhinehart Tynon, Atkinson; David Vondra, Lincoln; Kathleen Martin Ward, Wahoo; Joe A. Ward, Weeping Water; '1Donald Weiner, Odell; George Weiss, Virginia; Barbara J. Wheeldon, Council Bluffs, Iowa; David L. Wilson, Plattsmouth; Norma Wood, Beatrice; Donald Wright, Table Rock; Peggy O'Neill, Valen tine. August 20 degree candidates: Bachelor of Arts (liberal arts)--Gene d'Allemand, Wauneta; Ervey Henderson, Fairborn, Ohio; James Milburn, Blue Springs; JohnO'Connor, Worcester, Mass.; Bill Russell, Peru. Bachelor of Arts in Education--Richard Ferron, Omaha; Bill Russe 11, Peru; Frank A. Spizuoco, Mineola, N.Y. Bachelor of Science in Education--David Albert~ Plattsmouth; Irene Albert, Louisville; Jeneveia Ballue, Peru; Ruth Bauer, Verdon; Janet Beemer, Bedford, Iowa; Hilda Behrends, Elk Creek; Mary Ann Biere, Auburn; George Bleich, Steele City; Ruby Burr, Johnson. . L. Gerane Drewes, Plymouth; Lyle E. Elliott, Hiawatha, Kans.; Mildred A. Fuller, Emerson, Iowa; Davis Gerdes, Auburn; JoAnn Hauptman, Peru; Gary Holthus, Te-cumseh; Helen Jacobson, Horton, Kans.; Ingeborg Jennings, Talmage; Carol Kennedy, Oxford. Loretta Kratochvil, Raymond; Fordie K. Lucas, Syracuse; Leora May, Fairbury; Marion L. Miller, Wymore; Thelma McNergney, Tecumseh; Frances Nelson, Fremont; Evelyn Niebrugge, Auburn; Edus Offel, Crab Orchard; Wayne Pesek, Western. Mildred Pflaum, Papillion; Donna Puls, Pawnee City; James Ramsey, Tecumseh; Bertha Richardson, Crab Orchard; Leona Richardson, Crab Orchard; Jack E. Roper, Eagle Grove, Iowa; Helen Sager, Randolph, Iowa; JoAnn Schultz, Burchard; Margaret Schwartz Falls City. ' Joyce Sedlak, Plattsmouth; Hazel Taylor Council Bluffs, Iowa; Patrick J. Thomas' Bellevue; Theresa Walker, Fairbury; Barbar~ Welch, Nebraska City; Marion Wittrock, Humboldt. 7


~Ne·zv

Academic Year Brings

Changes in Faculty Family ·.""'

./'

The 99th academic year at Peru State opened with 13 new faculty members, one returned from a·leave of absence, and two new housemothers. Three new positions--a fulltirne director of guidance and counseling, an assistant librarian in reference, and an additional art instructor--have been added for the 1965-66 school year. Four of the new faculty members are Peru State graduates. The newcomers: Dr. Frederick Freeburne, Kirksville, Mo., head of the division of fine arts, replacing R. T. Benford, retired, 35-year veteran of the music faculty.. Dr. Galen Dodge, Lincoln, director of guidance and counseling, a new position. Dr. Dodge's duties formerly were divided among a number of administrative officers. Mr. Joe Pelisek, Monmouth, Ill., head baseball and assistant football coach, replacing A. G. Wheeler, retired, a member of the physical education staff since 1938. Mr. Clyde J. Barrett, Warrensburg, Mo., assistant professor of English, replacing Lyle Domina, who resigned to enter graduate study at the University of Missouri. Mr. George J. Geenen, Emporia, Kans., assistant librarian, a new position in the area of reference. Miss Bonnie Rutz, Plattsmouth, instructor of women's physical education, replacing Mrs. Frances Wheeler, who resigned at the time of her husband's retirement. Mr. Paul F. W. Sorensen, Andale, Kans., instructor of physical education and soc~al science in the campus school, re~lac1ng William Witty, Sr., who resigned to Join the teaching staff at Nehawka High School. Mr. James W. Clark, Lexington, Mo., assistant professor of history and social science, replacing LeRoy Leland, who resigned to join a teacher education program in East Africa sponsored by Columbia University. Stanley Longfellow, Lyons, instructor of biology on a one-year appointment, to replace Albert Brady, who is participating in the National Science Foundation Nebraska Cooperative College Teacher Development Program at the University of Nebraska. Mr. Donald Weiner, Odell. instrµctor of industrial arts on a one-year appo1ntment, to replace Lester Russell, who is on a sa~­ batical. leave for graduate study at the Un1veristy of Nebraska. . . . Mr. Robley B. Carr, M1ss1on, S. D., d1rector of guidance and instructor o~ social science in the campus school, replac1Ilg Mrs. Dorothy Martin, who resigned to enter graduate school at the University of Missouri. Mr. Robert M. Henry, on a one-year leave of absence for.graduate st~dy at the University of Kansas, as.si_stant d1recto'.!-" of special servic~s. a pos1t1on he held s1nce 1960 . ' , Leland Sherwood, who assumed Mr • Henry s duties in his absence, assistant professor of art . He was art instructor during 1963-64 while Norma L. Diddel was on a leave of absence. Mrs. Granville D. Longfellow, Peru, who has served for the past seven years as a re-

8

serve housemother, as housemother at Delzell Men's Hall, replacing Evanelle Paradise, retired, a cqunselor since ~955. . Mrs. Marie Oestmann, Auburn, housemother at Majors Men's Hall, replacing Mrs. Helen Donovan, who resigned to make her home in San Lorenzo, Calif. Peruvians named to the faculty include: Mr. Barrett, '56, MAinEd '58; Miss Rutz, '57; Mr. Longfellow, '54, MSinEd '61; Mr.. Weiner, '65 • Retiring faculty and their addresses: A. G. and Frances Wheeler, Rt. 1, Matthews, N.C.; R. T. Benford, Peru; Mrs. Evanelle Paradise, Lancaster, Mo.

Brochure Receives Award • Peru State's 1965 Spring Sports Brochure received an All-America Honorable Mention from the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. Edited by Leland She~­ wood '57 assistant professor of art th1s year but ~ssistant director of spec~al services last year, the brochure conta1ns preseason information on baseball, track, tennis, and golf. 1

Prantes, Buettenbachs Return Mr. and Mrs. Walter (Elizabeth Savidge) Buettgenbach, '26, '28, Lo.yd Prante, '20, and Mrs. Prante were early October visitors on the Peru State campus as they crossed the country on post-retirement vacations. The Buettgenbachs, LaPine, Oregon, remained on campus long enough to see the Peru State vs. Wayne State football game at which time they were given an ovation by the crowd. Buettgenbach starred in Peru athletics during the 1920s, several years later than Prante's athletic career. Buettgenbach retired last year from the Redmond, Ore., public schools where he had served as athletic director. Loyd Prante, LaCanada, Calif., also re~ tired last year after serving 22 years at Mt . Gleason Junior High school in the Los Angeles Public school system. Prante was honored in May by some 300 friends and colleague~ c;i.t a di~er held in Burbank_. Prante, in add1t1on to h1s record as a publ1c school administrator, was well-known along the West coast as an after dinner speaker, delivering more than 3,000 speeches. He won the Pacific Coast Toastmast~r International speaking championship in 1943. Perusing Peruvians • • • the Prantes, the Buettgenbachs, Placement Director Harold Johnson, '.38.


Foundation's Fund Year Nears End As 1965 goes into its final month, all appearances are that this will be the greatest year for the Peru Achievement Foundation since it was founded in 1955. For the second semester last year, summer school and the fall semester this 99th academic year, a total of 95 scholarships were awarded through the Foundation. Besides those provided from alumni gifts, the following groups, individuals and _firms have provided scholarships during that A memorial scholarship fund has been established by the f arnioy of the late Dr. John W. Wear, '~4, who died October 19 at Walnut Creek, Calif. Memorial contributions from the family and friends as of December 7 totaled $1,199. Dr. Wear's family, in establishing the scholarship fund, has indicated the desire to make it self-perpetuating and "to be used to help someone to whom a little help at a critical time will be important. Perhaps firsd priority would be given to someone in pre-medical studies. But our first desire is to help someone like Dad, who was penniless and to whom an education was so important that he was willing to sacrifice much to achieve it." period. The amounts of the scholarships have varied from $25 to $400. Scholarships awarded include: Ak-SarBen; Millicent Smalley (Mrs. R. W.) Endres, '13; Jess A. Harris Memorial; Plattsmouth Mrs. Jaycees; Pearl Kenton Memorial Foreign Language; Peru National Education Associa-

tion; Women's Division, Nebraska City Chamber of Commerce; Nemaha County Teachers Association; Morton House Kitchens, Nebraska City, for home economics; P-Club and P-10 Club; Peru VFW & VFW Auxiliary; Peru Kiwanis Club; Swenson Athletic Award; Charles P. Weigand, '06, Memorial; White Angels; Zelma Wonderly Memorial Second Grade Student Teacher Award; Louise Mears Memorial Geography; Bath Family Memorial; E.C. and Mae Miller Beck, '13, '13, English; Alpha Mu Gamma Foreign Language; Nemaha County Horne Extension Unit; Delzell Hall; Nebraska Eastern Star; Gage County Education Association Elsie Jensen,' 54, Memorial; Degree of Honor; Blanche Gard Memorial; Women's Athletic Association Volleyball. One of the Foundation's biggest contributions to student aid has been in the f orrn of matching funds provided for the National Defense Student Loan Program. Since the beginning of participation in this program in 1959, the Foundation has provided a total of $12,431.10 in matching funds, which has made it possible to match federal grants for loans totaling $124,311 to Peru students •. While this is irnpressi~e, even more impressive is the fact that the matching funds were made possible primarily by the generosity of Peru State alumni. These voluntary contributions are a tribute from the prtiducts of Peru State and others who hold this near-century-old institution of higher learning in high esteem and who believe in its students and their future. Contributors from April 1 through October 31, 1965:

The only gift too small ...is no gift at all FAYE HANKS, '07 MILLICENT SMALLEY {MRS. R.W.) CORA CH I TTENDEN (MRs. 0.S.) ENDRES, '13 1890's DUFFENDACK. '09 DR. & MRS. E.C. (MAE MILLER) WARREN B. CATLIN, '99 ROBERT B. RAY, '06 BECK, BOTH '12 A.O. MAJORS, '96 OTTIS LORANCE (MRS. V.L.) MR. MRS. FLOYD (ANN GILBERT' WINIFRED PUTNEY LATHROP, '97 STRICK LAND. '08 <!HR ISTY. '18. '22 ANDREW J. WJ~SON,'97 MR. & MRS. B.H. (DORA B. LILLIAN I. K!ERSEY, '10 DR. H. CLYDE FILLEY, '99 ZooK)RowAN,Fs'09,'09 MILLIE GILBERT (MRs. CLAIR) I. HOMER WATT, '98 AMELIA MARTENS, '03 CHRISTY, '13 MAY WATKINS MORLEY. '97 MILDRED PORTER DUNLAP, '09 VIVIAN TEICH (MRS. A.E.) EDNA BEACH(MRS. L.V.)ADAJR,'08 KILGORE, '19 1900's DR. HENRY J. BRODERSON,'06 E. MAUD JONES, '11 IVA GLASGOW (MRS. GEORGE) BERNICE MAcHJRRON(MRs. CHARLES) IN MEMORY OF EARL SLOTHOWER, HANSEN, '08 WEIGAND, '06 '15, BY MRS. SLOTHOWER MAUDE MOSELY (MRS. TOM) ELIZABETH L. MALLALIEU, '05 JESSIE MODLIN, '17 CARTNEY, '09 LENA HALLET (MRS. S. J.) C. VERNON KREBS. '13 MYRTLE YOCUM COMSTOCK,'09 ELLENBERGER, '08 MR. & MRS. CLARENCE A. MARGARET SEECK, '09 HOPE ABBOTT(MRS. F.W.)DORLAND,'06 (AUDREY CHASE)HOWIE, ROY G. SMITH, '07 LILLIE WAHLSTROM (MRS. HERBERT) '16 '18 MAUDE WATKINS MICHAEL, '05 JOHNSON. '07 PRUDE~CE STILES (MRS. H.C.) MARY Jo ANDERSON, '08 PENCY SKYRME SALSBURY. '08 DALLAM. '15 ELLEN JACOBSON SuNDSTROM.'08 MR. & MRs. FRED (AGNES BLANK) BEULAH A. HARRISS, '11 EARL C. CLINE, '07 PAGE, '09 VIRGINIA AILOR LAYTON. '18 GLEN D. JENKINS, '09 GEORGE 0. CARRINGTON, '03 ANNA CHAMBERS EMERICK. '16 LA URA PORTER (MRS. GEORGE) EMILY REDFORD (MRS. C.W.)GooD.'04NELL KELLY (MRS. PAUL) ll:ARLSON, '08 ALTA GRAY DENSLOW, '06 RosEAN. '17 BENJAMIN HARRISON, '07 CLAIRE McDERMOTT NICHOLLS '09 ROSALINE KOHN (MRS. G.E.) EVA GILBERT FRANCE, '07 D. L. CARLSON. '08 • FISHER. '18 GLADYS MAJORS(MRS. C.W.) IN MEMORY OF ANNA MAY DUNTEN LAURA SALZMANN GALE, '07 MEYER,'06, BY HER HUSBAND FJRQVED, '16 ELLEN A. WAHLSTROM (MRS. PHIL) GROVER H. MEYER RUTH PRYOR RUSSELL, '11 EKBLAD, '09 ESTHER McDONALD AXTELL,'18 ALICE WRIGHT (MRS. CLAY) I 910's DR. MRS. ELLSWORTH P. WALLACE, '06 HANNA JENSEN, '15 (VIRGINIA McNEAL) LENA JONES HUFF, '09 MR. MRS. HAROLD (GLADYS WARD) CONKLE, '19, '32 EADS, '18, '20 NAN BARTOS FITZ-PATRICK, '03 ELIZABETH SCHELKOPF (MRS. FRED 0. ZtNK. '08 ELLA V. ANDERSON, '15 HENRY) DRAKE. '13 MARY DITTMER ANDERSON, '09 CECIL HARLOW (MRS. J. A.) EBBA WAHLSTROM (MRS. MABEL BAILOR WERNIMONT,'08 BOWLES, '14 ROBERT) EDSTROM,'12 MARTIN JussEL, '06 MARY OGG (MRS. W.N.)DELZELL. '11 CARRIE E. HANSEN, '12 MABEL M. PECK. '08 CLARA ERICKSON (MRS. IRA T.) C.H. CARTER, '14,'19,'40 MARTHA E. MuMF ORD • ' 08 BECKMAN, '11 MARIE FINLEY (MRS. LEO) ROSA LEE {MRS. J.E. }CLAR KE • • 06 CHARLOTTE KooP, ·11 POST, '16 W. L. DwtTEN. •07 ETHEL KELLY (MRS. R.M.) ETHEL JOHNSON (MRS. HENRY) E - L. FERGUSON. '09 HANSON, '15 ARKELL, '11

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HORTENSE INKS (MRS. F .E.) LEHMER, '12 OPAL RICE JOHNSTON, '13 LAURA MACKPRANG CUTTLER, '17 HELEN DONOVAN THOMPSON '19 MR. & MRS. R.L. (BELLE' MEYER )SANDBERG,' 33,' 18 SUSIE PowELL (MRS. JOHN) HAVERKAMP, FS '15 MARGARET ANDERSON (MRS. B .E.) WARNER, '12 GOLD IE GLEA SOPER, '13 BESSIE F. GETTERT, '13 BEATRICE A. WALTON. '18 MILDRED SPENCER ALCORN, '10 JOHNS. BOSWELL,'15, '23 MARY ANN HOGARTH, '13 EFFIE SWANHOLM, '18 CATHERINE GREENLEE, 'i2 BESSIE HUTCHINSON (MRS. CYRIL) MAXTED, '14 ETTA ARNDT PASCO, '18 LAURA KRAUSE DAVIES, '15 M. C. BLOSS, '15 IN MEMORY OF HER HUSBAND, SPENCER LEGER,' 14, '24, BY FLORENCE M. LEGER HELEN C. RE GAN , ' 1 5 ESTELLE BAUCH, '14 AMELIA J. BAUCH, '11 VESTA LEWIS COMER, '15 VER NE H. WR I GHT, '1 6 MR. MRS. W. HARRISON (LULU GUNDERSON) LINE, '14, '15 MARY FISHER, '14 IMO M. HEEBNER, '15 BETTY;H I LEMAN, Pow ELL," 15 ES_T.J::!ER ANDERSON WELLS,' 12 FRANK Hosie, '15 MARY A. SJCK, '18 FLOSSIE MORRIS (MRS. 0.L.) BILLINGTON, '10 (CONTINUED ON-PAGE 19)

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1890' s

Homer Watt, '98, lives at 43 Green Lane, Green Ridge, Pa. He sent _an interesting clipping relating an educational problem of the 1820' s. A letter protesting the scheduled debate for Lancaster, Ohio, in 1826 on the subject concerning the practical u~e of the railroads. 1be school board explained that such a topic was not proper since "railroads and telephones are impossibilities and rank infidelity; there is nothing in the Word of God about them. If God designed that his intelligent creatures should travel at the frightful speed of 15 miles an hour, He would have clearly foretold it through His holy prophets. Mrs. Win if red Putney Lathrop, '97, writes from the Methodist Home, Topeka, that she will celebrate her 9lst birthday December 24.

1900' s Thanks to Ethel Williamson Kilbourn, '04, 841 Utah, Gooding, Ida., for sending a collection of programs from her years at Peru. Included were those for the senior class play, "Flowers of the Forest," on which she had noted, "a gypsy was I ." A Round Robin letter started by 13 coeds graduated from the kindergarten course in 1906 is still making the rounds, according

New Facilities

,I

Woods, Gail Cochran Gibbs, Ress Bedell, Phebe Sheppard Ray, and Mernie McKechnie Johnson. Roy G. Smith, '07, notes he is still

hale and hearty, and busy in orchard work. Mr. Smith urges Peruvians to stop and see him at 3842 Jacksonville highway, Medford, Ore. Emily Redford (Mrs. C. W.) Good, '04, lives at 1600 Argyle, Hamburg, Iowa. After completing Miss Hosmer' s kindergarten course, she taught in Hamburg ahd Omaha.

1910' s Rosaline Kohn (Mrs. Clarence E .)Fisher

'17, taught in Omaha for 11 years afte~ graduation and has lived in Washington, D .C ., since that time. She has fond memories of

In Use· Other Improvements on Campus Horizon '

(continued from page 3) Residence Hall, a project which has added space for 128 students. Included in the $400, 000 addition is a new entrance in the center of the building. A ramp leads from the front walk to the top floor where the lobby, officel mail boxes and housemother's apartment are ocated. On the second floor is a lounge. The west wing is identical to the original, curving in the opposite direction so that the building is shaped like a flattened letter S. Helping to meet the demands placed upon food services is a new addition to the west end of the Student Center Building. The addition houses two new dining rooms and additional kitchen area. Cost of this project was $100,000. Both residence hall addition and that to the Student Center are being paid for from revenue derived from the buildings. No state funds are involved. Relocation plans are being completed for evacuation of the Administration building, prior to work which will begin on a $172,500 remodeling project. Administration offices and classrooms will be relocated throughout the campus. Starting date for the remodeling will be February 1, 'with comple1>• ion scheduled for September 1, 1966. The crowded residence hall conditions brought on by the bigger-than-expected enrollment have sent administrators scurrying to the plannin, g tables. Peru State, r,epei ved approval from the Board of E:ducat1on of State Normal Schools to prepare plans for a 300-bed coed dormitory to be located south of the main_campus ctn the west side of Park 10

to Parriett Carter Rl_ythe, 112 - 7 Market street , Morro Bay, Calif. . f:fiss Lou Hosmer, the kindergarten supervisor, was a contributor until her death. 1be group has been scattered from Nebraska to Canada, Costa Rica, Hawaii, North Carolina and California. Six of the original 13 are deceased. The letter is still circulating among Irma Grimes Verling, Hastings; Valma Morehec:-d Krause, Albion; Ione Chappell, Omaha; Jennie Lee Joy, San Gabriel, Calif.; Edith Ranney Gilham, Los Angeles; Ilma Kennedy Rickel, El Monte, Calif., and Mrs. Blythe. The deceased members are Kitt_y Carlson Loyd, Mae Alderson

avenue on the Davenport property, acquired by the College in 1957. Estimated cost of the structure is $1,500,000, with costs to he paid for bJ the sale of revenue bonds. No tax funds wil be used. Delzell Hall and Eliza Morgan Hall will ~et a face-lifting during the summer of 1966. The $75,000 project will include the refurbishing of rooms and public spaces, new draperies, carpeting for hallways, new furniture where needed, and the revamping of some space for more efficient use. Nearly completed and now partially occupied is the new F~ll:e Arts Center built on the site of the old Music Hall. Full occupancy of the two-story $500,000 structure is scheduled for the st.art of the second semester. The structure houses a 214-seat re· cital hall, classrooms for art, speech and nusic, in addition to instructional staff offices. During the current biennium, five other physical plant improvements are scheduled: remodeling of office, classroom and lobby area of the Gymnasium, electrical and heating e~uipment improvements, construction of dressing rooms and equipment s tor a~ in Oak Bowl area, campus school repair, installaticn of fire detection systems. New sidewalks, necessitated by the new construction, have been put in place, giving the center. campus. quadrangle the a:P.pearance of a busy highway interchange. New five-globe light fixtures, similar to those which were the gift of the 1914 class, have been placed near the Fine Arts Cente~


Returning 1915 class members back on the Campus of a Thousand Oaks for their Golden Anniversary Reunion May 30 (from le~t), front row-Vesta Lewis Comer, Nebr~ska C1~y; Elvida Bern Franson, W~hoo; Cor~1ne Wh!tfield Smith, San Francisco, ~al 1f.; Ol 1ve Jackson White, Fairmont; ~da Nickel, Hebron; Grayce Teich caster, Clovis •. Cal if.;_ second row~tmo Heebner, Nebraska City; Cel 1a Group ch ate 1a i n, s i 1 v er S pr n g, Md • ; Rut h Co~ rt right Kennedy, Brownville; Pru~ence Stiles Dallam, Peru; Lena Cole Helm, Winslow, Ark.; third row-Beatrice Blythe Adee, Sutherland; Genie France Smith, Talmage; Lulu Gunderson Line, Loup City;L~ura Dustin Heacock, O,i:naha; Alta Garrison Lincoln; fourth row-rrank Hosie, Clevela~d, Ohio; Dr. Louis R. Kilzer, Laramie, Wyo.; Fred Stoddard, Ord; L •. B. Mathews Peru; Elizabeth Freeborn Fren1er, Sherida~. Wyo.; Vera Hudson Manv i 1 le, Omaha; fifth row-Orley D. Clements,_Elmwoo9; J.J. Klima, Milligan; w. w. Schneider:, Lincoln; J. H. Adee, Peru; M. c. Bloss, Lincoln; Hal Glasgow, Little Rock, Arkansas.

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Peru and her favorite teachers--Dr. Homer C. House, English, and Dr. F.M. Gregg, psychology. Her address is 4912 New Hampshire, N.W. Hazel Meyer (Mrs. Harry J.) Johnson, '16 and Mr. Johnson, 4012 177 S.E., Bellevue: Wash., were fall c~mpus visitors while in Peru visiting her sister, Pearl Meyer, '05. Mrs. Nettie Stanton Fernley, fs, S'll , '12 '22 '27 received her bachelor s degre~ fr;m Te;as A&I College, Kingsville, last summer. A teacher in the Harlingen (Tex.) schools, Mrs. Ferrley writes that the (co~tinued on next page)

Twenty-nine Return

1915

Reunio~n

Twenty-nine members of the class of 1915 met Sunday, May 29, on the Peru State campus for their Golden Anniversary reunion. A registration and coffee hour, followed by a class meeting kicked off the daylong event which was culminated with recognition of the returnees at the afternoon Baccalaureate services. Some of the class arrived in time to attend the Saturday evening faculty reception for the 1965 graduating class. After Baccalaureate, Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Kennedy, '14, '15, entertained more than 40 members, spouses and guests at their country home. Dr. Kilzer, L. B. Mathews, professor emeritus of physics at Peru State, and Frank E. Hosie, Cleveland, Ohio, had the longest teaching records. Mr. Hosie taught 47~ years and Kilzer and Mathews 47. (Mr. Mathews returned to teaching in September--helping out at Malvern, Iowa.) The returnees had a total record of 572 years of teaching service. 1bis year's reunion attendance figure fell short by one of equaling the 30 present for the 1909 reunion in 1959. 1be returnees are pictured elsewhere in the Peru Stater. During the class meeting, M. C. Bloss, Lincoln, 1915 class president, presided. Ruth Courtright Kennedy, Brownville, acted as secretary, and called the roll which was responded to by those present, with letters read from absent members. Plans are underway for the 1916 reunion scheduled for May 29, 1966. The alumni office is attempting to locate" lost" members of the class before the event.


Iva Seid Brown, '17, Peru, a college friend {continued from preceding page)

roots of all that have caused me to grow were grounded in the Southeast Nebraska at Creek and my first college--Peru. Esther McDonald Axtell,'18, 1823 Grant, York, writes that Peru holds many fond memories and she is pleased to know of the new facilities and continued growth. Anna Hazen Wood, '12, 931 Highland avenue, Bremerton, Wash., writes of her interest in learning about Miss Gosh~n, w~ose lOOth birthday was observed March 5 in Phi la delphia. Mrs. Wood recalled a number of her other favorite teachers. Edmond Karlsrud, son of Erica Jean Thomas (Mrs. P.T~) ~Karlsrud, '18, appeared at an all-college artist series convocation pi:ogram in July with the Rondoliers, vocal trio. Among those in the audience were relatives from his mother's home town of Nemaha and

News About Yourself Blank How long has it been since we have heard from you? The Alumni office likes to receive letters, from alumni and former students telling of promotions, family, graduate work or about other alums. We would like for you to send information to the Peru 1

Stater. Present position or occupation------Married------ W h e n - - - - - - - - - - Position of husband or w i f e - - - - - - - - Additional study since graduation _______ Children~------------------------

News of yourself or other grads _________

of his mother. At the time of his retirement as head of the University of Maryland history.department in June after 20 years of service, Dr. Verne Chatelain, '14, '17, received a special citation from President Lyndon B. Johnson. Dr. Chatelain is regarded as an authority on Maryland history .Mrs~Chatela~n, the former Celia A. Group, was in Peru in late May for the reunion of the 1915 class. An address for Mrs. Helen E. Miller Smith, '15, was not found until after the May reunion of the class. Since her graduation, she taught at Alma, Gothenburg! S~er1 ing, and Yutan; served as a statistical clerk in Washington, D.C., during World War II; was with the VA hospital and American Legion in Lincoln; worked as a personal shopper ~or a Lincoln deeart~ent s~ore. Widowed in 1937, Mrs. Smith is retired.

1920's Margaret Clineburg (Mrs. Wallace) Hervey, '29, received the Ph.D. degree from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, in June. She is in the mathematics department of State College of Iowa, Cedar Falls. Harold Marren, '29, r~tired in August as supervisor at Western Electric in Omaha, and is now living at 1123 Ella, Beatrice. Prior to his 21 years with Western Electric, he served two years in the army and taught 18 years. George C. Reinmiller, fs '28, and Mrs. Reinmiller, 798 South Main, Janesville,Wis., were summer campus visitors. Mr. Reinmiller is an attorney.

Marion Overholt (Mrs. Lloyd) Parsons,

2 yr. '25, 2329 East Main, Medford, Ore., was a post-homecoming visitor. Her father, the late R. D. Overholt, was registrar at Peru during the 1920's. Mrs. !nice {McCorkle) Dunning, '25, who served as Dean of Women from 1924 until 1946, lives at Forest Hill Manor, Pacific Grove, Calif. Mrs. Dunning writes that after "20 years on the dear old campus, how I w~sh might be there to celebrate the centennial. Ruth Blomquist Rumley, 2 yr. '24, writes from Port Orange, Fla., how she has been fortunate to have escaped recent hurricanes. Anna Mason Underwood, 2 yr. '24, is included in the fourth edition of Who's Who of American Women. Her address is Box 72, Southard, Okla. Mildred Reynolds Osterhoudt, fs '25, Stockville, has completed her 23rd year of teaching. Widowed, Mrs. Osterhoudt has three sons and three grandsons. Glen Gilkeson, '25, received emeritus rank at Riverside (Calif.) City College at the school's June 18 Cornmencemen t . A member of the Peru faculty from 1930 to 1938 as a coach and teacher, Mr. Gilkeson was on the Riverside faculty from 1939 until 1962. He notes he spends his time on the golf course and traveling. Mrs. Gilkeson is the former

J

Name-----------------------------------------

(Marr ied women should give aaiden naae also)

Address ________________________________ Degree Last Year at Peru ____ or Diploma ________ 1

C)

He Zen I. Uumber t, '33 .

1930's Col. George D. Haskins, '34, is professor of military science at Jacksonville (Ala.) State College. Previously he was chief of the joint training branch, U.S. ContinentaJ


Returning 1940 class members attending the October 22 reunion on homecomin, eve at Auburn•s Arbor Manor (from left front row: Marjorie Hull (Mrs. Walter Zink St-erling; Frances Wrightsman (Mrs. Bil15 Rarick, Auburn; Gladys Grush, Peru; Maxine Pershing (Mrs. Carter) Johnson. DesMoines; Norma L. Oiddel, associate professor of art from 1929 to the present; Nona Palmer. Bradshaw. professor emeritus of commerce. a faculty menber from 1915-1950; Martha Clifton

(Mrs. Harold) Boatman, Tarkio, Mo.; Esther Wellensick, Syracuse. Back row--Mr. Zink; Mr. Rarick; Mrs. Schacht; Marvin Schacht, Cook; Carter Johnson, DesMoines; Charles Gabus, Holdrege; Mrs. Gabusr Russell Bailey, Gilman, Iowa; Mrs. Bailey; Leonard Greathouse, Streator, Ill.; Mr. Boatman. A twelfth member, Beul ah Livingston (Mrs. Clayton) Evans, North Bend, Was~., and Mr. Evans, ctrrived Saturday after experiencing a flight delay in Seattle.

Army, Ft. Monroe. Va. Mr. and Mrs. Haskins have two daughters. 19 and 14. Pre-homecoming visitors were Wayne Lundberg,,• 38. and Mrs. Lundberg, 115 Seventh street. Salem. N. J. Mr. Lundberg has been associated with the Atlantic City Electric company for 23 years. It was his first visit to the campus in 14 years. Hazel Broady {Mrs. Albert) Lampe, fs '30, and Mr. Lampe operate a drug sundries store in Johnson. Mter 13 years of teaching. Mrs. Lampe still_does substit,uting. Daughter, Barbara. was 1n Peru State s Talented High School Junior Program last summer. Pauline f..ytle Scott,, '30. is an English teacher at Oceanside (Calif.) High school. A widow, Mrs. Scott's children are Pollvann. a 1963 magna cum laude graduate of the University of Denver. and Terry, a college sophomore. Dr. Kenneth D. Young,, '37, is now associated with the College of the Ozarks, Point Lookout. Mo •• a new college in its secOn.d year moving toward four-year status, with first class scheduled for graduation in 1967. Dr. Young has been dean at Oklahoma College for Women. Chickasha. Lucille Hughes (Mrs. Earl) Curtis, '30, elementary music teacher at l(imball, lives at 601 Adams street. Kenneth Pace, '35. received his doctorate from George Peabody College for Teachers, Nashville, Tenn., on June 4. Mrs. Pace, the former Katherine Bergaan,, 2 yr. '32, is a libr~rian in a new elementary school in lfa:rfreeshoro. Tenn., and Mr. Pace teaches mqs;;ie; in the-Murfesshoro schools.

Grace Reiff, '37, 1s in her 13th year as a history teacher at Southeast High school, Lincoln. Her permanent address is 1206 Jefferson, Beatrice. J.C. Gridley, fs '39, is postal inspector traveling throughout the Northwest, including Alaska . The Gridleys and their six children live at 366 Pearl, Pocatello, Ida. Marguerite Graves Thompson Winter, '35, has been operating a rest home at 7401 Sky View drive, Riverside, Calif., for the past eight years. After graduation she taught for two years, was home economist for the Kansas City Power & Light company, served as a dietician for Wentworth Military school and Washington State, and was an office manager. She writes that she is grateful for the excellent training she received at Peru. She has one daughter . Dr. Elvin Semrad, '32, is director of psychiatry in charge of clinical services at Massachusetts Mental Health Center, Boston. An article in the MMHC Auxiliary Newsletter tells how Dr. Semrad came to the Center to "round out" his preparation for treating internal disorders following his graduation from the University of Nebraska College of Medicine. He is in his 30th year in the Boston area, having served teaching affiliations at Harvard, where he is clinical professor of psychiatry; Boston University Medical School; Boston College; Institute of Living in Connecticut, Simmons College, St. Johnson's University in Minnesota. Dr. and Mrs. Semrad live at 86 Upland road, Waban, Mass. They have two sons, two daughters, and two grandchildren .

(continued on next page)


(continued from preceding page)

1940' s Dr. Ruth Patterson, '40, is reading specialist fo~ the Allegany County Board of Education in Maryland. She completed her second year last spring as associate professor of education at Frostburg (Md.) State College. She was a member of the Peru Stat.e faculty in the early 50's. She received her doctorate at Washinpton State University. Art Ronhovde, 44, a member of the Fremont High school faculty for the past 13 years, has been named to the coaching staff of Midland College, Fremont. The Ronhovdes have six children. Bernice Wernsman Myers, fs '40, resides at Worland, Wyo. The Myers have three children. Loretta M. Wernsman, fs '49, is an elementary counselor at Ruth Clarke Harding school, Bakersfield, Calif. Her address is 2209 Autumn. Edith Wright (Mrs. Herbert L.

l

Ginoza,

'41, is a part-time student in library science at San Jose State. Mr. Ginoza is working in bacterial genetics for Ames. Research with NASA. The Ginozas and their children, Cheri, a college scphomore, and Otis, a fifth grader, live at 1729 Morgan, Mountain View, Calif. The alumni office has received a request f~r the address for Frances Jean Hoag-

I N!~?:!"i~c~k,

'64, to G,rald Parish, June 18,. Christian Church, Pawnee City. At home: 3143 North 56th street, Lincoln. Carolyn Schramm to Larry Hennerberg, '63, June 6, Our Savior Lutheran Church, Odell. At home: 909~ North Eleventh, Beatrice. Judi th Ament to Phillip_ Knowles, f s '65, June 5, St. Joseph Catholic Church, Beatrice. At home: Nebraska City. Connie Sims to Larry Meyer, fs '64, June 6, First Christian Church, Auburn. At home: Lincoln. Carol Ifohbein to Wendell Mohl inr;, '64, June 20, Zion Lutheran Church, Harbine. At home: Scribner. Annette Plumer to Gary Berthold, fs '65, June 26, St. Mary's Catholic Church, Nebraska City. At home: 1520 First avenue, Nebraska City. Rosalyn Miller to Dale Vanderford, 'SO, June 5, Evangelical United Brethern Church, Elmwood. At home: Elmwood. Judith Miller, '61, to David Stiteler, June 3, Chapel of St. John's Cathedral, Albuquerque, N.M. At home: 1404 Vassar, N.E., Albuquerque. Jeanette Romans, fs '60, to Roger Eck, June 5, Albuquerque, N.M. At home: 1408 Vassar, N.E., Apt. A, Albuquerque. Judy Wolfe, '64, to Wayne Weible, June 11, First Methodist Church, Humboldt. At home: Tecumseh; Carol Curd, fs '63, to Gerald Timothy, '64, June 19, SAC Chapel, Offutt Air Force Base, Omaha. At home: 3422 Gertrude avenue, Omaha. Elva Schulz, '64, to William Morrow, H.

land '43. Jean was named Representative stude'nt in her senior year. Information about Jean would be appreciated. Elsie Viola Parret Grunwaldt, '40, has been a member of the teaching staff in the elementary segment of Long Beach (Calif.) Unified district since 1944.. A California resident since 194~ Mrs. Grunwaldt was widowed in 1960 . Darrell Genzlinger, '48, has joined the faculty at Scottsbluff as junior high principal. For the past 13 years he has been basketball coach at Beatrice, where in 1959 he coached his Orangemen to the Class A State Championship. Sidney E. Johnson, '46, has joined the speech faculty at Fort Hays Kansas State College. The Johnsons have four children, Sandra, 15; Jeffrey, 11; Marla, 4, and James, 2. Patrick 0. Rooney, '45, has been named superintendent of the Ventura (Calif.) Unified district. Rosemary Tiehen (Mrs. Donald) Williams,

2 yr. '41, lives at 105 Fourteenth avenue, N.W., St. Cloud, Minn., where Mr. Williams is recreation director at the VA hospital. The Williams children are Steve, a St. Cloud State freshman; Jim, a high school senior, and Julia Ann, 9 . Edi th Straube (Mrs. Rollert) Sykes, '48, teaches an orientation class for transients at Wyman school, Denver, returning to the profession after 12 years of "just a house_wife ." Mr. Sykes is a dispatcher for Beech Aircraft. 1hey have three children.

June 19, St. Paul Lutheran Church, Diller. At home: Friend . Prudence Fritch, fs '64, to Jon Gorton, February 12. St. John's Lutheran Church, Otoe. At home: Lincoln. Judy Strange, fs '65, to Terr{ Kuenning, junior, February 12, St. Pau Lutheran Oiurch, Auburn. At home: Auburn. Judith Hubka to Dennis Crawford, '64, December 20, United Presbyterian Church, Pawnee City. At home: Byron. Mrs. Fern Will to Carlton Rhoten, Sr., fs '28, April 25, Syracuse Methodist Church, At home: Syracuse. Patricia Richardson, fs '64, to Marvin Frank, April 17, St. Paul Lutheran Church, Beatrice. At home: Beatrice. Shirley Ito to Harlan Ebeler, fs '64, April 17, Evangelical United Brethern Church; Grand Island. At home: 3833 Randolph, Lincoln. LaRhea Swedell to Warren Dyke, '60, June 5, Federated Church, Mitchell. At home: Cedar Falls, Iowa. Berdean Wilken, fs '62, to Dale Young, May 28, Luther Memorial Church, Syracuse. At home: Syracuse. Terri Siercks to Dennis Teten, fs '65, June 12, First Evangelical Lutheran Church, Nebraska City. At home: 2235 St. Mary's, Omaha. Judy Anvil le, fs '63, to Gerald Herzog, June 12, Julian Methodist Church. At home: Nebraska City. Alvera Wallman to Victor Bade, '63, June 6, Zion Lutheran Church, Pickrell. At home: Beatrice. ¡ Linda Stephens, '64, to David Gamon,

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1950's Marcello Panko (Mrs. Robert) Lund, fs '55. lives at 1027 Pearl, Wayne, where her husband owns a drug store. Marcella, a prenursing student at Peru, was graduated from the Lincoln General Hospital School of Nursing in 1958. She is busy .as a h~usewife and caring for daughters, Lori, 6, Linda, 5, and Lisa. 1. Lt. Com. Ronald C. Kucera, fs '51, is on a three-year assignment as assistant naval attache to the U.S. Embassy, Buenos Aires. Mr. and Mrs. Eldon (Betty Whipple) Teten, '51, MS '58; '59; are living at 264 Southmoor road, Hammond, Ind., where Eldon is assistant superintendent, School Business Management School, Hammond. The Tetens' children are Ronald, 12, and Mitzi, 9. Gerald Trullinger, '56, is principal of Clarinda (Iowa) High school. The Trullingers and their three children live at 613 West Orang_e. Betty McCollum (Mrs. Carroll) Hardy, fs ' 51 teaches kindergarten in a private school in Denver. The Hardys--including a daughter, 8. andason, 7--live at 8711 Edison, Denver. Robert Resz, 'SO, a teacher in the Lincoln schools for the past seven years, received a $1,000 award from the Lincoln Scottish ~ite Temple for being na~~~ th~ "outstanding public school teacher in Lincoln. He lives at 1015 Meadow dale, Lincoln. Pete G. Karabatsos, '55, joined the staff of the University of South Dakota, Ver-

• 65. August 14,, St. Paul i..ut.heran Ch~rch, Auburn. At homel'. 408 North Vine, Harrison, Ohio •JoEllen McN ergney, ' 59 , to Dr. Da l c V.inyard, August 11, Mary Grove Chapel, Detroit. At home: 17535 Manderson road, Detroit. Orrillia Gordon Lucas, '64, to Carroll E. Wood, June 28, Jackson, Wyo. At home: 3980 El Camino Real, Palo Alto, Calif. Nancy Kemper to Harry Whitney, '63, May 22. Lutheran Church, Albion. At home: 2017 Deer Park boulevard, Omaha. Marilyn Meyer, '58, to Dale D. Naggatz, June 27, St. Paul's Lutheran Church, Hastings. At home: 1122 East Seventh, Hastings. Dorothy Hajek, '60, to Kenneth Grell, St. Mary's Church, Odell, July 24. At home: RFD, Beatrice. Frances Sanders, '64, to Lt. Gordon Lee Steinbrook, Emanuel Lutheran Church, Beatrice, September 5. At home: 701 North Ninth, Beatrice. Mariedith Greenlee,'65, to Roger Pagel, First Christian Church, Atlantic, Iowa. At home: Box 131, Valley. Connie Easter, fs '65, to Eldon Thomas, Rock Port, Mo., July 5. At home: Auburn. Betty Schilling, fs '65, to Robert R. Peck, senior, Presbyterian Church, Pawnee City. At home: Peru. Zona Mae Salmen to LeRoy Scheele, '59, Zion Lutheran Church, Sutton. July 18. At home: 609 South Main, Rocky Ford, Colo. Ruth Rulla, '65, to Gerald Neeman, fs "64.St. John American Lutheran Church, Sterling. At home: Unadilla. Sharon Earl, '63, to Kenneth Kruse, Pirs~ Methodist Church, Syracuse, July 11.

million, after resigning las_t spri.ng as viceprincipal of Bellevue Senio~ hi&h. He received his Ed D. from the University of Nebraska in June. E. W. (Bill) Larson, fs '57, ~as been appointed to the faculty as speech in~tr~c­ tor at Central State College, New BritaiP. Conn. Franklin Pederson,'59, a September visitor, began teaching math at ~outhern Illinois University, Carbondale, this fall. In graduate study and part-time teaching at Tulane the past six years, Frank hopes to complete his Ph.D. next May. Lt. Robert Kramer, '57, is operations officer on the USS Buckley. He has served seven years in the Navy. Mrs. Kramer is the farmer Peggy Wende Zn, 2 yr. '56. Adela Jun (Mrs. Murray) Williams, '56, 426 East Madison, Colorado Springs, is in her ninth year of teaching second grade at Longfellow school. Mr. Williams is a contractor and daughter, Fran, is working on her master's at the University of Nebraska.

Mr. and Mrs. Boyd (Ilene Thiltges) Good, '55, '53, live at 1360 South Grape, Denver. Ilene returned to teaching kindergarten at Mitchell school, Denver.

Dr. and Mrs. Bill H. (Janice Redfern) Schulte, '53, '52, now live at 202 McCormick drive, DeKalb, Ill., wher~ Dr. Schulte is with the Northern Illinois University bureau of research.

Phyllis Vollertsen (Mrs. Larry) Olson, '59, is now li.ving at Blandinsville, Ill., (continued on next page)

At home: Syracuse. Susan Aasen to Dale Pflaum, '62, St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Clinton, Okla., July 2. At home: North Little Rock AFB. Carla Jacobson, '64, to Harlan Plager, St. John's Lutheran Church, Otoe. At home: Tecumseh. Mary Ann Sudr la to Darrell Wo Zea t t, '61, St. Joseph's Catholic Church, Beatrice. At home: Ode 11. Margaret Svoboda, '59, to Jack Kilibarda, Holy Rosary Church, Plattsmouth, August 7. At home: 917 Ash, Council Bluffs. Sharon Donlan, '64, to Tom Brown, '63, St. Teresa's Catholic Church, Linc~ln, August 15. At home: 8616 Lakeview drive, Omaha. Douglas Hunzeker, '65, to Nancy Svoboda, First Methodist Church, Seward, August 7. At home: Filley. Roswi tha Von tz to Roy Rroadbooks, f s' 64, August 22, Nazarene Church, Beatrice. At home: 921Yz North Sixth, Beatrice. Bonnie Duncan, fs'65, to Daniel F. Jantzen,August 15, First Christian Church, Fairbury. At home: 410Yz Sixth, Stromsburg. _ Carol Faker, fs '63, to Robert Krofta, senior, August 1, United Presbyterian Church, Pawnee City. At home: 706 First avenue, Nebraska City. Nancy Niemann, fs'64, to Robert Schuerman, September 4, Trinity Lutheran Church, DeWitt. At home: 3420 Dudley, Lincoln. Farbara Wheeldon, '65, to Leland Headley, Tecumseh, September l. At home: Tecumseh. Judith Shuey, fs '63, to James R. Libal, fs '65, Lewiston Methodist Church. At home: 3821 Steele avenue, Lincoln.

, ,..


(cont1nued

from preceding page)

where her husband is a music teacher in Unit District 335, LaHarpe, Ill. Phylli~ had worked in the department of computer science at Illinois while her husband was a student. After more than 40 years of teaching, Genevieve Cross Clark, '54, is retired and lives at 902 Sixth, Fairbury. Starting in 1906, Mrs . Clark has taught in rural schools, served eight years as Jefferson county superintendent of schools, taught rural education summers at Peru State, and in Jansen, Harbine and Diller. She is past president of the NSEA, District 1.

Carol Duerfeldt (Mrs. Kenneth J.) W~it­ comb '52, 204 Riagelawn drive. Fort Collins,

Colo: reports she has played flute with the city ~ivic symphony for the past two. seasons . Mr Whitcomb was promoted to associate profe~sor of math at Colorado State University

in July. The Whitcombs have four children, Duane, Roger, Mark and Sheri. Dr. L. Fred Thomas, '51, is beginning his third year at North Texas State University as assistant profess or of secondary education. He received his M.Ed. in 1955 and his Ph.D. in 1963 from the University of Arizona. The Thomases have one son, Larry. Ed Whitmore, fs '57, is a timber sales administrator for the Olympic National Forest, living at Star Route 1, Box 44, Forks, Wash. The Whitmores have two children, Catherine, 4, and Steve, 1. Ed received his BS in 1961 from Iowa State.

1960' s

Duane Elliott, fs '61, received his Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Optometry degree from the Southern College of Optometry at Memphis, Tenn., in June and is now associated with the Lincoln Vision clinic. 1 Lt. and Mrs. John J. (Gail Ankrom) Masonbrink, '62, 2 yr. '60, are living at

I

Bor11 To Bruce Smith, '59, and Mrs. Smith Syracuse, a son, Bradley Jay, June 15. ' 'fo Richard Ferron, '65, and Mrs. Ferron, Fullerton, a daughter, July 21. To Chick Stessman, '61, and Carol Ellenberger Stessman, fs '61, 5211 East 42 street North, Kansas City, Mo., a daughter, Susan Joy. To Bart Trout and Dianne Lidolph Trout, 2 yr. '56, Filley, a daughter, Alisa Dawn, June 18. To Nick Stalzer, 'SB, and Mrs. Stolzer, 4315 Grant, Omaha, a daughter, Susan Elizabeth, October 4. To Harry Weichel, '59, andMrs. Weichel, 8316 Park drive, Ralston, a daughter, Lynda Mareen, October 21. To Pat Hamm, '63, and Karen Mcintire Hamm, '63, Tecumseh, a daughter, Patricia Ann, October 19. To Don Weiner, '65, fac, and Mrs. Weiner, Peru, a daughter, Kathryn Ann, October

19.

To Duane Elliott, fs '61, and Donna Hoemann Elliott, fs '62, 2006 South Cotner boulevard, Lincoln, a son, Michael David, October 6. To Gary Anderson, '60, and Marian Schmidt Anderson, '60, Elmwood, a daughter, Susan Jane, October 20. To Edwin Groth and Elinor Keefer Groth, '62, West Point, a son, Mark David, September

2.

To Richard D. Parriott and Jan Hoffman Parriott, fs '58, Peru 1 a son, Richard Gregg,

September 30. To Stan Giles and Lois Wilton Giles, '58 1 1725 Jeanette, Wichita, a daughter, Kathy Sue, July 23. To David W. Duey, '51, and Charlotte Jones Duey, '51, 641 North Montgomery, Bremerton, Wash., a daughter, Robin Lynn, April

6.

To Elmer E. Remmers and Betty Lou Ast Remmers, '59, 811 Smith circle, Papillion, a son, James Elmer. To Joe Vacek, '40, and Mrs. Vacek, 1908 Oneida, Denver, twin sons, Keith and Daniel, April 14.

16

To Phillip D. Manly and Mary Ann Baufs '57, Hanove~ Park, Ill., a son, August 10. ¡ To Terry Harlow, '61, and Karen Ann Pflaum Harlow, fs '61, Lewiston, a daughter, Debra Ann, October 12 . To Ross Reasoner and Jenis Craig Reasoner, fs '56, Fort Collins, Colo., a daughter, Kelly Ann, March 27. To Harold Moss and Marilyn Giesmann Moss, fs '62, Burr, a daughter, Leigh Ann, March 25. To John Biere, '62, and Sandy Stephens Biere, '63, Westminster, Calif., a son, .Gr~ory John, May 30. To Charles Duncan and Barbara Story Duncan, fs '61, Nebraska City, a daughter, June 26 . To Alan Woodhouse and Betty Kuenning Woodhouse, 2 yr. '51, a daughter, Laurie Ann, May 15. To Wayne Wright and Betty Sedlacek Wrir;ht, '59, 218 Peninsula drive, ~farina Calif., a daughter, Julie Ann, June 2. ' To Robert Reimers,'63,and Mrs. Reimers Essex, Iowa, a son, Gerald Alan June 24 . ' To Jim Boatman, '58, andRa~ona Boatman fs '_64, Exira, Iowa, a daughter, Cynthi~ Mar1e, June 12. To James Meacham, '63, and Evelyn Meacham, Wilcox, a son, Scott Alan, July 28. To Jim Kelly, '64, and Janet Handley Kelly, fs '64, Stanton, Iowa, a son, Richard Scott. August 16. To Marvin Gerdes, '53, MS '60 and Ruth Johnson Gerdes, 2 yr. '53 Aubur~ a son Michael John, July 27. . ' ' ' To Lynn Wederquist fs '64 and Mrs Wederquist, Omaha, a son,' Shawn ~drew July.

man Manly,

12.

'

To Merton Finke, '65, and Judy Whigham Finke, '65, Summerfield, Kans. a daughter Gretchen Ruth, September. ' ' To Glen Royal and Betty Stubbendeck Royal, fs '63, Palmyra, a son, September 7. To Guy Grafton and Shirley Rodgers Vaughan Grafton, fs '65, Peru a daughter Sara Robin, September 23. ' '


daughters, Debra, 5; Michelle, 2, and Pamela, 9 months. Phil Knowles, fs '65, is manager of the new Sears store in Nebraska City. Ramona Bock (Mrs. Leonard) Jacob, 2-yr. '61, resides at 4963 Miami, Omaha, where her husband is associated with Campbell's Soup company. The Jacobs have a son, Brian, UL Ramona taught three years at Ralston before her marriage. Among the 1965 summer candidates for master's degrees at Kearney State were: Joe Verbeek, '60, Gretna, and Tom Vincent, '58, Centerville, Iowa. Joe teaches industrial arts and Tom is assistant football and head track coach in their respective communities. Charles Francis, '60, has been named head basketball coach at Abraham Lincoln High in Council Bluffs. A junior high coach for two years, he was an assistant at AL last year.

Mr. and Mrs. David (Rae Mae Henry) Fulton, '60, 2 yr. '60, and son, Scott, 4, live

Mrs. Martha Campbell Aldrich, '81, Peru State's oldest known ex-coed, was present in June for commencement exercises when her granddaughter Karlene Dougherty (Mrs. Leland) Sherwood (left) was graduated. At right is Mrs. Sherwood's mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Aldrich Dougherty, fs '21. Mrs. Aldrich was honored at the commencement exercises.

at 322 North Seventeenth, Clarinda, Iowa, where David is a history instructor at Clarinda Community Collepe. Jerry Wanser, 61, is assistant principal of Wheat Ridge Junior High in Jefferson County, Colo. Mr. and Mrs. Wanser, the former Linda Nygaard, fs '61, and James Jay, 1,. live at 1425 South Estescway, Denver.

Anderson AFB, Guam . Their. address is 1114B Roberts terrace, APO, San Francisco, Calif. Chick Stessman, '61, is coaching football and basketball at Paseo High school, Kansas City, Mo. Mr. and Mrs. Stessman, the former Carol Ellenberger, fs '61, live at 5211 East 42nd street, North. They have three children. Richard Schoeppner, '60, is guidance counselor at Abraham Lincoln High, Council Bluffs. The Schoeppners and their three children, Ricky, 6, Donnie, 4, and Donna, lYz, live at 1531 Avenue F, Council Bluffs. Ray Unterbrink, '61, received his master's degree from Washington University, St. Louis in 1964, and has been promoted to supervi~or wit~ the department of ch~~d~en and family service for the state of Illinbis. Mr. and Mrs. Unterbrink, the former, Pat Thorkildson, fs '61, live at Moro, Ill.

Homecoming Reminder In 1966 It's Octoher 22

Donna Francis (Mrs. Donald) Schwertly, '61, is women's physical education instructor at Edison Junior High, Council Bluffs. Larry Carre, '60, is English teacher and drama coach at Sheridan Union High school, Sheridan, Colo. Mr. and Mrs. Carre, the former Janice Jahn, '60, have two children, Katharine Lee, 3Yz, and Kevin Lee, 11 months. The Carres live at 396 South Nome, Aurora.

Melissa Fulkerson (Mrs. Bernard) Jarecke,

'64, ninth grade speech teacher at Bellevue sent her speech students to get first-hand information concerning solutions to problems of our times. After visits to such places as the SAC Base in Omaha and the Nebraska Penitentiary, their findings were reported in the Omaha World-Herald. Mrs. Jerecke appeared in a summer production of the Omaha Community Play House. Roger West, Jr., fs '60, has been named assistant trainmaster for the Missouri Paat Memphis, Tenn. Mr. and Mrs. West, former Joan Bohlken, fs '59, have three

Track Improves (continued from page 5) by Joe Pelisek, first year member of the Bobcat coaching family. Golf Coach Larry E' ~er, business manager suffered a rather infamous season as his linksmen tasted victory once while bowing in eight matches and placing fourth in the NCC meet. Ebner has all five lettermen returning for next spring's outings. The ~96_5 Bobcat tennis team, coacheel by Darrell Wininger, education division head wound up third in the NCC, trailing winne~ Hastings and runner-up Wayne. In other matches, the racqueteers won one and dropped five matches.

IDied Information comes to the Peru Stater of the deaths of these alumni and friends Richard D. Moritz, '93, member of the 1893 football team, September 15, Lincoln. Until his retirement he had been associated with the University of Nebraska teachers college and was summer school director. Josephine Richards, '12, October, Red Cloud. She had been a member of the University of Pittsburgh faculty until her retirement.

Charlotte Rage (Mrs. D.L.) Robertson

'11, December 16, 1964, Lincoln. She was ~ teacher for 30 years in Nebraska from rural to English and Latin at the University of Nebraska.

(continued on next page)


!Died

I

(continued from preceding page)

Frances Willard Blake (Mrs. Joy Elmer) Morgan, '10, Washington, D.C., May 27. While ...

a Peru student, she was assistant to the Registrar "and secretary to the President. Since 1920, when her husband founded the N.E.A. Journal, she was active in volunteer work in the nation's capitol. _ Dr. John W. Wear, '14, Walnut Creek, Calif., Oct. 19. Dr. Wear had been the medical director of 11 western states for the Aetna Life Insurance Co. of San Francisco for. 2S years prior to his retirement in 1962 . Dr. and Mrs. Wear were present in May of 1964 for the Golden Anniversary Reunion of the class of 1914. William E. Shuman, '00, September, North Platte. A Nebraska law school grad, he practiced law until his recent retirement. Mrs. C. H. Marsh, assistant dean of women 1929-1946, October IS, Postville, Iowa. Survivors include daughter, Mario~ Marsh (Mrs. Gilbert) Brown, '27, fac 193S-38. Dr. Louise A. Nelson Garrett, fac SS-S6, St. Augustine, Fla., October 10. Claude E. Hutchinson, '11, Concrete1 Wash., August 28 . Maud Stephens (Mrs. Pete) Toews, '11, Hastings, July 2S. Earl Slothower, 'IS, Lincoln, August 17.

Anna May Dunten (Mrs. Grover H.) Meyer,

'06, Garter, S. D., September 16. Present in 19S6 with Mr. Meyer for the 1906 reunion, Mrs. Meyer taught in rural schools of Nebraska and South Dakota, including a sod house in 1912 where she taught 40 students. William S. Vance, a custodian at Peru for more than 40 years, Peru, September 20. For many years he played with the Peru band. Audra Wilkinson (Mrs. LeRoy) Cook, '16, McCook.

Barbara Majors (Mrs. William) Davenport, '92, former college librarian, Colum-

.. ¡

bus, September 13. A Peru resident from 1876 until 19S7 when she moved to Chappell. She had lived at Columbus since 1961, when her son, Fulton, '27, became junior high principal . Kenneth Stiers, '30, Auburn, September 7. A teacher in Nebraska for 2S years, and for six years Nemaha County superintendent, Mr. Stiers has been associated with the Follett Publishing company the past six years. Daisy Beard Nettleton Taylor, speech instructor from 1904-1911, February 26, Alhambra, Calif. She lived at Carmel from 1924 until 19Sl, when she moved to Alhambra.

Elvira N. Johnson (Mrs. O.M.) Good, bookkeeperatPeru State inl910's, April 26, Lincoln. Eleanor Wheeler, '03, Lincoln, December 27. Mary E. Struck, 'OS, Hiawatha, Kans~, March 14, 1962. Hilda Grosshans, 'lS. Francis T. Anderson, '17, Santa Clara, Calif., February 13. . Lulu Burket (Mrs. William) Day, '16, Lincoln, February, 1962. Eleanor M. Lally, fac 07-11, Cleveland, Ohio, August 6. After teaching at Peru, sh~

18

was on faculties of the University of Chicago and Western Reserve. Lloyd Beamer, '28, Mankato, Minn. He was industrial arts teacher at Franklin Junior High in Mankato since 1928.

Emilie Papez (Mrs. William P.) Kirk, art teacher from 28-47, Springfield, Ore., June 17. After leaving Peru, she taught at Lewis ton (Ida.) College and in public schools at Klamath Falls and Springfield. Dr. J. A. Jimmerson, '14, '22, Sun City, Ariz., June 18. Teacher for 30 years, Dr. Jimmerson had a career in military as an edu ca tor as well as in public schools. His military career spanned 3S years, including reserve status. He was executive dean at Peru from 1938 to 1943. Florence Lee Duvel, '11, Escondido, Calif., December 19, 1963. AnnaM. Booth, '12, BEd, '18, fac 18-19, Lindsay, Calif., April 28 . Arch Hosterman, fs '10,Lynwoed, Calif., August 7 . Frank Sharrar, '36, Alexandria, Va., 1960. Lewis Lotter, residence hall custodian, Peru, May 4. Clinton Jones, '14, Minden. Former Minden superintendent of schools, Mr. Jones served for 12 years on State Activities Association. Marion Livingston,¡! '05, '26, retired Nebraska City teacher, March 25. Wayne Good,fs'l6, Sherman Oaks, Calif., April 20. Arthur L. Hill, math professor from 1923 until 1941, Denver, Colo., November 23. Mr. and Mrs. Hill were organizers and enthusiastic Rocky Mountain Area Alumni chapter members. Arthur C. Lindahl, '27, bursar from 1953 until 1959, Nebraska City, September 29. A member of the band and orchestra at the college even after leaving the faculty, the December 2 concert by the Peru State College Band Ensemble was designated as a Memorial to Mr. Lindahl. He was a Foundation trustee. Lee Redfern, 'IO, Grand Island, November 13. He was a SO-year reunion attendant in 1960 . Ethel B. Cope (Mrs. Fred) McKnight, fs '23, Brock, November 13. Dr. Selma Sophia Konig, foreign language department head from 1932 to 1946, Milwaukee, Wis., December,1964. After leaving Peru, she taught at Racine and Kenosha, retiring five years ago after 4S years of teaching. Blanche Gard, campus school supervisor from 1930 until 19S7, Athens, Texas, May 17. Her teaching career included kindergarten work as a missionary in Japan with the Methodist Church . After leaving Peru, she operated a private kindergarten in Athens . W. Hugh Joy~ '97, San Gabriel, Calif., September 24, 1964. A civil engineer, Mr. Joy managed railroads in the Andes in Peru, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Guatemala, and Columbia, and was builder of a railroad in Persia in the 1930' s. Son of Anna Moorehead Joy, Peru's first woman graduate in 1870, survivors include brother Guy Joy, '97, sisters, Sarah Joy (Mrs. Oliver H.)Cleveland, '03, and Jennie Joy, '06. Kate Lincoln, college nurse in the early 19SO's, Phoenix, Ariz., September. Mabel Gustafson Quiller, '10, '25, Fort Collins, Colo., January 20, 1964.


Foundation Donors Honor Roll (CONTINUED

FROM

PAGE

9)

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JR. MRS. JOY ELMER (FRANCES WILLARD BLAKE) MORGAN, '11 , FS ' 11 MINNIE BAYER (Mis. W.A.) McFARLAND. • 14 IRENE FRINK (MRS. GROVER) BROWN,'17 EDNA BARNES (MRS. FRITIOF) JOHANSON • • 10 HELEN MILLER SMITH,'15 MARGUAR I TE MOUL TON PEEBLER, '16 LENA COLE (MRS. C.J.)HELM, '15 ANNA HAZEN WOOD. • 12 0RLEY D. CLEMENTS, '15 ELIZABETH CURRY (ti/RS. B. CttFFORD)HENDRICKS, '12 MARSHALL C. JONES, '14 ALICE.GRIESS. '16 ROSE L. HANSON, '12 CATHARINE M. KELLY 1MRS. GLEN A.) GALT, '17 UYNCE BURNEY Mo.RSH,' 17 ROBERT 0. VERNON, '14 EssE TEICH (MRS. JACKI EMMERT, • 11 FRANCES CHEZ (ti/Rs. PA UL R.) KINGSTON, '11 MR. MRS. WAYNE (HALLIE GATES) Gooo,Fs '16, '18 FLORENCE BOWER TRUE, • 11 RoY B. COEUR, '15 HELEN McKEE (Mis. L.E.J SAUER, '14 ALICE HUNT (MRS. R.C.) HARRISS, '10 BERTHA DETWILER, '1 2 MtLDRED HUFFER (MRS. ALFRED) NIELSEN,' 17 BEATRICE BLYTHE (MRS. E.H.) ADEE, • 1 5 MARY HIBLER (MRS. F .P.) BOWERSOX, '16 S. L. CLEMENTS, '12 BERNIECE BORCHERS (MRS. GEORGE) PETRING, '15 DR. LOUIS R. KILZER, '15 BESSIE MORGAN (MRS. WM.P.) McINTOSH, • 13 MR. & MRS. 0.H. (HAZEL FRYE) SCHWENKER.~OTH '17 ETHEL CLARY NATION, '17 AMEL I A CLARY YOUNG, • 14 Mo.RY CLARY McKEE, '17 CECELIA WEHRS FORELL, '11 FRED L. STODDARD, • 15 FLORENCE P. RINEHART, '16 CHARLES E. ANDREWS, '14 HAROLD L. SCHWENKER, •15 LYDIA (MRS. FRANK)ADAMS,'12 IRENE FERNEAU (MRS. L.E.) W1LEY,'15 .

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LILLIAN G. PORTENIER. '17 HELEN LAWRENCE MORGAN, '19 CORRINE WHITFIELD (MRs. GEORGE) SMITH, '15 OLIVE JACKSON WHITE. '15 MINA PERR IN (MRS. P.C.) CotLART. • 1 ROSE BANKS (MRS. ARTHUR) EMBREE, '10 EULALIE SHAFFER CALL OHLSSON, '11 HELEN MAJORS RIDDLE,"15 RALPH W. WAYBRIGHT,'15

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Mo.UDE

LAWRENCE HESKETT, '14 (MRS. WALTER) SAD I LEK, '13 NETTIE PRELL (MRS. REX) BA I LEY. • 13

Ex~A AKINS

OTTILIE BRAUER. '16 J. J. KLIMA. '15 DEL IA TARS CH. '1 0 ELSIE NEEF WALLACE, '15 M4RGARET WORTH (MRS. R.C.) HAWK INS. '18 ESTHER MURDOCK STOKES,FS'19 LILLIAN HANKS. '13 HATTIE LILLY {MRS. R.H.) SL.AGLE. '!3 LYLLIS AHN WETMORE, '17 Ft@ ~ERSON FE!STNER.'17 ~$£N RASl!lf!JSSEN, '18 -.u: li'!.MSER (Mls .V. J.)

-~-. ·12

LENORA COWELL (MRS. H.0.) GASSNER, '21 DR. ESTHER COLE (MRs. H.L.J FRANKL IN, '24 MR. MRS. JOE (JOHANNA ZABEL)JONES, BOTH '28 BLANCHE SEID SAGESER,'20 lvfABEL McGINNIS NEISWINTER.26 '26 BETTY GRAVES OSGOOD, '27 RUTH MAE LAWRENCE (MRS. N.E.) READ, '21 IRENE VEAL KUCERA. '26 MARIE LEPOIDEVIN,2 YR'24 ELLA TE !CH (MRS. H .H.) Rt LEY, 2 YR. '24 HAZEL HUTCHINSON (MRS. JACK) ANDERSON, FS '29 HENRIETTA FLECK (MRS. DALE) HOUGHTON, 2 YR '23 BELLE ERISMAN (MRS • JAMES) SWEEN IE. '20 GENEVIEVE NtCHOLAS (MRS. WtLLARD) HAYWARD. '29 VERNA SNELL, '29 W1 LMA TROE GEL (MRS. HENRY) PETERSON,FS'24 LORRIE ERICKSON (MRs. ED) PARSONS. '29 Mt LDRED REYNOLDS 0sTERHOUDT FS '25 C. HAROLD MARREN, '29 OPAL CARTER RASMUSSEN, '27

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PAULW. LAMB, 2 YR. 23 MR. & MRS. LON R. (Mi LDRED TIBBETS) GRAF, FS '29, '28 HELEN WILLIAMS (MRS. A.E.) CARESS, '26 IVA REAGAN (MRS. H.H.) HUSTON, '25 PHILENA UHLIG ESMAY,Fs'28 OTTO PABIAN, '27 HELEN DYE (MRS. CHARLES) SHERROD, FS '21 HARRIETT NELSON (MRS. RAY) HALL, FS '27 CORRINE FRYE (MRS. l.M.) RooT. FS ·29 MR. & MRS. ELDRED 0.(THELMA EVELYN HowE)MORTON,Fs'22, 2 YR. • 23 FERN JONES (MRS. CLARENCE) LASH, 2 YR. '22 ELLEN ALBER, 2 YR. '22 MR. MRS. WALTER (ELIZABETH SAVIDGE)BUETTGENBACH, '26,'28 MR. & MRS. PAUL (MARGARET THOMAS) WILCOX, BOTH 2 YR'22

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MR. MRS. FLOYD (ALICE BRANDT)CHASE, '29, '28 FRIEDA WOITZEL, '27 MARION DOWLING (MRS. FLOYD) CORNELL,! YR'22 LOUISE CARTER CAMERSON,FS'21 HAROLD 0. PETERSON. '27 RUTH BLOMQUIEST RUMLEY, 2 YR '24 LOLA LOHR CoE, • 24 DOROTHY JACKSON (MRS. ALBERT)Mi·L LER ,2YR' 21 KATHARINE SCHILL. '20 NEVA HOAK (MRS. LYLE) NI CHO LS, '21 MILDRED PATE (MRS. N.J.) IVERSON, '26 HAZEL OSBORNE (MRS. CLYDE) WALKER, '26 ERNA WO ITZEL (MRS. JUL IAN) DUNCAN, '27 HELENE. MILLER, 2 YR. '25 TILLIE SALZMANN (MRS. GLEN) ANDERSON, '20 DR. INEZ R. WELLS, '27 1930.'s IDA HARRISON, '36 HELEN M. KUCERA. '30 SUE WESNER SIEG, 2 YR'30 MARY ELLEN NAV !AUX (MRS. W .F.) WI GNA LL , 2 YR • '34 THRESA CLARK, 2 YR '32 Mo.RGARET ALBERT, '33 J .D. HOBAN, '37 GRACE -REIFF, '37 HELEN DUEY LOWRY, FS '35 PAULINE LYTLE SCOTT, '39 BtLL OKRENT, '30 HARVEY F. MICHELS. '36 RUTH NAVIAUX (MRS. ROBERT) HANSEN, '35 W1NTON M_. G_t_t,BERT. Fs'35

DR. ROBERTS. PATE, '34 MR. & MRs. DAVID (WILMA LICHTY) DUEY,Fs'38, 2 YR'38 ORA F. FERGUSON, '33 EARL G. WHIPPLE, '34 HELEN EADS RATHSAM.~33 DR. MARY MARGARET (HERVEY) WOLF, '33 LUCILLE IRWIN STONEMAN,'36 W. E. SUGDEN. '32 MRS. WALTER W. (MAXINE REAGAN) KiELSMIER,'30 ADA -BRADY (MRS • C .E.) MURPHY, '33 MAGDELINE PFISTER, '39 MARJORIE YOUNG (MRS • CLOYD) MYERS, '34 DALE D. NtCHOLLS. FS '35 MR. & MRS • KENNETH L. (KATHERINE BERGMAN) PACE, '35, 2 YR '32 MARCELLA 0GUREK • '31 MR. MRs. VtCTOR (MADONNA BRADY) GALINAS, '30 ISABELLE Mo.JORS (MRS. WARREN) HAYS. '39 . MR. & MRS. E • W • (MAX I NE RANDALL) CLAREY, BOTH FS'39 FAYE E. BROD GREEN. FS '38 DEVA H. ARMSTRONG, '38, '62 MARGIE E. WINTER, '35 MARJORIE MENDENHALL (MRs. A.B.) HUMPHREY,'34 HARRIET FtAU COATES, 2 YR'39 LANGFORD A. WAGGONER, '34 MR. & MRS. FREDER !CK J. (DOROTHY COATNEY) WALTER, '38, •39 ROY LIVELY, '39 INGRID JOHNSON (MRS. Roy) ALEXANOER, FS '39 MR. & MRS. RICHARD D. (JULIA O'BRIEN) SLAGLE. FS'37,Fs'35 E. G. VICKERS .• '36 RALF E. SCHOLL, '38 MR. & MRS. THEODORE W. (DOROTHY PERKINS)GRAVES, FS '41, FS '39 MR. MRS. WALTER (CARYL BOHL) UBBEN, '35, FS '35 STELLA SEWARD (MRS. W.E.) GARRISON, FS '35 MRS. VERRIL (ELEANOR MAY) THOMAS, '36 VELMA BARSTER (MRS. Louis) BODEN. • 36 0

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MR. MRS. R.L. (JUNE BRICKELL) RIGGINS, '39,'31 GLADYS KINSEY (MRS. JOHN W .) Sw I SHER. '30 MR. MRS. MONELL V. (HELEN MllRKING) NELSON, '31. FS '31 JEAN BLANKENSHIP MORGAN,2 YR'32 HAZEL BROADY (MRS. ALBERT) LAMPE , 2 YR • 37 IVA SHUBERT (MRS. CLYDE) MART IN. '34 RuTH DOWNER (MRS. JACK) HARVEY, '35 REV. H. E. IVENS. '31 MILDRED HANKS (MRS. WENDELL) ABBEY. '31 JANE HACKETT (MRS • CHUCK) CHEEK, '37 AL ICE BISGARD (MRS. LOWELL) ANDERSON, '36 E. MAUDE DISBROW, '34 EVEA RusE(MRs. DALE)BLACK, •34 CHLOE PA TE (MRS • GEORGE) LEHMAN, '36 M.A. Goo ING, FS •34 MARGARET GRAFFT DICKEY, '30 S • CLAY Coy. '31

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1940's EVELYN HACKER (MRS. RICHARD) READ, 2 YR '42 DOROTHY TEACHMAN BACHENBERG, '42 DR. MRS. C. THOMAS (MARJORIE KENNEDY) DEAN, BOTH '42 ARNOLD E. HECTOR, '42 ELDON REUTTER, '47 JOSEPHINE JANICEK (MRS. DEAN) SEYMOUR, FS '43 ALVERTA REHM (MRS. ART.JR.) WELLS, '46 ESTHER C. Wt.CK, '49 AMANDA JORN, '46 ANNA PFISTER (MRS. JAMES) WATKINS. '47 JtJ.l..J./I _DIEHM, '43

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JANET WATKINS. '48 HAZEL M. PALMER, '44 MARJORIE BROWN (MRS. JOHN) SJULIN, FS '45 RITA RUSSELL BOLINSKI, '40 DELZENE POTTER (MRs. C.H.) PETTET, '41 GERTRUDE H i l l TRIPLETT,'49 JosEPHINE C1TTA GooowN.Fs'41 ANNA Lou I SE SHORT. • 41 AGNES MUENSTER. '42 NtNA KANEL (MRS. E.R.J KLAUDT, '43 EULA REDENBAUGH, '40 MR. MRS. MAX (WILMA MtLLER) JACKSON, '42, 2 YR '42 RtcHARD W. PASCAL, '47 ANNA HROMADKA (MRS. Roy) SE !DELMAN, '41 DON C. WAGNER, '49 ROBERT W. WEBBER, '47 DOROTHY M. STEPAN, '47 DR. & MRS. L.C. (ELDA HAMEL) VEJRASKA, '42, 2 YR • 42

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HELEN ROGERS GEBHART,2 YR 42 MR. MRs. LEROY (NANCY JoNEs) RcDFERN'.41 ,'42 MR. MRS. WtLLARD (JEAN MEISTER) REDFERN, '49, '48 MR. MRS. MERLE (MARGARET LEWIS) BAUER, '48, RUTH WALKER HOWE, 2 YR '49 MR. & MRS. KENNETH K. KNAPP.~'40, 2 YR '55 LORETTA M. WERNSMAN, Fs'48 MRS. GEORGE (ELS IE PARR ET) GRUNWALDT, '40 OLIVER W. JOINER, '49 MAX A. BURROUGHS, FS '43 MR. MRS. JOHN L. (DONAL·DEEN PARRIOTT) LEWIS, Fs'48. FS'47 MR. MRS. GERALD (ARLENE LOWE) MATSCHULLAT,'49,'63 LYDIA VoslCKY (MRS. E.A.) LEWIS, 2 YR '43 MARGARET CLARK (MRS. A .0.) RULLA, 2 YR '49 WILMA PARNELL (MRS. HOWARD) STEVENS, '41 RosEMARY TIEHEN (MRS. DoNI WILLIAMS, 2 YR '41 JOHN RHODUS, '42 MR. MRs. MARK (PATRICIA CARMINE) RUSSELL, '45 ROBERTA SNOKE (MRS. WtNIFRED) HARTMAN, FS '46 BETTY KENNEDY (MRS. JOHN) LEEDS. '43 RUTH HUTCHESON. '42 DR. JAMES F. CRAWFORD, '41 PHYLLIS BENSON (MRS. WALTER) HOFFMAN, '41 DR. & MRS. ARMON F. (EVELYN GATZ) YANDERS, BOTH '48 MAE JUNE YOUNG (MRs. ROBERT) BERGERON, '42 DALE RICH CHRISTIAN, '47 MR. & MRs. RALF 0. (A I LEEN WHEELDON) GRAHAM,BOTH'48 Ot I VE PuRUCKER (MRS • WAYNE) ANDERSON, '40 DOLORES SANDUSKY IRELAND,FS '40 MR. & MRS • Ross F. (GRACE MUENCHAN )RUSSE LL,• 41 , • 42 MARYL. ACORD, 2 YR '42 BEULAH LIVINGSTON (MRS. CLAYTON) EVANS,• 40 IN MEMORY OF FRED Wooos. BY DR. BILL M. Wooos, '45

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1950's FLORENCE COLGLASER •59

HALFH~DE,

LORRAINE L. HAACK, '58 MADGE CASEY (MRS • WILBUR) BROADY, '57 SAM BUCKMINSTER, • 59 MR. & MRS. W1LLIAM (IMOGENE RADFORD) CUMMINS, '51 , '52 MARGARET SPELLMAN (MRS. ALLEN K.J HARROLD, '50 RUTH MARSHALL, Fs'58 ROBERT NORVELL, '58 MR. MRS. LOREN (LORRAINE BIPPES)SCHULER, FS'55, '57 EDMUND W. BRISSETTE.JR. ,"56

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PERU STATE COLLEGE Campus of a Thousand Oaks Peru, Nebraska 68421

U.S. Postage

PA I I> Permit No. 4 Peru, Nebraska

Foundation Donors Honor Roll

• • •

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SHIRLEY ZABEL (MRS, 'WILLIAM) FRANZEN, FS 'S1 MR. & MRS. ARNOLD (SHARON GR IEN INGER )EHLERS. 'S9, 2 YR 'S8 RAYMOND EHLERS, 'S8 VERA JACOBS (MRS. RALPH) HOGAN, 'S2 DELA MERITT POLSTON,'SS DARLENE JANSEN (MRS. ROBERT) ANDERSON. 2 YR '58 OSCAR GROVES, 'S6 MR. & MRS. DONALD (VIVIAN SHEW) WENDT,'S5, '59: FS'54 EMMA PFISTER (MRS. A.V.) PRICE, '53 ESTLENE JUNE SLATER (MRS. JAMES) JANETZKE, '5S Wit.MA KLEIN (MRS. GENE) KE LL Y, 2 YR '55 MARVIDENE SHOWN (MRS. GEROLD) WARWICK,2 YR'S8 DOROTHY M. TILLER, 'SI WILLIAM Q. PHAROAH, 'S6 BOBBY DEAN LIVINGSTON, '50 JOHN A. HAMMER, 2 YR '53 MAY STEWART. ·so LUELLA DYE (MRS. f.l.H.) STAFFORD, 'SS MRS. JAYNE MONROE, '58 MARY ANN SMEJDIR (MRS. ROBERT) WEBER, '54 DR. L. FRED THOMAS, 'S1 RUDOLPH J. EICHENBERGER, '54 MR. & MRS. ELDON (BETTY WHIPPLE)TETEN, 'S1, '58: '60 tJAVID LONGFELLOW, '58 ToMW.RYAN, ·so EDNA STEOLE (MRs. OSCAR) FR I TZ, 2 YR 'S9 ROSE MARIE COOK (MRS. ROBERT) PURSEL, 2 YR '54 MR. & MRS. IVAN C. HAITH, 2 YR 'S8, FS '62 DR. & MRS. JOHN (DORIS KERL) VACEK, BOTH '50 MR. & MRS. RAY (ROSE EDELMAN) Ruz ICKA. 'S9, '58 CAPT. MERRITT J. SWINNEY,'S2 JULIA WHITNEY CHASE, 'S9 MAXINE EBERT (MRS. JACK) STILWELL, FS 'SI MR. & MRS. PHILIP RIHNER, '58, FORMER STAFF TED McCARTNEY, 'S1 MARGARET LONG KELLY, '58 WILLADEAN- SPIER (MRS, PAUL)KAUFFMAN, Fs'S3 DARRELL W. FISCHER, FS '55 HOWARD W. NICHELSON. '53 MR. & MRS. DEAN (MABEL - NEDVED) ScoGGINS,'S8, 2 YR'S3

90

DR. HARVEYS. loEus. '56,'59 GERA LO W. KERR, 'SS MARY ANN FUERST (MRS. DELBERT) CHAUSSE, 'S7 SHARON OCKER, 'S3, 'S9 EUARDA HUNTSMAN. 'SO JOHNILEE HENNING, '58 ADELA JUN (MRS. MURRAY) W I L L I A MS , ' SG 196o·s FRANCES BURGAN HARDIN,Fs'65 MR. & MRS. JAMES (MARION WEBER )THOMPSON. '62, '63 Jo ANN FRERICHS, '64 WILMA NOFSGER (MRS. HAROLD) BEER, '64 THELMA CLINKENBEARD, '63 MR. & MRS. LARRY (RAMONA GRINDLE) SWETT, '63, Fs'64 ENOCH W, SHEPHERD, '63 RUBY K. LOCKWOOD, '60 GARY A. STOVER, '64 CHRISTINE NAVRKAL, FS '65 LILLIAN CHAMBERLAIN, FS '64 WILLIAM E. ScoTT, '65 DUANE ARENDS, '60 MR. & MRS. ROGER (MARY ANN LEWELLYN) NOELL,'64, '63 MRS. ARETTAS KERL, FS '64 MARGARET BEARD (MRS. THOMAS) HORMEL, "63 LESTER MILLER, "60 RICHARD SCHOEPPNER, '60 BETTY HOBBIE COGDILL, '63 DOROTHY TYSON FRENCH, '60 ALTA McDANIEL (MRS. HENRY) KRAMER, '64 Bos MAIXNER, FS '6S ALTA HALL, FS '6S LUCILLE RUSSELL (MRS. EARL) HICKS, '60 NANCY MCCARTNEY (MRS. LONNIE) HOUCHEN, '63 VIOLET M. RICHES, '60 MR. & MRS. BILL (JOANN PAR !OTT) RUSSELL, '65,'S9 MR. & MRS. DONALD SCOBY, BOTH '60 GLADYS EDMONDS ACKLEY, '62 HARRY C. BRYANT, '60 NEOMA EICHENBERGER, '63 VIRGINIA FR~NCOIS, '62 ANNA KNOSP, '61 FRED BLAKE, '64 CAROL STIVER MORDAH, ? YR'60 GERALD BIPPES, "62 RoN COTTON. '64 SHERRIE SMITH, FS '65 JOYCE ANN CARMAN, '61 CHARLES R. FRANCIS, '60 SHARYLIN VRTISKA (MRS. LAVERNE) KNOCK, '63

LONN PRESSNALL, '6S RAYMOND OGLE, '64 MAXINE RUSSELL (MRs. FAY) MOORE, '63 MR . & MRS. GARY (MARY JARVIS) SCHLANGE, BOTH '63 MR. & MRS. BILL (LINDA RISLEY) LAWLOR, BOTH '63 IN MEMORY OF WILLIAM VANCE. FORMER STAFF, BY HIS GRANDDAUGHTER GRACE HANNAFORD RUSSELL. '61 FACULTY, STAFF- AND FRIENDS WALDO WILHOFT, '26 FORMER FACULTY DONALD K. CARLILE, FACULTY DR. & MRS. NEAL S. GOMON, FACULTY, '6S A.V. LARSON, PROF. EMERITUS MRS, OLIVER STEVENSON WAYNE SAYER, STAFF HAROLD PATTERSON, STAFF MR. & MRS. R.T. BENFORD, '27, FACULTY; FS '51 CLARA M. BOATMAN, FACULTY MR. & MRS. MICHAEL LAROCCA, FOOTBALL SCHOLARSHIP DONOR, PARENTS OF STUDENT ELMER J. NEMEC, FACULTY DR. & MRS. HAROLD BORAAS, FACULTY MR. & MRS. FRED STEPHENS, SHE STAFF LYLE G. STROM, FACULTY MR . & MRS • LE LAND (KARLENE DouGHERTY)SHERwooo. • 57. FACULTY; 'S8 DR. & MRS. KEITH MELVIN,'32, FACULTY; '55 MR. & MRS. ERNEST LONGFELLOW, '21 ,BOTH STAFF NORMA L. D!DDEL, FACULTY BEATRICE PATE YA~DERS, DAUGHTER OF FORMER PRES!· DENT, W. R. PATE NELL IE M. CAREY, FORMER FAC. INA D. SPROUL, FACULTY DR. & MRS. JOHN C. CHRIST, FACULTY; '53, '60, FACULTY MR . & MRS. GEORGE RATH, PROFESSOR EMERITUS L.B. MATHEWS, '15, PROFESSOR EMERITUS; IN MEMORY OF RUTH VERNON MATHEWS, '16, FORMER FACULTY IDA MAE BRACKNEY, FORMER FACULTY MR. & MRS. ROBERT L. (MARY RILEY) BOHLKEN, '59, FACULTY: 2 YR'59 MR. & MRS. JEROME D. STEMPER, FACULTY ANONYMOUS·-4

FACULTY WOMAN'S CUJB INVESTORS LIFE INS. Co. DIVIDEND ON KENNETH STROUPE LIFE POLICY ROCKY MOUNTAIN ALUMNI CHAPTER IN f>'iEMORY OF Louis LOTTER, BY RESIDENTS OF DELZELL f\'IE:N'S HALL SALE OF "HILLS OF PERI.!' LOUISE MEARS GEOGRAPHY SCHOLARSHIP FUND ALMA ASHLEY, FACULTY STANLEY LONGFELLOW, '54, '61, FACULTY CLARK & ENERSEN MR . & MRS. ARTHUR HILL, FORMER FACULTY MR. & MRS. A. G . WHEELER.FORMER FACULTY MR.&MRS. L.D. EBNER, FACULTY MR. & MRS. WILLIAM RANKIN.FORMER FACULTY MR. & MRS. GEORGE (LETA BALDWIN)DEVORE.EMERITUS STAFF. FS '15 MRS. CORABELLE TAGGART, FORMER STAFF L. K. CALLAHAN MR. & MRS . T. l . FR IE ST, FORMER FACULTY.FACULTY FRANCES F. F1ELD,FORMER FACULTY MR. & MRs. R.C. MAJORS, '30, STAFF MR . & MRS . LYLE MCKERCHER.FACULTY, '65 MR. & MRS. Ross (MARYON THOMAS)ADAMS, '41; '55, '59, FACULTY !NICE McCORKLE DUNNING, '25, FORMER FACULTY IN MEMORY OF ARUTHUR C. LINDAHL, '27 MR. & MRS. H.W. (ALICE GRUSH) JOHNSON,'37, FACULTY: FS '65 MR. & MRS. JACK (LUELLA DREIBus)MCINTIRE,'41,'58: FS '35 CLARA M. McCLATCHEY, '49, FORMER FACULTY MARY CLARKE, '45, PROFESSOR EMERITUS MARJORIE WEST (MRS. EARL) HART,'28, FORMER FACULTY MR. & MRS. GLEN (EVELYN WILLIAMS) SHEELY,'39, FACULTY,; FS '37 MR. & MRS. CLYDE (BETTY NEIL )BARRETT, '56, '58, FACULTY: '57'

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1965 The Peru Stater (Nebraska)  

1965 issues of the Peru Stater, Peru State College (Nebraska)

1965 The Peru Stater (Nebraska)  

1965 issues of the Peru Stater, Peru State College (Nebraska)

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