Page 1

ebraska's Oldest College

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

1

Peru Pedagogian \

Volume SO

PERU, NEBRASKA

Number 1

OCTOBER S, 1964

Nebraska s Best College

nrollment Up Ten Per Cent Watermelon feed Peru Citizens Vote 219 - 24 ith 866 Attending Classes For Campus School Contract On campus enrollment for the fall semester at Peru State College is 866, according to F. H. Larson, registrar. The total en-· rollment, compared to last fall's 780, is nearly a 10 per cent increase over the 1963-64 fall semester. The freshman class with 291 students is the largest, followed by the juniors with 197, the seniors with 186, and the sophomores with 169. Twenty-three students are specials or p o s t graduates. Men outnumber women 541 to 325. Of the total enrollment 723 are day students and 143 are enrolled in night classes. Thirtytwo Nebraska counties, 23 states besides Nebraska, plus Korea and the British crown colony, Hong Kong, are represented in the enrollment.

The Cast Is Working On Homecoming Play This year's Homecoming Play is a unique blend of entertainment and good literature. "The World of Carl Sandburg" has been performed by professionals and a few colleges and it has - been hailed as "a most impressive stage presentation." The Sandburg selections run the gamut of emotions and thoughts from A to Z. The serious and comical sections are punctuated by folk songs such as "Careless Love" and "John Henry." "The World of Carl Sandburg," shorter than the average play, will be presented at 7:00 o'clock - Saturday evening, October 17, and will be over before the Homecoming Dance begins. (Continued on page five)

Sifti.ng Sands Now Sold Out Sigma Tau Delta, honorary English fraternity, announces that the first edition of "Sifting Sands'· is sold out. A surprising number of people expressed interest in the issue. Consequently, a second printing is expected to a~ )ear a bout Homecoming time. The "Sifting Sands" contains original writings of Peru studenb. The year's edition features the winners of the Freshman Essay Contest. If anyone wishing a copy con\:Jds Lonn Pressnall or Mr. Silas

Summers, a copy served for them.

will

l.Je

re-

The organization will soon l.Jc accepting entries for next year's issue of "Sifting Sands," so if you have any talent or interest in writing, bear this in mind.

Peruvian Pictures Because of the later deadlines for Peruvian copy this year, Pernvian pictures will not be taken until October. The schedule for these pictures will be: Monday and Wednesday, October 26 and 28 and Tuesday morning, October 27, individual pictures; T~­ day afternoon, October ~I. organization pictures. Because a yearbook is a rnemory book of all friends and ewnt;, during a per::on·s school career, the Peruvian staff hopes that all Peru students will endeavor to have their photographs taken during these three days.

Assistant Coach, Jack Mcintire; Assistant Coach, Al Wheeler: Head Football Coach, Dr. Ervin PiUs: Charles Colebrook, David Obrenovich, Luke Cox, Ron Peterson, Samuel Carneal, Dave Wilson, Vin· cent Sabatinelli, James Manning, Dominick La Rocca,

An estimated 300 students attended the annual watermelon feed held Monday evening in the pit of the college gymnasinm. The Student Government Association sponsored the feed and furnished nearly a 1,000 pounds of watermelons. Harvey Fisher, president of SGA, voiced great delight in the success of the event. Rumors suggesting the cancellation of the annual event spread throughout the campus early Monday but were soon proven false with the carting of 30 ripe melons from Nebraska City. Dave Gomon transported all 30 melons in his, car. Lines formed quickly with the cutting of the first melons, which were sliced in proportion to in· dividual appetites. Freshmen cleaned up the debris after the feed.

Freshman Clash Day Features High Style Freshman clash day was held on Sept. 28, 1964, from 6:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. The girls' uniform for the day consisted of twenty braids in the hair, no make-up, one nylon and Olk' bobby sock with one hi g h heeled shoe and one flat shoe, and clashing skirt and blouse with beanies. Freshmen boys had a uniform consisting of two different types of shoes, two different colored ,.lockings. wrong side out shirt buttoned down the back, pockets of pants hanging out. one necki ie in front and one in back. and Ocanics. The freshrnen wore their uniforms to ~di their classes and to a!l their meals. Some freshmen said they enjoyed the spirit of it all and several girls said they had tired feet.

Ray Cotton, Calvin Miller, R o y Windhorst, Paul Fell, Leslie Raine, Charles Prati, Phillip Malone, William Witty, Allan Sullivan, Floyd Goff, Ber· nard Brown, Robert Urwin, Lowell Brown.

Variety Show October 6 J. D. Levitt's annual Variety Show will be October 6 at 7:00 p.m., and the show appears to be packed with a host of entertaining features. The "talent or nerve" come-on has induced several campus performers. In addition to the traditional chorus line of freshman beauties, there will be folk singing, stand-up comedy, guitar and piano solos and assorted other musicians and dancers. New to the show will be a brass band in the pit and colorful streamers and decorations expressing the "convention" theme. The show can best be described by a casual remark made by a student who had seen several of Levitt's shows before: "You never know what to expect; some years the faculty perform a n d that is 'different'; other years the stage crew perform and that too is 'different'; and occasionally the performers perform and that's really funny.•· So, for fun and surprises galore, attend the biggest show of the year, this Tuesday night.

Post Game Dance Peru State's own "dimensions" highlighted· the dance Saturday evening, Sept. 26. The dance, sponsored by Newman Club, followed Peru-N.W. Missouri game. Music was by a combo composed of Sharon Johnson, piano; Charles Wellensiek, drums; Ralph Shaffer and Dale Duensing. trumpets; Bill Carlson and Gary Schmucker, saxophones; Jim Johnson, trombone; an cl James Horgan, guitar.

There was standing room only at the Peru City Hall as the townspeople voted 219-24 in favor of continuing the contract for the campus school. At the Sept. 24th meeting, the citizens of Peru faced the decision of continuing the present contract or building a new school. Mr. Ward Adams, president of the Peru school board, presided at the meeting. Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of Peru State, read a statement of the State Normal Board's position on the issue. There was little discussion, due to the fact that two meetings had been held earlier in the month to discuss the possibility of the city of Peru starting its own school.

Freshman Looks At Registration BY MARCH TINKHAM September 15, 1964 was a memorable day for the Peru State freshman. On that day he registered. Advised by upperclassmen to get in line early, he got up at an unearthly hour and went to the gym. There he found a thick, long line of his classmates already impatiently waiting for the doors to open. When the doors did openmuch later-the freshman was handed some papers and forms and aimed toward his counselor. Two tables down from where he had been aimed, he found his counselor and handed him his completed schedule for approval. "This looks pretty good," h is counselor said, "except for one or two little things. I don't think you intended to have these two classes the same period, and I be(Continued on page five)

Ralph Di Cesare, Alfonso Pc:"Xili, Richard Daly, Richard Bencivenni, John Sin· noU, Michael Ferry, Narva Brye, Byron Montigue, Bruce Roberts, Douglas Dierks, Neal Holmes, James Nash, Ronald Yates, Timothy Logsdon,

George Evangelist, Jim Hardick, Jim Brown, Owen Dierks, Curtis Holliman, Harry Leth, Richard Daigle, Bill Kerkmann, J oh n Buchheit, Gregory Dichinson, James Horgan, Larry Tate, Bruce Vickrey, '

,

~

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Page 2-PEI\U 'Pt:DAGOGIAN--Monday. October S. 1964

NEW CURRICULUM FOR PERUVIANS The disappearance of two familiar words has baffled many Peru students. No longer does a person have a "major" and a "minor." Instead, he has a "field of specialization" and a "related field." This substitution of words is the result of an important change in the curriculum. ' According to Dr. Keith Melvin, dean of the college, "All professional groups concerned with the preparation of teachers, including niany lay citizen groups, have advocated that a teacher should be prepared in one field of specialization, instead of attempting to be a 'jack of all trades'." The curriculum at Peru State College is in line with this philosophy in that (1) 1/4 to 1/3 of the t.otal program of teacher prep~ra­ tion is spent in general education, (2) 1/3 to 1/2 of the ~1me is in the field of specialization, supported by a related field, (3) 1/6 to 1/3 of the time is in professional education. In the future, teachers will be endorsed by Peru State College in only one field or at a certain grade level. Dean Melvin states, "Students should choose their related field in terms of having some teaching responsibility in that field." The new curriculum is definitely an improvement. It allows more concentration in a specific field. Compare the requirements of a 1954 Peru catalogue with those of the 1964 college catalogue. A major in English required 32 hours (including English composition). Now, 36 hours (excluding English composition) is required. In 1954 only 24 hours constituted a major in mathematics. 'l'he 1964 catalogue requires 32 hours in that field. Other fields show comparable changes. Obviously, the 1964 Peru student is exposed to considerably more subject matter in his field than his 1954 counterpart. This should result in a teacher who is better qualified than previously. Although s~ne may mourn the passing of the familiar "major" and "minor,'' the new curriculum will produce Peru State graduates who are better prepared in their teaching fields than ever before. -Janice Wilkinson.

DELZELL HALL By Anthony Lopes -oWith things just about straightened away, Delzell Hall has 183 occupants. There are approximately 35 rooms with three men to a room. The first meeting of this year's dormitory counselors was held Monday, Sept. 21. The officers for the 1964-1965 school year are: Ray Cain, president; Al Sullivan, vice president; Jack O'Connor, treasurer. The other counselors include: Larry Trimble, Pat Thomas, Doug Cotner, Loren Penkava, and Ron McCoy. On Tuesday night, Sept. 22, a dormitory meeting was held with almost all the residents attending. At this meeting Mrs. Paradise told everyone what she expected and wanted the men to do this year while living in Delzell Hall. Mrs. Paradise also stated that she expected either to have the automatic washers in the basement fixed or to have new ones installed within the next f e w days.

Actually Delzell Hall was opened two weeks before the opening of school. This was done so that boys out for football would have a place to stay. No less than forty-nine Massachusetts boys are at Peru State this fall and over half that number live at Delzell Hall. Other distant states are well represented also. The states of New York, New Jersey, and Maryland all have boys living in Delzell Hall. Of course, Nebraska, Iowa, and Missouri hold the representation edge because of their nearness to the campus. The word around the T.V. lounge is that the Phillies will whip the Yankees in four games straight, just as the Dodgers did a year ago in the World Series. At the present the favorite T.V. shows seem to be: "Combat," "The Fugitive," "Bewitched,'' "McHale's Navy," and "Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea:" I have been told that the most common noise in Delzell Hall is the rolling of pop bottles in the T.V. lounge. Happy birthday to Jim Head, Sept. 22, from all the boys at Delzell Hall.

LITTLE. MAN ON CAMPUS

....

by Dick Bibler

Did you hear about Gary Virterese's new_ car? It's a 1953 Chevy. It's a beauty when it runs. You can buy it real cheap.

1 • cOCA·COLA" ANO "COK£" AR£ REOISTEllCO TRAO(·MAlfKS WH!CH !OENtff"i'ONLY THE PRODUCT OP THE.C"oCA•COL"- COMPANY

'.'.''.·'."''.'·'.''·'.'"·'.·''.''."'.

MORGAN HALL By Ginny Grossman //-0-

Morgan Hall welcomes freshmen and transfer students from eight states, including: Nebraska, New York, Iowa, Illinois, Idaho, California, New Jersey, and Massachusetts. Upperclassmen and freshmen met on friendly terms Sept. 22. at 10:30 for the annual "Sister Sue" party. Each big sister introduced herself and her little sister. Punch and cookies were served. Officers of Morgan Hall this year are: Linda Bartels, president; Linda Rogers, vice president; and Connie Rademacher, secretary. Birthday wishes go to Peggy O'Neill, Karen Quinn, Chris Christensen, JoAnn Sch u 1 t z, Marilyn 'Robertson, and Joanie Sprieck. Freshmen comments reflect attitudes toward these first few weeks of college life. When asked "How's college?" answers were: "It's O.K.," "I like the friendliness of the campus," and "There's too much work." Our new cheerleaders are: Pat Knippelmier, Kathy Francis, Karen Quinn, Ka·ren Renken, Ceci Evangelist; and Marilyn Masters. Mary Sautter and Karon Rathe are alternates. Card parties are growing in popularity. An unusual card party occurred in Room B21 this past week. The loser crept to her room. Name unknown?!? As a closing word, "Remember upperclassmen, be kind to the freshmen girls. They may have older brothers!"

Singing goes better refreshed. And Coca-Cola -with that special zing but never too sweet refreshes best things go

b~~th

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PERU MARKET

MAJORS HALL

Rex Rains

By LaVelle Hitzemann

Groceries Meats Lockers Fruits and Vegetables

-oMajors Hall is providing living quarters for ninety young men attending Peru State College. There are forty-five rooms in the building with two occupants in each room. These young men began moving into the dormitory Sunday, Sept. 13. The freshmen, as is the case every year, are being made useful by the many upperclassmen in the dorm. The newcomers shine shoes, clean rooms, etc. for the college veterans. Wednesday evening, Sept. 16, an all-freshmen meeting was held in the solarium of Majors Hall. The purpose of this meeting was to acquaint the freshmeq with the rules and regulations for the dormitory. Counselors for this year are as follows: basement, Jack Rinne; first floor, Don Schmidt; second floor, Ed Meyer. Our housemother this year is Mrs. Donovan, who is beginning her fifth year at that post. A new addition is being built on the west end of the present structure. This will be a great help to the college in that it should relieve the crowded housing situation.

HOMECOMING CORSAGES CONTACT GARY SCHMUCKER Ph. 872-2631

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Inspired Bobcat Eleven Overcome In Second Half By Northwest Missouri A big tough line and fast running backs from Northwest Missouri moved to a 19-0 victory·· over Peru State Saturday night, Sept. 26. Both teams played tough defensive ball during the first two periods with neither team making a serious scoring threat. Early in the second half Ken Peterson of Northwest Miss-ouri's Bearcats gathered in a Peru State punt and ran the ball from his own 28 to the Bobcats' 2.0, setting the ball in scoring position. Four quick plays enabled the Bearcats to score as Ken Thompson powered his way from his fullback position through the Peru State line and in for the touchdown. The extra point attempt was wide to the right leaving the score 6-0 midway through the third period. The powerful Bearcat line g, forced a Petu State f um b 1 e which was recovered by Northwest Missouri on the Peru State 17-yard line. Ken Thompson again carried the pigskin and cli-

maxed four straight plunges with a second touchdown. Thompson also made the conversion, making the Bearcats 13 points as the third period ended. Quarterback Bill Witty of Sy.racuse, continued his varied attack of passing and handing off to his running backs but was unable to crumble the forward wall of Northwest Missouri. Jim Blankenship, halfback of the Bearcats made the final score of the evening as he broke through Peru State's line and scampered down the sideline for 65 yards and a touchdown. Ken Tho"'<pson's conversion attempt fell short of the crossbar.

Peru Presses Doane For Tearn Honors

ular cross country meet held at Tarkio, Sept. 26. Individual honors went to Doane's Dennis Donlinger who covered the 2.7 mile course in 13:58. Lou Fritz of Peru was close behind in second with a time of 14:02. Other Bobcat harriers finishing high were: Tim Hendricks, third in 14:04; Jim Watson, sixth in 14:25; and Jim O'Donoghue, eighth in 14:41.

STATISTICS: First downs _______ Yards rushing ____ Yards passing _____ Passes attempted __ Passes completed _ Punt average, yds._ Fumbles ---------Penalties _________

Doane's balanced squad edged Peru for team honors in a triang-

INGERSOLL. BARBER SHOP Let Us Care For Your Hair

P.S. N.W.M. 8 10 62 194 70 59 17 . 12 7 6 36 16 1 2 60 45

Coach Pilkington said that this year's squad is much more improved over his harriers of last year.

Auburn, Nebr.

Team ScoringDoane-26; Peru-29; Tarkio-30

McADAMS STANDARD

-JI

Page 3-PERU PEDAGOGIAN-Monday, October 5, 1964

FOOTBALL SCHEDULE Peru at. Tarkio, Sept. 12 Peru at Lincoln University, Sept. 19 N.W. Missouri Sept. 26

at

Peru,

Chadron at Peru, Oct. 3 Peru at Wayne, Oct. 10 Hastings at Peru, coming), Oct. 17

(Home-

Peru at Doane, Oct. 24 Peru at Kearney, Oct. 29 Washburn at Peru, Nov. 7

Pitts, Grid Mentor, ~eads Department "Hustle!" comes the word from Peru State's new athletic director, Dr. Ervin Pitts. Dr. Pitts has attended the University of Arkansas, and he received his doctorate from the University of Missouri. Dr. Pitts coached track a n d was assistant football coach at Southeast Missouri State. The Peru State campus is not entirely new to. Dr. Pitts. In 1953, he was an assistant to Mr. Al. Wheeler, who recently retired as athletic director. Dr. Pitts now coaches football and will assist in basketball and baseball. He is well pleased with the spirit and competence displayed by the team. Dr. Pitts stated, "The Bobcats face a tough schedule, which includes many larger colleges than in the previous years, but with 'hustle' and a fighting spirit the team should progress steadily." He hopes the student body will support the Bobcats this season as they did in 1953 and also that the team fulfills its obligations to the college and student body. Mr. and Mrs. Pitts reside at the college apartments. They have two sons, one a freshman at Peru Prep and the other a sophomore at the University of Missouri.

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Bobcats Roll Past Tarkio The Peru State Bobcats opened their 1964 football season with a 12-0 victory over Tarkio. The game played at Tarkio on Sept. 12 was highlighted by the running of Calvin Miller and Roy Windhorst. Together they accounted for 154 yards rushing. Miller ran for 77 yards on 19 carries, while Windhorst was able to gain 77 yards on 12 carries. So devastating was the Peru ground game that they were able to amass a total of 19 first downs as compared to Tarkio's 7. The Bobcat touchdowns were scored by Chuck Colebrook who tallied in the third period, a n d Windhorst who added the final touchdown in the fourth period of play.

Lincoln U. Swamps Bobcats 40-10 Peru State was defeated by Lincoln University 40-10 in a game played at Lincoln University. Peru only trailed by a score of 14-7 at halftime. In the second half Lincoln University with a more experienced team was able to tally 26 points with 19 of them coming in the final quarter. Curtis Holliman, a 9.8 second sprinter, was able to dent the Lincoln defense for 46 yards in six carries. He also scored a touchdown which knotted the score early in the first quarter. Roy Windhorst kicked a 30yard field goal in the fourth period to round out the Bobcat scoring.

AUBURN BOWLING CENTER •

STORE HOURS

OPEN BOWLING

Daily-9:00 to 5:30

Thurs. and Sat., 9:00 to 8:30

AUBURN'S NEWEST DEPARTMENT STORE APP AREL FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY

Mon. PMOther sets from $29.50 up Diamonds shown evenings by appointment.

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Tues. PMWed. PMThur. PMFri. PMSat. PMSun. PM-

2:30- 6:00 9:30-12:00 9:30-12:00 2:30- 6:00 2:30- 6:00 2:30- 8:00 2:30-12:00 2:30- 6:00

High School Harriers Here October Third High school athletes from a four st.jite area were invited to participate in a cross country meet at Peru State College on Saturday, October 3, according to Coach Jim Pilkington, meet director. The cross country thinclads ran in open · class competition over the 1.8 mile course with place awards given to the flrst 12. Invitations were sent to 15 high schools of the surrounding area.

SPORTS COLUMN By Richard Berthold -oThe Bobcats encounter a tough schedule this season against many larger colleges. With losses to Lincoln University of Jefferson City and N.W. Missouri State of Maryville, the Bobcats still face a solid team fro m Washburn. Over-all, a 50-50 rating would be a logical prediction for the 1964 Bobcat gridders. With enough hustle and desire, the Bobcats could have a winning season by a slight margin. The cross country team this fall looks very promising with the help from new participants. Coach Pilkington has four returning lettermen: Jack Rinne Bill Rinne, Louis Fritz, and Ji~ O'Donoghue. Vince Dahmus a letterman two years ago, has' returned and could help considerably. Dan Bolin, the Iowa Class B cross country winner, could produce, as could teammate Tim Hendricks of South Omaha high school. Jim was the Class A Nebraska state champ. Jim Watsen from Red Cloud, Nebraska and Rich Zaparanick from New York have reported good mile and half mile times. Roger Nevjahr and Tom Rosengren have also reported excellent times. Jack Cook, John Allen, and Tom Saunders are also good assets to an excellent team. Mr. Pilkington states the team is ahead of last year's already; so sports fans, be prepared for a fine cross country season. Week-end warriors should take another glance at the recreation program. The pool is open Saturday and Sunday from 2:00 p.m. till 4:00 p.m .The gym opens Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon and from 1:00 p.m. till 5:00 p.m. Sunday the gym will open from 2:00 p.m. till 5:00 p.m.


, Pag-e 4-P:E:RU PEDAGOGIAN-Monday, O.ctober 5, 1964

CHERUBS The Cherubs held their first meeting on Tuesday, Sept. 22, at 6 o'clock in the dormitory recreation room. The sponsors for this year, Mary Sautter and Janey Moore, called the meeting to order and explained the rules and regulations of the organization to the new girls. The officers for this year were elected. They are: Cherie Trevino, president; Sheryl Gawart, vice president; Linda Combs, secretary; Sheryl Davis, treasurer, and Anna Marie DeGerlia, merit chairman. Plans for the coming y e a r were announced and discussed. New skirts are being ordered. The Cherubs, in the future, will meet with the White Angels.

Chinatown's Charms BY MIKE CHU Near the northeast corner of New York City Hall is Chinatown. It is located in the downtown section of Manhattan, in the area between the }vianhattan and the Brooklyn brictl;es. Mott and Bayard Streets are the center of Chinatown. In Chinatown, there is a great variety of restaurants, tea houses, super markets, gift shops, theatres, museums, also some night clubs and recreation centers. Chinatown is a mixture of old and new customs. What color there is in the streets! Most restaurants specialize in Cantonese food. One can have shark-fin soup, swallow's nests, suckling-pigs, grilled duck skins, quail meat with walnuts,. stewed abalone, and cream of almond. These are some of the special dishes. Chop suey is not a real Chinese dish. Many people are mistaken about that. In some restaurants food and drink often go together. You can order Chinese yellow w i n e , which is served warm in a jar with a spout, like a teapot's; you drink out of little porcelain wine cups. How smoothly the wine goes down your throat! Warm and mellow is your feeling; and

now t!.... t the dinner is at last over, you are ready to settle down for a quiet chat And the talk is mostly of the dinner. In the middle of Chinatown, there is a large building which is the Chinese Community Center. A Chinese high school and an elementary school are established in this center. Their. classes start from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. because these youngsters have to go to the public school in t he daytime. The Chinese population in New York City is ·about sixtyfive thousand-nine thousand live in Chinatown and the rest live in the New York City metropolitan area. In Chinatown, the people celebrate all the Chinese festivals. The biggest festival of the year is the Chinese New Year. Fire crackers, dragon shows, and great parades are held in Chinatown. On this occasion, Chinatown is crowded with tourists: The Chinese New Year this year falls on February 13.

by Dick Bibler

--oFRESHMEN The purpose of the first freshmen class meeting Sept. 30 at 9:30 a.m. was to elect officers. Officers elected are: Gary Viterise, president;, Ralph Deceaser, vice president; Sheryl Gawart, secretary; and Nancy Vanderbeek, treasurer. The class also elected three representatives to the Student .Governing Association. These representatives are Ceci Evangelist, Jim Butts, and Bill Joiner_ -0--

SENIORS The first Senior Class meeting dealt mainly with the election of officers. Elected were Dan Leuenberger, president; Jim Manning, vice president; Jan Wilkinson, secretary; and Jim Agnew, treasurer. The Seniors also voted not to build a float for homecoming.

--o-

PERU HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION The Peru Historical AssociaEditor's Note: * * * tion, a campus group dedicated to This story was wriUen by Mike'fellowship in history, will conChu, a Ped reporter who spent elude its membership campaign last summer in New York City's October 15. Chinatown. A residen! of Hong Total membership, according Kong, Mike has been in the Unit· to the club's sponsor, George ed States two years. Schottenhamel, Ph.D., sh o u 1d exceed last year's total. This local group operates in conjunction with the national Library Hours history fraternity, Phi Alpha Now Increased W.A.A. Theta. Dan Leuenberger serves Beginning Oct. 5, 1964 there The Women's Athletic Associa- as president of both organizawi!I be new library hours. Mrs. tion held its first meeting Sept. tions. Brandt reports that because of 23. Karen Cahow, president, ex--othe increased use of the library, plained W.A.A. objectives and she will keep the library open functions to the new members. PERU STATE from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. on Awards were presented to girls GEOGRAPHY CLUB Monday, Tuesday and Thursday who had earned them during the Peru State College has a new and from 7:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. past year. Girls receiving letters organization on campus, the Peru on Wednesday. were Marty Greenlee, Karon Ra- State Geography Club. It was This will enable students to the, Jeanette Fox, Nancy Muse, started in the second. semester of use the library during the eve- Myra Murren, Marilyn Masters, last year. Under the sponsorship ning supper hour. Mrs. Brandt Marsha Schaaf, Jackie Dodson, of former professor James . Jack, stated that if there is sufficient Carol Nickels, Cheri Combs, and the club organized its constitu~se of the library during these Nancy Jarvis. tion and elected its officers. OffiThose receiving gold bars were hours, they will become permancers are: Robert Hilt, president; Karen Cahow, Peggy O'Neill, . \llt hours. Jon Davis, vice president; Lester and Marty Greenlee (2). Turner, secretary; Henry Grace, Sharon Donlan and Connie treasurer; Larry Johnson, histor- , Dietl, neither of whom were ian a n d Professor Whiteman, present, will receive $3.00 each sponsor. toward the purchase of a book The newly authorized club has Fifty-three grads, former stu- of their own choice. two main purposes: first, to dedents, and friends of Peru State Plans were begun for the annuCollege registered for Sunday's al intramural volleyball tourna- velop the interests of students in geography; second, to illustrate fall picnic of the Rocky Moun- ment. developments in the field of tain chapter of the Peru Alumni -0-geography. Association in Denver on SepWESLEY FELLOWSHIP Meetings will ~e held once a tember 20. The first Wesley Fellowship month throughout the year. The Meeting in Washington Park; meeting of the year was held first meeting is scheduled for OcDenver, the group electedJunior Sept. 23 at Mt. Vernon Heights. tober 14. Films will be an added Karas, Woodrow, Colo., 'presiThe eighteen youth had a picnic attraction of each meeting. dent; Robert B. Moore, Arvada, The club is accepting memberand songfest. Wassail was served Colo., vice president; and Alice the group by Miss Mary Alice ships till October 15. Dues are DeVore ((Mrs. Ross) Organ, DenVernon, one of the sponsors. Rev. one dollar per semester. If anyver, secretary-treasurer. Hankins and Mr. L. B. Mathews one wishes to join, contact Bob Hilt or Professor Whiteman. Fay Schneitman Rawson, Lara- were her co-sponsors. mie, Wyo., a member of the class The evening was planned by --oof 1907, was the earliest graduate the group's new 1964-65 officers: in attendance. The organization Bruce DuVal, president; Gary L.S.A. is planning a spring meeting for Newman, vice president; and The Lutheran Student AssociCheyenne, Wyo., May 2. Nancy Springer, secretary. ation (LSA) met last Tuesday

ORGANIZATIONS

LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS

11

I LIKE THIS COURSE -

fac anc Mr the Bla

n's so PRACTICAL.''

evening, Sept. 22, at 6:30 p.m. in the campus school. The group is sponsored by Pastor and Mrs. Carlson of Auburn, Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Larson, and Miss Frieda Rowoldt. President Dennis Flattre presided at the meeting. Other officers for this year are Lonnie Bohling, vice president and Mary Ann Rademacher, secretary-treasurer.

Gary Bedea, senior; Charles Niemeyer and Joe Keys, membersat-large. Dorothy Bock, Jon Davis, and Bob Hilt provided the program. They reported on the State Leadership Conf~ence held at Chadron.

The meeting was opened by a short spiritual meeting a f t e r which the new freshmen members were welcomed and encouraged to attend the following meetings, The site for the organization's Homecoming display was chosen. Refreshments were served following the meeting.

-oP.S.E.A. The Peru Student Education Association held its first meeting of the year on Sept. 21. Tom Castle, president, presided. Bob Hilt was appointed chairman of the homecoming display committee. Representatives to the board of directors were elected. They are: Walter St. Lawrence, freshman; Myrene Hildebrand, sophomore; Marilyn Gonnerman, j u n i or ;

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Page 5-PERU PEDAGOGIAN-Monday, October 5, 1964

Orientation Held For Freshmen

The Peru Kiwanis Club entertained more than 100 guests and members at a reception honoring ihe faculiy of Peru Siaielollege Tuesday evening in the T. J. Majors Campus School. Miss Alice Vernon and Mrs. Earl Applegate of Peru are serving (from left) Kiwanian and Mrs. Neal S. Gomon and Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Gaines. Dr. Gomon is in his 14th year as president of Peru Staie, and Mr. Gaines, new io ~he staff this year, is superintendent of buildings and grounds. The Gaineses are former residents of

Frosh Convo Peru Welcomes Gaines New Supt. On Sept. 14, 1964, the freshmen Buildings And Grounds at Peru State College received New Students The new superintendent o f buildings and grounds at Peru State this year is Mr. Delbert Gaines. Mr. Gaines was born and reared on a farm near Arlington, Nebraska, and is a graduate of Arlington High School. Aft e r high school, Mr. Gaines was employed at Marshall's Nursery for ten years, where he did all kinds of landscaping. Later he became a tobacco salesman. The duties of the new superintendent consist of managing the landscaping of the c amp us grounds and supervising the care of the buildings on the campus. Four years ago Mr. Gaines started working at Dana College in Blair, Nebraska, as a groundsman. After a year, he became superintendent of buildings and .. ..grounds. ·Mr. Gaines had this position until this year. Mr. Gaines is married and the father of four children, th r e e girls and one boy. His wife's name is Anita, and his children are Debra, twelve; Julie, ten; Greg, six; and Carol, four. Mr. Gaines said he li~d Peru very much and thought 1t was a very friendly community. He also felt the college had a friendly atmosphere. Bowling and model railroading are Mr. Gaines' favorite hobbies although he has not had much time for the railroading lately. Mr. Gaines also stated that he enjoyed football and all other sports.

The Cast Is Working On Homecoming Play (Continued from page one) The play, under the direction of Mr. R. D. Moore, is now in rehearsal and enthusiasm is very high. There are two interpreters and a minnesinger. The female reader is Myrene Hildebrand, the male reader is Lonn Pressnall, and the singing and guitar are handled by Mike Janis. All three of these performers have had ample experience in stage work and should do justice to the extraordinarily fine script. This event, a traditional part of homecoming at Peru, should not be missed by anyone who enjoys ·good comedy, folk music, and dramatic readings blended together by Norman Corwin.

their first taste of a college convocation. Mr. Hanford Miller presided. The convocation was begun by group singing directed by Mr. Hugh Thomas, accompanied by Mr. T. H. Benford. The group singing was followed by welcoming addresses by Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of Peru State College and Harvey Fisher, president, Peru Student Governing Association. Both Dr. Gomon and Mr. Fisher informed the freshmen of various opportunities and advantages offered at Peru. After a series of announcements, including an expla'ftation of the week-end recreation program by Mr. James Pilkington, the convocation was dismissed.

Ped Staff Organized First semester staff members of the Pedagogian have received their assignments. The editorial staff was chosen from the advanced journalism and news editing classes. Reporters are members of the beginning journalism class. Editors for this half of the year include: Dorothy Bock, editor; Rich Berthold, sports editor; Mert Finke, photography and layout editor; Harvey Fisher, personnel manager; Me 1an i e Gould, feature editor; Lonn Pressnall, academic editor; Ron Rist, copy editor; Gary Schmucker, business manager; and Janice Wilkinson, copy editor. The twenty reporters are Mike Chu, Joan Dickman, Philip Dorssom, Eugene Fitzpatrick, Ginny Grossman, Melvin Hester, LaVelle Hitzeman, Bernie Jarecke, Dan Knudsen, Anthony Lopes, Robert Minks, Elaine Neddenriep, Larry Piper, Charles Richards, Mary Sautter, Jo Ann Schultz, Beth Ann Terwilleger, March Tinkham, Norma Wood, and George Zwickel.

Callan Meets Students Democratic Congressional candidate, Clair Callan held an informal coffee in the student union Tuesday, Sept. 22. Mr. Callan, a Peru State College graduate, answered questions concerning his stand on such varied issues as

Freshman Welcome Day occurred at Peru State on Sunday, Sept. 13th. The main event of the day was the freshman dinner served at 6:30 p.m. in the Student Center cafeteria. After the diinner Dr. Neal S. Gomon, President of the College, introduced to the freshman class the various deans. Among those introduced were Dr. Keith Melvin, dean of the college; Dr. Harold Boraas, dean of students; Miss Juanita Bradley, associate dean of students; and Donald Carlile, director of special services. After Dr. Gomon's comments, the freshmen went back to the task of getting settled in their new dormitory homes.

Freshman Looks At Registration (Continued from page one) lieve this class is closed; and we'll really have to do something about your minor. P.E. doesn't support English too well." Time passed. Changes were made. The freshman went to pick up his class cards. A voice blared over the speaker, "English Composition 101, section 2, period 5 has closed. I repeat . . " The freshman plodded back to hi s counselor. More time pas.sed.· M o r e changes were made. The freshman groped his way back to the card line. The rest of the registration process was a mass of words and phrases. "Fill this out." "Y()U didn't press hard enough. Please go back and press harder this time." "You are a freshman, single male, a resident of ...." "Do you want to pay for all or half?" "Sign here." "And here." "Wait! Here's your receipt." "I want your registration pad and class cards." "You may go buy books now." "Get your beanie here." "Would you care to join ..." the anti-poverty program, agricultural stabilization, and foreign policy. His future campaign plans will take him to many parts of Nebraska's First Congressional District before the Nov. 3 election.

On Sunday, September 13, the freshmen were first welcomed to Peru. Registration of the students took place in the residence halls between 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. From 2:00 p.m. until 4:00 p.m., a coffee hour for parents of freshmen was held in the Student Center, and the campus buildings were open for visitors. At 6:30 p.m., an informal dinner was held in the Student Center cafeteria, compliments o f Broughton Food Service, Inc. At 8:00, Monday morning, the freshmen met in the college auditorium for group singing led by Mr. Hugh Thomas, assistant professor of voice. Greetings were then given by Dr. Neal S. Gamon, president of Peru State, and Harvey Fisher, president of the SGA. After the greetings, announcements were made and the freshmen who had not taken their ACT tests proceeded to t a k e them. In the afternoon, from 1: 00 to 2:00, the School College Ability test was given by Mr. Harold Johnson. From 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m., an all-freshmen convocation was held in the college auditorium with Dr. John Christ presiding. Following the convocation, students met with their respective divisions. Tuesday morning, September 15, registration began at 8:00 in the gymnasium. The first 150 students were registered in the morning, and the rest in the afternoon. Audiometric tests were also given in the morning and afternoon. The Freshman Women's Party was held in the Campus School, Room 312, from 4:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. This event was arranged by Mrs. Louise Kregel and Mrs. Ina Sproul, assistant professors of home economics. Classes began for everyone on Wedneday, September 16, at 7:30 a.m.

Hamlet Through Electronovision BY HARVEY FISHER As the lights began to dim, a respectful hush of anticipation gripped the audience. This anticipation was not futile. The ensuing performance, which w as viewed simultaneously in 1,000 theaters throughout the United States, was both a technical and dramatic success. Through the advanced process of electronovision, a technique of complex photography and sound apparatus, Richard Burton's stage interpretation of Hamlet was made possible. This reporter saw the performance in Lincoln, Sept. 23. For over three hours, Burton and a great supporting cast held an audience spellbound. There was no casual chatter and no one left his seat. The cast was dressed in sports clothes and very little staging was used. The play was allowed to speak for itself. And speak it did. In the contemporary attire, the age-old play took on a grand perspective. Burton was superb. His emotions engulfed the entire spirit of the play. He was a contemplative, grief-strickei;i young man weeping over hiS!' father's death, a raging mad-man screaming at his true love, an angry son seeking revenge and a nobleman as he died. Burton's acting, the brilliant cast and electronovision combined to bring about one of the greatest dramatic accomplishments ever viewed on the motion picture screen.

Peruvian Plans In Progress The 1965 Peruvian staff h as been named, and the members are preparing for the long year ahead. This year the Peruvian will feature a new concept in yearbook production here. The pages have been enlarged from the old 8"xll" to a 9"x12" page. The biggest change in the Peruvian will be in the coverage. This year the Peru student w i 11 get the entire school year in the 1965 yearbook. This yearly coverage will begin with "Registration" and end with "Commencement." It will feature a calendar of events rather than the old method of divisions for Athletics, Glamour, Activities, etc. The Peruvians will arrive in May with supplements to be mailed during the summer. This year the Peruvian has a very experienced staff. The staff consists of: Harvey Fisher, editor; Melanie Gould, assistant editor; Judy Beran, layout editor; Janie Moore, copy editor; Tom Castle, sports editor; Mert Finke, photography editor; Dan Leuenberger, layout; Dorothy Bock, Virgini~ Grossman, Elaine Neddenriep, Mary Sautter, Karon Rathe, Jackie Swiegler, copy; John Soby, Rich Berthold, sports; Bernie J erecke, Mel Hester, photographers.

Cheerleaders Are Elected The sounds of "rah-rah" and "Bobcats!" can be heard from the Morgan Hall parking lot since the recent election of the 196465 cheerleading squad. Elections were held on Tuesday, Sept. 22. The newly elected squad consists of Marilyn Masters, from Nebraska City; Kathy Francis, Council Bluffs, Iowa; Pat Knipplemier, Johnson; Karen Renken, Nebraska City; Karen Quinn, Corning, Iowa; and Ceci Evangelist, Newark, N. Y. Mary Sautter, Bellevue, and Karon Rathe, Sterling, were the alternates. The girls are working hard on organizing new cheers and pompom routines. They made their debut at a bonfire on Friday, September 25.

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~age 6-PEltU PEl:>AGOGiAN-Monday, October 5, 1964

Introducing MISS ANDERSON Miss Laurine Anderson ha s been selected to fill the position of assistant librarian at the Peru State College Library. Miss Anderson received her A.B. degree from Peru in 1928. She received her M.L.S. from the Uaiversity of Denver in Denver, Colorado. Miss Anderson h a s been a librarian for thirty years, twenty-five of which were spent in Auburn. Since then, she has been a librarian at the S t at e Capitol and last year at Nebraska Wesleyan University. Miss Anderson stated that she was happy to be back in familiar grounds because Nemaha County is her home. -l:i-

MRS. BERNARD Mrs. Rose Bernard has been appointed elementary supervisor .of the second and third grades in the Peru State Campus School. The new supervisor holds a B.S. and M.S. from Peru State. Mrs. Bernard has also done graduate work at Peabody College, Nashville, Tennessee on a scholarship. Her past experience irfludes two years of rural teaching and nine years as coordinator of K-3 at the School for the Visually Handicapped, Nebraska City, Nebraska. Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Bernard are the parents of three children: Marilyn Sullivan of Lincoln, Jack of Omaha, and Connie, who is presently attending St. Mary's College at Notre Dame, Indiana. Mrs. Bernard's hobbies include swimming, golfing, reading, and traveling. Peru State's educational values and also its friendliness attracted Mrs. Bernard to the Peru campus. -l:i-

MR. DOXON The new principal of the T. J. Majors Campus School is Mr. Lynn Doxon. He came to Peru from Rocky Ford, Colorado, where he served as head of the science department for sixteen years. In addition to his duties as principal, Mr. Doxon will teach chemistry and general mathematics at the Campus School. Mr. Doxon received his B.S. at Kansas State Teachers College in Emporia, Kansas. He acquired his M.A. at the University

of Colorado. Mr. Doxon has completed work toward his Ph.D. at the University of Oklahoma and Stanford UI!iversity. Mr. Doxon and his wife, Lydia, have .three children. Charles, the oldest, is attending freshman classes at the Campus School. Their daughter, Lynn Ellen, is in the seventh grade. Donald, the youngest, is in the fourth grade. The family expressed an 'immediate liking for Peru. Mr. Doxon stated simply and sincerely, "Peru seems to be a comfortable place to live," and, "We like its friendliness." Mr. Doxon enjoys reading as an outside interest, he finds his greatest satisfaction in widening his academic background. -~­

MRS. MARTIN Dorothy Martin is the director of guidance and instructor of social studies at the campus school. She has a B.A. and a M.A. from the University of Nebraska. \Mrs. Martin has done graduate work at the University of Minnesota. Before coming to Peru, she was director of guidance in the high school at Scribner, Nebraska. She was also a private teacher for two years. Mrs. Martin, a widow, has six children: Eric, Kevin, Nancy, Mark, Timothy, and Teresa Ten. kune. Mrs. Martin enjoys bowling and reading. She thinks that Peru's campus is very beautiful. -l:i-

MR. NEMEC Mr. Elmer Nemec joined the Peru staff at the beginning of the fall term as instructor of German and English. Mr. Nemec received his B.A. and M.A. degrees from the University of Nebraska. This is Mr. Nemec's first teaching assignment, and he will teach all German classes and one freshman English class. His hobbies are art and drawing cartoons and he enjoys playing the bass horn. Mr. Nemec thinks the students are very friendly and cooperative in class and also on campus. He was born and reared in Crete, Nebraska, and is single. --M-

MR. PRESSNALL Mr. Wayne Pressnall has joined the Peru State College staff as instructor of math in the campus school. Mr. Pressnall acquired his B.S. degree at Peru State College. He received his M.S. degree at the University of Pennsylvania in

1963. He has done additional graduate worlt at Wisconsin State College at River Falls, Alfred University at Alfred, New York, and the University of Wyoming. His specific duties at the campus school are teaching math in the seventh and eighth grades, algebra I and II, and geometry. He also conducts a night class for elementary teachers and a fiveweek workshop at Tecumseh, Nebraska. Mr. Pressnall's· record of experience is a very substantial one. Before his position at Peru, he taught math four years at Fullerton, Nebraska. His family consists of his wife, Gloria and two children, Gretchen, age three and William, age one. "Peru appears to be an excellent school for teacher training," commented Mr. Pressnall. His statement is based on the comparison of Peru with other institutions he has attended. In· his spare time, Mr. Pressnall enjoys playing chess. His other major hobby is slide photography.

graduate study at the University of Maryland. Mr. Whiteman has charge of all geography classes on the Peru State campus. Prior to coming to the Campus of a Thousand Oaks he taught in New Castle High School, New Castle, Ind.; served as a graduate assistant at Ball State Teachers College; taught at Mo re he ad (Ky.) State Teachers College; and served as lecturer in geography, under William Van Royen, at the University of Maryland while taking additional graduate work. The Whiteman family consists of Mr~. Whiteman (Mildred) and two children, John Henry, 2nd, who will be five in December and Anita Carmen, four in November. At present Mrs. Whiteman and the children are residing in Muncie, Ind. Being a collector of guns, he hopes to make use of them during the Nebraska hunting season. His other hobbies include coin and stamp collecting, fishing and hunting. Among his prized possessions is a key wind pocket watch which -~­ belonged to his great-grandfaMR. SELLECK A new instructor at Peru State ther and dating to pre-Civil War College is Mr. Erwin A. Selleck, days. who is replacing Mr. Rankin in the field of physics and math. Mr. Selleck is teaching two courses in math, physics, and astronomy. Mr. Selleck received his B.S. and M.A. degrees from Clarkson College, Potsdam, New York. Melanie Gould, a sophomore at Last year he worked as a gradu- Peru, traveling with her father, ate assistant at the Agriculture Air Force Major J. K. Gould, last Technical Institute, Canton, New summer visited Taipei, Taiwan, York. the capitol of Chiang-Kai-Shek's When asked what he thought free Chinese government. of Peru, he stated that he liked The trip began July 14, at Trait very much. He added also that vis Air Force Base in California. he doesn't care much for the rest There she boarded a jet airliner of Nebraska. bound for Honolulu. During her He is single and his hobby cen- short stay on the island, she visters around a great interest in ited the University of Hawaii. rock collecting. After a three day tour of the -~Philippines, she began, the last MR. THOMAS leg of her journey, a three hour Mr. Hugh Thomas joined the flight to Taipei, Taiwan. Peru State College staff this year After being greeted at the Taias assistant professor of voice. wan airport, she left for her hoMr. Thomas received his B.A. tel in a pedicab, a vehicle refrom Catawba College, Salisbury, sembling the Japanese rickshaw, North Carolina. He earned his drawn, however, by a man on a M.M. at the University of Ne- bicycle rather than by one on braska. Mr. Thomas has done foot. graduate work at Eastern New While the small Chinese vilMexico University, Portales, New lage, Tien Mou, remained her Mexico, and U.C.L.A., Los An- headquarters in Taiwan, Melanie geles, California. took several side trips. Among For the past three years, Mr. these were a tour of the Buddhist Thomas taught voice in the Ains- Temples, where she saw the worth High School, Ainsworth, beautiful collections of religious Iowa. art. Mr. Thomas is single and lists On a visit to the port city of interior decorating as his outside Keelung, she learned first hand interest. He also directs the choir of the city's fame for 'being the at the First Lutheran church in rainiest city in the world. "It Nebraska City. rained every day that I was --Mthere," Melanie reported. MR. WHITEMAN While traveling, Melanie spent Mr. Harold Whiteman, assist- a good deal of her time talking ant professor of geography, is to the people she met. "Converamong the new members of the sation was no problem, almost Peru State College faculty. everyone I met spoke some EngHe holds a B.S. and M.A. from lish," she said. Ball State Teachers C o 11 e g e , Since Melanie often dined with Muncie, Indiana. With additional the Chinese, she became profi-

Melanie Gould Spent The Summer In Taipei, Taiwan

dent in the use of chop stick During her visit, Melanie learne a great deal about the histo and customs of the Chinese. In Taiwan, Melanie received offers of local employment. Fu· jen University offered her a po sition in the English department, teaching "Conversational Eng lish." The "China Lantern,'' Tai wan's military newspaper offere her a job on the reporting staff. Having decided against re-. maining in Taiwan, Melanie left the island to return to Peru September 2. Her father, Major Gould, is serving a two year assignment with the Military Advisory Assistance Group. In this capacity he is working directly with the free Chinese g o v e r n m e n t. Through correspondence w i t h him, Melanie will continue her. education of Orient, while completing her undergraduate work here at Peru.

Annual Faculty

Convo Held Neal S. Gomon, President of Peru State College, welcomed new and returning students at. convocation on Sept. 23. Harvey Fisher, SGA president, presented an outline of the or· ganization's plans for the year. He asked freshmen and upperclassmen -to cooperate with the initiation plans set up by SGA. After introducing the members of the faculty, President. Gomon emphasized the growing importance of education.

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~eru PERU, NEBRASKA

Pedagogian Volume 60

OCTOBER 19. 1964

Number 2

For U.N. Dinner

United Nations Dinner October 20

Miss Frieda Rowoldt sang Brown Bear Went- Woof!"

Dr. Boraas Announces Sigma Tau Delta Members Hear Five Scholarships Five scholarships for P er u Siegner ~ Pressnall State College students have been awarde.d since the start of the 98th academic year, according to Dr. Harold Boraas, scholarship committee chairman. The recipients and scholarships awarded through the Peru Achievement Foundation include: Carol Henderson, Brock, nd David Anderson, Weeping ater, $200 one-year Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben scholarships; Richard Ferron, 3105 North 83rd St., maha, and Kary Hoines, Davenort, $100 one-year Mrs. R. W. res scholarships; Mary Lu cks, Auburn, $80 one-year race Teare Memorial scholarip; Lois Monsees, 1502 Main, llevue, $40 one-year August genberger Memorial Scholarship. The Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben nnually presents two tuition holarships to be awarded to eru State College students who e Nebraska residents. Mrs. Enes, the former Millicent Smallclass of 1913, is a resident of ttle, Wash., and has provided holarship aid for Peru State tudents since 1961.

·enford Piano Solos ill Be Published Two piano solos by R. T. Benrd, associate professor of piano d organ at Peru State College, ve been accepted for publican by Pro-Art Publications, c., Westbury, New York. For the early grades, the solos e entitled, "Raindrop Frolic" nd "Doodling." Th e newest los make a total of 10 of Mr. enford's piano solos published the firm. Some of the other mbers are "Pin W he e 1 s , " warm of Bees," "Marching ies," and "Mischievious Pix-

rollment Up At ate Colleges

Sigma Tau Delta held its first meeting on Oct. 12, at 8:00 p.m. in the Student Center dining hall. Coffee and tea were served at the beginning of the meeting. Lonn Pressnall, the president of Sigma. Tau Delta, opened the meeting by extending a hearty welcome to everyone. Mr. Wayne Pressnall spoke on how necessary English is for a math teacher and also how it conflicts with his profession. Dr. Siegner told the history of practical arts education in the United· States. He also felt that because ·of today's increased automation English is nl!eded so that people can communicate better with others. Following the speakers, the meeting was divided up into two groups. The English Club met and elected Richard Berthold as its representative to Sigma Tau Delta. Sigma Tau Delta voted on the admission of new members. Approximately 35 people attended this first meeting.

Foods from the homeland of the newest Miss UniverseGreece-will be on the menu of the United Nations Dinner at Peru State College. Sponsored by the Home Economics Club, the thirteenth annual dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, October 20. LeRoy Leland of the Peru State history and social sciences faculty will be the speaker f o r the dinner. A Fulbright scholar to Greece last summer, Mr. Leland visited in the home of Miss Greece who received the title Miss ,Universe. Mr. Leland's talk will be illustrated with colored slides. A ladies night meeting of the Peru Kiwanis Club has been scheduled for the United Nations dinner. Reservations may b e made by calling Peru State College 872-2811, extension 47.

Photography Classes To Help Campus School Yearbook Dr. C. V. Siegner, division head of practical arts, has asked four beginning photography students, Tom Castle, Mary Sautter, JoAnn Schultz, and Melanie Gould, to assist the campus school in taking pictures for their yearbook. Kent Van Zant, editor of the yearbook,. will make .the assignments to· these stUdenfs. · All students who are taking beginning photography for three hours are required to specialize in a particular type of photography and do research in that field. Dr. Siegner feels that these special projects give the students additional experience in those areas in which they are most interested. These four students who are taking the pictures for t h e yearbook can apply this experience to their study of journalism.

Baker Recital October 25 Mrs. Lola Baker of Au b urn will appear in an organ recital Sunday, October 25, at 3:30 p.m. in the Peru State College Auditorium. A student of R. T. Benford, associate professor of piano and organ, the recital is in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Education degree. The recital program will include Fantasia Sonata by Rheinberger, Caprise Venoise and Liebesfrued by Kreisler. American Suite by R. T. Benford is in four movements, Grandeur in th e Hills, Winding Trail, Prairie Nights and American Dance. For the final selection on the recital program, Mrs. Baker will be joined by Mr. Benford at the piano for an arrangement of Fantasy in F-sharp Minor by Federer.

he enrollment at Nebraska's state colleges is up 17 .5 perfrom the fall semester of . The total enrollment hed a peak of 7,238 students, every dormitory at the four ges is filled. e enrollment for each colWith the flu and cold season with the 1963 enrollment in nthesis is: Chadron 1,335 ·here, the Faculty Association ar9); Kearney 3,057 (2,512); ranged for flu and cold shots to ne 1,981 (1,799); and Peru be given here at the infirmary. (Continued on page four) (780).

Flu-Cold Shots for Students, Staff

The Hillclimbers sang "The Crooked Little Man." "Barry's Boys," and "The House Of The Rising Sun." The Hillclimbers are Jim Manning, Susan Kenworthy, Marcia Scharp, and Joe Keys.

Excellent Variety Show Delights Larg~ Audience_: BY LONN PRESSNALL J. D. Levitt's eleventh annual Variety Show opened Tuesday night, Oct. 6 with a brass band and a lot of color. The eleven piece band led by Gary Schmucker played fill-ins and other numbers throughout the program. The colors-red, white, and blue-were first evident when twenty freshman girls opened the show with an intricate kickline. They were Jackie Sweg!er, Wanda Anderson, Linda Combs, Nancy Reidy, Tracy Hester, Annette Surber, Julie Harrison, Di an e Richek, Judy Kettlehut, Julie Bass, Sheryl Gawart, Darlia Obbink, Virginia Young, Mary McVickers, Mary Lou Hicks, Mary Beth Gerber, Carol Chandler, Marjean Wusk, Carol Hawley, and Gloria Jackson. Butch Haws followed this act with "Scotch and Soda," accompanying himself on a guitar.

Afternoon October 27

1964-65 Peruvian Organization Pictures 1:00 "P" Club

3:40 S.C.F.

1:10 Alpha Mu Omega

3:50 Gamma Delia

l :20 Beta Beta Beta

4:00 Home Economics

1:30 Blue Devils-Actives

4:10 Alpha Mu Gamma

1:40 Blue Devils-Pledges

4:20 M.E.N.C.

l :SO Business Club

4:30 Pedagogian

2:00 Newman Club

4:40 Peruvian

2:10 P.S.E.A.

4:50 Phi Beta Lambda

2:20 P.S.E.A. (Cont'd.)

5:00 Sigma Tau Delta

2:30 Industrial Arts

5:10 English Club

2:40 Epsilon Pi Tau

5:20 Student Wives

2:50 Phi Alpha Theta

5:30 Woiten's Athletic Assn.

3:00 Peru Historical Assn.

5:40 Cherubs

3:10 Geography Club

5:50 White Angels

3:20 L.S.A.

6:00 Choir

3:30 Wesley Fellowship

6:15 Band 6:30 Veteran's Club

John Bstandig then playe~ two numbers on the piano, "Canadiah Sunset" and "She Needs Me.1' At this point Mr. Levitt, alias Senator Fudnik, read a modern version of the Gettysburg Address. The speech brought a floor demonstration which was supported by signs and placards on various themes. Miss Frieda Rowoldt came through again and sang "The Big Brown Bear" to the delight oUhe audience. Her accompanist was Miss Diane Regier. The next political speech was presented by Lonn Pressnal1. He quoted prominent politicians, and even nominated a Peruvian for president. The next striking number was "Something Wonderful" sung by Pat Wheatley, who was accompanied by Mr. Hugh Thomas. Mary Lou Hicks did a very creditable job with "Blue Moon" as her piano solo. The "Hillclim be rs" consisting of Jim Manning, Joe Keys, Susan Kenworthy, and Marcia Scharp, entertained with such numbers as "Barry's Boys" and "The House of the Rising Sun." Closing out an action packed program were Dave Seward and Curtis Holliman singing· "What's Your Name" and "Goodnight Sweetheart" with Butch Haws accompanying the last number. Ed Meyer headed a stage crew consisting of Jon Davis, Bob Craig, and Harv Fisher. Mr. Levitt was assisted by right and left hand men Bill Bowen and John Webster. Dance choreographen were Mary Sautter and Linda O'Hara. Costumes were arranged by Sally Kelly, Janie Moore. Lucy Sporer, and Judi Whig· ham.

Homecoming News There is no Homecoming news in this Ped because the deadline fell on Oct. 14 for the issue which is reaching you on Oct. 19. Coverage of Homecoming will appear in the next issue io be distributed Nov. 2.


----~·----------------------Page 2-PEllU PEDAGOGIAN-Mond.ay, October 19, 1964 DELZELL

Will YOU VOTE?

HALL

BY HARVEY FISHER With election day only a few weeks away, it might be worthwhile to reflect on the voting record of the college student in the 1960 election. A recap of the 1960 election shows tha~ only 52% of people in their twenties voted, while 82% of Americans ove_r the age of sixty turned out at the polls. The over-all American voter turnout in the 1960 election was bnly 63.8%. To c6ntrast this, in Italy and Austria more than 943 of the electorate voted in the national elections last year. Canada, West Germany, Sweden and Denmark all exceeded 80%, and Britain and France had over a 70% turnout. Is this a very respectable showing for the leader of the Free World? This complacency in ·political interest is a grave problem. Especially at the college level is this problem serious. College students are tomorrow's leaders. College students must learn to accept responsibility. Just why does this college lethargy exist? There are two possible reasons. First, the college i:Ludent engrossed in his academic, extracurricular and social activities often loses interest in the political scene. Also, due to a lack of information, the student may fail to comyly with voting regulations. This is ·often true of out of state" students and the absentee regulation. It is the responsibility of every American voter to be informed, both of voting regulations and the campaign issues. Only too often the attitude at Peru has been that since our representation is so small, there is no real significance in what we do on a national level. This type of indifference is the breeding ground for radical political parties. If we are to be worthy of our rights as citizens, we must protect these rights. One of the basic means of protection of our rights is the power of the ballot. Let us hope that the turnout at •the polls in November will not be a repeat of the pitiful showing in 1960.

L.B. 301 IS IMPORTANT

TO NEBRASKA EDUCATION BY NORMA WOOD Between now and election day, teachers and prospective teachers will hear a great deal of debate over the pros and cons of L.B. 300. This piece of legislation has created more controversy than any recent legislative bill pertaining to education.

By

Anthony Lopes The big news .at Delzell Hall these past few days is that Gary .Viterese was elected freshman class president. He was elected to his post at a clas_s meeting held Wednesday, Sept. 30. At his first press conference, Gary promised to work hard for the freshman class. The boys in the TV 1o u n g e have made a formal apology for picking the Phillies to win th e National League pennant. When I asked the boys who would win the World Series between St. Louis and New York, a major argument broke out. Someone said the other day that the boys from Delzell Hall should own stocks in Coca-Cola company. We go through 20 to 30 cases a week. The TV' lounge was completely silent last Sunday night from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. when the movie "The Miracle Worker" was presented. Everyone agreed that it was the finest movie presented on TV this year. A big battle raged last Thursday night in room 210. It was a battle of words between the backs and the linemen of the Peru State football team. They were trying to discuss who has the tougher job, the backs or the linemen. Representing the backs were Curt Holliman and Greg Dickinson. Representing the linemen were Bernie Brown and Bob Erwin. Did you ever hear Dixie being played over a hot water pipe? It happens every night at Delzell Hall.

Recent issues of the Nebraska Education News have carried. numerous articles designed to inform the educators of this state. Under the proposed L.B. 30Q, the state commissioner of education would be elected and the State Bol?.l;.d of Education would be appointed. The "301" committee urges that the present system of an elective State Board of Education and an' appointive commissioner of education be retained. Numerous educators from this state and other states are in agreement that the present system is superior. Miss Helen Heffernan, Chief of the Bureau of Elementary Education of the California Department of Education, stated "The presel\t plan allows the citizens to pick a board in which they have confidence, and allows the board to choose a commissioner qualified to supervise the education of children." Dr. Neal S. Gomon, President of Peru State College, commented, "An elective board and appointed commissioner keeps the school out of politics. Under this system the commissioner is free from political pressure." He also stated that a .number of the large parochial schools share this opinion. Dean Keith Melvin felt that education is not a political matter. He stated, that people promoting L.B. 300 don't realize that the eastern one-third of the state would elect the state commissioner of education. This particular issue affects both students and teachers. All persons of voting age should realize their rights and responsibilities and make use of their right to vote.

ELIZA MORGAN HALL By Ginny

Grossman Morgan Hall's advice for a long life: "You take care of every day -let the calendar take care of the years." Birthday wishes go to Rhea Reid, Connie Rademacher, Janey Moore, Linda O'Hara, and Linda Elliott. A new exercising program has

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been set up nightly in Room 34A. All girls who feel they need improvement° are welcome. Morgan Hall has named Margaret Helen Slayter as "Homemaker of the Year." Second place winner is Carolyn Mercer. Many of the residents are feeling "in the dumps" after receiving cold and flu shots. Some say that the shots are worse than a week of the illnesses. Engagement wishes are in store for Kris Wewel and Dom LaRocca. Congratulations to our Homecoming candidates who are Pat Wheatley, Judy Strange, Pat Knippelmier, Marilyn Masters, and Karen Renken. Mrs. Beckley thinks the prayer of the Morgan Hall girls is "Lead us not into temptation. Just tell us where it is and we will find

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Nebraska boys hold a vast majority in the number of residents in this dormitory. States represented with the number of boys from each are as follows: Nebraska, 69; Iowa, 11; Massachusetts, 3; Illinois, 2; Kansas, 2; Michigan, Missouri, and Ohio, one each. Thursday evening, October 8, a dorm meeting was held. The purpose of the meeting was to elect a new vice president. The individual elected last year is not with us this year. Roy Windhorst, Bill Rinne, and Sam Smith were nominated. Bill Rinne was elected. Other officers are: Mert Finke, president; John Barton, secretary-treasurer. Majors Hall had an oddity this year. The dorm was represented on the Homecoming Queen candidate list. Gayle E 11 is on , Holmesville, Nebraska, a sophomore, was among the many young ladies on the list-only this candidate was a young man. Sorry to report, Gayle did n o t win the election. David LaMontagne and Jack Cook were appointed to collect dues from the freshmen in Majors Hall. The charge of fifty cents was to be paid to these two boys. Dave was in charge of the ground floor; Jack was in charge of the basement and second floor.

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Majors Hall has been buzzing with radios and two televisions the past week. The reason f o r this is the 1964 World Series. Everyone seems to have some interesting sports, especially the well known World Series.

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PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Dorothy Bock _______ ---------------------------- ___ Editor Harvey Fisher· __________________________ Personnel Manager Richard Berthold ____________________________ Sports Editor Melanie Gould _____________________________ Feature Editor ·Lonn Pressnall ___________________________ Academic Editor Janice Wilkinson ______________________________ Copy Editor Ron Rist --------------------------------------Copy Editor Gary Schmucker _________________________ Business Manager Ginny Grossman ___________._______________ Morgan Column LaVelle Hitzemann ________________________ Majors Column Anthony Lopes ____________________________ Delzell Column Mike Chu _______________________ ------------ _____ Reporter Joan Dickman ___ ---------- ______ -------------- ___ Reporter Philip Dorssom _______________ -"------------------Reporter Eugene Fitzpatrick ___ -------------- ______________ Reporter Melvin Hester ____________________________________ Reporter Bernie Jarecke ___________________________________ Reporter Dan Knudsen ,____________________________________ Reporter Robert Minks"' _________________ ------------ _______ Reporter Elaine Neddenriep ___________________ ------------.Reporter Larry Piper _______________________ ---------- _____ Reporter Charles Richards _________________________________ Reporter Mary Sautter ___________________________ --------.Reporter JoAnn Schultz ____________________ ---------"----_Reporter Beth Terwilleger --------- __ ------------------- ___ Reporter March Tinkham --------------- ___________________ Reporter Norma Wood __ ----------- _______ ---------- ______ Reporter George Zwickel _________ ------------ _____________ Reporter


Bobkittens Lead N. V. Confere nee The Peru Prep Bobkittens moved to the top of the Nemaha Valley Conference with a 44-14 victory over Brock. This victory brought the Bobkittens' record to 4-0 for the season. Their other conference victims have been: Table Rock 44-7, Lourdes Central 39-0, and Cook in 33-26 thriller. The Bobkittens, bolstered by five players from last year's squad, are averaging 40 points a game while limiting their opposition to just 14 points a game.

Three former Bobcats are playing foi; ihe Omaha Mustangs this year. Lynn Osierholm was a Bo~at halfback, Mike Ramirez a guard, and Ken Dostal a tackle.

lntramurals Begin Mr. Stemper, director of intramurals, stated that eight teams have reported for the intramural touch football program. All the intramural games are played at the city ball diamond which is located north of the college baseball diamond. Officials are students from the officiating class. It is the responsibility of the team coach to acquaint all players with the intramural rules. All players must be officially registered in Mr. Stemper's office before they are eligible to participate. The scores after the eight games are: Worcesterites 30 Emperors 12 Duds 21 Beavers 6 Glunks 2 Ram Raiders 0 Misfits 34 Louts 0 Emperors 25 Beavers 6 Duds 8 Glunks 2 Worcesterites 54 Louts 0 Misfits 44 Ram Raiders 0

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Harriers Over Tarkio Lou Fritz led the Peru State harriers past Tarkio, 15-49, in a dual held at Tarkio, Oct. 6. Lou was able to cover the 2.8 mile course in 13:46. Tim Hendricks of Omaha finished second with a time of 14:03. Jim O'Donoghue, Jim Watson, and Dan Bolin completed a Peru domination of the first five places by finishing third, fourth, a n d fifth respectively.

Mike Tynon, John Mcintire, Bruce Henning, Bruce Cotton, and Mike Nincehelser are the five players returning from last year's squad. Tynon and Mcintire are in their third year as regulars and have started every contest since. becom\ng regulars as sophomores.

Bombers Bomb Bobcat B-T eam

Peru wasted no time in getting on the scoreboard. With 4:13 remaining in the first period, Mike Tynon ran 32 yards for the first Bobkitten touchdown. Mike scored again in the secQl,ld period on a four yard plunge. By halftime the game was already a complete rout with the score 26 to 0 in favor of Peru.

The Peru State B Team traveled to Fairbury, Nebraska, on Oct: 8, 1964. The Bobcats suffered a defeat at the hands of the Fairbury Junior College Bombers, 14-7. Peru won the toss and elected to receive the ball. Although both teams were hitting hard, the game remained scoreless through the first half. In the third quarter, the Bombers scored their first touchdown with a 40 yard pass. Peru's only touchdown came in the 4th quarter. Owen Dierks intercepted a pass, and ran 88 yards for the touchdown. The run was achieved through excellent blocking. Fairbury returned to score a second touchdown, widening the gap to 14-7. Although winning the game, the Fairbury Bombers seemed to have difficulty scoring after getting inside Peru's 20 yard line.

With Bruce Henning scoring twice and John Mcintire a Ii d Ken Hawkins each scoring once, Peru added the frosting to th e cake in the second half.

FOOTBALL SCHEDULE

Bobkittens Romp The Peru Bobkittens rolled to their third straight victory of the year as they defeated Lourdes Central High School 39 to (} in their first home game.

Pat Mullen was the only bright spot for Lourdes Central as he intercepted a pass in the final moments of the game and raced 72 yards to the Peru five yard line before being tackled from behind. The game ended as Lourdes Central failed to score against the strong Bobkitten defense.

Peru at Doane, Oct. 24 I

Peru at Kearney, Oct. 29 Washburn at Peru, Nov. 7

New Arrival On October 1, 1964, Mr. and Mrs. James Hardick became the proud parents of a son. They named him· Jeffrey James Hardick. Jim is a sophomore at Peru State College.

Homecoming News To Appear Late The Ped staff regrets that Homecoming is not covered in this issue. Because the paper is printed in Sterling, an early deadline is necessary. Our publishing schedule made it necessary for this deadline to fall on Oct. 14, thus making it impossible to print Homecoming news at this time. All Homecoming events will be given full coverage in the next issue, however. The problem is a matter of time and distance. We hope that you understand why we could print nothing about Homecoming in this issue, and we apologize for the delay.

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Flu-Cold Shots For Students, Staff (Continued from page one)

LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS r r

The Faculty Association made the arrangements for Dr. John H. Krichbaum, college physician, to give flu shots to the faculty and full-time college employees and their families. The shots were given on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. last week. Two kinds of shots were available: Flu shoi-This can be used for three month old babies and older. A second shot must be administered in two to four weeks with a booster in February, should an epidemic break out. The shot will cost $3.00. Flu-cold combination-This shot is administered to anyone sixteen years of age or older. A second shot is necessary in two months but no booster is needed. This shot costs $5.00.

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Page 3-PERU PEDAGOGIAN-Monday, October 19, 19&4 SPORTS

'Cats Cla\w Indians' Record

ROUNDUP. By Dick

Berthold

The Peru Bobcats proudly displayed their effort in the second half to trip Chadron for the 'Cats first conference win. Coach Pitts later stated that, "Chadron hit hard and the squad was badly bruised." Ron Peterson was the only senior letterman on the starting lineup for the young Bobcats. Ray Cotton and Curtis Holliman Teceived recognition for their outThe numbers 13 and 26 tell the final score of Peru's first Confer- standing defensive and offensive ence victory. The Bobcats downed the Chadroii Eagles in the Oak maneuvers. Dr. Pitts praised Chadron's quarterback, Olsen, Bowl on October 3. for a fine effort. The Bobcats collapsed under the hands of a strong Wayne team Oct. 10 by a score of 47-7. This was the first conference lost after the brilliant win against Chadron. ' Paced by the brilliant running nine plays for their first score as The Homecoming spirit added of Roy Windhorst and GregDick- Bill Witty broke through from to Wayne's strength and ability inson, the Peru State Bobcats the two yard line. Windhorst's because the Wildcats showed a defeated the Chadron Eagles in a try for the extra point was ·no winning desire throughout the good, and Peru trailed 7 to 6 with game. Dr. Pitts, disappointed by hard fought game, 26 to 13. Dickinson, starting his first 11:56 remaining in the second the lack of zest, is optimistically varsity game for Peru, carried period. looking forward to the next Peru scored again when Chad- game. He stated, "The team was the ball 15 times and gained a ron fumbled on its own 37 yard just not playing up to par against total of over a 100 yards. Windhorst scored two touch- line. Greg Dickinson and Roy Wayne." downs and kicked two extra Windhorst lead the drive. WindTwo major injuries resulted points to account for 14 of Peru's horst went over for the touch- from the clash against the Wild.down with only 4:34 remaining in cats. Windhorst re c e i v e d a 26 points. The star for the Chadron Eag- the half. Windhorst kicked th e sprained ankle, and Cotton was les. was sophomore quarterback extra· point and Peru lead for the sidelined with a dislocated shoulder. Greg Dickerson missed the Doug Olson. He scored Chadron's first time 13 to 7. Their lead however was short Wayne duel because of injuries first touchdown on a 21 yard keeper around left end and lived as Chadron came roaring received in the Chadron game. This is the third straight year passed 22 yards to Steve Shock- back to score with only 47 seconds remaining in the half. Doug the Wildcats have defeated Peru ley for Chadron's other score. The game started with Peru Olson passed 21 yards to Steve after losing 11 straight to them. Shockley for the score. The try Since 1919, Peru has gathered 24 receiving the opening kick-off for extra point was blocked and wins, six ties, and 12 losses to the and returning it to the 27 yard at the half it was a 13 to 13 tie. Wildcats. line. After three downs, P e r u From the opening kick in the With two conference games was forced to punt. Chadron resecond half it was all Peru as the left, the Bobcats can expect a win ceived the kick and put the ball into play on the 25 yard line. Bobcats scored twice within the over Doane and a grueling duel Seventy-five yards and eleven first five minutes of the thirii"- with Kearney. Peru rolled past Tarkio 12-0 on Sept. 12, while plays later Chadron was on the period. On the first drive of the sec- Tarkio tripped Doane 19-13 in a scoreboard with a 6 to 0 lead. ond half, the big play was Curt later outing. The scoring statisLarry Gold kicked the e~a Holliman running 30 yards on a tics show Peru 18 points o. v er point to make the score Chadron double reverse for the touch- Doane, but a closer game can be 7 and Peru 0. down. That made the score 19 to expected. After the Chadron touchdown, 13. The extra point was kicked Peru quickly picked up two first by Windhorst and the score stood The final game of the season finds a hard hitting Washburn downs. Then quarterback B i 11 20 to 13 in favor of Peru. Witty faded back to pass and hit team invading the Oak Bowl. The break of the game came Greg Dickinson over the middle The Bobcats will have to play when Chadron elected to try a for 25 yards. However, the drive hard ball to overcome Washburn, quick kick on third down from stopped short as Curt Holliman Nov. 7. their six yard line. The kick was fumbled on the next play, The Peru State harriers began blocked and recovered by Peru. Chadron, not wanting the ball, Two plays later Roy Windhorst displaying their unique talent fumbled the ball after three made the score 26 to 13 in favor while piling up four wins against plays, Ron Peterson recovered of Peru. The kick for extra point Maryville, Omaha University, for Peru on the Chadron 49 yard failed. and twice with Tarkio. During line. the Tarkio-Doane-Peru meet, the Chadron did march to the PeThat was all Peru needed. ru 10 yard line twice in the harriers received a second place. Paced by wingback Curt Holli- fourth period only to have the Louis Fritz, Peru's leading harman and halfback Greg Dickin- drives stopped by the strong rier, has far surpassed his previson, Peru marched 49 yards in Bobcat defense. ous skills of last year. Dau Bolin, the Iowa Class B champ, began to show his ability in the Tarkio meet. Dick Zaparanick and Vince Dahm us are good pushers for the team, and Jim O'Donoghue has displayed excellent back-up effort. Roger Neujahr is a fine freshMEALS SHORT O.RDERS man harrier. Bill and Jack Rinne are starting to shape up and Open: Monday· Saturday 6:00 a.m. · 11:00 p.m. could be strong by conference time. Other squad members makSunday 6:00 a.m. · 8:00 p.m. ing bid for positions are Larry Peru, Nebraska Carranza, Bill Stevens, J a c k Cook, and Roger Crook,

Bobcats Even Record With First Conference Victory

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The Peru State harriers handed Omaha U. its first dual meet loss in two years by a score of 21-35. The three mile course was ruil at Elmwood Park on Friday, Oct. 9. Peru, showing considerable improvement with each meet, w a s again paced by the running of Lou Fritz and Tim Hendricks. Lou, running second only to Omaha's Ken Gould, covered the three mile course in 16:21. Hendricks was third in the meet with a time of 16:48. Gould, in winning the meet, also established an Omaha U. record of 15:48. Finishing fourth in 16:49 was Jim Watson of the Bobcats, with Jim O'Donoghue also of the Bobcats running fifth with a time of 16:53.

Cross Country Novices Vie At Peru State Jack Weyers· of Sterling High School won the Peru State Invitational High School Cross Country Track Meet. He was clocked at 9:52 over the course distance of 1.8 miles. Weyers was followed closely by Galen Linnger of Clarinda High School. His time was 9:59. The first two runners were followed at a distance by Richard Wilson of Glenwood High, Calvin Smith of Glenwood, and Ronald Davis of Clarinda High. There were seven high schools from Iowa and Nebraska competing in the meet. Mr. Pilkington said that next year he hoped to have about 16 teams entered in the meet. He termed this year's event very successful,

Harriers Clip Maryville The Peru State harriers paced by Lou Fritz and Tim Hendricks, downed Northwest Missouri State 21-40 in a dual meet Oct. 2. Fritz turned in an outstanding time of 17:46 for the 3.4 mi 1e course. Hendricks placed second with a time of 18:15. Other Bobcat harriers placing were: Jim Watson, fourth in 18:37; Jim O'Donoghue, sixth in 19:09; and Dick Zaparanick, eighth in 19:36. Vince Dahmus ran his first race for the Bobcats and placed ninth with a time of 19:37.

Wayne's

Matthies Leads Win From World-Herald Oct. 11, 1964 Statistics

Peru Wayne First downs _________ 6 2 Rushing yardage ___ _ 17 390 Passing yardage ____ 82 94 Passes _____________ 16-7 16-7 Passes intercepted by 2 0· Fumbles ------------ 4 3 Fumbles lost ________ 3 2 Penalties ----------- 65 70 Punts ______________ 8-27 2-39 Wayne-Burt Matthies and Jerry Kilcoin led Wayne State to a 47-7 homecoming romp over Peru Saturday. Matthies, a 6-foot-2, 230-pound fullback, scored twice, once on a 75-yard run after going through right tackle on the first play of the second half. He kicked five conversions. Kilcoin scored on a 36-yard run and again on a 25-yard scamper. His total yardage for the afternoon was 139. Matthies accumulated 110. Some 3,500 fans watched the game playej in cool, w i n d y weather. Wayne and Peru each have now won one and lost one in Nebraska college conference play. This was the third straight year Wayne has defeated the Bobcats after losing 11 straight to them. Peru ----------- 0 0 0 7- 7 Wayne _________ 14 14 13 6-47 Wayne-Jerry Kilcoin 36 run (Burt Matthies kick) Wayne-Dean Debuhr 18 pass from Steve Feinstein (Matthies kick) Wayne-Kilcoin 25 run (Matthies kick) Wayne-Matthies one run (Matthies kick) Wayne-Matthies 15 run (kick failed) Wayne-Dennis Kirby one run (Matthies kick) Peru-Owen Dierks 3 run (Jim Hardick kick) Wayne-Jim Connick 5 run (run failed)

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Linda O'Hara Tours France Miss Linda O'Hara, a senior from Council Bluffs, Iowa, traveled and studied in France last summer. On July 2, she flew to France with eight other Americans on a tour pre-arranged by the Study and Travel Group in New York.

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ORGANIZATIONS

CHOIR ELECTS OFFICERS A Freshman convo was held Wednesday, Oct. 14. The presiThe Peru State choir elected dent of the Freshman c 1ass , new officers Friday, Oct. 9. They Gary Viterese, was in charge of are: Ralph Shaffer, president; the convocation. Jim Johnson, vice president; The class decided to sponsor a Mary Lou Hicks, secretary; and Halloween Dance Tuesday, Oct. Sharon Johnson, treasurer. 27, in the Student Center. The --Oparty, lasting from 7:30 to 10:30, WES LEY FELLOWSHIP will be an all-school party. It Linda Taylor, a .University of will be "Slop Night." Everyone Nebraska student, spoke at the will dress in sweatshirts, sandals, Wesley Fellowship m e e t i n g and the like. Admission will be Oct. 1. She described her exper$.50 per person or $.90 per cou- iences at the Great Plains Reple. Live entertainment will be gional Conference for Methodist furnished by a combo. youth at Lake Poinsett, South Three committees have been Dakota, which she attended from organized to prepare for the Aug. 29-Sept. 5. evening. The promotion commitBruce DuVal Jed devotions. tee is headed by Sheryl Gawart. -oA decoration committee, headed SENIOR CLASS by Ceci Evangelist, is to put up The first meeting of the Senior decorations. The third commit- Class was called to order on tee is the clean-up committee, Sept. 30, by Dr. George Schotten·which is headed by Ralph Di- hamel, class sponsor. cesare. On the first vote Dan Leuenberger was elected president. Dr. Schottenhamel then turned the remainder of the business meeting over to the newly elected president. The following officers Dr. Darrell E. Wininger and 28 were then elected: Jim Manning, Human Growth and Develop- vice president; Jan,ice Wilkinson; ment students toured the Bea- secretary; Jim Agnew, treasurer. Dr. Schottenhamel brought up trice State Home Tuesday, Oct. the subject of a senior class gift 13, 1964. to the college. He mentioned that The students spent the day vislast year's class had started a iting the wards and observing at fund to purchase a carillon bell the training school. system for the auditorium. The The students who toured the possibility of continuing th i s Home were Bonnie Anderson, project was referred to commitCheryl Armstrong, Lola Baker, tee, after discussion from t h e Dale Burgess, Joan Dickman, floor. Owen Dierks, Jacqueline Dodson, -0Angela Furnas, Melanie Gould, SOPHOMORE CLASS Gienda Hayes, Kevin Hoffman, The Sophomore class held its Connie Hoschar, Pat Knippelfirst meeting on Oct. 7. Officers mier, Nancy McCullough, Calvin elected were: Joseph Keys, presiMiller, Ron Mustard, Ross Oestdent; William Rinne, vice presiman, Harold Parker, Rhea Reid, dent; and Ronald Kroll, secreClement Rosengren, Bruce Schotary-treasurer. eneweis, Mary Tackett, Marion The Sophomores also voted not Thurman, Sharon Johnson, and to build a homecoming display. Regina Kreifels.

Students Tour Beatrice Home

Stopping first in Paris,. Linda spent three days touring the city, visiting. the Palace of Versailles, Notre Dame, the Eiffel Tower, and boating on the River Seine.

rem.

Page 5-PERU PEDAGOGIAN•Monday; October 19, 1984

Pert1, Nebr. -

~ck

stop. There she spent the rest of July studying French, art, and literature in the University of Angers. While in Angers, Linda stayed in the home of Madame and Monsieur Dieudonner and toured France with other students from Switzerland, Belgium, Germany, and Spain. In August, Linda traveled in southern France, and a g a in stayed in the home of a French family, Madame and Monsieur Brugiere, in Aix-en- Provence. Here, she visited the birthplace of the famous French artist, Cezanne. On August 28, Linda f 1 e w from Paris to New Yor"' City after spending, as she said, "a both educational and exciting summer."

-oL.S.A.

Post Game Dance STORE HOURS

Immediately following the Peru-Chadron game a dance hosted by Alpha Mu Gamma was held in the college gymnasium. Music was provided by the Four Coachmen. Dr. and Mrs. Wininger, Miss Regier, and Mr. Nemec chaperoned the dance.

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Faculty Women Meet On Oct. 8, the faculty women met in the recreation room of Morgan Hall. Mrs. Russell was in charge of serving, assisted by Mrs. Christ, Mrs. Van~e, Miss Regier, and Mrs. Pressnall. Cookies and coffee were served, after which there was a short business meeting. The officers include: Mrs. Louise Kregel, president; Mrs. Carol Pilkington, vice president; and Mrs. Alice Kite, secretary-treasurer.

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Individual Pictures: 8 a.m.

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Monday, Oct. 26

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Wednesday, Oct. 28

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The L.S.A. held its s e c o n d meeting of the year Tuesday evening, Sept. 27, 1964, 6:30 p.m. at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Gomon. The meeting was opened by a short vesper service with Dennis Flattre presiding. Following this, several hymns were sung by the group. President Dennis Flattre presided at the business meeting. Preparations for constructing the Homecoming display were made. The group plans to do the work on the display in Dr. Gomon's garage. A national L.S.A. magazine was given to each student present. He is to decide by the next meeting whether he wants to subscribe to the magazine or not. A few ideas of procedure at future meetings were discussed by the group. More definite conclusions are to be drawn at the next meeting. Sponsors for the evening were Pastor and Mrs. Carl Carlson, Auburn, Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Larson, and Miss Frieda Rowoldt.

--oSTUDENT WIVES The Student Wives' Club held its first meeting on Oct. 7. There were 27 members present. A business meeting was held and. a Christmas project was discussed. It was also decided to have a pot luck supper on Oct. 25, at 6:00 p.m. ~ It was suggested to wait and elect officers at the beginning of the second semester. A decision will be made at the next meeting. Officers at present are: Jan Hoover, president; Marsha Sharp, secretary; and Marilyn Zwickel, treasurer. After the meeting was adjourned, club members went to the Bob Inn for refreshments.

ALPHA MU OMEGA . Alpha Mu Omega held its regular monthly meeting .Monday, Oct. 12. The first point of business was the election of officers. The officers for the year are: Pa u. l Oliphant, president; Ed Loontjer; , vice president; and Royce Curtis;· secretary -treasurer. The members then voted on initiates for the fraternity to b.e accepted at the November meeting. It was decided that Alpha Mu would join Beta Beta Beta in making a combined Homecom- · ing display. -oPHI BETA LAMBDA The first meeting of Phi Beta Lambda, the honorary business fraternity, was held during convocation period on Wednesday, . Sept. 30. . Mary Sautter, president, called the meeting to order. Committees . were selected for the Homecoming display, membership, and the installation banquet. It was decided that the Business Club and Phi Beta Lambda will hold joint meetings ·from now on. Marilyn Gonnerman and Bob Krofta were chosen as cosponsors of the Busi'ness Club. The installation banquet will be held on the third Monday in' October. The other officers incl tide: Larry. Ffanke, vice president; Allan Richards, secretary; A 11 e n Chandler, treasurer, and Marilyn · Gonnerman, historian.

-oKAPPA DELTA PI Kappa Delta Pi, honorary education fraternity, held its first meeting of the year Oct. 5 in the Campus School. Joe Ward, presi~ dent, presided at the meeting'.. Joe Ward was named'chairman of the Homecoming display com-•· mittee. Sixteen people were ap· proved for membership in the organization. Miss Ashley, counselor, announced a regional ·conference to be held Nov. 7 at Omaha University. After adjourn~. ment, refreshments of punch and cookies were served. -0-'-

ANGELS - CHERUBS The White Angels - Cherubs meeting was held on Monday, Oct. 5, at 6 o'clock in the girl~ dorm recreation. room. A Homecoming display w a.s decided upon. Kay Bender will . be the chairman. The cleaning of the refreshment stand was discussed. Miss Rowoldt, the sponsor, asked that everyone cooperate. It was announced that dues must be paid by the next meeting. -0-

NEWMAN CLUB The Newman Club held its first meeting on Wednesday; Oct. 7 at 6:30 p.m. in the admin-. istration building, The new chaplain, Father Birkel, was introduced. Father delivered a talk in which he explained the purpose of Newman Club, and also explained the Liturgy. Father Birkel has formed .an information and inquiry class for anyone who is interested in the Catholic faith. This class meets at 7:30 p.m. every Wednesday in the administration building. -O-

W.A.A. W.A.A. met Oct. 7 in the gym. The 28 girls who attended divided into four volleyball teams and practiced for the intramural tourney .beginning Oct. 14. Papers explaining the W.A.A. point system were distributed and discussed during the b r i e f . business meeting. The possibility of a girls' swimming team w a s also mentioned. Any girls inter- . ested in such a team are to get in touch with Marty Greenlee.


Page t-PERU PEI>AGOGIAN-Monday, October 19, 1964

Improvements Carnpus School News Know Your Library On Campus BY MARIE BALLUE

, BY DAN KNUDSEN

Thirty-one freshmen_were hon· ored October 2 by the junior class. Each was assigned a comic costume. John and Macy Lutt deserve a medal for John's cos· tume, Mary's ,,little larrib. 'Tis fruitcake-time again! For those of you who love fine fruit· cake but hate to bake, the Peru Prep Sophomore class is taking orders for fruitcakes. They are 80% fruit and nuts, weigh two pounds. The cost is small-a mere $2.25 and the cakes are made by Duncan Hines. The Junior Class spQnsored an after-the-game dance on Friday, Oct. 2. The seniors planned a car wash for Saturday, Oct. 10. The Peru Prep band acquired tired feet along with marching skill last week as they practiced for Homecoming and the parade at the Brownville Apple Festival. The festival parade is the first parade in which the full band has marched. On Saturday, Oct. 3, Pat Adams and Marie Ballue auditioned for All-State Band. Results will be given the last of October. For those who like · statistics, Mr. Wilson reports that the Prep Band now numbers forty-one and that eighteen more people are tal,l:ing lessons. Mrs. Friest reports that t h e Campus. Book Club is in full swing. Forty-five books were ordered, including Diary of a Young Girl, Big Doc's Girl, New. Roget's College Thesaurus, The Scarlet Letter, The Bed Badge of Courage, and Rebecca. Kent Van Zant is in charge of the orders. Kent Van Zant, who won a navy cruise at the Science Fair last spring, reports that he had a wonderful time touring various naval installations, enjoying San Diego and other Southern California climate, and cruising aboard the U.S.S. Preble.

PSEA Members Attend Conference

CASEY

Four Peru students attended Many improvements have been made at Peru State College in the Conference on Instruction, the past several months. · held Oct. 16-17 at the Nebraska A spacious 40'x80' Ceco steel Center for Continuing Education. building was erected last sum· Dorothy Bock, Jon Davis, B o b mer. This building will be used Hilt, and Tom Castle represented the Student Education Associafor storage purposes. A new driveway was complet- tion of Nebraska and the Peru ed behind the library and a new Student Education Association. Featured speakers included Dr. 6x12 foot sidewalk was completed in front of the campus school. Ole Sand, Director of the NEA Keeping the walks clear of snow Project on It'lstruction, and Dr. will be easier because of these Elbie Gann, Assistant Commissioner of Education Colorado new, wider sidewalks. Delbert Gaines and his staff State Department of 'Ed~cation. The conference was sponsored are in charge of these improveby the Nebraska State Education ments. Association in cooperation with Teachers College, University of Nebraska, State Department of Education, and the Nebraska AsSENIOR CLASS MEETING sociation for Supervision and The second meeting of the Curriculum Development. Senior Class was held Oct. 7. Jim Manning's committee made several recommendations about possibilities for the class gift to the college, The committee was diAn All College Mixer was held rected to obtain prices on the Thursday, Oct. 1, in the school various projects before a final gymnasium. Music for the dance vote is taken. was provided by the "Bel-Airs," Ed Loontjer, George Zwickel a three piece combo from Omaha. and Ron Foreman were appoint· The Student Government Assoed to select several styles of anciation, continuing their efforts nouncements for later consideration. To avoid the last minute to provide social activities for rush, caps and gowns will be Peru Staters, sponsored the measured prior to Oct. 23. Those dance. S.G.A. president, Harvey taking care of the measuring are Fisher reported an exceptionally Mike Chu, Delzell; Ed Meyer, large attendance at the dance.

Many people think that the li· brary is a confusing collection of books, maps, and,periodicals. After looking closer at the library, the student finds that the li· brary's 75!000 volumes are easily accessible through a consistent system o f arrangement. Th e method of classification is based on the Dewey Decimal System. The card catalog arranges the library's material in alphabetical order according to title, author and subject matter. On the shelves, printed material is arranged according to the Dewey Decimal Divisions. The 10 di visions are ''rrther divided so that it is poss'fble to assign a specific number to even the smallest subject. Two rooms in the library which can be of significant value to the student are the reserve room and the special collection room. ' The reserve room has a collection of records which include helps in English, foreign languages, and business education. These records can be played on a closed circuit phonograph kept in the room.. Along with the records are study guides which follow the material being covered. This service can assist the student who is looking for extra help in these subject areas. The special collectio~ room contains volumes of rare books Majors; and Norma Wood, Morgan. and unique collections. A collec-0tion of books, written by Peru PERU HISTORICAL SOCIETY State graduates, fill an entire The Peru Historical Society shelf in the special collection room. ~opies of the Peruvian had its first official meeting dating back to 1902, and the October 5, at 7 p.m. Dan Leuenberger, president of Pedagogian from 1939 are availthe society, called the meeting to able to students. One of the room's most interesting facets is order. After several announce· the archives file. It includes pic- ments, the meeting was turned tures of Peru's activities from over to the speaker of the eve1902. It is kept up to date by the ning, Mr. Leroy Leland. Mr. Leland told of his trip to library staff. the Mediterranean area. It a 1 y , There are times when a student Greece, and Egypt, were of parneeds assistance to find some Or ticular interest to him. the library's material. Help is -o-available at all times during liPHI ALPHA THETA Mike Goldwater, son of Re· brary hours. If you have any Phi Alpha Theta met Monday, publican presidential nominee questions, do not hesitate to ask Oct. 5, and again Wednesday, Barry Goldwater, spQke at a Mrs. Brandt and her staff to an· Oct. 7. At these meetings nine Young Republican Rally at swer them for you. new members were accepted for Creighton University last week. initiation into the honorary hisDana College has a new men's tory fraternity. dorm, Holling Hall, financed 11 These initiates are Richard through a donation. Ferron, Joan Dickman, James Mari Sandoz, native Nebraskan "Diamond Head," the second Snyder, Larry Kuenning, Oliver author, addressed two student S.G .A. sponsored movie w a s Bierman, Harold Marshall Marconvos at Kearney State. shown Sunday, Oct. 4, in the col- jorie Williss, Harvey Fraz~r, and The state legislature has allo- lege auditorium. Donna Van Buskirk. cated funds for a new two milThe technicolor p r o d u c t i o n -olion dollar scien<:e building to be starring Yvette Mimeaux and L.S.A. built at Kearney. Charlton Heston was produced The L.S.A. held its weekly Acute housing problems have by Columbia Pictures. All of the meeting Wednesday, Oct. 7, at developed at Kearney. Campus action takes place in Hawaii in the Campus School. The meeting housing facilities are operating at 1959. The moving love story was which began at 6:30 p.m. was 120 per cent capacity. All dorms interspersed with exotic scenes opened with devotions presented are filled or overflowing. of the Hawaiian landscape. by Lonnie Bohling. Included was There has been much contro· the singing of several hymn; in versy at Doane over mandatory appeared Monday at Hastings. addition to the reading of scrip· purchase of meal tickets. Earlier in the month, the "Astro- ture and a prayer. Doane possesses a record en· The "Frontiers" m a g a z i n e nauts" appeared! rollment of 655 daytime students. which had been given to the The Hastings College newspaThis is an increase of 1O per cent members at the last meeting was per, the "Collegian" was awardover last year. discussed. This concerned t h e Wayne State has such a large ed "All American" honors for ordering of the magazine by the its top publications. enrollment that it now has a members. It was voted not to orIn all college wear this year, der the magazine. quota on out of state students. Enrollment this semester neared the individual look is "in." Lacy President Dennis Flattre told or textured kneesocks are strik- the group that he is hoping that 2,000 students. State Normal Board unanimous- ing with most outfits. Fashion- L.S.A. will be able to publish a ly voted to make the trimester able colors are brilliant re d s , Peru newsletter soon. This would mochaberry, camel, and white on be a general bulletin telling the program permanent at Wayne. The "New Christy Minstrels" gray and brown. news of the L.S.A. This would include the coverage of the meeting as well as the upcoming events of L.S.A. Pastor Carlson lead the evening's Bible study taken from the gospel John. Interesting points of the scripture used as the basis for our study were dis· cussed at length by the members. At all future meetings there will be some form of Bible study. NEBRASKAland ... ~Hm THE WEST 1ro1Ns Anyone who wishes to attend is welcome at any of the meetings.

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Peru NSEA Unit Meets The Nebraska State Education Association covered dish dinner was held Oct. 8, 1964, at 6:00 p.m. in the campus school. The annual dinner is held as a reception in honor of all new faculty members on the Peru State staff. A short business meeting preceded the dinner.

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The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Nebraska's Oldest College

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 60

Number 3

NOVEMBER 2, 1964

Nebraska's Best College

Homecoming Play Delights Audience

Annual U. N. Dinner Has Grecian Theme

"We are going to travel fast and far tonight because we have a wide world to girdle and cross ... the fabulous world of Carl Sandburg." These words were among the opening lines Saturday evening as the 1964 Homecoming Play was presented at 7:00 p.m. The audience did tr av e 1 through many different aspects of Sandburg's world of thought and emotion. The collection ,of Sandburg ballads, poetry, a n d prose was blended together by Norman Corwin to produce an interesting and exciting evening of entertainment The Peru Dramatic Club produced the play, directed by Mr. R. D. Moore, by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc., and were among the first college groups to do "The World of Carl Sandburg." It had previously been produced on Broadway, The minnesinger and able guitarist was Mike Janis. Mike has worked in folk groups in the past years and has made appearances on TV, in coffee houses, state fairs, and many other places, Mike was a natural to do the singing of Sandburg's ballads such as "John Henry," "By'm By," "Careless Love," and others. His reading and narration were also very credibly done.

The thirteenth annual United Nations Dinner was served Tuesday, Oct. 20th at 6:30 p.m, in the campus school auditorium. Approximately 130 were in attendance, The theme for the evening was Greece, The menu, planned by the experimental foods class, consisted of the following: oregano chicken, carrots glace, winter salad, tomato salad, raisin bread, five o'clock cake, and coffee. The meal was prepared by members of the Home Economics Club, under the direction of Mrs. Louise Kregel. (Continued on page two)

Myrene Hildebrand was the only girl in the cast. She gave excellent contrast attired in a striking white evening gown to the men in black tuxedos. She w a s outstanding in selections such as "The Machine," "Elizabeth Umstead," and a musical number about jazzmen. Myrene has had a considerable amount of experience in acting at Peru State and at her home in Denver, Colorado. Lonn Pressnall, a senior acting in his sixth play at Peru, was the other interpretative reader. Besides some comic parts, he had key speeches on hate, war, and death. Probably the most impressive of his lines were his in(Continued on page two)

Pat Wheatley Homecoming Queen The attendants for Homecoming this year are, from left to right: Miss Pat Knippelmier, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Knippelmier, Auburn, Nebr,; Miss Marilyn Masters, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. N. R. Masters, Nebraska City, Nebr.; Queen Pai Wheatley, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Wheatley, Cedar Rapids, Iowa; Miss Karen Renken, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Renken, Nebraska City, Nebr.; and Miss Judy Strange, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ira Strange, Nebraska City, Nebr.

Homecoming Displays Show Imagination Saturday morning, Oct. 17, a panel of judges selected the winners of the awards for the 1964 Homecoming displays. Members of the panel were Mr. Hanford Miller, Mr. Stewart Linscheid, and Mr. Robert Benford, from the Peru State faculty. Mr. G. E. Peterson and Mr. Dick Hahn of Auburn, and Mrs. Delbert Gaines of Peru were the other judges. The Student Governing Association presented cash prizes totaling $50 to the winners of the contest. The winner of first place and $25 was the Industrial Arts Club with their "Bust The Broncos." Their display was a miniature football stadium, where Peru's Bobcats were pushing over the Hastings College Broncos for an easy victory. (Continued on page two)

Six Year Development Plan Submitted By Gomon A 17-project six-year program of development of the physical facilities of Peru State College has been presented by President Neal S. Gomon to the buildings and grounds committee of the The appearance of a large Board of Education of State Nor- crowd at the annual Homecommal Schools. Action on the pro- ing Dance made the event quite gram is expected at the n e x t successful, Tony Bradley and his meeting of the Board at Kearney, orchestra provided the dance muNov. 1, 1964, If the $3,807,872 sic and also played a background "package" is approved, a request for the coronation, for $1,628,522 will be made to the The decorations showed vari1965 Legislature for building levy ous fall colors apparent in .the funds to implement the 1965-67 streamers which adorned e a ch phase of the program. side. In the center there appeared Recommended p r o j e ct s for a large shock of corn surrounded 1965-67 are: modernize the cam- by several squashes and pumppus fire detection systems to meet kins. Mr. Scarecrow greeted evstandards required by the State eryone at the entrance. Fire Marshall, $15,180; renovate The highlight of the dance was and remodel the administration (Continued on page two) building, $172;500; replace existing campus electrical system, $168,000; modernize the heating plant, $151,250; install dressing rooms, storage and additional seating at Oak Bowl stadium, ... $77 ,500; construct a new campus K-12 laboratory school, $652,000; remodel and renovate the college auditorium, $183,792; remodel and renovate front portion of gymnasium, $58,300; acquire sites for additional dormitories and housing units, $85,000, and develop athletic and physical education outdoor areas, $65,000. Projects recommended for 196769 are: install central air-conditioning system for classroom and dormitory buildings, $360,800; construct a women's gymnasium, $465,700; replace the student health center, $125,000; construct an addition to the college library, $300,000 and remodel , and renovate the present campus laboratory school for college classroom use, $435,850.

Dance Was Finale Of Homecoming

During the halftime of the Homecoming game, Miss Patricia Ann Wheatley was announced as the 1964-65 Homecoming Queen. Miss Wheatley, better known to her friends as Pat, was presented a bouquet of roses by President Neal S. Gomon. Pat is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John E, Wheatley of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Her parents, who are both alumni of Peru, were present at the game. Pat has a brother, John Wheatley, who is stationed in Salem, Mass., with the Coast Guard. Pat is in her junior year at Peru State majoring in elementary education. She is a member of the PSEA and the social committee of SCB and has been in White Angels and Cherubs. She also is well known for her singing after appearing in the Variety Show this year. In her freshman year, Pat was a lady-in-waiting at May Fete and in her sophomore year was an attendant at the Sweetheart Dance. Pat plans to teach when she graduates and hopes the level will be kindergarten. Swim.ming, knitting, and sewing occupy much of her time,

The final phase of the program recommends an addition to the science hall, $250,000 and expansion of the heating and air conditioning systems, $242,000 during the 1969-71 biennium.

Mike Janis, Myrene Hildebrand, and Lonn Pressnall presented

"The World of Carl Sandburg."

Long range plans for housing students recognizes a need f o r (Continued on page two)

Pat Wheatley, Queen of the 1964¡65 Homecoming.


MAJORS

HALL By Lavelle Hilzemann

Majors Hall is now carrying· a daily newspaper, the Evening World-Herald, and also, the Sunday World-Herald. The subscription payment w a s taken from the Majors Hall Men's Dormitory Fund. Does anyone want to buy a new 1965 Caliente Mercury Com-. et? The car for sale is red with a red interior and a 289 engine. The owner says that it is broken in, and is ready for any drag. For more details, see John Gorges. Jim Brenn and Bob Ruff, room 113, have an added convenience in their room. Although most students have radios in their room, these two boys are the only two in the dorm with a television.

ELIZA MORGAN

HALL By Ginny Grossman

On Homecoming day the dorm held open house for relatives and friends. The dorm seems to be getting back to a somewhat normal state after all the rushing around to build displays and get ready for the Homecoming activities. Congratulations to.' Pat Wheatley, our 1964 Homecoming Queen.

found Kathy Francis instructing exercising lessons. A formal dinner served by <:andlelight was given by Karen Quinn. in Room 33A. Her guests included Judy Beran and Carolyn Mercer. Advi~e to Morgan Hall residents: "Being a woman is a terribly difficult task, since it consists principally of dealing with men."

DELZELL ;HALL

Six Year Development Plan Submitted By Gomon (Continued from page one) additional dormitory space and an addition to the food services facilities. Enrollment projections indicate the need for a 150-bed women's dormitory and a 250bed men's dormitory, estimated at a total cost of $1,600,000 and an addition to the Student Center estimated at ·$400,000 before 1969. Housing and. food service facilities .are financed by revenue bonds with no tax money involved.

By Anfhony Lopes

Homecoming Play

Last week Mike Chu cooked a very fine meal for the Geography Delights Audience Club. Nineteen people attended (Continued from page one) as Mike served various types of terpretation of Sandburg's adChinese food. vice to a son nearing manhood, Three weekends ago Fr e d and the closing of the play in Shannon of Delzell got sick of which he impersonated Abe LinPeru. He decided to take a weekcoln. · end vacation. He left on Friday Director R. D. Moore has now afternoon and hitch hiked all the directed over '52 three-act plays way to Milwaukee, Wis. Fred arat Peru State and he feels in rived in Peru safe and sound some ways this was among the Sunday evening in time f o r best he has coached. supper. His assistant director was DorA group of men from the New othy Bock. The technical work York and Boston area living at was handled largely by Ed MeyDelzell have made arrangements er. Members of the Dramatic to fly home at Christmas in a Club aided in prompting, ushergroup through United Airlines. ing, and publicity. Don Carlile, By traveling as a group the boys Leland Sherwood, Robert Bohlwill be able to get reduced rates. ken and Mrs. Gnade also gave Washing your clothes is much valuable assistance. The prompteasier now that a new washer er was Dan Knudsen. and dryer have been installed at Delzell.

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Alumni Luncheon Held

Annual U. N. Dinner

The annual Homecoming Day Has Grecian Theme Some coeds studying for °l Alumni Luncheon was held at (Continued from page one) bachelor's degree would settle 11 :45 Saturday morning in the Student Center cafeteria. The welcome was given by for a bachelor. This is true in the Many alumni gathered for the Donna Gerdes, president "of the case of the newly engaged couples. Congratulations go to Judy event. The years ending with "4" Home Economics Club. Mr. LeStrange and Terry Kuenning and and "9" were the special guests. roy Leland gave the invocation. Among the many people attend- John Bstandig provided several Judi Whigham and Mert Finke. Any attempt to describe a typi- ing were Mr. and Mrs. John E. ....._piano selections. Wheatley of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, The speaker for the evening cal evening in Morgan Hall the parents of the 1964 Home- was Mr. Leroy Leland, who had would be' in vain, but a midnight stroll through the halls did re- coming Queen, Patricia Wheat- studied this past summer in sult in an interesting cross sec- ley. They both attended P e r u Greece. He also showed slides of State. his summer in Greece. Mr. Letion. First floor was rather inland's collection of Greek items active. Most of the occupants on was also on display. second floor were asleep except General chairman for the dinfor a birthday party going on for ner was Peggy Qua<:kenbush. Twila Cloyd. Helpjng her celeOn October 14, 1964 Mr. and Phyllis Rebuck was in charge of brate were: Ruth Kalafut, Lucy Mrs. Henry Grace became the the ticket sales and also attended Sporer, Annette Surber, Dianne proud parents of a son. He was the guest book. Morrison, Shirley Barr, Diana named Barry James Grace. Barry Hall hostesses for the evening Rieschick, Mary Mowry, R i t a is their second child. were Ruth Rulla and Glenda Henry is a junior at Peru State Harris, Donna Dankof, Gina Rima. Young, Joanie Sprieck, and College and is majoring in geogServing as waitresses and din"Brandi" Kahley. Third f 1o or raphy. ing room hostesses were: Ruth Schnute, Jeanne Tynon, Arlene Borcher, Pam Bottemley, Judy PERU PEDAGOGIAN Elsinger, Connie Rademacher, Wanda Hartnell, Laurena Fisher, Mary Martin, Carol Henderson, STAFF Carol Hawley, and Mary Beth Dorothy Bbck --------------------------------------Editor Kernes. All were appropriately Harvey Fish.er --------------------------Personnel Manager dressed in chitons, an early cosRichard Berthold ____________________________ Sports Editor tume of the Greeks. Melanie Gould -----------------------------Feature Editor Lonn Pressnall ----~----------------------Academic Editor Janice Wilkinson ------------------------------Copy Editor Ron Rist --------------------------------------Copy Editor Gary Schmucker _________________________ Business Manager Homecoming Displays Ginny Grossman __________________________ Morgan Column Show Imagination LaVelle Hitzemann ________________________ Majors Column (Continued from page one) Anthony Lopes ____________________________ Delzell Column The Peru State Education AsMike Chu ----------------------------------------Reporter sociation captured second place Joan Dickman ------------------------------------Reporter and won $15 with their "Bag The Philip Dorssom -----------------------------------Reporter Broncos." This group pictured a Eugene Fitzpatrick -------------------------------Reporter Bobcat player engulfing a fightMelvin Hester ------------------------------------Reporter ing Bronco in a large sack on the Bernie Jarecke -----------------------------------Reporter way to another win. Dan Knudsen ------------------~-----------------Reporter The Lutheran Student AssociRobert Minks ------------------------------------Reporter Elaine Neddenriep ________________________________Reporter ation took third place with their display proclaiming "Real VicLarry Piper --------------------------------------Reporter tory, In Christ." They received a Charles Richards ---------------------------------Reporter check for $10 from the S.G.A. Mary Sautter --------------'-----------------~----Reporter Other fine displays depicting JoAnn Schultz -----------------------------------Reporter this year's theme, "Autumn VicBeth Terwilleger ---------------------------------Reporter tory," were shown by the White March Tinkham ----------------------------------Reporter Angels and Blue Devils, the LanNorma Wood -------------------------------------Reporter guage Club, and the Geography George Zwickel ----------------------------------Reporter Club.

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Dance Was Finale Of Homecoming ·(Continued from page one) the presentation and crowning of the 1964 Homecoming Queen, Miss Pat Wheatley. Lonn Pressnall first introduced Miss J a.n Beemer, the 1963 Homecoming Queen who was escorted by Vincent Sabatinelli. The attendants to this year's queen included Judy Strange, Marilyn Masters, Pat Knippelmier, and Karen Renken. The girls were escorted by Dave Wilson, Ron Peterson, Luke Cox, and Jim Manning. The queen was escorted by Sam Carneal. After the crowning Patricia, her escort, the attendants, and their escorts, led everyone in the first dance. Several faculty members and their wives were the chaperones. These included Mr. and Mrs. James Pilkington, Mr. and Mrs.

Changes At Student Center The Student Center is gradually undergoing a slight renovation. The first change made resulted in the elimination of the publication offices. The journalism classes required a larger work area, so the old publication offices were removed to make more room in the Bob Inn. The doors on both sides of the Bob Inn were moved closer to the staircase. The restrooms were removed and relocated on the north side facing the stairway. There have been some modern trophy cases added to the area beneath the staircase. A major change in the kitchen and cafeteria will take place in the future.

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Wi!iy and Pitts reflect l:he mood of the game.

Peru band performs at half time.

Royce Curtis performs before the game for the gymnastics display.

Industrial nrts again takes first place in the homecoming display contest.

PSEA bags second place in the homecoming display contest.


Peru Cross Country Squad Outruns Maryville 15-44

SPORTS .ROUNDUP

By Dick The Peru State harriers raced Berthold past Maryville 15-44 on. Oct. 15 for their sixth win of the season. Louis Fritz covered the th re e Hastings handed the Peru Bobmile course in 16:06 ·minutes for .cats their second conference loss a new school record. Oct. 17 by a score of 50-0. The Peru placed in the first five Broncos reacted as a well drilled positions to completely dominate and mobile club while the batthe winning score. Individual po- tered Bobcats tried to stay alive. sitions and times were: · Because of backfield injuries, the Fritz --------------- 1 16:06 Bobcats needed more time to re(3 mile school record) cuperate and· to function as a Hendricks ---------- 2 1~:20 team. Dr. Pitts stated, "There O'Donoghue --------- 3 16:44 will be no relief until the season Watson ------------- 4 16:50 ends because the next games will Bolin --------------- 5 16:58 be tougher yet." Zaparanick --------- 9 17:42 The Doane Tigers passed conDahmus ____________ 10 17:42 siderably in the second half to Neujhar ____________ 13 18:33 defeat Peru Oct. 24 by a margin of 21-7. This was the third conference loss for the Bobcats. The Tigers completed 16 of 24 passes for 198 passing yards while Peru completed 4 of 11 passes for 57 yards in the air. Witty and Bernie Browri disThe Worcesterites defeated the played fine effort at the halfback Misfits 6-0 for the intramural championship in touch football. positions. Leth did an excellent The Misfits defeated the Emper- job as quarterback to lead the ors 13-6 to capture the runner-up Bobcats. Hardick, at fullback position, was praised for his trespot. mendous effort. Coach Pitts statFinal Standings: W LT ed, "I was well pleased with the Worcesterites ---------- 7 0 0 team effort. There were better Misfits ---------------- 6 1 0 blocking and tackling than in previous games." Emperors -------------- 5 2 0 Coach Pitts also praised the Louts ----------------- 3 3 1 Bobcats' goal line stands which Duds ------------------ 3 4 0 helped tremendously. Mistakes Glunks 2 5 0 Beavers --------------- 1 5 1 and penalties hurt the Bobcats. Windhorst and Dickinson are Ram Raiders ----------- 0 7 0 Coaches are to be reminded sidelined for the season because that the deadline for volleyball of injuries received at Hastings. entries is Tuesday noon, Nov. 3. Windhorst suffered a concussion, Volleyball competition will start and Dickinson is recuperating either Nov. 5 or Nov. 9. Ten from a muscle spasm in the back. teams are already entered for Four Peru State seniors will be volleyball competition. playing their final college game against Washburn Nov. 7. Ron Peterson and Luke Cox will alternate at the center position. Dave ·Wilson, a guard, will a'ltd pressure to the line for halfback The Peru State Bobcats were Sam Carneal. "Washburn will be defeated by Doane College 21-7 a tough game because they dein a game played at D o a n e feated Fort Hayes, who b eat Oct. 24. Kearney," commented Dr. Pitts. Defense prevailed during the The Peru harriers presented an first half of play as both teams exhibition prior to the Peruwere unable to score. Mike McHastings Homecoming game. Intyre of Doane ran a yard for the game's first tally in the third Fritz was timed at 10:12 minutes quarter, after which Nathan Hin- while covering the two mile kle sprinted 35 yards for a 14-0 course. Hendricks and Watson placed second and third. Coach Doane advantage. Pilkington remarked, "The times The Bobcats were able to cut the lead to seven points on a 24- were not too impressive because yard pass from Harry Leth to of the wind and cold weather." On the basketball scene, Coach Lowell Brown. Brown also added the extra point making the Mcintyre reported, "Practice is going as well as can be expected score 14-7. Doane added another touch- at this early date. The players down in the final quarter to give are working hard to eliminate defects in playing." them a 21-7 victory. Those participating in preThe Bobcats will close their season in a game with Washburn season practice are: Snodgrass, University here on Nov. 7. Harmon, Smagacz, J·ennings, Estes, Kroll, J. Raine, B. Raine, Alexander, Caine, Chase, .Gustason, Capps, McCormick, and Hitzemann. Witty, Vickrey, and possibly others are expected after Peru Prep sailed to their sixth football season. win of the season in a 53 to 21 purge over the Johnson Eagles. The Bobkittens were in doubt the first half as Johnson was dazzling with fine catches and For the first time in the histricky reverses; but Peru Prep settled down and dominated the tory of the school, letter jackets have been awarded to the tennis entire second half. Mike Tynon was the big reason and golf teams at Peru State Colfor the romp; he threw three lege. Those receiving jackets for touchdown passes and ran for four more. Jim Whisler also tennis are Joe Smith, Larry played an outstanding game, Trimble, Hank Grace, John Nore, hauling in two touchdowns on and Larry Piper. Jackets for lettering in golf Tynon's passes. Peru did not take the lead un- went to Jim Head, Dick Seybert, til the closing minutes of the Pete Lynch, Bill Heineman, and first half, 27 to 21. Peru, however Steve Sellergren. The awards were made possiscored four times the second half and held the Eagles scoreless. ble through the combined efforts Peru's offense clicked all night of Al Wheeler, Darrell Wininger, and Lawrence Ebner. and did not have to punt.

Worcesterites Win Touch Football

---------------#

Doane Defeats Peru

Prep Snares Eagles

Tennis, Golf Lettermen Are Awarded Jackets

Peru Harriers Take Seventh Victory Louis Fritz paced the Peru harriers to the seventh win of the season against Doane College, Oct. 24. The final ranking was Peru 26 and Doane 29 points. Fritz was timed in the four mile course at 21 :59 minutes which is the second best time ever reported for Peru. Bolin ran fifth at 23:02. The final Peru placf%,~ were: Fritz --------------- 1 21:59 O'Donoghue -------- 4 22:50 Bolin --------------- 6 23:02 Hendricks ---------- 7 23:08 Watson ------------- 8 23:12 Dahmus ____________ ll 24:15 Zaparanic}- ---.------12 24:19 Neujhar ____________ 15 25:35

Peru Cagers Hope For Good Season BY. CHARLIE RICHARDS On Oct. 15 the Peru State cagers held their first practice session. Coach Jack Mcintire welcomed the return of lettermen Mike Harmon, Ray Cain, Dick Estes, and Jack Rinne. Bill Witty, another letterman will report after the football season has ended. Newcomers to this year's squad are: John Chase, Gordon Gustafson, Jim Jennings, and Roger Capps. Ron Snodgrass, who lettered two years ago, is back to bolster the squad. His rebounding and scoring power should help the Bobcats greatly. Other members of the squad include: Bill Rinne, Mike Smagacz, John Alexander, Ron Kroll, Lyle Bohanon, Mike Guilliatt, and Mike McCormick. The Bobcats are hoping to improve on their 13-13 record of last year. In Nebraska College Conference play the Bobcats finished second with a record of 7-3. The first game for the cagers will be against the alumni on Nov. 30. Last year the alumni fell to the youthful Bobcats by a score of 94-80. The first regular season game will be at home against Tarkio College Dec. 2.

Basketball Schedule Tarkio at Peru, Dec. 2 Northwest Missouri at Peru, Dec. 4 Peru at St. Benedict's, Dec. 8 Washburn at Peru, Dec. 12 Peru at Dana, Dec,. 16 Dec. 17, Open Beatrice Holiday Tournament, Dec. 29-30 · *Kearney at Peru, Jan. 9 Peru at Northwest Missouri, Jan. 12 Peru at Doane, Jan. 16 Peru at Tarkio, Jan. 19 *Hastings at Peru, Jan. 23 *Wayne at Peru, Jan. 30· *Peru at Kearney, Feb. 6 *Doane at Peru, Feb. 9 *Peru at Chadron, Feb. 12 *Peru at Chadron, Feb. 13 Feb. 17, Open *Peru at Hastings, Feb. 2.0 Concordia at Peru, Feb. 22 Peru at Wayne, Feb. 24 *Denotes conference games

Broncos Stampede 'Cats In Homecoming Encounter The Hastings Broncos, ranked eleventh in the nation in small college polls, smothered the Peru Bobcats 50-0 during the homecoming festivities. This was the first time since 1960 that the Broncos have defeated Peru. In a 32 game series with Hastings, this was the worst beating the Bobcats have suffered. Senior halfback, Dick Peterson, ran for two first period touchdowns and later added a third. Peterson, a former high hurdles champ, sprinted for runs ·of 38, 2, and 39 yards to lead the Hastings ground attack. Bruce Roberts played an aggressive game on both offense and defense, and Ralph Decesare made two fine defensive maneuvers for Peru in the remaining minutes. The Bobcats picked up four first downs while Hastings totaled 23. Peru's ground and passing yardage averaged 22 yards and Hastings' total was a fantastic 485 yards. With the strong wind, Hastings had a punting average of minus three yards. The Bobcats averaged 19 yards per punt.

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:ire Destroyed ~istoric House 1

BY LARRY PIPER

At approximately 9:30 p.m. on ct. 15, a fire started in the house "'cupied by Mrs. Dorothy Martin !hd her children. The fire startupstairs and quickly spread rough the second story. Mrs. artin and her children were rtunate to escape the burning ouse. The fire smoldered throughout ~e night. At 6:00 a.m., Oct. 16, e fire was still burning. Members of the Peru Fire Dertment expressed the opinion at the fire originated in the atbecause of defective wiring. ie efficient work of the firemen nfined the fire to the second ory but damage caused by heat, noke and water was extensive. :rs. Martin's household effects d clothing were almost a total 'SS.

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The State of Nebraska does not sure houses owned by the State the house was uninsured. The use will be razed. There are plans to build another. The house has quite a history. dgar Guest's poem, "It Takes a eap O' Livin' to Make a House Home," could have been writn with such a house as this one mind. The story begins in 1856 when oung Thomas Majors, a teen-age ny, left his home in Kentucky "go West and seek his forne." He came to Nebraska to sit his Uncle Alex who was dexander Majors of the Majors nd Waddell Pony Express. It as while he was in Nebraska ty that he heard of the gold to had near Pikes' Peak, Colora1. Young Thomas bought horses nd supplies and headed West, nly to meet many families reirning, disillusioned, from the eat gold rush. He returned to Nebraska City d it was. at that time that he !ard of corn to be harvested d the need for teams of horses d wagons "on the Peru botm." So Tom came to Peru. Aftthe harvest season was over, 1e team of horses and the wagon ·ere traded for a store which is ow known as the Deck Hard-

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ware Store. He wrote to his father in Kentucky to tell him that he had bought a store and asked for advice. He replied, "You have bought a store ... Run ittt" In the first days of the Civil War, all young men of Peru formed a company and with them went young Thomas. It was in 1863 that Sterling Majors came from Kentucky to· operate the store and live in the house in Tom's place. After the end of the War, Col. Tom and his younger brother, Wilson, returned to Peru. Wilson Majors and his · wife, 0 1 iv e , moved into the house. The house became a home as the two sons, Hal and Andrew Dorsey, and two daughters, .Bess and Barbara, were born and grew up. Hal Majors went to South Dakota. Andrew Dorsey Majors moved to Omaha and is now a member of the State Normal Board. (Majors Hall is named for him.) Bess married and her daughter, Beatrice, is Mrs. John Burns, wife of the governor of Hawaii. Barbara continued to live at home with her father and worked at Peru Normal as college librarian. When it became necessary for Barbara Majors Davenport to leave the house, it was sold to the State for further development of the campus. Barbara Davenport said that her sorrow at leaving the home of her lifetime w a s tempered by the pleasure that she received in the knowledge that her beloved home was to be a part of the college she loved.

A Halloween Dance was held in conjunction with "grub night" in the Student Union. It was sponsored by the Freshman clas·s. state and national units, which BY MARCH TINKHAM Music was provided by th e hold conventions each year and "Unknowns" of Omaha. The Peru branch of the Ameri- each second year, respectively. Prizes were given to persons can Association of University At the 1963 Denver convention dressed in the "grubbiest" grub- Women is celebrating its 30th bies. Honors went to George anniversary this year. The that Peru graduates were made Weiss, Barbara Thompson, and branch has another reason to be eligible for . A.A.U.W. membership. The ruling making Peru Ron Robbins. · celebrating, for this past sum- graduates eligible is retroactive Ceci Evangelist was in charge mer marked the end of the first of decorations for the dance. full year that Peru graduates extending back to the first womSheryl Gawart was in charge of have been eligible for member- an to graduate from Peru. This ruling is expected to greatly inpromotion. Ralph DeCisare was ' ship in the association. crease membership in the Peru clean-up chairman. The A.A.U.W. is a purposeful branch, which is the smallest Mr. Hugh Thomas and Mr. J. organization open to all women branch in the state. At the DenD. Levitt were chaperones. who are four-year graduates of ver convention members of the an accredited college. Its main Peru branch were also given the purpose as stated by Mrs. George honor of corporate standing. Schottenhamel, president of the The Peru branch is well reprePeru branch, is to aid women in sented on the state level by Miss "avoiding stagnation after grad- Alma Ashley, associate professor The annual Homecoming Day uation." of elementary education, who is "P" Club Luncheon was held. at The A.A.U.W. is further inter- presently serving as state first 10:45 Saturday morning in the ested in seeing more women on vice president. She has served in Student Center. the staffs of colleges and univer- the past both as second vice presMaster of ceremonies, Jack sities. It also encourages the col- ident and as secretary. Mcintire, introduced the followThe A.A.U.W.'s regular meetlege girl to graduate and not to ing guests: Dr. N. S. Gomon, Dr. ings, aimed at "avoiding stagnadrop out before securing her deErvin Pitts, Jam es Pilkington, gree. After the girl obtains her tion," center around discussions Jerome Stemper, and members of bachelors degree, the A.A.U.W. of a topic chosen from the fields the football squad. further encourages her to get her of science, education, Occident, Two members of the squad had Orient, and the American family. masters and finally her doctors. fathers present who had been This year's topic is modern JaIn keeping with this desire to members of the "P" Club during have more women get their mas- pan and the changes which have their college careers. ters and doctors degrees, the taken place there since World Coach "Al" Wheeler, who beA.A.U.W. grants fellowships for War IL gan his coaching career at Peru Other A.A.U.W. activities inState in 1938, addressed the gath- graduate work. These fellowships clude publishing a yearbook, lisare available to women of foreign ering. Mr. Wheeler introduced tening to occasional guest lecturfour members of his first football countries as. well as those of the ers, and holding open meetings team at Peru. Jack Mcintire and United States. when a topic of vital interest is It is only for these fellowships Glen Sheeley, instructors on the under consideration. Peru campus, were two of the that the A.A.U.W. branches enOfficers of the Peru branch in members. Also introduced were gage in fund raising. The Peru addition to President Scllottenbranch ranked fourth in the state the other "P" Club alumni atin per capita giving this past hamel, include Mrs. Vernon SiegSocks high, low, or at half tending the luncheon. year and was honored at the an- ner, vice president; Miss Edna mast ... Girls wear their socks Weare, secretary; and Miss Frienual state convention. at. these three levels. Beyond the branch unit are the da D. Rowoldt, treasurer. Most low socks are white because they're usually bobby sox. The half-masters are also usually in white, but occasionally there The annual Phi Beta Lambda will be a black one slipped in. Three representatives from the These are mostly worn w i t h banquet was held Oct. 26, in the Mennenger Foundation of TopeThe English a n d Dramatic small dining hall of the Student ka, Kansas will arrive on the slacks and stretch pants. Clubs are joining together to proMany colors, sizes, shapes, and Center. Approximately 30 mem- Hastings College campus, Nov. 2. duce a program celebrating Wilforms make up the v a r i e t y bers attended the banquet. Miss The purpose of their visit is to liam Shakespeare's 400th anniHazel Weare and Miss Frieda Roknown as the "knee socks." They discover problems affecting the versary. Mr. Robert Bohlken is come in stretch, argyle, and mo- woldt. sponsors of the organiza- student body as a whole. 0 n e preparing the script which will hair. They hit below the knee, tion, were also present. question to be studied is: "Is consist of soliloquies and short Mary Sautter, president, w a s above the knee, and up to the there a prevailing apathy among scenes from Shakespeare's plays. waist. Various wild colors a n d mistress of ceremonies. Dr. C. V. students?" The program will be presented plaids can be seen in this. type. Siegner was the speaker. His The Doane Owl of Crete is topic was "The Future of Busiby a cast of about fifteen people The latest thing is really wildsponsoring a mock election in from Sigma Tau Delta, the Engthe wilder the better. Stripes, ness." Linda Bartels, past state and conjunction with the upcoming lish Club, and the Dramatic Club. spots, lines, and even roses adorn the college coed's legs these days. local officers, installed the fol- national election. The slate will A model stage, built last year by Not too many have appeared on lowing officers: Mary Sautter, consist of Barry Goldwater and Mr. Linscheid's students, and president; Larry Franke, vice Lyndon Johnson. The purpose of authentic costumes will be feathe Peru campus. A small survey was taken to president; Allen Chandler, trea- the election is to stimulate inter- tured. find the opinions of the girls on surer; Alan Richard, secretary; est in the national election and The program will be given on campus. The following are com- and Marilyn Gonnerman, histor- the current issues at hand. Nov. 9 in the campus school audiia.n. ments. Midland College of Fremont torium for the joint meeting of New members of the Phi Beta "Oh, I like them. I don't see has J6 states and three foreign the English and Dramatic Clubs. anyone wearing them here, just Lambda, honorary business fra- countries represented in its en- It may be presented later at a ternity, were presented and inin magazines." convocation for the entire sturollment of 655 students. "They are different, but I like troduced. dent body. President Sautter announced Chadron State is expecting an them." "I like them but I couldn't the next meeting will be Nov. 16, enrollment of 2,000 students by at 8:00 p.m. in the administration 1966. In view of this fact, a new wear them." co-educational dorm now under "I don't like them all the time building. construction will be nearly doubut occasionally." SHOE REPAIR bled in size. Plans are also in the "I have a pair, but I haven't Auburn · Nebraska offing for doubling the size of the had a chance to wear them." Campus Center.

Wheeler Addresses "P" Club Luncheon

Phi Beta Lambda Banquet Oct. 26

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Shakespearean Production To Be Presented

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The survival preparedness class will begin Tuesday, Nov. 3 at 6:30 p.m. in the Industrial Arts Building room 29. The course will meet each week for three hours and continue for five weeks. Mr. Jarvis will be the instructor Students enrolled in the course may earn one hour college credit. All students are eligible. Th e course is particularly important to seniors who are not presently in their professional semester. In addition to acquiring the knowledge of how to care for yourself and your family in time of national disaster, one has the opportunity to now become a certified teacher of survival.

Hastings College is revamping its religion courses: New courses are being added, but students are still required to take eight hours of credit in religion. Work has b e g u n on a n $800,000 fine arts building at Wayne State. Hastings College has changed its chapel system. Chapel is still required and still meets twice weekly, but attendance is now honorary. Housing for women is an acute problem at Eastern Montana State in Billings. Women are being housed in the infirmary. All dorms are filled to capacity, as are all waiting lists.

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WHITE ANGELS • CHERUBS The association won second p White Angels - Cherubs held in the annual display contest. ~ Delegates to the fall conven their regular meeting on MonGEOGRAPHY CLUB 'day, Oct. 19 at 6:00 p.m. in the of the Student Education Ass· The Oct. 14th meeting of the ation of Nebraska were also girls' dorm. Geography Club was called to The meeting was short. Kay cussed. Peru will have thirt order by President Bob Hilt. A Camden, president, and Miss Ro- delegates at the convention. committee was appointed to sell After all old and new busi woldt, the sponsor, thanked evthe book Hills of Peru during eryone for their help on the was discussed, a film entitled" homecoming. The proceeds of the Homecoming display, in selling Teacher Alone" was shown. sale go toward a scholarship fund carnations, and helping in the film dealt with teachers and th for an outstanding student majormembership in the NEA. refreshment stand. ing in geography. Myra Murren, merit chairman, A movie "Arizona,'' distributed read the list of d:merits. by the Bureau of Mines, w a s Cherie Trevino, president of shown. The movie depicts the the Cherubs, called a short meetgrowth of Arizona since the days ing to discuss the possibility of of the Spanish conquistadors. Its Mrs. Adams and Miss Grush, dues in Cherubs. It was decided wealth of natural resources was to have $1.00 dues, payable in the campus school, attended emphasized.. two weeks. The Cherubs' skirts Conference on Instruction at The meeting was concluded Nebraska Center for Continu' have been ordered. with a social hour. Homemade ice Education in Lincoln on Fri -ocream and cookies were served. and Saturday, Oct. 16 and 17. S.C.F. --0The workshop was sponso The Student Christian FellowL.S.A. jointly by the NSEA and ship held its first meeting Oct. 21 L.S.A. held a very informal at the Campus School. Rev. Car- University of Nebraska. It meeting Wednesday evening, ter, minister of the Christian held in connection with the Oct. 14, at 6:30 p.m. The meeting Church of Peru, and Dr. Winin- project on instruction c a 11 was in Dr. Gomon's garage to ger, S.C.F.'s faculty advisor, ac- "Schools for the Sixties.'' work on the Homecoming disThose in attendance were p quainted the new members with . play. The group spent the evethe organization's background marily principals, superint ning stuffing the display with tisand purposes. There was a brief dents, and administrative p sue paper and preparing signs discussion about a future Bible sonnel. that would be a part of the disstudy. David Hensley led group play. singing. After finishing the work, t h e This ii;iter-denominational group group sang several songs. Followwas formed on campus in 1955 ing this, apple cider and brownIt will soon be the Christmas from the old YMCA and YWCA ies were served. Mr. Larson sponSeason again when we usually groups. It then embraced all think about candy. The Junior , Dr. Darrell E. Wininger spon- sored the group. Oct. 20th was Chinese night Protestant denominations. In --0the Geography Club. Eight class of Peru Prep is selling sored two trips for groups of hu1957 Wesley Fellowship splinW.A.A. Kathryn Beich's candies; includ- man growth and development tered off. Since then the organ- members and a guest, Mr. Nem The second r o u n d of the ing mouth watering, Katydids students to the Beatrice St ate ization has, continued primarily attended a Chinese dinner p W.A.A. volleyball tournament got and Butter Crunch and Choco- Home. through the ·efforts of the various pared and served by Mich under way Oct. 21. Tourney late Covered Almonds. We apOne group toured the Home on resident Christian and Baptist Chu. The dinner featured so preciate your order. Only a $1.50 Monday, Oct. 19, and another standings find Team I in the lead ministers. fried rice, sweet 'n sour pork with two wins. This team intea. After dinner Mike ent a can. -oTuesday, Oct. 20. cludes Ceci Evangelist, Myra tained the group with seve The Sophomore class of Peru L.S.A. Those who toured the Home on Murren, Ruth Kalafut, Nancy stories and sleight of hand tric Prep is taking up a fund for JerDennis Flattre opened the Monday were: Marilyn Bailie, The dinner was held at ry Allgood. A donation of any Charles Baskett, Mary Brown, Muse, Judy Harbeson, Karen Oct. 21 meeting of the L.S.A. with kind would be appreciated. A John Chasse, Michael Chu, Rich- Renken, Carol Chandler, a n d evening vespers. Rev. Carlson home of Mr. Harold White box is being put in the high ard Daigle, Richard Dorsch, Karen Cahow. continued the Bible discussion on club sponsor. Team IV (favored) is closely sChool hallway during each noon Bruce DuVal, Mike Harmon, Jimthe book of John. following with one win and one hour. New song books were purmy Jicha, Mary Jones, Dennis bye. chased by the group. Dennis Kennedy, Suzan Kenworthy, The gymnastic apparatus set up Grade School News Roger Kizeor, Vern Kranzer, in the gym distracted many of the thanked the group for winning Brenda McCarthy, Pat McKee, girls from their volleyball games. third. place in the Homecoming BY MARIE BALLUE Auto Repairs Pat McNulty, Dave Perry, Bob Girls who were not used to the display and contest. Halloween is a topic of great Rev. Carlson closed the meetPeterson, Ron Snodgrass,""'Nancy strain the equipment put on their • Automatic trans. interest now. The first and secSpringer, Charles Steer, Charles muscles suffered the conse- ing with a prayer. • WRECKER SERVICE ond grades are especially excit-oStoner, Carol Thornton, March quences the following day. • Steam cleaning ed. All grades plan. to take part P.S.E.A. Tinkham, Tim Tomlyn, Roy -a-in the annual parade. The sixth The Peru Student Education lubrication grade is niaking paper mache Windhorst, Sarah Goodwin, and WESLEY FELLOWSHIP Association held a meeting on Marjorie Lines. masks painted to represent asWesley Fellowship met Oct. 21 Tuesday the group was made in the Methodist church base- Oct. 19, in the college auditorium. sorted monsters. The second and Gasoline The meeting was called to order third grades have been doing po- up of: Devon Adams, Kathy ment. A review of the book The by President Tom Castle, and • Check our price and etry and art work connected with Black, Bernard Brown, Lowell Community of Celebration was save money Brown, Margaret Chi 1 v er s , given by Rev. Hankins, G a r y the minutes of the last meeting Halloween. were read. The second and third grades Wayne Christensen, Ted Comp- Neumann, and Nancy Springer. The new constitution was acPeru 872-3201 are working on a United Nations ton, Ray Cotton, Sheryl Davis, The book is one of the study cepted unanimously. A commitDick Curtis, Paul Fell, Floyd Unit. They also are proud of books for the Quadrennial NaTOP VALUE STAMPS Goff, Marrill Greenlee, Jim Head, tional Methodist Student Move- tee report on the Homecoming their parakeet, Corky. The sixth grade is studying the Jim Johnson, Philip Madden, ment Conference to be held in display was given by Bob Hilt. history of the southeastern states, Gerald Marks, Ellen Meritt, Jim Lincoln Dec. 28 through Jan. 2, and in science the pupils are O'Donoghue, Bill Rinne, Charles 1965. Strong, Allen Sullivan, Bob Uk.learning how to stay healthy. President Bruce DuVal anThe fourth and fifth grade offi- will, Pat Venditte, Boyd Wood, nounced that the pre-registration Dinners and Short Orders cers are: Tommy Combs, presi- Letha Bayes, and Kevin Mc- blanks for the Fall Conference of dent; Scott McKercher, vi c e Cauley. the Nebraska M.S.M. had arrived. Lee and Norma Blankenship president; Anne Rene Vaughan, A committee was formed to appoint the official representative secretary. The fourth grade has two girls to the Fall Conference and a and twelve boys while the fifth news reporter for "The Comgrade has six girls and eleven The Alumni Homecoming Cof- municator," newsletter for the bpys. fee was held October 17, in the Nebras]\a M.S.M. Peru 5c & 10c Pam Bottomley led the group Student Center. The coffee was Clothing attended by approximately 100 in devotions. \ f / Shoes -o!,./ people. They came from CaliforBUSINESS CLUB// nia, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, MisDEAD END NEBRASKA, read souri, Nebraska, and Ohio. The The Peru State Collei'e .Busithe old highway department sign. earliest class, 1889, was repre- ness Club held its first meeting This greeting which motorists sented by Fanny Smith of River- Monday, Oct. 19. stopping by the Avenue S t o r e ton, Iowa, and Clyde Filley of Doug Cotner opened the meethad seen for years is now reLincoln, Nebraska. ing by reading the club's constiplaced by a masonry monument The coffee was sponsored by tution for the benefit of new which reads "PERU S TATE the Student Center Board. Host- members. COMPLETE CAR SERVICE COLLEGE." The officers for this year were esses were Patricia Wheatley, Alumni are pleasantly surRuth Schnute, Kathy Francis, elected. They are: Phil Knowles, prised at the renovations being Washing . Lubrication Ruth Rulla, Margaret Slayter, president; Ron McCoy, vice presimade at Peru State and this new .I Judy Strange, and Janet Beemer. dent; Mary McVicker, secretary; sign and the accommodating new Gas . . Oil . Tires . . Battery After coffee and doughnuts and Bob Sporhase, treasurer. sidewalk around the sign are the Sponsors for the club this year were served, there was much visfirst thing they notice. are Mr. Leonard Cartier, Mis s i~ing with old friends. Hazel Weare, Robert Krofta, and Mary Gonnerman. PERU CLEANERS & TAILORS FISHER'S BAKERY REMEMBER TO VOTE! The newly-elected president Repairing and Remodeling Men's and Women's Clothing This is a reminder to all voters appointed a publicity committee Home-baked Foods Forty-five Years Serving Students and Faculty that Tuesday, Nov. 3, is Election and a membership committee. PHONE 872-2671 PERU, NEBR. In the future the Business Club Peru, Nebr. day. Be sure to cast your ballot will meet with Phi Beta Lambda. that day!

LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS

ORGANIZATIONS

Campus School Teachers Attend Lincoln Meet

Campus School News Two Groups Visit Home

Mike Chu Serves Chinese Dinner

BEATTY GARAGE

L and N CAFE

Alumni Attend Coffee

MORRISSY'S VARIETY STORE

New Sign Improvement

McADAMS STANDARD


.,

.

The Voice of the Campus of a.Thousand Oaks ...

Pedagogian Salutes

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

"

Volume 60

Number 4

Peru's Who's Who

NOVEMBER 16, 1964

State Normal Board Approves President's Budget

Janice Wilkinson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Wilkinson of Humboldt, Nebraska was elect.ed to Who's Who.

A total operating budget of $2,710,886 for the 1965-67 biennium has been presented to the Nebraska Legislature by Peru State College, according io President Neal S. Gomon. The budget request was approved for submission to the Legislature by the Board of Education of State Normal Schools at a special meeting in Kearney, November 1. The 1965-67 budget reflects requests for an anticipated enrollment of 1,050 in 1965-66 and 1,100 in 1966-67 compared to 780 in 1963-64 and 866 during the current academic year. The over-all increase in funds is $908,888 over the present biennial operating budget of $1,801,998.

A 1962 graduate of Bratton Union High School, she received a Nebraska State Education Association Scholarship awarded by the Peru unit. Her major is English with history as her related field. She is presently carrying a 7.92 G.P.A. A member of Student Governing Association, Miss Wilkinson also is secretary of the s e n i o r class and Peru Student Education Association. She is secretary of Kappa Delta Pi, treasurer of Phi Alpha Theta, and a member . BILL WITTY of Sigma Tau Delta. Last year William Witty, Jr., son of Mr. she was co-editor of Sifting and Mrs. William Witty, Sr., of Sands; Syracuse has been elected to Jan's other activities include "Who's Who." Bill's major field of concen~­ Peru Historical Society, Newman tion is math with a supporting Club, and Pedagogian staff. field of earth sciences. His overFor relaxation she enjoys sew- all grade point average is 8.56, ing, reading and music. one of the highest a v e r a g e s among students. A~ a transfer from the Ai r Force Academy in C o 1 o r a d o Springs, Colorado, Bill was not eligible for athletics during hi s freshman year at Peru State. Since that time he has been a three-sport. letterman, lettering in football, basketball, and track. During his sophomore year, Bill became a member of Alpha Mu Omega, "P" Club, and Blue Devils. He has also been a dormitory counselor in Delzell Hall. Bill was elected vice-president of DON SCHMIDT the Blue Devils during his senior Don Schmidt, son of Mr. and year. Mrs. Victor Schmidt, of Sterling, Nebraska, was elected to Who's LONN PRESSNALL Who. Lonn Pressnall, son of Mr. and Don's major fields of concen- Mrs. Ray Bernadt of Wymore, tration include chemistry and Nebraska, was elected to Who's physical science. He has been on Who. the Dean's list with both distincEnglish and speech are Lonn's tion and high distinction. major and minor fields of concentration; Lonn's grade point A transfer from the University average is 7.05. of Nebraska, Don was ineligible Lonn is currently vice-presifor athletics until his sophomore dent of S.G.A., president of Drayear, in which he began particimatics Club and president of pating in both football and basSigma Tau Delta. He has been ketball. He has also participated vice-president of Dramatics Club in intramurals. and Foreign Language Club. Lonn has been very active in Organizations of which Don debate and in plays throughout has been member include: Foreign Language Club, Peru Stu- his college years. This is Lonn's dent Education Association, Blue second semester on the PedagoDevils, Lutheran Student Associ- gian. He has worked one semesation, and Alpha Mu Omega. He ter on the Peruvian. Last year Lonn became a memwas secretary-treasurer of Alpha Mu Omega in his junior year. ber of Kappa Delta Pi. He also Don has been a member of Dorm received the Charles P. Weigand Council since he was a sopho- Memorial Scholarship for the "outstanding junior." more. Lonn is married to the former Upon graduation from Peru Jane Currier of Blue Springs, NeDon hopes to enter medical braska. They are parents of two school. children.

The largest increase is requested in personal services (salaries, wages, retirement, social security) with a request of $2,091,039 for 1965-67 compared to $1,349,853 for the present biennium. The request includes the addition of 10 instructional staff members, an assistant business manager, a director of guidance and counseling, an assistant )ibrarian, nine clerical and secretarial assistants, and four maintenance and custodial staff members. Also included in the personal services budget are funds for salary increases for present staff members according to the s a 1 a r y schedule adopted by the Board for the four state colleges. Contractual services are up from $13,337 to $17,500, operating expenses from $206,576 to $246,674, supplies and materials from $142, 759 to $212,977, travel from $24,280 to $42,770, capital expenditures fro m $60,973 to $94,526 and non-budget expenditures from $4,220 to $5,400. The requested budget will require $1,861,957 from state tax sources with $848,929 from institutional cash receipts. The 196365 tax fund allocation is $1,047,793 with estimated current institutional revenues of $820,969 including carry-over balances of $141,278 from the previous biennium. College tuition is expected to produce $521,101 during the 196567 biennium compared to $400,323 in 1963-65. Revenue from exten-

sion and study centers is estimated at $5,940 compared to a current $3,746. Income from contracting elementary district an d free high school tuition for the T. J. Majors Campus School is estimated at $225,600 up $36,970 over the current bir11nium. Registration, matriculation, contingency, graduation and miscellaneous fees are estimated at $35,160 compared to $17,761 for the current biennium. Athletic admissions, book store revenues, campus school lunch, sale of surplus equipment and material and income from other miscellaneous sources is estimated at $58,320 compared to $57,556 during the present two-year period.

HARVEY FISHER Harvey Fisher, son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert H. Fisher of Tecumseh, 'Nebr., is one of this year's Who's Who.

JUDI WHIGHAM Miss Judi Whigham, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Whigham, Blanchard, Iowa, has been chosen as a member of Who's Who. She was graduated in 1962 from South Page High School, College Springs, Iowa. While in high school, Judi was a member of Y-Teens, yearbook staff, and served as accompanist. Music, with concentration in piano, is Judi's major field with speech as tier minor. After graduation, she plans to teach. Judi is a senior at Peru. During the time she has been here, she has been active in chorus, band, orchestra, P.S.E.A., and piano ensemble. Judi has served as vice-president of Dramatics Club, secretary of White Angels, correspondence secretary for Student Center Board, secretary-treasurer of M.E.N.C.,, and a member of the debate team. Judi enjoys spectator sports and water skiing.

Harvey has major concentrations in the fields of both mathematics and English. He has maintained a G.P.A. of 7.15. Always an active student, Harvey has been an officer of many campus organizations a n d a working member of still more. He has been a member of Sigma Tau Delta, honorary English fraternity, for two and a half years and was its president during his junior year. Also during his junior year, he was historian of Phi Alpha Tl;J.eta, honorary history fraternity. He was secretarytreasurer of Major's dorm council in his sophomore year, and is presently president of the Student Governing Association.

DAN LEUENBERGER

Dan Leuenberger has been an outstanding student in the classJAMES AGNEW room and an active leader in James Agnew, son of Mr. and many college activities. Mrs. James L. Agnew of Omaha, Dan, who holds a grade point Nebraska, was elected to Who's average of 7.10 as a mathematics ,Who. and history major, is the son of Mathematics and physics are Mr. and Mrs. Fred Leuenberger Jim's field of concentration. of Tecumseh, Nebraska. An excellent English student, Throughout his years at Peru Dan was graduated from TeState he has maintained a 7.99 Harvey has lent his talents to cumseh High School in 1961. He student publications. He has stated that he chose Peru State¡ average. Jim has membership in the served on the Pedagogian staff College to further his education (Continued on page two) one semester and the Peruvian because it was close to home. staff five semesters, including beDan has held seven major ofing this year's editor. His original fices in seven college activities. works have appeared in Sigma He also has been on the Peruvian staff for the last three semesters. Tau Delta's Sifting Sands. Dan has been an exceptionally Other organizations to which active member in the following Harvey has belonged include: campus organizations: the StuAlpha Mu Omega, honorary ma- dent Governing Association for two years, Alpha Mu Omega for thematics fraternity, three and a four years, Phi Alpha Theta for half years; Peru Historical So- three years, Peru Historical Society, four years; P.S.E.A., two ciety for four years, Kappa Delta years; Kappa Belta Pi, honorary Pi for two years, Blue Devils for education frat~rnity, two years; two years, and the Peru Student Education Association for o n e and English Club, one year. year. In his spare time, Harvey enDan has held the offices of joys listening to recorded music. president and vice president in He plans to teach after gradua- Phi Alpha Theta and the Peru Historical Society 1for the last tion and hopes some day to get two years. He is also president of his M.A. and Ph.D. in mathe- the Senior class and holds office LONN PRESSNALL matics. of treasurer in Kappa Delta Pi.


ELIZA MORGAN HALL

DELZELL HALL By Anthony Lopes

P.S.E.A. Convocation For Education Week

By Ginny Grossman

The Christmas party for Delzell Hall has been set for either Dec. 6 or Dec. 13. The exact date .. will not be chosen until other campus organizations announce the dates for their Christmas activities. Hotdogs, beans, and potato chips will be served. The party will start at 10:0(} p.m. · Both Larry Trimble and Pat Thomas will be leaving Delzell to go on their professional teaching semesters. Both are members of the Dormitory Council. P a t will be doing his student teaching in Bellevue, while Larry will do his in Beatrice. Ray Cain and Bob Krofta will replace them as dorm counselors. Bryant Montigny and Greg Dickinson have caught the hitchhiking habit. During the recent vacation they went on a three hundred mile trip to Hastings. They left Friday afternoon, October 30, and returned on Sunday night. They had little or no trouble getting rides as the longest time they spent standing on the road was 2(} minutes. Ed (Jersey) McGaughy had to have shots for rabies this week. He was bitten by a mad dog that was roaming through the campus. We want to wish happy birthday to Tim Logsdon, Rich Daly, and Bryant Montigny, who have Nov. 9 birthdays.

MAJORS

HALL By

La Velie Hitzemann During the four-day vacation of the teachers' convention, a stereo set was stolen from Rodney Baade. His door was locked, but somehow someone got into the room and took the phonograph and some records. The stereo was insured. Rod Kettlehut is going to have an extra passenger on his way home this week-end. Rod is planning to give the dog that has been staying outside Majors Hall for the past few weeks a home. Dan Leuenberger was unable to get a deer when he went hunting last Tuesday.

Midterm exams, presidential elections, and state football championships are the main topics of discussion at Morgan Hall this week. There was a presidential poll taken in the dorm and Lydon Johnson won over Barry Goldwater. The ratio of voting w a s three. to one. (Four people were asked.) The girls from third f 1o or joined with Elie Frandsen on her 21st birthday to make the celebration a memorable one. "Good-byes" are being said as our student teachers •journey offcampus to begin nine weeks of teaching. Those leaving are Karen Cahow, Kay Camden, Ruth Rulla, Linda O'Hara, L u c i 11 e Christensen, Jan Beemer, Glenda Rima, Janis Mayer, and Elaine Muller. Rook is the new card game bein~played in the dorm by Sharon Johnson, Marilyn Hunzeker, Elie Frandsen, Betty Schilling, Ruth Kalafut, and Gina Young. Margaret Slayter has been voted the best "Horseback Rider" on campus. Advice to Morgan Hall residents: "Exams are a good wayto learn what you didn't, but should have learned during the first nine weeks."

Kadelpian Convention Eight members of the Peru chapter of Kappa Delta Pi att\'nded a regional conference November 7, at the University of Omaha. Nine chapters from Nebraska and Iowa were represented. The program consisted of group discussion and g u e st speakers from national headquarters. ' Those attending from Peru were Joe Ward, Janis Mayer, Virginia Cockerham, Harvey Fisher, Kristine Wewel, Dorothy Bock, Janice Wilkinson, and Miss Ashley, faculty sponsor. Congratulations to Ron Peterson, a Majors Hall resident, f o r his being recognized in the selection of the Omaha World-Herald NCC all-conference team. He was the center for the Bobcat football team. Two others from Peru were recognized in addition to Ron.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Dorothy Bock --------------------------------------Editor Harvey Fisher --------------------------Personnel Manager Richard Berthold. ----------------------------Sports Editor Melanie Gould -----------------------------Feature Editor Lonn Pressnall ---------------------------Academic Editor Janice Wilkinson ______________________________ Copy Editor Ron Rist --------------------------------------Copy Editor Gary Schmucker _________________________Business Manager Ginny Grossman __________________________ Morgan Column LaVelle Hitzemann ----------------------~-Majors Column Anthony Lopes ____________________________Delzell Column Mike Chu ----------------------------------------Reporter Joan Dickman ------------------------------------Reporter Philip Dorssom -----------------------------------Reporter Eugene Fitzpatrick -------------------------------Reporter Melvin Hester ---------------------------~--------Reporter Bernie Jarecke -----------------------------------Reporter Dan Knudsen ------------------------------------Reporter Robert Minks ------------------------------------Reporter Elaine Neddenriep --------------------------------Reporter Larry Piper --------------------------------------Reporter Charles Richards ---------------------------------Reporter Mary Sautter ------------------------------------Reporter JoAnn Schultz -----------------------------------Reporter Beth Terwilleger ---------------------------------Reporter March Tinkham ----------------------------------Reporter Norma Wood -------------------------------------Reporter George Zwickel ----------------------------------Reporter

A convocation was held November 11, in recognition of American Education Week. This convo, sponsored by the Peru Student Education Association, emphasized the importance of education. Education Pays Dividends was the theme of the program. Tom Castle, p r e s i d e n t of P.S.E.A., introduced the c,o-sponsors of P.S.E.A., Mr. Harold Johnson and Dr. Kite. He also introduced the speakers on the program. The speakers and their subjects were as follows: Barbara Gordon, "Education Pays Dividends In Better Human Relations"; Dan Leuenberger, "Education Pays Dividends In Improved Earning Power"; Jackie Swegler, "Education Pays Dividends In Personal Fulfillment"; Charlie Niemeyer, "Education Pays Dividends In Good Citizenship"; Jim Manning, "Education Pays Diviqends In National Economic Growth"; Harvey Fisher, "Education Pays Dividends In International Relations." The American Education Week was established in 1921. Its goal was to obtain a program of education adequate to American needs. The A.E.W. has become the leading school public relations event of the year.

Dean Melvin Attends Denver Conference Dr. Melvin attended the First National Summer Session Conference, held in Denver on November 4. The conference, o r g a n i z e d through the six regional accrediting agencies, considered topics of concern to summer sessions directors. Some of tiiese topics included: nation wide summer ses. sions information and research; developing a balanced summer academic program; relationships between summer sessions, organizations, foundations, and agencies; the challenging future of higher education; and administration in summer schools. Representatives from all United States colleges and universities offering summer sessions were present.

Boraas Announces The Completion Of Class Elections With election of junior officers last week, all four classes at Peru State College are now organized, reports Dr. Harold Boraas, dean of students. The freshman class was the first to be organized, for the 98th academic year. Dan Leuenberger, Tecumseh, is senior class president; Jack Rinne, Burchard, heads the juniors; Joe Keys, 32 North Bellmawr, Bellmawr, N. J., is sophomore class president. Othr senior officers are Jim Manning, Lacombe, La., vicepresident; Janice W i 1 kins on, Humboldt, secretary; James Agnew, 32(}5 Blueridge Drive, Omaha, treasurer. Other junior officers: Bill Heineman, Wahoo, vicepresident; Marilyn Robertson, Dunlap, Iowa, secretary; Jim Snyder, Nebraska City, treasurer. Other sophomore class officers: Bill Rinne, Burchard, vice-president; Ronald Kroll, Steinauer, secretary-treasurer. In their election early in the school year, the freshman class selected Gary Viterise, Newark, N. Y., president; Ralph DiCesare, Worcester, Mass., vice-president; Sheryl Gawart, Nebraska City, secretary; Nancy Vanderbeek, Adams, treasurer.

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S.E.A.N. Convention Held In Lincofn The 1964 fall convention of the Student Education Association of Nebraska was held Oct. 30 in Lincoln. Peru was represented at the convention by eleven official delegates. They were Tom Castle, Janice Wilkinson, Linda Bartels, Barbara Gordon, Connie Hoschar, Myrene Hildebrand, S a 11 y Kelly, Jim Horgan, Gary Fritch, Charles Niemeyer, and Robert Peck. The three state officers from Peru, Dorothy Bock, Robert Hilt, and Jon Davis, were a 1s o present. Several topics of interest were discussed at the convention. It was decided that the spring convention of the S.E.A.N. would be held at Kearney State College, March 26-27. Afternoon session of student convention was held in Golden Crown room at King's restaurant.

JAMES AGNEW (Continued from page one) . S.G.A., P.S.E.A., and the honorary math fraternity, Alpha Mu Omega. He is presently treasurer of the Senior class. Jim h a s served as a physics lab assistant, an assistant to Mr. McKercher, and has worked in the library for two years. He was presented the Freshmen Math Award, the Peru Achievement Foundation Scholarship, and a P.T.A. Scholarship.

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SPORTS

By Dick Berthold With the gridiron season ended, the Peru Bobcats deserve credit for their continuous effort during the season against overwhelming odds. The 1964 schedule contained many larger teams. Injuries plagued the Bobcats, arid consequently, Dr. Pitts had to rely on inexperienced _underclassmen. Lack of team depth was apparent throughout the season. The Bobcats finished fourth in N.C.C. competition with one conference win. and three losses. The Bobcats opened their season with a 12-0 victory over Tarkio. Peru controlled the ball and gathered 19 first downs to Tarkio's seven. Chuck Colebrook tallied in the third quarter, and Windhorst added the final touchdown in the fourth period. Lincoln University defeated the Bobcats 40-10. Lincoln University overpowered the Bobcats in the second half, at halftime Peru trailed 14-7. Ho 11 i man scored in the first quarter, and Windhorst kicked a 30 yard field goal in the final period. Northwest Missouri combined their tough line and fast backs to defeat Peru 19-0. Both teams ·played tough defensive ball during the first half with neither team making a serious threat. The Bobcats swept the Chadron Eagles in a ragged dual, 26-13, for their first conference win. Windhorst and Dickinson con-

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tributed brilliant running. Dickinson carried the ball 15 times and gained a total of over a 100 yards. Windhorst scored two touchdowns and kicked two extra points to account for 14 of Peru's 26 points. The Bobcats collapsed under a strong Wayne team by a margin of 47-7. This marked the first conference loss for the Bobcats. Injuries began plaguing the Bobcats at this point. Windhorst received a sprained ankle, an d Cotton was sidelined with a dislocated shoulder. The Hastings Broncos smothered the Bobcats 50-0 during the homecoming festivities. This was the worst beating the Bobcats have suffered in the 32-game ,series. The Bobcats totaled four first downs while Hastings gathered 23. Peru averaged 22 yards and Hastings' total was 485 yards. The Doane Tigers rallied in the second half to defeat Peru 21-7. Both teams were unable to score in the first half. The Bobcats cut the lead on a 24-yard pass from Harry Leth to Lowell Brown. Brown added the extra point making the score 14-7. In the final quarter, 1'oane added another touchdown for the 21-7 victory. Peru traveled to Kearney for the final conference game a n d was defeated 48-7. Kearney earlier squeezed past Hastings for the deciding game in N.C.C. competition. After defeating Peru, Kearney took command of the N.C.C. ranking. Washburn trounced Peru 42-0 for the final game of the season. Washburn took an early lead and held command throughout the game. Nebraska College Conference finals: W L PCT Kearney --------- 4 0 1.000 Wayne ----------- 3 .750 Hastings --------- 2. 2 .5.00 Peru ------------- 1 3 .250 Chadron --------- 0 3 .000 Scoring Player: TD EP FG T. PTS Holliman __ 2 12 Windhorst _ 3 3 24 Witty _____ 1 6 Roberts ___ 1 6 6 Colebrook _ 1 Hardick ___ 1 3 9 Brown ____ 1 6 Team Totals: Peru-YG 1223; YL 465; NYG 758; PA 150; PC 58; YG 694; Total points 69. Opponents-YG 2643; YL 345; NYG 2298; PA 134; PC 63; YG 996; Total points 280.

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Basketball Schedule Four 'Cats Play Tarkio at Peru, Dec. 2 Final Game For Peru Northwest Missouri at Peru, Dec. 4 Peru at St. Benedict's, Dec. 8 Washburn at Peru, Dec. 12 Peru at Dana, Dec. 16 Dec. 17, Open Beatrice Holiday Tournament, Dec. 29-30 *Kearney at Peru, Jan. 9 Peru at Northwest Missouri, Jan. 12 Peru at Doane, Jan. 16 Peru at Tarkio, Jan. 19 *Hastings at Peru, Jan. 23 *Wayne at Peru, Jan. 30 *Peru at Kearney, Feb. 6 *Doane at Peru, Feb. 9 *Peru at Chadron, Feb. 12 *Peru at Chadron, Feb. 13 Feb. 17, Open *Peru at Hastings, Feb. 2.0 Concordia at Peru, Feb. 22 Peru at Wayne, Feb. 24 *Denotes conference games

Four members of the Peru State football team played in their final game against Washburn University. They were: Sam Carneal-Played the halfback position and lettered four years. Although he is small according to football standarC:.~, he was a standout on defense and showed a lot of hustle and desire. He is a P.E. major who lives in Nebraska City.

Kearney Outclasses Peru Kearney State defeated Peru State 48-7 to capture t4e Nebraska College Conference football championship with a 4-0 record. Touchdowns by Bill Backes and Lee Jacobsen gave Kearney a 14-0 first quarter lead. Peru cut the margin to 14- 7 on a touchdown run of two yards by Bernie Brown but Kearney scored again and held a 21-7 halftime advantage. They added 27 more points in the second half to claim their second conference championship in a row.

Harriers Triumph The Peru State Cross Country team won the Nebraska Wesleyan University Invitational Cross Country meet Nov. 6. Individual winner was Lou Fritz of Peru, who covered the three mile course in 15:21. Peru also placed Tim Hendricks sixth, Jim Watson eighth, Dan Bolin tenth, Jim O'Donoghue eleventh, and Dick Zaparanick seventeenth. The team scoring (low s core wins) was: Peru 36, Wesleyan 44, Doane 59, Midland 91, and Concordia 129.

'Cats Preparing For Opener The Peru State Bobcats continue to stress defense and the fast break as they prepare f o r their season opener in three weeks. The Bobcats were dealt a severe blow when postman Ron Snodgrass was injured in a c a r accident Oct. 31. He sustained an injured pelvis and is expected to miss two to four weeks of practice. This is the third season in a row that Coach Mcintire ha s found disappointment at the center position shortly before the opening of the round ball season. All other members of the squad seem to be in good shape physically, and Coach Mcintire is pleased with their continued progress.

Luke Cox-Lettered four years as a center. He played high school football at Lincoln Northeast. His major field of study is history and he will soon be doing his student teaching at Johnson. David Wilson-He played halfback at Plattsmouth but converted to guard at Peru. This 5'7" guard earned three letters while here at Peru. Ron Peterson-His major field of study is P.E. He played his high school ball at Omaha Westside. He received honorable mention this year for the all conference team, and earned four letters during his four years at Peru.

'tous:.b.d.owns

with Bob Betts pacing the attack.

Peru State did not win a berth on the all-conference team, but did have the following persons listed under honorable mention: James Manning, Lacombe, Louisiana, end; Bernie Brown, Rockford, Illinois, guard; and Ron Peterson, Liberty, Missouri, center.

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Peru State finished the 1964 football season by losing to a big and rough Washburn University team 42 to 0. The Bobcats were at a big disadvantage being outweighed by almost twenty pounds per man. Peru fought gamely, and although the score was 42 to 0, did have several long runs and fine defel!si ye plays. Leading the attack for Washburn was All American candidate Bob Hardy, who scored three touchdowns and threw a halfback pass for another. Washburn had a powerful running attack and used the pass only to keep the defense honest. Peru, using the "shot gun offense" for the first time this year, moved the ball well on the passing of Harry Leth. Vinnie Sabatinelli made several fine receptions to lead the Peru offense. Bob Urwin made the finest play of the night on defense for Peru when he intercepted a pass and returned it some 40 yards before being run out of bounds.

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Peru Prep finished a very successful football season Nov. 6 by defeating Nemaha High School 38 to 21. The victory gave the Bobkittens a final season record of seven wins and one defeat. Peru led 20 to (} at the half. The Bobkittens made use of long runs with Bruce Henning and Bruce Cotton leading the way. In the second half Nemaha played inspired football. The Intb:ree

The Omaha World-Herald announced the following players as members of the All-Nebraska College Conference team: Larry McCord, Kearney, end; Cliff Schilling, Wayne, end; Randy Rasmussen, Kearney, tack 1e ; Gary Palmer, Wayne, tackle; Bob Kruse, Wayne, guard; Bob Peterson, Hastings, guard; Ed Kruml, Kearney, center; Neil Kaup, Kearney, back; Dick Peterson, Hastings, back; Burton Matthies, Wayne, back; Bill Backes, Kearney, back.

'Cats Lose Finale 42-0 To Washburn

Prep Downs Nemaha

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Peru Players Rate Honorable Mention By World Herald

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42

l


Blame It On Smoking Four Members Of

Peru Debaters To Tourney The Platte Valley Invitational Speech-Debate Tournament was held Nov. 6 and 7 at Kearney State College. The ·competition included 22 schools from eight states. Peru State College entered two teams in the debate division of the tourney. Team H4 consisted of Bill Bowen and Kit Wildinger. Laura West and March Tinkham made up team H3. Out of their five debates, team H4 won two, and team H3 won one. In the speech division, Peru was represented in extemporaneous speaking by Marjorie Williss and Bill Bowen. In his round, Bill ranked second in a field of 31 <:0ntestants. Marjorie also competed in oral interpretation. Accompanying the s t u d en t s was James D. Levitt, coach. During the tournament Mr. Levitt judged debate events in which Peru students were not entered.

Shenandoah Marching Band Performs Here

BY LONN PRESSNALL · Lately, smoking has b e en blamed for a lot of man's problems. It has been connected with heart troublE!, yellow fingers, tired feet, cancer, bad breath, and a host of other evils. Mr. R. D. Moore, head of the Language Arts Division, has added another hazard to the list. It seems while peacefully puffing his pipe and reading a book "something gave 'way." The collapse wasn't the Roman Empire, but a front tooth. It was broken in two, exposing the nerve and painfully ending the chapter of the book. The tooth was allegedly in poor condition,· but showed poor judgment in its choice of departure. A more considerate tooth would have gone to a dentist. At any rate, a few hours and a swollen jaw later, Mr. Moore had to go to the dentist. He is n ow back to normal, excepting a missing hunk of enamel-coated calcium from his upper jaw. The moral (if there is one) to this tale of w~e is slightly vague, "one should either take good care of his champers or quit pipesmoking" or in other words "tobacco is the leading cause of statistics."

On Saturday, November 7, the Shenandoah, Iowa High School Band traveled to Peru to provide halftime entertainment at the Peru-Washburn football game. The band, under the direction of Dr. Robert Creighton, is a consistent Division I winner at the Iowa marching contests. It numbers 97, and there are two substitutes who travel with the band at all times. The group is .well known for its fine marching techniques which follow the A. R. Casavant style of marching. This is typified by a company lront entrance rather than the old block style. The Shenandoah guests were met by Chuck Wellensiek, president of the PSC band, and Mr. Gilbert E. Wilson, assistant pro• fessor of music, and director of bands at Peru. Other PSC bandsmen attending the guests were Ross Oestmann, vice president, Mary Ellen Oestmann and Ralph Shaffer, board members at large, and Gary Schmucker, drum major. The group enjoyed a baked ham dinner at the Student Center after which a rehearsal was. held by the Iowans in preparation for the evening's performance.

Peruvian Pictures Taken Pictures for the 1964-65 Peruvian were taken on October 26-28 by Mr. Bill Oliver from Delmar Studios of Omaha, Nebraska. Five hundred and sixty-one individual pictures were taken in the Student Center television room all day on Monday, Oct. 26 and Wednesday, Oct. 28, and on the morning of October 27. Thirty organization pictures were shot on Tuesday afternoon, Oct. 27. Some of the pictures were taken outside. Large group pictures were taken in the auditorium.

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The Publications Staffs Named To Who's Who Among the eight p er sons named to Who's ·who recently were four members of the publications staffs. They were Janice Wilkinson, Harvey Fisher, Dan Leuenberger, and Lonn Pressnall. Janice has been a member of the Pedagogian staff for two semesters. She has been a reporter and is presently serving as a copy editor for the newspaper. Harvey has been a member of the Peruvian staff for five semesters. Three of those semesters he served as a layout editor. Harvey is the current editor of the 196465 Peruvian. He is also active on the Pedagogian staff, currently serving as personnel manager. Dan is beginning his third semester of work on the Peruvian staff this year. Lonn became active on the Pedago gian staff last year as a reporter. This semester Lonn is the academic editor of the newspaper.

Campus To Campus The student body of Hastings College is very proud to have an Olympic Gold Medalist as a member of the college. Gary Andersen recently returned from Tokyo where he was a member of the U. S. 300-meter free rifle shooting team. Mr. Mohammed Ali, Minister of Pak.istan, appeared last week at Doane to speak to the faculty and students about his country. A new student parking 1 o t, costing $47,000, was opened last week at Washburn Unive~ity. The purpose of the parking lot is to keep cars off· the campus as much as possible. Wayne State played host to the National Swedish Chorus which is considered one of the finest in Europe. This was the third time the chorus had appeared in the U. S. since 1906. The U. S. Minister to Bulgaria, Mrs. Eugenie Anderson, spoke to convo at. Moorhead State College in Minnesota. Mrs. Anderson is one of the few Americans who has talked with Brezhnev, the new Russian leader. Wayne State's trustees gave their okay for a budget of $12,000 -an all time record high. Dana College has received official word that it is a member of the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. Schools of Dana's size usually find it difficult to obtain NCATE approval.

PERU HISTORICAL SOCIETY The s€cond meeting of the Peru Historical Society was held Monday, Nov. 2, 1964. The meeting was called to order by President Dan Leuenberger. After issues at hand were discussed, Robert K€pler gave a lecture on Japan. He spoke on such points of intere: ; as language, music, and land. He also showed slides of Tokyo and surrounding locations. The next meeting will be he).d on Dec. 10, in the Campus School Auditorium.

ORGANIZATIONS PHI ALPHA THETA On Oct. 27, Phi Alpha Theta held its meeting at the home of Dr. and Mrs. George Schottenhamel. Nine students were initiated into the Peru Chapter of the honorary national history fraternity by Dan Leuenberger, president, and Dr. Schottenhamel, advisor. The initiates are Donna Van Buskirk, Joan Dickman, Marjorie Williss, Harvey Fraser, James Snyder, Harold Marshall, Richard Ferron, Oliver Bierman, and Larry Kuenning. At the business meeting, it was decided that the initiates would plan the Christmas party. Refreshments were then served· by Mrs. Schottenhamel.

Draper Dances In Convocation Paul Draper performed his "taps to classics" for the student bo'dy at Convocation on Wednesday, Nov. 4. Mr. Draper is known for his tap routines set to classical selections by Bach and Beethoven. He also gave a satire on political speeches and one on a dance hall. Accompanied by Eugene Mancini, he closed his program by ad libbing to songs which were requested by the audience. Mr. Draper studied dance at the School of American ballet. From there he went to 'the vaudeville circuit and then to cafe society. Mr. Draper is the only tap dancer ever to appear as soloist with symphony o r c h e s tr a s throughout the country.

meetings could be improved. Mt. Larson led th€ group in the closing prayer.

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KAPPA DELTA PI The initiation meeting of Kap-· pa Delta Pi, the honorary educa· tion fraternity, was held Nov .. 2 at 8 p.m. in the Campus School Auditorium. New members initiated were: Donna Gerdes, Dave Gerdes, Dorothy Bock, Eric Dorf Anne Epley, Kristine Wewel: Letha Bayes, Royce Curtis, Jerry Sayer, Marilyn Gonnerman, Donald Weiner, and Leland Schneider.. -oA business meeting followed, STUDENT WIVES CLUB and refreshments were served. The Student Wives Club held the third meeting of the year on Nov. 4. Grade School News New officers are: Pat Johnson, By Mary Lutt president; Nancy Ferron, viceThe second and third grades president; Jane Pressnall, secre- are preparing for the Thanksgivtary; and June Evilsizer, treasur- ing season. They have made some er. very attractive centerpieces from It wa~ decided that a bake sale familiar dry weeds and styrowil! be held on Nov. 21 in down- foam. town Peru. The elementary library has Christmas caroling will be the several new books, including December project. The wives will Communism: An American's also decorate boxes and fill them View and Ben and Me. with cookies and candy. They will be given to the older citizens of Peru. An Easter project was also suggested. This will be discussed at Open Monday thru Saturday a later meeting. After the meeting, refrshments PERU. NEBRASKA were served.

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LSA The LSA met at the Campus school on Nov. 4, at 6:30 p.m. Pete Bohling led the group in devotions. At the business meeting, a discussion was held on how the

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-oGAMMA DELTA Gamma Delta met on Nov. 4 in the Campus School Cafeteria. President Ed Loontjer welcomed and officially initiated the new members, Roger Neujahi, Phil Stroy, and Lori Tonniges, into Gamma Delta.

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1964

Peru Pedagogian Volume 60

PERU, NEBRASKA

·Peru State Chorus Has Selected . S· Ch . .O · Sa1nt aens _ r1stmas ratono The 48-member College Chorus of Peru State College will present the Saint Saens Christmas oratorio in December, according to Hugh Thomas, choral director and assistant professor of voice. Featured soloists will be Sharon Johnson, soprano; Ross Oestmann, baritone; and Ralph Shaffer, tenor. Other solo parts will be assigned at a later date. College chorus personnel: Bobbie Armstrong, Nebraska City; Lyle Bohanan, Craig; Jim Butts, Bellevue; Adrian Bartek, Weston; Bill Carlson, Falls City; Bob Craig, Peru; Richard Duponcheel, 4406 South 18th, Omaha; Dale Duensing, Odell; Alfred Eickhoff, Falls City; Jean Egger, Douglas; Sheryl Gawart, Nebraska City. Virginia Grossman, 5612 Jackson, Omaha; Jon Haase, Bennet; Marilyn Hunzeker, Pawnee City; Mary Lu Hicks, Stella; G 1 or i a Jackson, Bellevue; Michael Janis, 7514 Kildare, Skokie, Ill.; Sharon Johnson, Auburn; Bill Joiner, Menlo, Iowa; Jim Johnson, Syracuse; Linda Jones, Nemaha. Judy Kettelhut, Bennet; Teri Ki'sby, 156 Park, Council Bluffs, Iowa; Robert Krofta, Table Rock; Jerry Laflin, Crab Orchard; Tom Majors, Peru; Dianne Morrison,' Beatrice; Myra Murren, Elliott, Iowa; Louise Otley, Rt. 3, Lincoln; Ross Oestmann, Auburn; Mary Ellen Oestmann, Peru. Mary Ann Rademacher, Johnson; Linda Renz , Woodbine, Iowa; Diana ReischicK, Fa 11 s City; Gerald Strecker, Rulo; Gary Schmucker, Brock; Betty Schilling, Pawnee City; Ralph Shaffer, New Market, Iowa; Richard Shelton, 450 Elmwood Drive, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Barbara Summers, 3732 North 54th street, Omaha; Bill Stephens, Brownville; Eleta Snyder, Unadilla; Nancy Vanderbeek, Adams; Charles Wellensiek, Syracuse; Pat Wheatley, Cedar Rapids, Iowa; Joyce Wheeler, Pawnee City; Judi Whigham, Blanchard, Iowa; Virginia Young, Falls City.

0

Short History Of Peru In The Old Steamboating Days BY DAN KNUDSEN

"Shakespeare In Review" Presented By English And Dramatic Clubs The English Club and the Dramatic Club .presented "Shakespeare in Review" at Convo, November 2·5th. The progrc;m consisted of historical narration and selected excepts from William Shakespeare's fa~us plays. The narration was done by Dan Knudsen and Gene Fitzpatrick, who also acted as characters in the performance. The other members of the show included Harvey Fisher, Lonn Pressnall, an d Paul MacNeil. The script was chiefly edited by Mr. Robert Bohlken and Mr. Silas Summers. Mr. R. D. Moore directed the presentation. Staging and lighting were handled by Jon Davis. The featured selections. were a drinking scene with Falstaff; the speech by Shylock, the Jew of Venice; Antony's funeral oration from' Julius Caesar; and Hamlet's well known "To be or not to be." The program was given before at a joint meeting of English Club and Dramatic Club. It was revised. and polished for the allstudent convocation.

....

Peru Delegates Participate In First NSGA Convention

The 1964 Fall Convention of the Nebraska Student Governing Association was held at Chadron State College on November 19-21. Representing Peru at the convention were Harvey Fisher , president of the Peru Student Governing Association, M a r y Sautter, Charles Niemeyer, an d Ceci Evangelist. The convention opened with registration on Thursday evening. Friday was spent in discussion groups. Each school attending sent representatives to these groups. Common problems concerning each college were presented and discussed. Friday evening, the delegates were guests of Chadron at a banquet. The featured speaker was Mr. Phil Sorenson, Lt. GovernorTwo new driver training film- elect of the state of Nebraska. strip packets have been present- Mr. Sorenson spoke on the imed to Nebraska State Teachers portance of education in NeCollege at Peru by Ford Motor braska. "The Zoo Story," a short, oneCompany in recognition of the school's outstanding driver edu- act play by Edward Albee was the next event of the evening. cation program. It is one of 144 colleges and Immediately following the play, universities selected by the "The Minutemen" played at a company's Educational Affairs dance in honor of the convention Department to receive the dona- delegates. A general business meeting was tion. Entitled "Intersection Maneu- held Saturday morning w i t h vers" and "Freeway Maneuvers," George Douglass of Chadron, the packets are the latest in a chairman, presiding. The anseries of Ford-produced driver nouncement was made that the training materials. The 35mm constitution had been finished filmstrips use a training tech- and had received the necessary nique that analyzes various driv- ratification. Elections were held ing maneuvers by means of time- with Lyle Koenig of Wayne State lapse photography. College becoming president an d Through the time-lapse tech- Mike Moody of Hastings College, nique, the key steps in an actual vice-president. driving maneuver are photoThe convention next year will (Continued on page two) (Continued on page two)

Drivers Education Gets Filmstrip

In 1857, the township of Peru was entered at the Brownville Land Office. Peru was one of the first settlements in the n e w 1 y formed Territory of Nebraska. The town was formed around the Lone Tree Steamboat Landing on the west bank of the Missouri River, and in 1859, a row of warehouses was erected a 1 on g this dock Soon, Peru was established as a productive center of trade for both the settlers and the friendly Indians. With increased steamboat deliveries, Peru expanded up a main street that ran east and west. Two banks, a post office, several restaurants, a bakery, a tailor shop, and numerous general stores, were early additions to the town. These were the "golden days of steamboating," and the town was well on its way to being one of the largest towns in the territory. These were the happy carefree days when the townspeople could take a moonlight cruise and dance to the music of the Peru band. One could also visit the Peru Opera House to hear popular entertainers of the day on every Saturday night if he, could get reservations and had the money. Traveling groups liked to perform at Peru because the audiences were always large and enthusiastic. If one had nothing · to do, he could always go down to the docks and get the news of other ports told by the captains of the steamers. By 1865, most of the steamboats had vanished. Peru w a s then a favorite point for wagon trains to cross the river because it had a ferry boat system which made it easy on the men and the ox drawn wagons. This system saved the lives of many travelers that would otherwise have to ford the river. This business brought increased trade to the Peru community, and an ever increasing population to the area. Around 1867, the wagon trains crossed on bridges at Omaha or Brownville. Grass had grown thick at Lone Tree Landing, and main street was changed to run north and south towards the newly formed Peru Normal School. Also in 1867, Nebraska was admitted to the Union, and soon, land speculators were buying large tracts of the rich Missouri River bottom land, so that agriculture increased to be the area's largest single resource. In 1875, the railroad came to Peru, bringing students from all parts of the United States. In 1888, six regular passenger trains passed through Peru, as well as intermittent freight trains. At the beginning and end of the school year, the Peru terminal looked like a miniature Grand Central Station with people coming and going at all hours. In fact, during the 1913 summer session at the college, the enrollment was over 1,000. Most of the students came on the train, and stayed in private homes because there were no dormitories at that time. (Continued on page two) , ...,...,r

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Number 5

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Oldest and

Best

NOVEMBER 30, 1964

Students Change Addresses As Practice Teaching Starts Fifty-eight seniors at Peru State College started student teaching assignments Nov. 16 as a part of their professional semester. Assignments will continue through January 22 for secondary student teaching an d through January 29 for elementary. Elementary and secondary student teachers have been engaged in course work during the ,first nine weeks, with the students in elementary education enrolled in teaching in the e 1 e m e n t a r y school. In this course, the student considers elementary school subject matfer, curriculum, and effective methods of presenting the materials. During the first half of their professional semester, students in high school teacher education take courses in Educational Psychology, Educational Measurements, Audio-Visual Materials, Teaching in the Secondary School, Special M e t h o d s in Teaching Field. A week of evaluation will conclude the semester's work in secondary education. Forty-nine students have assignments in cooperating schools in southeast Nebraska, while nine are student teaching in the T. J. Majors Campus School on the Peru State campus. The cooperating student teaching schools for the first semester include: Auburn, Beatrice, Bellevue, Fairbury, Falls City, Johnson, Lincoln, Nebraska City, 0 mah a, Plattsmouth, Syracuse, Tecumseh, Westside District 66, Omaha. Fifteen are in elementary education and 15 in secondary. Student teaching centers, students, home towns, and fields of concentration: Auburn-Alfred Eickhoff, Falls City, business education; Richard Floerchinger, 1935 South 35th avenue, Omaha, physical education; Ronald Foreman, Beatrice, industrial arts; Davis Gerdes, Auburn, social science; Madelyn Fraser, Humboldt, elementary education; Carolyn L. Mercer, Malvern, Iowa, elementary education. Beatrice-Gary Bedea, Table Rock, biology; Larry Hart, Aub-

M.E.N.C. Members To State Meeting The Nebraska State Music Educators National Conference was held on November 19, 20, and 21, at Hastings. This event, held annually, is in connection with the Nebraska State Music Clinic. Music students are chosen from various high schools in the state to participate. There are three organizations which rehearse daily for the entire three days and then present a concert on Saturday night. The band, orchestra, an d chorus are di.'fected by guest conductors from across the nation. Music students from the Nebraska Colleges met on Saturday morning and presented a recital. Each chapter of the s tu dent M.E.N.C. was represented by a number, Peru State's chapter fur(Continued on page two)

urn, physical education; Lawrence Johnson, Tecumseh, social sciences; Jerry Joy, Crete, physical ·education; Dan Leuenberger, Tecumseh, history; Larry Trimble, 3303 North 58th, Omaha; Marvin Corbin, Fairbury, elementary education; Alvin D. Henrichs, Wymore, elementary education. Bellevue-William Bouton, Amsterdam, N. Y., art; Merron Camden, 3550 Sixth avenue Council Bluffs, English; Lind~ Elliott, 1602 Washington Omaha business education; Jam~s Kan~ ter, East Alton, Ill., physical education; Edwin Meyer, Imogene, Iowa, general science; Lind a O'Hara, 3302 Twelfth avenue Council Bluffs, history; Larr; Phillips, Nebraska City, social scienct:; Glenda Rima, Farragut, Iowa, home economics; Ruth Rulla, Sterling, home economics· Patrick Thomas, 1614 HancocK'. Bellevue, elementary education; Lucille Christensen, Valparaiso, elementary education. Fairbury-Daniel Coffey, Stamford, physical education. Falls City-Elaine Muller, Falls City, elementary education. Johnson-Luke S. Cox, Lincoln, physical education; J a n i s Mayer, Auburn, elementary education. Lincoln-Kenneth A. Hartman, 140 South 52nd, Lincoln, chemistry; Robert Troester, Hampton, social science. Nebraska City-Virginia Cockerham, Peru, modern languages; John F. Barton, Essex, Iowa, history; David Malmberg, Nebraska City, mathematics; Carl Stukenholtz, Nebraska City, business education; Mary Ann Biere, Auburn, elementary education. Omaha-Richard Baker, Pennsville, N. J., modern languages; Karen Cahow, 4532 Spencer, Omaha, physical education; Lorene Kostal, Odell, home economics; Jeanne Tynon, 7007 North Sixty-fifth, Omaha, home economics; Wendell Wiksell, 1023 South Forty-first, Omaha, English; Sharon Fike, Peru, elementary education. Peru-Phil Bateman, Sidney, Iowa, English; Robert W. Kepler, Otoe, social science; Peggy O'Neill, Milboro, S. D., English; Don Weinger, Odell, industrial arts; Mike Janis, Skokie, Ill., music; Barbara Wheeldon, Rt. 3, Council Bluffs, elementary education; Marian Gomon, Peru, elementary education; Susan McKee, Emerson, Iowa, elementary education; Kathleen M art in Ward, Wahoo, elementary education; Richard Sims, Quenemo, Kans., elementary education. Plattsmouth-William Scott, Malvern, Iowa, mathematics. Syracuse-Douglas Hunzeker, Seward, physical education. Tecumseh-Richard F e r r o n , 3105 North 83rd street, Omaha, social science; Penny Edwards, Table Rock, elementary educac ti on. Westside District 66, OmahaJanet Beemer, Bedford, Iowa, home economics; William McCoy, Tecumseh, history; Larry Morrissey, Tecumseh, physical education.


,

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BECOMING MEANINGLESS Another American holiday has now passed into the pages of an almanac! People nowadays dq not think of Thanksgiving as commemorating the successful settling of the Pilgrims in America, or Independence Day as the anniversary of the adoptjon of the Declaration of Independence. But rather, these so-called holidays have been thrust into the pitiless throes of news reports and headlines. "The death rate on American highways over the 4th of July weekend is expected to increase four percent over last year's rate," the papers read: "Eighty-seven more deaths are expected over the Labor Day weekend," the radios blare. "Watch out on the highways over the Thanksgiving holidays," the televisions warn. Originally, each American holiday had a definite and important place in our heritage. They were celebrated for their true meanings, as a significant part of the American way of life. Now it seems that these holidays have become mere statistics. 'Tis a pity! By Melanie Gould

PERU DOESN'T HAVE IT SO BAD Peru doesn't have it so bad. At the recent Nebraska Student Governing Association Convention at Chadron, campus problems were discussed. Peru's problems seemed small. Several topics were discussed, and among them was the weekend migration problem. It was estimated that more than half of the University of Nebraska's students migrate to their homes on Friday. So, the problem doesn't lie in the lack of something to do for entertainment. As at Peru, the other colleges agree that students leave campus to visit parents, boy friends, and girl friends. It was suggested that students who leave the campus may lack interest. Hastings College has a rule that requires Freshmen to remain in town for seven weeks.

ELIZA MORGAN HALL By Ginny Grossman The girls at Morgan Hall are looking forward to Thanksgiving. Everyone is anxiously awiliting Thanksgiving vacation-many because they want a rest, others for time for working on a project; but, in most cases, for the g o o d "ole fashioned" turkey dinner. Shouts of glee and disgusted mumurs could be heard in the halls after mid-semester grades were received. Most of the girls agree that they will have to study harder the next nine weeks. A wrestling match was held in Rm. 323 among Linda Combs, Ch~ri Combs, and Wanda Anderson. Cheri was the winner. Wanda was the loser, but she claims there was cheating going on. Birthday congratulations go to Phyllis Rebuck, Kathy Hennig, Cheri Combs, Lois Monsees, and Marilyn Masters.

MAJORS HALL By

On the topic of housing regulations it was discovered Lavelle Hil:zemann that Peru had about the best regulations. Concerning off. campus housing, all the schools except Peru had several rules and regulations to govern this. At Chadron they are trying Majors Hall lost some of its to get dorm hours for the boys, and govern off-campus liv- occupants at the close of the nine ing the same as in a dorm. The off-campus students :are be- weeks period. Five young men ing required to sign an agreement. The dorm hours for girls have gone out as student teachat Peru are the latest of any of the schools except in some ers. instances the University has later hours. Dan Leuenberger and Marv Campus dress was discussed. Dress in the library was the main topic of discussion. Peru and Wayne were the only schools which allowed casual dress in the library. Girls can't wear casual dress in the library at Chadron but can wear slacks to dinner on Friday night. Hastings has a very striG.t dress code, but this is often being broken so the Student Senate is trying to change it. They can't wear casual dress until after 7 o'clock on weekdays, and have to dress formally for dinner every night. It was decided that the colleges. need to have practice rules and develop a good dress code. Help may come from the faculty. Also it was decided that the library is a place to study, so the administration should relax the dress rules and make them practical and workable for students.

Things at Peru could be worse. In all discussion topics, Peru seemed to fare among the top as far as desired feelings were concerned. By Mary Sautter

Corbin are teaching in Beatrice. Bill Scott is teaching at Plattsmouth, while Ed Meyer has gone to Bellevue. John Barton is also student teaching, but he is commuting from here to Nebraska City. Dale Cerny is substituting for Ed Meyer as dorm counselor. Ed was coupselor on the s e c o n d floor.

DELZELL HALL By Anthony Lopes

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:Drivers Education Gets Filmstrip

Peru Delegates Attend First NSGA Convention

(Continued from page one)

(Continued from page one)

graphed and projected on a screen in exactly the same length of time required in an actual driving situation.

be held at Wayne State College in the fall. Other colleges present were Wayne State College, University of Nebraska, Hastings College, Scottsbluff Junior College, and Chadron State College.

Each packet contains from four to five strips and is accompanied by recorded narration and guides for both the teacher and students. The record-guide-filmstrip combination is considered ideal f o r group projects and self-teaching assignments.

Short History Of Peru In The Old Steamboating Days (Continued from page one)

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

It was announced after a re-

STAFF Dorothy Bock --------------------------------------Editor Harvey Fisher __________________________ Personnel Manager Richard Berthold ----------------------------Sports Melanie Gould -----------------------------Feature Lonn Pressnall ___________________________ Academic Janice Wilkinson ______________________________Copy

Editor Editor Editor Editor

Ron Rist --------------------------------------Copy Editor Gary Schmucker -------------------------Business Manager Ginny Grossman __________________________ Morgan Column LaVelle Hitzemann ________________________ Majors Column Anthony Lopes ____________________________ Delzell Column Mike Chu -------------------------------~--------Reporter Joan Dickman ------------------------------------Reporter Philip Dorssom -----------------------------------Reporter Eugene Fitzpatrick -------------------------------Reporter Melvin Hester ------------------------------------Reporter Bernie Jarecke -----------------------------------Reporter Dan Knudsen ------------------------------------Reporter Robert Minks ------------------------------------Reporter Elaine Neddenriep --------------------------------Reporter Larry Piper --------------------------------------Reporter Charles Richards ---------------------------------Reporter Mary Sautter ------------------------------------Reporter , JoAnn Schultz -----------------------------------Reporter Beth Terwilleger ---------------------------------Reporter March Tinkham ----------------------------------Reporter Norma Wood -------------------------------------Reporter George Zwickel ----------------------------------Reporter

cent dorm council meeting that a one-hundred dollar scholarship will be given to a deserving resident of Delzell Hall. This scholarship will be an annual affair. The details and the qualifications have not been released yet. With the coming of the winter holidays-Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year-the men at Delzell can think of nothing but going home. Delzell Hall will hold t h e i r Christmas party early this year. The date has been set for Sunday, Dec. 6, at 10:00 p.m. Franks and baked beans will be served. Tim Logsdon had one of t h e biggest skinning parties e v e r seen at Delzell Hall. On Tuesday, Nov. 24, Tim bagged six squirrels. He cleaned and dressed them all that night. Tim wanted to take them home to his mother for Thanksgiving dinner. But the Union Pacific would not allow fresh meat on the train he was traveling home on. We want t~ wish Happy Birthday to James Nash and John Chasse, November 21.

Since that time, the river M.E.N.C. Members changed its channel to the present location, and people hear no To State Meeting more the steamboat whist 1 e (Continued from page one) sound, calling the workers to the nished their male octet who sang docks. No more do the people, "Song of Peace," by Persichetti. hear the sound of horses moving The octet includes Ralph Shaffer down the dirt packed main street and Richard Sheldon, 1st tenors; towards the warehouse. No more Gary .Schmucker and Jim Butts, does the jolly conductor call his 2nd tenors; Ross Oestmann and "all aboard" to the waiting pasMike Janis, 1st basses; and Chuck sengers. These sounds belong to Wellensiek and Dale Duensing, the past, and are heard only in 2nd basses. The group of 19 who the memories of the "old timers" attended from Peru State were of Peru. sponsored by Mr. Thomas and Mr. Wilson, associate professors Just twenty-four days until of music. Christmas.

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------------'"""'""''···· Fritz Breaks Own Record The Peru State Cross Country team defeated Doane C o 11 e g e Nov. 19. The score was 19 to 37 in the four mile meet he 1 d at Crete. This meet was a warm-up for the N.A.I.A. Nationals to be held in Omaha Nov. 27. Peru took the tirst four places in their contest with Doane. Lou Fritz finished first with a time of 22:51 for the four mile course. This was a new track record. Ile was followed by Tim Hendricks, Jim Watson, and Jim O'Donoghue in that order. The win gives Peru a record of 14 wins and four defeats.

Campus To Campus McCook Junior College is excitedly anticipating completion of their new Student Union. Th e completion date is set at February 1, 1965. Central Missouri State has raised its hourly rate of pay for student jobs from 60 cents an hour to 80 cents an hour. SPORTS ROUNDUP By Dick Berthold

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er esno le :he ple ing eet ore his asto in rs"

Coach Mcintire r e c e n t 1y dropped the Bobcat basketball squad down to 20 well-rounded players. An overabundance of participants can harm a team during practice because of the ample time needed in coaching each progressive player. A post offense will be stressed with Bohannon, Harmon, Raine, Smagacz, and Snodgrass working for the starting line-up at center position. · Three transfer players are good possibilities for the Bobcats this season. John Chasse participated at Leicester Junior College 1a s t year where he was named the team's most valuable player. Roger Capps received N.C.C. honorable mention last year at Doane, where he earned two varsity letters. Bruce Vickery earned two varsity letters at Princeton, Illinois. Snodgrass is recovering from a hip injury received from an auto accident and is beginning to progress steadily. Dean Cain should be a real asset this year. Last year Dean hit 74 per cent of his free throws to lead the squad.

CASEY

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Dick Estes scored 133 points la;;t year and pulled down 107 rebounds. Mike Harmon averaged 17 .5 points a game during th e 1963-64 season. Coach Mcintire stated, "Bill Rinne, Ron Kroll, and Jim Jennings are showing good progress." The 1964-65 roster includes: Alexander, John, 6'0", 154 lbs., guard, sophomore, Omaha. Bohannon, Lyle, 6'7", 180 lbs., center, sophomore, Craig. Cain, Dean, 6'1", 180 lbs., guard, sophomore, Thurman, Iowa. Capps, Roger, 5'11", 170 lbs., guard, sophomore, Alton, Ill. Chasse, John, 5'8", 155 lbs., guard, junior, Worcester, Mass. Estes, Dick, 6' 4", 174 lbs., forward, sophomore, Wood River, Illinois. Gustason, Gordon, 6'1 ", 170 lbs., guard, freshman, Bellevue. Harmon, Mike, 6'4", 190 lbs., center, sophomore, Wood River, Illinois. Hitzemann, LaVelle, 6'2", 180 lbs., forward, freshman, T a b 1 e Rock. Jennings, Jim, 6'4", 200 lbs., forward, sophomore, C o u n c i 1 Bluffs, Iowa. Leth, Harry, 6'0", 175 lbs., guard, sophomore, Rocky River, Ohio. McCormick, Mike, 6'0", 175 lbs., guard, sophomore, Chicago, Illinois. Kroll, Ron, 6'3", 187 lbs., forward, sophomore, Steinauer. Raine, Leslie, 6'5", 230 lbs., center, junior, Glenwood, Iowa. Rinne, Jack, 6'1", 165 lbs., forward, junior, Burchard. Rinne, Bill, 5'11", 165 lbs., guard, sophomore, Burchard. Smagacz, Mike, 6'9", 240 lbs., center, junior, Omaha. Snodgrass, Ron, 6'8", 180 lbs., center, sophomore, Seward. Vickery, Bruce, 6'3", 200 lbs., forward, freshman, Princeton, Ill. Witty, Bill, 6'2", 200 lbs., forward, junior, Syracuse.

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Wayne State has already received 350 inquiries concerning entrance to the school next fall. Next year will be the biggest increase ever for the college, an d the idea of placing three students to one dormitory room in order to accommodate all students is being considered. Mark Van Doren, poet, critic, and 1939 Pulitzer prize winner, visited Hastings College 1 a s t week and delivered several lectures. Trustees of the Wayne State Foundation have announced their intention to purchase and restore a one-foom country school building to be located on the campus. The building will eventually become a museum, representing a phase in Nebraska school history to which the college made an early contribution. The 1965-67 legislative budget submitted by the four state colleges calls for appropriations of $18,642,887, a 71 per cent increase over the 1963-65 biennium.

Historical Note On The Rock BY LaVELLE HITZEMAN of Andrew Dorsey Majors after The big, pale red, glacial rock whom Majors Hall is named. just north of the Administration Andrew Majors is now a memBuilding may not mean much to ber of the State Normal Board. students at Peru State today. It The marking of this site with certainly was significant to those the rock was the first marking of students attending Peru in 1911, a historic site in Peru. The rock, one of the societies on the camwhich is unusually large for pus in 1911, and the class of 1870. rocks in this area, was found on On May 29, 1911, at 10:30 a.m., a farm southwest of Peru. Cona dedicatory service was held at siderable difficulty was experithe spot where the rock now enced in transporting the rock to rests. The purpose of this service Peru from the farm on a wagon. was to dedicate this rock to the Peru State Normal School and to the state of Nebraska. This rock marks as nearly as possible the spot where the first commencement exercises at the Peru College were held. The first exercises were held in 1870 with only two graduates, Dr. George Groceries • Meats E. Howard and Anna Moorhead Fruits • Vegetables Joy. Dr. Howard later became head of the sociology department at the University of Nebraska. The class was also Nebraska's first graduating class. At the dedicatory service, as much duplicating of the first commencement service was done as possible. The original music composed by the first music instructor at Peru Normal, Professor Perry Martin, was resung. The rock was presented by the Philomathean Literary Society. L. H. CRAIG, Owner This society was the first of its kind in Nebraska, being organPERU, NEBRASKA ized in 1868. The first president Phone 872-2701 of the society was Wilson E. Majors. Mr. Majors was the father

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Creighton University debate teams finished fourth among 70 colleges and universities participating in the University of Chicago Invitational tournament. Creighton teams won 19 out of 24 debates. Permission was granted to Midland Lutheran of Fremont to proceed with plans and specifications for another men's dormitory. The dorm is expected to house from 100 to 120 men. Kearney State has arranged a program with Bryan Memorial and Lincoln General Hospital schools of medical technology in Lincoln. Under the new arrangement, medical technologists completing their first three years at Kearney may transfer to either Lincoln school. Midland Lutheran received a grant of $500 from The SearsRoebuck Foundation to aid privately supported colleges. Construction has begun on a new men's dorm at Doane College. The dorm will house 64 men and is expected to cost $191,500.

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Bobcats To Play Alumni Tonigl1t In Gymnasium

The cross country squad is shown with the trophy won at the Wesleyan dual meet. First row, L·R: Jim Watson, Louis Frifz, Richard Zaparanick. Second row, L·R: Tim Hendricks, Jim O'Donoghue, Dan Bolin, Vince Dahmus, Coach James Pilkington. "-

Cross Country Season History BY RICHARD BERTHOLD & GEORGE ZWICKEL JR. The second year of Peru's Cross Country team ended as a success. Louis Fritz was the finest harrier to participate at Peru State College. Individual spirit and training were the largest factors f o r the winning season. Coach Pilkington is well pleased with this year's results. The harriers opened the season with a second score of 29 against Doane. and Tarkio. Louis Fritz and Tim Hendricks placed second and third with times of 14:02 and 14:04 over the 2.8 mi 1 e course. Peru State took first place in a dual with Maryville, scoring 21 to Maryville's 40. Fritz, Hendricks, and Watson placed first, second, and third respectively. The Peru harriers provided the top five winners in the dual with Tarkio Oct. 7. Fritz, Hendricks, O'Donoghue, Watson, and Bolin all scored. The final score g a v e Peru a 15-49 win on the 2.8 mile course. Fritz paced the harriers to an overwhelming 21-35 thrashing over Omaha University in a dual on Omaha's three mile course. Fritz ran the distance in 16:21 as

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the Bobcats placed four runners in the first five positions. The Peru harriers nabbed the first five places Oct. 13 as they capped a 15-48 victory over Tarkio. The dual was run over Peru's three mile course. Fritz, Hendricks, Watson, O'Donoghue, Bolin, and Zaparanick again took the honors for Peru. The winning time, by Fritz, was 16:07. The Peru-Maryville dual held at Peru Oct. 15 resulted in a landslide victory of 1'5-44 for the Peru harriers. The team again took the first five positions with Fritz, Hendricks, O'Donoghue, Watson, and Bolin. Fritz's winning time of 16:06 set a new school record for the three mile course. Fritz paced the Peru harriers to a 26-29 victory over Doane Oct. 24 at Doane. Peru took two of the first five places. Fritz's winning time was 21:51. The final results of the N.C.C. Cross Country meet gave Peru 57 points for third place. Kearney grabbed first place with 29 poiilts, Wayne second with 52, and Chadron fourth with 95 points. The We s 1 e ya n Invitational Nov. 6 at Seacrest Field in Lincoln resulted in a win for Peru with 36 points. Peru placed four runners in the top ten. F r i t z , paced at 15 :41, took first place honors. Hendricks finished sixth, Watson eighth, and Bolin tenth to round out the scoring. The Peru harriers traveled to Wayne Nov. 13 for the N.A.I.A. Regionals and won four individual trophies of the 15 presented. Peru ranked third with 56 points. Kearney won with 32 p o in ts , Wayne second with 44, and Midland fourth. Fritz, Hendricks, O'Donoghue, and Bolin scored within the first fifteen positions. The harriers raced past Doane 19-37 on Nov. 19 to add another victory for the season. Fritz placed first with a time of 22 :51 for the four mile course. Hendricks, Watson, and O'Donoghue followed to cap the first four positions. On Nov. 27, the harriers participated in the N.A.I.A. Nationals in Omaha. As this occurred after the Nov. 25 deadline, the Ped will cover the event in the next issue.

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The Peru State Cagers o p en their 1964-65 basketball campaign tonight against the alumni. In last year's contest the alumni bowed by the score of 94-80. Coach Mcintire has b e e n pleased with the progress his cagers have shown since the first week of practice. Defense is being given top priority in hope of improving on last year's defensive lapse which proved costly to the team. Ron Snodgrass, who was inFirs! row, R·L: Dick Zaparanick, Tom Rosengren, Louis Fritz, jured in an automobile mishap Jim O'Donoghue, Jack Cook; manager, Roger Neujhar, Dan Bolin, two weeks ago, has rejoined the Larry Carranza. Second row, R·L: Coach James Pilkington, Edward Stillinger: team in practice. Coach Mcintire stated that it is doubtful as to manager, Tim Hendricks, Bill Rinne, Jim Watson, Roger Crook, Bill Stevens, Jack Rinne. whether Ron will see a considerable amount of action against the ticipant most spectators enjoy. alumni tonight. Lou stated, "Competition and Coach Mcintire will pick his better training throughout the starting line-up from these playsummer have helped tremend· ers: Mike Harmon, Ray Cain, ously. On a four mile course, the Dick Estes, Jack Rinne, Bill Witfirst mile is run fast; then more BY RICijARD BERTHOLD ty, John Chasse, Jim Jennings, stamina is needed in between, John Alexander, Mike Smagacz, Louis Fritz, the 1964 Cross and then stride out the final mile Ron Kroll, Lyle Bohannon, Bill Country co-captain, has far sur- to win. It takes the correct frame Rinne, Mike McC.ormick, Mi k e passed his previous records f o r of mind and training to win." Gulliat, and Ron Snodgrass. the winning Peru harri<:rs t h i s Coach.,_ Pilkington remarked, The next home game for the year. The harriers are presently "It appears that before Lou is Bobcats will be Wed., Dec. 2, leading 18-4 in competition if all against the team from Tarkio finished, he will be the finest dismeets were classed as duals and tance runner in Peru." College. recorded. Coach Pilkington statt:d, "Lou is a tremendous runner as well as a psychological factor in pulling younger runners together."

Louis Fritz Holds Nine Peru Records

lntramurals In Full Swing

BY ANTHONY LOPES Intramural volleyball is in full swing with eleven teams competing in the league. Eight complete rounds have been played with the Road Runners leading the league with an 8 and 0 mark. They are closely followed by the Misfits who have a record of six wins and one loss. The standings as of November 24 are: 8 0 Road Runners 1 6 Misfits 2 5 Worcesterites 2 5 Emperors 3 4 Glunks 3 4 Louts 3 4 Duds 3 5 Playmakers 2 5 Playboys 2 6 Beavers 0 8 Ram Raiders Intramural director, Mr. Jerome Stemper, noted that the deadline for entering teams for the Intramural Basketball League is Dec. l. Teams that are entered for volleyball need not register again for basketball. The basketball season will start around December 2.

Only Snyder of Kearney and Denlinger from Doane have beaten Lou this season. Since the first meet, Lou has defeated Denlinger twice for revenge. Lou has paced a 20:54 four mile run at Kearney in N.C.C. competition, and was timed at 15:41 in the three mile course while winning the Nebraska Wesleyan Invitational. These are his two most outstanding performances at this time. Louis presently holds nine Peru records on different courses and distances. The list includes: mi. at Peru 13 :27 (13:29) mi. at Tarkio 13:48 (14:05) mi. at Peru 16:06 (16:41) mi. at Omaha U. 16:21 mi. at Doane 21:51 mi. at Kearney 20:54 (conference meet) 4 mi. at Wayne 22:41 3 mi. at Seacrest Field in Lincoln 15:41 10 mi. at Peru 58:30 Louis is the quiet type of par-

2.5 2.8 3 3 4 4

Harriers Finish Third At NAIA Meet

Peru State's harriers finished third in the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics cross country meet at Wayne St ate College Friday, Nov. 13. The race was won by A. D. Bensen of Wayne State in 21:17 while Alan Schreider of Kearney finished second. Louis Fritz, Verdon, finished in fifth place in 21 :41, to lead the Peru State Bobcats. Other Bobcat runners and their places: 11. Dan Bolin, Coin, Iowa, 22:27; 14. Tim Hendricks, Omaha, 22:52; 15. Jim O'Donoghue, Worcester, Mass., 22:59; 16. Jim Watson, Red Cloud, 23:29; 17. Dick Zaparanick, Westfield, N. J., 23:36.

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Gymnastic Tryouts Held

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Thirty-five students turned out for the first night of gymnastic tryouts. Coach Pilkington said sixteen to twenty of these candidates will be chosen for the gymnastics team. The purpose of the team is to provide entertainment during the halftime of basketball games and at various times put on exhibitions for the campus school. The performers back from last year are: Sheri Combs, Joe Smith, Ron Robbins, Joe Hertz, Kent Dorsti, Charley Pratt, and Kathy Francis. Injuries to Karen Renken and Lowell Brown will slow the over-all performance of the team. First year performers showing considerable improvement are: Anita Cox, Dan. Bolin, Tim Hendricks, and Charley Colebrook.

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Indian· Educator , Speaks At Convo

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K. Shanthi Rangarao was the guest speaker at the Nov. 18 convocation. Her subject was "How Education Can Combat Communism In India." Miss Rangarao said, "Only by educating the Indian people can the increasing tide of Communism be stopped." Miss Rangarao is a distinguished Indian educator, social worker, and writer. She won B.A. and M.A. degrees from Madras University in history, economics, political science and in the principles of teaching and psychology. One of Miss Rangarao's outstanding early successes was as Foundation Principal cf the new Central College for women at Nagpur, India. This college is the only casteless college for women in India. During, World War II, Miss Rangarao was appointed the first woman Deputy Chief Commander of the Women's Auxiliary Corps of India. Miss Rangarao has spent her life actively working for better understanding of world affairs can college students in summer through education. jobs in Europe on a large scale, is a private, non-profit, non-poliBY BETH TERWILLEGER Stop! all you students who are tical, non-sectarian organization. diously pouring night after The ASIS was founded in 1958 · ht over those dull books. with the primary goal being to Dr. Vernon Hungate, Dean of re's your chance to get away promote better understanding between the people of the United Graduate Studies, Adams State rom it all! Every student in America can States and Western Europe College, Alamosa, Colorado, viset a summer job in Europe and through the unique method of ited Peru State College on· Notravel grant by applying di- placing American college stu- vember 12, to interview the stuectly to the European headquar- dents in summer jobs in Europe. dents for graduate assistantships Jobs are much the same as stu- to Adams State College. rs of the American Student InAdams State College offers rmation Service in Luxem- dent summer work in the United urg. Also optionally included States with employers offering graduate assistantships in the ith this plan is a 19-day ex- work periods ranging from three following areas: business; lanuded tour at less than cost weeks to permanent employment. guage and literature; education, ices that takes you to Paris, Lifeguarding, office work, re- philosophy and psychology; natucerne, Lugano, Florence, Ven- sort-hotel jobs, factory, construc- ural science and mathematics; e, Rome, Innsbruck, Heidel- tion, camp counseling, farm-work, fine arts; health and physical edrg, and Luxembourg-all those and hospital work are only a few ucation; social studies; industrial mantic places you've dreamed categories to be found among the and mechanical arts. Each assistantship carries a stid read about until the wee thousands of jobs on file. An inpend plus the remission of tuition urs of the morning. teresting summer pastime no t The American Student Infor- found in America is tutoring. charges for three quarters of the ation Service, the only author- Well-to-do European families are academic year. ed organization placing Ameri- inviting American college stuIn order to qualify for the dents to spend the suffimer with graduate assistantship, one must them and teach their children be a graduate student enrolled in a program of courses carrying English. Wages range up to $300 a credit toward a masters degree. month, and in most cases there The prospective student would is no previous experience or a obtain a concentration of courses foreign language required. In in the particular department in some cases, living accommoda- which the assistantship has been granted. tions are provided free. During the interview, Dr. HunStudents interested in workgate explained the graduate studing in Europe next summer may OPEN BOWLING ies curriculum and held class diswrite directly to Dept. II, ASIS, cussion. Mon. PM2:30- 6:00 22 Ave. de la Liberte, LuxemThe students who attended the 9:30-12:00 bourg City, Grand Duchy of class discussion were: Robert Tues. PM9:30-12:00 Luxembourg, enclosing $2 for the Wed. PM2:30- 6:00 ASIS 36-page booklet which con- Kepler, Richard Ferron, Bill Thur. PM2:30- 6:00 tains all jobs, wages, working Scott, Jim Agnew, Edwin LoontFri. PM2:30- 8:00 conditions, etc., job and travel jer, Oliver Bierman, and David Sat. PM2:30-12:00 grant applications, and to cover Malmberg. Sun. PM2:30- 6:00 the cost of handling and overseas air mail postage. A newcomer on the Peru State campus Friday afternoon would PERU CLEANERS TAILORS have thought that the students were making their New Ye a r Repairing and Remodeling Men's and Women's Clothing resolutions a little early th i s Forty-five Years Serving Students and Faculty year. They would have heard PHONE 872-2671 PERU, NEBR. such phrases as "I hereby resolve ... ," "Never more shall I . . .," and, "From now on I will ..." Friday was not NewYear'sDay on campus, it was the day that Complete Line of School Supplies grades came out. The pledges to "study harder," "finish assignRevlon Coty Evening in Paris ments earlier," or "frequent the Cosmetics lab more often," were vows to raise grade averages, not premaKODAKS & SUPPLIES ture resolutions. If there are any gloomy faces on campus, it is FAST FILM SERVICE not because our students are unBRING US YOUR PRESCRIPTIONS friendly-it is because the grades are out.

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Appli~ations

Being Accepted For Student Center Board The Student Center Board is having its annual drive for members. Students wishing to become members are to write an application to the board and present it to Mrs. Merrit, the Student Center director. In this application the students are to state their status in college, their grade point average, their activities, and why they wish to become a member. If they have any ideas on how the organization can be improved, they are also to add these to their papers. The executive board will inter-

view all applicants, and their applications will be put on file. As people go out to teach, names will be drawn out of the file so that the vacancies can be filled. In order to apply, you must be at least a second semester freshman with a 5.00 GPA. The Student Center Board was designed to coordinate the use of the Student Center. The board sponsors May Fete and the Valentine dance. The board is also in charge of the Convocation schedule, and the recreation tournaments which are held each year.

ORGANIZATIONS

W.A.A. The Buzzards cam.e out on top in the final round of the W.A.A. volleyball tournament Nov. 18. Members of this team are: Wanda Anderson, Marge Chilvers, Cheri Combs, Linda Combs, Anita Cox, Jackie Dodson, and Carol Nickels. The Buzzards had a perfect 5-0 record. The runner-up team was Team I with a 4-1 record. Ceci Evanggelist, Karen Cahow, Carol Chandler, Judy Harbeson, Ruth Kalafut, Myra Murren, Nancy Muse, and Karen Renken are on this team. Swimming will be the next activity taken up at W.A.A.

PHI BETA LAMBDA Phi Beta Lambda-Business Club held a joint meeting on Monday, Nov. 16 at 7:30 in the Administration Building. The State Convention, which will be held in March was discussed. A list of possible contests to enter was given to the members. The members were also reminded of the possibility of holding a state office. The program for the rest of the year was discussed. A group of speakers were presented for possible programs. The possibility of holding a dance sometime in the future was discussed. It was announced that there would be no business machi.nes program this year. It was announced that dues were due that day or would go up 25c every week thereafter. Larry Franke and Ron McCoy are investigating the possibility of organizing a FBLA chapter in Falls City and in Millard. The Christmas party commit-: tees were appointed. Doug Cotner was appointed general chairman. The meeting was adjourned after a talk on sales by Mr. Brumhall from Falls City.

-o-PHI ALPHA THETA

Phi Alpha Theta held its meeting on Nov. 19 in the basement of the Administration building. The meeting was called to order by Bob Hilt, the acting president. Arrangements for awarding the scholarship next semester were discussed. Committees were chosen for the banquet in the spring and for the scholarship. Editors were also chosen for the publication put out by Phi Alpha Theta. Dr. Schottenhamel was approved as our representative to the national convention.

-oSTUDENT WIVES

On Nov. 17 the Student Wives Club held their fourth meeting at the campus school. A bake sale was discussed for Nov. 28, at the Peru Market. The money received from the bake sale will be used for Christmas and Easter projects. The Christmas project for this year includes going Christmas caroling on Dec. 14. Both husbands and wives will participate. The group will meet at the campus school at 6:30 p.m. Also the wives will distribute decorated boxes of candy to the elderly members of the community. After the meeting, refreshments were served.

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900% Return BY NORMA WOOD How would you like a 900 per cent return on your investment? With the current coin shortage this may be possible. One student on the Peru campus stated he knew a party that was currently offering $18.00 for a 1964 proof set. A proof set consists of a half-dollar, quarter, dime , nickel, and penny. All are minted at Philadelphia and encased in plastic.

1 1 1/'JG'R~ TO ~ATOUIZ LUNCH IN THG ~WC.7GNrl71NING R.OOM ,,

A recent notice issued by the superintendent of the U. S. Mint at Philadelphia, stated, "A Crash Program has been initiated by the Mint to alleviate the critical shortage of coins throughout the country. In order to carry out that program, equipment used in the manufacture of proof coins is being converted to the production Of regular coins. Therefore, we regret that it will not be pos' sible to accept orders for proof coins for 1965."

f~M NOW ON - lT DO~S GO MUCH FO~ ~Tl.J~Nf Mc@I..f;.

Peru's Campus School Is Unique BY MARCH TINKHAM

instructors all have their masters degrees and are qualified to teach at the college level. The results of the school's experimentation and research functions were never more obvious than right now. The campus school is presently a pilot school in the use of Nebraska's new English curriculum. This curriculum is quite advanced over that in use elsewhere. Aspects of grammar and literature previously not introduced to the student until high school or even college are being taught at much earlier levels. The new B.S.C.C. biology program is also in operati014. at the campus school, as well as the new concepts of mathematics. The campus school building itself has been especially adapted for the fulfillment of the observation function. Its classrooms contain observation booths separated from the pupils by one way mirrors. College students taking courses, such as Human Growth and Development, use these booths to study pupil behavior. Normally, student teachers teach at the campus school nine weeks each semester, although sometimes there are student teachers there all year. About student teaching, a former campus school pupil said "In some ways it's good and in some ways it's bad. Those student teachers who commanded respect got it; those who didn't got it too-but not the same thing." Evan S. Van Zant, Director of the Campus School since 1961, supervises student teachers at the campus school. *"Lament of the Normal Child" by Phyllis McGinley.

Since its dedication in June, 1917, the T. J. Majors Training School has been an integral part of Peru State College. With the discontinuance of Kearney's training school t hi s year, Peru is the only Nebraska state college with a college-controlled laboratory school, although many exist elsewhere throughout the United States. These laboratory schools share six common functions: observation, demonstration, student teaching, participation, experimentation, and research. Though similar to the others in function, Peru's campus school is unique in that its students represent a true cross-section of the community. 0 the r laboratory schools are saddled with the problem of selectivity. Their students are either children of college instructors or problem children who can't get admitted to regular schools. Their policy seems to be "cherish the problem cases!"* This is not true at Peru. Nebraska District Three con-., tracts for all its school age children to attend the college's campus school. Thus student teachers face not only those pupils with "interesting fixations,"* but normal children as well. The campus school is supported for the most part by s t a t e funds, but the county pays tuition for all high school students. Until 1951, the district maintained Indian Hills School for elementary students. Now elementary students, too, attend T. J. Majors Training School. Enrollment in the school is now 284 pupils: 159 in the elementary grades and 125 in high school. In contracting with Peru State for the education of its children, Campus School District Three makes a sound Holds Open House bargain. As President Gomon Parents who had children in stated in a 1955 article appearing in the Lincoln Star, ".... Peru grades 7-12 attended an open students receive a superior edu- house at T. J. Majors Campus cation because a town of 1,200 School on Thursday, Nov. 12, at population couldn't possibly sup- 7:30 p.m. The open house was port the type of school we have held in observance of American here." This "superior education" Education Week, November 8-14. From 7:30 to 8:15 the teachers is the result of two factors: first, the high quality of the school's were in their rooms, where disteachers; and second, the above plays and demonstrations could average curriculum e v o 1 vi n g be seen. At 8:15 coffee was served from the experimentation and re- by the F.H.A. girls. There was a search functions of the labora- short program in the study hall tory school. The campus school auditorium at 8:30.

The above is but one of the many ways that the mint hopes to alleviate the coin shortage. Congress has been asked to keep dating coins 1964 for several years to discourage collectors from buying up coins each year. The pattern of shortage repeats itself throughout the country. Federal Reserve banks take what money they can get from the mint (less than they want), and allocate it to their banks (which get less than they want) who pass it out to businessmen (who get less than they need). In an effort to overcome t h e situation the First National Bank of Monroe, Wis., made 20,000 wooden nickels. National B an k and Trust Co., in Ann Arbor, Mich., ran a "green sale" offering $1 for 98c or a $2 bill for ·$1.95. Other banks have issued a "patriotic appeal." Numerous banks have offered to sort and count coins collected at toll booths to get them back into circulation. Scarcity of coins is a nuisance to merchants and consumers. The shortage was caused by a growing appetite for coins stimulated by the boom in use of vending machines, parking meters, and other coin-operated de vi c es . State and local sales taxes an d the growing hobby of coin collecting are also causes. People who had never thought of collecting coins bought a Kennedy half-dollar, met a coin dealer and got hooked on a new hobby. Currently the mints .in Denver and Philadelphia are on overtime. Treasury officials speculate that the shortage will continue until a new mint starts operating in Philadelphia-prob ab 1y in 1967. An appeal to families to turn in their coin hoards in time for use in heavy Christmas trade was issued by Treasury Secretary Douglas Dillon. Mr. Dillon joined with American Bankers Association officials to launch a "Calling All Coins" campaign.

Class Tours Omaha Junior High School On Nov. 19th, the Education 350 class visited the George Norris Junior High School in · Omaha. The students making the trip were David Albert, Linda Bartels, Tom Castle, Eric Dorf, James Felton, Larry Piper, Channing Redfield, Lonnie Shafer, Frank Teleen and David Wilson. They were accompanied by Mr. Evan Van Zant. The group visited the different classes and talked to the instructors. The block of time, core program is used in the school. This program consists of correlating two subjects. There are 1283 students in the George Norris Junior H i g h School. The enthusiasm of teachers and students was quite impressive.

GAMMA DELTA Gamma Delta met in the Cam pus School cafeteria on Nov. 17 Dr. Harlan Heim from Hum boldt, spoke on his impressions Russia. He also showed slides h took while he and his wife wer traveling in Russia. -0-

LSA The Nov. 18 meeting of th LSA was called to order b President Dennis Flattre. Devo· tions were led by Joan Dickman The group listened to a tape re cording entitled "For Heaven' Sake." The recording was a satir showing the way that people be lieve in Christ, recorded in th fashion of a Broadway musical. Following the recording, t h group discussed its meaning. The group was sponsored b Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Larson.

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FACULTY WOMEN The monthly meeting of t h Faculty Women's Club was hel Nov. 19, in the recreation room o Eliza Morgan Hall. Mrs. Brad GEOGRAPHY CLUB was in charge of serving, assiste The Nov. 18th meeting of the by Mrs. Pate, Mrs. Benford, Mrs. Geography Club was called to Bernard, Miss Ashley, and Mrs order by · President Bob Hilt. Kregel. Lester Turner reported that 15 A Thanksgiving theme w a copies of Hills of Peru were sold carried out on the serving tabl during homecoming. Doughnuts, coffee or tea, an Henry Grace proposed that mints .were served, after which membership cards be issued and short business meeting was held that a newsletter be distributed Plans for the annual Christma to past members. Both proposals tea, to be held Sunday, Dec. 1 were referred to committee. A in the Student Center, were dis discussion of money making procussed. jects was held. The film "The Rival World,'' distributed by the Shell Oil Company was shown. The movie depicts the insect population of the world and the devastation that it causes. Charades highlighted the social hour. Cookies and punch were served. -oLSA The LSA met in the basement of the Campus School on Nov. 24. Lee Peterson opened the meeting NEBRASKAland ... WHERE THE WEST BEGINS by giving devotions. Joan Novak, the regional president of the LSA, was the guest speaker for the evening. Joan, a student at the University of Nebraska, told the group about the national convention that is to be "The Store of Standard held on Febr. 19-21 at Kansas Brands" State College in Manhattan, Phone 274-3620 Auburn Kansas. Joan also read a paper that she wrote. The paper contained many of the experiences she has had during her three years in college. She explained how college h a s changed her and how her faith Auto Repairs has been strengthened.

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The Voice of the Campus of aThousand 07ks . . .

Peru Pedagogian Volume 60

PERU, NEBRASKA

The Junior Class of Peru Prep igh School presented the All chool Play, "Our Hearts Were oung and Gay," Tuesday, Dec. 1, the College Auditorium. The lay was directed by Mr. Robert ohlken and produced by special rrangement with the Dramatic ublishing Company of Chicago. The play was an adaptation of ne summer in the lives of two teresting people, Cornelia Otis kinner and Emily Kimbrough. During the summer of 1923, the two young girls set upon their voyage to Paris. Cornelia's worried parents start the play on a humorous note with their oldfashioned safeguards to protect their young, innocent daughter. Danna Henry, playing Cornelia Otis Skinner, and Nancy Adams as Emily Kimbrough meet many interesting people on the ship. First there is the ship's crew, then there are the two overfriendly neighbors, and finally two pre-med students from Harvard come on the scene. These people cause many humorous sit.uations which keep the play moving at a rapid pace. When the girls reach Paris, they again meet with some farfetched people and situations. Exploding heaters, carnivorous bed bugs, and. some erratic French people kept the audience laughing throughout the third act. The ship's experiences as well as the encounters in Paris added up to a good time for all concerned. The audience was particularly impressed with the ease and fluency which was displayed I by the student actors.

Area High¡ Schools Attend Choral Clinic

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A concert by area high school students was presented in the Peru State College Gymnasium Saturday, Dec. 5, at 7:30 p.m. The concert was the climax of the 13th annual Choral Clinic Festival which brought students from 12 area schools for the daylong event. Mr. Robert McCowen, associate professor of music at Iowa State University, was the guest conductor. Selections on the concert program included: "God of Our Fathers," Warren, accompanied by a trumpet trio and percussion; selections from "The Sound of Music," Rodgers; "O Rejoice Ye Christians Loudly," Bach; "We Praise Thee, O Lord," McCowen; "O Lemuel," Foster-Wagner; "Cherubim Song," Davis; "Sine Nomine," by Williams. Schools that participated and the choral directors include: Auburn, Robert Williamson; Beatrice, Lucille V. Reilly; Bratton Union of Humboldt, Jean Avery; Brock, Gaylin Sudik; Bennet, Oran F. Palmateer; Dawson- Verdon, Wendell Armstrong; Elwood, Judith McBride; Norris High School of Hickman, Mary V. Kettelhut; Nemaha and Stella, . Ralph J. Chatelain; Peru Prep, Mr. Thomas.

The Ped Staff

DECEMBER 14, 1964

Number 6

Classes Of 1985 1989

rep Juniors resent Play

From

Peru Band Gives Christmas Concert The Peru State College 40member concert band, under the direction of Gilbert E. Wilson, appeared in a concert Thursday, Dec. 10, at 8 p.m. Highlighting the concert were such selections as, "Bravura for Trumpets," a trumpet trio by Morrissey featuring Tom Majors, Peru; Ralph Shaffer, New Market, Iowa, and Dale Duensing, Odell. The Christmas season w a s brought into focus with the presentation of the Christmas Story by Paul Yoder, narrated by Tom Majors, and featuring a vocal octet: Sharon Johnson, Auburn; Mary Ellen Oestmann, Peru; Judi Whigham, Blanchard, Iowa; Mary Lu Hicks, Stella; Ross Oestmann, Auburn; Mike Janis, Skokie, Ill.; and Richard Shelton, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Other numbers included: Storm King March, Finlayson; Cosi Fan Tufte, Mozart; Prelude and Fugue in B-flat Major, Bach; Two Pieces for Band with Muted Brass, Dedrick; Selections from How the West was Won.

Front Row: Jack Eugene Johnson, Sheridan Monroe Manning, Tom Castle Jr., Barry James Grace, Jeffery James Hardick. 2nd Row: Mikheal LeRoy Greenlee, Tracy Ann Hoover, Laren Lee Leander, Chadwick Lee Holt¡ hus, David Wesley Wilson, David Scott Leonard. 3rd Row: Deirdre Lyn MacNeil, Brenda Jane Pressnall, Kimberly Marie Zwickel. 4th Row: Lonn Anthony Pressnall, Lourie Lynn Grace, Lou Ann Leander, Timothy Thane Hoover, Daryll Robins MacNeil, ~ Castle, Scott Majors, Sherry Lynn Allen.

Vital Statistics On Campus Small Fry B~

GEORGE ZWICKEL JR.

The Peru student wives-and, incidentally, husbands-boast of 22 children, ranging in age from three weeks to four years. There are seven girls and 15 boys included in the group of 22 youngsters. Sherry Lynn Allen is the daughter of ~fr. and Mrs. Roy L. Allen. Sherry is two years old. She was born July 13, 1962. Mr. and Mrs. Tom Castle are the parents of two sons. Tod, the oldest, was born April 8, 1962. He is 21h years old. Tom Jr., is five months old. He was born June 26, 1964. Lourie Lynn Grace is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Grace. Lourie is at the ripe old age of one year, 11 months. She was born Jan. 5, 1963. A more recent addition to the Grace family is Barry James. Barry is seven weeks old now and seems to be taking after his mother. The young Mr. Grace was born Oct. 14, 1964. Mitchael Le Roy Greenlee, who is five months old, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Merrill Greenlee. Mitchael was born July 9, 1964. Jim and Colleen Hardick have recently become the parents of a young son, named Jeffrey James. Jeffrey is all of two months old. He was born Oct. 1, 1964; in Omaha. The next group member is Chadwick Lee Holthus. Chadwick is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Gary Holthus. Chad was born Sept. 27, 1964. He is nine weeks old. Todd and Jan Hoover are the

proud parents of a son, Timothy Thane and a daughter Tracey Ann. Tim is 17 months old and Tracey is a bright and shining four months. Next there is Jack Eugene Johnson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Johnson. Jack is now seven months old. He was born April 12, 1964. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Leander are the parents of Lou Ann and Laren Lee. Lou Ann was born June 24, 1960. Being four years old, Lou Ann is the oldest child of the group. Laren is at the young age of two months. He was born Sept. W, 1964. David Scott Leonard.is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Leonard. David gives his parents quite a time in trying to keep up with him. David is at the grand old age of 18 months. He was born May 29, 1963, in Albany, New York. Paul and Joyce MacNeil are the parents of a son, Daryll Robin and a daughter, Deirdre Lyn. Daryll was born on March 23, 1962, making him 21/2 years old. Deirdre, 18 months, was born Sept. 1, 1963. Next on the list of youngsters is Scott Majors, son of Mr. \nd Mrs. Tom Majors. Scott is a fine 2-year-old young man. He was born Sept. 17, 1962. Mr. and Mrs. James Manning are the proud parents of Sheridan Monroe Manning. "Bud," as he is called by his father, is at the glorious age of 4 months. He was born in Louisiana on July 25, 1964. Lonn and Jane Pressnall are

the parents of two children, Lonn Anthony and Brenda J an e . "Tony," age three years, was born Nov. 3, 1961. Brenda, 18 months, was born Dec. 24, 1962. Being two lovely children, they are undoubtedly "stars" in their parents' eyes. David Wesley Wilson, the youngest member of the group, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. David Wilson. David Wesley was born on Nov. 8, 1964. He is now at the "old" age of three weeks. Kimberly Marie Zwickel is the daughter of Marilyn and George Zwickel Jr. Kim is at the promising age of 14 months. From all indications she promises to be as smart as her mother. Kim was born Sept. 24, 1963. The picture above was taken by Eugene Patrick Fitzpatrick in the record breaking time of 45 minutes. This time includes 44 minutes and 59 seconds of arrangement time and one second to snap the picture.

Practical Arts Is Expanding Rapidly BY DR. C. VERNON SIEGNER Practical Arts is c o n c e r n e d with areas of study which emphasize practj.Cal activities and understanding typified by industrial arts, business, and home economics. The major objective is to enable individuals to prepare for personal living needs through practical activities. This year the Practical Arts field has finally come of age. The (Continued on page four)

Annual Morgan Hall Christmas Tea Dec. 10 BY MARY SAUTTER The annual Christmas Tea was held at Eliza Morgan Hall on Thursday, Dec. 10. Active and retired faculty members as well as other campus personnel were invited. The guests were greeted at the door by a group of hostesses who ', were organized and directed by Marilyn Gonnerman. Freshman women and transfer women then directed the guests on a tour of the dormitory, showing them the Christmas decorations in the various rooms. Of special interest were the rooms that were the winners in the room decoration contest which had been judged in the morning. Upon their return to the lobby, which was decorated in .the festive mood by Cherie Combs and her committee, the guests w ere served coffee, cakes, nuts and mints by a committee headed by Marilyn Masters. Entertainment was presented throughout the afternoon and was furnished by Mary Ann Rademacher and her committee. The annual affair was headed this year by Mary Sautter, Social Chairman of the dormitory. Other committee chairmen included: Myrene Hild e brand, guest book; March Tinkham, buying food; Dorothy Bock, making coffee and tea; Connie Hoschar, dean-up; Elaine Neddenriep, refill nuts, mints, cream, and sugar; Karon Rathe, refill cake; Sally Kelly, pick up dishes from guests; Myra Murren, carry up plates and take down; Carol Nickels, carry up cups and silver; Linda Rogers, borrowing dishes; and Cherie Trevino, wash and dry dishes.


MAJORS HALL

By Lavelle Hi:tzemann

Bob Hilt introduces Miss K. Santhi Rangarao, a well-known Indian educator, who spoke :to an all-college convocation on November 18. -Photo by Eugene Fitzpatrick.

Food Class Tours DELZELL HALL By Anthony Lopes

Delzell Hall is preparing for the Christmas season, and .most of the Easterners living in Delzell are just about bursting at the seams, waiting for vacation to start. For many of them, it will be their only visit _home all year. Thanksgiving dinner for Rich Daly, Greg Dickinson, Bob Urwin, and a few others was truly great. They had their own turkey, with all the fixings, cooked for them. Dinner was held in room 210 and in little over an hour the 18 pound bird was gone. The seventh annual Delzell Hall Christmas party was held Sunday night, Dec. 6. Over one hundred of the residents attended. Paul Fell is always complaining about never getting his name in the Pedagogian. So I want to

The Beginning Foods Class went on a field trip to Lincoln on Tuesday, Dec. 8. The class visited four main companies in Lincoln: Roberts Dairy Co., Gooch's Macaroni Co., The Weaver Potato Chip 'Co., and The Miller and Paine Candy store. Mrs. Louise Kregel, assistant professor of home economics, accompanied ten girls on the trip. They were Linda Bartels, Laurena Fisher, Wanda Hartnett, Carol Hawley, Carol Henderson, Jackie Kahley, Barbara Lasko, Mary Martin, Lois Monsees, 'and Mary Ann Rademacher. The main purpose of the field trip was to become informed on procedures in various food companies. wish happy birthday to my roommate Paul Fell, from Worcester, Massachusetts, even though it comes on January 8. Mike Malone has a very serious problem. He is losing his hair. Mike s.,ays that he loses on an average of 27 hairs a week.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF

Dorothy Bock --------------------------------------Editor Harvey Fisher __________________________ Personnel Manager Richard Berthold ----------------------------Sports Editor Melanie Gould -----------------------------Feature Editor Lonn Pressnall -------------"-------------Academic Editor Janice Wilkinson ----------------------~-------Copy Editor Ron Rist --------------------------------------Copy Editor Gary Schmucker -------------------------Business Manager Ginny Grossman --------------------------Morgan Column LaVelle Hitzemann ------------------------Majors Column Anthony Lopes ____________________________ Delzell Column Mike Chu ----------------------------------------Reporter Joan Dickman ------------------------------------Reporter Philip Dorssom -----------------------------------Reporter Eugene Fitzpatrick -------------------------------Reporter Melvin Hester ------------------------------------Reporter Bernie Jarecke -----------------------------------Reporter Dan Knudsen ------------------------------------Reporter Robert Minks ------------------------------------Reporter Elaine Neddenriep --------------------------------Reporter Larry Piper --------------------------------------Reporter Charles Richards ---------------------------------Reporter Mary Sautter ------------------------------------Reporter JoAnn Schultz -----------------------------------Reporter Beth Terwilleger ---------------------------------Reporter March Tinkham ----------------------------------Reporter Norma Wood -------------------------------------Reporter George Zwickel ----------------------------------Reporter

The Christmas spirit is beginning to take command at Majors Hall. With all the snow and decorations, the major thoughts of the men are of going home for the Christmas holiday. Our housemother, Mrs. Donovan, displayed the first Christmas decorations in the dormitory. She has sitting in the window, a small artificial Christmas tree, flanked on either side by a candle, and on one side, an angel. Hanging in the window is artificial holly. The halls are a bit darker than usual. Blue, red, green, yellow, and orange bulbs have been put into the fixtures to replace t h e normal bi,tlbs. A silver-colored art if i c i a 1 Christmas tree decked with ornaments has been set up in the solarium. Different colored lights are reflected upon the tree causing color changes of the tree. We say "thanks" to those who helped decorate the dorm, bringing about the holiday spirit. A Christmas party is being planned for the dorm residents. No definite date has been set, but it will be held before the boys from the East will have to leave for home. A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year wish goes out to all. We wish everyone a safe trip home, and, of course, a safe trip back again.

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Kissing Under The Mistletoe BY ELAINE NEDDENRIEP

The dorm has now taken on a Christmas atmosphere. Everyone is anxiously awaiting the Christmas vacation, especially those from far away who are making plans for transportation home. Morgan Hall has set its annual Christmas tea for December 10. The spirit of giving has begun to haunt the dorm occupants and Peanut and Shuck exchanges have resulted. What is Peanut and Shuck? Those girls who participate, draw names. The name they draw is their peanut and each day they do something nice for that girl. All of this is kept secret, and the end result is a party to guess who was peanut and shuck. A shower is being planned by Laura West and Karen Renken for Judi Whigham. Birthday congratulations go to Arlene Borcher. Bonnie Anderson returned to school Monday after being a patient at Clarkson hospital in Omaha. Advice to Morgan Hall's Christmas shoppers: ."The time for any buyer to be most alert is when he is dead certain he has found a bargain."

Vacation Library Hours During Christmas vacation, the Library will be open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 21-23 and Dec. 2830. The Library will also be open until noon Dec. 31. All books that have been checked out before Dec. 6, are due by Dec. 18. Any book that is checked out after Dec. 7 is not due until Jan. 4.

In the language of flowers, mistletoe means "give me a kiss." This has its basis in a Scandinavian myth. "Balder (the Scandinavian counterpart fo:v Appollo) received a charm from his mother Frigga or Freyja (equivalent to Venus) against all injury from everything which sprang from the four elements-fire, water, air, and earth. Loki, an evil spirit, having an enmity against· Balder, formed an arrow from Mistletoe which did not grow from any of these elements. The arrow was placed in the hands of the blind Helder, whom Loki directed was t o launch at the seemingly invulnerable Balder. The Mistletoe dart struck Balder to the ground. The tears of Frigga became the white berries of the Mistletoe. Through the concerted efforts of the gods, Balder was restored to life and Frigga decreed that the plant must never again serve as an instrument of mischief. "Frigga, being the goddess of love and beauty, grateful for the return of her son, is said to be-

stow a kiss upon anyone who shall pass under the Mistletoe." 1 From this old tale we derive our custom of kissing under the Mistletoe. As it hangs upon the chandelier or in the doorway each lad may claim a kiss from the maid who chances beneath it with this provision: that the lad remove a berry to give to the maid until, at last, when no berries are left, the bough loses its spell and no more kisses are then available. 1-1001 Christmas Facts and Fancies, Alfred Carl Hottes. (New York, 1944, A. T. DeLaMare Co., Inc.)

THINGS TO COME Tuesday, Dec. 15 7:30 p.m. HS Basketball, Cook at Peru Wednesday, Dec. 16 9:10 a.m., Christmas Convo, Lutheran Student Assn. 8:00 p.m., College Choir, Saint Saen's Christmas Oratorio, Auditorium College Basketball at Blair Thursday, Dec. 17 7:30 p.m., Campus School Christmas Program, Aud. Friday, Dec. 18 5:00 p.m., Christmas Recess begins

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even Harriers et Monograms Coach Jim Pilkington has named seven monogram winners or the 1964 cross country season. The Peru State College harriers completed a 13-3 dual meet competition season and placed first among Nebraska college teams entered in the NAIA meet at Omaha. The lettermen include:

Louis

Fritz, Ver;don, 2nd letter;' Tim Hendricks, Omaha, 1; Jim Watson, Red Cloud, 1; Jim O'Donoghue, Worcester, Mass., 1; Dan Bolin, Coin, Iowa, 1; Dick Zaparanick, Westfield, N. J., 1; Vince Dahmus, Peru, 1.

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PERU, NEBRASKA

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Grid Awards Announced Coach Ervin Pitts announced that thirty football players will receive varsity letters at Peru State College. The grid awards go to four seniors, eight juniors, ten sophomores and eight freshmen. Seniors: Sam Carneal, Nebraska City; Luke Cox, Lincoln; Ron Petersen, Liberty, Mo.; Dave Wilson, Plattsmouth. Juniors: Floyd Goff, Nebraska City; Phil Malone, Plattsburg, Mo.; Jim Manning, Lacombe, La.; Les Raine, Glenwood, Iowa; Vince Sabatinelli, W or c ester, Mass.; Roy Windhorst, Deshler; Bill Witty, Syracuse; Charles Pratt, Bridgeport, N. J. Sophomores: Bernie Brown, Rockford, Ill.; Lowell Brown, East Alton, Ill.; Ray Cotton, Hartford, Ill.; George Evangelist, Newark, N. Y.; Jim Hardick, Omaha; Dominick L a Ro c c a , Brooklyn, N. Y.; Harry Leth, Rocky River, Ohio; Allan Sullivan, Wor<:ester, Mass.; Bob Urwin, Rockaway, N. J.; Richard \ Daigle, Dracut, Mass. Freshmen: Richard Bencivenni, Worcester, Mass.; Richard Daly, Worcester, Mass.; Ralph Decesare, Worcester, Mass.; Greg Dickinson, Worcester, Mass.; Tim Logsdon, Macomb, Ill.; Al Polselli, Worcester, Mass.; Bruce Roberts, Missouri Valley, Iowa; and Ron Yates, Granite City, Ill.

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Peru Top Nebraska Team At National Meet

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BY GARY SCHMUCKER On December 2, the Strategic Air Command Band presented a fine convocation under the direction of Captain Edward D'Alfonso. The audience was favored with such selections as "American Overture for Band," "Begin the Beguine," "Prologue" from "Westside Story," "A Change of Pace," "Parade of .Cliches," and the theme songs from the various divisions of the armed forces. Mr. Gilbert Wilson, associate professor of music at PSC, conducted the group on "Liberty Bell," a march by John P. Sousa. Chief Warrant Officer Richard C. Daugherty narrated the program.

SPORTS ROUNDUP By Dick

Berthold

The Peru Bobcats used a balanced attack to defeat Tarkio 9484 for the season opener Dec. 2. mance has reached that stage, Both teams were quick and please bear this in mind; we're showed desire and hustle. The ready, willing and able to serve The Peru State harriers finyour best interests in that diished their 1964 season Nov. 28 as· Alexander and Estes combinarection. the top Nebraska team entered tion proved potential for several in the NAIA Cross Country meet fast breaks. Chasse e x hi b i t e d at Elmwood Park in Omaha. The good individual desire and ball Beau!ilul · diamond Bobcats finished 14th in the team control. ring from In the first half, the Bobcats totals. a wide choice. Louis Fritz finished 54 among had difficulty rebounding on ofthe 144 runners to lead the Peru fense. Tarkio scored mainly on $19500 State entries. Watson placed 55, long shots and from the post poEasy Terma Hendricks 82, O'Donoghue 98, sition. Snodgrass played a tight game while picking up four fouls. and Zaparanick 132. The team percentage on free Other sets from $29.50 up Emporia State's John Camien became the first to win the event throws was 68 per cent which Diamonds shown evenings by two straight years. A biting wind accounted for 28 points. Cain hit appointment. and 25-degree temperature held 12 or 13 free throws for a 92 per the Hornet ace to 20·:25.8, some cent average. Bobcats hit 43.4 per two seconds off his last year's cent on field shots, which accounted for the other 66 points. AUBURN time. Fouls plagued the B ob cats while defeating N. W. Missouri 87-72, Dec. 4. Estes, Jack Rinne, and Alexander entered the second half with three fouls apiece. Alexander displayed an excellent PHONE 872-2331 job of ball control and hustle. Harmon collected 16 points the Member F.D.I.C. first half to lead the scoring chart. INVITES YOUR BUSINESS Eleven Bobcats saw action for the third straight victory o v e r CARROLL LEWIS, JOHN L. LEWIS, Maryville. The Bobcats averaged Vice Pres. & Cashier President 42.5 per cent on field shots and 67.9 per cent on free throws, Jack Rinne, Cain, Snodgrass, Estes, Harmon, and Witty played an important part in the Bobcats' two intercollegiate wins over Tarkio and Maryville. Cain leads scoring for Peru with 32 points, Shoes Clothing followed closely by forward Mike Harmon with 30 points. A four team college holiday basketball tournament will be played at the Beatrice City Auditorium on Dec. 29-30. The annual holiday tournament is sponsored by Peru State College and the Beatrice Junior Chamber of Commerce. According to Coach Mcintire, the four teams which will partiWashing • • Lubrication cipate in the tournament are: Doane College; Tarkio; Central Gas . . Oil . • Tires • • Battery Methodist College of Fayette, Missouri; and Peru State College.

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SAC Band Entertains In Dec. 2 Convocation The Strategic Air Command Band is noted for its versatility and unique showmanship. It is acclaimed as one of the finest musical organizations in the United States Air Force. The fifty members of the SAC Band were all carefully selected for their ability and professional experience. The result of this careful staffing is displayed throughout t h e entire band, whether it is performing as a symphonic unit, a marching aggregation, or broken down into the 16 piece "Notables," ten piece "Ambassadors," the 20 voice "SAC Glee Club," a society combo, a progressive

jazz combo or any of the other numerous instrumental and vocal combinations at their command. "The Flying Band of SAC," as it is called, has traveled throughout the North American Continent and to various other points in the world. Also featured on the program was A3C John Kamp. He came to the SAC band as a folk singer from the Gulf Coast area. He has performed in clubs from coast to coast and has played the Hootenanny Show on ABC-TV. Shortly after entering the Air Force, he won the World-Wide USAF Talent Contest in the folk singing division.

Peru Hoopsters Avenge Grid Defeat The Peru Bobcats galloped to their third straight victory by defeating Northwest Missouri State, 87 to 72. Peru was in command from the opening tap to the final buzzer. Again it w a s a team effort that sparked the Bo beats to victory. The fast break and a hustling alert defense enabled Peru to gain the victory. Time and time again either John Alexander or Ray Cain would knock the ball loose or steal the ball to set up a Bobcat bucket. Peru started things off with a bang on hoops by Alexander and Mike Harmon. Harmon hit from everywhere on the floor in the first half. Maryville could do nothing to stop him; neither could they keep pace as Peru lead 46 to 32 at the half. In the second half Peru ran their lead to as high as 27 points. In the final minutes of the game Maryville did manage to close the spread. Peru, however, was never in danger of losing. Leading the offensive show for the Bobcats was Harmon, with 18 points. He was followed closely by Alexander with 17 points. Joe Pierce paced the losers with 16 IJ.oints.

Bobcats Take Owls The Peru Bobcats opened their 1964-65 basketball season with an impressive 94 to 84 win over Tarkio college. The Bobcats showed fine poise for their first game. It was a pressure packed game, and the final outcome was not certain until Mike Harmon hit a jump shot with 1:47 remaining in the game. Peru used an explosive fast break coupled with an aggressive defense to gain the victory. Great teamwork and a great team effort were the features of Peru's attack. The Bobcats had a balanced scoring attack with six of th e eight men who saw action hitting in double figures. Leading the offensive show for Peru was Ray Cain with 22 points. Dick Estes also did a fine job by pouring in 16 big points. Tarkio got an 18 point effort from Nelson Thompson while Larry Scheuerman had 17 points. Peru built up a lead of 6 to 10 points several times only to have Tarkio fight back to make a game of it. There were· several hectic moments before Peru put th e game on ice in the fourth period.

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Practical Arts Is Expanding Rapidly

·Christmas Oratorio December 16

(Continued from. page one)

A casual all s_chool Christmas Dance will be held Thursday, Dec. 17 in the Student Center. Admission will be 50c per person, 75c per couple. Music will be furnished by "The Jags" (Sig Ep Combo). The dance will last from 8:30-11:30 p.m. The dance will be sponsored by the Student Center Board.

Saint Saehs' "Christmas Orapassage of the Vocational Educa- torio" will be presented Wednestion Act of 1963 should bring the day, Dec. 16, by the Peru State greatest growth ·to the field in the College Chorus under the direchistory of education. Under this tion of E. Hugh Thomas, associnew bill, federal legislation pro- ate professor of voice. The 8 p.m. vides funds to states to broaden presentation will be in the Colprograms in new occupational lege Auditorium and will feature areas and extend and expand· ex- secular music in addition to the isting offerings. In the future ·all sacred oratorio. CHRISTMAS AT PERU Soloists for the Saint Saens vocational education must b~ for BY MARCH TINKHAM gainful, not merely useful em- portion of the program will be Christmas at Peru is ployment. The areas of industry, Sharon Johnson, Auburn; Ross a girls' dorm whose songs business, office occupations and Oestmann, Auburn; Ralph Shafaren't loud and rowdy. home economics will be greatly fer, New Market, Iowa; Judy a special meal in the cafestressed throughout the nation. Kettelhut, Bennet; Jim Butts, teria. In next year's federal legislation, Bellevue. Members of a vocal a deadline for all term papers. quintet will include: Tom MaPractical Arts should be given door slamming time. more funds and leadership in jors, Peru; Mary 1l!len Oestmann, one final test (in every class). serving today's changing individ- Peru; Linda Renz, Woodbine, a dorm that smells of pine Iowa; Nancy Vanderbeek, Panaual and industrial needs. needles. Peru State's industrial arts fa- ma, and Miss Kettelhut. a fervent prayer for some The choral program will be cilities are among the best in the snow-anytime after the nation. Staff members consist of concluded with "It's Beginning to plane leaves. Dr. C. Vernon Siegner, Head of Look a Lot Like Christmas," tea time and boys in Morgan the Practical Arts Division; Mr. Willson; "Little Drummer Boy," Hall.. Dee V. Jarvis, associate professor Katherine Davis, and "Christmas a pass by train or plane to of industrial arts; Mr. Lester Rus- Song," Mel Torme. home. sell, assistant professor of indusa red and green and yellow trial arts; and Mr. Gordon Gavin and blue lights district. instrudor of industrial arts. At sneaking cards in your budthe present time there are fiftydies' mail boxes. eight students enrolled with inthe program chairman's big The annual Wayne , Debate dustrial arts as their major field headache. Tournament was held Dec. 4 and Christmas at Peru is an empty of concentration. The industrial arts department 5 at Wayne, Nebr. Peru was repcampus. was approved by the Veteran's resented in the debate division of Administration Nov. 1, 1963 for the tourney by two teams. Team a manual arts therapist program. 29, composed of Laura West and After completing a ten weeks af- Kit Wildinger, won three out of filiation with the Veteran's Ad- their five debate rounds. Team 30, BARBER SHOP ministration Hospital at Wads- March Tinkham and Paul Macworth, Kansas, the prospective Neil (substituting on short noLet Us Care manual arts students can take a tice) scratched after their first Civil Service Test and be quali- round. For In the speech division of the fied for a GS-6 civil service ratYour Hair ing. The industrial arts major tourney, Kit and Paul rated excan be an industrial arts teacher, cellent both in extemporaneous a manual arts therapist, or work speaking and their discussfon Auburn, Nebr. groups. Laura and March were in industry. The business department at rated good in their groups. Peru State has grown more. per, centage-wise than any other department on the campus. In 1960 there were thirty-eight majors; at present eighty-two students list business as their field of concentration. Staff members consist of Miss Hazel Weare, associate Groceries • Meats professor of business education; Miss Freida Rowoldt, assistant Fruits • Vegetables OPEN BOWLING professor of business education· and Mr. Leonard J. Cartier as~ 2:30- 6:00 Mon. PMsistant professor of busines~ ad9:30-12:00 ministration. Miss Weare advises 9:30-12:00 Tues. PMmost of the business education Wed. PM2:306:00 students, Miss Rowoldt the sec2:30- 6:00 Thur. PMretarial students, and Mr. CarFri. PM2:30- 8:00 tier the business administration Sat. PM2:30-12:00 students. In future the business 2:30- 6:00 Sun. PMdepartment would like to offer work with electronic machines and go into data processing. Home economics is the third FISHER'S BAKERY department in the Practical Arts L. H. CRAIG, Owner Division. The number of students Home-baked Foods PERU, NEBRASKA listing home economics as their Phone 872-2701 Peru, Nebr. field. of concentration is twentyeight. Staff members consist of Mrs. Louise Kregel, assistant professor of home economics; and Mrs. Ina Sproul, assistant profesPERU CLEANERS TAILORS sor of home economics. Events Repairing and Remodeling Men's and Women's Clothing sponsored by the home economForfy·five Years Serving Students and Faculty ics department include the MarPHONE 872-2671 PERU, NEBR. tha Washington Tea, the United Nations Dinner, and Freshman Girls Tea.

Debaters Attend Wayne Tournament

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Space Demonstration In Convocation Dec. 9

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration presented a Space Science Demonstration at the December 9th convocation. Accompanying the Spacemobile and presenting the demonstration were Mr. Robert Helton and Mr. Bruce Peske. These lecturers traced the history of rocketry ... from the early efforts of the Chinese in We wish you a Merry Chri the 13th century, the liquid fuel mas and a Happy New Year. rocket research of America's Dr. Robert Goddard, and to the more recent success of the Germans and their V-2 missile. They also explained the bene"The Sfore of Standard fits of communications and Brands" weather satellites, and the scienPhone 274-3620 tific information derived from current satellites. Through space research international cooperation is obtained. Spacemobiles carry cargos of side models of rockets and satellites, mechanical and electrical equipment and other space-sciAuto Repairs ence exhibits. 0 Automatic trans. • WRECKER SERVICE • Steam cleaning

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The second semester c 1 a s s schedule for the school year 196465 will be released before Christmas vacation begins. For the students who have trouble deciding on what classes to take, this will be a good chance to start early. For those who do not care, it will make the job of crossing out difficult dasses much easier.

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The campus secretaries· and office staff wish to announce that cookies and hot drink will be served Friday afternoon in the lobby of the Administration building. The gesture is their way of wishing .everyone a Merry Christmas and a safe journey home. Everyone is cordially invited to enjoy the refreshments.

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Pe'ru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 60

Number 7

JANUARY 18. 1965

Oldest And Best

Kiwanis Club Helps Peru NEA. Met College and Town January 12 Larry Ebner New Kiwanis President

Larry D. Ebner (left) business manager at Peru Staie College, was presented l:he 1964 Cil:izenship Award of the Peru Kiwanis Club. Carroll Lewis (center), club treasurer, made the presentation and Dr. Glenn Turner (right) Lincoln, Kiwanis Lieutenant Governor, presided at ceremonies installing Mr. Ebner as ~lub president for 1965. Mr. Ebner came l:o l:he Peru Sial:e faculiy in September, 1961, coming from Lincoln where he was office manager for Donley Medical Supply Co. A nal:ive of- l:he capital city, Ebner is a gradu· al:e of ihe Universil:y of Nebraska. Other new officers installed at the ladies night dinner meeting were Rev. J. Wilfred Carter, first vice-president; Rex Rains, second vice-presidenl:; Ward Adams, sec. rel:ary, and Mr. Lewis, treasurer. Present were l:hree original members of the Peru Kiwanis Club, chartered in 1929: H, U. Landolt, Cassius Kennedy, and Frank Heywood.

Nineteen Night .Courses Offered Nineteen courses will be offered at Peru State College dur. ing the second semester Wednesday evening course series beginning February 3, according to Dr. Keith L. Melvin, dean of the college.

-

Continuing through May 26, the Wedr:··!~day class series will be offered .:.:uring two class periods, making it possible to earn up to six hours of college credit by enrolling in classes both periods. The first period will begin at 5 p.m. and continue through · 7:4q, with the second period from 7:45 to 10:10 p.m.

Thirteenth Annual Schoolmen's Day On January 30 Schoolmen from N e b r a s k a , Iowa, Kansas and Missouri b?ive been invited to the 13th annual Schoolmen's Day program at Peru State College. (Continued on page two)

Mr. La r r y Ebner, business manager at Peru State College since 1961, was elected president of the Peru Kiwanis Club. Mr. Ebner succeeds Donald Stanley. Ne\rly elected officers for 1965 were Rev. Wilfred Carter, first vice president; Rex Rains, second vice president; Carroll Lewis, treasurer. Dr. Glenn Turner of the Lincoln Downtown Kiwanis and Lancaster county superintendent of schools, presided at the installation. Three charter members were present at the ceremony: Frank Heywood, Cassius Kennedy and H. U. Landolt. The Peru Kiwanis Chapter has been in existence since 1929. Next year the International Kiwanis will celebrate its 50th Anniversary. The Peru Chapter has made many worthwhile and notable contributions to the Peru area. They spearheaded the street sign project. The Peru Kiwanis sponsored the Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts and provided for corrective dental and optical care to deserving children. The group is active in its support of the Brownville Historical Society. It also sponsors two scholarships: the Bond Kennedy Scholarship and the A. B. Clayburn Scholarship. The latter is in conjunction with the Boy Scouts.

The Peru unit of the NEA met Jan. 12, in the auditorium of the Campus School. The business meeting was called to order by Dr. Siegner. After the usual routine business Dr. Siegner gave a report on the delegate assembly of the NSEA which he and Mr. Van Zant had attended in Lincoln on Dec. 11. District 2, of which Peru is a member, had 58 delegates. He brought the local association a concise report of the information given by the various NSEA committees. Ninety-sev~n per cent of the delegates voted to support the ETV commission. The adoption of tenure by school boards was approved by 94% of the delegates. The NSEA Helpmobile Project is t o be continued. Among those on the 1965 staff will be Mr. Leland Sherwood of the Peru faculty. Dr. Siegner said, "Fifty-two and three-tenths per cent of the youth in Nebraska did not complete high school. Only 6.8% graduated from college."

Want to Sing? The college choir, under the direction of Mr. Hugh Thomas, is open to anyone interested in vocal training. This year the college choir presented the "Christmas Oratorio" in December. The organization also plans to present a Broadway musical in the spring.

Peru State Basketball Team

Stacy Vance, former superintendent of buildings and grounds, pad been with the college for forty-four years. Mr. Vance officially retired Dec. 31, 1964. "Stac" was born and reared in Peru. He received all of his education here. He was an industrial arts major and also played football for the college. After serving in World War I, Mr. Vance came back to Peru, where he started working for the college in the maintenance department. This was in 1920. He did a variety of jobs for the college maintenance department. One of the first jobs he did was to lay forms for the installation of the concrete bleachers at the Oak Bowl. At this time, coal was hauled by horses and wagons from the depot to the five man-fired boilers in the heating plant. Another job he did was to fire one of these boilers. In 1944, Mr. Vance was made Chief Engineer, and in 1950, he became superintendent of buildings and grounds. Since he started working, he says, "The campus has changed considerably. There have been a number of new buildings and many ground improvements."

On the first night of classes, students will meet with counselors in the Administration Building from 4:30 until 5:45. Classes will meet on a shortened schedule on opening night, following class enrollment, Dr. Melvin said.

Mr. Vance lives with his wife, Beulah, in Peru. He has one daughter, Betty, who is married to Mr. Calvin Frerichs of Groton, Massachusetts.

First period classes: Audio Visual Materials, Administration of School Libraries, First Aid, History of United States Since 1865, Speech Correction and Development, Romantic Period, Typewriting, C hi 1 d Development, Physical Science, Algebraic and Geometrical Concepts.

When asked about his future, Mr. Vance stated that he wanted to catch up on his fishing and hunting. Also, being a traveller at heart, he plans to do a lot of travelling within the next few years. Mr. Vance also talked about a trip back east next summer to visit his daughter and sonin-law. He plans to continue living in Peru.

Second period classes: Foundations of Education, Library Reading Guidance, Art Appreciation, Print Making, Health, Geography of Anglo-America, Labor and Industrial Relations, Introduction to Literature, Shakespeare.

MENC

Scholarships The Nebraska Congress of Parents and Teachers scholarships i>r second semester, 1965, have •.been awarded. Recipients are: >Oliver Bierman. Dorothy Bock, .!'homas Castle, Dianne Morrison, Baine Muller, Edwin Loontjer, h Tinkham, Joe Ward.

Stacy Vance Retires

·First Row, L.-R. John Chasse, LaVelle Hiizemann, Mike McCormick. Gordon Gustason, Bill Rinne, and John Alexander. Second Row, L.-R. Coach Al Wheeler, Dean Cain, Jack Rinne, Dick Estes, Ron Snodgrass, Mike Harmon, Bill WiUy, and Head Coach Jack Mcintire. Third Row, L.-R. Mike GuilliaU, Ron Kroll, Jim Jennings, Mike Smagacz. Lyle Bohannon, Bruce

Vickrey, and R<>sei: Capps.

On Monday, January 11, the Peru chapter of the MENC met in the Campus School auditorium. Mr. Robert Williamson, Auburn choral director, gave a demonstration on various problems of vocal music teaching and their solutions. Several members ofhis junior and senior high school choral groups assisted him.


Thirteenth Annual ELIZA MORGAN HALL

Schoolmen's Day路 On Janu,ary 30

MAJORS HALL

(Continued from page one) By Scheduled for January 30, the Ginny LaVelie event will give visitors opportunGrossman Hitzemann ity to visit classrooms, laboratories, residence halls, and other faWe trust everyone had a pleas- cilities during the afternoon. On Wednesday, Dec. 16, at ant and relaxing vacation. But A coffee hour is s<:heduled for 10:30 p.m., the Majors Hall counneedless to say it's time to. get 4 p.m., followed by a dinner at selors and officers sponsored the out those forgotten books and 5:30 p.m. The schoolmen will be fifth annual dol'lll Christmas parstudy for finals. guests at the Peru State-Wayne ty. Ron Peterson and Mert Finke The -latest question asked in State basketball game at 7:30. served the refreshments of fruit Morgan Hall: "What's your New <:ake and eggnog. Nearly everyYear's resolution?" Comments one attended the party. However, were: Pat Wheatley, junior, "To <:ake and punch were saved for keep on just as I've been doing." the basketball players who were Judy Beran, senior, "To quit at Blair. LSA smoking." Jo Ann Schultz, senThe LSA met in the basement On Thursday, Dec. 17, several ior, "To get my homework done of the Campus School on Jan. 6. on time." Wanda Anderson, Lonnie Bo~g led the group in boys departed from Majors Hall freshman, "To get all 'the publi- devotions. Dennis Flattre, the and Peru State College for two city I can in 1965." Marcia president, gave his report on the weeks. The group left about 9:30 Schaaf, sophomore, "To try and conference he attended at Valpa- 路 a.m. for Auburn to board a bus get a1ong with my roommate." raiso University this summer. headed for Kansas City. Here Kris Wewel, junior, "Why make Meeting was closed with prayer. they bbarded a plane and headed for home. From Thursday morn路 any? I wouldn't keep them any-oing until Friday evening the how." Brenda McCarthy, junior, KAPPA DELTA PI number of men left in the dorm "Not to envy others' possessions." Kappa Delta Pi met Jan. 4 in kept dwindling until everyone They always say that diamonds the Campus School Auditorium. had gone home. Singing goes better refreshed. are a girl's best friend. This held Joe Ward presided. Dorothy Bock true for a great beginning of was elected historian to fill a vaDon Schmidt had a wonderful And Coca-Cola -with that special zing_ 1965 for many girls. Engage- cancy caused by graduation. The Christmas vacation. He, his parbut never too sw~et ments over vacation were: Elaine program for the evening consist- ents, and his sister took a twoNeddenriep and Ron Peterson, ed of a group discussion, led by week trip into the South. They Phyllis Rebuck and Marvin Hop- Joe Ward, <:0ncerning means of visited his brother in Mississippi, per, Sherrie Hall and R o d strengthening Kappa Delta Pi. visited New Orleans, and attendReusch, Mary Hand and J i m Refreshments were served fol- ed the Nebraska-Arkansas Cotton things Bowl football game in Dallas. Shirmer, Diana Rieschick and Ed lowing the meeting. -oScholl, Nancy Check and Charles Dick Daigle has an interesting STUDENT WIVES CLUB Gordon, Connie Rademacher and hobby-collecting antique cars. Dick Haach, and Mary Sterner The Student Wives Club held Dick, who lives in Dracut, Mass., and Louis Prue. Best wishes girls. their first meeting this year on buys the old cars, fixes them up Birthday congratulations go to Jan. 6, 1965. and drives them in parades. The Easter project was decided Nancy Muse, Linda Combs, Wanon. It was decided to make toys Ted Compton has left Majors da Anderson, Mary Sterner, Carol Hinson, Bonnie Duncan, Anne and Easter gifts for children's Hall. Ted, who was married durhomes. The Beatrice State Home ing the Christmas va<:ation, is Epley, and Connie Hoschar. Bottled under the authorll)' of The Coca路Cola Company by: This year-1965-will be a suc- and the Martin Luther Home now living in the Oak Hi 11 s Nebraska City Coca-Cola Bottling Co. were suggested for this purpose. apartments east of the Oak Bowl. cess for the averfjge person if he During the first part of Februgets a little less than he wants, ary, the wives and their fa'!nilies books, a watch or some other but a little more than he dewill gather for a pot luck supper. item of value, is required for use serves. DELZELL This will be the second supper of the recreational equipment. held. New members of the club Mrs. Meritt stated that a certain HALL Newspapers always excite curi- are urged to attend. Mrs. Ellen Meritt, new director amount of flexibility was necesosity. No one ever lays one down of the Student Center, assumes sary in the interpretation of the At the next meeting, Marilyn By without a feeling of disappoint- Majors will present a film on the duties of scheduling all acti- rules governing the Student CenAnthony ment-Charles Lamb. vities and meetings that are to be ter. mentally , retarded children. It Lopes held in the Center. will be to the advantage of all In addition to her other duties, members to see this film. Her other duties include su- Mrs. Meritt serves as secretary of John Doyle of Delzell is the pervising the students use of the The wives are also considering proud owner of a new 1965 Ply- snack bar, game room and TV the Student Center board. Durstarting a basketball team. Pracmouth Barracuda. If you are lounge. Various equipment is ing her free hours, Mrs. Meritt is tices will be held on Wednesday "The Sfore of Standard wondering where he got the Bar- available through her office for a student on campus. She and her Brands" nights. Phone 274-3620 Aubum Recreation and refreshments racuda, John's parents gave it to use in the game room. A deposit, two daughters are residents of him for Christmas. followed the adjournment. usually in the form of keys, Peru. Tim Logsdon went hunting re<:ently and had a great afternoon. PERU PEDAGOGIAN He shot one squirrel, taking only 22 shots to kill it. STAFF Bruce Vickrey's wife is expecting a baby around Jan. 27. Bruce Dorothy Bock --------------------------------------Editor is ready to head home a!ter his Harvey Fisher --------------------------Personnel Manager Richard Berthold ----------------------------Sports Editor last final exam. Bruce is hoping Melanie Gould -----------------------------Feature Editor he can arrive home before the Lonn Pressnall ---------------------------Academic Editor baby. Janice Wilkinson ------------------------------Copy Editor During the semester break, Ron Rist --------------------------------------Copy Editor a group of boys from Delzell are Gary Schmucker -------------------------Business Manager planning a trip to Mexico. I have Ginny Grossman --------------------------Morgan Column been asked by the boys not to LaVelle Hitzemann ------------------------Majors Column print their names because they Anthony Lopes ____________________________ Delzell Column are afraid the Mexican authoriMike Chu ----------------------------------------Reporter ties might be alerted. Joan Dickman ------------------------------------Reporter Again it is Tim Logsdon in the Philip Dorssom -----------------------------------Reporter news. Tim also is the proud ownEugene Fitzpatrick -------------------------------Reporter er of a new car, a 1964 VolksMelvin Hester ------------------------------------Reporter wagen. Bernie Jarecke -----------------------------------Reporter Tom Loizeaux owns something Dan Knudsen ------------------------------------Reporter very special. His baseball spikes Robert Minks ------------------------------------Reporter once were worn by Milt Pappas Elaine Neddenriep --------------------------------Reporter of the Baltimore Orioles. Tom is Larry Piper --------------------------------------Reporter also a personal friend of Steve Charles Richards ---------------------------------Reporter Barber and Brooks Robinson of Mary Sautter ------------------------------------Reporter the same team. Tom was bat boy JoAnn Schultz -----------------------------------Reporter for Baltimore in 1961. His bigBeth Terwilleger ---------------------------------Reporter gest thrill, Tom says, was the March Tinkham ----------------------------------Reporter day he pitched batting practice Nol'llla Vfood -------------------------------------Reporter against the regular Baltimore George Zwickel ---------------------------------Reporter hitters. By

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Finals Dates Changed Mr. F. H. Larson, Peru State Co 11 e g e Registrar, announced that there will be changes in the final examination schedule for first semester. Tests will be given Jan. 21, 22, 25, 26, and 27. Tests were to be ·given from Jan. 25-29, but were changed to leave more time for second semester registration. Registration for second semester will begin on Monday, Feb. 1, and classes will begin on Tuesday, Feb. 2.

\\ Yo1.1 Ger 1tN 'A',100 ~ ''

Curriculum Enrichment? BY NORMA WOOD All teacher colleges supposedly prepare prospective elementary teachers for most of the expected and unexpected situations that arise. Despite all the courses available, a few of the most important are not offered at this or any other college. Some of the new courses that should be offered are: Educ. 451 Techniques in endurance sitting. Survey of methods of sitting in one position during pre-school workshops. Educ. 452 0 r g a n i z a t i o n and Management of Classrooms. Methods of cramming 36 desks in a room designed for 25. Educ. 453 Principles of Record K e e p i n g . Prerequisites: Elementary deciphering and s p e e d reading. Designed to supply th e teacher with new methods of interpreting the information on cumulative records. Educ. 454 Elementary 1u n c h room. Prerequisite: ear plugs and strong stomach. Of particular value ·to those who will be required to supervise lunchrooms. Educ. 455 What about parents? Techniques of meeting parents the first day, at the monthly PTA meeting a n d during parent-teacher confer-

ences. Educ. 456 Student-Teacher relat i o n s h i p s. How to smile from 8:00 to 4:00 each day. There are probably hundreds of other courses that could be included, but you'll never realize until you have finished the first year of teaching. Whoever said the teacher learns more the first year than the pupils, knew what he was talking about.

Vacation-time Campus BY DAN KNUDSEN During Christmas vacation, I had to return to Peru to complete some studies. The campus w a s almost empty. Many diff;rent and int\:resting sounds floated in 1 the air. • Several youngsters walked by on their way to the gym, dribbling a basketball. Their echoes resounded in the empty buildings. Students could be heard opening the door to the Library, trying to finish term papers before the vacation ends. Construction workers filled the air with sounds of building. Maintenance men could be heard washing and waxing floors before the students' return. Occasional professors could be heard working on lectures and grading the preChristmas exams. Office workers were typing forms and letters. Monday, Jan. 4, the campus took on renewed life. The students are back. Now sounds of hustling students fill the air. The Student Center buzzes with stories of vacation, but soon many of these sounds will fade, giving way to semester test studying.

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Original Writing Wanted For Sifting Sands Ernest Longfellow Is AVery Versatile Man BY LARRY PIPER Ernest (Ernie) Longfellow was born March 16, 1902 on a farm near Peru. He was graduated from Peru High School. Mr. Longfellow attended two years of college at the Peru State Normal School. Ernie moved to Arkansas in 1924. V{hile there, he married Granville Norris. In 1936, they moved to Peru where they have lived until the present. He came to work for the college on Jan. 1, 1953. Mr. Longfellow is a carpenter, plasterer, and mason for the college. The new eye-catching Peru State College name plate located in front of the Campus School was constructed by him. Some of his other projects are the bulletin board by the library, the ticket houses near the football field, the basement rooms in Eliza Morgan Hall and Delzell Hall, and many of the sidewalks on campus. All of the college furniture refurnishing is handled by him. His hobbies include hunting, nature study, and building things. He has been writing the Sportsman News column for the Nemaha County Herald for the past five years. Mr. Lo11gfellow has three sons. Jack, a graduate of Elon College, Burlington, N. C., is an electronic engineer with Western Electric Co. Stan, holder of A.B. and M.A. degrees from Peru State, is a teacher. David graduated from Peru State with an A.B. degree. All three boys were members of the National Honor Society at Peru Prep. At the present time, Ernie and Bob Henry are preparing a 100 year history of Peru State College. They plan to have it ready in time for the 1967 centennial of Peru State College.

Each year the English organizations on campus produce a publication entitled Sifting Sands. This publication serves as an outlet for the creative writing ability of Peru students. Material for this publication is not solely the contribution of Sigma Tau Delta and English club members, but may come from any student. Material for Sifting Sands is not restrictive as to type. Short stories, poems, essays-any type of written work is acceptable. The only restriction is that the work must be original. Any student having material for Sifting Sands is asked to get in touch with either Oliver Bierman, Oak Hill, or March Tinkham, Morgan Hall.

teach during the spring semester of 1965 will enroll on Thursday, Jan. 21. All other Peru students will enr6ll as the present schedule states.

ALUMNUS DEMONSTRATES CONDITIONING EXERCISES Bob Lade, 1954 Peru State College graduate gave a demonstration of conditioning through resistive exercises for Convocation Jan. 13. Mr. Lade used a device called the "Exer-Gini," which was developed by Dr. Dean Miller, a 1951 Peru graduate. The "Exer-Gini" is an instrument used to tone muscles isometrically and isotonically.

THE ORIGINAL

Student Teaching Areas During the spring semester of 1965, 51 Peru State College students will begin their student· teaching practice. There are also eight other Peru State students who will be eligible to practice teach this spring semester if they raise their grade average to five. This gives us a breakdown of: two in general science, three in English, 10 in history, 14 in men's physical education, four in women's physical education, one in geography, two in modern language, seven in industrial arts, one in home economics, one in speech, two in chemistry, two in biology, and one in social science. Students planning to student

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StateNorthwest rallied fromMissouri behind to Peru defeat State 66-64 in the game played at Maryville Jan. 13. The Bobcats, who trailed ·by as many as 15 points, were dawn at the half by a score of 32-20. John Chasse hit the basket to put Peru ahead for the first time 65-64, then added a free throw for the winning margin. Chasse finished with eight points. Mike Harmon paced the Bobcats with 19 points, followed by Ron Snodgrass who tallied 18 points. Joe Pierce was high for Northwest with 21.

'Cats Lose to Dana

Gymnastic Team Performs During the Saturday evening, Jan. 9, basketball game between Kearney and Peru, the Peru gymnastics team performed at halftime. Several individuals performed on the high bar and the rings. Those performing on the rings were Tim Hendricks and Joe Hertz. Performing on the high bar were Kathy Francis, Lee Pe-

terson, Royce Curtis, Weiss, and Joe Smith.

Intramural Scores

George

Dana handed the Peru Bobcats their third loss of the season Dec. 16' by a margin of 97-73. Peru took an e,arly lead only to discover the Vikings. dosing the gap. Individual errors by both teams were dominant throughout the first half. The game was deadlocked 45-45 at halftime after Dick Estes missed a free throw in the final second. Dana's Ken Kemmish added a basket immediately in the second half to boost the Vikings ahead. The Bobcats closed the margin in the final quarter prior to the Vikings last quarter surge. With a combination of double pointers and free throws, D a n a added their winning 24 pQints. Ron Snodgrass paced the Bobcats with 20 points followed by John Alexander with 18. Ken Kemmish collected 34 points for Dana, 12 points coming from free throws.

Tigers Beat Bobcats

In Ho1·1day Tournament Doane College captured the Doane scoring attack with 23 championship of the Beatrice points, followed by Dennis NelHoliday Tournament with an sen with 21. Peru State's Dean 85-78 win over Peru State. The Cain led the Bobcat scoring from Tiger victory was the first win his guard position with 17 points. In the consolation game, Cenfor Doane over Peru State in their last 13 meetings, the second tral Methodist successfully emDoane-Peru game in the 1956-57 ployed a closing minutes fullseason. In the consolation round, court press to overtake and deCentral Methodist College, of feat the Tarkio Owls. The Owls Fayette, Mo., copped third place ran to a seven-point lead early with a hair raising 103-99 victory in the game and maintained the advantage throughout all but the over Tarkio (Missouri) College. final three minutes of play. The A fine display of ball handling Eagles of Central Methodist Coland sharp shooting enabled the lege scorers were led by sophoDoane Tigers to hold on to a narmore forward, Alan Miller, talrow lead throughout most of the lying 27 points. This effort gave championship game. Miller the scoring honors for a Peru challenged several times single game in the tournament. in late game action, tieing t h e Doane and Pe~u advanced: to scete four times in the last 15 the finals of the Beatrice tourney minutes of play. Each challenge with red hot performances on was met and successfully Monday night. Doane manhanshrugged off with the Tigers dled Central Methodist 106-80 showing the poise and ability to and Peru raced past Tarkio 119hold their ·grip on the winner's 81 to break the Bobcats' previous laurels. scoring record of 118 points, set Senior Craig Kelly led the against Doane in 1960.

Coach Stemper reported that the first four rounds of intramural basketball were completed Jan. 11. The Misfits, Emperors, and Glunks have won four games to tie for first position. The team positions are: Playmakers 2-2 Misfits 4-0 Centennials 1-3 Emperors 4-0 Louts 1-3 Glunks 4-0 Duds 1-3 Road Runners 3-1 Worcesterites 2-2 Beavers 0-4 Playboys 2-2 Ram Raiders 0-4 The Misfits won their op_ener in the second roflnd robin agirhst the Beavers Jan. 5. The opening scores for the second round were: BY CHARLES RICHARDS Beavers 26 Misfits 49 There are 39 trophies located Glunks 49 Playmakers 46 We're partners Duds 31 Road Runners 39 in the Bobcat trophy case. In adwith Cupid in Centennials 35 Worcesterites 32 dition to these trophies there are seeking to further your The point standings for football 12 plaques and two cups. The romantic efforts. In fact and volleyball have been com- earliest trophy is a cup which ours is the first stop after the Bobcats received in H>24 for she has said yes. And you pleted. The scoring for the overbasketball. The most recent ones ,can be sure that we have all champioriship in intramural represent the NCC championyour interests at heart in play is that the team which finships in basketball and baseball providing the very utmost ishes .first in each sport will score in 1963. for your diamond dollar. ten points. The ,team scoring secThese trophies represent five ond will collect nine points. Each sports and one organization. They team following will score points are divided among the various Loveliest that balance with their position. of styles sports and organization as foiThe point standings after intrain new lows: 22 for basketball, eight for diamond mural football and volleyball are: bridal sets. football, nine for track, two for F.B. V.B. Total baseball, one for swimming, and 9 9 18 Misfits $!~650 one for the band which particiWorcesterites 10 8 18 Easy Ter1111 pated in the 1955 centennial 8 6 14 Emperors parade. ' Other sets from $29.50 up 12 6 6 Duds Many of these trophies were 7 10 3 Louts Diamonds shown evenings by national honors. The majority of 10 10 Road Runners appointment. them are for district and state 3 8 Glunks honors. 6 6 Playmakers In 1939 the Bobcats, led by 1 4 5 Beavers Coach Al Wheeler, f i n is he d AUBURN 3 0 3 Ram Raiders fourth in the national basketball 3 3 Playboys championship tournament held in Kansas City. This is the highest that any Bobcat basketball NEBRASKA CITY team has ever finished in a national tournament. JAN. 17-18-19-20 SUNDAY-WEDNESDAY The Bobcats were NCC basketball champs in 1948-50, '58, '59 and '61-'63. The basketball team also was District 11 champion from 1961-63, and represented the district in the national tournament held in Kansas City. The football team was the NIAA champ in 1940. The team captured NCC honors in '49, '51'53, and in '61. The baseball team topped the conference standings in 1962 and 1963. .

Packed Trophy Cases Testimonials to Peru's Great Sports Record

ROURKE JEWELRY

PIONEER

SPORTS ROUNDUP. By Dick

Berthold Dana clipped the Peru Bobcats 97-73 Dec. 16, giving the Bobcats their third loss of the season. After a 45 tie at halftime, Dana widened the gap in the final seven minutes, starting with a 72-69 lead. Dana collected on 53.7 per cent of their field attempts, but Dana's 65.7 per cent on free throws was the winning asset. The Bobcats finished runner-up in the Beatrice Holiday Tournament Dec. 29-30. The Doane Tigers edged past Peru 85-78 for · first place in the deciding contest. Tarkio, leading throughout the consolation game, was over-powered by Central Methodist's full court press in the final three minutes and finished in the cellar. Peru fell victim to a balanced Kearney squad Jan. 9 to start the new year before an estimated crowd of 800 spectators. Kearney's triumph smothered the winning hopes of Peru's opening Nebraska College Conference engagement. The Bobcats collected 70 per cent on free throws while the Antelopes hit 77 per cent. Individual statistics were: Free Goals throws Total Estes --------- 8 3-5 19 Rinne -------- 7 0-0 14 Harmon ______ 6 3-4 15 Witty -------0-0 2 Snodgrass ____ 3 4-6 10 Chasse ------- 0 1-1 3-4 13 Cain ---------- 5 Alexander ____ 2 4 0-0 Personal and team mistakes have jeopardized the Bobcats in many close contests. Coach McIntire stated, "The Bobcats can go a long way this season if some of the passing and defensive errors can be ironed out." Gary Fisher, a tp.nior at Hastings College, set new NCC records in his passing performance against Wayne State. Fisher passed 65 times and completed 31 for 436 yards and four touchdowns. The Bronco squad named their mythical All-Opponent team

which included players from Kearney, Wayne, Peru, and Nebraska Wesleyan. At the end positions were Dwight Tietjen of Wesleyan and Larry McCord of Kearney. Gary Palmer of Wayne and Mick Pierce of Wesleyan were selected at the tackle positions. At guards were Bernie Brown of Peru and Bob Kruse of Wayne. Ed Kruml of Kearney was selected the best opposing center. Mike Slatinsky of Wesleyan was . voted the top ·quarterback. Bill Backes of Kearney and Van Steckelberg of Wayne were named at the halfback positions. Burt Matthies of Wayne completed the backfield choice at fullback.

Cagers Drop Conference Opener to Kearney The Peru Bobcats lost a heartbreaking conference opener to Kearney 81-78, Jan. 9. The Bobcats raced back in contention during the second half after trailing by 18 points. Jack Rinne collected 14 points, most of them scored during the second half, to spark the Bobcat rally. Kearney, paced by the accurate shooting of Larry Martin and Bob Whitehouse, had a 12 point lead in the first half. Peru, hampered b: 1 bad breaks, managed to cut the margin 42-35 at half. Bill Holiday and Martin widened the lead for Kearney during the opening minutes of the second half with good outside shooting. At this time, Coach McIntire installed substitutes Jack Rinne and John Chasse. With more desire and hustle, the Bobcats began cutting Kearney's lead. With six minutes left, Peru trailed 64-63. Ray Cain took control of the ball after Kearney lost possession on a traveling violation and sank a 30 foot jump shot to put the Bobcats ahead for the first time. The game was finally decided after Kearney collected on their last seven straight free throws. The game's high scorer was Larry Martin of Kearney with 21 points. Dick Estes collected 19 points for the Bobcats before fouling out.


DL Christ Heads NCC BY DICK BERTHOLD

aff Photographers re Essential

Peru Campus Has "Living Fossils"

With photography becoming ineasingly i m BY LARRY PIPER rtant in comIf anyone is looking for "livunications, a ing fossils," he has no need to go 11 staff of farther than the nearest Ginkgo otograp h e rs - tree. Peru State College is fortunoot pictures ate enough to have three such r the Pedagotrees. One is located east of the an and Peruvian. Heading the greenhouse. The other two are ff of four photographers is located near the walk between ert Finke. Mert uses a Yashica the Science Hall and the new lliflex in his work and received Administration-Fine Arts Builds training through photography ing that is being constructed. urses instructed by Dr. ~iegner. These trees were planted by Dr. Working under Mert are Eu- John Christ about eighteen years ene Fitzpatrick, Mel Hester, and ago. The Ginkgo Biloba is the oldest Bernard J a r ecke. Eugene tree known to man. It is a survivFitzpatrick uses or of the Ice Ages. Only by being both a Speed completely free of disease and inGraphic and a sect pests, and being able to vtith3 5mm Motor- stand almost any climate condition has it survived: over a million years. It remains troubleived from working two years free and is the answer for shade ith the Omaha Photo Shop, tree planting in practically all of lus acting as a freelance photog- the United States. These prehistoric trees can be apher for another year. found in most temperate regions. Mel Hester uses a 35mm Leica The maidenhair tree, as it is n taking his commonly known, has been culictures. T h e tivated for centuries in Asiatic reater part of gardens. From these gardens, it i s experience has been transported to the omes from United States. Many parks and orking at cities in this country have lined hotography as their boulevards with this tree. hobby. This type of tree is a mediumBernie Jarecke, who also re- fast growing tree and will make eived his training under Dr. an oval-upright shaped tree. It iegner, uses a 35mm Prakitca. will reach a height of 50 to 60 ernie does a major portion of feet. The rich green foliage has he dark room work for the staff. a unique fan shaped' leaf which Bernie was absent when pictures turns to a golden-yellow in late of the photographers were made. fall.

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Many Scholarships Are Available For Students of Peru State College

Dr. John C. Christ, head of the division of science and matheBY RICHARD BERTHOLD matics at Peru State, was elected president of the Nebraska ColOver 50 scholarships are availlege Conference at the fall meet- able annually at Peru State Coling in November, 1964. EacJ:\ se- lege. Students with a high six or mester the board meets, and ad- seven GPA have an excellent opditional meetings are called for portunity to receive a scholarspecific urgencies. ship if all qualifications are fulThe NCC is an organization filled and approved. During 1964, which administers the athleti~ over fifty per cent of the recipiprograms of Peru State College, ents received scholarships. StuChadron State College, Kearney dents should apply at the earliest State College, Wayne State Col- date possible regardless of the lege, and Hastings College. The possibilities. Each student should NCC was organized in 1946 by complete an application form and many prominent persons, includ- apply for a general scholarship, ing Charles Foster of Kearney, unless requested otherwise, since Ross Armstrong of Chadron, Al any of the scholarships could be Wheeler of Peru, and Tom Mc- granted. Laughlin of Hastings. There are three distinct cateIn addition to the athletic di- gories of scholarships presented rectors of the member colleges, at Peru State. Different organizathere is a committee of faculty tions, as the Nebr. PTA, gr ant representatives. Although coach- their scholarships through the sees may recommend and advise, lection of their organization. The only the faculty representatives second category is composed of cast votes. The present faculty funds allocated to the Peru representatives are: Dr. John C. Achievement Foundation by inChrist of Peru, president; Dr. dividuals to be granted by a facRussell M. Owen of Wayne, vice- ulty committee. These scholarpresident; Mr. Dale Ingram of ships usually include individual Kearney, secretary-treasurer; Mr. grants as the Endres Scholarship D. M. Burkhiser of Chadron; and and August Eggenberger MemorMr. James Standley of Hastings. ial; and by organizational grants The original intention of the s u ch as the Bath Memorial, NCC was to have all small col- Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben, and E. C. leges in Nebraska as members. and M. M. Beck English scholarEarlier the membership included ships. The third category consists Concordia, Dana, Doane, Mid- of scholarships awarded by variland, Wesleyan, and York. Many ous departments as the foreign of the smaller colleges found it language department, White Anincreasingly difficult to compete gels, and Blue Devils. successfully w i t h the larger Individuals, groups, service and schools and withdrew. The Tri- professional organizations an d state Conference was organized . businesses have provided funds and attracted many of the small- for scholarships administered er schools. An attempt is being through the Peru Achievement made to a 11 ow non-member Foundation. These scholarships schools to participate in some provided by the Peru Achievesports. At present, a member ment Foundation are: school must participate in all maPearl Kenton Foreign Lanjor sports. guage. The NCC recognizes football, Louise Mears Geography. basketball, baseball, track, golf, Nebraska St ate Educational cross country, tennis, swimming, Association, Peru Local. and wrest Ii n g. Championship Alpha Mu Gamma Foreign trophies are awarded in these Language, Freshman with a proareas. jected concentration in Language Peru has been awarded many White Angels. NCC trophies in the past. KearCharles P. Weigand, For a ney recently has dominated foot- senior student. ball and track because of the Women's Athletic Association. larger enrollments. Dr. Christ Morton House Kitchens of Nestated, "The NCC participants braska City, four year, for girl exhibit a good brand of ball." majoring in Home Ee. The next NCC board meeting Fletcher Neal Memorial. will be next May in Kearney. Peru V.F.W. Auxiliary. The State Track Meet will be at Clear Lake, Iowa Chamber of that time. Commerce (Miss Iowa Contest). Iowa Girls HS Athletic Union. Plattsmouth Mrs. Jaycees. Mrs. R. W. Endres, two male students who are entering the teaching profession. August Eggenberger Memorial. Bath Family Memorial. The 1965 edition of Peru State's

New Format For 1965 Peruvian

yearbook the Peruvian, will handle its materials differently this year. Past issues of the yearbook were divided into sections, each one concerning one facet of college activities. This year, Editor Harvey Fisher is arranging campus events in chronological order. The Peruvian staff has submitted 8(} pages to the American Yearbook Co. of Topeka, Kansas. When complete, the Peruvian will contain over 130 pages of events, organizations, and student pictures. The yearbook will be completed and ready for distribution the last week in May. A supplement to the book will be sent out during the summer that will cover events that happen after the spring deadline.

Peru Achievement Foundation. Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben, two Nebraska residents. E. C. & M. M. Beck, English major, preferably with athletic ability. Nemaha Co. Extension Club. Nebraska City Chamber of Commerce, Women's Division. Nebraska Grand Order of Eastern Star. Jess A. Harris Memorial. P-Club Gold Star. The Foreign Student Scholarships are four year scholarships awarded annually to qualified undergraduate students who are citizens of foreign countries. Candidates for such scholarships must present proof of ability to defray expenses other than tuition and fees. Applications must be filed no later than June 1, prior to fall entrance. The Pearl A. Kenton Foreign Language Scholarship was established by Miss Alice Kenton in memory of her sister, Miss Pearl A. Kenton, associate professor of foreign languages from 1924 to 1944. This grant provides for an annual award: of $5(} to an outstanding student in the foreign language department. The Zelma R. Wonderly Scholarship was provided by the late Zelma R. Wonderly, elementary supervisor from 1950-59. This fund provides for an annual award of $50 to the outstanding second grade student teacher. The Nebraska Congress of Parents and Teachers Scholarships are granted by the Nebraska Congress of Parents and Teachers to full time students of the Nebraska State Colleges who are Nebraska residents training to become teachers. In order to be eligible for these scholarships which vary in funds, the student must have a pleasing personality, have high moral and social standards, and show an aptitude for teaching. These scholarships are given the second semester only. The Cooperating School Scholarships are available to graduates of cooperating schools in the teacher preparation program in the ratio of one scholarship to each five student teachers. The scholarship has a value of $400 which applies at the rate of $50 per semester of attendance. Information concerning scholarships administered through the Peru Achievement Foundation may be secured from Dr. Harold Boraas, dean of students.

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Joe Oh, Peru's First Korean Student BY MARCH TINKHAM College is the .Place to meet people and get away from home. Students travel across counties, states, and nations, to collect in youth communities known as campuses. Some students even cross the globe before settling in the campus which shall be home for the ne:id four years. Most nation-hopping college students never penetrate into the interior of the new na_tion, but settle along its coasts; consequently, few have found their way to Peru. Among those few who have made t h e i r way through the hills and oaks to this spot along the Missouri is the first Korean in Peru's history, Chaisan Oh. Around Peru Chaison is more commonly known as Joe. Joe first heard of Peru through the United States Information Service in Seoul, which described Peru's location "in the heart of midwestern America" and its distinction as '~the oldest college in Nebraska." The fact that Peru was a small college influenced his decision to come here as he felt it would be easier to adjust to new circumstances in a small place. Joe's home is in Seoul where he has two older brothers and three sisters. Before corning to the U.S., Joe completed. four years college in Korea and spent three years in the Korean Air Force. He is now a second semester freshman majoring in biology. One of the things which struck Joe as strange when he first reached America was the difference in table customs. The only utensils to which he was accustomed. were chopsticks and the spbon. W hi 1e we westerners might think he would have found our knife and fork easier to handle, this was not so. Our foods,

All About Convos BY MARCH TINKHAM

Campus To Campus BY BETH TERWILLEGER At several different colleges, proposals for a Work-Study Plan have been submitted to the federal government for approval. The work-study program is designed to give part-time jobs to students who might otherwise be unable to attend college because of financial difficulties or those who might be forced to drop out for the same reason. The proposal is sponsored under the antipoverty law. Recent reports show that the honor chapel attendance at Hastings College is not working satisfactorily. Absences range fr om 160 to 180 each assembly. The honorary system was set up for a trial run. The State Normal Board has approved a $1,782,500 building budget for Wayne State. Coming out of the budget will be $1,500,000 for a new sdence building and $90,000 to complete and furnish the new Fine Arts Building. Chadron State has received word from the State Normal Board that seven of their fifteen projected projects have been approved. Included in these are replacement of utility lines, improvement of electrical lines, a new boiler, and safety proposals set up by the state fire marshal.

Musicians, two space engineers, several scared students, a dancer, some faculty members, and the queen of the Mighty Mo., Cleo, The Hound have all trod the stage at this year's convocations. Except for the queen's unscheduled debut, all these appearances resulted from planning done by the Student Center Board. This Board, composed of nine student members and two faculty members, is headed by James D. Levitt. Except in rare cases, it plans all convos. In deciding what is seen and when, the Board's two main considerations are the college's general schedule and the cost involved. Dates nationally set aside to honor certain intoo, seemed strange to Joe. Ko- stitutions also influence the prorean food on the whole is much grams. National Education Week spicier than ours. Red peQPers in . and National Music Educators' particular are used frequently. Week have already been obOne food which is a winter fa- served:. Mr. Levitt has commentvorite of Koreans is "kimchi." ed that observance of all weeks This hot dish, bearing only a of this nature is attempted., but, faint resemblance to our sauer- "We haven't managed Cheese kraut, is made of cabbage, fruit, Week yet." red peppers, and other spices. Joe Convocations fall into two catesays any westerner first eating gories: special programs and bud"kimchi" or most Korean food get events. The special programs would find himself desiring "a are those which depend upon kettle of water." student organizations and camBesides Peru, Joe has se€n Chi- pus activities. Budget events are cago, Cleveland, New York and booked through the Pryor-Menz Pittsburgh while in the U. S. This Concert Service, a theatrical summer he was able to visit the booking agency in Iowa. When booking events for conWorld's Fair. Joe has managed to keep from being too homesick by vo, the Student Center Board trying not to think of home too tries to select a good cross section often. While he has not been of varioi.ls types of programs. home yet, Joe does intend to re- Jazz trios and classical musicians, turn before completing his Amer- actors and puppets, dancers and ican education. When he does lecturers have all found their return to Korea for good, it will way to Peru in the past. Th e be as a fully qualified physician. Board also likes to book proAbout his decision to attend grams of a nature not available Peru, Joe says it has proven "not in this area. Convocation and budget events foolish," for it has afforded him many opportunities to me4_ and have been a part of Peru for a long time. Chapel was once held associate with Americans. every morning. A 1944 Pedagogian reports that skips of Monday and Friday convos were becoming a problem. Now the Student Center Board is shooting for an average of two convos per month over the whole year, and the student body groans from over-culture.

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On Thursday, January 14, 1965, thirty Peru State students traveled to Lincoln, Nebraska. The purpose of the trip was to visit the Nebraska State Penal Complex and the Whitehall Home for delinquent children. A panel of four members, Ron Wiksell, George Zwfokel, Judy Strange, and Linnea Ingwerson, delivered informative speeches on the main points of interest prior to the class trip. Each of these panel members had visited one of these institutions to obtain information for the entire class. Mr. and Mrs. Van Pelt and Mr. Leland Sherwood accompanied the group.

English Club announces opening of the Freshman E Contest. This contest is open all freshmen and those enro in freshman English classes. deadline for essays will be Ma 15, 1965. The papers should submitted to English profes or Lonn Pressnall, English C and Sigma Tau Delta presi Rules pertaining to the con will be posted in all fres English classes.

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The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks .· ..

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To 1965

ie

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 60

Number 8

JANUARY 25. 1965

Marl'il,-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

10Uld

Band Ensemble Entertains Convo

reshman Writing ontest Rules

Entries in the Freshman Essay Contest sponsored by English lub and Sigma Tau Delta may now be submitted. Any student ~!!!!!!~l~iassified as a freshman and any tudent currently enrolled in English Laboratory, English 101, -0r English 102 are eligible. Any type of prose may be en;ka tered in the cDntest-descriptive, ;;a;;;;;;;;;;;;ljnarrative, expository, argumen!!'.'!~--.l·tative. However, the documented research paper is not eligible. The papers will be judged by a committee selected from the membership of English Club and Sigma Tau Delta, with one faculty member who will serve as chairman. The judges will contCE sider neatness, correctness of mechanics, organizatiDn, style, and content. Prizes will be awarded. Entries may be submitted to the English instructors or Lonn Pressnall. The closing date of the contest is March 15, 1965. md

A concert .by the Peru State College Band Ensemble was featured at an all-college convocation Wednesday, January 20. The winter performance was under the direction of Mr. Gilbert Wilson. A trumpet trio was featured at the morning concert. Dale Duensing, Odell; Ralph Shaffer, New Market, Iowa; and Tom Majors, Peru, presented "Bravura for Trumpets," by Morrissey. Other selections for the concert included "Variations on a Shaker Theme," by Copland, featuring Sharon Johnson, Auburn, at the xylophone, and Mary Lu Hicks, Stella, at the piano; "Storm King March," by Finlayson; selections from "My Fair Lady," by Lowe; "Two Pieces for Band," by Dedrick; selections from "Music Man," by Willson, and "Prelude and Fugue in B-flat Major," by Bach.

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S.G.A. Very Active Builders Make Progress On Campus Buildings Reg1s. tra t.ion Construction To Be Eight Students New Faces To Be Completed By Aug. I Are Awarded Seen On Campus pTA Scholarshl.pS

This year the S.G.A. was in charge of freshman initiation. After initiation was completed, the S.G.A. came up with several BY LARRY PIPER suggested changes to i m p r o v e initiation for next year, Also, On June 1, 1964, the Beall Conearly in the year, the S.G.A. struction Company of Lincoln, sponsored Homecoming. EveryNebraska, began work on three one was pleased with the way new building projects on the the day's activities were recampus. Under supervision of ceived. Superintendent Hugh Beall, there The S.G.A. has been continuing are thirty men working on these the Sunday night movie schedbuildings. ule. Attendance has not been too At a cost of $500,000 a new great, but large enough to warrant extension of the program. Fine Arts Center will be erected. The S.G.A. is also in charge of This building will be 75.3 feet the weekend recreation program. wide by 171.3 feet long. The MuA fact that many people may not sic Department, Art Department, know is that the S.G.A. sponsors and Language Arts Department the cheerleaders. They hold the will be located in this building. elections and furnish money for On the first floor there will be their outfits and transp-0rta tion. two classrooms and offices for the This year a special S.G.A. com- Language Arts Department. A .mittee turned in a comprehen- recording room with three listensive report on the Pedagogian. It ing stations is also connected included constructive criticism with this department. Three offor nearly every aspect of the fices and two classrooms will be Ped. In the future such a com- located on the sec-0nd floor. mittee is going to look into stanA choir room, band room, six dards on the Peru State campus. studios and nine private practice Other future plans of the rooms will take up part of the S.G.A. include a migration to building. A concert hall with a Hastings on February 20. The seating capacity of over 200 adds S.G.A. is attempting to coordito the importance of the buildnate a road show. This would be ing. a college talent show to be sent The addition to Majors Hall to other colleges in the near viplus the addition to the Student cinity. The S.G.A. has been sending Center will cost $645,000. members to high school visitaMajors Hall will be able to actions and is hosting high school commodate 128 more men when students who visit the campus on it is completed. On the first floor weekends. The S.G.A. also plans a game room will be available. A to help with the interscholastic storage and equipment room will contest held in March. be located on the first floor.

Student Art Display '

A display of student art work will be held in the north hallway of the Campus School. The display is scheduled for January 30, in connection with the thirteenth annual Schoolmen's Day program at Peru State College. Work completed by students of Miss Norma Diddel will be on display.

When work is completed at the Student Center, the cafeteria will be able to accommodate 123 more people at the same time. This will increase the present serving capacity by one-third. In addition to this, there will be t w o large private rooms, a new loading dock, special room for the bakery, and increased space in the kitchen. The building progress has been

• •

Dr. Harold Boraas, Dean of Students, has announced the names of eight students who have been awarded P.T.A. Scholarships for second semester, 1965. The scholarship recipients are : Oliver Bierman, a junior majoring in English; Dorothy Bock, a junior majoring in English; Tom Castle, a senior English major; Dianne Morrison, a freshman elementary major; Elaine Muller, a senior elementary major; Ed Loontjer, a senior majoring in industrial arts; March Tinkham, a sophomore majoring in English; and Joe Ward, a senior majoring in .chemistry. The Nebraska Congress of Parents and Teachers an nu a 11 y awards scholarships to full-time students of the state colleges who are Nebraska residents training to become teachers. Recipients must have a pleasing personality, have high moral and social standards and show an aptitude for teaching. Winners are selected through an application form and several letters of recommendation . In addition to financial assistance, the P.T.A. -0ffers encour· agement to scholarship recipients. Mrs. Karl Janecek, Chairman of the Scholarship Committee, in her letter to the winners, says, "We commend y-0u foryour decision to enter this very important profession and wish you every success. We are glad to assist you in even a small way in attaining your goal." rapid because of the exceptionally nice weather. Very few work days have been lost. At the present pace, the buildings are to be completed by August of this year.

As second semester registration begins, many new faces will be seen in the lines. Tentatively, there will be 44 new students enrolling. Thirty-two of these have been cleared, while 10 are pending additional information. Two prospective students have sent only limited information. Also, there are 21 students who are returning to Peru's campus. Of the possible 65 new and returning students, 35 are freshman, 11 are sophomores, 15 are juniors, and two are seniors. There is o n e post-graduate student. The majority of the students are from Nebraska, with 45. Iowa is second with seven, followed by Kansas with four. New York, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania each have two, while Illinois, Connecticut, and Korea have one each. Physical education and business are in the lead as far as expected enrollment is concerned. '·They each have 10. History follows with nine, with elementary education having seven. Math and social science are tied with four. English, biology, and industrial arts all have two, and speech, chemistry, music, and pre-veterinary all have one. There are 10 prospective students undecided.

Eleven Alumni Get Doctorates In '62-'63 The National Research Council has sent a report of Peru State College graduates who received doctoral degrees during 1962 and 1963. They are: Loren N. Argabright, PSC class of '54, from U of Kansas in mathematics; Mary Alice Engles '30, from U of Nebraska in secondary education; James JVL Gleason '50, from U of Nebraska in elementary education & supervision; (C{)Iltinued on page two)

Registration for the second semester of the 98th academic year at Peru State College is scheduled for February 1 and 2, according to F. H. Larson, registrar. Classes will begin at 7:30 a.m. February 3. Seniors and post graduates will register between 3:30 and 10:30 a.m., with juniors scheduled from that hour until noon. Sophomores will begin registering at 2 p.m. Freshman and special students are scheduled to register Tuesday, February 2, beginning at 3:30 a.m.

Present indications are that the second semester enrollment will be down slightly from the 866 enrolled for the first semester. Twenty-seven students will complete degree requirements at the close of the present semester.

Bohlken Speaks To Peru PSEA Mr. Robert Bohlken, instructor of English on this campus, w as the featured speaker at the Peru State E du c at i o n Association meeting held Jan. 18, in the college auditorium. Mr. Bohlken has the distinction of being the first president of the PSEA when it was organized on this campus in 1958. The benefits of wide participation in the association were emphasized by Mr. Bohlken. President Tom Castle urged all members to attend the spring convention held March 19 and 20 on the Kearney State College campus. Coming programs will include a panel discussion on problems encountered by student teachers. Members of the panel will include those persons recently returning from their practice teaching. In April Mrs. Anne Campbell will be the guest speaker. Mrs. Campbell is a registered lobbyist for education in the Nebraska legislature.


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Doctorates In '62-'63 Eleven Alumni Get

DELZELL

MAJORS

HALL

(Continued from page one)

HALL

By

Roger M. Haigh '57, from U of Florida in history; Harland E. Heilig '30, from Rutgers U in secondary edu<:ation; Merle L. Lange '55, from Colorado State College in guidance & counseling; Wilbur F. Schindler '29, from U of Nebraska in secondary administration & supervision; Nels A. Sullivan '37, from U of Nebraska in educational administration & supervision;· L. Fred Thomas '51, irom U of Arizona in secondary administration & supervision; Wm. L. Vacek '52, from Colorado State College in industrial arts, and Donald D. Wendt '55 from U of Missouri in vocational education.

By

Anthony Lopes

By the end of the semester Delzell Hall will be minus a few of its occupants. Among those planning to leave are Harold Connor, Bob Krofta, and John Doyle. Both Harold and Bob are planning to move into apartments next semester. The dorm will really miss Bob because he is one of the dorm councilors on the first floor. John Doyle is moving out for another reason. His parents recently having moved into Mr. Pilkington's old house. John and his parents plan to· have apartments for students to live in next semester. Doug Dierks now holds th e record for staying under the shower longer than any other student at Peru State. On Saturday, Jan. 16, Doug· stood soaking in the shower a total of four hours and thirty-eight minutes. Doug said that he challenges anyone to break his record.

Campus To Campus

q

ELIZA MORGAN HALL

By Ginny Grossman

"The calm before the storm" is an apt description of Morgan Hall, as the girls prepare for finals. Everyone is now getting ready for tests, second semester, and planning her class schedule.

BY BETH TERWILLEGER

Fourteen of the girls will be Midland Lutheran College's leaving the dorm at the semesnew science complex is halfway ter. They are Bonnie Duncan, finished. Features of the new Sherry Hall, Arlene Anderson, building are a 300-capacity audi- Judi Whigham, Cheri Combs, torium, six research laboratories, Linda Combs, Peggy O'Neill, three permanently mounted tele- Rhea Reid, Marjorie Williss, scopes, a photographic dark room, Carol Thorton, Marjorie Price, and a high fidelity sound system Judy Strange, Sheryl Gawart, and Darla Obbink. in the planetarium. In plans next year for Kearney State are possible Saturday classes. Also classes will begin at 7:30 and end at 5:30 on all other days. Plans are being made, financially and academically, to enlarge Creighton University's Tutor Corps. More than 200 college students are helping to stem t he school drop-out rate by tutoring youngsters. Enrollment at Kearney State next fall is expected to be around 3,900. Two new dormitories, one men's and one women's, are slated to be built from student fullds and rentals.

A new game called "Categories" is being played in the dorm. Maggie Slayter "invented" the game, but has lost eve~ time. She is still trying to win. He r motto is, "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again." Congratulations go to Kris Wewel and Dom LaRocca who became "officially" engaged January 5. Advice to Morgan Hall girls while taking finals: You cannot always be sure when some people wish you luck which k i n d they mean.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF

Dorothy Bock --------------------------------------Editor Harvey Fisher --------------------------Personnel Manager Richard Berthold ----------------------------Sports Editor Melanie Gould -----------------------------Feature Editor Lonn Pressnall ---------------------------Academic Editor Janice Wilkinson ______________________________ Copy Editor Ron Rist --------------------------------------Copy Editor Gary Schmucker -------------------------Business Manager Ginny Grossman __________________________Morgan Column LaVelle Hitzemann ________________________ Majors Column Anthony Lopes ----------------------------Delzell Column Mike Chu ----------------------------------------Reporter Joan Dickman ------------------------------------Reporter Philip Dorssom -----------------------------------Reporter Eugene Fitzpatrick -------------------------------Reporter 1!elvin Hester ------------------------------------Reporter Bernie J<irecke -----------------------------------Reporter Dan Knudsen ------------------------------------Reporter Robert Minks ------------------------------------Reporter Elaine Neddenriep --------------------------------Reporter Larry Piper --------------------------------------Reporter Charles Richards ---------------------------------Reporter Mary Sautter ------------------------------------Reporter JoAnn Schultz -----------------------------------Reporter Beth Terwilleger ---------------------------------Reporter March '.finkham ----------------------------------Reporter Norma ·Wood -----~------------------------------Reporter George Zwickel ----------------------------------Reporter

-

LaVelle Hitzemann'

Majors Hall is· aware of the semester break coming soon. The talk of semester exams is one indication of this. Another sign is the last-minute cleaning of rooms. Majors Hall would like to begin the second semester on a happy note with all rooms newly cleaned. C 1e a n in g procedures consist of scrubbing and waxing the floor. Friday, Jan. 15, was a day of hazardous driving conditions. Several Peru Staters undoubtedly became aware of this on their · journey home from ·Peru. Some did not even leave Peru before they learned of the icy condition;;. Leland Sink was driving his car north from Delzell Hall when he hit an icy spot in the street. His car veered off the street and over an embankment. Neither he nor his two companions, Alan Rothe or Phillip Stroy, received any injuries. Damage was done to the right front fender and bumper of the car. The semester ends Jan. 29. This date is also the graduation date of Larry Giesmann and Bill Scott. Bill is now student teaching in Plattsmouth, while Larry is putting the finishing touches on his courses. However, three of the men now student teaching will be back with us next semes. ter. They are Dan Leuenberger and Marv Corbin, now in Beatrice, ancJ. Ed Meyer, now in Bellevue.

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Don Carlile of Special Services received the following letter from Mrs. Richard Monroe, Peru graduate now living in Falls City.

Daily-9:00 to 5:30 Thurs. and Sat., 9:00 to 8:30

14 January 1965 824 E. 17th St. Falls City, Nebr. Dear Don, Peru scores again! Seven years ago, Mr. Jindra taught an offcampus class down here in Falls City. Mustc Appreciation. I was in that class. Now, seven years later, Radio Station WOW phoned me (and got me out of bed) 7:30 a.m. to give me a chance to answer the question of the day: "In 1869 a famous Italian artist was commissioned to write an opera to be used in the celebration of the opening of the Suez Canal. What was the name of that opera?" When I answered "Aida"-the man told me I was correct and wou1d receive 9,950 T.V. trading stamps! Don't know that six-anda-half books will make much of a dent in the 695 books required for a Mustang Hardtop ... but perhaps if I save really assiduously .... Perhaps this little item will spur up Mr. Jindra's classroomwho knows, someone might get 695 books .... Regards, J. Monroe

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beats Beat Tarkio e Peru State Bobcats raced their fifth victory of the sea' defeating Tarkio College for third time 99 to 87 on Jan. 19. ike Harmon played his best e of the season pouring in 28 ts for the Cats. Jack Rinne d 25 points for his best efof the year. gain Peru had to battle from ind most of the game. Tarkio really up for the g am e . ch Bob Lade's brother was ed in an automobile crash was buried on the day of the e. No one expected Lade to at the game, and when he was, boys played just a little hardthan usual for him.

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Doane College grabbed their second basketball victory of the season from Peru State Bobcats Saturday night, nipp{ng the 'Cats 71-70 at Butler gymnasium, Crete, Nebarska. Doane's Tigers took the lead early in the opening half and displayed a fine ball control attack to maintain their lead throughout the game. The Tigers led 39-33 at halftime. Coach Jack Mcintire's Bobcats, down 57-63 with 3:40 remaining, moved into a press in an all out effort to overtake the Tigers. The Peruvians' hounding proved all but effective as they moved to within one point of Doane as the final buzzer sounded. The Bobcats' reboijnding game appeared improved over previous outings as they gathered in 47 of 73 challenges off the board. Ron Snodgrass and Dick Estes led Peru's rebounding efforts with 12 each. Snodgrass also led Peru's scoring attack with 19 points. The game's leading scorer was Larry Andrews of Doane with 10 field goals and five free throws for 25 points.

24

State Normal Board Approves Seven Projects For Peru State

SPORTS

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By Dick Berthold The Bobcats utilized their full court press with six minutes remaining to clip Northwest Missouri State by a slim margin of 66-64. At halftime, the Bobcats trailed 32-20 in the non-conference clash. John Chasse dumped the lead basket to put the Bobcats ahead 65-64, then added a free throw for the winning margin. Peru hit 16 of 21 free throws while Maryville collected on 16 of 20 free shots. The Bobcats totaled 25 baskets compared to· Maryville's 24 to round out the scoring statistics. Doane survived the Bobcats' press to capture their secondnonconference triumph over Peru by a 71-70 skinning. The Bobcats performed at capacity against the Tigers although the single point gnawing was a heartbreaking loss. The contest was without incident as the referees made three serious book mistakes which possibly decided the game's final outcome. Wayne invades the Bobcat home court Jan. 30 for another battling conference dash with the Bobcats. Wayne holds third position, one above the Bobcats, in NCC standings. Wayne's Dean DeBuhr {!Ould cause scoring difficulty for the Bobcats. DeBuhr connected for 33 points against Southern South Dakota Jan. 18. The Bobcats are working strenuously and are still enthused despite their record. Coach Mcintire commented, "The Bobcats are a young team composed mainly of sophomores. After they get more seasoning and experience, things will shape up." Eight cinder men have been training daily while preparing for the Bobcats' track season. Alvin Hendricks, James Watson, James O'Donoghue, Dick Zaparanick, Louis Fritz, Roger Neujahr, James Hagemeier, and Roger Crook form the nucleus of the winter workouts .

Seven projects of the six-year building program of Peru State College were approved for submission to 1965 Legislature by Board of Education of State Normal Schools at a special meeting held in Omaha Nov. 23, 1964. Included in the projects are: installation of fire detection systems in areas of need, $15,180; repair of west and south exterior walls of campus school, $10,000; remodeling of administration building, $172,500; renovation and improvement of campus electri-

Gym Was Originally A Chapel BY GEORGE ZWICKEL JR. The Peru State College Gymnasium was originally built to be a combination chapel and auditorium. The construction of this building was completed in 1894. The. gymnasium portion of the building was then located in the basement of the building. However, in 1917, due to poor acoustics, the auditorium portion of the building was remodeled. At this time the gymnasium w a s moved to the first floor. A very interesting point of Peru history is tied in with the building of the college gymnasium. The bricks used to build the structure were manufactured in Peru. At that time a brickyard was located north of the present post office and just west of a blacksmith shop on Fifth Street. The brkks used for the building were the last manufactured by this firm. The original building was Romanesque style, showing characteristics of buttresses, s tr in g courses, battlements, crockets, barrel valuts, round arches, and a steep gabled roof. It was entirely constructed of brick with a stone trim. It had the effect of having three front entrances. In 1949, the building was remodeled. More convenient dressing rooms and classrooms re-

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placed the old ones. The steep roof and arches were removed. The towers of the building were also reduced in height. Also in 1949, an addition to the original building was built. This is the portion which is now occupied by the back one-third of the ba&ketball floor and on the lower level by a varsity dressing room.

THE ORIGINAL

Peru State College

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During second semester, there will be five rounds of intramural basketball. Immediately aft e r second semester begins, all coaches should correct their team rosters. If any players are graduating or dropping,· the coaches must inform Coach Stemper. In order for new play~rs to be eligible, their names must be registered at least 24 hours ahead of the game. The next intramural games are tentatively scheduled for Feb. 4. There is some possibility that they may play Feb. 2. All coaches are advised to check the bulletin board in the gym or science hall for the next list of games.

cal system, $168,000; heating plant modernization, $151,250; dressing rooms, showers a n d storage rooms at Oak Bowl, $50,000, and remodeling of front of gymnasium, $58,300, a total of $625,230 for the 1965-67 biennium. Although ,continued as a part of the building program but de·· ferred until future bienniums are: additional seating at Oak Bowl, new campus laboratory school, remodeling and renovation of auditorium, acquisition of dormitory sites and physical education fields development.

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JOHN L. LEWIS, Vice Pres. & Cashier


-·-··----·----

·Peru's Mr.Jindra-

ORGANIZATIONS

Expeditis

GEOGRAPHY CLUB

Rushingrushingrushin g Andneverstopping Foursyllables Asound Afeeling Adiseas

BY MIKE CHU

Professor Victor H. Jindra reThe January 13th meeting of tired as head of Peru's Fine Arts the Geography Club was called Division in 1961 after serving as to order by President Bob Hilt. division head since 1952. He During the business meeting a joined the college staff as a ma- motion was made that the club thematics teacher in 1923. meetings be changed to Tuesday Mr. Jindra received his Bache- evening during the second selors degree from the University mester. The motion carried.. Inof Nebraska in 1923. He contin- quiries are to be made regarding ued his study of music, complet- affiliation with the national geing ad,vanced study of ·music at ography fraternity. Lester Turthe Chicago Musical College in ner reported that membership 1925. He studied violin under cards will be issued to members Carl Frederick Steckelberg, Marx second semester. Fischel and Victor Kuzdo. The movie, "Prospecting for Before joining the Peru State Petroleum," distributed by the faculty, Mr. Jindra served as the Shell Oil Company was shown. principal in the Linwood and The movie, in cartoon style, deThis will be ihe last Ped edited by the staff members above. Bruno high schools and as super- picted the history of petroleum First row: Gary Schmucker, Mert Finke, Melanie Gould, Janice intendent at Brainard and Firth. and the various methods used in Wilkinson. Back row: Harvey Fisher, Ron Rist, Lonn Pressnall, He is a member of Phi Beta Kap- locating oil basins. Dorothy Bock, Richard Berthold. pa and Phi Delta Kappa national -oSchmucker, Finke, Fisher, Pressnall, and Wilkinson will be in fraternities. In 1944, he served as WOMEN'S FACULTY CLUB their professional semester.·· Most of the remaining editors will be · president of the Peru Kiwanis on the staff through the spring semester, The Women's Faculty Club Club. Mr. Jindra taught music and met on Jan. 14 in the Faculty team won the Nebraska Wes- was the director of the college Dining Room of the Student Center for coffee. leyan University Invitational and campus school orch~as. The business meeting was held He was honored by Dr. NealS. Cross Country meet. in the F..aculty Lounge, and a Gamon, Peru State President, on 6 Peru State debaters participate in the Platte. Valley In- May 8, 1961. The honor was pre- movie on "Birth Defects" was vitational Speech-Debate tour- sented at a dinner party. Dr. Go- shown in the TV Lounge. September, 1964 Mrs. Robert Bohlken was the mon presented the honored guest nament at Kearney State. 12 Bobcats open grid season with chairman of the meeting. The with books of greetings from fel7 Peru closes season with 42-0 12-0 victory over Tarkio. low faculty members. Dr. Gomon others on the committee were loss to Washburn. 13 Freshmen wekomed at Peru. announced that contributions by Mmes. Larry Ebrn~r, James Pil8 Janice Wilkinson, Bill Witty, 15 Registration day for freshmen Don Schmidt, Lonn Pressnall, friends of Mr. Jindra had estab- kington, Delbert Gaines, Jake 17 Classes begin. James Agnew, Harvey Fisher, lished scholarship funds in his Gergen, and Miss Gladys Grush. 19 Lincoln U. downs Bobcats 40-0Dan Leuenberger, and Judy name. The scholarship is to be 10. Whigham, elected to Who's used to aid music students at LSA 22 Peru State elected Marilyn Peru State College. Who. Masters, Kathy Francis, Pat Wednesday evening, Jan. 13, After retiring from the Peru Knipplemier, Karen Renken, 13 Peru State harriers finished the LSA held its last meeting of third in the N.A.I.A. cross State faculty in 1961, Mr. Jindra Karen Quinn, and Ceci Evanthe semester. The usual procedcontinued to give private violin country meet at Wayne State gelist as cheerleaders. lessons to students. On Monday ure of the meeting was altered College. 26 Peru State falls to N.W. Miswith Pastor Jurgens giving his 18 K. Shanthi Rangarao was the and Thursday afternoons he gives souri State 19-0. message first. Pastor Jurgens, guest speaker at convocation. lessons in Peru. On Wednesday 26 Bobcat harriers succumb to who substituted for our sponsor, 19 Peru State harriers defeat and Saturday, he gives lessons in Doane in triangular 26-29. Pastor Carlson, is the minister of Nebraska City. He said that his Doane 19-37. 28 Freshman clash day offered a St. Paul's Lutheran Church of 20 Nebraska State Music Educa- hobby was within a hobby. variety of dress. rural Auburn. Teaching violin to grade school tors National Conference was 30 Freshman class elected Gary Following the pastor's talk, youngsters is his hobby. held at Hastings. ......_ Viterise as president. President Dennis Flattre lead the Victor Jindra is also a great 25 The English Club and the closing devotions. friend to all Peru dogs, especialDramatic Club presented October, 1964 Miss Rowoldt and Mrs. F. H. "Shakespeare in Review" at ly mongrels. It's not unusual for 1 All college mixer held in gym. Larson sponsored the evening him to be seen feedihg a hungry convocation. 2 Peru State harriers down meeting. dog with scraps left from his Northwest Missouri State in 30 Peru State defeats Alumni by meals. He knows every dog in a score of 102-84. dual, 21-40. Peru by its first name. 3 Bobcat gridders roll p as t

First Semester In Review

Chadron 26-13. 6 Peru State students entertained by annual variety show 9 Bobcat harriers handed O.U. its first dual loss in two years by a score of 21-35. 11 Wayne defeats Peru 47-7. 13 Human growth and development students toured the Beatrice State Home. 14 Bobkittens defeat Lourdes Central 39-0 for third straight victory. 15 The Peru State harriers raced past Maryville 15-44. Cagers open basketball practice. Fire destroyed historic house occupied by Mrs. Dorothy Martin. 17 Homecoming time once again on campus. Pat Wheatley elected 1964-65 Queen, with Pat Knipplemier, M a r il y n Masters, Karen Renken, and Judy Strange as attendants. Injury ridden Peru falls to Hastings 50-0. Dramatic Club presented works on C a r 1 Sandburg. Industrial Art s wins homecoming display for second year in row. 20 The thirteenth annual United Nations Dinner held. 29 Kearney State defeated Peru State 48-7. 30 The 1964 fall convention of the Student Education Association held in Lincoln. November, 1964

4 Paul Draper :performed at convocation. 6 Peru State Cross Country

Goinggoinggoing Andneverstopping Verycontagious Notdeadly Justbad Why? Doingdoingdoing Andneverstopping RelaxandenjoyGod'sworld Nature Beauty Grace Runningrunningrunning Andneverstopping Taketimetodothings Smiling Praying . . . . . AND STOPPING!

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2 The Peru Bobcats open seaDisappointment son ·with 94-84 win over Tarkio. SAC Band entertained at Oh? convocation. Oh! 4 Peru attended annual Wayne Oohh .. . Debate Tournament. No .. . 4 Bobcats dropped N.W. Mis-Lonn Pressnall souri State 87-73. 8 The Beginning Foods Class went on a field trip to Lincoln 10 The Peru State College 41)member concert band under the direction of Gilbert E. Second semester registration Wilson, appeared in a concert. The annual Christmas Te a will take place Monday and was held at Eliza Morgan Hall Tuesday, Febr. 1-2. Monday regi16 Saint 8aen's "Christmas Ora- stration lines up as follows: torio" presented. 8:30-10:30-Post graduates and 17 Campus S c ho o 1 Christmas seniors (90, plus hours) program in auditorium. All school Christmas dance held 10:30-12:00-Juniors (60-89 hours) in the· Student Center. 1:30- 2:00-Additional for jun29 Peru State finished third: in iors and seniors and not comBeatrice Holiday Tournament. pleted 31 Stacey Vance, former super2:00- 4:30-Sophomores (30-59 intendent of buildings and hours) grounds, officially retired. All freshmen and specially January, 1965 classified students will register 9 Bobcats lose conference open- Tuesday, 8:30-12:00. er to Kearney 81-78. Further registration informa13 Peru State rallied from be- tion is available on the yellow hind to defeat N.W. Missouri sheets enclosed in the second seState 66-64. mester schedules.

Second Semester Registration

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Peru Pedagogian PERU. NEBRASKA

Volume 60

Number 9

Second Semester Enrollment Shows Fourteen Per Cent Gain

eru Graduates 27 t Semester's End

Twenty-seven students at Peru tate College completed degree uirements at the end of the 11 semester, Jan. 29, according F. H. Larson, registrar. Dees will be conferred at the th a n nu a 1 commencement, une 4, at 10 a.m. Six Bachelor of Arts degrees, ree Bachelor of Arts in Educa>snail ·on degrees, one Bachelor of ine Arts in Education degree, nd 17 Bachelor of Science in Edcation degrees were included on e ;:andid:ate list. The degree candidates: Bachelor of Arts-Richard L. aker, Pennsville, New Jersey; illiam P. Fournell, Tecumseh; ry L. Giesmann, Sterling; onald J. Grant, Madrid, Iowa; ayne B. Kellogg, Hiawatha, ansas; Robert Kepler, Otoe. Bachelor of Fine Arts in Edution-Michael F. Janis, Skokie, linois. Bachelor of Arts in Education-irginia L: Cockerham, Peru; R. ichael Troester, Hampton; endell R. Wiksell, Omaha. Bachelor of Science in Educa'on-Daniel J. Coffey, Stamord; Penelope H. Edwards, Tale Rock; Ronald R. Foreman, eatrice; Margaret L. Gigax, remont; Ima A. Gottula, E 1k reek; Marion L. Gomon, Peru; erry D. Joy, Shubert; Lorene K. Kostal, Odell; David L. Malmberg, Nebraska City. Gary L. Manning, Hubbell; Janis E. Mayer, Auburn; Larry L. Morrissey, Tecumseh; Ronald W. Pethoud, Beatrice; William E. .Scott, Malvern, Iowa; Carl E. Stukenholtz, Nebraska City; eanne R. Tynon, Atkinson; thleen Martin Ward, Wahoo. d

oore Announces Cast or "Kiss Of Death" Rehearsals are now in progress for the Spring Play fo be presented Thursday, March 11. "The 'ss of Death" portrays tp.e favorite old west drama in a new vein. Mr. Robert D. Moore, director, announced the following cast: Missouri Bill, Jim Manning; Walter Halliday, Lonn Pressnall; Shorty, Phil Dorssom; Conductor, Pat Venditte; Drummer, Dale Burgess; Peg Tyson, Judy Elsinger; Matt Hawkins, Dan Knudsen; Jud Nolan, Mike Otto; Nelly Wilkins, Wanda Anderson; Abagail Ritter, Myrene Hilde. brand; Will Perkins, Bob Hilt; Hank Bridgers, Haryey Fisher; Effie, Janie Moore; Rosie, Barbara Gordon; Bartender, Paul MacNeil; Hallie Mulcher, Dorothy Bock; Buck, Ron Wiksell; Assistant Director, Barbara Gordon.

End Of Semester Celebrated By Dance On Febr. 4, 1965, the freshman class of Peru State College sponsored an "end of the semester" dance for the students. High <<;;ontinued on page two)

FEBRUARY 22, 1965

Nebraska's Best College

Seventy-six Make Dean's Honor Roll

Ruth Schnute and Luke Cox Reign At Sweetheart Dance, February 10 The ground was white, and the scene was red and white for the Sweetheart Dance, held in the Student Center on February 10, from 9:00 until 12:00. The Bill Alber's Orchestra and vocalist provided the musical atmosphere. Frank Spizuoco, master of ceremonies, introduced the candidates. They were Cecilia Evan· gelist, Newark, N. Y., escorted by John Chasse, Worcester, Mass.; Mary Gonnerman, Waco, escorted by Luke Cox, Lincoln; Julie Harrison, Wood River, Ill., escorted by Ralph DiCesare, Worcester, Mass.; Linda O'Hara, Council Bluffs, Iowa, escorted by Dick Estes, Wood River, Ill.; and Ruth Schnute, Falls Ciity, escorted by Mike Harmon, Wood River, Ill. The master of ceremonies then crowned Luke Cox and Ruth Schnute, king and queen. Following the crowning, t h e y led their attendants in a dance. The Sweetheart Dance w a s sponsored by the Sophomore class. Mr. and Mrs. McKercher, Mr. and Mrs. Schottenhamel, Mr. and Mrs. VanPelt, and Mr. Miller were the chaperones.

Queen Ruth

the office of vice-chairman. Ruth believes that dormitory life is the most exciting part of college and that activities are the most fun. After graduation, she plans to be a secondary teacher and some day would like to travel, preferably to Europe. For relaxation, Ruth likes to knit and swim and enjoys spectator sports a great deal. King Luke Luke Cox, son of Mrs. Helen Cox, Lincoln, was selected King of the annual Sweetheart Dance by the student body of Peru State College. Luke is a senior, majoring in history and physical education. He has been very active in various campus o r g a n i z a t i o n s throughout his college years. This year Luke is a member of the following organizations: Peru Historical Society, P.S.E.A., Blue Devils, "P" Club, and the Student Center Board:, of which he is the presiding offic€r. Luke has also taken part in various extra-curricular activities during his four years. He has been a regular perform€r on both the football and baseball teams, lettering each year. Luke, who will graduate this coming spring, eX:presses a great desire to teach and coach in future years.

Ruth Schnute reigned as Queen of the 1965 Valentine Dance. Sometimes called: "Spoof" by her intimate friends, Ruth is the youngest of the four daught€rs of Mr. and Mrs. Martin Schnute of Falls City. She graduated from Falls City High School in 1961 THANK YOU and chose Peru State because she I wish to extend my apliked the campus and felt it was preciation and thanks to a good college for her fields of the faculty, office employconcentrations, physical educaees, college students, and tion and home economics. others for the comforting A senior, Ruth is a member of words of sympathy in the Women's Athletic Association, loss of my sister, Mrs. AlHome Economics Club, PSEA, bin Anderson of Minneapoand the Student Center Board. lis, Minnesota. Last year she served on the SoFrieda D. Rowoldt cial Committee of the Student Center Bc;>§!:d and t.ttls yea,:rho~ds ,,, '"

Twenty-one students at Peru State College have been named to the Dean's Honor Roll with high distinction for the first semester. Fifty-five additional students were named to the honor roll with distinction. Recognition of honor students will be made at an all-college convocation Wednesday, Febr. 24. The honors list includes one student, Marion Gomon, Peru, who received a perfect grade point average of 9.00 for the semester. To be eligible for honors with high distinction, a student must have a grade point average of 8.0 or above, and from 7.25 to 7.99 to be eligible for distinction. Students receiving high distinction include: Devon Adams, Peru; Oliver Bierman, Peru; Eric Dorf, 3700 L, Lincoln; Penny Edwards, Table Rock; Marion Gamon, Peru; Kenneth Hartman, 140 South 52nd, Lincoln; Carol Henderson, Brock; Alvin Henrichs, Wymore; Mary Lu Hicks, Auburn; Robert Hilt, Falls City; John Hunzeker; Mary Jones, Nemaha; Janis Mayer, Auburn; Wayne Kellogg, Hiawatha, Kans.; Joseph Keys, Bellmawr, N. J.; Elaine Muller, Falls City; Mary Newmann Nilsson, Odell; Georgia Sherwood, Peru; March Tinkham, Holmesville; Donna Van Buskirk, Clarinda, Iowa; Janice Wilkinson, Humboldt; William Witty, Syracuse . Students receiving distinction include: Bobbie Armstrong, Nebraska City; Linda Bartels, Tobias; Janet Bierman, Peru; Dorothy Bock, Pawnee City; Joan Bretthorst, Dunbar; Mary Brown, Bell City, Mo.; Ray Cain, Thurman, Iowa; Carol Chandler, Shubert; Patricia Corrigan, C a s e y , Iowa; Jacqueline Dodson, Nehawka; Anne Epley, Peru; Richard Ferron, Peru; Merton Finke, Tecumseh; Gordon Garrett, Glenwood, Iowa; Sheryl Gawart, Nebraska City; David Gomon, Peru; M_arilyn Gonnerman, Waco; Sar~h Goodwin, Hiawatha, Kans.; Barbara Gordon, Hamburg, Iowa; Merrill Greenlee, Atlantic, Iowa; Mary Hand, Seward; David Hensley, Loup City; Myrene Hildebrand, 5220 W. 28 Ave., Denver, Colo.; Nancy Jarvis, Peru; Jerry Joy, Crete; Robert Kepler, Otoe: Teri Kisby, 156 Park Ave., Council Bluffs, Iowa; Edwin Loontjer, Deshler; Suzan McKee, Emerson, Iowa; David Malmberg, Nebraska City; Edna Martin, Hamburg, Iowa; Virginia Moody, Peru; Joseph Oh, Taejou City, Korea; Loren Penkava, Stella; Charles Pratt, Bridgeport, N. J.; Lonnie Pressnall, Wymore; Connie Rademacher, Johnson; Mary Rademacher, Johnson; John Rinne, Burchard; Jack Roper, Eagle Grove, Iowa; Billy Russell, Peru; Mary Schriner, 2968 Orchard, Lincoln; William Scott, .Malvern, Iowa; John Schatp, Atlantic, Iowa; Joseph Smith, 7 Mitchell Terr., Mt. Holly, N. J.; (Continued on page four).

Second semester enrollment at Peru State College is 840 students, according to F. H. Larson, registrar. The figure is a 14 per cent increase over the 738 students enrolled for classes the second semester a year ago and is only 26 fewer students than enrolled for the fall semester. Twenty-seven students completed degree requirements at the close of the first semester. The freshman class with 261 students is the largest class, followed by 212 seniors, 183 juniors, and 165 sophomores. Nineteen are post graduates. Daytime enrollment includes 721, while 119 are enrolled in evening classes. Campus laboratory school enrollment (K-12) is 279, with 164 in elementary grades and 115 in high schools (9-12).

Peru State Grad Named President Of New York College A 1937 Peru graduate, Dr. James Perdue, has been named president of the State University college, Oswego, N. Y., effective July 1 of this year. He is the seventh president in the 104 year history of the college. Dr. Perdue is currently serving as Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Denver. Dr. Perdue was graduated from Auburn High School. His advanced study was done at Colo· rado State College and Stanford University. While at Peru, he participated in Pi Gamma Mu, a national social science fraternity; Phi Lambda Alpha or "P" Club; Dramatic Club; Men's Club; Kappa Delta Pi; men's glee club; chorus and tennis. He held offices in both Pi Gamma Mu and Kappa Delta Pi. Dr. Perdue's major field at Peru was history. He comments about his undergraduate days: "My major professor was a very inspiring man and provided the encouragement for me to continue my advanced work."

Mary Ann Biere Writes Of Second Grade Teaching Experience In Nebraska City It is quite an experience when you take your first step in student teaching. The first day is filled with many trials. The supervisor I was assigned to was Miss Dorothy Nicholas, a graduate of Peru State. She teaches the second grade at 14th Street in Nebraska City. Miss Nicholas was pleasant and reassuring, with her educational knowledge and warm personality. The classroom had an educational atmosphere, which was re· assuring to me. The elementary children seemed happy and excited. I could see children of all descriptions peering at me. I bravely smiled and took a seat in the back of th€ room. (9ontin,ued on iPage four)


ANYO~

MAY CONTRmUTE TO PED

Recently students have questioned whether outside contributions are accepted in the Ped. The editors are happy to receive material from anyone. However, the contributions must be signed; anonymous articles cann~t be printed. The editors reserve the right to reject any material which is submitted, if necessary. As editors of the Ped, we hear many comments about the quality of the paper. We are trying to publish a good school paper, and we welcome these suggestions; Up to this point, however, there has been nothing but talk on the part of non-staff people. This is the time to "put your money where your mouth is." If you have an article or suggestion which you want to have printed in the Ped, give it to any editor. All material submitted will be carefully considered. -Dorothy Bock, editor.

WILL YOU BE A GOOD TEACHER? Will you make a good teacher? I think this question enters the mind of every individual going into teaching. There are times when most of us are uncertain as to our ability to become a good teacher. There is no such thing as keeping hours in teaching. One does all he can before he becomes too tired to work effectively. Still he faces the vast undone. One should be sure of three things before he ever embarks on a teaching career. The :Nrst thing is that he really enjoys his subject enough to dedicate his life to working with it. The second is that he has enough understanding and knowledge in his field to do an acceptable job, even when the inexhaustible demands of a teacher's life have left him very little chance for preparation. And lastly, one must like to teach. A real teacher must help his students to find their own way in the realms of knowledge. One must strive to bring out the creativeness in each individual. The teacher must have self-discipline enough to set reasonable standards for the students. He must care about teaching the slow learner as well as the intelligent students. There is no better assurance of a student's respect than the confidence that the teacher really knows what he is talking about in the classroom and other situations. We, as future teachers, have an obligation to be the very best. Let's. all live up to this obligation. -By. Larry Piper.

IS THIS MESS NECESSARY? Why must the front of Morgan Hall always look like a trash pile? . ,. Everyone who sits on the steps leaves a remmder of ms visit behind. Everything from cigarettes to paper cup~can be seen on either side of the steps. There are wastepaper baskets inside the dorm in ~he lounge; these were meant for this purpose. Perhaps the situation could be helped in another way too. Couldn't one or two painted barrels be put in the corner out of sight? Then the people on the steps would have a place to put their paper. The rest of the campus is clear of paper most of the time, but in front of Morgan Hall there is always a mess. Let's clean it up! ' -By Joan Dickman.

End Of Semester Celebrated By Dance (Continued from page one) school seniors from the surrounding area were also invited to attend. Approximately 160 students,

chaperoned by Miss Regier and Mr. Nemec of Peru's language department, danced from 7:30 u111til 10:30 to the music provided by ''The Unknowns." Ceci Evangelist and Ralph DiCesare were in charge of the decorations.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Editor _______________________________________ Dorothy Bock Associate Editor_ ____________________________ Dick Berthold Copy Editor_________________________________ Mary Sautter Copy Editor______________________________ Charles Richards Feature Editor____________________________ Ginny Grossman Photography Editor_____________________ Eugene Fitzpatrick Layout Editor ___________________________ Elaine Neddenriep Academic Editor____________________________ Joan Dickman Business Manager ____________________________ John Barton Circulation Manager_________________________ Bruce McCoy Morgan Hall Column _______________________ Barbara Gordon Majors Hall Column __________________________ John Barton Delzell Hall Column ___________________________ Bill Bowen Sports Column______________________________ Dick Berthold Reporter__________________________________ Mary Ann Biere Reporter___________________________________ Oliver Bierman Reporter__________________________________ Joan Bretthorst Reporter____________________________ Anna Marie DeGerlia Reporter. ___________________________________ Bruce McCoy /Reporter----------------------------------- Jackie Swegler Reporter____________________________________ Mary Tackett Reporter_____________________________________ Ron Wiksell Adviser_________________________________ Stewart I..i.nscheid

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DELZELL HALL By Bill Bowen Delzell Hall is back to normal after the semester break with one hundred sixty-nine men staying in the dormitory for the second semester. There were forty-three applications for residence, and of those, thirty-four new residents are living in Delzell Hall. The new residents were welcomed to the dorm Monday night at a dormitory meeting. The meeting involved an explanation of dormitory rules and proce· dures followed by the presenta· tion of candy bars to the dorm residents. This semester's dormitory of.ficers were introduced, including Ray Cain, president; Loren Penkava, vice president; and Ron MoCoy, secretary-treasurer. The two new counsellors were also introduced. Gary Viterise is now working on the first floor, and Charles Gordon is working on the third floor.

Just time to get that second wind. Have aCoke. Coca-Cola - Its big, bold taste never too sweet, puts zing in people ... r!#reshes best.

We have two people back from student teaching; Larry Trimble and Alvin Henrichs both taught in Beatrice. Larry Trimble has re-assumed his job as counsellor. It's nice to welcome them back as well as several other people who are back in the dorm after being away. Some rather interesting trips were made during the semester break. Several Delzell residents left for both the South and the West. Alan Zipper, Alan Sullivan, Ed McGaughey, Tom. Bresnahan, Greg Dickerson, andPete Zona all headed south for New Orleans. Ralph Procaccini, Dennis Martin, and John Sinnod traveled west to the Grand Canyon. These people have proved that with a little money and a lot of curiosity one can travel j u st about wherever he wants in a very short time.

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had problems getting home after the tremendous amounts of snow blocked roads. Rod Baade was snowbound, but powerful John Soby was there to rescue him; Bill Rinne and Ron Kroll helped push cars out of ditches in Unadilla area Thursday, February 11. They were members of The fire on the third floor has the basketball team w h i c h caused some moving around and stalled and had to return to Peru some cr~wding, but when the re- that afternoon. modeling is done on the damaged Several residents obtained pups room, some of the pressure .from Louis Fritz. They include: should be taken off. We can only RQy Windhorst, Oharles Niemeyhope for one thing, that _the er, and Bob Ruff. The pups could painters will also paint the smoke be heard barking at all hours, but damaged hall as well as the were generally well accepted by room. When the remodeling is the dorm residents. completed, room 302 should be the nicest one in the dorm. Maybe we should all have a fire. ELIZA MORGAN HALL MAJORS By HALL Barbara Gordon

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Sound of Music, starring Gloria DeHaven. New first semester freshmen include: Nancy Gosset, Fremont; Carolyn Price, Pawnee City; Carleen Kreifels, Nebraska City; Donna Wiley, Red Oak, Iowa; By Charlotte Hershberger, Fa 11 s Second semester routine is now City; Diane Bartels, Papillion; John Barton fairly well established at Mor- and Sandra Wickham, Salem. gan Hall. The dorm's customary There are two more new As the second semester begins roar has been dulled a little, 1Majors Hall is once again filled to since 17 girls left over semester "faces" in the dorm. One is a capacity. The new residents in- break. Ten new girls survived new automatic washer-we realelude: Bob Conradt, Tony Lopes, registration and are becoming ac- ly miss the clank-bang of the old one. The television in the rec Fred Rimmer, Walter Rimmer, quainted with the campus. Bill McVicker, Dennis Rinne, AlMary Ann Sharp, a second se- room finally broke down and is len Scott, Fred Shannon, Dick mester freshman, is from Platts- beyond repair. Soon a new porShelton, Dave Shuey, Joe Ward, mouth. She is the sister of Susie fable will be hooked up and "As the World Turns" will turn 1Mark Wendt, Mike Palmer, Larry Sharp. Roder, Forrest Ogle, and Gel'hart Julia RummerY' is a transfer again. Wehrbein. student from :ffighland Junior Bertha Terwilliger's birthday This past week-end Don College. A junior, she comes was Jan. 30. Pat Wheatley's and· Schmidt went to "Stillwater, Ok-' from Oskaloosa, Kansas. Cherie Trevino's are the 8th and lahoma, for an interview conGinny Mullen is from North 18th of February. cerning Medical School. D on Attleboro, Massachusetts. She at,also spent some time in Oklahc- tended the Radio and Television Joyce Wheeler, Pawnee City, ma City. School in Boston for two years. is engaged to Larry Tegtmeier It seems as if several stud~n,,t£,;,,!-,~§t,,~!J!11!11er;.,,,sh~ to1;i.r~ in the from Burchard,. Nebraska.


Bobcats Down Tigers On Home Maples 77-72

MAl!.K•

Peru State College gained revenge from Doane College on Febr. 9, in a game played on the Peru hardwoods. This· was the third meeting of the season for these teams, Doane winning the two previous outings. The Bobcats out-distanced the Tigers 7772.

and Cain led Peru's balanced attack with 21 and 18 points. Accurate free-throw shooting paid off for the 'Cats. The Bobcats were outscored from the field 31-26, but cashed in on 25 of 32 free throws while Doane collected 10 of 20 from the charity line.

Peru jumped to an early 12-6 lead in the first half. Estes, Harmon, and Snodgrass sandwiched baskets to keep Peru's lead during the first half of play.

BOX SCORE: FG FT PERU 8-9 Estes ----------- 4 3-3 Witty ----------- 1 2-5 J. Rinne -------- 0 5-5 Harmon -------- 8 0-1 Snodgrass ------ 7 6-7 Cain ------------ 6 1-2 Chasse --------- 0

The Bobcats played fine team defense during the first half. This, along with excellent rebounding, allowed Peru to stall off Doane's bid. As the first half ended Peru led 41-35. During the second half Peru kept its slim margin. With 16:21 left in the game, Peru lost Dick Estes due to a knee injury. As the game progressed Doane narrowed the margin with Andrews and Kelly leading the way. With 2:25 remaining, Peru held a one-point advantage, 69-68. A basket and two free throws by Cain moved Peru out of Doane's reach. Doane's top scorers were Andrews and Beecher, with 15 and 14 points respectively. Harmon

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Bobkittens Victorious In Nemaha Valley Tourney The Peru Prep Bobkittens emerged victorious in the recent Nemaha Valley Conference basketball tournament. After downing Brock, 61-59, they took successive victories from Elk Creek, 56-54, in the semi-finals and from Lourdes Central, 61-50, in the finals. Mike Tynon and John Mcintire led the Bobkittens in~oring through the tournament. The three tournament vi c tori e s evened their record at eight wins and eight losses for the season.

An attempt is being made to form a Rescue Squad Unit for Nemaha County. This Unit will be based in Auburn and will serve all of Nemaha County. It is estimated that $5500 will need to be raised for this project. The faculty and stud~nt body of Peru State College have been asked to contribute to this worthy cause. A box is located in the Business Office to receive any contribution you would care to make to this cause. Your contribution will be appreciated. Erv. Pitts

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Coach Jack Mcintire's Peru State Bobcats picked up their first NCC victory Jan. 30 by defeating Wayne State 76-70 on the home maples. The Bobcats had a relatively easy time holding a 32-27 halftime advantage. The lead was stretched to 18 points midway in the second half as the Bobcats broke the Wayne zone defense with f\ne outside shooting from the forward Dick Estes and guard Dean Cain. Estes and Cain paced the Bobcats with i9 and 18 points respectively. Dean DeBuhr paced the Wildcats with a 26 point outburst. Wayne 'state closed the scoring gap in the las\ minutes of action as McIntire's substitutes finished the game. Kearney ended the Bobcats' bid for top NCC contention Febr. 6 by defeating the 'Oats 80-68. The Antelopes' press kept Peru off balance throughout the contest. The game tied 35-35 at halftime as errors stopped both teams from gaining a margin. M i k e Harmon collected 29 points while Estes followed with 19 points. The Bobcats connected on 10 of 18 charity shots, and Kearney collected 16 of 35 free throws. Peru used the charity line Febr. 9 to defeat Doane by a 7772 margin. The Bobcats connected on 78 per cent of their free throws for 25 points while the Doane Tigers averaged 10 of 23 free throws. Doane had a 31-26 edge in field goals. Peru didn't trail although the Tigers had one tie early in the first half which en<led in a 41-35 advantage for Peru. Estes turned in an excellent performance by gaining 16 points in the first half before being sidelined in the second half with a knee injury. The contest accumulated 40 fouls; Doane accounted for 22 and Peru 18 fouls. The Peru Bobcats added another NCC victory Febr. 13 by defeating Chadron 60-57. Cain netted six field shots and six free throws for 18 points. Cain's free throw percentage was 100 per cent. The Bobcats' over-all average rwas 66.6 per cent. Chadron tripped the Bobcats Febr. 15 by knocking Peru for a 74-64 upset. Mi<lway in the second period, Chadron's Jerry Bartak brought his team into winning action. Chadron claimed a 64-63 advantage with two a half minutes remaining. The Bobcats made some passing errors and Chadron took advantage of the situation. The Bobcats averaged 58.8 per cent on free throws which was 7.8 per cent down from their previ-ous game. The Bobcats travel to Wayne Febr. 24 fo hopes of adding another NCC victory for the season's final. By stopping Wayne's Dean DeBuhr and playing headsup ball, the Bobcats should net the win.

The Bobcats picked up their eighth win of the season and second in NCC competition Febr. 13 by defeating Chadron 60-57 in a close contest played on the loser's court. Mike Harmon's field goal at the second half's outset put the Bobcats ahead for good. Dean Cain collected 18 points for the winners' high followed by Harmon and Ron Snodgrass with 14 points each. Chadron clipped the Bobcats Febr. 15 by 74-64 to gain their first NCC victory this season. Chadron was previously in the cellar at 0-5 for NCC competition. Jerry Bartak displayed sharp ball handling to spark a come-from-behind drive in the closing minutes. The Bobcats edged Chadron 35-31 at halftime 'alld was at a 51-42 advantage midway in the second period. Chadron switched to a full court press with five

minutes remaining. Bartak stole the ball twice and netted t w o quick points. Chadron began closing the gap 58-60. With less than three minutes remaining, Bartak grabbed another loose ball and added a lay-up which put Chadron into the lead at 64-63. Snodgrass picked up 21 points for the Peru Bobcats followed by Harmon with 17 points.

Intramural Basketball Nearing Completion

'Cats Drop Second Game To Kearney

Intramural basketball t e am standings at the end of eight rounds of competition have the Emperors and the Road Runners tied for first place with seven wins and one Joss. The Glunks, the Playmakers, and the Misfits are tied for second place with a six win, two loss record. In third place are the Duds and the Centennials with four wins and four losses. The Worcesterites have won three games and lost five. The Playboys and the Louts come next with two wins and six losses. Holding up the bottom of the standings are the Beavers and the Ram Raiders with no wins and eight losses. The highest individual score in one ball game came in a game between the Playmakers and the Centennials, with Bernie Brown of the Playmakers scoring 27 points. The highest average score for the basketball competition is also held by Brown, with a sixteen point per game average after seven rounds of play. Harry Leth has averaged 13.6 points after eight games to rank second. Jim Manning stands third with 13.6 points after six games. Luke Cox and Barry Kennedy a r e next with 13.2 and 12.8 points, respectively, after five games. The basketball competition will be completed after eleven rounds, and no tournament is planned at the present time. Team standings after the eleventh round will be final and count in the over-all intramural competition. The Misfits and the Worcesterites currently lead the over-all championship competition with 18 points. Intramural competition has taken place in touch football and volleyball as well as the current basketball program. The next intramural competition will begin about April 1 with softball competition. Assisting Mr. J erome Stemper, director of intra-

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Kearney State College grabbed their second victory of the season from Peru State, Febr. 6, at Kearney as they copped an 80-58 victOfy. The loss for Peru marks coach Jack Mcintire's first double defeat by Kearney in his nine years as head coach at Peru State, and virtually drops the Bobcats from NCC contention. The Antelopes of Kearney State applied an off ang on full court press to keep the Bobcats off balance throughout the game. Halftime found the score tied 3535 as errors kept both teams from gaining a decisive advantage. Early in the second period a 13-point scoring spree involving Kearney's Bob Whitehouse and Larry Martin gave the Antelopes the momentum to slide on to victory. Martin led Kearney's scoring attack with 20 points. Mike Hare mon produced his best scoring effort of the season as he rolled in 29 points for the Bobcats.

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Valentine Attendants Cecilia Evangelist Cecilia Evangelist, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Evangelist of 2103 Madison Street, Newark, New York, was elected royalty attendant at the Sweetheart . Dance, February 10, in the Student Center. Cecilia, better known as Ced, is a first semester sophomore. Her major field of concentration is elementary education and physical education is her supporting field. Ceci is a cheerleader and belongs to the Student Governing Association, Newman Club, and: the Women's Athletic Association. Ceci's main hobby is, "I like to eat pizzas!" Ceci also enjoys all kinds of sports, especially snow skiing, water skiing, and basketball. Ceci's future plans consist of graduating from college and becoming a teacher.

In Convocation

Julie Harrison Julie Harrison, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Harrison of Wood River, Illinois, was chosen as a royalty attendant for the Sweetheart Dance. Julie, a freshman at Peru State, is a member of the Cherubs and the Women's Athletic Association. Her major field of cm:i.centration is physical education with a related field in biology. She enjoys dancing and athletics, especially swimming. When asked: why she chose Peru as her college, Julie replied, "The coach at my high school is a graduate of Peru State. As a good friend: of my family, he recommended: it to me." U~n completion of her college education, Julie plans to teach physical education courses on the secondary level.

Ralph DiCesare Ralph DiCesare Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph P. DiCesare of John Chasse John Chasse, son of Mr. and Worcester, Massachusetts, w a s Mrs. Joseph Chasse of Worcester, chosen as an attendant to the Mass., was chosen a member of royalty of the Sweetheart Dance, the royalty for the Sweetheart held Febr. 10, at the Student Dance February 10. Center. John attended Leicester Junior Ralph is a freshman at Peru College at Leicester, Mass., for State College. His major field of two years before transferring to concentration is science, with a Peru in Sept. 1964. He is a jun- supporting field of concentration· ior and is majoring in history and in mathematics. He played footsocial science. ball last fall and was chosen as Included in his ex:tra curricular a member of Peru State's "P" activities are intramural foot- Club this year. Ralph was electball and: 1baseball. John is also a ed vice-president of the freshman member of the "P" Club. class, and has since been active John is planning to teach here in promoting freshman class acin the midwest after he gradu- tivities and projects. ates. Linda O'Hara Marilyn Gonnerman Linda O'Hara, daughter of M;r. Marilyn Gonnerman, daughter and Mrs. Charles D. O'Hara, of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Gon- Council Bluffs, Iowa, was elected nerman of Gresham, was chosen royalty attendant at the Peru as an attendant for the annual State Sweetheart Dance. Sweetheart Dance. Known as Linda is a senior majoring in "Mary" to many of her frieni:ls, modern languages. She is a memshe is a senior at Peru State. ber of Alpha Mu Omega, a forMarilyn's major field of con- eign language fraternity, of which centration is business education, she was past vice-president; Forand her related field of interest eign Language Club; PSEA; and is mathematics. During her pre- Peru Historical Society. During vious years at Peru State, she her freshman and sophomore has been on the Dean's Honor year, Linda was listed on the Roll. Her time is occupied with Dean's Honor Roll. such organizations as the BusiLinda was the Junior attendant ness Club, Phi Beta Lambda, for May Fete last spring. Gamma Delta, Kappa Delta Pi, Tennis and modern dance are and PSEA. Marilyn's hobbies in- Linda's favorite hobbies. Linda's clude reading, listening to mu- plans for the future are indefinite sic, and dancing. as to the area in which she will Following her graduation from work, but it will be in the field Peru State College, Marilyn plans of foreign languages. to enter the field of teaching secondary business education. Richard Estes Richard Estes, son of Mr. and Mike Harmon Mrs. E. Porter Estes of Wood Twenty-one year old Mike River, Ill., was chosen for ValenHarmon, son of Mr. and Mrs. Eu- tine Royalty at Peru State Colgene Harmon of Wood River, Ill., lege. Richard: graduated from was elected as one of the attend- East Alton Wood River Comants to the Valentine King at the munity High School in Wood annual Valentine's Dance. River, Ill. Mike is a graduate of Wood Richard is a sophomore at Peru River High School and is now a State majoring in physical edujunior at Peru State, majoring in cation. He participates in Blue physical education. Mike's main Devils and, is a member of the hobby is sports, and he has been "P" Club. During his freshman an active participant in basket- year, Dick earned letters in basball and track at Peru, being one ketball and track while particiof the main cogs of the Peru bas- pating at the forward position ketball team. and at high hurdles. Dick is presMike is active in school organ- ently active in basketball, playizations and his popularity is evi- ing the starting forward position denced by his election to the of- for the Peru Bobcats. During the fice of vice-president of the "P" Bobcat track season, Dick will be Club. Mike plans to coach and a team asset. teach physical education at the Sports are his hobby. His fuhigh school level upon gradua- .ture plans are centered around tion. the sports field.

Students of Peru State College were entertained by a variety show February 17 with Myrene Hildebrand acting as mistress of ceremonies. The first number was "Man With a Horn" by the Dimensions C h a r 1e s Wellensiek, Ralph Shaffer, Bill Carson, Gary Schmucker, Sharon Johnson, Dale Dunsick and Elmer Nemec. Virginia Mullen gave a comedy sketch called "Mrs. Weeks Learns to Drive." Ross Eastman sang a solo, "Song of the Open Road," accompanied by Mary Lou Hicks. The Brass Choir then gave a presentation of "76 Trombones" from Meredith Willson's "Music Man." The men's octet presented "Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor." The trumpet trio, Ralph Shaffer, Dale Dunsick, and Tom Majors gave the ''Trumpet Wild." Myrene Hildebrand: gave dramatic selections of "Mildred Klinkhoffer'' and "Elizabeth Umstead." The convo was ended with "Sound of Music" by the College Choir.

Peruvians Take Year's First Snow Storm In Stride

Seventy-six Make Dean's Honor Roll (Continued: from page one) James Snyder, Nebraska City; Arnold Teten, Auburn; Nancy Vanderbeek, Panama; Michael Wallis, Bellevue; Joe Ward, Weeping Water; Donald Weiner, Odell; Ronald Wiksell, 1023 S. 41 Omaha· Norma Wood, 1108 N.' 9th, Be;trice; George Zwickel, Shenandoah, Iowa.

Melvin And Van Zant Attend MCTE Meeting Dr. Keith Melvin, Dean of the College at Peru State, and Mr. Evan S. Van Zant, Director of the Campus School in Peru, attended a series of meetings in Chicago, February 9-13. The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, (AACTE), met in conjunction with meetings of the National Commission on Accreditation of Teacher Education, (NCATE), and the Association of State Coll:eges and Universities, (ASCU). 'J1he National Commission on A:ccreditation of Teacher Education meetings were started on Tuesday afternoon with an information session on NCATE concerning issues in accreditation. Tuesday night the Association of State Colleges and Universities met in its first session at the Conrad Hilton. ASCU meetings continued until Wednesday afternoon, February 10. The Ame'I'ican Association of Colleges for Teacher Education meetings began Wednesday night with a speech titled, "Perspective on Action in Teacher Education,'' by Florence B. Stratemeyer, Professor of Education at Columbia University. AACTE meetings continued until Saturday morning, February 13. While attending the meetings in Chicago, Dr. Melvin had two conferences with Dr. Elmer Clmk, Peru State College's North Central consultant. Dr. Clark, Dean of the College of Education at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Illinois, spent some time on Peru State's campus during the summer of 1964. Melvin and Van Zant also spent some time in the headquarters offices of the North Central Association in Chicago conferring with the North Central staff. The meetings were concluded Saturday, February 13.

for the week-end. blizzards there was some excite· ment, and a few students even thought aimless swirling of the large flakes was very pretty, al· though trying to get around: was an inconvenience.

At first, Thursday, Febr. 11, seemed like just another wintry, blustery day. There was a little snow and a lot of sliding to classes. After first period classes, students buttoned their coats tighter and hurried to their next destination for Mr. Winter was becoming more boisterous. Other students looked: out windows, and turned on the radio only to hear reports of various school closings and warnings to stay off roads as much as possible. This presented a small problem for Peru's commuters though. With mixed emotions of apprehension and excitement, Peruvians were all aware by noon that this was the year's first real blizzard. The snow came faster than the custodians could scoop it off the sidewalk. Various students began to worry that th e weather would ruin their plans

Mary Ann Biere Writes Of Teaching Experience In N~braska City (Continued from page one) The first two weeks were spent in observation. During this time, I acquainted myself with the class procedures and realized also the importance of adequate class preparation. It was hard at first for Miss Nicholas to gain complete attention of the children. They would always look back to see what I was doing. But observing helped me to gain an insight into their attitudes, traits, and behavior. The following weeks, I assumed: the responsibility of teaching. My teaching was d o n e through the observed procedures and integrated with the methods learned in my .college classes. I found a need for visual aids, dramatization, and other projects in different areas in the elementary grade necessary. With different aids, the children seemed to understand and learn faster. I felt that children appreciated these aids. They made puppets and acted out stories. I had them make a booklet on "Sound," for a science project. This was just one thing I used. But any different or exciting idea used: always met with the majority approval. If one has interest and participation of the class, he should

Friday, however, the snow had stopped and the sun shone on the earth's new white robe. Although a couple of commuters, Mrs. Lines and Mrs. Bennett, decided to spend Thursday night in the girls dorm, the worry about not getting home for the week-end had almost vanished. Friday evening the students enjoyed the snow on a sledding party. Saturday and Sunday, many students, free from the worry of classes for a few days, spent at least a couple of gay hours playing in the snow.

have few disciplinary problems. A meaningful look, few words spoken, or ignoring the situation was all that seemed necessary. I would keep children in after school. This was for assignments not completed or a 1problem that I felt should be handled at that time. Children of second grade age are easier to discipline as it takes few actions or words to get results. During a spelling lesson, for example, one boy was cheating. All I did was walk over to his desk, and throw his paper from which he was copying, into the waste basket. Through student teaching I could see and realize the importance of professional ethics, attitudes, and training.

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Schoolinen's Day Well Attended Nearly 200 educators attended the Schoolmen's Day program at Peru State College Saturday, Jan. 30. Schools from southeast Nebraska, northeast Kansas, southwest and northwest Iowa were represented at the thirteenth annual event. Campus tours included the new construction of the Fine Arts Center and additions to Majors Hall and the Student Center. Following an afternoon coffee, dinner was served in the Student Center dining room. Later that evening the schoolmen w e r e guests of the college at the Peru vs. Wayne State basketball game.

Sunrise At Morgan

Cleo Leads A Dog's Life BY RON WIKSELL "Tame enough she could play th rabbits and never harm m," said Mrs. Gaines when cribing the Gaines' pride and , "Cleo." leo' s placidness is vividly wn in her photograph. A rerkable likeness, it shows not y her physical attributes inding extra long and sensitive se and ears, but also her look firm resolution. leo leads (I hope this won't end her) a "dog's life." Devotg a minor portion of her day to addling about observing the dents as ,they cross 5th avenue, e major portion of her day is nt acquiring much needed ep-you see, Cleo is as yet a

ootball Brochure eceives Award The 1964 Football brochure of eru State College received an I-America Award of the Nanal Association of IntercollegiAthletics, according to Tom no, public relations director of AIA. It was the second conse· tive award for Peru State, in mpetition with the nearly 500 AIA schools.

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puppy of less than 12 months of age. Her birthday isn't until Easter. Her special treat for this occasion· will . undoubtedly be bread since she readily prefers this to meat dishes. Could Cleo design a birthday feast it would no doubt include a visit from her brother "Scorchy." Scorchy often visits Cleo at the Gaines' since he is owned by Mr. Stober, a family friend. If for some reason Cleo should appear to you to be rather sad, it might possibly be that most people are in too much of a hurry to stop and talk to her. So the next time you pass the Gaines' residence; lean over the fence and say "Hi" to Cleo, the bro\vn registered bassett. Edited by Leland ~erwood, assistant director of special ser· vices, the publication is distributed to press, radio, and TV media. &tords, statistics, schedules, rosters, player sketches, and season's prospects are included in the contents. Last year's winner was edited by Robert M. Henry, who is on a one year's leave of absence for advanced study at Kansas University. Other schools in the top five of the "reproduced" or offset category were Pacific Lu t h e r a n (Wash.), Southern Connecticut State, Howard Payne (Texas), and Eastern New Mexico. In announcing his selections, Judge Tom Hedrick, announcer for the Kansas City Chiefs and the director of the University of Kansas Sports Network, offered special praise to the brochure entries and compared the winners to the best brochures in the nation.

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BY MARCH TINKHAM Quiet hours prevail. They have been fought and held off for most of the' night, but, at last, just before morning, they are triumphant. The girls' dorm lies vanquished, ,and it is quiet. The silence presents the observer an unparalled opportunity to contemplate the beauty and serenity of this ... "Bbrbrbrbrbr rrrrrr iingngnggngnggngn ngngngngng!" End of serenity! '11he first alarm goes off. "Cccklclclllll aaaaangngn ngng ngngngngngng!" Another! ' 1Bbuuuzuzuzuzuzz!" And another! "Click. And now for the news at 6:30. New troops have moved in ..." And a clock radio! All up and down the halls, alarms demand and redemand to be heard until their owners can no longer refuse recognition, and grope for their switches. Someone finds a snooze alarm. Quiet again as the girls wring one last moment of pleasure from their beds. After hesitating as long as they dare, they crawl from beneath the warm covers into the cold room. Scattered solitary lights wink on. Bare feet pad toward the restrooms, and soon there are flushing sounds. Somewhere the snooze alarm goes off, but is husihed by someone's hand. Water belches from the faucet and gurgles down the pipes as eyes gradually begin to open. Amid the flushing, belching, and gurgling, water pipes start to clankingly complain of overwork. Still\ in bed, lucky girls without 7:3p's roll over and try to blot with covers the light and sound their roommates have produced. Somewhere the snooze alarm begins to sound again and is caught again by solljeOne's hand. Curlers plunk "in curler pails" Hair spray sets up a smog. Perfume begins to taint the air. A bottle hits the floor, and soft profanity floats up the hall. Closet doors swing open, closed. Snaps snap shut, and zippers zipper up. Stacked heels cliek down the still dark halls, and the first shift moves off to dass. Somewhere a snooze alarm begins to sound . . . .

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Peruvian Meets Deadlines Over half of the 1964-1965 school year has passed, and work on the new Peruvian is still being diligently carried on. The final yearbook deadline for this year's book is March 8, and the final supplement deadline is set for June 5. Approximately 110 pages of the new Peruvian have been sent in to the printer, and work on the rest of the book seems to be going along quite smoothly. The new yearbooks are scheduled to arrive during the third or fourth week in May. The books should prove to be very interesting, colorful, and accurate as the result of the effort displayed by members of the yearbook staff.

Delzell Fire

se.c.ond Semester G·rads Sign Contracts Fourteen Peru State College candidates for teaching positions have signed contracts for the second semester, according to Harold W. Johnson, director of placement. Four of the new teachers a r c in elementary education, and two of the IO secondary candidates are graduates ·of previous years. The mid-year candidates and their teaching location: January elementary graduates -Penny Edwards to Elk Creek; Janis Mayer to Bellevue; Kathy Ward to Bellevue; Pat Thomas to Bellevue. January secondary graduates -Ronald Foreman to Veterans Administration Hospital, Wadsworth, Kans.; Mike Janis to Millard; Jeanne Tynon to Atkinson; Ken Hartman to Civil Defense Adult Education, State Department -of Education, Lincoln; Wendell Wiksell to Omaha; Dan Coffey to Chester; Jerry Joy to Doane College, Crete; David Malmberg, Iowa, to Nebraska State School for Visually Handicapped, Nebraska City. Alumni secondary candidates: Marion Battani, Madrid, Iowa, to Wet<ping Water; Jan Lillethorup Krakow, Kenosha, Wis., to Madison, Wis.

On the evening of Jan. 31, 1965, a fire broke out in Delzell Hall. The fire was confined to room 302 in the north wing of the dormitory. No one was present in the room when the fire broke out, and considerable damage was Take your vacation and earn done before it was discovered. The fire was discovered about five hours credit. A tentative course on wheels, 7:00 p.m. and put out soon by the Peru Fire Department with depending on sufficient student chemical fire extinguishers. The interest, was recently announced blaze was blamed on an electric by Dr. George Schottenhamel, short caused when a lamp near head of the Division of History an open window was blown over and Social Science. The course will include a four on a bed. A bed was destroyed, and the room was severely smoke thousand mile tour of the Revodamaged. Several radios, clocks, lutionary Battlefields in the East. and a tape recorder were lost in Niagara Falls, Bdston, Yorktown, the fire, but the clothes, luggage, Saratoga, the World's Fair, Ten. and other furniture in the room nessee Valley, and Washington, were recovered. Most of the dam- D. C., are other places of interest age in the room was covered by to be visited. The cost of the trip is $324.00 both school and personal insurplus tuition for five hours and ance. Bill Klabunde, Lester Turner, obligatory college fees. This cost and Alvin Henrichs, who lived in includes twin bed accommodathe room, have moved to another tions, baggage tips, and transporroom in the dormitory. They ex- tation on an air-conditioned bus. pect to move back into their old The course would start with a room when the remodeling now two-day briefing session at Peru being done is completed. The on July 15 and 16, and would be room is being completely repaint- completed August 8th. Anyone ed, refinished, and refurnished by interested should. contact Dr. the school maintenance depart- Schottenhamel for further dement. tails.

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Next week, Wesley Fe_l- · lowship will sponsor ·a showing of the film, "We'll Bury You" at the college auditorium at 6:30-8:00 p.m. Everyone is invited. A freewill offering will be received to defray expenses. Learn about "Communism" as to what it really is.

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ALPHA MU OMEGA The Peru chapter of Alpha Mu PSEA

Omega met on Febr. 8. A movie about mathematics, en t i t 1e d 'ILimits," was presented. ,The next meeting will be held on March 8, at 'Wlhich time new members will be initiated into the fraternity.

The Peru Student Education Association meeting was held in the college auditorium, Febr. 15. After a short business meeting, a panel of student teachers discussed various aspects of their -0first teaching experiences. Mary WHITE ANGELS Ann Biere and Marvin Corbin A White Angels-Cherub meet· represented the elementary level. ing was held on Fehr. 8 with Kay Jian Beemer and Dan LeuenberOamden, the returning president, ger taught in junior 'high; Linda in charge. O'Hara and Larry Trimble disThe White Angels were re· cussed teaching in senior high. minded of their second semester 'Each gave a brief summary of dues of one dollar to be paid behis student teaching, stressing fore the March meeting. The or· the areas of discipline, classroom der of business was the "voting preparation for students and in" of the Cherubs to the Wrote teachers, duties, :and methods. Angels. The qualifications of All felt that student teaching was each Cherub were gone over betheir most valuable and worthfore voting. The Cherubs will be while college preparation for progiven 'invitations to join if acfessional teaching. It was agreed cepted. that no one shd':>Jld be afraid of ---0this rewarding opportunity for H O ME EC CLUB actual teaohing. A question and Donna Donovan, president, opanswer period followed the panel ened the monthly Home Ee Club discussion. meeting on Fehr. 8 at 7:00 in the -oCampus School. PHI BETA LAMBDA A short business meeting was At the meeting of the Phi Beta Lambda on Fehr. 15, the min- held. The Spring Home Ee Conutes were read by the secretary, vention which is to be held in and the treasurer's report was Lincoln, March 25 and 26 was discussed. The remainder of the presented to the members. meeting was spent preparing Mary Sautter provided some fruit for the fruit cakes that will questions concerning the participation of each active member, be served for the Martha Washand the state convention was dis- ington Tea, Febr. 18, from three cussed. 'The convention is to be to five o'clock in the Home Ee held on March 19 and 20 in Lin- Room. The meeting was adjourned. coln. Applications for contest are Refreshments were prepared and due by March 8. Larry Franke ·provided the served by Carol Hawley, Judy Elsinger, Wanda Hartnett, an d program. Jan Beemer. -0-

BLUE DEVILS The regular evening meeting of the Blue Devils was held Monday, Fehr. 8. President Jack Rin· ne opened the meeting. The meeting consisted of discussion of the pledges for the coming semester. Members were urged to bring pledge candidates to flhe next meeting. Semester dues WeJ;e also a topic for discussion. The meeting rwas adjourned with the singing of the Blue Devil Song. --0-

FACULTY WOMEN'S CLUB The Faculty Women's Club met Thursday, February 11, in the recreation room of Eliza Morgan Hall. Mrs. Louise Kregel presided over the short business meeting. Contributions were taken for the Nebraska Children's Home in Omaha.

The table decorations and refreshments portrayed a Valentine theme. The members of the committee, headed by Mrs. F, H. Larson, were: Mrs. Leland Sherwood, Miss Norma Diddel, Miss Frieda Rowoldt, and Mrs. Lyle l.MCKercher. The next meeting will be held on March 11. -0-

SENIOR CLASS MEETING The Senior class met Wednesday, Febr. 1.0, during convocation period. The purpose of the meeting was to decide what to do with the class treasury. President Dan Leuenberger appointed a committee to look into the cost of promoting a new innovation to the school which could be left as a reminder of the class of '65. Other business was postponed until the .next meeting, so that the class could have a better idea of where they wanted to use their money. President Leuenberger adjourned fihe meeting, urging all class members to . attend the next meeting so pertinent business could be discussed.

KAPPA DELTA PI Kappa Delta Pi held its first meeting of the semester Febr. 3 at the Campus School with Joe Ward presiding. A pledge program was discussed during the business meeting. Mr. Doxon, principal of the campus school, told of the problems of the higih school teacher. Miss Ashley was in charge of refreshments.

-oSIGMA TAU DELTA Sigma Tau Delta met Fehr. 11 at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Silas Summers. Three new members were initiated. They include: Myrene Hildebrand, Denver, Colo.; Donna Van Buskirk, Clarinda, Iowa; and March Tinkham, Holmesville. Refreshments followed the candlelight ceremony. Later, the English Club met for a social hour and refreshnients.

-oGAMMA DELTA On Jan. 13, the Gamma Delta members elected new officers for the second semester of the 196465 school year. The officers are the following persons: president, .Larry Franke; vice-president, Roy Windhorst; secretary, !Marsha Schaaf; and treasurer, Lorraine Tonninges. On Febr. 3, members of Gamma Delta discussed the Central Plans Convention to be held at Lincoln, Nebraska, on March. 5, 6, and 7. One delegate is entitled to go to the convention. A "Foot Frolic" (square dance) is planned for February 24. Members of the Lutheran Student Association have been invited to attend the affair. -0-

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LSA

MENC

Wednesday evening, Febr. 10, the LSA held its regular meeting. The business meeting consisted of discussing the Midwest Winter Conference to be held at Kansas State University Fehr. 19· 21. Following the meeting president, Dennis Flattre lead the closing devotions. Mrs. F. H. Larson sponsored the meeting.

'.MENC met on Fehr. 8 in the Chorus Room in the Campus Scliool. · The meeting was called to order by President Dale Duensing. The order of business consisted of a discussion of a possible "road show," to tour other colleges. The 1MENC also voted on the idea of ·having ·guest speakers come and talk to them about marching band and concert band methods. The motion was passed and the meeting W>as adjourned.

'.h~ VanderCook·C··~····,.·

dir.ector of lege of Music m Chicago, will 1 the guest director for the e'" ning concert to be present ' February 13 in the chapel. .

Dinner meetings for two chapters of the Peru State College ** * Alumni Association are being A short circuit on the secoti planned for the coming weeks, reports Donald K. Carlile, execu- floor of Deglman Hall, Creight .· tive secretary of fihe Peru Alum- University, caused a fire sho before 10 p.m., according to ni Assodation. The Greater Oma!ha area chap- Norbert P. Loehr, director. ter will meet Marc'h 20 at Mar- though nothing serious resulte chio's, 4443 South 13th St., Oma- one incident came from the pa ha, Saturday, March 20, for a demonium which is well wo dinner meeting, program, a n d repeating. One young man, business session. R. D. Slagle, 511 had been routed from his ro West Mission, Bellevue, and Vir- in a hurry, headed for ginia Lazzaro, 5636 Leavenworth, warmth of the Student Center i Omaha, are in charge of arrange- his cut-offs and sweat shirt. Th first person he met happened ments. Officers of the Northern Cali- be a Jesuit who informed t fornia chapter have selected Sat- young man that cut-offs were n urday, April 10, for the date of allowed in the Center. The st their eighth annual meeting, dent explained that there was scheduled for" Frenchy's, Hay- fire in the Degiman Hall. "That, ward, Calif. Genevieve McNally, the priest replied, "is the 23716 Lynn Street, Hayward, excuse I've heard yet!" Paul 0. BlaiT, 7380 Saroni Drive, Oakland, and A.. B. . C1ayburn, 1309 North San Juan Avenue, Stockton, are in charge of arSHOE REPAIR rangements.

PARDE

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Campus To Campus A trip to Nassau on the SS Florida will be one of the high· lights of the Southeast Study Tour, June 18-July 11, according to Dr. Catherine Titus, associate professor of English, at Central Missouri State College. Three countries in Europe, the Southeast United States, and Missouri will be the territory for three study tours conducted by members of the social science and English departments.

•** Hastings College will host its fourth annual Nebraska High School Honor Band February 12· 13, according to Jimmie King, band director and honor b a n d co-ordinator. Richard Brittain,

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--<>WESLEY FELLOWSHIP On Fehr. 3, Wesley Fellowship was served a Chinese dinner which was followed by an informal meeting to discuss plans for the next week's meeting. The dinner, cooked by Michael Chu, consisted of sweet and sour pork, shrimp-fried rice, Chinese vegetable soup, and tea. Twenty-sev· en people attended the dinner and listened to Mike's fortune· telling. !Because of the transfer to Kearney State College by Nancy Springer, the Fellowship's secretary-treasurer, and the resignation of Bruce DuVal, president of the organization, a nominations committee was appointed. The committee held a meeting with the Reverend Hankins on Sunday night, Febr. 7. At the Wesley Fellowship meeting on Febr. 10, new officers were elected and a roller-skating or bowling party was planned for Febr. 17. The new officers are the following: president, Gary Neumann; vice-president, Lonnie Dambrecht; secretary, Pam Bottomley; treasurer, Judy Elsinger. On Fehr. 24, Wesley Fellowship is sponsoring a film to be pre· sented in the College Auditorium from 6:30 to 8:00 p.m. The film is called ''We Will Bury You," and it concerns Communism. The public is invited.

Afumni Meetings Being Planned

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ebraska's Oldest College

The Voice of the Campus ,of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 60

Number 10

MARCH 8, 1965

Gymnasts Perform At Annual Event

nual Martha ,~ashington Tea ':eld February 18 -

:R

, ~

,'

BY JOAN BRETTHORST On Febr. 18 the annual Martha ashington Silver Tea was held the Home Economics Room of e T. J. Majors Campus Sc!fiol. e tea, sponsored by Mrs. Ina roul and given by the Home onomics Club, was scheduled om 3 to 5 p.m. The framed recipe for Martha ashington's famous fruit cake as on display in the H o m e onomics Room. In 1940 it was pied from the original recipe a group of Peru State coeds. companied by Miss E d n a eare, they had visited Mt. Vern while in the East for a home onomics convention. One of the rls found the recipe, which had en copied from Martha Washgton by her granddaughter, artha Custis. The recipe, ''How Make a Great Cake," reads, in rt: "Take 40 eggs ap.d divide e whites from the yolks and at them to a froth; work four unds of butter to a cream; put e whites of the eggs: to it a oonful at a time ..." This year the Home Economics lub members baked approxiately 100 pounds of fruit cake. e cake was prepared in the ods classes under the supervion of Mrs. Sproul and Mrs. uise Kregel. The "Great路 Cake," w.h i ch rved as the centerpiece, eighed about 20 pounds. It was corated by Do~s McConnau~ey of Peru, assisted by Bobbie rmstrong of Nebraska City. The ake was fashioned as a calendar in white, pink, and red, with the "22" outlined in red. Red carnations and greenery surrounded he centerpiece, and there was a buffet arrangement of red an d white porn porns. Over 100 guests attended. Guests came from Percival, Johnson, Bellevue, Bancroft, Falls City, Brownville, and Brock, as well as from Peru.

Initiation Of New hite Angels Held The White Angels held their initiation party in Morgan Hall on Monday, Febr. 22. The initiation actually began earlier in the evening when each of the pledges wore angels' "wings" to the basketball game between Peru and Concordia. After the game the n e w pledges presented a skit to the White Angels which was centered around the commercials on television today. Judy Harbison was master of ceremonies while Wanda Anderson recommended "Miracle" watermelons for those who are unhappy and depressed. Joanie Sprieck and Anna Marie eGerlia sang the Ken-L-Ration song. Later, Sheryl Davis and Laura West argued over whether Certs is a breath mint or a candy mint. When a giant (Lois Monsees) (Continued on page four)

Nebraska's 路Best College

Jon Davis, Lonn Pressnall, Judy Elsinger, Phil Dorssom, Wanda Anderson, and Harvey Fisher are busy practicing for the play "Kiss of Death" which will be performed on March 11.

Get Yourself On Down To The Annual Spring Play "Folks, air ya-all jest a mite taired them modurn si-kolog-i-cal dramers, an' hev ya got a hankerin' ta see a reel western story thet'll kinda git the hair riz up on yore haids? Wal, dadblame it, jest mosey on down an' take a gander at 'The Kiss o' Death'." This sound advice"'Was given by Missouri Bill, interna, tionally famous yarn-spinner, in an exclusiVe interview yesterday. MissoUri referred to the Spring

Play, to be presented Thursday, March 11, in the college auditorium. It is the story of the perilous adventures of Walter Halliday, a young Eastern journalist who travels westward to Red Butte. Walter plans to publish the Territory's first newspaper, but the first moment he enters town, he is marked for death by the kiss of Nelly Wilkins, the town's rich, spoiled darling. Will Walt win the fair hand of Peg, the sweet orphan girl? Or will the scheming Nelly Wilkins destroy their happiness? Who will "git hot lead in their gizzards," in the refined words of Abby Ritter, the town gossip, Consairn it, ya-all 'll be plum Entry materials for the seventh disapinted if'n ya miss this annual Peru State College Interhyar play! Whup up yore hoss scholastic contest scheduled for an' git down thar! Friday, March 26, have b e en mailed to area schools, according to Leonard Cartier, assistant professor of business administration and contest director. Inclement weather last year trimmed entries from 41 to 33 Kappa Delta Pi is a national schools, with Falls City winning honorary education fraternity. their fourth consecutive first Juniors and seniors are, invited place division A trophy. Lourdes to become members路 because of Central of Nebraska City took high records and good professionhome the division B trophy-the al attitudes. Also considered are third for that school. Schools personal attitudes toward life and above 150 enrollment are divi- teaching. In the Peru chapter, insion A and below are division B. vitations are extended in the fall In the Peru State Interscholas- and the spring to those who are tic contest, tests are given in 24 eligible. Students on campuses areas, with points awarded the across the United States consider top five students in each event in it an honor to be invited to join the respective :divisions. Division Kappa Delta Pi. A schools may enter two stuThe fraternity was founded dents in each event, while divi- March 8, 1911, at the University sion B schools may enter only of Illinois. It strives to encourage one. excellence in scholarship, high Examination areas inc 1u de : personal standards, improvement Algebra II, American Govern- in teacher preparation, distincment, American History, Biology, tion in achievement, and contriChemistry, Drawing, English Us- butions to education. Members age, French, Geometry, German, are expected to maintain and Health, Home Economics, Indus- further these ideals. trial Arts, Latin, Literature, MuMembership in Kappa Delta Pi sic, Physics, Shorthand I, Short- is for life. One pays annual dues hand II, Spanish, Spelling, Typ- to maintain active membership. ing I, Typing II, and World Active members receive the soHistory. (Continued on page two)

o'

Interscholastic Meet Friday, March 26

What Is Kappa Delta Pi?

NOTICE

The deadline for entries to the Freshman Essay Contest is March 15. Manuscripts may be submitted to any English professor or to . Lonn Pressnall, president of English Club and Sigma Tau Delta. Awards will be given to the first and second place winners.

Peruvians Compete In Speech Debate Contest On Thursday, February 25, 1965, James D. Levitt, Associate Professor of Speech at P er u State, was accompanied by Laura West, Cheryl Gawart, John Webster, Dan Kundsen, and Bill Bowen to the campus of the University of Nebraska in Lincoln for the annual speech and debate contest. The contest began Thursday night with the initial rounds of debate. Friday brought the competition in individual events. Entered from Peru State in debate were Laura West and Bill Bowen. In original oratory, Dan Knudsen competed, with Cheryl Gawart reading dramatic interpretation. In extemporaneous speaking were John Webster and Bill Bowen. Schools from Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, 路 Colorado, South Dakota, and Minnesota were in attendance in Lincoln. One competitor was the United States Air Force Academy.

IF YOU Eloped Shaved your head Had twins Have married Loved and lost Had two birthdays Have a new old girl friend Passed a calcu1us exam Learned a new word Had two dates in one eve Studied ahead of time Have been quiet for 10 whole minutes Have kisses sweeter than wine-Send it to the PEDAGOGIAN.

The third annual Gymnastics Demonstration was held in the Peru State Gym on Tuesday evening, March 2. Mr. James Pilkington was the program director. The following list took part in the program: Joe Hertz, high bar, rings, an:d. the parallel bar; Lee Peterson, high bar; Tim Hendricks, rings and high bar; LeRoy Arellano, high bar and parallel .bar; Bruce DuVal, high bar; Kathy Francis, free exercise and high bar; Anita Cox, free exercise and parallel bar; Royce Curtis, free exercise, high bar, and parallel bar; Gary Viterise, free exercise and parallel bar; Ken Dorsti, tumbling; Bob Garner, tumbling; Charles Pratt, tumbling; Dan Bolin, tumbling; Jim K~nter, tumbling; R. Sunderman, tumbling; and Ron Robbins, free exercise and parallel bar. To change the pace of the evening, the public was treated to a girls' basketball game. Most of the girls who took part in this game were from Iowa, where they have girls basketball in high school.

Mrs. Wheeler Lists Volleyball Schedules Pairings for the first round of the 19th annual High School Girls Volleyball Tournament at Peru State College March 15-1617, have been announced byMrs. Frances R. Wheeler, director of women's physical education. Beginning Monday at 9:30 a.m., two games will be played simultaneously throughout the day, with the last pair of opening round games scheduled for 8 p.m. At the conclusion of the first day of games, the 32-team field will be reduced to 16. Tuesday afternoon's games, beginning at 1 p.m., will determine the top eight teams, with quarter finals scheduled for 7 and 8 p.m. Wednesday afternoon semifinals are set for 3 and 4 p.m. These will be the first single games of the tournament. Consolation and championship games are set for 7 and 8 p.m., Wednesday. Murdock, winner of the 1964 tournament, Bratton Union of Humboldt, Dawson-Verdon, and Elmwood are seeded teams. Seedings are based on season's records. Runner-up in the 1964 tourney was Bratton Union, with Dawson-Verdon, third, and Stella, fourth. First Round Pairings9:30 a.m.-Peru Prep vs. Syracuse; Johnson vs. Sterling. 10:30 a.m.-Lewiston vs. Shubert; Nehawka vs. Stella. 1:00 p.m.-Western vs. Adams; Steinauer vs. Mead. 2:00 p.m.-Louisville vs. Avoca; Prague . vs. Douglas. 3:00 p.m.-Elk Creek vs. Endicott; Alvo-Eagle vs. Talmage. (Continued on page two)


EDITO~

VlE\'fS

Snow

MAJORS

. W~E!n it snows, students and faculty may be seen mak· HALL mg thell' way care~y down the hills. Often, some unlucky s?ul takes a nasty spill and suffers the resultant loss of dig· mty. By John However, the snow usually doesn't stay on the walks Barton Ver'{ long. The maintenance men are soon on the job with thell' shovels, brooms, and salt. Residents of Morgan Hall These past few days have been who live on the east side can often tell whether or not it rather hectic for anyone in the snowed during the night by listening for the sound of snow dorm who wanted to study. Ev-. shovels. A vote of thanks, then, goes to these men for their ery day has. been disrupted due to construction work on the new prompt attention to snow removal on campus. Flag We are concerned ·about the lack of respect shown on this campus to the flag of the United States. It sometimes flies all night; students have commented about seeing it bravely waving in the rain and snow. When it is taken down it is sometimes rolled into a ball rather than being correctly folded. The situation 'is probably due to the fact that several people are responsible for the ",are of the flag. However, this carelessness does not speak well for the college, and we feel that steps should be taken to insure proper treatment of our flag.

addition. Workers seem to be well ahead of their schedule.

Ed Stillinger and Rod Baade spent the weekend in Fort Madison, Iowa, visiting Gary Stover, who teaches in the Fort Madison school system. Various dorm residents have been working out with the baseball and track teams. Those on the track team include: Chuck Niemeyer, Roy Windhorst, Jim Watson, Jack Rinne, and Tom Rosengr~n. Niemeyer placed first in a triangular meet at ()maha University last week. Chuck vaulted 12 feet. Roy Windhorst placed second in the shot put.

Organizations "That organization has such dull meetings-it's just a waste of time. Mortimer iS a lousy president." This sentiment is being expressed frequently around campus. The complain· ers don't seem to realize, though, that although Mortimer may not be an outstanding president, it isn't all up to him. Those residents on the baseball He would probably appreciate some program and project suggestions from members. It's up to everyone to improve team are: Larry Fangmeyer, Harry Leth, Pat Venditti, Gary the quality of his organizations. -Dorothy Bock Young, and Jack Cook. The y

Singing goes better refreshed. And Coca-Cola -with that special zing but never too sweet · refreshes best.--

open the season on March 29, so everyone charges up and down playing a double header wit h the stairs. The girls who carry Central Missouri. ELIZA pop bottles were given a raiseMORGAN Various dorm residents a r e they needed the extra money to starting to sign teaching conHALL buy linament for their aching tracts for next fall. One of the backs. By first to sign was Marvin Corbin, February 24 was a busy day who is going to teach in the Barbara Gordon for Sally Kelly and Connie Ho- Chio, California, school system. schar. First they hosted a bridal It seems that Bill Rinne is glad The . girls in Morgan Hall are shower for Carol Thornton. Cara little sad this week-'Our favor- ol's mother, Mrs. Roesch was that the basketball season is ite guest was Virtually thrown able to attend. Carol's marriage over, for he wishes to spend more Bottled under tht auU!ority of The Coca-COia Company by1 Nebraska City Coca-Cola Bottling Co. out of the dorm. She even had to to Dan Coffey will take place of his time studying. leave town escorted by Joe, the March 6. John So by celebrated his Later that night Sally and night watchman! Yes, our yellow Now that the cast is gone, everytwenty-first birthday on March 2. cat is now somewhere in Brock. Connie hosted a happy un~th­ one fondly misses the sight of A small party was held in John's DELZELL If Majors Hall has pups, why day party. Everyone except Pat Dick struggling up those three honor. shouldn't we have a cat? Coulr. Knippelmier (it was her birthHALL long flights of stairs. He easily we stop her from "wandering" day) was a guest of honor. Tea, Bob Ruff antl Pat McNulty deserves the medal for the most into our rooms? And of course crumpets, and cucumber sand- have been doubling as electriguts of the month. By we had to feed her. No one was wiches were served. cians this past week. They have Bill It is a sad fact that since the Teri Kisby and Carol Nichols been rewiring their TV set for cruel enough to put her outside Bowen advent of the deep drifts of snow in the cold. Some kind soul even have the same birthday, March 1. better reception. on the front lawn of Delzell, I really feel like a columnist fixed up a box for her. The latest thing in Delzell Hall more screens have been deDue to the elements, various Yes, she belonged to everyone because I have something to reright now is the fad for the clean stroyed than were all last fall. parking lots around the dorm -until she became, ah . . . care- tract. Diane Bartels is a second room. The latest trend in our The people who sleep near the less on first floor. Then a note semester freshman, not first. I have become very soft. Numer- winter weather has made the windows have learned that unous residents became stuck and appeared on the bulletin board. was unable to contact her for a ground so muddy that it is near- less the window stays closed, it requested that something be done THEN the kitty belonged to no personal interview, so I had to ly an impossibility to keep the can get very wet when a fast one. Poor thing, just another vic- rely on someone else. I must get about the problem. To relieve floors clean. At almost any hour snowball comes w h i s t 1i n g this problem for the present, another "contact" on third floor! tim of circumstances. of the day someone can be seen through the window. residents were permitted to park Ginny Mullen is having a hard No one can say the girls living trying to sweep the dried caked Those people who were up on second, third, and in the base- time getting around on crutches, their cars in other areas. Bill mud out of a room. Before long Rinne, president of the dorm, has early enough last Saturday mornment aren't getting enough exer- and hopes the snow stops falling requested that something be the parking lots around the dorm ing saw a beautiful creation in cise. The elevator is still broken, before she falls! done about the situation in the will have to be re-filled with dirt, the snow by the bulletin board in because the great majority of it future. front of the administration buildis already in the dorm. ing. Some of the weekend resiPERU PEDAGOGIAN Some congratulations are in dents of the dorm, and there Mrs. Wheeler lists· order for Dick Dobbs, who lives aren't many left, decided that STAFF Volleyball Schedule on the third floor of Delzell. Dick something was needed to give Editor--------------------------------------- Dorothy Bock has spent the last three weeks added sophistication to the cam(Continued from page one) Associate Editor_____________________________ Dick Berthold with his right leg in a full cast. pus. Copy Editor_________________________________ Mary Sautter 6:00 p.m.-Malcolm vs. Table Copy Editor______________________________ Charles Richards Rock; Holmesville vs. Brock Feature Editor____________________________ Ginny Grossman 7:00 p.m.-Platteview of SpringPhotography Editor_____________________ Eugene Fitzpatrick field vs. Dawson-Verdon; Layout Editor___________________________ Elaine Neddenriep Appliances - Sporting Goods Elmwood vs. Republican Academic Editor____________________________ Joan Dickman City. Hunting and Fishing Licenses Business Manager ____________________________ John Barton PERU 8:00 p.m.-Murdock vs. Pana872·2561 CECIL BOWMAN Circulation Manager_________________________ Bruce McCoy ma; Bennet vs. Bratton UnMorgan Hall Column _______________________ Barbara Gordon ion of Humboldt. Majors Hall Column__________________________ John Barton Delzell Hall Column___________________________ Bill Bowen Sports Column______________________________ Dick Berthold Reporter__________________________________ Mary Ann Biere What Is Kappa Delta Pi? Reporter___________________________________ ()liver Bierman (Continued from page one) PHONE 872-2331 Reporter---------------------------------- Joan Bretthorst ciety's publication, The EducaReporter____________________________ Anna Marie DeGerlia tional Forum, an outstanding Member F.D.I.C. Reporter------------------------------------ Bruce McCoy journal in the field of education. Reporter___________________________________ Jackie Swegler INVITES YOUR BUSINESS Peru's chapter of Kappa Delta Reporter------------------------------------ Mary Tackett Pi, Beta Mu, is one of those esReporter_____________________________________ Ron Wiksell CARROLL LEWIS, tablished early. Miss Alma AshJOHN L. LEWIS, President Vice Pres. & Cashier Adviser--------------------------------- Stewart Linscheid ley is the counselor. Joe Ward is currently serving as president.

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··Twelve Cagers Earn letters

In Home Finale

C o a c h Jack Mcintire h a s named 12 lettermen for the 196465 Peru State College basketball season. Mcintire is already looking forward to next year's round ball season as no seniors appear on the lettermen roster this year. The monogram winners include four juniors and eight sopho'"' mores. They are: Juniors-Bill Witty, 3; Jack Rinne, 3; John Chasse, 1; Mike Harmon, 2. SophomoresBill Rinne, 1; Dean Cain, 2; Jim Jennings, 1; Ron Kroll, 1; Dick Estes, 2; Roger Capps, 1; Ron Snodgrass, 2; John Alexander, 1. \

The Peru State Bobcats beat Concordia 87-76 in the Bobcats' home finale for the 1964-65 season. Trailing at the half by a score of 45-41, the Bobcats were led in a second half surge on the shooting and rebounding of Mike Harmon. Harmon led all scorers with a total of 29 points. Other Bobcat performers in double figures were Dean Cain and Jack Rinne with 18 and 15 respectively. Concordia was paced by Pete Frerking and Paul Weigert who combined for 47 points . ·The win boosted the Bobcats' record to 9 wins against 10 losses for the season.

Bobcats Second In Triangular Peru State College's track team placed seeond in their initial indoor meet Fehr. 23, scoring .5B2 points behind the host University of Omaha Indians, who scored 621h. The third entrant, Yankton College, trailed with 37 points. Peruvians Charles Niemeyer, Deshler; Buddy McCrea, Omaha, and Curtis Holliman, Rockford, Ill., scored firsts in vault, broad jump, and 60-yard dash, respectively. Peru ScorersShot-2. Roy Windhorst, Deshler; 3. Les Raines, Glenwood, Ia. Vault-1. Charles Niemeyer, Deshler; tie for 3. Tim Hendricks, Omaha. Height 12-1. Broad jump-1. Buddy McCrea, Omaha; 3. Lowell Brown, Wood River, Ill.; 4. David Seward, Rockford, Ill. Distance 217314. High jump-3. Buddy McCrea. Mile run-3. Louis Fritz, Verdon;. 4. Jim Watson, Red Cloud. 60-1. Curtis Holliman,.. 3. David Seward; 4. Jim Hagemeier, Beatrice. 440-2. Curtis Holliman; 4. Narva Brye, Omaha. Two mile-2. James O'Donoghue, Worcester, Mass.; 3. Richard Zaparanick, Westfield, N. J. 1,000-2. Louis Fritz. 880-4. Jim Watson. 60 lows-3. David Seward. Mile relay-2. Roger Crook, Salem; Curtis Holliman, Buddy McCrea; Narva Brye.

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Bobcats Lose To Hastings The Peru State Bo beats dropped a close conference game to Hastings Satul'day, Febr. 20. Slow and precise offense in the first half produced a six point Peru lead at halftime. Peru suffered a height loss early in the second half when Ron Snodgrass received his fifth personal foul and went to the bench. Midway in the second half, Hastings began to penetrate Peru's defense and secured a comfortable lead. Peru made a strong rally with only minutes left in the game. Hastings' defense, however, tightened and Peru was nipped by six points. The final score was 80 to 74. Individual Scores Witty ------------------ 18 Harmon ---------------- 12 Cain ------------------- 12 Snodgrass -------------- 10 Capps ------------------ 8 Rinne ------------------ 7 Jennings --------------- 4 Chasse ----------------- 3

INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS: No. F.G. Games Scored Atts. Estes _______ 15 82 180 J. Rinne ____ 20 66 121 Harmon ____ 20 134 309 Witty ______ 20 37 106 Snodgrass __ 18 107 258 Chasse _____ 18 25 60 251 Cain ------- 20 92 Alexander __ 12 40 104 21 Capps ~----- 4 8 Jennings ___ 11 7 10 B. Rinne ___ 8 8 4 Kroll ------- 8 2 Peru _______ 20 597 1345 Opponent ___ 20 62.9 1419

gren, mile and two mile; Charles Niemeyer, pole vault; LeRoy Arellano, pole vault; Curt Holliman, sprints; and Jack Rinne, half mile. The freshmen include: Jim Hagemeier, a top sprinter, who was the Nebraska State Champ in the 440 yd. dash last spring; Buddy McCrea, who was the Nebraska State Champ in the broad jump last spring; Narva Brye, a fine sprinter; Tim Hendricks, mile and two mile; Jim Watson, mile; Dan Bolin, mile; Red Huelson, hurdles; Roger Neujahr, sprinter; Mike Ferry, sprinter; and Dick Zaparanick, mile and two mile. Peru has already started its indoor season. Last week the Bobcats took second in a meet held at Omaha University. CurAccording to Head Coach Jack tis Holliman won the 60 yd. dash, Mcintire, Peru State's track team Chuck Niemeyer won the pole should enjoy one of its finest vault, and Buddy McCrea won seasons this coming spring. Last year Peru conducted a fine cinder campaign, winning 9 of 10 dual or triangular meets. This year's team should do just SUNDAY-WEDNESDAY as well even though the competition will increase. There are 13 returning lettermen from last year's team. A host of fine freshmen should also bolster the team. The lettermen include: Gene Noell, hurdles; Jim O' Donoghue, mile and two mile; Roy Windhorst, weights; Bill Witty, weights; Louis Fritz, mile and two mile; Dave Seward, sprints and hurdles; Roger Crook, sprints and hurdles; Lowell Brown, broad jump; Tom Rosen-

Track Prospects Good

PIONEER

F. T. Scored 46 38 71 33 73 23 79 13 6 2 10 0

398 364

Atts. Rebounds Points 76 124 210 54 85 152 100 286 339 49 48 108 174 113 277 37 33 73 93 64 261 33 36 89 22 8 7 9 12 16 12 14 6 1 4 5 580 961 1594 952 557 1512

the broad jump. Schedule: Febr. 23-At Omaha University March 6-Federation Meet at Lincoln (played) March 11-N.W. Missouri State, Maryville March 20-Kansas State University .Relays at Manhattan April 1-Tarkio at Peru April 5-N.W. Missouri State, Maryville April 7-Midland at Fremont April 10-Kearney State at Kearney April 15-Washburn University at Peru April 20-Wesleyan at Lincoln April 22-N.W. Missouri, Tarkio, at Peru April 24-Drake Relays at Des Moines April 29-'Concordia at Seward May 4-Wayne at Peru May 14-15-NCC Meet at Kearney

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Holiday Tournament, the Bob· cats accumulated their highest SPORTS score ih a 119-81 triumph over ROUNDUP Tarkio. Mike Harmon finished with a 16.5 per cent point average to lead the Cats. Ron SnodBy Dick grass followed with 15.4 per cent. Berthold Dean Cain connected on 79 of 93 free throws for 85 per cent to The Peru Bobcats finished the lead the Peru cagers. Harmon 1964-65 basketball season with a pulled down 286 rebounds for 18 9 win and 11 loss record. They per cent, and Snodgrass followed gained three NCC victories while with 174 rebounds for 9.7 per toppling Wayne, Doane, and cent. Peru grabbed 961 rebounds Chadron. Their six NCC losses as a team for 48 per cent. John were from the hands of Kearney Rinne connected on 66 of 121 (2), Hastings (2), Chadron, and field goals, and Dick Estes folWayne. During the Beatrice lowed with 82 of 180 goals.

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Peru, Nebraska


Beta Beta Beta To Hear Englehart At the March 22 meeting of Beta Beta Beta Dr. Warren Enlehart will speak on some of the new discoveries r e g a r d i n g viruses. Dr. Englehart attended the University of South Dakota and later the University of Nebraska, where he received a doctorate in bacteriology. Dr. Englehart has been working with theories concerning the correlation between viruses and cancer. This meeting will be open to all interested persons.

Journalism Contest To Be Held At Peru State Elli Frandsen, Karon Raihe, Kafhy Francis, and Phyllis Rebuck are all wondering what the Ouija board holds for them. The girls live in Morgan Hall on ihird floor.

Band Tours Area Schools On February 25, at 8:30 a.m., the Peru State College Band boarded a bus and left the "campus of a thousand oaks" to perform at Hamburg and Sidney, Iowa. Their concerts were scheduled for ten o'clock at Hamburg and one o'clock at Sidney. The program consisted of "Storm King," "Overture fr o m Ben Hur," "Two Piece for Muted Brass," "Prelude and Fugue," and "Bravura for Trumpet." The "Bravura for Trumpet" w a s played by a trumpet trio with band accompaniment. D a 1e Duensing, Ralph Shaffer, and Tom Majors made up the trio. Selections from "My Fair Lady" and "How the West Was Won" were also played. Myrene Hildebrand was the mistress of ceremonies. The band was under the direction of Mr. Gilbert Wilson. The band members are as follows: Lola Baker, Cynthia Meier, Cherie Combs, Barbara Peck, Lucy Christensen, Adrian Bartek, Pat Corrigan, Mary Oestmann, Dorothy Bock, Marjean Wusk, Carol Kennedy, Judi Finke, Mike McNeely, Rogine Bang, Bill Carlson, Ruth Rulla, Gary Schmucker, Ralph Shaffer, Dale ·Duensing, Oliver Joiner, Judy Harbison, Al Chandler, Tom Majors, Ross Oestmann, Anita Cox, Jim Johnson, Al Eikhoff, Linda Renz, Chuck Wellensiek, Paul Stevenson, Marcia Cunningham, Larry Adams, Dick Shelton, Sharon Johnson, Tod Hoover, Gary Neumann, Keith Rawson, and Pat Knippelmier.

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Woes Of lntramurals Winning spirit, which is very prevalent in intramural basketball, is something to behold. The participants have an uncanny desire to win, most of them to the extent that they care more about their intramural team than they do about the college team. The first requisite of a team is having a name which is enhancing to all who hear i!t. Using this criteria, we come up with names such as "Road Runners," "Misfits," (and they are), "Glunks," "Worcesterites," (with as many as two or three boys who are actually from Worcester), "Emperors," "Centennials," "Duds" (and they are), and "Playboys" (and they really are). After the names, come the games. When basketball season arrives, the boys get togetherfor pre-game warm-ups and their spirit is very high. They run and holler encouragement and as the games proceed, tempers flare at certain officiating calls and at times a fist or two has be en known to fly through the air, aimed for a friendly chin. When a team wins, they are surprisingly exuberant about the victory· and rehash the game in the shower room, each player extolling his own prowess and endeavoring to pat his own back. During and after the first game, blisters are prevalent on the undisciplined feet of the warriors as they hustle up and down the floor. Aches and pains arrive the next morning as the players begin to feel the effect of using flabby muscles and of catching an eLbow in the ribs or a left to the jaw. In days to follow, the spirit of the teams remains high as they talk in anticipation of their next game and are always quite careful in seeing that at least five players know about the game which is upcoming. The intramural program is a. big asset to Peru because it does stimulate the interest among the student body and it provides an outlet for the boys' pent up emotions and lack of physical exercise. As long as the spirit remains among the participants and they enjoy their nights of athletic activity, intramurals will be a main part of student cooperation and incentive.

The district journalism contest will be held Saturday, March 13, on the Peru campus. Tests will be given in news feature writing, sports writing, editorial writing, copy-reading, editing and headline writing, yearbook copy reading and editing, yearbook copywriting, yearbook layout, newspaper layout, advertising, and radio news-writing and announcing. Winners at the district contest will be eligible for the state meet. District contests are also being held at the University of Nebraska, Wayne State College, Midland Lutheran College, McCook Junior College, Kearney State College, and Chadron State College. Participants in the Peru contest will come from high schools in the following counties: Cass, Otoe, Nemaha, Richardson, Johnson, Pawnee, Gage, Saline, and Jefferson. The contest is sponsored by the Nebraska High School Press Association and the Nebraska School of Journalism.

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Edifor Harvey Fisher is showing Elaine Neddenriep a sam page from an old yearbook, while Mary Sauffer looks af picfur The staff is busy working to meef ihe March 15 deadline, final de line for the '65 Peruvian. After March 15, work will begin on f supplemenf.

lnit1ation Of New White Angels Held (Continued from page one) emerged from a washing machine, Twila Cloyd almost had a heart attack. Meanwhile, Nancy Reidy told of how she had finally won an honor over Julie Harrison, even if it was only in a toothpaste test. Beth (Bertha) Terwilleger related the story of her new boyfriend to the group but asked why he never asked her out again. The highlights of the evening were the "happiness slogans" such as, "Happiness is having a diamond ring that will not cut glass."

Dr. Gamon Attends AASA Meeting In Atlantic City

President Neal S. Gomon w in Atlantic City, N. J., Febr. 1 17 for the meeting of the Ame can Association of School A ministiators. Nearly 26,000 p ple were present for the conv tion. Dr. Gomon was among proximately 50 Nebraskans tending. The whole program center around a principal theme of fe eral aid to schools. Distinguish speakers included Stewart Udall, Secretary of the Interi and George W. Ball, Under-Se retary of State. After the presentation of the Dr. Gomon attended seve skit the White Angels had a par- discussion groups, prim a r i 1 ty to welcome the new members those concerned with impact federal aid to higher educatio into the organization.

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ebraska's Oldest College

The Voice of the Campus of aThousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 60

Number 11

MARCH 22. 1965

Nebraska's Best College

Seventh Scholastic Contest On Friday

s The cast of "The Kiss of Death:" J. Manning, B. Gordon, R. ist, E. Fitzpatrick, K. Boatman, P. Dorssom, L. Pressnall, J. Elger, P. MacNeil, D. Knudsen, R. Hilt, H. Fisher, R. Wiksell, J. avis, and W. Anderson. Ameriil A d · : f i - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - (){} peo· ~onven­

mg ap·

Is

~Kiss

of Death" Well Attended

Thursday, March 11, the Spring lay, The Kiss of Death was prented at the college auditorium. s Jim Manning sang and told e tale of love, deceit, and reenge, Lonn Pressnall received e fatal kiss from Wanda Andrson. From that moment, he was arked for death at the guns of on Wiksell. Not even Myrene ildebrand, the town's most alkative woman, would tell the 'pore young stranger" of his imending doom. But true love and udy Elsinger's sharp hatpin aved Lonn from "gitting hot ead in his gizzard." Bill Bouton did a wonderful ob on the wall mural and other cenery. The stage crew built all ew flats for the play. Mr. Moore, Barbara Gordon, nd the whole cast offer their anks to Dorothy Bock, Mary llen Oestmann, and Mary Ann nade for the gigantic task of etting props and costumes. Mr. Bohlken was an energetic and able technical assistant. Other ·credits go to Mr. Sherwood an:d Mary Ann Gnade for designing the programs, and to Mrs. Gnade, Mrs. Moore, Ginny Mullen, and Mr. Bohlken for makeup. It has been rumored that people are in the plays at Peru just to eat Mrs. Gnade's refreshments -that's a very good reason too.

S.G.A. Movies May Be Discontinued On Sunday night, March 7, the Student Governing Association presented another of its series of Sunday night movies. The movie seen that night was "My Seven Convicts." Sunday night, March 21, saw the presentation of "The House of Usher."' The S.G.A. announced before the showing of last night's movie that unless the attendance improved at the presentations, that it would be necessary to discontinue the series. The attendance at the movies has apparently not been what it should, so unless some increase in interest is shown, the movies will not be shown in the future.

District Two Speech Contest Held At Peru The Nebraska High School Ac· tivities Association Dis·trict Two Speech Contest was held on the campus of Peru State College Friday, March 19, 1965. The annual District Two contest is held as a qualifying prerequisite to the state speech contest. The local director of the contest was Mr. Robert D. Moore, Reali' of the Language Arts Department. He was assisted by Mr. James D. Levitt in organizing the contest events. The district contest is held by Peru State as a service to the area high schools. High schools competing in the contest were divided into two classifications, Class "A" and Class "B." The District Two contest was one of the few that includes both Class "A" and Class "B" schools in one contest. Schools entered in Class "A" competition included Nebraska City, Auburn, Falls City, Tecumseh, and Syracuse. In Class "B" the schools included Dawson-Verdon, Talmage, Nebraska City Lourdes Central, Falls City Sacred Heart, Peru Prep, Platteview, Weeping Water, Palmyra, and Johnson. The contest events taking place on Friday included one act plays, poetry reading, oral interpretation of prose literature, oral interpretation of drama, informative public speaking, interpretative public speaking, television news commentary, original public address, and d i s c u s s i o n . Judges were Mr. Lyle Domina, Mr. Silas Summers, Mr. Robert Bohlken, Mr. James D. Levitt, and Mr. Robert D. Moore. Also judging was Mr. Donald Trubey of Northwest Missouri State Col· lege. In the discussion rounds the judges were Laura West, Judy Finke, Dan Knudsen, John Webster, and Bill Bowen, all students at Peru State. Time will explain it all. He is a talker, and needs no questioning before he speaks.-Euripides.

Peru State College will host the seventh annual Scholastic Contests to be held on Friday, March 26. Forty-seven area high schools will compete in nearly 1,000 tests. Competition is open to all students enrolled in grades t e n through twelve, according to Leonard Cartier, director. Certificates will be awarded to the students finishing in the first three positions. The contest areas are: drawing, biology, typewriting, industrial arts, home economics, English usage, world literature, spelling, algebra, geometry, chemistry, physics, shorthand, American history, world history, American government, music, health, Latin, French, German, and Spanish. Last year's winners, Falls City in Class A and Lourdes Central in Class B, will return to defend their titles.

Yearbook Final Deadline Met Editor Harvey Fisher announced that this year's final deadline for the Peruvian was met March 8. It contained 120 pages and all activities including pictures of basketball and the Valentine dance. The book will be delivered in May. The supplement will include 12 pages to be published this summer and distributed next fall.

I. A. Students See Kansas City Mr. Gordon Gavin, instructor of industrial arts, took Industrial Arts students to Kansas City on a tour of two industrial plants. The trip consisted of a guided tour of the General Motors, Chevrolet Division as s em b 1 y plant. At that plant most of the smaller lines of General Motors cars are built, including Chevy II's, Chevelles, Pontiac Tempests, (Continued on page four)

Honors Convo Held March 10 Honors Convo w a s opened man, Sarah Goodwin, Barbara March 10 with the Star Spangled Gordon, Merrill Greenlee, Mary Banner and Pledge of Allegiance. Hand, David Hensley, Myrene Dr. Gamon introduced the speak- Hildebrand, Nancy Jarvis, Jerry er, Dr. Freeman B. Decker, co- Joy, Robert Keppler, Teri Kisby, ordinator of state colleges. Dr. Edwin Loontjer, Suzan McKee, Decker discussed four trade- David Malmberg, Edna Martin, marks of a truly educated per- Virginia Moody, Joseph Oh, Lorson: one who has learned to use en Penkava, Charles Pratt, Lonn the English language as it should Pressnall, Connie Rademacher, be used, one who has taken ad- Mary Ann Rademacher, John ventage of education to find out Rinne, Jack Roper, Billy Russell, about different kinds of govern- Mary Schriner, William Scott, ment and separate the good from John Scharp, Joseph Smith, Mitthe bad, one who has learned the chell Terr, James Snyder, Arnold value of getting along with his Teten, Nancy Vanderbeek, Mifellow-man, and one who has a chael Wallis, Joe Ward, Donald knowledge of the social graces Weiner, Ronald Wiksell, Norma or courtesy. Wood, and George Zwickel. Following Dr. Decker's .talk, The final group recognized Dr. Gomon gave public recogni- were those who received high tion to students named to Who's distinction: Devon Adams, Oliver Who, James Agnew, Harvey Bierman, Eric Dorf, Penny EdFisher, Dan Leuenberger, Don wards, Marion Gomon, Kenneth Schmidt, Judi Whigham Finke, Hartman, Carol Henderson, AlJanice Wilkinson, Lonn Press- vin Henrichs, Mary Lu Hicks, nall, and William Witty. Robert Hilt, John Hunzeker, Student.s who recei.ved P.~.A. Mary Jones, Janis Mayer, Wayne Scholarships were Ohver Bier- , Kellogg, Joseph Keys, Elaine man, Dorot~y Bock, _Tom Castle, Muller, Mary Newmann Nilsson, Diane Mornson, Elame Mueller, Georgia Sherwood March TinkMarch Tinkham, Joe Ward, and ham Donna Van Buskirk Janice Ed Loontjer. Wilkinson, William Witt;. Students receiving distinction Convo was concluded with the included: B ob bi e Armstrong, Color Song. Linda Bartels, Janet Bierman, Dorothy Bock, Joan Bretthorst, Mary Brown, Ray Cain, C a r o 1 Chandler, Patricia Corrigan, Jacqueline Dodson, Anne Epley, Richard Ferron, Merton Finke, Gordon Garrett, Sheryl Gawart, According to Mr. James PilDavid Gamon, Marilyn Gannerkington, the Gymnastics Team will hold an All-School Carnival sometime in late April. This will be somewhat similar to the one held last year. The proceeds from the Carnival will be used to purchase blazers for the new members.

On campus to speak at Peru Kiwanis meeting, Gov. Morrison chats with visiting volleyball players.

Gymnastics Team To Sponsor Carnival

The Gymnastics Team h a s completed its tour for this season. Gymnasts have performed at various high schools in Iowa and Nebraska. On their recent tour they gave performances at Council Bluffs, Iowa, for both junior high and senior high students and at Auburn and Hebron. In addition to their tour they have performed at halftimes of various basketball games. Just recently they sponsored a Fun Night to raise money. Mr. Pilkington was very pleased with the members of the Gymnastics Team this year and expressed a desire to see new members next year.


GUIDES TO SUCCESS There are no exact rules to guarantee success, but there are guides to point the way by which others have found a measure of it. Call them rules, if you wish. Here they are. All work is combined of little tasks done daily. Some are harder than others, but if you like your work, you will do the hardest things first. In that way no challenge ever becomes a burden. Accept criticism as growing out of the desire of someone to help you. We learn to do right by being shown what we have done wrong. Produce all the enthusiasm for your work that you possibly can, for enthusiasm spreads and makes the tasks of everyone important, and easier to do. Build self-confidence by doing everything right the first time, if possible. ·Know your work. Try these guides throughout the year. -By Ginny Grossman thing about the culprits, at least we hope the break-ins will stop. DELZELL HALL By Bill Bowen

Lester Turner, Alvin Henrichs, and Bill Klabunde, who were displaced by the fire in Delzell, have moved back into their old room. The reconstruction of the room included the addition of the most brilliant yellow walls the dorm has ever seen. If it weren't for the soot covered walls in the hall, you'd never know we had a fire. The laundry room in Delzell has suffered another idiotic act of vandalism. I want to personally "thank" and "congratulate" whoever smashed the controls on one of the washing machines. You join a select group of senseless idiots, including the happy soul who took the knobs off the clothes dryer doors. Sometimes it seems a marvel that we have anything left in the dormitory. I don't think it's too much for those of us who use the dorm laundry facilities to ask that they be left in one piece.

The third floor of Delzell has finally achieved the ultimate touch of luxury. Our shower stalls are now graced with shower curtains. Af<ter seven months of being on display while taking a shower, it's nice to have some privacy. To whoever is responsible, goes a .big "thank you." This, along with hall lights that work, has made the third floor livable again. The warmer weather has only made the mud problem worse, but I've yet to talk to someone who isn't willing to put up with the mess as long as the weather stays warm and comfortable. The pups of Majors Hall and the ill-fated cat of Morgan Hall have a new contemporary in the collie that spends most of his time in Delzell. He started comMAJORS ing in when the weather was bitHALL terly cold and seemed to like it, so he .stayed around. The street near Delzell is now his favorite By haunt. He waits there to chase John Barion the cars passing by. As far as I can figure out, he chases only certain cars. Why he chases all Most of the residents of Majors the cars in one group going by, have been hit by spring flu. and then just watches the next Some -0f the residents were found group is a mystery. It could be on the tennis court enjoying the that he's neurotic. nice weather. Dennis Curtis, Roger Lucas, Roy Windhorst spent the weekand Ron Rist have offered a re- end with Rod Baade. They atward of $15.00 for any informa- tended the High School Baskettion concerning the recent rash ball Tournament in Lincoln on of break-ins in the basement Saturday evening. Tim Gilligan rooms at Delzell. Apparently the and Bob Ruff were in attendance break-ins have been numerous. at the Tourney in Omaha on SatPerhaps someone knows some- urday evening.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF

Editor--------------------------------------- Dorothy Bock Associate Editor_ ____________________________ Dick Berthold Copy Editor _________________________________ Mary Sautter Copy Editor ______________________________ Charles Richards Feature Editor____________________________ Ginny Grossman Photography Editor _____________________ Eugene Fitzpatrick Layout Editor ___________________________ Elaine Neddenriep Academic Elditor____________________________ Joan Dickman Business Manager____________________________ John Barton Circulation Manager_________________________ Bruce McCoy Morgan Hall Column _______________________ Barbara Gordon Majors Hall Column __________________________ J-0hn Barton Delzell Hall Column ___________________________ Bill Bowen Sports Column ______________________________ Dick Berthold Reporter__________________________________ Mary Ann Biere Reporter___________________________________ Oliver Bierman Reporter---------------------------------- Joan Bretthorst Reporter____________________________ Anna Marie DeGerlia Reporter____________________________________ Bruce McCoy Reporter___________________________________ Jackie Swegler Reporter------------------------------------ Mary Tackett Reporter------------------------------------- Ron Wiksell Adviser _________________________________ Stewart Linscheid

ELIZA MORGAN HALL By Barbara Gordon I feel as though I'm writing a strictly society column this issue. The past two weeks were filled with marriages and engagements. Carol Thornton and Dan Coffey were married in Falls City, March 6. Connie Hoschar, Mary Mowry, Diane Morrison, Mary Martin, Judy Harbison, Sheryl Davis, Cherie Trevino, and Joanie Sprieck attended the wedding. They were house guests of Sally Kelly, who was maid of honor. Carol and Dan are living at Chester. Judy Strange and Terry Kuenning were married March 12 in Auburn. Many girls attended the wedding, including Maggie Slayter and Marilyn Masters, w h o were in the wedding party. Judy and Terry are living in Auburn. And now for the engagements. Janie Moore's engagement to Larry Hayes was announced this week. They plan an August 14 wedding at Hampton, Va., Janie's home town. They will live in Peru after the wedding. Two roommates became engaged this weekend. Charlotte Hershberger is engaged to Larry Nedrow. Marilyn Hunzeker and Charles Wellensiek are engaged. The girls on second floor seem to like unusual birthday parties. Mary Mowry' s birthday was March 7. She was given a birthday card party-each guest made her a card. Jan Beemer had a birthday Wednesday, March 17. Cherie Trevino entered the Auburn hospital last Tuesday. Some of the second floor girls sent her flowers, and hope she will return to the dorm this week. Pat McNulty was a recent visitor to the Playboy Club in Kansas City, Kansas. Pat returned with a few souvenirs and stated he enjoyed his visit. Allen Scott, Gary Madison, John Soby, and Rod Baade have been developing and enlarging various pictures. They are enrolled in Photography I this semester. LaVelle Hitzeman was elected vice-president of the LSA this past week. Various dorm residents are still in the process of signing teaching contracts for the coming school year. The latest member to sign a contract was Harv Fisher. ' Roy Windhorst placed first in the shot-put at a recent track meet with Northwest Missouri State. Peru came out on the short end of this meet. Other residents taking part in the meet were Jim Watson and Tom Rosengran. Pat McNulty recently installed a two-way radio in his room. Various dorm residents enjoy listening to people talk over it.

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Fortunes Of Peru Prep Bobkittens

SPORTS ROUNDUP

BY BRUCE McCOY

By Dick ·Berthold

The fortunes of the Peru Prep Bobkittens were tempest tossed this year.

Coach Jack Mcintire named 12 lettermen for the 1964-65 Peru Staie College basketball season. Left to right: D. Caine, B. Rinne, R. Kroll, M. Harmon, J. Jennings, R. Estes, J. Rinne, J. Alexand· er, R. Capps. Not pictured: B. Wiiiy, J. Chasse, R. Snodgrass.

Diamond Mentor Hopes For Banner Season According to Coach Al Wheeler, prospects for a good baseball season loom bright on the horizon. Twelve returning lettermen form the nucleus of the 1965 .diamond edition. The club appears to be strong in hitting, although there is not much left-handed hitting strength to take advantage of the short confines of right field on the Peru diamond. According to Mr. Wheeler, there will be more team speed than in the past. The schedule is as strong as it has ever been, but the Wheelermen will be battling for every game to make his last season a good one. Competition is fierce for starting assignments. In the infield, lettermen Luke Cox and Steve Pattison are vying for the first base position and newcomers Don Cobb and John Chasse are fighting for second base. Lettermen Allan Sullivan and Jim Hardick ""· "'!!!!!!!!fl are the leading prospects f o r """ shortstop and third base with y Owen Dierks and Jack White_ _ _, head pressing them. l-24

I

In the outfield, lettermen Bruce McCoy, Jim Manning and Gary Young head the cast, while being forced to hustle by Ron Yates, John Alexander and Roger Gifford. Lettermen Dick Floerchinger and Pat Vendetti head the catching corps and are backed by Tim Logsdon and George Evangelist. Heading the list of pitchers are lettermen Frank Spizuoco, Larry Fangmeyer and Ray Cain. Other pitching prospects in-

elude Don Lehmann, Harry Leth, Dale Borman, Bob Hayn, Pete Lynch, Jack Cook and Ray Johnson. The squad will get its test as it opens at powerful Central Missouri State, then travels to Creighton. Team spirit is high and the team hopes that many students will turn out to cheer for them at all the home games. The schedule for the season is as follows: Mar. 29 Central Missouri State at Warrensburg, 1:00 p.m. Apr. 2 Creighton University at Omaha, 1:00 p.m. Apr. 6 St. Benedid's at Atchison, Kansas, 1:00 p.m. Apr. 10 Wayne State at Peru, 1:00 p.m. Apr. 14 Maryville at Maryville, Missouri, 1:00 p.m. Apr. 19 Graceland at Lamoni, Iowa, 3:00 p.m. Apr. 23 Kearney State at Kearney, 1:00 p.m. ...., Apr. 27 Hastings College at Peru, 1:00 p.m. Apr. 29 Tarkio College at Peru, 1:00 p.m. May 4 Chadron State at Broken Bow, Nebr., 2:30 & 7:30. May 7 Simpson College at Peru, 12:30 p.m. May 11 Concordia C o 11 e g e at Peru, 2:00 p.m. May 12 Maryville at Peru, 1:00. May 14-15 NAIA Playoffs.

Coach Jack Mcintire's cinderThey opened the season with men have once again emerged on an 86-61 victory over Nehawka, the sports scene for the 1965 Peru followed by an eight point loss State track season. With unstable to Brock, a 71-46 victory over weather conditions thus far, the Talmage, and a loss to DawsonBobcats have limited their prac- Verdon. Next came the Johnson tices while they wait for better Invitational Tournament, with running conditions. Despite the Prep finishing third. They beat early weather set-backs, Peru Brock 62-51, lost to the eventual State was honored with two new winner Dawson-Verdon, 79-49, school records at the Federation and defeated Cook, 59-56, in the meet in Lincoln March 6. consolation game. The next Charles Niemeyer vaulted 13 weekend the 'Kittens dropped feet to crack the old record of 12 two more games, to Lourdes feet 6 inches. Louis Fritz re- Central and Johnson, both by turned from his yearly training fairly close scores. to cap the second school record On Jan. 26, former Peru Stater with a 4:30 mile. Fritz captured Rockwood (Rocky) Edwards was nine school records for Peru last autumn during the Cross Coun- seen leaping through the air with try season under the direction of shouts of glee as his Table Rock Coach Pilkington. Buddy McCrea team stunned the Bobkittens, high-jumped 5 foot 11 inches for 53-50. an excellent headway this early Following the Table Rock in spring training. McCrea, a joust, Prep was nudged by a good freshman, was the Nebraska Pawnee City five, 55-51, and on State Champ last spring. Coach Febr. 5, the 'Kittens broke their Mcintire stated that he was losing streak with a 69-46 victory pleased with the outcome of the at Nemaha. meet. Peru State picked up nine The Nemaha Valley Conference places in 11 events March 11 at tourney was next and Prep upNorthwest Missouri State as they .set the dope sheets by taking all dropped their second indoor meet the marbles. They won the first to the Missourians 57-34. Head game, 61-59, from Brock, then Coach Mcintire was especially defeated Elk Creek, 56-54, in the pleased with McCrea's 221/4 foot semi-finals, and finally romped broad jump, Curtis Holliman's past Lourdes Central 61-50 in the 4.3 time in the 40 yard dash, and finals. The last two regular seaFritz's winning feat of 6:02.4 in son games found Prep on the the 16 lap run. short end of the ledger, losing to Individual Bobcats who placed Humboldt and Elk Creek. In the District Tournament at Nebraska were: 40 Yard Dash: (1) Curtis Holli- Wesleyan in Lincoln, Prep lost out in the first round at the man, 4.3. 8 Lap .or 1008 Yds.: (2) Louis hands of Louisville, 64-61, in overtime. Fritz, 2:34. 16 Lap or 2016 Yds.: (1) Louis The final season record stands Fritz, 6:02.4. at eight victories and eleven 40 Yd. L.H.: (2) Roger Crook, losses. John Mcintire and Mike 5.0; (3) Dave Seward, 5.1. Tynon led the 'Kittens throughBroad Jump: (1) Buddy Mcout the campaign, with averages Crea, 22-3; (3) Dave Seward, 20-3. of approximately twenty and Shot Put: (1) Roy Windhorst, sixteen points, respectively. Ed 44-7. Cox, a sophomore, averaged High jump: (1) Buddy McCrea, eleven points and will be return5-10. ing next year to try to help the If spring weather conditions 'Kittens improve their over-all improve, the Peru thinclads season record. should be strong when they tackle Tarkio at home April 1. N.W. Missouri will host the Peru Bobcats April 5 for an outdoor meet.

Thi'ncfads Show Favorably The Peru cindermen made a good showing at the recent Federation Meet held at the University of Nebraska Fieldhouse in Lincoln. Medals were given for the first three places. Top medal winner was Roger Crook. He garnered a second place in the 60 yard low hurdles and a third place in the 440 yard dash. In the lows he finished second to David Kudron, former prep hurdles champion, now a freshman at Nebraska University. Another creditable showing was made by Lowell Brown, who finished second in the broad jump to former Big Eight cham· pion Victor Brooks. Gene Noel finished third in the high hurdles, Dave Seward third in the low hurdles and Buddy McCrea third in the high jump. Although he didn't get a medal, Charlie Niemeyer finished fourth in the pole vault with a high of thirteen feet.

Golf Tearn Shaping Up The match schedule for the Peru State golf team will be released on March 22 and will feature ten conference games and a tournament. The team will use the Nebraska City Golf Course for home matches. Those qualifying for the team will be selected during the last week of March. Bill Heineman will be the only returning letterman. Others bidding for a position on the team are: Eugene Burgess, Mark Wendt, Gary Fritch, Larry Roder, Douglas Cramer, David LaMontagne, Gary L. Viterise, Mel Hester, Jim Sprague, and Dan Knudsen.

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Table Rock Rocks Bratton For Title In Volleyball Meet Table Rock received top hon· ors at the nineteenth annual High School Girls Volleyball Tournament by defeating Bratton Union 11-15, 15-8, 15-8. In the semi-finals Table Rock stopped fourth place Avoca 15-12, 15-10. Bratton Union received their position in the finals with a smooth victory over third place Elmwood 15~11, 15-11. The quarter-finals were represented by: last year's champion Murdock, who lost to Table Rock; Dawson-Verdon, who bowed to Avoca; Sterling, stopped by Elmwood; and Stella, who stepped aside for Bratton Union. Bennet players practice "spikes" in pre-game warm-up.

Volleyball Tournament Had Its Excitement "Side out!" ''Honestly, Myrtle, ·can't you keep that ball inside the court? If you keep this up I'll be forced to put Hilda in your place. Now, let's go, girls!" To the spectators, volleyball may be a fun game; but when girls are playing the game and competing for trophies at the same time, it can become hectic. There were some minor injuries during the tournament this past week but not enough to scare the rest of the girls to distraction. But what can be done with Lucy who has the long fingernails (how does she keep them?) that tend to slash human flesh, or with Betty who seems to be all over the court and in everyone's way, or with Frieda whose large feet seem to trip everyone but herself? These are unavoidable circumstances and are inevitable in a girl's volleyball game. There are many other things that constitute a hearty game of girls' volleyball, such as the redheads who fly off the handle at the referees when given the opportunity. Then there are the larger girls with whom no one, not even the referees, intend to get involved. And, Of course, there are always the girls who keep right on playing even after the whistle has blown. Fortunately, none of these mishaps occurred during the volleyball tournament on Peru campus last week. The thirty-two competing teams came to Peru with their own cheering sections and a lot of spirit, skill, and good sportsmanship. The games went smoothly and without much difficulty. The teams and their traveling cheering sections worked and pulled together for victories. We should all commend the girls who participated in the volleyball games and the cheering on their fine conduct and outstanding playing ability.

Six Bobcats Place In Lincoln Meet Peru State College thin clads competed with Wesleyan, Doane, Concordia, Dana, Nebraska freshmen and a few Nebraska varsity athletes in the federation championships at Lincoln on Saturday, March 6. Six Bobcats placed in the meet. The Peru State scorers: 440: 3. Roger Crook, Sa 1 em, winning time 52.8. 60 yard high hurdles: 3. Gene Noell, Plattsmouth, winning time :07.8. ...... 60 yard low hurdles: 2. Roger Crook, Salem; 3. Dave Seward, Rockford, Ill., winning time :07.3. High jump: 3. Buddy McCrea, Omaha, 5-111/2. Broad jump: 2. Lowell Brown, Alton, Ill., 21-1.

World Of Sandburg In Convocation The students of Peru State enjoyed a very entertaining convo March 17 by the Kaleidoscope Players. Bill Fegan, manager and founder, Lee Speich, Eric Conklin, Sam Buck, and Ian Thomson presented "The World of Carl Sandburg." Many different dramatic, humorous, and musical selections were given from Sandburg's readings.

Much Color Of Color Song Has Been Lost BY BRUCE McCOY Originally, the Peru State Color Song had mucll more "color" to it. Through the years, the last two verses have been forgotten and today the main emphasis is placed on the first verse. Everyone is required to know this first verse, but why have the last two been put aside? If we want to learn the true meaning of what the Color Song was originally for, we should take a look at the complete song. How many people know all three verses th a t follow? Fling abroad our college colors To the free Nebraska breeze Blending heaven's own white and azure With the soft green of the trees While our loyal hearts and voices With pride and joy unite As we sing Peru's devotion To the pale blue and the white. CHORUS: While our loyal hearts and voices With pride and joy unite As we sing Peru's devotion To the pale blue and the white.

(Continued from page one)

Through the years of sun and shadow Mid the scenes we love so well O'er our hearts our dear old colors Still weave their magic spell And wherever life may find us We'll strive with all our might To uphold the brave tradition Of the pale blue and the white.

and Buick Specials. The second part of the tour was of the Sheffield Steel Division of ARMCO. The Kansas City plant produces steel for this immediate market area. Students taking part in the trip to Kansas City included Richard .Allgood, Jim Evilsizer, Ray Eickhoff, Jim Hanks, Gary Holthus, Ed Loonjter, Don Mach, Jerry Sayer, Paul Stevenson, Don Weiner, John Wilson, John Witler, Harold Conner, Ken Olson.

When the cares of life o'ertake us Mingling fast our locks with gray Should our dearest hopes forsake us False fortunes fade away We shall banish pain and sadness By mem'ries fond and bright Of the old Nebraska college And the pale blue and the white.

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Cejkas Tell Of Peru As It Wa BY JOAN BRETTHORST Time is the author of change. And a half century makes a great deal of difference in the mode of living. During no period of history did life in the United States change move radically than during the last fifty years. The small midwestern town has been as much affected as any locality, and for the sake of pure curiosity it would be interesting to note the contrast between the Peru of today and the Peru of yesteryear. Naturally, the long-time inhabitants themselves are the best source of information. Mr. and Mrs. John Cejka, owners of the Peru Cleaners and Tailors Shop, have always had more than an ordinary interest in the town, the college, and the students. Having served Peru longer than any other merchants, they supplied facts and human interest items about the town as it was 48 years ago when they arrived. Originally from Czechoslavakia, Mr. Cejka cam~ to the United States in 1911. He had studied tailoring in Vienna, Austria, and after his arrival in America, began studying in New York. According to Mr. and Mrs. Cejka, Peru was quite a prosperous village. Business establishments included seven grocery stores, two banks, two drug stores, a mortuary parlor, a printing shop, a cider factory, a laundry, livery barns, and a lumber yard employing thirty people. There were also four doctors, and two dentists. A hay barn stood where the drug store now is, and a threestory hotel occupied the site of one of the present filling stations. Four passenger trains stopped regularly in Peru. In 1917 the main street of Peru ran east and west, past what is now the faculty housing and right up to the gate of the college. Not until 1920, after much debate, was it changed to its present location. A common sight on Main Street was the ridiculed "horseless carriages" parked in the middle of the road, not along the sides as they are today. On the average, the girls at Peru State were older than the boys, for many of them had taught at country schools for several years before attending nor· mal school.

'There was only one coll dormitory for the girls, and n for the boys, who stayed in va ious rooming houses a r o u n town. Married students were known, and when the first dent (a boy) married while s in school, a big celebration w held. Those boys in the college ch who detest having to "dress u to sing for audiences can grateful that they are a part today's world, for ,in 1917 boys' Glee Club wore tuxed for every performance. "Way back when," Peru Sta did not habitually resemble ghost town on weekends, beca a dance was usually held a most of the students stayed. is one case in which progress in all probability, not for best. Although they have receiv offers from other larger towns set up business there, the Cejk maintain that they will rema in Peru, fortunately for both t town and the college.

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Mrs. Ellen Dell Bieler, Chicago, field consultant of the National Congress of Parents and Teachers, will visit future teachers at Peru State College Thursday, March 25. She will be accompanied by two offi~ials of the Nebraska Congress of Parents and Teachers-Mrs. Ralph Beechner, president, and Mrs. George E. Robertson, cbairman of the cooperation with colleges committee. During Mrs. Bieler1s staY' on the Peru State campus she will talk with students majoring in elementary education and with senior students in secondary education. Mrs. Bieler hiis visited nearly all of the state congresses to help develop more effective PTA leadership. She participated in the 1963 fall conference of the European Congress of American Parents and Teachers at Garmisch, West Germany, and spoke to the European Liason Commission of the International Union of Family Organizations. Mrs. Beechner and Mrs. Robertson will tell of activities of the Nebraska Congress.

The business office at Peru State announced a new procedure in distributing student payroll checks. All checks will be sent to the department head where the student works, and each check need not be signed for as previously. If the student worked in more than one department, the check will be sent to the department where the student attained the most hours. If the student has financial obligations to the college, the check will be held for that student in the business office. This new procedure marks another advancement in the efficiency of business relations at Peru State. Because of the increase in checks, which number approximately 115 semi-monthly, there is more efficiency in business operations and provides more convenience for the student. Next year, because of increased enrollment, this procedure should prove beneficial. 'The student checks will be sent beginning with the next payroll to: Mrs. Beckley, Morgan Hall; Mrs. Brandt, Library; Don Carlile, Special Services; Dr. Christ, Science and Math; Del Gaines, Maintenance, Delzell, Majors; Mrs. Gnade, Post Office; H. W. Johnson, Placement; F. H. Larson, Registrar's Office; Dr. Melvin, Fine Arts; Mr. Moore, Language Arts; Dr. Pitts, Health and PE; Dr. Schottenhamel, History and Social Sciences; Dr. Siegner, I.A., HmEc., Bus. Ed.; Mr. Van Zant, Campus School; Dr. Wininger, Education.

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The Department of Health, Education and Welfare has granted Washburn University $43,335 to conduct a summer institute for teachers of disadvantaged children. Forty teachers from cities with from 10,000 to 100,000 population will participate. I~

Springtime In Peru BY ANNA MARIE DeGERLIA

Springtime in Peru is like .... A sudden and ferocious snowstorm That drifts and drifts and drifts Then melts and melts and melts Then freezes and freezes and freezes Then melts and melts and melts. Eventually it will evaporate. But spring is not here yet! So, prepare for a sudden snowstorm That will drift and drift and drift Then freeze and freeze and freeze Then melt and melt and melt. But, maybe, it will stop there. Then it will flood and flood and flood.

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Maybe we are better off it will just Keep on freezing and freezing and freezing. But that means that Spring will never come! Maybe we should just let old Mother Nature Take care of it and take care of it and take care of it.

TICKETS for the University of Nebraska dinner honoring Chancellor Hardin to be held at Steinhart Lodge, Nebraska City, Tuesday, March 30, 1965, 6:30 p.m., are available in Mrs. Gnade's office at $2.50 each. If interested; tickets must be purchased no later than March 25.

**

Two students from State College of Iowa are among 16 college students in the state to win trips to Washington, D. C., under a "Week in Washington" program sponsored by the Iowa Center for Education in Politics. The Fourth Annual State Drama Festival is scheduled for the latter part of April, at Kearney State College. Approximately one hundred high school students, college students, and instructors

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are expected to attend the Festival sponsored yearly by the Nebraska Speech Association. The State Normal Board approved final plans for a $1,600,000 nine-story dormitory at Wayne State College. The new dorm will be the first high-rise structure on any campus in Nebraska with exception of the university. The Midland College students set the world's record for a marathon basketball game as they played for 14 hours and one minute. A total of 2,938 points were scored by the two teams. Leading scorer had 506 points.

:: * * Weather is the key word in the construction of Midland's new planetarium, the section of the Science Complex now undergoing the most work. The framework, which is the major part, is up and is ready for the roof and the walls. The walls are to be comprised of 24 side panels of prefabricated concrete slabs of milky quartz, each weighing five tons. The dome will be turquoise in color.

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ORGANIZATIONS ALPHA MU OMEGA Alpha Mu Omega met on Monday, March 8, in the Science Building. After a routine business meeting, new members were inducted and refreshments were served. Those persons who were initiated include: Charles Bowman, Mary Lou Schreiner, Don Zartner, Richard Cassidy, Kenneth Gayer, Charles Adams, and Nile McCoy. The next meeting will be held on April 12. ---0-

FACULTY

WOM£N~

·HEA

CLUB

The Faculty Women's Club met in the Student Union, March 11. The committee for the day was Mrs. Kite, Mrs. Sproul, Mrs. Martin, Mrs. Boraas, and Mrs. Van Pelt. The committee served refreshments done in a St. Patrick's Day theme, before the business meeting. A guest at the meeting was Mrs. Geraldine Straw, a former member of the Club, who teaches in Bellevue. During the business meeting, the ladies discussed the creating of a Faculty Welcoming Committee for new members, and a Courtesy Committee for illnesses among the faculty or spouses.

The Peru Student Education Association · tp.eeting was held ·in the college auditorium Monday, March 15. After a short business meeting, the members voted for the "Teacher of the Year." A committee for the convocation was appointed with Mary Ann Biere as chairman. Members suggested new ideas for improving next year's programs. Mert Finke discussed the duties of a historian. The delegates to the Spring Convention at Kearney March 19 and 20 met for a short time after the regular meeting.

BLUE DEVILS

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SIGMA TAU DEL'l!A

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The regular meeting of the Blue Devils was held Monday evening, March 8. President Jack Rinne called the meeting to order. The meeting consisted of electing pledges for the coming semester. Those elected are as follows: Mike Harmon, Larry Tate, Ron Kroll, John Buchheit, Dale Kreimer, Dennis Keller, Jerry Allen, Lowell Brown, Ed Stillinger, John Bohaty, Ra y Cain, and Harold Marshall. The meeting was closed with the singing of the Blue Devil song.

The regular meeting of Sigma Tau Delta was held in the AdLSA ministration Building Monday, LSA held its regular meeting March 8. The minutes and' treasWednesday evening, March 10. urer's report were dispensed President Dennis Flattre called with. Judges were selected for the meeting to order. Officers the Freshman Essay Contest. were elected for the comingyear. Mr. Summers led the group in They are as follows: president, a discussion about the Language Dan Knudsen; vice-president, Arts Department project for the LaVelle Hitzeman; secretary- Centennial Year, and members treasurer, Marjean Wusk. were urged to think about future Dennis Flattre and Dan Knud- plans for the project. sen recently attended the Midwest Regional LSA Convention at K~State University. They spoke W.A.A. to the group concerning the conAt a meeting in Morgan Hall vention. last week the Women's Athletic Dennis Flattre led devotions. BUSINESS CLUB Association chose the girls to Mrs. F. H. Larson sponsored the The Business Club meeting for work and officiate at the volleymeeting. March 8 was opened by Ron Mcball tournament which is sponCoy. The new constitution was sored by W.A.A., held in Peru on approved, and the organization March 15th, 16th, and 17th. decided to have a steak fry at the There were girls chosen to MENC end of the semester. The idea for MENC met on March 8 in the work in concessions, as timea high school "Career Day" was auditorium in the Ca mp us keepers, scorekeepers, umpires, dissolved because of the lack of School. and referees. time for plans. The tournament began at 9:30 The meeting was called to ora.m. Monday and continued until The group decided to make a der by President Dale Duensing. .display at the Interscholastic Wednesday evening. All proceeds The business meeting consisted of from the tournament go to the Contest to be held on March 26. discussion of the band cl i n i c A table with machines and books W.A.A. for their annual scholarthat will be held on April 10, at was suggested as an exhibit. The Peru State. Committees for the ship, awarded to a deserving freshman majoring in physical committee for planning the disorganization of the clinic were education, and for their annual play consists of the following appointed. Spring outing. persons: Ken Boatman, Doug The MENC had a guest speakCotner, John Hunzeker, Carlene -OKreifels, Allen Chandler, an d er, Mr. Mathis, the band director WES LEY FELLOWSHIP at Auburn. He talked on the subDale Kreimer. ject of "Teaching Instrumental The meeting of Wesley FellowAfter looking into the matter of finding a suitable time for Music." He brought with him ship on Marcil 10 was opened meetings, Ken Boatman suggest- fifteen students ranging from the ed that they should be on the fifth to the twelfth grade. The first and third Monday of every students played different selections tq show the common faults month. in playing instrum'.ents. After Following the regular meeting, a short discussion was held con- each selection Mr. Mathis gave Auto Repairs cerning the expenses for those the MENC students a summary • Automatic trans. going to the convention. The of how long the students h a v e • WRECKER SERVICE group decided that twenty dol- been playing and their common • Steam cleaning faults. lars would be set aside from the The April meeting of the treasury. Lubrication MENC will have Mr. Johnson -ofrom Syracuse talk on "MarchGasoline ing Techniques." HOME EC CLUB

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Donna Donovan, president, opened the monthly Home Ee Club meeting on March 8 at 7:00 in the Campus School. The State Home Ee Convention in Lincoln, March 26-27, was discussed. The Peru State College Home Ee Club is to head the "money making" project for the Home Ee Clubs in the state. Arlene Borcher is the chairman of this committee. The Club plans to sell stationery and recipe cards at the convention. The new business of the evening was the election of officers · for the coming year. The officers are Arlene Borcher, president elect; Judy Elsinger, vice-president; Mary Ann Rademacher, secretary; Sandra Hopp, treasurer. Judy Elsinger was also elected to be a member for the State Council. The meeting was adjourned. The Saint Patrick's theme was carried out with the refreshments served after the meeting.

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-oPHI BETA LAMBDA

On March 8, the Phi Beta Lambda organization held a meeting concerning the convention to be held in Lincoln on March 19 and 20. The persons attending the convention are the following: Mary Sautter, Lorraine Tonninges, Ron McCoy, Bob Krofta, Allen Chandler, Alfred Eickhoff, Jack McVickers, Ken Boatman, and Allan Richards. On March 15, members of Phi Beta Lambda watched movies on business procedures which were presented by Larry Franke, program chairman.

with devotions led by Pam Bottomley. Gary Neumann led a short business meeting. The group also watched a film called "The Gospel" after which the Reverend Hankins conducted

a discussion. A Bible study "Ephesians" was begun this we by the organization. The meeting place for the Fe lowship was changed to the sm dining room in Student Center

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Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 60

Number 12

APRIL 5, 1965

Peruvians Elected To State SEAN Offices Dorothy Bock and Bob Hilt were elected president and treasurer at the Student Education Association of Nebraska Convention, held March 19 and 20 at Kearney, Nebraska. Fifteen Nebraska colleges were represented in the event, including the four state colleges, Nebraska University, Omaha University, s even church-related colleges, and two junior colleges. The luncheon speaker on Saturday was the national SEA secretary, Nancy Tanner of Graceland College, Lamoni, Iowa. Dorothy Bock of Pawnee City is a junior at Peru. Having previously served as vice-president of SEAN, she was elected president. Dorothy is a member of PSEA, English Club, Sigma Tau Delta, and band. She is treasurer of Dramatic Club, historian of Kappa Delta Pi, and secretary of the Organization Approval Committee. An English major, she is editor of the "Pedagogian" and works part-time as a student assistant at the library. Dorothy took first place in the Freshman Essay Contest and re·cently won a PTA scholarship. Her over-all grade point average is 7.20 and last semester was 7.69. As president of SEAN, Dorothy is entitled to an expense-paid trip to the national convention, to be held in Washington, D. C. and New York in June and July. Her election also entitles Harold Johnson, Peru's pla<.:ement director, to the trip as state sponsor. Bob Hilt, a first-semester senior at Peru, was re-elected treasurer of SEAN. He is active in several organizations, serving as president of Geography Club, vice-president of Peru Historical Society and Phi Alpha Theta, and convocation chairman of theStudent Center Board. He is also a member of the Foreign Language Club, Newman Club, Kappa Delta Pi, and PSEA. Bob has participated in dramatics and chorus. Bob holds the Phi Alpha Theta Certificate of Merit and has won the Louise Mears Scholarship. With a major concentration in history, he has maintained an over-all grade point average of 7.48, and! his G.P.A. last semester was 8.50.

Student Center Board Elects Four Members lier

The Student Center Board has elected four new members and they are Beth Terwilleger, Lowell Brown, Ceci, Evangelist, and Ralph DeCaesare. The applicants sent in a letter of application. The letters contained the reasons why the applicant wanted to be on the Board and what activities they were in. The members of the Board interviewed ea<.:h applicant and then voted. At present, the Student Center Board is working on May Fete. The Board is also setting up the (Continued on page two)

On April Tenth

Scholastic Contest Won By Falls City And Lourdes Central The annual High School Interscholastic Contest was held on the campus of Peru State College March 26. Students from high schools throughout the area competed in tests of various scholastic skills. Areas of competition included Advanced Math, Algebra II, American Government, American History, B i o 1o g y, Chemistry, Drawing, English Usage, French, Geometry, German, Health, Home Economks, Industrial Arts, Latin, Literature, Music, Physics, Shorthand, Spanish, Spelling, Typing, and World History.

Mr. and Mrs. Al Wheeler were honored guesfs af a dinner held in Omaha lasf week. The group presenf fo honor ±he Wheelers included many former Peru afhlefes. Picfured wifh Mr. and Mrs. Wheel· er are Jack Halis±rom, Lynn Osierholm, and Ken Dostal.

Mr. and Mrs. Wheeler Retiring Alfred G. Wheeler

Student Center Board Announces 1965 Frances Wheeler May Fete Royalty

BY BRUCE McCOY

BY BARBARA GORDON

In the fall of 1938, a new face appeared on the campus of Peru State College and this :mQ.n was to leave his imprint indelibly in the minds and hearts of thousands of Peru students who came under his tutelage. This man, Alfred George Wheeler, has contributed so heavily to the development of Peru State that it would be next to impossible to write down everything he has done for the s<.:hool and its many students over the years. The following account, largely from old Peruvians, will attempt to go over the ·highlights of his days at Peru and bring b a c k memories of his overwhelming importance in this college community. The 1939 Peruvian stated that he used "precise" English in telling muscle builders, "If you wan'na have a ball club-" or "If you're gon'na go out and teach-." It further stated that Al Wheeler believes in putting out a team that will play good, hard and clean football and that he promotes conditioning and careful aid of injured players. It was also pointed out that "Al" was a firm believer in intramurals and sports that will carry over into future years. The 1941 Peruvian stated that Mr. Wheeler is a champion trainer of athletes and a medicine man of the "get in shape" variety and that he requires nothing he can't do himself and thinks consonants on the end of words are trivial and unnecessary. It also states that Coach Wheeler's philosophy of the gridiron sport is the basis for the determination of his tutored teams. The 1942 yearbook says that Mr. Wheeler can "certainly use chalk," that he has flowers in (Continued on page three)

It is most appropriate that "Coach Al" have a wife as popular and as active as he. Mrs. Frances Wheeler is held in an equally affectionate regard by "her girls" as Coach Al is by "his boys." Mrs. Wheeler was born in Crouse, N. C. She still retains a trace of her charming southern accent despite a long residence in the middle west. She received a B.S. from Woman's College, University of North Carolina, Greensboro. She taught physical education at Durham, N. C., and the University of Tennessee. It was at Columbia University that she met Mr. Wheeler for the first time. Both were working toward their M.A.'s. They were married at Christmas, during Mr. Wheeler's first year at Peru. Mrs. Wheeler finished the academic year at the University of Tennessee, teaching women's physical education. In March of that year, she saw the Peru basketball team go to the semi-finals in the N.A.I.A. tournament. Mrs. Wheeler worked part time in the department of physical education here before assuming the position of assistant professor of physical education in September 1957. She has been girls' physical education supervisor in the Campus School since 1951. The W.A.A. or Women's Athletic Association is sponsored by Mrs. Wheeler. Members participate in various sports, sponsor events-such as the recent volleyball tournament, and present awards and scholarships.

A great part of ihe social event at Peru, May Fete, is under the direction of Mrs. Wheeler. She directs and coordinates the program. Plans begin early e a ch (Continued on page three)

Miss Jan Beemer and Mr. Vinent Sabatinelli have been elected to reign over the 1965 May Fete, which will be held May 7. Miss Beemer is a home economics major and will graduate late in the summer. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Beemer of Bedford, Iowa. Jan is a past homecoming and sweetheart queen. Mr. Sabatinelli is majoring in biology. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Antonio Sabatinelli of Southbridge, Massachusetts. Vinny is a pas,t Sweetheart King. Attending the king and queen will be Marilyn Gonnerman and Gary Schmucker, seniors; Marilyn Masters and Jack Rinne, juniors; Ceci Evangelist and Bill Rinne, sophomores; and Julie Harrison and James Nash, freshmen. Also elected were the ladiesin-waiting: Wanda Anderson, Carol Chandler, Melanie Florea, Diane Morrison, Mary Ann Sharp and Joanie Sprieck.

Gomon And Melvin Attend Conference Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of the college, and Dr. Keith L. Melvin, dean of the college, attended the North Central Conference on Summer Schools in Chicago, March 2S and 29. Deans and directors of summer sessions from 107 colleges and universities in the midwest share membership in the conference. Among the' topics discussed in this year's sessions were "Quality of Summer Instruction," "Organizing for the Administration of Summer Programs," and "Issues, Impacts and Opportunities for Sponsored Educational Pro(Continued on page two)

The competing schools were divided into Division A and Division B, with Falls City winning theii. fifth consecutive over-all victory in Division A. Nebraska City Lourdes Central won th e over-all competition in Division B. Auburn placed second in Division A with Clarinda, Iowa winning third place. In Division B Lewiston placed second, with Mead taking third place. Individual first place winners from Falls' City included Nancy Cummins, Shirley Sandrock, Norvalynn Jones, Carol Arnold, Keith Arnold, anclJ Winona Turpin. Individual first place winners from Division B winner, Nebraska City, Lourdes Central included Eileen Wirth, Pat Mullen, Mary Stukenholz, Walter Grantski, Jane Hutchens, Carol Hutchens, and Julie Ryder.

District Two Speech Contest Results Given In the District Two Speech Contest, held on the campus of Peru State College last March 19, a large number of students competed in qualifying rounds for the state speech contest held by the Nebraska High School Activities Association. The results were announced by Mr. Robert D. Moore of Peru State, director of the contest. Superior ratings in one act plays were given to Auburn and Tecumseh in the Class A divission, and to Nebraska City Lourdes Central and Peru Prep in Class B. The best actor and adres,s in Class A were Juanita Constantine of Falls City and Shelby Hendee of Tecumseh. In Class B the awards went to Mary Beth Frederick of Falls City Sacred Heart and Phil Parker of Peru Prep. In original public address, superiors went to Jane Hutchens of Lourdes Central and Diann Rector of Weeping Water in the Class B division. Poetry reading superiors in Class A were awarded to Don Lodge of Nebraska City, and in Class B to Pat Adams of Peru and Mary Frederick of Falls City Sacred Heart. In oral interpretation superiors went to Sally Leonard of Auburn and Gay Gibson of Falls City in Class A. A superior was also . (Continued on page four)


MAJORS HA.LL· By John Barton Ron Peterson, Harv Fisher, Dan Leuenberger, Charles Niemeyer, and Jon Davis attended a recent State SEAN convention, which was held at Kearney State College. Jon Davis was the state treasurer of this organization. Thursday, March 25, the Peru State College Historical Society held its annual banquet at Nebraska City. Those in attendance from Majors included: Charles Adams, Ron Peterson, Dick Kennedy, Dan Leuenberger, Tim Gilligan, Mike Smagacz, Jon Davis, and John Barton. Don Schmidt and Rod Baade attended a performance by Henry Mancini in Lincoln over the week-end. Don Glaesemann is in the· hospital at Auburn, Nebr. Donbroke his ankle over the week-end playing basketball. He will remain in the hospital for about two weeks. Roy Windhorst is sporting a new look this week. Over the week-end Roy chipped a tooth and cut his mouth. Roy ran into a clothesline. Various members of the dorm will be student teaching t h i s coming nine weeks. They include: Joe Ward, who will student teach in Bellevue; Charles Niemeyer, who will teach at Omaha Westside; Dick Kennedy, who will teach in Shenandoah, Iowa; and Harv Fisher, who will do his student teaching at Peru Prep. Jerry Allen and Rod Baade attended a meeting at · Beatrice, Nebr., Tuesday, March 30. The meeting concerned drlving stock cars for the coming ra<:ing season. Both Jerry and Rod drive racers.

DELZELL· HALL By Bill Bowen Delzell will be losing some people with the end of this nine weeks. These people include Lester Turner, Duane Haith, Lonnie Shafer, Jim Felton, Keith Rawson, and Mike Chu. They will all

be leaving to do their student teaching for the next nine weeks. We wish them the best possible luck in the weeks to come. The dormitory was probably quieter than it has ever been over the last three-day week-end. Even with the high school Interscholastic Contest on Friday, the week-end seemed awfully lonesome. The high school students who wandered in to look around even seemed to notice the unique lack of activity. I want to mention, however, that even with the few people in the dormitory, the laundry room was quite filled whenever I wanted to use it. I have heard the same complaint from others in the dormitory, and have noted with something less than enthusiasm that some of the people using those facilities are from outside the dorm. 'This month's game to keep occupied while you climb th e stairs is called, "follow the mattress." One poor mattress started on the thilld: floor landing of the south stairs, and in the space of only two weeks slowly made its way, level by level, to the basement landing. It now lies there in satisfied silence. Nominated for the weirdest comparison of the semester, is one heard somewhere in the dormitory after the recent showing of "The Fall of The House of Usher" by the S.G.A. Even I must admit that occasionally Delzell does look like the ill-fated House of Usher. It's especially noticeable in one of those early morning mists.

Gomon And Melvin Attend Conference

ELIZA MORGAN HALL By Barbara Gordon It is quite evident in Morgan Hall that a fearful outbreak of "ninth-week plague" is occurring and is claiming new victims every second. Walking through the halls one can hear agonized cries of "Quiet hours!," "Why did I leave this paper 'til the 1as t minute?" and "But that notebook can't be due tomorrow!" But the real suffering begins after closing hours. Then the clacking of countless typewriters drowns out the moans and groans of the hapless victims. The only cure for this disease is prevention-does anyone ever keep up his readings and notebooks or do 'his term papers ahead of schedule? Delzell isn't the only dorm that has trouble with the laundry room. The residents of Morgan Hall are more careless than malicious, however. Sometimes we get a little carried away w i t h those "high suds" detergents and a sea of bubbles comes frothing through the rec room. (At least it ·covers up those empty pop bottles that are just too heavy to carry over to the cases by the coolers!) The dryers leadi a hazardous existence too. Some girl, driven to madness after waiting hours for a dryer, recklessly tossed two or three loads of wash in one dryer. Fortunately, someone redistributed the load and saved the dryer from total collapse.

(Continued from page one) Cupid has not been at restgrams." The primary concern of J oyce Wheeler and ]4'arry Tegtthe conference is to give attenmier were married March 12. tion to the problems of the sumShe is presently here in the dorm mer session, which increasisgly is providing year-round educa- while her husband is in the service. tional opportunities for students. Myrene Hildebrand had two Enrollments in summer sessions at member institutions has reasons to celebrate on March 2,1; experienced: a rapid rise during it was her birthday and her "enthe pas·t decade as increasing gagement anniversary." She and numbers of students take advan- Jon Dav.is are planning an Augtage of summer study to accel- ust 7th wedding in Denver, Colo. erate their progress toward grad- Linda Elliott and Frank Ruecker uation, or use the summer to en- are planning a September 4th wedding at Omaha. rich programs of study. Among the speakers heard at Dorothy Bock was maid of honthis year's conference were Dr. or at the March 25th wedding of Raymond C. Gibson, director of Martha Bock and Alan Richard. the Division of Higher Education, Marti is a former student and Indiana University; and Dr. Alan is currently enrolled here. George E. Davis, executive director, Indiana Commission on AgStudent Center Board ing and Aged.

Elects Four Members PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Editor--------------------------------------- Dorothy Bock Associate Editor----------------------------- Dick Berthold Copy Editor. ________________________________ Mary Sautter Copy Editor. _____________________________ Charles Richards Feature Editor____________________________ Ginny Grossman Photography Editor _____________________ Eugene Fitzpatrick Layout Editor___________________________ Elaine Neddenriep Academic Elditor____________________________ Joan Dickman Business Manager____________________________ John Bar.ton Circulation Manager------------------------- Bruce McCoy Morgan Hall Column ___________________ .:. ___ Barbara Gordon Majors Hall Column__________________________ John Barton Delzell Hall Column___________________________ Bill Bowen Sports Column ______________________________ Dick Berthold Reporter__________________________________ Mary .Ann Biere Reporter__ -------------------------------- Oliver Bierman Reporter_________________________________ Joan Bretthorst Reporter___________________________ Anna Marie DeGerlia Reporter___________________________________ Bruce McCoy Reporter_________________________________ Jackie Swegler Reporter·----------------------------------- Mary Tackett Reporter------------------------------------ Ron Wiksell Adviser________________________________ Stewart Linscheid ,.._iliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii••iiiiiiii•iiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii-'

(Continued from page one) convocations for the coming school year. The Student Center Board is responsible for the Sweetheart Dance. It governs the Student Center; the grounds, the Bob-In, and the lounge. If there are any complaints concerning the Student Center they are to be directed to the Student Center Board which will consider their validity.

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State Phi Beta Lambda Convention Held In Lincoln On March 19 and 20, the Nebraska Center for Continuing Education in Lincoln, Nebraska, was the scene of the annual convention of the Phi Beta Lambda business fraternity. Allen Chandler, a member of Peru's own organization, was re-elected to the office of state recording secretary. The campaign speeches were presented to the members of the convention on Friday night. It was at that time that Allen was nominated to the office by Bob Krofta, also of Peru. A program was held later in which Miss Frieda Rowoldt, a member of Peru's faculty and one of the group's ,sponsors, presented her version of "The Big B r o w n Bear." Mary Lou Hicks accompanied her. The Award:s Banquet w a s held on Saturday night, but since the delegation from Peru did not participate in any of the contests, no awards were received by Peru. Various high schools also took part in the convention along with the college organizations. The representatives from these high

schools are known as the Future Business Leaders of America. The delegation from Peru's Phi Beta LamMa consisted of the following persons: Mary Sautter, Ken Boatman, Jack McVickers, Ron McCoy, Alfred Eickhoff, Bob Krofta, Allen Chandler, and the sponsors, Hazel Weare and Frieda Rowoldt.

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Mr. and Mrs. Wheeler Retiring (Continued from page one)

ALFRED G. WHEELER his garden and flowers in his lapel and that he is always "under the bench" unless he has a twenty point lead.. The 1943 Peruvian tells about Mr. Wheeler's teaching physical education to the cadets during the war and states that he once wanted to be a doctor and won a Rhodes scholarship. It further adds that he likes pie, traveling, bridge and "workin' with the boys" and that when his ship comes in, he and Mrs. Wheeler are going to South America. The 1946 yearbook states that girls just don't rate with him except when they cheer for his team and credits his athletic victories to his magic handshake and the loving pat he bestows on each of his players before the game. It also states that he gives "a word" at pep rallies, but reportedly makes his best speeches between the halves. The 1947 yearbook calls him a bridge player par excellence and states that even at home Mr. Wheeler never gets very far away from the Oak Bowl.

ure Phi the ter,

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The 1950 Peruvian states that Mr. Wheeler's first love is baseball, with golf and tennis next in order and also says that his greatest pastime is playing the game of "zitts." Mr. Wheeler was graduated in 1922 from Oberlin College in Ohio, where he starred in football, basketball and baseball with T. N. Metcalf's great team of that era. He quarterbacked the Oberlin team to a 7-6 victory over Ohio State in 1921 and during his three years of playing, Oberlin won 23 football games while losing only three. He was named All-Ohio quarterback in his junior and senior years. He captained the basketball team for two years and was named to the All-Ohio team in his senior year, as a forward. Following his graduation, he played a year of professional basketball with the Cleveland Rosenblooms. He received his masters degree in physical education from Columbia University in 1937. His first coaching position was at Manual Arts High School in Los Angeles, California. During his two years at Manual Arts, his teams won one city championship in football and placed second in basketball. From 1925-27, Mr. Wheeler was freshman coach of football at Iowa State College in Ames, Iowa. From Iowa State, he moved to Amherst College in Massachusetts, where as freshman football coach, his team's record was marred by only one defeat and one tie. Mr. Wheeler was head coach of football at Amherst for the next

football record! of Peru State during the last 23 seasons. Although Al compiled a tremendous record as a winning coach, his greatest contribution has been in the development of hundreds of young m€n as outstanding teachers and citizens." Mr. Wheeler, dean of Nebraska College Conference foot b a 11 coaches, posted a most enviable gridiron record in his 23 year reign at Peru. His teams won 133 games, lost 51 and tied 12 for a .723 percentage. During this period he led the Bobcats to five conference championships and to two co-championships. The championship years were in 1939, 1940, 1942, 1952 and 1953. The co-championships occurred in 1942 and 1951. The 1942 season saw the Wheeler team tie forthe conference ,championship and win the state crown. One of Mr. Wheeler's most memorable deeds in football coaching came between mid-season in 1951 and a similar time in 1954. This three year period saw Mr. Wheeler coach the Bobcats to a winning string of 26 straight games without a defeat. During this streak of success, Mr. Wheeler was named "Coach of the Year in Nebraska" by the Omaha WorldHerald in 1952, and the same year was selected the "Little AllAmerican Coach of the Year" by the Rockne Foundation Club of Kansas City. Although best known for his football teams, the Bobcat coach has won coaching laurels in other areas. In basketball, his teams have won three conference championships and participated in five N.A.I.A. National Tournaments. The 1939-40 Wheeler coached ,cagers reached the semi-finals. His over-all record in basketball for eight years was 95 wins and 65 losses. In track, Mr. Wheeler ,coached the thinclads to two conference championships in an eight year span.

three years, during which time his teams scored 16 wins while losing eight. His varsity baseball teams at Amherst made an outMusic is fine. Atmosphere helps standing record, winning t h.e too. But the diamond ring Little Three Championship four clinches the deal. If your royears. His teams had the distincmance has reached that stage, tion of never losing to 'Yale, please bear this in mind; we're Princeton or Harvard. ready, willing and able to serve In 1958, Mr. Wheeler revitayour best interests in that diIn 1938, Mr. Wheeler came to lized the Peru State sport scene rection. Peru and began building Peru by bringing baseball back to the State's Department of Healthand Campus of a Thousand Oaks aftPhysical Education into one of Beautiful er its 35 year absence. Since that diamond the most outstanding in the Midtime, he has coached Peru to two ring from west. He is now in his 27th year a wide conference championships (1962 choice. at Peru. and 1963) and aspirations are At the homecoming luncheon high for a third this spring. His $195°0 in 1960, Mr. Wheeler announced over-all record in baseball since Easy Terms his retirement as head football 1958 has been 64 wins and 57 coach. Commenting on Coach losses, but the first few years Other sets from $29.SO up Wheeler's retirement at that time, must be considered as "building" Neal S. Gomon, president of Pe- years. Diamonds shown evenings by ru State, had this to say: "Al appointment. Success and organizational Wheeler's decision to retire from ability have brought Mr. Wheelactive football coaching is entireer many important offices. In ly his own. It is doubtful if any 1953-54, he served as president of AUBURN college in the <:auntry, large or the N.A.I.A. He served as Dissmall, can match the successful trict N.A.I.A. chairman for 12 years, and was a member of the organization's executive' committee for six years. In 1956, Mr. Wheeler was named to the Helms Friday 9-12 p.m. Athletic Foundation Hall of Fame by N.A.I.A. and he served as Sunday 10-12 p. m. chairman of the awards committee for this organization for many Bring your wife or girl friend years after that time. for an evening of fun Mr. Wheeler served as sponsor to the of P-Club (Phi Lambda Alpha) for 12 years. During the war, he acted as Dean of Men for one semester and one summer session. He also served for many years on the school's budget and calendar committees. Recently, a banquet was given Complete Line of School Supplies in his honor by the Omaha Alumni Club. The banquet was held at Revlon Coty Evening in Paris Marchio's in Omaha. Mr: Wheeler still remembered his old athCosmetics letes 'and what they participated KODAKS & SUPPLIES in. When asked if the coaching fire still burned, his reply was, FAST FILM SERVICE "You're darned right it does." BRING US YOUR PRESCRIPTIONS His local organizations have included the Peru Kiwanis, serving

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as president in 1946, and Phi Delta Theta honorary fraternity. He was married December 16, 1938, to the former Frances Rudisill of Crouse, North Carolina. They celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary in 1963. Their only child, Al, Jr., is a student at Grinnell College in Iowa. Mr. Wheeler has served as a scout for the Baltimore Colts of the professional football league for the past 15 seasons and he has also scouted for the Cleveland Indians of the American League of professional baseball. His plans for the future include some scouting for Cleveland, along with doing some traveling in future years. He hopes that Mrs. Wheeler and he can now make that trip to South America he talked about way back in 1943. The Wheelers plan to move to North Carolina, where Mrs. Wheeler originally lived. As much a part of Peru as he is a living part of the gymnasium, Mr. Wheeler has been a traditional figure in our college picture. A friend to every one of his flock of athletes, he has been the kingpin in all our "Bobcats" lives. It is a privilege to know "Coach Al," and we Peruvians will long remember the immacu1 a t e gentleman who p1otted sports strategy in his second floor office of the gymnasium and muttered "ma' God" as one of his athletes made a whopping mistake. -0-

MRS. FRANCES WHEELER year to insure an interesting and enjoyable program. The college and the town look forward to seeing the May Fete royalty, the colorful skits, the variety of dances, and the traditional Maypole dance. Indeed, Mrs. Wheeler has led an active life at Peru. Now she hopes to catch up on some of her hobbies, such as reading and golfing when she and Mr. Wheeler return to North Carolina. They will be leaving many friends behind them, but they plan to return often, especially since their son, Al, junior, will gr a du at e from Grinnell College in 1966.

Track Meet Off The 1965 Peru State College high school invitational track meet scheduled for April 2-3 was cancelled, according to Dr. Ervin Pitts, Peru State Athletic Director. The event which drew athletes from four states and 51 high schools last year was scheduled for Class B and C school competition on Friday and Class A schools running on Saturday. The continued late season snow and cold weather have kept participants as well as track and field facilities from getting ready for the early season competition.

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Peru Indoor Track Records Are Broken Three Peru State College indoor track records were set March 27 as the Peru Bobcat thinclads participated with over 50 colleges and universities at the Kansas State University indoor meet, Manhattan, Kansas. The records include: 75 Yd. dash, 4th place, Curtis Holliman, 7.6, new record . Mile, 10th place, Louis Fritz, 4:25.7; old record, Frank Graham, 4:30.6, 1964. Broad jump, 5th place, Buddy McCrea, 22-ll/2; old record, Lowell Brown, 21-4, 1964.

Three Returning Tennis Lettermen The Peru State tennis team boasts three returning lettermen: Joe Smith, Larry Trimble, and Henry Grace. Others bidding for a position on the team are: James Nash, Gordon Garrett, Bill Schiermeier, and Ken Boatman. This season's schedule includes nine matches and! a N.C.C. meet at Kearney. April 1, Tarkio at Peru, 1:00 p.m. April 5, St. Benedict's at Peru, 1:00 p.m. April 10, Maryville at Peru, 1:00 p.m. April 23, Peru at Tarkio, 1:00 p.m. April 27, Peru at St. Benedict's, 1:00 p.m. April 30, Peru at Creighton, 1:00 p.m. May 1, Concordia at Peru, 9:30 a.m. May 4, Peru at Maryville, 1:00 p.m. May 7, Creighton at Peru, 1:00 p.m. May 14-15, N.C.C. meet at Kearney.

Golf Season To Open The Peru State golf team opened the season with a match against Tarkio on April 1. Peru will use the Nebraska City golf course for home matches. The schedule is as follows: April 1, Tarkio at Peru, 1:00 p.m. April 2, Peru at Maryville, 1:00 p.m. April 8, Doane, Concordia, Peru at Lincoln, 1:00 p.m. April 12, Maryville at Peru, 1:00 p.m. April 21, St. Benedict's at Peru, 1:00 p.m. April 23, Peru at Tarkio, 1:00 p.m. April 27, Peru at St. Benedict's, 1:00 p.m. April 30, Peru at Creighton, 1:00 p.m. May 1, Concordia at Peru, 9:00 a.m. May 4, Wesleyan at Peru, 1:00 p.m. May 7, Creighton at Peru, 1:00 p.m. May 14-15, N.C.C. meet at Kearney.

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Thirty-five Sign Contracts Fifteen Peru State mid•year . graduates and twenty seniors have signed contracts for teaching positions and other occupations, according to Harold Johnson, Director of Placement. The following list includes those persons employed at present, as well as those signed up to teach this coming fall. · The January graduates and their employment locations: Elementary graduates- Penny Edwards to Elk Creek; Janis Mayer to Bellevue; Kath 1 e en Ward to Bellevue; and Pat Thomas to Bellevue. Secondary graduates - Lorene Kostal to Ashland; Ron Foreman to Veterans' Administration Hospital, Wadsworth, Kans.; Mike Janis to Millard; Jeanne Tynon to Atkinson; Ken Hartman to Civil Defense Adult Education, Lincoln; Dan Coffey to Chester; Wendell Wiksell to Omaha; Dave Malmberg to Nebraska St ate School for Visually Handicapped, Nebraska City; Jerry Joy to Doane College, Crete; Carl Stukenholtz to Farmer's Credit Bureau, Omaha; and Virginia Cockerham to North Bend.

Home Economics Club Attends State Convention

Employment locations of June candidates: Elementary candidates - Sharon Fike to Malvern, Iowa; Marvin Corbin to Chino, Calif.; Suzan McKee to Malvern, Iowa; and Madelyn Fraser to Genoa. Secondary candidates - Robert Jennings to Ruskin; Ruth Rulla to Cook; Harvey Fisher t o Prague; George Weiss to Filley; Doug Hunzeker to Filley; Larry Johnson to Exeter; Harvey Fraser to Genoa; Alfred Eickhoff to Bern, Kans.; Ted Compton to Nemaha; Roger Crook to Diller; Don Wright to Exeter; Gary Schmucker to Exeter; Karen Cahow to Omaha; William Scott to Villisca, Iowa; Don Weiner to Industrial Arts, Peru State; an d Ed Loontjer to Ball State College, Graduate Assistantship, Muncie, Indiana.

District Two Speech Contest Results Given

A number of Peru State home economics students and their sponsors attended the Nebraska Home Economics Association Convention, which was held at the Cornhusker Hotel in Lincoln, March 26 and 2,7. Those representing Peru at the convention included: Donna Donovan, Peru, president of the lo·cal college home economics chapter; Linda Rogers, Stella; Peggy Quackenbush, Beatrice; Cynthia Meier, Table Rock; Lois Monsees, Bellevue; Jackie Kahley, Bellevue; Bobbie Armstrong, Nebraska City, member of the state board; Doris Mcconnaughey, Peru; Mary Martin, Wahoo; Juidiy Elsinger, Omaha; Mary Ellen Nilsson, Peru; Arlene Borcher, Steinauer; Mary Kerns, Peru, and her mother; and Mrs. George Lavigne, Auburn. Also attending were Mrs. Louise Kregel and Mrs. Ina Sproul, sponsors of the local home economics chapter. Mrs. Sproul presided as chairman of the College and Universities Committee. At the convention, Judy Elsinger of Peru State was chosen presidentelect of the State College Home Economics Clubs.

Reading Demonstration Mrs. B. A. Eddy, Reading Supervisor in the Auburn Junior High, gave a demonstration of the reading techniques used in the seventh and eighth grades to the combined educational psychology classes of Dr. Boraas and Dr. Kite, Thursday, March 18.

Ca\ifornia A\umni Plan Meetings Meetings of alumni of Peru State College, Peru, Nebr., in Southern and Northern Califor~ nia are scheduled for the first two Saturdays of April, according to Donald K. Carlile, director of special services and alumni secretary. The Southern California chap~ ter will gather at the Chapman Park Hotel, Los Angeles, for their fifth annual luncheon meeting on April 3. Arrangements for the meeting are being handled by the officers: Orvil Rodgers, 9708 Arkansas, Bellflower, Calif., president; Charles E. Smith, 6811 Santa Rita, Garden Grove, vice-president; and Katherine Lash Donaldson, 2745 Grand Summit Road, Torrance, secretary. The Northern California group will meet for their seventh annual luncheon at Frenchy's in Hayward on Saturday, April 10. Arrangements are being handled by A. B. Clayburn, 1309 North San Juan Avenue, Stockton, president; Paul 0. Blair, 738(} Sarani Drive, Oakland, vice-president; Genevieve McNally, 23716 Lynn Street, Hayward, secretary. Both meetings will include a program of selected slides from the personal collections of faculty members and recordings by Peru State College music groups.

Carnival Coming The annual gymnastics carnival will be held: the second week in May. Mr. Pilkington will announce details of the carnival after the April 6 meeting of the Gymnastics Club. Events at the carnival will include: pie throwing ~ontest, car demolition, dunking board, etc.

Mrs. Eddy has received training in the Educational Developmental Laboratory in Huntington, New York. The system involves reading speed and perceptional alertness.

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(Continued from page one) awarded to Anita Ahern of Falls City Sacred Heart in Class B. The informative public speaking contest brought superiors to Bert Engles of Auburn and Roger Lempke of Tecumseh in Class A and to Danna Henry of Peru and Tom Dunbar of Falls City Sacred Heart in Class B. Discussion conte~ brought superiors to Shelby Hendee of Tecumseh in Class A, and Mary Livingston of Weeping Water in Class B. The superior speakers in interpretative pub 1 i c address were Mary Eiserman of Nebraska City in Class A, and Dan Froeschl of Falls City Sacred Heart in Class B. The two extemporaneous speaking rounds brought superiors to Jack Layson of Auburn in Class A, and to Kent Van Zant of Peru Prep and Gary Carmichael of Platteview in Class B. Class A competition in television news commentary brought a superior to Marcia Gerdes of Auburn. In Class B Dale Parson of Weeping Water was awarded a superior. In oral interpretation of drama, Auburn received the only superior in the Class A division. In Class B, Falls City Sacred Heart and Peru Prep were both awarded superior ratings.

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Nebraska's Oldest College

iiiiiii

Peru Pedagogian PERU. NEBRASKA

Volume 60

Number 13

APRIL 19, 1965

Nebraska's Best College

Ped And Peruvian Have Long History

Fine Arts Head And Guidance Counselor To Begin Duties

BY DOROTHY BOCK A recent questionnaire from the journalism history class of the University of Nebraska School of Journalism prompted some research into the history of the Ped and Peruvian. During the course of the research, some interesting facts came to light. The first journalistic efforts on the Peru campus consisted of a monthly magazine started at the request of the students in 1892. The editor was T. S. Van Fleet of Peru. Mr. Van Fleet later went on to teach in Fort Lewis, Colorado, and Condon, Oregon. The Normal Courier lasted until 1896. In 1898, the faculty started publishing the State Normal School Messenger. which was continued until March, 1900. The predecessor of the Ped began as the Normalite in 1902. At that time it was a monthly magazine; it was later changed to a weekly or bi-weekly. The date could not be found, however, because the files are not complete. There were variations on the name of the paper, and it was later changed to the Pedagogian. Yearbook history at Peru began in 1902 with the Goldenrod, The editor was C. W. Buckley of Bradshaw; he later went to York as president of a business college. The yearbook for 1906-07 is named the Oak Leaf. In 1908, the (Continued on page two)

Dr. Frederick Freeburne of Kirksville, Missouri, has b e e n named head of the division of fine arts and Dr. Galen Dodge of Lincoln will be director of guidance and counseling, Peru State College, according to an announcement made t o ia: a y by President Neal S. Gomon. Both men will begin their d u t i e s July 1, 1965. Dr. Freeburne, 43, has a bachelor of science degree from Kansas State Teachers College at Emporia, a master of arts degree from the University of Missouri, a master of music degree and a doctor of philosophy degree from the University of Indiana. He is presently associate professor of piano and theory at Northeast Missouri State College, Kirksville, a position he has held since 1961. He has previously served as chairman of the department of music, Woodbury College, Los Angeles, chairman of the department of music, University of Nevada, Reno, associate professor of piano at Baylor University, Waco, Texas, dean of the conservatory of music at Yankton, (S. D.) College, and supervis0r of gradua,te assistants in piano at the University 0f Indiana. Dr. Freeburne is married and has two pre-school children. Dr. Dodge, 35, is presently a counseling psychologi~t 'with the Veterans Administration in Lincoln. He was formerly a consultant and director of special education in the Nebraska State Department of Education, director of guidance and counseling in the Louisville, Nebraska, high school and an instructor in education at the University of Nebraska. He has a bachelor of arts degree from Kearney State College, master of education and 1d'octor of education degrees from the University of Nebraska. Dr. Dodge is married and has three children.

Ninety-five To Apply For Baccalaureate Degree

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The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

As of June 4, 1965, 95 students will have applied for the baccalaureate degree upon the termination of this semester at Peru tate College. They have been hecked following approvals in e divisions concerned with the ours for endorsement, related nd other fields. Each candidate eeks recommendation for a deree and the appropriate enorsement which may be appliable relative to his planned eaching. Within the group of students oncerned, twenty-two have aplied for an A.B. Degree in Eduation, sixty-seven for a B.S. Deree in Education, five for a Llbral Arts Degree, and one h a s plied for a B.F.A. Degree in ducation. The candidacy of each f these individuals will be conidered next by the A<lministraive Council. NOTICE The annual publications banquet will be held on April 27 in the Legion Hall in Nebraska City, at 6:30 p.m. Everyone who has been on the Ped or Peruvian staff, this year is invited to attend. Tickets are a $1.75 and may be purchased from Dorothy Bock, Karon Rathe, or Joan Bretthorst. Tkkets must be purchased by April 23.

Dr. Stewart. Professor of Geography from the University of Nebraska. spoke in the April 7 convocation. Dr. Stewart discussed problems of. development in South America. After convo, Dr. Stewart further elaborated on the problems of South America to Dr. Schottenhamel's history class and Mr. Whiteman's geography class.

Harbor Lights May Fete Theme At 7:00, May 7, the 1965 May Fete program, under the direction of Mrs. Fran Wheeler, hosting a Harbor Lights theme, will open in the South Pacific on the island of Tahiti. The triple trio and the men's octet, directed by Mr. Hugh Thomas, will be featured singing "Bali ha'i." The program will then travel no11th to the Philippine Islands, where a Philippine Pole Dance entitled "Tinikling" will be presented. A Lantern Dance, from the last island visited in the Pacific, will be p~rformed by members of the modern dance class. Another Japanese dance will also be featured by the class. Then the program will travel to Greece and the Greek Isles, Italy and the Isle of Capri and then end its journey in the British Isles. Susan Kenworthy, portraying a Grecian, will sing "Exodus." The dancers will also present a Greek Dance. "Come Back to Sorrento" will be sung by Richard Shelton, who will be standing on an Italian street as we travel through Italy. An Italian Tarantella Dance will also be featured by the dancers. 'Then the program will whisk to the British Isles and view a Flamborough Sword Dance. The dance typifies the death of winter and the rebirth of spring. The seventh and eighth grade girls from the campus school will conclude the program with the traditional May Pole dance. (Continued on page two)

Melvin Announces Wide Course Variety For Summer Of 1965 More than 100 course offerings will be available during the 1965 summer session at Peru State College, reports Dr. Keith L. Melvin, dean of the college and director of summer school. Two five-week sessions-June 14 to July 16 and July 19 to August 20-make it possible for a student to earn up to six hours credit each session or 12 hours by taking full class loads bot h sessions. Registration for the first session will be June 14, with classes beginning the next day. For the second session, registr,ation is set for Saturday, July 17, with classes getting underway July 19. Summer commencement is scheduled for Friday, August 20 at 6 p.m. In addition to regular offerings during the two five-week sessions, two short terms and a field trip to revolutionary battlefields and colonial history sites in the East also are available during the 1965 summer school at Peru State. The three-week short courses include: June 28 to July 16-Diagnostic and Remedial Reading, Techniques of Counseling, Speech Correction. July 19 to August 6-Psychology of Exceptional Children, Philosophy of Education, Audio Visual Materials, Art Exploration, First Aid, Conservation of Natural Resources, Aerospace Science. (Continued on page two)

Peruvians Attend Speech Convention The annual convention of the Central States Speech Association was held in Chicago, on April 9 and 10. The convention was attended by James D. Levitt, Robert Bohlken, both speech instructors at Peru State, and William Bowen, a student. The meetings were held in the Pick Congress Hotel in downtown Chicago, and involved workshop conferences and general sessions on speech and related fields. Also in attendance at the convention were representatives from Omaha University, University of Nebraska, and Kearney State College. Other colleges and universities in the area were also present at the meetings. Central States is a subsidiary organization of the Speech Association of America.

Choir Tours The Peru State Choir, under the direction of Mr. Hugh Thomas, went on tour to the Tecumseh (Continued on page two)

Coach Joe Pelisek To Assume Duties Sept. 1 Joe Pelisek, 41, football, wrestling and baseball coach at Monmouth, Ill., has been appointed head bas¡eball and assistant football coach at Peru State College effective September 1, 1965, according to an announcement made today by President Neal S. Gomon. Mr. Pelisek will replace Al G. Wheeler who retires from the Peru State staff in June. Mr. Pelisek has been in his present position eight years and for a similar period of time was coach and physical education teacher at Wilson High School, Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He also served a year as freshman: football and wrestling coach at Cornell College, Mt. Vernon, Iowa. He received his bachelor of arts degree from Cornell College and his master of arts degree from New Mexico Highlands University, Las Vegas, and has a year and a half of graduate work above his masters in physical education at the University of Iowa. Mr. Pelisek is married and has two teen-age daughters.

Peru Students Featured On Channel 10 T.V. "From the Campus," a series of informative television showsconcerning Nebraska colleges, featured Peru State College on Channel 10 on Sunday, April 4. Representing Peru State College were the science, music, and speech departments. Lonn Pressnall narrated the show, Joe Ward: explained a scientific experiment and reviewed the science d<epartment of Peru. Myrene Hildebrand gave an oral interpretation by Carl Sandburg and the men's octet sang "Camelot," "Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor," and "Black is the Color of My True Love's Hair!' The trumpet trio played "Trumpet's Wild" and "Bugler's Holiday." The students performed before a live audience of approximately two hundred people because it was the studio's open house. There is no doubt that the show was beneficial to the college because it was on a statewide network. And, as Myrene Hildebrand explained the broadcast, "It was an excellent means of publicizing Peru State, and it was a great opportunity to the students of Peru to show the world that we are here."

Gymnastics Carnival May 13 The annual gymnastics carnival on May 13 will include a variety of games and events ranging from penny throws to an auto demolition. Hamburgers, hotdogs, sodas, etc. will be sold beginning at 4:30 p.m. Everyone is advised to attend in "sloppy sty le" because two trophies will be awarded to the two sloppiest fun-makers. (Continued on page two)


DELZELL HALL By Bill Bowen There is now available a scholarship from Delzell Hall. 0 n e hundred dollars is available to a qualified Delzell resident toward continuing his residence in the dormitory. The qualifications include at least two semester residence in the dormitory before application and a minimum grade point average of 5.00. The final recipient of the scholarship will be chosen by the Peru Achievement Foundation. Application blanks are available from the Dean of Students. Delzell's new custodian is really making the old hall shine. He has martialed his forces in the dormitory and made everything shine. More than one resident has commented on the newly found spotlessness in the building. On any evening recently it was kind of fun to wander around the halls late at night and listen to the frantic typing. When both Mr. Domina and! Mr. Summers had term papers due sometime near each other, the typing got so loud it was hard to sleep. I wonder why everyone waits until the last minute to do all his h a r d work? When you have nothing better to do try looking out the windows on the north side of the dormitory. Sometimes extremely late at night the local police force can be found lying in wait f o r speeding cars to come flying off the nearby hill. A word to the wise, don't get caught. It's very expensive to go to court in Peru.

ELIZA MORGAN HALL By Barbara Gordon Morgan Hall is in a curious state-let down from exams mixed with anticipation for Easter vacation. Most of the girls are going home, to friend's homes, or on vacations. Jan Beemer left April 10 for a week in Colorado as a sponsor for a skiing trip from Arbor Heights Jr. High, where she did her student teaching. Dianne Morrison, Mary Mow-

ry, Connie I:i:oschar, Sally Kelly, Judy Harbison, and Joanie Spriech are planning to spend the Easter holiday in Colorado. There was a real hootenanny out on the po:vch steps April 7. Most people enjoyed it, even those who had to st rug g 1 e through the crowd to. get inside the dorm. I think many of them just gave up and joined in the singing. Three girls participated in beauty pageants. Marilyn Masters is the first runner up in the Miss Nebraska City contest. Judy Elsinger and Barbara Lasko were in the Miss Auburn pageant. Judy is second runner up. Bertha Terwilliger, Linda Elliott, Ceci Evangelist, and Betty Andrews have turned plumber. They succeeded in rescuing Tracy Hester's contact lens from the lavatory drain while Tracy watched-with one eye. I believe spring has finally come-I just observed the first invasion of ants last week. Now we can hear the patter of many little feet-roaches and ants-on the floors, walls, ceilings . . . Birthdays this month: Carolyn Mercer, the 12th; Dorothy Bock, the 15th; Myra Murren, the 20th; Mary Sautter, the 26th; and mine was the 11th. Yes, there is an engagement! Betty Schilling was engaged to Bob Peck April 10. They plan an August wedding. Mrs. Beckley has been ill with a throat infection, but will probably return before Easter vacation. She is in Lincoln now; Mrs. Longfellow is taking her place.

tefinis teani fiefeat Tarkio in a match held in Peru last week. Lee defeated his opponent in the singles competition. On April 10, Peru played host to Maryville. Lee lost his singles makh 6-0 and 6-2. Maryville went on to win the meet 7-0. Mark Wendt and John Gorges helped Peru's golf team to win their first match of the season. Peru played Doane College on the Pioneer Course at Lincoln and! defeated them 12-3. Mark won his match 3-0 and John won his match 2-1. The track team recently took part in the Kearney Relays. Charles Niemeyer placed fourth in the pole vault. Jim Watson ran on several relays which placed second. John Soby has a new roommate. Bill McVicker moved in with John over the week-end. Dan Leuenberger and Rod Kettelhut were among the students who went to Omaha on Tuesday, April 13, with Mr. Whiteman's meteorology dass. Spring is surely here. Evidence of this can be found in the dorm almost every night. After spending some of their time in Auburn a few of the students became very loud and had: to be called down. It will no doubt get worse before it gets better.

Melvin Announces Wide Course Variety For Summer Of 1965 (Continued from page one)

Peru State's 196'5 travel-study opportunity is scheduled from July 17 to August 8. The New MAJORS York World's Fair will be a bonus of the 23-day trip which alHALL so will include Niagara Falls, Gloucester, Boston, Washington, By D. C., and the Lake of the OzJohn arks. Up to five hours of college Barton credit may be earned in history or social science. The $324 cost This week finds most of the includes air conditioned charter residents of Majors wondering bus transportation, hotel, tips, about their mid-term grades. incidentals, with meals and tuiSeveral say they intend to spend: tion extra. a little more time studying these Repeated in 1965 will be the last nine weeks. Don Glaesmann is back in the Aerospace Science short course, dorm after a two-week stay in which proved to be so popular the Auburn hospital. Don broke last summer. Taught by airforce his ankle some time ago playing officers, the course considers the aerospace age from a non-techbasketball. nical standpoint, and will include Larry Fangmeyer helped to win the opening game of the 1965 a tour of the Strategic Air Combaseball season by defeating St. mand, Offutt Air Force Base, Benedicts 4-0. The game w a s Omaha, and an airlift trip to an played at Atchison, Kansas, Fri- air force installation outside Nebraska. day, April 9. Lee Garrett helped the Peru

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Editor·-------------------------------------- Dorothy Bock Associate Editor_____________________________ Dick Berthold Copy Editor_________________________________ Mary Sautter Copy Editor. _____________________________ Charles Richards Feature Editor____________________________ Ginny Grossman Photography Editor _____________________ Eugene Fitzpatrick Layout Editor_ __________________________ Elaine Neddenriep Academic Editor____________________________ Joan Dickman Business Manager_ ___________________________ John Bar.ton Circulation Manager_________________________ Bruce McCoy Morgan Hall Column _______________________ Barbara Gordon Majors Hall Column __________________________ John Barton Delzell Hall Column ___________________________ Bill Bowen Sports Column------------------------------ Dick Berthold Reporter---------------------------------- Mary Ann Biere Reporter___________________________________ Oliver Bierman Reporter---------------------------------- Joan Bretthorst Reporter ____________________________ Anna Marie DeGerlia Reporter------------------------------------ Bruce McCoy Reporter----------------------------------- Jackie Swegler Reporter------------------------------------ Mary Tackett Reporter------------------------------------- Ron Wiksell Adviser--------------------------------- Stewart Linscheid

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Choir Tours

Harbor Lights May Fete Theme

(Continued from page one)

(Continued from page one)

and Wymore High Schools. The gave a morning performance i Tecumseh and an afternoon per formance in Wymore.

The modern dance ·class includes: Rogine Bang, Jackie Dodson, Mary Beth Gerber, Nancy Gosset, Wanda Harnett, Sandra The program consisted of Hopp, Lois Monsees, Mary Mowfollowing: "The Last Words o ry, Carol Nickels, Mary Oestman, Karen Quinn, Nancy Reidy, and David"; "Bouree for Bach," (ful Kris Wewel. Other dancers will chorus); "In the End of the Sa be: Eloy Arellano, Pat Behrends, both," solo by Sharon Johnson Anita Cox, Marcia Cunningham, "Trumpets Wild," by Ralp John Duder, Connie Easter, Mike Shaffer, Tom Majors, and Dale Ferry, Angela Furnas, Sheryl Gawart, Melanie Gould, Sandra Duensing (trumpet trio); and se· Hopp, Marilyn Hunzeker, Ruth lections from "How the West Kalafut, Sue Kenworthy, Dom Was Won" by the entire chorus. LaRocca, N an c y McCollough, Mary Lou Hicks was the accom· Carolyn Mercer, Gary Pummell, panist. Nancy Reidy, Delores Rice, Ron Robbins, Allan Sullivan, LorPed And Peruvian arine Tonniges, Nancy Vanderbeek, Gary Vitterise, Jan WalHave Long History ford. These are all members of "The Store of Standard (Continued from page one) the folk dance class this semesBrands" name was changed to the Peruter. Phone 274-3620 Auburn vian. It is interesting to note that this edition of the yearbook is Also helping Mrs. Wheeler prebound in suede. sent the program will be Mr. LeThe Ped and Peruvian are con- land Sherwood, who is helping SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITIES Enjoy Your Vacation in the High tinuations of a long tradition of with decoration, and the Student Country. We List Dude Ranches, journalism at Peru. Much interMountain Resorts, Etc. For 2Z Center Board, who are in charge States, For Listings Send $2.00 To esting history may be found in Rocky Mtn. JPIS, Post Office of general arrangements for the any volume of either. Box 87, Kearney, Nebraska. May Fete.

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Gymnastics Carnival (Continued from page one) The events will include a penny toss, dunking stool (possibly with volunteer instructors), fun house, balloon bust, freethrow tosses, fish pond, remarkable pillow-style fight, a car demolition, and several other events. A dance will be sponsored after the carnival so bring your best girl, guy, and friends.

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The Peru baseball nine defeatMaryville twice on April 14 the Peru diamond, 4-2 and 5-4. In the first game, Frank Spizuand Bob Hayn combined on three hitter as Peru won 4-2. izuoco struck out seven a n d ve only two hits in five in~ ngs. The hitting was led by Al llivan, who drove home two s, and Gary Young and Bruce cCoy, who each got two hits. In the second game, Ray Cain d Larry Fangmeyer combined a four hitter, as Peru pulled t a 5-4 victory. Fangmeyer was edited with the victory, his cond against no defeats. Don bb drove in the winning run the seventh inning and Bruce Coy drove in two runs with a gle in the fifth inning. Albin t a home run for Maryville. After six games, Don Cobb ds the hitting with a .381 batg average, followed by Bruce Coy at .350 and Gary Young .313. aryville _________ 010 100 0 2 ru State ________ 102 001 x 4

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The Peru thinclads have begun showing their potential outdoors as they previously did during the indoor meets. Although the weather remains a threatening problem, the Bobcats defeated Maryville and Tarkio by a sufficient margin. Kearney proved to be a powerhouse for the Bobcats April 10. Buddy McCrea sailed 45'9 l/2" in the hop-step and jump at the Kearney meet for a new Peru outdoor record. Charles Niemeyer vaulted 13' to daim another Bobcat outdoor record. Coach Mcintire commented that the running events from th e fourth-mile on are stronger than the field events this season. The Bobcat baseball team has shown good improvement since they began practicing on the field. Coach Wheeler stated, "The team is hitting and fielding better, and I've had a better opportunity to evaluate each player since outaryville _________ 002 020 0 4 door practice began. The fielding ru State ________ 001 030 1 5 in the first game was poor; but because of better ground coverage and speed, it improved in the second game." Coach Wheeler added, "I was pleased with Cain's pitching against Wayne andwith Fangmeyer's pitching at St. Benedict's. If the pitching comes through, we can expect a good season." Dale Borman and Don Lehman are showing good freshman potential at the pitching position. We're partners Pat Venditte has done a good job with Cupid in seeking to further your at catching for the Bobcats. "If romantic efforts. In fact the speed, defense, outfielding, ours is the first stop after and hitting continue to improve," she has said yes. And you Coach Al mentioned, "we still can be sure that we have have a chance to win the ch;unyour interests at heart in pionship and that is what we'll providing the very utmost try to do." for your diamond dollar. The Bobcats travel to Kearney April 23 for a conference double hitter. K~arney should be one of the toughest opponents of the season for the Bobcats. If the warm weather prevails, the tennis and golf teams travel to Tarkio April 23. Maryville, Tarkio, and Peru will meet on the cinders April 22. Other sets from $29.50 up

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Peru State's baseball squad split its conference opening double header with Wayne State on April 12 on the Peru field. In the opening game, a flurry of base hits produced a final score of 8-7, with Wayne State on the top end. Leading the Bobcat hitting were Gary Young, who smashed a solo home run, John Chasse, who crashed a two run triple in Peru's big fifth inning, and Steve Pattison, who smashed two hits. Frank Spizuoco was the victim of some bad· luck in losing the ball game. Spizuoco struck out 10 and gave up 11 hits. Bock got three hits for Wayne. In the second game, Ray Cain pitched five hit baseball as Peru pulled out an 8-3 victory. Bruce McCoy led the way with two doubles and a single, driving in two runs and scoring two. Al Sullivan also drove home two runs for Peru. Bock and Bernstein hit home runs for Wayne early in the game and thereafter the Wildcats were silenced by Cain's pitching. Wayne State ______ 040 112 Peru State ________ 10(} 140 Peru State ________ 004 220 Wayne State _______ lll 000

Colebrook, Holliman, and Seward on blocks for Peru in 100 yd. dash.

Golf Team Wins Opener

Placement Bureau Places Twelve More

The Peru golf team won their opening match of the season. Peru played Doane College at the Pioneer Golf Course in Lincoln. The final team score was 12-3. The low score on Peru's team was an 82 by Bill Heineman. Bill Heineman won his match 0 8 2-1, Mel Hester won his match 1 7 2-1, John Gorges won his match 2-1, Mark Wendt won his match 0 8 3-0, and Jim Sprague won h is 0 3 match 3-0.

Baseball Tearn Divides In Season Debut

Students Tour Weather Bureau

Whether the weather forecast is sunshine or rain we keep on The 1965 Peru diamond edition living. The weather was somesplit a double header in its sea- what cloudy on April 13 when son opener with St. Benedict's at Mr. Whiteman and twenty-two students of his meteorology and Atchison, Kansas. In the opening contest, Peru climatology class toured the took a 4-3 victory behind, the five U. S. Weather Bureau in Omaha. The class was directed on their hit pitching of Larry Fangmeyer. tour by Mr. Edward F. StapoDon Cobb paced the Peru attack with three hits, three stolen witch. He is connected with the Aero-Space Workshop, here last bases, and two runs scored. summer. In the second game, the BobThe class is very much intercats fell before the four hit pitchested in this, as the department ing of Tom DeGreeff, 5-0. The has a small weather station on Bobcats could muster only four campus. The geography departsingles as their batting tailed off ment, according to Mr. Whitea great deal from the first game. man, has purchased new equipPeru State ________ 101 010 1 4 ment for their study of weather. St. Benedict's ______ 101 001 0 3 Peru State ________ ooo 000 O O St. Benedict's ______ 301 001 x 5

Twelve additional Peru State seniors have signed contracts for teaching and other positions, Thirty-five placements were announced in the last Pedagogian. The elementary candidates and their la.cation of employment: Mary Ann Biere to Auburn; Thelma McNergney to Gretna; Gary Manning to Ralston; and Elaine Muller to Millard. Employment locations of secondary candidates: Don Mach to Plymouth; Tom Majors to Atkinson; Jim Kanter to Farragut, Iowa; Judy Beran to Genoa; Joe Ward to AlliedChemical Corporation, Omaha; Charles Niemeyer to Prague; Darlene Wright to Cook; and Tom Castle to Weeping Water.

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Kearney Proves A Powerhouse Peru State took part in the Kearney Relays held at Kearney on April 10. Kearney swept every relay event and all but three of the field events in the meet. Peru placed second in the distance medley relay, the sprint medley relay, the 880 relay, andi the 440 relay. Bobcats placed third in the mile relay. Buddy McCrea took Peru's only first place of the day. Buddy won the triple jump with a 45' 9Y2" effort. Buddy also placed fourth in the broad jump. Charles Niemeyer placed fourth in the pole vault and Bill Witty placed fourth in the discus. No team totals were kept in the meet, but medals were given in each event. Everyone from Peru received a medal in some event.

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Peru Open House Sunday, April 25 Invitations to the eighth ammal All-College Open House at Peru State College have be en mailed to prospective students, their parents, and parents of currently enrolled students. Th e event is slated for Sunday afternoon, April 25, and the public is invited, according to Miss Juanita Bradley, associate dean of students, coordinator for the event. Visitors will be entertained at a 2 p.m. variety show, after which refreshments will be served in the Student Center. All resident halls, classrooms, laboratories, and shops will be open for inspection. Instructors and administrative personnel will be on hand to answer questions about Peru State and academic offerings.

English Instructor Becomes Student

Student Wives

Chancellor John W. Schwada of the University of Missouri has announced appointments to the faculty and staff. Included is the appointment of Mr. Lyle D. Domina, English instructor at Peru Staie College. Directly following the spring term of the 1964-65 school year, Mr. Domina will leave his position at Peru and become a student during the summer session, which begins June 14, at the University of Missouri. In the fall he plans to teach a full teaching load, consisting of twelve hours, and carry six hours at the same time, working toward the Ph.D. in English. According to Mr. Domina, being a student and a teacher simultaneously has become quite a standard procedure in colleges and universities across the country.

ORGANIZATIONS Twenty-two Represent Peru In Spring Tour BETA BETA BETA The regular monthly meeting of Beta Beta Beta was held in the Science Building on Monday, March 22. The featured speaker was Dr. Warren Englehart, professor of microbiology at the University of Nebraska. The program consisted of demonstrations on virus culture. During the afternoon Dr. Englehart met with several biology classes and explained some of the other processes used in virus culture. During his undergraduate days Dr. Englehart studied with Mr. Brady of the Peru biology staff at Northern State Teachers College of South Dakota, and! both went on and received their masters degrees at the University of South Dakota.

On Thursday, April 8, twentytwo Peru students, representing the speech and music departments, traveled to Thurman, Iowa to entertain students of Tabor High School. The men's octet sang "Black is the Color of My True Love's Hair," "Camelot", and "Give Me Your Tired, Your Poor." The Dimensions played "Man With a Horn" and "Misty." "Trumpet's Wild" and "Bugler's Holiday" were played by the Trumpet Trio. The triple trio sang "Holiday for Strings" and "Love Is a Many Splendored Thing." Representing the speech · department were Ginny Mullin, who gave a monologue on "Mrs. Weeks Learns to Drive( and Myrene Hildebrand, who gave an --ooral interpretation by Carl Sandburg. WHITE ANGELS Accompanying the group were The White Angels will have a Mr. Thomas and Mr. Carlyle. meeting on the 20th for election of the officers for the 1965-66 school year. A nominating committee will submit the names of Karen Duke entertained Perucandidates at a meeting. The vians at convocation April 14 committee chooses the candidates with a program of folk songs acon the basis of leadership, at- companying herself on the guitendance at meetings and games, tar. The public was invited and dependability, contribution to the campus school attended the White Angels and school life, college convocation to enjoy her academic standing, and citizenfine music. ship. Each candidate must also Miss Duke has an enviable have at least 26 hours of college background of professional excredit. perience in opera, musical comAlso, next year's Student Gov- edy, appearances in clubs, reerning Association member from sorts, schools, hospitals; andi a the White Angels will be elected. tour of Japan and Korea with a These candidates must meet the special USO unit. She has done requirements of the S.G.A. extensive summer stock work; The new White Angels are in has toured with "Can Can," the process of ordering their "Silk Stockings," "Mr. WonderWhite Angel jackets for n e x t ful," and has had her own radio year. The jackets should arrive program over WHMP in Northby the close of May. hampton. She has played the lead for 144 performances in a melodrama at Cripple Creek, Colo., and has been a favorite guest television attraction at the Westbury, Valley Forge and Camden County Music Fairs.

The Student Wives club held a special meeting on April 7. The meeting was held in order that coffee cans could be decorated and then filled with cookies for Easter. Approximately 20 cans were filled, enough for several wards at the State Home. The number of stuffed toys for the children of the State Home at Beatrice has now counted almost 40. We are certainly glad that so many student wives contributed their time and energy to make it able for us to send these toys and cookies to the State Home in Beatrice. Later on in the meeting, fUrther plans were made for a spring picnic for the wives and their families. A possible date has been set for sometime early in May. After a short business meeting the stud~:mt wives then got busy packing the coffee cans. Refreshments were then served.

Faculty Changes Four faculty members will be leaving Peru State next fall. Mr. and Mrs. Al Wheeler, and Mr. R. T. Benford are retiring. Mr. Lester Russell will be taking a leave of absence. Mr. Robert Henry will be returning to Peru State after his leave of absence in Lawrence, Kansas. New instructors this fall will be: Dr. Galen Dodge, Lincoln, Nebraska who will be the director of guidance and counseling; Dr. Frederick Freeburne, Kirksville, Mo., who will head the Division of Fine Arts; and Mr. Joseph Pelisek, Monmouth, Ill., who will instruct physical education. He will assist in coaching baseball and football. TEACHERS WANTED Southwest, entire west and Alaska Salaries $5,400. upFREE registration SOUTHWEST TEACHERS AGCY. 1303 Central Ave. N. E. Albuquerque, N. M.

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Students from Auburn, Brock, Elk Creek, Johnson, Norris High, Hickman, Odell, Peru, Stella, Sterling, Tecumseh, and Table Rock took part in the clinic. The band directors from each of those schools assisted Mr. Gilbert Wilson of Peru State in operating the clinic.

Children who will be five y old by Oct. 15 and are eligi for kindergarten next fall a attending the pre-school, w began on April 12 and will c tinue through May 6. The school meets on Mon., Tues., and Thurs. of each week an operated by the college child velopment class under the di tion of Mrs. Ina Sproul. Day pervisors are Suzan McKee, Ellen Nilsson, and Karlene S wood, Peru, and Elaine Mul Falls City.

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The ·clinic was climaxed Saturday night by the public concert held in the Peru State Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. The program was highlighted by presentations of the two· bands organized during the clinic. The intermission saw presentations by the Brock High School Band, a flute solo by Ann Goldenstein of Sterling. and numbers by the Peru Woodwind Choir.

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The twenty-second annual Peru State Band Clinic and Festival was held on the campus at Peru Sat., April 10, 1965. The clinic was attended by 150 students from 10 different area schools. The guest conductor of the clinic was Mr. F. E. Mortiboy, director of bands and supervisor of music in the Davenport, Iowa Public Schools. He was assisted by Gilbert Wilson of Peru State College.

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The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . .

nnual May Fete Program

Peru Pedagogian Volume 60

PERU, NEBRASKA

Number 14

MAY 3, 1965

May7 7:00 P. M. Gymnasium

Cornerstone Was Laid For Fine Arts Center The cornerstone of the new Fine Arts Center at Peru State College was laid Thursday, April 29, at 3 p.m. The $500,000 structure, which will house departments of art, music, speech and drama, is scheduled for completion by September 1, 1965, in time for the opening of Peru State's 99th academic year. Members of the Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Nebraska were in charge of the cornerstone cereTom Casile presents "Ou:ts:tanding Teacher" awards to Mr. Lyle mony. Dr. Freeman B. Decker, rom, Mr. Jerome Stemper, Mr. Robert Bolken, and Mr. Albert coordinator of State Colleges of :rady and :the "Teacher ¡of :the Year" award io Mr. Lyle McKerche11. Nebraska, gave the address. Music was provided by the Peru State Band Ensemble and the Men's Octet. State offkials, civic leaders and educators from the In recognition of Teaching Caarea were invited. (Continued on page four) er Month, the Peru Student Edation Association held a cono April 21 in honor of the outaooing work of our teachers. The Peru Student Edu<:ation om Castle, president of the Association has selected! Lyle McSEA gave a special recognition Kercher, assistant professor of Mr. and Mrs. Al Wheeler and mathematics, as "College Teacher r. Benford. These three teachNearly one thousand attended of the Year." He was honored at s, who have devoted most of an all-college convocation on the all-college Open House at eir life to teaching, are retiring Peru State College Sunday afterApril 21. ¡s year. Recognition was also noon. Guests from Iowa, Kansas, A native Iowan, Mr. McKerven to Dorothy Bock and Bob Missouri, Nebraska and Illinois cher has been a member of the 'lt who were elected president attended the 2 p.m. variety show Peru State College faculty since nd treasurer of SEAN. sponsored by college residence 1959. He received his undergradMr. Leland, teacher of the year halls. 1963, gave the speech on some uate degree from Morningside Greetings were presented by f the qualities good teachers College. He has completed adHarvey Fisher, president of the vanced study at Iowa State and eed. To be good, a teacher must Student Governing Association, njoy life, especially in teaching at the State University of Iowa, and Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president where he received his M.S'!">. in nd needs a sense of humor. Mr. of the college. Miss Linda Rogers, mathematics. During the 1962-63 land is also leaving this year to Ray Cain, and Bill Rinne, extendudy in East Africa as a repre- academic year, he took a leave of ed a welcome on behalf of Eliza absence from Peru for advanced ntative of the American EduMorgan, Delzell and A. D. Mastudy at the University of Neation System. jors hall residents. Tom Castle presented outstand- braska under a grant for graduThe variety show included ate study from the National Scig teacher awards to Mr. Albert numbers by the College Band ence Foundation Nebraska Teachrady, assistant professor of bioEnsemble, Men's Octet, Girls gical science, Mr. Robert Bol- er Exchange Program. During Triple Trio, Trumpet Trio, Peruone summer, he studied at the en, instructor of English, Mr. vian Singers, and readings by erome Stemper, associate ;pro- University of Georgia, and last Myrene Hildebrand, D en v e r, ssor of physical education, and summer studied at U.C.L.A. Colo., and Virginia Mullen, North r. Lyle Strom, assistant proMr. McKercher is currently Attelboro, Mass. ssor of social sciences. The sponsor of Alpha Mu Omega, an Refreshments were served in acher of the year awardi went honorary mathematics fraternity. the Student Center and visitors o Mr. Lyle McKercher, assistant For several years, he was active- had the opportunity to visit classrofessor of mathematics. ly connected with S.G.A. rooms, laboratories, shops an d Following the presentation of When asked what he thought residence halls. wards to the teachers, the SGA made a good teacher, Mr. McKerandidates for vice-president and cher replied, "I think a teacher resident gave their platforms has a responsibility to go to class and ideas for next year. prepared and to make each lesson worthwhile. One must be fair and just in grading. In my field, as in any other, a teacher must be able to 'get the i de a across' to the student; and he must let the students know just Harvey Fisher, son of Mr. and what is expected of them."

onvocation Features Teachers of Year

GE :CE

ind

McKercher Designated Teach er Of The Year

One Thousand At Open House

arson Award Goes To Harvey Fisher

tier

Mrs. Albert Fisher of Tecumseh, has been named recipient of the A. V. Larson Award. This award is given annually to one person on the Peruvian staff for outstanding work done on the yearbook. Harvey has served as personnel manager on the Pedagogian for one semester, and has been with the Peruvian staff for three years. This past year Harvey has served as editor of the book. Harvey's original works have also appeared in the Sigma Tau Delta's Sifting Sands. Mr. Fisher has also won two <:ertificates of merit for his work on the Peruvian staff.

New Supervisors Added Because of the increased number of student teachers, Dr. Lloyd B. Kite, Director of Student Teaching, has added several new supervisors to help with visitations off campus. Mr. Van Zant will supervise in the schools at Auburn, Beatrice, Fairbury and Johnson. Dr. Kite will be at Bellevue, Omaha, Shenandoah, Sidney, Westside, and Hamburg. Mr. Strom will visit Falls City, and Syracuse. Dr. Wininger will be at Nebraska City, and Plattsmouth.

Ted Benford Will Retire This Year BY MARY SAUTTER

Recognition Dinner For Ted Benford Over 170 friends, colleagues, and former students were on hand for the recognition dinner for Ted Benford held in the Student Center on Saturday evening, April 24. Mr. Benford is retiring from the music faculty this year after serving since 1926. At present he is the oldest active faculty member in years of service to the college. President Gomon's emceeing was at its best. Reverend: Ray E. Hankins of the Peru Methodist church gave the invocation. Gary Schmucker and William Carlson did a skit "The Development of a Pianist." Mary Lou Hicks played a piano solo. Mr. Hugh Thomas sang "Let All My Life Be Music"; he was accompanied by Mrs. Mary Ruth Wilson at the piano. Dr. Keith Melvin presented Mr. and Mrs. Benford.with a bond, a folder of letters and a set of matched luggage, the gifts of friends, and the pleasant evening came to an end.

Dorothy Bock Named Gamon Award Recipient Dorothy Bock, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Bock of Pawnee City, has been named recipient of the Neal S. Gomon Award for 1965. This honor is given anually to one outstanding Pedlagogian staff member. The person receiving the award is chosen by a vote of the Ped staff. Dorothy began as a reporter for the Pedagogian when she was a freshman, and in her sophomore year she was promoted to copy editor. In this, her junior year, she is editor of the Ped. Dorothy has also worked on the Peruvian staff and contributed to Sifting Sands.

Prep Home Ee Serves Dinners Dr. Neal S. Gomon welcomes parents io Peru's open house.

The advanced campus school home economics class has given several dinners featuring foreign menus. Each of the five members (Continued on page four)

R. T. .Benford, associated with Peru State College's fine arts division since 1926, the longest of any professor here, will retire at the close of the 1965 summer session. The piano and organ teacher and his wife, Jennie, were honored at a recognition dinner sponsored by the division of fine arts, Saturday, April 24. Except for four years since joining the Peru State faculty, Mr. Benford has been a part of the college's music department. He began his teaching career at Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, where he taught piano, organ, theory, and was director of band and choral music. Through his years at Peru State, Mr. Benford has served at various times in these same capacities, plus supervising elementary and secondary vocal music in the Campus School his first 18 years, and as acting head of the division of Fine Arts for three years. In addition, he has served on numerous college committees. During his three years at Central Michigan, Mr. Benford's first work as an arranger and composer was published. His music was used in "Dance of Our Pioneers " authored by Grace Ryan, whi;h is still a popular test for folk, square and tap dancing. This first effort has been followed by published and unpublished works for piano and choral groups. Vocal arrangements include: "Where is John," "Three Blind Mice," and "Rackety Coo." "Raindrops" and "Doodling" have just been added to his repertoire of original piano solo selections published by Pro Art Publications, Inc. Already popular with piano students and teachers are "Explorer 88," "Flying Saucer," "Teddy Bear Waltz," "Swarm of Bees," "Pinwheels,'' "Mischievious P i x i e , " and "Marching Pixie." An unpublished ,cantata, "The Easter Carol," was presented under his direction in 1954 by the choir of the Peru Methodist church. The choir of First Methodist Church of Greeley, Colorado presented the work again in 1960. Other unpublished numbers have been used in recitals by Mr. Benford's students. (Continued on page four)


SPRING BRINGS A LOOK AT TBE "MIGHTY MO" By Dick Berthold

ELIZA MORGAN

LET'S HELP KEEP THE CAMPUS CLEAN By Jackie Swegler

The snow has melted, and Mother Nature has fina What does "respect" mean to you, your roommate, or HALL disclosed her first signs of spring. But what lies benea your friends? To the "Mighty Mo," respect requires a mere that cold, white, and troublesome substance is another sto choice between recreation or tragedy, dignity or disrespect, By Barbara The campus grounds of Peru State College may be acquir' or the commonly neglected choice of life or death! The MisGordon an appearance of springtime-flowers, greener lawns, souri River is noted as the most treacherous river in the budding trees-but how many people notice the littering th continental United States because of the swift currents, conOpen house rcertainly caused has taken place during the past winter? The students the stantly changing sub-channels, hidden drop-offs, whirl pools, under currents, and submerged objects. Any experienced two unusual events in Morgan selves apparently don't have very much pride and respe riverman urges "respect" for the river and never disrespect Hall. I think everyone re a 11 y for their school or they would have been more diligent cleaned: everywhere in the rooms caring for the college's property. It seems that Peru's st for its strength. for the first time since open house dents have accustomed themselves to the cluttered appea The Corps of Engineers advises all boaters never to at Christmas. It seemed to be a ance of the grounds. launch a small craft directly above a moving barge, with or Last winter the papers and bits of litter were unnotic without a motor. Because of stubborn motors, the craft mass spring house cleaning. The could drift into the suction current which flows beneath the second: event was people! H-ere able due to the blankets of snow which were so often cov barge and thus cause a catastrophe. George Nincehelser, a ... early on Sunday ... dorm ing the lawns. However, since the snow has made its fin former Peruvian, received the Department of Army's Meri- residents, parents, friends! There exit for the winter season, signs of constant and unnece torious Civilian Service Decoration June 17, 1962 for saving hasn't been so much activity in sary littering on the part of the students of Peru have be evident. Candy wrappers, gum papers, and other items ha a life during a boating accident which resulted from a simi- a long time. Several cases of pink eye were taken places across the grounds without even stirring t lar type of accident. It is sheer folly to attempt extensive Missouri River reported recently in the dorm. attention of the students. Trash cans have been placed at various spots arou cruising in canoes, row boats, sailboats, or floats. Unfor- Now Connie Rademacher has the seeable river hazards of floating or submerged stumps and measles. What childhood disease the campus for the use of the students, and they should used at all times. Littering is simply the result of careles hillocks should dissuade attempts at water skiing, surfboard will strike next? Marilyn Masters' sister, Leona, ness, and it certainly does NOT reflect credit on the stu riding, or aquaplaneing. andl her friend Deedee Farson, dents. Let's try to keep a clean campus. Remember: "Ev A few simple navigational aids are: were weekend visitors on the ery litter bit hurts!" {1) Keep at a maximum distance from large craft. 24th and 25th. (2) Slow down when passing. All the warm weather and sun(3) Keep bow straight over waves; when crossing waves shine brought out sun worship- too bad that some thoughtless cations Banquet held: in Nebras person or persons had to ruin a ka City at the Legion Club Tues· from a barge, go at right angles. pers and! sunburns. Linda Elliott privilege enjoyed by so many. day, April 27. ( 4) Beware of submerged objects. and Lucy Sporer had a "lamp- Residents must now use the com(5) If boat capsizes, stay with it until help arrives. Pat McNulty spent the week .burn." With the changeable bination mail boxes to receive (6) Always wear Coast Guard approved life jackets-never weather weve been having, we end in Kansas City, Missouri vi their mail. use them for cushions. iting friends and relatives. all may have to resort to sun John Soby and Rod Baade were (7) Never overload craft and keep seated. lamps to get a tan. in attendance at a party given by (8) Never over-horsepower a craft. Announcing a new contest for Gary Stover over Easter vaca(9) Know rules and regulations of Coast Guard. members of Eliza Morgan Hall! The Corps of Engineers dissuades anyone from swim- Due to the weather situation at tion. Tim Gilligan and Dave Shuey ming or wading in the river. If wading is necessary, always Peru, girls have been plagued BARBER SHOP use a pole or long object for checking the depth and for sud- with dry, splitting hair-com- recently celebrated birthdays. It seems they do not wish to disden drop-offs. New sub-channels are continually forming and monly referred to as the broomthe river bed is never stationary. Pleasure seekers should stick coiffure. We hope to find the cuss their age. let Us Care Various members of the dorm stay away from pile or rock dikes and bridge piers. girl who has the greatest number have enjoyed playing on the nuFor Tragedy struck May 15, 1962, in the drowning of Sher- of splits on a single hair. The merous intramural softball teams. Your Hair wood Packwood, a Peru State student. Sherwood was wad- current record is eight, with six ing in the Missouri River north of Peru with several friends as a dose second. A bottle of The softball games started last when he stepped into an out-flowing current. All efforts to Tame will be awarded: at the end· week; to continue for some time. Auburn, Nebr. Harv Fisher, John Soby, and save him were in vain as the swift current proved too great of the year to the winner. Sorry, an obstacle. Tragedy struck again last year on May 6 when but bleachedl hair cannot be ac- John Barton attended the PubliGary Ohnoutka, a Peru State freshman, drowned in the riv- cepted-it would be an unfair er northeast of Peru. Gary and a few friends were wading in advantage. All right girls, get the shallow water when Gary fell and was washed into deep- busy and shampoo! er water by the strong current. His body sank despite strenMarilyn Gonnerman' s birthday uous efforts to rescue him. is May 5. Barbara Thompson's The Corps stresses two main factors when people are birthday was April 22. On April near the river. They are: (1) Don't mix alcohol with boating 15 she became engaged to George or follies on or around the river, and (2} never get to the Weiss. point where you disrespect the river-never take it for granted. What does this mean to you, your roommate, or your friends? Only you know the answer, which lies between scoff, disrespect, or logical sense. MAJORS HALL

INGERSOll

PRESSURE ON STUDENTS IS INCREASING By Mert Finke

The pressures start early for today's youth and keep building. To get into- one of the top colleges, it helps to go to a good high school or prep school. A report on high school students in New Jersey contained these damning words: "There was an almost unanimous evaluation of each child who was capable of doing better." Under such pressure, the young student finds he has little time for fun, for reading a book because he wants to, for talking to friends, or just loafing-and maybe, in the process, finding himself. Where high school students were once assigned 10 math problems for homework, they now have to do 20 or 30. The problems are no more challenging or interesting, just more numerous. For first-year students at the top colleges, the workload is overwhelming. They are asked to do more than it is physically possible to do. The official rationalization is that in this way the students learn to study, to organize their time and become efficient people. Today's explosive growth in the sheer quantity of knowledge puts educators under pressure to cover more and more academic ground in the same length of time. Two out of every ten American students need psychiatric help during those four bright college years. About half of them get it. Colleges with mental health facilities find the psychiatrists are getting busier and busier. At M.I.T., psychiatrists saw 793 patients last year, 257 more than in 1964-a 48% jump. Today's youths operate under a fantastically high pressure; it's a group with a builtin potential for breakdown, whether they're in college or not. Parents have to think first of what their children can do and want, rather than what the parents believe to be best for them. A prestige college is not right for every high school graduate, and if a student wants to drop out of school for a year to sort out his life, why shouldn't he be able to without feeling guilty?

By John Barfon Most of the residents seemed to have survived the Easter vacation in fine style. Don Stuart spent his vacation in Loveland, Colo., visiting relatives and skiing. Ron Peterson spent some of his vacation in Michigan. Mark Flemming was somewhat more of an enterprising nature. He hitch-hiked to his home in Massachusetts. At the recent elections, held by the PSEA, Tim Gilligan was elected vice-president for the coming year. Ron Peterson was elected as the treasurer. Harry Leth recently spent some time in the Auburn hospital. Harry had a small blood dot in one of his arms. It seems as though some of the residents of Majors can not wait for the sun to shine in order to get a sun tan. Lyle Stewart, Allen Scott, and Marv Corbin have a slight case of sunburn from lying under a sun lamp too long. During Easter vacation someone vandalizedl the Majors Hall mail room. Several letters ·Were destroyed. As a result of this thoughtless· act the mail room will be locked from now on. It is

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lN

nnounces Four taff Changes

The Ninth Annual Publications Banquet

Bobcat Golfers , Peru Thinclads Down Defeated At Home Nebraska Wesleyan

St. Benedict's Netsters Defeat Peru

The annual Publications Banquet was held April 27, 6:00p.m., at the Legion Hall in Nebraska City. Bill Bowen, the toastmaster for the evening, welcomed everyone and introduced the guests. Guests present were Dr. and Mrs. Neal S. Gomon, Mr. A. V. Larson, Mr. and Mrs. R. D. Moore, Mr. and Mrs. Silas Summers and Mr. Gary Tuttle, representative from the American Yearbook Co., andMrs. Stewart Linschei<l:. The awards for outstanding work done on the Pedagogian and Peruvian were presented be· fore the dinner was served. The awards for the Pedagogian were presented to Bill Bowen, Barbara Gordon, Elaine Neddenriep, Mary Sautter, and Janice Wilkinson (not present because of :prac· tice teaching in Beatrice). The Peruvian Awards were presented to Rich Berthold, Eugene Fitzpatrick, Ginny Grossman, and Mert Finke (not present because practice teaching in Beatrice). Dorothy Bock and H a r v e y Fisher received plaques for the most outstanding work done on the Pedagogian and Peruvian. Dorothy Bock was presented the Neal S. Gomon Award, and Harvey Fisher was presented the A. V. Larson Award. After the dinner there was a short program given by students of Peru Prep. Pat Adams gave a poetry reading and Lola Morrissy a prose reading.

The Peru State College golfers were handed their second home course defeat Wednesday, April 21, falling to St. Benedict's College of Atchison, Kansas, 121h· 2112. The matches were played at Nebraska City. Bill Heineman, Wahoo, and Jim Sprague, South Lyon, Mich., picked up one point each and Mel Hester, Lincoln, edged one-half point to round out the Bobcat scoring.

Coach Mcintire's th incl a d s picked up their fourth straight dual outdoor track win of the season Tuesday, April 20, as they downed Nebraska Wesleyan 8268 at Lincoln. The Bobcats won first in 10 of 18 events. Louis Fritz led the Peruvians as he won first in the 880 yd. run and the mile, and anchored the two mile relay team to pick up first place honors in three events. Other Bobcat winners were: Narva Brye, the 440 yd. dash in Resulls: 50.6; Curtis Holliman, the 100 Pat Hare (SB) defeated Bill yd. dash in 10.0 and the 220 yd. Heineman 2-1, 77 -84. dash in 22.2; Roger Crook, the Carl Berkhout (SB) defeated 330 yd. hurdles in 40.9; Buddy McCrea, the broad jump at Mel Hester 21/z-l/z, 84-92. Pat O'Donnell (SB) defeated 22-11/4 and the triple jump with a 42-8 effort; Bill Witty, the disJohn Gorges 3-0, 75-90. cus with a toss of 138-111/2; and John Dockery (SB) defeated Peru's two-mile relay team won Jim Sprague 2-1, 82-88. with a time of 8:11.5. Tom Matthews (SB) defeated Mark Wendt 3-0, 81-97.

St. Benedict's College of Atchison, Kansas, defeated Peru State 4-3. The match was played on the Peru courts April 22. Dave LaMontagne and: Lee Garrett won their singles match, while Larry Trimble, Joe Smith, and Hank Grace lost. Grace and Garrett were victorious in the doubles competition, while Trimble and Smith were defeated.

A leave of absence, an appointent and two resignations at PeState College have been anounced by Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president. Lester Russell,· a member of the industrial arts faculty since 1956, has been granted a oneyear sabbatical leave for ad· vanced study. He will pursue doctoral studies at the University of Nebraska. Don Weiner, 29, a June candi· date for the Bachelor of Science in Education degree at Peru State, has been given a one-year appointment to replace Mr. Russell during his absence. Weiner, a native of Odell, will teach in the area of electricity, electronics and metals. Resignations announced by Dr. Gomon include Mrs. Dorothy Martin, Campus School guidance director and social studies instructor for the past year, an d William Witty, for three years Campus School coach and social studies instructor. Mr. Witty has accepted the position of coach at Nehawka; Mrs. Martin has not announced her plans.

)

Cornerstone Was Laid For Fine Arts Center (Continued from page one)

llU<S ~HV,

The Fine Arts Center is being constructed on the site of the former Music Hall which was built in 18B7 as the Library and was later used as a Science building before becoming a music hall in the 1930's. The two-story 170x76 foot structure will include band and choral rooms, a 214-seat auditorium, listening rooms, recording studio, and offices for instructional staff on the first floor. The second story will house two general classrooms, music and speech practice rooms, and the art complex of classrooms, laboratories, studios and offices. The air conditioned building is windowless except for entrance area, vertical glassed areas at each. corner, and sky lights in the art complex. Exterior walls are of red brick to harmonize w i t h other campus buildings. East and west walls will be pattern brick of flemish bond with black headers of the same design as in the Student Center.

Prep Home Ee Serves Dinners (Continued from page one) planned a meal and centerpiece and prepared it with the help of the other girls. The meals have been Chinese, Scandinavian, Spanish, Italian, and most recently, French. Guests at the dinners included Mrs. Dorothy Martin, Mr. LeRoy Leland, Mr. Lynn Doxon, and Miss Dianne Regier and her high school French class.

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Ted Benford Will Retire This Year (Continued from page one) At various times in his career, Mr. Benford was organist for the Woodward Avenue Baptist church, Detroit, assistani"organist and choral director at Pueblo, (Colo.), First Presbyterian church. He is now regular organist at the Peru Methodist church. A member of the American Guild of Organists, the Music Teachers National Association, the Nebraska Music Teachers Association, and the Music Educators National Conference, Mr. Benford was honored in 1962 by the National Association for Am· erican Composers and Conductors when he was presented a life membership as "an expression of the esteem in which we hold: you and your work and the gratitude for your loyal support." During his four-year absence from Peru State, he completed graduate work toward the Master of Music degree at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He served one year as choral director of Central High School, Pueblo, Colo., and taught piano and organ at Pueblo Conservatory of Music. The year preceding his return to Peru State in 1948, he was choral director at Iowa Wesleyan University, Mt. Pleasant, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Benford are the parents of two married daughters, Kathlyn, Mrs. Harold Reed, 1822 Mayfield Avenue, Omaha, and Patricia, Mrs. Mark Bornemeier, 2636 Thirteenth Avenue, Greeley, Colorado. A native of Michigan, Mr. Benford was named the 1955 "Man of the Year" by the Peru Pointer, being cited for finding time for community activities in addition to his ,college duties. The 1956 edition of the Peruvian was dedicated to Mr. Benford. A part of the dedication summar-

DELZELL HALL By Bill

Bowen The dormitory was shined to its brightest for the open house, Sunday, April 25. The visitors seemed to enjoy their tours of the building. More than oneroom was cleaned beautifully because parents were expected. It w as very obvious that most of the parents showed up. Most of the parents were dying· to meet the sons' friends and their sons were just as anxious· not to have them meet. Throughout the dormitory and across the campus it was like ships passing in the night. One might think that dorm residents knew no one but their roommates. One complaint that the visitors held was almost universal. An awful lot of people had difficulty locating Delzell Hall. The only sign identifying the dormitory is located directly in front of the main entrance. This entrance, however, is well hidden from the street as well as from the rest of the campus. It would seem logical that an identifying sign be placed near the street entrance and the walk that leads to the main entrance. The signs that identify the various campus buildings are attractive, and serve a very useful purpose. However, unless they are placed where visitors unfamiliar with the campus can easily see them, the whole point is lost. When this column is printed Delzell will have had its Spring Supper. The Spring Supper will have been held! in the T.V. Lounge Sunday night, May 2. Delzell has a new mascot as of last week. A poor underfed little puppy has taken charge of the third floor, and is about to expand to the rest of the dorm. No matter where anyone that dog knows is, he will follow them back to the dormitory and beg for food. The little dog is so skinny and has such a hungry howl that he can be awfully hard to ignore. This little puppy joins the big collie and the phantom parakeet in wandering around the dormitory. izes his great contribution to Peru State: "his love of music and the talent he so freely shares will long be remembered."

Peru And Maryville Tie In Triangular

Campus To Campus The Association of American Geographers and the Princeton Educational Testing Service have chosen the Kearney State Department to assist in planning the test for the Graduate Record Exam. Kearney State College has been selected as the site for a joint meeting of the Nebraska Vocational Association and the Nebraska Industrial Education Association to be held Sept. 25, says Dr. Floyd: Krubeck, chairman of the division of Industrial Arts.

Peru State College and Northwest Missouri State College of Maryville, Mo., tied for first Washburn University's fullplace in a triangular meet 881/2- time equivalent enrollment for 881/2, Thursday, April 22, on the the spring semester is 2,736 comPeru track. Tarkio College, Tar- pared to 2,955 for the fall semeskio, Mo. picked up the remaining ter, as recorded! by the Kansas four points as the third partici- Board of Regents. pating school. One Peru State College record By the fall of 1966, Kearney was bettered as Charles Niemey- State students will be utilizing er skimmed over 13-3 in the pole the new science building n o w vault to erase his own previous under constrution. The total cost record of 13'. of the building s t a n d s at Peru's Bobcats dominated in $1,750,000. the distance running, taking 1, 2, A new $1,550,000 women's dor3, sweeps in the 880 yd. run, mile mitory is scheduled to be in use and two mile events. by August of 1966. Narva Brye won the 440 yard dash in 50.4, Louis Fritz won the 880 yard run in 2:00.4 and the FISHER'S BAKERY mile run with a 4:33.4 effort. The two mile event was won by Jim Home-baked Foods Waston in 10:17.7. Bill Witty won Peru, Nebr. the discus with a toss of 143', while Charles Niemeyer won the pole vault with a 13-3 effort. The Bobcats garnered enough seconds and thirds to offset the strong Maryville bid in the sprints and field events.

Rabbi Sidney Brooks Convocation Speaker Rabbi Sidney H. Brooks from Temple Israel in Omaha was introduced in the April 28 Convocation by Bob Hilt. Rabbi Brooks gave a very interesting talk, "A Jewish View of Modern Social Issues." Following convocation, he visited with the Peru students in the Student Union.

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SPORTS ROUNDUP By , Dick Berthold

Joe Smith, :the number one player for Peru, demonstrates an over·head serve.

Bobcats Split Doubleheader Peru's chances for a clear cut shot at the Nebraska College Conference baseball title were virtually eliminated as the Bobcats split a double header on the Kearney diamond. A fine effort by the Peru pitching staff w a s nullified by the paltry hitting of the Peru batters. In the first game, Frank Spizuoco and Larry Fangmeyer combined on a fo u r hitter as Peru won, 3-2. B o th Kearney runs were unearned, scoring on Peru's only error of the game. John Chasse had two hits for Peru. In the second game, Kearney won, 1-0, in eight innings, as Pe-

ru handed them the game. Ray Cain and Larry Fangmeyer had combined on a three hitter in the losing cause. Fangmeyer pitched three innings of hitless ball, but lost the game as the result of a wild pitch and two errors, following a base on balls to a Kearney hitter in the eighth inning. Peru's meek hitters could manage only one hit, a long double by Gary Young in the last inning.

Kitten Track

Johnson by winning the meet, 63 to 55.

The Bobkittens opened their track season on March 22, against

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On April 22, Peru Prep w a s stopped by Lourdes Central 641/2 to 531h. ' ~ A Nemaha Valley Conference meet will be held on April 28, at one o'clock. The participants will be: Talmage, Lourdes Central, Brock, Nemaha, Table Rock, Elk Creek, Cook, and Peru Prep.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF

Editor_______________________________________ Dorothy Bock Associate Editor_ ____________________________ Dick Berthold Copy Editor_~------------------------------- Mary Sautter Copy Editor______________________________ Charles Richards Feature Editor____________________________ Ginny Grossman Photography Editor--------------------- Eugene Fitzpatrick Layout Editor___________________________ Elaine Neddenriep Academic Editor---------------------------- Joan Dickman Business Manager ____________________________ John Barton Circulation Manager_ ________________________ Bruce McCoy Morgan Hall Column _______________________ Barbara Gordon Majors Hall Column__________________________ John Barton Delzell Hall Column___________________________ Bill Bowen Sports Column ______________________________ Dick Berthold Reporter---------------------------------- Mary .Ann Biere Reporter----------------------------------- Oliver Bierman Reporter---------------------------------- Joan Bretthorst Reporter ____________________________ Anna Marie DeGerlia Reporter------------------------------------ Bruce McCoy Reporter----------------------------------- Jackie Swegler Reporter ___________________________ ;.. ________ Mary Tackett Reporter------------------------------------- Ron Wiksell Adviser--------------------------------- Stewart Linscheid

The Peru thinclads have swung into top competition the last two weeks while participating with Washburn, Wesleyan, Maryville, and at the Drake Relays. Against Washburn University, the Bobcats dominated the track events, winning firsts in all but the 440 yard dash. The kabods capped five of seven field events. Washburn was defeated 94-54 in the Bobcats' Oak Bowl. Dan Bolin, Louis Fritz, James Watson, and Roger Neujahr clipped. 17 seconds off the old two mile relay during the Wesleyan meet April 20 at Lincoln. Coach Mcintire expects top performances from his distance men: Fritz, Hendricks, and Watson by conference time May 14 and 15. Peru and N.W. Missouri were out-witted by Tarkio April 22 as Tarkio picked up the remaining four points to throw Peru and Maryville in to an 881h-&!l1/2 deadlock. Charles Niemeyer bettered his previous. outdoor pole vault record from 13 ft. to 13-3. The Bobcats dominated! the distance running by taking first, second, and third sweeps in the 88(}, mile, and two mile. At the Drake Relays, Curtis Holliman, Roger Crook, Jim Hagemeier, and Narva Brye clipped a new 880 relay record in 1:24.4 while bettering the old record of 1:24.6. Fritz ran a tremendous two mile race in 9:58.2 for hi s top individual effort. Frank Spizuoco pitched a no hitter against Hastings April 27 to win the first game 7-0. Hastings slipped past the Bobcats 4-2 in the second outing to even the doubleheader. The Bobcats travel to Broken Bow May 4 to lead off a doubleheader against Chadron. The St Benedict's tennis team squeezed past Coach Wininger's Bobcats 3-4 on the Bobcat's home court. Individual sum mar i es were:

Take me oui io :the ball park • • •

Spizuoco Tames Broncos

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Frank Spizuoco fired a brilliant no hitter in the first game of a double header with Hastings, as Peru won 7-0. Spizuoco struck The intramural softball season out 14 and walked only two in his masterpiece. He also aided opened on April 2(} with the Duds his own cause by driving in three skinning the Beavers, 10 to 0. The Emperors took a close one from runs. Bruce McCoy smashed a the Centennials, 7 to 6, for the home run and George Evangelist second game of the day. had two hits in the winning On April 21, the Gangsters were shot down by the Worcescause. terites, 17 to 4. The Roadrunners In the second game, Hastings ran over the Glunks, 17 to 3. lived on an error with two outs, On April 26, the Playboys and went on to score three runs nipped the Louts, 15 to 14, and on four straight bases on balls, the·Mustangs stopped the Misfits, 9 to 8. as they defeated the Bobcats, 4-2. Peru could muster only two hi ts off the offerings of Hastings' Singles Bill Kall (S.B.) defeated Joe Deidricks. The Bobcats now stand "The S:tore of S:tandard Smith (P.) 6-2, 6-4. 3-3 in the Nebraska College ConBrands" Helmut Ellrich (S.B.) defeated ference and stand little chance of Phone 274-3620 Auburn Larry Trimble (P.) 6-3, 6-4. salvaging a tie. Bill Murray (S.B.) defeated Henry Grace (P.) 7·5, 7-5. Lee Garrett (P) defeated Frank Bain (S.B.) 6-1, 6-4. Dave LaMontagne (P.) defeated Jack McKenna (S.B.) 6-1, 6-1.

Intramural Softball Begins

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Kall and Murray (S.B.) over Smith and Trimble (P.) 6-2, 8-6. Grace arid Garrett (P.) over Bain and McKenna (S.B.) 6-1, 7-5.

Intramural Track The intramural track meet is scheduled for May 5. The schedule of events include: 3:00 Discus, broad jump. High jump and' shot. 3:30 88(} Relay. Mile. 440 Yard dash. WO Yard dash 880 Yard run 220 Yard dash 100 Yard low hurdles. Mile relay. The deadline for entries is Monday, May 3, at 2:30, at which time a meeting will be held to draw up the heats.

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[eland To Teach In Big Game Country !

BY BARBARA GORDON LeRoy Leland, assistant prossor of history at Peru State ol!ege since 1962, has resigned accept a teaching position with e Overseas Di vision of th e eachers College of Columbia niversity for a two-year assignent in East Africa. , The program is under the ausJ ices of the American and Britsh governments. Mr. Leland is ne of 35 educators chosen from plicants from teachers colleges the United States. A similar mber of British educators will involved in the program. After the initial screening of plicants, Mr. and Mrs. Leland w to Chicago for further tests d for interviews with representives from Columbia and Engnd. The American and British edutors will work on reorganizaon of the present teachers colges and establishment of new hools for teacher education. st Africa now has one univer·ty and a number of teachers olleges. Mr. Leland will be asciated with the fieLd: of history. Mr. and Mrs. Leland will unergo an orientation and briefg period of six weeks, beging July 4 in New York. On 0 2

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Illinois Assistantship For Lonn Pfessnall

Lonn A. Pressnall, a June can- William Pressnall, Beatrice, and The student body elected the didate for the Bachelor of Arts in Mrs. Ray A. Bernadt, Wymore. following persons to represent it: Education degree at Peru State Active in forensic and drama president and vice-president, Bill College, has received a one-year throughout his college career, Rinne and Gary Viterise; and or- graduate assistantship to the Uni- Pressnall is currently serving as ganization representatives, Wan- versity of Illinois, Champaign- president of the Peru Dramatic da Anderson, Ray Cain, Royfe Urbana. Pressnall has received a Club and Sigma Tau Delta, honCurtis, Carol Hawley, Ron Kroll, $2,250 grant, plus tuition and orary national English fraternity. Myra Murren, Connie Rademach- fees. His area of study will be Mrs. Pressnall is the former Jane Currier of Wymore. Lonn and er, Mary Ann Rademacher, Kar- drama. on Rathe, Jack Rinne, Chuck _A 1961 graduate . of Wymore Jane are the parents of two chilStoner, March Tinkham, Chuck High School, Lonn is the son of dren, Tony, 3, and Brenda, 2. Wellensiek, and Jim J o h n s o n . · - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ed the picnic would be held on Gary Fritch and Mike Smagacz May 2, at 2:00 p.m. at the Peru were chosen first and second alPark. Every family will bring its ternate. BY MARY TACKETT own meat dish and one extra The candidates for SGA posiSwish! Swish! Run, hurry! dish, consisting of a salad or tions were: president, Ka thy Gotta catch a ride! Good-bye! dessert. The club will furnish a Francis and Bill Rinne; viceHave a nice week-end! Friday president, Bill Joiner and Gary afternoon-a time to put the drink and ice cream bars. An alViterise; organization representa- books aside a few minutes and ternate date of May 16 was detives, Wanda Anderson, Mary catch a breath after a week of cided upon in case of rain. After the business meeting the Brown, Ray Cain, Royce Curtis, diligent study. All at once, to Gary Fritch, Carol Hawley, Bob those who are left, there comes president passed out patterns for Krofta, Ron Kroll, Bob Hilt, My- a realization that the relaxation the members to trace, if they wanted to make stuffed toys for ra Murren, Connie Rademacher, has settled into a sense of de- their own families. Refreshments Mary Ann Rademacher, Jack sertedness. The girls find they were then served. Rinne, Karon Rathe, Chuck Stonhave no callers for a couple of er, Lyle Stewart, Mike Smagacz, hours. Those who aren't gaily on Verona Borcher, Jim Johnson, their drive home with plans for Chuck Wellensiek, John Wieereexciting week-ends, have settled bine, March Tinkham, and Mary into a deep midafternoon nap in Tackett. order to catch up from the week Graduates, former students and and to get a head start for the friends of Peru State College livweek-end. Friday night-more serene and ing in the Rocky Mountain area calm than the dormitories have met for their seventh annual been for at least a week. If the meeting in Cheyenne, Sunday, walls had thoughts, they'd be May 2, 1965, according to Donald A concert by the Peru State puzzled at the sense of loneliness K. Carlile, director of special Historic Brownville was the College Band Ensemble, under and the sense of friendliness that services. site of an All-Western Extrava- the direction of Gilbert E. WilThe 2 p.m. meeting at the son, will be presented Tuesday, students had often times been too Hitching Post was arranged by ganza-Spectacular Thursday, Apbusy to show earlier in the week. May 4, at 8 p.m. The concert, an ril 29-when more than 70 stuSaturday and Sunday-usually the chapter officers, Junior Karobservance of National Music dents from Peru Prep and Peru a peaceful bonus of two whole as, Woodrow, Colo.; Robert B. State College presented the first Week, will feature a work by days to finish that theme or study Moore, Arvada, Colo.; and Alice Nebraskan Howard Hanson. of a series of Lyceum numbers DeVore Organ, Denver. The selection, "Chorale and that test due bright and early under the auspices of the BrownThe program included a color Monday morning. However, alAlleluia," was completed in 1954 ville Historical Society. slides presentation of Peru scenes most everyone has to come out and was Hanson's first work for The 8 p.m. production at concert band. The composition from behind those books and take and new construction on the Brownville-early day seat of was commissioned by Edwin a refresher of fun. Honoring the Campus of a Thousand Oaks, plus culture in Nebraska territory- Franko Goldman for the Ameri- serenity of the week-end campus, recorded music by the Peru State College band and the Men's Ocfeatured the Peru State College can Bandmasters Association. this is a quiet talk with some Chorus in "How the West Was Hanson, a native of Wahoo, has friend or a <:.ew minutes spent at tet. Won," a musical adaptation ingained international fame as a the Student Center or in some spired by the movie. Under the composer, conductor and former beautiful spot outdoor if weather direction of E. Hugh Thomas, indirector of the Eastman School permits. structor of vocal music, the canA chorus of gay shouts, comof Music. In 1944; he was award~ Survival preparedness and the tata traced the American pioneer ed the Pulitzer prize for h i s parisons of events and the week- relationship of area defense inin his western migration. R o s s end is over. Symphony No. 4. stallations will be subject for the Oestmann, Dan Knudsen, and James Johnson, a sophomore May 5 all-college convocation at Mary Lu Hicks, were soloist, music major from Syracuse, will Peru State College at 9:10 a.m. harmonicaist, and pianist, respecbe trombone soloist for "Adagio: Amzie V. Grass, consultant, tively. from Concerto for Orchestra," civil defense adult education of Students from Peru Prep, un- the Haydn work arranged by Dathe State Department of Educader the direction of Robert M. vid .Shuman. tion, will be the principal speakBohlken, presented a western Other numbers. on the concert, Student Wives club held their er. He will be assisted by Kenspoof, "Red Gulch-the Cleanest which is free to the public, inregular meeting on April 21, neth Hartman, Lincoln, a memTown in the West." clude "United Nations March," 1965. The main topic on the agenber of his staff who completed The Hilldimbers, campus folk- King; "March for the Prince of da was a picnic for the wives teacher education requirements singing group, were also fea- Wales," Haydn; "Fandango," Perand their families. It was decid- at Peru State in January. tured. kins; "Crucifixus from Mass in B Minor," Johann Sebastain Bach; "Allsports March," Farnan; selections from "My Fair Lady," Lerner-Loew.

August 15, he and his family will fly to East Africa. Mr. Leland will work either in Nirobi or Dar el Salaam. Each city has a population of nearly 170,000. During vacations, he and his family hope to travel in the Middle East, the Holy Land, and South Africa. Last summer Mr. Leland studied in Greece for eight weeks under a Fulbright grant, .complementing his doctoral studies. Upon completion of the current two-year assignment, Mr. Leland will continue doctoral studies at Columbia on a fellowship. In 1963, Mr. Leland was honored by the PSEA by being named "Teacher of the Year," and served as presicll:nt of the Peru unit of the NSEA. Th i s year he was Peru State College's nominee for a Danforth Teacher Scholarship. Mr. Leland stated: "My association with students and the staff at Peru have been most profitable. I'm very thrilled for the opportunity to be associated with an institution like Columbia, and I'm also excited about the opportunity of international education. This fulfills a dream of both my wife and myself to spend time in big game country."

All-Western Extravaganza Presented At Brownville

7

Bill Rinne Heads Peru State SGA

A Dorm Week-end

Rocky Mountain Alumni Meet In Cheyenne, Wyo.

Band Concert On May4

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Student Wives Club Plans APicnic

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Gymnastics Carnival May 13 The annual gymnastics carnival on May 13 will include a variety of games and events ranging from penny throws to an auto demolition. Hamburgers, hotdogs, sodas, etc., will be sold beginning at 4:30 p.m. Everyone is advised to attend in "sloppy style" because two trophies will be awarded to the two sloppiest fun-makers. The events will include a penny toss, dunking stool (possibly with volunteer instructors), fun house, balloon bust, freethrow tosses, fish pond, remarkable pillow-style fight, a car demolition, and several other events. A dance will be sponsored after the carnival so bring your best girl, guy, and friends.

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TO: Student Body FROM: Library Staff DID YOU KNOW THAT: -You can borrow from the duplicate sets of encyclopedias overnight from the upstairs reading rooms? -You may bring your own typewriter into the seminar rooms or the multi-purpose rooms to help you in your notetaking?

-There are coatracks with hangers just inside the main entry so that you need not place your coat on one of the tables or over the back of a chair? -There is a display rack in the browsing room for new materials just processed so that you have a chance to see what is new without having to go through the stacks?

-You have the privilege of borrowing books on interlibrary loan if your own li b r a r y doesn't have the material?

business meeting at their regular meeting on April 21. The minister from Dunbar, Nebr., was also present to give a short talk. The organization planned to have a picnic on April 28 instead of holding their weekly meeting.

-Reserve books are presently being kept behind the circulation desk where they are available to you at all times the library is open?

-The library is open from 7:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, from 7:30 -You may listen to any records a.m.-10:00 pm. on We(fyiesfrom our collection on a spedays, and that during t he dal record player with earweek-ends it is open from 9:30phones which is kept in the 11 :30 a.m. on Saturday and reserve room? from 7:00-9:00 p.m. on Sunday? -You can borrow a reserve book overnight if .you return it the next morning at 8:30 a.m.? -You can stop accumulating a fine on a book by reporting when you receive the first overdue notice? -You are invited to browse through the back copies of the Peru Pedagogians and Peruvians in the special collections room? -It is possible for you to place a hold on a book in circulation which you need .so that you can obtain it when it is returned?

-You may request books which you would like to see placed in the library collection?

-The library has a file of model papers and college studies made at Peru State College which may be used in the library? -There is a picture file as well as a vertical file in the library which will give you supple· mentary information which can be checked out for three days? -The library is often given duplicate copies of magazines which you can borrow so that one need not mutilate the bound ones? Also, for five cents a page you can have copies made from periodicals by getting permission to take them to the placement office where the Xerox copier is kept. -You can get help with a reference question by asking the members of the library staff? -Just inside the front library entrance we post general information as well as specific information on fellowships and scholarships concerning graduate and undergraduate work? -Smoking is restricted in all areas of the library except for the northwest corner of the first floor?

BEATTY GARAGE

--oWESLEY FELLOWSHIP On April 21, the members of Wesley Fellowship made plans concerning the meetings for the remaining weeks of the school year. At the next meeting, the group will hear from the · nominating committee for the officers f o r next year. The students will also discuss their opinions concerning the morals of college students. On May 5, Mr. Van Pelt w i 11 speak before the group on "Sex and the College Student."

Typical Russian Education?

ORGANIZATIONS

The Russian school teacher was giving her students an examination. Her first question was, "Who PSEA were the first human beings?" The April meeting of the Peru One youngster promptly reStudent Education Association sponded, "Adam and Eve." was highlighted by a speech giv"Correct," said the teacher. en by Mrs. Anne Campbell, direc- "And what nationality were tor of professional services !f o r they?" the Nebraska State Education "They were Russians," the boy Association. Mrs. Campbell spoke answered proudly. of the problems and position of 'ICorrect, again," said the professional education in Nebras- teacher. ka. Mrs. Campbell also reported "And how do you know they on the current status of bills deal- were Russians?" ing with education in the state "Well," the boy replied legislature. thoughtfully. "They had no house The meeting also saw the elec- to live in, no clothes to wear, tion of the organization's officers only one apple between them-for the next school year. P.S.E.A. · and: they called it Paradise." members elected Bill Bowen as president-elect, Tim Gilligan as vice president-el~t, Elaine Neddenri~ as secretary-elect, Ron Peterson as treasurer-elect, and Chuck Stoner as S.G.A. repreOpen Monday sentative. These people will be thru Saturday installed as officers at th e P.S.E.A. steak fry on Monday, May 17. Haircu:ts

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LSA The members of the Lutheran Student Association held a brief

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month. In Europe you will n~ . that company personnel offi~ assist employees in making roci ~ and board arrangements. Yl will also find that these arrang BY MARY ANN BIERE Would you like a do-it-your- ments cost very little in Europ For further information wrr self trip to Europe for less than to International Travel Establis one hundred dollars? Charter flights are available to lishment, 68 Herrengasse Vadt almost every American. If you Liechtenstein (Switzerland). are not aware of charter flights and their privileges, inquire at the nearest travel agency and they will give you a complete breakdown on the rules and regOn April 20, 8:00 p.m., t :E ulations. ff you are a member of a charterworthy organization Peru Prep School, presented th rv (school, company, church, social pre-contest concert. The progr a club, etc.) you can even organize consisted of numbers from 'o Peru Prep Band, instrumen f'V a charter flight yourself. Second class train travel is in- solos and ensembles, andi t expensive in Europe. Special Peru Prep Mixed Chorus. n The program was under 1 0 group rates are available to students for both train and plane supervision of Mr. Gilbert 'IA tli travel within Europe. You only son and Mr. Hugh Thomas. Gi " v have to inquire at your univer- Schmucker, student teaching ity travel office. Money saving Peru Prep, conducted the bar i: tip: You could always hitch hike and mixed chorus. The program was as follow s (in Europe it is even common for girls to hitch hike) to your job "Second Symphony for Ban< f and save this entire expenditure. and "Symphonic Overture," Pei Surveys show that one hundred Prep Concert Band; "Tympol fifty dollars far exceeds the ro," solo for tympani by Pl amount of cash on hand that is Parker; "Danse Des Mirliton: ] ordinarily carried by young flute trio; "Trifolbum," trurni: Americans traveling in Europe. trio; "Sonata," flute solo by F You can get along with far less Adams; "Passacaglia and Sche. \ and make what you do have go zo," brass sextet; "The Cre: farther by taking advantage of tion" and "Ride the Chariot," PE the thousands of free or near ru Prep mixed ·chorus; "Noctm t free attractions available in Eu- no," French horn solo by Laur : lee Adams; "Scherzo," clarill rope. 1 The ITE search fee is the one quartet; "Cavaliers," trombo1 trio; "Antiphony No. 2," bra 3 and only fee you have to pay in 1 order to obtain a job opportunity choir; and "Parade of the Wood in Europe. Absolutely no addi- en Soldiers," drum quartet. tional charges are made. ~!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!~1 A factory job in Heidelberg, TEACHERS WANTED J Southwest, entire west and Alaska Germany is a fair sample of a 1 Salaries $5,400. upjob in Europe. Such a job, more FREE registration SOUTHWEST TEACHERS AGCY. often than not, yields enough to 1303 Central Ave. N. E. allow you a net profit of one Albuquerque, N. M. hundred twenty-five dollars a

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Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 60

Number 15

MAY 17. 1965

ollege Band Presents usic Week Concert

Nebraska's Best College

Improve Your Job Opportunities

The Peru State College Band ,nsemble, under the direction of .· r. Gilbert E. Wilson, presented concert on May 4, at 8 p.m., in servance of National Musk eek. The program consisted of these umbers: "March for the Prince Wales," "Chorale and Alleia," "United! Nations March," dagio from Concerto for Cello" ith J.im Johnson trombone solot, "Fandango," "Crucifixusom Mass in B Minor," "Allports March," and selections rom "My Fair Lady."

BY HAROLD JOHNSON

965 Peruvians Will e Available Exam eek In Student Center

The 196'5 Peruvians will be disibuted by staff members in the tudent Center dluring the examnation period. The book, with arger pages than in previous years, will have 116 pages. Also e Woo there will be a supplement of 12 pages. tet. The supplement will co v er ~hings that happened after the ) March 15 final dea<lline on the Alaska book proper. Spring sports, May Fete, commencement, and other AGCY. events will be in the supplement. E. As the supplement cannot be iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiill completed until after commencement, it will be printed during the summer. Copies will be mailed to seniors. Other students may pick their copies up during the summer or when school starts next fall. These supplements make complete coverage of the school year possible for the first time in many years and should be a most valuable addHion to the book That the books are being distributed later than usual in recent years is no fault of Editor iHarv 1fisher and his staff, w h o met deadlines promptly. Later delivery fa the result of a later final OOa.dline (Maroh 15 instead of February 15, as in recent years) and a heavy production schedule at the publishing plant.

:a

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . .

May Fete Program Enjoyed By Near Capacity Crowd

da Anderson, Joan Sprieck, Dianne Morrison, Carol Chandler, A near-capacity crowd saw Mary Ann Sharp, · and Melanie Miss Jan Beemer and Vincent Florea. S<ibatinelli crowned queen and In appreciation of the effortsof king of the 1965 May Fete. Mrs. Frances Wheeler, director Ji Attending the royal couple the program, the Student Center were Julie Harrison and James !Board presented her with a bouNash, as Freshman attendants; quet of one dozen red· roses. Mrs. Cecilia Evangelist and Bill Rinne, Wheeler has been he1ping with Sophomore attend!ants; Marilyn the programs since 1948 and has Masters and Jack Rinne, -J.\lnior been directing the May Fete proattendants; and Marilyn Gonner- grams since 1951. man and Gary Schmucker, Senior The theme of the program, attendants. "Harbor Lghts," was carried out Herald4ng the arrival of the in decoration, song, and dance. king and queen for the coronaThe first island visited on the tion were Alice Massoth and tour of harbors was Tahiti. The Carol Hawley. Miss Katie BohlPeruvian Singers, accompanied ken, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. by Mary Lu Hicks, sang Rodgers Robert Bohlken, and Miss Julie and iHammerstein's "Bali Ha'i." Ebner, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Also from this island came a Larry Ebner, were the flower dance entitled "Tinkling." The girls. Carrying the crowns for the dancers were Jan Walford, Ron royal couple were Miss Linda Roblbins, Me1anie Gould, Gary Sayer, daughter of Mr. andi Mrs. Viterise, Anita Cox, and Leroy Wayne Sayer, and Dwight WininArellano. At the poles were Sue ger, son of Dr. and Mrs. Darrell Kenworthy, Marilyn Hunzeker, Wininger. Delores Rice, Nancy McCollough, The ladies-in-waiting at the Marcia Cunningham, and Connie coronation were the Misses WanEaster. The Lantern dance, customary of Japan, the next island visited, was danced by Nancy Reidv, Kristine Wewel. and Kar;n Quinn. Also customary of the island of Japan is the Waraku Odori (Gentle Happiness) dance, which was presented by Mary Oestmann, Rogine Bang, Mary Mowery, Mary Beth Gerber, Wanda Hartnett, Lois Monsees, Nrancy Gossett, and Sandra Hopp. Half a world away in space lies the Greek Isles, where Miss Sue Kenworthy, accompanied by Jim Manning, sang "This Landis Mine." Melanie Gould, Gary Viterise, Sandro. Hopp, Angela Furnas, Nancy McCollough, Ruth Kalafut, Carol Nickels, Jackie Dodson, Anita Cox, Connie Easter, Gary Pummell, Carolyn Mercer, Allan Sullivan, and Ron Robbins then presented a Greek folk dance entitled "Miserlou,'' Traveling on to Italy and a village street scene the dancers presented an Italian folk dance enMr. Amzie Grass and Mr. Kenneth Hartman speak in convocation titled "Tarantella." The scene BY ELAINE NEDDENRIEP

centered around Richard Shelton who sang "Come Back To Sorrento." He was accompanied by Mr. Hugh Thomas. Dancers were Deloris Rice, Ron Robbins, Carolyn Mercer, Dom LaRocca, Nancy Vanderbeek, Leroy Arellano, Lorraine Tonniges, Gary Viterise, Nancy Reidy, Allan Sullivan, Sheryl Gawart, and John Duder. Coming closer to home and the British Isles, the audience saw the Flamborough Sword Dance pel'formed by Dom LaRocca, Allan Sullivan, Ron Robbins, Gary Viterise, Gary Pummell, Mike Ferry, Leroy Arellano, and John Duder· Climaxing the evening and song and dance, was· the annual Maypole Dance, which is danced each year by the seventh and eighth gra<le girls from the Campus School. The girls were Pam Lewis, Debbie Gaines', Beth Applegate, Rose Shandy, Linda Nin(Continued on page three)

A statistical report recently issuedl by the Nebraska State Department of Education may provide food for thought as you prepare to teach. All indications point to the fact that the teacher supply is catching up with the demand in many areas. A shortage of teachers continues to prevail in the subject areas of English, foreign languages, mathematics, library, music and general science. There seems to be a moderate oversupply of biology and· commerce teachers· There is an oversupply of men's physical education and social studies teachers, now. In actual teaching positions available in the schools in Nebraska,· there are approximately ten elementary school positions to seven secondary school positions. But the supply of teachers in 1965 is estimated to be S€ven elementary school teachers to ten secondary school teachers. The shortag·e of elementary teachers is still a serious problem in Nebraska. Underclassmen may wish to change their program so that they will be prepared to teach in the fields on levels where the teachers are in short supply. The three young men who graduate this year with a degree in elementary education will start at an average salary of $5300.00, which is higher than those with a degree in secondary education· '.Dhe future is extremely bright for men in the area of elementary education or administration. If there are those students who contemplate a change of program, please discuss this with your counselor before the end of the present term. '.Dhe placement director will be gle1d to visit with (Continued on page six)

Mrs. Fran Wheeler, Queen Jan Beemer and King Vincent Sabatinelli


SHOULD WE RECONSIDER? By Bill Bowen

DELZELL HALL

On the campus of Peru State College a sittlIAAli-On exists that demands immediate attention. In far too m!liy instances the administration, various departments, and individual inBy Bill structors threaten to subtract grade points in order to inBowen sure uninterrupted attendance by the students. History and experience have shown that negative threats rarely prove to 'Dhe spring supper was held be successful stimuli. When the average student is forced 1Sunday n1'ght, May 2, in the teleto attend class because unless he does his grades ·will be lowered, he no longer exists in the atmosphere that ideally vision lounge. The food was plentiful and the pundh delicious. exists in college. !Having scheduled the dinner late The class structure that would obtain the best results involves voluntary attendance almost exclusively. The stu- Sunday night, the majority of the dent attends the class, then, because in order to learn, he weekend nomads were il!ble to must. When this situation exists, the benefits are evident to attend. The dormitory is filled: with both the student and the instructor. The instructor finds it nervous people alreadry worrying necessary to actually teach during the class periods, and not about the final tests OOheduled: at · merely assign the course material in outside reading, . as is now done in some cases. The student soon discovers that un~ the end of this month. When the less he attends the class, he will be unable to obtain the ma- schedules were dTstributed, th e terial he needs for the course. In the current situation, the moans could be heard aH the way student often becomes quite bitter and sometimes rebellious. to the river. Even with the differIt is really quite a shame when paying students must be ent, and spread out schedule of forced to attend classes. The ideal situation probably can- tests, there ·are still people that not be reached, but surely some median solution could be have unusually heavy schedules. found that would prove to be more desirable than the cur- '.Dhere is at least one person in Delzell who has four tests in one rent opposite extreme that exists. Another situation that exists falls along somewhat simi- day. Eight hours of tests in one lar lines. We now have a mandatory convocation attendance day must surely set some sort of rule in operation. The absence of that rule would probably purnshment record. Things are looking b e t t e r cause a considerable drop in convocation attendance, but is around here every day. '.Dhe boys it valuable to force students to sit through programs they don't want to see? My answer is a highly emphasized "no." who work rpart time cleanin:g the If the quality of the convocations were improved the atten- dormitory and more specifically dance would no longer be a problem. The current unrecep- our new janitor, "Duf," h a v e tive audiences that convocations now face would no longer !been iworking their hardest to keep the dorm in livable shape· exist because the audiences would be honestly interested. The consensus of theories presented here evolves into I've mentioned some congratulathis simple fact: mandatory attendance rules are not desir- tions before, but I thought that able. It must be admitted that the opposite extreme is prob- "Duf" should: lbe properly introably not workable, but surely somewhere between the two duced and the credit for the hard extremes lies a workable and desirable solution to both the work he's done ibe given to him specifically. On~y one piece of adconvocation anff class attendance problem.

vice needs to be given at th i s Editor's Note: This article expresses the opinion of the point-to 1give "Duf" and the boys a break. When the PO"P bottles author. and the cigarette btitts are ready to be thrown w:ray, please put 'IJ!e's dead:! ! How did it hapthem in the pop cases and the pen? Whew '1 last saw him, he was ashtrays.. To scream about litter as active ..as a. ho:uncing hall.'' . . BX ~RY.ANN BIERE may ieeni like fl.eking a very While Midland Warrior golfers At three o'clock, Chadron State dead horse, but let's remember were outshot 'by Nebraska Wes- College, on that fatal day of that :we live in this dormitory leyan, they managed to overcome Arpril 2, twenty students gathered and what shape it's in depends Doane by 9-3 at a triple meet to pay due reSJpects to the &e;partas much on us as it does on "Duf." !held in Lincc>ln. ed soul. A competent organist By the way, the next time you rolled out the notes of the funeral Paul J. Lovewell, a prominent march as a deep-voiced preacher see "Duf" say hello to 'him, or economist and! business manage- repeated the final rites. Several just smile. He's"wo!th the time. ment coil'sultant from California, ¥oiceS' :were raised in solemn song will give the lOOth annual com- as two lblurry-eyedi grave carriers mencement address to Wash- lifted the fragile little body and MAJORS burn's 1965· graduates in ceremon- departed. HALL ies June 6. "We're really going to m i s s Next fall, Central Missouri Harry. Yes, after all, he was the By State will inaugurate a freshman: prettiest little goldfish in the John football program, Kenny Robb world."

Campus To Campus

head football coach announced this plan. Coach !Robb stated this program would help strengthen his building project of his team.

Destiny has more resources than the most imaginative composer of fiction.-Frank Frankfort Moore.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Editor--------------------------------------- Dorothy Bock Associate Editor_____________________________ Dick Berthold Copy Editor_ ________________________________ Mary Sautter Copy Editor ______________________________ Charles Richards Feature Editor_ ___________________________ Ginny Grossman Photography Editor _____________________ Eugene Fitzpatrick Layout Editor ___________________________ Elaine Neddenriep Academic Editor ____________________________ Joan Dickman Business Manager____________________________ John Barton Circulation Manager_________________________ Bruce McCoy Morgan Hall Column _______________________ Barbara Gordon Majors Hall Column __________________________ John Barton Delzell Hall Column ___________________________ Bill Bowen Sports Column ______________________________ Dick Berthold Reporter_ _________________________________ Mary Ann Biere Reporter_ __________________________________ Oliver Bierman Reporter__________________________________ Joan Bretthorst Reporter ____________________________ Anna Marie DeGerlia Reporter_ ___________________________________ Bruce McCoy Reporter_ __________________________________ Jackie Swegler Reporter____________________________________ Mary ':rackett Reporter_____________________________________ Ron Wiksell Adviser·-------------------------~------ Stewart Linscheid

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New residents moving into 1breakdowns-first the dirye Majors West will be somewhat sewing machine, then the r disappointed when they move in room T.V. :Some electronic geni during the fall term. It seems hooked up the old: set, and that the new addition to Majors worked surprisingly well. will not be air conditioned. New officers were elected f A large number of the residents the dorm on May 4. They are somewhat disappointed this Karon Rathe, president; Barb spring because it seems the air Lasko, vice-president; and Ma conditioning units •Will not be Ann Rademacher, sec r e t a r y turned on. So far the weather treasurer. Refreshments we r seems to ,be cooperating however. served after the meeting. Majors Hall held a dorm meetGirls are making plans for t ing to elect ·officers for the com- summer vacation· Many will a ing school year. Dennis Flattre tend summer school. Others pl was elected president, Ed Stillin- on working. One girl I know w Barton ger was elected vice-president, have an interesting job---she ma It seems as most of the Majors' and Lyle Stewart was elected be a drummer in a combo. I he that some people are really tak men enjoyed the May Fete. I secretary-treasurer. ing vacations too! !heard several comment on the program and the dance. Mary Gonnerman received on 1 Don Stuart spent the week-end dozen yellow roses on her birth·. ELIZA water skiing at Big Lake, Mo., day, May 5. Other birthdays MORGAN with his family and friends. May 7, Sharon Johnson and Ma. HALL Dan Leuenberger r e c e n t 1y 9, Tracy Hester. signed a teaching contract' for the Laura West received a diamond By rn65-66 sciJ.ool year at SummerBarbara on the first of May. She and Ger· Gordon field, Kansas. A former Majors ry Cullen plan a June 4th wed· resi<l:enit, Mert Finke, and his wife ding in 1967. also signed to teach in the SumEveryone around Morgan Hall merfield system. is counting the daysr until the seVandals have hit Majors again. mester is over. Girls are going Last week a large door was brok- "insane" trying to do readings, en at the west end of Majors. term papers, a!lid otherwise catch Jerry Allen placed fourth in a uip on the rwork they should have heat race and! fourth in the "A" done earlier. Tyipewriters c an feature in the stock car races at again be heard at all hours of the iBeatrice this past Sunday. Jerry night. Many girls seem to be Drycleaning and Rod Baade race in Beatrice sleep walking right now, and and almost every week-end. those late study sessions for Dennis Flattre recently attend- finals haven't yet begun. My symLaundry ed a !Midwest Regional Lutheran rpathy to all of those who have Student Association meeting at tests on the last day in the afterCamp Kitaki, which is northeast noon-you're not alone, if that's d.f 'Lincoln. Dennis was elected to any comfort. the office of president. Dan Knud~ :Several familiar faces again OPEN sen was elected to the office of appeared at the dorm over May secretary. Mr. F. H. Larson was Fete week-end, among them were 6:30 a.m. • 10:30 p.m. selected as the advisor for the Janis Meyer and Janice Jones. group. Tliis dorm is plagued w i th

SPEED WASH

COIN-OP.


May Fete • 1965

Queen Jan and King Vincent Ladies-in-Waiting: Joan Sprieck, Melanie Florea, Carol Chandler, Mary Ann Sharp, Wanda Anderson, Dianne Morrison.

May Fete Program Enjoyed By Near Capacity Crowd (Continued from page one)

:o.

dryers, rec genius and it '

cehelser, Nancy Rogers, Bonnie Stemper, Lynn Doxon, Ann Grafton, Rena Merritt, Nancy Terhune, Rebecca Kite, Gaile Hammons, Patsy Stephens, Rhonda Collin, Cheryl Groff, Holly Ful-

ton, and Mary Lou Lotter. Barbara Lasko directed the dance. General arrangements for the program were made by the Student Center Board. Miss Virginia Mullen, Mrs. Fred Stephens, and Mrs. Ralph Groff assisted with the costumes. Processional music for the royalty was provided by Mike McNealy. James Manning narrated the program. The stage aa4 seen-

ery decoration was supervised by Mr. Leland Sherwood, and Mr. Robert Bohlken. Mr. Lester Russell and his electrical technology class had charge of the sound system. Properties for the program were supervised by Mary MoMunn and Letha Bayes. The evening was concluded with dancing. The music was provided by Bud Holloway and his band.

:ed for Y are :arbara Mary '.arywere 'or the 11 ats plan w will e may I hear r takd one birth.ays. May

The King Crowns The Queen

mond Gerwed-

And then there was dancing . . . . BLUE DEVILS The Blue Devils held their regular meeting on Monday, May 10. Ja.ck Rinne called the meeting to order. The election of officers was held. Bill Rinne was elected president, Bill Heineman was elected to the office of vice-president. Rod Baade was elected secretarytreasrurer. The date was set for the Blue Devil picnic. The meeting was adrjourned by

.· ·- ·

Bud Holloway and his band provided the music ·

singing the Blue Devil song.

The McKerchers, Sherwoods, and Dominas chaperoned the dance


May Fete Royalty JAN BEEMER Janet Eileen Beemer, 21-year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Beemer of Bedford, Iowa reigned over May Fete ceremonies at Peru State College Friday evening. Jan, as she is called by h e r many friends, is a senior student at Peru. Her major and minor fields of concentration are home economics, physical education, and industrial arts. In her four years at Peru State College, Jan has been a freshman class officer, a cheerleader, a member of the college band, a fres!hman representative to the girl's dormitory council, h as served on the girl's dormitory council, and she has been active in the Women's Athletic Association and the Home Economics Club. Jan was also Peru's 1963 rSweetheart Queen and Homecoming Queen in 1964. Next fall Jan will travel to Omaha to teach home economics and physical education at Arbor Heights Junior High School in the Westside District. Upon 'being elected Peru's 1965 May Fete Queen, Jan exclaimed, "! was very happy to be elected to the honor of May Fete Queen, and I feel this will be one of the fond memories I will have to remember." Jan's advice to present andi future college students is simple but true: "Be proud of your college. What YOU put into college you will get out of it."

VINCENT SABATINELLI Vincent Sabatinelli, son of Mr. and Mrs. Antonio Sabatinelli of Soufubridg·e, Massachusetts, was selected ;by the Peru student :body as King of the 1965 May Fete dance. ''Dwenty-one year old "Vinnie," as he is caHed by his friends, is a graduate of Mary E. Wells High School. During his high ·school years, he was active in baseball and football. At Peru State, Vinnie ihas a major field of concentration in biology, with history an<li general science as his related fields. He participates activ·ely in football and: is a member of the "P" Club. An athletics enthusiast, he finds playing softbaH a chief source of enjoyment. During his sophomore year at Peru, Vinnie was Sweetheart King, and in his junior year he was an attendant to the 1964 Sweetheart King. A first semester senior, Vinnie will graduate in January of 1966. Upon graduation from college, he would like to begin filling his military obligations by becoming a member of the Special Forces, a select branch of the armed services. Vinnie commented, "I came to Peru on a football scholarship, which is understandable because football was and is my favorite iJpOrt. I very muc'h enjoy· g9ing to school at Peru because it is suc'h a· small college. an<l: · gives me the opportunity to get to know a lot more people."

GRADUATE EXAM 1Monday, May 311, beginning at 12:30 :p.m. in the gymnasium, the Graduate :Record Examination will be given to all graduating seniors. This required examination will :be aipiproximately three hours long. There is no charge for the test. It con·sists of verbal reasoning and: r ea d i n g comprehensioil' questions chosen from and ibordering on several fields. Arrangements were made with the Educational Testing Service to make this exam available to Peru State. . PERUVIAN STAFF VISITS PUBLISHER The Peruvian staff were guests of the American Yearbook Company of Topeka, Kansas, May 4. The Peruvians tourec1 the printing factory during the morning when the 1964-65 Peruvian cover was presented. During the afternoon, the class toured the binding plant and then discussed the Bobcats' 1965-66 yearbook cover with a specialized artist. The trip proved very interesting and worthwhile to the students. Those attending were: Kay Bender, Eugene Fitzpatrick, Marilyn Gonnerman, Barbara, Gordon, Karon Rathe; Mary Sautter, John \So'by, Madelyn Fraser, Elaine Neddenriep, Glenda Rima, Brenda McCarthy, Richard: Berthold. Mr. Linscheid (adviser), and Gary Tuttle (area representative for American Yearbook Co.)

I A Open House Held April Seventy-three high school stu·dents from Humboldt, Tab 1e 'Rock, Deshler, and Peru attended the Industrial Arts Department Open House on Friday, April 30, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The Open House was sponsored by Etia Chapter of Epsilon Pi Tau, industrial arts honorary fraternity. Donald Weiner, Epsilon Pi Tau president, was the program chairman. Guides who showed the high school students around the laboratories were: Richard Allgood, Larry Bohling, Harold Connor, John Eads, Raymond Eichoff, Jim Evilsizer, Kenneth Otteman, and Frank Ruecker. Students were shown the la'boratories in small groups by the guides. In the graphic arts area, Kenneth Olson demonstrated architectural drafting, Dean Cerny demonstrated how to do offset printing and Robert Jones demonstrated gold leaf printing. Mary Sautter, Larry Hayes, and Eraine Neddenriep also demon-

Faculty. Members Give Their Services To City Of Peru

5. The farm last year return to the city about $5400, and it hoped that this income will be i creased to about $8,00(} per ye

Three Peru 'State faculty members-Mayor ,Jack Mcintire, Jerome Stemper, and Lawrence Ebner-1have contributed a great deal to numerous civic improvements in Peru during the past year as a result of their services on the city council. Several major projects still remain to be carried out, such as improvements on equipment, the oiling andJ rocking of all Peru streets, and the remodeling of the city hall. When asked about Peru, majoring in biology and president of Blue Devils, presi- these, Mr. Mcintire stated that, minoring in general science. dent of the junior class, secretary barring any intervening probBill is an active participant in of Tri-Beta, and a member of lems, he intended to see these athletics and activities at "?eru P.S.E.A., S.G.A., and "P" Club. projects completed in full. In athletics, John has lettered State. Bill is sophomore. class Some of the accomplishments vice-president, next year's presi- three years each in basketball for the past year are as follows: dent of S.G.A., president of Maj- ·anc1 track and has also lettered or's Hall, and: a member of the onice in cros.si country. 1. Between $19 and $20,000 in Blue Devils and "P" Club. In He was fresihmari attendant at unpaid bilis have ·been reduced athletics, Bill has lettered once May Fete in 19613 and sop'hom'bre to $4,000. each in basketball and cross attendant at the Valentine's 2. New vapor lights for the encountry. Dance in 1964. He has been a clJorc tire town have been hought and :Bill has been on the Dean's List mitory counselor at Major's Hall paid for at a cost of $2250. They twice acB:demically in his three for two years. are being installed at the present semesters at Peru State. His hobJohn's academic achievements time. bies include hunting and fishing. include perennial membership on 3. Poles and lights for the lightBill plans to teach and coacih up- the Dean's List since his enrollon completion of his college days ment in 1962. His hobbies include ing of the main street have been at Peru State. hunting and fishing. He plans to bought at a cost of $1200.

May Fete Attendants JULIE HARRISON Miss Juliet Harrison was 1965 Freshman ·attendant to the May Fete Queen. Miss Harrison, better known on campus as Julie, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Harrison of 673 Leslie, Wood River, Hlinois. Julie's major field of concentration is physical education, and her supporting field is biology. Julie is in many campus activities, and is a member of the White Angels. JAMES NASH James L. Nash, 19-year old son of Mr. and: Mrs. C. S. Nash of Granite City, Illinois, was freshman attend1a nt to Peru State's 1965' May Fete ceremonies. Jim has been active in football and tennis wlhile a1: Peru. His 'hobbies are hunting and fishing. Jim's major and minor fields of concentration are industrial arts and history, respectively. Jim's philosophy Of life at Peru is: "It's not such a bad place but it needs some kinds of activities for those w'ho stay on weekends." As far as his philosophy of life 1goes, Jim just sighed, "I'm tired."

MARILYN MASTERS Miss Marilyn Masters, a junior at Peru State, was dhos·en as attendant at the annual May Fete Festival held on May 7, 1965. Marilyn is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Masters, .who reside in Nebraska City. Bes.ides being known as an outstanding· cheerleader for the Peru Bobcats, Marilyn is quite active in sucJh organizations as the W.A.A. and White Angels. She CECILIA EVANGELIST is also a member of the Methodist Miss Cecilia Evangelist, daugh- church in Nebraska City. Marilyn's major field of cOnter of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Evangelist, Newark, N. Y., has been centration at Peru State is eleselected: as a May Fete attendant. mentary education. Following her Ceci is a sophomore majoring in graduation in 1966, she plans to elementary education. She is a begin a career of teaching school. cheerleader and belongs to the JOHN RINNE Student Governing Association, John Rinne, familiarly known the Student Center Board, and to most Peruvians as "Jack," is the Nerwman Club. She was Valthe son of Mr. and Mrs. Norman entine Royalty in February. Rinne of Burc!hardi, Nebraska. John is twenty-one years old and BILL RINNE Bill Rinne, Sophomore atten- a junior at Peru, majoring in ibidant for May Fete, is the son of oiogy and minoring in general Mr. and Mrs. Norman Rinne of sieience. J·C!hn is an active participant in 1Burchard, Nebraska. Bill is twenty years oldi and a sophomore at activHies and athletics. He is

teacih and coach following h i s graduation from Peru State. MARILYN GONNERMAN Marilyn Gonnerman, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Gonnerman of Gres'.ham, Neb:i;., was elected the senior attendant to the annual 1965 May Fete. She is known as "Mary" to her friends. Marilyn's major field of concentrations are business education and mathematics. Following graduation from Peru College, Marilyn plans to enter the field of teaching business education in secondary schools. GARY SCHMUCKER Gary Schmucker, son o!f Mr. and Mrs. !val Scihmucker of Brock, was this ye1ar's Senior attendant in the May Fete Court. Gary is majoring in music. He is and has been active in band, chorus, orchestra and M.E.N.C. during his college 1career. Gary has held offices in band and chorus, andi was a class officer during his junior year. Mr. Schmucker will be teaching in Exeter next year.

strated in this area. The ind al crafts area featured a cera diemonstration by Bernard and a plastic casting demon tion. by Donald Weiner. The tricity-electronics area had J Sayer showing radio align and John Wilson showing a se of electrical displays. The working area featured Lawre Adams and Kenneth Arnold d onstrating woodfinishing. In power mec!hanics area, stu saw a demonstration by J' Hanks on how to time an eng· by Dave Perry on how to ch an ignition, and by John S on valve conditioning. The als area featured a gear cut demonstration by John Patte a demonstration on heat tre ment of carbon steel by J Witler, and a foundry demonstr tion by Paul Stevenson and De nis Rinne. Registration for the open ho was handled by Mary Ke Mary Sautter, and Linda Rog

6. A construction company hiredJ at a cost of $1200 to elimin ate electric problems caused b improper wiring and over-loadin of transformers.

7. Some more machinery ha been purchased. 8. A new bookkeeping and ac. counting sys'tem was installed. 9. College rates on sewer usage were raised from $60.20 to $100 per month. 10. A small softball program for children was begun. 11. Nearly all city employees were given substantial raises during the past year. 12. The present bonded indebtedness isl $77,000, and the money · for a $5000 bond payment , is availalble. .

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~O: ats Set Record istn-, t Sioux City .mies Scott Peru State College set a meet stra- e<:ord in the 440 yard relay and elec- ra1bbed three firsts and a second 'erry . t Sioux City, Iowa on Friday, nent , ay 7· eries Peru's scoring. indudes: ood440 yard relay-1, with a clocken<:e 'ng of 42.8 which is a new re<:ord. l The 880 yard relay team took a ~~; . st place also with a time of ent 11:29.5. In the sprint medley relay r . s Peru also placed first with a time rm L . , lof 3:35.2. In the mile run ours ;~~~ Fritz took second with a 4:30.2 nith effort.

;:~ ~olfers Lose

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ToWesleyan

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l"a- j Peru State College golfers 'en- .!were easily handled by Wesleyan !university, rnl/z-ll/2 at Nebraska use .!'City on Tuesday, May 4. 1es, Summary: ers. Steve Deines (W) defeated Bill Heineman, 70-79,-2%, 11z. Bob Sheilds (W) defeated Jim t is Sprague, 71-80,-3, 0. in~ i '.Doug Dorland (W) defeated !ar. bohn Gorges, 77-87,-3, 0. Doug !Hruza (W) defeated Mel l'aS Hester, 8'1-97,-3, 0. inBob !Hoerner (W) defeated by Mark Wendt, 88-93,-2, 1. ing

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Thinclads Down Wayne Peru State finished the home tra<:k season on Tuesday, May 4, downing Wayne in a dual meet 951/z-49%. The victory boosts Peru's dual record to 6-1 for the season. Roger Crook continued to lead the Bobcats to victory. The Bobcats will make their final outing at the Nebraska College Conference meet at Kearney on May 14-15. Summary of the meet: Peru won the 440 yard relay; the 220 yard dash was won by Hagemeier; Crook won the 440 yard dash; Fritz won the mile run; Waston won the two mile; Crook won the low hurdles; Estes won the high hurcHes; Windhorst won the javelin; Curtis won the pole vault; L. Brown won the triple jump; McCrea won the broad jump; and Peru won the mile relay.

Golfers' Bad Luck Continues Peru State golfers continue to have their problems, dropping their match at Omaha, 16-2, against Creighton University on Friday, April 31, and losing to Concordia College 71/2-4% at Nebraska City on Saturday, May 1. Summary: Friday's match Bob Mitera defeated Bill Heineman, 7'6-35. Denny Houliham defeated Jim Sprague, 81-88. Tom McGovern defeated Mel Hester 77-90. Jack Gross defeated John Gorges, 86-88. Tom Smith defeated M a r k Wendt, 86-96. Mike Conway defeated Luke Cox, 79-94. Summary: Saturday's match BiH Heineman defeated K en Mangels, 81-82. Mike Held d e f e ate d Jim Sprague, 79-86. John Gorges tied Dan Jurgensen; 88-88. Lou Janders defeated Mark Wendt, 79-86.

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Bobcats Trounce Owls Cain Slays Peru State trounced Tarkio in a Able Eagles double header orr the Peru dia-

SPORTS ROUNDUP By Dick Berthold The Peru Bobcats nicked Concordia May 11 to win the final home game 2-0. Spizuoco connected for a late inning homer with one man on to bring in the winning score. The pitching was good for both teams throughout the contest. Peru was allowed only five hits; Spizuoco slammed for one, Venditte two, Sullivan one, and Cobb one. Spizuoco ·allowed only six hits, w h i ch showed both teams were evenly matched. Peru disiplayed their finest defensive game of the season against Concordia, and the fielding looked tremendous. Yates and Sullivan displayed a good job at catching. Cox, MoCoy, Spizuoco, and Floerchinger played their final home game against the Concordia team. The contest a 1so marked the final home game for Coa<:h Al Wheeler. Earlier in the season Coa<:h Wheeler remarked, "If the pitching comes through, we can expect a good season." The Bobcats' pitching did improve and Coach Wheeler wound up with a fine record for his final season at Peru State. Coach Mdntire was w e 11 pleased with the Peru thinclads this season. With the new records captured this year, the Bobcats displayed excellent conditioning and team spirit throughout the season. At the WaynePeru meet, Hagemeier ran an excellent 220 in 22.3 seconds. Fritz took the mile in 4:26 while Crook nabbed the 440 in 51.3 seconds· Brye, Seward, Hagemeier, and Crook clipped the 440 relay in a record 42.8 while knocking off four-tenths of a second. Witty heaved the discus for 144 feet for one of his top performances. Coach Mcintire released th e following lettermen for the 1965 track season. The lettermen include: Holliman, Seward, Hagemeier, Brye, Crook, Neujahr, Estes, Noell, Bolin, J. Rinne, Fritz, Watson, Hendricks, Zaparanick, Witty, Windhorst, Vickory, L. Brown, McCrea, Arellano, Curtis, and Niemeyer. Because of the Pedagogian deadline for this issue, the cond'erence statistics are not available. The next issue will provide a complete roundup of the conference games in track, golf, and tennis. The baseball team .wrapped up their final game with Maryville Wednesday, May 12.

Peru Splits With Simpson

In the first game, Don Lehmann gave up only three hits and struck out eight, as Peru won 121. Pat Vendi tte smashed a three run homer for Peru and Jim Manning late added a two run ,homer to the cause.

In the first game, the luckless Bobcats were once again the victims of poor hitting, as Chadron triumphed, 1-0. The Bobcats could coJ!le<:t only two hits off Chadron's pitching, both by George Evangelist. Frank Spizuoco threw a fine five hit ball game, but three of these came in succession in the fourth inning and produced the lone Eagle run.

In the second game, Dale Borman fired a three hitter, striking out nine, as Peru won, 13-0. Gary Young hit a two run homer for the Bobcats and Bruce McCoy drove in three runs for Peru with two hits. The 'Bobcats collected 17 hits in the two games in preparing for their conference closing douJble header with. Chadron, to 'be played at Broken Bow. Tarkio ___________ ooo 01 Peru State -------710 4x

12

Tarkio ___________ ooo oo Peru State _______ 104 8x

13

o

Concordia Bows To Peru Peru State College rolled to an easy victory, Thursday, April 30, as they defeated Concordia College, 104-40 in a dual meet at Seward. Jim Hagemeier and Roger Crook led the way for the Bobcats as they shared in three victories each. Hagemeier rolled to an easy vktory in the 100 and 220 yard dashes, and assisted in the 440 yard relay victory. Crook loped to a victory in the 440 yard dash and intermediate hurdles, and also ran with the 440 yard relay team.

Results440 yard relay placed first with a 42.8 clocking. The 880 yard run was won by Fritz in 2:00.2. Tim Hendericks won the mile with a 4:37.3 effort. Dick Estes won the high hurdles, Bill Witty won the discus with a toss of 140- 1/2, Lowell Brpwn won the broad jump with; 20-71/z jump, and the triple jump with a leap of 40-10. Peru also placed firnt in the mile relay.

PARDE

It appeared that Chadron was as good a club as Peru has faced all season, and the Eagles have an excellent chance of winning the conferen<:e crown. Peru finished their conference season with a record of four wins and four 1osses, losing the four games by a total of five runs.

Peru State ____ 01)0 000 0 Chadron State _ooo 100 x Chadron State _ooo 100 o Peru State ____ 100 010 x

• Nebraska

4

2

Tennis Team Loses The Peru State tennis team has its pwblems this season. Tuesday, May 4, they became the victims of Northwest Missouri State, 7-2, in a match played at Maryville, Missouri. The final outing of the tennis team will be the NCC m e e t , which Kearney will host on May 14-15. Summary of the match: Hank Grace and Lee Garrett won their doubles, match.

Smith, Trimble, Grace, Garrett, and LaMontagne were defeated in singles.

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The second game, originally scheduled as part of a day-night double header, had to be postponed until the next morning, due to inclement weather. Cain found the morning air to his liking, and stifled the Eagles on a lone single, as Peru won, 2-1. The only Chadron hit produced a run, and came after a disputed play which would have ended the inning, had it been called correctly. Bruce MoCoy uacked t w o hits to pace the Peru hitters.

Rex Rains

Peru ,State split a double header with Simpson College on Friday, May 7, winning the first game 7-2; losing the second, 4-1. In the first game, Bob Hayn fired a five hitter, striking out seven, as Peru won, 7-2. Gary Young, Al Sullivan and Bruce McCoy ea<:h had a home run, and each drove in two runs in the winning cause. In the second game, Simpson scored four runs in the third inning and went on to win, 4-1. Young had two hits for Peru in the losing battle. Simpson _______ ooo 200 0 2 Peru State ____ lll 130 x 7 Simpson _______ 004 000 0 Peru State _____ 001 000 0

Ray Cain pitched a magnificent one-hitter in the second game of a conference double header with Chadron, after the Eagles had won the first game.

mond April 29, winning 12-1 and 13-0. Both games were shortened to five innings by the ten run rule.

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WORK OPPORTUNITIES

LITTLE MAN ON .CAMPUS

A number of work opportunities are now available at Peru State College under the Economic Opportunity Act of 1004 to students who qualify from the stan<lipoint of economic need. This act has been designed to promote and stimulate parttime employment in institutions of higher education for students in need of economic assistance for pursuing studies. Anyone interestedi in this program Should contact Dr. Keith L. Melvin, Dean of the College.

JUNIOR CLASS

Shangri-la Theme Of Peru Prep Banquet Peru Prep held its Junior-Senior banquet on Saturday evening, May 8, in the Student Center. The rprom theme, '1Shangri-la," was carried! out in the decorations, program, and menu. The decorations indud:ed a 14-foot "Puff the Magic Dragon," \Japanese lanterns, and wind chimes. The program, Oriental in nature, included an invocation by Kent Van Zant, the Juniors' toast of welcome by Ken Hankins, the Seniors' toast of thanks by Phyllis Groff, and a skit presented by the waiters and waitresses. The class prophecy and the Senior will were read by Bob Mullendorf and Donna Henry. Phil Parker served as master of ceremonies for the evening. ·The menu, an adaptation of Oriental terms, included such exotic dishes as "butterfly wings," "bamboo shoots," "Fujiyama mist," and "pagoda fluff with dragon sauce." Special guests at the dinner were Mr. and Mrs. Doxon, Mr. and! Mrs. Van Zant, and Mrs. Dorothy Martin, junior class sponsor. The dinner was followed by a dance, iwith music provided by the Four Coachmen of Atchison, Kansas.

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The Junior Class meeting was held May 12 diuring Convo period in the college auditorium. President Jack Rinne presided. Charles Gordon was elected as S.G.A. representative fOr the coming year. Mr. Albert Brady1 class sponsor, asked for 11 volunteers to act as ushers for Baccalaureate and Commencement services May 30 and June 4.

Union. Initiated were E. J. Hen- the benefit of the annuai con, derson, Bob Hilt, Mary Jones, ence. Peru's L.S.A. pledged th• WHITE ANGELS · Donna Van Buskirk, Nancy Jar- dollars. The White Angels had its elec- vis, Mike Otto, Jackie Swegler, M.E.N.C. tion for the 1965-66 school year Sheryl Gawart, Tim Tomlyn, The M.E.N.C. meeting was held TEACHERS WANTED , April 26. The organization's new Loren Penkava, Don Jeung, and Southwest, entire west and Alaskl~ at the Campus School, May 10, officers are: president, Myra Jo~h Oh. Salaries $5,400. up' with Dale Duensing presiding. FREE registration , Murren; vice-president, Joanie Officers for next year are SherThe business meeting consisted SOUTHWEST TEACHERS AGCY.: Sprieck; secretary, Beth Terwille- yl Gawart, president; Jackie 1303 Central Ave. N. E.. ·. of discussion of new officers for Albuquerque, N. M. ger; treasurer, Chris Wewel; and Swegler, vice-president; and the ensuing year and an annual merit chairman, Lois Monsees. Mary Tackett, secretary-treasurparty. The newly elected officers and er. The memibers talked about a the organization's present officers -opossible M,E.N.C. scholarship for will form a committee to choose L.S.A. the next year. next year's. White Angel scholarAt the L.S.A. meeting on May ---0ship winner. 5, Dennis Flattre, president, gave BUSINESS CLUB This meeting concluded the a brief talk on the even ts th a t On May 3, the members of the White. Angels' ··business for the took place at the Midwest ConBusiness Club . discussed plans 1964-!Y5 school year. ference :which united the LutherGas - Oil • lube for a picnic .to be held on May 13 --0an associations of other colleges at 5:30 p.m. at Neal park in Peru. W.A.A. Motor Tune-up around the state. Dennis was All students whose major_jield: or On May 18, the Women's Ath- elected president at the conferrelated! field of concentration is letic Association will hold its anbusiness education were invited nual picinc outing at Neal Park. ence. Each college that particiAuburn, Nebr. pated in the event pledged a certo attend. The girls will join together in a tain amount of money towards -ogame of softball after the election FRESHMAN CLASS MEETING of the organization's officers for On May 12, the freshman class the 1965-:66 school year. · !Mrs. FISHER'S BAKERY of Peru State CoHege convened Wheeler, sponsor for the group, at 9:10 a.m. in the College Audii- will accompany the girls on their "The Store of Standard Home-baked Foods tor.ium. The purpose of the meet- outing. Brands" ing was to elect one member to Peru, Nebr. All W.A.A. members that are Phone 274-3620 the S:G.A. Mary Mowery w as interested in attending the picnic chosen to represent the class. are asked to sign a list on the The class also discussed the re- bulletin board! in the girls' dorsults of the dances they have mitory. sponsored during the past school -0year and the profits made on each ALPHA MU GAMMA & of them. Gary Viterise, president A1pha !Mu Gamma, foreign Clothing Shoes of the freshman class, commented language fraternity, members and that the functions were complete initiates enjoyed supper together suocesses, and, to verify this Thursday, April 29 in the Student statement, the treasurer's report was read by Nancy Vanderbeek. !He also gave creilit to the many Appliances - Sporting Goods persons involved in arranging Hunting and Fishing Licenses these events and especially to PERU 872·2561 CECIL BOWMAN Mr. J. D. Levitt, the class spon• sor.

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The Home Ee Club met on M,ay 10, at the Campus School, with president Donna Donovan in charge. The business for the evening was the discussion of the National Home Economics Convention at Atlantic City, New J·ersey, from June 21-25. Mary Ellen Neilson will be attending the convention to represent Peru State College. The Home Ee Club also set up a tentative date for the United Nations Dinner next October. After the meeting refreShments rwere served by Mary Jacobson, Virginia Mullen, and Mary Ellen '.Neilson.

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The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU.NEBRASKA

islature 's Closing Of Campus School s Strong Effect On Town And College BY DICK BERTHOLD e Nebraska Legislature's den ·to close the Peru State pus School ignited numeremotional flares and serious ghts throughout the school ict. The Legislature firmly d that on June 30, 1968, PeState College and the Campus ool must separate, leaving apximately 300 youngsters to an education elsewhere. e decision was esteemed a plete surprise by most alugh some officials suspected change through different thods. "The way it was accom_ __..shed came as a surprise," stat! confer; Mr. Ward Adams, head of the ed thirt 1 strict 3 school board·. "I expecti:t eventually by the Normal ard and not the Legislature," !!"1111_...., continued. ) The possible reasoning behind Alaska decision was the economy an. The state presently is financ$48,182 biennially, which is a ction of the present biennial iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii.lf'erating cost of $236,812. The binial income from elementary ~~Sfnd high school contracts account r $188,630 which constitutes a ajority of the present operating st. By continuously exchanging nancial figures, several differces could be accountable. Is e campus school closing stimu>e ted by a new trend? Dr. Gomon nswered, "A number of colleges ave eliminated their campus hools; however, more than half the teacher training instituons still accommodate them." What are the two main prob- -•.~ems facing the college officials ecause of the decision? Dr. Goon explained that the college ust find new and substantial rd laces for observation and experimentation. Another difference is >urn that the ·college must hire four supervisors. Fourteen of the high school's 21 teachers also hold classes at college level. "The campus laboratory school is a significant part of Peru State College," stated Dr. Gomon. "It serves as the heart of the teacher education program, which is, of course, the principal objective of the college. It is difficult to envision an adequate teacher-training program without laboratory school experiences. It is true that some teacher-training schools use the facilities of local school districts for this purpose, but such colleges are fortunate to be in communities of a size capable of maintaining a superior school system." · Dr. Gomon continued, "In the absence of a quality school, it would be necessary for the college to make arrangements with other schools in the area for observation, etc., probably at a fee, in addition to arranging for transportation of students and supervisors to such sites." What effect did the Legislative decision have on the campus and school board officials? One unfortunate thing is that many present teachers and administrators must seek new employment. Mr. Doxon, campus school principal, stated, "The majority of (Continued on page four)

ce

Dr. Clarence Forsberg Baccalaureate Speaker Dr. Clarence J. Forsberg, minister of St. Paul's M et hod is t Church in Lincoln, Nebraska will be the speaker at the baccalaureate ceremonies in the auditori· um on Sunday, May 30. He has served in his present capacity since 1962, having been associate minister of the same church in 1948. A graduate of Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois, Dr. Forsberg was graduated from North Park Theological Seminary, Chicago, and has complMed additional training at Garrett Biblical Institute, Evanston, Ill., and in the Council for Clinical Training as an assistant to the chaplain, Illinois State Training School for Boys, St. Charles. Dr. Forsberg is a contributor to various homiletical journals, including The Pulpif, Pulpif Digest, Pulpit Preaching. A participant in Methodist-sponsored preaching missions to Hawaii and Northwest Europe, Dr. Forsberg ha s served as the Conference preacher in Oregon, Alaska, Idaho, and the Pacific Northwest Conference. He received an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree from Willamette University, Sa 1 em, Oregon.

Banquet Honors The Wheelers Mr. and Mrs. Al Wheeler were feted at a banquet in their honor in the Student Union on Saturday, May 22, 1965. One hundred and thirty guests and friends were in attendance to pay tribute to the Wheelers' accomplishments in their years at Peru. Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of the college, was the master of ceremonies. Professor Robert Moore, a long time bridge companion of Mr. Wheeler, was the principal speaker and commented on past happenings at Peru State. Dr. John Christ of the science department made the presentation of a gift to the Wheelers, from all the people who wished to honor them. Entertainment was provided by Mr. Hugh Thomas of the music department, who favored the audience with two vocal solos.

Volume 60

Number 16

Student Leaders Are Recognized At Honors Convo BY MARY TACKETT The end of the school year has come. In the midst of the rush the whole school pauses to recognize its deserving students. Honors convo opened Wednesday, May 19 with "The Star Spangled Banner" and the "Pledge of Allegiance" led by Dr. Gomon. Dr. Harold Boraas presented the first series of awards to outstanding students. Harvey Fisher received the A. V. Larson award, a plaque, for outstanding contribution to the Peruvian, college yearbook. Harvey also received an efficiency award in behalf of the yearbook staff given by the American Yearbook Co., Topeka. Lonn Pressnall was given the Dramatic Club award for the senior who has made outstanding contributions to drama activities. The Neal S. Gomon award for outstanding contribution to the Pedagogian, the student newspaper, went to Dorothy Bock. Sheryl Gawart received the Pearl A. Kenton Foreign Language Scholarship, for outstanding work as a foreign language student. This scholarship was established by Miss Alice Kenton, Pomona, Calif., a 1921 graduate, in memory of her sister, a Peru graduate and teacher of languages at Peru. The Alpha Mu Omega, honorary mathematics fr ate r nit y , award for excellence in mathematics, went to Mary Schriner. The Louise Mears Geography Award, provided by the sale of "Hills of Peru," went to Walter Rimmer. (Continued on page three)

Knudsen Presents Original Play BY BILL BOWEN An original one act play by Peru State undergraduate Dan Knudsen was presented in the college auditorium Friday night, May 21. Requiem On The Horn Of The Moon, an analytic look at the futility of civilization was produced and directed by Knudsen, who also played one of the major roles. Other actors were Barbara Gordon, Phil Dorssom, and John Webster. The play begins on a rather indefinite note, but develops clar· ity as it moves forward. The introduction, as written by the author, is far too involved for the average audience. It sounds more like a philosophical outline than like the outline of a play. A simpler more direct introduction would have been desirable. The ·characterizations are dear, but the actors at times seemed as much in doubt about the symbolism as the audience. Even though the play is vague in places, it makes its point and has real value as an analysis of one person's interpretation of life. The one major fault lies in the flash type scene divisions, which lack the finesse that is needed in the presentation of a symbolic dramatization. (Continued on page two)

MAY 24, 1965

Vaya

Con Dios

Ninety-sixth Commencement Honors 123 Degree Candidates

Dr. Louis Kilzer Commencement Speaker Dr. Lcuis R. Kilzer will be the speaker at the commencement exercises on June 4. Dr. Kilzer graduated from Peru in 1915 after attending the Grand Island Business College. He received his B.A. from Parsons College, Fairfield, Iowa, his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Iowa. His many years of teaching experience were mostly in Iowa but included Wyoming and Nebraska. He is currently teaching college classes at the University of Wyoming. He is a member of several committees at the university. Some of the honors received by Dr. Kilzer include the Distinguished Service Award, Wyoming Education Association, Special Honors from the Beta Mu Chapter of Phi Delta Kappa, a professional fraternity, and a special award from Kappa Delta Pi. He is listed in Who's Who in America and Who's Who in the West Leaders in Education. He received an honorary life membership in NCA in April of 1964. Publications by Dr. Kilzer in· elude 54 items including books, guides, articles, and standard tests.

Cheerleaders Elected For The Coming Year Six girls were elected by the Peru State student body as cheerleaders for the 1965-66 school year. They are Carolyn Price, Charlotte Hershberger, C e c i Evangelist, Mary Mowry, Joanie Sprieck, and Kathy Francis. A freshman at Peru, Carolyn served as cheerleader for two years at Pawnee City high school. Charlotte, also a freshman, was cheerleader during her senior year at Falls City High. Ceci was cheerleader during her entire high school ·career at Newark Central high school in Newark, N. Y., A sophomore, she has also served as cheerleader at Monroe Junior College in Roches·· ter, N. Y. She is a returning cheerleader for Peru State. Mary is a graduate of Beatrice high school. A freshman, she has (Continued on page two)

A total of 123 degree candidates will be honored during the 96th annual commencement week at Peru State College. The week's activities at Nebraska's first college will begin May 29 with a faculty reception at 8 p.m., and will close with Commencement June 4 at 10 a.m. The degree candidate list includes 96 June candidates and 27 who completed requirements in January. One candidate, David N. Gomon, Peru, has qualified for both the bachelor of arts and bachelor of arts in education degrees. Other commencement week activities will include: Sunday, May 30-1915 class reunion beginning at 9:30 a.m., and Baccalaureate at 4 p.m.; Wednesday, June 2-T. J. Majors Campus High Scho.ol Commencement at 8 p.m. Dr. Clarence J. Forsberg, minister, St. Paul Methodist Church, Lincoln, will address members of the college and campus school graduating classes, at the Baccalaureate Services on May 30. Speaker for the 96th graduating class of Peru State will be Dr. Louis R. Kilzer, professor emeritus of education, University of Wyoming, Laramie. Dr. Kilzer, a member of the class of 1915, will address the 1965 spring graduates with the subject, "Time for Inventory," touching upon the past, present and future. Degree candidates include: Bachelor of Arts (liberal arts) James Agnew, 3205 Blue Ridge Drive, Omaha; Richard L. Baker, 11600 West Dodge, Omaha; William P. Fournell, Tecumseh; Larry Giesmann, Sterling; David N. Gomon, Peru; Donald I. Glaesemann, Hebron; Ronald J. Grant, Madrid, Iowa; Jimmy Jicha, Lawrence; Wayne B. Kellogg, Hiawatha, Kans.; Robert Kepler, Otoe; William W. Klabunde, Papillion; Donald V. Schmidt, Sterling. Bachelor of Aris in Education John F. Barton, Essex, Iowa; Phillip R. Bateman, Sidney, Iowa; Merron K. Camden, 3550 Sixth Ave., Council Bluffs, Iowa; Thomas D. Castle, Falls City; Michael C. Chu, Hong Kong, British Crown Colony; Virginia L. Cockerham, Peru; Daniel E. Donovan, Peru; Eric E. Dorf, 370{) L Street, Lincoln; Judith Whigham Finke, Blanchard, Iowa; Harvey A. Fisher, Tecumseh; David N. Gomon, Peru; Larry W. Hershberger, Falls City. Lawrence L. Johnson, Tecumseh; Thomas M. Majors, Peru; Jane Moore, 7 Freeman Drive, Hampton, Va.; William B. McCoy, Tecumseh; Linda O'Hara, 3302 Twelfth Ave., C o.u n c i 1 Bluffs, Iowa; Larry G. Phillips, Nebraska City; Lonnie A. Pressnall, Wymore; Gary L. Schmucker, Brock; Frank Teleen, 2;601 South Fifteenth, Lincoln; R. Michael Troester, Hampton; Lester P. Turner, Nehawka, Janice A. Wilkinson, Humboldt; Wendell R. Wiksell, 1718 South 54th Street, Omaha; George W. Zwickel, Shenandoah, Iowa. (Continued on page two)


EMPTY HEADS STRIKE AGAIN By Barb Gordon Congratulations to the person who succeeded in burning. the litter barrel outside of Morgan Hall. Whether done d~hberat~ly or by accident the incident illustrates two obv10~s po~nts. ~ure vandalism is not the exclusive property of JUVemle delinquents. Or it could be still another example of the complete indifference to responsibilities which is so often displayed on this campus, with respect to private or school property.

DELZELL HALL By Bill Bowen

The residents of Delzell Hall contributed a donation to the Peru Achievement Foundation, I have no birthdays to report, and sent flowers to the funeral of but I want to wish a happy birth- Mr. Lewis Lotter, former janitor ELIZA day to all those girls who have in Delzell. Mr. Lotter died earlier MORGAN birthdays in the summer months this month, after a prolonged illHALL and who will never get it in the ness. 'John Chasse was awarded the paper. By Delzell Hall Scholarship at the Since this is the last column Barbara for me, I'd like to thank all my Honors Convocation last WednesGordon "spies" for the news that I've put day, May 19. The scholarship was awarded for the first time this Everyone in Morgan Hall is in the column (and some that I year, and will be awarded anhaven't put in the column!) It's counting the days until the end nually from now on. This scholof the semester. Even t h e been fun, exasperating, a n d: arship sets a desirable precedent, thought of those final exams sometimes maddening writing and hopefully it will be imitated this, but I think it was worth it. can't ruin that feeling of anticiby others. The awarding of such I know a lot more people at any pation for a summer full of fun. rate. Have a nice summer!-Barb. scholarships is a valuable contriAnyone who was up studying bution to higher education. late (and I'm certain someone While competing in the dual was beside me, because I heard track meet with Doane Colllege, them faithfully pecking on a Dellzell resident Tim Hendrichs typewriter in the rec room) probset a new school record in the ably wondered what was happenJust time to get that second wind. Have aCoke. two mile run. Tim is a dedicated ing on the street. The noise runner who works his heart out Coca-Cola - Its big, bold taste wasn't the familiar racking of to do his best. All the congratuDonald Schmidt, Sterling, a lations that came his way are pipes. When I looked out the never too sweet, window, I discovered two boys June candic1ate for the ba>ehelor well deserved. puts zing in people ... refreshes best. zooming up and down the street of arts degree has been awarded The dormitory is already be¡ on motor scooters, honking horns a $2,500 National Defense felginning to show the signs of peoand shouting. At least it woke lowship in physical biochemistry things ple getting ready to leave for me up enough to go on studying, at Oklahoma State University, home. It won't be long before the but I don't know if the people Stillwater, according to Dr. John building will be empty again. For who were sleeping appreciated it C. Christ, head of the division of those people who have signed up science and mathematics at Peru that much. for rooms in the staid old castle The new TV is back in good State. called Delzell for next fall I The fellowship, renewable for working order. I finally found have only the highest reg~rd. out who hooked up the old TV. two additional years while workYou are the backbone of courage It was Nancy Gossett, assisted> by ing toward a doctorate in biothat this college needs. Joyce Tegtmeier-they felt they chemistry, is the fourth at OklaSince this is the last column of should at least be recognized homa State, for recent graduates the year, I would like to thank Bottled under the authority of The Coca-Cola Company by: - since they were almost electro- of Peru State. Two other Peru Nebraska City Coca-Cola Bottling Co. State students are in fellowship all the people who have helped cuted trying to fix it. Several girls from the dorm programs in mathematics at Ok- me to bring this column to its successful completion. The people Kans.; Jerry Joy, Shubert; Ja attended a Studio Girl party giv- lahoma State. who have helped me the most 96th Commencement R. Kanter, 126 Tomlinson, E en by Mary Beth Kernes May 20. A 1961 graduate of Sterling (Continued from page one) Alton, Ill.; Merlin Kastens, 0 Lucy Sporer and Donna Wiley High School, Don is the so'ii.' of are the least deserving, so I won't Richard M. Kennedy, Paw gave a miscellaneous surprise Mr. and Mrs. Victor Schmidt. mention their names. That may Bachelor of Fine Arts City; Darlene B. Kent, Aub shower for Rita Harris May 19. Elected to Who's Who Among sound like a backhanded compliIn Education ment, but it is a fact, nevertheLorene Kostal, Odell; Le r Dorothy Bock and I gave Myrene Students in American Colleges Hi 1 de brand a miscellaneous and Universities last fall, Don less, that the best way to help a William J. Bouton, Route 1, Leonard, 62 Newton Street shower, but it really wasn't any has been active in co-curricular budding journalist is to leave him Amsterdam, N. Y.; Michael F. bany, N. Y.; Daniel J. Leu~nb ger, Tecumseh; Edwin G. Loo surprise since she happens to, be activities throughout his college alone. Thank you for doing just Janis, 7514 Kildare, Skokie, Ill. that. jer, Deshler; David Malmbe our roommate! career. One final news flash, in elecBertha Terwilleger had some Bachelor of Science in Education Nebraska City; Gary Manni During his sophomore and junHubbell; Janis E. Mayer, Aubur unexpected guests weekend be- ior year, he was a member of the tions held Wednesday night, May Linda M. Bartels, Tobias; Gary 19, officers for the following year fore last. Ginny Mullen, Bob basketball squad', and as a sophoBedea, Table Rock; Judith A. Carolyn L. Mercer, Malver Murray, and Ed Harned hitch- more participated in football. Ac- were elected in Delzell. Ray Cain Beran, Odell; Janet G. Bierman, is once again the president, Gary Iowa; Larry Morrissey, Tee hiked the rest of the way after tive in the Student Governing a33 North Burlington, Hastings; Miss Anderson took them to Te- Association, he is a counselor at Viterise in his second vice presi- Karen S. Cahow, 4532 Spencer, seh; Elaine A. Muller, Falls City, dency in a month, and Charlie Donald E. McCord, Firth; Suza cumseh, and gave them s o m e A. D. Majors Men's Residence Omaha; Lucille E. Christensen, S. McKee, Villisca, Iowa; Norm provisions for the rest of the trip. Hall. He has served as secretary- Gordon as secretary-treasurer. Valparaiso; Roger L. Crook, SaJ. McKercher, Peru; Charles H Only one engagement th i s treasurer of Alpha Mu Omega, lem; Daniel J. Coffey, Stamford; Niemeyer, Deshler; Ronald Pe time. Connie Easter became en- and: is a member of the Blue Cheerleaders Elected S. G. Compton, Muscotah, Kans.; thoud, Beatrice; Larry P .. Piper gaged to Eldon Thomas May 14. Devils, men's pep club. Marvin W. Corbin, Fairbury; 1()29 Court Street, St. Joseph For The Coming Year Luke S. Cox, Lincoln. Mo.; Keith L. Rawson, Villisca (Continued from page one) Iowa; C. Channing Redfield Hazel J. Denison, Hiawatha, no previous cheerleading experPERU PEDAGOGIAN Newark, N. Y.; Glenda M. Rima; Kans.; Penelope H. Edwards, Taience. ' Farragut, Iowa. STAFF Joanie, another freshman, is a ble Rock; Alfred H. Eickhoff, g r a d u a t e of Louisville high Falls City; Linda M. Elliott, 1602 Editor--------------------------------------- Dorothy Bock Ruth H. Rulla, Sterling; Associate Editor _____________________________ Dick Berthold school, where she was a cheer- Washington, Omaha; James E. E. Scott, Malvern, Iowa; Rut Felten, Bellevue; Sharon K. Fike, CoPY Editor--------------------------------- Mary Sautter leader all four years. Schnute, Falls City; Lonnie W. Copy Editor______________________________ Charles Richards Kathy, a junior, is also a re- Peru; Merton R. Finke, Tecum- Shafer, Shubert; G. Karlene Feature Editor____________________________ Ginny Grossman turning cheerleading veteran for seh; Richard J. Floerchinger, 1935 Sherwood, Peru; Richard L. Sims 1 Photography Editor_____________________ Eugene Fitzpatrick Peru, having led the yells for two South 35th Ave., Omaha; Ronald Quenemo, Kans.; Alice L. Sloan, years previously. She is a gradu- R. Foreman, Beatrice; T. Eleanor Hiawatha, Kans.; Robert L. SporLayout Editor--------------------------- Elaine Neddenriep Academic Editor____________________________ Joan Dickman ate of Abraham Lincoln high Frandsen, Falls City; Madelyn C. hase, Nebraska City; Richard E. Fraser, q'310 Ida, Omaha; W. HarBusiness Manager____________________________ John Barton school, Council Bluffs I o w a Stock, Unadilla; Carl E. StukenCirculation Manager_________________________ Bruce McCoy where she was a chee;leader fo; vey Fraser, Humboldt. holtz, Nebraska City; Mabel M. Morgan Hall Column _______________________ Barbara Gordon three years. Margaret L. Gigax, Fremont; Tanking, Sabetha, Kans.; LawMajors Hall Column __________________________ John Barton Carol I. Glathar, Humboldt; llma rence E. Trimble, 3303 North Delzell Hall Column_____________ _. _____________ Bill Bowen Gottula, Elk Creek; Marion L. 58th, Omaha; Jeanne Rhinehart Knudsen Presents Sports Column-----------------------------Dick.Ann Berthold Gomon, Peru; Mariedith Green- Tynon, Atkinson; David L. VonReporter __________________________________ Mary Biere lee, Atlantic, Iowa; Duane E. dra, 4035 J Street, Lincoln; KathOriginal Play Reporter----------------------------------- Oliver Biennan Haith, Plattsmouth; Mary L. leen Mamin Ward, Wahoo; Joe A. (Continued from page one) Reporter---------------------------------- Joan Bretthorst Hannah, 5208 C~dar, Omaha; Ward, Weeping Water; Donald A. Reporter---------------------------- Anna Marie DeGerlia The presentation of an original Larry G. Hart, Burchard; Alice Weiner, Odell; George A. Weiss, Reporter------------------------------------ Bruce McCoy play on campus is a big cultural E. Haxton, Sabetha, Kans.; Al- Virginia; Barbara J. Wheeldon, Reporter-----------------------------------¡ Jackie Swegler step forward. Dan Knudsen has vin D. Henrichs, Wymore; Doug- Route 3, Council Bluffs, Iowa; Reporter------------------------------------ Mary Tackett presented an example of what las G. Hunzeker, Seward; Linnea David L. Wilson, Plattsmouth; Norma A. Wood, Beatrice; Doncan be accomplished by a college A. Ingwerson, Plattsmouth. Reporter------------------------------------ Ron Wiksell ald E. Wright, Table Rock; Peggy student who wants not only to Adviser--------------------------------- Stewart Li.nscheid Robert C. Jennings, Reserve, O'Neill, Valentine. learn, but also to produce.

Donald Schmidt Gets Fellowship At Oklahoma State U.

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~~seball_ S~ason p1sa ppo1 nt1 ng [

BY BRUCE McCOY

A double loss to Maryville osed the curtain on a disapointing season for the Peru Bobats' baseball squad, leaving the eason record at eleven wins and ight losses. I Peru's shabby playing at µaryville exemplified the season !or the Bobcats. The potentially ~owerful Bobcats could not musler the dutch base hit or come hp with the fine defensive play hen they needed them the most. eru ended its conference season ith four wins and four losses, losing the four games by a total only five runs. [ After splitting with St. Beneaicts in the season opener, Peru ~plit conference double headers ith Wayne and Kearney, with win victories over Maryville andwiched in between. Followng the split at Kearney, Peru plit with Hastings, via errors nd bases on balls, and then the obcats drubbed the hapless arkio team in a double header. Next came a split at Chadron, · ollowed by another split with Simpson College at home. Peru ·then downed Concordia and ended its season with the double loss Maryville.

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Frank Spizuoco and Ray Cain led the Peru pitching staff throughout the season, as the fine pitchers posted an earned run average well under two per game. Spizuoco fired a brilliant no-hitter against Hastings, and also shut out Concordia. C a in twirled a one-hitter at Chadron, in pacing that victory. Leading the Bobcat hitters throughout the season we r e Bruce McCoy, Gary Young, and Don Cobb. McCoy was the only regular to hit over .300, finishing with a .327 mark. He also led the team in hits with 17, and in runs batted in, with 18. Young finished the season with a .280 mark, hitting three home runs and driving across 15 runs. Cobb posted a .2S3 batting mark, and also stole 16 bases and scored 16 runs.

Dr. Pitts Announces 1965 Football Dates Dr. Ervin Pitts, director of athletics, at Peru State College, has announced the 1965 football schedule. The Bobcats will play the same nine opponents as in the 1964 season with five home encounters and four Nebraska College Conference games. Schedule-Sept. 11-Tarkio College Sept. 18-Lincoln University Sept. 25-Ait N.W. Mo. State Oct. 2--At Chadron St. College Oct. 9-Wayne State College Oct. 16-At Hastings College Oct. 23-Doane College (Home•coming) Oct. 30-Kearney State College Nov. 6-Washburn University

THE AVENUE STORE

GO TOGETHER

Bill Rinne Heads SGA Next Year

SPORTS ROUNDUP By Dick Berthold The Peru State thinclads concluded their 1965 season May 14 and 15, grabbing second place in the NCC meet at Kearney with 58 points. Leading the Bobcats was Buddy McCrea, who captured two firsts and a fourth. McCrea set a meet record in the triple jump with 45'1"; jumped 23'2" in the broad jump for his second win, and cleared 5'10" in the high jump for fourth place. Jim Hagemeier tied the conference record in the 220 yard dash as he climaxed a 21.8 victory. Hagemeier, David Seward, Roger Crook, and Narva Brye captured Peru's fourth victory with a 1:27.6 in the 880 yard relay. Their time bettered the Bobcats' record for the second time this season. SUMMARY: 100 yd.-Seward (3) 220 yd.-Hagemeier (1), 21.8 440 yd.-Crook (5), 51.8 880 yd.-Fritz (4), 2:01.l; J. Rinne (5), 2:02.2 Mile-Fritz (3), 4:28.5 Two Mile-Watson (2), 10:02.8; Hendricks (3), 10:05.6 330 Inter. Hurdles-Crook (5), 41.6 880 Relay-(1), 27.6 Broad Jump-McCrea (1), 23'2" L. Brown (5), 21'10" Shot-Windorst (5), 46'7" High Jump-McCrea (4), 5'10" Discus-Witty (3), 151' Pole Vault-Niemeyer (3), 12'6"; Arellano (4), 12' Triple Jump-McCrea (1), 45'1"

Friday 9-12 p. m. Sunday 10-12 p.m.

The Peru Bobcats finished third in tennis and fourth in golf at the NCC championship meet in Kearney. Coach Wininger's tennis team grabbed two points to trail champion Hastings with 16 and Wayne with 5. Kearney failed to score and finished fourth while Chadron did not participate in either event. Joe Smith picked up Peru's two points in the opening round of tennis action defeating Dwight Keith of Wayne, 6-3, and 6-4. Hastings won a repeat championship in golf with a foursome total of 333. Top score for Peru was Bill Heineman who carded an 85. Other Bobcat competitors included Jim Sprague, John Gorges, and Mel Hester. The column extends its appreciation for the fine assistance and cooperation from Dr. Pitts (F), Coach Pilkington (C.C.), Coach. Mcintire (B.B. and Tr.), Coach Wheeler (Base.), Coach Stemper (I.), Dr. Wininger (Tennis), Mr. Ebner (Golf), and the personnel of the special services department throughout the school term.

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Bill Rinne, Burchard, and Gary Viterise, Minsteed Road, Newark, N. Y., have been elected president and vice-president, respectively of the Student Governing Association at Peru State College, according to Dr. Harold Boraas, dean of students. The S.G.A. at Peru State includes a membership of 14 representatives from candidates nominated by various student organizations. In addition, the top three classes have one representative, and the incoming freshman class next fall will elect three delegates. At-large student organization delegates, elected at recent college-wide balloting, inc 1 u de : Wanda Anderson, Talmage; Ray . _C).in, Thurman, fowa; Royce Curtis, Creston, Iowa; Carol Hawley, Brock; Ron Kroll, Burchard; Myra Mu;ren, Elliott, Iowa; Connie Rademacher, Johnson; ;Mary _Ann Rademacher, Johnson; KaronRathe, Sterling; Jack Rinne, Steinauer; Charles Stoner, Tecumseh; Maren Tinkham, Holmesville; Cliarles Wellensiek, Syracuse. Gary Fritch, Table Rock, and Mike Smagacz, 1015 Mercer Boufovard, Omaha, have b e en chosen as first and second alternates.

Student Leaders Are Recognized

award of Kappa Delta Pi, honorary education fraternity, for scholarship a n d professional promise in the field of education. Mrs. Marion Gomon and Mrs. Suzan McKee were recipients of the Zelma Wonderly award for outstanding work as student teachers in second grade. This award was provided by the late Miss Zelma Wonderly, campus school supervisor from 1950 to 1959. A special gift, a traveling case, was presented to Mr. Leland from the Peru Historical Society in recognition of his leadership. Four seniors were listed who were given honors and scholarships from graduate schools for next year. James Agnew has been given a full expense grant in mathematics at the University of Washington. Lonn Pressnall has been given a one-year assistantship. Don Schmidt has been given a scholarship by Oklahoma State University. William Witty received the Swenson Athletic Award, a g<Jld watch and a medal, which was presented by Mr. Wheeler. This was established in 1925 for the outstanding senior who has participated in athletics, by the late Mr. and Mrs. Bert Swenson of Stockton, Calif. In conclusion the senior members of the base ball team presented a special award to Coach Al. Wheeler to show appreciation for everything he has done in the past. The gift was a golf cart.

(Continued from page one) John Chasse was the first recipient of a new scholarship, the Delzell Men's Residence Hall scholarship for a resident of the dormitory, a $100 one-year grant. Mary Jones was given the Nemaha County Teachers Ass<Jciation, for a Nemaha county resident enrolled in teacher education curriculum at Peru State. Dr. Keith Melvin, dean of the college, presented the next group of awards. Karen Quinn was the recipient of the White Angels scholarship for contribution to school activities, by the women's pep club. The Peru Historical Society award for contributions to the organization was given to Larry Phillips. The Sigma Tau Delta, honorary English fraternity, gave Dennis Kennedy the award for written contribution in the freshman writing contest. Mary Mowry received the runner-up award. Mary Lu Hicks was given the

Thanks From Staff The Pedagogian staff extends thanks to all those who ha v e helped us in publishing the paper this year. Help came from many sources, so we can't mention all of you, but we do appreciate your efforts. Special thanks, however, do go to Dr. C. V. Siegner, Mr. J. D. Levitt, Mr. Don Carlile, and Mr. Leland Sherwood. Dr. Siegner has given our photographers much good advice and direction. Mr. Levitt has also given us a hand with photography. Because we weren't able to send reporters to all out-of-town events, we sometimes have had to depend upon the special services releases of Mr. Carlile and Mr. Sherwood as our only source of information. These boosts have helped us to put out a better paper. Again, our thanks go to all who have given even a little of their time and energy for the Ped.

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Peru, Nebraska


whole district; thus not only will in American Colleges and plenum and: vacuum and is inthe community of Peru be affect- versities last fall, Jim is a sured! against any failure to fured, but the surrounding commun- ber of the Peru State chap nish plenty of fresh air by powity as well. Change is always Alpha Mu Omega, honora erful electric motors. A stationary vacuum system of cleaning Two appointments to the staff difficult but once people adjust, tional mathematics fraterni A member of the Student ' has been installed thruout the of Peru State College, and one they should be satisfied." erning Association, and the~, The final results of the LegislabuiJiding and the· very best means resignation has been announced, BY ELAINE NEDDENRIEP of sanitation has been provided according to Dr. Neal S. Gomon, tive action will emerge within dent Education Association," With the passing of the resolu- for the entire plant. Wiring; the future years. At present, pre- has worked as a library assi' president. tion to dose the Campus School plumbing and heating are disfor two years and two s Effective with the beginning of dictions would be immature; but by June 30, 1968, many a person tributed thru a special subcellar. approximately 300 youngsters and is laboratory assistan .· may remember the story pub- This is an important feature as it the 99th academic year in Sep- will be seeking an education else- physics and a student assist · lished in The Peru Normalite, gives easy access at all times to tember, Clyde J. Barrett, War- where. mathematics. He has been o' Jan. 10, 1917, upon the opening of vital parts of the heating and rensburg, Mo., will become asDean's Honor Roll "with sistant professor of English, and distinction" every semester~ the training school. lighting and plumbing systems. George J. Geenen, Emporia, cept his first. "On Monday of this week, Care and repair of these essen- Kans., will become an assistant model school and teachers' train- tials may thus proceed at any librarian. er classes convened for the first time without disturbing the work Mr. Barrett will fill the v8Jeantime in the T. J. Majors' trainer of the school. cy created by the resignation of school ·building, the beautiful "By an ingenious arrangement Lyle D. Domina, a member of the product of long and: careful plan- of interior, pupils in the primary ning on the part of President department are not disturbed by faculty since 1962, who will enter James L. Agnew, Jr., a June graduate study toward his docHayes and Dean Rouse. the pupils of the upper grades. torate in English under an in- candidate for the Bachelor of "A more ideal spot for the lo- They may enter the building by structorship at the University of Arts degree at Peru State ColDryc:leaning cation of the building could not the same doors, bU.t not meet in Missouri. Mr. Geenen will be an lege, has been awarded a Nationhave been found. The opportun- the building during the entire addition to the staff, working as al Aeronautics and Space Adminand ity for recreation and nature day. The cloakrooms, recitation a reference librarian. istration Traineeship in mathestudy in connection with the rooms, play rooms and toilet Laundry A native of Hamburg, Iowa, matics at Washington State Unitraining school work is one not rooms for kindergarten, primary, versity, Pullman, for the 1965-66 Mr. Barrett comes to Peru State given to many schools-a few and grammar grades are entirely a<:ademic year, according to Dr. steps from the building and the separated, yet so skillfully done from Central Missouri State College where he has been assistant' John C. Christ, head of the divichild is in touch with a miniature that a visitor might not discover professor of English for the past sion of science and mathematics. f-Orest of native oaks and shady it. OPEN year. Previously he held a simiThe NASA traineeship which nooks not yet disturbed by men! "Other notable improvements lar position for four years at carries a $2,400 stipend, plus tuiThe building itself, 196 feet by are found in tl~e domestic science 6:30 a.m. • 10:30 p.m 106 feet, is a fine well-propor- rooms: vermin-proof store room; Kansas State College at Pitts- tion and fees, is renewable f o r burg. A 1956 graduate of Peru two additional years, making it tioned structure of Bedford stone built-in refrigerator so arranged and vitrified brick for the exter· that temperature is controlled for State, Mr. Barrett received his possible for Agnew to complete ior walls. The interior walls are both winter and summer use; master's from Peru in 1958. He the doctor of philosophy degree has pursued graduate studies toTEACHERS WANTED , of concrete reinforced by steel. complete electric apparatus for ward his doctorate at the Univer- in mathematics. Southwest, entire west and Alaska~ "Entering the building we find kitchen; and arranged whereby sity of Colorado and University A 1962 graduate of South High Salariles $5,400. up'j FREE registration that no effort has been spared to all the rooms of the suite may be of Arkansas. School, Agnew is the son of Mr. SOUTHWEST TEACHERS AGCY(~ make it serve the intended pur- quickly converted into one large and Mrs. James L. Agnew, 3205 1303 Central Ave. N. E. ·· His high school teaching experAlbuquerque, N. M. pose. There is no waste room. dining hall. In the manual trainBlueridge Drive, Omaha. Elected ience has been at Dawson and There are no useless corridors. ing rooms on the same floor, to Who's Who Among Students Mitchell, Nebr., and Pueblo, There cannot be found doors, drawing rooms, bench rooms,, and Colo. He taught in the 1963 sumwindows, or panels which are lathe room are connected in such mer session at Peru State and not placed to serve some econom- a way that the instructor has FISHER'S BAKERY will teach the second five-week easy oversight of all rooms. No ic purpose. Everything has been session of the 1965 s um m e r arranged to save steps, time and belts or shafts or other dangerous Home-baked Foods school. Mrs. Barrett is the former energy in the movement of class- parts of machinery will be found Betty Ann Neil of Union a 1957 Peru, Nebr. es. All recitation, class rooms exposed. • Peru grad. The Barretts have two and laboratory floors are of the "A large assembly room pro- children, Roland, nine, and: LaGas - Oil • Lube finest concrete, covered with bat- vided with a wellcequipped and tleship linoleum. This gives firm- lighted stage not only seat all the Rhea, six. Motor Tune-up A native Kansan, Mr. Geenen ness and cleanliness, yet reduces pupils but care for an assemblies noise and vibration to a mini- or convocations and make pro- received his bachelor of arts de· gree with a major in political mum. vision for dramatizations, plays, Auburn. Nebr. Open Monday "The lighting is unilateral and etc. The gymnasium, 30 by 60 science from Fort Hays State the heating is the vapor system feet, is arranged so that two College, and his master of science thru Saturday of steam. The ventilation is both audiences may be convened at in librarianship from Kansas State Teachers College at Emthe same time. The possibilities Haircuts poria. for great good afforded by these $1.25 Mr. Geenen has had: one year two assembly rooms in the way "The Sl:ore of Standard of high school teaching experiof social and community work Brands" ence, was student assistant in the PERU, NEBRASKA are unlimited." Phone 274-3620 BARBER SHOP library at Fort Hays during his Many years have passed: and four years as an undergraduate. have aged the building, but most He is presently an assistant liLet Us Care persons will still agree it is one brarian at Kansas State Teachers For of the best classroom buildings College of Emporia. He is single. on campus. Its design still offers Your Hair & many possibilities for use, whether by students of the elementary Clothing Shoes Campus School Closing Auburn. Nebr. and secondary level or college (Continued from page one) level.

President Gomon Appoints Two

Campus School Closing Prompts Backward Look

James Agnew Receives Traineeship In Math At Washington U.

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parents are concerned about seeking a different school for their children." He eontinued, "Students are adaptable and they can enter and: adjust to a new school readily." Mr. Doxon explained, "The present course offerings in high school and the quality of teaching are competitive with schools twice our size. The only way we can provide a thorough curriculum is through consolidation." He fUrther added, "The only way we can provide teaching of the present quality is through the employment of master teachers." Mr. Ward Adams interpreted, "District 3 presently is valued at $2,550,000 and the community of Peru consists of one-quarter the

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Profile for Peru State College Library

1964-1965 Peru Pedagogian - issues 1-16  

1964-1965 newspaper issues 1-16 for Peru State College, Peru, Nebraska

1964-1965 Peru Pedagogian - issues 1-16  

1964-1965 newspaper issues 1-16 for Peru State College, Peru, Nebraska

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