Page 1

Peru's

Biggest Year

The Voice of the Campus of aThousand Oaks ...

Peru's

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 55

Number I

SEPTEMBER 28, 1959

561 Enrolled Now On Full Time, Basis

I

Performers Sing ~~Nothin' Like A Dame" At 1959 Variety Show As Larry Carre Beats Ivories Ori Thursday evening, Sept. 17, the curtain rolled up once again on Peru's annual Variety Show. The program consi~ed of combined faculty, upperclassmen. and freshman talent, and was produced by Prof. J. D. Levitt. With the addition of scenes fro m Broadway spectaculars, such as "Oklahoma" and "South Pacific," the 75 member cast gave the show a new twist. The other performances varied from a humorous reading to a glimpse of the unconventional Be at n i k World. The large array of talent ineluded: "Music For Kicks," Ruth Carmichael,

Linda N y g a a rd, / Carre, Alan Kreglo, John Parli,

Sandra, Pearson,

Judy

Bliven,

Edna McGovern, Barbara Wellensiek.

lyn Sudik, Steve Parker,

Tom

Higgins, Hank Hendricks,

Bob

Kaiser.

"Manhattan Serenade," Steve Parker; A Combo, Music Department; "Many A New Day" (Oklahoma), Barbara Hill, Lois Fritz, Mardelle Miller, Inga Faubion, Sandy Hemphill, Carol Ellenberger. Individual acts were announced by Rae Mae Henry, Pam Yost, Barbara Hill, Lois Fritz, Mardelle Miller, Inga Faubion, Carol Ellenberger, and Sandy Hemphill displayed large records depicting the performances. Working behind the tormenters were: Allen Nelson (in charge of art work); Jim Christ (in charge of lighting effects); John Parli (curtain); Lola Triska, 'Joan Votroubek, Joan Riggle, Norma Pugsley (in charge of costuming); Joni Wesolowski and Rose Clancy (student directors); Mr. J. D. Levitt (sponsor).

Miss Ruth Crone Joins Peru Faculty Orientation For Miss Ruth Crone, assistant partment of Commerce and was Freshman Students professor of literature, received reports editor for the New York

Bell Ringer Presents Convo

Music Activities On the Peru Campus

On September 14, the Student Senate sponsored a watermelon feed following the football scrimmage. The Student Senate has been busy planning · H o m e c o m i n g events and freshmen initiation

Tumbling, Don Clark; "The Four Roses," A Quartet, Ray Meister( Clark Maffitt, A 1 an Kreglo, Richard Sietsma. A Humorous Reading, John Biere. Keep Talking Panel, Mr. Moore, Miss Crone, Mr. Holmes, Miss Rowoldt. · "Like Dreamsville," Ernie Ridgeway, Janie Kunkel, Tom Higgins, Ellen Hunzeker, Steve Parker, Chick Stessman, Karen Fankhauser. "The Moon Chases Me," Joyce Carman; String Duo, Mr. Jindra, Miss Row o 1 d t; "There's Nothing Like a Dame" (South Pacific), 'Clark Maffitt, Steve Rice, Dick Hurley, Larry

Sharon Haile, Rita Grandgenett, 'Dick Sietsma, Ray Meister, Ga-

her M.A. at George Washington University, Washington, D. C., and her B.A. at Nebraska State Teachers College in Peru. During the last year, Miss Crone The first of a series of artists was assistant professor of Engto appear on the campus, Dave lish at Gustaves Adolphus ColWorkman, America's foremost lege, St. Peter, Minnesota. Prior to entering the college bell ringer, entertained at the all-college convo September 23. teachihg field, Miss Crone was A very skilled showman, Mr. on the news-editorial desk of Workman has appeared with the Beatrice Daily Sun, on the Spike Jones, and he utilizes staff of the New York Times, an many of the Jones techniques of editor writer. with the "Voice of America," an information spehumor and showmanship. In addition to playing selec- cialist with Foreign Service in tions from many of his collection. Shanghai, Canton, and Seoul, of more than one thousand bells, and with Army Intelligence in he also featured novelty num- Tokyo. She has also served as a bers with other musical instru- research wriler for the U. S. Dements. Among these was an au die n c e participation game called change-ringing for which Charles Francis, Rayburn Benton, Jerry Beckman, Leon ChapAt 4:00, Monday, Sept. 14, the pel, Lynda Ehlers, Donna FranPeru college band officially becis, Rose Clancy, and Marilyn gan its work for this season·. The Monroe were called upon to volband, under the direction of Gilunteer. They played "Home on bert Wilson, has twenty-seven the Range" by each ringing his veteran members and seventJen bell at the appropriate time. beginners. The next program in the ArComing events for the band tist Series will be a Memory Depi.onstration by 0. G. Fitz- include a trip to Midland on October 10, to present a halfgerald on October 7. time program; several off-campus concerts in nearby h i g h

Student Senate Sponsors Watermelon Feed

Year

Dr. Gamon To Tour Russia And Other European Countries

Total Over 600 For '59-'60 Peru has the largest enrollment in 20 years. Speaking of enrollment, Pres.ident Neal S. Gomon said, "This number (561) is not a record, but it is the highest in twenty years." Peru had 267 students at the time Dr. Go-, mon became president. At the beginning of the second full week of school, enrollment at Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru is up eight per cent, according to Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president. Full-time enrollment stands at 561 compared with 519 on the same date a year ago. Day-time enrollment consists of 186 freshmen, 142 sophomores, 74 juniors, 96 seniors, one postgraduate, and six special students. Part-time students swell the total enrolled in on-campus college courses to slightly over the six hundred mark. There are 353 boys and 152 girls, making the ratio of men to women about seven to four. Of the :t53 boys, 196 occupy Delzell. Of the 152 girls, 112 occuP'Y Eliza Morgan. The majority of these students hail from Nemaha, Richardson, and Otoe counties. Keith L. Melvin, dean of the college, said, "I think one reason why the enrollment in colleges has increased is the fact that there are more people that are college age and more people who see the need for college. Our increasll in enrollment is largely be ca use of the efforts of three or four staff members who have a particular responsibility in this area. Also, the prospects of new buildings has increased interest at Peru."

Best

activities. "Say It With Music" is the selected Homecoming theme. Prizes of $25, $10, and $5 will be awarded to the three best displays respectively. Freshmen initiation activities will begin Monday, September 28, and close with the half-day work session on Thursday, October 1.

Port Authority. Miss Crone has been a frequent contributor to magazines and has reviewed books for the Omaha WorldHerald, the St. Louis Post Dis· paich, and the Minneapolis Siar

and Tribune. Miss Crone's home is in Beatrice, Nebraska. She is also a graduate of our own school, Peru. When asked to comment on the fact that she is now an instructor where she once was a student, Miss Crone replied, "Though I'm now on the other side of the fence, I have found that all the Peru professors, and especially my former instructors, have been very kind to

m:."

schools preceding a two-day tour in the spring; and several concerts here at Peru. The band's first appearance before a home audience will be at· half-time on Homecoming. The members are working on some special marching along with a band version of the show "Brigadoon." Smaller groups-a brass choir and a woodwind choir-are being organized. Earlier, on Sept. 14, Conductor Darryl Manring lead sixty-six voices in a try at a Bach chorale. The choir's schedule includes the presentation of Gilbert and Sullivan's "Pinafore" on Nov. 12; the Christmas convo; a tour this spring; and an oratorio performance on Palm Sunday. The smaller group, Peruvian Singers, will not be organized until after the operetta.

This year's freshman class arrived on Sunday, September 6, to start a week long orientation program. The first activity was an informal dinner that night in the college cafeteria. Each freshman wore a name tag which helped him get acquainted with his new classmates. Throughout the week freshmen attended meetings on "How to Study." These meetings were headed by Dr. Keith L. Melvin. Different methods of reading assigned material, taking notes, and organizing time schedules were given and illustrated to the new students. Mr. Max Langham, head librarian, gave library orientatiqn instruction. He explained the use and general arrangement of the library. On Wednesday night, Sept. 9, the freshmen met their advisors to make study plans and schedules. Thursday, Sept. 10, all freshmen registered. The week's social events were climaxed by dorm .parties in Morgan and Delzell Halls a~d a Freshman Women's party Friday afternoon given by the Home Ee. Club.

Officers to N. U. Ag. Campus On October 19, the Home Eeonomics Club o~cers, Joan Riggle, Jeannine Ehlers, Janet Bertram, Darlene Critel, and LaVerna Roos, and sponsors, Mrs. Sproul and Mrs. Kregel, attended the State Home Economics Club's planning meeting held on the Nebraska Agriculture Cam(Continued on page two)

LIBRARY

Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of Peru State College, will leave Friday morning, October 2, on the first leg of his journey to Russia and other European countries. He will fly to New York that day for an orientatioh session with the other 32 'American educators who will make the tour. The group will depart from New York via Scandinavian Airlines for Berlin Sunday evening, October 4, with arrival in the German city Monday afternoon. The group will tour the Free University of West Berlin on October 6 and depart for Warsaw, Poland, the evening of October 7. October t°'th\ tour party will visit the Univer'l!ity of Warsaw, Belvedere Palace and Castle Square. On the evening of October 9 the group will depart for Moscow ~ they will remain five days,.ncluded in the Moscow visit will be the Kremlin, the Lenin-Stalin Mausoleum in Red Square, Hermitage Park, Subway Stations, G.U.M. the World's Largest Department Store, an all-day trip to Yasnaya Polyana (a collective farm and school), a technical school, the University of Moscow, the Academy of Pedagogical Sciences and the Moscow Sports Palace, Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, will be visited October 16-18. A school emphasizing foreign ·1anguage study, a IO-year t r a d e school and other places of interest will be visited. Next stop will be Kiev, capital of the Ukrain. Included in the planned visits will be the Museum of Ukranian Art, the Sophia Cathedral, a collective farm, the Ministry of Education and an electronics factory. After four days in Kiev the group will fly ·to Leningrad for a five-day visit including tours of Pushkin's home, a boarding · school, the Pavlov Institute, the Hermitage and Pioneer Palace. On October 30 the group will leave Russia and fly to Helsinki, the capital of Finland and on November 1 to Copenhagen, Denmark. The tour will be completed on November 3 when arrival in New York is scheduled with Dr. Gomon returning to Peru on November 4. The tour is sponsored by the American Association of School Administrators in cooperation with the U. S. Department of State. The thirty-three members of the tour group are educators at all levels from 19 states. Each is paying his own expenses.

First All-College Convocation On September 16, the first allcollege convocation started with a typical bit of Peruvian humor as a large boxer dog crossed the stage. The formal program op· ened with Reverend Lawrence Williams of the Peru Christian Church giving the invocation and the welcome of the ministerial association. Dr. Gomon then introduced the administrative and instructional staff and asked each class to stand for recognition. According to tradition, the first convo ended with the color song, accompanied by R. T. Benford at the organ.


Play Cast Selected The former Broadway production, "The Cave Dwellers," by William Saroyan, will be presented as Peru's Homecoming play on October 17. It will be under the direction of Mr. R. D. Moore. The setting for the drama is the stage of an abandoned theater. This is particularly fitting, because the author feels that all buildings are caves. The theater is the cave at its best, for it is the last arena in which all is possible. Portrayed in the dialogue of the actors is the importance of love and compassion in man's limited nature. Two of the leading characters of the play are the King, played by Tom Higgins; and the Queen, played by Rose Clancy. They are old and unemployed actors. An ex-boxing champion, played by Ray Meister; and a homeless girl, played by Sue Moore, complete the ostracized family which finds refuge in the old theater. Other members of the cast are: The Young Opponent, Harold Schmitz. A Woman, Joni Wesolowski. The Young Queen, Rae Ann Gnade. A You,ng Man, Ray Parde. The Father, Steve Rose. Gorky, Allen Nelson. The Mother, Helen Warford. The Silent Boy, Steve Parker. The Wrecking Crew Boss, Bob Mayo. Jamie, John Parli.

Business Club Elects

Delzell Hall News By Ray Meister Increased enrollment appears to be the picture in Delzell Hall this year. There are 197 men living in the dorm at the latest count. Three men live in each of the rooms at the present time, while five new rooms in the basement have furnished space for an additional 19 men. As usual, Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, and Missouri have the greatest number of men enrolled. There ~re ten lads from Illinois, two from Michigan, one from New York, and one from Idaho. The Dorm Council is headed this year by President, Jack Johnson; Vice president, L eon Chappel; and Secretary-treasurer, Dick Gerber. Dorm Counselors are Ray Parde, Milan Hawxby, Jere Krakow, 'Jerry Beckman, Charlie F~ancis, and Gary Scoggin. The first dorm meeting was held Tuesday, September 15, at 10:30 p.m. In the absence of President Johnson, Leon· Chappel outlined the general procedures for the coming year. Mrs. Paradise greeted all the returning students and welcomed all the freshmen and transfer students. She also discussed the modern facilities available to residents of the · dorm, such as the electric washer and dryer. The meeting was closed with a roll call, which many of the socalled weary sack-rats missed.

The greatest boon to a more The first meeting of the Busi- comfortable life in the dorm is ness Club was held on Monday, the new 27-inch Zenith T.V. set September 21, at 8:00 P. M., in which was purchased during the Administration Building. , ·Freshman Week. It received its Miss Hazel Weare, sponsor, initiation last Saturday, w)ien it conducted the meeting until of- was played constantly from early ficers were elected: The offkers at noon until the end of the late are: Jerry Collier, president; Jo- show that night. This proves anne Bohlken, vice president; that the T. V. bugs are still with Terry Harlowe, secretary; and us from last year. John Ahl, treasurer. The president· appointed vari~ In making the rounds, this reous committees to serve during porter has found that there have' the year. The meeting adjourned been no engagements or marat 9:00 P. M. riages of dorm residents during the first week of school. Let's go fellows! These bath tubs have got to be used for something and a good dunking party seems to be just what they were made for. With cooler fall weather apAt the first Home Economics proaching, there should be some Club meeting, held in the cambetter results in this department. pus school on September 27, guest speaker, Mrs. F. Wheeler, explained the importance of good constitution were explained. On health and demonstrated exer- October 12, the dub is planning cises for correct posture. The to attend a utilities 'dinner at the pledge program and the club's Natural Gas Company in Omaha.

Home Ee. Club Holds First Meeting

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks Member Intercollegiate Press September 28, 19S9 THE STAFF Co-Editor ----------------------------------Donna Francis Co-Editor ------------------------------Rosemary Rottman Sports Editor ________________________________ Tom Higgins Sports Reporter ____________________________ David Hoffman Sports Reporter ______________________________Jerry Osborn Sports Reporter _____________________________ Wallace West Copy Editor ---------------------------~----Kathy Rhoten Copy Editor ----------------------------Martha Sue Moore Business Manager __________________________ Jerry Lunsford Business Manager ---------------------~-------Al Bohlken Columnist ------------------------------------Ray Meister Columnist ___________________________________ Carolyn Parli Exchange Editor _______________________ Mrs. Dorothy High Con,vocations ------------------------------Ellen Hunzeker Student Senate ___________________________Jeannine Ehlers Dramatics ------------------------------------Rose Clancy Church and Music -------~--------------Karen Fankhauser Campus School News _________________________ Chris Hayes Campus School News ______________________ Joanne Bohlken Library Column ------------------------"Carol Ellenberger Reporter ____________________________________ Leland Smith Reporter ---------------------------------Alice Greenwood Reporter ____________________________________ _Jane Kunkle

New History Frat Is Now Active The Eta-Delta Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, a National Honorary History Fraternity, was organized on the Campus of Peru State Teachers College in May, 1959. Students who had fulfilled the requirements to join this organization were initiated.. at a ceremony in the Campus School. Charter members of the chapter are: Robert Henry, Ch a r 1 es Francis, _])r. Gordon Kenyon, Ray Meister, Rey Parde, James Rosenquist, Dr. George Schottenhamel, Dr. John Dearth, Francis Harris, Gary Hull, JoEUen McNergney, Joan Schneider, Phyllis Vollertsen, Alan Wheeler, and Marie Antalek. After the ceremony, members of both the national and local fraternity traveled to Auburn to enjoy a banquet which was held at the Auburn Hotel. The local fraternity of Phi Alpha Theta met in the Ad. Building at 7:oo p.m. on Sept. 21, with Marie Antalek serving as presiding officer. The program for the ·evening was a debate between Jerry Wanser and Dan Jones on the topic: Resolved: That it was a mistake to invite Khrushchev to the U. S. This interesting debate was later opened to the entire group for discussion. No final decision was reached, but many minds were certainly enlightened on this current issue. ' The third Monday of each month b.as b'een designated as the meeting night for both the local and national 'fraternity. All students who are interested in the field of history are urged to attend.

Whispers From Morgan By Carolyn Parli There has been a lot of activity in the dorm these last two weeks. The freshman girls are being initiated into our unique way of living with such things as brisk, cold showers and door slamming parties. The first floor gang had a surprise birthday party for Gail Ankrom and Judy Wolfe on Thursday night, September 17. The new members of the dorm council met September 15 and 17 in Miss Slattery's apartment to discuss various p r o b 1e m s brought up by the girls. The new members are Linda Moore, president; Joan Weslowski, vice president; Marilyn Monroe, secretary-treasurer; Gail Ankrom, bulletin board chairman; Karen Fankhauser, house ch air m an; Linda Goodin, social chairman; Carolyn Parli, program chairman; Carolyn Wing, scholarship chairman; Janice ~orber, friendship chairman. The Sister Sue party was held Wednesday night, September 16. Each 11pperclassman brought her "little sister" to the party and introduced her to the other girls. ;Refreshments were served.

OFFICERS TO N. U. 'AG. CAMPUS (Continued from page one) pus. Plans were made for the State Home Economics Club's . Workshop which will be held on the Peru Campus, November 20 and 21. The theme selected for the workshop is "Home Economics, the Area of Opportunity."

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SIGN OF GOOD TASTE

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SHOE FASHIONS WITH THE YOUNG POINT OF VIEW

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t'eru "tr 1earn Wins First Game

Lettermen 11oost Wheeler's Bobcats

An intercepted pass by Phil Peavyhouse, South Lyon, Mich., frosh, paved the way for a 6-0 Peru State Teachers College "B" team victory over Highland Junior College Thursday night.

Fifteen r e t u r n i n g lettermen bolster Coach Al Wheeler's W59 Bobcats. Included are Buddy Bookwalter, Jerry Henning, and Jim Poage, who were given honorable mention on the 1958 all N.C.C. team. Other veteran lettermen are Gary Anderson, Don Kasbohm, Dick Gerber, Wayne McFarland, LaMar Gibson, Gail Beckstead, Marion Battani, Bob Gibson, Gary Randles, Ray Utterbrink, Ernie Ridgeway; and H arr y Bryant. These fifteen lettermen, the other . upperclassmen, the transfer students, and the freshmen will make the Bobcats a tough team to peat.

The "B" team opener was marred by numerous fumbles and errors by both Bobcat and Scotty teams. Both teams were outstanding defensively, according to reports by "B" team coaches Jack Mcintire arid Jerome Stemper.

Al Wheeler's 1959 Bobcats, the Pride of Peru

Bobcats Mangle Westmar 34-0 In Season's Opener A smooth crew of Bobcat gridmen rolled to an easy 34-0 win over Westmar College Saturday night at LeMars, Iowa, to get the 1959 Peru State edition of football off to a roaring start. Conference competition opened for the Peruvians Saturday when they were in action against Dana College at Blair. The Bobcats' only non-league opponent proved to be no match for the Wheelermen, who scored twice in the first and third periods and once in the final. Fourteen first downs and a total of 541 total net yards were gained by the Bobcats, while the Westmar Golden Eagles gained two first downs for 49 yards. All 33 traveling squadmen saw action with almost all playing in two quarters. Depth That the Bobcats have quality in their added depth for the 1959 season was evident from the backfield speed, smooth passing _attack, line strength, and excellent blocking and ta c k 1 i n g throughout the game. Passes. Work Four of the five trips to pay dirt were made via the aerial route. The first came on a third down with 7:13 remaining in the first quarter as Falls City's signal caller Jim Poage rifled a pass to right half Ross Pilkington, fleet-footed Red Oak, I o w a, sophomore. In the same period Pilkington swept right end behind ·some excellent blocking as the clock registered 4:48 yet to play. The third quarter tallies came with 8:05 and 2:40 remaining. Falls City's Gibson brothers, LaMarr, end, and Bob, halfback, were on the receiving ends of

ROY PECK Barber Shop Haircut, $1.00 Peru, Nebr.

PERU FOOTBALL SCHEDULE FOR 1959 After successfully opening the 1959 football campaign against Westmar, Peru has seven more games to play. There are three away games and four home games. The away games are: Dana, Sept. 26, 2:00 p.m. Midland, Oct. 10; 7:30 p.m. Chadron, Oct. 30, 7:30 p.m. The _home games are: Concordia, Oct. 1, 8:00 p.m. Wayne (Homecoming) Oct. 17, 2:00 p.m. Hastings, Oct. 24, 8:00 p.m.' Doane, Nov. 6, 8:00 p.m. passes from Dick Place, Nebraska City halfback, and quarterback Poage. The Place to LaMarr Gibson pass play originated on the Westmar 24 , and the Poage

Peavyhouse's interception in the second period took the pigskin on a 55-yard gallop to within inches of pay dirt. Freshman quarterback Dennis J oh n s on, Mound City, Mo., sneaked the ball over for the 6 points.

"Genius is infinite painstaking."-Longfellow.

Frosh and Transfers Bolster '59 Bobcats Twenty freshmen and six key transfers are one reason for the bright outlook for the 1959 season in the Bobcat camp. At least a half dozen of these candidates have proven themselves good enough to earn early starting l;>erths on one of the two units. At present, both halfback spots are manned by new men. Ross Pilkington, a first year man, and Dick Place, transfer from the University of Nebraska, started Saturday against Westmar. A transfer from Fairbury J u n i o r College, Vern Thompson, also started at tackle on the offensive unit. Two transfers from Omaha University-Harry Whitney, tackle, and Mike Ramirez, gu~rd -cracked the startmg defensive

to Bob Gibson pass began on the j teaOmh. 4-yard strike. · t er new-comers on Coach ·Wheeler's squad who show Chris Salberg, Louisville halfback, found Gary Randles, Full- promise and should see action erton end, waiting. in the end are: Chris Salberg, transfer from zone for his pass in the fourth Omaha University, Tom Lakin, quarter with 5:31 remammg. freshman fullback, and Phillip The play came on the second Peavyhouse, a freshman who has down on the Westmar 23 . looked good defensively. Also showing up well in the early sessions are Barney Mcillvoy, Pat Conversions Help Hamm, Cletus Shrout, and Jerry Jim Poage made all but his Wanser. second third-quarter conversions good. In the individual statistics de- PERU PREP KITS partment, Ross Pi 1 k i n gt o n MAUL NEMAHA 40·0 emerged . with 89 net yards Peru Prep opened the 1959 gained in 10 carries,. while Dick football season at Nemaha on Neale, Bellevue fullback, travSept. 11, with a rousing 40-7 viceled 60 in eight strips. tory. Prep was playing their first Poage's four completed passes eight man football game. They accounted for 30 yards of gains, showed plenty of speed. Bill Tywhile Wayne McFarland, Sumnon and Marshall Adams each ner quarterback, made 78 yards scored two touchdowns for Peru. in three throws. Fullback Buddy Other touchdowns were scored Bookwalter punted six times for by Pat Morris and Rich Reeves. a total of 228 yards or an averPeru was forced to switch to the age of 38. eight man game this year because of the manpower situation. STATISTICS Prep will play the first home p game on Sept. 25 against Cook. First downs ----------- 14 2 Passes attempted ______ 17 20 Passes 'completed ______ 12 ·5 KITTENS CLAW Yards passing _________ 214 24 DUNBAR 33-0 Yards rushing _________ 321 25 Peru Prep raced to a second Number of punts ______ 6 13 consecutive Nemaha Valley ConPunting average ------- 38 36.6 ference football victory Monday, Fumbles lost ---------- 1 1 Sept. 21. The final score was Penalty yards --------- 80 25 Peru 33, Dunbar 0. Peru touchSCORING BY QUARTERS: downs were made by R i c h Peru ----c-14 0 13 7 34 Reeves, Marshall Adams, Paul Westmar __ 0 (} 01 {)! 0 Heuer, and Bill Tynon. Tynon scored two touchdowns, one on a 50-yard punt return. Adams place-kicke_d two extra points and ran the other over on a quarter-back sneak. The field was muddy and mad,e the going slow. This game was originally set for Thursday, Sept. 17, but the rains came and the game was postponed until Monday. The Peru Bobkittens had just and Evenings too much depth and speed for the Dunbar squad. Peru was Earl Applegate ahead 13-0 at halftime and had a touchdown· in each period.

Head Coach Al Wheeler, center, and his assistants, Jack Mcintire and Jerome Stemper Coach Al Wheeler is off to what looks like another fine season . Coach "Al," as he is. known on campus, has been on the Peru campus for 22 years. During this time he has been head football coach. His name has become a tradition at Peru. In 1939, his third year as coach at. Peru, he coached, the Bobcats to the conference championship. In 1940, he went undefeated and again took the conference. In 1942 he shared the championship with Wayne. In the past nine years at Peru he has chalked up an unbelievable record of 66 wins against 12 losses. At one time Al's Bobcats went on a spree of 26 consecutive wins. This victorious spree began during the last part of the "51" season and continued until the first part of the "54" season. So our hats are off once more to Al Wheeler and the '59 Bobcats.

Jerome Stemper During the past five years, Al Wheeler has been very fortunate to have the able-bodied assistance of Jerome Stemper. Coach Stemper has also been headtrack coach. Last year his track team won 7 out of their 8 small meets and finished sixth in the conference. Last year's cinder men broke five school records. The word for this year's track team seems to be, "go man go." Jack Mcintire For the past three years, sports fans have rec'ognized the face of Jack Mcintire on campus. Coach Mcintire has already made quite a name for himself and the Peru basketball team. Last ·year he coached the Bo beats to the conference title. The year before he tied for the conference title. These three men are doing their best. Let's do our best and really back the Bobcats.

w

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II


1mprovemems m i:.qu1pmem and Facilities Tumbling mats, trampoline, By Carol Ellenberger Enrollment as of September 21 and climbing ropes for physical The college library is already Elementary (grades K-6): 74 education classes. functioning in its own efficient boys; 69 girls; total 143. .Mr. Stacy Vance, superintendmanner. Secondary (grades 7-12): 61 ent of buildings and grounds, The eight new library assist- boys; 46 girls; total 107. has had hangers anchored to the ants who are working in the liTotal: 135 boys; 115 girls; total gymnasium walls behind the brary during their free periods 250. basketball goals so that the attended an instruction class tumbling mats can be used as Curriculum which lasted the first two weeks New courses (offered first time wall pads· to prevent possible inof school. For one hour each aft- this year): Latin, first year; Ger- jury to students who participate ernoon, the girls learned basic man, second year. in physical education classes. Alskills governing the running of a so, the large me.tal-lathe machine Staff library. They were instructed in now in the corridor of the· baseNew staff members and posi- bent of the_.campus school buildreference finding, the card catalog, mending of books, special tion: Milburn W. Blanton, direc- ing is to be ;emoved and stored projects, and arrangement of the tor of campus school. D on a 1d in a storage b u i 1d i n g on the library. The new assistants are: Foss, high school mathematics. campus. Kay Stahalt, Elaine Hint o n, Mrs. Faith Friest, librarian and Phyllis Peters, Mary Ann Gra- ·.Latin. Miss Gladys Grush,- superStudent Activities ham, Julie Mayer, Peggy Clutter, visor, grade 2. Lyle Strom, high Jane Kunkle, Judy Adams, and school social studies. Everett ATHLETICSIf the first two football games Sandy Stephans. Traylor, 7th and 8th grade indusare a barometer of the campus In addition to these girls, a trial arts. school achievements, the future professional librarian will be on duty evenings during the year. Contusions both physical and for the school is indeed bright. Mr. Max Langham, head librari- mental "but no broken glasses!" Winning the first two games by margins of 33 points each is a an, said that library service emWith all the mad first-of-year phasis this year will be put on scramble of books for German, fine start in the new Nemaha Valley Conference. Credit is due reference work. geometry, algebra, physics, EngThree new books added to the lish . (and notebook from last to the fine spirit of cooperation library this fall that may be of year), notebooks for five assort- and hard work of all 31 players interest are: Back of Sunset by ed grades, instruments for band and to Coach DeZwarte and his Jon C 1 ear y, Hawaii, Isle of and orchestra, no wonder PTA three assistant student teachers, Dreams by Jaques Chegary, and open house to meet student Gary Olson, Raburn Benton, and Owen Wister Out Wes!: by Fanny teachers and supervisors caught William Tulk. Wister. me short-I didn't know which Officers of High School Classes teachers to meet! It's a real SENIORS pleasure to meet and talk with President, Bill Tynon. the people who will influence Vice president, Richard Reeves. your offspring (even briefly). Secretary, Jane Crabtree. No talk yet of baiting the stuTreasurer, Karen Mcintire. dent teacher, but the year is By Mary Anna Gnade Student council: Bill Tynon, young. From personal observaYou can't tell me these car- tion, I doubt the baiting w i 11 Barbara Adams, Marcia Allgood, Larry Blanton. toons showing eagerness of even get a good start. Who says· Latin isn't wanted? mothers for school to start aren't based on real life. At 7:45 a.m. Offered on a purely elective baFirst Day I met two mothers · sis and in competition with othBILL'S CLOTHING with several children (pencils er desirable courses, Mrs. Friest & SHOE STORE and tablets in hand) hurrying to- is imparting the mysteries of You Pay Less at Bill's ward the Campus School. Regis- amo, amas, amat to five schaiars. Auburn, Nebr. The high school athletes met tration was at 9 a.m. But it's not only the mothers-the kids them- and conquered their first foe on selves just can't wait for school the football field. Steve came to begin! home so elated over winning and GEBER'S Kindergarten is really jump- getting t.o play, he didn't even ing-16 boys and 6 girls; Georgie know the score. Now for Dunbar Conoco Service Service Is Our Specialty Grafton reported to his mother: -even with warmed-over pep BR 4-3818 ' "Us MEN go to the gym." At the for a postponed game, spirits are Auburn, Nebraska other extreme is 8th grade with hopefully high. (Later flash12 girls and only 3 boys. won again!) To show how closely a grade Socially, the juniors gave a keeps to itself: though Jimmy freshman initiation dance last G has been in the same building Friday. At home, my freshman's with his "new" teacher for lo apprehension was more of an inthese four years, he came home itiation than the real thing as with a pleasantly surprised ex- my junior outlined the horrors pression "I LIKE this teacher!" waiting. You hear of playground acciFirst trip of the season took 8 dents. First accident of the year high school girls to the baton happened to Mrs. Brown, 4th twirling clinic in Syracuse. grade supervisor, and in her You might say the school year room not on the playground. is off and running!

Library Shorts

Campus School News

Campus School Chit Chat

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The Voice of the Campus of aThousand Oaks . . .

Welcome Alumni

Peru · Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 55

Number 2

Homecoming October 17

OCTOBER 12, 1959

Dr. Dearth Attended Conference In Colorado

Student Body Elects Cheerleaders The five new cheerleaders elected at student convocation are: Joanne Bohlken, Lynda Ehlers, Rae Mae Henry, Jane Kunkel, and Pam Yost. Joanne, who is in her second year as cheerleader, is a sophomore from Peru. She is a business major and her activities include White Angels and Business . Club, of which she is vice president. Last year she was one of the Valentine Royalty. Joanne's advice is, "Go West young man, go West." Lynda Ehlers is a sophomore hailing from Nebraska City. She is treasurer of the White Angels and a member of W.A.A. Lynda is majoring in elementary education. She was also one of the Valentine Royalty and freshman attendant at May Fete last year. Lynda's advice is, "There is more than one fish in the sea." Rae Mae Henry, also a sopho-

more, comes to us from Plattsmouth, Nebraska. She is majoring in elementary education and belongs to White Angels, W.A.A., and Lutheran Club. Her advice is, "One ring on the hand is worth two in the bush." Janie Kunkel, who is in her second year as cheerleader, is a sophomore from ·Falls City, Nebraska .She is majoring in for. eign language .and is a member of the White Angels, W.A.A., and secretary-treasurer of the Foreign Language Club; Last year Janie was elected Queen of the Sweetheart Dance. Her advice is, "The bigger they are, the harder you fall." Pam Yost, the only freshman; hails from Sumner, Nebraska. She is majoring in physical education and is a member of White Angels. Pam's advice is, "Nothing ventured, nothing gained."

Dr. Gomon Touring Russia .And Other European Countries

Dr. John Dearth, professor of history at Peru State, participated in the 7th N;tlonal Conference of the United States Na- · tional Commission for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization from September 29th through October 1st. The conference was conducted at Denver, Colorado. Many national topics were discussed and acted upon at the conference. Teacher education, cultural exchange, student tours of Latin-America, and the suggestion that every college student spend at least one semester studying in Latin-America, are examples of the conference's work. A number of experts as speakers, in a variety of fields, made By Joanne Bohlken the conference a valuable exOn Wednesday evening, Sepperience, according to Dr. Dearth. He stated, "I believe it tember 30, the 1959 freshmen was a challenge to anyone inter- class was initiated into college ested in a better understanding life. of Latin-America." The initiation was accompanied by a dance which began at 7 :30 at Peru's college gym. At 8:30, Leon Chappell called the freshman roll. The freshmen filed in and sat on the basketball floor as they anxiously waited For the second consecutive for the conesquences of their week, the Peru State Teachers actions. College Bobcats are leading the Presiding over the initiation nation \lmong small colleges in was "judge" Ray Meister. The ,itotal team: defense, according to prosecuting attorney upholding the statistical report of the Nathe upperclassmen was Ernest t'ional Athletic · Inter-collegiate Ridgeway. The attorney for the Association. defendants was Jim Yelnek. The The Peruvians, in ·their games jury representatives were Joan with Westmar and Dana, have Weslowski, Donna Francis, Janet held their opponents to a total of Lillethorup, Peggy McGee, Kar30 yards rushing and passing, for an average of 15.0 per game. Central State of Ohio is second with a game average of 55.5 "Write on your mind" was the yards. Peru State ranks first in team key to the system of 0. G. Fitzrushing defense with a game av- gerald, memory expert. Demonerage of 6.0, and is fourth in strating the power of the mind team passing defense with 6.0 at an all-college convocation on October 7, he stated that anyone per game. Buddy Bookwalter, Lawrence, can remember anything if he has Kans., senior fullback, ranks enough interest in it. To demonstrate his skill, he sixth nationally in individual introduced a large number. of punting, with a game average of

Kangaroo Court Held For Freshmen

Bobcats Lead Small Colleges In Defense

Five Days In Moscow October 8, the tour party will visit the University of Warsaw, Belvedere Palace and Castle Square. On the evening of October 9, the group departed for Moscow where they will remain five days. Included in the Moscow visit will be the Kremlin, the Lenin-Stalin Mausoleum in Red Square, Hermitage Park, Subway St at ions, G.U.M., the World's Largest Department Store, an all-day trip to Yasnaya Polyana (a collective form and school), a technical school, the

Finland and Denmark On October 30, the group will leave Russia and fly to Helsinki, the capital of Finland and on November 1, to Copenhagen, Denmark. The tour will be completed on November 3, when arrival in New York is scheduled with Dr. Gamon returning to Peru on November 4. "CAVE DWELLERS" TO BE HOMECOMING PLAY At 7:00 p.m. Saturday, October 17, Peru's auditorium will be the scene of the annual Homecoming play. This year William (Continued on last page)

Dave SadRhoJack

Some of the various accusations the en were found guilty of ·;window peeking in the girl' dorm, insulting the upperclassmen, violating the initiation rules, and "necking" on "Cemetery Hill." The guilty freshmen were penalized by having to do such deeds as shaving a boy's leg, giving speeches on various topics, doing 50 pushups, and getting "beauty" treatments. As an over-all penalty, the freshmen were sentenced to sponsor a wiener roast for the entire, student body. The ordeal of the trial over for the freshmen!

was

Memory Expert Demonstrates Skill In Convo

Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president University of Moscow, the Acadof Peru State College, departed emy of Pedagogical Sciences and Friday, October 2, on the first the Moscow Sports Palace. leg of his journey to Russia and Georgia other European countries. He Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, flew to New York that day for will be visited October 16-18. A an orientation session with the 44.2 in 11 punts at the end of the other 32 American educators who school emphasizing foreign lan- second week of ratings. guage study, a 10-year trade will make the tour. The tour is sponsored by the school and other places of interAmerican Association of School est will be visited. Administrators in cooperation The Ukrain with the U. S. Department of Next stop will be Kiev, the State. The thirty-three members capital of the Ukrain. Included of the tour group are educators in the planned visits will be the at all levels from 19 states. Each Museum of Ukranian Art, the is paying his own expenses. Sophia Cathedral, a collective farm, the Ministry of Education Flight To Berlin The group departed from New and an electronics factory. After York via Scandinavian Airlines four days in Kiev the group will for Berlin Sunday evening, Oc- fly to Leningrad for a five-day tober 4, with arrival in the Ger- visit including tours of Pushkin's man city Monday afternoon. The home, a boarding school, the toured the Free University of Pavlov Institute, the Hermitage West Berlin on October 6, and and Pioneer Palace. departed for Warsaw, Poland, the evening of October 7.

en Trotter, Lynda Ehlers, Fulton, Dua~e. Lewis, Sam ich, Lanny 1.Richl\ds, Ken dus, Harry Whitney, and Head.

Mr. Foss New Math Instructor Mr. Donald C. Foss, the new assistant professor of mathematics, received his B.S. degree from Morningside College in Sioux City, Iowa, and his M.A. degree from the University of Iowa, in Iowa City. Mr. Foss comes from Sioux City and for the past four years · instructed in South Sioux City High in Sioux City, Nebraska.

Homecoming Plans Now Completed Plans are proceeding for the 38th annual Homecoming at Peru State, October 17. To the usual ingredients - football, displays, queen, dance, coffee hours - will be added an alumni luncheon. Homecoming 1959, will find the Bobcats of Peru State clashing against their foe, the Wildcats of Wayne State in the Oak Bowl at 2 p.m. "Say It With Music" is the theme that will be symbolized in the displays. Prizes of $25, $10, $5 will be awarded to the three best displays, respectively. The luncheon for alumni, former students, and friends of the college is scheduled for 11 :So in the College Cafeteria. Seven queen candidates, chosen by the student body, will be presented at the football game. The queen will be' crowned at the annual Hometoming dance. When asked his opinion of today's students, he stated that their attitude is better than most adults give them credit for, and the so-called normal student is greatly underrated.

students he had met only that morning, repeated numbers from dollar bills he had seen only a few secor;ds, and did lightningfast mental arithmetic calculations. He emphasized that each person has a best way of remembering, and that finding that best way is vital to inscribing on the mind. The., c o m p 1 e t e Homecoming schedule is as follows: 9:30 a.m.-Homecoming dis plays, depicting a "Say It With Music" theme, in place. 10:00 a.m.-J u d g i n g of displays. Open house in dormitories until 1:00 p.m. 11:00 a.m.-"P" Club luncheon. Campus school cafeteria. 11:30 a.m.-All-Alumni luncheon honoring classes of 1899, 1904, 1909, 1914, 1919, 1924, 1929, 1934, 1939, 1944, 1949, 1954, 1959. 2:00 p.m.-Football. Peru State Bobcats vs. Wayne State Wildcats. Halftime show and presentation of queen candidates. 4:30 p.m.-Coffee hour in Delzell hall. Open house in dormitories until 6:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m.-Peru Dramatics Club presents Homecoming play, "Cave Dwellers." 9:30 p.m.-Homecoming Dance and Coronation of 1959 Queen of Homecoming.

ART EXHIBIT Since the week of freshman orientation, Miss Diddel, of the art department, has conducted an art exhibit. The subjects were wildflowers of Colorado. The watercolor sketches were done by Miss Diddel and several others.


Detonations From .Delzell By Ray G. Meister Footprints On fhe Sidewalk. a rare, new, first edition by Dr. I. Got Wet, could very well be the theme of initiation week in Delzell Hall. Upon returning from supper, it was not an uncommon sight to see fOOtJ?rints leading from the vicinity of the Auditorium to the · dorm. Often some rather damp levis and sweatshirts were hanging from various freshman windows. Another common sight was to see a room full of filthy shoes and a group of beanie-clad boys eagerly shining away.

~k-Sar-Ben

Scholarships to Peru Students

Vernon Thomsen, Exeter jun- careers in their home ·state. ior, and Mary Ann Graham, AuThomsen, a 1957 graduate of burn, have been named recipi- Exeter high school, was graduatents of Ak-Sar-Ben scholarships ed from Fairbury Junior College for the 1959-60 academic year at last May. The son of Mr. and Peru State Teachers College, ac- Mrs. Fred Thomsen of· Exeter, cording to Dr. Harold Boraas, he is majoring in industrial arts chairman of the scholarship and physical education at Peru committee. State. The scholarships, in the Miss Graham, daughter of Mr. amount of $150 for the year, are and Mrs. David C. Graham, Augiven annually by the Knights burn, was graduated from Auof Ak-Sar-Ben to Nebraska resi- burn high school in 1959. She is dents who plan to carry on their majoring in business education.

Now that initiation is completed, a state of calmness has settled cautiously over the dorm. At times slight reverberations of activity ca.li be noticed in the hallways, but by the time midnight or 1:00 a.m. rolls around, about all that is left stirring are the "bookworms" and debators.

Preparation for Homecoming, Octobe 17, is the main issue in theDorm at the present time. The committee for· the Homecoming display this year is composed of Dick Kunde, Ray Meister, Jerry Wanser, Alan Nelson, Hank Turner, Carroll Johnson, and John Masonbrink. Delzell Hall will also hold Open House on HomeBy Carolyn Parli coming Day, and immediat'ely On October 1, after the Peru- following the football game, cofThe dorm has been bustling with excitement these last two Concordia football game, a sur- fee will be served in the lobby weeks. This must be the time for prise bon voyage party was giv- until 6 o'clock. birthdays. Lola Triska, Mardelle en for Dr. Neal S. Gomon by the This week I have added a new Miller, and Karen Blomquist faculty of the college. section to my column which I celebrated their birthdays with Dr. Gomon departed from New will entitle, "Ray's Report To the the help of several girls. York Sunday, October 4, with Rascals." The "love bug" virus has really group of 32 American educators hit the campus this year. There ·on the first leg of the monthIn interviewing a select group are five girls engaged. They are long trip sponsored by the Am- of approximately 70 inhabitants Jan Lillethorup to Jere Krakow, erican Association of School Ad- of Delzell Hall, we find that Jane Dietl to Don Jackson, Ray- ministrators and the National Maverick won by a nose ·over lene. Miller to Larry Curnes, Education Association, under the 77 Sunset Strip, in the T.V. race Marilyn Wenzbauer to George supervision of the U. S. Depart- while Mickey Mouse Club came ·Tomek, Virginia Garton to Jerry ment of State. in on the tail end of things. !n Beckman. the 1 it er a r y section Playboy Dr. Gamon was presented with Magazine gained undisputed first There are 114 girls in the dorm this year, and you can surely tell a transistor radio. In addition to place with 40 votes, while Mod· it! Those coming the longest dis- this gift, he was presented a ern Man and Esquire tied for tance are Barbara Lehman from "Back Home in Nebraska Kit" second and third place. Of course Riverside, California; Judy Bli- which included "Free Nebraska there are still the intellectuals in ven from Grand Forks, North Breeze" plus "October Rain," a this abode who love to read such Dakota; Marie Antalek from box of "Nebraska Soil,'' and Ne- great classics as Popular Elecbraska Scenery, (campus aerial tronics and Mad Magazine! Newark, New Jersey. The dorm council met Tues- view). This concludes the report for day, September 29. They decided that each floor should have a Helen Warford, third east wing; this edition except that this rewing meeting to elect counselors. Jeannine Ehlers, ·third west wing. porter is still waiting, somewhat The counselors for this year are,, Attention all girls! "Ben the impatiently, for some soul to get Karen Blomquist, bas em .e n t Hairdresser" is coming Oct. 19. engaged to some member of the floor; Ellen Hunzeker, first floor; Let's beautify our campus-chal- fairer sex! Here's hoping that Donna Francis, second east wing; lenge yourself to a fabulous new ;Homecoming will arouse · s o m e emotions to the extent that the Kay Stalhut, second west wing; hair style. diamond salesman will again be back in business. ·

Whispers From Morgan

Faculty Gives Dr. Gomon Bon Voyage Party

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PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of ihe Campus of ·a Thousand Oaks Member Intercollegiate Press October 12, 1959 THE STAFF Co-Editor ----------------------------------Donna Francis Co-Editor .------------------------------Rosemary Rottman Sports Editor ________________________________ Tom Higgins Sports Reporter ____________________________ David Hoffman Sports Reporter ______________________________ Jerry Osb~rn Sports Reporter _____________________________ Wallace West Copy Editor ________________________________ Kathy Rhoten Copy Editor ____________________________ Martha Sue Moore Business Manager -----------~--------------Jerry Lunsford Business Manager _____________________________ Al Bohlken Columnist ____________________________________ Ray Meister Columnist· ___________________________________ Carolyn Parli Columnist ______________________________ Mary Anna Gnade Exchange Editor _______________________ Mrs. Dorothy High Convocations ______________________________ Ellen Hunzeker Student Senate ___________________________ Jeannine Ehlers Dramatics ------------------------------------Rose Clancy Church __________________________________ Alice Greenwood Music __________________________________ Karen Fankhauser Campus School News __________________________Chris Hays Campus School News _____________________ _Joanne Bohlken Library Column _________________________ Carol Ellenberger Reporter ------------------------------------Leland Smith Reporter _____________________________________ Jane Kunkle Sponsor --------------------------------Stewart Linscheid

Library Shorts By Carol Ellenberger Wildlife Cameraman by J:im Kjelgaard is a book for those who like adventure stories. It is a story about a young man named Jase Mason who wanted to be a wildlife photographer. To test himself and his ability, he spent a summer in the wilderness with his · dog and his cameras. The summer was full of adventure as Jase and his dog lived close to nature. They met with unexpected adventure m a n y times, as they learned about life in the wilderness. Even though Jase met many obstacles in this summer, he remained steadfast to the goal he set out to accomplish.

is

It an exciting open-air adventure delightful in its story of a boy's youthful determination and a picture of nature in its truest form.

Inside the Living Cell by J. A.

Of Two Minds On the one hand, you have Thirsty G. Smith. Good taste to him means zest and zip in a beverage, sparkle and lift and all like that •• • On the other hand, T. Gourmet Smythe per.ceives good taste as the right, fit and proper refreshment for a Discriminating Coterie. So? ••• Have it both ways! Coca-Cola ••• so good in taste, in such good taste.

SIGN OF GOOD TASTE

Et vous?

Bottled under authority of The Coca·Cola Company by NEBRASKA CITY COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO.

PERU CLEANERS & TAILORS Repairing and Remodeling Men and Women's Clothing Forty-two Years Serving Students and Faculty PHONE TR 2-2671 PERU, NEBR.

BANK OF PERU PHONE TR 2-2331

Member F.D.I.C. INVITES YOUR BUSINESS CARROLL LEWIS, President

JOHN L. LEWIS, Vice Pres. & Cashier

HEUER GROCERY Groceries Fruits

PERU V. Butter is a book that contains many of the all time great questions of biology and research that has been done to clear these questions up. The book discusses many things, including the complex pattern of heredity, and the mysterious activities of the human brain. Written by a noted biophysicist and chemist, it is a fascinating story told in a clear, nontechnical way. The cells of the body, their make-up, their reactions to radiation and other foreign influences, and even the malignant cells of cancer, are explained and illustrated. For those who enjoy a good mysterr, there is Tree House Island by Scott Corbet.

Meats Vegetables

NEBRASKA Two strangers arrived in the area of Goose Harbor and immediately began acting mysterious. Harvey Harding first noticed these two and their suspicious actions. Both strangers, Dr. Dellingham and Professor Santos, claimed to be scientists doing research. But why were they digging all night long on the island? Why did Dr. Santos carry a gun? Soon a clue was found that linked their mysterious activities with a murder and a robbery. This brought four men to the island one night, where they met suspense and violence. Tree House Island is a rousing mystery that is packed with suspense.


I ,

Peru State's New $500,000 Industrial Arts &ilding Peru State Starting Million-Plus Building Pr0gram Providing Four New Structures By Jeannine Ehlers This past summer, contracts were let for construction of the first phase of a million-plus building program to take place on the Peru Campus. The general construction contracts included an addition to Eliza Morgan Women's Residence Hall, a ninety-student Men's Residence Hall, a new Student Union and Cafeteria Building, and a split-level Industrial Arts Building. The dormitory facilities are scheduled for use in September, 1960. Target date for completion of the Student Union Building and Cafeteria has been set for January, 1961. The IndustriaJ Arts Building is scheduled for completion in January, 1961, also. Morgan Hall Addition Eliza Morgan Hall will have two new additions added to it. The west addition that will provide housing for twenty women will consist of four floors, each having five doUJble rooms. After Mount Vernon Hall is razed upon completion of the new Student Union Building, a south addition of four stories with the ground floor as a study hall will be added to Eliza Morgan. New Boys' Dorm The ninety-student men's residence hall is .being erected on the west rim of the Oak Bowl, south and east of Delzell Men's Residence Hall. The ground floor will include eight double rooms; with a television lounge, laundry room, and storage and maintenance rooms. The first floor will have seventeen double roorris. It will also include a lobby, an office, and a two-room house mother's apartment. The second floor will house forty students. All of the rooms will have built-in desks, dressers, book shelves and closet space. The structure has been planned in order to make possible the addition of a future wing.

Industrial Aris Building Student Union Bids for the new Industrial The new Student Union and Cafeteria Building will be erected Arts Building to be located south just south of Mount Vernon Resi- of the Campus School on the west dence Hall. The greatest portion side of the Avenue are. to be opof the main floor space will be ened during the week of October devoted to cafeteria and kitchen 26, 1959. It will be a split-level area.. A faculty lounge, televis- building with two stories on the ion room, offices, private dining front or east, and one story on the rooms, and rest rooms will occupy rear or west. The building will be steel framed, with brick veneer the remaining space. The lower floor of the split- facing on exposed surfaces. The classroom area will be on level structure will include a snack bar and kitchen area, the upper level. There will be two meeting rooms, offices of student general classrooms, an arts and publications, and a book store. crafts laboratory, an electricity The south wall of the snack bar and electronics laboratory, a drafting room, a photography and will be mostly glass. At the south end of the present blue-print laboratory, a suite of site of Mount Vernon Hall, the offices for staff members, project second phase of the Student Unc suppy and storage rooms, and a ion project to be built is a one- women's lounge. story lounge, featuring glass panThe ground floor of the classeling and an umbrella-type roof room section will have the proThe lounge will be cqnnected ject and general storage area, with the main Student Union men's locker room, and the dryBuilding by a glass corridor. ing and finishing area for the

woodworking department. The shop area will be the onestory section to the rear part of the building. It will be of industrial type construction with the shop divided into three major areas-general metals, general mechanics, and general woodworking. Each of these' major shop areas will be forty by sixty feet, and each will have a planning center, general storage space and locked storage space. To the rear of the shop area, there will be a forty foot concrete apron for outside storage of machinery. There will be 24,000 square feet in the industrial arts building, of which 14,500 ,square feet will be devoted to the general shops. To serve the new industrial arts building and the campus school, the construction of an extension to the heating tunnel now running from the engine room to Morgan and Mount Vernon Halls will be built. Tax Funds Not Used There will be no tax funds involved in the new constructions which are to be financed by rev-

Plan Of Boys' Dormitory To Be Completed In 1960

enue bonds. The bonds will be paid for out of rentals of dormitory space, rentals from the various enterprises which will occupy space in the ·Student Union Building, and from a special Student Union fee charged to all students and faculty members. It is interesting to note that on the cahipuses of all four of the Teachers colleges in Nebraska, only the classroom buildings have been paid for out of tax funds. All of the dormitories, student unions, and other building of that nature, have been paid for under this revenue bond program. The capital value of the facilities at the four colleges is roughly $15 million dollars. Of this amount, only slightly more than $7 million dollars has been at a cost to the taxpayers. The rest of the buildings have been built by revenue bonds. When all bonds are paid off, these buildings become the property of the State of Nebraska, without direct cost to the people of the state.

Wiener Roast For Ped And Peruvian Staff The Pedagogian and Peruvian staffs were honored with a wiener roast by Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Linscheid on Tuesday, October 6, at their new home here in Peru. The students devoured a tremendous quantity of hot dogs, potato salad, beans, cake, and pop. Twenty staff members attended the wiener roast.

Girls' Pep Club Is Active

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After holding several meetings, the girls' Pep Club is ready to cheer the Bobcats on to victory. The girls will wear white blouses and blue skirts this year to carry out the school colors. The girls will sit in a special section and cheer at. all home games. Some of the more adventurous ones will be on hand at away games to give the boys the spirit and the feeling that the girls are backing them. The officers this year are Pat Rathe, president and Ruthie Carmichael, secretary.


$12,000 Improvement Of Stage Delights Dramatics Club Director

Rooms Added In Dormitories

By Ray Meister The lights are beginning to dim. The .Cuttain is about to go up. The play is ready to begin. Another season is about to open for the Peru Dramatics Club under the direction of Mr. Robert D. Moore. Many people have already noticed that Mr. Moore is probably one of the happiest men on campus .this year. The reason for this is the $12,000 allocated to redecorate and relight the stage in the college auditorium. This much needed improvement was begun during the summer session and was only recently completed. A pleasant surprise. will greet the eyes of returning alumni when they attend the production of The Cave Dwellers Saturday evening, October 17. The first object to attract their attention will undoubtedly be the new, paleblue front· curtain. This is indeed a great improvement over the old, red curtain which has be en cleaned, refinished, and hung dead at the back of the stage. Other additions in the line of new curtains are: dark blue tormentors and teasers; a cyclorama on a steel track; and an olio or act curtain. All of these are mounted on a counterweight system and can be pulled into the stage loft when not in use. After the curtain has opened for the first act, the audience will be again surprised at the various effects that can be achieved with all the new lighting system.

Architect's Drawing Of Boys' Dormitory

Student Teaching Assignments For Fall Semester At Peru

Leon Chappell, Wood River, Sixty students are enrolled in student teaching at Peru State Ill., tumbling, home room, geomTeachers College for the fall se- etry; Jerry Collier, Falls City, mester, according to Harold general math 9, study hall; BarJohnson, director of student bara Clover, Auburn, home econteaching. The majority of stu- omics; Marlin Danielson, Updents. have assignments in the T. land, noon duty, industrial arts, J. Majors Campus School, while typing; Douglas Dickerson, Sumothers are assigned to public ner (Johnson), industrial arts, schools in Auburn and Johnson. football; Terry Forney, Tabor, Eleven students have nine- Iowa, general math · 7, general week assignments in grades kin- science 8, study hall. dergarten through six and 49 Paul Goebel, Fairbury, generstudents have full semester jun- al science 9, physics, home room; ior high and senior high school Milan Hawxby, Nemaha, general assignments. science 9, study hall; Mrs. LuFirst of all, there are six ellipThe student teachers and their cille Hicks, Auburn (Auburn), soidal spotlights mounted on the English 7, science 8, library; Tom assignments: balcony rail that allow any part Higgins, Valley, English 10; RobSecondary-Marie Ant a 1e k, of the stage to be put under the ert Hoback, Nebraska City, band, Newark, N. J., girls physical edconcentration of a spotlight. chorus; Carroll Johnson, StanNext is a new, front plugging bat- ucation and volley ball; Elmer ton, Iowa, biology 10, industrial Anton, geography 9, social studten, directly above the front of arts, home room. the stage, on which are mounted ies 7, study hall; Duane Arends, DeLynn Kienker, J oh n s on eight fresnel spotlights, each be- Manley, biology 10, geography 9, ing on a separate circuit. Directly home room; Ronald J. Axt, (Johnson), typing, physical edubehind this batten, on the stcond Scottsbluff, home room, Ameri- cation; Jere Krakow, Superior, and third ·borders, are four units can history 11, social studies 8; world history, general business, of enclosed border lights that Lee Becker, Peru, driver educa- home room; Alan Kreglo, Auhave color londels of five differ- tion, industrial arts 7-8, noon burn, algebra 9. Janet Lillethor· up, Omaha, girls' physical eduent colors: red, blue, green, am- duty. ber and white. All of these lights Jerry Beckman, Diller, indus- cation, volley ball; Ernie Madiare connected to a master control trial arts 9, home room; Ray- son, Adair, Iowa, industrial arts. panel that has 36 separate cir- burn Benton, Malvern, Iowa, Robert Mayo, Brooklyn, N. Y., cuits leading into it. This panel typing, football, playground; physical education, speech; Laralso has 2£,()00 watts of dimming Janet Bertram, Falls City, home ry Miller, Hamburg, Iowa, elecapacity. economics, FHA assistant; Harry mentary music, high school If one is looking for Dramatics Bryant, Peru, boys' physical ed- chorus; Lester Miller; Beatrice, Coach Moore and cannot find him ucation, industrial arts 7-8; J er- band, music 7-8, high school in his office, he will most likely ry Carlson, Clearwater, (Auburn) chorus; Linda Moore, Nemaha, be found backstage, tinkering modern problems, football; .Ron- world history, home economics, with his "Pride-and~Joy." His ald Case, Omaha, guidance, Eng- FHA; Sue Moore, Peru, English 9, speech. first comment will undoubtedly lish 10, typing. be, "This is indeed a great improvement over the old oil canwash pan dev.i.ces that we have ,fought with in former years!"

Robert McFarland, Sumner, elementary physical education, junior high basketball; Gary Olson, Rulo, industrial arts, football, playground; Jerry Paden, Seneca, Kans., junior high physical education, playground; Raymond Parde, Crab Orchard, general business, social studies 8, home room; Fred Regnier, Diller, physics, science club. Lois Rowe, Glenwood, Iowa, general science 9, general math 8, study hall; Chris Salberg, Louisville, modern P r 0 b 1ems; Wiley Sandusky, Table Rock, language arts 7, social studies 7, study hall; Don Stange, Cairo, high school basketball; Robert Taenzler, Plattsmouth, language arts 8, Ind. arts, home room. William Tulk, Horton, Kans., general science 7, library, football; Cha.rles Tillman, North Platte, language arts 8, physical education, home room; Mary Tynon, Peru, geometry; Joe Verbeek, Firth, industrial arts, basketball; Donald Weeks, B 1 u e Rapids, Kans., social studies 7, physical education, playground; Howard Wells, Tabor, Iowa, jun.ior high art, class plays, study hall. Elementary-Sharon Bates, Burchard, kindergarten; Carol Jean Kennedy, Brock, kindergarten; Gladys Monahan, Palmyra, grade 1; Judy Carlisle, Nebraska City, grade 2; Linda Goodin, Humboldt, grade 2; Carol Stivers, Shubert, grade 3. Carol Ann Buell, Exeter, grade 4; Kay George, Auburn, grade 4; Irene Ogle, Dawson, grade 5; Leota Gebers, Auburn, grade 6; Richard Stock, Nebraska City, grade 6.

Drawing Of Pmu's New Student Union

Football Convo On September 30, a combination pep rally and convocation was held to introduce the football team and personnel. Mr. Gilbert Wilson, director of the band, led it in a few numbers to arouse the spirit. After announcements by Tom Higgins, Coach Al Wheeler introduced Coaches Stemper and Mcintire, who expressed their weighty confidence in the team. Mr. Wheeler then introduced the team members. The cheer leaders led in yells for the team, and had the cocaptains for the game, Dick Gerber and LaMar Gibson, give brief, encouraging statements about the game. The convocation ended with the color song.

The last few days the men and women in Eliza Morgan and Delzell Halls have been listening to the sound of hammer and saw. New rooms are being added in the basemen ts to take care of a few more students. These rooms are being built by the college carpenter, Mr. Ernest Longfellow, and campus workmen. In Morgan Hall accommodations have ,been made for ten more girls. There will be room for two girls in the old laundry room, two in the old sewing room, two in one of the old storerooms, and four in the old study hall. Accommodations in Delzell Hall have been made for 10 more boys. There will be five boys in what used to be the old Peruvian room, three ·in the east part of the old pool hall, and two in the faculty room. This, along with the lowering of the ceilings and replacement of old furniture, constitutes the extent of the improvements on the two resident halls.

Freshman Initiation Held In Morgan Hall As a part of freshman initiation, the freshman girls in Morgan Hall entertained the upper classmen with stunts on Thursday, September 24. Basement new comers-Mary Ann Lewellyn, Lois Fritz, Inga Faubion, Sharon Watton, Rosea Oestmann, Judy Bliven, Anna Shawn, Carolyn Armstrong, Barbara Lehmann, and Margaret Beard-donned "ears" and sang their way through a "Lamb's Serenade." Various first floor upper classmen were imitated by Connie Erisman, Carol McLain, Julie Mayer, Mary Ann Graham, Judy Wolfe, Jean Ast, Marilyn Wenzbauer, Sharilyn Vrtiska, and Linda Beery, in the classroom scene, Introduction to Trash. Second floor proved that "Life Can Be Beautiful" with their demonstration of the art of proper make-up by Linda Nygaard, Sandy Hemphill, Pam Yost, Beverly Prokop, Romona Bock, Bar. bara Wellensiek, Pauline Fink, and Clara Kelly. "Styles From the Files" was third floor's presentation. Kathy Kopplin, Edna McGovern, Eileen Neels, Beverly Parde, Barbara Story, Carol Sudik, Roberta Wiltse, Kaye Jacobson, A 1ice Greenwood, Romona Grind 1 e, Linda Hagan, Sharon Haile, Elaine Hinton, Barbara Hill, Carol Ellenberger, Sandy Pearson, Rita Grandgenett, Rosalie Baehr, Beverly Farmer, and Marilynn Giesmann mo de 1e d some of the more becoming (?) fashions of the day. Over-all coordinator and emcee was Linda Goodin, social chairman for Morgan Hall.

"Freshies" Elect Officers At September Convocation Freshman Convocation was held Thursday, September 24, in the college auditorium. Dean Melvin reviewed the freshmen on his previous "How To Study" lectures during freshman orientation. The meeting proceeded w it h James Levitt, freshman sponsor, presiding until the newly elected president, Paul Fenton, took over. Carol Ellenberger was elected secretary, Connie Erisman, vice president and Joe Roach treasurer. Members elected to the student senate were Tom Lakin and Sandra Pearson.


Bobcats Slay Vikings 53-0 Bobcats Mangle Peru State's Bobcats made the Dana Vikings their second victim of the young football season Saturday as they rolled to an easy 53-0 victory at Blair. The Bobcats will face their second N.C.C. opponent in their first home contest Thursday when they meet the Concordia Bulldogs of Seward in the Oak Bowl. . Cats Score Quickly From the opening kick-off of Saturday's tilt, it was evident' that the. Vikings were no match for the Wheelermen.. After the Bobcats received the kick-off ·. and returned to their own 31, Buddy Bookwalter quick-kicked on the first play from scrimmage to put the Vikings back on their own 5-yard line. After no gain on the first down, the Vikings punted to their own 43-yard line, where the ball rolled dead. Peru using 10 plays pushed the ball to Dana's 8-yard line, where Chris Salberg, Louisville h a 1f b a c k, swept left end and crashed into the end zone for the first touch.down of the game. After Dana received the kickoff on their 6-yard line, they lost five yards on their first play from . scrimmage. On the second down Jerry Henning, hard-hitting defensive· end, recovered a fumble in the end zone for Peru's second touchdown. ·

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back, to Dick Gerber, Fullerton end, covering 38 yards. Poage converted the first of his five extra points, after missing the first two, making the score 19-0 at the quarter. Peru's fourth touchdown came early in the second period as the Bobcats took over on the Dana 35, after the' Vikings failed to move the ball. Peru drove to the Dana 4-yard line where Dick Place plunged over on a fourthdown situation. Poage again converted. Scoring Spree In Second After Dana and Peru exchanged a series of downs, Dana punted from Peru's 48 to the Bobcat 10, where Ross Pilkington, Red Oak, Iowa, halfback, fielded the ball and electrified the crowd with a beautiful 90yard run up the sideline for a touchdown. Gerber and 'Leon Chappell, Wood River, Ill., center, threw key blocks to spring the Red Oak speedster. Poage's kick again split the uprights. With about two minutes left in the half, the Wheelermen pushed across two more touchdowns. Quarterback Jim Poage pitched a 25-yard ·pass to Pilkington for Peru's sixth touchdown of the afternoon. Once again Jim converted. This made the score 40-0. With less than 30 seconds left in the half, Peru took over the ball on the Dana 46. Bob Gibson, Falls City halfback, passed to Chris Salbert for 24 yards and then passed 22 more to Ken Rhodus, Bellevue end, for the seventh Peru TD. Poage booted the extra point, making the score 47-0 at halftime. 'Cats Coast. The game securely in the bag, Al Wheeler's charges were content to hold the score down. Only once, in the third period, did they unleash the power they showed the first half. On that play they broke Pilkington loose over the center of the line and he rambled 55 yards for the tally. Poage, losing some of his ·touch after booting five straight extra points, missed on his last try. This touchdown ended the scoring. The final score was Peru 53 and Dana 0. · The defensive work of the Bobcat team was outstanding. This is shown in the fact that Dana was held to a total of minus 19 yards both passing and rushing. At game time the Bobcat team was the leading defensive. team in the NAIA. The Dana Vikings could content themselves in the fact that their halfbacks, Stan Cupp and Gary Kubik, looked like future threats to the N.C.C. with a little more experience. STATISTICS Peru Dana 2 First downs ------- 7 Yards rushing _____ 149 -15 Yards passing _____ 133 -4 Passes attempted __ 8 7 Passes completed __ 6 2 11 Punts -----"------- 5 Punting average ___ 51.6 30.27 Fumbles lost ______ O 2 Penalty yardage ___ 50 10 SCORING BY QUARTERS: Peru ______ 19 28 6 O 53 Dana _____ 0 0 0 0 0

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Concordia 46-0 By Tom Higgins The Peru Bobcats hit through the air for two tallies and webfooted their way for five, as they downed a mud-drenched Concordia Bulldog eleven ,46-0, October 1. A series of ~obcat plays advanced the ball to the Concordia four. Buddy Bookwalter, powerful Peru fullback, swept right end for four yards. Jim Poage converted the extra point and Peru grabbed a quick 7-0 lead with 9:46 remaining in the first quarter. It was quick t,hinking and good footing that brought about Peru's next tally. Jim Poage called for a quick kick from his own 34. Buddy Bookwalter booted the ball 63 yards. Concordia fumbled on their own 10 and it was quick and alert Dick Gerber who recove,red for Peru. Seconds 1ate r quarterback Poage flipped a muddy spiral to Ross Pilkington. The completion was good for eight yards and a T:D. Poage converted making the score 14-0. Costly Concordia Fumble Poage had no sooner kicked off than Concordia again lost the muddy football on a fumble. This time it was Pilkington who recovered on the Concordia 35. Only seconds had elapsed in the second quarter before Bookwalter again crashed over from the four. Poage's extra point at~ tempt was no good and the score stood at 20-0. With a little more than five minutes left to play in the first half, speed merchant, Dick Place jaunted 50 yards to pay dirt. Again Poage's extra point was no good and the score indicator added six more for Peru. More Concordia Fumbling Again it was a fumble, only two plays after the kick-off, that set up the fourth Peru tally. Cletus Shrout fell on a Concordia fumble on the Concordia lZ. Eight plays later and with a little less than two minutes remaining in the first half, Peru again struck through the air. The completion was good for 23 yards. Chris Salberg flipped the water-logged pigskin to Bob Gibson, making the score 32~0. Extra point by Poage was no good. Thus, the fiirst half ended. Muddy Last Half By the time play resumed the second half, a steady drizzle and churning cleats changed the complexion of the Oak Bowl from "pasture" green to "mud pie" brown. Both teams were covered w:ith the moist terra firma . Peru received the kick and in four plays moved the ball 62 yards to another T.D. This time it was the running 'ability of Ross "swivel hips" Pilkington that carrieQ. it over from 36 yards out. Poage's conversion was good, making the score 39-0.

Three-TD Performance Nets Peru Ace Award '

Ramirez Cited For Defensive Play (From World-Herald, Oct. 6)

The Red Oak, Iowa, sophomore is a sprinter and broad jumper on Peru's track team. 0th e r stars: John Siedhoff, Doane-Regular offensive guard, he doubled on defense to help stop Chadron, 14-0. Ron Barry, Hastings-F 1 as hy Bronco halfback scored on runs of 49, 13 and 70 yard,s against Midland. Dean Sell, Wesleyan-Helped -Plainsmen whip Dana with scoring dashes of 26 and 65 yards. Gene Carstens, Norfolk JCEnd caught a touchdown pass and kicked three extra points in 21-7 victory over Scottsbluff. Bob Campbell, Kearney-Two touchdowns helped keep Kearney rolling at Wayne, 34-0.

Peru Prep scored its third victory Friday, October 2, defeating the Table Rock Tigers 31 to 7. The game was played in a constant drizzle and there were several fumbles. Peru recovered four Table Rock fumbles and turned two of these into touchdowns. Table Rock recovered three Prep fumbles but failed to make the necessary yardage for touchdowns. Table Rock scored first when Joe Smith ran 37 yards for a touchdown. Bob Freeman ran the ball across the goal for the expoint and Table Rock led 7-0. Peru took the Table Rock kickoff and went all the way for 6 points. Marshall Adams took the ball at the ten yard line and as he was tackled, lateraled off to Paul Heuer, who ran it over the goal line. The next Peru touchdown came at the start of the second half when Marshall Adams went 70 yards on a kick-off return. Bill Tynon ran the ball across for the extra point. The third Prep touchdown was on a 30yard run' by Adams. Bill Tynon scored the fourth Prep touchdown on a 2-yard plunge. Rich Reeves ended the night's scoring. as he went over the center of the line for a touchdown. Peru had nine first downs to seven for Table Rock. Prep's record now stands at three wins and on€ loss. Mike Ramirez, Peru-Defensive play at guard has been a major reason Bobcats lead the NATA in defense.

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Pilkingion's Third T.D. With six minutes. remaining in the third period, again it , was Pilkington who carried the mail 25 yards for the final Peru T.D. Extra point attempt by Poage was good, and the final score was 46-0. The fourth quarter furnished a lot of excitement, but furnished nothing at all to the s c o r i n g column. Impressive Statistics Peru now has a string of three, straight wins and no losses. The Bobcats have scored 133 tallies to their opponents' o, Next home game 'is Homecoming, Oct. 17, when the Peru Bobcats will tangle with the Wayne Wildcats)

Peru Prep Downs Table Rock 31-7

A second straight three-touchdown performance earns Peru's Ross Pilkington The World-Herald's Star-of-the-Week Award for state colleges. Pilkington, who returned to Peru football this fall after Air Force duty, ran 25 and 35 yards and took a two-yard pass from Dick Place to pace the 46-0 Nebraska College Conference rout of Concordia. The previous week, the 165pound halfback ran a punt back 80 yards, was on the receiving end in a 25-yard pass play and broke loose, for 45 yards from scrimmage for ·t o u c h d o w n s against ·Dana. His six touchdowns give him the NCC scoring lead and he may be impossible to catch. In the non-conference opener against We$tmar, Pilkington s c o r e d twice.

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Campus School News Opera To Be Presented Campus School ~hatter Heading Program Officers of High School Classes On Peru Campus Am~~g~~:ye!~:-~u~~:~1:r or- Is A Success and Organizations of

November 12, 1959, is the date set for. the presentation of GilEIGHTH bert and Sullivan's comic opera, President, Ann Adams. "H. M. S. Pinafore." The cast Vice president, Jeannie Gnade. has been selected from the memSecretary, Janice Biere. bers of the current Peru State Treasurer, Barbara Peck. Concerl Choir, and rehearsals News reporter, Anita Cox. are under way. Student council, Ann Adams. The cast is as follows: Sir JoSEVENTH seph Porter (First Lord of the President, Steve Snyder. Admiralty), Henry Hiilrich; CapVice president, Lavonne Ste- tain Cocoran (Commander of the phens. H. M. S. Pinafore), Clark Maffitt; Secretary, Patty Adams. Ralph Rackstraw (Able Seaman), Treasurer, Lola Morrissy. Alan Kreglo; Dick Deadeye Student council, Steve Snyder. (Able Seaman), Dick Sietsema; Bill Bobstay (Boatswain's Mate), PEP CLUB President, Sara Adams. Eugene Walden; Bob Becket Vice president, Harlene Palmer (Carpenter's Mate), Larry MillSecretary, Linda Applegate. er; Josephine (the Captain's daughter), Marilyn Wright; CouTreasurer, Jane Crabtree. LETTERMAN'S CLUB sin Hebe (Sir Joseph's first cousin), Jan Lillethorup; Little ButPresident, Bill Tynon. Vice president, Marshall Ad- tercup (Bumboat Woman), Joyce ams. Carman. Secretary-treasurer, David Gomon. F. H. A. President, Mary Jarvis. The Peru Prep Bobkittens met Vice president, Harlene Paldefeat for the first time this year mer. on September 25, 1959. The Cook Secretary, Sara Adams. Cougars beat the Bobkittens 25 Treasurer, Karen Mcintire. to 20 on Peru's home field. It was Parl., Kay Tripp. a close game all the way, and it Degree chair., Sue Applegate. gave the Peru people their first Song leader, Mary Wilson. chance to see the Bobkittens at Rec. chair., Marion Straw. Publicity chair., Dorothy Sher- home. The only time that Peru led was at halftime when they man. had a 13-12 edge. STUDENT COUNCIL ' The Cook Cougars completely OFFICERS controlled the game with their President, Marcia Allgood. hard running and fine defensive Vice president, Bill Tynon. play. Halfback Dale Mueller Secretary, Laquita Allgood. scored 13 of Cook's 25 points and Treasurer, Sara Adams. News reporter, Larry Blanton. quarterback 'Ted Kroese got the other 12. Kroese ran 57 yards CHOIR from scrimmage for the finfl President, Karen Mcintire. Cook touchdown that gave Cook Vice president, Kay Tripp. the winning points. Sec.-treas., Sara Adams. Pat Morris went across the Freshman rep., Nancy Jarvis. Sophomore rep., Linda Mor- Cook line three times to score the Peru touchdowns. The extra rissy. points were kicked by Marshall Junior rep., Linda Applegate. Adams. Senior rep., Mary Jarvis. ihe Campus School

Cougars Defeat Bobkittens

SEE

HThe Cave Dwellers" Presented by the Dramatics Club OCTOBER 17

The reading program that is now in effect at the Campus School was started last year and is conjunction with the Library Club of America. In the grades kindergarten through eight last year, 104 books were read by the first grade, 299 books by the second grade, 230 by· the third grade, 181 by the fourth grade, 141 by the fifth grade, 331 by the sixth grade, 103 by the seventh grade, and 115 by the eighth grade. Last year the program was very successful. Certificates and Pins are t awar ded t o th ose st udens wh o read a specified number of books. Four books qualify the student start, but annual pictures have to be a member, 14 books an been taken, the Juniors chose . honor member, and 25 for memand "paid 'down" on class rings, bers~ip.

the Seniors ordered commencement announcements -already! And it was more or less impera"Every brave man is a man of tive that orders for school an- his wqrd."-Corneille. nuals be in last week-they made a good start last year. GEBER'S Hope they do as well or better Conoco Service with this issue. Service Is Our Specialiy The first fire drill was held on BR 4-3818 Wednesday, September 30, the Auburn, Nebraska first period with fair warning to all (but no untoward incidents, apparently)-future fire drills will be unannounced and that's when the unusual occurs. Ditto (pardon me, Darrell) Wininger, opened his birthday package six weeks ahead of time and promptly donned the complete football outfit, pads, helmet and all. Denied the pi:ivilege of wearing them to bed, he wore them to school next day. (Proud papa couldn't stay away from 1st grade room to see the contrast between his'n and regularly clothed young'ns.) With most members of the high schol taking i:i.art in band, on the football teani or at the Pep Club stand, it's a good thing the 4th and '5th graders are enClothing thusiastic cheerers 'for our side. Little 4th grader Faye Furnas fell on the cement steps in her enthusiasm during the first home game and sported a forehead bandage over her stitches for several days. But who can be enthusiastic at a football game when the Open Soon skies keep dampening clothes and playing field and spirits?

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ganizations in the Campus School is the FHA sponsored by Mrs. Kregel. Those gals have more meetings, more projects, more trips! Last Saturday was a food sale, this Saturday a trip to the· state convention, and meetings after school now to plan a display for Homecoming. Betcha there's more scurrying around at the Campus School over their Home<:oming than you've seen or.heard among college groups. The theme is "Nursery Rhymes;" they play Talmage; they've voted for queen; and "We have an ideal spot for our class display!'" According to the calendar, the school year just has a good

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The first meeting of the Beta Mu Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi was held in the music hall on October 5. After a short business meeting, Miss Ashley talked and showed slides of her recent experiences while studying in New York. Miss Ashley attended Columbia University last semester to work on her Ed.D. degree. Refreshments of coffee and cake were served by the officers.

"CAVE DWELLERS" TO BE HOMECOMING PLAY (Continued from first page) Saroyan's "Cave Dwellers" will be presented. According to word received by Mr. Moore, the director, special arrangements had to be made in order to present the drama. This is the first time it has been allowed to appear off Broadway. Tickets will be sold at the usual price of 60c for general admission and 80c for reserved seats.

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The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . .

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 55

Number 3

Mr. Holmes, Asst. Professor of English Mr. Richard Holmes, the new ass is tan t professor ..of English, believes the main obstacle students have to overcome today is their indifferent attitude to w a r d s school and studying. He thinks this must be overcome before the students can receive the maximum from their studies.

OCTOBER 26, 1959

ALetter Fram Dr. Gamon

This is a letter written by Dr. Gomon to his wife and children about his experiences in Moscow on October 14, 1959. "This is our last day in Moscow. We leave in the morning for Tbilisi. It is snowing very hard now. It started about six o'clock. Nice day yesterday. Had When asked how he 1 i k e d a fine day visiting a 10-year Peru, he replied that he liked it school and the Academy of Pedvery much. He especially enjoys agogjcal Sciences. Last night I the academic f r e e d o m , the went to the Sports Palace (seats friendly attitude both between 19,500) and saw a double header the faculty and students and basketball game, Korea vs. Yuamong the faculty itself, and the chance for everyone to take part. goslovia and Czechoslovakia vs. Bulgaria. Girls basketball played Mr. Holmes received his bache- under men's rules. Excellent lor of science degree and his players, could beat many small master of science degree from college teams. Sometime during the day my Kansas State University. He also has had one year of graduate baggage was ransacked. 0 n 1y study and has taught on an as- things taken were five rolls of sistantship at Kansas State Uni- film, three unused and two used . . versity for two years. Cannot understand taking used film unless did not know the difMr. Holmes is married and is ference. Anyway I have lost two a native of Salina, Kansas. His rolls of pictures taken in East favorite hobbies are fishing, tenBerlin, Warsaw and some here nis and chess. in Moscow that can never be replaced. One of the other men in the group said he lost four films but none used. Don't know how we can protect our luggage any more than we do, but there are a dozen maids and others traipBy Rose Clancy sing in and out of the rooms all Tom Higgins was voted the day. Must be a black market in Mst actor in Peru's Homecoming American film, at least Soviet play, October 17. He was anony- colored photos are of p o o r mously selected by three faculty quality. and two alumni judges for his Do not know if mail is getting character portrayal, sincerity, out or not. Only two letters have and effectiveness as the King in been received by our entire William Saroyan's "Cave Dwell- group. We do know that foreign ers.'' mail goes in or out of Tbilisi or Kiev. Here in Moscow not even In recognition for his percablegrams are delivered to the formance, Tom has received a hotel. They are received at Inticket to the play "Dear Lear," tourist Headquarters. Le t t e rs , starring Kathrine Cornell. After cards, cablegrams, etc., are all the play, Tom will be presented dumped into a big laundry basto Miss Cornell by a member of ket, then tourists may go there Peru's faculty. · and sort through the entire mess Tom is a senior at Peru this to see if he has any mail and year. English and speech are his messages. Our representative was major fields of concentration. He there an hour and a quarter sorthas been active in dramatics ing through the stuff before he throughout high school and col- came up with the two letters inlege. He has· served as Drama tic's dicated. Some system. Club president in both high Breakfast is in 20 minutes school and college and is a mem- then to the Ministry of Educaber of the National Thespian So- tion. This afternoon to the Uniciety. After graduation, he plans . versity of Moscow. Tonight · a to teach drama in high school. circus (Soviet equivalent of a Tom says, he hopes some day to vaudeville show.)" have an opportunity to direct theater productions other than high school plays'.

Tom Higgins To Meet "First Lady Of The Theater"

Lynda Ehlers, Homecoming Queen By Carolyn Parli During her high school days, Miss Lynda Ehlers, daughter Lynda was a cheerleader for of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Ehlers three years, president of her senof Nebraska City, was crowned ior class, attendant for the Carthe 1959 Homecoming Queen nival Queen, Homecoming during the ceremony at the Queen, Choir Queen, and FFA dance in the evening of Oct. 17. Sweetheart. Being a queen isn't This year's queen is a sopho- new to Lynda, since she was more at Peru State and is major- honored by being chosen Snow ing in a two-year elementary ed- Queen during her senior year. ucation course. Our queen is a She was also vice-president of busy girl with the many activi- the Youth Council of Nebraska ties in which she participates, City. such as Student Christian FelThis summer Lynda attended lowship, treasurer of White An- a Methodist Church Camp near gels, cheerleader, WAA, SEAN, Fremont. as a counselor. and employment at Special SerWhen asked her reaction when vices. Last year Lynda was sec- she discovered that she was retary of the freshman class, queen, Lynda exclaimed, "I was member in choir and band, and completely flabbergasted. This is an attendant at the May Fete the most wonderful surprise I've ·and Sweetheart Dances. ever had!"

Home Ee Club Guests Pledges Initiated At Utilities Dinner Into Tri Beta On October 12, thirty-five Home Economics Club members, sponsors Mrs. Sproul and Mrs. Kregel, and guests, Miss Margaret Slattery, Miss Edna Weare, Paul Goebel and Dr. Owen Harlan, attended a six o'clock dinner given by the Metropolitan Utilities District of Omaha at the Gas Company in Omaha, Nebraska. After the dinner Mrs. Marilyn Kollmorgen presented a Hawaiian food demonstration. She prepared a meal consisting of golden stuffed baked fish lima beans in sour cream, t~opical fruit ring with Hawaiian fruit dressing, flame kissed corn bread, and polynesian cocoea dessert. Following the demonstration, ~· Evelyn Gordon showed the , "Miracle Kitchen." Each ber and guest was presentrecipe booklet published by staff of the "Good Living"

Seventeen pledges have been initiated into membership of the PI chapter of Beta Beta Beta, national honorary biological fraternity at Peru State Teachers College, according to Ronald Stoltenberg, Nebraska City, chapter president. The new members include: provisional, LaVerna Roos, Dunbar; Kathleen Rhoten, Palmyra; Robert Heng Jr., Nebraska City, Albert Van Borkum, Beatrice; Ronald Callan, McCook; Jerry George, Auburn; John Masonbrink, Stella; Gerald Bippes, Stella; Ron Leitschuck, Burchard; Nancy Kunkel, Falls City; and Larry Morgan, Beatrice. Full membership: Lanny Richards, Bellevue; Jim Kemp, Muscotah, Kansas; Willard Jensen, Ruskin; Gerald Jeanneret, Brock; Darrel Wright, Steinauer; Glen Irwin, Nebraska City; Doug Dickerson, Sumner; Paul DeVries, Douglas; Judy Miller, Pe-

Ninety-Two Years Great

Organization Pictures To Be Taken November IO

The play which Tom will see, "Dear Lear," is based on the correspondence between the dramaThe organization pictures for tist, George B. Shaw, and the the 1960 Peruvian are scheduled famous actress, Mrs. P. Camp- to be taken during the afternoon bell. It will be showing one of November 10. The time and night at the Music Hall Audi- place for individual organizatorium in Omaha, November 5. tions will be announced at a laThis is the second pre-Broadway ter date. tour of the play before it opens Photographers for the organin New York in December. Coizational group pictures are Mr. starring with "The First Lady of Don Carlile and Mr. J. D. Levitt. the Theater" is Brian Ahern. Mr. Mr. Carlile will take pictures in Ahern and Miss Cornell have the auditorium; Mr. Levitt in the starred together in a number of Music Hall. previous productions, including Mr. Jim Leachman, a repre"The Constant Wife," and "The sentative of the lt1ter-collegiate Barretts of Wimpole Street." Press Company, Kansas City, Mo., was present for the Oct. 16 ru; Lee Becker, Peru; Rand Peruvian Staff meeting. At this Schumaker, Omaha, and Jack time, he presented ideas and exHead, Bellevue. amples for a 1960 Peruvian covJohn C. Christ and Albert 0. er. A novel cover design was seBrady are faculty . sponsors of lected from a wide variety of the PI Chapter. ideas.

Mr. T. I. Friest T. I. Friest, former superintendent of schools at Plattsmouth, is the new dean of business affairs. As the new dean he will havelsup'-rvision of all business activities 'Df the college including general control of the housing and eating facilities as well as budgeting and financial operations. ·~~ Dean F 4 r e c e i v ed his bachelor of arts degree from Morningside College, Sioux City, Iowa, and his master of arts degree from the University of Iowa. He began his teaching and administrative career at Bloomfield,· Nebraska, where he spent eight years. He was Superintendent of Schools at Wisner, Nebraska, for 16 years and at Plattsmouth, Nebraska, for 15 years. Mrs. Friest, who was high school librarian and teacher of Latin at Plattsmouth, is employed as librarian and Latin instructor at the campus school and part-time,. librarian at th~ college library. The Friests have two sons, David, who is employed by the North American Aviation Corporation in Downey, California; and Wendell, a recent graduate of the University of Nebraska who is now an ensign in the Navy.

Will Hold Receptions For Alumni and Friends Of N.S.T.C. Receptions for alumni and friends of Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru have been scheduled in connection with the Nebraska State Education Association conventions in Omaha and Lincoln. Both events will be Thursday, October 29, from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. At Lincoln the event will be held on .the mezzanine of the Cornhusker Hotel, and the Omaha reception is scheduled for the Sheraton South Room of the Sheraton-Fontanelle Hotel. Harold Johnson, director of placement, is in charge of the Omaha event, and Donald K. Carlile, director of special services, will be host for the Lincoln reception.

Guitarist Entertains Ramon Hernandez of Taos, New .Mexico, presented a guitar program at the all-college convocation October 21. Among the styles of guitar he played were concert, flamenco, folk, and1 pop- · ular. Giving a brief explanation of each song before he played it, he presented "Taboo," "Malaguina," and many others.


CONGRATULATIONS, STUDENTS There was much of excellence in Peru's 1959 Homecoming. Even the weather was splendid and contributed much to the over-all success of the event. Exhibits were better than usual and the freshmen won with their "record" display. The Wheelermen turned in a fine performance in the Oak Bowl and defeated Wayne 16-6. The only regrettable thing about the game was the injury of Poage at the second half kick-off. The band gave a fine performance. Hundreds were served at the Delzell coffee hour, and representatives of the alumni office and the Pedagogian were on hand passing out Peru Staters and Pedagogians. The alumni luncheon and the "P" Club luncheon were well attended. The Dramatics Club gave a professional performance of Saroyan's "Cave Dwellers." The festivities ended with the Homecoming dance. The entire student body is to be congratulated for splendid cooperation in making Homecoming the great day it was. Also the student body deserves commendation for its exemplary behavior. Conducting themselves with dignity, the students had a good time and were fine hosts to the alumni and friends of the college. All of us were very proud of you, students, and of the contributions you made to the finest Homecoming in recent years. -S. P. L.

1

Library Shorts By Carol Ellenberger Kissing Cousins by E m i 1y Hahn is a true story about a trip the British-born author took across the country with her two young daughters. It is a story containing many and varied experiences as the English family become acquainted with the United States and its ways. The trip is an eye-opener in many ways for the family and the author instills the humor to be found only in such experiences. Kissing Cousins is a book full of joyfulness and the varied observations that an Englishman has of the United States. For a story about cattle and the ranching empire of the Old West, The Cattlemen by Mari Sandoz is just the book. In the book the author traces the history. of cattle raising, its movement westward, and the beginnings of the towns w h i c h were destined to become the centers for markets and railroads. Mari Sandoz also 'reaches back into the lives of many men and the . campaigns against "rustlers" and the big gun fights. Just as the cattle empire's power increased, so did they collapse, and the author recovers the sharp and moving action of this period of our history. The Cattlemen is an exciting book and a true account of the frontier days. Nehru by Dr. Michael Brechner is a political biography and also a political history of India covering the last forty years.

The author makes an impressive study of Nehru's political and psychological development. It is a striking portrait of the Indian leader, his influel}Ce, his past experience and background. Sources for the book were many of Mr. Nehru's speeches and information gathered from the archives of Congress. Dr. Brechner, the author, is associate Professor of Political Science at McGill University. If you are interested in astronomy, The Stars Are Yours by James Sayre Pickering is an informative and en t e rt a in in g choice. This book, recently revised, explains astronomy, emphasizing objects easily seen wi~hout telescopes and other expensive equipment and clearly defines everything avoiding scientific terminology. In it the solar system is discussed as well as. our galactic system and those that lie beyond. Mr. Pickering tells about many strange occurences and mysterious activities that happen in space that are almost unbelievable. Many of the age-old questions are also explained and discussed with the help of clear, up-to-date charts. The author, James Pickering, is a graduate of Columbia college and has been interested in astronomy all his life. At present, he is Special Lecturer at the Hayden Planetarium.

Whispers From Morgan By Carolyn Parli The girls have been busy these last two weeks getting ready for Homecoming. Long hours were spent by Linda Goodin and her committee making the dorm's display. The dorm was decorated to represent a music shop called Melody Hall. If you saw dust flying from the windows, you shouldn't have been a 1arm e d, the girls were making use of their housekeeping instincts to make a good impression during Open House. The building project for the extension of the d-0rm is progressing rapidly. The workers are now on the first floor leveL The first floor gang has done it again! They had another one of those parties-birthday party, that is. This time the party was for Marilyn Wenzbauer and Ellen Hunzeker. Dorm council met in Miss Slattery's apartment Oct. 13, 1959, at 6:00 p.m. They decided that the Christmas Tea will be h e 1 d Thursday, Dec. 10. The girls enjoyed the program given by "Ben, Your Hairdresser" on Oct. 19. Free gifts were given to some of the girls whose names were drawn from name cards. The girls at the dorm had a surprise birthday party for Miss Bradley on Wednesday, Oct. 21, at 10:30 p.m. Refreshments were served, and Miss Bradley was presented a gift from the girls. Janice Korber is engaged to Stan Hightower. The dorm lost a resident last week when Judy Eleven married Al Bohlken. The girls all wish them years of happiness.

Super Sub! It's been said that the atomic submarine ''Nautilus" stays submerged so long that it only surfaces to let the crew re-enlist. Perhaps for this reason, the Navy has taken valuable space aboard the "Nautilus" for the only soft-drink vending machine in the entire submarine fleet. Naturally (or you wouldn't hear about it from us) it's a Coca-Cola machine. And not unexpectedly, re-enlistments are quite respectable. Rugged lot, those submariners. Gl'ellt drink, Coke! SIGN OF GOOD TASTE Bottled 11nder authority of The Coca-Cola Company by

NEBRASKA CITY COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO.

Detonations From Delzell By Ray G. Meister

BANK OF PERU

Delzell Hall capped off HomePHONE TR 2-2331 coming by winning third prize in the display contest. Since the Member F.D.I.C. theme was "Say it with music," the display turned out to be a INVITES YOUR BUSINESS little, green recording booth, more commonly known as an JOHN L. LEWIS, CARROLL LEWIS, outhouse. Called "The Home of Vice Pres. & Cashier President the Wayne Wildcats," this dilapidated den was fully equipped with dual accessories plus a record player and loud speakers for added comfort. "Music with an odor," was provided by the "PINAFORE" COMING "Three Stooges,'' alias Hank 2 ON NOVEMBER 1 Turner and Ray Meister, plus Peru State Choir will present Larry Carre on the guitar. Their Meats Groceries "Pinafore" Nov. 12. Watch for it. "scented" record will undoubtedly sell a million · copies, and Vegetables Fruits who knows, maybe even a comPERU PEDAGOGIAN mand p e r fo r m a n c e for the Queen! The Voice of ihe Campus of a Thousand Oaks Now that Homecoming is over, Member Iniercollegia±e Press peaceful snores can again be Oc±ober 26, 1959 heard resounding through the with the Ept chapter at woodwork and foundations of THE STAFF State Teachers College, exhibit this building. Co-Editor __________________________________ Donna Francis for the State Industrial Arts Credit must be given to Jim Epsilon Pi Tau, honorary fraCo-Editor ______________________________ Rosemary Rottman Mayo, who maintained law and ternity in industrial arts educa- Convention to be held in Omaha, Sports Editor ________________________________ Tom Higgins order in Delzell and was walking tion, held its first meeting of the and organization of demonstraSports Reporter ____________________________ David Hoffman his beat through the halls at year at 8:00 p.m. October 14, tion teams to put on programs Sports Reporter ______________________________ Jerry Osborn 4:30 a.m. Sunday morning check- 1959. The meeting was conducted in neighboring high schools. Sports Reporter _____________________________ Wallace West ing doors and making sure that by the president, Milan Hawxby. The new president appointed Copy Editor --------------------------------Kathy Rhoten everyone was comfortable. The main purpose of the meeting the following committees: proCopy Editor ____________________________ Martha Sue Moore The T.V. set in the lobby was was to elect officers for the com- gram committee, Richard GerBusiness Manager __________________________ Jerry Lunsford hard-pressed for its usual large ing year. The following we re ber, chairman, and Robert TaenBusiness Manager _____________________________ Al Bohlken audience the past week, due to elected: president, Wayne Mc- zler; field trip committee, Gail Columnist ____________________________________ Ray Meister some ill-timed tests given by Farland; vice-president, Richard Beckstead, chairman, and Joseph Columnist ___________________________________ Carolyn Parli various members of the faculty. Gerber; secretary, Douglas Dick- Ve r b eek ; and demonstration Columnist ____ .__________________________ Mary Anna Gnade Some students burned the mid- erson; and treasurer, J o s e p h committee, Milan H aw x by, Exchange Editor _______________________ Mrs. Dorothy High night oil, while others set t!J.eir Verbeek. chairman, and Jerry Beckman. Convocations ______________________________ Ellen Hunzeker souped-up sun dials to ring a litStudent Senate ___________________________ Jeannine Ehlers The fraternity set 8:00 on the The remainder of the time was tle earlier in a last-ditch attempt Dramatics ____________________________________Rose Clancy second Wednesday of e a c h taken up in considering t)le actito cram a few more secrets from Church __________________________________ Alice Greenwood vities for the year. Activities month as its regular the books into their brains. Music __________________________________ Karen Fankhauser This reporter sadly reports that proposed incluc'led prospective period for the year. Campus School News __________________________ Chris Hays no one has gotten engaged yet! field trips to Lincoln and Omaha Campus School News __ " ___________________Joanne Bohlken It seems that there was a wed- to visit industrial art shops, the 'Library Column _________________________ Carol Ellenberger Casey's Standard ding last Friday, though, but-'the possibility of a joint initiation Reporter ____________________________________ Leland Smith Service lucky groom doesn't live in this Reporter _____________________________________Jane Kunkle establishment. He's luckier than ready engaged all over again so QUALITY SERVICE Spoii.sor ________________________________ Stewart Linscheid he thinks! Well, it looks as if they'll be sure to remember how BR 4·9963 we'll just have to dunk those al- it feels!

HEUER GROCERY

PERU

Epsilon Pi Tau Meets

NEBRASKA


19 5 9 Peru

~tate

Homecoming

Pre-Homecoming Pep Meeting An all-college pep rally started enthusiastically when the cheerleaders stepped onto the stage to lead a few yells with the band. Coach Al Wheeler introduced the captains for the-game-John Bookwalter, Wayne McFarland, Ernie Madison, Chris Salberg, Jerry Paden, Clyde Haskins, Don Kasbohm, Don Stange, and Gary Anderson. Professor John Christ then spoke briefly about the meaning of homecoming to the alumni. Special stars such as Miss J. P. Morgan, the McGuire sisters, Fats Domino, Bo Didly and Friend, Elvis Presley, and the cheerleaders were hilariously misrepresented by Harry Whitney, LaMar Gibson, Dick Gerber, Bob Gibson, Jim Poage, Mike Ramirez, Joe Barrientos, Sam Sadich, Roger Smith, Pat Hamm, Tom Yopp, Drexel Harvey, and Tom Lakin.

J. P. MORGAN LETS GO WITH A SONG

The convocation ended with the yell for victory and the color song.

McGUIRE SISTERS APPEAR AT CONVO

CHEERLEADE(.RS STRUT THEIR STUFF

INDUSTRIAL ARTS CLUB TAKES SECOND

Freshmen Display Homecoming Winner The Homecoming displays for the 1959 Homecoming were set up and ready for the judging early Saturday morning. Exhibits were many and varied all in some way carrying out the 1959 Homecoming "Say It With Music" theme.

FRESHMEN WIN AGAIN

"Deep Down Under" Published By Miss Crone The story relates the happenMiss Ruth Crone, assistant professor of literature, has pub- ings in a small town when it is lished a short story, "Deep Down found that a Negro has been burUnder," in the July-August issue ied in what had been previously thought to be an all-white cemeof The Humanist. Miss Crone, .in her short story, tery. visits her "home town" during Mr. Richard Holmes, assistant World War II. Her home town is professor of English, commented 'Beatrice but the home town and "It is a different and interesting ·lhe characters in her story are approach to our racial problem ~pletely fictional. . with a cleverly concealed end-

First place was won by 'the freshman class display with the theme "Do You Remember." At the center point of the triangleshaped display was a large record player playing the record, "Do You Remember?" Stretching down in either direction from the record player was a series of records with silhouettes symbolizing an aspect of the hit songs

through the years. In this way, the freshma,n class hoped to bring to the mind of the alumni the songs that were popular when they were here on the campus. For their efforts, the class received the plaque with the names of all previous winners engraved on it and twentyfive dollars. Second place winner was the Industrial Arts Club s a y in g , "Wildcats, You Won't Be Satisfied." To carry out the theme, a

"football player" sat in a caterpillar tractor and a booming voice told the Wildcats, "Look out Wildcats, here we come!" A prize of fifteen dollars was awarded to the club. Delzell Hall's display to o k third and ten dollars with its clever structure and motto, "Wipe Out the Wildcats!" Ray Meister, Hank Turner, and Larry Carre recorded songs that were played for the music end of the theme.

Open House Held at Dorms

"Forewarned is to be fore- coming from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 armed," and with this in mind, p.m. and from 4:30 p.m. u n ti 1 the girls of Morgan Hall diligent- 6:00 p.m. ing." Mrs. Mary Anna Gnade, ly cleaned and polished their In the morning a desk was secretary to President Neal Go- rooms' for the open house which set up in the lobby for the remon, said she thought the story was held ,during Homecoming. turning alumni to regis·ter and had a "Hitchcock ending." Between the hours of 10 and 11 vote for next year's alumni offiAs a small return for many a.m., and for one hour after the cers. Working at this desk were kindnesses, Miss Crone, few game Saturday, friends, faculty, Mr. Foss, Mr. Johnson, and Mayears ago, wrote a collection of . and alumni were aM!e to pene- rie Antalek. These people were short stories and articles for Mr. trate the sacred halls and ob- kept very busy in the morning, and Mrs. John Foster Dulles. serve how the girls lived. The as well as during the coffee hour Mrs. Dulles told the author, "I alumnae, especially, en j o ye d in the afternoon. After the Homecoming game, want to see these in print." viewing their old rooms. Delzell Hall, also, was the approximately 500 alumni and "Deep Down Under" is one of (Continued on page four) these stories. scene of Open Hous·e on Home-

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CANDIDATES PRESENTED AT HALF-TIME

Coronation of the 1959 Homecoming Queen

THE QUEEN AND HER ESCORT

By Al Bohlken The Homecoming Coronation was conducted in the college gymnasium at 9:30 p.m., on October 17. Lynda Ehlers, a sophomore, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Ehlers .of Nebraska City, was crowned queen. Mr. Richard Holmes was the emcee for the coronation. :He began the program with musical

entertainment. Judy Miller gave a violin performance, followed by a singing duet with Marilyn Wright and Clark Maffit. The musical entertainers were accompanied on the piano by Mr. R. T. Benford. The presentation of awards for the three outstanding displays for homecoming was made. "Hit Parade," the freshman class display, won the first prize of $25. This is the third straight year the freshman class has "walked off" ;vith first prize. Holmes presented a trophy to the class rep· resentative. Second prize was won by the Industrial Arts Club; a $15 check was presented to the club representative for this ac· complishment. Delzell Hall recei\·ed the third award of $10 for their display.

"The Cave Dwellers" Was Big Success· By Karen Fankhauser Into their derelict w or 1 d, grace before tearing down their "The Cave Dwellers" was the comes Sue Moore in the part of theater and their world. play chosen by Dramatics Coach a lonely, homeless girl; He 1 en Others appearing in the play Robert D. Moore to be presented Warford and Steve Rose, cast as were Harold Schmitz as the a destitute young couple, their at the 1959 Peru Homecoming. young opponent, Ray Parde as The story takes place on the new born baby, and a performthe young man, Joni Wesolowski stage of an abandoned theater ing bear who, under the costume, which is about to be torn down is Alan Nelson. Steve Parker en- as a woman, Rae Ann Gnade as the young queen, and John Parle in a slum clearance project. Here ters later as a mute young milkas Jamie. dwell three lost, broken people~ man, who is persuing the Duke the Queen, a fallen star, por- because he has stolen milk for This play, which was symbolic trayed by Rose Clancy; the King, the baby and the mother. Even- of love, was said b:,.· many to once a great clown, played by tually the boss of the wrecking have been the best they had seen Tom Higgins; and the Duke, an crew, Bob Mayo, takes pity on by a college group. ex-fighter, done by Ray Meister. them and gives them a few days BUSINESS CLUB. HAS HALLOWEEN PARTY The Business Club met Monday, October 19, .at 3 :00· for its regular meeting. A short business meeting was held. Requirements to be a member of the Business Club were discussed. A time limit was set for paying dues. It was decided that everyone must have his dues paid by Monday, October 26, to be a member. A Halloween party followed the business meeting. Games were played and at the close of the party refreshments w er e served.

OPEN HOUSE DORMS

HELD AT

(Continued from page three) friends attended the coffee and social hour in the TV lounge of the dorm. A double serving line was set up to take care of them all. Working on this line were: Mrs. Straw, Mrs. Gergen, Mrs. Sproul, Mr. Christ, Mr. Sheely, Mr. Eddy, Mr. McKercher, Mr. Linscheid, D"onna Penkava, Patsy Melcher, Pam Yost, and Rosemary Rottman.

"If you would create something, you must be something." -Goethe

Kasbohm and Jeannine Ehlers daughter of Mr. and .Mrs. Loui: Ehlers of Syracuse, by Erni( Madison. The escorts were , thE f q o t b a 11 co-captains for thE Homecoming game. A¢1ou1*ement that Lynda Eh· · lers was q'tleen was made follow· ing the seating of the seven can. didates. Bookwalter, the queen'> escort, then took the crown and flo~from the crown bearer an~lower girl-Dwight Rogers·, son of Mr. and Mrs. Don Rogers, Peru, and Pattie Masek, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Masek. also of Peru. Afte:· Book',ralter presented the queen r..vith the crov,·n and flr~».1 :0:-3. the queen and her escort The Coronatic,n Danci: v:as •,»2n· successful ""·ith a large cto\\·cl present. T11e music i':as furnished by Ctirly Stengel and his band.

Lynda Ehlers. the queen, and the six attendants were escorted to the throne. Joanne Bohlken. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edgar "P" Club Luncheon Bohlken of Peru, b1· Jerry PaAbout 30 former Peru State P den; Lynda Ehlers. daughter of Club members were welcomed Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Ehlers of by Ke:th },Ieh·in, Dean of the Nebraska City. by John Book- Coiit-g~. e.t the 2.nnual P Club walter: Marilyn Monroe, daugh- ienchecn Saturday at the col~ ter of Mr. and Mrs. William iege caf2tena. Coach Al Wheeler Monroe of Farragut, Iowa. by greetE:d the former Peru athletes Don Stange; Caro 1 y n \Ving. and introduced them to the foot· daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse bail squad and told of their presWing of Shubert, by Gary And- ent coaching po s i t i on s . Mr. erson: Jane Kunkel, daughter of Wheeler then introduced the Mrs. Mary Kunkel of Falls City, squad to the Alums. Because of by John Okerlin; Rae Mae Hen- the crowded schedule, the lunchry, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ray eon was adjourned immediately Henry of Plattsmouth, by Don after dinner.

Peru's Marching Forty Performed Peru's Marching Forty performed i.n the Oak Bowl for the first time this season at the Homecoming game, October 17. Under the direction of Mr. G. E. Wilson, the band did an impressive "open counter marching routine." After the gr o up marched to the field playing "I Love a Parade," they did a precision routine to the "Saints."

While the seven candidates for Homecoming Queen were intro- · duced, the band played background tunes from Brigadoon. The marching unit was led by Alar, Kreglo who substituted as drur;i major for Dick Sietsema. Mary Eiler. Wilson acted as head majorette: other twirlers were Barb Hill, Judy Adams, Sandy Hemphill, and Marlene Ailgood.


t1oncats

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Bobcats Nip Wildcats 16-6 At Homecoming

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An estimated crowd of 2,500 s, t:rans filled the Oak Bowl for the is J38th annual Homecoming game ie Ii at Peru State Teachers College te Joct. 17, 1959. te I This mass of h u m a n i t y watched with much gusto as the 1- !Bobcats stepped past the Wayne r- j State Wildcats 16-6. t- f ·This victory gave Peru its 's l•.fou.rth straight conference win. d The victory tied Kearney for the !r l conference lead.

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s, I The Bobcats, who were first in t- the nation, in total defense for t- : small colleges, found the hard ; charging Wayne linemen a little h ; more aggressive then their foren runners. However, the faithful , Bobcats put up a gallant fight s and were able to ward off many e Wayne's attempts to score.

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cats again hit pay dirt. This time it was Jim "the toe" Poage who split the uprights with a field goal from 27 yards out. The angle seemed almost impossible but Poage's kick was true and the score stood at 10-0 with 11 :35 left in the first half. The remainder of the first half was left scoreless. Both teams found it hard to move the ball against the onslaught of the opposing linemen. The score at the half remained Peru 10, Wayne 0. During the half, the crowd was kept enlightened by the Peru State Marching Forty. The excitement was kept alive by the presentation of the seven queen candidates for H o me c o m in g Queen of 1959. Poage Hurt

First Period TD

Poage Field Goal

As the second half began, this excitement quieted down to momentary sorrow and grief as star quarterback, Jim Poage, staggered off the field and collapsed on the sidelines. Wild anticipation filled the stands as the crowd waited for a report to the extent of his injuries; but no report came. The game must go on. Senior quarterback Wayne McFarland went in to call the signals.

It was this first TD that kSE'err1ed. to give the blue and .white their spark. It was only .five minutes later when the Bob-

With just a little less then ten minutes gone in the third period,

The first score of the ball game came via a 47 yard march. When Ross Pilkington intercepted a Wayne pass on the Wayne Four plays later, quarterback Jim Poage tossed the tally pass to Ross Pilkington. The play 28 yards. Poage's kick for the extra point was good and the score was 7-0 with 1:53 left in the first period.

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Quarterback Jim Poage has kicked 21 extra points in 29 attempts until he was sidelined after the kick-off for the second half in Satu.rday's game against Wayne State. In Saturday's game, he was successful on his first field goal attempt. It was a 15-yard kick from a difficult angle. Linebacker Jerry Henning of Peru was a demon on defense as

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As the fourth period began, it looked as though Peru's goal line was still not going to be crossed. This thought was· soon abandoned when Wayne State's, Lyle Blattert, intercepted a Peru pass on the Wayne 26. It was a 74 yard march, highlighted by a 29 yard run by fullback Merlin Mitteis, that set up their tally. The six points came when quarterback Doii. Potter7'pfonged over from five yards out on a keeper play. Ron Bovill's attempt at the extra point was no good. The score with 6:07 left in the game was 16-6. Wayne made one last vain attempt to shorten the gap, but this was shut off by the alertness of Ross Pilkington as he intercepted a Wayne pass on the Wayne goal line. Wayne was the stiffest competition to face the Bobcats yet this year. A fired up Peru football team proved themselves master of such competition .

1V11d1and warriors

~~-u

The Peru State Bobcats swept past the Midland Warriors 55-0 Saturday night at Fremont. As the case in the Bobcats' previous three victories, the Warriors did not have the speed and manpower to stay with the visitors. With Buddy Bookwalter playing one of the most brilliant games of his career, the Bobcats crushed the stout-hearted Warriors of Midland. Bookwalter, senior fullback from Lawrence, Kan., personally rolled up 215 of the 456 yards the Bobcats g a in e d on the ground. This total included a first quarter up-the-middle 69yard touchdown gallop, on the last play from scrimmage, and a 65-yard streak to the Midland 5 to end the half. His second touchdown came early in the fourth quarter on a 7-yard run around left end. Bookwalter was ably assisted by his fellow speed merchant in the backfield, Dick Place, Nebraska City halfback, who scored two touchdowns and passed for another and gained a total of 164 yards. His touchdowns were on runs of 50 and 3 yards respectively. The 50-yard scamper came early in the first quarter as he started around left end, snake-danced away from three defenders and outsprinted the rest. The second Place touchdown, in the third quarter, capped a 76-yard drive of the Bobcats which began upon the receiving of the Midland kickoff. It was a 3-yard sweep of left end, climaxing a series of eleven Bobcat plays.

ers, Bob and LaMarr, each contributed a touchdown to the Bobcat cause. Bob's came on a 57yard sprint around right end about midway in the last quarter. Not to be outdone by his brother, LaMarr scored near the end of the quarter on a 26-yard pass from another Falls Citian, quarterback Jim Poage. Peru's other touchdown came in the second quarter as Phil Peavyhouse, South Lyon, Mich., halfback, snared one of Midland's 34 passes and scampered 55 yards for the score. Midland's deepest penetration of Bobcat territory was the first time they had possession. With the ball on their own 20, Midland's fullback Ben Stindt passed out in the flat to quarterback Bill Nelson, who, in turn, passed downfield to Jim Scherer on the Peru 35. However, as it turned out, Stindt fumbled five plays later on the Bobcat 22 and Bobcat Ray Unterbrink, East Alton, Ill., lineman recovered. Midland used the air lanes 34 times in a fruitless effort to score on the Bobcats. However, with linemen like Mike Ramirez of Omaha and Cletus Shrout of Wood River, Ill., and ends LaMarr Gibsonfe'hdlpick Gerber, Fullerton, leading .. the Bobcat defensive wall, the Warriors were held to a total of 73 yards both rushing and passing. Peru's s~ working machine grouITl!JOut 456 yards on the ground and 52 yards in the air for a total of 508 yards. Another highlight of the game was the extra point kicking of Jim Poage, who booted seven in Ross Pilkington, Red Oak, a row before he missed his last Iowa, comet, and leading scorer one. Poage's season record is 20 in the N.A.I.A., was the receiver out of 28 attempts. of the 25-yard touchdown pass by Place early in the first quarter. After this touchdown which boosted Pilkington's total season's points to 54, he acted more Barber as a decoy as his mates in the Haircut, $1.25 backfield did the damage. Peru, Nebr. The Falls City Gibson broth-

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Peru again hit through the air. This time it was the alertness· of freshman, Pat Hamm, that set up the T.D. Hamm intercepted a pass on the Wayne 23 and three plays later McFarland flipped the pigskin to Bob Gibson for six points. Tom Lakin's attempt for the extra point was no good and the score read 16-0 with 5:21 remaining in the third period.

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he figured in almost half of the tackles made by the Bobcat team against Wayne. He literal~y was all over the field. Peru has scored 13 of their 30 touchdowns via the air lanes with Jim Poage pitching five of them ... Red Oak, Iowa, comet Ross Pilkington has scored five of his 10 touchdowns on pass plays ... Bob Gibson, F a 11 s City sophomore, has been on the receiving end of three TD passes. Peru's leading N.A.I.A. rushing defense slipped a little after the Wayne State game-from a minus 4.5 yards per game to 21.2 per game. Total defense slipped from 43.8 yards to 81.4 per game. Buddy Bookwalter has punted 23 times for 1,014 yards or a 44.l average. He was leading the nation in punting with a 46.2 average going into Saturday's game against Wayne. However, a leg injury may have hurt his chances as he punted only six times for an average of 38 yards. Senior Fullback Bookwalter's total of 215 yards gained rushing against Midland College on October 10 could be a school record. However, there are no complete records to verify this fact.

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CHURCH ORGANIZATIONS The church organizations are getting into full s win g this month. Various activities are under way, and projects are being taken up by the clubs. Homecoming, October 17, saw displays by Newman Club and the L.S.A. set up on the campus. October 14, the Lutheran Club sponsored a skating party at Ne-' braska City. It was well attended by the students from the Lutheran Club and the Lutheran Association.

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Karen Mcintire and Bill Tynon Crowned Karen Mcintire and Bill Tyn- best Homecoming displays were to attend. The royalty were on were crowned Homecoming announced. First place went to again presented and took their Queen and King during half time the sophomore class for their places on the thrones. The King ceremonies, Friday night, Oct. 16. display of "Humpty Dumpty." and Queen led the first dance. Prep beat Talmage 33-0. Marcia Second place went to the fresh- Free sandwiches and punch were Allgood, Marshal Adams, Bar- man class and third place to the served during intermission. bara Adams, and Richard Reeves senior class. The theme of this The sponsors for the d an c e year's Homecoming 'was "nurwere attendants. were: Mr. and Mrs. Jack McinDuring the half time, the high sery rhymes." tire, Mr. and Mrs. Johnny AllFollowing the game, a dance school band, under the direction good, Mr. and Mrs. Gergen, and of Mr. Gilbert Wilson, marched was held at the high school audiMr. Frank Masek. on the field. The winners of the torium. Everyone was welcome

Campus School Chatter By Mary Anna Gnade We DID have nice weather for Homecoming but someone left the d-0or open for the draft to blow through! High school queen Karen Mcintire and her attendants, Barbara Adams and Marcia Allgood, did have the good sense to wear warm suits (pretty too), but the poor little crown bearer Janet Wilson and flower girl Diane Coatney were so cold they were pitiful; crown bearer David Adams and bouquet boy Ricky Palmer fared a little better with long trousers and jackets; of course, football players Bill Tynon (king), Rich Reeves and Marshal Adams were warm from conquest. Recommendation for next Homecoming: either hold it during summer weather or dress the little tykes in fuzzy snowsuit type costumes. (You notice I haven't mentioned the frozen state of the majorettesred flannels would be more attractive than blue flesh!) AND the team won! Each class and some of the organizations had clever take-offs of nursery rhymes on display. Sophomores won (glad I'm not a judge to have to choose which one is better than the others). AND the team won 1 These pep rallies are fun and wear off a lot of excess energy but I always wonder if throats are going to hold out through the game itself. My three band members just HAD to be there at 7:10--not a soul around. Five minutes later everyone was there-I mean kids. A scattering of parents (like me, who had kids to haul) and a few faculty members stood around the edges. The band blew, the kids yelled,

but you should have seen spirits swell when Dr. Blanton spoke a few words of confidence in the team and the school as a whole! After the bonfire (enlivened with assorted explosions), the snake dance led by Marshal Adams wound up the rally. AND the team won! But Homecoming is over and done, to be filed away in memorjes. One last memory: the junior band members sporting older brother's and sister's uniformsdidn't look too obvious in spite of inches and inches of turn-ups and oh, the pride engendered; (proof: smart formation marching.) Mundane sch 0o1 goes on, sparked by different activities. Science Club organized for 7th to 12th graders under sponsorship of Mr. Eddy and Mr. Foss .. Senior class play started rehearsals under direction of Sue Moore .. Preliminary aptitude test for juniors and seniors, w hi ch sounds more like tests to come .... Mr. Eddy retrieved the school work sent to the State Fair, along with the monetary awards: superior work drew 40c, excellent 24c, good a mere 8c, but it's MONEY! Now the Scholastic Contest creates a lot of interest and there's more SHOW but it's this cold hard cash that makes, an impression .... Articulate students in speech class will go to Lincoln Saturday to show their proficiency in the art of discussion ... And several instrumentalists are making

ready to participate in an allstate band clinic at Grand Is.land. With all this extra-curricular activity, you wonder if school is after all made up of frills: I'll cue you in-if the mounds of books toted home and hours spent in homework mean anything, school still i n c 1u des readin', writin', and rithmetic in large quantities! Tonight (Tuesday) the football team plays at Shubert-"but we won't get home till 11 :30 or so, because the Rinky-D inks (scrubs) play, too." Doubleheader football games, yet! (After all, Homecoming isn't the only game.)

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The Voice of the Campus of al housand"~a,ks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU.NEBRASKA

Volume 55

Number 5

Don't Come Back From Vacation Dead

NOVEMBER 23, 1959

Dr. Gomon Tells About Travel in Russia

JERRY BECKMANN

~erry Beckmann, senior in-

~strial arts major, has been !osen for a place in the 1959~0 "Who's Who." Jerry is the in of Mr. and Mrs. Ivan Beck~nn of Diller. iA veteran member of the Stu~nt Senate, Blue Devils, Indusbl Arts Club, Lutheran Club, ~d Delzell Council, Jerry is a kent member of SEAN. Jerry ~joys his honorary fraternities fAlpha Mu Omega (math), EpJon Pi Tau (industrial arts), ~ppa Delta Pi (education)~be­ ~use of the professional atmosµere. Offices that Jerry has held fclude being secretary of Epsilti Pi Tau, president of Delzell 1 ~ll, and president of Kappa ~lta Pi. [Jerry, who is student teaching pth semesters this year, hopes teach in Colorado.

By Ray Meister This is the second article I have written on Dr. Gomon's trip to Russia, and I must say that it makes one feel rather envious to hear him relate the many wonderful things he saw while on his tour, while I was back here watching my textbooks. Therefore, if anyone is interested in going to Russia, Dr. Gomon has informed as to what procedures one must go through to get there, and what sort of accommodations to expect upon arrival. In the first place, it is impossible for a person just to go into Russia, merely tO visit. One must first gain permission from the Russian Embassy in the United States. When permission is granted, one must then submit an application to the Intourist Association, which happens to be the only organization in Russia that conducts tours in that country. In the application, one must state exactly what places he wishes to visit and how long he wishes to remain there. Then, upon arrival in Russia, those are the only places he may visit. Everything must be paid for in advance, and the amount paid makes a great difference in the

!hanksgiving Dance lo Be November 23

i fl·

~ss Grush Supervising

~cond

Grade

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Dr. Gomon traveled in the $30 a day, "Regular Class." He]\e one is assured of a room with single beds if there is more than one in the room. A bathroom is also inincluded. Meals for the "Economy Class" and "Regular Class" are the same, and they are served in a specific time and place. In the $40 "DeLuxe Class," accommodations are about the same except that one ·is given coupons with which to buy his meals, and he may eat his meals at any time that he likes. Dr. Gomon's comments on the rooms were that the beds wer,e uniformly hard, the rooms were always cold and never too clean, and the bathrooms were of ancient vintage with either the stool, lavatory, or bathtub always out of order. The Russian Intourist hotels are supposedly

their best hotels, but they compare somewhat to our second class hotels. This leads one to wonder what their poor hotels are like. In Russia, the main cultural entertainment centers a r o u n d the ballet, opera, and the circus, which is somewhat like our vaudeville. While attending the ballet in Moscow, Dr. Gomon saw the Bolshoi Ballet Troupe, which happens to be the number one ballet troup in the world. In Moscow, he also saw the semi-finals of the Women's World Basketball Championship, which included mostly Russian satellite countries. Czechoslovakia defeated North Korea and Bulgaria downeQ. Hungary. Bulgaria went on to win the title. These women played according to our men's rules except that they played 18 minute halves and could only get four personal fouls instead of five. He also visited the Mausoleum in Moscow, where the bodies of Lenin and Stalin are interred. According to Dr. Gomon, thousands of people visit this place each day, and the line waiting to get in is sometimes as much as three-quarters of a mile long.

11

"H. M. S. Pinafore Pleases Enthusiastic Audience

By Rose Clancy The opera, "H. M. f', Pinafore," was presented Thursday evening, November 12, in the College 1I Auditorium. Despite the bad weather, the Gilbert and Sullivan comedy was enthusiastically received by a large audience. The performance went like clock work, thanks to the direcThe M.E.N .C. is sporisoring the tion of Mr. Darrel T. Manring, anksgiving Dance to be held the hard work of almost 75 cast onday, Nov. 23, from eight members, and the production tlock to eleven o'clock in the staff. Those on the production ~mpus School Auditorium. The staff were Mr, R. D. Moore, draparge for admission will be matic coach; Mrs. A. G. Wheeler, ps per couple and .75 per per- choreographer; and Miss Norma The college dance band will Diddel, art designer. Don Carlile fovide the music for the dance. was in charge of publicity, Mrs. R. D. Moore did the makeup. Jim Christ and Howard Wells did the lighting. The Industrial Arts Club constructed the scenery. A satirical conflict between f, social classes evolved amidst the ~ Miss Gladys Grush, the new costuming, lighting, dancing, and ppervisor of second grade at the singing. Ralph, played by Alan ' .·. pus school, received her B.A. Kreglo, had fallen in love with gree and her M.S. degree in his commanding officer's daughii u cation from Peru State keachers College, after which he instructed six years in rural i:hools in Richardson county and jlrenty years in second grade in 'alls City, Nebraska. Miss Grush thinks the main between her present supervising, and her former teaching, is the contact with college student. She says she inspired. by today's student and that she must keep r toes while supervising. s Grush, who comes from City, has been very active Business and Professional 's Club and has held ofooth the State Federation the Falls City Club. She also traveling, music-espethe organ, which she plays "eU-and people.

i

accommodations one receives. There are three classes one may travel in, in Russia. Th_e $15 a day, "Economy Class," only assures one of a bed. He m i g ht have five or six other people in a room with him, and chances are, they will all share a bathroom with various other people in the hotel.

I

ter, Josephine, played by Marilyn Wright. Likewise, Little Buttercup, a peddler wdman, played by Joyce Carman, had fallen in love with the captain of the Pinafore. Clark Maffitt. Class pride dictated that mutual love between the couples was impossible. Captain Corcoran, had, in fact, been arranging a marriage between his daughter and the Admiral of the English Navy, Sir Joseph Porter, played by Hank Hendricks. After Sir Joseph a r r i v e d aboard the Pinafore, the plot deepened. Josephine found the Captain unbearable. She told Ralph of her love for him, and they planned to elope. Dick Deadeye, played by Dick Sietsema, told the captain of his daughter's plans. When 'the captain reported the news to Sir Joseph, he ordered Ralph to be put in irons. At that opportune moment, Little Buttercup related a secret which she had kept for years.

She had been a nursemaid of the captain and Ralph and had mixed them up when they were babies. The error was immediately corrected. The reversal in social status of Ralph and Corcoran removed Sir Joseph as a suitor for Josephine and permitted her to marry Ralph. The former captain married Buttercup, and Sir Joseph married his cousini Hebe, played by Jan Lillethorup. The male chorus played the sailors of the Pinafore. The members of the crew who did the hornpipe dance were "clapped back on the stage" by the receptive audience. The finale chorus was made up of Sir Joseph's cousins, sisters and aunts. The orchestra furnished the accompaniment for the production. The combined acting, art work, staging, choreography and music made a brilliant production. Each of the participants and directors deserve a "WELL DONE!"

1

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IVING staff wishes you all a blessed Thanksgiving.

MISS LINDA MOORE Miss Linda Moore, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fay H. Moore of Nemaha, Nebraska, has been chosen as one of the five students for this year's Who's Who. Miss Moore has}o·eeq very active in many organizattons. She has been vice president of the Home Economics Club, social chairman of Eliza Morgan Hall, and she has als~ed on the Dorm Council. ~• . the present time, Linda is historian of Kappa Delta Phi, the honorary educational society, president of the Women's Student Association, and vice president and program chairman of the Student Educational Association of Nebraska. Besides. these clubs already men~ tioned, she also belongs to White Angels and Phi Alpha Theta, and was on the debate team for two years. She has also been on the Dean's Honor Roll for the last two years. Miss Moore, who will graduate this spring, is majoring in home economics and history. She plans on teaching after finishing school.

THANK YOU, ORGANIZATIONS Peruvian pictures were taken by all student organ~ izations, also all officers, the afternoon of Nov.10. Shooting on a ten minute schedule, Mr. J. D. Levitt and Fred Regnier took two pictures each, every teu minutes-one of an organization and one of the organization's officers. Thanks to the cooperation of every organization, officer, and sponsor, the tight shooting sch e du 1e worked to perfection. Without such splendid cooperation, the schedule could not have worked. The Peruvian staff wishes to express its sincere appreciation to all of you for being e x a c tl y where you were supposed to be at exactly the right time. The Peruvian staff wants to express especial thanks to Mr. J. D. Levitt. Mr. Levitt is a photographer of professional skill, and he was for many years sponsor of the Peruvian. His skill, knowledge, and work will result in pictures of high quality that we would have been unable to obtain without him. So the entire staff wants to say, "Thank you very, very much, Mr. Levitt."


Delzell Detonations By Ray G. Meister All is quiet on the home front, that is, betwee.n three and four in the morning and once in awhile in th~ afternoon when the sack-rats are at work. The Dorm Council is making plans for a Christmas party for all dorm residents, which should certainly be a gala event. ATTENTION! Residents of Delzell Hall! Because of the lack of some people, we have no pop in the machines in the dorm. This is for the simple reason that some people would rather throw the empty bottles out of the window or break them than return Left to right-Ron Stoltenberg, Donald Weeks, Warren Dyke, them to tlie empty cases. If you see someone doing this, you are and Sue Moore. as. much to blame as he is if you The senior class meeting was ident, Donald Weeks, Fairbury, fail to stop him. As soon as evcalled to order by the sponsor, Nebr.; secretary, Sue Moore, eryone realizes that the bottles Dr. Schottenhamel, November 10. Peru, Nebr.; treasurer, Ron Stol- must be returned, we will again The officers elected for the tenberg; Nebraska City, Nebr. have pop in the machine. The year were: president, Warren The members also discussed an- members and officers of the Dyke, Thurman, Iowa; vice pres- nouncements, rings, class pins., Dorm Council urge you to think before you give that next empty bottle a heave! There is no report for the rasBy Carolyn Parli cals this week, although this reOld Man Winter made an earporter did attempt a "safari" Peruvians who attend dramat- through the dorm to see what ly appearance by stranding the suitcase collegians for the week- ic performances may have no- everybody thought about anyAmongWestern Hemisphere cities end. Many "card lovers'' spent ticed that there is an orchestra thing, and what should have with the largest per capita enjoyment of the dreary week-end playing in the pit to accompany the pre- happened, but didn't! There Coca-Cola are, interestingly enough, sunny cards in the lobby. The only ex- sentation. were numerous obstacles in the According to Victor Jindra, di- path, such as the issue of "PlayNew Orleans and chilly Montreal. When we say, citement during the week-end "Thirst Knows No S~ason," we've said was the marriage of Grace Han- rector, Peru is fortunate in hav- boy Magazine" in room 101. This ing the orchestra. He said, "Many issue had been banned in Calia cheerful mouthful. naford to Roger Russell. There have been a few "dizzy other schools of this size are fornia, so it is really quite a colSo don't take any lame excuses about its dames" in tne dorm since the flu forced to give up orchestra for lector's item. not being hot enough tor Coca-Cola. Forget lack of needed instrumentation. bug made its siekening arrival. It seems that Warren Dyke has the temperature and drink up! Peru is not ready to give up." The Dorm Council met Nov. 3 turned 21 and is getting a little The Peru orchestra personnel in Miss Slattery's apartment to noisy again. Since he's be en Bottled under authority of The Coca·Cola Company by discuss Christmas decorations for includes faculty, students, and elected president of the Senior the dorm and the sending of gifts business people. Recently the class, his roommates have had to to orphans and elderly people in orchestra a c c o m p a n i e d the buy their own shower shoes? NEBRASKA CITY COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. Dramatic Club's presentation, homes. Alan Nelson predicts that Ed"The Cave Dwellers," and the Kathy Rhoten, Jan Korber, ward R. Murrow will smoke his Peggy Clutter, Virginia Garton, Choir's, "H. fyL S. Einafore." little finger, and Duane Arends and Carol Wilton got thrown in has discovered that a light in the the tub-consequences of being closet will keep the silver fish ·engaged. away. Now, take those pesky, Ramona Grindle and Jeanne red ants for instance . . ah, . . . Schuttlesworth celebrated their The Alpha Mu Omega met in would you, PLEASE? There birthdays this last week. the music hall November 9, 1959. seem to be more and more of The editor is adding a small Because several pledges w e r e them all the time. Who was it "ON THE CORNER OF THE CAMPUS" article written by Ellen Hunze- absent, initiation was postponed. that said the next war would be ker announcing a new language The group discussed sponsoring with the Russians? We of DelSchool Supplies conceived in necessity and dedi- an event, such as a leap year zell believe that it will be with Groceries cated to the principle that some- dance, and discussed the Christ- the ants. Bob Gibson says that his roomtimes circumstances alter cases. mas party. After the meeting, Priced Right for the Student mate might get engaged in the Among the definitions in this refreshments were served. near future? Hmmm ? ! Also, new language are the following: Egads, gadfrey, etc.!-SomeTurn down the radio-I'd rath- about five lads in the basement is an accurate account of t body passed a test. er have it louder, but you know have taken up Yoga and are Spanish conquest of the Ne planning to organize a cult. What Come on in-We hate to· have how some people are. World. The story is told throu By Carol Ellenberger you blocking our view of the Man, you look a mess!-Who next? Some of the wiser lads the biographies of the great lea hall. have been going ice-skating and Mr. Lincoln by J. G. Randall ers of the time. All of the gre was your date? Did you lock the door?-I left Are you home?-If you're not, playing a little hockey lately. and edited by Richard N. Cur- explorers, discoverers, and co my purse, lipstick, etc., in there. I'll stop yelling at you. Mrs. Boatman, get the splints rens is a story of the Illinois querors like Columbus, Corte ready! lawyer and politician as his the Pizarro, Coronado, La Casa Hi-Fi sets are getting to ~e the neighbors saw him. The b o o k Ponce de Leon, and DeSoto ar rage on second floor. While I ... traces his life through his love of linked together in the buildin PERU PEDAGOGIAN was wandering down. the hall- Ann Rutledge and devoted hus- of the civilization that influence The Voice of fhe Campus of a Thousand Oaks way on 2nd, a speedmg streak band of Mary Todd, his debates our own. Member Intercollegiafe Press shot by me, and wh~n my he.ad with Stephan A. Douglas and his finally stopped spmnmg, I decid- triumph as president of the UnitNovember 23, 1959 ed to follow it. It turned out to ed States. be Chick Stessman heading for a It is a humanly touching story THE STAFF room where rock and roll was of his daily life and Lincoln as being played. Next .thing we'll he truly was, undistorted and Co-Editor ----------------------------------Donna Francis have is a speed limit in the halls! real. Co-Editor ------------------------------Rosemary Rottman Sports Editor ________________________________ Tom Higgins When Ed Savage arrived as Sports Reporter ____________________________ David Hoffman On November 12, more than 6 the new head football coach at Sports Reporter ______________________________ Jerry Osborn layout mats were sent to the In Hastings University, he was deSports Reporter _____________________________Wallace West termined to clean up the rough- ter-Collegiate Press in Kans.a Copy Editor ________________________________ Kathy Rhoten Sigma Tau Delta held its sec- play reputation the Hastings City. A cover picture and layou Copy Editor ____________________________ Martha Sue Moore ond meeting of the year on Mon- Cavaliers had gotten under the were also sent. Othei:. deadline Business Manager __________________________Jerry Lunsford day, November 9. The program, previous coach. Savage comes up will be December 15 and Febru Business Manager -----------------------------Al Bohlken presented by Joni Wesolowski against trouble when the teams ary 15. However, the 1960 Peru Columnist ____________________________________ Ray Meister and Al Wheeler, was an "English most valuable player, Vince vian is over half completed a Columnist ___________________________________ Carolyn Parli Workshop." Several themes were Crump, believes in "win-at-all the present time. Columnist ______________________________ Mary Anna Gnade Making this first big deadlin costs." Coach Savage is forced to presented and discussed. Exchange Editor _______________________ Mrs. Dorothy High Sigma Tau Delta, national make a hard decision, a decision was a real accomplishment for Convocations ------------------------------Ellen Hunzeker English fraternity, has as its pur- which will not only effect the the staff. Last spring a girl phoStudent Senate ___________________________ Jeannine Ehlers pose to promote a mastery of team and Vince, but his· own fu- toographer shot a number of facDramatics _· ___________________________________ Rose Clancy written expression, to encour- ture as well. Written by Dick ulty pictures on exposed film of Church ----------------------------------Alice Greenwood age worthwhile reading and to Friendlich, Gridiron Crusader is spring sports and other spring Music ----------------------------------Karen Fankhauser foster a spirit of fellowship a challenging, thought provok- activities, ruining all pictures Campus School News __________________________ Chris Hays among teachers and students of ing sports story by an author and causing the staff to be beLibrary Column _________________________ Carol Ellenberger our language and literature. The well-experienced in sports writ- hind schedule when school started this fall. Thanks to ·a lot of Reporter ------------------------------------Leland Smith members of Sigma Tau Delta are ing. Reporter _____________________________________Jane Kunkle For a historical book of hero- hard work by Lois Rowe and her proud to say that the Phi Alpha Sponsor ---------------------------- ____ Stewart Linscheid Chapter is the oldest national ism, violence and brutality, The staff, the 1960 Peruvian is ahead Conquistadors by Jean Descola, of schedule at the present time. fraternity on the campus.

Whispers From Morgan Orchestra Accompanies Dramatic Performances

Tale of Two Cities!

Alpha Mu Omega Discu.sses Future Plans

THE AVENUE STORE •

Library Shorts .

Peruvian Staff Makes Biggest Deadline

Sigma Tau Delta Meets


Alumni Game Opens Basketball Season

Peru iacklers smo±her Chadron's Jay Hall for a loss, bui Chadron won ihe game.

Bobcats Lose to Chadron

E

Peru State's Bobcats went down to their first defeat of the 1959 campaign in the final game of the season against the Chadron Eagles on Chadron State's Elliott Field Thursday (Nov. 12) afternoon. The 26-14 loss gave the previously unbeaten Bobcats second place behind Kearney State in the Nebraska College Conference and marked the third year that a single conference loss kept the Bobcats from top spot in the N.C.C. Originally scheduled for October 31, the game had been cancelled when road conditions made it impossible for the Bobcats to reach the Eagle's gridiron. The game was rescheduled so that the Peruvians could play the seven games required by conference rules. The game was played in three inches of snow and numbing cold which saw the mercury dip to eight degrees above zero by the end of the game. Peru's stout defense was not up to par against the powerful Eagle single wing attack as they allowed a total of 357 yards to be gained. Most of this yardage was made by the swift Eagle trio of backs, Virgil Meyer, Bertrand, who rammed for 125 yards on 10 carrie>kand Jim Schwartz, Potter, who picked up 119 yards in 20 carries. The third member, Guido

Santero, Lewellen, passed for lowed them only 91 yards on the two touchdowns and scored one. ground. However, Peru did strike He passed for the final touch- for 141 yards via the airlanes down with about three minutes with Poage completing nine of 15 remaining in the game to insure passes for 105 yards. The only casualties were frozthe Eagle victory. It was a 35yard pass to end Pete Beckman, en fingers suffered by Jerry HenJordan, Minn. Santero earlier ning, Peru center, and Gary Tughad passed 12 yards to Beckman gle, Chadron quarterback. for another tally. Meyer turned in the longest run of the day. It came late in the third quarter when he flashed 55 yards to score. Santero scored Chadron's first touchdown about midway in the second quarter as The Peru State cagers took the he ·plunged four yards for the floor the 19th of October as they score. , opened practice sessions for the Peru, unable to move the ball 1 1959 basketball season. for three quarters, trailed at that ' Jack Mcintire's Bobcats finpoint 19-0. In the fourth quarter ished as the kingpins in the the Bobcats began to "thaw out" MCC last season. The Bobcats and with the help of a couple of were defeated in the NAIA disChadron penalties, scored on a trict playoffs by Wesleyan in a six-yard pass from Jim Poage, somewhat controversial game. Falls City quarterback, to LaCoach "Mac" said, "We will be Marr Gibson, Falls City end. just as good this year as we Peru then used an outside kick, were last year." recovered the ball, gained more The Bobcats' first appearance yards by Chadron penalties, and will be at home, when they take then moved to the Eagle eight. on the Alumni Nov. 24. From there Buddy Bookwalter, The rest of the schedule is as playing his last game for the Bobcats, drove into the end zone. follows: Home Games Poage made both placements. Dec. 1-Tarkio Peru was unable to move Dec. 8-0maha U. against the heavy Chadron line Jan. 5-Wesleyan and were held to their season Jan. 9-Concordia low in rushing. The Eagles alJan. 23-Doane Feb. 2-Dana Feb. 5-Chadron Feb. 6-Chadron Feb. 12-Wayne Feb. 13-Kearney Feb. 25-Midland Meats Feb. 27-Hastings

Jack Mcintire's Peru State Bobcat basketball team will take to the maples Tuesday, Nov. 24 for their season's opener against the former Peru State basketball greats. The annual Alumni-Varsity game will enable fans to get a preview of the 1959-60 edition of Bobcat basketball, which from present indications should be nearly on a par with last year's Nebraska College Conference championship team, which completed 23-5 over-all season's record. , Last year Jack Mcintire guided his cagers to their first N.C.C. title in his third year at the helm. The previous year the Bobcats were co-champs with the Hastings College Broncos and the Chadron State Eagles in a threeway tie. Missing from the roster will be lettermen Bruce Smith, a January graduate who is now coaching at Pawnee City, and Jon Appleget, a May graduate now on the Fremont coaching staff. Back for more service will , be nine lettermen: Bob Gibson, Falls City; Charles Francis, Council Bluffs, Iowa; Jack Johnson, Loup City; Bob Mayo, Brooklyn, N. Y.; John· Okerlin, Clarinda, Iowa; Jim Poage, Falls City; Mike Roach, Palmyra; Chick Stessman, Omaha; Roger Witt, Otoe.

Bobcats Hopeful For Good Season

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Away Games 7-Dana 11-Tarkio 14--Doane 17-18-19-NAIA Tournament, Nashville, Tenn. 29-30-Four State Tournament, Falls City 15-Kearney 16-Hastings 29-Wayne 30-Midland 16-Wesleyan 20-Concordia

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Coach "Mac Preparing To Defend NCC Crown

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Bobkitten Basketball Gets Under Way

11

Coach Jack Mcintire has been putting his cagers through their early paces in preparation for the Bobcats' 1959-60 defense of the NCC crown. Coach Mcintire's team will be molded around nine returning lettermen and a corps of promising freshmen and transfer students. Bob Mayo, Jack Johnson, 'Charlie Francis, John Okerlin, Jim Poage, Bob Gibson, Roger Witt, Chick Stessman, and Mike Roach are returning veterans. Roach, Stessman, Mayo, Johnson, and Francis are expected to carry the lion's share of the load. Promising newcomers include Drexel Harvey, a transfer from Indiana, and Bob Buettengenbach , who transferred last year from Oklahoma City University. Larry Rathe, a returning squadman, should see action this season. Other promising material includes Jim Mayo, Jon Palmer,

Four returning lettermen bolster Coach Virgil DeZwarte's 1959-60 Bob kitten basketball squad. These lettermen are: seniors Marshall Adams (1958-59 all conference Southeast Eight) and Bill Tynon. Junior Pat Morris and sophomore Tom Boatman. Other outstanding prospects include Paul Heuer, Dave Gomon, Al Wheeler Jr., Tom Majors, and Larry Blanton. The Bobkittens have a full sixteen game schedule plus two tournaments for the 1959-60 campaign. The first game is December 1, at Watson, Missouri. The first home game is with Cook December 15. All home games are scheduled for 8:15 p.m. with a B game or preliminary game starting at seven. The game with Cook is the only game without a preliminary game. Tom Yopp, Pat Hamm, and Craig Fishel.

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Peru State's Bobcats have a big task facing them during the coming season, which includes 12 home inter-collegiate contests, nine away games and two tourneys, if they are to equal last season's record. The Bobcats of 19·58-59 scored a total of 2,148 points to their opponents' 1,840; won the second annual FourState Tournament in Falls City; placed fifth in the N.A.I.A. Tipoff tourney in Nashville, Tenn., which saw Tennessee A & I, the team which won the N.A.I.A. Championship Kansas City Tournament in March, emerge victorious; broke the school scoring mark twice-against Concordia 103-68 and against Kearney 11074. Invited to represent the alumni in the November 24 opener are: Jon Appleget, Fremont; Bruce Smith, Pawnee City; Ron Wagner, Syracuse; Oscar Dean Smith, Nebraska City; Ron Witt, Millard; Nels Overgaard, Farragut, Iowa; Roger Majors, Sidney, Iowa, Jerry Trullinger, Clarinda, Iowa; Ned Eckman, Tecumseh; Bob Davis, Omaha; Jack Hallstrom, Omaha; Tom Hallstrom, Omaha; Rudy Shrader, Omaha; Bob Lade, }fark,io, Mo.; Bob Norton, Odell; Mar~n Gerdes, Auburn; Sharon Ocker, Table Rock; Bill Thurman, Nebraska City, and Gilbert (Casey) Gray, Fair-

ROY PECK


Dr. Harlan Speaks on HBurma'' Dr. Owen Harlan spoke to the members of Phi Alpha Theta on November 16, on the topic of "Life in Burma." Dr. Harlan had been in Burma. from 19-55 to 1957 under the Fulbright Program. There he aided in setting up a teacher training program in Industrial Arts. According to Dr. Harlan, religfon, and not politics, is the primary factor in the ·li~e of a Burmese. BUd9.hism, which is 'the largest religion in Burma, is follbwed ·by approximately 90% of the people.· During his talk, he sl).owed some slides that he had taken while in Burma. In his

Prep Students Appear In All-State Musical Groups

Campus School Chatter

. By Mary Anna Gnade talk, he dealt with the customs and traditions of Buddhistmonks Oh, joy-slick roads let school and their beliefs, as well as the out unexpectedly Friday afterliving conditions of the common noon. On the sad side was canpeople. ·In Burma, there are cellation of an already once•postmany families living on as little paned Prep fo-0tball game with as ten cents a day. Brock meaning loss of first-place After Dr. Harlan returned to tie in the conference. But look at the United States, he was very it this way: until this year with fortunate in having two of his a change to 8-man football, Prep Burmese friends come to visit didn't have a prayer of getting him. These men happened to be even this close to placing on the monks who were interested in 11-man circuit. life in America. Dr. Harlan says (At a later·. date): SP 0 RT S th9t they seem to think some of our customs very strange, just as FLASH-Coach DeZwarte finally got a piece of the plum! Peru we might think some of theirs a Prep shares first place in the little foolish at times. conference with Cook; Marshall Adams was named All-Conferthe theme' for the evening. Mr. ence; Bill Tynon and Pat Morris Jarvis presented the program. received honorable mention ! ! ! ! Dr. Blanton and Dean Melvin It's nice to taste glory for a attended a joint meeting of the change. (PS: Coach's wife spills Nebraska School Administrators thrills all over the place, too.) Association and the Department The record breaking cold unof School Administrators, at .the University of Nebraska. This loosed some first-class flu-type two day meeting was held on No- germs. With sick bay full, Mr. Eddy carted several home who vember 16 and 17. were stricken after braving the freezing air. MEETING OF HOME EC CLUB The FHA treasury must be .fatOrt November 9, the Home Economics Club met at 6:30 p.m. ter. Called to get more candy in the Campus School. Plans for from them and they were sold the fall Workshop of the college out! Good candy or good salesclubs on November 20-21 we.re manship.

Eight students from Peru Prep will be members ·of All-State musical groups this week during the Nebraska convention of the Music Educators National Conference meeting in Lincoln. The students will join musicians from throughout Nebraska in rehearsals Thursday, Friday and Saturday and will appear in concert .in the Pershing Auditorium Saturday night. ' Appearing with the 500-voice All-State Chorus· will be Mary Jarvis, .Jim Christ, Paul Heuer, discussed. Mrs. Kregel, c 1u b Marshall Adams. Members of the sponsor, reported on the MilwauAll-State Orchestra will include kee Convention of the American Mary Ellen Wilson, oboe, Tom H om e Economics Association Gomon, violin, and David Go- that she attended last June. mon, cello, and Hanford Miller wil play trombone with the All- SCF PLANS MEETINGS The newly elected program state Band. chairman of Student Christian Fellowship, Gail Ankrom, is really on the ball with ideas and plans for future meetings. Coming up in December is a series of The Senior class play "Seven- ·two meetings concerning prayer. . teenth summer" will be·present- During the week preceding ed Thursday, December 3. Christmas vacation,, the SCF Thursday and Friday, several plans to have three meetings, as campus scho()l students will be was done last year. These meet.ei:rcused from classes to attend ings will encompass a party, carthe State Music Clinic in Lin- oling, and communion. coln. They are: Tom Gomon, Regular meetings of SCF are Mary Ellen Wilson, David Go- held each Wednesday evening at mon, P;ml · Heuer, James Christ, 6:30. All students are welcome. Mary Jarvis, Marshall Adams, al'ld Hatjford Miller. BUSINESS CLUB MEETS The tl:~eme of. the Home Room The Business Club held its Guidance program given once a regular meeting Monday, Nov. 16 weelj: is "How To Study." Film- at 8:00. Floyd Wymore, Nebrasstrips on this topic .are being ka City representative from showµ to and discussed by all State Farm Insurance, spoke to high sc:hpol students. the group about all types of PTA was held Tuesday, No- automobile insurance. After the vember 17, at the Campus School meeting, refreshments of cake Auditorium. "Safe Driving" was and hot chocolate were served.

Campus School

The Science Club is an ambitious crew. Each one has a private project, but all seem to be interested in the other fellow's, too. They made a trek to the observatory to look at the ol' moon one night. Another night Fred Regnier entertained them at' photograph developing in Delzell Hall. Brenda Blanton enlisted her dad's aid in plaster-casting animal tracks out toward the river early one morning, and if you doubt the enthusiasm of

PERU CLEANERS

Campus schoolers were prepared for Dr. Gomon's talk on Russia. Daughter Georgette is quite a speaker in her own right and created a lot of interest in the various rooms with her display and explanation of the items brought back from Russia and other countries. Good advance-man. The music department-vocal, band and orchestra representatives-travel this week-end to Lincoln for for the all-state clinic. 'Swonderful that the kids have opportunities to get out and see what other schools are doing and to feel pride in their own accomplishments. "Gobble, gobble, c ran berry jell, Now it is time of the Pilgrims to tell . . . Dredge · up white collars and broad-brimmed old hats, (Last month the feature was leering black cats.) Paint up the Indian brave, bring sheaves of corn, A Thanksgiving play is about to be born." Yup, turkey-time is here!

!

The Foreign Language Club met Monday, October 26, in the Administration building. A movie "Mexico Builds a Democracy,'' was shown to the group by Mr. Rath, the sponsor. The meeting was then adjourned to the Music Hall where the Spanish group sang several songs in Spanish. The president, Jerry Wanser, conducted the business meeting and then refreshments were served. The next meeting will be held November 23 at 6:30 p.m.

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The Voice of the Campus of a· Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 55

Number 6

DECEMBER 14, 1959

rett Traylor . Arts Instructor

Schedule of Events To Come

erett Traylor, the new inial arts instructor, received B.A. at Teachers College in ar Falls, Iowa and his M.A. olorado State College at eley, Colorado. Mr. Travlor ht five years in Adel, I;wa two more years in southern Iowa. He enjoys, as hobbies, rock i;rollecting, hunting, and fishing. He takes special interest in his writing most of which is composed of technical and project «rticles. Mr. Traylor, who comes from Iowa, is married and has two :sons: Kevin, two, and Mike, four. Traylor also served in the Army in Korea.

The remaining days of the preChristmas school t e r m are packed with various events and activities. In addition to those enumerated below are many club and fraternity meetings or programs which are observing the merry season. Dec. 14-Peru vs. Doane at Crete. Dec. 15-A United Nations Dinner in the Campus School at 6:30 p.m. Dec. 16-All College Convocation, Christmas program. Dec. 17-Christmas Dance at the College Gym from 9 till 12 p.m. Semi-formal sponsored by the Veterans Club. Dec. 17-19-f-NAIA Tournament at Nashville, Te~. ·

Merry Christmas From The Pedagogian Staff

Dr. Gamon Gives 111 ustrated Lecture On European Tour

Orchestra and Peruvian Singers Present Christmas Vesper Service

JERRY PADEN Jerry Paden, a senior from Seneca, Kansas, chosen for Who's Who, plans to follow in his parent's footsteps and seek a career in education. A physical education major, Jerry has participated in many <i.ctivities of the school after transferring from Kansas State at the beginning of his sophomore year. His activities have included Chorus and the Peruvian Singers, Blue Devils, Kappa Delta Pi, SCF, and SEAN of which he is president. In addition to this, Jerry was on the track team his sophomore year and has played football for the last three years. One of his favorite pastimes is hunting. In the summer he es~ec!ally . enjoys worki~g ~th Jumor high age children at sum:.mer camps. As for his plans for . the future, Jerry hopes to start teaching and coaching a junior high school and then eventually hopes to coach in a high school.

Crone Authors Article or Japanese Magazine An article by Miss Ruth Crone, 'iSSistant professor of English, published in the MinneapoSl:ar and Tribune and was slated and printed in the azuka Dance Theatre Maga· a Japanese publication. e article was written after Crone became acquainted the Tkarazuka Opera, all n, after being evacuated U. S. Foreign Service per1 from Seoul. Crone has authored five for metropolitan news' including the World-Her. Magazine.

At 3:00 on December 13, the College Orchestra, directed by Victor H. Jindra, and the Peruvian Singers, directed by Darryl T. Manring, presented the Christmas vesper service. Aft:~r the orchestra's selections of : "Avioso" by Bach and "Noel," a 'traditional number, the Peruvian Singers sang "The Holy Birth," by Norman Lockwood. The 1959-1960 Peruvian Singer group has just recently been selected. This twenty-vmce choir is chosen from the larger concert choir and is the representative of the vocal department of the college. Members are as follows: Grace Hannaford Russell, Mary Ann Lewellyn, Marilyn Wright, Sandra Hemphill, Karen Fankhauser, Barbara Lehman, Jan Lillethorup, Edna McGovern, Joyce Carman, Brenda Spaulding, Alan Kreglo, Darrell Feit, Henry Hinrichs, John Parli, Bob Hoback, Larry Miller, Clark Maftitt, Dick Sietsema, Eugene Walden, and Steve Parker.

TOM HIGGINS

A member of Who's Who, Tom Higgins is presently serving as president of the Student Senate and is also active in many other campus activities. He has been active in intramurals, debate, Peruvian Singers and the Peru Chorus, and the Newman Club, Catholic students' organization. He is a past president of Newman Club and the Dramatic Club. He has appeared in many of its productions including the Homecoming play, Fall Review, and spring play. Tom is a 1956 graduate of Valley High School and is the son The White Angels met Thurs- of Mrs. W. J. Higgins. He keeps day, November 19, to elect the himself occupied during ' the pledges, who then came to their summer months working for Natkins & Co., a plumbing firm first meeting on November 23. The following girls are White m Omaha and o c c a s i o n a 11 y serves as a lifeguard at home. Angel Pledges: Judy Adams~ Ramona Brock, Among Tom's hobbies are readJoyce Chard, Carol Ellenberger, ing, fishing, hunting, and recentConnie Erisman, Karen Fank- ly he has started a pipe collechauser, Beverly Farmer0 Mari- tion. Tom is cited by his roomlynn Giesmann, Carol Glathar, mates as probably the most Rita Grandgenett, Barbara Hill, slothful housekeeper in the hisEllen Hunzeker, Kaye Jacobson, tory of Delzell Hall, but Tom inClara Kelly, Mary Ann Lewel- dignantly denies their accusation. After graduation, he plans to lyn, Julie Mayer, Carol McLain, Kay Parli, Sandy Pearson, Phyl- teach dramatics and English and lis Peters, Kathleen Streich, Lola would like to study law after several years in the · teaching Triska, Barbara Wellensiek. field. Tom is at present sports editor of the Pedagogian. ANNUAL CHRISTMAS TEA BIG SUCCESS The annual Christmas Tea for "MAC" HEADS CONVO the faculty and freshman girls An all-college convocation was was held December 10 from 2:00 held December 2 to introduce the to 5:00 p.m. basketball team. Coach Jack McEach freshman girl and trans- Intire presented the players and fer student invited a faculty coaches to the group. The convocation closed with the color song. member. 0

White Angels Pledge New Members

By Ray Meister Monday, November 30, at 7:30 p.m., in the college auditorium, Dr. Gamon showed a group of slides that he had taken while on his tour of Russia. Dr. Gamon began his talk by pointing out, on a large map of Europe, the various cities and countries he had visited on this unofficial trip. On this Educator's Tour, he traveled approximately 12,000 miles, of which nearly 4,000 miles were in the Soviet Union. He showed some of the 600 pictures he had taken from hotel windows, bus· windows and plane windows as w_ell a~ from more conventional shooting sites. The first group of s 1i d e s showed his departure from New York City, on to Europe by way of Newfoundland and Scotland and his arrival in Hamburg, Ger~ many. After showing some shots of the beautiful Grunwald, or the Green Forest, and other scenery surrounding Hamburg, the audience traveled with Dr. Gamon, via the slide ·route, to Berlin where slides of both East and West Berlin were shown. A startling comparison of the two is that since World War II, West Berlin has been 95% rebuilt while East Berlin, the Russia~ Zone, is only 15% rebuilt. From Berlin, Dr. Gomon went to Warsaw, Poland, where one of the most interesting shots was that of the Ghetto, where 500,000 Jews were executed by the Nazis, and where thousands of their bodies still lie buried under the rubble. The next stop was Moscow a city of approximately five ~nd one-half million people. Here Dr. Gamon had taken pictures of the University of Moscow·, the Kremlin; Gum, the world's largest department store; the Bolshoi Theater, which is famo1,ls for its ballet; and other famous sights. Dr. Gomon's son David operated the projector as Dr. Gamon explained the pictures. Later slides were taken in Georgia, home of the Cossacks and Joseph s_talin's native land; Kiev, the. capital of the Ukraine; (Contmued on page

MISS MARTHA MOORE One of the five seniors chosen for Who's Who, Martha Sue Moore, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Moore of Peru is a speech and English major'. In her freshman year Miss Moore was a member of the Stu.dent Senate, and a freshman attendant at the Valentine Dance. She has been secretary of the Dramatics Club, president of the Dramatics Club; secretary-treasurer of Sigma Tau Delta, and secretary of the Senior class. In college, she has belonged to var10us organizations such as, Sig• ma Tau Delta, Kappa Delta Pi Dramatics Club, White Angels'. S.E.A.N., Student Christian Fellowship, and was a past member of the chorus. She is copy editor of the Pedagogian, and a past member of the debate and discussion team. She has been on the Dean's honor roll for the last two years. After graduation, she plans to teach dramatics and speech.

Dr. Gamon President Of School Administrators Dr'· Nea1 S· Gomon, president of Peru State Teachers College, was elected president of the Nebraska Association of School Ad· ministrators at the organization's winter meeting at Creighton University Saturday. Other officers elected were Dr. Allen P. Burkhardt, president of Norfolk Junior College vice-president, and F. Don Ma~ clay, president of Fairbury Junsecretary.

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Journalism Classes Visit Sterling. At 7:15 a.m. on November 20, the journalism classes started their "safari" to the far westSterling-to visit Mike and Mary Packwood and their printing plant. Besides seeing the press, · the classes observed the operation of the linotype and folding machines. Because the Packwoods print the Pedagogian, the students were pleas.ed to learn that Mike and Mary have received one of

Delzell Detonations · By Ray G: Meister Delzell Hall held its annual Christmas party for all dorm residents Sunday, December 6, at 9:30 p.m. Mrs. Paradise prepared, and the .Dorm Council served, the meal which consisted of hot dogs, potato chips, cookies, and hot chocolate. After the meal, some of the boys sang Christmas carols, while others listened to the record player. The Dorm Council is ·making. plans to improve the game room. It is hoped that work will begin on this project soon after ·the holidays. Mrs. Paradise and the Dorm Council have expressed their thanks to all residents for the excellent cooperation received in returning the empty pop bottles to the cases. Keep up the good work men, because the money we make from the empties could help to improve our game room a great deal. After Peru soundly whipped Omaha U. Tuesday night, a dance was held in the lounge of Delzell. Quite a few couples attended, and (Oh boy, DARK!) This week this reporter mounted his kerosene-powered, steelwheeled sleigh and took a quick ride through the dorm to get a few opinions on Christmas. Santa Claus can rest at ease, because an overwhelming majority of people still. believe in him. Of course, these people still want something in return, such as a car, rich wife, eight averages, copies of. final tests, 98 cent gun and holster, used icicles from last year's Christmas trees, 56 broken balloons, Marilyn Monroe, coeducational dormitories, and Steve Banks even wanted me to get my sleigh out of his room! i:\]an Nelson wants a slightlyused, Beechnut gum wrapper for Chris.tmas, and plans to invade a few watermelon patches over the holidays. Is. this what Peru does

the most prized awards in newspapering in Nebraska-'-the AkSar-Ben award for community service. It wasn't hard to see why they deserved it. The small town of Sterling has a new clinic and a new gymnasium, largely because of the stand the newspaper has taken for community progress. After getting "shot" by Mike, the group returned to Peru. to us? BAH! HUMBUG! One Joker even wanted a maid?! Engagement rings seem to be a hot item on the market _these days. Bill Meyer recently gave one to Chris Hays to start the pall rolling for the' Christmas season. I imagine this is the time of year when that sort of thing takes place. My, my, my! I could make. a few prediction~, but I'd either get clobbered or incriminated, so· I'll leave the predictions to Milrrow and Nelson. The sack-rats, lovers, Yogis, hoCrodders, smokers, book~ worms, and other non-descriptive characters appear to be giving the Samsonites that last minute check for the dash home Friday, so this reporter wishes to take this opportunity to wish everyone a very Merry Christmas, and New Year's Eve is your own problem! All you sick, lame, and lazy will certainly be welcome back here next year; so keep your eyes on the road, your hands on the wheel, and your Western Civ. Book out of the hock shop!

Whispers From Morgan By Carolyn Parli The excitement of Thanksgiving has died down, and everyone is getting the Christmas spirit. The strong fragrance of pine fills the halls ;is girls. busily dee-· orate their rooms for Christmas, each hoping to win a prize. A large Christmas tree adorns the lobby. Early Saturday morning was a state of noise and confusion as the girls from the Choral Clinic began arriving~ior the day. A bridal 1shower was given for Carol Wilton by Donna Francis and Pat Rathe ..Carol received a steam iron as a gift. Linda Bertram, Janie Hahn, Carol Sudik, Kay Stalhut, 'Linda Hagan, Jan Lillethorup, Barbara Story, Joyce Carman, Mary Ann Steinbrink, Linda Moore, Anna Shown, Kathy Kopplin, .and Carol Wilton had birthdays these last few .weeks. Brenda \Spaulding is pinned to Lyle Wathier from Genesee, Ill., who is now teaching in the Auburn high school. Latest fad-second floor has organized a knitting club called the "knitting knuts." Order your sweaters now, fellas! An off-campus member of the Pedagogian staff, Chris Hays, has recently become engaged to Bill Meyer from Omaha, Nebraska.

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DR. GOMON GIVES ILLUSTRATED LECTURE ON EUROPEAN TOUR

(Continued from page one) and Leningrad, the most cultural city in Russia, as well as the home of the Czars. After showing a number of slides of his return trip to the U. S. A., Dr'. Gomon showed a ) The Business Club will ha'.!€ picture of the sight he longed their Christmas party Monday, most to see while in Russia, and Dec·. 14 at 8:00 in the auditorium. that was the Flag of the United Games will be played, Christmas States. At this point, the procarols sung, and refreshments gram was concluded by the will be served. Everyone should group's singing of "God Bless bring a child's gift which will be America." wrapped at the party. These gifts will go to a children's orphanage. All members are invited. By Carol Ellenberger As all Hemmingway's works, THANKSGIVING DANCE WAS To Have and Not Have is a remarkable book in its vivid deHELD NOVEMBER 23 The Thanksgiving Dance spon- scription and exceptional characsored by the M.E.N.C. was held ter study. The setting is the tropics beNovember 23, in the Campus School Auditorium. Those who tween Florida and Cuba, and the attended enjoyed the music of action is the experiences of Harthe college ·dance band and the ry Morgan, a rum-run n er. punch. The dance was over at Though Morgan is a hard and ruthless man, he· and his ambi11:00. tions are understandable. No new Hemingway again instills his own individual style inPERU PEDAGOGIAN to an enthralling book. The Voice of l:he Campus of a Thousand Oaks In 1949 Robert S. Henry's, The Member Intercollegiate Press Story of l:he Confederacy, was heralded as a classic and a great December 14, 1,959 . contribution to the history of the South. Today, as then,' it is still : THE STAFF a thrilling book for 'all ag,es. Recently, Henry wrote a new inCo-Editor ----------------------------------Donna Francis troduction which brought the Co-F,:ditor ------------------------------Rosemary Rottman book up to date for today's readSports Editor --------------------------------Tom Higgins ers and their ideas. Sports Reporter· ----------------------------David Hoffman Sports Reporter ______________________________ Jerry Osborn The Story of ihe Confederacy Sports Reporter _____________________________Wallace West has always been known to be a Copy Editor --------------------------------Kathy Rhoten fair and unbiased account, but Copy Editor ----------------------------Martha Sue Moore now, after Henry's new introducBusiness Manager __________________________ Jerry Lunsford tion, it is truly a book for both Business Manager -----~-----------------------Al Bohlken North and South to read. Columnist ------------------------------------Ray Meister Columnist -----------------------------------Carolyn Parli Columnist ----------------------------~-Mary Anna Gnade WHEELER Exchange Editor -----------------------Mrs. Dorothy High Dairy Queen Convocations ------------------------------Ellen Hunzeker Cone With l:he. Curl on Top Student Senate --------------~·____________ Jeannine Ehlers AUBURN NEBRASKA Dramatics ------------------------------------Rose Clancy 'Church ----------------------------------Alice Greenwood Music __________________________________ Karen Fankhauser

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Basketball Tournaments The Peru Bobcats will participate in two basketball tournaments before the New Year. Coach Mcintire will take a 12player contingent to Nashville, · Tenn., Dec. 17-18-19 to participate in the 8-team NAIA South Central Tip-Off Tourney at Tennessee A & I College. Peru State is seeded No. 2 behind last year's winner and eventual NAIA champion, Tennessee A & I. The Bobcats, winner of fifth place in the tournament last year, will play Villa Madonna College of Carington, Ky., in the first round at 3:30 p.m. Dec. 17. Championship semi-finals and first round

Bobcats Maul Indians 89-59 1959 Nemaha Valley Conference Co-Champions Top Row-Left to right, Gary Olsen asst. coach, Keith Marnell, Tom Majors, Al Wheeler Jr., Jerry Reeves, Fred Shirley, Pat Morris, Haney Milstead, Bill Tulk asst. coach. 2nd Row-Raburn Benton asst. coach, Richard l}eeves, Bill Tynon, Marshall Adams, Larry Blanton, David Gomon, Paul Heuer, Keith Knople, Coach Virgil DeZwarte. 3rd Row-Leland Schneider~ Steve Gnade, Spencer Pebley, Tom Gamon, Bob Peck, Richard All·good, John Stevenson, Garth Adams, Jim Furnas. Bol:iom Row-Richard Rains, Paul Stevenson, Butch Blankenship, John Eickhoff, Terry Marnell, John Patterson and Bob Newton. Monday night, November 16, the Nemaha Valley Conference Committee met to decide the final standings of the football season. At this meeting it was decided that Brock would forfeit their game with Peru Prep. This left Peru and Cook as co-champions with league records of six wins, one loss.

In non-conference games Prep won one and lost one, so they completed a very successful season with a record of seven wins and two losses. On the all conference team selected at the meeting of Nov. 16, was Prep's quarterback Marshall Adams. Receiving h o nor ab 1 e

Bobcats Defeat Alumni 78-57

Bobkittens Win First Conference Game

By Tom Higgins The 1959 Peru basketball season opened in full swing November 24, as the Bobcats dumped the Alumni 78-57. A very ragged Peru. offense was paced by Chick Stessman, Omaha sophomore, and Chuck Francis, Council Bluffs, Iowa, senior with 14 and 13 points respectively. Ned Eckman, Tecumseh coach, pumped in 12 to pace the alumni. Jon Appleget, a regular on last season's squad and now coachoing at Fremont, added nine to . the Alumni total. The Bobcat's· superior height, ;;;,.., .;rebounding ability, and fast . breaking told the story. The speed 'merchants literally wore ihe Alumni to a frazzle.

By Wallace West Peru Prep opened up their 1959-60 conference basketball schedule Tuesday, Dec. 8, with a 62 to 35 win over Brock. This was the Bobkitten's third straight win of the season.

mention were Bill Tynon, Pat Morris, and Haney Milstead. Bill Tynon was selected as team captain of the season by the squad. The seniors on the Prep squad w~re Marsh a 11 Adams, Larry Blanton, Keith Knople, Haney Milstead, Richard Reeves, and Bill Tynon.

The Bobcats out-shot and outfought the Indians from Creighton in a rough game on the local hardwood December 9. Playing his best game of the year, big Bob Mayo poured in 34 points to lead Bobcat scoring. Roger Witt started the scoring with three quick points, and the Bobcats moved out front to stay there for the duration of the game. At no time were the Indians a threat. · C o a ch Mcintire substituted freely throughout the game, and ten Bobcats registered in the scoring. Following Mayo in scoring, Chuck Francis made 16 points, and Jack Johnson, who saw limited service, scored 10. The Bobcats showed deadly accuracy from the free throw line, making fouling e x p e n s i v e for the Indians.

Bobcats Romp \ Team Beats 0. ver. Tark.10 B Maryville 53-42

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By Jerry Osborn Coach Jack Mcintire's Peru cagers romped over Tarkio College, 86 to 71, on De'c. 1 at the Peru Gym. The Bobcat's height, speed, and scoring power were The ball game was decided too much for the Missourians to early as Peru opened up a seven . handle. The contest was raggedpoint lead at the end of the first ly played and many violations quarter. At half-time, the Bob- were called. Bob Mayo led all scorers with kittens were ahead 27 to 9 and started substituting freely in the 19 points, while Duane Ridnour third and fourth quarters. was high for the Owls with 17. Game captain Charles Francis Marshall Adams was high for had 13 points and Bob BuettgenPeru with 18 points. Bill Tynon bach chipped in with 12. Eleven dumped in 15 while Larry BlanBobcats m.ade the scoring colton scored 11. The only Brock umn in the evenly balanced atplayer to get into double figures tack: was Don Jeanneret who scored Tarkio took an early lead in 10 points. the game when a technical foul Brock defeated the Peru vol- was called on Peru for a uniBall handling and general play ley ball girls by winning, two out form infraction. The Owls could were very sloppy and haphazard; of the three games played before hold the lead for only a short maybe it was first game jitters. the basketball game. time, however, and Mike Roach hit a two-pointer to send the McIntiremen into a 9-7 lead. Peru stretched the margin to · 35-19 with six min.utes left in the first Complete Line of School Supplies half, and was never threatened after that. The half-time score Revlon, Coty and Evening m Paris was 44 to 30. The biggest margin Cosmetics of the game was late in the last half when Peru led by 24 points. KODAKS SUPPLIES The. Bobcats clicked for 78% Fast Fihn Service from the free throw line, but shot a sub-par 31 % from the Bring Us Your Prescriptions· field.

HILL'S REXALL DRUGS

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The Peru basketball B squad picked up win number four last Saturday night, at Maryville, Mo., as they defeated the B team of N:orthwest Missouri State College 53-42. It was preliminary contest to the Northwest Missouri State and Wayne (Nebr.) State Teachers College game.· The game was shortened to 16 minute halves, to allow the var-

consolation games will be played Dec. 18, with finals and consolation finals scheduled for Dec. 19. All teams will play at least three games during the t o urn e y . Coaches Al Wheeler and Jerry Stemper will also make the trip as assistant coaches and drivers of the state cars. The Peru Staters will host the annual 4-State Tournament at' Pritchard Auditorium, Fa 11 s City, Dec. 29-30, 1959. First round games begin at 7:00 p.m. Tuesday evening December 29, with consolation finals at 7:00 and finals at 8:30 p.m. Wednesday evening, December 30.

Peru Prep Opens With Victory Over Watson, Mo. By Wallace West Peru Prep opened· their 195960 basketball season with a victory over Watson, Missouri on Tuesday, December 1. The final score was Peru 76, Watson 28. At the half, Peru was ahead 52 to 10. The Bobkittens were led by Marshall AcJ!!.ms with 14 points, followed closely \y Tom Boatman with 10, and Bill Tynon and Larry Blanton with 9 each. Rightsill was high for Watson with 10 P?P. . .;;..while G. Armstrong ha::.:. Coach Virgil DeZwarte had a good chance to see all his boys in action as he got his whole traveling squad of 16 into the game. Fourteen of these sixteen contributed to the total of 76 points. The Prepsters made 50% of their free throws while Watson could connect for only 39%. Watson was also having trouble from the floor as they only made seven out of 38 field goal attempts for an 18% average. In the preliminary game, the Peru Junior High beat Watson Junior High 35 to 2Q.. sity teams time to warm up. Bob Buettgenbach, 6'8" Beatrice lad, led the Peru attack with a total of 20 points. The ·B squad's record now stands at 4-0 for the season.

Peru Prep Squeaks Past Tarkio, 52-49 By Wallace West al fouls in the game with 24 bePeru Prep won their second ing called on the Prep Bobkitgame in as many starts as they tens and 20 on Tarkio. The Bobkittens jumped off to squeaked past Tarkio, Missouri, Friday night, December 4. The a 5-point lead at the end of the final score was Peru 52, Tarkio first quarter and led by 12 (3349. The game was tied at 48 .all 21) at half-time. Tarkio closed with just over a· minute remain- the gap to just 4 points at the ing when Tom Boatman sank end of the third quarter as the two free throws and put Peru score stood 42-38. Three of the ahead by two. Tarkio came back Prep starters fouled out in the with a free throw by Brooks and fourth quarter but Coach Decut the lead to one point. Paul Zwarte's bench strength cam~ Heuer then put the game on ice through for the victory. In the preliminary game, the for Prep as he made a field goal with just eight s e o n d s re- Tarkio second team trounced Peru's second team 48 to 20. maining. Marshall Adams was high in scoring for Peru with 17 points. ROURKE JEWELRY Tom Boatman was next with 13 Quality Service and points, nine of them coming on Distinctive Gifts free throws. Brooks was high for Tarkio with 17 and Slemp had AUBURN, NEBRASKA 12 points. There ..were 44 person-

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ttSeventeenth Summer" Presented By Peru Prep Seniors

Will Present Distinguished Service Award Campus School The first Distinguished Educational Service Award will be presented at the 90th Commencement of Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru on May 27, 1960, according to Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of Peru State. Authorized by the Board· of Education of State Norm a 1 Schools, the award will be made to graduates of Peru State who are making or have made significant contributions to education

in the area served by the college, or to persons .who have been previously associated with the college who have gained regional or national prominence in the area of equcation. Provision has been made for granting of two awards each academic year. At a faculty meeting Dec. 7, Mrs. Ruth Mathews and Mr. Hanford Miller were nominated as candidates for the award.

Roundup

The following students have mer romance is Jack, played by By Rose Clancy received a grade average of B or Marshal Allgood. Thursday, December 3, the Pehigher for the first quarter of the Others in the play were: Kitty, ru Prep Seniors presented their school . year. class play in the college auditor- Angie's little sister, played by Seniors: Marshall Adams, Marium. The· play -was entitled Karen Mcintire; Margaret, Ancia Allgood, Larry B 1 a n t o n , "Seventeenth Summer." M is s gie's engaged sister, played by James Christ, Mary Jarvis, KarSue Moore and Mr. Howard Mary Jarvis; Lorraine, her en -Mcintire, Hanford Miller, Wells were the student directors; "hopeful sister" played by Janie Harlene Palmer, Bill Tynon. ' they were under the supervision Crabtree. Harlene Palmer was Juniors: Sara Adams, Elaine of Mr. R. D. Moore. Angie's mother; Jim Christ was Gerdes, David Gomon; Fred The teenage comedy, written her father. Margaret's fiance, Shirley. by Anne Martens, r e v o 1 v e s Art, was played by Haney MilSophomores: Linda Morrissy, , around the typical American stead. Lorraine's "hope" was Jerry Sayer, Leland Schne·ider, family. It touchingly and humor- Martin, played by Hanford MillAl Wheeler. ously depicts the problems, hopes, er. Barbara Adams played Jane, By Mary Anna Gnade who was a menace to Angie's roFreshmen: Devon Ad ams , and .wonders of growing up. The holidays come crowding Cheryl Combs, Tom Gomon, Marcia Allgood played Angie, mnce. Margie, a girl friend, was On November 18, fifteen wives so fast, the Pilgrims step on the Nancy Jarvis, Marilyn Larson. who has just graduated from played by Dorthey Sherman. witches and the angels crowd met at the home of Mary Jo 8th Grade: Ann Adams, Linda high school. It's her "seventeenth Larry Blanton played Fitz, Marthe Pilgrims. The teachers, who Becker for the purpose of organ- Combs, Jeannie Gnade. summer." At the beginning of gie's steady. Bill Tynon played will long remember other Christ- izing a student wive's club. Offi7th Grade: Patty Adams, Kareach act, Angie gives a very ef- Tony, a boy friend of Jane's. mas programs, are cheerfully (?) cers elected were: Mary Jo Beck- en Beatty, Sharon Beatty, John fective narration. During these Many comments were heard, preparing another · program for er,-pr~sident; Jolehe Stange, vice Mcintire, ·Gary Milstead, Lola · descriptive passages, one sees such as: "It was very good." "My president; Pauline Pilkington, parents. In response to "What's Morrissy, Steve Snyder, James something of the joys, aches, and I thought they did a good job.'' for Christmas?" kindergarten secretary; Beverly Bookwalter, Wilson, Brenda Blanton. pains of first love. Angie's .sum- "How glad I am that we went." treasurer; Beverly Roach, proteacher Mrs. Adams said her The high school Christmas wee'uns, appropriately garbed, gram chairman; Karen Salberg, Miss Juanita Bradley greeted are to dance on stage singing refreshment chairman and Judy dance sponsored by the sophothe guests to the Campus of a _more class was Saturday, DeUnterbrink, reporter. The group "Twinkle, twinkle, little stars, Thousand Oaks. The guest speakcember 12, in the high school We are lit-tul men from Mars." decided to call the organization er, Mrs. Sue Smith, the Home auditorium. the "Peru Student Wives Club." On Friday and Saturday, NoYou can understand this when The senior class play was pre- vember 20-21, the Peru Home Editor of the Nebraska Farmer, you know the main theme of the They also decided· to give toys to the Children's Home in Beatrice. sented Thursday, December 3, in Economics Club was host to the spoke of "Women In This Scienprogram is a visit to Earth by Nineteen members were presin the college auditorium. After annual .Fall Workshop of the tific World." two space children and their Following the business meetent for the second meeting Dethe play, a party was held at State Home Economics Associawonderment at Christmas. Not ing, conducted by president of cmbr 2, 1959, in the TV lounge Karen Mclntire's house for the tion, College Club Section. Delemuch chatter this year ab-Out the state club, Alma Heuermann, cast and directors. gates were present from the program other than a lament of Eliza Morgan Hall. University of Nebraska, feature President Mary Jo Becker The high school chorus' partiUniversity of Nebraska, Omaha that "we lost our best tenor" reports on various phases of and "I get to sit on the couch in read a letter from Marion Koer- cipated in the music clinic which University, Wayne State Teachhome economics were presented witz giving ideas and suggeswas held at Peru, December 5. ers, Peru State Teachers College. the home scene." Drawing of by club representatives: JournalA combined elementary and names for gift exchange seems tions from the University Dames Friday evening's session inin Lincoln. The club decided to high schgol Christmas program cluded a mixer, and a talent ism In Home Economics, Omaha more important, and trimming go Christmas caroling Decem- will be presented Thursday, De- show presented by each club re- U., Consumer Buying and Sellthe tree. High Schoolers h a v e their ber 14, at the Auburn hospitals cember 17, at 7:30 in the college presented. The delegates were ing, U. of Nebraska; InstitutionChristmas dance Saturday. Busi- and nursing homes. Carita New- auditorium. housed in Eliza Morgan Women's al Management and Dietetics, The high school general busi-· Residence Hall. ness ed class will make a field ton was elected historian, and Wayne State, and Chemistry Retrip to Omiaha the same day as Margaret Mayo was appointed ness class plans to take a field On Saturday morning seventy- search, Peru State. trip to Omaha, December 17. five guest~ attended the 7:30 a.m. the program "but we'll be back assistant reporter. Any student wife who did not - They will visit business estab- breakfast•_ held in the Campus in time." In spite of holidays, add yet receive a letter concerning the lishments there. School. Vice-president of the REDFERN The sophomore home econom- state club\ Jeannine Ehlers, was another test: for Betty Crocker organization of this club is corClothing Co. Homemaker Award. Five candi- dially invited to attend the next ics class prepared refreshments the mistress of ceremonies. Joan "The Store of Standard and invited sophomore boys and Riggle, president of the Peru dates: Marcia Allgood, Barbara meeting on January 4, 1960. Brands" Mr. Johnson, Mr. Masek and Mr. Home Economics Club gave the Adams, Jane Crabtree, Mary Jar- . Phone BR 4·3620 Auburn Strom to a party. vis, Dorothy Sherman (who came welcome from the local club, and The eighth grade home ec girls out of hospital just in ti:nie for this). The Eighth Annual Peru Chor- prepared r!'!freshments and inAnd science is always present: al Clinic was held Saturday, vited the eighth grade boys, Mr. PERU CLEANERS TAILORS spotted Paul Goebel and Lois December 5. Since 1951 repre- Sheely and Mr. Masek to a party. Repairing and Remodeling Men and Women's Clothing Rowe, student teachers, escort- sentatives from nearby high Foriy·iwo Years Serving Siudenis and Faculty ing freshmen to the Science schools and their directors have PHONE TR 2-2671 PERU. NEBR. Hall-good field trip but never gathered at Peru for instruction and singing experience. did find out for' what. This year's guest director was Fourth graders were studying about molecules last week. Jim- Clayton Krehbiel, director of my's discussion at home brought choral music at the University 8th grader Jeannie's comment: in Lawrence, Kansas. Mr. KrehPeru Sc & lOc "These little kids are studying biel, a native of Moundridge, about things that our class only Kansas, earned his B.S. in MuClothing Shoes just heard about last year!" sic Education from the UniverSaid Jimmy, "Yeh, we do asper- sity of Kansas in 1942, taught iment every day." two years in Oberlin, Kansas, and then went to New York, Kindergarten is one vignette WASH after another. F'rinstance: during where he earned his master's decoloring session one day Mrs. gree from Columbia University. Coin Operated - Automatic Laundry Mr. Krehbiel was associated Adams asked David Nincehelser with the famous Robert Shaw what he was drawing. "I don't know," replied David, "I'm not Chorale, having been assistant finished yet." (Logical.) Then the conductor and tenor soloist for OPEN NOW •• IN PERU problem of undesirable language the group for five years, before reared its ugly head. Mrs. Adam:s returning to the University of asked what mother did when Kansas. This year's Choral Clinic rethings were dirty. "Washed them." "What kind of soap do presentatives came from nine- · you think best?" So a touch of teen schools which include the Ivory to the tongue cleans up f o 11 o w in g : Auburn, Avoca, dirty language now. (Too bad Barnston, Bratton Union (Humsuch a simple solution can't be boldt), Brock, Dawson, Diller, The Shop of Quality applied on up through school.) Douglas, Essex, Iowa; Falls City, Ladies' Wearing Apparel and Millinery Ah, to be a mouse in the kinder- Filley, Humboldt, Johnson, NePHONE BR 4-3520 AUBURN. NEBR. braska City, Palmyra, Peru, Stelgarten room-with 25 quickla, Sterling, and Table Rock. thinkers, what a floor show!

Campus School Chatter Peru Student Wives Club Is Organized

Home Ee Workshop H'eld On Campus

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Choral Clinic Held Dec. 5

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Nebraska's Oldest College

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks . . .

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 55

Number 7

JANUARY 18, 1960

Nebraska's Best College

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By Carolyn Parli Dr. Darrell Wininger has been chosen Peru's Man of 1the Year. A controlling factor in arriving at the fina1 decision was based on the conduct of the nominee's vocation and his service over and beyond his duty. When asked what his first reaction was toward receiving this award, Dr. Wininger replied, "Who made this mistake?" Dr. Wininger joined the Peru State faculty in 1952 as associate professor of educational psychology. He had bachelor of science and master of science degrees from Kansas State at Pittsburg, Kansas, and received his doctorate from Colorado State at Greeley in 1955. Dr. Wininger has always been a well-liked and popular instructor. His philosophy of teaching is that if any student. wants to learn and has the ability to learn, he will work until midnight with them; but any student who is in college wasting his time will get no help f r om him. Dr. Wininger has many outside interests besides teaching. He has been active in aiding the Boy Scout troop in Peru, and in 1959 directed its most successful ·fund raising campaign: He is secretary of the Peru Masonic Lodge. He is an active member of the Peru Volunteer Fire Department. Dr. Wininger has been pastor of the Bethel Communi·tY Church and sponsor of youth fellowships. Although Dr. Wininger is very busy with his many responsibilities and duties, he still has time to be with his best interests-his four boys a n d wife. Perhaps his very best accomplishment was persuading Ardith Felton of Dwight, Kansas, to marry him. They are home owners, and have a family of four sons, Darrell 7, Dennis 5, David 3, and Dwight 6 months.

The Policies Committee has approved the granting of rthese degrees to the following students who have completed or will complete the requirements in the current semester. They are recommended for the degrees by the registrar. These students will be honored at the Honors Convocation on February 3. Bachelor of Aris

Axt, Rolan James, Peru, Soc. Sc., His., Eng. Karrer, James Stewart, Nebraska. City, Chem., Biol.

Dr. Blanton Heads Education :Division Dr. M. W. Blanton, head of the division of education and director of the Campus School, re·ceived his B.A., M.A., and doctor's degree from the University of Arkansas. He also attended Southern State College in Magnolia, Arkansas, and did graduate work at Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas. After college, Dr. B 1 a n t o n taught and coached five years in Polk County, Arkansas, andthen was superintendent in Polk County for nine more years. He also worked as a research assistant at the University of Arkansas for two years, sponsored by the Kellogg and Southern Education F-oundations.-He served in the Army for three and a half years during World War II. Dr. Blanton was a member of the State Legislature of Arkansas in 1953-1955 also served on the State Board of Education. Dr. Blanton enjoys sports, hunting, and fishing as hobbies. He is married and has two children, Larry who is seventeen and Brenda who is twelve.

and

Dr. Gomon Speaks at Doane President Neal S. Gomon spoke at a Doane College convocation Thursday, January 7. Dr. Gomon talked about his recent trip to the Soviet Union.

Distinguished Service Award For Alumni At the commencement exercises of Peru State Teachers College on May 27, 1960, the first Distinguished Educational Service Awards will be presented. Mrs. Ruth Mathews and Mr. Hanford Miller have been appointed faculty representatives on the committee to select the recipients of this award. Some of the more pertinent rules and regulations governing this award follow:

person in any one year. No person shall receive the award more than one time. The award shall consist of a suitably inscribed certificate and a medallion or plaque, ,but not both. · The selection committee will consist of .the president of the college, an administrator holding the rank of dean (to be named by the president), a division head (to be elected by the diviThe name of the award will be sion heads), the director of speThe Distinguished Educational cial services, two faculty members without administrative asService Award. signment (to be chosen by the Candidates are .to be gradu- members of the teaching faculates of the college, persons who ty) and an alumnus of the colare making or who have made lege not currently employed by significant contributions to edu- or whose spouse, is not currently cation in the area served by the employed by the college. college, or persons who have The award will be made at the been previously associated with spring and summer commencethe college who have gained re- ment exercises or at a special gional or national prominence in honors convocation. the area of education. The award will be given to no more than two living persons in WINTER WONDERLAND any one year. Snow fell here Sunday and left The award may be given posthumously to no more than one

Mrs. F. H. Larson Peru Woman Of the Year

Candidates, For Graduation

Wininger Receives Man of the Year Award

a blanket of white over the campus and an area for miles around.

Bachelor of Aris in Education

Krakow, Jere L., Superior, Hist., Bus. Educ. Sandusky, Wiley Edward, Table Rock, Eng., Soc. Sc., Biol.

Strom New Supervisor Of Social Sciences

Mr. Lyle G. Strom is the new instructor in government and soBachelor of Science in Education cial sciences at the college and · Buckminster, Lucile Margaret, supervisor of student teaching in Falls City, Elem. Educ. social sciences at the Campus Case, Ronald Leon, Peru, Bus. School. He studied at the UniEduc., Eng., Hist. versity of Nebraska, University Danielson, Marlin L., Peru, of Missouri, and University of Bus. Educ., Ind. Arts. California at Los Angeles. Mr. Dry, Mildred Beamer, Bea- Strom received his B.A. at Morntrice, Elem. Educ. ingside College in Sioux City, Furlong, Lillian Kirby, Falls Iowa, and his M.A. at Drake UniCity, Elem. Educ. versity in Des Moines, Iowa. Goebel, Candace Felton, Peru, Mr. Strom has been superinElem. Educ. tendent of schools in s e v e r a 1 Goebel, Paul William, Peru, Iowa communities for about Gen. Sc., Phy. .Sc., Phys. twenty years and held coaching Johnson, Carroll La Verne, positions for seven years in Stanton, Iowa, Ind. Arts, Biol. Iowa and North Dakota. He was Peterson, James Norman, Wy- on the staff of the Sioux City more, Elem. Educ. Journal for several years and Tillman, Charles E., Peru, Phy. served in the Army for four Educ., Eng., Safety Ed. years during World War II. Prior to his present position here, Two-Year (in Elementary EduMr. Strom was district superviscation) and Certificate or for the Iowa department of Dietrich, Ruth Eileen George, public instruction of vocational Falls City. · rehabilitation for three years. Although Mr. Strom is a bachMaster of Science in Education Slack, Mary Ellen, Nebr.aska elor, he says he does not fear leap year. When asked whether City, Sec. Sch. Adm. his being a bachelor means that Certificate based on 15 hours he is a woman hater, Mr. Strom graduate work replied, "Definitely not. It is a Beckman, Mrs. Sarah, Burr. case of the women hating me."

Don Carlile Receives Awards

Second Semester Night Classes

Two Peru Stat\') Teachers ColNineteen courses, in~ 1 u di n g lege publications received awards , one graduate offering, are inlast week a•t the district meeting cluded on the Wednesday eveof the American Alumni Council-American College Public Re- ning class schedule at Peru State lations Association in Wichita, Teachers College for the second ·Kansas. Ratings were given by semester, according to Keith L. a "consumers" panel of judges Melvin, dean of the college. Beginning January 27, and from the convention host city. They were . thirds for football continuing through May 18, the booklet and alumni newsletter. Wednesday evening classes at The latter tied with the Univer- Peru State will be offered during sity of Oklahoma and Kan,sa~ two periods, making it possible State Teachers College, Emporia. for students to earn up to six Both Peru State publications are hours credit by enrolling in supervised by Donald K. Carlile, classes both periods. The first period will begin at 5 p.m. and director of special services. The football brochure is dis- continue through 7:40, with the tributed to 125 newspapers and second period beginning at 7:45 radio and TV stations. "The Peru and continuing until 10:10 p.m. Stater,'' alumni magazine, is isThe graduate course, Philososued three times a year and has phy of Education, is scheduled from 7 to 9:30 p.m. a circulation of 6,000. Other course offerings include: First period-Social S tu d i e s COLLEGE BAND PRESENTS Survey (104); Arithmetic for ALL-COLLEGE CONVO Teachers; Survey of Biological The college band presented a Science (201); Industrial Arts for concert at all-college convoca- Elementary .Teachers; Educationtion, January 13. Director Gil- al Measurements; Speech Correcber.t E. Wilson ledi the band in a tion and Development; Survey variety of numbers, ranging from of English Literature; Elementypical band numbers to semi- tary German; Home Planning (Continued on page four) popular to classical selections.

The Peru Woman of the Year is Mrs. F. H. Larson, wife of Mr. F. H. Larson, registrar of the college. Ever since the Larscns moved here in 1954 from Blair, Mrs. Larson has · repeatedly served the community in many ways. She is an active member of the Faculty Women's Club and a member of Quercus Club. The Larson family are members of St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Au bur fi., but Mrs. Larson's church service work does not stop there. She also serves on the Missionary Society of the Peru Baptist Church and the Women's Society of Christian Service of the Peru Methodist Church. For some time now, she has been a leader in 4-H club work and under her guidance many members have received awards. Mrs. Larson, a busy housewife, is the mother of three children: Fran, Mrs. Ron Witt of Millard; Bill, a senior at the University of Nebraska; and Marilyn, a student at the Campus School. Considering all her social and dvic activities, one can see how deserving Mrs. Larson is of this honor.

Professional Semester To Begin Fall, 1960 By Al Bohlken Eight southeast N e bras k a schools will cooperate with Peru State Teachers College beginning next fall when the professional semester in secondary education goes into effect at Peru State. In preparation for this step, eighteen representatives from the cooperating sch o o 1s were on the Peru campus during the first week in December, 1959. Under the professional semester, students in secondary education will devote six weeks to student teaching exclusively. The remainder of the semester will be devoted to course work in preparation for the professional experience and an evaluation of the student teaching. The s c ho o 1 representatives were briefed on the plans for .the professional semester. Under the plan, it will be possible for students in secondary education to be given student teaching assignments in cooperating schools for a six week period. The increased enrollment at Peru State has made it necessary ,to provide for student teaching in area schools in addition to the C am p u s School. "The schools attending the meeting to Chiscuss the professional semester were very enthusiastic about the prospec.t of having student teachers in their schools. They were unanimous in their support of the plan as a forward step in the improvement of Teacher Education," commented Dr. Keith L. Melvin, dean of the college. Falls City, Auburn, Johnson, Tecumseh, Syracuse, Nebraska City, Plattsmouth, and Bellevue, Auburn, 1Johnson, and Nebraska City now have student teachers from Peru .State in their schools.


Delzell Detonations

Whispers From Morgan By Carolyn Parli

Hap-py Leap Year, everyone! By Here it is 196Cf. The boys had betRay G. ter watch out. From the looks of Meister things, the girls have already started. The newly engaged couThe semester is about to reach ples are Linda Moore to Fred its climax, and now is the time Regnier, and Sue Moore to Carfor all noble thoughts (and oth- roll Johnson. Carol Wilton beerwise) to be prepared to jump came the bride of Leon Chappell out on a final exam paper and on December 19. Miss Slattery and Mrs. Longtry to make sense fo any passing reader, (especially professors). fellow had a Christmas breakTypewriters seem to be pounding fast party for the girls on Thurslater, and judging from the looks day, December 17. It was a of some sagging eyeballs, a few "come-as-you-are" party. Miss people are seriously preparing Slattery and Mrs. Longfellow received gifts from the girls. for the coming event. Alice GreelllWood, Helen WarThe Dorm Council is still ford, and Janice Jahn had birthworking on plans for improvedays these last few weeks. ments in the game room. Also, There was much sorrow and an election is to be held at the first of next semester to elect a unhapp~ness on Peru c a m p u s new vice president on the Coun- Saturday afternoon-Peru was cil, since Leon Chappell has "dry"! Everyone had to skip his weekly Saturday night bath. In moved out. spite of the inconvenience, the Since this is my final column girls got along rather well. Sevof the semester, I hereby wish to eral eager beavers ran outside dedicate it to the best-behaved, and caught water in pots and most industrious, and probably jars under an open fire hydrant. the most intelligent residents of Here are a few resolutions Delzell Hall, those little red ants! These little gentlemen never made by some of the girls in the seem to bother a person while he dorm. I resolve to catch a man before studies, except for w a 1k i n g away with textbooks or beds. No leap year is over. I resolve to cram well for my obstacle seems to be foo great for them to surmount in their final exams. I resolve not to make a scene search for food; that is until when I flunk the final for which recently. I crammed. Designer, Paul DeVries, and I resolve to get out of bed durEngineer, Fred Regnier, have ing the week-ends. erected a rather primitive moat I resolve not to have any 7:50 in their room to keep the ants classes next semester. from devouring their chocolates. I resolve to clean my r o om The ants have been stymied once ..... simply by setting each leg of a I resolve not to pull tricks on chair in a can of water and put- the upperclassmen. ting the chocolates on the chair. I resolve to treat my roommate This will undoubtedly work as with respect. long as no ones leaves without I resolve to keep the Morgan pulling the drawbridge up. A Hall sign on the girls' dorm. more modern method, almost as good as insecticide, according to Nick Sheppard, is fo sic Ken Yours Truly. They say that these Dostal after them. Rather unfair, little engagement rings later lead tO being led around by a bigger I'd say! one in the nose. I wonder if It has been said that spring is that's true? That shower certainthe time when a young man's ly is invigorating though, espefancy turns to what he's bee n cially just before British Literathinking about all winter! If so, ture class! spring certainly has come early One final thought for the sethis year. In fact, perhaps that's mester is this: "Keep your ear to why we've been having all this the ground, your shoulder to the strange weather lately. Through wheel, and your eyes straigM the halls resounds the big step ahead." ... Now, try to work Leon Chappell took by getting from this position! Please remarried over the holidays. Else- member though, the young man where smaller steps were taken who goes around looking for a· by ButCh Torring, John Ahl, Car- soft place has got one alreadyroll Johnson, Fred Regnier, plus under his hat!

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of fhe Campus of a Thousand Oaks Member Intercollegiate Press January 18, 1960 : THE STAFF

Co-Editor ----------------------------------Donna Francis Co-Editor ------------------------------Rosemary Rottman Sports Editor ________________________________ Tom Higgins Sports Reporter ____________________________ David Hoffman Sports Reporter ______________________________ Jerry Osborn Sports Reporter _____________________________ Wallace West Copy Editor --------------------------------Kathy Rhoten Copy Editor ----------------------------Martha Sue Moore Business Manager __________________________ Jerry Lunsford Business Manager -----------------------------AI Bohlken Columnist ------------------------------------Ray Meister Columnist ___________________________________ Carolyn Parli Columnist ------------------------------Mary Anna Gnade Exchange Editor _______________________ Mrs. Dorothy High Convocations ______________________________ Ellen Hunzeker Student Senate ___________________________ Jeannine Ehlers Dramatics ~-----------------------------------Rose Clancy Church ---------------------------------~Alice Greenwood Music ----------------------------------Karen Fankhauser Campus School News __________________________ Chris Hays Library Column _________________________ Carol Ellenberger Reporter ------------------------------------Leland Smith Reporter ------------------------------------..Jane Kunkle Sponsor ________________________________ Stewart Linscheid

Second Semester New Students Fourteen new faces will be seen on Peru's Campus the second semester of this y e a r . Among the new students, will be Parviz Abedini from Teheran, Iran. Parviz, who will be ·enrolled in the sophomore class, is a transfer from Nebraska University. Other new students will be: Glen Beran, Odell, Nebr., junior; Charles Caverzagie, 0 mah a, Nebr., freshman; Gerry Daffer, Nebraska City, Nebr., freshman,; JoAnn Eickhoff, Shubert, Nebr., freshman; Duane Hemminger, Wymore, Nebr., junior; Thomas Leckenby, Nebraska City, Nebr., freshman; Orvin Lindell, Mip-dock, Nebr., freshman. I John MacDonald, Long Island, N. Y., freshman; Robert Penkava, Beatrice, Nebr., freshman; Ronald Pluta, Tecumseh, Nebr., freshmen; Roger Ray, Tecumseh, Nebr., sophomore; Richard Shuman, Lincoln, Nebr., freshman; Gary Wittwer, Auburn, Nebr., freshman.

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Sociology

Floating University Proposed

Spi~ a platter. , • have some

Representative George Kasem of California has proposed a legislative bill, H.R. 386, which would authorize a committee to investigate the problems involved in establishing a floating university. The university would visit ports in various parts of the world. The mode of travel for this university would be U nit e d States naval ships converted to the needs of an educational institution. Students and faculty will be chosen from cooperating colleges and universities, largely on the basis of their demonstrated interest in the program. Faculty and students will go abroad for a prescribed period of time such as a semest.er or a year. All students and: faculty who approve of this proposed plan should write their Congressman by January 25, 1960.

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By Carol Ellenberger Hawaii and Its People by A. Graves Day, gives the history of the Hawaiian Islands from the time they were first sighted by an unknown Polynesian until the present time. Professor Day goes into the history of the islands bringing in much of the drama and battle of its past. As the civilization developed, the cultural changes were great and: soon the island became a territory of the United States. Through authentic narrative, Professor Day shows the life of the people of Hawaii through the different eras. Beyond My Worth by Lillian Roth, author of I'll Cry Tomorrow, is written in frankness and honesty just as her other best seller was. In it she describes her struggle back to the night club circuit. She also tells of her desire to become a serious actress and her never-ending search for religious understanding. It is an inspiring book about a woman who has searched for happiness and peace within herself.

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Plainsmen Beat Bobcats' 66-61 Plainsmen's Accuracy On Charities Deadly In what was an early season showdown ·between the two top title contenders for the NCC crown the Wesleyan Plainsmen TueS:day night ediged the Peru State Bobcats 66 to &1, on the Peru court. The difference in the game was at the charity line as the Plainsmen cashed in on 18 of 20 opportunities while the Mdntiremen htt only 7 of 11 chances. The 'Cats outshot the Wesleyan team from the field 24 to 27 but their fouls kept them in hot water all night. The usually high scoring Rudy Stoehr was helcli to a total of 15 points, but Jim Munford, a Lincoln product, pumped in 20 points to fire the Wesleyan attack. Duane Eichorn contributed a total of 16 to sweeten the total. The Peru attack on the other hand, was mostly a one-man show featuring Bob Mayo. The big pivot tossedi in 24 points as he hit on 11 of 17 field goal attempts and went 2 for 2 at the line. The Bobcats blew an early 10 point lead in the first half and

were on top by a 30-27 margin at the intermission. When the teams came back on the floor it was all Wesleyan the second half, with the Bobcats going ahead only once and tying three times before the Plainsmen pulled ahead to stay with 4 min- · utes remaining. The Plainsmen hit on 24 of 66 shots for 36% while the Bobcats were hitting on 27 of 66 for 41 % from the field. PERU Francis ------------ 4 Johnson ----------- 5 Mayo _____________ ll Roach ------------- 5 Yopp -------------- 1 Witt -------------- 1 27 WESLEYAN Stoehr ------------ 6 Major ------------- 2 Semin ------------- ·3 Gillham ----------- 0 Eichorn ----------- 6 Munford ---------- 7

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Peru Prep Wins From Talmage

Bobkittens Win From Cook 56-37

Peru Prep ran their winn~g streak to four straight games Friday, Dec. 11, as they defeated Talmage 61-57.

Peru Prep won their fifth straight game Tuesday, Dec. 15, as they defeated Cook 56-37. This was the first home game for the Prep Bobkittens, and they gave their rooters plenty to cheer about. In the first three quarters, the lead was constantly changing. Neither team was able to build up a comfortable margin. At the end of the first quarter, the score was tied at 11-11. At the end of the first half, the score was even at 24-24: When the third quarter ended, Per~ was ahead by o n e point, 34 to 33. In the fourth quarter the Prepsters broke the game wide open as they went into a full court press and held Cook to just four points while Peru was making 22. The leading scorer for Peru and for the game was Marshall Adams 'who hadi 29 points. Tom Boatman was second high for Peru with 10. Ted Kroese led the Cook team with 15 points, followed by Ray Doeden with 10. The Prep volley ball team won their first game as they defeated Cook in 2 out of the 3 matches.

It was a close game w1th the score reading 28 to 23 at halftime in favor of Peru. At the end of the third quarter Peru was still ahead,. but Talmage had cut the lead to one point, 41-40.

Marshall Adams led the Peru team with 31 points, 18 of them coming in the last half. T o m Boatman had 19 to help out the Peru cause. Bischoff and Kramer each scored 14 points for the Talmage ball club. The Prep Bobkittens also won the second team game by the score of 17 to 15, but the Talmage volley ball girls defeated the Prep girls in two straight games.

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Bobcats Champions Falls City Tourney Third Straight Year On the evenings of December 29-30, 1959, the Peru State Bobcats successfully defended, for the third year, their Four State Championship in Falls City's Pritch;ard Auditorium. On opening night, Baker University, of Baldwin, Kansa~, de" feated Simpson College, of Indianola, Iowa, by a score of 7764. The Peru State five dampened the spirits of Drury College from Springfield, Mo., by a score 'of 102-75. The Bobcats ran into consid- · erable difficulty in the finals however, as they went against Baker U. The Bobaats trailed by as much as eight points in the first period and seven in the second. The half-time score was 4237. Then, with only 3:36 left in the game, a field goal by Bob Mayo put the Bobcats ahead 77-76. Chuck Francis led the Bobcat scoring with 28 points, while Mike Neal, a Baker U. guard, matched Francis' efforts with 28 points.

Kittens Defeat Watson 65-25 The Peru Prep Bobkittens rolled to their sixth straight win Friday, Dec. 18, as they defeated Watson, Mo., 65 to 25. The game was lop-sided after .the first quarter as Prep did not allow Watson a point in the second qu~rter. Coach Virgil DeZwarte played . fifteen boys in the game and eight of these 15 scored points for Peru. Leading the scoring for the Bobkittens was Marshall Adams with 18 points. Tom Boatman had 14 and Larry Blanton 10. The high ~orer for Watson was Larson with 11 points. In the preliminary game, the Peru Junior High defeated Watson Junior High 31-11. Mike. Tynon led the Peru Junior H i g h team with 10 points.

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Bulldogs Scare Bobcats As 'Cats Win 82-76 Fray A still shaky Peru basketball team eked out an 82-76 victory over the Concordia Bulldogs January 9. The victory boosted the Bobcat's record to 3-1. A late rally put on by the bulldog's Jim Jurgensen (6'5" center) and Roger Schmidt (guard) kept Concordia's hopes alive. The accurate eyes of Charles Francis and Bob Mayo, however, were just as sharp. Jim Jurgensen was the big gun for the losers with 20 points, followed by Roger Schmidt's 18. Francis and Mayo shared. hon-

ors for the Bobcats with 25 points each. The Bobcats outshot the Bulldogs 29 to 26 from the field, but could onLy stay even with 25 apiece from the line. Peru's next home game will be Jan. 23 with Doane college. The Bobcats managed to squeeze by the Tigers at Crete by only three points. With this ever present struggle existing in the .conference th i s year the game could go either way, but the odds favor the Peru five.

Kentucky Teams Peru Prep Rolls Over Undefeated Tigers Defeat Bobcats Peru Prep rolled to their sev- In NAIA Meet enth straight win Friday, January 8, as they defeated .the Table Rock Tigers 38-30. Peru was in the lead for the complete game but the Table Rock team gave them a close scoring battle. Marshall Adams and Pat Morris led the Prep team in scoring with 15 and 8 points respectively. J. Smith and D. Bernadt each scored 9 points for Table Rock. In the preliminary games, the Table Rock second team defeated the Prep second team by the score of 34-19. The Table Rock volley ball team defeated the Peru voUey ball squad in 2 out of 3 matches. This was a close game with lots of excitement. The Peru girls rallied in the last match but were unable to overtake the Table Rock lead.

Bobkittens Maul Nemaha Indians 77-22 Peru Prep had an easy time in winning their eighth straight game Tuesday, Jan. 12, as they defeated the Nemaha Indians, 77-22. Peru was ahead by nine points at the end of the first quarter and kept building up the margin. Marshall Adams set what is probably a new school record as he scored 42 points for the Bobkittens. This is a record, according to the record books of Coach DeZwarte, which dates back to 1950. This total of 77 points was also a high for the Prep team for the 1959-60 season.

Peru State's Bobcats were handed a pair of defeats in their second year at the N.A.I.A. Tip Off Tournament in Nashville, Tennessee. Both losses came at the hands of Kentucky teams, Villa Madonna and Pikeville College. Peru played Villa Madonna in the first round as they did the previous year, when they were beaten by one point. The Bobcats found it tougher going this time arid lost 67 to 56. Jack Johnson paced Peru's scorers with 15 points and Mike Roach was next with 9. Villa Madonna went on to the final round where th e y were beaten by defending champions Tennessee A. & I. An overtime period was· needed in the second game to decide the winner. The score was tied at 76-all at the end of the regulation time, but Pikeville outscored .the Mcintiremen by 8 to 6 in the extra period, winning 84 to 82. Bob Mayo poured in 29 points while Chuck Francis and Mike Roach each had 19 markers. The Bobcats were outscored in field goals but shot an amazing 18 out of 21 from the free throw line. High scorer for the Nemaha Indians was G. Moore who made 8. He was closely followed by W. Boden and E. Smith with 5 each. The Peru volley ball team did not have as much luck. The Nemaha volley ball girls beat the Peru girls in two straight sets.

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F.H.A. Holds Snow Festival The F.H.A. Snow Festival

Janie Crabtree received

the

Campus School Chatter Steam Tunnel By Mary Anna Gnade Contract Let

Elementary Science Program Well Under Wa

With exams such a feature The P. M. Anderson Construcitem in both the college and tion Co. of Tecumseh, was campus school, maybe some award1=d the contract for conquick highlights of the past few struction of an extension of a weeks will lighten the gloom. heating tunnel on rthe campus of The holidays hadn't even been Nebraska State Teachers College properly tucked: away when Mr. at Peru, by the Board of EducaMasek trotted out the junior tion of State Normal Schools class rings$$$$but very pret-ty! Monday. The successful bid was (Wonder if elemenrtary grade pie- $39,800 for the tunnel and steam ture-trading is the forerunner lines and water lines. for class ring trading at high The extension will serve the schoo.l level?) campus school, the new indusTo "tuck away" the· holidays- trial arts building and ,the new along with reports of wonderful 'student center. Contract calls Christmas gifts came reports of for completion of the tunnel by illness and accidents. Fourth May 15, 1960, and complete ingrade teacher Mrs. Brown is even stallation of steam and water yet convalescing at home from a lines by July 15, 1960·. pneumonia-type cough compliOther bidders were: Beall Concated by too much Christmas struction, H. R. Bookstrom Co., program. Student teacher Chuck Dobson Bros., Newberg and Tillman and wife "stretched" va- Bookstrom, all of Lincoln; Induscation by way of a highway ac- trial Heating and Plumbing and cident. Rumor of chicken pox Thomas Bros. Construction Co., and usual GERM absences from both of St. Joseph, Mo.; McTiche school-however, I feel the kids Co. of Mitchell, S. D.; L. M. Marenjoy the type. of illness· that cum of Marshall, Mo. and Schoolisn't too serious but just bad man Bros. of Omaha. enough to stay at home. Not to give the impressi<>n that they dislike school!-some of them were ready to return after just one week of Christmas recess. The holidays brought n e w faces to the campus school in Alpha Mu Omega, honorary quite a few grades and one or mathematics fraternity, held intwo losses. Immediately upon reitiation for new pledges Jan. 11. turn to school, the hig,li. school The new members of the organand junior high embarked on a ization are Don Niemann, Darrel ping pong tournament during Wright, Terry Harlow, John Manoon hours~should relieve the sonbrink, Ellen Hunzeker, Wilcongestion at the candy counter. lard Jensen, and Vernon Aylor. The FHA girls sponsored a After the meeting, the group dance; at their regular meeting had refreshments at the Bob the first Monday of the month, Inn. they cut snowflakes to turn rthe auditorium into a Winter Wonderland. This was only for FHA girls and their dates. From the corsages worn to Sunday school next day, the affair was highly successful. Queen of FHA w a s The Beta Mu Chapter of KapHarlene Palmer, attendants were Mary Jarvis and Janie Crabtree. pa Delta Pi met Monday evening, Surprise of the evening was the January 4, in the Music Hall. awarding of the National Betty Plans were discussed concerning Crocker Homemaking pin to the Kappa Delta Pi Convocation Janie-highest ranking senior in which is to be held in Chicago this March. the home economics test. Following the short business Athletic note: Kindergartner Mark Coatney, after attending meeting, Dr. Gamon spoke to the the Peru-Wesleyan game (his group about the educational first) told teacher, "My, they system in Russia. The students were noisy-almost as bad as we were then able to ask ques·tions' about the Russian system. were at first of school."

The science program, kindergarten through sixth grade, was revamped in the fall of '59. Instead of using one textbook for study, several different books are used in each grade. · The areas studied in each grade are: living things, keeping healthy, using electricity, lifting and moving things, using heat, light and sound, common chemical and physical changes, the atmosphere, the earth, and the earth and space.

dance was held Saturday, Jan. 9 Betty Crocker Homemaking in the high 'school auditorium. Award. The award is given to The theme for the dance was the highest scorer in a test given Winter Wonderland, and the dee- by the Home EconomicS! departorations carried out the effect. . ment. The coronation took place at The adult sponsors for the 9:30. There was a candidate for dance .\rere: Mr. and Mrs. Dee each of the letters F-H-A-. V. Jarvis, Mrs. H. Palmer, Mrs. Harlene Palmer was the queen. Louise Kregel, Mr. and Mrs. B. Janie Crabtree and Mary Jarvis Morrissy, and Mr. and Mrs. E. were attendants. The girls were Adams. chosen by F.H.A. members. .Student spons<>rs were Fred The seventh grade girls served Regnier, Linda Moore, and punch and cookies. Janet Bertram.

Schoolmen's Day To Be January 23 Schoolmen's' Day at Peru State Teachers College is scheduledfor Saturday, January 23, 1960, according to Presid~mt Neal S. Gomon. The event will mark the eighth consecutive year that male faculty members fr o m schools in Southeast Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas and Missouri have been invited to visit the Campus of a Thousand Oaks. A special showing of colored slides of Dr. Gomon's inspection tour of educational institutions in the Soviet Union is scheduled for 3:30 p.m. in the College Auditorium. A coffee hour is scheduled for 4:30 p.m. in Delzell Hall. The visitors will be guests of the college at a 6 p.m. dinner meeting and at the Doane-Peru State basketball game in the College Gymnasium.

United Nations Dinner Was Big Success On December 15, at 6:30 p.m., in the Campus School, approximately fifty guests attended the United Nation's Dinner sponsored by the Home Economics Club. Special guests includ~d Mr. and Mrs. Paul Barker, and Mr. and Mrs. John Smull from Otoe Foods of Nebraska City, President of the Peru Achievement Foundation, Mr. Fred Rothert and his wife from Auburn, and Miss Jeannine Ehlers, who represented the stud~mt senate. The menu consisted of meats from Ceylon and Sweden, vegetables from Chile and France, salads from Sweden and Australia, breads from England and Austria, desserts from the Netherlands, Sweden, and China, and beverages from England a n d America .. Miss Janet Bertram, mistress of ceremonies, welcomed the guests, and Mr. George Rath, foreign language instructor, gave the blessing. The co-chairmen for this event were Miss Janet Bertram and Miss Darlene Critel.

Senior Life Saving Course To Be Offered The Senior Life Saving Course will be offered fr<>m January 26, through the month of February. If interested, sign up on the bulletin board in the gymnasium. The instructors for ,this course will be Ernest Ridgeway and Donna Francis. Upon passing the course, you will be qualified to take the Water Safety Instructors course in March.

Chess Club Organized The recently organized Chess Club, sponsored by Mr. Holmes of the English Department, has had several well attended meetings. Meetings will be held in room 304 of the adminisrtration building at 7:30, every Thursday evening. Anyone interested in the club is '4nvited to attend.

All-College Convo An all-college pep rally was held January 5 before the PeruWesleyan game. Coach Jack McIntire gave a report of the trips· to Tennessee and Falls City. The band played, and the cheerleaders led several yells. Coach Al Wheeler spoke briefly about good sportsmanship and the initiation of sportsmanship ratings in the conference. The convocation ended with the color song.

Associate Dean of Students Leads Busy Life For three years, Miss Juanita Bradley, Associate Dean of Students, has been instructing education and psychology courses on the Peru Campus. Miss Bradley received her master degree in personnel work and guidance from George Peabody College for Teachers, Nashville, Tennessee. She has completed one year of gradua.te work at the University of Indiana, and a fall rtevm at the University of Chicago. Before coming to Peru, Miss Bradley taught and counseled! at Stephens College, in Columbia, Missouri. Miss Bradley is a native of Warrensburg, Missouri. She is very interested in public school music and has an undergraduate major in music. Her favorite pastime is reading history. Miss Bradley's eagerness to help others is a quality admired by many. Whenever asked, she has extended a helping hand to the residents of Morgan Hall in connection with any problem that has arisen. It is the opinion of many of the girls on the campus that the new dorm should be named Bradley Hall.

Sigma Tau Delta Initiates Ten Sigma Tau Delta held its initiation Monday, January 11, at 8:00. Those initiated were: Al Bohlken, Rose Clancy, Karen Fankhauser, Glen Irwin, Jane Kunkel, Bob Mayo, Ray Meister, Carolyn Parli, Kathy Rhoten, and Marilyn. Wright.

Student Senate Sponsors Collection BetWeen halves of the Wesleyan basketball game, Jan. 5, 1960, the Student Senate collected $13.83 for the World University Service. This money will be used to help finance foreign refugee college students. The Senate is planning other activities to raise more money to meet irts goal of one hundred dollars. Following the game, the Senate sponsored a dance in Delzell Hall. Mr. and Mrs. T. I. Friest, and Dr. and Mrs. George Schottenhamel were the chaperons.

. Individual storage cabinets for each room were purchased as well as the necessary science supplies. A mid-year evaluation was made, and the consensus of opinion seems to be that the program is working out well.

l

Alpha· Mu Omega Held Initiation

1

Kappa Delta Pi Discussed Chicago Convention

And since exams lead to grades: Mrs. Adams found she had only 19 report cards for 21 kindergartners. Does she use the same card for ·more than one pupil? 'Twould make it interesting, huh!

Refreshments of coffee and ribbon sandwiches were served at the end of the evening.

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(Continued from page one) and Furnishing; Library Practicum. Second period-Fundamentals of Music; Integrated Mathematics for Secondary School Teachers; Arts and Crafts; English Composition (Hll); Survey of American Literature; Elementary School Curriculum; History of U. S. to 1865; Principles of Classification and Cataloging.

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Peru

Is Growing

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume

5~

Number 8

FEBRUARY 15, 1960

Grow

With Peru

Construction of New Campus School Set For 1963

Nebraska City Industrial Aris Instructor Ken Clark and Don Graham (right) congratulate A. V. Larson.

New L A. Building To Be Named For A. V. Larson By Carol Ellenberger "The new Industrial Arts building will provide a facility which will lend much to the development and training of industrial arts teachers. Designed specifically for teacher education, the shops and laboratory areas will incorporate the latest developments in industrial and mechanical arts education. "Because of his long association with the college and his contributions to education for over four decades, it is particularly appropriate that this building should be named· for A. V. Larson.;, These were the words of Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of the college, when asked about his feelings on the new $500,000 Industrial Arts building now under construction and the dedication to Mr. A. V. Larson.

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:r

Long Peru Residents The A. V. Larsons have been Peru residents now for 34 years, 32 years of which Mr. Larson spent in service as an instructor in the Industrial Arts department. He studied at the Universities of Nebraska and Chicago <and received his Masters degree from the University of Minneso. ta. After he completed his college work, he taught two years in rural schools and then t w o years at Wahoo, Nebraska where he and Mrs. Larson met. She was also a teacher at the time. After that he faught nine and a half years at Columbus, Nebraska before he came to Peru. He retired in the summer of 1958 and as for future plans, he and Mrs. Larson plan to stay in Peru. A Dream Come True The new Industrial Arts build. ing which will include classrooms, an arts and crafts laborat<>ry, an electricity and electronics laboratory, a drafting room, a photography and blue-print laboratory, a suite of offices for !l'taff members, and project supand storage rooms is a dream «ime true for Mr. Larson as well the others who have recog$1.ized the need and worked long mid hard for the new building. Mr. Larson's words, "I've been forward to this for a time, especially the 1 a s t five years." •tore his retirement, Mr. Lara great deal to do with the initial plans for the

building which was to be located on a different site. Although some changes had: to be made and some features were revised, the building will be a highly useful and up-to-date addition to the campus. Children Educated Here Mr. and Mrs. Larson are parents of three. children and have seven grandchildren. All of their children graduated from the Peru schools and received their degrees from the college. Frank, who is director of chemical lab· at th e Umvers1 · 'ty Hosora t ones pital at the University of Wisconsin studied at the University of Nebraska. Their eldest daughter, now the Mrs. Joseph Seiger, received her Masters from Columbia and now teaches in Greatneck, Long Island. M rs. Robert Graf, their y o u n g est daughter lives in Fairfield, Connecticut.

Construction of a new Campus School was given top priority on physical facilities needs of Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru by Dr. Leonard Walsh of the Colorado State College Educational Planning S er vi c e of Greeley, in a report submitted to the Board of Education of State Normal Schools last week-end. The report culminates a twoyear study of facilities needs of the four State Teachers Colleges at Peru, Chadron, Kearney and Wayne. In this report, Dr. Walsh indicated the critical needs of the four colleges could be met during the next ten years, assuming income from the state-wide buildring fund levy would continue at the present rate of income. Currently, the Board receives approximately $850,000 a year from the fund. Priority of buildings for all four schools was recommended by Dr. Walsh. The Board will consider the recommendations and take action on establishing building priorities at the next meeting of the Board on Feb. 24. The presidents of the four colleges were instructed to prepare site plans for proposed n e w /buildings and make recommend,ations for necessary acquisition of property to implement the building program. Priority listings for Peru include purchase of necessary additional property immediately, construction of a new campus school in 1963, remodel the pres-

D.elegates Elected For Chicago Convention

ent campus school to serve the needs for bask classroom areas, staff offices, homemaking, business education, art and speech in 1964, remodel the administration building to accommodate required administrative functions, leaving a classroom or two available in the building for general academic use and remodel the library to provide additional stack space and reclaim presently-used art and· speech classroom space for library functions in 1965. Extensive reconstruction of the library is not recommended, since eventually the entire building must be replaced. Final project under the current program would be construction of a fine arts building in 1968.

Monday evening, February 1, the Beta Mu Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi held their election for delegates for the 1960 Biennial Convocation of Kappa Delta Pi to be held at Chicago. A 1an Wheeler was elected delegate; and Judy Miller was elected alternate delegate. The Convocation will be held March 10 through the 12.

Priority projects at Chadron include a new campus·scliool in 1962, remodeling of present campus school and administration building in 1963, library addition in 1965, new health and physical education building in 1966, remodeling of present gymnasium for women's physical education in 1967 and a new industrial arts building in 1968.

After the business meeting, Mr. Johnson spoke to the group about the job of the Placement Bureau. He exlained that the purpose of the Placement Bureau was not to find a person a job, but to bring prospective employer and employee together. He mentioned that schools a 11 over the United States and some from other countries are interested in Peru graduates. At the end of his speech, he allowed time for questions from the students.

Kearney to build a new administration-library building in 1961, remodel present administration building for classroom use in 1962, build a new campus school in 1968, construct a new fine arts building in 1965, build a new science and mathematics building in 196g,

Honored and Surprised When asked .about his reaction to the news that the new building was to be named for him, Mr. Larson laughed and modestly replied, "I'm very proud of that honor and it came as qui~e a surprise."

This meeting was open to all students.

Wayne to build a new campus school and remodel the present one in 1962, build a new fine arts building in 1967 and a new women's physical education facility in 1968 with remodeling of industrial arts and home economics quarters in 1969.

New Men's Dormitory To Be Named In Honor Of A. D. Majors Of Omaha According to President Neal S. ka. He is o~t.en credited with beGomon, "The Board of Educa- ing responfible '{or the location tion of State Normal Schools has of a college at Peru. named the new men's dormitory · Mr. A. D. Majors, a former Pein honor of Mr. A. D. Majors of ru student, has long shown an cation. Along with Omaha. The dormitory will be interest in his servi . the Board of Eduknown as A. D. Majors Hall." This announcement was made cation, he· as also been a memon January 16 at a meeting of ber of the Omaha University Peru alumni at the Birchwood Board of Directors. Club in Omaha. Among the nearA. D. Majors Hall is being ly 100 people in attendance who built on the west rim of the Oak praised and congratulated Mr. Bowl. There will be accommodaand Mrs. Majors (above left), tions for 90 men, with television were Mrs. Gamon (center), and lounge, storage and maintenance Mr. and Mrs. Donald Overholt area on the west. Each room will (right) of Omaha. Mr. Overholt accommodate two men. The was a student at Peru during the structure, now taking form, time his· father served as regis- promises to be a beautiful additrar of the college. tion to the campus. Mr. A. D. Majors has been a Mr. Majors is reportedly not member of the Board of Education for 12 years, serving as its only quite modest about the president this past term. Mr. Ma- naming of the dorm in his honor, jors, a retired livestock commis- but all his. work for education. sioner, is the nephew of T. J. Ma- Many of his friends and relatives jors, in whose honor the Campus were not aware of this latest honor until days after the news School was named. T. J. Majors, on the Normal had been released. How did they Board for years, was a member find out? They had to read it in of the first legislature in Nebras- the paper.

Peruvian Met Deadline Cast Selected "The Peruvian, Peru's year- For Spring Play book, will be handed out to students in May," reports editor Lois Rowe. Every yearbook staff member has been working hard to see that the Peruvian will arrive on time for the annual spring yearbook party. The staff met its last deadline today. The Peruvian staff members are: Lois Rowe, editor, Jeannine Ehlers, layout editor, Rosemary Rottman, copy editor, and Glen Chambers, photographer. Assistants are: Chris Hays, photography, Carol Ellenberger, layout, Francis Lindell, sports, K a t h y Rhoten, copy, and Carolyn Parli, layout. The sponsor of the Peruvian is Mr. Stewart Linscheid. Miss Rowe also reports that this year's yearbook will have a very unusual cover. The company that makes yearbook covers is using this particular one as a sample for its advertising. Peru students are anticipating the arrival of this year's Peruvian.

Manring Guest;conductor At Clinic In Louisville Darryl T. Manring, associate professor of voice at Peru State Teachers College, was guest conductor for the Southeast Eight Conference Vocal C 1i n i c i n Louisville, Wednesday, Jan. 27.

Tryouts for the spring play "Brief Music" were held in the Little Theater Monday, Febr. 1. This play, a comedy about a group of college girls, is the first in several years to have an all girl cast. A number of the girls, including several freshman girls, tried out for the play. The seven girls parts each depicting a definite personality, were cast as: Sue Moore, Drizzle; Carolyn Wing, Alexander; Helen Warford, Minnie; Rose Clancy, Lovington; Carol Stivers, Jinx; Joni Wesolowski, Rosey; Sandy Stevens, Maggie. The play will be presented March 10.

Tri Beta Meeting Held The monthly meeting of Pi Chapter of Tri Beta was held January 25, at 7:30 p.m. in the Science Building. Mr. Christ reviewed some reports about the International Geophysical Year. He also displayed and explained a "demonstration eye piece." This is a new instrument received by the biological science department and consists of a dual eye piece enabling two individuals to observe one slide at the same time. Pi Chapter will hold its next meeting, February 22.


ONE THOUSAND PLUS IN 1970 Dr. Leonard C. Walsh, director of a survey team studying the potentialities of state teachers colleges, reports that his team thinks Peru will have 742 students in ten years. Now we don't know anything about statistics-and our banker probably has his doubts about our ability to add-but we think Dr. Walsh and his survey team are probably wrong. We think that Peru can and will have more than a thousand students in 1970.

In ten years, Peru will certainly have an enrollment of more than a thousand if this student body, this faculty, and this community exert some effort to attract students to Nebraska's oldest and finest college. We know they will. Peru has a fighting spirit that wouldn't show on a statistical report but is a tremendous asset. At a time when Pe~u had an enrollment of less than five hundred, Al Wheeler s Bobcats beat football teams of Warrensburg, Missouri, and Greeley, Colorado, both schools boasting enrol~m~nts running into the thousands.· Last year, Jack Mcintire s basketball team won the Nebraska Collegiate Conference title although many of the defeated teams represented scho?l~ far larger than Peru. All of us are justly proud .of the spmt and the achievement of Bobcat teams, and we believe that the student body, the faculty, and the community have at . least some of the spirit that sparks Bobcat teams to victory against great odds. Finally, Peru has another great asset that would hardly show on a statistical report. Peru is under capable, competent, progressive, and aggressive leadership. Largely because of the untiring efforts of President Neal S. Gomon, four buildings are going up now. There will be a new Camp~s School going up in '64. Improvemen~s yet undrearrl:ed of will be realities by 1970. Dr. Gomon is dom~ m?re t~an. Just working hard at his job. He is literally dedicatmg hrs hfe to making a good school great. Peruvians, let's make it one thousand plus in 1970.

-S. P. L.

Library Shorts By Darlene Critel Ben Hur, written by Lew Wallace is an excellent book about a y~ung Jewish boy who lived during the time of Christ. He had lost his inheritance along w i t h his mother and sister because of Roman tyranny. This is a story of his re-instatement to his original position in life as well as his search for hi1> mother and sister. He leans toward C h r i s t i a n thoughts and when he witnesses the Crucifixion he b e c o m e S· a changed man. There are catacombs in Jerusalem today that he is said to have founded. Exodus has a double meaning in this book. It is a ship w h i ch was reclaimed and readied to take 300 Jewish orphans from the island of Cyprus to their homeland, Israel. It is also a symbol of the Jewish effort to carv~ a place of their own after having been ousted from different countries all over the world. T h e y came by ship, air, an<l horseback

to this new land. This is a touching story of the Jewish people's struggles. Exodus was written by Leon Uris. Entry, by Richard Frede, transcends the usual category of "college novels." It probes deeply and dramatically into a genuine human conflict that characterizes, but also extends beyond, the new college generation. Mr. Frede's protagonist, Ed Bogard, is like many of this generation.content to settle for security and conformity. Then, one dramatic week-end Bogard encounters a situation in which it is impossible to play it safe. This weekend is filled with football, girls, liquor, and excitement. When Bogard learns that down the hall a girl from New York is about to be victimized by a group of his entry mates, he tries futilely to interest other students in helping him. What he can't do is break the code and summon the authorities. In addition to adding new books to the stacks, the library has recently added about $11,000

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The

Voi~e

of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks

Member Inl:ercollegial:e Press

Delzell Doings By Gary Brown· Baseball practice has started already for pitchers and catchers. As a result of this, many prospective baseball candidates have been complaining of sore muscles and bruises. Ken Dostal has recently revolutionized the dorm with his in-, vention of the triple decker bed. This idea is beginning to take over as many others are following suit. This all goes to show one thing, Ken isn't afraid of high places. I guess he's accustomed to the altitude. On a recent tour of the dorm, I received the following comments on dorm life: Chuck Francis "Its a rough life," H a r o 1 d Barnhart "What, me worry?" Jerry Littell "When in doubt, pull out," Bill Bliss "Dorm life is wonderful, marvelous, and colorful." Who's Bill Bliss?? David Fulton "Too quiet." Willie Jensen, "Too darn much noise." Jack Johnson, "Just don't get caught." Steve Bates and Larry Randolph "There should be a coed element introduced in the dorm." Snowball throwing has become the major sport of the boy's dorm because of the changing temperature and melting snow. I should like to close with a few words of wisdom from yours truly, "Flunk now and avoid the rush later." in microfilm of bound periodicals. If one doesn't know how to operate the machine, he can ask the librarian to help him.

STATE THEATER Auburn SUN. MON. TUE. Febr. 14-15-16 Doris Day • Rock Hudson "PILLOW TALK" WED. THUR. Febr. 17-18 John Lupton "BLOOD AND STEEL"

Back row, lefi l:o right: Ron Stolienberg, Joe Verbeek, Larry Carre, Wayne McFarland and Larry Whittington. Front row, left to right: Rosemary Rotl:man, Beverly Parde, Phyllis Peters and Judy Adams.

Nine State PTA Scholarships Awarded To PSTC Students Mrs.· Robert Moore of Peru, hawka, and Phyllis Jean Peters, state chairman of the scholar- Johnson. ships committee of the Nebraska The PTA scholarships program Congress of Parents and Teach- is an important part of the work ers, has announced that the or- of the Nebraska PTA Congress ganization this year has awarded because of the need for well 44 tuition scholarships to stu- qualified teachers. This year the dents• in Nebraska colleges. 44 PTA scholarships were awardNine students at Peru State ed to students from 34 communiTeachers College have b e e n ties. They were dis tr i b u t e. d named winners of tuition schol- among those in the teacher eduarships according to Dr. Harold cation curriculums at the four Boraas, dean of students. These State Teachers Colleges, Universcholarships are award€d on the sity of Nebraska, and the Omabasis of need, character, aptitude ha University. for teaching, and a c a d e m i c Funds for these scholarships record. are raised by local unit participaRecipients of the $90 scholar- tion in the State Life Memberships, which will cover the cost ship program in which individuof tuition for the second semes- als are honored by this unit for ter, include: Beverly J. Parde, outstanding service to children Pickrell;-Judy A. Adams, Peru; and youth. Joseph H. Verbeek, Firth; R. Since the inauguration of the Wayne McFarland, Sumner; Ron- L if e Membership-Scholarship ald J. Stoltenberg, Nebraska program in Nebraska 15 years City; Larry Carre, B e a tr i c e ; ago, 401 scholarships for second Rosemary Ann Rottman, Pawnee semester tuition have b e en City; Larry B. Whittington, Ne- awarded.

FRI. SAT. Febr. 19-20 Robt. Mitchum Julie London "THE WONDERFUL COUNTRY" SUN. MON. TUE. WED. Febr. 21-22-23-24 Pat Boone James Mason Arlene Dahl. "JOURNEY Tb THE CENTER OF THE EARTH" THUR. FRI. SAT. Febr. 25-26-27 Frank Sinatra Gina Lollobrigida "NEVER SO FEW"

February 15, 1960 THE STAFF Co-Editor ----------------------------------Donna Francis Co-Editor ______________________________ Rosemary Rottman Sports Editor _________________________________Wally West Sports Reporter _____________________________ Jerry Osborne Sports Reporter ______________________________ Steve Parker Copy Editor ________________________________ Kathy Rhoten Copy Editor ____________________________ Martha Sue Moore Business Manager _____________________________ Al Bohlken Columnist ____________________________________ Gary Brown Columnist ___________________________________Carolyn Parli Columnist ------------------------------Mary Anna Gnade Library Column ____________________________ Darlene CriteI Exchange Editor ____________________________ Nancy Kunkel Convocations ______________________________ Sharon Watton Dramatics ________________________________ Joni Wesolowski Music ----------------------- ________________ Peggy McGee Church ----------------------------------Alice Greenwood Campus School News __________________________ Chris Hays Campus School Reporter ____________________ Elmer Antons Reporter __________________________________ Sandra Pearson Reporter ______________________________ Mary Ann Lewellyn Reporter ________________________________ carol Ellenberger Reporter --------------------------------------Leroy Keyt Reporter ____________________________________ Leland Smith Sponsor ______________________________ Stewart P. Linscheid

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Honors Convocation Held

Rascher Appeared On Peru Campus The· internationally kn o w n concert saxophonist, S i g u rd Rascher, was on the Peru State Teachers Campus February 8-10. Mr. Rascher was the first to bring the saxophone to the concert stage. He is known as the "Paganini of the saxophone" because of his flawless- technique and tone quality. Mr. Ras<:her, a Germari-born musician, has increased the range from two and one-half to four octaves. This he accomplishes on a stock-mode 1 American-made instrument. The _concerts, both scheduled for Wednesday, February 10, one at the 9:30 a.ni. convocation and the other at 8:00 p.m. climaxed Mr. Rascher's three-day stay at Peru State. Mr. R. T. Benford, associate professor of piano and TOM LAKIN organ, accompanied Mr. Rascher at the 9:30 a.m._ convocation and On February 8, 1960, Tom Lathe Peru State Symphonic Band kin, nineteen-year-old son of Ensemble accompanied Mr. RaMrs. Frances E. Lakin, was scher at the 8:00 p.m. concert. crowned King of Hearts at the Instrumental clinics for area annual Valentine Dance. Tom comes to Peru from Wood River, high school directors and stuIllinois; he was graduated from dents was conducted by Mr. RaRoxanna High School in 1958. scher during his three-day stay Before coming to Peru, he on campus. Solos for the evening concert worked on a barge line on the by Mr. Rascher included "Adagio Mississippi river. and Samba" by Whitney. Other Tom's major field of study is business administration. Tom is an avid football and track enthusiast. He is also a member of one of the intra-mural basketball The annual Valentine Dance, teams. Previously, he participatsponsored by the girls of Morgan ed in wrestling. Hall, was held in the gymnasium

Jeannine and Tom, King And Queen of Hearts QUEEN JEANNINE

The Honors Convocation was held on February 3, 1960. Dean Keith L. Melvin read the announcements and introduced the program. Mrs. Neal S. Gomon, accompanied by Mrs. Gilbert Wilson, sang a solo. Dean Melvin then introduced the nine winners of the P:T.A. Scholarships. These winners were: Beverly Parde, Judy Adams, Joseph Verbeek, Robert Wayne McFarland, Ron Stoltenberg, Larry Carre, Rosemary Rottman, Larry Whittington, and Phyllis Peters. Mr. Hanford Miller awarded, John Masonbrink a chemistry handbook for being the most outstanding student in the general chemistry class. Runner-up recognition was given to Ar 1in Richardson. President Neal S. Gomon spoke briefly about scholastic recognition and its attainment. He then introduced the fifty-two students who were named to the Dean's Honor Roll. Those who had a grade point average ranging from 7.25 to 8.00 were placed on the honor roll "with distinction." This group was made up of the following: Glady& Ackley, Rolan Axt, Stephen Banks, Sharon Bates, Jerry Beckmann, Raburn Benton, Ramona Bock, Herbert Brown, Tom Brown, Carol Buell, Judy Carlisle, Jqyce Car-

Jeannine Ehlers, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Ehlers of Syracuse, Nebraska, was crowned Queen of Hearts at the annual Sweetheart Dance Febr. 8, 1960. Jeannine is a sophomore t h i s year and is majoring in home economics and English. Being president of Lutheran Student Association, secretary of White Angels, vice president of the State Home Economics Association, (College Club Section), and president-elect of Home Economics Club, the queen is kept quite busy. Besides holding these offices, Jeannine takes an active part in Student Senate, Women's Athletic Association, and the Dorm Coundl of Morgan Hall. Also vying for Tom's time are February 8 at 9 o'clock p.m. The This year Jeannine was chosen his memberships in the "P" Club, Starlighters from Syracuse, Neas a cheerleader and she holds and the Student Senate. His fa- braska, provided music for dancthe position of layout editor on vorite extra curricular interest is i ing. this year's Peruvian. Earlier in music. Tom stated that he liked The highlight of the evening the year she was an attendant to all kinds of music, but that he es- was the coronation of the King the Homecoming Queen. pecially favored rhythm an d and Queen of Hearts which took Being queen was no new ex- blues. place at lO:OQ. p.m. The royal properience for Jeannine as she was cession was led by the following chosen Prom Queen in high When asked about .his reaction attendants: Pamela Yost, freshschool, but when asked her reac- to being chosen king, Tom says, man from Sumner, Nebr.; Jerry'· tion to being chosen Queen of "I didn't believe it- I thought Hearts, she replied, "I can't be- they were joking!" However, lieve it; I don't know what to· once the crown was placed on his say." She considers it to be one head, he realized that it was not of the happiest moments of her a joke; but that he was the 1960 life. King of Hearts.

man, Leon Chappell, Barbara Clover, Sandra Craig, D o u g Dickerson, Lynda Ehlers, Roger Eshelman, Karen Fankhauser, Donna Francis·, Virginia Garton, Clyde Haskins, Milan Hawxby, Rae Mae Henry, Glenn Irwin, Delynn Kienker, Jere Krakow, Jane Kunkel, Francis Lindell, Clark Maffitt, John Masonbrink, Judith Miller, Tom Mincer, Carol McLain, Donald Niemann, Herbert Peterson, Ross Pilkington, Kathleen Rhoten, Jeanette Romans, Rosemary Rottman, Larry Swett, Alan Wheeler, Julie Meyer, and Phyllis Peters. Those with a grade point average of 8.00 or above were placed on the honor roll "with high d,istinction." Those students receiving this recognition were: Leota Gebers, Kay George, L i n d a Goodin, Morris Keyt, Ray Meister, Linda Moore, Karen Stahlhut, and Deanna Wach. Sixteen mid-year diploma and degree recipients were also given recognition at the convocation. Mrs. Candace Felton Goebel, Fairbury, and Mrs. Lillian Furlong, Falls City, . received their Bachelor of Science in Education degree "with distinction." To graduate "with distinction," one must have an over-all average of 7.25 or above.

Schoolmen's Day Held January 23 On Saturday, January 23, nearly two hundred superintendents and principals from Nebraska concert selections ·included "Beguine for Band," Osser; ·"First Suite for Band in E-flat," Host; selections from "Windjammer," Gould; "An American in Paris," Gershwin; "Foundation March," Goldman. In the evening concert of February 10, high school students from Nemaha, Nebraska City, Brock, and Peru played.

were present for the eighth annual Schoolmen's Day at P.S.T.C. Because of inclement weather, schoolmen from Iowa, Kansas, and Missouri were u n a b 1e to attend. A special event started at 3:30 p.m. preceding the coffee hour at 4:30 p.m. Dr. Gomon, President of the College, showed slides of his recent trip to the Soviet Union. Dinner was served at 6:00 p.m. and at 8:00 p.m. all were guests at the Peru State-Doane basketball game.

King and Queen Honored at Dance

Enrollment Drops For Second Semester A new semester began on January 26, and with it came the usual fluctuation of the enrollment at Peru State Teachers College. A quick look shows us that although the number of full time students has dropped considerably from the first semester, we are still ahead of the recorded enrollment at this same time last year. The spring term of 1959 showed a total full time enrollment of 502 students. There were 166 freshmen. The fall term this year increased this by 50 students and in<:reased the freshman enrollment from 166 to 186. The 1960 spring enrollment has again taken a dip and at present

Paden, senior from S e n e c a , Kans.; Sandra Stephens, freshman from Peru, Nebr.; Tom Yopp, freshman from Wood River, Ill.; Jane Kunkel, sophomore from Falls City, Nebr.; Clarence (Chick) Stesslnan, junior from Omaha, Nebr.; Carolyn Wing, senior from Shubert, Nebr.; Drexel Harvey, sophomore from Wood River, Ill.; Linda Ehlers, junior from Nebraska City, Nebr.; and Jack Johnson, senior from Loup City, Nebr. The at-

tendants were followed by Queen of Hearts Jeannine Ehlers, sophomore from Syracuse, Nebraska, and King of Hearts Tom Lakin, freshman from Wood River, Illinois. The royal pair were placed before a pair of outsized p 1 a y in g cards representing the King and Queen of Hearts for the crowning ceremony. After the coronation, the King and Queen, and their attendants led the royalty dance.

there are 509 full time students, 158 of these being freshmen.

Mrs. Faye Brandt New Assistant Librarian Mrs. Faye Brandt is assistant librarian. Mrs. Brandt hails from Otoe, and has taught school in Syracuse for many years. She is a graduate of Nebraska St ate Teachers College at Peru. She also received her masters degree from Peru this summer. Mrs. Genene Gude, her daughter from Nebraska City, is attending Peru at night and will get her degree from here t h i s spring. Her son, Bruce, will graduate from Syracuse High School this spring. Mrs. Brandt says she likes her work very much because it is interesting and different.

Left fo right, seated: Sandra Stephens, Carolyn Wing, Queen Jeannine Ehlers, Lynda Ehlers, Jane Kunkel. Pam Yost. Standing: Tom Yopp, Drexel Harvey, King Tom Lakin, Jack Johnson, Chick Stessman, Jerry Paden.


150 enrolled in grades 9-12 will be classed as Division A; schools with less than 150 enrolled in grades 9-12 'Will be classed as Division B.

Whispers From Morgan Inter-Scholastic Contest By Carolyn Parli To Be Held March 25 Ah, Spring is here ... there's

Thirty-eight schools in the music in the air ... but, alas! surrounding area are going to it's snowing again. What's with Trophies will be awarded to compete in the second annual In- the schools with highest total this weather, anyway. Oh well, ter-Scholastic Contest sponsored points. Tests will be given in "variety's the spice of life." by Peru State Teachers College. twenty-two areas and will be Four new girls moved into the dorm at the end of the semes- The contest will be held March judged by campus instructors. ter-Betty Bebb, a transfer from , 25, 1960, at Peru. In last year's contest, Nebraska the University of Nebraska; Jo The purpose of the contest is City High School edged out Falls Ann Eickhoff from Shubert; Su- to foster, promote, and recognize City by one-half point to win the san Hulbert from Falls City; scholarship. Division A Championship; St. Shirley Rhineshart, a transfer p t' . t' h ill b from Midland College. a~ icipa mg. ~c. oo1s w . .e Bernard (Lourdes· Central) of . t T d classified as D1v1Slon A or D1.v1- Nebraska City took Division B ues ay, ' . Dorm ·Counc11 me . M' SI tt y' s1on B. Schools with more than honors. iss ~er s Feruary, b 2 m apartment. They discussed spon- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _.,;___....__ _ __

Wininger Presented ~~outstanding Community Service Award" By Morris Keyt Dr. Darrell Wininger was given a gold plaque for "outstanding community service" by the Peru Kiwanis Club, Tuesday evening, Jan. 12, at the regular Kiwanis meeting. Daryl Manring, chairman of the committee which chose the outstanding community worker, presented the plaque to Dr. Wininger. Upon receiving the honor, Dr. Wininger commented, "In all probability my father should receive this. He taught me that, if you live in a town, leave it better than you found it; and, if you believe in the purposes of an organization, join and work to help achieve those ideals." Dr. Wininger nas done several things to merit recognition as an outstanding citizen. He helped

organize the Kiwanis dent a 1 clinic and worked on the summer recreation project. He was instrumental in getting Peru's side streets paved. Peru's associate professor of educational psychology is also president of the Chamber of Commerce. He played a leading role in forming the Rural Fire District. The Kiwanis award is the second honor Dr. Wininger has received this year. He was previously named Peru's Man of the Year. The "outstanding service" honor came as a surprise to Dr. Wininger. He was invited to the meeting, ostensibly to take charge of the meeting's program, although he is not a Kiwanis member.

BANK OF PERU PHONE TR 2-2331

Member F.D.I.C. '

INVITES YOUR BUSINESS CARROLL LEWIS, President

JOHN L. LEWIS, Vice Pres. & Cashier

soring the Valentine Dance. The magazine rack has been made, but we now need some ambitious people to sand and varnish it. The kitchen shower was held Thursday, February 4, down in the recreation room. The engaged girls unwrapped the gifts to get in practice. Many useful g i f t s were received. Carolyn Wing, Kay Parli, Julie Mayer, Darlene Critel, Ros a e Oestman, Lois Fritz, Kathy Rhoten, and Sandy Pearson had birthdays these last few weeks. Some of the alumni girls visited Peru campus this last weekend to see the Chadron game. That miserable little flu bug has been putting several girls out of action for awhile. The strong ones are still surviving; so have no fear. The female population of Peru is still blooming. One last word of caution to anyone reading this. Valentine's Day was just over; so watch out for flying stray cupids from the girls' dorm. The reporter took a poll on what people do with the newspaper after they read it. Here are a few remarks made by some of the girls. 1-Polish shoes on it. 2-Line waste baskets with it. 3-Wrap food. 4---Throw it away. 5-Give it to the dog. 6-Cut out paper dolls~pref­ erably cupids. 7-Nothing ...

PSTC Booklets Edited By Carlile Three booklets have been published by Peru State Teachers College under the editorship of Don Carlile, director of Special Services. The booklets are "Facts ·About Peru State," "Prepare for a Proud Profession at· Peru," and w i n t e r issue of "The Peru Stater." The booklet "Facts About Peru State" contains basic information about the college and its program. It is designed to acquaint you with the services offered by Peru State College. "Prepare for a Proud Profession at Peru," describes briefly the field of specialization in education in hopes that it will help students choose a career. It mentions the new "block system" of student teaching which gives the student an opportunity to devote his full time, during a given period, to the assignment of student teaching. Peru is one of the first colleges to inaugurate a "block

system" of student teaching in both elementary and secondary fields. Pictures of the four new structures-the new S t u d e n t Center, addition to Eliza Morgan Hall, new boy's dorm, and new Industrial Arts Building-are also shown in the booklet. The "Peru Stater" is published and distributed three times yearly to alumni and former students of Peru State College. It contains such articles as Dr. Neal Gomon's Tour to Russia, sports at Peru State, and the 1959 Homecoming. The fall issue of the "Peru Stater" and Peru State's 1959 football publicity booklet received awards at the fall district meeting of the American College Public Relations Associ- ' ation and the American Alumni Council in Wichita. The "Peru Stater" tied with ·alumni publications from the University of Oklahoma and Kansas S tat e Teachers College.

HEUER GROCERY Groceries Fruits

PERU

Meats Vegetables

NEBRASKA

Here's Your Chance To Get In On The Payoff! Being a member of the National Guard pays you in three ways - in cold, hard cash; in teaching you skills to advance yourself: and in fulfilling your military obligations the most convenient way. FORMER SERVICEMEN Any individual who has prior military service experience is not required to attend six months basic training and may be eligible for an ·advanced rating in the local guard unit.

MEN OVER 18V2 Anyone over 181/2 may fulfill his obligation by taking six months basic training and five and a half years of active participation* in the local guard unit. "

*Active participation means 48 two-hour drill periods and two weeks summer camp each year.

If any individual wishes to go on active

TRANSFERS TO ACTIVE DUTY

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I

GOOD PAY

TRAIN WITH FRIENDS

COMMISSIONS

During participation in guard drills you will receive a full day's pay for each two-hour drill.

Any group of men wishing to take their six months basic training together may do so by request.

MILITARY ACADEMY

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION

1

See any personnel of :the National Guard or call

BR 4.3711

George Washington's birthday has been set the country over as "Muster Day" to emphasize the event. Open house will be held-

duty, he may do so with the rank he has accumulated in the National Guard up to Sgt.

TAKE ALOOK AT THESE ADVANTAGES. Base pay-figured on no year's service: Rating Pay Pay Per Drill Per Year M/Sgt. $8.33 $587.84 SFC 7.50 516.00 Sgt. 6.83 475.84 Cpl. 5.67 362,83 Pfc. 4.13 264.37

OPEN HOUSE

DRILL CREDIT FOR R.O.T.C. College students who take ROTC will be credited for National Guard duty. Attendance with the local unit while in school is not required.

Commissions are available to qualified personnel of the National Guard with a high school education, two years of N.G. ser. vice and attendance at Officer's Training School. Appointments to the Milita,ry Academy are made each year directly from the National Guard.

Come See For Yourself

Monday, Feb. 22 7:30-10:00 p.m. At fhe Armory in Auburn

COFFEE AND COOKIES WILL BE SERVED EVERYBODY WELCOME

APersonal Invitation We would personally like to invite you to learn more about the National Guard and what it can do for you.

First Lieut. Joseph Edwards Commandiing Officer

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Come down to the armory any Monday night in Auburn during February and March at ·7:45 p.m. and seEl for yourself how easy it is to LEARN AND EARN the National Guard way.

Company "B" Second Battle Group


Invitational Volley Ball Tourney To Be Held

Disastrous Road Trip May Cost Bobcats Championship

The Peru State Bobcats a r e points as he converted 11 of 15 Sixty-seven teams have been nestled in fourth place in the free throws. 1 invited to the annual Peru State NCC as a result of their disasThe following night the BobInvitational Volley Ball Tourna- trous road trip on which they cats ran into a buzzsaw of a basment for High School Girls, suffered defeats at the hands of ketball team as they met the sched!uled for the Peru St a t e Wayne, 58-56 and Midland, 73-66. Midland Warriors at Fremont. campus March 14-15-16. Mrs. The Bobcats, a pre-season The fast, smooth Midland team Frances Wheeler, director of choice as league champion, must handed the Peruvians a 73-66 women's physical education and now face the reality of a long up- loss as they moved into the Contournament director has set Feb- hill fight to retain their champi- ference lead with Wesleyan. The ruary 22, as the e.ntry deadline. onship. The first link in this re- game was nip-and-tuck with In its fourteenth year, the Peru turn will be Tuesday, Febr. 2, Midland holding a one-point, 33State tournament has come to be when they meet the Dana Vik- 32 lead at halftime. regarded as the "world series" in ings, who will invade the Bobcat After the intermission the MidNebraska girls' volley ball. Last lair. land team move(l: out in front year's tournament champion was The Wayne game, played Fri- 38-37 and were never behind Verdon High School, winners day night, was a cliff-hanger all again as they held a 68-57 lead over Prague in the championship the way as the two teams battled with 3:47 to play. game. Dunbar High School up- on virtually even terms. The The improved play of 6'8" cenended Sacred Heart of Falls City winning margin came on a 30- ter Rick Hillman and the steady in two straight matches to win foot jump shot by substitute Ron ball-hawking of Glen McCoy and the consolation. Thirty-five teams Marcellus, who entered the game Denny Groves proved too much were entered in the 1959 classic, when Larry Coney, regular cen- for the Bobcats. Groves paced all while the 1958 event attracted ter, fouled out late in the game. scorers with 22 points as he rea record 43 teams. 'There were only four seconds peatedly slipped through the PeWhile the majority of teams showing on the clock as the ball ru defense for easy layups. entered in the event come from dropped through the nets. Peru was led by transfer stuSoutheast Nebraska, a number Wayne's attack was led by dent Drexel H a r v e y , who of· teams from more distant Ne- Charles Rachow and Larry Con- pumped in 16 points. In both braska points have been repre- ey, who garnered 18 and 16 games it appeared as if the 'Cats sented in recent years. The 1957 points respectively. Peru's Bob would never seem to move their tournament attracted Broadwa- Mayo led all scorers with 21 offense into ~!:"h gear. ter and in 1958 Sunflower Consolidated of Mitchell was represented. Talmage, Brock, Johnson and Nemaha have been represented Peru St~""" Bobcats upped in the first 13 events. V e rd o n By Jerry Osborne High School, which this year has Peru State's Bobcats racked up their Nebr;ta College Conferjoined forces with Dawson to 118 points and a new home court ence record to five wins and one form Dawson-Verdon, had been scoring record while trampling loss, with wins over Kearney represented in all but one tour- Doane College on January 23. State and Hastings College with nament, have ranked in the top This score bettered the old rec- 78-69 and 88-63 victories, reChuck Francis was named sophomore, he was on the Bobfour teams in nine tournaments, ord of 110, set last year against spectively. Omaha World-Herald Star of the cat team that split the NCC title with last year's championship Kearney State. Doane never After a disorganized first half Week for his contribution to the with Hastings and Chadron. Last being their first. Peru Prep also could muster a threat and the in which the Mclntiremen trailed year Francis was a consistant .Peru victories over Kearney and h~s participated in all but one Bobcats opened a 21-5 lead and Kearney, 34-27, the Bobcats reHastings. The Council Bluffs, point-producer when the Bobtburnament. bounded on the hot shooting of stretched! it to 57-26 at halftime. Iowa, forward scored 24· points cats won the NCC race. In the ·Throughout the opening day of Chuck Francis and Bob Mayo, Peru then sizzled the cords for in the defeat of Kearney and the first six conference games this the tournament two games will 41 points in the third period and who rang up 24 and 22 points renext night scored 21 points as the year Francis has scored 103 in progress from 9 a.m. until the the reserves took over to finish spectively, to lead the 'Cats' .Bobcats beat Hastings. final pair of games be g i n at the game at 118 to 58. comeback. They re p e a t e d 1y Chuck is working for his points, or an average of 17.l 9 p.m. Tournament action will be swept the boards and scored on Jack Johnson led the Peru atfourth basketball letter. As a points per game. limited to afternoon and eve- tack with 22 counters while Bob fastbreak situations as Francis ning on Tuesday, with two games Mayo and Chuck Francis each ran up 18 points in this half. peared tired after their long 500- in progress simultaneously. At Big Paul Collinson was the mile trek from the west. In Sat- the end of the first day's action, had 20. Chick Stessman and Mike best that the Antelopes had to Roach rounded out the starting urday's game Chadron moved 16 teams will remain and on offer, as he hit 19 points to lead ahead early, but once again fad- Tuesday evening the top eight five with 18 and 11 points, re- their attack. He kept Kearney in spectively. Bob Buettgenbach alIn a week-end doubleheader on ed in the stretch. teams will clash. The consolation so hit in the double figures with contention until he fouled out Chadron's Bud Murray, who and championship games will be 13. Jim Davenport hit 17 points with approximately four minutes e Peru hardwoods, the Peru tate Bobcats clipped the Chad- hit 18 points Friday, was held to Wednesday evening. to play in the game. for Doane. n Eagles' wings 97 -86 and 96- one field goal in the encore game, Invited teams include: Adams, . The "White Caps," N av a 1 On the following night, the . With the 'Cats hitting 50 per- as Francis placed the clamps on Alvo, Avoca, Barneston, Bel- ROTC drill team from the Uni- Bobcats played their best game cent of their shots in both games, him. Murray's running mate, grade, Bennet, Bennington, Brat- versity of Nebraska, presented a of the season, outhustling the the Eagles never had a chance. Pete Hook, managed 20 p o in ts ton Union, Brock, Broadwater, performance of military preci- Hastings Broncos and late in the In both contests, the Peruvians Saturday as he took up the scor- Bruning, Ceresco, C h a p man, sion and exhibition drill se- game literally running them off hit 34 for 68 from the field. ing lag for the Eagles. Chester. quences during the halftime. the court. Francis again continThe two victories boosted the Cook, Cortland, Dawson-Ver- They are under the command of ued his hot sniping as he filtered In the rn games played to date, beats' Nebraska College Con·· the Mclntiremen at times have don, Daykin, Davenport, DeWitt, Captain J. R. Hansen, U.S. Navy. 21 points through the nets to rence record to nine wins and displayed a potent offense, which Diller, Dorchester, D u n b a r , pace all scorers. ree losses behind Wesleyan, is averaging 80.2 points per Douglas, Eagle, Elk Creek, Filley, All the Bobcats had a hot idland and Wayne. shooting night as they bombed game, while holding their op- Hampton, Holmesville, HordWayne and Kearney are sched- ponents to 66.1. The leading scor- ville. the cords at a 47.6 clip. At the intermission they led 38-28. The ed to appear on the Bobcat. er has been Bob Mayo, who has Honey Creek of Salem, Humurt Friday and Saturday, Feb- averaged 19.2 points per game. boldt, Johnson, Lewiston, Liberclosest that Hastings came in ary 12-13. Game time for both He is followed by Chuck Fran- ty, Mason City, Mead, Louisville, the second period was 43-36. A revised Peru State Bobcat Fred Johnson, Kansas City, ncounters is 8:00 p.m. cis, who is traveling at 15.8 clip Millard, Murdock, Nehawka, relineup, using regulars sparingly, maha, Palmyra, Panama,· Paw- ran up a 75-44 victory over Dana Kans., and Ron Schoonover, In Friday's 97-86 victory, Bob per game. Aurora, each mustered 12 points nee City. ayo supplied the fireworks as College Tuesday on the Peru to pace the Bronco attack. hammered home 30 points, inPeru Prep, Potter, Prague, Sa- maples. Bob Buettgenbach, 6'8" center, ding 16 of 18 free throws. In from' Beatrice was selected by cred Heart, Salem, Shubert, After Dana opened the game turday's lopsided 96-67 romp, the Omaha World-Herald as one Snyder, Springfield, Steinauer, with a free throw, the 'Cats ran from Beatrice, who replaced Bob uck Francis provided the fire of the outstanding Stars-of-the- Stella, Sterling, Syracuse, Table up 10 straight points and never Mayo as a starter, led all scorers wer as he registered 25 points, week for his play in the Peru Rock, Talmage, Thayer, Tobias, were threatened. Coach Jack Mc- with 18 points. Don Joern was inly on long jump shots from State victory over Dana, Tues- Valparaiso, Weeping Water, Wes- Intire juggled his lineup through- the Dana pacemaker with 15, corners. He scored a brilliant day, February 2. This was one of ton, Yutan, Sunflower Consoli- out the game enabling the entire nine of which were from the for 13 shots from the field. charity line. Bob's first starting assignments, dated! of Mitchell. squad to see action. Drexel Harvey, transfer from Friday's game was close until and he came through with 18 The Vikings were cold from second half when the Bob- points to lead the Bobcats to the the field, being held without a DePauw University, who started out-ran the Eagles, who ap- win. ADDITIONAL STRENGTH field goal until 10 minutes had at guard, hit for 12 points, all in FOR BASKETBALL SQUAD elapsed in the contest, when the first half. Mike Roach, Peru's bustling Larry West connected on a twistAt the start of the second seguard, gari:iered 13 points, mostly ing jump shot from the post. mester, the Bobcats added addiBob Buettgenbach, sophomore on feed plays off the post man. tional strength to their basketLarry West, one of the N.C.C.'s ball squad when three transfer leading scorers, was held to 10 students became eligible. The ru a squad that will"be tough for points. new members o.f the squad are their opponents. These new men Ken Dostal and John Christen- will help to take up the slack sen, transfers from the Univer- left when Jim Poage and Roger ROURKE JEWELRY Open Sunday and Evenings sity of Nebraska, and Drexel Witt left Peru. Jim transferred to Qualify Service and Harvey, who came to Peru from Kansas University where he Distincfive Gifts could work toward a degree in DePauw University. Earl Applega:l:e TR2-2601 PERU AUBURN, NEBRASKA Coach Jack Mcintire feels that engineering. Roger gave up his the new members will make Pe- studies to go to work.

Cats Break Record In Making Peru Conquers Kearney and Hastings 118 Points Against Doane

Francis Named Star of the Week

Peru Wins Week-end Doubleheader

Bobcats Storm Over Vikings

EARL'S CAFE


T but the high schoolers were erable study. on the part of the short-term Scoutmasters ended shy-not a one appeared. Piano non-carpenter Scoutmaster. This when A. B. Clayburn came to solos to make a teacher proud; was located in a corner of the lot town in 1922 and from the probaton routines; vocal solos with where the Fire Station now cession of an average annual and without accompaniment, al- stands, where a hotel stood at group of 25 boys has come a list of outstanding men and so violins; and skitS-'pure ham; that time. Intermittent organiz~tion and plishments. but no high schoolers. (Personally, I wondered if it was fear of competition, but no, I've seen the talent the high schoolers used to have; and the program wasn't Rex Rains too long, we could have clapped through a lot more acts. So maybe they're saving it.) As usual, Groceries Meats Mrs. Kregel had! a surprise preFrui:l:s and Vege:l:ables sentation: Mary J a r vis was picked as top clothing student for the McCall's M a g a z in e , Free Delivery Tuesday and Friday Award. It was nice, too, to see a sponsor who wasn't shy-stuPhone TR 2-4351 dent teacher Norma Pugsley sang. John Masonbrink (left) Stella sophomore, receives the Handbook beautifully. (You'd have thought of Chemistry and Physics from chemistry instructor Hanford Miller the high schoolers would follow at the Peru State Teachers College honors convocation. The Handbook her example.) PERU CLEANERS & TAILORS is awarded by the Chemical Rubber Publishing Company to topAnd report from the GERMS: Repairing and Remodeling Men and Women's Clothing r~nking students in first-year chemistry. Masonbrink is majoring in first grade was depleted by Forty-two Years Serving Students and Faculty general science and mathematics. A 1958 graduate of Stella High chicken pox type germs. PHONE TR 2-2671 PERU, NEBR. School, John is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Masonbrink of S.iella. I'm just waiting for the day when temptation overcomes heswhat the finished product sounds itation and sno·wballs are relike. ('Twas wonderful-contest placed by mudballs. Can't say By Mary Anna Gnade stuff?) Peru ignored the groundhog,-we've got a giant-type deiselBesides requiring pupils to Seventh grader Marilyn LarCoin Operated - Automatic Laundry son's mother was named P er u make up a story to use 20 spell- powered species cutting across ing words each day, Mrs. Ivercampus. Woman of the Year-'but she can't very well wear a sign sen split 5th graders into groups OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY In recognition of the Golden around listing all her mother's to write and present original Anniversary Year .of · the Boy qualifications. I can and will add skits. (Pure creativity! Just try S c out organization, AdvanceSOFT WATER to the list already published: no that 20-word stint once.) ment Chairman Ward Adams of mention has been made of the Junior class play is in the air. the Peru Troop 325 introduced TR2-3201 Beatiy's Peru fact that Mrs. Larson holds a Sue Moore told them she didn't "the oldest Peru Scout he could bachelor of science in education want to direct another comedy. find," Ernest Longfellow, to rem· degree from University of Ne- Juniors told her no matter what inisce about the start of Scouting braska and is a former teacher; type play. was chosen, it'd be in Peru, at the Court of Honor nothing was said of her service comedy by the time they got it which followed a potluck dinner ELLA MARGARET SHOP as an officer of the PTA or the to the footlights. (Latest word Monday evening. The Shop of Quality many hours spent in the Well was Tom Higgins would have a Ladies' Wearing Apparel and Millinery Scouting began in 1910, Peru Child Clinic. Remember the old hand in it.) PHONE BR 4-3520 AUBURN, NEBR. had! a troop in 1911, but Ernie slogan "Let George do it"? Peru Shiversome sight: come rain wasn't 12 until 1914 when severlets Mrs. L. do it-director of Polio campaign, funds for Re- or snow, sleet or high wind, cam- al boys got together and pertarded Children, and Heart Fund. pus schoolers trek to the Hill suaded the Christian C h u r c h Besdies which she's always do- Store every noon NO COATS! minister to be Scoutmaster. Ering something for someone! They just HAVE to visit Len's nie said early-day difficulty in Delicatessen to fill gaps left by keeping a Scoutmaster was due Young extension pupil: kinder- school lunch, I guess, but NO to the fact that ministers and colgartner Scott McKercher w a s COATS? (Another shiver: boy in lege professors didn't stay put "ON THE CORNER OF THE CAMPUS" with his mother during her fa. swimming trunks on school s·teps too long. In spite of that fact, the ther's illness, therefore his les- looking-Wonder if he was in boys built a log cabin from cotsons were mailed to him. (Kin- school ii.ext day?) tonwood logs donated by the School Supplies Groceries dergarten lessons?) city, with a fireplace courtesy Told you that FHA organiza- Ernie's father, and with considAnnouncement read "victory tion was always doing. Ta 1 en t Priced Right for the Student dance after the game." Wot hap- show this time, last Monday evepens if it's no victory? Bright ning. Organizer Laquita Allgood answer, "victory for someone!" rounded up talent with a capital

PERU MARKET

Campus School Chatter

SPEED WASH#

THE AVENUE STORE •

Grade and prep bands blew lungs out at concert but were appreciated by only a handful of people-have parent-type people gone out of style? Sure, the kids practice at home but you'd think parents would want to hear

REDFERN Clothing Co.

Ker,,c

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Farm Supplies TR2-2561

CECIL BOWMAN

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~gEsSake

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DIAMOND RINGS A. BAlDWIN $400.00 Wedding Ring $175.00 B. KENNAN $150.00 Wedding Ring $ 75.00

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ON EASY CREDIT

RIGGS JEWELRY Auburn, Nebraska

McINTIRE'S- GARAGE Auto Repair Peru, Nebr.

TR2-2791

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You're always sure of maxi· rrium diamond beauty and brilliance with a Keepsake Interlocking Ring set. The rings are secretly locked to· gether and can't twist or separate. Many exquisite Keepsake styles in a wide price range.

Rl.incs enlarged to show detalll Prices Include Federal Tu

Appliances

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"The Store of Standard Brands" Phone BR 4-3620 Auburn

fl~~ RING SETS STAY LOCKED

BOWMAN'S HARDWARE

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MORRISSY'S VARIETY STORE Peru Sc & lOc Clothing

Shoes

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Complete Line of School Supplies • • • •

Slim Styling Low Waisted Adjustable Waistband Wash 'n' Wear Cords & Polished Cotton

RARICK CLOTHING in AUBURN, NEBRASKA

Revlon, Coty and Evening in Paris Cosmetics KODAKS & SUPPLIES Fast Film Service

Bring Us Your Prescriptions


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;o l-

il st

Spring

Play

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March 10

The Voice of the Campus ot a I nousana uaKs ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU. NEBRASKA

Volume 55

Number 9

FEBRUARY 29, 1960

Ian Wheeler To ·epresent Kappa Delta Pi In Chicago

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The Veterans' Club provided an evening of entertainment Wednesday, February 17, at the Campus School Auditorium. The club presented, "Bend in the River," featuring James Stewart, Rock Hudson, and Julie Adams. The Veterans termed it a successful venture because about 80 students came and viewed the film. A small door charge was taken to cover costs. A similar attempt was made last year, however, it did not meet the success it had this year.

Angels Initiate Twenty At Tea The annual White Angel tea was held February 15, at 6:00 p.m., in the recreation room. This year the girls decided to have an informal party. The White Angel Pledges entertained the group with a skit. Refreshments were served later. The purpose of this party is to initiate the pledges and have them sign the traditional White Angel Pledge. The new members are: Judy Adams Carol Ellenberger Connie Erisman Karen Fankhauser Beverly Farmer Marilynn Giesmann Carol Glather Rita Grandgenett Barbara Hill Ellen Hunzeker Kaye Jacobson Clara Kelly Mary Ann Lewellyn Julie Mayer Carol McLain Kay Parli Phyllis Peters Kathleen Streich Lola Triska Barbara Wellensiek Sandy Pearson Romona Bock

Russell and Boraas To Attend Confe.fense A meeting o,t }he National · Conference on ~i!fl.ter< ·Education will be held in Chi!mgo, Illinois, · on March 6 to 9, Mr. •Lester Russell and Dr. Harolti Boraas will be in attendance from Peru.

"Brief Music" Worthy, Noted News Correspondent, Interviewed

Alan Wheeler, junior from Stella, will represent the Peru State Teachers College Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi at the national education honorary fraternity's 196(} biennial Convocation in Chicago, March l(},12. Judy Miller, senior from Peru, will be alternate. Visitors from the Beta Mu Chapter at Peru State to the Convocation will be Donna Francis, junior, Council Bluffs, Iowa; Jerry Paden, senior, Seneca, Kans., and Linda Moore, senior, Nemaha. Founded in 1911, Kappa Delta Pi has more than 140,000 members in 225 chapters throughout the nation. Convocation sessions will be held in Shoreland Hotel.

Veterans' Club Presented Movie

~ee

By Leroy Keyt

Dr. Neal S. Gomon was in Chicago, February 9 and 10, attending sessions of the President's Advisory Committee of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. The advisory committee is a 35-man group appointed by the NAIA executive board to assist in development of policy for the national organization which has a membership of 475 small and medium sized colleges in the United States. The Peru president also attended sessions of the American Association of School Administrators in Atlantic City, New Jersey, February 14-18. More than 20,000 administrators from across the nation were in attendance at the meeting. Enroute home from Atlantic City, President Gomon visited placement offices at Columbia University, City College of New York, and New York University examining. credentials of candidates for possible vacancies on the college staff.

William Worthy, noted news correspondent, gave his views on good reporting and explained parts of his convocation speech in an interview following the February 17 assembly. The convocation speaker feels that the top reporter must have a strong curiosity, "a temperament that enables one to ignore the clock, especially in foreign countries," and a good education. What are the educational prerequisites to becoming a crack reporter? In Mr. Worthy's opinion, top itents on the list are: a good liberal arts background, plenty of history, a detailed knowledge of the area to which the reporter is assigned, and a "broad kcllwle~ge of current events." ·• Mr. Worthy feels that his most important s in g 1 e assignment, from a personal standpoint, was the five · he spent in the Soviet Uri in 1955. He believes that it aided his intellectual development, since it gave him his first substantial introduction to life in a totalitarian state. Peru's guest said that he entered reporting because he likes to write and, "It gives you a good box-seat on the world." Mr. Worthy declared that "China Today" would have been a better title for his talk than "My Trip to Red China," since he "up-dated" much of the material in his speech. The guest speaker reiterated the reason why he had stressed the good points of Red China in his discourse. "Most people hear and read only the bad points about China." Why don't Americans get the full news about Communist countries? According to Mr. Worthy, "The American press has played footsy with the Federal government in not favoring recognition of Red China." He further believes that the press has censored the worthwhile accomplishments of the Chinese Reds. Mr. Worthy declared, "Some people may have been shocked at some of my statements, but they were true. Too often we act as if 'ignorance is strength'."

Mr. Wilfred Semrad Speaks At SEAN Meeting

Linscheids Give Dinner For Peruvian Staff

Students of the Education Association of Nebraska met in the Campus School auditorium at 7:00 p.m. Monday evening, Feb· ruary 15. Jerry Paden, president of the club, opened the meeting and presented the guest speaker of the evening, Mr. Wilfred T. Semrad, N.E.A. Consultant. Mr. Semrad discussed the N e b r as k a school system, advantages of teaching in Nebraska, and the progress which has been made in school systems in N e b r a s k a through the yeafs. Mr. Semrad's report was both interesting and enlightening. Other business of the meeting concerned voting for the Faculty· Teacher of the Year. Both Faculty Teacher and Student Teacher of the Year will be announced

Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Linscheid gave a dinner for the 1960 Peruvian staff on February 18, at 6:30 p.m., to celebrate the completion of the yearbook. The guests were Carol Ellenberger, Lois Rowe, Chris Hays, Francis Lindell, Kathy Rhoten, Jeannine Ehlers, Rosemary Rottman, and Carolyn Parli. Photographer Glen Chambers was imable to attend because he had the flu.

Six instructors, representing 106 years of teaching service to Nebraska Staie Teachers College af Peru, have been nominated by the Peru chapter of the Student Education Association of Nebraska as candidates for "College Teacher of the Year" at Peru Sfate. The candidates, who will be presented at the Peru SEAN all-college convocation April 13, include (from lefi) front row-Miss Alma Ashley, elementary education, 11 years; A. B. Clayburn, geography .and geology, 38 years; Mrs. Ruth Math· ews, healih education, 17 years; back row-James D. Levitt, speech, 12 years; George Rafh, modern language, 14 years, and John C. Christ biology, 14 years.

Melvin and Blanton Attend AACTE Meet

Home Ee Club Sponsors Martha Washington Tea

The Home Economics C 1 u b On Saturday, February 13, Dr. held the annual Martha WashMelvin and Dr. Blanton returned . ington Silver Tea on February 23, from a four-day trip to Chicago ' 1960 in the Campus School. to a meeting of the American 'Martha Washington's o d gin a 1 Association for Colleges of fruit cake recipe was used. This Teacher Education. recipe was sent to Martha WashThe theme of this meeting was ington by her niece Martha Cusdirected toward programs of tis. It is on display in the museteacher education. Represented um at Mount Vernon, Virginia. were institutions which ha v e In 1940, the recipe was secured programs for teacher education. by a group of Peru State stuNot only was the single-purpose dents who accompanied Miss Edteacher education institution re- na Weare, now professor emeripresented, but also the multi- tus of home economics, to a napurpose university of which the tional convocation of home econteacher education college is a omists in the East. The cake has. part. been served annually since that Dr. Melvin and Dr. Blanton's time. time in Chicago was spent in atThe fifteen pound cake was the tendance of general and smaller centerpiece of the serving table. group meetings. The general The cake was baked by J o an meetings covered topics of gen- Riggle, Janet Bertram, Linda eral .interest to all those present, Bertram, Laverna Roos, Clara such as the trend in teacher Kelly, and Darlene Critel. The preparation and future trends so cake was decorated in pale green far as society in general is con- and pink by Deanna Wach. A cerned. The smaller group meet- figure of Martha Washington, ings covered more specific topics. dressed in a pale green dress with pink roses, was standing on top of the cake. SCF and LSA Have The buffet centerpiece was Discussion Period pink carnations in a crystal bowl. The cake was cut by Lol~ TrisThe S.C.F. presented a very effective film on Protestant- ka and Rita Grandgeriett. DarCatholic marriages, Wednesday lene Critel poured coffee and tea. evening, Febr: 17. The success Ruth Carmichael was in charge and the failures of these mar- of the guest book and the indiriages were discussed after the vidual cakes were sold by Sandra film. Also Karen Fankhauser Craig. read the agreements which are signed by both parties before marriage. These were later explained by the ministers. LSA presented a Bible study program on February 17. On February 24 a film entitled "Boy Meets Girl" will be presented to the club members. MEISTER SHOWS SLIDES OF\ GERMANY Foreign Language Club met Monday, February 22, at 8:30 in the Administration Building. Ray Meister showed slides of Germany to the group. The German students then sang several songs. Lunch was served by Carol McLain and Jane Kunkel.

Blue Devils Pledge Five New Members Five new members were pledged into the Blue Devils at their February 1 meeting. At this meeting, Drexel Harvey, Larry Rathe, Barney Mcilvoy, Galen Conn, and Butch Tarring became official members of the Blue Devils. Other business transacted at the meeting was the election of Duane Lewis and Neal Eickhoff as secretary and treasurer respectively. They will hold these offices for the remainder of the year.

President Attends Meetings In Chicago And Atlantic City

by the SEAN at an all college convo sponsored by them on April 13. It was also decided that election of officers would take place at the next meeting of SEAN. Approximately 50 me m b er s attended this meeting of SEAN.


LIBRARY SHORTS By Darlene Critel

Different Phases of Dancing Offered Mrs. Frances Wheeler, director of women's physical education, is conducting two dance classes this semes,ter. Folk dancing, a class for both men and women, takes up the folk dances of other countries as well as some social dancing, just as the square and social dance class did the first semester. Folk dancing, · Mrs. Wheeler believes, developes coordination and poise, and broadens dancing abilities and appreciation of folk lore. In connection with her folk dancing class, Mrs. Wheeler said that it appears men are becoming more interested in dancing, and have realized that dancing is not a sissified thing. Proof of this could be that the men outnumber the women in the class. Her other dancing class is modern dance . . . Mrs. Wheeler

said that nowadays mo d er n dance fa often confused with social dance and many experts believe that contemporary dance is a better name for it. Modern dance has changed over the years. A generation ago lt was just very light and pretty dancing; now it is more developed and has strength and character shown in more exaggerated and interpretive movement. Any movement that is suitable for expression may be used.

Convo Pep Rally Held Before Wesleyan Game

"House Party," and the "News Report." The following girls took part in 'the skit: Karen Fankhauser, Connie Erisman, Carol McLain, Julie Mayer, Rae Mae Henry, Mary Ann Lewellyn, Lola Triska, Kathy Streich, Ellen Hunzeker, Phyllis Peters, Clara Kelly, Marilynn Giesmann, B a r b a r a Hill, Judy Adams, Sandra Pe,arson, Rita Grandgenett, Beverly Farmer, Carol Ellenberger, Carol Glathar, Kaye Jacobson, Kay Parli, Barbara Wellensiek, and Ramona Bock. During the "It Could Be You" portion of the skit, Coach Jack Mcintire was called to the stage. The rally was ended with more yells and the school color song.

A special all-college Convocation was held on Wednesday, February 16, 1960. The purpose of the Convo was the presentation of a pep rally for the Wesleyan basketball game. The cheerleaders led the st u de n t body in several yells. A skit was presented as part of the initiation of the White Angel pledges. The skit took the form of satires of scenes from such popular television and radio shows as: "This Is Your Life, Peru State," "Zorro," "Man on the Street," "Red Skelton," "It Could Be You," "Weather Girl,"

Mrs. Wheeler said that through modern dance a girl can gain poise and gracefulness that will carry over into later life. At present the girls are learning the techniques and are building a "vocabulary of movements." Later the girls win create dances improvising their own movements.

"He who consid1;rs too much will perform little."-'Schiller.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks Member Intercollegiate Press February 29, 1960 THE STAFF Co-Editor __________________________________ Donna Francis Co-Editor ______________________________Rosemary Rottman Sports Editor _________________________________ Wally West Sports Reporter _____________________________ Jerry Osborne Sports Reporter ______________________________ Steve Parker Copy Editor ________________________________ Kathy Rhoten Copy Editor ------------~---------------Martha Sue Moore Business Manager _____________________________ Al Bohlken Columnist ____________________________________ Gary Brown Columnist ___ -------------- __________________ Carolyn Parli Columnist ---------------"--------------Mary Anna Gnade Library Column ____________________________ Darlene Critel Exchange Editor ____________________________ Nancy Kunkel Convocations _~--------- ___________________ Sharon Watton Dramatics --------------- -------------- ___ Joni Wesolowski Music ----------------- ______________________ Peggy McGee Church __________________________________ Alice Greenwood Campus School News __________________________Chris Hays Campus School Reporter ____________________ Elmer Antons Reporter __________________________________ Sandra Pearson Reporter ______________________________ Mary Ann Lewellyn Reporter ________________________________ Carol Ellenberger Reporter --------- __ ---------- _________________ Leroy Keyt Reporter ____________________________________ Leland Smith Sponsor ______________________________ Stewart P. Linscheid

Advice and Consent is a book written by Allen Drury. This is an extraordinary novel of politics and politicians. Allen Drul'y has penetrated the world's stormiest p0litical battleground-the smoke-filled committee rooms of the United States Senate. Here he has probed with fascinating detail, into the minds and motives of the statesmen, the opportunists, and the old-fashioned idealists of present-day Washington. He shows their public and private "faces," iheir driving ambitions, their vanities, their hopes, and their fears. The book is set against the ominous background of steadily mounting crisis with Russia. Advice and Consent is far more than a timely eye-witness chronicle of our American leaders. It is a remarkable human document which places man's weakness and nobility under the same r e 1 e n t 1 e s s but compassionate scruting. The book is hailed by one enthusiastic reader as "a Washington novel worthy of the name and the city." Advice and Consent is one of the most exciting and authentic American political novels ever written. The author is a man who is an experienced and astute reporter as well as a profoundly skillful writer. Alan Walker's central theme in A New Mind for a New Age is that in this new age it is the totaliiy of Christian discipleship which will alone be sufficient. In our urbanized and massproduced society is Christianity still relevant? Alan Walker's answer is an emphatic yes. "What the present time not only needs but demands," he says, "is the total gospel brought to bear on the totality of life~a Christianity in which personal and social witness go forward side by side." In this book, Mr. Walker is concerned with individuals-h ow one as a Christian can come to terms with such aspects of ,contemporary life as urban living and its consequent rootlessness and loneliness, the problem of race, and the challenge of spaceage science. A New Mind for a New Age will speak to all who would find in Christianity not a retreat from life, but a call to involvement in it. The Final Diagnosis is written by Arthur Hailey. At the heart of this great medical novel is Dr. Kent O'Donnell's struggle to pull his declining hospital back to its former standards. O'Donnell's greatest pro~lem lay in the power wielded by the aging, once brilliant pathologist, Joe Pearson. Proud, unwilling to acknowledge his failure to keep up with modern methods, Pearson ruled his staff and the tight-fisted hospital board of directors with absolute tyranny. One faulty' diagnosis, one irrevocable error in j u d gm en t brought on the final tragedy. The passionate romance between a beautiful student nurse and an ambitious staff doctor has a share in the tragedy. So does the accomplished, arrogant David Coleman-whose obsession with perfection and order has blinded him to the needs of other "less perfect" human beings. Seldom have the complex workings of a great hospital-its intrigue, its heartbreak, its triumphs-been more dramatically revealed than in The Final Diagnosis. The author explores a world the patient never sees.

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WHISPERS FROM MORGAN By Carolyn Parli This snowy weather makes it extremely easy for people to slide to classes. Maybe if it snows enough, we'll be able to have a closed week-end with dances, etc. Sounds like fun, doesn't it? The workmen said tha:t the new rooms will soon be ready to paint. Nightly inspections by some of the girls have .verified this statement. · Diana Gibson, a former Peruvian, is staying at the dorm for a few days on her vacation. She is attending School of Nursing in Omaha. Third floor has, been turned into a roller skating rink, and first floor has a wading pool from all the excess water from the water gun fights. It seems that third floor has some talented girls. Room 308 has a unique art gallery. The girls said that anyone was welcome to see their

masterpieces. Room 302 has so pet dinosaurs in an aquarium course, they're only plastic. There aren't very many birt days this time. The ones havi birthdays are Sharilyn Vrtis Connie Erisman, Jo Ann Eick hoff, and Virginia Garton. This reporter decided to a list of songs describing variou classes on campus. Western Civilization- "Whe or Where" First-Aid-"It Only Hurts fo a Little While" Folk Dancing - " R u n n in Bear" Love, Courtship, and Marriag -"It Takes Two to Tango" Statistics-"Baby, You Go What It Takes" Astronomy-"Star Bright" History of Christianity-"Tee Angel" Psychology-"What in th World's Come Over You" Industrial Arts-"Handyman" Costume and Design-"Wha Did Delaware?" Life Saving-"He'll Have t Go" Music Appreciation-" Lon Ranger" theme Health Education-"You Got to Have Heart"

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'Cats Beat Kearney.,. Lose To Wayne The Peru State Bobcats .split even in their week-end games with Wayne State and Kearney on February 12 and 13. The Cats took it on the chin from Wayne, 70-65, but rebounded to roll over Kearney by 87 to 68.

four minutes remaining in the game. Mike Roach led all scorers with 23 points, while Bob Mayo followed with 18. All of Wayne's starters scored in double figures with Larry Berre's 19 counters leading them.

The loss to Wayne made Peru's record 10 and 4 and dimmed their N.C.C. title hopes. The Bob~ cats were cold from the floor and the Wildcats couldn't miss. During one stretch in the game, they hit on 10 of 11 shots. Wayne led at intermission, 40-29, and was threatened. only once after that as Peru pulled up to 53-51 with ,

The Kearney game was a typical race horse affair and bad passes and interceptions were frequent. Peru led at the half, 41-36, and pulled away a f t e r that. Bob Mayo and Chuck Francis led the victory with 29 and 16 points, respectively. Paul Collison mustered 16 for the Antelopes.

Stompers Win Intramural Basketball Tournament

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With the · regular play concluded, and some of the games in the play-offs completed, the Intramural basketball season is nearly ended. The regular play champions were the Stompers, who finished with a 9-0 record. Second were the Coasters w h o sported a 7-1 record. Tied fo r third were three teams, each with a 6-2 record. These three teams were the Drifters, the Shieks, and the Ramblers.

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N T I N E N T

Dave Hoffman of the Rockets took top scoring honors for the regular play with 103, points in seven games played. Gary Olsen, of the Barrel Bottoms, had 100 points for eight games, followed by Vern Thomsen of the Green Mountain Boys. with 97 points and Leon Chappell and Ken Rhodus of the Coasters with 90 points each for eight games.

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The Drifters had the best average in points· per game with 47.75. The Coasters had the best defensive record, allowing only 30.52 points per game.

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At the time this information was received, there were still several games left to be played in the play-offs.

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Improved Squad· Will Play ·Eleven Baseball .Games Al Wheeler, coach of Peru's baseball team, had the following to say when asked about this year's baseball team: "Peru this year has a better pitching staff, better hitting squad, and a better team." Chris Salberg is again student coaching this year under Coach Wheeler and is proving a great help and benefit to the team. Chris · played for Duluth t!iis summer in the Northern League. Coach Wheeler reports that he has returning lettermen at every position except center field. The returning lettermen are as follows: Jackson, pitcher; Gerber, catcher; Verbeek, catcher; Chapel, first base; Fitzgerald, second base; Smith, shortstop; Carlson, third base; Roach; left field; and Gilson, right field. Gary Randles, pitcher; Gary Olson, outfielder; and Jim Fisher, shortstop, are also returning men from last year's squad. Promising new prospects for this year's squad are: Kelly, pitcher; Fritz, pitcher; Jacobs, pitcher; Osborn, pitcher; Bliss, catcher; Shrout, catcher or shortstop; Jackson, catcher; Yopp, first base; Ma<:ovoy, second base; Sadich, third base; Eddy, third base; Littell, third base or sh9rtstop; Bates, outfield; Harvey, outfield; and Rhodus, outfield. Coach Wheeler hopes to have a better team and team results this year because of better material. 1960 Baseball Schedule April I-Concordia at Peru (2) 8-Highland JC at Peru 13-Peru at Graceland 22-Peru at Creighton (2) 26-Peru at Midland (2) 29-Wayne at Peru (2) May 3-Maryville at Peru 4-Peru at Hastings (2) 11-Graceland at Peru 13-Wesleyan at Peru (2) 19-Peru at Dana (2)

,Prep Loses To Table Rock In Nemaha Valley Tournament Table Rock defeated Peru Prep 45-39 to win the Nemaha Valley. Tournament Saturday night , February 13, at Cook. Marshall Adams of Peru was high for the night with 17 points, even though he was on the losing team. Bernadt and Schmitz each scored 11 points for the winning Table Rock team. Third place was won by Talmage as they defeated Lourdes Central of Nebraska City, 73-30. In preliminary games played Thursday night, February· 11, the-. Prep Bobkittens d e f e ate d Lourdes Central 58-43, and Table Rock defeated Talmage 3425. In the Prep-Lourdes game, Adams was high with 24 points, followed by Morris with 10 and Tynon and Blanton with 8 each. R. Schmitz led the losers with 22 points.

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Bobcats Defeat Wesleyan 69-67 The Bobcats, trying to stay in the race for the NCC championship, defeated Wesleyan Tuesday, February 16, 69-67. The Bobcats were having their share of troubles the first half and at half-time were down 8 points, 36-28. In the second half the Bobcats caught fire and went on a scoring spree that boosted them into the lead. The margin of the game was decided on the free throw shooting of the Bobcats. Wesleyan connected on 28 field goals to 26 for Peru, but the Bobcats made 17 out of 24 attempts at the charity line while Wesleyan made only 11 out of .17 tries. Mayo High Scorer Leading the Bobcat squad in scoring was Senior Bob Mayo who had 2(} points. D.rexel Harvey was close behind him with 17 points. Carrying the blunt of the Wesleyan attack was Rudy

Stoehr with 25, points and Jim Munford with 17. Roach Throws Winner The game was tied at 67 all with less than one minute to play when Wesleyan's Dennis Semin fouled Mike Roach. Mike s an k one of two charity tosses to put Peru into the lead. With just one second remaining Drexel Harvey was fouled and he added the other free throw to ice the game for Peru. Balanced Performance The complete Peru sq u a d played a bang-up ball game and kept Wesleyan on the.move. Bob Mayo was tough under the boards, and Roach, Harvey, Yopp and Stessman kept firing in baskets from the outside. Chu ck Francis did a remarkable job in stopping Rudy Stoehr. This is the first time that Peru has defeated Wesleyan since December of 1958.

Kittens Win Nemaha Valley Conference Peru Prep sewed up the Nemaha Valley Conference championship, Friday, February 19, as they defeated Elk Creek 85-59. Leading the Prep team to the victory were Bill Tynon and Marshall Adams with 36 and 30 points respectively. Knipplemeyer scored 20 points and Parrish 16 to lead Elk Creek. Peru outscored Elk Creek in

every quarter, leading by 6 points at the end of the fir~t quarter, 9 at the half, and 19 at the end of the third quarter. The 85 points that the Bobkittens scored is their high for the season. Peru ended with an 8 win, 0 loss, record in the Nemaha Valley Conference and has a 17 and 2 record for the season.

Bobcats Roll Over Concordia

Prep Defeats Tough Avoca Squad

The Peru State Bobcats won their 12th conference game Saturday, February 20, as they defeated Concordia 95-76. Peru was never in trouble in the game as they jumped to an early lead. It was a rough played game with the Bobcats hitting 37 free throws out of 51 attempts. The Bulldogs of Concordia made 20 out of 39 attempts at the fr e e throw line.

The Peru Prep Bobkittens defeated a strong Avoca club Tuesday, February 16, by the score of 60-52. Assistant coach Joe Verbeck said that the Prep team played one of their best games in defeating Avoca. Both teams showed a lot of hustle for the first three quarters, but the Bobkittens went into a semi-stall in the fourth quarter to preserve their victory.

Leading the Bobcats in the scoring department were Drexel Harvey with 22 points, Bob Mayo with 18, Chuck Francis with 17, and Bob Buettgenbaugh with 16. High for the Bulldogs was Etzler with 25, points. Dieckhoff had 15 to help· out the Concordia cause.

The starting five went all the way for the Bobkittens and all figured strongly in the scoring column. Marshall Adams led the Prep team with 19 points, followed by Bill Tynon with 14, Tom Boatman with 12, Pat Morris with 10, and Larry Blanton with 5.

This victory, coupled with Midland's loss, moved Peru into a tie for third place. Peru or Midland will have third place by themselves when this p a p er comes out.

The Prep team has compiled 16 wins against 2 losses thus far. One regularly scheduled game and the Class C district tournament are left on the schedule.

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Janie Crabtree, Larry Blanton Sweetheart King and Queen The Campus School Valentine dance was held Saturday, February 20, at 7:30 in the high school auditorium. The seniors, who sponsored the dance, elected two attend• ants from each of the freshman, sophomore and junior classes. Terry Marnell and Marylin Larson were the freshman attendants· Tom Boatman and Linda Mor~issy were the sophomore attendants; and Pat Morris and Laquita Allgood were the junior attendants. The King and Queen were chosen from the senior class by the freshman, sophomore and junior classes. Janie Crabtree was elected Queen and Larry Blanton King. fanie is the daughter of Mr.

and Mrs. Byran Crabtree. She has attended Peru high school a:ll four years. She is treasurer of the Pep Club, a member of FHA; and was recently an attendant at the FHA Snow Festival, secretary of the senior class, and has lettered in volley ball three years. Larry is the son of Dr. and Mrs. Milburn Blanton. This is Larry's first year in Peru. He is an honor student and is also publicity chairman for the Student Council. Larry lettered in football and in basketball. .The auditorium was decorated in red and white, and refreshments were served by the seniors.

W.A.A. SPONSORS CO-RECREATIONAL NIGHTS WAA sponsored two co-recreaP.T.A. met Monday evening, February 15, at 8:00 p.m. in the tional activities the past two Campus School aud!itorium. The weeks. February 10, 30 students purposes of the meeting were attended the co-rec. swimming to present awards to two of the night. Campus School faculty, and to. On February 17, a volley ball hear a panel discussion on "Ex- night was held with approxitra-Curricular Activities." mately 25 students attending. Mr. B. A. Eddy, principal, and Plans are being made for a coMrs. Ruth Brown, fourth grade recreational badminton tourn\1teacher, were presented Life ment. Membership Awards by Mrs. M a r y o n Adams, kindergarten teacher. The awards are given to PHI ALPHA THETA persons who have contributed MET FEBR. IS The Chapter of Phi Alpha the most to bettering children's Theta held their monthly meetattitudes. A panel discussion concerning ing February 15, at 8:00 p.m. in " Extra - Curricular Activities" the Administration Building. The business meeting consistwas also presented. Mrs. Buddy ed of making plans for ratifying Morrissy acted, as moderator. The members of the panel w e r e and adopting a new constitution. Coach Stemper from Peru State A spring banquet was also Teachers College, Coach De- planned at which the new memZwarte from Peru C amp us bers will be initiated. Dr. Dearth provided several School, and Mr. Gilbert Wilson, director of band and music edu- interesting films revealing some cation from Peru State Teachers of the fine arts of our Latin AmCollege. The panel members dis- erican neighbors. cussed winter and summer activities and all phases of instru- STUDENT WIVES mental and vocal activities. The WILL HOLD BAKE SALE audience was allowed to ask Student Wives Club met Monquestions of the panel members day, Feb. 22, at 8:00 p.m. in the after the discussion. Campus School home ec departMrs. D. V. Jarvis recognized ment. these people as recipients of the The wives' bake sale, headed P.T.A. Scholarship: Beverly Par- by Mrs. Dan Jones, will start at de, Pickrell, Nebraska; Judy 10:0(} a.m. Saturday, March 5, at Adams, Peru, Nebraska; Phyllis the City Hall. The bake sale will Peters, Johnson, Nebraska; Rose- close when all the pies, cakes, mary Rottman, Pawnee City, Ne- brownies, candy, cookies, and braska; Wayne McFarland, Sum- cupcakes have disappeared. ner, Nebraska; Larry Carre, BeaThe Student Wives Club has trice, Nebraska; Joe Verbeek, started saving a pound of celloPeru, Nebraska; and Larry Whit- phane cigarette tabs to provide tington, Auburn, Nebraska. a seeing eye dog for some blind The third grade and ninth person. grade room mothers served reAlso in the line of thrift, the freshments in the Campus School Wives are collecting Butter-Nut lunch room following the meet- key strips for a 50-cup coffee ing. urn.

P.T.A. Presented Awards

BANK OF PERU PHONE TR 2-2331

Member F.D.I.C. INVITES YOUR BUSINESS CARROLL LEWIS, President

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Campus School Enters Interscholastic Contest

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Peru

By Mary Anna Gnade

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Delzell Doings

PERU MARKET

By Gary Brown

Rex Rains

Gary Scoggin has ·finally revealed to the press that he is engaged to Miss Donna Darwin, a registered nurse from Lit t 1 e Rock, Arkansas. Donna is pres" ently residing in Beatrice while working at the Lutheran Hospital in that 'city. John Ahl is engaged to Miss Janet Albert, who is presently employed in the Omaha National Bank. John and Janet will exchange vows on August 26 of this year. Diets have become the up and coming thing in Delzell the past two weeks. In case anyone is considering undertaking a diet, the following suggestions were given by the men of Delzell: Chuck Francis, "The best way to lose weight-don't eat"; Larry Rae, "Just sleep late in the mornings and miss breakfast"; Glenn Irwin, "Physical exercise and invigorating food to maintain shape for boxing"; Dick Kunde, "Less solid food and absolutely no liquid refreshment"; Tom Higgins, "An idea for losing 10 pounds of ugly weight is to cut off your head"; George Riege, "Reverse mitosis"; Bill Bliss, "Dieting as prescribed by Coach Wheeler." Dennis Hilfiker has been taking week-end jaunts to Slenderella; Ken Humphrey , "Track diet (large breakfast, small lunch, small dinner, no inbetween-meal snacks) and many exciting week-ends in Bellevue." Remember the old saying: "You can't have your cake and eat it too." I ask you this: "What good is your cake if you can't eat it?"

Groceries Meafs Fruifs and Vegefables

ROURKE JEWELRY TR2-3201

ners across campus to visit the nurse. Curiosity asked whylogical reason: usual check-up of eyes, ears, throat, etc. Kindergartners aren't checked in the fall with all the others because they're not yet accustomed to the ways of school then. All of February is Sweetheart month. HS waited almost till the last to have their Sweetheart Dance-naturally, in the midst of a raging snow storm. But they danced and honored a Queen of Hearts (Janie Crabtree-she's making .this queen business a habit) andi a King of H e arts (Larry Blanton) chosen by ballot of freshmen, sophomores and juniors. Then the seniors elected the attendanb>, a boy and g i r 1 from each class. Makes good yearbook material!

With basketball and v o 11 e y The Interscholastic Contest, ball tournaments· all around us, sponsored by the College, will be it is refreshing to see a notice of held on the campus F r i d a Y , high school convo for the purMarch 25. Many schools from the pose of awarding scholastic Asoutheast part of Nebraska will pins and recognizing progress in reading; and contrary to popular participate. Two classes of schools will be cartoon conception, the athletes in the contest: High schools with get scholastic awards, too. Along the same line, the camover 150 students will be in Class A and will be permitted to enter pus s·chool has entered 13 brains up to two students in each sub- in the interscholastic contest. ject area. High schools with less (Thirteen out of an enrollment of than 150 students will be in Class 52 is a pretty good proportion of B and can enter only one stu- 'brains!) Then we have Speech and Mudent in each subject area. College departments have written sic contests coming up shortly. up the tests to be given in each Did you ever stop to think that all these contests involve as area . . The areas which will be of- much or more work on the part Tickets are out for the All fered in the contest are: English of the instructors as the students Sports banquet on March 19. Be usage, home economics, indus- who participate? fore that on March 11 comes th e trial arts, algebra I, American Here's more work for the in- PTA Carnival ·(adv.). Daily in government, American history, structors: University of Nebras- quiries are being made about th e art, biology, geometry, German, ka ·Art Department- and Exten- books for the Junior Class pla y health, Latin, literature, music, sion Division invites entries of which is scheduled for April 7 physics, chemistry, algebra II, creative art work chosen fro m (they may have to go on stag e French, Spanish, spelling, typing, grades beginners through eighth. with scripts in hand!). And I am Mr. Eddy has sent a fair-sized constantly reminded that a name and world history. Thirteen students from the packet of en tries; now to see if (former Peru Stater) band h as Cam,pus School are entered in any of ours is mentioned in the been arranged for to play fo r the contest. They are: Sara Ad- listing sent out by Miller & Junior-Senior Prom. ams in English usage and litera- Paine. Last year, without knowture, Tom Boatman in typing, ing such had been sent in, it was Elaine Gerdes in American his- quite a surprise to find my JimREDFERN tory, Karen Mcintire in spelling, my's piece the only entry from Clothing Co. Nemaha County accepted and Harlene Palmer in American "The Store of Standard government, Leland Schneider then sent on tour. Brands" in algebra I, Mary Ellen Wilson I watched Mrs. Adams con,duct Phone BR 4·3620 Auburn in music, Larry Blanton in phys- two lively hordes of kindergartics and Latin, Jane Crabtree in home economics, David Gomon in geometry and German, HanPERU CLEANERS TAILORS ' ford Miller in chemistry, Al Repairing and Remodeling Men and Women's Clothing Wheeler in world history and Forty-two Years Serving Students and Faculty health, and Jerry Sayer in indusPHONE TR 2-2671 PERU. NEBR. trial arts and biology.

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路Volley Ball Tournament

I he voice ot tne Lampus or a 1nousana uaKs ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU. NEBRASKA

Volume 55

Number 10

Inter-Scholastic Contest

T~~eln~:~~~~

Marterie and His Marlboro Men Will Be On Campus

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Ralph Marterie and his Marlboro Men, the swinging orchestra with more record hits than any other band, is coming to the Campus of a Thousand Oaks. Marterie's c amp us-acclaimed band was voted tops in a popularity poll conducted by Downbeat magazine. In recent years,. Marterie believes there has been a big change among the youth and college crowds. "They used to 路 dance only to slow tunes. When we'd play a jump number, they'd crowd around us and go wild listening. Now, though, they stay . out on the floor when we pick up the tempo. That's the way we

like it because we know they're having more fun." Some of Mr. Marterie's Mercury records which have sold over a million copies are: Pretend, Crazy, Man Crazy, Blue Mirage, Shish-Kabob, Skokiaan, Caravan, Tricky, and Compulsion.

So shine up your dancing shoes and oil your kneecaps, for the coolest, swingiest band in the land is coming your way. A swinging band, a swinging evening for all students will be an event in April. The exact date is not set at the present.

Maryon Adams Writes "Kindergarten Guide"

I.A. Club and Epsilon Pi Tau To Go to Kansas City, Mo.

"Kindergarten Guide," compiled by Maryon L. Adams, kindergarten supervisor and assistant professor of education at Peru State Teachers College, has been published by the Special Services Press at Peru State.

The Peru Industrial Arts Club and Epsilon Pi Tau, the honorary industrial arts fraternity, will be visiting Kansas City, Missouri, April 7th and 8th. They are to be accompanied by Mr. Jarvis, Dr. Harlan, Mr. Russell, and Mr. Traylor on their trip. This will be a personally financed trip except for the transportation which is being supplied by the State. The Peruvians will be staying at the Y.M.C.A. while in Kansas City, and plan to visit General Motors, Sheffield Steel, and other educational places of interest while in the city.

Written to supplement the regular texts used by those students majoring in early elementary education, the guide includes chapters concerning the potential of the average five-year old, the kindergarten teacher's role, curriculum guides, ideas for presenting some of the basic concepts and desirable understandings for the kindergarten child. One of the main features of the book is an extensive collection of 80 finger plays. Mrs. Adams r e c e i v e d her Bachelor of Science and her Master of Science in Elementary Education from Peru State. Sh e has been on the staff of the college for eight years as kindergarten supervisor, professor of early elementary education and Children's Literature. On sale at the college Book . Store at $1.00, the new publication has been received enthusiastically by those who have used

High

School Contest sponsored each year by Peru State,Teachers College will be held on March 25. Although the deadline for entry is not until March 11, 38 schools are expected to participate. The planning for 路this contest has been put into the hands of the Inter-Scholastic Contest commitc tee headed by Mr. Max Langham. Participating schools will be classified into either Division A or Division B, depending upon the size of the school. All schools with enrollments of 150 or more in grades 9 to 12 inclusively will be placed in A Division. Those schools with smaller enrollments will be placed in B Division. Trophies will be given in e a ch division. The schools expected to attend this year are: Adams, Auburn, Avoca, Barneston, Bennet, Bratton Union, Brock, Cook, Dawson-Verdon Cons., Douglas, Dunbar, Falls City, Friend, Gretna, Humboldt, Johnson, Lewiston, Louisville, Lourdes (Nebraska City), Millard, Milligan, Nebraska City, Nemaha, Pawnee City, Plattsmouth, Salem, S h u. b e r t , Springfield, Stella, Syracuse, Table Rock, Talmage, Valley, Waverly, Weeping Water, Yutan, and Peru Prep. / The purpose of the contest is to foster, .promote and recognize scholarship. It will cover 22 areas, stressing comprehension and reasoning.

Janet Bertram Awarded $1800 Graduate Assistantship Janet Bertram, a Peru State senior from Falls City, has been awarded an $1800 graduate assistantship to Iowa State University at Ames, according to Hanford Miller, associate professor of chemistry at Peru State Teachers College. Miss Bertram, a 1956 graduate of Falls City High School, is a May candidate for graduation from Peru State Teachers College with a Bachelor of Science in Education degree with majors in chemistry and home economics. At Iowa State, Miss Bertram will work toward a master's degree in chemistry. The daitghter of Mr. J. A. Bertram of Falls City, Miss Bertram has attended Peru State under a four-year $480 scholarship provided by the Morton House division of the Otoe Food Products Co. of Nebraska City.

March

14 16

MARCH 14, 1960

Forensic Students Have Participated In Three Inter-Collegiate Tournaments Forensics students at P er u have participated in three intercollegiate debate and discussion tournaments since the beginning of the semester. The team traveled to the third annual NODUET Debate Tournament January 29 and 30, at Northwest Missouri State College, Maryville. Receiving certificates for excellence in the discussion division were John Biere and Sue Moore. Other entrants from Peru were Connie Erisman, Lois Fritz, and Jerry Littell. John Biere won the after dinner speaking contest and w a s asked to be the principal speaker at the banquet held on Friday night. Sue Moore received superior ratings in both rounds of extemporaneous speaking. John Biere and Jerry Littell were entered in radio newscasting.

On February 10, four students and their coach, J. D. Levitt, left by train to spend four days in Denver as participants in the Rocky Mountain Speech Conference. Lois Fritz, Connie Erisman, and John Biere participated in a five round discussion progression, while Sue Moore entered three rounds of oral interpretation. Seven students were entered in the inter-collegiate Debate and Discussion Conference at the University of Nebraska February 26-27. Sue Moore received a superior rating in interpretative reading. John Biere and Stephen Bates received points for their participation in the' discussion sessions. Other Peruvians in attendance were Conni.f Erisman, Jerry Littell, and Lois Fr'h.z. in discussion. Mary Ann Lewellyn entered extemporaneous speaking.

Cantata By Benford To Be Presented At Greeley, Colo.

Band afT.:Choir To Take Tour

A cantata by R. T. Benford, associate professor of piano and organ at Peru State Teachers College, has been selected for presentation by the First Methodist Church Choir at Greeley, Colo., according to Dr. William Gower, professor of music at Colorado State College and choir director. An unpublished work, "Easter Carol," was written by Mr. Benford in 1952. It was first presented under Mr. Benford's direction by the Peru Methodist C h u r ch choir in 1952. The entire cantata was again presented in 1953 by the church choir, with excerpts used by various college a n d church groups since that time. The text for the cantata is from the scriptures and familiar Easter carols. The work has solos for soprano, alto, tenor and bass, in addition to choruses for the whole choir and for men and women's voices. The Greeley church choir will present the cantata at two morning worship services on Palm Sunday. Mr. Benford has been invited to be guest organist for the presentations.

A two-day tour of the Peru State College Symphonic Band Ensemble and the College Concert Choir has been scheduled for March 16-17, according to Victor H. Jindra, head of the division of fine arts. Concerts will be presented in six area high schools. The band, under the direction of Mr. Gilbert E. Wilson, will appear in concert March 16 in Pawnee City at 9:00 a.m., Tecumseh at 11 :00 a.m., and Syracuse at 3:00 p.m. The itinerary for the College Concert Choir, under the direction of Darryl T. Manring, will include Johnson at 9:00 a.m., Rockport, Mo., at 11:00 a.m., and Sidney, Iowa, at 2:00 p.m.

Kappa Delta Pi Met March Seventh

Kappa Delta Pi held a regular business meeting Monday night, March 7. The program presented by Keith Haxby, Larry Carre, Marie Antalek, Marianne Steinbrink, and Joyce Carman was a series of five scenes depicting student -teacher relationships. These were proper dress, discipline, teacher-teacher relationships, teacher-community relationships and the showing of favoritism. The Student Wives Club's bake At the meeting plans were sale was a success with sales to- made for the convention in Chitaling 43 dollars. The entire cago which Al Wheeler is attendstock of baked goods was sold ing as a delegate and Judy Millbetween 10:00 and 3:00 p.m., Sat- er as alternate. Others who are urday, March 5, at the City Hall. going are Jerry Paden, Linda Mrs. Dan Jones headed the Moore, and Donna Francis. selling of cakes, cookies, and Refreshments were served aftpies. Her helpers were: Mrs. Jack er the meeting. Hardy, Mrs. Bill Fitzgerald, Mrs. of the group. The dinner also Ross Pilkington, Mrs. Gary And路 gave the church members and erson, Mrs. Joseph Verbeck, Mrs. the singers an opportunity to Don Stange, and Mrs. J oh n meet each other. Okerlin. At 2:3.0 p.m. the group presentEach of the Student Wives ed a Sunday concert in the contributed to t1ie sale. Mrs. Omer Meeker, a former baschurch. "Be Thou Still," "Glory Jones reported that all of the ketball hot shot for Peru, ha s to God," "Roots and Leaves," and members came through with been named to the NAIA Hall of Fame. Omer was graduated from "Salutation" were sung. Joyce their allotments of sweetmeats. Carman also sang a solo at the Mr. Levitt, Dr. Wininger and Peru in 1951 with a degree in afternoon performance. Professor Mrs. Gomon brought food and physical education and biology. Robert T. Benford accompanied baked rolls for the girls who He was a very prominent figure the group at both performances. were working. on the campus.

Wives' Bake Sale Was Successful

Peruvian Singers Appear At Church In Humboldt The Peruvian Singers were the guests of the Women's Association of the Presbyterian Church in Humboldt, Nebraska, Sunday, February 28. The group, under direction of Prof. Darryl T. Manring, sang at the morning church service. Prof. Manring also presented the sermon for the service. The Presbyterian Women's Association prepared and served a buffet lunch for the 21 members

Meeker Makes Hall of Fame


WHISP~RS

FROM MORGAN

Delzell Doings By Gary Brown

Sixty-eight Are Practice Teaching

There are no new engagements to be announced in the dorm this Sixty-eight students are entime. I guess it is just the wrong rolled in student teaching at Peru time of year for engagements. State Teachers College for the This past week-end was about spring seines.ter, according to the quietest we have had all Harold Johnson, director of stuThis weather is strictly ''bad year. Just about everyone packed dent teaching. The majority of news"! We must ·not be living up and went home for the weekthe students have issignments \11 right, that's all there I is to it. end to renew acquaintances with the T. J, Majors cainpus school, Here it is March already, but do parents. while others are assigned to pubwe· have any of those March Ping-pong has come. back to lic. schools in Auburn, Johnson winds-no, just more snow. Delzell. Three ping-pong tables and Nebraska City. Dorm council met in Miss Slat- have been set up in the recreaNine students have assigntery's apartment March 2, at tion room of the dorm. Now all ments in grades kindergarten 6:00 p.m. They discussed o Pen that is needed to play is 50c dethrough six for the first .nine 'house. which will be held in posit for each paddle supplied weeks, while 10 students will be April. by the dorm and your own ball given elementary assignments Elaine Hinton, Elinor Keefer, (these can be purchased from for the last nine weeks. FortyGeorge W(!shington, Carol Ellen- ·, Mrs. Paradise or from the person nine students have full semester berger, and Edna McGovern had at the desk). junior high .and senior high birthdays these last few weeks. Delzell now has desk and teleschool assignm~nts. It's even getting too cold for phone service. From the hours of The student teachers from this the pigeons. One of them sneaked 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. on Monday area and their assignments: into the dorm and tried to make through Friday, there is now himself at home on first f 1o or. someone to answer the. phone. Secondary None of the girls seemed to ap- Upperclassmen are being paid Gary Anderson, H am b u r g , preciate his company, though, from dormitory funds for this Iowa, physical education, indusand escorted him out again. He service. Well, girls, if you want trial arts, home room; Marie< Anlost a few tail feathers and his a date now, all you have to do is talek, Newark, N. J., modern pride in the process. call. problems, noon duty; Vernon The "love bug" is still biting I asked a few of the boys what Aylor, Plattsmouth, algebra 9, from the looks of things. Dianne they think of the snow and re- physics; Jerry Beckman; Diller, Schultz from Burchard, Nebr., is ceived the following replies: geometry, home room; Marvin engaged to Don Wilhelm1 from Gary Scoggin: "I'm glad to see it Bergsten, Red Oak, Iowa, indusAuburn, Nebr. snow again because I'm getting trial arts,. physical education, There was a small fire on the tired of this warm, sunny weath- study hall; John Bookwalter, second floor this week-end. A er." Jim Yelnek: "I'd just liketo · Lawrence, Kans., worid history, waste basket caught on fire when see my car again." Bob Reitz: physical education, study hall; the dorm was without water. A "Ha! Ha! Ha!" (Too bad, he was Lon Bottcher, Talmage, biology, fire extinguisher was used to put a nice guy.) Jerry Osborn: "I general science 8; ' it out. The result was a scorched think it's here to stay." Allen Larry Carre, Beatrice, English waste basket. It sounds as if the Nelson: "Tennis, anyone?" 9, instrumental music; Jerry Colsecond floor has gone classical. lier, Falls City, bookkeeping; Not only do they have hi-fi piped Doug Dickerson, Sumner, (Johnto all rooms within listening disSteck Dead son), industrial arts; W a r r e n tance, but some of the girls have Mrs. G. Holt Steck, wife of a Dyke, Thurman, general math 7, been practicing .modern dance. former Peru State Teachers Col- general science 8, noon duty; The east wing group on third lege faculty member, died Thurs- Robert Fisher, Falls City, Amerifloor had a Leap Year Party. En- day, February 25, in Tripoli, Af- can history, physical education, tertainment was furnished and rica, where her husband was noon duty; Charles Francis, refreshments of punch and wed- with the Red Cross. Council Bluffs, American history, 'ding cake were served. Sounds Mr. Steck was in the music de- physical education; David Fulas if they're getting a head start, partment at Peru State during ton, Wood River, Ill., American · doesn't it? the 1930's and early 1940's. history, social studies 8. First floor didn't have too Funeral services were in ·ToClyde Haskins, Fullerton, (Nemuch excitement. They did, how- peka, Kans., Tuesday, March 8. braska City), physical education, ever, throw Carol McLain in the general math; Tom Higgirts,Valtub for getting "married" at the ley, speech, English 7; Dorothy "I like 'em-I like 'em!" mock wedding at SCF 1a s t High, Nebraska City (Nebraska "I hate blind dates." Wednesday night. Since t h e y "They're o.k. as long as they're City), typing, bookkeeping; Hendidn't want to waste any of the blind!" ry Hinrichs, Nebraska City (Newater, they also threw Linda braska City), general biology, al"I think they're neat." ·Goodin in, just for kicks. gebra 9; Robert Hoback, Nebras"I think they're 'lousy'." ka City (Nebraska City), instruThe editor took a poll on what "WOW!" the girls thought of blind dates. "They can prove to be inter- mental music; Here are the results: esting.'' Donald Jackson, Nebraska "Oh, gads!" "I think they're crazy, man, City, general science 7, algebra "They're such a chance." crazy!" 9, noon duty; Janice Jahrt, Alex"I've never had one." "Well, they're different." andria, English 11, music; Willard Jensen, Ruskin, general science 9, general math 8, no on duty; Dan Jones, Douglas, geomPERU PEDAGOGIAN etry, world history, home room; The Voice of ihe Campus of a Thou~nd Oaks Don Kasbohm, Nebraska City, industrial arts, physical education; Member Intercollegiate Press Richard Kunde, Fairbury, (Auburn), algebra 9, typing, study March 14, 1960 hall; Duane Lewis, Nebraska City, biology, general science 8; THE STAFF Jan Lillethorup, Omaha, physical education; Fred Miller, TeCo-Editor ----------------------------------Donna Francis cumseh, physic a 1 education, Co-Editor ------------------------------Rosemary Rottman guidance, study hall; Larry MillSports Editor ---------------------------------Wally West er, Hamburg, Iowa, instrumental Sports Reporter -----------------------------Jerry Osborne music, vocal music; Lester MillSports Reporter ------------------------------Steve Parker er, Beatrice, piano, vocal music; Copy Editor ----------~---------------------Kathy Rhoten Wayne McFarland, Sumner, phyCopy Editor ----------------------------Martha Sue Moore sical education, industrial arts; Business Manager -----------------------------Al Bohlken John Okerlin, Clarinda, Iowa, Cdlumnist --------------------------•---------Gary Brown art, physical education, gym; Columnist -----------------------------------Carolyn Parli Jerry Paden, Seneca, Kans., EngColumnist ------------------------------Mary Anna Gnade lish 10; Herbert Peterson, Diller, Library Column --------------------~-------Darl~ne Critel social studies 8, modern probExchange Editor ----------------------------Nancy Kunkel lems, home room; Convocations ~-----------------------------Sharon Watton Dramatics --------------------------------Joni Wesolowski Norma Pugsley, Lincoln, home Music --------------------------- 7 ___________ Peggy McGee economics, F.H.A.; Don RadeChurch ----------------------------------Alice Greenwood macher, Tecumseh, general math Campus School News --------------------------Chris Hays 9, physics, noon duty; Fred RiegCampus School Reporter --------------------Elmer Antons nier, Diller, chemistry; Keith Reporter ---------··------------------------Sandra Pearson Richey, Rulo, coach, geography Reporter ------------------------------Mary Artn Lewellyn 9, library; Lee Rottman, Pawnee Reporter --------------------------------Carol Ellenberger City, industrial arts, geometry, Reporter --------------------------------------Leroy Keyt home room; Rosemary Rottman, Reporter ------------------------------------Leland Smith Pawnee City, shorthand, English Sponsor ------------------------------Stewart P. Linscheid II, home room; Chris Salberg, Louisville, physical education; By Carolyn Parli

Mrs. G. Holt

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2; Gail Ankrom, Stella, grade Nancy Gerdes, Auburn, grade Virginia Garton, Diller, grade Carol Glather, Humboldt, grad, 5; Lynda Ehlers, Nebraska Cif grade 6. Second nine weeks: Jane Die~ Nehawka, grade kindergarte Betty Cogdill, Nebraska Cit " grade 1; Nancy Kunkel, Fa City, grade 2; Raylene Milll Elmwood, grade 3; Carol Stiv( Mordah, Nemaha, grade 4; Ru Carmichael, Nemaha, grade Elementary Rae Mae Henry, Plattsmout , First nine weeks: Kay Parli, grade 6; Kathy Streich, Plat • Pawnee City, grade 1; Kay Stahl- mouth (Plattsmouth); Barba hut, Nebraska City, grade 1; Snow, Auburn (Auburn); Ri Donna Penkava, Stella, grade 2; Bosworth, Nebraska City (N Nancy Kunkel, Falls City, grade braska City).

Lloyd Scarrow, Fairbury, general science 7, physical education; Harold Schmitz, Omaha, world history, speech; . Rand Schumaker, Omaha, biology, biology 10; Don Stange, Cairo, physical education, industrial arts; Ron Stoltenberg, Nebraska City, biology, general science 9; Mary Tynon, Peru, physics, Pep club; Helen Warford, Endicott, speech, office practice; Wallace West, Peru, typing, English 8, home room.

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Fourteenth Annual Volley Ball Tournament Will Be Held March 14-16

Peru Ends Conference Race With Win Over Hastings Peru State finished the conference race with a 14-4 record by beating the Hastings Broncos 8680 on the Peru maples Saturday night. Seniors Chuck Francis and Bob Mayo made their last appearance before the home fans. The two seniors did outstanding work on both boards. Mayo was also outstanding in the scoring column hitting 32

points. He was fouled repeatedly and made 18 of his counters on free throws. Drexel Harvey's corner shots made a big difference in the scoring column as he blistered th e nets with 20 points.· Playmaker, Mort Fuller, was high man for the Hastings Broncos with 17 points. He was followed closely by freshman Jake Scherzinger, who garnered 16.

Bobcats Roll Over Midlai;nd

Prep Wins First Round In Class CDistrict

The Peru State Bobcats outfought the Midland Warriors in a 72-63 thriller to capture third place in the NCC race. Peru's fast-handed guards , Mike Roach and Tom Yopp kept the 'Cats in the game by repeatedly stealing the ball for fast break opportunities, but the Bobcats were down 29-33 at halftime. Although Denny Groves garnered 20 points for his night's work, it was not enough and Peru captured a 48-47 lead early in the fourth period. M i d 1a n d fought desperately but never regained the lead. Peru's Bob Mayo and Drexel Harvey were high in the scoring column with 21 and 16 points respectively. Peru's record is now 13-4 which sets them in third place, ahead of Midland whose record dropped to 12-5.

Peru Prep won their first round in the Class C District Tournament Wednesday, February 24, when they defeatedHumboldt 59-46. The game was close for the first three quarters, with the lead changing several times. In the fourth quarter, the Bobkittens employed a full court press and pulled away from the Humboldt Cardinals. Marshall Adams led the Prep team in scoring with 24 points. Bill Tynon dumped in 12 and Pat Morris had 10 for the runner-up honors for Prep. Harvey Fraser was high for the Cardinals with 20 points. Peru Prep was especially hot from the charity line in the fourth quarter as they made 14 straight free throws.

Johnson Defeats Prep In Second Round Class CPlay Peru Prep went down to defeat in the second round of the Class C District Basketball Tournament at Johnson, Thursday, February 25. The jinal score was Wymore 54, Peru !>1. Peru was ahead for most of the game, but in the last two minutes Wymore forged ahead to win. Robert Vrooman led the Wymore team with 25 points. Lonnie Pressnall was runner-up in scoring for Wymore with 15 points. Leading Peru in scoring was Marshall Adams, who had 25 points. Bill Tynon, Tom Boatman, and Larry Blanton each contributed eight points to the Prep cause. This game closed the successful basketball season for Peru and left their final record at 18 wins and only three losses.

3·, 4; 4; ie y,

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CHUCK FRANCIS Chuck Francis is a four year letterman on the Bobcat five. He is from Council Bluffs, Iow,a, where he attended Abraham Lincoln High School. Chuck was second in scoring for Peru this year and was a defensive stalwart. He received all-conference ·honorable mention this year. He has also lettered in track. A history and physical education major, Chuck plans on getting his master's degree before teaching.

BOB MAYO Bob Mayo is a 6'8" center from Brooklyn, New York. Bob transferred to Peru his sophomore year after playing varsity basketball at the University of Nebraska. He has been an all-conference selection the last t w o years and was fourth in the conference scoring race with 365 points. He is considered the best all-around pivot man in the N.C.C. and handles himself with ease in his position. Bob's major is speech and he plans on a teaching career after graduation this spring.

Peru will be host to 38 teams entered in the Fourteenth Peru State College High School Girls Volley Ball Tournament scheduled for March 14-16. Twenty-two games will be played the first day, narrowing the field down to 16 teams. Two games will be in progress simultaneously, beginning at 9:15 a.m., and continuing until the last games at 8:30 p.m. At 2:0{} p.m., Tuesday, the 16 remaining teams will be narrowed to eight. The quarter finals are set for Tuesday evening with the first games at 7:00 p.m. The semi-finals are Wednesday, 3:00 and 4:00 p.m., with the consolation and championship games at 7:00 and 8:00 p.m. Four of the 38 teams entered

Bobcats Lose To Wayne Wildcats In Opening Game Of NAIA Playoffs

in the Fourteenth Annual High School Girls Volley Ball Tournament will be awarded trophies. Teams entered include: Avoca, Bennington, Bratt.on Union of Humboldt, Brock, Cook, DawsonVerdon, Di 11 er, Dorchester, Douglas, Dunbar, Elk Creek, Elmwood, Hickman, H one y Creek of Salem, Johnson, Louisville, Mead, Millard, Murdock, Nehawka, Palmyra, Peru Prep, Prague, Sacred Heart of Falls City, Salem, Stella, Shubert, Springfield, Syracuse, Talmage, Thayer, Tobias, Weston, Yutan. Among the 38 entries are four schools from distances of more than 200 miles. They are Dix, Farwell, Mason City, Belgrade. was held from February 26 until March 3.

Playing before a packed house at Wayne, the Bobcats dropped a 71-56 decision to the Wildcats. It was the opening game of the NAIA playoffs and eliminated Peru from the district runnings. Peru took an early lead, but before the first half Wayne had surged ahead with. a lea,d they never relinquished. The Wildcats were· leading 32-24 at halftime. Peru's shooting was cold, and the team was affected when Drexel Harvey went out on fouls. Peru finished the season with a 14-5 conference record.

Prep Girls In Nemaha Valley Conference Tournament The Peru Prep volley ball team played in the Nemaha Valley Conference Tournament which

On February 29, Peru Prep played Cook at Cook winning this first game of the tournament. The .score in the first set was 8-6 and the second was 11-4, High scorers for the Prep team w e r e Mary Jarvis with seven points and Jane Crabtree with six points. Diane Ellig was high scorer for Cook. In the second round of the tournament, Peru Prep met Brock and was defeated 11-4 in the first set and !}-7 in the second set. Brock won tlf~; second set in an overtime. Karen Mdntire.and Mary Jarvis were high scorers for Peru with three points. each. First place in the tournament went to Dunbar and Brock came in second.

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Clarinda, Iowa, is the home of John Okerlin, a guard on this year's Peru team. Although he was the shortest player on the team at 5'8", John was one of the fastest Bobcats, and made up for his lack of height with drive and desire. The two year letterman transferred to Peru after attending Clarinda Junior College. John is majoring in physical education and his minors are art and safety education.

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Prep To Present Mystery-Farce

LIBRARY SHORTS By Darlene Criiel \

The Celestina is a dialogue novel translated from Spanish by Lesley Byrd Simpson. This book is remarkable for its originality, depth, handling of dialogue, and its drawing of character. Celestina is one of the great creations of ·an literature and has a secure place beside her two compatri9ts, Don Quixote and Sancho Panza. In the book, Calisto, a humorless and halfmad egotist, tries to seduce Melibea, the 1ove1 y daughter of the noble Pleberio. Calisto is frantic because of her rejection which he takes as an intolerable affront to his "honor." Sempronio solicits the aid of an ancient procuress, Celestina, "a witch, astute and wise in all evil things." . From the moment Celestina appears, she dominates the story. Her pagan delight in the pleasures of the flesh, and her surehanded manipulation of her puppets make her one, of the great figures of all time. With all her wickedness, we can hardly help admiring the old witch. The author of this Spanish classic is unknown although the book is usually attributed to Fernando de Rojas. A Man Teliteet Tall is the sto\> of Adam Regan. Adam's heart went out to his mother, but she gave her heart to his brother. His father, though ·illiterate was intelligent and steady. · Adam's father knew · how badly the Ozark people needed a good doctor. His .sawmill business was not prosperous, but he made sacrifices and contributed a few dollars to Adam's medical training. As an interne, Adam silently vowed to tum his skill to the service of his people in the Ozarks. Other internes talked about the professional and financial advantages of a city practice. In the hospital he was drawn to a clever and attractive nurse. For years he had ·sternly denied his natural human cravings for fun, companionship, and love because of his drive to master medicine. The sweep ·of this fine novel· carries the reader from the turbulent twenties to the battlefields of World War II and into the operating rooms of big city hospitals, hill shacks, London Red Cross shelters, and the tents . oi field hospitals in a war-tomland. It pits brother against brother as sworn enemies and drives · a

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The Junior Class play will be presented April 7, ill the college auditorium, at 8:00. The name of the play is, "The Clock Struck Twelve." It is a mystery-farce in three acts, written by James Reach. The play opens when Peggy Parker (Sara Adams), Gail Martin (Mary Ellen Wilson), and Mimi Davis (Kay Tripp), seek shelter in the old deserted Thomas Mansion. The house turns out to be a scene of a previous murder. Strange goings-on, turn this play into two hours of sure-fire, unadulterated entertainment. Other cast members are, Elizabeth, the housekeeper (Elaine Gerdes), John D.. Astrofeller, a crazy millionaire (Paul Heuer), Randy Hendrix (Jim Furnal), Lucille Thomas, an invalid (Linda Stephens), Tom Dick, a bibliophile (Dave Gomon), and Slim Summers (Bob Gnade). . Tom Higgins and Sue Moore 1 are co-directors of the play.

Mock Wedding Held For S1CF Group Carol McLain was wed to Larry Whittington in a mock Wedding Wednesday, March 2, at 6:30 p.m. at the Methodist Church. Reverend Charles Moorer performed the ceremony. The wedding party consisted of Connie Erisman, maid of honor; Glen Irwin., best man; Dr. Wininger, father of the bride; Gail Ankrom, mother of the bride; Linda Goodin, pianist; Marilyn Wright, soloist; Paul Moorer and Lynn Moorer, candle lighters. A reception was held afterwards. The PUrPOSe of this wedding was to teach the SCF group the principles and meanings behind the. marriage vows.

Cancer and Heart Disease Discussed At Convo An all-college convocation was held March 2. Guest speakers were Dr. Ronald E. Wagner, University Hospital radiologist, and Dr. Richard E. Ogborn, director of radioisotope service at V,eterans Hospital and chairman of the public education committee of the Nebraska Heart Association. Dr. Wagner gave an informative speech about cancer, and Dr. Og,born's talk was about he'art disease. wedge between mother and son. It shows devoted men giving the

last ounce of their strength and skill to save the lives of strangers. With insight and compassion, :t la¥s bare the angers, loves, Jealousies, and other vagrant impulses of men's hearts. In the end, two people will stand tall in your memory-the nurse Mac and Adam Regan himself. They are absorbing figures, not witltout trials and unhappi· ness, giving much· of themselves.

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Campus School Chatter Special Services Prints Handbook By Mary Anna Gnade

The Faculty Handbook of Ne· The Junior High had an braska Staie Teachers College Awards Assembly this week. of 1960 consists of 116 'pages. It Awards for new memberships in is divided into five part&-"Gen· the Reading Program (reading a eral Information," "Administraminimum of 4 books), for read- tive," "Control and Officers of ing 14 books, for reading 25 Administration," "The College books, and thereafter. for reading Faculty," and "Faculty Guidat least one book a month. After ance." The last section is called the Assembly, I hear Mr. Eddy "Miscellaneous" and includes all threatened (?) his 8th graders' other information not falling unwith no field trip if everyone had der one of the other topic head· not read at least four books this in gs. year by time to go (no fair countThis handbook should be useing books read last year) and as ful to the faculty in that it helps of Assembly time only three in ke~p unity and can be kept on the dass were eligible! (I thought hand at all times to refer to when a problem arises. · everyone liked to read.) The handbook was printed by At the same Assembly the tro- the department of Special Serphies gathered in by basketball vices. teams were presented to the schools-yeah, teams! This .is the period for looking back over the season and counting up accomplishments. First off, Coach and An election for senior repreMrs. DeZwarte gave a dinnerfor sentative for the Student Senate all the basketball and football boys, junior and senior high last was held on March 2. Phyllis Peters from ;Johnson was elected. Sunday at the Home Ee Rooms Other nominees were: Gary (place for 54!)-and for all ··the Olson, Ray Parde, R o s e m a r y student coaches. The varsity basRottman and Robert Taenzler. ketballers get to go to Lincoln for the last two days of the state tournament, which is a nice re- Art Exhibit ward for a strenuous season, but An exhibit of 40 original prints oh, the wear and te_ar on the by American artists was on dissponsors! Then to sum it all up play at Peru State week days comes the All-Sports Banquet March 1-11, according to Norma the 1!1th-a very formal affair L. Diddel, associate professor of where due tribute is paid the arts. coach as well as the players. The collection by Prairie Print And here is where the conflict~ Makers being circulated through develop-junior play is rehears- the Kansas State Federation of ing but how with the male char- Art was on display in the art department, library, second floor. acters off to a tournament? Included in the collection were And one post-season (or is it block prints, lithographs a n d pre-season for next year?) acci- etchings. dent: Tom Boatman and Jim Furnas carry interesting-looking scars, Tom on the eyelid, Jim next to the eye-yup, collision on the basketball practice floor. Rex

CARROLL LEWIS, President

JOHN L. LEWIS, Vice Pres. & Cashier

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To depart from athletics, the FHA Mother-Daughter banquet last Monday was another dressup social experience. Very nicely done, very prettily set up, with solo by student sponsor Norma Pugsley, slides by outgoing president Mary Jarvis, and installation of new officers by candlelight. It's too bad time is scheduled so closely that Mr. Jindra has to call in passersby to view the accomplishments of his 2nd and 3rd grade marching violinstheir show is worth proper staging and attention. Hints of activities carried on in vocal music in the grades is enough to pull inquisitive visitors. Sally and Jimmy both talk of going up to the auditorium to practice on the stage and are constantly singing or humming · snatches of songs; on the other hand Bob in high school remarks, "Yeah, those little kids come clattering up the steps and tro~p around making noise so you can't study." (Its refreshing to know they TRY to study!)

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The observation booths (?) erected in the grade rooms has that effect on the 5th gradersthat is, when they think they see someone in the booth, they pay attention to their books just in case!

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Spring Formal

I he Voice ot the

campus ot a I housand Ual<s ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 55

Number 11

Night Of April 19

MARCH 28, 1960

President Tells Of Student Union Construction Plans By Morris Keyt

Left to right: Tom Higgins, G. Ben Paxton, Gerald Edmonds, Leonard Allgood, Dennis Hilfiker

Radio Station To Be Built On March 10, Dr. Schottenhamel drove up to Creighton University to get some information on their radio station. He was accompanied by Tom Higgins (Student Senate Representative), Glenn Chambers, Larry Allgood, and Dennis Hilfiker.

built here at Peru. Much of the needed equipment for this radio station has already been purchased and is presently being rebuilt. However, much o the r equipment will have to be built by interested Peru students.

The party under the leadership of Dr. Schottenhamel went to Creighton to get information for the radio station that is to be

Many things are subject to change, but Dr. Schottenhamel and co-workers hope to be ready to broadcast next fall.

Kappa Delta Pi Members Attend Chicago Convention On Tuesday, March 8, five students left the Peru campus to attend the twenty-second biennial 'convocation of Kappa Delta Pi at the Shoreland Hotel, Chicago, Ilinois. Alan Wheeler was official delegate with Judy Miller elected as alternate. Jerry Paden, Lind a Moore, and Donna Francis also attended the convocation. Thursday morning was registration and a general session meeting. John J. Harton, the executive president, addresesd the first meeting. His address was entitled "Spirit For Them That Dwell Therein." Committees were set up to discuss such business affairs as appropriations and budget, attendance and travel expense, auditing, and credentials. Later in the convocation, these committees made their reports to the general session and many measures were voted upon. Group discussions were held. Many controversial issues were discussed such as membership problems, problems of alumni chapters, current issues in education and the issue of recognition for excellent teaching. In these groups no definite answers were decided, but the students realized there are many problems in the profession of education. Friday night the convocation banquet was held. The speaker was Robert J. Havighurst of the University of Chicago. He discussed "American Higher Education in the 1960's." Saturday all business and committee reports were finished and the¡ convocation adjourned at 2 o'clock. There were students attending the convocation from all over the United States. Thursdq.y night was left open

Officers Elected At S.E.A.N. S.E.A.N. held its reg u 1 a r monthly meeting Monday evening, March 21. Election of officers held the top place on t h e business agenda. The elected members were: Francis Hajek, president; Linda Goodin, vice president; Gladys Monohan, secretary, and Jeannine Ehlers, historian. Plans were made for members to attend the state convention, April 2, at Wayne State Teachers College. April has also been set aside as visitation month on Peru Campus. At this time all high school seniors will be welcomed to tour Peru College. April 13, an all college convocation will be s p o n s o r e d by S.E.A.N. The college teacher of the year will be named at this time, as well as the outstanding student teachers. The topic for the evening's discussion was, "How the Current Curriculum Can Be Improved."

Future Teachers Visit Campus The Bellevue chapter of the Future Teachers Association sent 16 students and two sponsors to visit the Peru campus, Friday, March 18, 1960. Each of the students was assigned to a college student in order to observe classes in which he was interested. At noon they were the guests at the college cafeteria. The Peru SEAN is making plans to have April as Visitation month in order to let students from other high school Future Teacher Associations see the campus and its facilities. for the people to see the sights in Chicago. Such events as Cinatown, Carol Channing in "Show Business," and the Kingston Trio received the attention of many of the delegates of the convocation.

Demolition of Mt. Vernon Hall, a 70-year old dormitory on the campus of a thousand oaks, will begin Monday, March 28, to make room for a new Student Center and a wing on adjoining Morgan Hall for women. Mt. Vernon Hall has not been used as a dormitory for several years. It houses the college snack bar, book store, and publications offices. The new Student Union will house the college dining room, snack bar, meetings rooms, publications offices, faculty lounge and dining room, game room, and student lounges. The building will be completely air-conditioned.

Nebraska City presents "The Ugly Duckling"

District Declamatory Contest Held On March 18

The District Declamatory Contest was held on Friday, March 18, at Peru State Teachers College. The contest was separated into two divisions. The first diContracts Lef vision was concerned with ForContracts totalling $342,249 ensics and included discussion, were awarded by the Board of original public address, extemEducation of State Norm a 1 poraneous speaking, radio and Schools Friday, March 18, for the television commentary, and inStudent Center and south wing of Morgan Hall. The addition to terpretative public address. The second division was under th e the residence hall will house 18 sponsorship of the Peru dramatwomen and provide additional ics club and included oral interstudy space on the ground floor. pretation of prose literature, inWith the 40-woman addition on terpretative public address, poetthe west, which is now under ry reading, oral re a d i n g of ,1 construction, the occupancy of drama, and the one-act plays. Morgan Hall will be increased There were thirteen h i g h from 126 to 184. Tllomas Construction Co. of St. schools which attended the conJoseph, Missouri was awarded test. These included Louisville, the general contract for the Stu- Kennard, Humboldt, Lourdes, dent Union and south wing for Millard, Salem, Nehawka, and $241,506. The mechanical work Peru Prep in Class B. The Class will be done by Wentz Heating and Plumbing of Lincoln for $74,79(}, and the electrical work by Cesco Electric Co. of North Platte for $25,953. All work is to be completed and ready for ocP.T.A. met Tuesday evening, cupancy by September 1, 1960. March 22, in the Campus School Auditorium at 8:00 p.m. The Temporary Facilities evening opened with a short Razing of Mt. Vernon will rebusiness meeting. The P.T.A. quire temporary arrangements Convention at Sidney, Nebraska, for enterprises now housed in the was discussed. The success of the building. The book store has P.T.A. Carnival held Frid a y moved to the upper floor of a evening, March 18, was also disvacant faculty apartment imcussed. mediately north of the Music Mr. A. 0. Brady introduced the Hall. The publications office has evening's speaker, Dr. John R. moved to the lower floor of the Thompson. Dr. Thompson talked same apartment. about health in the school an d Wednesday afternoon, March home. His talk included many in23, all Bob Inn activities were teresting and informative things transferred to the cafeteria, and about what to do in case of acciwill continue to be housed there dents and sickness. Everyone until the new Student Center is considered the talk worthwhile. ready. When the new building is After the meeting, a luncheon ready for occupancy the cafeterwas served by the fourth and ia equipment will be moved to the new facility. Then the pres- eighth grade room mothers in the ent cafeteria building will be Campus School Cafeteria.

Dr. Thompson Speaks At P.TA.

razed. Cafeteria Hours To facilitate additional activity in the cafeteria new meal hours will be observed for the remainder of the second s e m e s t e r . Breakfast Monday through Friday will be served from 6:45 to 8:15 a.m., lunch from 11:00 a.m. to 1:OG p.m., and dinner from 5:00 to 6:15 p.m. Snack service will be available Monday through Thursday from 9:00 to 11:00 a.m., 1:30 to 4:30 p.m., and 7:00 to 10:0(} p.m. On Friday the foregoing hours will prevail, but there will be no evening service. Snack service will be available on Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., and from 5:00 to 6:0() (Continued on page two)

Stude_nt Union Is Busy The Student Senate is busy making plans for the coming election to be held during the first part of April. A new system for electing the preside"nt and vice president will be tried. Parties consisting of a minimum of fifty members are to be formed. Each party selects candidates for the office of president l:..ld vice preside~t. From these candidates, the student body will elect the president and vice president. As previously done, the student body will elect the members at large, and each class will elect its class representatives.

A division included Nebraska City, Auburn, Bellevue, Falls City, and SJr.acuse. In the Class ~ one-act plays, Humboldt received a superior on "The Leprechaun." Peru Prep and Millard both received excellents o ¡r plays, "Strange Road" an he Happy Journey" respectively. Elaine Gerdes, Peru Prep, and Bob Heim, Humboldt, were selected outstanding actress and actor in Class B. Auburn and Falls City received excellent ratings in the Class A division. The Bellevue and Nebraska City productions received superior ratings for "The Happy Journey" and "The Ugly Duckling" respectively. Janet Anderson, Bellevue, was named outstanding actress and Lyle Brown, Nebraska City, the outstanding actor in Class A.

Phi Alpha Theta Adopts National Constitution The chapter of Phi A 1p ha Theta held its monthly meeting Tuesday evening, March 15. The business program consisted of adopting the national by-laws. A report was given by the new members committee. Three new members were present. A special meeting will be called in the near future to vote on the ratification of the local constitution. The next regular meeting will be conducted by the new members.

Jobs Plentiful Pay Is Good As commencement time draws near, the graduating senior asks, "What are my chances of getting a good teaching position with good pay?" According to Mr. Harold Johnson of the Placement Bureau, teaching positions and pay are better than ever. The average salary for men ranges fro m $4,100-$4,300, with no experience; while the women's salary ranges from $3,900-$4,200, with no experience. The demand for men is great in the fields of science (chemistry and physics), mathematics, band, coaching, and the upper elementary fields. The demand for women is concentrated in the fields of physical education, home economics, lower elementary, and in vocal music. The fields of English, speech, foreign language, and commercial (with shorthand) are open to both men and women.


A S'.[iEP. FORWARD For the first time, the Peru student. body will have the pleasure of dancing to a name band. Thanks to the combined efforts of the Student Senate, the sponsors, and Dr. Gomon, we are going to have Ralph Marterie and his Marlboro Men to play for the Spring Formal. . To help promote this event, Dr. Gomon is providing the Student Sen.ate with additional funds. We feel this is a great step forward in the progress of Peru State. This is our opportunity to support our school, and make this "extra-special" event a huge success. This will insure that activities of this type will appear on the Peru Calendar in the future. Let's all take this opportunity to back the Student Senate in their efforts to improve our college. See you at the Spring Formal on April 19. -Rosie Rottman and Donna Francis

Twenty-eight Schools In Interscholastic Contest On Campus

but in this case, there were none, just a few bruises. The dorm inspection last Thursday proved quite valuable to many of the residents. Such articles as follows were uncovered while the rooms were being cleaned: 1. Unmailed Christmas card. 2. Last year's newspaper. 3. Homecoming carnations. 4. $17 worth of parkingtickets. 5.· Last year's library books. .

Twenty-eight schools participated in the Inter-Scholastic High School Contest sponsored by Peru State Teachers College Friday, March 25. A total of 438 high school students took tests which stressed comprehension and reasoning in the 22 areas which were covered. Participating s c h o o 1s were Water Safety classified into either Division A Course Completed or Division B, depending upon George "Rusty" Gates was on the size of the school. All schools with enrollments of 150 or more the campus this past week to in grades 9 to 12 inclusive were give the Water Safety Instrucplaced in A Division. S ch o o 1s tion Course. The following stuwith smaller enrollments were dents took the course: Ernie placed in B Division. Trophies Ridgeway, Lois Fritz, C on n i e Erisman, Carol McLain, Duane were given in each division. Lewis, Bart Bartholomeu, Jim Class A schools which participated were: Auburn, Falls City, Kemp, Rand Schumaker, Jerry Nebraska City, Plattsmouth, Sy- George, Jerry Collier, and Jack Head. racuse, and Crete. Class B schools which t o o k part were: Bratton Union, Brock, BUSINESS CLUB SEES Cook, Dawson-Verdon Cons., SLIDES OF RUSSIA Douglas, Dunbar, Friend, HumThe Business Club met Monboldt, Johnson, Louis vi He, day evening, March 21, in the Lourdes (Nebraska City), Mil- Music Hall Auditorium. Presilard, Pawnee City, Salem, Shu- dent Neal S. Gomon showed the bert, Springfield, Stella, Table very informative and interesting Rock, Talmage, Waverly, Weep- slides which he took during his ing Water, and Peru Prep. recent trip in Russia. Following the pictures, a business meeting was held. Plans for the April and May meetings were discussed.

Delzell Doings By Gary Brown

bid you hear that Peru had a ski hill? Well, she did for a short while anyhow. The sidewalk in front of the Science Building down to Dr. Gomon's house had an ice coating so everyone was taking advantage of some ·easy sliding. When there is skiing one usually hears of broken bones,

PRESIDENT TELLS OF STUDENT UNION CONSTRUCTION PLANS

(Continued from page one) p.m. The cafeteria will be open from 12 noon to 1:15 p.m. for dinner, and from 5:00 to 10.:00 p.m. for snack service. West Entrance To Cafeteria

Demolition of Mt. Vernon Hall will require closing of the front ,entrance of the ·cafeteria for si~ to eight weeks. A temporary entrance to the cafeteria has been provided at the west end of the building. Residents of Morgan Hall will use the southwest exit of Morgan and cross the drive behind Morgan Hall to. the temporary cafeteria entrance. All other persons will need to walk around Morgan Hall on temporary walkways to the new entrance to the cafeteria. $900,000 Project Completed

The letting of contracts for the Student Union and the south wing of Morgan Hall completes a $900,000 project for· increasing and improving housing facilities on the campus. Now under construction and to be ready for occupancy June 1 are the west addition to Morgan Hall and the new 90-man A. D. Majors residence hall. This dormitory will increase capacity for men from 145 to 235. Parking Important

Because of the building activity on the campus, special care will be taken to see that there is no car parking except in designated parking areas. Newly completed parking areas on the perimeter of the campus provide ample space for all cars which must be on or near the campus. All student cars are supposed to be registered with the dean or associate dean of students. If such cars are improperly parked they will be tagged and fines collected through the b1isinE!ss office. For unregistered cars, either city or county law. enforc~­ ment officers will be called to tag or tow away cars which are improperly parked or parked in such a way as to hamper traffic. The calling in of city or county officials may be very expensive ALPHA MU OMEGA Alpha Mu Omega, honorary to car owners who infringe on mathematics fraternity, held a the rules. regular business meeting Monday, March 14. WHISPERS The election 9f next year's ofFROM ficers was disc~ssed and set for MORGAN the month of April. The club also is planning a steak fry for By sometime in May.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks Member Intercollegiate' Press March 28, 1960 THE STAFF

Co-Editor ----------------------------------Donna Francis Co-Editor ------------------------------Rosemary Rottman Sports Editor ---------------------------------Wally West Sports Reporter -----------------------------Jerry Osborne Sports Reporter ------------------------------Steve Parker Copy Editor --------------------------------Kathy Rhoten Copy Editor ----------------------------Martha Sue Moore Business Manager _____________________________ Al· Bohlken Columnist ------------------------------------Gary Brown Columnist -----------------------------------Carolyn Parli Columnist ------------------------------Mary Anna Gnade Library Column ____________________________ Darlene Critel Exchange Editor ----------------------------Nancy Kunkel Convocations ------------------------------Sharon Watton Dramatics --------------------------------Joni Wesolowski Music ---------------------------------------Peggy McGee Church ----------------------------------Alice Greenwood Campus School News ------------------------,-Chris Hays Campus School Reporter ____________________ Elmer Antons Reporter ----------------------------------Sandra Pearson Reporter ------------------------------Mary Ann Lewellyn Reporter --------------------------------Carol Ellenberger Reporter ---------------------A----------------Leroy Keyt Reporter ------------------------------------Leland Smith Sponsor ----------···------------------Stewart P. Linscheid

Carolyn Parli

"Spring is sprung; the grass is riz; wonder where the flowers is?" I know where the flowers "is"-under six feet of snow! Spring has finally arrived to the surprise of everyone. Some of the braver birds have come back to fill the air with their music. Isn't spring a wonderful time of the year? Everyone seems so much happier and gayer. We can now wipe away our fears of a coming "Ice Age"! Sounds as if the girls on second floor are living up to the tradition. Dianne Schultz was thrown in the shower-you know why! Jane Dietl and Jan Lillethorup were also thrown in accide:µtally. They broke the record and got the privilege of being thrown in twice. Sandy Hemphill and Pat Rathe moved to first floor, and Beverly Prokop and Barbara Lehman moved to second floor this week.

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The girls have been busy signing up for rooms for this summer and for next year. Sounds as if there is going to be a large enrollment for the summer session. There were only two birthdays these last few weeks-Sharon Haile and Saint Patrick. Kathy Streich is planning on moving to Plattsmouth to do her student te'aching for the next nine weeks. The editor took a poll on what the girls thought of letting the boys take a short cut through the girls' dorm to get to the cafeteria. Here are several comments made by the girls. "Too mucli favoritism for first floor."

"Oh, some of the idiots would get lost!" "Sounds great!" "Can I put up a toll gate?" "Das ist eine dumm Frage." "Do we get a warning?" "Eeeek!" "Let 'em come, man." "Uhhhhh-no comment." "Gee, I always did think that this college was coeducational."

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Eight Mclntiremen Awarded Letters

Mayo. All Conference For Second Year

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Bob Mayo, Peru State's 6'8" center, has been chosen on the All Nebraska College Conference basketball team. This is the second consecutive year that Mayo has been selected for this honor. Both the Omaha World-Herald and the Lincoln Star chose the towering pivot on this team that features the best basketball players in the N.C.C. After transferring from the University of Nebraska, Mayo gave a good account of himself on the Peru maples. He has led the Bobcats in scoring and rebounding for the past two sea-

sons and has rated high in the N.C.C. standings in both departments. He accomplished all this even though he was heavily guarded and received more punishment than any other center in the conference. Bob also features one of the best outside shots for a big man and is a mainstay on defense.

Mcintire Heads NAIA Coaches' Association

Weather" Biggest Problem Facing Baseball Squad

Head basketball coach, Jack Mcintire, was elected president of the NAIA Coaches' Association at their annual meeting in Kansas City. Since coming to 1 Peru State in 1956, Coach Mcintire and his Bobcats have. won one conference championship and tied for another. This was not the first honor bestowed upon Mcintire by the NAIA. In 1957, he was named by the NAIA to the Helms Athletic Hall of Fame, Los Angeles. When asked about the honor of being elected as president of the NAIA coaches, Jack remarked that it is a great honor to be of service to the other coaches and that he is very proud to act as their president.

With eleven returning lettermen to bolster the 1960 baseball squad, the outlook is bright. Coach Al Wheeler has experienced men at every position except center field. The Bobcats open their season April 1, with a home double-header a g a inst Concordia. If the weather will improve so that the team can get outside, the players will get a chance to see what they can do. So far, practice has had to be held in the basement of the gym, and this has not given Coach AI a good chance to see what he has in the way of power hitters. Right now, the worst thing that is facing the ball club is the weather.

Mayo is a senior and plans on a teaching career after graduation. His major is speech. Chuck Francis and Mike Roach both received honorable mention on the all N.C.C. team. 11

McINTIRE'S GARAGE

Eight members of the 1959-60 cage machine at Peru St ate Teachers College have b e en awarded letters, Coach Jack McIntire has announced. The Bobcats worked their way to a 14-4 ·conference record to place second in the topsy-~urvy Nebraska College Conference, behind a tie for first between Wayne State and Nebraska Wesleyan. The over-all season record for the Bobcats was 19 wins against 7 losses. For the third consecutive year, the Mcintire-guided cagers won the Four-State Tournament at Falls City. The season saw the Bobcats score 2,0·53 points against their opponents' 1,751. During the season a new school scoring record was established in the 118-58 win o v er Doane College, erasing the 11074 record set against Kearney State in 1958-59. Of the eight 1959-60 lettermen, only two will be lost through graduation. They are the season's top scorers, 'Bob Mayo; Brooklyn, N. Y., and Chuck Francis, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Mayo, who earned his second letter, scored a 19.7 point average for the season, while Francis, a four-year letterman, scored an average of 14.1. The letter-winners, total number of cage monograms earned, and home town: Charles Francis, 4, Council Bluffs, Iowa; Bob Mayo, 2, Brooklyn, N. Y.; Chick Stessman, 2, Omaha; Mike Roach, 2, Palmyra; Tom Yopp, 1, Wood River, Ill.; Drexel Harvey, 1, Hartford, Ill.; Bob Buettgenbach, 1, Beatrice; Larry Rathe, 1, Sterling.

First Track Meet To Be April 13 Coach Stemper's track squad finds the adverse weather quite a hindrance to practice, but conditioning runs heavy in the gymnasium. The squad is preparing for the first college meet against Washburn College April 13 on the home track. The Bobcats have a seven . meet schedule. April 14-Washburn at Peru April 28-Peru at Maryville May 3-Peru at Tarkio May 6-Doane Relays at Crete May 10-Peru at Midland May 13-State Teachers College Meet at Kearney May 19-20-Conference at Has.t. ings

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The Da;,,son-Verdon champions: front row, left to right-Doris Dittmann, Darlene Fritz, Kathy Marsh, Donna Howmann, Lonna Stevicks. Back row, left ±o right-Mary Goolsby. Sandra Bahr, Judy Stewart, Kathryn Vollmer, Jean Deckinger, Pail:y PeUit and Coach M. H. Elliott.

Dawson-Verdon Wins Volley Ball Tournament By Wally West The Dawson-Verdon girls won the 1960 Peru Invitational Volley Ball tournament, defeating Prague 2-0 in the championship game Wednesday morning. Third place was won by· Sacred Heart of Falls City as they defeated Tobias 2-0. There were 39 teams entered in the tournament but s e v e n were forced out by the icy roads and deep snow. The t~am from Dix came the longest distance as they had to travel 475 miles only

to be defeated in the second round. Peru State had to put in a version of Lincoln's "operation mattress," Tuesday night, in order to accommodate the 200 players, coaches, fans and sponsors. This was taken care of in good fashion by the combined effort of the girls' dorm and the houses around the campus. The 1959 winner of the tournament was Verdon-Dawson. Several of the same girls were back and played on their second straight championship team.

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PTA Carnival Raises $150

Campus School Chatter

xer

By Mary Anna Gnade

Hottest News of the Day-5th grader Steven Stemper is going By Chris Hays to Paris, France!!! His classThe annual P.T.A. Carnival mates, for that matter the whole was held Friday, March 11 from community, are as thrilled as if eight to ten, at the eampus they were going themselves. School. Besides memorizing and reThe carnival consisted of many hearsing parts in the Junior booths which were headed by, P.T.A. members. Ten cent tickets Class play, Sara Adams, Elaine were sold by Mr. John Lewis and Gerdes, Mary Ellen Wilson and Mrs. Brady. It took one ticket to Paul Heuer took on a one-act play for the Speech Contest. participate in one event. Mr. Lester Russell and Mr. Dee And hey, our Elaine came away Jarvis were in charge of the dart with Best Actress award (any inbooth, Mrs. Buddy Morrissy in feriority complexes can take a charge of the fish pond, Miss back seat)! The play rated exFrieda Rowoldt and Rosemary cellent in spite of noisy doors, Rottman in charge of fortune inconsiderate talkers in the back telling, Mr. and Mrs. Richard of the auditorium, and suchHolmes in charge of the dance, surely, the thousand deaths the Mrs. F. H. Larson in charge of student directors died helped. Peru doesn't enter these conhats, Mrs. Virgil DeZwarte in charge of makeup, Mr. B. A. Ed- tests for nothing-Sara J a n e dy in charge of ping pong, Mr. Adams rated a 1 on poetry readAlbert Brady and Mr. Ellis Ad- ing and Mary Ellen Wilson rated ams in charge of the white ele- a 2 on discussion. Even if :none of phant auction, Mr. and Mrs. Ross them rated, 'twould have done Many snowbound students and ly tried to be something she was Adams in charge of the cake 'em good just to take part. faculty members got a "breath not; her estimation of herself walk; and Larry Carre, Janice Every one of the 125 attendof spring'' when they attended was based merely upon the opinJahn, Karen Mcintire, and Sara ing had a good time at the Allthe Spring Play, Brief Music. on ions of others. Her roommate, Adams took turns at the piano Sports Banquet. Pa u 1 Heuer Spiff, tried, with noticeable sucMarch 10. The play, presented by for the cake walk. served as Master of Ceremonies the .Peru Dramati~s Club, was cess, to help her friend, nearly Sandwiches, coffee, and pie at the banquet; Sara Adams was to the point of giving up the man under the direction of Robert she loved. She decided, however, were served downstairs, and Master of Ceremonies during the Moore. .Mrs. Carl Adams and Mrs. Roy dance and crowning of the royThe audience followed the ex- that giving up the college profesPeck were in charge. The male alty. Royalty was Marshall Adperiences of seven coeds through sor, Jeff, was one thing she could clean-up committee was headed ams and Linda Stephens (picnot do. The two agreed to be their sophomore, junior, an d by Mr. Martin Heuer. The over- tures by Jim Christ and Mr. Massenior years. Leading roles in friends regardless of who won ' all committee for the carnival ek-yearbook stuff). the all-girl cast were played by Jeff. were Mrs. Max Langham, Mrs. This Friday Mr. DeZwarte Drizzle discovered her real two seniors, Carolyn Wing (Spiff) Ellis Adams, and Mrs. Mary turns from athletics to governand Sue Moore (Drizzle). A third self when she wrote a book of Anna Gnade. ment-he takes his American poetry about college life and her senior, Helen Warford, played The purpose of the carnival History class to Auburn to parthe part of Minnie, a college friends; this book was titled Brief Music, from which the title was to raise funds for the P.T.A., ticipate in County Government smoothie. and this year it was a huge suc- Day. Each school elects county Lovey, the class beauty with of the play is derived. The rocess because of the cooperation officials, then that official talks the Body-by-Fisher look, was mantic conflict was dissolved of all P.T.A. members. The to them about his duties. Our . when Jeff decided to wed the played by veteran actress Rose P.T.A. took in over $150. election results: Sheriff, Linda Clancy. Rosey, the college oracle, French belle of the faculty. Stephens; County Attorney, Lawas played by Joni Wesolowski, Maggie and Jinx, along with quita Allgood; Clerk of District while Carol Mordah portrayed Minnie and Rosey, highlighted Court, Jim- Furnas; County Jinx, the eternal straggler with the humor and underlying seriJudge, Jerry Reeves; County Asa southern drawl. Sandy Ste- ousness of the play. sessor, Jack Mcconnaughey; phens, freshman newcomer to the The quartet of Clark Maffitt, Peru stage, played Maggie, the Alan Kreglo, Larry Miller, and Ralph Marterie, who brings his Treasurer, Lind a Applegate; dynamic revolutionist. musical Marlboro Men to Peru County Clerk, Kay Tripp; CounDick Sietsema were the off-stage ty Superintendent, Larry KnoIn the first act Lovey found singers in the final act of the State Campus on Tuesday, April ple; County Commissioner, Bob what she wanted f.rom life and play. The off-stage voice of an- 19, is variously called "The Man Gnade. eloped. This kindled the roman- other dorm resident was provid- Born To the Horn,'' and "The And this Friday the brains got Man With the Golden Horn," betic instincts of her friends, and ed by Julie Mayer. this fire burned throughout the Brief Music was said by many cause of his hot swingin' trum- a workout at Interscholastic Contest. Also report on progress in entire play. ~cf to be one of the most entertain- pet. The dance will be formal and school is made to parents on that Throughout the p 1 a y, the ing plays they'd seen in recent held in the College Gymnasium day. would-be poet, Drizzle, constant- years. 1.1_.IJ-, from 9:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. Prices We have an elementary school, are $2.50 per couple and $1.25 too. Miss Grush says she thinks single admission. 2nd graders are the best group High school seniors and their to teach, then she admitted each dates from a twenty-five mile teacher probably feels the same The annual All-Sports Banquet for the banquet and Mr. Masek radius will be invited. about their grade. Under the direction of Miss' was held Saturday, March 18, delivered the invocation. On Monday the 4th graders Mary Jarvis gave a speech Diddel, art instructor at Peru presented a play "The Ugly from 6:00 to 11:30 at the campus about volley ball, Bill Tynon State, posters are being made for Duckling" which wasn't widely school. The coronation took place at talked on last year's track team, this special occasion. They will advertised so who saw it? Usual6:00 in the auditorium. Marshall Marshall Adams talked about serve as reminders to everyone. ly Miss Ashley's "observers" get Adams and Linda Stephens were football, and Larry Blanton about in on these cute things .. Then on crowned King and Queen. Linda basketball. Wednesday Mrs. Brown's 4th HOME EC CLUB HOLDS Jan Lil!ethorup presenled the Applegate and Paul Heuer were graders gave a formal tea for attendants. The royalty was volley ball letters, Mr. DeZwarte MONTHLY MEETING parents. Hosts greeted you at the The Peru Home Economics chosen by the student body. To presented the last year's track door and seated you. The probe eligible, one must be a junior letters, and this year's basketball Club held their monthly meeting gram was a cleverly arranged or senior, participate in s o me and football letters. Mary Tynon Monday, March 14. During a travelogue to Holland with folk presented the letters and awards short business meeting, the club dancing and songs. Then hosts sport, or be a cheerleader. members voted for officers of conducted you to the formally After the coronation, S t e v e to Pep club members. Larry Miller's band provided Nebraska Home Economics As- beautiful tea table for tea (pink Parker sang "Captain Mac,'' Trudy Schneider sang "Chances music for the dance. The ban- sociation. After the meeting a lemonade) poured by a class Ate,'' and the triple trio sang quet was sponsored by the high demonstration on upholstery was member, pretty cookies and given by Wayne McFarland, as- mints. After you were finished, "The World Is Waiting for the school Pep club. sisted by Joan Votroubeck. Sunrise" and "So's I Can Write a host took your empty plate My Name." and glass (Not paper!) and "Next to excellence is the apshowed you work that has been Dr. Blanton was guest speaker preciation of it."-Thackeray. MODERN DANCE GIRLS ATTEND N. U. PERFORMANCE done in class. As you left another

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Edna McGovern and Linda Nygaard, two members of Peru's Modern Dance class, attended a program on Modern Dance at the University of Nebraska's Howell Theatre, March 11. The program was presented by the Orchesis members and the Modern Dance Class of the University of Nebraska. The program included demonstrations of fundamentals followed by contemporary and i n t e r p r e t i v e dances.

BILL'S CLOTHING & SHOE STORE You Pay Less at Bill's Auburn, Nebr. host told you they were glad you could come. I still say boys and girls from OUR s ch o o 1 are equipped to meet most_ social occasions when they arise. Last word from the PTA Carnival front-official take clear was $151.07. However, enough material for sloppy joes and hot dogs was left over to serve the regular PTA meeting this past Tuesday. To clean up the .leftover left overs, every crumb was sent with Mr. Moore to Junior Class play rehearsal which put an end to that evening's practice session.

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Night Of

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 55

Number 12

APRIL lL 1960

More Than 100 Courses To Be Offered In 1960 Summer Session

Large Audience For Style Show By Sandra Pearson . On March 29, 1960, at 7:30 p.m. in the Campus School Auditorium, a spring style show sponsored by the American Association of University Women was enjoyed by a large audience in spite of the drizzly weather. Manager, Mr. R. M. Gladstone, of Wessel's of Nebraska City, Nebraska, was assisted by staff members, Mrs. Lillian Bush, Mrs. Georgia Granger, and Mrs. Irene Enrjght in selecting outfits for the review. The fashions for the coming spring and Easter were modeled by four groups. The adult models were: Miss Mary Clarke, Mrs. Ellis Adams, Mrs. Al Wheeler, Mrs. John Lewis, Mrs. Lee Becker, Mrs. W. E. Morrissy, Mrs. Er· vin Eickhoff, Mrs. Lyle McKercher, Mrs. Albert Straw, and Mrs. Jack Mcintire. College and co-ed fashions were modeled by Peru Staters Rita Grandg~nett, Mary Ann Lewellyn, Sue Moore, and Linda Nygaard, while Campus School youngsters Pamela Lewis, Pamela Morrissy, Mark Coatney, Lavonne St~phens, Darilyn Manring and Scott McKercher . presented styles geared to this age group. Two pre-school children Janet Wilson and . David Wininger, showed styles for the very young set. An outfit which drew approval was the blue-gray suit worn by Mrs. Mary Clarke. For accessories, Mrs. Clarke chose a chic hat of blue nylon roses and pale blue gloves. A light-weight white wool coat worn by Mary Ann Lewellyn was another eyecatcher with its long row of buttons in front and its embroidered satin lining. A black patent leather bag made a beautiful contrast to the white of the coat. Pamela Morrissy wore a black and white checked cotton dress with a smart Easter bonnet also of black and white, while young David Wininger was set for the coming spring and summer in his short plaid trousers, w i th matching jacket, and cap. At mid-point in the show, the Easter Parade theme was set to music when Mrs. D. Wininger sang "Easter Parade," accompanied by Mrs. Gilbert Wilson. The commentary, written by Mrs. G. Schottenhamel, Mrs. Lee Becker, and Mrs. Gladys Ackley, was presented by Marge Parker of station KNCY in Nebraska City. The style show committee was composed of Mrs. G. Schottenhamel, Mrs. Robert Majors, Mrs. Al Wheeler, Mrs. D. Manring.

·Radio Station On Campus The Peru State Teachers radio station has been appropriated five hundred dollars from the college funds by the president of the college and from four hundred to five hundred dollars from the Student Senate to cover the expenses involved in establishing such a project. Dr. Schottenhamel reports that substantial equipment for a radio station is very expensive, but if all goes well, the station will be ready to broadcast late next fall.

April 19

Mrs. W. A. Clineburg Tells of the Burning of Old Mount Vernon By Chris Hays Mt. Vernon Hall was completed January 4, 1897. It is to be razed to make way for a new $342,249 Student Center and an addition to Eliza Morgan. On October 24, 1867, the first term of the state's new Normal School started in part of this structure with three teachers and 40 students. The building c o s t $8,000 which was raised by subscription from citizens in the Peru area. The property was given to the State Normal Board in August, 1867, by the Methodist Episcopal Church Conference, which had started classes August 1866, in a downtown building with one teacher and 38 students. The Nebraska Legislature appropriated $10,000 to refit the building in 1869. It was this building which was gutted by fire in January, 1897, and which, since its reconstruction, has served as a dormitory on the Peru State Teachers College campus until this year. Only the walls of the original structure were standing after the fire but much of the sam,e material is in the soon-to-pass Mount Vernon. Mrs. W. A. Clineburg, Peru's ·city clerk, says she remembers when the old dormitory burned. "My sister and I had just come back from Christmas vacation. At that time there were two

trains through Peru, and we came in on the one that arrived in Peru about 4:00 p.m. We lived in a basement apartment across the street from the girls' dorm. We had heard while in Nebraska City that the dormitory had burned. When we entered our room, we found it stacked /full of dormitory property that had been placed there because of the fire. There was a big cream can which had spilled, and cream was running all over our room. And that's what we young, and homesick girls found when we arrived home." Mrs. Clineburg said that she still has a celery dish that was left in her room during the fire. She remembers Miss Morgan quite well. Mrs. Clineburg commented, "Miss Morgan was proprietor at that time, and she taught me in algebra class and also physiology. One of my most prized possessions is a picture that Miss Morgan gave me of herself."

The college catalog for the 1898-99 announced that the new dormitory "is heated with steam and lighted with electricity. Each room is intended for two ladies and is furnished as follows: bedstead, bed springs, mattress, pillows, chairs, washstand, and dresser, study table, wash bowl and pitcher; and window shades. Bed clothing and necessary articles which can be brought in a trunk are to be furnished by the students. The cost of room rent includes lighting."

Epsilon Pi Tau Initiates Four Members

On Friday, April 1, an initiation of new Epsilon Pi Tau mem- , bers was held at Wayne St ate Teachers College. Twel.ve indusMrs. Clineburg also says she trial arts students from Peru remembers hearing many interState attended the affair, which esting things concerning the hiswas held in the Wayne State tory of Peru State. Someone told Library. her that while the school was Eight members from Peru still Methodist it was located were in charge of the initiation downtown. The building had a railing around it and the girls Room rent per term was $8 for proceedings. They were Jerry couldn't go beyond the railing. "a back inside room" to $13 for Beckmann, Douglas Dickerson, Richard Gerber, Milan Hawxby, The rules were very rigid. "a front corner room." Wayne McFarland, Lee Rottman, Robert Taenzler, and Joseph Verbeek. The four students who were initiated were James Dovel, The Student Senate plans to Roger Eshelman, Eric Mortenincrease its membership from The members of the Pedago- son, and Gary Olson. twelve to seventeen. A president, gian staff observed first-hand the A banquet was glven after the vice president, three members- functions of a large newspaper initiation. Mr. Fred Witt was the at-large, three representatives on April 6th. Twenty-one stu- main speaker. The program was from each class are to be elected. dents enjoyed a guided tour of followed by a dance. The Peru students returned Saturday after World-Herald Building, Omaha. CHORUS PRESENTED Students participating in the staying overnight at Wayne. "THE HOLY CITY" Mr. Russell, Mr. Jarvis, and tour of the Omaha World-Herald The Peru State College Chorus were: Wallace West, Sue Moore, Dr. Harlan attended the meeting. presented "The Holy City,'' an Rosie Rottman, Peggy McGee, oratorio by A. R. Gaul, Sunday, Mary Ellen Lewellyn, Leland April 10, in the College Auditor- Smith, Steve Parker, Elmer Anium at 3:00 p.m. The traditional tons, Sharon Watten, Gary Palm Sunday presentation was Brown, Joan WesQolowski, Sandy under the direction of Darryl T. Pearson, Carol ElThnberger, Alice James Axt, a January graduManring, associate professor of Greenwood, Morris Keyt, Jerry ate, has received a full tuition vqcal music. Osborn, Carolyn Parli, Chris scholarship at the University of Soloists were soprano Marilyn Hays, Donna Francis, Darlene Wyoming for graduate work in Wright, Table Rock; alto Joyce Critel, and Al Bohlken. history. Carman, Cook; tenor Alan KregThe students were accompanJiip. hopes to complete requirelo, Auburn, and baritone Clark ied by Stewart Linscheid, Peda- ments for his degree by the end Maffitt, Sidney, Iowa. gogian sponsor. of the 1961 summer session.

Student Senate Plans Spring Election The Student Senate has been making plans for the coming elections to be held in May. It has planned a new system for this election. Parties consisting of seventyfive members are to be organized. These parties will form t h e i r platforms. At a party caucvs meeting, candidates for president, vice president, and members-at-large will be nominated. The campaign kick-off starts Wednesday, April 20, and lasts until 10:30 p.m., April 26. After Easter vacation a convocation will be held so candidates c an give campaign speeches. The election for president, vice president, and members-at-large will be May 2. Following the May 2 election, the class representatives will be elected.

Mrs. Clineburg asked me if I knew where Peru's bell came from. I said, "No," and she said, "A school bell was needed, so the girls got a lumber wagon and went into the country and got chickens. The chickens were sold to raise money for the bell fund." So we owe thanks to the ambitious money raisers of the early 1900's for our victory bell.

More than lOO•courses will. be offered for under-graduate and graduate students in the 1960 summer session at Peru State Teachers College, according to F. H. Larson, registrar. The regular eight-week session, during which nine hours of college credit may be earned, will open June 6 and close July 29. Offerings will include not only those of interest to the in-service teacher, but also to homemakers and business people. With the 1960 session, Peru State will continue the special gifted student program for high school students between the junior and senior years. Under the program, students will be perniitted to enroll for three beginning college courses after succelsf~l ~ompletion of entrance tests and U'pon recommendation of high school officials. The college credit earned during the summer may be applied to future co· work at Peru State or be transferred to other colleges upon high school graduation. The popular two-week post session will open July 30 and continue through August 13. During the session, two or three hours of college credit may be earned. The post session offerings will include: Children's Literature, Audio-Visual Mater i a 1s, Workshop in Elementary Education, Safety Education and First Aid. Those planning to enroll for post session courses should do so on June 6, the opening of the regular session. Post session classes will have limited enrollments, Mr. Larson said.

A further notation adds: "The cost of fuel cannot be given in advance as the heating apparatus has not been tested." This item no doubt was of great interest to residents of the former structure since an earlier catalog quoted the cost of wood at $3 to $5 per cord.

Pedagogian Staff Tours World-Herald Building

James Axt Receives Scholarship At Wyoming


LIBRARY SHORTS By Darlene Criiel The Alive and Growing Teach; er was written by Clark E. Moustakas. This book is ~ portrayal of persons living and. learning together. It describes the emo1 tional atmosphere, the condi· tions, and the process of learning. It tells what happens to individuals when they are free to be themselves. The particular group involved is composed of classroom teachers and principals, but their experience and the underlying theory are relevent to any person concerned with human relations and genuine life with other persons. The Yellow Wind, written by William Stevenson, is a brilliant and fascinating portrait of modern China. More than any politi· cal study or specialist's report, it gives the American reader some understanding of a new people and the secret of their power. William Stevenson is a Canadian foreign correspondent who went to Korea in 1952 with a challenging assignment-to get at the root of the system of indoctrination that made Chinese prisoners so impervious to Western. ideas of democracy. Fascinated by what he saw, Stevenson stayed on in the Far East, making prolonged trips throughout . China, Southeast Asia, India, Tibet, and far eastern R.ussia. His object everywhere was to learn the secrets of Mao's success. He found ·that Mao has adapted Marxism to his own people and the result is infinitely m o r e subtle-and. thus more dangerous than Slavic Communism. We of the West realize these people have a new faith to replace their broken superstitions. We must not ignore the ancient Chinese proverb "Grass covers the globe because grass bends before the wind." Beyond My Worth is an inspiring new book by Lillian Roth, author of I'll Cry Tomorrow. "Nothing in my wildest imaginings could have prepared me for what has happened these p as t five years," says Lillian Roth in her new book. This book continues the story of her life from the publication of I'll Cry Tomorrow

to the present. Catapulted back into the limelight as a "reformed" alcoholic, faced·with the problems of a professional comeback, besieged by people w h o sought solace and advice, troubled by her own weaknesses and doubts, she found herself on the verge of panic and blindness. But the love and strength of her husband, the will to make good on her own, and the faith and affection of a vast audience w h o turned to her for help, carried her over the troubled waters. Step by step she found her way out of the darkness that still threatened her. With the same frankness and honesty that made her autobiography a deeply moving experience, Lillian Roth now describes her struggle back to the top of the night club circuit, of the lean and the full years, of the disappointments and triumphs, and of her search for religious understanding. She tells of her decision to become a serious actress. "Life is a struggle-and to stop struggling is to stop living. But that struggle is not for money alone, but to create, to realize the best within us. In this way we draw closer to God." Seldom has there been a story as inspiring and warmly human as this continuation of the record of a woman's search to find peace and happiness within herself.·

Band Presents Concert At Sidney, Iowa '.(.'he Peru State Symphonic Band Ensemble was invited to play a concert at Sidney, Iowa, Tuesday, March 29, at 8 o'clock p.m. The band members we re transported to their destination by individual cars. Flood conditions caused a small crowd. The first selection presented was "Foundation March" by Goldman. Some of the other selections were "First Suite for Band," "Gustav Holst," selections from "Windjammer" by Morton Gould, and "American in Paris" by Gershwin. Other features were Larry Miller playing "Trumpet Concerto" by Joseph Hayden and Alan Kreglo, ."Melody" by Young Harper. The trumpet trio consisting of Larry Miller, Henry Hinrichs and Robert Kaiser, accompanied by the band, played "Bugler's Holiday." Concert was completed with "March Opus No. 99" by Prokofieff.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of ihe Campus of a Thousand Oaks Member Intercollegiate Press April 11, 1960 THE STAFF Co-Editor ----------------------------------Donna Francis Co-Editor ------------------------------Rosemary Rottman Sports Editor -----------------------,----------Wally West Sports Reporter -----------------------------Jerry Osborne Sports Reporter ------------------------------Steve Parker Copy Editor --------------------------------Kathy Rhoten Copy Editor ----------------------------Martha Sue Moore Business Manager -------------------------~---Al Bohlken Columnist ------------------------------~--~--Gary Brown Columnist -----------------------------------Carolyn Parli Columnist ------------------------------Mary Anna Gnade Library Column ----------------------------Darlene Critel Exchange Editor _____________ "______________ Nancy Kunkel Convocations ------------------------------Sharon Watton Dramatics --------------------------------Joni Wesolowski Music ---------------------------------------Peggy McGee Church ----------------------------------Alice Greenwood Campus School News ----•---------------------Chris Hays Campus School Reporter ____________________ Elmer Antons Reporter _____ -----------------------------Sandra Pearson Reporter -----·-------------------------Mary Ann Lewellyn Reporter --------------------------------Carol Ellenberger Reporter ----·----------------------------------Leroy Keyt Reporter ------------------------------------Leland Smith Sponsor ------------------------------Stewart P. Linscheid

Nebt WHISPERS FROM MORGAN

Of

By Carolyn Parli Ah, spring is here-tra la, la la la, and all that jazz! It's becoming a struggle to stay in a stuffy classroom while Mother Nature is beckoning us outside. But alas, the call of the teachers is a much stronger force. Once again we see hikers running up and down the hills of Peru exploring for a few early-blooming flowers. To celebrate the coming of · April, the girls in the dorm liad an April Fool's Party, March 31, Thursday, at 10:30 p.m. CarolJ'.11 Wing and Jeannine Ehlers were in charge of the party. Several skits were given. Those participating in the skits were Ro s e Clancy, Lois Fritz, Mari 1y n Wright, Connie Erisman, Carol McLain, Ellen Hunzeker, and · Carolyn Parli. Dorm council met Tuesday, March 29, at 6:30 p.m., in Miss Slattery's apartment. They decided to order two card tables and another hair dryer. They also discussed Open House. There were several birthdays these last few weeks. The girls having birthdays are K a r e n Fankhauser, Jane Kunkel, Jane Dietl, Margaret Beard, and Norma Pugsley. The bathtub has been quite a busy place these days, Rae Mae Henry was dunked for being pinned to David Fulton from Wood River, Illinois. The g i r 1s have been trying to throw Alber" ta Kasparek in the tub for a long time. They finally succeeded after nearly drowning everyone. Joan Eickhoff also met her fate in the tub. A surprise wedding shower was held for Raylene Miller on April 4. Raylene received an electric skillet as a gift. Refreshments were served later. The climax of the evening was when Raylene got a dunking in the "ole tub." Raylene who is from Elmwood, Nebraska, became the bride of Larry Curnes from Falls City, Nebraska, on April 9th at the Methodist church in Elmwood. The editor took a poll on how one can avoid getting that dreaded disease-spring fever! Here are some of the comments made by the girls. "Don't, look at the opposite sex." "Avoid long walks on sunny afternoons." "Avoid moonlight drives through the country." "Sit in your room and study, study, study!" "Run around with the girls all the time." "Who says it's a 'dreaded' disease?" "Move to the Arctic." "Take tranquilizers." "Play it cool, man, cool." "Get thrown in a tub of cold water!"

. , Confession· -

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Rickard Sietsema Presents Senior Recital The Fine Arts Department presented a senior vocal recital Thursday, March 31, at 8:00 p.m. in the college auditorium. Mr. Richard. Sietsema, a student of D. T. Manring, was the featured vocalist and was accompanied by R. T. Benford. Included in the recital was "Silent Worship" by Handel, "Bois Epais" by Lully, "I'll Sail Upon a Pog Star" by Purcell, "Non Piu Andra I" by Mozart, "Ave Maria" by Mascagni, "Who Is Sylvia" by Schubert, "Ich Grolle Nicht" by Schuman, "Vergebliches Standchen" by Brahms, "Ci Tra I Creppis" by Handel,

"Danza, Danza" by Durante, "Old Mother Hubbard" by Hutchinson, and "Two Appalachian Mountain Ballads" by Shaw. In the selection of "Non Piu Andra I" by Mozart, Figaro tells the unfortunate Cherubino the differences that lie between the bright and happy life he has lived among the intriguing and beautiful women, and the terrible life that now lies before him. The recital was divided into five parts, with a reception in the Music Hall Auditorium immediately following the recital.

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Nebraska City Repeat Winner Of Interscholastic Contest At Peru By Morris Keyt

ART-

In the second annual Preru State Interscholastic Contest Friday, March 25, Nebraska Cit Y made a repeatwin in Division A with 76% points; and Humboldt s we p t Division B with 63% points. More than 400 students from '29 Nebraska high schools participated in the second annual event. Tests were given in 22 areas, with points awarded for the top five students in each event in the respective divisions. Runners-up in Division A were Falls City, 73%; Crete, 64; Auburn, 38; Plattsmouth, 40; and Syracuse, 35. Division B team totals included: Johnson, 29%; Pawnee City, 27 1h; Springfield, 23%; Millard, 21; Peru Prep, 20%; Stella, 19%; Lourdes Central, 19; Friend, 17%; DawsonVerdon, 161/z; Bratton Union, 9%; Brock, 8; Salem, 8; Cook, 71h; Dunbar, 7; Douglas, 5; Weeping Water, 31/z; Shubert, 3; Louisville, 2%; Talmage, Ph; Table Rock, 1.

Division A-1st, Florence Stephens, Auburn; 2nd, Mike Maxwell, Plattsmouth; 3rd, M a r y Henry, Nebraska City. Division B-1st, Orville Reed, Waverly; 2nd, Nancy Gergen, Dunbar; 3rd tie, Ronald Grundmann, Cook, Arnold Ziels, Lourdes. ENGLISH-

Division A-1st, Joyce Laughlin, Syracuse; 2nd, Carol Coulter, Auburn; 3rd, Bill Davis, Nebraska City. Division B-1st, Gary Isk, Springfield; 2nd, Kay Pearson, Stella; 3rd, Janet Watson, Humboldt. ALGEBRA II-

Division A-1st, Larry Roos, Nebraska City; 2nd, Bill Ahlschwede, Crete; Tie 3rd, David Sheldon, Nebraska City, Nelson Meyer, Syracuse. Division B-1st, Cheryl Donahoo, Millard; 2nd, Thomas Kotouc, Humboldt; 3rd, Jim Bruning, Springfield.· WORLD HISTORY-

Division A-1st, Mike Moody, Auburn; 2nd, Dick Law, Fa 11 s City; 3rd, Charles Winkelman, Nebraska City. Division B-1st, Ann Kotouc, Humbo!dt; 2nd, Alan Jennings, Brock; Tie 3rd, Richard Howe, Dawson, Tom Sedlacek, Springfield.

nek, Crete. Division B-lst, Mardelle Knippelmeir, Johnson; 2nd, Karen Glenn, Pawnee; 3rd, Barbara Metzger, Springfield.

Tennis Team Has Nine Game Schedule

Large Track Squad Prepares For Season

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT-

The 1960 Peru State Tennis Team, ·coached by Dr. Darrell Wininger, has a nine g am e schedule. Three returning lettermen bolster the team. The returnees are Marvin Bergsten, Dick Kunde, and Eldon Rossmiller. A promising newcomer is Jon Palmer, a freshman from Omaha Central. The tennis squad has b e en hampered by the weather. Most of the drills so far have been held in the gymnasium. The opening match will be against Creighton University on April 12 at Peru. Other matches are scheduled for:

Nearly forty men h;n.-e repmt.. ed for track drills. Among these are thirteen returning lettermen. They are Chuck Francis, 440-880, one and two mile relay; Don Stange, pole vault and broad jump; Jack Johnson, who set the school record for the high jump at 6'21/2"; Ross Pilkington, sprint and broad jump; LaMarr Gibson, javelin; Jack Head, high jump; Jerry Henning, discus; D i ck Neale, 440; Lanny Richards, 440880; John Werner, 440-880; Ken Humphrey, hurdle and broad jump; Bob Gibson, pole · vault; Phil Rhodes, high jump. The team was hurt when John Greene, Buddy Bookwalter, and Ron Callan, three 1 e t t e r m e n , failed to report for drills. Outstanding prospects for this season include Vernon Thompson, John Christensen, Dick Place, and Ken Dostal who are transfer students. Last year the Bobcats won seven out of eight meets and placed sixth in the Conference Meet.

Division A-'-Tie 1st, Judy Heineman, Falls City, Jackie Smith, Nebraska City; Tie 3rq, Ron Meinke, Crete, Bette Knutson, Plattsmouth. Division B-1st, Lawrence Cary, Pawnee; Tie 2nd, Thomas Kotouc, Humboldt, Leland Volker, Johnson. INDUSTRIAL ARTS-

Division A-1st, Charles Toman, Plattsmouth; 2nd, Ronnie Gilkerson, Falls City; 3rd, Brian Mariska, Crete. Division B-1st, Bob Lindsey, Friend; 2nd, Jerry Sayer, Peru Prep; 3rd, Jerry Oestmann, Johnson. ALGEBRA!-

Division A-Tie 1st, Carol Sue Hall, Falls City, Harriett Hunker, Falls City; Tie 3rd, David Williams, Crete; John Vasak, Crete. Division B-1st, Robert Leech, Bratton Union; 2nd, Eldona Dettman, Dawson-Verdon; 3rd, Joyce Rohrs, Johnson. LATIN-

Division A-1st, Erick Kutzelnigg, Crete; Tie 2nd, Jackie Smith, Nebraska City, Sh a r on Earl, Syracuse. Division B-1st, Ann Kotouc, Humboldt; 2nd, Pierce Johnson, Pawnee; 3rd, Ronald Volkmer, Lourdes.

Dr. Darrell Wininger, in charge of scoring and awards, declared, "I think the contest this year BIOLOGYwas superior to the one 1 a s t Division A-1st, Roger Kenyear because of, one, increased HEALTHnedy, Falls City; 2nd, Harriette pupil interest, two, news coverDivision A-1st, Richard Gibage by KNCY, and, three, a son, Falls City; 2nd, Clark Witt, Hunker, Falls City; 3rd, Cathy greater competitive spirit among · Falls City; 3rd, Dianne Jessup, Collett, Crete. Division B-1st, the .contestants." Nebraska City. Division B-1st, Ruth Bucholz, Johnson; 2nd, Judy Gerhard, Millard; 3rd, Gary Final ratings were: Al Wheeler, Peru Prep; 2nd, Fankhauser, Humboldt. GERMANGeorgene Rohrig, Friend; 3rd, SPELLINGDivision A-1st, Christine Sondra Witler, Dawson-Verdon. Division A-Tie 1st, Kent AnBrown, Nebraska City. Division LITERATUREB-1st, David Gomon, Peru Prep; Division A-Tie 1st, Martha derson, Crete, Jean Bruegge2nd, Anna Marolf, Waverly; 3rd, Cain; Falls City, Susan Sharp, mann, Syracuse; 3rd, Linda SimRobert Rademacher, Johnson. Plattsmouth; 3rd, Wauneta Bock- mons, Nebraska City. Division FRENCHman, Falls City. Division B-lst, B-1st, Carolyn Parde, Douglas; Tie 2nd, Carol Hunzeker, HumDivision A-1st, Nancy Wil- Robert Heim, Humboldtj 2nd, boldt, Carol Ziels, Lourdes, Iiams, Crete; 2nd, Roger Rine, Nancy Osborn, Springfield; 3rd, Jackie Prokop, Friend, J an i c e Crete; 3rd, William Morrissey, Robert Tynan, Stella. Wilkinson, Bratton Union. Nebraska City. Division B-1st, HOME ECONOMICSJudy Durr, Lourdes; 2nd, Carol Division A-1st, Winnie Spor- CHEMISTRYDivision A-1st, Lyle Brown, Yates, Millard; 3rd, Ann Peery, er, Plattsmouth; 2nd, Kathryn Waverly. Currie, Crete; 3rd, Shirley Buria- Nebra~ka City; 2nd, Frank Masters, Syracuse;. 3rd; Larry Hojer, Crete. Division B-1st, Lambert Bright, Stella; 2nd, H ow a rd STATE THEATRE - AUBURN, NEBR. Peckham, Pawnee; 3rd, Gary Van Zant, Humboldt.

••

Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday April 10-13 David Wayne

Paul Muni

"THE LAST ANGRY MAN"

April 14-16

Thursday, Friday, Saturday Double Feature

"THE BOY AND THE PIRATE" Plus

"RETURN TO WARBOW('· Sunday, Monday Richard Todd II

April 17-18 Jean Peters

A MAN CALLED PET,ER"

Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday David Niven

April 19-21

Mitzi Gaynor

"HAPPY ANNIVERSARY" Friday, Saturday Gary Cooper

April 22-23 Charlton Heston

"THE WRECK OF THE MARY DEARE"

PERU MARKET Rex Rains Groceries Meais Fruits and Vegelables

April 23-Graceland at Lamoni, Iowa April 20-Doane at Peru April 28-Northwest Missouri State at Maryville April 29-St. Benedict's at Peru May 6-St. Benedict's at Atchison May 9-Wesleyan at Peru May 11-Creighton at Omaha May 13-Graceland at Peru May 19-20-Conference Meet at Hastings

Divi~ion

A-1st, Larry Roos, Nebraska City; 2nd, Steve Davis, Syracuse; 3rd, Jim Masters, Syracuse. Division B-lst, Robert Heim, Humboldt; 2nd, Carol Schlophott, Waverly; 3rd, Lawrence Cary, Pawnee. AMERICAN HISTORY-

Division A-1st, Suzanne Murdock, Plattsmouth; 2nd, To m McGuire, Falls City; 3rd, Larry Beesing, Falls City. Division Blst, Sue Lawritson, Salem; 2nd, Merton Colson, Humboldt; 3rd, Kathryn Vollmer, Dawson. TYPING-

Division A-1st, Rachel Wittrock, Falls City; Tie 2nd, Lindale Cure, Nebraska City, Joyce Wieting, Crete. Division B-lst, Judy Hunzeker, Humboldt; 2nd, Carolyn Kammerer, Dawson; 3rd, Sharryll LU!jdy, Shubert.

Lincoln AFB, on April 22, will throw its gates open to Nebraska students and their teachers from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. when it holds the first Air Science Education Program. This Air Science Program will run for three days. Thursday, April 21, has been set aside for Lincoln's 1,800 eighth grade students; Friday, April 22, is to be open house for all students and teachers in Nebraska. Saturday, April 23, is to be open house for the general public. On these days there will be many lectures, films, and military and industrial displays. Aircraft and aircraft parts are to be among the many things displayed at the program.

BANK OF PERU

SPANISH-

Division A-1st, Beverly Fenstermacher, Nebraska City; 2nd, Karen Ely, Auburn; Tie 3rd, Mazy Ann Griffiths, Auburn, Janet Niebruegge, Nebraska City. Division B-1st, Gary Iske, Springfield; 2nd, Ron Brauer, Waverly; 3rd, Robert Tynan, Stella.

Lincoln Air Force Base To Have Open House

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Division A-1st, Elaine Schwaninger, Crete; 2nd, Jeanne Moore, Auburn; 3rd, Ernie Thalman, Nebraska City. Division B-st, Ellen Kerns, Humboldt; 2nd, Lois Remmers, Johnson; 3rd, Marge Cornell, Friend.

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Division A-1st, Tom Smith, Plattsmouth; Tie 2nd, Jackie Hall, Plattsmouth, Ron Sawton, Syracuse, Ronnie Harris, Falls City. Division B-+lst, Warren Wh!ieler, Millard; 2nd, Ronald Lockard, Stella; 3rd, Patrick Goodin, Humboldt. Heim, Humboldt; 2nd, C a r 1

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Peru Concert Choir Makes 1960 Tour The Peru Concert Choir made its 1960 tour on April 5. The choir performed at Johnson at 9:00 a.m., Rockport, Missouri at 11 :00 a.m., and Sidney, Iowa, 2:00 p.m. Each performance was begun with "Dream" written by Johnny Mercer, and was concluded with the choral selection of "Carousel" written by Rodgers and Hammerstein. Other songs included were "He Watching Over Israel" from Elijah, written by Mendelssohn, "Thou Must Leave Thy Lowly Dwelling" written by Hector Berlioz, · "He's Gone Away" arranged by Joseph W. Clokey, "O Man Thy Grief and Sin Bemoan" written by Ralph E. Williams, "John Henry" arranged by Lionel Wood, "Negro Bell Carol" written by Willis L. James, and "Oh Lemuer' arranged by Roger Wagner.

Delzell Doings By Gary Brown

Solos were also included in the concert. Marilyn Wright, soprano, sang "Carrissima"; Joyce Carman, alto, sang "Gypsy Love Song" written by Victor Herbert; Clark Maffitt, baritone, sang "Serenade" from The Fortune Teller; and Richard Sietsema, baritone, sang "When I Think Upon the Maidens." "You Are Love" written by J. Kern was sung as a duet by M a r i 1y n Wright and Clark Maffitt. Larry Miller p r e s e n t e d a trumpet solo of "Hungarian Melodies" written by Vincent Bach. The male quartet, Al Kreglo, first tenor, Richard Sietsema, second tenor, Clark Maffitt, baritone, and Larry Miller; bass, sang "Seeing Nellie Home," "Shine On Me," and "Brothers Sing On." time to crack all the nuts on this campus." Chuck Francis-"I'll miss the Blue Devil "picnic" and the exciting week-ends at good old Peru." As your dorm column writer I have a complaint that I would like to publish. Will someone please get .. married or do something so that I will have something to write about. Notice! Orvin Lindell is · reported by himself to have in his possession the best looking pinup in all of Delzell. What do you say about that, you guys?

Shorthand Class Is Campus School Chatter By Mary Anna Gnade Making Progress In The sudden silence after the Timed Writing roar and confusion of mud-work-

Delzell is now being plagued by another fad. Many of the guys have returned to their childhoods and are again putting model airplanes together. Among these plane builders are Terry Wickham, Roger Buman, Arlan Stuhr, Rex Rhodes, Hank Turner, Drexell Harvey, and Darrell Feit. Roger Smith and Tom Lakin have also announced that they are building a missile to knock down the model being constructed by Turner, Harvey, and Feit. (This could lead to the Third World War.) Keep it up, fellas, because a creative mind is never Administrators Attend Convention an idle mind. Dr. Keith Melvin, Dr. Neal S. As everyone knows, profane Gomon, and Frank Masek atlanguage seems to go with the male populace when they are by tended the convention of the themselves. In room 302 there is North Central Association of now a change because John Betts Colleges, Universities, and SecDennis Hilfiker, and I have start~ ondary Schools in Chicago. The ed a "stop, swearing drive." Ev- convention which was held from erytime there is a slip, the per- March 28 to April 1 was con~ son who slipped has to go out cerned with the improvement of into the hall for one minute. Why secondary education. The theme for the convention don't you try it and we'll make next week "be kind to English was "High School and College Articulation." Such topics as week." "National· Program of Testing," On a recent tour of the dorm "Philosophy and Procedure in I asked some of the seniors who Accreditation,'' ,;Summer will be leaving us if they had School,'' and "Teachers' Educaanything they would like to say. tion Programs in Colleges, Uni, H a r o 1 d Schmitz-"California versities by Types" were dishere I come." cussed. . Ernie Madison-"I'll miss the The topic on summer school good looking girls." was concerned with the probaJerry Beckmann-"I'll miss bility of having three semesters. the quietness of second floor." This would allow a person to David Fulton-"! sure hate to graduate in three years. leave all the good chow." The Teachers' Education ProGary Olson-"From the way grams in Colleges and Universimy grades look I may be back so ties by Types included the multiI will have to stand on the Fifth purpose schools, private schools, (Scotch)." teachers colleges, and liberal arts Jerry Collier-"It took a long schools.

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ing construction men must have been hard on campus s c h o o 1 study habits! Whether is is absehce of working noise, awakening of winter-dulled energies, or a sudden feeling of time a-fleeting and no money in the coffers for end-of-school trips-in any case, suddenly we have a flurry of teenage willing workers (for a price). Seniors are washing cars Saturday-tentative go a 1, 24 , hours in Kansas City. Juniors, of course, have been spending their time and energies on the class play, proceeds of which help finance the Junior-Senior Prom. Eighth graders are soliciting yard work for Saturday (this and other Saturdays,. too-advertisement!) since ·they have high hopes of including "Ben Hur~' in their field trip to Omaha someKappa Delta Pi held their time in May. Apparently, class monthly meeting April 4, 1960 in dues are enough to finance the the Music Hall. field trip for the 7th graders-no The following students w e r e solicitors have been around yet. initiated into the organization: "Lucky" Steve Stemper has Phyllis Peters, Fred Regnier, and excited a little envy in classGrace Watkins. mates-seems since he will be A short business meeting was making speeches not only to felheld, and plans for .next month's low Peru classes but even to Austeak fry were discussed. burn pupils, his make-up work Officers were then elected for will not be as much as other stunext year. They were: Judy Milldents expected it wo.uld. "Lucky er, president; Keith Hawxby, Steve-sigh!" vice president; and Donna FranBasketball suits have b e en cis, secretary. Alan Wheeler, Judy Miller, traded in for track duds. The Linda Moore, Jerry Paden, and corner at the Park is a good restDonna Francis reported to the ing place, then you see another group the many phases of the group resting at Schneider's just convocation that they attended around the big curve, and even a few at Sayer's where the rock in Chicago. road cuts off. But they do runRefreshments were served. they have to get from one spot to the next! Have to wait for a meet to .see the results. And now we have the final spurt of rehearsals for the music The m e m b e r s of Tri Beta contest. An impressive list of enChapter held their month 1 y tries has gone in. This is also a meeting March 28, at 7:30 p.m. in track meet of sorts-getting from room 304 of the Science Building. one contest site , to another in · Plans were made to have a Auburn! steak fry at Waubonsie Park in Social note: Linda Stephens Iowa on April 25. This steak fry will entertain the Junior Class is replacing the usual Auto Clave after their efforts on the stage. Dinner. And that FHA group never have The group also discussed at- a dull moment: Nebraska City tending Pre-Med Day at the Uni- chapter entertained Peru, Neversity of Omaha and the meet- ~awka and Plattsmouth at a fun ing of the Academy of Sciences night Monday at the Ft. Teen at the University of Nebraska. Youth Center. Over 100 registered and really had FUN judging from the raves, although FOREIGN LANGUAGE CLUB come to think of it, the raves SEE MOVIES OF MEXICO The Foreign Language Club were as much about the Youth met Monday, March 28, at 8:30 p.m. in the administration building. Carol McLain introduced two movies about Mexico. The members then went to the music hall for a short business meeting and program. Several songs were sung by the Spanish and Russian students. Refreshments were served by the Spanish students, and the meeting TR2-2791 was adjourned.

The members of Miss Rowoldt's shorthand class have been taking timed writings. Emphasis is placed on shorthand speed rates and transcription rates. The following are those w h o have passed tests and the shorthand speed of their fastest teSt: Sharon Watton, 100 words per minute for five minutes; Ing a Faubion, Shirley Rhineshart, and Bob Raper, 80 words per minute for five minutes; and Mary Ann Graham, Sandra Hemphill, Linda · Hagan, J oAnn Eickhoff, and Chris Hays, 80 words per minute for three minutes. ·

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Dedication of

1

Larson Building

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 55

Number 13

APRIL 25, 1960

Larson Building Finished By Sept. 1 --Despite Strike

Political Parties In Student Senate Election For '60-'61 Political parties have been formed on the Peru State campus for the purpose of electing the Student Senate for the school year of 1960-61. The first step of the campaign was the formation of platforms. Wednesday, April 20, the three political parties attempted to meet the 75-signature requirement. The Progressive Party is headed by Al Wheeler and Donna Francis. A second party is sponsored by Drexel Harvey and Jack Johnson, Jerry Wanser and Ray Meister head the third party. After the 75 signatures have been obtained, each party will hold a caucus meeting. Candidates for president, vice-president, and the three members-atlarge will be nominated at each caucus meeting. Written certification from the party to the senior represen tati ves must be given after the candidates are nominated. The candidates names will then be placed on the ballot. The ~en i or representatives, which will govern the elections, are Tom Higgins, Carolyn Wing, Warren Dyke, and Phyllis Peters. Students should watch the bulletin boards for changes in the campaign and election dates.

This Afternoon Cornerstone Rites Today Brandenburg Will Speak

By Leroy Keyt Construction on .the four building projects on the Peru .campus was halted for 14 days, between Tuesday, March 29, and Tuesday, April 12. According to Dr. Neal S. Gomon, the college president, the Industrial Arts and Student Center buildings will be ready by September 1. The construction was stopped when pickets from Local 1190 first appeared at the site of the new A. V. Larson Industrial Arts Hall, the A. D. Majors Men's Hall, the Student Center, and the addition to Eliza Morgan Women's Residence Hall. The stoppage was the result of a dispute between labor union representatives and the Thomas Construction Co., St. 1.Joseph, Mo. The laborer's union wanted to unionize the Peru job, as well as other sites at which the Thomas Construction Co. was working. Similar strikes took place in Missouri and Kansas, as well as Nebraska. The strike was also a jurisdictional dispute, in that the Omaha local wanted to extend the i r control to this area. Additional men have been put on the job in order to meet the building deadlines. According to the present schedule, the we st addition to Eliza Morgan Women's Residence Hall will be ready for occupancy by June 1 and A. D. Majors Men's Hall by July 1.

At 2:30

Dr. Blanton and student teachers of the year: Leota Gebers, Wayne McFarland, Lynda Ehlers, Rosemary Rottman, Jerry Paden and Linda Moore.

Six Student Teachers Honored Science Head By Carol Ellenberger At the convocation Wednesday, April 13, 1960 six outstanding student teachers were honored for their ability and effort. Before the awards were presented, Dr. Blanton spoke and told the difference between a good teacher and a great teacher. When a teacher has "ability to recognize that all people love to achieve" he is a great teacher. He went on to tell how all people love to achieve and how the creativity of man sets him apart from the lower animals. Of the six honored s t u d e n t teachers, two were from the twoyear program and four were four year students. Ehlers One of the two year students was Lynda Ehlers. Linda has been active in WAA, SEAN, and Student Christian Fellowship. She is treasurer of White Angels, a cheerleader, and works in Special Services. Last year she was secretary of the Freshman class and in addition to being Homecoming Queen this year, she was an attendant at last year's May Fete and also the past two years at the Sweetheart Dance. Gebers Leola Gebers, the other twoyear student who was honored, is active in SEAN. Leola is a sophomore in elementary education.

Moore Linda Moore, a four year stuc dent, is a major in home econO!flics. Linda is President of W o m e n Student's Association and is a former social chairman of Morgan Hall. Linda has been a9tive in the Home Ee Club and served as vice-president. She was also a member of the debate team for three years. Other activities include Student Christian Fellowship and White Angels.

College Teacher Of The Year

By Sandra Pearson Mr. John Christ was chosen as College Teacher of the Year by the Student Educational Association of Nebraska of Peru. Mr. Christ received his B.A. degree from North Central College at Naperville, Illinois, and his M.A. degree from NorthwestMcFarland ern University. He taught high Wayne McFarland, a physical school science and biology in education and industrial arts ma- Illinois for fifteen years before jor, plans to attend the Univer- coming to Peru in 1946 as a biolsity of Illinois next year to work ogy teacher. on his masters degree. Wayne He has been studying in sumhas been a member of Student mer school since 1955 at which Senate and is president of Epsi- time he received a grant from lon Pi Tau. He is treasurer of the National Science Foundation SEAN and has participated in to study at the University of football all four years and bas- Minnesota. Last summer he studketball, track and baseball two ied at Oregon State College and years. this summer his study will take place in Italy. If all goes well, Paden Mr. Christ expects to receive the Jerry Paden is currently servPh. D. degree in 1960 at Bari, ing as president of SEAN. Jerry Italy. was a member of. the football Mr. Christ and his wife, a susquad and a member of Blue pervisor at the campus school, Devils. He has participated in the are the parents of two sons, Peru Chorus and the Peruvian James and John. Singers and has been active in Among his honors are being the intramurals. His majors are listed in American Men of Sciphysical education and English. ence and Who's Who in American Education. At present, Mr. Rottman Rosemary Rottman, another Christ is President of the Nefour year recipient, is a business braska College Conference and chairman of the biology section (Continued on page two) of the Nebraska Academy of Science. Memberships in Beta Beta Beta, an honorary biological society, N.E.A., N.S.E.A., Nebraska Ornithological Union, National Geographic Society, American Biology Teacher, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science are some of the activities which keep Peru's Mr. Christ busy. Mr. Christ has recently published articles in the American Biology Teacher and in the American Midland Naturalist; both of these are recent jtudies conducted at Minnesota and Oregon. Another of Mr. Christ's accomplishments is extensive travel in the United States, Canadfl, and Mexic9; this summer he expects to go t~ Europe. Having each student succeed (Continued on page two)

John Christ, Teacher of the Year

The cornerstone of the new A. V. Larson Industrial Arts Building on the Peru State Teachers College campus will be laid at 2:30 p.m. today. Named for A. V. Larson, a member of the Peru State faculty from 1926 until his retirement in August, 1958, the new $500,000 building is scheduled for completion by September 1, 1960. When Mr. Larson came to Peru State in February, 1926, he was the only member of the industrial arts faculty. At the time of his retirement, the staff included three members; and the Practical Arts Division, which he had served as head sin'e 1945, included eight members .., During his years at Peru State, Mr. Larson's name had become synonymous with industrial arts. Members ~ Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M~ Nebraska will be in charge of the cornerstone ceremony. Dr. William A. Brandenburg, president of Nebraska State Teachers College at Wayne, and Grand Orator of the Grand Lodge, will give the address. The April m e e tin g of the Board of Education of State Normal Schools will be held on the Peru State campus in conjunction with the event. State officials, civic leaders, and educators from the area have been invited to be guests. In addition to his instructional and administrative duties at Peru State, Mr. Larson served on a myriad of committees. For 25 years he was a member of the publication board for The Peru¡ vian, 52-year-old college yearbook. During his' final year on the Peru faculty, the Journalism Club created the A. V. Larson . award, which is presented annually to the student making the greatest contribution to the yearbook. Mr. Larson has served in numerous civic and community capacities during his years as a citizen of Peru. From 1933 until 1939 he was a member of the Town Board. He is a charter member and a past-president of the Peru Kiwanis Club. Before joining the Peru faculty, Mr. Larson was industrial arts instructor at Columbus High School for nine and one-half years. While there he planned the construction and equipment for the school's first industrial arts department. He was a member of the Wahoo High School faculty the previous two years. A native of Arapahoe, Mr. Larson received his Bachelor of Science in mechanical engineering degree from the University of Nebraska in 1914. He was granted the M.A. degree from the University of Minnesota in 1929. He has completed further graduate study at the University of Chicago and the University of Nebraska. He began his teaching career in the rural schools of Furnas county 52 years ago. Mr. Larson's memberships include Phi Delta Kappa, honorary education fraternity and Epsilon Pi Tau, industrial arts honorary. The Eta chapter of Epsilon Pi (Continued on page two)


Congratulations, Student Senate

Dr. George Schottenhamel hopes that the organization which left equipment and supplies in the east kitchen of the Music Hall will remove them soon so that work can begin on the radio station which will be housed in the kitchen.

The Ralph Marterie band apparently made a big hit with all who attended the spring dance-judging from observations at the dance and comments heard later. We can not remember having seen a larger or happier crowd at a PSTC dance. We believe that h a v i n g a "name" band on the campus was Robert Wayne McFarland, Pea morale booster for the student body and good advertising too. ru State senior, has received a quarter-time assistantship in the Guests received a favorable imfield of physical education for pression of PSTC. Decorations, music, crowd-everything w a s men to the University of Illinois. Wayne is the son of Mr. and Mrs. good. Earl McFarland of Sumner, Nebr. · Student Senate members, who His fields of concentration are promoted the dance and decoratindu.strial ar~s and physical eded the hall, are in line for pats ucat10n. He 1s also a member of on the back for the high class the Industrial Arts Club and Epentertainment they provided for silon Pi Tau, national honorary the rest of us. So are the Student industrial arts fraternity, of Senate sponsors, Miss Bradley which he is the current 1o c a 1 and Mr. Holmes, and Dr. Gomon, president. whose assistance made the afUnder this assistantship Wayne fair possible. If you liked t he will be teaching two c'l a s s e s dance, why not tell those who while taking graduate courses in worked to bring it about? preparation for his master's de-S. P. L. gree.

McFarland Has Assistantship To University of Illinois

Meister New Prexy Of Dramatics Club

Science Head College Teacher Of The Year

The Dramatics Club elected officers for next year at their meeting April 5·. Ray Meister, a sophomore from Humboldt, Nebraska, was elected president. Joni Wesolowski, a junior from Omaha, was elected vice president. Rose C 1an c y (Dawson, Nebraska) was elected secretary, while Allen Nelson (Colberg, Iowa) was e 1 e ct e d treasurer. Points chairman is John Parli. Each year the Dramatics Club gives a senior award to the senior man and/or senior woman whom the group thinks contributed most to the club. Candidates for this year's award were Harold Schmitz, John Okerlin, Ray Parde, Bob Mayo, Tom Higgins, Larry Carre, Helen Warford, Carolyn Wing, and Sue Moore. The winners will be announced and the awards presented at commencement. The program, presented by Mr. Holmes, Helen Warford, and Joni Wesolowski, proved to be very entertaining. With Miss Wesolowski as director, tryouts were held for the play "The Moon is Blue." Men were cast in female parts, women in male

(Continued from page one) in something if possible and trying not to feel as though his subjects are the only ones which are important are examples of the objectives of Mr. Christ as a teacher. When asked how he felt when he received the College Teacher of the Year award, Mr. Christ stated that he "was quite honored" but that "there are many good teachers who are mo re worthy."

Paintings By Norma Diddel Are On Display At Steinhart Lodge Water color and oil painting~ by Norma L. Diddel, associate professor of art at Peru State Teachers College, are on display in Steinhart Lodge in Nebraska City. The collection of landscapes of Colorado mountain scenes will be on display through the month of April. parts. Result: a very entertaining evening.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of ihe Campus of a Thousand Oaks Member Intercollegiate Press April 25, 1960 THE STAFF Co-Editor ----------------------------------Donna Francis Co-Editor ------------------------------Rosemary Rottman Sports Editor ---------------------------------Wally West Sports Reporter _____________________________ Jerry Osborne Sports Reporter ------------------------------Steve Parker Copy Editor --------------------------------Kathy Rhoten Copy Editor ----------------------------Martha Sue Moore Business Manager -----------------------------Al Bohlken Columnist ------------------------------------Gary Brown Columnist -----------------------------------Carolyn Parli Columnist ------------------------------Mary Anna Gnade Library Column ----------------------------Darlene Critel Exchange Editor ____________________________ Nancy Kunkel Convocations ------------------------------Sharon Watton·· Dramatics ________________________________ Joni Wesolowski Music ---------------------------------------Peggy McGee Church ----------------------------------Alice Greenwood Campus School News --------------------------Chris Hays Campus School Reporter ____________________ Elmer Antons Reporter ----------------------------------Sandra Pearson Reporter ______________________________ Mary Ann Lewellyn Reporter --------------------------------Carol Ellenberger

~ -----------~-------------------------Leroy Keyt ·"~-------------·---Leland Smith

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Marterie Band Played For Spring Dance

Lo The their April sity c nine: other point: and t total Thr ners terso won Wasl the l: feler Tb set mile Jim 7112"

Ralph Marterie and his Marlboro Orchestra made their appearance on Peru State Campus Tuesday, April 19. A large number of students and members of the community attended. The music seemed to be enjoyed by all as maneuvering around the crowded dance floor became rather__ difficult at times. The Student Senate was in charge of decorations. The i r theme, April Showers, was carried out with a rainbow and a pot of gold on the back wall of the gym, with umbrellas and raindrops hanging from the ceiling. . This was one of the highlights of the year on the Peru State Campus, and the dance was thoroughly enjoyed by all attending.

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(Continued ·from page one) Tau was organized on the Peru State campus in 1932 under Mr. Larson's leadership. It was the seventh of the 60 chapters now active. In 1935 Mr. Larson was aw:arded the Laureate Citation of the national headquarters for "his example as teacher, scholar and administrator in the field of industrial. arts education in the State of Nebraska." Professional memberships include: Mississippi Valley Manual Arts Conference, American Association of Industrial Teacher Trainers, American Industrial Arts Association, American Vocational Association, and the Nebraska Industrial Arts Association, of which he is a past-president. He is a member of the National Education Association and during his association with the Nebraska State Education Association has served as president and secretary of the Industrial Arts Section. Mrs. Larson is the former Wilhelmina Herold of Plattsmouth. Their children are Helen Margaret Seiger, Sea Cliff Long Island, N. Y.; Dr. Frank C. Larson, Associate Professor of Medicine, University of Wisconsin; Leonore Graf, Stratford, Conn. All three of the Larson children received their elementary and secondary schooling at the T. J. Majors Campus School and hold bachelors degrees from Peru State.

Absent·minded Professor r

Alpha Mu Omega Elects Officers The monthly meeting of A1pha Mu Omega was held the evening of April 11, 1960. The new officers for the coming year are: Steve Banks, president; Keith Hawxby, vice president; and Ellen Hunzeker, secretary-treasurer. The new members who were initiated into the organization were: Jack Broady, Dick Carlson, Jerry George, Gary Madison, Dale Pflaum, Ray Rice, L a r r y Hayes, Gary Schlange, Roland Sohnholz, John Biere, Dick Place, Bill Show, and Ken Humphrey. The picnic will be held on May Hl, and will feature a steak fry.

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people will forgive you almost anything if you just remember to bring along their favorite sparkling drink-ice-cold Coca-Cola. Do have another, professor!

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Pan American Day Festival Held April 13 Education and entertainment were provided at the Pan American Day Festival on Wednesday, April 13, 1960, at the Campus School Auditorium. This event was sponsored by the Latin American and Foreign Language Clubs under the direction of Dr. Dearth. A program consisting of music, skits and historical readings provided the entertainment for the evening. Some of the participants in the evening's entertainment were: mas·ter of ceremonies, Jim Yelnek; singers: Carol McLain, Julie Mayer, Herbert Peterson and Miss Frieda Rowoldt. Ray

Six Student Teachers Honored (Continued from page one) education and English major. Rosemary has been active in White Angels and SEAN. Other activities she has participated in are Sigma Tau Delta,· English honorary, and the Commercial Club. She is editor Of the Pedagogian.

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Not so absent-minded when you get right down to it. He remembered the most important item-the Coke! Yes,

Parde, Robert Kepler, Roger Wellensiek and Mrs. Schottenhamel rounded out the program with various skits and readings. There was a display of Latin American products and a picture of the various flags of the different Latin American countries. A contest was held to see who could answer correctly the proper country for the proper flag. The winner was Bill Meyer. A history book of Latin America was presented to him by Dr. Schottenhamel. Mrs. John Dearth prepared and served refreshments.

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Peru State Trackmen Lose Meet To Washburn The Peru State tra<:kmen lost their opening meet Wednesday, April 13, to Washburn University of Topeka. Washburn won nine first places and tied for another while rolling up 74 2/5 points. The Bobcats got six firsts and tied for another in gaining a total of 61 3/5 points. There were three double winners in the meet. Peru's Don Peterson, freshman from Richfield, won the .mile and two mile. Washburn's Jim Anderson swept the hurdles and sprinter Don Nyfeler slammed the sprint races. There were three new records set between the two schools: mile relay, Washburn, 3:32.2; Jim Cain, Washburn, discus, 140' 71/2"; and shot, 51' 2%". Summaries: 100 yd. dash-Roger Nyfeler, Washburn, Time 10.(}. 220 yd. dash-Roger Nyfeler, Washburn, Time 22.7. 440 yd. dash-Lanny Richards, Peru, Time 53.1.

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880 yd. run-Harry Mataya, Peru, Time 2:08.9. Mile run-Don Peterson, Peru, Time 4:48. Two-mile run-Don Peterson, Peru, Time 10.43. 120 yd. high hurdles-Charles Anderson, Washburn, Time 15.3. 220 yd. low hurdle.s-Charles Anderson, Washburn, Time 26.1. Mile relay-Washburn, Time 3:32.3. 440 yd. relay-Peru, Time 45.8. Shot put-Jim Cain, Washburn, Distance 51'21/4". Discus-Jim Cain, Washburn, Distance 140'71/2". Javelin-Bill Muncy, Washburn, Distance 187'. Broad jump-Ron Bingesser, Washburn, Distance 21'11/2". Pole vault-Robert Gibson, Peru, Distance 11'1(}". High jump-(Tie) Jerry James, Washburn, Ron Bingesser, Washburn, Starbuck, Washburn, Jack Head, Peru, Jack Johnson, Peru, Distance 5'10".

Delzell Doings By Gary Brown How did you like the dance? The musk wa:s great and just about everyone must have gone because Delzell suffered with another night of peace and quiet. As Easter vacation started last Thursday everyone tore out of the dorm in the afternoon a n d headed for home. It sure was a gay time. However, the gay mood changed Monday night as everyone came trudging back to good old Delzell.

Not everyone spent the Easter vacation at home. Kenneth Humphrey, for instance, spent his vacation in Minnesbta visiting his sister, who attended Peru a few years ago. Colorado or bust! A few of the boys used the vacation for a trip to Colorado. Clinton Blekher was the provider of the car, and he was accompanied by LaMarr Gibson, Bob Gibson, Galen Conn, and Larry Rebuck. The boys visited Denver and Boulder on their trip. Congratulations are in order. Rae Mae Henry and David Fulton have announced that they are pinned. Congratulations. Tom Higgins and Barbara Hill have announced their engagement. We wish you the best of everything, Barbara and Tom. "Without labor nothing prospers."-Sophocles.

VOTE PROGRESSIVE In the Student Senate Election See Donna Francis or Alan Wheeler lo join the Progressive Party.

OUR NAME EXEMPLIFIES OUR GOALS!

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Peru Splits Double-header With St. Benedicts

'Cats Win One And Lose One To Concordia Peru State split in their conference baseball double-header with Concordia College on April 12 at Peru. The Bobcats won the first game, 7-4, but lost the nightcap, 5-3. Peru is 1-1 in the conference race while Concordia is 1-3. Ron Kelly and Dave Fritch combined to tame the Bulldogs in the first game. Dick Gerber drove in two runs with a smashing triple in the 5-run fourth inning. Concordia grabbed an early lead and held it in the second game. The Bobcats could not get going until the fifth and sixth innings when they pulled up to a 4-3 count. Concordia scored

On Friday, April 8, Peru State opened their 1960 baseball season with a double-header against St. Benedicts of Atchison, Kansas. Ron Kelly pitched a brilliant five innings in the opener as Peru won, 6-1. Kelly allowed only one hit and struck out 10 men. The Bobcats ran out of gas in the second game and were defeated by a score of 8-2. The Peru batsmen could collect only three hits from the stingy St. Benedicts hurlers. Don Jackson, David Fritch, and Leonard Jacobs shared the pitching chores for the Bobcats. Drexel Harvey was the batting star for Peru, getting two for three in each game. R H E St. Benedicts_lOO 000 o_ 1 2 1 Peru ________ 110 301 x_ 6 8 1 Thirty 1960 degree and diploBatteries-Rottinghaus, V o s s ma candidates for May and (5), and Pufall; Kelly, Jacobs (6), August graduation a cc e pt e d and Gerber. W-Kelly. L-Rot- teaching positions for the 1960tinghaus. 61 academic year, according to RH E information released by Harold St. Benedicts_005 210 O_ 8 6 1 Johnson, director of placement at Peru ________ ooo 002 o_ 2 3 6 Peru State Teachers College. In Batteries-Shellenberger, Bun- addition, 19 alumni members of gard (6), and Pufall; Jackson , the placement bureau also have Fritch (3), Jacobs (6), and Ger- signed contracts for new posiber, D. Johnson. W-Shellen- tions. berger. L-J ackson. The candidates, their ho me town or present teaching address, and new locations include: 1960 diploma and degree candidates-Joe Verbeek, Firth, to Gretna; Lester Miller, Beatrice, . I Peru State's t enms team to Clatonia; Clyde Haskins, Fulldropped their opening m e e t erton, to Genoa; Carol . Buell Tuesday, April 12, .to Creighton Exeter, to Shickley; Caroly~ University 3-4 on the Peru Wing, Shubert, to Bellevue· Peggy McGee, Council Bluffs, t~ courts. The Peru points were rolled up Bellevue. by Dick Kunde, Fairbury senior, Judy Carlisle, Nebraska City, and Eldon Rossmiller, Fairbury to Millard; Lynda Ehlers, Nejunior, in singles matches and as braska City, to Ralston; Leota they teamed for their doubles Gebers, Auburn, to N em ah a match. county rural; Karen Stahlhut, Results: Nebraska City, to Millard; Mary Dick Kunde, Peru, defeated Jane Hahn, Tecumseh, to LakeFrank Bemis; Creighton, 6'-1, 6-1. wood, Colo.; Janice Korber, Ed Schultz, C, defeated Marvin Bern, Kans., to Topeka. Bergsten, P, 6-4, 6-2. Donna Penkava, Stella, to John Kellogg, C, defeated Jon Ralston; Kathleen Streich, PlattsPalmer, P, 6-3, 6-1. mouth, to Plattsmouth; Douglas Dave Manning, C, defeated Dickerson, Sumner, to Dalton; Roger Schumaker, P, 6-4, 6-3. DeLynn Kienker, Johnson, to Doubles: Wood River; Rosemary Rottman, Kunde-Rossmiller, P, defeated Pawnee City, to Omaha; Raburn Bemis, Schultz, C, 6-8, 8-6, 8-6. Benton, Malvern, Iowa, to MalKellogg-Manning, C, defeated vern, Iowa. Schumaker-Palmer, P, 6-4, 7-5. Helen Warford, Endicott, to

again .in the last frame and Peru <:ouldn't' close the gap. Joe Verbeek rapped out a solo home run in the fourth inning. R H E Concordia __ 200 002 o__ 4 8 1 Peru _______ 005 200 x __ 7 9 2 Freudenborg, Kunkel (5), and Hintz; Kelly, Fritch (6), and Gerber. W-Kelly. L-Freudenborg.

RH E Concordia __ 310 000 L_ 5 8 1 Peru _______ ooo 120 o__ 3 4 o Juergenson and Horn; Jackson, Fritch (6), and Verbeek. W-Juergenson. L-Jackson. HR -Verbeek.

Forty-nine Placed By Peru Bureau

Peru Loses First Meet To Creighton

James Levitt Attends Central States Speech Confere nee The Central States Speech Conference was held in Chicago April 8 and 9. Mr. James Levitt of the Peru Speech department attended this conference. The conference, i n v o 1v i n g eight states, consisted of sections on speech correction, college forensics, secondary school tea<:hing, teaching speech in wllege, theater, public address, interpretation, psychology of speech, discussion, business and industry, ministerial training, radio and television, Russian studies in speech, secondary school e x t r a curricular, reading hour, political speaking, elementary school teaching, speech in business ~nd industry, rhetoric and communications. Mr. Levitt said that those attending the conference w e r e concerned about the lack of integration between Eng 1 is h and speech in high school. They felt that both the English and speech departments should be encouraged to attain more knowledge about each other.

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Scottsbluff; Sue Moore, Peru, to Missouri Valley, Iowa; Warren Dyke, Tabor, Iowa, to Plattsmouth; Don Rademacher, Johnson, to Springfield; Marilyn Tynon, Peru, to Bratton Union; Jerry Paden, Seneca, Kans., to Smith Center, Kans. Ron Stoltenberg, N e bra ska City, to Springfield; Ray Parde,. Crab Orchard, to Leavenworth, Kans.; Elmer Antons, Odell, to Sterling; Fred Regnier, Diller, to Humboldt; Linda Moore, Nemaha, to Humboldt; Keith Richey, Hiawatha, Kans., to Winnebago. Alumni placements-Ned Eckman, Tecumseh, to Cozad; Harley Rector, Tecumseh, to Norfolk; Jerry Grancer, Wallace, to Fullerton; Lee Norris, Sabetha, Kans., to Augusta, Kans.; Sharon Ocker, Table Rock, to Diller; Carlton Rhoten, Palmyra, to Springfield; James Walz, Coleridge to Dodge; Eldon Teten, Dunbar, to State Department of Education, Lincoln; Julius Mueller, Hardy, to Winona, Kans.; Francis Rarick, Bratton Union, to Humboldt; Christian Kleine, Odell, to Auburn; Nancy Carr Dickerson, Johnson, to Dalton; Mary Jo Scharp, Omaha, to Auburn; Joan White Rademacher, York, to Kearney; Betty Ast, Beatrice, to Papillion; Harry Meeker, Orleans, to Hooper; Ron Case, Filley, to Elkhorn; Guilford Thomas, Bratton Union, to Elk Creek; Rolan James Axt, Laramie, Wyo., to Powell, Wyo.

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Prep Presents HThe Clock Struck Twelve" Symphonic Band Ensemble Campus School News The Campus School presented their annual junior class play in the college auditorium April 7. The play, entitled "The Clock Struck Twelve," was a comical mystery written by James Reach and directed by Tom Higgins and Sue Moore. The play centered around a haunted house inhabited by an eccentric old lunatic, Paul Heuer, who thought he was a millionaire. Elizabeth, his mother, was played by Elaine Gerdes. The plot becomes more complex when three singers, M a r y Ellen Wilson, Sara Jane Adams, and Kay Tripp, visited the house because of car trouble. Randy Hendrix, a neighbor, played by Jim Furnas, came to 1

SEAN Presented All-College Convo An all.co 11 e g e convocation, sponsored by the Student Education Association of Nebraska, was held on April 13, 1960. In-· formation concerning SEAN membership and the purpose of SEAN was given by Jerry Paden. Following this, Linda Moore introduced a skit which depicted the poor traits sometimes foUI).d in teachers. P or tray in g the teachers were Jane Deitl, R a e Mae Henry, Helen Warford, Jerry Wanser, and Jerry Collier. Jerry Paden introduced the six candidates for the Teacher of the Year award; Mr. John Christ was presented with the award. Other candidates were Miss Alma Ashley, Mrs. Ruth Mathews, Mr. J. D. Levitt, and Mr. George Rath. Chosen as outstanding student teachers were Leota Gebers, Lynda Ehlers, Linda Moore, Rosemary Rottman, Jerry Paden, and Wayne McFarland.

Bill Larson Awarded Defense Fellowship Bill Larson, former Peru State student has been awarded a three-year National Defense Graduate Fellowship to the University ~f Iowa at Iowa City. Bill, vtho had one year of college work here before transferring to the University of Nebraska, is now a senior at University of Nebraska, where he is a candidate for a Bachelor of Arts degree in June. Bill will begin study next fall

investigate the strange doings in the house, and revealed that Old Man Thomas, owner of the house, was murdered two years before to tlie very hour. At this time, Lucille Thomas, who has been in a mental asylum, portrayed by Linda Stephens, and Dick Thomas, the accused murderer, David Gomon, appear on the scene. Dick Thomas is searching for a note written by Lucille which will clear him of the charges. Slim Summers, the town constable, portrayed by Bob Gnade, discovers the note quite by accident. The neighbor is exposed as the real murderer, and Dick Thomas is set free. in the department of Speech and Drama.tic Arts. The fellowship provides a stipend of $2,000 the first year, $2,200 during the sec. ond, and $2,400 the third year. A graduate of the Campus High School, Bill is the son of Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Larson of Peru. Bill has two sisters, Mrs. Ronald Witt (Fran), a Peru State graduate, and Marilyn, a freshman at Campus High.

Steve Stemper Returns ~teve Stemper, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Stemper, returned Sunday, April 17, after a 10-day tour of London and Paris. Th e trip was sponsored by the Lincoln Siar. It was the grand prize Steve received for building up his Peru paper route for the Siar. Steve, who was one of sixty boys across the country who won similar trips .was very impressed with the sights of Europe. He had looked forward to his flight over to Europe and enjoyed it very much. One of the sights he saw was Bucl}ingham Palace and the changing of the guard. When he toured Paris, he saw the famous Louvre Museum, the Eiffel Tower, and other historic sights of the city. Steve was glad to get home again to his parents after his trip. He had many things to tell his family about the sights he saw and many pictures to show them.

"One cannot always be a hero, but one can always be a man"Goethe.

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The child care class under the I The 1960 Symphonic Band En- supervision of Mrs. Sproul, are semble went on their tour April holding a pre-school for 12 chil5, and journeyed to Pawnee City, dren. The pre-school is held in Tecumseh, and Syracuse. the kindergarten room from 2:30 The band opened each per- till 4:00, Monday through Thursformance with "March Opus 99" day. All the children will enter composed by Serge Prokofieff. kindergarten next fall. The preThe programs were divided in- school, lasting four weeks, is to to five sections: overtures, suites , teach the children to get along and tone poems which included with others and to prepare them "First Suite in E Flat" composed for regular school. by Gustav Holst, "Die Nact'' Card Party (The Night) composed by RichThe senior class card party was ard Strauss, and "Nabucco" com- held Tuesday, April 12, in the posed by Giuseppe Verdi; selecHome Ee room of the Campus tions which included "Windjam- school. Tickets were sold for fifty mer" composed by M or t o n cents, and all kinds of cards were Gould, "An American in Paris'' played. Cake and punch w er e composed by George Gershwilr served. The purpose of the party and "West Side Story" composed was to raise funds for the senior by Leonard Bernstein; concert trip. .Twenty-five dollars was marches with the selections "The raised. People's Choice" composed by Music Conies!: Douglas Moore and "March of The District Music Contest was the Three Oranges" composed by Serge Prokofieff; marches which held April 21 and 22, at Auburn. included the selections "The The entries from the Campus Foundation" composed by Rich- School were: the complete orard Franko Goldman and "March chestra; with string trio consistof the Steel Man" composed by ing of Tom Gomon, Dave Gomon, Charles S. Belsterling; and spe- and Sara Adams, cello solo by Dave Gom-0n, violin solo by Tom cialties. The specialties were a trumpet Gomon; the -complete band with trio, consisting of Larry Miller, special numbers; oboe solo by Henry Hinrichs and Robert Kais- Mary Ellen Wilson, trombone er, who played "Bugler's Holi- solo by Hanford Miller, French day" composed by Leroy Ander- horn solo by Sarah Adams, flute son and "The Three Trumpeters" trio with Linda Morrissy, Patty composed by G. Agostini. Larry Adams, and Donna Cox; brass Miller played "Concerto f o r sextet with Marshal Adams, Tom Trumpet" composed by iJoseph Boatman, Tom Gomon, Hanford Haydn and Richard Sietsema Miller, Sara Adams, and P au l played "Concerto for Horn" com- Stevenson; cornet trio with Marposed by W. A. Mozart. Mr. Alan shal Adams, Tom Boatman, Tom Kreglo also played a solo called Majors; clarinet quartet with "Melody" which was composed Mary Jarvis, Chery Combs, Linda Combs, and Steven Gnade; by Young V. Harper. horn quartet with Marsha AlLgood, Sara Adams, Elaine Gerdes and Anita Cox. The complete chol'.US with the boys' glee and New officers for the coming girls' glee, the madrigal group, year were elected by SEAN the girls' trio with Karen Mcinmembers. They are: president, tire, Sara Adams, and Mary JarFrancis Hajek; vice-president, vis; the triple trio with (altos) Linda Gooden; treasurer, Sandra Sarah Adams, Harlene Palmer, Craig; historian, Jeannie Ehlers. and Linda Applegate, (seconds) Mary Tynon reported on the Nancy Jarvis, Mary Jarvis, and state code of ethics committee Linda Morrissy, (sopranos) Karmeeting which met on Peru's en Mcintire, Donna Cox and campus March 12 with repre- Marsha Allgood; girls' s e x t e t sentatives from Wayne, Wesley- with Sara Adams, Harlene Palman and Peru. A code of ethics er, Mary Jarvis, Linda Morrissy, was written up by this commit- Karen Mcintire, and Marsha Alltee and will be voted on at the good. Paul Heuer sang a solo. spring convention, May 7. Peru Prom SEAN is planning to send repreThe Junior-Senior Prom is scheduled for Saturday, May 7. . sentatives to this convention. The FHA are planning a skating party for Friday, April 29.

Gifted Student Program Continued The summer program for gifted high school students between the junior and senior year, inaugurated last year, will be continued at Peru State Teachers College during the 1960 regular summer session, according to Keith L. Melvin, dean of the college. S t u d e n t s recommended by their superintendents or principals will be admitted as special students upon successful completion of classification tests to be given May 7. Students will enroll for the regular eight-week summer session, which will begin June 6 and continue through July 29. Only nine hours of college work may be' carried. The student's program, which will include beginning courses, will be determined by interests, hi g h school record, and test results. Only after graduation from high school will the college cred~ it earned be applied toward a college curriculum at Peru State or be transferred to another college.

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Phi Alpha Theta Initiates Members Phi Alpha Theta held two special meetings since the last regular meeting on March 15, 1960. The purpose of the first meeting was to select a research paper to submit at the Regional Meeting , at Omaha. The paper selected was written by Chuck Francis. The second special meeting on April 5, was concerned with the voting on the possible new members. Three persons were elected. Ted Kirbey, Jerry Wanser, and Keith Richy were initiated at the regular meeting on April 21.

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The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

Peruvian

Night

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 55

Number 14

May 10

MAY 9; 1960

May Fete Theme "May Day In Old England" Carolyn Wing, -- Shubert, and Jack Johnson, Loup City, were crowned Queen and King of the 1960 Peru State Teachers College May Fete Friday, May 6. The "May Day in Old England," theme carried out in songs, dancing and decorations, was presented at 6:30 p.m. Royal:ty

Rottman and Chambers Get Top Awards For Publications Work Two members of the Pedagogian and Peruvian staff received outstanding journalistic awards at the Publications Banquet held at Nebraska City, April 26. Senior Rosemary R o t t m a n , daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Rottman, received the Neal S. Gomon award as outstanding worker of the Pedagogian. Roesmary is a very active member of the school, majoring in business and English. She is a member of the White Angels, Kappa DeHa Pi, Sigma Tau Delta, and the Business Club. Rosemary is a member of

Publications Banquet Held April 26 At Steinhart Lodge The annual Publication's Banquet was held at Steinhart Lodge on Tuesday, April 26. Donna Francis p r e s e n t e d awards for outstanding work on the Pedagogian to Carolyn Parli, Sandy Pearson, Carol Ellenburger, Rose Clancy, Sue Moore, Kathy Rhoten, Wallace Wesit, Morris Keyt, Al Bohlken, Jane Kunkel and Jeannine Ehlers. An award was presented to Donna Francis by Mr. Linscheid. Lois Rowe, editor of the Peruvian, presented the awards to the outstanding members of the Peruvian staff. Those receiving awards were: Carol Ellenburger, Jeannine Ehlers, Kathy Rhoten, Rosemary Rottman, and Frances Lindell. Mr. Linscheid presented Lois with her award. The A. V. Larson plaque was presented to Glen Chambers for his work with the Peruvian as photographer. The Neal S. Gomon plaque was presented to Rosemary Rottman, who is co-editor of the Pedagogian this year. The guest speaker for the evening was Mr. R. D. Moore who spoke on "Functions of School Publications." Joni Wesolowski served as Mistress of Ceremonies for the evening. PERUVIAN NIGHT TO BE MAY 10 The a n nu a 1 Peruvian Night will be held on Tues· day, May 10, from 6:30 un· iil 9:30 in :the gymnasium. The yearbooks will be hand· ed ou:t :to ail s:tudert:ts at :this time.

S.E.A.N. and was recently chosen as one of the outstanding student teachers of the campus school. Rosemary has been on the Peruvian and Pedagogian staff for the past two years. Glen Chambers, another sen· ior, received the A. V. Larson award. Glen has been outstanding in the field of photography for the Pedagogian and Peruvian. Glen is majoring in math and physics, and is a member of Alpha Mu Omega. When he graduates, Glen is planning to work for Boeing Aircraft. He has a position in the experimental aerodynamics center.

Piano Ensemble Clinic Entertains Convo A piano ensemble clinic, under the direction of R. T. Benford, performed at the College Auditorium, Thursday, April 28. Featured in two, three and four selections were students from 10 high schools and were under direction of Mrs. Winnifred Easterday, Shenandoah, Ia., Mrs. Lucille Hicks, Stella, Mrs. Rachel Kerns, Humboldt; R. T. Benford. Students were Mary Beth Lavigne, Claire Ann Carpenter, and Ellen Kerns, Auburn; Myrna Oestmann and Lois Remmers, Johnson; Mary Lou Hicks, Kathleen Krouse, Karen A n n Masonbrink, Stella; Kath 1 e en Gerking, Talmage; Sara Adams, Peru; Lynette Olmsted, Coin, Iowa; Barbara Davis, Farragut, Iowa; and Sandra Hays, Riverton, Iowa.

Miss Wing, a S'enior in elementary education, and Mr. Johnson, a senior in biology and physical education, were selected by all-college balloting. Class Representatives

Elected class representatives were seniors-Phyllis Peters, Johnson, and Jerry Paden, Seneca, Kans.; juniors-Di an n e Schultz, Burchard, and Francis Hajek, Odell; sophomores--Jane kunkel, Falls City, and Drexel Harvey, Hartford, Ill.; freshmen -Sandra Pearson, Bellevue, and Tom Yopp, Wood River, Ill.

Masonic Lodge Lays Larson Cornerstone

By Leroy Keyt Cornerstone laying ceremonies of the A. V. Larson Industrial Ladies In Waiting Arts Building took place Monday Ladies-in-waiting inc 1u de d afternoon, April 25, at 2:30. Offifr e sh m e n Carol Ellenberger, cers of the Grand Lodge A.F. & Omaha; Connie Erisman, AubA.M. of Nebraska conducted the urn; Inga Faubian, Beaver Crossceremonies. ing; Alice Greenwood, Bartlett, The cornerstone laying opened Iowa; Sandra Hemphill, Nebraswith the formal invitation bJ ka City; Barbara Hill, Fremont; President Neal s,, Gomon to Most ,Mary Ann Lewellyn, Bellevue; Worshipful Joseph C. Tye, Grand . and Pamela Yost, Sumner. Master of Masons of Nebraska, to Flower Girls lay the cornerstone of the A. V. Flower girls and crown bearers Larson Industrial Arts Building were kindergartners from the T. in accordance with Masonic cusJ. Majors Campus School. Rhon- tom and usage. da Sayer, daughter of Mr. and ,Following the Grand Master's Mrs. Wayne Sayer, and Ricky introductory statement, Grand Palmer, son of Mr. and Mrs. Chaplain William P. Reid gave Harley Palmer, carried the regal the invocation. crowns, while Mary Masek, Peru State Teachers College's daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank male octette sang "Send Out Thy Masek, and Charlene Langham, Light" by Gounod. The singers daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Max were Alan Kreglo, John Parli, Langham, were flower girls. Richard Sietsema, Henry Henricks, Clark Maffitt, Eugene WalDancing Dances, under the direction of den, Larry Miller, and S t e v e Mrs. A. G. Wheeler, director of Parker. women's physical education deGrand Secretary Carl R. Greipartment, will include May Fires, sen read the list of deposits, Chimney Sweeps, Morris, Rib- which included the Holy Bible, born, Flamborough Sword, and · signatures of the Peru student the climax-the traditional May body and faculty, and an issue of ' pole dance. the "Peru Pointer." The Grand Treasurer deposited the casket in Songs Vocal music, directed by Dar- the cornerstone. ryl T. Manring, included a girl's The cornerstone placing was (Continued on page two) ordered by the Grand Master.

While the stone was being lowered, Peru ,Stat~'s band played "America 'the Beautiful," "National Emblem," and "Star Spangled Banner." Peru's male octette then sang "Liberty's Creation." Testing of the cornerstone was done by the Grand Master, the Grand Senior Warden, and the Grand Junior Warden. Following decoration of the cornerstone by the flower girls, the male octette sang "Proudly as the Eagle." William A. Br and e n burg, Grand Orator of the Grand Lodge and President of Nebraska State Teachers College at Wayne, gave the oration. Mr. Brandenburg pointed out that a building is more than mere bricks, stone, and mortar; that buildings may ennoble lives, or they may degrade lives. "The influence of A. V. Larson has been hard to measure," he said. "There is no end to the influence of a teacher." He concluded his remarks with the thought that A. V. Larson's influence will live on in the new industrial arts building. Peru's band played the closing ode "America," after which the Grand Chaplain gave the benediction.

President's Tea Held For Graduating Seniors The annual President's Tea for the graduating seniors was held on Sunday, May 1, in President Gomon's home. Miss Juanita Bradley, Dr. Harold Boraas, Dr. George Schottenhamel, and Dr. Neal S. Gomon greeted the guests as they arrived. Mrs. Harold Boraas, Mrs. Evenella Paradise, and Mrs. George Schottenhamel served refreshments of ice cream, mints, and coffee.

Mrs. Doris TenHulzen Chosen To Receive Sigma Tau Delta Award Mrs. Doris TenHulzen has been chosen to receive the Sigma Tau Delta Freshman Award for her informal essay, "The Food Addict" The award, which consists of a certificate of merit and $10 worth of books, will be presented at the awards convocation. (Continued on page two)


Presiding at serving fable in Eliza Morgan Hall is Joan Riggle, Endicoii. Being served are Mr. and Mrs. Lind Mayer, Julie and Robert.

All-College Open House A Big Success The annual All-College Open House was held the afternoon of Sunday, April 24, from 1:00 to 5:00 p.m. Both Eliza Morgan and Delzell Halls served refreshments and had the rooms open for inspection. All the departments were open to the visitors, with displays showing the activities of each division of the college. Faculty members were there to answer

LIBRARY SHORTS By Darlene Criiel Make Way for Music is a book written by Syd Skolsky. It is for the music lover who would like to sharpen his listening powers and know more about the music he hears. In clear and understandable style Make Way for Music offers the reader a practical working knowledge of the musical materials used by the composer; it presents graphically, in simple outlines, the standard musical patterns and forms; and it familiarizes the reader with the instruments that go to make up

any questions concerning pro- selections;' Judith Miller, violin solo; Carolyn Wing, Buddy Bookgrams of study. A variety s>how was held at walter, Ruth Carmichael, Larry the auditorium during the after- Vice, Jan Lillethorup, Wayne noon at 2:30 p.m. Linda Moore McFarland, dance contestants for and Jack Johnson, presidents of the Al Wheeler Dance Party. The purpose of Open House the dorms, acted as emcees. The following people participated in was to invite future students, the program: Steve Parker, piano their parents, and: parents of solo; Clark Maffitt, vocal solo; present students to visit our Ray Meister, Tom Higgins, Rose campus and to see its many, opClancy, Sue Moore, dramatic portunities. the orchestra. To give the reader a clear understanding of the great musical masterpieces, it provides an engrossing panoramic view of the times in which the composer lived. / Simply and without resort to technicalities, the reader is guid- · ed through many musical masterpieces of the standard orchestral repertoire. All is made as clear and effective as though he were holding in front of him the musical score. This book is dedicated to that great radio and phonograph audience who want to get the most out of what they hear, but are too busy for involved discourse or technical detail. Deep Is the Shadow is a dramatic novel written by G. Arnold Haygood. Richard Jordan, a special assignments newsman, felt no sense of danger when he traveled to Central City. Even

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of ±he Campus of a Thousand Oaks Member Intercollegiate Press May 9, 1960 THE STAFF Co-Editor ----------------------------------Donna Francis Co-Editor ------------------------------Rosemary Rottman Sports Editor ---------------------------------Wally West Sports Reporter -----------'------------------Jerry Osborne Sports Reporter ------------------------------Steve Parker Copy Editor --------------------------------Kathy Rhoten Copy Editor ----------------------------Martha Sue Moore Business Manager -----------------------------Al Bohlken , Columnist ------------------------------------Gary Brown Columnist -----------------------------------Carolyn Parli Columnist ------------------------------Mary Anna Gnade Library Column ----------------------------Darlene Critel Exchange Editor ----------------------------Nancy Kunkel Convocations ------------------------------Sharon Watton Dramatics ------------- ___________________ Joni Wesolowski :M:usic ---------------------------------------Peggy McGee Church ----------------------------------Alice Greenwood Campus School News --------------------------Chris Hays Campus School Reporter --------------------Elmer Antons Reporter ----------------------------------Sandra Pearson Reporter ------------------------------Mary Ann Lewellyn Reporter --------------------------------Carol Ellenberger Reporter --------------------------------------Leroy Keyt Reporter ------------~-----------------------Leland Smith Sponsor -------------·--·--------------Stewart P. Linscheid

when he went calling on an old acquaintance, the lovely niece of the local multi-millionaire construction man, he still imagined he would be digging away at a feature story-one he'd chosen himself-about a noted psychiatrist's work in human rehabilitation. But a sudden explosion of maliciously planned terror and tragic death jarred Richard Jordan from his routine· assignment into a lurid nightmare. With only the bright promise of a woman's love to support him, Jordan began a perilous one man search for the evil force who cast a palling shape across men's lives-a shadow of fear that sealed lips, cloaked murderers, and had held the threat of vicious reprisal over the head of everyone in Central City for over ten years. It Takes One ±o Know One is the Joey Adams do-it-yourself laugh kit. "Laugh and the world laughs with you-but only if the joke is good. If you want to 'make funny' for the people you must be prepared for battle," says Joey Adams. Here, from a master comic, are the secrets of success in the joke-telling game. With devastating a c cur a c y, Joey anatomizes the styl~s of today's funny men. He· also investigates the components of comedy and gives valuable tips on joke telling-such as sizing up an audience, switching, introducing a gag, topical jokes, and the monologue. Five detailed examples of Joey's stock-in-tradethe monologue-are included: on Alaska ("I love God's frozen people but I get a chill when I open the refrigerator"); Texas ("There is a movement afoot to teach Texas school children how to spell 'small' "). Finally, for all readers, Jo e y presents Joey's "Portable Gag File," a virtual dictionary of jokes for all occasions.

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May Fete Theme "May Day In Old England" (Continued from page one) sextet singing "Now is the :M:onth of Maying," :M:orley, and a vocal solo, ":M:ay Day Carol," Taylor, by :M:arilyn Wright. The sextet included Joyce Carman, Tecumseh; Sharon Haile, Nebraska City; Sandra Hemphill, Nebraska City; Jan Lillethorup, Omaha; Edna McGovern, Nebraska City; :M:arilyn Wright, Table Rock. Master of Ceremonies was R. D. Moore, head of the division of language arts. Other principals of the pageant were heralds, Carol :M:ordah, Shubert, and Virginia Van Winkle, Dawson. John

Okerlin, Clarinda, Iowa, jester. There was d a n c i n g 9-12:00 p.m.

Mrs. Doris TenHulzen Chosen To Receive Sigma Tau Delta Award (Continued from page one) :M:rs. TenHulzen, a night-class student in :M:r. Holmes composi· tion class, is from Auburn. Each year Sigma Tau Delt holds a contest to determine th winner of the Freshman Award This year contestants wrote es says. The contest was open to al freshman students.

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wmg ana Jonnson ·King and Queen Of The May Carolyn Wing, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Wing, was named Queen to reign at Peru's annual May Fete Dance held May 6, 1960. Miss Wing comes to Peru from Shubert, Nebraska, where she graduated from high school in 1957. Now a senior, Carolyn's . major field of concentration is elementary education. After attending Peru State for three years and two summer sessions, Carolyn will graduate in July of this year. She has signed a contract to teach in the Bellevue Public Schools, Bellevue; Nebraska, at the elementary level. The queen is kept quite busy with many activities: she is secretary of the Dramatics Club, secretary of Student Senate, a member of Kappa Delta Pi, White Angels, S.E.A.N., and the dorm council of Eliza Morgan Hall. Also vying for Carolyn's \ time earlier in the year was her role in the spring play, Brief Music. Being a candidate for Homecoming Queen and Sweetheart Queen, Carolyn got a small sample of how being queen would feel but when it happened to her she was still surprised and felt it to be an honor. Miss Wing's attendants were Phyllis Peters, a senior from Johnson, Nebraska; Di an n e Schultz, a junior from Burchard, Nebraska; Jane Kunke 1, a sophomore from Falls City, Nebraska; and Sandra Pearson, a freshman from Bellevue, Nebraska.

l~CILIUllcll' IVIU~IC

Was Big Success

1959 Queen Rose Clancy, Dawson, crowns Miss Nygaard. Standing, left to right: Yost and Wright.

Linda Nygaard Wins Miss

A~burn

The first appearance of the contestants was in evening dress. Talent of the participants was displayed in the second portion. Marilyn Wright was the first to perform with her presentation of the song "Love Is Where You Find It." Pam Yost gave a dramatic reading from Our Town; Mary Ann Lewellyn presented a song and dance routine of "I Love My Baby;" "Here We Are" was a humorous reading given by Sandra Stephens. Two modern dances were presented: Linda Nygaard danced to "Quiet Village". and Lois Fritz performed the "St. Louis Blues." Beverly Parde sang the song

Five Peru co-eds captured top honors in the Miss Auburn Pageant sponsored by the Auburn Junior Chamber of Commerce on April 24, at 7:30 p.m. The young lady chosen as winner by the foµr judges was Miss Linda Nygaard, a freshman from Omaha. Misses Pam Yost of Sumner, and Marilyn Wright from Table Rock were first and second runners-up, respectively. Mary Ann Lewellyn of Bellevue and Sandra Stephens of Peru completed the top five. Other competitors were Lois Fritz, Omaha; Beverly Parde, Pickrell; Nancy Sears and Bette Coulter, both of Auburn. ,/

King Jack Jack Johnson, son of Mrs. Elenora Johnson of Loup City, Nebraska, was elected king of the May and reigned over the festivities at the annual May Fete Dance held May 6. Other such honors Jack has received was being Sweetheart King last year and an attendant this year at the Sweetheart Dance. Jack participates in a variety of activities. He is a member of the Blue Devils and the P Club and he also serves on Student Senate. Other activities include being president, of the Dorm Council and recently b e i n g pledged to the Dramatics Club. Sports have played a large part in his college life as he has been on both track and basketball teams for two years and has lettered in each. He holds the school high jump record at 6' 21/z ". After graduation n ex t spring, he plans to coach.

WHISPERS FROM MORGAN By Carolyn Parli Hurrah! Vacation is just around the corner-no more lessons, books, or teachers' stern looks. Summertime will soon be here and everyone will be drifting his different way. Mount Vernon has seen its last days. Let us have a moment of silent meditation in honor of the old building. It seems sad to see it torn down, but everything must go sometime, and now is the time! Open House must have been a tremendous success, j u d g i n g from the looks of all the empty tea cups and cookie trays afterwards. You should have seen

Harlan Returns From Canadian I. A. Conference Dr. Owen Harlan, Professor of Industrial Arts and Head of the Division of Practical Arts at Peru State, has returned from Toronto, Canada, where he was an active participant in the -convention of the American Industrial Arts Association. "I was particularly impressed by the progress made by the Canadian schools during the past decade," he said. "This is especially evident in the industrial arts program, where welltrained teachers, well-equipped shops, and artistically designed projects have replaced the meager programs of 10 years ago." This being the first convention of the AIAA to be held outside the United States, the theme was " Promoting International Understanding Through Teacher Education." Since Dr. Harlan had two years of experience teaching in

vveel\

foreign lands, he was called upon to act as chairman of a panel discussion, "Global Geography and the Industrial Arts Program." He also gave a speech on "Developing an Industrial Arts Teacher-Training Program for the Union of Burma." This was illustrated by a number of colored slides which Dr. Harlan took during his assignment in Burma. He acted as a consultant to the Ministry of Education of the Union of Burma from 1955 to 1957 under the Fulbright Program. Dr. Harlan reports that the week was a very busy one. In addition to the above, he acted as judge of the ballot for the election of new officers for the Association. He returned to Omaha just in time for meetings of the Nebraska Industrial Arts Association on Friday evening and Saturday.

those future homemakers d o their spring deaning. W h a t would we do without Open House-have a dirty room all year round! We've done it again! Another Peru coed has been crowned Miss Auburn-Linda Nygaard. The girls who took first and second place were Pam Yost and Marilyn Wright, respectively. Other girls in the dorm participating were Lois Fritz, Bev Parde and Mary Ann Lewellyn. The girls having birthdays these last few weeks are Marilyn Wright, Patsy Melcher, Pat Rathe, Beverly Farmer, Janet Bertram, Carolyn Parli, Susan Hulbert, Linda Goodin, Barbara Wellensiek, J o a n Votroubek, Lynda Ehlers and Mary Ann Lewellyn. Sounds as if that "ole spring fever" is, doing its job. Several girls have been seen flashing diamonds on their fingers. The engaged girls are Barbara Hill from Fremont, Nebraska, to Tom Higgins from Valley, Nebraska; Rae Mae Henry from Plattsmouth, Nebraska, to David Fult()n from Wood River, Illinois; Carolyn Wing from Shubert, Nebraska, to Larry Law, who is stationed at the Air Force Base in Omaha; Gladys Monahan from Palmyra, Nebraska, to Pat Mahoney from Sterling, Nebraska, who is stationed at San Diego, California. Some of the girls on second floor had a party for Linda Nygaard to celebrate her becoming Miss Auburn. The climax of the evening was when Linda got thrown in the tub. Carolyn Wing was also thrown in the tub to celebrate her engagement. Third floor had a little excitement this week when they tried to throw Gladys Monahan and Barbara Hill in the tub. Seems as though the girls weren't too happy about the whole deal. The girls had a dorm meeting Tuesday night, May 3, at 10:30, to elect officers for next year.

Pageant

"One Kiss," and another song was presented by Bette Coulter. Miss Sears gave a reading. Following the display of talent, the girls appeared in bathing" suits for the third part of the program. After the top five contestants had been chosen, they were individually asked a series of questions by which final judgment was made. Miss Rose Clancy, a Peru State junior and "Miss Auburn of 1959" performed the coronation which made Lind a Nygaard "Miss Auburn of 1960," and a 1 contestant in the Miss Nebraska contest.

Student Wives Club Elects Officers For Coming Year Peru's Student Wives Club met Monday, April 25, at 7:15 p.m., in the Campus School Home Ee. Department. Seventeen members were present. At the beginning of the meeting, Herbert Brown took pictures of the officers and members, which will be placed in next year's "Peruvian." The members then caravaned to the Science Hall, where a brief talk was given by Mrs. Ruth Mathews. Two films, "Human Beginnings" and "Labor and Childbirth," were viewed. Election of· officers for the 1960-61 school year was held. Officers elected are as follows: Mrs. Jack Hardy, president; Mrs. Ted Kirby, vice-president; Mrs. Dwight Anderson, secretary; Mrs. Ross Pilkington, treasurer; Mrs. Leroy Keyt, reporter; Mrs. Ronald Leitschuck, p r o g ram chairman; Mrs. Al Bohlken, refreshment chairman; Mrs. Mike Roach, historian; and Mrs. Ted Kirby, project chairman. The May project for the club is to clean up an area south of Oak Hill for a playground-picnic area. Clean-up day was April 30. Plans were made to have a picnic for the members and their families. The picnic will be held at Waubonsie Park, Sunday, May 15. The meal will be eaten at 4 p.m. Each member bring food, service and drink for own family. Refreshments were served by Mesdames Dwight Anderson, Joseph Verbeck and Keith Richey. The girls elected are Linda Goodin, president; Pat Rathe, secretary-treasurer; R6'se Clancy, vice president. A surprise wedding shower was held for Virginia Garton at Marian Anderson's home. She received many useful gifts. Several of the girls in the dorm were in charge of the shower.

National Music Week activities were officially begun on Peru Campus May 1. The nucleus of what is hoped to b e c o me a Southeast Nebraska CommunityCollege orches.fra presented a concert in the college auditorium May 1 at 4:00 p.m. The orchestra was under the direction of Victor H. Jindra. During the past several years, the number of string students in college has dropped sharply, making the supply of violinists, celloists, and other string players quite low. The college orchestra was reenforced by violinipts from Auburn and Nebraska City as well as from the Peru Campus School. The orchestra's program consisted of: overture, "Ipheginia in Aulis" by Gluck, a flute solo by Bonnie Vanderford,, "Menuetto From LiArlesienne Su~te" composed by Bizet, "London Symphony" composed by Haydn, a cornet solo by Robert Kaiser, "A Trumpeter's Lullaby" 'composed by Anderson, "Country Dance in C" composed by Beethoven, a violin solo by Judith Miller, "Czardas" composed by Monti, "China Doll" by Anderson, "The Typewriter" soloed by Frieda Rowoldt and composed by Anderson, and R. T. Benford presented a piano solo, "Concerto in G Minor" by Mendelssohn. Middle of the week musical activities 'included a symphonic band ensemble concert, under the direction of Gilbert E. Wilson, on Tuesday, May 3, at 8:00 p.m. in the college auditorium. Included in the program were: Mard "Opus 99" by Serge Prokofieff, "Overture for Band" by Felix Mendelssohn, "Concerto for Trumpet" soloed by Larry Miller and composed by Joseph Haydn, "Witch Doctor" composed by Richard Bowles, "Melody" by Young V. Hkrper with Alan Kreglo as soloist, "West Side Story" by Leonard Bernstein, "Concerto No. 1, First Movement" composed by W. A. Mozart and soloist was Richard Sietsema, and the final selection was "March of the Steel Men" composed by Charles S. Belsterling. Also in the week was a concert choir presentation of songs featured on their tour. The group performed May 5, 8:00 p.m. in the college auditorium under the direction of Mr. Manring. Selections included: "He Watching Over Israel" frbm Elijah, composed by Mendelssohn, "O Magnum Mysterium" arranged by Joseph W. Clokey, "O Man Thy Grief and Sin Bemoan" by Rodgers and Hammerstein, "John Henry" arranged by L i o n el Wood, "There Shall a Star From Jacob" by Mendelssohn, "The Last Words of David" by Randall Thompson, "Ave Maria" by Anton Bruckner, "Negro Bell Carol" by Willis L. James, "Oh! Lemuel!" arranged by Roger Wagner, "My Fair Lady" choral selections by Lerner· and Loewe, and the final selection w a s "Dream" composed by Johnny Mercer. The choir program consisted of solos from Marilyn Wright, Clark Maffitt, Joyce Carman, and Richard Sietsema. The male quartet and also the girls' sextette performed at this event. DRAMATICS CLUB INITIATES MEMBERS The Peru Dramatics Club initiated its new members on Sunday night, May 8. New members are: Sandy Stevens, Jack Johnson, Steve Parker and Julie Mayer. Immediately following the initiation, a steak fry was held at Neal Park in Peru.


JacK Jonnson t1ecrna

Student Senate Head

Commencement Speaker Alexander J. Stoddard served as Superintendent of Los Angeles City Schools from August 1948 until his retirement on July 1, 1954. Prior to that time, he served as Superintendent of Schools at, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Denver, Colorado; Providence, Rhode Island; Schenectady, New York; Bronxville, New York; Beatrice, Nebraska; and Newman Grove, Nebraska. He began his educational career as a rural school teacher in Nebraska, was later a principal of an elementary school, prindpal of a high school, and then s er v e d as superintendent of schools in small and large cities. He is a graduate of the Peru State Teachers College and the University of Nebraska (B.S. in 1922) and Teachers College, Columbia University (A.M. 1924). .. He has been granted honorary degrees from various institutions, including the Rhode Island' College of Education (Ed. D. 1932); Beaver College (L.H.D. 1939); Temple University (L.L.D. 1939); University of Nebraska (L.L.D. 1940); University of Pennsylvania (L.H.D. 1940); Bucknell University (L.L.D. 1947); Occidental College (L.L.D. 1949); and College of Osteopathic Physicians and Surgeons (L.H.D. 1954). He studied law at the University of Michigan. Dr. Stoddard served as a member of the Connecticut Faculty of the Summer School at Yale, of of the Summer School Faculty of Teachers College, Columbia University, and lectured at the University of Panama. He served as President of the American Association of School Administrators in 1936; was chairman of the Educational Policies Commission from 1936 to 1946; was a member of the educational mission to Japan to advise with General MacArthur on the reorganization of the Japanese school system; was chairman of the Superintendents of Larger City School Systems from 1946 to 1954; was a member of the Pacific Coast Committee of the American Council on Education; and also served as a member of several other national committees and commissions. For eighteen years he was a member of a commission which pioneered in the development of educational sound pictures, for three years was a member of a commission which was concerned with the promotion of air age education research, and for several more years was a member of a national commission which carried on research and formulated a program for dealing with economic illiteracy. His professional activities have included authorship of textbooks and numerous magazine articles. He has lectured before educational and lay groups in practically all of the states of the country. He has vigorously championed the cause of public education and the functions of the schools in relation to our coun-

Baccalaureate Speaker Dr. Paul W. Dieckman, president of Midland College, Fremont, Nebraska will be baccalaureate speaker. He holds the following degrees: AB from Muhlenberg College, BD from Philadelphia Lutheran Theological Seminary, STM from Philadelphia Lutheran T:p.eological Seminary, DD from Wagner College, and LLD from Muhlenberg College. Dr. Dieckman held Lutheran pastorates at Easton, Pennsylvania, Detroit, Michigan; he was pastor for Lutheran Students in Greater Chicago and Lakeland, Florida. He was vice-president of Wagner College, Staten Island, New York, from 1947 until 1951 and has been president of Midland College since 1952. Dr. Dieckman is past president of the Nebraska Independent College Foundation, vice-president of the Fremont Rotary Club, a member of the Education Committee of the Fremont Chamber ·of Commerce, a member of the/ Blue Key and Kappa Phi Kappa.

Lee Rottman Awarded Assistantship to Indiana State Teachers College Lee Rottman, senior at Peru State Teachers College, has been awai::ded a $1500 graduate assistantship in Industrial Arts at Indiana State Teachers College, Terre Haute. Under the assistantship for the 1960-61 academic year, Rottman will pursue graduate work in industrial arts toward the master's degree, according to Sylvan Yager, chairman of the industrial education department at Indiana Teachers. A May candidate for graduation with majors in industrial arts and mathematics, Rottman was graduated from Table Rock high school in 1955. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Rottman of Pawnee City. While a student at Peru State Teachers College, Rottman has been a member of the Industrial Arts Club, the Peru chapter of Student Education Association, Epsilon Pi Tau, honorary industrial arts fraternity, and Alpha Mu Omega, honorary mathematics fraternity.

An all-college convocation was held April 28, 1960 to annomice the names of those students campaigning for various Student Senate offices and membership. Short speeches were given by members of each party to present and explain their platforms. The following were the parties and their candidates: Esoteric Party-president, Jack Johnson; vice-president, Jeannine Ehlers; aiid- members-atlarge, Joan Riggle, Chick Stessman and Bob Fisher. Liberal Expansionist Party-president, Jerry Wanser; vice-president, Dick Neale; a,n d members-at-large, Rose Clancy, Ray Meister, and Eric Torring. Progressive Partypresident, Al Wheeler; vice-president, Keith Hawxby; and members-at-large, Karen Fankhauser, Tom Brown and Francis Hajek. Elections were held Monday, May 2, with the following results: president, Jack Johnson; vice-president, Jeannine Ehlers; and members-at-large, Chick Stessman, Bob Fisher and Eric Torring. Student Senate class representative will be chosen Thursday, May 4.

White Angels Elect Officers The White Angels met Monday, April 25, in the basement of Morgan Hall. The purpose of the meeting was to elect officers for next year: The results of the election are: president, Joni Wesolowski; vice-president, Marilyn Monroe; secretary, Rita Grandgenett; treasurer, Carol Ellenburger; and point chairman, Connie Erisman. The new officers took charge of the meeting held May 2. It was decided to have the White Angel dinner on May 16 at Ulbricks in Nebraska City. WIVES GIVE BANQUET FOR THEIR HUSBANDS The Peru Student Wives banquet was held for their husbands Friday, April 29, at Steinhart Lodge in Nebraska City. Twentyfive members and their husbands attended despite rainy weather. Diners had their choice of steak, fried chicken, shrimp, rainbow trout, and northern pike. After the repast, dancing was enjoyed. The music came from a hifi phonograph furnished by the lodge.

N1nety-six ~tudents Will Receive Diplomas Ninety-six candidates await May 27, at which time they will receive their diplomas. This year one Masters Degree will be given, 68 Bachelors Degrees, and 27 two-year diplomas. The majority of the future graduates c om e from the tri-state area, Kansas, Iowa and Nebraska; however there are also graduates who came to Peru from New Jersey, Illinois, Ohio and New York. The Master of Science Degree will go to Tom Whitney from Pawnee City. Those who will receive Bachelor of Arts Degrees (Liberal Arts) are: Marie Antalek, Irvington, New Jersey; Glen Chambers, Bennet; Paul DeVries, Douglas; Charles Francis, Council Bluffs, Iowa; Raymond Parde, Crab Orchard; and Donald Wilhelm, Auburn. R.ichard Sietsema, Tabor, Iowa will receive a Bachelor of Music in ;Education Degree. the Bachelor of Arts Degrees in Education will go to: Elmer Antons, Odell; Larry Carre, Beatrice; David Fulton, Wood River, Illinois; Tom Higgins, Valley; Rober Hoback, Nebraska bty, Nebr.; Danie Jones, Douglas; Alan Kreglo, Auburn; Lester Miller, Beatrice; Sue Moore, Peru; Herbert Peterson, Omaha; Rosemary Rottman, P a w n e e City; Helen Warford, Endicott; and Howard Wells, Tabor, Iowa. The Degrees of Bachelor of Science in Education will go to: Gary Anderson, Hamburg, Iowa; Mrs. Marian Anderoon, Hamburg, Iowa; Duane Arends, Manley; Vernon Aylor, Plattsmouth; Lee Becker, Peru; Jerry Beckmann, Diller; Raburn Benton, Malvern, Iowa; Janet Bertram, Falls City; John Bookwalter, Lawrence, Kansas; Harry Bryant, Oberlin, Ohio; Jerry Collier, Falls City; Douglas Dickerson, S u m n e r ; Warren Dyke, Thurman, Iowa; Terry Forney, Tabor, Iowa; Carol Gawart, Nebraska City; Mary Hahn, Tecumseh; Milan Hawxby, Nemaha; Henry Hinrichs and Donald Jackson, Nebraska City; Donald Kasbohm, Dunbar; Delynn Kienker, Johnson; Richard Kunde, Fairbury; Nancy Kunkel, Falls City; Duane Lewis, Nebraska City; Robert McFarland, Sumner; Earnest Madison, Adair, Iown; Mrs. Opal Martin, Union; Mrs. Margaret Markel, Nebraska City; Robert Mayo, Brooklyn,

New York; Mrs. Edna Moore, N maha; Linda Moore, Nema John Okerlin, Clarinda, Io Gary Olson, Rulo; Jerry Pad Seneca, Kansas; Don Rademac er, Tecumseh; Freddie Regni Diller; Lee Rottman, Pawn City; Lois Rowe, G 1 en w o o Iowa; Christian Salberg, Loui ville; Rand Schumaker, Omah Donald Stange, Cairo; Mary A Steinbrink, Falls City; Rona Stoltenberg, Nebraska City; w· liam Tulk, Horton, Kansas; Mar lyn Tynon, Peru; Donald Week Fairbury; Wallace West, Lincol Mrs. Margaret Winkler, Tabo Iowa. The following will their two-year diploma mentary Education: Gail. A krom, Stella; Sharon Bates, B chard; Rita Bosworth, Nebrask City; Carol Buell, Exeter; Ju Carlisle, Nebraska City; Carmichael, Nemaha; Linda lers, Nebraska City; Virgin Garton, Diller; Leota Gebers, Au burn; Mrs. Kay George, Auburn Nancy Gerdes, Auburn; Caro Glather, Humboldt; Ve 1 vet t Gottula, Tecumseh; Rae Ma Henry, Plattsmouth; Carol Ken nedy, Brock; Raylene Mille Elmwood; Mrs. Carol Mordah Shubert; Mrs. Irene Ogle, Daw son; Kar Parli, Pawnee City Donna Penkava, Stella; Charlen Rohlmeier, DuBois; Mrs. Jun Ross, Nehawka; Mrs. Barbar Snow, Auburn; Karen Stahlhu Nebraska City; Mrs. The 1m Stalder, H um b o 1 d t ; Richar Stock, Nebraska City; and Kath leen Streich, Murdock.

Concert Pianist Gives Concert Mr. Albert Huetteman, a con· cert pianist, was guest of Peru State Teachers College music department and performed at the all college convocation, Wednesday, May 4. Mr. Huetteman, who is instructor of piano at Hastings College, has made many appearances on television and has played as soloist for the Boston Pops Orchestra. For his selections, he played the first movement of Beethov- · en's "Sonata," excerpts from Schumann's "Papillion," and three preludes from "Book Two" of Debussy.

Tri Beta Has Steak Fry On April 25, the members and guests of Tri Beta journeyed to Waubonsie Park in Iowa for a steak fry. Twenty members and guests were present. After the meal everyone enjoyed playing Frisbee. try's purposes. He has traveled into all parts of the country, many times, and has come to know American education intimately at all levels and in all sections of the nation.

On April 25 the Normal Board met on !:he Peru Campus for the first time since 1957 when the board were guests a± the college 90ih anniversary convocation. Left to right, seated: A. D. Majors, Omaha; Carl Spelts, Kearney; Mrs. Haven Smith, Chappell; Freeman Decker, Lincoln. Standing: Dr. Neal S. Gomon, Peru: Dr. William A. Brandenburg, Wayne; John T. Bressler, Jr., Wayne; Dr. Herbert L. Cushing, Kearney; Dr. Barton Kline, Chadron; Bruce Hagemeister, Hemingford; Bernard M. Spencer, Nebraska City; E. Albin Larson, secretary, Lincoln; Wanda Hendriksen, Lincoln, secretary to E. Albin Larson.


Peru Wins Double Header From Midland Warriors 1·

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The Peru State Bobcats swept a double header· from the Midland Warriors at the Midland diamond on April 26. Peru won the first game, 8-5, and the second game by a score of 10-2. Larry Gilson clouted a 2-run homer in the first inning to put Peru ahead, but Midland forged past the Bobcats in ·the fifth inning by a score of 5-4. Ron Kelly then relieved starting pitcher Roger West, and received the credit for the win as Peru went

ahead! and won. In the nightcap, Peru use d power hitting and tight pitching to conquer the Warriors. Drexel Harvey and Roger Smirth b o t h hit home runs, and Harvey ended up with 4 for 4 from the plate. Don Jackson pitched five innings and gained credit for the win. David Fritch and Leonard Jacobs finished the pitching chores for the Bobcats. Peru evened their conference record to 3 and 3 with these victories.

Peru Tennis Downs Doane

Peru Baseballers Lose To Northwest Missouri State

The Peru State Tennis team scored a 5-2 win over Doane Friday, April 22. The Peru squad swept both doubles matches while Bergsten, Palmer, an d Schumaker won their singles match. Resulis: Dick Nohavec (D) defeated Dick Kunde (P) 2-6, 6-4, 6-2. Marvin Bergsten (P) defeated John Dudley 6-3, 6-4. Jon Palmer (P) defeated Jim Sedwick 6-0, 6-1. Roger Schumaker (P) defeated Milt Bower 6-3, 3-6, 6-4. George Davenport (D) defeated Eldtm Rossmiller 6-4, 6-4. Doubles: Kunde-Rossmiller (P) defeated Nohavec-Sedwick 6-1, 6-4. Palmer-Schumaker (P) defeated Dudley-Bower 6-3, defaµlt.

Northwest Missouri State beat the Peru baseballers in a single game at Maryville on May 3. The score of the non-conference tilt was 6-2. The Bobcat batsmen c o u 1 d muster only three hits off the three Missouri hurlers. Don Jackson pitched seven innings for Peru and was relieved by Leonard Jacobs. Northwest Missouri scored two runs in the first stanza and never relinquished their lead. Peru's overall record this year is three wins against four losses with ten games remaining on the schedule. Eight of these are conference tilts. The April 29 double header with Wayne State was rained out and will be played on May 17 at Peru.

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By Gary Brown Bermuda shorts and beach comber pants are becoming the accepted things to wear around good old Delzell Hall. Jim Fisher, Dick Gerber, Galen Conn, John ·Betts, Bob Gibson, Roger Bowman, Terry Wickham, and Tom Sewell· are among the many who have been seen wearing Bermudas. David Fulton and Rae rxtae Henry have announced their engagement. Jerry Joy has recently become engaged to Marge Sailors from Shubert. Roger Ray, Ron Rathbun, Joe Roach, Bob Reitz, Victor Bade, and Ron Girl are presently working nights at Otoe Foods in Nebraska City. They work from three in the afternoon until about two in the morning. And you think you've got troubles! Gene Wright, Ron Rathbun, and Joe Roach would like to announce to all girls that if they are missing a white glove, it may be obtained by contacting them. Jerry Wanser and Linda Nygaard were seen in Brandeis Bridal Shop Saturday. afternoon. What's up, doc?? Chick Stessman and Ron Stoltenberg play bubble-gum baseball. If you've never played this exciting game, just ask either of the guys to explain it. If you can not do this, just drop into room 214 some night after 10:30 when the Salty Chicks come home to roost. By the way, they threw away most of the bubble-gum they had ~o buy in order to. get the baseball cards needed for the game. A dorm meeting was held last Tuesday night and at the meeting it was announced that both men's dorms next year will be occupied by all four ·classes. It was also announced by Mrs, Paradise that Delzell is to get new beds and that there will be only two men to a room next year.

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May 18, 19 BATTLE OF THE CORAL SEA Cliff Robertson -

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May 20, 21 THE TINGLER

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May 22, 23 SINK THE BISMARCK Kenneth Moore

Peters and Littell Win Badminton Tournament

Delzell Doings

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last round Peters and Littell de· feated Larry Rathe and Donna Francis. The double elimination tournament began with sixteen mixed doubles teams.

Peru Loses DoubleWickham Enters Header To Creighton Collegiate Rodeo On Friday, April 22, the Peru State baseball team journeyed to Christie Heights ball park to play the Creighton Blue Jays in a double header. Creighton used different routes to beat the Bobcats in both games. The first contest was a low scoring pitching duel with the Jays winning it by a score of 3-2. Ron Kelly absorbed his first loss of the season although he allowed only three hits. Creighton scored the winning run in the last half of the seventh inning. The second game was a different story as Peru allowed four runs on five walks and five errors. The Cats could never catch up after that and lost, 14-6. Roger Smith was the only bright spot for Peru as he hit 4 for 4, including two doubles. Tom Fretz relieved in both games and got credit for both Creighton wins.

Terry Wickham, a freshman from Salem, Nebraska, w a s Peru's only entry in the Nebraska Inter-collegiate Rodeo. The rodeo was held in Lincoln at the Nebraska State Fair Grounds Coliseum on Friday and Saturday, May 6 and 7. Terry has been riding the nonprofessional rodeo circuit for five years. Last year he entered the Nebraska High School Rodeo at Harrison. Terry won the "barebacks" the first night but was injured the second. Terry entered three events in the Inter-collegiate Rodeo, which were "barebacks, bull riding, and bull-dogging." He picked a Palomino and a Pinto quarter horse to be used in the "bull-dogging" event. These horses are part of an elevenhorse stable owned by his father, Ed Wickham of Salem.

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Albert Brady Heads Parent-Teachers By Mary Anna Gnade Congratulations are in order for Albert Brady who was elect· ed president of Peru P.T.A. Tuesday evening, April 19. Mr. Brady is first of all the father of two campus school littl'uns and secondly a well-thought-of college teacher of biology. Mr. Brady has served with distinction his apprenticeship in P.T.A. as program chairman this past year, Don't let congratulating him be the end, get behind him and help make his term as president a memorable one. Also deserving congratulations are Mrs. T. J. Parker, elected vice president; Mrs. Geraldine Straw, elected secretary; and Mrs. Garold Goings, re-elected treasurer. This year instead of trying to have an all-school end-of"Year picnic, the P.T.A. will assist each teacher in having individual room picnics or parties or trips. (Those parents having more than one chick at school may have 1 difficulty helping each room in which theY; . are represented!)

Instructors Appointed To Summer Session Six visiting instructors and an assistant librarian have been appointed to the 1960 Summer Sessions staff at Peru State Teach• ers College, according to Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president. The 1960 regular eight-week session will open June 6 and continue through July 29. The two-week post session is scheduled for July 30 through August 13. · The visiting S:taff members will include: Dr. Robert W. Delaney, Ft. Lewis A. & M. College, Durango, Colo.; Dr. James M. May, principal, Holmes Elementary School, Tulsa, Okla.; Donald Scoby, Sabetha (Kans.) High School; Miss Alma Stoddard, Tarkio, (Mo.) College; Mrs. Margaret F. O'Brien, Omaha Public Schools; George Gates, American Red Cross, Lincoln; Mrs. Aileen Graham, Wichita, Kansas. Dr. Delaney, a member of the Peru State history department from September, 1955, through January, 195'7, and a visiting professor for the 1959 Summer Session, will teach American history, western civilization, and history of Christianity. A member of the 1959 Summer Session faculty, Dr. May will teach Techniques of Research, Elementary School Administration and Science and Mathematics in the Elementary Schools. Mr. Scoby, science instructor at Sabetha (Kansas) High School, will serve as a graduate assistant in the _biology department. He will be candidate for the Master of Science in Education degree from Peru State at the close of the session.

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Miss Stoddard, women's physical education instructor at Tarkio College, will be in charge of women's physical e ducat ion courses for the regular session. Mrs. O'Brien, director of curriculum for the Omaha Public Schools, will conduct an Improvement of Instruction in Social Studies workshop from July 5-15. Mrs. Graham will be serving her fifth consecutive summer as an assistant librarian. A 1948 graduate. of Peru State, Mrs. Graham holds the M.A. degree in library science from the University of Minnesota.

Campus School Chatter By Mary Anna Gnade The college home ec girls are conducting play school for next falls kindergartners, 12 boys and two (that's right, only two) girls. You hear the phrase "two boys for every girl," but this class is ridiculous! On the other hand, present enrollment in 8th grade is nine girls and three boys. Distribution, law of nature, sumpin' didn't work. By the way, have you met the hamster in kindergarter? Or the guinea pig? (These kindergartners are going to know how to read two words when they "graduate"-the label "guinea pig" is the only reading matter in the room!) But that hamster · -greedy little thing! Stands and begs for food and stuffs it in his cheek pouches until he is all out of proportion. Mrs. Adams, teacher, '(with her weird sense of humor) gave the poor thing a whole unshelled peanut one day-you can just imagine the animal's frustration! The night watchman says the guinea pig makes the oddest noise, begging for company when the building is vacant. Speaking Of animals, the little fox caged in the Science building also gave Pop a start in the blackness of night. Junior-Senior Pr~ is the subject of the moment. Having a girl anticipating this event is rather hectic, but getting a boy ready for the big event becomes a little frantic-no tie good enough, suit must be cleaned at last minute, need sharper socks (!), corsage, boutonniere, probably a crewcut trim 10 minutes before the dance, not to mention decorating at the school! In fact, this topic rather puts May Fete in the background among campus schoolers. Having National Music Week May 1 to 7 works out fine for the <:ollege, but is rather an anticlimax at the campus S<:hool. Their music week came during contest time (and they !,ipheld the honor of the ol' school, too), although they are rehearsing for a musical performance to windup PTA. Each organization will perform-A and B bands, A and B orchestras, choruses and possibly smaller groups. This year the PTA voted not to have an all-school picnic the last day of school but rather to help with individual classroom affairs. Haven't yet heard of any plans in this direction, but Jeannie said "I suppose 8th grade won't have one since we're going on our field trip May 13 and that will probably take the place of a picnic." Yup, guess the field trips are pretty well set now: 8th grade to Omaha Friday, May 13, with "Ben Hur" to finish it off. Seventh grade goes to Lincoln Friday, May 20; seniors to Kansas City but what with announcements and other end•ofschool details this trip merges into -the general confusion. Ninth grade doesn't go on a

Prep Receives Ten Superior Ratings In District Music

Home Economics Club Elects Officers

Members of the music department of the Peru Campus School participated in the District Music Contest held at Auburn High School, April 21 and 22. Those groups receiving superior ratings were: brass sextette, girls glee, boys glee, chorus, girls triple trio and the madrigal. Soloists receiving superior ratings were Tom Gomon, violin; Mary Ellen Wilson, oboe, and Hanford Miller, trombone. Groups receiving ratings of excellent were the orchestra, flute trio, string trio, clarinet qua11tet and drum quartet. Solos receiving excellent' ratings were Sara Jane Adams, French horn; David Gomon, cello and Paul Heuer, vocal solo. The cornet trio a n d the French horn quartet received ratings of good.

The Peru Home Economics Club met in the Campus School on April 11 at 6:3(}. The girls who attended the convention in Grand Island gave reports on the different meetings they attended.

Peru Achievement Foundation Trustees Held Meeting A meeting of the Peru Achievement Foundation Trustees was held April 27, 196(}. The foundation voted to award five $100 scholarships for the year 19601961. This is the same number that has been given for the pa:>t two years. The Foundation created a $100 scholarship to be awarded to a senior from the income from contributions of the class of 1906 in memory of a classmate, Charles Weigand. It has been voted to provide $1,00(} for the furnishing of the guest dining room in the new student center. The foundation will also provide matching funds ·for the next allocation of federal fun<ls for the National Defense Student Loan. It is reported ·that the alumni .contributions have, so far this year, surpassed the amount given one year ago. Through April 23, it has been $2,007. Alumni. gifts throughout the calendar year 1959 have been $2,893.18. formal "field" trip, but I spotted them on an informal type visitation-to the Special Servkes Department in the Ad Building to visit the dark room in the interests of Science! I doubt if many people get the reaction I have had: Jimmy, in 4th grade, is taking part in an· other play. Sally, in 5th grade, says "We never got to be in plays and things when we were in 4th grade." Jeannie, in 8th grade, tops her: "Both of you get to do more things and study more science than our grade did when we were in 4th grade." Sibling bitterness, or ah-progress!

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CECIL BOWMAN

Janice Jahn Presented Recita I

Miss Janice Jahn, a senior in music education, presented a piano recital Saturday, April 23, at 8:00 p.m. in the college auditorium. Miss Jahn's program consisted of "Sonata Op. 2 No. 3" by The club held election of offi- Beethoven; "On Wings of Song" cers for next year. The following by Mendelssohn and L i s z t ; people· were elected: president, "Grand Valse Brilliant Op: 18" Jeannine Ehlers; president elect, by Chopin; "Rhapsody Op. 79 No. Elaine Hinton; vice president, 2" by Brahms; "Lake at EveLaverna Roos; secretary, Kaye ning" by Griffes; "Minstrels" by Jacobson; treasurer, P a u 1i n e Debussy; and "Concerto A MinFink; historian, Carol Ellenberg- or" by Schumann .. , er. Joan Riggle was elected state A July candidate for graduavice president at the convention tion with the Bachelor of Music in Grand Island. in Education degree, Miss Jahn is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James F. Jahn, 9281 North Grove, Westminster, Colorado.

Daphne Hellman, Harpist Presents All-College Convo

An All-College Convocation was held on April 27, 1960. Announcements were made by Sue Moore. She also introduced Miss Daphne Hellman, featured harpist, who presented the program. Miss Hellman began studying the harp with Renie in Paris and continued studying with Mildred Dilling. Although Miss Hellman was trained to be a classical harpist, through playing f o r friends and GI's during the war, she became quite proficient in mixing classical and popular selections. She has appeared guite successfully before such audien'ces as the Phillips Gallery of Washington, St. Johns College of Annapolis, Walter Reed Hospital, Billy Rose Diamond Horseshoe, and the Mars Club of Cannes, France. Miss Hellman's program ineluded selections by Bach, Scarlotti, Rachmaninoff, Tschaikowsky and Chopin. During the program she gave a brief history of the harp and its mechanism. The c o n c 1u d i n g portion of her program was made up of a medley of Gershwin tunes, Scotch tunes, and several arrangements by Fats Waller. A touch of humor was added in Miss Hellman's final number, a musical history of her life.

A 1956 graduate of North High School, Omaha, Miss Jahn presented her senior high school recital in Omaha's Joslyn Art Museum. At Peru State, she is a piano student of R. T. Benford, associate professor of piano and ; organ. Miss Jahn is a member of the Peru chapter of the Music Educators National Conference, having served it as secretary-treasurer. She is a member of Sigma Tau Delta, national English honorary, and Kappa Delta Pi, national fraternity in education.

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Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 55

Number 15

10:30 May 27

MAY 23, 1960

Class Of 1910 To Have Reunion

Honors Convo Held May 16 By Pinky Lewellyn An All-College Convocation was held April 16 to honor fourteen students in recognition of their outstanding achievements during the 1959-60· a c a demi c year. Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of the college, presided at the 9:30 a.m. annual spring Honors Convocation. Awards and honors recipients included: Swenson Award Charles Francis, Council Bluffs, Iowa, the B. E. Swenson, Jr., Athletic Award, presented annually since 1925 to the outstanding senior who has participated in athletics. Charles received a gold watch and medal. The award donor is Bert E. Swenson, Stockton, California, a member of the class of 1909. Charles, a physical education and history major, is active in Kappa Delta Pi, historian of Phi Alpha Theta, SEAN, P Club, and Blue Devils. He has lettered four years in basketball and is active in track. Wonderly Scholarship Linda Goodin, Humboldt, received the Zelma R. Wonderly scholarship for outstanding work as a student teacher in the second grade. This is a $100 oneyear scholarship, established by the late Miss Wonderly during her last illness. Linda, a twoyear student, participates in SEAN, Student Christian Fellowship, and White Angels.

Club, Vets Club, SEAN, vicepresident of Dramatics Club, and was a staff member of the Pedagogian. Dramatics Club Awards Tom Higgins, Valley, and Sue Moore, Peru, received the Dramatics Club Award, for outstanding work in dramatic activities on the campus. They were presented with comedy and tragedy masks. Tom is a four year student majoring in speech and English. He served as president of the Student Senate, he was active in intramurals, debate, Peru vi an Singers and Chorus, and t h e Newman Club. He has beenpresident of Newman Club and the Dramatics Club. He has appeared in many productions of the Dramatics Club and was voted the outstanding performer in "The Cave Dwellers." Sue Moore was on the Student Senate in her freshman year. She has served as secretary and as president of the Dramatics Club, secretary-treasurer of Sigma Tau Delta, and secretary of the Senior Class. She has also belonged to Kappa Delta Pi, White Angels, SEAN, SCF, and Chorus. She was on the debate team and was copy editor of the Pedagogian. Her junior and senior year she was on the Dean's Honor Roll.

By Carolyn Parli At least 18 of the-- 75 known living members of the Class of 1910 will be guests of the college on Sunday, May 22, for their 50year class reunion. The day's events will begin with a 10:00 a.m. coffee hour and class meeting in the recreation room of Eliza Morgan Hall. A luncheon with the members of the class as guests of the college will be held at 1:00 p.m. Dr. Gomon will extend greetings. Other guests at the luncheon will include M r. Fred Rothert, Auburn, president of the. Peru Achievement Foundation, and Mrs. Rothert. Dr. Alexander J. Stoddard, who is educational advisor f or the Ford Foundation and former superintendent of Los Angeles City Schools who will be the speaker at the 90th annual commencement, is a member of the Class of 1910. A highlight of the day will be roll call of the members of the class. Greetings will be read from absent members. A class picture will be taken at 3:00 p.h. Those who have indicated they will be present include: Walter L. Best, Byers, Colo.; Rolla T. Fosnot, Schuyler; Arthur Gilbert, Johnson; Frances Gilbert Aron, Crete; Carrie Hansen, Hastings; Alice Hunt Harriss, Fremont; Frank L. Jennings, San Antonio, Texas; Nona Palmer, Bradshaw; Eulalie Shaffer Call, Altadena, Calif.; A. J. Stoddard, Los Angeles, Calif.; F. Clary Nielson, Centuria, Wis.; Mrs. Arthur Embree, Plattsmouth; S. J. Ellenberger, Omaha; Mrs. A. A. Bloomquist, Willmar, Minn.; Lee Redfern, Grand Island; Mr. and Mrs. Glen Co 1 born (Frances Lynch), Hardy. ,

White Angel Scholarship Clara Kelly, P a 1my r a , was awarded the White Angel $50: scholarship, for contribution to school activities by a freshman by the women's pep club. Clara is active in Home Economics Club, Newman Club and White Angels.

Weigand Scholarship Joyce Carman, Tecumseh, received the Charles P. Welgand Memorial Scholarship, for an outstanding junior student. It is a $100 one-year scholarship established by members of the class of 1906 in memory of their classmate. Joyce is active in MENC, Peruvian Singers, choir, and had one of the leading roles in this year's operetta.

Kappa Delia Pi Award Larry Swett, Malvern, Iowa, the Kappa Delta Pi Educational award, for promise and interest in education. He received membership in the national honorary education fraternity.

Alpha Mu Omega Award Gary Madison, Adair, Iowa, received the Alpha .Mu Omega, honorary mathematics fraternity, for excellence in mathematics. He was presented a book of Standard Mathematical Tables.

Sigma Tau Delia Award ;Mrs. Doris TenHulzen, Auburn, won the Sigma Tau Delta freshman award for best written contribution by a freshman student. She was presented a certificate and volume.

Pearl A. Kenton Scholarship Ray George Meister, Humboldt, received the Pearl A. Kenton Scholarship for outstanding work as a student in foreign language. A $50 scholarship, the award is given by Alice Kenton, a 1921 graduate of Peru State. Ray is secretary of Phi Alpha Theta, is a member of Foreign Language

Epsilon Pi Tau Award Jerry Beckman, Diller, received the Epsilon Pi Tau recognition award, for the senior industrial arts student with the highest scholarship. Jerry received a certificate and key. J erry was a member of the Student Senate, Blue Devils, Industrial (Continued on page two)

Raymond Rice Killed In Traffic Accident Raymond Eugene Rice, a Peru State junior from Sidney, Iowa, died Saturday morning, May 7, in a Hamburg, Iowa, hospital of injuries received in an automobile accident near Waubonsie State Park, Iowa, east of Nebraska City. According to investigating officers, Raymond lost control of his automobile as he started up the bluffs west of the park. Raymond, a mathematics major, was enroute to visit his parents after taking part in the May Fete celebration. Funeral services were conducted Tuesday afternoon, May 10, by the Reverend Albert Clements, at the Sidney Methodist (Continued on page two)

Miss Bradley Presents Scholarships fo Ray Meister, Linda Goodin and Joyce Carman

Nineteen More Degree Students Approve And Diploma Candidates Campaign System By Alan Wheeler Accept Positions The student body overwhelmNineteen additional 1960 degree and diploma candidates for May and August graduation accepted teaching positions for the 1960-61 academic year, according to information released by Harold Johnson, director of placement at Peru State Teachers College. In addition, 13 alumni members of the placement bureau also have signed contracts for new positions. Announcement of 49 placements was reported by the bureau in April. The candidates, their h o m e town or present teaching address, and new locations include: 1960 diploma and degree candidates-Norm a Pugsley, Lincoln, to Papillion; Robert Hoback, Nebraska City, to Edgar; Duane Lewis, Nebraska City, to Waverly; Jan Lillethorup, Omaha, to Tabor, Iowa; Mary Ann Steinbrink, Falls City, to Westside, Omaha; Kay George, Auburn, to Bratton Union, Humboldt; Raylene Miller Curnes, Elmwood, to Johnson; Carol Kennedy, Brock, to Papillion; Carol Glathar, Humboldt, to Papillion; Sharon Bates, Burchard, to Papillion; Terry Forney, Tabor, Iowa, to Wetmore, Kans.; Jerry Carlson, Clearwater, to Shelby, Iowa; Don Jackson, Nebraska City, to Tecumseh; Jerry Beckman, Diller, to Fullerton; A 1 an Kreglo, Auburn, to Tehachapi, Calif.; Buddy Bookwalter, Lawrence, Kans., to Tehachapi, Calif.; Robert Mayo, Brooklyn, N. Y., to Tehachapi, Calif.; Dick Sietsema, Tabor, Iowa, to Custer, S. D.; Jane Dietl, Nehawka, to Elk Creek. Alumni placements- H arr y Meeker, Orleans, to Hooper; Guilford Thomas, Bratton Union, to Elk Creek; Ronald Case, Filley, to Elkhorn; Ken Majors, Lexington, to Lincoln; Jerry Krakow, Worland, Wyo., to Tabor, Iowa; Duane Overgaard, military service, to Cumberland, Iowa; Doris Stiers, Nebraska City, to Brock; Beverly Coatney, Peru, to Brock; Earl McCain, Tecumseh, to Bradshaw; David Miller, Dannebrog, to Soldier, Iowa; Bertis Adams, Tekamah, to Anita, Iowa~; August a Schlange, Brock, to Humboldt; Wayne Minchow, Reserve, Kans., to Howells. "The eye of the master will do more work than both his hands." -Franklin.

ingly approved the campaignparty system of electing student senate representatives. One hundred and jixty ·said they liked the way the election was run, but only 57 said they did not. One hundred and forty-three said they liked· the way parties were set up, and 72 said they did not. One hundred and sixty said three parties were enough, while 50 . said they were not. Many students made comments. The main comments were that they would like to see more week-end activities. Improvement of cafeteria food was also an important item. Most party workers felt there should have been more campaign time. They felt that campaign platforms should not be copied. Some complained this was too much of a popularity contest, and that it was somewhat disorganized. Some students felt they were not given enough opportunity to join parties and that the parties were cliqueish. Other suggestions included opening of the swimming pool, do away with student grading of papers, have qualifications for officers of the senate, that there should be more professional entertainment at convocations. Some ask that a balloting place with booths be set up. The Student Senate would like to thank the student body for the response on this questionnaire.

Steve Banks To Head Alpha Mu Omega Steve Banks, a junior fr o m Stella, has been elected president of the Peru State Teachers College chapter of Alpha Mu Omega, honorary national fraternity in mathematics, according to Lyle McKercher, assistant professor of mathematics and fraternity sponsor. Other new officers for the 1960-61 academic year include Keith Hawxby, Nemaha, vicepresident, and Ellen Hunzeker, Humboldt, secretary-treasurer. Recently initiated into membership of the chapter were Jack Broady, Johnson; Dick Carlson, Falls City; Jerry George, Larry, Haye&, Gary Schlange, Roland Sohnholz, John Biere, Bill Snow, Kenneth Humphrey, Auburn; Gary Madison, Adair, Iowa; Dale Pflaum, Dawson; Dick Place, Nebraska City.


EDITORIAL WHISPERS As the year ends, it is time to thank a lot of people who FROM have helped record the events of the year in student publicaMORGAN tions. Nearly every person on the campus has helped in some way. If a student did no more than have his picture taken By for the Peruvian, he at least helped that much. Carolyn Parli We appreciate the help we have had from members of student organizations, sponsors, faculty members, and administrative personnel. Don Carlile, Jim Levitt, and Mary Just guess what week this isAnna Gnade have given generously of their time and talents. test week. The midnight oil is Speaking for all members of the Pedagogian and Peru- burning low, eyes are drooping, vian staffs and adding our personal gratitude, we thank you and the brains are cracking. for the help you have consistently given us throughout the This year is coming to a close, year and in years past. -S. P. L. and many of the girls will be HONORS CONVO HELD ON MAY 16

(Continued from -page. one) Arts Club, Lutheran Club, and Delzell Council. His honorary fraternities were Alpha Mu Omega, Epsilon Pi Tau, and Kappa Delta Pi. He has served as president of Delzell Hall and of Kapp~ Delta Pi. Business Club Award

Raburn Benton, Malvern, Iowa, received the Business C 1u b award as the outstanding graduating senior in business - education. He received a membership in the United Business Association and some professional journals.

the Pedagogian. Rosemary h a s worked on the Pedagogian for two years, is a member of Business Club, Kappa Delta Pi, White Angels, and Sigma Tau Delta. She is also a member of SEAN and was recently chosen as one of the outstanding student teachers of the campus school. Who's Who

Certificates for "Who's Who" were presented to Linda Moore, Sue Moore, Jerry Beckman, Tom Higgins, and Jerry Paden. Assistaniships

Also recognized were recipients of assistantships and fellowships: Wayne McFarland, Lee Rottman, Charles Francis, a n d Janet Bertram.

Delzell Doings

Forensics Awards

Linda Moore, Nemaha, and Sue Moore, Peru, won the Forensics awards in recognition of intercollegiate competiti6n in forensics. Linda and Sue were presented with plaques. Linda has been vice-president of the Home Economics Club, social chairman of Morgan Hall, and a member of the Dorm Council. Her senior year she was historian of Kappa Delta Pi, president of W.S.A., and vice-president of SEAN. She was a member of the White Angels and Phi Alpha Theta a n d was on the debate team for two years. Her junior and senior year she was on the Dean's H on or Roll. Larson Plaque

Glen Chambers, Bennet, w o n the A. V. Larson ·plaque for outstanding work on the Peruvian. Glen has been outstanding in the field of photography for the Pedagogian and Peruvian. Glen is majoring in math and physics and is a member of Alpha Mu Omega. Neal S. Gomon Plaque

·Rosemary Rottman, P a w n e e City, won the Neal S. Gomon plaque for outstanding work on

By Gary Brown The time has come to Delzell for blood-shot eyes and harsh feelings as finals are upon us again. Congratulations, seniors. Please don't make all the money, but save some, for the rest of us. Delzell Hall has a rodeo star. Congratulations, Terry Wickham on your getting fourth in bulldogging at the Nebraska Collegiate Rodeo. There is an old saying that practice makes perfect. As this was Terry's first try at bull-dogging, Peru should have a real champion. Congratulations are in order for Joan Riggle and Jack Johnson on their recent engagement. Good luck to you both. Gary and Dick Brown should have a very interesting and educational summer as they are to spend it abroad. The boys will spend most of · the summer in Saudi, Arabia with their parents, but plan to visit much of Europe and the Holy Land while abroad. As this is my last column, I should llke to thank everyone who has faithfully read it. So long, and have a good summer.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

graduating and getting married. Dorm council met on May 17, at 6:00 p.m. in Miss Slattery's , apartment. The new president, Linda Goodin, conducted the meeting. The girls decided to have the student teachers serve refreshments at 10:30 p.m. during the final exam week. The birthday bug just flew through the dorm again. The girls having birthdays were Alberta Kasparek, Donna Penkava, Inga Faubion, and Mary Ann Lewellynn. Since the last issue of the paper, several other girls have received diamonds·. The engaged girls are Inga Faubion from Beaver Crossing, Nebraska, to Marion Battani from Madrid, Iowa; Joan Riggle from Endicott, Nebraska, to Jack Johnson fr o m Loup City, Nebraska; Donn a Is it ever Ivy! Why, Coke is the most Francis from Council Bluffs, correct beverage you can possibly Iowa, to Mark Thompson who is order on campus. Just look around you. in the Navy and stationed at San Diego, California. Wh~t are the college sotjal leaders A surprise wedding shower going for? Coca-Cola! So take a leaf was held for Donna Francis on out of their Ivy League book and do the May 16. She received an electric skillet as a gift froin several same! Enjoy the good taste of Cokel BE REALLY REFRESHED of the girls. . - .._;,..)....___ Everyone was trying out Sandy Bottled under authority of The Coca-Cola Company bJ Hemphill's new typewriter on the night of May Fete. The amNEBRASKA CITY COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO. bitious typists were Mary Ann -Lewellynn, Rosalie Baehr, Rita Grandgenett, Lynda Ehlers, and The son of Mr. and Mrs. DonRAYMOND RICE KILLED Marilyn Monroe. ald L. Rice, Raymond was a 1956 IN TRAFFIC ACCIDENT Karen Trotter was initiated by graduate of Sidney Consolidated being thrown into the shower. It (Continued from page one) High School. He was born Sepseems as though she hag been a tember 9, 1938. Before coming to church. Clark Maffitt and Marihelper in th r o w i n g in other Peru State Teachers .College in lyn Wright sang "Hold My Hand people. the fall of 1958, he had attended Sounds as if sorµe of the girls Dear Lord" and "Beyond the Iowa State University at Ames. Sunset." Casket bearers were on first floor have been trying His brother, Steven, was enout some new, exotic delicacy- Warren Dyke, Norman Catlett, Ronald Wilson, James Du Val, rolled at Peru State for the fall fried grasshoppers! Try some, Jack Johnson, and Terry Forney. 1959-60 semester. they taste like burned toastRaymond was interred in the very tasty. Raymond was a resident of Some of the girls on third floor Sidney Cemetery. Dr. Keith L. Melvin, Dr. Har- Delzell Hall, where he was a heid a pizza party for Mary Ann Steinbrink, Lois Rowe, Janet old Boraas, Mr. Lyle McKercher, frieli.d to all who knew him. On Bertram,. Marie Antalek, and Mrs. Evanelle Paradise, and Mr. April 11, he was initiated int o Janice Jahn. The purpose was to Donald Carlile, of the faculty, membership of Alpha Mu Omebid them adieu to dear "ole" and 30 Peru State students were in attendance at the funeral ser- ga, honorary mathematics fraPeru. ternity. vices. As your columnist, I would like to say the best of luck and good wishes to all the graduates of 1960.

Ivy League

BANK OF PERU

The Voice of the Campus of a Tho\isand Oaks Member Intercollegiate Press May 23, 1960 THE STAFF

Co-Editor ----------------------------------Donna Francis Co-Editor ------------------------------Rosemary Rottman Sports Editor ---------------------------------Wally West ' Sports Reporter _____________________________Jerry Osborne Sports Reporter ------------------------------Steve Parker Copy Editor --------------------------------Kathy Rhoten Copy Editor ----------------------------Martha Sue Moore Business Manager -----------------------------Al Bohlken Columnist ------------------------------------Gary Brown Columnist -----------------------------------Carolyn Parli Columnist ------------------------------Mary Anna Gnade Library Column ----------------------------Darlene Critel Exchange Editor --------~-------------------Nancy. Kunkel Convocations ------------------------------Sharon Watton Dranitatics --------------------------------Joni Wesolowski :M:usic ---------------------------------------Peggy McGee Church -----------------------------~----Alice Greenwood Campus School News ____ ,_ _____________________ Chris Hays Campus School Reporter ____________________Elmer Antons Reporter ----------------------------------Sandra Pearson Reporter ------------------------------Mary Ann Lewelly.n Reporter -------------------------------.Carol Ellenberger Reporter --------------------------------------Leroy Keyt Reporter ------------------------------------Leland Smith Sponsor ------------------------------Stewart P. Linscheid

Home Ee Club Holds Wiener Roast Thursday, May 12, at Dr. Harlan's country home, the Home Economics Club held their wiener roast. Transportation for the group, which met in front of Eliza Morgan Hall, was furnished by Mrs. Ina Sproul, sponsor; Mrs. Louise Kregel, sponsor; Patsy Melcher; and Lola Triska. After a meal of roasted wieners, baked beans, potato chips, and tea, the twenty-six girls enjoyed tramping through the nearby wooded area. Some w e r e searching for a view, which they found readily, while others hunted mushrooms and flowers. Guests of the club were Dr. Harlan and his two star boarders, Wayne McFarland and Harry Bryant.

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Calendar ot the y ear

Frank Masek Going To San Bernardino, California By Chris Hays Mr. Frank Masek will be leaving our campus in August. He is going to San Bernardino, California, where he will teach high school mathematics. He plans to do graduate work at the University of California. Mr. Masek received his Bachelors Degree from PSTC in January 1951. He received his Masters from Greeley, Colorado and attended summer sessions at the University of Nebraska and the University of Missouri. Before coming to Peru, he coached and taught at Randolph, Iowa, for two years and at Tarkio, Missouri, for two years. He came here as coach of Peru Prep and later became supervisor of the math and science department at the Campus School. He has been principal of the Campus School for. the past two years. In addition to being principal of the Campus School, Mr. Masek is sponsor of the senior class, student council, and the high school yearbook, the "Bobkitten." He is vice-president of the faculty association. He has served on Peru's city council, and was president of the local NEA unit. Mr. Masek's record is outstanding as an administrator, coach, teacher, and citizen of the community. He and Mrs. Masek have been active in church, school, and community affairs. They are the parents of five girls, four of whom attend the Campus School.

Senior Reception Held The Senior Reception was held Saturday evening, May 21, at 8:00 p.m. in the Campus School Auditorium. Seniors were greeted by a receiving line that included members of the faculty and President and Mrs. Gamon. Refreshments were s er v e d . The College Orchestra provided music for the evening.

Linda Nygaard Entered In Miss Nebraska Contest Miss Linda Lee N y g a a r d , daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dexter Nygaard, win.ner of the 1960 Miss Auburn Pageant, will be an entry in the 1960 Miss Nebraska Pageant. There will be approximately twenty-three girls entered in this contest. The Pageant will be held at Columbus, Nebraska, the first and second of July. Mrs. Dexter Nygaard will accompany her daughter to Columbus. The contest starts Friday morning at nine o'clock with various teas, which will be followed by a parade in the afternoon. The actual judging will be done Friday and Saturady evenings. As her talent for the contest, Miss Nygaard will do her interpretation of "Quiet Village," which she did for the Miss Auburn Pageant. Her approach, however, will be different because she plans to use a picture as a background through which she will explain her dance. Then she will proceed to explain it in actions rather than words. Lin d a plans to use plumes which will symbolize the waving palms of the "Quiet Village" in her dance.

The Emerson, Iowa, IndeSeptemberpendent High School team 6put on an exhibition game 11 Freshmen Orientation Week. prior to the alumni game. 10 Freshmen registration-this 26fall 186 freshmen enrolled. 11 Upper classmen registration 29 Thanksgiving vacation. -561 students enrolled, the highest number in 20 years. December1 Peru defeated Tarkio at 14 Classes began-Also the Stuhome 86-71. dent Senate sponsored the 5 Peru was host to surroundannual watermelon feed for ing high schools for a choral the student body. clinic. A con_cert was given 17 The Freshmen Variety Show in the evening directed by produced by J. D. Levitt was the guest director, Clayton given. Afterwards an all-colKrehbiel, from the Univerlege mixer was held in the sity of Kansas. gym. 7 Bobcats defeated Dana at 19 The Bobcats defeated WestBlair 67-45. mar 34-0 at Westmar in the 8 The Peru five defeated Omafirst football game of the ha University on the home season. court 89-59. 22 Cheerleaders were elected by 9 An all-college convocation the student body. They inwas held featuring the "Melcluded Joanne Bohlken, Lynody Masters,'' a Negro quarda Ehlers, Rae Mae Henry, tet. Janie Kunkel, and Pam Yost. 23 All-college convocation was 10 The Christmas Tea was held in Eliza Morgan Hall. held featuring "Dave Work11 Peru defeated Tarkio 73-52 man-Bell Ringer." on Tarkio's home court. 26 Peru defeated Dana at Dana 13 Vesper Service wa$ given by 53-0. the Orchestra and Peruvian 28Singers in the auditorium. 30 Freshmen Initiation began. 30 Kangaroo Court was held at 14 Peru slipped past Doane 6461 at Crete. 7:30 in the gym. Presiding over the court was "judge" 15 The United Nations Dinner was given by the local Home Ray Meister. Economics Club. 16 The college choir gave a OctoberChristmas program at con1 The Bobcats defeated Convocation. cordia at Peru 46-0. 2 President Gomon left on his 17 The Christmas Dance w a s held with music provided by trip to Russia and other Euthe "Starlighters." ropean countries. 7 All-college convocation with 170. G. Fitzgerald, a memory 19 N.A.I.A. Basketball Tournament in Nashville, Tennesexpert. see. The Bobcats were beat10 Peru defeated Midland Colen by Villa Madonna 67-56 in lege at Midland 55-0. , 1 the first game and by Pike17 Homecoming-The Freshville 84-82 in the second men class won the display game. award with the theme "Do You Remember." Peru de- 19feated the Wayne Wildcats J an. 4 Christmas Recess. in an afternoon game 16-6. 29At 9:00 the homecoming 30 Four-State Tournament at Falls City, Nebraska. Peru play, "The Cave Dwellers," won by defeating Drury 102was presented. The Dance 75 in the first game and Bakwas held at 9:30 with Curly er 87-81 in the second game. Stengel and his band providing the music. Miss Lynda Ehlers was chosen Home- January4 Classes resumed. coming Queen. 5 Peru was handed its first 21 Raymon Hernandez, a guidefeat in the conference from tarist, was featured at the Wesleyan 66-61. all-college convocation. 9 Peru defeated C o n c or d i a 24 Peru defeated Hastings in a here 82-76. home game 31-20. 11 The College Band performed 29at Brock in an evening con30 Nebraska State Education cert. Association Convention was held and classes were dis- 15 Peru defeated Kearney at Ord 78-69. missed these two days. 16 The Bobcats defeated Hastings at Hastings 88-63. November4 President Gomon return.ed 18from his trip to Europe and 20 Final Examinations. 22 First semester ended. Russia. 6 Peru defeated Doane here 23 Schoolmen's Day was held at P.S.T.C. A new home court 28-7. scoring record was set as the 12 The college choir presented Bobcats trampled Doane 118the operetta "H.M.S. Pina58. fore." 18 President Gamon spoke on 29 The Wayne five defeated Peru 58-56 at Wayne. his trip to Russia at an all¡ 30 Six student participated in college convocation. the Noduet Debate Tourna19 White Angels pledged twenment at Marysville, Kansas. ty-three new members. The Bobcats were defeated 20by Midland at Fremont 7321 The local Home Economics 66. Club was host to the State Home Economics Club Workshop. The University of February1 The cast was selected for the Nebraska, Omaha University spring play "Brief Music." and Wayne State Teachers Five new members were College sent delegates. pledged to the Blue Devils. 23 Thanksgiving Dance sponWayne clobbered Peru 71-56. sored by M.E.N.C. was held. 2 In a conference game on The college dance band proPeru's court the Dana Vikvided the music. ings were defeated by Peru 24 The basketball season was 75-44. opened by the varsity team defeating the alumni team 3 Honors Convocation was 78-57: A girls basketball clinheld. Fifty-two students were ic was held in the gymnasinamed to the Dean's Honor um conducted by Marlin D. Roll. Sixteen mid-year diMercer of Emerson, Iowa. plomas were recognized and

B~Jhne Kunkel and Sandra Pearson

nine students were awarded P.T.A. scholarships. 5-

6 Peru won a week-end double-header over Chadron at Peru. Scores were 97-86 and 96-67. 8 Jeannine Ehlers and Tom Lakin were crowned Queen and King of Hearts at the annual Sweetheart Dance. 10 An all-college convo heard internationally-known concert saxophonist, S i g u r d Rascher. 1113 Four Peru Students participated in a speech conference at the University of Denver. 12 Wayne toppled Peru 70-65. 13 Peru Bobcats won over the Kearney five 87-68. 15 Twenty White Angel pledges were initiated. Chuck Francis was named 0 m a h a World-Herald "Star of the Week." 16 An all-college pep rally for the Wesleyan game was held at convo. Peru upset Wesleyan 69-67 in the last seconds of the game. 17 William Worthy, noted news correspondent, s p o k e at convo. 18 A dinner for the Peruvian staff was given by Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Linscheid. 20 The Peru Bobcats defeated Concordia 95-76 for their twelfth conference win. 23 The Peru Home Economics Club gave the annual Martha Washington Silver Tea. 25 Peru won third place in the N.C.C. by dumping Midland 72-63. 27 Peru beat the Hastings Broncos 86-80. 28 Peruvian Singers sang at the Presbyterian Church service and gave a concert in the afternoon. 29 Wayne felled Peru 71-56 in the N.A.I.A. playoffs. March2 An all-college convo was held at which Doctors Wagner and Ogborn discussed cancer and heart disease. SCF sponsored a mock wedding at the Me tho dist Church. 8 The P.S.T.C. chorus went on a three-state tour to Rockport, Missouri, Sidney, Iowa, and Johnson, Nebraska. Five Peru students attended the Kappa Delta Pi convention in Chicago. 10 The Peru Dramatics Club presented the Spring P 1 a y Brief Music. 15 Two hundred girls from the volley ball tourney w e r e snowed in at Peru. The tournament winner was DawsonVerdon. 18 Two hundred high school students participated in the 1960 Nebraska School Activities Association D i st r i c t Speech Contest on the Peru campus. 21 SEAN elected its new officers. 25 Four hundred Nebraska high school students participated in the Peru State inter-scholastic contest. Nebraska City and Humboldt were the division winners. 28 Demolition of Mt. Vernon Hall was begun. 29 The Peru Chapter of the American Association of University Women presented a spring style,; show in the Campus School. 31 Dick Sietsema presented his senior vocal recital. April6 The P.S.T.C. band went on a tour to Pawnee City, Tecumseh, and Syracuse.

8 Peru split a double-header baseball game against St. Benedicts of Atchison, Kansas winning the first one 6-1 and dropping the second 8-2. 10 The Peru State C o 11 e g e Chorus presented the oratorio "The Holy City" on campus. 11 Home Economics Club elected new officers. 12 Peru won over Concordia 7-4 but lost the second game of a double-header 5-3. Peru dropped its opening tennis meet to Creighton University 4-3. 13 The Pan American Day Festival was held at the Campus School. Peru trackmen lost their opening meet to Washburn University of Topeka. SEAN presented an allschool convo. 19 Ralph Marterie and his Marlboro Men played for a large crowd at the Spring Formal. 20 Outstanding Student Teachers of the Year and Outstanding College Teacher of the Year, Dr. John Christ, were named at an all-college convocation. 22 Peru trackmen participated in the Wesleyan W-Club Invitational track meet. The tennis team downed Doane 5-2. Creighton Blue Jays defeated Peru Bobcats 3-2 and 14-6 in a siouble-header baseball' game. 23 Janice Jahn presented her senior piano recital. 24 Peru held its annual Open House. Linda Nygaard was chosen as Miss Auburn 1960. Six other Peru co-eds were contestants for the title. 25 The cornerstone was laid for the A. V. Larson building. Tri Beta sponsored a steak fry at W au b on s i e Park. White Angels held election of officers. 26 The Publications Banquet was held at Steinhart Lodge. Peru baseballers won a double-header from the Midland Warriors 8-5 and 10-2. 27 Harpist Daphne H e 11 man performed for an¡ all-school convo. Phyllis Peters and Jerry Littell won the badminton tournament. 28 A piano ensemble clinic performed in the auditorium.

May1 The President's annual tea for graduating seniors was held. 2 New Student Senate officers were elected. 3 Peru baseballers lost 6-2 to Northwest Missouri State at Maryville. 4 Student Senate class representatives were elected. An all-college convo was entertained by concert pianist, Albert Huetteman. 8 Dramatics C 1 u b initiated four new members. 9 The "May Day in Old England" was the theme of May Fete. Carolyn Wing and Jack Johnson reigned over festivities. 10 Annuals were distributed at Yearbook Night. 11 Wesleyan students entertained at an all-college convocation. 20 Dr. Paul W. Diekman was the speaker at the Baccalaureate service. 27 Alexander J. Stoddard was speaker at the Commencement exercises.

WHEELER Dairy Queen Cone With the Curl on Top

AUBURN, NEBRASKA


Al Wheeler's Article Published in The Rectangle

Sophomore Proficiency Test Given to 104 Students

pletion. A simple peace flooded his mind as he sang the words of The Sophomore proficiency j;he hymn and beheld the gath- test was given to 104 college stuering. His thoughts reviewed the dents on May 5, 1960. Twentypast months. He remembered his four of the 104 students, approxearly hesitancy; his long prayer imately one-fourth, did not meet to. God to help him fill this pul- the requirements set by the Engpit; to help him know the prob- lish department. lems, hopes, and fears behind the The students were given a list faces turned expectantly to him: of twenty titles from which they in those early weeks. were to choose a subject and As time passed, he realized write a theme 250-350 words that God was truly answering his long. All the papers were graded prayer. ID.deed, he was getting to by not less than two English inknow these people. Today his structors, and in the case of mareyes wandered over the worship- ginal or failing papers, a third inpers. They fell, first, on a staid structor graded them. The papers The Flock farmer and his wife, both popu- were graded on the basis of comThe greying minister looked lar Sunday school teachers. They position, s en t e n c e structure, out over the congregation during had a son in the ministry. Quiet spelling, punctuation, etc. the first hymn on a cold Sunday peace shone on their faces, the All students are required to morning in January. His sixth result of years of Christianity in pass this test if they wish to month as pastor of the smallaction. graduate from college. The stutown church was nearing comA few rows away the minister dents who did not pass the test saw several college students are required to take a remedial home for the semester break, re- English course which will grant united with homefolk in a hymn two upper-level credit hours if of praise to God. satisfactorily completed the first His eyes moved to the right. time; however, if they fail to There sat,the high school coach pass, they must repeat the course and his wife. Further over he saw without credit until they are able another teacher and f am i 1 y . to pass the test. These were worshipping as an example to the student who respected them. His eyes crossed the aisle. They stopped for a moment on a young , On Tuesday, May 10, from 6:30 woman. Deserted by a heavyuntil 9:00 p.m. the 1960 "Perudrinking husband, she was doing vian" was placed in the hands of her best to guide their two sons the proper owners. toward the right path in life; the This year's book carried out three occupied their pew every the theme of an ever expanding Sunday. Peru Campus. This idea was porNearby sat the town banker, trayed on the cover by oak leaves singing with spirit, living up to floating on ripples of water. This the rule of his bank: "Christian year's book was also expanded. business is the best motto we It contained 131 pages. know." The members of the Peruvian To the far left sat the regular staff are: Lois Rowe, editor; Glen church organist. After years of Chambers, photographer; Jeanfaithful service she had moved nine Ehlers and Carol Ellenbergfrom the town. Each Sunday she er, lay-out; Rosemary Rottman, drove many miles to help train Kathy Rhoten, and Francis Lina replacement. Today one of her dell, copy editors; and Chris students was capably handling Hays, glamour editor. Members her job. She knew that soon she who worked on the staff only one could carry her inspiring music to the church in her new com- semester are Jane Kunkel, Carolyn Parli, and Al Bohlken. munity. Next year's "Peruvian" is to be The minister smiled for a moment as he looked upon an elder- edited by- Carolyn Parli, Carol ly lady. Singing with loud, Ellenberger, and Jeannine Ehlers. Anyone who has not received though untrained voice, she • Slim Styling often had a tendency to be just his "Peruvian" may pick it up at • Low Waisted a bit ahead or behind, but her the business office. • Adjustable Waistband sincerity, her obvious joy in • Wash 'n' Wear praising God somehow made hers · school members of the church. Cords & Polished Cotton the most beautiful voice ill the At the end of the loft stood ihe congregation. minister's wife, who was helping RARICK CLOTHING His eyes strayed to the choir with the choir. He looked into in loft, which was filled with the her serene face as she sang the youthful voices of the high well-known words. Somehow he AUBURN, NEBRASKA knew that she, too, was thinking much as he was. He knew the question that was going through her mind and heart: "How can Rex Rains we, through this work, further glorify God? How can we further know and help the s e Groceries Meats people?" Fruits and Vegetables As the hymn drew to a close,. the minister bowed and breathed ' a prayer to his beloved God, a Free Delivery Tuesday and Friday prayer of thanks for blessings ' received and a prayer of asking, Phone TR 2-4351 asking to be of help to this, his flock. A descriptive narrative by Alan Wheeler, a junior at Peru State 'J;eachers College, appears in the Spring issue of The Rectangle, publication of Sigma Tau Delta, national professional English fraternity. The article, "His Flock," tells the story of a minister in a small town church. Wheeler, a 1957 graduate of Stella High School, is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Ivan Wheeler of Stella. He is a member of the Phi Alpha chapter at Peru State and is majoring in English and history.

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Mary Clarke President of Delta Kappa Gamma Mary Clarke, assistant profes- son, Nemaha, Pawnee. and Johnsor of elementary education at son counties, include: Mrs. Ruth Peru State Teachers College, was Brown, Peru, first vice-president; elected president of the Iota Miss Marian Rist, Auburn, secchapter of Delta Kappa Ga:inma, ond vice-president; Mrs. Madge national honorary fraternity for Broady, Johnson, recording secwomen educators, Saturday at retary; Miss Alma Ashley, Peru, the chapter's meeting in Tecum- corresponding secretary; M r s . Ruth Sorensen, Tecumseh, treasseh. Other officers elected by the urer, and Mrs. Wilber Clarke, chapter, which includes Richard- Pawnee City, parliamentarian. , ------------------------of Siberia's primeval forests; the trains crowded with deportees; LIBRARY apartment houses overrun by SHORTS rats; cities starving and freezing, villages burned and depopulated. By And woven into this background Darlene is the story of Zhivago's love for Critel tender and beautiful Lara who is constantly pursued, found, and Raintree County was written lost again. by Ross Loc;kridge. It is an epic In Command ihe M o r n i n g , novel describing a day, the . Pearl S. Buck has turned to the Fourth of July of 1892, in the life greatest topic of our timesof Johnny Shawnessy. He partiman's conquest of the atom-and cipates in the holiday ceremonies has seen it through the eyes of of his small Indian.a. town and both novelist and woman. S h e meets \two old boyhood friends. takes us back to those fateful These events set off a series of years, early in the second world flashbacks in his mind and he war, when great physicists have relives his schooldays, his Civil become convinced that a weapon War experiences, his brief politiof unalterable destructive power cal life, his two marriages, and a is within their grasp. We live love affair that ended badly. with the scientists as they beRaintree County has so much come more awestruck at what life that it grips the heart an d they are unleashing. We listen in stirs the mind. By any standard their laboratories as they work it is a novel of rare stature for out the mechanics of their monyour summer enjoyment. ster-the details that may mean Another book for summertime the differences between a dud, a leisure reading is Boris Paster- usable bomb, and holocaust that nak's Doctor Zhivago. Zhivago, a will set the hydrogen in the physician and poet, is the prom- oceans ablaze and consume the inent figure in the n o v el . world. We sit in their homes as Through his experiences, the they struggle with their disruptreader witnesses the outbreak ed private lives. We stand beside and the consequences of the Rev- them through their sleepless olution: army revolts, irrational nights as they grapple with that killings, starvation, epidemics, nightmare question which each party inquisition. In an epic train of them must ultimately conride from Moscow to the Ural front squarely: Shall this weapon Mountains-a journey that takes be used? weeks-Zhivago transports his The story follows accurately family to what he hopes is shel- the course of actual events, but ter in obscurity. Actually, he it is told through fictitious charlands them all in the chaos and acters: Burton Hall, the nature cruelty of strife between white scientist, head of the project, and and Reds. his beloved homebody of a wife, Pasternak's superbly evocative Molly; the younger S t e p hen style is equal to the grandeur of Coast, Hall's chief assistant, uphis theme. "Storm" is the recur- on whom Hall's collapse throws ring key word of his book-the the responsibility for the most storm of war, of revolution, of crucial decision of all; Stephen's human passions, of nature. With passionately devoted wife, Helen, awe and terror he recreates mod- who lives these troubled years in ern history's most titanic effort ignorance of his work and in to bring forth a new world from growing doubt of his iove; and a deliberately created chaos. Jane, beautiful woman and keen The book is crowded with scientist, who is drawn constantscenes and people of unforget- ly to both Burton and Stephen, table impact: the eeriness of par- and yet fears that by love she tisan camps in the ice and snow might be destroyed.

PERU MARKET

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Kappa Delta Pi Held Steak Fry Kappa Delta Pi held its annual steak fry on Monday, May 9, at Neal Park in Peru. Approximately 35 members were in attendance. The members e n j o y e d steak, potato salad, baked beans, 'potato chips, punch and cookies. No business meeting was held.

ROURKE JEWELRY Quality Service and Distinctive Gifts AUBURN. NEBRASKA

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STATE THEATRE -

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AUBURN, NEBR.

May 23. 24 SINK THE BISMARCK Kenneth Moorg

Dana Wynter

May 25. 26 GIRLS TOWN Mamie VanDoren

Mel Torme

May 27, 28 THEY CAME TO CORDURA Gary Cooper Van Heflin

Rita Hayworth Tab Hunter

Midnife Show Friday 27th 11:30 P. M. BUCKET OF BLOOD


Baseball Squad Wins Eleven -Loses Six: The Peru State baseball team made a very good record this spring and enjoyed a winning season. The tally for the Bobcats •was 11 wins and 6 losses. They had an 8 and 4 record in the conference race to place high in the loop and obtain the right to a play-off berth. Coach Al Wheeler put together a winning combination with

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young pitchers and. a. veteran infield and outfield. The Bobcats compiled a remarkable confer-. ence record considering that only two of the loop double headers were played at Peru and the remaining four on the road. Freshman Ron Kelly led the pitching staff with a 6 and 1 record and Drexel Harvey led the team in hitting and home runs.

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Peru Tennis Team Nosed Out By Creighton I. i r s i

1960 BASEBALL BOBCATS

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Peru Takes Triangular Meet The Bobcat trackmen came out on top in a triangular meet, competing with Midland College and Luther Junior College. The ineet was held at Fremont. The Bobcats scored 102 points by winning twelve first places. Midland scored 49 points and Luther finished with five points. Ken Humphrey, sophomore from Auburn, scored four first places. Ken won the 120 yard high hurdles with a time of 16.4, the 220 yard low hurdles with a time of 27.2. Ken won the broad jump with a leap of 21'5" and also the pole· vault with a height

of 11'. Don Petersen, freshman distance man, swept the mile and two-mile races. He won the mile with a time of 4:48.1 and the two-mile with a time of 10:20.9. John Christensen, sophomore from Nebraska City, won the 100 yard dash with 11.3, and the 220 yard dash with a time of 23.3. Charles Francis won the 880 yard run with a time of 2:09.7. Other winners for the day were Vern Thompsen, who won the shot with a toss of 45'31/2", and LaMar Gibson, who won the javelin with a throw of 161'11".

Bobcats Take Two Games From Wesleyan

Bobcats Take Doubleheader From Graceland

The Peru State baseball team swept a double header from Graceland on May 12 at Peru. The Bobcats had a good day at the plate as they rapped out 12-8 and 6-1 victories. Roger Smith started off the scoring in the first inning as he The Bobcats won the first game, connected for a 3-run home run. 9-3. In the first inning, Mike Leon Chappell followed with a Roach led off with a double 2-run blast in the second inning. f o 11 o w e d with home runs . Chappell also had two doubles as by Leon Chappell and Drexel he went 3 for 4. Dave Fritch Harvey. In the fourth inning, gained the win as Peru got 13 Roger Smith and Dick Gerber hits. Coach Wheeler used 18 playboth homered; Smith connected ers in the romp. for another round-tripper in the In the second game, Mike fifth inning. Ron Kelly turned in Roach led off with a home run. a superb pitching job and picked Larry' Gilson also tripled as Peru up his sixth win. scored in every inning but the The second game was almost a fourth. Don Jackson and Gary duplicate of the first as Roach Olson combined their efforts to tripled and Chappell and Harvey hold Graceland to five• hits. Olson homered in the opening stanza. received credit for the win. Peru went on to win the game "Be not merely good; be good by a 10-2 count. Roger West got the victory for Peru. · for something."-Thoreau. The Peru State baseball team had a field day on May 13 as they romped over Wesleyan in a double header. The Bobcat batsmen connected for many extra b a s e hits and shelled every Wesleyan pitcher.

PERU CLEANERS & TAILORS "

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Peru State dropped a close tennis match to Creighton, Wednesday, May 11. The final result was Creighton 4, Peru 3. Winning singles for Peru were Marvin Bergsten and Roger Schumaker. Bergsten teamed with Eldon Rossmiller to win a doubles match: to account for Peru's third point. ResultsMarvin Bergsten (P) defeated Frank Bemis (C) 6-4, 1-6, 6-0. John Eastly (C) defeated Eldon Rossmiller (P) 6-2, 6-3. The Peru State-St. Benedict's John Kellogg (C) defeated Jon tennis match ended in a 3-3 tie Palmer (P) 6-2, 6-2. Wednesday, May 4, when darkRoger Schumaker (P) defeated ness forced the final doubles Geo. Thompson (C) 6-2, 4-5, 9-7. match to be called. Mike Weaver (C) defeated Jack Jon Palmer and Roger Schu- Johnson (P) 6-1, 6-3. maker teamed up to defeat John DoublesHutchinson and Charles Haller in Bergsten-Rossmiller (P) dethe first doubles match. Marvin feated Bemis-Ryan-Quinn (C) Bergsten and Schumaker won 6-4, 4-6, 8-6. singles matches to account for Kellogg-Thompson (C) defeatthe other two Peru points. ed Palmer-Schumaker (P) 1-6, 6-2, 6-3. ResulisJohn Sullivan (S.B.) defeated Dick Kunde (P) 0-6, 6-2, 6-2. TERRY WICKHAM TOOK Marvin Bergsten (P) defeated PART IN THE NEBRASKA John Landon (S.B.) 11-9, 6-0. COLLEGIATE RODEO John Hutchinson (S.B.) defeatPeru has recently received reced Jon Palmer (P) 6-1, 7-5. ognition in another field. Terry Roger Schumaker (P) defeated Wickham and Gary Brown went Dennis Barnes (S.B.) 6-3, 6-4. Charles Haller (S.B.) defeated to Lincoln May 6 and 7 for the Nebraska Collegiate Rodeo. This E. Rossmiller (P) 6-1, 6-4. was not a small rodeo; there Doubleswere about seventy contestants. Palmer-Schumaker (P) defeatTerry entered three of the five ed Hutchinson-Haller (S.B.) 6-4, possible events-bull r i d in g, 6-3. bareback bronc rdiing, and bullKunde-Rossmiller (P) tied Sul- dogging. He has been bull riding livan-Landon (S.B.) 0-6, 11-11. for five years and has been bareback riding for two years in many of the rodeos throughout Nebraska. Bull-dogging was a new experience for Terry. As the rodeo ended, Terry failed to finish in the first four Coach Stemper's track squad places in bareback bronc riding ran up 77 1/6 points to defeat the and bull riding. However, he did Tarkio Owls 58 5/6 points in a finish fourth in the bull-dogging. dual meet at Tarkio. By winning the dual, the Bobcats won a postal meet, defeating Northwest Missouri State College of Maryville. Don Petersen, freshman fr o m Richfield, established a new two · · mile record for the school. His 10:11.3 bettered the 10:15.4 record he set in the Wesleyan Club Invitational. Petersen also won the mile in the dual meet. Lanny Richards, junior f r om Bellevue, won the 100-yard dash in 10.3 and won the 440-yard dash with a time of 53.1. John Christensen, a sophomore from Nebraska City, won the 220-yard dash with a time of 23.5 and placed second in the 100yard dash.

Peru-St. Benedict's Tennis Match Ends In Tie

Peru Trackrnen . Defeated Tarkio Owls

Wheelermen Split Doubleheader With Dana Vikings Peru traveled to Dana on May 10 and split a double-header with the Vikings. The Bobcats won the first game, 4-3, and dropped the nightcap by a score of 11-8. Peru jumped to an early 3-0 lead and held on to win. Ron Kelley started the game and received credit for the victory. He was relieved in the sixth inning by Don Jackson. The second game was a slug-· fest with three pitchers used by each team. Dana obtained a 2-0 lead in the second inning, b u t the Bobcats came back to tie the count. Drexer Harvey brought the Cats back into contention twice with booming home xµns~ but the Vikings outlasted · :P~ru and went ahead to stay in t 11 e sixth inning. Roger West started for Peru, but Ron Kelly relieved him, was credited with the loss.

PERU LOSES TENNIS MATCH TO WESLEYAN The Peru State tennis team dropped a 5-2 verdict to Nebraska Wesleyan, Monday, May 9. Winning matches for Peru were Roger Schumaker and Eldon Rossmiller. ResulisJim Fowler (W) defeatedRichard Kunde (P) 6-2, 6-1. Leonard Spearman (W) defeated Marvin Bergsten (P) 8-6, 6-0. Gale Beckman (W) defeated Jon Palmer (P) 6-4, 8-10, 6-2. Roger Schumaker (P) defeated Fred Clark (W) 6-3, 1-6, 7-5. Eldon Rossmiller (P) defeated Don Yost (W) 6-0, 6-1. DoublesSpearman-Beckman (W) defeated Rossmiller-Kunde (7) 7-5, 6-4. Fowler-Clark (W) d e feat e d Palmer-Schumaker (P) 6-2, 6-4.

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In the dual meet, Kenneth Humphrey, a sophomore hurdler and broad jumper from Auburn, won a first and two seconds. He won the broad jump with a leap of 21'2" and placed second in the high and low hurdles. In the high jump, three men from Peru, Jack Johnson, Phil Rhodes and Jack Head, broke the six foot barrier.

Jack Head clears ihe bar.

Charles Francis, veteran track and basketball man for the Bobcats, took the 880 yard run with a time of 2:06.3.

John Christensen, Ron Oestman and Don Bedea are ready to go,


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Wesleyan Road Show Presents All-College Convo An All-College Convocation was held Wednesday, May 11, 1960. The program featured the Wesleyan road show. Master of ceremonies was Warren Danskin. He gave a short resume of the past year's activities and introduced Miss Mary Boyken, soprano soloist. She sang "Deep River" and "Let Us Break Bread Together." , Lowell Gaither, tenor, con:,,. tinued the program with "Women Are Fickle," from Rigeletto, and "Thine Alone." Miss Janet Richey, piano soloist, presented a medley of tunes which included "Tenderly,'' "Someone to Watch Over Me," and "Love Is Just Around the Corner." Miss Richey also accompanied the vocal soloists. Miss Boyken then sang "The Glory of Love," and Mr. Gaither sang "Be My Love." As a finale the entire group joined to form a calypso ensemble; Miss Merry Perry presented an interpretive dance as they played "Jamaica Farewell."

Phi Alpha Theta Elects Officers Phi Alpha Theta held their election of officers 'for the coming year, May 16. The results were as follows: Jim Yelnek, president; Jerry Wanser, vicepresident; Bill Fitzgerald, secretary; Ted Kirby, treasurer, and Alan Wheeler, historian. Phi Alpha Theta has distributed their publication The Lantern to students. The Lantern consists of papers written for history classes on campus, a resume of chapter activities, and news of former Peruvians. They may be obtained from history majors for 35 cents.

Dramatics. Club Attends Play In Omaha The Peru Dramatics Club took a trip to Omaha on May 19. They attended the play "Strange Bedfellows" at the new Community Playhouse. Peru Dramatics Club members and their guests were taken on a tour of the theater before attending the final dress rehearsal of the play. Kendrik Wilson, director of the Community Playhouse, gave his comments to the group following the play.

Organizations

White Angel Dinner Held at Ulbrick's May 16 The White Angels held their annual dinner Monday, May 16, at Ulbrick's in Nebraska City. Dinner was served at 5:30 p.m. The girls had their choice of

chicken fried steak, chicken, or shrimp. There were twenty-eight girls attending the dinner, accompanied by the White Angel sponsor, Miss Frieda D. Rowoldt.

summer, · then concentrate on home ec and physical ed at Peru State-"have to follow my father By Mary Anna Gnade and be a coach, y'know." EveryHigh School Home Ee g i r 1s one has known for some time ' took part in a place setting con- that Harlene Palmer will be in test staged by Riggs at Auburn- nurses training. Jim Christ took won an impressive number of college work in Oregon last sumprizes for pretty tables! mer (enrichment, not college credit) and plans to go right into The Report on Campus Styles college this summer-an o the r was a wonderfully well exfollowing in the footsteps-physplained showing of work done in ics and math, biology and chemsewing and tailoring classes. Deistry! And another scientist, Hanspite the myriad problems deford Miller, Jr., only he isn't goscribed by Mrs. Sproul, the fining to accelerate .during summer ished products as modeled by the sessions (trombone tooting, no makers were well worth t h e doubt). "blood and tears." Mary Jarvis is another enrichThe violin-cello recital, as alment student-sat in on college ways, showed off the progress classes last summer-plans to Vic's kids have made during the enter summer school and conyear. It's good showmanship to centrate on elementary educastart with the beginners (with tion. Bill Tynon is coming to Peremarkably few skreeks) and go ru State but doesn't know. what on to professional type performhe is going to "take"-would like ances so both performers and to be a lawyer. Larry Blanton audience can see what can be will follow footsteps by going to done. University of Arkansas but isn't End-of-school brings on exub- sure about concentration-mayerance that must be let off some- be science or engineering. (Nothway. Did you witness the over- ing like lofty ambitions!) Marwhelming kissing that student shall Adams will work for Clay teacher Warren Dyke got caught Kennedy, farmer, this summer in after May Fete? The 4th and and IF he saves enough will go 5th grade girls explained it: to college at (shhh) Kearney. "We've just got a crush on j:J.im!" Rev. Gomon came along and in (Same girls who last year 'came answer to "what are you going early to school "just to say hello to do after graduation" he s a i d to (sigh) Steve Parker.") "loaf." We have three girls going

Campus School Chatter

Trips have been taken (and I highly recommend same for all parents as well), picnic~ have been planned and already rained in, and hours counted till school's out with the afterthought "Do I have to go to summer school?" Even the final PTA meeting (10 minutes squeezed between band and orchestra) was highly satisfactory since it was a surprise, more or less, to the parents attending the over-all c a m p u s school musical Tuesday evening. Each fond parent, naturally, felt the number their chick appeared in was outstanding. In fact, all numbers were outstanding, but who can help but succumb to the charms of 25 kindergartners singing earnestl1. A hurried poll of graduating class revealed the following plans "after I graduate": Karen Mcintire will work for her father this

SIGMA TAU DELTA HELD SHORT. MEETING A Sigma Tau Delta meeting was held on May 9 in the Music Hall Auditorium. This was the last meeting of the year and no business was discussed. Janice Jahn was in charge of entertainment and passed out topics for impromptu speeches. Sue Moore and Joni Wesolowski were announced ,as the winners by Mr. Holmes and a committee 01f judges.

into offices: Janie Crabtree at an insurance office in Omaha, Marcia Allgood and Dorothy Sherman. Herbie Simpson has already been working in brickyard at Nebraska City arid will go on full time. According to Haney Milstead's mother, he doesn't know . what he wants to do-get a summer job, come to Peru State. Keith Knople wants to get on summer construction, concentrate on business education at Peru next fall. Rich Reeves will start work at the meter plant in Nebraska City, save money to go to a mechanics training school. I tried to pin down some of the juniors but they objected. And Mr. Masek, after this graduation will catch his breath then leave for San Bernardino, California, to be close enough to a graduate college to pick up more schooling h i m s e 1f . Ah, commencement-

Larry Miller, son of Mr. and Mrs. James B. Miller of Tabor, Iowa, presented his senior trumpet recital in the College Auditorium, May 16. Larry, who is majoring in music education, is a member of band and' orchestra, also Peruvian singers and choir. He is teaching part time at Nemaha and Stella. His wife, formerly Georgia Isham of Elkhorn, is now an elementary teacher at Brock Public Schools. His recital included "Adagio and Allegro" by Handel; "Sonata" by Purcell; "Concerto" by Haydn; "Concertino" by Whitney; and "Hungarian Melodies" by Bach. He was accompanied on the piano by Mrs. Gilbert E. Wilson. How long it takes to cook dinner is no problem to today's bride. What worries her is how long will it take to thaw it out.

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Chuck Francis presented his paper "A History of Omaha" at the conference. Chuck had originally written this paper when he was a sophomore for a class in Colonial History.

STUDENT WIVES CLUB HELD PICNIC SUPPER Eight members of Peru's Student Wives Club and their husbands had a picnic supper at Waubonsie State Park, in Iowa, Sunday evening, May 15. Before and after the meal, the men played catch. This was the last Student Wives Club meeting of the 1959-60 school year.

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Miss Jean Schroeder from Augustana College in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, also presented a paper. Her paper was on the "Public Opinion in the Elections of 1936."

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Phi Alpha Theta, honorary history fraternity, held a regional onference at the University of Omaha, May 8, 1960. This conference was attended by students of the colleges and universities of Nebraska and South Dakota. Dr. Dearth, Dr. and Mrs. Schottenhamel, Marie Antalek, A 1 an Wheeler, and Chuck Francis were the six Peru representatives at the conference.

ALPHA MU OMEGA HAS STEAK FRY Members of Alpha Mu Omega enjoyed a steak fry between '5:00 and 6:00 p.m., Tuesday, May 10. Approximately 35 persons attended. The honorary mathematics fraternity members ate, in addition to the one-inch steaks, potato salad, baked beans, potato chips, ice cream, and iced tea. Although this was the last meeting of Alpha Mu Omega for the 1959-60 school year, no business session was held.

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Ninety-three Years Serving

The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks ...

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Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

Volume 55

Number 16

JUNE 27, 1960

Staff Adds Seven For Summer Six visiting instructors and an assistant librarian are on the faculty for the 196(} summer session at Peru. The visiting staff members include Dr. Robert W. Delaney, Dr. James May, Mr. Donold Scoby, Miss Alma Stoddard, Mrs. Margaret F. O'Brien, Mrs. Aileen Graham, and Ge or g e Gates. Dr. Delaney is from Ft. Lewis A. & M. College, Durango, Colorado, and was a member of the PSTC history department fr o m September 1955 through January 1957. He is teaching American History, Western Civilization, and History of Christianity. Dr. May, principal of Holmes Elementary School, Tulsa, Oklahoma, is teaching Techniques of Research, Elementary School Administration, and Science a n d Mathematics in E 1 em en t ary Schools. Mr. Donald Scoby, from the Sabetha, Kansas High School, is the graduate assistant in the biology department. .Mr. Scoby is a candidate for Master of Science in Education degree from Peru at the dose of the summer session. Miss Alma Stoddard, women's Physical Education instructor at Tarkio (Mo.) College, is teaching five women's P.E. classes. Mrs. O'Brien, director of curriculum for the Omaha Pub 1 i c Schools, will teach Improvement of Instruction in Social Studies workshop from July 5 to 15. Mrs. Aileen Graham, Wichita, Kansas, is spending her fifth consecutive summer as an assistant librarian. A 1948 graduate of Peru, Mrs. Graham holds an M.A. in Library Science from the University of Minnesota. Mr. Gates, from the American Red Cross, Lincoln, will teach first aid in post session.

Large Enrollment For Summer Session A total number of 488 students are enrolled in college classes at Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru for the 1960 summer session, according to Registrar F. H. Larson. The 1959 regular session enrollment was 402. The figure, which excludes the July 30-August 13 post session, includes 386 women and 102 men, including 18 veterans. Enrollments at Peru State's regular sessions have climbed steadily from 362 in 1955. Summer enrollment in the Campus Sch.ool (grades 1-6) is 65 stud~nts.

Faculty Introduced At Convocation The first convocation of the summer s e s s i o n was held Wednesday, June 8th, in the College Auditorium. President Neal S. Gomon opened the convocation with the entire assembly singing the National Anthem. A summer recreation program was announced. The faculty was then introduced and several appropriate remarks were made by President Gomon. Dr. Gomon then recognized all those in the assembly who are working on the Master's Degrees,

Of Nebraska Building Program Is Progressing By Barbara Wellensiek In an interview on June 10, President Go m o n said, "The building program is making satisfactory progress." The new Student Union is scheduled to be done before school opens this fall, but there is some doubt as to whether it will be finished then. It is to have priority over the other buildings. If possible, work will be shifted from the other buildings to the Student Union so that it can be completed by September. The Student Union will, however, be completed by October 1st at the latest. The A. V. Larson Building is progressing very satisfactorily and will be finished by September. The equipment will be moved in by August 15. President Gomon also said that the new wing of Eliza Morgan Hall has been accepted. The work being done on Majors Hall at 1he present is plastering and laying the floors. Majors Hall will be completed by July 15. The new street lighting that is now on the campus was a joint college-city installation. The total cost was $6,000 with the city paying 1h and the college paying % of the cost. Work has begun on a separate, new telephone system for Peru's campus. The system will be completed by September 1st.

Professor J. D.. Levitt took this picture of Karen Fankhauser and Rose Clancy standing in the windows of Mt. Vernon Hall shortly pefore workers tore down the wall of the old dormitory. The roof had already been removed. The picture might be entitled "Complete Air Conditioning at Peru" or "Pulchritude Amidst The Ruins." Anyhow, it's a novel and interesting example of photographic composition. In a sense, the picture has historical value. Mount Vernon had to go to make room for the new Student Union Building Âąo be compleied this fall.

Melvin Explains Graduate Program According to Dr. Keith Melvin, 1962 will be the last summer for anyone to qualify for a masters degree from Peru State. This means that anyone expecting to qualify for the masters at Peru would have had to be enrolled as of the summer of 1959. The program of courses is being carefully planned so that all who are in the program at the present time will be 'able to complete their degrees. The masters program at Peru is accredited by the North Central Association up to and including tb,e summer of 1962. Graduate work for transfer and certification purposes will be continued. The program will be pointed toward improvement in elementary and secondary instruction. Dr. Melvin stated that there are 11 candidates for the mas,ters degree on July 30: Robert Bacon, Gertrude Chase, John Christ Jr., Lillian Christ, Carl Gawart, Marvin Gerdes, Doyle Gump, Lee Norris, Dorothy Rieke, Donald Scoby, and Dale Whited. Bachelor's Degrees, Two-Ye a r Diplomas, and also those who were in attendance at Peru State for the first time. The convocation closed with the assembly singing the Color Song.

Mr. Pettit Retires

Home Economics Summer Program

Mr. Wilber Pettit, better known to everyone as the custodian of the Auditorium and Science Hall, Thirty-three students are enwill retire on June 30th. rolled in home economics this Mr. Pettit started working for - summer. Mrs. Louise Kregel is the college on September 1, 1948. the instructor. At that time he took over the The courses being offered this duties of Mr. William Vance. summer are: Beginning Foods Outside of spending one year and Nutrition Dietetics and Nuin the Army during World War_;. trition, Perso~al and Family RePeru has always been Mr. Pettit s . ¡htionships, and Special Problems home. He was born here, attend- in Home Economics. ed the Campus School, and then Special Problems include recontinued working in Peru. Prior search or study projects which to working for t~e c?llege, he may be arranged, with credit worked for the City Light Plant from one to three hours. One confor 27 years. ference period a week is required. Upon retiring he plans to con- Problems this summer include: tinue living in Peru. planning courses of study for Home Economics on junior and senior high levels, textbook evaluation, research in health and foods, and special diets. The people in Beginning Foods Mrs. Ralph Brandt, Librarian, and Nutrition class have been is attending summer school at Denver University. She is work- preparing cereals, fruits, an d ing towards a masters degree in vegetables in their two hour class Library Science, and will com- period. One outside project is required plete it in August of 1961. Last summer, Mrs. Brandt re- in all Home Economics classes. ceived an M.A. degree in Admin- Two projects are required in Beistration and Supervision at Peru. ginning Foods and Nutrition if it She has been librarian here since is taken for upper division credit. January, and will return to work August 21, immediately at the close of the summer session at Denver University. A faculty picnic scheduled for Mrs. Brandt's class schedule the Sunday afternoon of June 12 for this summer will include was rained out. An all day rain Government Documents, Techni- : the day before and continued cal Processes, and Advanced rains on Sunday forced abandonCataloging. ment of the planned picnic.

Mrs. Brandt Attending Denver University

Faculty Picnic Rained Out

Summer Recreation In Full Swing Tired of studying? ? ? May)Je you should put a little recreation into your curriculum. Now that the summer session is in full swing, there are many different types of sports in which one can participate. Coach Stemper has announced that softball, volley ball, swimming, badminton, tennis and square dancing are on the agenda for this summer. The .schedule of events will ch an g e from week to week with the exception of swimming, which will meet at 4:15 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday, and at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday. A schedule of the other events will be posted on the main bulletin board the first of each week. If your sport is not being offered see Coach Stemper. He will gladly direct any sport in which several people are interested. So-get your studies done early and participate in the recreational program that is being offered this summer.

Interest In Math Is Increasing The mathematics department is offering Fundamentals of Mathematics, Statistics, Slide Rule, and Arithmetic for Teachers. Fundamentals of Mathematics is a five hour course which combines algebra, trigonometry and analytical geometry, and is open to upperclassmen and graduates. Statistics is being offered for the first time this summer. Slide Rule has been offered every summer as well as this summer. Mr. Christ, head of the science department, stated, "Enrollment in math courses is increasing."


Language Arts Offers Thirteen Courses The Division of Language Arts Survey of American Literature is offering thirteen courses this is also a seminar class with an summer. They are: English Com- enrollment of seven. This class is position, Introduction to Litera- discussing the works of Ameriture, B;;ginning Journalism, Sur- can authors since 1850. Each stuvey of English Literature, Mod- dent is r~quired to write a term ern Poetry, Survey of American paper having to do with the litLiterature, Modern Fiction, Mod- erature of this time. · ern Drama, Teaching of English The Public Speaking and Funin High School, Fundamentals of damentals of Speech classes have Speech, Public Speaking, Speech been discussing the techniques of Correction and Development, and the symposium and panel. GreatPlay Production. er emphasis will be placed on rn Speech Correction and De- ,student speeches starting June 20. velopment, each student is pre- · There are thirteen students in paring a case study of a speech Survey of English Literature. defective. In Teaching of English The class is conducted partly on in High School, the students re- a seminar basis. Each student port on the topics, "Grading and will report on an author. Evaluation" or "What Are the Modern Drama 440G is a semMinimum Essentials of Senior inar class with eight students. English." Later, each student The class will discuss eleven will plan a one semester syllabus plays. Each student will choose for high school English and will one play and report on the auteach one lesson from this to the thor and his critical standing. class. There are seven people enModern Fiction has an enroll- rolled in Beginning Journalism. ment of eight and is a seminar This class is responsible for the class. Each student is required to three issues of the Pedagogian report on a short, modern novel. that will be put out this summer.

Whispers From Morgan By Jan Lillethorup Morgan Hall returned to life again June 6, after a week of quiet. There are about 75 residents in the girls' dormitory this summer. Third floor is vacant, but second, first, and the basement are well occupied. The first dorm meeting w a s held at 10:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 14. The following officers were elected for the summer: Lee Christen, president; Sherrill Torring, . vice president; and Marilynn· Giesmann, secretary-treas-_ urer. After the dorm meeting, wing meetings were held to elect wing counselors. They are, basement, Belva Hewitt; first, Alberta Kasparek; second east, Carolyn Kratochvil; and second west, Dorothy Hajek. A number of girls from the dorm were pretty put-out Friday afternoon, June 3. Joni Weslowski, Rose Clancy, and Peg McGee helped at Sue Moore's wedding that evening and the water was off in the dorm from 2:00 until 6:00 p.m. Not having water can make some things p r e t t y hard!!! Wednesday night, June 15, a bridal shower was held for Diane Schultz, a former Peruvian. Peg McGee and Jane Dietl had a room full of girls including Joni Weslowski, Mrs. Marlene Zinn, Mrs. Grace Russell, Jane Kunkel, Nancy Kunkel, and Jan Lillethorup. Jeannine Ehlers received a present from Gladys Monahan-a frog sandwich, with a very alive frog in it! The frog heard lots of screaming from girls on second when Marilynn Giesmann, Kay Jacobson; Marge Leenerts, and Pat Earl met up with him.

Week-ends in Morgan Ha 11 have been rather quiet, but it seems the television is kept in almost continuous use. Boys have been in the dorm all week painting the halls. The improvement is a very welcome one! Joan Riggle has been having car trouble lately-first of all the brakes went out, then she managed to flood the motor in Auburn and cause a traffic jam. Such luck! Rose Clancy has been staying up late at night reading a few science fiction novels. She claims they're pretty interesting. If you see her walking around in a space helmet, try not to pay any attention to her! The dorm's ice bag got a workout the other night when Sandy Krakow put it to good use. It seems she was chasing a volley ball up the bleachers in the gym, and missed the first step. She managed to end up with a few bruises. Gladys Monahan has joined the "We Rate" club. She received two long distance telephone calls ' in one week-end, both from the same lucky guy!! Must be nice! SATURDAY CLASSES HELD AT PERU Classes were held on the Peru campus Saturday, June 25, to 1 make up for the Fourth of July holiday. Peru Staters will have a chance to recuperate on the long week-end, July 2-4. Here are a few enthusiastic comments on the S at u rd a y classes: "If we have to, we have to." "I guess I won't die." "I'm against it, strictly against it!" "That's my wash day!" "Weird, Man!" "Ugh! UGH! !"

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of ihe Campus of a Thousand Oaks Member Infercollegiaie Press June 27, 1960 SUMMER STAFF Joni Wesalowski -----------------------------------Editor Pegg McGee -----------------------------Business Manager Barbara Wellensiek ------------------------------Reporter Julie Mayer --------------------------------------Reporter Barbara Clover ----------------------------------Reporter Bob Taenzler ------------------------------------Reporter Jan Lil!ethorup ----------------------------------Reporter Dave Longfellow --------------------------------Columnist Mary Anna Gnade ------------------------------Columnist Stewart Linscheid _________________________________ Sponsor

Eleve.n Masters Candidates There are eleven Master's Degree candidates who expect to get their degrees at the close of the summer session. They are: Robert Bacon, Ravenna, Nebraska, Secondary Administration; Gertrude Chase, Gresham, Nebraska, Secondary Supervision; John Christ Jr., Peru, Nebraska,, Secondary Education (Biology); Lillian Christ, Peru, Nebraska, Elementary Education; Carl Gawart, Nebraska City, Nebraska, Secondary Administration; Marvin Gerdes, Auburn, Nebraska, Secondary Administration; Doyle Gump, Lincoln, Nebtaska, Secondary Administration; Lee Norris, Verdon, Nebraska, Secondary Administration; Dorothy Rieke, Auburn, Nebraska, Secondary Education (English); D 0 na1 d Scoby, Sabetha, Kansas, Secondary Education (Biology); D a 1 e Whited, Norfolk, Nebraska, Psychology and Guidance.

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Far and Beyond By Dave Longfellow The American coffee break has become an institution indulged in by all, with the possible exception of the Coffee Tasters Union. It is viewed by so1,11e as an unproductive waste df time, b u t some remarkable thought has had its roots in the morning coffee hour. Witness this baseball line-up which was evolved by philosophy students Roy Laue and Bill Almond during last summer's session: Short-stop; Socrates; 2nd base, Plato; 1st base, Aristotle. That's a double play combination to rank with Tinkers to Evers to Chance. Third baseman, Heraclitus, a man who believed in fire, is the logical choice for the "hot corner." Pythagorus, a man who depended on geometry for every explanation, is "way out in left field," while Leucippus, who believed in the atom as the basis of all is the natural choice for right field. Marcus Aurelius and Zeno, Stoics with a lot of control, are the pitchers, and Pestilozzi, who was always catching it, is the catcher. You .need a mean guy for the manager so Laue and Almond d(:!1 cided on Caligula, no meane r than whom there never was. Epicureas is the choice for the concessions stand, while Marx and Engles have the business managership. Water boy is Thales who was a great believer in water.

• * ** The path of teachers leaving Nebraslm in favor of the western states is getting deeper, and the route 1s being touted by reports from Bob Slaughter who teaches in the Pueblo, Colorado system. It's just great out there they say. Ruth Linsi:heid~ p1aces California in the "greener pastures" category. Ruth, who taught in the Santa Ana schools this last year, is here for a visit with her parents. Succumbing to this propaganda, Nancy Kunkel has decided on Reno, Nevada for her next year's address. Also hitting the trail west is Bob Whited, a candidate for the master's degree this summer, who is considering Oregon or Arizona as possible headquarters sites after three years at Bloomfield, Nebraska. Kathy !deus, spending this summer in the Science ·Hall, reports that husband Harvey, a masters recipient last summer, is embroiled in courses at the University of Wyoming at Laramie. Clyde Barrett, another graduate of the masters program, made a brief visit to the campus two weeks ·ago and expressed amaze-

non est disputandum''-and, quite literally, there's no question about it.,when it comes to taste, Coca-Cola Wins bands down. In Latin, Greek or Sanskrit~ "Have a Coke" means the same thingit's an invitation to the most refreshing pause of your life. Shall we?

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• ** * The superintendent of a school system has a lot of headaches. Among them are discipline and the hiring of teachers. Dick Arington, former superintendent at Nemaha found that out last year. He moves to Bratton Union this fall and reports with glee that they have all the teachers hired already. He figures he can handle the discipline alright, but teachers can be a headache and a half. Roy Laue begins his first year as a superintendent at Arthur, Nebraska and is having trouble filling one post on the faculty. It seems that he needs the strange combination of a math and music teacher. As far as I know there just "ain't no sech animal," but if any of you readers know of one contact Roy. The town is friendly, the fishing and hunting is great, and the pay is quite attractive.

• * •• An education in history is a great help in geography. Harold Johnson asked Dr. Robert DeJ.an-

ey where Meeker, Colorado was located and the good doctor guessed it was in the western part of the state, basing his reasoning on ·a massacre there involving the Ute Indian tribe, which seldom got east of the Rockies. Well, that might be okay, but you've got to take into consideration that those might have been the lean years when an Indian had to go a long ways for a good massacre. Remember, you _heard it here first, and will probably wish you hadn't.-DKL

Diddel Exhibit Miss Norma Diddel, art instructor, has six of her. recent oil paintings exhibited in the Bowman Hardware Store in Peru. All the pictures but one, "Peru Street," were done by Miss Diddel when she visited Colorado last summer. "Morning Mist" and "Evening" were painted near Estes Park. "Old Barn" was painted west of Johnston, Colorado. The public is invited to see this exhibit.


Library Column By Barbara Wellensiek

STUDENT DIRECTORY Summer Session 1960 Nebraska Siaie Teachers College

Edna Ferber's "Ice Palace" depicts today's Alaska, its modern, vigorous people and: its dramatic weather and scenery. The novel tells of a fifty-year battle between two Titans trying to dominate Alaska's future. This is the story of their lovely Y o u n g granddaughter, Christine Storm, who had to choose between' two younger Titans-a choice t h a t might affect Alaska's future. The characters are strong and bold. This is a novel which everyone would enjoy.

Musical Portraits Entertain at Convo Convocation Thursday, Jun e 16 at Peru State offered enjoyment for all attending. A talented trio from New England appeared in the first Summer Artist Series program. Featuring soprano, tenor and pianist, the Musical Portraits, as they are known, was the brainchild of pianist-arranger D a n a Lordly, whose aim was to combine concert, musical comedy and theatre and present them in a new and entertaining! fashion. In their presentation the group, which met as students at Bos-

ton's New England Conservatory, replaced the formal recital approach with scenes and skits featuring arrangements of music that everyone knows and loves. It was apparent that to the Musical Por,traits music is fun, and offered an opportunity for listeners to share the enthusiasm of three young people with a new and novel approach to the music they love. The artists were Dana Lordly, pianist-arranger, Angelo Picari, tenor, and Dolores Baldyga, soprano.

American Since '58 Loves New Mexico's Scenery and Culture '

By Barbara Clover

When Ria Bauer, who is now the wife of Dr. Robert Delaney, a former Peruvian, came to this country from Germany in August 1958, she was surprised in a very good sense. Everything in America was much nicer than she had expected.

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Loves Open Spaces The things that Mrs. Delaney likes best about this country are the wide open spaces, the scenery, and the f r e e d o m from crowding. Mrs. Delaney says the most obvious difference between Germany and: America is the latter's higher standard of living. The modern appliances of this country are available in Germany but only for a few very well-todo people. The automatic washer and dryer top her list of desirable appliances. To Mrs. Delaney the most impressive part of America is the state of New Mexico, where Indian, Spanish, and Anglo cultures come together. She loves the pueblos and cliff dwellings. She says, "Santa Fe is unique to America. A big city could be built any place in the world, but not another Santa Fe." Americans Friendly People everywhere have been friendly to Mrs. Delaney. She is enjoying her second summer in Peru, where her husband is a visiting professor. She loves the campus and the greenery but finds the climate difficult to adjust to. Mrs. Delaney considers herself luckier, than the average immigrant. She had a job waiting for her, a friend to meet her in New York, and the language was no

barrier because she came here ,to teach English. She says that she has had no big adjustment to make because she is associated with 'the same kind of people here as she was in Germany. Language Scholar Mrs. Delaney was born in Gelsenkerchen, Germany, which is in the Ruhr area. Her parents and two sisters are still living there. She attended law school at Munenster University for three years and has a minor in international law from the University of Heidelberg, where she majored in foreign languages. For several years before coming to the United States, Mrs. Delaney lived in Heidelberg where she worked for a gradua,te professor and taught German. In Heidelberg she met a professor from ]ft. Lewis A. & M. College, of Durango, Colorado. This meeting led to a job offer for her. It was in Durango that she met her husband. Visit Home Last summer the Delaneys flew to Iceland, Scotland, Ireland, Holland, and Germany. While Dr. Delaney went on to Paris and London, Mrs. Delaney stayed in Germany for a month's visit with her parents. She then flew from Hamburg, Germany to Durango. More Travel Mrs. Delaney has visited 22 states since she came to America. She spent three weeks in New York when she arrived, th en travelled to Durango, Colorado by bus in order to see more of the country. She spent several days in Washington D. C., St.

(Continued from page three)

Torring, Sherrill, 11091h Chestnut St., Atlantic, Iowa. Trail, Mary, Nebraska City. Tyler, Donald, Peru.

Rieger, Audrey Mrs., Fairview, Kans. Riggle, Joan, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Roberts, Robert, Delzell Hall, Peru. Robinson, Anna, H a m b u r g , Iowa. Rooney, Lillian, Sabetha, Kans. Roos, LaVerna, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Rowe, Elizabeth, 2106 First Ave., Nebraska City. Russell, Emma Mrs., Auburn.

Marian Anderson's account of her life is inspiring and deeply moving. Her autobiography entitled "My Lord What a Morning" expresses her warm and reverent approach to living and to music. She began singing as a mere child in her church in Philadelphia. During her girlhood she began to be in demand in other churches, and the small fees she earned enabled her to help her widowed mother and family. Encouraged by others, she began years 0f arduous study on her way towards a musical career. Once she ventured too far ahead, making a premature debut in New York's Town Hall that was a complete failure. Years later the voice of Marian Anderson was first recognized in Europe. From that time on, her tours ii.ave taken her to every corner of the United States, to Mexico, South America, Europe, Russia and the Orient. Also there is the side of her life that f e w people know, the happy marriage and home in Connecticut. Particularly moving in her patience t o w a r d race prejudice, which she has endured with sadness rather than anger. The book unconsciously portrays a Great Lady of two worlds, the world of music and the world of plain living. "Mine Enemy Grows Older" is an autobiography by Alexander King, a non conformist. King has done about everything and he speaks freely of his experiences. He tells why he wore nothing but pink ties for thirty years and how a famous author once sat quietly on a shore watching King drown. He cured himself of drug addiction with the help of doctors and: hospitals. Once an advertising agency gave a party in honor of nine prominent illustrators responsible for the success Of a big campaign. All nine of them happened to be King under different names and addresses and with gracefully invented past histories. King's observations on the .. insane, on marriage a.nd on Am"erica are the pepper of this flavored narrative. Pe.ru State's Library has belonged to the Rocky Mountain Bibliographical Center for one year. By being a member of this organization, the library can use the resources of other libraries belonging to it. The United States Office of Education Pamphlet file, which is on the main floor of the library, can be a great help to student teachers. This file will answer any question about st u d e n t teaching. The library also has a microfilm reader and has purchased a sizeable amount of microfilm for tsudents' use. Louis, Kansas City, and Denver "looking thing& over." The Delaneys are looking forward: to a trip to Mexico during the month of August. They plan to v.isit Acapulco and Mexico City.

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u Underwood, Apts., Peru.

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v Vanderford, Constance, Peru. Vanderfor!i, Dale, Peru. Verbeek, Janice, Peru. Verbeek, Joe, Peru. Vincent, Tom, Springfield. Vogele, Carol, Rulo. Volkmer, Lulu, 4128 No. 70, Lincoln. Volkmer, Marlene, Talmage.

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Waggoner, L. A., Johnson. Sampson, Maxine, Endicott. Walker, Vera, Riverton, Iowa. Sand, Blanche, Pharoah Apts., Wamsley, Frances, Falls City. Peru. Watkins, Gordon, Auburn. Sand, Kenneth, Pharoah Apts., Watkins, Lucile, Campbell. Peru. Weber, Ruth, Cook. Sasseen, Nellie, Unadilla. Weddle, Ida, Peru. Sauberzweig, Joann, Otoe. Wehrman, Ruth, Falls City. Sauer, Ruby, Falls City. Weik, Joyce, Nehawka. Sayer, William, Peru. Weise, Alma, Jansen. Scarrow, Lloyd, Fairbury. Wellensiek, Barbara, Lorton. Schlange, Augusta, Auburn. Welsh, Mary Low, Plattsmouth. Schmit, Leland, Delzell Hall, Wellsandt, Gloria, Talmage. Peru. Wendt, Sharol, Syracuse. Schmitz, Harold, Delzell Hall, Wenninghoff, Ronald, Pawnee Peru. City. Schoening, Marilyn, Malvern, Weiland, S h e r r i e , Highland, Iowa. Kans. Schriever, Ella, Eliza Morgan Wesolowski, Joan, Eliza MorHall, Peru. gan Hall, Peru. Schuler, Edna, Falls City. Wheeler, Alan, Stella. Schulz, Elva, Diller. Wheeler, Charlotte, Nemaha. Schomacher, Joan, 2015 1st Wheeler, Marcella, P a w n e e Ave., Nebraska City. , City. Scoby, Glenna Jean, Sabetha, Whited, Dale, Ave. Apt. No. 1, Kans. Auburn. Scoby, Mary Jeanne, Fairview, Whited, Frances, Bloomfield:. Kans. Whitney, Harry, Delzell Hall, Shafer, Dorothy, Nebraska Peru. City. Whitson, Lois, Coin, Iowa. Sheehan, Marg., Verdon. Wieckhorst, Norma, R.R. No. 2, Sheldon, Karen, Percival, Iowa. Nebraska City. Sheldon, Tom, Percival, Iowa. Wilhite, Genevieve, 904 13th Shubert, Carole, Shubert. Ave., Nebraska City. Sipes, Kenneth, Oak Hill HousWilson, Mary Ruth, Peru. ing, Peru. â&#x20AC;˘ Windels, Doris, Unadilla. Skalak, Mary, Plattsmouth. Wing, Carolyn, Shubert. Slaughter, Bob, Everett ClauWOlcott, Darrel, Delzell Hall, sen; Peru. Peru. Smith, Leland, 1520 1st Ave., Wolfe, Judith, Humboldt. Nebraska City. Workman, Joseph, Tobias. Snyder, Elsie, Unadilla. Wurtele, Mary, Dunbar. Spangler, Ve 1m a , Fairview, y Kans. Spaulding, Mary, Osceola. Yates, Verlin, Randolph, Iowa. Speak, Barbara, Brock. Yearsley, Mary, Dunbar. Specht, Priscilla, Syracuse. Yelnek, James, Delzell Hall, Spilker, D o 1 o r e s , Oak Hill Peru. Housing, Peru. Young, Helen, Peru. Stalder, Lydia, Humboldt. Young, Ruth, Cortland. Stanley, Blanche, Thurman, Zabel, Edna, Johnson. Iowa. Zinn, Michael, 1502 M St. AuStessman, Clarence, Omaha. burn. Stettenbenz, Jack, Tecumseh. Stevens, Hazel, Bellevue. Stewart, Mildred, B e a v e r Crossing. Stites, Jerrianne, Rockport, Mo. Dr. Darrell Wininger, associate Stock, Frances, Auburn. professor of educational psycholStock, Kay, 910 4th Corso, Ne- ogy, of Peru State Teachers Colbraska City. lege, atte11ded a religious conStogdill, Kathryn, Malvern, ference for ministers at Regina, Iowa. Saskatchewan, Canada. The conStone, Clare, Falls City. ference was held May 30 through Stoner, Lillian, Hiawatha, Kans. June 3. Story, Barbara, Nemaha. Some of the subjects discussed Strader, Eugene. during the conference were imStuck, Zelda, Auburn. proving church services and Sunderland, Nedra, Liberty. Christian higher education. Susong, Madlyn, 1317 13th St., While in Canada, Dr. Wininger Auburn. visited a provincial college. The Swanson, Brenda, Rosalie. State C o 11 e g es are financed Sweenie, .Bruce, Nemaha. through the sta~e but are not run

Winninger Attends Religious Conference

T Taenzler, Robert, Plattsmouth. Taylor, Gertrude, Talmage. Tegtmeier, Carol, DuBois. Tegtmeier, Clarice, Burchard. TenHulzen, Doris, 1621 Central Ave., Auburn. Teten, Betty, 417 Lincoln, Lincoln. Thelmann, Merna, Nebraska City. Thies, Ruth, Burr. Thomas, Guilford, Nemaha. Thompson, Marian, Falls City. Tiemeyer, Ellen, Rockport, Mo. Torkelson, Loyal, Auburn.

by the state. A student ms;" teach after only one year of college. The certificates they receive are good in any province in Canada. All of the certificates are issued through the universities even though the work done to qualify for the certificate was d-0ne in a college.

GEBER 'S

Conoco Service TOPS IN SERVICE BR4-3818 Auburn


Student Directory Summer Session 1960

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A Ackley, Gladys, Box 281, Peru. Adams, Judy, Peru~ Albert, Mrs. Lorraine, 416 E. 16th, Falls City. Allen, Robert, Oneida, Kans. Allgood, Marcia, Box 295, Peru. Allgood, Monty, Peru. Almond, William 0., Falls City. Anderson, Adelaide, Steinauer. Auderson, Dwight L., Oak Hill, Peru. Andrews, Evalin, Box 465, Nebraska City. Ankrom, Mrs. Florence, Shubert. Applegate, ·Marianne, Peru. Arington, Richard, Nemaha. Armstrong, Carolyn, Brownville. Armstrong, Deva, 912 14th St., Auburn. Ast, Jean, Humboldt.

B Bacon, Robert, Mcintire Apt., Peru. Badberg, June Jessie, 301 1st Ave., Nebraska City. Bailey, F. Lucile, Avenue Store Peru. Ballue, Jeneveia, Peru. Banks, Camilla, Stena. Banks, Stephen, Stella. Barr, Thelma, Box 11, Nebraska City. Bartram, Elsie, Pawnee City. Bath, Edith, Auburn. Bath, Elaine, Auburn. Bauer, Ruth, Verdon. Bausel, Lawrence, Dawson. Bebb, Betty Lou, Stella. Beer, Wilma Mrs., Dawson. Behrends, Georgina, 1500 O. St., Auburn. Behrends, Hilda Mrs., E 1k Creek. Bell, Velma, Tabor, Iowa. Benedict, Mildred, Tabor, Iowa. Bennett, James, Stephens Apt., Peru. Bennett, Shirley, Lake View, Iowa. Benson, Mrs. Nellie, Sidney, Iowa. Benton, Mrs. · Dixie, Oak Hill Housing, Peru. Bergsten, Marvin, RR 3, Red Oak, Iowa. Bernard, Rose, ,Auburn. Biere, John, Auburn. Bigley, Florence, Crab Orchard. Birkley, Sabria, Tabor, Iowa. Blas, Mary K., 923 B. St., Fairbury. Boettcher, Wenona, Unadilla. Bohling, Edna, Tecumseh. Boos, Lorraine, Underwood, Iowa. Bosworth, Rita, 902 N. 10th St., Nebraska City. Bottcher, Lon, Russell Apt., Peru. Brauch, Gale, Peru. Braun, Viola Mrs., Russell Apt., Peru. Brock, Mildred, Tecumseh. Brunner, Odus, Auburn. Brunsdon, Ruby, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Boggess, Mable, Salem.

Clancy, Rose, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Clarke, Ruth, Pawnee City. Clay, Laura C., Malvern, Iowa. Clevenger, Elizabeth, Shubert. Clinkenbeard, Thelma, Morrill, Kans. Clover, Barbara, 2117 P. St., Auburn. Clutter, Peggy, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Coatney, Rex, Cook. Cockerham, Lydia, Peru. Cogdill, Betty, Peru. Cooper, John, Pate's Apts., Peru. Corners, Grace, 1320 15th St., Auburn. Cotton, J. L., Box 63, Peru. Cox, Viola L., Peru. Craig, Nedra, Peru. Craig, Sandra, Peru. Crooker, Susan, 1605 K, Auburn. Crooker, Theoda, Falls City. D d'Allemand, Arline, Wauneta. Dandliker, Lois, Sabetha, Kans. Dickerson, Nancy, Nebraska City. Dierking, Irene, Otoe. Dietl, Connie, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Dietl, Jane, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Dodson, Merritt, Nehawka. . Doeden, Ruth E., Cook. Dovland, Maude, Humboldt. Drewes, Gerane, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Duder, Mary Louise, T a b 1e Rock. Duncan, Laura Mrs., Box 64, Nehawka. Dyke, Marilyn, Essex, Iowa.

Gerdes, Marie, R. 1, Auburn. Gerdes, Marvin, 1014 19th Auburn. Giesmann, Marilynn, El i z a Morgan Hall, Peru. Giittinger, Evelyn, Dunbar. Gilbert, Florence, Sidney, Iowa. Gilley, Georgia, Nehawka. Gilliland, Lucile, 1410 N., Aubur;n. Glynn, Marilyn, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Gobber, Evelyn, 1506 L. St., Auburn. Goodin, Linda, Humboldt. Goodin, Nelle, Humboldt. Gottula, Velvette, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Graham, Mary Ann, Auburn. Graham, Mary K., Percival, Iowa. Gray, Edwin G., Delzell Hall, Peru. Green, Alyce, Plattsmouth. Green, Ella Marie, Brock. Grimes, Janis, Julian. Grindle, Janie, Malvern, Iowa. Grindle, Lorraine, Malvern, Iowa. Groves, Ted, Peru. Grundmann, Rosemary, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Gude, Genene, 801 12th Ave., Nebraska City. Gump, Doyle, 724 S. 45th, Lincoln.

:E; Earl, Patricia, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Eddy, Bruce, Peru. Eddy; Carol R., Auburn. Eddy, Lillian, Peru. Egger, Lydia Mrs., Douglas. Ehlers, Jeannine, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Eichenberger, Neoma, Sabetha, Kans. Eichenberger, Nora, Steinauer. Eisenhauer, Irene, Burr. Elliott, Mary C., Auburn. Elmore, Richard, 1901 Central, Auburn. Eshelman, Roger L., Delzell Hall, Peru. Eschen, Ruby, 619 S. 5th, Nebraska City. Estes, Marie Ellen, Pawnee City.

F Ferrel, Thelma, R a n d o 1p h , Iowa. Fink, Pauline, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peril. Fisher, Carrie, Verdon. Fisher, Fern, 1814 Abbott, Falls City. Flessner, Carolyn, Burr. Foster, Jessie, Tabor, Iowa. Foster, Marcella, Tabor, Iowa. Frazie~ Jessie, Malvern, Iowa. French,Dorothy, 521 N. 11th, c Plattsmouth. Carlson, Mary J., Syracuse. Frisbie, Sylvia, A. V. Larson, Carlson, Jerry, 1107 Central Peru. Ave., Aubilrn. Fuller, Mildred, Eliza Morgan Carman, Joyce, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Hall, Peru. Furlong, Lillian, 1904 McLean Caripenter, Esther, Sabetha, St., Falls City. Kansas. Carver, Marguerite, Burchard. G Champ, Elaine, Wymore. Garner, Lena, Hiawatha, Kans. Chase, Gertrude, Gresham. Garner, Mary, Falls City. Christ, James W., Box 31, N.S. Garrett, Walter, Bloomington. T.C., Peru. Gawart, Carl, Nebraska City. Christ, John C., Box 31, N.S. Gawavt, Elfrieda, Nebraska T.C., Peru. City. Christ, Lillian, Box 31, N.S.T. Gehringer, Ann, Eliza Morgan C., Peru. Hall, Peru. Christen, Leona, Eliza Morgan George, Wyeman, Madison. Hall, Peru. Gerdes, Dorothea, Humboldt.

Jahn, Janice, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Jarvis, Mary, Peru. Jeanneret, Gerald, Brock. Jensen Willard, Delzell Hall, Peru. Johnson, B. A., Syracuse. Johnson, Donna L., Box 382, Humboldt. Johnson, Wilma, Elliott, Iowa. Jones, Helen, Salem. Jones, Virginia, Tecumseh. K

Karnes, Lila, 1109 Virginia St., Sabetha, Kans. Kasparek, Albevta, Haddam, Kans. Kelly, Agnes, Verdon. Kelly, Clara, Palmyra. Kennedy, Diane, 817 E. 17th, Falls City. Kerns, Jane, Humboldt. Kerns, Racl}el, Humboldt. Kesterson, Mildred, T a b o r , Iowa. Killion, Roger, 2115 P St., Auburn. Kirkendall, Fern, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. · Kistmer, Jessie, Humboldt. Kite, Bonita, Auburn. Klein, Helen, Union. Kleopfer, Mil an, Fairview, Kans. Knoll, Betty, Nebraska City. Knople, Lillian, Peru. H Koester, Doris, DuBois. Hajek, Dorothy, Odell. Kopplin, Kathleen, Sterling. Hall, Blanche, Humboldt. Korber, Janice, Bern, Kans. Hall, Joyce, Wetmore, Kans. ~oso, JoAnn, 619 W 20th, Falls Hall, Vera, Tecumseh. City. Hannaford, Merle, Brownville. Koso, June, 2124 Wilson, Falls Happ, Theda, Humboldt. City. Hardin, A1ta, Tecumseh. Krakow, Elfreida, Superior. Hardin, Frances, Tecumseh. Krakow, Sandra, Peru. Hardy, Donna, Oak Hill, Peru. Kratochoil, Carolyn, Raymond. Hardy, L. J., Oak Hill, Peru. Kresok, Doris, Tobias. Harper, Ellen, Peru. Kuck, Charles, Morrill, Kans. Haskins, Clyde, 1520 1st Ave., Kuhes, Lorene, Eliza Morgan Nebraska City. Hall, Peru. Hauptman, JoAnn, Peru. Kunkel, Nancy, Eliza Morgan Hawley, Jean, Nemaha. Hall, Peru. Hayes, Irene, Auburn. Hebard, Albert, 718 Ave. A, L Plattsmouth. Laha, Patrick, Oak Hill, Peru. Hecker, Jim (Miss), Hamburg, Laird, Kathl€en, Sidney, Iowa. Iowa. Lambert, Betty, Murray. Hedgecock, Geraldine, HiawaLape, Viola, Falls City. tha, Kans. Laue, Roy, Auburn. Heidbrin, Charles, Ste m 'Per Laverty, Olive, Eliza Morgan Apts., Peru. Hall, Peru. Heim, Charlotte, Dawson. Learned, A. Lucity, A. V. LarHelmer, Marie, Eliza Morgan son, Peru. Hall, Peru. Leenerts, Marjorie, Bruning. Henderson, Arlene, Brock. Leeper, Beverly, 1605 4th CorHeng, Robert D., 1337 12th so, Nebraska City. Corso, Nebraska City. Loew, Leroy, Oak Hill HousHerfkens, Ruth, Box 106, Ne- ing, Peru. braska City. Lillethorup, Jan, Eliza Morgan Hewitt, Belva, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Hall, Peru. Lindquist, Luanne, Eliza MorHickman, Angela, 417 N. 22nd, gan Hall, Peru. Nebraska City. Lippold, Laura, Velvick Apts., Hicks, Lucille, Auburn. Peru. High, Dorothy, 2002 3rd Ave., Lockwood, Ruby, Brock. Nebraska City. Lohmeyer, Karen, Falls City. Hilger, Mable, Hamburg, Iowa. Loney, Allen, 308 Oregon, HiaHilgerson, Margaret, E 1i z a watha, Kans. Morgan Hall, Peru. Lone.y; Mae, Hiawatha, Kans. Hillman, Elda, Tecumseh. Longfellow, David, Peru. Hilton, Mildred, Farr a gut , Longfellow, Stanley, Peru. Iowa. Lookabell, Hazel, M al v er n , Hinds, Mae, Auburn. Iowa. Hinton, Elaine,. Hamlin, Kans. Loofe, Georgia, 2211 First Ave., Hoban, Mary Jane, 2410 Wil- Nebraska City. son, Falls Gty. Lovelady, Lois, Fairview, Kans. Holmes, Eleanor, 1602 Valley, Lucas, Orrillia, Hamburg, Iowa. Falls City. Lumm, Hazel, Percival, Iowa. Hoover, Nettie, Auburn. Lutie, Graham, Sidney, Iowa. Horr, Arlene, Adams. Luttman, Louise, Springfield. Hoscher, Thelma, Murray. Lutz, Josie, Auburn. Hosfiel, Verna, Rockport, Mo. Lyon, Lillian, Nebraska City. Howe, Arthur, Verdon. Hoy, Lela, 211 W Grant, ShenM andoah, Iowa. Madsen, Carol, Nehawka. Hughes, Judith, Beattie, Kans. Maffi!tt, Helen, Sidney, Iowa. Hulbert, Susan, 1612 Lane, Mahoney, Betty Ann, TecumFalls City, Nebr. seh. Hultquist, John, Peru. Meyers, Hazel, Hiawatha, Kans. Humphrey, Mildred, 1514 CenMalone, Inez, Unadilla. tral, Auburn. Manche, Bertha, 213 11th St., Hunley, Virgene, Rulo. Sabetha, Kans. Hunzeker, Joann, Pawnee City. Maness, William, Delzell Hall, Hutton, Gaynell, Nemaha. Peru. Manley, Ethel, Odell. I Maple, Delma, Tecumseh. !deus, Catherine, Minden. Marshall, Paul, 1110% J, Auburn. J Martin, Gerald, Salem. Jacobson, Kaye, Eliza Morgan Mason, Beatrice, Tecumseh. Hall, Peru.

Master~. Frances, Syracuse.·~ Mattes, Gretchen, Hamburg', Iowa. Matthews, Neva, 2011 Washington, Hamburg, Iowa. Mayer, Julie, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Melvin, Martha, Peru. Mendenhall, Mabel, M o r r i i 1, Kans. Meyer, Daisy, 2202 Main, Falls City. !Meyer, Enid, Talmage. Miller, Frances, 312 W. 20th, Falls City. Miller, Frederick, S t e m p e r Apts., Peru. Miller, Georgia, Peru:. Miller, Hanford Jr., Peru. Miller, Judith, Peru. Miller, Larry, Peru. Miller, V)ola, Elmwood. Maloy, Vila, Unadilla. Monahan, Gladys, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Morrell, Evelyn, Palmyra. Moyer, Norma, Percival, Iowa. Mueller, Joann, Peru. Muluania, Ralph, Rockport, Mo. Murphy, Margaret, Tecumseh. McBride, Ruth, Springfield. McCall, Florence, Pawnee City. McGee, Peggy, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. McGinnis, J. E., Dawson. McGovern, Edna, Nebraska City. McKercher, Norma, Peru. McMeekin, Dorothy, Shelby.

N Nance, Shirlee, 1710 Courthouse Ave., Auburn. Navrkal, Christine, Dunbar. Neels, Eileen, 1502 4th Ave., Nelson, Frances, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Nelson, Loma, Crab Orchard. Newton, Larry, 1512 N. Auburn. Norris, Lee, Verdon. Norton, Deanna, Oak Hill Housing, Peru. Norton, Robert, Oak Hill Housing, Peru. Norvell, Sharon, Auburn.

0 Ocker, Emma, Cook. Oestmann, Lucille, Johnson. Olson, Evelyn, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Orth, Abbie, Peru. Owens, Gerald, Verdon. p Pabian, Otto, Clarkson. Padgett, William, Tobias. Parli, Carolyn, Humboldt. Parli, John, Delzell Hall, Peru. Pasek, Anna, Humboldt. Penn, Mildred, Sidney, Iowa. Penney, Ella, Verdon. Peters, Esther L., Cook. Peters, Phyllis, Johnson. Peterson, Esther, Talmage. Pflaum, Gary, Delzell Hall, Peru. Pflaum, Mildred, Dawson. Pilch, Eva M. S., Auburn. Pilkington, Pauline, Oak Hill Housing, Peru. Pilkington, Ross, Oak Hill Housing, Peru. Pohlman, Kim, Humboldt. Pope, Russell, Riverton, Iowa. Price, Wanda, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Pugh, Olive Mrs., Auburn. Pugsley, Norma J., Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru.

a Quante, Lawrence, Brock. Quante, Veve; Brock. R

Rasmussen, Kay, Eliza Morgan Hall, Peru. Reason, Keith, Sidney, Iowa. Rector, Harley, Weeping Water. Reed, Leona Mrs., Auburn. Reeves, Shirley, Brownville. Remmers, R. Wiley, Auburn. Reuter, Emma Mrs., Cook. Rickabaugh, Frances, Ta b or, Iowa. Ridgeway, Ernest, 1604% 5th Ave., Nebraska City. Ricke, Dorothy, Auburn. (Continued on page four)

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Women's Physical Ed. Offers Variety Miss Alma Stoddard, Physical children, and a broad, g e n' e r a 1 Education Instructor from Tar- elementary physical education kio, (Mo.) College, is the visiting program. Such things as rhythms, instructor in the Women's Physi- stunts, tumbling, and games will cal Education Department for be covered. Eighteen people are in the Inthis summer. dividual Sports dass. Badminton, Five P.E. courses are being offered this summer, including shuffleboard, deck tennis, paddle physical education for Elemen- tennis, archery, and aerial darts tary School Teachers, individual will be played in the course of sports, swimming, square danc- the summer. Nine girls are enjoying the ing, and tennis. There are only eight girls in cool comfort of the swimming tennis because of limited c o u r t . pool. The swimmers are learning facilities, but the demand for the basic swimming skills as well as course was much greater. This a variety of strokes. Twenty-two people are learnclass is always filled early on registration day. These e i g ht ing to square dance, in a class girls are getting their exercise which also covers round dances climbing up the hill from the and dances which can be taught to grade school children. courts as well as· playing tennis. The physical education proPhysical Education for Elementary . School Teachers has gram for this summer is a varied thirty-one ·members. These peo- one, which manages to keep a ple are learning methods a n d number of people in the gym class organization, teaching and learning to exercise their bodies learning games, understanding as well as thei minds.

by Oick Bibler

SHORTENED PERIODS ON CONVO DAYS

1st ------------- 7:0().. 7:50 2nd ------------ 7:55- 8:45 3rd ------------- 8:50.- 9:40 4th ------------- 9:45-10:45 Convo __________ 10:40-11:30 5th _____________ 11:35-12:25

Christ Works On Doctorate At Italian School

Mr. John Christ, Science and Math Department head, will travel to Italy to work on his doctorate at Bari University this summer. Mr. Christ will go to Italy for the purpose of faking oral and comprehensive exams. On passing a comprehensive examination and examinations on two foreign languages, Mr. Christ will be awarded a Ph.D. degree. Mr. Christ, who will be accompanied by Mrs. Christ, will leave Omaha on July 30th and fake a Pan American jet to London. mark, "It's too quiet to even They will arrive in London on study." The reason for vacancies the morning of July 31st and will in Delzell is there is a larger per- stay there two days. From Loncentage of women students than don, they will cross the English Just by glancing at this head, in the regular year and also more Channel, go into Holland and you might think this was the students who commute during Belgium, down through Germany score of some doubleheader. Ac- the summer months. and into Italy. After his work at The completion of the A. D. Bari University i; fifi.ished, Mr. tually it is the ratio of men to rooms at Delzell Hall in the Majors Dormitory is expected to and Mrs. Christ will spend a Spring semester as compared handle the overflow of male stu- week in the Swiss Alps with reladents who will be coming in next tives, then go to Paris for three with the summer semester. fall. days ·and return home by air in It is hard to believe that there time for school. are only 15 men residing at DelMr. Christ has done work on zell Hall now, after the crowded his doctor's degree at Columbia conditions that existed there last University, Northwestern Unisemester. On Wednesday, June 22, the versity, University of Minnesota, . Delzell Hall was built in 1939. Nebraska Textbookmen's AssoThe dormitory was originally ciation displayed an educational and Oregon State College. He has built to accommodate 128 men. exhibit in the gymnasium. Mr. attended summer school every This was not sufficient to handle Forrest B. Shrader, secretary- summer since 1954. The thesis Mr. Christ has been the enrollment of the male stu- treasurer of the Nebraska Textworking on for three years is endents last semester, so more bookmen's Association, s aid, rooms had to be built in the base- "This educational display is for titled "Production of Lactobacilment. The recreation room and the p u r pose of acquainting lus Acid-0philus for Medicinal several of the meeting rooms, teachers and administrators with Purposes" and is based on research completed at the Univerwhich were once used as the the new material available." sity of Minnesota, Oregon State "Bob Inn," were remodeled and On display were representative College and some work at Peru made into living quarters. Even textbooks from the following this did not ease the strain of publishing companies: South- State. All of his course work and traffic enough, so three men had Western Publishing Company, thesis has been accepted by Bari tO be crowded into most of the· The Macmillan Company, Fol- University. rooms. This worked a hardship lett Publishing Company, Ginn ' on all the students involved as & Company, University Publishthe rooms were equipped for ing Company, McCormick-Mathjust two men. There were o n 1y ers Publishing Company, John C. two desks, two dressers, and Winston Company, Scott-ForesThe election of Morgan Hall barely enough closet space. One man & Company, D. C. Heath & could hardly turn around with- Company, American Book Com- officers for the summer session out bumping into someone else. pany, Laidlow Brothers, Mid- was .held June 14, 1960. The nomConditions this summer at Del- west Publishing C o mp any, inees for the office of dorm presizell Hall are just the reverse. Houghton-Mifflin Company, Row dent were Rosemary GrundThere is more than enough room Peterson & Company, Silver Bur- mann, Jo Ann Hauptman a n d for everyone. And as for study- dett Company, and Scholastic Lee Christen. Lee Christen was elected president for the summer ing, one student made this re- Magazine and Books. session. The candidates for vice president were Sherrill Torring, Nedra Sunderland and Elizabeth Clevenger. Sherrill Torring was elected vice president. For the office of secretarytreasurer, the nominees w e r e Gladys Monahan, Marilynn Giesmann and Elva Schulz. Marilynn DIAMOND RINGS Giesmann was elected. Immediately after the election A. BALDWIN $400.00 of officers, wing meetings w er e Wedding Rine $175.00 ONW'f held to elect wing counselors. CllDIT B. KENNAN $150.00 nus The new wing counselors are: Weclcllav Ihle $ 75.00 first floor, Alberta Kasparek; secYou're always sure of maxi· ond floor, west wing, D or o thy mum diamond beauty and Hajek; second floor, east wing, brilliance with a Keepsake Carolyn Kratochvil; and baseInterlocking Ring set. The ment, Belva Hewitt. rings are secretly locked together and can't twist or separate. BILL'S CLOTHING Many exquisite Keepsake & SHOE STORE styles In a wide price range. You Pay Less at Bill's Auburn, Nebr.

Three to One One to Five

Book Exhibit Held at Peru

Christen Heads Morgan Hall This Summer

STAY

LOCKED

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RIGGS JEWELRY

Auburn, Nebraska

WHEELER Dairy Queen

SILAS SUMMERS JOINS ENGLISH DEPT.

Wilson Doing Graduate Work This Summer Mr. Gilbert Wilson, Assistant Professor of Instrumental Music, left Monday, June 13, for Vermillion, South Dakota. He plans to enter the graduate school of the University of South Dakota. Mr. Wilson will be working on a doctoral level. His credits will be transferred from Chicago Musical College.

Industrial Arts Activities The main project this summer for the Industrial Arts Department is preparation for the move into the new building. Bids have been submitted for the equipment to furnish the building. As soon as the Board of Education of State Normal Schools gives its approval, orders will be placed. Four teachers, teaching o n e month each, are teaching Industrial Arts courses this summer. All four teachers will work during the month of August on the big move. Industrial Arts for Elementary Teachers with Lester Russell and Everett Taylor as instructors, is the largest class in the Industrial Arts Department for the summer.

Silas E. Summers, Tarkio, Mo., has been appointed assistant professor of literature at Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru, according to Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of the college, The appointment effective September 1, 1960, is subject to the approval of the Board of Education of State Normal Schools. Head of the English department at Tarkio (Mo.) College since 1945, Mr. Summers is a native of Colorado. He holds the A.B. degree from Western Colorado State College of Gunnison, an M.A. degree from the University of Missouri and has completed graduate study at the University of Iowa, the University of Oregon, and the University of Colorado. Mr. Summers has taught in high schools at Montrose, Colo.; Udell, Iowa, and Nyssa, Ore., and has been a college instructor at Jamestown (N. D.) College and at the University of Missouri. He has been a contributor to ·the "High School Teacher" and the "English Journal," professional publications. The new faculty member and his wife, the former Florence Hornaday, will reside in the college's faculty apartments.

BANK OF PERU PHONE TR 2-2331

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Francis Awarded Assistantship at Okla. State Charles R. Francis, senior at Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru, has been awarded an $1,80() graduate assistantship to Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, for the 1960-61 academic year, according to an announcement by Dr. Homer Knight, head of the division of history, at the Oklahoma school. Francis will work toward a master's degree in American history at Oklahoma State. A May candidate for graduation from Peru State, Francis was graduated from Abraham Lincoln High School, Council Bluffs, in 1956. He is. the son of Mrs. Rose AIU?-e

Francis, 623 Sixth Avenue, Coun· cil Bluffs. While attending Peru State, Francis has been a member of the college's basketball team, earning letters all four years. He: also lettered in track three years. An honor student, Francis has served as vice-president of Phi Alpha Theta, honorary history fraternity. He has memberships in Kappa Delta Pi, honorary edu-_ cation fraternity, the Peru State Student Education Association, the Foreign Language Club, and Blue Devils,, men's pep organization.

Mr. Holmes Helped Judge Iowa Beauty Contest

new buildings. These extended projects will greatly expand and moderni:z;e the campus.

Mr. Richard Holmes, Assistant Professor of English at Peru State, was one of five persons who helpt;d judge a beauty contest held at Clarinda, Iowa on June 9, 1960. Nine contestants from the surrounding area were entered in the Miss Southwest Iowa Contest, which is a preliminary to the Miss America Contest. Elaine Cummings, Bedford, Iowa, won the Miss Southwest Iowa title. The first and second runners-up were Marilyn Brownlee, Northboro, Iowa, and Diane Mae McElroy, Percival, Iowa, respectively. The contestants were judged on personality, poise, talent and beauty. Emphasis was placed on talent. TP,e judges met with the girls at a tea in the afternoon and talked with the contestants individually. This was to help the judges evaluate the contestants' personality. In the evening the candidates and judges had dinner together. No voting had been done up to this time. When three finalists had been chosen, each was asked two questions. Then the final ballot was cast. The top two finalists tied for first place. Elaine Cummings, the queen, won by a 3-2 tie-breaking ballot.

Hastings College, too, has building projects. Plans have been made for a new dining hall-student center which will be finished by September 19Bl. The new men's dorm is now under construction and is expected to be ready for occupancy by September, 1960. Projects of the future include a nBw administration building, outdoor amphithea1Br, another men's dorm, women's dorm, library, speech and drama buildings, and an addition to the gymnasium and science building.

.What Others Are Doing Peru, it seems, is not the only Nebraska co 11 e g e entertaining building projects. Midland College Business Manager, Elmer B. Sasse has revealed a miniature model of the Midland campus of 1972-1975, which includes many

Plans are being made at Neb11aska Wesleyan University for Model United Nations which has been ·tentatively set for March 1011, 1961. Ray Jensen, chairman of the Campus Model United Nations, reports that this is a student participation €vent. There is a possibility that Henry Cabot Lodge will be a speaker for the Mcldel U. N. Creighton University, in ke<=ping with election year, played host to Senators John Kennedy and Stuart Symington, May 7. The arriv·al of the senators was a part of the Political Education Days program, which was held on the campus. The program also included a rally and banquet. Doan€ College held its Third Annual Fine Arts Festival, April 24-May 1. The Departments of Art, Drama, and Music presented a varied program of music recitals and ·art exhibits. A n€W addition to the program was a poetry-j•azz session. Spedal features of this event included original modern poetry and poetry read to jazz.

HEUER GROCERY Groceries Fruits PERU

Meats Vegetables

Campus School Activities

Six hundred new books of 1959 were put on display at the Sixty-five campus school stuPeru State Library from June dents are crossing the wooden 6th to June 10th. Books on Ex- ·. bridges every morning. Grades hibit is a cooperative promotion- one through six are attending al enterprise of the country's the four week summer session. Thirteen first graders and 10 leading publishers. Thirty-one subject categories second graders are under the suwere repreesnted in the collec- pervision of Miss Gladys Grush. Miss Mary Clarke supervises tion, and all grades, from kindergarten through high school were 13 fourth graders and seven third covered. Both fiction and n01t graders. There are 11 students in both fiction were included. An important part of the ex- the fifth and sixth grades, where hibit was an annotated, graded, Mr. Glen Sheely is supervisor. Campus school enrollment is indexed catalogue, which listed the collection completely, and open to all children living in the which was available for free dis- ' district, the children of currently tribution to teachers, librarians, enrolled college students, and and other professionals. To make the children of visiting faculty so large a collection readily ac- members. The latter groUP has cessible, the books were grouped one representative, Jimmy May, into grade categories and were son of Dr. James M. May. The Student Teaching Seminumbered to conform to the numbered catalogue.' The scope nar, under the direction of Mr. of the exhibit was indicated by B. A. Eddy, elementary rprincithe 31 subjects it covered, rang- pal, is made up of experienced ing from aeronautics and adven· teachers who get student teachture to story books and transpor- ing credit for their 'seminar work. They spend a required number tation. Its primary purpose was to of hours each week observing provide school personnel, teach- campus school classes. Other obers, and librarians with an op- servors are from the Elementary portunity to examine the best of Methods and Human Growth and the new library books, with a Development classes. According to Mr. Eddy, each minimum of expenditure of time and effort and thus make it pos- supervisor has prepared a resible for them to do an informed source unit. Subject matter areas and intelligent job of book se- will be drawn upon as necessary in $Olving the problems that lection. No books were sold since arise. The high point of the units Books on Exhibit is strictly a will be a culminating or concludpromotional operation. ing activity. Miss Grush's unit is "Explor-

Ca mpUS School Chatter'

elude a model rocket and satellite. Each student will make his own scrapbook with drawings and reports. Tentative plans have been made for a trip to Lincoln for the planetarium sky show at the University of Nebraska. A recent film taught the children not to pick wild flowers but to let them make seed for next year's flowers. Mr. Chalmers Cox had charge of the greenhouse tour where the banana plant caused a great deal of comment. Mr. Cox identified many trees on the campus. Leaves were taken from several trees to be identified by the pupils when they returned to the campus school. Mr. Albert Brady was in the science laboratory to explain many facts about insects. He showed many common ones and some from foreign countries. The children especially enjoyed seeing the monarch butterfly. Mr. Brady explained that birds leave this butterfly alone because it has such a bad taste. Nature study in the classroom centered around animals when Rose Thompson, Salem, brought in a rabbit and two ducks, and Bobby Sherman, , Peru, brought in a soft-shelled turtle. All the children have been bringing insects which th e y identify from books.

Former Peru Student Moves to Canada

i~g Nature." ?he plans a collection of materials, a mural, and By Mary Anna Gnade ) bulletin board displays. This will Mrs. June Hinds, a former Pe· The first few days of summer • be presented by the pupils to session are a series of reunions their parents and anyone else ru student, is moving from Auburn, Nebraska to Toronto, Cananot only at the college level but who is interested. at the campus schooi, too. FriendMiss Clarke's unit, "Hi Neigh.- da, where her husband will be ships between local boys and bor," is concerned with our Mex- employed by the Vigor Oil Comgirls and children of visiting ican neighbors and how they pany. Mrs. Hinds has taught in summer faculty and students live. Mexican objects will be Nemaha county for the past two seem to endure. For instance, made as well as brought in for and one-half years. She plans to when Bernard Chase didn't display. Besides giving a short attend the University of Toronto show up the first day or two, play this group will have fun this fall. there was quite a bit of concern singing and learning Mexican -you see, Bernard has been on dances. I REDFERN campus since a babe in arms atPart of the fun is learning tending college classes with his some Spanish words. When Mr. Clothing Co. mother until he was old enough George. Rath visited the room he "The Store of Standard Brands" to go to school; he is now in Miss spoke Spanish a n d answered Phone BR 4·3620 Auburn Clarke's 3rd and 4th grade room. questions. Correct pronunciation Friendships seem to be easily is encouraged with records. made and both local and visiting Mr. Darryl Manring has been children quickly adjust to each teaching Mexican songs and ROURKE JEWELRY other in this whirlwind time. dances. Quality Service and One attraction for enrollment In his unit, "Living In the Distinctive Giffs and faithful attendance in Mr. Space Age," Mr. Sheely stresses Sheely's 5th and 6th grade room preparing for life in the space AUBURN, NEBRASKA is the fact that boys and girls go age. Display materials will inswimming together twice a week. The group is divided into committees to work on various reports and questions about space. "Something about Mexico" is being 1 o o k e d into in Miss Clarke's room. Listening 1o Span"ON THE CORNER OF THE CAMPUS" ish records made a recent television program set in Mexico much more interesting-these 4th grad· School Supplies Groceries ers really absorb a strange language. Since a field trip with a Mexican flavor is well n i g h Priced Right fo~ the Student impossible, visiting resource people are bringing the country to the classroom, as well as films. The 1st and 2nd graders in Miss Grush's room are investigating NATURE. This includes bugs, in· sects, plants, animals-visiting the room is a rabbit, a snapping CECIL BOWMAN TR2-2561 PERU turtle, and knowing Darrell Wininger Jr's. father, no doubt assorted other species. In turn, the children have visited the science hall, the greenhouse, and have had one film after another. Then, on the side, Mr. Stemper permits college family swimming on Tuesdays,, and M i s s OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY Stoddard uses "waiting" children in her playground course once in a while. When there is so much SOFT WATER to find out about and so many in· teresting ways of investigating a TR2-3201 BeaHy's Peru project, summer school is just too short!

THE AVENUE STORE •

NEBRASKA

MORRISSY'S VARIETY STORE Peru Sc & lOc Shoes

Clothing

Books on Exhibit

BOWMAN'S HARDWARE Farm Supplies Appliances

SPEED WASH

McINTIRE'S GARAGE Auto Repair TR2·2791

Peru, Nebr.

Coin Operated - Automatic Laundry

r J


Goodbye

Graduates And· - -

1ne

voice or tne L-ampus or a 1nousana uaKs ...

Peru Pedagogian PERU, NEBRASKA

inety-five Get Degrees and Diplomas t End of Summer School Session Eleven masters degrees in edation will be conferred at sumer commencement at Nebraska te Teachers College at Peru hursday, July 28, at 6:00 p.m., cording to Dr. Neal S. Gomon, resident. In addition, recipients of 56 achelors degrees and 28 twoear diplomas will be honored at e exercises to be held on the in campus quadrangle. Candites for degrees and diplomas ll complete requirements at e close of the regular session ly 29, or at the end of the post ssion, August 13. Speaker for the commenceent will be Dr. Leroy T. Laase, hairman of the department of speec!i and dramatic arts, University of Nebraska. Degree and diploma candidates include: Master of Science in Education -Robert L. Bacon, Ravenna; Gertrude C. Chase, Nebraska City; Lillian J. Christ, Peru; John C. Christ, Jr., Peru; Robert K. Davis, Omaha; Carl C. Gawart, Nebraska City; Marvin H. Gerdes, Auburn; Lee V. Norris, Verdon; Donald R. Scoby, Sabetha, Kans.; Ronald K. Wenninghoff, Pawnee City; Dale R. Whited, Norfolk. Bachelor of Aris (Liberal Aris) -Larry L. Newton, Auburn. Bachelor of Arts in Education -Lucille R. Hicks, Auburn; Larry B. Miller, Hamburg, Iowa; Harold R. Schmitz, Jr., Omaha. Bachelor of Music in Education -Janice K. Jahn, Westminster, Colorado. Bachelor of Science in Education-Lorraine M. Albert, Falls City; Evalin Andrews, Nebraska City; F. Lucile Bailey, Sabetha, Kans.; Marvin L. Bergsten, Red Oak, Iowa; Lon E. Bottcher, '.Dalmage; Gale N. Brauch, Washington, Kans.; Jerry R. Callson, Clearwater, Nebr. Ruth F. Clarke, Pawnee City; Barbara J. Clover, Auburn; Nora L. Eichenberger, Steinauer; Mary C. Elliott, Auburn; Fern A. Fisher, Falls City; Evelyn J. Gobber, Elk Creek; Nelle M. Goodin, Humboldt; Ella M. Green, Brock. Genene K. Gude, · Nebraska City; Dorothy Hajek, Odell; Vera W. Hall, Tecumseh; Leone V. Hannaford, Brownville; Clyde A. Haskins, Fullerton; Dorothy M. High, NebDaska City; Ar 1en e Horr, Adams; Willard S. Jensen, Ruskin. Lila N. Karnes, Sabetha, Kans.; Lillian M. Knople, Peru; Janice M. Korber, Bern, Kans.; Janet Lillethorup, Omaha; Frederick J. Miller, Tecumseh; Georgia I. Miller, Peru; Peggy Lou McGee, Council Bluffs, Iowa. Mildred K. Penn, Sidney, Iowa; Phyllis J. Peters, Johnson; Norma Pugsley, Lincoln; H. Keith Richey, Hiawatha, Kans.; Lillian M. Rooney, Sabetha, Kans.; Lloyd D. Scarrow, Mankato, Kans.; Leland C. Schmit, Hebron. Richard J. Schoeppner, Louisville; Ella Schriever, Superior; Glenna J. Scoby, Sabetha, K!ans.; Lydia A. Stalder, Humboldt; Kathryn A. Stogdill, Malvern, Iowa; Lillian K. Stoner, Hiawatha, Kans.; Nedra M. Sunderland, Liberty. Robert B. Taenzler, Plattsmouth; Ellen Tiemeyer, Rock(Continued on page three)

He st

Placement Bureau Lists Thirty-three Additional Placements

Volume 55

Number 18

NEA Speaker At July 13 Convocation Wednesday, July 13, Mr. Kenneth Jonson spoke at convocation. Mr. Jonson is 'ihe National District Field Representative to the National Education Association. He discussed the NEA headquarters and the program and services of the NEA. Mr. Jonson emphasized the research division of the NEA, and the publications and studies available from this department. Mr. Bill Semrad, representative of the Nebraska Student Education Association, also made a few remarks.

Mrs. Milburn Blanton, secretary in the placement bureau, lists the following positions which have been accepted for the coming school year. Elementary: Rae Mae Henry to Clarinda, Iowa; Marion Anderson to Hamburg, Iowa; and Nancy Gerdes to Cook Dr. Owen Harlan presided at Secondary: Harry Bryant to the convo. Cleveland, Ohio; Keith Richey to Winnebago, Canada; Robert Tae.nzler to Glenwood, Iowa; Marie IAntalek to Sterling, Colorado; Dan Jones to Omaha; Larry Miller to Green River, Wyoming; David Fulton to Clarinda, Iowa; and Lois Rowe to Wray, Colo. Alumni: Cecil Rawson to Elliott, Iowa; Victor Graham to Laural, Kansas; Earl McCain to Bradshaw, Nebraska; Dan McNeeley to Prescott, Iowa; Lonnie Weidenhoft to Yoder, Wyoming;· Margaret Vance to St. Helena, California; LeRoy Hughes to Utica, Nebraska; Doris Kresak to Exeter, Nebraska; Roger Russell to Underwood, Iowa; David Glasgow to Glidden, Iowa; Dale Whited to Newport, Oregon; Merritt Dodson to Emerson, Nebraska; Donna Schuster to Littleton, MR. AL WHEELER Colorado; Edwin Meyer to Gresham, Nebraska; Donald Reed to Albion, Nebraska; Bill Beck to Friend, Nebraska; Irene Kucera to Kimball, Nebraska; Robert Bohlken to Nebraska City, Nebr.; A. G. Wheeler, director of Ted McCartney to Tekamah, Ne- physical education, was gradubraska; Louis Hughes to Holstein, ated from Oberlin College. Mr. Iowa; Donald Balderson to Sac- Wheeler received his M.A. degree ramento, California; and John from Columbia University. He Hiegerson to Ames, Iowa. has received credit from SouthTotal placements rep or t e d ern California and has done exthrough Monday were 105 includ- tra work at Iowa State. Mr. ing four spring graduates who Wheeler has attended coaching have accepted assistantships to schools at Tulsa, Northwestern, colleges and universities for the and Colgate Universities. He has 1960-61 academic year. attended the University of NeOnly nine teaching candidates braska Coaching School several have not as yet reported accept- times. ing positions, Mr. Johnson said. Mr. Wheeler came to Peru with Of the number, eight are qualified to teach in secondary areas, the intention of staying one year. while only one is an elementary "Peru is friendly, ·and I like it here. So-I'm still here," Mr. education candidate. Wheeler said. He has served under four presidents here at Peru. Mr. Wheeler thinks that the new buildings will really improve Peru State, and the college will grow as a result.

JULY 25, 1960

Dr. L. Laase Commencement Speaker Dr. Leroy T. Laase, chairman of the University of Nebraska Department of Speech, will address the 66 degree candidates at the 1960 Summer Commencement at Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru at 6 p.m., Thursday, July 28, 1960. The commencement exercises, scheduled for the main college quadrangle, will honor eleven candidates for master's degrees in education and 56 bachelor's degree candidates. Recognition also will be given to 28 two-year diploma candidates. The commencement speaker is a pioneer in the effort to direct the state's attention to the need

MR. ROBERT MOORE

Al Wheeler and Bob Moore Have Served Peru For a Total of Forty-five Years

1960 Bobcats Should Be Strong On the Gridiron

By Bob Taenzler Peru's prospective f o o t b a 11 team for the 1960 season should be as strong as ever according to Coach Al Wheeler. The returning season should find 39 members of the 1959 squad, including 19 lettermen, and also about 20 new freshmen reporting for duty. The date set for physical examinations is August 31, and practice will officially start at 10:00 a.m. on September 1. This season should find P e r u with a strong defensive team as most of the returning lettermen are linemen. In the backfield John Christensen is b e i n g groomed to replace Jim· Poage at quarterback since Jim is going to Kansas State. Ken Dostal and Wayne Winkleman will be contending for the fullback spot left (Continued on page three)

Mr. Wheeler has belonged to Kiwanis and has been president of that organization. His hobby is playing golf. In 1952, Mr. Wheeler received the World-Herald Coach of the Year Award. He had his first undefeated season .in football that year and repeated it in 1953. He piled up 26 consecutive victories before losing a game to Kearney in the middle of the 1954 season. Also in 1952, Mr. Wheeler w a s given the George Gipp Little AllAmerican Coach of the Year Award by the Rockne Foundation. He has served on the executive committee of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics .. He was president of the N.A.I.A. in 1954. Mr. Wheeler's son, Al Jr., will be a junior at Peru's Campus School this fall.

Of Luck

Robert D. Moore, head of the Division of Language Arts, finished his twentieth year of service at Peru State Teachers' college. Mr. Moore received his A.B. and B.S. degrees ·at East Central State Teachers' College in Ada, Oklahoma. He received his master's degree from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. He has also done additional graduate work at the University of Iowa and Colorado State College at Greeley. Mr. Moore has taught at P.S.T.C. since 1937 except for a period 1943-1945- when he served as a field director for the Red Cross. During Mr. Moore's years at Peru, he has given a great many speeches to men and women's clubs and has given commencement addresses to high school groups. He narrated the Nebraska City and Auburn Centennials and directed the Johnson County Centennial •at Tecumseh and the Hamburg, Iowa Centennial. Mr. Moore has directed 51 plays at Peru including "Blithe Spirit," "Our Town," "Cave Dwellers," "The Glass Menagerie" an d "Outward Bound." Mr. Moore is now serving his second term as Mayor of Peru, and he has served on Peru's City Council. His hobbies are fishing and stamp collecting. The Moores are a teaching family. Mrs. Moore has t~ught seven years at Auburn and"served as a substitute teacher in the campus school and in Shubert the past year. Mr. Moore's daughter Martha Sue and son Robert B. will both be teaching English and speech this fall. Both Mr. Moore's son an d

for speech correction and therapy services in Nebraska p u b 1i c schools. He is responsible in a large measure for the establishment of a speech and hearing clinic at the University and the operation of a therapy program which serves the dual purpose of training teachers who specialize in speech correction and aiding a limited number of children and adults who have speech or hearing difficulties. Under his direction the University operates a speech and h e a r i n g testing service for all entering students. His department, too, conducts special classes for foreign students to increase their proficiency in English. Dr. Laase received his bachelor's degree in 1927 from· Doane College at Crete, his master's degree in 1929 from Northwestern, and his Ph.D. from University of Iowa in 1937. He has also done advanced study at Yale University and the Universities of Michigan and Wisconsin. Before joining the University of Nebraska faculty in 1940, Dr. Laase was professor of speech and chairman of the speech department at Hastings College for ten years. At Nebraska he is also director of a speech clinic designed to serve university students and citizens of the state who have speech handicaps. Dr. Laase is a member of Delta Sigma Rho and Pi Kappa Delta, honorary forensics fraternities and a member of National Association Teachers of Speech and American Speech Correction Association. He is former president of Nebraska State Speech Association and of the Central States Speech Association.

Art Exhibit Three of Miss Norma Diddel's art classes exhibited some of their work in front of the gymnasium July 19, 1960. The three classes were freehand drawing, water color painting, and oil painting. Each student chose two pictures from many which he had done the first six weeks. The students arranged the p i c t u res themselves, and the display included charcoal, pencil, India ink, transparent water color, oil, and opaque water color drawings. Also some work from Miss Diddel's other art classes, general public school art and art appreciation, was shown in the three art rooms which are in the library. Forty-nine of the 76 students enrolled in art courses are taking a required class to fill certification or degree requirements. Miss Diddel usually has three · art classes during the summer session, but this summer she is instructing five art classes.

President Gives Tea For Graduates · The President's Tea, given by Dr. and Mrs. Neal S. Gomon, for the members of the summer graduating class of 1960 will be held at the president's home Thursday afternoon, July 28, from two to three-thirty. daughter married Peru graduates. Martha Sue is now Mrs. Carroll Johnson, and Robert B. married the former Maxine Lawritson.


red ~tatt -1-akes to Kive

Boat and skiers take off for channel in search of ±hat "perfect spot."

,. Rose Clancy prepares for take-off. It looks prel:ty hopeless this angle, buf . . • . . . . . . . . .

fro~

First attempt proves successful. with only one hand.

Clancy seems at ease as she glides over the wafer, holding on

Boating Skiing . Picnicking Highlights of Day The Pedagogian staff spent an afternoon at the river ori Thursday, July 7. A group of the members and sponsor Stewart Linscheid left at 3:00 p.m. for an afternoon on the river.

The girls relax in boat.

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The staff and their guests cooled off while riding on the river in boats. The boats belonged to Stewart Linscheid and Jim Levitt. Disaster struck when the motor went out on Mr. Linscheid's boat and it had to be towed ashore. The episode added a touch of humor as a picture was taken of the small boat be in g towed, as it sped through the water. A few brave staff members took to the water on skis while others looked on from the shore. Afterwards a picnic was held at the home of the sponsor.

Jim Levitt risks life on deck of boat - anything for a good picture!

The pictures which appear on this page were taken by Jim Levitt and Dave Longfellow during the afternoon.

Small boat gets fast tow home after motor breakdown. Longfellow looks disconsolate while Linscheid enjoys the ride. ..~I


tired group heads for the shore.

Far and Away By Dave Longfellow About this time of the summer it becomes increasingly difficult to find items to fill a far roving column. Not that people aren't doing anything, but they don't do ' anything that can be covered . in a family newspaper. The industrial arts section of the cafeteria gave forth with the bit of news that Guilford Thomas, a member of the group doing graduate work, is moving from Bratton Union to Elk Creek, where he will be handling business and industrial arts courses and spend his after-school hours as assistant coach. The cry, "Never fear-Coatney's here!" has echoed almost every morning in the coffee shop and will continue on to the end · of the summer session, but what then? Where will it be heard this fall? Even Rex Coatney doesn't know as he is still looking for a school after leaving Cook, where he has been superintendent for the past few years. Harley Rector organized a softball team for a game with the Tecumseh town team on Tuesday, July 19. According to the team members, it was a tight pitcher's battle with the Tecumseh crew winning in a cliff-hanger, 26 to 25. Harley, while we're on the subject, goes to Norfolk this fall to head the football chores and assist in basketball and track. Besides these extra-curricular duties he will also be teaching three classes in civics. Almond1 (Bill) and Laue (Roy) have done it again! After phenomenal success with their baseball team of philosophers t h e y have moved into the field of "cool" type music with the great thinkers again furnishing food for thought.

the bass, and Cannon Ball Kant on the tenor sax. Dogs Pavlov toots the alto sax while Hot Lips Herbart blows cool tones on the trombone. Satchmo Dewey will take a few choruses. on the trumpet as Tennessee Englehardt furnishes the background with a clarinet. Pee Wee Mort and Skinny Skinner will take their respective places at the flute and the drums while Fats Bacon provides e x o tic rhythms on the bongos. Fingers Freud, daddy of them all, will be tickling the ivories. The vocalists that Almond an d Laue have lined up are Nat Guthrie and Daddy Thorndyke. A novelty trio to rival the Kingston group are the Three Suns-Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. So long until next eternity.

NINETY-FIVE GET DEGREES AND DIPLOMAS AT END OF SESSION (Continued from page one)

port, Mo.; Betty J. Teten, Dunbar; Mary M. Trail, Nebraska City; John H. Verbeek, Jr., Firth; Carolyn J. Wing, Shubert; Edna C. Zabel, Johnson. Two-Year Diploma (in Elemeniary Education)-Adelaide K. Anderson, Steinauer; June J. Badberg, Nebraska City; Wenona Boettcher, Unadilla; Ruby Brunsdon, Sterling; K. Elizabeth Clevenger, Shubert. Betty H. Cogdill, Nebraska City; Jane Ann Dietl, Nehawka; L. Gerane Drewes, Plymouth; Lydia Egger, Douglas; Irene A. Eisenhauer, Burr; Janis Grimes, Julian; Blanche R. Hall, Humboldt; Margaret T. Hilgerson, Plattsmouth; Mae Hinds, Auburn. Gaynell Hutton, Nemaha; Fern I. Kirkendall, Falls City; Karen K. Lohmeyer, Falls City; Beatrice E. Mason, Tecumseh; Enid C. Meyer, Talmage; Gladys Ann The new, cool crew is caUed Monahan, Palmyra; Loma Nelthe "Gestalters Jazz Band." One son, Crab Orchard. thought is that this may be the Vera Mae Smith, Brownville; answer to those crazy mixed up Jack E. Stettenbenz, Tecumseh; education students who keep ask- Zelda Stuck, Auburn; Merna ing the question, "What is all of Thalmann, Nebraska City; Marithis jazz?" an L. Thompson, Falls City; They've put Elvis Pestalazzi on Grace G. Watkins, Verdon; Doris the guitar, Crazy Hips Froebe! on E. Windels, Unadilla.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN The Voice of the Campus of a Thousand Oaks Member Inl:ercollegial:e Press July 25, 1960 SUMMER STAFF Joni Wesalowski -----------------------------------Editor Pegg McGee -----------------------------Business Manager Barbara Wellensiek ------------------------------Reporter Julie Mayer --------------------------------------Reporter Barbara Clover __________________________________ Reporter Bob Taenzler ------------------------------------R~porter Jan Lillethorup __________________________________ Reporter Dave Longfellow ________________________________ Columnist Mary Anna Gnade ------------------------------Columnist Stewart Linscheid _________________________________ Sponsor

After a day of fun and sun. a cook-ou± was held at the home of !he sponsor. Tired and full, some of the "river rats" pose for one more picture before returning home.

Whispers From Morgan By Jan Lillethorup For eight of the dorm residents, this is the last week of school. They are ending their college career this summer, and will be graduated Thursday e v en in g , July 28. These women have been extra busy the last two weeks. Besides preparing term papers and studying for finals, they have had to do such things as apply for teacher /certification, send graduation announcements, and attend the dorm tea. This week, they will be taking pictures in caps an d gowns, buying graduation gifts, having small farewell parties, and attending the president's tea. While the seniors are preparing for graduation, the underclassmen are managing to keep busy . too. They gave a tea for graduating seniors, Thursday, July 21, in the dorm. A bridal shower was given for Miss Linda Moore in the basement apartment on Monday, July 18. Rose Clancy, Pat Earl, Marge Leenerts, and Jeannine Ehlers were hostesses, and guests included Linda Moore and her mother, Judy Miller, Carolyn Parli, Linda Goodin, Marilynn Giesmann, Kay Jacobson, Jo an Riggle, Jan Lillethorup, Rita Grandgenett, Sandy Pearson, and Carolyn Powers. Typing term papers and reports seems to be a favorite pas-

time. The rec room has been housing Nancy Kunkel, Joni Wesolowski, and Marilyn Glenn as they peck away. The dorm has been bustling with the activity of the girls here for the camp. There is a constant line at the pop machines, at least. The television has been taking a much deserved break after being watched constantly during the Democratic Convention. It is preparing itself for the Republicans, next! To the seniors, graduation is both a sad and happy occasion. It is sad to leave friends and acquaintances, yet it is a great thrill to look into the future,

knowing you are prepared to meet it. Those il). the dorm who will receive their degrees are Dorothy Hajek, Janice Korber, Janice Jahn, Jan Lillethorup, Peggy McGee, . Norma Pugsley, Ella Schrfover, and Nedra Sunderland. Those receiving a two-year diploma are: Elizabeth Clevenger, Jane Dietl, Gerane Drewes, Margaret Hilgerson, Fern Kirkendall, Gladys Monahan, and Loma Nelson. To these people, we give sincere congratulations with wishes for a successful future. Congratulations, summer graduates of Peru State Teachers College ! !

1960 BOBCATS SHOULD BE STRONG ON THE GRIDIRON (Continued from page one) vacant by the graduation of John "Buddy" Bookwalter. Peru is faced with a tough job this season as the first game will be played at Iowa Wesleyan on September 9. With little time to iron out the wrinkles, the Bobcats and Coach Al Wheeler hope to be ready for the opening ti! t. 1960 Football Schedule Sept. 9-Iowa Wesleyan at Fort Madison, Iowa Sept. 17-St. Mary's College of of the Plains at Peru Sept. 24-Kearney at Peru Oct. I-Hastings at Peru Oct. 7-Doane at Crete Oct. 14-Chadron at Peru Oct. 22-Wesleyan at Peru (Homecoming) Oct. 29-Wayne at Wayne Nov. 5-Pan Handle A & M at Goodwell, Oklahoma

It's a puzzlement: When you're old enough to go to college, you're old enough to go out with girls. When y.ou're o.ld enough to go out with girls, who needs • . college? Oh wep, there's always Coke.

BE REALLY REFRESHED

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l!ottled tinder authority of The Coca-Cola Co111pany_E_y NEBRASKA CITY COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO.

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Two Professional Staff Members Are Appointed The appointment of two professional staff members and the resignation of a d o r m i t o r y counselor were announced today by Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president, Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru. Appointments, subject to approval by the Board of Education of State Normal Schools, are effective September 1, 1960. Professional staff members appointed are Miss Judy Hohl, Kansas City, Mo., director of women's physical education, and Edward G. Camealy, Columbus, Miss., assistant professor of voice. Miss Margaret Slattery has ·resigned •as counselor at Eliza Morgan Women's Residence Hall. Miss Hohl is a recent graduate ·of the University of Nebraska with a major in physical education. She is now touring Europe and will represent the American Association of Health, Physical Education an.d Recreation at the Olympics in Rome. Mrs. Frances .Wheeler, presently head of the department, will become director of girls' physical education in the campus school.

Because of the building program on the campus, the Lincoln Telephone and Telegraph ComMr. Camealy's appointment is pany was asked to change t h e for the 1960-61 academic year route of long distance service cawhile Darryl T. Manring is on a bles. Permission was given to dig year's leave of absence for ad- trenches on the campus for an vanced study at the University of underground conduit route which Arizona. Mr. Camealy, has been will carry local and toll calls. An underground cable is also associate professor of music education at Mississippi State Col- being used for a P.B.X. board Jege for Women ·at Columbus that will be located in the adminsince 1957, and has had 15 years istration building. This will take experience as a vocal m u s i c care of all incoming college calls. teacher in colleges and secondary Outgoing calls will be handled as schools in Illinois, Tennessee, they are now. Inter-campus calls will go through P.B.X. equipNorth Dakota, and Washington. ment but not through the P.B.X. Mr. Camealy holds bachelors operator. Underground cables ha'{e adand masters degrees in music education from the University of vantages: less maintenance is reIllinois and has additional work quired, trees present no probon his doctorate from San Diego lems, and up.sightly wires are State College. Presently Mr. and avoided. Mrs. C a m e a 1y and year-old daughter are in Germany where Mr. Camealy is doing advance study in voice.

Levitt Shows Film On Yellowstone Park

Miss Slattery's resignation is effective at the close of the summer post session August 13. Miss Slattery joined the staff of the college in June 1959. Her future plans have not been announced. Lynn Street, Hayward, vicepresidents. More than 50 graduates and friends of the college were present for last year's meeting.

Gomon To Attend California Meeting Of PSTC Alumni Northern California graduates and former students of Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru will meet Saturday, July 30, in Oa1dand for a luncheon meeting, according to Donald K. Carlile, executive secretary of the Peru Alumni Association. The third annual meeting of the Northern California chapter will be at 1:00 p.m. in Goodman's Jack London Hall, Jack London Square, First and B r o a d w a y , Oakland, it has been announced by Mrs. Wanda N. Conklin, chapter secretary. Dr. Neal S. Gomon, president of the college, will be present to give a first-hand report on recent developments at Nehraska's first college. Mrs. Conklin, 3943 Burkhalter Avenue, Oakland, is in charge of arrangements and reservations. Other chapter officers include Ansel E. Clayburn, 1908 Porter Way, Stockton, president; Katherine Hanks Davis, 6480 Benvenue A venue, Oakland, and Genevieve McFadden McNally, 23716

C.Y.F. Conference Held at Peru The C.Y.F. conference of the Christian Church was held on the Peru campus from July 11-23. The first week 58 high school people from Lincoln, Beatrice, Fairbury and Hebron studied service enlistment, worship and recreation. Special aft er noon classes were held in the history of the disciples, world order, family life, and teachings of Jesus. Rev. Charles Wilson of the First Christian Church in . Lincoln, was in charge of this group and their 12 faculty members. This group, who had meetings in the Campus School and lived in the dormitories, was on t h e campus for the first time. The group attending the second week was on the campus last summer. These young people are from Fremont, Auburn, Murray, and Louisville.

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Mr. J. D. Levitt showed his travelogue movie of Yellowstone National Park and Teton National Park in the college auditorium Tuesday, July 19, at 8:00 p.m. The film, entitled "Summer Yellowstone" covered the park from Mamouth on the north end of the park to the Grand Tetons on the south. A brief history of the park was given before the movie by Mr. Levitt. Various books and pamphlets that can be picked up in the parks were also shown. A book "Footprints in Obsidian" written by Mr. Levitt himself was also displayed. A film clipping of the graduating class of 1958 getting lined up, in the auditorium, and after graduation was also shown. Entertainment during intermission was provided by Joyce Carmen, Marilyn Dyke and her husband. Mr. Manring sang the Yellowstone song.

Peru Sportsman's Club Elects New Officers The Peru Sportsman's Club met on July 5, at city hall, for an election of officers. The new officers are: Dr. Milburn Blanton, president; Jerome Stemper, vicepresident; John L. Lewis, treasurer; and Ernest Longfellow, secretary. Those who were appointed to the board of directors are: Ervin Eickhoff, Rex Rains, Dr. Keith Melvin, Chalmers Cox, and Ralph Beatty. The new cluh year will begin in August and new officers will be installed at the August 2 meeting. Dr. Blanton will replace Dr. Melvin as president. The first club president, a former faculty member, was Dr. Harold Hutcheson. Club members include Dr. Neal Gomon, 16 faculty members and

Mr. Williams' Son-in-law Killed at Road Block Mr. George D. Rees, son-in-law of Mr, Clarence "Pop" Williams, was killed when a speeding car smashed into a roadblock, killing its two young occupants and Mr. Rees, a veteran Utah Highway Patrol trooper. Mr. Rees, 42, lived at 6321 South Orchard Drive, Bountiful, Utah. Rees, a veteran of more than 12 years with the patrol, had just moved his car into position to block the route of the speeding car, which was reported stolen from Hatfield used car lot in Riverdale, south of Ogden, when it was struck at a 45-degree angle. Rees was still in his car when it was struck by the speeding car. He was pronounced dead on arrival at the hospital. Mr. Rees was married and had a sori, Michael, about 15.

seven maintenance men. Mr. bert Brady, a new member, the recreation program for children. This program sored jointly by the Club and the VFW. The club is buying 100 young pheasants from the Dahlke Game Farm in Auburn. Three farmer members will raise the pheasants 1 and they will be turned out this ! fall. '

i

The aim of the club is to pro-1 mote all sports in this area and .• to secure a lake or state park for Southeast Nebraska. All male students, 18 years old or over, who like hunting, boat· ing, trap shooting, or water skiing are welcome to join the club. The dues are five dollars per year. shop in home economics where she acted as r e c o r d e r for her group. Mrs. Mosher has learned braille which she uses in her teaching.: This fall she starts her fourth year at the Nebraska School for the Blind, where she teaches math and home economics. In 1929-30, Mrs. Mosher w a s the editor of the Pedagogian.

115 Enrolled in Post Session Post session will begin July 30 and will end August 13. Courses being offered are: Children's Literature, under Mrs. Marion Adams; Audio-Visual Materials, Sheely; Workshop .in Elementary Education, Eddy; Safety Education, Jarvis; First Aid, R. C. Gates. According to the Registrar there are at present, 115 enrolled for this 13. day session.

SWIMMING CLASS TAKES FIELD TRIP

Puppeteer In Convo Marshall Izen, TV pianist, humorist and puppeteer who has been featured on the Ed Sullivan and Steve Allen shows, appeared in the Peru State Teachers College Artist Series Thursday, July 21, at the 10:40 a.m., convocation. Mr. Izen's specialty is puppets. As he works with the puppet with one hand, he plays the music with the other. Izen sings all the parts. Born in Chicago, Izen became interested in the piano at the age of five. He was able to play all of his kindergarten songs by ear. While in school he accompanied his classmates' singing. During his youth, he saw a horror-movie which frightened him so that he was afraid to enter the room in which his piano was located. A psychologist prescribed puppets and a miniature stage as an outlet for his excessive imagination. Izen credits his success in his career as an entertainer to this treatment. At the age of 16, Izen made his debut in Chicago playing the Beethoven First. He continued his musical studies at Northwestern. While serving with the 104th Infantry Division in Europe during World War II, he entertained at the front lines. He has completed additional study at DePaul University and Julliard. THIRTY ATTEND PRACTICAL ARTS PICNIC The Practical Arts Division had a picnic at Dr. Owen Harlan's home on July 20. The menu for the picnic was fried chicken, potato salad, potato chips, cake and ice cream. There were about 30 people present.

Grad Attends National Convention Mrs. R. I. Mosher of Auburn attended the biennial convention of the American Association of Instructors of the Blind in Donelson, Tenn., from June 24 through June 30. Donelson, which is the home of the Tennessee School for the Blind, is 11 miles from Nashville. Mrs. Mosher attended a work-

Coach Al Wheeler's swimming class took a field trip to Lake Manawa, Iowa, on July 20. The purpose of the trip was to familiarize the class with boating procedures. Those making the trip were: Ross Pilkington, Joe Verbeek, Jerry Nautilus Carlson, Steve Banks, Bruce Eddy,· Charles Heidbrin, Marvin Bergsten, a n d Coach Al Wheeler. Ross Pilkington took his boat along.

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Teacher In School For Blind Now Attending PSTC Perhaps you have noticed that Peru has a blind student on th e campus. He is Eugene Strader, a teacher at the Nebraska School for the Blind. Mr. Strader was born in Kansas City, Missouri, in 1920 and spent most of his life there. When he was twelve, he lived in the country near Lawrence for two years. At this time he lost his sight. From the seventh grade on, Eugene attended the School for the Blind in Kansas City, Kansas. It was ten years after graduation from high school before he went to college. During those ten years, Eugene worked in a war plant and a concession stand. He had felt the need to do something more useful than that, so in 1953,, he enrolled in Washburn University in Topeka, Kansas. Eugene's major field was social studies, but a science teacher was in demand at the Nebraska School for the Blind, and he had enough hours to qualify. Mr. Strader said the classes at the Nebraska School for the Blind usually consist of five or six students, some totally blind, some partially sighted. Since the classes are small, they are not as uniform as larger p u b 1i c school classes are, that is, with respect to ability. Some children are born blind and others 1 o s e their sight later so that those who have once had sight h a v e learned many basic things, such as color, whereas the congenitally blind have not. Some children have been over-protected by their parents. Others have to be stimulated to become self-sufficient. Therefore, children of equal abil-

ity in the same grade often are in different stages of intellectual development. Discipline problems are greater in teaching these children largely because of the fact that they do not have much home life, and because many of them have other handicaps. Even so, the teaching is still quite rewarding when it is apparent that real progress is being made. Eugene received his Masters Degree and also did most of his undergraduate work at Kansas University at Lawrence. He is attending Peru to get enough hours in science to obtain a major. Later he hopes to get some more work in teaching the physically handicapped.

Marilyn Dyke Recital

As of July 6, a singles tennis tournament for women has been taking place on the Peru campus. This is a ladder tournament, and the names of the players have . been posted on a ladder in the gym. A player may challenge either of the two players directly above her, or she may be challenged by either of the two players below her. The challenge must be accepted within two days or the match will be awarded the chal- .. lenger. Each match will consist of at least one set, and if both parties agree, the best two out of three sets. The woman in first p 1a c e Thursday morning, July 28, will be judged the winner. Those taking part in the tournament are: Dixie Benton, Maxine Sampson, Mary Elliott, Rosemary Grundmann, Elva Schulz, Doris K.resok, Janice Korber and Janice Jahn.

Graduating Class Honored By Tea At Eliza Morgan The residents of Eliza Morgan Hall honored the summer graduating class of 1960 by a reception at Eliza Morgan, Thursday afternoon, July 21, 1960. The reception was held from two to four-thirty p.m. All dorm girls helped w i th the affair.

Mrs. Marilyn Dyke, a senior in music education at Nebraska State Teachers College at Peru, appeared in a senior vocal recital Dr. Milburn Blanton, director in the College Auditorium Thursof the campus school, is attendday, July 21, at 8:00 p.m. Mrs. Dyke, a mezzo-soprano, is ing an annual workshop at the a student of Darryl T. Manring, University of Minnesota from July 25 through August 19. associate professor of voice. The workshop is sponsored by Her recital program included operatic selections by Puccini, the North Central Association of Rachmaninoff, Saint Saen, Negro colleges and secondary schools. Spirituals, modern and light op- This is the organization that era selections by Carpenter, evaluates colleges and secondary Gershwin and Rodgers-Hammer- schools in the central part of the United States. stein. Mrs. Dyke is the wife of Loren Dyke of Essex, Iowa, a 1957 graduate of Peru State. The former Marilyn Mueller, daughter of Mr. Miss Alma Stoddard's individand Mrs. Harry Mueller of Grisual sports class is having various wold, Mrs. Dyke will be a canditournaments starting this week date for graduation at the close of and continuing to the end of the the 1961 summer session. She has summer session. Students a r e studied voice at Drake Univerparticipating in tournaments in sity as well as at Peru State the following sports: aerial darts, where she.has appeared as a solobadminton, paddle tennis, shufist in a number of operetta and fleboard, and archery. musical presentations.

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EVEN FORTY-FIVE YEARS AGO, PERU WAS A BUSY SCHOOL The Pedagogian lifted this account from the "News and Views" column of Editor Donald Stanley of the Peru Pointer. In the Good Old DaysJ ames Majors has furnished us with the Peru State Normal School Bulletin for the 1915-16 school year from which we glean that the Normal must have been quite a school. The previous year its enrollment was 1313 students, a gain of about 300 in three years and the bulletin forecast a larger enrollment for 1915. Tuition was free, books were free, dormitory room and board cost $2.90 a week, but in private homes the cost sometimes ran up to $3.50. And, students were expected to get through with their schooling, get their diplomas and get out in two years. Discipline was strict. No young lady was permitted to entertain a gentleman in her room. Th e town of Peru had multiple train service daily to all parts of the nation and it was the boast of the tova1speople that "no saloons or other haunts of vice are found in Peru."

Stemper Crashes-Through Library Floor Since coming to Peru and using the Library facilities, I have been afraid that the glass floor upstairs in the book s e c t i o n would break out from under me. Wednesday, July 6, it happenedto someone else. I was standing in the eight hundred section looking for some books on poetry, when I noticed Coach Stemper coming down the aisle. I said "Hi Coach," and went back to my looking. Right then it happened. I heard a cracking noise and turned around to see Stemper pulling himself out of a hole in the glass floor. The glass had broken out from underneath him, but luckily he had caught himself in time and wasn't hurt.

Junction Nears Completion July 21 was the completion date for the south part of the junction of highways 67 and 75, according to L. W. Fisk, resident engineer for the state department of roads. Mr. Fisk stated that testing should be done by this time if weather pe~mitted construction to continue. The area of new construction is 800 feet from the center line of highway 75, straight east toward Peru. Pavement has been wid-

ened and grade lines raised to the north and south, giving better site direction. Widening and tapering will make it easier to get on and off highway 75. Mr. Fisk said the rainy weather had delayed extending a culvert and bringing the grade up on the north end of the construction area on highway 75.

Class Visits Brownville Mill The Beginning Foods and Nutrition class visited the Brownville mill on Thursday, July 14. The mill is best known for its stone ground flour, but the owner also handles about 100 other foods products. Those who made the trip to Brownville were: Mrs. Louise Kregel, instructor, Marie Green, Arlene Hoshar, Betty Lambert, Ellen Harper, Mary Jarvis, Joann Hunzeker, Carolyn Parli, Georgia Miller, and Donna Johnson.

Kregel Attends Shower On July 8 Mrs. Louise Kregel, home economics instructor, attended a shower given for Linda Moore at the Christian church in Nemaha. Linda will be married to Fred Regnier on August 7. Both were graduated from Peru in May.

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Nebraska State Teachers College AT PERU SERVING STATE AND NATION SINCE 1867


UTTLE MAN ON CAMPUS

by Dick Bibler

Wininger Hurt By Power Mower

.Jindra Gets Small Fry to Fiddling

While mowing the Methodist church lawn in Brownville Friday, July 15, Dr. Darrell Wininger slipped and injured his right foot. The mower cut off half of his large toe, and made several deep cuts on the top of his foot. Dr. Wininger got in his car and drove to Doctor Thomson's office· in Auburn. After examining the foot, Doctor Thomson sent Dr. Wininger in an ambulance to .the Methodist hospital in Omaha. If this weren't bad enough, some of the Wininger children had mumps while Dr. Wininger was laid up with the bad foot.

Church Camp Here Young people of high school age from the Disciples of Christ Christian Church attended camp held at Peru State from July 10th to 16th. About 65 boys and girls from mid-Nebraska churches were here. The girls stayed on the third floor of Morgan Hall, and the boys stayed in Delzell Hall. The young people chose one of five courses of study in which they learned about the church and the Bible. They attended these study groups in the mornat the college, and the dependa- ing. The morning studies were bility of the college students next followed by recreation and social fall, but she feels that she will life in the afternoon and evening. "still have one finger in the pie." Another group of young people Beginning in March of 1957, from the same church was here Mrs. Wheeler joined the college July 17th to 23rd. staff. Miss Davidson, who had been the Women's Physical Education instructor, became ill at that time. Mrs. Wheeler had been Charlene Breaks Arm teaching fifth and sixth, seventh Charlene Langham, first grader and eighth, and ninth and tenth at the Campus School and daughgirls physical education at the ter of Mr. and Mrs. Max LangCampus School until that time. ham, broke her arm just above Mrs. Wheeler finished out the sethe wrist Tuesday night, July 19. mester, taught the next summer, Charlene was climbing trees at the year of 1958-5.9, and the year the old schoolhouse when the acof 1959-60. She feels that a good cident occurred. qualified person has been chosen The Langhams took Charlene to assume the responsibilities of to the college nurse, Mrs. Boatthe department. man, who put a splint on the arm. Then Charlene was taken to the this summer. Preparations are be- doctor in Auburn who set the ing made for the presentation of bone. "Witness for the Prosecution," the New York and London hit by Agatha Christie. This play has generally been regarded as the best crime melodrama-whether in book form or play form-ever The Beginning Foods and Nuto have been written by Agatha trition class went to Lincoln on Christie, who has 55 my st e r y Thursday, July 21 for a tour of novels to her credit. Central Missouri State College, several food industries. The guidtoo; is anticipating a summer of ed tours took them through Robdramatic presentations. The 4th erts Dairy, Miller and Paine canannual Central Missouri State dy factory, Coca-Cola bottling summer theater opened July 2 works, and Gooch's mill. The group who made the trip with "Shepherd of the Hills" and will close with the same produc- included: Mrs. Louise Kregel, Marie Green, Arlene Hoshar, Bettion Labor Day. ty Lambert, Ellen Harper, Mary Four stock shows will be preJarvis, Joann Hunzeker, Carolyn sented during the summer in adParli, Georgia Miller, and Donna dition to the "Shepherd of the Johnson. Hills" which will be playing each week-end. Stock shows scheduled are "My Three Angels," "Janos," souri that provides a s um m e r "Come Back Little Sheba,'' and theater workshop. "King of Hearts." Dr. Michael Kelly of the speech WHEELER department is directing the theaDairy Oueen1 ter for the second year. Dr. Wm. Cone Wifh fhe Curl on Top Dodge, also of the speech department, said that Central Missouri AUBURN, NEBRASKA State College is the only institution of higher learning in Mis-

Mrs. Wheeler Returns To Position at Campus School Mrs. Fran Wheeler, Head of the Division of Women's Physical Education Department, is returning this fall to her former position at the Peru Campus School. Mrs. Wheeler will be keeping one college class each semester, according to present plans. First semester she will be teaching square dance, and modern dance second semester. She will be supervisor for the fifth and sixth grade girls gym class, and for seventh and eighth grade girls gym class. Miss Hohl, the n e w college Physical Education instructor, will have the high school girls' volley ball team. According to Mrs. Wheeler, she will mi:is contact with all the college students, the good facilities

What Others Are Doing By Julie Mayer Colorado State C o 11 e g e at Greeley has been playing host to Dr. Loyd E. Grimes since Tuesday, July 5. Dr. Grimes is the Chief Education advisor for the Pakistan projects. The Pakistan program is divided into three sections, according to Dr. Grimes. Pakistani professors are trained in American universities and colleges. Up to the present there have been 200 Pakistani professors in the United States. The second section. of the program is the sending of American professors to Pakistan. At present there are 50 American professors in Pakistan. The third phase of the program is the use of United States equipment by Pakistan in certain areas. Dr. Grimes is presently taking a 90-day home leave from Pakistan during which he plans to visit four o th e r universities. These universities are all involved in the foreign aid program as it relates to education. The drama department at Colorado State College is also busy

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Violins and s ma 11 children seem to go together in Peru, Nebraska! From early morning, through the noon hour, in late evening, winter and summer, you'll find small fry coming and going to and from the Music Hall with violins to fit their size. The youngsters are students of Victor H. Jindra, head of the fine arts division at Peru State Teachers College. In a town where the population is right at 1,000 (1,270 in 1950), undoubtedly, there are more violins than in most cities several times the size. At present the younger set of violinists number 36 from kindergarten to the fifth grade age groups. Acccording to Mr. Jindra the old saw about practice making perfect is just a part of the battle in violin instruction for youngsters of this age. Starting them on ·the violin isn't nearly as difficult as keeping them interested. But here the veteran teacher of 37 years on Peru State's Campus of a Thousand Oaks has had more than moderate success through a number of ingenious methods that he employs. Unlike some music educators who feel that a child should not start string instruction before the fifth grade, Mr. Jindra says the secret of developing violinists is to start them when they'Ie young. Some of his incentive methods' include group classes in which the youngsters play together. It's not uncommon to find teacher and class playing an d marching around the room to a march time tune. The results of his recent efforts with youngsters could be seen at the spring recital in which almost all of his kindergarten through fifth grade students participated. A trio of fourth-grade young ladies played "Concerto No. 4" by Huberfrom memory. In 1956 when they appeared in their first spring . recital as kindergartners, th e y were the youngest on the program. They've come a long way, and are just as interested in violin today as they were then. In the four years Georgette Gomon and Lesley Manring of Peru and Jane Ann Frerichs of

Talmage have grown from the one-quarter size violin to the one-half and three-quarter size instruments. The body-length of a full-size instrument is fourteen inches, while the quarter-size is eleven inches. Another noticeable result was the number of youngsters-grownup who appeared in the CollegeCommunity Orchestra's spring concert and at Baccalaureate and Commencement. A number of Mr. Jindra's former students continue to play in college and city symphony orchestra. Some have played with the Honolulu, Wichita, Omaha, Lincoln, Sioux City, Detroit Women's, KRYL Women's symphonies, and the Seventh Army . Symphony in Europe. Miss Judith Miller, a senior in music education at Peru State who started violin instruction under Mr. Jindra as a fourth grader, is preparing for the 1961 Young Artist Auditions of the National Federation of Musi~ Clubs. She was presented in recital as a high school senior and as a sophomore at Peru State as well as soloist at Southeast Nebraska events. If you were to ask any of the small violinists about the best picnic they attended this spring, without a doubt they would tell you it was Mr. Jindra's picnic. The reason for their reply was no doubt due to the planning and preparation that went into it. There were even student committees for ice cream and pop!

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Profile for Peru State College Library

1959-1960 Peru Pedagogian - issues 1-18  

1959-1960 newspaper issues 1-18 for Peru State College, Peru, Nebraska

1959-1960 Peru Pedagogian - issues 1-18  

1959-1960 newspaper issues 1-18 for Peru State College, Peru, Nebraska

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