Page 1

Attend "P Club Auction 11

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU,

NEBRASK~

Volume 58

Number 1

OCTOBER L 1962

P-Club Men Plan Auction

Orchestra Will Perform At Homecoming Play Peru State's orchestra under the direction of Mr. Edward G. Camealy, will make its initial debut October 20, during the Homecoming play. On December 9, the orchestra will play the "Messiah" by Handel. Mr. Camealy reports a turn-out of twenty-seven musicians. This total includes seven students registered for credit, ten students for experience, and ten persons in the area who play for the fun of it. A new member to the orchestra is Mr. Robbins, the foreign language professor, who plays the flute. Mr. Camealy would also like to pay a special salute to Mr. Victor H. Jindra. He feels Peru State would not have an orchestra if it were not for Mr. Jindra, who is known to many around the area as "Mr. Stringman."

"Dirty Work at the Crossroads" Will Be Homecoming Play The Homecoming play, to be presented at 8 p.m. October 20, will be a melodrama, with three acts called "Dirty Work at the Crossroads" or .. Tempted, Tried and True." The play tells in laughablE> sty le about the tear-jerking story of Nellie Lovelace, an innocent country girl; of Adam Oakheart, the stalwart blacksmith's son; and of Munro Murgatroyd, the villain from the big city. Munro, the viper, has a wife named Ida Rhinegold, the belle of the Kew Haven Music Halls, but that does not prevent him from pursuing the innocent Nellie and tearing her from the arms of her dying mother (whom he has poisoned). Nor does it prevent him from driving Adam to drink, from blackmailing the rich Mrs. Upson Asterbilt, or from bewitching her daughter, Leonie. There are a number of places in the plot where such old-time songs as "All That Glitters Is Not Gold" and "The Old Cuckoo Clock" are introduced. The cast is as follows: Carol McLain as Nellie Lovelace, the heroine; Steve Parker as Adam Oakheart, the hero; Lonn Pressnall as Munro Murgatroyd, the villain;

Oak Bowl Thurs., October 11

Plans are being made at Peru State Teachers College for an educational benefit auction ¡ to be held in Peru's Oak Bowl, Thursday, October 11, at 7:30 p.m. Sponsored by the P-Club for varsity lettermen, the purpose of the auction is to earn money for scholarships for worthy students. All proceeds will be used for this purpose. Interested persons in Southeast Nebraska and friends of Peru State elsewhere have already donated items to be auctioned. Among these items are livestock, used cars, and miscellaneous objects. Leo Dietrich, Larry Ryan, Ron Peterson, Ray Front row, lefi to right-Coach Al Wheeler, Those interested in contributOgle, Coach Jerry Stemper. Coach Jack Mcintire, Duane Wichelmann, Bill ing saleable items to the Peru Lawlor, Dean Stapleton, Ken Dostal, Larry Rathe, 4!h Row-Gordon Scott, Charles Pra!i, Bob State scholarship auction may Ron Kelly, Pat Hamm, Barney McI!voy, Jim SimRuff, Sam Carneal. Roy Broadbrooks, Larry Mor- call 81 or 778W in Nebraska City; mones. rissey, Keith Grimes, Bill Wi!fy, Leonard Kinser, 274-3521 in Auburn; or 872-4631 2nd Row-Bill Bliss, Troy Lyon, Harold Choin Peru. Falls Citians may c a 11 Student Manager Charles Caverazagie. ate, Jim Manning, Doug McGaughez, Bob McCarPeru, collect, 872-4631. Any items 5th Row-Rich Schneider, Brain Maxwell, donated will be picked up at the ty, Dan Coffey, Roy Windhorst, Jim Hall, Bill TyJack Johnson, John Stefan, Bill Shaw, Larry King, donor's convenience, a P-Club non, Coach Jim Pilkington. Vincent Sabatinelli, Leroy Leonard, Floyd Goff, spokesma~said. 3rd Row-Tim Gilligan, Jim Kanter, Don Sam Smith, Marvin Hopper, John Jensen. Schmidt, Gary Hodge, Roger Noell, Luke Cox, If P-Club plans materialize, the auction may feature a number of items coveted by autograph collectors. Already on hand for the auction is some of Nebraska's finest beef, donated by Majors Brothers of Peru and Clair CalThe Peru Student Education lan of Odell. Association held its first meeting for the 1962-63 year on Septem4:00 P.S.E.A. 1:00 P Club ber 17 at 7:00 p.m. in the Campus 4:10 P.S.E.A. (cont'd) 1:10 Alpha Mu Omega School auditorium. 4.Zll Phi Alpha Theta 1:20 Bela Beta Bela A report was made concerning 4:30 Pedagogian 1:30 Blue Devils-Active the membership drive held dur4:40 Peruvian 1:40 Blue Devils-Pledges ing the college registration time. 4:50 Sigma Tau Della 1:50 Business Club Sigma Tau Delta, the honorary The membership is well over the 5:00 S.G.A. 2:00 Dramatics Club English fraternity, has completed hundred mark, and more stu5:10 Student Wives 2:10 Foreign Language Club. dents are joining. This is a con- the fall issue of its literary book5:20 S.C.F. 2:20 Home Economics Club siderable increase over the pre- let the "Sifting Sands." 5:30 Veteran's Club 2:30 Industrial Arts Club The booklet, which follows a vious year's total membership. 5:40 Wesley Fellowship 2:40 Epsilon Pi Tau Each member of the record- modernistic theme both in con5:50 While Angels 2:50 Kappa Della Pi breaking membership paid three tent and artwork, contains origi6:00 Cherubs 3:00 Lutheran Club dollars to join the local organiza- nal writings by students of Peru. 3:10 L.S.A. 6:10 Women's Athletic Assn. tion (PSEAJ, the state group It also contains the winning and 3:20 M.E.N.C. 6:20 P.E.M. (SEAN), and the national associ- alternate winning freshman es6:30 Band 3:30 Choir ation (SNEA). With the member- says of the 1961-62 academic 6:40 Orchestra 3:40 Peruvian Singers ship goes subscriptions to the year. The booklet will be released 3:50 Newman Club NEA Journal. the NSEA News- to the public this week. let!er, and the new SEAN NewsSigma Tau Delta is an honorle!!er. Melissa Jarecke as Ida Rhineary fraternity for all English magold, vampirish woman; The officers were introduced at jors and minors who maintain the Nancy Reed as The Widow the recent meeting. They are required grade point average and Lovelace, gentle old lady; Richard Elmore, president; Gary complete the required hours in Mrs. Shirley Vaughn as Mrs. The ninth annual Variety Stover, vice~president; Caro 1 e English courses. Mr. Silas SumUpson Asterbilt, a commanding Show, produced by Mr. J. D. Le- Shubert and Loretta Kratochvil, mers is the sponsor. dowager; vitt, was presented Thursday secretaries; Janis Mayer, historMarjorie Williss as Leonie, evening, September 17, in the ian; and Merlin Wright, treasur- at the state executive meeting at Mrs. Asterbilt's sweet young auditorium. The Freshmen made er. The co-sponsors are Harold Kearney State Teachers College. daughter; an impromptu appearance on the Johnson and Dr. Lloyd B. Kite. The representatives were Dick Pamela Froebe as Fleurette, stage and sang the "Color ,Song," On September 29 six members Elmore, Gary Stover, Merlin the French maid; Georgette Go- while two of their classmates did of PSEA represented the college (Continued on pagi: four) the twist. (Continued on page two) The various acts were introduced alternately by Mr. Levitt and Gary Stover. The program officially opened with a dance number entitled "Alley Cat." The dancers were: Myra Murren, Carol Curd, Dorothy Drubek, Dutchi Holland, Judi Whigham, Catherine Dusenberg, Dorothy Bock. "Abigail," a humorous reading, was given by Nancy Reed from Belleville, Kansas. The Barnyard Octet gave a skit called "Mortgage on the Farm." The octet consisted of Jan Beemer, Charlie Froebe, Jo Ann Schultz, Pat Wheatly, Mary Sautter, Bev Quinn, Linda Morrissy, and Cec Palmer.

Schedule For Organization Pictures For 1963 Peruvian - October 11

FOLK SINGERS-A very popular !rio composed of (I. !o r.) Russell Workman, Karen Workman, and Mike Jenis is shown en¡ ieriaining siudents at the annual Variety Show.

PSEA Membership Goes Over 100 Mark

HSifting Sands" Is Completed

Ninth Variety Show Enjoyed By Students

A pantomime dance, "Jeepers Creepers," was given by Barbara Thompson. She also performed this number in the Miss Auburn Contest last spring. (Continued on page two)

BIG BROWN BEAR-Miss Frieda Rowold! (right) en!er!ains Peru Slate students with her version of "The Big Brown Bear Said Woof," during !he annual Variety Show, held Sep!. 20 in !he college auditorium, Carol Sudik accompanied Miss Rowold! on !he piano.

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Return Proofs To Studio

MODERN DANCER-Mary Saul:fer did two modern dance routines during annual Variety Show held in the auditorium Sepi. 20.

"Dirty Work at the Crossroads" Will Be Homecoming Play

Each student who had his picture taken for the Peruvian should h ave received his proofs by now. The next step is to tell the Rex Haberman Studio which of t h e four proofs you want for the yearbook. There are four basic steps: 1. Fill in your name and college address on the enclosed order blank. 2. Write the letter, -not the code number, of the desired picture in the lower left corner. 3. Write the word, yearbook, across the order form. 4. Place a four-cent stamp on the enclosed envelope and mail it. If you do not make known your choice of proofs, the studio will send one picture of its choosing to be used in the Peruvian.

Cox. It involved fancy stepping and baton twirling. NEWS The Ethnic Folk Singers were (Continued from page one) well received and called back by By mon as Little Nell, a cute, lisping a standing ovation. The folk singCuriis child; ers were Karen Workman, RusNelson J. David Griffiths as Mookie sell Workman and Mike J enis. Maguggins, the hired hand. They sang, among others, "If I With the beginning of the The play is being done in the Had a Hammer." school year, we have a full house old-fashioned melodrama style, A humorous comedy routine at Delzell Hall. Some rooms have popular in the 1890's. It is exwas given by Lonn Presnall. The three people staying in them. pected that the audience will auditorium literally rocked with Freshmen have been kept busy join in by applauding the hero laughter during Lonn's novel act. polishing shoes, washing cars out- and hissing the villain. Mary Sauter did a modern side the dorm, carrying books, The musical direction is being dance number. Her two routines and doing other odd jobs. done by Robert 'I;. Benford, head were done to the music "Straight " of the Fine Arts division. The as- from Bason Street" and "Picnic." On Monday, September 17, at sistant director is Judith WhigA pantomime was the last act 10:30 the first dormitory meeting ham. The prompter is William of the' program. Gary Stover and was held. The officers and coun- Morrissey. Larry Whitfield p a n t o m i m e d selors were introduced. Mrs. "The Yellow Rose of Texas" and Paradise gave a talk on the dor"The Great Pretender." mitory life in Delzell. She ex- Ninth Variety Show As a grand finale, all the partiplained ho.;,,, the dorm makes Enjoyed By Students cipants in the show returned to money through the pop machines. (Continued from page one) the stage and did the twist. This money is used to pay atMiss Freida Rowoldt dedicated Congratulations to all the pertendants at the desk, keep the her vocal number, "The Big formers and to Mr. Levitt for an television in repair, buy washers and dryers, buy furniture, buy Brown Bear," to Mr. Jindra and "'excellent show. Mr. Levitt. She was accompanied the newspaper for the lounge, by Carol Sudik. The heavy apand buy treats, such as the candy plause showed that the number bars we had after the meeting. was well received. MAJORS An eerie act, "The Monster Thursday evening there was HALL another dorm meeting and the Mash," was pantomimed by Karnew dorm rules were handed en Cahow, Sue Sharp, Carolyn By out. Bill Springer read and ex- Mercer, and Karen Conrad. Richard Robert Lierz sang and accomplained them. Elmore panied himself on the guitar. He There haven't been too many was called back by overwhelmMajors Hall had its first dorm dull moments in the dorm. The ing applause and sang "Wolvermeeting September 20. The dorm only time when the activity ton Mountain." A musical baton cat, which al- officers for this school year are seems to decrease is on the weekends when something like a mass so appeared in the Miss Auburn Skip Ogle, president, and Tom evacuation occurs. Contest, was given by Donna Aitken, vice-president. The counselors are Duane Weichelman, second floor; Jay DuVal, first floor; and Bruce Francey, basePERU PEDA:GOGIAN ment. These three floor counselThe Voice of ihe Campus of a Thousand Oaks ors and the officers will enforce the revised set of dorm regulaOctober l, 1962 tions. Each student has a list. of the regulations signed by Dr. PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Harold Boraas, Dean of Students, Co-Editor. ______________ --------------------- Frank Bostic and Dr. Neal S. Gomon, PresiCo-Editor _____________ ------------------------ Tom Aitken dent of the College. Layout Editor_________________________________ Kay Camden The fellows in the dorm were Personnel Manager_ __________________________ Jane Rhodus treated to the luxury of a workAdvertising Manager_ _________________________ Larry Rathe ing air conditioner for the first Sports Editor_ ________________________________ Larry Rathe weeks of school. This was an Sports Column ____ ,. ____________________________ Pat Hamm improvement over the last part Delzell Column ______________________________ Curtis Nelson of school last year. Morgan Column ______________________________ Ardith Pratt The upper classmen have Majors Column _____________ ------------------ Dick Elmore found the young freshmen to ¡be Campus School Column _________________ Mary Anna Gnade very ambitious. There always Reporter_ ________________ -------------------- Judith Beran seem to be a couple of these Reporter___________ --------------------------- Tom Castle beanie-wearers to clean rooms, Reporter_ _____________________________ Virginia Cockerham shine shoes, bring bottles of pop, Reporter_ ____________________________________ Karen Conrad and other suitable tasks. Reporter. __________________________________ Sharon Donlan Almost everyone had a b u s y Reporter ___________________________________ Lee Haeberlein summer vacation. Aside from Reporter _______________________________________ Penny Hays work, the World's Fair occupied Reporter ______________________________________ Jane Moore some of the three free months Reporter_ ____________ .. ______________________ Carol Niebuhr for many such as Gary Stover Reporter____________________________________ Edward Smith and Fred Rimmer. Others deReporter _______ ¡---------------------------- Judith Wilson vised their own places to visit. Reporter __________________________________ Barney Mcilvoy Ed Meyer and some of his friends Sponsor _________ ------------------------ Stewart Linscheid from back home drove to the Cheyenne rodeo. DELZELL

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Nebraska City Coca-Cola Bottling Co. sure our three twist finalists, Carla Jacobson, Kathy Martinand winner Connie Dietl would be glad to fill us in on the fundamental movements. Freshmen comments -reflect attitudes toward these first few weeks of college life. When asked "How's college?" answers were: "There's too much to do at night!" (OH!!) "If initiation would be cut out it would be fine." "It's different." "It's 0. K." "I like the friendliness of the campus." Connie Dietl journeyed to Plattsmouth Thursday, Sept. 20 to appear as a candidate for queen for the King Korn Karnival. Birthday, wishes to Sharon Richardson, Jo Ann Schultz, and Dot Fink. As a closing word, "Remember, upperclassmen, be kind to the freshmen girls, they may have older brothers!"

ELIZA MORGAN HALL By Ardith Pratt

As "Fling abroad our college colors" echoes through the halls, all are shocked into the realization that another year has begun. Already the freshmen have broadened themselves. The second floor freshmen found their hall way measures only 890 toothpicks end to end. (Who knows, maybe someday they may volunteer to measure it with toothpicks side by side.) The third floor found their hallway to be longer than usual when they attempted to navigate pencils via their nose. Upperclassmen and freshmen met on friendly terms Wednesday, Sept. 19 at 10:30 for the annual Sister Sue Party. Each big sister introduced herself and her little sister. We then adjourned Responsibility's like a string to the basement for punch an d we can only see the middle of. cookies. Both ends are out of sight. -William McFee. Anyone for twist lessons? I'm

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Bobcats Slip By Pesky Tarkio

BOBCAT

Peru State Teachers College CHATTER Bobcats shook off the effects of 55 minutes of lack-lustre football By to strike twice through the air Pat Hamm lanes in the final five minutes, The Peru State Bobcats made and annex a come-from-behind 13-7 victory over the Tarkio Col- the most of their one ser~ous Peru State may very well be lege Owls at Tarkio, Saturday, . scoring threat Saturday mght, the first NCC school to win three September 8. Sept: 15, to record the.ir sec~nd conference football championstraight come-from-behmd wm. ships in succession. Coach Jack Outplayed by its smaller opA touchdown pass from quar- Mcintire feels this j;oal could be ponents, Peru was able to fight terback Bill Tynon to end Roger achieved if the team continues to to a scoreless tie at the half-time Noell with 10:36 remaining in the have a good attitude and is solmark. fourth quarter erased Northwest idly backed by enthusiastic stuMissouri State's 6-0 lead and set dents. The Owls were the first to the stage for Leonard Kinser to score as they connected on a 40Tri-State boot the game winning point aftyard pass from Charles Riley to It was recently stated in an er touchdown and give the BobGeorge Henry with only 8:09 reOmaha paper that the Tri-State cats a 7-6 victory. maining in the second half. Conference has stolen the NCC Northwest Missouri State took Conference's fire. This apparently With an opening defeat staring the lead in the first quarter by was due to NCC Doane's loss to it in the face, Peru took to the driving 54 yards in 14 plays. the Tri-State's Concordia. I think if air. After completing a long pass first time they got their hands on one were to check the records of from Bill Tynon to Pat Hamm, the ball. Halfback Bernie Ricono the former NCC schools who are the Bobcats went on to score as scored from six yards out with now in the Tri-State, he would Tynon hit Jim Hall with a quick 6:8 remaining in the first quarfind that all were in or near the pass in the end zone. Leonard ter. Perhaps the key play of the cellar when they competed in Kinser made the conversion to game came when Peru State's the NCC. tie the contest 7-7, with 4:45 re- big Jim Brenn lunged through maining in the game. the line to deflect Bearcat Earl Injuries Boyd's placement attempt. The Bobcats of Peru are After stopping a Tarkio drive, Peru state offered no serious plagued from the start by a serPeru took the ball on their own offensive attack in the first half, ies of knee injuries. Out for the 26 with less than two minutes to failing to cross midfield at any season with a badly injured knee play. Taking to the air lanes once time during those 30 minutes. is Tom Neal. Neal was hurt in more, Peru began to move again. Northwest Missouri threatened, in the 7-6 win over Maryville. With sorhe fine passing by Tythe second period, only to be Barney Mcllvoy, Luke Cox, non, and good reception by Barstopped by the tough on-rushing and Dean Stapleton are also on ney Mcilvoy, Peru moved close defense of the Bobcats. the knee injury list. to the Owl's goal line. The winPeru unable to move all night, Others nursing minor injuries ning touchdown was made when combined a couple of nice runs are: Bill Lawlor, Ron Kelley, Jim Gary Hodge caught a pass from and some timely passing to move Brenn and Jim Hall. All are exPat Hamm in the end zone. The down d~ep into the Bearcats' pected to be ready for Saturday conversion by Kinser was missed territory.· When it looked like the night's foe, Kearney. and with four seconds remaining Bearcats were going to hold, Pein the game it was Peru 13;·Ta:rOffense Rolls ' ru took to the air and completed kio 7. Coach Mcintire was we 11 the Tynon to Noell pass in the J1eased with his Bobcats' 34 Tarkio returned Peru's kickoff, end zone. point uprising over St. Mary's of After the kickoff, a stiff debut an incomplete pass on the the Plains of Dodge City, Kansas. first play from scrimmage ran fense by the Bobcats held the He feels the line was blocking Missourians to no gain and the clock out and ended Tarkio's forced them to kick. Peru took better and the backs' running was hopes. --, vver the ball a:nd ran the dock improved. Statistics Peru Tarkio out, ending the game with the A Smile or Two score Peru 7, N.W. Mo. State 6 , First downs -------- 11 8 Coach Mcintire was once asked Yards rushing _____ 157 Statistics Peru NWMSC by a fellow coach how he picked 98 Yards passing ______ 160 80 First downs ------ 6 10 a team from a bunch of raw reTotal yardage ______ 317 Rushing yards ____ 81 147 178 cruits. "I hate to give away my .Penalty yards ______ 87 Passing yards _____ 26 21 40 secrets," replied the coach, "but 13 Passes ------------- 15 Passes ------------ 12 10 I'll tell you. I take them out into Passes completed __ 8 3 7 Passes completed _ 3 the woods. Then, at a given sigIntercepted by _____ 1 45 0 Penalty yards ____ 15 nal, I start them running. Those Fumbles lost ______ 0 4 Fumbles lost ______ 1 that run around the trees are chosen as backs; those that run into the trees are chosen as linemen ... " A football- game is where the spectators have four quarters in which to finish a fifth.

'Cats Rally In Fourth To Defeat Maryville

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Bobcat Power Unleashed Against St. Mary of the Plains A big Peru State Teachers College line opened gaping holes, and a crew of hard-charging backs took advantage to key a 34 to 6 rout over St. Mary of the Plains of Dodge City, Kans., Saturday night at Peru. Sparked by the running of Leonard Kinser, Red Oak, Iowa, and Ron Kelley, Falls City, the Peruvians picked up a 16-0 halftime lead and then coasted! the final half to record their third win of the season against no defeats. Kinser rushed for 113 yards in 16 carries while Kelley w as picking up 83 yards in 12 attempts. Peru, haunted by the memory of their past two narrow wins, scored after only 2:47 had been played in the first quarter. The Bobcats had kicked off to St. Mary and on the Cavaliers' first play from scrimmage, halfback Bob Lisa fumbled and Jim Brenn, Hebron, recovered on the St. Mary eleven. Little Barney Mcllvoy, South Lyon, Mich., cr(lcked to the eight and on the next play he strolled in for the touchdown. Kinser's conversion was true and Peru, for all practical purposes, h a d enough to win. The Bobcats, on the strength of Ken Dostal, Scribner, picked up a safety early in the second period when the big tackle applied the press to St. Mary halfback George Evans in his own end zone. Bill Tynon, Bobcat quarterback, set up Peru's second touchdown with a Cavalier pass he pirated and returned from midfield to the St. Mary 44. With Pat Hamm, Wood River, Ill., picking up most of the yardage, P e r u moved down field to score. on a four-yard pass from Bill Witty, Syracuse, to Larry Rathe, Sterling, with 3:19 left before the intermission. Kinser kicked the extra point and Peru had its second of five touchdowns, final conversion, and a 16-0 halftime bulge. The Bobcats added their 22nd point with 9:40 to go in the third

quarter on an eight-yard burst by Ron Kelley. Kelley and Kinser had picked up huge chunks of yardage on this 64-yard Peruvian march. Late in the third quarter Leonard Kinser cracked two yards to score and cap a 68-yard march for Peru. On the ensuing kickoff, halfback Bob Lisa gave the Cavalier faithful their only cheer as he gathered in Kinser's kickoff on the 14-yard line and twisted 86 yards to score St. Mary's only touchdown. Peru smashed 71 yards in the fourth quarter to dose out the evening's scoring. Bill Witty moved the last 10 yards on a keeper with 2:10 showing on the clock. In winning their third of the '62 campaign, Peru revealed pow- · erful, if not fast, backfield. This corps ate up 316 yards on the ground while the air game was producing 77. Peru's twin tackle giants, Ken Dostal, Scribner, and Jim Brenn, Hebron, gave the fans an exhibition of defensive terrorism up front while Pat Hamm and Bill Tynon provided the secondary defensive wizardry. The win, however, proved to be costly f~ ·the 'Cats. Barney Mcllvoy was carried off the field in the second quarter with a leg injury and his speedy return is doubtful. Later, reserve center, Luke ·Cox, Lincoln, went the same route with a knee injury. His fate is questionable. As time ran out, still a third underpinning went as third string signal caller, Roy Broadbrooks, Beatrice, hobbled to the sidelines. Peru was without ends Tom Neal, Lincoln, who is out for the season, and Jim Hall, Omaha, who was recovering from a knee injury. Statistics Peru First Downs _______ 26 Rushing Yards ____ 316 Passes _____________ 9-17 Yards Passing _____ 77 Punts ------------- 0 Fumbles Lost ______ () Penalty Yards _____ 40

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Yearbook Pictures Were Taken Individual pictures were taken from September 17 through the 20th for the Peruvian. The flicking camera of Harry E. · Pollock took 2344 shots of 586 Peru students and faculty members. The Peruvian staff did the paper work for Mr. Pollock, the representative of the Rex Haberman Studio of Hastings, Nebr. A new system was used this year. Each student was issued a number which will appear on his picture for later identification. He also completed an information blank for reference. After receiving four proofs, the student will be able to select the proper one for the yearbook and have extra pictures made. According to Stewart Linscheid, sponsor of the Peruvian, this method of taking pictures is much more efficient than the one used in recent years.

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MAURICE E. DAHMUS

Fifty 'Piece Band Now Working On Ambitious Program '

The Peru State College Band under the direction of Gilbert E. Wilson consists of 50 members this year. Included in the plans for the year are two concerts, a convocation program, a marching appearance for Homecoming, and the annual band tour.

Maurice E. Dahmus is the mathematics instructor for the campus school this year. Mr. Dahmus received most of his education at the University of Illinois, but he sp~nt some time at Penn State. He has received his master of science degree and has passed the language test for his doctor's degree. During his years of teaching, M r . Dahmus has spent considerable time doing research on mathematics. Mr. Dahmus has spent most of -his teaching career in the school systems of North Dakota and Illinois. He has been teaching for eleven years. Before coming to Peru, he was employed in North Dakota. When asked for a c o mm e n t about Peru, Mr. Dahmus replied, "The community of Peru has been wonderful while helping me to adjust to my position here, more so than many other communities where I have lived. It is very rewarding for a teacher to find such a community. The people of Peru are most friendly, and I am finding it a wonderful place to teach and to make my home."

Jarvis and Wheeler Represented Home Ee At Lincoln Meeting Two home economics students from Peru State Teachers college represented the Peru Home Economics Club at a planning conference of the State Council of Home Economics Clubs in Lincoln Saturday morning. Meeting on the Agricultural College campus of the University of Nebraska, the delegates, Charlotte Wheeler, Nemaha, local representative to the State Council, and Mary Jarvis, Peru, president of the Peru club, joined others from Nebraska colleges in a planning session for the coming year's activities. The group tentatively set the first week-end in November for the State Workshop at Kearney State Teachers College. Miss Wheeler and Miss Jarvis were accompanied by the club sponsor, Mrs. Ina Sproul, assistant professor of home economics at Peru State.

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The concert selections include such works as the "William Byrd Suite" by Gordon Jacob, "Psalm for Band" by Vincent Persichetti, Ravel's "Bolero," Mendelssohn's "Pilgrims' March" and "Saltarello," and "Highlights from Exodus" by Ernest Gold. Following is the list of band personnel: flutes and piccolosMr. James Robbins, Barbara McCoy, Nancy Neiman, Lois Layden, Donna Cox; clarinets-Joyce Able, Sharylin Vrtiska, Prudence Fritch, Keith Rawson, Carolyn Reiber, Adrian Bartek, Cynthia

Peru State Offers Adult Education Classes Two adult education classes in Foundry and Machine Shop are being offered at Peru St ate Teachers College as a special series of evening classes, reports Dr. Keith L. Melvin, dean of the college. Made available for future employees of Magnolia Metal Co., Inc., who are relocating their New Jersey plant in Auburn, each course meets twice weekly for a period of five weeks. Upon completion of the initial courses, they will be repeated according to demand. These are adult education courses and carry no college credit. The Machine Shop class met for the first time Monday, September 17, and will meet on Wednesday for five weeks. The class is limited to 15. The Foundry class held its first meeting Tuesday, September 18. It will also meet on Thursday during the" five-week period. The Foundry. class is limited to eight students.

MRS. GENEVIEVE GERGEN

By Mary Anna Gnade

Greetings, prospective teachers, from the group of humanity Meier, Linda Bartels, Carol Curd, on the southwest corner of the Mrs. Lola Baker; bass clarinet- campus which you observe beJ udy Strange; bassoon-Gary ing taught and upon which you Schmucker; alto sax-'Carol Sumay practice your theories of dik, Ruth Rulla; tenor sax-Bon- teaching. nie Vanderford; baritone saxBetty Wellensiek, Gary Dahmke; In this "laboratory" of educatrumpets-Don Johnson, Carol tion nothing stands still. This McLain, Dale Dunsing, James year under new management and Watson, Arthur Lindahl, Allen with the usual changing student Chandler, Tom Majors, Karen and supervisor personnel, the Workman. -place got off to a flying start in Trombones-Linda E 11 i o t t, much the same fashion as the Robert Maximer, Alfred Eikhoff; college-that is with a football baritone horns-Russell Work- game almost before the popcorn man, Charles Wellensiek, Boyd could be ordered. Many summer Wood, Marilyn Marmet; b as s committee meetings had the Pep horns-James Kelly, Paul Ste- Club functioning with purple venson; French horns-Eugene skirts and white blouses (gold Walden, Ed McCartney, Anita sweaters still in state of discusCox, Larry Whittington; percus- sion). Band members were saved sion-Virginia Adkins, James by rain from exhibiting their Wilson, Allen Freemeer, Ruth lack of practice. Harris, Mary Holland; oboesMay closing of school means Ray Harris, Dorothy Bock. nothing to FHA which is energetic all the time: Crete summer workshop, Sidney rodeo, state PSEA Membership meeting at Hebron day after Goes Over 100 Mark homecoming, not to mention par(Continued from page one) ties, shows, and making money! Wright, Loretta Kratochvil, JanElection of officers in each is Mayer, and Dutchi Holland. It is the aim of the local asso- class usually results in bewildciation to be the main group on ered newcomers presiding over campus. "A teachers' organiza- a roomful of absolute strangers. tion certainly should be the main Follow this by immediate initiagroup for a teachers college,'' tion of freshmen (boys ALWAYS said the president at a local ex- in female attire), and who can ecutive meeting. resist assimilation?

Returning to the Peru State Campus School this year is Mrs. Genevieve Gergen. Mrs. Gergen taught three years before receiving a leave of absence for one year and she will reassume her duties as supervisor of English at the Campus School. She received her masters degree from Peru. Mrs. Gergen commutes fro m Dawson. She and her husband live on a farm and have two boys, one a freshman and the other a junior in high school. When asked her opinion of Pere, she said the students are very friendly and eager to learn and they are fun to work with. She also said she appreciates the good libraries.

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Tank Wagon Service Most students were acquainted with Mrs. Gergen so they could Ph. 274-3510 skip preliminary sparring and concentrate on English. All agree Auburn, Nebraska that the new math teacher (Mr. Dahmus) is different than Mr. Moeckly-what else? Mr. Leland, , Wednesday evening classes at social studies, broke the ice with rleru State Teachers College met funny stories, Mr. Benford's September 19, for the first of 17 classes have them really singing, ."The ,.Store· of Standa"d meetings, Dr. Keith L. Melvin, but this year's science iS chemBrands" dean of the college, announced!. istry so open the windows! JrHi Auburn Phone 274-3620 Seven classes are offered dur- girls have had enough home ec ing the 5 to 7:40 p.m. period and already to entertain mothers at six classes during the 7:45 to tea. So you can see that while 10:10 p.m. period. By enrolling in football and homecoming SEEM classes for both sessions, it is pos- all-important, an academic edusible to earn up to six hours of cation is also being offered in our college credit during the semes~ laboratory school. ter of evening classes. Quick-like, before the strain of Among the offerings is o n e Q graduate course, Language Arts hectic school life can show, anCone With the Curl on Top in the Elementary School, which nual pictures have been taken. The cheerleading tryouts for is taught from 5 to 7:40 p.m. Joy says, "I looked in a mirror Q the 1962-63 school year were held and smiled the way I did before Other class offerings include: Auburn, Nebr. in the college auditorium SepFirst period-Survey of Physi- the camera-nope, my pictures tember 25, and four girls and two cal Science, Freehand Drawing, will be awful!" 274-3102 boys were selected to lead the Library Reading Guidance, TypeAnd in the beginning room of cheering squad. writing I, Typewriting II, and The six cheerleaders selected Speech Correction and Develop- school, a kindergarten observer reports: "What wigglers, and are: Jan Beemer, Frank Bostic, ment. INGERSOLL where's the Kleenex box? Mary Ann Lewellyn, Marilyn Second period-Nutrition and Barber Shop Masters, Jeannie Rhinehart, and Dietetics, Basic Concepts of AUBURN, NEBRASKA Don Clark. Alternates are Karo- Mathematics, Photography, SurEverything is funny as long as lyn Powers and Mary Sautter. Elly Ingersoll - Nate Hayes it is happening to somebody else. vey of American Literature, AmOthers trying out were: Karen erican National Gove~nment, and -Will Rogers. Cahow, Connie Dietl, Kathy Mar- Educational Psychology. tin, Linda Morrissy, Mimi Rarick, Nancy Reed, Linda Stephens, Sharon Richardson, and Kathy Francis. Each did an individual cheer, and then all joined in with Rex Rains Dependable Service the student body and sang the "Color Song." Groceries Mea:l:s Lockers Reasonable Prices

Students Can Earn Six Hours Credit In Night Classes

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GENOA Dairy Queen

Cheerleaders Elected

BEATTY GARAGE

"Our World's Fair" Homecoming Theme "Our World's Fair" is the theme to be used to decorate the gym for the homecoming dance which is to be held October 20. The Jim Herbert Band from the University of Nebraska will play for the dance. The S.G.A. has not planned the decorations and halftime ceremonies.

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Welcome Home,

Grads.

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . .

Peru Pedagogian PERU.NEBRASKA

Volume 58

Number 2

OCTOBER 15, 1962

Complete Plans For Homecoming

To attract large numbers of men and womr"n to the profession of college teaching, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation an nu a 11 y awards fellowships to 1,000 prospective first-year graduate students, and honorable mention to another 1,500. These Fellows are chosen from about 10,000 candidates nominated by college faculty members in the United States and Canada. From funds

The 41st annual Homecoming at Nebraska State Teachers College, Peru, will be held Saturday, October 20, with a clash between Peru State and Chadron State at 2 p.m. The theme, selected by th e Student Governing Association, is "Our World's Fair." Peruvians will ballot for the twenty-fourth coed to reign as homecoming queen early in October. Her identity will be revealed at halftime of the game. For the fourth year, Peru State will honor alumni at an 11 :45 a.m. All-Alumni luncheon in the college dining room. This y e a r special tables will be arranged for classes ending in the years ''2'' and "7." There will also be a luncheon for lettermen of past years to be held at 10:45. a.m. The letter winners of the past will eat pregame lunch with the 1962 football team. Following the day-time homecoming events, the Peru Dramatic Club will present "Dirty Work at the Crossroads or Tempted, Tried and True" as their annual homecoming production at 7 p.m. The homecoming dance, featuring the Jim Herbert Band from the University of Nebraska, is scheduled for 9:30 p.m. The chairmen for the 1962 homecoming committees are: Mr. Buethe, coronation, dance, aRd halftime; Mr. Strom, coffee hour; Dr. Boraas and Miss Bradley, dorm open houses; Mr. Mcintire, P club luncheon; Dr. Siegner, displays and judges. The luncheon hosts are: Mr. Don Carlile for 1912 and earlier; Mr. Benford and Miss Diddel, '17-'22; Mr. Lanham and Miss Weare, '27-'32; Mr. Miller and Dr. Christ, '37-'42; Mr. Linscheid and Mr. Johnson,

(Continued on page three)

(Continued on page five)

Cheerleaders selected by the student body to lead them during the coming sports year are front row, left to right. Marilyn Masters, Jeanne Rhinehart and Jan Beemer. Back row, left to right, are Frank Bostic, Mary Ann Lewellyn, and Don Clark.

Wheeler Has Made Three Cheerleaders Re-elected, Great Contribution Three New Ones Selected To PSTC Athletl.CS Woodrow Wilson Fellowship BY RICHARD ELMORE Alfred G. Wheeler, b e t t e r known on the Peru campus as "Al" Wheeler, is head of the Division of Health and Physical Education. He is also director of athletics and professor of health and physical education. Coach Wheeler was graduated in 1922 from Oberlin (Ohio) Col!ege, where he starred in both football and basketball. He quarterbacked the Oberlin team to 23 victories and only three losses during these three years. He was named to the All-Ohio football and basketball teams in his senior year. He received his master of arts degree from the Teachers College of Columbia University in New York City. Mr. Wheeler did additional graduate study at (Continued on page four)

Three seniors, a sophomore, and two freshmen will head the cheering corps at Peru for the 1962-63 school year. The three· seniors are veterans and led the cheering section last year. They are: Mary Ann Lewellyn, a senior, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Lewellyn of Bellevue, Nebraska. "Pinky" is also an active member of White Angels:' Frank Bostic, a senior, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Bostic of Wabash, Indiana. Frank was elected captain of the cheerleaders and says the kids are inspirational and willing to work this year. Don Clark, a senior, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Clark of Talmage, Nebraska. Don commented on the good spirit of the group this year. (Continued on page two)

Offered To Graduate Students

Enjoy Your Homecoming Dirty Work at the Crossroads" Ready For Homecoming

11

BY CAROL NIEBUHR The cast of "Dirty Work at the Crossroads," 1962 Homecoming play, has been working and practicing diligently to make it an especially fine presentation. This play will be given Saturday, October 20 at 8 p.m. in the auditorium. Among the nine members of the cast, four have had previous experience in plays at Peru, and the remaining five are new. Carol McLain, Auburn, who portrays the heroine, had leading roles in "Blithe Spirit" and "Between Two Thieves," both presented last year. Lonn Pressnall, Wymore, playing the villain, also had a part in the play "B,etween Two Thieves." Steve Parker; Peru, in the role of the hero, also had leading parts in "Blithe Spirit" and "Between Two Thieves." Some of the other plays he has been in are "Ca~· Dwellers,'' "Arsenic and Old Lace," and "More to be Pitied than Censored." Marjorie Williss, B e a tr i c e , playing the part of the daughter, was a member of the cast in "Hot Ice" and "Man Overboard." These were the junior and senior class plays at Beatrice. Nancy Reed, Belleville, Kansas, the gentle old lady, was in the cast of "King Arthur's Court," in Belleville's junior class play. Pamela Froebe, Dayton, Ohio, playing the French maid, was a resident of Zaragoza, Spain, until the second semester of he r senior year. While living there, she participated in an organization known as Playhouse 286. They gave excerpts from such musicals as "Oklahoma" and (Continued on page two)

Homecoming Queen Candidates BY KAREN CONRAD Mary Ann Lewellyn is t h e daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. L. Lewellyn of Fort Crook. Mary Ann graduated from Bellevue High School, where she was a cheerleader, active in music, and Homecoming Queen her senior year. "Pinky," as most of us know her, is a phys. ed. major and home ec. minor. She is now teaching seventh and eighth grade P.E. classes at the campus school. Mary Ann is a senior at Reru and has been in Home Ee. Club, White Angels, W.A.A., on the dorm council, and a member of S.G.A. She also has been Homecoming, Sweetheart a n d May Fete attendant. This is her second year as a cheerleader. Sharon Richardson is t h e daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Richardson of Crab Orchard. Sharon came to Peru as a sophomore from N.W. Missouri State College, where .she was affiliated with Sigma Sigma Sigma national sorority. She is a junior majoring in elementary education, and ~s in Cherubs, Home Ee. Club,

P.S.E.A. and is a member of dorm council. She was graduated from Filley High School in 1960. Karolyne Powers is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Reed of Auburn. Karolyne was graduated from Benson High School in Omaha, and was a member of the annual staff and a cheerleader. She is a senior majoring in home ec. and minoring in phys. ed. At Peru, she participates in White Angels, S.G.A., and Home Ee. Club. Jeanne Rhinehart is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Rhinehart of Omaha. She also is a graduate of Benson High School and was a cheerleader and on the student council while th e re . Jeanne is a sophomore majoring in phys. ed. and minoring in home ec. On campus, she is active in Home Ee. Club, W.A.A., Cherubs, and was chosen to be a cheerleader for the coming year. Winnie Sporer is the daughter of Mrs. Susie Sporer of Murray. At Peru State she participates in (Continued on page two)

Queen candidates elected by the student body for l!he October 20th Homecoming are from left io right, Mary Ann Lewellyn, Winnie Sporer, Jeanne Rhinehart, Betty Painter, Karolyne Powers, Shar· on Richardson, and Elaine Gerdes.


Letter To A Freshman Dear Freshman: You have been around here long enough that it isn't necessary to tell you that you are in a very fine school and that you are very welc_ome. By now, you know that Peru is Nebraska's oldest college and that all Peruvians believe it is Nebraska's best college. One of the main reasons Peru is what she is today is your president, Dr. Neal S. Gomon. Last spring the Auburn Rotary Club and the Peru and Auburn Kiwanis Clubs sponsored a dinner attended by more than 250 people to recognize ten years of distinguished service by Dr. Gomon as president of N.S.T.C. at Peru. During Dr. Gomon's administration, enrollment has more than doubled, and so has the physical plant. If you see a new building or an addition to a building, he has had something to do with its being here. Also, he has surrounded himself with.an administrative staff that is dedicated to giving you personal attention and the very best service possible with the funds available. You know that the faculty of Peru takes far more than ordinary interest in you as an individual. Although we have lost some of our oldest faculty members-Victor Jindra, Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Mathews, George Rath, A. B. Clayburn-by retirement the last two years, we still have faculty members on duty who have been serving our students for a quarter of a century or more: R. T. Benford in music, Norma Diddel in art, R. D. Moore in speech and dramatics, Al Wheeler in physical education, and Stacy Vance in buildings and grounds. These people have made a record of unselfish service that newer faculty members are striving to match. If you have a problem, take it to a faculty member. He will do all that he can t9 help you. · Finally, there's a certain spirit here. You'll see it at its best during Homecoming. You are a part of that spirit now, and you will become more a part of it as your college years go by. We hope you do because that spirit is what makes Peru great. Best wishes for a great career. -S.P. L.

ELIZA MORGAN HALL By Ardith Pratt "Ssssssh, It's QUIET HOURS." Dorm counselors have been elected. In case you haven't met your hall patrol, girls, here they are: Basement-Barbara B eh re n s ; First floor-Loretta Kratochvil and Lois Layden; Second floorLynn McCann, Kathy Martin and Carla Jacobsen; and Third floor -Sharon Donlan, Ginny Grossman, Sharon Richardson, a n d Judy Wilson. Let it never be said that the girls Of Morgan Hall aren't creative, especially basement floor. In the absence of a bulletin board, they have made one of their own. Good work girls ! ! ! Don't be alarmed!-Those dramatically posed people you see wandering the halls are only the play cast practicing diligently for the homecoming production. Dance crazes have hit third floor. Among those demonstrated (in the halls) are the Majestic,

Hully Gully, the Bug and the Twist. Join the fun. Membership fee to Third Floor Dance Pavillion is "free time." (So, who has any?) Party time ! ! ! or so it seems. Sharon Donlon hit that magic age of 21, and was honored with a party. In attendance were Cok nie Dietl, Susan Sharp, Judy French, Karen Cahow, Jeanne Reiman, Carolyn Mercer, Pinky Lewellyn, · L i n n e a Ingwerson, Judy Wilson, and Karen Conrad. Not one but two parties were given in honor of Ruth Rulla's .birthday. Hostesses were }J.aine Gerdes, Linda Jeffers, Glenda Rima, Dot Fink, Sharon Earl, Rita Retkovis, Dale DeVoe, Charlotte Klever, and Joy Barnhart. Ginny Grossman, Brenda McCarthy, Janey Moore, Penny Hayes, Madelyn Bleach, J u d y Wilson, and Sue Dickerson gave Sharon Richardson a birthday party. Anna Shown shared her chocolate birthday cake with the girls in her wing-there goes the diet girls ! ! Lorene Kostal celebrated her birthday by taking a trip to Nebraska City with the Home Economics department.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks October IS, 1962 PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Co-Editor------------------------------------ Frank Bostic Co-Editor _____________________________________ Tom Aitken Layout Editor·--··---------------------------- Kay Camden Personnel Manager ________ " __________________ Jane Rhodus Advertising Manager __________________________ Larry Rathe Sports Editor_________________________________ Larry Rathe Sports Column ____ .. ____________________________ Pat Hamm Delzell Column ______________________________ Curtis Nelson Morgan Column ______________________________ Ardith Pratt Majors Column _______________________________ Dick Elmore Campus School Column _________________ Mary Anna Gnade Reporter _____________________________________ Judith Beran Reporter_ _____________________________________ Tom Castle Reporter ______________________________ Virginia Cockerham Reporter _____________ ----------------------- Karen Conrad Reporter_ __________________________________ Sharon Donlan Reporter ___________________________________ Lee Haeberlein Reporter _______________________________________ Penny Hays Reporter _____ --------------------------------- Jane Moore Reporter ____________________________________ Carol Niebuhr Reporter ____________________________________ Edward Smith Reporter___________________________________ Judith Wilson Reporter __________________________________ Barney Mcilvoy Sponsor _________ ------------------------ Stewart Linscheid

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Homecoming Queen Candidates (Continued from page one) White Angels, Home Ee. Club, S.G.A., Kappa Delta Pi, dorm council, and Student Center Board. Winnie is a graduate of Plattsmouth High School and was a cheerleader and on student council there. She is a junior majoring in home ec. a n d minoring in history.

By Richard Elmore ~-.;-.;-.;-.;-.;-.;-.;-.;-.;~~. Last Tuesday, October 2, an automobile accident involving five autos, including Mrs. Helen Donovan's car, occurred on the parking area overlooking the Oak Bowl. A vehicle driven by Mrs. Betty Painter is the daughter Lester Blankenship collided with of Mr. and Mrs. Everett Painter the rear of Troy Lyon's p ark e d of Bellevue. This is Betty's junVauxhal. The Vauxhal was ior year at Peru. She is majoring shoved into Larry Lines's Chevy, in elementary education, and her which in turn slid sideways into campus activities include White Mrs. Donovan's 1961 Comet, Angels, S.G.A. and dorm counwhich hit the side of F r a n k cil. She was a May Fete attendFrandsen's Ford. Mrs. Donovan ant last year. At Bellevue she had her car fixed in Nebraska was Prom Queen, a cheerleader, and on the annual staff. City for about $250. The members of Majors Hall Elaine Gerdes is the daughter elected Harvey Fisher to fill the of Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Gerdes of vacant office of secretary-treasPeru. She is a graduate of Peru urer for the dorm. Prep and was active in Pep Tom Bookwalter has been apClub, F.H.A., Student Council pointed as chairman of the Maand annual staff. In college actijors Homecoming display. Many vities, Elaine participates in of the fellows in the dorm are inWhite Angels, L.S.A., P.S.E.A., volved, and they are all busy. and the dorm council. She is a Congratulations to Louie Fritz, sophomore majoring in elemenJohn Barton, Don Schmidt, and tary education. Roy Broadbrooks. They are the new Blue Devils pledges. Three men from Majors were Three Cheerleaders initiated into Sigma Tau Delta, Re-elected, Three the honorary English fraternity. They were Tom Aitken, Skip New Ones Elected (Continued from page one) Ogle, and Richard Elmore. The dorm has lost t,;_,o of its men to the life of apartments. Fred Rimmer and Ed Horowitz have moved to the Beatty apartments. The fellows in the dorm wish Gene Wright the best of luck in his new life. He and Pat Markham were married October 11. They are living in Plattsmouth. Gene is commuting during the remaining part of his professional semester.

New Faculty Honored At Dinner A pot luck dinner was held in the Campus School lunchroom for all new faculty members and their spouses on Monday, O~t. 1. Each member was asked to bring a covered dish. The meal w a s then served buffet style. The dinner committee consisted of Miss Mary Clarke, Mr. James Granger, Mr. William Rankin, Dr. Lloyd Kite, and Mrs . Ross Adams as chairman.

The remaining part of the cheering corps includes a sophomore and two freshmen. Jeanne Rhinehart, a sophomore, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Rhinehart of Omaha. Jeanne attended Omaha Benson, where she was a cheerleader for three years. Jan Beemer, a freshman, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Horace Beemer of Bedford, Iowa. Jan graduated last spring from Bedford Community High School, where she was a cheerleader for three years. Marilyn Masters, a freshman, is the daught~r of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Mru1ters of Nebraska City, Nebraska. Marilyn was a cheerleader during her senior year in high school.

DELZELL NEW~

4.

By Curtis Nelson

On September 26, the basement of Delzell was the scene of a wrestling match. Mattresses were laid on the floor for a ring. Each wrestler had a manager, and there were referees on hand to carry out the rules. Ten cents ad m is s i o n was charged. This went for flowers for Mrs. Paradise, who had been taken to a hospital in Omaha. Since Mrs. Paradise left, Mrs . Longfellow has kept law an d order in the dorm. A letter from Mrs. Paradise has been received and placed on the bulletin board. In it, she thanked the stud en ts for the cards a n d flowers. She also added that she would be back one of these days with perhaps a crutch with which to manage us. On several occasions a smoke screen has been laid in the halls of Delzell. When the incinerator was lit, the smoke backed up through the trash chutes into the halls. The first time this happened, several fellows thought the dorm was on fire, but there was really no ca use for alarm.

"Dirty Work at the Crossroads" Ready For Homecoming (Continued from page one) "West Side Story." She has also had some experience with radio work. Mrs. Shirley Vaughn, Peru, portraying a dowager, has been in a couple of plays in previous years. J. David Griffiths, Summit, New Jersey, as the hired hand, was in two plays his senior year. One \vas "Lady Be Good," a school production, and the other · was an original presented by his dramatics class. The Future is something which everyone reaches at the rate of sixty minutes an hour, whatever he does, whoever he is.-Lewis.

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Complete Plans For Homecoming (Continued from page one) '47-'52; Mr. Summers and Mr. Robbins, '57-'62.. The entire homecoming schedule for 1962 is a.s follows:

The following nine seniors will be playing their final game in the Peru Oak Bowl at homecoming against the Chadron Eagles. They are back row left to right: QB-Jim Simones: HB-Ron Kelley: E-Larry Rarhe: HB-Pat Hamm: HB·Barney Mcllvoy. Front row: G·Bill Lawlor: T·Dean Stapleton: T-Ken Dostal: G-Duane Wiechel· man.

Bobcats Overtaken By Antelopes For 13-13 Tie BY LARRY RATHE Peru State Teachers College played the Kearney State Ante· lopes off their feet during the first half Saturday night and then had to depend upon a superb effort by Ken Dostal to hang on and gain a 13-13 conference tie at Kearney. The Peru Bobcats roared to a 13-0 first half lead, only to see Kearney do an about-face in the final half of play. A 64-yard pass from quarterback Dick Butolph to end Larry McCord with 5:26 remaining in the third quarter and an extra point placement by Dick Hollinger put Kearney in position for t'le tie. Kearney, on the efforts of fleet halfback Bill Backes' 15-yard jaunt, tied the game with 11:03 left to play and .Kearney had an . opportunity to win if Hollinger could split the uprights. Peru's Dostal hurled his 6'6'', 225-pound frame through the Kearney forward wall to block the attempt and allow Peru State to hang on to the tie. Peru's first score came with 0:42 left in the first quarter on Leonard Kinser's six-yard end

excursion. Leonard capped a 30yard drive which resulted after Bill Tynon returned a punt from the Kearney 46 to the Kearney 30. Windhorst and Kinser picked up all but two yards of this drive. Peru took possession on the Kearney 21 after a bad pass from center on fourth down forced the Antelopes to try and run the ball. Peru marched down to the Kearney five, but a holding penalty moved the ball back to the Kearney 20. On the next play, halfback Pat Hamm, pitched a perfect scoring pass to end Roger Noell. After converting the first point after touchdown, Kinser's second attempt went wide giving Peru its 13 points. This game could prove to have been a very crucial one for the Bobcats. A win could have given them a very good chance of picking up their third .NCC championship in a row. The tie with Kearney could d i m Peru's chances of becoming NCC champs, but they do have a go()(J. chance of becoming co-champions with Kearney State Teachers. Oaks are the true conservatives; They hold old leaves till summer gives A green exchange.-Roy Helton.

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9:30 a.m.-Homecoming displays. Theme: "Our World's Fair." 9:30 to 11:00 a.m.-Free coffee & doughnuts f o r registered alumni and guests in Stu· dent Center S~k Bar. 10:00 a.m.-Judging of displays. 10:45 a.m.-"P" Club luncheon, Student Center D i n i n g Room. 11:45 a.m.-All Alumni Lunch· eon, honoring classes of years ending in "2" and "7." 1:00 p.m.-Open house in dor· miiories until game fime. 2:00 p.m.-Peru State vs. Chad· ron State. Halftime S>how and coronation of Queen. 4:00 p.m.-Open house in dorms until 5:30 p.m. (Dining room and Snack bar open f o r evening meal). 7:00 p.m.-Dramatic Club pro· duction: "Dirty Work at the Crossroads or T e m p t e d , Tried and True.'' 9:30 p.m.-Homecoming Dance and presentation of Home· coming Queen, Gymnasium

BOBCAT CHATTER By Pai Hamm In Coach Mclntire's 20 years of coaching, his teams played only cine game that ended in a tie. That game was last year's 7-7 tie with Doane. This year's successive ties with Kearney and Hastings run the total to three in his last two year:C

Third Title Muffed Chances are the Bobcats muffed their bid for a third successive conference title. The 14-14 tie with Hastings means that Kearney and Hastings will have to tie to give the Bobcats a share of the title. If either Kearney or Hastings win, it's curtains f or Peru. Injuries Barney Mcllvoy, who missed the last two games due to an injured knee, may see some action against Doane this Saturday. Luke Cox, center, was sidelined for the Hastings game, due to a high fever. Average Size Incidentally, the average Bobcat football player stands six foot tall, weighs 187 pounds, and has a skinned elbow. A Smile or Two Just give the average young man two tickets to a football game, the nice fresh air and a beautiful girl to take to the game, and you can keep the two tickets and the nice fresh air ... Then there was the quarterback who discovered his girl was faithful to the end .... Sports Editor's Note: Congratulations are in order for Pat Hamm, who this week received one of the Omaha WorldHerald's "player of the week award." Pat received the award for an outstanding job of broken field running against the . Hastings Broncos. He gained 123 yards which nearly demoralized Hastings in the 14-14 tie.

Bobcats Lose Early Lead; Hastings Gains 14-14 NCC Tie For the second week in a row the Peru State Teachers College Bobcats struck fast to build up a first half lead and then watched their opponents come from behind to equal the early Peruvian efforts to gain a Nebraska College Conference tie. Last week Kearney came from 13 points behind to earn a deadlock, and last Saturday night at Peru, the Hastings B r o n c o s wiped out a 14-0 Peru State first quarter lead and gained a 14-all dead heat. The Bobcats struck twice in the first quarter and then stalled as Hastings took advantage of Peru errors to score once in the second stanza and once near the end of the third quarter. Coach Jack Mclntire's gridders drove 40 yards to score the first time they had possession. P at Hamm, Wood River, Ill., pitched 18-yard touchdown pass to Jim Hall, Omaha, for the counter and Leonard Kinser, Red Oak, Iowa, split the goal posts and Peru led 7-0 after 4:02 had elapsed. The second time they gained ball control, P'eru marched 51 yards to score with Hamm cantering the final 15 yards around left end. Kinser booted the extra point with 5:51 remaining in the first quarter. Midway in the second quarter, Hastings got one of two breaks they needed. Hard Luck Bill Witty, Bobcat signal caller from Syracuse, went back to punt on

Bobkittens Win Homecoming Tilt

his own 15-yard line. He fumbled a snap from center and was brought down on the Peru 9. Three plays later, Hastings quarterback Gerald Fisher passed to Dave Hanna who scored from seven yards out with 7:03 left to play. Late in the third quarter Peru opened a drive which lo,oked like it might pay off. The Bobcats moved from their own 41 to the Hastings 20. Then with third down and six yards to go, Witty passed toward end Jim Hall but opportunist Carl Allison picked off the toss on the 15 and ran 85 yards unmolested to score. Dave Hanna kicked the point and the scoring was done. Following the kick-off Peru drove from their 21 to the Hastings 8 before the drive died. on a Bobcat fumble. Late in the fourth quarter Peru again threatened, but an attempted field goal by Leonard Kinser from the 21-yard 1 in e sailed wide to thwart the Bobcat last-ditch attempt. SCORE I}Y QUARTERS: Hastings ----·· 0 7 7 0 14 Peru _________ 14 0 0 0 14 Statistics P H First downs --------- 14 2 Passes atteqlpted ____ 23 16 Passes co~\eted ---- 9 4 Passing yards -------- 95 33 Net rushing yards ___ 157 17 Punts ---····---------3-26 9-34 Fumbles lost -------- 4 2 Yards penalized _____ 2(} 20 ble Rock for another homecom· ing tilt.

The Peru Prep Bobkittens, rid· ing high on homecoming fever, outrode highly rated DawsonVerdon 28-14 here Friday night, October 5. Coach Witty's pepped-up offense, led by Mike Tynon and Clinton Reeves, waltzed to a 21-7 halftime lead. Reeves rambled twice to paydirt and Tynon once. Slowed down somewhat in the second half, the B o b k i t t e n s pushed one more score across on the rain-soaked field with Tynon going around the end. Ends John Mcintire and John Eickhoff and guard Bob Nincehelser were cited for excellent offensive and defensive play.

Kittens Whitewashed By Cook, 19-0 Peru Prep's Bobkittens 1o st their first game of the season Fri· day, Sept. 28, bowing to Cook, 19-0. Coach Bill Witty's charges, playing without the services of Clinton Reeves, failed to make a scoring drive and dropped the important Nemaha Valley Conference ti! t.

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Prep Celebrates Homecoming The annual Peru Prep Homecoming was held October 5. The high school pep club sponsored this event. '

the D-V Jets and the Peru Bobkittens battle. The Bobkittens were victorious a n d brought home a 28-14 win. Halftime activities included a marching exhibition by the Prep band and the crowning of Queen Virginia Moody and King Garth Adams. The couples' first attendants were Judy Pi,_erce and Clinton Reeves. Beverly Reeves and Leland Blankenship were second attendants. As the strains "We're loyal to you Peru High" floated through the air, alumni reminisced about their past. The alumni were later honored at a dance given in the high school auditorium. The homecoming royalty were presented at the dance. Refreshments were served by the pep club.

Twenty States Represented On Peru's Campus

Campus School Chatter By Mary Anna Gnade

Homecoming may be int 1 offing for college students, bu for An increase in enrollment has the campus school it is fast fadbrought with it an increase in ing into memory. The festivities began Thursday the number of states represented evening when the high school Mist didn't detract from the on campus. Students from twenstudents gathered downtown for glamour and the team defeated ty states and a British Crown a pep rally. The cheerleaders led Dawson-Verdon (but the popcorn colony are found here. the group in their school yells, popper broke!). Virginia M and Nebraska, with the largest enwhile a bonfire was started. Then Garth A were crowned with atrollment, has students from thira snake dance concluded this entendants Bev and Les, Judy and ty counties. The next three states thusiastic meeting. Clint. In spite of nearly no rewith the largest number of stuhearsal, the band and Pep Club Early Friday morning, all the dents are Iowa, 49; New York, mem.bers marched and counterindividual classes (7 -12) began to 21; and New Jersey, 16. marched and no one tripped? erect their homecoming displays. Other states and the number D-V accepted the invitation to The theme this year was "Hisof representatives are Illinois, 9; attend the Homecoming dance torical Events." Winners were the Kansas, 8; Massachusetts, 8; Misand the place was packed since juniors, first place; the sophosouri, 5; California, 4; Michigan, the numbers of alumni present mores, second place; and the 4; Virginia, 4 Colorado, 2; and made it truly Home-coming. How eighth grade, third place. Connecticut, 2. States with o n e patiently her admirers waited to student on Peru's campus are A crowd gathered in the Oak dance with the queen! WILLIAM WITTY Alabama, Indiana, Minnesota, Bowl Friday evening to watch Rhode Island, Texas, and WyomMr. William Witty is the new Did you see the displays before new members. Twelve people ing. There is also one student coach for the campus school this the wind took over? It's always from the British Crown colony of beca~e provisional members and year. a source of amazement how the Hong Kong. ten became, full members. Mr. Witty received his degree theme is worked out to relate to Following the initiation, planfrom Peru State. During his last defeating the opposing team, but three years in college, he coached The White Angels met in the ning began for all future scienthey do it. Whether Boot Hill is the Peru Prep Bobkittens. basement of Morgan Hall on Oc- tific programs. One of these proan important event in history is grams is the science exhibit for While coaching at Benkelman, tober 8 for a regular business still being hotly. debated. Raising Syracuse, Omaha South, and Pe- meeting. President Carol Mc- Homecoming. Ideas were pre- SENIORS ELECT OFFICERS the flag at Iwo Jima was definru, he has gained one of the most Lain called the meeting to order. sented but no work has yet beitely an important historical The Senior Class met on Sepimpressive won-lost records in Mary Ann Lewellyn was elect- gun. event, so this display had Peru tember 26 for its first meeting of Refreshments were served folthe state. ed chairman of the homecoming the year. Dr. Schottenhamel, class Prep raising the flag over the Mr. Witty and his wife, who display and it was voted on to lowing the meeting. sponsor, presided over the meet- bodies of e D-V team. The Troteaches at Syracuse, have two sell carnations to alumni again ing until the following people jan horse goes 'way back in hischildren, a daughter Dianne, who this year. Betty Painter an- SIGMA TAU DELTA were elected officers: Steve Park- tory and "If the Greeks could do is a freshman at Syracuse, and nounced that the new outfits con- INITIATES EIGHT er, president; Oene Wright, vice it, so can Prep" fits nicely. Of Bill Jr., a sophomore at Peru sisting of navy blue blazers and Sigma Tau Delta, the honorary president; Elaine Bath, secretary course John Paul Jones' saying State. pleated skirts will be here for English fraternity, held its initi- and Mary Jarvis, treasurer. "we have not yet begun to fight" When asked for a comment homecoming. ation meeting Monday, October Announcements, rings and pins is obvious. Words from Columabout Peru, Mr. Witty replied, The idea of buying a new pop- 8 at the home of Mr. and Mrs. are at the book store for the sen- bus to an Indian may have been "Just real fine." corn machine is being considered Silas Summers. iors to look at. Elaine Bath, Son- historic "What's new?" but the by a committee. The meeting Tom Aitken, Frank Bostic, ny Peterson and Karen Hamm answer is purely Peru '62: "Peru was closed by singing the White /Richard Elmore, Timothy Hol- are on the committee to plan the beat D-V." The 7th graders had Angels song. linger, Raymond Oogle, Mrs. homecoming display. a good idea but the wind defeatSteve Bates, Janice Jones, and Money making projects for the ed them: each yard line on a footMrs. Ruth Rankin were initiated. year were discussed. ball field was an important event After a short business meeting with the goal October 20, 1962, The college choir has just comthe organization was served cofand the event Peru beating D-V. pleted its voice testing and has SOPHOMORE MEETING The Blue Devils met Monday fee, punch and cookies. Professor Since Homecoming came so soon approximately 60 members. The At a class meeting the Sophochorus meets daily at 11 :50. Be- night, October 8, and appointed Robbins then led an informal more class decided to have $.50 after opening of school, prepara"Writing for discussion about tion time was telescoped-some ginning Tuesday, Oct. 23, chOir committees to reorganize frte dues. It also plans to sponsor a constitution and organize a dis- Publication." parents even began to wonder if will meet Tuesday evenings. dance later in the school year. they had children (except the one Included in this choir will be play for homecoming. home in each class where display Pledges, who were nominated KAPPA DELTA PI people from surrounding areas SOPHOMORES ELECT work was being done). such as Falls City, Auburn, John- last week, were voted on for ad- ELECTS OFFICERS OFFICERS son, and Nebraska City. They mission. Kappa Delta Pi, national honOn October 3, 1962, the Sophowill be practicing on "The MesThe Blue Devils have spon- , orary education fraternity, held Then after all the glamour and more Class elected officers for siah," which will be presented sored two highly successful danc- its organization meeting October excitement and exercise and late the 1962-63 school year. Elected Sunday, December 9, at 4 p.m. in es held after the Maryville and 1. The evening was spent in planhours, came the day after: everywere, president, Mike Janis; vice the college auditorium. The choir Hastings games. President Dean ning the yearly program and one had to help with clean up expresident, Joe Ward; secretary, accompanists are Judith Whig- Stapleton reported tha.t the Blue electing new members cept several girls who went to John Barton; treasurer, Duane ham and Ellen Meritt. According Devils are planning many more Officers of Kappa Delta Pi are: Hebron for FHA and Karen W Haith; and S.G.A. representato Mr. Camealy this year's chOir activities. president, Eugene Wright; vice tives, Penny Hays and Dick who went to Lincoln for all-state has the best balance of any since band tryouts and of course those president, Larry Swett; secretary, Floerchinger. he came here. with Saturday jobs (in any case, Mary Ann Graham; treasurer, On Monday, September 24, the no one slept late)! Mrs. Lydia Cockerham; historian, .CLASS OF 1967 choir elected the following offiLinda Beery. Miss Alma Ashley NAMES OFFICERS cers: president, Michael Jenis; is the sponsor. In spite of all this apparently At its first class meeting, the vice president, Gene Walden; time-consuming effort, classwork Freshman Class elected Jack secretary, Carol McLain; treasurwent on with maybe more franPHI BETA LAMBDA Johnson, Glenrock, Wyoming, as er, Russel Workman. Also elect- W.A.A. MAKES PLANS tic phone calls 'tween teens than The business department of its ·class president. Other officers ed as representatives from each FOR YEAR normal. (Incidentally, we do have Peru has joined the national fra· are: Mary Ann Biere, Auburn, class were the following: senior, The Women's Athletic Associaquite an active and exciting eleElaine Bath; junior, Carla Ja- tion held its first meeting of the ternity of Phi Beta .Lambda, vice president; Karen Quinn, mentary school on campus, too!) which is specifically for business Corning, Iowa, secretary; and cobson; sophomore, Ruth Rulla; school year on September 19, at majors and minors of the cam- Janet Beemer, Bedford, Iowa, freshman, Ray Harris. 8:00 p.m. in the gymnasium. pus. This organization is on a treasurer. Jeanie Reiman, president, called local, state, and national level. Dorothy Bock, Pawnee City, the meeting to order. The original business club is still and William Anderson, Chester, Dues, the point system, and in existence and will be used as Pa., are the S.G.A. representanew rules concerning member- a preparatory to · becoming a tives. Sponsor of the class is J. ship were discussed. Mrs. Wheel- member of Ppi Beta Lambda. D. Levitt. Q er showed the P.E. uniforms, and A member of Phi Beta LambCone Wifh .the Curl on Top it was announced that the club da must be a major or minor in will be in charge of ordering business and have at least 12 Groceries • Meats Q them. Plans were discussed for hours in business courses upon Auburn, Nebr. Fruits • Vegetables activities for the coming year. joining the club. Business club Dependable Service Meetings on September 26 and membership will consist of fresh274-3102 October 3 were spent tumbling men enrolled in business courses Reasonable Prices and on the trampoline. and thinking about concentraGas for less tion in the field. TRI BETA INITIATES INGERSOLL Wrecker $ervice On October 8, a special meet- M.E.N.C. HOLDS Barber Shop ing was held for Tri Beta mem- FIRST MEETING Steam Cleaning AUBURN, NEBRASKA bers, the professional honorary The M.E.N.C. (Music Educators 872-3201 Elly Ingersoll · Nate Hayes biology fraternity. The purpose National Conference) of Peru of this meeting was to initiate· State met Monday, October 1. A meeting is held the first Monday of every month. PERU CLEANERS & TAILORS Officers for 1962-63 school year L. H. CRAIG, Owner Repairing and Remodeling Men's and Women's Clothing are: Jim Kelly, president; Mike "The Store of Standard Forty-five Years Serving Students and Faculty PERU, NEBRASKA Janis, vice president; Marilyn Brands" PHONE 872-2671 PERU, NEBR. Marmet, secretary-treasurer. Mr. Phone 872-2701 Phone 274-3620 Auburn Gilbert Wilson is sponsor.

New Uniforms For White Angels

Class Meetings

:f

Sixty Voice Choir And Ci1orus Singing

Devils Active

News Of Organizations

GENOA

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BEATTY GARAGE

Redfern Clothing Co.


The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Attend United Nations Dinner--

Peru Pedagogian PERU. NEBRASKA

Volume 58

Number 3

OCTOBER 29. 1962

Campus School November 1

Peru's¡ Homecoming Royalty Was Presented

Homecoming royaHy and their escorts from left to right are: Elaine Gerdes. Tom Sewell. Mary Ann Lewellyn; Russ Hicks. Betty Painter, Bill Springer, K a r o 1 y n e Powers, Gary Stover, Jeapne Rhinehart, Steve Parker, Sharon Richardson. Dennis Peterson, Winnie Sporer, and Wayne Wallace.

Mary Ann Lewellyn Homecoming Queen BY PENNY HAYS The 1962 Homecoming Queen was crowned Saturday afternoon, October 20, during the halftime of the Peru-Chadron game. Mary Ann Lewellyn was chosen from seven candidates as this year's Homecoming Queen. Mary Ann is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. L. Lewellyn of Fort Crook. She was graduated from Bellevue High S c h o o 1 , where she was a cheerleader, active in music, and Homecoming Queen her senior year. Most of us on campus k n o w her as "Pinky." She is a senior at Peru and her major is physical education and her minor is home economics. At the present time, She is teaching the seventh and eighth grade P. E. classes at the campus school. In her four years at Peru, Mary Ann has been active in Home Economics Club, White Angels, W.A.A., on the Dorm Council, and a member of S.G.A. She has also been a May Fete attendant and this is her second year as a cheerleader. After graduation, Mary Ann plans to teach on the secondary level. The royalty of the queen's court consisted of the following six girls. Karolyne Powers, the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Reed of Auburn. Karolyne was graduated from Benson High School in Omaha. She is a senior majoring in home economics and minoring in physical education. At Peru, she participates in White Angels, S.G.A., and Home Economics Club. Jeanne Jl.hinehart, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Rhinehart of Omaha. She also graduated from Benson High School in Omaha. Jeanne is a sophomore majoring in physical education and minoring in home economics. On campus, she is active in Cherubs, Home Economics C 1 u b , W.A.A., and was chosen to be a cheerleader for the coming year. Sharon Richardson, the daugh(Continued on page two)

We Thank You, Friends The "P" Club scholarship benefit auction, held in the Oak Bowl Thursday evening, October 11, netted $1,044 profit for the organization. The first adventure of this kind ever attempted by the club, it was termed "highly su~cessful" by the organization's officials. In another part of this edition there is a complete story concerning the auction, the auctioneers and the buyers. However, there was not space enough in this story to give a list of the donors who gave so generously to the auction. We would like to take this space to thank those who contributed articles, or who gave money. To the best of our knowledge, the following list is complete. If we have left out anyone, we are sorry-but we would like to thank them also. Contributors from Falls City were Chaney Furniture, Sherman-Williams Paint Store, Falls City Elks Club, Falter Clothing Store and Falls City Mercantile. Those from Auburn who donated included: Pohlman Motors, Chevrolet Standard Company, Snyder's, Heskett Implement

Company, Gamble Store, Hathaway Sporting Goods, Earl May, and Mead Lumber Company. Donors from Nebraska City included: Wessels, Long's Drug Store, J. C. P~nney's, Rowe Clothes, Hest~d's, Hurlburt Sport Shop, Rollie's Hobby Sh6p, Norman'si;IG.A., Earl May, Dammast Clothing, Brown~&$l).oe Fit, Safeway, Mel's Texaco, Hasting Standard Service, Lima Clothing, Pla-Mor Sporting Goods, Morton House Foods, Clemmy Holmes, Ocoma Foods and Novak Auto Company. Peru contributors to the scholarship benefit were: Mr. and Mrs. Albert Brady, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Mcintire, Mr. and Mrs. Al Wheeler, Miss Shirley Majors, Mr. and Mrs. John Christ, Donald Carlile, Peru Market, Hill Drug. Store, Miss Norma Diddel, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. Keith Melvin, Peck's Palace, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Majors, Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Stemper, Ross Adams, Lawrence Bernard, and Mrs. J. W. Tyler. One other contributor was Mr. Clair Callan of Odell, Nebr. -Frank Bostic

Industrial Arts Club Display Was First To Win Permanent Trophy

11

For the third consecutive year the first prize for the best Homecoming display has been awarded to the Industrial Arts Club. The display consisted of a satellite and telestar revolving around a large world. A television set was inserted in the world projecting various scenes of the world. A teletape spelled out "Peru beat Chadron" and "Welcome Alumni." The first prize trophy is now permanently in the hands of the Industrial Arts Club. Second prize was awarded to the M.E.N.C. The slogan was "Music Makes Our World's Fair." A large globe was constructed with music emerging from the interior and' a satellite revolving around the world.

World's Fair Scenes Dance Background

The Senior Class was awarded the third prize for its display. The slogan was "Travel to Vic(Continued on page two)

Dirty Work At The Crossroads" Ably Presented And Well Received

The 1962 Homecoming Dance was held in the gymnasium at 9:00. Decorations consisted of blue and white crepe paper and cheesecloth made into a false ceiling. A 12 foot space n_eedle was erected in the center of the gym floor. Scenes of the World's Fair were posted about and tables were decorated with miniature replicas of the world. The homecoming queen, Mary Ann Lewellyn, and her escort, Larry Rathe, were presented at 10:30 p.m. Her attendants and their .escorts were: Karolyne Powers and Ron Kelly; Betty Painter and Bill Lawlor; Winnie Sporer and Barney Mcilvoy; Jeanne Reinhart and Ken Dostal; Elaine Gerdes and Dean Stapleton; Sharon Richardson and Pat (Continued on page two)

German, Italian Menus For U. N. Diners Diners at the United Nations Dinner at Peru State Teachers College November 1 will have their choice of complete menus from Germany and Italy. The Home Economics Club, sponsors of the annual event, will serve Italian spaghetti and meat balls and chicken and noodles as entrees at the 6:30 p.m. dinner. Major planning for the dinner has been carried out by members of the experimental foods classes, taught by Mrs. Louise Kregel, assistant professor of home economics, and sponsor of the Home Economics Club. Reservations may be made by calling Peru Campus Exchange 2811, Extension 47. The complete Italian dinner, besides the Italian spaghetti and meat balls, will feature green beans and onions, Italian tossed salad, bread sticks and hot milk sponge cake. The complete German meal will include, in addition to chicken and noodles, sweet sour cabbage, au gratin potatoes, wilted lettuce salad, German bread, and diced apple cake. Coffee will be the principal beverage.

BY CAROL NIEBUHR On October 20, the Homecoming play, "Dirty Work at the Crossroads,'' was presented by the Dramatics Club in the auditorium. The audience participated by booing and hissing the conniving villain and his wife, and Nearly 300 former Peruvians applauding the heroic deeds of from seven states registered durthe hero and heroine. ing alumni day activities, which Some of the exciting events included the traditional luncheon which happened during the play for former lettermen and the 1962 were the death of Nellie's mother football squad, and an all-alumni ¡ caused by poipon in her tea, luncheon which honored classes Nellie driving,.A.dam to drink by of the years ending in "2" a11d promising to run away to Aub- "7." Three members of the class urn with Munro, Mrs. Asterbilt's of 1902-Harry Hutchinson, Pescandal brought into the open, ru; Dr. Nels A. Bengston, Linand Adam put on trial and sen- coln, and Judge Frank Munday, tenced to death for a murder he Red Cloud-were present. Perudidn't commit. vians came from Iowa, Kansas, In the meantime, the helpful Missouri, Colorado, Tennessee, hired hand gets into the act by Texas and Ohio, as well as Nerescuing Nellie from the clutches braska communities. of Munro by helping Adam esNew officers elected to head the cape from jail, and by having a Peru Alumni Association include: (Continued on page twoL' .' r:v (Continued on page two)

Large Alumni Group Here For Homecoming

;_: ~)1~(\\\ I


PERUVIAN PICTURE TAKING-SMOOTH Thanks to each Peru College student and faculty memELIZA ber who gave his time to assist in making the 1963 Peruvian MORGAN picture taking the best in recent years. Individual pictures HALL were taken of 586 students and faculty members, each of By whom had to fill out several time-taking forms. These figArdith ures indicate a renewed interest in school spirit, as well as Pratt an interest in the school yearbook, the Peruvian. Because of the complete cooperation of 31 campus organizations, group Eliza Morgan Hall saw many pictures for the yearbook were also taken with a minimum familiar faces as the "ole grads" amount of time and effort. -By 'rom Aitken

Mary Ann Lewellyn Homecoming Queen

DELZELL NEWS By Curtis Nelson During the open house on Saturday, October 20, Delzell had its share of visitors. Many former students came back to the dorm with their wives and children. Many girls from Eliza Morgan Hall were also here. The halls were all cleaned .and polished for the o~casion, and almost all of the residents had their r o o m s cleaned up. The rest probably locked their doors. One delegation of students from the East went home on Friday, October 19. Another group left Monday, October 22. By Wednesday afternoon most of the residents were leaving for the vacation. The television set at Delzell has been out of order for more than a week to the disgust of many of the residents. Something musf be done about this. On September 14, Delzell had 161 residents. It now has 156. We have lost seven students, but two new ones have arrived since the beginning of the school year. The dorm really has room for only 151 students, so there are still a · few rooms with .three men in them.

(Continued from page one) ter of Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Richardson of Crab Orchard. Sharon came to Peru as a sophomore from North West Missouri State College. She is a junior majoring in elementary education, and is in Home Economics Club, Cherubs, and P.S.E.A. Winnie Sporer, the daughter of Mrs. Susie Sporer of Murray. Winnie graduated from Plattsmouth High School. She is a junior majoring in home economics and minoring in history. At Peru State she participates in White Angels, S.G.A., Kappa Delta Pi, and Home Economics Club among others. Betty Painter, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Everett Painter of Bellevue. She is a gmduate of Bellevue High School. This is Betty's junior year at Peru and she is an elementary education major. Her campus activities include S.G.A., White Angels, and the Dorm Council. Elaine Gerdes, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Gerdes. She is a graduate of Peru Prep. She is a sophomore majoring in elementary education. Elaine pa9ticipates in White Angels, P.S.E.A., L.S.A., and the Dorm Council.·

Art Department Exhibits Past Class ~ork

Faculty Association Elects Officers

poured in to spend Homecoming weekend. Choruses of "Where do you teach?" "Do you like teaching?" and other questions could be heard echoing through the halls all hours of the day and night. What is an the noise coming from the basement? After investigating, we found the girls of Morgan Hall huddled in Elsie Sejkora's room. The main attraction was her "Ouija" board. If you have problems just drop in and join the group. The girls in attendance report "Ouija" is right most of the time. Wedding bells are ringing loud and long. Carol Shubert is being married October 28th to Dwayne Brocher. They will live in Auburn. Ellen Harris became engaged to Dominick LeBate. · Judy Wolf is pinned to Craig Urbauer of Wesleyan. The girls are getting ready for Halloween, For example, y o u can see a "Jill-0-Lantern" peeking out of one of the windows. (Why not Jack?-boys aren't alfowedf) Has anyone noticed the clever signs which adorn the r o o m doors? It seems the "Men Wanted" sign hasn't brought any results-so complain its owners. Say Carla, where is your sign? Birthday wishes are extended to Sharon ·Peacock, Brenda McCarthy, Judy Wolf, Elaine Bath. Elaine Gerdes has been selected as the off-campus representative for Women's Student Association council.

"""

The Art Department, under the direction of Norma Diddel, pre,Sented an art · exhibit from A Faculty Association meeting ·October 20 through October 24 in was held Monday, October 1, at the art rooms of the Campus 4 p.m., with Lester Russell pre- School. The display was open to siding. Officers elected for th e the public during Homecoming, 1962-63. school term were: Han- October 20, from 10 a.m. until ford Miller, president; Mrs. Ross noon. On the following Monday Adams, vice-president; and Gene- through Wednesday, the display vieve Gergen, secretary-treasur- was shown between 2 and 5 p.m. er. The exhibit contained pictures Mr. Miller then appointed the drawn by past members of th e .following people for the .program Art Department's free hand committee: J. D. Levitt, Miss Al· drawing classes. The pictures ma Ashley, and D. V. Jarvis. were of scenes representing This committee will plan t h e something which they are now action or projects the Faculty doing. There were also examples Association will undertake dur- of art work by the present free ing the year. hand drawing class.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks October 29, 1962 PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Co-Editor ____________________________________ Frank Bostic Co-Editor _____________________________________ Tom Aitken Layout Editor ___ .. ____________________________ Kay Camden Personnel Manager___________________________ Jane Rhodus Advertising Manager-------------·------------- Larry Rathe Sports Editor _________________________________ Larry Rathe Sports Column ____ .. ____________________________ Pat Hamm Delzell Column ______________________________ Curtis Nelson Morgan Column ______________________________ Ardith Pratt Majors Column _______________________________ Dick Elmore Campus School Column_________________ Mary Anna Gnade Reporter _____________________________________ Judith Beran Reporter ___________ --------------------------- Tom Castle Reporter ______________________________ Virginia Cockerham Reporter-----------·-·----------------------- Karen Conrad Reporter ___________ ------------------------ Sharon Donlan Reporter ___________ ------------------------ Lee Haeberlein Reporter·------------··--------·---------------- Penny Hays Reporter_ ____ --------------------------------- Jane Moore Reporter·------------··---------------------- Carol Niebuhr Reporter ____________________________________ Edward Smith Reporter_______ ----------------------------- Judith Wilson Reporter __________________________________ Barney Mcilvoy Sponsor _________________________________ Stewart Linscheid

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"Dirty Work At The Crossroads 11 Ably Presented (Continued from page one)

MAJORS HALL By Richard Elmore Majors Hall has a state celebrity on first floor. Those who are curious can check back to the October 14 Lincoln Star. It seems that Rod Baade had an official sideline seat for the NebraskaNorth Carolina State game at Lincoln. When the Siar photographer snapped an action shot of a play, Rod was caught in the background. If anyone wants to see the picture, check with Rod. He probably has a few copies available. • Congratulations to Larry Phil· lips. He will be married Friday, November 2, to Sharon Irvin of Nebraska City at the Christian Church in Nebraska City. Jay DuVal had some trouble with his iron last week. A short circuit caused the iron to overheat enough to completely melt the bottom. Perhaps Peru State has a "first"-an iron hot enough to meH itself. Thanks go to the men of Majors who helped with the Homecoming display. Mert Finke made the frame for the picture wliich was painted by Tom Bookwalter, Dick Elmore, and Lester Starlin. Skip Ogle, John Barton, and Bob Hinks were up at 7 a.m. to put up the display. Even though it did not place, the display d i d draw much attention and many favorable comments. Some of the fellows in t h e dorm are already beginning to practice for the possible future. Every once in a while one can see a group marching in the halls.

narrow escape from death under the wheels of a train. There were a couple of unique things about the play. One was that the programs which were handed out at the door w ere printed in the style of old-time programs. Credit was given to · Thomas Edison for personally designing the lamps used to illuminate the auditorium . The other was, as the program stated, "the greatest mechanical effects ever seen," which was done by the backstage crew in the last scene. They simulated a train bearing down upon the two helpless men tied to the track. Special credit is given to all who worked behind the scenes. Here are the names of the crew: Bill Fournell, James Christ, Wendell Mohling, Tom Aitken, Larry Hennerberg, Paul Bodtke, Bill Bouton, Tom Castle, Susan Sharp, Gary Stover, Dorie Roemich, Judi Whigham, Mary Ann Gnade, Carol Curd, Mary Holland, Eunice Dovel, Sharon Peacock, Cecelia Palmer, Beverly Quinn, Lois Fritz, Carol Sudik, Myra Murren, Kathy Henning, Linda Bartels, Janey Moore, Sherry Panahpour, Phil Niemann, Bill Heineman, and Sharylin Vrtiska.

R. T. Benford played the over-

ture and mood music throughout the performance.

Industrial Arts Club Display Was First To Win Permanent Trophy (Continued from page one) tory." The display consisted of a globe with a protruding space needle. Traveling around the globe was a miniature train bearing the names of the seven senior football players. Coach Mcintire occupied the first car.

Large Alumni Group Here For Homecoming (Continued from page one) Marilyn Tynon (Mrs. Eidon) .Allgood, Peru, president; Mrs. Ardis Carmine Bates, Geneva, first.vice president; Clifford Stokes, Sidney, Iowa, second vice president; Fran Larson (Mrs. Ron) Witt, Millard, secretary, and Fred. Clements, Dunlap, Iowa, treasurer.

World's Fair Scenes Dance Background (Continued from page op.e) Hamm. The escorts were all Senior members of the football team. The Jim Herbert band from Nebraska University provided the music for the dance chaperoned by Dr. and Mrs. Wininger.

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Homecoming royalty from lef:t io right: Betty Painter, Elaine Gerdes, Sharon Richardson, Mary Ann Lewellyn, Karolyne Powers, Jeanne Rhinehart, and Winnie Sporer.

President of ±he Peru Staie College S.G.A., 'Tom Yopp, crowns Miss Mary Ann Lewellyn Queen of ihe 1962 Homecoming. Miss Lewellyn was chosen Queen of ihe 4lsi Homecoming by ihe Peru siudeni body.

Trophy Winning Display-The Industrial Aris Club created ihe winning display of ihe 4lsi Peru Staie Home~.)ming. This is ihe third consecutive first place for fire club, which gives ihem permanent possession of the trophy.

Peru's band, under direction of Gilbert E. Wilson, performed during half-iime of ihe Peru Staie-Chadron game.

Peru Siaie's Leonard Kinser picks up valuable yardage io help ihe Bobcats io a 14 ±o 0 triumph over conference rivals, ihe Chadron Eagles.

Three members of ihe class of 1902 returned Saturday io ihe Campus of a Thousand Oaks for the 4ls± homecoming ai Nebraska Staie Teachers College ai Peru. The three genilemen (from lef:t) are Harry Hutchinson, Peru; Dr. Nels A. Bengston, Lincoln, and Judge Frank Munday, Red Cloud. Mrs. Hutchinson is ai lef:t and Mrs. Munday is ai right. ~ ·111111111111111111111u111111111u1111uu1111111111u11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111

HOMECOMING Senior Larry Rathe breaks through the hoop held by cheerleaders Don Clark and Frank Bostic as the Bobcati ~ead for their fifth victory of the year,

1962 11111111111111111111111111rnm111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111


ALetter From The Cheerleaders What has become of that old Peru spirit? This question puzzled many alumni who returned to Peru for the college's homecoming against Chadron. It has also puzzled us, the cheerleaders, • elected by you, the student body of Peru State. Many comments have . been made about Peru's lack of spirit this season, but this black point seemed to reach its peak at the IVAN LeROY LELAND homecoming game. True, the Ivan LeRoy Leland joined the contest lacked sparkle and the faculty as assistant professor in excitement of many of Peru;s history. He teaches two history past games, but untrue is the fact courses in the campus school and that this was any cause for lack of enthusiasm on the student three in college. Mr. Leland received his mas- body's part. Some students and even certer's degree at Bob Jones Unitain professors have blamed this versity, and at the present time lack of spirit on the cheerleaders. he is working on his doctors .degree at the University of Ne- We would like to say here that we have worked many hours to braska. He has previously taught in improve ourselves, since our Nebraska City and Table Rock, election by you. Students have expressed their desire to us for Nebraska. He commutes from Percival, some new yells. We feel we have gotten some new yells with plenIowa, where he is a minister. Mr. Leland is married and has ty of pep. All we need now is for two little girls, ages two an d the student body to fulfill its responsibility to us by learning five. them and yelling them with us. It may be appropriate at this

Sigma Tau Delta Sponsors Contest In Prose Writing Sigma Tau Delta, honorary English fraternity, is again sponsoring its annual Prose Writing Contest. Those eligible to enter the contest are classified as freshmen or enrolled in Eng)ish 101, 102, or English Laboratory. Any student meeting the specified qualifications may submit his manuscript to the president of Sigma Tau Delta, Lynn Mccann, or the faculty sponsor, Mr. Silas Summers, before the deadline, which is ,ast day of the first semester. Any type of prose-descriptive, narrative, expository, or argumentative-is acceptable for entrance in the contest. The only type of prose that will not be accepted is the documented research paper. The selections will be judged by committee selected from Sigma Tau Delta and at least one faculty member. They will evaluate the papers according to neatness, correctness of mechanics, organization, style and content. The winner will receive paper bound books of his choice not to exceed $10 in cost. Last year's winner was "The Testament" by Peter W. Jacobs. The alternate winner was "A Castle for Angie" by Penny Hays. Both of these selections may be read in the recent edition of "Sifting Sands."

a

North Central Representative Visits Dr. Raymond A. Olson, director of elementary teacher education at Ball State Teachers College, Muncie, Indiana, was a visitor on the Peru State campus October 11 and 12. .While on the Peru campus, Dr. Olson acted as co-ordinator for the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools with their cooperative project in teacher education. Each member school is. visited as a part of this project. During the two-day period, members of the Peru faculty met with Dr. Olson to discuss problems in education. Dr. Olson stated the Peru State campus was located in a very scenic spot.

time to express the thought that we know we will not be able to please everyone with what we do, so we are trying to please the majority. Also, it is unfair to compare us with other college cheerleaders, who have made their appearance at Peru. These cheerleaders have told us that they -w~re elected last spring by their student body and practiced together all summer. Your comments and suggestions are always appreciated by us, as we are interested in finding out what we are doing wrong, or what you, the student body, is interested in. Remember, the cheerleaders are no better than the crowd behind them. Now that the home football season is completed, we will be working extra hard to prepare for the basketball season, which will be upon us soon. We sincerely hope that by working together during the basketball season, we can make you proud of us, and you can make us proud of you. -The Cheerleaders

P.S.E.A. Hears Robert Moore State President Has Served Peru The Peru Student Education For Twenty-five Years Association held its second meet-

Mr. Robert D. Moore, head of ing of the school year October 15 division of Language Arts and in the Campus School auditoriprofessor of English and speech, um. has faithfully served Peru State The featured speaker was Joan Teachers College for 25 years. Brodhead, president of the StuMr. Moore began teaching at dent Education Association of the age of 17 in a rural school in Nebraska and a student at NeOklahoma. By attending night braska Wesleyan University. Miss school, summers and special ses- Brodhead's topic was "Your Stusions he acquired his A.B. de- dent Education Association." She gree at East Central State Teach- related her experiences at the ers College, Ada, Oklahoma. He NTEPS meeting at Fort Collins, obtained his M.Ph. degree at the Colorado and the SNEA convenUniversity of Wisconsin and went tion at Denver in August. The on for graduate work at the State members of the Peru S.E.A. were University of Iowa and the Colo- told they are a very important rado State College of Education. part of the state and national ~tu­ His teaching experiences cover dent associations. Miss Brodhead small rural schools, city hi g h also explained the organization schools and college. of the four levels of the associaMr. Moore came to the campus tion and how they are related to in the summer of 1937. Since he each other and to each local levhas been on the campus, he has el. In concluding, the state presiproduced and directed approxi- dent invited all of the members mately 50 plays, ranging from of the Peru group to attend the light-hearted comedy to realistic state convention at Midland, Nodrama. Although nu me r o us vember 10. changes have taken place in the Other guests at · the evening last 25 years, Mr. Moore cited the biggest change in the dramatics meeting were Bill Semerad, director of the Nebraska State Eddepartment is the modernization of lighting and stage equipment. ucation Association, and Allan Evans from Wesleyan. Mr. SemHe is not only active on the Peru campus, but also in com- erad, Peru ~innus, said that he An all college convocation was munities surrounding Peru. He was sad that 'he was not in his held Wednesday, October 24, for helped with the centennials for youth as the student members the purpose of hearing Dr. David Nebraska City, Auburn, Johnson are but that he was happy that Dichter, Peace Corps Program county and Hamburg, Iowa. This he could work with the youthful W.A.A. DISCUSSES Operations Officer for Pakistan- last summer he directed two students of the NEA. GYM OUTFITS A dinner was held in honor of The W.A.A. held a short busi- Afghanistan, speak about the melodramas for the Brownville Peace Corps. the three guests in the college celebrations. ness meeting October 10 in the When Mr. Moore is not busy dining room. It was hosted by the Dr. Dichter is a native of Atgym. Gym outfits and the constitu- lantic City, New Jersey. He was working with the students and Peru S.E.A. executive committee. an. undergraduate at Illinois Uni- his plays, he spends his time coltion were discussed. Sharon Donlan was elected versity, but completed the final lecting stamps, fishing, or experipublicity chairman of the organ- two years of his bacehlor's de- menting with photography. Mr. and Mrs. Moore have two gree at Aligarh Muslim Univerization. After the meeting, the g i r 1 s . sity, India, where he specialized children, Robert and Martha. played a game of touch football. in Asian geography and political Both are graduates of Peru State Pictures of group organizations science. He served in the Far where they were active in debate ""-East during his tour of duty with and drama and majored in Eng- on Peru's campus were taken during the afternoon of Oct. 11. TRI-BETA HEARS the U. S. Marine Corps. His M.A. lish and speech. All classes were dismissed f or TALK ON BEES Mr. Moore stated, "I like the degree is from the Clark UniverTri-Beta, professional honor- sity Graduate School of Geogra- friendliness and neighborliness of the afternoon so there would be no conflicts. ary biology fraternity, held its phy, Worchester, Mass., and his Peru." Ph.D. was earned at Birkbeck organization meeting Oct. 22. J. D. Levitt, the photographer, Officers for 1962-63 school year College, London University. Dr. snapped 64 shots of 32 organizaare Arlan Richardson, president; Dichter has not only traveled extions. There was a total of 934 Robert Eichenberger, vice presi- tensively in South and Southeast individuals involved in all of the dent; Merlin Wright, secretary- Asia, but he has also driven ovpictures. treasurer; and Bob Penkava, his- erland on three occasions from An article, "Stained G 1a s s Members of the Peruvian staff Europe to India. torian. Work" by Dr. C. Vernon Siegner, who assisted Mr. Levitt were Guest speaker was Henry PupBefore speaking, Dr. Dichter head of the division of practical Dick Elmore, JoAnn Frerichs, pe from Nebraska City. Mr. Pup- showed a film on the Peace Corps. arts at Nebraska State Teachers Tom Aitken, Lonn Pressnall, Supe is well known, both state and In the film, the President spoke College, Peru, has been pubsan Sharp, Sharon Peacock, Wennationally, as an expert on bees. about the Peace Corps. We saw lished in the October edition of dell Mohling, John Davis, and The title of his talk was "Honey- what they actually did, the quali- SCHOOL SHOP. Richard Klinger. bees." fications needed to be accepted, Dr. Siegner, in his second year and the importance of the Peace at Nebraska State Teachers ColCorps. lege, explains in the article that INGERSOLL WHITE ANGELS Anyone who wished to speak the ancient craft of staining glass Barber Shop DESIGN EMBLEMS with Dr. Dichter about the Peace is again becoming popular in AUBURN, NEBRASKA In the absence of the president Corps could confer with him in modern .architecture. His discusElly Ingersoll · Nate Hayes of White Angels, the vice-presi- the Student Center following the sion centers around how familiar dent, Winnie Sporer, called the convocation. items such as book ends, room meeting to order on Monday dividers, and flower containers night, October 22, in the basemay be made from stained glass. ment of Morgan Hall. Dr. Siegner's explanation of the technique is complete and goes The new uniforms for the club along with the philosophy of the did not arrive in time for HomeDependable Service magazine which is to be an aid coming. A committee has been designing some emblems, one of to industrial education. Reasonable Prices The Foreign Language Club which will be chosen by the club Gas for Less held a banquet at the Auburn to be worn on the blazers. Hotel on October 22. There were It was decided that each memWrecker Service ber of the organization would twenty-five present. Before the meal, president, Carolyn Reiber "The Store of Standard again receive a copy of the Steam Cleaning Brands" White Angel Constitution. The introduced Mr. Robbins and his Phone 274-3620 Auburn 872-3201 meeting was closed by the sing- wife. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Moore were also introduced. The n e w ing of the White Angel song. pledges were recognized by the old members. PHI BETA LAMBDA Following the dinner, a proPLANS DISPLAY gram was presented with RichPhi Beta Lambda and the ard Baker as master of ceremonBusiness Club held a meeting ies. Mike Chu gave an entertainMonday, October 15. The eve- ing Chinese love story. Ron HartSHORT ORDERS MEALS ning was spent discussing and man added a musical note to the evening with his accordion. The designing the homecoming disOpen: Monday· Saturday 6:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m. group was left in a gay mood aftplay. Sunday 6:00 a.m .. 8:00 p.m. Plans for the future were pre- er Lonn Presnall presented a sented to the club. Each member comedy routine. Peru, Nebraska The next regular meeting of was asked to begin thinking of the club will be November 26. projects to adopt.

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Peace Corps Convo

Organization Pictures Taken For Peruvian

Dr. Siegner Has Article In I.A. Publication

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Peru Defeats Chadron 14-0 In Homecoming Contest Played Here Peru State .Teachers College took advantage of a break on the opening kick-off of the second half to break a scoreless duel with Chadron State and go on to record a 14-0 win over their Ne·braska College Conference rivals. With a scoreless tie still showing on the scoreboard and with the fans still discussing the crowning of Miss Mary Ann Lewellyn, Fort Crook, as the 23rd Homecoming queen at Peru State, the big break of the b!lll game occurred. Sterling's Larry Rathe, Peru State senior, kicked-off short and the ball slithered to the Chadron 46 yard marker where an alert band of Peru linemen covered the free ball while Chadron looked on. From there .Ron Kelley, senior Peru halfback from Falls City, took control. In five slashing carries,--one for 12 and another for 18 yards-Kelley personally delivered the pigskin to the one yard line. With the Chadron defense again expecting the flying feet of Kelley to do the damage, q~arterback Bill Witty, Syracuse, moved the final yard on a quarterback sneak. Leonard Kinser, Red Oak, Iowa, halfback, booted the first of his two extra points to give the Bobcats a 7-0 lead with 12:01 remaining in the third quarter. Peru's second and final touch.down came with 13:18 remaining in the game. The huge crowd, witnessing the 41st Peru State Homecoming clash, . saw Peru's 290-pound tackle, Jim Brenn, Hebron, .. scoop up a Chadron fumble on the Eagle 32-yard line and almost go all the way to score. A grasping Chadron hand tripped up the surprisingly fast 'Brenn on the Chadron 26. Seven plays later Len Kinser bolted over left guard to score from three yards out. Moments later his ·:)onversion at temp t stirred the autumn air between the goal posts. A big part of the credit for foe win must go to the Bobcat de-

fensive eleven who held the Eagles to 5'8 yards on the ground and 31 in tp.e air. Chadron never moved past their own 45 yard line. Defensive line plaudits were earned by tackle Ken Dostal, Scribner, a fifth man in the Chadron backfield; tackle Jim Brenn, Hebron; guards Bill Lawlor, Plattsburg, Mo., and Troy Lyon, Nebraska City. Ron Kelley, Falls City, picked off two Chadron passes and Sam Carneal, Nebraska City, sophomore, who has apparently won himself the specialized job of punt returning, returned seven Chadron kicks for a total of 72 yards. The game marked Peru's final appearance in Oak Bowl for the '62 season.

BTeam Defeats Northwest Missouri Reserves, 14-6

Five Original Wheeler Players At "P" Club Homecoming Luncheon Five members of the first football team coached by Al Wheeler at Peru State Teachers College in the 19~8 season were present for the annual luncheon sponsored by the 'P-Club, lettermen's organization, at the 41st homecoming. That team".. which posted a 1-7-0 season's record went ahead and won the Nebraska Intercollegiate conference championship in 1939, posting a 7-1-1 season record. Present were: John Boyer, York; Jack Mcintire, head football coach at Peru; Al Wheeler, director of athletics; Allison Dougherty, York; Ross Adams, Peru; Glen Sheely, Auburn. During his 23 years as football coach at Peru, Al Wheeler's teams posted a 133-51-12 record.

BOBCAT CHATTER

By Pat Larry' Rathe, Sterling, and Sam Hamm Carneal, Nebraska City, sparked the Peru State Teachers College Our undefeated Bobcats are all "B" team to a 14-6 football vicbut out of a chance for their tory over the Northwest Missouri third consecutive conference tiState reserves Oct. 15, at Peru. The little Bobcats splurged to tle. The Bobcat chances depend a 14-0 first half lead and then ·upon the Kearney-Chadron tilt at Eagle land. The Eagles have stood off a Northwest Missouri more than once been "Giant" second half rally. killers on their home field in cold, Peru's first counter came with western Nebraska. 3:49 remaining in the initial perMichigan Bound iod when quarterback R o Y While the Eagles entertain Broadbrooks, Beatrice, hit Larry Kearney, our Bobcats travel to Rathe with a scoring pass. Wathe Marquette, Michigan, to play took the pitch on the 15-Y,ard powerful Northern Michigan. Pemarker and sped into the e n d ru, hungry for an undefeated zone. The play covered 21 yards. season, has sorry plans for the Late in the second quarter, Northerners. Sam Carneal, Bobcat halfback, Injuries scooped up a Missouri fumble A regrettable loss to the Boband romped 30 yards to score. cats is senior halfback, Barney Larry King, Auburn:' booted · Mcllvoy. "Jap," as he is known both Peru State extra points. to many, was headed for a great Northwest Missouri's only tally senior year before he badly incame in the third period when jured his knee in the St. Mary's Bill Johnson scampered 51 yards game. Seemingly healed, he tried his knee out against Doane, but to score. painfully re-injured {t. A Smile or Two Two girls ·were talking about PERU CLEANERS TAILORS intercollegiate sports. One was Repairing and Remodeling Men's and Women's Clothing particularly against football. "For Forty-five Years Serving Siudenis and Faculiy instance," she said, "take Yale PHONE 872-2671 PERU, NEBR. and Harvard. This year Yale beats Harvard. Very well. Next year Harvard beats Yale. S e e what I mean? It doesn't prove anything ...."

&

HP" Club Auction N Profit For Scholarshirfi:i "Come on let's start the bidding folks! Need a five dollar billy, gotta five, gotta fiveWho'll go ten, gimme ten, c'mon just ten"-and so it went at the first "P" Club auction. On October 11, the Oak Bowl was suddenly transformed into an auction block and local auctioneers, Laurence Bernard, John Weisbrook and Tom Majors, offered their services in an endeavor to raise money for a "P" Club scholarship fund. Interested Peru State supporters donated everything from beans to thoroughbred calves for the bidding. Auction ·goers bid wholeheartedly for the cause; Mr. Gerald Moore went as high as fifteen dollars for a jar of olives.

Bobcats Slip Past Pesky Tigers 13-7 The Peru State Teachers College Bobcats, led by the steady rushing of Ron Kelley, Falls City, and the break-away running of Bill Tynon, Peru, annexed their first Nebraska College Conference victory by downing Doane College, 13-7, at Crete. Kelley sparked the Bobcats' ground game with 114 yards in 19 carries and Tynon ignited the sluggish Peru State scoring machine with an 87-yard sprint into pay-dirt. In downing the Doane Tigers, Peru State elevated its NCC record to one win and two ties and kept alive its slim hopes for the loop crown. Doane, unimpressed by Peru's rushing defense average of 85.4 yards-per-game, slashed the Bobcat defense for 170 yards rushing, while making the Bobcats come from behind for the win. It was the third time in six games that Jack Mclntire's charges have overcome deficits to win. Paced by halfback Roger Nieveen, Doane drove 85 yards in the first period for the evening's first s_core. The drive, accomplished in 10 plays, was capped by Nieveen's 11-yard burst with 4:07 remaining in the quarter. Marv Drevo booted the extra point to give the Tigers a 7-0 lead.

Jod'lfii

Dorm residents items as a chair, st0'1efi'v ,,. coach Mclntire's study',,-4 "genuine Royal Stetsotfl; stolen from his head, a .w~ table guaranteed to "shape~up" as soon as the weather gets dry, and a '50 Ford with a $48 "pot" donated by teachers and other spectators. Those who were not regular auction-goers listened c 1 o s e 1 y , shaking their heads as they tried to comprehend the ringing chant of the auctioneers. Others were overly careful not to nod or point in fear they might find themselves raising the bid. Final tabulation showed $1,044 collected for the fund. For many days after, the latest cliche was "sold to the highest bidder." Midway in the second canto, Peru thwarted another Doane drive on the Bobcat 6-yard stripe to set the stage for Tynan's heroics. With third down and three yards needed, Tynon called h i s own keeper signal. The slender junior slashed inside his own left e~d, tut toward the middle and rocketed 87 yards to score with 7:45 left. Leonard Kinser, Red Oak, Iowa, missed the P.A.T. placement attempt and the half enMd· with Doane nursing a onepoint' advantage. The Bobcats nailed down the win in the third quarter by driving 64 yards to score. Ron Kelley, Falls City, picked up 46 of those yards in five attempts, and Bill Witty, Syracuse, moved the final yard on a quarterback sneak. This time Kinser's conversion was good. Doane filled the air with passes in a vain attempt to score an upset, but a combination of Peru line pressure, inept Doane receiving, and timely Bobcat secondary saves carried the Peruvians to the win. 1

Peru State's offense was hampered by injuries. Roy Windhorst, Deshler, did not see action at his customary fullback position and Leonard Kinser, halfback, saw action sparingly and was considerable under par. Three Peru first-year men, Bill Witty, Keith Grimes, Columbus, and John Stefan, Fairfield, Conn., plus senior Ron Kelley formed the Bobcat starting backfield.

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PERU THUMPS TABLE ROCK Peru Prep traveled to Table Rock Friday, October 12, and downed the Tigers 27-0. Butch Blankenship; playing a brilliant .offensive game, hit John Eickhoff with a 25 yard scoring pass for Prep's first tally. Minutes later, Blankenship was on the receiving end of a Mike Tynon aerial for Prep's second score. Tynon rolled around the end to round out the Bobkitten scodng at 20-0 for the first half. The Bobkittens, substituting frequently, tallied only once in the second half. It was E\lankenship up the middle for thirty-five yards and pay dirt. PREP SLIPS PAST BROCK Peru Prep's Bobkittens overwhelmed the Brock Pirates for a 32-0 victory here Friday, October 19. Playing in a steady rain that started just before game time, Prep actually out-waded its highly rated opponents to score the soa''.ing victory. Mike Tynon and Clinton Reeves led the Bobkittens offensively, scoring five touchdowns.

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'· ;fiternational Presents ihg Performance At Peru

Church Club News

Chorus Members Names Released

Sixty-one students are mem- Humboldt; Ruth Rulla, Sterling; bers of the College Chorus at Pe- Gary Schmucker, Brock; Thomas ru State Teachers College, ac- Stevenson, Auburn; Eugene Walsigner, and director. cording to Edward G. Camealy, den, Ruskin; James Watson, LinFrom the specially designed a LUTHERAN CLUB associate professor of voice and don, Colo.; Judy Weichel, Alvo. stage, complete, with revolving cert at an all-college convocadirector of choirs. Charles Wellensiek, Syracuse; The Lutheran Club met Wedfloors and limitless effects such lonfOctober 17, 1962 at P er u The Chorus at Peru State will Kristine Wewel, Newport; Judas smoke, rain bubbles, lighted nesday, October 10, with 15 memState Teachers College. chandeliers and underwater il- bers present. Pros and cons were be joined by area high school and ith Whigham, Blanchard, Iowa; Daniel Llords presented the lusions, Daniel Llords creates the heard on the idea of Lutheran church choirs in the presentation Larry Whittington, Peru; Russel opera "Faust." Included in the magic that is the heart of all Club members joining an inter- of the Christmas portion of Han- Workman, Peru; Barbara Young, performance were several short- theatre. Described as the "Pyg- national association of Lutheran del's "The Messiah" on Sunday, Falls City. er acts, one of which featured a malion of the woodpile," he has students. In the- ease of such an December 9. small whi_te bear who has had a created more than 500 marion- event, the group would drop the College Chorus personnel: "puppet-sized street" named in ettes all of which he personally name of The Lutheran Club and Joyce Able, Auburn; Virginia would be called Gamma Delta. Adkins, Nebraska City; Judith honor of him. costumes. Llords ·and his puppets for When Concertheatre is not on No vote was taken pending fur- Anville, Peru; Wendell Armadults have been described as world tour, the company makes ther study of the matter. strong, Stella; Sidney Baney, Arbringing "the ancient craft of its home on the California Monlington, Va.; Adrian Bartek, WesPeru State's college band took puppetry to the highest standard terey peninsula on Cannery Row, STUDENT CHRISTIAN ton; Linda Bartels, Tobias; Elaine to the field during the halftime of . in the art's history." where the workshop serves as FELLOWSHIP Bath, Auburn; Bill Carlson, Falls the Homecoming game. Leading The Student Christian Fellow- City. Llords' one-man Concertheatre showcase. The theatre-in-resithe band through maneuvers was is a perfect vehicle for the creat- dence has never played to an ship held its October 10 meeting Allen Chandler, Peru; Karen Prudence Fritch of Pawnee City, or's many talents as singer, actor, empty seat-in fact, reservations at 6:30 in the Music Hall. The Conrad, Omaha; Donna Cox, Pe- Nebraska. musician, sculptor, engineer, are sometimes made a full year group was led in singing by ru; Gary Dahmke, Syracuse; VinAs the band headed to the Helen Drumm. Carole Shubert cent Dahmus, Peru; Dale Duen- center of the field, they played playwright, choreographer, de- in advance. gave the lesson-"The Stone that sing, Odell; Dorothy Edwards, the "Stop and Go March." The was Rejected." The theme of the Lincoln; Gary Fankhauser, Hum- letter "P" was formed. The band lesson was "Love Thy Neighbor." boldt; Jo Ann Frerichs, Beatrice; played as the spectators sang the Helen Drumm was elected sec- Pamela Froebe, Omaha. "Color Song." Featured twirler retary to rephlce Carole Shubert. Marion Gamon, Peru; Barbara at halftime was Donna Cox of The Home Economics Club held The members were reminded Gordon, Hamburg, Iowa; Ray Peru. its monthly meeting October 8. that they should pay their dues Harris, Ralston; Ruth Harris, The band played excP.rpts from Discussion consisted of the fol- of $1 to Janis Mayer. A second adult e ducat ion Ralston; Gary Henrichs, Auburn; "Blaze of Brass" as the seven lowing: course in M1chine Shop will be Jo Anne Howard, Falls City; queen candidates were presented Initiation will be held at the offered at Peru State Teachers November meeting. The pledges, WESLEY FELLOWSHIP Carla Jacobson, Otoe; Michael The band also provided pep College, beginning Monday, Oc- are to wear a belt or necklace The Wesley Fellowship met Janis, Skokie, Ill.; Linda Jansen, music throughout the game. tober 29, reports Dr. Keith L. five days before initiation. As Oct. 17 at the Methodist Church Lincoln. "Altho~h the band is primarMelvin, dean of the college. Melissa Jarecke, Omaha; Staneach day progresses, an object to construct their homecoming ily a concert band, it takes to the The first class of 15 members pertaining to home economics display. ley H. Johnson, Rockford, Iowa; field for Homecoming," said Gilcompleted the course last week will be added to their apparel. The group took a hayrack ride James Kelly, Farragut, Iowa; and the course is being repeated Each pledge has been assigned a on October 28. Gary Moore fur- Regina Kreifels, Nebraska City; bert Wilson, band director. Student director is Don Johnson. upon request. The classes are nished transportation. A wiener Robert Krofta, Pawnee City; big sister. adult education and carry no colroast was a feature of the eve- Mary Ann Lewellyn, Bellevue; Various committees were aplege credit. ning. Ed McCartney, Nebraska City; pointed for the United Nations Gretchen McKenney, Auburn. Made available for future emdinner. Carol McLain, Auburn; Ellen ployees of Magnolia. Metal Co., NEWMAN CLUB Open Monday ihru Saturday Following the meeting, Mrs. Newman Club was host to Re- Meritt, Peru; Marilyn Marmet, Inc., who are relocating their Sayor and Sharylin Vrtiska dem/ New Jersey plant in Auburn, the onstrated how to make smock gional Newman officers from the Falls City; Robert Mathews, PERU, NEBRASKA course will meet from 6-9 p.m. ·University of Nebraska, Wednes- Omaha; Mary Meyer, Nebraska on Mondays and Wednesdays for pillows. day, October 17. Mr. Corke! and City; Elaine Muller, Falls City; five weeks. The class will be limMiss DeVoe helped the club plan Curtis Nelson, Essex, Iowa; Bevited to 15. the Newman Regional Conven- erly Quinn, Bellevue, Karon Ration, which will be held on the the, Sterling. Those interested in enrolling Jean Reiman, Virginia; Pat Peru campus Saturday, Nov. 10. are asked to contact the office of The club reviewed its weekly Riederer, Omaha; Glenda Rima, the dean of the college, 872-2811, Farragut, Iowa; Ronald Rist, e~tension 22, Dr. Melvin said. The first meeting of the Stu- religion lesson and held a short Q business meeting to complete dents' Wives Club was held Cone With the Curl on Top Thursday, October 4, at the Cam- plans for the homecoming display. PECK'S PALACE Q pus School. The following offiShort Orders • Fries cers were elected: Marlene Zinn, Auburn, Nebr. Featuring Crispy Pizza president; Lynn Brown, vice- LUTHERAN CLUB The Lutheran Club met WedMembers of the sophomore and president; Karen Hamm,· secreHOURS 7 TO 11 274-3102 junior classes have elected offi- tary; Norma Blake, treasurer; nesday, October 17, in the Adcers, reports Dr. Harold Boraas, Gayle Shipley, program chair- ministration Building. President Jim Felton called the dean of students. man; Anna Murray, refre~hment Bill Springer, Beatrice, is the chairman; Joyce MacNeil, re- meeting to order and then 1 e d junior class president, and Mike porter; Marilyn Majors, assistant further discussion on the subject Janis, Skokie, Ill., is .the sopho- reporter.; and Beverly Eastman, of Gamma Delta. It was decided Skelly Service Quality Meats and to extend an invitation to the more president. Other j uni or historian. Groceries president of the International class officers include: Gary NedThe purpose of the club is to Gamma Delta to come to Peru denriep, Brock, vice-president; be of service to the community and enlighten the group about Sharon Peacock, Pawnee City, Open Sundays and Tank Wagon Service and to share evenings of enter- forming a Gamma Delta chapter secretary; Gary Schmucker, Evenings tainment. here. Brock, treasurer. Other sophoPh. 274-3510 The group also decided to have more class officers are Joe Ward, The next meeting will be No17ih at L Street a social night with the members Weeping Water, vice-president; vember 15 at the Campus School. Auburn, Nebraska AUBURN.NEBRASKA John Barton, Essex, Iowa, secre- All Peru student wives are in- of L.S.A. on November 14. The business meeting. wag then tary; and Duane Haith, Platts- vited to attend. closed and Rev. Schooler premouth, treasurer. sented a topic on the origin of the Bible.

Band Performs At Homeco~ing Game

Second Adult Education Course Made Available

Home Ee Plans November Initiation

Roy's Barber Shop

GENOA

Student Wives Meet And Elect Officers

Dairy Queen

Juniors and Sophomores Have Elected Officers

MIDWAY GROCERY

RAINS

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THE AVENUE STORE Groceries • Meats Fruits • Vegetables

l. H. CRAIG, Owner PERU, NEBRASKA Phone 872-2701

Rotarians See Stars

Twenty-two Rotarians from Auburn visited the observatory on the Peru State Teachers College campus recently for a view of two spectacular e v e n i n g "stars," Jupiter and Saturn.

MORRISSY'S VARIETY STORE

FOUR FROM PERU WESLEY FELLOWSHIP ATTEND CONFERENCE

The Fall Methodist · Student Movement was held at Chadron, Nebraska on October 12, 13, and 14. There were six schools repOther groups interested in resented at the conference. The viewing the 'heavens may make speaker was Richard Nesmith. arrangements through the astron- The theme was "The Church and omy instructor, L. Chris Buethe. the World." The group enjoyed recreation, Eleven students are enrolled talks, discussions, worship serin the .astronomy class being vices, and Christian fellowship. taught this semester. Serving as To climax this gathering, a worhosts for the Auburn visitors ship service was held at Camp were science majors Tom Buch- Norwesca, a Methodist camp loholz, Papillion; Rudolph Eichen- cated near Chadron State Park, berger, Steinauer, and Ben on Sunday. Kernes, Blair. There were four from the Peru Wesley Fellowship in attendance Where the telescope ends, the at this conference. They were microscope begins. Which of the Barbara Van Valkenburg, Virtwo has the grander view? ginia Cockerham, Sam Rankin, -Victor Hugo and Steve Rankin.

Peru 5c & lOc Clothing

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PERU MARKET Rex Rains Groceries Meafs Lockers Fruits and Vegetables

Free Delivery Tuesday and Friday Phone 872-4351

ELLA MARGARET SHOP The Shop of Quality Ladies' Wearing Apparel and Millinery PHONE 274-3520 AUBURN, NEBR.


The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . .

Fat Boys' Institute--

Peru Pedagogian Volume 58

PERU, NEBRASKA

Number 4

NOVEMBER 12, 1962

F.B.1.--Fat Boys' Institute Will Battle Girls' Tea,m In Epic Contest November 13

Phi Alpha Theta Initiates Six Phi Alpha Theta, the national honorary history fraternity, held its initiation meeting Monday, November 5. The new initiates are: Dale DeVoe, Paul Bodke, Wm. Springer, Dave Moyer, Mr. Leroy Leland, and Mr. James Robbins. The first duty given to the new initiates is to organize the Christmas program. Preceding the Phi Alpha Theta initiation, the Peru Historical Association and the Phi Alpha Theta held a joint meeting at which Dr. George Schottenhamel, head of the Department of History and Social Science, spoke on the topic "Twenty Three Days w i t h Thirty Six Women," a reference to his easfern trip during the past summer.

By Pat Hamm On November 13, at 7:30 p.m., an 'earth-~haking event will hit Peru State's basketball floor when the F.B.I. (Fat Boys' Institute) meets the Peru State Coeds for the first tilt of the season. Starting for F.B.I. at center is Darrell Wininger, number• 240. At forwards are numbers 295 and 300, Jack Mcintire and Jim Brenn. At tackles-I mean guards -numbers 265 and 220, Jerry Stemper and Bob Henry. These men and others make up the most fantastic team that ever played roundball in the Peru gymnasium. Not one of the players weighs less than ,;20 pounds. After this hilarious encounter, two Iowa girls teams from Glenwood and Fremont-Mills will tangle in a more serious affair. Proceeds will go towards uniforms for Peru's new gymnastics team and tickets can be purchased from any Blue Devil member.

Eighty Served Foreign Menus At U. N. Dinner • The Home Ecqnomj~s. Club prepared and served a complete German and Italian meal for the U. N. dinner, November 1. Eighty guests attended the annual affair. The program following the dinner was a welcome from Mary Jarvis, invocation by Doctor Wininger, and music by Mrs. Darrell Wininger. Mr. and Mrs. Wensien from Brownville showed slides of their trip to Italy and Germany. Out of town guests included people from Brownville, Auburn, Nebraska City, and Percival, Iowa. Max Mathews, son of Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Mathews, was present from Murray Hill, New Jersey. The Italian meal consisted of Italian spaghetti, green beans with onions, green salad, Italian bread sticks, hot milk s p o n g e cake, and coffee. The German meal consisted of chicken and noodles, sweet-sour red cabbage, au gratin potatoes, wilted lettuce salad with bacon, German bread, diced apple cake, and coffee.

Versus Girls Nov.13

Named to "Who's Who" from the Senior Class. are (from left) seated- Mary Ann Lewellyn, Fort Crook: Linda Berry, Gravity, Iowa: Carol McLain, Auburn: standing-Gary Schlosser, Dawson; Steve Parker, Peru: Larry Swett, Malvern, Iowa: Robert Penkava, Beatrice.

Seven Outstanding Students Chosen For Who's Who LINDA BEERY Linda Beery, a senior, has been chosen for Who's Who for the 1962-63 school year. She is the / daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ber~ nard Beery, Gravity, Iowa. Linda graduated from Gravity High School. She was Very active in high school and participated in girls' basketball, band, glee club, dramatics, annual staff, and paper staff. .,,.., Linda is in her final year at Peru State. During her college career she has been associated with many campus activities. They include: W.A.A., Peru State Historical Association, Student Christian Fellowship, Sigma Tau Delta, Phi Alpha Theta, Kappa Delta Pi, and Foreign Language Club. Miss Beery is majoring in social studies and minoring in English. MARY ANN LEWELLYN Miss Mary Ann L e w e 11 y n , daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. L. Lewellyn, Fort Crook, has been chosen as a member of Who's Who. She was graduated in 1959 from Bellevue High S c h o o 1 , where she was a cheerleader, active in small music groups, and Homecoming Queen her senior year. Physical education is Mary

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·r

~ Winnie Sporer (center) mixes dough for ihe I:talian bread siicks which were served at the United Nations Dinner, November 1. Sharon Donlan (left) and Mary Jarvis look on with interest.

Ann's major field of concentration with home economics as her minor. After graduation, she plans to teach on the secondary level. "Pinky,'' as most of us know her, is a senior at Peru. During her four years on campus, she has been active in Home Econom" i~s Cl~b, White Angels, W.A.A., on the Dorm Council, and a member of S.G.A. This is her second year as a cheerleader. Mary Ann was president of PEM her junior year. At the present time, she is teaching the seventh and eighth grade P.E. classes at the campus school. Mary Ann reigned as th i s year's Homecoming Queen. She has also b e e n Homecoming, Sweetheart, and May Fete attendant. Mary Ann enjoys music and spectator sports. CAROL McLAIN Carol McLain is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson McLain of Auburn, Nebraska. Carol attended Auburn High school, where she was an honor roll student. She was active in band, chorus, pep club, F.H.A., and dramatics. She was May Fete attendant during her soplromore year. She belonged to the National Honorary Society. In college, Carol has participated in chorus, Foreign Language Club, White Angels, and Peruvian Singers all four years. She has also been in Home Economics Club, Student Christian Fellowship, Sigma Tau Delta, Student Governing Association, Peru Student Education Association, and she has been active in debate and dramatics. Carol is majoring in languages with a concentration in Spanish and French. She is minoring in speech. She has maintained an honor roll scholastic record during her four years of college. STEVE PARKER Steve Parker, son of Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Parker of Peru, was a graduate of Peru Prep High School. He transferred from Dunbar High School after his sophoM more year. In high school, Steve excelled in football, basketball, and track. He took part in vocal

music and was a member of the National Honor Society. Steve is a senior at Peru State and the president of his class. He is an active member of Sigma Tau Delta, a national honorary E!Jl;lish fraternity, and of the Dramatics Club. In addition to being the photographer for the Peruvian and Pedagogian, he has been the sports editor for the paper. Steve has been a member of S.G.A. for two years, working one year as the secretary. He was also a member of the debate team during his sophomore year at Peru. Graduating in May of 1963, Steve will have a double major in art and speech. ROBERT PENKAVA Robert Penkava has been chosen for Who's Who for 1962-63. Bob is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Penkava of Virginia, Nebraska. Bob graduated from Virginia High School. During high school, Bob was active in band, chorus, athletics, and junior and senior class p)ays. He was secretary of his class for three years. Bob was a winner of the Regents Scholarship to the University of Nebraska. He also won the State Normal Scholarship to Peru State Teachers College. During his college career, Bob has been on the Dean's honor roll

SAC ~nd Returns 4-.· For Another Concert The SAC Band from Offutt Air Force Base will present a concert at an all-college convocation at P er u State Teachers College Wednesday, Nov. 14, 9:30 a.m. Acclaimed as one of the finest musical organizations in the United States Air Force, the 50 members were selected for their ability and professional experience. Captain Herman G. Vincent, commander of the SAC band, is a veteran of 12 years with the United States Air Force, having risen from trumpet desk with the USAF band to command of major bands within the Air Force. The musical group performs not only as a symphonic unit, but also is a marching group. Its members appear as the 16-piece Noteables, the 10-piece Ambassadors, and the 20-voice SAC Glee Club, a Society Combo, and a Progressive Jazz combo. The public is invited to the concert. Visitors are requested to use the balcony. with an average of 7.25. He is active in Alpha Mu Omega, Beta Beta Beta, Kappa Delta Pi, and P.S.E.A. He is a member of the Peru State Historical Association, the Foreign Language Club, a member of the Student Governing Association, the college chorus, and the Peruvian singers. He also participated in the first College Bowl held at Peru. (Continued on page four)

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The SAC Band, tremendously popular here, will do its stuff again on November 14 in an all school convo.


COPYRIGHT ~ 1961, THE COCA·COU MMPANY. COCA·COLA AND CO•£ ARE REGISTERED TI!AO!MARKI -~.·V,·:>l/

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DELZELL NEWS By Curtis Nelson On Wednesday, October 31, Delzell received a new television set. It is a 23-inch. Zenith model. I doubt that anyon~- misses the old one. The fellows really appreciate having a picture along with sound. It has been kept quite busy since the day we got it. The money used to pay for the set came from the sale of pop, so drink up, boys. Concerning the subject of televisions, Eric Dorf has a portable for sale. If anyone is interested, it is priced to sell.

1982 Pedagogian Member-Randy Rhodus Randy Rhodus, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ken Rhodus, Nebraska City, stands next in line as the next family member to serve on the Pedagogian staff. Randy's mother, the former Jane Kunkel of Falls City, is now serving as per.sonnel manager of the Pedagogian staff and served as a reporter when she was a freshman. She has also worked on the yearbook staff, the Peruvian. Randy's father, Ken, formerly

of Bellevue, was sports editor for the 1961 Pedagogian. Ken, who is now the assistant coach at Nebraska City, was a busy athlete, as he participated in three ·sports while in college. Randy has a new cousin, Rhonda Kelly Broers, born October 25. She is expected to join the Pedagogian in 1983. Her mother, the former Nancy Kunkel, worked on the Peruvian and Ped in the late '50's.

If you happen to be w,alking down the halls of Delzell, don't be surprised if you hear some music coming from some of the rooms. We have our share of musicians. If it is guitar music you are hearing, it might be Jim Manning, Mike Janis, or Bob Lierz. Also, there are a number of record players to be heard.

ELIZA MORGAN HALL By Ardith Prati

"Good-byes" are being said as our student teachers journey off ~ampus to begin nine weeks ,of t~aching. Those leaving are Carol Bottled under authority of Sudik and Jody Wiechel, BeaThe Coca-Cola Company by Nebraska trice; Dot Fink, Tecumseh; Linda Risley and Elaine Bath, AubStan Johnson finally did it. Aft- urn; Judy French, Connie Dietl, er nine weeks of luck witth his and Sharon Earl, Syracuse; Lynn glasses, Stan accidentally broke McCann, Sharylin Vrtiska, and MAJORS a lens. His famous last wor~ Lois Fritz, Bellevue; and Susan HALL were, "I don't want to take them Hulbert, Falls City. Return soon, The journalism classes took a off; they haven't broken yet." trip to Sterling, Nebraska, Mongirls, and clue us in on how the By day, November 5, to visit Mike Richard other half lives! Congratulations to the men and Mary Packwood's Johnson Elmore from Majors who are candidates Strange things are happening! County Courier. for initiation into Alpha Mu Some of the girls are wearing First, the class was shown how Majors Hall has the distinction Omega-the national honorary signs of homemaking. One sees the linotype operates. Then Mike of having its three floor counsel- math fraternity. They are Dennis spoons, clothes pins, needles, etc. demonstrated heir the different ors in professional semester at Hein, Ed Meyer, and D o n attached to their clothing. styles of type are set and how the same time. They are Jay Du- Schmidt. Val, Duane Weichelman, a n d Nine weeks tests haven't par- ' the paper is printed. He a 1 s o Two men from Majors were in- ticularly put a magic spell on the showed where and how the metBruce Francey. Jay and Duane itiated into Kappa Delta Pi-the dorm. Some of the more studious al is melted for the linotype. have begun their student teaching in Auburn while Bruce is national honorary education fra- girls study all day and all night In addition to printing the student teaching at Peru Prep. ternity. They were Richard El- -the rest of us just sleep. Johnson County Courier, Mike All three will remain in the dorm more and Ed McCartney. and Mary also print the PedagoParty time still prevails in the for the rest of the semester. gian. Mike stated that he has to Sam Carneal moved from the An old Spanish saying is that dorm. Almost every night, some- get up at 4 a.m. to get the Ped dorm to live in Nebraska City. "a kiss without a moustache is one has become another year old- printed on time. er. Congratulations to all who He is now commuting from the like an egg without salt." An unusual item Mike pointed City with several others. -Madison Julius Cawein have celebrated. out was that whenever there is a fire, a call is made to the newspaper office, and Mike then calls PERU PEDAGOGIAN the volunteer firemen. The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks Those who made the trip were

Ped Staff Visits Johnson County Courier

November 12, 1962 PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Co-Editor_ ___________________________________ Frank Bostic Co-Editor _____________________________________ Tom Aitken Layout Editor___ .. ____________________________ Kay Camden Personnel Manager_ __________________________ Jane Rhodus Advertising Manager_ ____________ ------------- Larry Rathe Sports Editor_ ________________________________ Larry Rathe Sports Column---------------------------------- Pat Hamm Delzell Column ______________________________ Curtis Nelson Morgan Column ______________________________ Ardith Pratt Majors Column _____________ ------------------ Dick Elmore Campus School Column_________________ Mary Anna Gnade Reporter_____________________________________ Judith Beran Reporter ___________ --------------------------- Tom. Castle Reporter ______________________________ Virginia Cockerham Reporter-------------·----------------------- Karen Conrad Reporter _____________ ---------------------- Sharon Donlan Reporter----------------------------------- Lee Haeberlein Reporter-----~-------·------------------------- Penny Hays Reporter-------------------------------------- Jane Moore Reporter------------------------------------- Carol Niebuhr Reporter------------------------------------ Edward Smith Reporter_____________ ----------------------- Judith Wilson Reporter---------------------------------- Barney Mcilvoy Sponsor_________________________________ Stewart Linscheid

Kappa Delta Pi Initiates Five Seniors And Seven Juniors

Kappa Delta Pi, the national honorary education fraternity, had its initiation for twelve candidates November 5. A tea was held following the initiation. The five seniors who were initiated were Sharon Earl, Dorthea Fink, Karen Hamm, Lynn Mccann, and Gary Schlosser. The seven juniors who were initiated were Richard Elmore, J oAnn Frerichs, Edwin McCartney, Ardith Pratt, Carolyn Reiber, Winifred Sporer, and Judy Weichel. The purpose of Kappa Delta Pi is to promote a closer bond among students of education and to enter into more intimate fellowship with those dedicated to the cause of teaching as a profession. It aims to foster h i g h standards of preparation f o r teaching and to invite into its membership those who have attained excellent scholarship and distinction as students of education.

Cify Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Judy Beran, Virginia Cockerham, Carol Niebuhr, Judy Wilson, Penny Hays, Janey Moore, Sharon Donlan, Karen Conrad, Kay Camden, Tom Aitken and Mr. Linscheid. Car trouble prevented Pat Hamm, Barney Mcilvoy, Tom Castle, Lee Haeberlein, Curtis Nelson, and Dick Elmore from completing the trip. EXTRA FRENCH COURSE An extra French course will be offered this spring. The division of Language Arts announced that French 202 will be offered during the spring semester. The course, second year Reading and Composition, will be open to those who have had one year of French in college or two years in high school. French 202 carries three hours of credit. Students who are interested in taking this course are urged to contact Prof. Moore or Prof. Robbins as soon as possible.

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Seven Senior Footballers Complete Careers Under Peru Banner earned three Peru football a n d KEN DOSTAL Big Ken has been an outstand- baseball monograms. He earned ing Bobcat for the last . three All-Conference at J.iight halfback years. Ken has been an All-NCC last year. During his high school career, tackle for the last two years and probable all-stater for ·his third Ron was an All-Conference footyear. He has also earned Peru baller for two years and lettered monograms in basketball and in ti:ack two years. Ron is an active member ·of the track. He had a tremendous high Blue Devils and "P" Club. He is school career at Scribner, where majoring in physical education he earned 12 letters in football, and industrial arts. basketball and track. Ken w a s LARRY RATHE named All-State in football his "Spider" has been a Bobcat senior year. athlete for a number of years. He is majoring in physical edDuring this time, he was known ucation and biology, and is acmainly as a basketball player. tive in Blue Devils, "P" Club, Last year he went out for track Newman Club and Tri-Beta. for the first time. This was his first year out for football, and he DEAN STAPLETON "Stape,'' hailing from Council turned in an excellent job. During his high school days, Bluffs, Iowa, has been a Bobcat tackle for the past two years. He Larry was a four sport man, earning 11 letters. He was Class made All-NCC tackle last year. While c o m p e t i n g in high C All-State his senior year in school athletics, Dean earned basketball. Larry is a member of the "P" All-State and Little All-American honors in football. He was Club, Blue Devils, and Tri-Beta. His majors are physical education also a fine wre tler. Dean is president of the Blue and biology. Devils and Newman Club. He is PAT HAMM also an active member in Tri"Hambone" is a product · of Beta, "P" Club, Vets Club and Roxana, Ill. While competing for S.G.A. Roxana high, Pat earned 13 letStape is majoring in physical ters. He was All-Conference in education and biology. football, basketball, and track. BILL LAWLOR During his stay at Peru, he has "Wild Bill," is an import from earned two football and basketHighland Junior College. While ball monograms. at Highland, · Bill played two He is a member of the "P" years of All,Conference football. Club, Blue Devils, and PedagoHe came to Peru and played two gian staff. His majors are in physmore fine years for the Bobcats. ical education and English. While playing his prep athletics at Plattsburg, Mo., Bill earned BARNEY McILVOY All-District and honorable men"Jap" migrated from South tion All-State in football. Lyon, Mich., where he was a 15 Bill is a member of the "P" letterman in football, basketball, Club, and a major in physical ed- baseball, and track. Barney was ucation and· history. the only athlete in South Lyon history to make All-Conference RON KELLEY in four different sports. "Machine Gun" Kelley is a While competing for Peru, ~ product of Falls City. Ron has has garnered three letters in baseball and one in football. He is an active member in the "P" Club, Blue Devils, Newman Club and vice-commander of the Open Monday thru Saturday Vets Club. Barney is majoring in physical education with minors PERU, NEBRASKA in history and social science. 0

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BOBCAT CHATTER By Pat Hamm

Peru closed out its football season on a somewhat sorry note, losing to Wayne 41-0. The Bobcats in their last two encounters failed to nrnke the scoring column and leaked defensively for 83 points. Peru's defeat at Wayne dropped them from second place in the NCC to tie for second with Wayne. Since 1950 The last time the Wayne Wildcats whipped the Bobcats was in 1950. Thus Saturday's defeat ended 12 years of Peru domination.

Wayne Gets Revenge In ABig Way, 41-0 Eleven years of frustr'l-tion for Wayne State Teachers College was wiped out Saturday as it hum b 1e d long-time tormentor Peru State Teachers College, 410, in a Nebraska College Conference contest at Wayne. Following a 7-6 Wayne win in 1950, Peru's Bobcats handed the Wildcats eleven straight setbacks. In the past two years Peru gained N.C.C. championships by eliminating Wayne from the title picture in late season wins. Wayne's inspired play Saturday afternoon handed Jack McIntire's Peruvians their first NCC loss since Hastings turned the trick in 1960. It closed out Peru's 1962 season with a record of 5-22, while their conference m a r k stands at 2-1-2. Pat Shimoda, 5'6 junior from Pulakani, Hawaii, sped his 160pound frame for 148 yards rushing, scored two touchdowns on runs of 25 and 18 yards, and booted five extra points to key the Wayne shutout. Wayne blasted for 27 points in the first 18 minutes to crush Peru's hopes. Fullback Burton Matthies opened the Wayne scoring parade with a one-yard blast to cap a 33-yard drive in Wayne's first offensive effort. Shimada picked up 32 of those yards and then booted the extra point to give the hosts a 7-0 lead with 3:27 played in the first stanza. Some five minutes later Shimada ripped into paydirt from 25 yards out. His extra point kick was blocked for his only failure of the day. Before the first quarter ended, Shimada scored again and booted a perfect placement. The second period was nearly three minutes old when Burton Matthies bulled his way for 16 yards to score. The extra point gave the WHdcats a 27-0 1e ad which they carried into halftime. Following a scoreless third period, Wayne climaxed the scoring with two touchdowns. Halfback Dick Chochon scored on an eight-yard burst and Jerry Kilcoin moved 20 yards to score. Scoring threats for Peru were few. Late in the first half the Bobcats moved to the Wayne 10yard line before running out of downs. In the third quarter a pass interception halted a Peru drive after the Bobcats had moved to the Wayne 9. Seven Peru State senior gridders played their last collegiate game Saturday. They include: Bill Bliss, Lincoln; Ken Dostal, Scribner; Pat Hamm, Wood River, Ill.; Ron Kelley, Falls City; Bill Lawlor, Plattsburg, Mo.; Larry Rathe, Sterling; and Dean Stapleton, Council Bluffs, Iowa. 1

What Happened? When the Bobcats returned hence ·from Wayne many were asked, "What happened?" To me, it is a question that is almost impossible to answer. Was Wayne better than Peru? I don't think so. Time Out A young college freshman proudly brought his Dad to the homecoming football game. After a game full of excitement and thrills, the young man exclaimed, "Well Dad, have you ever had more thrills and excitement for only two dollars?" The father smiled and said, "Well, son, I paid only two dollars for my marriage license."

Ron Kelley Leads Bobcats Total Offense Ron Kelley captured the 1962 total offense crown for the Peru State Teachers College Bobcats. The senior halfback ·from Falls City rushed for 444 yards in 102 attempts and had no passing yardage to lead the Bobcats. While recording a season mark of 5-2-2, Jack Mcintire's Bobcats totaled 2094 yards rushing a n d passing to their opponents' 1763 yards. Breaking it down, P er u gained 1508 yards on the ground while their opponents gained 1212. In the air it was closer with Peru holding a 35 yard edge on a total of 586 yards. In passing, Bill Witty, Syracuse completed 29 of 63 attempts for 297 yards and one touchdown to lead the 'Cats in that department. Jim Hall, junior end from Omaha nabbed 12 passes over the season to gain 148 yards. In scoring, the Bobcats had the most trouble since 1947. This year's 108 point production is the smallest point total since the 1947 team scored 97. Peru's 83 point defensive collapse in the final two games this year allowed the opposition to count the most points-136-since 1949 when 164 counters were registered against the Peruvians. The 1962 grid season, not too successful if measured by 1960 and '61 standards, saw the unseating of the Bobcats as Nebraska College Conference champs. Now the Peruvians find themselves echoing the famous "wait till next year" cry.

Kittens Pull Down Johnson Eagles 33-6 Peru Prep romped over the Johnson Eagles 33-6 here Friday night, November 2. Touchdowns were scored by Clint Reeves, John Mcintire and John Eickhoff. Prep, having lost only one game, is headed for one of its best seasons in years with the final game being Wednesday, November 7.

"

Northern Michigan Romps To 42-0 Wir_ Over Peru State The Peru State Teachers College_ Bobcats stepped out of their class, Saturday, and were reprimanded as Northern Michigan College administered a 42-0 spanking in .a football game played at Marquette, Mich. Northern's rough-and-ready crew used every scoring method in the books, with the exception of a forfeiture, to record the rout. The Upper Peninsula Wildcats scored five touchdowns, four extra points, two field goals, and a safety to thoroughly humble the previously unbeaten but twice tied Nebraskans. So effective was No rt h er n Michigan's defensive play that Peru State crossed mid field only once-that coming in the opening minutes when the Bobcats recorded two of their five first downs to move just inside the 50yard line. Fullback Don Bangret set the stage for Northern's first score when he pirated q. pass from Bobcat quarterback, Bill Witty, and returned it 29 yards to the Peru 44. Two plays later Bangret banged home from two yards out to set the tempo. Big Jim Welch booted the 11.rst of four perfect placement attempts and Northern was on the way with 5:58 remaining in the first quarter. The Michiganites salted the game away in the second period with a 12 point burst. Halfback Tom Neumann crossed the double stripe on the end of a 43yard pass from Stan Ferris and Welsh converted. Moments later Northern recorded a safety as Bill Witty was smothered behind his own goal line. With some 40 seconds remaining in the half, Terry Nyquist booted a 13-yard field goal to make the halftime score 19-0. Northern thrilled their huge homecoming crowd by recording 23 second half points. These came on a one-yard plunge by quarterback Stan Ferris; a 25-yard Nyquist field goal; Tim Tranetzki's 63-yard scamper; a nine yard pass to end Bill Rademacher from Nyquist and a pair of Welsh extra points. The Wildcat attack rolled up a total of 454 yards rushing while Peru was held to 79 yards.

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WILLIAM JAMES ROBBINS William James Robbins has been appointed assistant professor of modern languages at Peru State. Mr. Robbins received a bachelor of arts, masters of arts, an d a masters of religious educatio"Q. at Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa. He also received another masters of arts at the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks. The new professor is now working on his Ph.D. a+ the University of Missouri, and he hopes to complete this degree in the spring. The school year 1961-62, found Mr. Robbins on the faculty .at Arkansas State College in Jonesboro. In 1960-61 he worked on his Ph.D. at the University of Missouri, and the years 1956-60 were spent on the teaching staff at the University of Missouri. Mr. Robbins is married. He says that Peru has a pretty campus, friendly people, and he is very happy to be here.

Who's Who (Continued from page one) When asked for a comment, Bob replied, "To me, college is the bigge~t proving ground f o r anyone." I GARY SCHLOSSER Gary Schlosser is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Dean Schlosser of Dawsonr:·Nebra~ka. He is majoring in. mathematics and has a minor in social science and also in history. He is a senior and will graduate in January. In high school he was active in all sports, declamation,. and plays. He also worked on the high school newspaper and was editor of the high school annual. He was president of his senior class and was king of the activities banquet. In college he has been active in Wesley Fellowship and was its vice-president for one year. He has been vice-president and secretary-treasurer of Alpha Mu Omega, the honorary mathematics fraternity. Other activities have included membership in the Business Club; Peru State Education Association; Kappa Delta Pi, honorary educationfraternity; and president of Phi Alpha Theta, the honorary history fraternity. Among the things that he likes

are ail outdoor sports, hunting, and fishing. He also likes traveling and reading.

Regional Newman Club Convention Held On Campus

LARRY SWETT Larry Swett has been chosen for Who's Who. Larry is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Swett of Malvern, Iowa. Larry was graduated from the Straham Consolidated High School in 1959. His high school activities include two years as a class treasurer, member of the annual staff, three years participation in class plays and he lettered in all sports every year. Larry has shown his rank in scholarship by being the valedictorian of his class. Other activities include nine years participation in 4-H. During this time Larry served by being president of the county 4-H group .and was nominated for the state office of the same. Larry is a member of the Methodist church in Straham. While Larry was living at home, he belonged to the Methodist Youth Fellowship and also served as president of the organization. As a freshman in college Larry received an honorary membership to Kappa Delta Pi. This award goes to any freshman who shows promise in the field of education. He is now vice-president of that organization. Larry was past president of his class and is at the present time president of Alpha Mu Omega (honorary math), member of the Peru State Historical Association, Peru State E~ucation Association, N.S.E.A., and N.E.A. Larry is currently under consideration for the N.S.F. fellowship award which would allow him to pursue graduate work in math.

Peru Newman Club was host to the Regional Newman Club Convention Saturday, Nov. 10. The clubs represented were University of Nebraska, Omaha University, Wayne State Teachers College, and Peru Sta_~e Teachers College. ~ The day's events began with Mass at 8:30, followed by breakfast and registration. Meetings were held in the Music Hall Auditorium. Speakers included Rory Ellenger, Newman national vicepresident, Guy Cooper, president of O. A. Cooper Co. of Humboldt, Nebraska, and Father Flechek of Auburn, Nebraska. A banquet was held in the Student Union dining hall in the evening. Lonn Pressriall provided after~_dinner entertainment. To conclude the day, an open dance was held in the Student Union dining hall. Russ Workman Karen Workman and Mike Jani; sang during intermission.

Church Club News ROBBINS TALKS TO SCF The Student Christian Fellowship met Wednesday, Oct. 31, in the Music Hall. The group was led in singing by Linda Jeffers. James Robbins, professor of foreign languages, was the guest speaker for the evening. He spoke about the Ecumenical Council now in Rome, and of the existing fellowship among the protestant churches. The meeting was closed with the friendship circle.

Larry's work at Peru State will terminate at the end of three and one-half years. His fields of con.,..,_ centration are math, physical science, and physics. He is currently enrolled in the professional semester and has already been offered a contract to teach math on the secondary level. Larry is engaged to Romona Grindle, a former Peruvian, who now teaches in Ralston.

Cherubs Sponsor Halloween Dance

WESLEY SPONSORS UNICEF The Wesley Fellowship met Oct. 31 at the Methodist chur.ch to sponsor the annual UNICEF Drive which is held every Halloween. The money collected on that evening amounted to $37.32. This money will be sent to help feed and clothe the needy children of the world. After the teams returned to the church, a party was given for those who helped with the drive. Refreshments of .popcorn and hot chocolate were served.

Organizati 0 ns BLUE DEVILS President Dean Stapleton opened the Nov. 5. meeting by passing out copies of the new Blue Devil constitution. The constitution was then read by president Stapleton. Mr. Pilkington suggested two new projects, the resodding of the football field and a stone "Peru State" on the east side of the Oak Bowl. These suggestions were then discussed, but no definite plans were made. All members joined in with the singing of the Color Song to close the meeting. WHITE ANGELS The White Angels met in the basement of Morgan Hall on November 5, for a regular business meeting. President Catol McLain called the, meeting to order. White Angels have received their new uniforms, but they will not be worn by the organization until the basketball game of November 30 with Buena Vista. A bake sale has been planned for November 26, the Monday following Thanksgiving vacation. The baked goods will be sold in Delzel and Morgan Halls. T h e profits from the bake sale will help to pay for the new emblems for the White Angel uniforms. The meeting closed with the singing of the White Angel Song.

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To the sounds of "Happy Halloween" and "trick or treat,'' the Cherubs sponsored a Halloween dance. The purpose of the dance was to raise money to help pay for their uniform skirts. In typical Halloween fashion, trick or treat prizes were awarded to those wearing the best costumes. A prize for the best family group was awarded to triplets, Karen Quinn, Kristie Wewel, and Ruth Harris, and their mother,

Bev Quinn, and father, John Davis. The best couple prize was given to Nancy Reed and Bill Hieneman, who were dressed as hillbillys. Madelyn Bleach, who was dressed as the Hunchback ofNotre Dame, and Connie Dietl, 'who was her keeper, won a prize as the couple who were dressed most appropriately for Halloween.

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PERU, NEBRASKA Phone 872-2701

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Nebraska's Oldest College

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . .

Peru Pedagogian \

PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 58

Number 5

Dramatics Club Holcfs Initiation Banquet

Chorus And Orchestra To Present The Messiah In Nebraska City, Peru

BY TOM CASTLE On Sunday, November 18, the Dramatics Club held a banquet at the Grand Hotel in Nebraska City with 30 persons present. · Two people were initiated. Lonn Pressnall became a f u 11 member and Mary Anna Gnade became an honorary member. A new idea has been put into effect. Those people who are interested in dramatics are asked to enter the Dramatics Club as associate members. This would mean they could attend meetings but could not vote. When these Two ihousand and fifieeil. pounds of sheer muscle comprised the associate members ·arn a specified number of points, they are new F.B.I. (Fai Boys' Institute) baskeiball team. Shown below, initiated and become full mem- front row lefi to right, are: Darrell Wininger, Jim Brenn, Rudolph bers, Points may be earned by Gfeller, Bob Henry; back row: Jack Mcintire, Jerry Stemper, Red such things as participation in Holmes, and Dean Stapleton. They went down to defeat by ihe plays, helping backstage, and di- Iowa Collegian girls' basketball team· 26-22. Coaches for the F.B.I. are Karen (Mciniire) Hamm on ihe left, Jim Robbins on the right. recting Campus School plays. Currently the Dramatics Club has 13 full members. The officers are: Steve Parker, president; Gary Stover, vice-president; and Carol McLain, secretary-treasurer. Other members are Jim Christ, Jerry Littell, Melissa JarBY LARRY RATHE few other accessories, and midecke, Mrs. Robert Moore, James A battling ton of basketball way through the second quarter, Levitt, Lois Fritz, Silas Summers, material suffered the effects of put him in the game. Rathe, with Stewart Linscheid, Lonn Press~ pounds and age Tuesday night, some uncanny shooting and hilnail, and Mary Anna Gnade. Nov. 13, by going down to de- arious clowning around, sent the The associate members are Ter- feat at the hands of the Peru q.lmost capacity crowd into an ry Andrews, Carol Curd, Nancy State Teachers College coed "Io- ~proar. This proved too muchfor Reed, Wendell Mohling, Judy wegian" team. Billed as the tl\e tired and weary fat boys, as Whigham, Marjorie Williss, Tom world's largest basketball team, the coeds came from behind and Aitken, Tom Castle, Paul Bodtke, with a combined weight of 2090 scored a decisive 26-22 victory. Pamela Froebe, Sharon Peacock, pounds and a combined 346 inch In the second game of a feaMrs. Shirley Vaughan, Phil Nie• waist line, the F.B.I. (Fat Boys' tured doubleheader, two fine girls mann, Larry Hennerberg, Bill Institute) huffed and puffed but basketball teams from Iowa put Morrissey, J. David Griffiths, Cec couldn't keep up with the coeds, on a good performance. The Palmer, Bev Quinn, Harry Whit- as the more attractive team took Glenwood High girls of Glenwood, Iowa, overcame a first ney, Sherry Panahpour, Dutchi a 26-22 decision. Holland and Dori Roemmic. The F.B.I. took an early lead in quarter deficit and took a slim Robert Moore, sponsor of the the game on some good shooting halftime lead, and then came on Dramatics Club, gave a speech and rebounding by Jim Brenn, a strong in the second half to down following the dinner. He stated Peru student, and Jack Mcintire, the Fremont-Mills team of Tabor, that the Peru Dramatics Club is a Peru coach. With size and Iowa, 42-36. This was a benefit game sponthe oldest of its type west of the height in their favor, the F.B.I. Mississippi River. It was organ- led the college coeds by a 6-2 sored by Mr. Pilkington, physical ized in 1908. Mr. Moore also sug- score at the end of the first quar- education and gymnastic instructor and the Blue Devils. The progested the possibility of several ter. James Pilkington, coach of the ceeds of the game will go to buy one-act plays for sometime in the future. Peru's Dramatic Club is college coeds, had more than his gymnastic equipment for the the only one in the state to hold arm up his sleeve for this game. gymnasium, and suits for the a district speech· and one-act play He had former Peru varsity bas- gymnastic team, which will perketball player Larry Rathe put form between halves at some.;of contest. Mr. Moore stated, "The pur- on a wig, some make-up, and a the home basketball games.

"Greatest" Team Graces The Bobcat Maples - Loses 26-22

pose of the Dramatics Club is to encourage the quality, amount, and content of drama on the Peru campus and the area which it serves." Guests at the banquet were Mrs. Silas Summers, Mr. Bernie Jarecke and Miss Jill Reineke.

-Alpha Mu Omega Initiates Twelve Alpha Mu Omega, the national honorary mathematics fraternity, held its initiation Nov. 12, in the Science Hall. Those who helped with the initiation were Larry Swett, Gary Schlosser, D i ck Blake, Richard Elmore, R a 1 p Ii Plummer and Ed McCartney. The twelve Alpha Mu Omega initiates were Judy Beran, Rudy Eichenberger, Bob Eichenberger, Dennis Hein, Monroe McCoy, Edwin Meyer, Hanford Miller, Peggy O'Neill, Loren Penkava, Arlan Richardson, Don Schmidt and Larry Trimble. Refreshments were served by the executive board after the initiation.

NOVEMBER 26, 1962

Nebraska's Finest College

Teaching Assignments Given To Fifty-two Practice Teach~rs .

1~~~~~~~~~~~~.

TOPEKA, KANSAS INTERESTED IN PROSPECTIVE TEACHERS Dr. Joe Evans, Topeka, Kansas, will be on the Peru campus to interview prospective teachers, Dec. 3. He will be in the Placement Office at 9 a.m. He is particularly interested in all levels of elementary education. He also wants to meet math, English, and social studies teachers on the secondary level. Dr. Evans likes to hirt Peru graduates and is looking forward to interviewing prospective teachers.

Peru Special Services Office ABusy Place By PENNY HAYS Trying to obtain information about the various duties of the office of Special Services is a dif(Continued on page two)

.

Peruvian Staff Completes 94 Pages Of Yearbook The Peruvian staff met its first deadline on schedule. Layouts for 94 of the 138 yearbook pages were mailed to Inter-Collegiate Press in Kansas City, Nov. 15. This included student and faculty sections, organization pages, and division pages. J. D. Levitt snapped the organization pictures, and the student pictures were taken by the Rex Haberman Studio. Dr. C. D. Siegner took the division pages. Peruvian co-editors are Richard Elmore and JoAnn Frerichs. Other staff members who helped to meet the daadline were: Tom Aitken, Frank Bostic, L o n n Pressnall, Dareld Douglas., Susan Sharp, Sharon Peacock, Penny Hays, Wendell Mohling, Karen Conrad, Dick Klinger, Janey Moore, Bernadette Gallagher, and Jon Davis.

George Nincehelser Receives Medal For Lifesaving George D. Nincehelser received honors at an all-college convocation on Wednesday, Nov. 7. He is credited with saving the life of Mrs. Winnifred Longinaker of Randolph, Iowa, after a Missouri river boating accident last June 17. Last summer, George was employed by the Army Corps of Engineers to work as a deck hand on the dredge, Meriwether Lewis. The incident took place while George was on the boat, which was docked near Nebraska City. When asked to comment on the incident, George seemed reluctant to say anything, but finally consented to give this brief account. "I was off duty at the time, and I was standing on the top deck talking to another deck hand when someone yelled there was a boat in distress. I arrived at the scene just as the motorboat plunged into the Meriwether Lewis and upset. The next few moments I can vaguely remember. I guess I jumped into the water and grasped the lady with one hand and held onto the boat with the other until a rope was dropped to us. I tied the rope around her and she was pulled aboard the dredge."

Fifty-two seniors at Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru Monday began student teaching assignments as a part of their professional semester. Student teaching assignments will continue through January 1~;; for both students in secondary and Mrs. Longinaker's h us b a n d elementary education. was lost in the accident. Both elementary and secondGeorge received the Departary student teachers were engaged in course work during the ment of Army's Meritorious Cifirst nine weeks of the semester. . vilian Service Decoration which Elementary education students was presented to him by the were enrolled in Elementary Army's Missouri River Division School Methods and Manage- Engineer, Gen. Robert Seedlock. ment, which included the study of elementary school subject matter, curriculum, and effective methods of teaching the subjects. Students preparing for high An ACT test was given Thursschool teaching were enrolled in day, Nov. 15 in the auditorium. courses in Educational Psychol- The college requires a score in ogy, Educational Measurements, four subjects for each student enAudio-Visual Materials, H i g h rolled and their per·centile rank. School Methods and Manage- Twenty-eight freshmen and (Continued on page three) transfer students took the test.

ACT Tests Given

BY CURTIS NELSON On Dec. 2, at 3 p.m. Peru State Teachers College will present Handel's Messiah in the Nebraska City high school auditorium. It will be directed by Edward G. Camealy. It will be presented again on Dec. 9, at 3 p.m. in the College auditorium. The chorus will be composed of 60 college and 60 community voices. The college chorus has been rehearsing during their noon schedule, and the combined chorus has had four rehearsals on Tuesday evenings. The members in the combined chorus come from several surrounding communities. Included are Nebraska City, Johnson, Falls City, Auburn, Peru, Shubert, Brock, Talmage, Bethel Community, Stella, Nemaha and Hiawatha, Kansas. The orchestra, which is composed of c~Iege and community people, has· tehearsed separately on T u e s d a y afternoons and Thursday evenings. For the first time on Nov. 20, the combined orchestra and chorus practiced. The orchestra has been divided into two groups for the Messiah. The inner or small group, composed of the first chair string players and woodwinds, will accompany the soloists. The large group of 35 members will accompany the chorus. In addition to the orchestra, R. T. Benford, acting head of the music department, wi!J play the organ. The 14 soloists have rehearsed with the following pianists: Marilyn Marmet, Mrs. Elvis Meritt, Mrs. Charles Moorer, and Judith Whigham. Accompanist for the four combined chorus rehearsals has been Mrs. Robert Henry.

Wheeler Lists 25 Football Lettermen Alfred G. Wheeler, director of athletics, has announced the names of 25 letter winners from the 1962 Peru State Teachers College football team. This year's Bobcats posted a 5-2-2 season's record. The group includes eight seniors, five juniors, seven sophomores, and five freshmen. Heading the senior list by virtue of earning their third letters are, tackle Ken Dostal, Scribner; and halfback Ron Kelley, Falls City. Bill Lawlor, Plattsburg, Mo., guard; and Dean Stapleton, tackle from Council Bluffs, Iowa, earned their second monograms. Initial letters were won by halfback Pat Hamm, Wood River, Ill., halfback Barney Mcilvoy, South Lyon, Mich.; and Larry Rathe, Sterling; and equipment manager, Chuck Caverzagie, Omaha. Among the juniors were Bill Tynon, Peru, signal caller who won his third, while end Jim Hall, Omaha, and Troy Lyon, Nebraska City guard, gained their second letters. Tackle Jim Brenn, Hebron, and Roger Noell, Plattsmouth, were juniors who were awarded their first monograms. Five sophomores won their second letters. They include: halfback Sam Carneal, Nebraska City; center Luke Cox, Lincoln; end Gary Hodge, Boys Town; (Continued on page three)


DELZELL NEWS

By Curtis Nelson Three residents of Delzell have left to do their student teaching in Bellevue. They are Dennis Peterson, Bob Penkava, and Charles Aylor, Ken Dostal and Dick Berlin are doing their student teaching in the campus school. Mrs. Paradise is now in h e r son's home at Storm Lake, Iowa. She is reported to be getting bet- · ter day by day. Her address is 816 West 4th Street, Storm Lake, Iowa. A new washing machine has been purchased by the dorm. It will be installed within the next few days. We have two new dorm counselors. They are Ben Kernes, who is taking Bob Penkava's place in the ba•ement, and Gary Workman, who is the new counselor on the second floor. Allen Weber visited Delzell last weekend. He went to school here last year and is planning to return next semester. A date has been set for Delzell's annual Christmas party. It is to be Dec. 16, at 9 p.m. in the TV room. It was fairly quiet in the dorm over the Thanksgiving vacation. Most of the residents went home, leaving the dorm almost deserted.

also five student assistants who work part time. The duties of the office of Special Services fall into three main headings: public relations and the news bureau, prospective stu-· dents, and alumni. The responsibilities of Special Services in regard to public relations and the news bureau consist of: releasing press notices, taking pictures, keeping an archive of the history of the college, directing and supervising the duplicating and printing services, printing all the forms used by the college, and publishing and distributing booklet, pictures, folders, and bulletins about the college. The duties of this office which fall under the second heading, prospective students, are: visiting secondary schools to encourage students to come to Peru, preparing a mailing list to prospective students, maintaining a list of superintendents in the college service area, and arranging student visitations to the campus and acting as host to such groups. The last main heading, alumni, holds many duties for the office of Special Services. First, Special Services prints the "Peru Stater," a booklet put out by the college for distribution to the alumni. This year 8,000 copies of the booklet are being printed. Two issues will appear, one this month, and one next May. The office also maintains a file of the names and addresses of former students and graduates. Special Services keeps four completely different files which are arranged according to maiden names, class or year, an alphabetical file, and a mailing list which would be a geographical file. Finally, the office plans and directs activities such as celebrations, conferences, and other events which attract visitors to the campus.

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rites the other day. As Karen Cahow rushed down the hall, she tripped and fell. Her friends, thinking she had met her doom, immediately held funeral services. Myra Murren presided. What do you think of someone who spoils his own surprise party? Carol Niebuhr, Ginny Adkins, Cheryl Berner, Ruth Schnute, Carla Jacobson, Betty PaintPeru Special Services er/ Carol McLain, and Janice Office A Busy Place Tucker complain that Winnie (Continued from page one) Sporer not only brings her "own" birthday cake, but she won't ficult job. A reporter finds a nevleave her room long enough to be er ending chain of interruptions surprised. throughout his interview with Congratulations to Shirley TalMr. Donald K. Carlile, director of Editor's Note: The office of ley. She became engaged to Bob Special Services, as the office is Special Services plays an ex-'-Gnade Nov. 10. a busy place. Lose one and gain one. Linda Don Carlile, director of Special tremely active part on the Peru campus. No one knows this betTeten, who is to be married soon, Services, is in his ninth year at Peru. He was graduated from ter than the staffs of the Peda- moved out of the dorm to live at Kansas State University at Man- .gogian and Peruvian who re- home. Reginia (Reggie) Kriefels, hattan, Kansas. He came to Peru ceive valuable assistance daily Nebraska City, has moved in. from Special Services. from Kansas City, where he was Dorm statistics: Figures, figan editor with Financial Publicaures. After taking a survey of the tions. As director of Special Serpop machine, we found the occuvices he is responsible directly to pants of Eliza Morgan Hall conELIZA the president of the college, and sume 1,080 bottles of pop a week. MORGAN an advisory relationship exists This is approximately 10,800 calHALL between his office and the dean ories. Shocking, isn't it? of the college. By After that bit of information, Ardith Bob ;Henry is the associate dianyone for exercises? The followPratt rector of Special Services. He ing girls will be glad to help you: takes care of sports publicity and Kay Bender, from the basement Greetings and salutations! is giving "free" baton lessons; the news bureau. The secretary for Special Services is Mrs. Su- Things are fine in Mount Morgan. Loletta K r a t o c h v i l, H e 1 e n A moment of silence-o n e Drumm, and Janice Mayer have san McKnight. Aside from these three main positions, there are among us (almost) had her last begun a physical fitness program on first floor; and Winnie Sporer, from second floor, has hula-hoops PERU PEDAGOGIAN to rent. · In dosing, Pat Richardson has The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks been elected the official mouseNovember 26. 1962 catcher. If you don't understand, ask her. PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Co-Editor____________________________________ Frank Bostic Co-Editor_____________________________________ Tom Aitken Layout Editor ___ .. ____________________________ Kay Camden Personnel Manager ___________________________ Jane Rhodus ATTENTION-Sigma Tau DelAdvertising Manager-------------·------------- Larry Rathe ta is ?~oking for candidates for Sports Editor_________________________________ Larry Rathe the Freshman Essay Contest. The Sports Column ____ .. ____________________________ Pat Hamm contest is open to all members of Delzell Column ______________________________ Curtis Nelson the Freshman Class, of English Morgan Column ______________________________ Ardith Pratt 101-102 or English Laboratory. Major~ Column _____________ ------------------ Dick Elmore Candidates may· submit any Campus School Column _________________ Mary Anna Gnade type of prose-descriptive, narraReporter _____________________________________ Judith Beran tive, expository or augumentaReporter______________________________________ Tom Castle tive. A documented research paReporter ______________________________ Virginia Cockerham per will not be accepted. The Reporter____________________________________ Karen Conrad manuscripts will be judged ac-. Reporter ___________ ------------------------ Sharon Donlan cording to neatness, correctness Reporter. __________________________________ Lee Haeberlein of mechanics, organization, style, Reporter _______________________________________ Penny Hays and content. Reporter _____ --------------------------------- Jane Moore The winner will receive his Reporter·-------------·---------------------- Carol Niebuhr choice of paperback books not Reporter ____________________________________ Edward Smith exceeding $10 in cost. Reporter_____ ------------------------------- Judith Wilson Anyone wishing to enter the Reporter __________________________________ Barney Mc!lvoy contest should contact Mr. Silas Sponsor _________________________________ Stewart Linscheid Summers or one of the instructors in English.

Sigma Tau Delta Writing Contest

MAJORS HALL

By Richard Elmore ~iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiOiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii~~'

Mrs. Helen Donovan, Majors Hall housemother, has been having trouble with her eyes swelling. In hopes of curing this, she recently took allergy tests in Omaha. When she received the results of her tests, she f o u n d that her most violent reaction was to oak trees. There are supposed to be 1,000 oaks on the campus. Second floor has a new counselor. Ed Meyer took Duane Weichelman's position when Duane moved to Auburn for student teaching. Dan Leuenberger shot his first deer this year. He bagged a fourpoint buck at noon, Nov. 17, near Tecumseh. Several weeks ago some Majors fellows had some excess adhesive tape, about 10 rolls of it, and decided to put it to good use. They taped John Soby to his bed. When they finished, they still had some tape left, so they used

it on Louie Diblasi. A new fad ,has hit first floorbleaching ha~,· It seems that Tom Bookwalter started the fad when he used some peroxide from his mother's beauty shop. Since then, Bill Scott. Gordon Scott, Lyle Stewart, Larry Giesmann, Rod Baade and Stan Johnson have used it on their hair. Stan's didn't work. Majors Hall has been producing men for the Marines. Dennis Crissman and Sid Baney signed up for the Marine Corps Reserve PLC program. Cliff Sphon is seriously considering joining. He has already taken the test. They will go to Quantico, Va., for six weeks training beginning J u n e 11. Then, they will spend six more weeks during the summer between their junior and senior years in college. Upon graduation, the fellows will r e c e i v e commissions as second lieutenants in the U. S. Marine Corps· Reserve. John Barton already spent six weeks last summer for the first part of his training. Majors has quite a few "Bwanas"-great white hunters. Two of them, Sid Baney and John Soby, got two pheasants apiece, November 11, near Douglas. They fired only four shots for the entire day. Some day!

BANK OF PERU PHONE 872-2331

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Spider Bugs and Snappers Head Intramural Volleyball The 1962-63 intramural volleyball program at Peru State, under the able direction of Jerome Stemper, got started on Nov. 8 with four games. Because of varous interruptions, only one other night of volleyball has been played prior to this edition of the Ped. After the first two rounds, only two teams, the Spider Bugs and the Snappers, remain unbeaten. Four teams have split a pair, while two other squads have· yet to crash the win colu'mn. The Spider Bugs opened ·with a narrow 18-15 win over the strong Crazy 8' s. In their second round game, the Bugs thumped the Jockey Jrs., 21-13. The Snappers started with a convincing 23-15 victory over the Half Fast crew, then captured a forfeit from the faculty, 1-0. After dropping their opener to the Spider Bugs, "J.e Crazy S's pounded the Nebishes into total submission with a resounding 366 rout. The 30-point victory margin was one of the largest wins ever scored in intramural volleyball at Peru State. The Half Fast team bounced back from its opening loss to the

(Continued from page one) halfback Leonard Kinser, Red Oak, Iowa; center Ron Peterson, Omaha. David Wilson, guard from Plattsmouth, and signal caller Bill Witty, S yr a cu s e, earned their first letter recognition. Freshman honorees include: tackle Floyd Goff, Nebraska City; halfback Keith Grimes, Columbus; end Marvin Hopper, Auburn; John Stefan, fullback from Fairfield, Conn.; and Roy Windhorst, Deshler fullback.

The Peru State Teachers College "B" team, composed mainly of freshmen and sophomores, participated in a four-team basketball tournament at Highland, Kansas, Nov. 19-20. The younger Bobcats opened , the tourney by dropping an 83-69 1 verdict to St. Benedicts B squad, despite a 29-point performance by sophomore Bill Witty. Peru grabbed the consolation title by defeating the Haskell College quintet, 92.-81. High scorer for the Bobcats was Jim II.\;ll, who poured in 27 points.

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By Snappers to nip the Pussys, 18Pat 16. The Pussys ]\ad won an earliHamm er two-point victory from the Nebishes, 26-24. With the football equipment The Faculty, although having to forfeit its second contest, won tucked away in lockers, P er u its opener froin the Jockey Jrs., Staters are anxiously awaiting November 26th. That is the day 28-13. Intramural volleyball is ex- Coach Jack Mcintire will unveil pected to continue two more his 1962-63 Bobcats in the annual weeks, after which the intramur- alumni game. al basketball season will begin. Aumni May Be Toughest Intramural games are played The Bobcats may face their in the gym Tuesday and Thurstoughest foe their very first day evenings from 7 until 9. game. Returning for the annual STANDINGS game are former Peru greats Bob W L Buettgenbach, Mike Roach, Drex0 Snappers ----------- 2 el! Harvey, Bruce Smith, Larry Spider Bugs ________ 2 0 Rathe, John Appleget, and Bob Crazy B's ----------- 1 Gibson. Faculty ------------ 1 Witty Bombs Half Fast ----------- 1 Sophomore forward Bill Witty Pussys ------------- 1 1 Jockey Jrs. _________ 0 2 poured in 29 points in a "B" game loss to St. Benedicts. DeNebishes ----------- 0 2 Scores spite Witty's scoring, the Peru Spider Bugs 18, Crazy S's 15 team dropped the game, 83-69. Spider Bugs 21, Jockey Jrs. 13 Time Ou±! Snappers 23, Half Fas! 15 "Any big men born around?" Snappers L Faculty 0 a Big Ten basketball coach querCrazy S's 36, Nebishes 6 ied of a small town druggist. Half Fast 18, Pussys 16 "Nope," responded the native. Faculty 28, Jockey Jrs. 13 "Best we can do is babies. Dif" Pussys 26, Nebishes 24 ferent in the city, I suppose." "B" SQUAD GRABS CONSOLATION TITLE

Wheeler Lists 25 Football Lettermen

1962 Bobcats Short On Experience

SHORT ORDERS

Open: Monday - Saturday 6:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m. Sunday 6:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. Peru, Nebraska

Ken Dostal Has Outstanding Record As Peru Athlete

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Kittens Annihilate Nemaha, 60-0, In Season Finale

see a lot of action. Some goo d frosh prospects are Ron Snodgrass, 6'7" center from Seward; Jack Renie, 5'11" guard from Steinauer; Marvin Hopper, 6'3" forward from Auburn; and Bill Russell, 6' guard from Council Bluffs, Iowa. Coach Mcintire feels that inexperience and lack of rebounding power will be the greatest deficits to overcome. English and business education; William Meyer, Omaha, history and physical education.

Peru Prep finished its season in fine style here Wednesday, November 7, by running over Nemaha, 60-0. Prep, running its record to 6-11, took command early and waltzed to a 33-0 halftime lead. Coach Bill Witty's Bobkittens still couldn't be stopped in the second half although substitutions were rife. Touchdowns were scored by Mike Tynon (2), Clint Reeves (2), Rich Groff (2), Butch Blankenship (1), John Eickhoff (1) and Charles Henning (1).

Teaching Assignments Given To Fifty-two Practice Teachers

Beatrice-Darrell E. Feit, Beatrice, biology and industrial arts; Jerry Littell, Beatrice, history and speech; Steve Parker, Peru, art and speech. Bellevue-C ha r 1e s A y 1o r , Plattsmouth, physical science and social science; Galen J. Conn, Auburn, industrial arts and biology; Lois Fritz, Omaha, English and speech; Robert Penkava, Beatrice, mathematics and science; Dennis Peterson, Rockford, Ill., mathematics and history; Robert Reitz, Springfield, biology and physical education; Eugene Wright, Greenwood, physical education and history. Falls City-Susan H u 1be rt, Falls City, business education. Nebraska. City-Monty Allgood, Peru, bii3'1ogy and physical science; Thomas J. Brown, Fa 11 s City, general science and mathematics; John J. Ramsey, Dawson, physical education and business education.

(Continued from page one) ment, and Special Methods in Teaching Field. Nineteen are student teaching in the Campus School on the PePlattsmouth-Larry Swett, Ken Dostal, the son of Mr. and ru State campus, while 33 have Mrs. Leon Dostal, Scribner, Ne- assignments in c o o p er at in g Malvern, Iowa, mathematics and braska, is a 1958 graduate of schools in southeastern Nebras- physical science. Scribner High School. He was as ka. Eighteen are in elementary Peru-Linda Beery, Gravity, outstanding in high school athlet- education and 34 are in second- Iowa, social science and English; ics as he was in college. At Scrib- ary education. The cooperating James M. Bohlken, Peru, mathener, he was a three-sport star. In student teaching schools for the matics and physical science; Ken basketball, he made All-State first semester include: Auburn, Dostal, Scribner, physical educahonorable mention for three Beatrice, Bellevue, Falls City, tion and biology; Bruce Francey, years. Football, the big athlete's Nebraska City, Plattsmouth, Sy- Moira, N. Y., industrial arts and favorite sport, earned Ken All- racuse, and Tecumseh. physics; Wayne Gumaer, Fairstate honors his junior and senThe student teachers, ho m e bury, social science and physical ior years. He went to the state town, and their assignments in- education; Donald Johnson, Sytrack meet two years, where he lude: racuse, music and history; Bill placed fourth in the 440 his sen- Elementary EducationLawlor, Plattsburg, Mo., physical ior year. He lifted his 6'5", 225Auburn-Elaine Bath, Auburn; education and history; pound frame around the oval in Linda Risley, Omaha; D u an e James Meacham, Wetmore, 51 seconds flat. Wiechelman, Hartington. Kans., physical education an d After graduation from high Beatrice~Carol Sudik, Virginmathematics; Hanford J. Miller, school, Ken enrolled at the Uni- ia; Judy Weichel, Alvo. Peru, physical science and mathversity of Nebraska ori a GrantBellevue-Lynn McCann, Ral- ematics; Gary Schlosser, Dawson, in-aid scholarship. After one se- ston; Sharylin Vrtiska, Tab 1 e mathematics and history; Bonnie mester, Ken dropped out of the Rock. Vanderford, Auburn, music and University to enroll at Peru Nebraska City-Gerhard physical education; Betty White State. Schlange, Queen's Village, N. Y. Wellensiek, Riverton, Iowa, muPeru Campus School-Joyce sic; Merlin Wright, Virginia, At Peru State, Ken letter!=d three years in football, one in Able, Auburn; Margaret Beard, chemistry and biology; Michael Auburn;· Richard Berlin, Western Zinn, Falls City, physical educabasketball and one in track. Springs, Ill.; Mary Ann Graham, tion and business education. He has made All-Conference in Auburn; Nancy Houchin, ThurSyracuse-Roy Rub en k i n g, football three years. This is an man, Iowa. amazing feat, and Ken certainly Syracuse-Connie Dietl, Ne- Dunbar, mathematics, physics deserves all the laurels he re- hawka; Sharon Earl, Syracuse; and biology; Victor Bade, Dunbar, business education. ceives. Judy French, Douglas. Ken is the fourth oldest of six brothers and four sisters. Brother Bob attends the University of Nebraska, Larry attends the University of Omaha, Rich attends Norfolk Junior College, Norman is in the Navy, and the others are in the elementary grades.

WHEN

BY PAT HAMM The Peru Bobcats, defending NCC basketball champions, will have to do some fancy work to repeat the championship form of last year. Coach Jack Mcintire has only four returning lettermen. They are Tom Yopp, Pat Hamm, Jim Hall, and Larry Hayes. Sophomores Bill Witty, 6'1", and Don Schmidt, 6'3", are due to

Ken plans to exchange wedding vows with Miss Lee Christen on February 2, 1963. Lee graduated from Peru in 1961. She was a Bobcat cheerleader for two years, and is now teaching in the :Lincoln Public Schools. Ken will graduate this January. He hopes to get a coaching job in Arizona or California. Ken lists his favorite hobbies as hiking, keeping physically fit, and working on autmobiles.

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Annual Choral Clinic Will Be Held December 1 Warner Imig, dean of the College of Music at the University of Colorado, Boulder, will be guest conductor for the eleventh annual Choral Clinic at Peru State Teachers College, Saturday, December 1. More than 650 Nebraska high school vocal music students will participate in the event, according to Edward G. Camealy, clinic director and associate professor of vocal music at Peru State. The day-long clinic will be climaxed by a 7:30 p.m. concert by the massed chorus, boys chorus and girls chorus, under the direction of Mr. Imig. In addition to rehearsal sessions beginning at 9 a.m., ensembles will be auditioned during the day for the evening program. Registration will begin at 8 Peru journalists are show;n in the plant which prints the Pedagogian, Mike and Mary Packwood's a.m., with rehearsals scheduled Johnson County Courier in Sterling. The visiting journalists from left to right included Pedagogian for 9-11 :30 a.m., and from 1-4 p.m. sponsor Stewart Linscheid, Thomas Aitken, Janey Moore, Sharon Donlan, Kay Camden, Karen Conrad, Judy Beran, Virginia Cockerham, Carol Niebuhr, Penny Hays, and Judi Wilson. Pat Hamm's car load of students failed to arrive bi,cause the car motor threw a rod.

Campus School Commentary Dance Ends Hectic Week If, when crossing the campus, you should encounter a high school student, don't be offended if he doesn't speak. He is probably still dazed over the results of his quarter grades which were distributed last Thursday. However, a Sadie Hawkins dance, sponsored by the Freshman class, was held Friday night, Nov. 16, to revive the students. It, no doubt, had a beneficial effect on the girls, but the boys, after being chased, are probably m ore dazed than ever. English Go Greek With the passing of the first nine weeks, Prep English classes have concluded their study of Greek literature. The Bible, considered one of the greatest literary works of all time, will be the central theme of English study for the next nine weeks. Kiifen Pies On Tuesday, Nov. 13, classes were intermittently disrupted throughout the day as various organizations had their pictures taken for the 1962-63 BOBKITTEN. After minor complications, such as the collapse of a ping pong table and the absence of flash bulbs in the camera, both students and

By Devon Adams and Nancy Jarvis

photographer were relieved to see the end of a hectic day.

Seniors Swamped As usual, the Senior class is swamped with activities both scholarly and extra-curricular. They were given a day off to have their Senior pictures taken at the Peterson Studio in Aub· urn. Close on the heels of this bit of freedom came the Regents exam given by the University of Nebraska. The top third of the Senior class participated in this test which took the better part of the day. Tryouts for the class play "The Thursday Murders" to be presented January 17, were held; the participants are awaiting the assignments of the fifteen parts. The play is under the direction of Lonn Pressnall and Sharon Peacock. ,,,.,_

New Popper After the absence of popcorn at many of the football games, popcorn lovers will be pleased to know that the Pep Club has purchased a new popcorn popper. It produces "indescribably delicious"-phrase courtesy of Peter Paul Mounds-popcorn in a remarkably short time and in such abundance that no basketball fan

Equipment Bargains The G. E. equipment used only one and onehalf years in the Home Economics Department, on fhe school exchange plan, is fo be replaced SOON. All equipment is in "A One" condition! (See if in :the Deparfmenf.) The Knoll Appliance Co. of Nebraska Cify owns this equipment. Sale of these exchange ifems is by Knoll, NOT fhe college. Mr. Knoll has indicated, however, :that he would like to make :these items available to faculty and staff members before offering to others in the community or in Nebraska City. All financial arrangements are fo be made with Mr. Knoll. See Mrs Louise Kregel at Campus School to examine the following bargains. First come-first serve!

need be deprived. The sweaters ordered by Pep Club members have arrived in time for the start of the basketball season.

Athletic Teams Prepare For Indoor Seasons With seven wins, one loss, and o~e tie the Peru Prep football team ended a successful season by defeating Nemaha on Nov.' 7. The senior boys are especially proud of this record and played a major part in achieving it. Coach Witty and the basketball boys are planning an even more successful basketball s e a s o n , starting December 7 with an a'.way game at Nehawka. lfhe volleyball girls who have been practicing under the direction of Mrs. Al Wheeler since the beginning of the school year are looking forward to their first game with Johnson November 26 at Peru. Thankful With this hectic schedule of ac· tivities, and more to come, Thanksgiving vacation will truly be something for which to be thankful.

Editor's Note: The new "Campus School Commentary" written by Devon Adams and Nancy Jarvis under the supervision of Mrs. Genevieve Gergan. replaces the old column written for many years by Mrs. Mary Anna Gnade. Mary Anna found it increasingly difficult to get material as most of her children outgrew the campus school to enter college, to get married, to enter the armed services, etc. At her own request she was relieved of this chore. On the behalf of this year's Ped staff and on ±he behalf of staffs of years gone by, we wish' to thank Mary Anna for her many fine efforts in the past.

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Band Will Present Convocation Program

The Peru College Band under the direction of Gilbert Wilson will present th~ convocation program for Wednesday, Nov. 28. Selections for the concert include "A Festival Prelude" by Alfred Reed, James F. Burke's "Danza Alegre" featuring a trumpet solo by Don Johnson, "Alma .Mater" by Leroy Anderson, "Highlights from Exodus" by Ernest Gold, and two numbers by John J. Mor-

Mr. Imig is president of the American Choral Directors Association of which he is a charter member. He is an editorial associate of the Journal of Research for Music Educators and has held offices in several professional organizations, including the Music Educators National Conference, Colorado Music Educators Association, and the Music Teachers National Association. rissey, "Dance Fantasy for Band" and "Fiesta of the Charros." Also featured on the program are two special groups, the Ethnic Singers made up of Karen Workman, Russ Workman, and Mike Janis, and a brass sextet: Don Johnson, Carol McLain, Russ Workman, Linda Elliott, Ed McCartney, and .Jim Kelly.

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The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . .

Peru Pedagogian Volume 58

PERU, NEBRASKA

One Hundred and Twenty Voice Chorus and Thirty-five Piece Orchestra Presented Handel's Messiah" BY PENNY HAYS

••

DECEMBER 17, 1962

Nature is doing wonders tonight Across the midwest plain. On trees a beautiful snow white glint, Almost like God's domain.

11

Tumbling Room Nears Completion

A 120-voice chorus and the college 35-piece orchestra presented Handel's "The Messiah" in the Nebraska City High School AuCoach Pilkington anticipates ditorium, Sunday, December 2, completio~ .of a ·new tumbling and in the Peru State College room in the near future. The Auditorium, Sunday, December 9. room is located in the gym above IncJuded in the presentation were the offices of J. Mcintire and A. the Christmas . portion of the Wheeler. It will be used excluoratorio and the 'Hallelujah Chor- sively for gymnastic exercises. us. Remodeling, which consistecl"&f The presentation, under the direction of Edward G. Camealy, the razing of one wall, painting, assistant. professor of voice, was and cleaning up, has been done given by the Peru State Teach- by students with the help and ers College Chorus along with under the direction of campus high school and church c h o i r carpenter, Ernest Longfellow, members of surrounding com- and Mr. Pilkington. A tile floor munities. The various communi- will complete construction and ties represented were: Nebraska the gymnastics equipment will City, Peru, Auburn, Brock, John- then be installed. Equipment includes parallel son, Falls City, Shubert, Talmage, Bethel Community, Stella, bars, high bar, mats, and training Nemaha and Hiawatha, Kansas. weights. Other equipment will Choirs represented in the chor- be added when funds are made us included: United Church of available. Christ, Talmage; St. John's LuPhysical education and gymtheran Church, Nebraska City; nastics classes will utilize t h e St. Matthew's Lutheran Church, room as soon as it is completed. Johnson; Nebraska City High Other courses soon to be offered, School; Church of Christ, Aub- such as courses in physical fitness urn; Peru Campus School; Chris- and weight training, will also tian Church, Hiawatha, Kansas; use this room. Brock School; First Methodist The tumbling room will be Church, Falls City; St. Clara's open to all students for individuCatholic Church, Peru; Talmage al use. Procedure charts and diaHigh School; and Bethel Com- grams are on order and will be munity Church. hung on the walls so that any Accompaniment was provided student wishing to. participate on by the orchestra under Mr. Cam- his own may do so with no speealy's direction. The orchestra cial instruction. was divided into two groups for "The Messiah." The inner or small "The Messiah," Handel's most group, composed of the first chair successful and best known orastring players and woodwinds, torio, was composed in 1741 in 24 accompanied the soloists. The sodays. It was first performed in loists were sopranos: Elaine Bath, Dublin, Ireland, April 13, 1742, Auburn; Alice Emery, Nebraska Handel conducting the perform· City; Ardith Wininger, Peru; ance in person. During the years contraltos: Virginia Adkins, Neit.has come to be one of the most braska City; J oAnn Frerichs, popular oratorios. Beatrice; Marion Gomon, Peru; According to Mr. Camealy, the Karon Rathe, Sterling; Ruth Rulla, Sterling; tenors: Ron Bath, audience which attended the preAuburn; Curtis Nelson, Essex, sentation given in the Peru ColIowa; Stanley H. Johnson, Rock- lege Auditorium was the finest ford, Iowa; basses: Gary Dahm- and largest one that has ever atke, Peru; Eugene Walden, Rus- tended the performance. A pickin; and James Watson, Lindon, ture coverage was given "The Colorado. The entire orchestra of Messiah" presentation on the 35 members accompanied the KETV news of December 10. chorus. In addition to the orches"The Messiah" will be pretra, R. T. Benford, acting head of sented in succeeding years, thus the music department, played the becoming an "institution" of organ. Peru.

Number 6

Perhaps I am just seeing things As out the window pane I look, But fancies soon o'ertake my thoughts, Like ice upon a brook. I wonder why the trees are white Upon this winter's night. I wonder if a thought or two Would lessen this small plight. 'Twas this time of year long ago, A Child was born in stable bare. And wise-men came from far away To witness and to stare. Upon His crib, a mere stable, They placed their gifts to Him, And suddenly all the heavens above Responded with songs of Cherubim. A bright star appeared o'er East That crisp, cold winter's night. And shepherds ,witnessed with glowing eyes The wonderously bright light. And wondered from their hilltop posts Just why the star appeared. Some knew a Savior was born this night And in their hearts they cheered. For this small Boy so white and pure Would live to the age of thirty-three. And during His presence upon the earth Would offer all men eternity.

I 1· .

·

·.

Perhaps it was a night like this When Christ the Son was born. And all the whiteness of the trees Shone through the night until the morn. For nature is God any time of year, And all years are given us by Him. He who long ago in a manger lay, In a stable cold and dim.

Morgan Hall Tea Pre-Christmas Event BY PENNY HAYS

Fourteen Attended Kearney Workshop In Home Economics Fourteen girls attended the Home Economics workshop in Kearney, Nov. 9 and 10.

The annual Christmas Tea was held on December 13 from 2:00 to 5:00 i111 Eliza Morgan Hall. The dormitory was host to the faculty members of Peru State. In preparation for this event, the entire dorm was decorated in an atmosphere of Christmas by a decoration committee and by the girls in their own rooms. Just before the tea, a group of judges selected the three outstanding rooms, and a prize was given to each of the winners. Rooms chos-

Friday night thi= girls attended a mixer. Saturdaiy morning they attended a breakfast and business meeting. The workshop ended with a tour of the Kearney home economics department. The girls who attended were Judy Wolfe, Charlotte Wheeler, Linda Rogers, Ruth Rulla, Glenda Rima, Elaine Gerdes, Mary Jar-

(Continued on page two)

(Continued on page three)

On Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 15, 1963, with no classes to meet in periods 6, 7, 8, and 9, Peru State students will be expected to observe an indicated time for contacting their counselor for pre· registration. Do not seek time with your counselor in advance of the designated time on your schedule. Following the afternoon of pre· registration, as students have s u b m i t t e d the counselor-approved schedules, these "r'ill be checked as to each student's eli· gibility and other controls for classes, before pulling the class admission cards to facilitate the final registration on Monday, January 28. During the week of Dec. 17-21, the currently enrolled students may request registration materials from the registrar's office. Students are asked to read the advisement and directions carefully, and then retain them for definite use later.

Six Hundred Here for Choral Clinic BY CURTIS NELSON On Saturday, Dec. 1, approximately 600 high school students participated in the eleventh annual choral clinic at Peru State. It was sponsored by local chapter 208 of the Music Educators National Conference for the purpose of stimulating good choral music in the area. The guest conductor was War" ner Imig, who is dean of the college of music at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He is also president of the American Choral Association. Edward G. Camealy was chairman of the clinic, and Robert T. Benford was pianist. The following schools and their directors participated: Auburn, Robert Williamson; Beatrice, Lucille V. Reilly; Bennet, Mrs. L. Tracy Clement; Bratton Union, Mrs. Lucille Oestmann; Brock, Gaylin Sudik; Cook, Maxine Hahn; Dawson-Verdon, Gene K. Dappen; Dunbar, Marjorie Livingston; Edgar, Robert L. Hoback; Humboldt, Jay Fankhaus(Continued on page three)


''THE GRIM R:EAP:ERH Are you coming back to school after Christmas? I hope you do, but remember, there is a killer at large. By the time you finish reading this page, he will have killed one person and injured 33 others. . I

MAJORS HALL

By

What is this killer's name? No one knows the killer's Richard Elmore real name, but he u_ses the alias, "The Grim Reaper." The results of his work can be seen by investigating a traffic accident. He tears bodies limb from limb. He tears eyes from Majors Hall is in the Christmas their sockets. He impregnates glass deeply into fac~s and spirit. Mrs. Donovan, housemothheads. He breaks and smashes bones. He spills blood. He er, replaced the regular hall bulbs cripples for life. with colored bulb~: The ground floor even has its own Christmas tree, decorated with blue lights. The dorm's new aluminum tree was set up by Bruce Francey, Louie Diblasi, and Don LaRocca. Colored flood lights combined with colored solarium 1i g ht s Can this killer be stopped? "The Grim Reaper" and his make a very impressive sight. Frankie Kan and Jim Carlisle helpers, who are Alcohol, Speed, Carelessness, and Ignorance, can be stopped by the efforts of you! Here's how. Drive have a real tree, complete with carefully at all times. Don't be a Yule fool, and remember, lights, ornaments, and angel hair. They also placed a sign on their "The life you save may be your own." -By Lee Haeberlein door with a welcome written in Chinese. All the fellows are busy makWHY NOT CONSIDER PUBLICATIONS ing Christmas plans. Joe Perina As pre-registration nears, we hope you'll consider work- plans to cateh up on his hunting. ing on the Ped or Peruvian next semester. These publica- Roger Crook and Jack Rinne are tions are all school affairs intended to represent all of the going to spend some time at school. They are not, as some students seem to think, the Fairbury with Dennis Hein. The private poaching grounds of English majors. In fact, some hunting is supposed to be good of our finest editors have not been English majors at all. A there, too. Jay DuVal· only has one week good current example is math major Richard Elmore, who has been doing a terrific job as co-editor of the 1963 Peruvi- vacation because he has to be an. So if you are interested in working with us, do not hold back to a student teaching post back because you are not an English or Language Arts ma- by January 2. He does plan to see his former roommate, Ray jor. You don't have to be. Hunzeker, who will be home You can earn two hours credit a semester working on from California. the Peruvian or three hours on the Ped. Fields of work are Jim Carlisle plans to be in very broad, as broad as the curricular and extra-curricular Gretna for a New Year's Eve programs of the college. We need photographers, typists, ar- party. Most of the other fellows tists, reporters, feature writers. We can utilize almost any refuse to commit themselves for sort of ability and effort. that date. Last year, six out of eight members of Who's Who had , Frankie Kan and Ron Robbins worked on the Ped or Peruvian or both. Over the years, the ' are going to Pennsylvania with Ped and Peruvian have been lucky enough to have many of .Fred Rimmer. Warren Richards the finest students in school on the staffs. If you'd like to is riding with Bruce Francey to work with either organization, talk with the editors, present Miora, New York. staff members, or the sponsor. You can help us, and we hope Skip Ogle, Majors president, is we can help you. going to take some time out from -By S. P. L. dorm duties to catch up on other things. · Harlan Seyfer is going be ed for them. The program began """" studious. He plans to write toa hisMorgan Hall Tea with a dramatic reading by NanPre-Christmas Event cy Reed. Next, Mary Sautter did tory term paper over vacation. Sid Baney is going back to Aran interpretative dance to "Santa (Continued from page one) lington, Virginia, to do some Claus Is Coming to Town." Two en belonged to the following hunting and take possession of girls: first place, Loretta Kratoch- soloists followed; the first soloist his 1963 blue Volkswagen. vi1 and Janis Mayer; second was JoAnn Frerichs who sang. Dennis Crissman is heading to place, Kay Bender and Pat Rich- "Oh Holy Night" and the second Huntington Beach, Calif., to do soloist was Judy Wolfe, who sang ardson; and third place, Winnie some surfing and sunning. T h e "White Christmas." Sporer and Carol Niebuhr. money for this vacation was a The program was concluded by personal gift from the president Each freshman woman student and each woman transfer student a group of girls who sang Christ- of the Orange County Chapter of invited a faculty guest who was mas carols around the piano. The Young Republicans Association. shown through the dormitory. girls were: Betty Painter, Judi Cliff Spohn will be in Kansas After touring the dormitory, the Whigham, Karon Rathe, Ardith City visiting friends during guests were served refreshments Pratt, Carla Jacobson, Peggy Christmas vacation. in the lobby by residents of the O'Neill, Linda Janson, E 1 a in e Harold Choate is wondering if dorm. While the guests were re- Muller and Barbara Gordon. The he should take a snow shovel laxing and visiting in the living girls were accompanied by Judy with him after hearing about the room, entertainment was provid- Wolfe. heavy snows in the East. When he gets back to South Lyon, Mich., he "plans to sleep every PERU PEDAGOGIAN day until noon." The Majors Hall C hr i st m a s The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks party is planned for Thursday December 17, 1962 night at 10:30. A special fruit cake made by a woman in DuPEDAGOGIAN STAFF Bois, Nebr., will be served with Mrs. Donovan's egg nog punch. Co-Editor _______________ --------------------- Frank Bostic Co-Editor_ ____________________________________ Tom Aitken The Majors men wish everyone a safe and merry Christmas Layout Editor_ __ ··---------------------------- Kay Camden Personnel Manager ___________________________ Jane Rhodus and a prosperous New Year. Advertising Manager_------------·------------- Larry Rathe Sports Editor_ ________________________________ Larry Rathe STUDENT WIVES' CLUB TO SELL CHRISTMAS CANDY Sports Column----··---------------------------- Pat Hamm Delzell Column ______________________________ Curtis Nelson The second meeting of the PeMorgan Column ______________________________ Ardith Pratt ru Students Wives' Club was Majors Column _____________ ------------------ Dick Elmore held November 15, at the home Campus School Column_________________ Mary Anna Gnade of Norma Blake. Members deReporter _________________ -------------------- Judith Beran cided to sell Christmas candy and Reporter_ _____________________________________ Tom Castle contribute stuffed toys for ChristReporter_ _____________________________ Virginia Cockerham mas presents to children at the Reporter_____________ ----------------------- Karen Conrad home for the mentally retarded Reporter_ ___________________________________ Sharon Donlan in Beatrice. Reporter_ __________ -------------------- ____ Lee Haeberlein The members formed groups Reporter _______________________________________ Penny Hays and played cards for the remainReporter _____ --------------------------------- Jane Moore der of the evening. Refreshments Reporter_ ___________________ ---------------·-_ Carol Niebuhr were served. Reporter_ __ --------------------------------- Edward Smith On December 20, the club will Reporter_ ______________________ ------------- Judith Wilson go Christmas caroling in Auburn. Reporter_ ______ --------------------------- Barney Mcilvoy For further information ca 11 Sponsor _________________________________ Stewart Linscheid Marlene Zinn, president, or Kar· en Hamm, secretary.

Who are his victims? "The Grim Reaper" cares not who he kills. He kills fathers, mothers, husbands, wives, sweethearts, children, and frien4s. This is not all, he is after you, too. He breaks up families and friendships. He has killed more people than the total number killed in all the wars in United States history.

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DELZELL NEWS

By Curtis Nelson Delzell held its annual Christmas party Dec. 16, at 9 p.m. At the party a lunch was served in the TV room. A dorm meeting was held November 26. The new dorm counselors, Ben Kernes and Gary Workman, were introduced. Plans were made for the Christmas party. Mrs. Longfellow gave a talk on the care of the rooms.

The Christmas dance, which Delzell sponsored on Dec. 14, in the Student Center was discussed. Committees were also planned for it. After the dorm meeting some of the fellows got a space-saving idea and tried to see how many people they could get in a room. For awhile room 302 had quite a number of occupants. The gam,e room has been fairly busy lately. Many fellows enjoy playing ping pong. The dorm has now taken on a Christmas atmosphere. Everyone is anxiously awaiting the Christmas vacation, 'especially those from far away who are making plans for transportation home.

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CHRISTMAS DAY

During l:he elevenl:h annual Choral Clinic at Peru State Teach· ers College Saturday, December l, guest conductor Warren Imig, dean of the college of music, University of Colorado, discusses ihe evening program with area. students. More than 600 students from 19 high schools participated in fhe day-long event which was spon· sored by the Peru State chapter of the Music Educators National Conference. Among the students present (from left) Karen Work· man, Peru; Ron McGinnis. Humboldt; Joan Dickman, Dunbar; Bob Kyle, Beatrice; Carolyn Freeman. Nebraska Cil:y; and Tom Runge, Palmyra.

Fourteen Attended Kearney Viorkshop In Home Economics

Six Hundred Here For Choral Clinic (Continued from page one) er; Johnson, Mrs. Chris Simon; Nebraska City, Amelia Peterson; Nemaha, Russel Workman; Palmyra, Heather A. Wilhelm; Peru Prep, Robert T. Benford; Stella, Eugene Walden; Syracuse, Lois Anderson; Talmage, Mrs. Ellen Meritt; and Tecumseh, Mildred Brehm. The combined choir rehearsed from 9:00 until 11:00 in the morning and from 1:30 to 5:00 in the afternoon. From 5:00 until 6:00 a · sock hop was held in the south end of the gym. At 7:30 p.m. the combined choir presented a concert. The program began with three numbers by the mixed chorus, which were "Praise We the Name of the Lord" by Bach-Martir, "Klage" (Within a Sheltered Valley) by Swift-Matesky, and "Fanfare and Alleluia" by Merrill Knighton. The boys chorus then presented "Vive L'Amour," arranged by Shaw-Parker. Following this the girls chorus presented "Shy Love" (Ukrainian Folk Song), arranged by Boberg. Four selected ensembles from participating high schools performed. They were a girls' trio from Cook, a madrigal f r o m Humboldt, a soprano solo by Janet Livingston from Nebraska City, and the Choraleers from Auburn. The concert was closed with three numbers by the mixed chorus: "Kum Ba Yah," arranged by Gardner; "Moon Mon" (calypso) by Oliver, arid "Trumpet Voluntary" by Purcell-Pollock.

'ml:

..:II

(Continued from page one) vis, Winnie Sporer, Linda Stephens, Jeanie Rhinehart, Sue Dickerson, Ruth Schnute, Lois Layden, and Sharon Peacock, and instructor, Mrs. Sproul. Peru was the smallest school who attended and they had the most members present.

C is for the Christ Child, born on Christmas Day, With animals for visitors, he lay upon the hay. H is for the Halo, that shone round Mary's head, And little baby Jesus, so sleepy in his bed. R is for the Riches of frankincense, myrrh, and gold, The Wise Men brought to Jesus, the wealth is yet untold. I is for the Interest they showed the little child, Who slept there in the stable, so very still and mild. S is for the Star, which sparkled big and bright, It led the shepherds to him, on that glorious night. T is for the Than~ the world is still expressing, To God our Heavenly Father, for His wondrous blessing. M is for the Multitude of people far and near, Who celebrate this season at the end of every year. A is for the Angel on top of every tree, And lights which twinkle gaily for everyone to see. S is for the Santa Claus, who brings his bag of toys, He takes his gifts to Mom and Dad, and all the girls and boys. D is for the Deer, that pull old Santa's sleigh, While he delivers presents, before the break of day, A is for the Anxiousness in hearts of one and all, I hope he fills my stocking, hanging on the wall. Y is for the Yule log, a custom some hold dear, Its warmth is spread to all who want a bit of cheer. By Carol Niebuhr

Plan Field Trip To Omaha School On Thursday, December 20, Mr. B. A. Eddy and Mr. H. W. Johnson will sponsor a field trip to Omaha to visit the George W. Norris Junior High School. Those who will attend are Mrs. Lucile Gilliland, Mrs. Melissa Jarecke, Karolyne Powers, Robbert Reimers, Wayne Shafer, Mrs. Ruth Tushla, Charlotte Wheeler and Larry Rathe. The purpose of the trip is to put theory into action. This is a modern school just put into use four years ago. Mr. Eddy extends his thanks for the invitation to Mark K.

Annual Winter Concert . Mullins, principal of the school. To Be Held January 13 Peru State Teachers College Symphonic Band Ensemble. will present its annual winter concert Sunday, January 13, at 3 p.rll.':-- in the college auditorium. The program will feature trumpet soloist Don Johnson, playing the Hayden Concerto. Also included on the program will be the selection "Seascape," featuring trombonist Linda Elliott, and the "Concerto Guosso" by Morrissey, featuring Don Johnson and Carol McLain on trumpet, and Linda Elliott on trombone. Other selections by the fifty member organization will include the "Festival Prelude" by Reed, "Moods and Themes from Featured Movies" by Rosza, and the "Parade of the Charioteers," from the movie "Ben Hur." The public is invited to winter event.

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ELIZA MORGAN HALL By Ardith Pratt

"Deck the halls with boughs of holly," and the halls of Morgan have received the full treatment. The ambitious girls on first have Santa Claus and his eight reindeer sailing down the hall. Everyone interested in candy canes entered the competition for room decorations. Now each room has a personality all its own. Some of the more enthusiastic girls are Susie Sharp and Karen Conrad. They complain they have so many evergreens in their room they're looking for the forest ranger. The spirit of giving has begun to haunt the dorm occupants and Peaunt and Shuck exchanges have resulted. What is Peanut and Shuck? Those girls who participate, draw names. The name they draw is their peanut and each day they do something nice for that girl. All of this is kept secret, and the end result is a party to guess who was peanut and shuck. When we return from vacation one of us will have her M.R.S. degree. Donna Hoeman of Verdon and Duane Elliott of Memphis, Tenn., will be married Friday, Dec. 28. Congratulations to Linda Jeffers. She is engaged to Ken Sims. Vacation plans are in the air but none have reached the drawing board. Apparently "nothing" will be the favorite pastime of the majority. Really now, surely something interesting will happen during those glorious two weeks. Eleanor Frandsen, maybe you will bowl a 300 · again, and this time collect the reward. Good luck to those traveling many miles to be home for the holidays. To one and all: "Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!"

Student Center Board Conference Held At l.S.U. The tenth· annual Conference of Region VIII Association of College Unions was held November 29, 30, and December 1, at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa. Three hundred seventy-five delegates from 23 schools attended. The conference was opened by Stu Barger, president of Region VIII, of the University of Kansas. Presiding at the general session for all delegates was Loren Kottner, regional representative. Student and staff sessions were held in the afternoon. Student topics were: cultural programming, social programming, educational programming, and recreational programming. Planning and financing a new union or addition, and program department problems were the subjects of the staff sessions. The conference banquet was held Friday evening. Student and staff sessions comprised Saturday morning's schedule. Students attended sessions on committee structure and communications, personnel systems for union boards, total organization structure, publicity and public relations methods, and unions as a career. Staff members attended sessions on union administration problems, and building and facility operations. At the general business meeting, Tom Spark from Kansas State University was elected president for the ensuing year. The delegates selected the University of Missouri for next year's conference site. Peru's delegates were: Carla Jacobson, Betty Painter, Susan Sharp, Winnie Sporer, Linda Stephens, Russell Hicks, Raymond Ogle, Gary Stover, Wayne Wallace, Miss Alma Ashley, and Mr. J. D. Levitt.

Faculty Women Christmas Tea The Faculty Women's Association held their annual Christmas Tea in the Student Union cafeteria Sunday, December 9, following "The Messiah." Nearly one hundred faculty members, spouses, and frjends attended. The centerpiece consisted of a white ceramic Christmas tree on a red linen table cloth. The guests were served Christmas cookies, mints, spice tea, and coffee. Serving were Mrs. Albert Brady, Mrs. Ross Adams, Mrs. Evan Van Zant, and Mrs. Bob Henry, president. Mrs. Louise Kregel was in charge of the tea.

Christmas spirit on Peru's. cam· pus is heightened by the bright lights of this huge Christmas tree. which was decorated by the In· dusl:rial Aris. The tall tree sl:ands jusl: norl:h of l:he Indusl:rial Aris Building al: the entrance l:o the campus.

Debaters Participate In Wayne Meet The 1962-1963 Peru Debate Team traveled to Wayne State Friday aRd Saturday, December 7 an,d 8, fo·compete in the Wayne State Tournament. Peru was entered in three of the four classes. They were: debate, Sharon Peacock, Bill Donovan, Pam Froebe, and Dennis Crissman; discussion, Sh a r on Peacock, Bill Donovan, P am Froebe, and Dorothy Bock; and extemporaneous speaking, Dennis Crissman. A series of five debates and three rounds of discussions were held. Twenty schools were represented from Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri, and South Dakota. The results are as yet unknown.

Engineers Give Convo Program Lieutenant Colonel Lex E. O'Brient of the Army Corps of Engineers was guest speaker for convbcation Wednesday, Dec. 5. Lieutenant O'Brient outlined the civil and military duties of the Corps. Its main civic activity concerns flood control. The corps is continually at work to tame the Missouri River and aid navigation. At the present time it has six dams under construction. When its work is completed, the water power ·will be released to Nebraskans for electricity, and the reservoirs will provide recreation areas. The corps military duties include the Atlas missile program, Fallout Shelter programs and building projects on SAC Air Force Base.

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Bobcats Snap Losing Streak At Four Games

Third Floor boys in Delzell Hall used their own initiative and tlieir own money to purchase and decorate this Christmas tree, which stands in the east-west wing on the west end. Those in the photo from left to right include G!!ne Semelrash, Ed. McGaughuy, Vinny Jennings, Jim Lyons, Boyd Wood, Charlie Pratt. Bill Russell, and Jim Tonniges.

The Miracle of Christmas BY PENNY HAYS Perhaps the strangest event we have in the world today is Christmas. Most of us take it for granted; we never stop to think how unusual it really is. It is more unusual and m o r e mysterious than radio, aviation, serums, yes, greater than any discoveries science will make in the next ten years, no matter what they are. No one who really stops to think about Christmas can disbelieve in miracles or in God, the supreme miracle. We celebrate the birthday of an obscure young carpenter who died 2,000 years ago. This man wrote no book, struck no blow for freedom, had no money, no influential friends, no power at all and was executed for high tr~.ason. Everything he taught then sounded odd-the idea of telling an armed world that the real weapons are meekness and love. He lived and died in a very

small town. Men with outward appearances somewhat like Him are living and dying unnoticed every day. How was He different? What was there in that puzzling talk about brotherhood, . forgiveness, and love that dropped such a powerful seed into the simple hearts of His few friends as into ours today. Why do we decorate our shops with holly and ribbon? Why do we go mad with love and generosity and spend hundreds, when a few weeks ago we were grudging pennies? Why the stockings, the trees, the "orphan's benefits," the home celebrations? Why are theaters, clubs, and parks all blazing with lights and fragrant with evergreens for His day? Why, indeed, unless we know or we feel that He was right and that love and service, humanity and forgiveness are the seer~ we are all seeking, the magic formula without which these human hearts of ours will never be satisfied.

Larry Hayes and Tom Yopp paced the Peru State Bobcats to a 75-65 victory over the St. Benedict Ravens Tuesday, December 11, on the losers court. The scoring frQ!TI the floor was very even as both--teams scored 30 field goals. The big difference came as Peru hit 15 of 19 free throws, while their opponents scored only 5 points from the charity stripe. Coa<:h Mcintire stuck to his starting five of Tom Yopp, Larry Hayes, Bill Witty, Ron Snodgrass, and Pat Hamm the entire game. Hayes and Yopp scored 21 and 16 points respectively, w hi 1 e Mike Mccotter was high for the Ravens with 21 points.

Judy Shuey, left, a member of the Faculty's intramural volleyball team, spikes the ball against the Spider Bugs. Waiting to re:turn the spike for the Bugs were left to right, Ron Kelley, Roger Noell, and Bill Tynon. Other Faculty team members look on at left. The Spider Bugs won their third straight contest from the Faculty by a 21-15 count.

Prep Tramples Dostal, Lawlor, Hamm Nehawka, 52-18 Mr. Bill Witty, who was reOn All-Coach Tearn cently appointed head coach at

Peru Prep, made his basketball Three senior members of the debut a success as his Bobkit1962 Peru State Teachers College tens ran rougµshod over a game, football team have been selected but undermanned Nehawka quinby Nebraska College Conference tet, 52-18, Dec. 7, at Nehawka. coaches to the ·all-coaches team. The Bobkittens grabbed an Big Ken Dostal, 6'6" tower of early lead and steadily increased strength from Scribner, w a s it to a commanding 25-11 halfnamed as a tackle on the offentime bulge. sive eleven. This was Dostal's Mike Tynon, John Mcintire, third selection by NCC mentors. and John Eickhoff led the scorNamed at an offensive guard poing parade wjth 15, 14, and 14 sition was Bill Lawlor, two year points, respectively. letterman from Plattsburg, Mo. Although winning by a landPeru State's addition to the deslide margin, it was evident Pefensive squad was Pat Hamm at ru suffered from first game tenhalfback. Hamm, native of Wood sion. Coach Witty is confident his /River, Ill., earned his second let- team will settle down and lose ter as a Bobcat footballer this some of the "jitters" that marke.d faJI. Friday's contest. The Prep "B" squad easily won its first game of the season, 22-14. It was a combined team effort BOBCAT with all members getting into the contest. CHATTER By Pai Hamm

·Coach Jack Mc!ntire's Bobcats, 2 and 4 for the season, play host Cynthia Meier, Keith Rawson, Carolyn Rieber, Adrian Bartek, to Northwest Missouri and WashLinda Bartels, Carol Curd a n.d burn University, before the holiMrs. Lola Baker. Bass clarinet- day vacation sets in. Drop Close Ones The Peru Concert Band under J an Beemer. Oboes- D or o thy Over the last weekend, Dec. 7 the direction of Gilbert Wilson Bock, Ray Harris. Bassoon-Gary and 8, Peru came within whisSchmucker. Alto sax Gary presented the convocation prokers of adding to its win column. gram Wednesday, Nov. 28. Se- Dahmke, Ruth Rulla. Tenor sax- Friday the Bobcats bowed to Bonnie Vanderford. Baritone sax lections played were "Festival Omaha U., 82-81. On Saturday Prelude" by Alfred Reed, "Danza -Betty Wellensiek. Trumpet and they lost to the Morningside Alegre" by James F. Burke, fea- cornet-Don Johnson, Carol Mc- Chiefs, 82- 76. All the players, turing Don Johnson as trumpet Lain, Tom Majors, Karen Work- and I might include Coach Mcsoloist, "Fiesta Charros" and man, Dale Duensing, James Wat- Intire, feel it's about time to win "Dance Fantasy for Band" by son, Allen Chandler, Arthur Lin- some. John J. Morrissey and "High- dahl. Trombone-Linda Elliott, Yopp Hits .31 lights from Exodus" by Ernest Robert Maximer, Alfred Eichoff. Tom Yopp, East Alton, Illinois, Baritone-Russ Workman, Chas. Gold. Wellensiek, Boyd Wood, Marilyn senior pumped in 31 p o int s Also featured on the program Marmet. Bass-James Kelly, Paul against Morningside college. The were the Ethnic Singers, comStevenson. French horn-Eugene total broke Tom's personal recposed of Karen Workman, Russ Walden, Ed McCartney, Anita ord, as his previous high was 23. Workman, Mike Janis, and Gary Hopper Back Cox, Larry Whittington. TymSchmucker, and a brass sextet Marvin Hopper, Auburn freshpani-Virginia Adkins. Sn are which included Don Johnson, man, has been out of action 'due Carol McLain, Russ Workman, drums-James Wilson, A 11 e n to an infected cu~ on his elbow. ' Freemier. Cymbals-Ruth HarLinda Elliott, Ed McCartney and He received the cut in the annuris. Bass drum-Mary Holland. James Kelly. al alumni game. The band will present a formal Christmas Tournament Members of the band and their Our Bobcats will travel to Parinstruments are: Flutes-James concert Sunday, Jan. 13, at 3 p.m. Robbins, Barbara McCoy, Nancy in the auditorium. This concert sons College, Fairfield, Iowa, DeNeiman, Lois Layden and Donna will be open to the public. The cember 27 and 28, to defend their Cox. Clarinets-Joyce Able, Lor- band is also planning a two-day Christmas tournament . c r o W n. Last year the Bobcats won the ene Kostal, Prudence Fritch, tour in the spring. championship by whipping host Parsons College. "Slim" Gets Haircut Ron Snodgrass, 6'7" center, alAppliances - Spor:ting Goods ways asked his teammates for a Hun:ting and Fishing Licenses comb right before game time, 872-2561 CECIL BOWMAN PERU which caused him to receive a number of hecklings from his mates. Ron came to pr act i c e Monday with a new hairdo. It's a burr. PERU CLEANERS & TAILORS Special Repairing and Remodeling Men's and Women's Clothing The Peru Bobcats ended their Forty-five Years Serving Students and Faculty losing streak at four games by PHONE 872-2671 PERU, NEBR. beating the St. Benedict Ravens,

Concert Band Presents Convo

S.G.A. Awards Prizes In Convo Presentation of prize money to dubs which won Homecoming display awards highlighted the Dec. 12 convocation presented by the Student Government Association. First place prize money of $25 and a plaque were presented to the Industrial Arts Club. Second prize of $15 was presented to M.E.N.C., 'thile the senior class was awarded third prize of $10. Tom Yopp, S.G.A. president, introduced the organization's members and told of its functions. Each committee chairman told the duties of his committee and introduced the various members who served on it. Gary Stover spoke on the division of S.G.A. and Student Center Board activities.

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Chuck Baue(s Band Played For Delzell Sponsored Dance Chuck Bauer's band provided the music for the annual Christmas dance held December 14 in the student union cafeteria. Delzell Hall sponsored t h e dance and was in charge of decf)rations. Christmas trees lined the south side of the Union, and there was a display featuring three carolers in front. Hanging on the curtains along the north wall, were wreaths and the words, "Merry Christmas" in red and green. Table decorations consisted of small trees made of candles and net. Mistletoe was generously distributed around the room.

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Bobcats Outlast Buena Vista, 62-50

..L.

Iniramural Baskeiball siarted in ihe Peru Siaie Teachers Col· lege gym Thursday, Dec. 6, with all 16 teams seeing aciion. In ihe above phoio, it seems io be a maUer of who can get the highest io gain possession of ihe rebound. Lonn Presnall (30) of the Playboys, and Jerry Laflin (ai Presnall's lefi) of the Flunkies look on. The Flunkies won ihe contesi.

Peru Alumni Thumps Varsity In Opener, 95-62 BY BARNEY McILVOY

A tall, experienced alumni team ran rough shod over a green and undermanned Peru squad, 95-62, Monday evening, Nov. 26, in the college gym. With Mike Roach hitting consistently from the outside and Bob Buettgenbach ramming home baskets from in close, the Peru grads left little doubt as to the outcome of the contest, even in the first quarter. The alumni pulled to a 39-29 halftime lead. Both teams played even in the third quarter, but in the fourth quarter the "old college touch" returned to the former Peru stars and it was "goodbye, Bobcats." Seven grads scored in double figures with Roach and Buettgenbach leading the parade with lS and 17 points, respectively. Bill Witty scored 17 and Ron Snodgrass 14 for the Bobcats. Peru played without the services of two regulars, Tom Yopp and Larry Hayes. Both were suffering from sprained ankles. With the return of Yopp and Hayes, and the combined talents of Hamm, Jim Hall, Bill Witty and Ron Snodgrass, Peru can look to brighter days ahead.

Tarkio Snaps .Dry Spell By Dumping Bobcats Tarkio (Mo.) College, controlling both back boards and capitalizing on free throw opportunities, gained revenge on Peru State Teachers College with a sound 71-54 victory, Dec. 14, at Tarkio. The loss for Peru ended an eight game winning string against the Owls. Peru last lost to Tarkio in the 1957-5S season. Tarkio grabbed 45 rebounds'to Peru's 3S and converted 23 of 33 free throws, while the Bobcats were capitalizing on only eight of 13 gift shots. With the exception of several

Forward Larry Hayes paced Peru State Teachers College with 20 points Friday, Nov. 30, as the Bobcats outlasted Buena Vista College of Storm Lake, Iowa, 6250. Hayes collected 15 of his points in the second half and eight in the final nine-lll_inutes to lead the 'Cats in their final winning surge. Coach Jack Mcintire's Peruvians led throughout most of the first half by scant margins, but it took a last second lay-up by Pat Hamm to give the Bobcats a 23-22 halftime advantage . In the early stages of the final 20 minutes, Peru State opened up a 37-32 lead, only to see Buena Vista storm back to gain a 44-40 lead. A jump-shot by Tom Yopp put Peru back in front to stay with S:5S left. Hayes canned a'field goal with 6:20 showing on the clock to give the Bobcats a 52-4S ma'rgin and the 'Cats spent the remainder of the evening in a stall. Peru State capitalized on Buena Vista defensive mistakes and fouling in the final minutes to spread the gap to its final 12 point margin. Hamm and Bill Witty added 15 and 14 points respectively. Dick Point paced Buena Vista with 14 points.

brief leads in the opening minutes, the Peruvians tr a i 1 e d throughout most of the first half. At one point Tarkio held a 26-14 advantage, before the Bobcats closed the gap to a 33-30 halftime deficit. Peru tied the game at 35-all with 17:46 remaining, before the Owls again spurted to take full command throughout the remain· der. Tarkio stalled throughout most of the last six minutes and took advantage of the pressing Peru State defense. Tom Yopp led Peru's scoring with 17, while Tarkio's Carrol Hayden garnered the same number. In the "B" team engagement, A gallant Peru State Teachers the young Bobcats erased a one, College basketball team nearly point halftime disadvantage an'd: erased a 14 point deficit in the took a hair-raising 68-65 victory: final 6:30, Friday, but fell one Bill Hunsaker, Lincoln, paced the point short as Omaha University Peru State reserves with 25 copped an 84-83 decision at Peru. points. The loss ended a 17 game Peru State home winning streak and a five ·game ·win· skein over Omaha's Indians. The O.U. quintet, trailing at halftime 37-39, exploded in the second half to apparently wrap up the game. The Omaha surge was sparked by the fine jump A fast-breaking Simpson Col- shooting of Jon Lloyd and an imlege quintet plied their trade proved Indian defense which held with near perfection Dec. 1, in the Bobcats without .a field goal Indianola, Iowa, and trounced for nearly five minutes midway the Peru State Teachers College in the final half. At the end of basketball team, SS-61. that drought the Bobcats found The Iowans, with four players themselves trailing by 14. scoring in double figures, took With only 0:56 remaining, it command early and streaked to appeared the Peruvians were out a 45-32 halftime advantage. of it as they still trailed by six Coach Jack Mcintire's cagers points. Then came a free throw stayed close for 10 minutes, but by Bill Witty, a. field goal by ·could not cope with the fast Tom Yopp, and another pair of break which netted some 14 laygift shots by Witty and the Bobin field goals for the Iowans. cats trailed by only one point Peru State's cause was hamwith 33 seconds remaining. pered by the absence of veteran With Peru pressing to ga~n ball floor general, Tom Yopp, East Alton, Ill. Yopp, hobbling on an possession, Omaha's Paur Kaster ankle injury, played the first half was fouled. Kaster calmly conbut was forced to the sidelines verted the one and one situation during the entire final twenty to give his Indians a three point margin with only 13 seconds left. minutes. The one bright note for the The Bobcats' final gasp resulted Peruvians was the play of fresh- in a tip-in by Don Schmidt with man 'pivot man, Ron Snodgrass, two seconds showing on the Seward, who paced the Peru clock. Time ran out before the State scoring with 22 points. Pat ball could be put in play again. Tom Yopp, visibly slowed by Hamm, Wood River, Ill., was the only other Bobcat to hit in the an ankle injury, paced the Perudouble figures as he tallied 10 vians with 21 points. Freshman Bill Witty turned in lS points points. Jim Isaacson led Simpson Col- and led the Bobcats in the rebound department. Jon Lloyd led lege with lS points. his Omaha mates with 21 points. In the "B" team clash, Peru State edged the Omaha U. Rec serves 6S-67. Bill Hunsaker led the Bobcats with 21 points while Lou Murillo and Richard Tompsett hit 16 each for the Indians.

Bobcats Lose Thriller To Omaha University

Simpson Uses Fast Breaks To Stop Peru, 88-61

ELDON'S CAFE

"For the Finest Food in Town" MEALS

Iniramural volleyball was hot and heavy in ihe final week of aciion. In ihe above photo, Ed Loonijer, jumping to ihe left of ihe net. blocks an aiiempied spike by Jim Sauer of ±he Snappers ieam. Larry Trimble, with back l:o fhe play on left, and Gordon Scoii look on. Loonijer's team, ihe Crazy 8's, handed the Snappers iheir firsi loss, 18-16.

Spider Bugs Win PSTC Vol leyba 11 Championship Crazy S's Second BY FRANK BOSTIC

The Spider Bugs became undisputed intramural volleyball champs Thursday evening, November 29, in the college gymnasium by dumping the Snappers, 26-16, for their fourth win without a setback. The new champs had gained their third victory of the season on the previous Tuesday by crawling over the Faculty, 21-15. Members of the championship team are Larry Rathe, Bob Reimers, Russ Hicks, Mike Hunt, Ron Kelley, Roger Noell, and Bill Tynon. The Crazy S's gained second place in the final standings by nipping the Pussys, 16-13. Earlier in the week, the Crazy S's had knocked the tough Snappers from the undefeated ranks with a hard fought lS-16 win. Members of the Crazy S's are Edwin Loontjer, Frank Bostic, Larry Trimble, Duane Haith, Lester Turner, Lar. ry Duder and Bob Lierz. The second-place finishers' only setback was a close 18-15 loss to the eventual champs in the first game of the season. A three-way tie for third place developed as a result of final night scores. The Snappers, who had started with a pair of wins, had to settle for a share of third following their consecutive losses to the Crazy S's and the Spider Bugs. The Nebishes rebounded from an insulting 36-6 loss to the

Morningside Uses Gift Tasses To Gain 82-76 Win The Peru Bobcats traveled to Morningside College, Sioux City, Iowa, Saturday, December S. They lost, S2-76. The game was a close battle right down to the wire. Peru took the lead only once, at 16-15. The ChiefS then spurted to a 12 point lead, only to have it whittled to one point, 3S-37, by the end of the first half. The second half saw the Chiefs again burst to a 12 point lead.

Peru, Nebraska

Crazy S's ------------- 3 Snappers _____________ 2 2 Nebishes ------------Half Fast ------·-----Faculiy _______________ Jockey Jrs. ___________ Pussys

2 2 1 1

FINAL SCORES Spider Bugs 21. Faculty 15 Spider Bugs 26, Snappers 16 Crazy S's 18, Snappers 16 Crazy S's 16, Pussys 13 Nebishes 32, Half Fasi S Nebishes 24, Jockey J rs. 15 Jockey Jrs. 28, Pussys 14 Half Fast I. Faculty 0

The Peru quintet fought back to trail by only 4 points with 4 minutes remail'.ing. Morningside took ;.idvantage of their 4 point lead and held the ball, fordng the Bobcats to press and eventually foul to get their paws on the ball. The Chiefs were able to capitalize on their charity throws, sealing the victory. Peru outscored their opponents from the field, 33 to 26. Morningside won the game from the free throw line, hitting 30 out of 41. The Bobcats received only 21 tries and hit 10. Tom Yopp, breaking a personal record, hit 31 points. Tom's shooting eye constantly kept the Bobcats within reach.

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Crazy S's to win a pair from the Half Fast team, 32-S, and from the Jockey Jrs., 24-15. The pair of wins gave them a share of third place. The Half Fast team bounced back from the humiliating loss, to the Nebishes to take a forfeit Tupm the Faculty, 1-0. The Jockey Jrs., Pussys and Faculty ended in a three-way tie for last place. Jockey J rs. w on their only game on Tuesday, a 28-14 romp over the Pussys, while the Faculty and the Pussys had won earlier con tests from the Jockey Jrs., and the Nebishes, respectively. Lack of players hurt the Faculty team's chances for a higher finish in the standings, as they had to forfeit two of their four games. FINAL STANDINGS W L Spider Bugs __________ 4 0

JOHN L. LEWIS, Vice Pres. & Cashier


Campus School Commentary

By Pat and Ann Adams

The evening was climaxed by playing games.

Linda Beery led the singing and gave the prayer. The evening's program was a discussion about four religionsChristianity, Judaism, Hinduism, and Buddhism. The topic's purpose. was to acquaint the members with basic aspects of other religions. Richard Elmore served as panel moderator. Panel members were Linda Beery, Joyce Craig, and Ed Meyer. The meeting was closed with the friendship circle.

Now that cold weather and selves is the center of attraction. S.G.A. snow have set in, students at Pe- There is an air of secrecy as the Doctor Gomon sent a letter to ru Prep have had little to do dur- children make gifts for their par- the S.G.A. approving the appointing extra time but dream' of ents. Can't you just see them ment of Mr. Pilkington as sponChristmas vacation and on-com- beaming with pride when their sor of the complaints committee. parents open the presents on ing Christmas events. It was decided that any organThe sophomores are dreaming Christmas Eve? They can say ization which wins the homecomof a white Christmas next Satur- proudly, "I made this all by my- ing display plaque three years in day night, December 15, when self." a row shall be ineligible for comthey present the annual Christpetition the following year. mas dance in the high school auSharon Donlan was elected ditorium. Signs scattered through secretary-treasurer of the S.G.A. the halls \U'ge students to attend. ·Mr. Brady reported that the WESLEY FELLOWSHIP To carry out the coming YuleThe Wesley Fellowship met S.G.A. had no authority about tide season, the student council HOME EC CLUB decisions concerning wearing ap- Wednesday evening, Nov. 5, in The Home Economics Club and home economics classes are parel in the library. He was told the Methodist church. The theme competing to produce the most held a short business meeting that boys are allowed to wear for December was "The World's elaborate and creative Christmas December 10. The club plans to blue jeans but not sweat shirts, Great Religions." Carol Curd led tree. The home econ_omics classes make some more fruit cakes. and girls are not allowed to wear the worship service. Se v e r a 1 After the meeting, a Christmas are in the lead, but give the stutalks were given on the various slacks or shorts. party was held. Games w e r e dent council time! Mr. Buethe suggested we work world religions. Buddhism was The English classes have col- played and Christmas c a r o 1s on getting some interesting peo- presented by Prudence Fritch, lected and arranged in the cased were sung.' ple on our campus to speak to Confucianism by Lois Layden, Refreshments were served by create cultural ideas concerning Judaism by Mary Ann Holland, bulletin board in the hall, and on classroom bulletin boards, Mrs. Sproul and the officers of the students. and Mohammedanism by Judy material illustrating the influ- the club. Anville. ence of the Bible on our lives. 1<:APPA DELTA PI A short business meeting was The Bible, the greatest work of W.A.A. ' · Kappa Delta Pi held its month- conducted by Sam Rankin. The The W.A.A. held a short busiliterature in the world for cenly meeting Dec. 3, in the Music group discussed forming Wesley turies, is the subject of study in ness meeting November 28. Hall. Gene Wright, president, Players, which would present reJeanette Fox, Janet Hayes, the English classes. presided over the business meet- ligious one-act plays. "Victory, victory is our 1 cry" and Karen Cahow were put in ing. was chanted by both the volley- .charge of the activities for the The annual . Christmas party NEWMAN CLUB ball and basketball teams this December meetings. The Newman Club held its followed the regular meeting. Basketball was played afte£. past week. At 5:30 p.m. on DeArdith Pratt and Winnie Sporer Christmas party Wednesday, December 7 the basketball squad the meeting. organized Christmas charades. cember ·12, in St. Clara's church. The W.A.A. played the h i g h alj,d twelve fortunate girls boardChristmas religious recitations Singing of carols and seasonal ed a bus enroute to Nehawka to school girls a game of volleyball music was led by JoAnn Frer- and a movie "The Christmas pick up the first victory of the December 5. ichs. ·After the singing, a lunch Story" was presented by Father season-52-18. The volleyball Rydz. The group then s a n g was served by the officers. team won its first victory Tues- WHITE ANGELS Christmas carols. The White Angels held a bake day, December 11, with Brock. There was a gift exchange from S.G.A. The Prepsters didn't stop with sale November 26 to raise money At the last meeting of the Santa's grab bag, and games were this. The boys went on to match to buy crests for the blazers. S.G.A., Tom Sewell gave a re- played. The Angels decided to sell apthe girls' success by defeating The club wishes to thank Mrs. port concerning the curriculum Brock 62-45. We're really proud ples at the basketball games. Jerome Stemper for providing committee. Committees were assigned to of our volleyball and basketball The following people were ap- refreshments. work at the concession stand at teams. pointed to serve on the judiciary S.C.F. Both the grade school and high the game and to mark off a seat- board: school are working hard to mem- ing section for the White Angels Student Christian Fellowship Senior-Gary Dahmke. orize verses for the c o m i n g and Cherubs. held it~ first December meeting Junior-Susan Sharp. To improve the appearance of Christmas Chorale to be presentSophomore-Frank Spizuoco. ed Friday, December 21 at 1:50 the yelling section at the games, Freshman-Beverly Quinn. p.m. in the college auditorium. the White Angels will form the INGERSOLL Sponsor-Mr. Jack. letter "P,'' and the Cherubs will Under the direction of Mr. R. T. Barber Shop Benford with the assistance of be arranged around them to FOREIGN LANGUAGE AUBURN, NEBRASKA student teachers and Mrs. Mary- form .the background. The Foreign Language CJ u b Elly Ingersoll . Nate Hayes on Adams, the students are learnmet Nov. 26 in the Music Hall. ing, in addition to traditional SIGMA TAU DELTA Sigma Tau Delta, the honorary The group sang "Gaudeamus Igicarols, songs arranged by Mr. English fraternity, h e 1 d its tur," its theme song. The presiBenford. Parents and anyone else dent, Carolyn Reiber, presented interested are welcome to enjoy Christmas party Monday, Dec. 10, several resolutions and these will at the Silas Summer's home. this program. Quality Meats and The theme of the evening's be voted upon at a later time. "Deck the Halls With Boughs The pledges of the club will be of Holly,'' is the theme for the program was "Christmas in LitGroceries initiated the week of December grade school halls this Christmas erature." Thomas Aitken read an 3-7. The club also planned a season. Each door of the rooms original Christmas poem; Janice Christmas party. Richard Baker, Open Sundays and has a wreath of some sort. Mrs. Jones reviewed an American Litsocial chairman, disc~ssed sevEvenings Adams' kindergarten door h a s erature Christmas story, an d eral other activities before adan eye-catching wreath made of Carolyn Rieber reviewed an Engjourning. toothpicks and sprayed with arti- lish Christmas story. J oAnn Frer17th at L Street ' ichs gave the history of Christficial snow. AUBURN.NEBRASKA TRI BETA In the rooms a Christmas tree mas carols and led the group in Tri Beta held its re g u 1a r decorated by the children them- song. monthly meeting Nov. 26. Following a short business meeting, plans were discussed concerning Christmas. Among these plans was a Christmas party, which will be held before Christmas vaClothing Auburn, Nebraska Ph. 274-4315 cation.

Organizations

Wednesday, Dec. 5, in the music hall auditorium. Helen Drumm led the group in singing. S.C.F. was invited to join Lutheran Student Association for a candlelight service Wednesday, Dec. 19. Committees were organized for the Christmas party to be held at the next meeting. Linda Jeffers was in charge of the evening's program. Lucille Christensen read "The Black Madonna," a story of racial prejudice at Christmas time. The meeting was closed with the friendship circle.

LUTHERAN CLUB The Lutheran Club held its regular m'*ting on Wednesday, Dec. 5, 1962.' President Jim Felten called the business meeting to order a n d the subject of Gamma Delta was given consideration. President Felten read the constitution to the group. The Lutheran Club will be involved in a transition period and will emerge early next semester as Gamma Delta. The group voted to have a Christmas party. The date was set for December 19. A film was then presented by Rev. Schooler. The film dealt with the happenings at the Lutheran convention in Cleveland, Ohio.

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Church· Club News S.C.F. Student Chri.stian Fellowship held its weekly meeting Wednesday, Nov. 28, in the Music Hall.

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Nebraska's Oldest College

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . .

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 58

Number 7

JANUARY 21. 1963

Nebraska's Best College

Twenty-three Will Get Their Degrees In January Gordon D. Hall Peru State Receives Loan Grant Twenty students will receive Addresses .C~onvocation Nebraska State Teachers Coltheir B.S. in Education; one will Dean Melvin Has lege at Peru has received a grant Gordon D. Hall, nationally Professional Services of $250 from the J. M. McDonald get a B.A. in Education; and two known "hate group" lecturer and will get B.A.'s. Graduates and Numerous Duties Foundation, Inc. of Hastings, to author, told an all-college convo- Will Serve You home addresses follow. be used as matching funds for Bachelor of Aris (Liberal Aris)Richard H. Brown, Omaha, Nebr., Math, Phys, Hist; Robert R. Penkava, Beatrice, Nebr., Gen Sc, Phys Sc. Bachelor of Aris in EducaiionGerald L. Kirkendall, Auburn, Nebr., Eng, Bus Educ. Bachelo~ of Science in Educ.Monty L. Allgood, Peru, Nebr., Gen Sc, Biol; Florence M. Arnold, Falls City, Nebr., Elem Educ; Richard D. Berlin, Western Springs, Ill., Elem Educ; Thomas J. Brown, Falls City, Nebr., Gen Sc, Phys Sc; Betty L. Cogdill, Shelby, Iowa, Elem Educ; Galen J. Conn, Auburn, Nebr., Ind Arts, Biol; Kenneth W. Dostal, Scribner, Nebr., Phy Educ, Biol; James L. DuVal, Tabor, Iowa, Gen Sc, Biol; Darrel E. Feit, Beatrice, Nebr., Biol, Ind Arts; Bruce H. Francey, Moira, N. Y., Ind Arts, Phys; Mary Ann Graham, Auburn, Nebr., Elem Educ; Marian L. Johnson, Thurman, Iowa, Elem Educ; John J. Ramsey, Dawson, Nebr., Phy Educ, Bus Educ; Roy R. Rubenking, Syracuse, Nebr., Math, Biol, Phys; Gary L. Schlosser, Dawson, Nebr., Math, Hist, Soc Sc; Carol Ann Sudik, Virginia, Nebr., Elem Educ; Vera Mae Sugden, Tabor, Iowa, Elem Educ; Larry W. Swett, Malvern, Iowa, Math, Phys Sc, Phys; Sharylin N. Vrtiska, Table Rock,· Nebr., Elem Educ; Michael Zinn, Peru, Nebr., Phy Educ, Bus Educ.

Renovated Library In Daily Use BY SHARON DONLAN Many months of planning and hard work have terminated as the renovation of the campus library has become a .reality. The dismantling of the interior of the library began in February, 1962. The contract date was up to October 15, 1962. The original appropriation was $150,000. This included the building and all the furnishings. The most difficult part of the remodeling was the entrance and the stairway leading from t h e main floor to the second floor. Plans of the library were drawn up using the L.A.A. guideline. The guidelines were furnished to the architects to make the drawings. The furniture and equipment were purchased from the Prison Industries. The old library was meant to house approximately 20,000 volumes but did house 60,000 volumes. Since the remodeling, the capacity is over 100,000. The library has three floors. The main portion of the basement is turned over to bound periodicals and the multi-type purpose room. Originally the multi-type purpose room was conceived to house the audio visual department and collections but limited funds ruled this out for the present. On the main floor is the circulation desk, which is the only control point in the building. East of the circulation desk is the reference room, south of the circulation desk is the technical processes, and adjacent to both is the main stack tower. West of (Continued on page three)

BY KAREN CONRAD A face that should be familiar to all on the campus is that of Dr. Keith Melvin, Dean of the College. Dr. Melvin came to Peru in November of 1956 from the University of Nebraska, where he was an instructor in the College of Education. Prior to this, he was dean of McCook Junior College from 1946 to 1955, superintendent of schools at Blue Hill for three years, and principal and coach for seven years at Syracuse. His first teaching job was at Upland, where he was coach and instructor in math and science for four years. Dr. Melvin's primary function is being the administrative assistant to the president. He is also directly responsible for program and instruction. Some of his other duties include assisting the president in statistical administrative research as th e president may direct; acting in lieu of the president during his absences and performing s u ch tasks as may be assigned by the president from time to time; recommending new staff members in cooperation with the heads of d~'­ visions; formulating and presenting policies for the considera: tion of the college faculty, and perhaps the most important, directing the summer session.

Dr. Melvin is originally from Fairbury. He received his A.B. degree from Peru and his"-M.A. and Ed.D. degrees from the University of Nebraska. He has also done graduate work at the University of Denver. Mrs. Melvin is an elementary teacher in Nebraska City. The Melvins have a daughter, Nancy, who is a health counselor in the Denver Public Schools.

HOME ECONOMICS CLUB Doctor Siegner was the guest speaker at the Home Economics Club meeting on January 14. His topic was "The Importance of Home Economics." He spoke on the various fields in home eco(Continued on page six)

cation at Peru State Teachers College Friday morning that he is interested in preserving our system of orderly government in the United States. Mr. Hall, the subject of a December 8 Saturday Evening Post article, "Battler Against Bigotry," indicated that keeping well informed is the only way to protect oneself against the inroads of "hate organizations."

The lecturer quoted from the "Blue Book" of the so-called, "Conservative" John Birch Society, showing how the methods advocated by John Welch arethe same ones used by the Communists-front organizations, curbing of free speech, undermining parliamentary procedure. According to Mr. Hall, "The answer is to elevate public opinion to the point where people will begin to reject silly ideas and dangerous ideas because they wilI recognize that this is not the path of progress in the United States." Mr. Hall conceded that these groups occasionally do tell the truth. "Like the communist worker tells us we have an unempJoyment problem in Northern Minnesota. Well, of course, we do. I had a man up in Northern Minnesota say to me, 'Are yoU''teHing the communists are wrong when they say there is no unemployment on the iron ranges?' "Of course, we do," continued Hall, "but their solution is Marxism! I am not interested in Marxism, but in a democratic and orderly change which will relieve the problem." The speaker pointed to the need for a wide frame of reference so that all of these problems can be fit into a meaningful focus so that you know ab o u t NATO, you know about your own government, you know about the charter of the UN, you know about the Congo. Mr. Hall conceded that it is difficult to develop all of this, (Continued on page three)

BY ARDITH PRATT Hour by hour and day by day, Placement works continuously to put you Peru Staters on the "highway to opportunity." By enrolling in placement, a student has access to many services and opportunities which would otherwise not be available. One of the services is the publication of a monthly bulletin during the second semester. This bulletin lists teaching vacancies in the United States. Last ye'\r over 2,175 schools advertised far teachers through this office. Of the 516 Nebraska schools, 272 reported to Peru Placement. One hundred of the reported positions were filled by 1962 Peru graduates. 'Placement acts as a go-between for the employer and the prospective employee. Placement arranges interviews when hiring employers are on the campus. When credentials are needed, again Placement lends a helping hand. Placement assembles and prepares photostatic credentials, and sends the credentials to employers requesting them. These credentials are kept confidential and up-to-date. Last year, Placement processed over 1,300 sets of credentials. When the student leaves Peru, he takes Placement with him. If he has been enrolled in Placement, he may at any time call upon the bureau service. Many long-time alumni have secured jobs through this office. Placement is not restricted to teaching jobs. Information from the U. S. Employment Office, the Nebraska Employment Offices and the Civil Service Bureau is posted on the bulletin boards. This information covers the fields of industry, business, and trades. Information concerning summer jobs is also available. Placement is for you, me, and everyone. Placement welcomes the opportunity to help the students in any way they can. If you need a place in life, try Placement!

Don't Pity Me; I Am An American BY MARY HOLLAND I was studying it in school. But "I am an American; don't pity now we were actually going to me!" Susan Bishop read the live there for two and a half words of her poem to the as- years! Yes, this time it was difsembled student body. ferent. "I am an American." For me I looked out over the bay as these words brought a feeling of the tugs slowly pulled the ship deep pride that I could not quite into open water. The famous understand. It was more than pa- New York skyline passed before triotism. The words seemed to me. I had seen it many times in be meant for me alone. Memor- my mind's eye as I read of the ies and scenes from the past great city. It had seemed so far whirled in my mind as I tried to away then. Now it was the last comprehend this sensation. Grad- part of America I would see for ually, they fell into place. what seemed to be a long long, As a little girl of ten, I stood at time. "There's the Statue of Liberty, the railing of a great ocean liner. All of my life I had traveled, Susie," I said. But my younger never staying in one place more sister had left with Mommy to than three years at a time. I pose for pictures. knew that my daddy was in the I was left alone with my Air Force and his duties had tak- thoughts, as I would be many en him many places. It was his times in the next two years. life and it was mine too. "I'm ten now; when I come Yet this time I was confused. back, I'll be almost thirteen. I My family and I were not just wonder if everything will be the leaving a town or state-we were same. Sure it will; America leaving America. England had doesn't change that way. Maybe always seemed so far away when it'll just be me seeing it in a dif-

ferent way. I'll be almost grown up then. The Statue of Liberty will be almost out of sight soon. Good-bye Miss America. You are the only real Miss America." I stopped, surprised by my own deep thoughts and dramatization. Then, as the ship started under its own power, I felt the thrill of the great engines. I became a little girl again and scampered off to find my family and start on the new adventure. My parents were on the exchange program. Mommy had tried to explain it to me. "The Royal Air Force of England sends one of its offic'ers and his family to wo.rk with" the United States Air Force. Then our country sends one of its officers and his family to England.'' Mommy had said that it was a job for the whole family, not just for Daddy. She was right. The only contacts our family had with other Americans were through the USAF dependents' (Continued on page three)

National Defense Student Loans, according to Peru State President Neal S. Gomon. As a result of the grant, $2,500 will be made available to worthy and needy students as the federal government will make funds available on a nine to one matching basis. The McDonald F o u n d at i on grant is made annually to all Nebraska colleges participating in the NDSL program. The Foundation is headed by J. M. McDonald, Jr., with Val Peterson, former governor of Nebraska, as vice president and administrator. Under " the NDSL program, preference for loans is given to students with a "superior academic background who express a desire to teach in elementary and secondary schools," and "to students -iVhose academic background fo.dicates a superior capacity or preparation in science, mathematics or a foreign language." All loans are based on financial need and are without interest until one year after graduation after which time the rate will be three per cent per annum on unpaid balances. Repayment o f principal is to be 10 per cent per year, beginni~g one year after eompletion of training and military service. · The loan and interest thereon, of any borrower who serves as a full-time teacher in public . elementary or secondary school will be cancelled to a maximum of 50 per cent, at the rate of 10 per cent of the amount of the loan plus interest, for each academic year of service.

I. A. Club Visits Nuclear Power Plant On Friday, Jan. 11, eighteen members of the Industrial Arts Club and Mr. Russell and Mr. Granger journeyed to Hallam, Nebraska, to view the world's first full-scale nuclear power plant employing a sodium-graphite reactor. The facility was built jointly by funds coming from Consumers Public Power and the United States Atomic Energy Commission. The new power plant can produce enough electricity for a city of 100,000. The plant employs two different means for turning the giant generators-steam produced by heating water with coal, and steam produced by heating water with nuclear fission. At the present time, the conventional method is being used because the nuclear facility is still undergoing final construction and testing phases. It is expected to be in full production later this year. The plant employs 175 people. Total cost of the project including research, development, engineering and construction was $76,000,000. PSEA The Peru Student Education Association will hold its monthly meeting this Monday,. Jan. 21, in the Campus School auditorium (Continued on page six)


A Tll0UGll1: FOR 'l'HE NEW YEAR I thank God that I live in these United States-a country so powerful it can easily defend my home, family, and friends, against any aggressor. A country governed by a system much superior to any other type. A land that is rich enough to help support others who are not as fortunate as we. A land that is rich in natural resources, enough to last hundreds of years. A land that grows more food than we can eat. A land so beautiful that everyone in the whole world is envious of us. A land that is·overflowing with opportunity, a place for every talent. A country filled with people who are happy, happy to be here instead of some other place. Let's start this new year out right by thanking God fo1· what we have. Let's continue through the year constantly thanking Him for His blessings. Let's forgive our enemies. May they become our friends. Let's forget about what we haven't got and thank Him for what we've got. -By Lee Haeberlein.

IS THIS YOU? Have you ever sat in the cafeteria and watched your fellow students eat? If you are from a farm, you might have noticed a dramatic resemblance between this occurrence and that well known feature of farm living called slopping the hogs. , Napkins tucked under chins, elbows on tables, silverware held like machetes-these are some of the characteristics of our Peru State "chow hounds." Students should have more self-pride and realize that these actions make bad impress~ons of our campus. Maybe it does take a little longer to eat 'ii. meal properly and mannerly, but the fact remains that the little things you do now have a lot to do with how you will act later on. Correct eating habits are merely a matter of concentration and carefulness. If all of us become more aware of our conduct in the cafeteria, we will show more respect to our school, and will present better examples to those who judge us. -By Karen Conrad. A REASON FOR ALARM Recent incidents on Peru State's campus have caused much concern to the college administration and to dormitory officers alike. For example, the incident in Majors Hall when a bed was thrown out the window probably brought many laughs to the offenders at the time, but had they stopped and taken time to realize the damage they did, they probably would have used better judgment. · they probably would have used better judgment. This act, which cannot even be attributed to those of high school age, shows a lack of common sense by someone. Before we attempt something of this nature in the future, let's stop and think of some of the hardships it is going to cause, and also of some of the penalties the act will bring if we are caught. It isn't such an appealing idea after all, is it? Another incident of great concern was the theft of records, and of an electric razor from Delzell Hall sometime during the Christmas vacation. It was reported an estimated $108 worth of record albums was taken from one room. This act, which was without doubt profitable to the thief, presents quite a problem to students who live in the various dormitories. Whom can you trust? Is your roommate honest? What would your next door neighbor do if he had the chance? Did your best friend find his way into your room and accidentally find something of yours before it was lost? Fortunately, for most of us, we have great trust in our roommates and our friends and can trust them. Ill most cases the offender is probably someone who holds a grudge or is pretty hard-up for money. It seems the only thing to do when you leave your room at any time is to lock the door. Who knows, the phantom may find his way to your room next? The third incident that has caused quite a stir is the stealing of clothes hangers from the Student Center. Although these hangers are marked, and it is not too hard for Student

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks January 21, 1963

PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Co-Editor ____________________________________ Frank Bostic Co-Editor_____________________________________ Tom Aitken Layout Editor___ ··---------------------------- Kay Camden Personnel Manager ___________________________ Jane Rhodus Advertising Manager-------------·------------- Larry Rathe Sports Editor_________________________________ Larry Rathe Sports Column ____ ··---------------------------- Pat Hamm Delzell Column ______________________________ Curtis Nelson Morgan Column ______________________________ Ardith Pratt Majors Column _____________ ------------------ Dick Elmore Campus School Column_________________ Mary Anna Gnade Reporter------------------------------------- Judith Beran Reporter ___________ --------------------------- Tom Castle Reporter ______________________________ Virginia Cockerham Reporter----------- __ ----------------------- Karen Conrad Reporter ___________ ------------------------ Sharon Donlan Reporter----------------------------------- Lee Haeberlein Reporter-------------··------------------------ Penny Hays Reporter-------------------------------------- Jane Moore Reporter____________________ ----------------- Carol Niebuhr Reporter____________________________________ Edward Smith Reporter------------------------------------ Judith Wilson Reporter-------------------c-------------- Barney Mcilvoy Sponsor_________________________________ Stewart Linscheid

Center board members to recover them, it does take a lot of unnecessary time and effort on their part to search each and every room in quest of them. Be honest with yourself and you'll realize that Crime does not pay. Leave the hang~rs in the Student Center. -By Frank Bostic.

DELZELL NEWS

By Curtis Nelson

drill? Maybe next time it will be the real thing! Happy Birthday to Karolync Powers and Linda Risley. My farewell thought: "Good luck, future dorm columnist, whoever you might be."

After the Christmas recess, everything seems to be in full MAJORS swing again. Everyone is now HALL getting ready for next semester and planning his class schedule. By Th_ere will probably be some Richard new faces around next semester. Elmore On Dec. 14 and 15, three prospective students from H i g h 1and , A new fad has hit Majors Hall Kansas, visited the dorm. They were Philip Malone, Bob Cluck second floor. Gary Fankhauser and John Shrouger brought some and Dick Newton. Gordon Hall, who spoke at the yoyos into the dorm. Many of convocation on Jan. 11, stayed in the fellows, including Carey Lankford, are recalling their old Delzell during his visit in Peru. Two of our residents recently form. left school. They were Charles Harlan Seyfer had an automoPagel and Ron Hartman. Ron is bile accident Jan. 11 on the way going into the Navy. Floyd Goff to Nebraska City. He reportedly recently left the dorm to live in was passing another car, when Nebraska City, from where he his car collided with a Kansas now commutes to school. auto. Others with him were Ken On January 9, one of our resi- Smith, Jim Carlile, and Frankie dents, Michael Chu, cooked a Kan. Chinese dinner at the Methodist Harold Choate is trying to church here in Peru. Approxiqualify for the Audubon Society. mately 80 people attended. As far as we know now, Mrs. He found a small sparrow in the Paradise is going to be back with dorm. After showing the b i r d around the dorm, he turned it us again next semester. loose.

ELIZA MORGAN HALL By Ardith Pratt "The calm before the storm" i.s apt description of Morgan Hall, as the girls prepare for finals. Lois Layden, Joan Schultz, Linda Bartels, Judy Shuey, Joan Fritch and Cynthia Meyer are wondering what has happened to their chocolate cake and brownies. Anyone gaining undue weight will be called in for questioning. Third floor held its annual Miss Beautiful contest the other night. Peggy O'Neil captured the cro~n for 1963 from Carolyn Mercer. The runners-up were Karen Conrad, Karen Cahow, Sharon Donlan, Susan Sharp, Mary Ann Lewellyn, and Jean Reiman. Leanna Ingwerson acted as Master of Ceremonies. The annual event was closed with a coronation brawl. (?) Basement girls, is it snug-sleeping with your pajamas sewed shut? Congratulations are in order. Jean Reiman is engaged to Larry Clinton of Glenrock, Wyoming, ' and Penny Hays is engaged to Terry Hinze of Omaha. Madelyn Bleach, Ellen LaBate, Penny Hays, Judy Wilson, Jane Moore, Joan Schultz, Peggy O'Neil, Jan Beemer, Judy Wolf, Charlotte Wheeler, Shirley Talley, Brenda McCarthy, Ginny Grossman, Karen Hamm, Sharon Richardson, Melissa Jaracke, and Marilyn Zwickel honored Sue Dickerson with a bridal shower. Sue will be married Saturday, Jan. 26, to Jack Broady. Anyone wishing to raise his spirits through these trying test days should just fall down to the basement and join Kay Bender, Marjorie Willis, Barb Behrns, Barb Thompson, Judy Bence, Janice Jones, Barb Gordon and Mary Gonnerman. When their spirits are low, they organize a joke party and have a laughing good time. What floor had the fake fire ~

Mrs. Helen Donovan, Majors' housemother, received her new General Electric stereo. Her Christm~s present from the Majors men was money for records, and she is making good use of the present. Bruce Francey has had some of the fellows wondering when they first walk into his room. A full Seagram decanter is prominently displayed on his shelf. Bruce claims it is really filled with pop corn oil. He has even put a sign on the bottle telling unbelievers to taste the contents, if they don't believe him. Congratulations to Jay DuVal and Bruce Francey. They w i 11 graduate at the end of this semester. Larry (Boat) Johnson has a picture of Elvis Presley on his bulletin board. For further information on this, talk to "Boat." Skip Ogle and Joe Perina are just two of the Majors men who have be.en running their heaters full time. The cold weather is not really appreciated by most of the fellows.

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At present, the dorm residents are either taking finals or studying for other finals. After Thursday, the men can relax for a few days. Congratulations to Ed McCartney. He is engaged to Fe r n Willms from Sidney, Iowa. The engagement was announced December 1. With the close of this semester, there will be new appointments for the Pedagogian staff. This is my last column, so I would like to thank all the Majors men for their help with the column.

Peru Group Appears On TV Program The Ethnics, a Peru campus singing group, appeared on the Joe Martin Show over KOLN-TV in Lincoln, Friday evening, January 11. The group sang a number of songs and was interviewed by Mr. Martin. The Ethnics members are Kar·

take a break ••• things go better with Coke Bottled under the authorlly of The Coca-Cola Company by:

Nebraska City Coca-Cola Bottling Co. en Workman, Russ Workman, Michael Janis and Gary Schmucker. At the close of the program, the group was invited to appear again on the television show.


Calenda SEPTEMBER 1962 8-Peru beats Tarkio 13-7. 12-13-First semester enrollr, increased 9.5% over year. 15-Peru Bobcats defeat N01· west Missouri State Beare. 7-6. 17-Watermelon feed held in Oak Bowl. 20-Ninth ~nnual Variety She 22-Peru beats St. Mary of t Plains 34-6. 25-Cheerleaders elected: Jan Beemer, Frank Bostic, Mary Anne Lewellyn, M a r i 1y n Masters, Jeannie Rhinehart, and Don Clark. Alternates are Mary Sautter and Karolyne Powers. 27-All school picnic held on football field. Following the picnic, the freshmen were grouped and the initiation events were begun. 29-Peru ties Kearney 13-13.

Don 1t Pity Me;

I Am An American (Continued from page one) school that Susie and I attended, and through the Anglo-American square dances for which Daddy called. We all lived our lives in a glass cage. In turn, we were studied and ignored, criticized and praised. Finally, near the end of the tour, we were accepted as members of the English community. All of this came at a time when I was beginning to grow up and understand the world in which I lived: I saw my country presented to the English people in both a favorable and unfavorable light. Somehow, while I was stillquite young, I learned to know Amer" ica. I knew it only as one c a n know something after he h a s backed away from close contact and taken a long look. Still, I was only thirteen, and young girls tend to push such matters to the backs of their minds. Then, sitting at the assembly, years later, I remembered what I had said to my mother when we were finally back "Stateside" and traveling across country. "Mommy, it all looks so bright and modern and free. I love America." "Yes, Mary, we all do. We're very lucky to live here."

Now I was beginning to understand why I felt so proud. If only those words could make everyone who heard them feel the same way. Perhaps they did. I am not the only one who loves America. Yes, it means so much. "I am an American; don't pity me!"

Renovated Library In Daily Use (<;ontinued from page one) the stacks is the collection rqom, and west of the circulation ·&esk is the browsing and newspaper periodicals reading room. To the east and west of the third floor are reading rooms, and there is an east and west seminar room adjacent to the stacks. A large reserve room is located off the third fl00r landing. An attractive feature of the new library is the first floor column windows which set off the shelving arrangement. There are two scetions of double faced shelving coming out six feet from the wall and wainscot high. This tends to break up the large empty spaces. · The library staff is very appre. ciative of the patience and understanding which the students and faculty have shown. It will try to provide improved services as soon as possible.

BANK OF PERU PHONE 872-2331

Member F.D.I.C. INVITES YOUR BUSINESS CARROLL LEWIS, President

JOHN L. LEWIS, Vice Pres. & Cashier

PERU CLEANERS

& TAILORS

Repairing and Remodeling Men's and Women's Clothing Forty-five Years Serving Students and Faculty PHONE 872-2671 PERU, NEBR.

ELDON'S CAFE

"For the Finest Food in Town" MEALS

SHORT ORDERS

Open: Monday · Saturday 6:00 a.m. · 11:00 p.m. Sunday 6:00 a.m. · 8:00 p.m. Peru, Nebraska

OCTO,BER 1962 6-Peru ties Hastings 14-14. 11-P Club makes $1,044 at auction held in Oak Bowl. 13-Peru defeats Doane 13-7. 20-Homecoming 9:30 a.m.-Homecoming displays. Theme : · " 0 u r World's Fair." 9:30-11:00 a.m.-Free coffee and doughnuts for registered alumni and guests in Student Center Snack Bar. 10:00 a.m.-Judging of displays. Industrial Arts Club wins first prize. 10:45 a.m.-P Club luncheon, Student Center dining room. 11:45 a.m.-All alumni luncheon, honoring classes of years ending in 2 and 7. 1:00 p.m.-Open House in dormitories until game time. 2:00 p.m.-Peru State prayed Chadron State and defeated them 14-0. Mary Anne

Dr. Harold Boraas Associated With Peru For Eleven Years Dr. Harold Boraas, Dean of Students at Peru State, has been associated with the college for 11 years. He is also professor of educational psychology and currently teaches general psychology. Dr. Boraas commented that during his career, he has taught every subject in his particular field.

l.?n Snodgrass, freshman center, loops one in during ihe Wash1Tniversiiy game on the Peru maples.

Cagers 4-~orward To 7-E -s-)f

coach pfri{~nt clip. al at Peru, gymnastic~' i;iark groJliing interest. Last ye gym team put on many perforn,. ances during halftime at basketball games, and this year promises even greater things.

'"J::·-,, rsince

1

Sea.sfil't"emE:." n . .:0 a.t Wayne State. 8-M'6rnmgs1de defeats Peru 8476. 11-Peru defeats St. Benedict's 75-65. 13-Annual Christmas Tea held in Eliza Morgan Hall. 15-Peru defeats Northwest Missouri State 79_72 . 20-Peru defeats Washburn 60 .. 54 . 27-28-Peru ranked in third place in Mid-America Tourney.

JANUARY 1963 9-Peru defeated 75-72 by Emporia in overtime contest. 12-Peru defeats Kearney 84-60. 13-Band concert.

Gordon D. Hall Addresses Convocation (Continued from page one) but this is the meaning of a good education. He pointed out further that if you "do not get all of this, and you do not get your homework, then it seems to me you're wasting the best years of your lives and the rewards of being partially informed."

He received his A.B. degree from St. Olaf College, Northfield, Minnesota; his M.A. from Columbia University, New York City; and his Ph.D. from Cornell University, Ithaca, N~w York. The dean of students has many duties. They include holding conferences with students ab o u t living facilities, work, scholarships, and loans; arranging and directing the orientation program; preparing a list of approved off-campus housing for students; directing and supervising the counseling service; testing students in the undergraduate program; giving excuses to students who are absent from classes and convocations; supervising extra-curricular activities, and appointing faculty chaperons. These are just a few of the many services rendered by the dean.

completion average of 40.5 p e r cent. Peru .. State success from the charity stripe leaves something to be desired as the Mcintiremen

2-1lt

0

The squad was formed on a strictly volunteer basis and is open to everyone. Most students come from the gym classes or various athletic teams. The only awards given to this team are self-satisfaction and an opportunity to imp r o v e one's physical fitness. The students have a good time and. they also serve a purpose for the school. Besides halftime entertainment at basketball games, the squad will give lectures and short demonstrations to high schools. Much time and energy has been put into the gymnastics program. This includes working on equipment and cleaning an d building any material that can be made into gym apparatus. The gym team has three major projects at this time: building a new gym room, building gym equipment, and buying new uniforms. The new uniforms will be white pants, white slippers and Columbia blue shirts.

PERU MARKET Rex Rains Groceries Meats Lockers Fruits and Vegetables

Free Delivery Tuesday and Friday Phone 872-4351

BOWMAN'S HARDWARE Appliances - Sporting Goods Hunting and Fishing Licenses PERU

872-2561

CECIL BOWMAN

Hill's Rexall Drugs Complete Line of School Supplies

Dr. Boraas is married and has two daughters, who are also married. His hobbies include walking and working crossword puzzles.

Revlon, Coty and Evening in Paris Cosmetics

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KODAKS & SUPPLIES Fast Film Service


A THOUGHT FOR THE NEW YEAR I thank God that I live in these United States-a country

so powerful it can easily defend my home,

family, and friends, against any aggressor. A country governed . by. a system much superior to any other type. A land that is nch enough to help support others who are not as fortunate a._s we. A land that is rich in natural resources, enough to last hundreds of years. A land that grows more food than we c~n eat.. A land so beautiful that everyone in the whole world is env10us of us. A land that is overflowing with opportunity, a place for every talent. A country filled with people who are happy, happy to be ht:re instead of some other place. . Let's start this new year out right by thankmg God for what we have. Let's continue through the year constantly thanking Him for His blessings. Let's forgive our enemies. May they become our friends.. Let's forg~t about what we haven't got and thank Him for what we ve got. · -By Lee Haeberlein.

red Press

~~~ii r,ds the St,

IS THIS YOU?

'a

Board and room charges at Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru will be increased $9 a semester beginning with the 1963 fall term, according to President Neal S. Gomon. Proportionate increases will also prevaili for the 1963 summer sessions. The increase is necessitated by rising costs in dormitory operation and maintenance. The i n c re a s e amounts to 50 cents a week and all will be allocated to dormitory funds. N o increase in board charges is contemplated at this

time. Beginning in September, 1963, the board and room charge will be $289 a semester with board on a 5-day basis. A change in policy of board and room payments will also be in effect with the total board and room payment due on registration day.' In unusual circumstances individual students may apply for deferment of not to exceed one-half of the board and room until mid-way in the semester. All applications for first admission to the college must be accompanied by a $10 tuition nonrefundable deposit, which will be applied to tuition charges when student actually enrolls.

WHEN

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ROURKE JEWELERS AUBURN

Wheeler As M

~iiracle

an

77

im Pedagogian, Febr. 4, 1941) DE ..'.\. news story from Lincoln, N ritten by Charles Arnot, re' ased by United Press, was car:ed in a number of Nebraska ·.ailies Sunday, add.fog to the .-·eputation of Coach Al Wheeler of the Bobcats, and to the reknown of the teams. Here's the ei story: SI

g• Peru Teachers finally grabbed a the brass ring on the merry-goround of Nebraska college sports r teams because genial Al Wheel< er believed there had to be some artistic success before it could be practical.

Have you ever sat in the cafeteria and watched your fellow students eat? If you are from a farm, you might have noticed a dramatic resemblance between this occurrence and that well known feature of farm living called slopping the hogs. · . Napkins tucked under chins, elbows on tables, silverware held like machetes-these are some of the characteristics of our Peru State "chow hounds." Students should have more self-pride and realize that. these actions make bad impressions of our campus. Maybe it does take a little longer to eat meal properly and manner._ ly, but the fact remains that the little things you do now hai a lot to do with how you will act later on. · Correct eating habits are merely a matter of concent tion and carefulness. If all of us become more aware of ·~ conduct in the cafeteria, we will show more respect to 1.school and will· , • · "nr,il~s r<>Y' ~."w.ho judge . ' '" · Teachers Couege hmd antics. Si.... ,,.,, Conrpomts rom as much as 14 points paced both clubs. <· --,-.ci in the second half to tie From that point until the end Emporia (Kans.) State 66-all at of play the two quintets traded the end of regulation plaJ7 only to buckets until a 66-all existed as see Emporia State take a 75-72 the buzzer sounded. overtime decision. During the overtime period, Coach Jack Mcintire's Bobcats trailed throughout most of the Peru State found the range for contest and trailed Emporia 40- only one field goal, that by Bill 34 at the half. Capitalizing on a Witty, Syracuse. A pair of free Peru State second half scoring throws each by Pat Hamm, Wood slump, Emporia surged to a 48-34 River, Ill., and Tom Yopp, East lead before the Bobcats began Alton, Ill., finished out the scortheir comeback. ing for Peru. Ron Snodgrass' hook shot sent Bob Goldsmith provided the Peru into a 53-52 lead with some big Hornet punch in overtime six. minutes remaining. Snod- with two fielders while Doug grass, frosh pivot from Seward, Glaysher and Larry Chaney con. ....,, banged in nine points in the clos- tributed single fielders to give ing minutes of regulation play to the Kansans the three point ovpace the Bobcats' come-from-be- ertime win.

Board and Room Costs To Increase

Season Recap

Center unneceg;:

Three years ago Wheeler came west facing the task of pulling the Bobcats out of the athletic doldrums where they had languished through four campaigns, except for a brief excursion into the basketball spotlight. The extraction promised to be a long and painful process. Peru had been cuffed around at random in football and even basketball was still a problem, despite a success preview before Coach Stu Baller departed for Omaha university. Wheeler's first move was to order an obituary for the school's defeatist complex. Next came a transfusion of new spirit into the student body. "We had to build a desire to win before ever thinking of btilding a team," he explained. "That was one of the hardest jobs." The state college record book since 1938 substantiates the practical success of Wheeler's formula. As for the "artistic" angle, rival coaches agree emphatically that current Bobcat editions lack no desire for victory. Peru's football renaissance was not achieved overnight. The Bobcats still showed traces of grogginess during Wheeler's first year and won only one game. But in basketball they rolled along prosperity road, winning the N.I.A.A. championship, reaching the semifinal round in the National Intercollegiate tournament at Kansas City, Mo., and finishing a great campaign with 22 victories in 27 games.

BY LARRY RATHE The annual Alumni-Varsity game opened the 1962-63 basketball season on November 26. The bigger and more experienced alumni turned the game into a rout as they defeated the varsity, 95-62. In the first regular season game the Bobcats played host to Buena Vista College. Although out-manned greatly, the Peru team turned in a defensive gem and defeated "the Iowans 62-50. The following day, the Peruvians traveled to Simpson College to take on the Simpson quintet. It was a long night for the Bobcats as the fast breaking I ow a team walked away with an 88-61 win. On December 4, Peru journeyed to Tarkio, Missouri, to encounter the Tarkio Owls. The Bobcats again hit a night of cold shooting and took their second defeat in a row 71-54. On December 7, Peru entertained the Omaha U. Indians on the Peru maples. A gallant Peru State team nearly erased a 14point deficit, but fell one point short as Omaha U n i v e r s i t y copped an 84-83 decision. The loss ended a 17-gariie Peru St ate home winning streak. The following evening the Bobcats suffered their fourth straight loss as they were nipped by Morningside College of Iowa 82-76. Peru finally broke its victory drouth by winning away from home at St. Benedict's expense. The Peruvians again turned in a fine defensive game in a 75-65 victory. Back on the victory road, the Bobcats won their second in a row as they defeated tall and talented Northwest Missouri State. The fine ball club from Maryville, Missouri, was never out of the game but could never quite overtake the Bobcat lead as Peru defeated them 79-72.

BOBCAT CHATTER By Pai Hamm Coach Jack Mcintire and Co. are on the right road to repeat as NCC basketball champions. They started conference play by whipping Kearney, 84-60. Kearney's Second Loss The defeat was Kearney's second in conference play. Doane whipped the Antelopes earlier 78-64. The Bobcats played at Doane last weekend. Wayne Has Edge The way things stand at present, Wayne has a slight edge over the Bobcats. This is because of the fact that the Wildcats have already whipped Chadron twice, at Chadron! Chadron is known to be tough to beat on their home court. The Bobcats have yet to go to Chadron. Thus Wayne has the edge. One .at a Time Coach Mcintire · stressed t he importance of taking the remaining games one at a time. He feels that his team can repeat ac; champions, t.hrough desire and hard work."-·

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.THE MOST MARVELOUS MOVIE EVER' MADEi FROM THE PLAY . .· THAT KEPT PLAYING

fDRmRI

On December 20, the Peru Staters evened their record at 4-4 as they took a close one from Washburn University by a score of 60-54. Washburn was in the game all the way, but seemingly was hindered by a great deal of substituting by the Washburn coach. In the Mid-America Tourney at Fairfield, Iowa, the Bobcats broke their three-game winning streak by being defeated by Parsons College of Fairfield. Peru, th e champions of this tourney just a year ago, was hampered by the loss of star guard Tom Yopp, and was beaten easily, 77-51. The following night in a game for t h e third place trophy, Peru, with the services of Yopp, defeated Lewis College 76-69.

The Bobcats were more versatile in 1939-40. They won all the major N.I.A.A. championships, dominating football, basketball and track. Their football record showed seven victories in n in e After school again convened, games, and in basketball the Y the Peru State Bobcats went swept 19 of 25 engagements, down to Emporia, Kansas, to take reaching the second round of the on a tough Emporia State team. National Intercollegiate meet. The two teams seemed v e r y No one challenged Peru's claim evenly matched as the score at to the state college football title the end of regulation time ended last fall. The Bobcats were unde- in a deadlock. With the luck in feated and tied only by Wayne favor of Emporia, Peru was and Ft. Hays, Kansas. A power- slightly edged in the overtime ful team revolving around Cen- 75-72. ter Jack Mcintire and Halfback With the Bobcats record standJim Mather blasted Chadron on Thanksgiving Day to retain the ing at five wins and six losses, Nebraska Co 11 e g e Conference N.I.A.A. crown. Not even Wheeler knew what play began at Peru, January 12, to expect when the current bas- against the Kearney Antelopes. ketball campaign ope~ed. Only With the N.C.C. title defense factwo veterans were available and ing them, the Bobcats displayed freshmen showed undetermined an array of good basketball as they easily defeated . the Antecapabilities. lopes, 84-60. Ron Sf! o d grass, Peru dropped its first three freshman center, was the big games, just as Wheeler figured. man for Peru, pouring in 22 Then Veterans Cecil Walker and points. Mcintire teamed with th re e freshmen for a winning combination. Peru considers Wheeler something of a miracle man. His teams Open Monday ihru Saturday keep winning and home games are drawing the largest crowds in PERU, NEBRASKA history.

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RAINS Skelly Service

GUILLIATT Tank Wagon Service Ph. 274-3510 Auburn, Nebraska


Washburn Becomes Bobcats Fourth Victim, 60-54 Washburn University's s 1 ow moving, pattern working quintet Thursday found it impossible to cope with Peru State Teachers College's speed and suffered d 54-60 basketball defeat in Peru. With their run and shoot game keeping the Ichabods~from Topeka, Kans., off balance, Peru State capitalized from the free throw line to annex. their fourth win in eight collegiate starts and their third in succession. For the third game in a row, Larry Hayes, senior forward from Auburn, paced the Peru attack with 16 points. Freshman Bi 11 Witty, Syracuse, chipped in with 15 counters to second Hayes. Washburn's attack was led by Jerry Williams' 14 points.

Things ain't what they seem. H's no! a dance, Elmer. Tom Yopp is sinking a fielder to help down Washburn University.

Bobcats Cop Third In Mid-America Tourney Peru State Teachers College failed in defense of their 1961 Mid-America Tournament crown at Fairfield, Iowa, last week, losing their Thursday opener to host Parsons College, 77-51. The Peruvians came back on Friday night to gain consolation honors in the four team tourney by handing Lewis College of Lockport,_ Ill., a 76-69 defeat. In the championship game, Parsons took a hair-raising 70-68 decision over McKendree College of Lebanon, lll. McKendree downed Lewis 70·50 in the ·tourney opener. Peru's first round 77-51 defeat by eventual champ Parsons resulted from ragged and frigid Bobcat play. Coach Jack Mcintire' s charges stayed close to Parsons during the first half, trailing 28-32 at the intermission. Parsons spread their advantage to 10 points in the first 10 minutes of the second half and then exploded with eight points in the next 90 seconds to open a commanding 60-42 lead with some eight minutes remaining. Parsons guard Roger Sherrard led the game iceing explosion with three fielders in a 35 second span. Sherrard led game scoring with 20 points. With victory out of reach, Peru State reserves finished out the final eight minutes of the game. Ron Snodgrass, Seward, paced Peru's attack with 14 points. Key to the Bobcat loss w a s their inability to hit from either the field or charity stripe. Peru State hit only 28.6 per cent from the field and 42.2 per cent from the line. Five men, paced by Bill Witty's 22 points, scored in the double figures to spark Peru's 76-69 third place win over Lewis College. Rebounding from their dismal Thursday night night performance, Peru State 1 o o k e d sharp in the win though never in commanding position till late in the tilt. The Mcintiremen broke fast and led throughout the early stages before a six minute scoring drouth gave Lewis a 26-20 lead after Peru had commanded 20-16. Three fielders by Bill Witty, Syracuse, in the final stages of the first half keyed a Bobcat surge which sent them into the rest period leading 31-29. The lead changed hands six times and the score was tied once in the second half before

The win gives the Nebraska College Conference Peru Bobcats a record of two wins and one loss against C:entral Intercollegiate Conference foes. Previously, Peru had lost a one-point decision to Omaha University and won a 10-point victory over St. Benedict's College. In Thursday night's action, Peru could not take the lead to stay until well into the second half. During the first 20 minutes the two teams fashioned seven ties and exchanged the lead on s i x occasions. After jumping into a five point, 30-25 advantage just before the half, Peru faltered and Washburn edged the halftime score to 30-29.

Ron Snodgrass, freshman center, loops one in during the Washburn University game on the Peru maples.

Bobcat Cagers Look Forward To Rest Of Season

Coach Jack Mcintire, his Peru State Teachers College basketball team now five and five, has reason to hope for better things as the 1962-63 hardwood season heads into 1963. After losing four of their first five starts, the Peruvians came back with four wins in their last five outings. The comeback trail suffered a With 14:42 remaining in the setback after three straight wins second half, Ron Snodgrass, Sew- when Parsons College handed a,rd, pumped in a free throw to Peru a 77-51 shellacking in the give Peru a 36-35 lead, a lead first game of the Parsons' hosted they never relinquished. In the Mid-America tourney during the next seven minutes, Coach Jack holidays. Peru reb9unded to anMcintire'~ Peruvians built up a nex third place in the four team 49-42 lead, only to see Washburn tourney with a 76-69 win over a surge back to trail 52-53 w i th good Lewis College team. ,,,.,,_ 3:50 left. Tom Yopp, senior guard from After a field goal by Bill Wit- East Alton, Ill., is pacing the Pety, Peru went into a stall and ru State scoring attack with an picked up their final five points average of 15.5 points per game. The Peru State Teachers Col- from the foul line as Washburn's The Bobcat scoring pace, hittirg lege Bobcats Saturday opened methodical attack found it diffi- at 67.7 points per outing compared with the opposition's mark defense of two consecutive Ne- cult to shift gears. of 71.2, is highlighted by double braska College Conference championships with a convincing 84- lied briefly to make the half- figure scoring from all members 60 victory over Kearney State at time score read Peru 41 and of the starting quintet. In addition to Yopp, Ron Snodgrass, Peru. Kearney 31. Seward, is averaging 13.6; Larry The win evened Peru's season During the second half, Peru Hayes, Auburn, 12.5; Bill Witty, record at 6-6, while Kearney sufraced ahead by as much as 30 Syracuse, 11.9; and Pat Hamm, fered their seventh setback in points at one time. Bobcat re- Wood River, Ill., 10.l points per nine starts. serves carried much of the lead game. Peru and Kearney matched during the final six minutes. Larry Hayes, senior Bobcat forpoint production through the The rough and tumble contest ward leads his mates in the ri:first 12 minutes of a ragged contest. Kearney's Antelopes then saw 55 fouls called, 28 on Peru bound department. The 6'2" Auwent stone cold for 5:22, long and 27 on Kearney. The two burnite has pulled down 96 reenough for Peru to take a com- clubs toed the line for 73 free bounds in 10 games. As a team, Peru State holds a narrow 382 to manding lead. With 7:44 remain- throw attempts. ing before the rest period, KearRon Snodgrass and Tom Yopp 380 advantage in the rebound deney held a 23-20 advantage. paced the Peru attack with· 22 partment over their opponents. While Kearney's net unruffled and 19 points respectively. Allen Currently the Bobcats are hitPeru State bombed 18 points to Boucher led Kearney with 15 ting at a 40.3 per cent clip from take a 38-23 lead. Kearney ral- points. the field while the rivals show a

Peru took the lead to stay at 4847 on a twisting lay-in by Tom Yopp, East Alton, Ill., with 11:13 remaining. Peru raced to a 75-62 lead before a final dying gasp by Lewis narrowed the final score. Tom Yopp; Pat Hamm, Wood River, Ill.; Ron Snodgrass, Seward; and Larry Hayes, Auburn, banged 17, 15, 12, and 10 points respectively to round out the 'Cats well-balanced scoring attack. Bill Bereckis collected 18 points for Lewis.

Bobcats Start NCC Title Defense With 84-60 Victory

Fg

%

Ft

%

108-49 120-54 105-50 118-41 100-39 14-7 19-5 29-5 8-1 5-1 0-0 0-0

45.4 45.0 47.6 34.7 39.0 50.0 26.3 17.4 12.5 20.0 00.0 00.0

61-42 50-28 36-25 52-37 36-23 11-6 12-6 2-2 6-3 3-1 0-0 0-0

626-252 685-278

40.3 40.5

267-173 237-160

G

Tom Yopp, East Alton, IlL ____ 9 Ron Snodgrass, Seward ________ lO Larry Hayes, Auburn __________ lO Bill Witty, Syracuse ___________ lO Pat Hamm, Wood River, Ill. ___ 10 Jack Rinne, Steinauer_ ________ 8 Don Schmidt, Sterling _________ 8 Jim Hall, Omaha ______________ 8 Harvey Fraser, Humboldt_ ____ 7 Bill Russell, Massena, Iowa ____ 6 Jim Redden, Omaha ___________ 1 Jim Manning, York ___________ 1 PERU TOTALS __________ lO OPPONENT TOTALS ____ lO Games to Daie (Peru Score First) 62 Buena Vista ------------- 50 61 Simpson ----------------- 88 54 Tarkio ------------------ 71

83 76 75 79

Reb.

Ave.

68.9 56.0 69.4 71.1 63.9 54.5 50.0 100.0 50.0 33.3 00.0 00.0

64 60 96 62 50 10 21 13 3 3 0 0

7.01 6.00 9.60 6.20 5.00 1.25 2.60 1.60 0.43 0.50 0.00 0.00

64.4 67.5

382 380

38.20 38.00

Omaha -----------------Morningside ------------St. Benedict's -----------Northwest Missouri ------

84 82 65 72

60 51 76 72

4J

Stemp Stays Busy BY PAT HAMM Jerry Stemper has been serving Peru as head track coach, assistant football, basketball coach, and intramural director since 1954. Along with these many duties, he carries a full teaching load. One semester he taught algebra and human growth. "Stemp" was born in David City, Nebraska. Later, his family moved to Bellwood, Nebr., where he went to high school. Before graduating from Bellwood High, Stemp starred on the basketball team. He didn't play football because he was too small! Upon graduation, he enrolled at Kearney State Teachers College. Having no high school football experience, Stemp went out at Kearney and earned two letters. "I might add," said Stemp, "we whipped the pants off Peru too." (We'd better ask Al Wheeler about that) Jerry was graduated from Kearney in 1944. From there he went to the service for 33 months and saw overseas duty. After completing his service hitch in 1946, Jerry got his first coaching job in Table Rock, Nebraska. While he was at Table Rock, Jerry married his wife, Elsie, in August of 1947. He coached at Table Rock for four years, and then signed at Peru Prep in 1950. He coached at Prep until 1954, when he took the position he now holds in the college.

PERU ST ATE TEACHERS COLLEGE Individual and Team Basketball Statistics Ten Games PLAYER, HOME TOWN

completion average of 40.5 p e r cent. Peru State success from the charity stripe leaves something to be desired as·• the Mclntiremen have hit at a 64.4 per cent clip. The opposition's free throw mark stands at a 67.5 per cent.

Pf

Tp

Ave.

15 37 25 30 38 7 12 9 10 ' ~ 0 1 0

140 136 125 119 101 20 16 12 5 3 0 0

15.5 13.6 12.5 11.9 10.l 2.5 2.0 1.5 0.7 0.5 0.0

184 223

677 712

67.7 71.2

o.o

Washburn --------------Parsons ----------------Lewis ------------------Emporia (overtime) ------

54 77 69 75

Stemp has coached football, basketball and track. He has had many fine seasons in all, but expresses a preference for track. His four years of coaching track at Table Rock produced three conference winners and a runnerup spot in the state meet. His best football seasons were 8-0 and 7-1. The Stempers now have five fine children. They are Steve, 13; Bonnie, 10; Dave, 8; Donna, 5; and Debbie, 3. The only time we could interview Stemp was after some intramural basketball games in the coaches' dressing room. He had five minutes to dress, take a shower, and get to a meeting. Such is the life of a coach.


PSTC Symphonic Band Presents Winter Concert

JAMES T. JACK Mr. James T. Jack is the new geography instructor at . Peru State Teachers College. Before coming to Peru Mr. Jack taught for three years at Oregon State University. He also taught extension courses for the Oregon State System of Higher Education. Mr. Jack received his . bachelors degree at Southern Oregon College in Ashland, Oregon and received his masters degree at Oregon State University, where he also did other graduate work. He attended the University of Nebraska for one year and two summers working on his Ph.D. He says that he is quite impressed with the facilities of Peru.. He also said that he prefers smaller schools to the larger ones because one "has more opportunity to become qualified in more than one specific field." Mr. Jack is married and is the proud father of year-old Rowena Janice, who was born on Christmas day.

Debate Team Presents Convo January 17 Two Peru State Teachers College debate teams presented a demonstration debate at an allcollege convocation Wednesday, January 17. The teams debated the national college debate topic for the year, Resolved: That the Non-Communistic nations of the world should establish an economic community. The negative team, composed of Dennis Crissman and Sharon Peacock, won the debate according to a show of hands by the audience. Their affirmative opposition was Bill Donovan and Dorothy Bock. The teams were introduced by Pamela Froebe, who also acted as moderator. The debate teams have been active in forensic tournaments in this area during the year. Their outstanding trip was to Maryville, Mo. where the team of Crissman and Miss Peacock won three of five debates.

Cheating Policy Announced By Policies Committee

The Peru College Symphonic Band Ensemble;\ under the direction of Mr. Gilbert Wilson, held its winter concert Sunday, January 13 in the College Auditorium. Program s-=lections were "A Festival Preludf' by Alfred Reed, "Concerto for Trumpet" by Joseph Hayden, featuring Don Johnson as soloist, "Fiesta ofthe Charros" by John Morrissey, "Seascape" by Alfred Reed, featuring Linda Elliott as trombone soloist, "Parade of the Charioteers" by Miklos Rozsa, "Concerto Grosso" by John Morrissey featuring Don Johnson and Carol McLain on the trumpet and Linda Elliott on trombone, · and "Themes and Moods from Famous Films" by Miklos Rozsa. Band personnel are: Flutes and Piccolos-James Robbins, Barbara McCoy, Nancy Neimann, Lois Layden, and Donna Cox. Oboes -Dorothy Bock and Ray Harris. Clarinets-Joyce Able, Lorene Kostal, Prudence Fritch, Cynthia Meier, Keith. Rawson, Carolyn

Peruvians Attend Business Symposium Eight Peru students attended the College-Business Symposium presented by the U. S. Chamber of Commerce in cooperation with the Omaha Chamber of Commerce on Thursday, Jan. 10. The day-long meeting was held at the Omaha Livestock Exchange Building. Those who attended from Peru were: Richard Elmore, Kennefu Gress, Tim Holinger, Judy Hun. zeker, Raymond Ogle, Ardith Pratt, Susan Sharp, and Winnie Sporer. The faculty sponsor, Albert Brady, also attended the event. Twenty colleges participated in the symposium which ex'fliored five pressing national problems about which young college and university students and people from business and professional organizations shared a mutual interest. The five national problems which were discussed were: the European Common Market, economic growth, unemployment and technology, a balanced budget, and inflation. The panel members were: H. Ladd Plumley, president of the U. S. Chamber of Commerce and chairman of the board of State Mutual Life Assurance Co.; John E. Griffin, vice-president of the U. S. Chamber of Commerce and president of Lewis Drugs; Albert V. Hartl, president of the Minnesota Otter Tail Power Co.; Arthur C. Regan, vice-president and secretary of the First National Bank of Minneapolis; and Marvin G. Schmid, president of the Omaha Chamber of Commerce.

Reiber, Adrian Bartek, Linda Bartels, Lola Baker and Carol Curd. Bass Clarinet-Janet Beemer. Bassoon-Gary Schmucker. Saxophones-G a r y Dahmke, Ruth Rulla, Bonnie Vanderford and Betty Wellensiek. French Horns-Eugene Walden, Edwin McCartney, Larry Whittington and Anita Cox. Trumpets a n d Cornets-Don Johnson, Carol McLain Thomas Majors, Karen Workman, Dale Duensing, James Watson, Allen Chandler and Arthur Lindahl. Trombones-Linda Elliott, Robert Maixner and Alfred Eickhoff. Baritones-Russell Workman, Charles Wellensiek, Boyd Wood, and Marilyn Marmet. Bass-James Kelly and Paul Stevenson. Percussion-M a r Y Holland, Ruth Harris, Allen Freimauer, and James Wilson. Tympani-Virginia Adkins. The Band Ensemble will present concerts on these dates: Sunday, March 24 at 3 p.m.; Wednesday, April 24 at 9:30 a.m., and Tuesday, May 7 at 8 p.m. United States; if one gets married, she can cook and sew for her family; and if one likes color, she can go into interior decorating. He closed his talk by explaining the various fields in graduate study in the home economics field. KAPPA DELTA PI Kappa Delta Pi held its monthly meeting Monday, Jan. 7, in the Music Hall auditorium. Richard Elmore was elected secretary to replace Mary Ann Grrham, who will graduate in Jan,uary. Presentation of national honor keys was discussed. Honor keys are presented to persons who have served education and Kappa Delta Pi for over 15 years. After the meeting, the group went to the Student Center snack bar for refreshments.

Classes For Evening Courses Are Announced Sixteen courses, including a graduate offering in elementary education, will be offered at Peru State Teachers College during the second semester Wednesday evening course series, which will begin January 30, according to Dr. Keith L. Melvin, dean of the college. ; Continuing through May 22, the Wednesday evening series will be offered during two class periods, making it possible for students to earn up to six hours of college credit by enrolling in classes both periods. The first period will begin at 5 p.m. and continue through 7:40, with the second period beginning at .7:45 and continuing until 10:10 p.m. The graduate course, Social Science in Elementary Schools, a three hour course, will be included in the first period offerings. Other classes scheduled for the first period include: Social Studies Survey (104), Water Color Painting, Speech Correction and Development, English Composition (101), Elementary French, Methods of Teaching H o m e Economics, and Social Science in Elementary Schools. Second period classes: Fundamentals of Music, Fundamentals of Speech, History of U. S. Since 1865, Biological Readings, Survey of British Literature, Beginning Clothing Selection and Construction, Typewriting I, II, and IIL

PHI BETA LAMBDA Phi Beta Lambda, honorary business fraternity, was officially installed Friday, Jan. 18. Delegates from the Phi Beta Lambda chapter of the University of Nebraska were present to initiate the members. The local members of Phi Beta Lambda hosted a banquet supper at the Student Union.

THE FATE OF MASTER CASTER There was a young man named Caster Who always drove faster and faster; One day on a curve, He lost his nerve, That caused our Caster's disaster!

On Nov. 12, the Policies Committee, upon the recommendation of the Faculty Association, enacted the following policy on cheatSIGMA TAU DELTA ing. First, each case of cheating Sigma Tau Delta, honorary is to be reported to the Dean of ALPHA MU OMEGA English fraternity, met Monday, Students, and a record will be Alpha Mu Omega held its Jan. 14. made in that office. Second, there monthly meeting Monday, Jan. 'The meeting was devoted to are two classes of cheating. Pre- 14, in the Science Hall math business. Raymond Ogle was meditated cheating is where room. New officers were elected chosen to speak for the club in there is evidence of preparation, to replace graduating officers. S.G.A. 'Thomas Aitken, Frank while unpremeditated is where The new officers are: Dick Blake, Bostic, and Mr. Robbins were there is no evidence of previous president; Bill Scott, vice-presi- chosen to be judges for the Freshplanning. dent; and Tom Buchholz, secre- man Essay Contest. Richard ElThe penalty for premeditated tary-treasurer. more and Janice Jones were cheating is failure in the course The evening program was pre- elected as co-editors of Sifting for the first offense, and suspen- sented by Tom Buchholz and Sands, the club's literary publision with failure in all courses Rudy Eichenberger. They showed cation. The possibility of having for the second offense. new methods of addition and a spring banquet was discussed. Unpremeditated cheating re- multiplication and the proofs of sults in failure in the test or as- these methods. signment for first offense, and failure in the course for second HOME ECONOMICS CLUB (Continued from page one) "The Store of Standard offense. Brands" A student has the right to ap- nomics. For example, if a girl Phone 274-3620 Auburn likes to travel, she can demonpeal to the Dean of Students, if strate in various stores in the he believes he has grounds.

Organizations

Redfern Clothing Co.

~

Cone With the Curl on Top ~

Auburn, Nebr. 274-3102

INGERSOLL Barber Shop AUBURN, NEBRASKA Elly Ingersoll - Nate Hayes

MIDWAY GROCERY Quality Meats and Groceries

Open Sundays and Evenings

17th at L Street AUBURN, NEBRASKA

PECK'S PALACE Slfurt Orders - Fries Featuring Crispy Pizza HOURS 7 TO 11

THE AVENUE STORE Groceries - Meats Fruits - Vegetables

BEATTY GARAGE Dependable Service Reasonable Prices Gas for Less Wrecker Service Steam Clecming 872-3201

PSEA (Continued from page one) at 7 p.m. The short meeting is designed to be a break from examination studying. Richard Elmore, president, will introduce a 28-minute movie, Not By Chance, produced by the National Education Association. The basic idea of the color film is to demonstrate the makings and the qualities of a good teacher. The situation is similar to Peru life.

GENOA Daiiy Queen

L. H. CRAIG, Owner PERU, NEBRASKA Phone 872-2701

WHITLOW'S Shoe Repair AUBURN, NEBRASKA

COME VISIT US

ELLA MARGARET SHOP The Shop of Quality Ladies' Wearing Apparel and Millinery PHONE 274-3520 AUBURN, NEBR.

MORRISSY'S VARIETY STORE Peru 5c & lOc Shoes

Clothing

SIMON DRUG CO. Ph. 274-4315

Auburn, Nebraska

THE REXALL STORE Hallmark Cards

Russell Stover Candies

"Prescriptions A Specialty"


Valentine Dance Tonight

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks

Peru Pedagogian PERU.NEBRASKA

Volume 58

Number 8

FEBRUARY IL 1963

Student Center 9 -12

47 Students Make

Dean's Honor Roll Forty-seven students finished the first semester on the Dean's Honor Roll. Eleven of these stu·· dents were on the high distinction list (8.00 up). An additional thirty-six students were on the distinction list (7.25-7.99). Those people on the high distinction list include: Sharon Earl, Dorothea Fink, Harvey Fisher, Mary Graham, Nancy Houchin, Judy Hunzeker, Janis Mayer, C. Lynn McCann, Samuel Rankin, Larry Swett, William Witty. ·The students on the distinction list are as follows: Monty Allgood, Daeyl Bonow, M. Frank Bill Hunsaker (left), Lincoln, a September transfer to Peru from Representatives of the University of Nebraska chapter of Phi Bostic, Rudolph Eichenberger, Beta Lambda installed ±he Epsilon Tau chapter a± Peru State Teach- Warren Etter, Katherine Francis, ±he University of South Dakota, and Dean Cain, Thurman, Iowa, a ers College Friday, January 18. Miss Dorothy Hazel (left), faculty Prudence Fritch, Elaine Gerdes, freshman enrollee at the beginning of the second semester, donned advisor, and Miss Mary Sellen±in, Nebraska chapter president, make Barbara Gordon, Millard Hamel, Peru State. varsity togs for ±he first time Saturday, February 2, 1963. Cain, a 1960 Glenwood, Iowa, high school grad, has been working at the presentation to the Peru State Teachers College officers of :the Karen Hamm, Loretta Kratchona:tional business honorary fra:ternity. The officers are Kenneth Gress, vil, Robert Mathews, Carol Nei- the guard position and shows promise of being a fine asset A 1956 Nebraska City, president: Judy Hunzeker, Humboldt, secretary; John buhr, Linda O'Hara, Stephen graduate of Lincoln's University High, Hunsaker has been practicing Shrauger, Humboldt, treasurer, and Wayne Wallace, Nebraska City, Parker, Robert Penkava, Ralph with the Bobcats since October and demonstrated his talents as Peru vice-president. The Misses Hazel Weare and Frieda Rowold±, instruc- Plummer, Roger Ray, Carolyr.. beat Wayne in their crucial NCC dash. tors in ±he business education department, are advisors for the Peru Reiber, Jane Rhodus, Jack Rinne, Linda Risley, Esther Shafer, Chapter. Leland Schneider, Enoch Shepherd, Carol Sudik, Sharylin Vrtiska, Joe Ward, Judy Weichel, Kristine Wewel, Duane WeichelNine mid-year graduates at man, Janice Wilkinson, A. EuPeru State Teachers College have The second semester Peruvian gene Wright, Darlene Wrig' t, signed contracts to teach in area staff met in the Peruvian office On Friday, January 18, the and Merlin Wright. schools for the second semester, Thursday, Jan. 31. The staff dePeru State's program of physi- University of Nebraska installed reports Harold Johnson, place- cided to meet every Monday and cal fitness, accelerated two years Epsilon Tau Chapter of Phi Beta ment director. Lambda. A banquet at 6:00 p.m. · ago in keeping with President J. Wednesday. Mr. Johnson reports the availF. Kennedy's urging, has pro- in Student Center dining room Peruvian co-editors are Richability of candidates in the fields ard Elmore and J oAnn Frerichs. duced real results, reports Jim preceded the event. Twenty-three of business education, industrial Other editors are: Harvey FishPilkington, assistant professor of members and guests attended. Miss Dorothy Hazel, Miss Hahealth and physical education. Miss .Regina Kreifels, a fresh- arts, biology, physical education er, layout editor; Sharon DDnlan, Using the fitness tests devised zel Weare, and Miss Mary Sell- man from Nebraska City, has and English. Of the 23 mid-year photography editor; Bill Scott, by the American Association of entin, Nebraska chapter w:._esi- been awarded a $115 scholarship graduates only six remain a-; copy editor; and Tom Aitken, Health Physical Education and dent, installed the chapter. for the second semester at Ne- candidates for teaching positions, sports editor. Staff members are: Peru's officers are Kenneth braska State Teachers College at the placement director reports. Recreation, male Peru State stuPat Richardson, Marjorie Williss, dents enrolled in Natural Pro- Gress, Nebraska City, president; Peru. The new teachers, their home Richard Klinger, Mert F i n k e , gram were scored in sit-ups, pull- Wayne Wallace, Nebraska City, The scholarship, known as the town, teaching field\ and teach- Victor Bade, Jeanie Reiman, ups, shuttle run, standing broad vice president; Judy Hunzeker, Fletcher Neal Memorial Scholar- ing location include: Prudy Fritch, Connie Dietl, Judy secretary; John ship, was provided by Mrs. Marie jump, 50-yard dash, 600-yard run. Humboldt, Robert Penkava, Beatrice, gen- French, Tom Castle, Jerry LitAt the end of the first semes- Shrauger, Humboldt, treasurer. 0. Neal of Nebraska City in eral science and physical science, tell, Larry Spier, and Dan Leuter, the 68 students en r o 11 e d Misses Hazel Weare and Frieda memory of her late husband and to Omaha; Monty L. Allgood, Pe- enberger. ranked at the 80.3 percentile on Rowoldt sponsor this honorary administered through the Peru ru, general science and biology, the national scale-up from 64.9 business fraternity. Achievement Foundation, Inc. to Gresham; Thomas J. Brown, at the start of the semester. The Miss Kreifels, a 1962 graduate Falls City, general science and first semester percentile a year of Lourdes Central High School, physical science, to Wayne; Mary ago at the semester's close was is majoring in women's physical Ann Graham, Auburn, elemen73.3, and the spring semester education at Peru State. She is tary education, to Bellevue. The Peru Dramatics Club has percentile was 35.1. the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. OtRoy R. Rubenking, Syracuse, finished casting and has started Top award went to "All The freshman class sponsored to Kreifels of Nebraska City. mathematics, biology and phys- work on the Spring Play, to be Around Champ" Wesley Dickey, a dance, "Registration Romp," on During her high school career, ics, to Nebraska School for t h e freshman from Bradshaw, who Thursday, January 31, 1963, in Miss Kreifels was active in chor- Visually Handicapped, Nebraska presented in the college auditorium on March 14. It will be an averaged 98 per cent in e a ch (Continued on page four) (Continued on page four) (Continued on page four) adaptation of George Orwell's AAHPER test. Three o t h e r s famous novel 1984. ranked in the 90 percentileThe story has also been preLeonard Kinser, Red Oak, Iowa; sented as a movie and on televiGary Henrichs, Auburn; John sion, but was just released as a Barton, Essex, Iowa-and have play on January 15, 1963. Mr. R. been awarded AAHPER Go 1 d D. Moore, the director, says that Awards. Silver awards for 80 to there is a good possibility that 90 percentile ranking have been this performance will be one of presented to Jim Polvino, Rothe earliest presentations in play chester, N. Y.; Richard Braden, form. East Alton, Ill.; Gary Bedea, TaThe cast, in order of appearble Rock; Charles Houser, Dayance, includes the following: kin; Mike Leahy, Tecumseh ; Dave Griffiths and Larry HenGary Fritch, Table Rock; Jim nerberg as the Loudspeaker Redden, Omaha; Tom Buchholz, Voices; Steve Parker as Syme; Papillion; Harold Heineman, WaLois Fritz as Parsons; Lonn Preshoo. nell as Winston Smith; Dorothy In addition to regularly schedDrubek as the Messenger; Jerry uled exercises, instruction is givTimothy as the Coffee Vender; en in flag football, volleyball, Dorothy Bock as the First Guard; gymnastics, basketball, swimJudy Whigham as the Second ming, badminton, and track and Guard; Tom Majors as O'Brien,; field. Carol McClain as Julia; Marjorie Willis as Gladys; Pamela Froebe as the Landlady; Paul MacNiel a3 Martin; and Janey Moore as the Waitress. The assistant director is Tom Meetings of alumni, former stuAitken and Mary Holland is dents and friends of Nebraska prompter. Back stage, Beverly State Teachers College at Peru Quinn i.s handling make-up; Mrs. have been scheduled by two CaliGnade and Carol Curd are in fornia chapters of the Peru AlumDave Sear, righ±, and Sonja Sovig, center, en±er:tained the February 6 convo with their folk music. charge of costuming and proper(Continued on page two) Lee Kahn, left, was unable to appear because of illness. (Continued on page four)

,,,

Thirteen Rank High In AAHPER Test

Nine Sign Contracts With Area Schools

Phi Beta Lambda Chapter Installed

Changes Made In Peruvian Staff

Neal Scholarship To Regina Kreifels

Freshman Class Sponsors "Registration Romp"

California Alumni Schedule Meetings

Dramatics Club Rehearses Play


NEWBLOOfi The current Ped staff has had a tremendous transfusion of new blood4lmost enough to drown it. Right now, there are twenty reporters, every single one of them inexperienced. Of seven editors, only Tom Aitken is experienced. This condition is caused by a number of things: Lack of a minor in journalism, which makes it impossible for students to take much journalism; the professional semester, which frequently drains off trained talent when it is needed most; then, of course, graduation, and the pressing ne~d to complete required courses. This is not an apology. It is a statement of fact. If the Ped isn't as good as we'd like for an issue or two, hang on. The Ped will get better. Some of the finest kids and best students in the college are on the staff. They will be good just as soon as they have had a· decent chance to find out what they are supposed to be doing.

-S. P. L. TIIE FIGHTING BOBCATS This year's basketball team and Coach Mcintire deserve a lot of praise. As the season opened, only Tom Yopp of last year's great starting five 'was left. There was no height, no depth, no experience. Prospects were anything but good. But Mcintire had faith in his squad. "We are still champions," he said, "until somebody beats us." As this is being written, the Bobcats have a 4-0 record in the NCC. Those who saw the Wayne scramble, which could hardly be called basketball, saw the Bobcats defeat a top rated team with more size and experience. The victory was a result of sheer hustle and self control on the part of the Peruvians, who tried to play basketball while Wayne was making 34 personal fouls and two technical fouls. It is too early to predict another championship for McIntire's squad, but the boys have come a long way, and they never-repeat never-stop hustling. Would anyone like to bet that this isn't another championship team? -S. P. L.

MAJORS HALL By Keith Grimes Last Thursday, Jan. 31, about 1:00 A. M. the fire alarm was set off, causing mass confusion on

each floor at Majors Hall. Thanks to Dean Stapelton, things were well in hand after a few minutes, Evidently someone thought it was time for a Majors Hall fire drill. Skip Ogte anti Joe Perina are two of the Majors men who were "very fortunate" to move to the International Skid Row floor. International Skid Row welcomes them whole heartedly and wishes them a merry stay. For the people who do not know what the International Skid Row is, it is the basement floor at Majors. Last Thursday, "January 29, the basement floor had a little heat trouble, it seemed as though the thermostat was running a bit cold. But thanks to Dick Travers, and a little friendly persuasion, the matter was taken care of. The Spring semester has just

begun and Majors Hall has received a number of new students. The men of Majors welcome: Bob Beck, Jim Brenn, Mike Damiano, Larry Durrie, Bill Essman, Kelvin McCauley, Larry Piper, Leonard Schipper, Roger Slaughter, Fred Wademan, Fred Rimmer, and Mike Steffen. This semester Majors H a 11 dorm council has selected two new floor counselors, one in the basement, replacing Bruce Francey; and the other on first floor, replacing Jay DuVal. The two new floor counselors are D o n Schmidt and Skip Ogle. Roger Slaughter has part of a DeKalb sign in his room, a n d Ed (Tug) Myer has the other part. For further information on this subject please see either Tug Myer or Roger Slaughter.

MORGAN HALL By Mary Holland What happened to the sunny, happy days that were supposed to follow the storm of finals? It

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks February 11, 1963

PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Co-Editor_ ____________________________________ Tom Aitken Co-Editor_________________________________ Richard Elmore Layout Editor_ ________________________________ Judy Wilson Personnel Manager_ _________________________ Lynn McCann Business Manager ----------------------------- Tom Castle Copy Editor_ _______________________________ Carol Niebuhr Copy Editor----------------------------------- Jane Moore Morgan Column ________________________ "---- Mary Holland Majors Column ______________________________ Keith Grimes Delzell Column ________________________________ Ronald Rist Reporter __________________________________ Phillip Bateman Reporter_ ________________________________ Richard Berthold Reporter _____________ ------- ______ ----------- William Bliss Reporter_______________ ... ____________ ------- Dorothy Bock Reporter_ __________________________________ Dorothea Fink Reporter _________ ---·---------------------- Stanley Johnson Reporter ___________ -------------------------- Janice Jones Reporter_ ____________________ --------_____ Carey Lankford Reporter ___________________ ------------------ Robert Peck Reporter.------------------------------------ Karen Quinn Reporter___________ -------------------------- Glenda Rima Reporter _________ -------- ____ ---------------- Linda Risley Reporter·-------------------------------------- Ruth Rulla Reporter. ________________ --------------------- Larry Spier Reporter ________________________ --------- Wendell St~wart Reporter_ ____________________ ------------ Betty Wellensiek Reporter ___________ ---- ________ ---------- Janice Wilkinson Sponsor _________________________________ Stewart Linscheid

seems that they have been swallowed up in the rush of registration and new classes. The halls of Morgan are unusually quiet. Even the enthusiastic freshmen have settled down to books and study-for a while! The new semester has brought other changes too. Some of the girls, like Carol Curd, Dorothy Drubek, Dorothy Bock and Barbara Gordon have changed roommates and moved-- •to different floors. Morgan is also welcoming Phyllis Mosley and Janice Fletcher back to Peru and saying hello to five new girls. On the first floor, the new faces are Mary Parmenter, Northboro, Iowa; Sharon Furnas, Auburn, Nebr., and Sue Ellen Reilly, North Attleboro, Mass. On second floor they're saying Hi to Carol Mead, Nebraska City, Nebr., and Susan Stall, of Omaha, Nebr. What do they like especially? Sue Ellen is partial to dancing; Sharon likes blue, especially blue eyes; Mary is a happy gal and likes "everything in general"; Susan goes in for swimming; and Carol's special interest is her fiance, Marty Daffer. A common comment · is that everyone here is "so friendly." To prove this point, there have been various small study breaks when the gals get together and share pop and conversation. What is the excitement in the basement rooms? It seems that Kay Bender had some clay left over from art class and Janice Wilkenson, Karen Behrends, Barbara Thompson, and Linda Bartels have been having fun with the new "pet snake." Do you ;have your first aid kits handy,

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DELZELL HALL By Ronald Rist Delzell Hall has received some new residents for the second semester. They are: Ray Cain, Thurman, Iowa; Larry Eden, Wiota, Iowa; Tom Evans, Seward, Nebr.; Tom Mariano, Shorthills, New Jersey; Harold Marshall, Cook, Nebr.; William Murphy, Boston, Mass.; Phillip Nielson, Riverside, Ill.; Mike Ovrenovich, South Lyons, Mich.; William Quilty, Boston, Mass.; John Scharp, Atlantic, Iowa; Mike Smagacz, Omaha, Nebr.; Robert Sterner, Nebraska City, Nebr.; Robert Vonesh, Chicago, Ill.; Jerry Jacobson, Otoe, .Nebr.; John Coschka, Omaha, Nebr.; Roger Gardner, Brown's Mills, New Jersey; and Harry Whitney, Omaha, Nebr.

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We are happy to see Charles Aylor and Dennis Peterson return from their professional semesters. On Monday, February 4, a dorm meeting was held. Ru s s Hicks, the Dorm president, introduced the new men who have moved into Delzell to the residents. Mrs. Longfellow, do rm housemother, explained the dorm rules to everyone.

California Alumni Schedule Meetings (Continued from page one) ni Association, reports Donald K. Carlile, executive secretary. The Northern California group will meet Saturday, February 23, for a 1 p.m. luncheon in the Normandy Room, Southgate Lanes, Hayward, Calif. The Southern California chapter has scheduled its luncheon meeting for 12:30 p.m., Saturday, March 2, at the Chapman Park Hotel, Wilshire and Alexandria, Los Angeles. The Northern California group, organized in 1958, is headed by Mrs. Genevieve McNally McFad~ den, 23716 Lynn St., Hayward, who is in charge of luncheon reservations. Mrs. Chloe Pate Leh·

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Snappers Snap·· Intramural Lead

The upside-down world of :!:he college gymnasts is truly exhibited in the above picture as members of the Peru Staie Gymnastic Team practice for their performances.

Bobcats Slaughter Wildcats In 69-56 Feline Scramble BY BILL BLISS Peru won the battle of the conference leaders by knocking off Wayne State 69 to 56 in a wild and wooly game Saturday night, Fehr. 2. A capacity crowd sat in as a total of 58 fouls were called, thirty-four on the visiting Wildcats. The win put Pei u on top with a 4-0 record. Wayne drops to second with a 5-1 mark. Hustle played a big part in the triumph, as the shorter Bobcats handed Wayne its first conference setback. Freshman center Ron Snodgrass, 6'7", had 18 points to lead the Peruvians. Coach Jack Mcintire's charges were six down in the opening quarter before they were able to tally. With 12:25 left on the clock, Larry Hayes' jumper put Peru on top 13-12. Two free throws by Snodgrass upped it to 15-12, and lhe 'Cats were in the lead to stay. Peru maintained a seven and nine point lead throughout the first half, and a bucket just

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before halftime upped the margin to 36-26 at intermission. Wayne, led by ace Dennis Johnson, rallied for eight straight points at the start of the second half. Tom Yopp's free throw and lay-up and two free throws by Snodgrass padded the margin to 41-34. Johnson's jump shot cut the lead to 45-42. A Yopp jump shot and a Snodgrass lay-up put the 'Cats out of reach. Peru hit eight of thirty-two field goal attempts and were seventeen for thirty-two from the line. Wayne fared even worse in these departments. Five Wayne and two Peru players left the game via personal fouls. In addition, two technicals were called on the Wayne bench. Lack of offensive rebounding and free throw shooting hampered Peru, while excessive fouling and poor shooting percentage stymied the Wildcats. -.... Snodgrass· had 18 points for Feru, Bill Hunsaker 15, Tom Yopp, who played an outstanding floor game, had 14, and Larry Hayes finished with 12. Dennis Johnson's 12 points 1 e d Wayne. Peru had a poor 25 of 45 from the line while Way n e meshed 16 of 28.

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After four complete rounds of intramural basketball, the Snappers lead the seventeen t e am pack with a 5-0 record. They are followed by the Chuggers with a 4-0 mark. The Beavers, Spider Bugs, and Moonshiners ha v e identical 4-1 records. Regulation play ends after ·eight complete rounds. Leaders thus far in scoring are Russ Hicks, 73; Ray Ogle, 61; and Don Rut, 56. Team won and lost records are as follows: Team Won Lost % Snappers ____ 5 0 1000 Chuggers ____ 4 0 1000 Beavers ------ 4 800 Spider Bugs __ 4 800 Moonshiners _ 4 800 Blitzs' _______ 3 750 Marauders --- 3 2 600 400 Pussys ------- 2 3 3 400 Flun.kies ----- 2 Playboys ----- 2 3 400 400 Half Fast ·--- 2 3 Jockey Jrs. ___ 2 3 400 Crazy S's _____ 1 250 3 Empires ______ 1 3 250 Louts -------- 1 200 4 4 0.00 Fighting Illini 0 Hill toppers --- 0 5 0.00

Organizations BLUE DEVILSThe Blue Devils held their first meeting of the Spring semester Monday evening, Febr. 4, in the Science Building. It was decided that the names , of the pledge nominees would be ' presented at the next meeting. · Thomas Aitken and Ron Kellty were appointed to check the possibilities of obtaining a band for a future dance. The meeting was closed by the singing of the "Blue D e y i 1s Song."

John Steffan, Roy Windhorst, and Charles PraU act as spotters as two unidentified fellow gymnasts practice a routine. LSAThe L.S.A. met Wednesday, January 30, at 6:30 in the Music Hall. Gary Schlange led the group in a discussion on how tc:: make the meetings more interesting. Bob Mathews was in charge of devotions. The meeting closed with social activities led by Elaine Gerdes. SENIOR CLASSThe Senior class met in the auditorium Wednesday, Jan. 30, and discussed the gift to the school of a brick wall four feet high which will be constructed at the south approach to the campus. Class dues will be $1 payable immediately. Also tentative plans for money making projects and a Senior dance were discussed.

Practice Debate At Tarkio College The Peru State Teachers College debate team participated in a practice debate at Tarkio College, Tarkio, Missouri, Tuesday, February 5. The team, composed of Bill Donovan and Dorothy Bock, debated the negative side of the national college debate topic, Resolved: That the nonCommunist nations of the world should foi;m an economic co.mmunity. The debate, judged by Mr. George Hinshaw of Northwest Missouri State College, Maryville, Missouri, was won by the Peru team, coached by Mr. James D. Levitt. The two Tarkio teams are coached by Dr. L. A. Chaney. Mrs. Shirley Vaughn attended the debate as a spectator.

WHITE ANGELSThe White Angels met in th~ basement of Morgan Hall Febr. 4, 1963, at 6:30. President Carol McLain called the meeting to order. She reminded the members that second semester dues were due in three weeks. Plans were made to attend either the Kearney game, Febr. 9, or the Wayne game, Fehr. 28. Each girl is responsible for finding her own ride. The meeting closed with the singing of the White Angel song. M.E.N.C.M.E.N.C. held its reg u 1 a r monthly meeting on February 4. President Jim Kelly called the meeting to order. There was discussion concerning the possibilities of a Road Show this spring. Other topics brought up for discussion were the High School Band Clinic on April 6, and ways to improve attendance at future programs. HISTORICAL SOCIETYPeru State Historical Society met Monday, Febr. 4, 1963, in the Administration building. Tim Hollinger, president, opened the meeting and members chose the month of April to hold the club's annual banquet. The program was then presented by Mr. Strom, assistant professor of history. "Peru as Strom Sees It" was the theme. Mr. Strom humorously expressed his observation of students and classes during his four years at Peru College. Students thought Mr. Strom came to Peru by result of mistake, actually as a plumber. Another incident he humorously related was that during his third year at Peru, the Easterners started invading.

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Valentine Royalty Announced.

Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru. In establishing the fund, Mrs. Royalty for Cupid's Frolic, Val- from Bedford, Iowa, and Elaine Stevenson has indicated that entine dance at Nebraska State Gerdes, sophomore from Auburn. preference in awarding of scholTeachers College· at Peru, Februarships to Peru State will be givKing candidates i n c 1 u d e : ary 11, has been announced. Seven to students from Nebr. City. Wayne Wallace, junior from Neen candidates for queen and sevThe Peru Achievement Foundbraska City; Steve Parker, senior en for king were selected in allation was founded in 1955 to acfrom Peru; Ray Ogle, junior from college balloting. cept gifts for the benefit of the Dawson; Gary Stover, Jun!Or students and college. Loans and Queen candidates i n c 1 u d e : from Auburn; Vincent Sabatinelscholarships for worthy students Marilyn Masters, freshman from li, sophomore from Southbridge, received the great~st emphasis in Nebraska City; Judy Strange, Mass.; Ron Kelly, s.enior from the Foundation's program. freshman from Nebraska City; Falls City, and Larry Hayes, senSharon Richardson, junior from ior from Auburn. Crab Orchard; Karolyne Powers, senior from Auburn; Karen Identity of the queen and king Quinn, freshman from Corning, will be announced at the coronaIowa; Jan Beemer, freshman tion ceremony during the dance. A choral arrangement of the Psalm 8, "Oh Lord! How Excellent Thy Name," by R. T. Benford, associate professor of piano and organ at Peru State Teachers College, has been published by The American Folk Duo preThe Peru Prep Concert Band Pro Art Publishers, Westbury, sented a program of folk songs presented its annual winter con- New York. at an all-college convocation cert, Monday, January 28, at Mr. Benford, acting head of Wednesday, February 6. The duo 8 p.m. in the College Auditorium. the fihe arts division, has had a -Dave Sear and Sonja Savig- The band was under the direc- number.of vocal compositions and was well received by the audio tion of Gilbert E. Wilson, associ- arrangements' published. Among ence. The two opened with "This ate professor of music here a.t these are an arrangement of Land Is Your Land," and moved Peru State. "Three Blind Mice," "Where Is into a song about the open road, Mr. Wilson commented on the John?," and a girls' trio arrangeintroduced by a Walt Whitman excellent playing of his young ment of "Rackety Coo," from poem. Sear's singing remark,."Pe- bandsmen and praised them for Friml's opera, "Katinka." A numru water tastes like turpentine," being one of the finest concert ber of Mr. Benford's piano numwas met with laughter and ap- bands that he has been able to bers also have been published. plause from the audience. develop at Peru Prep. Featured soloist was Karen Miss Savig introduced 1o v e songs by singing, "Blow th e Workman, Prep senior, who per- Neal Scholarship Winds Southerly," an English formed the "Ode for Trumpet" by To Regina Kreifels song. This was followed by the Alfred Reed. Other numbers included on the (Continued from page one) "Irish Love Song to a Dead Cow," which, Sear informed the audi- program were: "The Earle of Ox- al music groups, the pep c 1 u b, ence, later became "Kisses Sweet- ford Marche," by Gordon Jacob; and church-related youth activier Than Wine." After this ro- "Tamerland," by Frank Erickson; ties. She was attendant at the mantic view of marriage, Miss "Coleman Stomp," by James May Crowning her senior year. Savig announced that she would Handlon; "Fitzwilliam Suite," ar- During the past semester s he like to give a true picture and ranged by Philip Gordon; selec- was a member of the college sang a humorous song about the tion from "West Side Story," by cl;wrus and active in the NewLeonard Bernstein; and "Seven- man Club. trials of marriage. ty Six Trombones," by Meredith From songs about love and Willson. marriage, the duo moved into Members of the concert band Nine Sign Contracts childhood songs. They opened include: Cheri Combs, Steve · this section of the program with With Area Schools Gnade, Linda Combs, Barbara a song about a "Child who "waked (Continued from page one) up in a dry bed." Sear then did Peck, Kent Vanzant, Nancy Ad..,,_ City; Gary L. Schlosser, Dawson, ams, Dana Henry, Rina Merritt, some highly amusing take-offs on mathematics, history and social TV commercials. The audience Margaret Lutt, Robert Mullenscience, to Exira, Iowa; Carol dore, Anita Cox, Lora Lee Adwas then invited to participate in Ann Sudik, Virginia, elementary ams, Jackie t Milstead, Karen some singing and handclapping. education, to Bellevue; Larry W. Workman, Allen Palmer, Robert Sear closed this portion of the Swett, Malvern, Iowa, mathematMilstead, Bruce Cotton, S a 11 y program with "John Henry."· Gnade, John Lutt, Sharon Beat- ics, physical science and physics, Miss Savig presented the eth- ty, Pamela Morrissy, Patricia Ad- to Glenwood, Iowa; Sharylin nic part of the program, singing ams, Jim Whisler; John Vander· Vrtiska, Table Rock, elementary Norwegian folk songs and ac- ford, Gary Hayes, Marshall Mer- education, to Bellevue. companying herself on the Lan- ritt, Tom Gomon, Karen Beatty, geleik, an eight-stringed Norwe- Lola Morrissy, Mike Adams, Gary gian folk instrument. Audience Milstead, Phil Parker, John Kite, Dramatics Club participation was again invited as Mary Lutt, Lavonne Stephens, Rehearses Play Sear sang an army song and in- and Ann Adams. (Continued from page one) vited the audience to join in as privates. ties; and Bill Fournell and Dave Griffiths are working with sound, Sear read a poem by James lighting, setting, and special '!fThurber about World War II, inleets. troducing Miss Savig's, "Where As the name suggests, 1984 is Have All the Flowers Gone?" The Mrs. Oliver Stevenson of Neprogram, highly enjoyed by the braska City has established a set in the future-an all too posaudience, was closed by the duo $500 scholarship fund in the Pe· sible future in view of present with "Fare Thee Well." ru Achievement Foundation of world conditions. The air. is military in every aspect; the characters are monitored in every movement and (is it possible?) PERU CLEANERS TAILORS thought. Repairing and Remodeling Men's and Women's Cloihing Although the play is enterForty-five Years Serving Students and Faculty taining, it is not to be enjoyed in PHONE 872-2671 PERU, NEBR. a lighthearted manner. 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Peru Prep Band Presents Concert

P.T.A. Scholarships To Three. Peruv1'ans Three students at Peru State Teachers College received $100 scholarships from the Nebraska Congress of Parents and Teachers. The scholarships, which cover the consolidated fee at Peru State for the second semester, are awarded annually by the Congress on the basis of scholarship standing, moral and social standards, and aptitude for teaching. The scholarship program is in its eighteenth year. The recipients include: Steve Parker, Peru, a senior in art and speech; Dorothy Drubek, 12609 South TwentyNinth St., Omaha, a freshman in elementary education, and Rudolph Eichenberger, Burchard, a junior in physics and science.

Freshmen Sponsor "Registration Romp" (Continued from page one) the Student Center Cafeteria. Music was provided by The BelAirs. Intermission entertainment consisted of a pantomime by: Bill Anderson, Marilyn Master, Kristine Wewel, Beverly Quinn, Pamela Froebe, Judy Strange, Gretchen McKenney, Myra Murren, and John Soby. Bob Lierz and Tom Evans, folk singers, and "The Ethnics" folk singing group, also provided entertainment.

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The Ped Salutes Volleyball Meet Coming Up Deadline for entries for th e 17th annual Peru State Volleyball Tournament for High School Girls will be March 1, reports Fran Wheeler, director of women's physical education. Twenty schools, including Halsey from Thomas county, have already sent entry material. The tournament, scheduled for March 18, 19, 20, will be limited to 32 teams. The first 32 teams complying with entry procedures will be given tournament berths, Mrs. Wheeler said. Dawson-Verdon will defend their 1962 crown. Other top teams in the 1962 classic were Sacred Heart of Falls City, second, Avoca, third, and Adams, fourth. Entries received through Monday included: Avoca, Bradshaw, Cook, Dawson-Verdon, Dorchester, Douglas, Garland, Halsey, Hickman, Holmesville. Malcolm, Peru Prep, Prague, Platte View, Stella, Syracuse, Table Rock, Virginia, Weston, Walton.

We're Nutty Too BY RICHARD BERTHOLD Three groups, consisting o f fourteen Peruvians, attempted the fifty mile hike in accord with President Kennedy's plea for physical fitness on Fehr. 15 and 16. Blisters, sore feet, and aching muscles were felt within a few miles l)y .rno~.t of :.th~ hikerp. The first group leaving Nebraska City at 10:20 p.m. Saturday were: Jim Tonniges, Jim Green, Boyd Wood, George Nowak, Jim Minor, Charles Pratt, and Richard Berthold. Between Dunbar and Syracuse, a welcome meal was waiting for them. All seven thanked the Syracuse police f o r arranging the meal. Around 2:30 a.m. some began to fall behind when Ken Olson went running by pulling Brenda McCarthy in a wagon. This was the most embarrassing thing because they had a two hour start on Ken and Brenda. At 11:15 p.m. Saturday two wagons began the hike. Mike Hunt and Ken Boatman pulled Karen Quinn and Sharon Richardson over the cold route. The four Peruvians t w i s t e d and played for photographers a n d curiosity-seekers. They reached Lincoln around 4:30 Saturday afternoon and KLMS Radio unit furnished transportation to the Governor's Mansion. Instead of touring the mansion that evening, they waited and enjoyed a party themselves. The most outstanding feat was performed by Ken Olson an d Brenda McCarthy. Ken, running with Brenda in a wagon, left Nebraska City about 12:10 a.m. Saturday. George Nowak of the first group reached Lincoln minutes ahead of Ken and Brenda. Dick Floerchinger started with the two but after reaching Syracuse sore feet took over. Steve Parker w a s waiting with a car. Ken stated he would have run back if it were not for a sore toe! Saturday afternoon, many Peruvians welcomed the weary hikers at Lincoln. Governor Morrison personally directed a t o u r through part of the Governor's Mansion. A Peru sweatshirt w a s given Mr. Morrison.

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU. NEBRASKA

Volume 58

Number 9

FEBRUARY 25. 1963

Forty-seven

Honor~d

An all-college convo was held February 20, 1963, to give recogc nition to those students having received honors for scholastic achievement for the first semester of 1962-63. Mr. Robert D. Moore, Head of the Division of Language Arts, opened the convo with a few introductory remarks. He stressed that three things are needed to make a college great: a trained and dedicated faculty, a wellequipped library, and a student body ready to put forth a great effort. Mr. Moore introduced the Dean of the College, Dr. Keith Melvin. Before giving out the awards, Dr. Melvin spoke on the importance of scholarship and education. He compared education to a bank, saying that if you put something into it, you can draw something out of it.

In the course of talk, he defined college as a place of learning for the mind and the spirit, an atmosphere, and a tradition. The price of success in college depends upon four categories: study, classes, work, and leisure. Each must be given due consideration for success. In conclusion, Dean Melvin read the names of the students on the Dean's Honor Roll, as they came forward and were recognized. Of these forty-seven students 1 eleven were on the high distinction list and thirty-six on the distinction list. The students on the high distinction list are: Sharon Earl, Dorothea Fink, Harvey Fisher, Mary Graham, Nancy Houchin, Judy Hunzeker; Janis Mayer, C. Lynn McCann, Samuel Rankin, Larry Swett, William Witty. The students on the distinction

Interscholastic Meet To Be Held Fifth Time March 22

Elmore and Frerichs Piloted '63 Peruvian To Completion

In Convocation Mexican Trip

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On Thursday, February 14, fifThe a n nu a 1 Interscholastic teen mats were sent to the InterContest will be held Friday, Collegiate Press, Mission, Kansas. March 22, 1963. This is the fifth All copy is in except the history year that Peru State has held ·tf the unfinished basketball seathis contest. The purpose of the son. contest is to foster, promote and This year's staff was headed by recognize scholarship. two English majors, Jo Ann FrerSchools participating will be ichs and Richard Elmore. classified A or B. Those schools Jo Ann is the daughter of Mrs. with 150 students or more in grades 9-12 are Class A. Schools Marie Frerichs, Beatrice, Nebraska, gnd is ajuniqr 9t Peru.. Sl},e w:ith a~. ,e~J,;ql~tx;iEln~ .of)e.s.s.. t;r~ 150 stu'dents are Class B. Only is·ab'l:We 'in R:appfbelta Pi, Sig~ those students in grades 10, 11, ma Tau Delta, M.E.N.C., P.S.E.A., L.S.A., and the college chorus. and 12 are eligible. There were 29 schools in last Jo Ann was vice-president of year's contest with 454 students L.S.A. last year, and is secretaryparticipating. Falls City walked treasurer of Sigma Tau Delta at away with A honors and Nebras- the present time. Richard, also a junior, is the ka City Lourdes Central took B. College officials in charge are son of Mr. and Mrs. Dale M. Ellooking forward to a very suc- more of Nebraska City. He has worked on college publications cessful con test. for two. years. At the present time Dick holds the position of co-editor. on both the Peruvian and the Pedagogian. Being president of the Peru Student EducaThree Peru Student Education tion Assn., vice-president of the Association members represented Student Christian Fellowship, the organization at the state executive meeting Saturday, February 16, at Kearney State Teachers College. The representatives were Richard Elmore, state executive committee member; Merlin Wright, Peru SEA treasurer; and Ed Meyer. Twelve of the 47 students on Plans were made for the state spring convention at Chadron the Dean's Honor Roll have been, and for the officer election pro- or are now, on the Pedagogian or cedures. It was announced that a Peruvian staffs. Frank Bostic, distinction, start~ nominating committee w o u 1 d meet Saturday, March 9, at Mid- ed on the Ped as a sports reporter. Last semester he served as land College. co-editor. Steve Parker, distinction, also served as a reporter and an editor on the Ped. In addition, he was the photographer for both the Ped and Peruvian for four years. Carolyn Reiber, On February 7, 1963, the Nutri- distinction, served as a Ped retion and Dietetics class went to porter. Jane Rhodus, distinction, St. Mary's hospital at Nebraska started as a reporter and later beCity, on a field trip. A demonstra- came personnel manager of the tion on basal metabolism and a Ped. Merlin Wright, distinction, tour of the hospital were con- is a former member of the Peruvian staff. ducted by Sister Regina. The drivers were Mrs. Louise Now serving as a Ped reporte1 Kregel, the instructor, and Linda covering administrative offices is Stephens. Others who went were Dorothea Fink, high distinction. Elaine Gerdes, Lucille Gilliand, Lynn McCann, high distinction, Mary Hannah, Nancy Houchin,· is now serving as personnel manBetty Painter, Linda Risley, Ruth ager of the Ped. She has also Schnute, Janice Tucker, and Ruth served as a reporter and a columWheeler. nist. Carol Niebuhr, distinction, is

PSEA Plans

Honor Students Represented On Publications Staff

Nutrition Class Visits Hospital

Our Honor Students

list include: M 0 n t y Allgood, Daryl Bonow, M. Frank Bostir., Rudolph Eichenberger, Warren Etter, Katherine Francis, Prudence Fritch, Elaine Gerdes, Barbara Gordon, Millard Hamel, Karen Hamm, Loretta Kratochvii, Robert Mathews, Carol Niebuhr, Linda O'Hara, Stephen Parker, Robert Penkava, Ralph Plummer, Roger Ray, Carolyn Reiber, Jane Rhodus, Jack Rinne, Linda Risley, Esther Shafer, Leland Schneider, Enoch Shepherd, Carol Sudik, Sharylin Vrtiska, Joe Ward, Judy Weichel, Kristine Wewel, Duane Weichelman, Janice Wilkinson, A. Eugene Wright, Darlene Wright, and Merlin Wright. Dean Melvin also awarded the P.T.A. scholar.ship to three Peru students: Dorothy Drubeck, Rudolph Eichenberger, and Stephen Parker.

Is Planned F0 r summer ·

Peru State Teachers College will sponsor a Mexico Field trip as a part of the Summer Sessions offerings, according to Dr. Keith L. Melvin, dean of the college and director of summer school. The 27-day tour, which includes two days of orientation on the Peru campus, will run from July 15 through August 10. It is possible to earn up to five hours of college credit. The itinerary enroute to Mexico includes stops at Springfield, Mo.; Little Rock, Ark.; Natchez, Miss.; New Orleans, La.; Lake Charles, La.; Houston, Texas and Corpus Christi, Texas. After entry at Laredo, Texas, overnight stops in Mexico will include Monterrery, Valles, Mexico City, laxco, Acapulco, San Luis Potosi.· The return to Peru will include stops at San Antonio, San Marcos, and Dallas, Texas, and Wichita, Kansas. Complete information will be sent upon request. Dr. Melvin pointed out that applications will be honored on a first come basis.

Sweetheart Dance Event Of February 11 Queen Janet Beemer and King Vincent Sabatinelli reigned. over the annual Valentine Day dance, February 11, 1963. Miss Beemer was presented with a bouquet of long-stemmed red roses and a locket. Mr. Sabatinelli was presented a cuff-link and tie-tack set. RICHARD ELMORE and JO ANN FRERICHS secretary of Kappa Delta Pi, and a member of Sigma Tau Delta, Alpha Mu Omega, and the Nebraska S.E.A. executive board, Dick spends a lot of time with "extra" paper work.

Dr. Melvin Attends AACTE Meeting February 13-16, Dr. Melvin, Dean of Students, attended the meetings of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education and the Association of State Colleges and Universities in Chicago, Illinois. The theme of AACTE w a s "Strength Through Reappraisal." The purpose of the meeting w a s to consider the trends and issues in teacher education with a view toward their future improvement. Dr. Melvin said that the time was spent at seven general sessions and four group sessions. What does this mean to Peru? Dr. Melvin says th~t it gave him the opportunity tQ< view teacher education on national basis and compare it with the local level. now copy editor of the Ped. She was a Ped reporter last semester. Linda Risley, distinction, and Janice Wilkinson, distinction, are present Ped reporters. Prudence Fritch, distinction, and Harvey Fisher, high distinction, are editorial assistants on the Peruvian.

Attendants to the reigning couple were: Sharon Richardson, Karolyne Powers, Karen Quinn, Marilyn Masters, Elaine Gerdes, Judy Strange, Steve Pavker, Ray Ogle, Gary Stover, Ron Kelly, Wayne Wallace, and Larry Hayes. Miniature cupids adorned th e tables and throne, and hearts were suspended from the ceiling. Music for the evening was provided by the Sigma Chi Combo from the University of Nebraska. Chaperons were Dr. and Mrs. Siegner and Dr. and Mrs. Wininger.

Enrollment Is Up This Semester Second semester on-campus enrollment of Nebraska St ate Teachers College at Peru is 713, a post World War II high, according to F. H. Larson, registrar. This is an increase of 12.8 per cent over enrollment for the second semester a year ago when 632 students attended on - campus classes and is 19.4 per cent greater than the number attending the second semester of the 1960-61 school year. Men students outnumber t 11 e women 437 to 276. The freshman class is the largest with 231. There are 175 sophomores, 122 juniors, 164 seniors and 21 unclassified. Campus laboratory school enrollment (K-12) is 255 with 160 in the elementary grades and 95 in high school (9-12).

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Queen Jan Jan Beemer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Horace Beemer of Bedford, Iowa, reigned as the Queen of Hearts, at Cupid's Frolic Feb- ~·· ruary 11. She captured the hearts ' of her "subjects," including that . , ·,. of the King, Vincent Sabatinelli, as they were presented during_ the coronation ceremonies at 10 p.m. in the Student Center. A graduate of Bedford Community High School, Jan is somewhat accustomed to t h e limelight. As a freshman, she was F.F.A. Sweetheart, and was a member of the Valentine Royalty as a senior. Her other high school activities included the following: band, cheerleader, girls basketball, track and softball, F.H.A., chorus, Y Teens, class plays, class officer in her freshman year, and Worthy Advisor of her Rainbow Chapter. As a college freshman Jan. is just as busy, participating in the following organizations: Home Ee. Club, W.A.A., Business Club, cheerleader, class treasurer, Wesley Fellowship, and band. Aside from her busy schedule of varied activities, Jan enjoys "being with friendly people." Her sparkling personality is a good testimony to this special interest. What did she think of being chosen the Queen of Hearts? She said, "I was really ;urprised, and so thrilled!" She shared her excitement with her escort, Jack O'Connor. It was a common c o m m e n t among the freshmen that they were proud to have Jan as their representative and the campus Valentine.

King Vincent

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Vincent Sabatinelli reigned over the Cupid's Frolic Valentine Dance, · February 11, as 1963 Sweetheart King. He was chosen from the seven candidates f or king in an all-college election . Vincent is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Antonio Sabat in e 11 i of Southbridge, Massachusetts. He was graduated from Mary E. Wells High School in Southbridge where he was active in football and baseball. Vincent, a resident of Delzell Hall, is commonly known on campus as "Vinnie." He is a sophomore majoring in Biology and minoring in History. During his two years at Peru, Vincent has been an escort in both the Homecoming and Mav Fete activiti.ils. Last year he wa's one of the royalty for the 1962 Valentine dance. After completing his four years of college, he plans to teach biology or history at the secondary level.

Sweetheart Royalty 1963 Miss Sharon Richardson is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Richardson, Crab Orchard, Nebr. She is a senior elementary education major. Her activities at Peru include Chorus, P.S.E.A., Home Ee. Club, White Angels, and wing counselor. Stephen Parker, son of Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Parker of Peru, was named an attendant by the student body of Peru State at Cupid's Frolic. Majoring in dramatics and speech, Steve is a member o £ Sigma Tau Delta honorary English fraternity and has served oL the Peruvian and the Pedagogian. As president of the Senior class, Steve has been named to the Dean's Honor Roll and to Who's Who. He is also a member of the Student Government Association here at Peru State. Miss Karolyne Powers is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. William A. Reed of Auburn. Nebraska. She is a senior majoring in home economics and minoring in physical education. She participates in S.G.A. and Home Economics Club. Ron Kelly is the son of Mr. anu Mrs. Bertha! Kellv of Falls Citv. Ron is a senior "in physical ucation. He is now engaged in his professional semester. Among his duties at the campus school is coaching the Junior High basketball team. An all-conference halfback last fall, he is also an outstanding baseball pitcher. A member of Blue Devils and P club, he plans to tea~h upon graduation.

ed-

SHARON RICHARDSON AND STEVE PARKER

KAROL YNE POWERS AND RON KELLY


Upper Left-

ELAINE GERDES Elaine Gerdes, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Gerdes of Auburn graduated from Peru Prep. Elaine is a junior majoring in elementary education. She is active in Home Economics Club, L.S.A., White Angels, P.S.E.A., and is a member of the Dorm Council. Last fall, Elaine was one of the Homecoming attendants.

LARRY HAYES Larry Hayes was a member of the Sweetheart Dance royalty. He is the son of Mr. and M rs . Nathan Hayes of 1422 N Street, Auburn, and a senior at Peru State Teachers College. Larry, 22. is a 1959 graduate of Auburn High School and plans to graduate from Peru in January 1964. Larry is majoring in physical education and is a member of the Bobcat basketball team and PClub. He is an Auburn commuter.

Upper Righi-

KAREN QUINN Karen Quinn is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Quinn of Corning, Iowa. She is an English major. While in high school, Karen was a cheerleader. She was an active member of Thespians. She was also a member of National Honor Society. At Peru State, Karen is a member of Cherubs and Newman Club. She serves as secretary of the freshman class. Karen's favorite pastime is dancing.

GARY STOVER

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Gary Stover, son of Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Stover of Auburn, Nebraska, was a member of the court for the Cupid's Frolic Valtine dance. Gary, a junior, is majoring in business education and minoring in speech. He attended the Bratton Union High School in Auburn. Hunting, fishing, and love for the "outdoors" are Gary's hobbies.

Lower Left-

MARILYN MASTERS Marilyn Masters, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Masters, Nebraska City, was a member of the queen's court at the Valentine dance. Marilyn is an elementary education major, active as a cheerleader and in White Angels. She was escorted at the coronation by Wayne Wallace.

WAYNE WALLACE. Wayne Wallace is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth R. Wallace of Nebraska City. He is a graduate of Nebraska City High School. At Peru, Wayne is a junior majoring in business education and minoring in social science. Wayne participates in Blue Devils, P Club, Phi Beta Lambda, Peru Historical Society, P.S.E.A., S.G.A., and S.C.B.

Lower Righi-

JUDY STRANGE Judy Strange is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ira Strange of Nebraska City. Judy is active in Cherubs, N.S.E.A., and Christian Fellowship.

RAY OGLE Raymond Ogle is the son of Mrs. Irene Ogle. Raymond is a football letterman, and is Majors Hall Dorm president. He participates in Sigma Tau Delta, Peru Hi<toriral Sorietv. and Alpha Mu


MORGAN HALL By Mary Holland Where were the co-eds w h e n the lights went out? Morgan Hall experienced a sort of power failure and girls like Carol Curd, Sue Ellen Reilly and Linda Bartels were searching wildly f o r candles. They seemed to think that candlelight studying is romantic, somehow. Are you trying to make like Abraham Lincoln, gals? Perhaps one of you will be our first lady president. Dorothy Drubek is recovering slowly but surely from the bumps and bruises she received at the Newman Club skating party. Asked what she thought about her first time on roller skates, she commented, "Help! Unlike ice skates, they roll!" Sharon Furnas, Mary Parmenter, and Ann Epley had a geography studying party. Anyone trying to enter the room found the floor covered with maps, atlases and study notes. The password may well have been, "What is the definition of a landmark?" instead of, "Who goes there?" Mary swears that she will dream of islands, bays and plateaus for some time now. A new form of language from the play 1984 has invaded the dorm. It is called Newspeak. One of the most dire threats that Dorothy Bock can impose on one of her friends is, "I shall turn y o u into an unperson for that form of crime think!" Morgan Hall was turned into a flower garden of reds, whites, and various pastels as the gals prepared for the Valentine's dance. Two days later, it blossomed for real when Pinky Lewellyn received her long stemmed roses. Room 120 also saw many callers who wanted to "take a sniff" of the dozen red roses there.

DELZELL HALL By Ronald Rist Delzell Hall salutes its journeyers. Richard Berthold, Boyd Wood, Jim Minor, Jim Green, Jim Tonniges, Charles Pratt, a n d George Novak were the Delzell residents who made history f o r Peru State. This great event took place on February 16, 1963. These men journeyed, on foot, from Nebraska City to .Lincoln. They started at Nebraska City at 10:30 a.m. Saturday morning and all managed the 54 mile trip. T h e

over-all average for this walk was 12 hours. The journeyers were picked up at Lincoln and they were driven back to Peru. We, in Delzell, are fortunate enough to have a king in our dorm. Vincent Sa'batinelli was crowned king at the Valentine Dance on Monday, February 11. Congratulations, King Vincent. The Delzell. boys competed in table tennis, chess, and pool in the recreation tournament in the Student Center. Dave Barns is a new resident of Delzell Hall. His name w a s left out of the last issue. Several residents moved o u t of Delzell Hall. William Murphy, William Quilty, and Mike Smacgz moved to Majors Hall. Others who moved were: Bob Lierz, Louis Mathieu, and Norman. Sorge. Jim Wheeler is commuting.

''COCA•COVi.'' AHO "GOU'' Aftl

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By Keith Grimes Last Saturday, Febr. 16, Dan Leuenberger, a Majors m an , walked from Peru to his home town, Tecumseh. The distance is about 40 miles. The jaunt took Dan from 4:00 Saturday morning to 2:00 Saturday afternoon. The men of Majors congratulate Dan. Last Tuesday, Febr. 19, John Moore, an ex-Majors man visited the old dorm. Last year John roomed with Roger Slaughter. John is a sophomore at the University of Nebraska. Roy Broadbrooks is hospitalized in Beatrice, Nebr. Majors men wish him speedy recovery. Bernie Lorimar has just returned after a weeks illness. It seems as though the flu bug got the best of him. Majors Hall welcomes th re e new residents, Mike Smagacz, Bill Quilty, and Bill Murphy. Dean Stapleton, senior, has signed a teaching contract at Huntington Beach, California. Congratulations, Dean. The nurse's office, evidently, not the only sick bay on campus. It seems as though Mrs. Donavon has turned room 117, at Majors, into a sick bay also. It seems as though Spring has sprung at Majors Hall. Tuesday, Febr. 19, a few of the Majors men got ambitious enough to start a srriall game of touch football on the "Oak Bowl" football field. Also, I happened .to see Harold Choate at the other end of the football field, teaching Janette Fox how to use a golf club.

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Pamela Ann Maria Froebe Has Traveled - Will Travel BY SHARON DONLAN One of the most interesting people on this campus is Pamela Ann Maria Froebe, daughter of ,Air Force Major and Mrs. L. R. :r:roebe. She was born in Richmond, Indiana July 3, 1944. Pamela, better known as Charlie, spent almost three-fourths of her life in foreign countries. When. she was three days old, she moved to Dayton, Ohio, then moved to Texas. After living in Texas, the Froebe family were sent to a small village near London, England for three and onehalf years where Pam grew up with mostly English people as there were only forty-eight Americans in that part of the country. She attended an English school her kindergarten, first, second, and beginning of third year. Students were urged to read Shakespeare in the t h i r d grade, as well as to have a knowledge of the twelve time tables. She saw the coronation Queen Elizabeth.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks February 25, 1963 PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Co-Editor_ ____________________________________ Tom Aitken Co-Editor_________________________________ Richard Elmore Layout Editor_ ________________________________ Judy Wilson Personnel Manager __________________________ Lynn McCann Business Manager ----------------------------- Tom Castle Copy Editor ________________________________ Karen Conrad Copy Editor_ _______________________________ Carol Niebuhr Copy Editor_ __________________________________ Jane Moore Morgan Column _____________________________ Mary Holland Majors Column ______________________________ Keith Grimes Delzell Column ________________________________ Ronald Rist Reporter_ _________________________________ Phillip Bateman Reporter ____________________ ------------- Richard Berthold Reporter_ ____________________________________ William Bliss Reporter_--------------··-------------------- Dorothy Bock Reporter ___________________________________ Dorothea Fink Reporter _______ ----- .. ---------------- _____ Stanley Johnson Reporter_____________________________________ Janice Jones Reporter _____________________ ------------- Carey Lankford Reporter_ ______________ -------------------___ Robert Peck Reporter _______ ------------------------------ Karen Quinn Reporter___________ -------------------------- Glenda Rima Reporter _____________________________________ Linda Risley Reporter _______________________________________ Ruth Rulla Reporter_ _____________________________________ Larry Spier Reporter ___________ ---------------------- Wendell Stewart Reporter _________________________________ Betty Wellensiek Reporter_-------------------------------_ Janice Wilkinson Sponsor_________________________________ Stewart Linscheid

Nebraska City Coca-Cola Bottling ·Co.

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The Froebes then returned to the U. S. and lived a couple of years in California. From there, they were transferred to Tucson, Arizona and frequently visited Mexico. After that her fathi;r receiv.ed a Department of State appointment to study foreign languages in Washington, D. C. At the age of thirteen, Pam and the rest of her family moved to Zaragoza, Spain, where they spent four years. In those four years they met many people from different countries and Pam stayed often in the homes of foreign families. She stayed with a family in Munich, Germany. During the summer she stayed with a family in the French Riviera. Pam spent private vacations in other parts of Spain during the winter and summer. They visited Switzerland, the Tangiers, and Gibralter. While in Spain, they had interesting experiences such as hosting a ball for the crown prince of Spain, Juan Carlos; and making the movie of a story about the base which was released all over Europe. Her father was in that movie. They spoke Spanish fluently in the home and school, and during

her three-fourths of a year back in the United States, she has found it difficult to speak English. After leaving Europe, sh e moved to Dayton, Ohio, which she considers to be her home and where she completed her h i g h school education. During the summer, she toured America becoming re-acquainted with its old customs and such current practices as the twist, tennis shoes, and sweat shirts. After this tour, she became a Peruvian. Charlie's hobbies include writing poetry and stories with which she would like to make a partial living, meeting and studying people, and reading foreign novels. After completing two years at Peru, she plans to round out her travels with a year in the Orient working for Pan American Airlines.

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Bobcats BeatDoane On Home Court

'Cats Split With Chadron Eagles BY BILL BLISS

Peru escaped a certain title Peru smashed Doane 79-61, through and outshot their falterelimination by splitting two Tuesday night, February 12. This ing foe. Coaches cleared their games at Chadron, Friday and pushed the Bobcats back into a benches, with Peru building its Saturday, Febr. 15 and 16. The tie for first, with a 5-1 record. ffnal margin. Hopper did an outEagles took Friday's game 89-81, The Peru court was the setting as standing job of rebounding and the Bobcats prevailed Saturday the Peruvians and the Tigers shooting. Hayes played a fine night 55-53. played an even first half. T h e game as did hustlers Yopp and Wayne leads -the N.C.C. conscore was tied 10 times, before Hamm. ference with a 6-1--record while Larry Hayes' hit a jumper to DOANE (61) ft pf fg Peru stands 5-2. give Peru a 17-15 lead. They then 4-4 5 Ker'brock -------- 2 Friday's game saw Chadron stretched their lead to nine points 0-0 0 Klein ------------ 0 survive a Peru rally to win 89-81. with six minutes left on the 0-1 0 The 'Cats had tied the score 78Koch ------------ 2 clock. Then Doane went to work. Capps ----------- 3 3-3 4 78 with 4:08 remaining, and it They scored 11 points to Peru's Andrews --------- 7 0-0 3 was only 82-81 with two minutes two. Tying the score 35-35, on a Nelson ----------- 7 5-7 2 left. Peru was then blanked, and bucket by Don Dondlinger. Pe- Dondlinger ______ 1 3-4 3 Chadron capitalized on Bobcat ru's attempt at a last shot went Stephens ________ 0 1-3 0 fouls to form the final score. astray, and Doane hit one instead. 1-2 1 Ross ------------- 0 Big 6'6" Felix Sanford had 25 This put them on top 37-35 at Machmann _______ 0 0-0 0 for the Eagles while Pat Hamm's halftime. Center Ron Snodgrass Lothrop _________ ·o 0-0 0 23 led the Peruvians. picked up his fourth personal Saturday night Peru overcame with 4:00 remaining. This dam22 17-24 19 the Eagle's nest jinx, by winning aged the Bobcat rebounding sea hard fought contest 55-53. The severely. ft pf PERU (79) fg Bobcats never trailed. 6-7 0 Peru regained the lead in the Witty ------------ 4 Coach Ja'ck Mcintire's team led 4-5 3 second half on a long fielder by Hunsaker -------1 30-18 at halftime, but Chadron 0-0 4 Pat Hamm 42-40 as 15:42 showed Hayes ----------7 quickly moved to a 35-35 dead0-0 0 lock early in the second half. on the dock. Doane fought back Schmidt --------- 1 0-0 0 Sparkling sub Marv Hopper then to take and maintain a one and Hall -----:,-------- 0 Snodgrass ___ ·____ 4 0-0 5 paced Peru to a 46-39 margin. three point ·margin. The Tigers Freshman Jack Rinne took the 3.3 2 The Bobcat "B" team extended held the lead until sub Marv Hopper ---------4 The Eagles weren't going to play 2-5 0 its victories to seven by defeat- game's scoring honors by netting dead, however, as they rallied to Hopper hit a short one, and Hamm ----------- 4 0-0 0 ing the Doane "B" team Tues- 17 points, 12 of those being scored trail only 49-50 with 2:00 left in canned a free throw to give the Rinne ----------- 0 0-0 0 day, Febr. 12, 68-56. Coach Mc- in the last half. Close behind was the game. Bobcats a 55-54 lead, 11 :33 re- Russel ----------- 0 Yopp _A, _________ 5 4-6 2 Intire's second team has been teammate Bill Russe 11 who maining in the game. Bill Hunsaker's two free throws 0-0 0 beaten only by St. Benedict's pumped in 15. Rounding out the and Hamm's lay-up put Peru out This is where the game ended Fraser ----------- 0 Bobcat scoring was: Marv Hopand Northwest Missouri State. for the tiring Tigers, Peru led by of reach. 30 19-26 16 Trailing by 27-24 at halftime, per, 12; Jim Hall, ten; Don Hopper hit for 15 points and Al floor leader Tom Yopp, dribbled the Bobcats pulled ah"'ad early in Schmidt and Harvey Fraser, six; Lawrence meshed 17 for Chadthe third period and went on to and Jim Manning, two. ron to lead their respective Center Bob Klein was high for cap the victory by outscoring teams. Doane, 20-12, in the final period. Doane with ten points, scoring Peru plays its home finale SatTeam Won Lost % After seven rounds of intraonly one field goal in the final The Tigers scored 16 points on the urday, Febr. 23, hosting the Bron- mural basketball, the Snappers Snappers 7 0 1000 charity line to 14 for Peru, but half. Three teammates followed cos from Hastings. (7-0) and the Chuggers (6-0) are Chuggers 6 0 1000 the Bobcats seven additional field with nine points each to form the' the only teams to have main- Spider Bugs ___ 6 1 857 bulk of the Tiger scoring. · Friday's Gamegoals spelled the difference. tained perfect records. The Spi- Beavers ------- 5 2 714 PERU (81) pf fg ft der Bugs have lost one while Moonshiners ___ 5 2 714 Witty ------------ 3 5-5 1 winning six. The Beavers an d Blitzs --------- 4 2 666 Hunsaker -------- 2 1-4 4 Moonshiners are tied for fourth Marauders _____ 4 3 571 Hayes ----------- 5 7-10 5 place with 5-2 records. Regula- Half Fast ------ 4 3 571 Snodgrass ------- 1 4-5 5 tion play ends after one more Jockey Jrs. ____ 3 4 429 Hopper ---------- 2 0-0 3 round. Crazy 8's ______ 2 4 333 Hamm 5-9 SPECIAL PLANS FOR STUDENTS 4 ----------- 9 Following regulation play, a Flunkies ------- 2 4 333 Yopp ------------ 6 3-6 5 4 333 double elimination tournament Empires _______ 2 involving the top four teams will Pussys -------- 2 5 286 23 27 25-39 Phone 274-4413 be held. This tournament is Louts ---------- 2 5 286 ft pf scheduled for the week of Febru- Playboys ------ 2 CHADRON (39) fg 5 286 6 000 Megown --------- 6 0-0 5 ary 25-29. Following are records Hilltoppers ____ 0 7-12 3 of the 17 teams: Green ----------- 3 Fighting Illini _ 0 6 000 3-4 Lawrence -------- 3 4 Muma ----------- 7 3-8 4 Parr ------------- 2 0-1 3 PERU CLEANERS & TAILORS Sanford ---------- 3 9-10 5 Repairing and Remodeling Men's and Women's Clothing Matthesen ------- 0 4-4 0 Forty-five Years Serving Students and Faculiy Rama ------------ 1 4-4 2

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JOHN L. LEWIS,

Vice Pres. & Cashier


Peru SEA Begins Auburn FTA Group On February 19, four members of the Peru Student Education Association, with their advisor, Mr. Johnson, conducted a followup meeting for prospective Future Teachers of America members in Auburn. Dick Elmore, president of the PSEA; Dorothy Drubek and Ed Meyer, co-chairmen of the FTA committee; and Mary Holland conducted the meeting. The prin. ciples of the Future Teachers of America, which had been presented at the first meeting, were reviewed and sample constitutions were submitted to the group. The members then he 1 d EDITOR AITKEN elections and the new president Thomas Aitken, Jr., son of Mr. appointed constitution and proand Mrs. Thomas Aitken, Sr., of gram committees. Falls City, is this year's Pedagogian co-editor-a position he has held for two semesters. Tom has also been the Peruvian's business manager, layout editor, a n d sports editor. The S u r v i v a 1 Preparedness Tom, a 1959 graduate fro m classes are being offered on the Falls City Sacred Heart, has atPeru campus again this semester. tended St. Benedict's College at There are four meetings in one Atchison, Kansas. At Peru he is session. The first meeting of this a first semester senior majoring session was held Tuesday, Februin English and speech. ary 12. The classes will meet with Tom is a member of Blue DevMr. Jarvis every Tuesday from ils, Sigma Tau Delta, and an as7 to 10 p.m. Twenty students are sociate member of the Dramatics 'enrolled this session, as comClub. He also serves as Majors pared to eighteen enrolled for the Hall vice-president. first session last semester. The purpose of the course is to give the students a knowledge of atomic blasts, radiation, and how to prepare for it if the n e e d arises. On Wednesday, February 6, 1963, forty-six former students ,I and friends of Nebraska State Teachers College of Peru met in In high school news the F.H.A. Lincoln for a banquet. It was held its annual Talent Show held at the Nebraska Center for Monday evening, Febr. 4, in the Continuing Education. high school auditorium. Talent New officers for the coming consisted ,of several tap and bayear were elected. Dr. F l o y d ton numbers, skits, solos, and duMiller,. State Commissioner of ets. The winning entry w~ a Education and a graduate of Pespecial by Kathy Rice and Lindy ru State, gave a report on legislaStole. tive matters concerning higher The Senior-sponsored Sweeteducation in Nebraska. Dr. Neal heart Dance took place Saturday, S. Gomon offered greetings from Febr. 9. The seniors decorated the Peru. high school auditorium with the Entertainment was provided by traditional Valentine hearts and Eugene Walden, music major a false ceiling of balloons. from Ruskin, Nebraska with piKing and Queen for the dance ano accompaniment by Miss Judy were Karen Workman and John Whigham from Blanchard, Iowa. Eickhoff. Junior attendants were Miss Frieda Rowoldt, Associate Janice Biere and Tony Dahmas; Professor of business education, sophomore attendants were Phyland Donald K. Carlile, director lis Groff and John Mcintire; and of Special Services at Peru, also freshman attendants were Donna attended the meeting. Henry and Phil Parker. The Bobkitten volleyball team won their first round in the preliminaries for the N.V.A. tournament Saturday, Fehr. 17, in a game with Cook on the ho m e The 1963 Peruvian staff met its court. Good luck to the girls in final deadline Wednesday, Febru- the coming tournament. ary 13. Fifteen final pages were The high school students a r e mailed to Inter-Collegiate Press proud of their basketball boys. of Mission, Kansas, completing the 138-page yearbook. Kansas City to proof-read the

Survival Preparedness Classes Are Offered

Alumni Bariquet Held In Lincoln

Campus School News

Peruvian Staff Meets Deadline

After the Peruvian proofs have been made by the publisher, five staff members and the sponsor, Mr. Stewart Linscheid, will go to

yearbook, probably in early April. The Peruvians should be ready for distribution in early May.

BOWMAN'S HARDWARE Appliances - Sporting Goods Hunting and Fishing Licenses PERU

872-2561

CECIL BOWMAN

SIMON DRUG CO. Ph. 274-4315

Auburn, Nebraska

THE REXALL STORE Hallmark Cards

Russell Stover Candies

"Prescriptions A Specialty"

They won the second place trophy in the N.V.A. tournament held here this past week. With the tremendous school spirit that the students have shown and the ability the boys have, they should place high in the Cl~ss C tournament to be held in the next few weeks. The seniors are still working hard on · their play-"Thursday Murder." They hope to present it in early March. These next fe~ weeks w i 11 prove to be busy ones for P e r u Prepsters because of tournaments, the scholastic contest, tests, and studies. Valentine's Day with its colorful motifs and excitement ha s gradually given way to the less spectacular but necessary lessons in the elementary school. In the Campus School Mrs. Christ's room boasts an eye-catching bulletin board of red, white, and blue with the words, "Fabulous February," extolling the important days of the month. The fourth-fifth grade combination, under the supervision of Mrs. Iversen, is studying Holland, and the room reflects the Dutch influence. Girls going from door to door is a common sight. These girls are F.H.A. members collecting for the March of Dimes and Heart Drive. Dr. Wininger's Human Growth classes are invading the Campus School. The college students perform a regular cloak and dagger routine as they try to observe some child and keep the c hi 1d from knowing he is being observed. Miss Grush's room seems to be a popular observing port. Mr. R. T. Benford and Mrs. Maryon Adams, music supervisor, are beginning to practice for the elementary operetta which will be produced in April. Mr. Benford has written the operetta, and it is called "Mrs. Melody Entertains." 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111u.

Organizations 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111

BLUE DEVILSThe Blue Devils met on Monday, Febr. 11, and nominated 24 names for pledges.' At the following meeting held Monday, Febr. 18, 12 of these 24 were elected as pledges. The new pledges are: Luke Cox, Bob Ruff, Roy Windhorst, Sam Carneal, Harvey Fraser, Jim Manning, Doug Cotner, Don Stuart, Dominic LaRocca, Jim Kanter, Mike Chu, and Lany Hershburger.

HOME ECJudy Wolf, Elaine Bath, Mary Schlange, and Mrs. Ina Sproul attended Graduate Students Day at Kansas State Vniversity Saturday, Fehr. 9. The workshop was sponsored by graduate students of K.S.U. The program consisted of a morning coffee, a tour of the new home economics facilities, and a luncheon with a panel discussion.

from a box and presenting guts to those drawn. Committees were assigned for the annual Martha Washington Tea. It was held Thursday, Febr. 21, in "the Home Economics Department at the Campus School.

M.E.N.C.A special M.E.N.C. meeting was held Fehr. 11. President Jim Kelly called the meeting to order. Tom Majors was elected as the representative from the Peru Chapter. He is to attend th e M.E.N.C. board meeting at Kear· ney in the near future. Mike Janis was selected as the alternate. Plans were discussed for t h e Road Show. Hastings College and Kearney State Teachers College are to be contacted to see if dates can be arranged for the show.

The meeting closed with the singing of the White Angel Song.

SPEED WASH COIN-OP. Drycleaning and

PSEAThe Peru Student Education Association met Monday, Fehr. 18, 1963, in the Campus School auditorium. Dick Elmore, President, opened the meeting. Ed Meyer gave a report on the Kearney Convention and the plans for the Chadron Convention. The theme for this conven· tion will be "Comparative Education" and will be held April 5, 6, and 7. A short program followed the business meeting. It involved group discussions on three problems concerning ethics in t h e teaching profession. Three case studies were used. A report w a s made by each group on its conclusions to the cases.

Laundry

THE AVENUE STORE Groceries • Meats FruJts • Vegetables

SIGMA TAU DELTASigma Tau Delta met Sunday evening, Fehr. 10, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Silas Summers' home for an initiation ceremony. The new members are: Dale De· Voe, Kay Camden, Harvey Fish· er, and Bill Scott. Those who helped with the initiation ceremony were Lynn McCann, JoAnn Frerichs, Ardith Pratt, and Richard Elmore. Plans <:oncerning the spring banquet were discussed during the business meeting. Janice Jones reported on the Freshman essay contest judging. Mr. Summers was in charge of the evening's program. He had each member write limericks which were turned over to Richard Elmore and Janice Jonesco-editors of Sifting Sands. Lois Fritz Jed the group in a game she learned while student teaching. Mrs. Summers served refreshments after tl).e meeting.

L. H. CRAIG, Owner PERU, NEBRASKA Phone 872-2701

INGERSOLL Barber Shop AUBURN, NEBRASKA Elly Ingersoll - Nate Hayes

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WHITE ANGELS-

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The White Angels met in the basement of Morgan Hall, Febr. 11, at 6:00. There was a discussion concerning the attendance of th e Fehr. 12 game. The names of the eligible cherubs were read, discussion and voting followed. Invitations will be sent to those who are eligible, asking them to join. The meeting closed with the

Steam Cleaning

HOME ECONOMICS CLUBThe Home Economics Club met Monday, Febr. 11, at 6:30 in the recreation room of Eliza Morgan Hall. All the girls in the dormitory were invited to the special program given by Mr. Ben Myers, better known as "Mr. Ben-Your Hairdresser," of Lincoln, Nebr. Mr. E. T. Bell, head instructor at Mr. Ben's School of Beauty, was also present. Both men gave the girls hints on how to improve their appearance with a ha i r style suitable to each face. They told how fashion trends originate and how the styles are introduced for the next season. Mr. Ben ended the program by drawing some of the girls' names

singing of the White Angel Song. White Angels met in the basement of Morgan Hall at 6:00, February 18. Winnie Sporer, the vice-president, called the meet· · ing to order. Initiation of the new members that were present was discussed. It was decided to sing the White Angel song at the Hastings game, Fehr. 23. The new members are to have it memorized by then.

872-3201

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Open: Monday · Saturday 6:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m. Sunday 6:00 a.m. · 8:00 p.m. Peru, Nebraska


The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . . ·

Congratulations, Bobcats

Peru Pedagogian PERU.NEBRASKA

Home Economics Serves Martha Washington Tea The Annual Martha Washington Tea, sponsored by the Home Economics Club, was held Thursday, February 21, at the T. J. Majors Campus School. Mrs. Ina Sproul, Home Economics sponsor for the event, said that th e r e were over fifty guests who attended during the afternoon. A patriotic theme was .carried out by the various decorations. The first was the centerpiece-a hat box decorated with frosting in the shape of a drum. The fruit cake was served from this. Winnie Sporer, Elaine Gerdes, and Linda Stephens were in charge of decorating it. Sugar cubes for the tea table were decorated in red and blue by Lois Layden. The theme was carried out further in the pyramid floral arrangement consisting of blue and white chrysanthemums accented by red candles. Serving coffee, tea, and cake at the table were Charlotte Wheeler, Judi Wolf, and Winnie Sporer. Hostesses for the afternoon were, Mar,y Schlange and Elaine Gerdes. Ruth Rulla and Glenda Rima were in charge of the guest book. Individual fruit cakes were sold during the tea. Cheryl Berner, Sharon Peacock, and Cyn~ thia Meier did the selling.

Faculty Rejects IAA Proposal A new teachers' retirement plan was voted down Febr. 25, 1963. The Teachers' Insurance Annuity Association presented the plan. At a meeting of the faculty Monday, the plan was unanimously rejected. Freeman B. Decker, state coordinator of teachers' colleges, had proposed the plan. k committee made up of faculty members had studied the plan an d listed their objections. The chief objection was that there is only a 2% return on the investment. When put to a vote, the faculty backed the committee unanimously. This plan would replace t h e present plan and is compulsory. With the present plan a teacher may quit and draw his money, but not so with the new one. Over 1,000 schools have voted on the TIAA plan and accepted it. The other State Teachers' Colleges are to vote on this plan. Several other schools in the state have already accepted the program.

Iowa State Professor Speaks In Convocation Dr. Wilbur L. Layton was the featured speaker at an all-college convocation on Wednesday, Febr. 27. Dr. Layton is head of the department of pyschology at Iowa State University. Dr. Layton's topic was differential psychology, which he defined as "individual differences of behavior among man and animals." Immediately following convocation, a question and answer session with Dr. Layton was held in the college auditorium. All interested persons were invited to attend. Another such session was held at 12:50 that afternoon.

NAIA

Beatrice Field Trip For Practical Arts A field trip will be made to the Palmer Furniture Company in Beatrice, Nebraska on Wednes-. day, March 27 by a combined group of home economics and industrial arts majors and minors. The group will be headed by Dr. C. V. Siegner, associate professor of Industrial Arts. Students taking the trip include: William Anderson, Judy Anville, Janet Beemer, Darryl Chapelle, Marie Conn, Sharon Donlan, Ronald Foreman, Judy French, Donna Gerdes, F. Lucille Gilliland, Nancy Houchin, Lorene Kostal, Lois Layden, Cynthia Meier, Clifford Murray, ·Carol Niebuhr, Peggy Quackenbush, Glenda Rima, Linda Rogers, Judith Shut~Y. Alice Urbina, Judith Wilson, Darlene Wright, Ann Wittwer, and Barbara Young.

Fran Wheeler Announces Dates For Volleyball Meet

Volume 58

Number 10

I. A. Will Tour K. C. IndUstries On Friday, March 15, thirtyfour students interested in industrial arts will leave for Kansas City, Missouri. The group w i 11 visit Sheffield Steel and the Chevrolet assembly plant. Sheffield Steel contains many factories within itself. Among them are a nut and bolt factory, nail factory, and a wire fac_tory. Sheffield also has a rolling mill in which heavy beams and plates are made. Reinforcements for highways are another product of this factory. Two commonly used furnaces in this mill are the electric and open hearth. The Chevrolet plant is located next to Fisher Body Company. Fisher makes the upholstery and fraipe work of the car, while the Chevrolet plant deals with the assembly of the Chevrolet automobile. Other years, similar groups have visited the Yard Institute and the stockyards in Kansas City.

WAA Tourney Coming Soon

The women's intramural volleyball tournaments will be played on Wednesday, March 13. There will be two play-offs: a The 17th annual Peru State Loser's Play-off and a ChampiVolleyball Tournament for high onship Play-off. The Loser's school girls will be held March Play-off is between the Co-Eds ·rn, 19,• and 20. The deadline for and the Slick Six. It will begin entries was March 1. The ~.ur­ at 8:00 p.m. The Championship nament has been limited to 32 Play-off will begin at 8:30, and teams. Mrs. Fran Wheeler, direc- will be played by the Spikers tor of women's physical educa- and the SIOA's. tion, said there were eight teams The tournaments are sponsored that had to be turned down be- by the Women's Athletic Associcause of the entry requirements. ation. There were eight teams Teams planning to compete participating. Each team consists are: Dawson, Weeping Water,· of eight or nine girls. The tourJohnson, Malcolm, Sterling, Mur- naments were open to all girls dock, Prague, Stella, Holmesville, and the teams were formed by Endicott, Virginia, Lewiston, Hal- dividing floors of Morgan Hall sey, Syracuse, Alvo-Eagle, Avo- and appointing a member of ca, Douglas, Brock, Walton, To- WAA as the team's captain. bias, Waco, Talmage, Shubert, There was also one team, the InPeru Prep, Platteview, C o o k , dependents, which consisted of Millard, Elmwood, Elk Creek, girls living off-campus. The Bradshaw, and Adams. names of the team participating Mrs. Wheeler also said that are: SIOA's, Co-Ed's, Tippers, this year she plans to hav:e twen- Basement Beauties, Independty P. E. majors work the tourna- ents, Basement Babes, Slick Six, ment. and the Spikers.

Champions

MARCH 11. 1963

Dramatics Club Will Conduct Speech Contest Here March 21 College Men Attend Educational Meeting February 11-20, President Gomon attended the meetings of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education and the American Association of School Administrators at Atlantic City. He joined Mr. Van Zant enroute to the latter. The theme of AASA was "Keep Pace with Space." The purpose of the meeting was to bring new insights, new concepts, n e w knowledge, and new inspiration to the heads of school systems and their associates. Some of the "courses" consisted of presentations and interpretations of resarch findings; some dealt with general and special aspects of school and college curriculums; and still others attempted to analyze new instructional methods and new materials for improved learning. In addition, a magnificent laboratory on new school building ideas, equipment, and facilities for learning was available for examination. Mr. Vanzant said that more than three million dollars was spent in providing these displays. Among the speakers at the AASA convention was Lyndon B. Johnson, Vice-President of the United States.

Plans Under Way For Scholastic Meet A committee met Tuesday, March 5, to work out details of administering this year's Interscholastic Contest for area high schools. The contest will be held Friday, March 22, 1963. Many new entries are expected this year, especially in the class A division. School superintendents expressed keen satisfaction concerning the contest, and every effort is being made to insure their continued support. The Student Governing Association will sponsor an afternoon (Continued on page two)

'Cats Squeak By Wayne 61-60 To ·3rd NAIA Championship BY BOB PECK Peru State gained a 61-60 basketball victory over Wayne State Teachers as the Bobcats won the District 11 NAIA championship for the third straight year. Bill Hunsaker provided the Bobcats with the victory by dropping in a field goal with 15 seconds of the overtime to go. Bobcats Jack Rinne and Ron Snodgrass added the one t w o punch to Wayne in the first half as Rinne collected half of Peru's score and Snodgrass did a tremendous job of rebounding. Rinne had help in the scoring column as Bill Witty provided the Bobcats with eight big points. Wayne led the Bobcats early in the game but Peru came on strong as they picked up momentum in the later minutes of the first half. Peru led Wayne at halftime 26-18 as the student body of Peru gave the Bobcats a rousing cheer as they left th e floor. The Bobcats widened their first

half lead to 13 but saw a determined Wayne State crew dwindle the point margin. Students from both schools enjoyed many anxious moments as the game drew tighter. Wayne tied the game at 51-all at the end of the regulation play. In the overtime. Wayne jumped to a 59-55 lead but the Bobcats battled back to close the gap to 60-59 before Hunsaker' s shot clinched the victory. Wayne State's last desperation shot did not count because the buzzer had already sounded and the official scorer said the game was over. Students and fans of Peru State hoisted Coach Mcintire to their shoulders at the game's end.

WAYNE WILDCATS fg D. Johnson ____ 1 Nielsen _______ 0 Peterson ______ 1 Jones _________ 5 Garcia ________ 1 Collins _______ 6 A. Johnson ___ 8 Torgerson ____ 2 Ginapp --·----- O Murphy ______ 0

Jack Rinne, who played an outstanding game for the Bobcats, finished with 18 points to share high point honors with

Witty --------- 6 Hunsaker _____ 1

Dick Collins of Wayne. Snodgrass and Witty finished with 13 and 14 points respectively as both boys played an excellent game.

pf 1 1

T 2 0

5

4

4 4

12 5 14 18

4

0-0

2 2 0

0-0

0

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24 12-22 23

60

PERU BOBCATS jg Yopp --------- 2 Rinne ________ 7 Snodgrass ____ 4

Hayes -------Hopper ------Russel ________ Schmidt ______ Frazer ________

ft 0-0 0-0 2-4 2-4 3-3 2-2 2-6 1-3

2 0 0 0 0

ft 2-2 4-5 5-9 2-7

0-0 4-4

0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

pf 4 4 4

5 0 3 0 0 0

5 0

On March 21, the Peru Dramatics Club will sponsor the Student Activities Association of Nebraska Speech Contest. It is for all classes of District Two, Class A and B high schools. Registration will be held at 8:15 in the college auditorium, followed by a general meeting at 9:00. The various events will then be held in separate buildings. The areas of competition are oral reading of drama, oral interpretation of prose literature, oral interpretation of poetry, discus:>ion, extemporaneous speaking, radio and television speaking, standard oration, original oration, and one p.ct plays. Most of the events will take place in the morning, with the one act plays starting at 1:00 and continuing into the evening as necessary. Theref,will be between ten and fifteen schools represented by approximately 200 contestants. However, not all entries have been received. Judges will be local and t h e Peru Dramatics Club will take care . of all of the arrangements. Mr. Levitt will be in charge of the speech events and Mr. Moore will have the dramatic competition. All students are invited to observe the events, and there will be no admission charged.

Peru On T.V. Program Sunday Peru State Teachers College presented a program on Channels 10 and 11, KOLN-TV/KGIN-TV, on Sunday, March 10 at 1:00 p.m. The program, in part, was composed of sketches of the background of the college and current campus events. Mr. James Pilkington, associale professor of physical education, conducted a discussion on physical fitness. A gymnastics demonstration was presented by 12 Peru State gymnasts. The program was closed by the Ethnic Singers, Karen Workman, Russell Workman, and Mike Janis, and a film of the r i v e r , hills, and campus. The program was under the direction of the department of special services, headed by Mr. Donald K. Carlile. Mr. Robert Henry served as narrator. Mr. James Levitt, associate professor of English and speech, secured and supervised the pictures shown on the program. Background music was furnished by Mr. Robert T. Benford, associate professor of piano and organ, and the college band, under the direction of Mr. Gilbert Wilson. The band music was taped at the winter concert. The 30 minute production was part of the weekly, "From the Campus" series. The series runs for 13 weeks with 11 colleges participating.

T 6 18 13 14 2 8 0 0

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61

Peruvians Attend Debate Conterence The University of Nebraska's Debate -Discussion Conference was held February 21, 22, and 23 in Lincoln. Five Peru S tat e Teachers College students, Sharon Peacock, Dorothy Bock, Bill Fournell, Ed Meyer, and Lonn (Continued on page four)


ANYONE WANT TO BET?

"CtCCA·COV.1' AND "COKI" Al'tl ftlQltf!ltH TftAOt•MAftKS WtltC" 10tttt1N ONLY THI l'AOOUC:T 0, tHt COCA·COV.. C:OMflittY, 1

First, this year's edition of the Bobcats and Jack Mcintire have earned a lot of credit. As the season began, few people thought the 'Cats had much of a chance to show or to place in the conference race-much less to win! But win, they did-too many times for the wins to be accidental. They won because they hustled and never quit. Now, everyone knows the score. Peru and Wayne tied for the NCC championship; then Peru defeated Concordia by a big margin and went on to beat Wayne by one point (61-60) and earn the right to represent the district in the K.C. tourney. About a month ago, when it was too early to make sane predictions, we made one: that the 'Cats might be champs. We ended the editorial with, "Does anyone want to bet?" Nobody offered to. We guess Peruvians knew or felt the boys would win all along. And win, they did! Right now, we'll bet that Peruvians are proud of the Bobcats and Mac. Anyone want to bet?

-S. P.L.

DELZELL

MAJORS

IHALL

HALL

NEWS By Ronald Rist

By Keith Grimes

.... gym .... tumble .... flip ...flop ... lug ...tug posh ...jump.~~leap ... ... chin ... lift ... pull .. . ... run ... puff puff .. . pause I

There are no new "fads" going around Majors Hall, but an old one seems to take up most of the time, card playing. If anyone wants to talk to one of the "old pros" of the game please contact one of the following persons in room 107 between 2 p.m. and 1 a.m.: Jim Brenn, Bill Essman, Dennis Heiney, Rod Baady, Jack Roper, Bob Ruff, and John Barton. Wayne (Bob) Wallace was ill M-0nday, March 4. Cary Lankford was also ill this week. I hope this doesn't turn out to be like the last flu epidemic. Majors received a new washer and dryer on Monday, Febr. 25. Now everyone's wash will be "whiter by far." It seems that Majors Hall has a "do-it-yourself" man. Roger Slaughter is tooling his own billfold. Good luck, Roger. Majors Hall was almost vacant the night of the Wayne game. The following names are just a few of the Majors men who attended the game: Ed Stilinger, Roy Broadbrooks, Charles Caverzagie, Bill Scott, Bob Ruff, Rod Baady, and Gary Stover. Congratulations to Sam Smith and Gary Frankhauser. Both will be initiated into Alpha Mu Omega. Everyone please note ... John Soby is now known on the baseball squad as "Mickey." F o r

, take a break ••• things go better with Coke

A surprise birthday party was ~ TRADE•MARK 1%1 held for Brian Maxwell on Monday, February 25, 1963. Brian Bottled under the authority of The Coca-Cola Company by1 Nebraska City Coca-Cola Bottling Co. celebrated his 19th birthday. This party was held at the Student Center from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. A large birthday cake was preELIZA built th1.Bob Inn in the Delzell BY JUDITH WILSON sented in his honor. MORGAN basement, and the Bobcat Inn When a frantic student's founThe Delzell men who were HALL tain pen runs out of ink, a term was once again remodeled into guests were: Richard Klinger, By paper needs a cover, or someone an apartment. Boyd Wood, Jim Agnew, Jim Mary Mr. Landolt has "many happy needs fiv!' or ten minutes of Tonniges, Jim Lyons, Ken Gayer, Holland small talk, there is only one memories" of his days in the Dale Duensing, Bob Sterner, Bill place he can turn and that is the store. Even now alumni send reRussell, Royce Curtis, Bob MaixHey, Dorothy Bock, does Mr. ner, Jim Green, Ronald Foreman, Moore know about your devotion Avenue Store. If one could turn gards with their children, who Don McCord, Charles Wellensiek,. to the play? Those rats you back the calendar to the 1890's, are now students at Peru, to Mr. William Witty, Bob Powers, and brought for the props would have one would find college students Landolt. As the college has added new running in and out of the store Charles Pratt. caused quite a commotion ii).- the buildings and acquired m o r e just as they do today. The guests presented Brian dorm. Around 1946 the son-in-law of .land, the store has been surwith a combination clothes brush Congratulations to Judi Wilson Mr. Landolt, Mr. Lenis Cr a i g , rounded by college property. and manicuring set. Brian said on her engagement to Bob Gal- bought the store. It was then Without stretching the facts, one that he truly appreciated the par,. lerani. Three others on Cupid's that the basement storeroom was could say the store is on the ty and the gift. list are Bev Quinn, Madelyn remodeled and called the "Bob- campus although the property is Hark! One may hear s ~ e Bleach, and Karen Quinn. They cat Inn." It was here where stu- still privately owned. beautiful music from the third are going steady with Bob Ster- dents purchased 50c dinners and floor of Delzell. This music is ner, Harvey Fraser, and Larry 5c pop. The "Den," as it was "A man's real life is that accoming from an instrument hav- Morrissey, respectively. called by many students, re- corded to him in the thoughts of ing a long fretted neck and six Red roses seem to be a favorite mained open until all campus ac- other men by reason of respect strings. The musical instrument at Morgan Hall, and another doz- tivities ceased at night. or natural love." is the guitar. The "musician" is In later years the c o 11 e g e -Joseph Conrad. en came to third floor. Bev Quinn Arlan Richardson. received them from that n e w Some of the Delzell Hall men steady of hers. entered the ping pong and pool Morgan suffered another powcontests during the week of Feber failure. Third floor had a ruary 25th. The results will be blown fuse which darkened some known later. of the rooms. Studying and other _../

·>

The Avenue Store APeru Tradition

LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS

further details on this subject please contact "Mickey."

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of

aThousand Oaks

March 11, 1963 PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Co-Editor_ ____________________________________ Tom Aitken Co-Editor _____________________ ------------ Richard Elmore Layout Editor _________________________________ Judi Wilson Personnel Manager_ _________________________ Lynn McCann

regular activities were conducted in the hall. Parts of Morgan were active until 2:00 a.m. the night of th e Wayne game. Some of the girls had a little trouble getting in at the unusual hour, but managed to attract attention and get the door opened without too many frozen toes. Some of .them, like Janey Moore and M a d e 1y n Bleach set their hair and talked quietly in the hall to avoid awakening their roommates.

Business Manager ----------------------------- Tom Castle Copy Editor. _______________________________ Karen Conrad Copy Editor_ _______________________________ Carol Niebuhr Copy Editor ___________________________________ Jane Moore Morgan Column _____________________________ Mary Holland Majors Column ______________________________ Keith Grimes Delzell Column ________________________________ Ronald Rist Reporter __________________________________ Phillip Bateman

The gals in the basement were treated to a self-styled tumbling exhibition recently, as some of the more active members showed off their skills. The gals who put on the show were Marilyn Gonnerman, Barbara Young, Donna Gerdes, Kay Bender, and Pat Richardson.

Reporter _________ ------------------------ Richard Berthold Reporter_ ____________________________________ William Bliss Reporter_____________________________________ Dorothy Bock Reporter___________________________________ Dorothea Fink Reporter_ __________________________________ Stanley Johnson

Plans Under Way For Scholastic Meet

Reporter_______ ------------------------------ Janice Jones Reporter_______ --------------------------- Carey Lankford Reporter------------------------------------- Robert Peck Reporter_____________________________________ Karen ~uinn

Reporter------------------------------------- Glenda Rima Reporter------------------------------------- Linda Risley Reporter--------------------------------------- Ruth Rulla Reporter ______________________________________ Larry Spier Reporter _________________ ,; _____ ~------___ Wendell Stewart Reporter_________________________________ Betty Wellensiek Reporter _______________ ------------------ Janice Wilkinson Sponsor--------------------------------- Stewart Linscheid

(Continued from page one) sock-hop. College students will be available to answer inquiries of the high school students. Other college students will assist in carrying out the contest.

BANK OF PERU PHONE 872-2331

Member F.D.I.C.

Redfern Clothing Co. "The Store of Standard Brands" Phone 274-3620 Auburn

INVITES YOUR BUSINESS CARROLL LEWIS, President

JOHN L. LEWIS, Vice Pres. & Cashier


Al Wheeler Announces 1963 Baseball Schedule Alfred G. Wheeler, athletic director and head baseball coach at Peru State Teachers College, has announced an 1"8-game baseball schedule for his 1963 defending Nebraska Co 11 e g e Conference champions. The schedule includes n in e doubleheader dates. The Wheelermen will play four home dates and five on the road. In addition to NCC clashes with Wayne, Kearney, Hastings and Chadron, the Bobcats will play non-conference twin bills with Northwest . Missouri, St. Benedict's, Omaha U., Creighton, and Parsons College.

Bobcats Clobber Concordia 89-78 ·And Win First Round Of Playoffs BY STAN JOHNSON Peru State hit Concordia of Seward with a balanced scoring attack and won the first round of the NAIA district 11 basketball ' play-offs, 89-78, Monday, March 4. The game saw five Bobcats score in double figures, with Tom Yopp, senior guard, leading with 20. Larry Hayes came off the bench midway through the first half and netted 16 points for the night. Following the opening tip-off, the ball exchanged hands several times before Yopp hit a 20-foot jump shot to start the scoring. Concordia came back with a fielder to even the game at 2-2, then Yopp bucketed two more jumpers for a Peru lead which was never overcome. Hayes' six straight points just before the first half ended extended the Bobcats' margin to 13 points. Both teams exchanged field goals in the final seconds and Peru led at half, 43-30. The Bobcats kept up the scoring pace in the second half. After scoring six straight points, they yielded a jumper to Concordia's Wayne Clements with about three minutes already gone in that half. Clements kept the Bulldogs in the game by canning 17 field goals for 34 points. His eight straight points with nine minutes left on the scoreboard trimmed Peru's lead to 14 points, but the Yopp-Jack Rinne fast break com-

The schedule: April 3-Northwest Missouri at Maryville, Missouri. April 5-Wayne State at Peru. April 8-St. Benedict's at Atchison, Kansas. April 10-0maha at Omaha. April 19-Kearney at Kearney. April 26-Hastings at Peru. May 1-Chadron at Kearney. May 8-Creighton at Peru. May 10-Parsons at Peru.

Peru Drops Hastings __ . In Home Finale 90-79

bination clicked for two quick Peru dropped Hastings from buck€ts to add more "insurance." title contention 90-79, Saturday, With 4:19 remaining in the February 23. It was the Cats' last game, Coach Mcintire put in his home game of the season. Hastreserves, replacing Yopp, Hayes, ings, who on February 22 upset Bill Witty, Ron Snodgrass, and Wayne, was completely outRinne. Concordia's varsity whitplayed by their impolite hosts. tled away at Peru's 25-point lead, ) A~ter two years of bitter frusThe key to this win could be but fell short by 11, the margin . trat10n, Wayne State has finally called "the renaissance of Ron of Bobcat victory. shared a Nebraska College ConSnodgrass." The lanky pivot, who Peru met Wayne State, Wed- ference crown. They blasted Pehas been having his scoring trounesday, March 6, in the finals of tu 92-58, Th~rsday, February 28. bles lately, came through with a the NAIA district 11 play-offs at Both the Wildcats and Bobcats sparkling 25 point performance. Fremont. fimshed at 7c3. A rubber game Sn.odgrass wasn't the only BobCONCORDIA (78) fg ft pf was March 6, at Fremont, to de- cat who had a conference chamBliss ------------- 2 l-3 -.... 2 termine the N.A.I.A. District 11 pionship on his mind, as the PeBredow __________ 1 _ 4 champ. The winner will repre- ruvians ripped the cords for a 23 Clements ________ 17 0-2 1 sent this district at Kansas City's blistering 48.5 percent. Frerking _________ 1 2-3 2 "Tournament of Champions." If The first twelve minutes of the Koenig ---------- o 0-0 o Peru wins, it will be their third initial half was a seesaw affair. Kroger ---------- o 0-0 1 trip in three years. Snodgrass then hit a jump shot Maurer ---------- o 2-3 The game Thursday was no to put Peru on top 27-25. The 5 Niemeier ________ 4 2 match as the Wildcats ripped Cats were never headed again. 2_2 Plughaupt _______ 1 0-0 4 over 50 percent of their shots, They upped their lead to 48-41 at Reinke ---------- 3 1 while the Bobcats were frigidly halftime. 2_3 Schulz ----------- 3 3 cold. Wayne moved to a 41-28 3_5 The Bobcats maintained their lead at halftime. lead throughout the second half. 32 14-2 The second half was all Wayne 4 25 The win put Peru's Conference PERU (89) fg ft pf as they rang up 51 points to Peleading mark at 7-2. Wayne holds Fraser ___________ 1 _ ru's 30. Dennis Johnson and Ron 1 00 down second, 6-3. Snodgrass was Hayes ----------- 7 _ Jones were the hotshots for the supported by peppery guards 3 22 Hopper __________ _ host Wildcats, hitting 30 and 23 45 5 Tom Yopp and Pat Hamm, who Hunsaker ________ _ points respectively. Tom Yopp 1 11 had 22 and 18 points respectively. Rinne ----------- 3 was high for Peru with 17. 3_3 Bill Witty chipped in w i t h 1.1. PERU (58) 1 Russell ---------·· 1 0-1 3 Witty ------------ 1 0-1 0 Schmidt --------- O 0-0 Snodgrass _______ 3 4-7 3 Hayes ----------- 0 0-1 O 6-9 3 2 Snodgrass _______ 4 Witty ------------ 6 1-1 0-0 5 Yopp ------------ 5 10-11 4 Hamm ---------- 2 - - - - - Hunsaker -------- 4 1-4 5 4-6 O 32 25-31 20 Schmidt _________ 0 Hall ------------- 0 0-0 2 COMPLETE Hopper ---------- 0 0-2 2 Rinne ----------- 1 0-0 1 Washing Fraser ----------- 1 0-0 2 Russel ----------- O 4-6 O Gas .. Oil . Yopp ---- Rpt'r. failed to get statistics on Yopp

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Wayne Blasts Peru 92-58 To Tie Bobcats In NCC Race

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HASTINGS (79) fg Fish ------------- 4 Hellings _________ O Bacon ___________ 6 Hamlett --------Priebe ----------Motley ---------Gilliland -------Russel ----------Marvel ---------Sample ---------Juel ------------Harris -----------

5 5 0 O O O O 2 5

28

ft 3-3 0-0 3-3 0-2 9-9 0-0 2-2 0-0 0-0 0-0 2-2 4-4

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PERU (90) fg Witty ------------ 5 Hunsaker ________ 1 'Redden ---------Hayes ----------Schmidt --------Hall ------------Snodgrass _______ Hopper ---------Hamm ----------Rinne ----------Fraser ----------Yopp -----------Russel -----------

35

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WAYNE (92) D. Johnson ______ 13 Nielson ---------- 3 Peterson _________ 4 Jones ____________ 10

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into the club and were wished good luck by the members. Sometime in the near future a tailor will come from Falls· City to measure the pledges for their blazers. No more weekly meetings will be held this year. There will be a special officer election and a meeting for the upcoming spring picnic. WHITE ANGEL'S.The White Angels met Febr. 25, at 6:00. Carol McLain, president, was in charge. Members were urged to attend the Wayne game at Wayne, February 28, 1963. The pledges were excused and initiation plans were discussed. Initiation will be March 11. There will be a short business meeting and a party that evening. The White Angels met in Morgan Hall at 6:00, March 4. Initiation plans were discussed for March 11, in Morgan Hall at 5:30. The meeting closed with the singing of .the White Angel Song.

Kittens Volleyball Team Has Successful Season ble Rock, Dunbar, Nemaha, and Elk Creek. By beating Cook in the first round and Brock in the S€mi-finals, Peru Prep was entitled to play Table Rock in the finals, March 6. The Kittens' scheduled season ended last week with only two/ Other s ch o o 1s participating losses. These were to Elk Creek were Brock, Talmage, Cook, Ta- and Table Rock.

The campus school girls volleyball team and their coach, Mrs. Wheeler, played in Nemaha Valley Conference Championship. The tournament was played at Lourdes Central in Nebraska City. The Ped will give the results in the next issue.

Peru Cubs Advance To Nemaha County Finals, The Peru Junior High Cubs advanced to the finals of the Nemaha Valley Conference at Lourdes Central March 4. T h e Cubs bumped Brock 34-27. Ed Cox led the campus school team with 19 points followed by Denny Collins who had 7. In the final round for the championship, the Cubs suffered a 3916 loss. The team had a record of four wins and two losses before the tourney, but had to content

themselves with· a runner-up finish. The starting line-up for th e year has been: Ed Cox, Denny Collins, Ken Adams, Steve Stemper, Bill Allgood, and Chris Maxwell. Backing up these six are: John Schneider, Mark Parker, Jim Gnade, Al Palmer, Paul Dahmus, and John Lutt. Ron Kelly of Falls City coaches the team as part of his student teaching duties.

Peru State's baseball team gets into action, April 3, against Northwest Missouri at Maryville. Peru's schedule proinises to be one of the toughest they h ave faced in many years. In addition to conference play, the Bobcats will meet with Omaha University, Creighton University, and Parsons College, which carries a 37-game schedule including three Big-Ten clubs. The Peru team lost three .300 hitters from last year's squad, but Coach Wheeler states that the team will be stronger defensively. A promising group of freshmen also makes a good addition to the squad. The pitching staff of ten faces keen c o m p e t i t i o n for the varsity positions. Veterans Ron Kelley, 7-1 last season, Frank Spizucco, and Bob Riemers form the nucleus of the p i t ch in g chores. Others tabbed for mound duty are Doug Cotner, Dale Kreimer, Mel Hester, Marv Hopper, and Duane ·Hufnagle.

NEWMAN CLUBThe Newman Club met in the administration building Febr. 20, at 6:30 p.m. After the film, "Sacraments in. General,''Father Rydz discussed problems of mixed marriages. Citations from The Ari of Happy Marriage were then quoted by Father Rydz. During the Lenten season, the Newman Club does not meet. All Newmanites should attend Mass every Wednesday in St. Clara's Church at 7:30 p.m.

Bert Swenson, Loyal Peruvian, Died February 25

Bert Swenson, a member of the class of 1909 of Peru State Teachers College, died February 25 in Tempe, Ariz., where he was visiting his daughter, Mrs. J oh n Breck. A native of Shickley, Nebr., Mr. Swenson served as superi;ltendent of city recreation at Stockton, Calif., from 1918 until 1954. Mr. Swenson and his wife the late Stella Spillner Swenson'. also of the class of 1909, established the Swenson At h 1 e t i c Award at their alma mater in 1925. The award, a memorial to their son, Bert, Jr., has been preBLUE DEVILSThe Blue Devils held their sented annually since that time to the outstanding junior or senlast meeting Monday, Fehr. 25. ior athlete at Peru State. The new pledges were brought The Stockton Record editorial-

A battle for positions is taking place in the infield, Coach Wheeler reports. First-base tryouts are Luke Cox and Jim Manning; seccond-base, Barney Mcilvoy and Frank Teleen; shortstop, Mike Hunt and Stan Johnson; and third-base, Don Corbin, Ed Stillinger, and Ray Cain. Bruce McCoy, who played last year at third, will move to the outfield. Bruce, a switch-hitter, was one of the conference's leading hitters last season with a .412 batting mark. Other outfielders are letterman Rocky Edwards, LeRoy Leonard, Vincent Sabatinelli, Lynn Wederquest, Bill Heineman, and Leland Schneider. Returning catchers are Eldon Baker and Dick Floreschinger, and a newcomer is Gene Semelrath. NAIA area play-offs will be held May 17-18 at Wayne this spring. Last year the tournament was scheduled for R a p i d City, South Dakota, but the long distance prevented Peru from making the trip.

ized: "Stockton was endeared to named in honor of Mr. and Mrs. the late Bert Swenson as much Swenson. for his qualities of character and personality as for his achievements ·during a 36-year career of PECKTS PALACE public service. He was an exponShort Orders • Fries ent of recreation in its mo s t Featuring Crispy Pizza wholesome, re-creative sense, HOURS 7 TO 11 and his life was a testimonial to the professional values to which Mr. Swenson was attached. "Stockton's system and program of recreation was developed by the gregarious b i g Swede. This statement requires no qualification. More than anyone else he was responsible for Groceries • Meats creating the Metropolitan Recreation District that uniquely joins Fruits • Vegetables city, county, and school district resources in a single program .. " Stockton's Swenson P a r k which includes a golf course, wa~

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Peruvians Attend Debate Conference (Continued from page one) Pressnall, attended the individual events on Friday, Febr. 22. Events entered were interpretative reading and extemporaneous speaking. The participants we r e coached by Mr. James Levitt.

Organizations

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L.S.A.During the Lenten Season LSA will not be meeting on campus. St. Paul's Lutheran Church of Auburn has invited the group to participate in Lenten services on Wednesday evenings, at 7:30. Anyone desiring a ride, contact either Mr. Larson or Mr. Granger.

Baseball Squad Prepping For Tough Season Schedule

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See Orwell's "1984"

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks

P~ru PERU, NEBRASKA

Dramatics Club Production Orwell's Hl984" Coming Soon As March 28 draws near, the cast and crew of Orwell's 1984 are working to prove Mr. Moore's statement that a play i~ .an impression made on an audience. Every word and gesture tells of life under a totalitarian government when even history is obliterated in the belief that whoever controls the past also controls the present and the future. Children are trained as spies before the age of ten and are hailed as "child heroes" when they denounce members of their own families. Marriage, in Let, any form of church, is abolished and all women who are loyal party members belong to the Anti-sex League. The air is militaristic and every party member must wear a uniform. As those who know her say, "Mrs. Gnade came through again!" The Coakley Industrial Service, Omaha, has offered the necessary uniforms, with a return guarantee. Mrs. Gnade ·says that she knows now why the Yellow Pages are yellow and is g 1a d that the uniforms will be "uniform." An interview with the five principal characters rev ea 1e d their previous dramatic experience and how they feel about the spring production. Carol .McLain was in her high school junior .and senior c I a s s plays; 'three previous college pv-0ductions, is secretary of the Dramatics Club, and has participated in debate and extemporaneous speaking. Of 1984 she said, "The play is something that made me stop and think about what the world would be under a system I hate." Tom Majors, a freshman, was in his high school junior and senior class plays, and is a V.F.W. speech contest winner. He feels that this is a good play w i th great possibilities and thinks the audience will be surprised with its general atmosphere. Steve Parker was in his high school junior and senior c 1ass plays, seven college plays, participated in debate and is president of the Dramatics Club. "I feel that it's the best play we've attempted to put on here. I think the people have worked v er Y hard to make it a good presentation." (Continued on page two)

Dr. John Christ Attended Meeting Dr. John Christ, head of the science and mathematics division, attended the "18th National Conference on Higher Education" in Chicago, Ill., on March 3-6. The key speaker Dr. Glen T. Seaborg, chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission in the U. S., set the pattern by telling about advances in the fields of science and technology yet to come. The theme, "Critical Decisions in Higher Education," opened with topics about problems in larger enrollments, admittances, classes, and teaching by machines and television. Almost all accredited colleges in the U. S. were represented. The group of 1,700 participants resided at the Morisson Hotel in Chicago.

Summer Sessions Offer Wide Variety Of Courses, Travel More than 100 cour~e offerings will be available during the 1963 summer sessions at Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru, reports Dr. Keith L. Melvin, dean of the college. Two five-week sessions-June 10-July 12 and July 15-Aug. 16make it possible for a student to earn up to six semester hours of credit each session. By enrolling in both sessions, 12 semester hours may be completed. Registration for the first session will be June 10, with classes beginning the next day. For the second session, registration will be July 13, and classes will begin July 15. Summer commencement is scheduled for Friday, August 16, at 6:00 p.m. Five three-week seminars will supplement the regular offerings. They include: June 24-July 12-Concepts and Techniques in Science; Guidance. July 15-August 2-R ea ding Problems, Mental Health, Philosophy of Education (graduate). Peru . State'.s . tf!l~nte.<;Lj ~ ni or p:togram: ll'.lr hi~h's~hool students between their junior and senior year will be available during both five-week sessions. Under ~ program, students may enroll for six hours of beginning college courses after successful completion of entrance tests and upon recommendation of high school officials. College credit earned during the summer may be applied to future college work at Peru State or may be transferred to other colleges upon high school graduation. A field trip to Mexico is included in the summer sessions offerings. Scheduled from July l5 to August 10, the 27-day tour offers five hours of college credit. Historic and scenic areas in the Middle Southern United States as well as Mexico will bit included in the tour. Complete information may be obtained by contacting Dr. Melvin.

Pedagogian Volume 58

MARCH 25, 1963

Number 11

Dramatics Club Manages Large Speech Meeting BY MARY HOLLAND On Thursday, March 21, the Peru Dramatics Club sponsored the Student Activities Association of Nebraska Speech Contest for District Two, Class A and B high schools. Registration was held at 8:15 in in the college auditorium, followed by a general meeting at 9:00. The various events were then held in separate buildings. The· Peru Dramatics Club took care of all arrangements. Mr. Levitt was ' in charge of the speech events and Mr. Moore handled the dramatic competition. The areas of competition were oral interpretation of drama, oral interpretation of prose literature, oral interpretation of poetry, discussion, extemporaneous speaking, radio and television speaking, standard oration, original oration, and one act plays. The schools, both A and B Class, which received superiors in these fields were Lourdes Central, Dawson-Verdon, Br at ton Union, Platteview, Falls City, Auburn, Nebraska City, and Ralston. . Awards for the outstanding actor and actress in Class B one act plays went to.,~fly,.Gage ·. part' hi "cThr~e r())l; a '

Meetings Attended By Dr. Keith Melvin Dr. Keith Melvin met with representatives from other state teachers colleges on March 13, 1963, in Lincoln. The meeting regarding the s p a c e utilization study was requested by the budget committee of the state legislature. On March 14, Dean Melvin also attended the hearing on L. B. 740. This legislative bill will place the standards for teacher certification under the S t ate Board of Education rather than in the statutes or laws of the state.

Oak Hill Housing Has Sixth Birthday On September 1 of this year, Oak Hill celebrated its sixth birthday. Oak Hill is the married student housing. It consists of five housing units, which were completed in 1956. Two units contain four two-bedroom apartments and three contain two one-bedroom apartments. These housing units are locat-

ed,, ittl\ parkclike .setting east of

;J~m:r.1fa¢c.iteifa.i{ · ~!~~s~~~~!~W:~c!~~l~~s~h~he~:a~~~

Platteview, and •to "Kitten in the Elm Tree," sented by Talmage.

March 28th Auditorium

Band Takes Bus To Tournament In Kansas City

pre-

ments are quite modern. Each is furnished with a stove, refrigera-

Class A Best Actress Award honors were shared by Beth Brown and Kay Jones for their work in "The Sisters MclnTosh," presented by Nebraska City. The Best Actor Award went to Louis Magor of Auburn.for his work in "I'm a Fool."

tor, automatic washer and dryer. The apartments are heated by gas. Rex Allgood is in charge of Oak Hill. He services the appliances and keeps the grounds in proper order. Rex and his family occupy one of the apartments on Oak Hill. Oak Hill is ideally suited to married students. It has a beautiful setting and is a fine addition to the college.

The other participants in the day's activities were Tecumseh, Papillion, Johnson, and Nehawka high schools.

Forty-one High Schools Competed In Peru's Interscholastic Contest Selective Service Tests To Be Given

Applications for the Selective Service College Qualification Test to be given on April 18 are now available to college students at the Selective Service local boards The Peru State Teachers Col- throughout Nebraska. Applicalege Symphonic Band Ensemble tions must be postmarked no lapresented its annual spring con- ter than midnight Wednesday, cert Sunday, March 24, at 3 p.m., March 27. In Nebraska, the test in the Peru College Auditorium. will be offered at the following The Ensemble under the direc- schools: Nebraska State Teachers tion of Gilbert E. Wilson, associ- Colleges, Chadron, Peru, a n d ate professor of instrumental mu- Kearney; Hastings College; Unisic, presented concerts during the versity of Nebraska; Norfolk Junpast week in Auburn, Platts- ior College; University of Omaha, mouth, Table Rock and Lewiston. and Scottsbluff College. In Sunday's concert, Gar Y Scores made on the test will Dahmke, Syracuse, appeared as provide local boards with evifeatured soloist in the "Ballade dence of aptitude for continued for Saxophone" by Alfred Reed. undergraduate and gr a du a t e Other selections i n c 1u d e d : study. Eligible students may ·ob"American Overture for Band" tain information about the test by Joseph Jenkins, "Fandango" from any local board. by Frank Perkins, "Sea Pieces" The applicant must be a Selecby Edward MacDowell, "Mata- tive Service registrant who indor'' by John Cacavas, and "High- tends to seek deferrmen t as a lights From the Sound of Music," student. He can take the test onarranged for band by Howard ly once. Cable. (Continued on page two)

Symphonic Band Ensemble Concert

...

Forty-one high schools competed in the fifth annual Peru State Inter-Scholastic Contest, Friday, March 22. Twelve more schools were entered this year than were in 1962. The following nine Division A schools were entrants: Auburn, Falls City, Nebraska City, Papillion, Platteview of Springfield, Syracuse, Tecumseh, Waverly, Pawnee City. Thirty-~wo Division B schools were entrants: Adams, Alvo-Eagle, Barneston, Bennet, Bratton Union of Humboldt, Brock, Central of Sprague-Martell, Cortland, Dawson-Verdon, Dunbar, E 1k Creek, Elmwood, Gretna, Humboldt, Liberty, Louisville, Lewiston, Lourdes Central of Nebraska City, Mead, Murdock, Nemaha, Palmyra, Panama, ·Prague, Peru Prep, Stella, Stefling, Tab 1 e Rock, Talmage, V a 1p a r a is o , Weeping Water, Yutan. Trophies were given to the high schools accumulating the highest number of points in the A and B divisions. Certificates were awarded to the top three contestants in each test. The contest results will be given in the next issue of the paper.

March 11, at 1:00 P.M., a chartered bus left Peru, bearing signs, "Kansas City or Bust." The passengers were members of the Peru State Band. Because of the importance of the game, the f u 11 band, in regulation u n if o rm , made the journey. The four-hour trip was filled with talking .... card playing ... talking . . . . . play rehearsal ... and m o r e talking. When the destination was reached, the band felt as though they took President Kennedy's message to heart. It seemed as though it was a fifty-mile hike around the auditorium to the Peru secJion. The band played hard and loud, but it. wasn't enough to cheer the Bobcats to victory. After the game, the members were given some free time. The majority of the girls headed for the depar~ent stores. The purchases ranged from clothes to novelty gifts. The trip home was filled with comparing purchases, t e 11 in g jokes, making up verses to favorite songs, and eating. Toward the end of the trip, there w a s much sleeping. It is probably safe to say that no one envied the job of the bus driver. After .everyone has a chance to catch on lost slee):>, he . w i 11 probably start lookij'.J.g forward to next year. The personnel making the trip were: Nancy Neiman, Lois Layden, Donna Cox, Myrna Oestmann, Mr. James Robbins, Joyce Able, Cynthia Meier, Lorene Kostal, Keith Rawson, Carolyn Reiber, Adrian Bartek, Linda Bartels, Carol Curd, G a r y Schmucker, Dorothy Bock, Ruth Rulla, Bonnie Vanderford, Bill Carlson, Betty Wellensiek, Carol McLain, Tom Majors, Dale Duensing, Jim Watson, Allen Chandler, Karen Workman, Linda Elliot, Robert Maixner, Alfred Eickhoff, Boyd Wood, Wendall Mohling, Eugene Walden, Ed McCartney, Anita Cox, Jim Kelly, Paul Stevenson, Brian Maxwell, Virginia Adkins, James Wilson, Mary Holland, Mike Janis, and Gilbert Wilson, director.

up

Miss Diddel Takes Leave Of Absence Miss Norma Diddel, associate professor of art, Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru, has been granted a leave of absence for one year beginning June 1, 1963, according to President Neal S. Gomon. Miss Diddel, who has been on the staff of the college since 1929, plans to travel ..extensively and will study at various art centers. She hopes to have time to work on art illustrations and plans for pain tings based on the history of Peru. During her absence,

Leland

Sherwood, a Peru State graduate, will teach art courses in the 1963 summer session and the 1963-64 academic year. Mr. Sherwood is presently supervisor of art in the Topeka, Kansas, schools and is working on a doctorate in art at the University of Wyoming.


IT COULD HAPPEN

18 a:m: Cil'fCUliiS~-~]-ate

Peru State Teachers College students are given an opportunity to attend at least two plays every year. These plays are held in the College auditorium-one at Homecoming, the other in the spring. This year's spring play is to be presented on the evening of March 28. This play, Geqrge Orwell's 1984, is under the direction of Mr. Robert Moore, head of the Language Arts Division. The director and his staff have put in many hours and at least deserve some recognition from the student body. The average person doesn't realize how much time and effort goes into the production of a play. Two hours a night, four or five nights a week, six weeks preparation-all components for the final stage production. Once a person reads a play several times, he himself is usually satisfied. But constant rehearsing is required-constant memorizing of lines-in order to present the finished product to you, the college students. Elsewhere in this issue of the Ped one will find comments by the actors themselves. The attitudes developed by the cast on the subject matter are amazing. And this same attitude concerning things that could develop in the future should persist as much with you-the college student. The play will be a oudget event-FREE. -By Tom Aitken.

ELIZA MORGAN HALL

rush.~.arrive; ..quiz...

'lEng ••• read ...write... ,.. .Jcorrect ... Psych ... psycho~ic...neurotic Pavlov.'•• bell ... lunch ,Whew... pause

DELZELL HALL NEWS

I

By Mary Holland

take a break ••• things go better with Coke

By Ronald Rist

Two girls from first floor are Delzell Hall was pretty "dead" dazzling the gals of Morgan. during the days that Peru stuThey brought long, black cigar- dents went to Kansas City for ette holders back froin Kansas the N.A.I.A. Tournament. EveryCity to lend an air of sophistica- one returned home a little sad. tion to the dorm. Spring must be coming around What are those strange noises the corner. It seems that everycoming from room 126? Judy one is getting all of his washing Shuey, Cynthia Meier and Jo- done. The washers and dryers Ann Schultz are studying the have been humming continuously works of Shakespeare by reading every day. aloud and identifying lines from Once in a while it seems as if Hamlet. The effect is quite "drathere is a dust storm around the matic." dorm. No, it is just the boys It seems that roses are the shaking out their carpets and thing for spring bouquets at Mor- rugs. gan Hall. Kathy Francis received What's with all of the furniture a dozen in an arrangement acin the halls? A lot of boys wei:.t cented by pink pussy willows. wondering about this until they Judy Beran, Pat Wheatly, looked into the rooms and saw Phyllis Mosley, and Eleanor the sparkling floors. Frandsen held a birthday party Delzell Hall is proud of its for Sharon Schmidt and Jan Beemer. Linda Rogers and Pruddy house cleaners. Let's keep everyFritch also celebrated their birth- thing spic and span. days with a surprise party given Delzell Hall held a dorm meetfor them by Myrna Oestmann, ing on Monday, March 18, at Lois Layden, Cynthia Meier, 10:30 p.m. The purpose of the Judy Shuey, and Jo Ann Schultz. dorm meeting was to elect new Happy birthday girls! dormitory officers for the next Congratulations are in order school term. The officers are: for Pamela, better known as Rudy Eichenberger, president; Charlie, Froebe. She and Russ Tom Buchholz, vice president; Workman are planning a Decem- Douglas Cotner, treasurer. Roger ber wedding. Noell will represent Delzell Hall

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks March 25, 1963 PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Co-Editor_ ____________________________________ Tom Aitken Co-Editor _________________________________ Richard Elmore Layout Editor_________________________________ Judi Wilson Personnel Manager__________________________ Lynn McCann Business Manager ----------------------------- Tom Castle Copy Editor________________________________ Karen Conrad Copy Editor ________________________________ Carol Niebuhr Copy Editor___________________________________ Jane Moore Morgan Column _____________________________ Mary Holland Majors Column ______________________________ Keith Grimes Delzell Column ________________________________ Ronald Rist Reporter__________________________________ Phillip Bateman Reporter_ ________________________________ Richard Berthold Reporter _____________________________________ William Bliss Reporter---------------·--------------------- Dorothy Bock Reporter ___________________________________ Dorothea Fink Reporter __________________________________ Stanley Johnson Reporter_____________________________________ Janice Jones Reporter_________________ ----------------- Carey Lankford Reporter_____________________________________ Robert Peck Reporter _____________________________________ Karen Quinn Reporter___________ -------------------------- Glenda Rima Reporter_____________________________________ Linda Risley Reporter _______________________________________ Ruth Rulla Reporter ______________________________________ Larry Spier Reporter_________________________________ Wendell Stewart Reporter _________________________________ Betty Wellensiek Reporter_ ________________________________ Janice Wilkinson Sponsor _________________________________ Stewart Linscheid

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in the Student Governing Association. The residents of Delzell congratulate Russ Hicks for the fine job he has done as Dorm president and as a dorm counselor.

MAJORS HALL By Keith Grimes John Soby was "last but not least." It seems as though John missed his ride from Kansas City and had to ride home with the Peru basketball team. It seems as though Majors Hall has a car dealer in its midst. Mike Leahy has bought and sold two cars since the start of school. Mike is known around the dorm as "trader Mike."

Roger Slaughter has just finished tooling his first billfold and has already started on another. Majors Hall has two S.G.A. presidential candidates. They are Raymond (Skip) Ogle and Wayne (Bob) Wallace. Good luck to both of you. Ron Peterson, Charles (Charlie Ben) Caversagie, and Ed Stillinger attended the finals ~f the NAIA basketball tournament in Kansas City. It is almost safe to say that the most popular television program at Majors Hall is "Combat," which is on Tuesday night at 6:30. In order to get a seat in the television room on that night, you have to g€t in there about 5:30.

Jim Brenn, Jack Roper, John Barton, Bob Ruff, and Rod Baady seem to be holding down the canasta game on the first floor. It seems as though Jack Roper had quite a scare a few days ago. He accidentally mislaid someone's history notes, and for a while it was tense. After a roomto-room search Jack found them in the room next to his.

Dramatics Club Production, Orwell's 11 198411 Coming Soon (Continued from page one) Lois Fritz has worked with four college productions, is a two year member and past secretary of the Dramatics Club, has participated in debate and has worked with high school speech conferences. Of the play she said, "It's a good play, different, and w i 11 make a good dramatic change as a Peru presentation." Lonn Pressnall, also experienced in high school dramatics, has worked with three college plays, is a member of the Dramatics Club, a participant in speech contests and performs for various clubs and variety shows. "I think that this spring p I a y would be well worth the time spent in attending it, for the mere reason that it creates a somber impression of the lives that would persist if a totalitarian government would fall i n t o power." From the outlook, 1984 will make the impression of which Mr. Moore spoke.

those hopiag to continue studies . graduate If, schooI , f or example, m will need a deferrment to do so. A test score in the file will giv.; the local board an additional piece of important information to use in determining whether a registrant is eligible for a student deferrment.

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Virginia Tops Millard In Volleyball Meet For 1963 Championship

LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS

The Virginia Pirate-ettes, coached by Don Weeks, won two out of three sets to become the 1963 Champions of the 17th Annual High School Girls Invitational Volleyball Tournament played at Petu--State, March 18, 19, 20. The Pirate-ettes won over Millard, coached by Phyllis Peters. Dawson-Verdon won over Avoca to be placed third in the tournament, with Avoca p 1 acing fourth. The Dawson-Verdon Jets are coached by M. H. Elliott, and the Avoca Cardinals by Ronald Seymour.

Two Peru Staie Teachers College seniors played their final collegiate basketball game in the Peru Staie Gymnasium, Monday, March 4, 1963, when the Bobcats hosted Concordia College in an N.A.I.A. playoff clash. The two (from left), Larry Hayes, Auburn and Tom Yopp, East Alton, Ill., were regulars on Coach Jack McIntire's 1962-63 Peru Staie Bobcats.

Yopp and Hayes Took Scoring and Rebounding Honors BY BOB PECK Tom Yopp and Larry Hayes, senior Peru State cage stars walked off with individual scoring and rebounding honors ac" cording to the final Bobcat basketball statistics. Both seniors played their last collegiate game against Pa.n American of Edinburgh, Texas in the NAIA tournament in Kansas City, Mo. Yopp, a four year veteran from East Alton, Ill., copped team scoring honors, both game average and total by connecting :fior 121 field goals and 112 free 'throws for a total of 354 points in 24 games and a 14.8 average. Yopp hit 74.6 of his free throws and 45.7 of his field goals while pacing the 'Cats to their third consecutive Nebraska College Conference championship and a third straight journey to the NAIA tourney. Yopp-who is known for his ball handling, play-making, and defensive abilities-will be sorely missed by coach Jack Mcintire's squad as basketball season again enters into the limelight.

INGERSOLL Barber Shop AUBURN, NEBRASKA Elly Ingersoll - Nate Hayes

Hayes, a 6'2" senior from Auburn, captured the individual rebounding honors by dragging down 233 rebounds for a game average of 9.3. Hayes' jumping and rebounding abilities a 1s o helped the Bobcats to a successful year in the conference basketball race. Hayes also turned in a fine job for the Bobcats in the scoring column as he hit llO fielders and 57 free throws for a season total of 277 points and an average of 11.l. ,,

Track Prospects Look Encouraging The Bobcats' track season looks good this spring with the,;q_elp of many underclassmen. There a r e 35 prospects participating including eight returning lettermen. The lettermen are: John Barton, Gary Bedea, Roger Crook, Louis Fritz, Paul MacNeil, Charles Niemeyer, Larry Rathe, and Bill Tynon. The upperclassmen include only three juniors and one senior. Much of the support will fall back on the shoulders of the underclassmen. The track schedule for the season is as follows: April 4, Tarkio at Peru. April 8, Peru at Midland. April 18, Washburn at Peru. April 26, Peru - Tarkio - Maryville at Tarkio. May 2, Peru at Maryville. May 7, Wayne at Peru. May 11, Doane relays at Crete. May 16-17, NCC at Kearney.

The other teams participating in this year's tournament were: Weeping Water, Johnson, Malcolm, Table Rock, Sterling, Murdock, Prague, Stella, Holmesville, Lewiston, Halsey, Syracuse, AlvoEagle, Douglas, Brock, Walton, Tobias, Waco, Talmage, Shubert, Peru, Platteview, Cook, Elmwood, Elk Creek, Bradshaw, and Adams. The referees for this year's tournament were Mr. H a r o 1 d Johnson and Mr. Jerome Stemper. The other officials and assistants were volunteer college students. Mrs. Fran Wheeler was tournament director.

Pan American Downs Bobcats In Kansas City BY BILL BLISS

Pan American (83) fg Friddle ---------- 2 Villegas --------- 1 Marino ---------- 0 Yates,.: ____________ 0 Urand ---------"- 6 Carney ---------- 1 Harter ----------- 1 McGurk --------- 5 Edwards _________ 12 Jackson --------- 7

ft 2-5 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-1 0-0 0-0 0-0 2-4 9-10

Peru's Cinderella bubble burst Monday, March 11, at Kansas City's Tournament of Champions. Pan American of Texas bombed 35 13-20 83 the Bobcats 83-48 in the first ____________ 19 29 48 round of the National Association Peru ___ 47 83 36 Pan American The regulation season for in- of Intercollegiate Athletics playtramural basketball ended with offs. the Snappers (7-1) and the SpiThe Peruvians' record-tying der Bugs (7-1) tied for first. The twelfth appearance was scuttled Chuggers were third with a 6-1 by a huge pair of Texans, Lucius mark. The Beavers, Moonshiners, Jackson (6'9", 240), and Mitchell and . Blit~', ¡each with two losses, Edwards (6'5", 215). This massive The Omaha area chapter of the were tied for fourth. duo scored 23 and 26 points re- Peru State Teachers College spectively, and pulled down 33 Alumni Association will meet Scoring leaders for the regular rebounds between them. for their annual dinner meeting season are Bruce McCoy, 111; Peru gained an early lead but Thursday, March 28, in Omaha. Brian Maxwell, 97; and Russ it was destroyed by Jackson, who Slated for 7 p.m. at Marchio's, Hicks, 96. Each man played eight scored six straight points. The 4443 South 13th St., Omaha, the games. Broncos then scored 16 points to meeting will be the eighth since A play-off was held among the the Cats' one. This made it 41-16. organization of the group in 1956. fourth place teams to determine The winners increased their lead Evelyn S. Brown, 2342 South which team would gain a tour- to 47-19 at the half. 33rd, Omaha, chapter president, The second half was a repeti- is in charge of reservations. nament berth. The Beavers qualified for the tournament by de- tion of the first as the tall and Jack Mcintire, head football feating the Moonshiners a n d talented Texans continued to and basketball coach at Peru dominate the boards. Peru was State, will be the speaker of the Blitzs.' out-rebounded 67-33. In addition evening. A 1941 graduate of PeThe Spider Bugs won the tour- to the height problem, the losers ru State, Mcintire last w e e k nament by winning three succes- were ice-cold. Pan American hit guided the Bobcat basketball sive games. The Spider Bugs de- 41 percent of their shots to 26 team to their third consecutive feated the Chuggers, Beavers, percent for the 'Cats. Se n i or appearance in the NAIA Tournaand finally the Snappers for the guard Tom Yopp was the bright ment of Champions in Kansas championship. Final standings spot for Peru with 13. City. In his seven years as basare as follows: The Peruvians, who have won ketball mentor, he has won five or shared the N.C.C. Crown the Nebraska College Conference Team Won Lost 3 Spider Bugs ---- 10 1 909 last three years, have nothing to basketball championships an d Snappers ------- 9 3 750 be ashamed of. Their roster of 10 one football crown in two years Beavers -------- 9 692 players for the N.A.I.A. tourney at the football helm. 4 Chuggers ------- 6 667 included five freshmen. 3 Moonshiners ---- 6 3 667 Peru (48) fg ft Blitz' ----------- 5 3 625 Fraser 0-0 0 0 ----------Marauders ------ 5 625 Yopp 3 5-5 4 13 -----------Half Fast _______ 4 571 Hunsaker 3 2-2 2 -------- 0 Flunkies ------- 3 4 429 Rinne 2-2 1 4 ----------Empires -------- 3 4 429 Schmidt --------- 1 0-0 2 Jockey Jrs. ----- 3 375 Hopper '5 0-2 3 6 ---------Drycleaning Crazy S's ------- 2 5 286 Russell 0-0 0 0 ---------Pussys --------- 2 6 250 Snodgrass 0-0 3 ------- 4 and Playboys ------- 2 250 Witty 6 1-2 5 11 -----------250 Hayes Louts ---------- 2 6 ----------- 1 0-0 2 Laundry Fighting Illini -7 143 Hilltoppers ----- 0 7 000 19 10-13 48

Spider Bugs Win Intramural Contest

Mcintire To Speak To Omaha Alumni

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Prep Second In Volleyball Peru Prep was defeated in two of three sets by Table Rock in the finals of the Nemaha Valley Volleyball Tournament. The host team was Lourdes Central of Nebraska City. The final game of the tournament was p 1 a y e d March 6.

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Work has begun on next year's Sifting Sands-literary publication of Sigma Tau Delta honorary English fraternity. Richard Elmore and Janice Jones have been selected as editors for the coming year. Anyone wishing to contribute short stories, poems, or critiques should give this material to the·- editors as soon as possible. The second semester yearbook class completed ihe 138 page PERUVIAN begun by the ·first semester yearbook class. The 18 mem·. hers met the February ·15 deadline and checked some proofs. They will read negative proofs in Kansas ,Ciiy next month so that the PERUVIANS will be ready for distribution in early May.

Three Big Little Words Good relations are of utmost importance to industry, civic af· fairs, and schools. A school cannot hope to grow unless it has established good relations in the area which it seriVes. Some people here spend a great deal of time and energy through· out the year working on favorable relations and good publicity for Peru-President Go mo n, Dean Melvin, Don Carlile, Bob Henry, Jack Mcintire, Harold Johnson, and many others. Student publications try to help. Last week much good work was done by the entire faculty and a large portion of the stu· dent body when we had nundreds of high school students on our campus for the volleyball tournament, the speech and dramatics contests, and the interscholastic meet. Also, the band was on tour two days in our area. More will

be done this Thursday and Friday, when Class A, C, and D schools are on the campus for the music contests. Activities such as we h av e been discussing have helped tremendously in more than doubling the enrollment of Peru in recent years. Much has been done, and more will be done. President Gomon and the rest of us intend for Peru to grow. But you students can do more to help Peru grow than all of the rest of us put together and multiplied by ten. And all you have to do is to say three little words. All colleges have public relations, but you have close personal friends who place great weight on what you say. So if you like Peru and want to help Peru grow, please say three big little words-I LIKE PERU! -S.P.L.

Campus School News

players. The seniors are making big plans for their "Sneak Day" to Kansas City. A pancake· feed is scheduled as a money-making project to add to their class trea· sury. The itinerary of the seni'Ors lists many po in ts of interest in and around Kansas City, leaving a few hours open for the "must" -window shopping. Fourteen Peru Prepsters are preparing for the scholastic contest to be held March 22 at Peru. They are participating in' th e fields of science, math, history, English, and foreign languages.

The volleyball girls are in the spotlight this week. Defeating Platteview in the Regional Volleyball Tournament here at Peru, the girls were on their way to victory. Unfortunately, in their second game with Millard, Tuesday afternoon, they experienced one of the season's few defeats. For seniors Cheri Combs, Judy Pierce, and Nancy Jarvis t h i s game was their last. Congratulations to these girls on their record as outstanding volleyball

The Pep Club girls are work· ing hard to make this year's All· Sports banquet an outstanding affair. The banquet is to be held March 30, at 6 p.m. in the Student Center. The evening will consist of entertainment, a banquet with a guest speaker, presentation of athletic awards and a dance. Tickets are $1.50 and everyone is welcome. The elementary teachers report that all is "as usual" in the ele· mentary grades.

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Thursday Murders was presented on March 9, at 8:00 p.m. by the senior class of Peru Campus School. Co-directors were Sharon Peacock and Lonn Pressnall. The play took place in a shanty on the outskirts of Thursday, Iowa.' From the time a turkey was hit by a car until after two humans were murdered, the audience was kept in suspense. The cast included Tom Gomon as Bingo Riggs, an ambitious young man; John Eickhoff as Handsome Kusak, his friend and business associate; Virginia Moody as Gussie, a woman with an eye for profit; Garth Adams as Chris Halvorsen, a farmer; Cheri Combs as Christine Halvorsen, the farmer's daughter; Doris Mcconnaughey as Annie Halvorsen, the farmer's wife; Clint Reeves as Henry Judson, the sheriff; Karen Workman as Henrietta, a glamour gal with big ideas; Nancy Jarvis as Aunt Hester, a cold, ) calculating female; John patterson, Steve Gnade, Bev !Reeves, 'and Judy Pierce as un~elcome house guests; Charlotte Rankin as Mrs. Silton, a well-draped widow; and Devon Adams as a tourist. Others assisting with the play were: Rich Rains, assistant director; Bill Fournell, technical director; Richard Groff, stage manager; Leland Blankenship, property manager; and Charlotte Rankin, ticket manager. Members of the junior class ushered.

Dr. Harold Boraas Attends Meeting Dr. Harold Boraas, dean of men students at Peru, attended a psychology meeting Friday, February 8, in the student center at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln. There were meetings both February 7 and 8 which were sponsored by the department of psychology at the university. The meeting on Friday consisted of a speech on how the brain correlates mental behavior. A symposium was given on the pr;oblems of motivation. The speaker was from the University of California.

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BY DOROTHY BOCK The Peru State Symphonic Band made its concert tour Tuesday and Thursday, March 19 and 21. The band, under the direction of Mr. Gilbert Wilson, performed at'high schools in Auburn, Plattsmouth, Table Rock, and Lewiston. Opening the program was a concert introduction written especially for the Peru band by Don Verne Joseph. The opener featured fanfares and choral reading. Several numbers were alternated between the morning and afternoon programs. These included: "Fandango" and "Matador"; "Ballade," a saxophone solo featuring Gary Dahmke, and "Seascape," a trombone solo featuring Linda Elliot; highlights from "Exodus" and highlights from "The Sound· of Music." Other numbers appearing on the program were "American Overture

for Band," "Sea Pieces," a n d "Fiesta of the Charros." In each program, a vocal inter· lude was presented by the Ethnic Singers, Karen and Russ Workman, Mike Janis, and Gary Schmucker. Steve Parker narrated the Tuesday programs. "All who joy would win must share it, - happiness was born a twin."-Byron.

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Nebraska's Oldest College

The Voice of the Campus of aThousand Oaks . . .

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRhSKA1

Volume 58

Number 12

Dr. Gomon Speaks At Alumni Meeting In San Bernardino

APRIL 8, 1963

Peru State Chorus Entertains Kiwanis Club

More than 100 alumni, former faculty members and friends attended the annual meeting of the Southern California chapter of the Peru Alumni Association, according to Waldo Willhoft, class of 1926, San Bernardino, Calif., Mrs. Ruth J. Mathews, longchapter president. Meeting at theChapman Park Hotel, Los An- time instructor at Peru, died geles, March 2, the chapter heard March 30 at a Nebraska City hosa progress report by Dr. Neal S. pital, where she had beep a paGomon, president of Peru State. tient the past three weeks. Although she had been quite ill, Dr. Gomon's remarks were her death was unexpected. She suppl~mented by a 20-minute was 67 years of age. movie of the Peru campus and A graduate of Peru and the surroundings, filmed by J. D. Le- University of Nebraska, she was vitt, associate professor of speech a member of Phi Beta Kappa and and English, and narrated by Sigma Xi scholastic ho no r Robert M. Henry of the college's groups. She represented the Kelspecial services department. logg Foundation health program Other speakers at the luncheon in southeast Nebraska. Mrs. Mathews was assistant meeting were Glen Gilkeson, class of 1925, and former faculty professor of health education at member, now at Riverside, Calif.; Peru from 1943 to 1961. She was Dr. Alexander J. Stoddard, '10, the wife of Mr. L. B. Mathews, former superintendent of the Los retired associate professor of Angeles Public Schools; A. B. physics. She had been an active supClayburn, former faculty member, now of Stockton, Calif.; Miss porter of the Nemaha county hosPhyllis Davidson, former faculty pital and served on several commember, now of Chico, Calif. Mrs. mittees, and was a director of the Inice Dunning, '25, former dean county Red Cross chapter. A member of the Methodist of women, now of Pacific Grove, Calif., gave the invocation. Mrs. church at Peru, she actively parBirdie Baldwin Cockrill, '25, sang ticipated in PEO, Tuesday club, ,three vocal se!ecticms and led the and other community organizations. group· in .. "The Color Song." Funeral services were held at New officers elected include: 2:30 p.m. Tuesday at the May Walter L. Naiman, '29, West Co- and Timm chapel in Auburn , vina, president; Haro 1 d Mc- conducted by Rev. Charles A. Creight, '29, Ontario, vice-presi- Moorer of the Peru Methodist dent; Miss Julie Mayer, '62, Chi- church. no, secretary-treasurer. Graveside services were held The Southern California chap- at 6 p.m. at the Blue Springs, ter membership voted to meet in Nebr., cemetery.

Mrs. Ruth Mathews Retired Faculty Member Died March Thirtieth

Chick James {left), Falls City, and Richard Elliott. Weeping Waler, display ±heir trophies and receive congratulations from .. Dr. Neal S. Gomon {right), Peru State Teachers College president, for the championships their respective schools won in. ihe fifih annual Peru Siaie Inier·Scholastic Contes± held Friday on the Peru Siate campus. Falls Ciiy High school won their ihird consecutive Division A iiile, while Weeping Waier captured their first Division B championship. More ihan 600 students from nine Division A and 32 Divisio'!t'>.B schools competed in 23 academic tests.

Dramatics Club Play, 1984, Presented J\t'larch 28th, 1963

1964 at the Chapman Park Hotel on Saturday, March 7, 1964.

Benford's Students Mcintire Addresses Give Music Recital

BY MARY HOLLAND At 8:00 on Thursday, March 28, the spring play, 1984, was presented. Through the curtains, the audience caught a glimpse of what life might be like under a Jack Mcintire kept an: appointtotalitarian system of government 46 weeks late! The Peru Mr. Don Marcouiller, director ment. State Teachers College football The members of the cast were of bands at Drake University, and basketball mentor, scheduled Lonn Pressnall, Carol McLain, Des Moines, Iowa, was guest con- for the May 3, 1962, Omaha area Tom Majors, Lois Fritz, Steve ductor for the twentieth annual alumni meeting, was the main Parker, Pamela Froebe, Marjorie Band Clinic-Festival at Peru speaker at the March 28, 1963, Willis, Dave Griffiths, Jerry Tim- State Teachers College Saturday, banquet gathering. othy, Larry Hennerberg, Dorothy April 6. A free public concert Coach Mcintire failed to keep Drubek, Dorothy Bock, J u d y was presented at 7:30 p.m. in the college auditorium. the 1962 date when he s1;1bstitutWhigham, Paul MacNeil, and I The day-long event, which at- ed as base ball coach for Al Janey Moore. Wheeler, Peru director of athletThe telescreen, with Big Broth- tracted 150 instrumental musiics, who was convalescing from cians from 11 area high schools, er's picture, was dominant an ulcer attack. Mcintire's temthroughout most of the play. This began with registration at 8:30 porary charges brought home a a.m. The personnel were divided was indicative of the way the doubleheader winner from Chad~ into two balanced bands and reparty controlled everyone except hearsals were scheduled in order ron State. the sub-human proletarians. that Mr. Marcouiller might work Meeting Thursday, March 28, The play tells the story of Julia with both bands. Mr. Gilbert E. at Marchio's in Omaha for their and Winston Smith and how they Wilson, clinic director and asso- eighth annual meeting, the chapfought the tyranny of Big Brothciate professor of instrumental ter heard a review of Peru State's er. The suspicion that first separmusic at Peru State, served as athletic records since the formated them turned to love and a assistant conductor. ing of the Nebraska College Concommon rebellion. The guest conductor is author ference in 1946. Mr. Mcintire supThey were first discovered by a child, Gladys, who later de- of a book on marching bands plemented his remarks on recent nounced her own mother. Still, which is used as a text in many campus developments with the they married, lived in what they colleges and universities. Mr. .showing of a color movie of the thought was safety, were be- Marcouiller's Drake University campus and surrounding area. trayed, captured, and "re-edu- Concert Band has been featured Dinner music was provided by by Iowa Bandmaster's Associa- recordings of the Peru Symphoncated." ic Band Ensemble. tion at their annual meeting. Lonn Pressnall did a superb job in those scenes in his bare cell Schools entered in the clinicPresent for the meeting fr om while his mind was being re- festival and their instrumental Peru were Miss Juanita Bradley, constructed. He and Tom Majors music instructor included: Aub- Miss Frieda Rowoldt, J. D. Leworked as a team to make a urn, Ralph Chatelain; Brock, vitt, Don Carlile, Mr. and Mrs. dramatic impression. Gaylin Sudik; Cook, Maxine John Lewis, and Mr. and Mrs. (Continued on page two) (Continued on page two) Mcintire.

Drake Band Director Guest Conductor For Omaha Alumni Twentieth Band Clinic

Nebraska;s Best College

Proud parents, friends, and college students attended the grade and high school music recital held March 26, in the Music Hall Auditorium. The performers were students of Mr. R. T. Benford. Laureen Falk played two organ solos. The piano solos were given by Rhonda Collin, Laureen Falk, Martha Rankin, Lauralee Adams, Marsha Lewis, Phil Parker, Irene Bergmann, Allyn Remmers, and Mary Lou Hicks.

BY RUTH RULLA The Peru State Chorus, under the direction of Mr. Edward Camealy, made its first appearance Tuesday, April 2, 1963. The group sang for the Peru Kiwanis meeting at 7:15 in the Campus School. The program featured Mrs. Darrell Wininger, Peru, as the soloist in "Marry A Woman Uglier Than You." The other numbers were: "Beauty In Humility," by Christiansen; "Everyone Has His Day," by Hayden; "Louise," by Whiting; "The Lord Is Nigh," by Monhardt; "Brazilian Psalm," by .Berger; "Valse," by Toch; "When Jesus Wept," by Billings; "Fire, Fire My Heart," by Morley; "Gloria Patri," by Palestrina; and "Gloria, In Excelsis," by Edward Camealy:. This is the same program that they will do on tour April 10, at Tecumseh and Filley, and April 30, at Falls City. Member~ of this year's t o u r choir are: Joyce Able, Virginia Adkins, Adrian Bartek, Elaine Bath, Cheryl Berner, Pennie Born, Allen Chandler, James Christ, Lucille Christensen, Michael Chu, Donna Cox, Ga r y Dahmke, Michael Janis, Stanley Johnson, James Kelly, Bill Klabunde, Ed McCartney, Gretchen McKenny, Thomas Majors, Marilyn Maimet, Ellen Merrit, Phyllis Mosley, Curtis Nelstm, Steve Parker, Jean Reiman, Sharon Richardson, Glenda Rima, Dorie Roemmich, Ruth Rulla, Gary Schmucker, Adair S h e r w o o d , Betty Stubbendick, Bonnie Vanderford, Eugene Walden, James Watson, Barbara Wheeldon, Judy Weichel, Charles Wellensiek, Judith Whigham, Larry Whittington, and Russel Workman.

Fletcher Paintings Are On Exhibition Paintings by Miss Clara Fletcher of Hamburg, Iowa, will be on exhibit in the art department at Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru through April 11, according to Miss Norma Diddel, associate professor of art. Miss Fletcher, a graduate of Peru State, teaches kindergarten in the Hamburg Public Schools. The paintings, both watercolor and oils, are Southwest Iowa landscapes.

Carolyn Fritch, Laree Libal., Mildred Stevens, Trudy Fisher, Norma Fredrickson and Lillie Mench, Virginia High School volleyball players. proudly display their 1963 Peru Invitational Volleyball Tournament championship trophy. The trophy was presented by Jeanie Reiman (right), president of ihe Peru W.A.A.


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MAJORS HALL By Keifh Grimes

By \ Mary Holland

There has been a switch of janitors at Majors in the last two weeks. Keith Grimes has the basement floor; James (Jim) Hall has the first floor; and Ron Peterson has the top floor. So far this year the janitors have done a ·good job. The Majors men welcome John Nore to Majors. He moved in Saturday, March 30, and will be with us the remainder of the semester. John Barton, Roger Crook, Louie Fritz, Tom Bookwalter, Jim Brenn, Bob Ruff, and Jim Reddin are the Majors, men out for track. John Soby is known around the dorm as the "popcorn kid" because he makes popcorn almost every night. Chan Redfield, Jim Reddin, Roy Broadbrooks, Ken Sims, and Jim Hall were the Majors men who went to Omaha to see R a y Charles perform, S a turd a y , March 30. Bill Scott, Harvey Fisher, and Richard Elmore were mysteriously missing from the dorm Wednesday, March 27. It was found later that they were in Kansas City on an official yearbook checking mission. The other day Mike Peterson washed a wool blanket. When he put the blanket in the washer and dryer it was the size of a double-bed,· but when he took it out it was shrunk to the size of a single-bed blanket.

Mr. Leland Guest Of Iowa State Legislature LeRoy Leland, assistant professor of history at Peru State Teachers College, was selected by the Iowa State Legislature as their official guest, Friday, March 29. One Iowa resident is selected for such an honor each day the Iowa Legislature is in session. Mr. Leland is a resident of Percival, Iowa. Mr. Leland was hosted by The Honorable Paul McElroy, representative of Iowa's Fremont county. Mr. Leland will open both the Iowa House of Repre-

Spring is coming to Peru, as evidern::ed by the girls of Morgan.· For example, . Nancy Niemann gave her room a spring cleaning. Also summer clothes are finding their way back into the wardrobes. The Peru girls who are entering the Miss Auburn contest took part in their first official function on March 30. Linda O'Hara, Karen Quinn, Carol Curd, Nan c Y Reed, Pat Wheatly, Mary Sautter, and Dutchi Holland attended the tea at the Arbor Manor in Auburn. Donna Gerdes celebratea her birthday with a party given for her by Kay Bender, Judy Bence, Marjorie Willis, Judy Whigham, Verona Borcher, Pat Richardson, Linda Bartels, Janice Wilkensen, Karen Behrends, Barbara Young, Mary Gonnerman, and Barbara Thompson. The same gals gave a party for Barbara Young to help her celebrate her birthday. Happy Birthday, galst Judy Wolf treated the Morgan co-eds to a party .in honor of all the gals who have started student teaching this quarter. At the party, Judy turned over her duties as president to the vice-president, Susan Sharp. The cookies and punch were served, and the girls said so long to Judy, Pinky Lewellyn, Karolyne P o w e r s , Charlotte Wheeler, Carol McLain, Ardith Pratt, and Sharon Peacock, before going back /to their rooms. It was a refreshing break in the routine of n i n e weeks tests. Congratulations are in order for Susan Stall. She is engaged to Don Clark. Also, a pat on the back goes to Linda Bartels. She was 'e°l'ected state secretary at the Phi Beta Lambda at the Future Business Leaders of America convention held in Lincoln on March 29-30. sentatives and Senate with prayer and will then observe committees in action as well as observe procedure on the floor. It is expected that he will testify before the legislative committee on capital punishment, giving his views on that controversial Iowa issue.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

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DELZELL HALL NEWS

I

By Ronald Rist The boys of Delzell Hall have been getting spring fever. 0 n e may find Arlan Richardson, Rudy Eichenberger, Dave Barns, and many others playing catch out on the front lawn. Others have been making their way towards the Oak Bowl, where they can watch or participate in track. Still, there are others who walk towards the baseball field. Delzell Hall has a lot of baseball lovers. Gary Fritch of Room 8, Delzell Hall, and Miss Mary Michal of Table Rock were married. The boys of Delzell extend congratu· lations. Almost everyone in Delzell Hall campaigned for the S.G.A. election. Arlan Richardson was campaign manager for Ray Ogle, presidential candidate, and Jack O'Connor, vice-presidential candidate. It's been pretty obvious that most of the boys are glad that the nine weeks tests are over.

The Voice of fhe Campus of a Thousand Oaks April 8, 1963

PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Co-Editor _____________________________________ Tom Aitken Co-Editor _________________________________ Richard Elmore Layout Editor _________________________________ Judi Wilson Personnel Manager_ _________________________ Lynn McCann Business Manager ----------------------------- Tom Castle Copy Editor ________________________________ Karen Conrad Copy Editor ________________________________ Carol Niebuhr Copy Editor __________________________ , ________ Jane Moore Morgan Column _______________________ ·______ Mary Holland Majors Column ______________________________ Keith Grimes Delzell Column ________________________________ Ronald Rist Reporter__________________________________ Phillip Bateman Reporter_________________________________ Richard Berthold Reporter_ ____________________________________ William Bliss Reporter____________________________________ Dorothy Bock Reporter-----------·----------------------- Dorothea Fink Reporter __________________________________ Stanley Johnson Reporter ___________________ ---~--~----------- Janice Jones Reporter __________________________________ Carey Lankford Reporter_____________________________________ Robert Peck Reporter_ _____________________________________ Karen Quinn Reporter_____________________________________ Glenda Rima Reporter_____________________________________ Linda Risley Reporter_______________________________________ Ruth Rulla Reporter ______________________________________ Larry Spier Reporter_ ______ ~--------------------~---- Wendell Stewart Reporter _________________________________ Betty Wellensiek Reporter _________________________________ Janice Wilkinson Sponsor_________________________________ Stewart Linscheid

Dramatics Club Play, 1984, Presented March Twenty-eighth _19.63 (Continued from page one) A good deal of the credit for this impressive production goes to the back stage crew. Bill Fournell, Carol Curd, Tom Aitken, the student director, Wendell Mohling, Mrs. Gnade, and Mary Holland worked with lighting, costumes, props, and special effects.

Drake Band Director Guest Conductor For Twentieth Band Clinic (Continued from page one) Hahn; Dawson-Verdon, Gene K. Dappen; Elk Creek, Gary Dahmke; Elk Horn, Iowa, Don Gibson; Fairbury, Kenneth E. F o u s t ; Johnson, Fred Allen; Odell, Harold Chatelain; Peru, G. E. Wilson; Sidney, Iowa, Bud Wahling.

Missionaries Speak At Convocation

PIONEER -NEBRASKA CITY

BY JANICE JONES

1 WEEK-

OPENS THUR.. APRIL 11

Wesley Fellowship sponsored a convocation on April 3, at which Misses Betty Good and Jacqueline Skiles were guest speakers. Miss Good is a social worker in large cities and Miss Skiles has done work in Brazil. Miss Good pointed out work religious groups have done much work in the field of social work. Community centers are established for the use of the young people. Through group activities and talk with social workers, problems are solved and group barriers broken down. She said that if the problems of the world could be solved as easily as those of children, this world would be a better place. Another phase of her work concerns elderly people. They must find a useful place in life just as everyone else. Miss Skiles discussed the plight of the people of Brazil. Poverty is the greatest problem there. The average monthly wage is $28. One-third of the people live in slums. Malnutrition and poor health are caused by poverty. Primitive farm methods are used. Ignorance is an outgrowth of poverty. There is lack of medical assistance and loss of human dignity. Only a very few control the wealth.

rRioMACMURRAY NANcvOLSON KEENAN WYNN 4 DAYS-OPENS WED., APR. 17

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These ladies said that college students have an opportunity to study these problems and look for an answer. They emphasized that. work opportunities are numerous in this field for those who want to answer the challenge. Miss Good and Miss Skiles spoke in various .classes and were available in the Student Center for consultation the remainder of the day. They spoke at Wesley Fellowship that evening. Without music life would be a mistake.-Nietsche.

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Peru's Tennis Tearn Opens Season April 9

11

AT l..&A-ST l'vi;- c:iOf 10 BE Fl:JL.IT6 TO l·l/M- HE:1S THc Oll-{t::R f;ND OF MY CLJRVG //

Nine Lettermen Return To Peru's Baseball Squad BY BOB PECK Nine lettermen will lead the Peru State Bobcats in defense of their 1962 Nebraska College Conference baseball championship. Veteran left hander Ron Kelley, a three year letterman from Falls City, returns after posting a 7-1 pitching record last year. Frank Spizuoco, a 5-3 performer a n d Bob Reimers, a 1-1 performer last vear also return to help bolster the Bobcats' pitching staff. Other lettermen i n c 1 u d e : Catchers-Eldon Baker (.361), Falls City; Dick Floerchinger (.333), Omaha. Infielders-Barney Mcilvoy (.239), South Lyon, Mich.; Mike Hunt (.273), Tecumseh; Bruce McCoy (.412), Tecumseh. Outfielders-Rocky Edwards (.313), Southbridge, Mass. Despite the nine returning lettermen, the loss of six monogram winners from last year's squad has left immense defensive and offensive holes which untried newcomers must fill. Graduation took the services of centerfielder Drexel Harvey (.380), Hartford, Ill.; first baseman Roger Smith (.365), East Alton, Ill.; outfielder Larry Gilson (.313), Fullerton; outfielder Gordon 0 h n o u t k a (.364), Valparaiso; shortstop Mike Roach (.268), Palmyra. Catcher Tom Neal (.055), Lincoln, trans. Coach Wheeler has many newcomers and returning squadmen vying for the vacated positions. Squadman Luke Cox, Lincoln and Jim Manning, Birmingham,

Ala., are pushing each other for the starting assignment at first base. Fairbury Junior College transfer Don Corbin, Fairbury, has shown up well at third base and is battling newcomers Ed Stillenger, Kent, Iowa and Frank Teleen Lincoln for that position. Lett~rman Mike Hunt or rookie Stan Johnson, Rockford, Iowa, will man Mike Roach's vacated shortstop position. Veteran Barney Mcllvoy and rookie Ray Cain of Thurman, Iowa are in spirited battle for the second base opening. Rocky Edwards and Bruce McCoy appear to be set in left and center fields. "!!he right field job seems open, with LeRoy Leonard, Albany, N. Y., Lynn Wederquest, Rando 1 p h, Iowa, and Bill Heineman, Wahoo, struggling for the nod. A number of new faces plus returning squadmen give the Bobcat mound corps more depth than in recent years. Back from a year of seasoning are Doug Coutner, Waco, and Dale Kreimer, Talmage. New team members include: Mel Hester, Lincoln; Duane Hufnagel, Lenox, Iowa, Marv Hopper, Auburn; Roger Noell, Plattsmouth; Bob Peck, Peru. The Bobcats opened their 18game slate last week with doubleheaders against N o rt h w es t Missouri at Maryville on Wednesday and Wayne State at Peru on Friday. All home games commence at 1 p.m.

Bankers Life of Des Moines SPECIAL PLANS FOR STUDENTS Phone 274-4413

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The Peru State tennis team opens its game schedule Tuesday, April 9, against Creighton University on the Bobcat court. Two returning lettermen a r e Dennis Peterson, senior, and Hank Grace, sophomore. They are in first and third positions, respectively, in the player standings of the team. Ranked second is sophomore Joe Smith, fourth is senior Frank Bostic, and fifth is sophomore Larry Trimble. Bob Vonesh rounds out the top six positions on the Bobcat squad at this time. The top five Peru netters who compete against the opposing team are determined on a challenge basis between the t e am members. Players must challenge higher positions at least twice a week and also accept challenges from those of a lower rank. The leading five will then face t h e other team's best five and from those the , singles and doubles matches are drawn. Schedule April 9-Creighton, Here. April 30-Creighton, There. May 2-Maryville, There. Tarkio (2) May 16-17-N.C.C. Meet.

SHORT ORDERS

Open: Monday· Saturday 6:00 a.m. · 11:00 p.m. Sunday 6:00 a.m. · 8:00 p.m.

Peru, Nebraska

Falls City Wins Third Inter-Scholastic Contest

Official Health Regulations Effective September I, 1963 The following are regulations of the health services offered by the College through the nurse and college physicians beginning with the fall semester, 1963. Health examinations are required of all students before registering at Peru for the first time. An audiometric test for hearing will be scheduled after the student reaches the campus. Students participating in competitive activities such as football, basketball, track, baseball, and tennis are required to take a physical examination yearly. Any student may consult the nurse at the Infirmary at any time during her regular office hours: 8-8:40 a.m., 9:30-12 .noon and 2-5 p.m. each school day. No charge will be made for a call during office hours. For calls io or by the nurse outside of office hours, there will be a charge of $1 per call, except in the case of an emergency. Cold tablets, aspirin, gastro-intestinal medication, first aid and dressings are provided from the health service free of charge. The student will pay for infirmary care, all x-ray, laboratory fees and other medication issued through the Health Serviq; and the College Doctor's office. Any visit to the College Doctor's office, unless paid for by the student, must have a written authorization from the nurse before the call is made. The student may visit the college doctor or other doctors at any time at his own expense. The college will pay for the first call to the doctor's office for

More than 600 high school students participated in the fifth annual Peru State Inter-Scholastic Contest on March 22. Nine Division A, 32 Division B, schools were entered in the contest. Falls City swept to a third consecutive Division A championship with 9811.i points. Nebraska City and Auburn followed with 861/z and 54 5/6 points, respectively. Other Division A schools represented and t h e i r points were Waverly, 371/z; Syracuse, 32112; Platteview, 24; Pawnee City, 16; Papillion, 5; and Tecumseh, 2. Weeping Water captured the Division B honors for the first time. Second and third places went to Lourdes Central with 29 points and Lewiston with 24 5/6 points. Other schools collecting points were Peru Prep, 231/z; Mead, 22 5/6; Humboldt, 22 1/2; Table Rock, 18; Dawson-Verdon, 17; Panama, 13; Louisville, 121/2; Bratton Union, 101/z; Dunbar, 101/z; Sterling, 10112; Adams, 9; Bennet, 8; Brock, 71/z; Palmyra, 6· Stella 5· Cortland, 41/z; Elmwood,' 41/z'; Prague, 41/z; Nemaha, 4; Talmage, 4; Alvo-Eagle, 3; Valparaiso, 3; Elk Creek, 2; Yutan, 11/z; Murdock, 1. Other schools involved were Barneston, Gretna, Liberty and Sr;ragueMartell. Tests were given in algebra I, algebra II, American government, American history, general biology, chemistry, drawing,. English usage, French, geometry, German, health, home economics, industrial arts, Latin, literature, music, physics, Spanish, spelling, typewriting I, typewriting II, and world history. Certificates were awarded to those students placing first, second, and third in each subject for each division. Trophies were awarded the school in each division with the highest total number of points.

SYMPHONIC BAND TO APPEAR ON TV The Peru State Symphonic Band under the direction of Gilbert Wilson, will appear on television in May. On May 21, the band will go to Omaha to make the tape. It will be shown during the weekend on WOW-TV. Gary Dahmke will be the feature soloist, and the Ethnic Singers will also be featured.

diagnosis. Any follow-up or additional calls will be at the student's expense. These privileges and benefits are in effect so long as the student abides by the orders of the doctor or nurse. Otherwise the student will assume all responsibility and cost of his own care, REPORTING OF ILLNESS For All Dormitory Residents: When the student is ill in the morning, he should report to the Health Center at 8-8:40 a.m. If too ill to come to the Health Center, the student or his roommate must notify the dormitory counselor by this time. The dormitory c o u n s e 1o r will then call the nurse. No excuses for missing classes because of illness will be given unless this proced· ure is carried out, except in cases occurring during the day which ±he nurse classifies as emergency illness or accident. For Students Living Outside ~he Dormitories: Again,· if the student is able to come to the Health Center, it must be between the hours of 8-8 :40 a.m. in order for an illness excuse tP be given. In case the student is too ill to come to the Health Center, he should have a call made by telephone to th e nurse telling her of this fact by 8-8:40 a.m. Health Insurance Recommended: Blue Cross, Blue Shield Health Insurance is available to all students. You are urged to become a member.

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Campus School News BY PAT ADAMS

These 20 PEDAGOGIAN reporters write the stories for "The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks." They tell the "who, wha!. when, where, why, and how" of Peru's curricular and extra-curricular campus life.

Dr. Kite Announces Teaching Assignments Forty-nine Peru State seniors in secondary education began student teaching assignments April 1 as a part of their professional semester at Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru. The students will continue student teaching until May 24. Thirty-nine students have offcampus assignments in eleven area schools, while ten will teach in the Peru Campus High School. During the first nine weeks of the semester, the students preparing for high school teaching have been engaged in course work related to professional education. Courses completed during that time are Educational Psychology, Educational Measurements, Audio-Visual Materials, Teaching in the S e c o n d a r y School. The student teaching center, student teachers, home town, and teaching fields include: Auburn-Wendell Armstrong, Stella, industrial arts and music; Gary Workman, Stella, physical education, biology and safety education; Russel Workman, Peru, music and biology" Beatrice-Dennis Hein, Fairbury, mathematics and physical science; Russell Hicks, Auburn, physical education, social science and safety education; Mary Ann Lewellyn, Fort Crook, physical education and home economics; Sharon Peacock, Pawnee City, English and speech; Roger Ray, Tecumseh, history and social science; Tom Sewell, Dunbar, biology and physical education; Enoch Shepherd, Fairbury, modern language and English; Judith A. Wolf, Davenport, home economics and physical education. Bellevue-Edward H ohm an, Plattsmouth, industrial arts, physics and mathematics; Carol McLain, Auburn, modern language and speech; Rex Rhodes, Gresham, biology and physical education; Mary Schlange, Peru, home economics and history; Gary Schlange, Auburn, industrial arts and mathematics. Falls City-Karolyne Powers, Auburn, home economics and physical education; Ch a r 1 o t t e Wheeler, Nemaha, home economics and physical education. Fairbury-Paul F. Bodtke, Jr., Reynolds, social science, speech and history; Stanley Hajek, Odell, industrial arts and physical education; Larry Hennerberg,

Steele City, social science, history, speech; Wayne Shafer, Shubert, physical education, social science, history and safety education. Johnson-Thom as Stevenson, Auburn, nhysical education and social science. Tecumseh-Ronald Oestmann, Johnson, physical education, industrial arts and safety education. Nebraska City-Donald Babcock, Nebraska City, biology and physical education; Dareld Douglas, Peru, business education and history; Karen Hamm, Peru, home economics and physical education; Pat Hamm, Peru, physical education and English; Gary Randles, Fullerton, physical education, industrial arts, and safety education; Ruth Rankin, . Peru, English and library science; James Simones, Tekamah, physical education, biology and safety education. · Omaha-Robert C. Nntthews, Omaha, social science and library science; Francis Dean Stapleton, Council Bluffs, Iowa, physical education and biology; Harry W. Whitney, Omaha, physical education, speech and safety educa·tion. Peru Campus School-Richard E. Blake, Atlantic, Iowa, mathematics, history and safety education; Frank Bostic, Wabash, Ind., English and physical education; Gary Dahmke, Syracuse, music and art; Millard Hamel, Fullerton, industrial arts and physical education; Barney M c I 1 v o y , South Lyon, Mich., physical education, social science and history; Larry Rathe,. Sterling, physical education and biology; Bob Reimers, Brock, physical education and social science; Eugene C. Walden, Ruskin, music and speech; Larry Whittington, Nehawka, music, biology and mathematics; Ron Kelley, Falls City, physical education and industrial arts. Westside Community Schools, Omaha-Lee W. Haeber 1 e in, Springfield, industrial arts, English and safety education; Richard J. Kiger, Springfield, physical education and history; Roland Sohnholz, Auburn, industrial arts and mathematics. Syracuse-Phillip Ni e m an n, Nebraska City, history and speech; Ardith Pratt, Cook, business and English.

BANK OF PERU PHONE 872-2331

Member F.D.I.C. INVITES YOUR BUSINESS CARROLL LEWIS, President

JOHN L. LEWIS, Vice Pres. & Cashier

It's that time again-mid-semester grades in the Campus School. Since this past quarter has been an unusually busy one for the high schoolers, everyone is chewing his nails hoping Mom and Dad won't be too mad. The All-Sports banquet was held Saturday, ·March 30, and proved to be a "smashing" success. The banquet, held in the Student Union, featured speaker Claire Hurlbert of the Falls City Journal. presentation of sports and pep awards, the Ethnic Singers, and the high school woodwind choir. The following Monday, April 1, the F.H.A. girls began F.H.A. Week with their annual MotherDaughter banquet. Eighty mothers and daughters enjoyed a meal of delicious home-cooked food. For entertainment Trudy Schneider sang a solo and Sherry Seibert played the piano. Mr. Leland of the Social Studies department of the college gave an interesting talk about "Women." Closing the evening was the installation of officers for the following year. The girls have planned an activity for each day of the week to recognize F.H.A. Week. Events for the next few weeks are numerous-band clinics, concerts, and solo preparations. Strenuous exercising by the high school boys is preparing them for the track and field events. The campus school elementary teachers attended an Art Workshop held at the campus school last week. There were 50 teachers from the surrounding schools who took part in the workshop. Many good ideas were received by the group. The workshop was sponsored by the Southeastern Branch of the American Childhood Education Association. The Child Care class is sponsoring a pre-school in the kindergarten room during the month of April. Eleven four-year-olds are attending. The older girls are kept busy watching that tiny fingers don't get bitten by the hamster, that the children don't frighten the guinea pig, and that the parakeets aren't turned out of their cage by some "helping hand." The spring season · a 1 w a y s brings about a variety of interesting activities in the elementary school. The various grades are. planting seeds, experimenting with soils, electing class officers, and manipulating puppets to enrich the reading program.

Miss Gladys. Grush Will Tour Europe Miss Gladys Grush, the first and second grade teacher at the Campus School, will be taking a tour of Europe this summer. It is a study-tour sponsored by the University of Omaha and will be directed by Dr. A. Stanley Trickett, professor and chairman of the department of history at the University of Omaha. Miss Grush will receive six hours of graduate credits for completing the prescribed requirements. The tour will leave Omaha on June 10th and go to Chicago, where it will board a Trans-Atlantic jet flight for Ireland, and then continue to England. After several days in England, it will take an overnight steamer to Holland. From Holland, it will go to Germany, Switzerland, Italy, Monaco, and France. Several days will be spent in each country where the group will attend lectures led by Dr. Trickett. The group will return by jet to Omaha on July 16th.

Peru Prep Concert Peruvian Proofs Read Tomorrow Night The spring concert of the Peru Prep Concert Band will be presented Tuesday, April 9, at 8 p.m. in the College Auditorium. The program, under the direction of Mr. Gilbert E. Wilson, associate professor of instrumental music, will include band and ensemble selections which will be presented in the district music contest in Peru, April 25'-26. Selections by the band will include Tamerlane by Erickson, Marco Polo by Scarmolin, Music Man by Willson, and LaBamba de Vera Cruz by Tucci. Ensembles presenting numbers will include the brass sextet, drum quartet, trump e t trio, woodwind choir, woodwind quintet, mixed clarinet quartet, an d saxophone quartet.

On Wednesday morning, March 27, four Peruvian staff members and Mr. Stewart Linscheid, sponsor, took Peru's new station wagon to Mission, Kansas, to read negative proofs for this year's yearbook. The four proof-readers were Dick Elmore, Bill Scott, Tom Castle and Harvey Fisher. Mr. W. G. Austin, Inter-Collegiate Press Inc., took the staff members on a tour of the yearbook publishing plant after th e Peruvian was proof read. A copy of the full-color c~ver for the 1963 Peruvian was given to Mr. Linscheid and will be shown at the publications banquet, April 16, at Nebraska City.

PECK'S PALACE Short Orders • Fries Featuring Crispy Pizza HOURS 7 TO 11

Publications Banquet To Be Held April 16 The annual publications banquet will be Tuesday, April 16, at 6:30 ill Nebraska City's Steinhart Lodge. The tickets are $1.75 per person. Swiss steak will be served. Dr. Neal S. Gomon will be the speaker. Publications awards will be given. Everyone who has worked on publications is cordially invited. Staffers should get tickets from JoAnn Frerichs or one of her committee members before April 11.

INGERSOLL Barber Shop AUBURN, NEBRASKA Elly Ingersoll • Nate Hayes

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Majors Hall Holds Election Majors Hall held its annual dormitory election meeting, Tuesday evening, April 2. The following men were elected by simple majority in the meeting led by Ray Ogle, acting Majors Hall president. President, John Rinne. Vice-president, Dan Leuenberger. Secretary-treasurer, Bill Scott. S.G.A. Representative, Harvey Fisher. These men will take office at the start of the .63-64 fall term. The officers to retire at the end of this school year are Mr. Ogle and Tom Aitken. Mr. Leuenberger and Mr. Fisher will continue to work as dorm officers. Jack-"The judge gave that man two years just for having one too many. Seems kind of severe." Jill-"Well, you see, the one too many was wives."

PERU CLEANERS

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The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU.NEBRASKA

Volume 58

Number 13

Mrs. Wheeler Announces Plans SEA Convention

for 1963 May Fete Program At 6:30 on the evening of May 3rd the 1963 May Fete will be officially opened by the Ethnic Singers. They will sing "Wonderful, Wonderful Copenhagen," in connection with this year's theme of Denmark and Sweden. May Fete is directed by Mrs. A. G. Wheeler. To carry out the theme, she plans to have f o 1k dances from the two countries presented by her folk dancing classes. Mr. Pilkington's gymnastic team will serve as her Danish gymnastic team. The modern dance class w i 11 perform a ten minute ballet "The Fable of the Donkey." It is the well known story of a father and son who took their donkey to market to sell him, and of all the people they met on the way. As a stage setting for this ballet; Miss Diddel's painting class is making a moving background nine feet high and seventy-two feet long. It will be moved behind the dancers during the ballet. May Fete is the largest event of the year. This year the program will consist of seventy-five dancers, a gymnastics team of twenty or more, and a Royal Court of twenty-two. The general arrangements for May Fete are made by the Student Center Board. Majors Hall is in charge of decorations.

Ten Receive Letters For Basketba II Jack Mcintire, head basketball coach at Peru State Teachers College, has announced the names of ten Bobcats awarded letters for the 1962-63 basketball season. The monogram winners, two seniors, two sophomores, and six freshmen, carried the Bobcats to a third straight Nebraska College Conference championship-a cochampionship with Wayne State -and a third straight trip to the NAIA tournament in Kansas City, Mo. The Peruvians notched a 7-3 conference record and a 1411 season mark. Tom Yopp, East Alton, Ill., senior was awarded his fourth letter· and senior Larry Hayes, Auburn, his third. Two sophomores, Harvey Fraser, Humboldt, and Bill Hunsaker, Lincoln, were awarded their first letters. The six freshmen include: Marv Hopper, Auburn; Jack Rinne, Steinauer; Bill Russell, Massena, IowH; Don Schmidt, Sterling; Ron Snodgrass, Seward; Bill Witty, Syracuse.

Open House To Be Held April 28 Preparations are being made for Peru's annual open house. This is the sixth year this event has been held on the Peru campus. It will be held on Sunday, April 28, 1963. Invitations have been sent to prospective students and their parents. Current students and their parents have also received invitations. According to Miss Bradley, associate dean of students, the general public is also invited. All dorms, laboratories, classrooms,

Chorus Goes On Tour The Peru State Chorus, under the direction of Mr. Edward Camealy, was on tour Wednesday, April 10. Performances were given at the Tecumseh Public School at 10:00 a.m., and the Filley Public School at 1:00 p.m. The chorus was accommodated at the Hopkins Hotel, in Tecumseh, where they were served lunch. They entertained with the same numbers that were used for the Peru Kiwanis meeting. An added attraction to the program was the Ethnic Singers, who sang several numbers at both schools.

Easter Vacation BY PHIL BATEMAN A common occurrence on college campuses all over America is the traditional Easter vacation. It may be termed spring vacation, however, and the length of the respite varies with different schools; but it is essentially the same all across the length a n d breadth of the land. This is as far as the similli.rity goes though, and from there on out madness and mayhem take the fore. Students find many different ways to celebrate the annual rites of spring. Some take the sun, some rush to the girl back home, others visit relatives, some studY. and some actually attend religious services. There are literally hundreds of "things" one can do on vacation, but most of them seem somehow drab and dull. Unless, of course, you are one of the hardy, pioneering breed who makes the exodus to far off and exotic places. Places like Miami Beach, Fort Lauderdale, C a p e Cod, and Old Mexico. These are the "golden ones" of contemporary college life, the ones we look to for leadership, fun and games, and, last but not least, the ones you read about in the newspapers. These are the students who risk life, limb, throbbing head, dry mouth, and daddy's disapproval for the ultimate status symbolthe wild Easter vacation. They may be arrested, they may spend their last dollar, blow their car to pieces. Pop may cut off their allowance; but it is really worth all the hardship and pain. They are the rage of the campus, the knight errants of their corner of the world. Their sunburned heads are tilted high and they w a 1 k with a studied nonchalance. When anxiously queried by some unfortunate who spent Easter at home in East Overshoe, Iowa, they casually reply that the booze was so-so, the climate okay, and the girls .... plenty. Will they go again next year? They frown, purse their lips and turn their bloodshot eyes to the east. Next year, the world! and shops will be open. Visitors will also be able to inspect the recently remodeled library. At 2 p. m. a variety show will be presented. After the show refreshments will be served at Eliza Morgan Hall. Instructors and administrators will be present to answer all questions.

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nine sleepy travelers left Peru for the state Student Education Association convention at Chadron. The delegates discovered that the trip was a long one, and several learned more about Nebraska during the weekend of riding. The new Dodge station wagon, purchased for trips 1 i k e this one, held nine people a n d their luggage very ·comfortably. The Peru delegates arrived in Chadron in time to freshen up before. beginning the evening's activities. Friday's agenda included registration, a variety program, and a fraternity dance. Saturday began with breakfast in the Campus Center, followed by a welcome and the business meeting. At 9:30, the candidates for office were presented. Peru's candidates and the offices t h e y were running for were: Dorothy Bock, vice-president; Elaine Gerdes, secretary; Janis Mayer, treasurer; and Janice Jones, historian. Following speeches by the candidates, the morning program continued with talks on comparative education. During the noon hour, 1u n ch was served in the Campus Center, and the election of officers was held. The afternoon program was composed of speeches on education behind the Iron Curtain and group discussions. New officers were announced during the afternoon coffee break. They are: Stephen Honey, University of Nebraska, president; Penny Wright, Kearney, vice-president; Sally Lynn Hughes, Nebraska Wesleyan, secretary; Judi Johnson, Chadron, treasurer; and Fran Duffy, Kearney, historian. At 4:00, a free period was provided. Several of the Peru delegates took a tour of the Chadron State Park and the surrounding area. The convention was closed with a banquet at the Campus Center. The evening program included: the Eaglaires, Chadron's select choral group; a talk on Cuban and Latin American education by Dr. Jorge Marti, assisted by Miss Rosa Gonzales an d Juan Reyes; and installation of officers. Sunday was spent in traveling back to Peru. The eight delegates and one sponsor were rather happy to see familiar territory again as they returned at 9:30 that evening. Peru delegates and their sponsor were: Elaine Gerdes Janis Mayer, Loretta Kratochvil' Janice Jones, Dorothy Bock, Mer~ !in Wright, Dick Elmore, Ed Meyer, and Mr. Harold W. Johnson.

Yet

APRIL 22, 1963

Ogle and O'Connor Win SGA Election Thursday, April 4, 1963, Skip Ogle and Jack O'Connor were elected president and vice-president to SGA. Ray (Skip) Ogle is the son of Mrs. Irene Ogle of Dawson, Nebr. Skip graduated from DawsonThe first term of summer school Verdon High School. Skip is a will run from June 10 through junior majoring in math an d July 13, 1963. The second term is physics and minoring in English. from July 13 through August 16, He is a football letterman and is 1963. Students may pick up six president of Majors Hall. S kip hours credit per term. Two sem- participates in Sigma Tau Delta, inars are of special note. T h e y honorary English fraternity, Peare: Problems in Reading and ru Historical Society, Alpha Mu Concepts and Techniques in Omega, honorary math fraterModern Science. nity, Wesley Fellowship, Blue A field trip to Mexico will be Devils, and is vice president of featured from July 15 through "P" Club. He was also a member August 10, 1963-. The cost of $477 of the court for the Cupid's Frolwill include lodging, transporta- ic Valentine dance. tion, and twenty-three meals in John (Jack) O'Connor is the Mexico. Dr. George Schottenha- son of Mr. and Mrs. John J. mel will be tour director. If all O'Connor, Sr. of Worchester, assignments are completed five Mass. He ~s graduated fro m hours credit will be given. These South High School there. Jack is hours will serve as credit to- majoring in pre-medicine and wards a degree or certificate re- biology. Last year he was a memnewal. ber of the gymnastics team. Details concerning s um mer Skip and hck lead their camschool and the trip may be ob- paign with, "Vote for the three tained from Dr. Keith Melvin, O's-Ogle, O'Connor, and OrganDean of the college. ization." When asked for a statement about his new office, Skip said, "Jack and I certainly appreciate the support given us, and we'll do our best to be worthy of the offices entrusted to us. With student body support, the Mr. Silas Summers, Mr. Lyle SGA can become a strong voice Domina, and Mr. Stewart Lin- of student opinion. We encourage scheid of the English department students to make suggestions and and Mrs. Genevieve Gergen of criticisms that might be helpful the Campus School attended a next year." Others running for the presimeeting of the S. E. Nebraska Council of English Teachers held dent and vice president offices in in the Beatrice H. S. the after- SGA were: Dick FloerchingerKenneth Olsen, Gary Stover-Ron noon of April 6. The main feature of the meet- Foreman, and Wayne Wallaceing was a discussion by Dr. Har- Elaine Gerdes. dy, chairman of the University of Nebraska English department, of the planned curriculum fr om grades 1-12. The program being tested in selected schools at the present could result in more efArlan Richardson, an August fective teaching of li tera tu re and candidate for the Bachelor of writing. Arts degree at Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru, has been awarded a three-year National Defense Fellowship for study in biochemistry at Oklahoma State University, Stillwater.

Summer School Features Field Trip To Mexico

English Teachers Attend Meeting

Arlan Richardson . Gets Fellowship

Asad Ali Khan, Pakistan Visitor, Speaks At Convo

Asad Ali Khan, an educator from Pakistan, spoke at an allcollege convocation Wednesday, April 10, 1963. Mr. Khan is a former English and mathematics instructor in the s e c o n d a r y schools in his native land. He is presently a Ph.D. degree candidate at the University of Nebraska. A native of Peshawar, We st The Peru State Home Economics Club was the guest of Pakistan, Mr. Khan came to the Brandeis Department Store for United States on a Fulbright a Bridal Show Monday, April 8, scholarship and has been enat 7:00 p.m. Mrs. Stratton, of the gaged in graduate study in NeCameo Room at Brandeis, ar- braska since that time. In his address, Mr. Khan disranged for the showing. The group saw several bridal and at- cussed the educat1onal systems tendant gowns. Following the and philosophy of education in showing, the girls had an oppor- Pakistan. tunity to ask questions pertaining The education system in Pakito weddings. stan and India is shaped like an Those providing transportation inverted pyramid. At the top are for the event were Elaine Bath, the colleges and universities. Winnie Sporer, Barbara Gordon, These constitute the highest and Pruddy Fritch, Mrs. Louise Kre- broadest level. Situated at the gel, Mrs. Ina Sproul, and Mrs. bottom of the inverted pyramid Fern Stephens. are the elementary schools, which

Home Ee Club Attends Bridal Show ·

The Best

Richardson will begin study in September on work leading to a Ph.D. degree. The three-year stipend is for $6,600. A 1959 graduate of Lewiston High School, Arlan is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Richardson of Steinauer. He is serving as president of Beta Beta Beta, national biology honorary, and is a member of Alpha Mu Omega, honorary national mathematics fraternity. are given a bare minimum of funds for existence. In Pakistan, about 7 percent of the total population are literate. Pakistan has no compulsory education and only 43 percent of the school-age children attend school. This is partly because of the lack of available transportation and the cost of books. No tuition fee is charged in the elementary schools, which are grades kindergarten through five. Mr. Khan went on to explain (Continued on page two)


SCHOOL SPiRlT AT PERU Let's face it! Peru State is the oldest and best college in Nebraska and is something of which to be proud. Much too often, however, Peru State's energetic school spirit prevails throughout her athletic contests and then slowly dwindles away. The enthusiastiC school spirit that all of our contenders admire should be carried on throughout the entire year. The Peru Staters are for "good old Peru" all the way in athletic events in which the Bobcats always shine. Let's not limit this school spirit to just athletic events; but let it ring out in every other activity also. The students are a part of nearly a century of tradition and we owe our support and pride to everything that represents Peru State. This includes th e chorus, band, orchestra, dr-ama productions, the "Ped,'' Pe• ruvian, all-school parties and dances, student organizations, student government, and scholastic events. So, as we roll into our final weeks of the 1962-63 year at Peru, check over your school spirit. Are you an active student that takes pride in your school and the part you play, or are you one of the few who stands on the side and criticizes? Never let it be said that any college ever surpassed Peru State in school spirit! -By Dorothea Fink.

FOR CONCLUSIVE EDITORIALS In recent years, the trend in editorials in newspapers and magazines has been to get away from the old fashioned blasting and criticism of any and all things wrong. The modern editorial is truly a disciple of the times in that it no longer rips into the heart of an issue and presents a definite opinion of the editor and the paper, but rather seeks to "explain" matters of current interest. It brings the facts to bear and presents them in a pleasing manner and thus the whole affair is cleared of the fog and delusion inherent with nearly all affairs new and different. This is its job and the editorial in most news media goes no further. The meaning of the sentence containing the "disciple of the times" phrase might seem too cryptic, so some explanation perhaps should be in order. The period we now call modern is too often characterized by a wishy-washy viewpoint and an absolute reluctance to express a contrary or critical opinion. There was a time in the history of news when the printed word was a strong' element in keeping hypocrisy, graft, corruption and other such crud at least somewhat in line; This was accomplished by such devices as satire, irony, expose and many others. Not so the modern paper where the emphasis is on winning friends and enlarging circulation. The opinion is that blandness and friendliness go together as do salt and pepper. No strong views, no truth seeking, just "nice" articles written in very proper King's English is the order of the day. It seems to matter little if the editorial page is filled with what appears to be excerpts from a courtesy and manners pamphlet; no one gets hurt and everybody g~ al6ng perfectly. It is indeed unfortunate that the fire and verve seems to be hopelessly lost from its natural habitat, the editorial page; It is also very doubtful that this will change unless the readers of today's news vehicles show their contempt f o. r blandness, in general, and spineless journalism, in particular. · -By Phillip Bateman.

Ebner Gets Grant L. D. Ebner, business manager at Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru, has been awarded a grant from the Carnegie Corp. of New York to attend the 1963 oneweek short course in college business management at the Univer-

sity Of Omaha. Mr. Ebner, business manager at Peru State since September, 1961, completed a similar short course at Omaha University last summer. The Carnegie grant of $200 will cover tuition, f e e s , room, board and transportation.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice 'of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks April 22, 1963 PEDAGOGIAN STAFF

Co-Editor------------------------------------- Tom Aitken Co-Editor _________________________________ Richard Elmore Layout Editor _________________________________ Judi Wilson Personnel Manager.------------------------- Lynn McCann Business Manager ----------------------------- Tom Castle Copy Editor________________________________ Karen Conrad Copy Editor ________________________________ Carol Niebuhr Copy Editor----------------------------------- Jane Moore Morgan Column _____________________________ Mary Holland Majors Column ______________________________ Keith Grimes Delzell Column ________________________________ Ronald Rist Reporter__________________________________ Phillip Bateman Reporter _________________________________ Richard Berthold Reporter_____________________________________ William Bliss Reporter·-----------------~----------------- Dorothy Bock Reporter___________________________________ Dorothea Fink Reporter__________________________________ Stanley Johnson Reporter_____________________________________ Janice Jones Reporter __________________________________ Carey Lankford

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MAJORS HALL By Keil:h Grimes

rarey Lankford, Ed (Tug) Meyer, Ron Peterson, and Mike Smagacz turned mechanic t h e other day. It seems as though the four of them took Mike's transmission out and fixed it. Bill Quilty and Sid Baney went to the Ozarks on a fishing and camping trip over the Easter vacation. Bruce Mau and Dom LaRocca flew to their Eastern homes for their Easter vacation. Majors Hall has selected their new dorm officers. They are: Jack Rinne, president; Dan Leuenberger, vice-president; Bill Scott, secretary-treasurer; an d Harvey Fisher, SGA representative. Jack Roper took ill last Monday. It seems as though he had a bad case of the flu. We sure hope that an epidemic doesn't break out around the dorm.

Asad Ali Khan, Pakistan Visitor, Speaks At Convo (Continued from page one) tbat all education is started in the English language. It fs the official language and is a compulsory subject in all the schools. The students are also taught the native language. The other subjects taught in the Pakistan schools are similar to those taught here in the United States. In spite of various difficulties, Mr. Khan stressed that the educational systems in Pakistan are improving tremendously. There are now colleges for science, arts, business, medicine, teaching, and engineering. At the close of convocation, Mr. Khan answered questions concerning various phases of life in Pakistan. He also spoke to various classes throughout the remainder of the day. If you buy an expensive wig on time, you're in debt over your head.

DELZEtL HALL NEWS

ELIZA MORGAN HALL By Mary Holland

By Ronald Risi

Spring has come and congratulations are due to Ginny Adkins on her engagement to Mike Janis. Also, Becky Perdew is going steady with Ron Cotton. April first found many pranks pulled on the Morgan gals. Pruddy Fritch found forty marbles in her b.ed, compliments of Cynthia Meyer, Lois Layden, and Judy Shuey. Myrna Oestman and Linda Rogers had Tide in the i r beds and Anne Epply found her door knob greased with butter. Dorothy Bock and Dorothy Drubek had their fun by lightly sprinkling three beds with tooth picks, soaping two mirrors, and cleverly inverting one dresser drawer. Carol Curd and Sue Ellen Rielly found an extra door of brown paper outside their room. Barbara Gordon celebrated her birthday with a cake shaped like a bear and a party given for her by Nancy Niemann, Elaine Muller, Janice Meyer, Helen Drumm, Margaret Beard, Mary Parmenter, and Sharon Furnas. Janice Wilkenson and Dorothy Bock celebrated their birthdays together with two cakes decorated like clowns and a party given for them by Karen Behrends, Dorothy Drubek, Nancy Niemann, and Linda Bartels. Happy Birthday gals! Jennie says: No fool like an old fool. Why? Because it takes practice.

Richard Klinger and Ronald Rist attended the Publications Banquet at Nebraska City Tuesday, April 16 at 6:30 p.m. The banquet was held at Steinhart Lodge. Every one of the Delzell Hall residents seemed to have had a wonderful vacation over the Easter . holidays. Most of the boys went home; others visited relatives; still others did some vacationing in Mexico and o th e r areas. Who is the phantom running around the dormitory flashing his camera in different rooms? It is believed that the phantom is Richard Klinger. It's hoped that some of those pictures do not get into the Peruvian. What's this? We have a tutor of history in Delzell Hall? Yes, one may find Roger Lucas explaining important events to his special student, Bob Powers. If anyone is having trouble with his history, contact Roger Lucas for free lessons. Some of the Delzell men are chatting about the big housecleaning project, which is about to begin. Everyone wants h i s room clean and neat for College Open House Day Sunday, April 28. Who were you waiting on, Roger Lucas, Thursday before Easter vacation? Somebody said you were waiting for Jerry Strecker to drive you home. Roger, why don't you try the 5(}-mile hike?

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Wayne Takes Two Games From Peru BY ST AN JOHNSON

CHARLES NIEMEYER

RONALD KELLEY

Charles Niemeyer, Des h 1er, clears eleven feet during the pole vaulting event in the Tarkio-Peru track meet held on Thursday, April 4. Niemeyer and Peru State's Al Sharp tied for first place in the event.

Veteran left hander Ron Kelley, a three year letterman, returns for his senior year as head of the Peru mound corps. Kelley, a Falls City High School graduate posted a 7-1 pitching record for the Bobcats last year.

Peru State's home opener was spoiled by a no-hit effort in the first game of a d.oubleheader with Wayne State, April 5, and the Wildcats pounded out 12 hits and 11 runs in the last game to down Peru twice, 6-0, 11-3. Left-hander Keith Krommenhouck of Wayne hurled a no-hit shutout in the opening game at Peru and was backed by solo homers by Stan Schalis and Ron Jones. Krommenhouck allowed only two base-runners, b o th walks, with one of those being erased by a double-play. Bobcat Ron Kelley took the loss. In the second game, Peru rapped out three straight hits to push across their first run of the day. But Wayne came back and scored three markers to take a lead that they kept. The winning pitcher was freshman Dean DeBuhr of Wayne, while Frank Spizucco absorbed the loss. SUMMARIES:

First Game:_ RH E Wayne _____ 015 6 5 Peru _______ 000 000 0 0 0 2 Kelley, Hester 6, No e 11 7, and Baker; Krommenhouck and Quin.

ooo

BARNEY McILVOY

ROBERT REIMERS

Barney Mcilvoy, a Peru State senior from South Lyon, Mich., will be after his third baseball letter this spring. Barney, the Bobcats hustling second baseman, hit .239 for the N.C.C. champs in last year's campaign.

Bob Reimers, a senior right hander from Brock, will strengthen the Peru pitching staff again this year. Bob, a one year letterman, posted a 1-1 record last spring for the N. C. C. champs. 440 yard dash, George Henry

Peru Runs Over Tarkio In Track Meet

(TJ, :51.7. 880 run, Jim Redden (P) 2:07 .3. Mile run, Louis Fritz (P), 4:-.il.6.

In a dual meet with Tarkio College Thursday, March 28, Peru won its first home meet 90 to 46. A three year standing record in the 440 was broken by Tarkio's George Henry, the record time was :51.4 seconds. The record, by Peru's Lanny Richards, was set in 1959. Peru's Jim Redden, an Omaha product, was the only d o u b 1 e winner of the afternoon. Redden took first place in both the 880 yard run, in 2:07.3, and the broad jump, 20'3". The winners were:

on

the

cinders

100 yard dash, John Barton (P), :10.3. 200 yard dash, George Henry (T), :22.7.

Two mile run, Louis Fritz (P), 10:45.1. 120 yard highs, Doug McVickers (T), :16.5. 220 yard lows, Doug McVickers (T), :27.5. 880 relay, Peru (Crook, Hunzeker, Braden, Barton), 1:34.6. ' Mile relay, Tarkio (Henry, Fox, McKinley, Martie), 3 :35.5. In the field events the winners were: Shot put, Jim Brenn (P), 42'5". Broad jump, Jim Redden (P), 20'3". Javelin, Bill Witty (P), 158'2%". High jump, Roger Noell (P), 5'8". Discus, Ken McKinley (T), 133'6".

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Second GameAB Johnson, S. ___ 4 Mcllvoy, B. ___ 4 Edwards, R. ___ 4 McCoy, B. ____ 3 Manning, J. ___ 3 Cox, L. _______ 1 Hunt, M. ----Baker, E. _____ Corbin, D. ____ Stillinger, E. __ Cotner, D. ____ Schneider, L. Spizucco, F. --

3 3 2 1 1

R 0 0 1 0 0 0

1 1

0 0 0 0 0

31

3

H RBI 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 l 1 0 0 0 0 0 8

3

R H E Peru _______ 100 002 0 3 7 2 Wayne _____ 320 024 x 11 12 3 Spizucco, Cotner 2, Kreimer 5, Hester 6, Noell 6, and Baker, Floerschinger 6; DeBuhr and Quinn.

Peru Places Second In Fremont Triangle

Peru, Nebraska

Peru State Teachers College Monday battled from behind to notch a 7-5 night cap win and gain a split in a double header baseball engagement against St. Benedict's College at Atchison, Kans. St. Benedict's had pummeled the Peruvians 14-6 in the opener. In the second game, Peru spotted St. Benedict's a four run first inning lead and then began whittling away to win with a two run burst in the eighth inning of a scheduled seven inning encounter. Ron Kelley, Falls City senior, who picked up the win by hurling three shut-out innings, singled in the top of the eighth to give Peru their winning run. Barney Mcllvoy, second sacker from South Lyon, Mich., gave the Bobcats insurance by sacrificing home another eighth inning run. Peru scored three runs in the second inning, on a solo home run by left fielder Rocky Edwards, Southbridge, Mass., and two more on Mcllvoy's single.

The Bobcats tied it up in the top of the third but saw St. Benedict's again go ahead with a single tally in the bottom of the inning. Bruce McCoy, Tecumseh, lined a single in the seventh to score Mcilvoy and send the game into extra innings. It was all St. Benedict's in the first game as they pounded out 10 hits and took advantage of nine big Peru State errors to annex the 14-6 win. A six run fourth inning, aided by three Bobcat errors, a passed ball, and a walk, iced the game for the Ravens. Doug Cotner, Waco, absorbed the loss for Peru. LINE SCORES:

Game 1Peru ______ 003 300 0 6 4 9 St. Ben'dts _131 603 x 14 10 3 Losing pitcher, Cotner; winner, Maurer.

Game 2Peru _______ 031 000 12 7 10 4 St. Ben'dts _-401 000 00 5 7 1 Winner, Kelley (1-1); loser, Weiderholt. ry Grace, Warren, Mich. (P), 5-7, 6-3, 6-4.

Peru Loses Tennis Match To Creighton Creighton University coasted to a 7-0 tennis victory over Per u State, Tuesday, April 9, on the Peru courts. By mutual consent and because of time difficulties, the two doubles matches went only one set.

Terry Tonkin (C) defeated Frank Bostic, Wabash, Ind. (P), 6-1, 6-1. Dave tittle (C) defeated Larry Trimble, Omaha, (P), 7-5, 6-1.

DoublesBrown and Stabile (C) defeated Peterson and Smith (P), 8-5. Little and Tonkin (C) defeated Grace and Bostic (P), 8-6.

SUMMARY:

SinglesSam Brown (C) defeated Dennis Peterson, Rockford, Ill. (P), 6-3, 13-11. John Lammers (C) defeated Joe Smith, Mt. Holly, N. J. (P), 6-3, 6-0. Tom Stabile (C) defeated Hen-

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Peru State Teachers College Rex Rains failed to score in the broad jump, shot put, and javelin as they Groceries Meats Lockers placed second in a triangular Fruits and Vegetables track meet at Fremont, Monday, Midland College copped first with Free Delivery Tuesday and Friday 79 1/6 points, Peru State was second with 55%, and Concordia Phone 872-4351 of Seward trailed with 35112 points. The Bobcats captured six first - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - place finishes in this their second meet of the young 1963 season. Larry Rathe, Sterling, raced for a win in the 120-yd. high hurdles and Roger Crook, Salem, won the 220-yd. low hurdles. In the pole vault, Peru's Charles Niemeyer, Deshler, tied for the top spot and another Deshlerite, Roy Windhorst, threw the discus for a win. Peru copped wins in both the 880-yd. and mile relays, The team of Doug Hunzeker, Seward; Rich Braden, East Alton, Ill.; Roger Crook, Salem; and John Barton, Essex, Iowa, took the half mile baton derby. The mile relay team COLUMBIA EXCLUSIVE of Braden, Crook, Barton, and Matched diamonds, in Built-in Tru·Fit original settings to accent ring guards adjust Jack Rinne, Steinauer, romped their flawless beauty, give automatically to size. you the look of luxury at home in front. No more,.turning,

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er numbers by the band were "Tango for Band" by Osser, "Marco Polo Overture" by Scarnolin, and "Selections from the 'Music Man' " by Willson. The ensembles featured were the woodwind choir, trumpet trio, mixed clarinet quartet, brass sextet, woodwind quintet, saxophone quartet, ·and the drum quartet. All of these ensembles will be entered in the music contests. Members of the band are Pat Adams, Pam Morrissy, flutes; Karen Beatty, oboe; Cheri Combs, Linda Combs, Nancy Adams, Barbara Peck, Kent V an Zant, Danna Henry, Margaret Lutt, Robert Mullendore, Ren a Meritt, clarinets; Sharon Beatty, bass clarinet; Lola Morrissy, bassoon; Ann Adams, Lavonne Stephens, alto saxophones; Mary Lutt, tenor saxophone; JohnKite, baritone saxophone; Karen Workman, Bob Milstead, Bruce Cotton, Alan Palmer, Sally Gnade, John Lutt, cornets; Anita Cox, Lauralee Adams, Jackie Whisler, Martha Ra~kin, French horns; James Whisler, John Vanderford, Gary Haith, trombones; Tom Gomon, baritone; Marshall Meritt, bass; Philip Parker, tympani; James Wilson, Gary Milstead, and Mike Adams, percussion. The band is under the direction of Gilbert Wilson.

able to share with my family from time to time the joyous pleasure of life itself. The affectionate, slightly shy BY DOROTHY BOCK smile of my date, as he calls for At times, I feel that I must me, makes me realize that someburst with happiness or sing of day in the near future I shall be my love of life. The very joy of guiding a family of my own. Yes, being alive, and young, and it will be someday .... with healthy, and free is so great that someone. Perhaps this young man it seems this joy must be shared with the shy, affectionate smile with those around me. I feel an will be that "someone"; perhaps impulse to laugh and shout, and it will be someone of whose exinfect my friends, so we .may enistence I am not yet aware. The joy together our love of life. I future will answer that question, am young, strong, and healthy; but for the present, I am filled now is the time for me to smile, with the bright expectancy of a and sing, and live each day to the rich, full life ahead. fullest. As I continue to dream and My foot is hovering above the wonder about my future, I look threshold of adulthood. I h ave ahead to the day when I shall cares and responsibilities, but have ·completed the requirements they are not yet so great that I for a degree and passed the tests cannot take time to enjoy the and interviews necessary for bebeauties and simple pleasures of coming a teacher. The v e r y life. I am still able to look and thought of facing a room full of listen and live! student::, and trying to impart my Some seem to think th a t knowledge to them sends a thrill clothes, cars, and money are the most important things in a young and a sense of fear coursing person's life. They apparently through my body. Yet this, also, feel that dates and parties pre- brings about a feeling of joy at sent the height of pleasure and being able to choose how I shall fun. In their own time and place, use the talents and abilities that these things are important I have been given. I appreciate the warm friendenough. Along with countless other young people, however, I ship of my former teacher as she find that these pleasures, by unofficially continues her role as themselves, fail to bring about friend and adviser. She is a g~ the special, warm glow of pleas- teacher, understanding and symure-the glow that appears be- pathetic, and I am striving to folcause of the mere fact that I am low in her footsteps. Our 1 on g alive and healthy enough to en- talks inspire me to find and to use the very best that I have. joy the world around me. The things which make me What are the things that make me feel so intensely alive? For aware of the joy of life need not the most part, they are simple, be complicated. A letter from a everyday occurrences which pro- friend who is attending a miliduce a warm, wonderful glow tary academy many miles from deep inside me. They are just the my school is enough to fill me small, happy moments that a r e with happiness for the remainder the very essence of the delicious- of the day. After arguing and competing through four years of ness of living. The beautiful radiance of a high school, we have at last disrose and gold sunset, or the stars covered a deep and 1a s ting spattered across the sky like friendship. The realization of this thousands of tiny eyes watching friendship is one of the special over the earth direct my thoughts ingredients that can make a day toward God. It is through His seem bright and filled with promgoodness and mercy that I am ise. A good, rousing discussion in able to live and to love and to even see the beauties around me. English class; an hour spent playHe has bestowed these wonders ing in the band; an opportunity to be enjoyed;· they fill me with to do a favor for a friend; a job well done; all these fill me with ~ sense of wonder and thankfulan awareness of life. They proness. duce that small glow deep inside God has also given me a won- me. These are the things th at derful family that radiates gen- make me want to shout my joy erous amounts of love and affec- to the world. I am alive; I am tion. There are many, many young; I am healthy; and I am things about them that make me humbly grateful. love them to the point where I Editor's Note: This essay by nearly burst with that love .. The questions of the little first grad- Dorothy Bock won the Sigma Tau er as she sounds out words in Delta/ sponsored wrifing confesf books which are supposed to be by a ~lose decision. Second place beyond her ability; the laughter went to Roger Marnell for a short and shouts of my brother as we story, and fhird place fo Harlan play football in the back yard or Seyfer for a shorf story. have a mock wrestling match on the living room floor; the sweet helpfulness of my fourteen-yearold sister as she lends me just the right shade of lipstick; the fun my look-alike sister and I April 9, the Peru Prep Concert have in being mistaken for twins; the gay, affectionate ban- Band presented their pre-contest ter that Dad and I exchange concert. The band opened the when I'm hoine from college; program with their contest numMother's woman-to-woman smile bers, "Tamerlane Overture" by as we just "talk things over"; all Erickson and "Earle of Oxford these make me glad that I am Marchc" arranged by Jacob. 0th-

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Publications Staffs Have Banquet On. April 16, the Pedagogian and Peruvian staffs held their publications banquet at Steinhart Lodge in Nebraska City. Master of Ceremonies, Tom Aitken, played host to the group and introduced the main speaker, Dr. Neal S. Gomon. Mr. R. D. Moore also spoke. The main order of business was the presentation of certificates for outstanding work for the school paper and the yearbook. Sharon Donlan, Frank B o s t i c , and Tom Castle received b o th Peruvian and Pedagogian awards. Peruvian certificates also went to Richard Klinger, Karen Conrad, Wendell Mohling, Pat Richardson, William Scott, Judi Wilson, Pat Hamm, Larry Rathe, Jane Rhodus, Lynn McCann, Carol Niebuhr, Harvey F i sher , and Penny Hays. Pedagogian certificates went to Ardith Pratt, Dorothea Fink, Dorothy Bock, Mary Holland, Stanley Johnson, Robert Peck, Bill Bliss, Phillip Bateman, Lee Haeberlein, and Richard Elmore. The Gomon plaque . for outstanding service on the Pedagogian was presented to Tom Aitken. Jo Ann Frerichs and Richard Elmore shared the honors for the A. V. Larson Awara and were presented plaques by Mr. Larson.

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Sigma Tau Delta Held Annual Banquet The annual Sigma Tau Delta Banquet was held at Arbor Manor in Auburn on April 8. Twentynine members and guests, Mr. and Mrs. Silas Summers, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Moore, and Lon n Presnall attended. After the banquet, President Lynn McCann had the members introduce their guests. L o n n Presnall provided the entertainment with a speech on "Death." Mr. Moore then gave a short talk. Spring copies of The Rectangle were distributed by Mr. Summers. The meeting was adjourned.

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Nebraska's Oldest College

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 58

Number 14

MAY 13, 1963

Aitken and Levitt May Fete Program Has Scandinavian Theme Make World-Herald A Peru College professor and student collaborated on a feature story which was recently published by the Omaha World-Herald. James D. Levitt, associate professor of speech, was the photographer. He took pictures of the Ralph Groff family of Peru. The Groffs are well-known for their horseback-riding ability. The story which accompanied the pictures was written by Tom Aitken. Tom is a senior majoring in English. He is presently coeditor of the Ped. The story, entitled "Bunions and Blisters," appeared in the World-Herald magazine secticn on Sunday, April 21. It acquainted the reader with the rodeo ability of the "riding Groff family." Particular emphasis w a s given to the achievements of the family last summer. A picture of all eight members of the family, each astride a horse, was included. The story began when Mr. Levitt was taking publicity pictures for the Little Britches Rodeo at Peru last year. He later inquired at the World-Herald office and found that they were interested in publishing some of the pictures. Mr. Levitt asked Tom to do the story needed to accompany the pictures. The finished product was sent to the World-Herald last November.

Increase In Board And Room For 1963-64 Residence hall students planning their finances for the 196364 academic year will want to keep in mind the nine dollar per semester increase in room a n d board to go into effect in Septem(Continued on page two)

BY BETTY WELLENSIEK The entertainment for Queen Karolyne and King Steve, began as the Ethnic Singers sang "Wonderful, Wonderful Copenhagen." During the song, dancers, attired in colorful Scandinavian costumes, entered and took their places on the floor. Crested Hen The first dance was the Crested Hen, which is a Danish folk dance. The girls tried to get the red "stocking cap" which the men were wearing. The successful girl became the "crested hen." The dancers were Kay Camden, Karen Conrad, Carol Curd, Sharon Fike, Mary Holland, Susan Hulbert, Loretta Kratochvil, Jane Moore, Elaine Muller, Myra Murren, Myrna Oestmann, P e g g y O'Neill, Becky Perdew, Beverly Quinn, Winnie Sporer, Betty Stubbendick, Shirley Talley, Betty Wellensiek, Allen Chandler, Robert Hinks, Gerald Laflin, Ed McCartney, Gary Moore, Bi 11 Murphy, Cliff Murray, Charles Pratt, and Bill Scott.

Donkey Fable The modern dance class presented The Fable of the Donkey, another Danish dance. M a r Y Sautter, a little boy, and Mary Lynne Hannah, his father, were taking their donkey, Karen Cahow, to market. On their way, they met three young girls, Lois Fritz, Lorene Kostal, Lucille Christenson. The girls asked why they were walking when someone could ride. So the little boy got on and rode. A little further, they met two acrobats, Ronald Robbins and Don Clark. They said the father should be riding instead of tb.e boy. Soon they met Mother, Linnea Ingwerson, a n d her playful children, Ruth Har- . ris and Frankie Kan. They suggested that both the father and son ride. The last group the father and son met were two gossips, Donna Cox and Susan Stall. Their advice was that the father and son carry the donkey. Their advice was taken, but the donkey didn't like it, and he ran away. The moral of the dance was,

"You can't please everybody!" The background was painted by Miss Norma Diddel and her art classes. In a Fix "Little Man In a Fix" is a dance in which there is always one extra couple. The man in a "fix" gets upbraided by his partner for not getting in a set. When the music changes, the couple finds a set and leaves another "man in a fix." Dancers were Madelyn Bleach, Cliff Murray, Jane Moore, Victor Bade, Beverly Quinn, Paul McNeil, Peggy O'Neill, Bill Bouton, Nancy Neimann, Bill Scott, Mary Holland, Luke Cox, Eleanor Frandsen, Gerald Laflin, Loretta Kratochvil, Leroy Leonard, Carol Curd, Ed McCartney, Cheryl Berner, Roger Noel\, Myra Murre11, and Gary Moore. Gymnasts Mr. James Pilkington's gymnastics team represented the Denmark Gymnastics team. They performed a number of traditional (Continued on page three)

Thirty-third District Music Contest Held April 25-26

Peru NEA Elects

Peru Entertains 1,000 Guests At Open House April 28

BY DOROTHY BOCK & RUTH RULLA The thirty-third annual music contest for districts one and two was held on this campus Thursday and Friday, April 25 and 26. Peru was brightened with ~ny different colored band uniforms and choir robes. Humboldt's cardinal red robes added a note of color on Friday during the Class C and D events. Class A competition was held on Thursday. Judges for the contest were Dr. P ¡thur L. Fritsche!, Western Illinois University; Dr. Gavin L. Doughty, Tarkio College; Mr. (Continued on page two)

LeRoy Leland, assistant professor of history at Peru State Teachers College has been elected president of Peru district of the Xational Education Association and the Nebraska State Education Association in a ballot conducted last week. Other officers elected for the 1963-64 school year include: Dr. C. Vernon Siegner, head of the division of practical arts, president-elect; Mrs. Lillian Christ, assistant professor of education, secretary; and Larry Ebner, business manager, treasurer. Mr. Ebner served in the same capacity during the current year. Outgoing officers are Wm. S. Rankin, assistant professor of education, president; Evan Van Zant, campus school director, vice president (an office now called president-elect); Gladys Grush, assistant professor of education, secretary.

Peruvians Attend Home Ee Meeting

The Ethnics, popular folk-singing group, are caught performing for the huge open house crowd during the program in the auditorium on April 28. On Wednesday, May l, the group conducted its own convocation, much to i'he delight of the Peru student body. Russel Workman, Karen Workman, Mike Janis, and Gary Schmucker comprise the singing group,

The Nebraska Home Economics Association and Diet_etics Association held their annual state convention in Hastings, Nebraska on April 26-27. The theme of the convention was "Patterns for Learning." Mrs. Louise Kregel, assistant professor of home economics at Peru State, left for Hastings on Thursday evening. She served on the state curriculum committee which met on Friday. Other members of the Peru delegation were: Ruth Rulla, Glenda Rima, Cynthia Meier, Donna Gerdes, Linda Rogers, Carolyn Rohlfs, Peg Quackenbush, Elaine Bath, Lorene Kostal, Judi Wolf, Charlotte Wheeler, and Mrs. Ina Sproul. Miss Glenda Rima of Farragut, Iowa, was elected to the office of state secretary-treasurer of the Nebraska Home Economics College Clubs. Glenda is a ho.me economics major at Peru State. Other officers elected were president elect, Donna Moorehead from Kearney State, and vice president, Karen Farrell from the (Continued on page four)

BY MARY HOLLAND Beginning at 1:00 p.m. on Sunday, April 28, Peru State piayed host to prospective students, their parents, and the parents of currently enrolled students at the All College Open House. At 2:00 the visitors were entertained at the college auditorium. The program opened with the College Band Ensemble playing "To the Sea," "Theme from Lawrence of Arabia," and "Fandango." Tom Yopp, president of the Student Governing Association, and Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of the College, greeted the guests. The rest of the program consisted of a presentation by the Peruvian Singers, a modern dance by Mary Sautter, and piano and organ selections by Mrs. Lola Baker, Judy Whighc. '1, (Continued on page two)

Nebraska's Best College Music Organizations Observe Music Week National Music Week was observed at Peru State by numerous events. These included concerts by the Peru Symphonic Band Ensemble, the College Chorus, and the College-Community Orchestra, plus a vocal recital by Eugene Walden. The concert by the Symphonic Band Ensemble was presented at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, May 7. It was under the direction of Gilbert E. Wilson, and featured Russel Workman as baritone horn soloist. An original composition, arranged for band by Edwin McCartney, junior music ma:jor, was presented by the band. The College Chorus was featured at an all-college convocation on Wednesday, May 3. The chorus, under the direction of Edward Camealy, presented numbers featured on the group's tour of southeast Nebraska. The concert by the CollegeCommu~1ity Orchestra, also under the direction of Mr. Camealy, was presented Thursday, May 9, at 8 p.m. The program featured R. T. Benford as organist, Jam es W. Robbins as flute soloist. Eugene Walden, senior from Ruskin, was presented in his senior \'Ocal recital on Sunday, May 12, at 3 p.m. He is a voice student of Mr. Camealy. Eugene is an August candidate for the Bachelor of Fine Arts in Education degree. All programs were held in the college auditorium.

Ethnic Singers Present Convo One of the best received convocations of the year was presented Wednesday, May 1, 1963. It featured the Ethnic Singers, popular folk music singers. They sang several songs which the audience seemed to like very much. Karen and Russel Workman and Mike Janis make up the trio and are accompanied by Gary Schmucker on the bass violin. Lonn Pressnall acted as master of ceremonies, rounding out the program with comedy routines.

Mr. and Mrs. Glen Neddenriep and sons, David (center) and Gene (right), of Brock were guests on Sunday, April 28, of Miss Elaine Neddenriep (second from left) at the annual Open House at Peru State Teachers College. Elaine is a Peru State freshman and has a brother Gary, a junior at the college. More than LOOO visitors jammed the Campus of a Thousand Oaks.


BIG AND BEAUTIFUL BUT CAN BE BAD We hope that students will treat the Missouri River with great respect because the river can be very dangerous. It is one of the largest rivers on the continent, and old river pilots say that the real river is the Missouri. Around Peru the river is falling very fast and has very fast and treacherous currents, currents reaching twelve miles per hou,r in .spots. We are not afraid of water, having enjoyed water sports and things like duck hunting and fishing· all of our life and having served as a Navy swimming instructor, but we have great respect for the river, and we hope you will too. Last year about this time one of our students, Sherwood Packwood of Tecumseh, was drowned while swimming below the second dike down from the Peru boat dock. Another student, George Nincehelser of Peru, was awarded a medal for saving a woman's life, but the woman's husband was drowned in the boating accident. By contrast, not a single regularly enrolled student has become a traffic fatality in the seven years we have been here;and there are few places where students do more driving than they do here. So, if you decide to go swimming, be careful where you swim. Don't swim alone. If you are boating, be sure your boat has oars in case of motor failure and that your boat has an adequate number of life preservers. Obey Nebraska's boating laws and treat the river with respect. We'd like to have you around next year. -S. P. L.

Increase In Board And Room For 1963-64

DELZELL HALL NE,WS

(Continued from page one)

By Ronald Rist Some of the Delzell Hall residents were running around the dormitory in brightly colored clothing. They were getting ready for May Fete. Some of these characters were demonstrating how to dance different national dances. Bill Lawlor and Gene Burgess were seen mowing the lawn in front of Delzell Hall. They were> preparing for the open house, which was held on April 28. The parents were very impressed by the clean rooms that they saw when they visited Delzell Hall on open house. Most of the boys did an exceptionally good job in the room-cleaning project. The mail boxes in the dorm have been smelling sweet lately. It must be some of those love letters coming in. It usually happens in the spring. It seems that Bob Krofta has been receiving some letters with a very fragrant odor. A few of the Delzell Hall men were seen at Table Rock, Friday night, May 10. Roger Lucas, Ronald Rist, Don Rut and others were really living it up. The occasion was Mr. and Mrs. Gary

ber, reminds L. D. Ebner, college business manager. Room and board costs will increase from $280 to $289 in September. It will be possible for the student to make two payments$144.50 at time of registration and the second payment by November 8. A similar arrangement is possible for the second semester.

Buethe To Attend Science Conference L. Chris Buethe, assistant professor of physics at Peru State Teachers College, will participate in a National Science Foundation conference at the University of Colorado August 5 to August 30. Mr. Buethe is one of 30 selected to take part in the "College Physics Teachers Conference on Mechanics." A NSF grant of $180 will cover his expenses of the conference. Fritch's wedding dance. Mr. and Mrs. Canter, parents of Jim Canter, and Mrs. Snyder stayed in Delzell Hall on Saturday, April 27. The Delzell Hall residents enjoyed their stay in the dorm. Delzell Hall will hold its spring party in the near future. Everyone watch for the date.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks May 13, 1963 PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Co-Editor_____________________________________ Tom Aitken Co-Editor_________________________________ Richard Elmore Layout Editor_________________________________ Judi Wilson Personnel Manager __________________________ Lynn McCann Business Manager ----------------------------- Tom Castle Copy Editor________________________________ Karen Conrad Copy Editor________________________________ Carol Niebuhr Copy Editor___________________________________ Jane Moore Morgan Column _____________________________ Mary Holland Majors Column ______________________________ Keith Grimes Delzell Column ________________________________ Ronald Rist Reporter __________________________________ Phillip Bateman Reporter_________________________________ Richard Berthold Reporter_____________________________________ William Bliss Reporter____________________________________ Dorothy Bock Reporter ___________________________________ Dorothea Fink Reporter __________________________________ Stanley Johnson Reporter_____________________________________ Janice Jones Reporter---------------------------------- Carey Lankford Reporter_____________________________________ Robert Peck Reporter·------------------------------------ Karen (iuinn Reporter·----------·-------------------------- Glenda Rima Reporter_____________________________________ Linda Risley Reporter·----------·---------------------------- Ruth Rulla Reporter·----------·--------------------------- Larry Spier Reporter.----------·---------------------- Wendell Stewart Reporter_________________________________ Betty Wellensiek Reporter_ __________.______________________ Janice Wilkinson Sponsor___________ -··-------------------- Stewart Linscheid

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ELIZA MORGAN HALL By Mary Holland Morgan is welcoming b a c k Sharon Furnas and congratulating her on her engagement to Larry Kuenning. They are planning a June wedding. Lois Layden has nicknamed her car the "Tornado" after her recent experience try in g to drive in the wind, rain and hail. The co-eds were treated to the last big dorm party when the elections for next year's officers were held. The gals seemed tickled with the "real ,food," including sandwiches, potato chips, and ice cream. Susan Sharp expressed her thanks for the cooperation she has had as vice president and introduced the new officers. They are Ruth Rulla, president, Cheryl Berner, vice president, and Mary Ann Biere, secretary-treasurer. What is the new word for snacks in the dorm? Lately the community ice box has seen corsages from the May Fete replacing fresh vegetables. Orchids and roses make a nice change f r o m lettuce and parsley.

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Thirty-third District Music Contest Held April 25-26 (Continued from page one) Monte Tubb, Tarkio College; Mr. Melvin Olson, Municipal University of Omaha; and Mrs. Charles McBride, Director of Protestant Memorial Choir, Offutt Air Force Base. There were the usu a 1 groans and cheers as decisions were handed out. In Class A competition, Plattsmouth received superior ratings on its girls' glee and mixed chorus; the band rated a II. The Falls City band ranked superior; girls' glee was given a II, and mixed chorus ranked a III. Schools receiving superior ratings in Classes C and D for band work were Humboldt, Odell, Peru, and Brock. Bands rating II's were Elmwood, Nehawka, Johnson, Nemaha, Table Rock, and Diller. Stella's girls' glee received a II; mixed choruses from Diller and Nemaha also rated a IL Bands from Dawson-Verdon, Murdock, Palmyra, Elk Creek, and Cook were given III's. Third p 1 a c e ratings were given to large vocal groups from Brock, Dunbar, Murdock, Talmage, and Avoca. The contest committee was composed of Mr. R. T. Benford, Mr. Victor Jindra, Mr. Edward G. Camealy, Miss Norma Diddel, and Mr. Gilbert Wilson. Faculty members, music majors an.d minors, and interested students assisted with the various events.

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MAJORS HALL By Keith Grimes Jim Brenn, Bill Essman, John Barton, Bob Ruff, ·John Nore, Tom Aitken, and Jack Roper seem t~ be holding the "canasta" game down in Majors Hall. Monday, May 6, Bob (Tiger) Hinks was mysteriously Jocked in his room. It took Don Schmidt, Joe Ward, Gordon Scott, and Charlie Houser about fifteen minutes to get him out. Ed (Tug) Meyer has a sign on his door. For further information about this subject please see Edwin Dale Meyer.

Majors Hall has a new champion "rassler." He is known as "Thirty-Second Bull Aitken." He took down the defending champion, Jim Brenn, in exactly thirty seconds. John Nore is known around the dorm as "lover boy." Larry Piper, John Nore, Bill Quilty, Bill Murphy, and Mike Peterson can be found behind the dorm every day taking a sun bath. Watch this week for the winner of the sloppy tennis shoe contest, which is being sponsored by the Missionaries. The Majors Hall Missionaries are: Larry Piper, Keith Grimes, John Nore, Bill Quilty, Bill Murphy, Dick Travers, Mike Peterson, Jim Brenn, Jack Roper, Larry Durrie, Harold Choate, Roy Broadbrooks, an d several others who didn't care to be mentioned.

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(Continued from page one) Marilyn Marmet, and Virginia Adkins. The Ethnics, Russel Workman, Karen Workman, Mike Janis, and Gary Schmucker sang some old favorites of the Peruvian audience and introduced a new number. The program ended with "Daldans," a folk dance preview of the May Fete activities, presented by Karen Cahow, Ed McCartney, Mary Holland, and William Scott. Afterwards, refreshments were served at Morgan Hall, and despite the muggy weather and threat of tornadoes, the visitors took advantage of the open house in all of the campus buildings and residence halls.

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Queen Karolyne Powers

King Steve Parker

Karolyne Powers, granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. William A. Reed of Auburn, reigned as queen over the 1962-63 May Fete. Karolyne was graduated from Benson High School in Omaha, where she was a member of the annual staff and a cheerleader. Karolyne is a senior at Peru, majoring in home economics and minoring in physical education. At present, she is student teaching at Falls City, Nebraska. While at Peru, Karolyne ¡h a s participated in White Angels, S.G.A., and Home Economics Club. She has been an attendant for the annual Valentine dances for three years, a Homecoming queen candidate for the last two years, and was a lady-in-waiting for the 1960-61 May Fete court.

Steve Parker reigned as king of the 1963 May Fete. Steve is the son of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Parker of Peru. In 1959, he was graduated from Peru Prep, where he was a member of the National Honor Society. At Peru State, Steve is an art and speech major and plans to teach upon graduation. He is a very active and popular person. He is a member of the Student Governing Association. He serves as senior class president. He has been a member of Sigma Tau Delta, honorary English fraternity, for two years. He is one of the most active members of Dramatics club, having participated in seven play productions while at Peru State. He has been a member of this organization for four years and is currently serving as its president. For four years Steve has served as photographer for the Pedagogian and Peruvian. In 1962, he was given a special award by the publications staffs for his services as photographer. As a senior, he was elected to Who's Who. He was a member of this year's Valentine royalty. Steve has a 1 so served as narrator of many events on campus such as last year's May F.ete, convocations, a n cl open house.

MARILYN MASTERS Marilyn Masters was freshman representative to the royal court of the May Fete, held Friday, May 3. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Masters of 702 N. 17th Street, Nebraska City, and a freshman at Peru State Teachers College. Marilyn, 18, is a 1962 graduate of Nebraska City High School. Marilyn is majoring in elementary education. She is a cheerleader and a member of the White Angels. She was also an attendant to the Valentine Dance.

JACK RINNE Jack Rinne, son of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Rinne of Steinauer, Nebraska, has been elected by the student body of Peru State as royalty for the May Fete Festival. Jack made the Dean's List the first semester and is a basketball letterman. Jack was recently elected president of Majors Hall, and is also the S.G.A. representative from the "P" Club.

LARRY HAYES Larry Hayes, son of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Hayes of Auburn, served as an attendant to the '.royalty of ihe annual May Fete. Larry is a senior majoring in physical education and mathematics. He was a member of the Peru State N.C.C. basketball champion team and is active in Blue Devils, I.A. Club, and "P" Club. qf.

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1963 May Fete Royal Court lllllllllllllllllJll11111111111111ll!UlllllllllllllllllllllllllllUltlllllllllllllllllll1111llllllllllllllllllllllllUlllllllllUllllllllJllltUUlt111111111111111111111111111tllij1111JllUllllllllll!LlllllllllllllllJtllllllll

ELAINE GERDES Elaine Gerdes is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Gerdes of Auburn. A junior in Elementary Education, Elaine is a graduate of Peru Prep high school. Miss Gerdes' activities include White Angels, S.E.A., L.S.A. secretary, Home Economics Club treasurer, Kappa Delta Pi honorary fraternity.

RAY OGLE The junior attendant is Rav (Skip) Ogle, son of Mrs. hene Ogle, Dawson, Nebr. Skip, a math and physics major, was recently elected president of the Student Governing Association for the '63-'64 school year. He is a football letterman and is president of Majors Hall. Skip is active in Sigma Tau Delta, honorary English fraternity; Peru Historical Society; Wesley Fellowship; Blue Devils; Alpha Mu Omega, honorary math fraternity; and is vice president of the "P" Club. He was a member of the court for the annual Valentine dance.

MAY FETE PROGRAM (Continued from page one) Danish routines. For the musical sports-lover, they performed a routine to music. Nancy Reed presented a solo routine which was enjoyed by the audience. The gymnastics team consisted of Charles Pratt, John Stefan, Dom LaRocca, Joe Hertz, Ron Robbins, Nancy Reed, Joe Smith, Susan Stall, Don Clark, Jim Polvino, Larry Trimble. Charles Neimeyer. Darrell Baker, and Carey Lankford.

Ethnics The Ethnic Singers, Karen Workman, Russel Workman, and Gary Schmucker, sang "Oleanna." With the audience participation, the words, Oleanna, w i 11 live forever. Karen Cahow, Jim Polvino, Carol Curd, Ed McCartney, Nancy Neimann, Bill Scott, Madelyn Bleach, and Charles Pratt performed Daldans. It is a Swedish folk dance. Daldans was a change of tempo from the other fast and livelier dances. Oxdansen Probably the most enjoyed dance of the evening was Oxdansen. The dance originated at the college in Karlstad, Sweden. The freshmen were called "oxen." They were required to execute the dance, which is a mock fight, without smiling. The "oxen" were Bill Bouton and Leroy Leonard. A smile was sighted a few times, but the dance wa,s so entertaining, no one seemed to mind. May Pole The festival ended with the pink and green ribbon of the May Pole being wound. The dance was by the seventh and eighth grade girls of Peru Prep. The dancers, who were dressed in green and pink dresses, included: Lauralee Adams, Linda Adams, Jackie Allgood, Pearl Allgood, Linda Blankenship, Jody Crabtree, Ronda Craig, Sally Gnade, Georgette Gomon, Vivian Guilliatt, Judy Henry, Marsha Lewis, Margaret Lutt, Jackie Milstead, Pam Morrissy, Joy Mullendore, Mary Sherman, Carol Tynon, Jackie Whisler, and Christie Ubben. The colorful decorations were provided by the men of Majors Hall. Judi Wilson, Penny Hayes. and Winnie Sporer assisted Mrs. Wheeler with the costumes. Everyone agrees that Mrs. A. G. Wheeler has presented another fine May Fete and one that will be remembered.

SHARON RICHARDSON Sharon Richardson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Richardson of Crab Orchard. Nebraska, was elected as one of the May Fete royalty. Sharon was graduated from Filley High School, and then attended N.W. Missouri State. Since transferring to Pern State Teachers College, Sharon has participated in S.E.A., White Angels, Home Economic, Club, and as secretary and treasurer of the Cherubs. Sharon plans on teaching at the elementary le\¡el after graduation. Dancing, spurts, and piano are her hobbies.

JOHN O'CONNOR John (Jack) O'Connor was elected to represent the sophomore class as a member of the court for the May Fete dance. Jack is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John J. O'Connor, Sr., of Worces\i''', Mass. He was graduated from South High School there. Jack is majoring in pre-medicine and biology. Last year he was a member of the gymnastics team. Earlier this spring, Jack w a s elected by popular vote as vice president of next year's Student Governing Association.

LINDA JEAN STEPHENS Linda Jean Stephens, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Stephens of Peru graduated from Peru Prep. Linda, the sophomore attendant, is majoring in home economics and minoring in business education. While in high school, Linda belonged to Student Co u n c i 1, F.H.A., C.Y.F., annual staff and was cheerleader all four years. In her senior year in high school, she was chosen All-Sports Queen. At Peru State, Linda is a member of the Student Center Board; Business Club; Phi Beta Lambda, a business honorary fraternity: White Angels; and was elected vice president for next year of the home economics club. She was also elected an S.G.A. representative for 1963-64. Last year Linda was a Sweetheart attendant and a lady-in-waiting for May Fete. Linda is a recipient of the Morton House Scholarship.


Karolyne Powers And Steve Parker Crowned At May Fete

PSTC Will· Double Enrollment In Decade A near doubling of enrollment of Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru in the next decade has been forecast by President Neal S. Gomon. The projection is based on the percentage of high school graduates enrolling at Peru, the number of expected graduates of Nebraska secondary schools and the percent of high school seniors that go on to college. The big bulge in enrollments will come in 1964 and 1965, the years that Nebraska high schools will graduate record classes. The current enrollment is expected to boom 55% in the next three years to 1,222 in the fall of 1965· compared to 784 in the fall of 1962. Increases are expected to be less sharp after 1965 but will rise steadily to an estimated enrollment of 1,504 in 1972. Ability to meet the anticipated increases will depend upon pro-

Advanced Photography Course Ottered

visions of housing and classroom space and staff, according to President Gomon. Present dormitories and married student hOusing accommodates 425 students, with the remainder housed in the community or driving from area towns. Nearly all available space in Peru is now occupied, thus additional space must be provided by the college. Doubling of dormitory space will be needed by 1965 and rooms for another 250 students will be required by 1970. A recent study of classroom and laboratory space utilization reveals a near-maximum usage of present facilities. A doubling of enrollment will require the addition of at least 20 classrooms and laboratories, with two-thirds of these needed by 1965. A minimum of 25 additional staff members will be necessary to meet the instructional needs of the anticipated enrollments in the .next decade. "" O'Toole, Dean of the Division of Home Economics, Ok 1ah om a State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma, and Mrs. Winnifred Jardine of Colorado Springs, Colorado. Mrs. Jardine is the food editor of the Desert News and the Salt Lake Telegram, S a 1 t Lake City, Utah. ·

A new course, I.A. 325 Photography II, will be offered fall semester 1963. In the past three years six courses of photography I were offered with classes generally closing before noon of registration days. Many students expressed desire for a continuation course in photography on a more advanced level. Photography II will attempt to meet the Dr. Schottenhamel, Mr. Strom, needs by covering a scope of top- and Mr. Leland attended the ics such as infra-red photogra- Mississippi Valley Historical conphy, advanced portraiture, photo- vention at Omaha on May 2 journalism photography, color and 4. photography, color developing, The 56th annual convention and color printing. consisted of talks on various hisBy initiating a second course in torical subjects. The speakers photography, Peru State will be- were subjected to questions and come one of 250 colleges and uni- challenges by -the audience after versities teaching two or more the program. photographic courses. Other Nebraska colleges teaching two or more such courses are: Luther College, Chadron State, Wayne State, University of Nebraska and the University of Omaha. On April 24, the Peru State The prerequisite for photography II is photography I. Photog- Band presented its first convocaraphy II class will be limited to tion concert for the second seten students who are of junior or mester. The first number was a music senior classification, and will be and choral introduction, welcomoffered the fall semester every ing the audience to the concert other year. and introducing the director, Gilbert Wilson, and the narrator, Steve Parker. The selections that Peruvians Attend followed included "American OyHome Ee Meeting erture for Band," "Dynamarch," (Continued from page one) "Theme from Lawrence of AraUniversity of Nebraska at Lin- bia," "Fandango," "To the' Sea," "Matador," and "Ballade for coln. Mrs. Ina Sproul, assistant pro- Saxophone," a solo number by fessor of home economics at Pe- Gary Dahmke. Each number was highlighted ru, was elected chairman of the college and university section. by a comment from Steve, and at She will serve in this office dur- one point, he gave his interpretation of what a Spanish dancing ing the coming two years. Among the speakers at the girl should look like, complete convention were Dr. Le 1a with a spray of lilacs.

Three Attend Convention

Band Entertains In Convocation

Karolyne Powers, granddaugh't.er of Mr. and Mrs. William A. Reed of Auburn, and Steve Parker, son of Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Parker of Peru, were crowned Queen and King of the 1963 May Fete Friday, May 3rd. After the presentation of the Royal Court Miss Powers and Mr. Parker placed a crown on each other's head. At the close of the program Miss Powers and Mr. Parker led the Royal Court from the floor. Other members of the Royal Court included: Senior attendants, Sharon Richardson and Larry Hayes; Junior attendants, Elaine Gerdes and Ray Ogle; Sophomore attendants, Lind a Stephens and Jack O'Connor; Fre8hman attendants, Marilyn Masters aIJd Jack Rinne. Th e flower girls were: Meg Seigner and Dianna Adams. Crown bearers were: Gail Pilkington and Jay Whisler. The six ladies-inwaiting were: Judy Strange, Elaine Neddenriep, Karen Quinn, Marjorie Williss, Pat Wheatley, and Gretchen McKenney.

Wininger President Of NSCTE The National Society of College Teachers of Education met April 25 at Crete, Nebr., with 52 members from 14 colleges attending. It was predicted by the panel that 25 years from now, all elementary and secondary education teachers would have a master of arts degree. The National Society of· College Teachers of Education elected Darrell E. Wininger of Peru State as their president. Other members from Peru attending were Mr. Kite, Miss Bradley, Dr. Boraas, Mr. Johnson, and Miss Ashley. The next meeting will be held at Omaha University this fall.

Bobcats Trounced By Washburn University The Bobcat track men were beaten badly for the second year in a row by one of their oldest rivals, Washburn University. They were soundly trounced 10234 taking only two first. Both of the winning events were by Louis Fritz in the mile and two mile runs. The rivalry is 14 years old, and started in 1949. Until 1as t year it had been a pretty. close race but Washburn ha~ become a school of nearly 3,200 students, considerably larger than Peru. All in all it was a pretty dismal day for the Bobcats in the Oak Bowl. 100 yard dash, Lorey Rosson, w, 10:5. 220 yard dash, Leonard Rogers, w, 23:5. 440 yard dash, Bob Kimba~, W, 51:2. 880 yard run, Dick Swarts, W, 2:10. Mile run, Louis Fritz, P, 4:44.4. Two mile run, Louis Fritz, P, 10:44.4. 120 highs, Charles Pettway, W, 16:2. 220 lows, Charles Pettway, W, 26:5. 440 yard relay, Washburn (Kimbal, Green, Hossfield, Roger), 44:4. Mile relay, Washburn (Swarts, Vieux, Hossfield, Kimbal), 3:32.1. Broad jump, Irwin, W, 22'91h". Discus, Perkins, W, 139'3". Pole vault, Marriott, W, 11'9". High jump, Morrow, W, 5'8". Javelin, Muncy, W, 182'1". Shot put. Clanton. W. 47'21h".

Faculty Members Will Take Advanced Work Several instructors on the Peru State campus will be going to various schools this summer. Miss Gladys Grush will attend a lecture-tour to Europe under Dr. Trickett. Her group will attend lectures in the mornings and have the afternoons fairly free. Miss Grush will also do some other work to be completed before November 1 for six hours credit. Mr. Camealy is to attend the University of Colorado at Boulder, Colorado for a 10 week session to begin work on his doctorate of musical arts with concentration in choral literature. Mr. Strom is planning to go either to Drake University in Des Moines, Iowa, or to the University of Nebraska for six hours of work beyond the master's level. Mr. Witte will attend the University of Nebraska for eight hours work in secondary admin-

istration. Mr. Robbins will go to the University of Missouri, where he will defend his doctoral dissertation. Mr. Leland will attend a three hour post session at the University of Nebraska. It will be a personal study course dealing with ancient history. Mr. &ady has received an N.S.F. grant from the University of Oregon. He plans to go to Coos Bay, Oregon, where he will do work in marine research for eight hours of credit. Miss Diddel plans to do further work in art, but she is planning a six to eight week vacation in Colorado before she does anything further. She has been granted a leave from Peru State to study in the fall. Mr. Stewart Linscheid will teach the first five week session here then go to the University of Colorado for five weeks of newspaper and ·yearbook study.

Bobcat Netsters Split Matches The Peru State Teachers College tennis team split a pair of tennis matches Thursday and Friday, May 2 and 3. The Bobcat net men downed St. Benedict's College of Atchison, Kans., 5-2, Friday, after losing to Northwest Missouri, 0-7, Thursday. Pi=ru's win came on the home courts and the loss was suffered at Maryville, Missouri. SUMMARY-NORTHWEST MO. Singles- ' Neil Reynolds (NWM) defeated Dennis Peterson, Rockford, Ill. (P), 6-2; 6-1. Doug Mossberg (NWM) defeated Joe Smith, Mt. Holly, N. J. (P), 6-2; 6-0. Merle Carley (NWM) defeated Henry Grace, Warren, Mich. (P), 6-3; 6-1. Wayne Mains (NWM) defeated Frank Bostic, Wabash, Ind. (P), 6-1; 6-1. Terry Owens, (NWM) defeated Larry Trimble, Omaha (P), 6-0; 6-2. DoublesBob Shagg and Reynolds (NWM) defeated Peterson and Smith (P), 6-2; 6-1. Mains and Owens (NWM) defeated Grace and Bostic (P), 6-0; 6-0. SUMMARY-ST. BENEDICTS Singles~· Dennis Peterson, Rockford, Ill. (P), defeated Warren Murray (SB), 7-5; 6-4. Joe Smith, Mt. Holly, N. J. (P) defeated John Riley (SB), 6-2; 6-1. Henry Grace, Warren, Mich. (P) defeated Gene Meyer (SB), 6-2; 6-3. Frank Bostic, Wabash, Ind. (P) defeated Pat Kructon (SB), 2-6; 7-5; 6-3. Mike Pascucci (SB) defeated

Larry Trimble, Omaha (P), 6-4; 4-6; 7-5. DoublesPeterson and Smith (P) defeated Murray and Riley (SB), 6-3; 6-0. Meyer and Kructon (SB) defeated Grace and Bostic (P), 6-2; 7-5.

Peru Loses Track Meet To Wayne On Wednesday, May 8, Wayne traveled to Peru, matching talent with the Bobcats. The weatherman proved worthwhile in giving a near-perfect day. Wayne captured twelve first places to win the meet 83-53. Charles Niemeyer displayed a good performance in the pole vault with 12 feet to place second. Fritz, placing second, gave the crowd a tremendous thrill in the final yards of the two mile. Peru's 880 relay was disqualified for stepping out of the exchange zone. First place winners were: 100 yard dash, Rerfenrath, W, 10.3. 220 yard dash, Rerfenrath, W, 23.1. 44 yard dash, Buelt, W, 51.9. 120 yard H. hurdles, Rathe, P, 16.7. 220 yard L. hurdles, Rathe, P, 27.8. 880 yard run, Borg, W, 2:03.9. Mile run, Owezarzah, W, 4:38.5. 2 mile run, Owezarzah, W, 10:30.6. 880 relay, (Hamson, Bueit, Robinson, Rerfenrath), W, 1:33.7. Broad jump, Nelson, W, 20'1%". Shot put, Humpal, W, 48'5". Discus, Witty, P, 1315'6". ' Javelin, Witty, P, 166'10". High jump, Nelson, W, 5'8".


Bobcat Hitting Downs Hastings

LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS

BY BOB PECK

Bobcats Split With Kearney BY STAN JOHNSON Frank Spizuoco held Kearney Teachers to two singles in t h e last four innings to secure Peru's conference victory over the Antelopes, 7-4, in the second game of a doubleheader played April 19, at Kearney. The Peru Bobcats were beaten in the first game, 6-0. Frank evened his won-loss record at one and one, and helped the cause by collecting t h r e e timely hits. Mike Hunt and Luke Cox also take game-winning honors. Mike rapped out two hits and scored a run, and Luke helped sadden Kearney by rounding the sacks three straight times. Steady pitching by Kirk Arterburn and a grand-slam homer by Roland Anderson boosted Kearney's win in the opener. Arterburn allowed only two Bobcat

hits-a single by Ron Kelley in the sixth inning and a groundrule double by Jim Manning in the ninth. Kelley, in going th e distance for Peru, yielded only four opponent hits, but walks and clutch hitting spelled the difference. SUMMARIES:

First GamePeru _______ ooo ooo o Kearney ___ 041 001 x

Second GameAB Johnson ------ 2 Mcilvoy ------ 2 Edwards ------ 4 Manning ----- 4 McCoy ------- 3 Hunt --------- 3 Floerschinger - 2 Cox ---------- 1 Spizuoco ----- 3

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 2.

H RBI 1 1 0 0 2 1 0 0 ~ 0 2 0 0 0 1 3

24

7

9

INGERSOLL Barber Shop AUBURN. NEBRASKA Elly Ingersoll • Nate Hayes

HR E 2 o 1 4 6 0

Kearney ____ 103 000 0 Peru _______ 030 202 x

HR E 9 4 2

9 7 1

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The Peru State Bobcats took a doubleheader from Hastings on the 'Cats home mound Friday, April 26, to even their conference record at 3-3 and to bring their overall record to 5-7. Peru won a. hitting duel in the first game as they collected 7 runs on 10 hits. Hastings scored first as they tapped starter Frank Spizuoco for 3 runs in the first inning. Spizuoco needed the help of ace reliefer Duane Hufnagel in the sixth inning as Hufnagel blanked the Hastings club the rest of the way. The Bobcats bounced back in the bottom half of the first stanza to bomb Hastings starter Dunker for 5 runs on 6 hits. The Bobcats then fought off a late Hastings rally and added insurance runs in the 5th and 6th innings to down the Broncos 7-5. Peru's offensive load was carried by Mike Hunt, Bruce McCoy, and Jim Manning as each collected a pair of hits in the opening game. The Hastings club was lead by Beran and Brethawer, who also collected a pair of hits. Ron Kelley struck out 13 and hit a homerun to help lead himself to another victory in the second game. Kelley had plenty of help from third baseman Bruce McCoy, who collected 3 Hits and drove in 3 runs. Kelley gave up just 4 hits to even his record at 2-2. The Hastings club was never in contention as they scored their only run of the game in the sixth inning on a hit and a throwing error. The 'Cats downed Hastings 6-1 as the team's hitting seemed to be much improved over recent games. LINE SCORES: Hastings ____ 300 110 0 5 10 2 Peru _______ 500 011 x 7 10 3 Losing pitcher, Davidson; winning pitcher, Spizuoco. Batteries-Hastings: Dunker, Davidson (1); and Curtis. Peru: Spizuoco, Hufnagel (6); and Floerchinger. Peru _______ 102 011 1 6 6 2 Hastings ____ 000 001 0 1 4 4 Winning pitcher, Kelley (2-2); losing pitcher, Krammer. Batteries-Peru: Kelley and Baker. Hastings: Krammer and Curtis.

Track Team Beats Maryville Peru traveled to Maryville Friday, May 1, and capped their third win of the season. Foul weather Thursday postponed the meet till that Friday. A small margin of only a few points separated the two teams. · Maryville took the 100 yard dash in 10.4 to win, Peru placed second and third. Bill Witty, Tom Bookwalter, and Jim Kanter swept the javelin for first, second, and third places. Niemeyer vaulted 12'1314" to win the pole vault. Rathe and Bookwalter took second and third in low hurdles. The 888 relay consisting of Braden, Crook, Barton, and Hun/ zeker won in 1 :32.8. Braden, Barton, Tynon, and Rinne took the mile relay for first place. Rinne also won the 880 yard run:

Open: Monday - Saturday 6:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m. Sunday 6:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. Peru, Nebraska

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Bobcat hurlers Ron Kelley and Frank Spizuoco both picked up their third wins of the season as Peru dumped Chadron twice, 6-1, 1-0, Wednesday, May 1, at Kearney. Kelley gave up only one Chadron hit in the opener-a blooping single in the sixth inning. The one-hit pitching was backed by eight Bobcat hits, which included a solo homer by first sacker Luke Cox in the fourth. Frank Spizuoco hurled a twohit shutout in the second game of the doubleheader to beat the Eagles, 1-0. Second inning doubles by Jim Manning and Spizuoco supplied the winning margin in the game which lasted only one hour and fifteen minutes. After losing their first three conference games; Peru bounced back and won the last five. Wayne and Kearney have a doubleheader left to decide the final N.C.C. standings. SUMMARIES:

First GamePERU AB Hunt, ss : _____ 2 Mcllvoy, 2b -- 4 Edwards, lf ___ 2 McCoy, 3b ____ 4 Spizuoco, rf ___ 3 Manning, cf ___ 4 Baker, c ______ 3 Cox, lb _______ 2 Kelley, p _____ 3 Schneider ---- 1

R 2 0 0

0

H RBI 1 0 2 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0

28

6

8

1 0 0 2

0

4

R HE Peru _______ 300 201 0 6 8 3 Chadron ____ 000 001 0 1 1 1 Parr, Riley L. (2), and Riley M., McGowen (5); Kelley and Baker.

Second GamePERU AB Hunt, ss ______ 2 Mcllvoy, 2b ___ 3 Edwards, If ___ 2 McCoy, 3b ____ 3 Manning, cf __ 2 Floerschinger, c 2 Spizuoco, p ___ 2 Cox, lb ------ 2 Schneider, rf __ 2 20

R 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

H RBI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

4

Track Tearn Takes Tarkio Triangle BY RICHARD BERTHOLD The Bobcats added another track victory for the season during a triangular meet at Tarkio. Peru, Maryville, and Tarkio matched speed and endurance Friday, April 26. Both Peru and Maryville struggled for first position clear up until the last race. The weather proved to be rather wet, but the Bobcats came through. The final score was: Peru 77, Maryville 68, Tarkio 25. Peru picked up· first places in the 220 and 440 yard dashes, 880 yard relay, javelin, broad jump, and pole vault. Larry Rathe was leading in the 120 yard high hurdles for a good time, but took a spill on the final hurdle to place third. Winners for the afternoon were: 100 yard dash, Don Gibson (M), :10.6. 220 yard dash, John Barton (P), :23.2. 440 yard dash, Roger Crook (Pl, :52.4. 880 yard run, Marv Branch (M), 2:07.1. Mile~ Allen Jensen (M), 4:36.5. Two mile, Allen Jensen (M), 10:18.4. 120 yard high hurdles, B ob Clarke (M), 16.9. 220 yard low hurdles, Doug McVicker '(T), 26.5. 880 relay, (Hunzeker, Crook, Niemeyer, Barton) (P), 1:34.6. Mile relay, (Shurbo, Branch, Haskell, Plagman) (M), 3:32.9. Shot, Lee Ragle (M), 44'9%". Discus, Ken McKinley (T), 141'. Javelin, Bill Witty (P), 166'1/4 ". Broad jump, Albert Sharp (P), 19'11". Pole vault, Charles Niemeyer (P), 11'7%". High jump, Larry Richardson (M), 6'1112". RH E Chadron ____ 000 000 0 O 2 1 Peru _______ 010 000 x 1 4 1 McGowen and M. Riley; Spizuoco and Floerschinger.

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Steak Fry Held By Kappa Delta Pi

. .LITTLE MANTON CAMPUS

Kappa Delta Pi held its annual steak fry Monday, April 6, at Neal Park. The initiates were in charge. Nancy Houchin was chairman, and the committee consisted of Elaine Gerdes, Timothy Hollinger, Ila Mae Hunzeker, Judy Hunzeker, William Scott, and Alice Urbina. An installation of officers for the 1963-64 school year was also held. The new officers are: Richard Elmore, president; JoAnn Frerichs, vice-president; William Scott, secretary; Judy Hunzeker, treasurer, and Elaine Gerdes, historian. Miss Alma Ashley installed the officers. Those who attended the Regional meeting of Kappa Delta Pi at Wesleyan April 20 were:' Eugene Wright, Richard Elmore, JoAnn Frerichs, Judy Hunzeker, Judy Weichel, Elaine Gerdes, William Scott, and Miss Ashley.

SGA Representatives Elected For 1963-64

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Machines Demonstrated For Phi Beta Lambda

on Fike, Joan King, Donna Gerdes, Peggy Quackenbush, Darlene Wright, Lorene Kostal, Linda Rogers, Cynthia Meier, Judy Shuey, Betty Painter, Carolyn Fisher, and Linda Risley.

Election of 14 organization repOn Monday, April 29, Phi Beta resentatives has completed spring Lambda, honorary business fraelections for the 1963-64 Student ternity, sponsored an evening of Governing Association at Nebrasbusiness machines demonstraka State Teachers College, Peru. tions and display in the Campus Earlier, Ray Ogle, junior from School auditorium. The companDawson, and John O'Connor, ies represented were IBM a n d sophomore from Worcester, Burroughs Corporation. Mass., were elected by the stuThe representative from IBM Richard Elmore, JoAnn Frer- the Pedagogian staff, and she has dent body as president and vice demonstrated the newest typeichs, and Tom Aitken received served two years on the Peruvian president, respectively, of SGA. writers by IBM. He showed the Drycleaning The fourteen newly elected awards at the Peru publications staff. new devices in dictaphones and representatives include: Tom banquet at Nebraska City, April demonstrated a portable dictaNeal S. Gomon presented the and 16. Mr. A. V. Larson presented Gomon Award for outstanding Buchholz, Papillion; Luke Cox, phone. the A. V. Larson Award fOr out- work on the Pedagogian to Tom Lincoln; Rudy Eichenberger, Mr. Larry Ebner, Peru State's Laundry standing work on the Peruvian Aitken. Tom has been co-editor Pawnee City; Harvey Fisher, Te- business manager, showed a film cumseh; Elaine Gerdes, Auburn; to Richard and J oAnn. Richard, of the college newspaper for two furnished by the Burroughs Cora junior majoring in English and semesters. He also has been a Mike Janis, Skokie, Ill.; Elaine poration.. .He then demonstrated mathematics, has worked three Pedagogian reporter and a divi- Neddenreip, Brock; Roger Noell, their accounting machine that is semesters on the yearbook staff sion editor for the Peruvian.Tom Plattsmouth; Ken Olson, Zim- used in our business department. and is co-editor for the 1963 Pe- has served two years on both merman, Minn.; Karon Rathe, After the demonstrations, stuSterling; Nancy Reed, Belleville, dents were allowed to examine ruvian. He is also co-editor of newspaper and yearbook staffs. Kans.; Jack Rinne, Steinauer; the machines more carefully. Rethe Pedagogian and· has been a Winnie Sporer, Plattsmouth; Lin- freshments were served by memWe, regret that the flash ~­ Ped reporter. JoAnn, a junior majoring in music and English, is tures of Mr. Larson and Dr. Go- da Stephens, Peru. bers of the fraternity. Groceries • Meats Ronnie Cotton, Southbridge, co-editor of the Peruvian. She mon presenting the awards at the. Mass.; Art Howe, Verdon; and has been a reporter and editor on banquet did not turn out. Fruits • Vegetables Pat Richardson, Crab Orchard, were elected as alternates. The newly-elected representatives April 30, Mrs. Kregel and the and officers will meet with the meal planning class took a field current officers during the re- trip to Lincoln. Included in the mainder of the school year. trip were tours through Roberts' The beginning journalism class Dairy, Gooch's Flour Company, traveled to Sterling, Nebraska on Miller and Paine Candy KitchFor the past 35 years Peru has May 3 to tour the print shop ens, and Ditmer's Flower Shop. had a language club, which at where the Peru Pedagogian is Members of the class who parfirst concentrated wholly· upon printed. Mike and Mary Packticipated in the tours were: SharThe Peru Student Education German and gradually included wood showed the class around all foreign languages. But recent- the shop, explaining the opera- Association held its annual picly the members felt that it would tion of the vai;ious machines and nic Monday, April 29; at 6:00 p. PECK'S PALACE be to their advantage to consoli- showing them the problems in- m. Because of bad weather, it L. H. CRAIG, Owner date with the national organiza- herent in putting out a small was held in the Campus School Short Orders • Fries tion, Alpha Mu Gamma, Nation- town newspaper. Charlotte Kelle lunch room. Featuring Crispy Pizza PERU, NEBRASKA After the picnic, a short busial Collegiate Foreign Language explained the operation of the HOURS 7 TO 11 Phone 872-2701 Honor Society. linotype machine to the class and ness meeting was held. The memBeta Omicron, which is the Mary ran a few copies of the bers voted in favor of the proname chosen for Peru's chapter, Ped through the press to show posed constitutional amendment to change the name of the organis the second ·chapter in the the actual printing process. The journalism class traveled ization to Peru Student Educastate. The other chapter is Wesin three cars driven by Bob Peck, tion Association. An election was leyan. Phil Bateman, and Mr. Lin- held to determine the outstandApril 22, the Wesleyan chapClothing Shoes scheid. The students arrived at ing teacher of the year. The reter and their sponsor, Professor Sterling shortly after eight and sults will be announced later at Katherine Brown, installed the were treated to coffee and dough- .convocation. Peru chapter at a banquet at ArIn conclusion, new officers for nuts by Mike and Mary. An addbor Manor. Installed were sponed treat was the good humor of next year were elected. They are sors, Professor George Rath and Mike and the splendid coopera- as follows: Dorothy Bock, presiProfessor James William Robdent; Art Howe, vice president; tion of Mary and Charlotte. bins, and the following members: Janice Jones, secretary; Bob Mike and Mary praised their PHONE 872-2331 Carolyn Reiber (1962-63 presiEichenberger, treasurer; and Linlinotype operator, Charlotte Keldent), Virginia Cockerham (1962da Jeffers, historian. Member F.D.I.C. 63 secretary-treasurer), Richard le, for her willingness to work Baker (newly elected president), and her accuracy on the linotype INVITES YOUR BUSINESS Linda O'Hara (newly elected machine. Members making the trip were: secretary-treasurer), Mrs. Marion CARROLL LEj/IS, JOHN L. LEWIS, Gamon, Sam Rankin, Dale De- Mary Holland, Keith Grimes, Vice Pres. & Cashier President Ronald Rist, Phillip Bateman, Voe, Kay Camden and Eldora Richard Berthold, William Bliss, Roemich. 1301 Courthouse Dorothy Bock, Dorothea Fink, Stanley Johnson, Janice Jones, Avenue Carey Lankford, Robert Peck, Karen Quinn, Glenda Rima, LinPh. 274-3510 Appliances - Spor:l:ing Goods da Risley, Ruth Rulla, Larry "The Store of Standard Brands" Hunting and· Fishing Licenses Spier, Wendell Stewart, Betty Auburn Nebraska 872-2561 CECIL BOWMAN Phone 274·3620 Auburn PERU Wellensiek, Janice Wilkinson, and Mr. Stewart Linscheid.

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Good Bye, Seniors

Rev. Darrel Berg Baccalaureate Speaker Rev. DarrPt E. Berg, pastor of Trinity Methodist Church, Lincoln,. Nebraska, was the guest speaker at the baccalaureate services on Sunday. Born at Boone, Iowa, he was graduated fro m Boone High school and later attended the St. Paul, Minnesota, Bible College from which he g~aduated in 1941. From 1942-48 he was pastor of the College View Community Church in Lincoln. While in Lincoln he received his bachelor of arts degree from Nebraska Wesleyan University. He was a football and basketball letterman, participated in student theatrical groups and was a member of the senior men's honor. and servic~.:society, .'Jlhe last time he ;,as in Peru was in October, 1946, when the Plainsmen tied the Bobcats in the Oak Bowl. Upon graduation from Wesleyan, Rev. Berg enrolled at Garrett and was grarited a bachelor of divinity degree in 1951. He was pastor of the Ronald Methodist Church, Seattle, Washington, following his graduation. He served that church until his appointment to the pastorate of the church he now serves. The Rev. Mr. Berg spent the summer of 1959 as a temporary missionary in Japan and the summer of 1961 in Europe. Rev. Mr. Berg is married to the former Ruth Sanborn of Remer, Minnesota. They are the parents of four children: Brenda, Lowell, Bruce and Debbie.

Art Students Present Show One hundred thirty art students, under the instruction of Miss Norma L. Diddel, presented an art show on May 15, 16, and 17 in the Campus School from 3-5 p.m. The public was invited to the display of art work done by students in the various classes this semester. Demonstrations were the afternoQns on clay crafts, etching, block water color painting, painting.

given in modeling, printing, and oil

According to Miss Diddel, it is the custom for each student to choose and arrange his work for display. This gives the student experience needed in teacning. Mind is the great lever of all things; human thought is the process by which human ends are ultimately answered.-Webster.

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . .

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 58

Number 15

MAY 27, 1963

New Appropriation Formula Set By State Normal Board

Ninety-five Seniors To Receive Degrees May 31

BY DOROTHEA FINK The State Normal Board has decided on a new formula for the appropriation of tax funds f o r the state teachers coileges in Nebraska. Dr. Gomon, president of Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru, stated, "The formula adopted by the board is almost identical in its percentages of the budget request. The total asking of all the colleges from the tax funds is $9,249,570. Peru's request is $1,561,216, which is 16.88% of the total. Under the new formula, Peru will receive 16.85% of whatever amount is voted by the legislature." The vote was 5-2 in favor of the formula, devised by Dr. Freeman Decker, Normal Board coordinator. Under this formula, Kearney will receive 35.55%, Wayne 27.54%, Chadron 20.06%, and Peru 16.85%. The request for funds for the coming biennium amounts to a 51112 % increase over the last allocation. Normal Board member, Carl Spelts, said that the colleges weren't allocated enough last biennium. The enrollment at the four teachers colleges has tripled over the past 10 yeiirs, as a greater percentage of high school students attend college. Approximately 5,500 full-time students are now enrolled at the colleges. It is estimated that 9,000 will enroll in the fall of 1965. · Betty Person, staff writer for the Lincoln Star, explained h'G\v the colleges "managed to get along" with the small allocation last biennium. Steps were taken by the board to increase tuition, eliminate issuance of scholarships to each high school in the state, and various other methods. The four state teachers colleges' programs are financed entirely with tax and cash funds. Spelts emphasized the need for salary increases for the faculty of the colleges. The salary is far below average for the Midwestern states. Also, the teaching load is above average for college teachers.

Commencement exercises on May 31 will graduate 95 Peru Staters. Of these, 10 are receiving Bachelor of Arts degrees, two will become Bachelors of Fine Arts in Education, 15· will receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Education, and 68 will receive the Bachelor of Science in Education degree. These numbers include mid-term graduates who will officially receive their degrees this May. The graduates, their home addresses, and their fields of concentration, are as follows:

Wheeler Men Bring Second Championship Of The Year Despite a 7-11 over-all record, the 1963 Bobcat baseball team gave Peru its second Conference championship of the 62-63 school year. The Peruvians were trichampions with Wayne and Kearney. All three had 5-3 winloss conference records. Inconsistent hitting kept the Bobcats from a better season. Peru split a double-header with Maryville, Mo., in the first game of the season. Bob Reimers, senior chu.cker lost a two hitter 2-1, with the Bobcats taking the second, 8-1. Wayne visited the Peru campus and took home two victories, 6-3 and 11-3. The Ravens of St. Benedicts were next on the schedule, and again the 'Cats split, losing the first game 15-6, copping the second game 7-5 as ace left hander Ron K e 11 e y picked up his first win. Peru stepped out of the conference to take on a classy Omaha U outfit. Peru succumbed 12.-2 (Continued on page four)

Bachelor of Aris (Liberal Aris) Larry L. Bausch, D aw s on , Math, Phys; Linda R. Beery, Gravity, Iowa, Soc Sc, Eng; Richard H. Brown, Omaha, Math, Phys, Hist; Donald R. Clark, Talmage, Soc Sc, Hist; Kenneth T. Gress, Nebraska City, Bus Ed, Hist; Robert C. Mathews, Omaha, Soc Sc, Lib Sc; Morris D. Moyer, Wymore, Soc Sc, Hist; Dennis A. Peterson, Rockford, Ill., Math, Hist; Robert R. Penkava, Beatrice, Gen Sc, Phys Sc; Ralph B. Plummer, Fairfax, Va., Math, Phys. Bachelor of Fine Aris In Education Bonnie L. Vanderford, Auburn, Mus, Phy Ed; Russel H. Workman, Peru, Mus, Biol. Bachelor of Aris in Education Paul F. Bodtke, Reynolds, Soc Sc, Speh, Hist; M. Franklin Bos'tic, Wabash, I\J.d., Eng, Phy Ed; Gary R. Dahmke, Peru, Mus, Art; Lois J. Fritz, Omaha, Eng, Speh; Wayne W. Gumaer, Fairbury, Soc Sc, Phy Ed; Larry D. Hennerberg, Steele City, Soc Sc, Hist, Speh; Donald B. Johnson, Syracuse, Mus, Hist; Gerald L. Kirkendall, Auburn, Eng, Bus Ed; Gerald W. Littell, Beatrice, Hist, Speh; William A. Meyer, Auburn, Hist, Soc Sc; Phillip A. Niemann, Nebraska City, Hist, Speh; Stephen R. Parker, Peru, Art, Speh; Roger D. Ray, Tecumseh, Hist, Soc Sc; Enoch W. Shepherd, Fairbury, Mod Lang, Eng; Larry E. Whittington, Peru, Mus, Biol, Math. Bachelor of Science in Education Joyce E. Able, Auburn, Elem Ed; Monty L. Allgood, Peru, Gen Sc, Biol; A. Wendall Armstrong, Stella, Ind Arts, Mus; Florence M. Arnold, Falls City, Elem Ed; Charles D. Aylor, Omaha, Phys Sc, Soc Sc; Donald E. Babcock, Nebraska City, Biol, Phy Ed; Victor R. Bade, Dunbar, Bus Ed, Phy Ed; Margaret A. Beard, Auburn, Elem Ed; Richard D. Berlin, Western Springs, Ill., Elem Ed; Richard E. Blake, Peru, Math, Hist, Saf Ed; James M. Bohlken, Peru, Math, Phys 'sc, Germ; Thomas J. Brown, Falls City, Gen Sc, Phys Sc; Betty L. Cogdill, Shelby, Iowa, Elem Ed; Galen J. Conn, Auburn, Ind Arts, Biol; Karen K. Conrad, Omaha, Elem Ed; Kenneth W. Dostal, Scribner, Phy Ed, Biol; James L. DuVal, Tabor, Iowa, Gen Sc, Biol; Sharon S. Earl, Syracuse, Elem Ed; Darrel E. Feit, Beatrice, Biol, Ind Arts; Dorothea C. Fink, Elk Creek, Elem Ed; Bruce H. Francey, Moira, N. Y., Ind Arts, Phys; Doris M. Fyfe, Nebraska City, Elem Ed; Lucile F. Gilliland, Auburn, Elem (Continued on page two)

Good Luck, Seniors

Honors Convocation For Peru State's Finest Students BY BETTY WELLENSIEK Honors Convocation, on May 22, opened with the singing of the "Star Spangled Banner." Dr. Gomon, in the introduction, said the purpose of the convo was to honor students who have performed excellent work in various activities. A touch of humor was added when he confessed his 'thirtyminute speech had been cancelled because of the many awards to be given. This statement brought forth applause from the student body. Miss Juanita Bradley, associate dean of students, presented the following awards. The Pearl A. Kenton Scholarship was awarded to Richard Baker. The fiftydollar scholarship and certificate is for the highest ranking foreign · language student. The White Angel Scholarship was awarded to Myra Murren. The fifty-dollar scholarship is based on scholarship, leadership, citizenship, dependability, contribution to the White Angels, and to school life in general. The Zelma R. Wonderly Scholarship was given to Nancy Houchin. It is awarded to the outstanding second grade student teacher in the Peru Campus School. The scholarship was established to help promote good student teaching. The Sigma Tau Delta award is' for the best written contribution by freshmen. Dorothy Bock was the winner, and Roger Marnell was the runner-up. JoAnn Frerichs was the recipient of the Charles Weigand Memo r i a 1 Scholarship. The seventy-five dollar scholarship is awarded to the most deserving junior. The Oliver Stevenson Award was given to Judy Strange. Regina Kreifels was awarded the Fletcher Neal Award. Coach Jack Mcintire presented the basketball awards. To qualify for an award, a player must maintain a scholastic average, and must participate in athletics. The gold basketballs are awarded to members of a championship team. Coach Mcintire turned humorist as he presented the awards to Tom Yopp, Larry Hayes, Don Schmidt, Harvey Fraser, William Hunsaker, William Witty, Ron Snodgrass, Jack Rinne, Bill Russell, Marvin Hopper, and Cliff Murray, manager. Dean Melvin presented the honorees of Who's Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities. The awards are based on scholarship; leadership and participation fil. academic and extra curricular activities; citizenship and service to the college, and promise of future usefulness in business and society. The Who's Who •Of Peru State Teachers College" are L i n d a Beery, Stephen Parker, Gary Schlosser, Mary Ann Lewellyn, Carol McLain, Robert Penkava, and Larry Swett. Dean Melvin also presented the following awards. Leland Schneider was awarded the Kappa Delta Pi Educational Award. It honors the freshman judged to stand highest in scholarship, leader(Continued on page four)

Dr. Floyd Miller Will Deliver Commencement Talk The ninety-fourth annual commencement exercises of Peru State Teachers College will be ,j<. 0 held May 31, 1963, at 1 :00 a~m., in the college auditorium. The processional will be played by the college orchestra, under the direction of Mr. Edward Camealy. Rev. Tim B. Nelson, of the Auburn Presbyterian church, will give the invocation. Senior music major, Bonnie Vanderford, Auburn, will present a flute solo, "Sonata Number Two," by Handel. A vocal duet, "I'll See You Again," by Noel Coward, will be sung by Elaine Bath, Auburn, and Curtis Nelson, Essex, Iowa. Presenting the commencement address will be Dr. Floyd Miller, Commissioner of Education, State of Nebraska, and a graduate of Peru State. He received his bachelor of arts in education degree from Peru in 1931. Later he was awarded his master's and doctor's degrees by the University of Nebraska. Since leaving the Campus of a Thousand Oaks 32 years ago, Dr. Miller has had a varied and illustrious career in education. He served as superintendent of schools in Nebraska from 19311946 at which time he joined the state department of education. Dr. Miller advanced through the ranks of the department and was assistant commissioner prior to his elevation to commissioner in January, 1962. Dr. Miller has also served on the summer teaching staffs of the University of Nebraska, University of New Mexico, and Nebraska State Teachers College at Wayne. As Commissioner of Education, he is an ex-officio member of the board of education of the State Normal Schools, the governing body of Nebraska's four state teachers colleges. At the close of the ceremony Rev. Nelson will give the benediction, and the college orchestra will play the recessional.

Band Makes Video Tape On Tuesday, May 21, fifty members of the Peru State College Band traveled to the studios of WOW-TV to prepare a taped concert to be shown on channel six on Father's Day, June 16. Steve Parker will narrate the twenty-nine minute show. The numbers the band will (Continued on page three)


LET'S KEEP THE CAMPUS CLEAN Most college students try to · dress neatly to make the best impression possible upon their friends and instructors. They realize that appearance is important. So it is with college and university campuses; appearances are important. A neat, well-groomed campus impresses visitors.'

Ninety~five MAJORS HALL By Keith

Grimes Peruvians are .fortunate in having a naturally lovely campus. However; its beauty is being marred by empty cigBill Quilty and Bill Murphy arette packages, candy and gum wrappers, and paper cups. They can be seen at several different places around the have converted their room into a grounds. These items have evidently been tossed carelessly greenhouse. They are growing all sorts of plants iil their room. aside by students and, perhaps, faculty members. Louie Fritz, Roger Crooke and

It would take very little individual effort to have a clean Roy Broadbrooks are the "hoocampus. Instead of being thrown beside the Student Center doo" stick experts at Majors Hall. steps, that empty cigarette package could be tucked back For those of you who don't know into a shirt pocket or purse until it is handy to dispose of it what the "hoo-doo" stick is, in a wastebasket. Gum wrappers and paper cups also fit please see one of the preceding nicely into waste containers. fellows. The Majors men wish to exMost students like to feel proud of the college grounds; they like to have clean, well-kept surroundings. With some press their thanks to Mrs. Donathought and a little effort, Peru students can have a very von for the wonderful job she has attractive campus. No one likes unkempt grounds; it is sim- done this year as Majors Hall ply a matter of thinking before giving that piece of paper house mother. a toss. -By Dorothy Bock. Bob Ruff, John Barton, Jim

THANK YOU Peru's ninety-sixth year has been a good one in almost every way, and reporting the events of the year has been a pleasant task. But it would have been an impossible task without the help of a great many good people. First, we want to thank the staffs of the Pedagogian and the Peruvian, who worked faithfully and did the very best they could. Working with these staffs has been a genuine privilege and a pleasure. Mr. J. D. Levitt and Dr. C. D. Siegner have made valuable photographic contributions. Mr. Don Carlile and Mr. Bob Henry of Special Services have given us a lot of what the name of their bureau signifies. Mrs. Genevieve Gergen has taken time to "mother" the Campus School news. Actually, almost everyone has helped us in some way. We want to thank everyone from President Gomon and Dean Melvin OIJ. down for the time and courtesy that have been extended to our reporters, writers, and editors. Thank you, all of you, very, very, much.

-S. P. L.

ELIZA MORGAN HALL By ~ary

Holland The main activity concerning Morgan co-eds of late is that of organizing for the summer. Each weekend more clothes, knickknacks, and souvenirs go home, leaving the rooms a little emptier. Carolyn Rolfs, Sharon Schmidt, Jan Tucker, and Carol Curd are blinding the Morgan gals w it h

their new diamond engagement rings. Congratulations! For Mother's Day, Mrs. Morrison received a bouquet of carnations and mums from thirtee!'N)f "her girls." She wishes to express a special thanks to Dorothy Drubek, Nancy Niemann, Dorothy Bock, Elaine Muller, Helen Drumm, Barbara Gordon, Mary Parmenter, Sharon Furnas, Janice Wilkinson, Linda Bartels, Loretta Kratochvil, Janice Meyer, and Karen Behrends. This will be my last column, and I want to thank all of t h e Morgan gals for their cooperation and information. Best wishes to next semester's budding reporter and dorm· columnist.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of Jhe Campus of a Thousand Oaks May 27, 1963

PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Co-Editor.------------------------------------ Tom Aitken Co-Editor_________________________________ Richard Elmore Layout Editor.--------------------------------- Judi Wilson Personnel Manager__________________________ Lynn McCann Business Manager ----------------------------- Tom Castle Copy Editor________________________________ Karen Conrad Copy Editor ________________________________ Carol Niebuhr Copy Editor----------------------------------- Jane Moore Morgan Column _________ ~------------------- Mary Holland Majors C-0lumn _________ L ___________________ Keith Grimes Delzell Column ________________________________ Ronald Rist Reporter__________________________________ Phillip Bateman Reporter_________________________________ Richard Berthold Reporter_____________________________________ William Bliss Reporter ____________________________________ Dorothy Bock Reporter----------------------------------- Dorothea Fink Reporter__________________________________ Stanley Johnson Reporter_____________________________________ Janice Jones Reporter__________________________________ Carey Lankford Reporter_____________________________________ Robert Peck Reporter------------------------------------- Karen Quinn Reporter------------------------------------- Glenda Rima Reporter·------------------------------------ Linda Risley Reporter·-------------------------------------- Ruth Rulla Reporter·------------------------------------- Larry Spier Reporter--------------------------------- Wendell Stewart Reporter--------------------------------- Betty Wellensiek Reporter ________________________________ Janice Wilkinson Sponsor_________________________________ Stewart Linscheid

Brenn, Bill Essman, Roy Bretthorst and Louie Fritz are the canasta champions at Majors Hall. ' Jim Brenn and Thirty-Second Bull Aitken had a re-match last Monday, May 20, but the rematch was in vain for Brenn. He was taken down by Aitken in exactly twenty-eight seconds by Bull's fabulous "sleeper hold." Jim Hall and Jim Redden have the name "Manfred" written on their door. For further information on this subject please see one of them. Jack Roper is known around the dorm as "9:30 Roper," for he is seen leaving the dorm at this time every night and then returning at 10:35. Jack, the Majors men would like to know where you go during this hour. Carey Lankford won the Class D Stock Automatic drag at Irvington Sunday, May 19.. He was driving a 1961 Ford Starliner. Congratulations for winning a beautiful trophy.

Fifty-year Class Held Reunion At least twenty-two of the 84 known living members of the class of 1913 returned to the Campus of a Thousand Oaks at Peru State Teachers College Sunday, May 26, for their 50-year class reunion. A 9:30 a.m. coffee hour in Eliza Morgan Women's Residence Hall began the daylong event. A highlight of the day's activities was roll call of the 166-name class roster.· Of that number graduated during the year of 1913, 29 ·are reported deceased, and addresses of 54 are unknown. Greetings from absent members were read during the roll call. Greetings from the college were brought to the h o n o r e d guests at the 1:30 p.m. luncheon by President Neal S. Gomon. Recognition was given the returnees at the 4 p.m. baccalaureate services. Members of the class who were present included: Exha Akins (Mrs. Walter) Sadilek, Schuyler; Florence Atwood, 3476 Woods Ave., Lincoln; Amy Baker (Mrs. Orin) Moore, Gering; Ada M. Brawner, 3401 California, Omaha; Esther Bryan (Mrs. L. A.) Hamerstrom, 4353 Dodge, Omaha; Mrs. Pansy Cole Wyatt, Peru; Helen Cornell (Mrs. C. A.) Holman, Auburn; Arta Draper (Mrs. John) Parriot, 107 Lindy Lane, Omaha; Millie Gilbert (Mrs. Clair) Christy, Brock; Ethel Hale (Mrs. Robert R.) Russel, 2120 Sheffield Drive, Ka 1 am a z o o , Mich.; Russell J. Hale, Hardy; Mrs. Amy Herrick Gustus, Cozad; Mary A. Hogarth, Springfield; Ethel Johnston (Mrs. C. E.) Lively, Carbondale, Ill.; Hattie Lilly (Mrs. R. H.) Slagle, Falls City; C. E. Lively, Carbondale, Ill.; Verna Mowry (Mrs. Thomas)

Seniors To Receive Degrees May 31

(Continued from page one) Ed; Mary Ann Graham, Auburn, Elem Ed; Lee W. Haeberlein, Springfield, Ind Arts, Eng, Saf Ed; Stanley M. Hajek, Odell, Ind Arts, Phy Ed; Dennis D. Hein, Fairbury, Math, Phys Sc; Russell E. Hicks, Auburn, Phy Ed, Soc Sc, Saf Ed; Edward L. Hohman, Plattsmouth, Ind Arts, Phys, Math; Nancy L. Houchin, Peru, Elem Ed; Susan A. Hulbert, Falls City, Bus Ed, Lib Sc; Ila Mae Hunzeker, Falls City, Elem Ed; Marian L. Johnson, Thurman, Iowa, Elem Ed; Ronald L. Kelley, Falls City, Phy Ed, Hist; William D. Lawlor, Plattsburg, Mo., Phy Ed, Hist; James L. Meacham, Peru, Phy Ed, Math, Saf Ed; Hanford J. Miller, Peru, Chem, Math; Caroline L. McCann, Omaha, Elem Ed; Ronald L. Oestmann, Johnson, Phy Ed, Ind Arts, Saf Ed; John J. Ramsey, Dawson, Phy Ed, Bus Ed; Larry L. Rathe, Sterling, Phy Ed, Biol, Saf Ed; Robert D. Reimers, Brock, Phy Ed, Soc Sc, Saf Ed; Robert R. Reitz, Springfield, Biol, Phy Ed; Rex S. Rhodes, Gresham, Biol, Phy Ed; Roy R. Rubenking, Syracuse, Math, Biol, Phys; Gary E. Schlange, Auburn, Ind Arts, Math; Gerhard G. Schlange, Queens Village, N. Y., Elem Ed; Mary J. Schlange, Peru, Hm Ee, Hist; Gary L. Schlosser, Dawson, Math, Hist, Soc Sc; Tommy L. Sewell, Dunbar, Biol, Phy Ed; Wayne A. Shafer, Shubert, Phy Ed, Soc Sc, Hist, Saf Ed; James J. Simones, Tekamah, Phy Ed, Biol, Saf Ed; Francis D. Stapleton, Council Bluffs, Iowa, Phy Ed, Biol, Saf Ed; Clare M. Stone, Independence, Mo., Elem Ed; Carol Ann Sudik, Virginia, Elem Ed; Vera Mae Sugden, Tabor, Iowa; Elem Ed; Larry W. Swett, Malvern, Iowa, Math, Phys Sc, Phys; Roland W. Sohnholz, Auburn, Ind Arts, Math; Sharylin N. Vrtiska, Table Rock, Elem Ed; Elsie H. Wenzbauer, Table Rock, Elem Ed; Charlotte A. Wheeler, Nemaha, Hm Ee, Phy Ed; Harry W. Whitney, Omaha, Phy Ed, Speh, Saf Ed; Judith A. Wilson, Omaha, Elem Ed; Judith A. Wolf, Davenport, Hm Ee, Phy Ed; Gary R. Workman, Stella, Phy Ed, Biol, Saf Ed; A. Eugene Wright, Plattsmouth, Phy Ed, Biol; Merlin C. Wright, Steinauer, Chem, Biol; Michael Zinn, Peru, Phy Ed, Bus Ed.

DELZELL HALL NEWS

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By Ronald Rist Delzell Hall held its spring party, Sunday, May 19, at 10:30 p.m. Hot dogs, potato chips, i c e cream bars, and punch w e r e served. The dorm c o u n s e 1 o rs served the food. Delzell Hall has very fine desk service this semester. The desk help are: Stan E. Johnson, Don McCord, Gene W. Burgess, Jr., Lester Turner, George Nowak, Bill Klabunde, Bill Carlson, Alvin Henrichs, Mike Chu, a n d David Barnes. ~ Delzell Hall appreciates the fine work that the dorm counselors have done this year. Wagner, Geneva; Charles A. Novak, Ottawa, Kans.; Mrs. Maud Phelps Vacek, 4461 South Elati, Englewood, Colo.; Nettie Prell (Mrs. Rex) Bailey, 502 South 12, Lincoln; Basil Sims, 2420 Begole St., Flint, Mich.; Henry Staack, 2928 11th Ave., Moline, Ill.

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LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS

by Dick Blbler The name "Nebraska State Teachers College" has b e e n changed by the unicameral to "Nebraska State College" for all four state-operated colleges, Peru, Chadron, Kearney, and Wayne. The bill received a 29-0 first round approval from the floor by the law makers on Wednesday, May 15.

va.1-.JP.te

(~~ ~ Sam Rankin Receives Award Samuel Rankin, a senior majoring in history and foreign languages at Peru State College, has been awarded the Wall Street Journal Student Achievement Award for 1963. A specially designed medal and a year's subscription to the Journal are awarded annually to the outstanding student enrolled in economics. Rankin, the son of Mr. a n d Mrs. William Rankin of Peru, is a 1960 graduate of South Page High School, College Springs, Iowa. He attended Tarkio (Mo.) College his freshman year. He is a member of the Foreign Language Club and Wesley Foundation. He is also assistant librarian at the Auburn Public Library.

Calendar Of The Year January-

29 Second semesfer enrollment to post-war high of 713. Wes. Dickey wins top award in AAHPER test. 31 Freshman c 1a s s sponsors Registration Romp. February2 Bobcats trounce W a y n e ,

69-56. 6 American folk duo presents convo. 11 Jan Beemer and Vincent Sabatinelli reign at Sweetheart Dance. J2)3asketballers defeat Doane 79-61. 15-16 Fourteen Peruvians attempt fifty mile walk to Lincoln. 'Cats split with Chadron Eagles, 81-89, 5553. 20 Annual honors convo held, forty-seven Peruvians honored for scholastic accomplishments. 21 Home Economics s er v e s Martha Washington Tea. 21-23 Peruvians attend debate conference at University of Nebraska. 27 Iowa State professor speaks in convo. 28 'Cats squeak by Wayne 61-60 to 3rd NAIA district championship. March-

4 Bobcats clobber Concordia, 89-78, in the first round of playoffs. 6 Wayne blasts Peru, 92-58, to tie Bobcats in NCC. 8 Spider Bugs win intramural basketball. 11 Band takes bus to tourna-· ment in Kansas City. Pan . American downs Bobcats in K. C., 83-48. 10 Peru presents television program over KOLN-TV. 18 Start of high school volleyball meet at Peru. 19-21 Band makes tours to sur, rounding high schools. 21 Dramatics Club conducts speech contest. 22. Inter-Scholastic C o n t e s t held on campus. 24 Symphonic Band presents spring concert. 28 Dramatics Club presents play, 1984. April2 Chorus entertains Kiwanis Club. 3 Missionaries speak at convo. Peru baseballers split with Northwest Missouri, 1-2, 9-1,

4 Skip Ogle and Jack O'Connor elected to head S.G.A. Peru wins track duel over Tarkio, 90-46. 5 SEA Convention held in Chadron. Wayne beats Peru twice, 6-0, 11-3. 6 Twentieth annual b an d clinic at Peru. 8 'Cats split with St. Benedicts, 6-14, 7-5. Sigma Tau Delta holds annual banquet. Peru places second in Fremont triangular. 9 Creighton wins t e n n i s match from Peru. 10 Chorus goes on tour. Asad Ali Khan speaks at convo. Omaha University sweeps doubleheader from Bobcats. 16 Publications staffs h ave banquet at S t e in hart Lodge. Washburn trounces Peru in track duel. 19 Bobcats split with Kearney, 0-6, 7-4. 21 Tom Aitken and Mr. J. D. Levitt have story published by Omaha World. Herald. 22 Foreign Language Club installed. Dorothy Bock wins the Sigma Tau Delta writing contest. 24 Peru State Band entertains in convo. 25-26 District music contest here on campus. 26 Track team wins Tarkio triangular. H a s t i n g s is downed twice by Peru, 7-5, 6-1. 28 Campus entertains 1,000 guests at open house. 29 S. G. A. representatives elected. PSEA picnic and election of officers held.

'

May1 Ethnic Singers present con-

vo. 'Cats down Chadron twice, 6-1, 1-0. Peru · thinclads beat Northwest Missouri in duel. 2 Netsters beaten by Northwest Missouri. 3 May Fete program h a s Scandinavian theme. Chosen king and queen were Steve Parker and Karolyne Powers. ·Peru tennis team wins over St. Benedicts, 5-2. 7 Band concert. 8 Track team loses to Wayne in duel, 83-53. 8-9 Creighton and Parsons win doubleheaders from Peru. 16-17 NCC track meet, Peru finishes fifth.

Phi Alpha Theta Initiates Seven, Elects Officers At the May 23 meeting, Winnie Sporer, Sherry Lynn Panahpar, Mrs. Ruth Camealy, Ronald Cotton, Dan Leuenberger, Darrel Bonow, and Troy Lyon were made members. Officers elected for next year are: Ronald Cotton, president; Dan Leuenberger, vice president; Winnie Sporer, secretary; Sherry Panahpar, treasurer; and Troy Lyon, historian. Dr. Schottenhamel and Mr. Strom discussed the history of Peru's Delta chapter. Plans for a scholarship fund and n e x t year's picnic were discussed. At the conclusion of the meeting, Mrs. George Schottenhamel served refreshments.

Leland Selected Teacher Of The Year Mr. Leroy Leland was honored as "College Teacher of the Year" at an all-college convocation Wednesday, May 22. The five other nominees selected by the Peru Student Education Association were Mrs. Maryon Adams, Miss Alma Ashley, Mr. Chris Buethe, Mr. James Jack, and Mr. James Pilkington. Mr. Leland's first reaction was one of astonishment. • He later stated, "I do not believe I am the best teacher here on campus by any means." He also said that he felt very honored, but added jokingly, "I have lost respect for the judgment of the student body." Mr. Leland is the assistant professor of history and obtained his bachelors and masters degrees from Bob Jones University at Greenville, South Carolina. Since then, he has done graduate work at the University of Nebraska.

Band Makes Video Tape (Continued from page one) play are: Introduction Fanfare, To the Sea, Ballade for Saxophone, featuring Gary Dahmke as soloist, Fiesta of the Charros, Lawrence of Arabia Theme, and Fandango as the final number. The Ethnics, popular folk group, will also sing two numbers. The band is under the direction of Mr. Gilbert Wilson.

The measure was introduced by Senators Peter H. Claussen of Leigh, Richard Lysinger of Ravenna, William B. Brandt of Unadilla, and George H. Gerdes of Alliance. It is hoped that this delayed action will raise the prestige of the colleges and attract more students to our state supported schools.

Peru Foundation Has $21,000 Assets of more than $21,000 were revealed in the financial reports of the Peru Achievement Foundation, Inc., at Frid a y night's annual meeting on the campus of Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru. During the 1962 calendar year total receipts of the Foundation were $9,888.&9, the biggest year in the eight-year history of the organization. Alumni and form· er students contributed, $4,900 of this amount, with the balance from civic, service, educational groups, business and industry, and in di vid ual friends of the college. The Peru Achievement Foundation, II).c., founded in 1955 to accept gifts and promote Peru State Teachers College, has provided all matching funds for the National Defense Student Loan Program in which the college has participated since 1958. Student aid in the form of National Defense Student Loans, scholarships, and other 1o a n funds have constituted the major expenditures. Mr. Claude Matthews, Auburn, was elected president of the Foundation to succeed Judge Fred A. Rothert, Auburn, who has served in that capacity since May, 1957. John L. Lewis, Peru, was elected vice-president, and A. V. Larson, Peru, and Donald K. Carlile, Peru, were re-elected treasurer and secretary, respectively.

Chorus Presented Varied Program In May 8 Convo The College Chorus presented a concert during convocation on May 8. To show the versatility of the singers, the program included religious, madrigal, popular, modern, and calypso songs. Selections sung were "Gloria Patri" by Palestrina; "The Lord is Nigh" by Monhardt; "Fire, Fire My Heart" by Morley; "Gloria, in Excelsis" by Edward Camealy; "When Jesus Wept" by Billings; "Brazilian Psalm" by Berger; "Everyone Has His Day" by Hayden; "Beauty in Humility" by Christiansen; "Louise" arranged by Simeone; "Valse" by Toch; "Marry a Woman Uglier Than You" by de Paur. Mrs. Darrell Wininger was soloist. Piano accompanists were Ellen

In other action the Foundation trustees voted to provide $515 in scholarships the following amounts and funds: Two $80 one-year scholarships from the August Eggenberger Memorial Fund. Mr. Eggenberger was a member of the class of 1908. One $80 one-year scholarship from the Grace Tear Memorial Fund. Miss Tear was a longtime member of the Peru faculty. One $75 one-year scholarship from the Charles Weigand Memorial Fund. The class of 1906, of which Mr. Weigand was a member, established the fund at their 50-year class reunion, providing a scholarship for a senior student. Two $100 one-year scholarships from the P e r u Achievement Foundation Scholarship Fund. Continuation of support of the Natio~al Defense Student Loan program by providing $2,000 for matching funds for the coming year was voted by the trustees. Eighteen of the 21 trustees were present: Gordon Peterson, Claude Matthews, M. Allan Casey, John McKnight, Fred Rothert, Alice Rothert, Auburn; S. L. Clements, Elmwood; Marie 0. Neal, Arthur Lindahl, Nebraska City; Helen Pollard, Larry Eb· ner, A. G. Wheeler, K. L. Melvin, John L. Lewis, A. V. Larson, Donald K. Carlile, Peru; Kenneth Stroupe,' Omaha,; Iva! Schmuck· er, Brock.

Human Growth Tours Beatrice State Home Dr. Darrell Wininger and 47 members of his human growth class traveled to Beatrice, May 14. The day was spent visiting the Beatrice State Home. The tour began at 9 a.m. with a lecture providing background information on the Home. Following this, the students were permitted to sit in on some of the classes held in the education plant and the training school. Later, the group received an extensive tour of the Home. On May 21, Dr. Wininger accompanied a group of 21 human growth students to Beatrice. This group received a similar tour of the State Home. Merrit and Tom Majors. The chorus is ·under the direction of Edward Camealy.

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LIT'ttE

MAN. ON CAMP:us··,

by

Dick Bibler

BY BOB PECK Parsons College of Fairfield, Iowa swept a doubleheader from the host Peru State Bobcats by the scores 10-2 and 4-3, leaving the Bobcats with a season mark of 7 wins and 11 losses. Parsons put on a hitting exhibition in the first game by collecting 10 runs and 15 hits, 13 hits were off losing pitcher Frank Spizuoco. Parsons scored first in the top half of the opening stanza by gathering in one run on one hit. The 'Cats bounced back by pushing across two runs on hits by Edwards, McCoy, Manning and Spizuoco. This was the extent of the hitting by the Bobcats as they could not touch winning pitcher Shelby for another garner.

of .

Dr. Gomon Speaks At Seven High Schools Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of Peru State Teachers College, has seven high school commencement speaking engagements on his agenda during the month of May. President of Peru State since 1951, Dr. Gomon addressed the graduating class at Avoca High school on Thursday, May 9; Steinauer, Wednesday, May 15; Talmage, Friday, May 17; Filley, Tuesday, May 21; Dunlap, Iowa, Wednesday, May 22; Brock, Thursday, May 23; Nebraska City School for the Blind, Sunday, May 26.

Honors Convo (Continued from page one) ship, and interest in education. The Dramatics Club A ward is made to the senior who has contributed most to dramatics during his four years at Peru. This year, the certificate was awarded to Stephen Parker. Jerry Littell and Stephen Parker were given a certificate and plaque for the Intercollegiate Forensics Award. The awards are to be given to graduating seniors who are outstanding in this field. The S.G.A. Service Award was given to Tom Yopp. This new award recognizes outstanding service of an S.G.A. member. Dean Melvin recognized Arlan Richardson, James Bohlken, and Rob-

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Wheeler Men ~ring Peru Second Championship Of The Year

Peru Bows To Parsons Peru Cops Fifth In N.C.C. Track Meet In Doubleheader

After Peru collected their only runs in the bottom half of the first, Parsons came roaring back to .push across two runs each in the second and third innings, and four runs 'in the fourth and one in the fifth to stomp out any possible chance of any late Peru rally. Ace right-handed reliefer Duane Hufnagel came in the fifth and finished out the game by alert Penkava, who have be en lowing Parsons only one run on awarded assistantships for fur- two hits, that a home run by winning pitcher Shelby in the top of ther study next fall. Richard Elmore, president of the sixth. Spizuoco ended the the Peru State Education Asso- season with a 3 and 2 record. Veteran left-hander Ron Kelley ciation, announced the outstanding college teachers. Those hon- was touched for four runs on six ored were Mrs. Maryon Adams, hits as Parsons took a heartMiss Alma Ashley, Mr. Ch r is breaker from the 'Cats by the Buethe, Mr. James Jack, Mr. Le- score of 4-3. Kelley got off to a Roy Leland, and Mr. James Pil- rough start as Parsons hit him kington. Mr. Leland was named for two runs on three hits in the College Teacher of the Year. Out- opening inning. The Peru State standing student teachers, as rec- squad then caught on fire in the ommended by their supervisors, bottom half of the second inning were Sharon Earl, Mary Ann to sweep in three runs on hits by Graham, Tom Brown, Dennis Manning, Baker and Hunt. KelHein, Ardith Pratt, and Larry ley then held Parsons until the fourth inning when they tied it Swett. up a 3-3. Dean Boraas awarded the folThe Bobcats rallied in the sixth lowing awards. The Alpha -¥u Omega Award honors a member with a double by Schneider only of the freshman class for excel- to see it fall short by lack of hitlence in the field of mathematics. ting. Parsons added their winning The recipient of the award w a s run in the top of the seventh on James Agnew. Charlotte Klever a triple by Greene and a sacrifice was awarded the General Physics fly to centerfield by the third Achievement Award. The award baseman Larkin. Kelley put on a is for outstanding work in phy- brilliant pitching exhibition by striking out 13 Parsons batters, sics. The R. W. Endres Scholarship six of these in a row. Kelley was awarded to Ray Ogle a n d brought his brilliant/ c o 11 e g e Monroe McCoy. Mrs. Endres was pitching career to an end with a a 1913 graduate of Peru State. season record of 3 wins a n d 4 For outstanding student achieve- losses. ment in the field of economics, the Wall Street Journal Achievement Award went to Samuel Rankin. The award was a silver medal and a subscription to the Wall Street Journal. J oAnn Frerichs and Richard Elmore were honored by being presented plaques for the sixth annual A. V. Larson Award. The award is made to the outstanding staff members who have contributed most to the Peruvian. The seventh annual Neal S. Gomon award was presented to Tom Aitken. The award is made to the Pedagogian staff member who has been voted most outstanding in his contribution. Mr. Hanford Miller, associate professor of chemistry, presented the General Chemistry Achievement Award. The award is for the highest total score to date, and was awarded to George Weiss. Mr. Al Wheeler presented the B. E. Swenson Jr., Athletic Award. The award is to honor a junior or senior who is an all around athlete and scholar. Ron Kelley, the recipient, received a gold watch and medal. Dr. Gomon made the closing remarks. The convocation was dismissed with the singing of the Color Song.

Peru traveled to Kearney May 16 and 17 for the N.C.C. Meet. Kearney again walloped the points with 135, Doane following with 70 points. The Bobcats took fourth in the mile relay and 880 relay to gather four points. Barton, Tynon, Crook, and Rinne made up both relays. Wayne and Hastings captured 32 and 29 points accordingly. Chadron finished last with two points. The winners for the two day performance were: Mile: Ron Wise, (K) 4:23.5. 440: Jim Wolstenholm (K) 49.8. 100: Clinton Skinner (D) 9.8. 120 Highs: Dick Peterson (H) 14.9. 880: Peter Sura (D) 1:56.5. 220: Clinton Skinner (D) 21.6. 220 Lows: Dave. Roh (K) 23.9. Two Mile: Clarence Wiedel (K) 9:57.4. Mile Relay: (Doug Martin, Steve Peratt, Dave Roh, Jim Wolstenholm) (K) 3:22.5. Vault: Bill Nelson (W) 13-51/4. Discus: Jerry Ludwig (D) 144-

Line ScoresParsons ___ 122 410 0 10 15 0 Peru ______ 200 000 0 2 4 3 Winning pitcher, Roger Shelby; losing pitcher, Frank SpizU:oco (3-2).

41/2.

Tennis Team Had Hard Sledding Peru's 1963 tennis team again ran into some hard sledding this season and won only one match out of four. The only bright spot for Peru was a 5-2 win over the Saint Benedict Ravens of Atchison, Kansas. Peru opened the season with a 0-7 loss to the Creighton Blue Jays on the Peru courts. Later in the season they were again the victims of the Jays 7-0 on the Omaha school's courts. Peru also suffered defeat at the hands of the Marysville, Mo., net-men 0-7 on the Peru courts. The squad was coached by Dr. Darrell Wininger.

(Continued from page one) and 12-1. Peru Jost their third straight to Kearney in the first game of a double-header, 6-0. Frank Spizuoco was the winning pitcher as the Antelopes were beaten in the finale 7c5. Hastings was dumped twice on the Peru diamond. 7-5 and 6~1. Kelley and Spizuoco were the w inning pitchers. Kelley and Spizuoco combined again for key pitching performances and gave the improving 'Cats a double victory over Chadron, 6-1 and 1-0. It was the fourth straight win for Peru. Creighton visited the Bobcat lair earning two close, we 11 played games 1-0 and 4-3. A barnstorming Parsons, Iowa club completed the schedule with a pair of victories over the homestanding 'Cats 10-2 and 4-3. Leading hitters. for the '63 team were: pitcher-outfielder, Frank Spizuoco with a .387 average. Rocky Edwards was next with .302, Jim Manning, .288 and Bruce McCoy, .275 completed the top four stickers. Manning ha d 5 doubles and McCoy had 12 R.B.I.'s to lead in these departments. Classy second base short stop combination, Barney Mcilvoy and Mike Hunt hit .254 and .250 resiwctively. Leading pitchers were: relief specialist, Duane Hufnagel with a fine 1.23 E.R.A. Kelley's 3-4 win-loss record was far overshadowed by his low 1.77 E.R.A. Spizuoco had a 3-3 tally and Reimers could be called the h a rd luck pitcher with a 0-3 final count. He deserved much better. Kelley struck out 77 batters in 43 innings to lead in the strike out department. A large number of underclassmen saw action on Al Wheeler's team, and their experience m a y pay off handsomely next year.

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Batteries: Parsons-Shelby and Blixt. Peru-Spizuoco, Hufnagel (5), and Floerschinger. · • Home runs: and Starniri.

Parsons-Shelby

Parsons ____ 200 100 1 Peru _______ 030 000 0

4 6 3

3 5 1

Winning pitcher, Snyder; ing pitcher, Kelley (3-4).

los-

Batteries: Parsons-Snyder and Blixt. Peru-Kelley and Baker.

Going Was Rough For The Bobcats At Doane Relays The Bobcats traveled to Doane May 11 for the Doane Relays. Many surrounding states were represented with hundreds of athletes matching speed and talent. The Bobcats placed fifth in the 880 yard relay and mile relay. Hunsaker, Crook, Braden, and Barton ran the 880 yard relay in 1:32.8. The mile relay consisting of Tynon, Rinne, Barton, and Crook placed fifth in 3:33.6.

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Fourteen Letter

lit-iii MAN-ON

..,":!

CAMPUS\Jwby Dick-Bibler ,,

In Baseball Athletic director Alfred G. Wheeler has announced t h e names of fourteen men awarded letters for their participation in baseball at Peru State Teachers · College during the 1963 esason. Heading the list are four seniors: Ron Kelley, Falls City; Bruce McCoy, Tecumseh; Barney Mcilvoy, South Lyon, Mich.; Bob Reimers, Brock. Kelley earned his fourth monogram, Mcilvoy his third, and McCoy and Reimers their second awards. The remaining lettermen include: Juniors-Rocky Edwards, Falmouth, Mass.; Mike Hunt, Tecumseh. Sophomores-Eldon B a k e r , Falls City; Luke Cox, Lincoln; Dick Floerschinger, Omaha; Jim Manning, Birmingham, Ala.; Frank Spizuoco, Mineola, N. Y. Freshmen-Du an e Hufnagel, Lenox, Iowa; Stan. Johnson, Rockford, Iowa; Leland Sclme.ider. Peru.

This Was Track

Season Of 1963

Bill Witty Is Athletic Scholar Take football, add basketball, mix with a javelin and a discus, and top off with an arm load of books and you get the adventures of Bill Witty, freshman scholar and athlete .at Peru State Teachers College. Bill, in his first year on the Campus of a Thousand Oaks, has mixed athletics and academics to near perfection. The 6'2'', 200 lb., former Syracuse high school star earned letters this year in football, basketball, and track to be Peru State's only 1962-63 three sport letterman. In addition to his achievements in athletics, Witty cracked the scholastic part of his young collegiate career with a first semester grade point average of 8.36, on 9.00 scale, to place him third highest of regularly enrolled students at Peru State. Witty's quarter grades for the second semester saw him still rolling along at an 8-plus pace as he majors in mathematics and physical education at Nebraska's oldest college.

a

Witty's athletic performances would make almost any freshman satisfied, but not Bill who is regarded as one of the hardest workers on the Peru State sport squads. "The greatest asset he has," says Peru State track mentor Jerome Stemper, "is his de-

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sire to improve and his complete willingness to work toward that goal." The former Class B Nebraska discus champion has performed creditably 'in that event and in the javelin throw. Witty's best mark to date in the discus was a toss of 135~6" against Wayne State. His throw of 168'8" in the javelin against Northwest Missouri State ranks as his hi g h mark in that event. As a plebe basketballer on Coach Jack Mcintire's N&Q,raska College Conference champions and NAIA tournament representatives, Witty scored 283 points for an 11.3 point average per game. He was one of two Bobcats to start every game in the Peruvians' 25 game slate. Although his scoring antics were good for a freshman performer, Witty's defensive play was perhaps the high point of his game. During gridiron season, t h e affable Witty fought off contenders to nail down the number one quarterback position and direct the Bobcats to a 5-2-2 record. Witty completed 29 aerials in 63 attempts to gain 297 yards. While handling all of Peru's punting, he found time to gain second place in the Peru State individual scoring for the 1962 football season. Three athletic letters and one of the highest academic rankings on the Peru State campus make Bill Witty a young man to watch in his future years at Peru State. A good listener is a good talker with a sore throat.

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Peru Falls To Creighton In Doubleheader

BY BICBABI> BERTHOLD

BY STAN .JOHNSON

Coach Jerry Stemper's cinder men broke into the victory column during the 1963 season with three wins. With more experience and help from the underclassmen, the Bobcats concluded the season exceptionally well. An intrasquad meet was held prior to thei:r outings between the upperclassmen and freshmen. The freshmen were outclassed 44-91 by the upperclassmen.

Creighton University upended the Peru Sta~ baseballers twice by one-run. victories, Wednesday, May 8, on the Bobcat diamond. The Blue Jays swept the doubleheader by scom oi 1-0, and 4-3. It was a pitcher's duel in the opener with the only :run being scored on a solo oomer by Creighton's third baseman S.pensieri in the fourth inning. It was one of only two hits given up by Ron Kelley who collected 16 strikeouts and walked just two. The Bobcats hit safely six times, but couldn't bunch them to get the needed scoring. Eldon Baker and Jim Manning both rapped out doubles, in the fourth and fifth, respectively, but were left stranded when the Peru hitters couldn't collect in the clutch.

Peru opened the s~ason with an enormous bang against Tarkio in the Oak Bowl. The Bobcats totalled 90 points to Tarkio's 46. The Bobcats then found themselves placing second to Midland in a triangular affair on Midland's cinders. Midland outdistanced Peru for the win, scoring 79 and 1/6 points to the Bobcats' 55 and 1/3. Concordia totalled 35 and 1/2 points. The next outing for Peru was held in the Oak Bowl, and was a black day for Peru. Washburn overpowered Peru in 14 events to ring up 102 points to the Bobcats' 34. Louis Fritz gathered the only ffrsts for Peru in the mile and two mile distances. The Bobcats then journeyed to Tarkio for a trianguar meet where they compiled their second win of the season. Maryville kept close to Peru's heels until the final races. Peru nippM Maryville 77-68 while Tarkio gathered 25 points. The Peru-Maryville meet held at Maryville proved to be another winner for the Bobcats. Peru totalled 80 points to Maryville's 55. Larry Rathe and Bill Witty were the only double winners in the single events for Peru. Peru was host to the Tigers in the Oak Bowl which resulted in a win for Wayne. The Tigers gathered twelve first places to Peru's four. The Bobcats scored 54 to Wayne's 82 points. The Bobcats placed fifth in the 880 yard relay and mile relay during the Doane Relays. The Doane Relays were one of the larger meets of the season for Peru. The final outing for Peru was the N.C.C. Track Meet held at Kearney. Kearney again led the field with 135 points to capture first place by a large margin. Peru placed fourth in the mile relay and 880 relay to gain four points.

Creighton's pitcher Kros drove in three runs on a homer and a two-run single to spoil Peru's nightcap, 4-3. The winning run was scored in the top of the seventh on a walk and two singles. Peru drew first blood in t h e first inning on singles by Mcllvoy and Edwards and an infield out. Bruce McCoy drove in Peru's second marker on a line-drive double to the right corner scoring Edwards in the sixth. The Bobcats collected their final run in the bottom of the seventh on a sacrifice fly following F r an k Spizuoco's triple.

H RBI

First Game AB Hunt, ss _____ 3 Mcllvoy, 2b __ 4 Edwards, lf __ 3 McCoy, 3b ___ 3 Manning, 1b _ 3 Spizuoco, rf __ 3 Leonard, cf __ 3 Baker, c _____ 3 Kelley, p ____ 2 Floerschinger 1

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4 7 2 3 6 0 Kros and Chapman; Reimers and Floerschinger. When Rachel applied for a job as secretary she was asked, "How do you spell Mississippi?" She answered, "The river or the state?"

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Rex Truman, '10, Writes Ballad

Bonnie Vand~rtord _ In Flute Recital

Lightning Strikes

Library Patio Shaping Up

A giant elm tree, located near the center of Peru's -quadrangle, Miss Bonnie Lee Vanderford, was struck and damaged by Rex Truman, '10, 1470 Sierra "What is going on in front Auburn, a May candidate for the lightning Friday, May 3. Workers the library?" seems to be a fredrive, Arroyo Grande, .Calif.,, has Bachelor of Fine Arts in Educa- have attempted to preserve this quently asked question awund come along with anothe.1' ballad tion degree at Nebraska State elm by cutting branches off the campus. as a sequel to the one printed in PHI BETA LAMBDA the 1961 Spring edition of the Phi Beta Lambda met May 20 Teachers College at Peru, was damaged side to relieve it of exThere is to be a landing or pa• Peru Stater. Peru's poet laureate· to elect officers for the coming presented in a flute recital Tues- cess weight. tio similar to the one in front of has entertained with his own school year. These elected were day, May 14, at 8 p.m. in the Torn bark was glued back on the student center in front of the compositions at meetings of the Wayne Wallace, president; Jan- College Auditorium. the trunk and the split was filled library. The patio is to extend A student o{ Gilbert E. Wilson, with a plastic sealing compound. from the present steps up on the Southern. California area chapter ice Jones, vice president; Pat of the Peru Alumni Association·; Richardson, secretary; Lind a associate professor of instrumen- Tar was used to cover the split walk to the brick wall on the The following ballad was in- Bartels, treasurer; and Elaine tal music, Miss Vanderford is a and the ends of the removed east side of the library. There graduate of Auburn high school. branches. Chances for its surviv- will be only one step from the spired by the meeting of old Neddenriep, historian. Her selections included: Sonata al are good. patio up into the library. friends at one of these ch~pter No. II by Handel; Butterfly by It has been necessary to remeetings and by memories of L.S.A.There are to be lights and ceL.S.A. met at the Music Hall, Kohler; Minuet from L'Arlesien- move two great oaks from the college days on the Campus of a ment benches on the patio. It is ne by Bizet; Meditation by Mas- quadrangle, the dying trees were Wednesday, May 8 at 6:30. Thousand Oaks. hoped that the lights will reduce Business for the evening in- senet; Andalouse by Pessard; and a hazard. the number of accidents occuring Ballad of Old Peru cluded election of officers. Those Concertino by Chaminade. Piano on the present steps during the Now Frankie and Johnie were elected were Anne Epley, presi- accompanist was Mrs. Lola Bakicy months. lovers, they swor~ they'd ever dent; Dori Roemick, vice presi- er, junior music major, Auburn. The dirt piled high around the be true dent; and John Barton, secretarywalk now is to be used as fill for When they met beneath the oak treasurer. the patio. It is to be shoved onto The program of "Christ and the tree on the hills of old Peru. Miss Glenda Rima, a Peru the walk shortly after commenceWhat could they do _ Fine Arts" was continued. It was State Teachers College sopho- ment. The project is due for com-in old Peru! given by Miss Frieda Rowoldt, more in home economics from pletion after commencement. Anne Epley, Dori Roemick, and Wichita; Kans.-Marcia Sproul, Farragut, 'Iowa has been elected In quest of entertainment Gary Schlange. daughter of Mrs. Ina Sproul, Pe- state secretary-treasurer of the their position was no joke; ru, has been selected as floor di- Nebraska Home Economics ColThey couldn't bowl, they couldn't SIGMA TAU DELTArector in the Women's Dormitory lege Clubs for the 1963-64 school dance, and they weren't alSigma Tau Delta met at the for the 1963-64 school year at the year. lowed to smoke! Musk Hall on May 13; President Dependable Service University of Wichita. Elected at the annual state What could they do Lynn McCann called the meeting Miss Sproul, along with eight convention in Hastings, Nebras-in Old Peru! to order. A treasurer's report was Reasonable Prices other girls from other dorms was ka, April 26-27, Miss Rima is atgiven. The possibility of Sigma chosen on basis of superior aca- tending Peru State Teachers They arranged a formal meeting, Gas for Less Tau Delta's sponsoring a convodemic achievement and citizen- College on a scholarship providand they watched the hours cation next year was discussed. Wrecker Service ship. Election to this position re- ed by Morton House Kitchens, roll by Dick Elmore gave a report on the flects the high esteem in which A sittin' in the girl's dorm parlor Inc., Nebraska City. progress being made on Sifting Steam Cleaning the recipient is held by the Uni'neath Miss Stoner's eagle eye. The convention, which had as Sands. versity staff and students. This they could do 872-3201 its theme, "Patterns for. LearnNew officers were elected for -in Old Peru! ing," was attended by 13 women the next year. Those elected were delegates from Peru State. In 'atThey arranged some secret meet- Harvey Fisher, president; Kay tendance were Ruth Rulla, Sterings when they could leave Camden, vice president; and Janling; Cynthia Meier, Table Rock; ice Jones, secretary-treasurer. their posts, Donna Gerdes, Humboldt; Linda Lynn Mccann and J oAnn FrerTo wander out to the cemetery BY PHIL BATEMAN "The Store of Standard Rogers, Stella; Carolyn Rohlfs, where they'd flirt among the ichs installed the new officers. Brands" Early one morning a few Unadilla; Peggy Quackenbush, Harvey Fisher then took charge weeks ago, a raccoon named Ranghosts. Phone 274·3620 Auburn of the meeting and told of hi s dolph, feeling the need for more Beatrice; Elaine Bath, Auburn; This they still do Lorene Kostal, Odell; Judi Wolf, -in Old Peru! plans for the next year. The education in this complex society Davenport; Charlotte Wheeler, meeting was adjourned. decided that it was high time he Nemaha; Miss Rima, and Mrs. And so they went to college, went to college. It was truly a Ina Sproul and Mrs. Louise WHITE ANGELSlife's major goals to reach. tribute to this particular rac- Kregel, members of the home The White Angels met in MorThey lacked for entertainment, coon's intelligence and grasp of economics faculty at Peru State. but they sure learned how to gan Hall at 6:00, May 7, to ';tect the situation t h a t he would Mrs. Sproul was elected to a twoofficers for the 1963-64 term. teach. choose Peru State as the best pos- year term as chairman of the The new officers are: president, That's what they do sible place to better himself. College and University Section -in Old Peru! Peggy O'Neil; vice president, Kay Drycleaning His first stop was Majors Hall, of the Nebraska Home Economics Camden; secretary, Lucille Chriswhere he hoped to meet a few Association. tensen; and treasurer, Kathy and nice guys, get a place to sleep, Martin. and generally to get better acEight girls were nominated for Laundry quainted with college life. He the White Angel Scholarship. One was no sooner inside the door, girl will be picked from the eight, Mr. Richard Steiner, instructor however, than he discovered that Mr. Gilbert Wilson, associate and the winner will be anof 'biology in the Bellevue high he was not wanted. He was reprofessor of music at Peru State nounced at Honors Convocation. school, ha.s been selected by the The· meeting adjourned with moved from the premises to a is planning to take a professional PECK'S PALACE National Association of Biology f:: hooting chorus of catcalls and course at the Eastman School of the White Angel Song. Short Orders • Fries Teachers as the Outstanding Bijeers. Discrimination at Peru? Music in Rochester, N. Y. this Featuring Crispy Pizza ology Teacher of the Year in the ALPHA MU OMEGAHow could this be? Randolph summer. He will attend the third HOURS 7 TO II State of Nebraska. Mr. Steiner's Alpha Mu Omega had a steak was crushed. annual Woodwind Institute from award places him in contention fry at Neal's Park Monday, May Randolph was known in rac- July 8-19. for the Outstanding B i o 1 o g y 13. The fraternity chefs fried 45 coon circles as absolutely indomMr. Wilson will study all woodTeacher of the Year in the Unit- steaks. itable, however, so he bravely winds with emphasis on clarinet ed States. A meeting was held to elect pursued his driving quest for and bassoon. He will study clariSteiner, a 1954 graduate of Pe- officers for the 1963-64 s ch o o 1 knowledge. He walked around net with William Osseck, first ru State Teachers College, re- year. The new officers are: Tom the dormitory for a while and clarinetist for the Rochester Symceived the honor Wednesday, Ap- Buchholz, president; Bill Scott, then ..... acceptance at last! phony and bassoon with Edgar ril 24, at a banquet at Gene's Res- vice president; and Don Schmidt, Two stalwart, independent-think- Kirk, former bassoonist for the 1301 Courthouse taurant, Bellevue, attended by secretary-treasurer. ing individuals, Keith Grimes New York Philharmonic OrchesAvenue Dr. John C. Christ, head of Peand Dom La Rocca, risked the tra. ru's division of science and math- HOME EC CLUBwrath of their narrow-minded Ph. 274-3510 ematics. Presenting the certifiThe Peru State Home Econom- friends and invited Randolph inSign on a department store: cate was Dr. H. Edwin Cramer, ics Club held their banquet at to their room. "Use our Easy Economy Plan. superintendent of the Bellevue Arbor Manor in Auburn, NebrasAuburn Nebraska Oh, the glow of true friendship! Nothing to pay each month ... schools. ka, Monday, May 13 at 6:30. The three of them sat around 100% down payment." After the banquet, installation smoking and talking and getting Steiner, in addition to graduation from Peru State, received of the new officers was lead by to know each other better, when his elementary and secondary ed- Mary Schlange. Those installed Dom took offense to a slighting ucation in the Peru State Cam- we re : Ruth Rulla, president; reference Randolph made to the pus school. His father, H a r r y Judy Schlange, president elect; New York Mets. It was a natural Steiner, operated the Peru State Linda Stephens, vice president; reaction for Dom, being from cafeteria. The young biologist Glenda Rima, secretary; and Bar- Brooklyn and all, but Randolph PHONE 872-2331 took work in his major field un- bara Gordon, treasurer. felt that his raccoon honor was Other members who attended being questioned so he chewed der .Dr. Christ, and did his stuMember F.D.I.C. dent teaching under the late Mrs. were: Elaine Bath, Linda Risley, on Dom's hand (an old raccoon Donna Gerdes, Helen Drumm, custom). The duel proved fatal L. B. Mathews. INVITES YOUR BUSINESS Elaine Gerdes, Loretta Kratoch- for Randolph, however, as he CARROLL LEWIS, JOHN L. LEWIS, vil, Lois Layden, Janis Mayer, died a week later of a rare disPresident Vice Pres. & Cashier Cynthia Meier, Elaine Muller, ease known as distemper. A formal reception was held in and Linda Rogers. Two sponsors, Dom was treated by competent honor of the class of 1963, Satur- Mrs. Ina Sproul and Mrs. Louise medical men so that it would be day, May 25, at 8:00 p.m. in the Kregel, also attended. impossible for him to infect othStudent Center. ers and that was the last of the The seniors were formally Keith Melvin; Dean and Mrs. whole affair, supposedly. There Appliances - Sporting Goods greeted by a receiving line that Harold Boraas; Dr. and Mrs. is a strong rumor about, howHunting and Fishing Licenses ever, that a life-sized statue will included Steve Parker,. senior George Schottenhamel; and Dean PERU 872-2561 CECIL BOWMAN be erected in honor of Randolph Juanita Bradley. class president; President and Raccoon, lest mankind forget. Refreshments were served. Mrs. Neal Gomon; Dean and Mrs. From Peru stater

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Organizations

Marcia Sproul Floor Director At Wichita U.

Thirteen Peru Students Attend Home Ee. Convention

BEATTY GARAGE

Randolph Raccoon Has Expired

Redfern Clothing Co.

SPEED WASH

COIN-OP.

Steiner Excellent Biology Teacher

Wilson To Eastman

DUANE RAINS SKELLY

BANK OF PERU

Senior Reception

BOWMAN'S HARDWARE

Profile for Peru State College Library

1962-1963 Peru Pedagogian - issues 1-15  

1962-1963 newspaper issues 1-15 for Peru State College, Peru, Nebraska

1962-1963 Peru Pedagogian - issues 1-15  

1962-1963 newspaper issues 1-15 for Peru State College, Peru, Nebraska

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