Page 1

·Nebraska's Oldest College

Meeting Of Nebraska Councn Of Gllurehes Held On Campus A meeting of the Nebraska Council of Churches was held Monday, Sept. 20, at 8:00 p.m., in the Conferenee Room of the Student Center. Those attending from the faculty were Dr. Neal s. Gomon, Dr. Keith L. Melviri, Dr. Galen Dodge, Dr. Wininger, F. H. Larson, and Miss Fried.a Rowoldt, and other organization sponsors. Thos~ attending from the Peru clergy were Father Rm:old Birkle of St. Clara's parish; R~verend Robert Linder, Methodist minister; and Reverend Wilfred Carter, Christian minister. Those representing the Auburn clergy were Reverend .Scht>ciler, Reverend Norman, and Reverend Jurgens, Lutheran $isters. Others attending from out of town, were Pastor Alvin Peterson, Representative of the Nebraska Council of C~ches; Carol H. Lemon, of Liil'eoln, executive secretary of .the Nebraska Council of Churches;/and William 0. Haney, eh~ of the Departinent of Campus Ministry. Three students from the college attended. They were Dennis Flattre, Midwest Region president of L.S.A.; LaVelle Hitzemann, vice president of the Peru L.S.A.; and Gary Newman, pres• ident of the Peru Wesley Fellowship. The. meeting was held for the purpose of discussing a lack of . fadlities for the campus ministry on the Peru campus. The meetings had in previous years, been held in the music hall, and last year they were held in the Campus School. The council decided the C a mp u s School would be adequate again this year. There were suggestions made to have the ·six campus denominations have their meetings as one single body. There was also discussion of a common chapel for all denominations. This ehapel would be used as a meeting place of discussion between the student and the minister of his choke. It was concluded that a meeting next month of the various religious sponsors should be in order.

The Voi~e of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . .

Peru Pedagogian PERU. NEBRASKA

Volume 61

Number 1

these people is getting smaller each year as more schools are requiring a minimum of the bachelors degree for beginning elementary teachers. Off-campus classes are being held at Beatrice, Falls City and Plattsmouth with a total enrollment of 66. At least one more off-campus class will begin next week at another center. These students are not counted in the total of 1,041. Total Campus Laboratory S ch o o I enrollment is 289, up four students over a year ago. There are 109 students in senior high (9-12) compared to 118 in 1964-65; 48 in junior high (78), seven more than a year ago, and 132 in the elementary school (K•6), compared with 126 last year. "Future growth of the college will depend in ability to house students," President Gomon said. "Our dormitories are above capacity a n d classroom space is at a premium. Opening of the Fine Arts Center later in the fall will provide some much-need-

ed additional classroom space but will fall short of present requirements and need in the immediate future. Nearly 200 would-be students were denied admission or were discouraged from attending Peru State this fall because of an acute housing shortage in college-operated facilities or the community. "The housing problem will be no better next fall as the earliest additional dormitories could be made available, if approved; would be the summer or fall of 1967. The 1965 fall enrollment exceeded our most optimistic estimates by more than 100 students and with a backlog of another 200 failing to gain admission, another 300-bed dormitory would be filled as soon as its doors would open. With no major classroom additions approved for the next two years, the college will be hard-pressed to meet the needs of the area until a major break-through in construction of added facilities is made."

Bus Stop Scene Of Peruvian Supplement Cash Payments The supplements to the 1965 For Students Homecoming Play' Peruvian were distributed last The cast for the annual Home- week. The 12 page addition to Now Available

coming play is in the second week of rehearsal on William Inge's Bus Stop. The play, originally a Broadway hit, was also made into a popular movie. The action takes place in a small town restaurant and the plot involves the lives of eight individuals brought there together by a storm.

Bus Sf op is a challenging scri:pt for actors and stage crew alike, but the director, Mr. Robert D. Moore, expressed high hopes for the success of the production. The performance will be held at 7:30 p.m. on the evening of October 23, as a traditional part of the Homecoming celebration.

the annual completes a pidure record of the entire college year. Spring sports, May Fete, the spring play, Open House, the Fine Arts Center Dedication, and Graduation were included in the final pages. Any student not receiving a supplement should contact Mr. Stewart Linscheid or any member of the Peruvian staff. Copies are being mailed to the 1965 graduates and to those students who did not return to Peru this year.

Bock Attends NEA Convention

Best

Co1lege

OCTOBER 4, 1965

Enrollment Of 1,041 Taxes Facilities; Housing And Classroom Space Short Peru State College has set an all-time enrollment record of 1,041 students for the first semester of the 1965-66 academic year, an increase of 20.2% over last year's 866, according to President Neal S. Gomon. Full-time enrollment has increased even more sharply from 723 a year ago to 943 this fall, up 30.4%. Part-time enrollment dropped from 143 to 98. The freshman class leads the way with 376 full-time students compared with 263 a year ago. There are 211 sophomores, 64 more t h a n last year; 164 juniors, two fewer than in 1964-65, and 188 seniors compared with 143 last year. The number of special students, four, is the same as a year ago. Evening class enrollment dropped sharply from 143 to 98 due largely to a reduction in offerings as well as smaller demand. Most evening class students are elementary teachers in service in the area with less than a bache!or's degree. The number of

Nebraska's

Monthly cash benefits now can be paid to students who qualify under a change in the social security law. Students up to age 22 may be eligible for benefits on the account of a parent who has retired, become disabled, or died. Students whose benefits were stopped when they reached 18 will have to file a new application in order to have their payments started again. Benefit payments can be retroactive to January 1965 and may be made for a vacation period of up to four continuous months.

Check with your social security office if: The cast was selected through Miss Dorothy Bock, senior at open try-outs on September 16, Peru State and president of the and parts were assigned to many -you are a full-time student Student Education Association of students new to Peru this year. Nebraska, attended two national -you are not yet 22 or atThese newcomers include Alicia education meetings this summer. tained that age in 1965 Andrews, playing .the part of a In Washington, D. C., Dorothy waitress; Janice Hauk as the -are unmarried or were marwas Nebraska's voting delegate chanteuse; Brian Collins porried after January 196& to the Student NEA National traying a sheriff; and John. SautConvention, June 17 to 21. Highter playing the young cowboy. -you are the son or daughter Four members of Peru's facul- Returning to the Peru stage lights included a special tour of of a parent who worked unthe White House, a visit to NEA ty traveled to Kearney Friday, again this season are Myrene Dader social security but is now Sept. 24 for a joint annual con- vis, in the role of the restaurant National Headquarters, and meetretired, disabled, or deceased ings at the Mayflower Hotel. ' ference sponsored by the Nebras- owner, and Dan Knudsen playThe national NEA convention Lka Council on Industrial Ar t s ing the pathetic college profesThe people at the district social Teachers Education, Nebraska In- sor. In the part of the bus driver was held in New York City, June 22 to July 1. Dorothy, along security office or a field represendustrial Education Association is Ken Boatman, and Mel Hester and the Nebraska Vocational As- portrays a lonesome ranch hand. with other student state repre- tative who visits in or near your sentatives, was a stage guest at community, will be glad to ex.sociation. the NEA General Assembly at plain further and help you apply Attending the eonference were The stage manager is Jon Da- Madison Square Garden. A tour for benefits if you think you are Dr. C. Vernon Siegner, Mr. D. vis. Assisting backstage are vol- of the United Nations Building eligible. The office serving this Jarvis, Mr. Gordon Gavin, and unteers from the Peru Dramatic was included in sightseeing trips. area is located in Room 400, NaMr. Don Weiner. Mr. Harold Johnson, SEAN ad- tional Bank of Comme11ce BuildClub. Dorothy Bock, assistant divisor, also attended the New ing, 13th and 0 Streets, in LinMr. Ray Karnes from the Unirector, and Dale Burgess, publi- York convention. He plans to coln. It is open from 8:30 a.m. to versity of Illinois gave the main city manager, are also members discuss his trip and show slides 4:30 p.m. and on Thursday eveaddress entitled "Inereased Exat a future PSEA meeting. nings. of the behind-the-scenes crew. (Continued on page four)

Four Attended :Vocational Conference

LIBRARY

Peruvian Pictures Dates Oct. 12-13-14 Organization Pictures To Be Made Oct. 14 The Peruvian individual and organization pictures this year were again ·contracted with Bill Oliver of Delmar Studios. The schedule for these pictures will be: Tuesday andi Wednesday, Oct. 12 and 13 and Thursday morning, Oct. 14, individual pictures; Thursday after no o n , Oct. 14, organization pictures. Since a yearbook represents a record of a person's school career, the Peruvian staff hopes all Peru students will strive to have their photographs taken· during these three days. Students are to be reminded that there is no finandal obligation for the s e pictures.

Nebraska Poet Laureate To Appear In Convo Dr. John G. Neihardt internationally known American epic and lyric poet and poet laureate of Nebraska, will present a reading from his works at P e r u , Nebr., at 9:10 a.m., October 27, 1965 in the college auditorium. Dr. Neihardt's appearanee will be sponsored by the convocation committee. Currently Dr. Neihardt is lecturer in English and poet in residence at the University of Missouri, Columbia; he has held that position since February, 1949. The program by Dr. Neihardt in Poetic Values is one of a series he is presenting throughout Ne bra ska over a tour of the state that is a reenactment of a personal appearance series he presented 40 years ago. At that time he made a "laureate tour" of the state which so many years was his home, appearing at most of Nebraska's universities and colleges, and before many civie and other organizations. Recently it was suggested that the tour be repeated in the light of his extensive accomplishments· in the field of literature and the widespread recognition as one of the country's leading poets during the intervening years. The recognition has induded his success as a lecturer and reader of poetry. Although born in Sharpsburg, Ill., 84 years ago, Dr. Neihardt is a son of Nebraska by adoption. With his family he moved to Nebraska when he was ten years old; he received his higher education at Nebraska Normal College, where he completed his studies in 1897. For many years he made his home at Bancroft. It was while a resident of Nebraska that he wrote all except two of his lyric poems, all hi s short stories, and two of his great epic poems in the "Cycle of the West." The Nebraska State Legislature in 1921 made Dr. Neihardt poet laureate of Nebraska. He holds an honorary degree from the University of Nebraska, where he was professor of poetry in 1923, and another from Creighton University, as well as one from the University of Missouri. (Continued on page five)

PERU STATE COLLEGt oi::ott

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COLLEGE AND CITIZENS ARE GRATEFUL TO SENATOR HUGHES Peru State College and the citizens of Peru community are grateful to Senator Calista Cooper Hughes for her continuing effort . for passage of Resolution 73. Official notice was received from Hugo F. Srb, clerk of the legislature, that Resolution 73, introduced by Senator Hughes, First district, was passed by the Nebraska Legislature. The Resolution stated, "Be it resolved . . . (1) That Peru State College be exempt from the provisions of Legislative Resolution 44, and continue operation of its elementary and secondary school. (2) That the facility may be used so long as it is necessary for the operation of Peru State College." The original resolution, which called for closing campus schools at the University of Nebraska and Peru State Col~ lege, was apparently based on opinion that all cost of operation came from state funds; and thus the state was completely subsidizing the education of the students attending these schools. Upon further examinations of the facts, it was revealed that the state portion is very small at Peru State. The college contracts with the local elementary district for the education of children grades kindergarten through eight, and the college receives tuition for all high school students (912) from the county free high school tuition fund. These sources produce nearly 85% of the cost of operation of the campus school. Senator Hughes was the only senator who voted in opposition to Resolution 44 which would have closed P e r u State's campus school by 1968. Only through strenuous efforts on her part, which included p e r s o n a l consultation with every senator, was Resolution 73 passed. -By Dick Berthold

ELIZA MORGAN HALL BY MARY ANN SHARP

The traditional structure remains the same spite new additions and occasional repairs. The portico still reads Eliza Morgan Hall. But generations have decorated its rooms, slept, studied, and relaxed within. With the start of this new year, a new collection has formed. The purpose of this column is to acquaint the reader with these residents of Morgan Hall and with the events taking place. But, it should also help to inform them about each other. There are two hundred girls in the dorm this year, which is a sizeable increase over the previous term. The number of n e w freshmen almost equals the total of the other three classes combined. No longer do they hide in corners and bark at every command. It's practically the opposite. That gave just two weeks for the upperclassmen to be generals. Dorm rules were decreed and energetically enforced with the hope that they wouldn't be slighted as the newness wore off. As initiators, however, the job was largely left to outside forces and the goober juice events. Little activity has taken place other than this, except for wing division meetings and one large "tea party" get-together. The screams and awes that have been heard are not from torture or

complete disillusionment. They are the reactions to announcements of engagement that I am sure Morgan Hall has been hearing for years. Mary Sautter has just included a Peru graduate, Mr. Charlie Caverzagie, into her June plans. He is teaching world history on the sophomore level in Plattsmouth, Nebraska. Mary will graduate this spring. Pat Knippelmier and J o e Smith have set no special date as yet, which leaves more time for concentration on his graduation in June. His major is in the field of chemistry. Pat i&.<1 junior majoring in elementary education,. As a home economics major, Barb Aylsworth will be taking many courses to her advantage. She is engaged to Erik Foged who is a history major and an upperclassman to this beginning freshman. Another on the taken list is Myra Murren who is a major in elementary education. She has announced her engagement to Mr. Dave Wickham of Salem, Nebraska. Dave attended Peru two years ago, but did not return this fall. Myra plans h e r graduation this June along with the scheduled June wedding. By doing some roving reporter investigating, I have found: that the activities covered a wide range over the summer. Some of these girls discovered they had hidden talents. Mary Gonnerman

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF

Richard Berthold -----------------------------------Editor Barbara Gordon ________________________ Personnel Manager Elaine Neddenriep __________ Layout Editor & Photographer Charles Richards _____________________________ Sports Editor Mary Sautter -------------------------------Feature Editor Bill Bowen ------------------------------Business Manager Joan Bretthorst -------------------------------Copy Editor Jackie Swegler -------------------------------Copy Editor Mel Hester ----------------------------------Photographer Alicia Andrews ___________________________________ Reporter Bobbie Armstrong ----------·----------------------Reporter Myrene Davis ------------------------------------Reporter Robert Minks ------------------------------------Reporter Dan Strecker -------------------------------------Reporter Mary Ann Sharp ---------------------------------Reporter Leland Schneider ---------------------------------Reporter Louis Rogers -------------------------------------Reporter Nancy Jarvis -------------------------------------Reporter Mike Sullivan ------------------------------------Reporter Stewart Linscheid ---------------------------------Advisor

worked for an egg plant in York, Nebraska, where she flipped 138 eggs a minute! Cheryl Davis became a door-to-door salesman for the Blind Crafters in Omaha, selling brooms and mops. She still limps on her left foot. Judy Elsinger worked in Yellowstone Park this last summer. She worked at the Old Faithful Lodge as a sales clerk. She said it was interesting and educational and that so were the rangers. She acquired a good talent for hitch-hiking, but she commented, "The bears always caused more attention than we did." An educational experience from many aspects was that of Janice Johnson who worked for the mental institution in Glenwood, Iowa. Carol Chandler and Nancy Muse both served as coun. sellors for a Girl Scout Camp outside Denver known as Tomahawk 'Ranch. Kris Wewel served: as a governess and tutor for a family in Colorado. I believe the most. memorable summer, however, would be that of Ann Epley, who traveled to Europe. Her father is stationed in Germany with the U. S. Army. If an enlisted man has children under the age of twenty-three and in college, they are entitled to one free trip a year to where their parents are stationed. Ann joined her family in Germany and: then traveled throughout the Scandinavian countries. She returned only two weeks before this term was to begin.

DELZELL HALL BY BILL BOWEN

With the beginning of the Fall semester Delzell Hall is back to its bustling self again. There are currently 158 residents in "Ye Olde Castle." There are still some rooms with three people in them, but on the whole the situation has improved considerably over last year. There are two of our residents in the hospital undergoing treatment for leg injuries. Dick Estes and Dom La Rocca are both in Lincoln hospitals. There are some very undesirable differences in the dormitory this year, and: among the foremost is the new paper cup pop dispenser. I realize that the lack of pop bottles is a great relief to the janitors, but the new method of dispensing pop leaves much to be desired. About half of the time the machine doesn't work, and when it bothers to react to the insertion of a dime, one can never be sure that the machine will dispense in the' proper sequence. It is very unfunny when to see the ice fall, followed by the pop, finally followed by the paper cup. Unhappily, this particular order of events occurs quite regularly. Perhaps suggesting that the old way of dispensing pop be used again sounds suspiciously conservative. However, let's be reasonable and put back the machines that gave us ten cents worth of pop for our dimes. The dormitory has a new system of dorm meetings this year. Starting this semester each wing will hold meetings every two weeks. This new method will bring about closer coordination between the dorm residents and their ,counsellors. In this way, complaints, questions and assistance will be considerably easier to handle. Delzell also has a new housemother this semester, Mrs. Longfellow. She helped out a great

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deal of the time last year, and so she is not new to Delzell. S h e handles a very difficult job with ease and friendliness.

nis Flattre, Roger Capps, Rod Kettlehut, Ron Kroll, Bill Rinne, Jack Rinne, Ed Stillinger, and Dave Hensley.

Should any of you Delzell residents have a bit of information that you think should be included in this column, let me know. This is your medium of expression, and if its printable, I'll include it.

The new west wing, which is being used for the first time this year, is very modern and comfortable. Conveniences are carpeting through the hall, fluorescent lights in all rooms, plenty of space for books and clothes, and a general modern atmosphere in the whole wing.

Remember The Fall Variety Show tomorrow night, Oct. 5.

MAJORS HALL BY MIKE SULLIVAN

One of the busiest places in Majors Hall is the games room, with the snooker table being the center of attraction. From noon until 10:30 p.m., it is constantly in use. The T.V. room is also enjoyed by many of the dorm's residenfs. Our dorm counselors for this semester are Dale Borman, Den-

We have several students in Majors Hall wishing to sell certain things for very reasonable prices. In Room 122, there is an AM/FM radio for sale. In Room 108, a green blazer is for sale for $10.00. Also for sale is an S-90 Honda, two months old for $270. For information on the Honda, : contact Room 226. ' It's been a little chilly in some of the rooms this past week, as there has been a heating problem in the dorm and an excess of unseasonable weather.

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Bobcats Play Well At Maryville, Missouri ··But Lose 28-18 Ervin Pitts, Peru State College football coach, looked out h i s office window Monday morning as heavy rain washed the Peru State campus. "Not much different than last Saturday night," Pitts said. "Only then it rained Northwest Missouri State passes," he said as he mused over Northwest Missouri's 28 to- 18 victory over his Bobcats at Maryville, Mo. "Poor pass defense beat us," the Peru State mentor said. However, he continued with praise for most other aspects of the Bobcat football picture. "Our rushing and passing game was much better than against Lincoln University, and: in general our defense against Northwest Missouri's rushing game was adequate," Pitts said. Northwest Missouri's Leo Pappas riddled the Peru State pass defense with nine completions in 17 attempts for 174 yards and one touchdown. It was Pappas' passing which rocked Peru State on her heels in the late stages of the second quarter and throughout the third canto when the Bearcats tallied 21 points to earn their third straight victory over Peru State. Concerning the Peru State game, Coach Pitts was elated over the showing of freshman quarterback Carl Satterfield, Chicago. The Windy City smoothie replaced Harry Leth, Rocky River, Ohio, late in the first quarter and paced the Bobcat offense the rest of the way. Satterfield, running the pass-run option as if he invented: it, completed 11 of 21 aerials for 133 yards and three Peru State touchdowns. The 5'11", 160 lb. quarterback also contributed 67 yards net rushing in 11 carries to dominate t h a t portion of Bobcat offensive statistiCs. Leading 7-6 with one minute remaining in the first half, Northwest Missouri broke Peru's back by driving 58 yards to score only four seconds before the intermission. The Bearcats took over on their own 42 following a punt by Peru's Bill Wit-

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ty, Syracuse. Northwest's Pappas arched a rainbow pass to Bob Albanese who raced to the Peru 2-0 before being pushed out of bounds. Freshman Mike Crank boomed to the Bobcat 8-yard line; another Pappas to Albanese pass moved the ball to the one, and Mike Crank crashed in on the next play. Pappas kicked the second of his four successful conversions and Northwest Missouri breathed easier with a 14-6 halftime margin. The Bearcats had bro ken ahead late in the first quarter when Crank scurried 26 yards to score. Peru's Phil Malone, Plattsburg, Mo., blocked Pappas' first extra-point kick, but an infraction of the rules by Peru gave Pappas a successful second attempt. Peru, with Satterfield at the helm, came back to take the following kickoff and drive 61 yards in 12 plays to score. An eightyard pass from Satterfield, as he was being knocked off his feet, to fullback Roy Windhorst, Deshler fullback, counted the Peru touchdown. Windhorst out-fought two green-shirted defenders to make a spectacular grab. On the extra point kick attempt, Northwest's Bob Leach blocked Windhorst's boot. Northwest Missouri recovered a Peru State fumble on the Bobcat 11-yard line midway in the third quarter to set up their third touchdown. Halfback Joe Spinello scored on a 9-yard run with 8:28 remaining in the third quarter. Northwest's final tally came on a 12-yard touchdown toss from Pappas to end Leon Muff five minutes later. Down 28 to 6 going into the fourth quarter, Peru capitalized on a Northwest Missouri fumble and an 85-yard drive to narrow the gap with two touchdown~e­ fore the final gun. End Ron Yates, sophomore from Granite City, Ill., recovered a Northwest fumble on the Bearcat 33. Four plays later Satterfield tossed a 12-yard scoring pass to end Jim Manning, Lacombe, La., with 7:43 showing on the fourth quarter clock. Satterfield tried to run the extra point but failed. Peru's final touchdown came at the end of an 85-yard sustained drive on a 9-yard touchdown pass to Curt Holliman, Rockford, Ill. Again Satterfield was dumped on the extra point attempt. Satterfield's three touchdown tosses were the most in a single game for Peru State since September of 1960 when P e r u bombed St. Mary's of the Plains 46-0. In that game Dick Place tossed one and John Christensen completed a pair of TD aerials.

Intra murals To Include Five Sports This Season The intramural program at Peru State College will soon be in full swing again. Football, volleyball, basketball, track, and soft ball are the sports to be played. Individual team championship for each sport will be recognized. The top teams in each sport will receive ten points and the second place team will receive nine points. At the end of the season, the over-all intramural champion will be determined by the total team points. The respective team coaches are encouraged to emphasize sportsmanship at all times.

SPORTS COLUMN BY DICK BERTHOLD Working primarily from the Split T and Wing T, the Peru Bobcats are hoping to improve their two and seven record of 1964. Last year the Bobcats lost seven tilts by an average of 31.7 points, per game, while the two victories were by -an average of 12.5 points. Coach Pitts commented, "We are improving every week and will continue to; there are many freshmen and sophomores playing who will learn as the season progresses." Coach Pitts has 19 returning lettermen to bolster the Bobcats this season. The Bobcats appear strong at the end position with lettermen Jim Manning (2), Tim Logsdon (1), Al Sullivan (2), Vince Sabatinelli (2), and Ron Yates (1). Dom La Rocca (1), Bobcat end prospect, was sidelined last week with a knee injury. Floya Goff (3) and Les Raine (1) have returned at the tackle positions. At guard, Bernie Brown (1) should head the position with Phil Malone (1) and: Bob Urwin (1) ready for action. Bill Witty (3), supporting an extra 35 pounds, has switched from quarterback to center to help fill the gap. -Roy Windhorst (3) returned to handle most of the offensive fullback chores. Curtis Holliman (1), George Evangelist (1), and Pete Campo (1) are fleeting the halfback positions. Sam Sadich (2) and Lowell Brown (1) have returned after last year's defensive work. Harry Leth (1) came on strong last season to earn the starting position in the final games. Some of the outstanding newcomers to the Bobcat gridiron camp this year are: John Gilmore, Carl Satterfield, Jim Hagemeier, Bill Everhart, John Creamer, Arnold Johnston, John Mizerski, Nick Petrillo, Ralph and Robert Stekowsai, and Lee Dunekacke. Carl Satterfield has begun to prove his potential at the quarterback position and is one of the best hopes for this year's signal caller. Satterfield, a graduate of Chicago's Roosevelt high school, was selected on the first team of the Chicago Red-Division All-Star team, All-Conference, team's most valuable player, and honorable mention of the Illinois All-State team. The Bobcats suffered a 7-6 setback from the hands of Tarkio September. 11 for the opening game. Coach Pitts described the game as a defensive duel where Holliman skipped to paydirt for six points. The Owls picked up their extra point after connecting to win by a single point.

Cross Country Boys To Cross The Nation -On Paper, That Is Peru State College cross country runners loped through central Illinois Friday night on an "on-paper" trip which is taking them from New York City to Los Angeles and from Seattle to Jacksonville, Fla., by the end of the 1965 cross country season. James W. Pilkington, Peru State cross country coach, theorizes that it is much easier to run if you have some place to go, so he dreamed up the "Across the Nation Marathon" training gimmick for his Bobcat harriers. By the end of the season, the Peru State squad will have run enough total miles to have traveled the 5,643 miles necessary to crisscross the nation twice. The Marathon works this way. At the end of each day's running, whether it be a meet or practice, the Peru State squad troops into Coa·ch Pilkington's office to record individually the number of miles each !}as run that day. At the end of each week Pilkington totals the number of miles logged and plots the total on a map in his office. Following last Friday's workouts, the Peru runners had logged nearly 920 miles in total, enough to bring them past Ottawa, Ill. The pseudo trip started September 12. At the end of the season, f o r further incentive, a trophy will be awarded to the individual who has run the most miles during the season. Pilkington says the idea came to him this summer when he was running off a little excess steam around the Peru State track. He felt like he wasn't getting anywhere as he ·circled the Peru cinder track, and he assumed h i s runners often felt the same frustration. Hence, the "Across the Nation Marathon" was born on the Peru State oval. Asked why his runners were going to Seattle as the place from where they would: start the run back east to Jacksonville, Pilkington quipped: "Well, I decided if they ran all the way to Los Angeles, I'd reward them with a jet plane trip to Seattle." When the Peru State runners end their season's "journey," the 16 participating Bobcats w i 11 have averaged 352 miles per man. The way the Bobcats have per-

Coach Pitts stressed that the Bobcats' pass defense was th e weakest point at this time, and their passing offense was steadily improving.

Peru Harriers Down Lincoln U. Peru State's cross-country team sloshed through rain and a muddy three-mile cross-country course at Peru to defeat Lincoln University of Jefferson City, Mo., 18 to 43 in Peru's opening meet of 1965. Coach Jim Pilkington's Bobcats slammed runners across in the first three positions and then followed with runners in 5th and 7th positions. Louis Fritz, Verdon senior, captured the meet victory with a time of 16:27, closely followed by teammate Jim Hendricks, Omaha sophomore, who clocked 16:28. Fritz holds the three-mile Peru State record of 16:06 which he set last year. Peru's Jim Watson, Red Cloud sophomore, notched 3rd place (16:56) to complete the leading Peru State trio. Dan Trout, freshman from Lewiston, placed 5th (17:20) and Jim O'Donoghue, Worcester, Mass., placed 7th (17:46).

Peru Drops Opener 7-6 "Tarkio College played well and :deserved to win," C. o a c h Pitts said: following Tarkio's hard fought 7 to 6 victory. "We had our chance to win it, and we muffed it," Pitts said. The Peru mentor referred to the early fourth quarter drive_ \Vhich was stalled on the fiv:e. Tarkio took 'the opening kickoff and drove 55 yards to score. The extra point provided the difference. Peru came back in the second quarter to score on one of the season's most bizarre plays. Satterfield fired a lateral pass in the flat which Holliman dropped. When no whistle sounded to end the play, Holliman scooped up the ball and scampered 48 yards to score before the Tarkio. defense woke up. The extra point failed and Peru was down 7 to 6. Peru outrushed Tarkio 207 to 119 yards, but Tarkio's aerial game overshadowed Peru's 103 to 10.

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The Bobcats won a moral victory although losing 6-0 against Lincoln U. September 18. Last year Lincoln U. ran off with a 40-10 victory over the Bobcats. Coach Pitts praised: the entire defensive unit and pointed to Gilmore, Malone, Bernie Brown, and Tim Logsdon for an outstanding defensive job. Northwest Missouri State overwhelmed Peru 28-18 Sept. 25. Satterfield put in an excellent effort at quarterback. He connected to Windhorst for n i n e yards, Manning for 12 yards, and Holliman for 10 yards to help gain the 18 points.

formed: in the first 13 days of the Marathon, running more than 900 miles, they may have time to extend their "geography field trip" northward along the Atlantic seaboard after hitting Jacksonville. Who says cross country isn't educational?

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Peru State Bobcat harrier· Lou Fritz spent the s.ummer v<1cation in an unusual manner.. While most of us were working:hard at jobs, Lou was running anywhere from two to 26 .miles in crosscountry events. While many of us wouldn't envy Lou, the rewards of his.ability to run were beneficial to him as a Bobcat harrier. Lou ran in the Tenth Annual Pike's Peak Marathon in Colorado during August. He finlshed eighth out of a field of sixty competitors. The race was 26 miles and 385 yards, taking the time of 4:58.0 to get to the top and back. Labor Day, Lou was able to capture seventh in a field of 38 over a 26 mile course. A 24-inch trophy was his reward for this Heart of America Marathon held at Columbia, Missouri. Lou's other outing was at Elmwood Park in Omaha. He finished fourth over a 4-mile course. Jim Hendricks, Lou's fellow teammate at Peru, was able to cap• ture second, and both Bobcat harriers received trophies for their fine efforts·. Lou's story of success is not an unusual one. A 4.43 fifth place state mile finisher from DawsonVerdon, Lou was not particularly tough as a freshman and sophomore. Between his sophomore and junior years at Peru State, he was determined to become the finest Peru distance runner in the school's history. Lou holds the. Bo.beat mile and three mile records and Pe r u State cross-country records at distances from 2.5 miles to 26 miles 385 yards. Lou's practice schedule is a vigorous one. He averages eight to 10 miles of running a day through the year regardless"" of weather conditions and temperature. Peru State's Bobcats· won a Lou's efforts to improve himmoral victory even though they dropped a 6 to O game to Lin- self have been inspirational in . coln University of Jefferson City, improving. the Peru distance Mo. The Bobcats, a 40-point un- runners in the last two years. He is married and his wife . derdog, battled the highly flaunted Lincoln Tigers under miser- Judy realizes what a track wi~ able. conditions. Coach Pitts said ow has to endure. Fortunately for the rain hurt Peru's offense but Lou, she is sympathetic to the also slowed the fast Lincoln demands of his chosen sport. She is one of his most ardent backfield. fans and attends all his meets. Coach Pitts expressed pride in

Interested in becoming a commissioned offker in the United States Navy? Then you should make it a point to talk with the Navy Officer Information Team which will be on the campus of Peru State College on October 7, 196•5, They will be available to discuss with prospective gradu. ates, botl:J,. men and women, such opportunities as officer candidate school, aviation training a n d many other programs. The Navy offers a wide variety of ways for the college graduate to fulfill his military obligation as a commissioned officer. Officer applicants from all undergraduate majors are being sought. Any junior or senior may make arrangements with the team to take the Officer Qualification Test on campus.

Peru Threatens, But Loses 6-0 To Lincoln U.

Four Attended Vocational Conference (Continued from page one) pectations for Vocational and Technical Education." Karnes is a former Nebraskan. Creating the greatest interest for Peru's representatives were the sectional meetings dealing with woodworking, electronics, .drafting, metal, crafts and small engine mechanics.

'

Information Tearn On Campus October 7

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···Paced by Louis Fritz's recordbteaking performance, Peru State College handed visiting Northwest Missouri State College a 1549 cross country defeat he re , Tuesday. Fritz, Peru's veteran distance ace from Verdon,. gunned the three-mile Peru State course in 15:56 to break his own record of 16:07 set on Oct. 13, 1964, against Tarkio (Mo.) College. Tim Hendrkks; Omaha sophomore, had a glittering ..performance overshadowed by Fritz. Hendricks a ls o eclipsed the old record by finishing second in 16:01. In all, Peru State copped the first five places in the dual meet. Jim Watson, Red Cloud sophomore, ran third! in 16:42; Jim O'Donoghue, Worcester, Mass., junior, took fourth with a 16:56 clocking; and Dan Trout, freshman from Crab Orchard and a graduate of Lewiston high school, orounded out the Peru point-getters with a 17 :01 fifth place time. Norman Johnson led the Northwest Missouri Bearcats with a seventh place finish at 17 :20. Rounding out the Missourian's scoring were: Junior Utt, 9th, 18:02; Roger Stucki, 10th, 18:50; Cary Castle, 11th, 18:55; Dan Reed, 12th, 19:14. The win was Peru State's second of the season. Coach JimPilkington's Bobcats defeated Lincoln University of Jefferson City, Mo., 18 to 43 on Sept. 18. ' Peru's harriers will do battle next on 'I'.uesd:ay, Oct. 5, when Tarkio College and William Jewell invade for a triangular.

the way his Bobcats had battled the Lincoln Tigers. "We played as well as we could," he said, "and I can't ask any more from our team than that. Our kids played much better than in our opening loss to Tarkio College,'' Pitts said. "I was especially pleased with the work of our defensive unit," he added. The Bobcats held Lincoln University to 145 yards rushing and 48 yards passing. Coach Pitts was disappointed in Peru's offense as they could only muster 10 yards rushing and 47 yards passing. The Bobcats threatened midway through the second quarter after Floyd Goff recovered a Tiger fumble on the nine. Two running plays and two incompleted passes later found the Bobcat drive ended on the three.

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Lou... Fritz· · ..Otltstandih ·.\ g· Navy· ·omter

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.....

Parliament Member Convocation Speaker Honorable Ivor Richard, member of the British Parliament, was guest speaker at the all college convocation, Wednesday, September 29, at 9:10 a.m. in the college auditorium. Mr. Richard represents the Baron's Court. He is a barristerat-law, as well as a member of parliament. He appeared for one of the defendant~ in the "Great Train Robbery" trial which commanded international attention several months ago. Mr. Richard stated the man was now serving a five year prison term. Mr. Richard talked of the present political situation in Britain. As a member of the ruling Labor party he had much to say about the House of Commons, which meets at Westminster Abby. Among other topics under discussion were Viet Nam, and Red China's possible admittance to the United Nations. After concluding his speech Mr. Richard held a short buzz session at which students and the faculty could question him.

Off And Running .Classes have begun once more at Peru State College, the beginning of a brand new year, and many students are already discovered burning the midnight oil. Studying??? We hope so! If the parents of these students could observe the behavior of their offspring in the dormitories after 10:30 p.m., they would certainly be wondering where they went wrong. It isn't all that bad though. Maybe it's just that college is a novelty for many of these young people, and they want to. see what it's like to be "on their own." Nevertheless, it's hardly unusual to get ready for bed and discover cheese •cracker crumbs between the sheets. How many parents would allow pranks such as this in the home? An d now that Morgan Hall has traded the old pop machine in on a newer model, the bottles have been eliminated, thus also eliminating the clamor of rumbling bottles in the broom closets. What a relief!!! Freshman Initiation is one of the principal causes for the commotion taking place in the dorms. "Freshman, 1button!" or "Carry my books!" or "Freshman, sing the color song!" are probably the most common phrases employed by upperclassmen during the first two weeks of school, but it's all taken in good humor, supposedly. The best time to get your room cleaned free of charge in Eliza Morgan Hall is, without a doubt, during Freshman -Initiation. However, once in a great while, one might encounter a freshman who absolutely refuses to cooperate; he'll soon wish he had. ·Then, of course, everyone wants to know who got engaged last summer, who got married, who's going with whom, who broke up with whom, what floor everybody else lives on, what classes everyone has, and other numerous vital statistics. Naturally, you'll have to get ,that alarm clock fixed for those 7:30 classes; you wouldn't want to miss one of those little goodies. What a race!!! However, never fear, fellow students! Christmas vacation will roll around before you know it, then Easter vacation, and finally summer vacation. But we're here to learn, to fill our weary minds with an infinite abundance of knowledge, anq, in order to learn, we MUST study.

Test Dates For Natfonal Teacher Examinations \

Princeton, N. J., Sept. 10-College seniors preparing to teach school may take the National Teacher Examinations on any of the four different test dates announced today by Educational Testing Service. New dates set for the testing of prospective teachers are: December 11, 1965; and March 19, July lp, and October 8, 1966. The tests will be given at nearly 500 locations throughout the United States, ETS said. Results of the National Teacher Examinations are used by many large school districts as one of several factors in the selection of new teachers and: by several states for certification or licensing of teachers. Some colleges also require all seniors preparing to teach to take the examinations. Lists of school systems which use the examination results are distributed to colleges by ETS, a non-profit, educational organization which prepares and adminis-

ters the examinations. On each full day of testi prospective teachers may f the C om mo n Examinatio which measure the professio and general preparation of teac ers, and one of 13 Teaching Examinations (formerly call Optional Examinations) whi measure mastery of the they expect to teach. Prospective teachers sho contact the school systems which they seek employment, their colleges, for specific advi on which examinations to tak and on which dates they shoul be taken. A Bulletin of Information co taining a list of test centers, information about the examin tions, as well as a registrati form, may be obtained from col lege placement officers, schoo personnel departments, or direct ly from National Teacher Exam inations, Box 911, Education Testing Service, Princeton, Ne Jersey 08540.

Music Department Making Plans

cial music at Christmas time. The M.E.N.C. held their firs meeting September 20th. The of ficers for this year are: Willi The "Campus of a 1,00-0 Oaks" Joiner, president; Jim Johnson .is beginning to ring with music. vice president; and Mary Lo The band, chorus, and t h e Hicks, secretary and treasurer M.E.N.C. (Music Educators Na- M.E.N.C. will also attend th tional Conference) are responsi- State Convention in Columb ble for the music. to be held during the week o The band is lead by Gilbert November 21st. Wilson who is in charge of the Dr. Fredrick Freeburne hea Campus School band. of the Fine Arts divisio~ sai There are 40 members in the that they have hopes of ~ovin college band. into the new Fine Arts buildin The band will have a pep band in November. The new build' for the October 9th home game. will have practice facilities a The first band concert will be little theatre, many pieces of ~ew Dec. 2, here at the college. equipment, several new pianos, The band will also march for in addition to one large stage the Homecoming game of Octo- piano. There will be a listening ber 2.3rd. Charles Wellensiek and room equipped with hi-fi · there Jim Johnson are in charge of the will be recording and sc~res for Homecoming show. The band will the use of the entire student begin practice this week. The body. twirlers will be selected from the The little theatre which seats band personnel. 220, will be used for Junior and The officers for band are: Ross Senior recitals as well as Oestman, president; Jim John- of the lyceum programs" son, vice president; Mary E. Oestman, secretary; and Charles Wellensiek, treasurer. Besides the band group there will be several small groups of brass sextet, wood wind quintet, trumpets and trombone trios. Dinners - Short Orders Mr. Hugh Thomas, instructor 6:30 a.m. io 10:00 of vocal music, has said that he has 50 members in his chorus. every day The group meets every day at 11 :30 and this year there will be Rufh Farrell a Monday evening rehearsal. The ·choir plans to present spe-

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Students Meet Faculty The Perils Of A In First Convocation College Fr,eshman The getting-to-know-the-faculBY JOAN BRETTHORST ty convocation was held WednesFor the incoming college freshday, September 22, at 9:10 in the men, the first week of school is college auditorium. President usually the most critical one. It Neal S. Gomon presided. is probably during this time that The students were reminded of he loses ninety per cent of the the G.I. benefits. · pleasant or unpleasant illusions. The seating assignments will be posted just prior to the next he may have had about college convocation. President Gomon life. By the end of that first stated that attendance was com- week, he has had all the setbacks and confusion he needs for a pulsory. All students' cars must be reg- while. His befuddled mind sees istered and they must have park- a maze of classrooms, unfamiliar faces, names, and directions. ing permits. What might be some of his Applicants of Ak-Sar-Ben and thoughts on Friday evening of Nemaha county scholarships must the registration week? (That is, see Dr. Galen Dodge, director of providing he can think at all.) guidance, for further information. "I wonder if that teacherStudents were told that there now, what was his name-oh, are 945 full-time students as well, he can't be like they say compared with 702 last year. he is ... no, he's probably There are 100 or more part time worse!! students. "Gosh, how'll I ever make that '.Dhe faculty was presented to 7:.30 class when I never got up the student body. before 8:00 at home? Why do The convocation closed with they have such things, anyway? the singing Of the "Color Song." "Let's see ... we're s'posed to , know this Color Song-' "Fling aboa!1d our college colors to the -no, that's not right ... oh, yeah, it's fling abroad ... Gee, I'm getting hungry, .but I'm scared to go to supper-what if 'The Student Governing Asso- they make me sing? And I ciation sponsored the annual wa- couldn't even carry a tune three termelon feed Monday, Sept. 28, feet. Maybe if I didn't wear this at 8:00 p.m. in the parking lot beanie, they wouldn't catch me behind the Administration Build- . . . . after all, I wore it to bed ing. In only one-half hour all of last night; I ought to get credit the 110 watermelons were de· for t.hat ! ! ! voured by Peru students. "Well, let me think about toOld "grubbies" were the prop- morrow-I guess it will come. er attire for this sticky occasion. I'll go to the library, wash, iron, The freshmen wore their famil- clean my room ... Oh, Mom, iar blue beanies to add color to you don't 1';now how I miss you the affair. The melon feed is on· now. I never thought college'd be ly one of the events during so much work ... and I haven't even started yet. Freshmen Week. "I'm starving ... I think I:J1 go to supper after all. Maybe all they'll make me do is duck walk; I do quack better than I sing. "The Store of Standard Now what did I do with that Brands" meal ticket? Oh, boy, here goes Phone 274-3620 Aubum absolutely, completely NOTHING."

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Members of the student body wish to extend heartfelt sympathy at the death of Mr. John Bradley of Warrensburg, Mo. Mr. Bradley was the father of Miss Juanita Bradley, Ass od ate Dean of Students.

Untotal Look Is Fall Fashion Preview Why were some students glad it rained Monday, September 27? Could it be because of freshman illitiation? The damp weather must have affected the eyesight of over 300 students, or else they were trying to start a new fashion trend, the "untotal" look. The girls seemed to be having their ups and downs. Their world rose and fell with each step they took. Maybelline and Hazel Bishop were not allowed to participate in the festivities. As for hair styles, pigtails made a comeback. Some were worn proudly-one girl had hers done up with blue yarn-while others,. not quite so sure of themselves, had theirs hidden under beanies. P 1aid skirts and polka-dot blouses fought for recognition. The boys were equally welldressed. Ties and tails were the order of the day. When a boy was seen, it wasn't immediately known which way he was going. His face was going one way, his shirt and tie the other. He also had trouble distinguishing the inside of the shirt from the outside. Shoes and socks of ·contrasting colors were also deemed desirable. These were the fashions to be seen on campus. The "untotal" look of total disaster was characteristic of freshman initiation.

U. N. Dinner Will Feature Four Speakers The featured speakers for the United Nations Dinner, October 19 will be four of Peru's college freshman girls. The speakers are Grace Cook and Sheryl Floyd, who have lived in Hawaii, Jette A'Porta from Denmark, and Pat Thompson, who has lived in Germany. They will speak or show slides of the foods, customs, and scenery of their particular country. The menu for the dinner will be composed of dishes from these countries.

Nebraska Poet Laureate To Appear In Convo (Continued from page one) The University of Nebraska Press has taken over the publishing of "A Cycle of the West," which is his five epics of the conquest of the West in a single volume, and has just this fall brought out his lyrics and dramatic poems. "A Cycle of the West" was selected as one of "The World's Best Books from Homer to Hemingway," covering the period from 1050 B.C. to 1950 A.D. Dr. Neihardt, whose published works number some 25 volumes, in 1936 received the gold scroll medal of honor as foremost poet of the nation, for the "Song of the Messiah," one of the epics in "A Cycle of the West." He is a Fellow of the International Institute of Arts and Letters, and an honorary Companion of the Order of the Indian Wars. Critics have termed him "the A m e r i c a n Homer." A bust of Dr. Neihardt, the work of his s·culptress wife, the

late Mona,,Martinsen Neihardt, is in the Nebraska State Capitol. Dr. Neihardt's works have been published in England, and, in translation, in Germany, Yugoslavia and Holland. Dr. Neihardt's "A Cycle of the West" is based on many years of dose association with and understanding of the Indians and the pioneers of the West. Some of his early years were spent in a prairie sod house. He lived among the Omaha Indians from 1901 to 1907; later he was closely associated with the Oglafa Sioux and one of their great medicine men, Black Elk. He was director of information• for the U. S. Office of Indian Affairs during 1944-46, and field representative of that office in 1946-48. From 1926 to 1938 Dr. Neihardt was literary editor of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. In his younger days in Nebraska he was also briefly connected with newspapers, before giving his time to the writing of poetry and, for some years, to fiction.

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The fall edition of "Sifting Sands," publication of the English Club and the Peru chapter of Sigma Tau Delta, national honorary English fraternity, is being distributed on the Peru State College campus. Co-edited by Oliver Bierman, Hastings, and March Tinkham, Holmesville, the 25-page book contains short stories, poetry and art. Published intermittently since 1936, the current issue includes two winning essays from the 1965 freshman writing contest. The essays include "It Took Nature" by Mary Mowry, Beatrice, a!JJd "Echo's Last Cry" by Donna Dankof, Hamburg, Iowa. Other contributors of poetry and prose include: Dan Knudsen, Lincoln; Barbara Gordon, Hamburg, Iowa; Dorothy Bock, Pawnee City; Zelda Current, Stockville; Connie Hoschar, Murray; Miss Tinkham and Mr. Bierman. Silas Summers, assistant professor of English, is faculty sponsor.

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Siegner Publishes Article Dr. C. Vernon Siegner, head of division of practical. arts, is author of an article ''Teach Design with Scrap Materials" in the September, 1965, issue of School Shop. The magazine has a nation-wide circulation of 48,000.

Campus School News The silence which had invaded the campus school during summer vacation was shattered upon the arrival of 289 studsits. The grade school, K-8, has a total of 180 students, a gain over the enrollment of last year. At this time, the main concern seems to be getting classes organized and underway. The high school enrollment is down slightly with 109 students. They have gained four new teachers: Mr. Carr, guidance and social studies; Miss Rutz, girls P. E.; Mr. Sorenson, coach and soeial studies; and Mr. Weiner, electronics. Miscellaneous activities a r e keeping everyone busy. The juniors and seniors have met with a representative of Joslyn-the juniors to select class rings, and the seniors to select graduation announcements. The high school English classes visited the college library and were instructed on its use by Mr. Geenan. Class elections have been held in grades 7-12. The presidents are: Mary Lutt, senior; Sue Vanderford, junior; John Lutt, sophomore; Rhonda Collin, freshman; Linda Nincehelser, eighth grade; Judy Whistler, seventh grade. The opening of school also brought the renewal of club activities. The Pep Club, sponsored by Mrs. Gergen, is in the process of obtaining new uniforms. They have bought new skirts and will complete the outfit next year with the purchase of matching sweaters. White, long-sleeved blouses will be in order this year. Also of importance is Homecoming, to be held Oct. 15, with a dance following the game with Talmage. President Dana Henry disclosed that something n e w may be done this year with the displays. The high school hopes to have two displays, the lettermen competing with the Pep Club girls. The FHA, Future Homemakers of America, has already begun an active year. On Sept. 18, 15 members accompanied by Mrs. L. E. Lutt and Mrs. Kregel, sponsor, attended the District 1 convention held in Nebraska City. Organization business and elections were held during the morning session. Dana Henry, retiring '64-'65 secretary, was elected district song leader. A style show was presented during the afternoon session. Among the models, who presented clothing which they had made, was Marilyn Moody, who modeled a formal. Also presented during the style show were styles of yesteryear. Sally Gnade and Margaret Lutt wore styles which were fashionable in 1929 and 1865. The production of the school annual is also beginning. T h e annual staff, sponsored by Mrs. Gergen, has met and editors have been appointed. They include: Dana Henry and Bob Milstead, co-editors; Bob Mullendore, sports editor; Nancy Adams, class activities; Cathy Pelisek, copy editor; Marie Ballue, busine.ss manager; and Robert Witte, 5chool activities. According to Mrs. Gergen, each editor has a junior apprentice as an assistant.

Covers have hMn chosen and three deadlines set. The girls' volleyball team is also underway. It is being coached by Cheri Combs, a college P. E. major, under the supervision of Miss Rutz. Coach Combs stated that the team looks pretty good and she. has high hopes for a successful season which will begin in December. Prep has had two scheduled games. They won the first one, and the second was postponed until a later date. The junior high also has a football team and will be playing two matched games. Freshman Initiation, held Friday, Sept. 24, was performed under the guidance of the junior class. Each junior was responsible for the initiation of one freshman. The Initiation Dance held Friday evening was termed a success, even though the football game was called. 1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111

ORGANIZATIONS lllllHUlllUlffllllfllllllllfllllUlllllllUlllUllUllllUUlllllUU

DRAMATIC CLUB The September meeting of the Peru Dramatic Club was held Sept. 21 at 6:30 in the College Auditorium. President Myrene Davis welcomed new members and briefly explained the constitution, which is slated to be revised. Dorothy Back was elected historian and parliamentarian. Heads of committees were appointed for the Homecoming Play, and members were urged to give assistance in the production. Plans were discussed for a Halloween Party, and there were tentative suggestions for a Christmas Convocation and an evening of one act plays.

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PERU HISTORICAL SOCIETY Despite rain forcing the cancellation of the Peru Historical Society's annual picnic at Neal Park, a large membership turned out at the Campus School lunch room, September 20. Greeting the faculty and students, President James L. Snyder said that many of the faculty members had been unable to attend because of a meeting of the Education Association and .that the evening's activities had to be cancelled. Sparked by Dr. Schottenhamel, the conversation ranged from the

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controversia1 career of General George S. (Blood and Guts) Patton to the Megalithic Monuments at Stonehenge, England. Dr. Schottenhamel also noted that one hill in Peru was thought to be an Indian burial mound, and that many such mounds had already been unearthed. The next meeting was scheduled for Monday, October 4, at 7:00 p.m. -0-

P.S.E.A. Activities for the Peru Student Education Association began on September 20 in the College Auditorium. After greetings were extended to the 110 members in attendance, the floor was turned over to Miss Dorothy Bock, State President of the Nebraska Student Education Association. Miss Bock showed color slides of her trip to the National Convention of SEA, held in Washington, D. C. and New YorkCity this su~mer. Dorothy was an official representative fr6m Nebraska at the two-week convention, and she explained in brief some of the ideas presented by national delegates. The meeting was adjourned after a brief business meeting, in which plans for a Homecoming display were discussed.

-o-WESLEY FELLOWSHIP Wesley Fellowship held! its first regular meeting Wednesday, September 22, at the Methodist parsonage. Twenty-six attended a pizza party and a dance sponsored by Rev. and Mrs. Linder. A short business meeting was held where plans for a clothing drive for the under-privileged high school sW.dents of Omaha was discussed. The officers for the year' are: Gary Neuman, president; Jackie Dodson, vice president; Marilyn

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--aBETA BETA BETA The Tri Beta (Beta Beta Beta) the professional honorary biology fraternity on this campus, held its first meeting on Sept. 27, at 7:30 p.m. in S.C. 304. Officers for the new school year were elected. They are: Jack Rinne, president; Tom Rosengren, vice-president; Joe Oh, historian; Charles Strong, secretary. Sponsors for this club this year are Dr. Christ and Mr. Longfellow.

--aALPHA MU OMEGA Alpha Mu Omega had a short organization meeting Tuesday, Sept. 21 at 7:00 p.m. The newly elected officers are: president, Roy ·c e Curtis; vice-president, Dick Casady; and secretary-treasurer, Russ Ash. A committee was appointed for Homecoming display: Russ Ash, chairman; Bill Witty, Kathy Francis, Kris Wewel, Gary Young and Mary Schreiner. A committee was OTganized for initiation of new members: Nile McCoy, Dick Casady, Sam Smith, and Wes Dickey. -oINDUSTRIAL ARTS CLUB The Industrial Arts Club held its first meeting of the year Sept. 28 in the I. A. building. Thirty persons attended the meeting. The following officers were elected: Paul Stevenson, president; Dave Perry, vice-president; Jim Hanks, secretary; Jerry Sayer, treasurer. The dub is sponsored by Dee V. Jarvis. The program

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The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . .· Peru State's Homecoming

Petu Pedagogian PERU. NEBRASKA

Volume 61

Numbe.r 2

OCTOBER 18, 1965

Many Newcomers Compose CastOf Homecoming Play

Bock Attends Teacher Education-Professional Standards Commissio.n Miss Dorothy Bock, State President of Student Education Association of Nebraska (SEAN), attended the Teacher Education and Professional Standards Commission (TEPS) . of N.ebraska meeting of Sept. 18-19, held at Lincoln. At this meeting Miss Bock reported on plans for the fall meetings to be held in ·conjunction with the Teachers Conventions. Miss Bock said, "Plans are to have a panel discussion, the panel to be comprised of three FTA members and three SEAN members, moderated by a state officer of SEAN." A problem confronting the group is the low attendance by the SEAN members due to the fact that several schools do not dismiss them to attend such ·conventions. Another problem is that many of the members of the local SEAN chapter leave the campus on weekends and are not available to serve as hosts to the FTA members. Miss Bock stated, "The TEPS Commission is responsible for the SEAN and FTA 1chapters andi there needs to be a closer liaison between the groups and TEPS. It was the consensus that Dr. Bonneau as a member of the (Continued on page six)

Convocation Will Feature Nebraska's Poet Laureate BY BOBBIE ARMSTRONG

Saturday, Oct. 23, 1965 Peru vs. Doane

Members of the Bus Stop cast are ·concluding a rigorous rehearsal schedule in preparation for the annual Homecoming Play, which will be presented on the evening of Oct. 23, at 7:00 in the College Auditorium. William Inge's Bus Stop was presented on Broadway in rn55, and a motion picture version was released a short time later. The play is a skillful blend of humor and pathos. The setting is a restaurant in a small Kansas. town between Kansas City and Topeka. The plot involves the eight characters assembled as the re, sult of a spring blizzard.

Beth Terwilleger interrupted the Variety Show complaining that Robert Stukowsky had stolen her seat. -Photo by Walter Rimmer

Levitt Terms Variety Show Hone Of The Most Successful Shows Presented" The 14th annual Fall Variety Show, produced by Mr. James D: Levitt, was performed for a full house on the evening of Oct. ,fii in the College Auditorium. Mr. Levitt expressed satisfaction with the quality of the performan<:es, and stated that this year's program had been "one of the most successful variety shows presented at Peru." Gary Viterise and Ginny Mullen presided as masters of ceremonies for the evening. First on the program was the Freshman Kickline, a regular feature of the show. Featured this season were: Louise Bareclos, Sherrie Floyd, Judy Focken, Nancy Guilliatt, Julie Goodwin, Bobbi Haddenfeldt, Mary Inglis, Janice Johnson, Leona Masters, Arlene Moss, Martha Mullen, and Donita Speckmann. Mary Sautter choreographed the dance, and spent many hours rehearsing with the girls. John Bstandig, a junior at Peru this year, played two piano selections. A monologue given

Nebraska's poet laureate, John G. Neihardt, will be the guest speaker at the October 2.7 convocation. He will be speaking on "Poetic Values." Mr. Neihardt has· been called "an American Homer." He has been an honorary Professor of Poetry at the University of Nebraska, literary editor for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, director of information for the Indian Bureau, and he has recently been appointed poet in residence and lecturer in English at the University of Missouri. John Neihardt was born in a one-room farm house n e a r Sharpsburg, Ill. He spent iJ. is childhood in Kansas City, Mo.; Wayne, Nebr.; and Bancroft, Nebr. When he was only five, he lived with his maternal grandparents in a sod house in Kansas. Mr. Neihardt possessed the same pioneering spirit that drove his The candidates for P er u' s family to new frontiers. He experienced the hard life the plains twenty-sixth Homecomihg qveen had to offer. Prairie fires, bliz- were selected last week by the zards, famine, and plagues were student body. From these five, one will be elected to reign over not new to him. Homecoming scheduled for OctoBecause of this rich backber 23. The five girls receiving ground experience in the early this honor are Pat Knippelmier, pioneer days, John Neihardt beCeci Evangelist, Mary Mowry, came an exceptional poet on the Kathy Francis and Marilyn Massubject of these early days of ters. our country. Mr. Neihardt knew personally many of the frontier Pat Knippelmier is a junior heroes he wrote about in his from Auburn, Nebraska. Her epic poems, such as A Cycle of parents are Mr. and Mrs. Ruthe West. His adventurous spirit dolph Knippelmier. She is maurged him to descend the Mis- joring in elementary education. souri River as the explorers did As a freshman, she was voted before him. He recorded his ex- Sweetheart Queen and was a perience in The River and I. candidate for Homecoming last (Continued on page seven) year.

by Alicia Andrews followed. She presented a satire of the Ed $ullivan show, impersoriatfog Ed, Jayne Mansfield, Charlie Weaver, and Dean Martin. Four Cherubs, Louise Bareclos, Connie Wright, Bobbi Haddenfeldt, and Terry M a honey , crawled wearily on the stage, dying of thirst. Louise Bareclos was the only one to reach the water jug, and despite the fate of her comrades, used the refreshing liquid to set her hair. Bob Lierz and Bill Anderson then presented a routine of guitar playing, singing, and comedy. Miss Frieda Rowoldt, who has been performing for the Variety Show for 12 years, evoked unanimous audience response with her vocal solo, "The Big Brown Bear." Mr. Hugh Thomas accompanied her on the piano. "Jazz Toe Strut" was then performed by Patsy Bindrum, a freshman from Falls City. A style show, commentated by Mary Sharp, featured Peru stu(Continued on page three)

Homecoming Royalty Candidates Revealed A sophomore this year, Mary Mowry is planning a major in elementary education also. She is from Beatrice, Nebraska and the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Merlin Mowry. This is Mary's first year as a cheerleader f o r Peru State. She has also served in White Angels and is a member of S.G.A. Kathy Francis is the daughter of Mrs. Rose Francis of Council Bluffs, Iowa. She is a senior majoring in physical education. She was a cheerleader the first three years and is on the gymnastics squad as well as W.A.A. Kathy has participated in White Angels and is a member of Alpha Mu (Continued on page seven)

College Work and Work Study Payroll Procedure Because of increased number of students working and a change in accounting procedures adopted by State Accounting Office in Lincoln, there will be .a delay in processing checks to students this first pay period. To prevent unnecessary delay, we request all instructors and division heads to follow the following procedures: 1. Each student be responsible for maintaining individual time card. 2. Time card submitted by student to supervisor on 1st and 16th of each month. 3. Supervisor will f o r ward time card to his division h ea d for consolidation on time sheet. (Cards and sheets provided by Business Office.) 4. Division heads submit time sheet to Business Office no later than one working day following end of pay period, i.e., 1st and 16th. Any problems a student may have concerning his pay check should be resolved by either his supervisor or division head. If problem cannot be resolved, division head should contact Business Office. No student should be referred to Business Office.

Ashley Attends Regional Meeting Of A.S.C.D. Miss Ashley, associate professor of elementary ·'education, attended a meeting of the A.S.C.D. (Associi!tion for Supervision and Curriculum Development), on October 2nd, 3rd, and 4th. The meet!ng was held at the Paxton Hotel in Omaha, Nebraska. It was a regional meeting and was (Continued on page seven)

Several newcomers to Peru this semester were awarded parts in the coming production. Janice Hauk, a junior transfer student from Highland Jr. College, is playing th!!< part of Cherie. Janice appeared in high school dramatic productions and became quite active in ·college activities. While at Highland Jr. College, she acted in three plays and appeared in several operas. Miss Hauk .is an elementary major, and has appeared in the Variety Show and revealed her interest in music and dramatics. Portraying Bo, a Montana cowboy, is Don Dodge. He is a freshman from Nebraska City. He has participated in numerous speech contests in the area, as well as appearing in .three plays presented in Nebraska City. Playing the sheriff is Brian Collins, a freshman from Bellevue. Brian is an English and speech major. (Continued on page two) POSTMASTER REQUESTS Mr. Homer Craig, Peru postmaster, requests that students give correct return addresses. Mr. Craig says: "Students living in Peru not receiving their mail through the college post office should name the residence in which they are living in their return address. Mail is distributed to Post Office Boxes, not by address."

HOMECOMING SCHEDULE 9:30 a.m. Displays in place 9:30-11 :00 a.m. C off e e, donuts for registered alumni and guests in Student Center Snack Bar 10:00 a.m. Judging of displays 10:45 a.m. P Club luncheon, Student Center west dining room 11:45 a.m. All-alumni luncheon, Student Center main dining room 2:00 p.m. Football game, Oak Bowl; Peru State vs. Doane College; halftime show and coronation of the Homecoming Queen 4:00 p.m. Lounges of all dormitories and Student Center open to visitors 7:00 p.m. Homecoming play, Auditorium 9:00 p.m. (or at conclusionof play), Homecoming Dance, Gymnasium


MAJORS HALL BY MIKE SULLIVAN Starting Saturday, Oct. 9, at 1:0-0 p,m., Majors Hall will have new rules concerning women guests in the dorm, The girlsmay visit on the following hours: Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday from 4:00 p.m.. to 10:00 p.m.; Saturday, from 1:0-0 p.m. to 12:30 p.m.; and on Sunday, from 1:0-0 p.m. to 1-0:30 p.m. No girl will enter Majors Hall unless escorted·. by a resident, unless she and her date are invited by a member of this hall. The girls will be restricted to the lobby and l()unge. The weekends at Peru bring hunger pangs to many of us here at Majors Hall. The old three meals a day habit seems to get out of orbit from Saturday morning to Monday morning. We residents on the west side of Majors Hall were awakened Saturday morning by the noise of trucks dumping the remnants of a sidewalk right outside our windows. New furnishings have been installed ·in the first and second floor lounges. The new sofas are are. very comfortable, and add to the good studying and relaxing atmosphere of the lounge. The stereo record player and radio is also enjoyed by many of the residents. If the Majors Hall residents aren't listening to records, playing cards, or studying, they are usually playing snooker downstairs in the game room. Dave LaMontagne has the longest run on our snooker table, with 38.

DELZELL HALL BY BILL BOWEN One of the· real problems in Deizell this semester are rooms that have people living in them. The rooms over here are admittedly larger than those at Majors, but to put three in one of them is crowding things just a bit. I expected the problem to be eased somewhat by the completion of the addition to Majors, but there are still some rooms with three in them. I have heard a suggestion that seems to have some merit. People who live three in a room should be given a redtj.ction in their room fees. That seems quite fair, after all, why shoul<t everyone pay the same fee for less room? Perhaps since the over-crowding itself cannot be solved, this would be worth considering. The weekends in Delzell have become even more boring than I remember their being last year. The only possible improvement

t cah thlnk of is the acl.ctit1o11 of pool tables in the basement of the dorm. This does help wit h some of the long lonely hours. One notable' change in the daily routine of Delzell are the increased numbers of people who attempt to eat some of their meals in their rooms. Crackers, cookies, and oranges are a poor substitute for a genuine lunch, however. · Very soon Delzell will have some furniture in its lobby area. This will be one of the most needed improvements that could be made over here. The lack of furniture has been a point of annoyance with a number of people around here for the last three semesters, and! I suspect even before that. I'm glad that at last we will have some semblance of a lobby area. More than one of us will appreciate a place to sit down.

ELIZA MORGAN HALL BY MARY ANN SHARP A new vice-president for the dorm was elected to replace Barb Lasko, who did not return this year. Nancy Muse is the newly elected officer. She has also ·been elected president of the W.A.A. Our congratulations go to herfor both of these offices. Marge Chilvers has been appointed as "Art Director" for the dorm, with special emphasis on decorations 'for Homecoming. Susan Kenworthy will serve as our social chairman. Special congratulations are being extended also to those who were elected Homecoming queen candidates - Pat Knippelmier, Kathy Francis, Mary Mowry, Ceci Evangelist, and Marilyn Masters. It is interesting to know that many of the girls iri Morgan Hall have come from areas other than the midwest to attend collegg; in Peru. These areas range from Hawaii and Denmark to the states back east. Barb Borgeson came from Sudbury, Massachusetts which is only about fifteen minutes from the famed Worcester metropolis. She selected Peru State through the advice of her guidance counselor at Lincoln Sudbury Regional. The guidance counselor's daughter also attended college in Nebraska. Barbara plans on a major in elementary education. Maureen Joy came from Norwood, Mass., and! was graduateq from Norwood High School. She worked for a resort in Maine all summer arid chose this college on the recommendation of a friend already acquainted with Peru. She hopes to acquire a foreign languages major, though her decision is not final.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Richard Berthold -----------------------------------Editor Barbara Gordon ________________________ Personnel Manager Elaine Neddenriep __________ Layout Editor & Photographer Charles Richards _____________________________Sports Editor Mary Sautter -------------------------------Feature Editor Bill Bowen ------------------------------Business Manager Joan Bretthorst _______________________________ Copy Editor Jackie Swegler _______________________________ Copy Editor Mel Hester ----------------------------------Photographer Alicia Andrews ___________________________________ Reporter Bobbie Armstrong ----------·----------------------Reporter Myrene Davis ------------------------------------Reporter Robert Minks ____________________________________Reporter Dan Strecker -------------------------------------Reporter Mary Ann Sharp ---------------------------------Reporter Leland Schneider ---------------------------------Reporter Louis Rogers _____________________________________Reporter Nancy Jarvis -------------------------------------Reporter Mike Sullivan ____________________________________Reporter Stewart Linscheid ---------------------------------Advisor

Dee Pierson and Sherry Boss· hart both went to high school at Prospect High in Mt. Prospect, Illinois. This is a suburb of Chicago. Dee lived in Omaha until her junior year. Her father attended Peru State. Sherry, on the other hand, has lived in Mt. Prospect all her life, and ·chose this college through her acquaintance with, Dee. Though this is her first experience in Nebraska, Cheryl Houseman finds there is little difference from her home town of Lyndonville, New York. She made it clear that there are only 777 people in Lyndonville.

Campus To Campus Kearney Staie College, Kearney, Nebraska A large celebration was scheduled for homecoming this year. T)le big day was Oct. 15. The drama department will present 'The Time of YourLife" on October 20th. It will run through October 23rd. The Kearney Antelopes have defeated Eastern Montana State College, 10-0 and Washburn Tigers 40-14. Moorhead Staie College Moorhead, Minnesota "Medieval Pageantry" will be the theme for hOmecoming on October 23rd. A large program of events is planned. The enrollment at Moorhead College is expected to r e a c h 3,360. The largest freshman class in the school's history is numbered at approximately 1,050. McCook College McCook, Nebraska The enrollment at McCook has increased by nineteen per cent. McCook College is now 3-0 for the current football season. They have defeated the Air Force J.V., El Dorado, Kansas, and Northeastern of Sterling, Colo. Creighton University Omaha, Nebraska The enrollment has increased from 3,749 to 3,890 students at Creighton. Cenfral Miss·ouri State College A $3,000,000 science classroom will be constructed some time in the near future. "International Holidays" is t.he homecoming the.me at CMS. The CMS Mules lost their first game to the Pittsburg Gorillas. Then the Mules came back to hold Washburn to a 7-7 tie. State College of Iowa Cedar Falls, Iowa Eighty-three new faculty members and 10 new staff members· have been announced. Sci-Lites will be the themefor the 1965 homecoming activities. The Panthers have yet to win a football game. They have lost two: 10-7 to Northern Michigan and 23-16 to Southern Illinois.

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Nebraska City Coca-Cola Bottling Company Show, performing a humorous monologue satirizing the Ed Sullivan Show. Returning this fall in the part of Grace, is Myrene Davis. Myrene portrayed three major roles in a Denver high school, directed several productions, and made four television appearances as a panel 'member on "Voice of Youth." Since coming to Peru, Mrs. Davis has taken part in four major college plays, narrated numerous college programs, and represented the Drama Dept. last spring on KOLN-TV in Lincoln. Dan Knudsen, playing the role of Dr. Lyman, is a senior majoring in speech. Dan appeared in a college convo honoring Shakespeare, and in last year's Spring Play. Highlighting Dan's activities was the production of his own play last spring, which he directed and in which he had a major role. In addition to this, he was a member of the debate team and participated in numerous forensic activities.

Many Newcomers . Compose Cast Of Homecoming Play (Continued from page ?·ne) Alicia Andrews, a senior transfer student from Burr Oak, Kansas, took part in high school theater and had a role in a one-act play which was rated "excellent" in the State Contest. Miss Andrews, an elementary major, taught first and second grades in Ohiowa, Nebr., after attending Fairbury Junior College. While teaching, she directed the senior play and wrote an operetta for her elementary classes. Alicia appeared in the Fall Variety

Ken Boatman, a business major from Auburn, participated in the Spring Play last year. Ken plays the part of Carl, the bus driver, in Bus Stop. In the part of Virgil, is Mel Hester. He is a junior majoring in speech. Mel is from Lincoln. In charge of the stage and lighting again this year is Jon Davis, a senior from Orient, Iowa, majoring in social studies. Jon has been involved in stage work for two years, and has participated in three major plays, two Variety Shows, and has handled the stage for all convos and programs held in the auditorium. He has also appeared on stage in the Spring Plays for two years. Dorothy Bock, a senior from Pawnee City, majoring in English, is the assistant director. She has appeared in three plays at Peru, and has acted as assistant director in four play. Dorothy has participated in debate and in numerous other speech-connected: activities on campus.

SEE

\\Bus Stop" Dramatic Club Homecoming Play 7:00 p.m.

Auditorium

October 23, 1965 Directed by Mr. R. D. Moore


VARIETY SHOW, 1965

Virginia Mullen and Gary Viferise M.C.'d the evening of entertainment. -Photo by Walter Rimmer

Bill Anderson and Bob Lierz brought the house down.

Variety Show

The opening of the show featured the freshman kickline.

-Photo by Walter Rimmer

Continued from page one

dents modeling their own clothes previewing the latest trends in fashion. Mary Inglis and Dave Fife modeled the newest in sportswear, followed by Connie Hoschar and Bob Jones, wearing casual ,campus attire. Barb Gordon and Bill Bowen presented the latest for "after-five," while Cherie Trevino and Gary Viterise modeled fashions for formal occasions. Working behind the scenes was Pat Wheatley, who organized the show. The first segment was brought to a close by Joanie Sprieck and Richard Sheldon, who sang "Getting to Know You," from The King and I. Mary Lou Hicks was the accompanist. The first half of the show was performed without interruption -except for the frequent appearance of some strange woman. A persistent rumor insists that Bertha Terwilleger was the guilty party, but this has not as yet been substantiated. After a brief intermission, the -Phoio by Walter Rimmer second part of the show commenced. Following the fashion of several television programs,

Jim Manning hosted "Shinabaloo." "The Outsiders," a new vocal group consisting of Janice Hauk, Ginny Mullen, Dale Burgess, and James Horgan, presented a selection of folk ballads, one of which was composed by Mr. Burgess. Jim Manning and Susan Kenworthy then sang several contemporary numbers. The remainder of the program was devoted to the "Rogues," a ·combo composed of Jim Manning, Pete Campo, Tom Pitts, and Don Lieman. Dancing the latest steps were Janice Hauk, Arlene Moss, and Jimmi Seay, along with several members of the Freshman Kickline. Carolyn Price organized the dancing for the finale. In ·charge of the stage and lighting was Jon Davis, assisted by Mike Weddle, Neal Bauer, and Marcie Anderson. Lucy Sporer provided the decorations and took care of the advertising. Mr. Levitt wished to express his thanks to those people who worked behind the s,cenes for contributing to the success of the program.

Variety Show

1965 One

Of Most Successful Miss Frieda Rowold± plays the trumpet in her famous aci. -Photo by Walter Rimmer

Jimmi Seay, Janice Hauk, and Arlene Moss entertain.

-Photo by Elaine Neddenriep


College Hires Ten New Instructors For 1965-66 School Year )

BARRETT Mr. Clyde Barrett, a Peru State graduate, has returned to the "campus of a 1000 oaks" as an assistant professor of language · and arts. Mr. Barrett received his BA at Peru and earned his MA in 1956 when Peru State offered graduate work. His doctorate study is being acquired at the University of Arkansas. After graduation, Mr. Barrett remained in the midwest, teaching at the secondary level in Nebraska and Colorado. Prior to joining the Peru State staff, he taught at Kansas State College and Central Missouri State. Roland and La Rhea, the .Barrett's two children, are attending Peru Prep. The Barretts are residing in the Oak Hill apartments. Indian artifacts and history, hunting, and fishing are Mr. Barrett's personal interests. He expressed interest in the progress and physical improvements at Peru State since his graduation.

-o--

CARR Mr. Robley B. Carr is the new director of guidance and an instructor of social studies at the Campus School. Mr. Carr received his AB degree at Dakota Wesleyan University, and his MA at University of North Dakota. From 1958 to 1964, Mr. Carr was with the Department of Interior, Bureau of Indian Affairs. Recently, he has had an NDEA fellowship at the University of North Dakota. Mr. and Mrs. Carr have a daughter, Lori Ann, who attends kindergarten at the Campus School. Mrs. Carr holds a teaching degree, but is now occupied with her home and family. This year marks the first teaching position for Mr. Carr. A native of South Dakota, Mr. C_arr enjoys hunting, fishing, and competitive shooting in his spare time. -0-

CLARK Mr. John Clark is a new assistant professor of history at Peru State. Mr. Clark received his AB and MA degrees from the University of Missouri, Kansas City, Missouri. He has also done graduate work at the University of Missouri, Kansas City, Missouri. Mr. Clark has held various positions around the Kansas City area including the following: Director of Audio-Visual Education at the University of Missouri, Kansas City, Missouri, and instructor of history in the Kansas City school system. Before coming to Peru, Mr. Clark was an instructor of history at Wentworth Military Academy, Lexington, Missouri. Mr. Clark and his wife Dolores are the parents of two sons, Gregory and Vincent, ages twelve and nine respectively. Both boys are attending classes at T. J. Majors campus school.

-o--

DODGE The new director of guidance, counseling and financial aids at Peru State College is Dr. Gale!). Dodge. Mr. Dodge received his BA and M Ed degrees fr o m Kearney State Teachers College and the University of Nebraska respectively. He also received his

Ed D degree from the University of Nebraska. Dr. Dodge's previous professional experiences include: Nebraska University graduate assistant and part time instructor at Lincoln; Consultant Psychologist, Nebraska Services for the Visually Impaired; High School coach, principal, teacher and guidance director; Consultant for the Mentally Retarded, State Department of Edu·cation; and Counseling Psychologist at the V:eterans Administration. Dr. Dodge and his wife Joy are the proud parents of three children, Steve, two, Kathy, six, and Jenny, eight. For recreation, Dr. Dodge enjoys the outdoor life of hunting and fishing. He also enjoys many sports, but likes the game of football the best.

--o--

FREEBURNE When asked to comment on the nearly completed Fine Arts Building, Dr. Frederick Freeburne exclaimed, "The whole facility will not only beautify the campus and make better facilities for the music students, but is something that everyone c a n use." Dr. Freeburne is the new Head of the Division of Fine .Arts. He received his BS from Kans as State Teachers College, Emporia; his MA from the Teachers College, Columbia University; and' his MM and EdD from Indiana University. Before coming to Peru, Dr. Freeburne was an associate professor of piano and theory at Northwest Missouri Stlte College in Kirksville. Since Dr. Freeburne receivedi his Masters Degree as World War II broke out, he was given the title of full professor and w as dean of the Conservatory at Yankton College in Yankton, South Dakota. From there he received a fellowship to Indiana University for work on his doctorate. He was Associate Professor at Baylor University for three years and then had a Chairmanship at the University of Nevada for four years. Dr. Freeburne, his wife and two children reside in Peru. One of his favorite hobbies, besides music, is hunting.

--o--

GEENEN Mr. George Geenen is the new assistant librarian. His duties indude the interpretation of the reference collection and general materials. He also is in charge of checking the card catalog for accuracy. Mr. Geenen holds an AB in Political Science from Fort Hays State College in Fort Hays, Kansas, and an MLS in Librarianship from Kansas State Teachers College in Emporia, Kansas. This is Mr. Geenen's first regular assignment, his previous position being a graduate student assistantship in the William White Library at Kansas State Teachers College in Emporia. Mr. Geenen is single and originally comes from Beloit, Kansas. His spare time is spent watching sporting events, and listening to dassical music. He is also a collector of Mario Lanza records, his favorite vocal artist. Mr. Geenen is looking forward to a rewarding year at Peru

State, and when asked what made him choose Peru, he replied, "The informal atmosphere and the academic community appeal to me."

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LONGFELLOW The new biology instructor at Peru State is Stanley Longfellow. However, the town and the college are familiar to him, for he is a native of Peru. Mr. Longfellow is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Longfellow, both of whom are employees of Peru State. His mother serves as house mother at one of the boys' dormitories, while his father is connected with the college maintenance department. Mr. Longfellow received his AB and MA degrees from Peru State, and he has done graduate study at the Universities of Nebraska and Wisconsin. He served as principal and science instructor at Brock High School and later at Lyons, Nebraska. Mr. Longfellow is married and has outside interests in a great variety of activities, including bowling, golf, tennis, hunting, fishing, and photography.

--o--

PELIS EK "I'm very well pleased: with the student body's attitude toward sports,'' acknowledged Peru State's new associate professor of physical education, Mr. Joseph P. Pelisek. Mr. Pelisekreceived his BA at Cornell University and his MA at New Mexico Highlands; he has done advanced study at Iowa University, Prior to his new position at Peru State, 'Mr. Pelisek taught eight years in the Cedar Rapids, Iowa public schools. His :b. e x t eight years were spent teaching at Monmouth College, Monmouth, Illinois. Mr. Pelisek and his family are residing at the Peru State faculty housing. His two daughters, Cathy and Wendy, are attending Peru Prep. Other than sports, Mr. Pelisek enjoys reading antique and classic automobile material.

-o-

RUTZ Miss Bonnie Rutz is the new instructor of women's physical education at Peru State College. Miss Rutz received her BS degree from Peru State and is doing graduate work at the University of Nebraska. Before coming to Peru, M i s s Rutz taught physical education in Red Oak, Iowa, and Plattsmouth, Nebraska. Miss Rutz is a native of southeastern Nebraska; she hails from Dawson, Nebraska. In her spare time Miss Rutz enjoys art work and sports. -0--

WEINER Mr. Don Weiner is a new assistant instructor of Industrial Arts in the Peru State College Industrial Arts Division. Mr. Weiner holds the BS degree from Peru State College. He was graduated from Peru State College in the spring of 1964. Mr. Weiner has had no experience other than that of student at Peru State. He is married and has one child. He and his family live in Peru. We are pleased to welcome a former student back as a member of the faculty.

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Mixer and Picnic Conclude Freshman Week Activities The annual All School Picnic was held Thursday evening, September 30, 1965 in the pit below the gym. A serving line was established and hot dogs, baked beans, potato chips, and kool-aid w€re served. The All-College Mixer, sponsored by the S.G.A. was held later in the evening. Students danced to the music of The Rogues, a new group on campus.

Opinions Of Freshman Sound Promising With Freshman Initiation over, Ye Olde Scribe has made it his business to find out what impression Peru State had on its incoming students. Sharon Beatty: "I thought it would be a lot worse than it is." Jim Million: "Different-but a lot better than high school." Charlie Sturm: "Rather small for a college." Judi Focken: "The freshman class was big compared to my

graduatiri'g class, which had only eight." Alice Bolin: "I cried the whole first week because of the weather, but I like it now." Marilyn Sugden: "It is really different from high school." Lowell Stevens: "There wasn't a whole lot here." Dave Shaw: "It was lousy, 'cause of nothing to do." Tom Wilson: "Big enough for me." Eldon Olson: "What a little town!" Mike Baily: "I like it; it is not so big that you get lost." Santiago Hernadez: "I don't know." Sherry Schiesow: "Everyone was friendly and the campus had some of the oldest ancli newest buildings I have ever seen." Maureen Joy: "It is quaint anc1 quite small as comparec1 to New England colleges." Barb Aylsworth: "Everyone was warm and friendly." Mary Inglis: "All the hills (oh no!). It was really friendly and everyone was willing to help me-'most everyone." Jim Morton: "It looked O.K. to me."

LITTLE MAN ON®CAMPUS


obcats End Drought With 21-0 Victory Over Chadron State Peru State College's football victory drought ended Saturday quarterback Carl Satterfield rained four key passes on the •Chadron State defense to pep Peru's 21 to 0 victory at Chadron and dampen the Eagles' Homecoming and Band Day. The victory, first of the season for Peru after three losses, erid€n an eight-game losing streak for Peru which started on October 10, 1964 when Wayne State humbled the Peruvians. Erv Pitts, Peru State he ad coach, hedged his elation over the long-sought victory with the simple statement, "We didn't play very well." Statistics bear out Pitts' contention. Pitts singled out offensive blocking and pass receiving as areas where Peru looked dismal at times. The Bobcat ground game sputtered with only 38 yards net rushing, and the Bobcats nabbed only five of 21 passing thrusts. Peru's 21-0 score was not indicative of the ·closeness of the game. Peru ·counted an opening quarter touchdown and then had to wait until the game's final five minutes to ice the contest with a pair of touchdown strikes. Despite Peru's problems, the victory was a pep pill for the Bobcat gridders. Defensive linebacker and halfback Vince Sabatinelli, senior from Southbridge, Mass., summed up t h e team's attitude following the game: "We didn't play as well as I had hoped, but the pressure of an eight game losing streak, and losing three games this year that we could have won made us 'tight.' Winning that game was like breaking over the ·crest of a high hill-I think things will go better for us now," Sabatinelli said. Peru scored the win on t h e strength of the right arm of freshman Carl Satterfield, a graduate of Chicago's Roosevelt High School. Near the end of the first quarter, Satterfield, from the 50yard line, uncorked a heave to end John Creamer, Worcester, Mass., freshman. Creamer pulled it in on the Chadron 25 and

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sliced to the Eagle four before being nailed. On the next play, freshman fullback Jim Kollbaum, Battle Creek, Iowa; knifed over his own right tackle to score .with 18 seconds remaining in the corner. The TD was Kollbaum's first collegiate score. Kollbaum got his opportunity to play some three minutes ear~ lier when Roy Windhorst, Peru's starting fullback, was injured. Windhorst shook off enough of the hurt to come in and kick the extra point. Peru's s e c on d touchdown, scored with 4:55 left in the game, was set up by a 51 yard pass-run play from Satterfield to Creamer. Creamer speared the aerial on the Chadron 35 and raced down the left sideline to the Chadron two before being knocked out of bounds. Following a five yard offside penalty assessed against Peru, Jim Kollbaum smashed right side of the Chadron line three times to bring the ball back to the one. On the next play, Satterfield scored when he faked to his fullback going into the right side and then whirled to skirt 1 e ft end on a naked keeper for the counter. The final Peru score came with 50 seconds remaining on a 24· yard pass from Satterfield to senior end Jim Manning, Slidell, La. A 39-yard pass play from Satterfield to halfback Curt Holliman, junior from Rockford, Ill., had put the Bobcats on the Chadron 24. Following the game, Coach Pitts singled out three Bobcat interior linemen for s p e c i a 1 praise. Phil Malone, 240 pound g~ard from Plattsburg, Mo., Be[.:: me Brown, 201 pound guardfrom Rockford, Ill., and 250 pound tackle John Gilmore, Shenandoah, Iowa, led the Bobcat defense. Brown was credited with seven tackles and two assists, Gilmore with seven and two, and Malone with four tackles and three assists. Pitts also commended the play of end John Creamer whose two pass grabs netted 97 yards and set up two touchdowns.

SPORTS COLUMN BY DICK BERTHOLD The Bobcats picked up their first NCC vidory over Chadron State Oct. 2 by a shutout of 21-0. Satterfield's aerial attack proved successful when he ·connected to Kollbaum for a 48-yard touchdown. A Satterfield. to Creamer combination resulted in the next 50-yard tally. Manning tucked the pigskin in for another 25 yard aerial touchdown to complete the scoring. Coach Pitts stated, "I was real pleased with the over-al! play. The team played well to win, and I be· lieve Chadron is physically the strongest team in the conference." The Peru Bobcats revenged last year's 47-7 thrashing by Wayne although losing the contest 17 · 7. Wayne State's potent rushing game was picked to be better than ever with the return of their entire backfield from the 1964 team which ranked third in NAIA rushing and tenth in NAIA total offense. Although the Wildcats gained: 14g yards in their rushing game compared to Peru's 39 yards, the Bobcats netted 104 aerial yard•s to Wayne's 37. Peru completed eight of 22 passes for a 35.4 per cent average. The Wildcats connected for four of nine passes for a 44.4 per cent average. Wayne dominated the first down statistics with 12 ·compared to Peru's eight. Over-all; Coach Pitts w a s pleased with the team's performance, especially the defense. Wayne took advantage of two Peru infractions which set up their winning points. "We've im· proved every week,'' Coach Pitts stated, "and we will continue the trend. There's no reason why Pe· ru should fear Kearney since we have shown good potential and improvement." Pitts praised Malone, Gilmore, Bernie Brown, and Witty for excellent line play. "The t ea m has shown they can hit with the hardest in the league," Pitts commented, "and I am well pleased they can play hard-nosed football."

Bernie Brown Is State College Star Of The Week "A leader in improving Peru State resistance, is two-way guard Bernie Brown,'' according to the World-Herald who picked Bernie as its State College Star of the Week. As his team stopped Chadron, 21-0, 5-11, the 201 pound junior contributed seven tackles and four assists. Bernie pilfered a pass in the fourth quarter, but fell over teammate Bob Urwin's block 15 yards from the goal line. "He'll outrun most of our backs," was Bobcat Coach Ervin Pitts' statement about Bernie's speed. Last season he found time to run track and was credited with running a 10.3 100-yard dash. This is his third year as a regular on the Bobcat squad. In the past two seasons Bernie has received honorable mention for the all NCC team, but has made the defensive unit. Bernie does not credit his success to quickness but rather to "alertness" and "awareness" of the game.

Peru Tapples To Late Wayne Surge 17-7

Bobcat Harriers Remain Undefeated

Fired-up Peru State College Peru State's Louis Fritz, Tim fought favored Wayne StateCol· Hendricks, and Jim Watson lege to a 7 to 7 halftime draw mauled Tarkio (Mo.) College's and then contributed to their own three mile ·cross country course downfall in the second half to record Tuesday as Peru State open the gates for Wayne's 17 to raced to a double dual cross 7 Nebraska College Conference country victory over Tarkio and William Jewell College at Tarkio. victory at Peru. A bad pass from ,center and a Peru dumped Tarkio and William fumble, both deep in Peru State Jewell by identical 17 -45 scores. Fritz, senior at Peru State from territory, allowed Wayne to score a touchdown and a field Verdon, swept to the victory by goal in the second half and covering the three mile course in thwart Peru's herok underdog 15:00, 50 seconds better than anyone had ever run the Tarkio effort. course. Following Fritz were It was a grim Erv Pitts, Peru teammates Tim Henddcks, OmaState head coach, who said folha, who ran second in 15:05; and lowing the game, "Despite the Jim Watson, Red Cloud, clocked fact our mistakes beat us, I'm in 15:10 for third place. very proud of these kids-they Peru's Jim ()'Donoghue, junior have come along faster than I from Worcester, Mass., also betever expected." Pitts continued, tered the battered 15:50 Tarkio "Don't take anything away from course record by finishing sixth Wayne; we gave them the opwith a time of 15:48. Rounding portunity to win, but they were out the Bobcat point-getters was good enough to capitalize when Jim Sprague, South Lyon, Mich., they got the chance." senior, who nabbed seventh in Freshman Jim Kollbaum, Bat- 15:56. tle Creek, Iowa, freshman, won In the dual between Tarkio and himself an offensive starting William Jewell, Tarkio gained berth at fullback with an out- the victory with a 25-30 point standing performance for Peru advantage. State. Starting his first game, Had the meet been scored as a Kollbaum led the Bobcat offen- triangular, the score would have sive department with 50 yards read Peru 19, Tarkio 45, and Wilrushing, 52 yards pass receiving, liam Jewell 49. and the Bobcats' only touchdown. Pacing the Tarkio harriers was Wayne had taken an early 7 to Jim Buchanan who ran fourth in 0 lead the first time they got 15:24. William Jewell was led by their hands on the ball. Peru Dave Parker who finished fifth took the opening kickoff an d in 15:44. moved from their own 40 to the Wayne 42 where the drive collapsed when Wayne recovered a Bobcat fumble. On Wayne's first offensive thrust, halfback Jerry Kikoin skirted left end to scoot to the Peru 15 before being knocked out of bounds. Big Bert Matthies, Sterling High School's Jack long-time Peru State nemesis Weyers and Abraham Lincoln barrelled to the Peru 2-yard lin~ High School, Council Bluffs, in three bursts and quarterback Iowa, took top honors here SatDean DeBuhr smashed the final urday in the second annual Peru yards to score with some four State College High School Invi~ minutes gone in the game. Den- tational Cross Country Meet. nis Kirby booted the extra point Weyers, the 1964 meet's indiand Bobcat fans feared a repeat vidual champion, retained his of the last three Peru-Wayne crown by winning the 1.8 m i 1e games which ended in Wayne run in 9: 11, breaking his o w n routs. Kollbaum and company meet record of 9:53 set last year soothed that fear in the second in the meet's initial running. canto. Abraham Lincoln High School Wayne's winning touchdown loped to the team championship Peru State's excellent intramural program is in full swing came on a silver platter as the by scoring 12 points. Eleven high schools, representagain this year. Intramurals re- third quarter waned. With the ceive more attention from the ball on the Peru 31, the Bobcats ing Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, and male student body than the cor- were forced to punt. The snap Missouri competed. responding varsity sports. Mr . from center sailed high over the The teams, places, and point Stemper, director of intramurals, frantic-outstretched fingers of total: 1. Abraham Lincoln (12); is assisted by Ray Cain, John punter Bill Witty, Syracuse. Wit- 2. Johnson (26); 3. Sabetha (40); ty scooped the ball up on the Gilmore, and Alan Sullivan. 4. Thomas Jefferson (42); 5. ClaThe Misfits, last year's over-all Peru four and tried to run out of rinda (47). champions, who finished second danger but Wayne defenders In divi dual finishers: in touch football are strong con- slammed him down on the s i x 1. Jack Weyers, Sterling, 9:11; tenders again this year. The Wor- where they took possession and 2. Jim Ratliff, Abraham Lincoln, then scored a touchdown. cesterites, last year's touch foot9:32; 3. Rodney Wenger, SabeWayne's kick was good for the ball champions, dissolved and tha, 9:33; 4. Steve Phelan, Abrathe members are playing with extra point. ham Lincoln, 9:34; 5. Don Ger-· other teams this year. With two minutes left in the des, Johnson, 9:40; 6. Byron Standings after three rounds game, Wayne recovered a Bobcat Grote, Abraham Lincoln, 9:47; (coaches' names in parenthesis): fumble. Wayne's Kirby kicked a 7. Larry Spratt, Thomas JefferIntramurals Team W L T field goal. son, 9:50; 8. Galen Lininger, ClaMisfits (Polselli) ______ 3 0 rinda, 9:51; 9. Ron Gerdes, JohnEmperors (Flattre) ____ 3 0 son, 9:54; rn. Mark Abel, AbraRd.Runners (Heineman) 3 0 ham Lincoln, 9:55. Sixty Niners (Pieper) __ 2 1 Play boys (Stanocheck) _ 1 1 15:02, cutting 54 seconds off the Studs (Komenda) _____ 1 2 old mark of 15:56 set Sept. 28 by Zephyrs (Zartner) ____ 1 2 Peru's fine cros~,;country team Peru's Louis Fritz, Verdon Octanubis (Burgess) __ 0 2 1 defeated Omaha University 20 senior. Centennials (Sears) ___ O· 3 to 43 at Peru to remain undefeatBeavers (Hains) ______ 0 3 Fritz, running second, established a Peru State record for the The officials for these games ed in 1965. Despite Peru's team victory, course at 15:37. Following Fritz, are students from principles of officiating class. These students Omaha University's Ken Gould were teammates Jim Hendricks, are doing a very fine job of offi- ran off with individual honors as third (15:58); Jim Watson,fourth ciating and according to Mr. he lowered Peru's three-mile (16:23); Jim O'Donoghue, fifth Stemper the Intramural program course record. Gould traveled (16:36); and Van Allen, sixth the rugged Bobcat course in (16 :51). is going smoothly.

Council Bluffs, Iowa Tops In Invitational Cross Country Meet

Intramural Touch Football Under Way

'Cat Harriers Beat Omaha U. 20-43


Brownville's Fall Festival Held Oct. 10

Walter Buettgenbach, Legendary Star Of 1920's, Returns To Peru's Campus

The annual Fall Festival was Walter Buettgenbach, LaPine, held in BrownviU~ on Sunday, Oct. 10. Official festivities began Ore., Peru State College's legenwith a parade down main street, dary football and basketball star at 1:30 p.m. Among those parti- of the 1920's was in the stands cipating were numerous residents Saturday night, Oct. 9 when Peof the town, dressed in fashions ru State hosted Wayne State in of the Old West, a model missile a Nebraska College Conference provided by the U. S. Navy, and grid encounter. The one-time Peru great, still. a miniature car patrol of Shrinwith the thick thatch of red hair ers. that trademarked him in the Exhibiting many Of her origi· 1920's, spent several days on the nal works was Miss Norma Diddel. They included oils, water Peru State campus in the midst color, pen and ink drawings, and of an across-the-country vacapencil drawings. Mr. James D. tion. Accompanying BuettgenLevitt had several photographs bach and his wife, the former Elizabeth Savidge, to the Peru displayed. campus were, Mr. and Mrs. Loyd The Medicine Show began at Prante, LaCanada, Calif. 2:30, with approximately 150 Prante, a · ,1920 graduate of people in attendance. Mr. R. D. Peru State and. a football and Moore presided as the medicine basketball star in his own right, man, reminiscent of the d a y s and Mr. and Mrs. Buettgenbach, when the traveling show was in the latter 1926 and 1928 Peru vogue. A variety of talent from graduates, respectively, toured the area, composed of acts from the Peru State campus during dancing to magic, was presented. the week, relived old memories The advertisement was presented in the area surrounding Peru, midway in the show, as Mr. and thumbed through old college Moore sold "Dr. Chilver's Honey yearbooks and record books as · Elixer"-guaranteed to c u r e they turned the dock back some anything afflicting man or beast. 40 years. The program was concluded at 4:00 p.m., and visitors were encouraged to visit the various historic sites of the town. Many booths and exhibits were also available for the crowd's enjoyment. Four representatives from Peru attended the State S.E.A.N. meeting on Oct. 2. There were ten other colleges represented at New Sidewalks On Campus the meeting. New sidewalks are replacing The purpose of the meeting the grass bare paths, proof that was to plan the program for the Peru college students do know S.E.A.-F.T.A. State Te a ·ch er s the shortest distance between Convention. two points is a straight line. Plans were also made for the The campus grounds should be fall S.E.A.N. Convention Wlllch in fine shape for the Peru grads is to be held at Doane College on who will be returning to see December 4, 1965. their Alma Mater for HomecomRepresentatives from P e r u ing on Oct. 23. were: Dorothy Bock, Myrene Davis, Bill Bowen, and Mr. Harold Johnson.

Peruvians Attend S.E.A.N. Meeting

Grush President Of Faculty Association Miss Gladys Grush was reelected president of the Peru Faculty Association on Monday, Oct. 11, at 3:45 p.m. in the campus school auditorium. Other elected officers are: D. V. Jarvis, vice-president, and Mrs. Faith Friest, secretary. Elected to the executive board were: Mr. Leland Sherwood, Mr:il. Lillian Christ, and Mr. L y l e McKercher. Mr. D. V. Jarvis gave a report of various health insurances and Miss Gladys Grush reported on the Centennial plans.

After-Game Dance Sponsored By Newman Club A dance, sponsored by the Newman Club, was held Oct. 9, following the Wayne-Peru football game. The dance, a moneymaking project, was held in the gym. Instrumental music w as supplied by The Rogues, a Peruvian combo.

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YOU ARE REMINDED That the college catalogue at the time of your matriculation becomes and usually remains the basic guide as to your program of studies-concentration. Retain that copy of ihat catalogue, and do not expect a second copy or a new copy each succeeding year. That your Counselor (Advisor) for the current semester is the faculty member who approved your registration and! his/her name appears on the original copy (which you retained) of the official registration pad. Know your Counselor for any contacts and ·note that you will request your mid-semester grade report from the counselor (about November 19). That your midosemester grade report will be with~ held if YOU have obligations to be deared-such as the medical report (including audiometric), library books overdue, financial payments due, etc. -Office of the Registrar.

Student Wives Want New Members All married women whose husbands are <:Urrently enrolled at Peru State are cordially invited to join the Peru Student Wives club. The purpose of the club is to carry out projects to help the community and surrounding communities by an organization with common interests and similar ideas. Each year the club sponsors such annual events as Christmas caroling, bake sales, and the making and distributing of gifts to the elderly and children's homes. We also confer the PHT (Putting Hubby Through) degree upon club members when their husbands graduate. Our next meeting is Wednesday, Oct. 20 in Room 304 of the Campus School. We hope to see you all there.

President's Secretary Is An "Unsung Hero" In a school system, just as in any system which depends on teamwork, there are the unsung heroes. Such is the case of the secretaries in schools. Mrs. Mary Anna Gnade, secretary to the president, is a good example. This is the twelfth year Mrs. Gnade has served as secretary to the president. When she first started, the enrollment was approximately 250 students. Despite the great increase of enrollment Mrs. Gnade says the noise and commotion have decreased during the years. She believes t he manner of conduct has generally improved through the years. Mrs. Gnade attended the campus school here at Peru and attended high school in De s Moines, Iowa. She served as secretary for five years at the State House in Des Moines. She also did secretarial work at the Peru Lumber Company for 3"2 years. Mrs. Gnade enjoys varied contact with· both students and teachers. Besides doing her regular secretarial chores, she frequently helps with the costuming and make-up in college and high school plays. Mrs. Gnade resides at 1820 Park Avenue, here at Peru. She is the mother of six <:hildren: Jimmy, a tenth grader, who attends the campus school, and is an active football player; Sally, an eleventh grader, who attends the campus school and is a longtime band member; Jeannie, who attends the University of Nebraska; Bob, who attended Peru State College in 1961, and who is now in the service, stationed in Japan; Steve, also in the service stationed in Oklahoma; and Mrs. Falk, who is employed at the campus library.

Bock Attends Commission Meeting (Continued from page one) TEPS Commission and a sponsor of an SEAN chapter is duly qu lified to serve as liaison for th group concerned." Dorothy announced the date the fall convention on the 4th December at Doane college ca pus. She was requested to se a copy of the program for th students' convention so that i can be made available to mem bers of the TEPS commission. Dorothy, who attended the SEA Conference in Washington, gave a report of the conference. The theme of the Student Con· ference was "If Not, Why-If Not Today, When?" Discussed at the student meeting was a report by a Special Study Committee on· Recruitment, Induction, and the Student Programs. Dorothy reported, "The students went through the report carefully and while some parts of the report were favorably received, other parts met with some disfavor."

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Preparations Underway For Homecoming At Peru Preparations for the 44th annual Homecoming, Oct. 23, at Peru State College are getting underway this week with the "primary" election for Homecoming Queen. Five candidates will be selected, and the queen chosen by all-college balloting. The class of 1940-60 members strong-have scheduled a homecoming eve reunion for Friday evening, October 22. The dinner is set for an Auburn steak house for 7 p.m. Among reservations already received is one for Beulah Livingston Evans, North Bend, Washington. The homecoming activities on Saturday will begin with a coffee session from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m., under the direction of the Student Center Board in the Student Center. The P-Club luncheon will be

served for former Peru lettermen and the 1965 football team at 10:45 a.m., and the All-Alumni Luncheon at 11 :45 a.m. Classes of the years ending in "5" and "0" will be seated by classes. All alumni and former students are invited to the event. Tickets at $1.25 per plate may be reserved at the alumni office. The identity of the 1965 Homecoming queen will be revealed at halftime of the Peru-Doane football game. The coed elected will be the twenty-sixth to reign at a Peru State homecoming. The 1965 homecoming production of the Peru Dramatic Club will be William Inge's "Bus Stop." R. D. Moore, head of the division of language arts, is director. The day's activities will close with the homecoming dance at 9 p.m.

Convocation To Feature Ashley Attends Regional Nebraska Poet Laureate Meeting Of A.S.C.D. . (Continued from page one) Mr. Neihardt lived with the people he wrote about in hiS poems. When he was gathering information for his book Black Elk Speaks, he lived with the Oglala Sioux medicine man, Black Elk, who became a very close friend. Neihardt wanted his information first hand1 so he would listen· to the old timers reminisce about the battles in which they had fought. He was also well versed in early frontier history. This aided him in writing the first three songs of A Cycle of the West. His best known epic is A Cy· cle of the West. John Neihardt was 31 years old when he began work on this epic, and he was 60 when he completed it. This epic deals with the period of ex· ploration and settlement t h a t John Neihardt knew personally as a young boy. It began in 1822 when General Ashley and Major Henry led a band of a hundred trappers from St. Louis, "the Mother of the West," to the upper Missouri River and ended in 1890 with the Battle of Wounded Knee which marked the end of Indian resistance on the Plains. The five Songs of the Cycle of the West are written in chronological order starting with the adventures of the Ashley-Henry men on the Missouri River to the crossing of the desert and moun· tains to the west coast. The last Song deals with the conquered Indian and the end of his great civilization. John G. Neihardt writes of life as it really was and not the way some imagined it to be. His poems represent a story of his life.

(Continued from page one) attended by a few national figures. According to Miss Ashley, the prime purpose of this meeting was to introduce new curriculum and ideas in biology, science, and other elementary subjects.

Homecoming Royalty Candidates Revealed (Continued from page one) Omega, the national honorary math fraternity. Ceci Evangelist is from Newark, New York and is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Evangelist. She is a mid-semester sophomore majoring in elementary education. This is Ceci's second year as cheerleader f/51' Peru. She is treasurer of Newman Club, serves· on the Student Center Board, and is a member of White Angels. Last year she was Sweetheart attendant and May Fete attendant. Upon her graduation in January, Marilyn Masters plans on teaching in the elementary level. She was a cheerleader the last three years, served in White Angels and W.A.A. Her freshman and junior years she was selected as May Fete attendant. She was Sweetheart attendant both her freshman and sophomore years and was one of the Homecoming candidates 1 as t year. She is from Nebraska City, and is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Masters. The choice for Queen will be announced at halftime for the Homecoming game with Doane College. The crowning will be performed by Miss Pat Wheatley, our reigning Homecoming queen.

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Nancy Check, Judy Elsinger, and Ken Boatman enjoyed the All School Picnic held during Fresh· man Week. -Photo by Mel Hester

United Nations Dinner To Feature Four Guest Speakers The 14th annual United Nations Dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 19, in the Campus School Auditorium. The menu features Danish, German, and Hawaiian dishes that will be planned and prepared by the experimental foods class and served by members of the Home Economics Club. Mike McNeely will play several piano selections before the meal is served. The four speakers are freshman students at Peru State College. Jette A'Porta, a native of Copenhagen, Denmark, has lived in the United States a year and a half. Sherri Floyd, from Amarillo, Texas, and Grace Cook of Corning, Iowa, will speak on the life and customs of our 50th state, Hawaii. Pat Thompson from Parlin, New Jersey, will tell about life in Germany. A trial run of the dinner was made on Monday, October 11, in the home economics room. Th e four speakers were invited to the dinner. Don Carlile and Bob Henry from Special Services were also guests, and they took pictures of the girls in the experimental food class as they 'prepared the meal.

Peruvian Pictures Snapped Peru students were dressed .in their "Sunday best" on Oct. 12, 13, and 14 as they filed into the Student Center game room to have their pktures taken for the Peruvian yearbook. The mirrors in the trophy cases helped t h e students to do last minute sprucing-up and to practice saying "cheese" to get the desired smile they wanted to use in front of the camera. On Tuesday, 190 students had their pictures taken by Bill Oliver from Del Mar Studio in Omaha. The club organization pictures were snapped on Thursday, Oct. 14. Classes were dismissed at 1 :00 p.m.

Freshmen Suffer Through Organized Events Again The organized events of the freshman initiation took place on the evening of September 29 at the intramural football field. The freshmen were seated in a large group and warned not to smile throughout the evening. They were then left to be preyed upon by the upperclassmen who served them the delightfully distinctive "goober juice." The events themselves began with the choice of the hapless freshman to occupy the box. A second freshman was chosen t9 beat on the box with a bat. The person inside the box then rang the bell so that all could hear it. As the evening wore on several freshmen were given the opportunity to ring the bell. The sack races followed with very tall boys with considerably shorter girls. So many partkipants were involved that two races were required to handle them all. The infamous beauty parlor came next on the agenda w i t h freshmen being shown the latest techniques in beauty. Participants suffered the use of catsup, mustard, flour, and raw eggs in the treatment. The whipped cream race followed, with the freshmen being divided into relay teams. In the process of relaying the cans of w h i p p e d cream, a notable loss of whipped

cream took place among the racers. The shoe scramble which came next, included a larger number of freshmen than . any other event. In the scrambling several shoes were never recovered. Other events of the evening included the egg catch, wheelbarrow race, egg-in-the-mouth race, and the goober juice race. The whole evening was a fitting end to the freshman initiation, and sighs of relief were heard from many an unburdened freshman.

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ORGANIZATIONS n111uu11uuu11uuu111111111111111uunu111111111111111111u1u1

ALPHA MU GAMMA On Oct. 7, Alpha Mu Gamma, the honorary foreign language fraternity, held the first meeting for the 1965-66 school year. The sponsors, Mr. Nemec and Miss Regier, presided at the gathering along with twelve foreign language students. The meeting was opened with a group discussion concerning a disi>Iay for Homecoming. Later Miss Regier gave a talk about her recent trii> to France and other European countries. Sh e brought many interesting pictures, pamphlets, and books concerning the various universities and memorable places she visited• Following the speech, refreshments were served and the meeting was adjourned.

-o-W.A.A. W.A.A., Women's Athletic Association, held its first meeting Wednesday, Oct. 6 in the gym. Vice-president Nancy Check conducted the business meeting. The main concern was the nomination of three girls for the office of president: Cheri Combs, Susan Kenworthy, and Nancy Muse. Election o~ the president will be held at the next meeting. An addition to the by-laws of the constitution was passed, which specified the election of a junior to the post of president. Also discussed were forthcoming activity }>Ossibilities. -0-

HOME EC CLUB The Home Economics Club held its first meeting Monday, Oct. 11, at 6:30 p.m. in the Cam.pus School Auditorium. The new officers for 1965-66 were introduced. They are Linda Rogers, president; Arlene Borcher, president-elect; Judy Elsinger, vicepresident; Mary Ann Rademacher, secretary; and Sandra Hopp, treasurer. Judy Elsinger is also the state president elect and will serve during the 1966-67 term. The welcome for the freshmen girls was held at thl.s meeting. All girls who were interested in home economics were invited to attend. Fall workshop will be at Wayne State College on Saturday, Nov. 11, starting at 9:30a.m. The Peru chapter's project for workshop is to lead a panel dis-

ENGUSH CLUB FRESHMAN CLASS Robert Linder. The topic w Meeting in the auditorium dur- "Why We Feel We Should Stud The first meeting of the English Club was: held in the facul- ing the convocation period on the Bible." ty lounge of the Student Center Wednesday, Oct. 6, the Freshman Two new officers were elect at 8:00, on Monday, Oct. 11. Dor- class held open elections for class , othy Bock extended a welcome officers and delegates to the Stu- -Marcia Cummingham, worshi chairman, and Dan Bolin, fellow· to the members and: students 'who dent Governing Association. Elected were: Carl Satterfield, ship chairman. were interested in joining. Dan Knudsen, program chair- president; Nick Petrillo, viceCoffee and cookies were served man, presented a program on the president; Nancy Guilliatt, sec- during the meeting. basic backgroi.tnd Of Nebraska's . retary; and Janice Johnson, -0poet laureate, John G. Neihardt. treasurer. The new delegates to S.G.A. This meeting was in; connection PHI BETA LAMBDA with the convocation coming on are: Mike Corgnati, John CreamOct. 27, which will feature Dr. er, Leona Masters, and Jette The organization meeting of Neihardt. He will be speaking on A'Porta. · Phi Beta Lambda was held Sep"Poetic Values." .-o-. tember 30 at 7:00 p.m. in the AdSTUDENT WIVES CLUB ministration Building. Out-going Mary Tackett gave a short Officers were elected at ·the president Mary Sautter conductsummary on the life and writings of Mr. Neihardt. Mary Mowry second meeting of the Student ed the election of officers for the read a selection from one of Nei- Wives Club. They are: Jan Shu- new year. The new officers electhardt's epic poems called "The man, president; Gerri Lierz, vice- ed were Bob Krofta, president; Song of Three Friends." Selected· president; Jan Marx, secretary; Allen Chandler, vice-president; portions from the "Song of the and Diane Stoner, treasurer. Beverly Kitelinger, secretary; A committee was appointed to Larry Franke, treasurer; and Messiah," were given by Barbara G:ordon. Several of John Nei- study the P.H.T. degree-putting Richard Duponcheel, historian. hardt's modern poems were read hubby through. The committee Plans were discussed for a poswill report at the next meeting. by Dianne Morrison. sible hay-rack ride in the near At the conclusion of the busiDan Knudsen, Mary Mowry, future, and there was the suggesness session, games were played and Pam Lett were assigned to tion that they combine with the prepare a display and posters on and refreshments were served. Business Club to build the o John Neihardt. The committee Homecoming display. KAPPA DELTA PI for the Centennial program conKappa Delta Pi held its first sists of Nancy Jarvis, JoanBrettThe next regular meeting will 'horst, and Dianne Morrison. The meeting this year Monday, Octo- be held Oct. 18 at 4:55 p.m. in cussion on the topic, "Building deadline for "Sifting Sands" ar- ber 4, 1965 at 8 p.m. The officers the dining room of the Student the Professional Character." Linticles will be March 1, 1966. Mr. are: president, Kris Wewel; vice- Union for the purpose of installda Oldfield and Ginne Mullen Neihardt will speak to the Ro· president, March Tinkham; sec- ing thef new officers and initiatwill lead the discussion. mantic Poetry class· after the con- retary, Carol Nickels; treasurer, ing new members. The guest The committee to choose the vocation on October 27. Every- Donna Van Buskirk; historian, speaker will be Miss Frieda Ro"best dressed girl on campus" one interested is invited to at- Anne Epley; SGA representative, woldt. are Bobbie Armstrong, C a r o 1 tend the Class. English Club Royce Curtis. Hawley, Cherie Trevino, and It was decided Kappa Delta Pi members and faculty will then atJudy Elsinger. The girl who is tend a luncheon for Mr. Neihardt would not work jointly with chosen will have a write-up and PSEA on a Homecoming display. in the faculty dining room. picture submitted to the Glamour The Homecoming display will be -0Magazine. centered around the symbols o f N.E.A. DINNER Linda Rogers gave a short talk Groceries of All Kinds A pot luck dinner was the Kappa Delta Pi. A committee on the "Values of Home Economword for the Oct. 8 meeting of was appointed for Homecoming ics as a Profession." A report Pizzas and Sandwiches the Peru chapter of NEA. The display: Bob Hilt, chairman; Jerwritten by Mary Ellen Wilson on dinner, held at 6:3{) in the Cam- ry Sayer, Royce Curtis, Anne Everything for the the American Home Economics pus School cafeteria, was given Epley, and Donna Van Buskirk. Student Association national convention A program committee was orfor members, new members, and held in Atlantic City, New Jertheir spouses. ganized. The purpose of this sey was read by Judy Elsinger. A short business meeting fol- committee is to plan the meetMrs. Ina Sproul showed slide's on lowed the dinner. ings for this year. It was decided the national convention. Refresh-athat one meeting would be rements were served after the served ,for a guest speaker. DurALPHA MU OMEGA meeting. Alpha Mu Omega held initia- ing the other meetings, plans are -0tion Monday, Oct. 11, 1965, at being made for speeches from PERU HISTORICAL SOCIETY 7 p.m. Those initiated were Owen members concerning the new The Administration Building Dierks., Eugene Bolz, and Dick programs and theories related to their major field of concentration. THE LITTLE STORE was the site of the Oct. 4 meet- Benciveni. ing of the Peru Historical Society. A short business meeting was The members of this committee ON THE CORNER The 7:00 p.m. meeting consisted held following initiation. It was are: March Tinkham, chairman; of a program, provided by Mer- decided that sweat shirts would Anne Epley, Carol Nickels and L. H. CRAIG rill Greenlee, and a business be ordered with the three Greek Dorothy Bock. PERU, NEBR. The next meeting scheduled meeting. Mr. Greenlee showed symbols for Alpha Mu Omega on 872-2701 slides taken during his stay in the front. They will be red with for Monday, Nov. 1, 1965, will be the Philippines. white symbols or white with devoted to initiation of new After the showing of the slides, red symbols according to indi- members. The dues of $4 per year will also be due at this time. March Tinkham called the busi- vidual tastes. --oness meeting to order. The or-<>WESLEY FELLOWSHIP ganization members voted to SENIOR CLASS BARBER SHOP Wseley Fellowship met Oct. 6, make a Homecoming display, and Dr. Schottenhamel, sponsor of a committee was set up to meet the Senior Class, opened the first 1965 in the Methodist Church and plan it. The committee mem- class meeting of this term. The basement at 6:30. Let Us Care Subjects under discussion were bers are: Merrill Greenlee, Rich- first item on the agenda was the For an all-college chili supper, the ard Shuman, March Tinkham, election of officers. He specified Pam Lett, Cheryl Armstrong, and that these officers should be sen- selling of kernel pop corn, and Your Hair the possibility of picking up field Joan Dickman. Anyone interest- iors graduating in June. corn in order to raise money. ed in helping construct the disOfficers elected were: Bill AnAuburn, Nebr. The Wesley Bible Study is to play may contact these people. derson, president; Jack Rinne, be started Oct. 11 under Rev. Also, Richard Shuman and vice-president; Elaine NeddenRon Peterson volunteered to help riep, secretary; and, Sam Smith, the officers plan the programs treasurer. for future meetings. On this note, After his election, Bill Anderthe meeting was adjourned. son presided. The decision of ---0what to leave to the college as a Auburn, Nebraska Ph. 274-4315 STUDENT CHRISTIAN remembrance was discussed. A FELLOWSHIP committee was selected for THE REXALL STORE The Christian Church was the choosing the graduation anscene of the Student Christian nouncements. They are: J oh n Largest Selection of Hallmark Cards in Southeast Nebraska Fellowship meeting, on Oct. 7, at Smith, Frank Ruecker, Dorothy 6:30 p.m. Bock, Marilyn Robertson, and Contemporary Style Cards Also . Lesson plans for the coming Barbara Gordon. Seniors were selected from the year were discussed, and it was: Chess Sets in Several Price Ranges decided that Don Jung would different dorms, and off-campus give devotions for the October 13 married students to measure evComplete Camera and Film Department meeting. eryone for caps and gowns. Dave Officers for this year are Carol Hensley will take care of Majors Russell Stover Candies Nickels, president, and M a r y Hall; Charlie Gordon, Delzell

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Hall; Barbara Gordon and Dorothy Bock, Morgan Hall; and Todd Hoover, married students.

"PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY"


The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . .

1867

To 1965

Peru Pedagogian Volume 61

PERU, NEBRASKA

Number 3

NOVEMBER L 1965

Oldest

And Best

Marilyn Masters Reigns As '65 Homecoming Queen; Peru Downs Doane Tigers 20·6 ·

Photo by Dr. Vernon Siegner, taken 40 feel away With telephoto hms

Miss Marilyn Masters reigns as Peru Slaie's twenty-sixth Ho~; coming Queen.

U. N. Dinner Features Four Speakers BY BOBBIE ARMSTRONG There were 94 people present at the 14th annual United Nations Dinner on Tuesday, Oct. 19, in the Campus School Auditorium. Linda Rogers welcomed the guests. Mr. Robert Moore gave 'the invocation. Piano music was played preceding the dinner by John Bstandig. The guests were served a variety of food prepared from Danish, German, and Hawaiian recipes. The audience enjoyed the entertaining and informative program given by the four guest speakers. Sherrie Floyd a n d Grace Cook presented an interesting travel log of the Hawaiian Islands. The two girls· showed slides of the various scen1c spots on the islands. These slides were taken by Sherrie Floyd and her father. Jette A'Porta gave an informative talk on Danish foods and entertainment. She a 1 so showed slides of Danish table arrangements and foods. Pat Thompson described some of the festivals that take place every year in Germany starting with the October festival. The meal was planned a n d prepared by Pam Bottomley, Doris McConnaughey, N or ma Loew, Mary Kerns, Judy Elsinger, and Bobbie Armstrong from the experimental foods class. The dinner was under the supervision of Louise Kregel.

Neihardt Entertains With His Poetry BY BOBBIE ARMSTRONG

Nebraska's Poet Laureate, Dr. John G. Neihardt received a warm welcome from the student body when he was introduced by Silas E. Summers at the Oct. 27 convocation. The 84 year old poet transported the audience back through time to the frontier days as he read from h i s epic poem Cycle of the West. He recited the "Song of the Indian Wars" which is one of the five songs found in the Cycle of the West. This song portrayed the events concerning the last fight for bison land between the white man and the plains Indians. Mr. Neihardt also recited three lyric poems from the Stranger at the Gate. This book of eleven sequences was written before the birth of his first daughter. The three selections from this book were, "Hymn Before Birth," "Child's Heritage," and "Lullaby to a Baby." He also recited several of his other lyric poems. Mr. Neihardt is interested in poetic techniques, especially rhyme scheme and sound scheme patterns which are very evident in his lyric poems. Mr: John Neihardt attended the Romantic Period class which was held in the auditorium. All who were interested were invited to attend this class. A noon luncheon was sponsored by the EngThe annual "P" Club Home· lish Club for John Neihardt in the faculty dining room. (Continued on page four)

"P" Club Luncheon

Miss Marilyn ·Masters, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. NormanMasters of Nebraska City, was crowned Homecoming Queen for 1965 during the halftime events at the Peru-Doane football game on October 23. M\).rilyn is a second semester senior at Peru State majoring in elementary .education. In her four years at Peru, she has been very active in White Angels and W.A.A. She was a cheerleader her freshman, sophomore, and junior years, and she was a candidate for Homecoming Queen her junior year. During Marilyn's freshman and junior years she was an attendant in the May Fete Royalty, and she was honored during her freshman and junior years to be an attendant in the Sweetheart Royalty held annually as part of the Valentine's Day festivities. Besides her membership in White Angels and P.S.E.A. this year, Marilyn belongs to the Methodist Church in Nebraska City. Although her plans are yet indefinite as to where she will teach, Marilyn wants to teach in the elementary school following her graduation from Peru State College in January. There were four attendants to Queen Marilyn. Pat. Knipplemier is a junior from Auburn, Nebraska. Her parents are Mr. and Mrs. Ru(Continued on page two)

Bobcats Rally To Please Homecoming Crowd Peru State College capitalized on three defensive gems to score three touchdowns · and hand Doane a W-7 loss at Peru State before a huge Homecoming crowd Oct. 23. Coach Erv Pitts' Bobcats turned a Doane fumble, a blocked punt, and a defensive stand deep in Doane territory into touchdowns in Peru's 44th annual homecoming game. Peru broke- into a 6-0 lead with 3:00 left in the first quarter on a 21-yard gallop by Carl Satterfield. The Bobcats had gained possession on Doane's 32-yard line when Phil Malone ripped the ball away from Doane quarterback Bill Stephenson in what was credited as a fumble recovery. This was one of four Doane fumbles the alert Bobcats recovered. Five plays later Satterfield ran the option play to the right side, elected to run, and scored after breaking away from two Doane tacklers on the 18-yard line. Roy Windhorst's attempted PAT kick was blocked by Doane's Dale Hoppe. Peru threatened seriously with seconds remaining in the first quarter but was stymied on the Tiger 5-yard line. Doane's deepest first half penetration was to the Peru 34-yard stripe, and that drive was nipped when Jim Manning pounced on another Tiger fumble.

Doane stormed back to take command briefly in the third quarter. The first time Doane got their hands on the ball, following the halftime festivities, they drove 65 yards to score and Fred Hayeks' extra point boot gave Doane a 7-6 lead. Doane's touchdown came on a 32-yard pass from Bill Stephenson to end Dick Katzman with 9:34 left in the third period. The next time the Tigers took control of the ball, the big break of the day for the Bobcats occurred. With the ball resting on the Peru 46, Doane was found guilty of a clipping penalty and a personal foul on the same play. After the 30-yard penalty s e t Doane back to their 24, the Tigers were forced to punt. Defensive guard Harold Van Arsdale broke through to block Dick Bush's punt. The ball bounced crazily at the 15-yard line, where Peru's Bernie Brown scooped it up and· raced in to score as the clock showed 5:40 left in the third period. A pass from Satterfield to end John Creamer added the extra point and Peru led 13-7. With time becoming an important factor, Peru's tough defensive line held the Tigers on downs on the latter's 14-yard line. Twice with one yard to go for a first down, (Continued on page four)

Independents Win With Bobcat Display Some very fine homecoming exhibits added to the festive mood on the Peru State campus the Oct. 23 weekend. Judged as the best exhibit was the Independents' huge bobcat, loc.ated at the gymnasium. The bobcat emitted "screams," which could be heard over most of the campus. The Independents broke the three year winning streak of the Industrial Arts Club. Second place went to thEJ Alpha Mu Omega project located by the Science Hall. "Crush the Tigers" depicted a large bobcat holding a tiger. Gaining third place, was the cleverly decorated covered wagon constructed by the Wesley Fellowship. Its theme was "Victory or Bust," and "Roll over Doane." There were many other very imaginative exhibits around the campus. Much time, labor, and creativity were employed by all who entered a project.

Alumni Coffee Homecoming day, Oct. 23, witnessed the arrival of many Peru State grads. The annual alumni coffee was held in the Student c·enter Snack Bar from 9:30 to 11:00 Saturday morning. There was a great deal of handshaking and renewing of old friendships. (Continued lln page two)

Photo by Elaine Neddenriep First place display winner was "Cai Galore" constructed by the Indepep.dents.


THANKS GO OUT TO MANY 1

F():R A.' sudcEssFUL HOMECOMING , . I

I

1 •

'

By Mary

Sautter

To make any Homecoming a success, many people must have a hand in it. Every year there are several "unsung heroes" who· go on unrewarded. Of course, many thanks are in order for the participation of the 1965 football squad, the P~ru State College Band, under the direction of Mr. Gilbert 'E. Wilson, and the builders of the many displays which adorned the campus for the 1965 Homecoming Day festivities on October 23. Many people don't realize that there are several tasks and responsibilities that must be taken care of weeks before the actual day. Most of the preliminary arrangements are handled by the Student Governing Asso~iation. The spotlight here should shine on Bill Rinne, S.G.A. president, and Myra Murren, social chairman. It was Bill's responsibility to oversee the necessary arrangements because the Homecoming and particularly the Homecoming Dance are sponsored by the S.G.A. · The theme of the displays and dance decorations, and the rules regarding design and location of displays are· just some of the responsibilities of the S.G.A. Myra, as social , chairman, must organize various committees for handling the necessary arrangements. The biggest responsibility for any committee is the Gym Decoration Committee. Cherie Trevino handled this committee by planning the decorations, ordering the necessary materials and equipment, and planning a work schedule. Chuck Wellensiek was the chairman in charge of the halftime ceremony. He was responsible for making sure that the time limit was met, a script for the candidates was written, and for handling the actual presentation. The flowers adorning the candidates and the bouquet of roses were ordered by Marilyn Masters, the reigning Homecoming Queen. Royce Curtis located the five colorful convertibles and the drivers used to transport the candidates around the field at the halftime show. The throne and chairs for the Queen and her court were gotten through the efforts of Charles Gordon. Chuck Stoner set up the band stand for the dance. · The crowning .ceremony at the dance was arranged by Myrene Davis who emceed the presentation. Many questions were hurled at Myra Murren, the Royal Committee Chairman; Without publicity, no dance can be a success. Paul Fell, as Chairman, and Mickey Slagle, as Co-Chairman, publicized the ticket sale. The actual ticket selling was handled by Gary Fritsch. . The crown was the responsibility of Kathy Hennig and was carried by crown bearers secured by Cheri Co..,mbs. Mary Sautter obtained chaperones for the dance. A special thanks goes to the escorts, Charles Gordon, Jack Rinne, Royce Curtis, Dean Cain, Bill Rinne, and Ron Kroll. Without judges there can't be a contest, so without Mrs. Dick Haughn, Mr. Selleck, Mr. Gavin, Mr. Thomas, Karon Rathe, and Myra Murren, the displays couldn't have been reviewed.

DELZELL HALL . BY BILL BOWEN Delzell acquired a new lounge area during · the week before Homecoming. After a fresh coat of paint in the entire downstairs area, Delzell took delivery of some beautiful new furniture. Suddenly .the lounge changed from a plain empty room into a comfortably luxurious s i t t in g room. I can only compliment the dormitory officers on their taste

in choosing the appointments. The room is a soft reminder of a living room at home, and is a satisfying change from the stark bareness that faced us as we came in before. We owe our good fortune to Mr. Larry Ebner, Peru State's Business Manager. His interest and help are responsible for our new furnishings. Rather than say a simple thanks, I think we should honor Mr. Ebner's kindness by preserving that furniture for our own use. That would

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF

Richard Berthold -----------------------------------Editor Barbara Gordon ------------------------Personnel Manager Elaine Neddenriep ---------~Layout Editor & Photographer Charles Richards -----------------------------Sports Editor Mary Sautter -------------------------------Feature Editor Bill Bowen ------------------------------Business Manager Joan Bretthorst -------------------------------Copy Editor Jackie Swegler -------------------------------Copy Editor Mel Hester --------------------------------~-Photographer Alicia Andrews -----------------------------------Reporter Bobbie Armstrong --------------------------------Reporter Myrene Davis -----------------------------------..Reporter Robert Minks ------------------------------------Reporter Dan Strecker --~----------------------------------Reporter Mary Ann Sharp ---------------------------------Reporter Leland Schneider ----------------.----------------..Reporter Louis Rogers -------------------------------------Reporter Nancy Jarvis -------------------------------------Reporter Mike Sullivan ------------------------------------Reporter Stewart Linscheid ---------------------------------A.dvisor

please ~r. E~~er £8.I' tttorT than anything: else .we .cotild do; A.t any rate, I hope we can tak~:care of the new appointments prb've to the world that Delzell is not the black sheep that it sometimes appears to be. Our dorm is due for a complete remodeling next summer, and if we have the common sense to take care of it, it will be nothing short .of luiuri- , . ous. I think that it should be pointed out that Delzell residents will have the unique opportunity of helping redesign the dormitory. If nothing else, it shows the confidence that someone is willing to place in our intelligence. I appreciate the trust, and I hope that we can live up to it. One addition to this column that I will include when~ver the topics of conversation around here seem to warrant it, will be called, "Only In Peru." The first item is a suggestion that the descriptive slogan of the college be changed from the current, "Campus Of a Thousand Oaks," to a more topical "Campus Of a Thousand Sidewalks." The poor confused student p r a ct i c ally needs a roadmap to negotiate the sidewalks now, and even more are being built. Finally, 'where else but in Peru do builders lay sidewalks that have trees in their centers. It is aesthetically beautiful, but it is also somewhat unnerving. Please don't misunderstand, however, because the new sidewalks are needed and appreciated.. Remember, on the other hand, that even valuable changes are often quite funny.

to

'I

MAJORS HALL

Singing goes better refreshed. And Coca-Cola - with that special zing but never too sweet -

refreshes best:' things

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BY MIKE SULLIVAN

Last weekend's open house here at Majors Hall proved to be a pleasant time for the residents, their families, and their g i r 1 friends. The dorm received many visitors, who seemed to have a very favorable reaction to our dorm. The new plants and furnishings in the lounge and lobby are very attractive. A.lso, the new wing in the dorm drew many favorable comments. Everyone enjoyed the I 0 n g teacher's convention weekend. Some of the students such as Ed Corwin and Paul Hendrickson of Worcester, Massachusetts ar~ making their first trip home, since the start of the school year. The Majors Hall Homecoming exhibit included a Peru player replica in a rocket ship, and a replica of a subdued Doane player who lay defeated beside the Peru player. The theme was "Rocket to Victory." One of the brightest aspects of living in Majors Hall is the presence of our jovial janitor, "Duff." "Duff" and his able staff of assistants, keep our dorm in spic and span condition. No matter what is going on, "Duff" always has a humorous remark to lighten the situation. A good deal of credit for the pleasant atmosphere of our dorm goes to Mrs. Oestman, our dorm mother. She has a personality which makes the students want to cooperate with her.

Alumni Coffee (Continued from page one) stealthy glances were .cast upon identification cards for those who saw a familiar face but couldn't quite remember the name. Reminiscing, most of 'which began "Do you remember the time . . . ... ?", was enjoyed over doughnuts and roffee.

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Marilyn Masters Reigns As Homecoming Queen; Peru Downs Doane (Continued from page one) dolp>h Knipplemier. She is majoring in elementary education. A.s a freshman, she was Sweetheart Queen and was a candidate for Homecoming last year. A sophomore this year, Mary Mowry is planning a major in elementary education also. She . is from Beatrice, Nebraska and the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Merlin Mowry. This is Mary's first year as a cheerleader f o r Peru State. She has also served in White Angels and is a member of S.G.A. Kathy Francis is the daughter of Mrs. Rose Francis of Council Bluffs, Iowa. She is a senior majoring in physical education. She was a cheerleader the first three years and is on the gymnastics squad as well as W.A.A. Kathy has participated in White Angels and is a member of Alpha Mu

Omega, the national honorary math fraternity. Ceci Evangelist is from Newark, New York and is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Evangelist. She is a mid-semester sophomore majoring in elementary education. This is Ceci's s.econd year as cheerleader for Peru. She is treasurer of Newman Club, serves on the Student Center Board, and is a member of White Angels. Last year she was Sweetheart attendant and May Fete attendant.

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"PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY"


HOMECOMING REVIEW 1965

Phofo by Mel Hester The Queen and her aifendants from left to right: Mary Mowry, Pat Knipplemier, Queen Marilyn, Ceci Evangelist, and Kathy Francis.

Photo by Elaine Neddenriep Alpha Mu Omega (honorary mathematics fraternity) captured second place with their display entitled "Crush the Tigers." "Victory or Busi" received third place honors. The display was . built by Wesley Fellowship. Photo by Elaine Neddenriep

Crowning Is the Highlight Of the Homecoming Dance

Photo by Elaine Neddenriep Dan Knudsen, Alicia Andrews and Janice Hauk appearing in Homecoming Play, "Bus Stop."

The Peru State S.G.A. spon- dren, Kelly Combs, who carried sored Homecoming Dance proved the Queen's crown, and Scott to be a perfect ending to a day Coatney solemnly walked across well stocked with excitement for the dance floor to the throne set students, alumni, and faculty. up at the entrance to the room. The dance was held in the gymNext, the retiring Homecoming nasium at 9 p.m., and the couQueen, Miss Pat Wheatley ples entered through the open walked to the throne escorted by mouth of the First Prize winning Mr. Bill Rinne. The four "rundisplay, the Peru Bobcat. Once inside, they saw stream- ners up" were then introduced and each of them joined the others decorating the ceiling, and ers at the throne with their esrevolving colored lights placed around the sidelines. Tables and corts. Miss Pat Knipplemier was chairs were set up around the escorted by Mr. Ray Cain; Miss Ceci Evangelist by Mr. Charles sides of the dance floor. The Norrie Eggers Quintet provided Gordon; Miss Mary Mowry by the evening's music. The atmos- Mr. Ron Kroll; and Miss Kathy phere was that of a night club, Francis by Mr. Royce Curtis. and the lights and tables gave a Escorted by Mr. Jack Rinne, feeling of intimacy unusual for Miss Masters took her place on the size of the floor. the throne. Pat Wheatley placed At 10 p.m., the music stopped the crown on the Queen's head, and the couples returned to their and Miss Marilyn Masters offitables as the Homecoming Queen, cially became the Homecoming Miss Marilyn Masters w a s Queen of 1965'. A radiant smile crowned. The band p r o v i de d lit her face as she and Mr. Rinbackground music as two chi!- ne led the first dance.


SPORTS COLUMN

By Dick

Berthold With a four loss and three win season, the Peru Bobcats are advancing in NCC play. The Bobcats utilized four Bronco fumbles to their advantage Oct. 16 and stunned the NCC Bronco favorites 20-6. Hagemeier's interception and run to the Hastings 8-ya:rd line opened the door for Kollbaum's second touchdown. Earlier, Kollbaum tallied on an 11-yard run that highlighted a 38-yard march. Peru dominated the latter portion of the game and scored with 2:12 left on a 42-yard Satterfield-to-Holliman combination. Coach Pitts praised the Bobcat effort and cited Malone, Bernie Brown, Gilmore, and Urwin for an outstanding defensive job. Photo by Mel Hester Curl Holliman (22) reaches for a quick pitch from quarterback Carl Satterfield (11) in the Homecoming day football game.

Bobcat Defense Stops .Hastings For 20-6 Victory A rugged rushing defense and the running of fullback J i m Kollbaum pepped revenge-mind· ed Peru State College to a 20 to 6 Nebraska College Conference football victory over Hastings College in the Broncos h om e corral, Oct. 16. Kollbaum, the 205 lb. blockbuster from Battle Creek, Iowa, scored Peru's first two touchdowns and the Bobcat defensive line limited Hastings to 35 yards rushing during the game. Revenge was the keynote of the Peru victory. Time after time during the preceding practice sessons, Bobcat Coach Ervin Pitts reminded his charges of last year's humiliating 50 to 0 loss to Hastings suffered before a huge Peru S t at e homecoming throng. Pitts' admonition evidently had the desired effect as the Bobcats upset nearly all the dopesters in registering the victory. Even as pleasing was the way Peru fought back after b e in g shocked by a Hastings touchdown on the opening play of the game when freshman Benny Congrove took the initial kickoff and sped 95 yards to score. Peru took new life when Congrove's PAT went to the left of the goal posts and Hastings led 6 to 0 with 14:47 still left on the first quarter clock. Following the game, Coach Pitts gave credit for the victory to Peru's stout defensive forward wall. Ring leaders of the stingy Bobcat defense were guards Phil Malone and John Gilmore, and tackle Bernie Brown. Pitts also cited the defensive work of linebackers Bob Urwin, and Vince Sabatinelli, as a key factor in limiting Hastings to their 35 rushing yards. Peru was without the services of tackle Floyd Goff, center Bill Witty, defensive end Tim Logsdon, and defensive guard Harold VanArsdale, all sitting out the game with limb injuries. The win over Hastings w a s partially the result of Pern State's taking advantage of Bronco mistakes. Trailing 6 to 0 in the second quarter, Peru capitalized on two

Peru Harriers Win Sixth Straight Meet

Peru State's cross-country team Hastings' errors to go into a 7-6 swept to their sixth straight lead with 5:37 remaining in the meet victory as they copped a triangular win from visiting second quarter. Peru gained ball possession on Tarkio College and Northwest the Hastings 38 when a fourth Missouri 63. down snap from center sailed Peru's Louis Fritz took first over the head of Hastings' wouldbe punter. Four plays later Hast- place with a time of 20:57 over ings had thrown the Bobcats the four-mile course. This was back to the 40-yard line, and Fritz's fifth meet victory in six meets, as he placed second to Peru had to punt. Roy Windhorst spiraled a punt Omaha's Ken Gould while Peru to the one-foot line, but in the defeated Omaha U n i v e r s i t y . meantime Hastings was ca!ted Rounding out the Bobcat scorfor roughing the kicker, and the ing were: Jim Hendricks, second Bobcats had new ·first down life (21:18); Jim Watson, third on the 25-yard stripe. Three (21:27); Jim O'Donoghue, fifth plays later fullback Kollbaum (21 :39); and Dick Zaparailick, sliced 11 yards off right tackle to sixth (22:17). Van Allen ran sevscore and Windhorst gave Peru enth and Jim Bohl eighth, both the 7 to 6 lead with his perfect in non-scoring positions, to push the other scorers down two more PAT kick. Late in the third quarter Peru places. halfback Jim Hagemeier, BeaTop man for Tarkio was Jim trice, picked off a Bronco pass and returned it 32 yards to the Buchanan ,_;ho finished fourth in Hastings eight-yard line. Koll- 21:36. Leading Northwest Misbaum smashed the Hastings' line souri's scoring was N. Johnson three times, scoring from one- who finished tenth in 22:47. yard out on the final carry. Windhorst again split the uprights with the extra point to make it 14-6. The final Bobcat tally came with 2:12 left in the game when Carl Satterfield, Chicago fresh man quarterback, pitched a pass to Curt Holliman, Rockford, Ill., in the flat, and the speedy junior halfback sprinted 42 yards to score. Windhorst's extra point kick sliced wide to the right.

The Bobcats revenged last year's 21-7 ·defeat and scored in the first, third, and fourth quarters to upset Doane 20-7 while adding the finishing touches to Peru's Homecoming festivities Oct. 23. Coach Pitts cited Harold Van Arsdale's blocked punt and Bernie Brown's grab for s ix points as one major play in the contest. The loss of a first down by inches was a disappointment in the first quarter. Doane gained seven first downs for 207 yards to Peru's five first downs for 177 yards. Doane averaged 31.25 per cent on pass completfons compared to the Bobcats' 28.6 per cent. The ·major factor was Doane's four fumbles which the Bobcats used to advantage. Coach Pitts stated, "Our passing and running game will improve. Over-all, I'm not pleased: with the offense because we can't achieve consistency. At this point, the defense has been outstanding." "I'm real pleased with the team's morale" he added, "particularly after Hastings' opening kick-off return which failed to demoralize the Bobcats." This week the Bobcats conclude their 1965 schedule against Washburn University at Topeka. As defending CIC champions, Washburn's nucleus will be

formed around Dode Lesser, 23 lb. tackle; Rod Tiesing, 228 end; and Pat Sherzer, defensi halfback. Peru's 42-0 loss 1as year should be revenged Satur day, Nov. 6. The Peru harriers have e joyed another outstanding seaso with Louis Fritz leading th squad. The remaining schedul should prove that the top notch harriers are exceptional. The re maining schedule is: Nov. 5 Wesleyan Lincoln Nov. 9 J. F. Kennedy, Wahoo Nov. 13 NAIA Invitational Nov. 20 Peru Invitational, Peru Nov. 23 Doane, Crete Nov. 27 National Cross Country Meet, Omaha

Bobcats Rally To Please Homecoming Crowd (Continued from page one) Peru's line, led by John Gilmore, Phil Malone, Bernie Brown, and linebacker Bob Urwin, stopped Doane ball carriers in t h e i r tracks. Four plays after taking control, Peru's Satterfield pitched a 7-yard pass to end Jim Manning and the-c·senior made a diving catch for the touchdown. Roy Windhorst booted the extra point.

11

P11 Club Luncheon (Continued from page one)

coming luncheon was held at 10:45 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 23, in the new west dining room of the Student Center. Along with lunch and a welcome to the old-timers by Coach Mcintire, the program was highlighted by introductions of guests by Coach Mcintire and Coach Pitts. The group of old _grads that appeared for the '6S welcome brought back a little nostalgia from past Peruvian f o o t b a 11 power. Invitations to the luncheon are limited to football lettermen of the past and the present Bobcat squad. Also attending the luncheon were Coach Pilkington and the excellent Bobcat cross-country team.

LOUIS FRITZ LEADS BOBCATS PAST MARYVILLE

Bobcat runners placed first, second, and third as they outdistanced Northwest Missouri State 17 to 44 for their fifth straight victory. Pacing Coach Pilkington's unbeaten Bobcats were: Louis Fritz (17:10), Jim Watson (17:19), and Tim Hendricks (17:43). Dick Zaparanick toured the 3.4 mile Maryville course in 18:07 for fifth, and Jim O'Donoghue ran 18:11 for sixth place. Jim Sprague ran eighth a n d Jim Bohl ninth, both in nonscoring positions, to push Maryville scorers down two more notcnes.

Photo by Mel Hester Carl Satterfield (11) struggles to free himself from a host of Doane pursuers.


Martha Ann Mullen and Dr. Gomon

Cross Country Team ·Wins Eight Straight Peru State College's undefeated cross ·country runners ran their 1965 string to eight straight Friday, Oct. 22, when the Y turned back Doane College and Concordia College in a triangular' on Peru State's four-mile course. With Peru runners sweeping the first three places, the Bobcats scored 19 points, Doane 50, and Concordia 68 points. Louis Fritz set another Peru State record for the Oak Bowl four-mile course. He clocked the distance in 20:38, erasing by 19 seconds his own record set earlier this year.

Photo by Special Services The l,OOOth student to enroll at Peru State College for the 99th academic year-Miss Martha Ann Mullen, a freshman from Nebraska City-was guest of the Board of Education of State Normal Schools at their recognition dinner Sunday, Oct. 31. The dinner in the Peru State College Student Center was to celebrate the surpassing of the enrollment goal established by the Research and Development Committee of

the Board, and honored the college, the faculty, and staff. The fall enrollment is 1,041-a record high. With Miss Mullen is Dr. Neal S. Gomon, President of Peru State since 1951, when the fall semester enrollment was 287. Miss Mullen, a 1965 graduate of Lourdes Central High Scliool in Nebraska City, attended the dinner with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Owen Mullen, 1502 First Avenue, Nebraska City.

Where The Pies Come From

Dr. Vernon Siegner helps us a great deal. He may use anything from a Leica 35 to a Press Graphic. The football action shots in this issue were made with a Leica equipped with a telephoto lens. Dr. Siegner's photography students are helping with phot~­ raphy for the Peruvian as a part of their class assignments.

Because of Homecoming, this Ped is loaded with pictures, so this is a good time to tell where the pictures come from. Student photographers on the Ped ap.d Peruvian staffs are a major source. Our photographers this fall are Elaine Neddenriep, Walter Rimmer, and Mel Hester. Elaine uses a Yashica, a reflex camera that takes 120 film. Walter uses a Japanese 35. Mel uses a Leica 35.

As always, we are getting pictures from Special Services. These are taken by Don Carlile or Bob Henry.

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Tarkio J-V's Upset Bobcat Junior Varsity

from Omaha, who ran second in 15:31, and by Midland's Dennis Dau, a third place finisher in 15:36. Peru State College's 3uruor In registering the victory, varsity football team blew a 7-6 Peru State runners scored in halftime lead, Oct. 19, and abfive of the first six positions, lossorbed a 7-12 loss at the hands ing the sweep by the fine perof the J-Vs from Tarkio (Mo.) formance of Midland's Dau. 0th· College in a game played at .er Peru State . scorers, t h e i r Peru. places and times, were: 4. Jim A late third quarter touchWatson, 15:40; 5. Jim O'Donoghue, 16:01; 6. Jim Sprague, 16:20. down by Tarkio gave the junior Midland point winners wer-=: Owls the victory after Peru State 3. Dennis Dau, 15:36; 9. F. Rod- had gone into a 7 to 6 second riquez, 17:10; 11. D. Meyer, 17:28; quarter lead on a touchdown by 12. L. Tabler, 18:00; 15. F. Grace, Bill Daigle, Worcester, Mass., and an extra point by Ken Kam19:33. Northwestern scorers were: 10. man, Imogene, Iowa. Charles Dippel, 17:27; 13. Dennis Tarkio scored their initial Dinges, 18:33; 14. Robt. Schneck, touchdown on the second play of 18:49; 16. M. Langston, 19:34; 17. the game with a 65-yard touchFred Flick, 20:06. down jaunt.

Trailing Fritz were Bobcats Tim Hendricks who ran second in 21:05, and Jim Watson, a third place finisher in 21 :12. Concordia's Bryan Ratt finished fourth (21:13) and Doane's Bruce Shefield ran fifth (21 :20). Closing out the Peru State scoring were Jim O'Donoghue, (6th, 21:31), and Dick Zaparanick, (7th, 21 :53). Other Doane scorers were: 8. Steve Donlinger, 21:58; 10. Dennis Donlinger, 22:06; 13. John Bible, 22:42; 14. Bob Roche, 22:43. Other Concordia point winners were: 12. Dave McCallister, 22:37; 16. Gary Ebendick, 23:10; 17. Dave E!fman, 23:11; 19. Marc Terrass, 23:25.

Fritz Continues To Lead Bobcat Harriers Peru State's Louis Fritz did it again Oct. 19. The slender Bobcat cross country ace, from Verdon, broke his own three mi 1 e Peru State course record with a 15:27 clocking as he led his Peru mates to a triangular cross country victory over Midland College and'Midwestern College of Denison, Iowa, at Peru. Fritz's effort was the third time this year he has bettered h.is own Peru State three-mile mark. At the start of this season, the record stood at 16:07. In clipping 10 seconds off the existing standard he set on Oct. 8, Fritz pepped the Peruvians to a lopsided victory. Jim Pilkington's Bobcats scored 18 points, Midland 50, and Midwestern 70. Midwestern, in its initial year of operation, was competing in its first cross country meet. The existing Peru State record was also eclipsed by Tim Hendricks, Peru State sophomore

NEBRASKA CONGRESS OF PARENTS AND TEACHERS 720 Soufh 22 Sfreef, Lincoln, Nebraska 68510

PTA SCHOLARSHIP RULES I. Participating Colleges Schalarships shall be made available from the Life Membership Fund to the following public colleges maintaining approved four-year teacher-education programs: Chadron State College Kearney State College Peru State College Wayne State College Teachers College, University of Nebraska Teachers College, Municipal Uni. of Omaha II. Eligibility Qualifications of Applicant A. Be a Nebraska resident B. Be registered in elementary or secondary education in any of the participating colleges C. Be in need of financial assistance to complete his education D. Have high moral and social standards E. Have achieved a good scholastic record F. Show special aptitude for teaching G. Possess a pleasing personality H. Submit written application to the Scholarship Committee of the Nebraska Congress of Parents and Teachers

III. Amount of Scholarship The amount awarded to a student working toward a teacher's certificate will be $100 issued in time for second-semester use. Application may be made for an additional PTA scholarship each year while attending school

IV. Terms of Scholarship Each recipient shall sign an agreement which specifies that: A. Each scholarship is earned by completing two years of teaching. If the recipient does not complete two years of teaching for each scholarship received he may discharge his obligation by repaying the unearned portion of the amount of the scholarship with interest at 21/z per cent from the time he leaves college B. The Tecipient shall advise the president of the Nebraska Congress of Parents and Teachers of his teaching status at the close of each year until the scholarship is earned The deadline for applications is Monday, Nov. 22

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Brock, s~retaey: Ju.4y Adat;ns Allgood/ '62, ·6551 Pacific, ·Omaha, treasurer. Peruvians from as far away as California and Florida returned for· Alumni Day activities. The all-alumni luncheon attracted representatives of the years ending in "5" and "O" who had special tables. Athletes of former years joined the 1965 football team at pre-game lunch. The Peru Dramatic Club's presentation of William Inge's "Bus Stop" met with enthusiastic response. The homecoming dance concluded the day's events.

Three Representatives From Peru State Attend Inauguration Three members . of the Peru State faculty, Dean of the College Keith L. Melvin, ·Head of the Divisipn of Education Dr. Darrell Wininger, and Assistant Professor of Speech J. D. Levitt represented Peru State .College Friday afternoon, October 15, at the University Stadium in Omaha when Dr. Traywick was officially installed as the new president of the University of Omaha. "I thought it was very impressive," said D ea n Melvin, "and the university certainly gained in stature and prestige." Said Professor Levitt, "It seemed chaotic at first, but what Photo by Special Services really impressed me was the Peru Prep Homecoming Royalty. Front row, left fo right, number of representatives from Chuckie Coatney, Shelley McAdams and Kim Jodry. Back row. hundreds of American, British and Canadian colleges and uniKing Bruce Henning and Queen Dana Henry. versities."

"Bus Stop" Added Pleasure To Peru Homecoming Program The annual Homecoming Play was performed in the College Auditorium on Oct. 23, at 7:00 p.m. William Inge's Bus Stop was presented for an audience of more than 250. The director, Mr. R. D. Moore reported that the audience response was commendable and the play as a whole was well received. Members of. the cast included: Alicia Andrews, Myrene Davis, Brian Collins, Janice Hauk, Dan Knudsen, Ken Boatman, D o n Dodge, and Mel Hester. After six weeks of intensive rehearsal, the actors agreed that the performance was a very rewarding experience, worth the time and work which had been devoted to the play. · In charge of the stage a n d lighting was Jon Davis, directing a crew consisting of: Neal Bauer, Steve Mason, and Marci Andrews. Dorothy Bock was assistant director, correlating the activities of the committees composed of Barb Gordon, D a 1 e Burgess and Joan Bretthorst.

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Dorothy Bock was also prompter. Many members of the audience extended congratulations to the entire cast and crew after the performance, indicating that the play, as well as the victorious football game, had contributed to the success of Homecoming i.Q65.

Alumni Elect Officers During day-long balloting for new officers of the Peru Alumni Association, the following were elected: Clyde Barrett, '56, Peru, president; JoAnn Parriott Rus-sell, 'W, Nebraska City, first vice-president; Mary Jarvis Morton, '50, Hamburg, Iowa, second vice-president; Troy Lyon, '64,

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Has New Coach Peru Prep's new footballcoach is Mr. Paul Sorensen. Besideshis football coaching duties Mr. Sorensen' will coach the Bobkittens in basketball and track. He received both his B.A. and M.A. from Wichita University, and while there was a graduate assistant. Mr. Sorensen has been head coach in basketball at Holyoke, Colorado, and Dodge City, Kansas. He was the assistant coach in football and track at those two schools as well.

'.Before coming to Peru he a P. E. teacher and head ba ball coach at Andale Rural H School in Kansas. Mr. Sorensen and his Joan are the parents of Miehe seven; Mari, nine; and Mark, We regret that we omitted story in the last issue. A rep failed to complete his assi ment.

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NCC Football Tri-Champs

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru · Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 61

Number 4

NOVEMBER 15, 1965

Nice Going Bobcats!

"

Bobcats NCC Tri-Champs Bobcats Whip Kearney In Close 14-13 Decision

Photo by Mel Hester Piciured above are nine of Peru's senior football players. Front ~w: Sam Sadich, Vincent Sabat· inelli, Roy Windhorst, Jim Manning. Back row: Phil Malone, Les Raines, Floyd Goff. Bill Witty, Dom La Rocca.

Normal Board Honors Peru Celebrating 1000 + Students The Nebraska State Normal Board hosted a steak dinner for approximately 250 to celebrate Peru's 1000+ enrollment, actually 1041. Guests were friends of the college, faculty and staff and spouses. The dinner was served at 6:30 p.m. on Sunday, Oct. 31, in the Student Center.

secretary; and Dr. F. B. Decker, Lincoln, Normal Board coordinator; and Dr. Floyd Miller, Lincoln, state commissioner of education. (Continued on page two)

Eighty-six Students To Do Practice Teaching Today, eighty-six Peru College students are in varied elementary and high schools throughout the area. According to Dr. Lloyd Kite, Director of Student Teaching, the (Continued on page two)

Peru State College carved a notch in the ranks of "come back" teams as they outscrambled Kearney State at Peru to win 14-13 and annex a portion of the NCC championship Oct. 30. In winning, the Bobcats completed a long up-hiH battle to the top spot of the NCC, a position they share with Kearney and Wayne State, who have identical three win and one loss records in NCC competition. Despite the crowded top spot, it was an extraordinary "comeback" for the Bobcats on the heels of last year's fourth place NCC finish with only one victory. The win over Kearney evened the Bobcats' season record at four wins and four losses. Carl Satterfield, frosh signal caller, passed for one Bobcat touchdown and set up another with his passing in an evening which saw him throw for 154 yards on 12 completions in 21 attempts. Freshman defender Bill Everhart made the key defensive play of the night following Kearney's near-equalizing second

Ten Named To Who's Who Ten Peru State College students have been named to Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges, according to Dr. G. N. Dodge, director of counseling and chair-

State Senator Calista Cooper Hughes of Humboldt was the main speaker. She predicted a bright future for Peru a n d praised the college for the thousands of excellent teachers it has trained. Mr. Bernard Spencer, Nebraska City, president of the Normal Board, emceed with wit and polish. After the invocation by Mr. Austin Van Pelt of the Perufaculty, dinner was served. Joan Sprieck and Richard Sutton sang "Getting To Know You'' from The King and I. Sh a r o n Johnson and Ross Oestman sang "Make Believe" from Showboat. Then all four did "People Will Say We're In Love" from Okla· homa. Mary Lu Hicks was accompanist for all numbers. Mr. Spencer introduced a number of distinguished guests: Senator Hughes and Mr. Hughes, trustees of the Peru Achievement Foundation, pr o f es s or s emeritus, state college presidents: Dr. F. Clark Elkins, Chadron State; Dr. Milton Hassel, Kearney State; Dr. William Brandenburg, Wayne State; and E. Albin Larson, Lincoln, Normal Board:

touchdown with 1:57 remaining. Everhart roared through the Kearney line to block Lee Jacobson's extra point attempt and to keep Peru in front 14-13. With seven seconds remaining in the game, Everhart thwarted Kearney's <lesperation field goal attempt from the 35 when he smacked down Jacobson's possible game-winning placement. Sparked by Satterfield's nerve and poise,. the Bobcats marched 79 yards in 14 plays to score on a 7-yard pitch by Satterfield to end John Creamer with 4:37 remaining in the first quarter. Roy Windhorst's kick from placement put Peru into a 7-0 lead. Satterfield had a personalhand in gaining 70 yards on this drive. He completed two passes to Creamer good for 16 (including the TD), ran the ball three times for 39 yards, and caught a pass from Bill Daigle for 15 yards. On the latter p 1a y, Satterfield pitched out to Daigle, a quarterback running from the halfback position, and Daigle sprinted to his right w hi 1e Satterfield (Continued on page three)

Photo by Special Services 1965 Who's Who Candidates, top row from left-Anne Epley, Peru; Marilyn Gonnerman, Waco; March Tinkham, Holmesville; Dorothy Bock, Pawnee City: Donna Van Buskirk, Clarinda, Iowa: Barbara Gordon, Hamburg, Iowa. Lower row, from left-Robert Hilt, Falla C.ify: John Rinne, Burchard; William Witty, Jr., Syra· cuse: Oliver Bierman, Hastings.

man of the student-faculty selection committee. Peru State's representatives, all seniors, are Oliver Bierman, Hastings; Dorothy Bock, Pawnee City; Anne Epley, Peru; Marilyn Gonnerman, Waco; Barbara Gordon, Hamburg, Iowa; Robert Hilt, Falls City; John Rinne, Burchard; March Tinkham, Holmesville; Donna Van Buskirk, Clarinda, Iowa; and William Witty, Jr., Syracuse. Outstanding students from colleges and universities throughout the nation are named annually for Who's Who listing. Selection is based on excellence and sincerity in scholarship, leadership in academic and co-curricular activities, citizenship, service to the school, and promise of future usefulness to society. OLIVER T. BIERMAN Oliver T. Bierman, Hastings, is a major in history and English who will be a candidate for the baccalaureate degree in June. A student assistant to the head of Peru State's history and social science division, Bierman has also been active in Kappa Delta Pi, education honorary fraternity; Phi Alpha Theta, honorary historical society of which he is the current secretary; Sigma Tau Delta, honorary English fraternity; and the Peru Historical Society. A 1939 graduate of Hastings High school, Bierman spent the following year in college before joining the Army where he remained until 1955. Following (Continued on page four)


EJ)ITORIAL On behalf of the Peru State College football players and coaches, I would like to thank the member~ of the student body in general arid the members of the Blue Devils ·in· particular for the fine support given our team in the recent football game with Kearney. I believe that the prime reason · our boys played so well was because of the strong enthusiasm and fine support you provided during this game. We thank you for this enthusiasm and hope that you will continue to support us in this manner which has been, over the years, a tradition here at Peru State College. Sincerely, Ervin .R. Pitts, Football Coach. Editor's Note: Speaking for the Ped staff and the student body, we congratulate Coaches Pitts, Pelisek, and McIntire, and the entire Bobcat team for the tremendous showing they have made this year. Pedagogian Editor, Richard Berthold.

ELIZA MORGAN HALL BY MARY ANN SHARP There was no column for the dorm in the last issue of the Pedagogian due to illness in my family-me. This explanation Is for the benefit of those who thought at last that with this many girls, we had finally run out of news and made a new mark in history~ I have been asked to make several announcements, some of which would have been printed in the last column. Miss Jeanie Bang, a junior in the field of elementary education, became engaged .on her twentieth birthday to Jim Felten. Jim was a 1965 graduate from Peru and is now teaching Industrial Arts in the ji.mior high level in Omaha. They have made no further plans for the. moment. The day before Marilyn Masters was crowned Homecoming Queen, she received a diamond from Tom Yopp, a former student of Peru State. He now works in Nebraska City as a salesman for the John Deere Co. Marilyn began her student teaching in Syracuse this week in the elemeniary grades. Nancy Gossett and Ron Robbins have set no date as yet, since Ron is a senior concentrating in physical education and math. Nancy is a second semester· freshman, majoring in elementary education. Majoring in Art at Peru State is Rosemary Slagle who announces her en. gagement to Vernon De Groot from Inwood, Iowa. He is an airman stationed at Lackland A.F.B. in San Antonio, Texas. No future plans have been made at the moment. With the end of the first nine weeks, much of the time w a s spent on mid-term exams and final papers for those girls who have now begun their student teaching. Those not so b us y studying were taking the time to

Eighty-six Students To Do Practice Teaching (Continued from page one) thirty-two elementary student teachers will be out for nine weeks and the secondary student teachers will have on-the-jobtraining for eight weeks. There are fifty-four secondary teachers. Miss Ashley will visit the elementary student teachers to check on their progress. Dr. Kite will visit the secondary teachers. Mrs. Adams, Mr. Van Zant, Mr. Strom, and Dr. Wininger will make visits, on the students, on a part-time basis. The secondary students are: Auburn-Richard A 11 g o o d , James Barnhart, Jon Davis, Merrill Greenlee. Beatrice-Ronald Eltiste, Marilyn Gonnerman, Ronald Peterson, John Riley. Bellevue-Sidney Baney, Dale Cerny, Bernard Jarecke, James Manning, Bruce Mau, Cynthia Meier, Paul Oliphant, Peggy Quackenbush, James Snyder, Joseph Wildinger. Fairbury_..:.Edward Baroud, Milan Obrenoviech. -.... Falls City-John Eickhoff, Louis Fritz, Robert Hilt. Glenwood-Joseph McKee, Roy Windhorst. Hamburg-Sam Carneal, James Hanks. Johnson-Larry Hayes. Nebraska City-Phyllis Hopper, Raymond Johnson, Robert Krofta, ·Harold Marshall, Sam Sadich, Paul Stevenson. Omaha-Garry Madison, Loren Penkava, Ronald Wiksell. Papillion-Henry Grace, Larry Lines. Peru-Oliver Bierman, Robert Leander, Ronald Mustard, Jim Sprague. Plattsmouth-Joseph Chamberlain, Carol Dafl'er. (Continued on page three) finally write home, slyly asking for more money before grades were mailed.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Richard Berthold -----------------------------------Editor Barbara Gordon --------------~---------Personnel Manager Elaine Neddenriep __________ Layout Editor & Photographer Charles Richards -----------------------------S:Ports Editor Mary Sautter -------------------------------Feature Editor Bill Bowen ------------------------------Bilsiness Manager Joan Bretthorst -------------------------------Copy Editor Jackie Swegler -------------------------------Copy Editor Mel Hester ----------------------------------Photographer Alicia Andrews -----------------------------------Reporter Bobbie Armstrong --------------------------------Reporter Myrene Davis ------------------------------------Reporter Robert Minks ------------------------------------Reporter Dan Strecker -------------------------------------Reporter Mary Ann Sharp ---------------------------------Reporter Leland Schneider -------------------------------~.Reporter Louis Rogers ----------------------------'---------Reporter Nancy Jarvis -------------------------------------Reporter Mike Sullivan ------------------------------------Reporter Stewart Linscheid ---------------------------------Advisor

DELZELL HALL BY BILL BOWEN Delzell is now the proud possessor of one of the nation's greatest natural monuments. On the second floor live a Mr. Pike and a Mr. Peak to make Delzell's version of Colorado's Pike's Peak. There is now a p0ssibility that we will have a hot drink vending. machine installed in o u r building. The addition of such machines are always an added converni.ence to life in the dormitory. There will be complaints about the operation of the machines, and those complaints will probably emanate from me. However, if we have to put up with the capricious vendors, we may as well have as many kinds of service as possible. There are available vending machines that dispense sandwiches, candy, and such snacks as potato chips and peanuts. I was informed that the profits from these machines go to the Peru Achievement Foundation, indicating a highly laudable situation. I think that the increase in the number and type of machines could only be to the increased benefit of the foundation. There can be little doubt in anyone's mind that the vending machines could be operated profitably in the dormitories. The amount of food that is purchased and kept in the various rooms for snacks should be an adequate index to the market that exists and could be served by such machines.

Studies piling up? Pause. Have aCoke. Coca-Cola - with a lively lift ' and never too sweet, refreshes best. .

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Many of the residents in the dorm are in favor of obtaining a bottle machine for soft drinks, rather than using the cup-containing soft drink machine now in use. It seems that last year, there was a bottle machine in the dorm, but a few students .took it upon themselves to sell the pop bottles and pop cases for spending money. This is the reason we have the cup machine this year. Led by Don Lehman, several of the boys went on a snipe hunt the other night. Everyone had a good time, but Don got lost for about 20 minutes. He missed all the snipes that the other boys so vigorously flushed, but all the boys seemed to have a good time anyway. The trip back to Worcester, Massachusetts, on teachers convention weekend, proved to be costly for Ed Corwin and Rick Cannole. In their enthusiasm to reach home, they each acquired a speeding ticket, Mr. Corwin in Ohio, and Mr. Cannole in Illinois. The record enthusiasts of the dorm are still waiting patiently for the arrival of a needle for the stereo. It seems the shipping time is taking a little longer than was expected.

go

betterth . •

BY MIKE SULLIVA?f The new parking lot west of the dorm is ready for use this week. It is an improvement over the old parking lot. Parking can be done practically right in front of the door, which makes packing and unpacking considerably easier.

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Normal Board Honors Peru Celebrating 1000+ Students (Continued from page one) Mr. Spencer then introduced his fellow Normal Board members: A. D. Majors, Omaha; Henry Freed, Chadron; Dr. Gordon Shupe, Wayne; and Mr. E. K. Yanney, Lodgepole. Bill Rinne gave greetings from the S.G.A.; Miss· Gladys Grush from the Peru facUlty; and Mr. John L. Lewis from the Peru Achievement Foundation. After Senator Hughes' address, Mr. A. D. Majors and Mr. E. K. Yanney of the Normal Board assisted Martha Ann Mullen, Peru's 1,000th student, in cutting the 1041 Cake. The program ended with the singing of the "Color Song." An event not on the printed program provoked much laughter. For years, Dr. Gomon has referred to various funds as

'

"cream cans." The NormalBoard presented him with a "gold," bottomless cream can with 1041 newly minted pennies in it. When Dr. Gomoh became president in 1951, Peru's enrollment was 287.

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. Satfer!Md ·.:rec,eived ·broken nose on the play~"· This play came eight plays a:fter Sutter had been involved in another roughing penalty. Washburn came back in the Again, quoting the Topeka Capi· second quarter for a halftime tie tal-Journal: " ... John Sutter by driving 88 yards to score on hit a Peru pass receiver from bea freak play. With a fourth down hind away from the play after and a one-yard-to-go situation on the whistle had blown for a 15the Peru five, quarterback Jack yard penalty," but Sutter reWellman attempted a sneak for mained in the game thanks to the first down. The Peru 1in e officiating which had lost control. Satterfield played briefly in the stopped We!1man short but . the ball squirted out of his arms and second half, but was finally rolled across the goal line where forced out by repeated shots to Ichabod end Jeff Hill recovered his nose, and into a Topeka hosfor the TD. Don Del Mazzio boot- pital where he remained until Monday. ed the point for the equalizer. Obviously disturbed about the The winning and go-ahead points for Washburn came with game and the quality of play dis11 :30 left in. the third period played, Coach Erv Pitts refused when John Sutter and Jim Wil- comment for quote, except for liamson collaborated to throw saying the lW yards in penalties Peru's Satterfield in the end zone assessed against Washurn (compared to Peru's 58) "is indicative for a safety and make it 9 to 7. Washburn took advantage of a of what happened in this soPeru fumble on her own nine called football game." The Topeka Capital-Journal yard line for their insurance touchdown. After recovering the summarized the Ichabods' play fumble, the Ichabods moved in this way: "When the Blues three plays later on Mel My- weren't fighting during the final rick's one-yard slant to end the three periods (which was selscoring as the try for extra point dom), they 'were putting on an exhibition of fine football." failed.

Peru's Satterfie.ld Rockets To Peak Of College Star List

seasoii: wl.th, "Everyone worked fine and they displayed. a good · attitude. Freshmen Satterp.eld, Kollbaum, Mizerski, and Creamer. filled right in as starters. Malone, Manning, Witty, and BerWashburn University outfought nie Brown played good steady From World-Herald Nov. 4, 1965 Peru State College for a 15 to 7 ball all season." By Paul . LeBar gridiron victory in Washburn's Carl Satterfield, in his eighth Game Scores: Moore Bowl, Nov. 6. collegiate contest, came of age Peru 6 - Tarkio 7 The game, the last of the seaagainst Kearney State. Peru 0-Lincoln U. 6 son for Peru State, ended the The Peru State freshman ran Peru 18 - N.W. Missouri 28 ·Bobcat season with a record of and passed for 162 yards, twoPeru 21 Chadron O four wins and five defeats. Washthirds of his team's offense. Peru 7- Wayne 17 burn moved its record to one It was the kind of performance Peru 20 - Hastings 6 win, one tie, and six losses. awaited from a quarterback, Peru 20 - Doane 7 Washburn's Ichabods, after bewho a year ago was good enough Peru 14-Kearney 13 ing shoved all over the field durfor Red Division all-star honors Peru 7 - Washburn 15 ing the first ,quarter when Peru Coach Mcintire's cagers begin at Chicago's Roosevelt High. took a 7-0 lead, completely domLine Coach Joe Pe!isek snared action Nov. 22 against the aluminated play thereafter. ni. The Bobcat nucleus will be the 5·11, 161-pound athlete, who Coach Ervin Pitts' charges, formed around Harmon, Snod- originally was headed for Doane. hoping for a win that would have Satterfield marshaled ~ team grass, Sanders, Knoll, Estes, given them their first winning 78 and 54 yards to touchdowns Chaase, Cain, B. Rinne, J. Rinseason since 1962, marched with ne, Heine, Lovejoy, Portrey, as Peru gained a share of the Nethe opening kick-off 68 yards in braska. College Conference title. Heng, Castle and Pokorney. 13 plays to score. Freshman quarWith the lift of his 12 pass ~rback Carl Satterfield sneaked completions in 21 attempts and the final yard and senior R o y net of 17 rushing yards, P e r u Windhorst booted the point after triumphed, 14 to 13. touchdown. "He's a scrambler," Bobcat Coach Ervin Pitts declared. (Continued from page one) "He seems to be able to see the sneaked into the left flat where whole field. You ·can't teach a Daigle hit him with a strike. boy that. He either has the abilKearney roared back minutes ity or he hasn't" later for an equalizing touchSatterfieJd, The World-Herald So far as Peru players a n d down with 13 :02 left in the sec- State College Star of the Week, coaches were concerned, the key ond period. Halfback Keith already owns a Peru one-season play of the game occurred midSPORTS Staehr tucked in a Bobcat punt high of 702 aerial yards. way in the first quarter on the COLUMN on the Peru 49 and skipped down Peru sideline. The total, on 49 completions in the sidelines to the 17 before .be134 tries, has shattered the old Satterfield was run out of ing stopped. Two plays 1a t e r school mark of 505 yards set by By bounds near the Peru bench aftDick quarterback Neil Kaup put Kear- Sid Brown in 1957. · er picking up 1() yards on an opBerthold ney on the board with a scoring His status has been that of a tion play. A Washburn player pass to end Myron Inselman, and regular since, in a losing effort at piled . on Satterfield embarrassThe Peru Bobcats wrapped up Jacobson booted the extra point. Northwest Missouri, he completingly long after the whistle. Peru guard Phil Malone gave ed 11 of 21 passes for 133 ·yards When no red! flag. followed, Pe- their 1965 gridiron campaign ru's Floyd Goff, senior tackle against Wash b urn University the Bobcats their second touch- and three &cores. "When. he matures,'! Pitts .· befrom Nebraska City, shoved the Nov: 6, climaxing a four win and down chance when he recovered Lovely five loss. season. The highlight of a Kearney fumble .late in the lieves, "he should . real.ly .. be Ichabod off· of Satterfield. Indiamond .stinctively, ,the . ,b l u e-s h ir t e d the season was the Kearney up- third quarter. Malone's piracy something." World-Herald Sfar-of-the~Week Washburnite spun and threw a set f~~ a three-way ti~ as NCC occurred on the Peru 47-yard wild punch at GQff and a near champs. Coach Pitts stressed, stripe, and Satterfield moved his card wi.ll be sent the 1&-year-old riot resulted. Washburn players "We simply wanted the victory team to score from that point in Illinoisan. seven plays. and coaches cleared their bench more than Kearney did. Our deTwo passes to Creamer gained PRACTICE TEACHING 11 diamond fense has ·carried. us through the from the opposite side of the ~!!!'!'!.!!19 (Continued from page t,wo) field, and when the fracas w a s last several games," Pitts con- 48 yards, the second of which · $gsoo Sidney-Ralph Shaffer; finally ended Goff and Jim Man- tinued, "and during the Kearney put the ball on the three. KollShenandoah- R o b e r t Ruff, ning were ejected from the Peru game we combined this defense baum punched to the two; Nick lineup while end Pat McCrite with our best offensive game of Petrillo slanted to the one and Donna Van Buskirk, Marilyn 14 diamond bride and received the same sentence for the season for the key to vic- Kollbaum provided the 'score Zwickel. with a one-yard lunge. Wind· gr.o.om the Ichabods. The incident fired tory." Tecumseh-Don n a Donavan, wedding horst's PAT provided the victory John Sharp. the Ichabod&, and took something The Bobcats annexed 267 yards ring set. out of the Peruvians. on 69 -carries while Kearney margin. · Westside-Charles Colebrook, ifs(foo Kearney's final touchdown Bob Jones, Linda Rogers. gained 181 yards on '54 plays. About four minutes later Satcame at the end of a 69-yard Elementary students will be Pay as terfield was sent out of the game Peru completed 13 of 22 passes drive, the big play of which was at these schools: for 169 yards and the Antelopes Convenient with an injury and the Peru ofcompleted seven of 18 aerial at- a 55-yard pass'-run from Kaup to Auburn-Karen Compton, Linfense thereafter sputtered. The end Gary Dubbs. Kaup plunged Matching Wedding Bands injury as reported by Bob Hart- tacks for 109 yards. Peru again the last yard to score and it was da Templeton, Mark Zimmerman. from $16, up dominated the first down statisBeatrice-Sharon Bender, Verzell, Topeka Capital-Journal rethen that Bill Everhart saved the ona Borcher, Gayle Schoen, Barb Diamonds shown evenings by tics with 16 against Kearney's 12. porter came this way: "The most appointment. c;lay with his block of Jacobson's Thompson, Barb Young. Satterfield completed 12 of 21 damaging incident of the game PAT attempt. Bellevue-James Carlisle, Marcame a few minutes after t h e passes for 145 aerial yards, and Peru's ever-improving defen- ilyn Robertson, Pat Wheatley. teammate C:reamer received six fight, when Sutter roughed SatAUBURN sive game came up with big Falls City-Jeanne Cummings, terfield after making a tackle. passes for 82 yards. Kollbaum carried 19 times for 41 y.ards. plays throughout the contest. The Sarah Goodwin, Julia Rummery. Nebraska City-David HensWitty punted six times for a 36.5 potent Kearney rushing game yards average, and Windhorst was stifled with a net of 72 ley, Brenda McCarthy, Myra kicked off three times for a 46 yards. Peru's secondary, led by Murren, Sherrie Smith. Omaha-Kathleen Henning. yard average. Both teams had Sam Sadich, Lowell Brown, Jim Complete Line of School Supplies Peru-Beverly Brigham, Dale six punts with the Antelopes av- Hagemeier, and Vince Sabatinelli limited Kearney to 109 yards Burgess, Judy Hoyt, Mary Jones, eraging 39 yards to Peru's 36 Revlon Coty Evening in Paris in the air. Vickie Still. yards. ·• Cosmetics Sidney-Marilyn Bailie. The Bobcats traveled to WashShenandoah-Margo· Bateman, .burn Nov. 6, climaxing a wellKODAKS. ' & SUPPLIES l· Letha Bayer, Pat McKee, Mary ' improved season. The Ichabods Parmenter. FAST FILM SERVICE overpowered Peru 15-7 after the Syracuse-Marilyn Masters. Bobcats swirled to a first quarBRIN~ US YOUR PRESCRIPTIONS Tecumseh-Anne Epley. ter TD. Peru's frosh signal callWestside-Karen Quinn. er, Satterfield, received a broken nose and remained in Topeka for BOWL AT THE SIGN OF observation, following the spirited game. THE MAGIC TRIANGLE Eight senior lettermen com' pleted their. college ball careers against Washburn University. OPEN BOWLING Although the Bobcats were a Dinners - Short Orders COMPLETE CAR SERVICE young team, their experience SATURDAY 2:30-? centered around Floyj:lj Goff, 6:30 a.m. io 10:00 p.m. SUNDAY 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. Dom LaRocca; ·Phil Ma 1 one_, 25c Washing . . Lubrication MON.-TUES. after 9:30 p.m. every day James Manning, Les Raine, Vince

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Ten ·Named.· To Who's Who (Continued from page Qne) his separation from the Army, Bierman spent eight years in business before entering Peru State in September, 1963. Bierman has been the recipient of a scholarship from the Nebraska Congress of Parenti and Teachers. DOROTHY BOCK The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth E. Bock, Pawnee City, Dorothy Bock· is a June candidate for graduation from Peru State. Dorothy has been active in the Dramatics Club and h a s served as president, treasurer, and historian of that organiza- tion in addition to acting as student director for Dramatics Club play ·presentations. The English :qlajor was honored by being elected state president for the Student Education Association of Nebraska (SEAN) following a year as the organization's vice president. She also served as the president of the Peru Unit of the SEAN. Miss Bock served as historian of Kappa Delta Pi and as secretary of Sigma Tau Delta. She has been listed on the Dean's honor roll ''with distinction" during two semesters and has been in the college band five semesters of her collegiate career. She has been the recipient of scholarships from the Nebraska Congress of Parents and Teachers, and the Peru chapter of the Nebraska Education Association. She has been editor of the Pedagogian and Peruvian. ANNE EPLEY Anne Epley, the daughter of Col. and Mrs. Albert D. 1Epley, now stationed: with the U. S. Army in Germany, is a major in elementary education. She has been listed on the Dean's academic honor roll her last four semesters. Miss Epley has been active in the Women's Athletic Association; Student Education Association of Nebraska, and has served on the board of directors of the Peru unit. During her in~ volvement with Kappa Delta Pi, Miss Epley has served as historfan. During her sophomore year she was president of the Lutheran Student Association. She has worked part time throughout her college career as secretary f or the head of the division of education at Peru State. She is a 1962 graduate of Burgess High school, El Paso, Texas. MARILYN GONNERMAN Marilyn Gonnerman, a 1962 graduate of Gresham High school, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Gonnerman, Waco. Ma· joring in business education, Miss Gonnerman is a candidate f o r January graduation from Peru State. Miss Gonnerman has been

ilctive in the Business Club ~d the Dean's honor roll five of 'his ·the Student Education Associa- six semesters at Peru State. Jack tion.• She is a member· of Kappa served last year as president of Delta Pi; Phi Beta Lambda, na- Blue Devils, men's pep organizational business honorary irater- : tion, and as president of the junnity, for which she has served as ior class. During the past two historian; and Gamma Delta, stu- years, and currently, Rinne is dent Missouri Synod Lutheran serving as dormitory counselor in A. D. Majors Men's Residence organization. Hall and as a representative on BARBARA GORDON the Student Governing Associa· The daughter of Mrs. Myra tion.. As a sophomore, Rinne was Gordon, Hamburg, Iowa, Barbara dormitory president. He is curGordon is a 1962 graduate of rently a member of the Student Sidney High school. She is an Center Board. Rinne has lettered English major and a candidate three years on Peru State. basketfor the baccalaureate degree next ball teams, three years in track June. Barbara is secretary to the and one year in cross country Peru Dramatics Club and ha s competition. served as vice president of the MARCH TINKHAM Foreign Language Club. As a March Tinkham, daughter of sophomore she was treasurer of the Home Economics Club. Her Mr. and Mrs. Marion Ro ot , participation in the Dramatics Holmesville, is a graduate of Club has involved student direc- Riverview Consolidated School, tion of club drama presentations. Holmesville. As an English and She is a member of Kappa Delta history major, Miss Tinkham has Pi, and is the current president been active in Sigma Tau Delta, of Sigma Tau Delta. She Is vice and in Phi Alpha Theta of which president of Alpha Mu Gamma, she is vice president. She is also foreign language honorary, and vice president of Kappa Delta a member of the Peru State Eng- Pi. She has been on the Dean's lish Club. Barbara serves on the honor roll in all college semesPedagogian, school newspaper, ters. Miss Tinkham has been acand Peruvian, school yearbook, tive in the Women's Athletic Asstaffs. She is a member of the sociation, co-editor of "Sifting Newman Club, Catholic student Sands," literary magazine of organization, and is serving as a Sigma Tau Delta, and has served dormitory counselor in Eliza one semester as a reporter on · Morgan Women's Residence Hall. the Pedagogian, school newspaShe has received scholarships per. She has served one year as from the National Honor Society a dormitory counselor at Eliza and the Peru State's Pearl A. Morgan Women's Residence Hall, Kenton Foreign Language Fund. and is a representative on the Student Governing Association. ROBERT HILT Miss Tinkham recently w a s Robert Hilt, the son of J. W. named re<;ipient of a $200 AkHilt, Raton, N. M., and Mrs. J. Sar-Ben scholarship for the curD. Darveau, Falls City, is a 1962 rent year. graduate of Falls City Sacred DONNA VAN BUSKIRK Heart High school. The history Donna Van Buskirk, a social major is a candidate for January graduation. He has served as science major and a January president of the Geography Club candida~ for graduation, is the as well as the vice president. of daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George the Peru Historical Society. Hilt Van Buskirk, Clarinda, Iowa. is active in the Newman Club, Miss Van Buskirk is treasurer of College chorus, Alpha Mu Gam- Kappa Delta Pi, and is a historima, and has been listed on the an of Phi Alpha Theta. She has Dean's Honor Roll the past five been listed on the Dean's honor semesters. As a member of Phi roll during six semesters, four Alpha Theta, national history of those at Clarinda Junior Colhonorary fraternity, Hilt has lege from where she transferred served as vice president. Throughout his college career, he has been active in the Student Education Association of Nebraska and has served as state Auto Repairs treasurer. Hilt also is active in the Foreign Language Club and • Automatic frans. Kappa Delta Pi. • WRECKER SERVICE • Steam cleaning JACK RINNE The vice president of the senLubrication ior class and president of Beta Beta Beta, national biology honGasoline orary fraternity, is Jack Rinne, son of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Rin• Check our price and save money ne, Burchard. Jack, a 1962 graduate of Steinauer High school, is 872-3201 Peru active in the Student Education Association of Nebraska, Kappa TOP VALUE STAMPS Delta Pi, national honorary edu(AAA Service) cation fraternity. He has been on

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Partick·and is under the · tion of Mr. Robert Bohlken. Th in Eliza Morgan Women's Resi- following cast has. been select dence Hall and to participate in Laura Adams,; Dana Henry, Don~ the College• chorus.·· Miss Van · etta Henne, Bob Mullendore, Bo Buskirk is a member of the Pe- Milstead, Marilyn Moody, Pearl ru · Historical Society, English Allgood, Greg Vaughan, Ro Club, and Alpha Mu Gamma. Blackwell, and Nancy Adams, She was graduated from Clarin- The play may be presented in da Junior College with high dis- arena, or theater in the. round1 tinction. style.

WILLIAM WITTY William W. Witty, Jr., a 1961 graduate of Syracuse Hi g h school, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. William W. Witty, Sr., Syracuse. Bill transferred to Peru State in 1962 after one semester as a cadet at the Air Force Academy. He is a member of Alpha Mu Omega, national mathematics honorary fraternity. Selected in 1964 for Who's Who distinction, Bill has been on the Dean's honor roll each semester since first enrolling, and twice making perfect 9.0 grade point averages. As a junior he was vice president of the Blue Devils, men's pep organization. While a sophomore, Bill served as a counselor at Delzell Men's Residence Hall. A four year letterman in football, three years in basketball, an d three years in track, Bill has been active in the P-Club let.termen's organization. '

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Campus School News BY NANCY JARVIS Of high interest is the All&hool play to be presented November 23. The play, The Curious Savage, was written by John

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·i:herVoice of the Campus ofa Thousand Oaks ... \

Years

Old

Peru Pedagogian PERU. NEBRASKA

Volume 61

Nulnber 5

NOVEMBER 29, 1965

Bigger· And Better

Board Approves $1,915,848 For Building And Remodeling New Co-Ed Dorm Will Be Completed By Fall Of 1967; Cost To Be $1,500,000 Morgan, Delzell, And Administration Building Renovated Heating System And Fire Det,e:ction To Be Improved The governing board of Peru State College has put itS stamp of approval on the construction of a new co-educational dormitory, the rehabilitation of Delzell Hall for men and Morgan Hall for women, modernization of the college heating plant, accepted the new $500,000 Fine Arts Center, and authorized an early call for bids on the renovation of the Admini.Wation building at a meeting <>f the Boar.di in Chadron NovembeJ 19. Co~ucation Dorm The new dormitory is to be constructed on a site purchased .several:. y~ ago .&..anticipation of future expansion. It will be l~ted on what is locally known as the Davenport Property ap'proXimately three blocks south 3and a 'block west of the Industrial Arts building. The housing "facility will aecommodate a ·,,,;minimum of 300 students and will be segmented for multiple ·use by men and women as re"quirements dictate. The complex will be self-contained with ·dining rooms, recreation areas, lounges and living spaces. Food preparation will be in a central kitchen in the Student Center with service areas provided in the new building. The estimate of cost is $1,500,000 to be financed' by the issuanee of reve.nue bonds and paid for from ·space rentals. No tax funds will be used for this project. Occupancy is scheduled for Septem·ber, 1967.

be removed and replaced with a . new 30,000 lb/hr oil-fired high pres,sure watertube boiler, feedwater heater and pumps, water softener and chemical treatment equipment. The ·campus steam distribution system will be changed to a 10() psi distribution pressure and all building pressure reducing stations renovated. The boiler room roof will be replaced, new concrete floors poured, an intermediate floor removed and all ceilings and roofs fireproofed. The new Fine Arts Center was accepted from the builders subject to issuance of final certification by thefulfi'fecl~.Pmia1 use of the building is scheduled immediately with full occupancy,b.y January l, 1966.

Admitiistration Bldg. Renovation Renovation of the Administration building will begin February 1, 1966, with completion by August 15, 1966. During the renovation period the business, registrat, placement and counseling 6ffices be housed in the Campus School in space to be vacated by the music and art tlepartments when they move into the new Fine Arts Center. The Special Services department and the telephone exchange will be quartered in the maintenance building, the college postoffice and supply distributiqn center will move to the foyer of the Auditorium. The officers of general administration will be in the Fine Arts Center with classes usually meeting in the AdminisDelzell and Morgan Halls Delzell Hall and Morgan Hall tration building shoe-horned inwill get a complete face-lifting to other classrooms on the cam.during the summer of 1966. All pus. The 195,5 Legislature approrooms and public spaces will be priated $172,500 for this project. refUrnished, new draperies inFire Detection stalled throughout, hallways carIn other action the Board appeted, new furniture supplied: as needed, and some spaces re- proved the low bids of the Beall vamped for more efficient use. ·Construction Co., Lincoln,. and Cost of the project is estimated the OK Electric Co., Omaha, for at $75,000 and will be paid from ~tio;n. of fire detection de'fire escapes to meet dormitory operation and main- viCes .ten:mce funds. No tax moneys reqµjrements of the State Fire will be used. Both dormitories :Marshall in the total amount of will be vacated during June, $17,603 to be paid from funds July and August, 1966. Summer appropriated by the 1965 Legislaschool residents will be housed t~ ' . . The Board also approved t h. e in the two wings. of Majors Hall. awarding of a contract for printHeating Plant Modernization ing 5,500 copies of the 1966-67 The 1965 Legislature appropri- college catalogue to the low bidated $151,250 for modernization der, The Augustine Co., Grand of the college heating plant. Island, for $2,309.28 and a conWork on this project will begin tract for ·furnishing draperies for at the close Of the present heat- the Fine Arts Center and the ing season and is scheduled for College Autlitorium to the low completion by early fall, 1966. bidder, Lokie Furniture Co., Au:The existing coal-fired boilerwill burn, for $995.00.

will

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Band Concert To Honor A. C. Lindahl The fall concert of the Peru State College Band Ensemble be presented Thursday, December 2, as a memorial concert to the late Arthur C. Lindahl of Nebraska City. The 8 p.m. concert in the College Auditorium will be under the direction of Gilbert E. Wilson, director of bands. Admission is free. Mr. Lindahl, a 1927 graduate -Photo by Special Services of Peru State who served as colPeru Staie College cross country runners and Coach Jim Pilk· ·1ege business manager from 1953 ingion pose with their championship trophy won last Friday when ·until 1959, was a trumpeter with they swept io first place in ihe NAIA District 11 cross counhy the college band and violinist meei fo Omaha. Front row-Jim Watson, Red Cloud: Tim Henwith the orchestra even a f t er dricks, 3709 S. 24th, Omaha: Louis Fritz, Verdon: Ron Jones, Hen· leaving the faculty. For many derson, Iowa; Jim Sprague, South Lyon, Mich.: fop row-Dick Zapyears he was director of the Nearanick, Westfield, N. J.; Coach Pilkington; Jim O'Donoghue, Worbraska City Municipal Band. Following Mr ..Lindahl's death, cester, Mass. 'September 29, a Nebraska City News-Press writer summarized Mr. Lindahl's devotion to his avocatio.fi fo. :&titting.: "Public accounting was his business, music Peru State's excellent cross- District 11 regionals at Omaha, was his.1~v~;" . country team currently-has a 26 which Peru also won. The ,secA trumpet· trio of D~e Duen- win; .one loss, and one tie record. ond defeat for Fritz came at the sing, Odell; Bill Joiner, Me:tllo, Led by the phenomenal Louis hands of A. D. Benson of Wayne Iowa, and Carol Smith, ·Battle Fritz, Verdon senior, the Bob- State in the. NCC conference Creek, Iowa, will be featured in cats have dominated the cross- meet at Wayne. Jim Dandies by Harold· Walters. . country scene in the District 11 The Bobcats only loss of the Other selections on the pro- NAIA area. season was at the hands of Keargram will inclutle: Days of Glory, ney State by a (28-38) score. PeCacavas; Four Sketches, Bartok; In the 28 meets so far, Fritz ru's tie came in the Peru State The Sinfonians, Williams; Sec- has won 25 and has run second ond Movement of Nordic Sym- iri. th~ other th.tee. Two of Louie's Invitational Cross-COuntry Meet phony, Hanson; Introduction of defeats came at the hands of in which they tied 31-31 with .Act III from Lohengrin, Wagner; Omaha University's Ken Gould. Kearney State. Fritz got reWhen Jesus Wept, Shuman; The first was in a dual meet at venge in this meet as he defeatHighlights of George Gershwin, · Peru, which Peru won 20 to 43, ed A. D. Benson of Wayne State, and the third was in the NAIA who ran second. arranged by Paul Yoder. Fritz has lowered his Peru course three-mile record five times this season and it currently stands at 15:21. He has lowered his four-mile record four times this year and it currently is 20:17. Fritz has become the BY BOBBIE ARMSTRONG · professional courses. He feels finest Peru distance runner in the President Neal S. Gomon of this program meets the needs and school's history. According to Peru State College has experi- interests of a larger group of Dick Berthold, "Lou holds the enced a successful administra- students. Bobcat mile and three mile rection for the last 15 years. He has ords and Peru State cross-counBuildings seen many changes take place on Peru campus has received a try records at distances from 2:5 the <:ampus. When he first came face lifting over the years. New miles to 26 miles 385' yards." in 1950, there were o:tlly 287 ·stu- buildings like Majors Hall, the Following Fritz has been Tim dents enrolled, but that number married student housing, the In- Hendricks, Omaha sophomore, has increased to 1,041. To meet dustrial Arts building, the Fine usually running second and Jim the increased number of stu- Arts building, and the Student Watson, Red Cloud sophomore, dents, more facilities, faculty, Center have been atlded. Some of third. After Peru's strong first and staff have been added to the older buildings have beenre- three runners has consistently meet the demands. modeled to make them more ef- been Jim O'Donoghue, Dick ZaCosmopolitan Students ficient and comfortable. Among paranick, Jim Sprague, R on He remarked that the type of the places that have been reno- Jones, Van Allen, Jim Bohl, Dan ·student attending Peru has also vated are the library, the audi- Trout, Phil Herbster, and Mike changed through the years. The torium stage, and additional seat- Bailey battling for the other two student body at one time was ing capacity in the Oak Bowl. Bobcat scoring positions. D u e ·regional. O:tlly the students from credit must be given to the enStudent Organizations neighboring towns attended. Totire Bobcat cross-country team Student opportunity has inday· the student body has become for their fine depth and determicreased and has given him more cosmopolitan and includes many nation. advantage to participate in colstudents from several states. The Bobcats avenged their onlege functions. Some of the orEnlarged Curriculum ganizations that Dr. Gomon ly loss of the season as they deThe curriculum program has thought added to the student's feated Kearney State in the Dischanged from a strictly teacher welfare were the Student Gov- trict 11 NAIA regionals Friday, training program to a multi-pur- erning Association, the Student Nov. 19. pose curriculum which includes Center Board, and the Student There can be no doubt that a liberal arts program and pre(Continued on page three) (Continued on page four)

will

Peru Harriers Co-Champs

Dr. Gomon's 15 Year Administration Achieved Peru's Greatest Growth


WllAT IS GOING ON IN VIET NAM.? By .Mel Hester \

Each day we read the newspapers telling us how B-52 jet bombers ripped up Red entrenchments and how U. S. ground troops killed hundreds of communists in a single engagement. In fact, in a recent battle the communist death toll reached 890. As for the number of Americans dead or wounded, we are only told the casualties were light or moderate. ·· What exactly is light or moderate. Does this · mean our casualties were light or moderate compared.· fo. the communist death count. Is fifty light or moderate or is 250. Eight American planes have been downed· by missiles which the Russians supply to the North Vietnamese. Jus.t how many other planes have been snatched from flight by other means? We can be sure no matter how many it has been, the American people will be informed in the terms of "light" or "moderate." A recent Associated Press picture was adjoined with this caption, "Poncho-covered bodies of American soldiers testify to what it has cost the 1st Cavalry Division to hold on in Ia Drang Valley." In the picture could be seen somewhere between fifteen and twenty dead Americans. These young Americans made the supreme sacrifice. Were these fifteen or twenty Americans among the "light" or the "moderates?" Were they the casualties of a single day, a single hour, or a single explosion? ·.Do we have to go ourselves to Saigon, Ia Drang Valley or the jungle between to learn the true story of Viet Nam. The war is every American's war. One would not brief only the pilot of a bomber before a mission and not the bombardier. We who are at home are a part of the team, but how can we play without knowing the game? There are many who know what's going on. Their letters home tell a tale not censored or watered down. In my next article on Viet Nam, I'll bring some of these letters from those fighting.

MAJORS

HALL By

Mike

Sullivan

The residents here at Majors IIall are raving about the .2nd City, the new coffee house, here in Peru. The 2nd City is a unique and original establishment here in the town of Peru. Music is provided by ·a juke-box, ·plus frequent live entertainment. The 2nd City also incl~des dance floor, unusual paintings, and a · very pleasant atmosphere. Ex-corporal Frank Murphy, resident of Majors IIall,. r;i.ther enjoys the informal atmosphere of a campus dorm. "Rick" a1;tended St. John's Military Academy at Salina, Kansas. It seems the rules were fairly strict at the academy. Could be that "Rick" is a "draft dodger," because of past experience. .Another resident here at Majors IIall is J)on Lehman, drummer for the "Rogues," the band which played at the 2nd City Saturday night. J)on also played drums for bands in Rochester, New York, and Fairfield, Conn.

A Thanksgiving dinner will be held on Thanksgiving J)ay for the residents remaining here at In a college town the size of Peru, competition for the Majors IIall. Mrs. oestman will student's business is at a minimum. Eating facilities and have the particulars on this postplaces of recreation are very limited and students often ed. This is truly a nice gesture, seek a greater variety of activity elsewhere. In view of this and Will make it seem more like situation, it would seem that any respectable new establish- a real Thanksgiving for the students who live a long distance ment on the streets of Peru would be a welcome sight. from Peru. · Some of the students themselves have considered this

2nd CITY A STUDENT ENTERPRISE By Myrene Davis

problem and have unde.rtaken a new business, in the form of a small coffee house. Admittedly, the furnishings in the building are not of the highest fashion, but the surroundings are suitable for the purpose they serve. ...., Poubts about the idea of student enterprise have been raised in the minds of some faculty members, townspeople, and even among students. The idea of students operating a business for students sparks misgivings on the part of some because of the suspicion that only riotous behavior will result through such a scheme. Any student-operated establishment, then, must avoid any cause for notoriety, and make every . effort to prove to the college community .that only wholesome entertainment is being provided. On the other hand, however, it would seem only reasonable and fair that adults in authority would allow students to be involved in a business. Only positive proof of improper behavior should be grounds for dissolving a student enterprise. The success of the new coffee house, or of any student venture, depends to a large extent on the intention and actions of the student clientele. If Peruvians want their own place of socializing and entertainment, they must not in any way undermine the activity through misconduct. The · students themselves must insist upon discipline to accepted bebehavior, and inform other students of this necessity. If the student customers, adults, and student businessmen will cooperate openly with one another, there is no reason to believe that student enterprise should be discontinued.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Richard Berthold -----------------------------------Editor Barbara Gordon ------------------------Personnel Manager Elaine NeddenriQ!> __________ Layout Editor & Photographer Charles Richards -----------------------------Sports Editor Mary Sautter -------------------------------Feature Editor Bill Bowen ------------------------------Business Manager Joan Bretthorst -------------------------------Copy Editor Jackie Swegler -------------------------------Copy Editor Mel IIester ----------------------------------Photographer PJicia .Andrews -----------------------------------Reporter Bobbie Armstrong --------------------------------Reporter Myrene J)avis ------------------------------------Reporter Robert Minks ------------------------------------Reporter J)an Strecker -------------------------------------Reporter Mary Ann Sharp ---------------------------------Reporter Leland Schneider ---------------------------------Reporter Louis Rogers -------------------------------------Reporter Nancy Jarvis -------------------------------------Reporter Mike Sullivan ------------------------------------Reporter Stewart Linscheid ---------------------------------Advisor

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our ideas on improvement of the th.e City of Peru. The object kitchen, lobbies, stairways, . fa- seems to be to gain as much cilities, and the rooms them- speed as possible before it beselves. comes necessary to begin brakThe only real problem the ma- ing for the stop sign at the botjority seems to be facing . right tom of the hill. The sound ·of now is that of improving of squealing tires is a regular hapgrades. Final exams will be here pening, because every other car sooner than· we.'expect..·If.·there is goirtg .about·ten miles· an hour is to be improvement,: the time .too fast. It's got to be something for it is now. about that girls' dorm that gives those drivers that extra zest, but I can't imagine what it is. As an example of the intense feeling DELZELL that is felt by the hill climbing HALL drivers trying to get to Morgan IIall, I give you the case of the .frustrated night driver. Late one By night I watched a haggard stuBill dent start up that hill and before Bowen he was halfway up, his .car made J)elzell IIall is once again prey a wheezing cough and died. Unto the all night test studier. He daunted he let his .car roll down can be heard wandering .around the hill, started it up again, the halls aimlessly looking for a turned around, and roared up the place in which the studying con- hill in reverse. Now that takes ditions are perfect. Somehow he real determination, and a real respect for the hills of Peru. never seems to find it.

J)uring Thanksgiving the dorm, as well as most of the campus, was deserted-as the few, w h o remained here can . well affirin. Several traveled as far as Illinois or Massachusetts to be home for the holiday. Those who couldn't go home were invited to st a Y with the families of their friends and roommates. Before vacation began, two girls traveled here from Mer Rouge, Louisiana, :to visit Shari Floyd and see Peru's campus. Both are her cousins and h a d extra time from their vacation periods to visit here before going to Wymore. Miss Bev Brigham, now student teaching at the cam pus school in elementary, moved out of the dorm before vacation. She was married November 24 to Mr. One item of interest that was J)ave Perry who is a senior in the I noticed that the students field of Industrial Arts. They will not included in the last column that were forced to stay in Peru be living in Peru until J)ave fin- because of lack of space, and I were invited out to Thanksgiv·still think that it deserves some ing dinner in a private home. I ishes this last year. Many plans are being proposed mention. Since early last month would like to compliment the for the Christmas holidays. Each the street behind J)elzell that ·responsible parties, and thank freshman girl selected a faculty runs by the girls' dorm has be- them for thinking of the student member to invite to the annual come drag strip number one for who can't run home all the time. Christmas Tea held in Morgan IIall. Their invitations were to be completed by November 24. Wing meetings were held to decide upon decorations and instructions about decoration of each room. Social chairinan, Susan Kenworthy, is setting up COMPLETE CAR SERVICE committees for work tasks. Since the state has requisi25c Washing . . Lubrication tioned funds for remodeling Morgan IIall, girls have b e e n Gas . . Oil . . Tires . . Battery asked to make suggestions. This is an excellent opportunity f o r

McADAMS STANDARD


ATTENTION: Girls of Peru State College be prepared! You may be selected to be a candidate for the "Best Dressed Girl On Campus Contest" sponsored by the Glamour Magazine. A committee from the Home Economics Club will select 10 girls on campus as possible candidates for the contest. The girls who are selected will have their names placed on ballots to be voted upon by the student body. Here are the qualifications the committee will use as they search for the campus beauty. She must meet these specifications. 1. A dear understanding of her

fashion type.

2. A workable wardrobe plan. 3. A suitable ·campus 1 o o k (she's in line with local customs). Left to right: Miss Frieda Rowold±, Mr. Allen Chand!ler, Dr. Margaret Johnson, Sharon Irmer, Bev~rly Kitelinger, Miss Hazel Weare at Phi Beta Lambda meeting.

4. Appropriate-not rah, rahlook for off-campus occasions. 5. Individuality in her . use of

Phi Beta Lambda State Officers Here Phi Beta Lambda, the honor· ary business fraternity, met last Monday evening, Nov. 15, to hear a lecture given by Dr. Darrell Wininger, head of the Division of Education on "Income Tax." The meeting was opened by vice president Allen Chandler.

Two distinguished guests were introduced to the members: Dr. Margaret Johnson, state advisor of Phi Beta Lambda; and Sharon Irmer, state president, who had come to Peru to attend a regular meeting of the fraternity and talk with the members.

Dr. Gomon's 15 Year Administration Achieved Peru's Greatest Growth (Continued from page one) Representatives on the Curriculum Committee. The student teaching. program, the offocampus teaching program, and the evening classes for teachers in service have greatly benefitted the student. Dr. Gomon commented that the one single thing that contributed most to student life w;is the Student Center. Future Bright Peru has a bright future with all the projects that are planil.ed for the next several years. During 1965-66 the Administration building will be renovated, the front of the gymnasium will be rebuilt, and dressing rooms will be added at the Oak Bowl. In addition to these projects, Delzell Hall and Eliza Morgan Hall will be beautified, the campus electrical distribution plant will be rebuilt, and the heating plant will be expanded. Another new

. The highlight of · Dr. Wininger's lecture, according to the reactions of many of the man· bers, came when he discussed the various legitimate methods that could be used to save onincome taxes.

Dean Melvin Attends Meeting On Education:Act

addition will be a 300 bed co-educational dormitory. He said that during 1967-69 The Higher Education Act of there will be an addition to t4e .. 1965 was elli,CJ#d"·as an atten;i.pt science hall, the auditorium will to equalize dpportU:nity in highbe renovated and air conditioned, er education, .Dean Melvin atand more seats will be added to tended an information meeting the Oak Bowl. The long range on. this held in Kansas City, projects that are planned for Missour1 on the twentieth of 1969-71 are an addition to the ·November. This·. meeting . was heating plant and a woman's held· for college heads i;n the physical . e<)..ucational building. states of Nebraska, Iowa, Kan- . ~earif 5.Have Been Good sas, Minnesota, Missouri, North when asked about his admin- and South Dakota. istration, he commented that the The sessions were held to in15 years speak for themselves, form and explain the first seven and they have gone pretty well. divisions (or titles) of this act. He felt that the future growth of Dean Melvin was particularly inthe college depended on the abil- terested in Title IV, and hopes ity to· house students. He esti- that Peru can qualify for Title IL mated that in 1970 there will be approximately 15,000 students I-Community Service and enrolled. Dr. Gomon closed by Continuing Education Programs. saying that the number of stuII~College Library Assistance, dents is not the measurement of Training and Research. the success of the college. III-Strengthening Developing Institu1;ions.

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Benford Publishes "Meet the Masters," a collection of 10 piano pieces compiled, arranged and edited by Robert T. Benford, professor emeritus of piano and organ at Peru State College, has been accepted for publi<:ation by ProArt Publications, Inc., Westbury, N. Y. Mr. Benford, who retired last spring after 35 years on the music faculty of Peru State, still gives private instruction in piano and organ. His most recent piano publications were "Doodling" and ''Raindrops."

colors, accessories. 6. Imagination in managing a clothes budget. 7. Good grooming, not just neat, but impeccable. 8. Clean, shining, well-kept hair 9. Deft use of makeup (enough to look pretty but not overdone).

10. Good figure, beautiful pos· ture, and poise.

The location of every participating college is considered whl'!n judging the appropriateness of the three outfits worn by the candidate. This means our Peru girl has an equal chance of winning, so girls put your best foot forward. and smile pretty. This is your big chance. You may win an all expense-paid trip to New York City to be one of the ten honored guests of Glamour Magazine, and have your p1cture in the August 1966 issue of the college edition of the Glamour Ma· gazine.

SIGMA TAU DELTA PROSE WRITING CONTEST I. Rules of eligibility A. Any student classified as a freshman. B. Any student currently enrolled in English Laboratory, English 101, or English 102. II. Submission of manuscripts

A. Any student meeting the above qualifications may submit manuscripts at any time during the first se~ mester to the president of Sigma Tau Delta or to its faculty sponsor. B. At the end of the semester, any college instructor may submit prose manuscripts from courses under his supervision. The manuscripts should be typed with no identifying marks. III. Type of prose A. Except as noted below, any type of prose is acceptable: descriptive, narrative, expository, argumenta" tive.

B. The documented research paper is not eligible. IV. Judging A. The papers will be judged by a committee selected from the membership of Sigma Tau Delta, with the addition of at least one faculty member, who shall act .as chairman. No faculty member who teaches one of the courses named above may serve on this committee. B. The committee will evaluate the manuscripts for neatness, correctness of mechanics, organization, style, and content. C. The decision of the committee will be final. V. Award Paper-bound books of the winner's own choosing not to exceed ten dollars in total cost. VI. Closing date Last day of the fall semester, 1965.

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Bobcats And Antelopes Tie In Peru State Invitational Peru State College, inspired by the running of Louis Fritz, fought favored Kearney State to a draw Saturday as the Bobcats and Antelopes tied for the championship of the Peru State College Invitational Cross-Country Meet. The two sister institutions scored 31 points each, easily outdistancing Doane College's 101 and John F. Kennedy's 110 points. Fritz, slicing 20 seconds off his old Peru State four-mtle course record with a sizzling 20:17, won the meet. A. D. Benson, Wayne State, finished second with a time of 20:22 but did not figure in the scoring since he was the only Wayne State runner to compete. Al Schneider, Kearney State, was third with the time of 20:40.

All NCC Team Has Four Bobcats Four members of the Peru State football team were honored by the World-Herald as all NCC selection. Peru led the conference in defense and placed two men on the defensive unit. Two other players were honored as standouts on the offensive unit. The players selected on the defensive unit were Jim Manning, end; and Phil Malone, tackle. On the offensive t e a m were Bernie Brown, guard, and John Gilmore, tackle. Brown and Gilmore will return next year to try to earn repeat honors and bolster the Bobcat forward wall next year. Those receiving h o n o r a b l "! mention were Peruvians Bill Witty, senior center; Bob Urwin, junior linebacker; Jim Kollbaum, freshman fullback, and Carl Satterfield, freshman quarterback. Kearney State and Wayne State, co-title holders with Peru State picked up the most honors, placing 11 and nine members, respectively, on the all-conference units.

The victory for Fritz and the Bobcat tie was, in a sense, revenge. Kearney had defeated Peru 28 to 38 in the Nebraska College Conference meet at Wayne on October 30, and in that race A. D. Benson defeated Louie for individual honors. Bruce Sheffield, Doane, paced his mates with a fifth place time of 20:46. John F. Kennedy College was led by Harold Nolan, 15th with a time of 21:40. Other Peru scorers: 6th, Jim Watson, 20:49; 8th, Jim O'Donoghue, 21:08; 9th, Jim Sprague, 21:09; and 11th, Tim Hendricks, 21:18. Other Kearney scorers: 4th, Carroll Kinneman, 20:43; 7th, Dan Moore, 21:01; 10th, Warren Christensen, 21:13; and 12th, Gary Mierau, 21:28.

Bobcat Cagers Qpen Drills Ten lettermen return this year to bolster the cage outlook for the Bobcat basketball team. Returning monogram winnners include the five leading scorers and rebounders of last year's squad. The returning players are: Dean Cain, Roger Capps, Mike Harmon, Ron Kroll, Bill Rinne, Jack Rinne, Ron Snodgrass, Bill Witty, John Chasse, and Dick Estes. Estes may not see action until later in the campaign because of a knee operation. Other candidates include: Mike Castle, Richard Gibson, Wayne Heine, Jerry Higgins, Ron Jones, Bob Lovejoy, John Mcintire, Allen Pokorney, Leon Portrey, Bill Sanders, Carl Satterfield, Randy Williams, and Jim Waltke. Coach Mcintire feels that the team will be stronger both offensively and defensively than a year ago. He also stated, ''The squad will have to improve because of, a tougher schedule."

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Harriers,;:W:in -NAIA For District Championship 'i

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SPORTS

By Dick Berthold Despite the losing season, the Bobcats considered the 1965 gridiron season far more successful than they imagined when it began. In nine games the Bobcats scored 113 points to 99 by their foes; this may be compared to the 1964 scoring of 69 points by Peru and 280 by the opponents. The Bobcat defense played the key role in the' big improvement. Last year the opposition rolled for 3591 yards compared to 1721 yards this season. Jim Kollbaum led the Bobcats' rushing offense with an average of three yards per carry in 101 attempts. I):illbaum also led in team scoring with five touchdowns and 30 points. Total offensive leader was Carl Satterfield who rushed for 176 yards and passed for 731 for a net of 907 yards. Bob Urwin led all Peruvians with 56 tackles and 32 assists. Jim M~nning was credited with 47 tackles and 32 assists; and Bernie Brown compiled 48 tackles and 24 assists. Phil Malone nailed 52 tackles and teammate, Sam Sadich, was credited with 43 tackles. With the cager season officially opening Tuesday, Nov.. 30 against Tarkio, the Bobcats will try to improve their nine win and eleven loss season of last year. Returning lettermen include five quards-Jack and Bill Rinne, Dean Cain, Roger Capps, and John Chasse; four forwards -Bill Witty, Mike Harmon, Dick Estes, Ron Kroll; and pivot Ron Snodgrass. Harmon, with fhe best shooting touch on the club, led last year's scoring with a 16.5 average. He was followed by Snodgrass' 15.4, Estes' 14.0. and Cain's 13.5. Snodgrass was hampered last year by the effects of injuries sustained in an automobile accident. Estes, this ye a r, will be slow getting into shape due to a late September operation which removed cartilage from a knee injured in last year's campaign. The schedule lists 11 h o m e games, seven road engagements and a three day tour to "The Top of the Nation Tourney" at Alamosa, Colo., during the Christmas holidays. On the schedule are five home NCC games and three away clashes. Also included on the home schedule is a two-night stand against what should be a very tough Chadron Eagle club.

Co-Champions Peru Harriers (Continued from page one) this is Peru's finest season in cross-country history. The Bobcats will lose Jim Sprague, South Lyon, Mich., senior, and Louis Fritz, Verdon senior, even though Fritz has another year of eligibility remaining. Due to underclass promise and recruiting potential, the Bobcats can 1o o k forward to cross-country prominence in future years.

PARDE SHOE REPAIR Auburn

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Peru State College <!aptured the championship of the District 11 National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics cross-country meet Friday, Nov. 19, by scoring five runners in the first 10 scorewinning positions. Pa<!ed by second place Louis Fritz and third place Tim Hendricks, Coach Jim Pilkington's Bobcats scored 30 points to outdistance Kearney State (43), Doane College (79), and Omaha University (94). Midland College and Wayne State entered runners who finished in the top ten, but were not scored since they did n o t

enter full teams. Ken Gould, Omaha U., easily• captured the individual championship of the four mile event, run on the Elmwood Park course in Omaha, with a first place time of 20:29,. two seconds off his own Elmwood course record. In team scoring, Peru's Fritz finished second in 21:39, and Hendricks followed in third with a time of 21 :44. Rounding out the Peru victory were: 6th, Jim Watson; 9th, Jim Sprague, and 10th, Jim O'Donoghue. Also running for Peru were Ron Jones . and Dick Zaparanick, both in non-scoring positions.

Bobcat Defense Was Outstanding

Misfits Capture Football Title

Although finishing with four wins and five losses, the Bobcat gridmen were able to share conference honors with Kearney and Wayne. Possessing one of the most formidable defenses in Bobcat history, the Bobcats were able to outscore their opposition, 113-99. Because most of the nucleus of the team is returning, the outlook is for a much improved team in the 1966 season. The individual statistical leaders on offense were: RushingJim Kollbaum: G 8; C 101; YG 323; YL 20; Net 303; Yards per carry 3.0. Curt Holliman: G 8; C 61; YG 234; YL 27; Net 207; Yards per carry 3.4. PassingCarl Satterfield: G 9; A 145; C 52; YG 731; TD 7; INT. 7; Per cent 35.9. ReceivingJohn Creamer: No. 16; YG. 273;

The Misfits captured the intramural football championship with a record of seven wins, no losses, and two ties. Runner-up to the champs were the Roadrunners. The Emperors, Sixty Niners, and Studs finished third, fourth, and fifth respectively.

TD 1. Curt Holliman: No. 12; YG. 156; TD 2. InterceptionsLowell Brown: No. 4; YRB 17. Individual ScoringTD EP Pts. Jim Kollbaum __ 5 0-0 30 Carl Satterfield _ 3 0-2 18 Curt Holliman _ 3 0-0 18 Jim Manning __ 3 0-0 18 Roy Windhorst _ 1 10-13 16 Bernie Brown __ 1 0-0 6 John Creamer __ 1 1-1 7

The final standings were as following: Won Lost Tied Misfits ----------- .7 0 2 Roadrunners _____ 7 1 l Emperors --------- 6 1 2 Sixty Niners ------ 6 2 1 Studs ____________ 6 3 o Centennials ______ 4 5 0 Playboys --------- 2 6 1 Zephyrs ---------- 2 7 O Octanubis -------- 1 7 1 Beavers ---------- 0 9 0

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obcats Prevaffi ver Alumni n Two Overtimes BY CHARLES RICHARDS The Peru State Bobcats, led the shooting of freshman ayne Heine, were able to down inspired alumni team by a ore of 95-94 in two overtimes Nov. 22. After a slow start the Bobcats were able to post a 45-28 · halftime bulge. The alumni, behind the shooting of Larry Rathe, Chuck Francis and Mike Roach, were able to whittle an 18 point Bobcat and :tie the game 75-75 at the end of regulation play. . Early in the first overtime, the former Peru State cagemen were able to go ahead. But the Bobcats, on key baskets by Jack Rinne and Heine, were able to tie the score once again at 83-83. The key basket, however, w a s delivered by Dean Cain, who was able to find the mark with only one second showing on the clock and! force the second extra period. In the final period, Heine's shooting and rebounding prevailed. He hit a pair of vital ii.elders in the last 34 seconds of play to assure the Bobcats of a victory over the inspired alumni team. Larry Rathe added the · final fielder of the game for the alumni with six seconds on the clock to make the final score 9594. The Bobcat scoring leaders were: Heine, Rinne, Mike Harmon and Ron Snodgrass with 29, 17, 14, and 13 points respectively. The grads were paced by Francis, Rathe, and Mike Roach, who were able to garner 18, 18, and 16 for their losing effort. The Bobcats open their regular season schedule Tuesday, November 30, against the Owls from Tarkio, in the Peru State gym. 12340TOTF Varsity _24 21 19 11 8 12-95 Alumni _14 14 19 28 · 8 lil-94

,:·al~KETbALf SCHEDULE Nov. Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb.

· t. r

30 Tarkio _________ Here 3 Maryville ______Here 8 Washburn _____ There IO St. Benedict's -.,Here 14 Dana __________ Here 16 Simpson _______Here 27-29 Tourney ------_________ Alamosa, Colo. 4 Maryville _____ There 8 Kearney ______Here* 15 Doane __________ Here 21 Tarkio ________There 22 Hastings _______ Here* 29 Wayne ________ Here* 5 Kearney _____ There* '8 Doane _________ There 11 Chadron ______ Here• 12 Chadron ______ Here* 19 Hastings _____There* 23 Wayne _______There*

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Bobcat Season BY LELAND SCHNEIDER Peru State opened the 1965 football season with a hard fought 7-6 loss to Tarkio College. "Tarkio College piayed! well and deserved to win," Coach Pitts said. The Bobcats scored on the season's niost bizarre play. Sat. terfield fired a lateral pass in the flat . which Holliman dropped. When no whistle sounded to end the play, Holliman scooped up fhe ball and scampered 48 yards to score before the Tarkio defense woke up. Peru outrushed Tarkio 2(}7 to 119 yards, but Tarkio's aerial game overshadowed Peru's 103 to 10.

. Loss To Lincoln U. Peru State won a moral victory even though they dropped SUPPORT THE BOBCATStheir second game 6-0 to Lincoln ATTEND THE HOME University of Jefferson City, Mo. GAMES!! ! The Bobcats, a 40 point underdog, battled the highly flaunted Lincoln Tigers under miserable ·conditions which hurt Peru's offense but also slowed the fas.t Lincoln backfield. Coach Pitts expressed pride in the way his Peru State's cross - count r Y Bobcats had battled the Lincoln team captured first place honors Tigers. "I was especially pleased in the NAIA District 11 Cross- with the work of our defensive Country Championships. held in unit," he added. The Bobcats Omaha, Nov. 19. The Bobcat held Lincoln University to 145 harriers, paced by dependable yards rushing and 48 yards passLou Fritz who finished third, ing. Coach Pitts was disappointeasily outdistanced Ke a r n e y , ed in Peru's offense as they could Doane, and Omaha U. only muster 10 yards ~ushing and Other Bobcat harriers placing 47 yards passing. were: Tim Hendricks, finishing Bearcais Beat Bobcats fourth; Jim Watson eighth; Jim Peru dropped their third conSprague eleventh; Jim O'Donoghue twelfth; and Ron Jones test in a row as the Bearcats of Northwest Missouri State defourteenth. feated the Bobcats · 28-18. Pitts Finishing Scores: said, "Poor pass defense beat us. Peru-30 Our rushing and passing game Kearney-43 ""' was much better %an ' against Doane-79 Lincoln University, and in genOmaha-94 Leaders: 1, Ken Gould, Omaha, eral our defense· against North20:29; 2, A. D. Benson, Wayne, west Missoliri's rushing game 21:29; 3, Lou Fritz, Peru, 21:39; was adequate." Peru outrushed 4, Tim Hendricks, Peru, 21:44; Maryville 131 to 110 yards, but 5, Allen Schneider, Kearney, Maryville's passing was better than Peru's .as they· completed 9 21:52. '.! '.) of i7' for 174 ~ards to Pel:u's''11 of 22 for 133 yards. • Denotes Conference Game

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Victory Over Chadron The Bobcats had to travel across the state of Nebraska for their first victory in four starts. The 21-0 victory spoiled the Eagles' Homecoming and Band Day. Coach Pitts commented on the excellent defense, but pointed out two weak points, offensive blocking and pass receiving. The Bobcats completed 5 of 21 for 171 yards while Chadron could muster only 5 of 26 for 32 yards. 'The Eagles outrushed Peru State W to 38 yards. Wayne Beats 'Cats · ·A strong Wayne State team turned back Peru State 17-7 for Peru's fourth loss in five starts. As Dick Berthold said in hi s sports column, "Wayne State's potent rushing game was picked to be better than ever with the return of their entire backfield from the 1964 team which ranked third in NAIA rushing and tenth in NAIA total offense." Wayne outrushed Peru 149 to 39 yards. The Bobcats completed 8 of 22 passes for 104 yards while Wayne connected on 4 of 9 for only 37 yards. The defensive unit was praised for their fine work. 'Cats Top Hastings The strong ·Bobcat defense stopped Hastings College 20-6 for Peru's second win in six starts. Following the game, Coach Pitts gave credit for the victo.17 t?;P(l·

ru's stout defensive forward wall. , Pitts also: ·.cited the, · 'd,eferisive. work of the linebackers. The Bobcats outrushed the Broncos 94 to 35 yards, but Hastings outpassed Peru 111 to 73 yards. Peru Takes Doane Peru State stopped Doane 20-7 before a h u g e Homecoming crowd to bring their record to three wins and four losses. Coach Erv Pitts' Bobcats turned a Doane fumble, a blocked punt, and! a defensive stand deep in Doane territory into touchdowns in Peru's 44th annual homecoming game. Doane outrushed the Bobcats 207 to 177 yards, butDoane's four fumbles was a large factor contributing to their downfall. Coach Pitts stated the Bobcat defense was outstanding. Peru Beats Kearney Peru State evened their record at four wins and four losses as they held off Kearney State 14 to 13. This established the Bobcats as tri-champs of the NCC because they have an identical three win and one loss record! in NCC competition as do Kearney and Wayne State. Peru's defensive unit came up with the big plays throughout the con test. Peru outrushed Kearney 267 to 181 yards. The Bobcats completed 13 of 22 passes for 169 yards as compared to 7 of 18 for 109 yards for Kearney. Loss To Washburn The Bobcats dropped their final gaine of the season to the Ichabods of Washburn 15-7. This left the Bobcats with a four win and five loss record for the 1965 season. The Washburn game was a rough-house affair in which the offieiating lost control. Coach Erv Pitts refused any quotes except for saying the 120 yards in penalties assessed against Washburn (compared: to Peru's 58) "is indicative of what happened in this so-called football game." Nine seniors completed their college ball careers against Washburn University. These were: Floyd Goff, Dom LaRocca, Phil Malone, James Manning, Les Raine, Vince Sabatinelli, S am Sadich,- :Roy Windhorst, and Bill Witty.

Dr. Christ Presides Over NCC Meeting Dr. John C. Christ, head of the Division of Science and Mathematics at Peru State and president of the Nebraska College Conference, presided at the annual meeting held Saturday, Nov. 20, at the Lincoln Y.M.C.A. The NCC is composed of the four state colleges-Peru, Kearney, Wayne, and Chadron-and Hastings. All the faculty representatives plus the coaches and athletic di~ rectors, who met Friday night and selected the all conference teams, attended the genera 1 meeting. The major part of the meeting was devoted to the revisfon of the constitution. The football championship was officially awarded as a three way tie between Peru, Kearney, and Wayne. The problem of military service due to the drafting of college students was discussed concerning the rules of eligibility after discharge. The election of officers· for next year was held and the results were: Dr. Owen, Wayne State, president; Mr. Stanley, Hastings College, vice-president; and Mr. Ingram, Kearney State, secretary-treasurer.

Harriers Smash J. F. K. College 20-41 The Peru State freshman cross-country team out-distanced John F. Kennedy College of Wahoo 20 to 41. The Bobcats placed first, third, fourth, fifth, and seventh. Ron Jones, Red Oak, Iowa, paced the Bobcat victory. Ron set a new J. F. K. four-mile course record and a new Peru State freshman four-mile record of 21:23. Other Peru State scorers: 3rd, Van Allen, Nemaha (22:28); 4th, Dan Trout, Lewiston (22.:50); 5th,, Jim Bohl, Auburn (22:51); and 7th, Phil Herbster, H oJ dreg e (23:59).

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Miss Susan Krenzer of the University of Omaha looks on as Myrene Davis fries on an Indian sari.

Alpha Mu Omega, Geography Club And Historical Society Have Meeting On Nov. 17, the members of Alpha Mu Gamma, the honorary foreign language fraternity, and students in the Geography Club and Peru Historical Society congregated at 7:30 in the Science Building. The group viewed slides of India and Ceylon provided by Miss Susan Krenzer from the University of Omaha. She also brought various articles of Indian clothing, music, and hand work, all of which she acquired during the two months she spent in India as part of an educational experiment 1a st summer. The program began with orientation exercises in Vermont, after which Miss Krenzer

and the other students participating in the project flew to India, Greece, Israel, and various other parts of the world. Besides students of the three organizations, Mr. Whiteman, Mr. Nemec, Mr. Strom, and the family of the guest speaker w e r e present. Her brother is curteli.tly a student at Peru State, and it was through his efforts that she was able to attend the meeting. Following Miss Krenzer's presentation, refreshments were served, and an informal discussion was held for persons w h o were individually interested in the speaker's experiences in India. ""

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Eight Peruvians competed in the Forensic Tournament at South Dakota University, in Vermillion, So. Dak., on Nov. 12 and 13. Mr. James Levitt sponsored the group and. judged several of the events. Thirty-seven schools were represented, in c 1u d i n g those in South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa; and Michigan. Each of the teams, each composed· of two students, debated four times in the tournament. Gene Fitzpatrick and Charles Williams, and Bill Bowen and Mel Hester were victorious in one round of debate, and Myrene Davis and Dan Knudsen won two rounds. Each of the students took part in at least one other event. Mel Hester entered Television Broadcasting, Cheryl Winans participated in Oral Interpretation, and Dan Bolin competed in Oratory. Dan Kii.udsen rated an "excellent" for his oration on "The Break-Down of the American Family," and Myrene D av is ranked fourth in Radio Broadcasting. Mrs. Davis re c e iv e d "excellent" and Mr. Knudsen received a "superior" in three rounds of Discussion, the topic being U. S, policy in Southeast Asia.

Dr. Dale A. Jorgenson, head of the divisil:ln of fine arts at Northeast Missouri State College, Kirksville, will be guest conductor for the 14th annual Choral Clink at Peru State College, December 4. Sponsored by the Peru chapter of the Music Educators National Conference, 13 schools, including the host chorus from Peru Prep, will participate in the

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event, according to Hugh as, clinic director and instr of voice at Peru State. Other schools participating elude: Auburn, Beatrice, Bra Union, Brock, Cook, Da Verdon, Edgar, Elmwood, Jo son, Nemaha, Southeast Lan ter Dist. 160, and Stella. A 7:30 p.m. concert, open the public, will climax the d long event.

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Miller Attends Meeting Professor Hanford Miller attended the annual meeting of the Nebraska Academy of Sciences held Satl!rday, Nov. 20, in the Colli!'ge Union at the UruversitY of Nebl'trska. Mr. Miller, cliel'iiistty professor, iS a member of the Policy Colrtmitte'e 6£ the Nl!br§Ska Acadelny of Sciences. :Represeti:tatiVes of an the colleges in Nebra.ska were present at the rneetmg. The meeting was primarily to take care of the routine bUsiness atid to prepare for the student presentation of papers on special projects ili sdence at the May ·conventiC>n. They voted officially to grant their regulat" scholarship , to the leading science student of the state based on the results of the Westinghouse Science Test. The Nebraska Academy of Sciences is maintained by a sizeable endowment from the Maiben estate. This endowment consists of a couple of farms and stocks and bonds. Part of the general business of the meeting was to take care of these administrative problems. J

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"Whaf Happen$ Behinrl Prison 'NVaills?" Convo Lecture Nov. 24 ',;

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Mr. Peter Tanis, criminologist, was guest speaker at the Nov. 24 convocation. The former prison chaplain of the Cook County Jall, Chicago, Illinois, spoke on the subjeet of "What Happens Behind Prison Walls?" Mr. Tanis said, "Crime is out of hand in the United States." Persons under 18 account for 43 % of all arrests. One-half of all car thefts may be attributed to juveniles too young to obtain Mark· .Zimmerman, Verona Borcher, Marilyn Masters, Kay Bend· a driving permit. According to Mr. Tanis, "NarSarah G·oodwin, Barbara Thompson, Marilyn Robertson at the given recently by Miss Alma Ashley for students leaving the cotics and crime go together." Thirty per cent of the inmates of ampus to do. their practice teaching. Cook County Jail are there because .of narcotics. Alcohol also plays a major. role in crime. He related .several personal experiences with the inmates of the Illinois jail. He also told of his The members of the Peru State Miss Carol Henderson, a soph- first experience with walking a usic Educator's National Con- omore in home economics at Pe- condemned man to the electric rence. attended a State Music ru State College, has been chair. He lead the audience on a linic, !held at Columbus,. Nebr., awarded a $100 scholarship by step by step tour of a prison the Nemaha County Teachers As- from a visitor's and an inmate's n Nov. 1· . . 19 an<lJ W1 sociation, aC{!ording to Dr. G. N. point of view. Thfoughout the .two days; ·varDodge, director of guidance and Mr. Tanis stressed the fact us concerts .were given by .top chairman of the scholarship that a purpose in life was lack'gh ~chool choruses and h(llldS. com1llittee at Peru State. ing in almost all cases of the n: th.e evening of :Nov, 19, • the The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. prisoners. A purpose and a goal trategic Air collun:and band William Henderson of Brock, are needed to keep p e o p 1e resented a concert; and SaturMiss Henderson is a 1964 gradu- straight. ay, Nov. 20, a morning perate of Brock High School. She ormahce was' given by :M.E.N.c. has been active in the Home embers of all Nebraska colEconomics Club and the Peru eges. Two members of Peru~s Student Education Association. ¥ .E.N.C. .participatep: in the As a freshman she was ·named !concert. Mary Ellen Oestmann to the Dean's Honor Roll with Thirteen Peru State College ,)played an oboe solo, aC{!om~" distinction. home economics students an d '~ed by Mrs. Gilbert Wilson; and their faculty sponsors, Mrs. LouMary Lu Hicks played a piano ise Kregel and l\1rs. Ina D. lsolo. Aero~Space Sproul;.attended t11e· state fall The highlight of the clinic ·w~s workshop of the Home Econom· e final concert Saturday night, ics Clubs at Wayne 'State Col,which was .•. given .. by all-state A film, "The Four Days .M. lege, Saturday. !bands, choruses, and orchestrals. Gemini 4," was presented by the Miss Judy Elsinger, Omaha, :These groups were composed Aero-Space Commission for the president-elect of the State Club, ;Qutstanding high school students 'Nov. 17 convocation. The film and Linda Rogers, Stella, local !throughout Nebraska. ' · 'retraced,tji.e,ateps of.the prep~­ club president, were official ration ofCol. James McDivitt delegates. .: and Major ,E~~ard. White's flight Others in attendance were . into space in Gemini 4 capsule; Peggy Quackenbush, Beatrice; Over the West. Coast, White Bobbie Armstrong, Nebraska •le'ftxthe ·space capsUie for a : 20 City; Doris McConnaughey, Pe•minute "walk'' in space. He used ru; Linda Oldfie1d, Brownville; a small space gun to propel him Linda Duffy, Glenwood; Iowa; in different directions. This ex- Janice Wheeldon, Brownville; periment became k n o w n as Cheryl Seibert, Brownville; SanEV A-Extra Vehicular Activi- dra Hopp, Syracuse; Carol Hen. ty. The two men perf;rmed 11 derson, Brock; Carol Hawley, on-board ex;periments whichcen- Brock; Grace CQok, Corning, tered around medical, metrical, Iowa. and photographic experiments. When the wmputer failed on the 4th day, the astronauts were forced to make a . "rolling" reentry.

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The summer of 1966 will oring a new look to Eliza Morgan, the girls residence hall. Changes will be made in the lobby, and the recreation and T.V. rooms, · According to L. D. Ebner, business manager, a committee will meet with the girls to find out just what changes they would like to see. Ebner feels the girls are more aware of problems and their opinions will be weighed heavily in the actual redecoration of the dorm. The old rooms will appear much more attractive and comfortable with the addition of the new desks and dressers. MRS. STACY VANCE DONATES PLANT The faculty were the proud recipients of a six-foot rubber plant for the faculty lounge in the Student Center. The donor is Mrs. Stacy Vance, retired manager of the Campus School h o t lunch program.

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NEWMAN CLUB On Saturday, Nov. 13, members of. the Peru State Newman Club attended a Regional Leadership Day Conference at University of Nebraska in Lincoln. · The conference was divided into three different sections. The first and third sections were discussions concerning leadership arid the history and structure of the Newrrian Club movement. The second division of the conference was composed of six discussion groups that commented on organizational difficulties concerning the establishment and maintenance of campus Newman Clubs. Peru students attending the conference were: Pat Venditte, Mike Smagacz, Adrian Bartek, David Francois, John Gilmore, Ed Letourneau, Pat Thompson, Mary Budler, Jean Wilkinson, Rosemary Slagle, John Hrbek, John Stukenholtz, Dick Vanek, Ruth Kalafut, and Jarold Bartek. -oALPHA MU OMEGA President Royce Curtis called the meeting to order. The n e w business consisted of the initiation Qf Ron Howe, who missed the original initiation. After initiation, Charles Adams proved without direct computation that e (naperian logarithm base) to the exponential power pi was smaller than pi to the exponential power e. The Alpha Mu Omega sweatshirts aren't here yet. The dues of three dollars must be paid before the next meeting ends. Charles Houser was in charge of refreshments after the meeting.

-o-EPSILON PI TAU Epsilon Pi Tau held a 5:30 dinner meeting in the small dining room of the Student Center, Monday, November 22. A business meeting followed the dinner. This year's officers are: John Patterson, president; John Wilson, vice-president; and Jerry Sayer, secretary-treasurer.

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STUDENT WIVES At the Nov. 17 meeting of Peru's student wives, two new members were present. The club set up a committee to decide how the new Ph.T. degrees will

be issued. The club also decided to send Ph.T;)degrees 'to last year's members who have grad~ uated. This year's project is to buy 'a United States flag for the stage in the new Fine Arts Building. The new date for the club's bake sale is Dec. 4, and it will be held in Rains Grocery Store. -oKAPPA DELTA PI Kappa Delta Pi devoted its regular meeting to initiation of new members. Those initiated were: Devon Adams, Bobbie Armstrong, Zeta Bausch, Elizabeth Cook, Myrene Davis, Joan Dickman, Jacqueline Dodson, Merrill Greenlee, Blanche Hall, Glenda Hayes, Nancy Jarvis, Mary Jones, Mary Kernes, Patricia Knippelmier, Bernice Kopetzky, Nancy Larson, Virginia Miles, Karen Parrack, Connie Rademacher, Mary Ann Rademacher, John Rinne, and William Rinne. To be eligible for Kappa Delta Pi, a student must have an over-all G. P. A. of at least 6.75 and plan to teach. The initiation ceremony · was centered around the four duties of Kadepians: the ideals of Fi-. delity to Humanity, Service, Science, and Toil. President Kris Wewel elaborated on what Kappa Delta Pi can do for the initiate. A short business meeting was held after initiation. Nancy Jarvis was elected treasurer since Donna Van Buskirk will student teach the next nine weeks. Two petitions were voted on so that new chapters of Kappa Delta Pi could be installed at two other colleges.

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Tbe Curious . Savage"

11

Presented By Peru Prep Peru Prep's Junior Class presented John Patrick's The Curi· Cius Savage in the College Auditorium on Nov. 23, under the direction of Mr. Robert L. Bohlken. There was an audience of over 150 in attendance. The plot involves the commitment of a wealthy widow, Mrs. Savage, to a mental hospital by her greedy stepchildren. While staying at The Cloisters, Mrs. Savage encounters five delightful patients. Through their un'realistic view of life, Mrs. Sav'age's new friends provide a humorous tone to the play. In spite of the comedy, there are touching moments in the play which cause Mrs. Savage, and the audience to take a second look at .the ~alues of the "real" world. The play reached a dramatic conclusion as all of the patients were pictured as the ideals which they imagined themselves to be. Members of the cast included: Donna Henry, Bob Mullendore, Lois Lammle, Bob Milstead, Donetta Henne, Greg Baughan, Ron Blackwell, Nancy Adams, Laura Adams, Marilyn Moody, and Pearl Allgood. Mr. Bohlken's young son, Danny, made his de-· but in the final scene of the play. Assisting in the direction of the play was Myrene Davis, and Mrs. Mary Anna Gnade costumed . the production. Among t h o s e who worked behind the scenes were: Kathy Sherman, John Kite, Jody Crabtree, and Ed Cos.

Johnson Attends Meeting On Supply Of Teachers Director of Placement Harold Johnson represented Peru State College at the annual meeting of the Nebraska Institutional Teachers Placement Association held at the University of Nebraska last Friday, Nov. 20. Current trends in the supply and demand of teachers in Nebraska, as well as areas of over and under-supply were discussed by the placement officers, who represented, according to Mr. Johnson, most of the colleges and universities in Nebraska.

:~q1ttp1vs S~~o~I ~ews

T1le. iollowit'ig studen.ts, are in~ \;<!fud:E!d.'on the'lirst fiondr roll of the year: Straight A's-John Kite, Christie Ubben, and Bonnie Stemper; two A's and two B'sDan Collin, Alan Henning, Ken Adams, Martha Seibert, P a m Morrissy, Pearl Allgood, Sue Vanderford, Wendy P e 1is e k , Georgette Gomon, Marsha Lewis, Ralph Kennedy, Judy Henning, John Lutt, Rosalee Goings, Mike Adams, Cheryl Groff, Rhonda Craig, and Alan Adams.

The Campus School had a well deserved rest over Thanksgiving vacation. The same rest was enjoyed by teachers and students alike. But time marches on and so do school activities. A word of congratulation is due .to the director and cast of the All-School Play, "The Curious Savage," presented Tuesday, November 23. Its direction and presentation were excellent. The audience was well pleased with the evening's entertainment. The Pilgrims and turkeys were kept busy during their seasonal performance. Classroom and library bulletin . boards helped further their cause. As a farewell salute to the turkeys, the Freshman class sponsored a dance Friday, Nov. 19. Turkey-A-Go-Gob.ble provided an enticing theme. The dance · was sponsored by class sponsor, Mr. Pressnall. Another possible social event has been planned by the Junior High. They hope to have a party Dec. 4 for members of the seventh and eighth grades. Annual pictures were t a k en Tuesday, November 23. Many students probably acquired the ability of a quick change through necessity. Bob Milstead and Laura Adams attended the ·choral clinic held Nov. 18 at Columbus, Nebr. This clinic was held in conjunction with the annual Nebraska State Music Clinic. Prep Junior and Senior English classes are looking forward to Dec. 11. On that date th e y will attend a presentation of "Macbeth" at the University of Nebraska. The arrangements have been made by Mrs. Gergen, English instructor at the hi g h school. The Betty Crocker test will be held Dec. 7. This test is .-ponsored by the Home Economics department and is given to girls interested in this field. The High School band, under the direction of Mr. Gilbert Wilson, will present a concert November 29 at 8 p.m. in the college auditorium. Among selections to be pfay!!:d ;.are: Jilhy~ of the Winds; Concert Rhumha; and Mary Poppins selections. The first basketball game will be against Nehawka in an away game, December 3. The volleyball girls will also begin their season at Nehawka.

Jarvis Attends Safety Meeting

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ch.a~on State College Chadron, Nebr. The first vocal concert w as held Sunday, Nov. 7, in the Memorial auditorium. The Chadron Union Board presented the "Cellar Dwellers," a musical trio, on Nov. 13.

Kearney State College Kearney, Nebr. Phi Kappa Tau, a social fraternity, is the newest addition to the campus. A new :women's dormitory is now under construction.

Mr. Dee V. Jarvis, associate professor of industrial arts and Hastings College safety education, attended the Hastings, Nebr. "In White America" was preAccident Prevention institute at the Nebraska·center for Continu- sented Nov. 17. The Ouija board is being usecf ing Education on Nov. 22 and 23. Several areas of accident pre- very extensively to answer and vention 'were discussed at the remedy many problems. institute including industrial, home, recreation, small business McCook Junior College McCook, Nebr. and traffic safety. The Indians tied a college recHe was especially interested in ord by beating Fairbury, 60-0, visiting with and hearing Amos E. Neyhart, Director Emeritus, for nine straight wins. Pennsylvania State University Creighton University of Traffic Safety, who addressed Omaha, Nebr. the g~oup at the luncheon on Smoky, a "descented" skunk "Why Do Drivers Have Acciis a temporary resident of Dawdents?" ling Hall. Mr. Jarvis stated that he enWOW radio has announced joyed the institute and felt it that it would not broadcast Bluewas a rewarding experience. jay basketball this season.

Tinkham And Chandler Get Scholarships

Central Missouri State College "Stop the World-I Want to Get Off" was presented Nov. 10, in Hendricks Hall.

Two ·Peru students, Marc h Moorhead State College Tinkham and Carol Chandler, Moorhead, Minn. l:lave been awarded Ak-Sar-Ben "Improvements in instructionScholai:ships. This grant pro- al facilities totalling $8.5 million vides for a remission of $200, or were proposed." $100 per semester for the 196'5The Dragons downed St. Cloud 66 school year. State 21-9, in their homecomil'\g Miss Tinkham, a senior; is the game. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Marion Root of Holmesville, Nebraska. Having a m.ajor concentration in English with a related field in history, she has been on the Dean's list with high distinction throughout her college career. Dryclea"ing Miss Chandler is the daughter and of Mr. and Mrs. Donald ChandLaundry ler of Shubert, Nebraska. Asoph· omore, she has a major field of concentration in physical educaOPEN tion, with a related field in biol6:30 a.m. • 10:30 p.m. ogy. Carol was on the Dean's list with distinction during the first semester of the 1964-65 school year.

SPEED WASH COIN-OP.

Dodge Attends Conference -

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Dr. Galen Dodge flew to Minneapolis to attend the eighteenth annual Orientation Directors Conference held on the University of Minnesota campus. The conference began on Nov. 10 and lasted for three days. Guidance and orientation directors from all parts of the United States attended this convention for discussion and evaluation. The keystone address, entitled "The Cool Generation," was presented by Dr. Charles Ramsey, Professor of Sociology from the University of Minnesota and co-author of The American Ado· lescent. Other highlights of interest included "Today's College Student-A Typology,'' "The Benefits of Systematic Data Collection" and "The Nature of the Educated Person." Discussions were held on the eleventh and twelfth. Dr. Dodge served as chairman for "smallsize colleges" classification.

;On Friday, November 5, ; don Gavin, Industrial Arts structor at Peru State, v· · the Nebraska State Voca Technical School at Milford, braska. He talked with Dr. ell Welsh, head of the sch and was taken on a tour of " facilities. He found the tr, quite interesting and was pl · antly surprised at the scllo · extensive equipment.

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The Voice o.f the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 61

Number 6

Band Ensemble Presented Jim Pilkington's Memorial Concert· Dec. 2 ·Pe~u Harrier~ The Peru state Band Ensemble presented a concem Thursday, Dec. 2 under the direction of Gilbert E. Wilson. The concert was a memorial to Arthur The Peru Prep Concert Band Lindahl, who served as a member of the Peru State band and presented a program Monday, orchestra for many years. November 29, conducted by GilWhen Jesus Wept by William bert E. Wilson. Mr. Wilson comShuman was dedicated t-0 the mended the work of the band memory of Mr. Lindahl. Carol and especially those members Smith, Bill Joiner and Dale playing in concert for the first Duensing were featured in a trio time. for cornets, Jim Dandies by HarThe selections presented were: old Walters. Other selections Independentia by R. B. Hall; performed by the band were: Rhythm of the Winds by Frank Highlights of. 'George· Gershwin; Erickson; If Thou Be Near by Lohengrin by Richard Wagner; Johann s·ebastia~ Bach; VariaFour Sketches· by. Bela . Bartok; Overture by Clifton . Williams; The Sinfonians by Clifton Wil- Tango Triste by Art Dedrick; liams;. Nordic Symphony No. 1 Bandology by Eric Osterling; by Howard Hi!ilsori; arid Days Concert Rhumb'! by Ted Peterson; and Highlights of Mary Popof Glory by John Cacavas. Members of the band and their pins arranged by Alfred Ree:d. instruments are: flutes-Pegeen Band personnel include: flutes Swiseg-0od, Sharon Johnson, Ju- -Pamela Morrissy, Sue Vanderdith Focken; oboe-:Mary Ellen ford, Martha Seibert, Lanna HenOestmann; clarinets - S :t e v e n ry; oboe-Lois Lammle; clariBroderson, Ronald Dobson, Ma- nets..,-Marie Ballue, Danna Henrie Ballue, Marlyce Fletcher, ry, Nancy Adams, Margaret Lutt, Dawn Nebola, Kay Painter, Ad- Rena Meritt, Beth Applegate, rian Bartek; b ass clarinet- Lynn Doxon, Tom Ballue, SharRobert Patterson; bassoon-Mike on Hammons; bass clarinetMcNeeley; saxophones - Gary Gaile Hammons; bassoon-FranNeumann, :Rogine Bang,. John cis Kite; saxophones - Ra 1p h Kite, Samuel Smith, Barbara . Kennedy, Jl;ic):lard· &:ix, :ill4'a.r y . Mosley; French horns - Ros s Lutt; John Kite; French hornsOestmann1... Jody Heather, James 41.lra Adams, Jacqueline Butts; trumpets and cornets- . ler; Juqy. Whisl~r, Marcia CatDale Duensiiig; Bill Joiner, Da- l~tt; ~~.Roliert Milstead, vid Swantek, Carol Smith, David Allen .P~mer;. Jollp. Lutt, Sally Schreiner; trombones0;:- James Gnade, J~es ~~11tty;. trombones Johnson, John Vanderford, Jar- -James Whisler, Charles Doxold Bartek; baritone-Charles on, Gary ·Haith; .baritone-Joe Wellensiek, Elmer Nemec; bass- Whisler; bass~Rex Beatty; perRobert Hunzeker, Ross McCall, cussion; Mike Ada:ms, Rebecca William Ricketts; . percussion- Kite, Carl Stevenson, Dave Lam.Donita Speckmann, Gary Ahlin, mle. Gloria Walker, ·Richard Shelton; . tymparii-J ames Baker. The program was narrated by Myrene Davis. '

Peru Prep Band Presents Program

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Third In NatlOfi

Peru State College's cr-Osscountry team raced into national prominence as the result of their third place finish in the 10th National Association of Intercollegiate Athletic Cross-country Championships in Omaha Saturday, Nov. 27. Louis Fritz led the Bobcats with a 14th place finish in 22:00. Pat McMahon, a 23-year-old freshman from Ireland at Oklahoma Baptist, -captured: the individual title with a time of 20:28.5 over the snow-spotted Elmwood Park four-mile course. A total of 48 schools were represented, 22 with full teams, in the national NATA harrier run. The third place finish marks the high point of any Bobcat team in national .sports comp.etition. With a score of 43 points, powerful Fort Hays College of Kansas took the team championship, followed by Whitworth College of Spokane, Wash., with 117 points. Peru State, virtually unnoticed in pre-meet prognostications, finished third with 171 points. Other Peru State runners, -their places and.>times: 41. Tim · Hendricks, 22:31; 48. Jim O'Don. oghue, 22:41; 55. Jim Sprague, . 22:48; 72. Jim Watson, 23:()5; 83. Ron Jones, '23:21; and 144. Dick Zaparani<:k, 25:16. Other Nebraska colleges, their . standing and point totals: 9th, Kearney State,· 256; 20th, Omaha University, 446; and 2.lst, Doane College, 466. Peru State's sparkling showing

DECEMBER 13, 1965

Mass Exodus From Ad. Building Begins

The Annual Christmas Tea in Eliza Morgan Hall was held the afternoon of Dec. 9. Each freshman girl, plus several upperclassmen, escorted a f a cu 1t y member and: spouse through the serving line. Guest,s were then shown through the dorm in order to see the decorations on each floor. The displays were judged by Dr. Siegner, Mrs. Adams, and Mr. Sherwood. The .living room of the dormitory had already been beautifully d:ecorated by a committee under the supervision of Marge Chilvers. During the tea, vocal music was provided by Karon Rathe, Sharon Johnson, Nancy Vanderbeek, and Joanie Sprieck. Their . pianist : was Mary Lou Hicks. Other committee ch airmen were Pat Knipplemier, Karon Rathe, Elaine Neddenriep, Bonnie Anderson, Lucy Sporer, Connie Rademacher, Mary Tackett, Joan Dickman, Kathy Francis, (Continued on page four)

Rehabilitation of the Administration building will require a wholesale shifting of offices and classrooms. So that the building may be completely vacated by close of first semester, some moving will be done soon, some during Christmas vacation period and some during the month of January.

Christmas Convo Will Feature 0. Henry's Gift Of The Magi The Peru Dramatic Club will present The Gift of the Magi at the Dec. 15th convocation. This one-act play was dramatized by Anne Coulter Martens from 0. Henry's short story, "The Gift of the Magi." The cast, under the direction of Myrene bavis and Dorothy Bock, includes: Mary Ellen Oestmann, Don Dodge, Antoinette Martin, Joan .Bretthorst, Marcie Anderson, Bruce Larson, and Neal Bower. Steve Mason, the stage manager, will be assisted by Dan Knudsen.

All classes meeting in Ad Bldg will continue to do so during remainder of the first semester with possible exception of business education classes. As soon as temporary quarters in .the Campus School are ready, business education department will be moved. Business office, Registrar's office, Placement office and Guidance-Counseling office will be moved to temporary quarters in campus school during Christmas recess. Offices of deans and president will be moved to Fine Arts Center sometime before the Christmas recess.

Choral Concert Choral works ranging from a 16th century motet, "A Magnum Mysteriune," to selections from the contemporary English composer Benjamin Britton's "Ceremony of Carols," highlighted Sunday's Christmas concert by the Peru State College choir at 3 .P,m. in the College Auditoriun:. T~e concert was under the 1rection of Mr. Hugh ~homas, mstructor of vocal music at Peru State.

?

in the national meet. closed out the most successful cross-country season for the Bobcats in history. The Bobcats posted a 13 meet win, 2 meet loss, and: 1 meet tie record in a truly outstanding season.

Peru State Will Graduate Forty-seven

Morgan H~ll ··Hosts Faculty At:Annual Christmas Tea

Come Back Alive

Forty-six Peruvians will. comBernard H. Jarecke, Bellevue, Loren E. Penkava, Stella, AB; plete academic requirements for BS in Ed, IA, SafEd. BS in Ed, Math, PhysSci. degrees when the first semester Raymond E. Johnson, BS in Ed, Peggy Quackenbush, Beatrice, ends January 28.. Names, degrees, . Phys, Math, PE, SafEd. BS in Ed, Rm.Ee, IA. and fields o:f concentration folRobert D. Jones, Omaha, BS John M. Riley, Pemberton, low: in Ed, IA, SafEd. New Jersey, AB in Ed, Hist, Bus. Sidney N. Baney, Peru, AB in Diane R. Kennedy, PlattsMarilyn Robertson, Dunlap, Ed, Art, IA. mouth, BS· in Ed:, Elem Ed. Iowa, BS in Ed, Elem Ed. Jim L. Barnhart, Auburn, BS Gail F. Kopplin, Gretna, BS in Linda L. Rogers, Stella, BS in in ·Ed, Phys .Sc. Ed, Elem Ed. Ed, HmEc, IA. Margo B; Bateman, Farragut, Robert L. Leander, Peru, AB Robert L, Ruff, Gretna, BS in Iowa,. BS in Ed, Elem Ed. in Ed, Hist, Bus. Ed, PE, Biol, Bus. Sharon K. Bender, Milford, BS Larry R. Lines, Villisca, Iowa, Samuel B. Sadich, Wood River, in Ed, Elem Ed. BS in Ed, IA, SafEd. Ill., BS in Ed, PE, Hist. James W. Manning, Slidell, Verona A Borcher, Steinauer, John L. Scharp, Peru, BS in La., BS in Ed, PE, Speech. BS in Ed:, Elem Ed. Ed, Bus Ed:, Eng. Harold D. Marshall, Cook, BS Sam E. Carneal, Nebraska James L. Snyder, Nebraska in Ed:, Math, GenSci. City, BS in Ed, PE, Biol. Edna H. Martin, Hamburg, City, AB in Ed, Hist, SocSc. Dale E. Cerny, '.Fairbury, AB Barbara Thompson, Filley, BS Iowa, BS in Ed, Elem Ed . . in Ed, Soc Sc, Eng, Hist, Geog. Marilyn J. Masters, Nebraska in Ed, Elem Ed. Donna G. Donovan, Auburn, City, BS in Ed, Elem Ed. Donna Van Buskirk, Clarinda, BS in Ed, HmEc, IA. Bruce L. Mau, Morton Grove, Iowa, AB; AB in Ed, Soc Sci, Marilyn Gonnerman, Waco, Ill., BS in Ed, Biol, IA. Libr Sci. BS in Ed, Bus Ed, Math. Cynthia E. Meier, Table Rock, Sarah C. Goodwin, Hiawatha, BS in Ed, HmEc, IA, Hist. Ronald E. Wik~ell, Omaha, AB Kans., BS in Ed, Elem Ed. Ronald L. Mustard, Auburn, in Ed, Soc Sci, Hist. Henry R. · Grace, Omaha, AB BS in Ed, Gen Sci, Phys Sci. Joseph Wildinger, Fairborn, in Ed, Geog, Hist. Milan Obrenovich, South Ly- Ohio, AB in Ed, Soc Sci, Hist. Merrill L. Greenlee, Peru, AB on, Mich., BS in Ed, Biol, Gen Mark E. Zimmerman, Nemaha, in Ed, Soc Sc, Geog. Sci. N. Larry Hayes, Peru, BS in Irene M. Ogle, Dawson, BS in BS in Ed, Elem Ed. Ed, IA, PE, Math. Ed, Elem Ed. James M. Sprague, South LyRobert S. Hilt, Falls City, AB; Paul R. Oliphant, Pacific Jct., on, Mich., AB in Ed, Soc Sci, AB in Ed, Geog, Hist. Iowa, BS in Ed, Math, Phys. · Eng, Speh, PE.

Special Services office, postoffice and switchboard will be moved to Maintenance Bldg dur·ing Christmas recess.

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Fac.ulty members quartered in Ad Bld:g will be moved to temporary office space elsewhere as the moving schedule permits . Permanently housed in Fine Arts Center: 106A-Mr. Moore 106B-Mr. Levitt 109 -Mr. Wilson 112 -Mr. Thomas 113 -Dr. Freeburne 203 -Miss Diddel 206 -Mr. Sherwood Temporarily housed in Fine Arts Center: 107 -Mr. Clark & Mr. Strom 108 -Dr. Schottenhamel 114 -Mr. Benford, Mr. Jindra 201 -Mrs. Gnade 202 -Dr. Gomon 213 -Dr. Wininger 214 -Dr. Boraas 215 -Miss Bradley 216 -Mr. Linscheid & Mr. Summers 217 -Dr. Melvin Permanently housed in Campus School: 103 -Miss Regier & Miss Rowoldt 113 -Miss Weare Temporarily housed in Campus School: 205-207-Registrar's office 211-2l!Y-Business office 203 -Dr. Dodge (Counseling) 219 -Mr. Johnson (Placement) Temporarily housed in Ind Arts Bldg: 25C -Mr. Cartier 27 -Mr. Barrett, Mr. Bohlken Temporarily housed in Maintenance Bldg (all on main floor): West-Special Services East-Post Office - Switchboard Temporarily housed in College Aud Ticket office-Mr. Nemec


TBlS C0ULD DELP YOU GET. HOME FOR CIIBISTMAS -AND B.ACK By Nancy Jarvis Statistics show that one out of every two drivers will have an accident during their driving career. This means the fellow standing by you will have a traffic accident sometime during his driving career, or the fellow beside him, ~! . What causes traffic accidents? A recent survey indicated that three factors are involved fo traffic accidents: the car; the road; and the human. As a result of many studies, it has been estimated that the automobile is a causative factor in five to seven per cent of all traffic accidents. The road is a causative factor in eight to ten per cent.. These two account for fifteen per cent of the total accident picture. The major cause then remains with the human, who is responsible for the other eighty-five per cent. Why do drivers have traffic accidents? Three human factors greatly affect drivers. These are mental, emotional and physical. Accidents don't "just happen." If you are a driver who is aggressive and intolerant, wp.o feels the other fellow is always wrong, and who acts with reckless abandon when driving a powerful car, check your attitude. In your hurry to get home for the holidays, there is a tendency to drive too fast and too long. Speed is a factor in severity of accidents and constitutes one of the main violations. Driving too long leads to fatigue. Strong emotions have a definite effect upon your driving ability. If you are depressed, angry, or worried about some personal problem, let someone else drive. You can't afford to divert thought and attention from the driving situation because most accidents happen in a split second. Anger, depression or any emotional state affects your ability to judge the driving environment until it is too late to react safely. Physical fitness is important for safe driving. Inadequate sleep and rest leads to fatigue which is the cause of many accidents. Fatigue accidents can happen in broad daylight. Whenever you feel the least bit sleepy, pull up and rest, or change drivers. Changing drivers every 100 miles or every two hours is a good driving technique. Drivers who force themselves are literally the ones who never saw what hit them. Alcohol and driving don't mix. Recent studies in one state indicated that sixty-two per cent of all one-car acci~ dents involved drinking. If you must drive, don't drink! Play it Safe! Play it Smart! We want you back on campus after the holidays . . . . . . . all in one piece.

DELZELL HALL

By Bill Bowen lJelzell celebrated the coming Christmas holidays with a dorm party held on Sun:day night, lJecember 12, at 10:30 p.m. The refreshments were enjoyed by all the residents. lJelzell has sprouted all th e traditional signs of Christmas trees with small highly decorated trees, signs, and other decorations that can be seen throughout the dorm. Somewhere on the second floor there is a mad stereo nut who plays a record of a woman's piercing scream that raises the hair on the back of everyone's neck throughout the dorm. That boy can produce more stereo realism than anyone around here had ever dreamed possible. With the fast ap'[>roach of the Christmas Holidays that begins for us this Friday, I .hope that everyone will remember to drive carefully over the vacation and return to finish the semester. Merry Christmas, Hap'[>y New Year, and a good: trir> home to everyone at Peru State College.

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Majors Hall 9nce again proved its superiority in the finer arts, Bottled under the authority of The Coca-Cola Company by: as "Nick" Steen car>tured th e Nebraska City Coca-Cola Bottling Company THE PEDAGOGIAN NEEDS YOU! college 8 ball championship, By Leland Schneider ...., lJave LaMontagne won th e The Pedagogian needs reporters for the second semes- snooker championship, and John was in the corridor on first floor, ter of the 1965-1966 term. Contrary to popular belief, one Bernadt and Jim Shilts placed formerly known as "leading to doesn't have to be an English major or minor to enroll in first and second respectively in · sick bay." It was remodeled into a comfortable living room for English 234, Beginning Journalism. the chess tournament. the girls in that wing. The current staff of reporters consists of five English A cigarette machine was inMany last minute wing parties majors, two speech majors, one social science major, one stalled in Majors Hall two weekphysical science major, and one reporter currently unde~ ends ago amid the cheers of the are being planned. Some divicided. · nicotine users. The machine will sions drew names for presents Gas • Oil • lube Next semester the Ped needs a couple of sports re- save many steps, and will pre· while others involved the drawMotor Tuneup porters with any major, a writing knowledge of English, sent more time to devote to our ing in a two-week game. All last and versed in basketball, track, and baseball. A music ma- studies at hand, such as snooker, week and this week until ThursU-Haul Trailer day night, small presents a r e jor is needed to report in this field, and anyone else is wel- television watching, etc. Rental Majors Hall was well repre- given each day to a secret "peacome to bolster and diversify the staff. Photographers are sented in our fine cross-country nut." A larger gift will be prealways in demand. Journalism is an interesting subject, and these hours team. Louis Fritz, who lived in sented at parties Thursday night. of credit look good as part of one's credentials. Do yourself Majors Hall for more than two A good deal of effort was applied: AUBURN, NEBR. and your school paper a service by enrolling in English 234. years, finished 14th, while two in almost every section to make the weeks before Christmas en2 blocks Sou:th of of our current residents, J i m Watson, and Ron Jones, finished joyable and a lot of team-work :the s:toplight was displayed. It brings the 72nd and 83rd, respectively. The water situation here at meanings behind Christmas a Appliances - Sporting Goods Majors leaves something to be little closer. Hun:ting and Fishing Licenses desired. It is nearly impossible Activity beyond this is almost PERU 872-2561 CECIL BOWMAN to obtain a cold drink of water. null. Everyone's securing rirles or If a water cooler could be ob- tickets· for getting home a n d tained, I am sure it · would be packing as much as possible in · BARBER SHOP well appreciated. as little as possible. For several, PERU PEDAGOGIAN it will be their first glimpse of STAFF home since September. We exlet Us Care tend to all the wish for a happy ELIZA Richard Berthold -----------------------------------Editor For Barbara Gordon ________________________ Pers·onnel Manager vacation and yuletide season. I MORGAN also send this message: Have a HALL Elaine Neddenriep __________ Layout Editor & Photographer Your Hair Charles Richards _____________________________ Sports Editor safe trip home, however great By the distance1 so that the season Mary Sautter -------------------------------Feature Editor Mary Auburn, Nebr. can be a happy one. Merry Ann Bill Bowen ------------------------------Business Manager Christmas & a Happy New Year. Sharp Joan Bretthorst -------------------------------Copy Editor Jackie Swegler _______________________________ Copy Editor It seems almost impossible that Mel Hester ----------------------------------Photographer Alicia Andrews ___________________________________ Reporter Christmas vacation is so close. Bobbie Armstrong ________________________________ Reporter The yuletide spirit pre v aj 1s throughout Morgan Hall and Copiple:te Line of School Supplies Myrene lJavis ------------------------------------Reporter Robert Minks ____________________________________ Reporter more music of the season is heard Revlon Co:ty Evening in Paris coming from the showers and lJan Strecker -------------------------------------Reporter Mary Ann Sharp _________________________________ Reporter down the corridors every day. Cosme:tics Leland Schneider _________________________________ Reporter Many of the rooms were elabLouis Rogers -------------------------------------Reporter KODAKS & SUPPLIES orately decorated for the contest Nancy Jarvis -------------------------------------Reporter held during the annual Christmas FAST FILM SERVICE Mike Sullivan ___________________________ .:. _______ ..Reporter Tea. Special congratulations go Stewart Linscheid ---------------------------------Advisor BRING US YOUR PRESCRIPTIONS to those who received this award. One of the improvements made

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Peru Edges Maryville 66-65

Nation's Third Best Harriers In A Practice Run Coach Pilkington (in background) watches as eight members of the Bobcat cross-country team be· From left they are: Phil Herbster, Van Allen, Ron Jones, Roger Neujahr, Rich Zaparanick. Jim O'Donoghue, Dan Trout, and Tim Hendricks.

gin the four-mile run.

obcats Down Owls With Free Throw Hits The Peru State Bobcats used of Tom Kaczor and Joe Hefferaceuracy from the foul line to nan, pulled within eight points at .down the Tarkio Owls by a score 62-54. Wayne Heine answered the of 83-72, in the Bobcat gym No- challenge with a three point play, and the Bobcat margin was inember 30. After a slow start the Bobcats, creased to 65-54. aced by the shooting of Ray Eight straight free throws, six ain, were able to post a 20-9 by John Chasse and two by Rogst quarter bulge. The Owls . er Capps, put the Bobcats out of closed the gap to five points, but reach at 81-70. two jumpers from short range Snodgrass added the final buck·by Mike Harmon gave the Bobet, and the Bobcats were able to cats a 36-27 half time margin. post their first win of the seaThe Bobcats increased their son 83-72. ' lead to 60-46 in the third quarter, The Bobcat scoring leaders on the shooting and rebounding were Snodgrass with 21; Cain, 20; of Ron Snodgrass. The Owls, led by the hot hands Harmon 15. The Owls were paced by Kaczor and Heffernan, with 22 and 19 points..

Coming Events ~

Tuesday, December 147:30 p.m. Basketball, Dan a at Peru

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Wednesday, December 159:10 a.m. Convo, Dramatic Club Play 6:30 p.m. Basketball, Prep vs. Cook, Gym Thursday, December 167:30 p.m. Basketball, Simpson at Peru Friday, December 17-'5:00 p.m. Christmas recess begins

Road Runners Hold First In Volleyball The Road Runners continue to pace the intramural volleyball sta!jdings after seven rounds of competition. With a perfect record of seven victories and no defeats, they are followed in the standings by the Misfits, who have only one loss and six victories to their credit. Volleyball Standings After Seven Rounds Won Lost Road Runners ------- 7 0 1 Misfits -------------- 6 2 Sixty Niners -------- 6 2 Beavers ------------- 5 3 Studs --------------- 5 3 Warriors ------------ 4 Centennials ---------- 4 3 Louts --------------- 4 3 Duds ---------------- 3 4 Zephyrs ------------- 2 5 Rodents ------------- 2 5 Emperors ------------ 2 5 Playboys ------------ 2 5 Worcesterites -------- 2 6 Octanubis ----------- 0 7

BY CHARLIE RICHARDS The Peru State Bobcats had to ·come from behind to defeat the Maryville Bearcats 66-65 on December 3. The Bearcats started· fast and were able to mount a 7-0 lead before Mike Harmon's jumper cut the deficit to five points. Trailing 15-21 at the end of the first quarter, the Bobcats were able to fight back and even the score 3·5-35 at halftime. At the start of the third quarter Wayne Heine's jumper put the Bobcats ahead for the first time in the contest 37-35. Less

than three points separated the two teams throughout the remainder of the contest. A jump shot by Ron Snodgrass with 3:27 left put the Bobcats into a 58-57 lead; Dean Cain added a fielder and the lead was increased to 60-57. The game, however, wasn't decided until the last 11 seconds when Heine scored a lay-up to help the Bobcats notch their second victory of the season 66-65. The Bobcat scoring was again paced by Snodgrass who tallied 21 points. Dave Remund paced the losers with 16 points.

WAA Members Attended Volleyball Officiating Clinic

Anita Cox, Donnita Speckman, Mary McMunn, Sandy Hopp and Bernadine Fittle represented Peru. The team played Doane, defeating them in two sets. They lost to Nebraska Wesleyan by a close margin.

Thirteen members of WAA, Women's Athletic Association, attended the Volleyball Officiating Clinic held Saturday, Dec. 4, at University -High in Lincoln. The clinic was held from 9 a.m. until 3:30 p.m. The clinic was presented by Lincoln Board of Women Offidais and was open to students from colleges and high schools. During the morning session volleyball rules were reviewed and new rules explained. Following the rules discussion, officiating demonstration games were held in which the h i g h &chool teams participated. This was followed by a question and answer period and another demonstration match to re-emphasize officiating techniques. This session concluded with a written examination given to those wishing to be rated. There was an afternoon rating session in which the girls who were being tested refereed the games. The college teams participated in this session. Five colleges were represented: Peru; Nebraska Wesleyan; Nebraska University; Doane; and Kearney. Nancy Jarvis, Cheri Combs, Carol Chandler, March Tinkham,

Others who attended the clinic from Peru were Nancy Muse, Ruth Kalafut, Dee Pearson and Kathy Welch. Miss Bonnie Rutz, Women's P.E. instructor at Peru also attended the clinic. She said she was proud of the girls' games and felt they did very well. Othef coaches also expressed this same opinion. Miss Rutz stated that Doane was very interested in future games with Peru.

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A meeting will be,. held today in Room 105 of the Science Building, to set up the rules and schedule for intramural basketball. The coaches are reminded that teams must be represented< if they are to \!Ompete. Play will start after Christmas vacati~n.

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-Photo by Mel Hester Jack Rinne tries for a layup in the Maryville game.


PACKAGE MAILINGS The college post office · can no longer be used to mail personal packages. All such mailings are to be processed through the downtown post office. Incoming packages will be delivered through the college post office, but all outgoing personal packages are to be mailed at the downtown post office.

Hundreds Were Here For Choral Clinic The 14th annual Choral Clinic was held on Dec. 4th at Peru State College. Students from Auburn, Beatrice, Bratton Union, Brock, Cook, Dawson~Ver­ don, Norris, Elmwood, Johnson, Nemaha, Nebraska City, Stella, and Peru Prep participated in the choral concert at 7:30 that evening after a ,day of practicing. The guest conductor was Dr. Dale A Jorgenson, head of the division of fine arts at Northwest Missouri State College, in Kirksville, and he was accompanied b y D r . Frederick Freeburne, head of fine arts division at Peru State. The Choral clinic was sponsored by the Peru chapter of the Music Educators National Conference under the direction of Hugh Thomas, voice instructor at Peru State. The selecti-Ons presented f or the concert were: "Praise Ye the Lord". by Molitor; "Poor Mary" by Davis; and "The Heavens Are Telling" by Haydn. The selections sung by small groups were: "Caroling, Caroling" by Burt; "She Walks in Beauty" by Foltz; "Chim Chim Cher-ee" fr o m Mary Poppins; and "Onward Ye Peoples," by Sibelius.

Campus School News The excitement and eXPectation of Christmas is in the air at the Campus School. Santa Claus is the honored guest in the grade school. A life size replica of the jolly old man welcomes one and all. A Christmas program is planned for the elementary students. In the high school, one is greeted by the aroma of a Christmas tree decorated by the junior and senior home economics girls. The 7th and 8th grades hadi a party Saturday, Dec. 6. Card games, dancing and refreshments were the order of the evening. Mr. Glen Sheely was the faculty sponsor. On Friday, Dec. 17, the sophomore class will sponsor a Christmas dance to be held in the high school auditorium. A Christmas program will be presented Thursday, Dec. 16. The program will consist of singing by the junior and senior high choirs and a play presented by the speech class. Another Christmas inspired activity was the caroling done by members of the FHA. The girls presented homemade candy to forty older people in the community. The first shipment of the school annual is ready to go to the publisher. Greg Vaughn, the Allen Funt of the Ca mp us School, will be taking candid shots in the near future so everybody "Smile"! Peru Prep opened its basketball season with a loss to Nehawka, 37-50.. The team played Brock and Talmage the week of Dec. 6 in away games. They will host Cook on Dec. 15. Mrs. Gergen' s English classes discussed the meaning of The

Curious Savage, the school play. She felt tt was "one of the most exciting sessions they h a v e held." All classes but the freshman ·class are dramatizing and writing short papers on various problems of Macbeth in order to gain a better understanding of the production which. they will attend Dec. 11.

Freshmen Are Encouraged To Enter Writing Contest Freshmen students currently enrolled in English Lab, English 101 or English 102 are encouraged to enter manuscripts in the Sigma Tau Delta Prose Writing Contest. The writings may be submitted to Dorothy Bock, club president or Mr. Silas Summers, club sponsor. Any type of prose, excluding the documental research paper, is acceptable. This includes descriptive, narrative, expository, and argumentative works. Judging of the papers will be done by members of Sigma Tau Delta and at least one faculty member. Manuscripts will be judged on neatness, correctness of mechanics, organization, style and content. Paper-bound books totaling ten dollars in cost will be awarded to the winner. These books will be of the winner's own choosing. The closing date for entries will be the last day of the fall semester,~January 18, 1966. Come on Freshmen! Uphold the creative tradition of your class and give the judging committee something to do. Enter y our manuscript in the Prose Writing Contest today!

The Peru State College Placement Bureau received a directive from the Board of Education of State Normal Schools to change the fee for services. Beginning December 1, 1965, the fee was raised to $5.00 for each year in which the credentials' are activated. H. W. Johnson, Director Placement Bureau

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MORGAN HALL HOSTS FACULTY AT ANNUAL CHRISTMAS TEA (Continued from page one) Kris Wewel, Mary Ann Rademacher, Ginny Grossman, Maggie playter, and Janis Walford. General arrangements for the tea were made by Karon Rathe and Susan Kenworthy.

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Kappa Delta Pi held its annual Christmas party on Monday, Dec. 6th in the Peru Campus auditorium. A short business meeting was held to discuss plans for sending delegates to the national Kappa Delta Pi Convocation held in Houston, Texas, on Febr. 24, 25, and 26th. Program books with the year's activities listed were given to the members. The program which followed was narrated by Nancy Larson. Myrene Davis, assisted by Roland and LaRhea Barrett a n d Katie Bohlken, presented a skit based on the Christmas story. Dorothy Bock and Barbara Gordon read portions from the Bible from the books of St. Matthew and St. Luke. Refreshments were served after the program. They were prepared by Nancy Jarvis, Nancy Larson, Pat Knipplemier, and Bobbie Armstrong.

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-oWESLEY FELLOWSHIP Wesley Fellowship sponsored a Chili supper at the Peru City Hall on Dec. 9th, from 5:30 to 8:00. The menu consisted of chili, coffee, tea, or milk, and a choice of pie.

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ebraska's Oldest College

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

. Volume 61

Numb.er 7

JANUARY 17, 1966

Nebraska's Best College

fourteenth Annual Schoolmen's Day Saturday, January 29

Senior Pictures Now Available In Placement Office

Schoolmen from Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, and Missouri have been invited to the fourteenth annual Schoolmen's Day program at Peru State College. The day will begin with a coffee in the Student Center. The male faculty members will be hosts at a dinner in the Student Center. After the dinner, guests and faculty will attend the PeruWayne basketball game.

The Delmar Studio pictures of Peru State seniors are available in the placement office to those seniors desiring to purchase them. The pictures are retouched and are of good quality at a reasonable price. Purchase is optional, not compulsory. The picture package includes an 8"xl0" studio portrait in a forder. There are also two dozen billfold size pictures (3l/4''x21h"). The student may buy the whole package for $9.50. Or he may buy the billfold pictures for $3.50 per dozen. The billfold size photographs will be valuable in making job applications. The new faculty members who had their pictures made this year are eligible for the same deal. All pictures are finished, retouched prints, not proofs. If interested, see these pictures· in Mr. Harold Johnson's office in the Campus School.

Material Needed For . Use In "Sifting Sands" Any Peru students interested in creative writing are sincerely invited to submit their original works for publication in Sifting Sands. This booklet is printed annually under the sponsorship of Mr. Silas Summers and Sigma Tau Delta, honorary English fraternity. Contrary to popular opinion, one does not have to be an English major or minor to submit his work. The deadline for submission is March 1, while the deadline for the freshman prose writing contest is January 26. The winning contest entries will be printed in Sifting Sands. Types of material eligible for Sifting Sands include poetry, short stories, short plays, and essays. The next issue of. Sifting.Sands will be the centennial issue, so let's make it as good as possible by having a good supply of original works to be considered for publication. Enter now ! !

Renovation Brings Crisis To u. N. Talk The renovation of the Administration building has brought about many changes. None are quite as odd, however, as that of seeing the building so nearly vacated. Where once you visited Dean Melvin or the business office, now stand pipe, cords, ma. chin<?S, tools, and carpenters busy at work. Partitions have been .lowered, many rooms completely cleared, and essential classroom areas left to themselves. In class, the occasional buzz of a saw or the sounds of the drill and hammer have caused little bother. The noted calamity was in Government 201 as the discussion of the U. N. was in its cli.max. A water pipe began to turn .and soon was separated from its connecting branch. A student or two was on alert. · A leak or two began, but didn t last long. A chair was moved just in time to avoid a gush of water from above. After slight confusion and a few wet feet ev. erything was back to normalfor a moment. Plaster fell from the side wall. More water gushed from the overflowing spout. The N. had enough of a problem for one day, and class was dismissed. Nothing stands in the way of progress and when it involves a ·shorter class period, ,you'll find ·no one to complain.

u.

Fine Arts Building Now Being Used To Capacity Myrene Davis Describes Interior Of Peru's New Fine Arts Building The Peru State physical plant has been enhanced by the completion of the new Fine Arts B~~g, Thll constrimtioll, of'th'e' buildi.hg began in the summer of '63 and the building·is scb.~uled for full use during the coming spring semester. - The struct~e was designed to house the facilities of the music, art, and speech and dramatics departments. The two main entrances to the north and south open on to foyers containing benches for the students' relaxation. All of the rooms themselves are located around a large exhibition court, the height of which extends to the second story ceiling. The court will be used for art displays in ~ddition to the show case now located in the northern foyer beneath the staircase. The music wing comprises the west portion of the building. Located on the first floor are the band and chorus rooms and several practice rooms. The recital hall, with a seating capacity of 214 will be used for recitals, small musical groups, lectures and speech and dramatic events which require no staging. All members of the music faculty have their offices in this wing. The western half of the second floor contains practice rooms and

Siegner Attended Planning Meeting For Curriculum Dr. C. V. Siegner attended a planning meeting at the state capitol in Lincoln, Nebr., on Jan. 7th to discuss a course of study for junior and senior h i g h schools. He was one of the members on a committee of six to form a course of study in industrial arts, for pre-vocational and vocational education for junior and senior high and 2-year post (Continued on page two)

studios and two large classrooms which will be used by all departments. At present the administrative offices are located in the southern rooms. . This situation will be changed by September of '66 when the renovation of the Administration Building is completed. These rooms will then be used for offices and practice studios. The east wing houses the departments of art and speech and dramatics. Upstairs are located one all purpose classroom, a n d art laboratory and a crafts shop. The offices of the art faculty are also here. The speech and drama facilities are found on the main floor, including one large classroom and offices for department faculty. A speech lab and listening rooms equipped with tape recorders and earphones will be available. A glass-encased recording st,udio with a stereophonic sound system is located in the classroom. In addition to the occupancy of offices, some classes are being held in the new structure. The installation of some new equipment has not been completed, but Peruvians may look forward to classes and activities to be held in the Fine Arts Building next semester.

Peruvian Deadline Nears The Peruvian staff completed their Jan. 3 deadline with the American Yearbook Co. prior to the Christmas holidays and are presently working toward the Jan. 31 deadline, After some delay, all individual pictures and copy were finished and delivered to Topeka, Kans. The Peruvian cover was approved and delivered for production. Bill Bowen, Barbara Gordon, and Mary Ann Sharp are pre(Continued on page two)

Mcintire Presented Citizenship Award Debate Season Is Mayor Jack Mcintire was pre- One Of The Best sented the 1965 Citizenship Award of the Peru Kiwanis Club at ceremonies held Tuesday evening, Dec. 21, 1965. The award, a bronze plaque, was presented by Don Carlile, a member of the club's selection committee. Mcintire, best known as the head basketball coach at Peru State College since 19fr6, was elected mayor of Peru in May 1964. Mcintire's. basketball teams have done an outstanding job of keeping the name of Peru before the public. On Dec. 16, Peru State defeated Simpson College, and in so doing, Mcintire w o n his 150th basketball game at Peru State College against only 89 defeats. Among the major achievements by the Peru mayor and his city council since they took office have been the reduction of the city's bonded· indebtedness; installation of mercury v a p or lights throughout the residential and downtown districts; improvements in the City Hall; and resurfacing of all city streets. During Mcintire's administration, the city electorate voted to purchase outside electrical power. A recent ruling by the State Supreme Court has made it possible for the purchase of th i s power more economically th a n could be produced in the local plant.

Concerning the award, Coach Mcintire said, "About all I can say is that I am happy to have received it."

FRESHMAN ESSAY CONTEST The end of th!! Freshman Essay Contest is n e a rJ an. 26. Entries must be submitted to English instructors or members of Sigma Tau Delta or the English Club before this date. Remember - Wednesday, January 26!

The 1965 debate season proved to be a rather successful one for several Peru teams. Three tour· naments were attended; those held at Wayne State College, the University of South Dakota at Vermillion, and Northwest Missouri State College at Maryville. The most notable achievement was attained by Chic Williams and Eugene Fitzpatrick, who won the "B" division tournament at Wayne State. This team won a trophy for the school, and each debater received an individual trophy. In addition to debating, several members of the squad scored favorably in individual events. Receiving a superior rating in extemporaneous speaking was Tony Lopes. Myrene Davis received awards for radio announcing, discussion, and oral interpretation. Dan Bolin won recognition in oratory, and Dan Kudsen in oratory and discussion. A total of ten students participated in at least one intercollegiate tournament. The second semester will find Peru's debaters expanding their study of forensics. Plans are being made to tour several area high schools to illustrate debating and other forensic techniques. The debaters will also take charge of the forensic portion of the district speech contest to be held here in the spring.

Melvin Attends North Central Meeting Dr. Melvin attended a meeting of the North Central Association of Secondary Schools in Chicago, January 5-7. During the meeting he talked with Dr. Elmer Clark and Dr. Richard Davis about the self-stud·y which the college is now doing in preparation for a graduate program. He also e~­ amined the North Central library of self-studies done by other colleges.


.J.>ED NEEDS VER$AME .STAfF By Bill Bowen· '. ·• ·.. To ~ublish a good newspaper the staff must represent ii.JI 'aspects of college life and be capable of clearly and knowledgeably reporting on all the varied activities that .take place on campus. To provide good reporting, our staff must consist of reporters with knowledge and experience in every field dealt with by the college. Unfortunately, sometimes students tend to think of English 234, Beginning J~mrnalism, as a course designed only for English majors. Consequently, it is my desire to clear up that misconception and recruit members for the staff of the Pedagogian. Don't assume that in English 234 you will be treated as if you were writing for a graduate English course. What we sorely need on our staff are athletes, musicians, drama students, photographers, history students, etc. Your grade will depend on the reporting you do for the Pedagogian. . If you have any interest in journalism, or if you would li~e to see your field more clearly represented, then contact your counselor and ask him about it. In almost any field you will find journalism, and the additional three hours credit, helpful in fulfilling requirements. So if you have any interest in the newspaper, in news photography, in newspaper business management, or in some specific reporting field, just ask someone on the current staff. We'd be glad to answer your questions and help you in any way we can. ELIZA .MORGAN HALL By Mary Ann Sharp With vacation over and the new year here, it seems that little has changed.. Books are open, the library is full, the campus is crowded, and announcements are piling high. Christmas eve brought two engagements to be announced. Marcia Cunningham became engaged to Mr. Jim Me·nefee of Menlo, Iowa, who has served in the U. S. Navy and is now working _in Menlo. Marcia is a.sophomore and is majoring in elementary education. She plans to work second semester and also. to work on plans for their August wedding. Also, December 24, L a n a Toelle received a diamond from Steve Colerick, who is a junior majoring in social science at ·Peru. Lana is a sophomore and her major is elementary education. Both transferred , to Peru after attending Maryville. Judy Elsinger announces her engagement to Ken Boatman, who is a senior majoring in business administration. She received her diamond on January 8th. Judy is a home economics major and is a junior here at Peru. . Charlotte Hershberger w i 11 become Mrs. Larry Nedrow on January 29th in Falls City, Nebr. Larry formerly attended Maryville for two years, and will begin his third year of college by attending Peru State the second

semester. They will live in Peru. Two important items that have received much comment from almost every girl in Morgan Hall have been called to my attention for publication. The first is the fact that since the week before Thanksgiving vacation, we have enjoyed little or no hot water in the dorm. This allows us maybe one or two hours a week to keep our washing and cleaning done. If we can't brave the cold shower, a trip to the local gymnasium is necessary. The other item, is the fact that though the cup disposal p o P machine is not particularly liked, it is greatly used. We would like to see other machines installed, such as the young men in Majors Hall are now enjoying. Majors Hall has candy, pop, SOifp, hot chocolate, and coffee mac@nes. It's not a cry for equal rights. The girls in Morgan Hall get hungry too, and tired of four flavors. TEMPORARY OFFICES: The December 13 issue of the Pedagogian lists temporary quarters for those housed in the Administration Building. P 1ease note two changes in the listing: Dr. Boraas is in FA 216, Mr. Linscheid and Mr. Summers in FA 214. Although all administrative offices are out of the Administration building, some faculty members will remain in present quarters for a few days or possibly until the end of the first semester. All classes scheduled for the Administration building (except business education) will continue to meet in presentlyassigned rooms the remainder of this semester.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Richard Berthold -----------------------------------Editor Barbara Gordon ------------------------Personnel Manager Elaine Neddenriep __: ________ Layout Editor & Photographer Charles Richards -----------------------------Sports Editor Mary Sautter -------------------------------Feature Editor Bill Bowen ------------------------------Business Manager J can Bretthorst ----------------------------·--Copy Editor Jackie Swegler -------------------------------Copy Editor Mel Hester ----------------------------------Photographer Alicia Andrews -----------------------------------Reporter Bobbie Armstrong --------------------------------Reporter Myrene Davis ------------------------------------Reporter Robert Minks ------------------------------------Reporter Dan Strecker -------------------------------------Reporter Mary Ann Sharp ---------------------------------Reporter Leland Schneider ---------------------------------Reporter Louis Rogers ----------------------..:______________Reporter Nancy Jarvis -------------------------------------Reporter Mike Sullivan ------------------------------------Reporter Stewart Linscheid ---------------------------------Advisor

DELZELL HALL By Bill Bowen In Delzell everyone is getting · ready for the fast approaching finail. · tests, but· even with all the preparations for them, the interest seems to be in the vacation that comes immediately afterward. They all seem to be far more interested in getting some sleep and in general taking it easy before the next semester starts. Delzell has made some changes in the lounge area with the removal of the pop machine to the basement game room, and the addition of a new candy. dispensing machine. Some Delzell residents have been spe~ulating about the couch that is missing in the lounge. The couch is the victim of an apparrent manufacturing flaw, and has developed a severe case of collapse in the center section. For those readers about to fall into the painless torture chamber called finaJ examinations, I have but one wvrd, "Banzai."

Jarvis Attends Civil Defense Conference On Tuesday, Jan. 11, Dee V. Jarvis, Civil Defense instructor at Peru State, attended a Civil Defense Conference for County and Municipal Officials held at Auburn, Nebraska. The three-hour conference was designed to bring together public and community officials to discuss the current Civil Defense program; to develop a better tinderstandirig of their responsibilities, required actions, and procedures to increase their abilities to cope with major emergencies; to explain assistance available through state and federal government agencies; and to present, in a stimulating manner, the issues and facts behind Civil Defense. The program consisted of films and talks on shelters, the status of Civil Defense, and developing operational readiness in the community.

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Siegner Attended Planning Meeting (Continued from page one) high school students. Dr. Royal Hanline, a State Department specialist in curriculum, led the meeting.

Peruvian Nears Deadline (Continued from page one) paring organization layouts and copy. Stan Johnson completed the football section and is presently working on cross country. Sharon Beatty, Mary Budler, and Leona Masters are finishing layouts and copy for the beginning school year events. Walt Rimmer has been photographing school events as the layout editors require them. Fifty-six pages were completed before Christmas, and thirtytwo more will be done before Jan. 31, making a total of eightyeight pages. The 1965-66 Peruvian will consist of 128 pages with a 12-page supplement. The supplement is necessary so that students c a n receive. their yearbooks prior to spring vacation.

-Photo by Walter Rimmer Pat Knippelmier won the Best Dressed Girl contest sponsored by the Home Economics Club. The girls are Pat Knippelmier, Mary Ingles, Mary Mowry, Mary Beth Gerber, Grace Cook, Nancy Guil· liait, Sally Kelly, Elaine Neddenriep, and Barbara Gordon.

Best Dressed Girl On Campus Contest Won By Pat Knippelmier The Home Economics c 1u b sponsored the first convocation for 1966 on Wednes<la;l-', Jan. 5th. They he1d a "Best Dressed Girl on Campus" contest. The contest is under the direction of the editors of the Glamour Magazine. A committee from the home economics club chose 10 girls from the student body. Bobbie Armstrong read the qualifications that each 'candidate had to meet, then she introduced the candidates to the student body. The 10 girls chosen were: Mary Ingles, Nancy Guilliatt, Mary Mowry, Mary Beth Gerber, SaJly Kelly, Pat Knippelmier, Cherie Trevino, Grace Cook, Barbara Gordon, and Elaine Neddenriep.

The voting to select one candidate followed the convocation. Pat Knippelmier was chosen as the "Best Dressed Girl" on Peru State campus. She will have her picture taken in 1. an on-campus outfit, 2. an off-campus outfit, and 3. an evening or formal dress. These pictures and the entry blank will be sent to Glamour Magazine headquarters in New York City. If she is one of the 10 national winners, she will win an expense paid trip to New Yerk City, and she will be featured in the August issue of . Glamour. Even if she does not win, she is eligible for honorable mention and her name may appear in August issue of Glamour,


obcats Down Kearney S0-62 Jn NCC Opener

'1

The Peru State Bobcats opened conference play Jan. 8, with a 80-62 bombardment of Kearney. The Bobcats opened up a 53-30 lead at halftime and never were seriously challenged by the Antelopes. ' Peru State was paced by rejuvenated Mike Harmon, who ' was able to score 19 of his gameleading 25 points in the first half. Other ringleaders for the victorious Bobcats were Ron Snodgrass, Dean Cain, and Wayne Herne with 19, 14, and 12 points respectively.

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.SPORTS COLUMN By Dick Berthold Coach Ervin Pitts recommended. 35 gridders for letters during the 1965 season, which netted a four win and: five loss season. The list of letter winners on Peru's co-NCO championship team included nine seniors, seven juniors, seven sophomores,· and 12 freshmen. Floyd Goff, Roy Windhorst, and Bill Witty headed the list of seniors by earning their fourth letter. Other senior lettermen included: Dom LaRocca (2), Phil Malone (2), Jim Manning (2), Les Raine (2), Vince Sabatinelli (3), and Sam Sadich (3). Juniors winning letters were: Bernie Brown (3), Lowell Brown (2), George Evangelist (2), Paul Fell (1), Curt Holliman (2), Al Sullivan (3), and Bob Urwin (2). The sophomores included: Pete Campo (2), Bill Daigle (1), John Gilmore (1), Tim Logsdon (2), Ralph Stukowski (1), Bruce Vickrey (1), and Ron Yates (2). Freshmen earning their first Bobcat letters were: John Creamer, Lee Dunekacke, Bill Everhart, Bert Faulkner, Jim Hagemier, Jim Kollbaum, Charles Myerski, Carl Satterfield, Harold Van Arsdale, Paul Vavra, andl Doug Winfield. Guard Bernie Brown and tackle Phil Malone were honorable mention selections on the NAIA's mythical defensive squad. Coach Pilkington recommended nine harriers for varsity letters, and four freshmen for certificates. Jim Sprague was the only senior heading the list. Sprague, hampered by injuries throughout his career, reboundim this. year to play an important role in Peru's third place finish in the NMA National Meet in ·· Omaha. ,, . . , Lettermen for · 1965 ·included: Jim O'Donoghue, Lo.uis . Fritz, Tim Hendricks, Jim Watson, Dick Zaparanick, Roger Neujahr, Ron Jones, and Van Allen. Freshmen certificates we r e awarded to Jim Bohl, Mike Bailey, Phil•Herbster, and Dan Trout. Team members selected Fritz and Hendricks to captain the 1966 squad. Fritz and Sprague were elected the most valuable runners, and Ron Jones was elected the most improved runner of 1965. Peru State opened its NCC schedule with a walloping 80-62 win over Kearney Jan. 8. The Bobcats hit 73 per cent from the field as they widened their 53-30 halftime lead. Harmon ·collected 25 points for the game's high point scorer. The Antelopes collected 15 fouls compared to Pe· ru's 22 fouls.

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. Ron Snodgrass snared top honors for Peru State College in The Top of The Nation Tournament in Alamosa, Colo., Dec. 27-29. Snodgrass was picked on the all-tourney team by the coaches and sportswriters. He scored 25 points in the Bobcats' 88-100 loss to Adams State; 26 points as Peru State downed East Central Oklahoma, who defeated Peru 84-66 for fourth place in th e tournament. Peru State played its best game in a losing cause against Adams State &8-100. Acdams State gained their victory by dominating both boards and exploding for 34 points in the fourth quarter to race ahead of Peru after the gam'e had been tied at 66-66 with'lO minutes remaining in the game. Paced by 'Snodgrass and Dean Cain, Peru managed a 45-43 halftime lead and then stayed with the Indians before tiring with 10 minutes left in the contest. Snodgrass hit 13 of his 25 points in the first half, and Cain tallied 11 of his total 17 points before the intermission. Ad ams State's Willie Davis led all scores with a 33-point production. In Peru's 81-77 victory over , East Central Oklahoma, the Bobcats had to come from behind after trailing 54-64 with 12 minutes left in the game. Bill Rinne came off the bench to lead a full· court press and spark the Bobcats to their first tourney victory. Snodgrass led Peru with 26 points and Wayne Heine contributed 17. In Peru's final contest, Central Oklahoma's defense held Snodgrass to seven points and gave them an 84-66 triumph. The Broncos gained the lead late in the first half and never relinquished it to the Bobcats. Jack Rinne played his finest game of the tournament and paced Peru scorers with 16 points. Central Oklahoma hit a blistering 56 .4 per cent of its field goals while the cold Bobcats could only manage 37 .3 per cent from the floor.

On Dec. 8, the Peru State Bobcats fell to Washburn by a score of 97-70. Peru bottled the home club to a 38-38 halftime tie, but succumbed to a second half Ichabod surge. Mike Harmon's 22 points paced the Bobcats.

Intramural BB Opens Play The Road Runners opened defense of their basketball title with two victories over the VIP's and the Studs. There are nineteen teams entered in the competition. At the conclusion of regular season'play there will be a round robin tournament consisting of the top eight teams. These top eight teams will be determined on the final standings based on regular season play. Results After Four Rounds Of Play Rodents 2, Misfits 0, Forfeit. Sixty Niners 2, Worcesterites 0, Forfeit. Studs 43, Duds 34. Beavers 43, Mustangs 22. Emperors 59, Octanubis 18. Centennials 39, Playboys 25. Show Boats 80, Kingsmen 49. Louts 40, Zephyrs 31. Road Runners 59, VIP's 14. Warriors 67, Octanubis 24. Centennials 44, Rodents 40. Kingsmen 36, Zephyrs 29. Beavers 38, VIP's 35. Road Runners 48, Studs 20. Misfits 51, Show Boats 35. Playboys 46, Sixty Niners 40.

BY CHARLES RICHARDS

The Bobcats battled a strong St. Benedict's team on even terms for a half, and finally fell to the Ravens 77-54. Leading Bobcat scorer was Mike Harmon with 18 points. Ron Snodgrass led the Bobcats out of a two-game losing streak by a 100-60 conquest of Dana Dec. 14. Leading by only 8 points at halftime, the speedy Bobcats outscored their opponents 60-28 to gain an overwhelming victory. Snodgrass with 29 points and Dean Cain with 18 points paced a balanced Peru scoring attack. Peru State dominated b o th boards Dec. 16 to gain an 89-63 victory over Simpson. With five men scoring in double figures, Peru State was able to notch its second victory of the week. Dean Cain and Mike Harmon each tallied 16 points for the winning Bobcats. Northwest Missouri State edged Peru 69-67 in a game at Maryville, Jan. 4. Both clubs made 25 field goals, but Peru State connected on only 17 of 25 free throws to give the Owls the victory. Mike Harmon lead Peru scorers with 26 points.

SECOND SEMESTER 1965-66 First Period· 5:00 to 7:40 p.m. Listed below are the Dept., No., Course Title, Room, Credit, and the Instructor. ***Educ 408; Audio-Visual Materials; CS 311; 2; Sheely. LSci 214; Principles of Classification and Cataloging; Li Bas; 3; Brandt. Hist 114; History of the U. S. Since 1865; FA 211; 3; Schottenhamel. **Geog 310; ,Geography of Africa; Sc 201; 3; Whiteman. HEc 323; Home Planning; IA 23; 3; Siegner. *IA 325; Survival Prepared· ness; IA 2B; 1; Jarvis. Second Period· 7:45 to 10:10 p.m. Educ 300; Foundations of Education; FA 211; 3; Johnson. Psyc 201; Human Growth and Development; FA 105; 3; Wininger. Art 306; Art Appreciation; FA 205; 2; Staff. **SS 305; Marriage and Parenthood; Sc 201; 3; Van Pelt. Eng 324; American Literature I; FA 204; 2; Linscheid. *Survival Preparedness will meet five (5) sessions for 1 hour credit. The first meeting will be Wednesday, February 9, 19u6. Also open to day students. "*Open to day students. *"*Will not be offered in the 1966 Summer Session. Note: Daytime students may register for night classes only after the approval of the Dean of the College.

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Miss F, arid :Oarta Henry, Ml$~ A. The girls w:ere escorted .and crowned by:· their .fathers. :Roses were pr~?ented to the queen by her sister, Margaret Lutt, chairman of the Snow Festival committee. Chaperones included Mr. and Mrs. L. Lutt, Mr. and: Mrs. Ramon Henry, Mr. and Mrs. Walt Lammle, Mr. and Mrs. Ellis Adams, and Mr. ·and Mrs. Lynn Doxon; 11111111111nnonu1111111u1111nrn11111111111111111111111111111u111

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Avon Long, Lucia Hawkins. and LaVem Hutcherson ••• Porgy and Bess Singers. Last Wednesday, Jan. 10, the Porgy and Bess Singers came to Peru and gave a convocation performance. Lucia Hawkins as "Bess," Leverne Hutcherson as "Porgy" and Avon Long as "Sportin' Life" gave the usual interpretations to their roles, and showed a more than working familiarity with Gershwin's music. Mr. Hutcherson's performance as "Porgy" seemed rather stolid how· ever, and at times, unambitious. The earliness of the hour may have been, in part at least, the cause. Certainly Mr. Long's portrayal

Library Special Collections Room BY DONNA VAN BUSKIRK A number of cards in the card catalog have "S.C." by the call number. This stands for special collections which are kept in a sparate room on the main floor of the library. It contains all the Peruvians from 1908 to the present, the Peru Pointers from 1898 to 1961 and the back issues 'of the Peru Pedagogian plus the current copies. This is the perfect place to spend an afternoon browsing, just for fun, through some of the old Peru annuals or to look at the news in last year's college newspapers. Being rich in Peru's history, the special collections room also contains many of the commencement week programs back to 1910. Photos of the campus and professors of past years are interesting and show the changes Peru has undergone. Of equal in· terest is the original manuscript of The Shadow of a Rock by E. R. Conkle, a Peru State College graduate. This is a scrapbook with all the notes, memos, etc., of first ideas the author had and it shows the various stages the play passed through.

DRAMATIC CLUB The January meeting of the Dramatic Club was held at 7:00 in room 105 of the Fine Arts Building, which will be the regular meeting room for the club.

of "Sportin' Life" was lively, hilarious in part and totally convincing. Miss Hawkins' voice w a s pleasant and well suited to her performance, although it seemed to sometimes get out of hand. Her "Bess" was a delight, and her facial movements, particularly in "Bess, You Is My Woman Now," made up for lack of scenery, costumes and orchestra. The entire performance was a continuous flow of enjoyable music; the numbers were sung pleasantly and the repertoir showed a surprising change of pace in its variety.

President Myrene Davis led the group in a short discussion of the value of attending more plays in the future as a project. Several members of the club, along with Mr. and Mrs. Moore, Mr. and Mrs. Bohlken, Mrs. Gnade, and Mrs. Gergen, saw "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf," Dec. 7 at the University Theatre.

Campus School News

"The Sfore of Standard Brands" Phone 274-3620 Aubum

BY NANCY JARVIS Activities have slowed with the close of the first semester. Teachers are busy compiling grades, while students are busy making up for lost time. Basketball is in the spotlight. Prep played Brock Jan. 13, in the Johnson Basketball Tournarft'l!ont, Jan. 10-14, at Johnson. Future home games include: Lourdes Central, Jan. 21; Johnson, Jan. 22; and Table Rock, Jan. 25. The Campus School junior high lost to Brock junior high Jan. 4, by one point. They will play Auburn junior high Jan. 27. The FHA held its annual Snow Festival, January 8. The theme this year was Fantasy in White. About one hundred people were present to see Mary Lu t t crowned Miss H (queen). Her attendants were Nancy Adams,

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While in the library, feel free to browse through these items plus the many others housed in the S.C. room. Anyone on the library staff will be glad to show you where the room is and to di· rect you to the proper use of the materials kept there.

Mr. Moore encouraged members to try out for the Spring Play, "Night Must Fall," by Emlyn Williams. Try outs were scheduled for Dec. 14. After a

the meeting was adjowned. The· executive .board · met to consider applicants for active membership after the meeting.

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KAPPA DELTA PI Kappa Delta Pi held the first meeting of the new year on Jan. 3, at 8:00 p.m. in the Campus School auditorium. March Tinkham introduced the guest speaker, Jerry Regler, the Superintendent of the School for the Visually Handicapped in Nebraska City. Mr. Regler showed a film entitled, "A Day With Suzie," which explained a typical day in the life of a blind student at school. He answered questions ·concerning the school and the curriculum following the film. He was accompanied by Becky and Lorie Beech, two high school students from the blind school. They sang and played several songs on their ukeleles.

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Nebraska's Oldest College

The Voice of the Campus of aThousand Oaks . . .

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 61

Number 8

Governing Board Of Nebraska State Colleges

FEBRUARY 21. 1966

Bobcats Conference Champions For Sixth Time In Ten Years Coach Jack Mcintire and his basketballers are the 1966 N.C.C. champs. For the sixth time in the 10-year tenure of Coach McIntire he has brought the Bobcats conference championships. Facing what many thought an impossible task, Peru State ,captured Friday night's clash at Peru, 73-64, and Saturday night's fray, 34-68. In nailing down the 1966 basketball title, Peru State's Bobcats established themselves as contender to represent NAIA District 11 in · the Kansas City tournament.

SEATED, left to right-Henry I. Freed, Chadron: Dr. Gordon Shupe, Wayne, president of the board; James M. Knapp, Kearney, vice-president of the board: Bernard M. Spencer, Nebraska City. STANDING, left to right-E. K. Yanney, Lodgepole; Dr. Francis J. Brown, Genoa; Dr. Floyd A. Miller, Lincoln, commissioner of education and ex-officio member of board.

Governing Board Members Give Generousij Of Their Time And Talent To Education Students, faculty, parents, and everyone interested in higher ed· ucation in Nebraska owe a great debt to the present Norm a 1 Board members and their prede· cessors. In the last ten years, the Nebraska State Colleges have seen their greatest growth in every way. The members of the board have given generously of their time and ability to direct a many sii<l.€d program of tremendous development. As the institutions grow, board member responsibilities increase. It would be interesting to know how many hours have been spent and how many miles have been driven by a long time board member such as A. D. Majors, who resigned in December 1965, or Mr. Bernard M. Spencer, who has served since 1955. We doubt that even these gentlemen would have a very exact idea how much work they have done. But there is n-0 doubt that these gentlemen and the other board members, have been of great service to the youth of Nebraska. Six of the seven members of the board are appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the legislature. The seventh member is the state com· missioner of education w h o serves ex--0fficio. The appointed members serve for a term of six years. None of the members receives any compensation other than actual expenses incurred in the performance of their duties. The board is charged with responsibility of the general con· trol of the state colleges at Chadron, Kearney, Peru and Wayne. Mr. Freed of Chadron has been

a member of the board s i n c e Dec. 1960. He is president of the Midwest Furniture Company of Chadron. Dr. Gordon Shupe has been a member -0.f the b o a r d since Jan. 1963 and is a practicing dentist in Wayne. Mr. Knapp has been a member of the board since Jan. 1965 and is a practicing attorney in Kearney. Mr. Spencer is the senior member of the board having served as a member of the board since Jan. 1955 and is the immediate p as t president of the board. Mr. Yanney has been a member of the board since April 1961 and is president of the Lodgepole State Bank. Dr. Brown is the newest member of the board having been appointed in January of this year to serve out the unexpired term of Mr. A. D. Majors of Omaha who resigned in December, 1965. Dr. Miller, as state commissioner of education and an alumnus of Peru State College, has been a member of the board since April, 1962.

Nebraska's Best College

The Friday night opener was a tension packed contest. The score at intermission was 33-25 with the Peruvians on top. The game had been tied six· times and the lead had changed hands on an equal number of occasions. Midway through the second half Chadron came back to take a brief 53-52 advantage, but seconds later Ron Snodgrass put two points on the score board which put Peru back ahead to stay. The Bobcats gained the 73-64 victory on the strength of their reb-Ounding, outgrabbing the Eagles 55·40. Friday night's scoring leaders for Peru were Mike Harmon with 18 p-0ints and Ron Snodgrass with 16. Big Joe

Johnson led Chadron with 17 points. Mike Harmon and teammate Ron Snodgrass, powered the Bobcats to victory with respective 24 and 23 point productions in the Saturday game. Harmon's 16-foot jumper bl'oke a 47 -all tie with 18:11 to go in the game and Peru was never behind again. Harmon 1 a t e r scored seven straight points to propel Peru to a 62-55 advantage with 12 minutes to go. Chadron's last gasp came minutes later when they moved back to trail 60-64, but a pair of fielders by Dean Cain, broke the back of the rally.

Leadership Workshop Held On Campus A Campus Leadership Work9hop, sponsored by the Nebraska Council of Churches, was held at Peru State College on Friday and Saturday, Febr. 11-12. The purpose of the workshop was to promote better communication between the students and faculty. A planning committee composed of six students and t w o members. of the faculty made the arrangements for the workshop. Those on the committee were Myrene Davis, Gene Fitzpatrick, (Continued! on page seven)

Board And Administrative Officers

P.S.C. On Television Peru State College was represented by the Music, Dramatics, and Industrial Arts Departments on a campus to campus television show at 1:30 p.m. on Sun· day, Febr. 20, 1966 over KOLNTV, Channel 10 at Lincoln. Performances in the show were as follows: a trumpet trio number, "Jim Dandies," by Dale Duensing, Ralph Shaffer, and Bill Joiner; an interpretive ex· cerpt from "The W-0rld of Carl (Continueill on page seven)

SEATED, left to right-Henry I. Freed, Chadron, member of the board: Dr. Gordon Shupe, Wayne, president of the board; James M. Knapp, Kearn~y, vice-president of the board; Bernard M. Spencer, Nebraska City, member of the board; Miss Sandra Carnicle, secretary to ihe siaie colleges coordinator. ST ANDING, left to right-E. Albin Larson, Linco In, secretary of the board: Dr. Milton Hassel, presi· dent of Kearney State College; Dr. W'tlliam A. Brandenburg, president, Wayne State College; E. K. Yanney, Lodgepole, member of ihe board; Dr. Francis J. Brown, Genoa, member of the board; Dr. Floyd A. Miller, state commissioner of education and ex-officio member of the board; Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president, Peru State College; Dr. Edwin C. Nelson, dean, Chadron State College representing President F. Clark Elkins; Dr. Freeman B. Decker, Lincoln, coordinator of siate colleges.


COMMENTS ON THE

C~pS LEAD~~i;QP·

CONFERENCE

,

, ·

.

As reported elsewhere in this paper, a Campus Leadership Conference· sponsored by the Nebraska Council of Churches was held on our campus the weekend of February 11 and 12. It is, perhaps, important that we recognize the value of such conferences, and that the correct interpretation be placed on this one in particular, since it was the first on this campus. This conference was sponsored by the Nebraska Council of Churches to promote the development of communication, and the understanding of campus problems as seen by the students, faculty, and administration. Representatives from every group on campus were present, and the real value of the conference was that it gave students, faculty members, and administrators a chance. to discuss and compare· thoughts, impressions, and ideas about our campus. More will be heard about this conference in the very near future and all of us should be alert and interested in the results. This conference and its effects can and will be a valuable experience for Peru. -By Bill Bowen

·Diana RiM;chiek from Falls City, ·· h~~~ als6 joined us here at Morgan Hall. I speak for all the girls when emending our warmest welcome to the new assistant dorm mother, Mrs. Phillips from Auburn. A .shower is being held f or Ginny Grossman Febr. 22 in Nebraska City. It seems she is planning a March wedding. Brenda McCarthy announces her engagement to Fi:ank .Teleen, a Peru graduate. A June wedding is planned.

DELZELL HALL By Ralph Shaffer

A NEW PUBLICATION ON OUR CAMPUS The S.G.A. Newsletter will begin publishing again this week and we want to emphasize the importance of supporting this valuable outlet of campus opinion. The Newsletter will be published on weeks alternating with the Pedagogian, and will depend on unsolicited articles from the campus population. Miss March Tinkham is in charge of the project, and any inquiries about it should be directed to her. We wish the Newsletter the best of success, and have high hopes for its future. -By Bill Bowen

Well, most of us are still here slaving away toward a degree of some kind: or another. Nevertheless, we wish to welcome the new girls this semester to Peru. ·Among them are Alice Massoth, majoring in business education; Mary Straight, a second semester freshman with a field of concentration in library science; and Dorothy Lazzaro, who is seeking her degree in secondary teaching. They are all transfers from Wayne State, Maryville, and Omaha University.

ond semester freshman at Peru. Donna Dankof has given up her long drive back and forth from Hamburg, Iowa, to jointhe dorm life. Also, Beverly Kitelinger has moved onto campus this semester. Seems they want to join the mad rush to get hot showers, their favorite television programs, and a washer between classes. Girls who gave up ,their jobs to come to college are Lynn Blackford, a sales derk from Lincoln; Renee Eberhard, a multigraph 6perator in Oma~ and originally from Brock; · 'an d Sharon Brownell, a· waitress from Bellevue. It may be of interest to note. that Sharon is a graduate from Eielson Higih of Fairbanks, Alaska. Her father is a T/Sgt. in the United States Air Force.

Mary Straight is the fiancee O·f Bill Everhart, who is also a sec-

Two elementary majors, Cindy Tomlins from Nebraska City and

MORGAN HALL By

Jean

Wewel

~!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!~ ·

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF

Bill Bowen --------------------------------------Co-editor Joan Bretthorst ---------------------------,,-------co~editor Nancy Jarvis ---------------------------Peri:onnel Manager Pat Venditte -----------------------------Business Manager Joan Bretthorst _____________________________ Layout Editor Dan Strecker __________________________________ Circulation Phil Dorssom __________________________ Campus to Campus Mary Lu Hicks ________________________________ Copy Editor Mary Budler ----------------------------------Copy Editor Jeatlj Wewel __________________________Morgan Hall Column Pat Venditte --------------------~-----Majors Hall Column Ralph Shaffer --------------'----------Delzell Hall Column Phyllis Groff _______________________ Campus School Column Ron Snodgrass ------------------------------Sports Column Walter Rimmer ______________________________ Photographer John Soby -------------------------------,--..:.:Photographer Edward LeTourneau _________________________ Photographer Phyllis Groff ________________________________ Photographer Bonnie Anderson _________________________________ Reporter Marilyn Bailie ___________________________________Reporter Al Blankenship -------------------------~--------Reporter Mike Castle ______________________________________Reporter Brian Collins _____________________________________Reporter Linda Coslett ------------------------------------Reporter Bernadine Fintel -------~------------------------.:Reporter Dennis Hubbard __________________________________Reporter Mary Inglis ______________________________________ Reporter Carleen Kreifels --------------------------------~Reporter Pat McKee _______________________________________ Reporter Wayne Miller -'------------------~--------------~-Reporter Mike Smagacz ----------------'------------------'--Reporter Pat Wheatley ------------------------~-----------Reporter Cheryl Winans ---------·-------------~-~-------~--Reporter

After ,the rest and relaxation of the semester break, the men of Delzell are back to the old grind of midnight hours, popcorn get-togethers, and a little studying for a sideline. Delzell suffered a slight loss when the number of dorm resi<lients dropped from 148 to 138 students at the beginning of second semester. Residents no longer have to make the long j·ourney to the store to spend their nickel& and dimes for candy since the welcomed addition of a candy machine in the lounge. Since new exit signs have been added, no one will now have rlmiculty finding his way out of the dorm. The dorm council held a meet.ing on Monday, Febr. 7, to discuss improvements on living conditions in the dorm. Plans were made to have a dorm party on Wednesday, Febr. 17, at 10:30 p.m. in the T.V. l6unge: · New residents were introduced d'uring the party. Quiet hours were discussed as an improvement for better studying conditfons.

MAJORS HALL BY PAT VENDITTE

At the beginning of the new semester, Majors Hall received 18 new dorm residents. Several boys have moved out for various reasons, leaving a total -Of 183 residents. Roger Capps, a dorm 'counselor, has left the dorm to prepare for student teaching, and Yours Truly has been pr-0moted to the job. The hot drink machine is gone. We hope its ailments can be repaired shortly. Jobs in the dorm are many, because f our boys have been released, leaving only three to carry on in their places. Even ·so, those left work for only one hour now, as compared with two hours before the "shake-up." Many newcomers have come and gone inquiring about the residential facilities here at Majors Hall for the fall term. Majors Hall served five 1ea de rs from the Campus Leadership Workshop this past weekend.

CAMPUS TO CAMPUS By Phil Dorssum

On the college scene at nearby -colleges we find Berry Hall at Wayne State recenUy playing host to a Zombie-A-Go-Go party. The Zombie-A-Go-Go party

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was actually a contest in which contestants from Berry Hall as well as other women's dormit-Ories took part. The lucky girl picked as winner of the contest became the Zombie-A-Go-Go Girl of 'Ilhe Year. To the south of us at the Washburn University in Topeka was celebrated the lOlst birthday of that institution on Febr. 6. The college has grown from a one-building school to a fifteenbuilding school on a campus of 160 acres. To the north of us, Midland Lutheran College of Nebraska was host to Dr. John G. Neihardrt, POE;t laureate of Nebraska. Dr. Neihardt spent two days lecturing on the •campus. As you may recall, Peru State was also host to Dr. Neihardt recently.

Dimes Crusade is that college bid for the top college contribu• tion of the nation. Highlighting these contribution efforts were an UMOC Dance, an Ugly Ma on Campus Contest, and a Beauty Queen Contest. More than 500 CMS students pledged ·their blood to U. S. servicemen stationed in Viet Nam. The S.G.A. sponsored this Red! Cross Blood Drive, held Febr. 8-9. A little farther from home at the Moorhead State College, Moorhead, Minn., things were really "swingin' " with the annual Snow Week celebrations Feb. 14-20. Events included two.. dances, a ski trip, a snow sculpturing contest, the crowning of the Snoweek king :and queen, and the abominable snow· man contest.

Students at the Creighton School of Pharmacy in Omaha donated 26 pints of blood f o r use by the U. S. Marine Corps. This fine gesture and blood donation program will now be on an annual basis.

Scheduled for Febr. 14, the Royal Winnipeg Ballet performed at Moorhead State; on Febr. 22, the Vienna Choir Boys will return to the campus.

To the east at Tarkio College, the results dealing with a vice survey conducted: last fall are coming in. The vice survey was carried out by the Tarkio Student Council. The Student Council sent 264 questionnaires to colleges throughout · 48 states. This survey dealt with rlirinking and smoking q,n and around the campuses involved. The survey was held primarily to find: out what steps have been taken by other colleges when dealing with outdated p o 1i c i es concerning drinking and smoking.

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Royalty -Photo by Special Services Queen Julie and King Jack.

-Photo by Walter Rimmer Sweetheart Attendants and Royalty-Nick Petrillo, Nancy Guilliatt, Dan Knudsen, Pat Wheatley, Queen Julie Harrison, King Jack Rinne, Ceci Evangelist, Gary Viterise, Mary Mowry and Larry Tate.

-Photo by Walter Rimmer Butch Gibson pins corsage on Jean WeweL -Photo by Walter Rimmer Joe Smith and Pat Knippelmier and Tim Gilligan and Cheryl Davis relax at dance.

-Photo by Walter Rimmer -Photo by Walter Rimmer

Dr. and Mrs. Darrell Wininger dancing.


Valentirie :Royalty 1

·The · Valemine royalty got away before our photographers could get their pictures, so the best we can do is bring you the following information on thein.

-vQUEEN JULIET HARRISON At 9:30 p.m. on Monday, February 14, 1966, Miss Juliet Marie Harrison was crowned Sweetheart Queen of the annual Valentine's Dance held at Peru State College. Juliet, known around the campus as "Julie," is the. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Harrison, Jr. of 673 Leslie Avenue; Wood River, Illinois. Announcements of the royalty were not officially · made until the evening of the dance. "It was really sweet,'' said Julie when she related the story of how she was personally taken into a conference room and: told that she was to receive the crown. The 5'5" brunette had been chosen as an attendant at both Valentine and May Fete dances in previous years, but she "just couldn't believe it" when the results of this year's voting were revealed. Julie is a sophomore majoring in physical education with biology as a related field. She is planning to teach high school physical education after h er graduation from college. When she was asked about her hobbies, Julie stated that swimming is her favorite, but she also enjoys horseback riding. Then with a smile she added, ''Studying in the library should be my hobby; I'm in ·there 24 hours a day." ····-·-····· ... - -

-v-

tion major with minors in language arts, fine arts, science, math, physical education, and English. She did her student teaching last semester in Bellevue. Her favorite ' hobbies are outdoor sports, music, art, and sewing. -vDAN· KNUDSEN Dan Knudsen, son of Mr. and Mrs. Keith Knudsen of Lincoln, Nebr., was one of the senior representatives at the Peru State St. Valentine's Day dance held' Febr. 14 at the school. Dan is married to the former Miss Ju:dzy- Johnson of Englewood, Colo., and is majoring in speech with English being his associated field. Dan is president of the LSA, vice-president of the Drama Club, vice-president of the English Club, editor of Sifting Sands, and: a member of the PSEA. Dan's hobbies include fishing and reading but a little more on his serious side is his interest in play writing. Last spring Dan wrote "Requiem on The Horn of The Moon" which was presented here. Dan also has an interest in acting and has appeared in s~v­ eral plays. -vCECILIA EVANGELIST The female attendant chosen by the Junior class for the 1966 Sweetheart Dance was Miss Cecilia Louise Evangelist, better known on campus as "Ceci." She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene J. Evangelist of ·213 Madison Street; Newark, New

KING JACK RINNE

York. Ceci is majoring in elementary Jack Rinne, son of Mr. and education, and she .would like-1o Mrs. Norman Rinne of Burchard, teach in the elementary ·grades Nebraska, was crowned Sweet- after graduation from college. heart King of the annual ValenShe says that for hobbiei, she tine dance. Jack is a senior ;it enjoys participating in almost Peru with a major in biology, any kind of sponts, but there is and a minor in general science. one hobby that she prefers to Jack's interests on campus are all others-eating pizza. so widely spread that he can be -vfound almost anywhere on cam~ .. . GARY V~'.fERISE pus from his job at Special SerGary Viterise was chosen by vices to the basketball court. the student body to represent Jack is an active member of the Junior class in the 1966 the S.G.A., Student C en t er Sweetheart Royalty. Gary, who Board, Blue Devils,. Kappa Del- is 23 years of age, lives in Newta Pi, and president of the Beta- ark, New York, and is the son Beta-Beta. of Mr. and Mrs. Dom Viterise. Jack will be graduating from "Vit," as he is often called by Peru State College at the end of his friend's,. is,, an elementary edthis semester. When asked what · ucation major ,vith minor fields his plans for the future were, in physical education, fine arts, Jack replied, "I plan on going . social science and industrial arts. on to graduate school, or posGary .participated in gymnassibly teaching. Right now I'm tics his freshman and sophomore not quite sure.'' years at Peru, until a back ''.·in~vjury forced him to retire from : PAT WHEATLEY the spont. '.Dhe 1966 Sweetheart Princess Gary's hobbies include sports, from the Senior class was Miss music, and art. Patricia Ann Wheatley, daughter -vof Mr. and Mrs. John E. WheatMARY MOWRY. ley of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. , Miss Mary Mowry, . daµghter Pat is an elementary , educa-i , · of Mr. ap.d M~r.lin A.' Mow-

M.rs,

Folk Singing Honors Victory

i ohnson did his

comedy version of "Who Needs Love." The group was completed 1by Dale Burgess, Dan Bolin, and Don Wilson, their guitar ac<:ompa.nfst.

There were many tears shed at the Bob-Inn Saturday night, Many of the songs were writFebruary 12, after Peru had just ten by Dale, who also played the cinched· the conference title. But guitar on several of the numbers. they were not for happiness as Several ,sqngs made group sirigyou might think. These were du,e . ii;ig possible, and encouraged; 'the completely t.o lau~hter. audience to participate. "My .Odd Girl," a take-off on ~'My, 01 d The Student Center Board seMan," brou~h:t ~anY ,• hU:mor()uS cur~ four young Peru State stlg{iesti~ns froin the audience. men to render their musital 'so~e of the. songs. performed abilities after the big game. The·. laughter ensued when Arnold by this folk group were: "The

ry of Beatrice, was elected Sophomore attendant for the Valentine Dance. Mary, an elementary education major, is active in many 1campus organizations including the. White , Angels, the Student Governing Association, and English Club.. She was a member .of the Homecomingroyalty andi also served as cheerleader for the .Bobcats.

-vLARRY TATE Larry Tate, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Tate of 1842 So. Washington; Wichita, Kansas, was the Sophomore male attendant at the Valentine's. Day dance. He is majoring in physical education with biology as .a supporting field. He is a member of the Blue Devils and P.S.E.A. DUring his hlgh school years in Ava, Missouri, he was All-Ozark halfback his senior year and was selected to the All-Conference football teamfor three years. His e:ictra-curricular activities at Peru include playing intramural sports and participating in athletic contests. He was a member of the 1964-65 Bobcats football team.

-vNANCY GUILLIATT Miss Nancy Jo Guilliatt, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dale Guilliatt of Auburn, Nebraska, was chosen as the 1966 Freshman Sweetheart attendant at the annual Valentine Dance. Nancy wore a stylish black crepe dress, accented with a Valentine corsage. The corsage and a Sweetheart pin were presented! as a gift in memory of this special event. Nancy's escort forthe evening was Nick, Petdllo. Nancy's major field of interest lies in elementary education. Along with this she has developed a taste for horseback riding, Honda riding, and other physical activities. Nancy has also taken a very active role in Freshman class activities and is now Freshman class secretary.

-vNICK PETRILLO Nick A. Petrillo, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Nick J. Petrillo, the son of Mr. and Mrs·. Nick J. Petrillo, was the Freshman male attendant for the 1966 Valentine's Day dance. His !home is 2201 Monroe; Granite City, ill. Nick is planning to major in elementary education but is undecided between geography or coaching interscholastic sports for his minor. He graduated from Ptather Junior High, where he lettered two years in football, wrestling, and baseball. High school days found Nick attending Granite City High School, where he earned two letters in baseball and three in football. During this time he also served three years in the Warriors. Morning's Misty," "Care," and "500 Miles.''

Student Teachers Hold Dinner Eighteen student ,teachers and two supervisors, Miss Ashley and Mrs. Adams,· attended the student teacher~' dillner held Thursday, Febr. 10 in the west dining ~oom at 5:30 p.m. After the dini;ier discussions of exi:)eriences andi evaluations ,were held.

Jim Levitt shot the above picture of Dan Knudsen, Marcy Anderson! and Elmer Nemec at the informal talent show and party held recently in Peru's, cify hall. Mr~ and Mrs. Dan Knudsen did most of the organizing of the event.

Knudsens Host Party Mr. ·and Mrs. i;>an Knudsen hosted a combi.nation variety show and party for 83 college students and faculty, on Friday, Febr. 4, at 7;30 p.m. in Peru's City Hall. There was popcorn galore and ptenty of Kool-aid to wash it down before the show.

The entertainment consisted of group singing, skits, humorous readings, solos, and harmonica and guitar playing. The entertainment was provided by college students and Mr. Nemec on his tuba. The master of ceremonies was Mr. James Levitt.

Peru Power Plant Will Be Sold

the publi~. The vote was 2,12-48 in favor of selling. Mayor Jack Mcintire said, "I was for it all the way. It w a s one of the best things th at could have happened to the

On Tuesday, Febr. 8, the citizens of Peru voted to sell their power plant to O.P.P.D. (Omaha Public Power District). The choice was either to sell or keep their power ,plant and retail to

town." This election makes it possible for both college and town to be

served by O.P.P.D.

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FRIDAYi FEBR. 18

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obcats Beat earney 77-70 The Bobcats remained on top f the Nebraska College Conferee with a dramatic 77-70 win er the Antelopes of Kearney br. 5 at Kearney. This was ru's first win on Kearney's me floor since 1962. Sparked by the uncanny shootof Dean Cain, Peru came m as many as seven points wn to tie the score 36-36 at the lf on a fielder by Cain with four seconds left. Kearney came back the second half and led 44-38 :before the obcats could get started. Be· hind the shooting of the Rinne :brothers, Mike Harmon, and Cain, Peru went ahead to stay with 16:10 left in the game. The Bobcats built up an eight-point lead before Kearney moved! back to narrow the margin to 69-71. A free throw by Harmon and a tip by Snodgrass put the game out of reach for Kearney. The scoring parade was led by Cain with 21, Bill Rinne with 18, and Jack Rinne and Harmon, who collected 12 each.

·1· ,. ., T 'k.e 'C · 1gers>1i.a .· a:t s.,:,, At Doane 79-70 The Doane Tigers severed Pe· ru State's six-game winning string with a 79-70 victory at Doane on Febr. 8. With both teams hampered by a soggy' floor, the first half wa~ nip ·and tuck all the way. · The Bobcats·. held ·a slim one,point lead at the half behind the sharp· shooting of Dean Cain and Ron Snodgrass. · The lea:di changed 10 times in the second half until Bill Buza of Doane broke a 67 "67 tie on a driving lay-in. Out in front by four with 2:32 remaining, Doane went into a stall which Peru found impossible to break. The Bobcats could garner only two points in the last 2:37 on a lay-' in by Bill Rinne with four seconds remaining. Ron Snodgrass led Peru with 19 points and was backed by Jack Rinne, who hit 16. The loss left Peru with an 11-6 record, with Chadron invading Bolx:at territory Febr. 11-12.

Intramural Tourney The intramural tourney is a double elimination which occurs in the first week in March. Nineteen teams are competing for the top eight places in the tournament. The team that is in the lead in the regular round robin schedule as of March 1 will be seeded Number 1. The Number 2 team will be seeded Number 2, etc.' The order of the finish in this tournament will deternii.ne the number of points each team will get toward the over-all intramural championship.

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Plans For Additional Dre,ssing Rooms Being Considered

SPORTS COLU'l4N By Ron Snodgrass

Preliminary plans for an addition of dressing rooms near the athletic field ·in the Oak Bowl Peru State College clinched area will be presented to the their first undisputed Nebraska governing board at its next College Conference basketball meeting on March 7. Fund\s for title since 1962 with a pair of this project were alloted by the victories over the Chadron State 1965 legislature in Peru's bienEagles last weekend. Friday niel building program. Space location sketches have beenprenight the Bobcats overcame a sented to the architect by Dr. late Eagle surge to pull out a 73-64 victory. Saturday night the Ervin Pitts, director of athletics, 'Cats made a sweep of it by and members of his staff. The pl-an envisions a large turning in an 84-68 rout. These varsity dressing room that will two wins, perhaps the finest of accommodate approximately 124 the season, gave Peru a perfect 6-0 conference record, compared players. There will also be a smaller dressing room for the with Chadron, at 1-3, Wayne at 3-3, Kearney with a 2-3 record, visiting teams, which will accommodate 40 players. Also to and Hastings in the cellar at 0-5. be included in the new structure Enroute to' its conference title will be shower and toilet areas, Peru has put four of its five training room, equipment room, starters in double figures for the storage areas, and ·an officials' season. Big Ron Snodgrass is dressing room. If preliminary plans are apleading the parad:e with 339 points for an average of 17.8 per proved by the board at the game, followed by Mike Harmon March meeting, final plans will with 336 and 17.7, Dean Cain be drawn up and submittedJ to with 261 and 13.7, and Jack Rin- bidders so that a construction ne with 191 points and a 10-point contract can be awarded at the average. Mike Harmon holds a April 11 meeting with complecomfortable lead in the rebound tion of the building scheduled department with 283 grabs, com- for August 1, 1966. pared with Snodgrass who has collected 159.

Peru's track team will hit the track for the first time this season in a triangular meet w it h Omaha University and Nebraska Wesleyan at Omaha. Heading the· thinclads will be Jim Hagemeier, Curtis Holliman, Tim l}endricks, Louis Fritz, Jim Watson and Jim O'Donoghue on the track an<l: Roy Windhorst, Low· ell Brown, Bill Witty, Arnold INTRAMURAL STANDINGS'°" Johnson, Dennis Tunks, Tom Hertz and Bruce Vickery in the Standings As Of Febr. 14 W9n, Lost field events. 1. Road Runners ---- 5 0 The Bocats' track schedule in2. Emperors -------- 4 0 cludes four indoor meets and 3. Showboats ------- 3 1 eleven outdoor outings. The slate 4. Louts ----------- 3 1 is: indoors, Febr. 18, Omaha Uni5. Misfits ----------- 3 1 versity, N. Wesleyan University, 6. Centennials ------ 3 2 and: Peru at Omaha University; 7. Warriors --------- 3 2 March 19, Kansas State Invita8. Kingmen -------- 3 2 tional at Manhattan; March 26, 9. Sixty Niners _____ 3 2 Federation Meet at Lincoln. The 10. Worcesterites ____ 2 2 outdoor season starts April 5 at 11. Studs ------------ 2 2 Northwest Missouri; continues 12. Beavers --------- 2 2 April 9, Bethel (Minn.) at Peru; 13. Rodents --------- 2 2 April 12, at Wayne; April 14, at 14. Vips ------------ 1 2 Washburn; April 21, Peru, Tar15. Octanubis ------- 1 3 kio at Northwest Missouri; April 16. Duds ------------' 1 3 23, at Nebraska Wesleyan Uni17. Playboys -------- 1 3 versity; April 26, at Doane; 18. Zephyrs --------- O 4 April 29-30, Drake Relays at 19. Mttstangs ---~---- O 5 Des Moines, Iowa; May 7, at Graceland (Iowa); Relays, ,May 10, at Omaha University; May 13-14, N.C.C. at Wayne.

Draft Status Of Peru Students Not Serious

Contrary to the common beliefs andi assumptions that have been floating around! lately, the draft status of those students now going to school is not as serious as one might think. On talking with F. H. Larson, registrar at Peru State, some· interesting facts were learned. According to Mr. Larson, only two of the new prospects were required to cancel second semester work because of draft obligations. Those who had gone to

school here .the previou$ setn~· ter were not at all affected. There have been some reports that grades would'il:J.ave some ef~ feet on· who ·is drafted and who is not. According to Mr. Larson, local boards have not written back to Peru for grade information, but some have written to findi the latest period of attendance of a few students. Mr. Larson said, "Students under Selective Service must be, enrolled in 12 hours, and ·at this time the students' scholastic average do not subject them to the draft." , As of this semest11r, there are 49 students on probation for the first time, 32 on continuing probation, and 15 new students on probation. There were 32 scholastic suspensions. Mr. Larson said, "Non-enrollees of the second semester were reported ·as such to their local boards." Mr. Larson went on to point out that there was a possibility of some students not even being affect~ by this. Such students would: include those over the age limit and those not physically fit.

Pelisek Releases Baseball Schedule Joe Pelisek, head baseball coach at Peru State College, Monday released ,the 1966 Peru State· baseball schedule. Pelisek, in his first year at Peru State after seven successful diamond campaigns at Monmouth (Ill.) College, will guide his Bobcats through an eleven da.te, ·22 game schedule, including four. hoine apearances and seven road . en• gagements. All dates are.dbubleheads. The schedule: April 1-at Creighton; April 2-J. F. Kennedy; April 6-at 'Northwest Mo.; April 9-at Wayne State; April 14-St. Benedict's; April 19..,.at Simpson; April 23 ~Ke a r n e y State; April 26-at HastingsCollege; May 3.-Chadron State at Broken Bow; May 9:.__at Concordia (tentative twin bill); May 11 .-Northwest Missouri State.

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As we go to press the only thing that is known about Coach · Joe Pelisek's baseball team is their schedule. The program includes 11 dates with 22 games, four tilts at home and seven away. The schedule is: April 1 at Creighton; April 2 at J. F. Kennedy; April 5 at Northwest Missouri; Aprfl 9 at Wayne State; April 14, St. Benedict's at Peru; April 19 at Simpson; April 23, Kearney at Peru; April 26 at Hastings; May 3, Chadron at Broken Bow; May 9 at Concordia; and May 11, Northwest Missouri State at Peru.

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.f ot Peru .Pta.yers erJy. "N"fght MU.st' Fall,"' Emlyn Wil. lia:l:ns' psychological drama, will be presented by the Peru Dramatic· Club, March 10, at 8 p.m. in the college auditorium. The play was fiist presented in London and enjoyed a long run ·on the Broadway stage. The Peru presentation will be under the direction of Robert D. Moore, head of the division of language arts. The cast includes: Neal Bower, Tenafly, N. J.; Myrene Hildebrand Davis, Denver; Marcie Anderson, Lincoln; Joan Bretthorst, Dunbar; William Bowen, Cheyenne, Wyo.; Dorothy Bock, Pawnee City; Barbara Gordon, Hamburg, Iowa; Don Dod·ge, Nebraska City; Dan Knudsen, Lincoln. Charles Williams, Beatrice, is student director.

Foundation Gives Three Scholarships

Meyers; Will Direct Institutional ·Studies Howard E .. Meyers Of Flagstaff, Ariz., has been named to the faculty of Peru State College as director o.f institutional studies and assistant professor of elementary education, effective February 15, according to Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of the college. Presently completing his doctoral studies in elementary education at Arizona State University, Tempe, Mr. Meyers holds an AB in elementary education and an MA in elementary curriculum from the University of Minnesota, and an Educational Specialist's degree in elementary education from Arizona State College, Flagstaff. Mr. Meyer was an elementary teacher in the Minnesota schools for nine years, a supervisor of elementary teachers at the University of Minnesota ·one year, and an elementary school principal in Flagstaff four years. He is married and has three school age daughters. The Meyers will· live in Faculty apartments BL

Three one hundred do 11 a r scholarships for the second semester have been awarded to residents of dormitories at Peru State College by the P er u The Silver Anniversary of the Achievement Foundation, according to John L. Lewis, Peru, Martha Washington Silver Tea, sponsored by the Home EconomFoundation president. Awatded as memorials to the ics Club, will be observed Tueslate Arthur C. Lindahl, '27, bur- day afternoon, Febr. 22. It will sar at Peru State from 1953 until be in the west dining room of 1959, the funds were. provided the Student' Center from three · ·.·.,from revenue received from the to five o'clock. The tea features a 35 pound Foundation's residence halls' soft :.drink vending machines. Mr. Lin- cake made from a recipe found dahl was a Fotindation trustee in a letter to Martha Washingfrom its organization in 1955 un- . ton from her granddaughter til his death, September 29. Martha Custis. Cakes made from The scholarship recipients, se- this recipe.have been served·anlected by the residence hall coun- nually since 1941, except for one cils include: Sally Kelly; Falls year during World War II when City, ·Eliza Morgan Women's sugar rationing made it imposHall; Lawrence Adam, Odell, sible. Delzell Hall; and C. Thomas RoThe pubiic is welcome ·to atsengren, 5364 North 27th Ave., tend. Omaha, Majors Hall.

Martha Washington Tea

DODGE TO MEETIN.G Dr. Galen Dodge, director of ·Guidance and Counseling, will represent Peru State College at a meeting in Lincoln, Nebraska, February 15, 1966. Discussions will be held on the continuity regarding the use of college aptitude tests given to high school seniors planning to attend college. Th'€ meetings will be in the· Beatrice Room of the Nebraska Center. SECOND SEMESTER ENROLLMENT DROPS Peru can no longer boast of the famous 1041 slogan. The annual mid-year drop has left Peru under the thousand mark once again. AccOJCddng to Special Services, the enrollment is as follows: freshmen 322; sophomores 183; juniors 1'59; seniors 186; and post graduates 10. This adds up to a final total of 861 daytime students. '11he number of evening students this semester is 101. The enrollment has usually dropped at the second semester so the drop is nothing new. The mid-year drop in 1963-64 was 3% and in 1963-64 it was 12%. There are many factors contributing to our drop this year with the main one being a graduating class of 50 students at mid-year.· OtheJCS are academic suspension, concern ·for the draft, lack·· of finances and a realization t h a t types of post-high school experiences other than college· .:tnay ·· prove to be more beneficial.

STUDENT WIVES MORRISON GUESTS Three representatives from the Peru Studep.t Wives were the gu!tsts at a Heart Fund Tea hosted by Governor and Mrs. Morrison at the Governor's Mansion in Lincoln, Nebraska, on Sunday, Febr. 6, 1966. The Student Wives who attendedi the tea were Janice Shuman, president; Jerri Liers, vice-president; June Evilsizer, and Mrs. Pat Cahill, Nemaha County Heart Fund Chairman. The purpose of the tea was to start the Nebraska state-wide drive for the Heart Fund, which will continue through the month of February. STUDENTS ATTEND FINE ARTS FESTIVAL Miss Bonnie Rutz, women's P.E. instructor and five students attended the Fine Arts Festival at Nebraska Wesleyan University in Lincoln on February 14. In the morning they attended the Modern Dance Convocation featuring Miss Margaret Mains, assistant professor and director of orchesis at the University of Wyoming. The afternoon's activities consisted of a Great Plains Dance Workshop with Miss Mains as the instructor. Particular emphasis was: placed on rhythmic factors, exploration of movement and qualities of movement leading to composition. The students accompanying Miss Rutz were: Bernadine Fintel, Nancy Schulenberg, Pat Wheatley, .Arlene Moss andi Diane Eltiste.

·Benson To-Discuss War In Viet Nam Bob Benson will speak. about the war in Viet Nam in ·the Fine Arts Building on March 7 at 7 :00 p.m. Mr. Benson has just returned from Viet Nam where he was on special assignment for the KOIL radiio station. Mr. Benson will tell about such things as the morale of the men, the food and the medical care that they receive, and the war itself. He will also give his views on whether the South Vietnamese are winning the war. During the second part of the program he will conduct a question and answer session. The Peru Historical Society and the Peru Geography Club are jointly responsible for securing this speaker.

SGA Plans Newspaper The Student Governing Association has decided to start publishing a bi-weekly newspaper. The paper will be called the Student Voice. Student Voice will be a take-off on the News Leiiers, published by the S.G.A. in 1963-64. The plans for the paper are .not completely finishedi y e t . However, if the plans continue as they now stand, the paper shall contain student and teacher editorials. The paper will provide a means for the student body to express their feelings about controversial subj e ct s . Student Voice will also contain editorials from anyone else who feels they have an article of interest to the students. The paper will also carry important events that take place around Peru. SENIOR PICTURES AVAILABLE Peru State senior pictures by Delma,r Studio are still available to those seniors wanting to purchase them. The pictures, retouched, are of good quality and sell at a reasonable price. The picture package includes an 8"x10" studio portrait in a folder. There are also two dozen billfold size pictures (31/4"x2%"). The student may buy the whole package for $9.50, or he may buy the billfold pictures for $3.50 per dozen. The billfold sizes will come in handy when making job applications. New faculty members are also eligible for the same offer. All pictures are finished, retouched prints, not proofs. If interested, see these pictures in Mr. Harold Johnson's office in the Campus School.

Polio Booster Clinic Here The. Nemaha County Hospital Ati.xiliary is sponsoring a booster c.linic for ·Oral polio vaccine March 5 from 9 a.m. to 151 p.m. Ori the college campus. Exact location will be announced later. If weather is bad, Maren 12 ·is set as an alternate .date. Everyone in Peru-townspeople, college personnel, college students, campus school students and parents-is. eligible to receive this vaccine at the college for a· charge of 75c per dose. If you choose, you may go to Auburn for this booster. (Please indicate this on registration card.) Charge for booster vaccine elsewhere than these clinics is $3. This recommended booster will contain all three types of polio vaccine. Anyone desiring . more information may call Dr. Krickbaum, 274-3125, or Mrs. Lloyd Hoffart, 274-3409 (both in Auburn).

Five Awarded Scholarships Five Peru State College students have been awarded $100 scholarships for the second semester by the Nebraska Congress of Parents and Teachers. The scholarships are awarded on the basis of scholarships, moral and social standards,. and aptitude for teaching. The schola,rship program is in its 21st year. The 1966 recipients at Peru State are: Mary Ellen Oestmann, Peru; Charlotte Hershberger, F a 11 s City; Dianne Morrison, Beatrice; Dav.id! Hensley, Loup City; Oren Bednar, Wymore.

Achievement Fund Awards Scholarship To Tom Rosengren

The Peru Achievement Foun dation Scholarship was awarde1 to Tom Rosengren of Omah! Nebr. Tom is the son of Mrs. C T. Rosengren, 5364 No. 27 Av< His major field of concentratiol is biology with general scienc as a supporting field. The one hundred dollar scholarship wa suported by the vending ma chines operated in Majors Hat Tom, selected by the dorm coun cil to receive the award, is : member of Alpha Mu Omegi vice-president of Tri-Beta, aru junior class representative to th Student Governing Associatio~ A letterman in track and cross country, Tom's hobbies includ1 officiating, intramurals, and at tending all athletic contests.

Student Center Board Plans Its Activities

The Student Center Boar1 plans to be quite active this se mester. After the completion o the patio on the south side of th1 Student Center, varied activitie are planned. These include pati1 parties and dances with livi combos entertaining. With the enlargement of thi Bobcat ;Bookstore, the telev:isio1 room was eliminated. The Boan hopes to find a new location f<i this in the future. May Fete is the main activitl of the year for the Board. Plan are not certain as of yet for thi event.

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Sophomores, Attention! During the junior and senior years, you can earn $40 a month while you learn and tram to prepare yourself for a commission as an ensign in the United States Nayy. If you are a 1college sophomore, it would pay you to investigate this brand-new program. For. more information about how you can serve your country while you serve yourself thru the NROTC Program, contact the Nayy Recruiting Station, Building 19, Fort Omaha, Nebraska 68111. Incidentally, while you're in the program, yQu.,,can't be drafted. If the idea appeals to you, hurry, applications' can only be taken until· May first.

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Heart Throb Dance Educators Met Here To Make Recommendations For Peru Graduate Work BY JEAN WEWEL

-Photo by Walter Rimmer This building isn't on the campus yet, but if will be in the near future. Thls is a scale model of Peru State's new $1.800,000 co-educational dorm complex. The building at the left is a dining hall. The rest of the buildings will be for living quarters.

Dean's Honor Roi I Thirteen students at Peru State College have been named: to the Dean's Honor Roll with high distinction for the first se'mester. Fifty-one additional students were named to the honor roll with distinction. The honors list indudes one · student, William W. Witty, Syracuse, .who received a perfect grade point average of 9.00' for the semester. Recognition of honor students will be made at an all-college ,convocation Wed'nesday, March 2.

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To be eligible for honors with high distinction, a student must have a grade point average of 8.00 or above, and from 7.25 to 7.99 to be eligible for distinction. Students receiving high distinction, in addition to Witty, include: Letha Bayes, Hastings, Iowa; Dorothy Bock, Pawnee City; Joan Bretthorst, Dunbar; Barbara Gordon, Hamburg, Iowa; Mary Hicks, Auburn; Mar y Jones, Nemaha; Larry Kuenning, Auburn; Norma Loew, Peru; Myra Murren, Elliott, Iowa; Mary Oestmann, Pe1i'1; Katherine Sh aw , Sabetha, Kansas; March Tinkham, Holmesville. Students receiving distinction include: Charles Adams, Greenwood; Devon Acdiams, Peru; Sheryl Barrett, Nebraska City; Rodger Bassett, Syracuse;. Gloria Bean, Council Bluffs, Iowa; Sharon Beatty, Peru; Oliver Bierman, Peru; Ronald Boerner, Nebraska City; John Bohaty, Lincoln; Ar. lene Borcher, Steinauer; Mary Bud:ler, Bradshaw; Ray Cain; Thurman, Iowa. ....., Karen Compton, Nemaha ; Elizabeth Cook, Sabetha, Kans.; Jeanne Cummins, Falls City; William DePetro, Omaha; Jean Egger, Douglas; Julia Emery, Nebraska City; Anne Epley, Peru; Louis Fritz, Verdon; Richard Hamer, Beatrice; Kathryn Harshbarger, Nebraska City; Glenda Hayes, Brownville; Carol Henderson, Brock; Kathleen Hennig, Omaha; David Hensley, Loup City. Mary Hunzeker, Humboldt; Nancy Jarvis, Peru; William Kerins, LaGrange, Ill.; Daniel Knudsen, Lincoln; Donna Kohrs, Johnson; Terry Kuenning, Auburn;· James Lyons, Gloucester, N. J.; Gary Madison, Omaha; Lola Morrissy, Peru; Michael McCormick, Nebraska City ; Elaine Neddenriep, Brock; Carol Nickels, Weeping Water; Joseph Oh, Sujedong, Korea; Kay Painter, Red Oak, Iowa; Lois Pietzyk, Elk Creek. Mary Sautter, Bellevue; Mary Schriner, Lincoln; William Shaw, Nebraska City; Marilyn Sugden, Adams; Michael Wallis, Bellevue; James Waltke, Beatrice; Kristine Wewel, Newport; Janice Wheeldon, Brownville; Jean Wilkinson, Humboldt; Richard Zaparanick, Westfield, New Jersey.

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An array ·of pink and red streamers caught at the center by a large red heart, accented by smaller hearts and: cupids about the room, made the setting for the "Heart Throb Dance", Monday night. The mood was created by the, sweeping music of the Dave Kavitch Combo. The highlight of the evening was the coronation of the 1966 king and queen, as announced by Mr. Sherwood. Jack Rinne, son of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Rinne of Burchard, Nebraska, reigned as king and Julie Harrison as queen. Julie is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William R. Harrison of Wood River, Illinois. She is a sophomore majoring in physical education. Jack is a. senior majoring in, biology and will student teach the last nine weeks of this semester. The attendants to the king and queen were: Dan Knudsen, Patricia Wheatley,. Gary Viterise, Ceci Evangelist, Larry Tate, Mary Mowry; Nick Petrillo, and Nancy Guilliatt. A variety of musical numbers made dancing a pleasurable festivity. The Student Center Board made this dance possible. Dr. and Mrs. Wininger, Dr. and Mrs. Boraas, and Mr. and Mrs. Sherwood chaperoned. Decorations were assembled by Lucy Sporer, Bob Garner, Bonnie Jacobson, Donna Wiley, Alice Massoth, Gloria Jackson, Mary Mowry, Twila Cloyd, Ann Wickham, Ed Harned, and: Bob Jones.

Leadership Workshop (Continued from page one) Tim Gilligan, Dan Knudsen, Mary Ellen Oestmann, Jack Rinne, Austin Van Pelt, and G. W. Dodge. Several people who had had experience with college students were available to discuss campus problems. Among these were Rev. Verlyn Parker, representing the Nebraska Council of Churches. Students partkipating in the workshop were selected on the basis of their leatlership in campus affairs.

P.S.C. On Television (Continued from page one) Sandburg," by Myrene Davis; . a demonstration on the new J. H. Kloke method of perspective drawing by Paul Stephenson; a medley of songs from "My Fair Lady" by a group from th~ college choir; an oboe solo, "Polovtsian Dance" from Prince Igor, by Mary Ellen Oestmann with an interpretive ballet by Patty Bindrum; a piano solo, "Preludes from Gershwin," 'by Bill Klabunde; and the "Hail Nero Triumphal March" from "Quo Vadis" by Peru State's brass choir. S.G.A. MOVIE '.Dhe S.G.A. sponsored two fulllength movies on February 6 and 13, 1966, in the Fine Arts Concert Hall. They were "Crooks Anonymous," a light-hearted tale of a reformation society for thieves, and "Houseboat" starring Sophia Loren. These were trial films to test the student body's reception of such planned campus entertainment. If it was considered well received, the S.G.A. will present other movies in the future including "The Misadventures of Merlin Jones" and "Hatari."

Eighty representatives from area public schools, the University of Nebraska and the State Department of Education met at Peru State College in mid January to make recommendations in regard to Peru State's proposed graduate program for classroom teachers at the elementary, junior high, and secondary levels, plus guidance and counseling personnel. The meeting was part of Peru State's institutional self-study in connection with requirements of

the North Central Association of colleges and: secondary schools for a graduate program at Nebraska's first college.

Twenty-five Peru Mid-Year Grads Now Teaching

sex, Iowa; Sharon Kay Bender, Milford, to Odell; Verona Borcher, Steinauer, to Tecumseh; Sarah Goodwin, Hiawatha, Kans., to Hamlin, Kans.; Marilyn Masters, Nebraska City, to Johnson; Marilyn Robertson, Dunlap, Iowa, to Bellevue; Barbara Thompson, Filley, to Tecumseh; Mark Zimmerman, Nemaha, to Auburn.

Twenty-five mid-year graduates of Peru State College have accepted teaching positions for the second semester, according to Harold W. Johnson, Director of Placement. Three others have accepted non-teaching posts; one has entered the Armed Forces; and one has entered graduate study. Those acx:epting teaching positions, their home towns, and teaching posts include: Secondary Education- D a 1e Cerny, Fairbury, to Council Bluffs, Iowa; Ron Wik.sell, 1023 South 41st, Omaha, to Omaha; James Snyder, Nebraska City, to Columbus; Cynthia Meier, Table Rock, to Jamestown, Kansas; Samuel Carneal, Nebraska City, to Hamburg, Iowa. Marilyn Gonnerman, Waco, to DeWitt; John Scharp, Atlantic, Iowa, to Oakland; Larry Hayes, Peru, to Pueblo, Colo.; Robert Jones, 5806 ·North 56, Omaha, to Tonganoxie, Kansas; Larry Lines, Villisca, Iowa, to Nebraska City. Harold Marshall, Cook, to Johnson; Paul Oliphant, Pacific Junction, Iowa, to Bellevue; James Sprague, 504 East Lake, South Lyon, Mich., to Tarkio, Mo.; Loren Penkava, Stella, to Omaha; Ronald Mustard, Auburn, to West Point; Jim Barnhart, Auburn, to Pawnee City; Milan Obrenovich, 504 West Liberty, South Lyon, Mich., to Novi, Michigan.

Area schools represented: Auburn, Beatrice, Falls City, Lincoln, Nebraska City, Omaha, Papillion, Syracuse, Tecumseh, Omaha Dist. 65, Peru Prep, Glenwood, Iowa, and Sidney, Iowa. Following a general meeting, the group divided into sessions accmxliing to the various levels of graduate work.

Non-Teiching PlacementsJoseph Wildinger, 267 Bowman Drive, Fairborn, Ohio, to Air force; Robert Leander, Peru, to Mutual of Omaha; Ray John~ son, Nemaha, to IBM, Minneapolis, Minn.; Henry Grace, 4510 South 61 Ave., Omaha, to Union Pacific, Omaha; Robert Hilt, Falls City, to graduate study, University of Nebraska.

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Complete Camera and Film Department RUSSELL STOVER CANDIES "PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY"


at 3:30 p.m; in Room 23 of Industrial Arts Building.

-oNEWMAN CLUB The Newman Club held first official meeting of tihe ond semester February 9 at Clara's church. The newly ele ed officers, Pat Thompson, pr ident; Mary Budler, vice-p dent; Jean Wilkinson, secret and Jarold Bartek, treasur outlined their plans for club a tivities this term. '.Dhe plans · elude more social functio money raising projects, and study course entitled "A.. Cath lic's Marriage Guide." Father Birkel, the club's spo sor, emphasized the· importan of the marriage course and urg all students to attend. The fir session will be held February 1 at 7:00 p.m. Pat Thompson and Jean Wil kinson volunteered to represe the Newman Club at the Cam pus Leadership Day on Febr. 12.

PAT KNIPPELMIER In Slacks

PAT KNIPPELMIER In Evening Dress

PAT KNIPPELMIER In Street Dress -Photos by J. D. Levitt

The above pies give some idea why Pat Knippelmier won the Best Dressed Girl contest sponsored by the Home Ee. Club. The ten national winners will get expense paid trips to New York from May 30 to June 11. Honorable mention winners will have their pictures in Glamour. Winners of the New York i'?ip will be dined at fashionable restaurants and taken to theatrical and cultural centers-also fashion shows.

Norma Diddel, Artist Peru Teacher Since '29 BY LOUIS ROGERS "When I was five years old," Miss Diddel remembered, "I did my first painting after class. That decided that,'' she said, and since then Norma Diddel's first love has always been art and painting. Professor Diddel started teaching at Peru in the fall of 1929, immediately after earning her BA at the University of Denver and MA at the Colorado State College of Education. However, teaching for her isn't a static matter, and her education didn't end with her last degree. She has done graduate work at Haryard University and Howard University and attended a workshop in graphic arts in Mexico. As an artist, she works primarily in watercolors, but has also d one work in graphic arts, prints, sculpture, etchings a111di lithographs. Miss Diddel has, in her own words, "exhibited many times • . . • . entering any and all exhibitions I was eligible for." Most recently she exhibited some watercolors at the Suirimer Festival in Central City, Colo:, and her work has won many honors for her. She was the only artist whOse watercolor was Chosen to be hung at the Governor's Exhibit i.J:i Omaha :filu'ee years ago. "I enjoy painting," she says. "To me it's an ·interesting and productive activity, and I enjoy the results." The fact that she

paints mostly landscapes may be symbolic, for she has traveled throughout the country, ·and for years was a member of the Colorado Mountain Climbing Club. "There hasn't been much of a change in teaching art courses," she thinks, "but the schools seem to have been over-influenced by the splash-dash type of painting -too little direction a111d! too much freedom. Students aren't well prepared; they can draw well, but can't make a picture come alive." Editor's Note: This is the first in a series of stories on faculty members with more than twenty years of service here.

CAMPUS SCHOOL NEWS By Phyllis Groff 'I1he Campus School has been very active these last two weeks with basketball games, dances, and ·Other activities. On Febr. 4, Peru Prep defeated Nemaha with a score of 48-44. The Nemaha Valley Conference Tournament began on Monday, Febr. 7. On Febr. 8, Peru Prep defeated Cook, 61-41; and on Fehr. lUhey defeated . Table Rock, 53-37, which left them third in the conference. On Fehr. 21, 22, 24, and 25 there will be a District Basketball Tournament at Johnson.

Last year winners attended "Y.outh Quake" in Roseland Dance Hall and were entertained by Sammy Davis Jr., Count Basie, The Supremes, Soupy Sales, and others. They also ap· peared on Match Game, NBC quiz show, saw "Hello Dolly," and visited night spots in Greenwich village. This year's win· ners will get similar entertainment.

Peru Prep will try its skills against Tecumseh for the first game. A dance sponsored by the seniors was heldi on Saturday, Fehr. 12, to celebrate St. Valentine's Day. The theme of the dance was "Sweethearts Forever." Cathy Pelisek, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Pelisek, was crowned queen and Bob Milstead, son of Mrs. Phyllis Milstead, was crowned king. Their attendants were as follows: juniors, Lois Lammle, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walt Lammle, and Ed Cox, son of Mr. and Mrs. Chalmers Cox; sophomores, Rosalee Goings, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Glade Goings, and Philip Lash, son of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Lash; and freshmen, Cheryl Groff, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph H. Groff, and Mike Adams, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ellis Adams. For the sixth consecutive year, the Peru Chapter of the FHA canvassed the city of Peru and the college ·campus for rt h e ''.March of Dimes." The members worked in groups of two or three, with each group volunteering for a certain section of town. All members recently met after school in the Home Economics Department with Mrs. Louise Kregel, club sponsor, for cocoa and cookies. This year the cookies were furnished by Mrs. Van Zant. After receiving the necessary equipment, the girls began their march. The Junior High has also been active. On Febr. 10, they were defeated in a basketball game by Johnson, 28-26. On Tuesdray,

Febr. 15, they matched their skills against Table Rock. They will compete in a tournament at Cook on Febr. 28 and March 1-3. Throughout the elementary grades excitement of St. Valentine's Day filled the air. Valentines and pictures of Abraham Lincoln and George Washington covered the walls in recognition of these important people and events. 11111111111uu111111111111111uun111111111u11111111111111111111111111

ORGANIZATIONS 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111un111

BUSINESS CLUB The Business Club met at 3:30 p.m. on Febr. 15 in the Industrial Arts Building. President Lyle Stewart called the meeting to order. During the course of the business meeting a discussion was held on the reconstruction of the constitution to the club. ·Allen Chandler, the appointed head of the constitution committee, is to investigate the plans of revision. The active officers for th i s year are: Lyle Stewart, president; Mary McVicker, vice-president; Sherry Schwiesow, 'secretary; and Allan Chandler, treasurer. One of their various projects this year is' to contact the new second! semester students, inform them about their club and invite those interested to join. To all interested in joining the Business Club, 'bhe present members would like you to consider this as your invitation. Their next meeting will be March 14

The Newmanites have re· sumed their meetings following a three week break. New officers installed Jan. 12, 1966, were Pat Thompson, president; Mary Budler, vice-president; Jeannie Wilkinson, secretary; and Jerry Bartek, treasurer. This is the first time in the history of the Newman Club that three girls have been elect-· ed to the high offices. '.Dhe New.man club held its initial second semester meeting Febr. 2. Easter plaµs were discussed as well as ideas for money raising projects. The Newmanites hope to develop interest in those Catholic students who have not attended ·the Newman club meetings regularly. Mike Wallace and Dave Kennedy are taking instructions every Wednesday at 4:(}{} p.m. Anyone interested in taking instructions, please contact one of the four officers. Weekly Mass is said at St. Clara's every Wedinesday at 6:30< p.m. with confessions one-half hour before Mass. The meeting is held immediately following Mass.

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Keep Our Campus Clean

The Voice of the Campus of aThousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU.NEBRASKA

Volume 61

Number 9

MARCH 7, 1966

Spring

Is Here

-Photo by Phyllis Groff Mrs. Ina Sproul. sponsor of the Martha Washington Tea, signs the guest list. At her left is Miss Edna Weare, guest of honor and originator of the tea. Grace Gook, freshman, is presiding over the guest list.

Martha Washington Tea Has Silver Anniversary Dan Knudsen, Barbara Gordon, Don ramatic Club's 1966 spring production.

'Night Must Fall" Scheduled or Thursday at 8:00 P. M. "Night Must Fall," a psychoogical drama by Emlyn Wiliams, will be presented Thursday, March 10, at S:OO p.m. in the college auditorium. The play will be presented by the Peru Dramatics Club, under the direction of Mr. R. D. Moore. "Night Must Fall" is a blood• curdler full of horror. It is the study of a· cold-blooded murder.

lay Is Advertised Advertisement for the AllSchool Play, to be presented March 10, is in full swing under the supervision of "Chic" Williams. "Chic" is the publicity ;manager and his assistants in•clude Nancy Larson, Jette A'porta, Mel Hester, Gene Fitzpatrick, Dick Berthold, and Phil Dorssom. The publicity committee has sent personal letters of invitation and complimentary tickets .to the drama coaches of 45 area Jiigh schools. This letter of invitation also presents the drama coaches with some idea of what the play is about. In addition, a poster advertis.ing the play and a picture of the east to be displayed at the school were sent, plus a letter to the students inviting them to the play and offering them a re·duced arlrmission price. Posters and pictures advertising the play are to be displayed on the college campus, and 76 ···handbill posters will be distributed in the surrounding communities. Several local radio stations will also advertise the play.

The play shows its audience a murderer at his murdering best and· certainly creates its share of shivers which are slightly coated with occasional humor:' Emlyn Williams knows how to frighten people and he does just that in "Night Must Fall." It is wholesale blood and horror and will more than be worth your while.

Peru State Band Presents Concert The Peru State College Wind Ensemble, under the direction of Gilbert Wilson, presented' a pretour concert for the student body and faculty on Wednesday, Febr. 23. The 42 piece ensemble presented the following selections: "Days of Glory" by John Cacavas; "Nordic Symphony" by Howard Hansen; "Ben Hur" by Miklos Rozsa; "Jim Dandies" by Harold Walters, a trumpet trio played by Dale Duensing, Ralph Shaffer and Bill Joiner; "The Sound of Music" by Rodgers and Hammerstein; "Exodus" by Earnest Gold; andi "Highlights of George Gershwin" Arr. by Paul Yoder. (Continued on page four)

Peru S.G.A. Schedules More Full Length Movies On February 27 the S.G.A. sponsored. its fourth full-length film, The Lisi of Adrian Messe11ger, in the Fine Arts Auditorium. It was an unusual murder mystery starring Tony Curtis, Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas, Frank Sinatra, and Robert Mitchum. The Ugly American, previously scheduled for Sunday, was not shown because of a shipping delay. (Continued on page four)

Honors Uonvo On March 2 in the college auditorium, President Neal S. Gamon conducted an honors convocation to recognize the outstanding achievements of some Peru students. The convocation was opened with "The Star Spangled Banner." Mr. Pilkington made the first presentation. Louis Fritz, Verdon, was name:di to the All-American Cross Country Team. President Gomon introduced the winners of the P.T.A. Scholarships for the second semester. They were: Oren Bednar, David Hensley, Dianne Morrison, Charlotte Nedrow, and Mary Ellen Oestmann. Peru's representatives for Who's Who in American Colleges and Universities were also announced. They were: Dorothy Bock, Anne Epley, Marilyn Gonnerman, Barbara Gordon, March Tinkham, Donna Van Buskirk, Oliver Bierman, Robert Hilt, John Rinne, and William Witty, Jr., all seniors. Students named to the Deq.n's honor rol\ with distinction for the first semester were recognized. They were: Charles Adams, Devon A:diams, Sheryl Barrett, Rodger Bassett, Gloria Bean, Sharon Beatty, Oliver Bierman, Ronald Boerner, John Bohaty, Arlene Borcher, Mary Budler, Ray Cain, Karen Compton, Elizabeth Cook, Jeanne Cummins, William D e P e t r o , Donna Donovan, Jean Egger, Julia Emery, Anne Epley, Louis Fritz, Richard Hamer, Kathryn Harshbarger, Glenda Hayes, Carol Henderson, Kathleen Hennig, David Hensley, Mary Hunzeker, Nancy Jarvis, William Kerins, Daniel Knudsen, Donna Kohrs, Terry Kuenning, James LyQns, Gary Madison, Lola Morrissy, Michael McCormick, Patricia McKee, Elaine Neddenriep, Carol Nickels, Joseph Oh, Kay Painter, Lois Pietzyk, Mary Sautter, Mary Schriner, William Shaw, Marilyn Sugden, Michael (Continued on page four)

On Febr. 22, the silver anniversary of the Martha Washington Silver Tea was observed in the Student Union. It was sponsored by the Home Economics Club. The practice originated from a 1940 trip several Peru coeds made to a home economics convention in the East.. During this trip, the girls visited Mount Vernon and copied a recipe, "How to Make a Great Cake." The recipe was found in a letter from Martha Custis to her grandmother, Martha Washington. It calls for five pounds of sugar and 40 eggs, among other ingredients. Cakes made from this recipe have been served annually for the tea since its beginning in 1941, except for one year during World War II. Miss Edna Weare, guest of

honor at the silver tea, was the sponsor of the first Martha Washington tea. She was also the home economics advisor the year the trip to the East was made. Each year the 35-pound cake has been rdecorated differently, and this year it was baked in the shape of a large open book. Ginnie Mullen and Mary Inglis decorated the cake with sugar bells, roses, and the inscription "Silver Anniversary." Janice Wheeldon, Arlene Borcher and Linda Rogers, dressed in colonial costumes, served at the tea table. Hostesses were Janice Johnson, Pam Bottomly, Marian Rex, Bobbi Armstrong and Linda Coslett. Seated at the guest book were Grace Cook and Barbara Brandt.

Home Court Wins In NAIA Play-offs Send 'Cats To K. C.

Peru evened District 11 playoffs with a 75-65 victory over Doane 'On March 1 after a loss to Doane at Crete. Loose ball handling and b a d passes hindered the Bobcats' showing in the first half. They left the court at the end of the first period trailing the Tigers 39-35. As the second half started the Doane Tigers hit two quick baskets to give them an eight-point lead. For the next five minutes the two teams exchanged baskets. Then with 8:00 minutes gone in the second half Peru started a comeback drive. Key baskets by Dean Cain and Mike Harmon with 9:00 minutes gone gave the Cats the lead, which they never lost. Peru's floor game in the second period had great importance in the victory. They made few mechanical errors during the last half. The Bobcats also played a tough defensive game after the intermission. Dean Cain lead the Peru scoring attack with 26. Harmon canned 21 points, and Ron Snodgrass added 15. Wayne Heine blocked five Tiger shots while playing a fine defensive game. Dennis Nelson of Doane took scoring honors with his 33 points.

Peru :State College basketball coach Jack Mcintire got an early birthday present as his Bobcats downed Doane College 8882 in the deciding game of the NAIA District 11 basketball playoffs, March 2. Mcintire, whose birthday falls on Monday, March 7, will take his cagers to the NAIA tournament in Kansas City, Mo., which starts March 7. Peru broke ahead early in the game on Dean Cain's free throw to break a 6-6 tie at the 2:57 mark and never trailed aft e r that. Mike Harmon with 17 points sparked Peru to a 47-37 halftime lead. Doane edged to within five points with 14.5'7 remaining on foe clock. Dean Cain sparked Peru ahead to safety with 10 straight ''Points from 10:39 to 7:21. Cain hit 16 points in the second half to gain top scoring honors with Mike Harmon at 24 points apiece. The losers' h i g h scorer was Dennis Nelson with 31 points. Peru out-rebounded the Tigers 55-40.


VANDALISM MUST STOP Recently, vandalism has appeared in the parking· iots at Peru State College. It is hoped that willful destruction or defacement of property will cease. Several students have reported gas stolen, beer bottles broken over their cars, aerials broken, hub caps kicked in, and tires slashed. These unlawful acts have been brought to the attention of President Neal S. Gomon, and plans are being made to stop vandalism. President Gomon has seen to it that more lighting will be provided in the parking lots, and that upon certain nights a policeman will patrol the parking lots throughout the night. Anyone seeing an act of vandalism should report the vandal to the college authorities immediately. President Gomon stated, "Any vandal caught will be fittingly punished." -By Walter Rimmer TO THE EDITOR OF THE PED I .was really disturbed when I read your editorial and the news item concerning the CAMPUS WORKSHOPS, lead by the Nebraska Council of Churches. I am sure that the college students are not familiar with the real purposes of the CAMPUS WORKSHOPS; therefore, I would like to acquaint them with the facts as received from a minister: These CAMPUS WORKSHOPS are intended to: 1. explore the Campus Ministry. 2. learn of Campus Ministry from other denominations. 3. listen to leaders who have ideas on Campus Ministry. The reports being spread on the Peru Campus are not in keeping with the above goals and would defeat the purpose for which the CAMPUS WORKSHOPS are intended. Any deviation from these goals has no place on this campus. If, however, these goals are followed on the Peru Campus, then I can see the future of· the CAMPUS WORKSHOPS. ...:..Frieda Rowoldt LET'S STOP LITTERING Littering is a subject overworked to the point that very often the intent is lost in the volume of material. On our own campus littering and its results are a constantly recurring problem. All too often the debris that students and others leave all over the grounds piles up and destroys the beauty of an otherwise beautiful campus. I realize that I run the risk of seeming like a preacher by bringing this subject up again, but if each of us would take the time to throw in the trashcan that cigarette, candy wrapper, or scrap paper, our campus could be a great deal cleaner, and a far more beautiful than it is. ...., Every time I see some litter around the dormitories, or any place else, I seriously wonder. why it has to happen. I realize that every one litters unconsciously at times, but if we could all stop and think for a minute before we throw away anything, we could certainly do something about the mess on our campus. Without demanding that anyone stop doing anything, I just hope that every one of us on this campus will decide that it's worth the effort to keep our campus clean. · -By Bill Bowen

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Bill Bowen --------------------------------------Co-editor Joan Bretthorst ----------------------------------Co-editor Nancy Jarvis ---------------------------Personnel Manager Pat Venditte -----------------------------Business Manager Joan Bretthorst _____________________________Layout Editor Dan Strecker ----------------------------------Circulation Phil. Dorssom __________________________ Campus to Campus Mary Lu Hicks --------------------------------Copy Editor Mary Budler ----------------------------------Copy Editor Jean Wewel __________________________Morgan Hall Column Pat Venditte --------------------------Majors Hall Column Ralph Shaffer ________________________Delzell Hall Column Phyllis Groff _______________________ Campus School Column Ron Snodgrass ______________________________ Sports Column Walter Rimmer ______________________________ Photograi;rher John Soby -----------------------------------Photographer Edward LeTourneau _________________________ Photographer Phyllis Groff ________________________________ Photographer Bonnie Anderson ---------------------------------Reporter Marilyn Bailie -----------------------------------Reporter Al Blankenship ----------------------------------Reporter Mike Castle --------------------------------------Reporter Brian Collins -------------------------------------Reporter Linda· Coslett ------------------------------------Reporter Bernadine Fintel ---------------------------------Reporter Dennis Hubbard ----------------------------------Reporter Mary Inglis --------------------------------------Reporter Carleen Kreifels ---------------------------------Reporter Pat :M:c!Cee ---------------------------------------Reporter Wayne Miller ------------------------------------Reporter :M:ike Smagacz ------------------------------------Reporter Pat Wheatley ------------------------------------Reporter Cheryl Winans -----------------------------------Reporter

MAJORS HALL By

Pat Venditte

The big week is finally here for the Peru basketballers. Five boys from :M:ajors making the journey to Doane are Bill and Jack Rinne, Bob Lovejoy, Leon Portray, and Bill Saunders. :M:any dorm residents have matle plans to make the trip to Doane. Mr. and Mrs. J. Monger came to Peru from Ava, Mo., to see their son Bart. Somehow, J i m Guilliat impressed Bart's parents, so he was invited out for dinner with the Monger family. Majors was very well represented in the musical tour to Iowa. Four members of our dorm are on. the Dean's honor roll. Included in the group are Bill DePetro, Dave Hensley, Mike Wallis, and Charles Adams. A coffee was held in the dorm lounge honoring our new substitute dorm mother, Mrs. Philips. :M:embers from the Administrative Department greet.ed Mrs . Philips. Ed Harned and! Steve Broderson were involved in separate car accidents during the weekend. We are hoping for a speedy recovery for these two boys.

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Spring fever has set in early now that the days are getting longer and vacation times are fewer and farther between. Some of the girls are rushing the season by taking hikes and· going on picnics. Others found enjoyment in flying a kite, which was nearly disastrous to Mr. Summers, who happene:dl by when they were in the process of getting it into flight. Besides a canasta craze among card sharps, everything has b e e n pretty much the same. A committee of three w a s formed by Barbara Gordon, Carolyn Price, and Bonnie Anderson to take suggestions on how the girls would like to spend the dorm money. So far the suggestions made were: to purchase a colored T.V. for the lounge; a water softener; or to build an enclosed patio with a barbecue pit on the south side of the dorm. This would also be ideal for sun bathers. Pat Knippelmier's fr i en 'd s helped her celebrate her birthday on Febr. 25 by taking her to supper at Fetty's in Nebraska City. Other birthday celebrants, some receiving dorm parties, were ~athy Black, Febr. 9; Pat Wheatley, Febr. 8; Lucy Sporer, Febr. 22, and Dawn Nebola, :M:arch 4. Every Saturday afternoon the Peru city hall is the setting for dance lessons given by Patty Bindrum. She gives two onehour lessons starting at 1 o'clock in the afternoon. She has a total enrollment of 26 children ranging from ages of two through 12. Janice Hauk, a former Peruvian, was a recent visitor at ·the dorm for a few days. Future plans will take her to Michigan, where she plans to finish he r college education.

Nebraska Cify Coca-Cola Bottling Company

DELZELL HALL By Ralph Shaffer

Delzell residents are to be congratulated on the active interest shown at the dorm meeting held on Wednesday, Febr. 23. Chairman of the meeting, Charlie Gordon, expressed! his thanks to all residents for airing their opinions and conducting a very orderly meeting on living conditions. The residents of Delzell have their share of troubles on th e highway. Bob Garner spent some time in the hospital as a result of a car accident, Febr. 27 near Peru. The dormitory is honored to have Lawrence Adams selected as the applicant to receive the 100 dollar scholarship for the 1965-66 school year. This dorm scholarship is to be used over a two semester period. Candidates for the scholarship must have an over-all 5.00 grade point average and be approved by the dormitory council and the achievement foundation. Lawrence was selected from nine other applicants.

CAMPUS TO CAMPUS By

Phil Dorssom

Recently at Chadron State College, representatives of the

U. S. Peace Corps were on pus to interview and talk interested students. These re sentatives had served with Corps in India and South Am ica. At Chadron State, as well at many area colleges, the s ond semester enrollment is 1 than that of the fall semester.· is assumed that at many c leges the draft forced stude into college last fall who di really want to be there, and a er the first semester, many these students left. At Wayne State in Way Nebr., on February 27, 28, :M:arch 1, "Carousel," the eel brated musical by Rodgers a Hammerstein, was presented the drama and music depa ments. Wayne State recently play host to two Peace Corps vol teers also. These volunte had served in Colombia, Sou America, and Guatemala; the purpose at Wayne was to rel experiences and enlighten pr spective volunteers about th Corps. Nebraska's lieutenant gover nor, Philip Sorensen, was a r cent guest of the Wayne Sta Young Democrats. Over 1,000 Central Misso State stu~nts have donat blood in support of U. S. Servi Men fighting in Southeast Asia Also at Central Missouri State on March 13, "King of the Road' Roger Miller and the Good! Tim Singers will appear. On Febr. 17, at nearby Tarki College, the Student Cente Board and the Student Counci presented the !Cingston Trio a two-hour concert.


Louis Fritz Makes ,Cats Second Place ·All-American Team In Oma ha Meet Louis Fritz, Peru's cross country ace from Verdon, was named Febr. 24 to the 1965 All-American NAIA cross country team. The All-American honors are the first for any Peru athlete since Bob Lade won Little AllAmerican football honors in the early 195-0's. "Lou" was selected on the basis of his brilliant 1965 season performance and his 14th place finish in the NAIA cross country meet in Omaha on November27. Fritz's high finish in the national meet helped Peru to third place in the national team standings. The Bobcat harrier consistently bettered existing Bobcat recordis during the 1965 season, lowering the school four mile course record to 20:17, 37 secondS off the fastest four mile record ever run by a Peruvian, and the old record was also held by Fritz. Fritz took 45 seconds off the Peru State three mile course record, breaking his own mark five times to move the mark from 16:06 to 15:21 during the course of the season. The Verdonite holds the Peru indoor mile record of 4:25.7 set last year.

Gals' Basketball ANovelty Here Wayne handed confere.nce champion Peru her s e c on d league loss on February 23 at Wayne. Back home a group of Omaha girls were dazzling the female sector of Peru on the basketball court. The girls from Omaha demonstrated fine ball handling and uncanny shooting eyes as they downed the Peruvians 51-22. '.Dhey play in a CYO League and call themselves the HasBeens. , Coach Tim Hanahan of the HasBeens said the girls played only in the league until this game. "They wanted this game as a warm-up for the AAU tournament," he sai:d.

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Since Nebraska high sCJhools are forbidden to participate in interscholastic basketball for girls, this game was quite an unusual sight for this area. The HasBeens held a slim 2113 lead the first half but exploded for 31 points the second half while Peru could manage only 9. Numerous steals, interceptions, and lack of experience proved to be the difference. Although the Peru girls had the height advantage, they couldn't control the boards. Sharon Brown, who attended Peru last semester, lea:dl the Omaha scoring. She received support from Kelly Grint and Mary Gehringer. Starters for Peru were Cirrol Chandler, Kathy Welsh, Nancy Muse, Myra Murren, Cherly Houseman, and Donita Speckman. Carol lead Peru in almost every .category as she showed both poise and experience. She also handled most of the scoring chores too.

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Miss Bonnie Rutz, who coaches the ·girls, said, "I think that they did very well in spite of their lack of experience." The girls will travel to Lincoln for a game against Doane Febr. 26.

Peru opened the Track campaign with a second place finish at Omaha Febr. 18. They lagged behind Omaha U. 62-551h while Nebr. Wesleyan scored only 331h. The meet went right 'Kiown to the wire to decide the victor. With only the mile relay remaining Peru trailed Omaha 57-551h. The Bobcats failed to score in the final event which proved the deciding the points. Things looked bright for the young tracksters who are lead by a relatively young group. All four places were garnered in the pole vault and the first three and a tie for fourth in the high jump. Freshmen proved to be the domineering factor in these t w o events. They accounted for five of the eight places in these. Louis Fritz scored the only first place for Peru on the track with his victory in the 1,000. The other scorers for Peru were: · MILE-Tim Hendricks 2, Louis Fritz 3. 60 YD. HIGH HURDLES-Bob Lovejoy 3. 60 YD. DASH-Curtis Holliman 2, Jim Hagemeier 4. 600-Roger Neujahr 3. 440-Jim Hagemeier 2. TWO·MILE-Jim Hentlricks 2, Jim Watson 3. 1,000-Louis Fritz 1. 880-Jim O'Donoghue 3. 60 LOWS-No place. MILE RELAY-No place. SHOT~Bruce Vickery 2. HIGH JUMP-Dennis Tunks 1, Arnold Johnston and Bob Love- . joy tie 2-3, Dennis Rinne tie 4. BROAD JUMP-Lowell Brown 3, Dennis Rinne 4. POLE VAULT-Arnold Johnston 1, Tom Hertz 2, LeRoy Arellano and Dwayne Brettman 3-4.

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Volleyball Pairings Are Announced Pairings for the twentieth annual High School Girls Volleyball Tournament at Peru State College March 14-16 will be announced next week, according to Miss Bonnie Rutz, tournament director and director of women's physical education. Twenty-one teams are entered. Table Rock High School's spikers will return to defend their 1965 title. Also competing will be runner-up Bratton Union of Humboldt, consolation winner Elmwood, and 4th place Avoca. Beginning on Monday at 9:30 a.m., two games will be playetl simultaneously throughout the day, with the last pair of opening round games scheduled for 8 p.m. At the ,conclusion of the first day, the field will be reduced to 16. Tuesday afternoon's games, beginning at 1 p.m., will determine the top eight teams, with quarter finals slated for 7 and 8 p.m. Wednesday afternoon semifinals are set for 3 and 4 p.m. These will be the first single games of the tournament. Consolation and championship games will be at 7 and 8 p.m., Wednesday. Teams entered include: Adams, Avoca, Bratton Union of Humboldt, Brock, Cook, Dawson-Verdon, Douglas, DeWitt, Elk Creek, Elmwood, Endicott, Gresham, Holmesville, Filley, Johnson, Lewiston, Louisville, Murdock, Nehawka, Peru Prep, Prague, Platteview of Springfield, Shubert, Stella, Syracuse, Steinauer, Table Rock, Talmage, Tobias, Walton, Weston.

Hastings Beat Peru 100-69

SPORTS COLUMN' By Ron Snodgrass

Undefeated in their first six ·conference contests·, the Bobcats found the going tough as they journeyed to Hastings and Wayne for their final regular season games. The Hastings Broncos handed Peru its ·first conference 1o s s with a 100-69 flogging Saturday, Febr. 19. Wayne State proceededto jump on the band wagon the following Wednesday, and handed the Bobcats a second conference loss, 97-87. The Bobcat track team nabbed a second\ place finish in its first indoor rr{eet of the year. The 'Cats accumulated 55% points compared to first place Omaha University, who had 62; and Nebraska Wesleyan, who finished a weak third with 331/2 points. LeaJd:ing point producers for Peru were Arnold Johnston wit.Ii seven and one-half counrters; followed by Louis Fritz and Tim Hendricks with six p o i n t s apiece. Meet Results (Peru) Mile run-2. Tim Hendricks; 3. Louis Fritz. 60 Yd. high hurdles-3. Bob Lovejoy. 60 Yd. dash-2. Curtis Holliman; 4. Jim Hagemeier. 440 Yd. dash-2. Jim Hagemeier. 880 Yd. run-3. Jim O'Donoghue. 1000 Yd. run-1. Louis Fritz. Two~mile run_;z. Tim Hendricks; 3. Jim Watson. 600 Yd. run-3. Roger Neujahr. Mile relay-3. Peru State. Shotput-2. Bruce Viiekery. High jump-1. Dennis Tunks; 2. (tie) Bob Lovejoy, and Arnold Johnston. Broad jump-3. Lowell Brown. Pole vault-1. Arnold Johnston; 2. Tom Hertz; 3. (tie) Leroy Arellano, Dwayne BreHmartn.

Hastings avenged an early season loss to :Peru Saturday, Febr. 19, by ma:riching past the newly crowned champs 100-69. T hi s proved the big upset of the week because Hastings had b e e n dwelling in the cellar of the conference with no wins in six starts. The Broncs' victory was the initial loss for ·the Bobcats in conference play this season. Hastings had the hot hand throughout the game and also dominated the board play. They hit exactly 50% of their floor shots. They were led by freshman Glen Mays and sophomore Dick Beck. Both of these bi g boys hit 27 points. Mays proved to be the big man on the boards as he continually got the good percentage shot with numerous rebounds and tip-ins. The Cats hit better than 40% of their shots but were not good under the boards. Their ineffectiveness was· partially due to losing Ron Snodgrass because of fouls with 15 minutes remaining in the game. Ron, who ha:d been the leading scorer, left with four points and four rebounds. Jack Rinne fouled out with 11 points to his credit, just seven minutes later. Peru was down 45-30 at halftime and couldn't regain the deficit even with the hot hand! of Mike Harmon. He was the bright spot in the Bobcat attack as he hit a torrid 67% the secondhalf. He finished the game as the lea~­ ing scorer with 31 points while hitting 11-20 from the floor. Mike also lead the Peru rebounders with 15 caroms. Wayne Heine added support with 11 points and nine rebounds. Both teams popped in 72 % from the line, but Peru was handicapped because they shot only half as many free thrqws as Hastings. The Broncs hit 2.6-36 while Peru hit 13-18. The defeat leaves Peru with a 6-1 record in the conference.

Doane Defeats Peru 73-62 At Crete

Junior High Beats Table Rock 37-18

Too short to look "Basketball Joe" in rthe eye, Doane was still able to bring the State N.C.C. powerhouse champs down to size Monday night, Febr. W, at Crete, Nebraska. Free throws and Doane's ability to break the Peru press helped cement a 7362 victory over Peru. Doane survived a rugged battle under the boards against the taller Bobcats·, and an enlightening performance by 6' 4" .center Alan Becher started the last half dash to victory. Becher poured in 30 points, all but 6 of lihem in the second half. Becher was enough to send the Tigers into an early secomli half lead of 49-41, and the Peruvians never caught up. Mike Harmon, Wayne Heine, and Ray Cain were the pointsetters for Peru. The trio scored all but 12 points in the first of a three-game series. Ron Snodgrass, Peru's 6'8" center, who was shackled by a cold shooting spell and foul trouble, ,gcored. only 6 points.

On Febr. 15 the Campus School Junior High Cubs defeated Table Rock 37-18. On March 1 the Cubs were victorious in their first game of the junior high tournament against Cook's "B" team. The final score was 55-5. Coach Pat Vendetti played all ten uniforme:dl players. Dennis Brady was high-point man with 12 points. Other Peru scorers were: Jimmy Beatty, 11 points; Rodney Groff, 8 points; Pat Tynon, 6 points; Darrell Wininger and Allen Blackwell, 5 points each; Keith Biere, 4 points; and David Lammle, Richard Cox, and Arnold Allgood, 2 points each. On March 3 they matched their skills in the finals of the tourney against Brock.

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Intramural Teams Are Now Seaded An intramural meeting was held Tuesday, March 1, to :see'd. those teams eligible for the d~­ ble elimination tourney. Seed.ed number 1 are tihe ~1'0t:S, number 2 are the Road Runners, number 3 are the Showboats, number 4 are the Rodents, ,number '5 are the StuKis, lfironiber 6 are the Kingmen, number 'l are the Worcesterites. The Misfits are seeded number 8 as a result of a drawing ·<'>f the four teams tied for this place. The other teams involved in the last place drawing were the Cen1ennials, Louts, and Sixty Niners. The tourney will be played according to intramural rules in the first two rounds. The remainder of the tourney w:ill follow high ,gchool rules with 2 16-minute halves. Each team will get three time-outs p er game.

Wildcats Scratch Peru Bobcats 97 ;g1 Wayne '°state College added'. a second blemish to Peru's N.'C!C. record with a 97-87 victory at Wayne, Febr. 23. Quick fielders by Mike Harmon andl Ron Snodgrass set Peru off to an early 9-point bulge, but the Wildcats mauled their way back to a 29-28 lead midway in the first half and went on to a 53-41 halftime advantage. The inspired Bobcats came -On strong in the second half and finally tied the score at 83-all on a fielder by Mike Harmon. The Wildcats then went back in front on a driving shot by Dean DeBuhr and were never threatened again. Big Mike Harmon ended the game with 36 counters; but ha:d to take a second in scoring honors ·to DeBuhr who tallied 37 for the victors. BOX SCORES Peru State (87) fg ft-fta pts Harmon ________ 15 36 6-7 Heine ---------- 4 0-0 8 Witty ---------- 0 0-0 0 Snodgrass ------ 8 2-5 18 Cain ----------- 5 4-6 14 Portrey -------- 0 2-2 2 2-2 J. Rinne ------- 2 6 B. Rinne ------- 1 3 1-1 Totals __________ 35 Wayne State (97) fg DeBuhr ________ 14 Neu brand ------ 4 Tewell --------- 1 Harkabus ------ 4 Hintz ---------- 3 Strathman ----- 4 Hope ----------- 6

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Peru Centennial Plans Under Way

The Peru Dramatic Club and its Director Mr. R. D. Moore present Emlyn Williams' "Night Must Fall" in the College Auditorium March 10, 1966 at 8:00 P. M. Peru Staie College students are invited to attend and will pay no admission. The cast of the play includes: Dan-Dan Knudsen Mrs. Bramson-Myrene Davis Olivia-Joan Breithorsf Hubert Laurie-Bill Bowen Director-Mr. R. D. Moore

Inspector Belsize-Don Dodge Mrs. Terence-Dorothy Bock Dora Parkoe-Barbara Gordon Nurse Libby-Marcie Anderson Ass't, Director-Chas. Williams

Dr. Gomon Attends Educational Meetings Dr. Neal S. Gomon, College President, returned to our campus Febr. 19 from a trip to New York, Atlantic City, and Chicago. Dr. and Mrs. Gomon left Monday evening, Febr. 7, for N e w York, where Dr. Gamon interviewed teacher candidates. He attended the annual American Association of School Administrators meeting in Atlantic City Febr. 12-16. They traveled on to Chicago to attend the American Association of Colleges f or Teacher Education Thursday and Friday the 17th and 18th.

History Scholarships .To Be Awarded The Peru Historical Society is receiving applications for scholarships to be awardecll to worthy history students for the second semester of this school year. Last year was the first time that such a scholarship was given. This year the membership has decided to double llhe scholarship. The Peru Historical Society plan to make this a regular part of their service to the school. One hundred dollars has been allocated for this scholarship fund to be granted either as two fifty dollar scholarships, or as

one seventy-five dollar scholarship and one twenty-five dollar scholarship, depemi!ing on the number and quality of the applicants. Preference will be given to the Peru Historical Society members. Successful candidates will not be chosen on .the basis of any single qualification. The basis for allocating these scholarships will include such considerations as need, merit, and contribution to the historical program at Peru. The scholarship committee requests that all interested persons make application. Those who wish an application form should contact Gary Still, Pamela Lett, Mr. Strom, or Dr. Schottenhamel. All applications should be submitted b e f or e March 10, 1966. ....,

Organizations Buy Flags And Standards For Fine Arts In January the Student Wives. bought an American flag and stand for use in the new auditorium in the Fine Arts Building. This was presentedi to Dr. Neal S. Gomon at a tea honoring the wives whose husbands were graduated at the end of the first semester. According to Bill Bowen, president of P.S.E.A., the P.S.E.A. will buy a Nebraska flag and stand for use in the Fine Arts Auditorium.

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(Continued from.page one) Wallis, James Waltke, Kristine Wewel, Janice Wheeldon, Jean The year 1967 will mark the Wilkinson, and Richard Zaparahundredth year of Peru State nick. These students had to have College. Much activity is under at least a 7.25 grade point avway in preparation for ,th i s erage. Thirteen outstanid[ng students event, beginning next fall. The various organizations and clubs were recognized for attaining an are asked to participate in this 8.00 grade point average and theme throughout the year. Ac- meriting high distinction on the tivities are to be posted on the Dean's honor roll. They were: Letha Bayes, Dorothy Bock, Joschool calendar. The following is a tentative an Bretthorst, Barbara Gordon, schedule, which may be sub- Mary Hicks, Mary Jones, Larry Kuenning, Norma Loew, Myra ject to change. In September the opening con- Murren, Mary Oestmann, Katili.vocation will feature a Nebraska erine Shaw, March Tinkham, speaker or an alumnus. The fac- and William· Witty.. The convocation closed with ulty will be introduced anrdl a formal announcement of the cen- the singing of the college color tennial year will be made by song. President Gomon. The theme for October will be Peru State Band Nebraskaland. The program will be a salute to Nebraska. A guest Presents Concert (Continued from page one) speaker will tell of Nebraska's Students participating in the history, including colored slides. The Homecoming convocation concert were: Pegeen Swisegood, will be scheduled for Friday, Ross Oestmann, Judith Focken, October 21, in order that a re- Dale Duensing, Jody Heather, turning Peru graduate may be Bruce Cotton, Mary Blezek, Gary Neumann, Barbara Mosley, Bill the speaker. In November, the theme will Joiner, Kay Painter, Ralph Shafbe Peru History. A committee fer, Rogine Bang, Charles Wellheaded by Robert M. Henry will ensiek, Myrene Davis, Adrian present an illustrated narrative Bartek, Mary Oestmann, Bill of the history of Peru State Col- Carlson, Patricia Corrigan, Jim Johnson, Julia Emery, William lege. The Thanksgiving convocation Ricketts, Donita Speckmann, Bill will be "Faith of Our Fathers." Uhri, Dawn Nebola, Jim Butts, The campus religious groups will Gloria Walker, Richard Shelton, arrange for this convocation pri- Marlyce Fletcher, Gary Ahlin, William Massie, Ross McCall, or to Thanksgiving recess. Christmas, the theme of the James Baker, Mike McNealy, December convocations will be J arold Bartek, Tom Osborne, arranged by the music andi dra- Duane Bloss, Steven Brodersen, Ronald Dobson, John Vandermatic departments. "Our Folk Heritage" will be ford, Bob Patterson, and Robert the theme in January. A pro- Hunzeker. gram is planned including national backgrounds, native song, and dance. The Dana College Danish folk dance group may participate in this convocation. Entry materials for the eighth For February, the theme will be Nebraska Folklore, arranged annual Peru State College Interby the speech and English de- scholastic contest scheduled for partments. E. C. Beck and Mrs. Friday, March 2,5, have b e en Beck, who were enthusiastically mailed to area schools. The Division A contest was received at previous convocations, are recommended to speak. won last year by Falls City for "Nebraska's First Residents" foe fifth consecutive year, while will be a program of Indian Lourdes Central of Nebraska 1dancers from Macy and perhaps City won the Division B trophy -the fourth for the school. an Indian chief. In March, one convo will pre- S0hools above 150 enrollment sent Midwest art. This program are Division A and below are Diwill be arranged by the art de- vision B. In the Peru State Interscholaspartment with a speaker and an exhibit. The English department tic contest, tests are given in 24 will be in charge of a program areas, with points awarded the top five students and certificates concerning Nebraska writers. The Easter convocation in Ap- to the top three students. Diviril will be arranged by the mu- sion A schools may enter t w o sic department. A discussfon of students in each event, while DiWilla Cather will be presented vision B schools may enter only by Mildred Bennet of RedCloud. one. The examination areas include: The month of May will be devoted to Nebraska, Peru,'. and the Algebra II, Advanced MathematFuture. Presi'<l'ent Gomon will ics, American Government, Amselect a speaker for this occasion. erican History, Biology, Chemistry, English Usage, French, GeOther features for the centenometry, German, Health, Home nial will be publication highEconomics, Industrial Arts, Latlights of this theme. The Peru in, Literature, Music, Physics, Stater and the Pedagogian will Shorthand I, Shorthand II, Spellfeature special articles of historing, Typing I, Typing II, World ical nature, and The Peruvian History and Spanish. · will devote a section to the history of the college. Everyone is asked to cooperate in the planning of the centennial activities to make this a memorable occasion to be enjoyed by everyone. Dinners • Short Orders

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Peru S.G.A. Schedules ' Full Length Movies (Continued from page one) Student attendance of these' movies has been increasing weekly. Encouraged by this, the S.G.A. has sheduled the following movies: March March March March April

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Benson Speaks Here Tonight On Viet Nam Tonight at 7:00 p.m., Bob Benson will speak on Viet Nam in the auditorium of the Fine Arts Building. He has just returned from Viet Nam where he was on special assignment for the KOIL radio station. Mr. Benson will divide his talk into two parts. During the first hour of the program, he will speak about the condition ofthe men in Viet Nam. He will also give his views as to whether we are winning or losing the war. To conclude the program, Mr. Benson will answer any questions the audience might have about the situation in Viet Nam. Everyone on campus is invited to attend this event.

Bowen And Larson Seek State Offices In Student Ed. Assn. -Photo by Special Services Miss Edna Weare came fo Peru Staie College as one of fhe Home Economics instructors in fhe fall of 1929 and continued until her refiremeni in 1957. At this time, she was replaced by one of her first Peru students, Mrs. Louise Kregel. Mrs. Kregel (left) is shown with Miss Weare. guest of honor and originator of the Martha Washington Tea. This was the silver anniversary of :the :tea.

.Dean Melvin, Faculty ·. Attend Ed. Meetings Dr. Keith L. Melvin, dean of the college; Dr. Lloyd B. Kite, director of student teaching; Dr. Darrell Wininger, head of Division. of Education; and Mr. Van · Zant, director of Campus Sohool, attended conventions held at the Conrad-Hilton Hotel, Chicago, Illinois. Dean Melvin had three conferences with Dr. Elmer Clare, Dean of College Education at Southern Illinois University and North Central consultant to Peru State College, and two conferences with Dr. Richard Davis, the assistant executive secretary of the NCA. These conferences · were held in connection with the Self Study for graduate program. The association of State Colleges and and Universities held its convention Febr. 14-16, 1966. Dean Melvin attended seven sessions covering such areas as the future of federal legislation affecting state colleges and universities, new approaches to federal support for state colleges, techniques for seeking federal research and teaching funds, the Interstate Compact and its implications for public higher education, the future of state budgeting procedures for public higher education, challenges to change and the future of the Association of State Colleges and Universities. The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Edtucation held its eighteenth annual meeting Febr. 16-19, 1966. Dean Mel-

vin and Dr. Wininger attended this convention. They sat in on lectures covering leadership for intellectual freedom in higher education, and the Higher Education Act of 1965, and lisitened to addresses given by Evan R. Collins, President of AACTE; Edwin P. Adkins, AACTE consultant of federal legislation, and Rona~dl Moskowitz, associate 4,irector. Dr. Wininger also attended the National Society of College Teachers of Education where the speaker of interest was Dr. Elmer Clark. Mr. Van Zant attended the Laboratory SchOol Administrators Association conference held Febr. 15-16, 1966. He sat in on four general sessions which proved to be both interesting and educational. Dr. Kite attended >the Association for Student Teaching convention held Febr. 16-19, 1966. Dr. Don Damies, Executive Secretary of the National Commission on Teacher Education and Professional Standardls, Washington, D. C., pointed out the changed conditions under which we work in teacher education. He spoke of the new Militancy of Teacher Organization pertaining to teacher salary, extra duties having to do with student teachers, etc., the entrance of business corporations in the field of education, the Civil Rights movement, the need for teachers who are specializing in one .field, and the massed participation of the federal government in public high :ichool affairs.

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The Student Education Association of Nebraska will convene on March 18-19 at Hastings College in Hastings, Nebraska. Of special interest to Peru students will be the election of officers to SEAN. Peru has two candidates seeking office. Bill Bowen is a candidate for State Vice President and Nancy Larson is seeking the office of State Secretary. Peru at present has one officer in SEAN, Dorothy Bock, the State Pres~dtent. She will preside over this year's meeting. The convention will make a study of Teacher Education and Professional Stanqards. Emphasis will be put ·on the professional rights and responsibilities of teachers. The aim of this study is to give prospective teachers a better und€rstanding of what is expected of them in teaching. Lawrence Lemons, State Chairman of TEPS, will be the speaker for this study. In addition, speeches will be given by Eugene Geisler, a member of the Professional Rights and Responsibilities Commission and by Jack Allen, Student National Education Association, Vice President. Mr. Allen's speech will be given at the Saturday luncheon.

Mr. R. D. Moore Reminisces:· About HOid Times" At Peru BY MARY ANN SHARP In the four yearn that we attend Peru, we become well acquainted with the campus, the students, and the educational program. But we .do not always take the opportunity to know our faculty and how much a pa.rt they are of Peru itself and its interesting past. Now head of the division of Language Arts, R. D. Moore has seen much of Peru's development and has played an important part in it. He began his own education in Hanna, Oklahoma, and attended a campus school at East Central St. College in Ada. When seventeen, he taught in a rural school, but went on to attain his bachelor of arts and bachelor of science degrees. Later he acquired his masters degree in philosophy from the University of Wisconsin. After holding several positions in Oklahoma and Kansas, he signed a contract with Peru in 1937. He noted that during the early 1940's very few students attended Peru. because of the war. During this time, the college offered courses for training in flying, and an air strip was built down along the river bottoms. When the Missouri threatened to overflow its banks and ruin the strip, the people of Peru, along with students and faculty, worked to sand bag the levies and save the land. For man y years after that an "Old Man River Days" was celebrated to commemorate the saving of much farm land and the ties between the town of Peru and its college. Mr. Moore rel?-ted that the first student activity center was in the basement of the Avenue Store. It was named "Bob Cat Den" where the bobcat you find today in the Student Center trophy case was kept caged. The cat was fed "steak compared to our hamburgers" and taken to all games and outside activities on a leash. Later a "College Shop" was also opened in a house right off campus, serving meals and cold

drinks. If rightly recalled, the young caterer's name was Jack Mcintire, who seems still to be around here somewhere also. Most of his work is spent with coaching now, however, unless he still cooks meals in the 1-0cker room. Many experiences such as these all make up a part of Peru's past and the things Mr. Moore has witnessed here. Twice Mr. Moore left Peru to instruct in other states, but he returned because of what Peru had come to mean to him. Th e years he has lived here he considers worthwhile and satisfying. Peru State's graduates can be found all over the United States, and his personal contact w i t h many of those graduates he believes to be one of the most rewarding aspects of teaching.. Mr. Moore has seen hundreds of men and women enter the field of teaching and many who have found success. It is with the instruction and guidance of faculty as devoted as he that we too hope for success and as much satisfaction from teaching as he has<'gained. He is one of the faculty who have helped to make Peru what it is. Editor's Note: This is fhe second of a series of four features on faculty members with over fwenfy years service here.

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Achievement Foundation Gives Three Scholarships Beginning this semester, the Achievement Foundation is making $100 scholarships available to those living in the dorms. The money for these scholarships is take~ out of the proceeds from the vendor machines placed within the residential halls. The recipients of these scholarships are selected by the dorm councils. The two most outstanding qualifications one. must have to be chosen are to be fair scholars, and to be good housekeepers. First to receive these scholarships are Sally Kelly, Morgan Hall; Lawrence Adam, Delzell Hall; and Tom Rosengren, Majors Hall. They are free to use this money in any way towards their schooling. It is the future hope of the Achievement Foundation to be able io give at least three of these scholarships to each dormitory.

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Peru Represented At Kappa Delta Pi Houston Convocation Kristine Wewel and! Nancy • Larson represented the Peru State College chapter of Kappa Delta'Pi at the national honorary :··. education fraternity's biennial convocation in Houston, Texas, Febr. 23-26. Kristine, a senior in mathematics and president of the 13eta Mu cllapter, was the official delegate, and Nancy, a junior in elementary education, was alternate. They were accompanied by Miss Alma Ashley, associate professor of elementary education, chapter counselor. During their four-day stay in Texas, the trio took part in the general sessions held to discuss education. These sessions were divided into various groups which talked about different topics in education. Included in their business meetings were the election and: installation of their officers. A few highlights of their trip were: a boat rrdie up the dhannel, where they viewed the San Jacinto Battleground; the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo; and the convocation banquet featuring the annual lecture given by Mrs. Anna L. R o s e Hawkes. Over 400 people were present for the convocation, 200 of them students. They were representatives of colleges from all over the United States.

Jarvis Attends Meeting On Febr. 21, Mr. Dee V. Jarvis represented Peru State College at a meeting in Lincoln concerning 'OJriver education. Mr. Alexander, director of drivers education, conducted this meeting. The purpose was to summarize recommendations from previous local conferences. These improvements and recommendations will be turned in to the State Department of Education. They are concerned with the preparation of driver education teachers. Another meeting is tentatively set for March 18.

Band Tours Four Iowa High Schools '.Dhe Peru State Concert Wind Ensemble, under the direction of Gilbert Wilson, ended a two-day tour of four Iowa high schools, Friday, Febr. 25. The selections presented on the tour were: "Days of Glory" by John Cacavas; "Nordic Symphony" by Howard Hansen; "Ben Hur" by Miklos Rozsa; "Jim Dandies" by

Marold Walters, which .was a trumpet trio played by Dale Duensing, Ralph Shaffer, and Bill Joiner; "The Sound of Music" by Rodgers anidl Hammerstein; "Exodus" by Earnest 'Gold; "Highlights of George Gel'Shwin" Arr. by Paul Yoder; "Concerto Grosso" by J·ohn Morrissey; and "Storm King," a march by Walter Finlayson. '!1he four host schools were Villisca, Menlo, Corning, and Malvern, Iowa. The wind ensemble members· were overnight guests in private homes in Menlo.

Nutrition Class Visits St. Mary's Fourteen students from the nutrition and dietetics class and Mrs. Kregel, class instructor, witnessed a basal metabolism test given Wednestl!ay, Febr. 23, at St. Mary's hospital in Nebraska City. Students visited some labs and were free to tour the labs and ask questions. Later the dass was taken on ·a short tour of the hospital. The tour included a v1sit to the emergency room, the .chapel, and the nur·sery. llUlllllUllllUllllllJlllUlllllllllllllllUUllllllllllllUllUl111111

ORGANIZATIONS 1111111111111111uu1111111u11111111u111111111u1111111unu111111111

STUDENT WIVE;S The Student Wives Club met Wednesday, March 2., at 7:30 for their regular meeting. They had a pot luck supper on Sunday, March 6, at 5:30 in the Campus School cafeteria. A Heam Fund Drive was just finished, and it was a great success. The club is a1so planning to buy a plaque for the flag they purchasea...,t'or the Fine Arts Auditorium on Jan. 16. -oP.S.:E:.A. On Febr. 23, 1966, Bill Bowen, P.S.E.A. presi:dent, called the meeting to order. The business part of the meeting was taken care of immediately. The theme of the evening's program was a panel about student teaching experiences. The panel consisted of Ron Peterson, Anne Epley, Jim Carlile, Paul Stevenson, and panel chairman Dick Dobbs. The purpose of this discussion was to have these individuals tell of the various teaching experiences they had. This gave the student teachers of the present semester a chance to find out what to expect, and to ask about things they had on their minds. P.S.E.A. also decided , at the Febr. 22 meeting to buy th e stand for the Nebraska flag in the new Fine Arts Buil:d~ng.

ALPHA MU OME!GA 'Six new membe11s were initiated into Alpha Mu Omega at the Febr. 24 meeting held in the Science Building, room 104. The new initiates were: Don Shaw, Kathleen Copas, Sam Smith, Larry Duda, Mike Wallis and Bob Vogt. To become eligible for membership, a freshman must be carrying a 7.0 average in the field of math. A 5 average is required for all upper classmen. The applicant must be either majoring or minoring in the field of math. -oP.S.E.A. The Peru Student Education Association met for a regular meeting on Monday, Febr. 21 at 7:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts Auditorium. A short business meeting was held to discuss plans for sending 15 delegates to the state spring SEAN ·convention to be held in ' Hastings, Nebr., on March 18, and 19. The two candidates for state office are Bill Bowen for vice presid1ent and: Nancy Larson for secretary. Tim Gilligan, the vice president, introduced the guest speakers for the evening. They were Jim Carlile, Anne Epley, Paul Stevenson, and Ron Peterson, who pre3ented a panel discussion narrated by Dick Dobbs. The students related the trials, tribulations, and triumphs they encountered during their student teaching. Anne Epley and Jim Carlile both did their student teaching in Vhe elementary field. Paul Stevenson taugiht industrial arts in senior high and Ron Peterson taught physical education in the senior high. -0-

NEWMAN CLUB The Newman Club met February 23 at 7:00 in St. Clara's Catholic Church. Pat Thompson, president, called the meeting to order. The minutes of the last meeting were , read: and approved, and the treasurer reported on club funds. The main ddscussion concerned the revision of the constitution. A rough draft of the revised :form was approved unanimously by the members present. The meeting was adjourned.

Campus To Campus During the first part ·of February at Tarkio, an entire week was designated as "T w r i P Week." The "Twrip Week" highlight was the annual 'Sadie Hawkins dance. During "T w rip Week" the girls asked the guys out and paid the costs of the dates.

THE AVENUE STORE

ser. On; Febr.' 2ll, thre~. sefif Bob Milstead, Bob Mull , and Gregg Vaughn-spoke Peru State English m class on problems of s teaching and other items.

CAMPUS SCHOOL NEWS By Phyllis Groff February saw the end of Peru Prep's basketball season. On Febr. 18, they defeated E 1k Creek 85-57; and Febr. 19, they defeated Humboldt 61-60. With the whole school cheering them on to a victory, the team won second in the District Tournament. On Febr. 22, they defeated Tecumseh 64-55; Febr. 24 they defeated HumboMt 48-46; and 'OU Febr. 2'5, they played in the finals against Pawnee City. Peru was defeated 67-5·2. Peru's high-point man in the tournament was Ed Cox with 62 points. Members of the varsity s q u a d were: Ed Cox, Rex Beatty, Danny Collins, Steve Stemper, Marty Henne, Bruce Henning, and Bob Mullendore. Prep's seasonal record: was· 11 wins-10 losses.

There is a poet in the ele tary grades. Jimmy Adams, of Mr. and Mrs. Robert A of Peru, was recently nof that he had won an award f the "Jack and Jill" magazin children's publication. A t grader at Peru Campus S last year, his dass was assi a project in creative writing, original poem related to A ham Lincoln. Mrs. Rose Be of Auburn was supervisor charge. Jimmy's poem was selected be forwarded to uhe magaz' and it was accepted for publ' tion in the February issue. nine-year-old received a cita certificate from "Jack and Jil

On the volleyball score board, Peru played Elk Creek, Febr. 18, with Elk Creek winning the first two of the three games played. On March 1, they were defeated by Table Rock in the Volleyball Tournament heldi at Cook. On Saturday, Febr. 26, Mrs. Gergen, assistant professor of English, took nine high school juniors and! nine seniors to Lincoln for a demonstration of teaching proje~t English-an integration of language, composition, and literature-before a meeting of Nebraska Council of Teachers of English. Each class gave two demonstrations. The Juniors based their d:emonstrations on Billy Budd, and the Seniors based theirs on The Faerie Queene by Edmund Spen-

His poem: Abraham Lincoln Abe Lincoln was a very fall man, He was honest and: straight for this great land. He led us in the right way fa en. We remember him as a wonderful man.

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The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . .

Class Friday

Invitational Track Meet April 1, 2 Entry materials are coming in for the second annual Peru State College high school invitational track meet to be held on the Peru State oval, April 1 and 2. The invitational, inaugurat~d in 1964, was 'cancelled last year because of snow and cold weather. This year's meet, unlike its predecessor, will be divided into competition in three divisions instead of two. Schools with male enrollment from 1-60 will compete in class C, from 61-149 in class B, and 150-up in class A. In 1964's two class meet, Omaha Bens·on cap• tured the A title and Sabetha, Kans., the B championship as 51 schools from four states battled in that one-day event. Winner's of this year's three classes will receive trophies the day of their participation. Class B and C events are slated for Friday, April 1, and class A ·competition will be on Saturday, April 2. Preliminary events will start at 9:30 a.m., and finals are set for 1:30 p.m. each day, according to Jack Mcintire, meet director and head track coach at Peru State College. Any schools who would like to participa:te, but who have not received entry materials, are invited to contact Coach Mcintire at Peru State College.

Peruvian Staff Met Final Deadline Mar. 11 The final two deadlines of the 1965-66 Peruvian were met by the second semester yearbook staff on February 21 and March 11, completing the final section of the regular yearbook. The two final parts of the book included pages 89 to 128. The staff, headed by hard-working Editor Dick Berthold, has been working on the final part of the yearbook since the beginning of the second semester. This firni,l section of the yearbook completes the yearly calendar of events to the present time. Basketball, Valentine's Day, Best-dressed Girl, and several other areas of coverage are the subject matter of this part of the book. A supplement to the yearbook is now being assembled fo r printing. It will cover the final activities of the school year, including baseball, track, May Fete, and Commencement. Supplements will be delivered during the summer. The second semester staff under Dick Berthold, editor, includes Sharon Beatty and Bill Bowen as co-editors, Leona Masters, Mary Budler, and Janice Wheeldon as layout editors, Stan Johnson, Mike ' Smagacz, and Pat Venditte as sports editors, anid Ginnie Mullen, Linda Armstrong, Louise Barelos, Bobbie Armstrong, and Bonnie Anderson as proofreaders. The 1966 Peruvians will be distributed on the campus in May.

Peru Pedagogian PERU. NEBRASKA

Volume 61

Number 10

MARCH 21, 1966

NCC Champs NAIA District Champs

. -Photo by Special. Services Coach Jack Mcintire, Leon Porirey, Bill Rinne, Bill Saunders, Wayne Heine, Dean Cain, Bob Lovejoy. Mike Harmon. Ron Snodgrass, Jack Rinne, Bill Wiiiy.

Selective Service Testing On Campus

Speech Contest

Approximately 180 high school Peru State College will be a students from 16 schools were testing center for the Selective entered in the speech contest Service College Qualification here on March 18. Mr. R. D. Test to be given April 18, accord- Moore was the contest director. Registration in the lobby of ing to Dr. Harold Boraas, de~ the Fine Arts Building was from of students at Peru State. Applications for the tests are 8:30 until S:OO a.m. Following available to college students at registration, there was a general the Selective Service 1o ca 1 meeting of the participants in boards throughout Nebraska, Lt. the auditorium of the Fine Arts General Guy N. Henninger, Building. Immediately after the State Director, has announced. general meeting, the events beApplications must be postmarked< gan. Because results were not availno later than midnight, Wednesable at the deadline, the Ped day, March 27. Seven other Nebraska colleges also will be test- will list them in the next issue. ing centers. Scores made ·on the test will provide local boards with evidence of aptitude for continued Area schools participatedi in undergraduate and g r a du at e study. Scores will not of them- the district journalism contest of selves d~termine eligibility for the Nebraska High School Press deferment, but are consideredi Association at Peru State Colwith other information by the lege, Saturday, March 19. Coboards in determining whether sponsored by the University of to defer individual registrants Nebraska School of Journalism, for further study. Local boards tests covered 10 areas. The contestants registered at will furnish information about the test for any eligible student. 9:30 a.m. at the Peru State StuTo be eligible to take the test, dent Center and! met for a genthe applicant must be satisfac- eral session at 10 a.m. The tests torily pursuing a full-time col- included: news writing, sports lege course, undergraduate or writing, editorial writing, copygraduate, leading to a degree. He reading, editing and headline need not be a student of a four- writing; yearbook copyreading year college, but his entire and editing; yearbook layout; course of study must be satis- newspaper layout; advertising; factory for transfer of credits to ra:dio newswriting and announca degree-granting institution. ing. The applicant must be a SelecMrs. Lois Berger, Nebraska tive Service registrant who in- City j-ournalism instructor, was tends to seek deferment as a contest director, and Don Carlile, student. He can take the t e s t director of special services at Peru State, distrkt contest cenonly once. ter chairman. Results were not available when the the Pedi deadline came.

Journalism Contest

Pep Band At Kansas City

The Peru State College P e P Band, under the direction of Gilbert Wilson, went to Kansas City, Mo., to support the Bobcat basketball team on Monday, March 7, at the NAIA basketball tournament.

The band chartered a Greyhoundl Sceni-cruiser which left Peru Monday morning at 9 a.m., and arrived: in Kansas City at 12:30 p.m. The band played before and during the game.

S.G.A. Candidates Present Platforms Candidates for the offices of S.G.A. president and vice-president were introduced by Gary Vlterise, present S.G.A. vicepresident, at the convocation held March 9. He also gave some qualifications for each candidate. Tom Rosengren, presidential candidate, and his running mate, Pat Venditte, were the first speakers. They indicated improvement in the areas of student indifference, student-faculty-administration communications, and inadequate social activities as the basis for their platform. Ron Kroll, presidential candidate, andi Jetta a'Porta were introduced as the opposing contenders for the ·offices. They listed a six-point improvement program: expansion of the S.G.A.; student violations; college centennial; recreation; relations between stu~Ients and the S.G.A.; and Student Voice freedom.

Gomon Takes Cruise . President Neal S. Gomon attended a ·civilian orientation cruise March 8-10. Forty-five men from Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, and Colorado took part in this program held at Pensacola, Florida. The purpose of this program was to acquaint these people with the educational training program of naval aviation. The group started at the naval air station in Olathe, Kans., where they received a briefing on the reserve program. They were then flown to Pensacola, Fla. The afternoon of the first day was spent observing the educational program for pre-flight students, ·officer candid:ates and support groups. In the evening briefings and demonstrations (Continued on page two)

Enjoy

Your Weekend

AReviewer's View Of "Night Must Fall" BY DOUG ANDERSON Thursday evening, March 10, the Peru Dramatic Club presented the Emlyn Williams :play "Night Must Fall." The cast of the play was obviously suffering from some opening night jitters and dosing night nostalgia. This is always the problem of one-night stands. It is unfortunate that the show was done in the British dialect of the shires rather than in standard British diction. I detected Cockney, Yorkshire, and Lancastershire dialects in the Nebraska ·cast. The ability to hear (even the best Rex Harrison standard British diction) with the acoustical conditions of THAT auditorium is next to impossible. Why !didn't they put a ceiling on the set? Our midwestern ears are not attuned to rural England speech; therefore much of the play was lost. However, the real and only valid gauge of a play's success is, "Did the audience enjoy it?" Here I must say, "Yea, yea!" The pacing was superb and the suspense builds were masterful. Sitting in front of me were two young ladies who were really carried away by the suspense. One suddenly moved, the other screamed, and then the first one jumped and screamed. I wonder if they also shared the same Alka-Seltzer tablet? DAN KNUDSEN, as Dan, was excellent. Particularly impressive was his ability to stay in character all the time. He displayed the required quality of a truly fine actor, spontaneity. Even though he had: been over the lines and action many times, his timing and reactions were as if he had heard it for the first time. A "well done," Dan. DOROTHY BOCK and BARBARA GORDON (note-alphabetical order) as cook and maid did a fine job of scene-stealing. Professor Moore may not approve, but I was delighted by the little extras added by these girls to their parts. Even though I had trouble understanding them, little was lost because they acted out their parts. BILL BOWEN, as Hubert Laurie, did such a steady job that one might almost forget that he was around. This is exactly what Hubert is, always around, but not remembered. Bill acted this part so well that I almost forgot him. MYRENE DAVIS, as Mrs. Bramson, was a bit too drab for my liking. To me, Mrs. Bramson is a more vivacious old bat (woman) than Mrs. Davis played her. Her dress was too dull and: her character, while strong, was not domineering enough. However, as the play progressed, things got better. Her scene with Dan (just before her demise) was well done. Mrs. B. is a tough part! What with that darn wheelchair to contend with, not only because you sit in it, but also because of the terrific jams and fender-benders with furniture, it is an awkward prop. I (Continued on page two)


MORGAN HALL By Jean Wewel

-Phofo by Rimmer Bill Bowen, Dorothy Bock, Barbara Gordon, and Joan Breft. horst just before they gof caughf snooping in "Night Must Fall/'

CAMPUS TO CAMPUS By Phil Dorssom

'Soldier-author Robin Moore, of "Green Berets" fame, lee· tured recently at the French Memorial Chapel at Hastings. Mr. Moore, author of the best seller The Green Berets, spoke on the "Three Faces of Subversion," and was sponsored by the Cultural Life Committee. March 15-19 was designated as "Twrip Week" at Hastings. The coeds at Hastings assumed the role reserved for the men on campus and: were obliged to carry books, open doors, drive the car, pay for dates, and! walk dates home if necessary. Moliere's "The Imaginary Invalid," slated for performance on March 11 and 12, was to be presented by the Hastings Thespians. During the first part in March, "Medea," under the direction of• Dr. John Kirk, opened at Kearney State. The 1966 baseball campaign is under way for the Chadron State College squad. The team

has a 24-game slate, with 48 participants trying out. Early in January, the Coed Dorm at Chadron State emptied during a night fire scare. The fire wasn't as serious as imagined at first, and: was the result of steam escaping from an over-heated steam boiler. The majority of the girls stepped from the dorm into the 25-degree temperature rather scantilly dad. To t;h.e northwest of us, at Midland Lutheran College in Fremont, Nebr., 37 Midland seniors and special students are practice teaching at nine Fremont area schools. At 6:30 on Febr. 14, the theme was "Goodbye, Craig" for 24 McCook college girls dressed in black. The 24 girls staged a funeral for Craig G. Fish, the pet goldfish of two Brooks Ha 11 coeds. CORRECTION In the March 7 edition 'Gr the Pedagogian it was stated t h a t "Chic" Williams was the . advertising manager for the AllSchool Play which was presented March _10. This is incorrect. The advertising manager w a s Gene Fitzpatrick, with "Chlc" Williams being the assistant director.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF

Bill Bowen --------------------------------------Co-editor Joan Bretthorst ----------------------------------Co-editor Nancy Jarvis ---------------------------Personnel Manager Pat Venditte -----------------------------Business Manager Joan Bretthorst -----------------------------Layout Editor Dan Strecker ----------------------------------Circulation Phil Dorssom --------------------------Campus to Campus Mary Lu Hicks -----------------------'---------Copy Editor Mary Budler ----------------------------------Copy Editor Jean Wewel __________________________ Morgan Hall Column Pat Venditte --------------------------Majors Hall Column Ralph Shaffer ________________________Delzell Hall Column Phyllis Groff -----------------------Campus School Column Ron Snodgrass ------------------------------Sports Column Walter Rimmer ------------------------------Photographer John Soby -----------------------------------Photographer Edward LeTourneau -------------------------Photographer Phyllis Groff --------------------------------Photographer Bonnie Anderson ---------------------------------Reporter Marilyn Bailie -----------------------------------Reporter Al Blankenship ----------------------------------Reporter Mike Castle --------------------------------------Reporter Brian Collins -------------------------------------Reporter Linda Coslett ------------------------------------Reporter Bernadine Fintel ---------------------------------Reporter Dennis Hubbard ----------------------------------Reporter Mary Inglis --------------------------------~-----Reporter Carleen Kreifels ---------------------------------Reporter Pat McKee ---------------------------------------Reporter Wayne Miller ------------------------------------Reporter Mike Smagacz ------------------------------------Reporter Pat Wheatley ------------·------------------------Reporter Cheryl Winans ... .: _________ .________________________ Reporter Jliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii--iiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii~

The N.A.I.A. tournaments attracted many Bobcat boosters. The big motto in the dorm was, "Kansas City or Bust!" Many of the girls made it . to the big game but the latter part of their motto also seemed to come true when they returned back to campus broke. Maggie Slayter was the hostess of a shower given for Brenda McCarthy March 12 . in Lincoln, at the Cornhusker Hotel. Anita Cox received a shower given by Marge Chilvers. Anita is gettmg married March 20 to Bill Heineman, also a student at Peru. Girls· anno.uncing their engagements are: Teri Kisby to Nick Steen, a Peru senior; Grace Cook to Terry Adams, a freshman at Maryville; and Cheryl Houseman to Lee Hoffman of Lyndenville, New York. Cheryl is planning a June wedding. It is good to have hot water again. The new coil for the hot water heater was almost given up for lost. With washing hours back to normal, things aren't quite so hectic. A candy vending machine was recently installed: in the dorm. We are hoping for more vending machines in the future. Ginny Grossman has set her wedding date for April 16. She will be the bride of John Riley. I had recently reported it as a March wedding andi would like to correct this error. Birthday celebrants th is month are: Jane Webb, 31st; Jean Wilkinson, 6th; G 1or i a Bean, 21st; Sue Kenworthy, 13th; and Bonnie Anderson, 28th.

Gomon Takes Cruise (Continued from page one) were given by the naval aero· space medical team. The second day was spent aboard the. U. S. Lexington. They observed operations of all departments and the qualifying operations of carrier landing by propellor aircrafts, jets, and helicopters. In the evening they attended a reception and a banquet at the officers' dub. The third day was given to a tour of the naval base and followed by their return to Olathe, Kansas.

A Reviewer's View Of "Night Must Fall"

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MARCIE ANDERSON, as Nurse Libby, had about as steady a British accent as anyone. When she slowed her rate of wo~ds it was excellent. I really enjoyed the play. Hope you did, too. By the way, what was that "before the play" bit? I could neither see him nor understand him. Editor's Note: Mr. Doug Anderson, a resident ·of Lincoln and father of Marcia Anderson of Peru State, has had experience as a director of plays.

MAJORS

HALL By Pat Vendiffe

Spring has sprung. Many dorm (Continued from page one) residents are enjoying the early know that Mrs. Davis has more arrival of spring. For some it talent than she displayed Thurs- means competitive sports and day night. for others just fun in tlle sun. JOAN BRETTHORST, .as Oli- A few residents enjoyed themvia, did a very fine job as "plain selves this weekend by having Jane." She was almost too me- a picnk. chanical an actress. Olivia, even This school year brought . the a plain Jane Olivia, should be ·engagement of four Majors resiwarmer and :display more femi- dents: Larry Sheehan and Sandy nine wiles (a natural female Jameson, Dave Hensley and characteristic) as she worked Nancy Vanderbeek, Nick Steen Danny over the rails from hate and Teri Kisby, Dave Kennedy to pity to love. The transitions to Bernie Brinkeman. were too abrupt. I'm sure that Many fine c<!l'mments have been tomorrow's performance, if received from the residents conthere had been one, would have cerning the movies presented by smoothed out this problem. DON DODGE, as Inspector the S.G.A. on Sunday nights. Belsize, thank goodness didn't There were three Majors resiplay it like a Brooklyn cop! He dents running for the office of did a good restrained rendition president and vice president of of a Scotland Yard man, which the S.G.A.: Ron Kroll, Tom Rois exactly what the part calls for. sengren and Pat Venditte. .

DELZELL HALL By Ralph Shaffer

Many loyal Delzell Bobe boosters attended the NAIA ketball tournament in Kans City, Mo. Dean Cain, dormpre ident, was the high point m for the Bobcats. Congratulatio Dean, from all the dorm! Mrs. Phillips from Aub Nebraska, is the new relief do mother. She is in Delzell fo days each month. Mrs. Philli also alternates with the - d-Or mothers from Majors Hall an Eliza Morgan Hall. Good luck t Mrs. Phillips. The dormitory council held a. regular meeting on Tuesday, March 15, to discuss various problems in the dorm. Dr. Dodge was the guest of the dorm resi· dents at a meeting held on Wednesday, March 16. At this meeting a Sociometric Examinatio · was given to all members of the dorm. ·

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;Hagemeier, Holliman 'Shine At Kearney A record-breaking perform· ance by Jim Hagemeier in the 440 and a win by Curtis Holliman in the 75 nailed down 10 of Peru's 23 points in the Kearney State College Invitational track and field meet on March 5. Hagemeier traveled a r o u n d the 220 oval twice to the tune of a :50.5 docking to knock two and three-tenths seconds off the old Peru State indoor mark set by Roger Crook last year. Holliman, a junior, sped through the 75-yard dash to turn in a :7 .8 clocking and a second Bobcat win. The Bobcats' other 13 points were garnered by Tim 'Hendricks, with a second place finish in the mile and a third in the two-mile, and by Louis Fritz, wrth a third in the mile, and two fourth-place finishes in the mile and two-mile relay events.

Harmon All-Conference Leading Peru State in both rebounding and scoring, Mike Harmon earned his second berth on the NCC all-conference team. The bruising rebounder blazed Peru's trail to Kansas City's NAIA tourney. Mike led the conference in rebounding with 14.8 retrieves per game and also ranked third in scoring with 183 points. He and Wayne State ace Dean DeBuhr are the only repeat selections on the mythical "5." In his three year career Mike has garnered 975 caroms and harvested 1270 points. This included 36 against a tough Wayne State team. Three other members of the NAIA championship team received recognition for conference honors although they didn't get enough votes for the first team. They are sharp-shooter Dean Cain, junior Ron Snodgrass, and senior playmaker, Jack Rinne.

Morris Harvey Beats Peru In Overtime Morris Harvey College o f Charleston, W. Va., canned 19 points in an overtime period to eliminate Peru State College from her record:-breaking thirteenth NAIA Basketball Tournament appearance Monday afternoon, March 7. It was a tip-in by Wayne Heine, with 11 seconds left on the dock, and an 18-foot jumper by Mike Harmon with one second left that sent the thrilling game into an overtime. With Peru trailing by as much as 37-25 with 5:17 left in the first half, Jack Rinne, who got 16 of his 20 points in the first half, inspired the Bobcats to surge back to trail 45-49 at halftime. Taking advantage of most of Peru's 20 turnovers, the Golden Eagles from Morris Harvey went into an 83-81 lead with 5:23 left in the game. Ken Minor scored to give Morris Harvey a 91-87 advantage with 24 seconds left. The tip-in by Heine and jumper by Harmon then sent the game into an extra period. Dean Cain, Ron Snodlgrass, and Jack Rinne led the Bobcats wrth 28, 23, and 20 points respectively. Roger Hart and Gerry Martin led Morris Harvey's attack with 31 points apiece.

sixth place in all-time scoring wi:th 1,053 points, ended! the season with 421 points and a 16.8 per game average. Bill Rinne, playing the sparkplug role throughout the year, finished: with 108 points, b u t gave promise of a good year ahead with his tremendous clutch play. The Bobcat baseball team will take foe field for the first time April 1, in. a double header at Creighton. Coach Pelisek'sstickers will be led by lettermen Gary Young, Allan Sullivan, and Steve Pattison, with Ray Cain, Jim Taglehutter, and Laverne Jensen handling most of the hurling chores.

SPORTS COLUMN By Ron Snodgrass

Seniors Mike Harmon, Jack Rinne, and Bill Witty bowed out of illustrious basketball careers and freshman Wayne Heine gave glimpses of great things to come as the Peru State Bobcats wound up their 1965-66 season with a 15-10 recor.d. Harmon moved into second place in ·career scoring with a total of 1,270 points, and, although there are not complete The Bobcat thinclads w i 11 records, probably set a career travel to Manhattan, Kansas, rebounding record with 979 March 19 for the Kansas State Invitational after two secondcaroms. Jack Rinne bows out of the place finishes thus far this year cage picture after a four-year -one in a triangular at Omaha career in which he played 90 University, and the other in the games and gathered 648 points Kearney State Invitational at Kearney. for a 7.2 average. Bill Witty, who played· in spots this year, leaves after a four-year, 91-game career, with 596 total points. As a freshman, Heine scored 227 points and grabbed! 168 reBARBER SHOP The intramural basketball seabounds. Moving into a starting son is coming to an end. S i x role as a first year man, the 6'4" and teams remain in the tournament Heine added much neededi that will be concluded during strength under the boards for SNOOKER HALL the week of March 21-24. the Bobcats. Due to the Invitational VolReturning with Heine next Open Monday leyball Tournament the basketyear will be juniors Ron Snodball tourney was delayed a grass, Dean Cain, and Bill Rinthrough Saturday week. The six teams remaining ne. These four, along with sophare: Misfits, Roadrunners, Emomore Dick Estes, should form perors, Showboats, Studs, and the nucleus of the 1966-67 BobPERU, Worcesterites. cats. The Misfits and Roa<lirunners Cain, a guard, collected 373 NEBRASKA were the only undefeated teams. Coach Jack Mcintire has 14 points this year for a 14.9 averThe winner was decided at the returning lettermen on th i s age. Snodgrass, who moved into March 17 game. , year's track team. The lettermen At the ,conclusion of the basinclude: Louis Fritz, Curtis Holketball season, softball will take liman, Jim Watson, Jim HageNESRASKA CITY over as the intramural t~m meier, Royce Curtis, Leroy Arelsport. Director of intramural lano, Roy Windhorst, Bill Witty, 7 DAYS OPENS FRIDAY, MARCH 25 athletics, J. D. Stemper, said, Jack Rinne, Tim Hendricks, Dick "The basketball season w en t Zaparanick, Roger Neujahr, and fine-right down to the wire as presents Ron Nolte. {/ Dean · Suzanne we expected. But we will be Promising material for the looking forward to the softball 1966 campaign includes: Dennis 11..r'JONES PLESHETTE season." ADMISSION 35c - 75c Tunks, Dennis Rinne, Bob Lovejoy, Arnold Johnson, Dwayne 13 DAYS - OPENS FRIDAY, APRIL I - Adm. SOc • $1.00 Brettman, Joe Hertz, Bruce Vickery, Bob Rapp, W a y.n e Heine, Phil Herbster, Ron Jones, Jim Bohl, Dan Trout, Van Allen, Dennis Williamson, and Bert Drycleaning Faulkner. This season's schedule is: and March 19-Kansas State Indoor Laundry Relays April 5-Marysville OPEN 12-Midland Relays 14-Washburn 6:30 a.m. • 10:30 p.m. 21-Marysville 23-Nebraska Wesleyan 26-Doane 29-3-0-Drake Relays May 4-Wayne State 7-Grasland Relays 10-0maha University PHONE 872-2331 13-14-NCC Meet

Intramural· Basketball Season Near End

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Baseball Tearn In Preparation Coach Joe Pelisek realized during the first few days of practice that everyone stays in shape over the winter months except the athletes. Pelisek and his baseballers have been blessed with the early arrival of spring. Preparing for their opener at Creighton in one week, the '.Bobcats have a 33-member squad. Returning lettermen from last year include John Chasse, Steve Pattison, Al Sullivan, Ron Yates, George Evangelist, Gary Young, Ray Cain, Laverne Jensen, Bob Hayne, and Pat Venditte.

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Dr. Freeburne In Concert The Peru State College Divi· sion of Fine Arts presented Dr. Frederick Freeburne in a piano ,concert on Marcll. 17, 1966 at 8:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts Re· cital Hall. Selections on the program included: "Beethoven's Thirty-Three Variations on a Waltz" by Diabelli; "Bagatelles" by Tcherepnine-"Allegro marciale," "Con vivacita," ''Vivo," "Lento con 'trixtezza," "Dolce," "Allegro con spirito," "Presstissimo," "Allegro," "Allegretto," "Presto"; "La Cathedrale en· gloutie" by Debussy; "The Fountain of the Acqua Paola" by Griffes; ''Tango Americaine" by Carpenter; and "La Campanella" by Paganini-Liszt.

CAMPUS SCHOOL NEWS By Phyllis Groff

The Campus School Junior High Cubs closed their basketball season on March 3 when they were defeated by Brock 32· 30, and on March 4 when Cook defeated them 32-23. Now that basketball season is over, the high school boys a r e training for track meets. An AllSports Banquet will be held on March 26 in honor of all athletic sports. Jit will be sponsored by the Pep Club. On March 25, thirteen students from Peru Prep will participate in the Interscholastic Contest which is to be held on campus. Peru Prep students will a 1so take part in a Science Fair on March 26-28. On March 18, twelve

Peru Prep students participated in the Speech Contest which was held on campus. Areas in which they performed were: oral interpretation of pl.1ose literature and drama, interpretative public address, original public address, extemporaneous speaking, poetry reading, television newscommentary, discussion, informative public speaking, and one-act play. The Twentieth Annual High Schdol Girls Invitational Volleyball Tournament was held <?n March 14-16. On Monday, March 14, Peru Prep played their first game with Endicott. On Monday, March 7, the Peru FHA met to discuss the MotherDaughter Banquet, which they sponsor each year; FHA Week; and to listen to a talk given by Jette a'Porta. Jette's talk was "Teen-agers and Dating in Denmark." After the talk, the girls had an 'Opportunity to ask questions. Each year the Peru FHA and their adviser, Mrs. Louis Kregel, observe National FHA Week between March 27 and April 2. This national youth organization of home economic students in junior and senior high school carries out a program of work designed to improve perwnal, family, and community living.

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GOMON AND MELVIN ATTENDED CONFERENCE President Gomon and Dean Melvin attended! the Conference of Higher Education heldi in Chicago, Ill., March 13-17. It was a meeting of the chief administrative officers ,of all the colleges and universities of the United States. The theme of the program was "Higher Education Reflects on Itself and on the Larger Society." -0-

PITTS AND PELISEK ATTEND NAIA MEET Dr. Ervin Pitts and Joe Pelisek attended the N.A.I.A. meetings at Kansas City, Mo., March 7-12. All coaches and representatives of the respective schools of the N.A.I.A. were present at a meeting held for rule changes and the election of new officers for national committees. All of the meetings were held in the Kansas City Municipal Auditorium. The main attraction was the National Tournament. -oEBNER ATTENDS BUYERS MEET Larry Ebner, Peru State business manager, attended a meeting of the National Association of Educational Buyers, Febr. 28March 4. This meeting was a purchasing institute for the agents of colleges and universities to improve purchasing techniques andi practices. The meeting was well attended: by many colleges and universities from a 21-state area. -O-

STEMPER SEES TOURNAMENT Jerome Stemper spent March 10-12 in Lincoln, attending the State Basketball Tournam~ of Classes B, C, and D.

-oDODGE AND CARR ATTEND CONVENTION Dr. Galen Dodge, Director of Guidance and Counseling, and Mr. Robley Carr, Director of Guidance and! Counseling at the Campus School, attended t h e State Convention of American Personnel and Guidance Association in Fremont, Nebraska. The theme of the March 18 meeting at Midland College was "Vocational Guidance: A Second

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Look." Dr. Donald Clifton, ass<i· ciate professor at the Univer~ity of Nebraska, gave his address, "Dynamics of Human Behavior in Vocational Choice." In the future, Dr. Dodge plans to attend the National Convention in Washington, D. C., where "Man in the World Society" will be discussed. -0-

VAN ZANT AND MEYER TO EDUCATIONAL MEETINGS

Mr. Evan Van Zant, director of the Campus School, and Mr. Howard E. Meyer, director of studies, will attend! meetings in Omaha and Chicago, Mar. 26-30. They will represent Peru and the Campus School at the Great Plains Core Conference held at the Omaha University. In Chicago they will attendi the annual meeting of the North Central Association held at the Palmer House March 23•30. Mr. Van Zant will attend meetings of the Commissions on Colleges and Universities and! Mr. Meyer will attend meetings of the Commis·sion on Secondary Schools. -oHENRY ATTENDS SPORTS WRITERS MEETING DURING NAIA TOURNEY Mr. Bob Henry, sports information director for Peru State, attended a sports, information directors meeting in Kansas City during the week of the NAIA tournament. Mr. Henry was 1n Kansas City from March 7 through March 10, meeting with sports information ,directors from other NAIA affiliated schools. Included in the topics of discussion were such issues as coordination of school reporting with network radio and televi· sion. A panel of judges was appointed to select the various sports brochures which are to receive awards.

DODGE TO LINCOLN !

Dr. Galen Dodge recently at· tended a meeting of the Nebraska Rehabilitation Association in Lincoln, Monday, Febr. 28. Dr. Dodge was vice-president of the organization last year and he is now president-elect.

-oHEALTH MEETING

Mrs. Clara Boatman, college nurse, will attend the Midwest Central American College Health Association, held in Lincoln on April 2. Mrs. Boatman will appear on a panel discussing "Stress and Tension," as seen by the Health Centers of American Colleges.

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Falls City Wins Division ATrophy; Johnson Winner Of Division BTrophy In Peru State Interscholastic Meet ,Falls City took the division A trophy and Johnson took the division B trophy in the eighth annual Peru State College Interscholastic Contest on Friday, March 25, 1966. It was the sixth consecutive trophy for Falls City High, but it was only the first trophy for Johnson. Tests were given in 24 subjects with points awarded to the top five places in each test. Certificates were awarded to the top three students in each division. Division A schools with enrollments above 150 students were allowed to enter two students in each test, but division B school'> were allowed to enter only one. More than 700 students from 44 area high schools were entered in the day-long event. Final results of the first place winners in the division A were: Industrial Arts~tie-George Marburger, Humboldt, Leslie Snodgrass, Nebraska City; ·MusicShirley Sandrock, Falls City; Algebra II--Carol Arnold, Fa 11 s City; English Usage-tie-Nancy Rourke, Auburn, Annice ·shurtleft', Falls City, Nikki Eloge, Nebraska City, Shirley Eichmier, Wahoo; Chemistry-David Waggoner, Clarinda; Typewriting II-Judy Byrom, Falls City; Home Economics--Carol Abbott, Nebraska City; French--Cecelia Delor, Waverly; Spelling-tieDeanna Lamb, Syracuse-Dunbar, Janet Manstedt, Wahoo; German --Cheryl Nansel, Waverly; Biology-Mike Woods, Falls City. Other winners in division A wer,e: Advanced Math-Ste v e Seawall, Tecumseh; Health-Sue Shurtleff, Falls City; Physic&Donald Davis, Falls City; World Literature-Merna Roeder, Waverly; American History-John Simon, Auburn; World HistoryNancy Cummins, Falls City; Shorthand I-Regina Dittmer, Tecumseh; American Gov't.Nancy Cummins, Falls City; Latin-Sue Strauss, Falls City; Shorthand II-Terrie McNulty, Clarinda; Typewriting I-Jean Converse, Ashland. First place winners in division B were: Industrial Arts- J o h n Lutt, Peru; Music-tie-Bonita Bacon, Adams, Bill •Schlichtemeir, Nehawka; Algebra IIBetty Parde, Sterling; English Usage-Sue Allen, Dawson-Verdon; Geometry-tie-Dean Shuey, Lewiston, Patsy Wirth, Lourdes Central; Spanish-Karen Miller, Adams; ChemistryPat Mullen, Lourdes Central; Typewriting II-Sandra Michel, Johnson; Home Economics-Luan Swanson, Johnson; FrenchLinda Hostetter, Nehawka; Spelling-Roger Rinne, Lewiston; German-Kristen Rogge, Johnson; Biology-Rhonda Hanson, Mead; Advanced Math-Lois Shufeldt, DeWitt; Health-Dean Shuey, Lewiston; Physics-Ronald Gerdes, Johnson. Other winners in division B were: World Literature-Kristen Rogge, Johnson; American History-Allan Oestmann, Johnson; (Continued! on page four)

Volume 61

Number 11

APRIL 4, 1966

Epsilon Pl Tau Initiation

·Sixteen High Schools Here For Band Clinic BY MARY LU HICKS The Division of Fine Arts and the Peru Chapter of the Music Educators National Conference sponsored a band clinic on April 2, 1966 in which more than 200 students from neighboring ihigh schools participated. There were 16 high schools in all represented at the clinic~Brock, Elk Creek, Ashland, Odell, Genoa, Atkinson, Palisade, Douglas, George Norris School at Cortland, Bruning, Fairbury, Sterling, Nebraska City, Auburn, Tecumseh, and Peru Prep. 'The guest conductor of the clinic was Alfred Reed, music editor for Hansen Instrumental and Choral Publications in New York. He was previously conductor of the Baylor Symphony Orchestra at Baylor University, and he was guest composer-conductor-clinician in 32 states and Canada during the past 12 years, with as many as 11 appearances in some of these states during that time. Mr. Reed has published over 300 of his own works for band, orchestra, and chorus. He iJ:l a.s been staff arranger and composer for the major radio and TV networks and he has been director and arranger for both the theater and motion picture. Mr. Reed studied 21h years at Juilliard School of Music for a B.S. in Composition; and he received a B.M. degree cum laude and a M.M. degree cum laude at Baylor University. He was recently the winner of the Luria Prize for his "Rhapsody for Viola and Orchestra," and he was appointed Associate Conductor for t h e School Band of America's 6th annual European tour in JuneJuly, 1966, with some 17 concerts in 15 cities in seven countries scheduled. Three of his original works are scheduled f o r performance during this tour. Peru's Band Clinic was composed of two concert bands, the White Band and the Blue Band. Both bands rehearsed throughout the day and performed in a concert during the evening. Selections of the White Band were: "Here Comes the Band:'' by Willcocks; "A Festive Prelude" by Alfred Reed; "Greensleeves" arr. by Reed; Walt Disney's "Mary Poppins" arr. by Reed; "A Kingston Trio,'' a folk song overture, arr. by Reed. Selections of the Blue Band were: "Holiday for Winds" by Osser; "I Left My Heart in San Francisco" arr. by Reed; "Song of Threnos" by Reed; "Music of Mancini" arr. by Reed; "Medley for Concert Band" by Rodgers and Hart, arr. by Reed.

GILBERT WILSON CONDUCTS ATKINSON BAND FESTIVAL Gilbert Wilson, Peru State Band instructor, had the honor

.:_Phofo by Siegner New members holdmg membership shingles: Lawrence Adams, Kenneth Arnold, Bernard Scott, Roger Slaughter, John Wifler. On Friday, March 18, 1966, the Industrial Arts Honorary Fraternity, Epsilon Pi Tau, ETA Chapter, held its annual formal initiation. Those initiated as new members were: Lawrence Adams, Kenneth Arnold, Bernard Scott, Roger Slaughter, andJohn Witler. Guests_ attending the initiation were Mr. Ross Adams, Peru, Mr. Jim Felton, Omaha, Mr. Wallace Richards, Auburn, and Mr. Gary Schlange, Auburn. Members of the initiation team

were D. V. Jarvis, Donald Weiner, A. V. Larson, John Patterson, Paul Stevenson, Jerry Sayer, John Wilson, and Dr. C. V. Siegn.er. Membership shingles were presented by Gordon Gavin, Trustee. A tape measure was awarded to Kenneth Arnold by Mr. A. V. Larson for recognition of outstanding skills. After the initiation ceremonies, members and their guests dined at Ulbricks in Nebraska City.

Fourteen· Attend MENC Co11ference

Kroll And, Venditte

The Peru State Chap.ter of the Music Educators National Conference was represented by eleven students and three sponsors at the Twentieth Biennial National Convention on March 1820 in Kansas City, Mo. Those attending were: students Mary Ellen Oestmann, Mary Lu Hicks, Jim Butts, Mike McNeely, Bill Joiner, Richard Shelton, Steve Broderson,· Ross Oestmann, Bill Uhri, Dale Duensing, Jim Johnson, and sponsors Mr. Hugh Thomas, Mr. Gilbert E. Wilson, and Dr.. Frederick Freeburne. Highlights of the convention included: Kirksville, Mo. State College Clarinet Ensemble; University of Kans. Symphony Orchestra; Oberlin, Ohio College Faculty Woodwind Q u i n-t e t ; James Oliver Buswell, Violinist from Julliard School of Music; a high school musical, "Bayou Flute," by Chappaqua, N. Y. High School; Brigham Young University Choir; and University of Ill. Symphony Orchestra.

Classes Dismissed Peru State College students will ,be dismissed from classes for the five day Easter holiday beginning Thursday, April 7. Classes will be dismissed at 5:00 Thursday, April 7 and will convene on Tuesday morning, April 12 at 7:30. of being the guest conductor of the "Three Rivers Band! Festival" held at Atkinson, Nebraska, on Monday, March 28. There were approximately 100 members participating in the select band.

Io Head: S.G.A. Announcements of the newly elected president and vice-president of the S.G.A. were released March 18. Ron Kroll and Pat Venditte will fill the respective offices for the coming year. The student voters split the ballots and elected one member of each party. On his way to the presidency, Kroll defeated Tom Rosengren. Ron, is a member of "P" Club, Blue Devils, Phi Beta Lambda, and S.G.A. (two semesters), dorm counselor in Majors Hall, and vice-president of the junior class. He accomplished his victory while running on a six-step platform. This platform included: expansion of the S.G.A., clarification of student violations, help with college centennial, recreation, better relationships between students and the S.G.A., and student freedom. When questioned about hi s new office, Ron Stated, ''There is one thing that I must ask of the student body-that the y work with the S.G.A. and back the newly elected officers to make the organization a workable group." The president-elect's running mate, Jette a'Porte, was defeated for the vice-presidency by Pat Venditte. Pat is an active student. He was 11'.ead basketball and football coach of the Peru junior high, member of "P" Club, dorm counselor in Majors, past presid'.ent of Newman Club, treasurer of the junior class, and dorm columnist and business manager for the Pedagogian. (Continued on page three)

Drive Home Safely

Ex -Governor Peterson Visited Peru State· Mr. Val Peterson, former governor of Nebraska and a Repub· lican candidate for governor in the May primary, was guest of honor at an informal ·coffee on campus March 28. Dr. Darrell Wininger was the college's official host for the occasion. Peterson was accompanied by Alvin Jensen of Lincoln, retired safety patrolman, and Floyd Pohlman of Auburn. This visit was part of Peterson's preliminary campaigning. During a brief question and answer session with the faculty and staff, he expressed his.views on a state income tax, state aid for education, and the feasibility of a partisan unicameral. Later he met Jette a'Porta, the Peruvian from Copenhagen. Peterson's special interest in Jette stems from the fact that he served as Ambassador to Den· mark from 19'57 to 1961.

Speech Contest Results One act plays by Auburn and Falls City in Class A and Per:u Prep and Prague in Class B were awarded superior ratings in the District Speech Contest of the Nebraska High School Activities Association at Peru State College Friday. Best actress and actor in Class A were Miss Beth Henderson and Jack Layson, both of Auburn; with honors in Class B going to Miss Connie Foreman of. Palmy• ra and Mark Meyer of Talmage. A total of 32 superior ratings were given in the 108 other events of the one-day contest. The superior ratings includedOriginal PubHc Address: Class A-Shirley Ford, Tecumseh, superior; Patricia Boerner, Lourdes Central of Nebraska City, super• ior; Mary Beth Fred~rick, Falls City Sacred Heart, superior. Interpretative Public Address: Class A-Jack Layson, Auburn, superior; Judy Mick, Falls City, superior. Class B-Christie Ub• ben, Peru, superior. Discussion: Class A-Deloi.t Childers, Auburn, superior; Tom Ferneau, Auburn, superior. Class B-JoAnn Auxier, Dawson•Verdon, superior; Ivol Stever; Ne· braska City Lourdes Central, superior. Extemporaneous Sp e akin g .: Class A-John Simon, Auburn, superior. Class B-Jerry Wirth, Nebraska City Lourdes Central, superiar. Television News Commentary: Class A-Dick Layson, Auburn, superior. Class B-Joe Batalion, Nebraska City Lourdes Central, superior. Informative Public Speaking: Class A-Donna Riensche, Te· cumseh, superior; Glenda Roesch, Falls City, superior; Kath'ryn Gerdes, Auburn, superior. Class B-Martha Seibert, Peru, superior; Linda Schmadeke, Weeping Water, superior. Oral Interpretation of Drama: Class A-Syracuse, s up er i or. Class B-Nebraska City Lourdes Central, superior; Falls City Sll· cred Heart, superior. (Continued on page four)


STUDENTS GIVE BLOOD On Tuesday, March 29, 1966 students from Peru St~te College donated blood to the Red Cross in Auburn to replace blood used by a student in recent open heart surgery. The drive on our campus was organized through the Kiwanis Club and headed by Dr. Darrell Wininger. Dr. Wininger worked hard on the drive and it was a success. The students who donated blood felt rewarded by this simple act of helping out their fellow man. To those stuents, and to Dr. Wininger, this writer offers congratula1't.i6ns on a job well done, and seconds the thanks sent by the Red Cross. To those readers who didn't donate this time for any number of reasons, I ask only that you remember that someday you may need the kindness and interest of your fellow man. Please donate at the next Red Cross Blood Drive; you could help save someone's life. -By Bill Bowen

S.G.A. RESPONSIBILITIES NUMEROUS AND VARIED S.G.A. is one of the most important organizations for students on the campus. It has many and varied functions. The most important of these is to represent the students and to work with the faculty and students. Members of S.G.A. assist with freshman orientation and initiation. They also sponsor homecoming and its activities. Weekend recreation has also been provided by S.G.A. It is very important to understand the responsibilities of each member of the organization. Each organization on campus .nominates a candidate to represent it in the S.G.A. To qualify as a candidate the student must not be on social probation, have at least a 5.00 grade point average, and be reasonably sure of returning for both semesters of the coming year. Seventeen members are chosen from the candidates, The first fourteen are elected as regular members. The last ·three are associate members. Each member is required to do his part for S.G.A. and the school. Regular attendance at all meetings is required. Members also must serve on numerous committees. They should always promote the image of S.G.A. on campus, as well as representing their organization. Communication between other organizations and the S.G.A. is also accomplished by its members. · · ·When voting for S.G.A. representatives, the student .should remember to consider the need for good members, the responsibility, and the candidate. -By Mary Inglis

·plans to live off campus.. Walt Rimmer was elected to replace him. March 22 the boys from Ma. jors elected the dofur officers for next year; Dennis Flattre, current president Of the. dorm, resigned. Lyle Stewart, vice-president, steps up. The election saw Tom Rosengren, president, Larry Sheehan, vice 7president, R o n Jones, secretary-treasurer, and Lavelle Hitzmann S.G.A. representative. These officers will assume office following summer vacation.

MORGAN HALL By

Jean Wewel

Sherry .Schwiesow, Mary McVicker, and Beverly K:itelinger were the delegates representing Peru at the Phi Beta Lambda Convention. The convention was held April 1 and 2 at Fremont, Nebraska. Sherry and Mary were participants in the spelling contest and: Mary was a candidate for the Future Business Teacher. Misses Weare and Rowoldt were sponsors for the girls. Mary Lu Hkks accompanied Miss Rowoldt at the piano when she sang "The Big Brown Bear" at the convention. More engagement announcements! Toni Clements has become engaged to Ron K:eene . Ron lives at Bellevue and is employed as a· construction worker.. Linda Renz became engaged to Bruce Mau, who graduated son, Mike Castle, Chuck Mizer- from Peru at mid-term and is ski, Doug Winfield, Al Burr, now working in Chicago; Nancy Larry Beach, Pat Venditte, Toip. Vanderbeek to Dave Hensley, MAJORS Woolsey, and Gary Young. both Peru students. HALL Our color television set is here. Melanie Gould and Bill BouYou can be sure someone iS' in ten were married March 24 in By front of the T.V. from the time Auburn. Melanie is a junior at Pat it goes -on at 12 p.m. until the Peru this year and Bill is a 1965 Venditfe screen goes blank in the early graduate of Peru. Future plans The baseball team has its first hours of the morning. The color will take them to Fort Dix, New television is situated in the Jersey, where Bill is stationed in engagement in Omaha against southwest corner of the lobby. the army. Creighton. The participants from This past week saw Bill Rinne Marriage vows were taken by Majors on the baseball team in- leaving the dorm for the rest of Tom Yopp and Mariiyn Masters clude Mike Corgnati, Jim Gib- this year. The former counselor April 3 at the First MethDdist Ohurch in Nebraska City. Marilyn was graduated from Peru at mid-term. Tom is a former Peru PERU PEDAGOGIAN student and is presently emSTAFF ployed in Nebraska City. Residents of the dorm who Bill Bowen --------------------------------------Co-editor are going out student teaching Joan Bretthorst ----------------------------------Co-editor the next nine weeks are: Maggie Nancy Jarvis _____ .; _____________________Personnel Manager Slayter, Kris Wewel, Elaine NedPat Venditte -----------------------------Business Manager denriep, K:athy Francis, K:aron Joan Bretthorst ------~----------------------Layout Editor Rathe, Joan Dickman, Nancy Dan Strecker ----------------------------------Circulation Check, Barbara Gordon, Dorothy Phil Dorssom --------------------------Campus to Campus Bock, Mary Sautter, March TinkMary Lu Hicks --------------------------------Copy Editor ham and Carol Nickels. Mary Budler ----------------------------------Copy Editor Jean Wewel --------------------------Morgan Hall Column Pat Venditte ---~----------------------Majors Hall Column Ralph Shaffer ------------------------Delzell Hall Column DELZELL Phyllis Groff _______________________ Campus School Column Ron Snodgrass ------------------------------Sports Column Walter Rimmer ------------------------------Photographer John Soby -----------------------------------Photographer Edward LeTourneau -------------------------Photographer Phyllis Groff --------------------------------Photographer Bonnie Anderson ---------------------------------Reporter Marilyn Bailie -----------------------------------Reporter Al Blankenship ----------------------------------Reporter Mike Castle --------------------------------------Reporter Brian Collins -------------------------------------Reporter Linda Coslett ------------------------------------Reporter Bernadine Fintel ---------------------------------Reporter Dennis Hubbard ----------------------------------Reporter Mary Inglis --------------------------------------Reporter Carleen Kreifels ---------------------------------Reporter Pat McK:ee ---------------------------------------Reporter Wayne Miller ------------------------------------Reporter lliike Smagacz -----------------------------------..Reporter Pat Wheatley ------------------------------------Reporter Cheryl Winans -----------------------------------Reporter

-

HALL

By Ralph Shaffer

Delzell Hall breathes a sigh of relief as the first half of the semester draws to a close. The highlight of the first half closing was the surprise party held for Charlie Gordon, who will be leaving the dorm to do his student teaching in Beatrice. Thanks to ·the west wing of ,the third floor things got rather damp for Charlie; but all ended well with refreshments being served. The d-Ormitory has two new floor counselors· to take charge for the last nine weeks. One is

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K:en Stoner, a sophomore from Homer, Nebraska. He is a biology major and will be replacing Charlie Gordon on third floor. The other is yours truly, replacing Ray Cain, who recently moved off campus. "Look out" basement!

CAMPUS

TO CAMPUS By Phil Dorssom

On March 24-2£, Creighton, in Omaha, hosted the largest debate tournament in its history. Approximately 80 debators from 16 schools competed in the annual Missouri Valley Forensic League Tourney.

The Kingsmen, a modern rock combo, have been contracted by the Student Center Board at Creighton to share the bandstand with the Don Rice Orchestra for the annual Prom on April 29. On March 24, at Central Missouri State College, The Turnau Opera Players presented an Italian buffa, "Don Pasquale," by Gaeta Donizetti. The opera company is from the Byrdcliffe Theatre, Woodstock, New York. The Washburn University's Dolphin Club at Topeka, K:ansas, presented its 18th annual water show March 24, 25, and 26 in Whiting Field House. Highlighting the year for the club, the show centered around the theme "Discover America," in which the performers took the audi-

ence on a make-believe tour the U.S. Also at Washburn, 200 students were named to the dean's honor roll for the first semester. In May, at the Midland Lutheran College in Fremont, the selective service will administer a test to determine aptitude of those students of draft age. The taking of this test is not mandatory, but will give the stud1mt an idea as to what his capabilities are. On March 20, music from Kearney State College was featured on the K:OLN-K:GIN TV Program "From The Campus." Twenty-five musicians performed on the show. Also at KSC, the Music Department presented "A Night at The Opera" on MaDch 2'1 and 22. Excerpts from four operas were featured. A little farther from home at Eastern Montana College in Billings, on April 16, Glen Yarbrough, renowned solo singer, will appear on the campus. Yarbrough was a former member of the Limeliters, and has made three RCA singles: "Baby the Rain Must Fall," "The Honey Wind Blows," and "It's Gonna Be Fine."

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ttermen returning at every poion except third, and is exptionally strong at some posions with two lettermen and pressive freshmen battlingfor he starting nod. According to Coach Larry Eber, the Bobcat golf team has nly one way to go-up. With ttermen Dick Seybert and Bill eineman returning, plus severpromising newcomers, Coach ner is looking forward to an ceptional season. The Cat smen will open their season pril 1 at St. Benedict's. Three lettermen, a freshman, d Peru State's first girl perrmer will be the nucleus of

Dr. Darrell Wihinger's tennis team for 1966. Senior Joe Smith starts the season as Coach Wininger's number one man, with sophomore lettermen Davidi LaMontagne and Roger Schumaker backing him up. Kathy Welsh, a letter winner at Creighton in 1964 transferred to Peru so that she could major in women's physical education. Coach Wininger thinks she will probably be battling for the number three "man" spot. Basketball coach Jack Mcintire has named ten lettermen for the 1965-66 season. They are: Freshmen, Bob Lovejoy, Bill Saunders, Wayne Heine, Leon Portrey; Juniors, Dean Cain, Ron Snodgrass, Bill Rinne; and Seniors, Bill Witty, Mike Harmon and Jack Rinne.

Mcintire Announces Ten Lettermen Jack Mcintire, head basketball coach at Peru State College, has announced the names of 10 men to be awarded basketball letters for the 1965-66 cage season. Included in the list are three seniors, three juniors, and four freshmen. The 10 lettermen scored 1,941 of Peru State's 1,9·76 season points as the Bobcats captured the Nebraska College Conference crown, the championship of NAIA District 11, and participated for a national recordsetting 13th time in the 29th annual NAIA tournament in Kansas City. Letter recipients, home towns, and number of letters earned in basketball at Peru State: Seniors-Mike Harmon (3), Wood River, Ill.; Jack Rinne (4), Burchard; Bill Witty (4), Syracuse. Juniors-Dean Cain (3), Thurman, Iowa; Bill Rinne (2), Bur~ chard; Ron Snodgrass (3), Seward. Freshmen-Wayne Heine, East Alton, Ill.; Bob Lovejoy, Red Oak, Iowa; Leon Portrey, Dawson; Bill Sanders, O'Fallon, Ill.

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Intramural Basketball Championship The Road Runners won the intramural basketball tournament and the over-all basketball championship by beating the Misfits 61-36. The. Misfits h a d earned the right to play the Road Runners by defeating the Emperors 46-43. The points standings toward the over-all intramural championship are as follows: Road Runners 29, .Misfits·28, Studs 18, Emperors 17112, Sixty-Niners 13, Centennials 11, Louts 9, Beavers 6, Showboats 6, Worcesterites 5. Eleven teams will vie in an intramural round robin softball schedule. Each game will end at five innings or 10 runs. All softball rules prevail.

Baseball Tearn Will Play Twenty-two Games Coach Joe Pelisek is the new baseball coach at Peru State College. He replaced Al Wheeler, who retired last year. From Monmouth, Ill., Pelisek coached at Monmouth College for seven years before coming to Peru. Coach Pelisek feels that Peru will have a fine baseball team this season. He will lead his team through an eleven date, 22game schedule. There will be four home encounters and seven trips on the road. The schedule is: April 1-at Creighton 2-J. F. Kennedy, here 6-at Northwest Missouri State 9-at Wayne 'State 14-St. Benedid's, here 19-at Simpson 23-Kearney State, here 26-at Hastings College May 3-Chadron State at Broken Bow 9--at Concordia (tentative twin bilf) 11-NW Mo. State, here

Dr. Pitts Announces Spring Sports Schedule Peru State College golf and tennis teams will open their respective seasons on April 1 and April 2, according to schedules released by Dr. Ervin Pitts, Peru tate Athletic Director. SchedulesTennis-April 2, at Northwest Missouri State; April 7, Northern (S.D.) State; April 16, Midwestern; April 19, at Creighton; April 29, at Midwestern; April 30, at Concordia; May 6, Northwest Missouri State; May 13, Neoraska College Conference Meet at Wayne. Golf-April 1, at St. Benedict's; April 5, Northwest Missouri State; April 16, Midwestern; April 18, at Concoroia; April 19, at Creighton; April 21, at Northwest Missouri State; April 23, Doane; April 27, St. Benedict's; April 29, at Midwestern; April 30, Creighton; May 2, at Nebraska Wesleyan; May 7, Doane at Lincoln; May 13, Ne· braska College Conference Meet at Wayne. Peru State's home golf matches will be played on the Nebraska City course. Home Saturday meets start at 9 a.m., and other home meets will begin at 1 p.m. Coach Darrell W i n i n g er ' s home tennis matches start at 1 p.m. on the Peru State courts, with the exception of the April 7 match with Northern (S. D.) State which will get underway at 9 a.m.

Murdock Bulldogs Capture Volleyball Tournament

Kroll and Vendittf! To Head S.G.A.

(Continued from page one) Murdock's high school girls' Pat's platform was based on volleyball team won the chamthe betterment of student-faculpionship of the 20th annual Pety-administration communication ru State College High School and improvement of social actiGirls' Invitational Volleyball vities. His comment on winning Tournament. Coached by Dale the election was, "The students Hall, Murdock's girls crushed Bratton Union 15-2 and 5-9. Elm- put their confidence in me by electing me vice-president. My wood, loser to Murdock in the semi-finals, defeated Lewiston future intentions include work· ing with the students and trying to gain third place in the tourto enact a program which will nament. enable them to recognize the Murdock's Bulldogs thus relack of unity not only between turned as champs at Peru State's faculty but between the stutournament after a one-year abdents as well." sence. In 1964 Murdock dDwned , Bratton Union for the volleyball Bratton Union won second crown. place for the thi~d straight year.

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Seniors,. Will Give New Pulletin Board Members of the Peru State Senior Ciass voted to leave as the ·class memorial a hexagonal hUlletin bOard similar to that in front of the Administration Building. .Other gifts voted on were a water cooler for the Fine Arts building and a scholarship. According to Class President Wm. Anderson, the bUlletin board got most votes.

AStanding Ovation For Peru Pianist The Peru State College Division of Fine Arts presented Dr. Frederick Freeburne in a piano concert on March 17, 1966 at 8:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. Selections on the program included: Beethoven's "Thirty-Three Variations on a Waltz" by Diabelli; · "Bagatelles" by Tcherepnin€-"Allegro marciale," "Con vivacita," "Vivo," "Lento con tristezza," "Allegro," "Allegretto," ''Presto"; "La Cathedrale engloutie" by Debussy; ''The Fountain of the Acqua Paola" by Griffes; ''Tango Americaine" by Carpenter; and "La Campanella" by Paganini-Liszt. The approval of the audience was evident when upon the performance of Dr. Freeburne's final number, a standing ovation was given. An encore of two selections was .then performed to conclude the concert. The selections were "Gymnopedie" by Satie and "Clair de lune" by Debussy.

Peru Prep Holds All Sports Banquet An All-Sports Banquet was held on March 26 in honor of all high school sports. The dinner was followed by a speaker and the presentation of awards. · Mr. George Kelly, defensive line coach from the University of Nebraska, was the guest speaker for the evening. · The boys and girls who lettered in the various sports received a "P" letter. Th es e awards were presented by Mr. Sorensen and Miss Rutz. Dana Henry, president of the Pep Club, presented the members of the club with pins. The cheerleaders received: both cheerleading and Pep Club pins. Trophies were given to the boy and girl who were outstanding in sports. Bruce Henning, son pf Mr. and Mrs. Charles Henning, won the trophy for the Outstanding Boy Athlete; and Laura Adams, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ellis Adams, won the

trophy for Outstanding G i r 1 Athlete. Marilyn Moody, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Vern Moody, and Margaret Lutt, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Lutt, received Pep Club Awards for their outstanding work. Immediately following th e banquet, there was a dance featuring the "Marques."

Interscholastic Contest (Continued from page one) World History-Linda Burney, DeWitt; Shorthand I-Shirley Pratt, Cook; American Gov't.Paul Clark, Lewiston; LatinRose Bachman,· Sacred Heart; Shorthand II-Bonnie See b a, Cook; Typewriting I- B o n n i e Seeba, Cook. The team totals for division A were: Falls City-105%; Nebraska City-50%; Clarinda-46 1h; Waverly-351/z; Auburn-34%; Syracuse-22; Wahoo-17%; Ashland-16; Tecumseh-141/z; Humboldt-111/z; George Norris -8; Hamburg-6; Pawnee City -5. The totals for division B were: Johnson-42; Lewiston33; Lourdes Central-28; DeWitt -24· Dawson-Verdon-221h; Adams.'.._201h; Cook-Wl/4; Peru181/4; Sterling-16%; Mead13%; Sacred Heart-131/z; Louisville - 121/z; Barneston-121/z; Diller - 11; Bennington - 101/z; Elmwood-101/4; Nehawka-9; . Weeping Water-7; Holmesville -6· Murdock-51/z; Alvo Eagle -5; Brock-4; Talmage-4; Prague-31/z; Bratton Union-3; Nemaha-2.

ru Prep matched their skills against those of Lourdes Central and Brock.

CAMPUS SCHOOL NEWS By Phyllis Groff

During the last two weeks, Peru Prep students have participated in several contests. At the Speech Contest on March 18 they won first in Class B. On On Monday, March 21 Mr. Sheely held a spelling contest. Winners were: Bonnie Stemper, Rena Merit, Darrell Wininger, and Holly Fulton. On March 25, thirteen students entered the Interscholastic Contest which was held on campus. Peru Prep ranked eighth out of thirty-one schools that participated in Division B. Peru Prep students also participated in the Nemaha Valley Science Fair held on March 26, 27, and 28 in Nebraska City. William Dean, James ·Beatty, James Gnade, Beth Applegate, and Ralph Kennedy took different projects to the fair. The first place winners of the individual Science Fairs are eligible to enter the National Science Fair-In· ternational. On Thursday, March 24 Peru Prep ran against Talmage in a track meet. Peru was defeated< 71-55. On Tuesday, March 29 Pe-

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Poetry Reading: Class A-Darrell Kuenning, Auburn, superior. Class B-Mary Casey, Falls City Sacred! Heart, superior; Laura Adams, Peru, superior; Lynda Shanahan, Prague, superior.

This year the schedule is as follows: Sunday-attend the Catholic church in Peru. Mon· day-fix a bulletin board. Tuesday-wear red and white. Wednesday-give roses to the teachers in the Campus School. Thursday-if a girl talks to a boy on this day, Slhe has to give him a card with "Mr. Irresistible" on it. The boy with the most cards at the end of the day is Mr. Irresistible. Friday-each girl wears a new hair style and puts a sign on her locker which reads, "An FHA'r lockers here."

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Speech Contest Results Oral Interpretation of Prose Literature: Class A-Gay Gibson, Falls City, superior; Kathy Vondrak, Nebraska City, superior. Class B~harlotte Lash, Peru, superior; Patty Ryan, Dawson-Verdon, superior.

The FHA girls met on Monday, March 21 to discuss the annual Mother-Daughter Banquet, FHA Week, and to elect officers for the coming year. The Mother-Daughter Banquet will be held on Tuesday, April 12. An Easter .theme will be used for decorating. EaJch year a committee of girls make a list of things to do for each day of the week in honor of FHA Week, which is March 28-April 1.

Next year's officers are: dent-Margaret Lutt; vicedent-Laura Adams; secre Martha Seibert; treasurer lyn Moody; parliamenta Pearl Allgood; historianGroff; degree chairmanLammle; recreation chair Carol Tynon; song lea Rhonda Collins; publicity c man-Vivian Guilliatt.

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ebraska's Oldest College

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . .

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 61

Number 12

APRIL 18, 1966

Nebraska;s Best College

Dr. John Christ Has Taught Here For Twenty Years

Curtis Holliman piled up a nice lead in this relay in the dual meet with Tarkio. Bui • • • down the track, someone dropped the baton, and ihe lead suddenly disappeared.

Peru Talent Show Peruvians Attend Given On KOLN-TV Phi Beta Lambda KOIJN-TV featured Peru State State Convention College talent on its "From the Campus Show" April 3. The program, emceed by Bill Bowen, opened with the folk singing "Inwrrigi'bles," Dale Burgess, Dan Bolin, and Jim Horgan. !Next the woodwind quintet, under the direction of Gilbert E. Wilson .and composed of Steven Brodersen, Mary Lu Hicks, Mary Ellen Oestmann, Mike McNeely, and Duane Bloss, performed. Turning from music: to drama, the Peruvians presented three short scenes from "Night Must Fall." The cast included Dan Knudsen, Myrene Davis, and Joan Bretthorst. -Dr. Frederick Freeburne and !Mary Lu Hicks closed the show with a piano duet from Bizet's lighthearted '\Children's Games." Mr. Robert Bohlken and Mr. R D.. Moore were faculty directors of this presentation.

SGA Representatives Chosen The representatives to the SGA have been elected for the school year 1966-67. There were sixteen elected, fourteen as regular members and two as alternate members. Each organization in school nominates a member to represent it and these are voted on by the entire student body. Listed below are the members and the organizations which they represent: Janice Johnson, Home Economics Club; Jerry Allen, Blue 'Devils; Ron McCoy, Business Club; Phyllis Groff, Phi Beta Lambda; Tom Rosengren, Beta Beta Beta; Mary Mowry, White Angels; Joan Bretthorst, English C1ub; Mary Lu Hicks, MENC; Jackie Swegler, Foreign Language Club; Joanie Sprieck, Women Students Association; LaVelle Ritzman, Men's Dorm Council; Pat Thompson, WAA; Ken Stoner, PSEA; and John Bystandig, Phi Alpha Theta. The alternative representatives are Charles Bowman, Alpha Mu Omega; and John Patterson, In.dustrial Arts Club.

Midland College, F r e m o n t , Nebr., was the site of the Phi Beta Lambda State Convention held April 1-2. The nine members who attended from the Peru State Chapter were: Bob Krofta, !Beverly Kitelinger, 'David Kramer, Allen Chandler, Sherry Schwiesow, Charlotte Nedr~, Gordon Essink, Ron McCoy, and Han Chul Park. Miss Weare and Miss Rowoldt were the advisers.

Many contests were held during the convention. David Kramer placed 1st in the typing division. The 2nd runner up for the "Miss Future Business Teacher" was Beverly Kitelinger. B ob Krofta was 1st runner up for "Mr. Future Business Teacher." The Peru Chapter placed 3rd in State Chapter Activities. Peru's own "Little Brown !Bear" celebrity, Miss Rowoldt, delighted the members of the convention when she sang "The Little Red Fox."

Microbiologist Speaks To Convocation Apr. 6 Dr. Warren E. Englehard, Professor of Microbiology at the University of Nebraska, gave a lecture about the diagnosis of microbial diseases during the convocation period on April 6. The purpose of his lecture was to demonstrate the way bacteria and viruses cause. diseases and to discuss the methods employed to treat these diseases. Dr. Englehard made excellent use of slides and gave a good explanation of what one could determine from these slides to illustrate his points. The slides he used were made by his own technique. Peru was able to get Dr. Englehard to speak to the students through the Distinguished Scholar Program and through the cooperation of the University of Nebraska.

BY LELAND SCHNEIDER Dr. J dhn C. Christ, head ofthe ·Division of Science and Mathematics, came to Peru in the fall ·of 1946 fortified with 15 years of teaching experience at Grant Community High School, Fox Lake, Ill., (a Chicago suburb) and an M.S. from Northwestern University. Dr. Christ was married an d had two sons-John Jr., 12, and James; 4-when he arrived at Peru. Mrs. Christ presently is an elementary supervisor at T. J. Majors Campus School. John Jr. is presently professor of physics at College of Sisquois at Weed, California. Jim is pr e s e n tl y Sieve Pattison hifa for two bases in Peru's game with John F. teaching science at Sutton, Nebr. Enrollment was low during Kennedy College. This hel1>ed beat J.F.K. Dr. Christ's first year at Peru. Enro11ment averaged approximately 200, but one year it dropped slightly below 200. Classes were small and averaged The Broadway production of under 10 except in requiredsub''Lil Abner" will be presentedon jects. Thursday, '.May 19, in the Peru Most of the students were loThe Division of Fine Arts will cal students with hardly any out present an Organ and Piano Re- State College Auditorium by the of state students. The veterans cital on Tuesday, April 26, at Division of Fine Arts. ·'11his will be a first attempt to present a of WW II started arriving in 7:30 p.m. in the Fine Arts AudiBro,adway Musical in the history 1947, and these :inen were ma- torium. The recital will be given ture and seasoned:. Smoking was by the organ and piano students of Peru State. Any college student is welnot allowed: anywhere except in of Mr. R. T. Benford. come to Mlp with staging costhe dormitory. The recital will consist of the tumes, and lighting. If yo~ are The neweSt 1classroom building following selections: interested in helping, please conwas the Science Hall. It was conOrg·an Solostact Mr. Thomas. sidered one of the most up to date science halls in the state. Postlude ----------------- Kern Vicki Fritsch Delzell Hall was practically new. Temple March ------------ Lyon The gymnasium didn't have the Suzanne Bailey new addition then, and looked Invitations to the ninth annual like a church with its steeple. Canzonetts --------- Hollaender Betsy Glenn All-College Open i:House at Peru The Administration B u i 1 d i n g housed 1!he president and all the Village Chapel _________Hopkins State College have ·been extertded Jane Rieschick to prospective students, their paradministrative officers in one ents, and parents of present stularge room. The T. J. Majors Piano SolosCampus School was about the Warsaw Concerto ____ Addensell dents. The event is slated for Sunday afternoon, April 24, and Marsha Lewis same as it presently is. In 1946 most of the staff was Nocturne --- Chopin Op. 9 No. 2 the public is invited, according to Miss Juanita Bradley, associate Sharon Pryon new. There was not a single staff member fr6m the previous year Butterfly ---------------- Grieg dean of students, coordinator for the event. Irene Bergmann in the science department. The ·Visitors will 'be entertained at grading system was A through Scotch Poem ------- MacDowell a 2 p.m. variety show, after Allyn Remmers F. The Bobcats dominated the whieh refreshments will be Organ Solosconference in all sPorts. served in the Student Center. All Postlude in F -------Thimann Dr. Christ worked on his docresidence halls, classrooms, labMary Helen Boose torate at Columbia, the Univeroratories and shops Will be open Fantisio ---------------Stainer sity of Minnesota, Oregon State for inspection. Instructors and ;Mary Kiethlyn Messler University, and finished his studies at . Bari University in Caprice Vrenois -------- Kreisler administrative personnel will be present to answer questions abOut Linda Ernst Italy in 1959. Dr. Christ's thesis the college and academic offerwas Production and Preserv'ation ings. of Concentrates of Laciobacillus Acidophilus fcir Therapeutic Use. Other articles published! as part of the work on his doctorate were: "Some Observations ofthe ·Six cheerleaders for 1966-67 The "Incorrigibles," a campus were elected by the student Nesting Habits of the Eastern Phoebe" and "A Stud~ of Yel- folk singing group, traveled to 1body at' the April 13 convocation. low Birch (Betula luteu) in the Michigan to perform s e v e r a 1 They are Arlene Moss, Nancy Bogs of Itasca Park, Minnesota." times over the Easter vacation. Guilliatt, Joanie Sprieck, Mary Dr. Christ holds membership The group, composed of Dale Bur- Mowry, Jan Johnson, and Donita in several national organizations: gess, Jim Horgan, and Dan !Bolin Speckmann. Other candidates American Association for the performed for the Port Huron were Cheri Combs, Carolyn Price, Advancement of Science, Na- Michigan YiMCA on April 7, at Mary Lu Hicks, iMary McVicker, tional Association of Biology Wagonsiel Gymnasium in Port and Bonita Jacobson. Each girl Teachers, American Men of Sci- Huron, and a wedding reception demonstrated one yell before the ence, Who's Who in American at Marine Hall in Port Huron on voting. ·' Science, and sponsor of Beta Be- April 9. Ceci Evangelist introduced the ·The "Incorrigibles" have been candidates. ta Beta national honorarr biological fraternity on campus. Dr. active on our campus over the Christ also belongs\ to several past several months, and recently Nebraska organizations: Nebras- appeared on Peru State's "From ka Ornithologist's Union, Ne- the Campus" telecast in Lincoln The Peru Chapter of the Nabraska Academy of Science, Ne- Nebr., April 3. They will appea; tional Student Education Associbraska School Master's Club a in the upcoming Open House Va- ation will meet Monday, April 18, (Continued on page two)' riety Show on April 24. (Continued on page two)

Fine Ans Will Present Piant> And Broadway Musical In May Organ Students To Present Recital

Local Folk Group Travels to Michigan Cheerleaders Elected

PSEA To Elect


ELE<JrION APATHY

1n: the recent elections held by the Student Governing Association there existed a situation that points up a major problem on our campus. The $GA is composed of four.teen organizational representatives elected in the spring as well as several other class representatives elected in the fall. To elect the fourteen SGA representatives, the student body had a choice of only seventeen candidates. That didn't leave much of a choice for the few of us that felt it worthwhile to vote. It is a real shame that we can't have a little more interest shown in the one organization that truly represents the students. It has been enjoyable to read the Student Voice published and distributed by the SGA, but it is a shame that the student body is ready to enjoy the results of hard work by the current SGA; but not ready to take an interest in the organization for next year. The only way that we will ever have a successful SGA that can operate as an active voice of the students is when we take the time and interest to make it one. -By Bill Bowen out of the dorm in an emergency without having to break the glass box previously placed around the MORGAN locks on the doors, or without HALL hurling ourselves out of the windows. By Jean Many oh's and ah's have been Wewel heard throughout the dorm as the ·grade reports have been received. What has happened to our I don't know whether they were · 'spring weather? '.It seems to have expressions of happiness or sorbeen lost somewhere among the row, but I have noticed that Easter vacation rush. A few of study habits have taken a more the girls remained in the dorm serious note. over the free days but the majorBecause many of the girls left ity were able to go home, some at the end of nine weeks, others traveling as far as 'Massachusetts have asked permission to move and Tennessee. Pat Thompson into their vacant rooms. Third was able to gain permission to floor has benefitted from the leave early so she could go to her change. There's nothing like a home in New Jersey for Easter. variation of neighbors to keep .She spent her vacation with her life exciting. parents. Her father had just returned home from Viet Nam, after being injured in a bombing raid on a hotel by the Viet Congs DELZELL around Christmas time. HALL The girls have been rushing about getting their room applicaBy tions in for next fall, practicing Ralph for cheerleader try-outs, preparShaffer ing for the summer session, and hunting for summer jobs. Time Easter vacation quieted the acseems to have suddenly run out tivities around Delzell Hall a bit. with only a few weeks of school A few lithargic souls lengthened left. their vacation by leaving a few New alarm locks have been days ahead of time and returning placed on the doors for emergena day or so late for classes. cy exit use. It has created a sense The dormitory council held its of security among the girls. At least now we know we can get regular meeting on Tuesday,

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Bill Bowen --------------------------------~-----Co-editor Joari Bretthorst ----------------------------------Co-editor Nancy Jarvis ---------------------------Personnel Manager Pat Venditte ------~----------------------Business Manager Joan Bretthorst -----------------------------Layout Ediitor Dan Strecker ----------------------------------Circulation Phil Dorssom --------------------------Campus to Campus Mary Lu Hicks --------------------------------Copy Editor Mary Budler ----------------------------------Copy Editor Jean Wewel --------------------------Morgan Hall Column Pat Venditte --------------------------Majors Hall Column Ralph Shaffer ------------------------Delzell Hall Column Phyllis Groff -----------------------Campus School Column Ron Snodgrass ------------------------------Sports Column Walter Rimmer ------------------------------Photographer John Soby -----------------------------------Photographer Edward LeTourneau -------------------------Photographer Phyllis Groff --------------------------------Photographer Bonnie Anderson -~------------------------------Reporter Marilyn Bailie -----------------------------------Reporter Al Blankenship ----------------------------------Reporter Mike C:astle -------------------------------------..Reporter Brian Collins -------------------------------------Reporter Linda Coslett ------------------------------------Reporter Bernadine Fintel ---------------------------------Reporter Derunis Hubbard ---------------------------------..Reporter Mary Inglis --------------------------------------Reporter Carleen Kreifels ---------------------------------Reporter Pat McKee --------------------------------------Reporter Wayne Miller -----------------------------------Reporter

~e S:inagacz ----------------------------------..B.eporter

Pat Wheatley ----------------------------------..B.eporter Cheryl Winans ----------------------------------Reporter

April 6. Plans were discussed on the :procedure that would be followed for election of next year's council members. During the Wednesday, April 13 dorm meeting, nominations for next year's council were made. The :present council then had to determine which of the nominees were qualified to be elected. The qualifications which the nominee must meet are: (1) be a resident of the dorm, and (2) have an over-all 5.00 grade point average. The residents are now able to open and close the front doors with ease because of the addition of two new latches. Now the cool southerly :breezes will no longer lbe able to whip through the "quiet" halls chilling our house mother to the bone.

CAMPUS TO CAMPUS By Phil Dorssom Leaving 'March 26, the Hastings College Touring Choir began its .annual spring tour. The choir was on the road for nine days and sang in concerts in Omaha, Fremont, Nebraska City, Cedar Rapids, '.Iowa, \St. Louis, !Mo., Hamilton, 'Bloomington and Chicago, Ill. and Battle Creek, Michigan. Also at Hastings College, Agnes Moorehead, star of stage, screen, radio, and television will present "An Evening With Agnes Moorehead," a performance of readings of various types of literature on Tuesday evening; April 26. On March 15, approximately 40 students of McCook Co 11 e g e toured the Nebraska State Penal Institution in Lincoln. After the tour the students were allowed to ask pertinent questions to a panel consisting of four of the institution's inmates. In addition, sociology students at 'McCook also visited the Beatrice State Home for the mentally retarded on March 15, 17, and 22. Recently at Moorhead State College, Moorhead, Minnesota, the Vienna Choir !Boys made their third appearance. At the annual Snow Week celebrations at Moorhead, awards were given to the men with the best beards. Awards were given for the "best all around :beard," "longest beard," "best try," "most unique," 'lbushiest," and "cuddliest." On March 18, the Sixth Annual Intra-,High School Scholastic Contest was held at Chadron State College. Approximately 1,300 participants from,50 schools were expected. On March 30, at Washburn College in Topeka, the Women's Sports Club of the University of Oslo presented a Norwegian gymnastics e:x:hibition. This group is presently on tour in the United States. At the State College of Iowa, in Cedar ·Falls, Mr. Ross R. Barnett, former governor of Mississippi, spoke March 23 on the Civil Rights issue. 1

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Nebraska Cify Coca-Cola Boitling Company and three of his students were guests of the dorm prior to the band clinic. 'Saturday, April 9, Bethel College, Minnesota, tt~ack team camped in !Majors after the loss to Peru. During the four-day holiday Rich Bencevinne and Arnold Johnson were able to catch up on :past assignments because they were the only ones in the dorm. Dennis Tunks is in Omaha under a doctor's care. Medical authorities say it will be four or five days before he is able to return to school. All here at Majors are hoping for a speedy recovery. Lavelle Ritzman was elected as S.G.A. representative from Majors. He will be in office in the fall term. The color T.V. is still playing to standing room only. The students stranded in Peru spend much of their time in the dorm. The Incorrigibles, a folk singing group, traveled to Michigan and played in three programs. Dan Bolin from Delzell Hall, the director Dale Burgess, and Jim Horgan from Majors were accompanied by Neal Bower and John Murren.

PSEA To Elect

(Continued from page one) at 7:00 in the Fine Arts Auditorium for the purpose of electing officers for the 1966·67 school MAJORS year. HALL The current• PSEA officers are: president, !Bill &wen; vice-president, Tim Gilligan; secretary, By Elaine Neddenriep; and treasurPat Vendiite er, Ron Peterson. Charles Stoner was the SGA representative for Friday, April 1, Eugene Wal- this year, and Ken Stoner was den, a former student of Peru, elected as SGA representative.for now teaching in Palisade, Nebr., 1966-67.

Dr. John Christ Has Taught Here For Twenty Years (Continued from page one) life member of NEA, an:dJ pres dent of the Nebraska Colle Conference. Dr. Ohrist is ch man of the Peru State Currie lum Committee and member the Administrative C o u n c i which serves in an advisory pacity to the President of th College. Dr. Christ wrote an interest' article for the March 15, 1956 Pedagogian entitled "How Im portant Are Science Teachers?' This article predicted the role o science in the future. I believ many of the students and facul ty should read this article. Thi may be done by asking the li· brarian for admittance to the reference room w!here all th Pedagogians are available in bounclJ volumes. Editor's Note: This is the third' in a series of four feature stories on faculty members with twenty or more years of service at Peru.

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two walks and a hit batsman, Peru scored its first run before John Creamer, Worcester, Mass., drove in two with a double. Tegelhutter iced the cake with his Combining superb pitching and three-run homer off Joe Rysavy. Creighton jumped on Vern timely hitting, Peru State College Jensen in the first inning of the opened its 1966 season April 1-2 · with three victories in four out- second game for a single tally, but the sophomore settled down ings. Of the four starting pitchers for the next two innings to hold selected by first year coach Joe Creighton scoreless before being Pelisek, 'only sore-armed Vern forced from the game with a sore Jensen, Nebraska City, failed to arm. The Bluejays belted freshman Larry '.Beach, Genoa, scoring go the route. In Friday's opening twin-bill two runs in the fourth and four with Creighton, big Jim Tegel- in the fifth. The Bobcats then swept a twin hutter, sophomore from Syracuse, pitched and batted the Bobcats to bill from Bob Cerv's John F. a 6-0 victory in the opener. Kennedy nine Saturday in AubCreighton rebounded to take the urn, 9-2 and 2-0, behind the hurlnightcap 6-4. The left h a n d e d ing of rookie Doug Winfield, Tegelhutter S:pun a two-hitter Granite City, m., and veteran and socked a three-run home run Dean Oain, Thurman, Iowa. Peru played errorless ball Satin defeating Creighton. Shakey Bluejay hurling enabled the Bob- urday in wrapping up the twincats to ice the giame behind Teg- bill victory over J.F.K. Righthanded Doug Winfield, elhutter's whitewash pitching. Taking advantage of a single, starting and winning his first collegiate game, pitched scoreless ball in the J.F.K. opener until the fifth inning when J.F.K. scored one on a hit batsman, a double and a single. The Kennedyites picked up another in the seventh. Peru won the game in the third and fourth innings by scoring five of their nine runs. John Creamer, Winfield, and Gary Young, led Peru at the plate, driving in two runs each. Dean Cain, junior righthander, allowed only a fifth inning single in Peru's second game win. His effort bested a two-hit performance by J.F.K. frosh hurler Pickering. John Chasse, Worcester, Mass., scored what proved to be the deciding run in the first inning when he drew a lead-off walk and scored on a squeeze bunt by Rick Connole, Worcester, !Mass. 'Peru's second run crossed the plate in the sixth when ~t

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Peru ______ ooo 060 o 0-9-0 Creighton _ooo ooo o 0-2-5 Tegelhutter and Venditte Rysavy, Shea (4) and Carpenter

Bobcat Bats Win Mo. Double Header

On Wednesday, April 6, Coach Joe Pelisek's Peru State College baseball team swept a double header from Northwest Missouri Peru ______ 021 010 0 4 - 5 • 3 State at Maryville, Mo., 5-0 and Creighton _100 240 0 7 - 8 - 1 8-5, to move their season's record Jensen, Beach (L) and Venditte to five wins and one loss. Rezek, DeLeo (W) O'Shea (7) and Jim Tegelhutter, Syracuse , Carpenter pitched his second two~hit shutPeru _____ 003· 213 0 9 - 12 - 0 out in as many starts and Al SulJ.F.K. ___ ooo 011 o 2 - 3 - 0 livan, Worcester, Mass., slashed two home runs to key the first Winfield (W) and Venditte game victory. In the second game McAlvey and Lattari Peru ______ 100 001 0 2 - 2 - 0 it was the relief pitching of J.F.K. ____ ooo ooo o o- 1 - 1 righthander Doug Winfield, Granite City, Ill., and a clutch twoCain (W) and Venditte run bases loaded double by Mike Pickering and Lattari Corgnati, Monmouth, Ill., which sparked the Bobcats to the decision. Tegelhutter scored what proved SPORTS to be the first game's winning COLUMN run in the third inning when he singled and later tallied on a single by Steve Pattison, ScottsBy bluff. Ron Yates, Granite City, Ron Snodgrass Ill., brought ;mother home in the fourth on a sacrifice fly. Bobcat track fans had their Peru scored twice in the fifth, last opportunity to see the Peru both on Sullivan's first home run thinclads on their home oval, as of the season, following a single the Cats beat Bethel College of by Pattison. Sullivan closed out St. Paul, Minn., 104lh-31% last . the scoring in the seventh with a Saturday. solo four-bagger clout. Tim Hendricks, Omaha, estabIn winning his second game of lished a new two mile school rec- the season, Tegelhutter allowed ord and his mates slammed the only two men to reach third and mile run, shot put, 880 yard run, two men to reach second. He and the high jump to earn the struck out nine and walked six while keeping his earned run landslide victory. fJ3unching six runs into the fifth average unblemished. inning, the Bobcat baseball team Ray Cain, Peru starting pitcher took the first game of a twin bill in the second game from Thurfrom Creighton University before m.an, Iowa, was hit hard in the the Bluejays came back in the three innings he worked but second game to win 7~4. managed to leave the game trailBig Jim Tegelhutter pitched ing only 2-1 when freshman Doug and hit Peru to the 6-0 victory Winfield took over in relief. Winwith near flawless pitching and a field pitched three innings of ·timely three-run homer. scoreless ball before weakening Freshman Doug Winfield yield- in the seventh to give up three ed but three hits in beating John runs after Peru had a six-run F. Kennedy in the first game of a cushion. twin bill at Auburn 9-2, and SenTied at 2-2 going into the top ior Dean Cain spun a one hit of the .fifth inning, Peru State exdandy to win the nightcap 2-0. ploded for six runs to win the Jim Tegelhutter pitched his game. Pat Venditte, Omaha, second two-hit shutout in as singled;· Winfield singled; John many .starts and Al Sullivan Chasse, Worcester, Mass., walked, smashed two home runs to lead and Rick Connole, Worcester, Peru by Northwest Missouri in Mass., scored Venditte on a fieldthe first game of a double header er's choice. The key blow of the April 6 at ·Maryville. inning came next on Corgnati's In the second game of the twin double which scored Winfield and bill it was Doug Winfield who Chasse. Al Sullivan gained life came to relieve Dean Cain, and on an error on a fielder's choice a clutch bases loaded double Connole scored. Gary Young, Adwhich sparked Peru to an 8-5 de- ams, singled to score another, cision. \and a walk to Ron Yates forced in The Bobcats dfamond record the sixth of the inning. now stands at 5-1, with Jim Tegelhutter and Doug Winfield leading the pitching with two wins apiece.

Winfield's yield of three runs in the seventh came when Stan Albanese, Northwest Missouri left fielder, smacked a three-run home run. Game 1Peru __ 001 120 1-5-5-0-Tegelhutter (W-2-0); and Venditte. NWM ______ 000 000 0-0-2-2Mitchell (L), Orlask (69); and Muff. ·Home Runs-Peru: Sullivan 2. Game 2Peru __ 100 160 0-8-6-5-Cain, Winfield (W-2-0); and Venditte. NWM __ 101 000 3-5-8-2-Girling (L), Anderson (5), Kurtz (5); and Pulland and Muff (6).

Home Runs-'NWM: Vierk, Albanese.

Omaha North, Wymore And Sterling Winners Of Invitational Meet Omaha North, Wymore, and Sterling high schools won division championships Friday and Saturday in the second annual Peru State College Invitational Track Meet. The Peru State-sponsored track meet attracted 53 schools from Nebraska, Iowa, and Missouri. Forty-seven schools competed in the inaugural in 1964. Last year's scheduled meet was cancelled because of snow. Using superior depth, Omaha North captured Saturday's Class A division by scoring 45 points in the 13-school division. Closest competitor was Omaha Technical High School with 39 points. Benson trailed in third place with 27. All 1966 Class A performances either equaled or bettered the performance of Class A in 1964. Wymore won a spirited tussle with Sidney, Iowa, to capture the Division B trophy, scoring 35 points to Sidney's 27. Nine Class ·B records were broken as 17 schools battled in that class. In Class C, Sterling High School completely dominated the meet with a championship total of 41 % points. Second place went to Filley. Jim Mencl scored all but % of his team's 201/s points with four first place finishes. Mencl, with the outstanding individual performance of the twoday meet, won the discus, 1ow hurdles, high hurdles, and broad jump. Twenty-three teams competed in Class C. AU performances in Class C stand as records because the 1964 meet was <livid· ed into only A and B classes.

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Golfers Lose The Peru State College golf team, under the coaching of Mr. Larry Ebner, opened its 1966 · spring season, April 1, with the St. Benedicts' Ravens at the Bellvue Country Club Golf Course· at Atchison, Kansas. The first five members of this year's Peru team include Dick Seybert, Mike Barsi, Dave Fife, Larry Roder, and John Gorges. Other members on the team are Jack Cook, Doug Cramer, Greg Hazen, Mel Hester, Dick Shuman, and Mark Wendt. The first match was played under rather poor conditions, and Peru was defeated by the Ravens,

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"PRESCRIPTIONS A SPECIALTY"


Peruvian Staff Met Final Deadline

Second Semester Ped Staff

CAMPUS SCHOOL NEWS By Phyllis Groff

-Photo by Rimmer Front row: Sharon Beatty, Bobbie Armstrong. Second row: Ginny Mullen, Mary Budler, Linda Armstrong, Jan· ice Wheeldon. Third row: Dick Berthold, Mike Smagacz, Pai VendiUe. . No~ in picture: Bill Bowen. Having met ihe final deadline ahead of fime on March 11, ihe second semester staff is now working on a twelve page supplement covering events from March 11 fo fhe end of the school year.

·Senator Hughes Speaks At Open AAUW Meeting

GAMMA DELTA Gamma Delta held a combination picnic~business m e e t i n g March 29, 1966, at the Peru Park. Rev. Schooler, who has been pastor of the Missouri Synod Church at Auburn, Nebr., and has led the Gamma Delta group for the past five years, was the honored guest. Rev. Schooler answered a call in Prohousky, Michigan.

Senator Calista Cooper Hughes, representative from this district to the unicameral legislature, spoke at an open meeting Tues· day, April 12, at 7:30 p.m. in the recital hall of the Fine Arts building. Senator Hughes topic was "The Work of a Woman Legislator." SOCIO-DRAMAS The speaker was sponsored by SPEECH PROJECT the local AAUW chapter, of The speech correction class, which Mrs. George Schottenhaunder the direction of Mr. Robert mel is president. Mrs. C. Vernon Siegner, im· Moore has begun to present socioplementation chairman for the dramas. Divided into five groups, topic, "Law and Citizen," and students are to investigate a Mrs. Robert Cockerham, vice· problem of society having to do president and local pr o gr a m with speech. After having done chairman, arranged for Senator this, they are to develop the problems involved by partic~at· Hughes visit to Peru. ing in plays, the casts .being made up of the individual groups. 11u1uuun11111111111u11111111uuuu1111uu1u11u1uunu1nn11 The plays will show how certain problems are taken care of ltUUUUllUllUIUlllUIUIUUIUllllllllUllUUllUUUUlllllllll in the school room. The child is taken through the phases of KAPPA DELTA PI Fifteen members were initiated speech correction and the prob· into Kappa Delta iPi, Monday, lem is eli.minated. April 4. They are: Sheryl Barrett; Charles Bowman; Pat Corrigan; Carolee Heim; Carol Henderson; Terri Kisby; Donna Kohrs; Faye Kuenning; Larry Kuenning; Auto Repairs Michael Malone; Mary Oestmann; Kay Painter; Lois Pietzyk; Ruth • Aufomafic frans. Stunz; Nancy Vanderbeek. • WRECKER SERVICE Oother business included the • Sfeam cleaning election of officers for the next school term. They are: Jackie lubrication Dodson, president; Nancy Jarvis, vice-president; Nancy Larson, Gasoline secretary; Carol H end e r s o n , • Check our price and treasurer; Par Corrigan, historsave money

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The students of Peru Prep have been busy with the coming of spring. On. April 5 they attended a music contest at Cook. The ratings were: chorus-one; bandone; woodwind choir-One; brass quartet-two; clarinet quartetone; sax quartet-one; flute triotwo; trumpet trio-two. Marie !Ballue received a one on her clarinet solo, and Laura Adams received a one on her French horn solo. On Tuesday, April 19 the band held a concert in the college auditorium. On April 22 and 23 the chorus and band will go to the District Music Contest in Nebraska City. Twelve track boys went to Doane for the 'Doane Invitational Track Meet on April 15. On Wednesday, April 27 they will compete in the Conference Track and Field Meet at Peru. The cast for the ;p1ay Tish have been busy practicing. The play will be presented on April 29. Ralph Kennedy, son of Mr. and Mrs. Clay Kennedy, w o n first in the !Nemaha Valley Science Fair with his entry, a sixinch reflecting telescope. The tube was made from stove pipe, and countes balanced by barbell weights. He ground the lensfrom raw glass'. The entire ;project took two years to complete: On May 13 and 14, Ralph will take his project to the National Science Fair at Dallas, Texas. The annual Mother-Daughter !Banquet, sponsored by the FHA, was held on Tuesday, April 12 in the high school cafeteriia. The guest speaker was Mr. Bohlken. Special guests were Edna and Haze1 Weare, honorary members of FHA; Jette a'Porta; and Mrs. Bohlken and Katy. Each member invited one or more guests to the banquet. 1

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Nancy Larson and Miss Ashley, sponsor, reported on their trip to Houston, Texas for their biennial Kappa Delta Pi convention held in February.

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Attend May Fete

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . .

Peru Pedagogian Volume 61

PERU, NEBRASKA

MAY 2, 1966

Number 13

Miss Hazel Weare Will Retire Soon BY PHYLLIS GROFF Miss Hazel Weare, associate professor of business education and supervisor of business in the Campus School, came to Peru in 1943. She received her 13.S. and M.S. at Kansas State Teachers ·College at Pittsburg, Kansas, and did additional graduate study at the University of California in IBerkeley, California. She has also attended the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska; the University of Denver in Colorado; the College of Education, Greeley, Colorado; and the State University of Iowa, Iowa City. Miss Weare has taught at Peru for 23 years. She taught three years at Edna, Kansas, where she was principal, and 15 years at Great Bend, Kansas. It was two years after she came to Peru before there was a boy in her class because of WW II. She taught business law to the Navy cadets, who were in training at Peru. There were ten boys in the classes at that time. When she first came to Peri.I, there was only one office machine. Today there are nineteen, not counting typewriters. Miss Weare is a member of · NiEA and NSEA, National Business Teachers Association, Mountains-Plains Regional Association, and State of Nebraska :Business Teachers' Education. She belongs to the American Associations of University Women and the Business and Professional Women's Group, both of which are national organizations. She is the advisor of Phi Beta Lambda, an honorary business fraternity here at Peru. She helped organize the first State Future !Business Leaders of America and has attended all state

The Choir will sing the fol· lowing selections: "Unnecessary Town" and "Jubilation T. Cornpone" from the show "Lil Abner," by Mercer and DePaul. This show will be presented on the campus on May 19. The final selection of the program will be "The Battle Hymn of the Republic," arr. for band and chorus by Alfred Reed. The public is invited to attend this concert. There is no admis· sion charge.

End Marlowe Twins Present Convo

. Dr. G. W. Do~ge attended a meeting of the American Personnel and Guidance Association, April 4 through Apnl 7. Congressman Clair Callan hosted the Nebraska group at a breakfast. During this breakfast. Mr. Callan reminisced about his .student days at Peru Staie College. Pictured are: Dr. Weidman, assistant to Congressman Callan: Mr. Stan Matzke, Supt. of the University of Nebraska School of Vocational Agriculture at Curtis, Nebr., Congressman Callan: Dr. Glaess, Director of Coun· seling at Concordia College of Seward, Nebr., Dr. Dodge, Director of Guidance and Counselling at Pe· ru Staie College; and Dr. James Auld, Director of Testing at Wichita University, Wichita, Kansas. conventions held by this organization. Miss Weare's hobby is traveling. She has been in 48 states, Mexico, Canada, and nine countries in Europe. When she first came to Peru, there were two clothing stores, four grocery stores, and t w o trains a day. Miss Weare is an active member of the Christian Church, and lives in Peru with her sister Edna 'Weare. Edna has· been in Peru

"°"

(Continued on page two)

Peru Band Ensemble and Choir To Present Music Week Concert The Peru State College Band Ensemble under the direction of Gilbert Wilson, and the College Choir under the direction of Hugh Thomas, will present the Annual Music Week Concert on Tuesday, May 3, in the College Auditorium; The College Band Ensemble will play the following selections: "High Noon" arr. ·by Dale Duensing, "Tympendium" b y Schinstine, a tympani solo played by Bill Uhri, "A Festive Overture" by Alfred Reed, "A Mancini Medley" by Alfred Reed, "Chorale and Capriccio" by Giovanni, and "Days of Glory" by Cacavas.

This Week

Bohlken Named Teacher Of Year Mr. Robert Bohlken, assistant professor of English, was honored by the Peru State Student Education Association as "Outstanding. Teacher of the Year" at an all-college convocation April 20. The presentation of the award was made by the PSEA president Bill 'Bowen. Bohlken was selected from a field of five nominated by the PSEA. Other nominees were Dr. John C. Christ, head of the Division of Science and Mathematics; .Leland Sherwood, assistant professor of art; Jerome Stemper, associate professor of physical education; Lyle Strom, associate professor of social sciences. For Bohlken, it was an award come home. In 1959, his senior year at Peru State, he helped originate the annual .award as president of the PSEA. The "Outstanding Teacher of the Year'' recipient list includes: (Continued on page two)

"Showboat" May Fete Children's Theatre The Campus School experiTheme For 1966 e.nced a first Thursday, April 21. The theme for the 1966 May Fete Program, under the direction of Miss Bonnie Rutz, director of women's physical education, will be "Showboat." The musical program, featuring folk and modern dance, will be climaxed by the winding of the May pole. Miss Pat Wheatley, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and Ray Cain, Thurman, Iowa, were elected by the votes of the student body to reign over the May F·ete at Peru State College, May 6. Attendants to the royalty include: Senior~Kristine Wewel, Newport; Phil Madden, Clarinda, Iowa.

Junior-!Ceci Evangelist, Newark, N. Y.; -Bill Rinne, Burchard. Sophomore--'Mary M o w r y , Beatrice; Ralph DiCesare, Jr., Worcester, Mass. · 'Freshman-Janice J o h n s o n , (Continued on page two)

Banquet • Picnic Spring Schedule The schE:dule of the spring banquets and picnics of the organizations on campus is: Phi Beta Lambda English Club Alpha Mu Omega

May May May May May

9 9 10 10 12

Drama Club Business Club Peru Student EducaMay 16 tion Association Pedagogian and Peruvian Staff May 17 Industrial Arts Club May 25

The Children's Theater was presented to grades 1-6 by the High School speech class under the direction of Mr. Robert Bohlken. The first performance of the Theater included a cut from Treasure Island, and the plays "Horton Hatches An Egg" and "Rose Colored Glasses." The purpose of the Theater is twofold. It enables the speech

On April 15, Jeffery and Ronald Marlowe performed for Peru State College students in the Peru State Auditorium. Their first appearance at Peru State College was in the summer of 1963. The Marlowe brothers have served two years in the United States Army. They have performed together more than half their lives. At eleven they appeared with the New York Philharmonic, the Pittsburgh, New Haven and Lancaster Symphony Orchestras. The Marlowes are graduates of Temple University, and have been featured since childhood on the television shows of Milton Bearle, Arthur Godfrey, Garry Moore, Steve Allen, and most recently on Johnny Carson's "To· night Show" and N.B.C.'s distinguished "Recital Hall" series. They are proteges of the famous duo-piano team Pierre Laboshutz and Genia Nemenoff. The program consisted of: "Esrrientes" from Magnificat; "Allegro con Spirito" from Sonata in D; "Romance and Tarantella" from Suite No. 2; "Vif," "Modere," "Braziliera" from Scaromouche Suite, and "Blue Danube Valse." The pair were so enthusiastically received by the Peru students that they played three encores, consisting of, "Yankee Doodle," Gershwin style, "Jamaica Rumba," and "Ritual Fire Dance" by De Falla. class to gain valuable experience before an audience and provides the younger children with literature in an acted form. Mrs. Gnade was in charge of the costuming.

More Than 1,000 Guests Here For Annual Open House Governor And Arndt In Debate Here A debate was held Wednesday afternoon, April 20, between Governor Morrison and J\'.tr. Arndt, the Democratic candidates for a seat in the United States Senate. Mr. Moore introduced the candidates. Both gave a ten-minute constructive speech and a fiveminute rebuttal. Mr. Arndt's main topics of discussion were population, leadership and the voting of the people. He also advocated a four-year term for house of representatives. Governor Morrison stressed the importance of speaking to the people in person and the open discussion of iss~es. He also placed special emphasis on education in Nebraska and the drastic need for conservation of water.

The ninth annual Open House Variety Show was held April 27, at 2:00 p.m. with the 1 a r g est turn-out ever. Over a thousand guests were present. Prospective students, their parents, and the parents of present students received special invitations. Th e public was also invited. The College Band Ensemble directed by Gilbert E. Wilson opened the Variety Show. Greetings were given by Bill Rinne, president of SGA, and Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of the college. Myrene Davis gave t w o readings. A duet from "Lil' Abner" was sung by Kathy Rotter and Richard Shelton. Excerpts from "Night Must Fall" were done by Myrene Davis, Dan Knudsen, Joan Bretthorst, and Bill Bowen. Two numbers were sung by "The Incorrigibles," a folk singing group consisting of Jim Horgan, Dale Burgess and Danny Bolin. Mary Lu Hicks and

The students then participated in a question-answer session. The

Dr. Frederick G. Freeburne played three piano duets. The final number on the afternoon program was a preview to May

(Continued on page two)

(Continued on page two)


CAMPUS TO CAMPUS By Phil Dorssom At nearby Tarkio College, Sele<!tive Service tests which may qualify students for a draft deferment will be given on May 14, May 21, and June 3. Also at Tarkio College, the Tarkio College Choir presented a roncert of sacred and secular music on April 8.

On March 31, April 1 and April 2, the Wayne State Drama Department presented th e i r Child's Theatre production of the fairy tale, "Cinderella." At Chadron State College on March 24 and 25, three one-act plays were presented by the Chadron State College Directing Class. Selective Service Qualifi.cation Tests will also be given at Chadron State this spring. The annual spring play at Midland Lutheran College, Fremont, Nebr., will be "The Trojan Women." Tryouts for this play have just been rompleted. Recently at Central Missouri State College, Warrensburg, eral Maxwell Taylor addressed the students and faclllty on the Vietnam situation. General Taylor is a retired four-star general and recent ambassador to Vietnam. A!So at CMS, 179 students . are enrolled in spring term studtinf' tea,ching. The women's GyifuiisHcs Club, University of Osfo, Norway, · recently performed atCMS. The group is celebr~tini its 70th anniversary. Bronco golfers, at Hastings College, recently opened their 1966 season in top form with a 10~2 victory over the Nebraska wesleyan squad.

Gen-

Loretta Young, internationally known star of motion pictures and television, met April 17 with Creighton students. Miss Young delivered the annual Alpha Sigma Nu lecture and was presented a Distinguished Citizen Citation by the college.

IJ:lhe E-State Players at the. Kansas State Teachers College, Emporia, recently p r e s e n t e d "Long Day's Journey Into Night." About two weeks ago the Northwest Missouri State College at Maryville presented its annual Ugly Man On Campus contest in order to raise money for student loans.

MORGAN HALL By Jean Wewel Open house, April 24, brought many new girls to look over the campus and the dorm. which quite possibly will be their home for the next school year. Many friends and parents of the girls came down to visit that weekend. May Fete has created ·S·ome excitement in. the dorm. Dtesses for the occasion are being .made, and dances for the evening program are being practiced. Two very talented girls, Arlene Moss .and Sue Kenworthy, took partin the annual Miss Auburn Pageant, held Sunday, April .24, at Auburn. For the talent division of the contest, Sue sang and Arlene danced. The girls in the dorm were behind them all the way and were proud to have them represent us in the pageant. A June 11 wedding is being planned by Kris Wewel. She will be the bride of Dom LaRocca. They .are both ·student teaching these last nine weeks and will be graduates this spring. They will have an 11 o'clock wedding at the Catholic Church at North Bend, Nebraska. Future plans will take them to Columbia, Mo.

MAJORS HALL By Pat Venditfe In preparation for open house, the boys at Majors washed, waxed, and dusted! rooms. all week. Brian Collins should be awarded a Mr. Clean trophy for the cleanest floor and the dirtiest knees, d'ue to the fact he could not find a mop. · Mike Corgnati saw his parents for the first time since Christmas. They came to .see their son for the first time in collegiate baseball. Accompanying Mr. and Mrs. Corgnati was a special friend! of Mike's. . · Dave Hensley, Wayne Miller, and Dave Kramer were part of the .contingent to Salina, Kans., attending a · stewardship .conference. The boys on second floor are having a physical fitness program in Room 2QIL Because the majority O·f the boys taking the test are from natural program, those flunking the test wish to have their names withheki. Dennis .Tunks is back from .Omaha after being under medical attention during the holidays. The boys from the East are planning travel arrangements to get home. They plan to use cars, buses, trains, planes, and thumbs as methods of transportation.

DELZELL HALL By Ralph Shaffer

.....

Kathy Welsh. is back with us after a long sick-leave ..Kathy has been very active in sports, in fact, is the only girl on the tennis team this year. But her tennis may have come to a close f o r this year due to her illness. We all hope she will soon be back on the go.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Bill Bowen --------------------------------------Co-editor Joan Bretthorst ----------------------------------Co-editor Nancy Jarvis ___________________________Personnel Manager Pat Venditte -----------------------------Business Manager Joan Bretthorst _____________________________Layout Editor Dan Strecker ----------------------------------Circulation Phil Dorssom __________________________ Campus to Campus Mary Lu Hicks --------------------------------Copy Editor Mary Budler ----------------------------------Copy Editor Jean Wewel --------------------""'-----Morgan Hall Column Pat Venditte --------------------------Majors Hall Column. Ralph Shaffer ------------------------Delzell Hall Co~umn Phyllis Groff _______________________ Campus School Column Ron Snodgrass ------------------------------Sports Column Walter Rimmer ------------------------------Photographer John Soby -----------------------------------Photographer Edward LeTourneau _________________________ PhotOgrapher Phyllis Groff --------------------------------Photographer Bonnie Anderson ---------------------------------Reporter Marilyn Bailie -----------------------------------Reporter Al Blankenship ----------------------------------Reporter Mike Castle --------------------------------------Reporter Brian Collins --------------j-----------------------Reporter Linda Coslett ------------------------------------Reporter Bernadine Fintel ---------------------------------Reporter Dennis Hubbard ----------------------------------Reporter Mary Inglis --------------------------------------Reporter Carleen Kreifels ---------------------------------Reporter Pat McKee ---------------------------------------Reporter Wayne Miller -----------------~------------------Reporter :M:ike Smagacz ------------------------------------Reporter Pat Wheatley ------------------------------------Reporter Cheryl Winans ------------------------------.-----Reporter

The newly cleaned rooms and polished floors of ·Delzell Hall greeted the many visitors. during Open House held on Sunday, April 24. The rooms will be completely renovated before the next Open House rolls around n ex t year. A drawing by ·Paul Fell of the proposed rooms is displayed on the bulletin board in the dorm. A special thanks to the residents who helped at the tea held in the Student Center. I am sure the helpers enjoyed sampling the extra cookies-after all, I w a s there to help them. With only a few weeks remaining in the semester, some of the residents have begun to burn the midnight oil in an attempt to learn a whole semester's work in a short time. The following are the election'. results for the dormitory rouncil for 1966-67: president, Roger Neujahr; vice-president, Berton Faulkner; and secretary-treasurer, Kevin O'Connor. Good luck to the new officers from the whole dorm!

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Governor And Arndt In Debate Here (Continued from page one) · faculty and their spouses and members of the S.G.A. were invited to coffee with the hon<>red guests after the debate.

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Miss Hazel Weare Will Retire Soon (Continued from page one) since 1929 · and taught home . economics here for 35 years before retiring. They are going to sell their house and move to Lexington, Mo., after Hazel · re.-_ tires.

"Showboat" May Fete Theme For 1966 (Continued from page one) Glenwood, Iowa; David Fife, Corning, Iowa. •Elected from the freshman class to be ladies-in-waiting are: Nancy Guilliatt, Auburn; Donita Speckmann, Elk Creek; Lola Morrissy, Peru; Diane Eltiste, Nebraska City; Janice Kelly, Falls City; and Leona Masters, Nebraska City.

(Continued from page one) Fete, a soft shoe dance done by Janis Walford, Sandi Hopp, and Mary Beth Gerber. At 3:00 p.m. refreshments were served at the Student Center. All residence halls, classrooms, laboratories and shops were open for inspection. Administrative personnel were ·present to answer questions about the college and academic offerings.

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Bohlken Named Teacher Of Ypar (Continued from page one) Albert Brady, Dr. John Christ, L. B. Mathews, now retired, Edward Camealy, now on leave of absence, James Pilkington, LeRoy Leland, now teaching in Uganda, Africa, for Columbia University, and Lyle McKercher.

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Peru And Kearney Split Games Here

SPORTS COLUMN By Ron Snodgrass The Bobcat baserunners found it tough to reach home plate in their last three outings, scoring only 13 runs in six games· to opponents' 32. Six of these 13 runs have been scored on home rurus. In the Bobcats' most recent outing, Allen Sullivan tripled and homered to lead Peru past Kearney 3-0 in the second game Coach Joe Pelisek and ±he bench seem ±o be relaxed during a of a double header, Saturday, April 23. In the first game Kear~cent game with Saint Benedicis. Needless :to say, :the Bobcats ney scored seven runs on four were winning this game. hits and four Peru errors to nudge the Bobcats 7-6. apiece in the twenty inning conWashburn University, using test. what seemed to be "pine trees" Peru's scoring in the top' of the for bats, bombed Peru 10-1 and twentieth, came when J 0 h n 13-2 in two non-conference conCreamer hit a stand-up triple. tests at Peru, Sa:turday, April 16. Rick Connoles' single brought in In another non-conference conPeru State d~feated Hastings Creamer.. Mike Corgnati singled test last week the Bobcats split College twice-4-1, and 19-3. The with Al Sullivan providing a a double header with St. Benefirst game went twenty innings triple, bringing in two more runs dicts College. The 'Cats took the .in a rugged battle between for Peru. first game 2-0, with Jim Tegelpitchers. Doug Winfie1d1 went the dis- hutter getting the win, then Starting left hander Jim Teg- tance in the second game giving elhutter went the first eight in- up only four hits and three runs. dropped the nightcap 2-1. The Bobcat golfers' record now nings and was relieved in the stands at one win and two deinth by Dean Cain, who oame feats. After losing their opener with the score tied 1-1. By to St. Benedicts College, they being able to hold the Broncos came back to defeat Midwestern for eleven extra innings, Cain i . On April 23, Peru's golf team College at Denison, Iowa. In was credited with the win. Tegelhutter and Cain walked one lost to Doane, 10-5, at Nebraska their latest outing, Northwest City. The leading scorer for Pe- Missouri easily outpointed the ru was Dick Seybert with 74. Bobcats 131h to 11h. Dick SeyOther Peru scorers were John bert picked up the points for Gorges 80, Mike Barsi 86, M e 1 Peru. Hester 92, and Dave Fife 96. PeNorthwest Missouri capitaru's record is one win and three lized on the injury of two of Pelosses. Poor weather has limited ru's top sprinters to take a vicpractice and matches for the tory in a triangular meet with golf team. The team hopes to be 94 points to Peru's 71. Tarkio tuned up for the NCC meet on College placed third with 10 May 13. , points. ~!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"i The Bobcat tennis team opened the season by suffering a defeat at the hands of Northwest Missouri 9•0, then bounced back to defeat Midwestern College 5-4 despite the forfeiture of t w o Drycleaning matches to Midwestern due to an illness on the squad. and

Peru State College and Kearney State split a d-0ubleheader Saturday, bpril 23, at Peru, Kearney winning the opener 7-6 and Peru the nightcap, 8-3. It was the first Nebraska College Conference tangle for both clubs. Kearney c-0pped the opener by scoring a run in the eighth inning on one of Peru State's four errors. The Antelopes' winning run came when a Peru error all-Owed Art Fritzon, Kearney's winning pitcher in relief, to score fr-Om the third. John Creamer and Steve Pattison belted solo home runs for Peru State. Dean Cain, Peru's route-going pitcher, slammed a bases empty

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INTRAMURALS The intramural softball schedule is getting off to a slow start. The standings as of April 25 are as follows: Won Lost 0 3 Emperors 0 2 Louts 0 2 Sixty Niners 1 2 Centennials 1 2 Misfits -1 1 Studs 2 1 Playboys 1 0 Road Runners 1 0 Beavers 2 0 Zephrrs 2 0 Octanubis An Intramural track meet will be held May 16 or 17. Three places will be scored, and: ribbons will be given to the first three places. A special plaque will be given to the outstanding participant.

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four bagger, his fust hit in his three-year Peru State career. Rick Connole contributed a tworun tripper in the second game. Cain, in winning his second game against one defeat, was never better as he allowed only two earned runs, struck out seven and gave up only one free pass. Line ScoresKearney ___ 020 130 01-7 4 2 Wilson, Fritzon (6..IW) & Lawson Peru ______ 201 011 10-6 11 4 Tegelhutter (L), & Venditte Home Runs-Peru: Creamer & Pattison; Kearney: Osentowski & Hoesly. Peru ________ 201 110 3--8 8 1 Cain (W), & Venditte. Kearney ____ ooo 300 0-3 5 2 Prindle (L), & Aerni Home Runs-Peru: Su 11 iv an, Cain, Connole

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Governing Board Plans Natural Gas System For College And Town First steps to acquire a natural gas distribution system for Peru State College and the City of Peru were taken by the governing board of state colleges at its April 18 meeting when the board approved, in principle, a longterm contract for use of natural gas to be supplied by Peoples Natural Gas.

Ashley Presided At AAUW Meet

CAMPUS SCHOOL NEWS

Miss Alma ·Ashley presided

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By Phyllis Groff

The students. of Peru Prep are being kept busy with their studies, track meets, play practice, conventions, and other activities. On Wednesday, April 27 the track boys tested their skills in the Nemaha Valley Conference held at Peru. On May 6 Peru Prep will Under the proposal, Peoples have a track meet with Daws-OnNatural Gas will build, opVerdon at Peru. erate and maintain a distribution The sophomores held a bake facility in the city of Peru and sale on Saturday, Apdl 30. For for the college upon obtaining a another fund raising project, franchise from the Peru City they are going to have a car Council and an acceptable certiwash on Thursday, May 6. ficate from the Federal Power On Friday, April 22, and SatCommission allowing service to urday, 23, the students particiPeru. pated in the District Music ConAccording to Peoples Natural test held at Nebraska City. They Gas representatives there received three 2's, and eight l's. The speech class, under the diis a lapse of approximately 18 months between nomination and rection of Mr. Bohlken, presented the granting of approval by the three plays to grades 1-6 on Federal Power Commission, thus April 21. Four representatives from the actual installation would not begin before the latter part of 1967, Peru FHA Chapter and their but hopefully before the 1967-68 sponsor, Mrs. Kregel, attended the State FHA convention at the heating system. Nebraska Youth Center at LinThe board also approved plans coln, Nebraska on April 23. The and specifications for the in- four girls were Vivian Guilliatt, stallation of a new 30,000 lb/hr Rhonda Collins, Cheryl Groff, high pressure boiler and other and Carol Tynon. improvements to the campus The elementary children have heating system; approved plans been taking tests. Reading Deand specifications for re-vamping velopmental Tests and Basic the campuS electrical system; Reading Tests were given to the authorized the drawing of plans lower elementary. Kindergarten and specifications for rehabilita- through the third grade h av e tion of Delzell Hall for men and been taking intelligence tests. Eliza Morgan Hall for women, The different elementary classes including a new heat distribution had baby chickens in their rooms system for Delzell Hall; author- for Easter. ized the opening of bids and Pre-school started April .18 for awarding of contracts at the next children who will be atten<lil;ig meeting of the board on May 16 school in the coming fall. The for the new dormitory complex, students in Mrs. Sproul's Child and received progress reports on Care Class are the teachers. the renovation of the AdminisMr. Cox brought a banana plant to the campus school so the tration building. students could see how the plant looks before the bananas are completely developed.

Mullen Elected State President Of Home Ee Clubs 'Miss Ginnie Mullen, sopho-' more at Peru State College, was elected to the office of presidentelect of the State Home Economics College Chapter. Ginnie will serve under Georgia Stevens, president, from the University of Nebraska until April, 1967, when she will take over the office of president. Before coming to Peru, Ginnie attended modeling school and a professional drama school, working toward becoming a food demonstrator. She toured three and one-half months with "Sound of Music" as head wardrobe mistress for the cast and served as personal dresser and secretary for actress Gloria De Haven.

a Frerich horn solo by Laura Ad ams ; "Divertimento;' by Haydn, played by the woodwind choir; "Caprice for Clarinet" by Groundman, a clarinet quartet consisting of Marie Ballue, Danna Henry, Nancy Adams, and Margaret Lutt. The finale was the bmss ohoir playing "Fidelio" by Beethoven.

American Association of University Women, in the absence of President Mrs. M. J. Hewiet of Omaha. The convention was held on April 29-30 in Sidney, Nebraska. Miss Ashley and two other representatives from Peru, Mrs. Peru Prep presented an AllGeorge Schottenhamel and Mrs. School play, "Tish," April 29 at C. V. Siegner, attended. 8:00 p.m. in the college auditoriThe purpose of this organiza- um. tion is to encourage women with Tish was a middle age spinster college education to keep them who, together with her two spinactive. ster companions, Lizzie and AgAt the national level this or- gie, decided to get close to naganization supports the Educa- ture and lead a simple life. The cast included: Laura Adtional Foundation in Washingams, Donetta Henne, Lois Lamton, D. C.

mle, Christi Ubben,. Marsha te is, Ron Fisher, Charlotte L ' Robert M u 11 e n d o re , G Vaughn, Marilyn Moody, D Collin, Robert Runkles, and M Lutt. Mr. Robert Bohlken direc with Nancy Adams and D Henry as assistant directors. Jo Kite was in Charge of lights.

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AAUWTea May 1, 1966 The American Association of University women held a tea for all Senior women of the 1966 graduating class. This tea was in the Neal Gomon home from 3:00 to 5:00. The tea gave the Senior women a chance to find out about the A.A.U.W. program. Mrs. George Schottenhamel presided over the tea.

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The Campus School band under the supervision of Gilbert E. Wilson, and directed by Charles Wellensiek, presented a pre-contest concert on Tuesday, April 19, at 8 p.m. in the college auditorium. The program consisted of the following selections: "Rhythm of the Winds" by Erickson; "Intrada'' from the "Second Symphony" by Erickson; "Jim Dandies" by Walters, a trumpet trio played by Bob Milstead, Allen Palmer, and John Lutt, "Concerto in G Minor" by Haydn, a clarinet solo played by Marie Ballue; "Theme and LitHe Fugue" by Singer, a sax quartet consisting of !Ralph Kennedy, Donna Meyers, Mary Lutt, and The annual State Home Econ- John Kite; "Rondo" by Mozart, omics Convention was held April 18 in Scottsbluff, Nebraska. Peru was represented by Arlene Borcher, Sandi Hopp, Ginnie Mullen, and Mrs. Ina Sproul. SHOE REPAIR In the meeting of the College Auburn · Nebraska Clubs, Ginnie Mullen was elected president-elect of the State College Chapter. She will assume the responsibilities of president in April, 1967. Mrs. Sproul was appointed State Subject Matter Chairman of Family Relations and Child Groceries of All Kinds Development.

Peruvians Attend Home Ee Convention

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University Women Sponsor Coffee At Governor's Mansion All senior girls were invited to a coffee at the Governor's Mansion in Lincoln, Nebraska, Saturday, April 23. The Lincoln Branch of the American Association of University Women sponsors the coffee to honor graduates of several Nebraska colleges.

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inals Begin

May26

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 61

Number 14

MAY 23, 1966

Congratulations Graduating Seniors

Memorial Services Held For Linscheids

-Photo By Special Services Three long-time faculiy members, whose combined years of service l:o Peru State College total 77 years. will retire al: the end of the 99ih academic year. according to Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of Peru State. The retirees are Miss Norma biddel, associate professor of art: Miss Hazel Weare, associate professor of business education; and Dr. Harold Boraas, dean of students and professor of educa· tional psychology. They were honored al: a faculty dinner May 15. Miss Diddel is completing 37 years, Miss Weare 23, and Dr Boraas 17.

resident Gomon Anneunoes Graduation ""June 3rd ormitory Rate lacrease Board and room costs at all average of comparable instituNebraska state colleges will in- tions in _the area." crease in the fall of 1966 as the There will be no change in result of a recent action by the policy for ·those students regoverning board of state colquired to live in the dormitories leges. Although charges will vary for the 1966-67 academic year, among the colleges because of according to Dr. Gomon. All the differences of numbers of single women will continue to meals served as a part of the be housed in the women's dormiboard and room plan, the allo- tory. Because of over-crowded cation for room rental will be conditions in Morgan Hall, it increased $1.00 a week effective may be that some senior or junSeptember 1, 1966. ior women will be permitted to At Peru State this means live off-campus, but this will be board and room charges will be only with the specific approval $325 a semester with 15 meals of the associate dean of students. served Monday through Friday. All single freshman men stuFood service will continue to be dents will be required to live available on weekends either in in one of the men's residence the Student Center snack bar or halls. With an apparent sharp dining room for all meals except increase in the number of n e w Sunday breakfast. Charges for students seeking admission, space this service will be based on in the existing dormitories will item or meal selection and it is be at a premium. Upperclassmen not a part of the board and room wishing accommodations in dorplan. mitories are urged - to reserve As commercial operations the space now. After June 1, assigndormitories and food service fa- ments for upperclassmen will be cilities are self-supporting. The made on first come-first s e r v e upward revision of rates reflects basis. When the dormitories are increased costs of maintenance filled applications will be placed and operation and higher inter- on file and as cancellations, if est rates on dormitory bonds any, occur, assignments will be which have made on-campus made in order of receipt. housing possible, according to Dormitory reservations are President Neal S. Gomon. considered a contract for a full "We want to keep the cost to semester, excluding those whom the student as low as possible, may be off-campus for student but we must meet our financial teaching in their senior year. obligations to our bond- holders When space is once occupied by and maintain a high level of a student it is assumed he will maintenance, thus there is no retain this space for a full sealternative to an increase in mester unless he withdraws from charges,'' President Gomon said. school or is involved in student "Despite the current increase, teaching. (Continued on page six) costs at Peru State are below the

A memorial service for Professor and Mrs. Stewart P. Linsoheid was held Saturday morning, May 14, in the Fine Arts Recital Hall on the Peru State Campus. Death claimed Mr. and Mrs. Linscheid Saturday, May 7, in a boating accident opposite Fancy Creek Marina on Tuttle Creek reservoir, north of Manhattan, Kans. Linscheid, 55, associate professor of English and faculty sponsor of the school newspaper, Pedagogian, 'and yearbook, Peruvian, at Peru State for the past 10 years, and Mrs. Linscheid, 54, left Peru the morning of May 7 for a weekend of boating, one of their favorite outdoor sports. Apparently, their boat capsized in a strong wind late Saturday afternoon. Prof. Linscheid w a s born May 22, 1910, at Bristow, Okla. He received his bachelor's degree from East Central State, Ada, Okla.; and the following year Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va., conProfessor Stewart Linscheid ferred the masters degree upon him. Since then, the Peru State faculty member had done additional graduate study at Washington and Lee, the University of Wisconsin, Madison; Oklahoma State Nniversity, Stillwater; University of Minnesota, Minneapolis; and the University of Coiorado, Boulder. During his 30 years of college teaching, Professor Linscheid taught eight years at Oklahoma State University, Stillwater; three years at Seminole (Okla.) Junior College; seven years at East Central State College, Ada, Okla.; and two years at Wentworth Military Academy, Lexington, Mo., before coming to Peru in 19•56. Mrs. Linscheid, the former Nevil Barrett, had taught third grade for the past 10 years in the 14th Street School in Nebraska City. Survivors include two married <laughters, Ruth (Mrs. David) Ross, Pensacola, Fla., and Ann (Mrs. Jerry) Dean, Patterson, La.; grandchildren Vicky Leigh Dean and Teri Ruth Dean; Mr. Linscheid's mother Mrs. A. Linscheid of Ada, Okla., and his brother Bill Linsoheid of New York N. Y.; Mrs. Linscheid's mother Mrs. J. M. Barrett, Ada'. Okla., and her sisters Mrs. J. B. Morey, Ada, Okla., and Mrs. A. D. Aldridge, Tallahassee, Fla.; and brother J. M. Barrett, Jr., Oklahoma City, Okla. The daughters of Stewart and Nevil requested no flowers, but suggested memorials to the Peru Achievement Foundation.

One hundr-ed fifty Peru State College seniors will receive baccalaureate degrees at the 97th annual -eommencement, June 3, at 10 a.m. in the College Auditorium. The Honorable Frank B. Morrison, Governor of Nebraska, will deliver the address to the degree candidates which include 48 .who completed degree requirements at the close of the fall semester. Governor Morrison has been a frequent visitor to the Campus of a Thousand Oaks since being elected to office in 1960. He delivered the address for the dedication of the $1.4 million building program in April of 1961. Five candidates have qualified for both libera1 arts and education degrees. They include: Robert S. Hilt, Falls City; Loren E. Penkava, Stella; Donna Van Buskirk, Clarinda, Iowa; Ronald G. Eltiste, Nebraska City; and Walter E. Zink, Sterling. Commencement week activities will begin Saturday, May 28, The Peru State College Music Mammy Yokum, Joanie Sprieck; with the annual faculty recep- Department, in a cast of 50, pre- Pappy Yokum, Stan Johnson; sented Johnny Mercer's and Gene Daisy Mae Scragg, Kathy Rotter; tion for the senior class. On Baccalaureate Sunday , de Paul's original musical com- Earthquake McGoon, Gregg HaMay 29, members of the 1916 edy, "Li'l Abner," at 8:00 p.m., zen; Marryin' Sam, Mike Mcclass will return for their day- Thursday, May 19, in the Col- Neely; Moonbeam McSwine, Myra Murren; Romeo Scragg, Ralph long reunion. The Baccalaureate lege Auditorium. The story of the musical was Shaffer; Clem Scragg, Stan Johnservices are set for 4 p.m. in the college auditorium with Dr. Ad- based on the comic strip by Al son; Alf Scragg, David Hunzedison Leitch, assistant to the Capp and centered around the ker; Hairless Joe, Steve Mason; president and distinguished pro- romantic theme of fl.bner Yokum Lonesome Polecat, Bill Stevens; fessor of philosophy and religion and Daisy Mae Scragg in the Available Jones, Jim Johnson; at Tarkio (Mo.) College, deliver- town of Dogpatch, U.S.A. Sus- Stupefyin' Jones, Rosemary Slapense was added to the story gle; General Bulmoose, Bill Joining the sermon. when Dogpatch was near 1y er; Jack S. Phogbound, Don Degree candidates include: blown off the face of the earth Dodge; Appasionata Von CliBachelor of Arts: Russell B. for being the most "unnecessary max, Mary Beth Gerber; Evil Ash, Omaha; Royce F. Curtis, Eye Fleagle, Jim Butts; Mayor Massena, Iowa; Ronald G. Eltis- place in the U.S.A." Members of the cast included: Dawgmeat, Bill Carlson; Scarte, Nebraska City; Irvin J. Heng, (Continued on page six) Abner Yokum, Richard Shelton; (Continued on page seven)

Music Department Presents Hli'I Abner"


FROM THE EDIToWs DESK

.

It is with a great deal of sadness and regret that the editors of the Pedagogian dedicate this . last issue of the 1965-66 school year to Professor Stewart Linscheid, our faculty sponsor. The tragic deaths of Mr. and .Mrs. ·Linscheid shocked the entire campus, but the tragedy was perhaps felt more closely by those of us who regularly worked with him. Mr. Linscheid was not only our professor, but also our friend. This is not a place to eulogize, but at times like this memories seem insufficient. It is an understatement to say that Mr. Linscheid will be missed, . but we would like to mark the end of an era by professmg our profound sorrow at the loss of our leader. Bill Bowen Joan Bretthorst

.the contest whereby the dotm.)$,,,.: offe~int $&:00 fot.'the ~s(<ii.~- '· ,: signed crest for Majorq Hall. The dormitory wou1a:r1ke to join with others in tp.anking Dr. Boraas for his past' years of' servi~e. In order to. give tangible feeling for our gratitude, th e dorm presented a plaque to Dr. Boraas at honors convocation. The dorm was shocked and saddened by the tragic news of the Linscheids. In closing this final column, I feel a ·personal loss in help received from Mr. Linscheid.

WAS THIS FIRE NECESSARY? Vandalism hit the Peru State campus again Saturday, April 30. This time the pole vault ~it burn~d. Both coa~h­ MORGAN es and athletes would be interested m knowmg how the fire HALL was started and by whom. The pit, which was new this school.year, was compo~ed By of foam rubber. This kind of landing is the newest thmg Jean for vaulting precautions. Now, b~cause ?f t?is recent bu~n­ Wewel ing, the pit has been refilled agam. This time the landmg area is sawdust. With finals just around the If you know anything about this incident, please report corner, many of the girls are beit to one of the coaches. -By Al Blankenship ginning to pack their belongings

MAJORS

HALL By Pat Vend.me

The boys enjoyed the dorm picnic on May 17. It was mandatory that all residents attend, even if a diet is part of the every day plan. '.Dhe dorm counselors had an end of the year get-together on Friday, May 20th. Our housemother plans to be in Niobrara, Nebraska with her parents for. part of the summer. She will be attending her par. ents' golden wedding anniversary on June 4. On June 11th she will be back in Peru to attend her son Ross's wedding. She'll leave again and come back in time for summer graduation. Graduation will take Jack Rinne, Mike Malone, D a v e Hensely, Chuck Adams, Charles Houser, Lee Garett, Lyle Stewart, and Stan Johnson. At the

end of the summer session it will be Dale Burgess, Rod Kettlehut, and Ed Stillinger. The dorm adopted a new constitution. It will go into affect at the beginning of the fall term. This year we decided to present an award to our outstanding resident. In order to be eligible for nomination the student must have resided in this dorm for three years, be in gooci. s0holastic and social standing, and be someone of whom the dorm can be proud. It was also taken into consideration what he has done for the dorm and the school. Nominations were castby the dorm at large. These votes were tallied and the four t o p nominees were again voted on by the students. These no~nees were Ed Stillinger, Tom Rosengren, Pat Venditte, and Jack Rinne. 'Dhe award was presented to Pat Venditte. The officers and the d o r m mother are making plans for next year. Plans in the making include a "Help Study Program" and a Majors Intramural Team. The big news in the dorm is

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF

Bill Bowen --------------------------------------Co-editor Joan Bretthorst ----------------------------------Co-editor Nancy Jarvis ---------------------------Personnel Manager Pat Venditte -----------------------------Business Manager Joan Bretthorst -----------------------------Layout Editor Dan Strecker --------------------------~-------Circulation Phil Dorssom. --------------------------Campus to Campus Mary Lu Hicks --------------------------------Copy Editor Mary Budler ----------------------------------Copy Editor Jean Wawel --------------------------Morgan Hall Column Pat Venditte --------------------------Majors Hall Column Ralph Shaffer ------------------------Delzell Hall Column Phyllis Groff _______________________ Cam.pus School Column Ron Snodgrass ------------------------------Sports Column Walter Rimmer ------------------------------Photographer John Soby -----------------------------------Photographer Edward LeTourneau -------------------------Photographer Phyllis Groff --------------------------------Photographer Bonnie Anderson ---------------------------------Reporter Marilyn Bailie -----------------------------------Reporter AI Blankenship ----------------------------------Reporter Mike Castle --------------------------------------Reporter Brian Collins -------------------------------------Reporter Linda Coslett ------------------------------------Reporter Bernadine Fintel ---------------------------------Reporter Dennis Hubbard ----------------------~----------~Reporter Mary Inglis --------------------------------------Reporter Carleen Kreifels ---------------------------------Reporter Pat McR:.ee ---------------------------------------Reporter Wayne Miller ------------------------------------Reporter Mike Sinagacz ------------------------------------Reporter Pat Wheatley ------------------------------------Reporter Cheryl Winans -----------------------------------Rep,orter

and are getting ready to · move home or to the places they are going to work this summer. Some of the girls will be traveling to various parts · of the world. For instance, Pat Thompson . will spend her summer in Bamberg, Germany, where h er father is stationed in the Army. A patio is being constructed on the south side of the girls dorm. It will be used by sunbathers. Also sidewalks extending from the back doors of the dorm have been laid, connecting the dorm with the back steps to the parking lot and to the doors on the new section of the cafeteria. A surprise shower was given for Kris Wewel by Nancy Reidy and Carolyn Price on Saturday, May 14, at the home of Mrs. John Riley. Thursday, May 12, the dorin had their dorm party in the recreation room. After the election of the new dorm officers, h o t dogs, potato chips and punch were served. The new officers of the dorm council are: president, Nancy Muse; vice-president, Gloria Jackson; and secretarytreasurer, Janice Johnson. Tracy Hester was given a birthday party, May 10, by some of the "west wing girls" on third. She received a variety of useful gifts. Lucy Sporer gave a birthday party for Nancy Larson on May 15. A surprise shower was given for Pat McKee on May 12 by Kathy Black. Kathy Hennig and Marilyn Yo,pp had a shower for Myra Murren in the dorm , Sunday, May 22. Also, a ·personal shower w a s given to Linda .Renz on Saturday, May 14. Her friends took her out .to eat at Fetty's in Nebmska 'City. Linda fa 'planning a July 3: wedding to' Bruce Mau, who:.gra:duated from Peru at mid-term and is now working fo'r his father. iJ?. Chicago. Many of the gfrls took part in the m.us,ical "Li'l. Abner':' whieh was presented Thursday, May I9, in the auditorium. and May ZO. 'in Brownville. Joanie SP r i e c k played ,one of the main roles \vhen 'she eff~ctively portrayed Mammy Yokum in the musical. Birthday · ·celebrants · for th~s month and this sum.mer are: Pat Thompson, June 26; Nancy Larson, May 9; Carla Giwoyna, May 23; Jean Wewel, May 22; Mary McMunn, July 4; Pat McKee, ~ugust 13; Janis, ~alj'.ord, August l; Nancy tarson, May 15; and Tracy Hester, May 10.

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DELZELL HALL By Ralph Shaffer

AUBURN BOWUNG CENTER BOWL AT THE SIGN OF

Men of Delzell Hall-Rejoice! There are only 11 days left until the official end of another school year. Final exams are the 1a s t hurdle to get over before sum,mer vacation. Delzell will be closed during the summer school session. The windows and doors are b e i n g measured for new ones which will be added during the renovation. With the new heating system to be added, no pails will be needed next year to catch the drips from the radiators. Between Bat Man and the Mad Bombers, residents find final tests a real "snap" to study for. It is almost becoming a race to see which group can have the most members. All counselors are pulling for Bat Man. Get your reserv.ations in before all the rooms for next fall are taken. A lot of new applications are. rolling in. The men are getting into shape for summer 'by running ·a mile .every night. oh, those aching 'i;nuscles! ;, The counselors of Morgan and Delzell will honor retiring Dr. Boraas on Monday, May 23, at Arbor Manor. Both dormitories wish to .. express their thanks to him for his years of service in helping with dorm affairs.

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Mcintire Basketball School June 6-11 second annual Jack Mctire Basketball School will be at Peru State College June rough June 11, according to Mcintire, head basketball ' h at Peru State College and rector of the school. The school is designed to give ys, junior high through high hool, instruction in basic funmentals in the game of basetball. Mike Harmon, Bobcat senior om Wood River, Ill., who holds -time Peru rebounding recrds and is second in all time obcat scoring, and Bill Rinne, eru junior from Burchard, who rred on Peru's fast break and ssing defense the past t w o seasons, will assist Mcintire in coaching the school. Mcintire was chosen as state high school coach of the year in 1955 by the Lincoln Journal-Star and by the Omaha World-Her-

ald. In 1961 ,both newspapers selected him as state college coach of the year, and the Lincoln newspaper repeated this honor in 1963. Mcintire, 10 years at Peru State, has coached six Peru teams to the Nebraska College Conference Championship and has taken four clubs in the last six years to the NA:IA tournament in Kansas City and in so doing he helped Peru State establish a national tournament participation record of 13 times.

Golf Team Closes Season

NCC Track At Wayne

The Peru State College golf team, under the coaching of Mr. Larry Ebner, brought their golf season to a close on May 13 at Wayne, Nebr., when the Peru linksmen competed in the Nebraska College Conference meet.

Freshman Arnold Johnston, Boys Town, and senior Louis Fritz, Verdon, took top honors Friday and Saturday for Peru State College as the Bobcats finished third in the four-team Nebraska College Conference track meet at Wayne State. Johnston, a fourth place" winner in the pole vault, established a new Peru State school record by clearing 13-6, bettering by three inches the old record set last year by Charles Niemeyer. Fritz gained Peru's· only victory in the meet with a 9:59.5 clocking in the two-mile run."" Kearney State rushed to their 13th straight conference t i t 1e with a Whopping 141% points. Chadron was second with 80, Peru third with 42, and Wayne fourth with 2l1h. Hastings College did not enter the meet.

The Peru State golfers felt the rugged results of a tough schedule and undesirable weather which endured most of the sean. The linksmen ended the season with the following results: St. Benedicts lllh, Peru %; Peru 14, Midwestern l; Northwest Missouri State 13112, 'Peru 1/2; Doane 10, Peru 5; Northwest Missouri State 12%, . Peru 5112; St. Benedicts 13, Peru 5; Peru 12%, Midwestern 2112; Creighton 9%, Peru 5112; Midland 6, Peru 6; Nebraska Wesley~n 9, Peru 2; Concordia 7, Peru.5; and the Peru squad trailed the field in final scoring at the Nebraska College Conference match at Wayne with a total of 319 strokes. Coach Ebner ·believes the team deserves a great deal of credit for its good team effort and improvement this year over the 1965 season. Coach Ebner believed the team made a rather good showing this year when the lack of golf practice facilities at Peru are considered. Mr. Ebner stated that the golf team had to travel to the golf course at Nebraska City for practice. Coach Ebner believes the lack of golfing facilities at Peru certainly handicaps necessary practice sessions. Dick Seybert, a senior at Peru from Atlantic, Iowa, paced the Peru squad this season with several blistering scores which earned him medalist honors on several occasions. Probably the highlight of the year was at the Nebraska College Conference match at Wayne when Seybert fired an impressive 32 on the first nine holes to tie the course record. Mike Barsi, Larry Roder, John Gorges, Mark Wendt, Dave Fife, and Bill Daigle are other Peru golfers who shot well this season and deserve much credit.

Mcintire, during 21 years of coaching (11 high school and 10 college), has won 301 games and lost 150. He is past president of the National Coaches Association and a member of the select Helms 'Foundation Hall of Fame. Inquiries may be directed to Coach Jack Mcintire at Peru State College.

Peru Meets 0. U. In Track Peru lost nine of 10 events on the Omaha track Tuesday, May 10, as Omaha U. took an 80-65 dual track and field meet victory. This was Peru's last meet before the Nebraska College Conference meet. Peru's winners are as follows: Javelin-1. ·Bert Fa u 1kn er, 170-2. Shot Put-Bruce Vickery , 45-51/4, Discus-Bill Witty, 138-4. Pole Vault-Arnold Johnston and Tom Hertz, 13-0. 880 Yard Run-Louis Fritz, 2:01.1.

Peru Over Concordia In Baseball

· High School SPORTS COLUMN By

Ron Snodgrass After taking the first game of a double header at Wayne Saturday, May 14, the Bobcats seemed well on their way to another conference crown. Then the roof fell in. Wayne bounced back to win the second game 4-2 and squeeze Peru out of the title picture. On the same day Kearney took two games from Chadron College and went home with the plums. Kearney's conference winning record is 6-2, Peru is 5-3, and Wayne finished third with a 4-4 record. In less recent conference clashes Peru took two games from Hastings College April 26 and split a double header with Chadron, May 3. Peru won the first game at Hastings in a twenty inning thriller, then came back in the second to bomb the Broncs 19-3. Defending N.C.C. tennis champions, Hastings, successfully defended her crown by winning the N:C.C. meet Friday, May 13 at Hastings. The Broncs notched 12 points to Kearney and Wayne with four each. Peru failed to score. Dick Seybert fired a course tying 32 at Wayne Friday, May 13 but his efforts fell short as Peru trailed the field in the N.C.C. golf meet. Hastings won the golf crown with a total of 304 strokes. Kearney, Chadron, Wayne, and Peru finished in that order behind. Hastings. Louis Fritz gained the only victory for Peru as the Bobcats finished third in the N.C.C. track meet. Kearney State won the meet, as eX'pected, with a total of 1411/2 points. Chadron, Peru and Wayne finished after Kearney in that order. There was, however a bright spot for Coach Mcintire. Freshman vaulter Arnold Johnston established a new school record by clearing 13'6" in placing fourth in the meet.

School Marks Fall But 'Cats Don't Score At Drake Relays Peru thinclads failed to score at the Drake relays he1d April 29 and 30, but this is where the disappointment ended. Three school records were broken by the six members of the t r a c k team making the trip. Neujahr, Fritz, O'Donoghue, and Hendricks combined for the two-mile relay record. Then Watson replaced Hendricks and the foursome pushed on to break the school record in the distance medley also. Cross-country "All-American" Louis Fritz broke Hendricks' two-mile run record later on in the day. None of the relay teams nor the discus thrower, Bill Witty, earned a place.

Peru State baseballers beat Concordia College in a single game 10-2 at Seward on May 10, nings, but only one was earned 1966. as Peru's Tegelhutter's earned The Bobcats jumped on Bull- run average dipped to 1.47. He dog pitcher Larry Olsen for four has worked 55 innings and given runs in the first and three runs up nine earned runs this season. in the second and then coasted Garry Young, Adams, paced in with a single tally in the sixth the Bobcat attack with a single, and two more in the seventh. double, and a sacrifice fly to Concordia scored their t w o drive in three runs, while Tegelruns in the fifth and sixth in- hutter drove two runs across.

District Meet Held At Peru Jim Mencl of Filley led the parade of class D athletes as he qualified in four events for the state track meet in the Peru State district, May 12. Jim harvested first in both ihurdles and broad jump, and second in the discus. He also picked up points for his team by placing third in the shot and getting a tie f o r fourth in the high jump. Talmage gained the team win in the qualifying meet by scoring 45 points. They were closely followed by Filley with 381/2 and Barneston with 32. The remainder of the scoring was handled by 10 other schools, with four teams failing to make the scoreboard. The winner, Talmage, led the way with seven qualifiers for the big shindig at Kearney. Weightman Don Wittler paved their way with his victories in the shot and discus. Also from Talmage, qualifying in two open events and a relay, was Dave Bohlken. He earned a victory in the 220 and second in the 180yard low hurdles. Dave also anchored the winning 88-0-yard relay team.

Joe Smith goes high to make a backhand return. A senior, Joe ends his tennis career here this spring.

INTRAMURALS SOFTBALL STAN<DINGS Won Lost Louts ---------------- 7 0 Road Runners -------- 5 2 Studs ---------------- 6 2 Centennials ---------- 5 2 Misfits --------------- 4 3 Emperors ------------ 5 3 Sixty Niners --------- 4 4 Playboys ------------- 3 5 Beavers -------------- 2 6 Zephyrs -------------- 0 6 Octanubis ------------ 0 The leaders of the over-all Intramural standing are as follows: Misfits 36, Road Runners 301/2, Centennials 21.

TRACK MEEt · The Centennials won, and six records were broken in the 1966 Intramural track meet he 1 d May 16. Centennials won the meet with 29. The remaining teams scored this way: Zephyrs 19, Misfits 16, Warriors 15, Showboats 15, Louts 7, Playboys 5, Kingsmen 5, Emperors 1, Road Runners. 1. Bernie Brown won the Most Outstanding Participant award as he took first in 3 events. He won the 100 yard dash, 11.2; 220 yard dash, 25.9; and the broad jump, 20 feet, a new record. (Old record ·was set by Dick Shantz' 19-6 in 1955.} Other records broken were the 440 yard dash by Mike Pike, 57.0; 880 yard run by Jim Bohl, Centennials, in 2:21; mile run, Jim Bohl, 5:09.1; mile relay, Zephyrs, 4:09.3; 60 yard high hurdles, 08.0 by Larry King, Centennials. CONCORDIA GOLFERS TAKE 'CATS 7-5

Thursday, May 5, Peru golfers dropped a dual meet with Concordia Teachers 715. This was their last match before the big Conference shindig Friday, May 13. Concordia produced the medalist with a 75 on the par 72 course. Dick Seybert 76, Mike Barsi 77, Larry Roder 82, and John Gorges 82, were the top four men for the Bobcats.

Kathy Welsh shows backhand form. Kathy has played with the men on this year's tennis team, and she has done her share of winning. PERU SPLITS WITH WAYNE

Peru State baseballers split an N:C.C. double header against 'Wayne State, 2-1 and 4-2. Jim Tegelhutter carried the hopes to the N.C.C. crown in the first game by a 2-1 conquest over the Wildcats. In order for Peru to tie the crown, a double header sweep was necessary. But Peru's hitting in the nightcap was not enough to overcome Wayne's four runs. Dean Cain went the distance in the second game, not very artistically but effective. Wayne scored three. of their four runs in the first inning, enough to cut Peru out of the conference title picture. Peru ended the N.C.C. in second place ·with a 5-3 record.


May Fete Queen Pat Wheatley

MAY FETE' 1966

MayFete King Dean Cain

Miss Pat Wheatley, daughter of Rev. and Mrs. John Wheatley of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, reigned as 1966 May Fete Queen at the May 6 pageant and dance. Queen Pat looked radiant in her long, empire-waisted gown of white satin and organza accented with white flowers. Pat, a senior elementary education major, did her student teaching at Bellevue last semester and has been elected by the Bellevue school board to teach there next year. During her college career, she has been active in Cherubs, White Angels, and P.S.E.A. She served as a lady-in-waiting for May Fete her freshman year. As a sophomore and senior, Pat was a member of the Valentine royalty, and last year she was elected Homecoming Queen. An exuberant coed, Pat's hobbies include swimming, g o 1f , tennis, and "just having fun."

Dean Cain, son of Mrs. A M. Cain of Thurman, Iowa, w elected by the student body King of the 1966 May Fete eel bration. Dean is a graduate of Gle wood, Iowa, High School wh he lettered four years in basket¡ ball and three years in baseball Upon graduating from hi g li. school in 1960, Dean worked tw;; years and then enrolled at Peru State in 1962. While at Peru he has lettered three years in basketball and three years in baseball. With one year of basketball left he should again be a prominent figure on Coach Mcintire's cage squad. After graduation from college, Dean has plans to coach a n d teach in the social science field.

May Fete Class Attendants

PHILIP MADDEN Philip Madden, the Senior attendant for May Fet~ from Clarinda, Iowa, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Manley Madden, Jr. Phil was the escort for Miss Kristine, Wewel. Phil is an active member of the Business Club, and is majoring in business administration and so~ial science. Hunting and horse vaising are two of Phil's favorite hobbies. Phil entered Peru in the fall term of 1964-65. He previously attended Clarinda Community College in Clarinda, Iowa.

May Fete Class Attendants

KRISTINE WEWEL Kristine Wewel, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Wewel of Newport, was the Senior attendant for Peru's annual May Fete. Kris is active in Kappa Delta Pi, Alpha Mu Omega, and the White Angels. She is now student teaching at Arbor Heights Junior High School in Omaha. Her major field is math and her minor field is general science.

WILLIAM RINNE William Rinne was a Junior attendant for the annual May Fete ceremony. Rinne's home is at Burchard, where his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Rinne live. Bill attended Steinauer High School where he was active in school functions and athletics. Hunting and fishing are Bill's ,favorite hobbies. Bill majors in biology and carries a minor in general science. Bill has held the presidency of the Blue Devils, Student Governing Association, and Majors Hall. He plans to teach when he graduates.

CECI EVANGELIST Ceci Evangelist, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Evangelist of Newark, New York, served as the junior class attendant for the 1966 May Fete at Peru State. Ceci was also a sophomore attendant last year, an attendant for Homecoming this year, and in the Valentine royalty for two years. Ceci has been a cheerleader for the past two years, a member of the Student Center Board, and of the White Angels, and a former member of the Student Governing Association. Ceci, an elementary education major, plans to graduate in June of 1967.

RALPH DiCESARE, JR. Ralph DiCesare, Jr. was the Sophomore class attendant at the 1966 May Fete. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph DiCesare, Sr., live in Worcester, Mass. Ralph enjoys swimming as his hobby, and he was a national record-holder in the 50 yard free sty le in the Junior di vision. He was named to the Junior AllAmerican swimming team. Ralph's field of concentration is chemistry and his supporting field is biology. Among Ralph's other activities since coming to Peru State include: Vice-president of his freshman class, freshman SGA representative, member of the Student Center Board, and lettering in football as a freshman. He is president of the Student Center Board.

MARY MOWRY Mary Mowry, a Sophomore at Peru State College, reigned as sophomore attendant at the May Fete. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Merlin A. Mowry of Beatrice. She is majoring in elementary education and is a member of SGA and White Angels. Her hobbies are swimming and art. Mary is a current cheerleader and was an attendant to the 1965 homecoming queen. JANICE JOHNSON Janice Johnson represented the Freshman class as an attendant at the May Fete pageant. Janice is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Johnson of Glenwood, Iowa. She majors in home economics and history, and this year she belongs to Home Economics Club, Cherubs, and is class treasurer. Next year Janice will represent the Home Economics (C-Ontinued on page six)

Back row: Mary Mowry, Ralph Di Cesare, Phillip Madden, Pat Wheatley,, Dean Cain, Bill Rinne, Ceci Evangelist, David Fife, Janice Johnson. Front row: Mitchell Allgood, Kathy Sayer, ¡Shelly Kieler; Janet Douglas,

DAVID FIFE Escorting freshman J a n i c e Johnson was freshman David Fife, the male attendant repre(Gontinued on page six)


Leona Masters, Nebraska City; Janice Kelly, Falls City; Diann Eltiste, Nebraska City; Nancy Guilliatt, Auburn; Donita Speckmann, EI k Creek; and Lola Morrissy, Peru.

"TEA FOR TWO" Soft Shoe Dance Janis Walford, Sandra Hopp, and Mary Beth Gerber.

1

May Fete 66 Entertainment Red, blue and white streamers created a background for the 1966 May Fete program, Friday, May 6, and the theme "Show Boat" was symbolized by a large show boat at one end of the gym, which served as a backdrop for a variety of entertainment. The program was opened by the presentation of the royaltyQueen Pat Wheatley and King Dean Cain. The attendants included: seniors, Kris Wewel and Phil Madden; juniors, Ceci Evangelist and Bill Rinne; sophomores, Mary Mowry and Ralph DiCesare; freshmen, Janice Johnson and David Fife. The freshmen ladies-in-waiting were Nancy Guilliatt, Donita Speckmann, Lola Morrissy, Diann Eltiste, Janice Kelly, Leona Masters. Little Shelly Kieler and Janet Douglas served as flower girls, while Mitchell Allgood and Kathy Sayer were the c r o w n bearers. The royal court was honored by dances and music performed by the loyal subjects, with Gary Vi terise acting as master of ceremonies. Ron Snodgrass, Mary McVicker, Don Stuart, Betty Andrews, Richard Dorsch, Kathy Downing, Roger Gifford, Marjean Wusk, Eugene Field, Jean Egger, Gordon Essink, Pam Kallemeyn, Richard Dobbs, Jeannie Bang, Gayle Schoen, and Mary Schriner thrilled the royal couple by whirling through a square dance, "Steamboat," accompanied by the pickin' and strummin' Blue River Valley Gang from Wymore. Arlene Moss interpreted the song "Beautiful Dreamer" in a

dance of graceful and precise movements. The number which stole the show was a circle dance presented by Pat Bindrum's campus school-age dance students-Debbie Patterson, Jenny Dodge, Donna Stemper, Melody Wininger, Debbie Stemper, Katie Bohlken, Kelly Combs, Julie Ebner, Shelly McAdams, Kelly Gaines, Helen Tynon, Debbie Allgood, Kathy Dodge and Cindy Kieler. Vocalist David Hensley caught the "show boat" spirit with "Old Man River" and Sandra Hopp, Mary Beth Gerber and Janis Walford gained the royal court's eye with a precision soft shoe dance to "Tea for Two." Don Stuart, Gordon Essink, ¡Betty Andrews, Pam Kallemeyn, Richard Dorsch, Richard Dobbs, Jean Egger, Jeannie Bang, Eugene Field, Gayle Schoen, Kathy Downing, and Mary Schriner added the classic "Virginia Reel" to the royal performance. A high-stepping dance line of Pat Bindrum, Bernadine Fintel, Darla Obbink, Jane Webb, Nan" cy Schulenberg, Jean Wewel, Arlene Moss, Jody Heather, Sue Morgan and Phyllis Groff provided a change of pace with a chorus line dance to the Ji vely sound of "Alabamy Bound." The traditional English dance around the Maypole was mastered by "Campus School Cuties" Patsy Stephens, Debbie Gaines, Rose Shandy, Bonnie Stemper, Pam Lewis, Beth Applegate, Ann Grafton, Lana Henry, Frances Kite, Rena Meritt, Judy Whisler, Marda Catlett, Linda Nincehelser, Gaile Hammons, Yancy Rogers, Lynn Dox(Continued on page six)


Graduation June 3rd

Financial Aid Now Availabl,e Washington, D. C.~Congress­ man Clair Callan (D•Nebr.) said today that qualified high school and college students now a r e able to secure financial assistance for their college education and vocationa1 training through "self-help" federal programs. The Higher Education Act of 1965 permits a student to borrow from a bank-up to $1,000 per year. The repayment · is guaranteed by the federal government. The student pays 3 per cent interest and the government pays 3 per cent for students from families with less than $15,000 adjusted income. For those above $15,000, the student pays 6 per cent simple interest. Repayment does not begin until after graduation. The Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 makes available grants of $200 to $800 per year to students who are financially unable to meet college expenses. The Act also makes funds available for part-time work while students are in school. T_he National Defense Student · 1111unu111111n111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111u1n11111

ORGANIZATIONS UlffllllllllllltllllllUllllllllllllllllllUlllllUIUUUllUUUlllU

BUSINESS CLUB

The Business Club had a dinner on May 12 at Ulbrick's in Nebraska City. Fourteen members attended. It was a social af~ fair and no business was conducted. -oPHI BETA LAMBDA

Phi Beta Lambda held a picnic and business meeting on May. 9. Officers for the ooming year were elected. They are: president, Ron McCoy; vice-president, Charlotte Nedrow; secretary, Mary McVicker; treasurer, Howard Stubbendieck; and historian, Sherry Schwiesow. Approximately 20 members and guests were present.

-a-WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION

The Women's Athletic Association met for the purpose of electing officers, May 11. Nancy Muse, president, conducted t h e meeting. Officers elected were Carol Chandler, president; Ruth Kalafut, vicepresident; Kathy Welsh, secretary-treasurer; Sandy Hopp, keeper of points; and Pat Thompson, SGA representative. The Women's Athletic Association held a picnic Wednesday, May 18, at 4:00 p.m. at the Oak Bowl. After the picnic the girls played softball.

--o-P.S.E.A.

The Peru Student Education Association held its annual end of the year picnic Monday, May 16, at Neal Park. Mr. J·orhnson, the chef, along with Mm. Johnson and thirty-one PSEA members enjoyed rare, medium-rare, or well done steaks. --0--

S.G.A.

The Student Governing Association met Thursday, May 12 to discuss ·the program for next year. Both new and old members met and sponsors were elected. The sponsors are Mr. Albert Brady, Dr. John C. Christ, and Miss Bonnie Rutz, alternate. The group then went to Arbor Manor in Auburn for a steak, shrimp, or chicken banquet.

Loan Program :permits up to $1,000 per year to be borrowed by undergraduates. Up to 50 per cent of these loans are forgiven at a rate of 10 per cent a year if a student becomes a teacher. The rate is 15 per cent a year in areas of high .concentrations of low income families. The National Vocational Student Loan Insurance Act of 1965 allows students to borrow up to $1,000 each year for 2 years with repayment guaranteed. Interest is paid by the federa1 government while the student is in school with repayment to begin from 9 months to 1 year after studies are completed. The Nurses Training Act provides for .the establishment of loan funds in qualified nursing schools and allows fu11-time student nurses to borrow up to $1,000 per year. A forgiveness clause allows cancellation of up to 50 per cent of the total loan at the rate of 10 per cent a year if the nurse is employed at a public or non-profit institution or agency.

President Gomon Announces Dormitory Rate Increase (Continued from page one) The opening of 1he new dormitory complex in the fall of 1967 should temporarily relieve some of the housing problems. At that time there will be no necessity to house single women students off-campus and all single freshman and sophomore men students will be required to live in one of the dormitories.

May Fete Class Attendants JANICE JOHNSON

(Continued from page four) Club in the Student Governing Association. She has also b.e en elected as a Bobcat cheerleader and secretary of the White Angels. DAVID FIFE

(Continued from page one) Nebraska City; Robert S. Hilt, Falls City; Todd J. Hoover, Lincoln; Marvin L. Hopper, Auburn; Stanley H. Johnson, Modesto, Calif.; Peter J. Lynch, Glenham, N. Y.; Michael A. Otto, Nebraska City; Loren E. Penkava, Stella; Joseph C. Smith, Mt. Holly, N. J.; Donna Van Buskerk, Clarinda, Iowa; Walter E. Zink, Sterling. Bachelor of Science: Kenneth Boatman, Auburn; Richard L. Behrends, Auburn; Allen W. Chandler, Peru; John C. Hunzeker, Humboldt; Dale L. Kreimer, Talmage; Richard J. Seybert, Atlantic, Iowa; Alan F. Shipley, Auburn; Lyle E. Stewart, Malvern, Iowa. Bachelo.r of Fine Aris in Education: Ross L. Oestmann, Peru;

Ralph E. Shaffer, New Market, Iowa. Bachelor of Aris in Education:

Sidney N. Baney, Peru; Adrian J. Bartek, Weston; Edward L. Baroud, Worcester, Mass.; Oliver T. Bierman, Hastings; Dorothy L. Bock, Pawnee City; Dale E. Cerny, Fairbury; Joseph Chamberlain, Dawson; Jon H. Davis, Orient, Iowa; Joan K. Dickman, Otoe; Dale D. Duensing, Odell; Ronald G. Eltiste, Nebraska City; Henry R. Grace, Omaha; Barbara L. Gordon, Hamburg, Iowa; Shirley Grafton, Peru; Merrill L. Greenlee, Peru; Robert S. Hilt, Falls City; Stanley E. Johnson, Davenport; Daniel Knudsen, Lincoln. Larry E. Kuenning, Auburn; Robert L. Leander, Peru; Michael E. Malone, Gretna; Karon K. Rathe, Sterling; Charles P. Richards; Omaha; John M. Riley, Pemberton, N. J.; Margaret Slayter, West Dennis, Mass.; James L. Snyder, Nebraska City; James M. Sprague, South Lyon, Mich.; Garry F. Still, Atchison, Kans.; March L. Tinkham, Holmesville; Donna Van Buskirk, Clarinda, Iowa; Ronald E. Wiksell, Omaha; Joseph Wildinger, Fairborn, Ohio; Walter E. Zink, Sterling. Bachelor of Science in Education: Charles E. Adams, Green-

wood; .Marilyn J. Bailie, New Market, Iowa; Jim' L. Barnhart, Auburn; Margo B. Bateman, Farragut, Iowa; Letha J. Bayes, Hastings, Iowa; Sharon K. Bender, Milford; Winona M. Boettcher, Unacli,lla; Mary R. Bohlken, Peru; Verona A. Borcher, Steinauer; James 0. Carlisle, Nebraska City; Sam E. Carneal, Nebraska City; Nancy K. Check, Endicott; Charles Colebrook, Boylston, Mass.; Karen J. Compton, Nemaha; Carol Daffer, Nebraska City; Joan E. Darling, Auburn; Leo J. Dietrich, HamMay Fete Entertainment burg, N. Y.; Donna G. Donovan,· Auburn; John J. Eickhoff, Shu(Continued from page six) bert; Anne C. Epley, Peru. on, Sharon Hammons, and DonJames Evilsizer, Bethalto, Ill.; na Meyers to close out May Fete Katherine •Francis, C o u n c i 1 1966. Bluffs, Iowa; Gary E. Fritch, TaThe pageant was directed by ble Rock; Louis J. Fritz, Verdon; Miss Bonnie Rutz, director of Gordon L. Garrett, Glenwood, women's physical education. Fol- Iowa; Marilyn Gonnerman, Walowing the program, the royal co; Sarah C. Goodwin, Hiawatha, party and subjects danced to the Kans.; Charles F. Gordon, Wamusic of the Dave Kavitch.Com- terville, Kans.; James E. Hanks, bo from 9 p.m. until the witch- Nebraska City; Michael P. Haring hour in the beautifully dec- mon, Wood River, Ill.; N. Larry orated Student Center. Hayes, Peru; Kathleen Henning,

(Continued from page four) senting the Freshman class in Peru State College's annual May Fete. Dave's hometown is Corning, Iowa. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Fife. Majoring in pre-medicine, Dave hopes to go into that field. Dave works at the Nemaha County hospital in his spare time. His favorite pastimes are golf, hunting, and playing pool.

PERU

Omaha; David M. -Hensley, Loup City; Phyllis R. Hopper, Auburn; Charles E. Houser, Daykin; Bernard H. Jarecke, Bellevue; Raymond E. Johnson, Nemaha; Robert D. Jones, Omaha; Diane R. Kennedy, Plattsmouth; Julia Rumery Kern, McLouth, Kans.; Bernice Kopetzky, Falls City; Gail F. Kopplin, Gretna; Robert Krofta, Table Rock. Rodger Langemeier, Snyder; Domonick LaRocca, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Larry R. Lines, Villisca, Iowa; Marjorie M. Lines, Sabetha, Kans.; Gary L. Madison, Omaha; James W. Manning, Slidell, La.; Edna H. Martin, Hamburg, Iowa; Michael McCormick, Palos Park, Ill.; Nile R. McCoy, Villisca, Iowa; Joseph E. McKee, Malvern, Iowa; Myra E. Murren, Elliott, Iowa; Ronald L. Mustard, Auburn; Elaine Neddenriep, Brock; Milan Obrenovich, South Lyon, Mich.; Irene M. Ogle, Dawson; Paul R. Oliphant, Pacific Junction, Iowa; Mary M. Parmenter, Northboro, Iowa; Karen Parrack, Mahaska, Kans.; Loren E. P~nkava, Stella; Beverly Brigham Perry, Hiawatha, Kans.; Ronald Peterson, Liberty, Mo.; Peggy Quackenbush, Beatrice; Karen M. Quinn, Marshalltown, Iowa; John N. Rinne, Burchard; Marilyn Robertson, Dunlap, Iowa; Linda L. Rogers, Stella; Robert L. Ruff, Gretna; Vincent Sabatinelli, Southbridge, Mass.; Samuel B. Sadich, Wood River, Ill.; Mary Sautter, Bellevue; Jerry Sayer, Peru. John L. Scharp, Peru; James Schirmer, Milford; Gay 1e Schoen, Auburn; William Shaw, Brock; Samuel. E. Smith, Johnson; Sherrie D. Smith, Sidney, Iowa; Paul Stevenson, Peru; Vickey E. Still, Atchison, Kans.; Barbara Thompson, Filley; Frederick Trumble; Lincoln; Leland Vrooman, Orchard; Vera V. Walker, Riverton, Iowa; Cynthia Meier Weddle, Table Rock; Kris-

iine Wewel, Newport; Pat Wheatley, Cedar Rapids, I John D. Wilson, Tecumseh· D. Windhorst, Deshler; Wll Witty, Syracuse; Marilyn ters Yopp, Ne'braska City; bara Young, Falls City; Ma Zimmerman, Nemaha; Mar Zwickel, Peru.

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--itty-three Received Awards At Honors Convocation Fifty-three Peruvians were onored Wednesday, May 18, at n all-college honors convoca·on presided over by Peru State ollege president, Dr. Neal S. omon. The awards were in recnition of outstanding achieveent during the current academic year. Awards and recipients: Dan Knudsen, senior, the Dramatic Club award to the senior . ho has made outstanding contributions to drama activities, a collection of books. John Creamer, Bernadine Fintel, and Dan Reed, freshmen, the Sigma Tau Delta, honorary English fraternity, .awards for written contributions in freshman writing contest. Creamer received a $10 award and the latter two $5 awards for the purhase of books of their choice. Mary L. Tackett, junior, the Pearl A. Kenton Foreign Lanuage &:holarship, for outstandfog work as a foreign language student, a $50 grant. Established by Miss Alice Kenton, Pomona, Calif., a 1921 Peru State graduate, in memory of her sister, a Peru graduate and teacher of languages at Peru State. Rodger Bassett, junior, Syracuse for outstanding work in .mod~rn languages, a certificate. William Kerins, sophomore, the Louise Mears Geography Award, provided by the sale of Hills of Peru, book authored by e late Miss Mears, a $50 oneear grant. Marilyn Sugden, freshman, recognition award of Kappa Delta Pi, honorary education fraternity, for scholarship and professional promise in the field of education, a certificate and badge of the society at the time :of becoming a member as a junior. Albert Cooper, sophomore, recognition award for outstanding work as a student in geography, a certificate. Rodger Bassett, junior, for outstanding work in the fields of history, geography, and social science, a $50 scholarship provided by the Peru Historical Society. Pam Lett, junior, the Peru Historical Society award for contributions to the organization, a volume of Langer's Encyclopedia of World History. Dorothy Bock, senior, for the ·. outstanding senior woman in a member organization, national membership in the American Association of University Women by the Nebraska Division of the

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Mary Mowry, sophomore, the White Angels scholarship for contribution to school activities, by the women's pep club, a $50 scholarship. White Angel service bars went to Miss Mowry, Marilyn Masters Yopp, Kathy Hennig, Joan Sprieck, Lucy Sporer, Ceci Evangelist; Kris Wewe!, Lois Monsees, and Myra Murren. Beverly Perry, senior, the Zelma Wonderly award for outstanding work as a student teacher in second grade, a $50 cash award provided by the late Miss Zelma Wonderly, campus school supervisor from 1950 to 1959. Nancy Vanderbeek, junior, the $50 Charles P. Weigand Scholarship established by the members of Weigand's class of 1906 at the time of their 50-year class reunion in 1956 in memory of the late Charles P. Weigand. Richard Hamer, junior, Business Club award for the outstanding Business Club member, a certificate. Mary Ellen Oestmann, junior, the Nebraska Music Educators National Conference award for outstanding performance in music, a $75 one-year grant. William ·Bowen, sophomore, the Neal S. Gomon award for outstanding contribution to the Pedagogian, student newspaper, plaque. Richard Berthold, senior, the A. V. Larson award for outstanding contribution to the Peruvian, college yearbook, plaque. Also honored were Pedagogian staff members Nancy Jarvis, Jo an Bretthorst (co-editor), Mary Budler, Phyllis Grolf; Mary Lu Hicks, Walter Rimmer (photographer), Ralph Shaffer, and &>n Snodgrass; and Peruvian· staff. members Barbara Gordon, Sharon Beatty, Barbara Armstrong, Walter Rimriler, and Bonnie Anderson. Recognition was given to this year's recipients of Who's Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges: Oliver Bierman, ·Dorothy Bock, Anne Epley, March Tinkham, William Witty, Marilyn Gonnerman, Barbara Gordon, Robert Hilt, John Rinne, Donna Van Buskirk. Jack Rinne, senior, the Swenson Athletic Award, a gold watch and medal. Established in 1925 for ·the outstanding senior who has participated in athletics, by the late Mr. and Mrs. Bert Swenson of Stockton, Oalif., the award has been presented annually since that time. The award donors were members of the class of 1909. Patricia Thompson, freshman, Newman Club, student Catholic organization, award . for outstanding service, a certificate and pin. Pat Venditte, junior, for scholarship, citizenship, and service, the Majors Ifall Residence Hall citation.

Henry Assumes Responsibility Bob Henry,. assistant director of the Office of Special Services, has assumed the faculty responsibility for the final issue of the 1965-66 Pedagogian. Mr. Henry has also assumed a similar position on the Peruvian staff, now completing work on the supplement to the 1966 yearbook.

Summer Instructors Announced According to Dr. Keith L. Melvin, dean of the college and director of summer sessions, seven visiting instructors will join the Peru State College staff for the 1966 summer sessions. These instructors and the subjects they will teach are as follows: Dr. James Howell, principal of McLean Elementary School, Wichita, Kansas, will teach the three-week developmental reading seminar. Walter Yost, art supervisor in the Atchison, Kansas, Public schools, will teach art appreciation and art exploration during the second five-week session. Miss Mary ·Ellen Slack, women's physical education director at Nebraska City Public schools, will teach folk dance, tennis and physical education activities during the first five-week session. Charles Francis, social sciences instructor and head basketball coach at Abraham Lincoln High, Council Bluffs, Iowa, will teach U. S. History Since 1865 an d American national government during the second term. James C. Lien, assistant professor of history and social science at Mayville College, Mayville, N. D., will teach social science 104 and World Civilization Since 1500 during the second session. Clifford S. Johnson, assistant professor of science at Wisconsin State University, Platteville, will teach the aerospace workshop. Daryl Long, assistant professor at the University of Nebraska College of Agriculture, which will teach the conservation of natural resources workshop.

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Music Department Presents 11 Li'I Abner" (Continued from page one) lett Darla Obink; Dr. Finsdale, Ste~e Brodersen; Scientists, Adrian Bartek, Charles Wellensiek; Gov't Man, Bill Uhri; Wives, Bonnie Anderson, Barbara Richard, Jolene Piper, Pat Bindrum, Nancy Vanderbeek; Cronies, Bob Patterson, Kenneth Carnes, Jim Baker, Tom Osborn. Directors of the musical were: Charles Williams, stage director; Mr. Hugh Thomas, music director; Mary Lu Hicks, accompanist; Jon Davis, stage manager; Mrs. Mary Ann Gnade and Mrs. Lola Baker, costumes.

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CAMPUS SCHOOL NEWS By Phyllis Groff At the campus school everyone is getting ready for the last day of school. Both teaohers and students are looking forward to a vacation. Students in every class of the high school bought and read a ·total of 178 paperback books this school year as members of the Campus Book Club. The highlight of the Club's activities came on April 26 when members selected 34 free dividend books, bonuses they had earned from books purchased through the Club. Mrs. Friest, the teacher-sponsor of the Club, described the Campus Book Club as a i.!nique plan whioh enables high school students to buy a wide range of selected paperback books at low prices. Campus paperbacks are chosen by educators to appeal to many teen-age interests. Selecttons range from serious classics rto suspense stories, from entertaining best sellers to books recommended for college-preparatory students.

serving as club president. The club ~also sent a six-mem ber delegation to the Centr 'I1he Student Center Board held States Province Convention i its final meeting of the 1965-66 Jefferson City, Missouri, Apri school year on Tuesday, May 17, 29 and 30. The group included in the Student Center conference Jerry Allen, Jarold Bartek, Caro~ room. The main business of the line Bliss, Mary Bu<ller, Dave meeting was to elect officers for Francois, Pat Thompson, and the coming year. Elected to the Father Birkel, chaplain. chairmanship for the second consecutive year was Ralph DiCesare. The other officers are as follows: Lowell Brown, vicechairman; Diane Morrison, corresponding secretary; and Ceci Evangelist, treasurer. The next Drycleaning regular meeting of the board will and be on September 22, 1966.

Student Cent~r Board Elects New Officers

Publications Awards Presented The Language Arts Division of Peru State College presented two publications awards at the AllCollege: Convocation on May 18, 1966-the Neal S. Gomon Award to Bill Bowen for his outstanding contribution to the Pedagogian, the student newspaper; and the A. V. Larson Award to Dick Berthold for his outstanding contribution to the Peruvian, the college yearbook. Pins were presented to Bowen as Editor-inChief of the Pedagogian and to Berthold as .Editor-in-Chief of the Peruvian. Those receiving other awards presented by the Language Arts Division for outstanding contributions to the Pedagogian were: Joan Bretthorst, editor; Nancy Jarvis, editorial staff; Mary Budler, reporter; Phyllis Groff, reporter; Mary Lu Hicks, reporter; Walter Rimmer, photographer; Ralph Shaffer, reporter; and Ron Snodgrass, reporter. Others receiving awards f o r their outstanding contribution to the Peruvian were-Barbara Gord-On, Sharon Beatty, Barbara Armstrong, Bonnie Anderson, editorial staff; and Walter Rimmer, photographer.

Ed Cox attended the State Track Meet at Kearney on Friday, May 20. On that same day the seventh and eighth grades went to Lincoln. On Monday, May 16 the FHA girls said good-bye to the seniors with a farewell picnic. And on May 18 the rural eighth grade pupils visited school to see what high school would be like. On 'I1hursday,

May 19, the high school girls, for the coming year tried out for cheerleader. Thursday, May 26, an Honors Convocation is to be held. May 27 is the last day the seniors will attend Peru Prep. On Sunday, May W Baccalaureate services-college and high school-will be held in the college auditorium. Wednesday, June 1 will be Peru Prep's Commencement. The graduates are: Darrell Chandler, Ron Fisher, Bruce Henning, John Kite, Marshall Merritt, Bob Milstead, Bob Mullendore, Jerry Pasco, Greg Vaughan, Kenton Wheeldon, Jim Whisler, Robert Witte, Nancy Adams, Marie Ballue, Alene Dobson, Danna Henry, Mary Lutt, Doris McCullough, Cathy Pelisek, Kathy Sherman, and Pat Williams. The Class of '66 chose as their motto a quote from Winston Churohill, "Give us the tools and we shall finish the job." Their colors are green and white and the white rose is their flower.

Preschool Classes Ended May 13 The campus school pre-school which opened April 18, came to a close on Friday, May 13, with the celebration of Perry Shuman's birthday. Mrs. Sproul and her child care class conducted the school. The group met daily from 1:45 to 3:15 p.m. During this time they participated in art, music, and stories. The main purpose of pre-school is to acquaint the children with the equipment, facilities, and the room which they will be using next year in kindergarten.

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Miss Ginnie Mullen, sopho· more at Peru State College, was elected to the office of presidentelect of the State Home Economics College Chapter. Ginnie will serve under Georgia Stevens, president, from the University of Nebraska until April. 1967, when she will take over the office of president.

Jarvis Gets Grant D. J. Jarvis, associate professor of ind us trial arts at Peru State College, has received a grant to attend a five-week Driver Education Safety workshop at Michigan State University, East Lansing. Made a v a il a b 1e to MSU through the All-State Corp., the stipend covers the five-week seminar whi<:h ends September 3. Jarvis has been a member of the Peru State faculty since 1948.

Miss Alma Ashley, associate professor of elementary education at Peru State College, Saturday was elected president of the Nebraska division of the American Association of University Women. Miss Ashley, who was vicepresident four years, serve6.four years as treasurer of the state organization. Her election came Student Center at the final session of the state Board Planning convention at Sidney. Patio For Bob Inn In cooperation with Mrs. Anne Dining and dancing under the Campbell, Lincoln, regional vicepresident, and association visit- stars will be a future pastime for or, Miss Edith Sherrard, pro- Peru State students. A patio is gram staff associate from the to be built adjoining the Bob Inn. The project, sponsored by the AAUW Educational Center in Washington, Miss Ashley will Student Center Board, will inplan for a board meeting in con- clude a flower bed at the foot of junction with a regional c<>n- the east steps leading down to the Bob Inn and the rest of the ference in Omaha, June 10-11. space is to be filled with red Ruth Harris of Hastings was named vice-president, and Mrs. brick decorations. After the project is completed, Ralph ,Hammond of Bushnell, tables will be installed as well as recording secretary. a public address system leading from the juke box to the patio. Various activities are being planned ,by the Board, such as outdoor parties, hootenannys, and dances.

Three Faculty Members To Retire

Three long-time faculty members, whose combined years of service to Peru State total 75 years, will retire at the end of the current academic year. The retirees are Miss Norma Diddel, associate professor of art; Miss Hazel Weare, associate professor of business education; Dr. Harold Boraas, dean of students and professor of educational psychology. Miss Diddel, who came to Peru in 1929, will complete 37 years of service; Miss Weare completes 23 years, coming here in 1943; and Dr. Boraas ends a 15-year tenure, joining the staff in 1951. Miss Diddel and Dr. Boraas will leave the staff at the end of the first five-week summer session, and Miss Weare will terminate her duties at ·the close of the current semester. They were honored by the Peru State faculty Sunday, May 15, at a dinner in the Student Center.

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NEWMAN CLUB The Newman Club attended the regional meeting and picnic at Kearney State College on May 15. Mary Budler was nominated for state vice-president, and Father Birkel was elected state chaplain. Dave Francois was selected as Peru representative for the Board. Pat Thompson also attended.· The club held its annual sp).'ing picnic May 11 at the Stemper home due to the rainy weather. Food was furnished by the cafeteria. Pat Thompson was elected by the club .members as "Outstanding Newmanite 1966." She is no·w

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Profile for Peru State College Library

1965-1966 Peru Pedagogian - issues 1-14  

1965-1966 newspaper issues 1-14 for Peru State College, Peru, Nebraska

1965-1966 Peru Pedagogian - issues 1-14  

1965-1966 newspaper issues 1-14 for Peru State College, Peru, Nebraska

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