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See The Homecoming Play Oct. 22

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 56

Number I

OCTOBER 3, 1960

Enrollment 606 .As Peru Begins 93rd Academic Year

Sam Sadich Star of Week Peru Back Raced 73, Doomed Kearney By Paul LeBar Omaha World-Herald, Sept. 27 Peru's Sam Sadich, who turned the tide in the Kearney-Bobcat contest last week, is The WorldHerald's state college Star-ofthe-Week. The 5-8, 155-pound line-backer, a transfer from Illinois, is proof that dynamite comes in s m a 11 packages. Peru, without a victory over Kearney since 1952, had its back against the wall when Sadich swung into action. The Bobcats were clinging· to a 12-7 margin, and Kearney was on the march. Nelson Hinkle of the Antelopes faded back to pass. The ball never reached Hinkle's intended receiver; Sadichsummoning the talent of a vet; eran-snatched the aerial at the 27 and sped 73 yards to score. The startling turn of events awarded Peru a 19-7 lead and handed Kearney its first NCC reversal in nearly three seasons.

'Buethe Principal Of the Campus School Mr. L. Chris Buethe (pronounced beethee), assistant professor of education, is the new campus high school principal. He also teaches science and mathematics. Mr. Buethe was g r a d u a t e d from Seward high school. He attended the University of Nebraska and received his B.A. in education from Wayne State Teachers College. From the University of Colorado, he received his M.Ed. Sponsored by the National Science Foundation, he attended an Academic Year Institute at the University of Utah and a summer physics institute at the University of Washington. At Brule, Nebraska, he taught two years in the high school. He then went to Loveland, Colorado, where he taught for four years. He has spent one year as an exchange teacher in the American School of Tangier, under the provisions of the Smith-Mundt Act and through the auspices of the State Department. Since then he has taught one year at Salinas, California. Mrs. Buethe is the former Pat Romano of Des Moines, Iowa. She was formerly a dance teach(Continued on page two)

''No Mother To Guide Her; Or More To Be Pitied Than Censured"

J. D. Levitt Produces Peru's Seventh Annual Variety Show Thursday evening, Sept. 15, the curtain went up on the seventh annual Variety Show produced by Mr. J. D. Levitt. The theme of this year's production was "Scalent Touts." Each act was introduced by a "scout," who after being interviewed by Master of Ceremonies, Levitt, gave some of the background of his discovery.

Miss Linda Lee Nygaard presented a modern interpretive dance entitled, "Bird at Dawn." Linda was appropriately discovered by "bird watching" Jerry Wanser. Mr. Harry Whitney introduced a fine triple trio, Larry Rathe, Sam Sadich, Bob Fisher, Joe Barrientos, Paul Fenton, Bob Gibson, Larry Morgan, Chick StessA salute to the Olympics op- man, and Jack Head. The group ened the program; Mr: L. B. sang "The Horse Song." Joyce Carman accompanied Matthews lit the traditional herself on the piano while she Olympic Torch. sang one of her own composiThe large array of talent intions, "The Moon Chases Me." cluded: An Olympic Chorus line, ,Joyce was introduced by John Margaret Campbell, Judith Wolf, Parli. Sandra Stephens, Betty White Lynn Baily, Joan Dyer, Annaand Deanna Donahoo. The girls were introduced by "coaches" belle Rosse, and Melissa .FulkerKaren F~nkhauser and Beverly son did a novelty routine to "Football Hero." Football celeLeeper. brity, LaMarr Gibson introduced Butch Whitfield and Gary Stothe number. ver did novel pantomimes to A violin duo was .presented by Stan Freeberg's "Great PretendMr. Jindra and Mr. Camealy. er" and "Yellow Rose of Texas." The comedy act was introduced The performers were introduced by Mrs. Donavan, who is a form- by Ray Meister. er resident of Butch and Gary's Allen Nelson introduced Bevhome town. erly Parde, who sang "One Kiss."

Bev was accompanied by Steve Parker. Carolyn Eynon, Mary Lou Reid, Virginia. Adkins, Betty Painter, Judy Pollack, and Lois Palmer did a pantomime and dance routine to "Honey Bun" from "South Pacific." The girls were introduced by "Honey Bun" Wayne Wallace. One of the added attractions of the evening was a "memorial" to the popular hit "Yellow Polka Dot Bikini." A yellow polka dotted handkerchief on a bare stage was the setting for the number. Steve Parker and Judy Wolf accompanied themselves on the piano while singing "Wanting You." The duet was introduced by Don Carlisle, A freshman Combo brought the fun-filled evening to a close. Th2 group, Gary Smucker, Charlotte Wheeler, and Joe Perina played three selections after being introduced by Tom Aitkens. Those working behind the scenes were Jim Christ, Al Wheeler, Julie Meyer, John Parli, Joni Wesolowski, and Rose Clancy.

Comprehensive Orientation Program Worked Successfully This Year.

Peru Dramatics Club to Present AMellow Drammer

By Marilyn Monroe The PSTC orientation program started Monday, September 5th, when the freshmen registered in' the dormitories. In the afternoon a coffee hour tor parents of the freshmen was given, and the campus buildings were open to the visitors. That evening the freshmen attended an informal dinner followed by a program. Tuesday morning, Dr. Boraas gave the School-College Ability Test. The American College Test was given that afternoon. That evening there were residence hall parties in each of the dorms. Wednesday, the English Classification Examination was given by Mr. Moore. The remainder of Wednesday and all of Thursday was divided into "How to Study" periods, physical examination, and library orientation. Thursday evening, an All-freshmen Convocation was held in the auditorium with James Levitt presiding. In this convocation, Mrs. Boatman told about "Your Health at Peru," Dean . Melvin interpreted the college catalog, and Mr. Larson described the registration procedure. Friday was registration day for all freshmen in the gymnasium. Saturday night, complimentary movies were shown in Auburn

and Nebraska City. Orientation identification was used for admission. Monday, as the upperclassmen registered, the freshmen had library orientation and "How to Study" periods. Members of the orientation committee stated that orientation is a controversial measure. The value of orientation is· effected by the opinion of the individual or group. Dr. Boraas stated the freshmen did very well in their American College Tests, which consisted of English, mathematics, soc i a 1 studies, and science. The _results of these tests were available at registration, so that some freshmen could be separated into basic mathematics and remedial English. Library orientation was given thee more hours this year. It is Mr. Langham's belief that the most effective library orientation should be a regular part of the . classroom assignment prepared by the faculty. But, as he stated, "It does not work as well in fact as in theory." Mr. Langham said that he was very happy to be a part of the expanding freshmen orientation, because it will permit students better standing in their later academic career, both (Continued on page two)

Mr. Robert D. Moore, dramatics coach at Peru State' Teachers College, has 'announced the selection of the cast for the 1960 Homecoming play, "NO MOTHER to GUIDE HER; or MORE To Be PITIED THAN CENSURED." Curtain time for this old fashioned mellow drammer is 7:00 p.m., October 22. Rose Clancy, Dawson, will play the part of Spring Overton, the beautiful young heroine; and Steve Parker, Peru, is cast as Casper Vandenburgh, Ahe handsome hero. Sylvester Vandenburgh, his wealthy and henpecked father, is played by John Biere of Auburn, and Effie, his domineering wife, by Melissa Fulkerson of Omaha. T a 1 b o t Twillingham, the villain who is a wolf in any kind of clothing will be played by Ray Meister of Humboldt. Other members of the cast are Joan Wesolowski., Linda Nygaard, and Lois ,.Fritz, all of Omaha; Allen Nelson, Red Oak, Iowa; Roberta Thomas, Adair, Iowa; Sandy Stephens, Peru; Carol Eynon, Columbus, Ind.; and Alan Wheeler, Stella. "One may smile and smile and be a villi an still."'-Shakespeare.

Enrollment at Peru St ate Teachers College at the close of the first full week of classes stood at 606, according to F. H. Larson, registrar. The 1960-61 fall semester figure continues the steady enrollment increase at Nebraska's first college since 1952 when 276 students were registered. 0 n - campus enrollment includes 336 men and 270 women. The sophomore class with 163 students is the largest, followed by 162 in the freshman class, 144 juniors, and 112 seniors. Graduate and post-graduate students number 25. In addition to on-campus students, 173 are enrolled in College Study Center and correspondence courses. A fotal ·of 250 students are enrolled at the T. J. Majors Campus school, 139 of which are in grades K-6 and 111 in grades 7-12. Students, 'served by the college, including on-campus, off-campus, and campus school, total 1,023. Twenty-four Nebraska counties, the states of California, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, K a n s a s , Massachusetts, New York and Wyoming, and Hong Kong are represented in the oncampus figure.

Dr. Lloyd Kite Directs Off-Campus Secondary Student Teaching Program Dr. Lloyd B. Kite of Commerce, Texas, was named associate professor of education and supervisor of off-campus secondary student teaching, Sept. 1, 196 ary student teaching September 1, 1960. He was awarded a Bachelor of Science degree by Mississippi Southern University at Hattiesburg in 1939, a Master of Arts degree by George P e ab o d y , Nashville, Tenn., in 1946; and a Doctor of Education degree by the same institution in 1956. Dr. Kite taught one year at the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. He was superintendent of school at Columbus, Miss., six years and has had experience as a high school principal and classroom teacher. Since 1957 Dr. Kite has been assistant director of student teaching at East Tex.as State College, Commerce, Texas. Dr. Kite is married and has two daughters, nine and seven, and a son, eleven. Mrs. Kite has a Master of Arts degree in Eng(Continued on page two)


NIGHT CLASSES TO MEET THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6 The Peru Achievement Foundation is sponsoring a "Legislators Day" on campus Wednesday, October 5. Because of the present lack of dining facilities it will be impossible to furnish meal service to night class students on the above tlate. Therefore, night classes will meet off -Thursday evening, October 6. Keith L. Melvin Dean of the College

LIBRARY COLUMN Mrs. Gertrude Fulion, counselor ai Eliza Morgan Women's Resi· dence Hall ai Nebraska Staie Teachers College ai Peru, explains dormitory rules io freshman coeds (from left) Connie Dietl, Nehaw· ka; Mary Lou Reid, Bellevue; and Nancy Sears, Auburn. Mrs. Ful· !:on, who served as housemother at Eliza Morgan from 1956-59, returned io Peru Staie this fall after a year's absence.

Student Union and Morgan Addition Have January 1 Completion Date The new Student Union building, now under construction, will be completed by January 1, 1961, according to Dr. Neal Gomon. President Gomon pointed out that the building will be completed on schedule, despite several setbacks. Student Union construction was hindered by last spring's strike and the late

arrival of the exterior support· ing columns. Emphasis on the new A. D. Majors Building and the A. V. Larson Industrial Arts Building has also slowed Student Union construction. The south addition to Eliza Morgan will also be completed by January 1.

COMPREHENSIVE ORIENTA· TION PROGRAM WORKED SUCCESSFULLY THIS YEAR

ley, Mr. Robert D. Moore, Mrs. Ruth Mathews, Mrs. Clara Boatman, Mr. James Levitt, anJ Mr. Don Carlisle.

(Continued from page one) here and in their graduate work. He also stressed the idea of a need of better communication in the organization of orientation week. A survey among the classes is being taken on the various events of orientation by Mr. Hanford Miller. This is an attempt to improve orientation by the opinion of the people who have participated in orientation. Mr. Miller thanks all of the people who aided in the various activities to make orientation a success. The orientation program for the freshmen at Peru is organized and carried out by an orientation· committee. The members of the committee are: Dr. Harold Boraas, gener~l chairman; Mr. Hanford Miller, activities chairman; Mr. F. H. Larson, Dean Keith Melvin, Miss Juanita Brad-

White Angels Plan' Trip to Doane The White Angels had a s'hort meeting, Sept. 26 at 6:30 p.m. The meeting was called to order to order by the new president, Marilyn Monroe. Carol Ellenberger and Connie Erisman were elected chairmen of a committee to acquire transportation for the White Angels to the Doane football game. The Angels also set up a committee to take care of the White Angel display for Homecoming. Karen Fankhauser, Patsy Melcher, Ellen Hunzeker, and Kay Parli volunteered for the committee. The meeting was dismissed with the singing of the White Angel song.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a 'I'.housand Oaks October 3, 1960

By Linda Bertram

J. Albert Fracht and Emmett Robinson have written a book entitled, You Too, Can Sing. This book was written to help cultivate voices for song and speech. In the step by step analysis of the voice, they explain s u c h phases as: self-analysis, relaxawhen that great ship went down and the tion, breathing, mechanics of last thing to leave the sinking ship was voice p r o d u c t i on , pitch and scales, and articulation. In addia bottle of Coca-Cola. That's because all tion, exercises have been includhands stuck to Coke to the end. Nofo there's ed which will put this new knowledge to work. popularity! That's the kind of loyalty Henry Morton Robinson's Wa· the sparkling lift, the good taste of Coke l:er of Life is an inspiring story of the good and evil of men. It engenders. Man the lifeboats, have a Coke! is the story of three generations' BE REALLY REFRESHED battle against evil. Anson WoodBottled under authority of The Coca-Cola Company by hull, the main character, sees his father harvest corn and distill NEBRASKA CITY COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. whiskey. He teaches Anson that this should be done for the sake Lain, president; Robert Keple~" of creation not money. Anson DR. LLOYD KITE DIRECTS vice-president; and Julie Meye4 comes of age during the time OFF -CAMPUS· SECONDARY secretary-treasurer. J when American power is being STUDENT TEACHING The group enjoyed refres~ forged. He establishes a whiskey- PROGRAM ments following the b u s i n e s' making dynasty. His adventures (Continued from page one) take him into every major conmeeting. flict in American life from brawl- lish from George Peabody Coling barn fights to the. halls of lege and a Bachelor of Arts deCongress and the "What Is Whis- gree from Wheaton, Ill. The Kites BUETHE PRINCIPAL key?" debates. In Woodhull's last reside at the faculty apartments. OF THE CAMPUS SCHOOL l (Continued from page one) l son, Chance, he finds an heir to the dynasty. This book describes er. The Buethes have one so~ the ways of the American people. Curt. The Plague, written by Albert Mr. Buethe is in favor of pu~ Camus, is the dynamic story of a lie education; and, since he h~ town in the grip of the deadly seen a little of other countrie bubonic plague. Oran was first The Foreign Language Club systems, is more in favor of o ' troubled by the rats. People came met in the Administration Build- form of public education. more and more to die in the ing, Sept. 26, at 8:30 p.m. Mr. feels that education is a prh streets. Although the city au- Rath, the sponsor, showed pic- lege raather than a right. Ho • thorities hesitated to give the tures which he took while travel- ever, he thinks that each pers disease a name, there was soon ing in Europe this summer. should have opportunity even · no room left for doubt that it The club then moved to the it is to fail instead of to succe · was the plague. The city is then Music Hall, where the German To him English is perhaps t · cut off from the outside world. language class sang German most important subject taug The author tells this st o r y songs. He says he <1dmires the stud through the eyes of a doctor. He The meeting proceeded with who does well whatever he has working with him a journal- the election of officers: Carol Mc- deavors to do. ist, a criminal, a priest, a legal official, and ordinary citizens. Those who survive learn the full meaning of good and evil.

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THE STAFF Co-Editor ________________________ -------- _____ Rose Clancy Co-Editor _____________________________ Mary Ann Lewellyn Sports Editor _________________________________ Steve Parker Copy Editor ____________________________________ Leroy Keyt Business Manager_ ____________________________ Ray Meister Personnel Manager ____________________________ Herb Brown Columnist. _________________________________ Linda Bertram Columnist_ _______________________________ Jerry Kirkendall ColumnisL _________________________________ Lynda Nygaard Columnist. .. _______________________________ Darrel Wolcott Columnist_ ______________________________ Mary Anna Gnade Campus SchooL. __ ---------------- ___________ Sandy Craig Sports Reporter. _______________________________ Bob Fisher Women's Sports ___________ ------------------ ____ .Pam Yost Reporter _____________________________________ .Lynn Bailey Reporter _______________________________________ .Lois Fritz Reporter __________________________________ Marilyn Monroe Reporter_____________________________________ Judy Pollack Reporter ____________________ ---~ __________ . Carolyn Reiber RepoI'ter_____ ------------ _____________________ .Gary Weiss Reporter·-------------~----------------------John Werner Reporter------------~-------- ___________________ Tom Yopp Sponsor ___ ------------------ ____________ Stewart Linscheid

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Foreign Language Club Elects Officers

Newman Club Holds Meeting New officers for the 1960-61 school year were selected September 21 by the Newman Club. They are: John Biere, president; Joe Barrientos, vice-president; Rita Grandgenett, secretary ; Chick Stessman, treasurer. Reverend Sigmund Rydz explained the purpose of the Newman Club. He stated that each week he would give ten minute lectures on a question proposed, and after this, a question and answer period would be held. The dues will be $1.50 for each semester, which will go toward social, state and national fees. A weekly inquiry class for non-Catholics and Catholics will begin October 5. The new officers will be installed at the next meeting.

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Bobcats Drop Kearney With 19-7 Victory

Roster Of 1960 Bobcats Name and Home Town

Richards, Lanny-Bellevue _________________ 6-1 Osterholm, Lynn-Glenwood, Iowa __________ 5-10 Ohnoutka, Gordon-Valparaiso ______________ S-9 Wiechelman, Duane-Hartington ____________ 5-8 Sadich, Sam-Wood River, rn. ______________ 5-8 Kelly, Ron-Falls City ______________________ 6-0 Christensen, John-Nebraska City ___________ 6-1 Neale, Dick-Bellevue ______________________ 5-11 Place, Richard-Nebraska City ______________ 5-10 Pilkington, Ross-Red Oak, Iowa ___________ 5-9 Dostal, Ken-Scribner ______________________ 6-6 Gibson, Robert-Falls City __________________ 5-11 Rhodus, Ken-Bellevue _____________________ 6-3 Gibson, LaMarr-Falls City _________________ 5-11 Yopp, Tom-East Alton, m. _________________ 6-l1/2 Gerber, Dick-Fullerton ____________________ 5-91/z Fisher, Jim-Falls City _____________________ 5-10 Tynon, Bill-Peru __________________________ 5-11 Lowrey, Tom-Nebraska City _______________ 6-0 Bliss, William-Lincoln ____ ~----------------6-0 Unterbrink, Ray-Wood River, IlL _________ 6-1 Sullivan, Dan-Omaha ______________________ 6- 1/2 Whitney, Harry-Omaha ____________________ 6-1 Shrout, Cletus-East Alton, IlL ____________ 6-3 Thomsen, Vernon-Exeter __________________ 6-1 Gilson, Larry-Fullerton ____________________ 5-91/z

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160 175 190 195 190 211 Stuhr, Arlin-Wa.co ___ ---------------------5~10 190 Workman, Gary-HumboldL ________________ 6-1 175 Schroeder, Darwin-Omaha _________________ 6-71/z 240 Henning, Jerry-Peru ______________________ 6-0 185 Haeffner, Monte-Firth _____________________ 5-11 268 Randles, Gary-Fullerton ___________________ 6-l 205 Peterson, Dennis-Rockford, Ill._ ____________ 6-0 155 Murray, Clifford-Omaha ___________________ 5-10 169 Chappell, Leon-Wood River, IlL ___________ 6-2 200 Stevenson, Tom-Stella _____________________ 5-11 190 Ogle, Ray-Dawson _________________________ 6-0 180 Widrig, Lawrence-Rockford, m. ____________ 5-9 162 Boren, Raymond-Council Bluffs ___________ 5_3 165 Wheeler, Ronaid-Auburn __________________ 5-6 140 Shown, James-Plattsmouth ________________ 5-10 150 Moore, Gary-N emaha ______________________ 5-11 170 Barrientos, J oseph-Omaha _________________ 5-8 135 Betts, J ohn-Nemaha ________ " ______________ 5-10 160 Henderson, Larry-Brock ___________________ 5-10 165 Hunt, Mike-Tecumseh _____________________ 5-6 140

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STATISTICS

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By Bob Fisher

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After battling to a scoreless /~a~*:tie in thei~ 1960 football season · t . '•opener against Iowa Wesleyan, n r1e. · if oJ~l Wheeler:s Peru State Bobcats H~~aturday mght, Sept. 17, roared 1 · . -fllack to a 46-0 win over St. ~ivi,.M. ary's of the Plains in their 0 Oak Bowl debut.

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Pl\lgued by the loss of eight fumbles in their Sept. 9 inaugurat Ft. Madison, Iowa, the Bobts Saturday were on the re"ving end of five fumbles by Cavaliers of Dodge City, sas. In the statistics departt, St. Mary's gained 307 s on 67 offensive plays, while the Bobcats managed only 226 rJards on 42 plays. I

~c The Bobcats took to the air for lllree of the TD's, one was a 65f:r_ard punt return, and three were keeper plays. ·

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Kittens Win 32-21 As Boatman Stars In Cook Encounter

'Bobcats Slaughter St. Mary's t46-0 In Home Opener

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By Bob Fisher A 62-yard touchdown run by Sam Sadich, Wood River, Ill., sophomore, after a pass interception with less than two minutes to play,· clinched a 19-7 victory Saturday for the Peru Bobcats over Kearney State on the Antelopes' Foster field. The Bobcats took the lead with 4:03 remaining in the fourth quarter, when John Christensen, Nebraska City, quarterback, connected on the Kearney 35 with Topp Yopp, Wood River, Ill., end, who went all the way to pay dirt. It was the first pass completion for the Bobcats after 10 tries. Christensen scored the first six points of the game midway in the second quarter on a one-yard plunge. Lynn Osterholm, Glenwood, Iowa, senior, failed on his first placement attempt, made the second try, and had the third blocked. The Antelopes' only tally was in the same period with 3:06 remaining, when Steve Kraus went over the goal line on a screen pass from quarterback Nelson Hinkle. Antelope Paul Peterson made his placement good, and Kearney lead 7-ti. After allowing the Antelopes 182 offensive yards in the first half, the Bobcat defensive unit tightened, permitting only 130 yards in th~ second round. In the fourth period, the Bobcats held Kearney to 20 y a r d s rushing, while the B o b c a t s gained 66 yards rushing, as many as during the three previous quarters. Outstanding defensive p 1 a y was credited Peruvian lineman Jerry Henning, Peru; Cletus Shrout, Wood River, Ill.; Ray Unterbrink, Wood River, Ill.; LaMarr Gibson, Falls City, and Dick Gerber, Fullerton.

First quarter saw St. Mary's rch to the Peru l0-y2rd stripe r plays after the opening -off. The Bobcats gained posion on downs and began a nsive battle until 1:03 re·ned in the quarter when Neska City's Dick Place coned with Ross Pilkington, Red , Iowa, halfback, on a 48-yard s play and was over for the t touchdown. Midway in the ening quarter, the Bobcat deive unit held the Cavaliers their one~foot mark. '!'he first second q u art e r uchdown came on a punt retaken on the Peru 45 by ington who handed-off on 's 35 to halfback Dick Place, o scampered all the way be-

hind excellent blocking. only 23 seconds remaining, terback John Christensen nected with Tom Yopp, River, Ill., sophomore end, 17-yard touchdown pass.

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Christensen scored both third quarter TD's on keeper playsa one-yard plunge with 3:17 remaining and a 21-yard run with 1:11 yet to go in the stanza. In the fourth period with Bob Gibson in the quarterback spot, the Falls City junior went five yards for the tally. Dick Gerber, senior end from Fullerton, was on the receiving end of a 9-yard pass from Christensen for the final touchdown. L y n n Osterholm, Glenwood, Iowa, senior, made good all four of his placement attempts, while Tom Lowrey, Nebraska City; freshman, had bad luck in his' three trys. Vernon Thomsen, Exeter, senior, grabbed two of the five St. Mary's fumbles, while Gary Randles, Fullerton; Marion Battani, Madrid, Iowa, and Ken Rhodus, Bellevue, each recovered one. STATISTICS STM PERU First downs _______ 10 6 Passes attempted __ 28 14 Passes completed __ 10 7 Yards passing _____ 131 126 Yards rushing _____ 176 106 Number of punts __ 4 6 Punting average ___ 37 44 Fumbles lost ______ 5 0 Penalty yards _____ 25 20 Scoring By Quarters: Peru _______ 6 13 14 13 St. Mary's __ Q 0 0 0

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In a hard fought battle, Peru Prep defeated the Cook Cougars 32-21 on Cook's field. Winning credit went to Tom Boatman, outstanding halfback who scampered on runs of sixtysix, forty-five, sixty-five, and fifty-five yards for four Prep touchdowns. Fred Shirley, defensive guard, picked off a Cougar pass and ran sixty-five yards for Peru's other score. Peru's defensive team was excellent with Jerry Reeves, Fred Shirley, and Keith Marnell being the main threats. Peru journeyed to Elk Creek on Sept. 30 and will play hqst to Dawson-Verdon in the Oak Bowl on October 7.

Blue Devils Organize For Coming Year The Blue Devil meeting held Monday, September 26, featured the nominations of eligible men on the Peru campus for Blue Devil membership. The nominees will be voted on in the next meeting. Twenty-three men will be selected from forty-seven nominations for Blue Devil membership. The Blue Devils will participate with the White Angels in Freshmen Work Day, Sept. 29. The Devils sent a committee to meet with White Angels representatives to arrange job assignments for the freshmen. Those making up the committee fr o m the Blue Devils were: Dick Gerber, Roger Witt, Harry Whitney,

DeZwarte's Team Starts Season With 69-0 Victory By Steve Parker Coach Virgil DeZwarte's Peru Prep football team launched its opening game of the 1960 season at the Oak Bowl last Saturday night by running over the Nemaha team by the lopsided score of 69-0. The scores of six more Prep touchdowns were cancelled by the officials by way of penalties. Running over the touchdowns which did count for Prep were Tom Boatman who made four, David Gomon 2, and Paul Heuer, Tom Majors, Jim Furnas, Al Wheeler, Jr., and Pat Morris one apiece. They were aided by fine work on both offense and defense by the entire Prep squad and that means every Prepster suited up, as DeZwarte swept his bench so that every Pe!u boy g_ot in on the fun.

Jim Fisher, and Neal Eickhoff. Roger Witt, vice-president, was appointed sergeant at arms at the meeting. His official capacity in this office will be to preserve order in all Blue Devil meetings. Two proposals were brought up for future consideration. The first proposal waSI the hiring of a. chartered bus by the Blue Devils for the purpose of having the organization attend the football game between Peru and Oklahoma Panhandle on November 5. The other proposal was that the Blue Devils should sponsor a dance to raise money for the organization's treasury.

p K First downs ----------- 7 ·13 Passes attempted ______ 11 34 Passes completed ______ 1 2.0 Yards passing _________ 35 227 Yards rushing _________ 132 85 Number of punts ______ 7 5 Punting average _______ 38 28 Fumbles lost ---------- 0 Penalty yards --------- 65 60 Scoring By Quarters: Peru __________ o 6 0 13 Kearney ______ o 7 0 0

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Kittens Plaster Dunbar 31-0 By Steve Parker The Peru Prep Bobkittens Friday rolled to their second victory in as many games by defeating the Dunbar Wolves 31-0 in Peru State's Oak Bowl. The quick-maneuvering backfield, composed of halfbacks Tom Boatman and Pat Morris and quarterback David Gomon, plus the strong offensive line proved to be too much for the Wolves. Peru Prep received the opening kickoff and three plays later Tom Boatman scored the first touchdown to climax a 65-yard march. The rest of the night proved to be almost entirely defensive for Dunbar. Danny Paap and David Hemminghaus were the major threats both offensively and defensively for the Wolves. Before the final whistle, Boatman had crossed the goal line twice more and Pat Morris and Paul Heuer had both scored once. Morris ran the ball across for the single extra point. The Bobittens were hosted at Cook Sept. 23, and will appear at the Oak Bowl Oct. 7 against Dawson-Verdon.


NOTES FROM DELZELL By Gerald Kirkendall

Delzell Hall has 119 residents. Mrs. Evanelle Paradise is the house mother, and Mrs. Granville Longfellow is the assistant house mother. This will ,~e Mrs. Paradise's third year as house mother of Delzell Hall.

Cheerleaders elected by the student body at Peru State Teach· ers College for the 1960-61 school year are Sandy Stephens, Phyllis Grube, Jeannine Ehlers. Lee ?hristen, and Karen Mcintire.

Cheerleaders Elected A special convocation was held in the Peru State Auditorium Sept. 15, for the purpose of selecting cheerleaders for the current school year. Chick Ste s s man introduced each of the twenty girls participating. Each girl led the student body in a yell of her own chasing; then all tryouts combined to lead the "P-E-R-U Yea" yell for a finale. Five girls were s e 1e ct e d through balloting by the entire student body. They were: Jeannine Ehlers, Syracuse; Phyllis Grube, Johnson; Lee Christian, Elk Creek; Sandy Stephens, Peru; and Karen Mcintire, Peru. Jeannine Ehlers, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Ehlers, was a cheerleader for Peru State last year: Jeannine, junior, is a home economics and English major. Phyllis Grube, daughter of Mr.

LS.A. Introduces Officers At First Meeting Of Term The Lutheran Student Assocition held its first me e tin g Wednesday, September 21, at 6:30 p.m. at President Gomon's home. Introductions were made of Pastors Rathkamp and Deithoff, pastoral advisors; Miss Rowoldt and Mr. Larson, faculty sponsors; and the officers of the

and Mrs. Justus Grube, was a cheerleader while she 'attended high school in Johnson. Phyllis,· a junior transfer student from the University of Nebraska, is a physical education major. Lee Christian, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rudy Christian, Jr., was a cheerleader for Peru State her sophomore year at Peru. Lee, a senior, returned to Peru this year after teaching in the elementary school system at Lyons, Nebraska, last year. Sandy Stephens, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Stephens, was a cheerleader for three years at Peru Prep high school. Sandy, a sophomore, is an elementary education major. Karen Mcintire, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Mcintire, was also a cheerleader at Peru ,Prep. Karen, a freshman, is a hpme economics major.

Delzell had a dorm meeting on September 17 in the lounge. President, Steve Bates, gave a few words and then introduced Mrs. Paradise. She gave a warm welcome and · a few comments concerning dorm life. She then introduced the officers as follows: Phillip Rh.odes, vice-president, and Larry Vice, treasurer. The dorm counselors for this year are as follows: John Parli, baseJ'\lent; Larry Vice, first floor; John Masonbrink and Gary Ran;:lles, second floor; and Larry Gilson and Duane Wiechelman, third floor.

Scholarships Awarded Six Peru Students One $450 Morton House threeyear home economics scholarship and four $100 one-year Peru Achievement Foundation scholarships have been awarded to Peru State Teachers College students for the 1960-61 academic year, according to Fred A. Rathert, Auburn, president of the Peru Achievement Foundation. Miss Joanne Hilficker, a 1960 graduate of Bellevue high school, was awarded the $450 home economics scholarship provided by the Otoe Food Products Co., Nebraska City. The Foundation scholarships, provided by gifts of alumni and friends of Peru State, were awarded to Larry Swett, sophomore, Malvern, Iowa; Sandra Krakow, freshman, Superior; Linda Goodin, senior, Humboldt; Stephen Parker, sophomore, Peru. Grants are to be applied to the payment of tuition and fees, according to Harold Boraas, chairman of the scholarship committee. Selection is based on interest in some phase of teaching, character, scholastic record, and need.

Delzell has received two new Coke machines which replaced the old ones used last year.

All College Mixer Held In Gymnasium

Delzell is fortunate to have musical freshmen. They have many musical instruments to entertain upperclassmen. Varieties are tom-toms, guitars, and singing voices.

The All College Mixer was held September 16 in the gymnasium. Upon entering the gym, each person was given a Democratic or Republican ticket, depending on his preference. Games and contests were played between these two parties under the direction of Miss Rowaldt. Following the games, a dance was held and refreshments were served.

Comments by freshmen concerning dorm initiation are as follows: Art Howe: "It's a hairy bear." Rudy Eichenberger: "Over in an hour, but nobody won:." Bob Penkave: "What happened to my goatee." current year; President, LaVerne Eddie Leistman: "Like shaking Roos; Vice-president, Mary Ann hands with the fuzz." Graham; and Secretary-treasurButch Weiss: "Two pair down er, Lois Fritz. A talk was given and four to go." by the pastors concerning the part Lutherans should play as "Ambassadors of the Lord." The meeting was closed by the singing of a hymn and the Lord's The 1961 Peruvian staff was Prayer. This was followed by refreshments served by the Luther- elected at a meeting September 20 in the projection room of the an Women's Club of Peru. An executive meeting was held auditorium. after the social meeting, at which Chosen co-editors were Carotime a schedule of programs for lyn Parli and Kathy Rh o ten . the month was set up. The first Other staff members are: Jeanof this series will be a discussion nine Ehlers, layout editor; Rose of the religious aspects of the Clancy and Deanna Donahoo, as1960 Presidential campaign. sistant layout editors. Darrel Wolcott, copy editor; Merlin Wright and Arlan Richardson, assistant copy editors. Phyllis The SCF met in the Christian Grube, sports editor; Judy PolChurch basement at 6:30 p.m. lack, assistant sports editor. CarWednesday, Sept. 21, 1960. This ol Ellenberger, business manasemester's first meeting w a s ger. Penny Thorkildsen, photogspent acquainting the group with raphy editor. Photographers are the organization's structure, pur- . Steve Parker and Jim Christ. pose, and program for the year. Students wishing to work on President Carol McLain introthis year's Peruvian should see duced the officers and sponsors: one of the co-editors or Stewart Connie Erisman, vice-president; Linscheid, sponsor. Glenn Irwin, secretary-treasurer; Rev. Breeding, pastor of the Christian Church; Rev. Falk, pasINGERSOLL tor of the Baptist Church; and Barber Shop Dr. Wininger. AUBURN. NEBRASKA Before adjournment, the group participated in a game designed Elly Ingersoll - Nate Hayes for the purpose of getting acquainted.

Peruvian Staff Elected

Blue Devils Elect The Blue Devils elected the following officers: president , Dick Gerber; vice president, Roger Witt; treasurer, Chick Stessmann; and secretary, Ken Rhodus. The Student Senate wants the Blue Devils and White Angels to be in charge of Freshman Work

The residence counselor for Eliza Morgan Hall is well known to many of the upper-classmen. Mrs. Gertrude Fulton has returned as temporary counselor after a year of retirement. Before coming to Peru in 1956, she served for seven years as e x e c u t i v e director of the Y.W.C.A. at Sheridan, Wyoming. i'ihe then served as counselor of the girls' dorm until she retired in 1959. Now she has returned on a temporary basis until a permanent .counselor can be hired. Mrs. Fulton's family consists of a daughter and a son, both of whom are married.

Mr. Silas Summers is Peru's new assistant professor of English. After Mr. Summers received his A.B. in English at Western State College at Gunnison, Colo., he taught in his minor field of concentration, Spanish, for three years at a high school in Colorado. He then attended the University of Missouri, where he received his masters degree in English. Upon completion of his graduate ·study he stayed on at the University of Missouri as instructor of English. During World War II, Mr. Sun;imers was instructor of history at Army Officer Training School in Jamestown, North Dakota. At the end of the war, in 1945, he taught at Tarkio College, Tarkio, Missouri, as a professor of English. After serving in this position for fifteen years. he camt> to Peru. In addition to teaching literature, Mr. Summers will act a' faculty sponsor for Sigma Tau Delta, national honorary profes· sional English fraternity. Day. These organizations are tc have committees meet to set the date. Besides the Work Day, th E Blue Devils want to fatten thei1 treasury by sponsoring a dance They weren't given this oppor· tunity last year, and they fee~ that. they were neglected.

HEUER GROCERY Groceries Fruits

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S.F.C. Holds First Meeting

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Tri Beta Elects Tri-Beta, the honorary biology fraternity, met on September 26 at 7:30. Officers elected were: Judy Miller, president; Darrell Wright, vice-president; Lanny Richards, secretary-treasurer; and Glen Irwin, historian. A special meeting will be held on October 11 for the admission of new members.

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Students Meet Staff In First Convocation

CAMEAL Y TEACHES VOICE .

ll's tg·ed

A new teacher on the Campus

l of a Thousand Oaks this fall is i Edward G. Camealy. Mr. Cal mealy is teacher of voice at, Pelr ru State Teachers College. Mr.

[Camealy has the choral program !rn f in the coll.ege and campus school lo.,f r:t and also teaches music educa0 i tion at the college. ree : Mr. Camealy has a B.S. and l~- i M.S. in music from the Univerm- I sity of Illinois. He has had extra he l work at Central Washington Colin flege of Education in Ellensburg, his [Washington and at the San Di. at jego State College. He has taken m- ivoice from Elbert Bellows, an \ outstanding voice teacher on the Mr. !west Coast. He attended the iis- IOiaf Christiansen Choral Clinic ing Chicago and the Robert Shaw Da- !Choral Clinic in San Diego. He in was a member of the Robert :ol- Shaw Chorus in San Diego in >ro- 1956. ing Mr. Camealy was a music suars, pervisor in Gallatin, Tennessee; · kinson, North Dakota; Pasco, shington; and Ellensburg, shington. He was Assistant fessor of Music at Mississippi State College for Women at Columbus, Mississippi. In Mississippi, he was vice-president of the Mississippi Music Teachers Ornization and secretary-treasurof the College Division of the · sissippi Music Educators Asiation. He was editor of the issippi Notes, which is an cial music publication of the te of Mississippi. Mr. and Mrs. Camealy are ntly living in A3 of the FacApartments in Peru. Their

tin

The first all-student convocation was held in the auditorium on Wednesday, Sept. 14, at 9:30 a.m. At that time, the college staff was presenteq. After the singing of the national anthem, the Rev. Charles Moorer of the Peru Methodist Church gave the invocation. Dr. Keith L. Melvin, dean of the college, made several announcements. He then presented Rev. Moorer, who spoke briefly on behalf of the Peru Ministerial Association. Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of the college, introduce~· the staff. New members of the staff are: Dr. Lloyd B. Kite, supervisor of campus school teachers; Mr. Edward Camealy, associate professor of vocal music; Miss Judy Hohl, director of women's physical education; Mr. Silas Summers, associate professor of literature; Mrs. Helen Donavan, dorm counselor at A. D. Majors Hall; Mr. Chris Buethe, principal of the campus high school; and Mrs. Gertrude Fulton, dorm counselor at Morgan Hall. Dr. Gomon then gave some. entertaining "vital" statistics. The convocation was ended with the benediction and the singing of the Color Song.

Seniors Elect Officers The Senior Class elected officers at a 9:30 meeting on Wednesday, September 28th. The following were e 1 e c t e d : Lee Christen, president; Francis Hajek, vice-president; Gladys Monahan, secretary; Keith Hawxby, treasurer. Appointed by the president to head a Homecoming display committee, was Carolyn Parli. Wanda Price and Jim Fisher were named to take charge of ring and announcement ordering. Kar e n Fankhauser and Jack Head are to take care of measuring for caps and gowns. Also discussed were possibilities for future class activities. son is a captain in the Air Force and is now stationed in Fontainebleau, France for three years with NATO.

TAYLOR JEWELRY Dean E. Taylor

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NOTES FROM MAJORS By

Darrel Wolcoft Dorm officers were elected at a 10:30 p.m. session on September 20th. The following w ere elected: Gordon Ohnoutka, Valparaiso, president; Darrell Feit, Beatrice, vice-president; Henry "Hank" Turner, W-o o d w a r d , Iowa, secretary-treasurer. The dorm counselors for this term are: John Christensen, Nebraska City, ground floor; Jerry Wanser, Ewing, first floor; Roger Eshelman, Elliott, Iowa, second floor. If you want to know the official name for the lower floor, you should check with Jerry Wanser. During the Sept. 20th meeting, Jerry was relaying the information that said floor should be called the "ground floor" rather than the "basement." After briefly explaining the whys and wherefores of this, he immediately came out with, "Now, you boys in the 'basement' ... " Maybe you should check with Eshelman or Christensen instead. The "flu bug" made way. into Majors Hall and put the following fellows out of commission for short periods: Glenn Irwin, Howard Engberg, Gary Stover, Don Underwood, and Larry "Butch" Whitfield. What started out to be a snake dance and progressive pep rally on Thursday, September 22nd, turned out to be more of a rain dance; but several girls splashed their way down to Majors Hall to give a warm send-off to the footJ;lall squad leaving for the Kearney game. The rain may have dampened their exteriors, but their spirits seemed to be in fine shape. Co-captains Dick Gerber and Ray Unterbrink gave their comments to wind-up the rally. On Thursday, September 29th, a dormitory meeting was held to agree upon a rate of dues and to get plans rolling for the homecoming display. Two dorm residents have left the campus. ' Larry Halbasch,

Once the signal was given, the Bobcats rushed down the steps, each to claim his share of the chilled 800 pounds of watermelon. Once the watermelon w a s gone, the students left for warmer surroundings with full tummies and sticky hands.

W.A.A. Plans

Freshmen ,Elec~ Officers

Novelty Night

Freshmen. officers and Student Senate representatives w e re elected in convocation Sept. 21. Officers elected are: Bill Tynon, president; Claren Keithley, vice-president; Betty Coulter, secretary. Freshman S t u den t Senate representatives are: Darwin Schroeder, Gary Stover and Mary Jarvis.

The first W.A.A. meeting was held September 21, under the direction of faculty sponsor, Miss Hohl. Officers were introduced as the following: Pat Rathe, president; Mary Ann Lewellyn, vice-president; Jeanne Shuttlesworth, secretary; Kathy Kopplin, treasurer;·. Carol McLain, publicity chairman; Clara Kelly, intramural coorC!inator; Marilynn Giesmann, chairman of awards; and Connie Erisman, sports chairman. Tournaments for the coming year and week-end recreation were discussed. A Novelty Night will be held on October 5, at 8:00 p.m. in the college gymnasium.

neruv1"an Pictures

Unadilla, decided to leave for reasons of health. Mike Hrabov- .L sky, Brooklyn, N. Y., has decided Bill Bell of Nebraska City was to go to Los Angeles either to Peruvian photographer a g a in work with his uncle or to join this year. He shot student picthe Air Force. tures from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Gordon Ohnoutka has had his in the gym ticket office Sept. 13share of troubles. He couldn't 16, except on Thursday, Sept. 15, make the Kearney game because when he worked from 8:00 a.m. of an injured ankle. So, during to 8:00 p.m. the week-end he played some He took 405 student pictures baseball and wound up with a and pictures of all new staff fat lip and a couple of loosened members. teeth, caused by the baseball's Pictures were taken earlier coming into violent contact with than usual in an attempt to get those parts. Gordon has taken it more pictures of students and to stoically, though, and hopes for give the Peruvian staff more time complete recovery of the te~th. to work with pictures. For the more e s t h e t i c a 11 y minded, this item of inter~st: Gracing our solarium are t w o genuine potted plants, a flowering bougainvillia and a croton. 1

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At 7:00 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 13, the Oak Bowl began to fill with Peruvian students, old and new for the annual watermelon feed. They came to watch the team scrimmage. The melons came afterwards.

Phi Alpha Theta And Historical Assoaiation Have Meeting

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Officers of Phi Alpha Theta, an honorary society, and the Peru Historical Association met at Dr. G e o r g e Schottenhamel's home Sunday, September 25, to discuss plans for the October 5 meeting of these organizations. After the first-meeting plans were made, officers enjoyed a hamburger fry and watermelon feed. Joint officers for. Phi Alpha Theta and th~ Pe't"u Historical Association are: Jim Yelnek, president; Jerry Wanser, vicepresident; Bill Fitzgerald, treasurer; and, Ted Kirby, secretary. Henry Turner, Allan Wheeler, Dr. and Mrs. George Schottenhamel, and Mr. Lyle Strom also attended the meeting.

MRS. DONNAVON FIRST MAJORS HALL COUNSELOR Mrs. Helen Donovan has been named counselor of A. D. Majors Hall, the new men's dormitory. Mrs. Donovan is no stranger to Peru residents, since she has lived on a farm near here for the last eighteen years. Mrs. Donovan is the widow of D. E. Donovan, a Peru State alumnus. Mrs. Donovan was born and reared in the state of South Dakota. After graduation from high school, she attended the University of Illinois at Champaign, where she received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Education. Mrs. Donovan has one son, William, who is attending prep school at Bratton Union, where his father was superintendent for several years. Mrs. Donovan is one of the more traveled persons on the Peru State campus. After her graduation from the University of Illinois, she traveled through eleven countries of Europe. After her marriage, she also traveled with her husband in the United States, while he conducted a market research survey for a New York firm during World War II.


First P.T.A. Meeting Held

MISS JUDY HOHL Miss Judy Hohl is the new assistant director of physical education for women. She attended Northwestern University for two and a half years and from there went to the University of Nebraska, where she received her B.S. This is her first year in the teaching profession. Miss Hohl comes from Kansas City, Missouri. She has a brother, twenty, who resides with his parents in Kansas City, Missouri.

Sigma Tau Delta Has Special Meeting

President Albert Brady opened the first meeting of the Campus School PTA and turned over the proceedings to Dr. Milburn Blanton, director of th e Campus School. Dr. Blanton s tr es s e d the uniqueness of the campus school in his talk. He said it served as both a public school and a laboratory training school. He also stated that it was the smallest school to carry the North Central Association accrediting rating. The Campus School has initiated two changes in its extra-curricular activities. 1. The junior high students will have dances separate from senior high. 2. No elementary students will participate in junior-senior high athletics. Dr. Blanton introduced th e new high school principal, L. Chris Buethe, and B. A. Eddy, elementary principal, who introduced their respective staffs. The officers of PTA served cookies and coffee after the meet. ing was ended.

WHISPERS FROM MORGAN By Linda Nygaard

A special meeting of Sigma Tau Delta was held in the Little Theater Thur s d a y afternoon, Morgan Hall's doors haye again September 24. The purpose of the meeting was to make plans for opened to fill the three floors and expanding and improving the or- basement with 138 coeds. ganization. The first dorm council meeting The group discussed the possi- of the year met in Mrs. Fulton's bility of increasing the member- apartment on September 13, at ship by inviting all students who 6:00 p.m. Linda Goodin/ dorm are interested in creative litera- president opened the meeting, ture to join as provisional mem- and temporary wing counselors bers. It would not be necessary were appointed for each fldor. I for these individuals to meet the September 15, was the ;date national requirements of th e for the Sister Sue Party; ~arol honorary fraternity. McLain was in charge. Each upMr. Silas Summers is the spon- perclassman introduced her "Litsor of the organization. Officers tle Sister" and gave the name of for the year are Rose Clancy, · her home town. Refreshments president; Joni Wesolowski, vice- were then served. president; Carolyn Parli, secreThere were three birthdays on tary-treasurer. third floor this month. Joan Riggle, Gladys Monahan, and Kaye Jacobsen celebrated with a party. On second floor, Judy Wolfe The first meeting this semester was also given a birthday party. of the SNEA was held in the PeFirst floor is boasting a clean ru Campus School auditorium at 7:00 p.m. Monday, Sept. 19 with bathroom. J u d g in g from the Francis Hajek, president, presid- noise made after 11:00 p.m., the ing. The program began with the freshmen have been put to work introduction of the officers: Lin- scrubbing. All freshmen underwent a ritda Goodin, vice-president; Gladys Monahan, secretary; Sandra ual, including: pushing pop botCraig, treasurer; and Jeannine tle caps down the hall with their noses, starching wet hair, and Ehlers, historian. Sandra Craig, the local dele- singing myriad choruses of the gate to the NEA, reported on the Color Song. Lois Palmer was thrown in the NEA Leadership Conference held bath tub several times last week in Chadron, Nebr., last August. to celebrate her 18th birthday. Brief remarks were made by the sponsors, Dr. M. W. Blanton Two separate parties were then and Mr. H. W. Johnson, before given for Lois. To commemorate Linda Goodadjournment. in's engagement to Jerry Paden, she was thrown in the tub. During the past summer, Marilyn The White Angels met in the Monroe and Linda Nygaard retelevision lounge of Morgan Hall ceived diamonds from Eric Morat 6:30 p.m., September 19, with tenson and Jerry Wanser, retheir sponsor, Miss Freida Ro- spectively. woldt. I wish to take a few last words Since Joni Wesolowski, Angel to say how proud we are to have president, will be graduating at all new students join us on the mid-term, the present vice-presi- Campus of a Thousand Oaks. dent, Marilyn Monroe, was promoted to president. Carolyn Parli was elected the new vice-president. Other officers are: Rita Grandgenett, secDairy Queen retary; Carol Ellenberger, treasurer; and Connie Erisman, merit ~ chairman. Cone With :the Curl on Top The Angels discussed the wearing of complete uniforms and ~ perfect attendance at all games. They also decided to attend the Auburn, Nebr. Doane football game as a group. BR 4-3102 The meeting was closed with the singing of the White Angel Song.

Campus School Chatter By Mary Anna Gnade After three weeks in school, class and lesson schedules are fairly w e 11 established. The "old" campus schoolers have taken the measure of the "new" students (and vice versa)-and the football teams, A and B, are unbeaten ! ! ! If you think a team uses adhesive tape for binding up injuries, you haven't looked closely at our Prep team. Paul Heuer's sweat pants consist more of tape than of material, and the operation involving holding up Tom Majors' pants was a show in itself-hoist pants till Tom teetered on his toes, then slap the tape around him; next time he squatted whole procedure was repeated. It's not "Quick, Henry -the Flit," but "Hurry-up, the TAPE!" Already GERMS have attacked. College freshman Jim ChriSt filled in for his mother at her 6th grade desk when she was stricken with voicelessness. Sally reported "He had to scold some of the boys, but he uses such big words!" When no voice developed into pneumonia for Mrs. Christ, Mrs. Schottenhamel took over to listen to the daily current events which seem to comprise the largest part of 6th grade homework. Have you noticed two very retiring LITTLE fair maids? Sympathize with them (and their teacher)-they fight a losing bat-. tle each day in kindergarten. Mrs. Adams has 12 boys and only the two girls. One thing, girls in this situation get early practice in "how to handle boys." Li'l Greg Anderson reported to his mother at end of first week that he kissed li'l Miss Spilker! Of course, last year Mrs. A. had 15 boys and only 6 girls so she has fought the battle before. In passing them on to Mrs. Straw, first grade, one fair maid was lost. The reverse was true last year in 8th grade, but when 3 boys · and 8 girls are shuffled in with other high schoolers, the disproportion is less evident. The first few days of speech class, the jun-

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iors and seniors frowned on hav· ing only one freshman boy but he held his own and his classification is no longer held against him. Incidentally, this class has already held its first "banquet" with toastmasters presiding over after-dinner speeches. After a year of construction, the campus schoolers have become a little blase about sidewalk superintending, but some of the littler ones couldn't resist the smooth expanse of MUD by the library-"footprints in the sands (mud) of time?" One of the many extra-curricular duties of an elementary principal came to light the day Mr. Eddy stopped at my door leaning on a crutch. Fifth grader Bonnie Biere doesn't let polio

crutches stop her from tak part in g am es , consequer crutches get broken. To turn her tears, soft-hearted (don't him hear you call him th: Eddy trotted down to the si and MADE a replacement pa Peru was represented at baton twirlers meeting in Sj cuse so you know the high scr will have half-time entert: ment at football games. l while the ranks of the band v; depleted by graduation, your musicians (?) don't sound badly for only a little practi Officers for HS classes h beee elected, and student cc cil organized. Now to get on ball for Homecoming displa; and don't laugh, it's only tl weeks (short ones, too) till tl

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The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

!fBurney's Comments Highlight

Volume 56

Number 2

OCTOBER 17, 1960

Peru vs. Wesleyan

:hoof----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1

~~~~;Legislators'

Day Here

t1ce.f.

havf :ounf l

t

By Leroy Keyt Governor Dwight

w.

Burney's

visit to the Peru State campus Wednesday, October 5, was the first by a Nebraska chief executive in eight years. The last gubernatorial visit was in October, 1953, when Govor Robert Crosby inspected State facilities. he Legislators' Day tour was second time Governor Burhas visited the Campus of a usand Oaks. He made a brief ection of Peru State around . The Governor stated that second visit made a more farable impression than the first. Following a tour of Peru's ilding program Wednesday, vernor B urn e y commented, eru has good buildings. I'm prised at the emphasis on instrial arts in a teachers cole." He continued, "The boys mitory is very fine, but the ition to the girls dormitory uld be air-conditioned." ropping a note on Nebraska's ool district organization, the vernor said, "I, my children, some of my grandchildren nded country schools. I am discouraged with the numerone-room schoolhouses." assing on to teacher certificastandards, Governor Burney lared, "Throughout my legiive career I have backed low ification standards. This atts people to the profession helps relieve the t e a ch er tage." ebraska's chief ex e c u t iv e d the coffee hour interview. a compliment, "You have a tiful campus here. It will be e beautiful when lawns surd the new buildings." egardless of the outcome of November gubernatorial conthe next governor of Neka has already paid a visit ebraska's first college. Both idates, Sen at or John R. per of Humboldt and Frank ison of Lincoln, were among v i s i t o r s at Peru for the ievement Foundation-spond Legislators' Day program. her senators in attendance ber 5 were: Senator Herbert iers and Mrs. Diers of GreshSenator William S. Moulton Mrs. Moulton, Omaha; SenaEdwin T. McHugh, Murdock; Senator Michael Russillo and . Russillo, Omaha. e afternoon and e v e n i n g am included visits to the tly-completed A. D. Majors , the A. V. Larson Industrial Building, and the new west tion to Eliza Morgan Hall, as as the Student Center and south Morgan Hall addition, under construction. her guests included: Mr. and William B. Brandt of Una; Mr. Jack Windle, Nebraska ; Mr. and Mrs. Blaine Yoder, City; and Mr. Lloyd StaldHumboldt. Mr. Brandt and Windle are seeking the secdistrict senate seats. Mr. Yoand Mr. Stalder are candifor senator in the First dis'ct. Representing the Board of Edtion of State Normal Schools : Dr. Freeman Decker, Linpresident; Mr. B er n a rd cer, Nebraska City; and Mr. (Continued on page two)

Bobcats Beat Doane 9-7 In Crucial Fray Ken Dostal Races 85 Yards For Touchdown By Bob Fisher Peru State's Bobcats bounced back in the third quarter by capitalizing on a Doane College fumble and a bad pass from center to score a touchdown and a safety to shade the Tigers 9-7. The Bobcat win Saturday night kept Peru State in contention for the N.C.C. crown as the Kearney Antelopes downed Hastings College to make each of the three leaders one-loss victims. In Saturday's contest the Tigers roared to a seven point lead in the first five minutes of play when Des Isernhagen latched onto a pass from Doane quarterback Ray Graves and scampered 47 yards for a touchdown. Peru's touchdown came with 10:25 remaining in third quar. ter when Ken Dostal, Scribner junior, scooped up a Doane fumble on the Peru 15 and traveled 85 yards for the tally to knot the score. Lynn Osterholm, Glenwood, Iowa, senior, made his placement good. With less than three minutes remaining in the same period Gary Beckwith, Doane's k i ck specialist, was the victim of a bad pass from center and was caught in the end zone for the two point safety that made the difference. The Tigers had taken possession on their own 19 and had been held to seven yards in the three plays prior to the fateful pass. In the waning minutes of the second quarter and early in the fourth period, the Tigers nipped two Peru State scoring threats. Doane's defense held. Peru four downs within five yards of pay dirt just before halftime. The fourth quarter Doane stand again kept the Bobcats from scoring as the Tigers restricted the Bobcats to within five yards of the goal. STATISTICS p D 6 First downs ----------- 9 Passes attempted ______ 10 10 4 Passes completed ------ 6 Yards passing --------- 93 84 Yards rushing _________ 141 71 Number of punts ______ 7 9 Punting average ______ 35.4 35 1 Fumbles lost ---------- 1 Penalty yards --------- 60 45 Scoring By Quarters: Peru ___________ o o 9 o 9 Doane __________ 7 0 0 0 7

Dramatics Club Works On Play Tuesday evening, October 11, the Dramatics Club held a short business meeting in the College Auditorium. The primary purpose of the meeting was to make technical preparations for the Homecoming Play. It was decided that a special meeting would be held in November at the home of the club's sponsor, Mr. R. D. Moore. Methods for enlarging and improving the organization will then be discussed.

M.E.N.C. Elects The M.E.N.C. met Monday, October 3, 1960, in Mr. Wilson's 路 room at the Music Hall. Last year's pre-sl.aent, Gaylin Sudik, presided. Election of officers was held. The new officers are: Gaylin Sudik, president; Eugene Walden, vice-president; and Jim Kelly, secretary-treasurer. Pamphlets that explained M. E. N.C. were handed out to each member. Mr. Wilson suggested some topics that could be used for discussion at the meetings. One of the topics was the revising of the music program so there would be no conflicts for the seniors. A short meeting was called Wednesday, October 5, in which the members decided on a display for Homecoming.

H ~./

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Mother To Guide Her" Is In Final Rehearsals Upperclassman Views Initiation By Linda Nygaard

September 26-28 were the days of Freshmen Initiation. A 1 on g with their little chores in th e three dormitories of polishing shoes, making beds, and doing other odd jobs, the beanie-clad freshmen always had a welcoming committee to greet them after dinner. The initiates were required to sing the Color Song, do a school cheer, and duck walk. If the freshmen were indifferent to the requests of the upperclassmen, they usually took a short trip to the fish pond .. After Kangaroo Court, the tables were turned. It was the upperclassmen who went into the fish pond! One would think the freshmen would be satisfied with seeing their superiors, by grade level only, dripping wet. They were still revengeful. After the girls' dorm initiation, some of the frosh coeds found acorns in their beds. An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth, and an acorn for an acorn. Th ere were, however, no acorns to be found in the upperclassmen beds -only shaving cream, dead mice, crackers, and dried cereal. All in all, it was a swell initiation, and all freshmen are now official Peruvians in good standing.

Freshman Views Initiation

Lois Palmer, Staten Island, New York, portrays "The Statue of Liberty" under the guard of Hank Turner, Fairbury, Nebr., during Kangaroo Court.

Freshman Initiation By Pinky Lewellyn The 1960 Freshman Class was brought before the student body Wednesday, Sept. 28, to pay for their crimes during the initiation period. At 7:30 p.m. the freshmen were brought in and seated as a group on the gym floor. "Honorable Judge" Allen Nelson presided over the court. The prosecuting attorney representing the upperclassmen was John Biere. Tom Aitken represented the freshmen in their pleas. Members of the jury were Mike Roach, Pat Martin, Ch a r 1 e y Schott, Sherrill Tarring, Linda Nygaard, Darrell Feit, Bill Bliss, Dick Gerber, Sandy Pearson, Rita Grandgenett, and Mary Ann Lewellyn. The charges against the fresh-

By Carolyn Reiber The freshmen of Peru State Teachers College were initiated by upperclassmen, Sept. 26-28. I, as a freshman, will attempt to summarize the various opinions of my class on this initiation. I believe that many of us almost enjoyed some of the things demanded of us during initiation. Seeing each freshman with his beanie, odd clothes, a n d stringy hair, displaying respect and obedience for the upperclassmen and singing the Color Song were expectations that added spice to the daily routine of college life. I do think that some of the stunts required of us went more to the extreme than they should have. These, however, were not too frequent and apparently caused no permanent disablements. In conclusion, initiation proved to be fun for the majority of the PSTC students and added color to the Campus of a Thousand Oaks. men varied and included browning up to the professors, kissing upperclassmen, for g e t t in g to wear their beanies, and "parking" during the路 daY'. Sentences for thl crimes were having a hair-pulling contest, eating an alum-covered marshmallow, building a log cabin, and reading Romeo and Juliet. As an over-all penalty, the freshman class was sentenced to stay on campus for the Peru-Hastings game.

The 1960 Homecoming play, "No Mother To Guide Her" or "More To Be Pitied Than Censured," is now in the final stages of rehearsal. Three members of the cast, .Rose Clancy, Allen Nelson, and Ray Meister have had a great deal of experience in dramatics at Peru. All three have been in two Homecoming plays, "The Remarkable Incident at Carson Corners" and "The Cave Dwellers" plus a one act play, "The Claw,'' and one Spring play, "Our Town." Rose Clancy also played in the 1960 Spring play, "Brief Music,'' which was composed of an all girl cast. After playing such parts as a school teacher and a French hussy, in past plays, Rose is no w playing the part of Spring Overton, the beautiful young heroine who has "no mother to guide her." From being a constable and an ex-prize fighter, Ray has moved to tile depths to play Talbot Twillingham, the nasty villain who decides that the chaste young heroine should be chased as well. Allen, who has previously acted as a French style Romeo, as well as a Bear in "The Cave Dwellers,'' is now Hadley, a butler with a prison record. Steve Parker, as Casper Vandenburgh the dashing young hero, has had previous experience as a deaf-mute in ''The Cave Dwellers,'' and Joan Wesolow. ski and Sandy Stephens b o th played in "Brief Music." Newcomers to the play cast include John Biere, Melissa Fulkerson, Carol Eynon, Barbara Thomas, Linda Nygaard, Lois Fritz, and Alan Wheeler. For a riotous evening's entertainment that will long be remembered, everyone is urged to attend this "Meller Drama" in order to revel in hissing the heavily moustached scoundrel as he pursues the down-trodden heroine, who is always rescued in the nick of time by the virile young hero.

Ornithologists Visit Peru, Brownville Area Sunday, October 9, a field trip was sponsored by the Nebraska Ornithologists' Union. Residents of the Peru a n d Brownville area were included in the trip which consisted mainly of bird watching. Everyone participating in the observation met at the Legion Park in Auburn at 6:00 a.m. At 10:00 a.m. a picnic was held in the Neale Park at Peru. There are approximately 50 members in the N.0.U., from the Southeastern area. All students, but especially biology majors and minors were encouraged to take part in this field trip. Dr. Christ and LeRoy Gates of Peru are members of the N.0.U. and helped in the direction of this field trip.

Linscheid Hosts Wiener Roast A get acquainted wiener roast for the Pedagogian and Peruvian staffs was held Thursday, September 29, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Linscheid. 路 Eighteen staffers were on hand. Special guests were Mr. and Mrs. Silas Summers ahd Mr. J. D. Levitt.


WHISPERS FROM MORGAN By Linda Nygaard

Members of ihe senior class ai Nebraska Siaie Teachers College at Peru elected Leona Christen (left), Elk Creek, class president. Other officers include (from left) Francis Hajek, Odell, vice-president; Gladys Monahan, Palmyra, secretary; and Keith Hawxby, Nemaha, treasurer. The 1961 class at Peru State will be fhe College's 9lst graduating class. BURNEY'S COMMENTS HIGHLIGHT LEGISLATOR'S DAY (Continued from page one) E. Albin Larson, Lincoln, secretary. Alumni representatives included: Mrs. Harold Davisson, Seward; Mr. and Mrs. Friel Kerns, Humboldt; Mr. and Mrs. John Lewis, Peru; Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Majors, Omaha; and Mrs. Marie 0. Neal, Nebraska City. 0th er hosts were: Mr. and Mrs. Alan Casey, Auburn; Mr. and Mrs. Floyd W. Pohlman, Auburn; Mrs. Helen Pollard, Peru; and Mr. and Mrs. Fred Rothert, Auburn. Student Senate representatives were. guides for the visitors. Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of the college, presided at a question and answer session. Also in attendance at the dinner meeting were: Jack Johnson, Student Senate president; Jeannine Ehlers, Student Senate vicepresident; and members of Peru State's educational policies committee.

Printing and Photography Are New I.A. Courses Two new courses wilV be installed this year. Dr. Har)an will teach photography and printing as industrial arts courses, but both courses are to be open as elective to all students. Photography will be offered in the spring semester. A well equipped dark room makes it possible to reproduce contact and enlarged prints and to develop roll or sheet film. The maximum number of people for the course will be eight. Printing, a course in letter reproduction, will inc 1 u de all phases of reproduction from spirit duplicating to letter press and offset printing. Silk screen printing, gold leaf printing, r u b b e r stamp making and book binding will also be included to make a wide variety of subjects available for the course.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks October 17, 1960 THE STAFF

Co-Editor _____________________________________ Rose Clancy Co-Editor_ ____________________________ Mary Ann Lewellyn Sports Editor _________________________________ Steve Parker Copy Editor ____________________________________ Leroy Keyt Business Manager _____________________________ Ray Meister Personnel Manager_ ___________________________ Herb Brown ColumnisL _________________________________ Linda Bertram Columnist_ _______________________________ Jerry Kirkendall Columnist_ _________________________________ Linda Nygaard ColumnisL _________________________________ Darrel Wolcott Columnist_ ______________________________ Mary Anna Gnade Campus School_ _______________________________ Sandy Craig Sports Reporter_ _______________________________ Bob Fisher Women's Sports __________________________________ Pam Yost Reporter ___ ~----------------------------------Lynn Bailey Reporter________________________________________ Lois Fritz Reporter __________________________________ Marilyn Monroe Reporter--------- ____________________________ Judy Pollack Reporter ___________________________________ Carolyn Reiber Reporter ___________ --------------- _____________ Gary Weiss Reporter _____________________________________ John Werner Reporter ________________________________________ Tom Yopp Sponsor _________________________________ Stewart Linscheid

Some girls just about got washed out of Morgan Hall last week. A water pipe from third floor broke and washed d o w n the steps to first. Second floor did have its trouble even-·though the girls missed the fun of splashing down t h e hall. Wasps, who make their home on the walls of Mt. Vernon, seem to be invading the west wing of second floor. The entire floor has a faint odor of "RealKill." Speaking of killing, Kay Parli, Carolyn Parli, Patsy Melcher, Lee Christen, and Linda ·Goodin did a pretty good job of devouring a watermelon at a party last week. The girls of Morgan are able to boast cleaner floors since the purchase of three new mops. The dorm has also invested in a new iron, ironing board and cover, and a waste paper basket for their kitchen. Donna Francis left the group of "available individuals" 1 a s t Saturday, October 1 when she b e c a me the bride of Mark Thompson. Mark is in the Navy, stationed in California. ' There was a talent show put on by the girls of .the freshman class. Each wing did a different stunt. Among others, there was a pantomime, several skits, and a take off on the television show "I've Got a Secret." The frosh coeds did very well and all the gals enjoyed themselves. New wing counselors w e r e elected by the seven wings last . Wednesday evening. The new · "peace-l{eepers" are: Mary Ann Lewellyn, third floor, west wing; Wanda Price, third floor, east wing; Linda Nygaard, second floor west wing; Lee Christen, second floor east wing; Connie Erisman, the new addition to all floors; Kathy Rhoten, basement. Freshman representatives to the dorm council are Carol Eynon and Bonnie Sude. Judy Adams is our off campus representative. Congratulations girls, I know you will do a fine job. I close with these words of wisdom. "Live each day as if it is your last," mid-semester exams are just about here! STUDENT WIVES MEET The Peru Students' Wives Club held its first meeting of the year, Thursday, September 29. Sixteen new members and 12 veteran members were pre s e n t . The meeting was opened by President Mrs, Jack Hardy, who gave a review of last year's activities. Mrs. Bill Hudgon was elected refreshment chairman and Mrs. Kent Wichman was elected sunshine chairman. Representatives from Auburn, Nebraska City, and Peru were selected for the purpose of notifying the student wives of club activities other than the regular meetings. These representatives are: Mrs. Robert Heng, Jr., Nebraska City; Mrs. Larry Curnes, Auburn; Mrs. Leroy Keyt, Peru. A vanilla and pepper selling project was approved by the club. If sufficient sales are made, the club will receive an 80-cup coffee urn. Refreshments of apple crisps, topped with ice cream, and coffee were served by Mesdames Jack Hardy, Ross Pilkington, Leroy Keyt, Ronald Lietschuck, Dwight Anderson and Ted Kirby. Students' Wives regular meetings will be held every third Thursday of the month, in the Home Economics Department of Peru Campus School at 8:00 p.m.

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Broncs Gallop Past Bobcats In 19-7 Win cos to kick on their fourth down following the opening halftime kick-off. Thirteen plays later, the Bobcats had fought their way from the Hastings 23 to the TD. It was John Christensen who went over after the ball had rested inside Hastings' two-yard stripe on the two preceding plays. Lynn Osterholm's placement try was good. Final touchdown came with 3:27 remaining in the third quarter on a 21-yard run by Ron Barry. The Broncos needed but five plays and the benefit of a 15yard Bobcat penalty to reach the Peru goal following Osterholm's kick after touchdown. A Bobcat threat in the fourth quarter ran out of downs about midway in the period as the Peruvians lost the ball on the fourth down on the Hastings 10yard line.

By Bob Fisher

Left 'to right: Jerry Henning. Gail Beckstead, Ray Unterbrink. Ross Pilkington. Dick Neale.

Penhandle Game Ends College Football Career of Eleven Seniors PERU FOOTBALL SENIORS (First of two articles) By Tom Yopp The ranks of the 1960 Bobcat grid squad includes eleven seniors whose college football careers will end with the November fifth game at P a n hand 1 e A & ·M in Goodwell, Oklahoma. Seven linemen and four backs are represented in the senior HED lineup, whose efforts had earned a total of 22 Peru football letters ·with the Bobcats at the start of the current season. Indications --t:i>alre that this number will be increased by eleven when the final whistle sounds in Oklahoma. Henning Jerry Henning is described by · hi.s coaches and opponents as the finest line-backer in the state. Jerry, a 1957 graduate of Peru Prep, is majoring in physical education and mathematics. Jerry's wife is the former Marlene Allgood. They have one child, Mike.

NOTES FROM DELZELL By Gerald Kirkendall Delzell Hall sponsored an all. college dance after the game with Hastings. The dance was held in the dorm lounge. A good crowd attended. A dorm council meeting w a s held on October 10. Plans were

J:leckstead Another four-year letterman is Gail Beckstead, a 1957 Bellevue high graduate. A scrappy defensive guard, Gail's experience has proved valuable this season. A physical education and industrial arts major, Gail is planning to coach and teach following graduation. Unterbrink A mainstay in the Bobcat line is Ray Unterbrink, who this season appears to be turning in his best. Last season, he was voted to the N.C.C. coach's all-conference team. Ray's experience at Wood River, Ill., high school and service ball is proving valuable to Peru State's football fortunes. Ray plans to teach physical education and social science. Pilkington Another service ball veteran is Ross Pilkington, a three-year letterman, and the fastest man in the ball club. A triple threat,

(passer, kicker and runner), "Pilky" is a candidate for a spot on the _NAI.A. All-American team. An outstanding athlete at Red Oak, Iowa, high school, and holder of the State 50-yard dash record. Ross is married to the former Pauline Carlson of Red Oak. He plans to coach and teach history. Neale A three-year letterman is Dick Neale, a 1957 graduate of Bellevue High School. A real plugger, l Dick has been dependable at both the halfback and fullback spots. 'In his college football career, Dick has proven himself worthy of the sportsmanship award he received in high school. A history and physical education major, Dick plans to teach. He was married last summer to the former Diane M. Phillips of Bellevue. The other seniors will appear in the next issue of the Pedagogian.

discussed concerning Homecoming. A fad has developed in the basement. Three rooms h av e placed signs on their door. The signs are "The Lair," "Harold's Club," and "The Cave." If anyone has noticed a stranger on campus, don't be alarmed; Norman Catlett shaved his mustache. Delzell has two intramural touch-football teams by the names of Delzell One and Delzell Two. Delzell One is managed by Roger Smith and Delzell Two

is managed by Jerry Partridge. In a game b e t w e e n the two teams, Roger Smith's team won by a score of 15 to 0. The lounge of Delzell was filled during the world series. The world series was a major topic of discussion for most dorm residents. Room five wants to pass a sure way of combatting ants .to other dorm residents. They have conducted an all-out defensive battle. They have prepared a moat by placing the legs of chairs in coffee cans filled with water and have hung food from the ceiling.

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NOTES FROM MAJORS By Darrel Wolcott One fellow who makes "horsing around" pay off is Howard Engberg. It seems he won 1st place trophy in the "open stick race" at the Cass County Horse Show in Plattsmouth, Aug. 9. The Majors Hall football squad defeated the Independent team 19-0 in an Oct. 4 game. Henry Turner zeroed in on Larry Rathe with two passes for two TD's. He also hit Jack Johnson for another TD and the extra point. Jim Kemp and Ray Plankinton's car went to Auburn th e other night. Jim came back but Plankinton's car didn't. Upon finding the battery was dead, Jim and passengers had to get a ride back to campus with someone else. Eugene Fritch doesn't th i n k greyhounds are so fast. He hitchhiked home to Atlantic, Iowa in less than half the time it takes him to ride back to Peru on a bus. Gary Stover and Butch Whit-

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White Angels Meet The White Angels met Monday, October 10th, in the recreation room of Eliza Morgan Hall. Roll call was taken and the minutes of the last meeting w e r e read and approved. Karen Fankhauser and Karen Mcintyre volunteered to rope off a section for the White Angels, the Cherubs, and the Blue Devils for the game Friday night. Karen Fankhauser presented a report on the Homecoming display. Bev Leeper, Phyllis Grube, Kay Parli, Patsy Melcher, Linda Goodin, and Sherrill Torring are to help with the display. The Cherubs are to help with the display and also the arch. Sherrill Torring, Julie Mayer, Carol McLain, Kathy Rhoten, and Carolyn Parli are to help with the coffee hour at Delzell Hall after the H o m e c o m i n g game. Nothing is really work unless you would rather be doing something else.-Sir James M. Barrie.

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Hastings College's Ron Barry galloped a total of 123 yards in three touchdown plays to pace the Broncos to a 19-7 victory Saturday, Oct. 1, over the Peru State College Bobcats in the Peru Oak Bowl. Despite 20 first downs gained by a total of 73 yards passing and 221 yards rushing, Peru State could not muster the gains needed at crucial moments to score more than one touchdown. The Bobcats were plagued by the loss of two fumbles and three pass interceptions. Barry's first trip across the Bobcat goal line was on a 32yard run with 4:44 left in the first period. The touchdown play was on the Broncos first down following a Bobcat quick-kick. Eldon Pequette, Bronco placement specialist, made his first conversion attempt, had his secSTATISTICS: ond try blocked by frosh lineman p H Darwin Schroeder, Omaha BenFirst downs ----------- 2(} 5 son grad, and his final attempt Passes attempted ______ 16 4 go wild. Passes completed ______ 5 0 The second Hastings TD was Yards passing --------- 73 0 set up when Pequette intercept- Yards rushing _________ 221 189 ed a Peru pass. On the Broncos' Number of punts ______ 3 6 first play, Barry made his sec- Punting average _ _____ 28 40 7 ond and longest touchdown run-'Fumbles lost ---------- 2 1 70 yards. A( halftime, Hastings Penalty yards --------- 45 25 lead 13-0. Scoring By Quarters: Peru's Bobcats crossed pay dirt with 5:43 yet to go in the third Hastings ______ 7 6 6 0 19 quarter, after forcing the Bron- Peru ----,------ 0 0 7 0 7

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Campus School Classes and Organizations Active By Sandy Craig Mr. B. A. Eddy, elementary principal, reports the enrollment is 249. Teachers include: Mrs. Maryon Adams, kindergarten; Mrs. Geraldine Straw, 1st grade; Miss Gladys Grush, 2nd grade; Miss Mary Clarke, 3rd grade; Mrs. Ruth Brown, 4th grade; Mrs. Dorothy Iversen, 5th grade; Mrs. Lillian Christ, 6th grade. Others teaching part time are Mr. Virgil DeZwarte, physical education; Mr. Edward Camealy, vocal music; Mr. Victor Jindra, orchestra; and Mr. Gilbert Wilson, band. Third graders are enJoymg their new room, previously the eighth grade room. Soon to be installed are science and music rooms in the basement. Karen Fankhouser, C a r o 1y n Parli, and Jim Kemp are playground supervisors for this semester. The high school enrollment is 111, an increase over last year. New to the teaching staff are: Miss Judy Hohl, volley ball; Mr. Chris Buethe, principal, chemistry, algebra and 8th grade general science; Mr. Edward Camealy, vocal music. Class officers have been elected. Seventh grade: Nancy Adams, president; Jerry Allgood, vice president; Phillip Parker, secretary; Mary Lut, treasurer. Eighth grade: Mike Nincehelser, president; Roger Gerdes, vice president; Dick Sherman, secretary; John Mcintire, treas. Ninth grade: Jeannie Gnade, president; Ann Adams, vice president; Lynda Combs, secretary; Anita Cox, treasurer. Tenth grade: Steven Gnade, president; John Patterson, vice president; Doris McConnaughey, secretary; Tom Gomon, treasurer. Eleventh grade: Tom Majors, president; Keith Marnell, vice

president; Linda Morrissy, secretary; Tom Boatman, treasurer. Twelfth grade: Jim Furnace, president; Bob Gnade, vice president; Linda Stephens, secretary; Elaine Gerdes, treasurer. September 19 was F;H.A.'s first meeting.' Yearbooks were reported near completion. The maintenance of the school lunch room aprons was accepted as a money making project. Visitors to the home economics department Sept. 21 were Mrs. Ellen Fellers, home economics instructor, and 21 students f_ r o m Elk Creek high school.

LIBRARY COLUMN By Linda Bertram

Dorothy Nyron. has compiled A Library of Literary Criticism. This comprehensive, authoritative, and easy to consult volume is a survey of criticism centering on one hundred and seventy American authors who wrote or came into prominence after 1900. These critical excerpts have been taken from the writings of outstanding critics in periodicals and books. Every major literary performance of the last sixty years is evaluated in this volume. Bibliographic information gives the source of more detailed criticism. The Breaking Point by Daphne du Maurier is a collection of nine short stories. These stories are characterized by intense and interesting plots. They are marked with overtones of terror, mystery, wry humor, and haunting recapturings of childhood. The nine stories range from "The Blue Lenses," a terrifying account of a strange sense of vision, to "The Menace," a funny story of movie idol. In the Waters of Kronos Conrad Richter tells the story of John Donnor's journey back through time to the town where he was born. He feels that this trip might make him free from a deep malaise. When he makes the journey· he is an old man. He finds himself in his own life at the time of a double crisis. As he tries to enter his old intimate family, he is rejected. Even the boy he was considers him a stranger.

Campus School Chatter

Paul H e u e r are co-editors. Haven't heard who will replace Mr. Masek and Jim Christ behind the camera. Its a real job recording memories for posterity. Mrs. Friest reports that she has 11 in her Latin class-all workers apparently or she wouldn't have been so pleased. Those -home economics people are no pikers-already yet a tea for 7th and 8th grade mothers. Just another step toward facing teas and open houses in college and adult life. The freshmen have now been initiated--i!ito high school at a dance after the Dawson-Verdon game. Besides such tricks as having to dance without shoes, singing the color song (have yo u heard Prep Color Song? Homecoming bonfire is a good place for it.) and such, each one was sentenced for a crime. Several had. to wear an apple all day Monday because they were "apple-polishers"; those who had to wear onions committed the awful crime of flirting too much with upperclassmen; being too noisy in halls drew cheerleading for punishment; and those too eag'er in football had to do calisthenics-"let the punishment fit the crime?" At least the jury sided with the freshmen-they didn't have to be slaves for the seniors (which in my case would have been drastic, having both a senior and a -freshman at home). The days are flying by-Homecoming is upon us-no queen yet, but display theme is_ "Song" and the high school band is on the march! The freshmen are desperate for cash-call upon them for any raking you need done, any Saturday. (Advertisement)

By Mary Anna Gnade Action on the football field is thrilling to players and spectators, but have you noticed how hard the alums play? Those recently on the field for dear ol' Prep run up and down with each play on the sidelines; older alums do their playing sitting in cars or bleachers-but if you're near 'em, you know they once gave all on the field, too! After a glorious start to a football season in which potential stars began to shine, Prep went to Table Rock to be ground under. A mangled c o 11 a r b on e blacked out Tom Boatman's star for the rest of the season. This makes the second season injury has sidelined his enthusiasm for the game-books, here he comes. Speaking of football, have you noticed the noon hour games on the driveway in front of the campus school? You know the way a football bounces-and a truckload of glass parked nearby! In case of a tackle on the margin of the walk, both players roll down the slope-for 1\ gain or loss? Visiting politicians may not have made much of an impression in the younger grades, but Mrs. Iversen has her 5th graders divided into two parties. They decided that Chris Maxwell would be Kennedy; Bonnie Biere, Johnson; Georgette Gomon,' Nixon; and Marcia Lewis, Lodge. The class members are to watch debates, newspapers and magazines and bring information to the proper candidates. Speeches will be made and if enough sample ballots are at hand, voting will take place at the correct time. Mrs. Christ's 6th graders are also following p o 1i t i c a 1 events. (Having a 5th and 6th grader is one sure way of not sluffing off information about the election.) Here's energy, dedication to satisfying seeking young minds, or "got another minute you want to fill?"-Principal Buethe mentioned that if anyone were interested, he'd teach 'em about slide rule Thursday noons. Full house! And the new slide rules really fascinate. And the high school will have a yearbook-Dave Gomon and

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Mr. and Mrs. Buddy Morrissy. Elected to serve the Stude1 Council for the year were: Sa1 Adams, president; Elaine Ge des, vice president; Linda St1 phens, secretary; Dave Gomo treasurer; Linda Morrissy, pul licity chairman. Mr. Bueth principal, will serve as sponsor The council is w o r k i n g c school problems through the sti dents suggestion box. Throu§ their efforts, the weekly menu being posted. The faculty w a prompted to cut down week-er assignments to school day siz Also, the council is stressir courtesy, especially in the lune room.

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By Sandra Craig Band officers for the 1960-61 school year are: Sara Adams, president; Elaine Gerdes, vice president; Bob Gnade, secretarytreasurer. There are 36 members in the high school band and 27 in the elementary school band. Pep band has been playing at the football games. The full band is preparing for Homecoming ceremonies and the fall concert. Freshmen were initiated at a dance after the game October 7. Calling Kangaroo Court to order was Al Wheeler, Jr., judge. His helpers were Tom Boatman, bailiff and Leland Schneider, defense attorney. Parent sponsors were

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Jimmy Dorsey Concert

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU.NEBRASKA

Al Wheeler Becomes Athletic Director After Successful 23 Years Coaching Wheeler Has Produced Great Football Teams And Fine Athletic Program at Peru State Al Wheeler, head f o o t b a 11 coach at Peru State Teachers College for the past 23 years, recently announced his retirement as head football coach at the end of the 1960 season. The announcement came at a luncheon gathering of his 1960 football team and a host of former lettermen . preceding Peru's homecoming tilt with Nebraska Wesleyan. Wheeler's retirement from the gridiron does not mean that he will be absent from Peru State and the Nebraska College Conference. He will continue as athletic director, head of the physical education department, and head baseball coach.

Gomon Praises Al Commenting on coach Wheeler's retirement, Neal S. Gomon, president of Peru State, stated: .. "Al Wheeler's decision to retire from active football coaching is entirely his own. It is doubtful if any college in the country, large or small, can match the successful football record of Pe::ru State during the last 23 sea. ~s. Although Al has compiled ~- tremendous record as a winning coach, his greatest contribu>'tion has been in the development ¡flf hundreds of young men as eutstanding teachers and citi~ns. I am happy that he w i 11 continue to head our health and fhysical education p r o gr a m s which are second to none in the ~a." Gomon went on to say that a successor would be named flt a later date. Dean of Coaches Wheeler, often referred to as Dean of Nebraska College ference football coaches, has ed a most enviable gridiron rd in his 23-year reign at . Including six games of the season, Coach Al has won games, tied 12, and lost but During this period he led his cats to five conference chamships and to two co-champi"ps. The championship years in 1939, 1940, 1942, 1952, 1953. The co-championships urred in 1942 and 1951. The 2 season saw the Wheeler tie for the conference pionship and win the state . One of Wheeler's m o s t orable feats came between season in 1951 and a similar in 1954. This three-year ¡ d saw Wheeler coach the ts to a winning skein of 26 ries without a defeat. Durthis streak of success, Wheelas named "Coach of the Year Nebraska" by the Omaha Id-Herald in 1952, and the year was selected the "Lit11-American Coach of the " by the Rockne Club of as City. ccess a n d organizational ty has brought W h e e 1er y important offices. In 1953he served as president of the .I.A. He served as District .I.A. chairman for 12 years, was a member of the organin's executive committee for years. Wheeler has served as man for the N.A.I.A. and s Hall of Fame awards come the last five years. (Continued on page five)

Student Senate Brings Jimmy Dorsey Band The Jimmy Dorsey band, under the direction of Lee Castle, has been contracted by the Student Senate to play a two hour concert in the college auditorium November 29, 1960. This is one of the top-name bands in the U. S. and it is a privilege to have them with us. The concert will begin at 8:00 p.m., and the price of tickets will be $1.75 for reserved seats and $1.25 for general admission. Admission to a show of this caliber would cost three or four dollars anywhere else, so it is hoped that all students will take this opportunity to see and hear a fine band.

Peruvian Pictures On November 8 The flash bulbs will start popping at one o'clock on Nov. 8 as picture taking of student organizations gets under way. Mr. Don Carlile, Mr. J. D. Levitt, Mr. Silas Summers, and Steve Parker will be pointing the Graphics. Four pictures will be taken every ten minutes. An organization picture and a picture of officers will be made in the Music Hall auditorium; at the same time, an organization picture and a picture of officers will be made in the main auditorium. Please help the staff by keeping this schedule. If you give the Peruvian Staff the cooperation that you have given for the past two years, this schedule w i 11 work to near perfection. All classes will be dismissed for the picture taking. The "shooting schedule" is as follows:

Audiforium 1:00-Tri Beta 1:IO-Business Club 1:20-Women's Athletic Association 1:30-Student Christian Fellowship 1:40-S.N.E.A. 1:50-Wesley Fellowship 2:00-Home Ee Club 2:10-M.E.N.C. 2:20-Kappa Delta Pi 2:30-Industrial Arts Club 2:40-Choir 3:30-Band

Music Hall 1:00-Epsilon Pi Tau 1:10-Student Senate 1:20-Lutheran Student Association 1:40-Phi Alpha Theta 1:50-Dramatics Club 2:00-Sigma Tau Delta 2:10-Newman Club 2:20-Alpha Mu Omega 2:30-Lutheran Club 2:40-Vets Club 2:50-Peruvian Staff 3:00-Pedagogian Staff Pictures of the "P" Club, the White Angels, and the Blue Devils will be taken at a later date because membership rosters will not be complete until the end of the semester.

Volume 56

Number 3

Lee Christen 1960 Homecoming Queen Lee Christen was crowned the 1960 Homecoming Queen between halves at the Peru-Wesleyan football game the afternoon of October 22. She is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rudy Christen Jr. of Elk Creek. . Lee is a senior at Peru, majoring in elementary education. She hopes to teach the intermediate grades in Lincoln upon graduation. Her secret ambition is to work with orphans or in an orphanage. Lee is very active on the Peru campus. She is a Yell Leader, Senior Class President, and a member of the Home Economics Club, SNEA, New m an Club, Kappa Delta Pi, and W h it e Angels. Although Miss Christen could think of no particular dislikes, her likes are many, including: Peru, people, steak, and California's Pacific coast. Her hobby is sports. She favors winter sports, especially ice skating. Lee Christen took a trip to California and Mexico this summer. During her stay, she attended a typical California beach party, which she t er m e d as "weird." She had her first roller coaster ride at the Pike in Long Beach; and she attended the bull 'fights in Tia Juana, where she met a Spanish matador. "If you want to know about the bull fights, just ask me," says Lee. She visited her sister in Los Angeles and friends in Salt Lake City, Utah, and Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Peru Student Earns Superior Ratings At Discussion Conference A Peru State sophomore earned superior ratings in both rounds of the Nebraska Wesleyan Discussion Conference in Lincoln, Friday. Steve Parker, Peru, gained this high distinction as the conference discussed the topic: "What type of compulsory health insurance program should the Unite d States adopt for all citizens?" Students were evaluated by a critic in each of the rounds. Only one other participant in the conference, attended by 15 Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, South Dakota, and New York colleges and universities, received two superior ratings. Darrel Wolcott, Reynolds senior, and Steve Bates, Lincoln junior, received superior ratings for Peru in one round of the discussion. Other Peru Staters attending the conference were: Lois Fritz, Omaha; Carol McLain, Auburn; Jerry Littell, Beatrice; Rose Clancy, Dawson; Alan Nelson, Red Oak, Iowa.

Ninth Home Economics Dinner To Be November 8 Representative dishes fro m nine foreign countries and the United States will be served by the Home Economics Club of Peru State Teachers College at the ninth annual United Nations Dinner. Serving will begin in the home economics suite, third floor of the Campus School at 6:00 p.m., November 8. The menu includes: meats from

OCTOBER 31. 1960

Here November 29th

Bobcats Beat Wesleyan Plainsmen Before Large Homecoming Crowd Victory Puts Cats in Running For Nebraska College Conference Championship

"Meller Drammer" Was a Crowd Pleaser By Herb Brown At 7:00 p.m. October 22, the Peru State Dramatic Club presented its annual homecoming play. This year's selection was a three act "Meller Drammer" entitled "No Mother To Guide Her: or More To Be Pitied Than Censured" by Anthony Forsythe. Spring Overton, played by Rose Clancy, was the beautiful heroine. Spring, at various times in the play, suffered a blow on the head, a loss of memory, a murder charge, a drugged glass of milk, and the attentions of both the villain and the hero's father. C asp er Vandenburgh, played by Steve Parker, in true heroic fashiorr proved steadfast in his faith in Spring. Talbot Twillingham (Ray Meister) proved just as steadfast in his efforts to besmirch the heroine's fair name. Sylvester Vandenburgh (John Biere) and his wife Effie (Melissa Fulkerson) enlivened the situation when Effie continually i n t err u p t e d the would-be Romeo. Rounding out the Vandenburgh household were Hadley the butler (Allen Nelson) and Fifi the French maid (Joan Wesolowski). Other members in the c as t were Carol Eynon, R o b e r t a Thomas, Sandra Stephens, Linda Nygaard, Alan Wheeler, and Lois Fritz. Intermission music was by the College Orchestra conducted by Victor H. Jindra and the. Barber Shop Quartet directed by Ed" ward G. Camealy. Robert D. Moore directed the play. The production staff included Chick Stessman, James Christ, and Julie Mayer. The sound effects were the courtesy of the audience who in true Meller Drammer fashion booed and hissed the villain, while cheering the hero.

Carlile and Levitt Discuss Photography The Sigma Tau Delta program was opened by Joni Wesolowski. She introduced the guest speakers, Mr. Don Carlile and Mr. J. D. Levitt. The speakers' topic was photojournalism. They explained the use of pictures in journalism. Also discussed was what makes a good picture. Pictures were then shown illustrating their points. Those present were reminded that monthly meetings are open to all who are interested. After adjournment, the group met in the Bob Inn for coffee. Austria and Frante; vegetables from Bolivia, Uruguay, and Ecuador; a salad from Hungary; breads from Italy and the United States; desserts from Norway and Alaska; and beverages from Brazil and the United States. Tickets may be purchased from organization members or reserved by calling Tr2-2811. The general public is invited.

By Bob Fisher The Peru State Bobcats capitalized on their .own alert play and costly Nebraska Wesleyan mistakes to build up an early 26 to 0 lead and go on to defeat the Plainsmen 47 to 12 in the 39th annual Peru State Homecoming Oct. 22 in the Oak Bowl. Peru State's Al Wheeler, after announcing his retirement as head football coach at the end of the 1960 season, led his charges onto the home field for the last time, and the Bobcat gridders responded immediately by recovering a Wes1eyan: fumble on the second play of the game at the Lincolnites' 18-yard line. Eight plays later, Falls City's Ron Kelley cracked over from the oneyard line,/for the opening touchdown with but 4:53 of the first quarter played. Shortly thereafter, Dick Place gathered in a Plainsmen punt on the Wesleyan 42 and. scampered to the Wesleyan 3-yard line be-. fore being downed. Workhorse Ron Kelley plunged over from the 1-yard line with 6:30 remain~ ing in the initial quarter. T he extra point was good on a pass from Ross Pilkington to Falls City's LaMarr Gibson, and the score stood 13 to 0. Peru's own Jerry Henning pilfered a Wesleyan aerial and scampered 24 yards for the Bobcats' third score with 5:18 left in the first quarter. A short kickoff followed and Peru recovered on the Wesleyan 49. Bob Gibson, the younger half of the Falls City Gibson duet, culminated the 49-yard drive with a 1-yard plunge into scoring territory. Lynn Osterholm kicked the first of his four extra points for the afternoon, and Peru had a 26 to 0 bulge early in the second stanza. Nebraska Wesleyan entered the scoring fray with 12 :24 remaining in the half on a beautifully executed 43-yard pass from quarterback Bob Els to Ron Peet. The Wesleyanites had to wait until midway in the final period for their last touchdown. That came on a 16-yard sweep by fullback Dan McCord. Peru's other touchdowns came on an 18-yard pitch from Bob Gibson to Fullerton's Dick Gerber in the second quarter, Bob Gibson's 4-yard dash just before the half, and a 20-yard pass from Falls City's Ron Kelley to Dick Gerber in the last quarter. Peru's strong line led by veteran ends Dick Gerber and LaMarr Gibson, tackle Vernon Thomsen, a n d guard Mike Ramirez, was a major factor in the victory. The victory placed Peru in the lead of the Nebraska Co 11 e g e Conference with a record of fom. wins and one loss. Wayne State,' who had been tied with the Bobcats, dropped into second place, as they engaged in non-league action Saturday. Peru's next: game is the vitally important clash at Wayne's Homecoming on October 29. Scoring By Quarters Peru ______ 19 14 7 7 Wesleyan __ 0 6 0 6 (Continued on page five)

47 12


STUDENT SENATE EDITORIAL By Ray Meister

NOTES FROM MAJORS

Is seems to be the opinion of some students on this campus that their Student Senate is not doing anything for them. A few facts should let the students know what this hardworking senate is doing behind the scenes. The half-time coronation of the Queen at the football game, -and the Homeco~ng dance festivities seem to have gqne over pretty well; this was all planned and executed by your Student Senate.

Darrel Wolcott

During Homecoming o p e n house, 208 guests signed the register at Majors Hall. However, a considerable number of guests did not sign, so that number of guests. is not acc\lrate. The s e guests represented six states, the most distant being Illinois and Oklahoma. After the game, four and one-half gallons of p u n ch and nine pounds of cookies were served. Tom Lowrey, Tom Morton, Howard Engberg, Joe Perina, Jerry Beecham, and R a y Plankinton had charge of the guest book. Glen Irwin and Mike Donavon served at the punch bowl.

Now, your senate has a truly great show for you. At 8:00 p.m. on November 29, the Jimmy Dorsey band under the direction of Lee Castle, will present a two-hour ~oncert in the colleg~ auditorium. The Dorsey band is one of the topname bands m the country and it is a privilege to have them with us. The· price of tickets will be $1.25 for general admission and $1.75 for reserved seats. A show such as this would cost three o~ four dollars anywhere else, so it is hoped the student body will take advantage of this opportunity to hear some excellent music. . By the .way, fellow Peruvians, how about showing a little mterest m. your Student Senate by coming to a meeting some Thursday night at 6 :30. The meetings are open to any student, and any constructive suggestions will be appreciated. This is your Student Senate, and it is here for your benefit.

N.C.A. Coordinator Visits Campus Dr. Clark Elkins, coordinator of the North Central Association of Colleges and S e c o n d a r y Schools, visited the Peru State campus Monday, Oct. 24 to discuss the improvemenf of the general education program of the college. Dr. Elkins met Monday morning with President Gomon, Dean Melvin, and Dr. Blanton. Monday afternoon, Dr. Elkins talked with the curriculum committee. Later in the afternoon, Dr. Elkins visited with the division heads. Dr. Elkins, in addition to being the coordinator of the North Central Association, is head of the department of social sciences at Henderson college at Arkadelphia. This summer he was co-director of the North Central As-' sociation Workshop at the University of Minnesota, which Dr. Blanton attended as a representative of Peru State. ·

The arrangements for the bus trip to Oklahoma Panhandle by the Blue Devils on November 5, were cancelled at the October 24 meeting. Dick Gerber, president, informed the members that all money needed to finance the trip had not been turned in to Mike Zinn, chairman of trip committee, by the October 23 deadline. Chick Stessman, treasurer, re-

If there are any reports abroad about a fire in Majors during the latter open house period on Saturday, let it be known that somebody "goofed" and set off a false alarm. No casualties reported.

Home Ee Elects V.P. Candidate

Language Club Sees Pictures

Devils Cancel Oklahoma Trip

Building the Majors di s p 1 a y "rocket" were "Rocketeers" J erry Wanser, Hank Turner, Monte Ha.effner, . Joe Perina, Tom Aitken, Charley Caverzagie, Gordon Ohnoutka, Darrel Feit, Glen Irwin, Jim Kemp, and Stan Vasey. Since there was no monkey available to enclose in the "missile," someone suggested the next best thing-Tom Aitken. However, Tom declined the honor:

ported that Blue Devil jackets had been ordered for the pledges, and the jackets would be received within three or four weeks. The members received a report on the financial outcome of the dance sponsored by the Blue Devils and held in Delzell Hall on October 19. No proposals were brought up for future consideration.

A special meeting of the Home Economics Club was held in the recreation room of Eliza Morgan Hall Monday, October 24, 1960. The purpose of the meeting w~s to nominate a girl from the club to be a candidate for the first vice-president: of the redional Home Economics Club. The name of the candidate will be announced later.

The Foreign Language Club met in the Administration Building at 8:30 p.m. Mr. Rath, the sponsor, showed p i c tu res of Spain. The club then moved to the Music Hall, where the group studying Spanish sang the native songs of that country. The business meeting proceeded with Carol McLain presiding. After adjournment, the group enjoyed refreshments.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The .Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks October 31. 1960 THE STAFF

Co-Editor_____________________________________ Rose Clancy Co-Editor_ ____________________________ Mary Ann Lewellyn Sports Editor _________________________________ steve Parker Copy Editor ____________________________________ Leroy Keyt Business Manager_ ____________________________Ray Meister Personnel Manager ____________________________ Herb Brown Columnist_ _________________________________ Linda Bertram Columnist_ _______________________________ Jerry Kirkendall Columnist_ _________________________________ Linda Nygaard Columnist_ _________________________________Darrel Wolcott Columnist_ ______________________________ Mary Anna Gnade Campus SchooL _______________________________ Sandy Craig Sports Reporter_ _______________________________ Bob Fisher Women's Sports __________________________________ Pam Yost Reporter ______________________________________ Lynn Bailey Reporter ________________________________________ Lois Fritz Reporter--"-------------------------------Marilyn Monroe Reporter_____________________________________ Judy Pollack Reporter___________________________________ Carolyn Reiber Beporter_______________________________________ Gary Weiss Beporter---~--------------------------------John Werner

Beporler:.----------------------------------___ Tom

Yopp S~~--~-·"""~-""."-..,.._~..--+,,.,.,.~-.,.Stewart Linscheid

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By

1

House Mother Mrs. Donavan and the dorm officers and counselors were present at a tea given by Dr. and Mrs. Harold Boraas and Miss Juanita Bradley at the Boraas . home Monday evening, Oct6ber' 24. i

In Intramural League football play on Thursday, Oct. 20, the Majors Hall eleven defeated Delzell II 20 to 0. "Eagle Eye" Eshelman scored two TD's and John Greene did the honors on a third one. "Jumping Jack" Johnson received a pass for one extra point and ran across for the other. As a result of a 0-0 game between Majors and the Independents on Tuesday, Oct. 25, those teams are tied for first place in the league. The defensive work of "Fiery Fred" Koudele, who is out with a shoulder injury, was missed "sorely."

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must have completed th re e courses in Biology and be enrolled in the fourth. For provisional membership, one must plan to make biology one ·of his major interests, but does not yet qualify for national membership. In addition, there are scholarship requirements for the organization. Officers for the 1960-61 school year are: Judy Miller, Peru,

President; Darrell Wright, Steinauer, Vice-President; Lanny Richards, Bellevue, SecretaryTreasurer; and Glenn Irwin Nebraska City, Historian. '

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PERU MARKET Rex Rains Groceries Meais Fruits and Vegetables

Beta Beta Beta Has Initiation At a special meeting on Oct. 11, eighteen national members and eleven provisional members were formally initiated into Beta Beta Beta, honorary Biology; fraternity. The national members include: Dwight Anderson, Ceresco; James DuVal, Tabor, Iowa; Roger Eshelman, Elliott, Iowa; Darrell Feit, Beatrice; .Katherine !deus, Peru; Jack Johnson, Loup City; Clinton Bletscher, Fa 11 s City; Robert Gibson, Falls City; Raymond Hunzeker, DuBois; LaVerna Roos, Dunbar; Kathleen Rhoten, Palmyra; Betty Bebb, Stella; Jerry George, Auburn; Robert Heng, Jr., Nebraska City; Ron Leitschuck, Burchard; John Masonbrink, Stella; Ronald Callan, Nebraska City; and Gerald Bippes, Stella. Provisional members are Don Babcock, Stella; Erik Torring, Ruskin; Monty Allgood, Peru; James Dovel, Auburn; Ro b er t Reitz, Springfield; Larry Whittington, Nehawka; Keith Hawxby, Nemaha; Larry Vice, Brownville; Ken Dostal, Scribner; Larry Curnes, Falls City; and Pat Martin, Falls City. In order to hold full, or national membership, a person

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Shots of PSTC's Homecoming Events 1111111111111111111u1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111u11111111111111111u111111111111n111111u11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111n11u11111111111111111111111uu111111111111111111H1

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First came registration for the alumni

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Captain Dick Neale plunged through White Angel hoop

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M.E.N.C. provided this exhibit

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Old fashioned m_!!lodrama by the. Dramatics club provided laughs

" After the melodrama there was a dance, but we failed to get a picture of it. "P" club members picked up their tickets for a luncheon


Queen Lee in the center, and attendants: Sandy Stephens, Jeannine Ehlers, Mary Ann Lewellyn, Rita Grandgenett, Sandra Pearson and Pam Yost

Queen Lee Christen was

es~orted

by Erik Tarring

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Colorful Show Added Attraction at Homecoming Peru's "Marching Thirty" played and· marched during the half j

Industrial Arts Club Takes First Satellite Theme Of

Place in Display Competition H~::,~~.~'.~;kl~!~.~~'·'"'

The Peru State Homecoming, Oct. 22, brought out many displays asesmbled by the various clubs. on the campus. Each club worked secretly on the displays which were unveiled Friday evening and early Saturday morning. The displays were judged at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 22. The judges were Mrs. Siple from Nebraska City; Mr. Marvin Gerdus, a teacher at Auburn Junior High School; and Rev. Leo Epperson, the minister at the Christian Church in Auburn. Kay Parli, Karen Fankhauser,. and Carolyn Parli were hostesses for the judges. Cash prizes of $25, $15, and $10, respectively, were given to the three rtop ranking clubs. The Industrial Arts Club won first prize with their "Echoes from Peru." The display consisted of a panel of dials and a tele. vision screen which sh o we d slides of the Industrial Arts Club, past and present. Beside the panel was a robot, which narrated the slides. The display consisted of several electrical devices and flashing lights. Second prize was won by the White Angels and the Cherubs. Their display consisted of a goal post standing on an angel filled cloud. Across the foreground of the display :was the title, "Our Goal is Sky High." The $10 prize was won by M.E.N.C. The M.E.N.C. display consisted of a brown and yellow rocket representing the Wesleyan Plainsmen, connected to a detonator which was about to be activated by a Bobcat. Smoke poured from under the rocket, due to a chemical reaction. The only class display w a s

constructed exhibit was ball set up "Blast Off on its side.

by the seniors. Their a blue and gold footlike a rocket, with to Victory," written

Morgan Hall constructed a picture of a football inscribed with "Rocket to Victory." Delzell Hall painted a tarp showing the Bobcats rocketing toward the NCC championship and all of its opponents falling down. Majors Hall constructed a Peru Minute Missile, on a gridiron, blasting off toward a plainsman hanging in an adjacent tree. The churches were also well represented with displays. L.S.A. had a golden ladder leading to a cross, with the reminder to "Soar Higher" in one's spiritual life. Wesley Fellowship had a cross, backed by a banner s a y i n g "Christ Above All." The Newman Club had a globe surrounded by rockets, representing space travel and such, with the title "He Holds the Future." The Business Club had two secretaries, one on each side of a board which said "Soaring 60's." The Foreign Language Club had a rocket with "Roaring With the Bobcats" inscribed on it and a board showing photographs of the Foreign Language C 1u b s from 1956 to 1960. The Home Economics Club had a plainsman in a boiling kettle with the caption "Stew the Plainsmen, Sew Up the Game." The Beta Beta Beta had a welcome to the grads and a sign saying, "Watch the Bobcats Soar.';

a floating satellite greeted Peru students and alumni at their annual homecoming dance. T o n i Cennamo and his orchestra furnished the music for d a n c i n g from 10:00 to 1:00 a.m. The dance began with the announcement of first, second, and third place display winners. Top award went to Industrial Arts, second place to the White Angels and third place to MENC. Steve Bates, master of ceremonies for the evening, presented Queen Lee Christen and her six attendants: Sandy Stephens, Jeannine Ehlers, Pam Yost, Mary Ann Lewellyn, Sandra Pearson, and Rita Grandgenett. Each girl was escorted by one of Peru's senior football players. Darrel Feit, Russel Workman, Duane Hemminger, and James Kelly entertained the crowd with two old fashioned barbershop quartet numbers; then, the dancing began.

Student N.E.A. Elects Board of Directors Student N.E.A. met Monday, Oct. 17. After regular business, the State N.E.A. Convention at Creighton was discussed. Since the date conflicted with Peru's Homecoming, it was decided that a representative would not be sent. Election of a Board of Directors followed. Those e 1 e ct e d were: Jim McGinnis, senior; Sherrill Torring, junior; M a r y Ann Graham, sophomore; Judy Hunzeker, freshman; Jay DuVal and Glenn Behrens, .members at large. The board, which includes the regular officers, will meet twice a month to plan Student N.E.A. activities. A film, "No Greater Gift," was shown. After adjournment, officers collected dues.

By Marilyn Monroe The Peru-Wesleyan game went into half-time with Peru leading 33 to 6. The half-time show started with the Peru Marching Thirty coming on the field. The band formed the word "Hi" and played "Hail, Hail the Gang's All Here." To a drum cadence, they formed a "P" for Peru and played "Our Boys Will Shine Tonight." The "Color Song" was then played and everyone sang. The Homecoming Royalty was introduced with background music from the band. The Royalty, as they appeared on the field, were: Sandra Pearson, Bellevue, escorted by Chick Stessman; Mary Ann Lewellyn, Bellevue, escorted by Larry Rathe; Lee Christen, Elk Creek, escorted by Eric Torring; Sandra Stephens, Peru, escorted by Jerry Wanser;

Jeannine Ehlers, Syrllcuse, corted by Jack Head; R Grandgenett, Bellevue, esco • by Darrell Feit; and Pa Yost, Sumner, escorted by Stover. Barbara Spilker, flo' girl, and Greg Anderson, er bearer, came onto the field · Jack Johnson, Student Se president. Jack Johnson t crowned Lee Christen Hd coming Queen of 1960. The alty were then escorted to t thrones to enjoy the remai . of the game. The Freshmen presented Class of 1964 Queen, Nancy S, of Auburn. She was d r i ~ around the field by Jim Chri Mr. J. D. Levitt's convertib The band went into marcj formation and left the field! end the half-time show forf 1960 Homecoming at Peru. :1

i j

Pep Rally The all college pep rally October 21 started the Homecoming f e s ti v i ti es. The cheerleaders started the rally by leading the audience in several yells. The rally featured a takeoff on "I've Got a Secret"; a pantomime, "It Was Football, It Was"; a speech given by Mr. Edward Camealy, the chorus director; and a Charleston routine done by some be-skirted Blue Devils. The pep rally was closed with the "Color Song."

Alumni Coffee The Alumni held their "Annual Coffee" Saturday, October 22, in the lounge of Delzell Hall between 4:30 and 5:30 p.m. Coffee and doughnuts were served to all

guests~

The serving committee under the direction of chairman Lyle McKercher included: Miss Hohl, Mrs. Gergen, Mrs. Iverson, Mrs. Sproul and Mrs. Straw. Also on the committee were Mr. DeZwarte, Mr. Buethe, Mr. Sheeley and Dr. Wininger.

Vets Club Elects 1960-61 Officers The Vet's Club met Tues November 25, at 6:00 p.m. in Administration Building. Th~ lowing were elected as off! for 1960-61: vice-commander) Hultquist; recorder, Ray Mei and treasurer, Tom McAl Wilbur Weaver had been elE commander at the October meeting. The group discussed plan! showing movies to the stu body again this year. Tent plans for other activities also discussed. The next me will be held Thursday, Nov. 7:30 p.m., in the Administr Building.

Business Club Meets The Business Club me' October 17 at 8:00. The of are John Ramsey, president; Koudele, vice-president; J Sanders, secretary; and II Roach, treasurer. Plans for a Thanksgiving ner and program were disc'


obcats Pull Down

hadron Eagles 20-7 Victory Keeps Bobcats in Conference Race By Bob Fisher

8" Bobcats Lose Game 14-0 at Maryville

11

State's Bobcats capitalon two fumbles Friday t, Oct. 14, to down the ChadState Eagles 20-7 for their win over the Eagles since e Eagles scored seven points but 4: 15 gone in the first d on a 20-yard run and ment by James Schwartz, to have the Bobcats retalifour minutes, 10 plays, an d first downs later on a twoplunge for a TD by Nea City halfback Dick Place. e second period score was 1-yard pass from Dick Place om Yopp, Wood River, Ill., with 3:58 remaining. After a less third period in which all changed hands eight on downs and an exchange bles inside the Eagle fiveline, the Bobcats scored in urth period with 1:57 reg. fourth period tally was set en Vernon Thomsen, Execkle, recovered the second fumble. In the first play the fumble recovery, John nsen, Nebraska City, rback, fired a pass to Dick from the 19-yard line for third Bobcat touchdown. Osterholm, Glenwood, placement specialist, made .three placement attempts. Kelly, Falls City, halfback, in an excellent game in ,role of the substitute. Playm place of Ross Pilkington, Oak, Iowa, senior, who was up early in the first perly gained an average of ds in 13 rushing and pass Score By Quarters: --------- 7 6 0 7 n _____ 7 0 0 0 STATISTICS:

20 7

c

p

downs ________ 12 ' attempted ___ 12 completed ___ 9 passing ______ 114 rushing, net __ 117 r of punts ____ 8 g average ____ 35 les lost _______ 1

16 15 5 69 210 7 32.6 3 60

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The Peru State "B" squad suffered their second defeat of the season by dropping a 14 to 0 contest to Northwest Missouri Te ache rs second-stringers at Maryville, Missouri, on Oct. 18th. The. young Bobcats had previously lost to Highland Junior College of Highland, Kansas in an earlier season game. The Bobcats; offensive punch was plagued by numerous fumbles and pass interceptions. One of the Peru gifts was turned into six points for Maryville when George Marsh scooped up a fumble in the first half and ran for the score.· The final points for Maryville were racked up in the third period when quarterback Dick McBride pasesd twenty yards to end. George Zwickel for the TD. Throughout the game, the Bobcat defense was called on to turn back the Missourians s c o r .i n g threats due to the Bobcats inability to move the football.

Cross Country New Sport at PSTC One cross country dual meet remains on the Peru State schedule before the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics tournament Nov. 26 at Omaha University. With cross country new at Peru State this year, coach Jerome Stemper is counting heavily on experienced sophomore trackman Donald Petersen, Richfield. In the spring N.A.I.A. track meet at Sioux Falls, S. D., P et er s en placed seventh in the 5,000 meters in a field of 35. Stemper's crew, which goes to Tarkio for an away meet Nov. 3, are freshmen and transfers. They include: David Malmberg, Red Oak, Iowa, freshman; Gary McCoy, Tecumseh, freshman; Thomas Buchholz, Papillion, freshman; Charles Dunn, Clarinda, Iowa, junior, transfer from Clarinda Juco; Bob Mulder, Panama, sophomore; and Joe Chamberlain, Verdon, freshman. Russ Godberson, Bellevue, sophomore, transfer from the University of Nebraska, is ineligible, but is working out with the squad.

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Al Wheeler Becomes Athletic Director (Continued from page one)

Basketball Champions Though known best for his football teams, the Bobcat coach has won coaching laurels in other areas. In basketball his teams have won two championships (1938-39 and l939-40) and participated in five N.A.I.A. National T o urn am e n ts . The 1939-40 Wheeler-coached cagers reached the semi-finals. In track, Wheeler coached two c o n f e re n c e champions in an eight year peroid. Baseball Revived In 1958, Wheeler re-vitalized the Peru Spring sport scene by bringing baseball back to the Campus of a Thousand Oaks after its 35-year absence. Building a winner took time, but in 1960 he led the Bobcats to a creditable 11-6 record. Resume of Great Career Wheeler was graduated in 1922 from Oberlin (Ohio) College, where he starred both in football and basketball with T. N. Metcalf's great teams. He quarterbacked the Oberlin team to a 7-6 victory over Ohio State in 1921 and to 23 victories and only three losses during his th re e years. He was named to the AllOhio football and basketball teams in his senior year. Wheeler received his masters degree from Columbia University in 1937. Before a c c e p t i n g his first coaching position at Manual Arts High School, Los A n g e 1 e s , Wheeler played pro-basketball for one year with Cleveland. During his two years at Manual Arts his teams won one city champiorr~hip in football and placed sec1md in basketball. From 1925 to 1927 Wheeler was freshman football coach at fowa State College, Ames. From Iowa State, he moved to Amherst (Mass.) College, where as freshman football coach, his teams' record was marred with only one defeat and one tie. Wheeler was head f o o t b a 11 coach at Amherst for the next three years during which time his teams scored 16 wins and lost 8.. His varsity baseball teams at Amherst made an outstanding record, winning the Little Three Championships four years. His teams had the distinction of never losing to Yale, Princeton or Harvard. His memberships include th e Peru Kiwanis, serving as 1946 president, and Phi Delta Theta social fraternity. Mrs. Wheeler is the former Frances Rudisill of Crouse, N. C. They have one son, Al, Jr., a high school junior.

Bobcats Whip Plainsmen (Continued from page one) STATISTICS p w 10 First downs -------- 19 Passes attempted ___ 13 11 Passes completed ___ 7 5 Yards passing ______ 146 127 Yards rushing ______ 200 55 5 Number of punts ---- 2 Punting average ___ -40.1 46 3 Fumbles lost -------- 2. Penalty yards ______ 40 45

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Kittens Claw Bulldogs 20-6 At Talmage

NOTES FROM DELZELL

By Steve Parker Peru Prep Friday night, October 14, journeyed to Talmage to hand the Bulldogs a 20-6 defeat. Peru took an early lead when, with two minutes remaining in the first period, q u a r t e r b a c k Dave Gomon passed to Fred Shirley and scored. Al Wheeler converted to end the quarter 7-0. Peru's second touchdown was called back on a penalty. The two teams then battled defensively. The half ended 7-0. In the third quarter Pat Morris, Peru halfback skirted the left end behind excellent blocking for the second Peru TD. Al Wheeler again, successfully converted. At the end of the third period Talmage penetrated deep into Peru territory on a 35-yard run by Bulldog back T err y Bischoff. On the first play of the fourth quarter, halfback Dennis Keller scored the B u 11 d o g s ' touchdown. B e f o re the final whistle, Pat Morris scored th e final Prep touchdown on a pass interception.

Kittens Beat Brock By Steve Parker The Peru Prep B o b k i t t e n s nipped tb,e Brock Pirates 13-12 Friday night, Oct. 21, in the Prep Homecoming, to remain in title contention in the Nemaha Valley Conference. The evenly-matched teams battled until 3:21 remained in the first quarter, when halfback Paul Heuer, Peru, scored on a six-yard plunge to cap a 55-yard drive. The extra point failed. Brock scored early in the second period when Pat McNulty plunged one yard. iµto pay dirt. The conversion was unsuccessful and the half ended 6-6. Peru struck the final blow in the third period when halfback Pat Morris ran the opening kickoff 65 yards for the score. Paul Heuer ran the extra point an d Peru went ahead 13-6. Before the q u a r t e r ended Brock scored again when Pat McNulty plunged three yards. Peru Prep's excellent defensive line held on the extra point attempt and the score remained 13-12.

Ped Camera The Pedagogian staff has a new Polaroid Land Camera for its photography department. Th e camera, which develops a picture in sixty seconds, is excellent for speed work. The camera takes 21/4" by 31/4" pictures for one column illustrations.

By Gerald Kirkendall An all-college dance, sponsored by the Blue Devils, was held in the lounge of De 1zel1 Hall Wednesday, October 19. Jerry Partridge's touch football team seems to be on the lower end of the totem pole. They won their first game on October 25, squeezing by Roger Smith's team 9 to 7. Jerry's team now has a 1-3 record, and Roger Smith's team has a 2-2 record. Delzell Hall was the scene of the alumni registration and the alumni "coffee" after the Homecoming game. Delzell had a homecoming display which was painted on a banner. Alan Nelson designed the display. The banner was painted by a number of Delzell residents. Delzell residents are proud of the new paint and drapes in our lobby. They really look nice. The counselors of Delzell and Majors Halls, Mrs. Paradise and Mrs. Longfellow, were guests of Dr. and Mrs. Boraas. and Miss Bradley on October 24. A party, with refreshments and television, was enjoyed. Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Majors were guests ol Delzell on Oct. 24. They stayed in Delzell during Homecoming. Dr. Elkins, a consultant for the Education Department, was a professional guest of Dr. Blanton.

N.E.A. Dinner An N.E.A. cooperative dinner was held Sept. 13, 6:30 p.m., in the Campus School lunch room. Committee for the dinner was: Miss Gladys Grush, chairman, Mrs. Ina Sproul, Mrs. F a i th Friest, Mr. Lyle Strom, Mr. John Dearth and Mrs. Fran Wheeler. The group moved to the high school auditorium for the business meeting. New N.E.A. officers and new faculty members were introduced. Elected to attend the N.E.A. Delegate Assembly in December were: Mrs. Maryon Adams, delegate and Miss Alma Ashley, alternate. Dr. Christ told of his European trip and showed pictures t a k e n while there. The meeting was attended by about 60 faculty members and guests.

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bandmaster Wilson was on hand to serve as faculty sponsor for the event.

Angels Meeting Held October 17

The White Angels met IV The very impressive and pretFourth g r a d e r Pam Lewis' day, October 17th, at 6:00 p.n ty half-time crowning of HS broken arm (left, luckily) resultEliza Morgan recreation roor ed in reminiscences by other homecoming royalty was dimmed The food committee was to young'uns of how THEY landed by the immediate injury thereder the food for Homecoming after of player Tom Majors, who when they fell from the same October 18th. Karen Fankha1 slide. Wasn't it too bad Pam fell was carted from the scene in the presented the report on just before Child Safety Week? same chariot that delivered part Homecoming display. of the royal court. (Meaning, if she had fallen durA paper was posted for t ing that week, her arm might Three carloads of FHA'ers par- White Angels and Cherubs not have broken?) ticipated in district meeting at sign concerning selling car These last nice days before Nebraska City homecoming tions on Homecoming day. It, snow m~. bring out the lower morning, for which they made suggested that the Blue De elementary grades on nature the napkins. Popular project now decorate the goal posts for ho1 walks. One morning all traffic underway for FHA is sale of all- coming. Joan Riggle and Gla, came to a stop between cafeteria occasion cards (adv.). Monahan volunteered to rope and library while Miss Clarke's the section for the White Ang Time for black cats and witchthird graders took advantage of Cherubs, and the Blue Devils. es is here. Assorted noises mean the sun. Beverly Leeper, Mary A "I gotta have a costume for the CS Library Committee is now Lewellyn, and Carolyn Parli ~ Halloween parade at school!" unteered to help with the f functioning. At least Sally G. is (Make a note-this is a must Convo which was given Frid; quite proud to have been elected see~) October 21. from her 6th grade along with ty walked. Majorettes leading the Stephen Stemper to serve on Another "must see" is the The cheerleaders worked ol band were Mary Ellen Wilson, this committee. grade school band which will be two yells with· the group. Tl Donna Cox, Sara Adams, Carol And now Homecoming is a allowed to play for the last home meeting was adjourned with j Quinn and Sherry Combs. White Angel song. , thing of memories. After days of HS football game. Y'all come. Following the game, the Ho,meplotting and evening after evecoming Dance was held in t h e ning of working (chattering!) the l high school auditorium. Students, l high school classes came up with alumni and the Brock High clever displays of songs paraSchool student body were wel- phrased to show how Prep would I comed by Linda Morrissy, mis- triumph over Brock on the foottress of ceremonies. The royalty ball field. Sophomore Tom GaDean E. Taylor was again presented. They were mon added the winning touch to given gifts by Miss Morrissy on his classmate's display by prebehalf of the Pep Club. A dance vailing on members of o:ther was then led by the royalty. classes to tape interviews about Refreshments were served the proposed game between inthroughout the evening from an tervals of song. Who said any• Keepsake 'Diamonds attractive table. Sponsors were thing about "mike" fright? On parents and faculty. • Hamilton Watches the contrary, that tape is' solid proof of ham talent available to has taken the part-time job of Mr. Moore. • Fine Jewelry cutting hair. Jody Dyer and EdWhile seniors didn't win first na McGovern have left the "long place with their pretty music • Gifts hair" set since they have en- staff and notes, they showed their gaged Penny's services. business acumen by selling the display (only to have the deal Carol McLain, Julie ~ayer, smashed by youthful exuberant Mary Ann Graham, Connie 'Erisvandalism). man, Susan Hulbert, Alberta KaSTUDENT ACCOUNTS Exuberance overflowed at the sparek, Joanne Eickhoff, Sherypep bonfire sparked by left-over Auburn, Nebraska lin Virtiska, and Ila and Jean firecrackers. The pell mell snake Raiman, the girls from the first dance broke at the drugstore floor's new wing, have taken up corner and Senior Virginia Cockthe art of telepathy. So, if you erham absorbed the skid. B u t happen to see any of the Peru Prep won the game! Since the PERU CLEANERS & TAILORS !i coeds walking around the camb~nd is an integral part of PEP, Repairing and Remodeling Men and Women's Clothing pus with starry eyes, just snap For:ty-:three Years Serving S:tudenfs and FacuUy J your fingers and break the trance! PHONE TR 2-2671 PERU, NEBR. '.Y ~

,Sue Applegate and Fred Shirley Reigned at C. S. Homecoming By Sandy Craig Linda Sue Applegate and Fred Shirley were crowned Homecoming Queen and King during halftime ceremonies, Friday, Oct. 21. Attendants were Kay Tripp, Pat Morris, Laquita Allgood and Larry Reeves. Mary Ann Goings was crown bearer and the flower girl was Nancy Allgood. The high school band, under the direction of Gilbert Wilson, performed on the field during half-time. They were assisted by the Pep Club. After a "P" was formed, the band played the Color Song. A h e a r t was then formed, through which the royal-

WHISPERS FROM MORGAN By Linda Nygaard

1

TAYLOR JEWELRY

Bittersweet, decorated bulletin boards, and alumni seem to be the big news this week f r o m Morgan Hall. Fall leaves, apple cider and popcorn parties seem to be the going thing in the dorm. Sandy Pearson, chairman of the decoration committee, along with many eager beavers, did a swell job with lobby decorations I shall now close with a tribute and the dorm's display. Twenty girls assisted as hostesses at the to the alumni of days gone-by. The old Normal School Yell: open house at Homecoming. Hoo-rah, hoo-rah, hoo-rah-rah! Cynthia Wegner has returned Normal, Normal, Nebraska! to the dorm after a weeks' stay Hoo-rah, hoo-rah, hoo-rah-rah! in the hospital. The girls sent her Normal, Normal, Nebraska! some flowers and get-well cards. White and Blue, White and If is good to have her back. Blue! Karen Fankhauser, C a r o 1y n What's the matter with old Parli, Patsy Melcher, Kay Ellen Peru? Parli, Linda Goodin, K at h y Blue and White, Blue and Banks, Connie Erisman, Carol White! McLain, Lee Christen had a Nebraska Normal, she's all birthday party for Ellen Hunzeright! ker. Also giving a birthday party, but this time in honor of Judy Wolfe, were Joanne Hilfiker, Charlotte Wheeler, Judy Sanders, Bev O'Harra, Shelia Hagan, and Deanna Donahoo. First floor Dairy Queen got into the act, too, when Coleen Q McQueen became one year older. Phyllis Grube can now stake Cone Wi:th :the Curl on Top all claims on Steve Bates, since they became pinned last week. Q Also staking claims, but w it h Auburn, Nebr. shining engagement rings, were: John Parli to Rose Clancy an d BR 4-3102 Ruby Smith to Donald Bardell. Don hails from Omaha U. Cleaner and dryer clothes seem to be the latest thing since a new REDFERN Speed Queen washer and dryer Clothing Co. took their place in the dorm "The S:tore of S:tandard laundry room last week. Brands" Second floor has turned into a Phone BR 4-3620 Auburn beauty salon. Penny Thorkildson

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The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU.NEBRASKA

Volume 56

Number 4

N. C. C.

Champs

NOVEMBER 14, 1960

ti·~·------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bobcats Champions Of Nebraska Conference

ans Entertain use Mothers d Dorm Leaders

Championship Came As Vi/ayne Beat Kearney

r. and Mrs. Harold Boraas Miss Juanita Bradley were s at the Student, Faculty ee given October 24, 1960, at home of Dr. Boraas. Officers, selors, and house mothers of three dormitories were their s. llowing refreshments, Dr. as introduced Mrs. Boraas Miss Bradley. He then introd the three house mothers: . Gertrude Fulton, Eliza MorHall; Mrs. Helen Donavan, . Majors Hall; Mrs. Evanelle dise,. Delzell Hall; and Mrs. st Longfellow, a s s is ta n t mother at all three dormih house mother in turn inced her dorm's president, s, and counselors. ese informal introductions followed by a light-hearted ssion on problems and exces which have occurred in dorms this semester.

ginning Debaters Omaha U. Meet Peru Beginning Debate went to the Omaha UniverTournament on Nov. 4 Steve Parker and Allen n made up one debate team. won one debate as the aftive. Lois Fritz and Darrel tt made up the affirmative other team; Jerry Littell olcott were the negative. team won one debate as the tive. Each team at the \mament debated the affirmad the negative sides twice. 1 McLain partidpated in raneous speaking. A 11 members took part in the round discussions. M i s s · had the most points in ion among the Peru memUniversity of Nebraska stutook the extemporaneous g honors. Creighton Unigathered the highest pernge of points per individual mussion. Iowa State Univerwon in the "A" divisfon deand Kearney State Teachollege won in the "B" diviFourteen colleges and unitook part in thEf tourna-

The White Angels met in the ~tmttion

room of Eliza Morgan at 6:00, November 2, for regular meeting. was taken and the minre read. Carol Ellenbergthe treasurer's report. suggested at the previous to have a sock hop to money. The committee as1: ~-~ had no further informa: on the dance. with

By Bob Fisher

1

Who s Who Front row, left to right, Linda Goodin, Rose Clancy and Judy Miller Back row, left to right, Richard Neale, Jerry Wanser, Jack Johnson, Alan Wheeler and Francis Hajek. By Marilyn Monroe and Mrs. Frank' J. Hajek, Odell, Eight Peru seniors have b e e n was graduated from Odell High named for 1960-61 listing in School in 1957. A major in physi"Who's Who Among Students in cal education, Hajek is currently American Universities and Col- serving as president of the Peru leges," according to Dr. Harold SNEA chapter and vice-president Boraas, dean of students. Selec- ,'of the senior class. When a freshtion was made by a committee of l]lan and sophomore, he particifaculty, administrators, and stu- pated on the college track team. dents. He served as president of the Who's Who annually names Newman Club in his junior year outstanding students from col- and is its regional secretary this leges and universities who meet year. Hajek is a member of Althe qualifications of excellence pha Mu Omega, honorary matheand sincerity in scholarship, lead- matics fraternity. ership in academic and co-curJack Johnson ricular activities, citizenship, The son of Mrs. E.W. Johnson, service to the school, and prom- Loup City, Jack Johnson was ise of future usefulness to society. graduated from Loup City High Peru State's representatives School in 1955. The 1958 transfer are Rose Clancy, Dawson; Linda from Nebraska University is a Goodin, Humboldt; Francis Ha- member of Beta Beta Beta, biojek, Odell; Jack Johnson, Loup logical honorary fraternity; Blue City; Judy Miller, Peru; Richard Devils, men's pep organization; Neale, Bellevue; Jerry Wanser, and "P" Club, varsity lettermen's Ewing; and Alan Wheeler, Stella. organization. Jack is now serving as president of the Peru State Rose Clancy Rose Clancy, a 1958 graduate Student Senate: As a junior, he of Dawson High School, is the was Delzell Men's Residence Hall daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. C. president. Johnson has lettered Clancy of Dawson. A major in two years in both basketball and English, Miss Clancy is president track. of Sigma Tau Delta, honorary English fraternity; a member of Kappa Delta Pi, honorary education fraternity; Foreign Language Club; and, Newman Club .. She has participated in debate and has served as both secretary and treasurer of the Dramatic Club. The 1959 Miss Auburn contest winner, Rose has served as vice-president of the Women Students Association and is co-editor of the Pedagogian.

Judy Miller Judy Miller, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hanford- Miller of Peru, is president of Beta Beta Beta and Kappa Delta Pi. ' The 1957 graduate of Peru Campus School is a member· of Sigma Tau Delta, honorary English fraternity. A major in biology and music, Judy is a member of the college chorus, Peruvian Singers, college orchestra, and the Music Educators National Conference. An acLinda Goodin complished violinist, Miss Mliler A graduate of Humboldt High School, Linda Goodin is present- is preparing for the 1961 young ly serving as president of the artist auditions of the National Women Students Association. Federation of Music Clubs. The daughter of Mrs. Nellie M. Dick Neale Goodin of Humboldt, she has A member of the Industrial been active in Student Christian Fellowship, White Angels, Kappa Arts club, "P" club, and Blue Delta Pi, and the college chorus. Devils, Dick Neale is a 1957 Miss Goodin has served as the graduate of Bellevue H i g h Eliza Morgan Hall social chair- School. The son of Mr. and Mrs. man and is a former vice-presi- Everett J. Neale, Dick has lettered three years in football and dent of the local SNEA chapter. As a college senior, Linda is the track. He served as president of his freshman c 1a s s and vicerecipient of the Zelma Wonderly president of the "P" Club during Memorial scholarship. his junior year. Dick is married Francis Hajek to the former Diane Phillips, Francis Hajek, the son of Mr. Bellevue.

Jerry Wanser A transfer student from Colorado State University, Jerry Wanser is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Max Wanser of Ewing. A 1953 graduate of St. Mary's Academy, O'Neill, Wanser served as president of the Foreign Language club in his junior year. A history major, Jerry has been active in the Newman club, International Relations Club, and Phi Alpha Theta, honorary history fraternity. As a sophomore, Wanser was a member of the football team. Alan Wheeler Alan Wheeler is a 1957 graduate of Stella High School and the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ivan Wheeler, Stella. He served as Phi Alpha Theta president in his junior year and its historian during the current session. He is a member of Sigma Tau Delta, Kappa Delta Pi, Studel\t Christian Fellowship, and the Business Education Club. Wheeler has served as a Student Senate member, treasurer of his class, vice-president of the Dramatics Club, and as college yearbook business manager. During his four years at Peru State, Alan has been a member of the college band.

United Nations Dinner Enjoyed By Seventy-four By Sandy Craig The ninth annual United Nations Dinner sponsored by the Home Economics Club was held Nov. 8, 6:00 p.m. in the· high school auditorium. Seventy-four people were served a three course dinner by Home Ee Club members. Special guests of the club were: Mr. and Mrs. Jack Mullen and Mr. and Mrs. John Smull representing Morton H o use of Nebraska City, Mrs. Marie Neal and Jack Johnson, representing the Student Sena'te. Tables were decorated with gilded fall arrangements an d vases of fall flowers. The serving table was marked with cards identifying each dish and the country from which it originated. After the welcome by Jeannine Ehlers, Home Ee Club president, (Continued on page two)

With the Peru State 1960 football season at an end for Coach Al Wheeler and his Bobcats, it might be well to observe t h e season in a closer look. Coach Wheeler's team captured the Nebraska College Conference title by compiling a conference record of five wins and one loss. This along with a nonconference record of one win one loss and a tie established an over all season record of six wins two losses and one tie. In the season opener with nonconference Iowa Wesleyan, the Bobcats battled to a scoreless tie. The followirlg week in a home field debut, Peru roared to an exciting 46-0 win over St. Mary's of the Plains from Dodge City, Kansas. The firsf conference game of the season featured Peru's invasion of the Kearney Antelopes. The Peruvians dropped the Antelopes with a rousing 19-7 victory to gain a start for title honors. However, title aspirations were jolted the next week-end by the Hastings Broncos when they ground out a 19-7 victory o v er the Bobcats. Peru then travelled to Crete to play the pre-season conference favorite, Doane. The alert Peru State defense won the game by turning a Tiger fumble into a touchdown and later getting a safety for a 9-7 win. Chadron invaded the Oak Bowl on October 14, and the Eagles were unable to stop the Bobcats as they were crushed by a 20 to 7 score. The Homecoming Day game featured the Nebraska Wesleyan Plainsman at Peru. The Bobcats completely dominated the gam•~ by grinding out a 47-12 win before Peru alumni. The Wayne Wildcats were the last team to stand in the way of a share for the conference title. The Bobcats humbled Wayne by a score of 25 to 0, to gain a first place position. The following week-end, the Wildcats surprised Kearney to clinch the conference title f o r Peru. In the season finale, P e r u travelled to Oklahoma Panhandle A & M where the Bobcats were defeated by a fine Aggie football team. The defensive minded Aggies g r o u n d out a 20 to 6 victory over the Bobcats. This year's season reflects the spirit of the Bobcat gridders, who were forced to arise to the occasion often in order to bring the title home to Peru.

New Fuel Tanks An excavation sixteen f e et deep, twenty-four feet long and wide has been dug to contain two twelve thousand gallon tanks to provide a twenty-four thousand gallon fuel supply for th e new boiler. The old boiler can't handle the steam load with the addition of the new dorm.

Hear Dorsey Orchestra November 29


Alumni Reception At N.E.A. Meetings Receptions in Omaha a_nd Lincoln for alumni, former students and friends of Peru State Teachers College attracted more than 150 guests Thursday afternoon during the Nebraska State Education Association conventions. The Lincoln reception w a s attended by 86 Peruvians, while 74 were present at Omaha. Harold Johnson, director -of placement, was---host for the 0 m ah a event, and Don Carlile, director of special services, was in charge of arrangements in Lincoln.

Peru State's "P" Club, varsity leiiel'men organization, installed new officers for the 1960-61 year Tuesday. They are Dick Place, Nebraska City, president; Harry Whitney, Omaha, secretary-treasurer; and Ken Rhodus, Bellevue, vice-president.

LIBRARY COLUMN By Linda Bertram

i':

Trustee From the Toolroom, by Nevil Shute, is a warm story filled with the goodness, charity, and the best capabilities of man. In this book Keith Stewart led a happy though rather uneventful . life until his sister and brotherin-law went down with their sailing ship somewhere off Tahiti. He then became trustee for his ten year old niece. Stowed away in the keel of the lost ship was his niece's only legacy, and he was determined to recover them for her. Although his means were meager and his experience outside England were nil, with the help of old and new f o u n d friends, he recovered the legacy. Vincent Scully, Jr. has written Frank Lloyd Wright, In this book he considers the basic elements in Frank Lloyd Wright's culture, the sources from which it grew, and the images he sought to create. It shows how he combined his ideas and those from the past to form a unique and original piece of architecture.

trian Stuffed Cabbage, French "Poulet Saute A La Marengo," Bolivian "Umintas," Uruguay · String Beans, and American Dilly Bread. The program was begun by a vocal number from Joyce Carman.. She sang "The Kashmiri ·Song" from Indian Love Lyrics From ±he Garden of Kama by Amy Woodford-Finden. Later she sang "Till I Wake" from the same suite. Frank Sunada, Honolulu, Hawaii, was the first speaker. He told of his state and of the need for flexibility among people of the world. The second speaker was Frank Kan, Hong Kong, China. He related facts about his country and explained some of their customs. Mrs. Chris Buethe spoke on Morocco. Having lived there for one year, she was able to tell of the n~tive's ways and customs. She told of her experience at a dinner in one of the homes there. Miss Ehlers closed the program with an invitation for all to return next year.

S. C.F. Meeting

Student Christian Fellowship met November 2 in the Music Hall. President, carol ivkLain, opened the business meeting. After the business meeting, David O'Dell led the group ih singing. Reverend Dale Falk, sponsor, UNITED NATIONS DINNER introduced the guest speaker, ENJOYED BY SEVENTY-FOUR Reverend Orville Mason of Wich(Continued from page ohe) ita, Kansas. He spoke on "The and the invocation by Mr. Rath, Importance of Christ to Student guests served themselves cafeter- Christians in General." ia style. They made their choice Carol McLain then gave the of food from such dishes as Aus- benediction.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks November 14. 1960 THE STAFF Co-Editor _____________________________________ Rose Clancy Co-Editor _____________________________ Mary Ann Lewellyn Sports Editor _________________________________ Steve Parker Copy Editor_ __________________________________ Keyt Business Manager _____________________________ Ray Meister Personnel Manager ____________________________ Herb Brown ColumnisL _______________________ ~ _________ Linda Bertram Columnist_ _________ .:~--------------------J erry Kirkendall Columnist_ _________________________________ Linda Nygaard ColumnisL _________________________________Darrel Wolcott ColumnisL ______________________________ Mary Anna Gnade Campus SchooL _______________________________ Sandy Craig Sports Reporter ________________________________ Bob Fisher Women's Sports __________________________________ Pam Yost Reporter ______________________________________ Lynn Bailey Reporter ________________________________________ Lois Fritz Reporter__________________________________ Marilyn Monroe Reporter_____________________________________ Judy Pollack Reporter ___________________________________ carolyn Reiber Reporter _____ ------------ ___________ ---------- _Gary Weiss Reporter _____________________________________ John Werner Reporter________________________________________ Tom Yopp ~Leroy

Sponsor-------------------------~~------Stewart Linscheid

WHISPERS FROM MORGAN By Linda Nygaard Presidential elections, midterm exams, and state football championships are the main top~cs of discussion at Morgan Hall this week. There was a presidential poil taken on second floor and Richard Nixon won over John Kennedy. The ratio of voting was three to one. (I asked four people.) Donna Francis Thompson left the dorm to do her student teaching in Bellevue. She is teaching English and physical education. There were four birthdays in the cl.arm this past week. Judy Pollack was surprised with '.l party given by: Betty Painter, Nancy Sears, Lois Palmer, Ginny Adkins, B. J. Steele, Carol Eynon, Janice Tucker, Joan Pelton, Francis Sanders, and K a t h y Banks. Sharon Watton, Anna Shown, Judy Pollack, Betty Painter, Wilma Johnson, Sherrill Torring, and Linda Nygaard h e 1 p e d Jeanne Shuttlesworth turn twenty-one. The festivities included a cake, cookies, and picture taking activity. Sharon Watton celebrated with just about everyone on second floor. Again, there was a cake, some candy, and a good time to be had by all. All the gil'ls from first floor joined with Crystal Seegel on her birthday to make the celebration a memorable one. · Parties seemed to be the going thing this past week. Judy Pollack and Betty Painter had the only organized Halloween party. Those attending had to wear costumes. The girls began by trick or treating in the dorm, then they paraded through the halls a n d ended up at a seance. The seance was topped off with goodies bought by the girls at the party. Between parties, · the g i r 1s found themselves studying for mid-term exams. Reluctant as the girls were, their books were pulled from the shelves and dusted off for many long hours of studying. An informal poll was taken to see just what the reactions were to these "little" exams. Here are some of the comments offered. · "They are a good way to lose weight and sleep." "Exams are a good way to learn what you didn't, but should have learned during the first nine weeks." "Exams are like pills; some go down easy; others you choke on." "Mid-terms, what are they? I'm in shock." "What, me worry?" With that, I shall close with the words for today. "When you feel as though you are at the end of your rope, tie a knot in the end of it and hang on by y o u r thumbs."

"cci1t£"

lS A fl(OISTEREO Tl'IAO(·MARlt. COJ>YlllQHT IHI TMI COOA•tOLA COMl'AN't.

·Dear Diary... As I take my pen in hand, I take my bottle of Coke in the other hand! Yes, dear diary, where would I be ,. . without Coca-Cola? Just a social outcast. Why, everybody drinks Coke! John and Bill and Barry and Charley. Horace too. Confidentially, I think I'll ,have another bottle of Coke. BE REALLY REFRESHED

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STUDENT ACCOUNTS Auburn, Nebraska


Peruvian Staff Met Deadline

Dorsey Band Here on November 29

IED

,

Even though many talented performers achieve st~rdom in aow business, the entertainers I.mt can excite and delight fans a two decade period are ·'RlY few and far between. Tomand Jimmy Dorsey were two performers. Together, or their own individual oras, , they delighted audifrom coast to coast w i th great music. Reunited a years ago, an entirely n e w tion, who had known of Fabulous Dorseys" only by tion, saw and felt for lves the same great band elighted their older brothd sisters, and, in s o m e parents, years before. Now, eat Jimmy Dorsey Orches-

astle, who has had the of "Mr. Trumpet" and of the Trumpet" beupon him by Jackie Glea-

attending the University ·gan during the 1960-61 c year under a National Foundation grant. been granted a leave of from the Ralston Public

and the late Glenn Miller played second trombone in this great. musical . aggregation, which in two years established musical tradition for an entire generation. Finally, Tommy and Jimmy decided to go their individual ways, and two fine orchestras emerged. Together and apart, the Dorsey Brothers sold a combined total of 110 million records, and many recording men credit Jimmy with the success and establishment of the juke box industry on a large1 scale. Jimmy Dorsey's recording · of "So Rare"' (1956) represented his first big hit in about 14 years, and is probably the one that is best known to the present younger generation.

Students Prefer The Elephant

Students and faculty at Peru State Teachers College voted to place Richard M. Nixon in t h e White House as the result of a straw vote at Peru on Nov. 2. The closest race was between the presidential contenders as Nixon won o\;-er Kennedy by a ratio of 1.52 to 1.00. In the senatorial and congressional races, The music of the Dorsey Or- Republican candidates Carl Curchestras has certainly won the tis, Phil Weaver, and Glen Cunacclaim of music lovers in Amer-·· ningham won handily over their ica, and the Jimmy Dorsey Or- Democratic opponents Robert chestra, under the direction of Conrad, Gerald Whelan and Joe Lee Castle, is certain to win the Benesch by margins of from two hearts of all who attend th e to one to four to one. The students who in general two-hour concert they will present in the college auditorium come from predominantly Republican southeast Nebraska, and Tuesday, November 29. the faculty whose origins are scattered over the United States Schools, where he has been a scicast their ballots in near proporence instructor since graduation tional agreement for the contendfrom Peru State. He is the son of ing candidates. Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Gilliland of The vote was sponsored by the Auburn. Peru chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, national history honorary fraterThe grant provides for tuition, nity, under the leadership of fees, travel and book allowances James Yelnik, Omaha. in addition to a basic stipend of $3,450.

8

Magic

When the ·Peruvian staff received the student pictures, it spelled work with a capital "W." The pictures arrived during the 4:00 p.m. class period, Tuesday, October 18. Identification was immediately started. Class grouping was the next order of business. In order to have the job done by Thursday night, several staff members worked almost full time that day. Editor Kathy Rhoten and Copy Editor Darrel Wolcott worked in the morning and after no o Ii through the regular Peruvian editing class period. Layout Editor, Jeannine Ehlers, put in her time working on layout mats. At the class period, the rest of the staff joined and worked into the evening meal period. After dinner, Merlin Wright, Arlan Richardson, Deanna Donahoo and Darrel Wolcott stayed until layouts were complete and copy finished. Mr. Stewart Linscheid, yearbook sponsor, maintained his post, during his spare time, from 8:00 a.m. until the lights went out at 10:00 p.m. on October 20. In all, 48 pages have been sent to the publishers, Intercollegiate Press of Kansas City, Kansas. These include student and faculty pages, division pages, sports from the spring of 1960, May Fete, 1960, and the cover.

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English Lit Class Hears Recordings Mr. Silas Summers, assistant professor of English, is planning to build up a collection of literary records now that he has a record player. There are only six records in the collection at the present time, but he has plans for many more records. He feels that this is a very profitable investment because the students will be able to hear the poems and other varied works as their authors intended them to be read. Mr. Summers has a 1r ea d y played some s e 1 e c t i o n s from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales in his English literature class. Ezra-"Why do you call your girl friend 'Brown Sugar'?" Zeke-"She's so sweet, so unrefined."

LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS

Choral Clinic On December 3

Cats Lope Past Tarkio 25-11

Clayton Krehbiel, director of choral music at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, will be guest conductor for the n i nth annual choral clinic at P er u State Teachers College. Representatives of choral groups from high schools from Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri and Kansas have been invited to participate in the December 3 event, according to Edward G. Camealy, clinic director. The day-long clinic will be climaxed by a 7:30 p.m. concert by the massed chorus, under the direction of Mr. Krehbiel. In addition to rehearsal sessions, soloists, ensembles and: choruses will be auditioned for the evening program.

The Peru State Bobcat crosscountry team captured four of the first five places. Thursday afternoon ,to· defeat Tarkio College 11 to 25 in a dual meet on th e Peru course. Peru's top runner, Don Peterson, of Richfield captured first place by running the two miles in 10:30. Charles Dunn, Clarinda, Iowa, and Gary McCoy, Tecumseh, captured second and third spots respectively for the Peruvians. In fifth place for the Bobcats was Tom Buchholz 1 Papillion. Tarkio runners and their placing were: 4-Bob Gordon, 6-Bill Fox, 7-Bill Lindsay, 8-Keith Watt. The last meet of the Fall season in which the Peru thinclads will enter is the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics meet in Omaha on Nov. 26.

Japanese Woodcuts Now On Display An art exhibit of Japanese woodcuts is being held Nov. 6 through Nov. 16 in the art rooms above the library. These p r in t s are Ukujoescenes of daily life-portrayals which date from 1675 to the present day. Some of the more prominent artists exhibiting are Utamaro, Hokusai, and Hiroshige. The original blocks thcit the pictures were printed from were cherry wood which is very unusual. As many as twelve blocks were used for some of the prints to achieve the different colors and shades. This type of art is a result of the. artist trying to make inexpensive copies of his work available to the common people.

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NOTES FROM

DELZELL

Howard Pierce Davis Joyce Carman Concert Joyce Carman, Tecumseh, Speaks In Convocation willMisspresent a senior vocal reci-

Howard Pierce Davis, famed lecturer on world affairs, was the speaker at an Oct. 26 convocation. Davis is noted for the frequency of 1 his return engageMany Delzell residents have ments as well as his· keen analbeen engaged in "operation bed yses of world affairs. This was switch." About 55 beds have his second appearance on the Peru campus. His topic for the been placed in Delzell's rooms. Delzell's touch-football teams day was "The Price of Survival." have played two games in the He contended that the concept last two weeks. Jerry Partridge's behind the United Nations is inteam, Delzell two, tied the Inde- dispensable-that concept being pendents 0-0, making Jerry's a compulsive desire for peace. record 1-3-1. Roger Smith's team, Further, he stated that the prime Delzell one, lost to Majors 13-0, problem is not one of cop.flicting ideologies, or religions, or culmaking Roger's record 2-3. An engagement shower w a s tures, but one of .a spiritual nagiven for John Parli. He was ture. At the outset of his speech he thrown into the bathing shower. First floor was the sc.ene of a stated that the generation represlapping contest between Art sented by the audience was the Howe and Gary Schmucker. For- only one in history to have no tunately, the bout ended with a guarantee of survival. He offered four approaches we can handshake of friendship. Delzell has lost two residents, take in contemplation of our Don Clark and Larry Cornelius, world situation: the look at phywho have moved to an apart- sical liabilities such as waste lands and the population exploment. Delzell residents wish to ex- sion; the sociological mosaic press their sincere gratitude for wherein different world groups Major Hall's entertainment Sun- were identified, with a ratio of day, November 6. About 11:30, 1,000 representing the total; a Jerry Osborne, playing the gui- chronological approach wherein tar, and a chorus of others sang each decade since 1900 is characsome of the "old favorites" in terized; and finally, an approach based on the other three, the obfront of Delzell. Some comments concerning the servation of the human community in action. presidential race are as follows: Merlin Wright: "Khrushchev can't dodge Nixon and Lodge." Glen Beran:\. "Election comes every four years, and this year the Republicans are really in tears." Kappa Delta Pi, Beta Mu chapJim Yelnek: "We will crack ter, initiated 25 members in with Jack." ceremonies on Nov. 7, at ~:00 By Gerald Kirkendall

Kappa Delta Pi Initiates Twenty-five

ROY PECK Barber Shop Haircut, $1.25 Peru, Nebr.

BILL'S CLOTHING &: SHOE STORE You Pay Less ai Bill's Auburn, Nebr.

THE FABULOUS

JIMMY

p.m. This brought the total trtembership to 41. A short business meeting was held in which Wilma Johnson was elected secretary. The following are the n e w members: Richard Carlson, Leona Christen, Pat Cooper, Catherine Ideus, Marion Gomon, Alice Greene, Wilma Johnson, John Masonbrink, Joseph Kirby, Linda Goodin, Kay George, Darrel Wolcott,. Glenn Irwin, Robert Kepler, Genevieve Wilhite, Karen Fankhauser, Kay Rasmussen, Rose Clancy, Ross Pilkington, Wanda Price, Ray Meister, Deanna Wach, Merna Thalmann, Mary Skalak, Kathleen Rhoten. If you're living in the past, maybe it's because it's cheaper.

DORSEY ORCHESTRA

GEBER'S Conoco Service TOPS IN SERVICE BR4-3818 Auburn

tal at Peru State Teachers College Tuesday, November 15, at 8:00 p.m. in the college auditorium. An alto, Miss Carman is a student of Mr. Edward G. Camealy, assistant professor of voice. Holder of the 1960-61 Charles Weigand Memorial Scholarship, Miss Carman taught one year in Nemaha County District 27 following her-freshman year. She is a member of Kappa Delta Pi, national honorary education fraternity. Her recital will include aria, oratorio, operatic, song cycle and contemporary selections. R. T. Benford, associate professor of piano and organ, will be accompanist.

Russell Heads Faculty Association

LS.A. Adds Members

and Music." Two members were added to the roll, Phil Grube and Shirril Torring. Up-coming events for L.S.A. will be a social meeting, Nov. 9, and a program on marriage, divorce, and remarriage, Nov. 16.

McINTIRE S GARAGE and

STANDARD SERVICE GASOLINE AND AUTO REPAIR Phone TR 2-2791

Peru, Nebr.

PERU MARKET Rex Rains Groceries Meats Fruits and Vegetables

=

Free Delivery Tuesday and Friday Phone TR 2-4351 4.HI .. &MUM

;p

I@ . ~ A

Pottery and oil paintings by Leland Sherwood, art instructor in the Hiawatha (Kans.) Public Schools, on exhibit at Nebraska State .Teachers College at Peru, has proved popular with art department ~isitors during the past week. The collection of nine pieces of pottery· and 10 oils were made by the 1957 Peru State graduate during summer graduate study at the University of Wyoming. Marion Bartholomew, Jr., a junior art major from Beatrice, views "Covey of Quail," and "Saturday Night." Sherwood is a native of Chester, Nebr.

Heading the Faculty Association this year are: Lester Russell, president; Hanford Miller, viceNOTES president; and Maryon Adams, FROM secretary-treasurer. MAJORS The association was fyirmed on the advice of the North-Central By Association. Heads of departDarrel ments, the deans, and the presiWolcott dent are not members. Its purpose is "to assist t h e Majors' residents now practice administration in forming and expediting college policies; to teaching off campus are: Henry provide a medium through which "Hank" Turner, at Syracuse; the faculty can make. recom- Steve Banks, at Falls City; and mendations and express its wish- Alan Wheeler, at Auburn. Wheeles; and to allow the faculty to er, however, commutes between assume leadership in the total Peru and Auburn. Monte Haeffner, no longer on college program." Included in the organization is campus, is working for his paran executive committee. It car- ents on their farm near Firth. When the owl who frequents ries the association's ideas to the policies committee. Mr. Russell the trees outside the dorm says, is an ex-officio member of this "Who's who?," we can say, "Johnson, Wheeler, and Wanser." committee. Areas of study this year are: · Intramural touch-football acconvocation procedures, mid-se- tion resulted in a Majors victory mester registration, freshmen or- over Delzell one on Nov. 3. Larry ientation, admission to the teach- "Rambleberry" Rathe c au g h t er training program, comparison passes in the end zone for ·the of salary schedules and general two tallies, and "Jumping Jack" improvement of the college pro- Johnson received for the extra point. Majors leads in the league. gram. If you're interested in something to eat, you might try "Ma Dostal and Mincer's Beanery," room 208. The L.S.A. club met Nov. 2 at If you know of a "soft touch" 6:30 p.m. in the Music Hall. we can put the "bite" on, see one Pastor Deithoff, of Nebraska of the dorm officers. It seems City, Miss Rowalt, Jeannie Ehlers, and Gary Stover gave a pro- that we need money to buy a gram entitled "Martin Luther page in the Peruvian.

1

conducted by

Sherwood Exhibits Art Work

Newman Club Plans To Attend Omaha Meeting The November 2, 1960, meeting of Newman Club was opened by John Biere, president. He asked the members of the club to pay up their dues if they want e d their pictures in the annual. Chick Stessman, treasurer, then gave a report on the amount of money in the treasury. A Newman Club convention is to be held at Omaha University on December 3, 1960. It was decided that Peru would send a delegation. Approximately fifteen members volunteered to go. The usual lesson was read and discussed, and the meeting was ended with a prayer.

M.E.N.C. Plans Choral Clinic The· regular m e et in g of. M.E.N.C. was held Monday, No-'. vember 7, in the Music Hall. , The main topic discussed wasi the Choral Clinic to be held on1 camJ.'US. 8linic committees were! set up. : The group also considered aVJ tending the Nebraska Music Ed-:j ucators Conference and M.E.N.d Student Chapter Meetings which.ij will be held in North Platte on] November 17, 18, and 19. M.E.N.C. members discussed,! getting a two-day tour for both~ the band and the choir. Nothing~ definite was decided. ~

~

Here's How-To Use Phone

~

The new campus phone system~ has been operating since Sept. 27.~ It has 42 extensions, numbering* from 21 to 62. If anyone off campus wants tdj dial any of these extensions, he) dials Tr 2-2811. He then asks for. the extension number. , Campus stations may complete'. public exchange calls by use otl the digit, "9," without the as-'I sistance of the campus exchange . ' After the caller gets the d i a 1. tone, he dials his number. ..~ For local campus calls one !is1:1 tens for the dial tone. After he~-~ has received the tone, he call~, the two-digit extension.

1 ·1·

J

Wesley Fellowship Elects Officers A· new group has been organ, ized on campus this year. It the Wesley Fellowship. 1 'l;he officers for the followin~; year are as follows: Alan LavineJ president; Gary Schlosser, vie: 7 president; Darlene Elliott, secre. ; tary; Crystal Seegel, treasurer. ! The sponsors for the organiza~ tion are Rev. Moore and Mr s·.i Paradise. •• Anyone interested, is encouri··.·.·.: aged to attend Wesley Fellowl ship each Wednesday evening. ;

r:

BANK OF PERU PHONE TR 2-2331

Member F.D.I.C. INVITES YOUR BUSINESS CARROLL LEWIS, President

1·~

JOHN L. LEWIS, Vice Pres. & Cashier


Bobcats·Annihilate Wiidcats

And Get Co-Championship Victory Came 25-0 On Muddy Field at Wayne

to right: .Vernon Thomsen, Jim Fisher, LaMarr ~ess

sumrthol!Uail,"

g

than a week these footwill have played their e as a Bobcat. Th e i r will be missed, but all gs must come to an end.

Chappel hails from iver, Illinois, where he -District as a fo o t b a 11 A transfer from the Uniof Cincinnatti, Chappy's d determination have valuable in the Bob·ve for· the conference nship. Leon is married er Carol Wilton of City. He plans to teach ics and coach, followmid-term graduation. Gibson, four-year letf r om "Mcintireland" ty, Nebr.), is the "meanon the squad." The a good pass receiver, a blocker, and vicious In short, he is a good allball player. A physical

Gibson, Dick Gerber, Leon Chappel. Lynn Osl:erholm

education major, LaMarr plans a coaching career. Dick Gerber, four-year letterman at the flank position, is a graduate of Fu 11 e rt o n High. Dick's fine pass-receiving a n_d deadly tackling earned him AllState recognition last year. With Dick and LaMarr at the ends, the Bobcat opponents have found it tough to run the ends. Dick is an industrial arts and physical education major and plans to teach and coach. Lynn Osterholm comes to the Bobcats from Glenwood, Iowa, where he was a four-year letterman in both football and track. After being injured in the first scrimmage last year and lost for the 1959 season, Lynn is being groomed at right half and a 1s o as a kick-off and extra-point specialist. Lynn is a mathematics and physical education major and plans a teaching-coaching career.

yne Jars Kearney ·;,i.ng Title to Peru t drouth against Keara 19-7 upset triumph Saturday. ion to scoring their first ce 1954 against KearWildcats handed Peru aska College Conference 'p. , Hastings and the Anare jammed into second

a game marred by furnrecovered most of its bobbles, then settled heroics. Every Kearney after intermission was by fumbles, with Wayne "31.ost of the recoveries.

Panhandle Aggies Bobcats 20-6 nFinals For Cats

season by stepping ence and absorbing defeat at the hands of A & M, Saturday, at Oklahoma. hdowns by halfback n, an inspiring 55own by fullback , and a rock-ribbed d defeat for the

if they halfback

lminated a 61-yard which was set up Oak's Ross Pilkington a Panhandle Aggie

s, .shier

Although only the s e c o n d Wildcat touchdown was set up by an Antelope fumble, bobbles ruined the Kearney race against the clock the last 30 minutes. Kearney had 11 .first downs and 198 yards to 10 first downs and a 194-yard total for tlile Wildcats. Kearney completed only three of 20 passes for 32 yards. Kearney _____ 7 0 0 0 7 Wayne _______ 0 6 6 7 19 Kearney scoring: Touchdown, Steve Kraus (15, end run). Point after touchdown, Gary Liesenfeld (placement). Wayne scoring: Touchdowns, Larry McHenry (5, run); D i c k Chochon, 2 (2 and 1, plunges). Point after touchdown, Dave Kracl (placement). back Tony Pontillo and the 221pound bull-like runner crushed his way 55 yards through the entire Peru team for an inspirational score tying effort. The Panhandle extra point kick went awry to leave the score knotted at halftime. No serious scoring threats materialized in the second half until late in the third quarter quarter. On the last play of the quarter, Linton broke loose from his own 28-yard line and sprinted to the Peru nine before being caught from behind by Peru's Sam Sadich, Wood River, Ill., halfback. Three plays later Linton scored on a five-yard plunge. Mel Begley kicked the extra point to give Panhandle a 13 to 6 lead. A thorn in Peru's side all afternoon, Linton gave the Oklahomans an insurance counter mid-way in the fourth quarter. Linebacker Charles Topinka had given the Aggies the ball on the Peru 14 by intercepting a Bobcat pass. Six plays later Linton swept end for two yards and the score. Again Begley converted to conclude the afternoon's scoring. Panhandle's strong defensive unit, led by towering Derrell Younger who spent much of the afternoon in the Peru backfield, limited. Peru to 61 yards rushing and 50 yards passing. Though disheartened by fh e

Vernon Thomsen, tackle, hails from Exeter, Nebraska, where he earned ten letters in high school sports, being an All-State foot~ baller twice. After transferring from Fairbury Junior College, "Smiley" worked his way into the Bobcat's starting line-up. A good blocker on offense and rugged on defense, Vernon c o u 1 d easily be a "sixty minute ball player." Physical education is his major, and teaching and coaching are his objectives following ·garduation. Jim Fisher, fullback, is another ball player from "Mcintireland". This is Jim's first year as a Bobcat, but' he has proven that he wants to play, and he has. "Fish" has been a great asset to the team in relieving the linebackers and fullback. Jim is a physical education major and is set on a coaching career following his graduation.

Cross Country Squad Fifth In Meet In their initial year of cross country running, the Peru State Bobcat thinclads found the going tough as they placed fifth in the five-team Nebraska College Con/ ference cross country meet at , Wayne, Saturday. Peru's Don Peterson, Richfield, placed sixth in the 32-man field as he ran the three-mile course in 16:56. Kearney State's squad won the event with a team score of 32 poihts. The other teams placed in this order: Wayne 57, Doane 72, Nebraska Wesleyan 84, and Peru 115. Dean White of Doane won the event with a time of 15:59. Other Peru runners and their placing were: 24-Charles Dunn, Clarinda, Iowa; 25-Gary McCoy, Tecumseh; 29-Dave Malmberg, Red Oak, Iowa; 31-T om Buchholz, Papillion. The remainder of the field finished as follows: 2-Martin Mason, K; 3-Don Weitzenkamp, W; 4-Gary . Shubert, K; 5- B ob Gemmell, W; 7-Larry Moore, K; 8-Tom Songster, D; 9-Phil Dean, K; 10-Phil Stineman, K; 11-Gil Carranza, K; 12-Terry Roberts, NW; 13-Ken Katzer, W; 14-Clarence Wiedel, K; 15Bob Allen, NW; 16-Dean Kirk, W; 17-Ray Jensen, NW; 18Gary Peterson, D; 19-Richard Carlson, NW; 20-Steve Powers, W; 21-Clifford, Sibley, NW; 22Tom Erickson, ·D; 23-Lynn Elsner, D; 26-Joe Green, W; 27Larry Johnson, W; 28-Ed Williams, NW; 30-Bob Grafton, NW; 32-Bob Benson, D. loss of coach Al Wheeler's 1a s t game as head mentor of the Bobcats, the day did bring joy to the Peru camp. Wayne State, turned giant killer, upset the Kearney Antelopes to give Peru the Nebraska College C o n f e re n c e crown. Had Kearney won as expected, they would have shared the title with Peru. Game Statistics P A&M First downs _______ 10 9 Passes attempted __ 20 4 Passes completed __ 8 2 Yards passing _____ 50 67 Yards rushing _____ 61 217 Number of punts ___ 7 5 Punt average ______ 40 37.2 Fumbles lost ______ 1 1 Penalty yardage ___ 10 40

By Bob Fisher On a rain soaked gridiron, the Peru State Bobcats further dampened Wayne State's homecoming and 50th anniversary by dumping the Wildcats 25 to 0 Saturday afternoon, Oct. 29 at Wayne. The victory insured Peru of at least a share of the Nebraska College Conference crown and closed the door to Wayne's title aspirations. Kearney State can gain a first place tie with Peru if they can get past Wayne next Saturday.

the rest of the way into pay dirt. With only 1:18 left in the first half, halfback Place scored h i s second tally on a 9-yard pass from Falls City's Bob Gibson. Jerry Henning's interception of a Wayne pass set up the score. The final counter came with but 32 seconds remaining in the third quarter. Place broke through tackle, slid to the outside and outran the Wayne defenders in a 30-yard romp to finish the tarnishing of Wayne's golden anniversary game.

An all-morning rain, which ended just prior to game time, thoroughly muddied the playing field, but the adverse conditions hindered the talented .Bobcats little as they scored all f o u r touchdowns in an explosive fashion. Dick Place led Peru by scoring three touchdowns. The Nebraska City star opened the scoring just before the end of th e first quarter by hauling in a 29yard aerial from quarterback John Christensen,. Nebraska City. Lynn Osterholm, kicking specialist from Glenwood, Iowa, split the uprights with the extra point. That was the only time Osterholm could get enough cooperation from the slippery turf to complete the extra point placement. Peru's second T.D. was scored by giant Ken Dostal from Scribner. Early in the· second period, Dostal blocked a Wayne punt on the Wildcat 49. End Dick Gerber, Fullerton, scooped up the loose pigskin and raced to the 25-yard line, where, as he was being tackled, lateraled to the 6'6" Dostal and the big tackle rumbled

Peru's fine defensive unit again earned p 1 a u d i t s . They held Wayne to only three first downs, none in the second half, and to a total .offense of 75 yards. Wayne was able to penetrate Bobcat territory once, that coming in the first quarter when they recovered a Peru fumble. The final outing of the 1960 season for the Peruvians came on November 5, when head coach Al Wheeler brought to an end his 23-year career at Peru State by leading them to Goodwell, Okla., for a game' witli Pan ha n d 1 e A & M. Statistics: P First downs ------- 13 Passes attempted __ 19 Passes co"l:iipleted __ 5 Yards passing _____ 54 Yards rushing _____ 154 Total offense ______ 208 Punts ------------Punting average ___ Fumbles lost ______ Penalty yardage ___

5 39 1 95

Scoring By Quarters: Peru --------- 7 12 6 0 Wayne _______ 0 0 0 0

W 3 15 4 21 54 75 10 30.l 2 91 25 0

Mcintire Prepares Cagers For Season's .Campaign Shedding his .assistant football coachings togs, head basketball coach, Jack Mcintire, led his Peru State Bobcat cagers through their first official drill Monday afternoon. It will be a fast and l'urious month of practice for the Peruvians as they prepare for a tough non-conference slate of games and the rugged Nebraska College Conference schedu19.

in Larry Coney, Charles Rachow, and Ron Raver. Besides experience and talent Wayne has the psychological edge of being the 'defending champions. Mcintire went on to say that Wesleyan and Hastings are good bets to be in the thick of the championship fight. The Peru coach predicted a "dog fight" for positions under the top three teams. Though humble in his evaluaWith the loss of two of his top aces on the 1959-60 squad, Mcin- tion of his own team, Mcintire tire has a tough rebuilding job. did leave a ray of light for BobThe loss of high-scoring Bob cat fans. The Peru sponsored 4Mayo and defensive star Charles State Tournament, during t h e Christmas holidays, which hosts Francis leaves a big gap. Panhandle A&M, Anderson (Ind.) The Peruvians, who finished· College, and Simpson (Iowa) Colthird in the N.C.C. last year, lege, plus the other non-conferhave nine returning lettermen. ence foes should sharpen t h e Returning monogram winners Bobcats for the start of conferare: 6'8" Bob Buettgenbach, Beaence competition. trice; 6'1'' Roger Witt, Otoe; 6'3" After underclassmen and new Larry Rathe, Sterling; 6'4" Jack starters have had their baptism Johnson, Loup City; 6'3" Drexel under competitive fire, the BobHarvey, Hartford, Ill.; 5'11" Bob cats could be a power to reckon Gibson, Falls City; 5'10" Mike with in the N.C.C. If this assumpRoach, Palmyra; 6'2" C hi ck tion is carried to its logical end, Stessman, Omaha; 6'1'' Tom and if catastrophe can be avoidYopp, East Alton, Ill. ed in the early part of the race, The non-conference schedule the Peruvians could be a real for the Bobcats looks like a kill- threat for conference honors. er slate. Heading the list is naThe Bobcat schedule for 1960tionally famous Tennessee A & I, 61: Nov. 28, Alumni; Dec. 1, TarNational Intercollegiate Athletic kio at Tarkio; Dec. 3, Omaha U. Association champions two of at Omaha; Dec. 8, Tarkio; Dec. 10, the last three years, and third Tennessee A & I; Dec. 14, Emlast yea~. Also on the agenda are poria State at Emporia, Kans.; three strong teams from the pow- Dec. 15, St. Benedicts at Atchierful Central Intercollegiate Con- son, Kans.; Dec. 29-30, 4-State ference-Omaha "U., St. Bene- Tourney at Falls City; Jan. 7, dict's College at Atchison, Kans., Wesleyan at Lincoln; Jan. 13-14, and Kansas State Teachers of Chadron at Chadron; Jan. 20, Emporia. Hastings; Jan. 21, Kearney; Jan. In evaluating the N.C.C. sea- 28, Wayne at Wayne; Feb. 2, son, Mcintire said Wayne State Doane at Crete; Feb. 4, Wesleyan; is the team to beat. They have Feb. 11, Wayne; Feb. 16, Keartheir three top stars from 1 a s t ney; Feb. 23, Doane; Feb. 24, season's championship club back Hastings at Hastings.


Kittens Chew Antlers At Elk Creek 38-13

Students coming the greatest distance to the campus this fall are Frank Sunada, Honolulu, Hawaii, and Frankie Kan, Hong Kong, China.

FRANK SUNADA

FRANKIE KAN

Frankie Kan, liberal arts maBefore coming to Peru, Frank Sunada attended the University jor, is a transfer student from of Hawaii for two and one-half Morehead State College, Moreyears. A junior, Frank's fields of head, Kentucky. He attended colconcentration .are speech and lege in Hong Kong for one year. business. After receiving his de- · Frankie chose Peru because it gree, he hopes to teach at the is a small, inidwestern college. junior high level in Japan. Frankie finds the scholastic Frank chose Peru because it is a small school specializing in system in the United States different from that of China. In teacher training. Courses, he says, are well China, there. are . no semester taught and detailed. Teachers are hours and no grade points. Stu'friendly and willing to help. Stu- dents pass from one. level to the dents here are more mature and next, comparable to our gr a de express themselves more freely school arrangement. Frankie enjoys table tennis. than do Hawaiian students.

Campus School Chatter By Mary Anna Gnade Mock elections in both college and high school went strongly Republican. The state of the nation~ politics-wise, has been of great concern to the campus schoolers. Elementary-agers wore tags home saying "I can't vpte, will you?" And teenage election parties were probably more hotly partisan than adults!

tighten up for awhile. In case being college s tu dent s has dimmed your memory of elemen-. tary days, why not visit open house Tuesday night, Nov. 15, and marvel at the changes in classwork even in the short time since you were there. Have you forgotten how much y o u liked to show off what you had accomplished? At 1east thai hasn't changed!

Education Week

Occasoinally, when you could Clear away election talk, y o u The Campus School observed caught glimpses that indicated, American Education Week, Noother school work and affairs vember 6-12, in numerous ways. . were taking their normal course. Parents were sent written invitaFor one thing, pictures for tradtions asking them ·to visit school. ing were taken-later than usual Students in grades one through but valuable in sustaining memtwelve participated in the camories in future. Various classes paign. All students were given are sponsoring d an c e s - f'rintwo pamphlets for their parents. stance, the Lettermen sponsored The pamphlets contained informa dance after the last football ganie; the freshmen a:re sponsor- ation about America's schools. Tags reminding adults to v o t e ing Thanksgiving dance. were worn by students throughThe football season wound it- out all grades. Also a part of American Eduself to a successful ciose with basketball practice starting im- cation Week but to be held Nomediately. (Wasn't it nice there vember 15, is P.T.A. Open House. was no precipitation to s it Parents will be free to visit all through at a game?) The elemen- class rooms throughout the evetary band performed with gusto ning. Special displays a:re being and found out a metal horn can planned by many. Students have been appointed to guide parents make fingers mighty cold. to the various rooms. In the thick of things, seniors ·-are preparing for tbeir departure from high school. Between Regents exams and American College Tests,. they attended college· night at Auburn where they P a r e n t -Teacher Conferences were formally interviewed (and were held for the ninth straight sold?)· by. representatives from year Friday, Nov. 11. Students colleges, including Peru State. were given the usual recess while They have also selected and cast their parents and teachers met. their class play to be directed by Elementary and high school stuJoni Weslowski. dents are included in this proSurely you haven't , missed the gram. The conference program was glee with which small boys (and dogs) romp in the dry, rustly initiated in the fall of 1951. Since . .leaves after school. It's so much then, parents and teachers have fun, the littl'ns have even been been meeting twice yearly to disseen carrying armloads of leaves cuss students' progress and probat noontime to build the· stack lems. It might be noted that Peru higher in back of the c a m p u s is one of the more progressive schools in the state in this area. school. It was one of the first schools to Since we are now observing start such a program. M an y American Education Week, par- schools in Peru's immediate area ents will confer with teachers on have since adopted the Parentchildren's progress after which Teacher Conference method of homework rules will no doubt distributing quarter grades.

Parent-Teacher Conferences Held For Ninth Year

The Peru Prep B o b k it t e n s traveled to Elk Creek Wednesday night, October 25, to defe~t the Antlers 38-13. The Bobkittens relentlessly marched for touchdowns through the entire game with J e r r y Reeves, outstanding. Prep halfback, scoring three times during the contest on runs of 38, 60, and 23 yards. ' The game was entirely Peru's both offensively and defensively. Repeatedly defensive tack 1 e s Fred Shirley and Keith Marnell broke through the Antler line to throw Elk Creek's major threat, 6-6, 235-pound Rich Knippelmeyer for losses. Elk Creek's only touchdowns came in the fourth quarter when Bobkitten coach DeZwarte swept the bench. The scores were made by Knippelmeyer on a 38-yard run and a three-yard plunge. Other Prep scores were made by Bob Peck, Pat Morris and Paul Heuer. Al Wheeler converted twice to furnish the e x t r a points.

Campus School Has ALibrary Council By Sandra Craig A new organization at the campus school this fall is the Library Council. I.t i~ comprised of a boy and girl from each of grades three through 12. The members selected must have read and rep~rted 25 books. The council will meet four times a year. They will' discuss reading problems and work on upgrading the entire reading program. Now in use in the elementary school is the S R A reading program. Its purpose is to improve the rate of reading as well as comprehension. The material is used for 20' weeks in one grade and passed to the next. The junior library has be.en moved from the college library to the campus school. Library participation will now be easier for the grade school students. Tryouts for junior high cheerleaders were held Friday, September 30. Chosen by the students were Nancy Adams, Karen Beaty, Brenda Blanton, D an a Henry, and Lavonne Stephens. The girls made their debut at a pep rally held before the Johnson game.

Six Campus School Seniors Take American College Test The American College Test was given for the first time in Peru Nov. 5, 8:00-12:00 a.m. Seniors eligible to take the t e s t were: Sara Adams, David Gomon, Pat Morris, Paul Heuer, Linda Jean Stephens and Robert Gnade. The tests are concerned almost exclusively w it h generalized skills and abilities rather than the specific content of the high school curriculum. Colleges use the test results for: pre-college and on-campus counseling, placement, granting of loans and scholarship awards and admissions.

The upper one-third of the ior class also participated i Regents Exam Nov. 2. Mr. the gave the test to David mon, Elaine Gerdes, Robert de, Sara Adams, Linda Jean·. phens, Virginia Cockerham, ; Mary Ellen Wilson. Those students receiving a cified score are awarded sch ships to the University of braska. Alternate and honor. mention are also determined this way. The test material ineludes ' solid subjects covered in school.

Practice Teaching In Session Peru State students began their six weeks session of p r a c t i c e teaching at the Campus School Nov. 7. Those in the professional semester will teach full time. The purpose of the professional semester is to create, in as far as possible, a real teaching situation. Teaching in the elementary grades are: Kathleen Kopplin, kindergarten; Virginia Van Winkle, grade 2; Sharon Norvel, grade 3; Judy Wolfe, grade 4; Kaye Jacobson, grade 6; Grace Russell, grade 3 and 4 science; James Kemp, grade 2 and 4 science. . Those teaching at the hi g h school level are: Leonard Allgood and Francis Hajek, mathematics; Christie Meyer, Carolyn Parli and Jerry Wanser, English; John Cooper, William Fitzgerald and Jerry Wanser, history; Rob-

ert Kaiser, Judy Miller, Leo Allgood, Frances Hajek, J · Kemp and Ruth Moorer, sci, Others include: Deanna ~ home economics; Christie M' Carolyn Parli and Deanna W, business education; William~ gerald, physcial education; , Weslowski, speech; Jack H · industrial arts; Robert 1( and Judy Miller, music. After a few days observ students will begin teachin last two weeks of the se will be devoted to e.valuati

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The "Soaring Sixties"' was the theme for the fi:i.ll Home Economics Workshop which was held November 5, 1960, at Kearney State Teachers College. The highlight of the workshop was a speech entitled "Fashions in the Soaring Sixties." This was given · by Mrs. Christie Hedelund, an instructor at the· University of Omaha. The Peru Home Economics Club was represented by eleven members and two sponsors. Those ·attending the workshop were: Jeannine Ehlers, Joan Riggle, Karolyn P o w e r s , Clara Kelly, Bette Coulter, Bonnie Suda, Deanna Wach, Barbara Story, Sandy Craig, Kay Rasmussen, Charlotte Wheeler, Mrs. Sproul, and Mrs. Kregel.

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··.Attend Jimmy Dorsey Concert

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 56

Number 5

NOVEMBER 28, 1960

On November

29th 8:00 P. M.

Student Senate Conducts W.U.S. Fund Drive

ee Castle Will Direct Dorsey rchestra Here November 29 , The famous Jimmy Dorsey or, estra, under the dire~tion of e Castle, will appear in con7,rt at Peru State Teachers Col'ge Tuesday, Nov. 29. Sponsored the Student Senate at Peru ate, the two-hour concert will 'gin at 8:00 p.m. · '.The first Dorsey Brothers mu..cal group, called the Dorseys' pvelty Band, had its beginning ·: 1922 at Shenandoah, Pa. It was t until 1934 that their orchescame into being, after the . others played with name bands that period. The Dorsey name music dates even farther back ; their father, Thomas Dorsey, ., who was their music teacher.

That first Dorsey orchestra featured Bob Crosby as their vocalist, Ray McKinley as a drummer, and the late Glenn Miller played second trombone. By 1936, the Dorsey musical tradition was established to continue for an entire generation. After the Brothers band went their separate ways, two fine orchestras emerged. Together and apart, the Dorsey Brothers sold a total of 110 million records. Under the direction of Lee Castle, the 15-piece Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra, and Letti Luce, are keeping the Dorsey music traditions alive .

iorensic Students Attend :outh Dakota Speech Conference \Five members of the "Begin'ng Debate" class journeyed to : rmillion, So. Dak. on Nov. 18 d 19 for the annual Intercol,igiate Speech Conference of the niversity of South Dakota. The :;re were: Carol McLain, Steve ; rker, Rose Clancy, Darrel Wol' tt, and Allen Nelson. 1)Misses McLain and Clancy won ., e affirmative debate. Parker d Wolcott aiso won an affirma;ye. Each team debated f o u r es. :• All members took part in the '• ree-round discussion, in which ; olcott received a rating of "ex-

,,re-Christmas :1osed Week-end ;A pre-Christmas week-end is · ing to be held' on campus De·mber 9, 10, and 11. ~:

f It

will begin Friday evening .ith a semi-formal dinner at the :. feteria. Following dinner, a ,;esper service sponsored by the ; usic department will be held in e auditorium. Peru Prep then as a game with Talmage at Pe.. At 10 o'clock there will be a ,ance in Delzell Hall with the : llege combo providing the mu.· c. The dance will be sponsored 'y the White Angels. Saturday a matinee will be giv-

cellent." Miss McLain was awarded the top rating in o n e group of seven extemporaneous speakers. Nelson received a "fair" for after dinner speaking. Miss Clancy and Parker received an "excellent" for their choral reading in the interpretive reading division. Wolcott received a "superior" for radio announcing. Mr. J. D. Levitt, Peru debate coach, acted as a judge and critic in some of the conference events. A total of 215 students from 25 colleges and universities participated in the event.

The Student Senate is conducting a fund-raising campaign for the World University Service. A collection will be taken up at the Alumni-Varsity basketball game November 28, and again at the Tennessee A & I game Dec. 10. The World University Service is under the United Nations, and is the only group which directs all its efforts to the university student. Forty-one nations, both donating and receiving nations, belong to the Service. The funds are sent to students who otherwise would be unable to stay in school because of some national crises. A good example of the work of the Service is that following the Hungarian revolt, the Service sent money to place the university students in schools of different nations. This aid is given in such a way that it helps th e students to help themselves. The principal fields of action of this non-profit, non-governmental organization are: problems of student lodging and living, student health, individual and emergency aid, supplying textbooks and other equipment necessary f©r an educational program. ' In a nation where education is more or less taken for granted, students should feel a concern for our peers · who must go through many hardships to get an education. With your contributions we can help the W.U.S. in its fight against poverty, disease, ignorance, and despair in the international community of students. This is especially important in this atomic age when there is a "race between education and catastrophe."

SAC Bqnd Wows Crowd

The SAC Band presented an enjoyable concert at Convocation Wednesday, November 16. The concert opened with an introductory piece. The director, Chief Warrant Officer Richard C. Daugherty, then introduced himself and presented the band. SAC band played "Florentina March"; "September Song," which w a s arranged by a member ·of 'the band; "Puccini Fantasy"; and "Indian Summer." A "commercial" for recruiting band members was given by a trombone player. The trombonist played a variety number w it h band accompaniment. In this en at 2 o'clock. That evening Penumber he portrayed various ru will play Tennessee A & I at leaders of well-known bands. Peru. After the game there will The band's pianist, L a r r y be a get-to-gether at Eliza Morgan Hall. There will be TV, ping Maust, was given special recogpong, card games, and other en- nition because he will be leaving the organization. He played a tertainment. specialty number, accompanied Sunday morning from 9 o'clock by the band. to 10 o'clock the Home EconomThe dance band was introics club will serve breakfast at Eliza Morgan. There will be a duced and they played "Leo, the small charge for the breakfast Lion," "Talk About Party," and consisting of coffee or hot choco- "Today Has a Day." The concert band then relate and rolls. Then everyone may attend the church of his turned· and played "Topsy Turchoice. Dinner will be served at vey," which featured the drumthe college cafeteria at $1.25 per mer. The program closed w it h plate. That afternoon the college the Air Force theme song. chorus will present the Messiah. Marilyn Monroe, White Angels have been working hard to make prexy, and others of the Angels this "closed" week-end a success.

Miss Diddel Exhibits Sister's Watercolors Miss Marguerite M. Diddel of Denver, Colo., has 24 watercolor paintings on display in the art rooms of the library, through December 2. Miss Diddel, a retired Denver Public School art instructor, is a sister of Miss Nor-

ma Diddel. She received her art education ef the 'Chicago Art Institute, Columbia University, and the University of California. Visitors are welcome to see the exhibit week days from 10:00 to 12:00 a.m. and 1:00 to 4:00 p.m.

Wheeler Announces Letter Winners For 1960 Season

Ninth Choral Clinic To Be Held at Peru

Director of Athletics Alfred G. Wheeler has a n n o u n c e d the names of 28 varsity letter winners from the 1960 Peru St at e Teachers College football team. These 28 men were largely responsible for the Bobcat's 1960 Nebraska Co 11 e g e Conference championship and a season's record of six wins, two losses, and one tie. The lettermen include 12 seniors, 11 juniors, three sophomores, and two freshmen. They are: Seniors-Gail Beckstead, Bellevue; Leon Chappell, East Alton, Ill.; Jim Fisher, Falls City; LaMarr Gibson, Falls City; Dick Gerber, Fullerton; Jerry Henning, Peru; Dick Ne a 1 e, Bellevue; Lynn Osterholm, Glen~ wood, Iowa; Ross Pilkington, Red Oak, Iowa; Ray Unterbrink, East Alton, Ill.; Vernon Thomsen, Exeter; and John Green, manager, Tecumseh. Juniors-Marion Battani, Madrid, Iowa; John Christensen, Nebraska City; ~en Dostal, Scribner; Bob Gibson, Falls City; Larry Hausman, Beatrice; Dick Place, Nebraska City; Mike Ramirez, Omaha; Gary Randles, Fullerton; Ken Rhodus, Bellevue; Sam Sadich, Wood River, Ill.; and Harry Whitney, Omaha. Sophomores-Ron Kelly, Falls City; Cletus Shrout, East Alton, 'Ill.; and Tom Yopp, East Alton, Illinois. Freshmen-Darwin Schroeder, Omaha; and Bill Tynon, Peru.

Dramatics Club Members Will Direct One-~ct Plays A Dramatics Club meeting was held Tuesday, November 8, at the home of Mr. R. D. Moore. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss ways of strengthening the organization. The members decided to produce and direct three one-act plays. The dramas will be pre-

More than 350 high school vocal students from 12 area h i g h schools have been registered for the ninth annual Choral ClinicFestival at Peru State Teachers College, December 3. Representatives of ch or a 1 groups from Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri, and K a n s a s high schools have been invited to participate in the December 3 event, according to Edward G. Camealy, clinic director. The clinic is sponsored by the Peru State chapter 208 of the Music Ed.ucators National Conference. · Clayton Krehbiel, choral director at the University of Kansas, Lawrence, will be g u e s t conductor. A free public concert will be presented by the massed chorus at 7:30 p.m. in the Peru State College gymnasium. In addition to rehearsal sessions, soloists, ensembles and choruses will be auditioned for the evening program.

Sophomore Class Elects Officers The first meeting of the sophomore class was held Nov. 10. The purpose of this meeting was the election of class officers. They are: Larry Swett, president; Eugene Wright, vice-president; Pauline Fink, secretary; and Rosalie Baehr, treasurer. The ·sophomore class met November 17, in the college auditorium to elect one Student Senate representative. Carol McLain was elected. sented this semester. Anyone interested in trying out, PLEASE DO SO! Those who are qualified for membership in the club will be initiated at the December meeting. Refreshments were served by Mrs. Moore.


ankle during basketball practice. To top it all off, the flu bug has By Lois Fritz hit the dorm again. "Life git s tedious, don't it " The Lord must have liked us, I say when I stand Gary Stover and Darrel Feit Where the waves like an army come into the land, · were members of Peru's five-man With the gulls riding high on the crest of the breeze delegation to the Student Senate And the ducks flying north in their echelon V's, Conference at Concordia TeachThe sun slipping down into liquefied gold~ ers College at Seward on Nov. 11 Oh, it's then the great love of the Lora I behold. and 12. "The Good World" From the January 1961 issue of Edgar A. Guest "Mad" magazine,. this famous Indeed, the Lord must have loved us to give such a Southern slogan: "If a·t first you don't secede, try, try, again!" bounteous abode; But how often does on~ thank Him for His gracious gifts

THANKSGMNG EDITORIAL

which encircle and engulf us? How often does one sit back and drink deeply of His blessings? Not often! People are too self-centered. We feel that the Lord <:lwes us a comfortable living, since He put .us on this earth. The truth lies to the contrary, however. We owe God for giving us the opportunity to live on His beautiful earth and to develop ourselves into useful beings for :flis service. Life is His greatest blessing, for without it we would not be. In addition to the gift of life, God endowed us with talents. No one is without talent. Not everyone is able to write a "William Tell Overture" or create a masterpiece comparable to Leonardo Di Vinci's "The Last Supper." Your talent may be one such as cleaning the streets. Whatever your talent, develop it well and thank God for it and life. SENATE STUDIES CENTER PLANS By Ray Meister Gary Stover, Darrel Feit, Gladys Monahan, Joan Riggle, and Mr. Holmes attended a Student Senate Conference at Concordia November 18 and 19. Representatives of senates . from other Nebraska colleges also attended this conference. Thirteen separate group conferences were held which dealt with such problems as activities, orientation and initiation, and functions of a Student Senate. It is hoped that ideas brought back from this conference by our representatives will help us in reorganizing our Student Senate and make it what it should be, A STUDENT GOVERNMENT, instead of a "crepe-paper decoration and dance committee!" December 2 and 3, Ray Meister, as Student Senate representative, will accompany Dr. Wininger and Mr. Holmes to Wichita, Kansas, where they will attend a Student Union Conference. The purpose of attending this conference is fo obtain ideas on how to run the new Student Center, and how to correlate the Student Senate with other student activities.

NOTES FROM MAJORS By Darrel Wolcott Anyone visiting the dorm in late afternoon of Nov. 22 might have thought he was in the wrong place. It seems almost everyone was d r e s s e d up for Thanksgiving dinner at the cafeteria. Darrel Feit did· a little "globetrotting" as he went to Illinois with Ray Unterbrink, Drexel Harvey, Roger Carnes, and Roger Smith for t he Thanksgiving

week-end .. Tom Mincer and Ed Hohman traveled to Minneapolis for the holiday. Bob Meinzer is married now and living in Auburn, commuting to campus for his classes. Mighty Majors wound up intramural football play at the top of the heap with a 4-1-1 record. Second place Independents had a 2-1-3 record. If you ask Harry Whitney, "Why the beard?," he'll probably ~ay it's for a Christmas play. Aches and pains seem to be the order of the day around here. Jim Kemp received a very bad injury to his thigh muscle in the last intramural football game. Chick Stessman injured h i s

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of :the Campus of a Thousand Oaks November 28. 1960

THE STAFF Co-Editor ___ --~--- _______ : _______ ------------ .Rose Clancy Co-Editor _____________________________ Mary Ann Lewellyn Sports Editor _________________________________ steve Parker Copy Editor ____________________________________ Leroy Keyt Business Manager _____________________________ Ray Meister Personnel Manager ____________________________ Herb Brown Columnist. _________________________________ Linda Bertram ColumnisL _______________________________ Jerry Kirkendall ColumnisL ________________________________ Linda Nygaard ColumnisL _________________________________ Darrel Wolcott ColumnisL ______________________________ Mary Anna Gnade Campus SchooL _______________________________ Sandy Craig Sports Reporter ________________________________ Bob Fisher Women's Sports __________________________________Pam Yost Reporter ______________________________________ Lynn Bailey Reporter ________________________________________ Lois Fritz Reporter __________________________________ Marilyn Monroe Reporter _________________________________.____ Judy Pollack Reporter ___________________________________ carolyn Reiber Reporter _______________________________________ Gary Weiss Reporter _____________________________________ John Werner Reporter ________________________________________ Tom Yopp Sponsor_________________________________ Stewart Linscheid

WHISPERS FROM MORGAN By Linda Nygaard Turkey time! Here and gone entirely too fast. I guess the little vacation did everyone some good, considering the things the coeds did. Here are a few of those things: " ... locked myself up in a room away from all the noise." " .. : ate, ate, ate." " ... recuperated from the first part of the semester and tried to prepare for the last part." " ... took up a collection for "underprivileged" turkeys who did not make it to the table this year." The rooms in the new wings are just about finished. It will not be long now until each floor enlarges! Only one comment to that, "Now there will be more space for the noise to go, so we can all be noisier." The girls can brag about some new frilly fabrics in their laundry room. It has now made this part of the dorm "strictly private." Francis Sanders celebrated her birthday with the help of 12 girls. They had quite a timk. ' Also celebrating a birthday on second floor, we find Mary Lou. Reid the center of attraction. All the girls there brought an insignificant gift. Winnie Sporer had a party, too, to help ring in her next year of life. Bev O'Hara, Betty Coulter, Carolyn Powers, Judy Sanders, and Deanna Donahoo were there to help her celebrate.

Gosh frosh! how'd you catch on so quick? Catch on to the fact that Coca-Cola is the hep drink on campus, I mean. Alwayi drink it, you say? Well-how about . · dropping over to the dorm and downing a sparkling Coke or two with the boys. The man who's for Coke is the man for us.

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A painting project is in progress at Delzell Hall. If you need your room painted, don't get overly anxious; you must await your turn. Robert Reitz, Rex ·Rhodes, Roger Smith, and Arlin Stuhr went deer hunting during the week-end. I wonder if they found any "dear" on their expedition. Woe unto you if you are going steady. You may be thrown into the shower. Ask Dennis Crawford. The final outcomes of the intramural touch-football teams were Delzell Two-1-4-1 and Delzell One-f-3-1. Now that football is over, almost everyone is juggling his schedule in order to participate in intramural basketball. · If you want a tip on a good movie, Arlan Richardson recommends that everyone see "Elmer Gantry." If you enjoy relaxing and listening to music, you should visit James Mayo. I warn you, though, he may give you a sales talk. He has a good stereophonic hi-fi that he would love to sell at a low price.

SOFT WATER BeaUy's

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TAYLOR JEWELRY Dean E. Taylor

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STUDENT ACCOUNTS Auburn, Nebraska


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BOBCAT BASKETBALL SCHEDULE- 1960-61 Nov. Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec.

28-Alumni 1-Tarkio at Tarkio 3-0maha U. at Omaha 8-Tarkio 10-Tennessee A & I 14-Emporia State at Emporia, Kansas Dec. 15-St. Benedicts at Atchison, Kansas Dec. 29-30-4-State Tourney at Falls City Jan. 7-Wesleyan--at Lincoln Jan. 13-14-Chadron at Chadron Jan. 20-Hastings . Jan. 21-Kearney Jan. 28-Wayne at Wayne Feb. 2-Doane at Crete Feb. 4-Wesleyan Feb. 11-Wayne Feb. 16-Kearney Feb. 23-Doane Feb. 24-Hastings at Hastings 111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111

ampions Honored In Convocation e college and campus school in joint convocation at 10:50, mber 10, to honor the chamBobcats of the Nebraska ge C on fer enc e and the pion Bobkittens of the Ne.Valley Conference. esident Gamon introduced hes DeZwarte and Wheeler,

who in turn introduced the Bobkittens and the Bobcats. Dr. Christ presented the N.C.C. championship trophy to Wheeler. Cheerleaders from the college and campus school lead the convo in two cheers each. Music was provided by the combined campus school and college bands.

e Bobcats Have Been Named to ~C.C. Coaches All-Conference Squad

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Game Time Changes The 1960-61 basketball season at Peru State will see a change in starting times of all h o m e games, according to Director of Athletics, Alfred G. Wheeler. All home "B" games will start at 5:45 p.m., and varsity games will begin at 7:30 p.m.

Peterson Places Third In N.A.I.A. Meet

Peru State's Don Peterson, Richfield, placed third in th e ·ve members of the Nebraska N.A.I.A. District 11 cross counits the Tarkio College. ge Conference ch amp i o n try meet at Doane College FriHeadlining the Peru S t a t e State Bobcat football team day. Peterson narrowly missed squad will be nine returning letbeen named to the N.C.C. finishing second as he came withtermen who will undoubtedly es all-conference s q u a d . in one-tenth of a s.e con d of carry the brunt of the load in d on the offensive e 1 e ·Ven cayching Kearney's Martin Matackle Vernon Thomsen, the coming season. They are: Bob son. Dean White, Doane College's r, and halfback Dick Place, Buettgenbach, Beatrice; Bob great dis t an c e man, won the Gibson, Falls City; Drexel Haraska City. four-mile event. ee Peruvians were ·placed vs;y, Hartford, Ill.; .JackJohns.ou, .. The Kearney State squad cap" Loup City; Larry Rathe, Sterhe defensive squad: tackle tured first place, Doane College ling; Mike Roach, Palmyra; Dostal, Scribner; guard Ray took second, and Nebraska WesChick Stessman, Omaha; Roger rbrink, East Alton, Ill.; and leyan finished third in the event. Witt, Otoe; and Tom Yopp, East backer Jerry Henning, Peru. Since Peru State and Midland did Alton, Ill. not enter full squads, they reReturning to face the current ceived no team score. crop of 'Cats wil be these formPeru will close out its cross er Peru State greats: Bob Davis, country schedule when Don PeOmaha; Marvin Gerdes, Auburn; terson will participate in the Na•oach Jack Mcintire will un- Ron Wagner, Syracuse; Bruce tional Association of Intercol,,.. his 1960-61 Peru State bas- Smith, Pawnee City; Jon Apple- legiate Athletics meet in Omaha )all Bobcats on November 28, get, Fremont; Gilbert Gray, Fair- oh November 26. en they tangle with former bury; Don Bornschlegl, Norfolk; ··u greats in the annual alum- Jack Hallstrom, Omaha; Ron i~ame at Peru. In reality this Witt, Millard; Oscar De an ''" e will be a prep for the op- Smith, Nebraska: City; Del Stolg of intercollegiate competi- tenberg, Scribner; and Jerry Twenty ball players reported December 1, when Peru vis- Trullinger, Clarinda. for Peru Prep's first basketball practice November 14, to prepare for the opening of a 15-game schedule December 2. Seven reAppliances - Spor:l:ing Goods turning lettermen will head this squad with Junior Tom Majors Hunting and Fishing Licenses and Senior Pat Morris carrying TR 2-2561 CECIL BOWMAN the bulk of the load. The other returning lettermen in c 1 u d e : Seniors, Jim Furnas, Dave Gamon, Paul Heuer; and Juniors, Tom Boatman, and Al Wheeler. Coach Virgil DeZwarte feels that this year's squad has SI betis the word for ter chance of winning the conColumbia's wonderful world of ference championship than th e Columbia Diamonds ... perfectly team of a year ago did at the matched and carefully selected start of the season. He believes diamonds. Priced from $59.50 up. the conference is weaker, but his team is nearly as strong as last year's team. All in all, DeZwarte is anticipating a very good season.

u Bobcats Will gle With Alumni

Twenty Kitten Cagers Prepare For Season

BOWMAN'S HARDWARE

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Please note the registration procedure as briefly outlined for the students who are now enrolled: 1.

In December call in the Registrar's Office to pick up your Registration Packet. This packet will contain the registration procedure sheet of directions, the class schedule, necessary cards and forms, the lolln copy of your academic progress sheet, the activity record !orm, etc. Comply fully on the directions and do not lose or destroy any materials in your packet.

- 2. The days of January 4-13 (prior to examination week) are designated as pre-registration days with a specific two days as to students of each classification. Approval of your personal registration by your counselof must be gained on or before the designated days to bring your completed materials in the packet to the Registrar's Office for checking and pulling of class admission cards. 3. On registration day of January 23, if you have preregistered as directed, you will remit the fees and have your class admission cards validated. IT IS RECOMMENDED that currently enrolled students take advantage of this extended registr,ation procedure rather than delaying until Monday, January 23, for the entire registration. -F. H. Larson, Registrar

Cat Cagers Include Nine Lettermen clever ball handling Clarence "Chick" Stessman, 6-3 j u n i o r from Omaha; ~uick and elusive sophomore Tom Yopp from East Alton, Ill.; and Bob Gibson, junior from Falls City, who adds outside scoring ability to the Bobcats. A non-lettebnan, Larry Hayes of Auburn wilf ada rebounding power to the forward position. Freshman p r o s p e ct s who should help the Peruvian cause after gaining experience will be: Mike Hunt and Bill Tynon. The Bobcats will open the season against the Alumni on November 28. The first scheduled game will be with Tarkio Owls at Tarkio on December 1.

By Bob Fisher

Facing one of the toughest seasons in many years, the Nebraska State Bobcat cagers under coach Jack Mcintire will feature the talents of nine returning lettermen and the untested abilities of several hopeful underclassmen. Peruvian aspirations hinge on the fact that there are so many returning monogram w inn e rs. The Bobcats will have experienced men at each position. A brief look at each position to be manned by the returning letter winners are: At center, one of the leading candidates w i 11 be 6'8" Bob Buettgenbach, a junior from Beatrice. Pushing Bob for the start. ing"'no·d will-be "6'1" --sophomore -- " Jim Mayo of Brooklyn, N. Y. The MAJORS HALL versatile Jack Johnson, 6-4 sen- INTRAMURAL CHAMPS ior from Loup City will double as Majors Hall shook free of othcenter and forward in relieving er contenders at the close of the the pressure whenever the situa- season to win the Intramural tion arises. Football League Championship The standouts for forwards in- with a season's record of four elude: Larry Rathe, Sterling jun- wins, one loss, and one tie. ior, a timely shooter; Roger Witt, Steve Bates organized and a defensive-minded junior fr o m managed the intramural league Otoe; and Drexel Harvey, 6'3" under the direction of Jerry junior from Hartford, Ill., w h o Stemper, head of the intramural gives addition a 1 offensive program. strength to the Peru attack. Final league standings: W L T Four fine monogram winners Majors Hall ---------- 4 1 1 return to handle the guard posi- Independents --------- 2 1 3 tions, The four are: 5-10 junior, Delzell Hall No. 1 ____ 2 3 Mike Roach from Palmyra; the Delzell Hall No. 2 ----- 1 4

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Choir Practices HThe Messiah" Singers from area churches met with the college choir in the Music Hall Nov. 17 to practice "The Messiah." "The Messiah" will be presented here Dec. 11. The group decided that robes will be worn for the presentation. Church singers will wear t h e robes of their re s p e c t iv e churches.

LEE CASTLE Lee Castle will direct the Dorsey Band in a Student Senate sponsored concert at 8:00 p.m. Nov. 29, in the auditorium.

Joyce Carman Presents Recital Miss Joyce Ann Carman, gave a senior vocal recital Nov. 15, in the college auditorium. Miss Carman, student of Edward G. Camealy, was accompanied by R. T. Benford. Her selections were as follows: "Vergin Tutta Amor," by Durante; "Se tu m'ami, se sospiri," by Pergolesi; "He Was Despised," by Handel; "Rose Softly Blooming," by Spohr; "Die Lotus blume," by Schumann; "In Wunderschoenen Monat Mai." by Schumann; "An die Music," by Schubert; "Four Indian Love Lyrics," by Amy Woodfords, and "Finden" from "The Garden of Kama," by Laurence Hope; "The Spirit Flower," by Campbell and Tipton; "Ah Love, But a Day," by Mrs. H. H. A. Beach; and "Velvet Shoes," by Randall Thompson.

Six From C. S. at MENC Meet In North Platte Six students from the Campus School at Peru State Teachers College participated in All-.State music groups in North. P 1 at t e during the Nebraska Music Educators .National Conference, according to Victor H. Jindra, head of the Division of Fine Arts. Paul Heuer and Sara Adams were members of the All-State Chorus; David Gomon, celloist, and Tom Gomon, violinist, played wit.h 'the All-State Orchestra, and Elaine Gerdes, French horn, and Mary Ellen Wilson, oboe, played in the All-State band. Mr. Gilbert E. Wilson, assistant professor of instrumental music, and Mr. Jindra attended the North Platte meeting.

Home Economics Club Holds Initiation The Home Economics C 1u b held its initiation meeting November 14, 1960, at the Campus School. Jeanine Ehlers, president, conducted the initiation ceremonies. Twenty-five girls became members of the club. The club decided to bake cookies for the old people and to go caroling at their D 0 cember meeting.

Speed Typist Presents Educational Demonstration Franklin Dye, famed s p e e d typist, presented an educational demonstration Friday, Nov. 11, to ·the Business Education Department and other interested people. Mr. Dye typed 140 words per minute with ease and accuracy. Mr. Dye demonstrated the basic techniques of typewriter mechanics, correct posture, and m a n y basic short-cuts for the secretary. Mr. Dye, a Royal Typewriter representative, has a varied background of teaching and busil)ess office experience. " As a native of Honolulu, Mr. Dye started to type at the age of 13. He holds an M.A. degree from Boston University' and is a member of Delta Pi Epsilon, national graduate business education fraternity.

Alpha Mu Omega Pledges Eleven

Alpha Mu Omega, met Monday, November 14. An amendment was proposed concerning the necessary grade point average to qualify for admittance to the organization. New pledges for Alpha Mu are: Joyce Able, Glen Beran, Duane Hemminger, Ray Plankington, Tom Mincer, Gary Schlosser, Norman Catlett, Roy Rubenking, Phil Rhodes, Ed Hohman, and Larry Swett. Duane Hemminger gave a demonstration of soap film calculus The Peru Students' W iv e s curves. Club's regular meeting was held Thursday evening, November 17. Twenty-five members were present. The Students' Wives will meet Sigma Tau Delta-met Nov. 17, December 15 at 7:30 p.m. in the Campus School Home Economics 8:00 p.m. Kathy Rhoten presided Department, before going Christ. mas caroling in Peru. Mrs. Bill Meyer, Mrs. Jerry Henning, and Mrs. Eldon Allgood will plan the caroling route. Haircut, $1.25 At the December 15 meeting, Peru, Nebr. each member should have a toy to be sent to the retarded children's home at Axtell, Nebraska. These gifts s h o u 1 d be gift BILL'S CLOTHING wrapped and designated as to & SHOE STORE age and sex. The December 15 meeting will be climaxed with a You Pay Less at Bill's chili supper. Auburn, Nebr. Peru's Students' Wives Club will hold a bake sale Saturday, December 17, at the City Hall. The sale will begin at 9:00 ...· a.m. GEBER'S and w:ill last until all the goodies Conoco Service are sold. Mrs. Herbert Brown and TOPS IN SERVICE Mrs. Ray Meister are in charge of BR4-381B making and displaying advertisAuburn ing posters for this event.

Student Wives Will Hold Bake Sale

in the absence of the president and vice-president. Leroy Keyt, Connie Wichman, and Sand Y Craig were accepted as pledges. Miss Rhoten read the proposed local constitution. Discussion followed, ·with final agreement to present it at the next meeting. Following the business meeting, Alan Wheeler read an origi· nal poem. The audience then offered praise or criticism. Mr. Summers distributed "The Rectangle," the national magazine. Members were pleased to find a poem> by Larry Carre, alumnus, had been printed. Refreshments and a social period concluded the meeting.

WA.A. Active Badminton tournaments have been held at the past three W.A.A. m e e t in g s . Bernadette Gallagher and Darlene Critel won first place in doubles. Playoffs in singles have not been completed; the three finalists a re Bernadette Gallagher, Jeannie · Shuttlesworth and P h y 11 is Grube. Several W.A.A. ·members at Peru attended a Field Hockey Clinic at the University of Nebraska, Nov. 5. Other colleges participating were Ke a r n e y, Doane, Omaha U., and Northwestern Missouri. An AAHPER Convention was held in Omaha, November 18 and 19. Peru attended this convention.

Rathcamp Speaks At LS.A. Meeting The L.S.A. met Wednesday, November 16, at the Music Hall. LaVerne Roos, president, conducted the business session. Following devotions, Rev. Rathcamp spoke on marriage, divorce, and remarriage.

INGERSOLL Barber Shop AUBURN, NEBRASKA Elly Ingersoll · Nate Hayes

Cam sh ICh atter . pus C. 00

Hastings. And we keep .track c Prep-ers who go to Peru StatE By Mary Anna Gnade Trouble is, parents revel in the; children's recognition, yet fail t', American E du c at i on Week get the word to the proper publi, came to a successful close as far city center. as campus schoolers were conSix high schoolers left Peru a cerned. Successful from the pa- 5:45 a.m. November 17 to tak rental viewpoint since they now part in the All-State Music Clin have THE WORD officially just ic at North Platte. Since all bu: what part of school work needs Tom Gamon are seniors, thi concentration. Successful from played havoc with play rehear : he student viewpoint (especially als. Mary Ellen Wilson, E 1a i n elementary) since they had won- Gerdes, Dave Gomon, Paul Heu · I derful numbers visiting class- er and Sara Adams (along wit rooms at PTA Open House. One Tom) represented our schoo oom had more than a hundred What with other conflicts i t registrations. scheduling of the stage for rE ' At least school is one place hearsals, we may have a uniqu t hat doesn't skip from Halloween class play-'-play books in han( t to Christmas without thought of exits where none are shown, et j Thanksgiving. Turkeys, very orThe Student Council was rE ' ginal, very creative, were much sponsible for a well-planne1 , :n evidence. Fifth graders exhib- convincingly produced convoci. : 'ted hobbies as well as d a i 1y tion on courtesy one noon. Moc. work .. Feature in the high school erated by Dave Gamon, panelis 1 was a tape recording (probably Sara Adams, Tom Majors, Elain . worn out by end of evening) of Gerdes, and Mary Ellen Wilso. f sophomores telling, not reading, presented the obvious breachE , 1 the original stories they had writ- of courtesy by skits showin ten. But it hardly seemed natural what takes place in lunchrooI c to visit third grade without their and class meeting, and suggeste ' c former worm's-eye view-they ways and means of improvemen J have now progressed to bird's- (I understand music "to sooth eye view since their room was the wild beast" at lunch time or ' moved from basement to first ly served to increase the volunl , floor. The sad part is that more of clatter.)· It is surprising thl · people simply do not have the individually well-mannered chi 1 1 time to visit these interesting dren become such unmannerf , rooms oftener, especially when in members of a mob. full operation. Greetings on your return Perhaps we should have honor campus after T h a n k s g i v i n rolls for Prep alums-the school stuffing! should be just as pro~d of graduates' progress as are their parents. F'rinstance, word from U of REDFERN Ark, where Larry Blanton, '60, is Clothing Co. .I a freshman, says he stands FIRST "The Store of Standard in 400 ROTC boys! Then, of 1 Brands" course, we have Lanette Adams, Phone BR 4-3620 Auburn '59, who has garnered honors at l 1

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}Nebraska's Oldest College

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian Number 6

Volume 56

PERU, NEBRASKA

DECEMBER 12, 1960

Nebraska's Best College

·udents In Exchange nvo At Hastings

Kappa Delta Pi Has Christmas Party

z;,Eleven Peru students present. a thirty-minute Convocation : Hastings College, Friday, De~mber 2. The acts included a 'i '.'mbo, a pantomime, a vocal soand an interpretative reading.

Beta Mu chapter of Kappa Delta Pi held its annual Christmas party Monday evening, Dec. 5. In a short business session it was unanimously voted to approve the application by the University of Alaska for a Kappa Delta Pi chapter . In charge of the Christmas party were Kathleen Rhoten, Rose Clancy, Ross Pilkington, Robert Kepler, and Wanda Price. After some games and singing, led by Joyce Carman, Rose Clancy read the Christmas story from the scriptures. Refreshments w e re then served and a gift of candy distributed by Miss Ashley, chapter sponsor.

. re: Don Johnson, Gary ,, ucker, Galen Sudik, Wayne iallace, Hanford Miller, an d · arlotte Wheeler. J<ary Stover and Larry White'ld pantomimed the "Great Pre: der." g.Joyce Carman sang and ac,ifipanied herself to her o w n mposition, "The Moon Chases :b:'he interpretative re a d in g , xtracts From the Diary of ; am and Eve," was given by se Clancy and John Parli. John s also emcee for the program. 1

iris Are Better ,·:.Th . an Ever" ;Campus school seniors are pre; ing for "Girls Are Better an Ever," their class play, to , presented Dec. 20 at 8 p.m. in :e college auditorium. :Included in the cast are: Paul 1 uer as Fuller Haight, David .. mon as Lambert Lark, Sara i:lams as Dr. Leslie Scott, Linda ephens .as Charis Carter, Elaine 'ides Sophi~ Madson,,, Ma~y ilson a:s Lola Hook, Fred Shiry as Ray Rash, Linda Apple' te at Honey Alpman, Bob Gna, as Barnaby Blore, and Laqui'1 Allgood as Cora Blore. }The play, a comedy, t a k e s , ace in the office of · Fuller . ight, businessman. Fuller be. ves that women aren't suited ·'.c,: business. The fun b e g i n s · en, after financial difficulties, Leslie Scott takes over Fullher

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.obcats Place Five .n All-Conference botball Squad

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1Five members of the Nebraska c-Ollege Conference c h a m p i o n , ru State Bobcat football team :. ve been named to the N.C.C. aches all-conference squad. !aced on the offensive eleven ;ere tackles Vernon Thomsen, 'nior from Exeter, and halfback :·ck Place, junior from Nebras. City, whose versatility as a ..sser and runner sparked Pe1 '. 's offense. INamed to the defensive squad ere: junior tackle Ken Dostal s ' , ribner; junior guard Ray Un, brink, East Alton, Ill.; and 1 nior linebacker Jerry Henning, , ru, who was described by one posing coach as the toughest , ebacker in the conference. }Ken Dostal, Jerry Henning, · d Dick Place were also named the Omaha World-Herald Clllnference football teq.m.

'n

'lasses Work Together :O Facilitate Learning \ The senior English and modern , oblems classes have combined bject matter assignments. Mrs. , rgen, English teacher, is as' ning such theme subjects as

David S.issons Addresses Convo By Linda Bertram Jimmy Dorsey orchestra playing at Student Senate sponsored concert here November 29.

Social Security Men Explain Civil Service Mr. Larson and Mr. Silber of the Social Security office in Lincoln spent Wednesday, Nov. 30, on the Peru Campus. The day was spent in the different classroo!'Ils, explaif)j.ng the Social Security program in its present operation and how it affects college students. The lack of civil service employees was also explained a n d discussed. During the afternoon hours Mr. Larson and Mr. Silber were available at the Placement Office to help fill out applications for Civil Service Examinations and discuss problems connected with the Social Security program.

Angels Plan Rally The White Angels held a regular meeting November 28th at 6:00 p.m. in the Eliza Morgan recreation room. The Angels decided to hold a bonfire-pep rally before the Tennessee A & I game. The girls' pep club will make porn porns for the games at one of their regular meetings. Phyllis Grube will make a sample and bring it to the next meeting. Paper for the porn porns can be purchased from Carol Ellenberger. Connie Erisman will read the demerits each girl has at the next meeting. 'I"he group discussed changing the demerit and the pledging systems. A committee, consisting of Phyllis Grube, Karen Mcintire, Karen Fankhauser, Connie Erisman, and Patsy Melcher, is going to investigate possible revisions. A motion was carried that the band play the "Star Spangled Banner" before basketball games. "The Gold Outflow" and "Kennedy's Cabinet." Mr. Strom, modern problems teacher, is emphasizing current events as well as theme composition. The purpose of this unit is to facilitate better learning in· both classes.

Dorsey Orchestra Entertained A Small Audience Here By Sandy Craig

Peru Debaters See Action At Wayne State

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In college debate action at Wayne State on Dec. 2 and 3 Darrel Wolcott and Steve Park~ er won two out of five debates in the "B" division. Lois Fritz and Jerry Littell won one debate. In the three-round discussion, Parker and Wolcott received ratings of "excellent." Pete Holdorf, a Nebraska Wesleyan student, received a rank of "one" in extemporaneous speaking. Pete is a former Peru student. Teams from Kearney and Morningside tied for first place in "B" division debate. In "A" division, four teams won all five debates, but Huron was awarded the trophy by virtue of a higher point total. Approximately 200 students from 21 schools participated in the conference.

Larson Presents LS.A. Program Mr. F. H. Larson presented the program "L.S.A. and L.S.A. Action" to the Nov. 30th meeting. L.S.A. hopes to have a candlelight service for Christmas. Volunteers for the committee are Eileen Neals, Bev Parde, Margaret Beard, Lois Fritz, Rosa Oestmann, and Sharon Watton.

Language Club Views Pictures of France The Foreign Language Club met in the Administration Building, Nov. 28, at 8:30 p.m. Mr. Rath showed pictures of France which he took while traveling in Europe this summer. The group then moved to the Music Hall, where the French class sang French songs. Following the business meeting, the ~roup enjoyed refresh,ments.

The Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra, directed by Lee Castle, played to a half-full auditorium Tuesday evening, November 29. The 15-piece orchestra and vocalist Letti Luce presented traditional Dorsey music: Jazz, old favorites, and Dixie Land. The orchestra played "I Hear a Rhapsody," "J. D.'s Boogie Woogie," and a unique arrangement of "The Bells of St. Mary" by Billy Finnegan. Castle and his orchestra also played selections from their latest albums "Just Swingin" and "Goodies But Gasers." One highlight of the evening was the presentation of. Jimmy Dorsey's last great hit, "So Rare." Lee Castle, conductor and star of the orchestra, joined Jimmy's Dorsey's orchestra in 1948. In 1953, with the merger of Tommy and Jimmy's bands, he became featured trumpeter and musical director. During this time he studied with Thomas Dorse;, Sr., father of the famous brothers. "I was always sort of a third son," said Lee. With the death of Tommy in 1955 and Jimmy in 1956, he was the logical one to take over the organization. Since then, he and the orchestra have been keeping the Dorsey tradition alive. The music is the same that was used by the Dorseys. "Even the stands and some other equipment are t h e same," stated Lee. "This is a hard w o r k i n g group," said Lee. "We work 52 weeks a year." The tours last for four months. Then it's back to New York for two weeks. In between tours they make their recordings. After stops at Hastings, Lincoln, Des Moines, ,and Chicago, they'll be in New ¥ork. Soon after, they are slated to appear in Las Vegas. M.E.N.C. PLANS CHRISTMAS DANCE

M.E.N.C. met Monday, Dec. 5, at 7:00 in the music hall. Plans for a formal Christmas dance on Dec. 19 were discussed.

David Si$sons; visiting professor at the Far Eastern and Russian Institute, University of Washington, Seattle, was the guest speaker at a convocation on December 7. Mr. Sissons, a native Australian, is a graduate of Scotch College and the University of Melbourne. At the close of World War II, he served in the Australian army as a Japanese translator. Since, he has studied in the field of Japanese-Australian relations. For the past three years he has done research at the Institute of Social Sciences at the Tokyo University. His topic was the economic and geographic conditions of his native country. He pointed out that Australia is much like the middle states in the United States. It is primarily an agricultural country. He told how schools differed in his country. In the high schools the boys and girls go to separate schools. College takes five years. All courses last at least one year. A certain number of courses are needed depending upon the major. These are all worked out before. The government selects students to train for teaching careers. For these students the government pays the expenses during the five years of college. Mr. Sisson spent two days on the campus observing our school.

Area Radio Stations Carry P.S.T.C. Recordings Three area radio stations carry weekly tape recording reports from Peru State Teachers College. They are: KNCY, Nebraska City; KTNC, Falls City; and KMA, Shenandoah, Iowa. At present Peru State tapes two weekly programs-a home making report by the department of home economics, and a sports report with head basketball coach Jack Mcintire. KNCY of Nebraska City airs the home making tape on "Personality Time" at 11:25 a.m. Fridays, and the sports show at 7:50 a.m. on Fridays. Fallls City's KTNC programs the two at 10:40 a.m. and 5:35 p.m. on Thursdays respectively. Radio station KMA, Shenandoah, carries the sport show at 10:10 p.m., Thursday.


LIBRARY COLUMN By Linda Bertram

Helen Topping Miller has written Nightshade, another intense and dramatic novel dealing with the ambitions, fears, conflicts, heartaches, triumphs, and defeats of man. In this book the members of the Dr. Jonathan Strong family walk the narrow line constantly bordering on tragedy. Henry C. Wallich in his book, The Cost of Freedom, has arrived at 'the conclusion that freedom comes at a cost, not a profit. This timely book is a significant contribution to one of our greatest debates today-shall we because of the rapid growth of other economies change the basic ideas of our economy. The author contends that the challenge is to go forward with the hard, deliberate processes of change that will produce rising welfare and equality of opportunity without destroying initiative and incentives. Hobbies, by Margaret E. Mulac, is a book offering helpful advice to teachers, parents, an d leaders of recreational groups of many kinds. In her book she discusses more than a hundred hobbies. In addition she explains the rewards and accomplishments of the creative use of leisure time.

NOTES FROM DELZELL By Gerald Kirkendall Delzell Hall held its third annual Christmas party Dec. 4, at 9:30 in the lounge. About 140 were present, including Mrs. Donovan and Mrs. Longfellow as guests of honor. All Majors Hall residents were guests. Hotdogs, potato chips, cookies, and hot chocolate were served. Third floor received the highest grade point average of Delzell for the nine week period. First floor was second, followed by the ground floor and second floor. Delzell has two boys who are changing intramural basketball into intramural football. Roger Smith and Russel Workman are hobbling around campus from in-

juries received from playing basketball. A dance, sponsored by the White Angels,. was held at Delzell December 9. If you need an actor for a Tarzan picture, Delzell Hall has the perfect one for the part. Bob Reitz jumped' off the wall in front of Delzell and injured his ankle. Were you chasing Jane? An engagement shower was given for Larry Vice. He was thrown into the shower for being engaged to Judy Wilson. . Delzell Hall had as their guests December 10, fourteen Tennessee A & I basketball boys and their two coaches. Delzell Hall is proud of ·their new silver Christmas tree with revolving colored spotlights.

WHISPERS FROM MORGAN By Linda Nygaard Chr}stmas trees, carols, presents, mistletoe and holly seem to be the main point of interest at Morgan Hall this week. Other preparations are in the making-LaVerna Roos and Bill Sayer became engaged last weekend. Judy Wilson and Larry Vice are also making plans for holy matrimony. Only one birthday this week. Carol Sudik celebrated with all of first floor! A demerit system was set up in Morgan Hall and took effect immediately. The list of misdeameanors in c 1u d e s : nonobservance of quiet hours, getting in after closing time, and failure io pass rom inspection. Bobby Thomas has her Christmas tree hidden (?) in the broom closet of first floor. She is worried about its health. Perhaps the following ode, written by Ellen Hunzeker, will explain how Bobby feels: "O thou tree so green and dried, Too bad your time of glory died; Holding tinsel, gifts so bright, All aglow with bulbs of light. How I wish I'd look so fine For only a dollar thirty-nine!"

Lutheran Club Meets The Luther a n Club met Wednesday, November 30, at the Administration Building. Rev. Schmidt lead the group in prayer and discussion. The group discussed the effects of immoral movies.

NOTES FROM MAJORS By Darrel Wolcott "Best dressed" award goes to Jack Johnson. lt seems at the Delzell Christmas party Sunday night, Dec. 4, Jack showed up attired in suntan trousers tee shirt, sport jaek~t-and tie. Drexel Harvey had worn the items but "chickened out," so Jack took over. The informal dress of the hosts and guests at the Delzell party had nothing to do with the spirit of the thing, though. It was a first-class gesture worthy of , a first-class, "Thanks!" · After a week's,stay in an Omaha hospital as the result of an auto accident, Chick Stessman is back on. campus. A new calendar is needed in room 214. Dorm counselor Roger Eshelman posted notice of room inspectiqn for Thursday, Dec. 7. Someone very quickly pointed out that, consequently, room inspection could not take place. Naturally, a few "kind, helpful" criticisms were written on the notice. A couple of Peru's good-will ambassadors, Gary Stover and Butch Whitfield, displayed their pantomiming talents at the exchange convocation at Hastings on December 2. When Mrs. Donovan started to set up an electric train in her living room, she had to explain that she wasn't in her second childhood but that she was taking inventory for possible sale of the outfit. Remember, he who laughs, lasts.

December 12, 1960 THE STAFF Co-Editor__ . . -----------------------------------Rose Clancy Co-Editor _____________________________ Mary Ann Lewellyn Sports Editor_ ____________ --------- ___________ Steve Parker Cop! Editor____________________________________ Leroy Keyt Busmess Manager_ ____________________________ Ray Meister Personnel Manager _______________ ~ ____________ Herb Brown ColumnisL _________________________________ Linda Bertram ColumnisL------------------------------~Jerry Kirkendall ColumnisL _________________________________ Linda Nygaard ColumnisL _________________________________ Darrel Wolcott ColumnisL ______________________________ Mary Anna Gnade Campus SchooL _______________________________ Sandy Craig Sports Reporter ________________________________ Bob Fisher W9men's Sports __________________________________ Pam Yost Reporter___________ --------------------------- Lynn Bai·1 ey Reporter ________________________________________ Lois Fritz Reporter __________________________________ Marilyn Monroe Reporter _____________________________________ Judy Pollack Reporter------------- -- ____________________ Carolyn Reiber Reporter - -- ------------ -- -- - - - ______ ------ _____ Gary Weiss Reporter--------------------------~----------John Werner Reporter ________________________________________ Tom Yopp

Sponsor- ---- -- -- -- -- __ -- ________________ Stewart Linscheid

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Peru Student Named As Candidate For Regional Home Ee Office The Home Economics C l u b held a special meeting Monday, December 5, in the recreation room of Eliza Morgan Hall. Jeannine Ehlers presided over the meeting. The girls were assigned a time to help bake .rolls and to serve at the breakfast on Sunday, December 11. Mrs. · Sproul announced that Jeannine Ehlers was elected as the candidate from the central states for the Regional First Vicepresident 6f the National Home Economics Association college club section. ' The next meeting will be the Christmas meeting on Dec. 12.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks

Wit ubl· bca tba: tor rki1 ate . up rin in ts d, d1 ed

Blue Devils Select Concession Workers The Blue Devils held a meeting Monday, December 5, at 6:30 p.m. in the basement of Delzell Hall. Members to work in the concession stand on game nights were selected. The new jackets, which have been ordered but not received, were discussed. Plans for the week-end of December 9-11 were also made.

Phi Alpha Theta Plans Christmas Party Plans for a Christmas party were discussed at the regular meeting of the Phi Alpha Theta held December 5. A committee of Kathy Ideus, Pat Rathe and Linda Berry was appointed to plan the affair. Linda Berry and Dave Fritch were chosen to represent the local club on board meetings.

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ats Open Season eating Tarkio By Bob Fisher ith four cagers hitting in the le figures, the Peru State ats opened the 1960-61 bas11 season with an 83 to 69 ry over Tarkio College at io, Thursday night. Peru forward, Jack Johnson, City, led the Bobcats in the g department with 19 ts. Drexel Harvey, Hart' Ill., Larry Rathe, Sterling, Mike Roach, Palmyra, fold with 18, 15, and 14 points ctively. Dick Marchand all scorers with 20 points he Tarkio Owls. e cold winds ()f s c o r in g hs hamper.ed both b a 11 but in the end it assured Bobcats of the victory. Peru e up a tight contest late in first half to lead 39 to 26 three minutes remaining in initial period before th e y t ice cold. The Missourians ted to close the gap to a point 39 to 36 deficit at the mission. rly in the second half the scoring drouth hit the Owls they had tied the score at 1. For three and a half minit was all Peru as th e y

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streaked to a commanding lead of 63 to 49. From then on the visiting Bobcats substituted freely and went on to the 83 to 69 opening victory. The Bobcats hit on 34 of 92 field goal attempts for a 37% average while Tarkio shot at a 35% clip, hitting 24 of 69 shots. PERU fg ft f tp Harvey ---------- 8 2-5 4 18 Johnson --------- 8 3~3 4 19 Buettgenbach ____ 3 2-4 4 8 Roach ----------- 5 4-6 2 14 Yopp. ------------ 2 0-0 4 4 Rathe ___________ 6 3-4 3 15 Christensen ______ 1 0-0 0 2 Witt ------------ 0 0-0 0 Hayes ----------- 1 1-1 3 Mayo ----------- 0 0-3 2 0 Gibson __________ 0 0-0 0 0 34 15-26 TARKIO fg ft Sprague _________ 1 4-5 McVicker ________ 1 4-5 Collins ---------- 2 4-6 Marchand ------- 8 4-7 McKinley ------- 1 1-3 Shineman _______ 7 4-7 Calvin ---------- 1 0-0 Ridnour --------- 4 1-1 Carr ------------ 0 1-3

25 83 f tp 1 6 1 6 4 8 4 20 2 3 3 18 0 2 4 9 0

----24 21-34 19 69

Charity Tosses Help Defeat Omaha University 75-64

Bobcats' Fast Break Runs Away From Alumni 93-62

By Bob Fisher

mantling lead on the young Indians early in the contest by The Peru State Bobcats clawed utilizing a fast break offense and to their second straight victory-. a tight defense. of the young season by defeating A significant fact in the cona scrappy Omaha University test was the ability of the Bobclub by the score of 75 to 64. cat cagers to convert their free The Peru attack was lead by throw chances in the contest. The center, Bob Buettgenbach scor- team made over eighty per cent ing twenty points, and forward of their attempted shots in mainJack Johnson following closely taining a comfortable lead over with 19 points. Omaha University who outshot The Bobcats hustled to a com- the Peruvians from the field.

By Bob Fisher Coach Jack Mcintire's Peru State Bobcats opened the 1960-61 basketball season Monday night with a high-scoring 93 to 62 victory over the Peru Alumni. The young Bobcats, utilizing a quick fast break with clever ball handling, sped away-·· from the former graduates on the opening tip off. The varsity, using different player combinations, ran up a comfortable lead of 62 to 22 at half. In the second half, the varsity maintained the scoring pace and won the contest easily_ The varsity, having five players in double figures, was paced by Bob Buettgenbach, Beatrice, and Tom Yopp, East Alton, Ill. Each scored the high of 13 points. Mike Roach, Palmyra junior, was one of the standouts of the contest with his general f 1 o or play. The Alumni was paced by Charles Francis, St i 11 w a t e r , Okla., who scored 17 points, and Frank Davis, Severance, Kans., with 14 points.

Cardinals Beat Bobkittens In Season Opener In their December 2 season opener, the Peru Prep Bobkittens dropped a non-conference 67-55 battle to the Humboldt Cardinals. The game, played on the Humboldt hardwoods, began with Peru moving to a 19-14 lead at the end of the first period. Al Wheeler, Prep forward, scored "10 of Peru's 19 points. Early in the second quarter the Cardinal quintet shifted to a tight man-to-man defense and · moved out in f.ront of the Kit-

BOWMAN'S HARDVIARE

Kittens Sink Pirates In Home Game 51-34

EUROPE 1961 - STUDY AND TRAVEL

By Steve Parker

Classes in leading European Universities combined with in· siruction while travelling ±o meet American requirements ·for academic credit.

In their debut on the home maples, Tuesday, December 6, the Peru Prep Bobkittens rolled over the Brock Ililates 51-34. /The game, a conference victory, showed Peru as a strong contender for a top berth in the Nemaha Valley Conference standings. Tom Boatman, Prep sparkplug, again led the scoring for b o th teams with 21 points. Prep's Tom Majors followed with 12 counters while Brock's Roger Rotter garnered 11 points. The Bobkittens led from the opening seconds and by halftime had pulled to a comfortable 35-19 lead. After the half, the Prepsters encountered a tight full-court press, and the Pirates 'pulled within 11 points, but the 'Kittens never relinquished their lead. In the close of the fourth period, Coach DeZwarte swept the bench,

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Including: Trans-Atlantic transportation by sea. All hotels, breakfast and dinner while travelling in Europe, full board in Russia, full board while attending the courses, tuition, . all sightseeing and transfers. Study Arrangements Directed by the International Education Advisory Committee in Accordance with American Accreditation Requirements OR OFF THE BEATEN TRACK PATHFINDER TOURS Around the World Aboard the luxurious, air conditioned 28,000 ton "Himalaya" of the Pacific & Orient Line. Shore excursions in the world's most exciting cities-Honolulu, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Singapore, Bombay, Naples. With four days in London and return to New York by Jet Flight. All meals, transportation, sightseeing and hotels. All for only $1,099. July 11-Sept. 4. Behind the Iron Curtain Aboard the "Arkadia" of the. Greek Line to England, France, through Scandinavia to Russia, Rumania, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Poland and sail home from Germany~ June 9-Aug. 1. All hotels, transportation, all meals in Russia, two meals in Europe, all sightseeing and transfers. Total price -$1,472. Europe at Leisure London, stay in a Castle on the Rhine, relax in Lucerne and charming Kitzbuehel, sunbathe in Iesolo on the Italian Lido, Rome and Paris. Trans-Atlantic aboard the "Arkadia," all hotels, two meals per day in Europe, all meals on board ship, all transportation, sightseeing and transfers. July 21-Sept. 13. All inclusive price -$1,199. For Further Information Write: · Lanseair Travel Service, Inc. 1026 .17th St., N.W. Washington D. C.

tens, never again to relinquish their lead. High scorer for Peru was Tom Boatman, Prep guard, who garnered 24 points. The Bobkittens were hampered greatly when the rebounding strength of Pat Morris and Tom Majors was lost via the f o u 1 route. The "Kittens" schedule resumes. with home games this week against the Brock Pirates, December 6, and the Talmage Bullldogs, Deeemb.er 9.

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BOBCAT BASKETBALL SCHEDULE -1960-61 Dec. 14-Emporia State at Emporia, Kansas Dec. 15-St. Benedicts at Atchison, Kansas Dec. 29-30-4-State Tourney at Falls City Jan. 7-Wesleyan at Lincoln Jan. 13-14-Chadron at Chadron Jan. 20-Hastings Jan. 21-Kearney Jan. 28-Wayne at Wayne Feb. 2-Doan~ at Crete Feb. 4-Wesleyan Feb. 11-Wayne Feb. 16-Kearney Feb. 23-Doane Feb. 24,-Hastings at Hastings

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Veterans Club Meets The Veterans Club met Dec. 6, in the Administration Building. A new treasurer, James Simones, was elected. A dance is planned for t h e second semester, but the date has not been set. On December 7, a film, "The Bank Dick,'' f e at u r in g W. C. Fields, was presented by the Vet's Club in the Campus School Auditoriurµ.

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Campus School Chatter By Mary Anna Gnade The Christmas season must be here-classrooms in the Campus School b 1 o s s o me d out with "trees" on Thursday, December 8. From past years, I know that Christmas ornaments will make the trek from home to school, that small fingers will manufacture attractive decorations, that the air of anticipation will balloon almost to the bursting poi:qt. Names have been exchanged -and already some gifts are wrapped and waiting for the day-before-vacation Christmas party. Kindergartners are making tree ornaments from styrofoam and colored picks to be used first on the school tree, then to b_e displayed at home during holidays. Little fingers fashion quite acceptable take-home gifts. for parents and if ambition and materials last, for other family members.

Progressive Science Program Being Used In The Campus School B. A. Eddy, elementary principal, reports that the science program being used is quite progressive. It is the type used in many Eastern schools. Nine units are used throughout the year. Each year, more advanced knowledge in each area is added. The topics studied are: Living Things; Keeping Healthy; Using Electricity; Lifting and :fy!oving Things; Using Heat, Light and Sound; Common Chemical and Physical Changes; The Atmosphere; The Earth and, The Earth and Space. The purpose of this program is to get away from the single text. The program helps develop science concepts and allows for individual differences.

White Angels Hold ·Meeting The White Angels met Dec. 7 in the recreation room of Eliza Morgan Hall. Connie Erisman read the demerits and explained the demerit system. The bonfire will be held behind the girls' dorm Saturday, December 10th at 4:30. Sandy Stephens, Julie Mayer, Judy Adams, and Rita Grandge.nette volunteered to make signs welcoming the teams we play. Mary Ann Lewellyn and Sandy Pearson will rope off the section for the Tarkio game and Jeannine Ehlers and Sherrill 'rorring will rope off the section for t h e Tennessee A & I game. The meeting closed with the White Angel song.

Newmanites View Film On Marriage Joe Barrientos, vice-president, presided over the November 30 meeting of Newman Club. The group saw a film on the sacrament of marriage. A question and answer period· followed. Approximately fifteen members will attend the Newman Club Convention in Omaha. Members will invite guests to a Christmas dance or party to be held sometime before the Christmas vacation. The meeting closed wiih a prayer.

Chorus Rehearses "Messiah" "The Messiah" was rehearsed December 1, by the Peru State College Chorus directed by Edward G. Camealy. The following selections from . the Christmas portion were rehearsed: "For Unto Us a Child is Born," "Glory to God," "Surely He Hath Borne Our Griefs," "Lift Up Your Heads, 0 Ye Gates," and "Hallelujah."

The sophomore class is sponsoring the Christmas dance and plan to feature a large Christmas tree, as part of the decor. It's a little hard to make the transition from grade schooler to high schooler especially at this season, meaning they'd still like to exchange names and party. At least this year no one will miss class time because of rehearsals for a Christmas program-no allschool performance this year. Prep basketball team is off and rolling (bouncing, I should say)if they can keep it going they'll have another trophy for the case And the girls have volley ball well underway, too, working for that tournament placing in the spring. In the midst of all the Christmas season music, the hi g h school choral clinic offered real MUSIC-s'wonderful! If your funny-bone is as easily

Extensive Audio-Visual p rogram In Campus School The audio-visual program in the elementary school is extensive. Films are used at all levels to supplement the regular curriculum. Teachers order films from the University of Nebraska. They also obtain free films from o th e r

The projector being used \\ purchased last year. The Da-V makes it possible to show a fi! without darkening the room. ] projector and screen are hou in one unit, and it looks like

sources. Each film is shown to at least touched as mine, you'd enjoy Mrs. Adams' account of "the day the parakeets got loose." Can't you just picture Mrs. A. trying to entice those fool birds off the light fixtures before they cooked? And how do you explain the difference between the male a n d female bird from the same hatching not having little birds without getting too involved? Kindergarten's the place-for laughs, for enjoyment, for astonishment, and for real patience when the unexpected situations and questions arise. Oh, for George Guinea Pig's sake, I'm supposed to ask for any old fresh lettuce you might not need. And if you lack for some place to go, the seniors are on public display Tuesday evening, December 20-gotta scrape together the means for spring trip, y'know. While earning money,

gloried television set. this class of hams enjoy ev minute of being in a play. The Campus Schoolers ci . wait for snow to make it a r ' Christmas season. How ab you? ';f fu

Epperson Speaks To S.C.F ~

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Student Christian Fellows, ~o met at the music hall Wednes ~e evening, Nov. 30. In a short b f; l ness meeting, December 12, . ac and 14 were set aside for ca IT[ ing, discussion periods, and\ ui communion service. , ~n . Leo Epperson from the Ch' ta han church in Auburn spoke 're ways to keep your faith as U. go ~hrough college. oa

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Mr. David Sissons, college convocation speaker, visited campus school classes Dec. 7. Mr. Sissons is a college professor from the University of Australia, Canberra. He is presently on a lecture tour across the United States. One of the purposes of his tour is to learn more of the United States and its people. Before coming to Peru, Mr. Sissons appeared at Stanford University .. His next lecture is at the University of Michigan.

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RARICK CLOTHING


The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . .

Peru Pedagogian

2

PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 56

Number 7

DECEMBER 19, 1960

k Mcintire Now ad Football Coach

Chorus and Choirs Present "The Messiah" In Peru and Auburn

Former Peru Athlete Has Made Fine Record . Neal S. Gomon, president eru State Teachers College, ounced Thursday the aptment of Jack Mcintire to head football coaching .posiat Peru State, effective imiately. cintire's appointment fills the ncy when created when Al eler resigned his gridiron es at the end of the 1960 seaafter 23 years at the Peru te football helm. Coach Mcinjoined the Peru State staff in ust, 1956, as head basketball h and assistant fo o t b a 11 ...,...,...ch. He will continue as head 1 e mentor and Wheeler will ain as head of the division of '·111th and physical education d director of athletics. )n announcing the appoint1 ·• nt, President Gomon ca 11 e d 1 ' cintire "an outstanding leader 1 'young men." 'i"Mcintire's approach to the in., -collegiate athletic phases of program and its relation to er areas of activity is in harny with· the objectives of the 'lege and in the best interest of · student body," Dr. Gomon 1

...

President NAIA The appointment brings to the · d football position a man with g experience in athletics. Mc1 1iire is serving as president of · National Association of Inter. legiate Athletics Coaches As, iation. In 1957 he was named the N.A.I.A. to the Helms Hall of _

native of Nebraska City, Mcjire earned letters in football . basketball during his high · ool career. As a student at Pe' State, he earned three letters h in football and track and r letters in basketball.

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College Fooiball Siar or three years he was named 'All-State teams of the Sunday · coln Journal and Star and Omaha World-Herald for his 'tstanding successes in football, d received honorable mention 0 years in basketball and durhis senior year was named to All-State team of the ~ame )braska newspapers. ;~lected football team captain ' ing his senior year, Mcintire iiiiiiiiiiiiil!O served as president of the (1> Club, varsity lettermen's or---1'' ization, and the Men's Club, college group. }For his participation in foot·' 1 and basketball during his : ior year, Mcintire was named '·rt E. Swenson, Jr., a ward --··,., ner, an honor which has been en annually at Peru State . ce 1925 to the junior or senior lete who has lettered in at . st two different sports and dged outstanding on the basis , character, personality, scholar'p and loyalty to school tradi•1

A 100-voice chorus and orchestra presented Handel's "The Messiah" at the Peru State Teachers College Auditorium Sunday, December 11, at 8 p.m. The choral group includes the Peru State College Chorus and mel\lbers of area church choirs. ·

Christmas Greetings From The Pedagogian Staff

Faculty Christmas Tea Held at Morgan Hall December 15 marked the day of Eliza Morgan Hall's annual Christmas Tea. Each year the freshmen and transfer student girls invite a faculty member or secretary from the office to be their guest at the tea. The girls make arrangements with their guests to meet them. The coeds then play host and escort their guests through the dorm. A refreshment table and musical program complete their visit. Sandy Pearson, social chairman, included every girl in a committee to help make the day run smoothly. ·'The committees included servers, hostesses, cake cutters, and dish washers. Christmas songs were presented by Edna McGovers, J o y c e Carman, Joan Pelton, Sharon Watton, Duane Hemminger, Delores Spilker. Rose Clancy read the Christmas story. This helped add to the success of the afternoon. Six girls' rooms won prizes for being "the best-decorated." To designate the winners, a candy cane was placed on their doors. Even though only six rooms won prizes, they were all decorated in a beautiful manner. The decorations went from the simple to the elaborate with s o m e having Santa Claus Jhe center of attention and others usihg the Manger scene. This was a dress-up affair and everyone left with the true Christmas feeling.

1

1

Baskeiball and Track 'During the 1937-38, 1938-39 and 9-40 basketball seasons at PeState, Mcintire was a mem1 (Continued on page three)

Senate Fund Drive Progressing Well Donations to the World University Service fund drive being conducted by the Student Senate now total $36.42. At the Alumni-Varsity game, $8.27 was donated, and at the Tennessee A & I game $28.15 was donated. The Student Senate wishes to thank all those who contributed to this worthy cause. A goal of $100 has been set by the senate to send to the WUS, and it is hoped to achieve this before the end of the school year.

College Provides Week-end Meal For Students Saturday night, December 10, the cafeteria played host to all Peruvians holding meal tickets. The free dinner was greatly enjoyed by the students.

11

'Twas The Night Before Vacation" In Ye Olde Eliza Morgan Hall The Merry Lads and Lasses. Had A Big Ball By Linda Nygaard

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'Twas the night before vacation, and all through the dorm, Not a girl was sleeping; they were waiting for morn. Their suitcases were packed with feminine care In hopes that they had everything to wear When out on the triangle there rose such a clatter They sprang from their cards to see what's the matter. Away to the window they flew in a flash, Bumped into the radiator and fell with a crash! The moonlight on the ground was a sad sight to see, No snow was piled up as they hoped it would be. When what to their wondering eyes should appear? Delzell and Majors spreading some cheer. The leader was caroling in an old fashioned way, . While the chorus of men· joined "in 'til break of day. More rapidly than eagles the choruses did come, And they sang and sang until they were done. To the top of the hill, now to the snow fence, And then a few girls used some good sense And called for Mrs. Fulton to beg no offense. Then in a twinkling, we heard from below, The song of yule-tide coming up slow. As we drew in our heads and turned around, We found half of second floor were on their way down. We were dressed all in robes, with our hair up in pins, And those smarty old boys wore superior grins. All around the piano we did then meet, While the girls came in with something to eat. Our droll little mouths were drawn up like bows, And for the first time, we didn't miss the snows. We laughed and sang; a good time was had by all, As in unpoetic terms, "We really had a ball." As the time wore on, and the dark turned to light, The boys all left and were soon out of sight. But we heard them exclaim as they left us that night, "Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good night!"

Peruvians Kept Busy During Closed Week-end

LS.A. Holds Effective ' Candle Light Service

Quiet Hour was held at 4:30 Friday afternoon in the · college auditorium. Organ and violin music was played by Mr. Benford and Mr. Jindra. The Movie Matinee was h e 1 d Saturday at 2:00 in the campus school auditorium. The movie was "Picnic," starring Kim Novak and William Holden, and was sponsored by the Student Senate. It was well attended. The bonfire pep rally was held at 4:30 Saturday afternoon. Logs for the bonfire were gathered by the Blue Devils. Everyone gathered around the brightly blazing fire and was led by the cheerleaders in yells for victory .

Home Ee Breakfast The Home Economics C 1 u b served a breakfast Sunday, December 11, from 9:00 to 10:00 a.m. The breakfast of rolls and cocoa or coffee was served in the lobby of Eliza Morgan Hall. There was good attendance.

L.S.A. held a Christmas candlelight service Dec. 14 at 6:30 p.m. in the Music Hall Auditorium. Pastor Rathkamp led the service. The service consisted of several Christmas carols and responsive reading. The candles were lighted during the singing of "Hark, the Herald Angels Sing." The candles continued burning during the singing of "Silent Night," prayer and the benediction. Refreshments were served by the Lutheran women of Peru.

White Angels Sponsor Dance The White Angel~· sponsored an informal dance at Delzell Hall a::fter the Peru Prep basketball game Dec. 9. Dancing was "to recorded music. A multi-colored rotating light was focused on a beautiful silver Christmas tree which was the major decoration. There was a good attendance at this dance.

The presentation, under the direction of Edward G. Camealy, assistant professor of voice, included the Christmas portion of the oratorio and the Hallelujah Chorus. Accompaniment w a s provided by Victor H. Jindra, director, orchestra; Robert T. Benford, organ, ~nd Mrs. Gilbert E. Wilson, piano. "The Messiah," Handel's most successful and best-known oratorio was co~pos,ed in 1741 in 24 days. It wis,first performed in Dublin, Ireland, April 13, 17 42. During the years it has come to be one of the most popular oratorios. Soloists included: sopranosMrs. Dolores Spilker, Adams; Judy Wolf, Davenport; Mrs. Grace Russell, Peru; contraltosJoyce Carman, Tecumseh; JoAnn Frerichs, Beatrice; tenor- Ron Bath, Auburn; basses-Dean Belknap, Lincoln; Duane Hemmin" ger, Wymore, and Steve Parker, Peru. Church choirs represented in the chorus include: First Methodist church, Auburn; Bethe 1 Community church, A u b urn ; Christian church, Auburn; Catholic church, Essex, Iowa; First Methodist church, Falls City; First Methodist church, Peru: First Baptist church, Peru; First Christian church, Peru; First Methodist church, Nebraska City; First Lutheran church, Nebraska City; Bethel United church, Nebraska City. "The Messiah," was presented by the Peru State Teachers College Choir and area church choir members in the Auburn High School Auditorium, Sunday, December 18 at 3 p.m. The Auburn presentation included the Christmas portion and the Hallelujah Chorus. Accompaniment was by the orchestra under the direction of Victor H: Jindra; R. T. Benford, organist; and Mrs. Gilbert E. Wilson, pianist.

Instructors Attend N.S.E.A. Assembly Mrs. Adams and Miss Ashley attended the NSEA Delegate Assembly in Lincoln Dec. 9 and 10. The meeting caucused local organizations as to what measures the NSEA should lobby for in the up-coming legislature. Some of the proposals were: a broadened tax base with a portion of the money specifically allocated to schools; federal aid with no government controls; higher teacher salaries; teacher tenure; and continuation of redistricting. Mr. Delbert (Spec) Nelson, Peru grad, was elected president of NSEA. Mr. Nelson is presently superint~ndent at Schuyler.


NOTES FROM MAJORS By Darrel Wolcott Henry Turner, who has been practice teaching in Syracuse, was on campus the week-end of December 10-12; · "Smoke Gets In Your Eyes," as the song goes. It did for Majors' residents on Thursday, December 8. A quantity of paper caught fire in the paper chute and emitted volumes of smoke throughout most of the building. It was later discovered that a waste paper can .had lodged in the chute. Jerry Osborn, with his guitar, has. been providing accompaniment for Christmas carol singing on second floor. Anyone interested in a Christmas goose-stuffing and allmight contact Darrel Feit. The goose is ' already stuffed-by a taxidermist. Although nature can seldom be improved, the spruce in the solarium presents a pretty sight. Halos of blue light shine through the "angel hair" covering the eight-foot tree. On the coffee table is an arrangement of ornamental bulbs· and evergreen. Small Christmas symbols 1 i n e the window ledges of Mrs. Donovan's apartment and the office. Girls! Be on your toes. Jerry Bell has suggested that some fellow run around campus with a sprig of mistletoe on the end of a long pole.

Mrs. Morrison, and Miss Bradley. These gifts were purchased and presented on behalf of all the girls. We have a new member. in Eliza Morgan Hall. Her name is Mrs. Morrison. She will be taking Mrs. Fulton's place as Mrs. Fulton will' be leaving us right after the holidays. I would like to take this time to say how much we have enjoyed having Mrs. Fulton with us this semester, and that we will miss her very much. On the other hand, welcome to Peru, Mrs. Morrison! We w i 11 really enjoy having you as our new "mother" away from home. Deanna Donahoo has left us to go to work. She is presently employed by Western Electric. I won't even try to mention all the holiday parties. I'll just be general and say that everyone has been to a Christmas party in the dorm. There was an exchanging of gifts, memories, goodies eaten, and carols sung. Third floor has stq.rted something new and different. They are having a "peanut and shuck" contest. Each girl in the west wing is a peanut and has h e r shuck. The shucks give their peanuts small gifts, make their beds, write them notes. This is all done anonymously. The girls will re. veal their identity at their Christmas party. Christmas time is here again, So let us leave Peru with a grin. And when we come back January third, Let the joys of the season still be heard. Merry Christmas Everyone ! ! !

Faculty Tea WHISPERS FROM MORGAN

By Lin4a Nygaard

Mrs. Fulton gave her Christmas party for the girls on Sunday night, after closing hour. It was a heart warming affair that everyone took part in. Each girl had a lighted candle to carry. Starting on third, the girls filed down the stairs singing. Next, came second floor singing "Oh Come All Ye Faithful" and so on until each floor was in the lobby. Then we all sang "Silent Night" and refreshments were served. The party was climaxed by the presentation of ChTistmas gifts to Mrs. Fulton, Mrs. Longfellow,

Language Club Party at Raths The Foreign Language Club attended a Christmas party given by Prof. Rath, Dec. 13 at 6:30 p.m. at the Rath home. The program consisted of a description of Christmas in e a c h country and Christmas songs sung in the respective languages. Lois Fritz was mistress of ceremonies. Rose Cl:n:icy gave .the description of Christmas in Germany. The German classes sang "Stille Nacht, Heilige Nacht,'' "0 Tannenbaum," and "!hr Kinderlein Kommet." The description of Christmas in France was given by Julia Mayer. The French students sang "Sainte Nuit,'' "Dans Les Ombres de la Nuit," and "Un Flambeau, Jeanette." Robert Kepler gave the ~eport on Christmas in Spain and Mexico and the Spanish students sang "Noche de Paz, Neche de Amor," "Oh Santisimo," and "Venid, Fieles Todos." Refreshments were served by Mrs. Rath. Mr. Rath gave each student a Christmas card in the respective language which each takes. The party closed with the group singing Christmas songs in English. SNEA CHRISTMAS PARTY Student N.E.A. will have their Christmas party this evening, December 19, e1t 7:00 p.m.

my dear Watson! From the happy look on your physiog, f;on; the cheerfu},~ift , you seem to be enioymg, I deduce " you are imbibing Coca-Cola. No mystery about why Coke is the world's favorite ... such taste, such sparkle! Yes, my favorite case is always a case of Cokel

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BE REALLY REFRESHED ····.;

NOTES FROM DELZELL '

The Peru State College a~nual faculty tea was held in the Campus School auditorium Sunday afternoon, December 11, from 4:00 to 5:30 p.m. The hostesses for the tea were faculty women: Miss Gladys Grush, Mrs. John Christ, Mrs. Silas Summers, Miss Juanita Bradley, Miss Frieda Rowoldt, Mrs. George Rath and Mrs. Ross Adams.

Alpha Mu Omega Initiates New Members Alpha Mu Omega met Monday, Dec. 12. Keith HawKby, vice president, presided. A committee report was given on p r op o s e d constitutional amendments. New members were initiated. Refreshments were served.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice· of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks December 19, 1960

THE STAFF Co-Editor_____________________________________ Rose Clancy Co-Editor _____________________________ Mary Ann Lewellyn Sports Editor _________________________________ Steve Parker Copy Editor ____________________________________ Leroy Keyt Business Manager _____________________________ Ray Meister Personnel Manager ____________________________ Herb Brown ColumnisL--------~-----~------------------Linda

Bertram ColumnisL _______________________________Jerry Kirkendall ColumnisL _________________________________ Linda Nygaard ColumnisL _________________________________ Darrel Wolcott ColumnisL ________________ c _____________ Mary Anna Gnade Campus SchooL _______________________________ Sandy Craig Sports Reporter ________________________________ Bob Fisher Women's Sports __________________________________ Pam Yost Reporter____________________ c _________________ Lynn Bailey Reporter________________________________________ Lois Fritz Reporter __________________________________ Marilyn Monroe Reporter_____________________________________ Judy Pollack Reporter___________________________________ Carolyn Reiber Reporter_______________________________________ Gary Weiss Reporter ___ c _________________________________ John Werner Reporter~---------------- _______ --------- _______ Tom Yopp Sponsor _________________________________Stewart Linscheid

By Gerald Kirkendall It's Christmas time again, and everyone from Delzell Hall is in the Christmas spirit. Room 108, decorated with boughs of holly and mistletoe, is an example of this Christmas spirit. Those of Delzell Hall who are traveling a long distance during the Christmas holidays are: James Mayo, Brooklyn; Frankie Kan, New York City; Edward Leistman, Brookhaven, N e w York; Richard LaRoche, Cheyenne, Wyoming; Richard Allan, Middleboro, Mass.; Roger Carnes, Roger Smith, and Thomas Yopp, East Alton, Illinois; and Frank Sunada, Greeley, Colo. Delzell residents are going to celebrate the Christmas holidays in the following manner: Mrs. Paradise, "Spend Christmas with son and family at Storm Lake, Iowa . " Jam es Mayo, "Going to night clubs and do a little of everything!!!" Roger Smith, "Spend a f e w days with relatives and a little time in the Old South." Tom Yopp, "Open my presents." Richard LaRoche, "Go home and stock up on goodies ! ! !" Edward Leistman, "Going to spend a pleasant vacation with family, relatives, and friends and go to parties." Roger Carnes, "Plan .on a few trips to East St. Louis." In closing, I leave with you this poem written by Esther Ann Clark. I'm wishing you all Christmas joys, Not just its pretty gauds and toys, But the inner thrills, the finer part That warms and fills the loving heart. God's highest good I wish for you; May it be yours the whole year through.

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Jack Mcintire Now. Head Football Coach (Continued from page one) ber of St ate Championship teams. The Peru football teams of 1939 and '40 captured the State championship crowns. In 1940, the Peru track team garnered the State title. Following graduation from Peru, Mcintire served one year as athletic coach at Auburn High School, where his teams recorded eight football win& to one defeat and 14 basketball wins to six losses. That year Mcintire's Auburn High track team won the Southeast Conference championship. Fine Record In 1942, when Mcintire served as line coach at Peru State, the Bobcats won the Nebraska College Conference title. After d i s c h a r g e from the armed forces, Mcintire joined the Falls City High School faculty as head coach, a position he held for 10 years. Mcintire-coached teams produced 71 'Yins and 17 losses on the gridiron and in basketball 126 wins against 47 losses. His track teams won 10 straight Southeast Con'ference champion'1Jerome Stemper, director of intramurals at Peru, has an- ships. In the Twin Rivers Con'· ced the standings of the 14 league teams, as of December 12th. ference, in existence since 1954, Mcintire's Falls City track Sheiks-coached by Roger Eshelman _______________ 3-0 teams brought home th r e e Drifters-coached by Dick Neale----------~-------- 3-0 straight titles. In the same conIllini-coached by Cletus Shrout_ __________________ 3-0 ference, his teams won one footStompers-coached by Harry Whitney~------------- 2-1 ball title, and won two and B-Sharps-coached by Russell Workman___________ 2-1 shared one basketball crown. In Falcons-coached by John Greene __________________ 2-1 1956, his basketball team won the Rejects-coached by Ervin Epley ___________________ 2-1 Class A State title. Outcasts-coached by Mike Donovan _______________ 2-1 Oak Hillers-coached by Bill Fitzgerald ____________ 1-2 In June, 1955, Mcintire was named "Nebraska High School Pee Wees-coached by Wayne Shafer_~------------ 1-2 Hawks-coached by Ray Boren ____________________ 0-3 Coach of the Year" by the OmaTerrifies-coached by Neal Eickhoff ________________ 0-3 ha World-Herald and "Prep Pushovers-coached by Robert Mulder_ ____________ 0-3 Qoach of the Year'' by the SunFarmers-coached by Jay DuvaL __________________ 0-3 d~y Lincoln Journal and Star. ~:. Mrs. Mcintire is the former ':coach Stemper is being assisted by John Christensen, Bob GibLuella Driebus of Nebraska City. ? Roger Smith, and Ron KeI!y. A round.:fobin schedule is being,. '.I'hey have two· children, 'Karen ,·wed. At the end of the season, the top four teams will play in a Ann, 18, a Peru State freshman, ble elimination tournament. and Johnny, a 14-year-old eighth grader at Peru Prep.

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Bulldogs Nip Kittens In Contest Here 44-42 In their second conference duel, the Prep 'Kittens were nipped 44-42 by the Talmage Bulldogs, Friday, December 9. The game, played on the Prep home boards, saw the Bulldogs come roaring from behind to make their victory bid. The Bobkittens charged to an early 13-2 lead at the end of the first period but the Bulldogs scorched the nets with 23 points in the second period and at halftime held a 25-23 edge over the Prepsters. Peru fought relentlessly, but early in the fourth period th e 'Kittens suffered the loss of rebounder Tom Majors, and although ace Tom Boatman garnered 18 points, they were not sufficient for a victory. Peru's conference standing in the Nemaha Valley Conference is 1-1.

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Tigers Tame ~cats In Home Game 78-66 By Bob Fisher Combining s p e e d, d e a d 1 y shooting accuracy, and rugged rebounding, the talent - 1 a de n Tennessee A & I Tigers administered a 78 to 66 defeat to the Pe· ru State Bobcats at Peru, Saturday night, before a standingroom-only crowd. The Tennesseans broke to an early 4 to 0 lead on two buckets by giant 7'1" George Finley, before Peru cracked the scoring column on a hook shot by B o b Buettgenbach, Beatrice. That was as close as .the outmanned but game Peruvians came to knotting the score all night. Midway in the first half the Bobcats suffered a scoring drouth of 3:15 and the Tigers spurted to a 15-point lead. At the intermission, the three-time N.A.I.A. tourney champions held a 42 to 28 marg.in over the homestanding Bobcats. In the second half it was the same story as the powerful A & I quintet held their lead and at one point bulged it to a 77 to 55 margin. The never-say-die Peruvians spurted in the last three minutes, looking for the first time like they had lost their awe of the potent Tennesseans, to close the gap to the final 12-point margin. Heading the A & I scoring attack was guard Porter Merriwether who counted 21 points.

W.A.A. Badminton And Volley Ball Are Under Way

The giant Finley contributed 12 points as did starting forward Hillary Brown. Scoring honors for the game went to hook-shooting Bob Buettgenbach who burned the cords with 27 points for the Bobcats. Jumping Jack Johnson took runner-up honors for the 'Cats with 21 points. PERU fg Harvey ------- 1 Rathe -------- 0 Johnson ------ 7 Witt --------- 0 Hayes -------- 0 Buettgenbach _10 Mayo -------- 0 Roach -------- 3 Gibson ------- 0 Yopp --------- 2 Tynon -------- 0

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ft 0-4 1-1 3-3 0-0 2-2 0-0 1-2 0-0 5-5 0-0 2-2 0-0

f 2 0 3 3 0 0 0 3 3 0 1

32 14-19 16 78 gar court, was a tight scoring duel from start to finish. The two teams battled defensively and at halftime Prep had a 15-13 edge.

The badminton pfay~offs were ht:?.ld NovemJ?er . 30, Be.rnadette. Gallagher won first place in singles. Pat Rathe and Jeannie Shuttlesworth attended a W.A.A. Convention at Crete December 3. Miss Cehtel of the University of Nebraska gave a speech on the Olympic games held in Rome. Volley ball was the main event at the last meeting. After Christmas there will be a volley ball tournament for the girls in the dorm and those living outside the dorm. All girls are welcome to participate in the tournament.

In the third quarter, the Cou~ gars came snarling back to outscore the 'Kittens 27-20.. Early in the fourth .peri0d .the Rrepsters rallied when Tom B o at man scored seven counters. At the final whistle .the score .was locked 38-38. In the overtime period, the Bobkitten hopes were inspired when Al Wheeler scored on a charity toss, but Ray Doeden, Cougar ace, scored a bucket to end the game in the Cougars' favor.

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In an overtime period, Tuesday night, December 13, the Peru Prep Bobkittens dropped their second straight conference decision, 39-40, to the Cook Cougars. The game, played on the Cou-

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Brock Beats Kittens In Volley Ball Game The Peru Prep volley ball girls lost to Brock in theiJ; opening game on the home court. In the first game Peru Prep's high point player was Kay Tripp with five points. The final score was 8-10. An 8-6 score in the next game gave Brock a second victory over Peru Prep. Laquita Allgood, scoring three points, was high point player for this game.

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Adult Civil Defense Class Will Be Offered Here in January

S.C.F. Hosts LS.A. And Wesley Fellowship

Elementary Grades Prepare For Christmas

Everyone at the C amp us point of the party will be The SCF was host to the LSA School is busily engaged in vari- pinata. The pinata, in the sh of a snowman, is filled with < and the Wesley Fellowship in the ous Christmas activities. dy and gifts. It will be suspen each night. There are no tests Music Hall, Dec. 7, at 6:30 p.m. PJ. Civil Defense course, "SurKindergarteners made Christ- from the ceiling. Each stuc vival :Preparedness" will be of- and certificates will be given to Carol McLain we 1 come d the mas decorations as gifts for their will be blindfolded and giver group. fered beginning the week of Jan- those who ·attend twelve hours. parents. Foam snowballs were chance to break the pinata v The guest speaker was the Rev. ml.ry 16, 1961. The course will be filled with colored toothpicks and a stick. Tod~y more than ever before Jerry Dunn of the Open-Door op err to college stud en ts a n d then sprayed with snow. Each it is imperative that every adult Mission in Omaha. Rev. D u n n aduits iri the Peru area. The purday a package is being added to pose of this course is to give the citizen of the United States be spoke to the group on the effect the large Christmas tree on the taught how to cope with nuclear, of alcoholic beverages. basi:C' facts needed in order· to be bulletin board. Mrs. Adams said prepared for natural, man-made chemical or biological attack by excitement is high when the and enemy caused disasters. modern weapons of war and denumber of days till Christmas is struction from · other disasters. There is no tuition fee or other counted. direct cost. Everyone needs this This is why we, as individuals, By Mary Anna Gnade Grade one has decorated its information. To enroll, call at need to know the facts about Here's a tickle: Mrs. Majors the-Office of the Dean of the Col- weapons, the facts about protecroom with Santa Claus faces and lege and· complete your pre-reg- tion and the actions we can take (asst. to registrar) took 3rd grade Christmas trees. Students have istration. The course does n 0 t · for personal preparedness in the son Tom to purchase a gift for written a Christmas story each carry college credit. event of attack and in natural the little girl whose name he day for two weeks. These stories drew. He veered toward the will be compiled and made into disasters. ·Several· local people have taschool supplies and finally se- a booklet. Mrs. Straw, supervisken special training and are cerCivil Defense_:prepared, col- lected a pencil. When mother tified to conduct the course. All lective action to meet any emer- asked if he thought Elizabeth or, said a party is planned for the class materials are free. Five ex- gency whether arising from nat- would like a pencil rather than last day of school. cellent films and several colored ural disaster or from wartime at- jewelry, he replied "0 yes, she's Second graders have also made film strips will be shown during tack-is the b u s i n e s s of all that type." (And Mrs. M asks, room decorations. They have this six week course, two hours people. what is an Eversharp type?) been writing original Christmas Just in time for Christmas! The poems. After the story of The Next week the Lutheran Club trading pictures came with cus- Nutcracker is read, students will will meet with L.S.A. for a joint tomary reactions of "how hor- listen to the recording of "The Christmas service. rible." Chris Maxwell and Georg- Nutcracker Suite." ette Gomon very reluctantly disBy Ray Meister Third graders wrote a letter to played theirs at the post office Santa Claus in conjunction with Dr. Darrel Wininger and Dr. window. Chris said "he made me Kite represented Peru S t at e say hamburger" and his picture their social studies unit, Sending Teachers College at the Teacher looked it. Georgette said he made all.d Receiving Messages. Other activities include: room decoraEducation Conference which was Sigma Tau Delta held its annu- some say hot dog. Jimmy G. had held at the University of Minne- al Christmas party Wednesday to say pony. Apparently just say tion, creating gifts for mothers, sota, at Minneapolis, Minnesota, evening, Dec. 14, at the home of anything-it still comes out, well reading and writing Christmas stories, and learning Christmas December 8-lOth. Sandy Craig. During the business not good. But we still have to carols. The gift exchange an d The conference was divided in- meeting, the local constitution trade! to two main sections. Dr. Kite was approved. The page in the In spite of excuses why we party will be held Dec. 21. attended the sessions which dealt annual and the club-sponsored couldn't go (on the part of sons, One of the highlights of grade with the supervision of student magazine were discussed. that is), Mrs. Boatman, Mrs. four's decorations is their Christteachers, and Dr. Wininger atAfter an introduction by Sandy Fisher and I were visiting moth- mas tree. All decorations w e r e tended the sessions ·dealing with Craig, a recording of Dickens' ers in Mr. Moore's (and student made by the students. Mrs. • Slim Styling the adinlnistration of student Christmas Carol w a s played. teacher J. Wesolowski's) debate Brown said their party will be • Low Waisted teachers. Rose Clancy then read the scrip- class this past week. HS Princi- held Dec. 21. Each student will • Adjustable Waistband According to Dr. Wininger, it tural Christmas story. be a Santa Claus and deliver one pal Buethe also was a visiting • Wash 'n' Wear appears that there will be a Cookies and punch ~re served judge. I still think it's wonderful gift. Cords & Polished Cotto change in the educative process from a table with a green table the way our Campus School Grade five has decorated its for prospective teachers in the cloth, white feather Christmas starts with even the littlest chil- tree with ornaments brought near future. Instead of a four tree, and white candles. Ju 1 i e dren preparing them gradually from home. Students have been RARICK CLOTHIN< year program of teacher educa- Mayer and Sandy Craig were in all through the grades so t h e y working hard on gifts for their in tion, a student will be required to charge of the party. are poised when unexpectedly mothers. Their party and gift exAUBURN. NEBRASKA complete a six-year program placed before an audience. change will be held Dec. 21. They which will include one year of The sophomore class have their are planning a program the same interneship. plans all made and on the stroke afternoon, featuring poems, storAt the same time, each individof dismissal bell Friday n i g h t ies, and Christmas carols. ual's program. will .be tailor made will go into action. Their dance The sixth graders are using to suit his own needs. For inStudent Christian Fellowship decorations will be out of th i s Christmas in Mexico as t h e i r Haircut, $1.25 stance, one person might be rec met December 14 at 6:30 in the world. A Christmas dance seems theme. Their party and gift exPeru, Nebr. quired to take only six weeks of to hold special fascination since Music Hall. change will be Dec. 21. The high science, while another person inKeith Stevenson of Lincoln even the play-rehearsing seniors terested in becoming a teacher spoke on the function and pur- are planning dates to attend. would be required to take a full And don't forget, the night bepose of the United Christian semester, or even a year. The fore the day you leave school for Campus Fellowship. Plans for the amount would depend ·upon his the holidays is the time to laugh Christmas convocation and a parbackground in this field, or the with the seniors at their playty, were discussed. number of courses he had taken ask Joni W, it's been work and in high school which would satwith a threat of mumps thrown Groceries Meats isfy this requirement in college. in! Fruits and Vegetables So with a hoo, ray, r~h and a sprig of holly, the twelve days of Christmas are almost accomFree Delivery Tuesday and Friday Beautiful Christmas carols and plished. Have a merry Christthe traditional turkey with dress- mastide! Phone TR 2-4351 ing set the pace for Friday night's Epsilon Pi Tau met Dec. 14 at 8:00 at the Auburn High School. formal dinner, which marked the They·were the guest of Mr. Wal- official opening of Peru State's REDFERN lace Richards, industrial arts in- "closed week-end." The.tab 1 es ClOthing Co. were decorated _with evergreen structor. "The Store of· Standard & Mr. Richards showed the club boughs and shiny bulbs. Brands" Phone BR 4-3620 Auburn through the Auburn industrial Shoes Clothing arts shop. James Dovel, vice president, was in charge of the arrangements. · GEBER'S Problems connected with de· At 8:00 p.m. on December 7, Conoco Service veloping an industrial arts program on the high school level the Industrial Arts Club he 1 d TOPS IN SERVICE their monthly meeting in the were discussed. BR4-3818 Auburn new Industrial Arts building. They d_iscussed plans for taking their annual field trip, this year OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY to the St. Louis Industrial Ar t s BILL'S CLOTHING Convention in April. SOFT WATER & SHOE STORE A film "Methods and . Tech·· · The Lutheran Club met 'Dec. 7 . You Pay Less ai Bill's at 6:30 p.m. in Ad 101. The group niques .of .Spray Painting" w a s Beatfy's TR 2-2101 Peru discussed "Crossing the Interna- shown. A film is also planned for Auburn, Nebr. I the next meeting. tional Dating: Line."

Camg_us School Chatter

Wininger and Kite Attend Education Meet

Sigma Tau Delta Holds Christmas Party

Speaker Discusses The Functions of S.C.F.

ROY PECK Barber Shop

PERU MARKET Rex Rains

Epsilon Pi Tau Tours Auburn l A. Shop

Annual Christmas Dinner ·Served Friday Evening

MORRISSY'S VARIETY STORE Peru Sc lOc

Industrial Arts Plans St. Louis Field Trip

SPEED WASH

Coin Operated - Automatic Laundry

Lutheran Clubs Will Have JOint Service

BOWMAN?S HARDWARE Appliances .- Sporting Goods Hunting and Fishing Licenses PERU ·-·,1.r.'"°:"'.···

TR 2-2561

CECIL BOWMAN

INGERSOLL Barber Shop

ELLA MARGARET SHOP

AUBURN. NEBRASKA Elly Ingersoll • Nate Hayes

Ladies' Wearing Apparel and Millinery PHONE BR 4-3520 AUBURN, NEBR.

The Shop of Quality


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Tell The World About Peru

The Voice of the Campus of aThousand Oaks ...

Peru· Pedagogian PERU,NEBRASKiA

Volume 56

Number 8

JANUARY 16, 1961

Tell The Truth About Peru

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Mr. J. D. Levitt took this dramatic shot of Peru's new Student Ce!1ter. this and agree that it was more than worth the waiting.

L andy Craig Describes Peru's Student Center

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Peruvians were delighted to housed in the main portion of the e the new Student Center on Center. eir return from Christmas va-· Modern furniture is used in the ti on. lounge. Dashes of blue, yellow The modified T-shaped Center and brown set off the c o 1 o r of classical modern architec- scheme of black, orange and re. Its two levels feature glass white. Various-shaped coffee ta.alls .and concrete columns sup- bles are surrounded by sofas and rting a concrete · roof. The chairs. There are also s e v e r a 1 s-walled student lounge is chairs and small tables. nected to the larger m a i r+ The north wall of the simply ucture by a glass walled endecorated meeting room is glass. ce ·corridor. A concrete terA large walnut table is surrounde surrounds the top floor. The ed by orange cushioned chairs cture is illuminated at night set on a black and brown tweed 1ights in the roof of the stucarpet. nt lounge and by glass bulbs The faculty lounge is furnished spended from the ceiling ovin Danish Modern. The coffee tahang. bles, end tables, and storage cabA coat room, dining room, pri- inet are done in walunt. Lamps, te dining room, snack bar, touched with orange and blue, chen, T.V. lounge, book store, offset the turquoise, orange, and ·ces for student publications, brown chairs and sofas. The careting rooms, faculty lounge, pet is similar to that in the meeting room.

ND DAY

__

Peruvians have

level of the Center. It will be ready for use by January 16.

The one large table and three smaller tables of the private dining room are of teakwood. Sand beige walls are accented by white drapes on the south wall. The drape liner, which is hung on a separate rod, facilitates better light adjustment. Simi 1 a r /drapes are planned for the entire ~outh wall of the building.

A temporary game room can be found in the T.V. lounge. Dr. Gomon said that the game room, which is directly under the student lounge, should be ready for use by the summer session. The Ped and Peruvian will move into new quarters by the entrance of the snack bar as soon as furniture arrives.

About forty-five tables, each seating four are found in the main dining room. The north and south walls are glass. The serving area, which cannot be seen from the dining room, is to the west.

Mrs. Douglas, supervisor of the snack bar and cafeteria, said the new building will permit much better service. All new equipment in the snack bar will make it possible to serve a greater variety of food.

The lower floor's southern exposure overlooks a walled court area which will be paved with flagstones, landscaped, and used for outdoor dining. Completion will be delayed until at least June, 1961. The book store is on the lower

New in the kitchen is a time clock, loading dock, and elevator, which will carry food to the upper level for serving. Waterless steam tables in the serving area will keep food hot. An inter-com system will be installed later to permit easier communication be-

tween the upper and lower levels in the j{,jtch~n. Fi.:. Mrs. Marfon .Gomon has been appointed temporary director of the Student Center. She will arrange social events, supervise the game room and lounges, and assist students and visitors in getting full utilization of the buil,ding. The directors office, which is on the upper level, will be open from 3 to 5 p.m., except Sundays, and from 7 to 10:30 p.m., except Saturdays. Dr. Gomon had this to say about the Center: "This is an entirely new facility and maybe some of the rules will need to be changed. I hope that students and faculty will use and protect the new Student Center." What remains of Mount Vern'On will soon be torn down. The job should be finished by spring. This will enable workers to complete the concrete terrace around the student lounge.

Steve Parker, photographer for the PEDAGOGIAN and the PERUVIAN, shot this view of the Student Center and the addition to Eliza Morgan Halt two structures of which Peruvians are proud.


The Play's Not Over Yet Not very long ago PSTC was sadly lacking in physical facilities. There was a fine spirit, a dedicated faculty, a capable administration, and many other non-physical assets; but all Peruvians could do about the phyiscal plant was to apologize for the present and to hope for a better future. The last building to be erected on the campus was Delzell Hall, constructed in 1939. '

LIBRARY , COLUMN By Linda Bertram

The Forest and the Sea, by

For many years, Mr. A. V. Larson, Miss Norma Diddel, Marston Bates, is a study of the administrative staff members, and others worked on plans biological community in the widfor a'practical arts building; but nothing much happened be- est sense. It examines the life of cause money for construction was not available. the forests, the lakes, the grassThen things began to happen. In the last few months, lands, t~ deserts, the coral reefs, four major construction jobs have been completed: Ma- and the open seas. His aim is to jors Hall, the large addition to Morgan Hall, the Industrial look again at the ever-fascinatArts Building, and the Student Center. Work began on the ing problem of man's place in nanew dorms first as the "rising action" started. TP.ere w a s ture. Professor Bates has organ"suspense" caused by delays in getting building materials, ized the vast material and pheand there was even a strike caused by differences between nomena of plant and animal the labor union and the contractor. Still, work got done and worlds, with recognition of their buildings were completed-the dorms, then the Industrial separateness yet interdependArts building, and finally the "climax"-the Student Center. ence. He has done this with an It was like the plot of a play, but the play is not over yet. · Although we know of no construction definitely planned for the immediate future, we feel that Peru is entering on a period of expansion which will lead to even greater things in the future.

appreciation of the biological communities as they now exist, the effect man has had upon them since prehistoric time, and the effect he could have upon them in the future.

On behalf of the staffs of the Peruvian and the PedagoA Sense of Values, by Sloan gian, we wish to thank the members of the State Normal Wilson, is the &tory of a man Board and President Gomon for our new offices in the splen- who, having achieved great sucdid new Student Center. We'll be working there just as soon cess and suffered great personal as the new furniture arrives. -S. P. L. failure sits down and tries to

WHISPERS FROM MORGAN By Linda Nygaard

The approaching of finals has not seemed to affect the girls at Morgan Hall. But, as the final days draw nearer and nearer, the lights seem to stay on later and later. Donna Francis Thompson has returned to the dorm after student teaching for the past six weeks ·at Bellevue. She ··will be leaving us again right after finals to join her husband in California, where he is stationed in the Navy. Christmas was an especially joyous time for many of the girls this year. Kay Parli received her diamond from Ray Farwell, DuBois, Nebraska. Also becoming engaged were Judy Sanders and Jim Hayes, Betty Bebb and Ray Plankington, Judy Pollack a n d Jim Woodrow (Bellevue), and Carolyn Armstrong and Don Be- · dea (Table· Rock), Gladys Monahan tied. the final knot with Pat Mahoney over vacation. Pat is stationed ill California with the Navy. Congratulations to all of you!

make some s•ense out of his life. Lee Christen saw the bottom It is the record of a man who has side of the bath tub last Monday struggled through the last forty when she had her twenty-first years of history. It is all kinds birthday. A party followed t h e of stories rolled into one. In small dunking with Linda Goodin, Pat- part it is a war story. In larger sy Melcher, Kay Parli, Carolyn part it is a study of "success" in Parli, Ellen Hunzeker, Bonnie 1960. It deals with the way one Sude, Ardith Pratt, Sharon Earl, man gained success, and the imand Cathy Banks all attending pact of money and publicity on and eating the goodies. an entire family. Betty Bebb had a birthday last week. Her entire floor helped her to celebrate the occasion. NOTES The time has now com~ for me FROM to bid you a farewell as the writMAJORS er of this column. I only hope By you have enjoyed reading it as Darrel much as I've enjoyed writi:ig it. ....

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Pastor Diethoff Discusses Communism and Atheism L.S.A. met January 4 at 6:30 p.m. in the Music HalL The program, "Communism is Atheism on the March," wa& given by Pastor Diethoff. P as t o r Diethoff concluded with the summary that Communism will not take over the United States, if the ·American people pray a n d fight Atheism with Christianity. The group discussed the possibility of sending representatives to the midwinter conference at Midland College, February 17, 18 and 19. The meeting closed with t h e Lord's Prayer.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of ihe Campus of a Thousand Oaks January 16, 1961 THE STAFF

Co-Editor_____________________________________Rose Clancy Co-Editor _____________________________ Mary Ann Lewellyn Sports Editor_________________________________ steve Parker Copy Editor ____________________________________ Leroy Keyt Business Manager _____________________________ Ray Meister Personnel Manager ____________________________ Herb Brown Columnist_ _________________________________ Linda Bertram Columnist_ _______________________________ J erry Kirkendall Columnist __________________________________ Linda Nygaard ColumnisL _________________________________ Darrel Wolcott ColumnisL ______________________________Mary Anna Gnade Campus SchooL _______________________________ Sandy Craig Sports Reporter ________________________________ Bob Fisher Women's Sports __________________________________ Pam Yost Reporter ______________________________________ Lynn Bailey Reporter________________________________________ Lois Fritz Reporter __________________________________ Marilyn Monroe Reporter_____________________________________ Judy Pollack Reporter___________________________________ Carolyn Reiber Reporter_______________________________________ Gary Weiss Reporter _____________________________________ John Werner Reporter ________._______________________________ ..:Tom Yopp Sponsor _________ .________________________ Stewart Linscheid

The end of the v a c a t i o n marked the "beginning of the end"-of the first semester, and almost everyone is "keyed" for the big "wind-up" session. Back from student teaching off campus are Henry Turner and Steve Banks. For some, such as Alan Wheeler, Jim Kemp, Steve Banks, and Bob Fisher these final two and a half weeks since Christmas put the finishing touches on their education here at Peru and mark the start of a new life. Good luck "on the outside," fellows. Of course, there are also the seemingly inevitable a i 1men ts that occur. Harry Whitney finally walked that "last mile" during Christmas vacation, and had his shoulder dislocation operated upon. Two down, no more to go, Harry! Jack Johnson got a "fat" ankle during ·the' Wesleyan game. Jim Kemp had to have an infected tooth treated; and Pat Cooper showed up with a rash. Maybe you're allergic to exam w e e k , Pat. You know, a dormitory is not just an inaminate object. It 1s a home for human beings, and these human beings are what actually make up a dormitory-not the brick and steel and wood that went into its "shell." On the basis of that statement, Majors Hall is a dormitory-and a good one, because the men in it have lived together well this past semester. It is to be hoped that this will always be true. Remember, as Katy O'Connor says, "Stay happy!"

INGERSOLL Barber Shop AUBURN, NEBRASKA Elly Ingersoll • Naie Hayes

Safe Deposit John always did take things too seriously ... like that habit of locking his Coke up in a safe! Sure ev!)rybqdy likes Coca-Cola .•. sure the~s nothing more welcome than th~ good taste of Coca-Cola. But reallya safe just for Coke! Incidentallyknow the combination, anyone? BE ~REFRESHED

Bottled under authority of The Coca-Cola Company by NEBRASKA CITY COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO.

McINTIRE'S GARAGE and STANDARD SERVICE GASOLINE AND AUTO REPAIR Peru, Nebr.

Phone TR 2-2791

s========~===========B

Magic

is the word for Columbia's wonderful world of Columbia Diamonds ••• perfectly matched and carefully selected diamonds. Priced from $59.50 up.

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B-===========B

THE AVENUE STORE "ON THE CORNER OF THE CAMPUS" Groceries

School Supplies

Priced Right for the Student


Peruvians enjoy the new lounge facilities. Students are Annabelle Ross, Larry Fisher, Joan Dyer, LaMarr Gibson, Karolyn Powers, and Sam Sadich.

Students take a break from their busy routine. Rita Grandgenett, LaMarr Gibson, and Mary Ann Lewellyn head down the Student Center stairs to get some java in the Bob Inn.

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The Bob Inn staff keeps busy satisfying student appetites for snacks, Cokes and coffee.

NEBRASKA STATE TEACHERS COLLEG::.T PERU

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Student Center Rules and Regulations

,

DressIt is expected that students, faculty and guests will wear proper attire at all times in the Center, Wednesday evening and Sunday noon are "dress up" meals, Coafa and ties for the men, heels and hose for the women. Men may not wear jeans and T-shirts and women may not wear slacks and bermudas in the main lounge or main dining room at any time. Such informal attire will be permitted in the snack bar and other ground floor areas after 6:30 p.m. and all day Saturday. FoodEating is restricted to the dining, rooms and snack Food or drink shall not be taken into any of lounges, meeting rooms, game rooms, publications fices, or meeting rooms unless special permission been given to a group for a social event.

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SmokingThere shall be no smoking in the main dining room or the faculty dining room at any time. CoatsCoats, hats, books and other personal paraphernalia are to be left in the spaces provided for that purpose and are not to be left on chairs or tables in lounges or food service areas. Card PlayingCard playing is restricted to the main lounge and the game room unless special permission is given to a group for a social event. In no case is gambling allowed in the Center. ConvoThe Center shall be closed during all-college convocations. It may be closed during the time of other all-college events. AdvertisingAll posters and advertising must be approved before being displayed anywhere in· the Center. DecoraiionsDecorations must be approved by the Center Board. Decorations must be removed by the group putting them up or a charge will be made for removal of the decorations. AdditionsOther rules and regulations will be formulated as need arises. The Student Center Board Jack Johnson, Chairman ~lllllHlllllUllllllJlllUlllUllllllllflllllJUUlllUllllUIUIUlllJIUllllfllJlllllllllUUlllllllllfllltllllllUllllllllllllUJJllllUllfm

The Peru Student Center governing board is in session. Members are: Gary Stover, Jerry Wanser, Jeannine Ehlers, Ray Meister, Mrs. Marion Gomon, and Jack Johnson.

This Could Save Your Life Civil Defense Coul'se Begins Hel'e January 26 United States breaks diplomatic relations· with Cuba. Trouble spots all over the world. The cold war could turn hot. Knowledge of civil defense could keep you alive. This knowledge will be made available in a class entitled "Survival Preparedness" beginning January 26 at 7:00 p,m., in Administration building, room, 101. The local course teaches the importance of family planning; the duties of federal, state, county, and municipal government in time of a war-caused disaster; what to do in case of tornadoes, fire, floods, and explosions; how

A free textbook and other related materials which you may keep for further reference will be provided. Five excellent films and several colored slides a n d filmstrips will be shown a 1o n g with discussion, question and answer periods. There are no tests, and certificates will be given to all who attend twelve class hours. Several local people have takThere is no tuition or other di- en special trainin.g and are cerrect cost for this six week, t w o tified to conduct the course. hours every Thursday night, Civil Defense-prepared, colcourse. To enroll, call at the Of- lective action to meet any emerfice of the Dean of the College, gency whether arising from natThe course does not carry college ural disaster or wartime attackis the business of all people. credit.

to build a shelter in your own basement; why you need stocks of food and water for fourteen or more days; our national, state, and local organization for airwarning; how to decontaminate yourself and your family fr o m radio-active dust (fall-out); and what you must do for yourself and what Red ~ross and other agencies may do for you.


Prexy Is "Man of the Year

11

"I certainly appreciate it." That was Dr. Neal S. Gomon's comment when Carroll Lewis presented the Peru Kiwanis Club's Citizenship Award for 1960 to P.S.T.C.'s president at the club's December 20 meeting. Dr. Gomon repeat~d his note of appreciation when "The Peru Pointer" named him Man of the Year, Thursday, January 5. While glad to receive the double-barreled recognition, President Gomon feels that the honor should be divided among all who have strived for Peru's growthin both college and community. The Kiwanis presentation cited the educator's outstanding community service. In 1 en gt hie r terms "The Peru Pointer" noted Dr. Gomon's lead role in boosting the town's economy, the completion of a $1.3 million building program, and Boy Scout work in the Cornhusker ·Council. During the Gomon administration, Oak Hill, Peru State's housing for married students, w a s completed. 1960 climaxed the president's bu i 1 d in g activities with completion of the A. V. Larson industrial arts building, the new Student Union Center, the Majors dormitory for men, the enlargement of Eliza Morgan dormitory for women, a new roadway to the Oak Bowl, the acquisition of land along the Avenue for a new Campus School, new heating facilities, and new parking areas. During the past year, Peru State Teachers College has con-

tinued to show a steady enrollment increase. Dr. Neal S. Gomon is now serving as president of the Nebraska Association of Colleges and Universities. The recently honored educator brought his family, Mrs. Gomon, Tom, David, and Georgette, to Peru in 1950 shortly before he was elevated to the presidency of the local Nebraska State Teachers College. Prior to his arrival here, Neal Gomon had served as teacher, school superintendent, and with the State Department of Education. He had a bachelors and masters degree from the University of Nebraska. Since his coming to Peru, he has received a doctorate from the same institution.

Fifteen Degree Candidates , Will Be Honored In Convocation Fifteen degree candidates will be given recognition at the Feb'ruary 1 Honors Convocation at Peru State Teachers College, according to Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of the college. The 9:30 a.m. convocation will honor four candidates for Bachelor of Arts in Education degrees and eleven Bachelor of Science in Education degrees. The candidates who will complete requirements at the close of the first semester, January 20, will include: Bachelor of Arts in Education-John R. Cooper, Fairbury;

James Lee Kemp, Muscotah, Kans.; Joan Kay Wesolowski, Omaha; Alan G. Wheeler, Stella.

Band Entertains In Convocation

President Gomon Will Address California Alumni

The Peru State Band, under the direction of Gilbert E. Wilson, presented a program for convocation January 11, 1961, at 9:30. The program started with "Music ftom the show Quovadis." "Soliloquy for Trumpet" was next with Don Johnson, soloist and band accompaniment. "Nocturne" was then played by the complete band. The saxophone quartet, which consists of Carol Sudik, Wayne Wallace, Gaylin Sudik, and Tom Sheehan, played "Sax Soliloquy." The program was then turned over to Don Johnson, director of the Blue Notes, the college combo. The members are Keith Hawxby, Hanford Miller, Bob Kaiser, Don Underwood, Carol enna's State Academy of Music. Sudik, Wayne Wallace, Gay 1 in He studied with Irma Correll in Sudik, Charlotte Wheeler, and New York and also in Portug~l. Tom Sheehan. The Blue Notes After graduation he went to played "Blues,'' "Esterlitta" and Salzburg to lead a music appre- "Night Train.'' Fifteen courses, including one The trumpet trio, Don Johnson, graduate offering, are included ciation study course for a group Bob Kaiser, and David O'dell, of American students. Since 1957, on the Wednesday evening class played "Trumpet Wild" with schedule at Peru State Teachers he has toured exte·nsively in Amband accompaniment. The proCollege for the second semester, erica and Europe. gram closed with the complete Displaying what a Los Angeles according to Keith L. Melvin, critic described as "virtuosity band playing "Tango for Band." dean of the college. that fairly exploded from the piBeginning January 25, a n d ano,'' Mr. de la Varre has been continuing through May 17, the acclaimed not only for his techWednesday evening classes at nical prowess, but for his draPeru State will be offered durmatic style of presentation. ing two periods, making it pos-' Mr. Jindra, Head of the Music sible for students to earn up to Department, had nothing but Photography will be a new six hours credit by enrolling in praises and compliments for Mr. course next semester. The class·, classes both periods. The first de la Varre. In summing it up, he entitled I.A. 226, will be taught period will begin at 5 p.m. and said the concert was a "superb by Dr. Harlan. The two-hour continue through 7:40, with secperformance." course will meet the third and ond period beginning at 7:45 and fourth periods on Mondays a n d continuing until 10:10 p.m. Wednesdays. The graduate course, PrinciThe course will be a. general ples and Practices of Guidance, .introduction to photography, is scheduled from 7:45 to 10:10. dealing with each facet, from the Other course offerings include: Beta Mu chapter of Kappa Del- taking of the picture to its deFirst period-Social Studies Surta Pi held its monthly meeting velopment in the new dark room vey (104); German Reading a n d January 10 at 8:00 p.m. in the at the I. A. Building. Composition (202); Survey of BiMusic Hall auditorium. After a ological Science (201); Survey of brief business meeting, Mr. Chris British Literature (303); Typewriting I (121); Typewriting II Buethe, Campus High School (220); Meal Planning and Food Principal, gave a talk on "Planning for Graduate Study?" in \ Preparation (234); Audio-Visual which he pointed out some good Materials (308). reasons for such planning. Second period_:.._History of the Refreshments were served by · U. S. From 1865 (114); Book sethe program committee. lection (220); Music Appreciation (311); Elementary German (102); Schoolmen's Day at Peru State Survey of American Literature Teachers College is scheduled for (325); English Composition (101). Saturday, January 21, 1961, according to President Neal S. GoThe Dramatic Club met Janu- mon. Tl).e event will mark the ary 8 at 6:30 p.m. in the Little ·ninth consecutive year that male faculty members from schools in Theater. New members, Melessia Ful- Southeast Nebraska, Iowa, Kankerson, John Biere, and Chick sas, and Missouri have been inVienna-born pianist, Andre de Stessman, were initiated at the vited to visit the Campus of a Thousand Oaks. la Varre, presented a concert in December meeting. The visiting schoolmen will inThe club decided to delay the the Peru State College auditorium, January 4, at the 9:30 a.m. one-act plays, now in rehearsal, spect Peru State's new buildings college convocation. For his first until after the spring play. The at 2:30 p.m., followed by a coffee number, he played Schumann's title of the spring play has no t hour in the main lounge of the new Student Center at 4 p.m. "Scene of Childhood.'' He then been announced. Two programs were given. played "Ritual Firedance," "ImAt 5:30 p.m. Peru State w i 11 promptu in E flat" by Schubert, John Biere gave a program of host the visitors at a dinner in Chopin's "Three Etudes," and the mathematical terms. Chick Stess- the Student Center dining room, man spoke on the evolution of and at 7:3D p,m. at the basketball "Rakoczy March" by Liszt. The 26-year-old Andre de la modern jazz n;.1;sic Varre is a 1956 graduate of Vi-

Fifteen Night Classes Offered Next Semester

New Photography Course Offered

Chris Buethe Addresses Kappa Delta Pi

N.mth Annual. Schoolmen's Day Here Saturday

Dramatics Club Holds Meeting

Concert Presented At College Convocation

Bachelor of Science in Education-Stephen Clyde Banks, Stella; Russell Leon Chappell, Wood River, Ill.; Donna V. Stranathan Hardy, Glenwood, Iowa; Helen N. Maffitt, Sidney, Iowa; James Edward McGinnis, Dawson; Ernest E. Ridgeway, Falls City; Gary N. Scoggin, Beatrice; Donna Francis Thompson, Council Bluffs, Iowa; Deanna McNerny Wach, Indianola; Robert Fisher, Falls City; Grace Hannaford Russell, Peru.

Southern California a 1um n i and former students of Nebraska State Teachers College, Peru, will meet at a 12:30 p.m. luncheon, Saturday, January 28, at the Chapman Park Hotel, Los Angeles, according to Donald K. Carlile, executive secretary of the Peru Alumni association. Dr. Neal S. Gomon, Peru State president, will present a progress repo~t on Nebraska's first college. More than 500 Peruvians in the Greater Los Angeles area have been invited to attend this first Peru State-sponsored gathering in Southern California. The program will include slides of the recent building program at the 93-year-old institution. Mrs. Phyllis Halferty, 4931 North Mamie, Lakewood, Calif., is in charge of arrangements.

National Defense Education Conference Held On Campus Peru hosted the first in a series of four conferences in Nebraska on National Defense Education Jan. 9, in the Campus School lunch room. Teachers and administrators from southeast Nebraska met to discuss the latest thinking in the teaching of science. Persons participating in the program were: F. K. Alexander, Department of Education; Dr. James Rutledge, University High School, Lincoln; Marlin Languis, University of Nebraska; Pearl Schaff, Department of Education; , Raymond Huitt, Department of Education.

Clara Boatman ' Woman of the Year;' Every year the community Peru chooses a person whom the think deserves the title Peru' Woman of the Year. This year' honoree is Mrs. Clara Boatma Peru State College nurse. Mrs. Boatman's reaction upon learning of her honor was one o'f complete surprise; "I couldn't be· lieve it." Since .1953, Mrs. Boatman has been nurse for Peru State Col• lege and the Campus School an Supervisor of the Well Child Conference Clinic. Professionally, Mrs. Boatman earne¥li~.11er 'R.N. degree at the Luthera'h Hospital, Beatrice, then took graduate work at the University of Minnesota. B e fore coming to Peru, she had profes· sional experience in California hospitals and the St. Louis, Mo., Pediatric Hospital. She has been president and secretary of the County Nurses, Organization. Mrs. Boatman's duties as col· lege nurse include treating sea· sonal illnesses and the treating of injured athletes both during th ·n regular school year and the sum Y mer sessions. All the youngsters e attending the Campus School are included within her nursing jurisdiction. She is also head of the Well Child Conference Clinic conducted on the Peru State., campus by the college and the State Board of Health for the benefit of all children from six' months to six years of age, re-! gardless of residence. Mrs. Boatman, a member ~f the Peru Baptist church, is quite active in the community. She has'; two sons, Jam es, whom she put through college and who is now; a teacher in Iowa, and Thomas. who attends the Campus Hig!ii School. '


LITTLE MAN ON

CAMPlJ~

Unterbrink Makes Little All-American Second Team

Bobcats Rip Plainsmen At Lincoln 69-55

Ray Unterbrink, a Peru State senior guard from East Alton, Ill., was chosen to be on the second team of the Little All-America academic football squad, according to Lester Jordan of Southern Methodist University, coordinator of the project. The team is sponsored ~Y the College Sports Information birectors of America and the American Peoples Encyclopedia. In addition to starring on the gridiron, a player must have made a "B" average in the classroom. Unterbrink, a three-year letterman, has been chosen as a member of the All-Nebraska College Conference football team for the past two seasons.

Intramural Standings mail the then Uniore >fes-

rnia Mo.,

)een the col-

Jerome Stemper, director of intramurals at Peru, has announced standings of the 14 league teams, as of January 4th. Drifters-coached by Dick Neale ____________________ 6-0 Illini-coached by Cletus Shrout_ ___________________ 6-0 Falcons-coached by John Greene ___________________ 5-l B-Sharps-coached by Russell Workman ____________ 5-l Sheiks-coached by Roger Eshelman _______________ -4-2 Stampers-coached by Harry Whitney ______________ -4-2 Outcasts-coached by Mike Donovan ________________ 3-3 Refects-coached by Ervin Epley____________________ 3-3 Oak Hillers-coached by Bill Fitzgerald _____________ 3.3 Pee Wees-coached by Wayne Shafer_______________ 2-4 Pushovers-coached by Robert Mulder______________ l-5 Hawks-coached by Ray Boren _____________________ 0-6 Farmers-coached by Jay DuvaL ___________________ 0-6 Terrifies-coached by Neal Eickhoff_________________ 0-6 ': High· point team honors are held by the Illini, who scored 69 ts in one game. Individual top-score honors are shared by three ers-Dick Place, Illini; ,Ken .Dostal, Falcons; and Wayne Shafer, Wees-having each scored 23 points in a game. At the; end of the season, the four top teams will play in a d-0u·elimination tournament.

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The 15th annual Peru State Invitational Volley Ball Tournament for High School Girls will be held March 20, 21, and 22, acci>rding to Miss Judy Hohl, direptor of women's physical education. The tournament will be limited to 32 teams. In last year's "world series of Nebraska girl's volley ball" at Peru, the Dawson-Verdon Jet Spikers copped the first place trophy by downing Prague in the championship game. S a c r e d Heart of Falls City placed third by defeating Tobias·.

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STUDENT ACCOUNTS Auburn, Nebraska

In the opening game after the long Christmas holiday layoff, Friday, January 9, the Peru Prep Bobkittens scored a conference victory by humbling the Table Rock Tigers 74-56. The game played on the Tiger home court, saw four of the Prep cagers scoring in the double figures. Al Wheeler ripped the cords with l& counters to gain top honors for the 'Kittens, followed by Paul Heuer's 15 and Tom Boatman and Tom Majors tallying 14 each. The Bobk:ittens led the game from the o~iming minutes and were never severely pres s e d throughout the remainder of the game. Three of the Prep ·starters left the game in the fourth quarter via the foul route. The win over the Ti g er s evened up the conference record for the Prepsters at two wins and two losses.

Buettgenbach lead Peru scoring with 23 counters, Drexel Harvey and Jack Johnson finished with 17 points apiece.

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Larry Rathe of Sterling was outstanding during the tournament by hauling down most of the rebounds for Peru.

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In the championship game with Anderson, the Peruvians trailed throughout the first half. The Ravens held a halftime margin of 38 to 32 over the 'Cats. The second half was a close affair for the remainder of the game as the Peruvians behind the shooting of Drexel Harvey of Hartford, Ill., and Bob Buettgenbach kept pressure on the Ravens to the final second.

N E

Dean E. Taylor

• Gifts

By Bob Fisher

The Bobcats had advanced to the finals the night before by defeating Simpson College of Indianola, Iowa by an 80 to 69 score. Big Bob Buettgenbach of Beatrice took scoring honors for Peru as he gunned in 32 points.

H. S. Volley Ball Tourney To Be Held In March

Bobcats opened a wide gap by utilizing the talents of Bob Buettgenbach, Beatrice, M i k e Roach, Palmyra, and Larry Rathe, Sterling. The Peruvians held a commanding lead with six minutes to go in the contest when they lead 60 to 42. Buettgenbach lead the Peru attack with 20 points and Harvey and Rathe contributed 14 and 13 points respectively. Mike Roach, Tom Yopp and Jack Johnson played a fine defensive ball game.

Kittens Humble Tigers In 74-56 Victory

A physical education major, Unterbrink plans to teach at the high school level next year.

N

• Hamilton Watches

Bobcats Lose Two In Four State Meet The Peru State Bobcats met defeat for the first time in the Four State Tournament at Falls City during the Christmas holiday. The Bobcats were downed by Anderson (Ind.) College by a score of 72 to 71 in the championship round.

TAYLOR JEWELRY

• Keepsake Diamonds

Coach Jack Mcintire's Peru State Bobcats opened the 1961 Nebraska C o 11 e g e Conference race with an impressive 69 to 55 victory over Nebraska Wesleyan University at Lincoln on Jan. 7. The Cats jumped off to an early lead in the first half behind the outside shooting of Drexel Harvey, Hartford, Illinois junior. The Bobcats held a 29 to 26 advantage at the halfway mark. After the intermission, the

As a senior at Wood River, Ill., High School, Unterbrink merited such honors as High School All America guard, St. Louis P o s t Dispatch guard, all State team, all Conference team, Lineman of the Year, and Player of the Year in Southern Illinois.

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TwoPeru Students Awarded Scholarships Two $100 s<:holarships have her, York. Bernadette is a gradubeen awarded to two Peru State ate of St. Joseph's High School, Teachers College students for the York. The Endres scholarship w a s second semester, according to Fred Rothert, president of the made possible by a donation to the Peru Achievement FoundaPeru Achievement Foundation. The recipients are Duane Elli- tion by Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Enott, Verdon, who received the dres, Seattle, Washington. Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Endres s<:hol- Endres was a member of the Pearship, and Bernadette Gallag- ru State class of 1913. Annually given at the beginher, York, receiver of the Matiida ning of the spring semester, the Evans scholarship. · Elliott, a freshman at Peru Matilda Evans scholarship was State, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. provided by an anonymous donor E. V. Elliott, Verdon. The 1960 t hr o u g h a gift to the Peru graduate of Dawson-Verdon High Achievement F o u n d at i o n in ·School is majoring in pre-optom- memory of Miss Evans. _Miss Evans, a member of the class of etry at Peru State. A home economics and art ma- 1886, taught in the Omaha and jor, Miss Gallagher is the daugh- Douglas county schools for forty ter of Mr. and Mrs. John Gallag- years.

Kay Tripp Candidate For Homemaker Of Tomorrow

Home Economics Club met Monday, January 9, 6:30 p.m. The tentative date for the Annual The 1961 Betty Crocker Home- Martha Washington Tea was set. maker of Tomorrow for Peru Also, the possibility of having a Campus high school is Kay Tripp. chili feed after a game was disHaving received the highest cussed. The group was then given a score in a written examination on homemaking knowledge and at- guided tour through the Indusc titudes taken by graduating sen- trial Arts building by Mr. Trayiors in her school, she becomes a lor, industrial arts instructor. Mr. candidate for the state Home- Traylor presented each girl with maker of Tomorrow a w a r d , a souvenir displaying thirteen which will be announced in types of wood. Refreshments of cookies a n d March. punch were served in the Home Each school Homemaker of Tomorrow will receive an award Economics department. pin, representing the slogan, "Home is Where the Heart Is." The examination papers of school Homemakers of Tomorrow will be entered in competition to name the state's Homemaker of The Lutheran Club met/ JanuTomorrow. ary 4 at 6:30 p.m. in Ad. 101. A The $110,000 homemaking edu- study of the liturgy of the Lucation program sponsored by theran hymnal, led by Rev. General Mills offers a $1,500 Schmidt, was the evening's proscholarship to the first ranking gram. girl in each state and $500 scholarship to the state's second ranking participant. State winners receive an expense-paid educational tour to New York, Washington, D. C., and Williamsburg, Va. This year's first meeting of Newman Club was held in the Ad building. The topic of birth control was discussed from t h e book, 25 Questions, Non-Caiho· lies Ask. Jerry Stemper, faculty advisor, showed the club the gift to be given to Father Rydz for a Mrs. Ruth Morrison of Mar- Christmas present. The subject of election of secquette has been appointed as the ond s em e st e r officers was residence counselor of Eliza Morbrought up. It will take place in gan Hall. two weeks. The meeting w as A native of Central City, Mrs. closed with a prayer. Morrison is a former teacher in Hamilton county rural schools. During the past two years, she served as president of the Federated Woman's Club of Central City. Mrs. Morrison is interested in Max Leonard, proprietor of the gardening, flower arranging, and State Theater in Auburn, disworking with driftwood. She en- cussed "Censorship of Movies" at joys collecting books on the s e the January 4 meeting of the subjects. Wesley Fellowship. He also disMrs. Morrison's family in- cussed selecting, grading, a n d dudes two sons and two daugh- cutting of movies before distri· bu ti on to theaters. ters.

Lutheran Club Studies Hymnal Liturgy

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Newman Club Meeting

Mrs. R. Morrison Residence Counselor Of Morgan· Hall

Leonard Addresses Wesley Fellowship

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·MIE'S FAMILY FOOTWEAR

White House Youth Conference, Lincolr'

February 17th has been set for Conference in Washington: .._"t he Nebraska White House Con- promote opportunities for chi[ erence on Children and Youth dren and youth to realize the i according to Mrs. Clifford J or- full potential for a creative lifi gensen of Lincoln, Conference in freedom and dignity." Chairman. It is to be a one-day It will include a review of thi session in Lincoln sponsored by . findings of the studies made ii the Governor's White House the preparation of the State Re Youth Committee. port which was taken by th. Invitations are being extended state delegates to the Whitl to representative citizens, includ- House Conference. Recommenda! ing youth from over the state, to tions from the Washington ·Con' all youth serving agencies an d ference which are pertinent t those organizations known to be the needs of Nebraska will be re sponsoring youth activities. ported. Plans of action are to ij The program is designed with developed through workshops # a "look to the future" for the the areas of health, educatiox' By Mary Anna Gnade <:hildren and youth of Nebraska. recreation, spiritual develot I went for a noon st r o 11 The theme will be in keeping ment, juvenile problems and we. through and by the Campus with that of the White House fare, and economic opportunitie'. School-have you listened to the sounds of school? Hushed scurrythat our discarded material. ing and chatter, burst of laugh-· clothing, furniture, shoes, elel ter, bells, echoes of band reheartrical appliances, etc., are a w~ sal, and in the kindergarten room of life to these handicapped, b( The Peru Campus F.H.A. held the guinea pig and parakeets vie willing workers. ) their annual Snow Festival dance with each other in song .... The Goodwill truck will be f Because the calendar says it is January 8, 8:00 p.m. "Wonder- your town again on winter, I hug my coat to me and land By Night" wa:s this year's January 24, 1961 feel ,very out of place among the theme. Brock: Mrs. Frank Quante, Decorations included murals "unwrapped" a c ti v e g r a de home. i of snow and pine tree covered schoolers. Instead of a snow pile, Dawson: Evangelical Un it e mountains. A large cotton snow. here's a "boy pile" and a voice Brethren. · from the one underneath "do you man and two trees completed the Falls City: Mrs. Joe Lemmon. want to help me up?" Going up arrangement. home; Methodist church; Evat Elaine Gerdes was crowned the steps I meet a rope tied to gelical United Brethren/ Mr{ one boy and held by another boy. queen during the coronation Marion Wise's home; Mrs. Mab. ceremonies. Laquita Allgood was "He's my horse," and off they Herling's home; Mrs. Dorot~ canter. A quick peek-in at the made Miss "F" and Sara Adams Shefferd's home. first grade door shows that Mrs. Miss "A." The girls were escort~peru: Methodist parsonage. ' Straw believes the calendar, too. ed to the throne by their fathers. ·Union: Union Farm Supply. No sinow outdoors doesn't mean Deanna Wach, student advisor, they can't have snowflakes in- presented gifts to the girls. The side-with a snowscape mural girls and their fathers then led BILL;$ CLOTHING growing and snowmen yet to be the next dance. Mr. Chris Buethe, high school principal, reports that the winner of the Regents' Scholarship at Peru is David Gomon, son of Dr. and Mrs. Neal Gomon. Alternate is Sara Adams, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ellis Adams. The test was given Nov. 2, 1960. Mr. Buethe said that David scored in the 98th percentile of the 4,700 students taking the test. This mearrs~-that only 87 students scored higher than David.

Campus School Chatter

F.H.A. Holds Annual Snow Festival Dance

Home Ee. Club Tours I. A. Building

David Gonion Is Recipient Of Regents' Scholarship

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added. Going down the steps I meet another rope this time involved with girls-"Giddyap!" The fifth graders are very social studies conscious and for the present have the hall bulletin board nicely arranged with presidents and their ladies. The sixth grade news event board is chiefly con<:erned with South America (and just try to find very many items in the newspaper on that area!). Talk of bulletin boardsa poster at the head of the high school stairs shows a huge laughing mouth, "Want an annual at half price-turn in funniest haha picture." After a spring-y Christmas recess, all (save those with mumps) have returned to the business of making memories for the annual. The FHA girls started off with a bang-up dance "Wonderland at Night," meaning STA3.S and food. It is at this event that the Betty Crocker Future Homemak· er award is presented, Kay Tripp on the winning end this year. This January 7th evPnt was somewh'l.t oversh'l.dowed bv the fact that senior Linda Applegate and alum Bruce Eddy picked the same time to get married-following the lead of math instruct· or Foss who listen'ed to wedding bells during the holidays. Murmurs of FHA talent show are cropping up; music contest numbers are starting to echo; "I want to be in the one-act play for speech contest"-in other words, anything to avoid th at nasty term "final exams"! Yes, even as in college, so it is in high school and in this particular high school where the word exam should turn no hair whatever with "exam-testing" going on pretty constantly. And the high schoolers a re quite elated-being permitted to use the snack bar and dining room in the new college Student Center building! Mrs. Gergen's freshman English class have scheduled a tour (meaning, of course, theme afterward), but Mr. Moore's s p e e c h class "dressed" and visited the snack bar first of all. More than ever the students at Campus School will be college-oriented before entering college!

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S. C. F. Meets S.C.F. met January 4 at 6:30 p.m. in the Music Hall. The meeting was opened with a business session led by Linda Berry. Devotions were given by Karen Conrad, followed by prayer by Susan Sharp.

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Snow flakes on the window paint a pretty picture of the beauty of winter-but, the hard, cold facts of increased need of discarded materials are crystalized with the necessity of handicapped people needing work and wages to sustain their families warmly and comfortably. Many of us overlook the fact

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Valentine Tonight

PERU, NEBRASKA

Fifty-eight Students Honored In Convocation Speaking at the honors convocation, Dr. Neal S. Gomon comared American and foreign sysms of education and stated that mericans had the greatest -eduational opportunities in the world. He urged that more stu-~~;dents make the best use of their great opportunities and capabilies. Then he presented those reiving recognition for outstandg academic achievement. Fiftyght students were honored for tstanding academic achieveent for the first semester.

ill's

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Annual Speech Banquet Held At Grand Hotel-

The Speech 102 Banquet of Mr. J. D. Levitt's classes was held January 12 from 6:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. at the Grand Hotel in Nebraska City. It was a satirical affair involving different styles of speeches given after the supper. The speakers were: Dan Gellerman, Invocafion; Dick LaRoche, Address of Welcome;· Bonita Kite, Mrs. Deanna McNerny Wach, Bonnie Collins, Linda Nygaard ndianola, who has joined the and Merlin Wright, Response to ebron High School faculty, was Welcome; The Hosts, Introducaduated "with high distinc- tion of Guests; Larry Widrig, ion" (8.0 or above on a 9.0 scale). Speech of Tribute; Mike Donoeceiving degrees "with distinc- van, A Personal Experience; Tom 'on" (7.25 to 7.99) were Stephen Aitken, Prose Reading; Dick Alanks, Stella, who is now teach- len and Sharon Watton, Diag in the Kalamazoo (Mich.) logue; Bonnie Suda, Introduction ublic Schools; Alan G. Wheeler, of Main Speaker; Susan Sharp, tella, now teaching at Ther- Main Speaker; Jack Huntington opolis, Wyo., and Mrs. Helen and Lynn McCann, Awards; Meffitt, Sidney, Iowa, elementary lissa Fulkerson, Acknowledghool teacher. ments; and Phil Bateman, Farewell Speech. Twelve students were named Judi Wilson was the Toastmisthe Deans Honor Roll for their tress of the evening. rst semester work. To be eligile for "high distinction," a stuent's grade point average must e 8.0 or above (9.0 is perfect). ating "high distinction were: · Roger Eschelman, Elliott, Iowa; aren Fankhauser, Humboldt; lyce Green, Plattsmouth; Kaye cobson, Syracuse; Robert Kepr, Otoe; Julie Mayer, Auburn; om Mincer, Plattsmouth; Robert aper, Burchard; Kathleen Rhon, Palmyra; William Springer, eatrice; James Thompson, Peru; eanna McNerny Wach, Indian"distincthe first

p

Gladys Ackley, Nehawka; Core Adams, Peru; Catherine anks, Stella; Gerald Bippes, ella; Ramona Bock, Millard; yce · Carman, Tecumseh; Leona risten, Elk Creek; Rose Clan' Dawson; Sandra Craig, Peru; aron Earl, Syracuse; Rudolph chenberger, Pawnee City; mes Enright, Nebraska City; rothea Fink, Elk Creek; JoAnn erichs, Beatrice; Gene Fritch, tlantic, Iowa; Stanley Geer, iller; Linda Goodin, Humboldt; ancis Hajek, Odell; Glenn Irin, Nebraska City; Morris Keyt, ravity, Iowa; Kathleen Kop'n, Sterling; Bonnie Linderan, Peru; Ronald Leitschuck, rchard; John Masonbrink, Ila; Ray Meister, Humboldt; dith Miller, Peru; Erik Morsen, Omaha; Edwin McCart' Nebraska City; Karen Mcinre, Peru; Carol McLain, Au-

Meister and Bertram Head Pedagogia nStaff

Ray Meister and Linda Bertram the new co-editors of the Pedagogian head a 22 member staff which includes 11 new members. The staff includes: Morris Keyt, copy editor; Sandy Craig and Carolyn Reiber, layout editors; Jack Johnson, sports editor; Darrel Wolcott, business manager; Gerald Kirkendall, p er so n n e 1 manager; and Pam Yost, women's sports and intramurals. Special columnists are: Susan Sharp, Morgan Hall; G a r y Brown, Delzell Hall; Raymond Hunzeker, Majors Hall; and Ron Pethoud, exchange column. Mary Anna Gnade writes "Campus School Chatter." Reporters are: Barbara Wheeldon, Melissa Fulkerson, Jerry E. Gress, Phyllis Grube, Edna McGovern, Gary Weiss, Tom Yopp, and Gerald J enneret.

Martha Washington Tea Coming Event

Volume 56

Number 9

Enrollment Near First Semester Total Peru State's-- second semester total enrollment of 597 showed a decrease of only nine students over the Fall semester's 606. Despite the fifteen mid-year graduates in January, this represents a one-student gain over the Spring term enrollment of a year ago. The men hold an edge of 77 over the women, with 337 men and 260 women. The freshmen are the biggest class with 155, followed by the juniors with 150. There are 142 sophomores, 122 seniors, and 28 post graduates. Enrolled are residents of 24 Nebraska counties and the states of Iowa, Kansas, Massachusetts, California, Illinois, Indiana, Idaho, Michigan, New York, Wyoming, and the British colony of Hong Kong.

Gomon Addresses California Grads The organization meeting of the Southern California Peru State Alumni Association was held January 28, in the Chapman Park Hotel, Los Angeles. Main speaker at the luncheon was Dr. Neal S. Gomon, who presented and narrated colored slides showing the old and new facilities of the campus. Frank Masek, '51, San Bernardino, was elected president of · the organization. Other officers include: Miss Nona Palmer, '15, faculty member 1915-1950, Whittier, vice president, and Mrs. Evelyn B. Ridder, '45, La Puente, secretary-treasurer. The semi-annual meetings will be planned by these officers. This new group is the fifth Peru State Alumni Chapter. Others are located in Omaha, Denver, Lincoln, and San Francisco. Former faculty members present were: Miss Palmer; Mrs. Cecile Sheeley Kelly, secretary to the president, 1905-1909; Mrs. Iva Dunn Wiley, 1915-1921; Mrs. Alice Swenson Giesecke, 19431945; and Mrs. Jenevie Marsh, 1929-1946, and Mrs. !nice Dunning, former housemothers and deans of women. The oldest representative was Mr. Charles A. Tucker, 1897, Alhambra, who is actively engaged in a real estate business, a1though over ninety years of age and confined to a wheel chair.

The one hundred fifty alumni The 20th annual Martha Washington Tea at Peru State has of P.S.T.C. represented thirty-six been scheduled for T u e s d a y , Southern California communiFebruary 21, according to Mrs. ties. The guests began arriving Ina Sproul, associate professor of about 10:30 a.m. and continued home economics and faculty visiting and reminiscing about sponsor of the Peru State home good times at Peru until about 5 p.m. economics club. The tea, which features a 35pound cake made with a recipe Richard Neale, Bellevue; De- from Martha Washington's fanna Norton, Nebraska City; mous cook book, is scheduled for aron Norvell, Auburn; Linda 3 to 5 p.m. Undoubtedly, several thousand ygaard, Omaha; John Parli, Mr. R. D. Moore, Allen Nelson, umboldt; Sandra Pe a rs o n, people in Nebraska and neighboring states have been served Joan Wesolowski, and Ray Meisllevue; Joan Pelton, Beatrice; ss Pilkington, Red Oak, Iowa; from these cakes baked in the ter took a trip to Seneca, Kansas, rle Rakes, Nebraska City; Peru State home economics de- Wednesday, Febr. 1. They were judging staff in the conference rolyn Reiber, Tecumseh; Wini- partment. · speech contest. They judged one ed Sporer, Plattsmouth; Bruce act plays, prose and readings, and eenie, Nemaha; Jerry Wanoral readings of drama, informar, Ewing; Sharon Watton, Dawtive speeches, interpretation of n; Alan Wheeler, Stella; Connie p o e try , and extemporaneous ichman, Fairbury; Darrel Wolspeaking. tt, Reynolds.

Speech Students Judge In Contest

.01

Meet The

Peru Pedagogian

Dance of th

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . .

Win 'Em All, Bobcats

FEBRUARY

13,

King and Queen 1961

Of Hearts

Buettgenbach Leads NCC Averaging 20 Points a Game By Jack Johnson Bob Buettgenbach, a Beatrice High School product, is currently leading the scoring parade in the Nebraska Co 11 e g e Conference The Civil Defense Adult Edu- with 165 points in eight games. cation Program class started on "Bitzy," who wasn't a regular on the Peru campus at the begin- the 1959-60 Bobcat team, h as ning of the second semester. Dr. amazed the fans with his treDarrell Wininger and Mr. Dee mendous improvement. Gaining confidence appears to be the big Jarvis teach the course. The purpose of CDEAP is to factor that has made him the provide instruction in the tech- leader of the Bobcats, who are niques of survival in natural ca- currently in first place in the tastrophes as well as those caused NCC race with a record of seven by war. wins and one loss. Sometimes referred to as "The At the present tirrie there are fifty-six persons. enrolled in the Tree,'' the 6'8" pivot man uses a class, only fifteen per cent of swinging hook shot and a turn whom are college students. Th e around jump shot to score most course will be offered two more of his points. His· biggest n i g h t times before the end of the year. this season was against Simpson College in the Four State Tournament at Falls City when he ripped the cords for 32 points. So far this. sel)son, the Bobcats have played A;'.6' gaines, and Buettgenbach has scored 323 points, an average of 20.1 per contest. If he Three students' wives were keeps up this torrid pace, Peru presented with P.H.T. (Putting State should wrap up the NCC Hubby Through) degrees upon championship within the next the graduation of their husbands two weeks. at mid-semester. The Peru Students' Wives Club presents each member with a P.H.T. degree at the time of her husband's graduation. The degree reads: "Having put her best foot forward and unerringly demonstrated her faith in The Peru Dramatics Club will her husband's ability to achieve a Bachelor's degree, is hereby present "Arsenic and Old Lace" meritoriously granted the degree as its 1961 spring production. Professor R. D. Moore has seof Putting Hubby Through with all the rights and privileges, as lected a cast which will be headwell as the obligations and re- ed by Julie Mayer and Melissa sponsibilities thereunto apper- Fulkerson as Abby and Martha Brewster, two old maids who taining." have the nasty habit of poisoning Mrs. Ernie (Carol) Ridgeway of Omaha, Mrs. James (June) Mc- old bachelors and burying them Ginnis of Curtis, and Mrs. Dan in their cellar. Ray Meister and Allen Nelson (Marie) Fellows of Ames, Iowa, were the recipients of the de- will again provide the element of all that is evil and villanous in grees. their roles as Jonathan Brewster Mrs. Marion Battani will give a jewelry exhibition at the Feb- and Dr. Einstein. The f!Ot-too,-innocent heroine, ruary 17 meeting. Elaine Harper, will be played by Linda Nygaard; and Steve Parker will be Mortimer Brewster, the concerned hero of the play. Some minor characters have not Darrel Wolcott is the new Pe- yet been selected.

Civil Defense Draws. Fifty-six

Students' Wives Receive PHT Degrees

"Arsenic and Old Lace" Upcoming Attraction By Dramatics Club

Wolcott Edits Peruvian

ruvian editor, replacing Kathy Rhoten, who withdrew from school at the end of the first semester. "The Last Hurrah" was the This semester there are eleven title of the movie which the Vets Peruvian staff members: Darrel Club showed in the College AuWolcott, editor; Kathy Ideus, as- ditorium on Tuesday evening, sistant editor; Jeannine Ehlers, January 21. This fine movie layout editor; Linda Bertram, which starred Spencer Tracy and layout assistant; Merlin Wright, a fine supporting cast was pre. copy editor; Glen Irwin, copy . ceded by a hilarious "Woody assistant; Arlan Richardson, copy Woodpecker" cartoon. Only eight assistant; Phyllis Grube, sports people attended the movie. editor; Lois Fritz, photography editor: Gerald Kirkendall, business manager; and Steve Parker, photographer. The final deadline for the PeThe results of the Sweetheart ruvian will be met February 15. Royalty election were announced The book of 140 pages is larger at the honors convo. The royalty than last year's ·book. are: The yearbook' staff will go to Rita Grandgenett, Mary Ann Kansas City to read proof in Llewellen, Karen Mcintire, KarApril. The yearbooks will be dis- olyne Powers, and Sandra Stetributed early in May. phens. Ken Dostal, LaMarr Gibson, Robert Gibson, Larry Rathe, and Tom Yopp. The King and Queen of Hearts will be announced at the Swee!heart Dance.

Vets Club Shows Movie

Royalty Announced

Be Champs1

Bobcats


LET'S SUPPORT ACTIVITIES "Very stirring," was Drexel Harvey's comment as he left the Auditorium following the Vets Club sponsored movie "The Last Hurrah," starring Spencer Tracy. ' The Peru Vets Club has shown two movies for the benefit of college students on this campus who complain of not having anything to do around here. At the first movie, an attendance of 27 students was registered. This' small "crowd" caused the Vets to lose approximately $20. "The Last Hurrah" drew a "crowd" of eight! This means a loss of nearly $25 to this club which is trying so hard to do something for students on campus on these cold, winter evenings, so that they don't just sit around and sulk! Fellow students, I ask you, isn't it easier and cheaper to go to a Vets Club movie, than to drive clear to Auburn or Nebraska City, and pay twice the admission price to see the same quality picture that the Vets Club is showing for only 35 cents? The Vets are trying, but they need your support, so how about giving them a little of it and show your appreciation, if you have any? -Ray Meister.

WHISPERS FROM MORGAN

By Susan Sharp .second semester has brought many changes to Morgan Hall. Rooms and roommates h a v e shifted, six new girls have taken up residence, and ten have left. There· are now 135 women living in the dorm. New dorm residents are Sharon Donlan, Eagle; Nancy Frey and Mrs. Ronald (Colene) Hoffman, DuBois; Carolyn Mercer, Omaha; Linda Hagen, Springfield; and Joan Vo tr o u be k, Barneston. Those not returning this semester are Carolyn Armstrong, Deanna Donahoo, Joan Dyer, Kathy Rhoten, Kathy Kopplin, Coleen McQueen, Anna M a r i e Stoddard, Donna Francis Thompson, Ruby Smith, and Judy Pollock. Two girls received engagement rings along with the customary cold showers. They were Joan Pelton, who is engaged to Dennis Fisher, Virginia, and Darlene Critel, who is engaged to Duane Hemminger, both students on campus. Recent activities have included many parties. There were many all-night sessions to usher in the new semester. There were also a number of birthday celebrations, including those for Julie Mayer, Sandy Pearson, Karolyne Powers, Kathy Banks, Kay Parli, and Bette Coulter. Bev Leper and Bonnie Collins have a sure-fire solution for those

eager beavers who wake you up an hour early. They hang the culprit in effigy, (a stuffed teddy bear). This cold weather makes every window a little deep freeze. and many girls take advantage of the cold storage space. One problem which arises is that glass bottles often explode and small j u i c e cans burst under changing temperatures. Did you notice the screen full of orange juice on third floor. One of the girls had a long distance phone call from Walt Disney last night. It seems that Tinkerbell is ill and he needs a new fairy. Some lucky Peruvian may be on television soon.

NOTES FROM MAJORS HALL By Raymond Hunzeker Majors Hall is sponsoring the annual Sweetheart Dance February 13. The Bobby Layne Orchestra will play the "Midwest's Most Enjoyable Music" from 9 to 12 p.m. The bulletin board in the office is being used quite frequently. The most recent addition states that Darrel Wolcott has located someone's lost postage stamps. A dorm meeting was he 1 d January 30 to introduce the new residents of Majors Hall. They are Sam Blacker, Charles Dunn, Dick Terron, Don Gellerman, Larry Giesmann, Jim Hall, Dave Jackson, Len Jacobs, Frankie Kan, Bob Majors, Ed McCartney,

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks February 13, 1961 PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Ray G. Meister ----------------------------------Co-editor 'Linda· Bertrafn ----------------------------------Co-editor Morris Keyt ----------------------------------Copy Editor Sandy Craig ------------------------------~-Layout Editor Carolyn Reiber _____________________________ Layout Editor Jack Johnson --------------------------------Sports Editor Darrel Wokott --------------------------Business Manager Gerald Kirkendall ----------------------Personnel Manager Pam Yost ---------------------------------Women's Sports Gary Brown _____________________________ Columnist Delzell Susan Sharp _______________________ Columnist Morgan Hall Katherine Ideus ________________________ Columnist Library Raymond Hunzeker ______________________ Columnist Majors Ron Pethoud __________________________ Columnist Exchange Barbara Wheeldon _______________________________Reporter Melissa Fulkerson --------------------------------Reporter Jerry E. Gress -----------------------------------Reporter Phyllis Grube ------------------------------------Reporter Edna J.fcGovern ----------------------------------Reporter ~ Weiss --------------------------------------Reporter "'-""--~~----~-----------------------Reporter

-""""'------,------------------------Reporter _______ Columnist

Gene Nannen, Bill Peterson, Joe Roach, Bill Scott, Tom Sheehan, Nick Shepherd, and Ken Sims. Three past residents of Majors Hall who are enjoying their new profession are Steve Banks, Kalamazoo, Michigan; James Kemp, Wendell, Idaho; and Alan Wheeler, Thermopolis, Wyoming. A thought for the egocentric person, by Thoreau, is: "I should not talk so much about myself if there were anybody else whom I knew as well."

l eru Nel nan1 n, c uar

Library Column Do you resent others assessing your character? Are faculty personalities different from other mortals? Read The Party of Canton's, by John Aldridge to find out what happens at faculty social get-togethers. Another Nebraska author, Hal Borland, has written The Seventh Winier, a novel of early day cattle ranching and a man's fight to save his cattle, his ranch, and his. own identity. Has anyone seen these books? (Garbled requests) How To Pickle Winners, How To Stop Living and Start Worrying, The Art of Breathing, How to Draw a Straight Line, and How To Frame a House. The Man Who Would Be God, by Chevalier, is a novel of the science world and of the men who inhabit it.

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Delzell Doings Two things are adding color to Delzell Hall this semester. First, we have a few new faces roaming around the halls. Second, the rooms are being given a fresh coat of paint. Duane Hemminger was given a shower by a few of his friends in recognitiqn of his recent engagement to Darlene Critel. Glen Beran, Keith Hawxby, Jim Yelnek, Norman Catlett, Dale Pflaum, Stan Geer, and Wendell Armstrong administered the bath. The 7:50 class has often been a discussion topic on the Peru State Campus. Therefore, a survey was taken to shed light on this subject. What do you think of 7:50 classes? "Hard to hack," Russ Godberson. "I love em,'' Jim Hurst. "They're too early for Mexicans," Mike Ramirez. The men of Delzell have been given many strange nicknames already this year. The following are just a few examples: Dave (Barffy) Malmberg, Ed (The NoDoze Kid) Rohlman, Joe (Tommy Tractor) Lee, Bill (Willie LumpLump) Springer, Clinton (Bozo) Bletcher, D e n n is (Crayfish) Crawford, Richard (Little Napoleon) Shuman, Art '(Spoon) Howell, Norm (Marshal Troop) Catlett, Arlin (The Bear) Stuhr, Glen (Bubbles) Beran, and Galen (Genghis) Conn. As you roam down the halls of Delzell it is impossible to keep from hearing someone complaining about something. The following suggestions were made by the men of Delzell. 1. Serve breakfast until 9:00. 2. Sell stamps in Delzell. 3. Put a Coke machine on third floor. 4. Install showers that won't clog up. 5. Put soap racks in the showers. 6. Get some hot water in the dorm.

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Judy Miller Recital Event of January 30 Miss Judith Miller presented her senior violin recital Jan. 30, in the college auditorium. A student of Victor H. Jindra, Miss Miller was accompanied by R. T. Benford. A fugue, "Sonata in A Minor for Unaccompanied Violin" by J. S. Bach, was Miss Miller's first

selection. As her ;econd number, she chose three movements: Al· legro Moderato, CanzonettaAndante, and Allegro Vivacessimo; from P. I. Tschaikowsky's enE "Concerts in D Minor." "La Vie Eu Rose" by Lowghey was her poi! encore number. the Following the recital, a reception was held in the Music Hall, where Miss Miller was greeted by her friends.

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beats Maul Plainsmen SS-68 scored 13 points, and both played

By Jack Johnson :. ru took a giant stride toward Nebraska College Conference ant by running past Wes' 88 to 68, Saturday night, uary 4. e fired-up Bobcats, led by Yopp and Mike Roach, con'. ed on 19 of 28 fi.~ld goal at~ts for a sizzling 69.7 percent e first twenty minutes. Yopp ;six field goals in eight at. ts and Roach hit five out of iwhile leading the Bobcats to to 32 advantage at intermisreru stepped its lead to 21 .':ts at the offset of the second . Wesleyan failed to move , in 14 points of the lead after • beat coach Jack Mcintire :t with his starting lineup unarry Rathe fouled out at 2:52 e second half. The strategy . off; Rathe had scored ·nine 'ts and picked off nine re• ds. ru was led by Bob Buettgen, who scored 22 points. Mike ch and Tom Yopp each ''/

'beats Tame Tigers ·~71 In· Crete Game

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By Jack Johnson eru State, led by Larry Rathe . Bob Buettgenbach, ripped '.ne 84 to 71 February 2, at · The win gave Peru a 6-1 Jd in NCC play and the Bobto one-half game above }ney. Totals _______ 38 . e Bobcats, who led by as 'h as 15 points in the first DOANE (71) fg '', cooled off, and the Tigers Velloff -------- 9 fthe lead to five shortly after Wallace _______ 0 ):mission. However, Peru Kers'brack ____ 6 ;,aged to pull away and lead Andrews ------ 7 ·• 3 as the final buzzer sounded. Sieber --------- 4 .'. the, who played his b e s t Moore --------- 0 ' e of the season, fired in 28 Rivers --------- 1 ' ts, while Buettgenbach gave Kelley --------- 1 Lothrop _______ 0 good support with 23. )ne Vellhoff was the leading Parker ________ 1 .J getter for the Tigers with Stephens ______ 0 'oints; 19 of these were scored Totals _______ 29 ~he first half.

15

ft 6-10 2-4 1-1 1-1 2-2 1-2 0-0 0-0 O·O 0-0 0-0

f The Drifters, Illini, and Stomp2 2 1,ers are assured play-off berths 2 following their victories as the 3 twelfth round of In tr a m u r a 1 3 League competition nears completion. During the t w e 1 ft h round, a new high team score of 0 1 69 points was made by the Re0 jects, and a new individual high 0 score of 30 by Jerry Beechum of 0 the Oak Hillers was established. The Drifters met the Illini in a 14 dual for the championship. Jerry Osborne made a last second jump shot to ice the victory for the Drifters.

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Recent Wins Giye Bobcats Top Ranking As the Ped went to press, Peru's Bobcats were leading th e NCC race. Action last week brought important changes in the NCC standings. Peru's Bobcats vaulted into first place as the result of their 84-71 win over Doane and the 88-68 bombardment of Nebraska Wesleyan. The wins shot the Bobcats record to 7-1 in conference play and 11-5 for the season. Kearney, deadlocked a week earlier with Peru for the loop

lead, tasted defeat when Hastings managed a 78.-69 victory over them. The defeat slid Kearney into second place with an NCC mark of 5-2. The biggest surprise of the season has been Wayne State. Cochampions last year, the Wildcats were counted on as the team to beat in the current race. However, they now hold a record of 3-5. Chadron State turned killer as they hammered out two ten point victories over Wayne last week-end in Chadron.

Wayne Defeated Peru

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Drifters, Illini, Stompers Leading In lntramurals

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a fine floor game. Dennis Semin and Jim Munford were the only bright lights Jack Johnson, senior f r o m for the Plainsmen as they scored Loup City, Nebr., ended his Bob27 and 21 points respectively. cat career at the close of the first semester. Since transferring from Nebr. Wesleyan (68) tp the University of Nebraska in fg ft 4 the spring semester of '58, Peet ----------- 0 4-6 2 "Jumping Jack" has played a Beckman ______ 1 0-0 4 major role in the rise of Peru Ehlers --------- 2 0-0 Fredstrom _____ 0 3 State basketball teams. He was a 3-4 2 member of the __ C on f ere n c e 0-0 Major --------- 1 Gillham _______ 2 4 Championship team of 1958-59, 0-0 1 and helped the Bobcats to their 1-2 Mitchell ------- 0 Munford ______ 5 11-14 21 current number one position. 13-16 27 During this span, Jack has parSemin --------- 7 ticipated in 55 games, and totaled 32-42 68 625 points, for a 12 point averTotals _______ 18 age. In nine games this season, Peru (88) he has scored 131 points for a tp fg ft 9 14.6 average. A good marksman, 5-7 Rathe --------- 2 3-5 11 Jack has hit 41 percent of his Harvey -------- 4 2 field goal attempts, and 80 per0-0 Hayes --------- 1 Buttgenbach ___ 8 6-12 22 cent of his free throws. Jack's athletic abilities were 2 2-4 Mayo ---------- 0 not confined to basketball, as he 2-2 4 Rhodus -------- 1 2-5 18 was also a member of the Peru Roach --------- 8 Stessman ______ 1 2 State track team. He started as a 0-0 high jumper, and is currently 18 2-4 Yopp ---------- 8 holding the' school record with Totals _______ 33 22-37 88 a leap of 6 feet, 21/2 inches .. The students of Peru State showed their respect for Jack's PERU (84) fg ft f leadership when he was elected Harvey ________ 4 0-0 3 president of the Student Senate. Rathe _________ 13 4-5 4 He was also elected King of Buttgenbach ___ 10 2 3-7 Hearts in 1959. 3 1-3 Yopp ---------- 2 "JJ" is a good student, major0-2 3 Roach --------- 5 Stessman ______ 2 0-1 0 ing in physical education and biGibson ________ 0 0-1 0 ology. He plans to teach and coach after i;?raduation. 0-0 0 Witt ----------- 1 0 0-0 Mayo ---------- 1 0-0 0 Hayes --------- 0

~

!!!!!II!!!:

Jumping Jack

Kittens Nip Wolves 54-51 In a thrilling conference victory, Tuesday, January 31, the Peru Prep Bobkittens nipped the Dunbar Wolves 54-51. The contest, played on the Peru maples, was a close cage battle from start to finish with neither team pulling ahead more than seven points. Al Wheeler was high for the "Kittens" with 19 counters, followed by Tom Boatman, who garnered 12. Danny Paap w it h 21 points was the leadin.g scorer for the Wolves. The Prepsters led the Wolves at the end of the half 26-28 b u t dropped behind 41-44 at the end of the third period. The hopes dimmed for the Bobkittens when leading scorer Al Wheeler w a s lost on fouls with four minutes left in the last quarter, but the Prepsters n e v e r relinquished their le.ad.

By Jack Johnson Peru State's undisputed hold on first place in the Nebraska College Conference came to an abrupt end Saturday night, January 28, at Wayne when they fell to Wayne State 67 to 61. Peru broke early to build up an 11 to 2 advantage in the first eight minutes before Way n e found the range for their first field goal. Wayne began to click behind the amazing shooting of Dick Goede, a 5'8" freshman, who scored ten consecutive points to put. Wayne into a 21 to 18 lead with 6:24 remaining in the half. Peru's Bob Buettgenbach, then scored seven points in a three-minute span to put Peru ahead 25 to 23. Wayne led briefly again at 27 to 26 before the Bobcats surged to a 34 to 29 halftime lead. The Bobcats held on to the lead until Ron Raver hit two free throws with 8:04 remaining to give Wayne a 48 to 46 edge, a lead they never relinquished. The key to the Wayne State victory was at the free throw line as they connected on 23 of 30 attempts. Little Dave Goede led all.scorers with 28 points, while . Bob Buettgenbach and Drexel Harvey scored 18 to 14 points for the Bobcats. Peru (61) fg Rathe --------Harvey -------Buettgenbach -Roach --------Yopp ---------Stessman -----Totals

4 7 7 4 1 1

_______ 26

9-12

Wayne (67) fg Raver --------- 1 Rachow ------- 6 Coney --------- 3 Marcellus ------ 2 _________ 10 Goede Dahl ---------- 0 Totals

_______ 22

ft 1-1 0-0 4-6 1-1 3-3 0-1

ft 4-6 5-6 5-5 1-2 8-10 0-1 23-30

By Phyllis Grube Rebound tumbling, archery, volley ball, basketball, and lifesaving are all a part of the Peru State Women's physical education program under the direction of Miss Judy Hohl. The department serves 19 majors and 24 minors. The majors include: Sherrill Torring, senior; Phyllis Grube, Pat Rathe, and Jeanne Shuttlesworth, juniors; Sharon Donlan, Connie Erisman, Mary Lewellyn, Penny Thorkildson, Bonnie Vanderford, and Pam Yost, sophomores; Margie Campbell, Connie Dietl, Kathi Donahoo, Darlene Elliot, Sandy Krakow, Karen Mcintire, Lois Palmer, Jean Reiman, and Judy Wolfe, fr~'\D:neh. These mi'l:jors are taking such required P.E. courses as community recreation, Jerry Stemper; organization and administration of physical education, Jack Mcintire; folk dance and modern dance, Fran Wheeler; health education, Ruth Mathews; biology, John Christ and Albert Brady; techniques and materials for women's physical education, physical education for the elementary school, swimming, and tennis, Judy Hohl.

New equipment has been added to the department and more will soon arrive. Approximately 50 percent of the majors are members of both tp 9 the Nebraska and American As14 sociations of Health, Physical Ed18 ucation and Recreation. Several 9 of the majors subscribe to Joh9 per, the national AAHPER maga2 zine. Women's physical education 61 students will supervise t h e Southeast Nebraska Volley Ball Tournament to be at Peru on tp March 20, 21, and 22. 6 17 11 REDFERN 5 Clo:thing Co. 28 "The Store of Standard 0 Brands" Phone BB 4-3620 Auburn 67

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The semi-finals in the W.A.A. volley ball tournament were played February 1. The first game was between the team led by Judy Wolfe and the team led by Kathy Kopplin, ending with another victory for the Wolfe squad. In the second game, between the team led by Judy Wolfe and the team led by Jeannie Shuttlesworth, the tide was reversed and the Shuttlesworth s qua d won.

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Phi Alpha Theta Will Print Booklet

AROUND THE CAMPUSES

By Ron Pethoud The Midland-Congratulations to head basketball coach, My Draemel, for receiving the Omaha World-Herald's "State College Coach of the Year" award for 1961. Draemel is the first Midland coach to be named the recipient of the award which was started in 1951. The Hastings Collegian-One unique tradition in Clark Hall at Hastings College is the pinning ceremony. When one of the girls receives a fraternity pin or an engagement ring, her dorm sisters are called down to t he i r lounge to celebrate. The owner's identity remains a secret while the girls form a circle. Then the room is darkened and the pin or ring, tied to a candle with ribbon, is passed around the circle. On the second round the girl blows out the candle to claim the ring or pin. She is duly congratulated and shares a box of chocolates with her dorm sisters to celebrate.

The Wayne Stater-As a publicity stunt for Morey Hall's third Playboy Party, three hoodlums and two flappers, dressed in 1920 style, robbed a bank in Wayne. They got away with a suitcase full of money. The president of the State National Bank had given smiling consent to the whole idea. One henchman held the bankmen off with a genuine "Untouchables" toy machine gun while the other two brandished pistols. The bank presidents, secretaries, and employees were all hustled into the back room. Another henchman and his moll were scooping play money into a suitcase and one asked, "Do we want the pennies?" They mad e their escape in a shiny black limousine, leaving the bank employees doubled up with laughter.

Phi Alpha Theta and the Peru State Historical Association held their regular meeting on Monday evening, February 6. Plans to, make a permanent collection of WWII newspaper clippings were discussed. A committee was appointed to make preparations for the printing of "The Lantern." This is a booklet of selected history seminar pa pers from Peru students. Dr. Schottenhamel told of his trip to the Phi Alpha Theta American Historical Association convention in New York during the Christmas holidays. There was discussion on the forthcoming spring banquet. The possibility of showing an historical movie on campus was discussed.

S.C.F. Meets

Campus School Chatter

Student Christian Fellowship met Febr. 1 at 6:30 p.m. Connie Erisman presided over a short business meeting. Karen Pflaum opened the worship service by leading the group in several hymns. The prayer was given by Linda Berry after the prayer song. Meditations from the magazine "Secret Place" were read by Jean Ast. Speaker for the evening w a s Susan Sharp. She gave an interesting and-effective talk on "How To Solve Your Problems." The benediction was given by Connie Erisman.

Johnson Speaks At I.A. Meeting

At 8:00 p.m. on February 1, the Industrial Arts Club held a monthly meeting in the Industrial Arts building. They disThe Newman Club met in the cussed plans for attending th e Administration Building Wednes- American Industrial Arts Conday, February 1, 1961, at 6:30. vention to be held in St. Louis p.m. Father Rydz opened the on April 2. meeting with a prayer and then The· guest speaker for the evea short religious period followed. ning was Harold Johnson. He disDuring the business part of cussed writing letters of applithe meeting, a roller skating par- cation. ty was planned for February 14. This is to be an open party, and everyone is welcome to attend. The plans are to meet at Eliza The White Angels met in the Morgan Hall at 6:00 p.m. and then to go to Nebraska City for television lounge ·of Morgan Hall at 6:30 p.m., February 6, with the party. A membership drive is pres- their sponsor, Miss Freida Rowoldt. ently being undertaken by the The meeting was called to orclub. As a way of carrying out this drive, the club was divided der by the president, Marilyn Roll call was taken and into two groups. The losing group Monroe. ·n t d d will have to organize and give the m1 u es were rea an approved. the spring picnic. The Angels discussed their point system. Under this system, / the girls are given points for games attended and for extra Wesley Fellowship met Febr. 1 work for the group. After a givat 6:30 p.m. in the Methodist en number of points have been Church. The lesson was "The acquired, pins will be awarded. Third Session of the Christian Money-making projects were Religion." suggested. It was decided to hold On Fehr. 12, Miss Marguerite a dance in the Student Center Sells, sponsored by the Metho- following the Wayne game. A dist Student Movement, will be committee was set up to make the guest speaker. the arrangements. The meeting closed with the singing of the' White Angels Song.

Newman Club Meeting

White Angels Plan Dance

By Mary Anna Gnade Between semesters Mrs. Iversen's doctor recommended a hospital oxygen tent for her, so her 5th graders sampled the instruction of Mrs. Moore and Miss Edna Weare. Miss W. decided these 5th graders are smart enough to do much more advanced work. Didja notice all the extra clothing being toted to school the last day of January? JDLevitt took pix for future memories when the old school annual is dusted off. Band uniforms, pep club outfits, athletic togs, dressup for class and club pictureswhat quick-change artists! Homework for Latin involves (among other things) snipping words that are Latin derivatives from magazines and newspapers. Had you thought. how many words you use daily grew from Latin? Mrs. Adams, in d is c us s in g proper food, asked her kindergartners to name their favorite food. Twinkly-eyed Mitchell Furnas said he liked square fish. Dennis Wininger said there was no such thing as square fish. Mitchell informed him and the class there was-"Martin Heu e r' s store had square fish and they really tasted good!" (Unsolicited testimonial.)

Wesley Fellowship

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SOMETHING SPECIAL

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Lutheran Club Meets The Lutheran Club met on February 1 at 6:30 p.m. in the Administration Building. They had the largest turnout of the school year. Portions of the Bible and various teenage problems were discussed.

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Robert Majors Talks To Tri Beta Guest speaker for Tri Beta at the last monthly meeting was Robert Majors of Peru. Mr. Majors lectured on cattle breeding. He discussed methods of marketing, selection of characteristics brought about by breeding, and how to judge for the qualities desired in cattle. He explained the difference between range a n d feeding cattle. After· the talk by Mr. Majors, a short business meeting was held.

The days leading up to Val• · tine's Day are as exciting Christmas. "How do you cut heart?" "Can I take cupcakes · valentines?" "I need a n • dress/suit for the dance!" · huge valentines of the sentim tal variety on bulletin boards the halls. Voting for valent' royalty takes place the day · fore the dance. Principal B; the's wife has been conditio • the high schoolers with classes: ' social dancing-no jerk 'n' j •. -so the Valentine Dance sho' be a thing of beauty and dign' And over the years I've ticed that up through 3rd g notes written from one child another or to an adult usu carry this message whether valentine time or not, "I you, do you love me? Yes, n "Cultivation to the mind is necessary as food to the bo

Instead of a Mothers March of Dimes, Peru's Mrs. FHLarson aimed the bulk of her campaign through the children. Prizes were offered for the FHA team bringing in the most money and stopping at the greatest number of places. Total c o 11 e ct e d was $231.61 (prize winners to be announced). Elementary schoolers brought $21.76; high school basketball game collected $12.77. So far, this accounts for more than two-thirds of Peru contribution. It's all the way the ball bounces. During the Dunbar bas· ketball game, action came to a, sudden halt while all players and coaches scrambled to find Al Wheeler's contact lens which popped out in the tussle. As if . ..that wasn't enough, a wild shot clipped publicity man Bob Henry, resulting in broken glasses and a black eye. (PS: Prep won.) From athletics to scholarship: Mr. Eddy held an honors convocation for grades 2 to 6 to present awards earned in the library-reading program. Muriel DeZwarte, fourth grade, has achieved the highest honors devised for this program. Beyond pins for membership, honors, and life membership, a trophy is awarded for reading 75 books, a dictionary for 125 books, and a book of reader's choosing for 175 books. Muriel's mother says she has read over 225 books-they no longer trust her to do dishes she's

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M.E.N.C. Meets A short meeting was held by M.E.N.C., Febr. 7, 8 p.m. in the Music Hall auditorium. Galen Sudie presided. Mr. Wilson, sponsor, reminded the group of the band clinic and music clinic to be held in April. Members will help with both of these contests. The next meeting is planned for the first part of March.

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See

The Voice of the Campus of aThousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 56

Number 10

FEBRUARY 27, 1961

"Arsenic and Old Lace" March 8

I

. earsals Under "~ on "Arsenic · Old Lace" , e cast for "Arsenic and ; Lace" has been completed, rehearsals are well under :, according to Mr. Robert D. '· e, Director of the Dramatlub's spring production. ,ose with previous experi. in the Peru theater who are fin this production are: Allen ' n as Dr. Einstein, a plastic ·.·on of ill repute; Melissa ·erson as Martha Brewster, ~of the two old maids involved · nously in the plot; S t e v e 'er as Mortimer Brewster, , nly sensible one of the clan; Meister as Jonathan Brew\the black sheep of the lot; · Stessman as Officer Klein, . ly cop; and Linda Nygaard . laine Harper, the girl who · ssly pursues Mortimer. · wcomers to the boards are: Mayer as Abby Brewster, ther half of the spinster duo; Stover as the Reverend Dr. r; Ralph Plummer as Tedewster, the nut in the ter basket; and L a r r y ld and Robert Mulder as s Brophy and O'Hara. Littell as Lieutenant ey; Gerald Kirkendall as , ibbs; and Jim Yelnek as )Witherspoon complete the 1 Lois Fritz is the assistant .tor for the production. ''e play will be presented ' esday evening, March 8, . in the 'College Auditorium.

lte Angels Pledge ·. nty-one Girls :e White Angels pledged 21 . Febr. 20. A White Angel :ber sponsored each pledge. , grade average was re, d for consideration. Pledges selected from the Cherub ization and considered as ;ttendance at games and in't in the school and its actiw pledges are: Karen McinSandra Stephens, Virginia ns, Rosalie Baehr, C at h y s, Bette Coulter, Karen ConlJ oAnn Eickhoff, Carol Eynudy French, Mary Ann Gra' and Susan Hulbert. o, Elinor Keefer, B et t y :~er, Karolyne Powers, Pat 'e, Jean Reiman, Winnie ·· r, Barbara Story, Bette , and Judi Wilson.

~.uvian Staff brates Deadline . and Mrs. Stewart Lin:. d were hosts to the 1961 Pe. n staff at a dinner in their 'e February 21. The dinner ·\ in celebration of the staff's g met the final deadline e 1961 Peruvian on Febru;:15. ,··menu of salad, ham, sweet toes, pecan pie and whipped was served to Linda Ber·' Loiz Fritz, Cathy Ideus, ' Irwin, Gerald Kirkendall, ~l Wolcott, Jim Christ, · k Caverzagie, Mer 1 in 'ht, and Arlan Richardson. grapher Steve Parker was 'Je to attend because of ill1.

Peru State Band Gives Concert

Larry Rathe and Rita Grandgenett Reign at Sweetheart Dance Powers, Auburn, and Bob Gibson, Falls City; and Sandra Stephens, Peru, and LaMarr Gibson, ~alls City. •' Crown bearers were J u d y Ideus, daughter of Mrs. Catherine Ideus, and Gregg Anderson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Dwight Anderson. The ballroom was decorated with red and white streamers, the center of attraction being the 'throne-backed by a large red heart with glittering numerals and a flounce of white cheesecloth. Appropriate centerpieces

decorated the tables around the dance area.

Kappa Delta Pi And S.N.E.A. Hold Joint Meeting

Martha Washington Silver Tea Successful

Dr. Boraas Speaks At Meeting Of Sigma Tau Delta

Kappa Delta Pi and S.N.E.A. held a joint meeting Febr. 20, at 7:00 p.m. in the college auditorium. The program consisted of a panel. The topic was "What do school administrators look for in applicants for positions in their schools?" Members of the panel were: Dr. Richard Whitmore, superintendent of schools in Nebraska City; Mr. Evan Vanzant, superintendent of s ch o o 1 s in Humboldt; and Mr. Wiley Remmers, principal of Johnson high school. Sample interviews were h e 1d with Lee Christen applying for an elementary position and Jerry Wanser applying for a secondary position. A question and answer period followed.

Seniors Hold Special Convocation The graduating seniors me t Febr. 22 at convocation in the college auditorium to discuss and order graduation announcements. The seniors were also told about name cards, thank you notes, class rings, and 1pins. Orders were taken. Payments f o r these purchases are to be made to Mrs. Gnade. Lee Christen, president of the senior class, reminded the seniors to pay their senior dues.

Correction Because of an error in the last issue of the ]?ed., Jim Yelnek was omitted from the Dean's Honor Roll. He was honored with those receiving "distinction."

~

!1,

,,

Bobcats Lead NCC

By Jack Johnson The Peru State Bobcats have at least tied for the Nebraska College Conference ChampionChaperones were Dr. and Mrs. ship. With two games remaining, Darrell Wininger, Mr. and Mrs. the 'Cats can wrap up the chamA. 0. Brady, and Dr. and Mrs . pionship by winning just one of George Schottenhamel. these games. The Doane Tigers Majors Hall s p o n sore d the visited the Peru maples Febr. 23, dance. Darrel Feit and Gordon and Peru traveled to Hastings Ohnautka were the co-chairman February 24 to wind up the seaof the event. Judi Wilson was in son. STANDINGS charge of the decorations. Mike w L Pts. Op. Roach was the announcer. Peru ------- 8 2 761 641 Music was provided by Bobby Kearney 755 754 --- 6 4 Layne's band as the king a n d Chadron 728 711 --- 6 4 queen led the coronation dance. Wesleyan -- 5 5 714 755 Wayne ----- 5 6 765 761 Hastings --- 3 7 678 703 Doane ______ 3 8 824 900

The annual Sweetheart Dance was held Monday, February 13, in the Student Center. Highlight of the evening was the ccronation of the King and Queen of Hearts, Larry Rathe, Sterling and Rita Grandgenett, B e 11 e vu e. Queen Rita was. presented.with a bouquet of red roses and a crown trimmed with rosebuds and lilies of the valley. Other attendants were Mary Ann Lewellyn, Bellevue, a n d'" Ken Dostal, Bellevue; Karen McIntyre, Peru, and Tom Yopp, East Alton, Illinois; Karolyne

By Sandy Craig The annual Martha Washington Silver Tea was held Tuesday, February 21, in the home economics suite of the C a mp us School. Sixty-five persons were served cake made from Martha Washington's original recipe. In the summer of 1941, Miss Edna Weare, now professor emeritus of home economics at Peru State, and five students attended a national home economics convention in Washington, D. C. While there, they vi'sited Mount Vernon, home of George and Martha Washington. In the museum, they saw Martha's recipe for "a great cake." They copied it and brought it back as a souvenir. In order to try the recipe, they planned a tea. The cake, weighing 35 pounds, and the tea have become a tradition. Bernadette Gallagher and Mary Jarvis headed the decoration committee. To permit ease in serving, a box cover was decorated in icing as a replica of Mount Vernon. Jeannine Ehlers, home economics club_ president, and Mrs. Sproul, sponsor, termed the tea a success.

The Peru State Band Ensemble, under the direction of Gilbert E. Wilson, presented .the program in the auditorium February 12, 1961, at 3:00 p.m. The program began with "Themes and Moods" from Quo Vadis. "Soliloquy for Trumpet" was next featuring Don Johnson accompanied by the band. The complete band then played "Second Symphony for Band" and "Nocturne." The saxophone quartet, consisting of Gaylin Sudik, Carol Sudik, Wayne Wallace, and Thomas Sheehan, played "SaxSoliloquy" with band accompaniment. The entire ensemble the n played "Tango for Band." The band accompanied the trumpet trio, 1,.Don Johnson, Rob.ert Kaiser, and David O'Dell, in "Trumpets Wild." The program closed with the complete band playing "Parade of the ·Charioteers" from "Ben Hur."

Sigma Tau Delta met at the home of Mrs. Delores Spilker February 13 at 8:00 p.m. Mrs. Spilker and Mrs. Connie Wickman served refreshments of Valentine cake, nuts and coffee to members and guests. After a social period, Rose Clancy called the meeting to order. Plans for the club's publication "Sifting Sands" were discussed. Members were reminded of the February 16 deadline for original writings. Mrs. Wickham opened the program with a review of the book, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, by R. L. Stevenson. She then introduced the guest speaker, Dr. Boraas. His topic was "The Psychological Aspects of the Book, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde." He a 1 s o spoke of the relatedness of literature and psychology. A question and answer period followed.

Second Civil Defense Program Begins March 9 will be- the starting day for the second"six-week Civil Defense Adult Education Program. Classes will be held in the Administration Building every Thursday at 7:00 p.m. This course is open to everyone; there is no charge; there are no tests; and a certificate is given on its completion.

W.A.A. Attends Sports Day Several members of W.A.A. attended a "Sports Day" at the University of Nebraska Febr. 11. Badminton, ping-pong, and bowling were the chief games of the day. Jean Reiman's team won the final game of the volley ball tournament. Basketball w a s played February 15 and will be continued for a few more meetings.

Student Wives View Jewelry Demonstration P.S.T.C.'s student wives met in the T. J. Majors Training School home ec. room Febr. 16. Eighteen members and one guest we r e present. A memoriam was sent to Red Oak, Iowa for Ted Kirby's father, George M. Kirby. The club decdied to help in the local Red Cross drive, which is headed by Mrs. F. H. Larson. Interested wives have enrolled in the March and April Civil Defense cours~. A Sarah Coventry jewelry demonstration was given by Mrs. Marion Battani. The club w i 11 receive a commission on orders taken. Cake and coffee were served by Mrs. Roger Killion, Mrs. Larry Curnes, and Mrs. Jerry George;


has just returned from a siege of them. Judi Wilson and Glenda Seger have just begun the battle, and J oAnne Hilfiker is back after a mistaken diagnosis. Only two birthday celebrations have taken place lately. Those were for Donna Hoemann an d Darlene Elliott. At a dorm meeting . it was was brought up that the girls seem to be "bothering" the workmen who are tearing down Mount Vernon. Seems to me that most fellow~'· don't mind that kind of bother. It might be "lifting" to know that the elevator is again in working condition.

Posed in front of 'the new A. V. Larson Industrial Arts building are·: Gien Beran, Jim Christ, Francis Hajek, Dareld Douglas·, Dr. ·Owen Harlan, Ernest Glockel, Dale Taylor, and Jack Hardy. The ·boys are using everything from the simplest box cameras up, and the ·picture was shot wHh a press camera. Developing and printing were done by Jim Christ. The photography course taught by Dr. Harlan is wide in scope, there is excellent new equipment in 'the new dark room. The ·course covers shooting pictureS', developing film, contact printing, en:Iarg~ng, ~d composition. Pictures are made by natural light and ar. tificial light. The class is working in black and white now, but color work will coirie later.

NOTES FROM MAJORS HALL By Raymond Hunzeker

and

then discovered that the song didn't even have words. AROUND THE . CAMPUSES By Ron Pethoud

The Her~es-Students fr o m Dana have two interesting nights. One is known as " G r i p e '·Night." This is their chance to ·make known their complaints. "Gripe petitions" must have ten ·signatures; one signer was desig··nated ·as spokesman. Th es e '"gripes" are then turned over to ·:a BMOC for screening. Then on ''Gripe Night," the views are brought out. This proves to be enlightening. .. · 'The 6ther night is "Reverse Night.'' This occasion is much i·like a Sadie Hawkins' day. The girls are able to ask their guys .for a date. The best part of the whole thing is that the gal picks ·UP the tab. The Eagle-Things probably seemed a trifle embarrassing to students from Chadron. During a recent basketball game, it was discovered that a large percentage of the students didn't even know when their school fight · song was being played; t h e y didll't even know what it was. If this wasn't bad enough, it was

The Mirror-Student teachers planning to teach in an elementary school in Colorado no longer have to worry about class discipline. That problem has been solved by the Colorado legislature. The Colorado House has given approval to a bill which permits spanking in Colorado's public schools.

WHISPERS FROM MORGAN By Susan Sharp

Mass evacuation again t o o k place on the week-end of the 17th. Neither ice, nor snow ... can keep the girls here on weekends. Third floor seems to have a thriving new business concern. Bette Coulter is the creator of many a "charming coiffure" for the girls. St. Valentine's Day had a special significance for Linda Bertram. She received an engagement ring from Jerry Bell and a cold shower from her friends.

Larry Rathe of Majors H a 11 was c~owned King at the annual Sweetheart Dance. Congratula. tions Larry! Committees from Majors Hall organized the event. Darrell Feit was in charge of decorations and Roger Eshelman reorganized the Union with his "clean up men." The addition of new chairs in the television lounge was a happy surprise. Fred Blake of Omaha is a new member of the dormitory. Fred studied last semester at the University of Madrid, Spain. Fred is majoring in biology at Peru. According to Fred, the people of Spain were more friendly than those of England, France, a n d Italy. The dorm is buzzing with the speculation that one of its members will be married soon. Mrs. Longfellow replaced Mrs. Donovan from Tuesday through Thursday this past week. We are pretty sure spring has arrived; Mrs. Donovan returned Thursday with a new spring hat! Gary Stover and Larry Whitfield presented their pantomime act of "The Yellow Rose of Texas" and "The Great Pretender" for the Campus High School. Their act was part of the program for the Valentines Dance February 13. Howard Engberg spent the week-end with his parents in Kansas City, Missouri.

Mumps is the latest ailment of the Morgan girls. Marilyn Glenn

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks February 27, 1961 PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Ray G. Meister ----------------------------------Co-editor Linda Bertram ----------------------------------Co-editor Morris Keyt ----------------------------------Copy Editor Sandy Craig --------------------------------Layout Editor Carolyn Reiber -----------------------------Layout Editor Jack Johnson --------------------------------Sports Editor Darrel Wolcott --------------------------Business Manager Gerald Kirkendall ______________________ Personnel Manager Pam Yost ---------------------------------Women's Sports Gary Brown -----------------------------Columnist Delzell Susan Sharp -----------------------Columnist Morgan Hall Catherine Ideus _________________________ Columnist Library Raymond Hunzeker ______________________ Columnist Majors Ron Pethoud --------------------------Columnist Exchange Barbara Wheeldon -------------------------------Reporter Melissa Fulkerson --------------------------------Reporter Jerry E. Gress -----------------------------------Reporter Phyllis Grube ------------------------------------Reporter Edria McGovern ----------------------------------Reporter Gary Weiss --------------------------------------Reporter Tom Yopp ---------------------------------------Reporter Gerald Jeanneret ___ ----------- ___________________ Reporter Mary Anna Gnade -----------------------------Columnist ~m -·-----------------------------Sponsor

Delzell Doings By Gary L. Brown Every room on third floor of Delzell Hall has been given a fresh coat of paint. Tli.e rooms on second floor are presently being painted, the first floor will be painted next. Bridge is becoming the spare time and week-end game in Delzell. Charles Schott, Dale Rocchietti, Larry Widrig, Dennis Peterson, Dick Brown, and Gary Brown have been seen playing an occasional rubber. Ron Pethoud received quite a shock the other night, as he was struck on the head by a mattress dropped from third floor. Don Mach, who was talking to Ron at the time, was missed completely by the falling mattress. There are quite a few loyal supporters of the Peru Bobcats here on campus. About twenty of these loyal supporters attended the Bobcats' game at Kearney. Mike Ramirez, Larry Rebuck, Richard Shuman, Ken Rhodus, Rex Rhodes, and Gary Brown were Peru's representatives at the game. irom Delze:;. T'nanks for

NEBRASKA CITY COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO.

Library Column By Catherine !deus Go North, Young Man, by Gordon Stoddard, tells of the author's first four years as a homesteader on Alaska's Kenai Peninsula. With wit made sharp by frontier life, he presents his experiences exactly as they happened. Suspense, color and inspiration are found in Profiles in Courage,

by President John F. Kenn These are dramatic personals·:, ies of a handful of Ameri · who, at crucial moments in .. tory, revealed a special sort ; greatness. The Unfinished Country, Max Lerner, is composed of';, lections from his daily col in the New York Post. They x rearranged under dramatic tions and deal with a variety'; subjects.

PERU MARKET Rex Rains Groceries Meats Fruits and Vegetables

Free Delivery Tuesday and Friday Phone TR 2-4351

McINTIRE'S GARAGE and STAND ARD SERVICE GASOLINE AND AUTO REPAIR Phone TR 2-2791

Peru, Nebr.

.BANK OF PERU

"

PHONE TR 2-2331

Member F.D.I.C. INVITES YOUR BUSINESS CARROLL LEWIS, President

JOHN L. LEWIS, Vice Pres. & Cashier


hots of a Championship Season

KS

oach drives for iwo points as Wesleyan's Fredsirom looks helpless

A Summary of the Season By Jack The annual Alumni-Varsity me opened the 1960-61 basket11 season on November 28. The arsity outran the old timers 93The following week Peru aveled to Tarkio College and ; maha University. The Bobcats .eat the Owls from Tarkio 83 to 9, and stopped Omaha UniverJty 75 to 64.

'2.

Tarkio Owls On December 8, the Tarkio wls visited the Peru maples and robably wish they hadn't, since e Bobcats shellacked them 109

64.

Johnson

Tennessee A. & I. The Mcintiremen played host to the number one team in the N.A.I.A., Tennessee A. & I., on December 10. Peru, led by Bob Buettgenbach and Jack Johnson, who scored 27 to 21 points respectively, made a good showing against the Tigers. After falling behind in the first quarter, the Bobcats played the Tigers even the rest of t~e game, but 1 o s t 78 to 66. Kansas Trip A trip through Kansas, on December 14 and 15, proved disas-

trous for the Bobcats. December 14, Emporia State outlasted Peru 76 to 67. The following night, hot shooting St. Benedicts beat the Peruvians 87 to 74. Four Siaie Tournament In the Four State Tournament at Falls City, Peru shook their three game losing streak by whipping Simpson College 80 to 69. Bob Buettgenbach scoretl 32 points. In the finals of the tournament, December 30, Peru met a very fine team from Indiana, (Anderson College), and lost a thriller 71 to 72. This was the first time in four years Peru has lost this tournament. Nebraska Wesleyan With the Bobcats record standing at four wins and four losses, Nebraska Co 11 e g e Conference play began in Lincoln, January 7, against Nebraska Wesleyan University. Peru, playing a fine defensive game, won 69 to 55. This was.the beginning of Peru's drive for the conference championship. Chadron The following week-end, January 13 and 14, Peru traveled to Chadron and humiliated the Eagles by beating them twice on their home court by scores of 75 to 60 and 80 to 62. Hastings and Kearney January 20 and 21 saw the Hastings College Broncos and the

Harvey and BueUgenbach scramble for rebound against Tenn. A. & I. Kearney Antelopes fall to the~~Larry Rathe played the best Bobcats. at Peru. The Bobcats ¡ game of his college career as he baffled the Broncos 68-54 while led the Bobcats with 28 points, playing their best defensive game Wesleyan Plainsmen of the year. Kearney, who had Nebraska Wesleyan traveled to been pressing Peru for the N.C.C. Peru February 11, in hopes of lead collapsed in the second half avenging an earlier loss, but Mcand was clobbered 89 to 66. Intire's crew had other ideas and Wayne they thumped the Plainsmen 88 Jack Mcintire's crew was now to 68. This victory left the 'Cats leading the conference with a on top of the N.C.C. race with a record of five wins and no losses. record of seven wins and one loss. However, disaster struck on JanWayne Again uary 28, at Wayne, as the WildThe big test for the Peruvians cats stopped the touted Bobcats 67 to 61. Wayne had beaten Peru came on February 11, as their in five successive games since the old nemesis, the Wayne Wildcats 1957-58 season. Diek Goede, a visited the Peru hardwoods. This 5'8" freshman stafting his first time the Bobcats tamed the varsity game, was the "Little Wildcats by a score of 76 to 66. Big Thorn" in Peru's side as he This ended Wayne's five game winning streak over the 'Cats-, scored 28 points.

Doane The Mcintiremen got back on the winning trail February 2, as they traveled to Crete and easily defeated Doane College 84 to 71.

After the victory over Wayne, Peru's record stood at eight wins and one loss, just one game away from clinching the N.C.C. championship.


Margurite Sells Lectures At

Wesley Fellowship Wesley Fellowship met Sunday, Febr. 12, in the Methodist church. This was a special meeting to hear Margurite Sells lecture about the church and its vast opportunities. She .told of her experiences while teaching in a southern high school and of the opportunities open ,to individuals interested in summer workshops. The meeting for Febr. 15 was postponed and a "fun night" was held February 22.

Newman Club Holds Skating Party The Newman Club sponsored a roller skating party at Nebraska City, Febr. 14. The Newman Club invited guests, raising the attendance to 41. · The party started about 7:00 p.m., and ended around. 9:30. Although the celebrants had a few sore spots the next day, there didn't seem to be any broken bones. Father Rydz and Jerome Stemper were the sponsors.

Angels Meet

Rita Grandgenett and Larry Rathe Were King and Queen of Hearts QUEEN RITA Miss Rita Grandgenett w a s crowned Queen of Hearts at the Sweetheart D,ance, Febr. 13. Rita, the 19-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Grandgenett, is a graduate of Bellevue High School. · Rita is a sophomore majoring in ·elementary education. She is planning to teach next year after she receives her two-year certificate this summer. She would like to teach in a lower elementary grade somewhere in t h e Middle West. She has little tinie for hobbies or outside interests, but she does take time out to follow the team. She particularly en~oys basket" ball and swimming. Rita is secretary of the White Angels, a member of the Newman Club, and the Student Senate, and she participates in W.A.A. She was also an attendant to the Homecoming Queen this year. Rita said, "I was very surprised to be Queen of Hearts and it made me very happy. I wish every girl could have this experience." KING LARRY Larry, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Rathe of Sterling, Nebr., was crowned King at the annual Sweetheart Dance, which w as held Febr. 13th at the Student Center. Larry, a junior, is majoring iii physical education, and he , is working toward a minor in biology. Rathe lettered last year in basketball and is currently working on his second letter in t h a t sport. This year Rathe is a memb~r of the starting five. In addition to his athletic activities, Larry is also a member of the "P" Club, Blue Devils, and the Lutheran Club. KAROL YNE POWERS Miss Karolyne Powers is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. , A. Reed of Auburn, Nebraska. Karolyne is a freshman majoring in home economics. She is a member of White Angels, W.A.A. i!nd the Home Economics Club.

BOB GIBSON Mr. Bob Gibson is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Otto L. Gibson of Falls City, Nebraska. Bob is a junior majoring in biology and physical education. He is a member of Tri-Beta, Blue Devils, and the "P" Club. SANDY STEPHENS Miss Sandy Stephens is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Stephens of Peru, Nebraska. Sandy is a junior majoring in elementary education. She is a member of Dramatics, W hi t e Angels, and W.A.A. KEN DOSTAL Mr. Ken Dostal is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Dostal of Scribner, Nebraska. Ken is a junior majoring in physical educatoin. He is a member of Tri-Beta, Blue Devils, and is president of the Newman Club. LaMARR GIBSON Mr. LaMarr Gibson is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Otto L. Gibson of Falls City, Nebraska. LaMarr is a senior majoring in physical education and social studies. He is a member of the "P" Club and Blue Devils. MARY ANN LEWELLYN Miss Mary Ann Lewellyn is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. P. L. Lewellyn of Bellevue, Nebraska. Mary is a sophomore majoring in physical education. She is a member of W.A., Pep Club, W.A.A., and is a dorm counselor. TOM YOPP Mr. Tom Yopp is the son of Mrs. Helen Fullagar of.East Alton, Illinois. Tom is a second semester sophomore majoring in math and physics. He is a member of the "P" Club and BI u e Devils. KAREN McINTIRE Miss Karen Mcintire is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs., Jack Mcintire of Peru, Nebraska. Karen is a freshman majoring in physical education and ho me economics. She is a member of White Angels, W.A.A., and the Home Economics Club.

The White Angels met in the television lounge of Eliza Morgan Hall at 6:00 p.m., February 20, with their sponsor, Miss Freida Rowoldt. The meeting was called to order by the president, Marilyn Monroe. Roll call was taken and minutes were read and approved. Members Were assigned to rope· off a White Angels section and make a welcome sign for the next home game. The Angels discussed sponsoring a closed week-end. An order for sweatshirts was taken; and the girls were reminded of dues. Pledges were assigned to present a skit at the next meeting. Carol Eynon and Bette Painter were appointed chairmen of the group. The meeting ended with th e singing of the White Angel song.

·Epsilon Pi Tau Amends Constitution Epsilon Pi Tau, honorary industrial arts fraternity, met at 8 p.m. Wednesday, February 8, in the Industrial Arts Building. They amended their constitution by reinterpreting the grading system, thus making the required GPA in IA courses 6.40 for entry into the fraternity. They also made plans for the Joint Initiation to be held with Wayne here March 17 and 18. ·" Roger Eshelman requests that anyone having any suggestions for campus activities or entertainment for the Joint Initiation Banquet contact him. His room is 214 at Majors Hall.

S.C.F. Meets S.C.F. met Wednesday, February 15, in the Music Hall Auditorium. The meeting opened with the discussion of a skating party and talent night to be held March 1. Sharylin Vrtiska led the songs, which were followed by devotions by Karen Fankhauser and Eugene Wright. Connie Erisman, moderator, introduced the following people who read poems: Jean Reiman, Carol McLain, Glenn Irwin, Elaine Hinton, Linda Beery, Ellen Hunzeker, Patsy Melcher, Kay Parli, and Carolyn Parli. In closing, Connie Erisman read "Jesus Christ and Me" followed with the benediction.

L. B. and Ruth Mathews, who will retire May 31, look over p for their retirement home on their 49 scenic acres overlooking; Missouri River near Peru.

After a total of 76 years teaching service in Nebraska and 53 years at Nebraska State Teachers College, Peru, L. B. and Ruth M,athews will retire May 31. The Mathews, natives of Blue Springs and graduates of Peru when it was a Normal School, returned to Peru in 1927 to begin their long tenure at their alma mater. In announcing the . Mathews' retirement, Dr. Neal 's. Gomon, president of Peru State, said: "L. B. and Ruth Mathews have been instrumental in developing and maintaining a sound educational program for the young people served by the College. They have been capable, devoted, dedicated and loyal teachers. Their impact on the lives of hundreds of young men and women is reflected daily in classrooms across the state and nation." Mr. Mathews' duties at the college have ranged from Campus School principal and supervisor of science, registrar, director of the placement bureau, to his present position as associate professor of physics. Mrs. Mathews first served Peru State during the 1927-28 school year as professor of rural education. She returned to teaching in 1943 to "substitute for a few weeks" during the war emergency. Her present title is assistant professor of health education. The Mathews are graduates of the University of N e b r as k a where both were elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Mr. Mathews holds his M.A. degree from Columbia University and Mrs. Mathews has completed graduate study in health education at the University of Nebraska, and was elected to the Society of Sigma Xi. The 1951 Peruvian, co 11 e g e yearbook, saluted the Mathews' devotion to Peru State, in dedicating the yearbook to them. The dedication, in part, reads: "Both Mr. and Mrs. Mathews have demonstrated their ability to make lasting friendships with students and have gained the respect and admiration of those with whom they have worked." Mr.. and Mrs. Mathews each taught two years in rural Gage county schools. While at Peru Normal, Mr. Mathews served as a substitute science teacher at Syracuse during the last quarter of 1914-15, and completed his work toward his diploma at Peru the following summer. He taught science at David City from 1915 until 1918, when he resigned to serve with the armed forces in France. Upon discharge from the service in 1919 and completion of his degree from the University, he was prin-

cipal at David City from 1921 L. B. was Columbus High Sc~ principal for five years prio joining the Peru State facul Mrs. Mathews, the former . Vernon, taught two 'years in;;; Blue Springs elementary sch: and in high schools in Sh# Table Rock, Stromsburg ' Friend, before her marriag . L. B. in 1925. , From 1944-1950 Mrs. Mat~ served as College Health· C dinator In seven southeastern;· braska counties under a pro subsidized by the W. K. Ke! Foundation, Battle Creek, As a, result of the project, .; Campus School Lunch prd was established and was use a pilot school for similar pro' in schools in southeast Nebra' Through Mrs. Mathews' lea1° ship and the cooperation of.; State Department of Health.~· Peru community, and the , lege, the Well Child Confer" was established at Peru. In f tinuous operation for 13 y~ the project serves children { six months to six years of a{ Mrs. Mathews was honore~ the Peru community in bet named "Woman of the Year"' the Peru Pointer in 1943. · Mathews was named "Man of'.( Year" in 1958. ,, ; Both L. B. and Ruth Math. are members of the National ucation Association and th~ . · braska State Education Asso tion. Mr. Mathews served on town board of Peru and Mayor for the years 1941 1942. His memberships incl Nebraska Academy of Sci and Nebraska School Ma Club. He is a past Lieute Governor of Kiwanis. Mrs. Mathews holds mem ships in the P.E.O., Nebr Public Health Association, which she serves as membe the Health Education Cammi She is a state director of Nebraska Tuberculosis Ass tion and a trustee of the Ne ka Crippled Children's Soci Retirement from teaching the Mathews will. make it p ble for them to work toward filling a dream of several y standing. Three years ago t purchased a 49-acre scenic on the bluffs overlooking Missouri River. They will be to devote more time to buil a retirement home and to c ing beauty on the "Hills of Pe They also hope their ref ment will afford great oppor ity to see their three grands the sons of Dr. and Mrs. Max Mathews of Murray Hill, N. Dr. Mathews is with the Aco tics Research Division of Bell Laboratories.


'}Ball-hawking Backcourt Men Bobcats Whip Wayne 76-66 'eru ';This season Jack Mclntire's State Bobcats have w o n elve of eighteen basketball , mes, and eight of ten in the ebraska College Conference. , e 'Cats currently need only

LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS

scored 28 points for the Wildcats. Yopp was assigned to guard Goede February 11, and he held him to five points as Peru won the game 76-66. Mike Roacl;,l., a 5'10" guard from Palmyra, Nebraska, has also been a nemesis to Peru's foes. In eighteen games this sea-

By Jack Johnson Scoring flurries by g u a rd s Mike Roach, and Tom Yopp, plus the 22-point production by Bob Buettgenbach powered the Peru State Bobcats to a 76-66 victory over the Wayne State Wildcats at Peru, Saturday night, Febr. 11. The victory enabled the Peruvians to creep__ within one victory of clinching af"least a share of the Nebraska College Conference championship. Peru broke into an early lead, only to see Wayne storm back into command at 18-17 with 6:10 remaining in the first half. Bobcat guard Tom Yopp then took charge and scored eight points in the next two minutes to give the 'Cats a comfortable margin. Drexel Harvey, a 6'3" forward picked off nine rebounds in the first twenty minutes to aid the Bobcats in their 33-25 intermission lead. e win in order to clinch the F o 11 o win g intermission, it .C.C. championship. One reason looked as if Jack Mclntire's crew ru has had such success this might blow the game wide open Mike Roach son is because of a pair of as they spurted to a 41 to 26 lead ssy guards, Tom Yopp and in the first three minutes. Howson, Mike has scored 227 points ike Roach. ever, Wayne continued to peck and has hit 45.5 per cent of his Tom Yopp, a 6'1'' sophomore field goal attempts. In N.C.C. away at that lead, and with 4:08 ard from Alton, Illinois, has play, Roach has scored 132 points remaining in the contest the n a nemesis to every team in ten games while hitting 50 Wildcats had fought to a mere, Peruvians have faced th i s per cent of his field goal at- 57-61 deficit. At that point Mike Roach, the , ason. Opposing players respect tempts. other half of Peru's classy guard , is lad,, for his shooting ability Because of his great speed and , d for his knack of stealing the combination, hit seven consecuquick thinking, Mike is a good tive points in one minute and II. ball hawk. Against Wayne, Febiin eighteen games this season, ruary 11, he stole the ball three thirty-six seconds to put Peru ; m has scorched the nets for a straight times and scored seven safely out in front 68-57. From .4 field goal percentage, which points in one minute and thirty- there on the Bobcats capitalized the best on the team. In the one seconds to break the game on fouling by the frantic Wildi:braska conference games his wide open. Mike's jumping abil- cats to complete the 76-66 win ' . ld goal percentage is a sizzling ity amazes the fans, becamie and to avenge their only conference loss of the season. '.6. many times he has jumped abo~e Bob Buettgenbach topped Peru I.After seeing these figures, one taller opponents to grab re• in scoring with 22 points but he ' ds it hard to believe that his bounds. was followed closely by M i k e st asset as a "roundball" playMike, a junior, has shown Roach who counted 21. Tom ., ,is his defense. Tom's finesse steady improvement during the Yopp continued his amazing '. d quick hands enable him to current season and has developed shooting with four for four from eal the ball many times during into Peru's floor general. the field. In the last two games ch, game. Yopp's great defenPeru fans are in hopes th at he has made 12 of 13 field goal e ability was proven against attempts. Ron Marcellus paced e Wayne Wildcats at Peru, Mike, Tom, and the rest of the ,~bruary 11. On January 28, Bobcats will continue their fine Wayne with 18 points. , ayne upset Peru at Wayne, as play and earn a berth in N.A.I.A. WAYNE (66) tp fg ft )ck Goede, a 5'8" freshman tournament in Kansas City. 13 Raver --------- 5 3-5 10 0-0 Ra chow ------- 5 0 0-0 Taylor -------- 0 16 4-5 Coney --------- 6 2 0-0 Dahl ---------- 1 1-1 5 Goede --------- 2 2-2 18 Marcellus ------ 8 Coin Operated - Automatic Laundry 0 0-0 Peneda -------- 0 2 0-0 Torgerson ----- 1 OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY

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Totals _______ 28 fg PERU (76) Rathe --------- 5 Gibson -------- 0 Harvey -------- 4 Buettgenbach -- 5 Mayo ---------- 1 Roach --------- 6 Stessman ------ 1 Yopp ---------- 4

10-13 ft 1-1 0-0 2-2 12-19

Totals _______ 26

24-32

o-a

9-10 0-0 0-0

Peru State's championship ex- cle and hooked, the ball reboundpress suffered a derailment Feb- ed off the boards and Nelson ruary 16 as they lost a heart- Hinkle tapped it up and in as the breaking 72 to 71 decision to buzzer sounded to give Kearney , Kearney State Teachers College the o~'point squeaker. at Kearney. A tip-in by Nelson Diminutive George Haun,paci:d Hinkle as the final buzzer sounded gave the 'Lepers the victory the winners with 20 points, whiie Jim Mayo, starting his first game . and kept the Peru cagers from for the Bobcats, hit 14 to lead clinching their seventh Nebraska College Conference basketball Peru. title. PERU (71) fg ft ,,'''tp As tight as last year's Easter J-1 '9 Rathe --------- 4 suit, the game was tied 11 times 2-6 ' 10 Harvey -------- 4 and the lead changed hands 15 4c9 , , 14 --------- 5 times. Peru's Bobcats held the Mayo Buettgenbach __ 1 8-11 ' 10 only commanding lead of the 0-2 ,,J2 Roach --------6 first half when they broke to a Stessman ______ 1 2-2 .4 22 to 16 advantage with 10 min2~2' 12 Yopp ---------5 utes remaining. Kearney stormed ~

back before the intermission and held a slim 33 to 31 lead at halftime.

In the first five minutes of the hectic second half, K e a r n e y surged into the largest lead of the, game at 44 to 37. Peru fought back to tie the game at 44 all in the next two minutes, and from that point on, there was never more than a three point difference in the score.

76

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KEARNEY (72) fg ft Benson -------- 5 2-5' Mason --------- 5 4-6 Hinkle -------- 5 1-2 Haun ---------- 8 4-6 Hohnbaum ---- 0 0-1 Dicke --------- 1 1-3 Williams ------ 2 0-1 Boss ---------- 0 0-0 Johnson ------- 2 0-0 Staehr --------- 0 0-1 With six seconds to go an d Boucher ------- 2 0-0 with Peru leading 71 to 70, Kearney gained possession of the ball Totals _______ 30 12-26 66 and called time. The Antelopes, tp following the rest period, to o k 11 the ball out of bounds in their 0 defensive court. Guard George Barber Shop 10 Haun received the pass, dribbled Haircut, $1.25 22 twice and fired to Eldon Benson Peru, Nebr. 2 in the offensive court. Benson 21 drove around the free-throw cir2 8

The Peru Prep volley ball team defeated Elk Creek in the Peru College Gym February 17. Peru won the first set by a score of 10-6. However, Elk Creek bounced back to take the second set 15-2. Peru Prep rallied again in the third set and defeated Elk Creek 10-8 to win the match. Peru Prep will travel to Brownville Febr. 27 for Nemaha Valley Conference Tournament.

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Peru Students

Campus School Chatter

On Honor Roll

By Mary Anna Gnade Because of the 24 hour s 1 i c k winter, the after-game d a n c e was called off depriving the senior class of anticipated funds. Now begins the season when the HS seniors dream up all manner of means to raise money for the last of school TRIP. They are now accepting orders AND money for sweatshirts imprinted with a bobkitten and "Peru Prep.' The ice also involved third grader Mary Rodgers in a threecar accident near the 6-mile corner, but she missed only one day of school. When the frost came out of the ground, sure enough small-sized tracks squished across the lovely muck under the library windows (and I'll bet there were no overshoes, either). Paging Mr. Levitt - future freshman varieties talent paraded across the stage at the FHA Variety show. However, this crew was rewarded with candy at the end of the evening. Mr. Buethe does everything possible to spark int e r est in study. This past week he had a visiting consultant on science who spent time in classes an d then interviewed those especially inferested and capable out of class. Then with all the excellent films and other A-V aids Mr. Eddy brings in, our campus schoolers are at least aware that science is fascinating if they want to probe a little.

The following students of the Peru Campus High School are on the honor roll for the first semester's work. To be on the honor roll, a student must have an average of a B or higher in his academic subjects. 71:h Grade Nancy Adams Danna Henry John Kite_ Robert Milstead Robert Wittee, Jr. 8th Grade Patty Adams Karen Beatty Sharon Beatty Brenda Blanton John Mcintire Gary Milstead Lola Morrissy Steve Snyder Mike Tynon James Wilson 9th Grade Ann Adams Linda <::ombs Jeannie Gnade

Campus School Band Presents Concert The Peru Prep Concert Band of 38 members presented an hour concert Thursday, Febr. 16, in the Campus School Auditorium. Mr. Gilbert E. Wilson, director, commented that the concert was the best winter concert given under his direction. Selections were "Forecaster March" by Harold Rusch, "Scherzo for Band" by Frank Erickson, "Aria and Minuet" by Alessandro Scarlatti, "Colorama" by Peter DeRose, "Painted Desert" by Joseph Olivadoti, "Syncopated Clock" by LeRoy Anderson, "Holiday for Winds" by Glenn

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Osser, and "Highlights from the Music Man" by Meredith Willson.

Rev. Housewright Speaks at Convo The Rev. George Housewright, Regional Director of Evangelism for the United Lutheran Church for the area west of the Missouri River, was the con v o c a,t ion / speaker February 15. Rev. Housewright, introduced by Dr. Neal S. Gomon, gave a short talk on his work on evangelism in the Lutheran Church and the Lutheran movement in the area. The neck is something which if you don't stick it out you won't get into trouble up to.

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10th Grade Devon. Adams Nancy Jarvis Marilyn Larson !Uh Grade Tom Boatman Linda Morrissy Jerry Sayer Leland Schneider Al Wheeler 12th Grade Sara Adams Virginia Cockerham Elaine Gerdes David Gomon Mary Ellen Wilson Of the above named students, Patty Adams, Lo 1 a Morrissy, Jeannie Gnade, Jerry Sayer, Leland Schneider and Al Wheeler received A's in all academic courses.

F. H. A. Holds Annual Ta lent Show The Peru chapter of F.H.A. held its talent show Monday, Febr. 13, 7:30 in the high school auditorium. David Gomon was master of ceremonies for the evening. The program included piano and vocal solos, baton routines, ballets, skits and pantomimes. Mary Ellen Wilson, program chairman, termed the show a success. After the show Mrs. F. H. Larson announced the winners of the March of Dimes collection contest. Awards were made to the F.H.A. teams who had brought in the most money and, also, who had called at the most homes.

Tournament-wise, our Prep basketballers aren't so bad, in spite of mumps and such. Even if they lose in the finals, C o a c h DeZwarte says they'll still get one of the biggest trophies they have ever had.

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Now if only Mr. Jindra can find a small piece of time when the band isn't rehearsing, or the chorus singing, or some serious studying taking place, the campus school will have an orchestra worthy of the name. As it is, a few violins rehearse at on e time, cellos another time, a n d other instruments squeeze in at odd moments, which doesn't make for very organized music. (Contest coming up, too.)

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Alpha Mu Omega met Tuesday -evening, Febr. 14. A new· constitution was approved at the meeting. Also, a demonstration was given about Abacus, the ancient arithmetical device used by the Chinese. Keith Hawxby w a s elected to succeed Steve Banks as president. Steve was graduated at mid-term. Dick Carlson was elected vice president. A luncheon was served after the meeting.

One of the mothers, w h asked if her boy had mu said "Oh, no, he's had mumps. must be the rocks in his h '' that slipped!" (So you hav '' had mumps-lumps.)

A glimpse of the cake baked from Martha Washington's recipe makes history more alive for smaller students. Supervisors enjoyed the tea since, as Miss Clarke said, "it came at just the right time for a cup of coffee.''

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And you should see the · you-tiful pictures ready for Prep yearbook! This is one the Student Council projects. other project is collecting postage stamps to be turned o \ to a church group to finance t for hungry children-so now know where to throw away used stamps.

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Husband: "That fellow on the fourth floor brags that he has kissed every woman in this apartment building but one." Wife: "I'll bet it's that stuck· up Mrs. Jones upstairs."

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'Cats Are K. C. Bound

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 56

MARCH 13, 1961

Number 11

Good Luck, Cats 1

Bobcats, NCC Champs, Are Tourney Bound

c 0 N

l I N' E Ni c

< ; <"

T A: L

s

1\.N

Coach Jack Mcintire, who has brought Peru iwo NCC champion· hips and one co-championship in five years of basketball coaching.

clntire Has Most Successful Season By Jack Johnson Coach Jack Mcintire reached into his bag of tricks again t h i s season and came up with the Peru State Bobcats. most successful basketball season since 1950. The 'Cats won the Nebraska College Conference Championship with a record of 10-2, and the National ssociation of Intercollegiate Athletics District 11 play-off by defeating Nebraska Wesleyan 7761 and Midland College 77-65. This year is the first time since 1950 that a Peru team has qualified for the Kansas City tournament. Peru's over-all record this season is 16-6. After suffering a disastrous 8-17 record his first year at Peru, Mcintire has brought his won and lost mark for his five years at Peru State to 86 wins and 42 losses. In three of the last four seasons the Bobcats have been the N.C.C. champions, but have been stopped short of winning a trip to Kansas City. However, this season the Bobcats "met the challenge" against the Midland Warriors in the District 11 playoff finals and are on their way to the big tourney. A main cog in Mac's success as a basketball coach is his ability to develop great pivot men. This year he brought Bob Buettgenbach from a reserve to a 20-point per game scorer and to an AllN.C.C. selection. In the last three seasons Peru has had a pivot man on the All-N.C.C. team. Next season the Mcintire men should be the team to beat in the N.C.C. due to the return of the entire starting five. Mcintire is now serving as president of the N.A.I.A. Coaches

Association. In 1957, he w.as appointed by the N.A.I.A. to the Helms Athletic Foundation Hall of Fame. A native of Nebraska City, Mcintire earned letters in football and basketball during his high school career. As a s.tudent at Peru State, he earned three letters each in football and track and four letters in basketball. For three years he w a s named to the All-N.C.C. teams of the Sunday Lincoln Star and the Omaha World-Herald for his outstanding success in football and received honorable mention two years in basketball. During his senior year he was named to the All-N.C.C. team of the same newspapers. For his participation in football and basketball during his senior year, Mcintire was named Bert E. Swenson, Jr., award winner, an honor which has been given annually since 1925 to a junior or senior who has lettered in at least two different sports and judged outstanding on t h e basis of character, personality, scholarship, and loyalty to school traditions. Before taking the reins at Peru as head basketball coach in 1956, Mac was on the Falls City High School faculty as head coach, a position he held for ten years. His basketball teams produced 126 wins against 47 losses and his football teams won 71 and lost 17. His track teams won ten straight South-east conference championships. In June 1955, Coach Mcintire was named "High School Coach of the Year" by the 0 m a h a World-Herald and "Prep Coach (Continued on page two)

Kappa Delta Pi Beta Mu Chapter Holds Banquet

Buettgenbach and Roach All-Conference Yopp and Rathe Get Honorable Mention

By Sandy Craig The Beta Mu chapter of Kappa Delta Pi held a banquet March 6, 6:00 p.m. in the college cafeteria. The purpose of the banquet was to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the national organization. Mrs. Neal Gomon was mistress of ceremonies for the evening's program. ' She introduced Mrs. Wilma Stutheit, who gave statistics concerning Kappa Delta Pi. Mrs. Stutheit told the group that the Peru chapter was founded in May of 1.929 and is the oldest chapter in the state. Joyce Carman sang two original songs. Miss Carman accompanied herself. Kay Rassmusen read a speech, "The Accomplishments of Kappa Delta Pi," which was written by Gleri Irwin. Judy Miller, accompanied by Mr. Robert Benford, presented a violin solo. A speech by Darrel Wolcott entitled "Famous Kappa Delta Pi Members" was read by Miss Miller. Spring pledges were then introduced by Miss Alma Ashley. They are: Mrs. Gladys Ackley, Pauline Fink, Elaine Hinton, and Sandy Craig. Miss Ashley a 1 s o introduced Mrs. B. B. Tyler whose husband helped organize Peru's chapter. Mrs. Tyler told of her experiences concerning the first meeting. The program was followed by a business meeting in the meeting room of the Student Center. The trip to the regional Kappa Delta Pi meeting at Kearney was discussed. Several members plan to attend. The next meeting will be April 12, 8:00 p.m., at which the pledges will be initiated.

St. Patrick's Day Dance To Be Held March 17

"Arsenic and Old Lace" Scheduled For March 16

The Home Economics Club and Epsilon Pi Tau will sponsor the St. Patrick's Day Dance Friday, March 17. Tickets may be picked up at the Student Union Office. Pre-sale price of tickets will be fifty cents; admission at the door will be seventy-five cents. The Starlighters will. furnish music. The dance will begin at 9 p.m. in the Student Union. A "Mr. and Miss St. Patrick" will be chosen at random from those attending.

Morrison Will Speak At Dedication A. D. Majors Hall for men, the Student Center, the addition to Eliza Morgan Hall for women, and -the A. V. Larson Industrial Arts Building will be dedicated in the college auditorium Sunday, April 16, at 2 p.m. Governor Frank Morrison has been invited to speak at the dedication. Carl Spelts, president of the state normal board, and Dr. Freeman B. Decker, commissioner of education, have also been invited. Music for the occasion will be provided by Peru's fine arts department. Open house will be held in the four buildings following the dedication. An informal reception for guests will be given in the Student Center lounge.

The Bobcats leading scorer, Bob Buettgenbach, Beatrice, and floor leader Mike Roach, Palmyra, topped the World-Herald's NCC All-Star Team. Bob's hook shot and Mike's long jumpers were "Mr. Inside" and "Mr. Outside" of the Bobcats and possibly the NCC. "Bitz," aft e r understudying Bob Mayo for 11/z years, provided the Bobcats with the "big punch" that proved to be the winning punch many times during the past season. His 6'8" frame makes h.is hook and jump shot nearly unstoppable. Bob's standout game this season was the Simpson College game of the Falls City Tournament. "The Tree" rjfilped -the cords for 32 points arid picked off many rebounds. His moves in the pivot earned him a season total of 438 points with 213 foul shots. His conference total of 243 was second only to Doane's Gene Velloff. Mike "Papa" Roach is t h_e "player that makes the Bobcats go." After transferring from the University of Nebraska, Mike became a "whiz kid" for the Bobcats. His aggressiveness and quick hands led to many stolen balls and baskets. Because of his fine play and floor leadership the Omaha World-Herald rated Mike as the "best all around performer of the NCC." Mike was the runner-up scorer for the Bobcats scoring 283 points on 22 outings and ranked tenth in the NCC scoring race. Also receiving recognition on the All-NCC team were Tom Yopp and Larry Rathe. Th e s e two Bobcats were named Honorable Mention for their smooth' and steady play throughout the (Continued on page two)

The Peru Dramatic Club's production of Joseph Kesselring's "Arsenic and Old Lace" has been scheduled for Thursday evening, March 16, according to R. D. Moore, head of the Division of Language Arts. Curtain time will be 8 p.m. in the College' Auditorium. Members of the cast, as well as the stage crew, have been working hard the past few nights putting finishing touches on the play, as well as erecting the stage set. This play is a "Budget Event," which will enable all Peru students to gain admission by showing their activities card at t he door.

Government Class Observes Town and School Caucus Ten members of the State and Local Government class observed the Peru town caucus Tuesday evening, February 28. They remained for the school caucus. Committees are also attending school and town board meetings in Peru, Auburn, and Nebraska City. They will report their observations to the class taught by Dr. George Schottenhamel.

Four of the five Bobcat s±arters made All-Conference. Bottom row: Drexel Harvey and Mike Roach, All-Conference guard. J?~ck row: Tom (Li'l Abner) Yopp, honorable mention guard: Bob Bj:leUgenbach, All-Conference center: Larry Ra!he, honorable mention forward.


Industrial Arts Building Open House To Be April 16 The A. V. Larson Industrial Arts Building open house will be held Sunday afternoon, April 16, following the dedication of Peru State's new buildings. N e w equipment in the six shops will be in operation. Throughout the afternoon, graphic art students will snap pictures of photogenic visitors. The electricity-electronics shop will have a dynamic TV demonstrator, which shows how a TV

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set operates. General metals visitors will ~e invited to try their own welding bead, while the power mechanics students will demonstrate lawn mower repair. Handcraft displays by local junior high students and general wood exhibits complete the billing. In addition to the pr act i c a 1 demonstrations, free samples will make the IA open house attractive to visitors.

NOTES FROM MAJORS HALL

LIBRARY COLUMN By Caihy I deus

By Raymond Hunzeker

Eating People Is Wrong, by Malcolm Bradbury, is funny, true, and memorable. The story is about a clash of generations which takes place in a provincial English university. A new novel by Rona Jaffe, Away From Home, is the story of young Americans in Rio. It is set against a dazzling B r a z i 1 i a n background. Stories From ihe New Yorker contains forty-seven s tori es which have appeared in "The New Yorker" since 1950. The stories range from hilarious to tragic.

Pedagogian, Staff Goes To Sterling Twelve Pedagogian staff members and their sponsor, Mr. Linscheid, went to the printing plant of the Johnson County Courier in Sterling, February 7. Mr. and Mrs. Packwood explained mechanical operations, the Miehle press, and the paperfolding machines. C h a r 1 o t t e Kelle, the linotype operator, showed the group how type is set. After seeing the plant, the group enjoyed coffee as guests of the Packwoods. The group consisted of Barbara Wheeldon, Jerry Jeanneret, Jerry Gress, Gary Weiss, Linda Bertram, Ron Pethoud, G a r y Brown, Pam Yost, Sandy Craig, Morris Keyt, Ray Hunzeker, and Carolyn Reiber.

Darrel Wolcott and Glenn Ir- · win from Majors Hall went to Kansas City to proof read the Peruvian Monday morning, returning the same evening. Darrel Wolcott won the A. V. Larson Award. The A. V. Larson Award is presented to the outstanding member of the Peruvian staff for his c:mtributions to the yearbook. Congratulations Darrel! Dick Gerber has been kept busy refereeing b a s k e t b a 11 ·games. Has anyone been practicing tennis? If so, note the poster on the bulletin board: tennis players are wanted for the team. Glenn Irwin is one of the representatives for Peru's Kyppa Delta Pi organization. Glenn attended the regional conference held at Kearney, March 11. Frankie Kan will give a speech to the Junior Woman's Club of Auburn at their April meeting. Frankie will give his reasons for coming to the United States to study and will tell of his experiences here and in Hong Kong, his home. Congratulations are extended to Ray Plankington on his marriage to Betty Bebb. According to Howard Engberg, many of the fellows are trying out for the baseball team. Majors Hall received a letter from a former member, Alan Wheeler. Alan told of his teaching experiences at Thermopolis, Wyoming.

WHISPERS FROM MORGAN By Susan Sharp

The girls from Morgan Hall made a fine showing at the tournament. games in Lincoln. Many of them are planning on going to Kansas City, too. Sandra Krakow underwent surgery March 1. Recovery wishes may be sent to Broadstone Memorial Hospit~l, Superior. Elinor Keefer, Elaine Hinton, Sharylin Vrtiska, Connie Erisman, Joan Eickhoff, and Annabel Ross have celebrated birthdays since the last report was made. The bulletin board on second floor is a center of attention this semester. Cynthia Wagner keeps interests aroused in her pertinent thought for each day. The dorm kitchen now has a number of new kitchen utensils, including cooking and pizza pans. · Judi Wilson has returned after a case of the mumps. Lee Christen will unfortunately miss the Kansas City game because she has just contacted them. Third floor may soon h a v e A teacher affects eternity; he some competition for the popucan never tell where his inflular guitar artists. Pauline Fink is ence stops. Henry Brooks Adams. becoming an accomplished guitar musician.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of ihe Campus of a Thousand Oaks March 13, 1961 PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Ray G. Meister ----------------------------~-----Co-editor Linda Bertram __________________________________ Co-editor Morris Keyt __________________________________ Copy Editor Sandy Craig --------------------------~-----Layout Editor Carolyn Reiber _____________________________ Layout Editor Jack Johnson ________________________________ Sports Editor Darrel Wokott --------------------------Business Manager Gerald Kirkendall ----------------------Personnel Manager Pam Yost ---------------------------------Women's Sports Gary Brown -----------------------------Columnist Delzell Susan Sharp _______________________ Columnist Morgan Hall Catherine Ideus _________________________Columnist Library Raymond Hunzeker ______________________Columnist Majors Ron Pethoud ----~-----------------~---Columnist Exchange Barbara Wheeldon -------------------------------Reporter :rv.telissa Fulkerson --------------------------------Reporter Jerry E. Gress -----------------------------------Reporter Phyllis Grube ------------------------------------Reporter Edna McGovern _________________________________Reporter Gary Weiss -------------------------------------Reporter Tom Yopp ---------------------------------------Reporter Gerald Jeanneret --------------------------------Reporter Mary Anna Gnade ______________________________ Columnist Stewart Linscheid ________________________________ Sponsor

Kappa Delta Pi Conference Held In Kearney Six members of the Peru.State Teachers College chapter of Kappa Delta Pi attended the regional conference of the national education honorary fraternity in Kearney Saturday, March 11. The Beta Mu chapter at Peru State was represented by Judith Miller, Wilma Johnson, Keith Hawxby, Glen Irwin, W i 1ma Stutheit, and Miss Alma Ashley, associate professor of education, faculty sponsor. An address by Franklin S. Parker, a Kappa Delta Pi fellow in international education w h o spent a year studying education in Southern Rhodesia, highlighted the meeting. Founded in 1911, Kappa Delta Pi has more than 140,000 members in 225 chapters throughout the nation. Sessions· of the central regional conference were held on the Kearney State Teachers College campus.

AROUND THE CAMPUSES By Ron Peihoud 'The Mirror-At Greeley, Colorado, tape measures played an important role in the Hawaiian Club's "Hip Hop." Admission to the "Hip Hop" was calculated at the door on an individual basis. The vital statistics were chest measurements for the guys and hip measurements for the gals. The charge was a penny an inch. All students from Colorado State College were invited to "measure in.'' The Wesleyan-This ad appeared in Wesleyan's school paper. "Wanted. A fuzzy wuzzy girl teddy bear as a companion f o r a fuzzy wuzzy wooly black an d pink tuxedoed boy teddy bear.'' If you have one, send it to Wesleyan. The Anielope-Rushees mus t lead a lonely life on the Kearney campus, at least for a week. During this week, no member of either a sorority or fraternity is permitted to speak to anyone going through rush. Silence reigns over all. Anyone violating this rule is brought before the interfraternity-sorority council and punished accordingly. The Doane Owl-Doane he 1 d its annual "Faculty Auction." All faculty members offered some

service to the students for au1, tion. The president of the colle 1 auctioned the right for someo" to ~'president of the college ' two !lours. Another faculty me ber gave an apartment and fa ities for a party for six peo All in all, the auction net $140.50 for the Doane C amp Chest. McINTIRE HAS MOST SUCCESSFUL SEASON (Continued from page one) of the Year" by the Sunday L' coln Journal and Star. Bobcat boosters will be pulli for Coach Mcintire and the tire Peru team as they travel Kansas City this week in ho of gaining win number 17. BUETTGENBACH AND ROA ALL CONFERENCEYOPP AND RATHE GET HONORABLE MENTION (Continued from page one) season. Tom was the defen ace for the 'Cats while Larry . a good scorer and the numb.'. two rebounder on the squad. " .SHORTHAND SPEEDSTERS Two students in Mrs. Frieda Rowoldt's business class receiv certificates for having a hi score in a recent test. Sh a r o' Watton exceeded 130 words f o' three minutes in advanced c lege shorthand for her certifica and Marcia Allgood exceeded 1 words for her certificate. · The news letter test was f nished by the Gregg Publishi · Company. 1

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Member F.D.I.C. INVITES YOUR BUSINESS CARROLL LEWIS, President

JOHN L. LEWIS, Vice Pres. & Cashier


Rebounders and Shooters

DREXEL HARVEY arry Rathe, junior forward Sterling, Nebraska, was sed into full time service as obcat with the departure of mate Jack Johnson at the ester. Since then "Spider" blossomed into a dependable rer and rebounder. For his exits Larry has gained the Oma' World-Herald's praise as the C's best rookie. Rathe's forte .ensively has been on tip-in ' ts despite a frame stretching only 6-3. To date Larry h as · red 99 field goals and 64 free . ows for a total of 262 points. ensively Spider "had it" bee he came to Peru State, for once scored 57 points in one e in high school. Coach Mc~ire says "he's just beginning ;come," but the NCC foes have rned to respect the "Spider" ' what he already is. ff the court Larry has the re. ct of his fellow students. He ' s elected the 1961 "King of arts." The physical education ' jor plans to teach and coach 'lowing his '62 graduation ..

Drexel Harvey, junior from Hartford, Ill., is the best rebounder and outside shooter on the team. Drex, a transfer student from DePauw University, doesn't receive much acclaim from the newspapers for his deft shot, but he receives the respect of his opponents and frequently their defensive ace. Drex has the uncanny ability to get that allimportant rebound or basket. Many times during the season he has scored the big basket or grabbed the rebound that might have saved the game. Drex has won the esteem of his teammates for his fine all-around game. He has an 11-point game average and captures nearly ten rebounds a game. Drex was an attendant at both the Valentine formal and May Fete, 1960. He plans a summer wedding to Miss Mardelle Miller, Elmwood, a 1959-60 Peru student. Drex, a physical education major, plans to teach and coach following graduation.

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The Peru State B o b c a t s clinched the Nebraska College Conference championship Thursday night at Peru with an 82 to 72 bombardment of Doane College. Peru's starting quintet all scored in the double figures to offset a tremendous scoring exhibition by Doane's Gene Velloff who counted 35 poijits. A sluggish Bobcat team had to battle tooth and nail to go into halftime leading by a slim 40 to 37 margin. During the first five minutes the score was tied twice and the lead changed hands four times before a hook shot by Bob Buettgenbach, shot the 'Cats into a 13 to 11 lead-a lead t h e y never relinquished. Peru led by as much as eight points in the first half before a late flurry by Doane narrowed the halftime edge to three points. Peru continued to sputter in the early stages of the second half. With ~ve minutes gone, Larry Rathe, and Buettgenbach took over to shoot Peru into a more comfortable 50 to 43 lead. In the next nine minutes, Peru spurted to a 72 to 50 advantage and then coasted to the 82 to 72 conference clinching conquest. Tom Yopp keyed the Peru surge to victory by holding Velloff to only four free throws in the first 14 minutes of the second half. The talented Tiger h a d hammered in 13 points during the first 20 minutes of play. With Peru leading comfortably 74 to 52 with 5:44 remaining, Veloff went wild to hit 18 points before the final buzzer. Paul Kersenprock, followed Veloff with 21 points for Doane. ' Peru's Buettgenbach led the Bobcats with 22 points, and was ably seconded by Rathe's 17 tallies. Drexel Harvey and Mike Roach contributed heavily to the victory with their sharp rebounding and ball-hawking tactics. tp PERU (82) fg ft Rathe --------- 7 17 3-3 Harvey ~------- 7 14 0-1 Buettgenbach -- 5 12-13 22 Mayo ---------- 3 0-0 6 12 Roach --------- 4 4-4 Yopp ---------- 5 1-1 11 Totals _______ 31 DOANE (72) fg Velloff ________ 11 Kelley --------- 0 Sieber --------- 1 Parker -------- 0 Kersenbrock --- 7 Rivers --------- 2 Andrews ------ 1

20-22 ft 13-14 0-1 4-6 0-1 7-8 0-0 0-0

82 tp 35 0 6 0 21 4 2

Totals _______ 24

24-30

72

Peru Tromps Midland Wins N.A.I.A. Play-offs And Trip To Kansas City By Jack Johnson Nebraska College Conference champion Peru State sped to a 77 to 65 win over Tri-State winner Midland College Thursday night in Lincoln's Pershing Auditorium to win the District 11 N.A.I.A. playoffs and a trip to the N.A.I.A. tourney in Kansas City. The quick, aggressive, and opportunistic Bobcats splurged. to a 34 to 26 halftime margin, killed a Midland bid which brought the Warriors to within 46 to 47, and then capitalized on frantic Warrior fouling to earn the Kansas City berth. Coach Jack Mclntire's battlewise Peruvians never trailed in the contest as they broke into an early 8-1 lead on three fielders by hustling Tom Yopp, and charity tosses by Bob Buettgenbach and Larry Rathe. Midland rallied several times during the first half to surge within two points before Peru's _speed and ballhawking paid off with the eightpoint intermission bulge. Big 6-7 LeRoy Hulsebus canned six fielders in the first seven and one-half minutes of the second half to spark the Midlandite's rally which brought them to within 46 to 47. The Bobcats refused to fold and again spurted ahead to a 57 to 46 advantage in the next three minutes. Peru State's rally was

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Jack Mclntire's Peru State Bobcats cleared the first hurdle in the District 11 National Association of Inter-Collegiate Athletics Play-Offs in Lincoln's Pershing Auditorium Tuesday night by defeating Nebraska Wesleyan 77-61. The Peruvians, winners of the Nebraska College Conference crown had littfe trouble downing the Plainsmen. Drexel Harvey's shooting boosted the Bobcats to a 40-27 halftime lead, as he ripped six field goals on 1 o n g jump shots. Daryl Mitchell was the sparkplug for the Plainsmen in the first twenty minutes as he scored 13 points. After intermission the Bobcats hustled to a 51-29 lead. Wesleyan couldn't manage a field goal until 11:11 remaining in th.e game; at that point Ron Gillham scored on a long jumper. Coach Mcintire substituted freely from this time on and his Bobcats coasted

aided by a personal foul followed by a technical foul on Midland. Drexed Harvey converted the personal into one point, M i k e Roach then added one . on the technical. On the out-of-bounds play, Rathe whipped in a two pointer to bring the Bobcats to 57 to 46. Thirteen of Peru's last twenty points came from the foul stripe as smooth ball handling dictated Midland's fouling in order to get their hands on the elusive ball. Larry Rathe paced Peru w i t h 21 points, followed by Buettgenbach, Yopp, and Roach who hit 19, 17, and 14 respectively. fg PERU (77) Buettgenbach -- 4 Harvey -------- 1 Roach --------- 4 Rathe --------- 5 Yopp ---------- 8 Mayo -------~-- 0 Gibson -------- 1

ft 11-16 1-4 6-7 11-16 1-1 0-0 1-3

tp 19 3 14 21 17 0 3

Totals ---'~ ___ 23

31-47

77

MIDLAND (65) fg Huse bus ------- 8 Frieze ~-------- 2 Groves __ ::~.:--~ 9 McCoy -~~<., ____ 0 Hillman ------- 2 Oltmanns ------ 1 Castig'no ------ 0 Otte ----------- 2

ft 6-10 0-1 5-6 3-4 0-1 1-2 0-0 1-1

tp 22 4 23 3 4 3 0 5

_______ 24

17-26

65

Totals

Peru Beat Hastings 71-60 Sparked by guard M i k e Roach's. 23-point production, the Peru State Bobcats closed out their regular season play Friday night at Hastings with a solid 71 to 60 triumph over the Hastings Broncos. Having clinched th e Nebraska Co 11 e g e Conference championship one night earlier against Doane College, the Bobcats needed this win to remain three full games ahead of second place Kearney and Wesleyan. Peru never trailed in t h e contest, and Hastings evened the score only once-that coming with the score knotted at two all. With Mike Roach, and Bob Buettgenbach, showing the way, Jack Mclntire's Peruvians sprinted to a 23 to 13 lead midway in the first half. Capitalizing on foul shots in the late stages of the first quarter, Peru whipped to a

43 to 26 halftime margin. The ball-hawking 'Cats iced the game in the first nine minutes of the second half as they raced to a 27-point margin of 62 to 35. Peru kept its lead above 20 points until only three minutes remained in the game. Hastings hit ten straight points in the final three minutes to bring the score to a more respectable 71 to 60 finale. Despite hitting 54 per cent from the field, accurate f o u 1 · shooting keyed the Peru State victory. Each team connected for 23 field goals, but Peru canned 25 of 34 free throw attempts while Hastings converted 14 of 23 charity tosses. Tom Yopp shot a torrid field goal pace, hitting 5 for 5, while Roach cracked 11 of 15 attempts from the f o u 1 line. fg PERU (71) Rathe --------- 3 Harvey -------- 2 Gibson -------- 0 Buettgenbach -- 7 Mayo ---------- 1 Roach --------- 6 Stessman ------ 1 Yopp ---------- 3 _______ 23 Totals

.Peru Spanks-Wesleyan 77-61

.

1 1

1 1 1•

Bobcats Clinch N.C.C. Championship

ft 2-2 0-1 0-0 7-9 1-2 11-15 0-0 4-5

tp 8 4 0 21 3 23 2 10

to an easy 77-61 victory. The leading scorer for Peru was Bob Buettgenbach with 21 points, followed by Drexel Harvey with 17, and Larry Rathe with 15. Daryl Mitchell paced 25-36 71 Wesleyan with 19 points. PERU (77) fg ft ' tp tp ft Rathe _________ 5 5-5 15 HASTINGS (60) fg 7 1-3 Hamlett ------- 3 1-1 17 Harvey -------- 8 3-3 3 Haumont -----0 Buettgenbach __ 5 11-13 21 7 5-6 Schoonover ---- 1 2-2 8 Mayo ---------- 3 0-0 8 Bacon --------- 4 5-6 7 Roach --------- 1 7 1-3 Peterson ------- 3 1-1 7 Yopp ---------- 3 3 1-4 Hoffman ------1 Gibson ________ 1 2 0-0 5 1-1 Fish ----------- 2 10 0-0 Priebe Totals _______ 2fr --------- 5 25-28 77 2-2 10 WESLEY' (61) (g ft tp Penney -------- 4 0-0 4 Ehlers --------- 2 14-22 60 Totals _______ 23 5-6 19 Mitchell ------- 7 0-0 2 Major --------- 1 6-9 10 Semin --------- 2 2-2 10 Nelson -------- 4 INGERSOLL 0-0 0 Peet ----------- 0 Barber Shop Fredstrom _____ 0 4-5 4 AUBURN, NEBRASKA 2-4 12 Gillham ------- 5 Totals _______ 21

Elly Ingersoll • Nate Hayes 19-26

61


1923 . 1961

Officials Attend Things Are The Same AACTE Meet By Sandy Craig It's nothing new for the Bobcats to beat Midland in the tournament pla:y-off. Midland was defeated by Peru in February, 1923. TI?-ese statistics came from the February 28, 1923 Ped. At first glance, it looks like we are slow readers. But this Ped ha s been stored away for many years. It was brought to the Pedagogian by Charles Caverzagie. He found it in the attic of his aunt, Mrs. Luva Kelly Wyatt of Falls City. Charles says he isn't sure where his aunt got the copy of the Ped; she was never a student at Peru. A closer look at the old Ped revealed it was addressed to Carroll Lewis. Mr. Lewis said he was cashier in the Bank of Peru at that time. The Ped was sent to him because of the ad the bank ran in the paper. The bank is now headed by Mr. Lewis. At any rate, it's nice to know the Bobcats are keeping up the tradition of winning championships.

Delzell Doings By Gary L. Brown Steve Bates is no longer living in Delzell Hall because of his marriage to Phyllis Grube. While Steve lived in Delzell, he held the office of dorm president. Now that Steve is no longer with us, Phil Rhodes will hold the office of president. No one seems to be living in his own room in Delzell. Because of the painting, everyone is being shifted around. The painting crew is moving rapidly, and they have brushed th.eir way down to the first floor. Tom, Broom-Broom, Yopp swept out the television lounge the other day. Before he was finished we had a small fire in the fireplace for the first time t h i s year. Don Peterson might as well be

Dr. Keith L. Melvin, Dr.. Melvin Blanton, and Mr. Lyle McKercher attended the thirteenth annual meeting of the American Association of C o 11 e g e s for Teacher Education held at the Conrad Hilton Hotel, Chicago. Meetings were held February 22-25. Only Mr. McKercher attended the first day's meeting, which was a seminar concerned with the improvement of college teaching. Dr. Melvin and Dr. Blanton joined him in Chicago where the three attended meetings concerned with the improvement of teacher education in the United States. Groups discussed s u ch points as the problems of n e w teachers, orientation for new teachers, and teacher evaluation. This organization is made up of all colleges which offer teacher education. The theme of the group is "Unity in Diversity." engaged. Recently he was assisted in the art of shower taking for apparently no reason at all. The song heading the Peru Hit Parade is now "Kansas City Here I Come." Everyone in Delzell is talking over his plans for t h e trip to Kansas City. The Kansas City trip being so important, I thought it would be a good idea to find out how everyone is going. The following are some of the ways the guys are going to K. C., and how they are going to finance the trip. Mike Ramirez-"With Sandy Pearson." George Zwickel-"Feet first, if necessary." Dick Allen-"Caa/ ( B o s to n talk). Norman Catlett-"I'm going on all the cigarettes that people owe me." Paul Fenton-"On G r e e n Stamps." Barney Mcllvoy-"I'm thinking of flying my private plane." Tom Yopp-"I'm going with Jack Mcintire, and I'm going to sit in the middle all the way."

Judy Miller Presents Violin Recital

Tri Beta met February 27. Mr. Gene Miller of the State Game Commission from Lincoln spoke on the role of Wildlife Management. Mr. Miller is a Fisheries Biologist. He showed slides on

quail and antelope stockin Miller answered questio Wildlife Management. Dr. Christ will show sli Europe at the next meeti March 27. Wanting to work is so want that it should be e aged.-Abraham Lincoln.

DON'T MISS ·

HArsenic and Old

Lace" Famous Three-act Comedy By

Joseph Kesselring Presented By

SPEECH CONTEST TO BE HELD AT PERU The annual Speech C o n t e s t will be held at Peru, April 17. The program will begin with registration from 8:00 a.m. to 8:40 a.m. The rest of the day will be devoted to oral readings, prose interpretation, one-act plays, debate, etc.

REDFERN

THE PERU DRAMATIC CLUB Thursday, March 16, 8:00 p. m. Budget Event

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Miss Judith Miller, a senior music major at Nebraska St ate Teachers College at Peru, presented a violin recital at 4:30 p.m. Sunday, February 26, at Joslyn Art Museum Recital Hall, Omaha. A student of Victor H. Jindra, head of the division of fine arts, Miss Miller is the daughter of Mr:- and Mrs. Hanford Miller of Peru. She began her study of violin under Mr. Jindra at the age of nine. She was accompanied by R. T. Benford, associate professor of piano and organ. The recital included: Grave from Sonata in A minor for unaccompanied violin by B a ch , Sonata in A major by Brahms, Poeme by Chausson and Precipitations (1946) by Donato. Miss Miller appeared in her senior violin recital at Peru State Teachers College in January.

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Nebraska's Oldest

College

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 56

Number 12

MARCH 27, 1961

s

evitt Announces chedule For Canvas

"Yes, we lei Teddy dig ihe Panama Canal in ihe cellar," says Aun± Martha io Jonathan, as Dr. Einstein, Teddy, and Aunt Abby look on. Left :to right. Allen Nelson, Ralph Plummer, Julie Mayer, Ray Meister, and Melissa Fulkerson.

HArsenic and Old Lace" Reviewed by Wolcott The Peru Dramatics Club's poisoning lonely bachelors w h o presentation of Arsenic and Old come looking for a room. They Lace on Thursday e v e n i n g , , had already buried eleven in March 16, was enthusiastically' Teddy's "Panama Canal" in the received by a large audience. · basement. Mortimer realizes he The famous three-act comedy by cannot marry because of the Joseph Kesserling was ably per- family's inherited insanity and formed by a well-rehearsed cast so informs the bewildered Elaine. under the direction of Mr. Rob- He saves the life of one, Mr. ert D. Moore. Gibbs (Gerald Kirkendall) as he is about to drink the aunts' Julie Mayer and Melissa Fulk"loaded" elderberry wine. erson endeared themselves to the audience as the two m a id e n To make matters worse, a longaunts, Abby and Martha Brews- lost nephew, Jonathan, returns ter. Steve Parker realistically with his plastic surgeon friend, portrayed their frantic young Dr. Einstein. They had been purnephew, Mortimer B r e w s t e r . suing a world-wide life of crime Once again Ray Meister did an and murder with Dr. Einstein excellent job as the villain, Jona- frequently changing Jonathan's than Brewster. Allen Nelson, as face. They decide to headquarter his inebriated sidekick, Dr. Ein- at Jonathan's aunts' house, using stein, was the perfect ingredient his grandfather's old laboratory for a nightmarish situation. as a face-changing hospital f o r Abby (Julie Mayer) and Mar- desperados. In the bargain, they tha (Melissa Fulkerson) live in discover the body in the window their ancestral home with their seat and threaten to expose the nephew Teddy Brewster (Ralph two ladies. After Teddy removes Plummer). Teddy has delusions the body for burial, they replace of grandeur, believing he is Ted- it with one Spenalzo, the owner dy Roosevelt. Occasionally Offi- of "their" car. They plan to bury cer Brophy (Larry Whitfield) and him in the basement also, to Officer Klein (Chick Stessman) which Abby and Martha strenu"report" to him on national con- ously object because he is a "foreigner." ditions.

J. D. Levi:tt, head of the Convocation Committee, has announced that the following atactions have been scheduled or this summer and the 1961-62 chool year. Summer programs will include "Dominico and Sear," featuring p dancing and folk singing, and he Boston Lyric Theatre, a ixed! quintet singing a variety f selections. Appearing on the fall schedule re William B. Davis, an outtanding platform speaker, reorting on a tour of South Afria, and Philip Hanson's Miniare Theatre with a dramatiza'on of "Moby Dick." Winter selections are the Rivrside Chamber Singers, presentg unaccompanied music rangg from 15th-20th century comositions, and John Kalisch, who resents lectures and demonstra.ons on the subject of hypnotism. Spring attractions inc 1u de yrna Kinch and Company in Mortimer, a dramatic critic, Dance Satires," and Nicholas proposes to Elaine Harper (Linda Sonimsky, famous and witty pi-· Nygaard), the daughter of the anist. Rev. Dr. Harper (Gary Stover). He discovers a body in the window seat. His aunts candidly reveal their nasty little habit of

esley Fellowship iews Film ·

s

Wesley Fellow&hip met March 5 at the Methodist church. The roup watched a film "One Love, onflicting Faiths," and then disussed the problems presented n it. Three members of Wesley Fe1owship attended a state Methoist Student Movement seminar at Kearney on Saturday, March 18. The theme of the seminar was world problems. The meeting p 1 an n e d for March 22 concerns an interview between a pastor and a young couple who plan to be married. This will be the second meeting in the series on dating.

College Ray Meister To Receive Neal S. Gamon Award

arrel Wolcott oReceive . V. Larson Award The Peruvian Staff elected arrel Wolcott to receive th i s ear's A. V. Larson Award. Each ear this award is given to the erson whom the staff selects as ts outstanding member. Darrel as been very active on both of the student publications th i .s year. He started as copy editor or the Peruvian and then became editor at the start of the second semester. On the Pedagoian staff he started as a columist and advanced to business anager the second semester. Darrel, the son of Mr. and Mrs. George J. Wolcott, is from Reyolds, Nebraska. He will receive is degree in May. English is his ajor field, and history is his econdary field of concentration. Other activities in which he kes part are Sigma Tau Delta nd Kappa Delta Pi. Darrel taught for six years in . e elementary grades and spent o years in the army before oming to Peru to complete work or a degree. Other candidates for the award ere Phyllis Bates, sports editor, nd Steve Parker, photographer.

Nebraska's Best

Student Wives Conduct Red Cross Drive The Peru Students' Wives Club met Tuesday, March 21, in the Campus. School home ec department. Nineteen members we r e present at the regular meeting. P.S.W.C. will head Peru's 1961 Red Cross drive. Canvassing will be done within the next two weeks. Mrs. Bill Hudson and Mrs. Ted Kirby are co-chairmen of the drive. Volley ball will be p 1 aye d Monday, Mar~h 27, at 7:30 p.m. (Continued: on page four)

Mortimer is unable to force his childhood nemesis Jonathan, to leave because of his threat to expose the aunts. But Mortimer is able to get Teddy to sign papers for his commitment to an asylum, hoping that he can be

lnterscholastics Here Nearly 450 students from 30 Nebraska high schools participated in the third annual P er u State Inter-Scholastic Contest, Friday, March 24, on the Peru State campus. This was the largest number of students and high schools to participate since th e inception of the contest. Entries for the 1961 event included five division A schools: Auburn, Falls City, Nebraska City, Plattsmouth, Syracuse. The 25 division B schools were Bennet, Bratton Union, Brock, (Continued on page four)

blamed for the bodies• in the basement. Officer O'Hara (Robert Mulder), a would-be p 1a y wright, comes back and finds Mortimer bound and gagged by Jonathan and Dr. Einstein, who h a d planned to slice him up. They convince the officer that Mortimer had been demonstrating a play which he had viewed. Officer O'Hara relates his play to his "captive audience" for several hours. Lieutenant Rooney (Jerry Littell) bursts in, recognizes the Boris Karloff face of Jonathan and arrests him. He does not believe the story about the bodies in the basement even though the aunts tell him so. He is convinced of their insanity. Martha and Abby sign papers so they may be committed along with Teddy, whose term in office has expired. Before they leave, they tell Mortimer that he is not really a Brewster, but was adopted as a baby. The scene closes as Mr. Witherspoon (Jim Yelnek), the superintendent of the asylum, is taking a glass of their famous . elderberry wine. Abby and Martha were determined to break their tie with Jonathan's total of twelve murders. The success of the play w as aided by James Christ's lighting and Haney Milstead's stage managing. In charge of the properties were Carol Eynon and Joan Wesolowski. Lois Fritz was assistant director.

Epsilon Pi Tau Holds Initiation The Peru State and Wayne State chapters of Epsilon Pi Tau, Eta and Omega respectively, held their annual initiation this year at Peru, on March 17. These are the crnly two colleges in Nebraska whfch have the Epsilon Pi Tau fraternity, which is the leading Industrial Arts Fraternity in the United States. The Peru chapter, Eta, w a s started in 1932 by A. V. Larson. This was the 7th chapter started (Continued on page three)

Ray Meister, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Meister of Humboldt, has been elected by the Pedagogian staff to be the recipient of the Neal S. Gomon Award. This annual award is to be presented on April 25, at the Publications Banquet. Ray received this award f or his outstanding work and leadership on the Pedagogian staff. He has served as columnist f o r Delzell Hall, business manager, and is now editor. Ray is quite active in dramatics and is presently serving as president of the Dramatics Club. He is the representative for the Junior Class on the Student Senate and was seFetary of Phi Alpha Theta. He also takes an active part in Sigma Tau Delta, Kappa Delta Pi, and is a member of the Student Center Board. Before , .,entering Peru, Ray served t~9 years in the Army, one year of which was spent in Korea. Ray is now a junior majoring in English, Speech, and German. His future plans are to teach English and German upon graduation. Other nominees for the award were Sandy Craig, Morris Keyt, and Jack Johnson.

"Sifting Sands" Magazine Revived "Sifting Sands," a revived campus literary magazine, will be on sale Monday, April 3, if the present schedule is maintained. Sponsored by Sigma Tau Delta, this 24-page issue will contain both short stories and poems. "Sifting Sands: A Book of Verse by Students and Faculty of Peru State Teachers College" made its first appearance on the campus in May of 1936. Its a r t editor was Miss Norma Diddel. World War II forced the first suspension of the campus literary magazine. After the war, publication of "Sifting Sands" was resumed, but the Korean conflict put it out of commission once again. Now, nine years later, the tradition has been revived. Your view of "those things which belong peculiarly to us because they are the children of our hands and brain" will cost twenty-five cents a copy.

Melvin and Langham Attend Conference Dr. Keith Melvin and Max Langham attended the National Conference on Higher Education in Chicago, March 5-8. The theme was "Goals for Higher Education in a Decade of Decision." There were 36 discussion groups and five general sessions. There were also sessions on research and other timely topics. An exhibit of some 300 books on higher education was on display at the conference. Published reports in proceedings of all groups and sessions are available to the faculty through the dean's office and the library.


THANKS, ANGELS, DEVILS, AND SENATE Hats off to the Student Senate, Blue Devils, and White Angels for their financial contributions toward transportation to the N.A.I.A. tournament in Kansas City. The Student Senate allotted an amount for each student to defray the cost of the buses and tickets. The Blue Devils and White Angels paid part of the expenses of the buses used. This action was in the true spirit of the purposes of these organizations. If, at times, we forget just why these groups exist, this exhibition of their jnterest in student activities should bring their services back to mind. They saw the need to promote a large following to this important tourney and helped make it possible for many to go who otherwise would not have. The next time one of these organizations asks for support in some of their undertakings, perhaps it would be good to remember this. -Darrel Wolcott.

DELZELL DOINGS

WHISPERS FROM MORGAN

By Gary L. Brown

By Susan Sharp

Things are finally back to normal since the basketball tourney. Jim Mayo says that our basketball team will go undefeated all the way next year, so he is reserving his room in Kansas City. We're with you all the way, Jim. Did you hear the latest? Lil' Abner finally got a new pair of shoes. It seems that we have a new sport developing in Delzell. A form of baseball, played with a tennis racket and ball, is the new sport. Rex Rhodes, a basement resident, asked me to ask that all games be suspended on Sunday afternoons, .during napping hours.

I hear that Norman Catlett is growing a beard because he likes to look grubby in the Spring. Having so many days off from school is the usual topic for discussion in the dorm at the present time. Therefore, I asked a few of the guys how they liked all this free time. Glen Beran-"! don't like it because I don't get enough sleep." Bruce Francey-"The days off are not long enough for people from New York to go home." Rex Rhodes- " M i g h t y fine, mighty fine." Gary Neddenriep-"! don't like them because they give me too much time to think." George Zwickel-"Due to the circumstances, they're too much, too fast, and too soon. Dale Rocchietti-"Good time to build snowmen."

Four of the girls from the dorm will be student teaching off campus this last quarter. They are Marilynn Giesmann, Elaine Hinton, Pauline Fink, and Rosalie Oestmann. Carol Ellenberger celebrated her birthday with her friends in the dorm. On the way back from Kansas City, Nancy Sears, Mary Lou Reid, Lynn Bailey, and Gloria Frankl devised a system using numbers instead of words f o r certain phrases. Better watch out when one of these girls says she is going to go "75." Lee Christen is wondering who stole the Easter bunnies: off of the second floor bulletin board. Winnie Sporer and: Penny Thorkildsen had quite a surprise when the mirror fell off the 'Yan and broke. It is unfortunate that they will have seven more years of bad luck. Jeannine Ehlers staged an "unbirthday" party for Joan Riggle and Gladys Mahoney. With this type of holiday in mind, one could certainly have a reason for a party anytime. There may be a traffic mishap in the halls if Joan Wesolowski doesn't get the horn fixed on her sportscar. She nearly collided with Rose Clancy and her truck. Many of the girls have acquired nicknames. Some of them are: Bonnie Jean Steele .... "B.J." Roberta Thomas ..... "Bobby" Kathy Dunahoo ....... "Tex" Judy Wolf ......... "Foxy" Carol McLain . . . . . . . . "Mac" Bev O'Harra . . . . . . . "Harry"

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks March 27, 1961 PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Ray G. Meister ----------------------------------Co-editor Linda Bertram ----------------------------------Co-editor Morris Keyt ----------------------------------Copy Editor Sandy Craig --------------------------------Layout Editor Carolyn Reiber -----------------------------Layout Editor Jack Johnson --------------------------------Sports Editor Darrel Wolcott --------------------------Business Manager Gerald Kirkendall ______________________Personnel Manager Pam Yost ---------------------------------Women's Sports Gary Brown -----------------------------Columnist Delzell Susan Sharp _______________________ Columnist Morgan Hall Catherine !deus -------------------------Columnist Library Raymond Hunzeker ______________________Columnist Majors Ron Pethoud --------------------------Columnist Exchange Barbara Wheeldon -------------------------------Reporter Melissa Fulkerson --------------------------------Reporter Jerry E. Gress -------------------------------.----Reporter Phyllis Grube ------------------------------------Reporter Edna McGovern ----------------------------------Reporter Gary Weiss --------------------------------------Reporter Tom Yopp ---------------------------------------Reporter Gerald Jeanneret --------------------------------Reporter Mary. Anna Gnade ------------------------------Columnist Stewart Linscheid --------------------------------Sponsor

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AROUND THE CAMPUSES By Ron Peihoud The Hermes-The men of Dana campus raided the girls' dorm. The men were so swift and quiet that the girls didn't realize what had hit them until it w a s over. Considering the raid a complete success, the men went back to their dorms, not realizing what was in store for them. Within twenty-four hours, another raid was being planned. This raid was more deadly than Pearl Harbor. This time, the girls were taking action. The "Curvaceous Raiders" hit the boys' dorm the next night. They converged upon the dorm with "thundering hooves and hearty .screams." It came as a complete surprise to the boys who had just turned in for the night. One fellow was caught in the hall wearing his bathrobe and soon wound up outside barefooted in the snow. "Vengeance is sweet." The Midland-One of the boys of Midland had a slight accident at one of their basketball games. Instead of struggling to climb the crowded bleachers with a soft drink in each hand, he decided to take a short cut underneath the bleachers. Things became a little more complicated when he began seeking the right leg to pull, in order to have the two drinks rescued. He soon wound up "wearing" his refreshments. Could it be that he pulled the wrong leg? The Wesleyan-Stan Welch of Wesleyan offers the following apology to Peru's basketball players: "In the February 6 issue of the WESLEYAN, this writer was guilty of several rash statements relative to Peru State and the Peru basketball team. I admit to the writing of certain statements in a heat of emotions. These statements ware not written in the tradition of good objective journalism. I apologize to the Peru players for any statements in that column which were untrue."

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NOTES FROM MAJORS HALL

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By Raymond Hunzeker Heading the sick list from Majors Hall was the Pop Machine last week. It was on the "blink" · but is in working condition now. Majors Hall was well represented at the N.A.I.A. tournament held in Kansas City on Monday and Wednesday. Almost every dormitory resident w a s present at one of the two games played. Guests of Majors Hall were two faculty and six members of Wayne's Epsilon Pi Tau Industrial Arts Fraternity F rid a y night. Majors Hall may be used as a women's dormitory this summer. Gary Stover, Butch Whitfield, Chick Stessman were in the play "Arsenic and Old Lace." Butch is still acting as if he were a cop! How about that Butch? Roger Eshelman was master of ceremonies at the joint WaynePeru Epsilon Pi Tau initiation. Drexel Harvey deserves a pat on the back for participating in the tournament with his sprained ankle. Gary Stover and Butch Whitfield presented their pantomime act "Tea for Two," and "What It Was, It Was Football" for the Epsilon Pi Tau initiation.

Kings Will Be T y r a n i s , Ward Hawkins, is a novel of r and death, individual sacrifi and violence, seething under t surface of the Cuban Revol tion. Two heroic men find the selves fighting side by side, b are bitterly opposed to the ul · mate uses that will be made Cuba's freedom. In Kissing Cousins, Americ born Emily Hahn gives a humo ous, perceptive, and candid a count of an eye-opening trip America with her two Engli daughters. She views and views her country and her fa ily through her daughters' eye Two Minutes Till Midnight, Elmer Davis, is about the pos bility of thermonuclear confli The author assesses our prospe -and our perils. Simply and sf ringly, he tells his countrym that they must never surrend for if they surrender, they wi no longer be Americans. f:

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Complete Results of Speech Contest One-act plays by Nebraska City and Lourdes Central of Nebraska City received superior ratings in the Nebraska High School Activities Association District Speech Contest on the Peru State Teachers College Campus Friday. Nebraska City High School presented "The Dear Departed," while Lourdes Central presented "Our Town." Linda Mead, Nebraska City, was named outstanding actress and Sam Carneal, Nebraska City, the outstanding actor in Class A one-act plays. Sally Miller a n d Tom Knoll, both of Lourdes Central, were selected as the outstanding actress and actor in Class B. Other one-act play ratings included: Class A-Auburn, "Balcony Scene,'' excellent; and Ralston, "Cradle Song," good. Class B-Humboldt, "Happy Journey," excellent.

Phyllis Grube Bates and Pa! Rathe hold ihe trophies which were awarded to the championship d runner-up teams at the Peru Invitational Volley Ball Tournament held March 20, 21 and 22.

acred Heart Wins Volley Ball Tournament Sacred· Heart of Falls City won 6-8 to Tobias and then went eir first championship in the ahead to win 13-1 and 8-5. The eru State Invitational Volley last game went down to the wire ·all Tournament for High School with the score knotted three-all irls Wednesday, March 22, by with four minutes remaining, at · wning top-seeded Tobias. Sa- 4-4 with three minutes yet to d Heart placed third in the play, and at 5-5 with two min(} event by defeating Tobias, utes left in the game. The Sacred 1958 champions. Thirty-two Heart Irish spikers scored their ams were entered in the fif- three winning points in the final 1:12 minutes of play. enth annual event. In the quarter finals Tuesday DawsoncVerdon, the 1960 ham p s, won the consolation evening Tobias defeated Mason me 2-0 over Dunbar. Sacred City 2-0; Dunbar won from Avo.,;' eart advanced to the finals by ca 2-1; Dawson-Verdon downed. feating Dawson-Verdon 2-1 Douglas, 2-0, and Sacred Heart d Tobias defeated Dunbar 2-1 defeated Palmyra, 2-0. Second round results: Tobias 2, the semi-final rounds. In the championship battle, Sa- Bennington O; Mason City 2, ed Heart lost the opening game Sterling l; Douglas 2, Stella O; the group in "I'm Gonna' Build a Bar." Dick Gerber, Tom Aitken, Bob Reimers, Gerald Jeanneret, and Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president Alvin Gunther decided to sing. Nebraska State Teachers Col- They sang little, but provided e, Peru, addressed a 6:30 p.m. much in the way of entertainner meeting of the Denver ment as they attempted to preea Chapter of the Peru Alum- sent such melodies as "Pickin' Association, Saturday, March Time" and "I Hurt My Knee," an , at American Legion Post No. original composition by Dick 1370 Broadway, Denver, Colo. Gerber. Dr. Harlan, who sponsored the Alumni, former students, and bus, was always in on the singiends of Peru State Teachers ing and fun. He lead as the group ollege from Colorado, Southern sang "Susanna Went Awading" . yoming and Southern and and even passed out green candy estern Nebraska attended the to those of Irish descent in recog· eeting, according to Donald K. nition of St. Patrick's Day. ·arlile, executive secretary of All aboard sang the songs that e Peru Alumni Association. groups find to sing and tried to remember forgotten words an d choruses. Sometimes words and melodies were not true, but what was lacking in talent w a s made up in good spirits. Both trips show that people By Susan Sharp can have fun anytime and anyi. The four busloads of Peruvians where. ho traveled to Kansas City und plenty of happy people d opportunities for fun. The first day, supplies of food ere brought along for the expehion. The travelers could hardwait for the buses to leave so Phi Alpha Theta and P.S.H.A. ey could begin eating. Many met Monday, March 6. P 1 an s so brought cards and reading were discussed about the annual · aterials to consume time on the magazine, put together by the · ur-hour trip. members, and about the banquet Only two buses m i g r a t e d to be held in the latter part of ednesday. This time the trip April. During the meeting, Gary wn was somewhat quieter. Brown showed slides he had takme sang such old favorites as en on his trip to Europe. ' he Ship Titantic" and "EveryAfter the meeting, new mem. ·ng's Up To Date in Kansas bers were initiated. New mem)ty." A few even tried to study. bers are: Roger Killion, Robert ; The journey back, however, Kepler, Richard Neale, and Ross ''.as full of songs and fun. Judi Pilkington. Linda Beery, also a new mem·• ilson was first to lead the sing. g with "Messy Ravioli"; then ber, was unable to attend the en Sims and Darrell Feit lead initiation.

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Dawson-Verd-0n 2, Hickman O; Avoca 2, Millard O; Dunbar 2, Brock O; Palmyra 2, Lewiston l; Sacred Heart 2, Endicott 0. Opening round results: Tobias 2, Weeping Water O; Bennington 2, Bratton Union 1; Mason City 2, Dorchester O; Sterling 2, Shubert 1; Avoca 2, Cortland O; Millard 2, Nehawka O; Dunbar 2, Diller 1; Central of Sprague-Martell forfeit to Brock; Stella 2, Weston O; Douglas 2, Honey Creek O; Dawson-Verdon 2, Talmage O; Hickman 2, Elk Creek O; Endicott 2, Adams O; Sacred Heart 2, Yutan O; Palmyra 2, Table Rock 0; Lewiston 2, P e r u Prep 0.

New Members Initiated At Alpha Mu Omega Alpha Mu Omega Fraternity met Tuesday evening, March 21, in the Science Building. At the completion of the business meeting, the program committee furnished entertainment. Dick Blake, Dennis Peterson, Gene Fritch, Jim Thompson, Stan Geer, and Ed McCartzey w ere initiated as new members of the organization. The evening's activities were concluded with the serving of refreshments. INTERSCHOLASTICS HERE (Continued from page one) Cook, Dawson-Verdon, Douglas, Dunbar, Gretna, H um b o 1 d t , Johnson, Lewiston, · Louisville, Lourdes Central of Nebraska City, Millard, Nemaha, Pawnee City, Peru Prep, Salem, Shubert, Springfield, Stella, Talmage, Waverly, Weeping Water, and Yutan. As this meet occurred after the Pedagogian's Wednesday deadline, the staff will give you the complete results in the n ext issue. STUDENT WIVES CONDUCT R. C. DRIVE (Continued from page one) in the college gymnasium. Election of officers will be held at the April 20 meeting. Mrs. Robert Heng, Jr., Mrs. Ronald Callan, and Mrs. Ray Koetter compose the committee which will make arrangements for the annual banquet and dance. Sandwiches, mints, and coffee were served by Mrs. Bill Hudson, Mrs. Bill Fitzgerald, and Mrs. John Werner.

Ralston, good; Patricia O'Farrell, Plattsmouth, good. Discussion: Class B-Stephen Harmon, Salem, good; L arr y Lanning, Dawson-Verdon, average; Ron McGinnis, Humboldt, excellent; David Fitz k ham, Lourdes Central, excellent; Dennis Witcofski, Millard, excellent; Wilbur Gentry, Salem, excellent; Jerry Owens, Dawson-Verdon, excellent; Janet Collins, Lourdes Central, superior; John Kotouc, Humboldt, average. Extemporaneous S p e a k in g: Class A-Lyle Brown, Nebraska City, excellent; Claire Julian, Plattsmouth, good; Steve Davis, Syracuse, superior; Pat Ainsworth, Ralston, excellent. Class B-Warren Wheeler, Millard, superior; Ron Volkmer, Lourdes Central, excellent; Wilbur Gentry, Salem, good. Original Public Address: Class A-Clair Julian, Plattsmouth, good; Nancy Siewerdsen, RalRatings in other events includston, excellent; Kent Neumeister, ed: Nebraska City, excellent; Jim Poetry Reading: Class ASherer, Syracuse, superior; Sue Charles Cawley, Ralston, good·; Leonard, Auburn, superior. Class Kenneth Price, Plattsmouth, exB-Patty Wassenberg, Humboldt, cellent; Arlene Schlange, Augood; Stephen Harmon, Salem, burn, excellent; Marjorie Enexcellent;' Ron. Schmitz, Lourdes right, Nebraska City, superior; Central, superior; Alfred E. Ron Lawton, Syracuse, superior. Smith, Shubert, good. Class B-Frances Esser, Lourdes Ooral Interpretation of Prose: Central, superior; Judy Wheeler, Class A~herry Merritt, NebrasMillard, excellent; Ann Wickham, Salem, good; Ann Kotouc, ka City,4''Superior; Ron Lawton, Syracuse," excellent; Barb PichHumboldt, excellent. ard, Ralston, excellent; Suzanne Interpretative Public Address: Murdock, Plattsmouth, good ; . Class A-Mary Kenna Henry, Mary Ann Griffith, Auburn, exNebraska City, superior; Mary cellent. Class B-Carole Shubert, Ullsperger, Syracuse, superior; Shubert, excellent; Wanda BramSteve Mannschreck, Auburn, exmer, Humboldt, superior; Regina cellent; Patricia O'Farrell, PlattsKrefelo, Lourdes Central, excelmouth, excellent; Ed Lippits, lent; Julie Hultman, Millard, exRalston, excellent. Class B-Jack cellent; Joan Decklinger, DawMack, Dawson-Verdon, g o o d ; son-Verdon, excellent; Sus an Harvey Fracer, Humboldt, good; Fouraker, Salem, average. Duane Hartmann, Millard, exRadio-Television Commentary: cellent; Terry Whitten, Salem, Class A-LeRoy Starr, Ralston, superior; M a d e 1 i n e Sasse, good; Carl Oestmann, Auburn, Lourdes Central, superior. excellent; Bill Morrissey, NeOral Reading of Drama: Class braska City, superior; Bill HighA-Nebraska City, superior; field, Plattsmouth, superior; BonRalston, excellent; Plattsmouth, nie Bauer, Syracuse, good. Class good; Auburn, excellent. Class B B-Tom Knoll, Lourdes Central, -Lourdes Central, sup er i o r ; excellent; Fred Mach, DawsonDawson-Verdon, excellent; SaVerdon, superior; Richard Stumlem, excellent; Millard, good; bo, Salem, excellent; Donald Humboldt, good. Weiss, Millard, good; Joe WittDiscussion: Class A-Florence wer, Humboldt, good. Stephens, Auburn, good; Stephen Davis, Syracuse, excellent; Janet Niebrugge, Nebraska City, excellent; Stephen Gold, Plattsmouth, Barber Shop good; LeRoy Starr, Ralston, suAUBURN, NEBRASKA perior; Carolyn Freeman, Nebraska City, excellent; Tim SherElly Ingersoll • Nate Hayes er, Syracuse, superior; Jim Kelly,

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Leroy Keyt Describes Larson Building and Tells You About Things To Look For At Open House In April The A. V. Larson Industrial Arts Building, located south of the Campus School on the west side of the Avenue, features beauty, safety, and utility. It is a 162 by 122 foot splitlevel building with two stories on the front or east, and one story on the rear or west. Lawn floodlights and spotlights on the front overhang reveal the brick veneer facing on exposed surfaces, trimmed with light green. Two front entrances give balance to the building. Fluorescent lamps and an ample sprinkling of windows, whose transparent qualities can be obscured by venetian blinds, expose vari-colored pastel walls and multi-colored floors. Slab marble paves the halls, while tile covers classroom and office floors.

his right or west. A classroom, the main office facilities, a seminar room and a second classroom lie to the east. ltrts and Crafis The arts and crafts shop parallels the ideal one-teacher high school shop, containing equipment for work with wood, clay, semi-precious stones, art metal, plastics, leather, reed, paper, and textiles. Twelve flexible w or k tables occupy the center of the room, while basic tools and machinery flange the shop. The electric kiln, at the south wall, has been used for glazing slab, coil, and low formings. The crafts shop serves junior h i g h students, girls, and future elementary teachers. The main office facilities include three offices to the east, a reception room, and a rest room. ·Dr. Owen Harlan occupies office number two; the two remaining offices are unoccupied at present. The seminar room will serve industrial arts student teachers in the future. In this connection, it will be 'used for classes and conferences, with a pertinent library at the east wall.

Safety Aids Each of the six shops and strategic points in the corridors are equipped with a fire extinguisher and a first aid station. A fire detector system protects the enAbby and Mariha Brewsier, played by Julie Mayer, Auburn, tire Industrial Arts Building. and Melissa Fulkerson, Omaha, look apprehensively ai iheir nephew Three safety switches in each Jonaihan. In ihe Peru Siaie Dramaiic Club produciion of "Arsenic shop make it possible for the inand Old Lace" presenied March 16, 8 p.m., Ray Meisier played !:he structor to turn off power with pari of the villain, J onafhan. alacrity. Compressed air is an importElectronics Equipment EPSILON PI TAU Schwartzkopf, both of the Lin- ant component in the exhaust The 52 by 30 foot electricity HOLDS INITIATION coln public schools. Also D o n and dust collection systems. The and electronics shop lies at the Carlile of Peru State was a guest. former system covers and re- south ~nd of the first floor. The (Continued from page one) in the U. S. Mr. Larson is one Tei add a little fun to the pro- moves heat and noxious ga~es. shop boasts dynamic demonstraof fifteen honorary members in gram, Gary Stover and Larry The dust collecting s y s t e fu -tors ·for radio, television, a threeWhitfield, Peru State students, whisks shavings and sawdust pole electric motor, and low voltthe international fraternity. The initiation itself started the gave a pantomime. from power saws and other work age remote control wiring. T h e Following the banquet, a dance areas. proceedings. It started at 5:30 floor and wall cabinets along the p.m. in the Music Hall and ended was sponsored by Epsilon Pi Tau. Propane, oxygen, and acety- east wall store test equipment, around 6:30. The Wayne St ate Music was furnished by the Stai;t- lene are piped to the individual including: eight vacuum tu b e students had charge of the initi- lighters dance band. Everyone. shops from storage supplies out- voltmeters, nine volt-ohm milation. From 6:30 till 8:00, a ban- was invited. side the building. Economy, con- liammeters, two AC ammeters, There were 14 students and venience, and safety favor this an AC milliammeter, a DC amquet was held in the Student Center. A. V. Larson was guest three instructors who made the central supply system instead of .meter, a volt and wattmeter, speaker. He talked on the history trip from Wayne. Peru w,as rep- the single-shop supply plan. three Eico signal generators, a of Epsilon Pi Tau. Toastmaster resented by the four officers: Each of the six shops has areas Heathkit test oscillator, an Eico was Roger Eshelman. The invo- Pres., Roger Eshelman; Vice for material and project storage. signal tracer, a battery eliminatcation was given by Mr. Lester Pres., Dick Gerber; Sec., Jim Do. Each teacher has an office, plus or and charger, a power transvel; and Treas., Erik Mortenson. a demonstration and planning former, a transformer and rectiRussell. Ray Schreiner, a member of Gail Beckstead is also an active room. Book shelves, coat racks, fier checker, a sine-square wave the Industrial Arts faculty at member. The neophytes or new lockers, and lavers provide for generator, two oscilloscopes, and Wayne, and a former student of members are Ernest Glockel, student needs. two power labs. · A. V. Larson, talked on the Marion Battani, James Johnson, A small appliance repair panel Cabinets By Prison and Ron Oestmann. Omega chapter. is under construction at the west The base cabinets, tool cabiPeru's instructors were repreDee Jarvis talked on the Eta wall of the electronics shop. A chapter of Peru. Owen Harlan in- esnted by Dr. Owen Harlan, Dee nets, book cases, and several oth- motor and generator repair panel troduced the guests, who were Jarvis, Lester Russell, and Ever- er items in the A. V. Larson is planned for the same wall. Building were built by the state Chester Gausman and Edward ett Traylor. Along the south wall, next to prison industries, effecting a cost the communications room, there reduction up to 40 per cent. is a practice radio-phonograph and a practice TV set. Graphic Aris The communications room at If one enters the north first the southeast corner of the elecfloor corridor by way of the vesComplete Line of School Supplies tibule, the graphic arts shop lies tronics shop has sound-absorbent ceilings and twin-pane windows to his right. Revlon, Coty and Evening in Paris Twenty drafting and mechan- which shut out distracting noise. Cosmetics ical drawing tables fill the east The Hammarlund all-band re~ half of the graphic arts shop. The ceiver is perhaps its most disKODAKS & SUPPLIES west half of the room houses tinctive piece of equipment. An Fast Film Service equipment for binding, letter- amateur transmitter for t h is Bring Us Your Prescriptions press printing, silk screen print- room is in the planning stage. ing, gold-leaf stamping, rubberGround Floor stamp making, and stereotypeDescending the south stairs to plate making. A black-on-white print machine re-produces tracings and mechanical drawings photographically. A recently acquired Davidson Offset Press, which will handle sheets up to 10 by 14 inches, utilizes the photo-offset method.

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the ground floor, one finds on the west the general metals shop, boys' rest room and showers, the general mechanics shop, the finishing room, and the general wood shop. A crawl area and equipment room lie to the east. Two planning rooms and metal storage areas lie to the west of the men's room. A planning room and wood storage areas are west of the finishing room. Meial Shop Both gas and electric welding may be done in the general metals shop, as well as forging and heat treating. Specific equipment in the metals shop include a foundry, four Sheldon lathes, a horizontal mill, a contour cutting band saw, a power hack saw, a surface grinder, and a tool grinder. Although not fully completed yet, the power mechanics shop n will eventually house courses in • acl p o w er mechanics, upholstery, · farm and home mechanics, shop maintenance, and driver training. When tJ:w necessary equipment . has been installed, all types of motors will be repaired in this shop. At present, equipment includes welding lines, an auto hoist, a ,i;pacl.iine lathe, and a hydraulic-ti~ress. · The most distinctive feature of the wood finishing room is the spray booth. The general wood area has nine 4-place work benches. Two pieces of certain ;. types of equipment speed up project work in this area. Specifical- Te ly, the equipment includes a surfacer, two lathes, two circular ~ saws, two radial arm saws, a · band saw, a tool grinder, a sand- 1 • rr er, two jointers, and two driU ·• presses. To the rear of the ground floor, there is a forty foot concrete apron for outside storage of ma-. chinery. Harlan Discusses Planning A recent statement by Dr. Owen Harlan points out the projective planning which has gone into this building. "The Industrial Arts Building was built not onry to meet present needs, but with flexibility and sufficient space to m e e t future needs brought about by incre·ased enrollment, changes in education patterns, industrial development, and an expanded industrial arts program." "Nothing is or can be accidental with God."-Longfellow.

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Dark Room The I. A. darkroom lies at the head of the north stairs. A vestibule at the darkroom entrance averts undesired print exposure. The enlarger, a Simmons Omega D-2, stands on the north base cabinet. The two darkroom sinks were made by the Nebraska prison industries. The usual darkroom equipment found here includes paper, chemicals, trays, and dryers. Entering the first floor northsouth corridor from the north, one finds a display room, the arts and crafts shop, the ladies rest room, and a janitor's closet to

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Statistical Record Of Bobcat Champs underdog, Peru S t a t e In the remaining 10:53, the Pechers College Bobcat cagers, ruvians made 12 of 16 free in the eked off fourth-seeded Ogleshop, rpe University of Atlanta, throws good. In the final 22 secs, the rgia, 72-65 Monday in t h e onds, Tom Yopp added two field e fin- hing round of the 23rd annual goals and Oglethorpe's Tom Normeral · ional Association of Intercol- wood made a final second-goal and ·ate Athletics tournament at for the 72-65 finish. Peru State got 46 rebounds and Oglethorpe east. · sas City, Missouri. got 33. metal e victory advanced the BobA following of at least 300 Pe;st of to the second round against ru State fans and the Peru State nning bling (La.) Colllege. Gramareas g defeated Linfield College of Teachers College Band were on · innville, Oregon, 107-85 in hand for the Bobcats' victory. A om. number of private cars in addiir first round encounter. tion to four chartered buses prohe Bobcats first round oppon_vided transportation for Peru !lding · , Oglethorpe University, was fans. met- ed in the N.A.I.A. final statis: and ' 1 report as being the leading PERU (72) tp fg ft >ment 'ensive team in the nation, Harvey -------- 2 0-0 4 de a · ing held their opponents to Rathe --------- 3 7 1-3 .es, a points per game while build- Buettgenbach -- 6 6-11 18 cut- a 20-3 record. Peru State out- Yopp 16 4-4 ---------- 6 hack red all of Oglethorpe's previ- Roach 20 6-9 --------- 7 ad a opponents. 7 3-4 Mayo ---------- 2 0-0 0 ,n Monday's contest the Peru- Stessman ------ 0 >leted ns took the lead 13-12 after 20-31 72 shop minutes of play on Mike Totals _______ 26 es in ch's field goal. The speedy O'THORPE (65) fg tp ft stery, rd hit 20 points to lead the 0 0-0 Couch --------0 shop scoring. 2 0-1 Nance --------- 1 lning. 12 2-3 Mitchell . y halftime the Peruvians led ------5 iment 2-2 18 $ of .31. With seven minutes gone Norwood ------ 8 14 6-7 this the second period, a charity Goodwin ------ 4 2-2 18 by Oglethorpe's Goodwin Rowland ------ 8 ,t in0 0-0 ught the Georgians within Dobbs --------0 auto 1 1-2 a .hy- 'ee points of the Bobcats, 43- Sexton -------- 0 . As the Bobcats pulled away, '13-17 65 eries of Oglethorpe fouls sent Totals _______ 26 ature

-The Peru State Bobcat basketball quintet's key to success can be found on the statistic sheet. As winner of the Nebraska College Conference championship, the Peruvians led their opponents in nearly every statistical department. While posting a 16-6 season's record to date, Peru State scored 1,693 points to thejr opponents' 1,488. The Bobcats' scoring average per game stands at 76.9 compared to the opposition's 67.6. Rangy Bob Buettgenbach, Beatrice, paced the individual scoring with 438 points- for a 19.9 game average. Topping the field goal percentage statistics w a s Tom Yopp, sophomore from East Alton, Ill. Yopp canned 77 of 166 field goal attempts for a sparkling 46.3 per cent. In team statistics, the Peruvians led their antagonists 623 to 547 in ·field goals while shooting at a 39.1 per ~ent clip. Larry Rathe, Sterling's gift to the N.C.C. champions, led his teammates in free-throw percentage. Converting 67 of 88 ·charity tosses, Rathe's percentage was a highly respectable 76.1 per cent. In team totals, the Peruvians tallied 459 of 657 free throws for a shooting percentage of 69.8, compared to the opposition's 383 of 570 for 67.2 per cent.

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nTrack Lettermen wWorking Out

ards and Werner were members of the crack mile relay team which set the school record at 3:22.6 in 1959.

profical- en returning lettermen buoy In addition to Humphrey, other surPeru State Teachers College two-year monogram winners are cular .ck and field outlook for the Bob Gibson, Falls City, po 1 e rs, a 1 season. Coached by Jerome ..vault; LaMarr Gibson, Falls City, mnd- roper, who doubles as assist- javelin; Jerry Henning, Peru, basketball coach, the Peru discus; and Phil Rhodes, Weepdrill te thinclads have been work- ing Water, high jump. themselves into shape with floor, · Don Peterson, Richfield, heads ·. ividual workouts over the crete the returning one-year letter·t month. ma-. men. The slender sophomore last eading the list of returnees is year topped school records in 'bum's Ken Humphrey, lead- both the mile and two mile runs •9 point winner for the Bobcats with times of 4:33.7 and 10:11.3, Dr. t season and defending Ne- respectively. pro- ska College Conference high Shotput artist Vern Thomsen, gone '.. dle champion the last two 1dus- rs. Humphrey, a Peru State Exeter, a Fairbury College transt not · 'ior, will be working toward fer last year, rounds out the onebut third letter in the c in d e r year men certain of bolstering cient : rt.. Humphrey also doubles in the track squad. teeds broad )ump. Two other lettermen are quesen. hree-year letter winners who tion-mark performers this year ation 1 lead the team in experience because of work schedules. They nent, Jack Head, Bellevue, h i g h are Ken Dostal, Scribner, who arts p; Lanny Richards, Bellevue, lettered in the 440-yd. run, and , -yd. run and mile relay; and Ross Pilkington, Red Oak, Iowa, · n Werner, Falls City, 440-yd. who has earned one letter in the denand mile relay. Both Rich- sprints.

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In choosing a diamond ring, the way to be sure is to choose a genuine registered Keepsake Diamond Ring. Quality in diamonds is judged by color, cut and cla•rity, and Keepsake's quality is clearly defined in writ· ing for your protection •

In rebounding, Peru snared 887 off the boards for a 40.3 game average. Buettgenbach topped the rebounders with 199, but was closely followed by Larry Rathe's 187.

Baseball Prospects Are Very Good

AUBURN

By Jack Johnson The Peru State Bobcats' role of giant killer came to an abrupt end Wednesday afternoon, March 15, as Grambling (La.) College crushed the Bobcats 80 to 60 in the second round of the N.A.I.A. tournament in Kansas City. Grambling's tall and talented Tigers were little impressed by Peru's opening round victory ov- er fourth seeded Oglethorpe University as they spurted away from the Bobcats in the early stages of the game and led 39 to 22 at halftime. Fresh from their sparkling 10785 first round victory over Linfield College and with a 20-3 season's record, Grambling slashed to a 21-14 lead in the first nine minutes. Sweeping both boards cl~an, Grambling then held the outmanned Peruvians scoreless for five minutes while increasing their margin to 33-14. From then on it was no contest as the freewheeling Negro quintet fro m Louisiana thundered to victory. The battling Peru State cagers never gave up, but, the best they

By Tom Yopp Ten lettermen bolster the Peru State Teachers College baseball prospects for the 1961 season. These veterans will form the nucleus of what head coach Al Wheeler calls "potentially t h e best squad since we reinaugurated baseball four years ago." Returning from last year's Bobcat nine, who posted an 11-6 record, will be the entire outfield trio-Mike Roach, Palmyra; Larry Gilson, Fullerton; and Drexel Harvey, Hartford, Ill. Roach and Gilson are two-year letter winners, and Harvey a one-year lettermarl. Coach Wheeler calls this one of the best outfields in the Nebraska College Conference. Lefty Ron Kelly, Falls City, who posted a 5-1 record last year, will lead the mound corps. Dave Fritch, Atlantic, Iowa, another letterman due for mound duty, is expected to be a front line hurler. The Bobcat infield looks strong down the middle. Roger Smith, East Alton, Ill., and Bill Fitzgerald, Genoa, will be working for their third letters at shortstop and second base, respectively. A one-year monogram winner, Barney Mcllvoy, South Lyon, Mich., will be fighting for a second base slot. Another one-year letterman, · Jim Fisher, Falls City, will be in contention for the shortstop berth. Returning for his fourth year behind the plate will be Dick Gerber, Fullerton, who has earned three letters behind the chest protector and mask. Wheeler calls Gerber one of the best in the league.

TAYLOR'S JEWELRY

'Cats Dropped By Gram~ling

A host of newcomers and returnees who have not lettered will battle the veterans for starting jobs. Infield possibilities are: Tom Yopp, East Alton, Ill.; Larry Widrig, Rockford, Ill., Gordon

Ohnoutka, Valparaiso, and Michael Hunt, Tecumseh. Outfield candidates are: Howard Engberg, Springfield, and Larry Cornelius, Pickrell. A number of fine mound prospects brighten the Bobcat outlook. These include: Jim Snyder, Nebraska City; Bob Reimers, Brock; Leonard Jacob, Council Bluffs; Calvin Hamilton, Clarinda, Iowa, a letterman at Northwest Missouri State last year; Jim Simones, Tekamah; and Jim Joy, Shubert. Bob Swinney, Nebraska City, and Ron Carnes, Auburn, head the list of catching prospects. Peru State will align with the newly formed Nebraska College Baseball Conference. All other N.C.C. schools will field teams except Doane College w h i c h plans to enter diamond competition in 1962.

could do was to narrow the margin to 15 points at one point in the second half. Though seeded only 13th in the tourney many ·observors feel that Grambling is the team to beat. Peru's Bob Buettgenbach, Beatrice, led t!Jr" team in scoring with 21 points. Mike Roach and Tom Yopp followed with 13 and 12 respectively. Rebounding demon, Charles Hardnett, paced Grambling with 20 points. fg PERU (60) Harvey -------- 1 Rathe --------- 5 Buettgenbach -- 7 Yopp ---------- 6 Roach --------- 6 Mayo ---------- 1 Gibson -------- 0 Totals

_______ 26

GRAM'ING (80) fg Hardnett ------ 7 Trippett ------- 3 Reed ---------- 6 Calhoun ------- 4 West ---------- 9 Ricks ---------- 2 Bowens ------- 1 Totals

_______ 32

ft 0-0 0-0 7-10 0-0 1-2 0-U 0-1

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Ten Track Meets Scheduled For 'Cats Ten meets are on tap for the Peru State Teachers' College 1961 track and field team according to Jerome Stemper, h e a d track coach. Of these ten scheduled meets, only three will be on the Peru State cinders. The 1961 schedule includes: April 12, Tarkio at Peru; April 14, Washburn at Topeka, Kansas; April 18, Tarkio and Maryville at Maryville, Missouri; April 21, Nebraska Wesleyan Invitational at Lincoln; April 26 or 27, Mid~ land at Peru; May 2, Maryville at Peru; May 9, Doane Relays at Crete; May 12, Nebraska St ate Teachers College Meet at Kearney; May 19-20, Nebraska College Conference Meet at Hastings; June 2-3, N.A.I.A. Meet at Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

McINTIRE'S GARAGE and

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Peru, Nebr.


St. Patrick's Dance Sponsored By Epsilon Pi Tau

Jindra and Rath Are Retiring

Band and Choir To Go On Tour

Campus School Chatter.

Marilyn Michel Wins Music Contest

By Mary Anna Gnade The St. Patrick's Day Dance, Miss Marilyn Michel, Annual FHA mother-daughter A two-day tour of the Peru · Two faculty retirements and sponsored by Epsilon Pi Tau, was won the music c on t es t one faculty reassignment on the held in the Student Center, Fri- State College Concert Choir and banquet had the usual good food, March 18 in the Music Hall. faculty of Peru State Teachers day, March 17, from 9 to 12 p.m. Symphonic Band Ensemble has good company, and the usual won with a vocal solo. Miss sudden awareness of "how our College have been announced by Tom Mincer and Virginia John- been scheduled for March 27-28, Lu Hicks, Stella, was· second girls have grown up!" Highlight according to Victor H. Jindra, President Neal S. Gomon. a piano solo. son wer!f chosen king and queen head of the division of fine arts. of the evening was the installaVictor H. Jindra, head of the at random from those present. Eleven students competed tion of new officers. As Elaine division of fine arts, and George the scholarship for the t . • Sponsors were Mr. and Mrs. D. Concerts will be presented in six Gerdes turned the gavel over to Rath, associate professor of mod- V. Jarvis, Mr. and Mrs. Lester area high schools. week summer Music Camp at Marilyn Larsen, she remarked, ern languag~s, will retire at the Russell, and Dr. Owen Harlan. The choir, under the direction University of Nebraska. The'. "That's the end of my responsiend of the current academic test was sponsored by Nebr'. The bandstand and tables were of Edward G. Camealy, assistant bilities except for the slumber year. T. I. .Friest, dean of busi- decorated with green shamrocks. professor of voice, will present General Women's Federation; ness affairs, will be reassigned to Music was provided by the Blue concerts- Monday, March 27 in party the senior and junior FHAJudges were V. H. Jindra,'. ers give for the others." (Sluma non-administrative position on Notes. T. Benford, and E. G. Cam · Nebraska City at 9 a.m., Hamber party was also a huge sucJuly 1, 1961. burg, Iowa, at 11 a.m., and Syracess.) The retirements and change of cuse at 2:30 p.m. Amid all the snow and attendassignment result from an impleThe March 28 itinerary of the ant "volley ball tournament'' mentation of a regulation on reSymphonic Band Ensemble, unweather, the bulletin board in the tirement recently adopted by the der the direction of Gilbert E. The Peru State College Board of Education of State NorWilson, director of bands, w i 11 elementary school hall cheerfully made a trip to Kansas announced "It's spring!" mal Schools. Under the new polMarch 13 to lend its supper Two Peru State Teachers Col- include Fairbury at 9 a.m., Heicy all professional personnel are bron at 11:10 a.m., and Deshler, You can see Mrs. Adams sev- this year's basketball team a. lege graduates, Brian R. Gfeller retired at age 65, however, such at 2 p.m. eral times a day and each time N.A.I.A. tournament. The e · persons may be employed in a and Frederick Regnier, ha v e she'll have another amusing tale. ensemble played pep music non-administrative position on a been awarded graduate study F'rinstance: she explained to her ing the game. They were di grants in the field of science for year-to-year basis until Septemkindergarteners how a barometer ed by Mr. Gilbert Wilson ber 1 following their 68th birth- the 1961-62 school year, accordworks and set it up for observa- Don Johnson. ing to Hanford Miller, associate day. tion. A week later she remarked Since the team was victor professor of chemistry at Peru Jindra, head of the fine arts to the class how remarkably ac- on Monday, the band return"' State. department since 1952, and proAn organizational meeting for curate it was, the little boy and the tournament on Wednesd Gfeller, currently teaching in the Association for Childhood fessor of music and director of little girl coming out at the propthe college and campus school the Scotia public schools, has re- Education was held following a er times. Up shot little John orchestras, has been a member of ceived a National Science Found- dinner meeting in the Student Coatney's hand, "Sure, I helped the Peru State music faculty ation scholarship for graduate Center in February. The A.C.E. it-each morning I looked out the since 1923. Receiving his bache- study in science ·at B ow 1 in g is an organization for those who window and turned it to match." lor's degree from the University Green (Ky.) College. The Peru are vitally interested in the wel- (Moral: who needs a barometer of Nebraska. in 1923, Jindra con- prep high school graduate re- fare of children aged two to when you can look out the wintinued his study of music, com- ceived his bachelor's degree from twelve. dow, or why teachers sometimes pleting advanced study at the Peru State in 1957. He is the son Plattsmouth, Syracuse, Nebras- feel frustrated.) Chicago Musical College in 1925. of Mr. Fred Gfeller, Peru. ka City, Brock, Johnson, Auburn, Then, too, Mrs. Adams has in He studied violin under s u c h A member of the Humboldt Falls City, and Peru were repremasters as Carl Frederick Steck- public school staff, Regnier will sented. The following officers her room a sweet potato plant elberg, Max Fischel, and Victor continue study in chemistry at were elected: Mrs. Maryon Ad:- "with a thyroid condition." One 'Kuzdo. the University of Oklahoma, Nor- ams, Peru, president; Mrs. Har- little girl rushed up to Mrs. A Prior to joining the Peru State man, under a University of Okla- riet Anville, Nebraska City, vice gasping, "it GRABBED at me!" faculty, Jindra served as the homa assistantship. Regnier, a president; Mrs. Wilma Heiser, (Too much TV Twilight Zone?) principal in. the Linwood and graduate of Diller high school Falls City, secretary; Mrs. Jim English supervisor Mrs. GerBruno high schools and as super- and 1960 graduate of Peru State, Jennings, Plattsmouth, treasurer. gen does her part to encourage intendent at Brainard and Firth. is the son of Mr. and Mrs. peorge The organization works closely TV viewing and movie going. He is a member of Phi Beta Kap- Regnier, Diller. Fred is married with the American Association of Special programs on TV are aspa and Phi Delta Kappa national to the former Linda Moore, Ne- University Women, the American signed to various high school fraternities. In 1944 he served as maha, a 1960 graduate of Peru Library Association, the Depart- classes to be reported on; letters president of the Peru Kiwanis State and a member of the Hum- ment of Health, Education and are composed to producers, stars, boldt public school faculty. Club. Welfare, the National Congress TV stations, etc.; and to top it off ·A one-man foreign language of Parents and Teachers, the Na- for the freshman class, Mrs. G department, George Rath will be tional Education Association, the and student teachers escorted the retiring after serving in that caWhite House Conference on Chil- wohle group to "Sunrise at Campobello." Who can object to pacity on the Peru State faculty dren and Youth. that type of teaching? since 1946. Rath, born of German The current program of A.C.E. parents, grew to manhood in the While Prepsters were not acThe Business Club met March is a study of the pressures of Russian Ukraine. In 1916 he was tive ·participants in the speech school and community on chilgraduated from the University at 20 in the Administration Builddren and how the pressures af- contest, members of English and Dorpat, Russia. Following service ing. A short business meeting speech classes were spectators at fect children. in the Russian army, Rath com- was held, and a committee was the various events. Rehearsals pleted ministerial training at the chosen to explore possibilities for are going forward for the music University of Teubingen, Ger- a field trip. contest with a dress rehearsal Two movies were presented many. A pogrom against Luthertype program· to be given f o r ans in his homeland caused Mr. entitled, "Credit-Man's ConfiPTA in April. Rath to move to the U n i t e d dence in Man" and "What Makes • Slim Styling Junior high had a most sucUs Tick." Following the movies, States in 1922. • Low Waisted cessful St. Patrick's dance and In the following year he was refreshments were served at Miss By Melissa Fulkerson • Adjustable Waistband have now won permission to atordained a Lutheran minister and Hazel Weare's home. • Wash 'n' Wear Memories of the past linger in tend the Sports Banquet and before coming to Peru State held Cords & Polished Cott the minds of the Mathews as dance. Mrs. Buethe is still doing pastorates in Montana, Colorado time. Dean Friest received hi s they make plans for the future. her part-senior high schoolers and Nebraska. While in Colorado bachelor of arts degree from RARICK CLOTHIN Their approaching retirement are finishing up their course in he received his A.B. degree at the Morningside College, Sioux City, brings back impressions of their social dancing, then junior high in University of Denver. In 1946 he Iowa, and his M.A. degree from early days at Peru N or ma 1 schoolers get a whirl at learning. AUBURN, NEBRiTl.SKA completed work toward his M.S. the University of Iowa. He began School. at the University of Nebraska. his teaching career at Bloomfield, Mrs. Mathews particularly reMr. Rath has taught French, where he served eight years. He members the Peru'hill as an inELLA MARGARET SHOP Spanish, German, and Russian at was superintendent of schools at troduction to the campus because Peru State. Wisner 16 years and headed the at that time, the students arrived The Shop of Quality Coming to Peru State in July, Plattsmouth school system for 15 by train and had to lug the i r Ladies' Wearing Apparel and Millinery 1959, T. I. Friest has served as years prior to joining the Peru suitcases uphill to the school. PHONE BR 4-3520 AUBURN, NEBR. dean of business affairs since that State staff. Groups of students used to

Band Supports 'Cats At Kansas City Tourney

Alumni Receive Grad Study Grants

A.C.E. Organized In Southeast Nebraska

Business Club Views Movies

Mathews Planning APleasant Future

BANK OF PERU PHONE TR 2-2331

Member F.D.I.C. INVITES YOUR BUSINESS CARROLL LEWIS, President

JOHN L. LEWIS, Vice Pres. & Cashier

BOWMAN'S HARDWARE Appliances -

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Hunting and Fishing Licenses PERU

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walk to Brownville, have a picnic lunch, and return to Peru by train. Mr. Mathews remembers when the boys used to go swimming in the Missouri River and had to swim back against the current to where they had left their clothing. The Mathews will enjoy their retirement on their 49 acres of land on the bluffs of the Missouri River. This land was the original Mount Vernon, the site of the town before Peru existed. Mrs. Mathews' maiden name was Ruth Vernon, and they have named their land "Mount Vernon Heights." The Mathews plan to further d e v e 1 o p their land through planting to conserve both beauty and wildlife.

PERU MARKET Rex Rains Meats Fmlk and Vegetables

Free Delivery Tuesday and Friday Phone TR 2-4351 PEBU CLEANERS 8t TAILORS Repair.ins Mi ltemodeling Mc ad Women's Clothing Forty-- Tears Serving lmdenis and Faculty PHO& ta J..2671 PERU, NEBR.


Peru iPublications Banquet

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU.NEBRASKA

hat They Say About That iddling Man - - Vic Jindra By Sandy Craig After a 38 year teaching career Peru State, Mr. Victor H. Jinwill retire in July of this r. As a teacher and as head qf Division of Fine Arts for nine rs, he has become well known well liked, not only by Peru ters but by people all over surrounding territory. s a tribute to a fine man and cher, just a few of his associs were asked what th e y ught of him. More would have n asked, but as one person , books could be filled about . Jindra and his accomplishts. --4~1v1iss Fr i e d a Rowoldt-"So ch can be said about that sixt man JINDRA, but poor me to sum it up in one paraph: who has at heart-uppermost-

l

Volume 56

Number 13

Dean Melvin Attends NCA

Dr. Keith Melvin attended the North Central Assoeiation of Colleges and Secondary Schools held at Chicago, Illinois, March 19-24, 1961. According to Dean Melvin, the general theme of the meeting was "Quality Education For All." On April 8, 1961, at the college The program was organized into club section meeting of the joint general sessions and small disconvention of the N e b r a s k a cussion groups. Some meeting Home Economics Association and topics were "The Meaning of Nebraska Dietetics Association, Quality in Education," "Testing Miss Mary Jarvis, Peru, Nebras- -A Tool in Producing Quality ka, was elected vice-president of Education For All. How Shall We the state college club section. Use It?" "Producing Quality EdMary is the third consecutive ucation For All," and "Quality candidate from the Peru Home Education For All." In addition. to the North CenEconomics Club to be elected to this office. Previous officers from tral Association of Colleges and the Peru Club were Miss Jean- Secondary Schools, Dean Melvin nine Ehlers, vice-president in attended the C o n f e r e n c e on 1959-60, and Miss Joan Riggle, North Central Association Summer School directors March 19 vice-president in 1960-61. and the Workshop for College One of the main duties of the vice-president is the planning of Presidents and Deans March 2122. the workshop. This workshop will be held on the Peru Campus next fall. The vice-president also assists the president with various duties.

Mary Jarvis, Vice President Nebraska Home Ee. Clubs

he welfare of others. ho very carefullly scrutinizes ll angles of a situation and hen makes a cautious decision. That is why he remained a ery happy bachelor.) Other state officers elected ho has given, without a mur- were Miss Gladys Rolfsmeyer, Mrs. Fran Wheeler, director of mur or complaint, time and University of Nebraska, presimoney to serve others. dent; Miss Jane Price, Univer- the May Fete, announces that the who is loyal to his employer, sity of Nebraska, president-elect; annual event will be May 5, 6:30 o matter what. Miss Barbara Bockman, Kearney p.m. This year's theme is "The ho is a true friend to all hu- State Teachers College, secre- Gay Fiesta." The Student Senate an beings no matter what tary-treasurer. Council members iS> working with Mrs. Wheeler on pecies. elected were Miss Karen Cobb, May Fete plans. Joan Riggle is h is that youthful-looking Wayne State Teachers College; heading the decoration commitan JINDRA." Miss Marilyn Jenkins, Chadron tee. Various Mexican dances are .:Frank Hays (Music Hall jani- State Teachers College; Miss being prepared by Mrs. Wheelr)-"I don't know what to say Judy Bondram, University of er's Modern Dance and Folk out a guy like that-you can't Omaha. Dancing classes. One of the high,t it into words. He has always lights will be the Mexican Hat ' ated me so nice that it's hard BASEBALL SCHEDULE Dance. The Maypole Dance will say anything nice e n o u g h be presented by the fifth an d April 12-St. Benedicts at At·out him. If Peru State stays sixth grade girls from the Camchison re another 94 years, they will pus School. April 14-Wesleyan at Lincoln '. ver find anybody like him. Mrs. Wheeler is working in April 18-Maryville at Peru ey won't find another guy who conjunction with Mr. Camealy on April 22-Kearney at Kearney 'll take the little kids who can the musical part of the program. April 28-Hastings at Peru rdly read and give them lesSeveral guitars. and voices in the May 5-Chadron at Peru '.ns and parties. He's done more · l this school than anyone else May 9-Maryville at Mary- crowd will supply the music. Other plans will be announced ville ound here. If everyone would later. May 12-Creighton at Peru rk like he has, we would have May 16-17-N.A.I.A. Playoffs re of a school than we'd know What one knows is, in youth, at to do with." With the exception of the 1 of little moment; they know ;Mr. Robert Moore-"He has May 16 playoffs, every Bobcat enough who know how to ·learn. ,obably developed more first outing is a doubleheader. -Henry Brooks Adams ss musicians than anyone I ow of. He starts kids at four · d five years of age and devels them. He has kept an orchesalive in this part of the state. e has made a contribution to · e whole state with his violin." '."Another characteristic of Mr. dra is that he's always interWhen this paper went to press, Fred A. Rathert gave greetings .ted in all activities-sports, Governor Frank B. Morrison was from the alumni; and Mr. Carl ays. He has cooperated with scheduled to deliver the main Spelts, president of the Board of er departments. His sense of address at the dedication cere- Education of State N o rm a 1 mor has saved the day mo.HY monies for the completed build- Schools, presented g r e e t i n g s .. es." ing program. The A. D. Majors from the board. 1 { 1 Mr. Max Langham-"He has a Mr. Edward G. Camealy diResidence Hall for men, the A. V. ady smile and shows genuine Larson Industrial Arts Building, rected. a vocal ensemble, which terest in people. He works well two additions to Eliza Morgan included: "The M a r ch e s of ith his colleagues." Women's Residence Hall, and the Peace," by Mueller; "Grant Unto : Judy Miller-"! think of Mr. Student Center were dedicated Me the Joy of Thy Salvation," by '.ndra as a teacher with capital Sunday, April 16, at 2 p.m. in the Brahms and Williamson; and, ..' His main concern has always College Auditorium. Dr. Neal S. "Come, Blessed Rest," by Bach en his students, and in a much Gomon presided at the ceremon- and Luvaas. 1 oader sense than just their mu- ies . The Honorable Frank Morri.cal relationship. I have studied The program opened with or- son, governor of the state of Neith Mr. Jindra for fourteen gan music by Mr. R. T. Benford, braska, then delivered the dediars and consider myself very and group singing of "Star Span- catory address. rtunate to have been one o'f his gled Banner" followed. The RevAfter the Governor's address, · pils, as do scores of other peo- erend George Rath gave the in- Mr. Victor H. Jindra led a string e." vocation. and wind ensemble in "Sym" ;Mr. R. T. Benford-"After Mr. Jack Johnson extended phony in D Major," by Sammar'any years of association with greetings from the student body. tini and Scarmolin, and excerpts ;ic' Jindra, I feel it would be Greetings from the faculty were from "The Sound of Music," by given by Mr. Lester Russell. Mr. Rodgers and Hammerstein. 1, (Continued on page three)

May 5 To Be Date Of May Fete

APRIL 17, 1961

Auf Wiedersehn, Prof. Rath Peru Band Tours Southeast Nebraska Once again the Peru Symphonic Band Ensemble has been on the go. This time it was for the annual spring tour. The thirtyfive members and their director, Mr. Gilbert E. Wilson, left by bus Tuesday, March 28 for a tour through Southern Nebraska. The first of the three concerts was played at Fairbury at 9:00 a.m. From there, they traveled to Hebron to play a concert at 11:00 a.m. The next stop was at the Longbranch in Hebron for a delicious meal. Following this, they proceeded to Deshler to play the final concert at 2:00 p.m. The repertoire for this year's tour included nine selections. Two of these, . "Soliloquy f or Trumpet" by John Morrissey and "Ode for Trumpet" by Alfred Reed, featured Don Johnson as solo trumpet player. Joining him in another of John Morrissey's pieces, "Concerto Grosso" were Robert Kaiser, a trumpet player from Auburn, and Hanford Miller, a trombone player from Peru. "Sax Soliloquy" by David Bennett featured the saxophone quartet consisting of Carol Sudik and Gaylin Sudik from Virginia, Wayne Wallace from Nebraska City, and Thomas Sheehan from Omaha. C 1 a r i n e t i st , Gary Schmucker from Brock, joined this group for David Schanke's selection, "Five Mellow Winds." The other selections on the program were: "Themes and Moods" by Miklos Rosza, "Themes from Caucasian Sketches" by Ippolitov-Ivanov, "Tango for Band" by Glenn Osser, and "Parade of the Charioteers" by Miklos Rosza.

Language Club Sees Film The Foreign Language Club met on March 27, at 8:00 p.m. in Room 101 in the Ad Building. The dub viewed a film on Mexico and one on Mexico City. After adjourning to the Music Hall, the Spanish students sang four songs. A short business meeting was held. A social hour followed.

Governor Morrison Gave Address As New Buildings Were Dedicated

o.g

April 25 7:00 P. M. Nebr. City

Dr. Owen Harlan gave the dedication for the A. V. Larson Industrial Arts Building; Mr. A. V. Larson gave the response. Dr. Harold Boraas gave the dedication for the A. D. Majors Residence Hall; Mr. A. D. Majors responded. Mrs. Harvey Hess, grand niece of Miss Eliza Morgan, gave the response to the dedication for additions to Eliza Morgan Women's Residence Hall, which were delivered by Miss Juanita Bradley. The Student Center dedication was given by Dr. Keith L. Melvin; Miss Jeannine Ehlers respolfded. The program closed with Peru's "Color Song," sung by the audience, and the benediction offered by The Reverend Rath. After the dedication ceremonies, open house was held in the four recently completed building projects.

By Ray Meister A friendly "Guten Morgen, Wie geht es Ihnen," and "Haben Sie seine Aufgabe gut vorbereitet'!" spoken with twinkling eyes is the usual greeting a student of German receives fro m Professor George Rath as he seats himself "in der klasse." Professor Rath, a man who always liked to make his students work, and who feels that perhaps he should have made them work harder, does not plan on being idle upon his retirement from the· Peru State Faculty. One year ago, his book "Klange der Seele," or "Sounds of the Soul," a collection of German poems was published. A book review in the Chicago Abendpost had this to say of Mr. Rath's work: "The present volume of poems is a 'Fruit of the soul's wounds, matdred ·in life's sorrow and splendor.' The author describes, in touching, poetic form, the destiny of the Russian-Germans, as well, as the nature and mode of liJ.£ihg bf this group of persons, fa~\from their home, in the American Middlewest.'' In the future, Mr. Rath plans to publish a collection of fables, also in German. Mr. Rath is indeed a master of languages. He can read, write, and fluently speak Russian, German, French, Spanish, English, and Ukranian, and also has a reading knowledge of Latin, Hebrew, and Greek. He began his education at the "gymnasium" in Russia, from which he graduated with four "B's" and the remainder, a 11 "A's." He then studied for two years at the University at Dorpat, Russia, until World War I came along. From 1916-1918 he served in the Russian Army, even though he was excluded from officers school because of his German descent. The rise of the Communists to power forced Mr. Rath to finish his studies at the University of Teubingen, Germany, where he received his degree in theology. In 1923, Mr. and Mrs. Rath were married at Loveland, Colorado, where Mr. Rath was serving as a pastor. To this marriage, three sons, George, Hans, and Otto, were born, of whom Hans and Otto are still living, and practicing medicine in Omaha. Mr. and Mrs. Rath are also very proud of their three grandchildren. For Peru, Mr. Rath has the highest regard. He is proud of the fact that his sons were educated here, and he has enjoyed living in this friendly town. After twenty-two years in the ministry, Mr. Rath says that he likes teaching young people better because, "I feel young with them." He is always very sincere with his students, and his students, likewise respect him, as can be seen by the fact that he was one of the finalists, last year, for the Peru College Teacher of the Year. Present and past foreign language students of Peru, will always remember the Foreign Language Club meetings, in which Mr. Rath has always been so interested. Another fond memory for them will be the Christmas party that the Raths have always held in their home, with M r s . Rath's spiced tea, and stacks of (Continued on page three)


Picfured are Miss Auburn, Mary Lou Reid (center), and the run·ner-ups: Marlene Lechliter, Auburn: Annabelle Ross, Shenandoah, Iowa: Pam Reid, Auburn; Carol McLain, Auburn. Miss Reid, a freshman from Bellevue, was crowned Miss Auburn Sunday evening, April 9. She is 'majoring in Home Economics.

Mary Lou Reid, Miss Miss Mary Lou Reid, a freshman from Bellevue, Sunday evening was crowned Miss Auburn of 1961 in the Auburn Jun i o r Chamber of Commerce pageant. Selected from a field of 17 candidates from Peru State Teachers College, Peru Prep, and Auburn High School, Miss Reid is t h e daughter of Capt. and Mrs. C. D. Harris, Offutt Air Force Base, Omaha, and a 1960 graduate of

~uburn,

Bellevue High School. Miss Reid did an interpretative dance f o r her talent number. Ranking in the top five were Miss Pamela Reid, Au b urn , daughter of Dr. and Mrs. C. A. Reid; Miss Annabelle Ross, Shenandoah, Iowa, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Ross; Miss Carol McLain, Auburn, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson McLain; Miss Marna Lechliter, Auburn,

1961

daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Lechliter. Miss Reid was the fifth Peru State Teachers College student to be crowned Miss Auburn since the inauguration of the pageant in as many years. She was crowned by 1960 Miss Auburn, Miss Linda Lee Nygaard, sophomore from Omaha, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dexter Nygaard.

It would seem that "Spring has sprung" on the Campus ~f a Thousand Oaks as seen in the reDELZELL WHISPERS appearance of summer frocks and DOINGS FROM nightly get-togethers on the steps MORGAN By of the girls' dorm. By Gary L. Spring may have influenced a Susan Brown young man's fancy, too, as three Sharp young ladies have recently received engagement rings. The Ken Rhodus is another Delzell The weeks of preparation for girls are Wilma Johnson who is Hall resident who has gotten the Miss Auburn Pageant are ovengaged to Leland Schmit, Jr. of married. Jane Kunkel is the other and again this year one of our Deshler, Bonnie Suda who is en- er half of this new family. Good girls, Mary Lou Reid, will repregaged to Ken Kreshel of Wilber, luck to you both. sent that city in the Miss Neand Kathy Graham who is enbraska competition. Other girls Lats week-end was not as borgaged to Cal Hamilton of Shenfrom the school who participated ing as the average week-end on in the event are Virginia Adkins, andoah, Iowa. the Peru campus. The Saturday Three girls have celebrated Carolyn Mercer; Sharon Donlan, party was responsible for making Bonnie Steele, Frances Sanders, birthdays in the dorm. They are this week-end a success; too bad Gloria Frankl, Judy Wolf, and Sandy Krakow, Bev Leper, and it had to snow. Annabelle Ross and Carol Mc- Karen Fankhauser. Who's Suzie Wong? There Cindy Wagner has again put Lain who were finalists. Conseems to be quite a bit of talk goup a fine bulletin board. The ing around the dorm about Suzie. gratµlations to all the girls and theme is "War Against Gossip." especially to Mary Lou, a fine Many creditable quotes exempli- From what I have heard, I would say that she must have been representative of Peru State! fy this worthwhile idea. quite a society girl. I asked a few of the guys if they had a few words on Suzie Wong, and rePERU PEDAGOGIAN ceived the following comments. The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks Mike Ramirez-"Wow!" Galen Conn-"Unprintable." April 17, 1961 George Zwickel-'~That Oriental Jazz is real cool." PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Gary Bro\vn-"La magnifique." Ray G. Meister __________________________________ Co-editor The boys of Delzell would like Linda Bertram __________________________________ Co-editor to commend the girls of Peru Morris Keyt __________________________________ Copy Editor State who participated in the Sandy Craig ________________________________ Layout Editor Miss Auburn Pageant. CongratuCarolyn Reiber _____________________________ Layout Editor lations, Mary Lou Reid, AnnaJack Johnson ________________________________ Sports Editor belle Ross, and Carol McLain. Darrel Wolcott __________________________ Business Manager Gerald Kirkendall ______________________ Personnel Manager Pam. Yost _________________________________Women's Sports Gary Brown _____________________________ Columnist Delzell LIBRARY Susan Sharp _______________________ Columnist Morgan Hall COLUMN Catherine Ideus _________________________ Columnist Library Raymond Hunzeker ______________________ Columnist Majors By Ron Pethoud __________________________ Columnist Exchange Cathy Barbara Wheeldon _______________________________Reporter Ideus Melissa Fulkerson --------------------------------Reporter Jerry E. Gress -----------------------------------Reporter Mine Enemy Grows Older, by Phyllis Grube ------------------------------------Reporter Alexander King, is the autobiogEdna McGovern ----------------------------------Reporter raphy of the last unself-conscious Gary Weiss --------------------------------------Reporter nonconformist. He speaks freely Tom Yopp ---------------------------------------Reporter about his fantastic safari through Gerald Jeanneret ---------------------------------Reporter the world of books, art, theater, Mary Anna Gnade ------------------------------Columnist and the larger world of love and Stewart Linscheid --------------------------------Sponsor trouble. King's stories of his battle with drug addiction, why he

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wore nothing but pink ties for thirty years, his observations on the insane, or on marriage, are unique in their humanity and humor. The famous, the colorful, and the mighty are glimpsed occasionally, never as n am es dropped, but as people recorded in the act of being people. The Watchman, by D av is Grubb, is an extraordinary novel-tender, grotesquely c o mi c , and frightening. To discover why a young man in a small West Virginia town was murdered, t h e author enters a dark tangle of events and human emotions. Each of the characters stands distinct, and they are interlocked in a strange pattern. The Stranger, by Albert Camus, is a short novel about an ordinary little man living quietly in Algiers. Life begins to stalk him quietly, slowly, but inexorably. The pace quickens until the little man commits a pointless murder-and reaches its climax after his trial. It presents an indelible picture of a ·human being helpless in life's grip.

AROUND THE CAMPUSES By Ron Pethoud Ye Stirling Stir-The editor of

the Sterling college student per received this letter: Dear Editor: I have been appalled by all. of the necking that goes on · in the rec room. It is shock- · ing when you stop to think about it-all this kissing go-, ing on right under our noses!·.· Students just don't realize ·. what they are up against. Irving More. The C r e i g h t o n i a n - Fo · Creighton students went a litt overboard in their celebration St. Patrick's Day. Claiming th they were of Irish descent, th used undiluted food coloring dye their hair green. Everybo thought it was really funny. ' celebrators were caught gree handed, green-toweled, an green-pillowed. "We were t, tired to wash it out ... so o pillows are green," they said. on' of the boys got the dye out of : hair, but he couldn't get it off h' scalp. He now is exhibiting green background for brown hai The Eagle-A secretary of campus organization of Chadr ' is wondering just where the "ne' addition" will be on their ca pus. The secretary of that orga ization recently received a bus' ness letter from an Omaha fi . addressed: RoomStork Hall Nebraska State Teachers College Chadron, Nebraska.

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ts Split Twin-Bill With Wayne eru State pitcher, Ron Kelly, ls City, was on the winning losing ends of pitching perances Friday afternoon at u as the Peru State Bobcats eball nine split a twin-bill h Wayne State. ehind Kelly's sparkling twor, Peru copped the opener 0. The Bobcats appeared set a sweep before Wayne rallied the second game for five runs the bottom of the seventh ing to eek out a 6 to 5 verdict hand Kelly the loss in relief. five run outburst in the secinning of game number one the victory for the Peruvi. Roger Smith, East Alton, , opened the inning with a line gle to left, Larry Gilson, Fullon, laid down a sacrifice bunt, two throwing errors by the yne infield allowed Smith to to third and Gilson to second. Fitzgerald, Genoa, followed th a run producing single. A ment later Gilson scored on a d pitch. Catcher, Dick Gerber, llerton, scratched out an ind single to advance Fitzgerald third. Gordon Ohnoutka, Valaiso, exploded a home run to score Gerber and Fitzld ahead of him and wind up five run inning. eru added another run in the th on Roger Smith's round per, and another in the sixth a walk, single, and a Wayne or. ayne opened the s e c o n d e with a triple by Nelson and ingle by Heerman to take a

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first-inning one-run lead. Peru's Mike Roach, Palmyra clouted a home run in the third to tie the By game. With pitcher Jim Snyder, Raymond Nebraska City, hurling effectiveHunzeker ly, Peru held on to the tie before scoring a brace of 'runs in each Frankie Kan commented on the fifth and sixth innings. Roger the quietness of the dormitory Smith's double in the fifth drove over the Easter holidays. in two runs. The pair of tallies in Jerry Jeanneret was married the sixth came on two walks and Saturday, April 8. Congratularun producing singles by Drexel tions Jerry ! ! Harvey, Hartford, Ill., and Rog.Jay DuVal was ·elected presier Smith. dent of S.N.E.A. and Glenn Irwin Going into the bottom of the was elected historian for t h e seventh inning, Peru held a 5-1 next school year. advantage. Relief pitcher Len Our baseball team made a fine Jacobs, Council Bluffs, suffered a showing for themselves against streak of wildness and walked Wayne Friday. Let's have a winthe first two Wayne batters to ning season ! ! face him. A double by Heerman Dedication of all the new scored one run; reliefer Charles buildings on our campus will be Fritch, Atlantic, Iowa, came in Sunday, April 16. The "whirr" of but issued another free pass to the floor polisher will be heard load up the bases. Coach Al in Majors this week! Wheeler then went to the bull Mike Donovan and Darrell pen for ace Ron Kelly. Kelly Feit will be among the mixed walked the first batter to face singing group at the dedication him which forced a run in, and of the new building. a Peru error allowed another Mrs. Donovan spent a pleasant run. With two men out, the score 5 to 4, in favor of Peru, and with Easter with her family in Peru. Wayne runners on second and Gary Stover and Butch Whitfield third, Wayne sent up pinch-hit- are going to present their pantoter Blake who de 1 i v e r e d a mime act for the Sportmans Club screaming single to right field to at Johnson this week. Among those from the dormiscore the tying and winning runs. tory that are student teaching Summary: Game 1 this semester are: Roger EishelRuns Hits Errors man, Dick Gerber, Terry HarPeru ______ 7 9 2 low, Ray Unterbrink, Jack JohnWayne ____ 0 2 7 son, Darrel Wolcott, and Neil Linescore: Eickhoff. Peru ______ 0 5 . 0 1 0 0 x Many teaching positions an d Wayne ____ 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 summer job applications have Home runs-Peru: Roger Smith, been discussed throughout the Gordon Ohnoutka. dormitory. Winning pitch-Ron Kelly; Losing pitcher-Hutchinson. , Summary: Game 2 Runs Hits Errors Peru ______ 5 7 4 Wayne ____ 6 5 1 Linescore: Peru ______ 0 0 1 0 2 2 0 Wayne ____ 1 0 0 0 0 0 5 Home runs-Peru: Mike Roach. Winning p it c h er-Kromnhock; losing pitcher-Ron Kelly.

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WHAT THEY SAY ABOUT THAT FIDDLING MANVIC JINDRA (Continued from page one) difficult to find a better person to work 'for' and 'with.'" Mr. B. A. Eddy-"Once in a while you see a teacher who is willing to do more than is required of him; one who will take his own time to help boys and girls and who will go just a little farther to mould and build young people. Such a teacher is 'Vic' Jindra. It will take a genuine teacher to fill his shoes." Mr. L. C. Buethe-"Anyone who has worked with Mr. Jindra, or watched or heard his students, knows that his harmony extends well beyond the sphere of music. Fifty more years of encores to 'Vic' and his 'fiddlin' around'.'' Mrs. Mary Anna Gnade (Secretary to President)-"Without Mr. Jindra's very real help, encouragement and love in formative years, how many, many people would have missed experiencing music. Having no children of his own, Mr. Jindra has made ALL children_his-a true Pied Piper with violin." Don Carlile-"Mr. Jindra undoubtedly is one of Peru State's best known faculty members, from the conversations that I have had with Peru alumni. Invariably he is one about whom alums inquire. His success as a teacher is evidenced by the many successful teachers of music that he has had a hand in producing." Dr. Neal S. Gomon-"Victor Jindra is a man of many talents but his greatest virtue is his love for young people. Although his contribution to the welfare and success of Peru State and th e community are beyond counting, there are thousands of youngsters (and some not so young) who sometimes in their educational careers, have basked in the sunlight of Vic Jindra's affection and are better people because of it.''

Cold Weather Hinders Thinclads The cold, wet weather has hindered Coach Jerry Stemper's thinclads thus far this season. With the first meet b e i n g Wednesday, April 12, the tracksters will probably not be in their best form. Coach Stemper's only comment about the team was: "The time trials have not been very good so far, however, this is because of the wet weather." The hurdles will probably be the strongest event for the Bobcats. Ken Humphrey, Au b u r n junior, is the defending Nebraska College Conference high hurdle champion. Two newcomers brighten the hopes of the 'Cats in the sprints. Jim Hurst, Plattsmouth and Dick Ferron, Omaha, have been the fastest twosome in the time trials run so far this season. Lanny Richards, Bellevue, and John Werner, Falls City, are the main threats in the 440. Both Lanny and John were on the mile relay team that broke the school record two years ago.

Don (Pete) Pederson, a Papillion sophomore, who last year led the Bobcats in the mile and two mile, will be counted on to score heavily in those events. Pete is the school record holder in the two mile.

"It's ADate" At Convocation

in 48 cities and an enrollment of 16,000 students. This summer Mr. Curry w i 11 teach the Nofmal· ,School of the Texas Association and again teach for the American Society of Dance Teachers. Mr. Curry, a past master of adlibbing, wa~''introduced by Miss Mary Louise•' Reid, Miss Auburn of 1961.

Mr. Russell Curry, manager of the Curry School of Dancing, lectured on social etiquette at convocation Tuesday, April 11. His lecture entitled "It's a Date" steers a young man and his feminine companion through the problems of an "evening out.'' "It's a Date" is a laugh provoking exploration into the realm of present day social behavior. According to Mr. Curry, "The boy is the boss.'' But, "In order to receive consideration and good manners, the girl must expect them." Thoughtfulness and con~ideration are the basis of good etiquetti:. The Curry School of Dancing is one of the largest schools of its type in the country with classes

The high jump and pole vault appear to be the strongest field events. Phil Rhodes, We e p in g Water, and Jack Head, Bellevue, are the leading high jumpers. Bob Gibson and Larry Noise, two Falls City juniors, will lead the vaulters. Vernon Thompson, a s e n i or weightman from Exeter, and Pat Thomas, a Falls City freshman, will be the leaders in the shot and discus. LaMar Gibson, a senior from Falls City, is Peru's threat in the javelin. LaMar will have good support from Phil Rhodes in this event. Coach Stemper reported that this year's squad is the smallest in number that he has had since he began coaching at Peru.

AUF WIEDERSEHN, PROFESSOR RATH (Continued from page one) cookies, baked from recipes of various foreign countries. Peru has indeed been fortunate to have such an excellent teacher of foreign languages for the past fifteen years, and the Pedagogian wishes Mr. Rath a great deal of happiness in the future, as well as a great deal of success with his writing.

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PTA Carnival Successful Alpha Mu Omega Elects New Office

are now underway. .Previously these have all been scheduled on one day; this time they are The annual PTA Carnival was scheduled over a two-week peri- held in the Campus School from Big event of the Easter week- od. It's nice to pin student teach- 6:00 to 11:00 p.m. on April 7. The end for Campus Schoolers was er's names to faces by meeting event was highly successful, netthe visit of Mohammed Ali Fail- them at these conferences. ting approximately $160. Nearly And needless to say, all these everything was sold out. ali, exchange student from Morocco. Ali w.p.s a student of M r. sounds of music herald the imOne of the most popular booths Buethe's during his tour of duty pending Music Contests when was the cake walk. Over 30 cakes as exchange teacher to Moroc- (excuse the phrase) the joint will ·were won. The Senior Class sponco. Mr. B introduced Ali to the be jumping! sored the Spook House. Approxhigh school at noon convo Thursimately 200 persons wended their day and this high school junior ways through the eerie passages. in a strange land gave a remarkOne high school boy hit the dart ably clear picture of his home board, winning a total of 20 country. canes. Interest was generated One clinic or event treads on among the elementary students The Home Economics Club met through a hat contest. Some real the heels of another. Mr. Wilson sponsored a band day UJJ.der ty- March 27, 6:30 p.m. Darlene Cri- masterpieces were created an d pical clinic skies-"I've come to tel reported that Brandeis of four first prizes were awarded. Peru for four years and it always Omaha would arrange a fashion Cakes, pies, and other foods in rains or something." This was show and bridal demonstration if the lunch room were furnished another demonstration of how the group wished. Teh members by parents of the students. good music can grow from a day's agreed and plans were made to rehearsal of strange music by visit Brandeis, April 25. Jeannine Ehlers r e m i n d e d musicians who are l a r gel Y members of the State Home strangers to each other. And if you wondered at red Economics and Dieticians Conribbons on all girls April 10 (and vention to be held April 8 and 9 Tri Beta met March 27, 1961, in red roses on HS faculty), it was. in Omaha. Several members plan the Science Hall. Plans concernjust the beginning of FHA week. to attend. ing a steak fry were discussed for Kathy Banks was elected to the next meeting on April 24. Next day each girl wore something she had made-no formal serve as club treasurer in the abDr. Christ showed slides on his style show, just all day long. The sence of Pauline Fink who is trip to Europe. Points of interest week ends with officers and practice teaching off campus. were New York City's InternaMrs. Sproul introduced Mrs. tional Airport; England's Trafalsponsor attending State FHA Rourke of Rourke Jewelry, Aub- gar Square, Big Ben Tower, Convention in Lincoln. urn, who presented the program Buckingham Palace, and WindThe elementary grades particfor the evening. She gave a very sor Palace. Scenic slides of Amularly enjoyed the PTA Carnival because they were invited to interesting and informative talk sterdam, Holland and Brussels, take part in a hat-making con- on diamonds and diamond rings. Belgium; and slides of the Luxtest. Of course, the prizes of sev- Club members especially enjoyed emburg and Switzerland areas eral tickets were quickly re- examining several styles of dia- were shown. The birthplace of Columbus in Genoa, Canals of turned to the carnival treasury in mond rings. Refreshments of cookies and Venice, and Italian Riveria· were exchange for a try at darts or the fish pond or cake walk-one punch were served by the com- of interest in Italy. The French Riveria, Arch of Triumph, Eiffel prize ticket even bought back the mittee.

Fifth Annual Press Campus School Chatter By Mary Anna Gnade Banquet Coming Up Peru's an nu a 1 Publications Banquet will be held at the Grand Hotel in Nebraska City on April 25 at 7:00 p.m. All persons connected with student publications, either in the past or at the present time, are cordially invited to attend the banquet. Presentations of the Neal S. Gamon Award, the A. V. Larson Award, and awards for outstanding work on the Peruvian an d Pedagogian will be made at this time. A skit about meeting a Pedagogian deadline will be given. Tickets for the dinner at $1.50 will be sold in advance. Anyone who is not contacted by a staff member should feel free to see either Darrel Wolcott or Ray Meister. Guests are welcome.

Sigma Tau Delta Initiates Pledges Sigma Tau Delta met at the home of Mr. Summers April 11, 8:00 p.m. Members discussed the forthcoming issue of "Sifting Sands," the club publication. Co-editors Julie Mayer and Steve Parker announced the deadline for material for next fall's issue as May 12. Contributions will be edited and readied for print this summer. The theme for the issue which will be distributed in October is Homecoming. Vice president Julie Mayer and other members conducted the initiation ceremony for f ou r pledges. Those initiated were: Mrs. Florence Summers, Mrs. Connie Wickman, Mrs. Delores Spilker, and Joyce Carman. Mrs. Summers s e r v e d the group ice cream s o d a s and brownies. A social period followed.

Mrs. RouJke Talks On Diamonds

Tri Beta Views European Slides

prize-winning hat. We have had only one day when yourlg track hopefuls were apparent jogging up the Av~nue. They must "jog" on disagreeable days, but more or less invisibly. Among extra-curricular activities, parent-teacher conferences

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SCF Views Movie The Student Christian Fellowship met March 29, in the Music Hall Auditorium. The meeting was opened with a song fest led by Carol McLain. Following a short business meeting, a movie, "The Trial," w a s shown. The meeting closed with a candle light communion service. Student Christian Fellowship held a joint meeting with the Wesley Fellowship April 5, in the Methodist Church. A representative from Alcoholics Anonymous talked on the effects of alcohol.

JOHN L. LEWIS, Vice Pres. & Cashier

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Newman Club Discusses Interfaith Marriages The Newman Club met at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday, April 5, in 301 Admin. Father Rydz led a discussion on interfaith marriages. After the discussion, they held a short business meeting. It was announced that a Central Province convention would be held in Lincoln April. 21,, 22, and 23. All members were urged to attend .

Lutheran Club Studies Easter Story The Lutheran Club met at 6:30 p.m. in 101 Admin. on April 5. They studied the Easter Story from Luke 24 and John 20. A short discussion followed.

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Alpha Mu Omega, honor mathematics fraternity, met S-105 at 7:00 p.m. on Mond April 10. They elected their o cers for the coming acade year. Dick Carlson will be new president; John Masonbr' will be the new vice-preside and Tom Mincer will hold position of secretary-treasurer. Also at the meeting, they cussed the forthcoming steak to be held May 8 at 5:00 p.m. city park. Committees were pointed for various planni phases of the steak fry. They nounced that members could vite guests. After the meeting, sev members accepted the invitat to attend the Southeast Nebra Mathematics meeting held at Campus School.

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Tower, and Notre Dame Cathedral of France completed th e program.

Wesleyans Discuss Marriage Problems Wesley Fellowship met March 22 to discuss marriage problems. A· panel answered questions submitted by those attending. Alcoholism was the topic for the April 5 meeting. A planning meeting was held April 10 to plan the meetings for the remainder of the year. The group intends to meet with the S t u d e n t Christian Fellowship April 12 to watch a film. Wesley Fellowship will have a bake sale to raise money to meet the M.S.M. fund. The next meeting will be on the alcohol question. There a r e only five meetings left this year.

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The Voice of the Campus of a. Thousand Oaks . . .

ga

May Fete

Peru Pedagogian PERU.NEBRASKA

Volume 56

Number 14

ndependents Win Close Politica I Race

Professor L. B. Mathews "Teach er Of The Year"

PresidentJohn Biere _____________ 185 Darrell Feit ____________ 126 ice-presidentJ eannine Ehlers ________ 163 .Ray Meister ____________ 147 embers-at-LargeSteve Parker ___________ 192 Allen Nelson ___________ 189 Mary Lewellyn _________ 159 Larry Vice _____________ 140 Sandy Stephens _________ 133 Karen Mcintire _________ 116

T I N

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The Pedagogian wishes to conratulate the new officers and embers of next year's P e r u tudent Senate.

T appa Delta Pi A lects Officers L

Kappa Delta Pi, honorary scho:· astics fraternity, held the spring initiation ceremony Wednesday :evening, April 12. Francis Hajek, 'Sandra Craig, Gladys Ackley, ·and Kaye Jacobson were the initiates. Officers for next year were elected as follows: Sandra Craig, Pres.; John Masonbrink, V. P.; . Gladys Ackley, Sec.; Glen Irwin, lTreas.; Lydia Cockerham, Histor-

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:otton: .ian. . Miss Alma. Ashley, sponsor, itold of the plan of voluntary con;.tributions to finance a new perKA .manent home for the national 1 eadquarters. Plans for the an==a.ual steak fry were discussed. . he price was set at $1.00 p er · 'person, and a committee was selected to choose a site and set a 1date.

ING'

"April Showers , ring Fashions" .In Campus School Tomorrow The annual Style Show pre==•ented by the Home Economics epartment at Peru State will ,be presented Tuesday, May 2, at )8:00 p.m. in the campus school auditorium. The theme for this ~ear's show is "April Showers iii0iiiiiiiiiiill3ring Fashions." All students who have completed a clothing class this past ear will be modeling their garments. This includes students .... :from junior high and high school. . tcollege students from the begin. 'ning and advanced clothing cfass.~s will, also, take part in t h e . ;show. The show is under the direction of Mrs. Ina Sproul, assistant 'professor of home economics. Ev~. ' ~ryone is cordially invited to at'.tend.

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MAY 1. 1961

Hundreds Were Here For District Music Contest

The Independent Party pulled ut a narrow victory over the soteric Party in Wednesday's tudent Senate election race. ohn Biere defeated Darrel Feit oundly for president, and Jeanine Ehlers narrowly defeated ay Meister for vice-president. Members-at-large are: Steve Parker, Allen Nelson, and Mary Ann Lewellyn. Results of the election are as follows:

,C 0 N

May Fifth

Pictured are May Queen and King, Lori Kubes and Dick Gerber. Both are seniors.

"Gay Fiesta" Is Theme Of May Fete Program By Sandy Craig Blake; Jeanne Shuttlesworth, The annual May Fete, present- Kenneth Humphrey; Sh a r on ed by the Women's Physical Ed- Donlan, Bob Kaiser; Crystal Seeucation Department, and the Stu- gal, Dale Pflau; Frances Sanders, dent Senate, will be staged May Gary Randles; Darlene Elliott, 5 at 6:30 p.m. in the gymnasium. Merlyn Wright; Dorthea Fink, This year's program is entitled Bart Bartholomew; Beverly Far"The Gay Fiesta" with Mexican mer, Jim Dovel. dances and decorations. The chorus and orchestra will The first of the three part pro- present the musical number, .Ciegram will be the processional lito Lindo. and coronation. May Queen and Another Mexican folk dance, King are seniors Lori Kubes and . La Cucaracha, will be done by Dick Gerber. Attendants a r e : Linda Goodin, Kenneth HumphJeannine Ehlers and Jack Head, rey; Dorthea Fink, Richard seniors; Sandra Stephens and Blake; Charlotte Wheeler, John Ken Dostal, juniors; R o s a 1 i e Biere. Baehr and Ron Kelly, sophoA special feature will be a remores; Carol Eynon and Bill Typroduction of a Mexican bull non, freshmen. Ladies-in-waiting are freshmen fight. La Chiapanecas will be Karen Mcintire, Karolyne Pow- sung by the chorus. ers, Betty Coulter, Bonnie Steele, Pam Yost and Jo Barriantos Kathy Banks, Virginia Adkins, will do the Mexican Hat Dance, Winnie Sporer, and Judy Sand- El Jarabe Tapatio. It is the naers. tional dance of Mexico. Flower girls are Margaret SpilA Mexican ceremonial dance, ker and Nancy Adams. Crown bearers are Mike Trailor a n d La Sandunga, will be presented John Coatney. All are kindergar- by Sharon Earl, Karen Fankten students at the C amp us hauser, Dorthea Fink, Linda Goodin, Marilyn Monroe, FranSchool. The next part of the program ces Sanders, Wanda Price, Norincludes the dances and other at- ma Reiman, Roberta Thomas, tractions. Dancers are from the Bonnie Vanderford, Charlotte Modern and Folk Dance classes. Wheeler, and Charlotte Wuster. The Modern Dance Class will act The last section of the program as a group of merrymakers in will be the traditional winding of their presentation. Those dancing the May Pole by the fifth an d are: Mary Lou Reid, Pam Yost, sixth grade girls of the Campus Marilyn Monroe, Mary Ann Lew- School. ellyn, Betty Painter, and Judy Other arrangements were made Wolf. La Raspa, a Mexican f o 1 k by the following: Mrs. A. G. dance, will be done by members Wheeler, dances; Mr. Edward Caof the Folk Dancing Class. Danc- mealy and Joyce Carman, vocal ers are: Marilyn Monroe, Jo Bar- music; Eugene Walden, procesriantos; Karen Fankhauser, John sional and recessional music; JoBiere; Wanda Price, Richard an Riggle, decorati0ns.

Mr. L. B. Mathews was named "Teacher of the Year" by S.N.E.A. at convocation Wednesday, April 26. Mr. Mathews has been associated with Peru State Teachers College and Campus School since 1927. Six teachers were nominated for this position: Mr. Robert T. Benford, associate professor of piano and organ; Mr. Edward G. Camealy, assistant professor of vocal music; Mr. Richard Holmes, assistant professor of English; Mrs. Ruth Mathews, assistant professor of health education; Mr. Lyle McKercher, assistant professor of mathematics; and Mr. L. B. Mathews, associate professor of physics. Dr. John C. Christ, recipient of last year's award, presented the certificate to Mr. Mathews. Outstanding student teachers were nominated by S.N.E.A., and the student teacher supervisors and administrative staff voted on the nominees. The two recipients on the twoyear program are Eileen Neels and Kaye Jacobsen. Laverna Roos, Jerry Wanser, Francis Hajek, and Deanna Wach were those with a bachelor degree who were honored. To be eligible for the award one must be a member of S.N.E.A. Dr. M. W. Blanton, sponsor of S.N.E.A. presented the certificates. Francis Hajek, president of S.N.E.A., presided over the convocation program. The old and new officers were introduced. Julie Mayer gave a reading on a typical day in an elementary school. Carolyn Parli, accompanied by Linda Goodin, gave a comical reading. A skit comparing a present day interview to an interview of forty years ago featured Patsy Melcher, Jerry Wanser, Ray Hunzeker, and Mr. Harold Johnson, sponsor of S.N.E.A.

Fifth Publications Banquet Held In Nebraska City Peru's an nu a 1 Publications Banquet was held at the Grand Hotel in Nebraska City, Tuesday evening, April 25. Mr. A. V. Larson presented the A. V. Larson Award to Darrel Wolcott for outstanding work on the Peruvian. Mr. A. B. Clayburn, a member of the Publications Board, presented the Neal S. Gomon Award to Ray Meister for outstanding work on the Pedagogian. Darrel Wolcott, editor of the Peruvian, presented certificates of award to the following Peruvian workers: Glen Irwin, Gerald Kirkendall, Steve. Parker, Arlan Richardson, Merlin Wright, Phyllis Bates, Jeannine Ehlers. Ray Meister, co-editor of Peda· gogian, presented certificates of award to the following Pedagogian workers: Melissa Fulkerson, Ray Hunzeker, Susan Sharp, Cathy Ideus, Morris Keyt, Sandra (Continued on page two)

By Morris Keyt The thirty-first Annual Music Contest for Districts One and Two was held on Peru's campus April 20 and 21. Approximately 1,500 students from southeastern Nebraska high schools participated in the contest. The College Gym served as headquarters for the contest, while the Campus School provided home rooms for the participants. The competition took place in the Campus School Auditorium, the Music Hall Auditorium, and the College Auditorium. The Music Contest j u d g es were: Mr. Ray T. DeVilbiss, director of bands at the University of South Dakota; Dr. Howard Ellis, head of the music education department at .the University of Wichita; Mrs. Gladys Hamstreet May, piano coach and accompanist, Omaha; Mr. Paul Neve, chairman for the department of music at :Dana College; and, Dr. Gordon "1:.erwilliger, head of graduate music studies at the University of Wichita. Members of the Contest Committee were Victor Jindra (general chairman), Richard Behrends, Wayne K. Wilson, Evan Vanzant, Cecil Weddel, William Metzger, Dr. Milburn Blanton, R. T. Benford, Miss Norma Diddel, Edward G. Camealy, and Gilbert E. Wilson. Contestants receiving superior ratings Thursday, April 20, are listed below. Clarinet solos: Joe Haberman, Brock; Sharon Blinde, Johnson; Karen Zorn, Falls City; Carol Vollertson, Syracuse; and, Alice Fisher, Pawnee City. Saxophone solos: Gerald Messler, Falls City; Karen Ely, Auburn; Marilyn Hunzeker, Pawnee City; and, Tom Jacobitz, Stella. Flute solos: Mary Ann Rademacher, Johnson; Evelyn Luedeke, Pawnee City; and, Karen Johnson, Syracuse. Mary Ellen Wilson, a Peru Prep student, received a superi. or for her oboe solo. Jim Tegelhutter, Syracuse, received a "one" on his cornet solo. French horn solos: Mary Riggert, Odell; Jim Masters, Syracuse; and, Pierce Johnson, Pawnee City. Mary Gray, Falls City, was given a superior rating on her baritone horn solo; Carol Forke, Odell, and Jim Johnson, Syracuse, led the trombone solo field. Tuba solos: Paul Stevenson, Peru; Nina Jean Bryan, Syracuse; and, Jim Thompson, Pawnee City. Superiors in girls high voice were given to: Zoe Jacobitz, Stella; Pam Rase, Murdock; Judy Hazen, Cook; and, Marilyn Michel, Auburn. Girls medium voice: Mariel Stock, Murdock; Sharon Schroeder, Elmwood; Marlene Zabel, Johnson; and, Pam Reid, Auburn. Girls 1ow voice: Carlene Kettelhut, Palmyra, and Jan VanSprecklson, Murdock. A boys low voice "one" w a s given to Gary Clements, Elmwood. Mariel Stock, Murdock, and Bill Glenn, Falls City, took superiors in piano solo competition. Thomas Gomon, Peru, got a "one" rating for his violin solo; (Continued on page two)


they work out the mechanics of their monster and watching as they confront the ultimate question: Shall this weapon be used? The story accurately follows the course of actual events, but it is told through fictitious characters.

NOTES FROM MAJORS HALL By Raymond Hunzeker Some girls attending the Music festival apparently were lost. They were observed wandering through the corridors of Maj.ors Hall. They said they were going "where the boys are." Frankie Kan has been giving some off campus talks about his native Hong Kong. Girls from Morgan Hall can enjoy the comforts of air_conditioning during summer session according to Mrs. Donovan. Spring fever seems to have hit the students of Majors. Howard Engberg has "fishing fever." Tennis players are observed "batting the ball" on the court. Jay DuVal is a member of the tennis team. According to Jay they have a "no win-no loss" season. Now and then you see a pair of swimming trunks. Anyone been in the river yet? This is a sure sign spring is here! Dick Gerber was elected King for May Fete. Congratulations Dick! Ken Dostal tied with Bob Gibson for Junior attendant. Midnight oil was burned ending the twelve weeks exams. Seems as if the "spring fever bug" hasn't hit the faculty yet. Here's hoping! ! Majors Hall was officially dedicated by Governor Morrison at the dedication ceremonies. Terry Harlow was operated on for appendicitis Sunday morning. Terry said that was an "unpleasant" way to receive a vacation.

LIBRARY COLUMN By Cathy I deus In Command the Morning, Pearl S. Buck has written of the greatest topic of our timesman's conquest of the atom. It is a suspenseful story of the human beings who brought it to pass. She takes us back to those years early in the second world war when physicists had become convinced that a weapon of terrible destructive power was within their grasp. We live with the scientists from then on, listening as

My Lord, What a Morning, an autobiography by Marian Anderson. It is effortless, inspiring, and deeply-moving, expressing its author's warm and reverent approach to living and to music. There are intimate glimpses into her private life. Particularly moving is her patience toward race prejudice, which she has endured with sadness rather than anger. The book is a portrayal of a great lady of two worlds, the world of music and the world of plain living. Robert Penn Warren: The Dark and Bloody Ground, by Leonard Casper, is a full-length study of the works of Robert Penn Warren. It traces the growth of a highly individualistic writer as he participates in or stands aloof from the events of his time. The criticism, poetry, plays, and fieâ&#x20AC;˘ tion of Warren receive searching analysis. The dark and bloody ground is the Indian name for Warren's home state of Kentucky. It is also his symbol representing the human condition, showing the long perspective in which Warren views his people and their history.

WHISPERS FROM MORGAN By Susan Sharp ¡Nine birthday celebrptions have taken place in the dorm recently. These were for Ardyth Pratt, Bonnie Collins, Lynn Mccann, Bev Farmer, Pat Rathe, Patsy Melcher, Carolyn Parli, Carolyn Mercer, and Ila Reiman. Lois Fritz is the originator of many of the new card games played in the dorm. Among the most popular are pounce, piquet, idiot's delight, pit, and Shanghi. Mice exterminators were at work in the dorm last week, but someone told me that the mice were just chasd from the old rooms to the new ones. Muu muu's are a fad here at Peru, too. Girls in the dorm have these Hawaiian dress in all colors and patterns. Many of the girls are becoming very interested in the gardening aspect of spring. Sweet potato plants and house plants adorn many windowsills.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks May 1, 1961 PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Ray G. Meister __________________________________ Co-editor Linda Bertram __________________________________ Co-editor Morris Keyt __________________________________ Copy Editor Sandy Craig ________________________________ Layout Editor Carolyn Reiber _____________________________ Layout Editor Jack Johnson ________________________________ Sports Editor Darrel Wolcott __________________________ Business Manager Gerald Kirkendall ______________________ Personnel Manager Pam Yost ---------------------------------Women's Sports Gary Brown -----------------------------ColumniSt Delzell Susan Sharp _______________________Columnist Morgan Hall Catherine Ideus _________________________ Columnist Library Raymond Hunzeker ______________________ Columnist Majors Ron Pethoud __________________________ Columnist Exchange Barbara Wheeldon -------------------------------Reporter Melissa Fulkerson --------------------------------Reporter Jerry E. Gress -----------------------------------Reporter Phyllis Grube ------------------------------------Reporter Edna McGovern ----------------------------------Reporter Gary Weiss --------------------------------------Reporter Tom Yopp ---------------------------------------Reporter Gerald Jeanneret ---------------------------------Reporter Mary Anna Gnade ______________________________ Columnist Stewart Linscheid --------------------------------Sponsor

AROUND THE CAMPUSES By Ron Pe:thoud The Wayne S:tafer - Wayne State announced that they will begin the trimester plan in September, 1961. Under this plan, students may graduate in two and two-thirds years or four years as tbey desire. Each trimester will not be less than fifteen or more than sixteen weeks in length. Classes will be sixty minutes long instead of the usual fifty minutes. Wayne is the first Nebraska college to adopt this plan, but it is expected that more will follow. The Wesleyan-Wesleyan held their an nu a 1 "Big Snob-Old Grouch" dance. The sororities select the "Old Grouch," who is actually an active member of some fraternity. In turn, the fraternities elect an active member of some sorority as a "Big Snob." Whether or not, this is a big honor, I couldn't say; but who wants to be known as an "Old Grouch?" The Doane Owl-Doane College held "The Doane Campus Chest Carnival" to raise money for the college's charity organization. At the carnival, some sorority girls, dressed like western sheriffs, sold justice. For a ticket, sold at a certain price, one could have a friend arrested. Once arrested, he stayed in jail. The only way the person could get out of jail was to buy his own way out. Also for tickets, he could buy a "shotgun wedding" for some couple. All in all, they netted about $115 for the "Campus Chest."

DELZELL DOINGS By Gary L. Brown Oh! the muddy Mo. It seems that everyone is in love with the river. Guys and gals alike have been going to the river lately for various things, such as swimming, sun bathing, and softball playing. Last Saturday Sandy Pearson, Sandy Stevens, Rita Grandgenette, Judy Wilson, Darrell Feit, Larry Rebuck, Larry Widrig and Mike Ramirez went to the river just to play softball. Mike Ramirez just about broke the dorm washing machine the other day when he washed his rug. It took two of us to bend it so we could get it into the machine. Paul Fenton, George Zwickel, Gary Brown, Jim Simmons, Phil Bateman had a little trouble going home last week:end. It seems that they made it as far as Nebraska City when the timing gear in Phil's car went out. It was a lot of fun hitchhiking in the rain. Everyone in Delzell will be cleaning his room this week, as the dorm will be open this weekend for open house. We, the men of Delzell, would like to thank everyone for visiting our dorm during open house. Bermuda shorts and beachcombers are becoming the most common wearing apparel of Delzell. The boys are taking advantage of all this fine, warm Nebraska weather and are getting out their summer clothes e a r 1 y this year.

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quartets. Johnson and Paw City won in the clarinet qua or trio arena; but Peru Pr swept the woodwind quintet (Continued from page one) vision. Superior ratings went . Peru Prep's string trio was at the Odell's saxophone septet a top. Falls City's saxophone quartet Odell and Peru led Class D trio. band competition. Peru's orchestra entry receiv Friday, April 21, was devoted a "one." to group competition. Schools reFalls City, 'Syracuse, and Pa ceiving superior ratings are nee City paced the Class B ban named below. Girls glee: Odell, Pawnee City, and Auburn. Peru led chorus competition. Tecumseh and AuFifth Publications burn were honored in miscellaneous vocal group attempts. A Banquet Held madgrigal superior was given to In Nebraska City Humboldt. (Continued from page one) Dawson-Verdon and Pawnee City headed the boys quartet Craig, Jack Johnson, Gerald field. Falls City topped the boys kendall, Rose Clancy, Linda B octet workout; Palmyra's mixed tram, Steve Parker, Mari 1 quartet received a sup er i o r Monroe, Linda Nygaard. rating. Girls trio superiors went Ray Meister was master to Brock, Palmyra, Humboldt, ceremonies. Mr. Robert Moo and Johnson. A "one" was given President of the Publicatio to Auburn's girls sextet. Palmy- Board, gave the invocation a ra, Humboldt, Tecumseh, and presented the board memb Auburn were honored in girls Mr. A. B. Clayburn and Mrs. triple trio competition. Kregel. Other guests inclu Pawnee City's horn quartet Mrs. Clayburn, Mr. Art Kre got a "one" and Falls City paced Mr. and Mrs. A. V. Larson, a the trumpet trios. Peru and Paw- Mrs. Mary Anna Gnade. M nee City led the brass sextets, Stewart Linscheid, sponsor while Carol Baker of Pawnee student publications, presen City got a drum solo superior. Mr. Wolcott and Mr. Meister f Odell and Pawnee City were their awards. honored in drum quartet compeThe program included a s tition. Syracuse received a super- on meeting a Pedagogian dea ior in the miscellaneous instru- line. "To cap the evening, th mental field. Pawnee City, Syra- newly arrived yearbooks w er cuse, and Auburn had top flute distributed.

Hundreds Were Here For Music Contest

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Cats Break Even In Double Header

Ray Meister awarded Neal S. Gomon Award by Mr. Clayburn ·at Publications Banquet.

Mr. and Mrs. Mathews Honored At Dinner Professor and Mrs. L. B. Mathews, who have given a total of 53 years teaching service to Nebraska State Teachers College, Peru, were feted by nearly 200 friends Saturday night at a testimonial dinner in Peru State's Student Center dining room. The Mathews, who have announced they will retire from teaching at the close of the current semester, were honored for thir dedicated service to Peru State Teachers College. Mrs. Evanelle Paradise, counselor of Delzell Hall, gave the .invocation, and Miss Judith Miller entertained with violin selections. The Mathews received tributes from Dr. E. E. Erickson, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Professor Emeritus, Gustavus Adolphus College, and a classmate of Mr. Mathews at Peru. Dr. Erickson replaced Mr. A. D. Majors who was sche1, --·•i:.duled to give the tribute from the State Normal Board, but was unable to attend. Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president .intet of Peru State, gave the tribute went .from the administrative staff of :et a the college. tuartet The head of the division of health and physical education, Mr. A. G. Wheeler, honored Mrs. Mathews for her service to that division. Dr. John Christ, head of the division of science and mathematics, gave tribute to Mr. Mathews for his dedicated service. A poetic tribute was given by Mr. Lyle McKercher, assistant professor of mathematics, on behalf of their co-workers. A bound volume of testimonial letters from friends, co-workers, " one) and former students was presentrald ed to the Mathews by Mr. Albert 0. Brady, assistant professor of biology. Mr. Hanford H. Miller, assoaster ciate professor of chemistry, preMoo sented Professor and Mrs. MathJlicati ews with a console stereophonic ion a record player. The gift was mem made possible by contributions Mrs. made by the Mathews' countless friends.

Foreign Language Club Holds Last Meeting The Foreign Language Club held its last meeting of the year on April 24, in Room 101 of the Ad Building. Members viewed a film on the people of France and one on Paris, France. After going to the Music Hall, the French students sang several songs. A short business meeting was held. A social hGur followed.

Seven Peruvians Attend S.E.A.N. Convention Six members and one sponsor of the Student Education Association traveled to Kearney April 15 for the state convention. Those attending the meeting were: Mr. Harold Johnson, Jay DuVal, Sandy Craig, Francis Hajek, Ellen Hunzeker, Patsy Melcher, and Glenn Irwin. At the morning meeting, th e group was invited to have the fall convention at Peru. The invitation was accepted. Date fdr the meeting will be decided later. Election of officers was held during the afternoon session. Sandy Craig was elected to serve as historian for the coming year. It will be her duty to keep a record of the organization through pictures and to rewrite the constitution. She will attend the first state meeting in Fremont May 13. As State Historian, she will be an official delegate to the NSEA Leadership Conference at Chadron in August. Other officers elected were from Midland, University of Nebraska, Creighton, and Wesleyan.

Special Meeting Of Blue Devils Monday, April 20, the Blue Devils held a special meeting. Because of lack of interest an d support the All Sports Banquet, to be held in May, was cancelled. It was announced that if the Blue Devils don't review and follow the constitution, the organization may be disbanded. President Gomon feels that the objective is not being fulfilled.

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Playing double headers on Monday and Tuesday, the Peru State Bobcats captured two victories and absorbed two defeats. On Monday, the Peruvians handed St. Benedict's College of Atchison, Kans., a 9-1 defeat in the first game, but then lost a 6-5 decision in the nightcap. Returning home on Tuesday, the Wheelermen whitewashed Northwest Missouri State College of Maryville, .4 to 0, but again lost the second game as the Missourians handed the Bobcats a 5-2 verdict. With starting pitcher, Bob Reimers, Brock, working effectively in the clutch, Peru scored single runs in the fourth and fifth innings of Monday's opener at Atchison, before icing the game with a seven-run sixth inning. Reimers weakened slightly in the seventh to allow the Kansans to push across their lone run. In the second game, St. Benedict's tallied twice in the second and thre12 in the third inning. Their winning tally came in the fifth stanza. Trailing 6-1 going into the seventh ~nning, Peru's Bobcat nine exploded for four runs before being stymied. Beautiful pitching performances marked both games as Peru State and Northwestern of Missouri, split their twin bill. Ron Kelly, Falls City, hurled his second two-hitter and second shutout of the season in the first game as Peru took a 4-0 victory. The Bobcats scored twice in the fourth inning as Roger Smith, East Alton, Ill., and Bill Fitzgerald, Genoa, each drove in runs. Catcher Dick Gerber, Fullerton, provided the big blow of the first game with a towering home run to deep left field. In the second game on the Peru diamond, right hander B i 11 Ludwig spun a no-hit game for six innings to spark Northwest Missouri to the 5-2 win. Dick Gerber spoiled Ludwig's bid when he legged out a scratch infield hit to lead off the seventh inning. Northwestern led 5-0 at that point. Little Michael Hunt, Tecumseh, provided Peru with its two runs when he lined a tworun single to center in the seventh inning. The Missourians actually wrapped up the game in the first inning with plenty of help from their hosts. In th at freakish inning Northwestern took advantage of two-hit batsmen,. three walks, an error, plus two hits to score four runs. SUMMARY: Game 1 St. Benedict's .. 000 000 1 1 7 1 Peru __________ ooo 117 o 9 7 2 Winning pitcher-Reimers (1-0) Losing pitcher-Wiederhold SUMMARY: Game 2 Peru __________ 010 000 4 5 4 4 St. Benedict's __ 023 010' x 6 6 0 Winning pitcher-Fraser Losing pitcher-Fritch (0-1) SUMMARY: Game 1 Maryville _____ ooo ooo o o 2 Peru __________ 000 220 x 4 4 Winning pitcher-Kelly (3-1) Losing pitcher-Esch Home run-Gerber, Peru SUMMARY: Game 2 Maryville ____ -401 000 0 5 6 Peru __________ ooo ooo 2 2 3 Winning pitcher-Ludwig Losing pitcher-Snyder (1-1)

1 1

0 1

Epsilon Pi Tau Plans Steak Fry Epsilon Pi Tau, Honorary Industrial Arts Fraternity met April 13, 1961. A brief business meeting was held. Plans for a steak fry on May 10 were discussed. It was decided to have the fry at Neal Park and to have members bring guests.

Darrel Wolcott awarded A. V. Larson Award by Mr. Larson. 440 yd. relay-1. Washburn (Russell M c C 1a n a h a n, D i c k Swartz, Claude Johnson, Roger Nyfeler). Time 43.3. Mile relay-1. Washburn (Chas. Peru State's track team received an unfriendly reception at Anderson, Russell Mcclanahan, Topeka, Kans., as the host Wash- Dick Swartz, Roger Nyfeler). burn University Ichabods de- Time 3.31.6. feated the Peruvians in a dual Shot put-1. Vern Thomsen, meet Friday, 771/:i to 58 2/3. Exeter, P; 2. Pat Thomas, Falls Husky Vern Thomsen, Exeter, City, P; 3. Russell Ha den , W. Peru weight man, set a new Peru Distance 47'll1h". State record in the shot put with Discus-1. Vern Thomsen, Exa toss of 47'111/2 11 to win the eter, P; 2. Jerry Perkins, W; 3. event. Thomsen came back to Jerry Henning, Peru, P. Distance win the discus and set a new 142'9". meet record at 142'9". The shot Javelin-1. Jon Bingesser, W; put record erases the old mark of 2. Bill Muncy, W; 3. PhilRhodes, 47'8" set by Eugene Hertz in Weeping Water, P. Distance 1932. Thomsen's new meet record 198'3". in the discus bettered the 1960 Broad Jump-1. Jon Bingesser, toss of Jim Cain, Washburn, of 11 W; 2. Ken Humphrey, Auburn, 1 140'7 /2 • 'l'r'< , P; 3. Hhil Rhodes, P. Distance Two meet records went by the 20'4". '-' boards as Washburn set new High jump-1. Roger Nyfeler, marks in the 440 yd. dash and W; 2. (Tie) Don Paine, W; Phil mile relay. Dick Swartz raced the 440 in 51.6 to erase the 1959 Rhodes, Weeping Water, P; Jack mark of 52.l. The Ichabod mile Head, Bellevue, P. Height 6'0". Pole vault-1. Bob Gibson, relay team of Charles Anderson, Russell McClanahan, Dick Swartz Falls City, P; 2. (Tie) Roger and Roger Nyfeler whipped the Bowman, Pawnee City, P; Larry distance in 3:31.6 to better the Noyes, Falls City, P. Height 11'7". 1960 record of 3:32.3. Peru's Don Peterson, Richfield, slammed to three wins in t h e 880, mile, and two mile events. Washburn provided a triple winner in Roger Nyfeler as he capBy Jack Johnson tured victories in the 100 yd. dash, 220 yd. dash, and h i g h The Peru State Bobcat baseball jump. team fell from the top spot in SUMMARIES: the Nebraska College Conference 100 yd. dash-1. Roger Nyfel- race when they absorbed two deer, W; 2. Russell McClanahan, W; feats at the hands of the Kear3. Jim Hurst, Murray, P. Time ney Antelopes, Saturday at 10.2. Kearney. Peru's conference rec220 yd. dash-1. Roger Nyfeler, ord now stands at 3-3. W; 2. Russell McClanahan, W; 3. In the first game Kearney came Dick Ferron, Omaha, P. Time from behind in the fifth inning 22.5. to score five big runs and go on 440 yd. dash-1. Dick Swartz, to an 8-5 victory. Peru had scored W; 2. Lanny Richards, Bellevue, twice in the first inning to take P; 3. Dick Ferron, Omaha, P. the lead. The host Kearney nine Time 51.6. scored two more in the sixth in880 yd. run-1. Don Peterson, ning to ice the game. Peru rallied Richfield, P; 2. Bob Murphey, W; for one run in the sixth and two 3. John Werner, Falls City, P. in the seventh before Kearney shut the door. Time 2:09. · Pitcher Jack Arterburn hurled Mile run-1. Don Peterson, Richfield, P; 2. Bob Murphy, W; three hit ball in the second game 3. Charles Dunn, Clarinda, Iowa, to spark Kearney's 4 to 1 win. A four run fourth inning won the P. Time 4:47.1. Two-mile run-1. Don Peter- game for the Antelopes.

Cats Lose Dual Meet To Washburn Thinclads

Antelopes Defeat Bobcat Nine

son, Richfield, P; 2. C h a r 1 e s Dunn, Clarinda, Iowa, P; 3. Art Carruth, W. Time 11:01. 120 yd. high hurdles-1. Chas. Anderson, W; 2. Claude Johnson, W; 3. Ken Humphrey, Auburn, P. Time 16.0. 220 yd. low hurdles-1. Roger Nyfeler, W; 2. Russell McClanahan, W; 3. Dick Ferron, Omaha, P. Time 22.5.

SUMMARY: Game 1 Peru ______ 200 001 2 5 6 5 Kearney __ 001 052 x 8 6 1 Winning pitcher-Boucher Losing pitcher-Kelly SUMMARY: Game 2 Kearney __ ooo 400 o 4 4 2 Peru ______ 100 000 0 3 4 Winning pitcher-Arterburn Losing pitcher-Reimers

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Governor Morrison Stressed Importance Of Education In Dedication Address Here

Lori Kubes Queen Of 1961 May Fete

May Fete Attendants

By Carolyn Reiber ior attendant for May Fete. S Miss Carol Eynon is a fresh- is the daughter of Mr. and M Reigning as 1961 May F et e Queen will be Lori K u b e s , man attendant for May Fete. She Fred Stephens of Peru, Nebr daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank is the daughter of Rev. and Mrs. ka. Sandy is majoring in eleme S. Eynon of Columbus, Indiana. tary education and is a memb Kubes of Fairbury. complain about the expense of By Melissa Fulkerson Lori, 22,. graduated from Fair- Carol is majoring in elementa::y of Dramatics, White Angels, an education. "Education is our most bury High School in 1956. She education and is a member of WAA. Governor Frank B. Morrison important business!" Mr. Ken Dostal is a junior at previously attended C o 1 o rad o Dorm Council, White Angels, dedicated the recently completed At the dedication ceremony, Women's College and Kansas Dramatics, Lutheran Club, Peru- tendant for May Fete. He is th $1.4 million building program at Mr. Jack Johnson gave the greet- University, where she was an art vian Singers, and WAA. son of Mr. and Mrs. Leon Dosta Peru State Teachers College Suning from the students; Mr. Lester major, and Fairbury Junior ColMr. Bill Tynon is a freshman of Scribner, Nebraska. Ken day afternoon, April 16. Russell, the greeting from the lege. attendant for May Fete. He is majoring in physical educati In his speech, the governor the son of Mr.. and Mrs. Andrew and is president of the Newm faculty; Mr. Fred A. Rathert, the An elementg.ry education mastated that the "most important greeting from the faculty; Mr. jor at Peru State, Lori is a mem- Tynon of .Peru, Nebraska. Bill is Club and a member of Tri-Be business of education is teaching, Fred A. Rathert, the greeting ber of Home Economics Club and majoring in history and physical and Blue Devils. and we will meet the problems of from the alumni; and Mr. Carl Student Education Association of education and is a member of Miss Jeannine Ehlers is a se our time if we meet the chalNewman Club and president of ior attendant for May Fete. S Spelts, the greeting from the gov- Peru State. lenge of providing good teachis the daughter of Mr. and M . erning board. Lori's future plans are to teach the freshman class. ers." Miss Rosie Baehr is a sopho- Louis Ehlers of Syracuse, N The dedication for the A. V. in lower primary grades in CaliGovernor Morrison s a i d , more attendant for May Fete. braska. Jeannine is majoring i "There is no limit to what we Larson Industrial Arts Building fornia and to work toward an art She is the daughter of Mr. an d home economics and is presiden was given by Dr. Owen Harlan degree at the University of can achieve if we motivate o u r Mrs. John Baehr of Virginia, Ne- of Home Economics Club and a minds." He referred to the and the response by Mr. A. V. Southern California. braska. Rosie is majoring in ele- member of White Angels, W.A.A., Larson. Dr. Harold Boraas dediworld's problems as a "challenge mentary education and is a soph- L.S.A., and Student Council. cated A. D. Majors Residence to the young people to combat omore class officer, a pep club ofMr. Jack Head is a senior atHall, and Mr. A. D. Majors reignorance and prejudice." tendant for May Fete. He is the ficer, and a member of SNEA. sponded. The Eliza Morgan Hall "Nebraska must accelerate its Mr. Ron Kelley is a sophomore son of Mr. and Mrs. August Head Dick Gerber, son of Mrs. Rose education program," the gover- additions were dedicated by Miss attendant for May Fete. He is the of Bellevue, Nebraska. Jack Juanita Bradley; Miss Harvey Gerber of Fullerton, Nebraska, nor said. At present, 40% of the son of Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Kelley majoring in physical educatio Hess responded. Dr. Keith L. has been elected to reign as king graduating teachers leave the of Falls City, Nebraska. Ron is and biology and is a member of state because of the poor teach- Melvin dedicated the Student during the May Fete festivities, Center; Jeannine Ehlers respondMay 5. He was an attendant this majoring in industrial arts and is Lutheran Club, Student Council, ing conditions. Blue Devils, "P" Club, and Beta year during the Homecoming fes- a member of Blue Devils. Realizing efficiency and econ- ed. Miss Sandy Stephens is a junBeta Beta. · The benediction was given by tivities. omy are necessary in education, Dick participates in several the governor criticized those who Reverend Rath. different activities. He is a memHargaret H i n t o n , Richards.on ber of the Blue Devils and P County Rurai; Rosea Lee Oest, Club. He is also a member of mann, Odell; Kaye Jacobson, Epsilon Pi Tau. Bellevue. Stanley N. Longfellow, Peru, Sports have played a large part Mr. Johnson remarked, "Safar· has been awarded a National Sciin his college life as he has been ies fo~~ginning teachers are up ence Foundation fellowship to on both football and baseball Twenty-eight Peru .students considerably over a year ago." continue his biological studies at teams for four years and has let- have signed contracts for the the University of Wisconsin, Dr. Harold Boraas attended the tered in each. 1961-62 school year,· according to Madison. National American Personnel and Upon graduation this spring, Harold W. Johnson, director of Mr. Longfellow, the son of Mr. Guidance Association Convention he plans to teach. placement. T we 1v e in-service and Mrs. Ernest Longfellow, Pe- which was held in Denver, teachers have also signed new ru, is scheduled to complete work March 27-30. contracts. The main purpose of APGA is The Peru State Teachers~ CoJ.,. toward the master's degree in edPositions filled are: Jack Johnucation at Peru State Teachers to unify all qualified workers in son, Sterling; Darlene Critel, lege Home Economics Club was College this summer. In the fall the field so that mutual acquain,fSummerfield, Kans.; Duane Hem- the guest of Brandeis. for a Bridhe will begin work at the Univer- ance may be cultivated, so that minger, Summerfield, Kans.; Sar- al Show Monday, April 24 at "Sifting Sands,'' a literary ah Anderson, Nebraska City; 6:30 p.m. Mrs. Stratton, of the sity of Wisconsin toward the doc- principles, practices and professional standards may be ad- magazine revived by the local torate in biological science. Catherine Ideus, Sterling; Joyce Cameo Room at Brandeis, arMr. Longfellow has taught in vanced, and to further the devel- Sigma Tau Delta chapter, was Carman, Elwood; Leonard All- ranged for the club to see a style review of the fashions in wedthe Brock public schools the past opment of personnel and guid- published April 18 and has been good, Papillion. ding gowns, attendants' dresses, four years and currently is prin- ance workers in educational in- on sale for the past two weeks. Henry Turner, W o o d w a r d , stitutions, community agencies, Volume 15 of "Sifting Sands" Iowa; Robert Kaiser, Anita, Iowa; and other dresses suitable for the' cipal of the Brock High School. government organizations, busi- contains five poems, two short Carolyn Parli, Anita, Iowa; Ter- trousseau during the summer ness, and industry. APGA holds stories, and a foreword by Silas ry Harlow, DeWitt; Jerry Hen- season. Following the review the' annual conventions and assists Summers, sponsor of the maganing, Humboldt; Morris Keyt, girls were shown gowns and ac. regional and state groups in con- zine. Bloomfield; LaMarr Gib s on , cessories in which they were par• ducting meetings. The AssociaThe poets and their poems are: Stanton; Keith Hawxby, Tecum- ticularly interested, and the i r Student Christian Fellowship tion provides certain field ser-, Joyce Carman, "Loneliness"; Le- seh; Roger Killion, Gurley; Don questions concerning weddings met April 19 in the Music Hall vices, conducts a placement ser- roy Keyt, "Trees"; Steve Parker, Niemann, Gretna; Alberta Kas- were answered. vice for guidance and student "Everybody"; Alan Wheeler, "In auditorium. Light refreshments of coffee parek, Palmyra; Roger Eshelman, personnel workers, and coordin- the Beginning"; and, Darrel Woland cookies were served. College Springs, Iowa. The meeting opened with a ates the work of a variety of cott, "Flowering Heart." Th e Those who provided transpor· Gordon Filmore, Palmyra; Rashort business meeting. Rev. Dale committees concerned with trainauthors and their stories are Rose mona Bock, Ralston; Ramona tation were Winnie Sporer, Mary Falk introduced Royal and Edsel ing, ethical standards, placement, Clancy, "Infinite Footsteps," and Grindle, Ralston; Linda Goodin, Jarvis, Mrs. Jack Mcintire, Mrs. Lindquist, evangelists. They sang Leroy Keyt, "The Red-Bearded Hastings; Betty Cogdill, Shelby, Louise Kregel, Mrs. Ina Sproul, a few songs, and Royal present- international relations, and reOne." Iowa; Rosalie Baehr, Ralston; and Duane Hemminger. ed a talk on "The Devil's Baits." lated matters. The staff · members who assembled the current issue of "Sifting Sands" are: Rose Clancy and Leroy Keyt, co-editors; Julie Mayer and Steve Parker, art editors; Connie Wichman, business Complete Line of School Supplies manager; and, Silas Summers, Coin Operated - Automatic Laundry sponsor. Revlon, Coty and Evening in Paris The next issue of "Sifting OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY Cosmetics Sands" is scheduled .for· publication at Homecoming time this SOFT WATER KODAKS SUPPLIES fall. Co-editors Julie Mayer and Fast Film Service Steve Parker welcome contribuTR 2-2101 Bring Us Your Prescriptions Peru BeaHy's tions from students, faculty, and alumni.

Dick Gerber May King

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Johnson Announces Twenty-eight Placed In Teaching Positions

Longfellow Awarded Science Fellowship Dr. Harold Boraas Attends Denver Meeting

Home Ee Club Sees Brandeis Bridal Show

Sigma Tau Delta Revives '.'Sifting Sands"

S. C.F. Meeting

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Wininger Civil Preparedness Instructor Dr. Darrell Wininger instructs the Civil Preparedness c 1 a s s which meets every Thursday night for six consecutive weeks. The first class met April 20 with a total enrollment of twenty members. Topics that will be instructed are: 1. The Need for Civil Defense. 2. The National Plan for Civil Defense and Defense Mobilization. 3. Effects of Modern Weapons. 4. Principles of Defense a n d Protective Measures. 5. Personal Survival Actions. 6. Planning Exercises.

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atcher Dick Gerber, the only ee year letterman on the Peru te baseball team, has b e e n d by coach Al Wheeler as the catcher in the Nebraska Cole Conference. Gerber, curtly the first string backstop on Peru nine, is hitting a rectable .280. Fast as catchers the senior from Fullerton retly broke up a no hit game an infield single in the sevinning against Northwest souri State. Dick's hustle and ire make him one of the best petitors in the N.C.C. ick's athletic attributes aren't fined to the diamond as he a four year letterman in tball. e "Gerb" is popular off the d as well as on, as was shown his selection as May Fete g.

beats Fourth Wesleyan Meet By Jack Johnson .eru State Teachers College ance star Don Petersen, Rich' sprinted the final lap to deDoane College's Dean White he two-mile event of the Neka Wesleyan invitational t Friday night to win the t and establish a new Peru te school record at 10:10.7. old two-mile record was 11.3, set by Petersen in 1960. etersen narrowly missed nipg White at the wire in the e event as he placed second. "te copped the mile in 4:33.3 the late charging Petersen clocked in 4:35.7. ern Thomsen, Exeter, won events for the Peruvians as hurled the shot put 46'6%" the discus 143'7". ·oane's crack squad captured meet win with 82 points; stings College placed: second h 59, Wesleyan was third with Peru fourth with 4() points, Midland fifth with 13 tallies. ther point winners for Peru's beats include: Jim Hurst, ttsmouth, fourth in the 100 dash with a time of 10.3; LanRichards, Bellevue, third in 440 yd. dash with a time of ; Ken Humphrey, Auburn, the 120 yd. high hurdles in to place fourth; vaults of " gave Bob Gibson, Falls City, Larry Noyes, Falls City, ts of a four way tie for second ce in the pole vault; Ken mphrey, Auburn leaped 20' " to place fifth in the broad p; Pat Thomas, Falls City, ved the shot put 43' 4" for a d place finish; LaMarr Gibhurled the javelin 175'1" for ond place, and Phil Rhodes, eping Water placed third in javelin with a mark of '10".

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Basketball Letters Awarded Eleven

Cats Win Two Thomsen Stars In Shot Put and Discus From Wesleyan

Eleven men have been awarded varsity basketball letters at Peru State Teachers College, according to head basketball coach Jack Mcintire. \ The eleven monogram winners were responsible for Peru State's sparkling 17-7 season's record, the N.C.C. ch amp ions hip, N.A.I.A. district 11 play-off crown, and the season-ending participation in the N.A.I.A. tournament in Kansas City. Letter winners, the number of times each has lettered in basketball and their home town inelude: Seniors-Jack Johnson (2), Loup City; Chick Stessman (3), Omaha; Roger Witt (2), Otoe. Juniors - B o b Buettgenbach (2), Beatrice; Bob Gibson (2), Falls City; Drexel Harvey (2), Hartford, Ill.; Larry Rathe (2), Sterling; Mike Roach (3), Palmyra. Sophomores-Larry Hayes (1), Auburn; Jim Mayo (1), Brooklyn, N.Y.; Tom Yopp (2), East Alton, Illinois.

Vern Thomsen, a six feet twoinch two hundred and forty pound senior from Exeter, is Peru's leading shot put and discus thrower. Before coming to Peru, he attended Fairbury Junior College, where he starred in football and track for two years. In four track meets this season, "Tommy" has not been beaten in either the sh-0t put or discus. Vern's best effort -in the shot put was i.n a dual meet with Washburn University. He heaved the iron ball 47'11112" to better the school record of 47'3" set in 1932. In the Wesleyan Invitational, Thomsen came through with his best effort of the season in the discus. He hurled the platter 143'7" to take first place. He also won the shot put, which gave him two Df Peru's three go 1 d medals. , Track is not the only s p o r t big Vern Thomsen excels in at Peru. On the gridiron, he was a top performer, in the 1960 season, as the Bobcats won the Nebraska College Conference Championship. "Tommy" hopes to get a profootball tryout in the near future.

Track Tearn Beats Tarkio 79-57 Coach Jerome Stemper's Peru State track team opened their season Wednesday at Peru with a 79 to 57 track victory over Tarkio College. A rain-sodden track and field cut times, heights, and distances. Don Peterson, sophomore distance ace from Richfield captured both the mile and two-mile events for the Bobcats. Lanny Richards, Bellevue, doubled in the 440-yd. run and the broad jump. Peru's other double winner was Vern Thomsen, Exeter, who captured the discus and the shot put. Tarkio's George McVicker provided the only double win for the Missourians when he won victories in both hurdle events. SUMMARIES: 100 yd. dash-1. Jim Hurst, P; 2. Henry, T; 3. Freeburg, T. Time 10.3. 220 yd. dash-1. Freeburg, T; 2. Henry, T; 3. Dick Ferron, P. Time 23.8. 440 yd. dash-1. Lanny Richards, P; Fisher, T; 3. John Werner, P. Time 54.3. 880 yd. run-1. Lechtenberger, T; 2. Bill Tynon, P; 3. McKinley, T. Time 2:08.3. Mile run-1. Don Peterson, P; 2. Gordon, T; 3. Tom Buchholz, P. Time 4.58. Tw-0-mile run-1. Don Peterson, P; 2. Gordon, T; 3. To m Buchholz, P. Time 10:49.6. 120 yd. high hurdles-1. McVicker, T; 2. Ken Humphrey, P; 3. Ron Oestmann, P. Time 15.6. 220 yd. low hurdles-1. McVicker, T; 2. Bob Gibson, P; 3. Ken Humphrey, P. Time 27.G. 38() yd. relay-1. Tarkio (Martin, Fisher, Freeburg, Henry). Time 1:35.4. Mile relay-1. Tarkio (Lechtenberger, Smith, McKinley, McVicker). Time 3:40.1. Shot put-1. Vern Thomsen, P; 2. Pat Thomas, P; 3. Hayden, T. Distance 45'. Discus-1. Vern Thomsen, P; 2. (Tie) Jerry Henning, P; McKinley, T. Distance 129'9". Javelin-1. LaMarr Gibson, P; 2. Russell, T; 3. Phil Rhodes, P. Distance 161'7". Broad jump-1. Lanny Richards, P; 2. Ken Humphrey, P; 3. Phil Rhodes, P. Distance 19'111/2". High jump-1. (Tie) Jack Head, P; Phil Rhodes, P; 3. Herzberg, T; Height 5'8". Pole vault-1. Bob Gibson, P; 2. Ferguson, T; 3. Roger Bowman, P; Height 11'3".

The Peru State Bobcats came from behind twice Friday afternoon to earn two one-run baseball victories over Nebraska Wesleyan in Lincoln. Peru copped the opener 6-5 and then scored four runs in the last inning of the second game to take a 4-3 verdict. The two wins brought the Bobcats' N.C.C. and season's record to 3-1. Coach Wheeler's Peruvians saw Wesleyan open the scoring in the first game with a 5-run second inning rally. Peru came back in their half of the inning to score three runs on a walk, error, single, and a triple by pitcher Ron Kelly, Falls City.

FIRST SACKER FITZGERALD

Bill Fitzgerald, Peru State first sacker, is working on his t h i r d letter in the diamond sport. "Fitz" has shown determination as he has made the move from second base, his accustomed spot, to the unfamiliar first base slot. Bill, who hails from Genoa, Iowa, is rated by many as having th0 best hands on the 1961 Wesleyan's Plainsmen opened club. His "pick-ups" of 1 ow the second game with three big throws have saved many an inruns in the opening frame against fielder from making an error. Peru pitcher Jim Snyder, Ne- Playing in the infield w he r e braska City. F0llowing that out- hustle is important, Bill is known burst, Snyder and o p p o s i n g as "holler guy," · an attribute moundsman, Jim Munford hurled which has helped start many shutout ball until the seventh in- game-winning rallies. Bill is married, has two chilning when Peru finally got to er third child "on the Munford for four big runs and dren, with Fl:i way." He plans to teach and the victory. coach following his graduation. Ron Kelly, pinch hitting for Coach Jerome Stemper's Peru Snyder, singled. Mike Roach, State Teachers College track Palmyra drew a walk to push and Munford was saddled with team placed second in a triangu- Kelly to second. Peru's C a 1 v in the loss. lar meet at Northwest Missouri Hamilton, Clarinda, Iowa, then SUMMARY: Game 1 State College of Maryville, Mo., worked Munford for a walk to Peru __________ 031 110 () 6 5 3 Tuesday afternoon. Northwest load the sacks. Drexel Harvey, Wesleyan _____ 05() 000 () 5 7 1 Missouri captured first place in Hartford, Ill., drew his sixth walk Winning pitcher-Kelly (2-1) the meet with 631h points. The of the day to force in Kelly with Losing pitcher-Eichorn (0-2) Pe'ruvians finished second with Peru's first tally. Two runs rode SUMMARY: Game 2 6G1h, and Tarkio C-0llege trailed h-0me on a single by Larry Gil- Wesleyan ____ 3000 00() 0 3 5 3 with 46 points. son, Fullerton, to tie up the game. Peru __________ ooo 0-00 4 4 7 2 Again as in past meets it was Senior Bill Fitzgerald, Genoa, Winning pitcher-Snyder (1-0) Don Peterson, Richfield, a n d lined a base hit to center to score Losing pitcher-Munford (1-1) Vern Thomsen, Exeter, w h o Harvey with the winning run. Snyder gained credit for the win paced the Bobcat thinclads. Peterson raced to victories in the High jump-1. West, M; 2. mile and two-mile events, while Thomsen hurled the shot put and (Tie) Phil Rhodes, Weeping Water, P; Jack Head, Bellevue, P; J. discus to victories. D. Miller, M. Height 6'2". Peru State, so far this y ear , SUMMARY: Pole vault-1. Ferguson, T; 2. has an undefeated tennis team. 10() yd. dash-1. Porterfield, R. Miller, M; 3. Bob Gibson, Because of some mix-up in their M; 2. Henry, T.; 3. Wink, M.; 4. Falls City, P; 4. (Tie) Larry schedule, they have been unable Jim Hurst, Murray, P. Time 10.3. Noyes, Falls City, P; Gentry, M. to participate in any of the three 220 yd. dash-1. Porterfield, M; Height 12'3". matches which were scheduled. 2. Henry, T; 3. Freeburg, T; 4. Shot put-1. Vern Thomsen, Their next match will be in the Dick Ferron, Omaha, P. Time Exeter, P; 2. Carver, M; 3. Pat conference. 23.3. Thomas, Falls City, P; 4. HayWith Kelly holding the Plainsmen scoreless after the second inning, Peru State scored single runs in each of the next three innings to take the one-run verdict. Kelly earned the pitching verdict for the Bobcats, with Duane Eichorn the Wesleyan loser.

Track Tearn Second In Maryville Triangle

Net Team Can't Contact Opposition

440 yd. dash-1. Lanny Richards, Bellevue, P; 2. Fisher, T; 3. Dick Ferron, Omr.ha, P; 4. Plagman, M. Time 52.0. 880 yd. run-1. Sommers, M; 2. Lechtenberger, T; 3. J oh n Werner, Falls City, P; 4. Denten, M. Time 2:04.6. Mile run-1. Don Pet er son, Richfield, P; 2. Sommers, M; 3. Denten, M; 4. Gilliand, M. Time 4:4().5. Two-mile run-1. Don Peterson, Richfield, P; 2. Gordon, T; 3. Sommers, M; 4. Charles Dunn, Clarinda, Iowa, P. Time 10.29.7. 120 yd. high hurdles-I. McVicker, T; 2. Ken Humphrey, Auburn, P; 3. Ron Oestmann, Johnson, P; 4. Miller, M. Time 15.8. 220 yd. low hurdles-1. McVicker, T; 2. H-0ward, M; 3. Ken Humphrey, Auburn, P; 4. Bob Gibson, Falls City, P. Time 25.7. 830 yd. relay-1. Mary vi 11 e (Wink, Tilman, Porterfield, Howard); 2. Tarkio; 3. Peru. Time 1:31.8. Mile relay-Tarkio (McKinley, Smith, McVicker, Lechenberger); 2. Peru; 3. Maryville. Time 3.29.5. Broad jump-1. Ken Humphrey, Auburn, P; 2. Lanny Richards, Bellevue, P; 3. Herzberg, T; 4. Smith, M. Distance 20'21/4''.

den, T. Distance 45'51/4''. Discus-1. Vern Thomsen, Exeter, P; 2. Boyd, M; 3. McKinley, T; 4. Jerry Henning, Peru, P. Distance 132'51h". Javelin-1. Meyers, M; 2. Ireland, M; 3. Gentry, M; 4. Russell, T. Distance 190'1/2".

W.A.A. Plays Ball Baseball was the main attraction for W.A.A. members last April 19 and will be for several more meetings. A business meeting will be held May 3, 8:00 p.m. in the college gymnasium.

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Teachers Colleges Continue Granting Liberal Arts Degrees Nebraska's four teachers colleges may continue to grant liberal arts degrees. The Legislature's Education Committee defeated 6-3, an effort to restrict this right. The bill, Sen. Hal Bridenbaugh's LB663, , was killed in committee. Bridenbaugh admitted in his testimony the bill was really aimed at preventing t h e colleges from conferring masters degrees. In 1949 the Legislature authorized bachelor of arts degrees at the teachers colleges. Granting of masters of science

degrees in education only was begun in 1955 under State Normal Board directive. The Board, at that time, decided its original statutory pqwer was sufficient to allow a graduate program. Now the Board has declared that unless the graduate programs at Chadron, Kearney, and Wayne State earn accreditation by 1963, the programs will be discontinued. All the State Colleges were represented. Peru State was represented by Dean Melvin and two students, Jerry Wanser and Robert Raper.

told: "That would really be the life-just walking around the campus." "I bet you like the boys to sit on the steps of the girls' dorm." "Have you ever heard a By Susan Sharp drum quartet practice in th e The music contest April 20 and 21 afforded an opportunity f o r basement of the campus school?" Yes, for a couple of days it was nearly 1,500 high school students difficult to find a place in the to look over the Peru campus. cafeteria line or the Bob Inn; but Perhaps the best way to note perhaps we have shown some of their reactions was to ask t h e the young people of the suryoung people themselves. Bob rounding area that Peru really is Long, Murdock, made the con- a fine place to come to school. cise comment: "I like it!" Linda Buman, Pawnee City, remarked at the great change in the face of the campus. Fred Mack, DawsonHome Economics Club met Verdon, said that he was imMonday, April 17, in room 312 pressed by the new buildings and at the Campus School. The main the friendly attitude of the colbusiness of the evening was the lege people towards the visitors; election of officers. They are as and Mary Dougherty, Lewiston, follows: Mary Jarvis, president noticed that "everyone was eager elect; Winnie Sporer, vice presito help." dent; Cathy Banks, secretary; You could tell the visitors as and Barbara Story, treasurer: It you saw them. They carried was decided to elect the historidrumsticks or transistor radios or sheet music or even an extra pair an and the publicity director next fall in order to give the inof shoes. coming freshmen and new rrlemThey piled in cars and looked bers a chance to hold office. · over the town of Peru. They Other business of the evening bought supplies arid ate picnic was a discussion of the plans lunches in the park. They prac- made for the trip to Omaha for a ticed nervously just .before the bridal show. And it was also deperformance. They walked in cided to hold a dinner in May intwos or in groups so large that stead of the usual picnic. Officers they crowded you off the side- will be installed at this meeting. walk. Some passing comments which were overheard were: "It took Tri Beta held their April meetme twenty minutes to get a cup of coffee in the Bob Inn." "I just ing at Waubonsie State Park, lost 65c playing cards." "If you Iowa. It was decided to have a wasn't a lady, I'd kick ya'." "I'm steak fry there at the last meetlost." "You just don't do things ing. Various committees we re like that here." "This is really a organized to plan the picnic. Sponsors, members, and guests big school." Some of our own students were had an enjoyable time.

Visitors' Comments On Peru Campus

Home Ee Elects Officers

Tri Beta Meeting

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Judith Miller Awarded LS.LI. Assistantship Miss Judith Miller, a senior music major at Nebraska State Teachers College, Peru, has been awarded a graduate assistantship at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, La., for the 1961-62 academic year. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hanford Miller, Peru, Miss Miller will study·- violin under Louie Ferraro, and will play in the Louisiana State University Symphonic Orchestra. She is a student of Victor H. Jindra, head of the division of fine arts at Peru State, and has studied under Mr. Jindra since age seven. In January, Miss Miller presented her si;nior violin recital at Peru State, and on February 26, she performed a recital of selections by B a c h, Brahms, Chausson, and Donato at Omaha's Joslyn Art Museum and Recital Hall. · Miss Miller is the president of the P~ru State chapter of Kappa Delti Pi, national honorary education fraternity, and is a member of the Peru chapter of Beta Beta Beta, professional honorary biology fraternity. She has been active in the college orchestra, band, college choir, and Peruvian Singers.

Hastings College Entertains In Convocation The Hastings College Road Show presented a program at Convocation, April 19. The commentators were Herb Shaw and John Nies. The Kings Four, consisting of Tom Copple, Gary Dobbins, Larry Froschheuser, and Jim Kimmel, sang "Casey Jones," "Four and Twenty Elders," and "Where or When." Emma Byrd presented an original dance interpretation. Judy Bauer, accompanied by Lanny Bohlke, sang "Bali Hai" and "I Like Men." The Two Muckrakers, Herb Shaw and John Nies, presented a T.V. spectacular, "You Are Here." Lanny Bohlke, accompanying himself on the piano, sang "Charmin' Carmen" and "I Know." Carl Manion played the ukelele and sang folk songs. The program was concluded by Bill Jacobs with a drum solo.

Harlan Chicken Dinner Followed Open House Harlan's Hilltop Hacienda was the scene of a party following the open houS€ of the new A. V. Larson Industrial Arts Building at the State Teachers College in Peru on Sunday evening. Friends from out of town brought fried chicken and all the trimmings, while Mr. Harlan prepared two freezers of homemade ice cream. The latter was supplemented by a surprise birthday cake brought by the guests to celebrate Dr. Harlan's "umpteenth" birthday. It was equipped with trick candles which wouldn't stay blown out. The following people were in attendance: Mr. and Mrs. Olen Brake, Mr. and Mrs. Don Dahlin, Mr. and Mrs. Ernes,t Sebby, Mrs. Ben Willard, Mrs. Paul Dry, Mrs. Viola Cox, and Mrs. Josephine Hannibal, all of Beatrice; Mr. and M_rs. D. M. Edgerly, Jr., of Omaha; and Mr. and Mrs. John Campbell of Wymore.

Student Wives Hold Final Meeting And Elect Officers For 1961-62 The regular meeting of th e Peru Students' Wives Club was held in the Campus School home ec department Thursday, April 20. This was the last regular meeting of the wives. Officers for the 1961-62 year were elected. The officers are: Mrs. Ted Kirby, president; Mrs. Ray Meister, vice president; Mrs. Dwight Anderson, secretary; Mrs. Marion Battani, treasurer; Mrs. Lonnie Hou-

Dr. Christ Accepts Post-Doctoral Grant Dr. John C. Christ, head of the division of science and mathe.matics, Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru, has accepted a post-doctoral grant by the National Science Foundation for a two-month study of marine biology at the University of Oregon. Dr. Christ will begin study in late June. The grant is one of a limited number made each year to outstanding biologists in colleges and universities on the North Americim continent. Dr. Christ began a survey of marine biology as a graduate student at Oregon State University, and th~ work he did in the field at that time won him the post doctoral grant. Dr. Christ was awarded a doctorate in biology by the University of Bari, Italy, in August, 1960. During his absence from the Peru campus Dr. Christ will be replaced by Dr. Frank W. Jobes, professor of biology, Yankton College, Yankton, S. D., who will teach advanced biology classes in the 1961 Peru State summer session. Dr. Jobes is married and has a 15-year old daughter.

chin, historian; and Mrs. Ri Blake, reporter. Refreshments of straw shortcake topped with whi cream, and coffee were serv Mrs. Richard Blake, Mrs. Meister and Mrs. Marion Ba The annual banquet was at Steinhart Lodge Saturday ril 22. Fourteen members their husbands later danced the Nebraska City Legion C

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Attend I.A. Convention Dr. Owen Harlan, Dee Jarvis and Lester Russell attended the annual convention of American Industrial Arts Associaition held at the Chase Park Plaza Hotel in St. Louis, Missouri, April 4-7. During the first two days of the convention, they attended the American Council of Industrial Arts Teacher Education, which is a subdivision of the American Industrial Arts Association and is1 composed of only college and university industrial arts teachers.

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Nebraska's First

College Constitution. Voted In At Convocation The convocation of Wednesday, May 10, was held for the purpose ~G;¡ of explaining the new constitution which was drawn up by the ifiy, student senate and faculty advisors. The committee which had worked on the constitution was in charge of the convocation. They read the contents to the students and answered any questions which the students had. ~-There was much debate. At the close of the convocation period, the students were given the chance to vote for or against the constitution. The vote was 136 in favor of the constitution and 104 against. In the future the student senate will be known as the Student Governing Association and will be called the S.G.A. The constitution, also, provides for a change in the membership of the governing body. If is designed to increase the efficiency and representative quality of the student government at Peru State.

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Profs. Jindra and Rath Honored At Dinner

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Victor H. Jindra, head of the fine arts division, and George Rath, associate professor of modern languages, long time members of th~ Peru State Teachers College faculty, were honored Saturday evening, May 8, at a dinner in the Student Center. More than one hundred Peru State faculty members and friends of the college gathered to honor Mr. Jindra and Mr. Rath, who will retire this year aft e r serving Peru State for a total of 54 years. Mr. Jindra came to Peru State in 1923 and Mr. Rath in 1946. Dr. Neal S. Gomon, Peru State president, presented the honored guests with books of greetings from fellow faculty members. Dr. Gomon announced that contributions by friends of Messrs. Jindra and Rath had established scholarship funds in their names. The scholarships will be used to aid music and foreign language students at Peru State Teachers College.

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Mrs. Mary Anna Gnade, secretary to the president, emceed the program which included skits by Edward G. Camealy, associate professor of voice, and Frieda Rowoldt, assistant professor 9f education; poetry reading by author George Rath, singing by Victor Jindra, better known for his violin work, and a piano-vocal duo by Dr. and Mrs. Neal G. Gomon.

'ipril Showe~ Bring Fashions" Was Theme Of Style Show "April Showers Bring Fashions" was the theme of the annual style show presented by the clothing classes from the college and Campus School. Girls modeled their garments in the Campus School Auditorium May 2 at 8:00 p.m. Stage settings and publicity (Continued on page four)

The Voice of the Campus of aThousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 56

Nebraska's Finest

College

MAY 15, 1961

Number 15

String and Wind Ensembles, Peruvian Singers Dramatics Club And Choir Give Annual Spring Concert Holds Initiation was Judy Wolf. This section of the program was closed with two novelty numbers, "Way Up On Old Smoky" and "Done Caught a Rabbit." The final portion of the program, featuring the College Chorus, presented Linda Goodin and JoAnn Frerichs as soloists in "In Heaven Above." This was followed by "Deep River," "Jubila," "The Deaf Old Woman," "Selections from 'South Pacific.' " The String and Wind Ensemble is directed by Victor H. Jindra. Edward G. Camealy is the director of the Peruvian Singers and the College Chorus.

The annual Spring Concert of the College String and Wind Ensemble, Peruvian Singers, .and the College Chorus was held Sunday, May 7, in the College Auditorium. The String and Wind Ensemble began the program with the "Baliet Parisien" by Jacques Offenbach. The program continued as Edward G. Camealy conducted one of his own composit10ns entitled "A Swiss Evening." As the final number in this portion of the program, they presented "Sound of Music" by RodgersHammerstein . "Marches of Peace" by Mueller

waf: the opening- number of the Peruvian Singers. They next sang "Grant Unto Me the Joy of Thy Salvation" by Brahms-Williar.i.son. Ardith Wininger, JoAnn Frerichs and Eugene W a 1 d e n were featured as soloists in "Three Lovely Birds from Paradise." This was followed by "O Filii et Filiae" by Leisring an d "The Turtle Dove" by Williams, which featured Mike Donovan as soloist. Next on the program was "Come, Blessed Rest," "In These Delightful, Pleasant Groves," "Oh, Dear! What Can the Matter Be?" and "Elijah Rock." The soloist in' "Lonesome Valley"

Peruvian Singers And Choir Perform In Convocation

Dave Gamon Awarded President's Tea For Stanford Scholarship Class Of .'61 Given David N. Gomon, son of Dr. By Dr. and Mrs. Gamon and Mrs. Neal S. Gomon of Peru,

The Peruvian Singers and the College Choir performed Monday, May 8, at a special convocation. Most of the selections were sung a capella. Others were accompanied by Sharylin Vrtiska on the piano. Soloists included: Mrs. Darrell Wininger, Gene Walden, Jo Ann Frerichs, Mike Donovan, J u d y Wolfe, Duane Hemminger, and, Darrel Feit. " The Peruvian Singers sang: "All Hearts Beat as One," "Grant Unto Me," "Three Lovely Birds from Paradise," "Turtle Dove," "In These Delightful Pleasant Groves," "Oh Dear, What C an the Matter Be?," "Lonesome Valley," "Way Up On Old Smoky," and "Done Caught a Rabbit." The College Choir sang: "Heaven Above," "Jubila," "The Deaf Old Woman," and selections from "South Pacific." The groups are under the direction of Mr. Edward Camealy.

has been awarded a tuition scholarship by Stanford University at Palo Alto, California. The grant is for four years of study in the department of science and mathematics. David plans to enroll at Stanford in September, 1961. The recipient will be. graduated from the Campus High School of Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru later this month as top student in his class. He has been active in many school affairs, lettering in football a n d bask'etball, re p r e s e n t i ng the school at the state high sch o o 1 golf tournament three years, student manager of the track team, participating in band, orchestra, chorus and dramatics throughout his high school years and editing the school yearbook during his senior year. David has been a member of the All-State orchestra three years as cellist. He plays on the local Junior Legion baseball team. He has been active in Scouting including Order of the Arrow and last summer was in charge of the commissary at the Scout Reservation near Humboldt. He is also active in church work serving as an alternate teacher in the St. Paul Lutheran Sunday School at Auburn.

Results Of Student Senate Election The 1961-1962 Student Senate has been completed with the election of three representatives from each class. Representatives from the senior class are Ray Meister, Pat Rathe, and Darrell Feit. Junior representatives are Gene Wright, Carol McLain, and David Fritch. Sophomore representatives are Gary Stover, Winnie Sporer, and Karolyn Powers. Results of the election are as follows: SeniorsRay Meister ___________ 60.** Pat Rathe _____________ 55** Darrell Feit ___________ 54u Joan Riggle __________ _48

JuniorsGene Wright __________ 60** Carol McLain _________ 51 ** David Fritch _________ -43** Carol Sudik ___________ 37 Lois Fritz _____________ 24 Phil Niemann _________ 10 Melissa Fulkerson _____ 8 SophomoresGary Stover __________ _44** Winnie Sporer ________ _43** Karolyn Powers _______ 36** Mary Jarvis ___________ 31 Cathy Banks __________ 29 Jean Reiman __________ 25 Mary Reid _____________ 24 William Springer ______ 23

"This Wonderful Year, 60-61" Is Theme For Open House Program The All-College Open House Program was held in the Peru Auditorium Sunday, April 30, 1961, at 2:30 p.m. The theme for this program was, "This Wonderful Year, 60-61." The hosts for the program were Linda Goodin, president, Women Students Association; Gordon Ohnoutka, president, Majors Hall Council; and Phil Rhodes, president, Delzell Hall Council.

Sigma Delta Tau Elects Officers Sigma Tau Delta held its regular monthly meeting Monday evening, May 8, in the Music Hall Auditorium. Officers for the following year were elected as follows: Julie Mayer, president; Dolores Spil(Continued on page two)

Dr. and Mrs. Neal S. Gomon gave the annual President's Tea for the 1961 graduating class in the main lounge of the Student Center Sunday, May 7, from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Approximately 50 students and faculty members attended. Mrs. D. E. Donovan and Mrs. Harold Boraas p o u re d ; Mrs. Keith Melvin and Miss Waunita Bradley served. Mrs. Ruth Morrison, Mrs. Evanelle Paradise, Dr. and Mrs. George Schottenhamel, Dr. Keith Melvin, and Dr. Harold Boraas also helped make the tea a success. Bouquets of apple blossoms, tulips, lilacs, and hyacinths decorated the Student C e n t e r lounge. Refreshments included molded ice cream, tea cakes in pastel colors, rose mints, nuts, coffee, and tea.

White Angels Elect Officers White Angels met May 1 in the T.V. lounge of Eliza Morgan Hall. At this meeting Patsy Melcher, Mary Ann Lewellyn, Clara Kelly, Pat Rathe, Winnie Sporer, and Jean Reiman were nominated for the White Angel Scholarship. The White Angel banquet was discussed and it was decided that it would be held at Ulbrick's in Nebraska City. The date is indefinite. Officers for the 1961-62 term were elected at the May 8 meeting. Judy Adams was elected president. Other officers include Julie Mayer, vice-president; Cathy Banks, secretary; Virginia Adkins, treasurer; and Pat Rathe, demerit chairman. It was decided that the pledges would sign the constitution at the banquet. Both meetings were closed with the singing of the White Angel Song.

Bureau :Places Eight More Harold W. Johnson, director of placement, has announced that eight more Peru students have signed contracts for the 1961-62 school year. Positions filled are: Ross Pil-

Banquet The Peru Dramatics Club held its Initiation Banquet in the Grand Hotel in Nebraska City Sunday night, May 7. Following a dinner of Swiss steak with all the trimmings, the group was entertained with the wit of Mr. Bob Bohlken, speech teacher in Nebraska City who is a former Dramatic Club member. Bob was master of ceremonies for the evening's program. As part of the program, the initiates were required to act out various pantomimes to prove that they were qualified to become members of the club. This was followed by the formal initiation ceremony. New mefubers of the club are: Gary Stover, Bob Gnade, Lo is Fritz, Bob Mulder, Haney Milstead, Jerry Littell, Gerald Kirkendall, Linda Nygaard, an d Carol Ewbn. ¡

Basketball Schedule For 1961-1962 Twenty-four games, e 1 even homes and thirteen away, plus one tournament will make up the 1961-62 Peru State Teachers College basketball schedule, according to athletic director Alfred G. Wheeler. Coach Jack McIntire's defending Nebraska College Conference cagers, will participate in a four-day tournament at Parsons College, Fairfield, Iowa, December 26-29. The 1961-62 Peru State basketball schedule: Nov. Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec.

Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec.

Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb. Feb.

27-Alumni at Peru 2-0maha U. at Peru 5-Tarkio at Tarkio 8-Northwestern at Orange City, Iowa 9-Buena Vista at Storm Lake, Iowa 13-St. Benedict's at Peru 16-Tarkio at Peru 18-Southeast Missouri State at Cape Girardeau, Mo. 19-Fisk University at Nashville, Tenn. 20-Harris Teachers at St. Louis, Mo. 21-Rolla School of Mines at Rolla, Mo. 26-29-T our n am ent at Parsons College, Fairfield, Iowa 4-Emporia St ate at Peru 6-Wesleyan at Peru 12-13-Chadron at Peru 19-Hastings at Peru 20-Kearney at Peru 27-Wayne at Wayne 1-Doane at Crete 3-Wesleyan at Wesleyan 10-Wayne at Peru 17-Kearney at Kearney 22-Doane at Peru 23-Hastings at Hastings

kington, Glenwood, Iowa; Sherrill Torring, Ralston; Marilynn Giesmann, Osceola; Pauline Fink, Osceola; Judith Wolfe, Wilcox; Beverly Leeper, Hastings; Alyce Green, Plattsmouth; and Carolyn Hinrichs, Dist. No. 2, Nebraska City, Nebr.


NOTES FROM MAJORS HALL

WHISPERS FROM MORGAN By Susan Sharp

By Raymond Hunzeker

At a dorm meeting the following people were elected to lead the dorm during, the fall term: President, Ellen Hunzeker. Vice president, Clara Kelly. Secretary-treasurer, Jan Tucker. Gowns shortened, hair set, shoes shined, and accessories chosen-at last the preparations for the May Fete are past. Congratulations to those whose cooperation made it a success. May Day was a busy time in the dorm for many girls were involved in the making and giving of May baskets. Two engagements were announced. Nancy Sears is engaged to Lee Pasco of Auburn; and Carol Ellenberger is engaged to Chick Stessman, w h o attends Peru State. Birthday celebrations w e r e held for Marilyn Glenn, S and y Krakow, Sharon Earl, Lind a Goodin, and Susan Hulbert. Pat Rathe was quite surprised the other night when a group of her friends threw her in the shower "because she was too happy."

We have a few "Huck Finn's" in the dormitory. Sam Sadich, Jim Simones, Henry Turner, Ken Dostal, Bob Reitz, Roger Carnes, and Wilber We aver floated down to Brownville on a raft Saturday. The "voyage" took three hours and forty-five minutes. Dean Stapleton met the Missouri sailors and drove them back to Peru. Beware of Frankie Kan fellows-he's on the loose with a match trick! ! There have been and will be many pre-test parties before final week, although it seems as if there are many fellows writing "dead line" term papers according to Glenn Irwin. Gary Stover and Butch Whitfield presented their pantomime "The Great Pretender" at th e Open House program last Sunday. Mrs. Donovan extends h e r thanks to all who contributed in making our Open House a success. One of the advantages of o u r solarium is that we can observe the track and tennis meets in cool comfort.

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LIBRARY COLUMN By Cathy I deus

Dick Gerber was crowned May With mixed feelings, we rea- Fete King of 1961. Ken Dostal You Can't Go Home Again, by lize that the end of this session is was selected as junior attendant drawing near. There is summer and Ron Kelly was selected as Thomas Wolfe, is the author's school or a job or vacation to con- sophomore attendant. Congratu- last and most mature work. The central figure is a gifted young sider. It will take a lot to move lations fellows ! ! author who writes a book about all the things which have accumDave Fritch was in the Aub~n his home town, putting into it ulated in our rooms. There are many memories and many atti- hospital for a few days 1 as t everything he knows about the tudes; but perhaps the best week with a bum leg. Glad tO place and about the people living thought was displayed in a car- see you up and around again, there. When the book is published, the whole town rises up toon on the door of the room oc- Dave. against him, and he sees how cupied by Judi Wilson and A grounded baby owl held the mortally afraid people are to face "Pinky" Lewellyn which depicts interest of Majors Hall except the truth. This event coincides a contemporary man confronted when the irritated mother flew with the beginning of the Deby stacks of books and papers. protective cover! Dr. Christ pression, and the young author The caption is: "It will all be warned that a mother owl can be sees that men need to accept the over May 2£." a handful or hairful of danger. truth if they want to be free, and Watch out guys t t he rededicates his life to the Sigma Tau Delta From the looks of things, it search for it. The quest leads him seems as if a prosperous summer into many strange adventures.

Elects Officers

(Continued from page one} ker, vice-president; Glen Irwin, secretary-treasurer. Members were urged to continue the sale of Sifting Sands, the booklet of student literary contributions. Anyone desiring a copy should see Julie Mayer or Mr. Silas Summers. Plans for the fall issue were also discussed.

is expected. ·Many fellows have summer jobs lined up. Many plan to return to Majors according to the room sheet in the office. Darrell Feit was elected senior class representative on the Student Senate; Junior electees were Gene Wright and Dave Fritch, and the Sophomores elected Gary Stover.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks May 15, 1961 PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Ray G. Meister ----------------------------------Co-editor Linda Bertram __________________________________ Co-editor Morris Keyt ----------------------------------Copy Editor Sandy Craig ________________________________ Layout Editor Carolyn Reiber _____________________________ Layout Editor Jack Johnson --------------------------------Sports Editor Darrel Wokott --------------------------Business Manager Gerald Kirkendall _____________________ ,,Personnel Manager Pam Yost _________________________________Women's Sports Gary Brown -----------------------------Columnist Delzell Susan Sharp _______________________ Columnist Morgan Hall Catherine !deus _________________________Columnist Library Raymond Hunzeker ----------------------Columnist Majors Ron Pethoud --------------------------Columnist Exchange Barbara Wheeldon --~----------------------------Reporter Melissa Fulkerson --------------------------------Reporter Jerry E. Gress -----------------------------------Reporter Phyllis Grube ------------~-----------------------Reporter Edna McGovern ----------------------------------Reporter Gary Weiss --------------------------------------Reporter Tom Yopp ---------------------------------------Reporter Gerald Jeanneret ---------------------------------Reporter Mary Anna Gnade ------------------------------Columnist Stewart Linscheid --------------------------------Sponsor

Dr. Gamon Busy Commencement Speaker The next two weeks will find Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of Peru State Teachers College, as a commencement speaker at five Nebraska and Iowa schools. The Nebraska educator, who is serving his tenth year as president of Peru State, has chosen as his topic "Freedom Is Not Free." Dr. Gomon has had wide experience in the teaching field and as a practicing newspaper man. His schedule includes: Nemaha, May 10; Decatur, May 16; Elmwood, May 17; Neola, Iowa, May 18; Farragut, Iowa, May 22.

AROUND THE CAMPUSES

The Midland-Midlanders now have toned down their complaining about their girls having to be in at 9:30 on week nights. Upon reading a 1895 catalogue, they are now counting their blessings. Take note of a few of the rules contained in that catalogue: "All social intermingling of sexes shall be limited to stated times and occasions, arranged by the faculty and under the direction of the preceptress." This meant DELZELL "no dating." It was also ruled that "ladies may receive gentleDOINGS men callers on Friday evening By from 7:30 to 9:00." The condition Gary L. for receiving "gentlemen callers" Brown was that written permission be obtained from the young ladies' The fifth of May was really an parents or guardian. The cataLe± fhe Crabgrass Grow, by H. exciting day on the Peru Cam- logue also stated that "under the Allen Smith, is a hilarious taie of pus. Just about everyone was ex- same condition, ladies will be Smith's adventures in suburban cited about the May Fete Dance permitted to accept the escort of young gentlemen to evening serliving. In this unorthodox Al- being held that evening. vices and, occasionally, evening There is always someone commanac, Smith talks about s u ch diverse problems as the Sunken plaining about the food served in entertainment." State of Strawberries, his fascin- the cafeteria. The other evening The Eagle-To raise money, ating Cocktail Party Policy, and Galen Conn found a half dozen the students of Chadron held a · Outdoor Cooking. He has ar- shotgun pellets in his roast beef. "Beauty and Beast" contest. A ranged his pseudo-almanac by So that's the way the cafeteria ballot was a penny donated to the four seasons of the year, and obtains its meat. All joking aside, the cause. You could vote as his experiences are only too true. I would like to say that the food many times as you could afford According to Smith, what's served in the Peru Cafeteria is to. Many prizes were given to the wrong with living in the suburbs the best I have eaten in any col- winners. Included in t h e s e is the Perversity of Nature. Bugs lege cafeteria. I speak from ex- "prizes" were the keys to a 1961 are a special nuisance, ' and he perience, as this is the third col- Thunderbird. has perfected an extermination lege that I have attended. Dorm elections were held this The Hermes-Doane College program to eliminate wasps. His past week along with the annual has found the answer. They now secret weapon is a rifle-but all this is described in his chapter dorm party. At the party Phil know how to launch a man into on Big Bug Hunting. This is the Rhodes was re-elected president, space and return him in the Almanac that will solve all your Arlin Stuhr was elected vice- same condition without risking household problems-and start president, and John Masonbrink his life. They were utterly confident of the success of their atyou thinking about a few th at was elected treasurer. As the year draws to an end tempt because, as one student probably never bothered you beDelzell will lose many of its old put it, "How could we lose? We fore. familiar faces as many of the knew he would return none the boys will be graduating. Good worse physically because we The View From the Forfiefh luck to all graduating seniors. launched a corpse." Floor, by· Theodore H. White, is the story of John Ridgely Warren, who came to New York to save two great magazines from failure. On his last desperate attempt to save his publishing em~ pire hang the lives and careers of Groceries Meats thousands who work for him, as well as the cold ambition of men Fruits Vegetables who see in his destruction their opportunity for fortune-and his Frozen Food Locker Service own honor. Out of Warren's struggles comes a swift and moving story of responsibility an d freedom. ·

HEUER GROCERY

PERU

NEBRASKA

(


Pictured are May Fete Queen and King, (center) Lori Kubes and Dick Gerber and. their attendants: (left to right) Ken Dostal, Sandy Stephens; Jack Head, Jeannine Ehlers; Rosalie Baehr, Ron Kelly; Carol Eynon, Bill Tynon.

Ladies-In-Waiting Winnie Sporer, Bonnie Jo Steele, Judy Sanders, Betty Coulter, Karen Mcintire, Karolyn Powers, Kathy Banks and Virginia Adkins wait to make their appearance at the May Fete.

Girls from the folk dancing class dance around baskets of flowers in La ndunga. Front row: Dorthea Fink, Linda Goodin, and Sharon Earle. Back w: Ila Reiman, Bonnie Vanderford, Charlotte Wuster, Frances Sanders.

-

EGAY FIESTA, MAY FETE PROC1RAM, was presented May 5, 6:30 p. m. Cuc!:~~ha~oodin and Ken Humphrey dance

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Mexican Theme

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Highlights 1961 May Fete The 1961 presentation of the May Fete was given Friday, May 5, at 6:30 p.m. in the college gymnasium. The Women's Physical Education Department and th e Student Senate sponsored the annual event. The throne was placed on the east wall of the gym. It was covered by red and yellow streamers, and looked like a bright Mexican awning. The throne was flanked by cacti, palms, and simulated trees. Green streamers covered the walls on either side. Colored balloons were hung on lavender streamers, which ran from the throne to the opposite wall. A large yellow sombrero was suspended by the streamers in the center of the gym. As Eugene Walden played the first measures of the processional, Ray Meister announced the appearance of the Ladies-In-Waiting. Karen Mcintire, K a r o 1 y n Powers, Kathy Banks, Virginia Adkins, Bette Coulter, Judy Sanders, Bonnie Jo Steele, and Winifred Sporer were attired in pastel gingham sun dresses and matching picture hats. May Fete attendants followed the Ladies-In-Waiting. Freshmen were Carol Eynon and Bill Tynon. Carol's white nylon dress was covered with embroidered yellow roses. It was accented by a floor-length, yellow bow in the back. Sophomore a t t e n d a n t s were Rosalie Baehr and Ron Kelly. Miss Baehr's formal was also white nylon. The floor length skirt was tiered. Each tier w a s embroidered in blue on the edge. Sandy Stephens and Ken Dostal were junior attendants. Sandy wore a pink formal. The pink organza of the bodice was used in an embroidered over-panel for the skirt. The panel, which fell to a "V" in the front and back, was over pink net. Senior representatives were Jeannine Ehlers and Jack Head. Miss Ehlers wore a Princess style dress of white taffeta. The bodice and sleeves were white lace. A fan-shaped panel fell from the waistline to the floor in the back. Jeannine's white lace mitts matched the white lace of her dress.

Eighteen Members Attend Homa Economics Banquet The Home Economics Club traveled to Nebraska City for a dinner Monday, May 8, at Steinhart Lodge. Eighteen members and two sponsors, Mrs. Ina Sproul and Mrs. Louise Kregel attended. The dinner marked the end of a successful year for the club. Upon returning to Peru, the group assembled in the Home Economics department for installation of officers. Jeannine Ehlers, retiring president, read the vows which the officers took. Those installed were: Clara Kelly, president; Mary Jarvis, president elect; Winnie Sporer, vice president; Kathy Banks, secretary; Barbara Story, treasurer.

"April Showers Bring Fashions" Was Theme

Of Style Show (Continued from page one) were handled by Joan Riggle. The center stage was set with vertical lengths of various fabrics. The fabrics were courtesy of Morrissy's Variety. On either side

Flower girls, Nancy Allgood and Margaret Spilker, wore pastel dresses with matching half hats. John Coatney and Mike Traylor were crown bearers. Ladies-In-Waiting curtsied as May Queen and King, Lori Kubes and Dick Gerber, passed by. The Queen wore a sheath gown of white satin. The front was accented by a panel of embroidered satin. The satin o v er ski r t dropped in the back to form a train. A group of merrymakers appeared before the throne. The girls, who were dressed in gaily colored full skirts and s u n blouses, did a modern dance. Dancers were Mary Lou Reid, Pam Yost, Marilyn Monroe, Mary Ann Lewellyn, Betty Painter, Linda Hagen, Connie Dietl, and Judy Wolf. The chorus was accompanied by Judy Miller, violin, and Gary Schumucker and Duane Hemminger on guitars in the song, "Cielito Lindo." Two Mexican folk dances, "La Raspa" and "La Cucaracha,'' were done by the folk dancing class. Dancers were: Marilyn Monroe, Joe Barrientos; Karen Fankhauser, John Biere; Joyce Carman, Richard Blake; Wanda Price, Richard Brown; Jeanne Shuttlesworth, Kenneth Hemphrey; Sharon Donlan, Bob Kaiser; Crystal Seegal, Dale Pflaum; Frances Sanders, Gary Randles; Darlene Elliott, Merlyn Wright; Dorothea Fink, Bart Bartholomew; Beverly Farmer, Jim Dovel; Linda Goodin, and Charlotte Wheeler. Girls were dressed) in bright Mexican style dresses. White shirts, dark pants, and brigh sashes were worn by t h e boys. A change in pace came with the next number, a bull fight. The brave matador, Mary Lou Reid, appeared in the traditional attire. Her cape was red. Next came the faithful estoquedor, Margie Campbell, bearing the sword. Lastly the ferocious beast, the bull, appeared. Bonnie Vanderford and Ila Reiman portrayed the bull. After a number of encounters, matador Mary Lou conquered the crafty bull.

Another Mexican song, "La Chiapanecas,'' was presented by the chorus and orchestra. The Mexican Hat Dance, El Jarabe Tapatio, was done by Pam Yost and Joe Barrientos. Pam looked like a Mexican senorita in a black blouse and sparkling white and black skirt:- Joe's black pants were trimmed in silver. He wore a sombrero. A Mexican ceremonial dance, "La Sundunga," was done by several girls. They carried baskets of flowers on their shoulders, which they placed on the floor at the start of the dance. White skirts and blouses trimmed in bright colors were worn by all the girls. Those dancing were Sharon Earle,' Karen Fankhauser, Dorothea Fink, Linda Goodin, Marilyn Monroe, Frances San. ders, Wanda Price, Jean Reiman, Roberta Thomas, Bonnie Vanderford, Charlotte Wheeler, an d Charlotte Wuster. The breaking of the Pinata, a fiesta tradition, was supervised by Sherril Torring. As Dick Brown broke the Pinata, dancers scrambled for the candy and trinkets which had scattered. As the Fiesta ended, the fifth and sixth grade girls from the Campus School came skipping in. They formed a circle around the Maypole. After a short dance, they wound the pink and blue streamers into a checked pattern by weaving in and out around the pole.

were replicas of sewing tools and an enlarged pattern. Both were on backgrounds of black fabric. Mrs. Ina Sproul, clothing instructor, narrated the 50 minute show. Elinor Keefer was in charge of background music. Lighting and sound were handled by Jim Christ. Darlene Critel was wardrobe mistress. Her as-

sistants were Laverna Roos and Linda Bertram. Fashions varied from blouses and skirts by the 7th grade to suits by the advanced clothing class of the college.

The King and Queen left t h e throne as the recessional music was played. They were followed by their court. May Fete director was Mrs. A. G. Wheeler. Mr. Edward Camealy and Joyce Carman handled the vocal music. Miss Judy Hohl assisted with properties. Joan Riggle was chairman of the decoration committee. The May Fete dance was held in the gym from 9 to 12 p.m. Couples danced to the music of Bobby Lane and his orchestra. Dr. and Mrs. Harold Boraas and Mr. and Mrs. T. I. Friest were sponsors for the evening.

"I read the newspapers to see how God governs the world." -John Newton

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Dr. Gamon Agai~st Any Tuition Increase Dr. Neal' S. Gomon, president ru Alumni Association in 0 of Peru State Teachers College, · Thursday. More than ~O alu called for a halt to the trend of fornWl students, and friends increasing tuition at Nebraska's Peru State gathered at the B' " state teachers colleges. wood Club to hear the P "Peru State, as well as the oth- State president. Eunice Burbridge (Mrs. er state teachers colleges, were founded so that any student ald) Naviaux and Marie A. R capable of college work c o u 1d both of Omaha, fascinated t · further his education,'' Dr. Go- audience with discussion a · · mon said. Referring to recent demonstrations in the field pressure by some legislative bud- grapho-analysis, the science get committee members for in- analyzing handwriting. creased tuition at the teachers A motion carried to have colleges, President. Gomon de- annual Omaha area dinner m · clared "Increased tuition will ing in latter March or e keep many talented young people April of 1962. The chapter . from attending college." journed to meet again at t : Dr. Gomon's remarks came at annual fall picnic, second Sun . the annual dinner meeting of the in September, at Riverview P '. Omaha Area Chapter of the Pe- Pavillion, "rain or shine."

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ru Wins Track Meet om Wesleyan 94 to 42

Baseball Standouts

By Tom Yopp Roger Smith, junior from East Alton, Illinois, is the power hitState's Ken Humphrey, Charles Dunn, Clarinda, Iowa, P. ter of the ball club. Roger's long n, posted three wins to Time 4:38.7. ball threat has won him the rethe Bobcats to a 94 to 42 Two-mile run-1. Don Peterspect of his opponents and the win over Midland College sen, Richfield, P; 2. 'Miller, M; confidence of his teammates. Rogeru. Humphrey, s l ow 1y 3. Charles Dunn, Clarinda, Iowa, er's speed is very deceptive of his ing into shape, captured P. Time 10:20. size, (210 lbs.), for he often will ribbons in both ·hurdle Mile relay-1. Peru (Werner, beat out an infield hit due to the s and in the broad jump. Richards, Tynon, Oestmann). infielder's misjudgment of his er multiple winners for the Time 3:38. speed. Roger is currently hitting State Bobcats were Vern 880 yd. relay-1. Peru (Ferron, 377 with 17 hits in 4:nrips to the sen, Exeter, in the shot put Humphrey, Hurst, Gibson). Time plate. iscus, and Don Petersen, 1:36.2. eld, in the mile and two120 yd. high hurdles-1. Ken Mcilvoy events. Humphrey, Auburn, P; 2. Jones, Barney Mcllvoy, sophomore ry Collier, Midland ace, . M.; 3. Johannes, M. Time 15.7. from South Lyon, Michigan is the ed the Warrior's two vie220 yd. low hurdles-1. Ken lead-off man of the ball club. as he won the 880-yard run Humphrey, Auburn, P; 2. Barney's speed on the base paths e high jump. Collier's jump Groves, M; 3. Bob Gibson, Falls has enabled the Bobcats to. capi" in the high jump is be- City, P. Time 27 .4. talize frequently on the hit and to be some sort of state Broad jump-1. Ken Humph- run. "Mac's" mobility at second , at least in the small col- rey, Auburn, P; 2. Groves, M; 3. base has robbed many hitters of Merchant, M. Distance 21'2". clean singles. Barney is currentHigh jump-1. Coliier, M; 2. ly hitting .353, second · only to Jack Head, Bellevue, P; 3. Phil yd. dash-1. Jim Hurst, Rhodes, Weeping Water, P. Smith. outh, P; 2. Merchant, M; Height 6'6". Roach ck Ferron, Omaha, P. Time Roach, yes the "basketball Pole vault-1. Bob G i b s on , Roach," is also baseball player. yd. dash-1. Dick Ferron, Falls City, P; 2. Larry Noyes, Mike's "hot hands'' of basketball Falls City, P; 3. Roger Bowman, ha, P; 2. Merchant, M; 3. have also helped him in baseball. Pawnee City, P. Height 11'6". Hurst, Plattsmouth, P. Time Javelin-1. LaMarr Gibson, While playing third base one needs very fast and sure handsyd. dash-1. Lanny Rich- Falls City, P; 2. Phil Rhodes, if he wants to keep his teeth. Weeping Water, P; 3., Meyer, M. Bellevue, P; 2. Ron OestMike is very fast. His superior Distance 170'4". ' Johnson, P; 3. Wray, M. speed has enabled him to utilize Shot put-1. Vern Thomsen, 52.5. the drag bunt very well. yd. run-1. Collier, M; 2. Exeter, P; 2. Meyer, M. 3. Pat Tynon, Peru, P; 3. J oh n Thomas, Falls City, P. Distance Harvey er, Falls City, P. Time 46'7". Another basketballer on the Discus-1. Vern Thomsen, Ex- baseball nine is Drexel Harvey e run-1. Don Petersen, eter, P; 2. Meyer, M; 3. Beatty, from Hartford, Illinois. Drex is a eld, P; 2. Miller, M; 3. M. Distance 137'8". centerfielder with a "surefire" arm. His accuracy at a distance scored pairs of runs in the first, has caught many runners atfifth, and seventh innings, plus a tempting to stretch a single to a single tally in the fourth to earn double. Harv is potentially the the 7-5 triumph. Peru's two runs strrlngest hitter of the team. His ny Garrels pitched an d which iced the game in the sev- stror.ig wrists give him the powhis Hastings College team- enth inning came on singles by er to hit the long ball or the to a twelve inning 3-2 vic- Mike Roach, Palmyra, Roger quick "snap" to hit the single. Friday afternoon over t h e Smith, East Alton, Ill., and two Kelly State Bobcats in the first run blow by catcher, Bob SwinRon Kelly, sophomore from ney, Nebraska City. Pitcher, of a double header. Peru Falls City, Nebraska, is the numback in the nightcap to Charles Fritch, Atlantic, Iowa, ber one pitcher of the Bobcat went all the way for the Bobcats a split with a 7-5 triumph. nine. Coach Al Wheeler says he to pick up the win. rels and Peru pitcher, Ron has all the makings of a major , Falls City, each hurled Michael Hunt, Tecumseh, start- leaguer. His current record (3 rfully before Kelly weak- ed his first game for the Bobcats wins-4 losses) is not an indicain the twelfth inning. Peru in left field, and led his mates at tion of his pitching but a summa!Scored in the bottom of t h e the plate with four hits in four tion of his backing. Ron has lost th to send the game i n t o appearances. some heartbreakers . (2-0, 2-1 in . innings. In the top of the twelve innings) and has been · th, Kelly walked the first bombed (10-2) but over-all he's SUMMARY: Game 1 .;to face him. The runner ada very good pitcher with a great ed to second on a single, be- Hastings 000 002 000 001 3 13 2 potential. ' Garrels doubled home what Peru ____ 100 000 100 000 2 8 3 )d to be the winning run. Winning pitcher-Garrels · the second game, Peru State Losing pitcher-Kelly (3-3)

a

cats Split h Hastings

Thomsen Establishes New Peru State Record

Vern Thomsen, Exeter, Peru State weight star, uncorked a heave of 49'3%" in the shot put to establish a new Peru State record and help his mates to a 75%;-60 1/4 dual track win over Northwest Missouri State of Maryville at Peru. Thomsen, who gained another blue ribbon in the discus, erased his own mark in the shot put of 47'111/2" established earlier this season. Peru State had double winners in Ken Humphrey, Auburn, who slammed the hurdle events, and Don Petersen, Richfield, winner of the mile and two-mile events. SUMMARY: 100 yd. dash-1. Jim Hurst, Plattsmouth, P; 2. Porterfield, M; 3. Dick Ferron, Omaha, P; Time 10.2. 220 yd. dash-1. Porterfield, M; 2. Dick Ferron, Omaha, P; 3. Wenck, M. Time 23.3. 440 yd. dash-1. Lanny Richards, Bellevue, P; 2. Beck, M; 3. John Werner, Falls City, P. Time 52.6. 880 yd. run-1. Sommer, M; 2. Bill Tynon, Peru, P; 3. Denton, M. Time 2:02.2. Mile run-1. Don Petersen, Richfield, P; 2. Sommer, M; 3. Denton, M. Time 4:41.3. Two-mile run-1. Don Petersen, Richfield, P; 2. Sommer, M; This Auburn Junior is Peru's leading hurdler for the third 3. Jones, M. Time 10:36.5. 880 yd. relay-1. Northwest straight year. Two years ago, as Missouri (Richard Wenck, Micka freshman Ken ran the h i g h ey Howard, Tilmon Porterfield, hurdles in 15.2 at the Nebraska College Conference meet and Frank Kasperesen). Time 1:34.1. Mile relay-1. Peru (Dick Ferwon the gold medal. Last yef)r ron, Bill Tynon, Ron Oestmann, the Bobcat timber topper again John Werner). Time 3:40.4. won the NCC championship race 220 yd. low hurdles-1. Ken with a time of 15.5. On May 18 Humphrey, Auburn, P; 2. Howand 19, he will try for a third· ard, M; 3. Bob Gibson, Falls City, straight gold medal in the NCC P. Time 27.1. meet. This year his best time is 15.4, however, the best time by an NCC athlete is 14.9.

Ken Humphrey, Hurdler

SUMMARY: Game 2

ROY PECK

Peru _________ 200 120 2 7 13 2 Hastings ______ 001 102 1 5 7 3

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Winning pitcher-Fritch (1-0) Losing pitcher-Fish

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120 yd. high hurdles-1. Ken Humphrey, Auburn, P; 2. Ron Oestmann, Johl)SOn, P; 3. West M. Time 16.3. High jump-1. West, M; 2. Jack Head, Bellevue, P; 3. (Tie) Phil Rhodes, Weeping Water, P; Miller, M. Height 5'10". Pole vault-.4J.: (Tle) Bob Gibson, Falls City;' P; Gentry, M; Marriott, M; Miller, M. Height 11'1''. Broad jump-1. Howard, M; 2. Ken Humphrey, Auburn, P; 3. Phil Rhodes, Weeping Water, P. Distance 21'2". Javelin-1. Meyers, M; 2. LaMarr Gibson, Falls City, P; 3. Gentry, M. Distance 183'6Vz", Discus-1. Vern Thomsen, Exeter, P; 2. Pat Thomas, Falls City, P; 3. Jerry Henning, Peru, P. Distance 140'3". Shot put-1. Vern Thomsen, Exeter, P; 2. (Tie) Pat Thomas, Falls City, P; Carven, M. Distance 49'3%".

Don Peterson, Distance Runner Sophomore Don (Pete) Peterson is perhaps, the best distance runner in Peru's history. Little Pete is 5'7" tall and weighs 118 pounds. His best event is the two-mile run, in which he holds the school record with a time of 10:10.7. He achieved this feat at Wesleyan Invitational this season. Don also runs the mile in very respectable time. He also holds the school record in this event, his record time is 4:3.7. On one occasion this spring Peterson entered the 880, m i 1 e , and two-mile in one day and won all three races. This Papillion sophomore, has a big career in the next t w o years at Peru. Each time "Pete" runs in one of his favorite events records will be in danger.

PERU CLEANERS & TAILORS

On May 9, 1961, the Peru thinclads traveled to Crete, Nebraska, for the Doane College Relays. Ace hurdler Ken Humphrey did not make the trip, the reason was his wife had been taken to the Auburn ho;;pital ·early th a i; morning. By 2:30 p.m., when he was to run the high hurdles at the Doane Relays, Ken had become the proud father of a healthy baby boy, Humphrey is also Peru's leading broad jumper, last season he bettered 22 feet several times. He has not equaled that mark so far this season; however, by the conference meet he hopes to be in top form.

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Church Clubs Meet L.S.A. met Wednesday evening, April 26. A short business meeting ,was held. Afterwards, the group conducted a B i b 1e study of the "Book of Ephesians" which was presented by the Rev. C. J. Deithloff, The Newman Club held its regular meeting wednesday evening, April 26. A short business session opened the me et in g . Francis Hajek gave a summary on the convention he attended which was held at the Newman Club Center at the University of Nebraska. Plans were also _discussed for the club picnic to be held May 10.

Goodwill Truck Coming

Peru Prep's English Class Tours Omaha World-Herald Plant·

Wesley Fellowship held its meeting April 26. During the meeting a panel discussion w a s held on the widely known word throughout schools, "cheating." On the panel were Coleen Hoffman, Charlotte Wuster, and Al Lavigne.

Advance

Professionally

S.C.F. held its regular meeting April 26. A talk was given on "Convictions W hi 1e Attending College," by the Rev. Bredding. A short business meeting followed the talk.

By Attending P.S.T.C. This Summer

The Lutheran Club discussed the sixth commandment April 26. A discussion was also held concerning divorces in the Lutheran church. Following the discussions, a short business meeting was held.

I.A. Holds Steak Fry The Industrial Arts Club held a steak fry at Neal Park in Peru, May 3. The club invited Epsilon Pi Tau, honorary industrial arts fraternity, wives and guests, and other industrial arts classes to attend. No business meeting was held. Contributing funds for the fry were the manufacturers who furnished equipment for the new Industrial Arts building.

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On or soon after May 23, 1961 a Goodwill truck will be in Brock, Dawson, Falls City, Peru, Peru Prep's sophomore English Union, and Verdon to pick up Collection class, 18 students, toured t h e discarded · articles. Omaha World-Herald p 1ant point at Brock, Mrs. Frank Quante's home; Dawson, Evangelical Wedne,sday, April 26. Highlights of the tour included United Brethren Church; Falls the editorial department, the art City, homes of Mrs. Joe Lemon, department, the morgue, th e Mrs. Dorothy Shefferd, Mrs. Macomposing room, the press room, bel Herling, Methodist church and Evangelical United Brethren and the dispatch center. After the World-Herald Square church; Peru, Methodist parsontour, several of the students re- age; Uhi-on, Union Farm Supply; mained in Omaha to see the and Verdon, home of Mrs. Ellie movie, "The Little Shepherd of Lowe. The Goodwill local secretary at Brock, Mrs. Frank QuanKingdom Come." Mrs. Genevieve Gergen, D. V. te; Falls City, Mrs. Marion Wise; Jarvis, and Leroy Keyt sponsored Union, Mrs. L. G. Todd; and Verand chaperoned the field trip. don, Mrs. Ellie Lowe.

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T I N E N T

Campus School Chatter

us." Last year, Mr. daughter Sue was so tha was her last May Fete-s been in it every year si grade-but she was repr yet this year by her ski Mexico. ~:-Track meets s u r r o u n Chick Stessman took his "thinclads" to Auburn for relays and they stood aro water until the "rotten, meet was finally called off. College doesn't have a on exchange convos-here' taking junior high chor orchestra to Brock in retu

· By Mary Anna Gnade Didn't, excuse the expression, the joint jump when the musicians were on campus·? We were all proud as punch at the good showing by our Prep groups and soloists. In this school we don't confine music to only one week-it's an integral part of every day and every night. After the c o 11 e g e music clears away, the violin re· cital of Jimmy Wilson takes the spot followed closely by the annual recital of all strings under Mr. Jindra. The Junior class are not only And campus schoolers smart but good salesmen-record counting the days, just as breaking crowd for their play and I .... which was tremendous! Such convincing acting-still can't believe Linda Morrissy can actually REDFERN see. Then, still in a daze fr o m Clothing Co. such success, they immediately "The Store of Stand had to plan and decorate for the Brands" Junior-Senior Prom (also a sucPhone BR 4-3620 cess). Freshman girls acted as French waitresses in short, short skirts and while the disc jockey - INGERSOLL and his records did a good entertaining job, the feature was Barber Shop the ballet dance by Mrs. Buethe. AUBURN, NEBRASK For the first time in several Elly Ingersoll - Nale H years the campus school 5th and 6th grade girls wound the Maypole. Freshman girls commented, "Wouldn't you know-the year LIMA'S CLOTHIN . we were eligible to wind the & SHOE STORE···· Maypole, they started using th e Ifs Smart To Be Thrif c college girls, and now we're too old they are using the campus AUBURN, NEBR. school girls again-just missed

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The Voice of the, Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . .

Goodbye, Graduates

Peru Pedagogian PERU,NEBRASI<_A

Volume 56

Good Luctk, Graduates

MAY 22, 1961

Number 16

~ ixty-nine

Degree andidates Will ~· eceive Diplomas

Outstanding Students Honored In Convocation

; January and May degree canidates will be graduated here at . e end of school. · aster of Science in Education: ' May-Bobby E. Slaughter, Pulo, Colo. achelor of Arts (Liberal Arfs): May-Robert W. Raper, Burard; Michael H. Roddy, Neraska City; Charles Schott, ouncil Bluffs, Iowa; James J. anser, Ewing; James R. Yelek, Omaha. ' chelor of ·Aris in Education: anuary-John R. Cooper, irbury; James Lee Kemp, Musah Kans: Joan Kay Wesolowi, Omaha;' Alan G. Wheeler, ell a. May-Robert H, Kaiser, Aubn; Morris L. Keyt, Gravity, wa; Roger S. Killion, Auburn; enry H. Turner, Woodward, wa; John M. Werner, Falls ty; Darrel W. Wolcott, Reylds. chelor of Music in Education: May-Joyce A. Carman, Temseh; Judith M. Miller, Peru. chelor of Science in Education: January-Stephen C. Banks, lla; Russell L. Chappell, Wood er, Ill.; Donna V. Stranathan rdy, Council Bluffs, Iowa; len N. Maffitt, Sidney, Iowa; mes E. McGinnis, Dawson; Erst E. Ridgeway, Falls City; ry N. Scoggin, Beatrice; DonFrancis Thompson, Council uffs, Iowa; Deanna McNerny ach, Indianola; Robert Fisher, Us City; Grace Hannaford Rus1, Peru. May-Leonard B. Allgood, Pe; Gail L. Beckstead, Bellevue; lma R. Bell, Tabor, Iowa; Herrt L. Brown, Plattsmouth; Marerite Carver, Burchard; Leona Christen, Elk Creek; Darlene . Critel, Waco; Neal R. Eickhoff, :erdon; James L. Fisher, Falls 'ty; Dorothy I. French, Plattsuth; William W. Fitzgerald, noa· Richard L. Gerber, Full. ton;' LaMarr R. Gibson, Falls ity; Alyce C. Green, Plattsouth; Francis B. Hajek, Odell. Leslie J. Hardy, Council Bluffs, wa; Terry A. Harlow, DuBois; ith W. Hawxby, Nemaha; John . Head, Bellevue; Robert J. eng, Nebraska City; David W. offman, Pawnee City; Jack L. hnson, Loup City; Wilma J. hnson, Elliott, Iowa; Alberta . Kasparek, Haddam, Kans.; nna M. Knosp, Julian; Lorene ubes, Fairbury; Ruby E. Lockood, Brock; Gladys Monahan ahoney, Palmyra. Larry W. Morgan, Beatrice; ichard E. Neale, Bellevue; Lynn . Osterholm, Glenwood, Iowa; rolyn R. Parli, Humboldt; Ross Pilkington, Red Oak, Iowa; ymond L. Plankington, Evert, Kans.; Wanda C. Price, Fairry; Kay Ann Rasmussen, North atte; Anna Robinson, Hamrg, Iowa; Laverna Roos, Dunr; Ray L. Unterbrink, East Aln, Ill.; Kent W. Wichman, Fairry.

Outstanding students at Peru State were presented awards in recognition of achievement ·during the 1960-61 academic year at an all-college honors convocation May 17. Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of the college, presided at this annual H on o rs Convocation. Awards were presented by Deans Bradley, Boraas, and Melvin. Awards and honors recipients included: Richard G e r b e r , the B. E. Swenson, Jr. Athletic Award presented annually since 1925 to the outstanding senior who has participated in athletics. The award is a gold watch a,n.d medal donated by Bert E. Swenson, a member of the class of 1909. Rita Grandgenett, the Zelma Wonderly Scholarship for outstanding w0i;Jt as a student teacher in the4'isecond grade. The award is a $100 one-year scholarship established by the late Miss Wonderly. Clara Kelly, the Charles P. Weigand Memorial . Scholarship for an outstanding junior student. This is a .$50 scholarship established by the members of the class of 1906 in memory of their classmate. Edwin McCartney, the Alpha Mu Omega honorary mathematics fraternity award for excellence in mathematics. The award is a Standard Mathematical Table. Carol McLain, the Pearl A. Kenton Scholarship for outstanding work as a student of foreign language. The award is a $50 scholarship donated by Alice Kenton a 1921 graduate. Rose Clancy, the Dramatics Club award for outstanding work in dramatics. The award is a plaque and a volume of drama. Norma Jean Reiman, t h e White Angel scholarship for contribution to school activities by a freshman of the Women's pep club. The award is a $50 scholarship. Duane Elliott, the R. W. Endres award to a male student who intends to be a teacher. The award is a $100 scholarship. JoAnn Frerichs, the Kappa Delta Pi Educational award for promise and interest in education. The award is membership in the national honorary education fraternity. Roger Eshelman, the Epsilon Pi Tau recognition award for the senior industrial arts student with the highest scholarship. The award is a certificate and a key. Christie Hays Meyer, the Business Club award for the outstanding graduating senior in business education. The award is membership in the United Business Association and the professional journal. Ray Meister, the Neal S. Gomon award for outstanding work on the Pedagogian. The award is a plaque. Darrell Wolcott, the A. V. Larson award for outstanding work on the Peruvian. The award is a plaque.

ewman Club Holds Picnic The Newman Club held its anual picnic in Nebraska City, ay 2. A very short business eeting was held before leaving r Steinhart Park. V a r i o u s mes wen~ played preceding the roast. '

Peru's losing some of her finest by retirement. Mrs. Mathews, Mr. Mathews, Mr. Jindra, by ali of us ..

and Mr. :Rath are retiring and will be mlssed

Independent Study Seminar Draws Faculty Attention A group of faculty members interested in "Ind e pendent Study" have met three times in a seminar discussion under the direction of Dr. Keith Melvin. Independent study is a challenge to our present practice of "spoon feeding," a term applied to the set schedule and assignx'nent program. Students will be expected, through self-discipline, to master subjects chiefly on their own initiative. Independent study involves independent re-· search reading. Some objectives of independent study are: to reduce the number of class meetings; to substitute for the conventional lecture, a lecture-conference or faculty supervised conference; to organize small, independent stud Y groups without faculty contact; and to provide independent study without faculty or student contact. The essential element in these methods has been described as one of inquiry. The Faculty Seminar meetings, according to Dean Melvin, will be continued next fall, at which time some of these theories will be put into practice. Next fa 11 representatives from different colleges that have independent study programs will speak to the group.

All School Picnic "Where are the hotdogs?" "I don't want any mustard." "Don't pinch the Peter Pan buns." These were some of the common quotes at the all-school picnic held May 15, 1961 on the football field. The picnic, sponsored by th e Freshman class, was a success with nearly all the students attending. The menu consisted of hotdogs, potato chips, b a k e d beans, and cookies.

.targe Course Offering For Summer Session More than 100 courses will be offered for under-graduate an d graduate students in the 1961 summer session at Peru S t a t e Teachers College, according to F. H. Larson, registrar. The regular eight-week session, during which nine hours of college credit may be earned, will open June 6 and close July 29. Offerings will include not only those of interest to the in-service teacher, but also to home makers and business people. The popular two-week post session will open July 29 an d continue through August 12. During the session, two or three hours of college credit may be earned. Three workshops are scheduled during the regular eightweek term and post session. Of two weeks in duration, the workshops will meet four hours daily, six days a week. They .will include: Concepts and Techniques in Modern Math in the Elementary School, June 19 to July 1; Concepts and Techniques in Modern Science in the Elementary School, July 5 to July 18; Modern Techniques in Teaching Reading, July 29 to August 12. The workshops will meet in air conditioned rooms. 'The 1961 Summer Session will see the end of the eight-week and post session terms at Peru State. Beginning with the summer of 1962, Peru State will offer two five-week sessions.

WE GOOFED! Attention! The last issue of the Pedagogian stated that Peru won a track meet from Wesleyan-Midland was the team defeated by the Bobcat thinclads. Our apologies f o r the error.

Peru State Band Presented Spring Concert May 11 As a feature of Music Week, the Peru State Band Ensemble presented its spring concert on Thursday, May 11 at 8:00 p.m. in the college auditorium. The thirty-five piece ensemble was under the direction of Gilbert E. Wilson. Included in the program were eight selections. The first on the program was "Folk Song Suite" by Ralph Vaughn Williams. This was followed by Alfred Reed's "Ode for Trumpet" played by Don Johnson and accompanied by the rest of the band. Next on the program were "Pastel f o r Band" by Maurice C. Whitney and "When Jesus Wept" by William Billings. "Five Mellow Winds" by David Schanke featured a small woodwind ensemble consisting of Carol Sudik, Wayne Wallace, Gaylin Sudik, and Thomas Sheehan playing saxophone and Gary Schmucker playing clarinet. The next selection, "Symphonic Suite," was composed by Clifton Williams. John Morrissey's "Concerto Grosso" featured two solo trumpets, Don Johnson and Bob Kaiser, and a solo trumpet, Hanford Miller. The final selection of the program was "Themes from Caucasian Sketches" by M. IppolitovIvanov.

Epsilon Pi Tau Had Steak Fry Epsilon Pi Tau, honorary Industrial Arts Fraternity held their steak fry MjlY 9 at Neal Park in Peru. The fry started at 6:00 p.m. and lasted until 7:30 p.m. There were nineteen Epsilon Pi Tau members and guests present. It was decided at the 1a st monthly meeting to use funds from the treasury to purchase the steaks.

Sharon Watton, the Gregg award for accomplishment in shorthand. The award is a certificate. (Continued on page two)


ANNUS MIRABILIS The school year now drawing to a close has been a wonderful year by any way of reckoning. Four new structures, costing nearly $1,500,000, have been completed and put to good use. The Bobcats won N.C.C. championships in both basketball and football. Open houses, music contests, athletic tournaments, dedications, and other occasions have brought more visitors to the campus than ever li>efore-one music contest alone bringing over 1,500. And the visitors have seen much to admire. We doubt that Peru ever before had as good a year as 1960-1961. We believe enrollment will be up substantially in 1961-1962.

AROUND THE CAMPUSES By Ron Pethoud

The Student-A class in Central Missouri State is looking for a few "Guinea Pigs.'' An instructor of advanced driver's educaHelping keep track of the many wonderful events that tion feels that the boys in his made up the wonderful year was a thrilling and exacting class would ·be.. better qualified as task, and we could not have done it at all without the help future drivers' ed teachers if of a great many fine people. We wish to express our great they could get the practical exindebtedness to: Mary Anna Gnade, for her fine Campus perience of teaching others to School Commentary; Don Carlile and Bob Henry and their drive. The only stipulation for helpers in Special Services, for many kinds of aid; Jim Levitt, volunteers is that they must not know how to drive at all. This is for some splendid photography. so they might better cooperate Above all, we wish to. thank the many staff members of with the class of would-be teachThe Peruvian and The Pedagogian who have done their best ers. The future teachers will inthroughout .the year to report the activities on the cam- struct methods and mistakes of pus of Nebraska's oldest and Nebraska's finest college. We driving and rules and regulafeel that these staffs are the best we ever had here-or any- tions of the road. If any boys where else. And we deeply appreciate the efforts they have should volunteer, they will 1also made throughout the year. teach care and maintenance of S.P.L. the car. This "courageous lot" of volunteers will receive no credit day held some significant hap- or grail.es for their cooperation. pening in which we found reason The Mirror-Colorado S t a t e to be happy. WHISPERS College reported that "A profesFROM There were times, too, when sor who uses 'Mad' magazine in MORGAN we were not so happy. Now is his introductory social science By such a time as we hear that one course said recently that AmeriSusan of our friends, Lynn Bailey, is in ca is losing its appreciation of Sharp the hospital. Those :who wish to satire. Roger W. Wescott of Michsend good wishes may send them igan State University defended This is the first day of the all· to Fairfax Community Hospital his liking for the national magaimportant semester tests; and as in Fairfax, Missouri. zine while speaking on "The Rewe prepare to take the examinaThe great mass of paraphernal- turn of Satire" during a "Confertions, we can think of the many ence of World Affairs panel.'' things which have taken place ia which we have accumulated After reading this, I went · right must now be taken home. All the during this year. books, clothes, and junk must be out and renewed my subscripWe can remember choosing the transported back to where it be- tions to Dell comic books. bedspreads and curtains and how longs. The Creightonian-A campus the colors seemed so very importpoliceman of Creighton UniverTo those who plan to begin ant. We laugh when we recall sity had one of his rare bad days. that we thought the mailbox teaching, we wish good fortllne He failed to find a single automoand success. would probably get cobwebs in bile not having a. parking sticker. it; and it's even a little funny to We like it here at Peru State This marked the first day in five think about the way we rushed and are very glad to say: "Yes, years that he didn't give a parkaround to make the presentable I'll be back-ready for another ing violation ticket to some unfor inspection and open house. formative year on the 'Campus fortunate Creightonian. When of a Thousand Oaks.' " questioned about this, he replied, We have acquired many "I am ashamed of myself." friends, and each has had some

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significant part in making th i s school year an enjoyable one. There have been many parties. The most common of these is the birthday party. The most recent ones were for Sheila Hagen, Ramona Bock, Karen Pflaum, Alberta Kasparek, Judy Hunzeker, and Judy Weichel. Maybe we ought to take this opportunity to say "Happy Birthday" to those whose birthdays are in the summer months. But parties were not the only occasions for happiness for every

Outstanding Students Honored In Convocation (Continued from page one) The following were recognized as being selected to Who's Who: Rose Clancy, Linda Goodin, Judy. Miller, Dick Neale, Alan Wheeler, Jerry Wanser, Jack Johnson, and Francis Hajek. The following were recognized as having received scholarships for graduate study: Lynn Osterholm, Alan Wheeler, Judy Miller, and Stanley Longfellow.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks May 22, 1961 PEDAGOGIAN STAFF Ray G. Meister ----------------------------------Co-editor Linda Bertram ----------------------------------Co-editor Morris Keyt ----------------------------------Copy Editor Sandy Craig --------------------------------Layout Editor Carolyn Reiber -----------------------------Layout Editor Jack Johnson -----------------------------,---Sports Editor Darrel Wolcott __________________________ Business Manager Gerald Kirkendall ----------------------Personnel Manager Pam Yost ---------------------------------Women's Sports Gary Brown -----------------------------Columnist Delzell Susan Sharp _______________________ Columnist Morgan Hall Catherine Ideus -------------------------Columnist Library Raymond Hunzeker ----------------------Columnist Majors Ron Pethoud :_ _________________________ Columnist Exchange Barbara Wheeldon -------------------------------Reporter Melissa Ful~erson --------------------------------Reporter Jerry E. Gress -----------------------------------Reporter Phyllis Grube ------------------------------------Reporter Edna McGovern ----------------------------------Reporter Gary Weiss --------------------------------------Reporter Tom Yopp ---------------------------------------Reporter Gerald Jeanneret ---------------------------------Reporter Mary Anna Gnade ------------------------------Columnist Stewart Linscheid --------------------------------Sponsor

NOTES FROM MAJORS HALL By Raymond Hunzeker Many students are waiting for final week to arrive now. Typewriters are heard from floor to floor banging out final notes. A few of the fellows seem to have summer vacation jobs lined up. Many have signed up for their rooms in Majors Hall next fall. Night lights have been burning a little later than usuai this past week. It appears the guys a r e bearing down for finals. Rain, rain, go away, come again another day is the popular feeling in the corridors at Majors. We <:an't get enough of the sunshine and associated fair weather. Many fellows are trying to get pre-season suntans or should we say "sunburns"? Now, bathing suits and bermudas appear to be the uniform of the day. A few last week organization parties are being, or have be en scheduled. For instance, S.N.E.A. is having a picnic in Neal Park on Wednesday. For the seniors, this will be their last year at Peru State. Congratulations and best wishes for a successful future! I wish to take this opportunity to thank all the fellows who helped make this column a success this semester.

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LIBRARY COLUMN By Cathy I deus Doctor Zhivago, by Boris Pasternak, is the only great novel to come out of post-revolutionary Russia without the approval of Russian censorship. Zhivago, a physician and poet, is the focal figure. Through his experiences, the reader witnesses the outbreak and consequences of the Revolution: army revolts, irrational killings, starvation epidemics, Party inquisition. These are not times for a domestic idyll or emotional bliss, and Zhivago sees man's simplest aspirations to a normal life frustrated. "Storm" is the key word of this book-the storm of war, of revolution, of human passions, of nature. The book is crowded with scenes and people of unforgettable impact; the trains crowded with deportees, apartment houses overrun with rats, cities starving and freezing, villages burned and depopulated. Woven into this background is the story of Zhivago's love for the tender and beautiful Lara, the human symbol of life's sweetness and joy.

ranches reached from the Grande up into the far regions Montana. It ranges from earl Spanish days, through the era far-flung cattle empires, down our own times. Miss Sand paints vivid pictures of Abilen Ogallala, Dodge City, the Maste sons, Wyatt Earp. It is an exc· ing account of the frontier da with the outline of a migh economic evolution always clea ly defined. The Status Seekers, by Van Packard, is an exploration class structure and behavior · America. After intensive inves, gation, Packard finds that the are indeed classes and class lin but they are more subtle th a you imagine. Above all, there a fast-emerging status syste that is the most important an startling phenomenon of o times. The car you drive, th church you attend, where yo went to school, the paintings o your walls, your political party all loom as symbols of your plac in society, and fix you on a cer· tain rung of the social ladder. Vance Packard paints our nation• al portrait in a fast-moving, ofte witty, sometimes dismaying, bu always informative vein.

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The Cattlemen, by Mari Sandoz, is the story of cattle in America and of the men w h o s e

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TC Baseball Closes Good Season By Tom Yopp e Peru State Baseball team ed the 1961 season with a d of ,10 wins and 8 losses. e Bobcats began the season a stunning 7-0 victory over ne State only to have the cats rebound to take the nd game of the doulJleheader with Ron Kelly getting both win and loss. The Bobcats wed this "win one-lose one" rn throughout the season the exception of taking a leheader from Wesleyan and g one to Kearney. -This "win lose one" pattern is good for tsmanship, but not for base-·

as often as anticipated. Only two of the regulars, Roger Smith and Barney Mcllvoy, hit over .300 for the entire season while the team average was near .230. The team fielding percentage was far lower than the opponertts with the Bobcats making twice as many errors. Peru's ace hurler, Ron Kelly, made his final outing his best. He threw a brilliant one-hitter against Creighton University and collected three hits, including a home run, in three trips to the plate for a perfect day. Ron hit .706 for the season with 12 hits in 17 trips, and for a pitcher that's not bad.

e Bobcats had a winning on but not a good one. With timely hitting and clutch ing, they could )lave easily five of their eight losses. king at statistics, one can why the Bobcats didn't win

Only veterans Dick Gerber, Bill Fitzgerald, and Jim Fisher will be lost from the 1962 squad. This year was a winning year, but the 1962 team should be one of the best in Peru State's history.

omsen and Peterson dBobcats ing To NCC Meet

He holds the school record in the mile and two mile, his times 4:33.7 and 10:10.7 respectively. In a dual meet with Washburn, Pete won the 880, mile and two mile. On May 18 and 19, in the NCC meet, he will aim for a win in each of these events. Peru has one defending champion returning to the NCC meet. Ken Humphrey, a jlinior, won the NCC high hurdle championship two years and will be gunning for a third straight title. Other Bobcat standouts who traveled to the big meet are: Jim Hurst and Dick Ferron in the dashes; pole vaulter !lob Gibson; Phil Rhodes and Jack Head in the high jump; middle distance runners Ron Oestman, John Werner, Lanny Richards, and Bill Tynon; LaMar Gibson is the javelin threat; and rounding out the traveling squad are Jerry Henning and Pat Thomas in the weights.

eightman Vern Thomsen and nee ace Don Peterson, were ain cogs for the Peru thinthis season. The Bobcat kmen had four dual meets were victorious in three of omsen has been defeated time in the discus and two s in the shot put in eight ts this season. Although fing second in. the shot at th~ state college meet, Tommy ed his school record to 49'5". best throw in the discus so this spring is 142'. He will unning for two first places in Nebraska College Conference t on May 18 and 19. n Peterso; was the best dise runner for the Peruvians.

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Ten Bobcats Results Of Class D District Track Meet 440 Yard Dash- (53.8)-1. Jim mer (24.5) Lourdes Central; 3. Vanderbeek, Pan am a ; 2. Don Jim Vanderbeek, Panama; 4. Bill Place In Dougherty (54.5) Brock; 3. Gary Shaw, Brock; 5. Gerry Meyer, (55.4) Elmwood; 4. Brock. Doane Relays Clements Lynn Ankrom (56.4) Stella; 5. Mile Run (4:52.8)-1. Louis Terry Whitter (56.7) Salem. Shot (48'3%")-l. Garold Parker, Douglas; 2. Terry Thacker (44'%") Daw-Ver; 3. Larry Goings (42'%") Bratton U.); 4. Darrell Herbster (40'11%") Daw-Ver; 5. Jim Vanderbeek (40'8") Panama. Broad Jump (20'5")-1. Roger Crook, Daw-Ver; 2. Ronald Lockard (20'33/4") Stella; 3. Phil Boehm (20'13/4") Avoca; 4. Don Dougherty (20'1/4") Brock; 5. Gerry Meyer (19'33/4") Brock. Pole Vault (10'5")-1. Phil Boehm, Avoca; Tie for 2nd and 3rd: (9'9") Derald Jones, Nehawka; Douglas Heim, Daw-Ver; Tie for 4th and 5th: (9'5") Bob Newton, Peru; Richard Knippelmeyer, Elk Creek; Larry Duder, Table Rock; Dennis Keller, Talmage. 120 Yard High Hurdles (16.9)1. Douglas Heim, Daw-Ver; 2. Ronald Lockard (17.1), Stella; 3. Ted Kroese, Cook; 4. Larry Lanning, Daw-Ver; 5. Ken Fossenberger, Brock. 100 Yard Dash (10.3)-1. Roger Crook, Daw-Ver; 2. Jerry Schutte (10.4) Daw-Ver; 3. Ron Volkmer, Lourdes Central; 4. Garold Parker, Douglas; 5. Don Dougherty, Brock. High Jump (5'4")-1. Bill Ely, Stella; 2, 3, 4, 5, Five-way tie: (5'1'') Tom Majors, Peru; Bill Hager, Bratton U.; Gary Clem. th t ents, Elmwood; John Ruhge, TalBecause of an error m e vo - mage; Dale Kreimer, Talmage. ing procedure on the new S.C.A. constitution on May 10, a revote 180 Low Yard Hurdles (22.9)was taken May 12. Beep.use the 1. Roger Crook, Daw-Ver; 2. P~agogian went to press before . Douglas Heim (23.2) Daw-Ver; this was discovered, the results · 3. John Banks, Stella; 4. .Tom published in the May 15 issue Boatman, Peru; 5. Ted Kroese, Cook. were wrong. The results of the revote were 220 Yard Dash (24.4)-1. Jerry 206 in favor of the constitution Schutte, Daw-Ver; 2. Ron Volkand 82 against.

Ten Peru State Teachers College thinclads placed in the 13th annual Doane College · Relays, May 9. The Bobcats were without ace hurdler Ken Humphrey, Auburn, who spent the day in an Auburn hospital fidgeting while his wife awaited the- arrival of a baby boy. Veteran Vern Thomsen led the Bobcats with a third place in the . shot put and a fourth in the discus. Thomsen hurled the shot put 48'91/z" and the discus 135'5". Peru State placed two menJ ack Head, Bellevue, and Phil Rhodes, Weeping Water-in a six way tie for fifth place in the high jump. The sextet jumped 5'10". Jim Hurst, Plattsmouth, ran the best 100 yd. race of his career at 10.0 to place fourth. In the mile run, Richfield's Don Petersen sprinted the stretch to overcome two opponents and· finish third with a time of 4:36.2. Finishing fourth with a time of 44.7 in the 440-yd. relay were Jim Hurst, Plattsmouth; Lanny Richards, Bellevue; Bob Gibson, Falls City; and Dick Ferron, Omaha.

Students Revote In Favor Of Constitution

The illusion that times that were are better than those that are, has probably pervaded all ages.-Horace Greeley, 1866.

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Coach Al Wheeler's Peru State Teachers College baseball nine came back in the night cap. Tuesday, May 9, for a 7-6 win over Northwest Missouri State at Maryville to earn a split after the Missourians had bombarded the Bobcats 10-2 in the opener. Three weeks earlier on the Peru diamond the two teams split, Peru winning the opener 4-0 and Maryville capturing the nightcap 5-2. Pitcher Bill Ludwig, who spun a beautiful three hitter against the Bobcats on April 18 picked up the Northwest Missouri win in the first game Tuesday. Lefty Ron Kelly, Falls City, was tabbed

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with the loss. Peru's Tom Yopp, East Alton, Ill., counted half of the Bobcat run production with a four-bagger to left center. In the second game, Peru State hurler Len Jacobs, C o u n c i 1 Bluffs, Iowa, hurled effectively until relieved in the seventh inning to pick up the Bobcat win. Jim Snyder, Nebraska City, came on in the seventh to put down a four-run uprising by Northwest Missouri. Roger Smith, East Alton, Ill., and Larry Gilson, Fullerton, drove in three and two runs, respectively, to pace the Peruvians.

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Toial Team Scoring 1. Dawson-Verdon-65% 2. Stella-25 3. Avoca-21 4. Brock;t;"15 5. DouglaS"--14 6. Lourdes Central-13 7. Peru Prep-12% 8. Elmwood-12 9. Talmage-11 % 10. Panama-10 11. Nehawka-6¥2 12. Cook-6 13. Bratton Union-5 14. Table Rock-4314 15. Salem-1 16. Elk Creek-314 Bennet, Nemaha and Palmyra failed to score.

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Fritz, Daw-Ver; 2. Allen Hollenbeck (4:58.9) Elmwood; 3. Jim Furnau, Peru Prep; 4. Larry Kepler, Avoca; 5. Dean Jeanneret, Brock. 880 Yard Run (2:07.2)-1. Phil Boehm, Avoca; 2. Tom Majors (2:10.6) Peru Prep; 3. Warren Wellensiek, Talmage; 4. Weldon Dettman, Daw-Ver; 5. Jim Johnson, Nehawka. Discus (130'9")-l. Garold Parker, Douglas; 2. Larry Duder (128'4") Table Rock; 3. Keith Stanley (120'1" Stella; 4. Bruce Hansen (116'2"); 5. Larry Rogers (113'6") Daw-Ver. 880 Yard Re 1 a y (1:41.7)-1. Lourdes Central: Frank Heng, Louis Eiserman, Jim Heng, Ron Volkmer; 2. Talmage (1:41.9); 3. Stella (1 :42.5); 4. Cook (1 :45.0); 5. Daw-Ver (1:45.2) Mile Relay (3:47.7)-1. DawVer: Louis Fritz, Roger Crook, Doug Heim, Jerry Schutte; 2. Avoca (3:52.6); 3. Elmwood (3:53.3); 4. Brock (3:55.0); 5. Perru Prep (3:57.6)

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Dr. Morgan. and Dr. Jackman To Speak At c• ommencement and .Ba'c·calaureate

Dr. Joy Elmer Morgan A 1911 Peru graduate and a Nebraska minister will deliver addresses for the 91st annual commencement and baccalaureate . services at Peru St at e Teachers College. Speakers for the events will be Dr. Joy Elmer Morgan, founder of the National Education Association Journal and editor from 1920 until his retirement in 1954, will address the 9lst graduating class at the commencement exercises. Dr. Morgan will be present for the reunion of the class of 1911, of which he is a member, on May 21. Dr. Everett E. Jackman, district superintendent of the Omaha district of the Methodist Church, will deliver the baccalaureate sermon. The native Nebraskan served as superintendent of the Norfolk and Columbus districts prior to being named to his present position in 1958. A total of 69 January and May degree candidates will be honored during the 91st annual Commencement week at Peru State Teachers College. The degree candidates include 54 May candidates, and 15 candidates who completed requirements in January. Dr. Morgan started his educational career as a teacher-principal in a two-room school in what is now Lincoln. He was superintendent of schools at Bloomington and Guide Rock, Nebraska. Dr. Morgan completed the course for the Bachelor's degree graduating from the University of Nebraska in 1917. In 1917 Mr. Morgan was called to Camp MacArthur in Texas to build and administer libraries there and in surrounding posts. In 1920 Mr. Morgan was urged to come to Washington to found the NEA Journal and become head of the NEA Division of Publications and Publicity. He also developed for the NEA, American Education We e k, Future Teachers of America, and wrote and presented to its Representative Assembly the Victory Action program and the Centennial Action program. He retired on November 30, 1954. After retirement Dr. Morgan decided to devote the rest of his life to public service. This led to the establishment of Senior Citizens of America and the development of its magazine, which is working to make the second half of life riCher for all our citizens in terms of personal growth and community service. The baccalaureate speaker, Dr. Jackman, has degrees from University of Nebraska, Nebraska Wesleyan University, and Boston University School of Theology and has been granted an honorary doctor's degree from Nebraska Wesleyan. He has held pastorates at Highland Union Church, Lowell, Massachusetts; Mittineague

Campus School'Chatter Class Of 1911 Holds so~Year Reunion

At least 24 of the 85 known liv- ton, Texas; Mrs. Laura Holli ' By Mary Anna Gnade ing members of the Class of 1911 Lurk, Harvard; Margaret Hol Well, you might say the year is will return to the Campus of a (Mrs. Harry) C o e n , Cres wound up for the Prep seniorsThousand Oaks at Peru State Iowa; Glen H. James (Mrs. J. they had their 'day and parts of Teachers College Sunday, May Wroughton, Hasting; Opal two nights enroute and in Kan21, for their 50-year class reun- Lewton, Lansing, Mich.; sas City. Sightseeing bus (man, ion. The day's events will begin Joy Elmer Morgan, Was · · you oughta see those million dolwith a 9:30 a.m. coffee hour and ton, D.C.; Cecelia Wehrs '· lar homest), taxi cruise, tour of Hallmark industry (city in it- class meeting in Eliza Morgan Ira G.) Forell, Chester; W. Hall. Whitfield, Ames, Iowa; Elmer self), shopping center (another Dr. Joy Elmer Morgan, presi- Christenson, Ladue, Mo.; small city), park, show, just dent of Senior Citizens of AmeriE. Maude Jones, Omaha; gawkin',-true hicks looking at •Ca, Washington, D.C., and found- Blanche Wells Snyder, Hasti the big -:tewn! Then back to er and former editor of the NaMrs. Edna Wells Weaver, Al ..· school for Honors Convo. 'N' then ti on a 1 Education Association andria; Dr. H. Clay Dallam, P · comes baccalaureate, 'n' then Journal, is a member of the Class Arthur B. Gelwick, Falls C~ commencement. Plans? Sara A to of 1911. He will be speaker at the Fred Ebert, Santa Monica, C · Wesleyan, David G to Stanford, 91st annual Commencement FriKay T and LaQuita A to beauty Cella Esse Teich (Mrs. J ' day, May 26, at 10:30 a.m. school, Mary Ellen W to HastW.) Emmert, Coeur d'Al A highlight of the day's activiings; prospective Peruvians are ties will be roll call of the class Idaho; Mrs. Clara Erickson B Virginia C, Elaine G, Bob G, Pat roster. Greetings will be read man, Fremont; Ed n a J ep ~. M, Charlotte I, Linda S, possibly from absent members. Dr. Neal Mead; Mrs. Lenore K. Mue ' Paul H and Fred S. Still undeS. Gomon, president of the col- Fritz, Wymore. Dr. Everett E. Jackman cided are Jim F, Bill S, Larry K. lege, will extend his greetings at Linda E is the first of the class the 1:00 p.m. luncheon. The class Church, West Springfield, Massato be married. (They t h i n k will be given special recognition ROY PECK chusetts; St. Paul Church, Lynn, they've been cracking books hard at the 4:00 p.m. Baccalaureate Massachusetts; Hanscom Park, for lo, these many years-now it servi<:es. Omaha, Nebraska; First Church; really begins.) Haircut, $1.25 The 24 1911'ers from 10 differNorth Platte, Nebraska; and First Peru, Nebr. Honors Convo was a dignified, ent states, who have indicated Church, Norfolk, Nebraska. Dr. prideful affair. As one of the they will be present, include: Jackman has served as District speakers said, "The final honor is Mary 0. Barnes (Mrs. Earl) Dean, Superintendent of Norfolk, Colreceiving the diploma." Sara AdYork; Amelia Bauch, Denver; umbus, and is now serving in ams led the group in honoring LIMA'S CLOTHING Mrs. Frances Chez Kingston, that status in Omaha, Nebraska. the teachers, then recognition ' &··SHOE STORE He is also the author of "The was given for service to school, Yakima, Wash.; Mrs. Marie O. Neal, Nebraska City; Lillian GalIt's Smart To Be Thrifty Nebraska Methodist Story," pub- leadership in activities, in readbraith (Mrs. H.) Hemmingsen, AUBURN, NEBR. lished in 1954. Dr. Jackman's ing, in attaining high grades, and subject for baccalaureate sermon finally taking five deserving senr Auburn; Beulah A. Harriss, Denwill be, "Gates to Greatness." iors into the National Honor SoScripture, Matthew 7:13-20. ciety-a goal worth the effort. The elementary grades are celebrating the end of school with room picnics even in rainy Complete Line of School Supplies weather ("we shoved back the desks and had our picnic on the Revlon, Coty and Evening in Paris floor"). Another end-of-school Cosmetics chore one isn't too aware of is the work the elementary teachers Chris Buethe, principal 6f the do to get outstanding classwork KODAKS & SUPPLIES Fast Film Service Campus High school at •Peru ready for fair display-and every State, has been awarded a Na- one of those kids make it a point Bring Us Your Prescriptions tional Science Foundation Sum- to look for Peru Campus School mer Institute award for eight work when they go to the fair, weeks of study at the University both county and state. of Vermont, Burlington. Final recital of the season is The N.S.F. award recipient has that given by pupils of Mr. Benbeen appointed associate profes- ford and Mr. Jindra. It's always sor of physics at Peru State, ef- unbelievable .the music those two fective September 1. Mr. Buethe, men can pull from such little who holds a bachelor's degree fingers. And you just can't fathGroceries Meats from Wayne State and a mas- om the pride those young'ns take Fruits and Vegetables ter's degree from the University in being called an orchestra! of Colorado, Boulder, will study But the thing that really spells Free Delivery Tuesday and Friday applied mathematics and physics. end-of-school is the incredible Fifty-one educators from 17 mound of "treasure" that comes Phone TR 2-4351 states have been selected for to light when desks and lockers summer institute at the Univer- are cleaned. sity of Vermont. Accompanying With the prospect of a whole Mr. Buethe will be his wife, Pat, summer ahead, the words "sumwho will take course work at the mer school" fall in the category University of Vermont. of dirty language. Yet after mere"TRU-FIT" ly a week of summer vacation, the campus schoolers seem not only glad but eager to go back to the relaxed summer s c h o o 1 S.C.F. held its regular meeting schedule. Hope your summer is in MH204, May 2. An election of relaxing and profitable, too. officers was held for 'the '61-'62 year. Those elected were: Susan Sharp, president; Norma Reiman, REDFERN vice president; Linda Beery, secClothing Co. retary; Jerry Kirkendall, treas"The Store of Standard urer. The new officers held a Brands" short business meeting after the Phone BR 4·3620 Auburn The diamond ring with election.

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ebraska's Oldest Campus

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 56

Number 17

Dr. Joy Elmer Morgan Addresses Commencement Audience

Wheeler ach of the Year Wheeler was named "1961 College Coach of the Year" he Sunday Lincoln Journal Siar in its June 4 edition. eler was cited not only for 1960 conference-winning rec~ of 5-1, but also for his 23record of 133 wins, 52 losses 12 ties while head football h at Peru State. The Lincoln r counted as "amazing" eler's record of the past 11 !!!!!!!=llro: 84 wins, 16 losses, 1 tie.

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heeler announced his retiret as head football coach near end of the 1960 gridiron camn, from which the Bobcats ged with their fourth NCC sixth conference title under irection. He will continue as tor of athletics and baseball h, while his football duties be assumed by Jack Mcin-

Dr. Blanton Attends Educational Conference

Delmonico and Sear Entertain At All-College Convo

eaking of the award, Wheelid, "Naturally I appreciate ward, but particularly beThe folk singer-dance duo, it was awarded for my last first artist series event of th e · 1961 summer session, was well n as coach." received at the all-college conaking it clear that he considvocation Friday, June 16 at 10:40 the '60 season a fine "team a.m. t," Wheeler stated: Folk singer Dave Sear an d t was a bunch of fine boys dancer Michael Dominico, who worked hard who made the have been featured throughout rd possible. They displayed a the United States and Canada in derful spirit and were al- concerts and television, gave a s willing. Also, I can't forget varied program of solo and duo assistants, Mac (Mcintire) numbers. Forrest Wood accomJerry (Jerome Stemper). panied them on the piano. The program began with a tap ''y did a fine job." dance interpretation of the "Min. e Lincoln Star p r a i s e d uet" from the second movement ' eeler's ability to develop tal- of Morton Gould's ballet, Inter. and mentioned that some play. A Cavalcade of the Dance stars were unable to make followed, featuring popular tap ·r high school first team. Com- routines of the past century in .. ting on this, Wheeler said, American history. A Spanish e never recruited. Most of number, "Fandango," done with players have come from boots and no taps, and an Irish ll schools." jig were equally, enjoyed. The audience, and especially s an example, he cited th e campus school, which grad- the younger set, responded quite . d such Bobcat regulars as :d Applegate, Sid Brown, Glen · wood and Roger Majors, lT"

eceiving awards is not a new ' erience for Al Wheeler. ong others he was named ttle All-American Coach of !, Year" by the Rockne Foundn and was also j u d g e d ach of the Year" by the Oma'.World Herald in 1952. These ors were received for coachhis Bobcat gridders through inning streak of 26 consecu-

ol Repaired new circulating motor and p were installed in the gym mming pool on June 7 to rece the motor which burned sometime during the weekof May 26. he old pump lasted only 21h . It came with a new filter

y

eorge DeVore, gym custodiexplains that corrosion, due e chlorine in the water, ed the motor to burn out. new filter shell had been ined one week ago. June 8, the pool was again y for class use. Only two sessions were missed.

JUNE 26, 1961

Nebraska's Best College

enthusiastically to the folk songs. Among the ballads sung w e r e "The Preacher's Holiday," a story about Amy S. MacPherson; "The Sausage Machine"; "John Henry"; "I Did What I Could"; "School Teacher's Lament"; and "Dr. Freud." Dave Sear has been featured wfth such notable performers as Harry Belafonte and The Weavers. He has recorded for Columbia, Folkways, and Prestige records. Michael Dominico has appeared regularly on the Perry Como show and with Steve Allen, Paul Winchell, Vic Damone, and Jo Stafford. Pianist Forrest Wood has, as an actor, appeared on "Studio One" 17 times. After the convocation performance, the youthful artists w e r e busy signing numerous autographs.

Summer Enrollment Stemper Outlines A total of 415 students are enrolled at Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru for the 1961 summer session, according to Registrar, F. H. Larson. This figure, which is for the June 5 to July 28 regular session, includes 335 women and 80 men. Enrollments at Peru State's summer session have shown marked increases from 362 in 1955. The 1961 regular session includes students from 24 Nebraska counties and five states besides Nebraska. There are 22 students from Brown county, Kans., 31 from Fremont county, Iowa. The student from the farthest state is Laura Lippold fro m Clark, Nevada. The ones driving a long distance are from Sabetha, Summerfield, and H i aw at h a , Kansas. The students driving the farthest are the ladies from Malvern, Iowa, which 69 miles from Peru. They drive 690 miles each week. By the end of the summer session they will have driven a total of 5,520 miles. SATURDAY CLASSES Regular classes were held Saturday, June 24. The second day of Saturday classes will be July 8. Two days of Saturday classes were scheduled this year because of the long July 4 holiday.

Recreation Program For Summer Jerry Stemper, head of the summer recreation program, has outlined the many activities available to the students on the Peru State campus this summer. Heading these activities are : swimming, square dancing, men's soft ball, and co-recreational volley ball. For those students on campus who would 'enjoy participating in square dancing, but who have not had past experience-this is your chance. There will be instructions given for beginners. If enough students are interested in some other form of recreation, such as a bathing suit contest, please contact Mr. Stemper.

First Convocation Held The first convocation of the summer season was held June 7. The convo was opened by singing the Star Spangled Banner. Members of the faculty were presented by Dr. Neal S. Gomon. Immediately following the presentation, Dr. Gomon delivered a short address. The convocation was dismissed by singing the color song.

Dr. Milburn Blanton represented Peru State at· the MidWestern conference on education held at Omaha University June 8 and 9. Representatives from Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Kansas and Nebraska attended the meeting. Membership in the conference is open to "all persons seeking a means of cooperative action in the study of major problems of education that are of common concern, with special emphasis on education in areas rural in character." These persons should be "leaders or heads of organizations· and reside in one of the seven Mid-Western states." The conference was recently incorporated. It has been in the formative stages for three years. The purpose of this Mid-Western conference is to provide for a cooperative study effort of major problems in education with special emphasis on rural education. Dr. Blanton said that there were two features of the two day meeting. The first was a report from the executive committee concerning their study of possibilities for conference action on rural instruction in the seven states. Their recommendations concerned "improvement of curriculum and quality of teaching, reorganization of districts, and development of total community educational programs." Another report was presented by the ad hoc committee which has been working with the Ford Foundation on a developmental program. If agreements can be reached with the foundation, they will provide from three to five million dollars for experimentation and special projects for improvement in education. The highlight of the conference was an address by Howard Dawson, director of rural education in the United States office of education at Washington, D. C. Mr. Dawson spoke about general problems in the improvement of rural education. He mentioned keeping educators in the Midwest as a major problem. Said Mr. Dawson: "If you want to see where outstanding educators in the nation come from but where they do not stay, look at Who's Who in American Education, You will see that Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, and the mountain areas of Arkansas are chief sources of outstanding educators in other states of the nation."

Display Case Needs Exhibits The display case, located between the library and gymnasium, is one of the newest additions to our campus. Its purpose is to display items of' educational and cultural value. ~ To date, a pipe collection belonging to Mr. R. D. Moore and a pottery collection made in art classes have been shown. Perhaps you or someone you know has a hobby, craft or collection which would be of interest. If so, contact Mr. Langham, librarian.

"The Teacher and Civilization" was the title of Dr. Joy Elmer Morgan:s commencement address at Peru State May 26. Said Dr. Morgan: "We are so busy at times that we may fail to consider ourselves in civilization. We need to take a look at the teacher and civilization from an aerial view." Dr. Morgan pointed out that our period in civilization is small compared to the whole. But the training of the mind remains important. Good schools b u i 1 d strong nations. Next Dr. Morgan considered pedagogy and the teacher, listing four fundamentals. The first principle is "love of the teacher for the individual." The younger the child, the m01;.e important the love. The child wh:o needs the most love is the child who is most difficult to love. "Awakening of the self" is the second principle. A child must be taught to w;$.'f to make something of himself. Fundamental number three is "the awakening of the child to a sense of others." This sense of others should include all mankind. By biological fact, we are all brothers. Science has brought us together and we must learn to get along. The last principle Dr. Morgan gave was: "the mind grows at the point of attention." The things one thinks about show the kind of person he or she is. Thus, make the child's mind a kingdom. The heritage of the United States is tremendous. Dr. Morgan mentioned several ideals that are part of the heritage. The first is "The Golden Rule." By it, people can live in harmony. Next is the law of growth or evolution. Children are expected to do better than their parents. The third ideal is that of democracy based upon intelligence and ideas. The last and dominant ideal is that of planning. Dr. Morgan said that President Kennedy's "Goals for Americans" is a part of the plan. The goals off er every American a chance to do something for America. Dr. Morgan concluded his thinking on ideals by saying: "Ideals are like stars-you can't reach them with your hands but you may choose them as guides." His final words to the graduates were these: "He most lives who feels most, thinks most, and acts best. It is your task as teachers to see that education wins."

Educational Books Exhibited The Nebraska Textbookmen's Association displayed an educational exhibit June 14 in the gymnasium. Mr. Forrest B. Shrader, secretary-treasurer of the Nebraska Textbook's Association, said, "This is an educational exhibit for the purpose of acquainting teachers and prospective teachers with new educational materials available to them." On display were representative textbooks from the following publishing companies: Holt, Rinehart and Winston; Rand McNally; Charles E. Merrill; Allyn and Bacon; Macmillan; Harcourt, (Continued on page two)


WHISPERS FROM MORGAN

WAY BACK WHEN •••

By Julie Mayer

By Hanford Miller Jr.

Eliza Morgan Hall has come to life again after a week of quiet. Students returning from 1 as t summer will notice some ~hanges in the dorm. This summer the new west wing is being used. Also new is the "face lifting" done to the front of Morgan Hall, extending to the Student Center. This retaining wall, according to Mr. Vance, is a decorative and practical means to' put the t w o buildings on the same level. Eventually, a cement walk will be laid from Morgan Hall to the Student Center and the area will be sodded. South of Morgan Hall workmen are busy planting roses between the dormitory and the Student Center. The cry, "Man on the floor!" has been loud and frequent recently as workmen administer welcome repair to third floor. First and second floors are occupied by the 74 residents of Morgan Hall. At a dorm party June 12, officers and wing counselors w e r e elected. Joan Hauptman is o u r new president; Ruth McBride, vice-president; Clara Kelly, secretary-treasurer. The following students were elected wingcounselors: basement, Patricia Shelly; first floor, Colene Hoffman; second floor, Pat Earl, Rita Grandgenett. Last week Karen Fankhauser, Joan Votroubek, Virginia Van Winkle, and Kay Parli played nursemaid to a baby blue jay that fell from its nest. girls kept it in their room for a day and then took it down to the lab where it is being cared for. The TV has been kept busy as students seek relief from studying. The game room in the Student Center and the tennis courts have also seen frequent use. For week-end recreation, Linda Risley, Rosemary Grundmann and Bev Parde went to the free movie downtown. One of the most popular activities this time of the year is sun bathing. From time to time the hills of Peru can be seen dotted with girls starting the summer right with a good tan.

The

EDUCATIONAL BOOKS EXHIBITED (Continued from page one) Brace and World; Science Research Associates; Follett; University; McCormick-Mathers ; American Book; Laidlow; Nystrom; Ginn; Grolier Society; S ch o 1 a st i c Magazines; D. C. Heath; Row, Peterson; Midwest; Scott, Foresman; Instructor.

The Peru Pedagogian through the years has reflected everyday life on the campus. From clippings in the 1928 files, we learned from the April 24 Pedagogian that the building program was then, as now, of top interest. A $50,000 appropriation was set aside for building a science hall. The hall was to be built on the north side of the auditorium, in the form of a T. The entrance to the finished building was to face north. As you can see, things turned out differently; the science hall does not form a T and the entrance faces west. The cost of this building seems low indeed when compared to our new $400,000 industrial arts building. In the August 15, 1928, issue, the placement bureau reported: "This year there has been a decrease in nearly every department. To date there have been 542 calls. Last year the bureau received 742 calls for teachers." "Most Peruvians located in high schools will teach two or three subjects. Salaries are as follows: Experienced Men ___ $1,660 Experienced! Women_$1,280" The placement bureau now receives an estimated 4,000 calls every year for teachers. Some names that made news in 1928 still are familiar on the campus. "On Friday, June 22 at the college auditorium Professors H. E. Wagner and Robert [', Benford presented a musical recital. A large crowd was present to hear these local artists." An idea for a summer convocation is contained in this item: "On August 8, 1928, convocation was devoted to a swimming demonstration and meet held in the college swimming pool." If some of you have wondered what the campus rules and customs were many years ago, here is what the March 20, 1928 Pedagogian said concerning th i s matter: "In the, early history of the school (Peru College), boys were not allowed to come within ten feet of girls. The boys of course were afraid they might accidentally break the rule, so they cut ten-foot poles. Girls and boys were often seen swinging these poles between them. If a gentleman wished to escort a lady home, he must walk on one side of the street and she on the other. A gentleman wishing to escort a lady to church must send

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks June 26, 1961 PEDAGOGIAN STAFF PERSONNEL FOR SUMMER PAPER Julie Mayer _____________________________________ Co-editor Sandy Craig -------------------------------------Co-editor Julie Mayer ___________________________________ Copy Editor Sandy Craig ________________________________ Layout Editor Dolores Spilker _________________________ Business Manager Julie Mayer --------------------- _______________ Columnist Cathy !deus ------------------------------------Columnist Hanford Miller, Jr. _____________________________ Columnist Mary Anna Gnade ------------------------------Columnist Rex Filmer --------------------------------------Reporter Grace Briley -------------------------------------Reporter Sandy Stephens ----------------------------------Reporter Karen Mcintire ----------------------------------Reporter Sandy Pearson -----------------------------------Reporter Bob Penkava ------------------------------------Reporter Richard Holmes ----------------------------------Sponsor

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his written compliments to the lady, which in turn must be approved by the preceptress. At convocation boys and girls sat in different sections. The janitor rang the rising bell at 5 o'clock, and few got to stay in bed long after this." We columnists are now wondering if "the good old days" really were.

LIBRARY COLUMN By Cathy Ideus Bedlam in ihe Back Seat, by Janet Gillespie, offers us a picture of the Europe which can only be seen through the eyes of a family of six. The author, he r husband, and their four children traveled in a Volkswagen bus, following a happy meandering path through France, Switzerland, Austria, Italy and the British Isles. Imagine the restive spirits of the children, the floor strewn with the litter of three days picnicking in the car, and an Alpine chill gnawing at the last frayed threads of your temper. This is not the stuff that travel posters are made of. Or imagine an idyllic olive grove, with a picnic of the pungent local cheeses, bread still warm from the bakery, and good Chianti wine. This is living; this is escape to be shared by all s.tay-athome readers. , To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee, is an interesting and warmhearted novel. At the age of eight, Scout Finch is an entrenched free-thinker. She can't accept her father's warning that it is a sin to kill a mockingbird because mockingbirds harm no one and give great pleasure. The benefits said to be gained fro m going to school and keeping her temper elude her. The place of this intensely moving story is Maycomb, Alabama. The time is the Depression, but Scout and her brother are seldom depressed. They have appalling gifts for entertaining themselves. The children become involved in some disturbing adult mysteries; fascinating Boo Radley, who never leaves his house; the terrible temper of Mrs. Dubose down the street; the fine distinctions that make the Finch family "quality"; the forces that cause the people of Maycomb to show compassion

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in one crisis and unreasoning cruelty in another. J. B., by Archibald MacLeish, is about the justification of the ; injustice . of . the . unive~se-our Concepts and TechniqJ love of life m spite of llfe. The Modern Science a tw~ Book of Job has lived in men's ,&'2o~se for elem~ntary tJ minds for thousands of years. It 'is being offered for the fi is Job who asks most poignantly at Peru beginning July 5. for all mankind the crucial ques- course designed to meet t · tion: "How can the world be jus- for basic training for new tified?" In this play, two broken- . ers and inservice educati' down actors, reduced to selling those on-the-job. Special popcorn and balloons in a circus, sis is given the changes a · venture to exercise their rusty concepts in elementary sc'" talents and reinflate their egos by reading the parts of God and Recent research has giv Satan after closing time on a ditional information on tM. side-show stage where others level at which various have played the play of Job be- con c e Pt s and underst . fore them. They put on masks should be introduced. In only to discover that they have tion, modern means of pr stumbled through the play into tion have been developed: reality: the real reality of a voice, modern science, including, not theirs, that knows the lines ca:tional television, progr " they mean to speak; the human materials, and other t reality of a living, suffering Job, aids. The teacher for this ne; '. the J. B. of the title, banker and industrialist, a happy and wholly cation course is Mr. Ly successful man, the possessor of Bargman of Lincoln. Bar · great wealth and power, confi- principal of the Lincoln e dent, virtuous, admired and re- tary schools. spected-from whom everything is taken. How can this be justi"Of plain, fied? current ·coin

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Faculty Changes A resignation and retirement from the staff of Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru were announced June 15 by President Neal S. Gamon. Darryl T. Manring, associate professor of voice, has resigned to continue graduate study at the University of Arizona, Tucson, and Mrs. Ruth Brown, campus school supervisor, has asked to be placed on emeritus status. Mr. Manring joined the musk staff in Septemb~r, 1949. During the 1960-61 school year he has been on a leave of absence to work on a doctoral program at the University of Arizona. Mrs. Manring served as secretary to the director of the campus school for a number of years. Mrs. Brown joined the staff of the campus school in 1943. During the last ten years she has been supervisor of the fourth grade in the campus school. Mrs. Brown is the widow of the late Dr. Castle Brown, long-time head of the division of history an d social sciences of the college. Mrs. Brown plans to dispose of her prop'erties in Peru and re· turn to her former home at River Falls, Wisconsin.

John Biere, Auburn, and Jeannine Ehlers, Syracuse, have been elected president and vice-president, respectively, of ihe Student Government Association at Peru State Teachers College for the 1961· 62 school year. Miss Ehlers was re-elected to the position she held during the 1960-61 school year. Peru State voters exhibited political independence by electing Biere from the Independent Party and Miss Ehlers from the Esoteric Party. John is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Otio Biere, Auburn, and Jeannine is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Ehlers, Syracuse. The new student leaders will be seniors.

Baccalaureate Sermon Delivered By Dr. Jackman Dr. Everett E. Jackman, super· intendent of the Omaha district of the Methodist church, deliv· ered the baccalaureate sermon on May 21 to the graduating class of 1961. Dr. Jackman chose his text from Matthew: "Straight is the gate and narrow is the way that leadeth to life." He discussed the gate as a symbol of freedom and escape. According to Dr. Jackman, the gates leading to greatness are the gates of purposeful learning, self -discipline, sincerity, a n d worship. He pointed out that worship with sincerity and common sense is the most important gate since

it gives reason for passin,g through all the others. In closing, Dr. Jackman wished the gradu: ates success and expressed t he hope that they would reach the goal of greatness.

Carlson To Head Alpha Mu Richard D. Carlson, Falls City, has been elected president of the Peru State Teachers College chapter of Alpha Mu Omega, honorary mathematics fraternity, for the 1961-62 s·chool year, according to Mr. Lyle McKercher, assistant professor of mathematics and organization sponsor. Other officers elected for the coming year include: John Masonbrink, Stella, vice-president; and Tom Mincer, Plattsmouth, secretary-treasurer.

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Teach er Spends Vacation Teaching Each summer many teachers return to study at Peru, but one teacher, Dr. James M. May, has returned for the third consecutive year not as a student but as a summer instructor in the department of education. Dr. May's fall and winter months are spent in Tulsa, Okla., where he h a s served for the past 11 years as principal of the Oliver Wendell Holmes elementary school. Dr. May's experience in the field of elementary education is shared with Peru students this summer in three courses: Techniques of Research in Education, Social Science in Elementary Schools, and Language Arts in Elementary Schools. When asked if he enjoys his summer job, Dr. May replied: "The fad that I have returned for the third time indicates, I believe, that I do like teaching here at Peru. I find my work pleasant and inspiring and the students attentive and appreciative. I also appreciate the apparent rich cultural heritage of the college and the ·community." The AB. degree was awarded to Dr. May by Henderson State Teachers College, Arkadelphia, Ark. His M.A. was earned at the University of Arkansas,, and his Ph.D. requirements were completed at Colorado State College, Greeley, Colorado. Dr. May is married and is the father of two children, a daughter, 13, and a son, ll. His family has accompanied Dr. May to Peru and is residing in the Manring apartments. Besides acting as manager of his son's Little League baseball team and being a self-classified "summer golfer,'' Dr. May served as vice-president of the national department of elementary school principals during 1957-58 and has held the position of memberat-lai'ge of the executive committee of that organization for the past three years.

Application Deadline For Master's Exams All candidates for the master's degree must make application in the office of the dean of the college for the written comprehensive examinations on or before June 27. The examination will be given July 6, a:t 9 a.m. in the library.

Clarence Williams Has HNo Complaint" At Retirement "All you have to do is let the students alone and they won't bother the night watchman." So states Clarence D. Williams, retiring deputy state .sheriff, with a hearty chuckle and a gleam in his eye. Harmless pranks ab o u t the "Campus of a Thousand Oaks" have given Williams much amusement and relief from the monotony of work as n i g h t watchman. It is this enjoyment of harmless pranks that has kept more drastic incidents at a minimum. Wiilliams practiced his particular kind of diplomacy on our campus for seven years. "I've got no complaints whatsoever," he says. "I loved working with the students and faculty in this school. I'll sure miss the kids." The small fry about campus are favorites of "Pop," as he is ·called. He likes to tell how Kurt Buethe watched him take the flag down last fall and said, "Say, Pop, better leave that up there. I'll tell on you!" With the exception of a few nights last year when he was recovering from a lightning shock,

Williams never missed a night in seven years. Williams spent eight years in forest se.rvice. He has m a n y memorie~ of his work as a ranger along the Mexican border; at Puget Sound, Washington; and along Wasatch Range near Salt Lake City. He was forced to leave irest' work when he was overcom'e by smoke poisoning in a fire. Fishing for trout is a favorite pastime of Williams, and both he and Mrs. Williams love to travel. Their outdoor fireplace is an indication of this because it contains rocks from nine different states. Included in these are gold ore, silica, and mica fr om Utah; silver from Montana; lead ore from the Black Hills; and a chunk of lava from the Ozarks. They will revisit many of these states in the near future. They plan an immediate visit to Utah, Idaho, Washington, San Francisco, and Nevada. Will he fish? "Very probably," he says. The Williams plan to remain living in Peru the greater part of each year. One thing seems certain, the kids will "sure" miss him, because it seems that they a 1so "have no complaints whatsoever."

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NSEA Official Visits Peru State Campus Campus Evergreens Campus to Be Beautified T. Semrad, direc- cent per year interest on loans Threatened By Insects torMr.of Wilfred field services for NSEA can be offered to NSEA members Through Gift of Iowa Nursery The pines on campus are being and also state advisor to the Stu- is that the NSEA "provides office The gift of 2,415 trees, shrubs and bushes by Interstate Nurseries of Hamburg, Iowa, to Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru in the years to -come will add to the beauty of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks. Included in the gift of nursery stock are 600 rose bushes, 380 of which are being planted in a formal garden between Eliza Morgan Women's Residence Hall and the new Student Center. The majority of the stock is being planted in areas near the f o u r recently-completed building projects at Peru State. The gift, arranged through Homer Greenwood of Interstate

Nurseries, includes in addition to the 17 varieties of roses, 25 sugar maples, 25 flowering crab, 40 pin oaks, 100 Marshall crab, 20 Buisman elm, 25 hiock orange, 15 forsythia, 15 burning bush, 250 winter green euonymous, 1,000 misty blue spirea, and 200 cardinal shrub. The nursery stock has. a retail value of between $3,500 and $4,000. The sodding and seeding of grass near the A. V. Larson Industrial Arts building, the A. D. Major's Men's Hall, additions to Eliza Morgan Women's Hall, and the Student Center, plus the new trees and shrubs will have erased the scars left by the $1.4 million building program.

Campus School Chatter By Mary Anna Gnade With all the college students in courses requiring observation of elementary pupils in action, it follows that Miss Clarke, M rs . Straw and Mr. Sheely conduct classes in rather a fish-bowl atmosphere. These summer sessions are "for fun" as well as enrichment for those in grades 1 through 6. Part of their education is in adjusting to new classmates since enrollments include children of summer college students and visiting relatives in the community. You'd think 23 lively 1st and 2nd graders would be enough for a teacher, but Mrs. Straw says she thoroughly enjoys the additional "livestock" which fills her room as part of the "Pets" project she is teaching this summer. It's a continually changing show since few of the pets remain for long. George Guinea Pig, the hamsters and parakeets from regular session kindergarten act as hosts to the parade of rabbits, salamanders, rats, chameleons, dogs, fish, turtles, etc. (PS: Gotta minute? Mrs. S. says visitors are welcome!) One nice way to get acquainted is to compare the history of Peru with the history of the towns from which the visitors come. Miss Clarke has representatives from eight other schools besides Peru and their project is "Peru Community, Yesterday and Today." They had almost-90-yearold Herbert Patterson from town who aroused the curiosity of the 3rd and 4th graders in the "olden days." A trip to Brownville isl a must when studying the history of this area, and a stop on Cemetery Hill points out the fact that Mt. Vernon became the city of the dead while the city of the living moved down the hill to Peru. (Had you stopped to think how YOUR city got its name?) Mr. Sheely's 5th and 6th graders didn't stay earth-bound: their project, involving committees and reports, is on phases of "Space." Books with articles about and by space scientists, models of space ships and stations and rockets and even plebian airplanes are making the trek from home to school. Wild rumors of "maybe a field trip to Morrill hall in Lincoln" to see the space exhibit are rampant (but likely not possible). So on Tuesdays and Thursdays, the young'ns come out of space and dunk in the college swimming pool. By serendipity pupils were allowed to hear and see the Dominico and Sear song and dance program. Vocalizing is done under the supervision of Mrs. Grace Russell, under the supervision of Mr. Camealy, under ... If children (or parents) are so inclined, grade school band makes music

damaged by an unknown insect. dent Education Association of Two of these trees were removed Nebraska, visited the Peru Camfrom the north gate of the cam- pus June 12. The purpose of his pus at the beginnig of the sum- visit was to explain to present mer session. A pine between the and prospective members of the gymnasium and library is also teaching profession the values showing the effects of this insect and services acquired by NSEA which according to Mr. Stacy membership. The visit to Peru Vance, has not yet been identi- was part of the Summer Visitafied. tions program conducted by the NSEA on Nebraska campuses The junipef's on the campus during June and July. are also diseased. According to Mr. Albert Brady, assistant proSeveral morning classes heard fessor of biological science, they Mr. Semrad tell about the official are being damaged by bagworms .. platform of the NSEA, the Teachers Insurance association, and the Nebraska Teachers Credit union. 1

Wednesday afternoons; campus school and college band members rehearse Thursday evenings with promise (threat?) of concerts later; boys and girls duck in and out of Vic Jindra's domain for quickie sessions on vi o 1ins or cello. A left-over-from-regular-school diagnostic reading test that was a requirement of the SRA survey conducted in 7th and 8th grades during the past semester turned into a highly social affair. Refreshments were served and a dance made this a most desirable exam, not to mention the excitement of getting drenched in the Wednesday evening downpour. Understand even prizes (of three and four cents, imagine!) were awarded for best waltzing, etc. And then the question arises, do we have a progressive or traditional school?

/

"Sifting Sands" Revived Sifting Sands, publication of Sigma Tau Delta, honorary English fraternity, was revived last spring. Many students returning to the campus· this summer will remember that the publication contains only original, creative literature written by Peru State students or faculty members. An autumn issue is · planned and contributions are welcomed. Those persons wishing to contribute or to buy a spring copy should contact Mr. Summers or Julie Mayer. Copies of the spring issue are available at $.25 p er copy.

Who s Whistring?

"Just 'whistling' in the rain!" That's what he was doing on Tuesday afternoon, June 13, between 5th and 6th streets. The tune was "America," the rhythm typically march, and the man a defier of gloomy days. He trudged' down the middle of the spongy street with the gentle rain dripping from· his bare head and a long gray plastic raincoat. On every last count of the huptwo-three-four, our whist 1er shifted into a higher key. Neither the rain nor the successive key changes seemed to affect him. He merely continued his activity in contrary motion to the elements. Who is this mysterious whistler who whistles uphill while the rain comes trickling down?

Financially independent school districts, state support of school districts, free high school tuition, and severance tax on natural resources to benefit future generations were included in the 1961 NSEA official platform. Other articles included state administered federal support, minimum of a bachelor's degree for all teachers, tenure balanced w i th added responsibility and professional growth, professional an d sabbatical· leaves without loss of salary, and, a state retirement plan to supplement the federal plan. The insurance and credit union plans benefit the teachers because they are designed on the "group" basis. There is a saving of 25% on certain policies from the T.I.A. One reason a six per-

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S.N.E.A. PRESIDENT James DuVal, Tabor, Iowa, has been ele~ted president of the Student Nebraska Education Association chapter at Nebraska State Teachers College, Peru, according to Dr. Milburn W. Blanton, head of the division of education and chapter sponsor. Other newly elected S.N.E.A. officers include: Mary Ann Graham, Auburn, vice-president; Patsy Melcher, Omaha, secretary; Ellen Hunzeker, Hum b o 1d t, treasurer.

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Nebraska's Oldest College

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU.NEBRASKA

Volume 56

Number 18

JULY IL 1961

Nebraska's Best College

ampus To Host eligious, onferences

Ten Scholarships Awarded Peru Students

Peru State will host the Christount and Mi-Ne-Co conferences r high school-age youngsters of e Nebraska Fellowship of ristian Churches, July 16-29. ccording to Mr, Lawrence L. ·mams, director of church delopment and acting executive cretary of the Nebraska Chrisn churches, these two conferees are a part of twelve weeks camps and conferences which e held across, Nebraska during e summer. He said they are "a rt of our youth program where e young people of our churches for a concentrated week of dy, recreation and fellowship." The Christmount conference ill be held July 16-22 and will elude youngsters from Cass, dge, Douglas, Sarpy, Washingn, Johnson, Nemaha, 0 t o e , wnee and Richardson counties. e Mi-Ne-Co meeting will last om July 23 through 29 and will rve representatives from Butr, Dixon, Lancaster, Saunders, ward, Filmore, Gage, Jefferson d Thayer counties. Approxitely 100 persons are expected r each week-long meeting, inuding 15 counselors each week. Present plans call for the girls be housed either in Eliza Morn or Majors Hall and the boys the second floor of Delzell 11. P~rticipants .will be fed in e college cafeteria and most of eir classes will be held in the mpus school. Williams described the activis of the conferences as follows: he morning schedule is usually led with the study of classes d an assembly period. In the ernoons we will do our comittee assignments. The rest of e afternoon is used primarily r recreation and swimming. "In the late afternoon, just bere dinner, we have interest oups. The time in the interest oups is ordinarily used to disss vocations. Following the ·nner hour we have a vesper rvice, social hour, singspiration, d our closing friendship circle, ter which everyone goes to eir dorms for the night." Friday nights will be devoted a banquet and consecration rvices. After the consecration rvice, the conferees enter into traditional "night of silence" ring which no one speaks until ey come together Saturday orning in a friendship circle. his gives the young people an portunity to think over the ents and experiences of the ek," said Williams.

Ten scholarships for the 196162 academic year at Nebraska State Teachers College, Peru, have been awarded through the Peru Ahievement foundation, according to Fred A. Rathert, Auburn, foundation president.

ew Official Seal Adopted Degrees issued by Peru State is ·summer will bear a new offi1 college seal. The old seal, d since 1867, bore the simple rds "Peru, Nebraska," surnded with, "State Normal hool and Teachers College." The new seal, adopted July 6, ars an acorn and oak leaf dewith the words "Campus of 0 Oaks," ringed with "Neska State Teachers College, u, Nebraska." The seal is now -to-date in accordance with a 9 decision to delete the "Nor1 School" portion of the offi1 title.

The scholarships in varying amounts are awarded from alumni gifts and grants provided by business and industry. The foundation's scholarship program, in existence since 1956, provides for full or partial payment of fees for worthy students planning to enter the field of education and in need of financial assistance. Scholarships granted include:

''·

Boston Lyric Theatre To Appear Friday teresting to note that the two sopranos, the tenor, and the baritone each studied under the New England conservatory's eminent teacher, Gladys Miller. Each of the artists has achieved success in the fields of concert, opera, and oratorio, having appeared with such leading musical organizatjons as the l3oston Pops orchestra, the Wheeling symphony, the Harvard M u sic a 1 association, Brown University chorus and orchestra, Al Goodman and orchestra, and the New England Opera theatre. Director of the ensemble is Paul Giles, baritone, who is responsible for the development of the Boston Lyric theatre, now in its seventh successful season. The public is invited to attend the July 14 performance.

The Boston Lyric theatre will appear here at the all-college convocation Friday, July 14 at 10:40 a.m. The appearance of this musical theatre group comprised of five singers and a pianist is part of a tour of the United States. Shown is a part of the six member ensemble in a colorfully costumed excerpt from "Carousel." Left to right are Paul Giles, baritone; -Betty Riggenbach, soprano; Geraldine Barretto, soprano; and William Conlon, tenor. Other members of the group are Edward Durbeck III, bass-baritone and Phyllis Hill, pianist. Originating in Boston, Massachusetts, the ensemble has been widely acclaimed for its fine programs and its colorful and artistic performances in colleges and

music centers throughout the eastern half of the United States. The program includes a group of 16th, 17th, and 18th century madrigals from the works of Handel, Sullivan, and Gibbons; excerpts from the Brahms "Liebeslieder W,altzes"; Beethoven and Chopin piano solos; scenes from the "Magic Flute"; and excerpts from "Carousel" by Rodgers and Hammerstein. ·The group, all versatile musicians, double at the piano and change costumes almost as often as they change languages. Each sings in at least five languages fluently. Each of the members of this unique group holds a masier's degree, four from the New England conservatory of music and two from Boston University. It is in-

Speech Banquet Held

B. Henry Compiles Tour Playgrounds Peru History

"Speaking of Ills and Pills" was the theme of the Fundamentals of Bob Henry, assistant director Speech banquet held at the American Legion hall in Auburn, of special services, is compiling a Saturday night, July 8. The ban- history of Peru Normal and Peru quet, which has become almost State. This project is in preparatraditional in Mr. J. D. Levitt's tion for the 100th birthday of PeSpeech 152 classes, gave the stu- ru State Teachers College in 1967. Up to the present, Henry has dents an opportunity to apply speech techniques in a c tu a 1 concentrated oh the 1860's and speech situations divorced from 1870's-the beginning years of Peru State. the classroom. Henry commented that .it was Toastmaster and chairman of the program committee w a s interesting to note the little difRalph Plummer. Belva Hewitt ference between students of todelivered the main address and day and nearly a century ago. He Doris TenHulzen acted as general also mentioned that many stuchairman. The imaginative an d dents now come to Peru from aphumorous decorations, including proximately the same areas as individual pill boxes at each they did when the school started. In compiling his research, Henplate, were arranged by Helen ry has consulted college records Maust and her committee. Entertainment included a piano and records of the board of eduduet by Mary Ellen Oestmann cation of state normal schools. He and Carol Baker, a five-member has also gone through old college catalogs, annuals, Pedagogians skit, and "sick" songs. and Peru Pointers. He plans to study research papers and books which deal with certain periods of the school history and eventuAchievement tests were given ally to visit the State Historical to 42 summer school students Society. Any person knowing of literaJune 27, in the campus school. ture or old pictures that would be These tests are prerequisite to of aid to this project is asked to entrance into the teacher curriculum and to obtaining a new contact Bob Henry.

Teacher Curriculum Tests Given

teaching certificate. The tests cover three areas, reading, math and language and take from three to four hours for

completion. To pass them, students must achieve at least a 10th grade level.

The community recreation class went on a tour of Omaha playgrounds Wednesday, June 28. The 22 students and instructor, Mr. Jerry Stemper, talked to Bob Ackerman, superintendent of Omaha playgrounds. Ackerman then accompanied the class in the park recreation bus to 15 playgrounds in Omaha. Stemper reports that they saw all kinds of school yards, one of the most interesting being the playmobiles. These are trucks loaded with p 1 a y equipment which serves as traveling playgrounds. The purpose of the community recreation class is to learn t h e principles of recreation and the operation of a summer recreation program.

Piano Arrangements By Prof. Benford Published Two piano arrangements by Robert T. Benford, associate professor of piano ·and organ at Peru State Teachers C'ollege, have been published by Schirmer, Inc., New York City. The arrangements for one piano with six hands· are of Henri Noel's "Waltz" and "March." A member of the Peru State faculty for 31 years, Mr. Benford has recently published solo piano (Continued on page two)

t.

Three $100 one~Y,ear scholarships from alumni gifts, to Mrs. Gladys Ackley, junior, Nehawka; Judy Dose, freshman, Underwood, Iowa; J",anice Jones, freshman, Neta~lrn, Kans. Miss Jones is a 1961 graduate of Wetmore (Kans.) High School. Two scholarships provided by Morton House Kitchens, Inc., Nebraska City, for the study of home eonomics, a $54() three-year grant to Catherine Banks, sophomor .;, Stella, and a $300 two-year scholarship to Linda Stephens, freshman, Peru. One $125 one-year A. V. Larson scholarship for the study of industrial arts, to Edwin Loontjer, freshman, Deshler. The scholarship is named for the former head of the practical arts division and professor emeritus of ind us trial arts. Two $100 one-semester scholarships provided by Mrs. R. W. Endres, Seattle, Wash., for male students planning careers in teaching, to Duane M. Elliott, sophomore, Verdon, and Raymond Ogle, sophomore, Dawson. Mrs. Endres is the former Millie Smalley, class of 1913. One $100 one-year Victor H. Jindra scholarship for the study of music, to Barbara Vanderford, freshman, Auburn. The scholarship fund was estabished by friends of the retiring veteran music faculty member. One $100i one-year Women's Physical Education scholarship to Karen Cahow, a 1961 graduate of Omaha Benson High School.

Library Purchases Califone A Califone, a record player with eight station listening earphones has been purchased by the library. Records now available include: foreign languages, juvenile and adult literature, poetry, drama, education and history. The facility will be in operation beg,inning this fall. It is hoped that the Califone will be used in classroom work. The machine is being demonstrated to administrators and division heads this summer. According to Mr. Langham, it has met with widespread approval. Participation in the selection of mateDial in the various subject areas has been good.


WAY BACK WHEN ••• By Hanford Miller Jr. The 193(} Pedagogians give a clear picture of student life. At this time the · students found much of their recreation in Peru. Plays were a popular form of entertainment. The Crystal Theater downtown also entertained students with "all-talking" movies. On April 18, 193(}, a special silent movie was seen by all students: "'Then and Now,' a movie featuring members of the class of 1930, was g·iven in convocation. It consisted of pictures of the senior class as they were at less than five years of age. Later these pictures were associated with recent photographs." Then, as now, athletics were a prime source of entertainment. From the October 7 Pedagogian we learned ·the greatest improvement in our outdoor sports was the installation of flood lights at Peru's athletic bowl. At .that time this undoubtedly gave Peru one of the best lighted fields in this section of the country. Every fall, freshman initiation is looked forward to-except by the freshmen. Here is how it was thirty years ago: "On September 23, 193(}, the freshman boys were initiated into college life. First, they were told to bend over and grab their ankles, to receive the paddle. Then a thirty-minute program was put on consisting of speeches, dances, love-making, song, and other stunts. As a reward for their tolerance, the freshman boys were allowed to walk the girls back from downtown, where the initiation ended." From the way older people talk, one might think initiations were rougher back then, but just try to get a modern veteran of Delzell life to believe this! A more educational form of entertainment was had here on May 9 and 1(}, 1930: "The Nebraska Academy of Sciences was held at Peru State Teachers College. There w er e special section programs in botany, zoology, chemistry, physics, earth science, mathematics, social science, and geography. "Talkie" films were also shown on these various subjects." On April 1, 193(}, the Pedagogian mentioned the latest improvements in our auto mechanic facilities: "The college's auto mechanics department has acquired new equipment among which a Wright aeroplane engine was included. They plan to study and exhibit the engine."

The typing class of 1930 w a s also to have approached the ultimate in the use of their typewriters. Sixty words per minute without errors was the most that could be expected of anyone. The closest any student came to this was a correct 58 words per minute. Even th,,ough these students were working toward national awards, their .typing seems only average when compared to the 80-100 word rates that are now common.

Survival Preparedness The fifth course in survival preparedness is being held on the Peru State Teachers College campus. This course deals with survival in any natural disaster. It also includes how to handle biological contamination, chemical warfare and nuclear warfare-the three major types of enemy strategy. Twenty-one students have enrolled in this civil defense course. Class meets at 7 p.m. and will run for six Thursdays, two hours each evening. Approximately 15(} students have received certificates for successful completion of the course since its inauguration last winter.

30-Year Hobby Displayed Salt and pepper shakers collected during a 30-year period by Mrs. F. H. Larson were featured in the library display case during the past two weeks. The 73 sets have been obtained in England, Italy, Japan, Mexico and in 14 states. Mrs. Larson started her hobby to collect souvenirs of places she had visited and where she l}ad lived. The collection is not now limited to Mrs. Larson's travels, however, because friends and relatives have contributed sets from around the world. Her daughter, Fran, supplied the set from Alaska, and a nephew in military service sent Mrs. Larson her favorite pair-peasant figurines from Japan. The difficulty of moving the collection caused Mrs. Larson to discontinue her hobby for a time, but "People kept sending them so I became interested again," she said. Mrs. Larson is w o n d er i n g where new additions to her collection will go, because as her hobby grows, display space in her home vanis·hes. PIANO ARRANGEMENTS BY PROF. BENFORD PUBLISHED (Continued from page one) numbers for grades 1-3 including "Explorer 88,'' "Flying Saucer," "Mischievous Pi x i e , " a n d "Marching Pixies,'' by Pro Arts, New York.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of ihe Campus of a Thousand Oaks July 11, 1961 PEDAGOGIAN STAFF PERSONNEL FOR SUMMER PAPER Julie Mayer _____________________________________ Co-editor Sandy Craig -------------------------------------Co-editor Julie Mayer ___________________________________ Copy Editor Sandy Craig ________________________________ Layout Editor Dolores Spilker _________________________ Business Manager Julie Mayer ____________________________________ Columnist Cathy Ideus ------------------------------------Columnist Hanford Miller, Jr. _____________________________ Columnist Mary Anna Gnade ------------------------------Columnist Rex Filmer --------------------------------------Reporter Grace Briley -------------------------------------Reporter Sandy Stephens ----------------------------------Reporte"r Karen Mcintire ----------------------------------Reporter Sandy Pearson __________________________________ Reporter Bob Penkava -----------------------------------Reporter Richard Holmes ----------------------------------Sponsor

WHISPERS FROM MORGAN By Julie Mayer "Only four more weeks of school!" is frequently being heard in Morgan Hall this week. No one seems ready to go back to books and classes after the long 4th of July week-e_~d. Morgan Hall.was deserted ov· er the 4th except for Elaine Current, Stockville, who was the only student to spend the whole vacation in the dorm. Workmen, however, were busy over the week-end. The front walk between Morgan Hall and the Student Center is nearly completed. Everyone agrees that it's a welcome change from the boards that served as walks when summer school began. Third floor has been painted and repaired and now workmen are moving down to second. All the rooms in the dorm will be checked for needed' repairs and paint jobs. Strange and familiar faces have been seen in the dorm the past few weeks as Morgan Hall played host to the following visitors: Lynn Bailey, Carolyn Parli, Linda Goodin, Sandy Stephens, Joyce Hall, Mary Epler, Betty Plankinton, Bertha Manche, Jean Ast, Grace Horner, Bev O'Hara, Dottie Fink, Edna Maystrick Fitch and Dorothy.. Maystrick. Hazel Stevens was visited.. by her son Bob last week. Mr. Stevens teaches music in Chicago and spoke to the psychology of exception children class. Mrs . Stevens was excused from classes July 5 to attend her son's voice recital in Omaha. Clara Kelly was absent fr om the dorm last week attending the American Home Economics Association convention in Cleveland, Ohio. Clara looked at exhibits and teaching aids, saw the Indians play the Washington Senators and brought home shopping bags full of souvenirs. Birthday parties were held for Rita Grandgenett and Sandy Stephens. Sandy Pearson, Judy Wolf, Rose Clancy, Judy French, Karen Conrad, Connie Dietl, Barbare Philpot and Judy Wils·on helped them celebrate. Mary Lou Welch was married Sunday, July 2 to Loyd Hawley. Their home is in Plattsmouth. Best wishes, Mary Lou! Preparations are being made for the senior tea which will be held July 19. Thirteen coµimittees are organized to make this event a success. Skit night in the dorm was held July 6. Seven skits were performed which provided an evening's relief from studying and term papers.

AProblem in Logic Have you tested your ability to think logically lately? Try this brain twister. It was used this summer in modern mathematics -Math 42(}. Supply a conclusion to the following argument, making it valid. "If he goes to a party, he does not fail to brush his hair. To look .fascinating it is necessary to be tidy. If he is an opium eater, then he has no self-command. If he brushes his hair, he looks fascinating. He wears white kid gloves only if he goes to a party. Having no self-command is sufficient to make one look untidy. Therefore . . . " (Adapted from Lewis Carroll) Look for the answer in the next issue of the Pedagogian.

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Band and Chorus to Present Convo The Peru State college and campus school summer band, under the direction of Gilbert E. Wilson, and the college women's chorus and .men's quartet, under the direction of Edward Camealy, will present the program for the Wednesday, July 19, convocation. The summer band personnel consists of summer music students and members of last year's campus school band. The band program will consist of the march, "Here Comes the Band," by George H. Willcocks, followed by the popular RodgersHammerstein s e 1 e c t i o n "The Sound of Music," arranged for

Lincoln Firm Operates Bobcat Book Store !(

Standing around :the piano in. the Student Center are, from left to right, Alice Seyfer, Robert Leech. lren Dissmeyer, Joyce Faubion, Myrna Oestmann and Louise Thielhorn. They are enrolled in fhe ~cial program for high school students here at Peru State. ~

ix High School

la; Myrna Oestmann, Johnson; Alice Seyfer, Nebraska City; and Louise Thielhorn, Dunbar.

ludents Enrolled i Special Program

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Of the eight students who took e classification examinations y 6, for the Peru State excepnal high school student prom, six are now attendng sumr session here. \dmitted to the program are dents who are recommended their superintendent or princiand who successfully comte the examinations. nder the program the students " carry nine hours of college k made up of their interest, ir high school record, and the ults of the classification examtions. 1nly after high school graduao. will the college credit earned applied toward a college curulum at Peru State or transed to another college. Those olled are Karen Dissmeyer, ilmesville; Joyce Faubion, Bea~ Crossing; Robert Leech, Stel-

Master's Candidates Take Exams Comprehensive exams for master's degrees were held July 6. These exams consist of two parts. The "core" exam covers courses required of everyone for a master's degree. These courses are philosophy of education, advanced psychology and elements of research. The "field" exam covers the students' majors. These tests take from six to seven hours for completion. Those who took the exams are the following: ·James Bennett, Rose Bernard, Ruby Eschen, Marie Gerdes, Francis Harris, Charles Benton Kuck, Roy Laue, Stanley Longfellow, William Maness, Ella Penny, Harley Rector, Wiley Remmers, Dorothy Rieke, Kenneth Sand, Kenneth Sipes, Mary Ruth Wilson.

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South Dakotan Comes South For Summer Dr. Frank W. Jobes, visiting science professor, has been beardless ever since the day he left Yankton, South Dakota for Peru State to teach biology and genetics this summer session. The occasion for the beard, which Dr. Jobes was sporting on his first visit to Peru in April, was the state centennial celebration of our/ northern neighbor. Dr, Jobes enjoys the spirit of the midwest. "I'm a mid-westerner by birth, tradition, and inclination," he states. Dr. Jobe~, who enjoys teaching very much, is especially fond of lab sessions. The A.B. and M.A. degrees were earned by Dr. Jobes at Kansas State University. His Ph.D. requirements were completed at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Previous to his present position as a faculty member of Yankton College in South Dakota, Dr. Jobes spent nineteen years doing research for the United States Fish and Wild Life Service along the Great lakes. It was here he wrote his doctoral dissertation on the "Age Group and Production of the Yellow Perch in Lake Erie,'' which has since been published by the government. Dr. Jobes was instrumental in collecting the early data on the distribution of the sea lamprey when this dreaded parasite first became a threat to other fish, particularly the trnut, and commercial fishing in the Great lakes. I~ connection with this problem, which remains a source of concern today, Dr. Jobes worked with a Canadian scientist on a cooperative investigation into Canada. The Jobes family also spent some time on the · west coast. There Dr. Jobes worked out of Seattle, Washington, making physical surveys of the tributaries of the Columbia river to relocate the salmon runs that we re blocked by the Cooley Dam. Dr. and Mrs. Jobes and daughter Frances, 15, are living in the home of the John Christ family this summer. They will return to their home in Yankton in August.

Member F.D.I.C. INVITES YOUR BUSINESS CARROLL LEWIS,

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The Nebraska Book company, Lincoln, is now conducting the operation of the campus b o o k store. On May 15, Peru State joined the other, state colleges of Chadron, Kearney and Wayne in accepting the services of.this company, which also operates an establishment for the University of Nebraska. The Lincoln firm has leased space in the new student union and is currently utilizing sh elving and furniture owned by P.S.T.C. At the end of the summer session, the firm will move into its own furnishings. These will include more shelves and display cases than are now available, according to Mrs. Harold Boraas, book store manager. Mrs. Boraas believes that the new arrangement will result in a "more functional" facility. "The store should always have new material,'' she stated, and then explained, "The volume in which the Nebraska Book company deals will enable it to constantly supply Peru students with a number of items which were not available in the past." Some of these items are being offered to Peru students this summer. Material now in stock includes plastic study guides, paperback books and various stationery supplies. Book store hours are: Monday, Wednesday and Friday-9-11 a.m.; Tuesday and Thursday-13 p.m.

Peru Represented at Cleveland Convention Two Peru State faculty members and four students attended the 52nd American Home Economics Association convention in Cleveland, June 25 th r o ugh June 30. Mrs. Louise Kregel was the Nebraska American Home Economics Association official delegate. Trave1ing with her by car to Cleveland were Mary Jarvis, state vice-president of the college home economics clubs and state

band by Robert R. Bennett. The closing selection will be "Tango for Band,'' by Glenn Osser. The women's chorus will present "Giannina Mia" from the opera "Firefly,'' by Friml, "At Times My Thoughts Come Drifting,'' by Brahms, and "Around the World" (from "Around the World in Eighty Days") by Young. The closing selection will be "A Paraphrase on a Bach Chorale." This last number is arranged by Mr. Camealy. The men's quartet will close the program with two arrangements: "You Tell Me Your Dream,'' by Daniels, and "The Whiffenpoof Song," by Galloway. representative to the convention, and Karen Mcintire, Peru college club voting delegate. Clara Kelly, Peru college club president, and Charlotte Wheeler also accompanied Mrs. Kregel. Mrs. Ina Sproul, associate professor of home economics, went by plane to the convention. ·On the way to the convention, Mrs. Kregel and her group made several stops at various college campuses. They visited Simpson College at Indianola, Illinois, and Notre Dame at South.Bend, Indiana. Other Ohio stops were at the home of President Rutherford Hayes in Bowling Green and at Lake Erie in Huron. Mrs. Kregel~erved as the Nebraska chairmaif for the Consumer Interest committee on June 25. Included on the convention program were various meetings, a college club mixer and miles of exhibits. Before leaving for home, th e group toured the Bobby Brooks clothing factory. They arrived in Peru July 1.

Examinations Will Be Given Oral examinations for master's degree candidates will be given between July 10 and 21. The 16 students who will be taking these tests are James Bennett, Pawnee City, public school administration; Rose Bernard, R-2, Auburn, elementary-supervision; Ruby Eschen, Nebraska City, elementary education; Marie Gerdes, Auburn, elementary education; Francis Harris, Auburn, secondary education-history. C. Benton Kuck, Hamburg, Iowa, e 1 em en tar y education; Stanley Longfellow, Peru, secondary education-biology; William Maness, Coin, Iowa, public school administration-elementary; E 11 a Penny, Waterville, Kansas, public s c h o o 1 administration-elementary; Harley Rector, Weeping Water, secondary education; Wiley Remmers, Auburn, public school administration. Dorothy Rieke, Auburn, secondary education-English; Kenneth Sand, Barneston, public school administration; Kenneth Sipes, Peru, public school administration; Mary Ruth Wilson, Peru, secondary education-English.

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LITTLE MAN ON CAMPUS

Twin Sisters Have Much in Common Even after seven summer sessions, students and professors still have a hard time knowing who's who. Mrs. Constance McKinney Vanderford of Peru and Mrs. Lucille McKinney Gilliland of Auburn are twin sisters. Originally from Nora, the sisters said it was nothing new for people to be confused as to their identities. They said that their grandchildren and children are sometimes baffled. E~en their own father wasn't always sure. Not only do the sisters 1o o k alike, but their experiences also have been similar. Their grade . point averages were less than one tenth of a point apart when they graduated from high school. Both entered Peru State in the summer of 1922 with a major in elementary education. That fall, they taught in rural schools i.n Nuckolls county. After two years there, they accepted positions in Keith county. Their engagements to be married did not separate the twins. Constance and Lucille had a double wedding and a double honeymoon.

Campus School Chatter By Mary Anna Gnade Summer school. may just be falling into place for those attending college classes, but for the grade schoolers (observation material) the week before th e 4th was a series of endings.

This is where Miss Grush, Dr. Kite, Dr. May, Miss Ashley, and Dr. Blanton hold forth teaching teachers to be better teachers.

58 Students Tested

Fifty-eight students of sophomore standing or above took the English proficiency tests June 22 Mr. Sheely's 5th and 6th gradfrom 2:30 until 4:30 in the Stuers did have a field trip to visit the planetarium at Morrill Hall dent Center. This is the first time these tests have been offered durin Lincoln. No education (child or adult) is complete if it has not in- ing the summer session. Of the 58 who took the test, 46 cluded a field trip. Of course, passed, which is 79% of I the without proper planning and group. A comparison of the .perguidance, a field trip can be pretcentage passing these tests given ty "blah," but for our campus school field trippers can't be the two previous regular sessions equalled (I could make so m e shows 85% for the 196G-61 year comment on choice of lunch loca- and 75% for the year 1959-60. The test consists of writing a tion ... ) theme from 3(}0 to 400 words in Yes, indeed, confirmed field trip- length on any one of 15 or more per that I am, I joined Mr. Eddy's topics given. This theme must be observers and Mr. Sheely's well- acceptable in four areas: content, behaved pupils and once again expression, organization and metoured the Capitol after a fascin- chanics. ating visit to the stars. This field Each paper is graded by at least trip also gave the young'ns an- two professors. If a paper is other practice session at letter scored passing by one and failing writing to thank drivers, guides, by the other, a third professor is etc. called upon to make the final decision. No name is written on any When Miss Clarke took her 3rd paper; a number corresponding to and 4th graders to Brownville, the student's name is written on · parent Stemper not only drove a the test paper. carload but took movies of the The purpose of these tests is to trip. What more fitting way to assure that the students have an end a study of local history than ability to communicate effectiveto watch yourself visiting histori- ly in writing before they begin cal 1andmarks. Then Miss their careers. Clarke's room joined Mr. Sheely's Those who :fiail the English proroom and witnessed the Pet Pa-' ficiency test are required to pass rade and Fair in Miss Straw's English 305 before they are gradroom. uated. Each 1st and 2nd gmder had charge of a pet in the parade. Much of this project was through the courtesy of a dog food company and an insurance company animal care program. Everyone had a ball-SRO audience, apprehensive caretakers, pets from the littlest fish to Wininger's asthmatic bulldog. But now all the pets have gone home, the four teachers are already busily engaged in other summer activities, and the campus schoolers have w h i r 1 e d through a busy Fourth with two months yet to fill with camps, trips, swimming, reading, j us t waitin' for school to start again (no doubt!). If that involved sentence leads you to believe th e campus school is an empty building with memories locked inside until September, take a quick look. It is well inhabited by a more serious minded breed busily engaged in gaining knowledge.

One difference between Constance and Lucille is)n their families. Mrs. Vanderford has three children; Mrs. Gilliland has four. But they all followed their mothers' footsteps to Peru State. Dale Vanderford, who teaches at Elmwood, received his bachelors degree from Peru in 1952. Dean and Anita Vanderford received two year degrees in 1954 and 1955 respectively. Gale Gilliland received her four year degree in 1953 from P.S.T.C. Also receiving a four year degree was Keth in 1956. He teaches in Ralston. Davida of Silver Creek and Norma of Syracuse received two year degrees in 1951 and 1955. Another slight difference is in their years of teaching. Mrs. Vanderford has taught for five years at Pleasant Ridge school in Nemaha county. After four years in Richardson county, Mrs. Gilliland will teach at Nehawka next fall.

Ker ,

The plans for the future for the sisters are alike-degrees fr o m Peru State.

Campus School Holds Pet Fair Tuesday, June 27, was a proud day for first and seconP. grade children in summer school at the Peru. State Campus School. Under the direction of Supervisor Mrs. Geraldine Straw, the young summer schoolers presented a Pet Fair in the Campus School Auditorium. The show was in conjunction with a study which correlated the care of pets with the care of children. With this in mind, the animal lovers learned that both children and pets need affection, sunshine, exercise, rest, good food, and water. For their efforts, each child received an award ribbon. In addition to the ribbon awards, special awards were given for the "sleepiest dog,'' "trickiest dog, ahd the most attractive cages. Judges for the fair were Dr. James May, Dr. Milburn manton, Mr. B. A. Eddy, and Mr. Don

PERU, NEBRASKA Phone TR 2-2701

While designed primarily to· ~ peal to high school students, exhibit had a broad interest adults.

Stranger-"You had a p!~:· heifer here last week, Mr. Jo Mind telling me how much s worth?" .· Mr. Jones-"Well, it all d1 pends; are you the new tax col lector, or has she been killed b an auto?"

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a book exhibit at the library which began June 28. Books were displayed in the northeast and northwest part of the main reading room. Arrangements for the exhibit were made by Mr. Langham, head librarian, from Books on Exhibit, a national exhibiting service. "Strictly promotional, the service neither accepts nor fills or-

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Nebraska's Oldest College

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . .

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 56

Number 19

·. tudents to Attend SEA Conference

Major Library Changes Are Planned Sixty-eight To Receive Degrees At Commencement

Peru Staters Sandy Craig, Jay uVal, Mary Ann Graham and m lie Mayer will attend the 10th ual NSEA leadership conferee at Chadron, August 6 rough 9. The conference is held Camp Norweska in Chadron · tate Park. Jay and Sandy will lttend the conference as official ----felegates. The student group at~nds the NSEA meetings and acpn vities . and also holds private Jon . eetmgs.

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. shei This year's conference theme "Professional Challenges of !he Sixties." Conference objec1 ~ves are: "Let us become aware c~f the challenges of the '60's; let .ed bls study them with all our ener'ies; let us understand their im. act completely; let us accept em without reservation; and t us resolve them with deterination." By doing this, "new.r and improved teaching techiques, successful legislation, ed.cational superiority and worthy rofessional pride" w i 11 be chieved.

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Betiy Riggenbach-Soprano

udget Announced

"As a result of this, we were ot able to give salary increases as large amounts as I think . ere merited," said Gomon. He fontinued, "We are certainly not ~oing to be able to do the new lhings we had hoped to do, but f.'e will provide the best educaiional program possible w i th hailable moneys."

~ The total operating budget, ex~lusive of such commercial enterprises as the cafeteria, will be ~50 thousand dollars with the ~ddition of 300 thousand from lash funds. Tuition fees are a ~rimary source of these funds.

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. These cash funds help brighten Jhe budget picture a bit, accordlng to Gomon, who said: "We are ~xpecting an increase from these ~ources which may take up some if the slack." The reason for this ~ptimism is an anticipated 10 ~er cent rise in college and camtus high school enrollment. $

f Peru State's budget will be disJributed as follows: $643,761~alaries and wages, $63,800-op~rating expenses, $50,450'-SUp~lies, $20,750-maintenance and jepairs, $63,750'-physical im~ provements and equipment, and 17,489-miscellaneous. W;

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Paul Giles-Baritone

Boston Group Entertains Here

On July 14, the Budget Events committee presented the Boston Lyric theatre to an all-college convocation audience in the auditorium. The members of this musical miniatures group showed b o th fine vocal and dramatk ability. Shown above are Betty Riggenbach, soprano, and Paul Giles, ' Included on the program is a baritone, who appeared with the iscussion on salaries in Nebras- group. In private life they are a by Robert W. McLailll, NEA Mr. and Mrs. Giles, and they are lary consultant, and Delbert E. well known through their many ' elson, NSEA president. Topic of appearances on television and as .ther talks are accreditation, cer- duo concert recitalists. Mr~ Giles 'fication and legislation. Discus- is founder of this theatre group. 'on groups will study: "What Other members of the ensem. ould locals expkt of the NSEA, ble are Geraldine Barretto, so.nd what should NSEA expect of prano, who has appeared in seve locals?" eral operas on television a n d On the entertainment side, the leading roles with two opera oup will make a trip to Fort companies; William Conlon, tenobinson and Sleepy Hollow or, who appeared in Ravel's "Spanish Hour" on TV, and nuanch near Crawford. merous opera productions in the east; Edward Durbeck III, bass•baritone, who recently appeared

,. Nebraska State Teachers Colge, Peru, will receive 550 thound dollars as its share of the tate colleges' tax allocation for ext year. This is a seven per ent increase over last year's alocation but is 21 per .cent short f the 750 thousand requested, ccording to Dr. Neal S. Gomon, eru State's president.

JULY 25, 1961

Nebraska's Best College

Faculty Appointments Appointment of a ddvision head and! two instructional staff members for Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru was announced today by Pres.ident Neal S. Gomon. Dr. C. Vernon Siegner of Fort Collins, Colo., will head the practical arts division; Dr. E. Charles Theno of Circle, Mont., has been named assistant professor of vocal music and orchestra, and Dr. Michel Weiss of Lake Charles, La., will be assistant professor of modern languages. All appointments become . effective September 1, 1961, and are subject to approval by the Board of Education of State N o rm a 1 Schools. Dr. Siegner is presently assistant professor of industrial arts at Colorado State University at Fort Collins. He has been a visiting professor at Central Washington College of Education and Western Washington College. For eight years he was head of the department of industrial arts in one of the senior high schools of Seattle, Wash., and was a supervising teacher for industrial arts majors for the University of Washington. The practical arts di vision head has an A.B. degree f r o m Central Washington College · of Education at Ellenburg, a Master of Science degree from Oregon State College at Corvallis and a Doctor of Education degree with a major in industrial arts education from Colorado State College at Greeley. He is married and· has two daughters, ages 5 and 8. Dr.

as Sir John Flastr.ff in "The Merry Wives of Windsor"; and Miss Phyllis Hill, pianist. The program, ranging fr o m madrigals to musical comedy, was well planned and coordinated. Each phase of the performance was colorful and artistic. The program consisted of choral art songs from the 16th century by the quintet; interpretations of four numbers composed by Brahms for four-hand piano and a quarti;t of voices with Giles doubling at the piano; colorful excerpts from Mozart's "Magic Flute," in whkh Miss Barretto portrayed Papagina; a pi,ano rendition of Chopin's "Waltz in E Flat" by Miss Hill; and familiar songs. in excerpts from "Carousel." Mr. and Mrs. Giles expressed pleasure in performing here. The group is comple.ting a tour of the United States, going to Wyoming from here and w o r k i n g south to the Mexican border.

Near One Hundred In Post Session Enrollment for the two-week post session beginning July 31 is approximately 100. Four ·courses are offered: Children's Literature, taught by Mrs. Maryon Adams; Audio-Visual Materials, taught by Mr. Glen Sheely; Seminar in Elementary Reading, taught by Mr. B. A. Eddy; and Driver Education Workshop, taught by Mr. Dee Jarvis. The three credit hour courses run six days a week, and the two hour courses five days a week. All classes meet frorri 8 a.m. to 12 a.m. each session. Dormitories will be closed during these two weeks; however, the Bob Inn will serve meals. The library will be open only during daylight hours. This is the last year a post ses~, sion will be offered by Peru State Teachers College. Siegner is the author of an industrial arts textbook which is now in its second printing and is used extensively in high schools throughout the country. He has also contributed articles to a number of professional magazines. Dr. Siegner replaces Dr. Owen Harlan, resigned. Dr. Theno has a bachelor of arts degree from Washington State College at Pullman, a Master of Science degree from t h e University of Southern California and a Doctor of Education (Continued on page three)

Seventeen masters degrees in education will be conferred at summer commencement at Nebraska State Teachers College, Peru, July 28, at 6 p.m., according to •Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president. In addition, recipients of 51 bachelors degrees will be honored at the exercises to be held on the main campus quadrangle. Candidate& for degrees will complete requirements at the close of the regular session, July 28, or at the end of the post session, August 12. Speaker for the commencement will be Dr. F. JI. Gorman, Dean of the College of Education at Omaha University . Degree candidates include: Master of Aris in EducaiionFrancis L. Harris, Auburn; Stan~ ley N. Longfellow, Peru; Dorothy M. Rieke, Auburn; Mary Ruth Wilson, Peru. Master of Science in Education-James F. Bennett, Lake View, Iowa; Rose M. Bernard, Auburn; Robert K. Davis, Omaha; Ruby S. Eschen, Nebraska City; Marie F. Gerdes, Auburn; Charles B. Kuck, Morrill, Kans.; Roy F. Laue, Arthur; William J . Maness, Coin, Iowa; Ella B. Penney, Verdon; Harley L. Rector, Weeping Water; R. Wiley Remmers, Auburn; Kenneth W. Sand, Barneston; Kenneth E. Sipes, Osceola. Bachelor of Aris (Liberal Aris) -Betty L. Plankinton, Stella; Wilbur F. Weaver, Beatrice. Bachelor of Music in Education-Marilyn P. Dyke, Griswold, Iowa. Bachelor of Science in Educa· tion-Sara B. Anderson, Peru; Stephen Bates, Pittsfield, Mass.; Mildred B. Brock, Tecumseh; Ronald Callan, McCook; Elaine M. Champ, Wymore; Marilyn M. Clement, Table Rock; Lydia H. Cockerham, Peru; Viola M. Cox, Beatrice; Roger L. Eshelman, Elliott, Iowa; Karen Fankhauser, Humboldt; Elfrieda A. Gawart, Nebraska City; Linda L. Goodin, Humboldt; Inez L. Hahne, Unadilla; Joyce L. Hall, Wetmore, Kans.; Theda Happ, Humboldt; Kathleen P. Heard, Plattsmouth; Geraldine Hedgecock, Robinson, Kansas; Duane R. Hemminger, Wymore; E. Arlene Henderson, Brock; Jerry T. Henning, Peru; Mildred E. Humphrey, Auburn; Eva M. Hunt, Tecumseh; Catherine M. Ideus, Tecumseh; Patrick H. Laha, Centralia, Kans.; Beverly J. Leeper, Nebraska City; Luanne Lindquist, Omaha; Laura Lippold, N. Las Vegas, Ne·· vada; Lillian G. Lyon, Nebraska City; Ethyl C. Manley, Odell; Mabel M. Mendenhall, Morrill, Kans.; Christie L. Meyer, Peru; Florence F. Milne, Endicott; Donald F. Niemann, DeWitt; Gloria Noell, Murray; Lucille L. Oestmmm, Johnson; Jerry G. Partridg~, Louisville; Gordon L. Pilmore, Nebraska City; Ruby V. Sauer, Falls City; Clarence W. Stessman, Omaha; Merna B. Thalmann, Lincoln; Vernon R. Thomsen, Exeter; Loyal Torkelson, Horton, Kans.; Erik H. Torring, Jr., Ruskin; Sherrill A. Torring, Ruskin; Genevieve

In an announcement on July 18, Dr. Neal S. Gomon, Peru State president, revealed that 150 thousand dollars has been allocated for the renovation of and purchase of equipment for the library. The renovation, to be completed by September 1, 1962, will result in the devotion of the entire building, with the exception of the "little theater," to library facilities. The "little theater" is used for drama, English and speech classes and as a meeting place. "The little theater will remain in the library building, although no t necessarily in its present (third floor) location," said Gomon. Present plans call for the art classrooms, currently sharing the third floor with the little theater, to move to the campus school. The northern portion of the top story of that 1building will probably be converted' into art classrooms. While discussing the time table for this work, Gomon said, "We hope to have . architects here within two -to three weeks, have plans submitt:'ed and: call for bids by November 1. Work will begin soon after the first of the year." Tentative plans have already been made to solve the problem of what to do with the library while work on the building progresses. It is anticipated that the "core," or main circulating portion of the collection, will be moved to the old Lewis home, south of the campus. The reference portion may be distributed about the campus by divisions, and periodicals will be moved to the campus school.

Summer Variety Show To Be Given In Convo Emcee Ken Sand will open the Summer Variety show for Peru students July 26, 10:40 a.m. Volene Albert, Sandy Stephens and Judi Wilson have been busy the last few weeks acting as talent scouts to round up acts for the show. They have come up with what promises to be a fine combination of humor ·and talent. Among the musical numbers· which have been planned are two duets: a piano-organ duo by Lois and Phyllis Remmers and a vocal duet by Clarice Tegtmier an d Russell Workman. Beverly Parde and Lois Remmers will each present a vocal solo. A comedy routine by Phil Fahrlander and an original "hat" show by Merna Thalmann and several other Eliza Morgan women will add a little spice to the show. An exhibition of physical skill and daring will be displayed by "Bart" Bartholomew on the trampoline. To round out the show with a bit of a change, little five-year old Janet Wilson and three-year old Pauline Anderson will perform a ballet number.

President's Tea Dr. and Mrs. Neal S. Gomon will honor the members. of the graduating class' with a President's tea. The tea will be in the Student Center lounge, 'Friday afternoon, July 28, from 2-3 p.m. M. Wilhite, Nebraska City; Verlin A. Yates, Randolph, Iowa; Helen L. Young, Horton, Kans.


Logic Problem Answer WHISPERS FROM MORGAN

Below are two equivalent answers to the logic problem printed in the last issue of the Pedagogian, the implication and th e contrapositive:

By Julie Mayer These are busy times in Morgan Hall. Final touches are being added to term papers and reports and a few ambitious students have already started studying for final exams. This is an especially busy time for seniors. They are involved in the senior tea, the president's tea, picking up announcements, ordering caps and gowns, and all the other events leading up to graduation. Those students in the dorm who will graduate th i s summer are the following: Elaine Champ, Rose Clancy, Karen Fankhauser, Luanne Lindquist, Ethel Manley, Ruby Sauer, Merna Thalmann and Helen Young.

If he wears white gloves, then he is'not an opium eater. If he is an opium eater, then he

does not wear white kid gloves.

LIBRARY COLUMN By Cathy Ideus The following books were selected from the library's excellent collection of paperbacks:

The 42nd Parallel. by John Dos Passos, is one of the three novels included in the trilogy U. S. A. The senior tea was held at Mor- It is the story of Mac, an idealist gan Hall July 19 from 2 till 4:30 who fled to Mexico to escape his p.m. Thirteen committees' were shrewish wife; of J. Ward Moreorganized to make this event a house, a poor, ambitious boy who success. The tea was held in hon- married an heiress and became a or of the 51 seniors graduating public-relations power; of Eleanthis summer. Graduates we r e or Stoddard, Morehouse's finicky greeted at the door by hostesses mistress; and of Charley Anc1erand then erved punch and cook- son, awkward and hopeful, a man ies. Entertainment was provided on the loose. The lives of these by Mr. Jindra, Bonnie Vander- people-passionate, self-willed, ford, Mr. Benford, Linda Goodin, bursting with energy-crossed at Clarice Tegtmier, Mary Ellen a time when the United States Neumann and Helen Young. was preparing for war. Their story is an American classic. Playing cards seems to be as popular in the dorm among the The Cabala, by Thornton Wilsummer students as it is during der, is an unusual novel by a the fall ses·sion. The girls in the writer noted: for the unusual. It basement a p a r t m e n t , Karen is a modern story of good a n d Fankhauser, Joan Votroubek, evil, of the last struggles of paVirginia Van Winkle and Kay ganism to survive in the yorld of Parli, hold nightly canasta par- today-seen through the eyes of ties. a young . American of Puritan The miniature golf course in Auburn also seems to attract many Morgan Hall residents. As always the river is a popular place. Picnickers and sun bathers have frequented this area. Sandy Stephens, Sandy Pearson and Rita Grandgenett recently spent an afternoon water skiing. Many girls who lived in Morgan Hall last semester have paid visits to their summer s ch o o 1 friends. These girls include Lee Christen, Jeannine Ehlers, Mary Ann Lewellyn, LaVerna Roos, Darlene Critel, Norma Pugsley, Charlotte Wuster, Virginia Adkins, Betty Painter and Phyllis Bates. Morgan Hall will not be open during post session. Workmen wiH finish painting and repairing the dorm during August. It will then be cleaned in preparation for the 140-plus students who will occupy it during the coming school year.

background living in Rome in the 1920's. Its title came from the name Wilder gave to his group of present-day pagans, talented and wealthy aristocrats, clever esoterics, who have mysterious influences in affairs· of church and state. The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair, contains some of the most harrowing scenes ever written in modern literature-depicting factory life .in Chicago in the first years of the twentieth century. The horror of the slaughter houses, their barbarous working conditions, the crushing poverty, the disease, the depravity, the despair-all are revealed through the eyes of Jurgis Rudkis, young immigrant who has come to the new world to build a home f o r himself, his fiancee, and her family. First published in 1906," The Jungle aroused public indignation and forced a government investigation which led to the passage of the pure food laws.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of fhe Campus of a Thousand Oaks July 25, 1961 PEDAGOGIAN STAFF PERSONNEL FOR SUMMER PAPER Julie Mayer -------------------------------------Co-editor Sandy Craig -------------------------------------Co-editor Julie Mayer -----------------------------------Copy Editor Sandy Craig --------------------------------Layout Editor Dolores Spilker _________________________ Business Manager Julie Mayer ------------------------------------Columnist Cathy !deus ------------------------------------Columnist Hanford Miller, Jr. -----------------------------Columnist Mary Anna Gnade ------------------------------Columnist Rex Filmer --------------------------------------Reporter Grace Briley -------------------------------------Reporter Sandy Stephens ----------------------------------Reporter Karen Mcintire ----------------------------------Reporter Sandy Pearson -----------------------------------Reporter Bob Penkava ------------------------------------Reporter Richard Holmes ----------------------------------Sponsor

WAY BACK WHEN ... By Hanford Miller Jr. The scenery around Peru is taken for granted by many of us. Our landscape has been, and still is, some of the prettiest in th e state. The May 19, 1931, Pedagogian stated that Peru's scenery was recognized by the woman's club federation. "The Nebraska Federation of Women's Clubs recently awarded first, second, and third prizes to three photographs of Peru beauty spots sent in by Mrs. W. R. Pate to represent the Peru Women's Club. When the scenery of one community wins all three prizes in a state-wide contest, that community is, surely justified in feeling that it has notable beauty." The following item from the April 28, 1931, Pedagogian may give the head librarian, Mr. Langham, ideas on how to select his student help: "On Thursday morning at 9 o'clock Miss Branson held the annual library tryouts. The s e tryouts determined whether any member of the present staff had the right to continue to be a member. With several guests to add solemnity and dignity to the occasion, Miss Branson and Miss Peterson a d m i n i s t e r e d the searching and grueling examination." Also for self-improvement, this article from the April 14, 1931, Pedagogian suggests r e a d i n g might be improved by the following: "The character of much that is read today is such that it fails to broaden interests and: to. cultivate systematically those attitudes and habits that characterize good citizens. The parts, of a newspaper read most frequently are cartoons, items relating to sports, personal violence and disaster, and serial stories. Reading should be taught as a friendly guide in solving personal problems, in increasing one's social efficiency or as a source of pleasure." The college s,pirit at Peru was lifted high on October 20, 1927, when a bobcat arrived from Arizona, alive and full of fight. A graduate of 1912 who became superintendent at Safford, Arizona, sent the spitting specimen. Peru was' the first to have a living symbol of their .college spirit. So it was "way back when .. "

Two Five-week Sessions Next Summer Beginning June, 1962 a tenweek session, divided into t w o five-week term6, will be held. A student may 'earn a maximum of twelve hours credit, six hours in each term. The program will be of special interest to teachers. According to Dean Keith Melvin, the main objective in changing the summer session is to make more effective use of the facilities and staff. Of interest to the student is the advantage of being able to take courses in sequence. There is a possibility of classes being scheduled five days a week, with classes one and one-half hours in length. Beginning courses will be available for recent high school graduates entering college. The summer school bulletin may be secured from the registrar. Graduate courses will be offered for purposes of certification or transfer. Detailed information on the graduate program may be obtained by writing the dean of Peru State Teachers College.

Bottled under authority of

The coca·Cola company by Nebraska Cify Coca-Cola Bottling Co.

4-H Camp Begins July 31 From July 31 through Aug. 4 Peru State will once again host a district 4-H camp. Dormitories, recreation facilities, classrooms, and snack bar will be utilized by two groups of campers. The junior group (those under 12 years) will arrive July 31 and depart August 2. Campers 12 and older will arrive August 2 and leave after lunch August 4. Participants will come from five Nebraska counties: Johnson, Nemaha, Otoe, Pawnee and Richardson, and from Atchison and Holt counties in Missouri. Approximately 250 to 300 members and counselors are expected, aocording to Mr. Robert Wilson, Nemaha county ag~nt. As host county agent, Wilson will serve as camp director. The activity program distributed to prospective campers indi-

cates busy days. Between "rll and shine" at 6:30 a.m. an "lights out" at 10:30 p.m., t~ visitors will view films, partic pate in handicraft sessions an enjoy many recreational acti'\'I tie. Besides swimming periodd the college pool, the youngst~ may engage in softball, voll~ ball, archery and dancing. Two special sessions will lJ presented to both junior and sell ior groups. A conservation sei sion will be presented by th, State Conservation, Parks ad Wildlife commission. Anothe! dealing with insect control, wil be presented with the assistan!l of a state entomologist from tij college of agriculture, Universi~ of Nebraska. "Be great in act, as you ha\ll been in thought."-Shakespea~

PERU MARKET Rex Rains Groceries Meats Fruits and Vegetables

Free Delivery Tuesday and Friday Phone TR 2-4351

McINTIRE'S GARAGE and STANDARD SERVICE GASOLINE AND AUTO REPAIR Phone TR 2-2791

Peru, Nebr.


!Kansas Educator Visits as Consultant

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:i Dr. Alex Daughtry, chairman

Fall Preview

Food Service Here Is Large Operation

Alma Ashley and Mr. Harold Many of the Ped's readers may en. Esther Brock prepares apJohnson. Dr. Melvin, dean of the have prepared some large meals proximately 60 to 75 pies eaten college, said the committee feels The 1961-62 school year at Ne- from time to time or wondered· daily by Peru diners. considerable progress has b e en braska State Teachers College, how one could manage to cook Other employees in the cafemade. A new program for ele- P.eru, will open Tuesday, Sept. 5, for a large family, but consider teria are Leota Morris, Blanche mentary educatio11 majors h a s with freshman welcome days. the problems involved in cook- West, Vena Fisher, Bessie Sherbeen developed and is at the Orientation activities for the Pe- ing for more than 300 people! man, Helen Allgood, Ruth Hays point of being presented to the ru State freshmen are scheduled This is the job that faced Mrs. and Edna Patterson. Donna Holpolicies committee. for Wednesday and Thursday, Edna Douglas last fall and win- quist, Helen ·Parker and BarDetails of the program will be with registration for classes Fri- ter, faces her to a lesser degree bara Etter are employed in the this summer, and will confront snack bar. released when and if it is accept- day, September 8. In addition to the regular emUpperclassmen will be on hand her again in September. Mrs. ed. Said Dr. Melvin: "Dr. Daughtry will return to the campus in Thursday, September 7, to regis- Douglas is the director of food ployees, four students are emOctober to assist the committee ter for their semseter c o u r s e services for the college. She and ployed by the food service dewith further evaluation of th e work. Classes will begin Monday, her staff are responsible for feed- partment this· summer. This fall ing students, faculty and visitors will bring about such an increase September 11. program." in student workers that Mrs. The freshmen orientation per- in the new student center. ~ Mrs. Douglas not only superDouglas says, "It's d:ifficult to iod will give the newcomers an of this country for 25 years. The ffaculty Appointments new assistant professor of mod- opportunity to become acquaint- vises food preparation, but she keep track of all of them at { (Continued from page one) ern languages received: his A.B. ed with the college, meet faculty must plan menus at least a week times." ?' The workday for these people members and classmates, and to ahead of time, arrange special ldegree from the University of degree from Luxemburg College, begins at 5:30 a.m. this summer. diet trays for those who require receive information and other foregon. He has been director of his Ph.D. degree in languages The regular session brings some them, cater for special events help from advisors. Special rec!music in the public schools at from the Univernity of Caen, reational and social events, to in- and order proper amounts of relief, however, when the huge !Circle, Mont., the last three years. France, and the Doctor of Juris~ kitchen springs to life at 6 a.m. clude a watermelon feed, mixer foodstuffs. !Prior to that he was instructor of prudence degree in French Law Among other modern convenThe ordering of food supplies dance and a variety show, a r e \instrumental music at Billings, from the Sarbonne, Paris, France. iences, the kitchen has a large reflects Mrs. Douglas' long exalso planned. !Mont., during which time he con- He also studied at Geneva Uniwalk-in cooler for storing meats perience in the food service field. fductedi the City Children's Sym- versity, Switzerland, and the She must order enough to satis- and other perishables, and an ~hony orchestra, the All-City University of Munich, Germany. fy appetites without having a elevator. The latter is used to High School or·chestra and played After coming to the U n i t e d great deal of left-overs. She has raise huge pans and kettles of ~ass viol in the Billings Sym- States, he practice& law in New learned, for instance, that the steaming edibles from the lowerYork for 10 years then turned to phony. He has had several years Mrs. Aileen Graham, visiting students in regular sessions will level kitchen to the cafeteria \1lf music experience in public teaching at the college level. He assistant librarian, arrived on consume about 150· pounds of po- above. !schools and for two yearn was has taught at the University of campus June 30. She will remain tatoes and 135· pounds of one kind The majority of cafeteria dinScranton, Pa., at Bluffton (Ohio) tassistant professor of music eduon campus through post session. ners are on the "food ticket" of meat at one meal. To further College, and most recently at ~ation in the extension departBoth Mr. and Mrs. Graham are compound her problem, two meat plan; that is, all meals are paid McNeese State College in Louisi!ment of Iowa State Teachers Colalumni of Peru State. They re- choices are normally offered. for at registration time. Those 'Iege at Cedar Falls·. Dr. Theno is ana. Dr. Weiss is married. He re- ceived their B.A. degrees in 1948. not using this plan pay very The pecan rolls, pies and cakes (married and has a teen-age places Mr. George Rath, retired. Mrs. Graham majored in English offered in the cafeteria and snack nominal f~ fot meals; 60 cents \P'aughter. He replaces Mr. Darand music which she later taught bar are prepared fresh daily in for breakfast, 75 cents for lunch rell Manring, resigned. If a nation expects to be ignor- at Brock, Auburn and Fairbury. the spotless student center kitch- and 85 cents for dinner. Dr. Michel Weiss is a native of ant and free, in a state of civili- In 1954 she received her B.S. in lLuxemburg, Germany, emigrat- zation, it expects what never library science from the Univerlng to the United States in the was and never will be.-Thomas, sity of Minnesota. Last year Mrs. Graham served [early '30's. He has been a citizen Jefferson. as substitute elementary librariA painting by Leland SherFreshman enrollment for the an in the Wichita, Kansas public schools. She was also a grader of wood, Hiawatha, Kansas, w a s 94th academic year at Nebraska freative writing for several high presented to the Student Center State Teachers College, Peru, is "TRU·FIT" school English classes. by the 1961 senior class. The up approximately 30 per cent In her spare time, Mrs. Gra- painting, "Peace," will hang in over what it was a year ago at ham enjoys sewing for her t w o the Student Center conference this time, according to Mr. F. H. Larson, college registrar. Applilittle girls, Gay, 4 and Dawn, 7 room. weeks. She especially likes cosMr. Sherwood, a 1957 Peru cations for admission have been tume making. State graduate, is a summer can- received not only from Peru's This is Mrs. Graham's sixth didate for an M.A. degree in art immediate service area, but also summer as assistant librarian. from the University of Wyoming. from the states of Colorado, ConShe enjoys returning to the cam- A graduate of Chester high necticut, New Jersey, New York. pus each June. ?aid Mrs. Gra- school, he will begin his fourth Peru State's enrollment has ham: "It is especially pleasing to year as art instructor in the Hia- increased steadily from 275 in riods see the progress that one's alma watha, Kansas public schools this 1951 to over 600 for the 1960-61 mgst mater is making. Peru is certain- fall. fall term. voll ly abreast of the times." Mrs. A number of Sherwood's illusThe diamond ring with Fora very Graham also commented that trations have been used by nathat "one in a million" look Special Girl •••, every summer she looks forward tional and Peru State publica;', . for that one girl in a million. 1 REDFERN to seeing many of her former stu- tions. The cover illustrations of Unconditionally Guaranteed( Clothing Co. dents and old friends who also the 1960-61, 1961-62 Peru State "The Store of Standard return to the campus. >Y general bulletins and the 1961 Brands" After their stay at Peru, the summer bulletin were designed Phone BR 4·3620 Auburn Grahams plan to return to Wich- by him. AUBURN ita where Mr. Graham will teach high school journalism. Mr s . Graham plans to give private piano lessons and continue as an English grader. j;of the division of education at lKansas State College at Emporj~a, was on the campus for consul~tation July 7. He conferred with ~the committee for the study of lthe .program for e 1em en tar y l,teachers. The committee has been in extstence for several years but has koncentrated its efforts this sumtmer session. Members of the comfiittee are: Dr. Keith Melvin, Dr. ~ilburn Blanton, Dr. Lloyd Kite; tDr. Harold Boraas, Dr. James fMay, Dr. Darrell Wininger, Miss

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Music Department Presents Convo The summer band and chorus presented the convocation program Wednesday, July 19. Under the direction of Gilbert E. Wilson, the band played three selections. One was an arrangement of the Rodgers-Hammerstein music from the show, "The Sound of Music." Band members consisted of summer music students, campus school band members a n d other interested individuals. Two selections, "You Tell Me Your Dream" and "The Whiffenpoof Song," were presented by a men's quintet. Director Edward Camealy sang second tenor. Other quintet members were: Russell Workman, first tenor; Bill Galbraith, second tenor; Phil Fahrlander, baritone; Roger Russell, bass. The womens chorus sang four numbers. "Giannia Mia," an Italian love song, was the last number. Mr. Camealy said the song attempted to create a mood of floating down a canal in Venice.

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HMr. Scouting" to Retire After 43 years as scoutmaster, 40 of them in Peru, Ansel B. Clayburn will step down September 1. Mr. Clayburn's 43 years of scout leadership undoubtedly places him at the top in years of service to Nebraska scouting. Perhaps it would be hard to find anyone in the United States who has devoted more years as a scoutmaster than Mr. Clayburn. Clayburn's scouting career started in Lincoln in 1919, and in 1922 he moved! to Peru where he has served since that time. Although he could continue his scouting for about another year, Mr. Clayburn s t at e d , "Scouting requires a great deal of outdoor activity and deserves the leadership of a younger man." This statement comes from a man who has "tried to average at least one hike a month" during his 43year tenure. Mv. Clayburn feels that by retiring in September he can give nearly a year's service helping his successor learn t h e "ropes." During his years of leadership, Mr. Clayburn has had approximately 15 Eagle scouts in his troop. The Eagle award is scouting's highest honor. Naturally, Clayburn takes pride in t h e achievements of his boys. Some have become· doctors; others, writers. One has done feature writing for Coronet magazine. As a dedicated scoutmaster, he

has received scouting's highest awards. In 1940, Mr. Clayburn was presented the Silver Beaver award by the National Council of the Boy Scouts of America. This award is' for distinguished service to boyhood. In 1958, "Mr. Scouting," received the Pop Warner Distinguished ·Achievement award of the Pop Warner Conference for Distinguished Service to Youth. That same year, the Peru Kiwanis Club recognized his work by providing a special .college scholarship for an Eagle scout from the Peru troop. A native of Monroe, Nebr., Mr. Clayburn holds bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of Nebraska and has had additional study at the University of Nebraska and the University of Chicago. He has been a director of the Nebraska chapter of the National Council of Geography Teachers, has served one term on Peru's city council, and has been president of the Peru Kiwanis club. Mr. and Mrs. Clayburn are parents of three married childrenMrs. J. B. Johnson, San Bruno, Calif.; Ansel Clayburn, Stockton, Calif.; and Gerald Clayburn, Brentwood, Calif.-all graduates of Peru State and teachers. Both boys were scouts and Ansel, Jr., received the Eagle award.

Faculty Pursues Varied Hobbies "I have many and varied interests and have pursued quite a number of these to a satisfying 'degree, going on to other ideas intermittently." This statement of Mr. Silas Summers well expressed the "hobby history" of many instructors. The majority of the faculty members choose the out-of-doors for their few leisure hours. Forty per cent of the present faculty list fishing as a favorite pastime. Many enjoy all types of outdoor sports as spectators. However, it is not unusual to find a math or psychology professor participating in active outdoor games. Two instructors admit to being avid golfers. Many more enjoy th e game occasionally. Several teachers even find enough energy to play tennis. Hunting and camping are pastimes of a limited few, while gardening and woodworking are loves of a great number. Of our activity minded, Max Langham, who also e n j o y s leather craft, has been flying a number of years and appears to be the sole faculty pilot. Mr. Albert Brady's "parade of skeletons"-models in miniature -consists of an assortment of mammals which Mr. Brady enjoys constructing.

tor of Psychology who writes piano arrangements is more unusual. Edward Camealy, who a 1s o writes orchestrations, gives an example of his· work as a ·~oet in the next issue of the Sigma Tau Delta magazine. Still life scenes of Dr. John Christ are on display in his home. Dr. Harold B o r a as has a fine piano arrangement on record. Perhaps the least surprising of collections are the librarian's first edition book collection_:including an ancient Horn Book, a violin collection belonging to Mr. Victor Jindra, and an engine collection which Mr. Dee Jarvis incorporates into his classroom teaching. Other collections of interest include a pipe collection featuring hand-carved pipes from many countries owned by Mr. Robert Moore and an unusual book collection of humorous writings gathered by Mr. Richard Holmes, who also collects recordings of contemporary jazz.

Surprisingli enough, reading wasn't mentioned among these varied hobbies. Professors are not so different from students in this one aspect. Perhaps this one particular pastime comes under Photography fascinates several ,the heading of duty?? faculty members. Mr. Brady is completing a series· of movie reels on reptile life, and plans to use these in coordination with classroom lectures. Another photographer, whose chief hobby exThe State Normal board has tends to the professional level, is Mr. James Levitt. "Footsteps in granted permission to the Peru Obsidian," his book of photo- .State campus school fo buy a graphs of Yellowstone national school bus, not to exceed $6,500 park, was published a number in cost. With the unit, Peru hopes of yearsi ago. He has also contributed photos to the Pedagogian, the Peruvian, and! special service bulletins.

California Alumni to Meet The fourth annual summer luncheon meeting of the Northern California chapter of the Peru Alumni Association, will be held Saturday, July 29, at Jacky Jensen's "Bow and Bell," Jack London Square, First and Broad.way, Oakland, Calif. Approximately 200 alumni and former students of Nebraska State reside in the Northern California area. Mr. Donald K. Carlile, Executive Secretary of the Peru Alumni Associ:aiion, will keynote the ·1uncheon with a report on progress at Peru State. Mrs. Wanda Nelson Conklin, secretary-treasurer of the Northern California Alumni Association, is accepting reservations for the Peruvian get-together. Mrs. Conklin lives at 3943 Burkhalter Ave., Oakland 5, Calif. Reservations must be in by Wednesday, July 25. The 1960· summer luncheon attracted 51 alumni, former students, and friends of the college. Other officers of the chapter include: Ansel E. Clayburn, Stockton, Calif., president; Genevieve McFadden McNally, Hayward, Calif., first vice-president; Anna C. Hansing Webb, Alameda, second vice-president. to enroll some 20 additional high school students from Brownville. A majority of the anticipated students attended Nemaha high school last term, with a few at Auburn. Dr. Neal S. Gomon, Peru State president, reported that free high school tuition from that number of additional students would provide about $10,800 tax income, which would allow an improved curriculum. Peru Prep is staffed to handle a student body of 100 in the 9th through 12th grades. Next year's enrollment, including the Brownville students, has been estimated at 73. Transportation charges. to Peru will be paid by parents of the children. Dr. Gomon estimated these charges would pay for the bus.

It is not surprising to find an

English professor interested in publication. Mr. Summers ha s had articles published and was recently chosen for Who's Who in American Education for work in this field. However, to find a musician who writes poetry, a science professor who paints mountain scenes in oil, or a Doc-

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New Guinea curios· belonging to Mrs. Herbert J. Schauer of Wymore, who is a student on our campus this summer, are now on display in the showcase east of the library. The curios were collected from natives near Finchhafen in the late 1920's and early 1930's by Mrs. Schauer's father, Dr. F. E. Pietz, first American missionary in that area. Each of these items was made with stone age tools. Most of the decorative pieces• were worn by native men, who removed these items and proudly gave them to Dr. Pietz or his family. The grass skirts on display, worn by both sexes, were tied with native string and colored with a primitive dye. The blanket or "rampi" w a s stone pounded from a banana tree trunk. The samples of net contain strings made from grass which was rubbed and stretched to elasticity. The neck piece, fur from an average size tree kangaroo first tanned by the natives, was trimmed and retanned in America. It is the only item American treated. Feathers of the large flightless Caswary bird were tied with native string to form a headdress. The long brown bird of paradise feathers were used as a decoration for headdresses. Natives drew through the entire length of the bamboo pipe, which held cigars made f r o m strong native tobacco. The war adz, with the b i r d skeleton charms, held interchangeable stone blades. These blades were worn down, not chipped out as Indian arrowheads were. The model of a clay pot is authentic even to the design. Pot-

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Profile for Peru State College Library

1960-1961 Peru Pedagogian - issues 1-19  

1960-1961 newspaper issues 1-19 for Peru State College, Peru, Nebraska

1960-1961 Peru Pedagogian - issues 1-19  

1960-1961 newspaper issues 1-19 for Peru State College, Peru, Nebraska

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