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Helpful Hints For Freshmen In <ivery freshman's life there comes that awful moment when sinking through the floor seems to be the only solution. However, since _ _. . ; . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - · - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - this solution isn't too practical, VOLUME XXXVI. PERU, NEBRASKA, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1940. NUMBER 1. here are other suggestions.

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Karr, Redfern Head ~:!!~e~;;:.:~~"~;~~e pperclass Students Orient ~~~dh~!e I~t~~~~~!~~n: ~~~::~ '41 Peruvian Staff cas~;: ~~~~!·c:~~p~~~P,'.~~ 255 F·1· r·st Year Colleg·1ans li'. You are atten:ng class. (Honestly) Suddenly you realize that in-

Government. Petrified Forest," last week. This A. Whisper your plight to the Selections for the entire staff of two act drama by Robert Sherwood prof. the 1941 Peruvian have been an- has been produced on both the - - - - - - - - - - - B. Tell everybody you're a fresh- nounced by yearbook editor, Dean .stage and screen. Four Day Program man in the wrong class. Karr. LeRoy Redfern will hold the , Mary Olive Richardson wm serve Crawford Inaugurates 0. Say "Wha~, isn't this the position of business manager and as student director. Precedes Classes Friday P.S.T.C. Marphing Band course in Shakespeare?" Rose McGinnis, that of assistant The following cast has been se-· With a crash of cymbals, a D. Get down on your hands and editor. 1ected: After struggling· through a day of knees and crawl out. Other staff members include Har- Gramp Maple, Warren Bollmeier. marching band forms on the camp- entrance tests, interspursed with E. Pick up the waste paper basket old Dallam, Phyllis Benson, Mar- Boze HertZlinger, Lloyd Dunlap. us. Prof. V. H. Jindra, the organiz- greetings and advice offered by and walk out like a janitor. gery Ann Kinsey, Rex Floyd, NanA Telegraph Linem!~m, Harold er, hopes to have 48 high-stepping Dean Inice Dunning, Dean J. A. uniformed members. (Answer: C will save your face, cy Ellen Jones, Elvera Schacht, Jenkins. ·' Jimerson and Leroy Redfern, who Marching practice was held for although not a convincing plan.) Grace Muenchau, Janet Harris, Another Lineman, Thaine Hale. represented the upperclassmen, the first time Wednesday with over • Faye Bouse, T'om Dean and Jason Maple, Carol Jones. and group singing led by Prof. G. Gabby Maple, Margery Ann Kin- 40 memebrs participating and Mary Holt Steck, freshmen were formal2. Your first blind date ha.s buck Horace RZehak. Grovenburg drum majoring. Plans for the new Peruvian will sey. teeth, wears horn rimmed specs, ly initiated into college life at Peru Jim Crawford, a music major, State. and dances like a rhinocerous. become more definite 11fter the Paula, Janet Harris. directed movements assisted by Jim A. Cross your eyes and tell it National Scholastic Press Associa- Alan Squier, D'ean Karr. Along the educational line, · guidyou had fits as a child. tion convention to be held in De- Mr. Chisholm, Burton Evere.tt. Bussenbarrick, who is interested in ance talks ancl discussions by the military work and is boosting plans J\'lrs. Chisholm, Nancy Henderson. B. Stumble on the steps and troit soon. for a color guard to precede the department heads occupied freshJoseph, Lester Ruetter. pretend :'ou hurt your footf f f men Tuesda:,r morning. Weclm:sday band. · Jackie, Jim Busenbarrick. ball knee. suc;gestions for socir:i adjustment Registration Week Ends Military maneuvering and marchDuke Mantee, Jim Sanc!in. C. Go through with it. ing bands a.1·e gaining attention ev- were conl;ributecl by the dean'; and With Lively Mixer, Dance Ruby, Wilbert Kohrs. morning buy a butcher kNexft ID e erywhere and Peru is proving it- ''Preshman Study Problems" by Pyles, Horace Rzehak. and seek out the person re- After a strenuous week of tesj;s, seif up-to-date with this new ac- I-'roi. Robert D. Moore. Legion Commander, Ralph Hayes. sponsible for elate. scenic drives, lectures, and regisThe major part of Freshman Another Legionnaire, Freddie tivi.ty. D. Remember that you yourself tration, upperclassmen and freshWee!\ was devoted to cntertaininff Drexler. f f f are not perfect and try con- men J·oincd hands and got acthG newcomers. A surprise part; Sheriff, Harold Dallam. FAYE .BOUSE ELECTED versa tion. quainted Friday evening, September was held at 6:30 Monday evening on A Deputy, Willard Wilson. G:u:RLS DORM PREXY .E. If you're a fast enough think- 13, at the collerre mixer. the lawn back of the training· Another D€puty, James Howe. er introduce yourself as your The "gym" echoed with group Following the election of repre- school. Miss Grace Tear, freshman f f f 011m roommate and explain singing, cheering, and the Virginia sentatives, the girls' dormitory class adviser, extended a cordial that you've just been taken to Reel. First on the program was a council held their first meeting of welcorp.e to all. Under the direction the hospital. community sing, grouped according the year late Wednesday evening. of upperclassmen, freshmen "romp(Answer: A is the best all around to class standing. Miss Palmer then The newly elected members are ed and played." AB a climax to the solution. Subtlety is an art!) divided the "mixers" into birthday Mary Olive Richardson and Elvera evening's fun, all were treated to watermelon. ' • groups. Each then presented a Schacht, senior represehtatives; 3. You are hurrying your girl home charade depicting a sport peculiar Grace Muenchau and Janet Harris, Representing the senior class as at 9: 15 and your watch stops. to one of the seasons. The winter At the end of the first week, junior members; Marjorie Evans hostesses were Wilma Parnell and A. Tell her the dean of women group ice skated, fall initiated 3 546 students had launched · into and Edith Willie, first floor mem- "Sherry" Hauptmann; as hosts is your pal and you can fix it freshmen, spring played a rough college life at P. S. T .. C. bers; Ruth Stoneman, seco;nd Frank Larson and Horace Rzehak'. up. g·ame of baseball and summer failA.ccord~ng to President W. R. floor; and Bernice Neddenriep and Sports direptors inducted Phyllis B. Explain about the fire-escapes ed to perform because they were all Pate this marks a four per cent in- Fern Peterson, third floor repre- Benson, Faye Bouse, Grace Muenon the dark side of the dorm on a vacation. crease over last year's 525. Follow- sentatives. The freshmen girls will chau, Edna Mae Petersen, Erma 'USeti by 15en:eratio115 101.. 1jllilt The .grand march was ~Jer1 ]1y .ing· are th(l):egistration figures for me~t at.. .R lat~r dRte to .elect t.hf'ir Meier, Margaret Gardner, Janet. such emergencies. Mary Grovenbur.g and Jerry Garb- the past two years: representatives. Harris, l<"ern f'eterscin, Clair Callan, c. Make the best of the situa- er. The remainder of the evening 1939 1940 Carolee Garver and Harriett Severn Handley and Cecil Walker. tion. was spept . dancing and at a late Senior ............ .. 53 54 Maxwell, sophomore members, and • D. Explain what happens to lit- hour refreshments were served. Junior ............ .. 61 88 Kathryn Bartling, second floor Scenic Drive Sophomore ......... . 158 149 member, are seFing the second tle girls who get in late. f f f Tuesday afternoon, freshmen Freshman ......... .. 254 255 year of their term. (Answer: Obviously C.) Pate Extends Welcome Dormitory assistant Marsh con- Faye Bouse was elected member- were introduced to the "Halls of At First Convocation firmed the fact today that Eliza at-large representative at the first Learning" on the campus. Last 4. Just as you wander in late to Morgan and Mount Vernon Halls meeting of the dormitory council. year's freshmen honor students President W. R. Pate addressed Comp you remember today is the the students at tne first convoca- are filled to capacity. Mrs. Russell, At the same time she was elected acting as guides of the freshmen day for the quarterly exam. mens dormitory matron, stated that president and Grace Muenchau groups were: Jean Hoagland, Carl A. Fall over a chair and knock tion of the year on Sept. 13. Wirth, Reuben Fanders, Ruth Adthey have a waiting llst. He e:id;ended a welcome to all new yourself out as you go. down. was elected secretary-treasurer. B. Star-t thinking up a good students and to those who are conMarjorie Evans was appointed amson, Inez and Mildred Longfelf f f low. Following the campus tour Petinuing their work. FRIDAY CONVOCATION story to tell Pa and Ma. the chairman of a committee to ru Kiwanians sponsored a s~enic FEATURES PEP RALLY investigate hiring an orchest·a for C. Use your book if you can; f f f drive, introducing local spots of inotherwise, cross your fingers. , the fall formal. Suzgestions for A pep ran,:, preceding the first terest to approximately 200 stuhomecoming activities were discusD. chew Beech-Nut. official football game, constituted sed. dents. After being treated to grapes (Answer: Try D. With Beech-Nut the convocation program Sept. 20. from t h e Hollywood fruit farm. you can pass any exam.) 1 f f The college pep band, with cheer Supt. S. L. Clements divided the

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Enrollment Shows Four Per Cent Gain

Clinton Sharp Accepts Science Assistantship

leaders Mary Grovenburg and Jergroup among 42 faculty and busi"Peru possesses an extremely at- ry Garber kept the convo-goers in nessmen's cars. The tour was led telling you what a perfectly di- tractive campus populated with a rally atmosphere. by Pete Holdorf and directed. by vine dancer Clarence is. friendly, cordial people," said Clin- Coach "Al" Wheeler outlined the Boy Scouts stationed along the A. Start waving over 11er should- ton H. Sharp, new member of the football prospects and .Coach Arthroute, where berry aiid fruit orcher at every girl on the floor science department. ur Jones introduced the members Prospectfve Y. M. and Y. W. ards were pointed out. The group and remarking what a swell Prof. Seegmiller and Sharp have of the squad in typical Jones style. members, in a joint devotional was taken to the farm where a gal Mabel is. much in coinmon besides science. He introduced team "backers" and hour, entered the Music Hall Tues- test oil well was being drilled a B. Take her to the double-feature They both come from warm cli- the eight candidates for Nebraska day evening, September 16, and novel sight for many. ' at the Paramount. mates and find Nebraska weather City's Apple Harvest Princess. found a different type of atmo- The procession then crossed the C. Comment quietly that no fel- very changeable. Mr. Sharp feels ;. ;. ;. sphere than characterized the pre- new bridge at Brownville into Misla can dance very well if the he is n6t prepared for the Ne- MENS DORM LANDSCAPEDceding Freshman Week meetings. souri after being honored by free girl won't follow him. braska winter of which he has New screens sidewalks and the The stage was draped in black transit. (Answer. C shauld _give. the idea been infonned. landscaping, f:aturing the Bob Cat with candles focused on a wooden Stopping at the Ak-Sar-Ben fruit that her own dancmg is not so He maintains that he learns oth- fish pond, are now offered to resi- cross on the rostrum. While an or- packing plant on the return trip ternfic, but you can't be too er theories before bothering with dents of the Mens Donn. gan played in the background, Bob the travelers were told about th~ subtle with a girl than dumb.) \ his own. Research is his only hailit. With exception of some minor Wiliiams, president of Y. M., read packing of apples by Manao-er • 1 ' d grading and other details the work a scripture and offered a prayer. Franklin. From there the newco~­ A 1 Prof. Sharps egrees were After an interlude of quiet music ers were driven back to the campus 6. You are Clarabelle and two men awarded at Louisana State, For his is expected to be completed in • arrive simultaneously. U-l'ot likely B.S. he majored in science and mi- about two weeks according to nr. Maryon Thomas sang "Where He to happen in Peru.) nored in mathematics. To receive J. M. Winter. Leads Me 1 Will Follow." Following Talent Night A. Suggest cheerily why don't you his M.A. he majored in education Vines and mther shrubbery will 8f1other period of orga;n mu8'c, Prof. Robert Moore spoke on "De- The freshmen dispiayed dramatic an three go out together. and. minored in organic chemistry. be planted next spring. veloping The Spiritual Side of and musical ability Freshman TalB. Bluff it out and try to tell Joe For his M.S. he majored in physif f f Life." Professor R. T. Benford was ent Night, Sept. 10. that your date was for tomor- ological chemistry and minored in JINDRA TRAINS TONETTES. Doris Brinson, local pianist, th~ organist. row nite. . zoology. He has completed all the Prof. Jindra and the Nemaha played Gautiers "Le Secret," folAbout 80 were present. C. Be playful and decide which required work for his doctor's de- County Tonette and Rhythm Band lowed by Patricia Rockwell, Humf f f to go with by the eenie- mean- gree. are very much in demand these boldt, who sang the well-lmown ie-minie-mo system. Prof. Sharp has charge at il)tmer- days. Mcintyre Leases Cctmpus Shop '.'Can't Yo' Heah Me Callin' CarolD. Hide under the bed. al chemistry and qualitative and The following schedule is before The campus shop has assumed a ine" • . · · "TY nomecommg" was a ' drama(Answer: C-you can't keep them quantitative analysis in the sci- them: Pawnee county institut@, busy air as Jack Mcintyre, Peru ti: reading by Hope Carter, Plnnboth anyway.) ence department. September 21; in Beatrice, Gage athlete and center on the mythical outh. i\fargare,\ Goodridge, Rock e This southern gentleman is a County, September 28; and Aub- all-state football team, has taken Por::~Mo., interpreted the violin so7. You are strolling with one of the bridegroom of but three weeks. His Hrn, Nemaha County; October 9. over the dining room and lunch lo, ;::iong·s My Mother Taw;ht Me" feminine species, when an upper- Wife will come to Peru when she This band. is composed of rural c0unter. The former operator now and Chopin's "Ballad, Op. ' ,, W<ts 47 classman overtakes you. has com]1leted her term as instruct- gTade school children of Nemaha has charge of the school supplies played by Evelyn Slagle, Falls C1ty. (Continued on page four) or in Louisiana. County. in the west side division. (Continued on page four) 5. Your date spends the evening

Sacred Hour Begins Y's Yearly Program


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TWO.

Publislted Weekly by T!te Peru State Teachers College Peru, Nebraska

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 19

Rdvice On Getting To ROne O'Clock

By this time if there is anything Entered at the Postoffice at Peru, Nebraska, as Second the lowly freshman doesn't need Class Matter. $1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc more of, it's advice. Although the fact remains that a freshman thinks he is old enough to make Rose McGinnis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editor his own mistakes and needs no Maryon Thomas .......................... Assistant Editor one's advice, never-the-less he Bill Brooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sports Editoi· has had it doled out to him withMelvin McKinney ................ Assistant Sports Editor out solicitation for the past two Nina Kane! ....... '. ........................ Proof Reader months. What freshman did not receive !VI. Florence Martin .............................. Adviser numerous do's and don'ts as he sevReporters: Meredith Jimerson, Milton Schultz, Margery ered home-ties last September? Kinsey, Leroy Redfern, Betty Miller, Mona Morelock, fl.far· And didn't the deans ofier addigaret Hesemann, Ralph Locke, Jean Haith, Janet Harris, tional instructions and pleas upon Jeanne Spier, Myrton Hall, Phyllis Wilberger, Dorothy arriving at the institution of higher Armstrong, Harold Lantz, Ardis Carmine, Virginia King, learning? Along with a. week of orientation came advisers advising Ruth Stoneman, Sarene Hauptman. what courses to take-not to mention everybody on the campus suggesting the organization to WELCOME FROSH!join-Philo or Everetts, and putting We devote ourselves this week to the lowly neophytes- in a word concerning the eligibles to date. those humble creatures 255 strong-who have entered our However, qo one has set forth midst in order that they may qualify as scholars. May all of any practical advice on ·an item you devour English poets, milkshakes, thermodynamics, back- which ranks high among the freshman's list of problems. Every lowly field tactics, classic fashions, week end relaxation and field neophyte is certain to be faced trips, with neve1' a flick of indigestion and not too many fur· with a one o'clock class. Getting there calls f or determination, rows of the brow. Spartan courage, i and a method. It gives us pleasure, or nearly scr-friend Frosh-to Try these ten steps for getting to a usher you onto our campus. I will not say that yours is the one o'clock. task of rebuilding the world, that America is calling, or that 12: 00--0utrun the upperclassmen and get in line (the end the future of this hemisphere is in your hands. I merely say of the line) at the cafeteria. "Welcome." Though your present conceit is in the process of

Over There ·n Over Here

12 :30--Arrive at the food and partake thereof. 12: 40--Chat with friends (both of them). It stimulates digestion. 12:45-Leave friends. Very important! If not observed, discussion evolves into one of those all-afternoon sessions on sex, life, Jove, and college. 14:47-Go to room. Be firm! Do not be lured by games of slap-jack, the radio, or Dagwood in the funnies. 12:50-Avoid roommate who wants to go down town. Note: Roommates always have the afternoon ofI on the day of yom one o'clock. 12 :55-It may be difficult if your route takes you past Mac's or the Hill Store. Walking on the other side of the street ir help, but the other side of the campus is even better. 12 :58-Resist current flame who is at leisure this hour and insistent upon having a coke. 1~00-Get to class. Remember that the beautiful (or nasty) weather has no Ltallng on the case. End of Semester: Discover two hours credit missing, as a result of overcutting. 0

being curbed with .a paddle, we sincerely hope that your - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - rank as alumni of Peru State Teachers College four years ~ Windsor, Colo., high school, has hence will inflate your ego to a near-bm:sting point. Good accepted a like position at the State Teachers College at Gunnisluck, Freshmen!

By Grace .Muenchau

on, Colo. He will also be assistant coach in the college. f

STATE OF MINDAt this time of the year an occasional student is seriously asking, "What good will higher education do me?". To this query the eminent Prof. Richard Burton has evolved a per· fect answer': "It will give you a state of mind which you will find the equivalent of a Rolls-Royce car." What good does it do one to fish in the Canadian woods? What good does it do one to live in a fine home? What good does it do one to wear good looking clothes, or to become an expert golfer? It gives one an exalted state of mind. Some can achieve this state of mind only by living in a 30 room house, others by riding the high seas in a private yatch, others by cruising about in a ten thousand dollar vehicle, others by 0rdering everything on the tailor's bill of fare. Still others can get it from. looking at an etching, or a marble figure in an art gallery, from reading a book, from listening to a Beethoven symphony, from an evening's con· versation with a congenial fellow. That's all there is to culture. It's a way of reducing the cost of a happy existence.

·ANNIVERSARYVeteran re~ders of THE PEDAGOGIAN may be aware of the changes in the appearance of this year's PED. For the benefit of freshmen along with the less observin~ individual, let us elucidate. The front page head appears in a script form; columns have been narrowed slightly in width; a new type face is used for the heads. A new printer at the helm is a fact by no means to be overlooked. R. M. King, formerly of Sidney, Iowa, presides over our present publication. Several PEDAGOGIAN staff positions are open this semester, but new blood wishing practical experience in journalism is mot .far in the offing and positions will be filled soon. • Confidentially, this is our twenty-fifth birthday. This marks the twenty.fifth year of a newspaper on the campus. The Normal School Journal came to life in 1905, only to give way to The Normalite the following year. In magazine form, this was published once each month until 1915 when it achieved the size and form of a newspaper. In 1921,' the changing of the school from a nom1al to a state teachers college necessitated another name. Since that time THE PEDAGOGIA..°" has ca.rn.e.d the ~ o! act.iv.ities th.at

GRETCHEN MILLER, class of '38, is teaching high school English at Mohamet, Ill., this year. Gretchen previously taught in Hamburg, Iowa, where she had Charge of junior high school English. That position was taken by :Marguerite Robinson, 1940 alumna, who· was particularly active in Sigma Taµ Delta and Kappa Delta Pi.

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Films developed 25c, 2 enlarge-

ments FREE. Hill's Drug· Store. f

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Engagement Announced

From a letter from war-torn land: "There is nothing excep going on. Yorkshire is a big c north and east. They hav bombs daily. Jerry wants the ical nitrate works on the Tees er, but he hits a few seaside ing houses on the coast or a house on the moors."

We ruminated that night while lolling on the bunk the latest edition of Esquire discarded. How peaceful it over here. Hear ths,t singing? Jim Mather in the shower, pr atory to a ·date. That bang noise? No, that isn't rifle bombs. That is Whizzer White ing impressed with the disad1 tage of being a freshman.

o More from Heading·ley: " night the sky was lit up searchlights. I counted about flashing after something, a w derful display and that was When you say the last collect prayerbook at evensong 'Lig our darkness,' it has a real ing to us now and we are th for quiet nights when they

o Dear old Peru. dGrolling a campus now. See those lights f ering to the west-all those Jig windows. Those are the girls d illuminators. Did you ever n how the moonlight flickers on observatory of the Science Hall you stroll up from the local nema with the mode of the mo at your side? It sort of inspires mance, doesn't it? Made you to linger for a few minutes campus bench before saying g night.

More from Headingley: "We s make our suits do and top but most of us have clothes f year or so and it >vill be fas able to be shabby and we d care two pence. We are in good ile and when we bite we shall through."

Mr. and Mrs. S. R. Kennedy announce the engagement of their daughter, Marjorie, to Thom.as Dean. The announcement was made at the Library StafI party Thursday evening at the home of Miss Grace .Petersen. Guests reJust saw Goerke walking ac ETHEL GLOSSER, rormer asvealed the 'summer highlights" of campus looking like a walking s sistant librarian at Peru has accepted a position at Ludne, Mo., a their vacation as entertainment. of Esquire. Have· you noticed tweeds on the campus? The c f f f suburb of St. Louis. as librarian and Additions to the giris' dormitor- are a little longer this year English teacher. Last year after ]earing Peru, she was librarian at ies' library this year are three new the cufis of the trousers are a the Agriculture college library at magazines, "Intercollegian," "Harp- tie higher. We even have fell ers." and "The American Home." who set the style in what kind the University of Nebraska. Through the efiorts of the dorm- paddle to use this fall. Hutch MAXINE PERSHING. 1940 re- itory counc!J the following magaFass are out ahead of the pa presentative student and Gamma zines are now available to all resi- with their dark walnut autogra Chi president, has· accepted the podents of the halls: 'Life." "Time," persuaden:. &ition of junior high instructor of "Reader's Digest," "Ladies' Home • mathematics and physical education Journal," "Woman's Home Com- More from Headingley: at· Linwood, Iowa. panion," "Cosmopolitan," "Silver men are beginning to show thef RACHAEL GONZALES (mat Screen." and "McCalls." fects of the extra strain and w '38) is attending the agricultural For research and study purposes put on them by this war but college at the University of Nebras- the "Wonder Atlas of the World," bearing up nicely." ' · ka, where she is majoring in home a large dictionary and encycloped• economics. ias are available. "TI1e Omaha What did you think of the MARJORIEJ HAfl.RIS (mat. '36) World Herald" and "The Lincoln beauties nominated for the is teaching fifth grade and grade State Journal" are subscribed to as representative to Apple Festiv school music at Weeping Water. well. Not bad, eh? I heard a guy She taught last year at Taylor f f f that he would like to call one where MA RY MATTHEWS is As a part of their initiation, the them up for a date tonight, but teaching home economics and freshmen boys presented a short told him she had "irons in the music. musical program in front the Eliza Tough luck, chum but I can't WARREN ADAMS, a Peruvian, Morgan and Mt. Vernon Halls I blame you for w~nting to try. is working on his master of arts Wednesday evening. Individual per• degree in Oregon. Mrs. Adams formances revealed unexpected ta!More from Headingley: "We d (MIRIAM REEL) is a former Pe- ent while the group singing showed hear much from our men folks ruvian. the need for more practice._ are away to the war, and those stay behind are becoming overw JOHN TYNON' is teaching in i f i high school and coaching 6-man Ed Wiltse a former Peruvian who ed and tired." is now attending National School of football at Stratton this year . Saw Anderson heading out Bill Zurbrick recently made a Aeronautics at Kansas City, Mo., short visit with J't.{r. and Mrs. Ralph visited on the campus last week the Missouri river Saturday af noon with a fish line in his ha Sellhorn, who are now residing at end. a crowd of freshmen playing Iowa City, Iowa. Mr. Sellhorn f f f taug·ht industrial arts at ·Peru last Johnson Fresh Hot Nuts at Hill's nis at the same tim.e. Drug Store. year. More from Headingley: "We f f f DANA SCHNEIDER and wife, ROSE McGINNIS TO confident that we will win this the former Marie Vickers, with DISTRIBUTE GUM but it is going to be a hard daughter visited on the campus Sept. 16. They reside at Ogallala Jaw-waggers on P. S. T, C.'s Pretty nice the way Peru w and are former .Peruvians. Dana campus will be urged to "Chew away from York Friday night was business manager of the 1934 Beech-Nut" again this year, accord- a score of 50-0, wasn't it? Peruvian. ing to student representative Rose MISS MONA LYON, former as- McGinnis. Continuing her Beech- Postscript from Headingley: sistant registrar, now instructor at Nut advertising campaign of last have air raid shelters all over. Hanisonburg, Va., was a guest of year, she will distribute free sam- children are dispersed to the r 1':i.!ss Elma Gocldey last week. pies of Beech-Nut products to all districts." WA i:"'NE WEAR:js, '35, who has college students at regular interGod bless Peru! God bless ~ te;arhing mk!u.strial arts at vals throughout the year. ica!

• •


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER '24, 1940.

Peru Smashes York 50-0 In Initial Bout Friday •

PERU PEDAGOGIJ\N

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PERU BOWLING

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CLUB

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the up-an d-conung . game

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Ladies Welcome at All Times

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itors were entirely outclassed all the way as the first downs numbered 16 for the Cats and 5 for York.

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r~ Ben Hanlon Mgr.

home lights Friday night. The vis-

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~ of the age. Apply for mem- ~ bership on a local team. ~

M. G. Heuer, Owner

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PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE FOUR.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER

24, 1940,

50c Lucky Tiger Hair Tonic, 50c (gjijj]l!lJ[gJ:;iJ§[;;:[g]§i1lJ[g]:;iJ[g][g][;][g]iif[gJ[g]:g":g;[~J!il Lucky Tiger Shampoo, both for ~ Singers Aspiration 69c. Hill's Drug Store. J<I BETTER The Peru S~ngers, under the dirfi:l ection of G. >Holt Steck, will pre- f~Jll:illi[gJ§illj[gJ[g]i5J[;]iif!li:li:)Iig:g:g:l])IEi5:E:Y,ll:'. ~ HARDWARE IT PAYS TO LOO K WELL §§ !1'§ l Sent the patri.otic cantata, "Ballad [;] § for Americans;" some time this year ~ [gJ § Ii.ii [g] [gJ if special permission can be ob- lilJ Thomas & Kingsolver lilJ i;;1 Perfection Oil Heaters . § § [ilJ tained. § BARBERS [gJ § Congoleum Rugs The text of this ballad was writ- lili Under Dr• Joders' Office [ilJ § § [gJ [gJ ten by John Latouche and the ljjJ 1~1 § music is by E1arl Robinson. William J1'1illi[gl~§§§[;filj][g][gllj]~[g][g]lfil[;][g]11l'~! Fankhauser :and Max Manifold @[g)!lj][g]@[;]§[;][gllij§[;filj]~[g)!lj][g][g)[g)!lj]§§' @ E. L. DECK & CO. will be featured as soloists. ~ ~ ~ . . . ts tt d d [;] We Call For And Deliver ~ Ii.ii Eighty-four asp1ran a .en e § • '~ f[g][;]§[g][;]~[g][g@[g][;]§§!ijj§i5'iif'!il1· mi~I the first meeting of Peru Smgers § Keep Your Busmess At Home~ Monday aftern.oon. I;: PERU CLEANERS ~. ~~§[;]§mfg]§[g][g]§§iii]ilJJ[;]§illJ~§ f f f " P:\lone 62 ftl @ The college trio, ' composed ; ~1 ~ of Margery Evans, piano; Jeanne ~iii1mi1lJ[g)!lj]§[g]§[g]l1lJ§[g][g][gllj]§lfil[g]§fID [l;j Spier, violin.; Rachel Weincke, ~ cello, played for the Women's Club ~:gigng@[;]!g][gill_r@[;]~@g][g][g][g)!lj][;]§l1!1., i i! tea held at Mrs. Pate's residence !ll! [;] ~ 11' DR. H. C. DALLAM §liil i,;i 'il' Wednes day ~·fternoon. • ~1 "Ballad for' Americans"

ffiary Grovenburg Student Choice For Neb. City Rpple Festival

I

K1zer • 'S

Market

The selections played by the trio were Cavatina, Cavalleria Rusticana and Iraillnerei. •' '· r • t J S. Th e t nos vio mis , · eanne pier, : also played three solo numbers.

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At a final poll held Friday morning, Sept. 20, Mary Govenburg, Auburn junior, was voted Princess to represent the college at Nebras~ City's apple festival. The coronation ceremony will be ·held Oct. 4. In a preliminary vote Monday, Sept. 16, the following candidates for princess were elected from the .student body: Elvera Schacht, Cook; Katherine Bartling, Nebraska City; Rose McGinnis, Humboldt; Mary Grovenburg, Auburn; Hope

Carter, Plymouth; Janet Harris, Fairfield; Margery Kinsey, Shubert; and Margaret Beezley, Syracuse. Blonde Princess Mary was voted the "Woman of Tomorrow" in last year's Peruvian yearbook poll and has twice been named state champion drum major. This marks her third year as Pep Club cheer leader, and she will also perform as leader of the newly organized marching band.

Helpful Hints for Freshmen Training School Notes(Continued from page one) A. Smile at him and remark doesn't he think your "sister" cute. B. Offer to flip a coin. C. Playfully rip off the upperclassman's collar. · D. Assume the position and await punishment. (Answer: You may as well choose D, as upperclassmen are sure to get you in the end anyway.)

Enrollment

at

the

Training'

School was placed at 266, an increase over other years according t S 1 Cl t G d 1 5 7 a~d '10. boa~e~ns. in:r~a~! ln 'at~ tendance, and 9 seniors more than last year are registered. (\)

The Training School band played Friday arternoon at the County Fair, Rock Po.rt, Missouri, and in the evening :·participated in a f f f marchi!.ig Cien1onstration between Upperclass Students Orient halves of the football game. September 21 they participated in the 255 First Year Collegians King Korn Carnival at Plattsmouth. (Continued from page one) October 8 they will play in the AkFred Drexler, Diller, held his audi- Sar-Ben Midwest Championship ence with a dramatic reading Marching Band Contest. "Afraid of the Dark." Betty Mc• Cardle, Salem, sang "From the H !Pl · Land of the Sky Blue Water," by aze a mer an d Ru th Ludmgwas ton are paid assistants in the touch humorous A Cadman. added When Jull·e Thomas, Tabor, Training School's primary departIowa,, read "Widow's Mites." Echo ment this year. Elaine Lum, Verdon, played a piano f f f solo, Greig's "Wedding Day at Potential Gamma Chi members Froldhaugen." Marjorie Evans was turned out Wednesday night for the the accompanist for the vocar so- tr·oductory par t y to what prolnls· . los . es t o be an unusua11y 1arge G1r1s' _, _, _, Club. Grace Muenchau and Janet 1 1 1 A pep squad of 100 members, Harris directed entertainment. Mrs. ~ach on\l equipped with a mega- !nice Dunning, sponsor, told the phone, will : 0 rm the nucleus of the girls about the activities of the cheering sectio11 :i.t f,1otball games tirganization. this fall. 1 1 1 At a meeting held in the gymnas- Bell Replaces Kendrick ium on Tuesday, Septe'!lber 17, 100 students were selected for mem- As Cook At Cafeteria bmhip in the organiz11tion. · Of Bruce Bell, formerly head cook this number, 25 are men. at the Grand Hotel Coffee 'Shop at The group will be directed by Nebraska City, is now employed in cheerleaders Mary Grovenburg and the college cafeteria. Bell has had Jerry Garber, who stress the fact 12 years culinary experience. that "tl1e primary function of the Harry Steiner, present manager squad is to lead the rest of the of the cafeteria, · reports 15 p e r student body in cheering." cent increase in the number of Small megaphones have been meals served this year. Steiner ordered and will be supplied to each says, "Any suggestions regarding member. the meals will be appreciated." m·

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Placement Bureau Gets Positions 'For All Seniors

Mary Grovenburg

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Silk Hose at ~ Shoe Repairs of All Kinds ~;;

Hill's Drug Store.

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:g;rg(g];g;~~gg~:g;~~lI:~:KJ;J~:g;:gmR· f f f ~ Bill Cain, (Jo-editor of this year's @ PED, is employed at the present '.llJ. J. P. CLARK time in Estes :Park. He plans to en- ~ roll at P. s. T. c. second semester. ~ Electric Shoe Shop

New Fall s£adls

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DENTIST

Prof. S. L. bcments has announced that all AB. 1940 grac:uates who desired positi9ns, h2,ve been placed. They are: Marjorie Hall, Douglas; Lawrence Bausch, Lewiston; Buenice Doty, Stamford; Robert Halliday, Union; Elizabeth Glosser, Crab Orchard;. ~eten Wildberger, Raymond; V1rgm1a Tnvely, Cook; Jack Floyd, Bratton Union; Mary Modlin, Ogallala; William Saale, Blue Springs; Hu]Jert Johnson, Somers, Iowa; Beula~. Livingston, Yutan; Marvin Schacht, Percival, Iowa; Joe Vacek,•• Guide Rock; Thomas Ohinnock, Atkinson; Bert Hall, Stromsburg; Rita Russell, Scotia; Charles Gabus, Loomis; Kenneth Knapp, Ster.ling; JV.r:ncrred West, Meadow Grove; Elsie Parrett, Beatrice; Isabel Snyder, Beatrice; Viola Weatherfield, Auburn; Ruth PattersD11, Chester; Ruth Fjellin, Lincoln; Gladys Graham, Lincoln; Gladys Grush, Falls City;

* 1zer Bros.

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Modern Barber Shop BILL LLOYD

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Attractive .. Modern .. Clean ~ Comfortable :E;

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WASHING AND

GREASING r~ll Soft water Shampoos; Hair ~i " . Ray Lindekugel, Clatonia; Leonard @ Trimming, Bleaching, Dyemg, l,r'. ~.~.:.· Greathouse, •Arapahoe; Bernice ~ St;/ling; Manicuring; Facials; n:~:g::g:ig]~EJE:I::ll!Kll!JI:g:~::;fg])IEJ~ Jacka, Marquette; Lena Bouse, An- ® Beauty Treatments. ';r ;,; der'sl1n, Iowa; Maxine Pershing, ~ ;;; jj! Linwood, Io\\ia; Gale Carter, Ara- )~~ "' ::< gon, S. D.; Merrit Jensen, Bassett; ifti Ca!J. or Phone No. 3 ;: ~j Patricia Lundy, Uehling; Esther for Appointments ;;: 1! Wellensick, Hamburg, Iowa; Erneot •,1 . -"' ><i Galloway, Danbury; Jay Troxel, '11!§[gllij!1llilJ~[gJ:g;~;::gg:g;r;:ccg:2cg::g:g:g:1:;::"" '.'., Wilsonville; Eula Redenbaugh, To- [g][g]§§!lli[g];g)EJ'.0[g]L;ll[g]illJ~1l:!~i!IG<~ElI1DrE~ ><J bias; Carter .Johnson, Winnebago i:<i · Mary Werner, Arlington; Ray Ke!- :si logg, Waterloo; Russell Bailey, ~i m -Birthdays Fairmont, Margaert Saville, Verd- ~I :;, .~.:.;! on. ~ ~ rgj -Anniversaries f f 1 ~ ~ ~ Margery Evans :ma Jeanne Spier ~ ~ ~ -Weddings plan to give senior recitals this iFi ~<I ITT] -Back to "ea·... [;JJ [gJ l:il ' Margery's . major work will be one i l! Sandwiches, Ice Cream, Col d~~ll:tl @ i11i ~ Drinks, Cigarettes, Candy llJJ ~ ~ of the Beethoven Sonatas. Jeanne "'1 ,,., LOTS OF NEW l:il ~... r:i..~. will perform the Mozart Concerto § 1<>1 "~ N 4 ~i Call us for Bus Information @ ~ MERCHANDISE IN 0. • § 1" l~J l:il Burlington and Peru[gJ STOCK ~[g]il!i[g][g][gJ[g]l1lJm§l1ll§~§[g][g)!lj]il!imt;jl, ~ Beatrice ~ !~ i~ DR. G. H. JODBR ~ ~ ;~ ;~ I!>! ~ h.,,, " Ph . ,,; fill ys1cian and Surgeon- ., ~ ~.· [i!J

GIFTS

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Student Speaks By LeRoy Redfern "Which of these two things do - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - · - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - you think the more important for VOLUME XXXVI. PERU, NEBRASKA, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 194-0. NUMBER 2. the United States to try to do-to keep out of war ourselves, or, to - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - · - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - help England win, even at the risk of getting into the war?" Day by day with the war between Germany and England increasing in velocity the question of whether United States should aid Britain, even at the risk of going to war, becomes more pressing. BE IT RESOLVED by this faculty that when any Miss Frances Harvey related her experiences traveling to and from student or group of. students absents himself or them· ' Students' opinions: England to the students in convoselves from class for the purpose of forwarding a de· ERNEST HILL: "I think we cation Friday, Sept. 27. She has just should help England. Hitler with monstration or disrupting the regular routine of the returr;ed from serving as an extoo much power would be dangerchang·e teacher in the Hereford college class room work, the instructor of the class so ous to us." schools. disrupted shall immediately drop all such students from "When we arrived in England, his class and report such action to the Deans. the weather was worse than the ELVERA SCHACHT: "We owe war," she said. The growing tensenothing to England; our destiny Any student or group of students, who encourage ness of the situation forced her to doesn't lie in England." the disruption of the regular class schedule, even though return before she had planned. Acthey do not absent themselves from class, shall be drop· cording to Miss Harvey "Lloyd's of BpB ASHTON: "Help even at London" was an experience in itself. ped from all classes by the Deans. risk: England is our first line of deAbout her return, she remarked, fense." The Deans shall require all students so dropped to "We were indeed relieved to see re-register for the class or classes from which dropped, home, and thrilled to see home and HAROLD DALLAM: "Keep out. to get out into space instead of bebefore issuing permit to re-enter same. Students so re· England isn't our first line of deing crowded up." registering shall be considered as late registrants and fense." j. j. j. pay fee for late registration. Instructor Impressed HAROLD DOUGLAS: "Help Eng. THIS RESOLUTION shall be effective on and aft· By English Kindness land. Why not win it across the er September 25, 1940. I "The coffee was vile!' declared ocean instead of waiting?" Miss Frances Harvey who has reCASHUS SMITH: "Help EngAdopted by the Faculty, Electing Ted Graves president, the turned from a year's exchange· land. Fight for the sake of dePeru State Teachers College. junior class held its first meeting teaching in Hereford, England. mocracy." September 25, 1940. of the year on Monday, Sept. 23. "I almost passed out until I • Grace Muenchau and Janet Harris learned to dress in wool from the RICHARD KINGSOLVElR: "Stay ' were ch osen vice pres1'dent and skin out," exclaimed Miss Harvey. "Hereford is extremely low and out. We upset the balance in 1917, . sec'y-treas. · ·1 b 1 t d damp and the climate ennervatI C F M G and this and the international sit- Ir s onvo eatures US!C Student counc1 mem ers e ec e ing." uation today has resulted from Mrs. Sidney Timmons and Jean at the same meeting are Mary Eliz- The complexity of the landscape that. Let's not do the same thing Spi·er entertam·ed coeds 1.n gl~ls' abeth Collin and Bi11 Fankhauser. was most impressive to Miss Harvagain." convocation held Monday, Sept. 23, Sophomore Class Election- ey. "There is a complete change of • with Mrs. Inice Dunning in charge. Tod Hubbell will head the sopho- scene within five miles. I lived in CLIFFORD HARDING: "Help Mrs. Timmons sang the hymn, "Are A youthful killer in sports shirt more class as a result of a class an area of black and white houses." England. They stand for our way of You Able," and Jean played two election· held Monday. Other offic- "I was impressed by the kindlibarks an order to a pale "negro," ki life. ,, violin numbers, "Gypsy Rondo" by ers chosen were: Jack At ·ns, vice ness of the people. They were so· • Severn and "Somewhere a Voice is and a millionaire speaks sharply to president; Christine Alger, sec'y- nice about taking one about; how. RJCHARD .. SEVJmSQN; ..•.~~r.,,bQ,v,e,,J:;!a!Jir\g,'.c.,Jl¥.,.Ta~w,Mat.ioxk..Ellans...his . wife in.,cai:upus.Jlai,ts.. A .Nevada .kP.~.. R11th J\1cDonald .and Willard ever. they were not to be hurriecl., to wash dishes; I can't be bothered was the accompanist. Tech ,ex-football star absently mum- Millikan will represent the class on but once they got started they with international politics." f f f bles threats in a corner of the the student advisory council. could talk me down." • Men Hear Air Inst uctor dark~ned auditorium, ignoring the John Schutz, last years' presi- "The English people are not food NINA KANEL: "Keep out of war.· r wails of a frightened negro chauf- dent, led a short business meeting. conscious," asserted Miss Harvey, Why push ourselves into a quar- Frank I. Bringham, a government feur. Party plans and class dues were "although they eat at all hours of rel?" flight instructor, addressed the These incdngruities show them discussed. the day. • mens' convocation Monday, Sept. selves during the early stages of re- Duties as class sponsor for the "To an American the food is unKAY BARTLING: "Keep out. It 23. Mr. Bringham spoke on the hist- hearsal for "The Petrified Forest," year are being taken by Prof. A. V. satisfying. I hope I never have to is an economic waste." ory and requirements for the Civil- the Homecoming play. Larson. see mutton or sponge cake again." • ian Aeronautics Training course of- In the hands of Prof. Robert D. ;. ;. ;. "The war was ever present. The THAINE HALE: "Keep out. Eng- ·fered to qualifying students. Moore and Mary Olive Richardson, B . M K To blackouts were a constant annoyc enney land is going to win." Announcements were made by student director, the cast has . rmson, ance," said Miss Harvey, who re• Jack Mcintyre, president of the launched upon nightly practices of Student Council turned before the intensive air raids BILL BROOKS: "Keep out. De- ~ens Club. Bob Ashton presented a the well-known stage and screen Doris Brinson and Melvin Mc- began. fend the North American contin- piano solo. play. Kenney will represent the fresh- "There was no food shortage, but ent. It's our first line of defense." man class on the student advisory ration cards were used. Hereford • council, according to reports (rom was a rest camp for soldiers returnFAYE BOUSE: "Keep out. What the class meeting last Monday. ed from Dunkirk. The schools were would all of us girls do if they Other officers will be elected at a upset -by evacuations of children took all the men away?" later date. but the situation was gradually re~

Harvey Relates Experiences On Return From Britain

RESOLUTIOQ

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Sophs, Juniors Elect Hubbell, Graves

Play Pract"1ce Shows

'"' Gf0SS Inc.ongrmt1es ••

Budget cOffiffil."tt· ee G"1ves preview .

Of F"1rst ·se·m· e'ster rnterta"1nment C

TOD HUBBEL: "Keep out. Build . ·. . up the domestic economy and then if Germany wins they will have a diff_icult time deefating us." • RUTH STONEMAN: "Keep out. Our first responsibility is to our own interest, and it doesn't involve England." • "Keep out of war," is the cry given by the majority of these students polled, the margin being 10 to 6. If you noticed the poll carefully you probably discovered that of the six who favored aid "even at the risk of getting in" four were freshmen, or, in other words 83 per cent of the persons polled, who were not freshmen, definitely opposed any aid that might .lead to war, while 100 per cent of the freshmen favored all possible aid. To give further light to the significance of student opinion, it . Howard Pierce Davis would be well to remember that according to the American Institute Back from bombings and blackof Public Opinion 96 per cent of outs is Howard Pierce Davis, war the people were pol1ed...as definite- correspondent and political analyst, ly opposing· war in September, 1939. who will appear here on Oct. 15. In May of this year the number Returned this .year from Europe, they reported as opposing war at l'fll'. Davis, whose appea.rnnce is the all costs had dropped to 64 per cent first schedciled budget event. w:l' and today it stands at 48 per cent. speak on "War Over Europe, It~ EeThus in th past year tJ1e public has percussions in America." Foreig'l1 (Continued on page four) ccrrc.sponde;,t for Newsweek and

i "f · i HUEGEL, DREEZAN, one-time foreign editor of the Bost- MILLER NAMED ON on Transcript, Mr. Davis is said to DOR ..iiv1 COUNCIL be one inof the the field. foremost political an- Members of the new dorm counalysts cil were elected at a meeting held Herbert Petrie and his White Sept. 16, in the lobby of the men's Hussars, a symphonic aind operatic dorm. ensemble, will appear on Oct. 29. Those elected were: Ernest HuegThis organization includes a brass el, Phil Lurk, Gail Miller, Vincent ensemble, a concert harpist and Dreezen, Willard Millikan, George pianist, an operatic tenor and an Atwood, Jack Snider, Fred Drexler, instrumental soloist. Lloyd Dunlap, Dean Karr, Clair F'eatured on Dec. 6 will be the Callan, Thomas Dean and Severn Marching Men of Song, a male Handley. choral group under the direction of The new dorm council held' a Howard Tooley. meeting Sept. 18 at which Ernest A Peru Dramatic club play has Huegel was elected president; Vinbeen tentatively scheduled by the cent Dreezen, vice president; Gail Budget Committee for Dec. 18. Miller, secretary-treasurer. An instrumental organization, At the second meeting, Sept. 23, the Ritz Trumpeteers, will present it was decided to purchase a piano a program before convocation on for the mens dorm. Jan. 10. ;. ;. J. Prof. A. B. Clayburn of the Miss Catterns Teachino Budget Committee, ix1 announcing ,_ . .J " • • " 1 acio c;ol!ege the schedule of budget events for At Co.oi the first semester, says, "All pos- ':::ca.ahing: at ColorJ,clo V!o:.11_823 sible c!Iort has been made to se- College a'c Denver i.s ,,IiEs Efr~rcc' cute the best talent av::tilable. Each Catte:·;1s. of Hcrefo:.'d, E·.~[;lc.:.id, number is of a high quality and is who bst year ro;;cha:1ged posEicn,1 11:orthy of the time and attendance with r. nss Frm-:ac.3 I:fai'vey. Subjccl! of the student body." ta ugh~ J:.y .:\iiss CUtcrns are Moc: 2 :" He points out that the cost for Eurcpcan Histc:·!-, r:.cternati0i;:'1 each event is approximately 18 Relat;ons, EDc;lish Com;Jositi.on m~d cents to holders of budget tickets. Dramatics.

adjusting itself. All road signs have been removed because of fear of parachutists." "The churches are beautiful and tell an enormous amount of history. Before long I became a veritab! e ch urch h oun d." The well-kept country churches were especially enjoyable to Miss Harvey. But most charming of all was Winchester, even though Miss Earvey was disappointed to find King Arthur's Round Table new and shining. ;. ;. ;.

Y. W.'s Discuss Problems Of Boy, Girl Relations Every girl's ultimate goal, namely marriage, was discussed at Y. W. Tuesday, Sept. 24. Mary Collin, president, gave a brief talk on the purpose of y. w,, and Mary Olive Ri.cha1'dson, vice president, led devotionals. The group was then divided into two sections led by Faye Bouse and Gnice l\'.Tuenchau. nsocial Life on Ca.;npus'' \\ GS the original topjc1 fjnt as t11e discussion lYOgtes.scd 7

such topic~; ~:,s n~aJ.·~'l;tgcJ e1:gag2n1cn~ .:; . choosL.rg o, niat;; and hon~c probl~·n1:3 \\ere disC:"J3Scd. ~l~~,e n:.Geting closed ·wi~h a piccolo sclo~ "The Cori.12t,i· played b1.· J2.~lC\; :t-Iarris. Grace rvrue:ich~u \Va~~

her accompan.ist.


PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE TWO.

Published Weekly by The Peru State Teachers College Peru, Nebraska Entered at the Postoffice at Pen:i, Nebraska, as Second Class Matter.

$1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc

-------------------------Rose McGinnis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editor . Ed' itor M, aryon Th omas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A ss1stant . Bill Brooks ................................. Sports Editor Melvin McKenney ................ Assistant Sports Editor . K l p f R d Nma ane .l\if. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . roo Adea. er iV F' .. 1 l .t. 101 eLce ' .artm ........ · · · · · ........ · . · · · · · . . v1ser Reporters:

Meredith Jimerson, Milton Schultz, Margery

Kinsey, Leroy Redfern, Betty Miller, Mona Morelock, Mar· garet Hesemann, Ralph Locke, Jean Haith, Janet Harris, J eamw Spier, Myrton Hall, Phyllis Wilberger, Dorothy

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Armstrong, Harold Lantz, Ardis Carmme, · irgmia Kmg, Ruth Stoneman, Sarene Hauptman, Marjorie Fidermutz, Tod Hubbell, Anselm Johnson, Jack Mcintyre, Emma Ro·

TUESDAY, OCTOBER

Upperclassmen Direct Frosh In Gentle Rrt Of Persuasion To help the freshmen realize their lowly positions, the upperclassmen have inaugurated a few forms of humble servitude-mainly, restricticm of dates, carrying pep signs and stooging for one's favorite (?) up-, perclassman. OI these three stooging is the most in1portant. Unless one has had experience in training a stooge, he fails to realize the trials and trib. . " ulat1ons that anse. The best·stoobes ''ore those about one-third to onehalf your size. This is an important factor in case of revolt. After selecting a puny, undernourished specimen, issue your commands ·in a stern unrelenting voice. The greatest task is conveying the idea of what you desire through the skull of the 'lad. For best results, first demonstrate and then order him to do likewise. Aft-

er several miserable attempts which fail, you'll probably have to do it yourself. Nevertheless you still have that exhilerating feeling of being boss. Never relent. If he feigns exhaustion when vou send him for ham· burg·ers at midnight, discipline him in the proper manner This includ 2s seve~al excellent nlet 0 • r • . .. . . . , hodu . .ll Gentll' th, ow him mco a. cold shower. \The awakening effect is · marve1ous. ) f2) . Remind · him · of what happened to the last disobedient freshman. (3J Apply your paddle to the posterior extremeity of his anatomy. CThis is the most convmcmg method of all and should be used whenever necessary.) Which brings us to the entire idea of freshman initiation - the application of the paddle!

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Hall is located. Mt. Vernon was then the only girls' hall with MISS LILLIAN STONER as preceptre:;is. The Ad Building was constructed during the year 1911.

sicky, Elvera Schacht, Isabel Tynon, Bill Zurbrick.

IF WE ALL THOUGHT ALIKEFour centuries ago Charles V was emporer of the Ger· By Grace Muenchau man empire, which then included most of Europe. He was ~ the most powerful monarch of his time.

But, like other

monarchs, he found the job of ruling people a strenuous and troublous occupation.

In his old age Charles V retired to a monastery to rest his frazzled nerves. There he amused himself by tinkering with clocks. He had a house full of them, and his pet ambition was to regulate them so that all would strike' at precisely the same time. But despite his most persistent e ff orts, he cou Id not make them do it. Finally he gave up, philosophizing as follows:

"I was

on everything.

a fool, trying to make my subjects think alike

I

can't even make these helpless clocks strike

alike!" The PEDAGOGIAN does not have this mania which pos· .sessed old Charles

V.

We exert practically no effort to make

the' general public think alike. To prove this f'!ct, we ·offer our "Man·on'the·street,". "professor quiz," "open forum". o_r what·have·you column to the exteme left of the front page, beginning with this issue.

If

you have a question which you

would like to have discussed, submit it to any member of lhe PED staff. Human progress .demands diversity of thought and ac· tion. Single·mi°'ded thinking is conducive to inaction and stagnation. Like _dwellers around the foot of a great mountain, none of us can see all s.ides of the mountain; 'neither can we see all the truth about any matter. So, instead of wrangling . among ourselves as to whether the mountain is covered with trees, or is bare of vegetation, or is cut by torrents and rushing strea!ns, or has no streams at all, suppose we get to· gether and compare notes as to the different vi~wpoints. f

f

f

GREETINGS AND A FIRM HANDSHAKE, 0 ne S un d ay t h e mmister of a pretentious but poorly at· tended church delivered a sermon on "Recognizing Our . d . H " Th d . . F nen s m eaven. e next ay he received_ a note which read as fallows: "Your sermon was an admirable exposition , , on the subiect. Now may I suggest that on next Sunday you preach an equally good sermon on 'Recognizing Our Friends ' . . . on Earth. I am a stranger m this city and on three succes. s1ve Sundays I have attended services at your church but . ' not a member of It has greeted me." Let us see that all the warmth of this campus is not fur· nished by the janitors. How many new acquaintances have you made since September 9? Do you treat the humble freshman as

if he were a culture of cholera germs purely because

he is a freshman? "Know" thy neighbor.

With enthusiasm Mrs. Brumage related anecdotes of the evening "There are none of the old guard p:nt:c:s h'.ld at their home, told of here," lamented Mr. and Mrs.. .Al- tl' • · • · hes st u. . ,c "')Q'"--~" u1 d san dwic pha Brumage \\hen they vis~t~~ c.erJ., ate Sunday afternoons when the campus last week. But the 9 they. "dropped in to chat." Peruvian came off the shelf and With money she earned substitutfor an hour they went bacl;: 30 years ing in :::~awaiian schools, lV'1.rs. Bruto discuss "Coach" Brumage's ath- mage ser1 t l ier t wm sons for a visi · ·t letic teams, the students and fac- t.o Chma. The boys, now Dr. Wilulty. llam and Dr. Robert, both in Texas, Mr. Brumage, Lieutenant Colon- were born at foe Brooke Estate, el of Field Atrtlllery, 35th Division scene of many mcidents in the film of the National Guards, is now sta- "Brother Rat," which takes place tioned at Hiawatha, Kan. From the at V. M. I. post of athletic director at Peru, Hastening off to the athletic field . . . . .. . d .. ne went to Virgmia Mll!tary Insti- .anll promismg to return for a foottute to teach mathematics and phy- oa game, Mr. and Mrs. Brumage sicaJ education. Since the World urged the Ped to encourage all their War, as a military officer, he has 1911 students and faculty friends to been among other places, princi- write. pally in Oklahoma, the Hawaiian f f f Islands and Texas. . " . Round Robin LetterBLACKSTONE ls the only Pe. ruvian I've seen since 1911 , and I · A. roundb robm t' 13letter, started 34 saw him in Chicago" Mr Brumage yeais ago Y ne members of the ' · k'nd ·t .. . said as he leafed through the foot- i erga1 en-pnmar)' class of Peru ball section "There's GELWICK State Teachers College and their · ' · t t · t'll · capta.in that year" brought inform- ms rue or, is s i gomg strong. It has · b ation that "A. B." is now superinnevei. een bro k.en because of tendent of school at Falls City. death or any other ieason. "Bashful". S'L'ODDARD, who played L Teacher o.f the class in 1906 was tackle. and end, is now superin- ou Hosmei, now of LaPorte, Ind. tend,mt of Phildelphia Public The letter was started by a stuSchools: BASIL SIMS, fullback, dent,. Bess Bedell, now of Omaha, lives in Flint Mich and PINK pnnc1pal of Lincoln school. Two RENFRO, half on the "All Star other Omahahans wc:re members Netras1'a Eleven" and basketball of the class-Jennie Joy, a teacher · ' school, and Mrs. C. C. forward, is at Chadron where he ~.t c. as te,ar is in business. JOY ELMER MOR- rax"o::, a teacher at Mason school. GAN, present editor of the N.E.A. Other members of the class are Journal, was a 1911 graduate, and Mrs. Milton Krous, Albion; Mrs. ARTHUR LONGFELLOW, father c.arl. Bickel, Greeley, Colo.; Mrs. of Inez and Mildred here in school H.arr:et Blythe, Peru; Mrs. Glen and superintendent at Ainsley, was Biggs, Roanoke, Va., Mrs. Clartreasurer of the sophomore .class. ence Johnson, Toronto, Ont.; May Mrs. Brumage asked of BEULAH ~lderson, M~diso~; Mrs. Robert RADER, girls physical education H:i,y'. Li~coln, Mrs. Peter Uerlmg, director and Mr Bruma"e of his astmgs, Mrs. Mary Gilham, Los 0 • Angeles· and Mrs· Burr Ll oy d, fEcuhy ' pals, CLARE B. CORNELL W llfl ' 2.nd CHARLES WEEKS E L e eet. HOUSE, now president of. Ch;dro~ . The letter takes. about a year to State Teachers College, was Dean, ~~~culate. Each wnter adds her bit, and D. W. HAYES, President. LOU ps off her last letter and sends HOSMER, LaPorte, Ind.; ESTHER the ba~ch on. Grandmothers inANN CLARK N H tf rd elude pictures of their grandchild' ew ar 0 ' ren Often e · 11 t Conn · JOHN M HOWIE N b _ ·. specia Y asty recipes " · ' e ras are mcluded ka Wesleyan; KATHERINE T .· . WOODS, Lincoln; FRED M. memwboeryseahiesl ago seven of th~ class GREGG, Lincoln· lVIATTIE COOK F t f d a reumon m Lmcoln. 0 ELLIS, Kirkwood, Mo · EFFIE M m~~t~os . th~:· it was the first AUSTEN-now Mrs.. , Thatcher_: in 1906g smce e class left Peru Lincoln; LOUISE w. :MEARS who · j ,. f gives the Geography Award and is B of . . teaching at Milwaukee state Colecause their enthusiasm, lege; DEAN w. N. DELZELL h mem~ers of the Marching Band died last summer; HOMER w; :cti~ed at 7 .a. m. Tuesday and HOUSE, who died in California two urs ay. By dillgent practice they years ago; MILLARD c. LEiF'LER hope to become an accomplished . t d t . ' group worthy of umforms superm n en of Lincoln schools; · / 1 f MISS LIBBIE BRANSON, retired librarian living at Peru; and REG• Margaret Hesemann: sophomore, ISTRAR OVERHOLT Omah has accepted a posit10n as head · ' a, are secretar" 0 in the N• y • A• area off'ice among those former acuity members . whose names aroused reminiscenc- m the Otoe county courthouse at es. Nebraska City. f f f Only the Cha el Gymnasium) a dpM (the prese~t Plans a:e underway for an ened familiar ton usic ~all look- lar~ed senes of Sunday musicales. Normal H ll t thde Bhrumaoes. Old Several of these were presented last a s oo w ere now Hoyt year.

1, 1940.

Schnicklgruber Vs. Columnist I am writing this with intellige people and freshmen in mind. consider the intelligentsia beca I know that they will not read Therefore, I don't VITite for th That leaves the freshmen. Now am not saying that fresh.men are mtelligent. 'Uhey are Just nai So nai·ve in fact that I e t th ' . . ' xpec to read this column. I do not exp the1:1 to read .this next week, ho eve1. You cant fool all of the pe pie all of the time, not even fresh men. I now proceed on the assump tion that if I have anything to sa I'd better say it now, since I convinced (another paragraph an you will be tool that no one wil bother to read these 500 words nex week. (Ed. note. Next week the. won't be here to read, w if yo• want to -know what he's got to say, you'd better keep on reading.) Hav· ing received an editorial plug that will insure the continued support of the two readers I have left, mJ roommate and my mother, I shall proceed to say what I have to say.

a That brings us to another rather interesting point. What SHALL I say? Being three-fourths English and one part, or rather one-fourth,:· scotch, r shall tell you my plan for bringing England out of the ticklish situation she now find h . If · Running a great ri.sk 0; di:~psepro~~i from the War Office for divulging information of military importance r shall list below the main feature~ of my system. 1. Force English and American

newspapers to .stop .calling Hitler-. Hitler. There is evidence that he was born as Adolph Schnicklornber 0 Th f • 1t "Sc~e ~re" ~· P~fers call him 1 tin tic ~e. t is .w( ha~e two dis. c ·a, van ages. D Smee even I wouldn ;, be af~,aid of anything called Schickie, the morale of both the army and of the civilian population would be ti · . grea Ybe mcreased. (2) Mr. Hitler would <o b ~ em arrassed that he would cease d . . d~mg thmgs that would cause the i eadful thmgs to appear in print d th ' an accord. e war would stop of its own •

1 2 · Find a level plot of ground

about ten acres. Cover this entire plot with a gigantic, stupendous, colossal portrait of Hedy LaMarr I will now explain the purpose be~ hind this pleasant procedure. The German fliers will see the picture «nd will f;y lower in order to obtain a better view. They will also cut their speed. Now here's the strategy behind the plan. When the planes come in low and slow, (pretty, isn't it?) the British shoot them, down. Simple enough, isn't it? Of c?urse, this plan has an alternative. Should we find it tiring to cit around a gun and wait for the planes' we can s1.ip away for a few hours and let the trap· do its own work. The flyers see the picture and are quite intrigued. Naturally, they cir~le around to fly over it again. This process is repeated until the plane runs out of gas and crashes · 9 3. Secure the co-operation of Hollywood and wheedle Warner Bros. into loaning the British Army James Cagney, Pat O'Brien Alan ~ale, et al. Mr. Cagney, with the mvaluable aid of Mr. Brent and Mr. Hale, and the great spiritual incentive furnished by Mr. O'Brien, was too big a problem for Hinden· burg to solve. I am, of course, re· ferrmg to "The Fighting 69th." Errol Flynn could aid tremendously, But r am af ·d th t th · rai a e Bntish Navy and the RAF would become. bitter rivals in the struggle to see which branch should claim him and th · us disrupt the harmony of' the whole. Besides, there is a rumor, that the u. s. A. wants h' It !ill. : would save us building about four' battleships at that. At his worsteven in a rowboat-he -is the equiv-; alent of at least two battle squadrons.


TUESDAY, OCTOBER I, 194,0.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE THREE.

Watch The Bobcats Battle ••

TO BE IN HOME

HOPES TO

BOWL

INCREASE PEP

The battle for :ceru-:Midland grid supremacy will be on full force Friday night as the Bobcats again take to the field of battle in defense of their championship, Last season's contest resulted in a 6-6 tie on a slippery field. Pending adverse weather conditions and injuries, the Cats should be at their prime, demonstrating the same land and air tactics which have been used so far thi3 season .

ffiidland

Pep Squad Orders Bubbling Rlong 100 megaphones • WITH BROOKS

Peru Meets Midland Friday night "

Bobcats Claim Second Bout

• • •

Tlle pep squaG is oraermg 100 megaphones which will be sold at the football games this fall, according to Mary Grovenburg, vivacious cheer leader. It is believed that these will help to bring added pep to the already highly spirited student body, One hundred students have been selected for membership in the pep squad, 25 of whom are men. Redheaded Jerry Garber is to a.ssist Bobby Henderson, pictured above, Mary Grovenburg in leading the was the highest scoring back of the pepsters. state last year with 42 points. Bob's i i i first taste of football was during the WAA To Give Sweaters pioneer days of six man ball in high Miss Davidson announced Saturschool at Anderson, Iowa. Bob is day that all who wish to join w. A. a . phys~cal_ education major with a A, and work toward a sweater may mmor. m mdustnal ~rts. still do so. H~ is kn~"".n to his team mates Practices are held every night of as_ Hendy, . Is well liked . and ad- the week, with the exception of mired for his shifty runnmg. Friday. Those who wish to participate in the hit-pin tournament 'Will ~ be urged to attend practice regularly. · Ardis Carmine was elected sports ~ leader to succeed Janet Harris, who was unable to carry on the A YEAR AGOwork. Peru smeared Doane 20-7 in the opening tilt of the season. Prep trimmed Shubert High 8-6. Coach Wheeler was encouraged by the ability of the freshmen on the squad.

I ad dress myself ti1is week to the freshmen and other fellows on the squad who feel that they are not good enough to ever make the team and are on the verge of checking in their equipment. Fellows, it isn't the first 11 men who make the ball club. It isn't the first 22 men who make the ball club, It is these fellows combined with the reserve strength which they have backing them that will make a championship team. There is an old saying that a chain is no stronger than its weakest link. At prl'f;ent you may be tying your load up short so that you will only need a few of the stronger links. But someday you will come up against a load on which you will have to use the other links. If these links are prepared for the strain, they will be able to step in without weakening the chain any great degree. The same holds true with a football squad. Even the best of players may become injured. The coaches will then have to look over their stock of reci:uits and pick a man to fill the hole. As a natural thing, they will pick the man whom they think is the best prepared to fill the place. That man could just as easily be you as the next fellow.

Mason kicked two extra points. Doane scored in the fourth period when Bigelow ended a drive he and Neihart engineered. Mcintyre, Floyd, Organ and Roberts were outstanding in Peru's line. Belka, Ogden, Rozdalovsky and Ragatz led Doane. DOANE Pos. PERU

In the Peru camp most of the drill will be stressed on offensive play. Coach Wheeler will hold light drills, with a possible scrimmage Tuesday atfernoon. Wednesday evening will probably see the Peruvians working out under the lights, giving the men an opportunity to become accus~omeG to 11ight play. Coach Wheeler h;:.~ ma~e several changes this week, one of which was the transfer of Oakman, Auburn freshman, from center position to right end. While several veterans of the ,39 squad are absent, it is believed that there is sufficient new material to plug the holes. Last year's meeting featured for Peru, Henderson's' running and Brown's 72 yard punt. Henderson is again playing under the blue and white banner and will probably be TWO YEARS AGO-

~~ le Floyd Ragatz It Organ Ogden lg Roberts Belka c Mcintyre Melichar rg Adams Edzards rt Mason Gillilland re Dougherty Neihart qb Callan Juarez lh , Henderson Bailey 1h ' Mather Gerner lb • Stark Officials: Earl Johnson, referee; Morris Fisher, umpire; Al Calvert, headlinesman. ;. ;. ;.

in the lineup Friday night. The Peru Sta!te Bobcats were ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Schmeckpeper, 185 pound tackle, edged out 13-12 by the Doane : : was the defensive standout for the Tigers. Warriors. The Kittens found themselves on . : The game is scheduled to begin at the short end of a 12-7 score in a 8. It is believed that student en- .game with Nemaha. (Chanj:ller, . : thusiasm will reach a new peak. Handley and Whitten, Peru Frosh, : The probable starting lineup for were members of that Nemaha • PERV will be: Floyd, left end; team.) · • Organ, left tackle; Roberts, left Bob Henderson, freshman from guard; Mcintyre, center; Adams, Anderson, Iowa, gave promise of be- • right guard; Mason, right tackle;, coming one of. Peru's great backs. Dougherty, right end; Callan, quarter; Henderson, left half; Mather, right half; and Stark, fullback. FIVE YEARS AGO-

MATHER SCORES TWICE A speedy Peru eleven outclassed Doane Friday night to win 20-6 on the' Tiger's home gridiron, although the Cats were outdowned 16-8. Jim Mather scored twice on long l'UlJ;3 Callan intercepted a pass to score in the second quarter. Lyle

Kittenball T earn Ties For First Place· A kittenball team made up of Peru State students. beat out a Hamburg, Iowa, outfit to tie ··for first place in a tournament held at Watson, Mo. Hamburg' scored two runs in the first inning and were held while Peru scored three runs later in the game. The Peru team was Millikan, Williams, Sehnert, Huegel, Mencl, . Smith, C'oLoon,, 13yer~, Lurk aaid others. ;.

f, f

Durst T0 Organize Boxing Club Leroy "Shiny" Durst, holder of the Midwest Golden Gloves welterweight championship and present student of Peru, has announced his intention of organizing a boxing club on the campus. Says Durst, "There seems to be a demand for this sort of thing on the campus." The club is to be organized as soon as a location can be had and a time set that will not confiict. Durst is to act as the trainer and Jerry Garber will handle the busi" ness of the club. There will be a small fee to cover the expense of equipment. · With meetings two nights a week, Durst intends to offer instruction in the use of the punching bag, sparring and the general fundamentals of boxing. "S.hiny" hopes, as his proteges develop, to be able to offer several good boxing programs open to the college people.

Sports Of Yesteryear

E 11 e r y ••

Queen

f

;.

f

Coach Gilkeson:'s gridiron machine downed Maryvillei 7-0. , Peru added the newest thing in school spirit in the way of a marching band. Over 100 s~udents treked to '"Shiny" Durst h~lder of the Mid- Maryville to 19.nd support to the west Golden Gloves .wdlterweight Battling Bobcats. championship, put on a free exhibition bout at the Firemen's Carnival in Peru Friday night. Durst's opponent was Myrt Hall, sophomore TEN YEARS AGOfrom Fairbuzy. The Bobcats defeated Maryville The first round was mainly a Teachers 13~0 in the first game on sparring match, with neither fight- the newly hghted field. er getting in any telling bltlws. Each ~~rgJ[gJljj]:llJ®'liJillllllllll man seemed to be considering his Ill! ti'(] opponent. Durst's round. ~ PERU BOWLING The second round was a contin- ~ CLUB [g] ~ation of the first, with Hall seem- ~ Ladies Welcome at All Times mg to gain both courage and speed. [1lJ Ben Hanlon Mgr. [g] Durst's knee began to bother him ~ M. G. Heuer, Owner ~ toward the end of the round. Hall's \ill [)lJ round. l!!J[g]lfil!ll[gJ[gJ!jj]lfil!lllllJlfil!lllllJ[gJ!jj]lllJ[gJ!jj]lllJ[gJ!jj][gJ[ll![g] In the third round, Hall realizing that Durst was unable to get around 5 v~1t<>£ the ring very fast because of. his knee, made a running fight of it, Hall's round, Durst forgot his lame knee in the fourth rot1nd and followed Hall around the ring, getting in a hard blow to the mouth which bloodied Hall's mouth and left him dazed. Hall's wind began to give way in this round, showing the result of a short training period. Durst's round. With Hall's strength gone in the fifth round, it was more or Jess a polish-off round for Durst, although his knee again showed signs of bothering him. He backed Hall inThe More Folks You Tell to the ropes twice during the The More Goods You Sell round. Durst's round. 19 oz. Country Club Hair Oil-49c FUils Drug Store

College Students Give Boxing Exhibition

ll Ill II

and author of the sensational best ,seller

II

"The Adventures of Ellery Queen"

• ••

PRESENTS

I

The DUTCH SHOE .MYSTERY You will be held breathless by this startling, fast-movmg story of murder in a modern hospital. Daring. clever, extraordinarily exciting, this is one of the most amazing adventures of the famous detective.

I

/JPW-R11S~ H~E

•• ••

THE FAMOUS RADIO DETECTIVE

•• • ••• •• ••• •

Because we want you to know Mercury Books (selected and published by The American Mercury), we'll send you this one-The Dutch Shoe Mystery, by Ellery Queenpractically F'RlEffiJ, We'll supply the book if you will pey lOc for postage and handling. Out of more than 60,000 copies printed we have less than 3,000 left-and they're going fast. Hurry and send a dime for the complete copy of this intensely interesting book. (Sorry only one to a customer.)

Here's my dime. Send me a copy of the Mercury Book "The Dutch Shoe Mystery, by Ellery Queen. clO Name ________________________________________________ _ Address ______________________________________________ _ City and State ----------------------------------------

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Mercury Books, 570 Lexington Avenue, New York N y

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Students Week End .At Local Carnival All steps led to the annual Firemens' Festival in "downtown Peru" Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Strains from the merry-go-round as well as cries of a bingo counter and other concessions attracted both young and old. Souvenir candy stands and three-for-a-dime photos created a real carnival spirit. Lights revealed a merry-making crowd enjoying the ferris wheel and side shows. The City Hall displayed prize exhibits, consistir,g of three divisions for which grand prizes were awarded. Canned goods, baked goods, vegetables and .needlework were entered by local women. At 7:30 Thursday evening Mr. John Scheet z, t own marsh aI an d pioneer fireman, gave the opening address and entertained the crowd with his popular Kelley Rope trick

I

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1

PERU PEDAGOGMN

PAGE FOUR. PALMER TALKS TO COMMERCE CLUB ON CIVIL SERVICE EXAMS

~II ~~~~:R~op~~ ~

NO TAXES HERE

Training School seniot. have elected the following officers: Donna Steffens, president; Robert Brown, vice president; Virginia Stepan, sec'y.; Ward Adams, treas. Three groups tried out for cheer leaders Sept. 25. The first group ineluded Verna Rogers and Shirley Rodgers; second ·group, Fern Kizer and Norma Jean Parriott; third group, Juanita Connely, Lawrence Good and Patricia Hill. ;. ;. ;. C. C. A. MEMBERSHIP

LET US DO YOUR PRINTING

·-----------------------·

A large number of commerce students, particularly freshmen, attended the first meeting of the Commerce Club Mondayi evening, Sept. 23. Following a discussion of. th~ purpose, plans and past act!Vlties of 1 b bY Miss Nona M· Palmer th e cu . . and former members, the C!Vll Service examinations were explained by Miss Palmer. After the sophomore and fres_hmen students were excused, Miss Palmer asked that any juniors and seniors interested in the operatwn of the mimeograph machine sign for the special classes which are being offered by a representative of a mimeoo-raph company. 0

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poll tends to show inThe the campus war. that the attitude of college students is changing much slower than the average citizen. This is of course based on the supposition that if a similar poll had been taken a year

ago student opinion wouldn't have varied materially from that of the average citizen. . The explanation of this may lie m the fact that, for the past deea~e it has bee·n· d:iven i~t~ our nunds by pollt1cams, rrumsters, teachers and authors that war has never gained anything for anybody, f f f that the entrance of United States Y. M. PLANS FOR in the world war was a mistake FUTURE MEETINGS

At Y. M., time was spent planm,ng the first quarter meetmgs. ~ dnve for membership and a wemer roast are scheduled for next week. The song "God Bless America" was adopted as the opening numbel'.

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October 4

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and that war will never serve as a

successful means of settling disputes. At any rate we have certainly taten it all in and· most of us ~re com·inced that the best poiicv for United States involves a recon·struction of domestic economy and a strong national defense. These, ~ we believe, will do more than anything else to protect us from external and internal invasion.

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meett::;. music hail for their first social igJ After election of officers the ISi "'' meeting was presided over by the [(!I new president, Bob Ashton. Other il!I ,., officers were Jack Brown, vice pres- ~ ident; and Virgie Lee Johnson, sec- r;;J retary-treasurer. [gJ 8 About 70 students were present. i!SJ Grace Muenchau led the group in ~i playing get-acquainted games. f~-~ Jack Brown \viii be chairman of il!J a program committee which will igJ outline future meetings. ~

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changed tremendously in its atti- Stu·I-cnt.: havn::; 0 cholarc,hips met tude as regards United States' part Monon ciening, Sept. 23, in the

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DOUBLES YEAR t . ~~ll c· c· A· h ~ IdTH.l tIS fi t ·~ s rs mee mg ;! Tuesday evenmg Sept 24 Last i1lJ MARDIS GROCERY Si , . . ifll year's president, Edna Mae Peter- ,,~ sen, was in charge. The next meet- •:!rillli1ll:ll'!ill1mm1:;;iilC:gm::g1m;:,,,l)ll i·ng w1·11 be Oct. 7 when off1'cers for Jl!Jl'JI\gj]] the year will be chosen. The club has a total membership Lcok no farther-look your~ of 36 compared to 16 last year. Haircutting A Specil>lty , Father J. F. Hennessen, Nebras- [g] ~1

ers, oldest pioneer farmer in Nemad [;!I 5 ha county and former band leader, ~i~~msburf' v:., ~~ ~:n:n!~ E:~a ~ gave an address. Prof. V. E. Jin- · ey mo ore 111: dra presented several violin selec- Weare's car. [;!I . . During spare moments at the @ trans and was accompamed by Prof. convent10n . th e p . S. T . C-er s toured ~! I~ -~ t t . Robert T. Benfom a he piano. . W'll' b . h restor1g! Friday night three young ladies colomal 1 iams. uig w ose rgi from western Nebraska who call ation was begun m 1927 by John D. ~ themselves the "Three Little Notes" Rockefeller, Jr. . @ . . d fi t . 't th The tour also mcluded the Pub- § and wh o receive rs prize a e . . h T and the !¥!) :state fair in Lincoln opened the lick Jaol, Ra1e1g avern i;;, , Cap1'tol and Jamestown ' West Va. [gJ l)jl PfOgTam with a VOCa] number · Swinging to the northeast, the 161 "Purple and gold" clad Training .1 !ii! School Band under the direction of part.y visbite.dldinthe Whs .ttehsoHoi~asne, Ithne ~ Cap1tol u1 g, nu n - lllJ Prof. s. L. Clements opened Satur·~· stitute, Arli!J.gt-0n Nati.Ona! Cem- ~ day night's program with· much t M "" ilash and rhythm. The "Three Lit- etery, Lincoln and Washing.a~ e- [i_" tie Notes" again performed and monals and the F. B. I. bmldi~g. [gj . . . New York City held such sights @ sang for the applaudmg audience. . . R d' c·t Em ll'l , Ph . J B .· as Times 'Square, a io l y, - llll Peru s own y11 is ean 1mson · . St t · B 'Id' W 'd's Fair l1ll climaxed the evening show with her pire a e. ui mg, . or; ' llll acrobatic and toe-tap dance. Riverside Baptist Chu~~h, CathedA large "platform dance" was the ral of St .. John the .Divme, Colum- i1ll . cent er at traction for Peru's young bia University · ' Julllard School of [gJ lllJ . . Music and the New York harbor. [g] people each evenmg of the festival. · h t th t ip were· )( Those w o wen on e r · ., ;. ;. ;. Miss Edna Weare, sponsor; Marjorie ; McKenney To Head Kennedy, Cathryn Erffmeyer, Mary :t Scribblers Club Horton, Helen Wilberger and Emma Rosicky. Melvin McKenney will serve as ' , ;. ;. ;. president of Scribbler's c:ub during B f · d R: · es Invitation E. the first seemster accordmg to re- en or . eceiy . k ~ suits of an election held last Thurs- To Submit Ongmal Wor s [i day evening at Mrs. 'R, K. Baker's Prof. R. T. Benford has been in- l!li home. "'I vited to submit some of. his compoOther officers elected were: Al- sitions to be played at concerts of veen Gillispie, vice president; June contemporary American music dur- [gJ d l!ll Hamilton, sec'y; Evelyn Ro gers, ing the 1940-41 seasol,J.: .The con- [gJ treasurer. certs will be held in New.York City. The meeting was conducted by The concerts are sponsored by the Nina Kane!, who will fill the vacan- National Association. for American. ~ cy left by Margare~ Hesemann as Composers and conductors and are ~ upperclassman sponsor. . The con- to be given on Sunday evenings at 1~ stitution of the club was read to the Henry Hadley Studio. § the nine new members, and the Woi·Ja; ·for violin, viola, cello, ~ "Scribbler ~crapbo~k" .in which' all string quartette, piano and voice will ~ of last years contributions are pre- be presented. fffi served was presented for inspection A womens' chorus arrangement of '~ and criticism. "Racl:ety coo," taken from the mu- I~ Mrs. Baker will act as faculty ad- sical r-la)' "Katinka," made by Prof. ~ visor for the group. B f d 1 · t b e ublished [gJ en er , 1as ]US en P § ;. ;. ;. by Scl1irmers.;. ;. > .~

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Student Speaks By LeRoy Redfern "Do you think every able-bodied young man 26 years old should be _V_O_L_U_M_E_XX __X_V_I-.___P_E_R_U_,_N_E_B_R_A-SK-A-,-T-U··.-E-SD_A_Y_,_O_C_T_O_B_E_R_S_,1-9-40-.------N-U_M_B_E_R_3-.made to serve in the army, navy or . air force for a year?" ---------------------------------------------------

This is the same question that was used by the Gallup poll in polling a cross section of the 21,000,000 Americans between the ages of 16 and 24. Although it seems to me a poorly worded and misleading question it has been used, as was the question last week, to compare the Peru students with the general publie. . . The IIllportance of the various student reactions to the question is not in the yes and no answers but in the reasons i;:iven, for they go much further than mere negative or affirmative answers in explaining a otudent's attitude toward the fundamental theory of peace time draft · • TED GRAVES: "No, it is contrary t? all our principles of freedom and liberty. It sets the man back .a year at the time .when his. years are most Valuable."

. GRACE MUENCHAU. "No, fe1lo~s. of college. age ~hould hav~;the prmlege of attehdmg college. • ,JIM LA.l.\1B~T: "Yes, I think it's O. K. Nothing like being prepared." • . JOYCE STARK: "No, 20 years ~s entirely too young; fellows don.t have a chance to complete their education."

Ban dT0 sport Blue un·1forms ·

MEMBERS SELL TAGS TO BUY TWO FLAGS t

. . With a burst of trumpet ~anfare, eight ranks of newly uniformed musicians will march onto the field at the Homecoming g~me, Oct. 19 · Ushered by drum maiorette Mary Grovenburg, Peru .state's 40 exponents of "music on the move" will go through maneuvers learned under the leadership of Jim Crawford, student director. In response to the current d.emand for militarism, Prof. Victor H. Jindra h.as. develop. ed. the marchi.ng band mto the highlight of the mstrumental department. Using thil skill he acquired as a former member of Peru's. mathematics depa:tment, Mr. Jmdra consulted with President W. R. Pate, who has publicly declared h~s h.earty support of the new orgamzation. The result: an order for . West Ppm~ styie coats, col?rful m blue, white and gold, white-plumed .shakos and powder blue trousers with royal blue side stripes. These will be purchased by the college and rented to band members for fifty cents per t se;i;~~ Di k Cl ts fir k . et c demenkn ',.. st Wrailln pivo man, move ra ou1cer ard Hw:izeker, Sarene Hauptmann, Janet ~rris, Bill Fankhauser, Bob Ashton _and BilJ.Y Berger. Baton twirlers, Beatrice Fulton and. Betty M~Ardle, . and a: color

Prof. Steck Supervises Convo-noers' Hilarity o

If student co!hment is any measure, last Friday's convocation Ullder the supervision of Prof. G. Holt steck proved to be a great success. To thread a needle, Bill Brooks needed the help of his freshman stooge, Neil McCory, who in turn required the assistance of Prof. Steck. The call of the wild by Jack Mcintire and Dean Karr were realistic. Jerry Garber and Prof; Robert D. Moore led the convo-goers in some roof-lifting yells, with Prof. Steck leading community singing at intervals.

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To rxam1ners Board. C President W. R. Pate will serve on the State Board of Eudcational Examiners, since his appointment on th'e State Board of Educational Charles w. Taylor. The other members of the committee, who are Dean B. E. McProud of Nebraska Wesleyan, Dr. A. A. Reed of the University of Nebraska and W. A. Roseen, visited the campus Wednesday Oct 2.

Student Council Plans For Homecoming October 19 •

Dorm Council Installed In Candlelight Service

FANKHAUSER HEADS ADVISORY BOARD

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By candlelight, the install&tion of members of the dormitory council took place Thursday evening. After a short talk stressing the ideals and purposes of the council, Mrs. Inice Bunning lit the candle of Faye Bouse, president, who in turn lit the candles of the other members, t he candles symbo1izing f 'th t· d · ai , co-opera 10n. an service. The oath Of the . council was taken by the c.ouncil members led by Faye Bouse, while the audience repeated each part after them led by Mrs. Inice Dunning. F ollowmg · th ceremony, Faye B · ouse reported on the results of the council meetings. EXplaining Homecoming she urged freshmen girls to "get into the spirit of Homcoming and help make it a success." Plans for the fall formal to be held Nov. 16 '\':'ere announced. The meeting closed with a grim reminder to freshmen girls that initiation plans are being made.

• Any suggestions for Homecoming? Any objections to offer? If so, track down one of the Student Council members immediately and tell him so. "The purpose of this organization," stated President w. Rt. !'ate, "is to keep in touch with student sentiment and make recommendations to the faculty." "We're open to any suggestions from the student body in reaard to .any matter," added William" Fankhauser, newly elected president of the Council.

Sub-Committees Named

. . . Other officers .of the AdVIsory C_ouncil ~re Phyllis Benson, semor, vice president; Dons ~rmson, freshn:an, secretary; MelVIn McKeru:ey, fieshman, treasurer. Remammg f f f . helpers chosen by each class are f f f ' · . . Mary El. Collin, junior; Dean Karr, <11 Y. M. Members Hold Picruc senior; Ruth McDonald and Willard. HORACE RZEHAK· "Definitely Marga.ret Beezley and Rogene Y. M. members held an informal Millikan, sophomores. · Rose wilt represent the freshmen · · th b ks f th · · s· ·t · t' no. In the first place such a proresidents of Mt. Vernon and Eliza p;cruc on the ba~ of e Missom~, 23 ~~ce ~ s o.~g~1za ion on Se.PL gram wouldn't solve a single probMorgan Halls in the Girls Berm- pTicrudc on et a o the Missouri, 'th He oun.ci. as been occupiedc 1 . lem. When the army is mechanized . il ues ay, 0 c. 1. wi omecommg pans. The com-· and the National Guards no longer itory Counc · Gathering in front of the Music mittee chairmen are Willard Milli-train with wooden guns or somef f f Hall at 5:30, the boys were driven to kan, advertising; Dean Karr and' thing as ancient then we can talk "War Over Europe" Topic this location by Lavern. B. Math- Mary E. Collin, campus decorations;. about everyone over 20 in a military Of First Budget S eaker ews, C~lvin Reed, Robert Williams R~t~ McDonald, gym decoration;: program." . · P and Dick Clements. , , , . . . . . . W1!1Iam Fankhauser, field decora!),J.'r1val, wem• t!on; Melvin. McKenney,, construe~ IVAN BERAN: "No, it ties them i Olries 'ltna: ap-::'·tt6n oraa:n~"g 1)1atrorin:: boi'is Brindown." Lawrence Blevins. and Joe Littr_~ll rise as leader of the German people, pies were served. son, badge sales. Each chairman • comp1ete the ensemble. was recalled to Howard Pierce Dav- Bob Ashton led the group in a few supplements his committee from the PHYLLIS BENSON: "No, they Warren Darrah, TabOr, Iowa, mas- is, war correspopdent and political songs. student body. should wait till the young men have yer of five marching bands, travel- analyst who will appear here on Shortly after the picnic, a short According to William Fankhausfinished college." ed 50 miles before 7 a. m. Wednes- Oct. 15, when a year later he re- business meeting was held. er the orchestra from Northwest • day, Sept. 25, to give professional ceived a note from Hitler reminding Next week the Y. M. plans to Misssouri State Teachers College RALPH HAYS: "Yes, we must be suggestions. · him of the prediction. have Calvin Reed try to answer the Maryville, Mo., is scheduled for the prepared for defense in ~ase of in- . Hoping to procure the loyal back- In the nine years since Hitler's question, "Are Gentlemen Sissies?" Homecoming dance. vasion." · mg of students and faculty, band rise, Mr. Davis has spent at least f f f "This Council has nothing but • members sold a~ symb?ls Of support, three months of each year in Eur- W'l T R l F . precedent to guide them, and they 1 HOPE CARTER: "Yes, because we small fl~gged tags at ten cents each ope. He was in Berlin when Hitler's son u e reshies are not bound by that," reneed a group of ab1e .bodied'young on Flag Tag Day~ Monday, Oct 7. soldiers began their march ilnto Four i:ien will rule the freshman marked E. H. Hayward, who is men to back up the nation in case Proceeds will be used to buy an Warsaw. On Aug. 26, Mr. Davis was class this se.mester'. Count of the sponsoring the two main projects of war." · American flag and a Peru flag to .on his. way to Paris-the last man vot~ _cast ~iday failed t.o record. a of the year-Homecoming and the • be carrie~ by the color guard. to cross the Franco-German border femmme office holder. WiHard Wil- Commencement Week All School TED STRAUSBURG: "Certainf f f ·at Cologne. During the summer he son heads the llst as president with Party. · ly, it's good discipline:" bad interviewed Count Ciano, Leon James Howe, vice president; Frt;d Being compelled by no one to Blum, Goering, Herbert Morrison Drexler, secretary and Tony De- meet, set within no bounds·by any MARY HORTON: "Yes, we and Amoassador Bullitt. He was Maro, treasurer, complete the male constitution, having no true faculty should be prep~red even t~oug~ it still in Paris, a gas m~sk on his roster. advisor, assembling only when there is .a greater nsk of gettmg mto shoulder, when war was declared. f f f is a need, this organization is truly war.". . ·A graduate. of Wesleyan Universa democratic student organization. • "Investigate before you invest!" ity, Howard Pierce Davis is said to It originally grew out of sentiNANCY HENDERSON: "Yes, we was the advice Rev. T. v. Hubbell be one of the foremost political ment for student government which should prepare in case of war." of Auburn gave the Y. w. members analysts in the field. He was at one n when put to a vote, was turned • Tuesday, Oct. i, in his address, time foreign editor of the Boston MU dbwn because the students didn't Speaking of compulsory military "The Wedding Ceremony." Transcript and is now foreign corwish to discipline themselves. The training makes me think of my "One out of every seven marriag- respondent for Newsweek. Amidst brightly illuminated cam- faculty, feeling need of an outlet ·grade school days when the teach- es ends in the divorce court," he Mr. Davis will speak on "War Ov- pus buildings housing usual activ- for student opinion, suggested the er. spoke of the policy which re- continued, "primarily because the er ~ro~e, Its Repercussions in ity-club meetings, study halls and stude~t advisory council. The required young boys of Athens, Spar- young people aren't prepared. The America, on Oct. 15. social hours-the college auditorium suit was such a compromise-giving ta and Rome to take military train- weciding ceremony should be one f f f s~ands apart. Behind its closed to the. student an opportunity to ing, ·as an ancient outmoded govern- planned through the years for much doors drama is being staged-dra- submit his desire, but ·leaving the mental theory. Even during the last of future happiness depends on it. Kappa.~ ma heavy and intense, in turn bit- task of disciplining to the faculty. year the picture "Four Sons" end- "If you have a good name, find ter, poignant, explosive. ed with a German mot~er bringing someone to match that name," he Prof. Robert D. Moore, aided by her young son. to America so that challenged. right-hand-man Mary Olive RichCALENDAR lle.~ight avmd compulsory army Seven fundamentals .for a sueardson, is skillfully shaping "The trammg. . cessful marriage according to RevPetrified Forest," annual HomecomTUESDAY, OCTOBER 8 Today, m our stud~nt poll, only erend Hubbell are: "Faith in your- New members to Kappa Delta Pi, ing play, which includes a cast of Y.M.C.A., Y.W.C.A., two out. of ten d~~tely opposed self and your partner; love; sense honorary education fraternity, will 21 collegiate actors. C.0.A.................. 7-8 peace time c?nscnption and only of humor; keen. understanding be initiated Oct. 21, it was de'cided f f f WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9 one felt that it was opposed to the generous personahty; co-opera- at a council meeting held Sept. 20. American system of government. tion." Candidates for membership are Grovenburg Crowned Queen Gamma Chi, Mimeograph Ten students indicated by their re- Mary E. Collin, president, Jed the the following: worthy Argabright Queen of the 1940 apple harvest Club ................... 7-8 marks that they favored some form song service and devotional period. Barbara Beal, Faye Bouse, Berth~ festival at Nebraska City is Peru's THURSDAY, OCTOBER 10 of peace time draft. Mrs. Sidney Timmons sang the sa- Clayburn, Mary Elizabeth Collin, Mary Grovenburg. At a ceremony Freshman Clubs ......... 7-9 The Gallup poll indicates the cred number, "Why Should He Love Harold Dallam Vincent Dreezen at Hayward Park Stadium on Oct. same result that the student poll Me So." Grace Muenchau was pi- Margery Evans' William Fankhaus~ 3 she was crowned queen by Miss FRIDAY, OCTOBER 11 does, thus whatever some of us may anist. er Norman 'Flau Neal Good Lorine Schmitz, Paul, abdicating Game at Kearney think about it we will have to ad;. f f Thaine Hale, Janet Harris, Nanc; queen. MONDAY, OCTOBER 14 mit that the majority of Americans Quiet hours will be enforced at Ellen Jones Herbert Knutson Ruth The program was broadcast over Elementary Club, Epsilon are behind it. boys dorm as decided by dorm Marshall, Grace Muenchau.' Rose station WOW and Mary was interPi Tau, Lambda Delta In regard to the reliability of council, in Sept. 30 meeting. Violat- McGinnis, Hazel Palmer, Wilma viewed by an a.nnouncer. Her picLambda ................ 7-8 these polls we have beeri taking, ors will be brought before the coun- Parnell, Margaret Stiers and Edith ture appeared in the state papers (Continued on page four) cil. Wiley. the next day.

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Y.W.'s Given Poihters On marr1·age Ceremony

College Drama Progresses Bh• d d' • D e m 1tonum oors

Delta p·I . El"191'bles named

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1940.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE TWO.

1884 Outlaws, 1940. Heroes Published Weekly by The Peru State Teachers College

Make Peru Gridiron History

Peru, Nebraska

Entered at the Postoffice at Peru, Nebraska, as Second Cfo.ss Matter. $1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc Rose McGinnis ............... , .............. : . . . . Maryon Thomas .......................... Assistant . , Bill Brooks · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·· Sports · M · Sports Melvm cKenney ......... ; . . . . . . A ss1stant

. Ed'.tor Editor Ed' · itor Ed'1tor

Meredith Jimerson ............... , ....... , Copy Reader .

Nma Kanel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Proof Reader · M. Florence Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adv1ser Reporters: Meredith Jimerson, Milton Schultz, Margery Kinsey, Leroy Redfern, Betty Miller, Mon.a Morelock, Mar· garet Hesemann Ralph Locke Jean Haith Jatfet Harris •

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Jeanne Spier, Myrton Hall, Phylhs Wilberger, Dorothy Armstrong, Harold Lantz, Ardis Carmine, Virginia King, Ruth Stoneman Sarene Hauptman Marjorie Fidermutz .

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Tod Hub~ell, Anselm Johnson, Jack Mcintyre, Emma Ro· sicky, Elvera Schacht, Isabel Tynon, Bill Zurbrick, LeRoy Durst.

Outlaws in 1884--Heroes in 1940: such is the fate of the Per~vians who played the first football m the annals of Peru. In the autumn of '8.4, . a group of hoodlums were organized under captam-and-cc1ach D.. D. Ashl~y, now a promment New York City physician. Ignoring strict regnlations these fellows assembled in a ' . .. pasture east of our present gridiron . . . and proceeded to enJOY a pigskin tussle, with hu5'.'y Bill York ofl'ic~atmg. They paid dearly for their b· d ti savagery- emg expel1e promp y by an indignant faculty for such atrocious conduct: Not until 1892 was a team ofiicially sanctioned, and they played th · eir games away. R. D. Moritz, at present on the University of Nebraska faculty, was captain and coach of this aggregation. Moderate success was achieved, and in stride with the team, Professors Howie, Whitenauk and Porter personally financed the clearing of our natural bowl, east of campus proper. All male students and fac-

. ulty members donated labor, and m a few weeks the field w~s ready for use. . . On Thanksg1vmg. Day of .1901 the new field was .dedicated with . Peru . ~oundly trouncmg. Falls City Hlgh '."chool 30-0, starrmg Harry Hutchmson, local elevator man. Thus was the long trail of pigskin glory, gloom and tradition begun. . Steady improvement has follow. ed that memorable year. It is one ?f the fe~ natural amphitheatres m the nation. Bleachers were con. fte structed m 1910. A few years a r the changing of the Normal school to a State Teachers college in 1921, the whole arena was enlarged. A tile drainage system was laid under the sod of the entire field and the track was built. Peru celebrated installation of stadium lights in 1930 with a 13-0 triumph over Maryville. The football men now were named "The Bobcats." The P. s. T. c. mascot (decease<!) came to Peru in 1926, a presentation from George Hanoon of Arizona, who is a graduate of Peru.

~ in Nebraska City. Boatman teaches

COMPLETE MENS HALL-

industrial arts in the high school. f

Constructed last year, the· mens dormitory now stands

By Grace Muenchau

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Neophytes Entertain

ffiusic Hath Charm To Soothe---Rt Times Someone once said that "Music hath charms to soothe the savage Heart." Now I have no quarrel with Confucius or whoever wrote up that bit of maxim, but I feel sure that if a savage would hear some of the lyrics of our American songs he'd be darnga · t a' 1 d h ewasJus plain old savage with only a tomtom to beat and a beard to mumble in when he sin s Lt . g· f e me give you a ew examp1es of songs we used to hear, read and d f th t h f weep an a ew a we ave orgotten to remember thank oodness. ' g Fi t h "Y k Do dl ,, rs we ave an ee o e. Most of us remember the words· · Yankee Doodle went to town Arldin' on a pony. He stuck a feather in his hat And called it macaroni. Now, I don't belong to the W. c. T. U. and the eighteenth amendment is just the eighteenth amend· ment to me, but I know as well as anybody that anyone who would stick a feather in his hat and call it macaroni must be a little cuckoo or pretty well lit. Don't take me wrong. I'm not saying that Yankee was that sort of fellow, but that's my general impression. That was the kind of people the song writers wrote about in 1700. In 1800 people went for the dramatic, "I will pay the rent" sort of thing. There was this killerdiller:

The freshmen repulsed the invasion of assuming the acute angle Woodman, spare that tree, Much has been said, as well as written, concerning the MR. and MRS. G. s. BROWN by presenting to their beloved upTouch not a single bow! and son, PAUL MARSH, of Omaha perclassmen a novel amateur hour In youth it sheltered me, man whose name will be forever linked with P.S.T.C. The visited Mrs. Brown's mother, Mrs. Thursday night in the lobby of the And I'll protect it now! c. H:. Marsh, in Peru Sept. 29. Pe- mens dorm. Then there were some other words Class of 1912 voiced the opinioi;i of Peruvians, past and pres· ruvians will remember Mrs. Brown Jittery jitterbug Douglas un- ~hat went along with the above, just as Marion Marsh, formerly of the tangled to do the big apple fqr the m case you don't like them. ent·, when they offered these words in tribute to their sponsor: English Department here. big boys. As an encore he portray0, barber, spare those hairs, CHARLES PENNY (, ) . d ed what he saw when a large negro Whi.ch sprout from both my 35 "N o one can know h"1m w1'thou t fee·1·m g th at here 1s · a his M.A. in Guidance and' receive · "th excessive · · ht a t cheeks, Person- women w1. we1g el, from Columbia University this tempted swmg rhythm. I've cherished t11em for weeks. man never-to-be-forgotten. That whiCh we obtain from books summer. At present he is engaged Melvin McKenney with the aid They come in single file, in guidance work in the junior high of those. 88 black and white keys As though afraid to bloom, constitutes but a small part.of. our .. educ~tion. It is the in- school at Madison, New Jersey. playoo his own arrangement of "In So, barber, give them room! the Mood." 1900 brought "Frankie and John.spiration that we derive from· personal contact with our fel· , .DOROTHY BRENNER . (mat.. Neal McCory wowed the crowd ny," which we've remembered a 30 was -graduatecf from the Kansas· with his to din t little too long. It seems that Frank1ow beings th<>t is of far-reaching importance and of a lasting City School of Nursing on Sept. 9. of "Hone as '"lun R g ,,arrandg~mBenl ie and Johnny were lovers and that -. . . . . ysuco.. e ose an ' ue ~rothy "'.as especially outstanding Skies." they'd sworn to be true to each ·character. Our advisor is a man Who has helped us get ideals m dramatics the three years she at. other. However, the lyrics are musstended school at Peru. Trip!~ Tonguer Tony DeMaro im- ed up a bit when Frankie gives and visions of the great possibilities and the grand opportunproved the boys' knowledge of class· Johnny a hundred dollar bill and MR. and MRS. KEN:' ETH ical music by his rendition of "Na- he runs off with another skirt 'w 11 · 'th h" FORESMAN, formerly Bobbie Son- poli,, · e , ities that are ours. If his reward be commensurate w1 is deregger (' 32 ) have a daughter Th. that makes sister F. a little burned ., . ., e upperclassmen lent eager up, so she ups and shoots brother Gretchen Lomse, who was born m ears to the wonderful strains which J y 'd th' services it will indeed be great.'' . tat· t · ou 1Ilk that would be the J u1y. Bobb1e was represen 1ve s U· proceeded from Dale Howard's saxd b t th ' ·· dent in 1932 and was a cheer leader h · · .en u e story drags on for alAs a 'young· man, he attended this ·college which was his for three y~ars op one m the form of "Nola." most four pages, with Frankie hap. • •. · " Four trumpeters, DeMaro, Mc- py about the whole thing. P. s. She "home" for haH·his life time. In 1905 he became .instructor GLADYS NOFSGER ('41) and Cory and Thomas, gave the rend!- got life. Richard Layson were married at tion of the old familiar "Beer Bar- In the latter part of the 1900,8 in mathematics. From 1909-1918 he advanced to .head of the the home of the bride on Sept. 15. rel Polka." At the request, or rather we have the tear-jerker type of lyr~ Gladys was president-elect of Sig- the demand <with paddles) of the ic. There is the one about the litcommerce department, then vice president in 1918 and to ma Tau for 1940-41, and held an uppercl~ssmen, Douglas and Wil- tle gal who goes after her father . active standing in Kappa Delta Pi, hams Jitterbugged to the strains who is the original fa~e on th~ executive dean in 1921. As dean, emeritus, he retired from Perusingers and Dramatic Club. cf the music. barroom floor, and keeps saying to • , , MR and MRS. ARNOLD FOX, i i f him, "Fathi!t, dear father, come active service m 1938-W. N. Delzell-17 years Dean of Men. formerly Beulah Johnson ('34), have RUTH AHLBERG, a former col- home with me now, the clock in the ~ son, Richard Deil, porn July 29. lege nurse here, has accepted a si- steeple strikes one." The jist of the Why not complete Mens Hall? "Delzell Hall." Beulah is the sister of Ruth John- milar position at Rockford College, whole gruesome thing is that mason ('41) and of Carter Johnson a girls' school at Rockford, Ill. ma is home waiting, while brother ('40). f f f Bennie is sick unto dying in her J~HN A. BATH, ('32), former su- Students From 32 Counties arms and papa is down having a few perv1so~ of mathematics in the ju. beers with the boys. The clock nior high school at. Peru, has an Students from 32 Nebraska coun- strikes every stanza until it is the assistantship in the Department of ties are represented in Peru's en- wee hour of 3 a. m. Said brother Education at the University of Ne- rollment. Bennie has in the meantime given WHY FRETbraska. He is continuing work on Nemaha county tops the list with up the ghost and pappy is still in· m p eru annoy you.? his Ph.D. He was formerly connect- 126 students. Richardson county ls dulging. In modern times, if m6thD oes th e Iack of transportation ed with the University Extension in second place with 63. Otoe fol- er sent daughter down to get fathDivision. lows with 62. er at the local saloon, daughter Caesar, with all his court, never exceeded the speed limit. Eleven counties slend stu'dents would probably say, "Move over CARL M. CUNNINGHAM has tot r t , Dad, and make mine straight" Is your allowance too small? In Europe people are con· been appointed as resident manager a mg en or more. Another one of the , i; the 1900 5 of the Lincoln office of Burns, Pot- . Stlli!ents comi~g the greatest type of song that portrays the time tent with having enough to eat. ter & Company. Carl is a graduate distance are Eumce Jeffryes and when men were men and women from a four-year . course at Peru, ~arthabelle Minnick from Alliance were glad of it. There is the wild Are you sick? Suppose you had lived 2,000 years ago and Mrs. cunnrugh am, f ormer1y i n B ox Butte count y, thriller of the two Russian fellas, Emma Wood, completed two years Towns enrolling five or more stu- Abdul Abulbul Amir and Ivan Skawhen 'sickness was fatal. here. dents include. vinsky Skavar. It seems that one Is your room cold? The soldiers of Valley Forge walked DR.. and MRS. ~CELLUS Peru, 56. morning Ivan Skavlnsky Skavar felt SHURTLEFF and their daughters, Auburn, 37. pretty salty, so he ups and goes barefooted on the ice and snow. Sandra and Gale, visited at the Nebraska City, 31. down town and steps on the toe of home of Grant Kingsolver during Falls City, 19, Abdul Abulbul Amir-which he nevAre the lights too dim? David wrote his psalms by the September. Dr. Shurtleff did his pre- Omaha, 12. er should have done. They get into medic work. in Peru from 1931-1933. Humboldt, 5. a bi'g fracas and Ivan Skavinsky light of a smoky torch. He is a naval surgeon, and is Wymore, 5. Skavar gets his head knocked off ·. . stationed at Bremerton, Wash. Plymouth, 5. by Abdul Abzulbul Amir, all for the Some~ing wrong with the steak? Th e people of India HUSTON KINGSOLVER ('35) who Lincoln, 5. sake of the lyrics. is working toward his Ph.D. at Unadilla, 5. As we move into the 20th century, ' are starving for want of a crust of bread. Ames, was also here at the same Dubois, 5. I wonder why we don't take such Are you tired? Why fret? Jacob was tired when he time. Talmage, 5. programs as the Hit Parade out MR. and MRS. HAROLD BOAT- Tabor, Iowa, 5. and quietly drown them, when they dreamed of the angels of heaven. MAN, (Martha Clifton), are living Rock Port, Mo., 5. (Continued on page four)

completed-but for a name.

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to.


TUESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1940. .

PER{.J PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE THREE.

Watch The Bobcats Battle on the 41. A take pass took Henderson through the entire Midland forward wall down to the 28 for a first down. Lantz made six through center followed by another Henderson-Dean first down pass to the 9. Chandler made it to the 4 'on a nice end-around from where Henderson took it.around his right end for Peru's first counter. Ma:>on's conversion from placement was perfect. Peru led 7-0. Following Peru's kickoff, the third quarter ended with Midland in possession on Midland's 49. Three Midland first downs in rapid succession made things tough for the Bobcats as the ball was advanced to the Peru 2. Once more, however.. Peru's line proved invulnerable, and a powerful assault waged by Hill wa~ stopped one yard short of the goal. In this desperatb stand, Linder, playing a beaut· tful game at. guard, suffered a severe back inJury and was forced from the game . final touchdown climaxed SECOND HALF RALLy a Peru's 35 yard drive. Three first downs gave Peru the ball on the 2 where GIVES PERU EDGE Atwood took a shovel pass from Henderson on an end-around and took it across standing up. Mason Producing a mighty second half passed to Mather for the point. Pe-

Bobcats Smash ffiidland 14-0 • •

offensive, Peru Bobcats fought their ruled 14-0. . way to a 14-0 decision over Mi'di:i.nd The remaining feat. ure of the on the home field Friday night. game was the blocking performl\!Iidland had the edge in first downs, .itnce staged by Richards, freshman collecting 15 to Peru's eight, 11 of blocking back, as he tossed aside . . his overly-large helmet while on the these 15 bemg m the first half. r a·nd to k t t t t· . • . Ul). o ou wo po en ia1 The Bobcat lme showed its might tacklers in one block. by throwing .back assaults by Knack- The game ended with Midland in stead. ai:d Hill, Midland's power possession in her own territory. The combmat1on. final count, Peru 14, Midland o. Peru's .kickoff went out of bounds L' and was put in play on the 35. Midmeups: land gained 16 yards on an ex-' Pe.ru Pos. Midland change of punts and put the ball in Ployd le Meaders 'play on the Peru 40. On a sustain- · Org~ lt Swanders ed goalward drive, Midland made Roberts lg Reeves two first downs in a row as they Mcmtire c Mrkvicka marched the pigskin to the Peru· 19.' Lirider rg Hintz Brower's pass wa:s intercepted by Ma,wn rt .Schmeckpepper Mather and on. the play, the Bob':. Chandler re ObUrg cate were penalized to their own Dean · qb McDaniels one where they piinted out to the Henderson lh Knackstead 50. A 23 yard return by Brower and Mather rh ·Little a first down by Knackstead made Stark fb Hill it Midland's ball on the Peru 14. OfficlaIS: Roper, referee; Knight, Another first down, this time to the umpire; Craig, hea.cUinesman. 3 made Peru's position even more Peru acting captain, Ross Adams. dangerous. The staunch Peru for- · ward wall went into action at this - - - - - - - : - - - - - - . : . . point and took possession of the ~ ba:l! on downs on their ow;i one foot . line. Mather's punt to th.e 43 was brought back to th& · 'Cat 27 by· Brower. Midland's next first down ~ came via the air as Brower tossed ONE YEAR AG6a perfect pass to right ·'end Oburg .' . . good to the 17. Another pass, this The Peru Bobcats and the Midtlme to Hill, put the ball on Peru's la:nd Warriors fought a stubborn 6-6 11 as the quarter ended. tie. Henderson scored Peru's touchMidland's fpurth down attempt ·down in the second quarter. Midfound Chandler and Mason mob- land came back in the second half bing Knackstead, giving Peru the to score Its touchdown on a re+erse ball on her own 15. A 13 yard re- from fullback Marr to G1isman. turn of Mather's· punt again put

Prepsters Down Nemaha 13-0. Coach Harold Fisher's Bobkittens won their second game of the seas'd . ft th d f t on Fn ay a ernoon as ey e ea ed Nemaha 13-0 in the college Oak Bowl. Eldon Nincehelsor was hurt on the kickoff and Pete Slinker replaced him at right end. Bob Brown, speedy halfback, set up the pins for the first touchdown by a 30 yard end sweep. An Ogg to Smith pass combination resulted in a touchdown for the Prepsters. An end run for the extra point failed. Herbert Nincehelsor, Prep halfback, was injured in the second quarter and was replaced by Gordon Palmer. Nemaha using a single wing formation ~d a "T'' formation box . ' threatened late in the second quarter but the threat failed as Peru ' intercepted a pass and kept possession of the ball until the half ended. An end run by Brown from midfield early in the third quarter, put

• TWO YEARS AGO· Peru rolled over Midland 21-6 before a large Homecoming crowd. Luther Hutton a:nd game captain John Boyer led the attack. Peru's second team journeyed to Pawnee City on Thursday and tied the Pawnee City CCC team 6-6.

What makes Peru's Team

After defeating the St. Benedict Ra"rens in the opening game of the season, the Cats slowed to a walk and were held to a tie by Northwest Missouri State Teachers of Maryville, Mo. George E. Hansen, a graduate of 1912, wired Dean Delzell that a live bobcat was being sent from Arizona to be used as a mascot.

c1·1ck

DON STARK Don Stark, sophomore fullback, was All Western state in the Iowa high school .division, lettering four years.

• WITH BROOKS • The most thrilling moment of the ball game Friday night wasn't when Peru scored either of their touchdowns, but when, with their backs to the wall on their own one fo?t line, the 1'.1ighty Cats held .the Midland offensive for three straight downs, and then on the fourth dow~ threw them for a .loss.. 1'.hat wasn t so much power as 1t was JUst plain guts. I think th h • "C b ,. 1 d b' echsc ooThowes bow oy ~~er ia. ig d ;;r. Ade co~ ~y w~s th nJur~ ssd i am& ~ ace n . be mfeit aAnndwtahs ohng a .~g-udp Jo o . en e was mJure • All I write this it is undetermind h · ' h · j d b t e ow senous1y e 1s m ure , u let's hope for the best. • ,

f.

extra point how the pep squad yelled "Make that kick-make that kick!"? They got Midland so anxious to block it that Mason had no trouble passing to Mather in the flat.

"Rowdy" Mcintire says that we can quote him as saying that the guy who poked him in the eye did it while he wasn't looking.

Don is known for his plunging abilities and is well headed for a college letter this fall. Nor does he confine his ability to football alone, as he was on the freshman basketball team last year. He is majoring in Industrial Arts and hopes to coach ,some day.

JIM MATHER

The Peru State Bobcats set the pace in Nebraska college football with a total of 84 points scored in three games, as compared to their opponents' six counters. In the three games played the Cats have romped home with three victories, all in inter-conference ganies, The 0ii.'iY."i€a:m.·wlii~h' "has scored on them is Doane. cats have romped with .three victories, all in inter-conference games. he only team Which has scored On them is Doane. Friday will see the Wheelermen in their first conference game of the season when they meet the Kearney Antelopes on the Kearney field. Kearney boasts a 200 pound line and a speedy backfield, but according to recent reports 'they have suffered several injuries. This ls doped up to be one of the stiffest games of the N.I.A.A. conference. ~illlfiilm""i·JOOlijifillj:Ji!!Jlli~l!fil~~illlllillll! ~ '"' [ljj

Jim Mather, pictured above, plays right halfback for the cats, and has scored 37 points in three games this sea:>on. "Lightning" lettered in football and track last year and made his "N" at the University of Nebraska his sophomore year. He holds the one lap indoor record and the 120 yard low hurdles outdoor record at ~ Nebraska. ~ He is the. state sprint champion 'it and holder of the N.I.A.A. 440-yard dash record.

J.P. CLARK

lt

Electric Shoe Shop ·

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Shoe Repairs of All Kinds

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DONALD "RED" DEAN

Donald "Red" Dean is a Jetterman and plays blocking half. "Red" is a junior and, despite his size, he is one of the hardest, surest blockers in the state. He ls one of the fellows who never carry the ball, but cleans the path for the other men. _ "Red" made his letter three years • in high school, and barring injury FIVE YEARS AGOor other bad luck will do the same in college. ' Coach Ernest "Dutch" Lorbeer HI . Ph . Ed t· 1 d hi if t d t s maior s ysica1 uca ion. an s w e re urne o Peru from Beaumont, Texas, where he had • been managing the Beaumont baseball .team. HAROLD LANTZ • TEN YEARS AGO-

the Bobkittens in position for a touchdown. A reverse was good for six points, as Palmer went over standing up. Hunzeker kicked the extra point, making the score 13-0, Prep. Nemaha threatened late in the third quarter, but the Prep defence stiffened, and thus the third quarter ended. The Nemaha offensive began to click early in the fourth period; but a penalty and a stiffening of the Peru line held them and Prep carried the ball out of the game. Bob Brown, Ogg and Smith were outstanding for Peru while Chand!er and the Millhouse brothers looked good for the losers Coach Fisher stated th~t he was well pleased with the team as a whole. Next week will be spent Improving the tackling so that the potentially stronger Tecumseh team can be held. 1 Officials: Ossian, referee; Newmaster headlinesman; Rottient umpire. ·

Bubbling Along

Coach Wheeler should take the college pep squad along on all of his trips. They serve as a wonderful - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - decoy. Did you notice after the second touchdown on the try for the

Sports Of Yesteryear

the enemy in home territory on the 40. Three more first downs, two by Hill and one by Kllackstead, put the ball on the 12. On the fourth down Midland's attempt at a fieldgoal from placement failed as the kick went far wide. Peru took possession ori, their own 20 where after attempt Ma~her !ticked to the Midland 20. A ruce run by Hill gave the Visitors still another first down on the, 50 followed by two more nice attempts, penetrating deep into home. territory. The first half ended Wlth Midland in poisession on t h Bobe t 5 Th half . OO ·e a . e , score, - . Peru came back Wlth speed and spirit combined with a passing attack to start things moving early in the second half. After unsuceessful attempts to return Peru's kickoff, Midland kicked it out on the 50. The Henderson to Dean pass combo lost no time in making it two first downs, the last being good to the 30. The Cats then lost the ·.ball as a partially blocked for·. Ward pass was caught by an inelig· ible player. Midland took over the ball l~ging and made first and ten 'on their own 45. Floyd went into tion and blo~ked ~n enemy ~unt d recovered m Midland territory

Kearney

• • •

Harold Lantz plays fullback posttion, and made third team All-State at! that bpost in high ;c~o;l. ~e P ays a .ang-up ~ame 0 e ensive ball and is recogruzed as an excel!ent plunger. . "Hod was holder of a scholarship to the Alabama University last fall, but it was withdrawn because of a foot injury suffered during the summer. He is a sophomore. and has two more years to show his stuff.

• CLAIR CALLAN

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We Call For And Deliver Clair Callan, known as "Stub," I@ Keep Your Business At Home is at the quarterback post where PERU CLEANERS he alternates with "Red' Dean.' :1 Phone 62 "Stub" is a good blocker and ex- ~ eels in those long spiraling punts. YlrJfilIDlll~~[g]@H He made a numeral at Nebraska in lilJlllJ®[g)lllJ®illJ!fillll@@~mmll!lll5liW!iffili '38. ilJl .He was a four year letterman in ~ DR. G. H. JODER ~ high school wher~ he was coached ~ -Physician and Surgeonby a former Peruvian, Leonard Bell. lg] Off" . "Stub' is a sophomore and ap-1:1 ice at Milstead Corner pears headed for a Jetter this. fall. :1 Office Phone 33, Res. 39 it Y ·11 h f h' b f ll ou wi ear more o im e ore iB!lll®llllliilllllllll®llll~llllllll®lilJJil'Jllll!!Jilillllllll!ID the end of the season. \ • ~!il!lmlJ@!il!lmlJ~llliilllll!illl:ilillllliilll511lll!ID lill ~ KEITH ROBERTS Peru Recreati.on Parlors ~ ll5l llll Keith Roberts is the rough and ~ POOL AND SNOOKER ready boy at left guard-is a crack liil Otto Boellstorff, Prop. ~ man, both offensive and defensive. \lll !iiJ "Butch" made his Freshman nu- r~llllliillllll1lJ!ilillllliilllfilll@llfilllllllliilllfillllilillfilllllliliil@fllt meral at Nebraska last year, hold- 11lJ!l!i@llfilllilllliilllllllllliilllfilllllllllfilllliil@lllll!!llilJrill:lllillJcgJ ing down a.guard position. ~ llll He played tackle in high school, ijji PERU BOWLING !SJ and made All-Conference his se- !SJ CLUB \lll nior .year. . ~ Ladies Welcome at All Times ~ Bemg a freshman, it looks as if ~ Ben Hanlon Mgr. l;;J he is headed for four years of great ~ M. G. Heuer, Owner ~ stuff. ![(]!ilililJliillllliililiilllfilll[(]liiJ@llllliilllfilllllllliillllfijJ!ilJliiJ!ilJ[gi

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PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE FOUR.

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.CPTC ReguI.at10ns OutIined By.Govt

• ·ho have J·oined Private

t St~den s w . . . . . (prehmmary) C!Vll Pilot Trammg ·11 Course for Fall of 1940 WI soo_n Swing into action both for the p1loting of planes and ground school. All students who wish may apply . 1 but. they ex. must pass a 1phys1ca t l.f ammat10n and be ab e o qua 1 Y · ru1es set up by under th e f o11owmg an act of Congress: students must be citizens of the United States. They must have reached their ·r nineteenth birthday but not thel .twenty-sixth, before or on 0 ct · 1, 1940. They must neither hold nor have t f . t held a pilot eertifica e o pnva e grade or higher. Applicants who are undergraduates still in college must be fully matriculated for a de· gree at the sponsoring institution And must have satisfactorily com· pleted at least one full year of ac· credited college work, accepted by the sponsoring institution. Those no longer enrolled must have fulfilled two years. of accredited work in the institution. They must pass the physical Civi! Pilot Training examination given by the aernautics medical examiner. If under 21, they must have parents' consent to take the training. They must never have been disqualified from partiCipation in c.

HELEN MASTIN VOTED HEAD OF DANCE CLUB Heading the Learn to Dance Club for the first semester is Helen Marie Mastin, elected Thursday, Oct. 3, at the second meeting of the club in th .c hall Completing the t"io 1 e musi · of officers are Bob James vice pres. ' , _ Jdent, and Margery Sheeley, sec Y treasurer. . Under the guidance of upper class sponsor Edna Mae Petersen ' the club members progressed from' . the rhythm walking stage, Thursday, and learned the elementary

catch step.

Edna Mae's assistants are: Erma ll' F B Meter, Phy is Benson, a~e ouse, Fred Gebers, Rex Floyd, Jun Sand1 in, Wayne Buhrman and Ray Coeman. About 150 students are members of the organization which is one of . the largest freshman clubs oru the campus. ;. .J. ;. . Cl b 21 Join P~rsonahty u Get-acquainted. games and election of officers n:arked the opening of_ the first meetmg of the Personal!ty Club Thursday. . Twenty-one .members elected ~Ois Glasgo:', presi~ent; L~rene Lmdberg, vice president; Lois Wagoner, sec'y-treas.. Members of. the program c?mmittee are Nettie Hanlon and Shi~ley Schuldt. . FolloWIDg election of offlce.;:s, Harriet Maxwell, upper class sponsor, discussed possible themes for future meetings. A Hallowe'en party is scheduled for the next meeting date. ;. ;. ;.

P.T.P. The following fees have to be paid: $6.00 for medical examination, 1:embers of Pe~ Pl~ye~ wer~ $9.00 for insurance policy $!0.00 to assigned . to upperc ass ea ers a the sponsoring institutio~. · the meeting of the clu~ Th;irsday, Those members who took advan- Oct. 3. ~h .leader will direct .a tage of the Private Civil Pilot Train- group which will present a play _this 1ng m.st summer now having com· semester.. n:e grou?s met. bnefl! , pleted the course, received their for orgamzat10n. Wilma Parnell JS private flying license and are now the upperclassmen sponsor for the able to apply all flying hours on. a ~~u~~~----A-~~~~~~~· commercial flying license. 1,'hese ~ men are: Lawrence •EJy Ro'ss oi:. , . John fa•tfl•lflQ C 00 gan, Joe Vacek, Boyd.Mager, Magor, Leland Fass, Noel' Lundy, Eugene Imler, Wendell Hutchison,~

T

sh I NOtes

TUESDAY, OCTOBER

ffiimeograph Instruction

~!llliillllimllll!illfg[g]§[gj§[j][gj[ill:g]§§llli§!ill§~ ~~IBJ§[j]m[l]m§§[j][gJ[gj§§§§[j]" FOR SATISFACTION IN ~ ~ ..., .. "" "" Cl1rn:ian Church § FOODS ~ ~ FALL FESTIVAL

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Offered In night Class

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!"ight classes for instruction in mimeograph work has r~cently been orgamzed. The class JS open for • • d · · l t JUmor an semor commercia s udents and will meet every Wednesday from 7 t o 8 p. m. for six . consecutive weeks. . c. F. Kemp, representative of the A B ff k Mim h c · giv· . · : ic . eograp o., is mg mstruct10n free of charge · an Students realize that, this is excellent opportunity as fees for

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ea e Thomsen. , ch~ering section for the high school Those students who have applied .this year ~ the result of the recent and who are to receive training for elec~ion. . the fall instruction are: _Bill Adam- ~lly Reddmg has been elected son, Charles Horton, Fay Lovejoy, chairman of the gate committee. Willard Milliken, Alfred. Moore, Marian Deck, Lorene Coatney and Leslie Bartholomew, D:iniel 'Hinds, Jack Whitfield were chosen to asKeith McHugh , Don. Rose , John sist him. They will have charge of ' Wieder. Alternate: Floyd Magor. the gate for high school'· games. Professors C.R. Lindstrom,·~. L. Budget_ tickets are acceptable for Hill and c. A. Hµck are giving the admission. . ground work instruction on the The flute trio, compos:d of ~ecollege campus.. onore Larson, Mary Shirley JimFlying lessons ,will be conducted erson and Betty Kennedy played at the Auburn airport which is lo- in Brownville at a meeting of the cated east of Auburn. Flying in- Federation of Women's Clubs of structors will be given by Frank Nemaha county, Wednesday, Oct. 2. Bringham of the Missouri Valley A4Victory Dance was held in the Fly!ng service. high school assembly aiter the The completion of eight house of Shubert game Friday evening, Sept. instructional flying and the passing 27. Fifty-six students were present. of an air regulation· examination Miss Isabel Mason has been inare necessary before the students structing a "how to dance" class in are permitted to solo. the assembly at 8 a. m. ;. ;. ;. Fire drill instructions have been issued to the whole school. A drill ' STUDENT' SPEAKSwill be held soon. John Lewis will head the fresh(Continued from page one) man class this year. Assisting him there is every reason to believe they are Thelma Sayers, vice president; are almost as accurate as the Amer- Mark Collins, sec'y.; and Marjorie ican Institute of Public Opinion. Rog·ers, class historian. '!he perce:itage of students flolle_d The purple and gold of the high m comparison to the enrollment IS school is parading in Omaha tomuch higher than the number they night (Oct. 8) as the Training use in comparison to the popula- School Band competes in the Aktion. We pick the students at ran- Sar-Ben Marching Band contest. , dom, no prefer~nce _being shown. Phyllis Brinson, drum majorette, Although w_e don t cla!ID our poll. to ~nd 36 members left ~his aftern~on be perfect it surely serves as an m- m the band bus driven by Dick dication of student thought. Clements. I would like to encourage all stuThe band is entered in Class B dents. who ar: interest~d in natioru:l schools with enrollment of 275 or and mternational affairs to contn- less, and will give a five minute bute to the colurru:. This is a stu- drill. dent column and 1f you have any Future Bobkittens are already in criticism or contributions they .will the making in the first and second be greatly appreciated. ~rades. The boys h~ve been choos;. J. ;. mg sides and playmg football and Kappa Omicron Phi members baseball. met Monday night, Sept. 30, at Miss .J. ;. ;. weare's home. It was unanimously "Not a creature was stirring, not agreed that handcrafts such as cro- even a mouse"-at least that's the cheting and knitting be studied and way it seemed to the 88 girls. relearned at the meeting. The spon- maining in the dormitories while sor, Miss Edna Weare, agreed to act the other 118 were home the week as instructor. end before last. Wl

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The name of Carl Wirth, treas., was omitte,d from the list of sophomore class officers. § Office Phone 32, Res. 196 [l] ;. ;. ;. [)tl [lj] · llllilllllil![l][gj§§[j]llillf§mili'[g[l]!li:§§lil!llllllll[g]!lli Want to know how the Bobcats lli§lilJ[g]fIDl1lJm1ilifili!lllimllll:Kllll[l]r;;;mllllm will score during the remainder of the season. See Supt. s. L. Clements. A 100 per cent prediction record prompts him to advertise "advance information for any game for .anyone willing to pay for it." In classroom management, Friday, Sept. 27, he wrote Doane 6, Peru 20, on the blackboard. .J.

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High honors and honors granted to 1940 summer schools students were: . Honors: Leslie Armstrong, Bob Ashton, Wilma Bartels, Lena Bouse, Jack Brown, Robert. Calkins, Louise Dugger, May Eads, Clara Eyre, Verna Fellows, Erwin Fruehling, Th.eodore Graves, George Grossoehme, Verna Gu?ser, Sarene Ha~ptman, Arlene Heimer, Gertrude Hill, Ernest Horacek, Lyle. Hunzeker, Ruth Hutcheson, Bernice Jacka, Helen Janecek, Jessie Jarman, Marjorie Kennedy, Frank Larson, Ruth Ludington, Erma Meier, Helen Meier, Margaret Meier, Ruth Meister, Harvey Michels, Wilma Miller, Ermond Moore, Monna Morelock, Agnes Muenster, Carolyn Papez, Elsie Parret, Etha Patrick, Ruth Patterson, Maxine Pershing, Marie Finckert, Irene Roberts, Thelma Roberts, Marguerite Robinson, Rita Russell, • • Lucile Sandfort, Marvm Schacht, Margaret Schulenberg, Anna Louise Short, Ruth Stoneman, Zora Tennant, Mary on Thomas, Viola Weatherfield, Katherine Webber, Mildred West Velma Wood. HIGH HONORS: Madonna Adee, Frank Dall Lloyd Dunlap; Dorothy Fischer, ~tilda Fritz, Marta Garber, Lillian Havel Irene Jones Opal Lisenby, Mary Meister, Lew~ is Patrick, Marjorie Prine, Ross R~ssell, Isabelle Snyder, Dora Spitsnogle Margaret Stiers Marie Ann Wall~. ' ;. .J. ;. Perusingers Begin Rehearsals The "quartette arranged" choir is. slated to be one of the best in years, according to director G. Hdlt Steck. They are showing the enthusiasm and co-operation needed to make a successful season for the Perusingers organization. The first week end practice is scheduled for Oct. 4 and 5 and another one is planned for the week end following Homecoming. Permission has been granted for the p~rformance of "The Ballad For Americans."

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WELCOME ALUMNI TO PERU HOMECOMING FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18-19, 1940 PROGRAM FRIDAY

7 p. m. Rally and Dance. SATURDAY

2 p. m. Peru vs. Tarkio. 5 p. m. Reception for Sigma Tau Delta Alumni. 7:30 p.m. Play, "Petrified Forest."

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Student.Speaks By LeRoy Redfern Willkie received 64 per cent of in the student-faculty election held last week; Roosevelt was second with 33 per cent and Babson polled 1 per cent.

-----------.....;-----~--------:::-:::-::-::-:--:::-:=-:-:=:--:-::-:-;:-~-------::-::~:::::;:--;--VOLUME XXXVI. , PERU, NEBRASKA, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15 ,194-0. NUMBER 4.

--------------!J---------------------·---------------------w·11tk·1e Subdu\es ~:~. ~:l::~er;e~· :~eQ:e::e Homecoming Grads To Be Given

F • wI B s d F. D.R. In Poll ~::~a~~~t~:e~a~:~s~!?~. :.isJ~~: est1ve ecome y tu ents members of the Y. M. Tuesday

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• There were numerous reasons giv· upport of each candidate. ~emm:Jority of those supporting lt ave one of the following Rooseve g r easons: 1. In such an' international crisis a change would be dangerous. 2. Roosevelt has had valuable experience and thus is much b.ett~r qualified than Willkie. 3. W1llkie hasn't anything; he is a big noise. 4. Willkie is an industrialist supported by Wall Street. • . · . Nearly one half of Willkie's supporters opposed a third. term., The others felt his success m busi~ess made him best suited for the JOb, that Roosevelt had dictatorial ambitions or they disagreed with the fundamental policy of the new deal.

• Much more interesting was the vote on the previously used question of whether the United· .States 0 should try to keep OU~ of w:ar 0~ help England even at the nsk . g

evening, Oct. 8, on the question,

Polls to end all polls, a blitzkrieg on the political situation! An overwhelming margin of 339 votes for Wen.dell L. Willkie and 178 for F. D. Roosevelt revealed that the concensus of opinion on the campus leans toward the Republican nominee. For further. information see the "Student Speaks" column. ;.

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athan's book, "Gentlemen Aren't Sissies." To substantiate his statement, he read excerpts from Jonathan's book. Richard Meyer presented instrumental numbers. Vice president Gail Miller, led the singing and devotionals. ;..

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Handley To Direct Tri .Beta Rctivities

Gone are the days of the dented, old waste basket in the training school assembly. Making a life time s~bstitut'.on, is a s.hiny modern ed1- Tti Beta elected Severn Handley, t10n obv10usly designated solely for new president; Jack Colglazier, vice "A" papers president; Jean Hoagland, secretary, · ;. ;.. ;.. at the Oct. 7 meeting. Dr. Theron Odlaug, sponsor, is the treasurer. Martin To Review Book Tentative plans for the coming year For A.A.u.w~ Series were discussed and meetings ar"Mrs Miniver" by Jan Struther ranged. will be. reviewed by. Miss Florence Martin Wednesday, Oct. 16, at 4 o'clock in the college Little Theater. All students townspeople and faculty are invited to attend. .Jan Struther has in "Mrs. Miniver" given a picture of a simple English woman, the ordinary problems of daily living she meets in caring for her husband and three children. Although the war is mentioned seldom, it c,onstaittly intrudes on the Minivers' daily lives - gas masks must be purchased, evacuees cared for little domestic economies establish~d. The story is simpleyet great because of that very simp!icity, a pattern of everyday life 0

Following the business session, refreshments were served. The meeting Nov. 5 will be a steak fry, weather permitting. ;.. ;.. ;.. Girls Plan Nov. 16 Formal The patriotic theme will predomipate at the fall formal according to plans made by the girls dormitory council at their meeting Monday, Oct. 7. This dance, chief social event of the year, will be held Nov. 16, with Lee William's orchestra playing. ;.. ;.. ;.. First Musicale Nov IO '

Y.W. Picnics At Neal Park Humming "Follow the Gleam," the Y. W. members departed from the last flickering rays of the campfire, which dominated their out-ofdoor meeting at Neal Park, Tuesday evening, Oct. 8. Preceding the devotional period, led· by Mary Olive Richardson, vice president, the girls held a weiner and marshmallow roast. Grace Muenchau led the group from pep songs into spiritual hymns as the fire burned low, and the rays of a lantern shone forth into the darkness. ;.. ;.. ;.. The first male Pi'esident of the Scribblers' Club, Melvin McKenney, has resigned his position to vice president, Alvene Gillispie. Alvene's former office is now held by Ruby Rischling. ;.. ;.. ;..

Peruvian Offers Candid Snap Prizes Do you like to take pictures? If so, here's a contest you won't want to miss. The 1941 Peruv1a1{ is sponsoring a snapshot contest offering local theatre tickets to the winners. Winners are announced every week. Practice your skill with the camera,

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'0 f 325 to• 120 the stu- afternoon book reviews being spon- ed will be the Perusing·ers and an Winning pictures will be printed By aopposed vote h e1pmg . England at sored by A. .A. U. W. instrumental group. in your own annual next spring. dents

• TWO QUEENS TO .REIGN AT GAME, DANCE

• Homecoming alumni will be welcomed by marching bands, campus queens and a fighting Boocat team Saturday, Oct. 19. Homecoming badges went on sale Thursday of last week. These badges will admit the wearer to both dances and entitle him to a favor at the game. The badges are priced at 25c until 6 p. m. Saturday. After that the price will be 50c. Proceeds from the sale of badges will be_ applied on the expense of decorat10ns, advert1smg, postage, favors and orchestra. Campus decorations will feature Peru and Tarkio colors. Dorm decorations will be handled by the councils. With a bonfire rally and dance scheduled for Friday night, the student body will inaugurate the· annual festivities. Marching bands from Nebraska, and Iowa high school have been invited to perform Saturday preceding the game. A trophy will be presented to the outstanding band . The Bobcats will meet the Tarkio Owls at 2:30. Half-time will feature the P.S.T.C. marching band. The Gridiron Queen elected by the football squad will be presented. Sigma Tau Delta wm hclu a re~ ception for their alumni members at 5 p. m.

An all-college cast will present the risk of getting into war our- _ _ _ __:._~---------------------------~-----the play "Petrified Forest" by Robselves, while the faculty polled 19 .to • ert E. Sherwood at 7:30 p. m. 0 0 Highlighting the evening's festivities and bringing to a concluTh ercentages read 27 per cent of e .~ d t nd 76 per cent o! the There are five girls whose hearts Erma Meier, who is also a commerce You can't go far without music sion the 1940 Homecoming will be the ~ u ~n s ang help at risk. beat a trifle faster when the w.ord major with work in phys ed, home and Sarene Hauptman has thrilled the coronation of the Homecoming 1 facu ty. avon • . Homecoming is mentioned, because ec and English. Erma gives as her students for years with her per- Queen and the dance. Maryville Col• · . · , ·. · thi~ each' is ·a 'possible Queen. The re- hobbies ·dancing and swimming and formance on the drum. Her major lege Swingsters will play. If you read the artic)e m · sults of the latest contest to choose refuses to make a statement con- is commerce; minors, home ec and ;.. ;.. ;.. column just two weeks.~go, you pos- a Homecoming Queen are locked in cerning Peru. Erma's ready smile English. She takes in the meetings sibly recall that ~n the poll t~[{en °~ the. vault, and not to be brought catches many second glances. of Kappa Delta Pi, Kappa Omicron Bauman To Head C.C.A. 0 the same quest10n 10 ~tudents forth until the night of Oct. 19, The girl who thinks Peru is swell Phi, Sigma Tau Delta and Y.W.C. the 16 polled were definitely oppos- when the Homecoming Queen will but stiII insists that it's a· "home- A. She likes Peru because of the Electing Ray Bauman president, ed to our support ~f . England at be presented at the annual dance. towner" who gets her vote is El- friendly people and thinks it a C.C.A: held its second meeting of the risk of war. This figure co~- Not even the five girls who are be- vera Schacht. She too has royal grand ·place to live. She's a blonde the year. Vice president will be pares favorably wi'.h the entn·e ing announced as the "topflighters" blood dating· from the court of May possibility to watch. Nunzio Lazzaro; secretary-treasurstudent poll, there bemg less than a know which is to be crowned. Can Queen Martha Clifton. She lists on The last of these commerce ma- er, Betty Jean Miller. 10 per cent variation, w~ich illus- you pick the winner from the fol- her date book; meetings of the Pe- jors who swept the field is Faye "Always set a good example for trates the value of the hmited poll lowing line-up of charm? ruvian staff, Y.W.C.A., dorm coun- Bouse, short, dark eyed and dark others,'' was the advice given by the in showing trends. Kay Bartling, who with a win- cil and dancing and swimming par- haired, active member of Y.W.C.A., Father Brower of Nebraska City, e ning smile says almost demurely, ties. Her major line of work is in W.A.A. (whose sweater she prizes guest speaker. There is little to be said in regard "I'm single-too single,". i~ a m~jor t~e commerce. department and di- highly), president of the dormitory Edna Mae Petersen ::ind Rooet th' . difference in the views held in commerce, loves tenrus, swim- v1des her m1'1or work between council, member of Peruvian staff, mary Tiehen will have charge of bo t~= students and teachers than ming and da~cing. She. has always math. and Englis.!\. .. She is thrilled Gamma Chi, Sigma Tau Delta, the program, Oct. . 22 yh t 1·d a couple of weeks been active m Y.W.C.A., cho_rus, over 1t all and ms1sts she should Kappa Delta Pi, Philo and Pep w a was sa Squad. Faye aids in steering the Flans for a wintet party were H ever We can speak of this dorm council and Sigma Tau Delta. know who the queen is. ow of thought • . of a roya1 nat ur e havm· g serv . fresh man dancers an d de- discussed by the members. , ago. variance in a more au- K'ay .1s errmg

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thoritative way than was previously d for now we ·know it is a fact ~~~~as before it wasn't a certainw ty. • one thing it might prove is that instructors are not as. influenti.al in forming student opinion as many fear. It may mean that the ones who fight the wars aren't nearly as anxious for them as those who are aupposedly being protected.

Chosen As Top Contenders for Homecoming Queen

ed m the court of May Queen Marge Hull and last year as a Duchess in the court of the Apple Festival. Kay's blonde locks and pleasing personality make her a big favorite. Next, consider a redheaded personality who aids in the Freshmen Learn-to-Dance Club, ls an active member of W.A.A., Gamma Chi, Kappa Omicron Phi and Y.W.C.A. By now you have probably picked

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votes time to math and phys ed. : - - - - - - - - - - - - - She likes Peru, and dislikes to think CALENDAR of graduating this spring. She was • terribly surprised a.t being in the "topflighters"' and that proverbial TUESDAY, OCT. 15 Howard Pierce Davis ... 8:00 feather touch would have gotten her. THURSDAY, OCT. 17 There they are, five girls, who Freshman Clubs ......... 7-8 could wear the royal robes with grace and splendor-but the vault FRIDAY, OCT, 18 holds the secret-which one are you Peru Prep vs.Weeping Watbetting on? . er ................... ,2:30 Homecoming Rally and Dance ............... 7:00 SATURDAY, OCT. 19 Peru vs. Tarkio ......... 2:30 Reception for Sigma Tau Delta Alumni ........ 5:00 Play, "Petrified Forest" . 7:30 Homecoming Dance 9:30-11:45

paragraph speaks the view of the majority of college stud);nt,s the country over:

We, the students, do not believe ·, the United States should aid England at the risk of getting into war. We are convinced the United States has no obligation to any other state or the international duty 0£ preserving democracy.

MONDAY, OCT. 21 Alpha Psi ............... 7-8 International Relations Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-8 Kay Bartling

Erma Meier

Elvera Schacht

Faye Bouse


PAGE

PERU PEDAGOGIAN.

TWO.

Published Weekly by The Peru State Teachers College

Peru, Nebraska Entered at the Postoffice at Peru, Nebraska, as Second Class Matter. $1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc Rose McGinnis . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . .. . .. . .. .. .. .. . . .. . Editor Maryon Thomas .......................... Assistant Editor Bill Brooks ................................. Sports Editor Melvin McKenney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assistant Sports Editor Meredith Jimerson ...................~. . . . . Copy Reader Nina Kane! . . . . . .. .. .. . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. Proof Reader M. Florence Martin ............ : ................. Adviser Reporters: Meredith ·Jimerson, Milton Schultz, Margery Kinsey, Leroy Redfern, Betty Miller, Mona Morelock, Mar· garet Hesemann, Ralph Locke, Jean Haith, Janet Harris, Jeanne Spier, Myrton Hall, Phyllis Wilberger, Dorothy Armstrong, Harold Lantz, Ardis Carmine, Virginia King, Ruth Stoneman, Sarene Hauptman, Marjorie Fidennutz, Tod Hubbell, Anselm Johnson, Jack Mcintyre, Emma Rosicky, Elvera Schacht, Isabel Tynon, Durst. '

Bill Zurbrick, LeRoy

HOMECOMING"Come back," {.!lead the multi-color~d postcards, "Come back and pretend the las~ two-three-five-ten-years have never been."

Each October these missives bob up in the

alumni's mail.

It brings them back to the ivied walls every time, emo·

Green beanies and expressions of assumed humility are being worn by 150 freshman girls, initiation rules having been posted at noon Friday, Oct. 11. Victims of upperclassmen's annual. tyranny read the following regulations: 1. Freshman girls will wear the perennial beanies level with the eyebrows until after Peru has defeated Tarkio on Homecoming Day. On Oct. 19, however, they may be worn as becomingly as possible, lest some alumnus report P.S.T.C. and the institution be forthwith dropped from the Northcentral Aissociation. 2. No dating until Homecoming. Exceptional co-operation will be received from freshmen fellows. Upperclassmen know better. 3. For meals only: Blondes will please· make up heavily on the right side of the face; all others on the left. During the evening meals, hair nets will be worn beneath aforementioned beanies. 4. Entrance to either dorm will be · made via the back doors. 5. The elevator is a convenience denied all members of the new class. 6. Freshmen will extend conscientious courtesies to upperclassmen: opening doors, carrying books, tying shoestrings, picking up dropped articles, etc. When addressing upperclassmen, accompany words with "Ma'am." 7. Freshmen will comply with any upperclassman's request that her bed be made up by the initiate, if the request is ~

sentiment, curiosity or exhibit!oni.&m, if you will, or possibly a sort of landscape love" that makes them want to walk the

By Grace Muenchau ~

ways again 'mongst the thousand oaks.

15, 1940.

Frosh Gals Bow to Upperclassmen ~ As Initiatory Rules Outlined ~

tionally keyed to live .in repl.icas of former P.S.T.C. days with never an uncharted moment for one week end. Call it

TUESDAY, OCTOBER

made before 12 noon. 8. Each freshman girl will wear around her neck a placard no smaller than a postcard conveying in rhyme the following information: a. That she is a Freshie. b. That she is green. This is to be signed in full No pseudonyms allowed. ·

?lasses have a nagging way of ~emg scheduled for ungodly hours

like 8 and 9.. ··.ATWOOD'S bacheJ.o:hood of last year now paying dmd;nds ..... Agreeable atmosphere: MACS..... DOUGHERTY'S mustache (?)·: .. Question: Does it '.:1e.an ~~ythmg when she wears. his wmgs · .... Mens Dorm Republican Pinochle Club..... Cafteria cheererupper: "Shaaaa" CHUCK SNYDER 9. These 1940 classics will be com- .... Hold over twosomes from last ll'.1tted to memory, to be recited year: MILLER-SCHUTZ .... VERA· with designated gestures when HUTCH .... RED DEAN-PETE. called for by number. · NO. I "Your m9nth's radio rent is due in "I'm fresh and green but adva~ce. Pre~ent your 50c at the hope to be • dormitory office..... MARGIE FRAA year from now as wise as SER'S airmail letters from Califorthee." (Curtsy humbly.) nia. NO. II WHIZZER WHITE hounding the "Rub-a-dub-dub, I'm just a editor to put his name in print..... green scrub The big boys who demanded a Just as green as it appears; freshman to shine his own footbarely dry behind the ears." gear..... CHRISTINE ALGER, No. 1 (Scrub, as on washboard, gi.J'l.. · · .Neckonomics..... Cub confirst line. Display reverse veys visions of local air raid blitzside of aural appendage on krieg..... People who go Talmagsecond line.) ing ..... Hour dances..... BEECH· NO. III NUT (plug). "Standing here on hands and Guy S. Williams' definitiop. of knees; alumni: "He whom the vicissitudes Barking loudly, scratching of time have fi.nii,ily convinced that fleas he doesn't know anything." .... PicIs more dignified I think tures up and rugs down in early Than hanging tailwise from preparation for alumni overnightLhe trees." ers..... DURST'S theme song: "If (Accompanying action ob- you can't be true to one or two, vious here.) you're much better off with three." Submitted by the initiation com- ···.Fellas ·with dilemmas, financial mittee and approved by the dorm- and feminine. itory council the first two rules will Too much livin' makes a home a carry over until Homecoming and heap-also dorm rooms ..... Likethe others will be enforced Oct. 14, able: BEE FULTON..... Add like15 and 16. able: RACHOW.... Captivating caps on cute coeds..... Just 50 per cent of 1ots of mutual attractions backMr. and Mrs. Sherman are living FREDDIE GEBERS prime example. in Julian where Richard is super- Wearisome queen election, after intendent. queen election, after qµeen election. RITA RUSSELL ('40) is teaching .... 7 a. m. marching musicians ..... art and fifth, and sixth grades at Smoothie: ROOLFING. Scotia. Rita was graduated last Delayed student di.reotorie~ .... . summer with an elementary major Activities man: McKENNEY.... . and an art minor. Rita will give a Chaperones avoided as the plague s~ort ta1k and demonstration in at glowy Saturday nit~ dances: .... Lmcoln at state teachers m:eting. WILLKIE .buttons. . . . . "Petrified" MERV~ L. KEEDY <mat. 38) is play. practice..... b:U:k handed pern?w stationed at Scott Field, Belle- fect10n .... ,Cute Ji! MARY ANN . ville, ~I. He is a member of '.he KEAN. God's in his heaven and army air corps and is taking tram- all looks well, but don't be deceived ing for airplane mechanical work. college is ........ (guess what). '

. GERALD' FICHTER . 1 RENE Watery cheers from old classmates ... "Welcome Alum- WESTERMAN and EVm..YN HOMOLKA, all members of the faculty ni," Ath field greeting •• '.blue and white banners .•• campus at Sidney, Iowa, visited in Peru last • , • . week end and attended the Mid.decorations .•. bonfire> pep talks .•. rally dance ..• Peru land-Peru game. , -vs. invading team ••• the play ••• more dance. STEVE TURILLE, formerly he~d . of the commercial department m A labyrinth of confusion for freshmen-an annual af· College View High Schoo!, Lincoln, _ __,_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ . is now a member of the faculty in fair, mere routine for upperclassmen~ut HOMEGOMING tli'e department of commerce at the · ·· . Kansas State Teachers College at for alumni. Emporia. Mr. Turille, who was on leave of .absence the past year to study for a doctorate at Harvard, hat also been teacher and princif f f pal at Elwood. He took the A.B. degree from Peru in commerce. eat fresh vegetables," he added with GILBERT COOK ('34) has re- Pork Chops Fruit Salad a flake of disgust in his tone. SAIL ONceived two degrees from Yale and Chicken Pie Cherry Pie When questioned about student , plans to locate as a mirl1ster in the Mashed Potatoes Ice Cream tastes, he chuckled, "They're really Nearly four hundred, fifty years a"o Rolls o a youn"o an started Middle West soon. While attending St· rmg Beans wild about brownies and cherry Yale, he was minister of the Cong- Cauliflower Coffee pie!" out from the west coa.st of Europe with three small ships and regational church at Niantic, Conn., "And jello--I've never seen people an idea.I. The point that is 0 £ importance was that the young which position he recently resigned Approximately 250 students scan eat jello like they do this year," to come West. 'such a sign board at least twice ev- added his wife who was listening man set before hjm an ideal and let nothing come before him LORENE GALLOWAY' ('36) visit- ery day. This week end that board intently. ed the campus last week whiie will be dressed in its finest garb. It, The supply house has informed until he had achieved it. Histories will tell you of the dif. gathering material to aid in pre- too,. will feel the spirit of Home- Mr. Steiner that its largest jello acpanng an art course. of study for commg. count is with the Peru cafeteria, ficulties he encountered before he came to what is now the McCook sch.ools. Miss . Gallow.ay Ftfily aware that the cafeteria which surpasses colleges at Kearnteaches art :n ·~he McCook semor line on that day will double or ey, Hastings, Student Union Buildgreatest country in the world. A new hemisphere was discov· ~ig~ school, JUmor high ~hool a~d triple in length, "Bake" Steiner Jo- ing at Lincoln and larger places. Jumor college and supervises art m vially declared "Homecoming does- "Guess I t f · grad h · Sh . d . • sor o grew up m the ered. A new theory waSi proved and the old belief that the the · e sc oo1s. e maiore · m n't worry me-I'll just begin a few bakery business," "Bake" explainart at Peru. days earlier." ed "I · wor ld was fl at was sh own to b e f a 1se ... t h e resu1t of an ideal. ERNEST BROD ('40) recently re. . · got .my first JOb when I was ceived a graduate assistantshi in In his sp.otless white, he leIBu:e- about as big as Dick, i:1Y seven year L ess than a century ago a youn~ mechanic worked on a school administration in th t P h- ly seated himself. "Just 50 pies m- old son. First, I earned wood for curious contrivance that he called a cotton gin. It was a crude ers college at the Universit; o~a~e- stead of 24 •" he continued. o~e dollar and maybe a piece of braska. Ernie graduated from Peru Also on that day several other pie. t'!'hen I got three, six and on affair and many laughed at his efforts. But today that contriv- last spring with High Honors and figures will soar upward. Several :k:ll ,: was foreman at Smith's was president of Kappa Delta Pi. more hundred pounds of potatoes ry. ance saves billions of dollars in labor and time •••• Another LESLIE ARMSTRONG and BILL will be added to the usual ioo Besides the 10 to 11 hours, which JAMES were married in Shenando- pounds peeled daily, more than begin long before the coeds have result obtained from an ideal. ah, Iowa, Sept. 29. Leslie received a twice 250 milk, chocolate and pop finished their beauty sleep and two-year diploma last year and is bottles will be emptied, and the daily last into the night, he keeps pace The hundreds of improvements of the last half-century teaching· at Yutan. Mr. James is a 288 pieces of butter will reach the \vith other ,activities. " Wouldn't 600 mark. The ordinary 288 cheese miss a game," he remarked posare the results of some person's setting up an ideal and work- barber in Peru. CORRINE BARNTS and RICH- sandwiches will only be a start. itively. ing toward it until the goal h. as been reached. Like the marin- ARD SHERMAN, both from the As the phrase "preparing menus" The origin of his nickname. is er who sets his compass and maintains a Ste d class of '37 were married Aug. 10 at was mentioned, "I'd really appreCi.- slightly a puzzle to him. "The kids a Y course, so the First Christian church, Beatrice. ate it," he stated definitely, "if the up here just started calling me does the individual who would achieve success choose a cer- Mrs. Wayne Wilson, nee Wvian kids would bring down suggestions. 'Bake; and I've been 'Bake' ever ' Lambert, was matron of honor and I'm tellin' you it's pretty hard to since," he remarked as he stamped tain course and let nothing come between him and his goal EARL ANDREWS ('37) was best put variety in menus when most of his smile of approval 011 the man. Miss Grace Petersen, college the customers just want corn, beans, "Bake" embroidered on the pocket librarian, attenaed the wedding. peas and beans, peas, corn. Won't of his uniform. until the port is reached.

"Bake" Steiner, Typical Example Of Gastronomical €fficiency

m'


TUESDAY, OCTOBER

15, 1940.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE THREE.

Watch The Bobcats Battle Peru Claims n.l.A.A. Opener

S'

• CATS TAKE FOURTH

IN

SUCCESSION

...

• • • •

What ffiake Peru's Team Click

Bubbling Along • • A pat on the bacK is due "Shiny"

. WENDELL HUTCHINSON W e n d e 11 Hutchinson, alias "Hutch," is the tall timber at left tackle. Lacking the necessary quarters for a letter in previous years, "Hutch" seems headed for his "P" this fall. He is recognized as one of the hardest working boys on the field. He played in the first six man football game in Iowa and was a high school team mate of Bob Henderson. The flying tackle is a senior, majoring in physical education.

Coach A. G. Wheeler's powerful . . f ht "t If t 20 grid machine oug i se 0 a 6 victory over the Kearney Ante!opes at Kearney Friday night in the N.I.A.A. conference opener, to give the BobcatS their fourth consecutive victory. Peru held the edge both in yardage. and first downs throughout the game. t Peru's kickoff went to the KearCats Highly Favored ney 10 yard stripe, but. Peru was • offside and the ball .was taken to Next Saturday afternoon will see the 35 yard line for a second kickthe machine like precision and off. Mason's kickoff again went to power of the Peru State Bobcats the Kearney 10 yard line. Kearney march onto the field to defend their returned the ball to the 25 yard laurels against the speed of the stripe before being tackled. Tarkio Owls of Tarkio, Mo., in a Peru's first touchdown was set Homecoming tilt. Last season's up by a punt to the Kearney 30, meeting resulted in an 18-0 victory fumbled by Kearney and Doughertor the Peruvians in' a .Turkey Day ty recovered. A pass to Floyd took game. With early season injuries the ball to the 15. The next three pealing fast, the Bobcats should be plays gave the Peruvians a first the prime of condition: down on the 5 yard line. Henderson 'I'his will be the first time that then went off tackle into pay dirt. the Owls have met the Bobcats in Mason's kick for the extra point a Peru Homecoming game. failed and Peru led 6-0. Former Peru-Tarkio. meetings: Peru kicked off to the Kearney ROSS ADALY.tS Year Peru ':Carkio 15 where the man was downed in Ross Adams, senior, plays right 1908 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . o 28 his tracks. Kearney punted to Peru, guard, at which position he has 1913 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . o 'o .who had the ball at the end of the lettered three years, and barring 1915 .............. · 13 0 quarte~. injury he will cop his fourth letter 1915 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 0 0 this fall. 14 • • 1916 .............. 40 "Ad" is a former Peru Prep star, 1917 .............. 17 having lettered in three sports. Kearney Scores m Third 0 1918 .............. 17 He was game captain for the 1924 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 7 • Bobcats when they tangled with 1927 . . • . • . . . • . . . . . 18 0 I th d t Math the Midland outfit, but due to in1928 .•••.•••.•• ~.. 18 o ; H ed secon ~ar er, al e~ jury did ··not see· as much service 1929 .....•. . . • . . . . . 6 o an t 0e\e:sonthmabell s~ve~he ~:r as usual. 0 1936 · · · · · · · · · · · · · ' 6 7 yard runs line. rmg e pass a ;. ;. ;. A shovel to Dough7 rt 1937 •...... • .. • · .... 13 th B be ts th ir d Kittens Tie Tecumseh . . . . • • • . .. . • 0 e secon 1938 9 e y gave e o a touchdown. Iyrason's kick for the To Remain Undefeated 3 0 extra point was successful to give 19 9 · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1 · •

WITH BROOKS

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• Former Homeconung results: 1924, Peru 16,. Doane O. 1925, Peru 14, Cotner 0. 1927, Peru 22, Wesleyan 0. 1928, Peru 13, Chadron O. 1929, Peru 39, Wayne 0. 1930 Peru l~ Ch.·adron o . 1931,, Peru o,.,,,Wayne 6.. 1932, Peru 6, !Waryville 7. 1933, Peru 13, Wesleyan 12.. 1934, Peru o, Chadron 12. 1935, Peru O, Wesleyan 13. 1936, 1937, 1.938, 1939,

Peru o, Chadron o. Peru 7, Wesleyan 6. Peru 21, Midland 6. Peru 6, ·Kearney O.

the Peruvians a. 13-0 advantage. Toward the end of the second · quarter Kea.mey began to show consiaerable pep. Peru fumbled on their own. 40 an.ct Kearney recovered, carrYiug the ball to the Peru 2rt where they lost It on downs.

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In the .thirdback quarter t~e Antelopes came . a reJuvenated team. Kea,rney ·kicked off deep into Peru te~rltory. Red.Dean returned the ball to the 30 · ard line, , · Y

to the Peru 3 yard line. HoUencamp scored for Kearney on a line plunge. The kick for the extra point ~ failed. ONE ""'',., i"""""" AGO·. Kearney held the edge in yards Coach "A. G. Wheeler's Bobcats and t<lowns for the remainder of the gave advance notice to the state quarter. schools that Peru was to be the Early in the fourth quarter, team of the year by cracking Doane Mather made Ii. 35 yard run for a 20-6. touchdown. Mason's conversion was

count.

. Cotton and B.rown were. outstandmg for the Kittens, while Oskerthun, Carmen and Koons looked good for Tec~s:h. J.. A picnic f0r all new members of W.A.A. will be held at the cabin some night this week. The time will be posted on the bulletin board. Team practices and the hit-pin tournament are being held this week.

Durst for his work in organizing a college boxing club. Durst, holder of the Midwest Golden Gloves welterweight championship and present student of Peru, is offering his services as instructor and the use of his equipment to meet the demand of students on the campus who are interested in this sport. A small fee is to be charged to buy new equipment needed. With meetings two nights a week, Tuesdays and Thursdays, Durst intends to offer instruction in the general fundamentals of boxing. "Shiny" hopes, as his students develop, to be able to offer several good boxing cards open to the college people. The first meeting will be held tonight in the Peru C'.ity Hall, beginning at 8 o'clock. • The Bobcats 'pushed themselves on toward a second conference and state championship in as many years Friday night as they defeated Kearney. At present the Cats have chalked up 10'4 points as compared with their opponents' 12 counters in the first four games. This gives Peru an average of 26 points per am g e. IBJf!lllllJlllJlllJ[;JlllJ~f!ll[;JiEJlllJ%2J:[!l]iEJfg'lllJiEJ'.m[!l]lllJ 1151

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We Call For And Deliver f1il Keep Your Business At Home

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PERU CLEANERS Phone 62

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J.P. CLARK

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Electric Shoe Shop Shoe Repairs of All Kinds

••••••••••••••••

atur·. a ' ct0 er 1 ~

OUR GRAND OPENING ON

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Free G~fts For Men, Women and Children

'~"''""'=1<lllll!iJ!lllll!lf!ll!llll!iJl!iJ!llllllllfililJi1llllllllll[gjll!Jilil\ ; successful. Peru held the edge until DR. G. H. JODBR Good Service and Quality Products are the basis of our ask· the final whistle, at which time the -Physician and Surgeon- l(gj ing your patronage. Phillip's Gasolines, Oils, Greases, Ac· Cats were carrying the mail on the Office at Milstead Coiner cessories and ·Batteries and Lee Tires and Tubes are m Kearney 30 yard stripe. The line-up: )( Office Phone 33, Res. 39 stock for your convenience. May we serve you? PERU Pos. KEARNEY .:§lf!ll!llli1lllllllillli.IDill!l§llllllill!lll[!l]~lfililll!illllllll~ A Case of Phillip's "66' Canned Motor Oil will be Floyd le Binger Presented to the Person Guessing Nearest the Cor· Organ It Newell llilf!llll.IDll!!f!lllllllill§llllllill§Jlllllill!1lilllllill!llllllJ!lllllllillllllJI rect Number of Pump Strokes of Air in the Tube Roberts Jg Smith ll15J llll Displayed at Our Station-It's Free! Mcintire c Ulbrick Peru Recreation Parlors Adams rg Journey [g] Mason rt Snyder :; POOL AND SNOOKER A COMPLETE GARAGE SERVICE Dougherty re Blessing Otto Boellstorff, Prop. We are also e~uipped to handle all types of automobile re·

Dean • Henderson TEN YEARS .!!.GO: Mather This was a hard week for both Lantz the Cats and the Kittens, as the former found themselves on' the short end of a 13-0 score in a game with Wesleyan, while the PreP_sters bowed to Shubert High 19-'/.

Rex Floyd, pictured above, is the "printer's devil" who holds down the left end position on the Bobcat starting eleven. Rex, a junior, has lettered in football two years and is w~ll on his way for a third letter. He is also a lett.erman m track. He ~s rated a~ one of the be~t defensive ends m the state this year· d . h. Rex made 10 letters unng . JS high school career at Beatrice High. where he was a backfield star. He was gold medal winner of the 380 yard run at th state track meet . 193~1 m · RI • INDER MAU GE L · Maurice Linder plays right guard and worked up to a starting position for the Midland game, but was injured in the fray and had to be carried from the field. A junior, the "Cowboy" is rapidly coming into his own. He lettered three years at Nehawka, where he was a star backfield man. He entered Peru as a pre-med student, but is now an Industrial arts major.

The Peru ~obklttens fought the Tecumseh Indians to. a 6-6 ~eadlock •••••••••••••••• on th Tecumseh gridiron Friday after~oon. Prep scored In the second peno~ when Brown broke through, the !me and ran about 20 yards to a touchd~wn. T~cumseh countered in the third period on a pass from . 11 t o Grell goo d for t en yards ••••••••••••••..: P1erso and the touchdown. . The game was played on fairly even terms. Tec?mseh held an 8 ANNOUNCING to 7 advantage m first downs but

Sports Of Yesteryear

• TWO YEARS AGO: With Hutton sparking the attack, Peru rolled over Midland 21-6 to make the Bobcat's Homecoming a complete success. Peru's first year men journeyoo to Pawnee City and tied the Pawnee OGC team 6-6. • PIVEl YEARS AGO: Peru tied Midland 13-l:t. Midland came from behind twice to even the

REX FLOYD

~~~~~r P;~~te~~sK~:;~e;nre:::~ ~re~~utyarded the Indian team, 187 ~ the ball to the Peru 45, and contin- o . ""·

ued to drive through the Bobcat's defense on spinners and sweeps. A ;. J.. J.. 15 yard penalty on the Wheelermen ~ helped the Antelopes bring the ball

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Mitchell 1 Wilmot ~ Shada HoJlencamp

pairing and overhauling, as well as greasing and lubrication. Careful attention to the needs of your automobile is assured when your car is brought info our garage! Expert mechanical knowledge will do much to keep the cost of repair bills down to a minimum. We suggest that you prepai;e your auto· mobile for winter driving soon-and we would' be only too glad to prove to you that our service is of the best.

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PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE FOUR.

maxwell Speaks Rt Teachers ffieet Nemaha county teachers held their association meetings Wednesday·, Oct. 9. Dean Frank Henzlik, teachers college, University of Nebraska, as banquet speaker, discussed "Some False conceptions of · Democracy." Rhythm and tonette bands composed of rural school children directed by Prof. V. H. Jindra, entertained during the morning. Prof. Jindra spoke on the selections to be used by the an-county band this

We want to see all you

grads. We know you will

You Asked For It· Before you proceed further, dear readers (both of you) permit us to clear ourselves for what is about to occur herewith. Our trusty Underwood pounds this out at the request of the homo sapiens in our midst who are so askew mentally that they maintain a PEDAGOGIAN is not worthy of reading unless their names. appear flash after · th 11 t t . f'ias h m e a oo, oo revea1mg lovelorn column. . . Proceed at your own risk, you two. •

Gamma· Chi Elects ffiuenchau President Grace Muenchau was elected Gamma Chi president at the meet. h Id t Sh ill b .t d 0 9 mg e c · · . e W. e assis e by Janet. Harns, vice president; Erma Meier, secretary and Edn&. M P t t · · ~~ese::rs~~~e re~ ur~embers to "Tr ti d . ,, P1ay . u 1 an Cons. equences. Dane d t t t . mg an ongue . wis ers provided othe.r entertamment with Janet Harns and Grace Muenchau · t ruet·mg m . various . ms steps Rf h t f .d · ies ~v:~: :~~e~.° Cl er and cook-

9

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1940. Peru Receptfons To BeHeld

Training School Notes .Life is becoming harder for the high school students. No longer can they use that old "I-have-to-go-to the-library" excuse for prolonrred . " absence. A branch library has been established in a room off the stage in the assembly. Paul Ogg, Josephine Setzer, Betty D. Collin and Raymond Sears are the library assistants. High school reference books and all books marked with an "H" in the college library are included. They are to be checked out in the same manner as in the college library with the exception that a book does not have to be checked out if read on the stage which has been furnished as a reading room.

At Omaha, Lincoln, Kearney During State Teacners Association the following meetings of Peruvians will be held: Reception, Hotel Fontenelle, Omaha, Oct. 24, 4-6 p. m. Re·ception, Hotel Cornhusker, Lincoln, ~t. 25, 4-6 p. m. Meeting of Peruvians at Hotel Niidway, Kearney, noon, Oct. 24.-0tto Oakes, chairman. j.

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Lutheran Club Has Ball Game Lutheran Young People's Club met Sunday evening and enjoyed a kittenball game. After the game the boys served ice cream. A business meeting followed with the Rev. Schultz of Nebrask.a City presiding. All Lutheran young people in coliege are welcome to attend.


udentSpeaks By LeRoy Redfern oward Pierce Davis is pro-Ger," stated a group of collegiate - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - mentators following his talk VOLUMB-XXXVI. PERU, NEBRASKA, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1940. NUMBER 5. day night. His statement that - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - · - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - some standpoints Hitler is the t unselfish, sincere man in all pe was the fact on which they While candles of Y.W. cabinet their conclusions. The folmembers burned brightly, President ing is what Mr. Davis really Mary Elizabeth Collin extended the

new Y.W.'s Installed

Education Frat Initiates 10 ·

"From some· stanapolnts Hitler is e most· unselfish, sincere man in rope. He is utterly unselfish ere Germany is concerned but crupulous and brutal to the re~t of the world."

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Willey.

view held by this group of ;students_ backs one of the funda,mental idea of h!S speech. That is the idea of hysteria, about fifth column, about anyone who doesn't get out and root for a war po!Jcy. If Y.Ou remember Mr. D~vis s~en_t c~nsrderable time on this subJec;;, g1vin 1 ·t t . hg _severa feye~w1hness I acdcoudn s s owmg how ar it as area Y c-

r(mght Mr. Davis continually b out that the only way to make.democracy work and the only way to defeat Hitler is to be calm and use reason in place of emotions. A 'large army would be of little value if the population is to be in an emotional turmoil. Davis made the following statement in defense of his point: "French soldiers war. The collapse corrupt politics in the army, caused

Kappa Delta Pi fraternity fo:mally initiated the following new members Oct. 21: Faye Bouse, Janet Harris, Nancy Elle~ Jones, Herbert Knutson, Ri1t.h Marshall, Grn::e Muenchau, Hazel Palmer, Margaret Stiers, Edith W;·ight and EditQ,_

did not lose the at Paris, due to the city and ;not the downfall of

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Nancy Ellen Jones, who in 1938 was chooen by Kappa Delta Pi as the outstanding freshman, was presented an official Kappa Delta Pi badge. Interlocutor Jeanne Spier conducted a quiz program. . . MarJone Kennedy, Sarene Hauptb • man and Ruth Ludington were in line was formed by the cabinet 'llith !Vfrs Collin at the heac' ara thr 0 charge of the 1 efreshments. • ' ' • faculty sponsors, Miss Marjorie ;.. ;.. ;.. West and Miss Edna Weare, at each WALKER ELECTED corner of the base. ' Members of the cabinet include TO HE.AD SENIORS Mary Horton se retar Grace ' c y; President of the senior class is Muenchau, trgasurer; Juanita West, Cecil Walker. His assistants are devotional chairman; Maryon Ernest Huegel, vice president, and Thomas, music cha~rman; Carolee Jeanne Spier, secretary-treasurer. Garver, creative leisure chairman; Th election was held Monday, Oct. Harriet Maxwell, publicity chair14. man; F'aye Bouse, outside conta~ts chairman; Nma Kane!, candy chall'Dr. A. L. Bradford will assume man. class sponsorship. ;. ;.. ;.. ;. ;. ;.. Trio To Play At Teachers' l\'.leet

S·1gma Taus Elect Eyre

As to this view your columnist is Clara Eyre was elected president in complete harmony, as you m1- Qf ~igma Tau Delta at the first doubtedly realize if you have read .meetmg of the year on Oct. 14. this column. It was just three wee~ The program consisted of a book ago that it was here stated that the .i'eview by Mrs. A. L. Bradford. She United States should concern her- reviewed "Moment in Pelting"' by self more with domestic problems; Lin Yutang. ' ~;1£,V;h,,f't:VttaHZtl,l'g d01nesticr::~oei:?m5~,, ·. ·,. W~!~B ,, .~{Zli.Ved- , -lJ~'t · F'1aye B ouse and wa s es Se n ti..al : t o a ~·sti·o11''.;,.· nL~v'i'o11°l {, G.• race l\''i.ucnc11au, defense program. Along the same Barbara Beal. line Davis made this remark: "A large army will not protect the United States if we are morally rotten at heart. Only if we tetain poise, rational approach, determin. .. can ' 'Brltam · · · ' w1-11 pro bab_y 1 withstand a t !On no t t o s_acn·fi ce f ree dom 0

light of fellowship and service to new members Tuesday evening, Oct. 15. The purpose of the Young Women's Christian Asociation of the United States and the World's Student Christian Federation, both of which the Peru Y.W. is a member, pledges each individual to unite in the desire to realize full and creative life through a growing knowledge of God. Upon receivino· light Mary Olive Richardson, vi~e pr~sident, and Wilma Parnell, drama chairman, led the members to their places in the symbolic y triano·le The out-

Colorful Week €nd Greets Grads At Sixteenth Homecoming •

SCHACHT, KINSEY REIGN AS QUEENS

Homecoming, 1940-and the traditional badges appeared on the shoulders of over 800 students and former Peruvians who took part in the kaleidoscopic campus scene Oct. 18 and 19. Rallying by bonfirelight, dances, football, drama, bands and old Bobcat territory in picturesque dress welcomed alumni home. Arourn;l the lea.ping flames of a huge fire on the hig·h school athletic field enthusiastic rooters, led by Cheerleaders Mary Grovenburg and .Jerry Garber, spurred the team to action. Moving gymnasium-ward, they danced to recorded music.

The colleg·e piano trio wm play at the Peru reception in Omaha, Oct. 2.4, at Hotel Fantenelle. The members of the trio are Margery Evans, piano; Jeanne Spier, violin; Rachel iHargery Kinsey Wieneke, cello. ; ;.. / Saturday afternoo<i, a stadiumMrs. Inice Dunnmg was the speak- full of fans saw lVLu-;;·ery Ann KinS('Y Cl'0\'\1l•"d Gridiron Queen by er at the second meeting of the Jack Mcintire, c<iptain of the fooi.Personality Club, held on Oct. 17. Sh~, :"pO!~~~. ~et>·:~~~itj~ettC:" balJ boys who chose her. :i\Iargery patrioticA I~allowc'en party is scheduled o1 S11\16ert.. a for Oct. 31. 8il>· dressed in sc~10ol colors, rode onto the field L1 a:1 open roadster containing miniature goal posts i decorated with blue and white. Carrying ycllo\v chrysanthemums, the regent was given a locket of mining of the League," suggested honor and remembrance.

Dav1s• Q . utIines Th e curopean Con flict

we save this. thing called. democ- invasion," said Howard Pierce Dav- ~ITr. Davis. racy.'_' IP discussing· the fall of France is, war correspondent and political ~.Ii. Davis contencted that the 'f' analyst who appei'\red here on Oct. French soldiers did r.o~ lose the He believes, as I do,_ th at i we 1~. "Hitler's army will meet its , . " . . .· beat Hitler's regime,'' and by beat ". , ' . " \\al. "The collapse at Pan~, he n in five in teri in twefit" Waterloo ac the· English channel. .said was due to corrupt10n lof I mea ' ' , b · h ' ,,ea_;.5 come out ahead, we must mike Mr. av1s,. w 9se appea:ance was French politics in the_ city of Paris , th fi t t J d 1 ' b th d emocracy worl,, we must find . a. . e rs even_ sc le ul eec _Y,, w e and to an inadequate moral soundt .budget coml1l.lt ee, spo' on. ar ness." So lution for our· present democra.tic • Eu It R · roblems. Over rope; s ep_ercuss10ns m It was then that' Mr. Davis stated p · H b h dd b · · Amenca." e egan IS c: res.s Y 11is belief that Britain will with• stressing the compl€1;ity of the war stand Hitler's invasion. He warned If we try to defeat Hitler by help- situation. He used as a basis· of his audience that this will not mean ing England rather than by making comparison the tornado of the Mid- Hitler's defeat. "Hitler will still be our democracy work we' will be com- west, which he compared with the in control of Europe," he continued. pelled to enter the war! ·This is story of civilization since 1920. A- "Hitler's defeat would mean the rewhat ·Davis says and is also what doif Hitler, he declared. was 'he invasion of Europe and of GerYour columnist has continually frst warning of the twiscer which many·." maintained. In the words of How- appeared on the ;1orizon. The hurricane in Europe, IMr. ard Pierce D. avis in 'reference to it: The speaker followed with a D · f lt b ht th · avis, . e roug e American "To beat Hitler means the rein- oketch of Hitler, in which be de- republics to their senses. A real vasion of Europe and Germany." w:ibfd Hitler as having been born spirit of solidarity was evidenced with an abnormal, highly strung at the Pan-American conference at temperament. He characterized Hit- Havana this summer. "The AmerGranting this is true both major ler as a 1man who offsets weakness icas," he said, "must stand together presidential candidates are contra- by brutality. "Power J:>y. brutality against economic, military and podieting themselves when they say and bluff where p0wor is lacking," litical penetration of the totalitarin the same sentence we will help is Hitler's attitude, according to the ian powers." · England defeat Hitl:er but we will f.pf,aker. "There need be no fear of the insend no soldiers to foreign soil. Davis then summarized the events vasion of this country for a long o wl1icl:1 led to the rise of Hitler as time," Mr. Davis assured his audim:::ster of the German people. E- ence. It was his belief that if Hitler 1'o defeat Hitler by making devents leading to the beginning of is unable to span the English chanmocracy work is the challenge bewar in Europe were reviewed. "Stu- nel, the American people need not pid allied diplomacy after the worry about invasion over 3,000 World War," he stat.2d, "g1ve Hit- miles of ocean . !er his opportunity." The speaker warned against hysRANDOM SHOTSThe first institution to fall unCicr teria. "Only if we retain poise, a raMr. Davis informed your column- the impact of IIitler·s power was tional approach and a determinaist that he'd better buck the tide the German republic. Hindenburg tion not to sacrifice freedom," he intended Hitler to iJe a mr,re figure- said, "can we save this thing called while he .can. He personally expressl1eacl 1 according- to the speak.er, but democracy." ed an enjoyment in meeting his opEW.ler soon elimimte 1 t 1.1e people The only way to defeat Hitler, he position. iv ho were to d;ctat.e to him. believes, is to make democracy Next to fall was tl1e Rejchstag, work and this is the challenge to Dr. Butler, president of Columbia 8.nJ after that the Lea~u9 of Na- the American people. "We wiil ,pniversity, following· a vigorous tions. "The Rome-Berlin axis, to- beat the Hitler regime," Mr. Davis speech favoring the 'democracies gdher with the weaknesses of the concludecl, "because we CAN make democracies, resulted in the under- democracy work." .~ (ContL11ued on page four) 0

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Elvera Schacht To the strains of a stately coronation march, Homecoming attendants filed into the dimly lighted gymnasium and saw their queen, Elvera Schacht, of Cook, formally crowned. In rose taffeta, the tall, slender senior mounted the throne. As she knelt on the velvet steps, Grid Queen Marg·ery Ann Kinsey, placed a black and silver crown on her head and presented her with a locket. Below the mounted Bobcat placed high above the throne, tl1e court made an impressive picture. Princesses Sarene Hauptman wore white, Erma Meier old fashioned black and lace and Kay Bartling and Faye Bouse blue. The queen and princesses were escorted by Marvin Juilfs, Harold Lantz, Dean Karr, Max Manifold and Milton Rohlfing. Don Moyer's Maryville College Band played a special arrangement of the color song and the court started the first dance beneath swingino: lights enrnloprd in red and blue.

. Responsible for the c: :',,rcj li_:.:Jit-1·11:."-_.·. t.!10·· ;,u.ccors/r::d· dnncc· . ._, platform, the \.all tb'o.ic: clrapej 1Jlu2 t 011 ped by the Bobc:.<."G chairmun Phyllis Benson and nllL! McDonald, Melvin McKennev ahd their committeemen. Eldon Clarke arranged the recording system for Fridav's dance. J

Adding music and color were high Visit.ors departed with pictures, school bands from Aulmrn, Nehras- Wh9ther mental or camerashots of 1 c·t p T 1 , N • rn 1 Y, eru, a mage anc, ema- campus-wide decorations. ha. After marching demonstrations Little Boy Blue stood at the eact by Peru Prep and Nebraska City, ., Dean J. A. Jimerson presented a girls dorm lawn entrance displaying his sign. In gigantic proportion trophy to Jack Porter, Nebraska · was the entrance to the house of City drum major, who represented the old woman that lived in a shoe tbe outstanding band. Prof. Victor at the Eliza Morgan Hall's east H. Jindra directed the music group door. In the parlor Georgie Poririe in "The Star Spangled Banner." w Puddin' and Pie kissed the girls and After the game, Sigma Tau Del- made them cry. Mother Goose's taps attended a reception in the gander, from the perch over the elmusic hall auditorium. Yellow cand- evator, offered a lift and the mouse les in amber holders around a cen- ran down the clock. !~t~~inoyf ~;~sl~wte:hp~ssanatnhdemtruamyss Guarding the door Clf the c.afeteria stood Jack Sprat and his carried out the theme of autumn 'f H w1 e. umpty Tarkio teetered on colors. President Clara Eyre and th t 1 t general chairman Wilma Parnell e mane' ye unaware of his 26were assisted by Hazel Palmer O doBwnbfaltl at the hands of the Pe, ru 0 ca s. Grace Muenchau and Nancy Ellen Jones. Maryon Thomas, Corrine Faye Bouse, Margaret Meier and Whitfield, Dr. Bradford, Mrs. Brad- Bob Koontz painted the Mother ford, Prof. Grace Tear, Jeanne Goose figures. Mary Elizabeth Collin and Dean Spier and Clara Eyre received ttie Karr were in charge of campus deguests. corations. From the music hall to the gym, blue and white pennants fluttered. A huge Bobcat done in charcoal on white and blue cloth hung from the top floor auditorium windows and Tarkio Owls, treed TUESDAY, OCT. 22 Y.M.G.A., Y.W.C.A., by Peru Bobcats, peered from the top of the lamp posts. A pair of C.C.A................. 7-8 football pants hanging beneath a WEDNESDAY, OCT 23 sign, "Beat the pants off Tarkio," Peru Prep vs. Table Rock 1 :30 suggested the effigy of the Peru opponents. THURSDAY, OCT. 24 Goal posts were wrapped in blue Vacation begins. and white, and purple and cre:.m1 in MONDAY, OCT. 28 honor of each college's color:;. CredInternational Relations it for these decorations Ls given to Club ................. . 7-8 Freddie Drexler, Dick Clements and Scholarship Club _....... 7-8 John Jenkins. Future Teachers of AmerMax Jac;kson, Bob Williams and ica .................... 7-8 Vincent Drcezen distri.buted the Pi Omega Pi .. .. .. .. .. .. 8-9 dozens of multicolored balioons waved at the ga111e.

Calendar


PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE TWO.

Published W echly by The Peru State Teachers College

Peru, Nebras!?a

Training School Student 1Cat Claw Is Professiona~ Dancer

\iVornan h?s 10112: rcga:;:ded her

01,e, of three pe/sons in the Un- c::.go, 1vhieh is said to be the Iar;s·-

Entered

at the PostoHice at Peru, Nebraska, as Second ited States, who can dt on her own cst dancing studio in the 1rorlcL Be110Gd is Peru's Phyllis Jean Brin- fore she bccan1e a proicssicnal Class r11atter. $1.00 per yez.r. Siagle Copy Sc soE, clrw11 rnajor fer tl1::; trt:tinL:1g dancer! she trn-;;cled Y';ith a i\ic.jor

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - .:~chool band <lncl a professional ac.Iobatic dancer. A high school sophRose l\foGinnis .... · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Editor cmore, Phyllis jean has been danc]\faryon Thomas .......................... Assistant Editor int; since she was nine years old, n ~· ·2nd has studied ballet, toe, tap and B1.11 Broo·1 <s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sports .Cd1tor ., ., d t bl' " 1• ,. ccc.10,JaclC Ci"ncn,g, an um mg. Melvin :tvfoKenney ................ ~Assistant Sports Editor Eer travels have taken her from Meredith Jimerson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Copy Reader ti1c west coast to northeastern United States and to Canada. Nina Kane! ·" · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Proof Reader Peatmed in Ripley's ''Believe It M. Florence Martin .............................. Adviser er Noi;'' column was her trick of sitting on her own head. Another accomplishment is that of taking Reporters: Milton Schulz, Margery Kinsey, LeRoy Redfern, a hat off her head with her feet Betty Miller, Mona Morelock, Jean Haith, Janet Harris, and putting the hat on again. Jeanne Spier, Myrton Hall, Phyllis Wilberger, Dorothy Phyl/is Jean· has studied with Bruce R. Bruce at his studio in Cl1iArmstrong, Harold Lantz, Ardis Carmine, Virginia King, 00 •

Ruth Stoneman, Sarene Hauptman, Marjorie Fidermutz, Tod Hubbell, Anselm Johnson, Jack Mcintyre, Emma Rosicky, Elvera Schacht, Isabel Tynon, Bill Zurbrick, LeRoy

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Durst, Ralph Locke.

22, 1940.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER

By Grace Muenchau

HOLES IN YOUR POCKETMany a man would. be rich if only someone would stop the holes in his pockets. Holes in pockets may be actual or they may be figurativ~; In either case they are sources of loss and should be mended. At one time or another we have very likely lost a coin or two through a hole in some pocket. It is irritating and somewhat tear-jerking, to find one's "coin of the realm" gone wlien he did not have the fun of spend· ing it. Such losses are trifling compared with the mental losses which slip away from us through holes in our pockets. More-0ver, it is impossible to retrace our steps to repair the damage done by our neglect. The~ opportunity for culture that es-

RUTH SANTO (mat. '30) is now Mrs. Kramer Lloyd of WinstonSalem, N. C. Clara Mooney, her roommate in 1930-31, is employed as assistant in the office of' the Lajncaster County Superintendent in Lincoln. MISS CHLOE BALDRIDGE, for· mer instructor in the Rural Department at Peru and now head of the rural section of the State School Department, visited the elementary grades last Thursday. ELEANOR El. HEMPHILL, '39, was married Oct. 12, 1940, to John P. Brooks at Holliston. Mass. •

Alumni registram;; at Homecoming included: capes for no good re9;son may be the ho!~ in our pocket. Bill Chapin, Lorene Moothart, ' • h' ' · fb d k I Th e. £1rst 111 t 1s yeat s. series o u get events too p ace John P. Heck, Ruth G. Brandt, c rte J 0 hn lasf-Tuesday riighrwhen ·Howard Pierce-·Davis war cot- Margverite P.obinson,. a r. ' son, Thelma V. Roberts, Margaret respondent and political analyst delivered his lecture "War Lorimor, Rachael Viers, Ollie Fred· erickson, Bette Schneider, Elsie over Europe, Its Repercussions in America." The word "lee· Parret, Beatrice Brown, Dorothy ture," whether budgyt event. or convoca.tion, instantly pre· Gakemeier, Rita Russell, Marie Wl.encke, Nona Palmer, M. F1orence · · ·f ff · d d d · sents to some stu d ents y1s1ons o an a air as ea an unm· Martin, Jack Floyd, Harold c. Priteresting as a. cow skull on a d~sert. Lectures are, therefore, chard, Marybeth Beckman, Merritt Jensen, Russell Bailey, Ray Lindeas widely frowned upon as final exams, and the result is that kugel, Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Johnwhen possible such ~'students'; e~cape from the audience. On son, Margaret Saville, · Lester A. Mosley, Gerald W. this same line of thought, :onsider 'the individuals 'who troop Fichter, Edwin Brecht, Stanley ·.enmasse to such\atherings and then proceed to furnish self· Sailors, . Catherine Beutler, Elizabeth Buetler, Robert Halladay, Frie-entertainment in v'arious forms,. su~h as round table discus· da Kennedy Gray, Carl Ludington, Perkins, William Saale, :sion of the World Seri~s th~ like-until the confusion reach· Dorothy Mrs. Wiley Remmers, Wiley Rem1es the speaker and it is necessary for him to say: "If anyone mers, Marvin L. Schacht, Roy J. Lively: Mr. and ·Mrs. Glen C. Sheely, is bored, will he please leave the room instead of annoy· w. s. Ray, Wauneta Ray, Mary E. ing me." , , , 1 Meister, Edward Arnold, Willes Lu. • · , ' • dington, Melba Ludington, Bernard The budget committee has been quoted 111 a recent issue Galloway, of the PEDAGOGIAN as saying, "All possible effort has Raymond "Bus" Moore, Merle Peek, Don Knapp, been inade to secure the best talent available. Each number is Darrell Lahociny, Jack R. Ashton, of a high quality .and is worthy of the time and attendance of Marjorie West, J. F. Hendricks, Ruth Sutorius, John E. Boyer, the student body." Kenneth K. Knapp, Mrs. Kenneth . A lecture delivered before a college audience is intend· Knapp, Elizabeth M. Downey, Helen . . . Holliway, Charles H. Place, Lloyd ed to be both cultural and educat10nal, and to lead one toward K. Johnson, George Armstrong, B.

o;

Bmvc.:~' troupe. Fe· three ye2.rs she Y1·as on the R.KO drcuit and tra~,'cl-

ed LhrougllouL i'orthcaslcrn Ur;ited States and in Canada. Phyllis j::an nun1bers an1ong her acqu:d1ltanc..:s ,, ,, . . _ . . nen lV.1aynarn :ma 0 ene J.-rntrey, with whom she has appea1ed on programs in Detroit and Chicago. Daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Brinson, 14 year old Phvllis Jean is ~ .sliJ'.1, vivacious girl with a quick, rnenaly s1mle. She plays a cello m the training school orchestra and a clarinet in the band. Her ambition is, of course, to be a dancing teacher and hopes someday to have her own studio.

as being snpcrior to e1an; howev tests have proved that \Vith rcga to Lec:.uty she is far interior to t mc.1e sex of the species. Artists ha c::;,taJcgucd beautiful tbin;;s as fo lO\Ys: first., n1an; second hors third, dor:;; m~d fourth, a dress, hnl: of hair ::;lued together with m:c?cr of paint-woman. 1

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eno.o. ~ne poor g -h t h' . 1 80 1 /~~ ~ '...ips to7 w 01 ·.0:,-1ea, 00 1'• e.res :oo c.o •• e t 1 t:;echer and s_louldei·s coo narr Of course, women cemnot hide the :!~::. as they are ll.ereditary blem

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As proof that woman' is closer t our hairy ancestor, the Anthro-: poid, scientists state that where man has only 125 hairs per square inch on the scalp, woman has a to· tar of 155 hairs per square inch or is 30 hairs closer to hanging from Jewell, Sam Jewell, Margart Adams a limb than man. and Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Schindler. Man is tall, darz and handsome, J. F. Hendricks of Dawson was while girls pride themselves on be· representative of the oldest class at ing short, blond and slap-happy, this homecoming. He was graduated not realizing that Venus the world's from Peru in 1909. most perfect woman, stands six feet' Frieda Kennedy Gray, who grad- three inches. uated in 1931, came from the long- It is a well known fact that man est distance. Her home is in La- is superior in intelligence. StatistiC r:mde, Ore. cians have proved that of the world over, man is 4.1 per cent more f F /. intelligent that woman. However, beauty and intelligence are not everything-{(uite. Some girls do possess some personality and a definite charm. A toast: God bless the women, nobody else will. Did you know someone in Peru f f ). carves his own violins? Making violins is his hobby. You can see his D~puty State Fire Marshall W. E. handiwork at the A.A.U.W. hobby Clement, accompanied by local fire chief, Jim Gatten, talked to the r;tushow in November. dents about fire prevention Friday, At Peru's own hobby show, each Oct. 11. person who collects cookie cutters, f f f old shawls, coins, paints portraits or scenes, constructs bird houses, On the afternoon of Friday, Oct. furniture or what-nots will have 11, the eighth grade had a pi.cnic • th B s the opportunity to display his work. a, e oy cout cabin. After games huci been plav_ ed eats wei·e S"'l'"ed. Townspeople, those living near ~ ' Peru, school children and colleze ;. J. f

November Hobby Show

Planned By AAUW

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students are all invited to contribute. No charge will be made to those wishing to enter. Mrs. Everett Good and Mrs. L. B.. Mathews will furnish entry blanks entitling the exb.ibitor to place his exhibit, and to attend the show free. Those not contributing to Peru's hobby show Wiil be charged a small admission to be used for prizes and awards. The hobby show is a community project held to arouse interest in leisure time activities and is not a money-making scheme. f

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High School Elects Officers The first week in November may be election week for the nation but last week was election week in the high school. Officers for all classes and a social committee were chooen. The senior class elected Betty Kennedy, president; Anna Burch, vice president; and Wilma Walker, secretary and treasurer. Jack Whisler was chosen president of the junior class; Clyde Hunzeker, vice president; Ward Ad· ams, secretary; and Charles H(;llning, treasurer.

Class rings will soon decorate thr: hands of 11 seniors. f

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With the junior high assisting, the b'.1g·11 ,. schoo1 h ad a pep rally Friday, Oct. 18. Lawrence Good presented a play by play description of the Tecumseh game from a diagrnm he had constructed. J.

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Steck To Participate In Omaha Convention Prof. G. Holt Steck is one of the leaders of a symposium discussion to be held in Omaha, Oct. 25, during the State Teachers Convention. "Basic Principles for the Projection of th.e Voice" will be the subject of discussion. Other members of the group are from Omaha high schools. This is a meeting of the music section of the Nebraska State Teachers Association. Prof. v. H. Jindra is president of this district. f

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'40 Peruvian Rwarded wholesome and beneficial pursuits. If you are Jetting this op- L. Goerke, Albert Skrabal, Howar9 The social committee consists of . • • Hatcher, Eula Redenbaugh, Rob- Juanita Connelly, chairman; Oscar First Class Rafo1g portumty escape, stop this hole 111 your pocket. ert Mason, Margaret Vance, Betty Deart Smith Mary Shirley JirnerBUTTON, FRESH/ElTwo hvndred and fifty-five green caps dotted the campus. Mount Oread's Greek neophytes were in the throes of an . . . . 0 nee more th e Iow Iy f ros h were ordea I lrnown as 1111trnt10n. . . . . . . . ternhed 111to meek subm1ss10n ! As their social status de· creased they became the proletariat of the campus. · · · · k h f f l For some f res.h men, m1tiat10n too t e orm o manua labor. This served a double purpose as it took care of the matter of housecleaning in preparation for Homecoming, to · f· · h l ' f say nothmg o mcreasmg t e upperc assmen s sense o superiority. Huzzahs for the green young things who.turned on their . . . .. . . personality smiles, despite this annual ordeal of combined pain and humor!

Stenglein, Art Harris, Omar Gottula, Blanche Freeman, Geraldine Burns, Wayne French, Betty Pancalrn, Eleanm· wb.nm, Eva Lee Tucker, Maxine Tucker, Vernelle Damme,. Ruth Noerrlmger, L. A. Atkms, Richar~ .· H. Turner, F1oreiee Fucmara, Tnvely, Ed . FV11gm1a L L'bh t wm a11oon, eora 1 ar ' Spencer M. Leger, Charles E. Parnell, Ralph Hopp, Martha and Harold Boatman, Wm. M. Davenport, Beulah Livingston, Jeanne Winkelman, Mr. and Mrs. Lenn T. Loken, Mr. and Mrs. Harvey E. Cole, G. E. Getes, Don J. Rose, Bernice Walker, Alice Devore Organ, Hazel Vanier, Mildred Jodry Vanderford, Iris Allen, Edith Davenport Linn, s. J. Ellenberger, Lena Hallett Ellenbergger, Enid stofl'erson, Frederick Larun, Lillian Hrunphrey, Iva Cattin

son, Arth~r Clements, Gordon Palmer and Norma Jean Parirott. Mrs. C. H. MaYsh, assistant dormitory matron, spent last week in Hous~on, Texas, visiting her brother, o. P. J!rairgrove. Leaving Saturday with her son, Oliver Marsh, a.nd his '"ife " and son sh e ret urne d h ome Friday in time for Homecomin"' activities. " ;. > ;.

First class honor rating was received by the 1940 Peruvian of last year. Out of the 50 books entered, Peru ranked ninth place. Ten books were granted the first cla~s honor rating also. Peru's book was entered in the class of small universities and larger colleges of 500 to 1,000 students.

The mascot of Peru College returns home after a long visit with the taxidermist. Two years ago the bobcat died a natural death at the age of 12 years. Since that time the mascot has been in the hands of Karl Schwarz, taxidermist in Omaha. The bobcat looks very real as he stands in the display aase on third floor of the Science Hall.

The college chemistry laboratory proved to be of much interest to the training school chemistry class Tuesday, as they were ushered about by Dr. Charles Seegmiller and student teacher Ross Russell: Dr. Seegmtller explained the variolljS devices and materials used as the group proceeded through the lab· oratory.

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PAGE THREE.

e froE1 the baci:'.'icld into the end position. l:.Ie ha::, be1::n sho,Ning up very 1vell tb.erc \Yith his ::tg;;T2scive st·de cf nlay. In tlJe l\.~:idlanci g::un2, Ha':e you ever wondered how 11~ v.:as the fello;.v w.l:o to:i:z He:1d- Fern's ail;letic Learns came to be cson's shovel pass on an end- known as Bobcats? Well, as tradi\{HEELERMEN TAKE ,, ;--~r-:.iuncl to score. t:on has it, this is how it hapFIFTH STRAlGHT fa a:tion, he is identified by the p·2ned. @ - numec als 44 on his jersey. ln 1921 a fellow by the name of He will bear watching .next spring ~alciy .Wilcox, editor of ~1e Ped a; The battling Bobcats roasted Tar2, 5 a candidate for the \rack squat. ,.hat time, started an ao1t~t10n ·~ tio·s Owl 26-0 to fe'.,ture a highly Eis specialtv is the 440. the student body to find a sm suecessful 1940 Homecoming pro· · able name and mascot for the gram. George is known about the cam- cchool. Wilcox spent Jnany sleepScoring was divided between ':JUS for his "Robert Taylor" ap~- earnnce and is nicknamed "Atty." Jess nights groping for some name Mather, Henderson, Snider and to represent the spirit, stubbornCailan in tI-!at order. Mason conness and aggressiveness displayed verted after Henderson's touchdown by all athletic organizations of the in the scco.nd period, Whizzer White JACK SNIDER, a freshie, is the campus. took a pass from Callan to top speedy understudy of Mather at Up until this time the teams Stub's six-ply counter, to wind up rig·ht half. He came from Wilber were known as the Peru Pedagogues, the scoring. high, a recipient of 12 letters for which as anyone can see is no . The fast quarter was a seesaw afhis athletic prowess in high school name for an athletic team. Late fair vlith Owl punting· keeping the one night, 'among his incoherent WheeLmen on their heels. Two of LYLE "Mase" MASON; letterman circles. thoughts, he was struck with a TEAMS WELL MATCHED Mather's punts were blocked, aiding of last year, is our heaviest man, His ability as a college gridiron great inspiration. He jumped out ·ihe Furple cause considerably. Mc- stationed at right tackle. man has been demonstrated mure of his bed and unceremoniously a. koff m an and than once. this fall, and will be m wakened his roommate to spring 1. t JntL e, game captain, intercepted a Lyle serves as k1c The Wildcats of Wayne are next pass to furnish Peru's first break, his powerful attempts seldom fail the remamder of the schedule. him. Tile name, "Bobcats," 011 for the rampaging Bobcat eleven. oniv to have Kimberlin recover a to set the opposition back deep in Snider is majoring in music. He came from the phrase, "fight like Tile game will be played Saturday fun;ble. Tarkio was held on downs, tl1cir own territory. Not only is his has won many music contests, both a bobcat," which, it seems, was one afternoon at Wayne, with a slight and Mather punted out of bounds toe powerful, but it is accurate. He as a crooner and instrumental man. of the popular catch phrases of the 0;1 the two yard line. Tarkio's kick kicks for point after touchdown and Jack is called "Chuck" for some day. The next morning it was subedge, if any, favoring Peru. Two weeks ago Wayne led the was taken by Snider and given to his average will compare with the unfathomable reason, and is a pop- jected to the vote of the students, mvthical "State League," and was Mather on a reverse and he streak- best. ular fellow. He has the rank of an who enthusiastically accepted it. favo:ed to claim tl1e N.I.A.A. flag. cu do1'vn the sidelines to score. Mas- He came to Peru from Wymore, instructor in lifesaving. rt has been used evAr since. The scene shifted abruptly, howev" qh's kick for point was blocked. the home of the noted "Zephyrs." George Hanson, graduate of '21, er, when Peru downed a strong Early in the second stanza, the He made the all-state football ,team G was teaching in Arizona in 1927. Kearney team to the tune of 20-6, 'Cats drove deep into Owl territory there, and served as' the mainstay He came into possession of a pair as Chadron upset the dope by edg- CJ' Jy to lose the ball via a fumble on the basketball squad. He will be BOB· SMITH is the boy in blue of twin bobkittens and immediately ing Wayne 6-0. on the 15 . A few plays later Hend- a man to watch in all three main who dashes out to fill in for Mac at made preparations for their shipAs far as injuries are involved, erwn raced through tackle to score. sports here. He tosses the discus a- center, on the scattered occasions ment to Peru. He wired Dean w_ both teams will be in the pink of J);Jason converted. After the kickoff, round lilrn an old overshoe, thereby that Mac is withdrawn from action. N. Delzell, to the delirium of tl1e condition, according to m l n Peru gained po~session of the ball being a cinch for the track team. He is very capable at the snapper- student bodu, , informing him of the · · f ormat·o at hand. on her own 40. They passed their In basketball, for all his weight; back post and has always proved present. Unfortunately, one of the The weight average of the start- way to Tarkio's 22, from where he gets around and will help the himself ~eliable. kittens died before he could be sent, ing lineups is even, Peru averaging He~derson flipped, a long spiral to Bobcats defend their state cro\vn Bob hails from Talmage, ranking so "Bob" came on alone. A very 1M 5 . . t w , 174 On the Smder who saumered across the this winter. ·among the best athletes ever turn- disconcerted fellow he was that ' , agams ayne s . . . , k' t 'd th , I h. h h 1 h t shoulders of Coaches All Wheeler pay stnpe. Masons ~ck wen w1 e. , ed out ere. n 1g sc oo e Friday morning, as he glared a a and Jim Morrison will rest the re- Score: Peru 19, Tark10 0. • played in the backfield but got the convocation, crowd which was ovsponsibility of getting the most out Tark!o's Burnett opened the. s~cGEORGE ATWOOD, three sport; call under Whe.eler to strengthen erly delighted with him. 0f h venly atched teams. ·.oud half by consistently dr1vmg star from Ashland high, is one of the center pos1t10n. A cage was built for him on the sue e m through the line, well into 'Cat ter- our most promising sophomores. , Smith has seen action all fall and south side of the Administration Last year the 'Cats were victor- ritory. There followed an exchange This year he has been converted appears headed for his first !'P." Building, and there he dwelt, an ious, winning 20-7, starring power- cf punts, Peru finally forcing the unwilling recipient of incessant vishouse Mmt Campbell, who is ab- Owls back, and Mather dropped a - - - - - - - - - " - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - itors, who showered their aggravatsent this year, perfect punt out of bounds on the ing attentions upon him. Could a Probable lineup.for )"eru will in- four yard line. After the Missourfellow like him, symbol of courage, elude: ians kicked out, Dougherty made it valor and aggressiveness spend all Name Wt.6 Pos. to the 15 on an end-around. Tarkio his time encouraging scatterbrain Floyd · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · "i 0 LE held, and took the down the Palmer was injured early in the blondes, daffy redheads and the 9 Organ · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 180 lSO LT field as the quarter ended. third quarter and was removed like? Well, maybe some of the felRoberts · · · · · · · · · · · '. · · · · 176 .LG In ·the final quarter, the reserves SMITH SCORES THRI GE from the game. Prep threatened lows did, Mt not old Bob. He was Mcintire · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 162 C held the Purple, and Stark plunged late in the third period but were there for business, and so at times Adams · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 206 RG consistently to set the pins up for • held for downs, and the Indians ·he was not so pleasant as he could Mason · · ·· · · · · · · · · : . . c:. 1 5 ·RT the final score. Handley passed to Coach Harold Fisher's Bobkittens kicked out. Brown hit the middle be. ' Dougherty ············· 8 RE Callan who darted into coffinof the line ·for_ 36 yards, putting the D · · 160 QB crushed Weeping Water 32 to 12 It was during his reign, that some ean · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 164 · · · corner to cross into pay dirt. Whizball on the four vard line. Two Henderson · · · · · · · · · · · · · LH zer White took Callan's toss in the Friday afternoon before a larg~ plays later Ogg sc~red on an end of the fellows sv.iped the fire siren Mather · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · l70 RH flat to make the point, winding up crowd in the college Oa.k Bowl. 'sweep,.but the play was called back. from the hated Omaha U outfit-Lantz · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · l8l FB the scoring chores for the afterweeping Water kicked off to Prep A :t;lay later Ogg scored on another how tl)at riled them up. They even The game will be broadcast ·over noon. The pistol sounded as the first and Slinker returned tile ball to the end run. Hunzeker kicked for the had the nerve to announce their intentions of retaliating by kidnapstation WJAG (1060 kilocycles) at team, back in action, was only a 3S yard line. End sweeps, plunges extra point, but it was low. Norfolk. The kickoff is scheduled h th b 11 d ping him, the mascot; but he didn't e a eep Bob Brown, who was injured in for 2 o'clock and Gene Corrigan, scant two yards from anot er and passes brought worry because the team sat up with touchdown. Final score:26-0, Peru. into Weeping Water trritory. An the fourth quarter, was remqved sportscaster, will be at the mike for Throughout tile game Tarkio held end-around play with Smith car- from the game. A pass to Smith was hiin the whole night to protect him. He did love to eat, too. The teams aThe complete description. contestplay-by-play will be a feature of the the edge in punting, but Peru cop- rying the ball was successful an.ct good for a touchdown and the pass were tasting victories all over the ped honors in the passing and Prep was ahead in the first few m1- for extra point failed. Score: 32-0. 1940 · Wayne Homecoming. state, so it was the best for him rushing department. Several heavy nute.s of the game. A pass was good The Indians opened up with too. i i i pe:ialties against Tarkio aided the for the extra point. Score 7-0. passes in the fourth quarter and He led a lonesome life, though, The brisk evening air of Oct. 15 home cause. Prep kicked off and the Weeping completed one to the one foot line. even if he did have a prince of a ~harpened the appetites of the W. PERU Pos. TAHKI.o Water Indians took the _]:)all, but A line plunge was good for a touchfellow in Billy Vance to take care A. A. members and prospective mem- Floyd 1e Kcmerlm were held for downs, and Prep ad- down. The plunge for extra point of him. He had a path two feet in bers, after their hilrn to the cabin. Organ 1t Baker vanced to midfield. Smith caught was short. width, the entire length of the A cafeteria lunch consisting of Roberts lg Folk a pass on his 30 yard- line and ran With a few minutes in the ball side of his cage, facing the timber. scrambled eggs and bacon sand- Mcintire c Rickard the remaining distance to the goal wiches, potato chips, marshmal- Adams rg Milton making the score 13 to 0.- The game remaining, Weeping Water Many times he called fruitlessly, lows and bananas was served. Mason rt Pierce plunge for extra point was short. connected with another pass for a trying in vain to call to a mate. touchdown. An attempted drop- His calls were very weird, much like Marshmallows were toasted over an Dougherty re Yorn: Score: 13-0. a woman's scream. qb D 1 kick was unsuccessful. open fire. Dean L Smith recovered a fU!llble after Coach Fisher, the team and back- Then once he got loose, and did Christine Wilkinson and Elaine Henderson lh o·ne:vis Cotton hit an Indian back hard and ers of the team will feel the. loss. of he throw a scare into some silly Brier were chosen team captains Mather rQ ,;nen f ll for the hitCpin tournament. Lantz fl, Steincamp the pins were set up ~or another Bob Brown deeply, as the star u - skirts! The whole outfit took to setouchdown, but the Kittens were back suffered a broken bone m the clusion till he was captured and ®llillilllillil~®l1lll1ll~!lillill~~~·flj)~~~llillill ~'illl~lliill:llliID11llJ:ill~£fil~i penalized 15 yards. A pass from the wrist which will probably put him caged again. i\<1 On the evening of May 20, 1933, ll>I 30 yard line put Prep in position out for the remainder of_ the seas!jj) DR. G. H. JODER ~ to score .again, and the first quarJ.P. CLARK old Bob died. A sad day indeed it -Physician and Surgeon- ~ ter ended. on.The lineups: was for the school. His spirit, Electric Shoe Shop ~ Pos. Weeping Water thoug·h, is still with us, and it all!Jl Another 15 yard 'penalty hurt the Peru Ii:: le Patterson ways will be. A fine fellow he was, ~ Prepsters on the first play of the Smith :t Shoe Repairs of All Kinds Speck and deserving of our everlasting ~ second quarter. Gordon Palmer ad- Whisler 1t lg Freeman tribute. ·liilliilliilliil§liilliilliilliillii1§§§1iiJrg;liiJig:§i1l! vanced the ball deep into Indian Henning --~,..- · §lii11iilliil:illlii111.illii111.illii11iil§lii11ii11iillii11ii11ii1fll:lll' . territory on an'th end sweep. lfil!llliilliillii111Jlliillii111.illiil~i1.illl!J,;,:l!;ll].!lJfiljj] d dTwo Redfern c Shoemaker @11lJ!llJ[g)flj)flj)i1lJi1lJ[ij]flj)li;J'ilJ[[@Jl:i19il.mm;~[gj:g:llJrn flj) flj) f;J plays later Sm1 score . on a ou- Cotton rg Lawrence lt!l l1!J rt Thomas ~ We Call For And Deliver ~ PERU BOWLING 161 iSl P R t. n ble reverse and Ogg plunged for the Hunzeker llll CLUB llll '" eru ecrea 10 @ t . t Slinker re Van Avery 11;1 Keep Your Business At Home ~ l!!J ~~ flj)exrapom. ~ • [ijJ 11'1 -Ladies Welcome at All Tunes ~ POOL AND SNOOKER 11.il Smith was injured a few plays Clements qb Power i!!l PERU CLEANERS ~ Ben Hanlon Mgr. ,, later and was replaced by Brown. Palmer hb Jergesson Phone ~ 62 M. G. Heuer, Owner [gj ll otto Boellstorff, Prop. 151 Ogg returned a punt to the 15 and Ogg hb Fitzpattrick ~

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1940.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE FOUR.

'"Petrified Forest" Presented For Grads BY DR. A. L. BRADFORD The Peru Dramatic Club submitted its first work of the year last Saturday night with a production of Robert E. Sherwood"s celebrated play, "The Petrified Forest." The play must be written down a distinct success and a pleasant augury of dramatic things to be. A large audience of college drama patrons and Homecoming celebrants received the play most favorably. And well they might. Here was theatre worth all it cost in toil and trouble, and in a play of the structure and thematic weight of "The Petrified Forest," there is plenty of both. The choice of the Sherwood drama was most fitting. The press of international events and the consequent widespread disilliusion and pessimism give this play an unusual appositeness at the present time. Whether or not the higher human values are so important in the face of mindless brutality as Mr. Sherwood seems to suggest, "The Petrified Forest" does provacatively mirror the macabre expectations of many thoughtful persons today. Moreover the Dramatic Club in this latest production has demonstrated that it is not afraid to tackle drama of brutal realism with disconcerting intellectual suggestions to boot when that drama is significant as art. That "The Petrified Forest" is good entertainment none who saw the play can doubt. To those to whom it is given to construe its often enigmatic implications it is considerably more than that. To repeat, tne product10n was first rate. The cast from top to bottom was a good one. Dean Karr as Alan Squier, the disillusioned sophisticate, gives a credible portrait of one who is spiritually at the end of his rope. Although Squier was a shade more emotional than I would have him, it is consistent throughout and evocative of real interest. Margery Kinsey's Gabby Maple. daug·hter of a filling station p:wrielor, was rJn acceptable, though not quite sufficiently lyrical, embodiment of the sensitivity and idealism in which the frustrated Squier can no longer believe. L 1o yd Dunlap, as Boze Hertzlinger, plays convincin;;ly the simple ex-foo~b&ll star and clumsy lover of Gabby in whom Sherwood incarnates natural impulse with which to oppose the sophistication of Squier and the yearning for it in Gabby. James Sandin's Duke Mantee was one of

Herbert Petr~e

Budget Committee To Present White Hussar Ensemble The White Hussars, a symph,6nic sa, and has made concert tours with ensemble, will appear here on Oct. some of the leading bands of Amer29 as the second event presented by ica. During the summer he conthe budget committee. Under the ducts the Petrie Band Camp at Widirection of Herbert Petrie, this en- nona Lake, Ind., for young musisemble features a quil..itette in brass, cians. an opera tic tenor, a soprano, a harp The ensemble has appeared here soloist and an instrumental soloist. three times in the ~ast, and Jrns Each artist is a soloist as well a.s been exceptionally we11 received, aca member of the ensemble and all cording to ProL A. J?. Clayburn of are attired in white and gold hus- .the budget c6inmittee. 1'The precissar uniforms. ion and snap wi,tl;t whioh the proDirector Petrie was at oµe time a gram moves along i:o;. pl\)asing to the cornetist with the Naval Battalion eye," said Mr. Clayburn, "and the Band, directed by John Philip Sou- qmility of the "music is .WR?rior."

Student Speaks-·-(contl.11ued f1·om page one) and what they stand for suggested that any one connected with Col. 't t · 1 d"d umb1a w10 i n agree wi h him t t ge ou · The PEDAGOGIAN .filas been extended an invitation to participate in conducting the Student Opinion Surveys of America sponsored by the University of Texas. The point isn't whether students . are qualified to judge on national and international policies. In a democracy the majority rules-right or wrong. Unless somethfug unforseen happens the next column will consider what the students think our policy should be in regard to the Far East. There is still an open invitation to .anyone interested enough to write a line or two for the column. ,. ,. ;..

Miller Heads Dramatic Club Gail Miller will be the new president of the Dramatic Club thi~ year. The offlee of vice president was filled by Nancy Ellen Jones. The offices of secretary and treasurer went to Betty Katherine Cole and Lloyd Dunlap, respectively. While the election of officers was the main issue of this meetmg, the members set Oct. 22 as the date fer their future picnic.

ated a bit. Some of the players, and particularly Mr. Karr, did not speak loud enough and many lines were lost to those of the audience beyond the first rows. There were pleasant exceptions, the lines

Men Get Etiquette Tips

1940 Call for Red Cross Recruits

Tbe 1940 Poster of The American Red Cross sounds the call to the nation to serve humanity within the ranks of this army of mercy.

KEEPING step with the boys called to tho colors in Amorica's new defense army and navy, will be the Ameriwn Red Cross, fulfilling its mission of scnice to the men in the line ancl to faeir loved ones at home, Chairman Nor· man H. Davis a!mounced in Wash· ington. "Several thousand Red Cross nurses already have been called to the colors," illr. Davis said, tand Red Cross field directors, and thou· sands of Red Cross workers in Chapters throughout the nation, are ready to help America's soldiers and sailors with personal problems, just as in the 1917-18 World War period. "Every patriotic man and woman in the United States, who wants to do his or her share in upholding the national defense of our nation, can

Mrs. Inice Dunning was the guest spea1rnr a t Y.M.C.A. on Tuesday, oct . 15 . Her su b.iect was "Etiquette for Men." the most satisfying· interpretations Bob Ashton pla11ed the piano, 0 of that role that I have seen. The while Bob Williams led the singing. bitterness of the man, the 1·mpei·-

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turbable egotism of the outlaw are communicated with much skill. Carroll Jones as Jason Maple, father of Gabby and boisterous patriot, was outstanding in the cast for his exceptional command. of techni'que. He will bear watching 1·n the future. Warren Bollmeier as Gramp Maple did a splendid piece of character work, keeping the relation. of his character to the main action at all times eminently correct. All the others of a large cast play capably and revealed an 1·ntel1ectual grasp of the characters and the_ drama_ that has come to be assoc1ated with the direction of-Prof Robert D. Moore. · The action of the play. was on the whole marked by prec1s10n and revealed painstaking direction. Although the cast was large the effeet of crowding was avoided and a fluid shifting of stage groupings secured. The difficult climactic scene in which the theme of the play must be expressed against a background of physical confusion was splendidly managed and showed a highly mformed direction throughout. The play, I thought, lacked something of accent in the latter stages of the • .A l" fj t 1rs ac t·, s1gm11cant mes and business not being sufficiently pointed om. The second act was on the whole crisper and more direct. aithouo·h the tempo might have be~n acce1:i·-

Debij t FOr, Marc h•mg Ban d ' Resplendent in flashy blue and white . West Point uniforms, the marchmg band performe~ between halves at the Homeconung game, Saturday afternoon in the college Oak Bowl. With a blare of trumpets and the ruffle of drums, the band made a spectacular and colorful entrance th h th th ts roug e nor goa1 pos · While an apprecitaive audience looked on the band formed the let1ier "T" and played the Tarkio College song, and immediately following this, in a "P" formation, the Color Song. After an excellent display of rhythrnic routine the band halted in concert for~atid,n before the crowded stadium. Prof. V. H. Jindra, in a new white uniform, directed the concert number, "Stars and Stripes Forever."

Following the crowning of the ;.. f.. ,. Gridiron Queen, the band marched Art students may now furnish off the field. any form of art for either an Omf ;.. Iaha or a Lincoln exhibit. Men Register for Conscri•ition , One exhibit wiE be the Liltcoln Required to register under the Artist Guild display at Lincoln Oct. 27 to Nov. lO. The other is the Six conscription law were 61 of the colStates Exhibit ul Joslyn Memorial lege men. Oct. 16 was the date for in Omaha from Oec. 1 to Dec. 31. registration.

of Carroll Jones, Warren Bollmeier and Nancy Henderson being pleasantly intelligible at all times. The setting was of the simple but highly effective type that is charHcteristic of the work of the club.

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do so by sharing in the vitally im· portant work of the Red Cross. Join as a member of the locc,l Chapter, during the roll c2.ll, November 11 to 30, and through your sup;Jort you. will strengthen the Red Cro:;s army of mercy. "Recruits are 1weded not alone as members, hut also as volunteer workers in tile i"ed Cro;;s Chap· ters." Red Cross work will continue nncliminished in its usual domestic program of relief in disaster; com· munity public health nursing; safe· ty education and promotion of the Junior Red Cross. An individual membership supports all of thfs work, not only in Red Cross Chap· ters, but in the nation. Relief to war victims in Europe is financed by the $20,000,000 war relief fund contributed by the public during the summer of 1940.

w·ith t he News ong

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who answered the question opposed

Collegians Hear YWCR Plans Program Sadie Hawkins Day Celebrated wh•tI e H.ussars For Vesper-Xmas Rffairs nMt nMn nuaI yw-ymcarn.1vaI

it. Thirteen felt, for one reason or another, that such naval action Thanksgiving Vesper services and would be advantageous, if not neetwo Christmas pageants .to be preessary, for American security. sented in the college auditorium The White Hussars, a symphonic The history of American diplom- ensemble, was presented on Oct. 29 were plan~ed at a joint session of acy in the Far East is a bit depress- by th e bud get commio ·•tee. ·the devotional drama and music ing but. interesting. Its origin can. Under the direction of Herbert commissions held during the Y.W. be placed as early as the 18th cen- Petrie, the ensemble consisted of a C.A. meeting Tuesday evening, Oct. 29 tury. For our purpose, it began Aug. brass quintette, an operatic tenor, · 12, 1898, when United States took a soprano, a piano soloist and an The devotional cor:imission under the Philippines. imtrumental soloist. the leadership of Juanita West, The date of the Philippine pur- foch member of the ensemble chairman, will plan the Thankschase, as Americans like to call it, .vore a white and ,;old hussar uni- giving services, v:hile the drama marked the beginning of American : r:n, and special lighting efl:ects commission led by Wilma Parnell, interest in the Far East. Secretary vie•. t; used during the progra:::. and the music group, directed by of State Hay, in 1899 and 1900 dis- );'catured soloists with th~ ~r0up i\iaryon Thomas, will concentrate patched to the major world powers wt·1e Helen Terry, soprano, v:anda en the Christmas programs. the "Open Door" notes. These CGrti, riano soloist, and Henry ~he creative leirnre· group, headnotes were so worded that, if all tae, Thomr.~on. operatic tenor. ed by Carolee Garver, discussed powers abided by them, the in- · /.. /.. /.. fm Lher plans for the Y.W. carnival. tegrity and open door Of China Tl:e proceeds from this project are would be guaranteed. 0 used to send deleg2tes to the reAt this same time the small coun-. gim1al conference helct in Estes try of Japan was steadily increasing Park each summel'. in power. In 1905 she surprised the Devotionals were led by Mary world in her success in the Russo- . "What About Willie?" This ques- Olive Richardson, program chairJapanese war. 'Til this time Ameri! ti~n was answered by Miss Ellza~ man. Mary Collin, president, cancans had sympathized with Japan, beth McColl um. at the Wednesday ducted a short Jusiness meetiug but the peace of Portsmouth, dictat- A.A.U.W..book ~eview. and led the song "ervice, · assisted ed by President Theodore Roosevelt, This ·children s book by Le Grand Ly Harriet MaxweJ. piand. was indicative of the sudden change tells of . Willle, . a homel:s.s. kitten. 1 J. /.. in attitude. The terms of the treaty Crayon illustmt10!:s o: Wlllle·s. adfavored Japan's antagonist, Russia. rnhtures by Mrns Gercrude Nickol. son, an early elementary maJor, With Japan's rise to power Umted were shown with the review of the States: viewed oriental diplomacy book. with even more concern. The Root- "Poogie and Sybilla," the second Takahra Agreement; Knox Neutral- book reviewed by Miss Mccollum, ization Plan and the Taft _Knox was written by Miss Nita Van HouConsortum were all pla_ns mstigated sen, a former Peru student. Poogie Rose McGil.mis, PEDAGOGIAN for the purpose of mamtammg _the was a dog who could read and edator; Dean Kan, PERUVIAN status quo and open door m Chm,a .. Sy.billa a cat who thought deep editor; LeRoy Eedfern, business Umted States went. at '.great thoughts that should have been manager; Harold Dallam, staff length to preserve the mtegrity of thought day before yesterday. member, and Prof. Robert D. Moore China and. to keep her ports open /.. > > will attend the annual Collegiate for ~r~de. What was her mot~ve? Dunnin Gives Men Pointers Press Convention in Detroit, Mich.,

mcc. II um Rev1ews . Book R. . RR uwm . t eetmg

Publications Group To Detroit ·meet

;:!~!:ti~s;_~t~:"i~:::t::tt~"~~~~t"();;"·Citi~l:YC~n1pU~Mafiners"~·~~~~~::i~~n~~~·tentative plans, the

---------~---

Photos For Peruvian Taken 'Til Nov. 20 Straighten those ties, get those hairdresser's appointments, write home and tell the folks-the 1941 PERUVIAN is on the march. Monday, Nov. 4, the staff photographer from Auburn started taking pictures for the class panels of the 1941 PERUVIAN. The time allotted to .the taking of pictures is starter this year so the cooperation of everyone who plans to have his picture appear in the book is going to have to be solicited. Pictures will be taken every :Mon d a y a n d Thursday afternoon through Nov. 20. Appointment slips are out now and all you hal'e to do i.s sign your n8me on the lin8 opposite the time that is most convenient to you. The pictures will be taken in the Peruvian office located on the second floor cf the Auditorium. $1.50 is required, of w;hicl1 75c goes to the photographer and 75c goes to the engraver. This insures your picture in YOUR class panel and any organization panel of which you are a member. Why not make this EVERYBODY'S year and have your picture taken early to a void the last minute rush? Pictures live for years. Will yours be among the 1941 PERUVIAN pages? . /.. /... ..J:

Dogpatch Hollar folks put on their brightest bows, shined their freckles and "unmattressed" the corn crop proceeds for the Y. W. C. A.'s Sadie Hawkins Carnival Saturday, Nov. 2. Dancing to the Kickapoo Joy Jammers and high-timing it at the concessions in Skunk Hollar and Pineapple Junction was climaxed by the election of Edna Mae Peterson as t.he "gal what could run the fastest" and Harold Dallam (imposterin' as Marryin' Sam) as the "man to fit the chair." Y. W. President Mary Elizabeth Collin awarded sacks of popcorn which she indicated to be symbolic of their appearance. As the Skunk Hollar orch played "Kickapoo Juice Barrell Polka" Hawkinsus and relatives Granci Marched p~;;t judges on the lookout for the most appropriately dressed pair. Mary Olire Richardson, alias Marryin' Sam, presented to Edna Mae Peterson a corn cob pipe and to Dean Karr, alias Lonesome Polecat, a jug of Kickapoo Juice. The Reverend, in black tails, plaid shirt; am.ct stripE\>d socks solemnly pronounced them man and wife over the neglected Dogpatch Bible,"Webster's Simplified Dictionary".

than" any of th~' powets to whom Do you sing wn~n you eat your group will be gone one week. the Open_ Door note~ were sent soup, or call the girl friend at 7:25 /.. .f. /.. The 42 milllon she did .have m- for a 7 :30 date? . ve~ted was aess ~han three per cent These q~estions were discussed by NOV. 2 PREVIEWS of her foreign mvestment. Exports Mrs. !nice Dunnirlg in her talk, AT CONVOCATION were Jess .than one per. cent, an.d ''.Caril.put Etiquette" itt men's con. t 1 th t t f ' · Dogpatch citizer:s invaded convo1mpor_ s ess an_ wo per cen "'Jen, · ' " tio·n, Monday, Oct"• 28. cation on Friday morning, Nov. I. T h e f'irst Sunday a ft ernoon musiAmen~an totals in 1914 · · .. A challenge was, issued .to the With Mary Olive Richardson in cale\ is to be held Nov. 10 in the In view of these facts •. mast lils- men to send· three rep'resenf~ tives charge, notorious characters of the Music · Ha11 au d't · i ormm. torians ·of the field are convinced to speak to the girls on what the h comic strip were presented. Perusingers will make their 1940tha t th e_ mora1 e1ement h ad .t e J:>oys expe.cted from . the fominir..e greatest mfluence on the American side of the campus: · Bob Willams as "Li'l Abner" made '41 debut at this time. Max Manipdlicy. Kipling's "White Man's Bur- This delegation is to be appoint- a hurried entran·:e with Beatrice fold will be the soloist. den" is given considerable credit as ed by Jack Mcintire president of Fulton as "Daisy Mae," and Betty The instrumental trio composed an influencing factor. The belief the Mens Club. ' Cole as "Sadie Hawkins," close at of Margery Evans, piano; Jeanne at that time was that America was /.. ;. /.. his heels. The leap:n' McGulp sis- Spier, violin; and Rachel Wieneke. the perfect nation and. it was her ters, "Frightful" and "Fruitful" cello, will also make its first campus duty to civilize the world. were present and portrayed by Mar- appearance. In the past 40 years America's gery Kinsey and Nancy Henderson. The piano department will be refundamental policy towar~ the orLloyd Dunlap was "Hairless Joe" presented by soloist, Echo Elaine lent hasn't changed materially. The with his mop of long white hair Lum. An added attraction will be Washington Naval Conference, 1921 Miss Nona Palmer and Marjorie and jug of Kickapoo Joy Juice. Hi:o an alumni guest performer. -1922, provided for the extension of west s~rprised Commerce Club pal, "Lonesome Polecat" was played Everyone is invited to attend. the "Open Door". In 1931 Secretary members with Hallowe'en party by James Steele, and James Sandin /.. , /.. /.. of State Stimson unsuccessfully pro- at the regular meeting Tuesday as "Pa Hawkins". posed co-operatio.n in preventing night. Preceeding the Dogpatch skit a Japan from upsetting the status quo Election of officers was the chief short rally and a concert was preby taking Manchuria. In the past purpose of the business meeting. sented by the marching band in year United States has taken eco- ,Sarene Hauptman will serve as uniform with James Crawford dinomic steps against the Asiatic ag- president; Faye Bouse, vice presi- recting. gressor, Japan. Whether or not our dent; Elvera Schacht, secretary; Following the beat of Maestro /.. J. /.. purpose has changed, the pplicy is and Ernla Meier, treasurer. Warren Bollmeier, Tecumseh, the the same. Upon arriving at the meeting, BESSIE VEDDER DIES college dance orchestra made its Looking back over ·this American each member was marked by wear- IN AUTOMOBILE CRASH debut of the 1940-41 season at the diplomacy it appears as if. we are ing his name written backward. Roll hour dance on Wednesday, Oct. 30. fighting a loosing battle. Morally call was · answered by repeating Bessie Vedder, Firth, was l:iiled Veterans returning to the swing in ,Un automobile accident near correct, yes, but for all practical these oddities. scene are: Jim Crawford, Jim Sanpurposes our actions have not only Entertainment consisted of bob- Martel, on Thursc.ay, Oct. 24. din and Hubert Hunzeker, brass; Miss Vedder enrclled at Peru this been foolish but dangerous. The bing for apples and puzzles on drummer Cecil Walker; and Clair tall as a freshman, but had left few million our wealthy control in parts of the typewriter. The room Callan and Janet Harris on saxoChina surely wasn't and still isn't was appropriately decorated with Dchool on Wednesday preceding the phones and clarinets. New recruits accident because of illness. worth the' lives of thousands of our black cats and jack o'lanterns. are Dale Howard and Freddie Drex/.. /.. j. youag Americans. Refreshments of fresh apple cider ler, freshmen, and Bill Brooks. The .situation in Europe makes and doughnuts were served at the Girls Discuss Formal Grace Muenchau assists Warren even more important that we stay close of the meeting. Bollm~ier at the piano. At Monday Convocation out 'of the Far East. Germany is /.. /.. /.. ~~..,·~?:!Wi"W'-:·-,;=.;:;"~h,v,.-.,,rr,.;yJ:::::·ni:?· ... -·;;;;~z~ /.. /.. /.. surely more of s, possible_ threat Young Citizens Selected Grace Muenchau, president of Gamma Chi, presided at girls' con- CCA HEARS LECTURE than Japan .and though it. wol.M be To Represent High School unwise to pick a fight with either vocation held in ~he auditorium Father J. F. Hennessy, sponsor of it would be even more foolish to Mary Shirley Jimerson, Arthur :Monday, Oct. 28. fight them both. Clements, Bob Brown and Donna Piano selections were played by C.C.A., spoke to the club about Several of the students put it Steffen were representatives from Margery Evans and Echo Elaine prayer and religious instruction at a meeting on Oct. 22. well in saying the "White Man's ;peru in the young citizens contest Lum. Burden" is, to put it in slang, pure sponsored by the American Legion Informative ta[{S on the Fall Rosemary Tiehen and Edna Mae bunk and it is about time we started held in Auburn Saturday, Oct. 19. Formal were given by Jan et Hani.s Peterson will lead the discussiou at looking out for Uncle Sam first. Results have not yet beeh disclosed. and Grace Muenchau. the meeLing to lle held on Nov. 5.

Sunday musicale Scheduled nov. ·10

°

• DALLAM, KARR,

0

Hauptman Elected Prexy At Commerce Club Party a

PSTC Dance Band Plays For Wednesday Nite Swing

PETERSEN RECEIVE NOVEL PRIZES

Legitimate swing was laid aside and dancers did the "Virginia Reel" while Mrs. Emile Kirk chorded with the band on "Turkey in the Straw". General Chairman Carolee Garver saw that fun-seekers were provided variety in frivolity. At the Bingo stand, prepared by Ruth McDonald, Christine Alger, Marjorie Wischmeier, and Audrey Zastera, the bunch "got corney with Salomey". In the west room, one of Harriet Maxwell's signs read, "If vou can't catch a man running, fish "for him", so those attracted by Nina Kanel' s and Betty Harphan's concession dangled for trinkets. The "General Store" in charge of Inez Longfellow and Marjorie Moore handled confetti, feathered derbies and novelties. Lucky gamblers won Collin-made chrysanthemum boutonnieres as they 'made ringers at Emma Rosicky's and Mary Horton's jar rubber stand. Communication in the Mardi gras atmosphere was by means of telegrams delivered for 2c anywhere in "Music Hall County" by Wilma Parnell. Those curious about the pardner they'd catch patronized Katharine (Continued on page four)

Calendar TUESDAY, NOV. 5 YMCA, YWCA, CCA ... 7:00 THURSDAY, NOV. 7 Freshlnlen c;Iubs ........ 7-9 FRIDAY, NOV. 8 Epsilon Pi Tau party .... 7:00 Scholarship Club Party . 7: 00 Dramatic Club Business Meeting ........ 11:30 a. m. SATURDAY, NOV. 9 Peru VS. Ft. Hays at Ft. Hays, Kans. MONDAY, NOV. 11 Sigma Tau Delta Banquet .................. 6:30 Kindergarten - Primary Club .................. 7-8 Epsilon Pi Tau .......... 7-8 Lambda Del1a Lambda .. 7-8


PAGE TWO.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

Published Weekly by The Peru State Teachers College Peru, Nebraska

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER

5, 1940.

ffien! How To Get Coveted Invite I Want To Be A Captain To Formal With Least Effort

Elliott Roosevelt recently joined "You are invited to attend THE trip her as she comes down the the army and was given an honor• FORMP_L Saturday, Nov. 16, met steps; somewhere giYe her before" that "haven't we ary captaincy and a 1pencil pushing Entered· at the' Postoffice at Peru, Nebraska, as Secon d FALL line-(it's 1940." job back of the lines, although he Class Matter. $1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc Fellows, this coveted scrap of pa- old but ft stiil works occasionally); lacked the required training. per can be youn if you follow the have someone introduce you-(this . r.dvice of this article. method is almost archaic now); I'd like to be a captain, yes I would R i\i G . · ...... · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·: · · · · Editor · theMac's best method ask her to go girls over ose l ' c mms . . Of course you_ should have. start-. to for a hamburger-al! In the quartermaster corps, if I Maryon Thomas .......................... Assistant Ed1t01 ed your aampa1gn. for a bid two love to eat. could. My heart, it doesr.'t flourish Bill Brooks ....................... •.......... Sports Editor i~onths ago. But smce procrast1~- After you've met, you should waste 0 With a g·allant type of courage Melvin McKenney ................ Assistant Sports Editor ~~~~ f~i;~e :d~~e ~a:;us~ait 1;~fno tim e.. Broach thte subject of the So I'd like to be with Elliott, safe R d 1 orma sugestions m a1mos and good. Meredith Jimerson · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Copy ea er highly. probable that a few of you These may any help: manner. casualNina Kane! ............................... . Proof Reader are without even a prospect of a ly remark what a swell orchestra is M. Florence Martin ........................... · .. bid. . . . playing for the affair; wistfully Oh, the battle front I'd rather not be near Adviser It 1s for you L1en, that this sure comment that you are dying to go; fire method is proffered. inquire wh~t color formal she plans And the rifle fire I do not want to Reporters: Milton Schulz, Margery Kinsey, LeRoy Redfern, First pick a likely girl, that is, to wear; or say in a bold manner, hear. . Betty Miller, Mona M.orelock, Jean Haith, Janet Harris, one who you are fairly certain will "How about taking me to the forWhen they holler, "Hell'~ a poppin'." attend the formal, even with you. ma!, kid?" Jeanne Spier, Myrton Hall, Phyllis Wilberger, Dorothy This is a little difficult without a You shouldn't have to repeat this And the soldiers start a droppin' Armstrong, Lantz, Ardis Carmine, Virginia King, directory. Perhaps you could spend procedure more than three times Then I want to be with Elliott in H. the rear. 1 M arione · · F'd t a profitable hour or so at some van- before you strike pay dirt. Total Ruth Stoneman, Sarene auptman, ermu z, tage point, such as the library expendi'tui·e ·f "OU use the ham. 1 0 0 Tod Hubbell, burger method, should not exceed Let the ahead. · Anselm Johnson, · Jac k IM c I ntyre, Emma R • steps. ' privates do the tightmg up sicky, Elvera Schacht, Isabel· Tynon, Bill Zurbrick, LeRoy Next, you must meet the girl. 30 cents. Let the battlefield be covered gory Durst, Ralph Locke. ' There are several ways: you could Here's to your success. red.

Ha~old

When the cannons start a roarin,, aid Duryea, Grand Island; Ruth And the blood, it starts a pourin' Osborne, Adams; Holly Osborne, The fact that Americans do not appreciate the advanPeru; Chloe Baldridge, Lincoln; Then I'd rather be with Elliott than be dead. tages which they enjoy as ::imericans, is not a recent idea. Yet Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Hayward, Peru; .:'::h:l Beyer, D2Witt; Russell BailBy Grace Muenc!zau many individuals are· of the belief that since these privileges ey, Fairmont; and Mary Gray Oh, we'll make two gallant captains, 6.tc;;enbien, Ashland. don't you fear, have existed, they wiM continue to exist. Possibly that was Ralph Williarr.s, '26, was elected to The following attended the re- Because both of us, we hold our the opinion held by the people of various European nations lives so dear. the teaching st2,fl' at Proctor, Minn. ception held at Hotel Fontenelle in Let the dough boys guard the Williams will teach industrial arts Omaha on Thursday: Lucille White before the preseilt-day dictators took. over. and Jean Wilson, Omaha; Viola front. and mathematics. How many citjzens awakened on this November 5 to the Weatherfield, Auburn; Arlene LamLet them bear the battle's brunt, Wm. Chapin, '38, recently comrealization that votin,g, as yet, remains an American's privil· pleted training at the National bert, Nemaha; C. L. Lindstrom and And well be two g·anant captains in the rear. Scllcol of AeronaLtics, Kansas City, R. T. Benford, Peru; J. Larson, ege?, Of the ,200 or more students qualified to vote in this Mo:' He is now employed at Stinson Farnam; A. V. Larson, Peru; Wil-Bill Brooks Iimn Dunn, Leshara; Robert D. colle~e, how many' cast a ballot today? Aircraft Co., Naslwille, Tenn. Moore, B. K. Baker, Norma DiddcI, At the State Teachers Conven- w. B. Thorson, Charles Seegmiller, Gail Miller, junior, prominent acj. tion in Wyomir.g Oct. 17 and 18, Victor H. Jindra, s. L. Clements, tivities man, has withdrawn from .J. .J. eight Peruvians attended the reeep- Arthur Jones, Elma I. Gockley, Ed- P.S.T.C. and will enter the National tion 'held at C::tsper, Wyo. They na Weare, Grace JNI. Peterson, Dr. School of Aeronautics, Kansas City, 'ILLUMINATIONwere Mayre T&.ngeman, Riverton; and Mrs. Castle Brown, G. Hoit Mo., this week. ;. ;. Marjorie Stephenson, Thermopolis; Steck, Mr. and llfrs. A. L. Hill, Mr. A string trio composed of Jeanne Lead,1 kindly light, amid the encircling gloom, Jeanne Burgner, Savary; "Bo" Co- and Mrs. w. R. Pate, Ida Mae well, Wheatland; Harvey Michaels, Brackney, J. A. Jimerson, Eperva Spier, A1argery Evans and H.achel Lead thou me on Greybull; Ben Sheldon and Wayne Weare, Dr. and Mrs. A. L. Brad- Wieneke 'played several number at The night:is dark, lead thou me on. Burney of Glendo. ford, Grace Tear, William T. Miller, tile Omaha reception. ,L ,L ). The following attended the recep- L. B. Mathews, Mrs. c. H. Marsh, Keep 'ti1ou my feet; I do not ask to see Ed Wiltse, former Peruvian, was tion held at Lincoln in the Hotel c. A. Huck, Ralph Chatelain, IsoThe distant scene; eleven steps enough for me. Cornhusker during Nebraska State bel Mason, Nona Palmer, Blanche a campus visitor Nov. 2. Wiltse attends the Nationa.I Schooi' of AeroTeachers Convention: Elizabeth (Continued on page fourJ Glosser, Crab Orchard; Mr. and nautics, Kansas City, Mo. More specifically, the eleven steps which must be en· Mrs. Harold Boatman, Nebraska

DID YOU VOTE?

,.

· I an d count1ess -'COuntered by over 200 dormitory gir dividuals who attend campus events after sundown.

s

· 0 th er Ill·

City;Wagoner, Dr. A. L.Lincoln; Bra:Jford,Mary Peru; HileMusa man, Mrs. W. E. Pate, Robert D. · l' h Moore, Marie Faulhaber, all of PeA long-felt need was realized recently when a ig t was ru; S. G. Caulk Reynolds; Nao:ni installed at this point. Abe Lincoln, in his day, was uncom- Meyer, Reynolds; Mr. and Mrs. • b ut 1940 d ar kness · ex- Harvey Cole, Nebraska City; Mr. P lainin" of his fireplace illumination, 5 • d and Mrs. A. L. Hill, Peru; A. L. . ceeds the bounds of reason by several parallels of latitu e. Biehn, Fairbury; William T. Speich, forget all those times when you cautiou.sly took Stockman; Mabe: R. Smith, David . d City; Ruth Patterson, Reynolds; twelve steps when there were but eleven, or more isastrous, Ruth Place, Lincoln; Kenneth took ten steps when were eleven to trip down. Dispense Knapp, Sterling; Ruth G. Brandt, with your eye-seeing dog. ,With head upright, and sure of Marjorie West and J. A. Jimerson, Peru; Betty Brunt, Byron; Mr. and foot, procede campusward. . , . . Mrs. J. W. Tyler, Peru; William The pedestrian who now proceeds by mght via the h· Saale, Blue Springs; Charles Hinb t kee a long face Jong. Be the weather fair or man, Wymore; Mr. and Mrs. rary canl!o P . . George Grossoehme, Odell; Ethel 1.11 freezing we shall tread the same steps with 6.0 watt umm- Long McMastin, Ruth Fjellin, Leo

Cal~ly

ther~

ation.

SADIE HAWKINS DAY-

1 ,, . "L'f new minor na· P.S.T.C. celebrated what e terms a tional holiday, Nov. 2. S d . H k' Day as you may know has become an a 1e aw ms ' 11 15" ' nd universities . f h l d' annual event m many o t e ea mg co e es a . . 111 throughout the country. This event, based on an amusmg • . . h well known comic strip "Li'l Abner" by Al cident m t e . . 0 f th Capp which runs in almost 500 leadmg newspapers e nation, started two years ago at the University of Tennessee. h et aside a week wherein girls might lawfully Students t ere s . h t bag boys. The penalty for capture was not so gnm t a exacted by the "historic" Sadie who demanded marriage. T .he parhc1pan · · t s o f the modern Sadie Hawkins day fes· 1 . h l · b ti vi ties reverse etiquette and ordam that t e ma .e species e wooed by the questing female. The boy-flees-glfl theme of . H ,k' D declares the female chase to be legal for Sadie a"lo> ms ay a day. Any gal whut didn't make a killin' this' Sadie Hawkins Day sho' should fee l morh 1e . 'f' d

~s

Indians Rnd Gold-Rush memories Told By Former Old Resident Amidst I,ndian fights, claim jumpers, gold rushing and early river rampagings, James Herold was born and raised. As one of the old settlers of the early west, his life was exciting a_nd crammed with experiences. Mr. Herold, is the father of Mrs. A. V. Larson, wife of the industrial arts professor, a~d is vi~it~ng ~hem at the present tune. D1stmgmshed in appearance, he is a familiar fig-

an old box stove, five feet long. Here they sold everything: including groceries, seven-year old whiskey at $1.50 per gallon, gun powder-which, by the way, reminded Mr. Herold of a joke he played on a mooching Indian who always filled his pipe from the tobacco keg, gratis. One day the redskin came in as usual, lumbered over to the tobacco keg to fill his pipe. It was not long before he was seen run-

M. Hauptman, all of Lincoln; Ruth Ul'e on the campus and can often ning and yelling from the store, Graves, Barneston; Etta Neunam- be seen seated on one of the bench- brushing bits of corn cob from his ber, Gilead; Arlene Hermer, Ches- es reading his paper. £ace. ter; John Bath anC. Elmer W. Her- Mr. Herold was born 81 years ago When questioned about his hobtel, Lincoln; S. L. Clements, Peru; near Glenwood, Iowa. Picture, if bies, Mr. Herold stated that he was c. E. Parnell, Lincoln; Mildred you·can, the Missouri river with no known all over his neighborhood as Beamer and Vilma McKenzin, Ches- bridges, navigated by steam boats quite a serenader with his guitar. ter; C. H. Rhoades, Seward; Doris and the scene of all travel in the However, he confessed that he was Snyder, Fairbury; Leslie Oppen- west-that is the way it was in the not appreciated in this line so he hermer, Lisco; K. S. Gaines, Ash- good old days, turned to waltzing, in which he took A d' t M H Id ·1 1 land.; Frances Harvey, Peru; M. R. ccor mg o r. ero '. ra1 - al the honors and praises of the Reismger, Chambers; Russell w. roads came west from Burlmgton. golden west. Mccreight, Fairbury; Florence Iowa, in 1879 but there was still no Many happy days were spent by Mack and Lena Henry, Lincoln; Ag- bndg·e. Two transfer boats, each of the nver, watching the supply boats nes Russell, Grand Island; Selma which held five boxcars, transport- come and go. At this time Omaha S. Konig, Peru; Lenore Harris, ed the trains across the river to the was no more than a small fort Ruskin; Rutheloise Sander, Emer- Nebr~slrn side and thus. were able with Plattsmouth as the large tradson; Matilda Fritz, Grand Island; to contmue west on then· Journey. mg center on the river. Gladys Graham, Lincoln; W. R. The Herold fa1111Jy moved to the Mr. Herold met his wife in NiPate, Peru; Ina A. Shubert, Ches- Nebraska side of the river when agara Falls while on a buying· trip ter; Phariss Bradford, Peru; Mr. their son was quite young; there- for his father's store. She was just ar::d Mrs. G. F. Gilbert, Milford; foreh' Mr. over h'from Scotland, and he says it h Herold dclaims Plattsmouth · t ·Nfr. and Mrs. Wiley R&mmers, Gar- as ,1s ome. An 1le may nghtlv do was is wes ern gall that won him land; Mary Liz Werner, Arlington; so, for it was his own Grandmother her heart and hand. They have Mrs. Paul McDonal:l, Lincoln; Ra- O'Neil who named the fair and been married 53 years. mona Handley, Blue Hill; Helen thnvmg city of that day. Although most of his life has Eads, Nebraska City; Bernard Gal- When asked to describe his fath- been spent in Nebraska, he lived for loway, Lincoln; James McAllister, er's first mercantile store, Mr. Her- 12 years in Minneapolis before comDuncan; Elma I. Gockley, Peru; old said he remembered it to be a ing to Peru to ·visit his daughter, Ge11evieve C. Clark, Lincoln; Don- small, w;ooden structure. Inside was Mrs. Larson.


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1940.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

Hail The Champs!

• •

PAGE THREE.

Beat Ft. Hays ·Saturday Caterwaul

Bobcats Wrest State Title From Hastings Broncos 22-0

c BY

RALPH LOCKE

Hod Lantz and Lyle Mason both rate a big hand for their part in bringing the NIAA Championship An age-old jinx and injuries were They were stopped there and the home from Wayne. Lantz plunged consistently in the final quarter to not enough to even phase the Peru punt went to the 'Cats 45. Peru drove to the opponents 25 and Matfinally score from the two. Mase Bobcats Friday night as they smashher dropped back to fire a pass, then calmly proceeded to dust ·off ed the Broncos of Hastings 22-0. but was trappe:i Jn the 45 and was his educated toe and knot up the The Wheelermen completely do- forced to run :or it. Mather then contest with his extra point. The tie gave Peru a 750 percentage to · minated the first quarter piling up more than measured up to all pubnine points. Mason's kickoff was licity given him by running swivelenable them to clinch the flag, their second in two years. returned to the 15, and Hastings hipped through the entire Red Barring injuries, Buck Dougherty failed to make their yardage in 3 squad behind sJme effective blockwill cop his letter this fall. Last tries. On the fourth down Mather ing to score. Roberts applied one year he lost out by riding a matsmothered his own fumble of the of the most outstanding blocks of punt on the 50. In exactly five plays the contest to take the last defentress nursing an over-indulgence of pheasant. This year, well, just take Peru sent Henderson over from the sive man out for Jim. Mason's kick a peek at the 10 p. m. bench-byten to score through tackle. Mason's went wide.' McCrady's men took try for. point was close but wide. the kick-off in the end zone and . h bench review of the campus and After the second kickoff into the got the ball on the 20: They started . ALLIS.ON DOUGHERTY is t e draw your own conclusions. Laugh of the season -. Schulp end zone, Hastings ran the ball another sustained drive, but were p1le-dnvmg nght end who made Peru fought the inspired Wikldats team . last · t o the from their 20 to the 32. Two plays stopped by Atwood, who intercepted the all-conference . . . fall thi'nks th e c0 -e ds are· gomg of Wayne to a bitterly contested 7-7 later Mather intercepted a pass on a forward pass Jn the 45. Peru but failed to letter due to m3unes. dogs. He has solemnly sworn that The likeable red-head hails from he will never cross racquets with tie at Wayne's annual homecoming. the 50 and ran it back to the 35. In drove to the R~d s 36 and Mather The tie enabled the Cats to anrwx seven plays the 'Cats were on the dropped back to kick on fourth Dawson where he lettered in basket- any of them again. His grievance undisputed claim to the N.I.A.A. .12 near the sidelines. Mason drop- down. His kick was the best of the ball four years and made an all centers on. their simplicity and lack . " ped back on the fourth down and evening in that it went out of conference guard in the Little Ten of understanding. It seems, accrown for the second straight year. although trying from an almost im- bounds on the two. Hastings kicked conference. He lettered his fresh- cording to him, that on tennis dates Wheeler's proteges withswo'\ possible angle, he made a perfect out and the Bobcats started their man year in football here. A fact the little darlings, persist in harborstunning breaks, inC!uding .fumbles, 'field goal from placement. The final scoring· push. The ball was worthy of note is that the first ing the illusion that they are going injuries and severe penalties at ~core stood 9-0, Peru. Hastings took carried and pasE.ec to the four, and football game he ever attended was to play (of all gamesJ tennis! critical moments. Red Dbn WJ.S the l'iclrnff and drove hard to the Henderson scooted through tackle to here at Peru and he played that Grads Halliday and Floyd are certainly proving their worth in coachseverely injured about the head as 40 on some very deceptive plays. add another six points. Mason's game as a first string guard. he returned the opening kickifL A ·Peru then held and on fourth down try for point si:lit the uprights to B uck's draft number was the only ing six-man football. Bob's work result of this was Wayne's recovery the Broncos tried to punt out. Rex make the total score 22-0. After college boy's called in the first 600, speaks for itself in that his team at Union is ranked the best in the of the ball-on the 10, which set the Floyd spoiled tlleir play by breaking the kiclrnff Haaings was held in- so lle may be leaving us soon. ztate. Jack's Bratton Union lads 'Cat'' on their heels from the open- through and dropping the kicker side their own 40 until the end of have yet to lose a game, and are inz minute. for a 12 yard lbss.' The 'Cats were the quarter. RAY BAUMAN plays left guard right at the top aJso. The fireworks Peru held Wayne for downs and 11eld, and the end of the period The final period the Reds were tool\. posse.ssion bf the ball. 'MatheI found the McCradymen driving into .held for most of the time by the re- for the 'Cats and does a fine job of due to be on display when these two tried to run the 'oall out of· the end Peru territory. 2erves. The play of Smith, moved it. He rnw nine quarters of service ti1·0 teams meet Nov. 11. The game ;~one. but tripped ·as he crossed the The second stanza started and so over from center to right end. was last fall, and is weil on his way to will be at Union, and if anv of vou students want to see a flrst-claSS' goa:I · line, falling on the one foot clid Hastings. Tiley drove deep to one of the major factors that en- his first letter this fall. marker. His, pwit on the next p:ay the Blues' 10. They were stopped abled the 'Cats to stop the Broncos. He is from Falls City. Ee played contest you'd better be there for the was partially blocked and wenr. out there by brilliant line play on the The first team came in for their with lhe Sacred Heart hi3l1 school opening kiclrnff. Miracles still can, and do, happen. to the 15. pern tplltin~d to rally part of Peru. Mather kicked' out final fling and rncceeded in throw- team in this prep career. He lettered oa del'ense and took· tlle b~ll 3.gain. and the punt was returned to the ing a scare into their rivals by driv- three years in both basketball and For proof, I refer you to past ediHe was all-conference tions of tlle state papers dating A hot punt exchange with Peru 12. In three downs Hastings had a ing to the 12. T:iey were stopped football. gaining the advant~gQ was in pro- first down on Peru's 2. The 'Cats and Hastings tcok over. They ad- guard along with Dougherty 0112 from mid-September to the present. gress at the end of .t,he fi'.·st quar- were invincible as they set tlle Reds vanced the pigskin into home terri- year, and made it another year also. What do you find?? -It's a factlRay is a sophomore and is major- write-ups on Peru! For years those ter. back seven yards in three pl~ys. On tory only to lose the ball on downs. Peru shook Henderson and Ma\h- the fourth Hastings went over, but An exchange of punts followed as ing in chemistry with a minor in sports-writers had abandoned such practices as that. Now, two or three er loose twice fdr long· gairn; early the play was called. back. and the the closing mihutes were ticking physical education. Gimes weekly, they publish stories, J. J. J. .in the second quarter but buth Bronchos were penalized five yards away. Peru g·ot tl1e ball on her 43 pictures and statistics on the team. ?.·uns were called b~ck and the Bob/ for bemg offside. Peru got the ball and Handley took a pass from cenGregg McBribe, columnist, recently cats suffered 15 yard penalties both and the wily Mcintire called for line ter and nestled il: the greensward used over half a column reviewing tmie:S. The battle raged betweion the plunges till the gun sounded. The as the final whistl2 ended the batthe potentialities of the Bobcats. 30 yard lines for t.ne remair:'.ler of reason was to· prevent Hastings tle. Score: Peru. 22; Hastings, O. The credit does not all go to the the quarter. The h.alf· ended O-O. from getting possession of the ball. This game was the last home conteam, because they've played brilTo start the last half Hastings test for game-.c;aptain Organ, Mc The second half saw Wayne ol'I brought the kickoff back to the 30. Intire, and Ross Adams. liant ball before. The main factor to a rousing start. They got to Pe'Peru will be lucky indeed to hold is the efforts of a fellow we know rn L 30 and a long pas3 to the goal Ft. Hays down to two touchdowns," as Wayne McGinnis. The piles of 1ine was the sc0ring play for the ~ said Coach Al Wheler as he gave his copy they used to ignore are printed home- towners for the afternoon. impressions of our opponents this now. There is still one thorn-they The conversion w;is close, om rul · coming Saturday afternoon. insist on sticking to that tag of ed good over Mcintire's objection,s. The Kansans have both weight "Peru Normal" when Peru g·ets any The score was 7-0 Wayne. After the By Jack Mcintire and power, besides outweighing Pe- headlines. Being a very optimistic kickoff, Peru drove into ;wayne Coach Harold Fisher's Prepmen ru close to 15 pounds to the man. individual, I like to fancy the time territory, but was held, and Math- ~ fought their way tD a 20-6 decision Their schedule lists some very when they'll come across and write er was forced to kick. His punt ONE YEAR AGOover the scrappy Talmage team and good teams and they have more out "Peru State" without having it went fo.r a total of .72 yards countin gthe roll, forcing Wayne to take Hastings handed the 'cats their by winning, captured the Nemaha than held their own this season clear back in the want ad section. over on her three. first and only defeat of the season, Valley conferenc~ title, last Friday. with the best of them. Using the By rolling over Hastings last FriTalmage took an early lead as unstable method of comparative day night the 'Cats virtually cinchThe fourth periOd saw a rejuven- a 14-0 setback. Warren Garrison a four yard plunge resulted in their scores, they rate on a par with Om- ed their first state flag since '33. ated. Bobcat sq»ad using line plays ran 35 and 15 yards for the only two only counter. Slinker knotted the aha u and on a level slightly lowe'.r More power to two mighty fine to drive to the Wayne seven. Wayne touchdowns of the game. count for Prep as he took a 27 yard than Kansas State. The scores be- coaches, and a couple of swell felstiffened and held. They •kicked out, • pass from Ogg. After Smith's re- hind those facts lie in two of their lows-Al Wheeler. and Art Jones. and once more Peru started to roll. TWO YEARS AGOcovery of a Talrr.age fumble on the games. They tied the Oklahoma Although there are no boys prancHod Lantz came back in and Before the largest football crowd enemy six, Clemrnts drove it across City team as did Omaha U. In their ing around the gym approaching plunged consistently. He 4nally in Wayne's history Peru teachers to take the lead. contest with Emporia they fought the shades of a guy named Hanna~, bucked the lU:e from the two to suffered a 12 _0 loss to the Wildcats. Whisler plunged from the six to to a draw, and this was with the the frosh are s~owmg up well m sc~re. Mason kickid a perfe~t extra Tommy Major's fine kicking was climax a 23 yard drive in the final same team that Was beaten out by pre-season practice. pomt and the team .went wild. The the main factor that held the score period, maki.ng it 20-6, still another Kansas State in the closing mo- lilJ§!!Jllllllllllllllll§!!llllJlllJlllJlllJlllJi1111llJ[lj][lj]lllJiilJlllllllJ@llll rest of the game resulted· in no down. for our Jun10r Cats. ments of their game. l!ll • 11!1 further scoring. • J. J. J. [lj] • [lj] The Bobcat squad is under a spell l~~ Peru Recreation Par.lors ~. Mather, who usually gets loose FIVE YEARS AGO Elaine Brier's team defeated of serious injuries. Two of the key- ::~ ;"" for valuab:le yardage, was bottled Christine Wilkinson's team in the men, Red Dean and R-0ss Organ, "' p :1!l OOL AND SNOOKER :; up. Every time he even got a good T.,he Omaha U Indians ran rough- hit-pin tournament held Oct. 30-31. are out of action for this game, a @ l!ll [::! rill look at the ball, Wayne had two shod over Peru to pile up a 31-0 Practices for basketball begin this fact that saps much of the team's lllJ Otto Boellstorff, Prop. 11!1 men crashing in on him. Red Dean victory. The 'Cats were outweighed week. All girls interested are inijj] !l!I came back in to start the second 15 pounds to the man, and had vited to attend. power and spirit. i1lJ:gjlllJlllJ(g]lllJlllJl1J:[gjlllJlllJlllJlllllllJ•lli1lllllJ::::JEli!lllliilj]lllJ@ half. It was learned later that he held the opponents down for three Ft. Hays will depend largely on lijjlllJ§lllJil!J[['.1!JlllJlllJlllJlllJJlJLgJlllJlllJJ;}lllJlllJE!FiFi~flTulllJI h d t · d t Th t'd b k · th l!lliilllllJ'.ii!EllllJlllJEJ::::JlllJlllJlllJlllilJJl!llllilllllllJlllJrgJ:l;JlllJ:gjlllJi their thr.ee stars, Tronto, Clifton §. ll!j a sus ame severe head injuries, quar ers. e 1 e ro e m e rg·.'i l·~ ~.J,.1, .and Iv1iller. Tronto is their runninrr R.·.l, 1 DR, G. H. JODER r:. ~.J and was taken to a hospital. fourth when the Indians ran wild:- 'lJ "' ~ "" " ,. f f • rm J. P. CLARK [~) back whil~ Clifton is the plunging ~~II -Physician and Surgeon- \~ TEN YEARS AGOr~ ~ fullback weighing 195. Miller is a l~I I~ 'RITTENS SMASH TABLE ROCK ~ Electric Shoe Shop ~ sensation .at end where he uses his f~~ Office at Milstead Corner ~ With Clement's punt return to a Peru blasted Wayne 39-0 before !il Shoe Repair~ of All Kinds 1fo 6 feet 4 mches of height to great f:j] Office Phone 33, Res. 39 l:;J 1 Bobkitten touchdown as the feature the sixth annual homecoming crowd. ~ ~ advantage in snagging passes. ~i:1~!ilJ2l:i1l!E::gJi?]]tgJ[!);~]Ei~!ti~!l1:lllJi1I:gji;m;::;;:i1I~ Of the afternoon, Coach Harold Thelarg·e score was a very potent fWllliEilllllllJll'Elillli1.ff1ll!ilJlllJrg)]§E:lllJ:gJ!i£:g:EJ:g:::;Jli]i Peru will take their unbeaten reFisher's Prepmen romped past Ta.. warning to conference teams of the ~ PERU BOWLING \jj) cord into the game, and who knows, ble Rock 20-0 and thus remained i·n t r ou bl e m · sto re f or th em. l,Ei Im maybe Dame Fortune will favor @ CLUB llll the undefeated class. Other Prep On the first play Shoffner gallop- ~ llJJ them with her smile. The squad and scores were run by Ogg on an end ed 45 yards before he was stopped tiiJ Ladies Welcome at All Times ~ coaches may rest assured that they sweep and by Nincehelsor on a re- on Wayne's 20. On the next play Ben Hanlon Mgr. ~ will enter the game with the hopes verse. Smith was another sparkplug Zook passed to Pike for the first lllJ M. 6. Heuer, Owner ~ and cheers of 550 students and facin Fisher's well-oiled machinery. touchdown lllJ llll • lllillli~lilJ!llililJlg!lliillEJlllllllJllllllillllllll[lj][lj] ulty members.

Peru Ties .Wayne, Wins nlAA Crown

Cats Will Storm Ft. Hays Stronghold

Sports Of Yesteryear

Prepsters Top Oemaha Valley Conference

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PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE FOUR.

Mary Olioe's First Dramatic Try Thwarted By Fit Of Giggles "Individuals are inclined to over- most in "Our Town," which was 1ook the fact that the study of presented two years ago. Its author, Wilder, along with Sherwood, Shaw, dramatic interpretation is valuable O'Neill, Ibsen and Anderson are ain daily living," said Mary Olive mong her favorite playwrights. Richardson, senior w'ho student- Bette Davis, Helen Hayes, Spen.iiirec!ted the Homecoming play. cer Tracy and Claude Rains rank "Individuals gain not only self- high in her list of favorite actresses confidence and pois.e," she contin- and actors. ued, "but also the study processes Mary Olive praised the organizaneeded to interpret a character in tion of Peru Players, "It is the A play are valuable in the under- work shop of progressive drama on .i>tanding of individuals in every the campus. It gives expression for day life." . ,freshman talent and provides a Mary Olive has been active in training ground for directors. .dramatics ever since the age of "The most important feature in tour when she failed to give l;:ter the development of a play," she children's .day recitation because of, c?ntinue.d, "is in the characterizaa fit of giggles. Durmg her college t1on. W1tl;l.out it there can be no lif~ she has partidpated in Alpha medium to transport the audience Psi Omega, Dramatic Club an,d has, to the land of unreality with the s~irit of reality. 6p~'.JSOred Peru Players.' My most embarassmg moment "As to my ambitions the immedwas back stage one night while tak- iate one is to achieve the she~pskin lng care of the promptmg al).d customarily granted after four sound effects, I rang the door b~ll years in this institution; other amseveral moments after the actress bitions I will keep tucked away in . . they reveal them'til ha d sa1'd . 'Th ere goes th e doorbe11' ." my mmd Mary Olive enjoyed actirtg tlie selves."

,cat cIaW.S Marchf!rS' · Perform Under Lights Friday Evening ~·

' . . . is . "I'm boosting our P.S.T.C. Band,"

KAPPA OMICRON PHI ENTERTAINS GUESTS Fifty-two home econom:cc stucir;r,ts were guests at a Tlrn.nksgivi;ig party given in their ho11or by L:appa Omicron Phi on M~.mday,. Noi · ~· Cl'.airman Ann.a Man5old was moeo by a committee consistmg of Mr:ry Elil!abeth Col'Iin, Bov&mger and Emma RosL.:v.

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Epsilon Pi Tau To Give Program in H. S., Nov. 8. Epsilon Pi Tau, National lionc,rary Industrial Arts Fraternity, will s~onsor a prog~am Nov. 8 in ~he 111gh school auc.:tormm.at 7:30.p m. The program will consist of d'.•~ms·on and a motion picture, "Copper Wire in the Making." ;. ;. ;.

PERU PLAYERS ELECT YOUNG Mae Young was elected president of Peru Players at a special business meeting held on Thursday, Oct. 31. Other officers are Doreen Meier, vice-president; James Howe, secretary-treasurer. Th e upper clas" group leaders for Peru Players are James Sandin, Lloyd Dunlap, ::-rarold Dallam, Horace Rezack, Margery Kinsey, Betty

vest and tie leading a band of wellpatched musicians who ~hared the contents of Bill Brooks' Jug. Trumpet and vocal special by Jim Sandi.n and Jim Crawford proved their share in the Brooks beverage. The _red a~d yellow decorations at the wmdows, arranged by Elvera Schacht and Rosemary Tiehen, matched Ruth Marshall's gay ball t box. Huge pigs, made by Redding, gave local color to the stage. At ten forty-five wraps were taken from Ha~el P.almer's. check-stand, and the mhab1tants hmped Patchward to remove infrequently populated running shoes. Unhappiest-Harold Dallam, because his induigence m K-juice was exposed by an over-sized mid-riff and proved his deaconship to be a dishonest imitation of Rev. Richa.rdson. Happiest-prize-winners Edna Mae and Dean, who had the solemn promise of Marryin' Sam to perform free funeral rites. ;. ;. ;.. The Senior High held a dance in the high school auditorium Friday evening, Oct. 25, under the chaperoning of Mrs. Larson and Mrs. Conneley.

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READ THE AD$ Along With the News

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.The Peru Pointer m. Kir1g. Publisher Telephone 30 Peru, Nebr. Roy

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hs Benson, Frui:;fi.:l and Frightful, in brief prints and big yellow bows· Melvin McKenney in Barney Haith'~ nightgown, explaining that h is "neighbors riz him after retirin' time to come carnivalate"; and Maestro Bollmeier in multi-colored

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(Continued from page one) Leigh, Phyllis J:ar::imast and Marjorie Fidermutz, who in the Mystic Old Mose hut, told fortunes by numerology. "Eat at Mammy Yokum's" invited hungry folks to buy Dogpatch DeIi ht (h t d ) g· o ogs , preserved turnips (candy bars), Ki·::kapoo Juice (pop) and popcorn sold by Barbara. Beal, Zola Nofsger and Marthabelle Minnick. L0oking at home among Mary Elizabeth Collin's caricatures' on the walls was Ross Russell's version of Little Abner· Erma Meier and Phvl-

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"Red" Dean Injured Showing Improvement

a broken jaw-bone below the left His condition has steadily Martin, Phyllis Davidson and Mr. improved since he regained conand Mrs J M u7· t JI f p ft · · · '' m ers, a o e- sc10usness a er a brief lapse followMarjorie Kelpi, Omaha; Jol1n A. ing tl1e game. Neman, Herman; H. D. Bugbee Union; F. L. Chase, Omaha; Rita,Rus- ~rgjrgJ[lli;g;}l!~:lll;;&W,;;J~ll::~m;;:irn:Fill:ll:Cill:lq[\ sell, Scotia; Serern Handley, OmaKIZER'S MARKET Ila; James Sandin, Plattsmouth; ~j HIGHER QUALITY MEATS f~ Eula Redenbaugh, Tobias; Bertie ff] LOWER IN PRICE [ill Barm Milligan· E'l . J G ·tr· l~J 1::1 , , , , ,. , i een oy n. m, f(il c. H. KIZER, Prop. ~ Muua~' Blanche ZaJICek, Beatrice; I~ Phone 115 ~(! Caroline Calder, Fremont; Earl ~---~ Whipple, Fremont; Mary Lou Har- lifillil!lll1!Jl!!l11ll11ll[g]l!ill!il[g][g][g][g][!j]l!ll[g]fg;[g]r;;J§l1lJr;;J~.;;1 vey Grand I la d· Eld B R . ' s n ' a · a- [!j]i1lJ[!j]i1lJ[g]l1lJ[g]:gj[g][g]§!gj[!j][g]!1lJ[g][!j]:gJ!jj][g]'llJ[g][r,Jim wean, Fullerto~; Cur~ and Iris ~ E. C. McALEER ~i: . Mane Wieneke, Physician and Bea.trice, Lilh~n Humphrey, Fuller- ~ Surgeon ~ ton'. Leona Givena Heaps, Omaha; 11;] Glen Bldg. AUBURN [!il Sylvia Deay, .Tekamah; Anna Blunt, ~ . . ?W Gret11 a; Dons M. Weaver, Omaha; ~I Office, 5 - Residence 56 ~ Gladys Pie e s J . M K th I)(] l'lJ · P r, a em, ary a - ~!l!ll1l:@!l!J[g]@gj§§:19~11iiilJ1£11lJl!il[gj[1ll§i5[g][g]~ erme Sanborn, Salem; Marion Marsh Brown, Omaha; L. L. Patterson Arlington· Geor e H k. Da;id City; M;bel Ston~man a~~~~ bury; Jeanne Spier Nebrask~ City· Rachel Wieneke Auburn· Ro GJ;over Ul:)'s ;. M ' se · Shubert· Gails~u'~·ntazkrgeryN Eb,vanks, ' " y, e ras a City; s. J. Ellenoe:ger, Omaha· and Mrs Elizabeth v B 'd · arner run son Sidney, Iowa. ' Those who attended the Peru Luncheon at the Kearne C tion are· Otto Oake YK onven. Helen M.. K ucera Hass,t·mgs· earney, Ray Trenhdlm, North Platte; Lou~ Decker, Pleasanton; Dora Garricker Hastings; Reba Yeakle· Hastin s.' Donna Jane Delzfl H 'r1 . ~t' hur Longfellow ·A' als ~gsc, C. ' ns ey, . . Thompson Ord· w E s d ' ' · · ug en, Grand Island; Harold Russell, Gothenburg; Charles A. Palmer, Kearney; Margaret Mitchell Palmer Kearney; Charles H. Gabus Jr' ' ., Loomis; Louine Dunlap, Kearney; Jane Oales, Plattsmouth; Vivian Priest, Kearney; l\fabel Jorn Oakes, Kearney. ;. ). ;.

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Dean was injured on the opening play of the Wayne b''-':::.[~;J o-ame su,tainino· 15)

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18 still the motto of Peru audiences Gard, Emilie P. Kirk, M. Florence temple.

max jacksoq trying to muscle in on according· to the applause · FTiday hendy's private property? .... HAS night, Nov. 1, when the Marching YOUR CONSCRIPTION NUJVIBER Band made its second performance in the "Oa!;: BowL" BEEN CALLED YET? ... wjsh.anAt 175 cadence the Marchino· dy andrews would make up his Band snapped throurh the mind-maxwell o:· her roommate? . forming letters "H'' an.d "P" f01'. GONNA VOTE FOR WILLKIE Hastings and Peru. While in this • ' · " ' · THIS ELECTlON? STO•Jf' FELLA! format10n they gave a yell and . . played the color song· of each col• . . ferne. peterson's d~1ly treks lege. over to the infirmary..... HOPE This was the first appearance of · ' THE GALS REMEl'l!BER THAT the filashy blue and white uniformSADIE HAWKINS, 'DAY. ONLY ed band at night. . LASTS ONE DAY. ; .. rachow lookAt 7:30 preceding this last home ed cute last saturday aft. behind game, the b~nd marched 'd,-0wn town rallying for the ,thus far un.bis pile of leaves listening to the defeatect Bobcats. ' nebr. game-the man with the hoe ;. f .J. or rake or som(lthing. . . . OVERHEARD· "GUESS I'LL GO OVER F T A ELECTS . . • ·, • TO THE LIBRARY .'\ND WHIP UP R. JOHNSON, HEAD A TERM PAPER--I'VE GOT AN HOUR BEPORE CLASS." . . . as Future Teachers of America ofcorny as hubert hunzeker's jokes.. ficer~ a.re Ruth Joh~son, .president; • , IN CONVOCATION; "WHO'S Mar~one W1schmerer, vice presiTHE GAL THAT IS DAISY MAE? d~t, Donna Duerfeldt, secretary; BOY!. SHE WOULDN'T HAVE TO Nma Kane!, treasurer; Wilma Wag'" ME ner historian· M · · a·ll 1 a~, ·CHAS"' ." . . . cardigan sweat'. . . '. ar3or1e ers, the color of whole wheat parhamentanan, Mary E. Collm, · El · B · l'b . bread. . . grovenburg, reitding from Song leader, ame ner, 1 ranan. Ped: "so-and-so was injured in the On Thursday, Oct. 17, three car fray." "Fray?What's that?His back? loads of Fut~re Teachers of A.mer•.. DORMITORY DESTRUCTION ica, with their sponsor, Dr. Bake~', AND HONEY . IN HIGHLY IR- sat , out for Corryell Park• near . REG~AR USE ON HALLOWE'EN. Brock, to mdulge the afternoon in •.. riotous: rosemary tiehen .•. fun, shuffleboar~, .art, and, best of homecoming continued: butch rob- all, to consume JUICY steaks cooked erts and last year's enid mae . . . out I~ .the open. In order that the terrific.: hairless joe dunlap . . . . expedition might be able to deal .· 1 with any e · · f caf eter111 emp oy~es, , e~nployed m mergency arismg rom ti can r d t the ravenous consumption of too nh. t oom:•~ mason an mea 15 d 't'l large quantities of pickles, bananas dis er ou er lo"' - . . ' . . . . ays 1 and steak, the organization carried Franksg1vmg. · · meow. ;. ;. ;. its own Registered Nurse. A special , treat of the afternoon was music Jindra Speaks at Tabbr dedicated to the group, which cam~ over the Singing Towers. After evProf. V. H. Jindra was speaker at eryone declaring that the afternoon a banquet given by the Tabor, Iowa, Chamber of Commerce on Oct. 25. was too short and that the picnic The banquet honored the Tabor should be repeated immediately to run a revenge upon Father Time Marching Band. This championship the expedition returned to Peru i~ .band is under the direction of Warthe twilight, accompanied by a full ren Darrah, who has helped in orrising moon.-Dr. B. K. B. ' ganizing Peru's Marching Band. ;. ;. f Mr. Jindra spoke on the qualities necessary for membership in a SCHOLARSHIP GROUP marching band. HAS HALLOWE'EN FUN ;. ;. .J. Goblins and witches were specPro~. A. V. Larson and w. H. ial guests at the Scholarship Club Hutchmson of Peru were chosen by Hallowe'en party M d t the local Kiwanis board to repre. on on ay, 0 c · 28 · sent the organization at the district H convention in Mason City, Iowa, . orace Rzehak, as Professol' last week. ~uiz, conducted intellige~~e tests among the scholars. To reneve the ;. ;. ;. 1.enswn caused by so much brain The Junior High began their Hal- work, the group played "Streets and lowe'en party within the auditor- Mey~ R f h .· . ium's darkened interior with a e res ments of bnck ice cream 1 ghostly reception for more than 60 a! d chocolate cake were se"ved. guests. An interlude of dancing i 1 t followed, after which the guests The boys of the Y.M. met in the were entertained with games, stunts gymnasium Tuesday, Oct. 30. Two games of basketball were played. and refreshments.

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Katherine Cole. Carrol Jones. The Reports from the infirmary state upperclass sponsor is Wilma Parnell. that Red Dean will be able to re- l1l J.. ;. ;. sume his studies this week. ll!J

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EGAD, TERM PAPERS!

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1940.

?i''·•.;····;·:. . ···:·;·:······:::· : : •...• ,.. .,..····::····:····


Student Speaks By LeRoy Redfern

e RICHARD SEVERSON Guest W rifer

VOLUME XXXVI.

PERU, NEBRASKA, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER12, 1940.

NUMBER 7.

~:Cc::;~~ ::~:::~R State Board Buys Si~m~ Tau Delt~ Holds

Hobert Corning, Omaha, Speaks lnitat1on Banque . • . Lots For College tio~g::nq::~ ie~~: ~~!:t~c~~~:: On Modern Teacher Attitudes

1940 EDITION

By now, you've all heard of the family of six. Five voted the J:!emo- According to an announcement ics room of the Training School, cratic ticket. The other had. an made by President W. R. Pate, the Monday evening at 6:30: Forinal in- - - - - - - - - - - - - education; he voted the Republican .stat~ board of education has made itiation servkes preceded the proticket.

arrangements whereby they wm buy the 14 lots north of the athletic field for the purpose of relieving The earliest election return:- the 'congested parldng problem and available Tuesday sh0wed, · W'.l~kie a.lso to• provide a practice field for leading in six states. A polltical tn~ foocball players. . . . analyst would say that this proved . The .present athletic field will be that the Republicans are employed re~on~1t10ned. and has a . poss1by the private enterpriser: Logically b1ht\ m the fut~re of becommg the he would reason thus: The private states best gridiron. Although legal enterpriser requires his employees "matters. are ne.ceGsary .befo:·e comto be at work·early in the morning, plet10n it i~ qmte. certam that contherefore, they must arise ear\lr and structwn will begm soon. vote before work. Thus early r~J. J. J. turns are the votes of the worki.ng man, in this case, the Republican. Alpha Mu Omega Initiates The Democrat, on the other hand, Four New :tviembers lieed not arise early to vote. Since most of them are employed bY the . Alpha . Mu Omega, honorary government (W p A to Pr,esidentl mathematics fraternity, initiated they will have the afternoon off Barbara Beal, Fa.ye Bouse, Maunce and can exercise their right to vote Anderson and Neil Good mto mem0 at this time. bership . n .Monday, Nov. 4·. The m1tiates were reqmred to solve problems.

T he latest election . returns brought home, with riara!yzing force the fact that the maiority can be and often 1is wrong. p'

The 1940 election served to recall to mind-as if we could forgetthat we are living 'in a· Machine Age. Witness: The efficient manner in which the Hl~grt'e and Kelly machines

gr~~~ive

new members were added to the honorary English fraternity, namely: Associate, Virginia King, Ruth Stonemrn, Juanita West. Pledge, Muriel Reuter, ·Delphine Bucher, Reuben Fanders, Inez Long· fellow, Dorothy Armstror;g, Janet Harris, Max Manifold, Edith Willey and Betty .:-ean Miller. The advancements were: te> active, MargarEt Stiers and Lloyd Dunlap; to associate, Katherinr Bartling, Mary Horton, Maryon Thomas Dorothy Teachman, Edna Mae Peterson, Grace Muenchau. Miss Norma L. Diddel, professor of art, spoke on the "TIlustration of Literature." Clara Eyre, president of Sigma Tau Delta, extended the greeting to new members. Janet Harris, speaking in behalf of the initiates gave the response. Jear_ne Spier played a violin solo, ''.Cavatina" by Ja Raff "end was accompan1'ed by Katherine ;. J. J. Bai·tJ1'ng at the p'~no. = The home economics fraternity, Kappa Omicror: Phi prepared and S I ffiS 0 served the following menu: spiced grape juice, baked ham, sWeet po0 tatoes, creamed peas, perfection "See you at Estes in June." That rnlad, jelly, rolls. hot mincemeat was the invitation presented by the sundae an d coff ee. t chn' film 'S c t e icolor ' ' ummer amp a > J. J. Estes-i939 ," shown to YW-YM 5 · members Tuesd ay evenmg, No:v. · This picture showed 1;!1.e flxperien-

Etes F'I

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T YW-Yffi members

steek T0 conduct

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connected Comment: Men cannot . . th h compete.with mach~nes even oug , t f h they can be the mas ersl tofmailc ines Proof: The comp e e a ure · . Machi ne cont ro11ed of Willkie m areas.

• This election also ·proved that money, and not music, (as Steck insists) has charms: Don't discount the effect of $45,000,000,000 ·worth of spending and the huge defense contracts.

Faye. Bouse, . one .of. Peru's representat1ves, 111 exp1ammg the Y sett d "Th · ht t t up sta e , ere are e1g s a es in the Rocky Mountain district. . These choose. representatives ,,to attend the national conference. "The Estes grounds," according to Fave, "are about four miles up the mountain in a very picturesque setting." Other representatives from Peru last summer were Mary Elizabeth Collin, Grace Muenchau, Mary Olive Richardson and Bob Williams, program chairman. A more detailed discussion of the various camp sessions will be discussed at future meetings according to the program chairman.

Th e p erusmgers · are playi·ng llost tb neighboring' music instiiuctors and their small vocal groups saturday Nov 16 ' ·, · · The teachers viii'" brina" their vocal problems to be discussed at a morning session conducted by Prof. G. H. Steck. Members of chorus will entertain the high school singers in the morning. After a luncheon a demonstration rehersal will be held in the music hall. The music instructors from the following school.: have sent in their registration, so far: Wymore, Fairfax, Mo., Wilber, Brock, Pawnee City, Tecumseh, Syracuse, Watson, Mo., DeWitt, Ham:imy, Iowa, Seward and Dawson

marching Band members need Rn Extended Sense Of Humor

There are- just two ·ways to do a thing~the right way and the wrong way. Psychologists agree that man invariably learns the wrong way first. This should cheer all Americans, for F. D. R. has already learned the wrong, way; now perhaps, he will give us four years of government the right way. J.

,.

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BOB CARMICHAEL ENTERS HOSPITAL Bob Carmichael, '35, one of Peru State's outstanding athletics, has been forced to resign his position as athletic coach at Blue Hill high, school due to illness. A year ago he fractured both legs in an automobile accident. Although ·he was in the hospital for several weeks at the time, one of the .injuries failed to heal properly. He has now entered the Mary Lanning Memorial hospitail in Hastings, where he is receiVing further treatment.

Being able to march with the college band is an accomplishment. , . . . If you don t believe it--pick up a bass horn and try it. You will be assigned a position in the last rank-right pivot, thereby inheriting the job of keeping at a distance, approximately two and a half yards from the rank in front of you. You must also keep your rank straight and stay directly in line with your file. When the signal to start is given, you step off with the drum beat, and when the halt is signaled you wait 'till the end of the drum beat, then slack your left foot against the right. The drums beat a tempo of 170 to 175, which means you take approximately 2.9 steps per second, and, if you don't practically knoc.k your teeth out with your knee at every step you will hear Crawford, or more likely, Snyder, call none too gently, "Pick up your feet!" Besides keeping in step, picking up your feet, keeping your rank and

publ ·,s hed Dec 15 •

t

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d ·

• KAPPA DELTA PI RECEIVES SPEAKER, GUESTS AT DINNER

· · 1

ccm~~~itri~ ~~~e "~%ti~~ o~~~~'~?

In observance of American Educatito1d1 WDeek, ~rapbp~ DeM,lta cPi presen ·e r. ' o er" . orrnng, superintendent of the Omaha publlc schools at convocatwn Fnday, Nov. 8. Dr. Cornmg is an .active member of the Kappa Delta PL ~~~~~o~f ~~~tg : ~~~~~e;~-~f\~~~ . H1 has had 17 years of experience fraternity but from anyone on the m the teachmg profess1011. Servmg campus. Alumni are also urged to on the summer facultws of Greeley d. ·r State Teachers College, Umvers1ty sen 111 composi wns. of Den and U · it• f '1. This is the sixth volume of ere- - . ver mvers Y 0 "'isative writing to be published by the soun and as a member of the Nathonorary English fraternity. Selec- wnal . School Adm1111strators Asr f . t ·!J b d b th sociat10n are a few of his many e~:ri~:· ~~~rd w~ons~s:i~ e ?.ccompli.shments. . Arthur Bradford, Miss Florence Dr. Cfortnmgh strtessed. the importMartin and Clara Eyre, president of ance 0 eac er rammg and how the organization. the young teachers of America must Block prints illustrating the mag- 8et the specifications for what eduazine will be made by Miss Norma cation is going to be. "Everything Diddel's classes. Sale of the publi- has speeded up and the old generacation will begin on Dec. 15 . tion is in slow motion. It is not ;. ;. ;. re1·olution, but slow evolution," says ~r. CornilJ.i;'. Warning against teaching as we were taught was one of his main issues. Teachers must launch forth IOQ according to new principles and build a new curriculum vital to edu"Cult1'vate Fr1·ends in Books," t· D ca 10n. r. Cbrning emphasize<l "Book Friends are Loyal Friends," the importance and responsibility "You Visit Old Friends, Why not .of American citizenship. The pri-

Remember, the deadline is set for N b 15 ~'~i~i~~ S~nd" is the bi-annual publication of the· Phi Alpha chapter of Sigma Tau Delta. Contri.

0

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al D:.

Nat'1onal Book Week • ~ nCOUfageS Rea d

Vocat''CfinrC" . . R~::~~~~~~:~~t~~YB:::t:re :a:~r~~s~~~:~~~~f ~~ ~~:c:;~~~e~

Eight years of the New Deal (sometimes called the Misdeal) and still they ask for more. Ye Gods! - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - What are these Americans made of? If we can withst~d another four year onslaught by the New Deal we need have no fear of a forei~n power for we shall be invulnerable.

s·IXth'S•f. I ting. sand'

file straight, you must also know the signals and be able to execute them snappily. For instance, ·.vten Mary brings the baton down as in a halt, but bas her back to the band, you· must be ready to take 7 steps backwards then march forwa~d again; or, if she blows three sl:ort whistles accenting each wit!: an upward thrust of her baton, those in the back row commence the weave, and so on for the rest of the performance. You must also be prepared to play from memory ")Jational Emblem" or the trios of "Stars and Stripes Forever" or "Ou~ Director." Lastly, you must be punctual at 7:00 practices and not weaken when there is a two hour period. It isn't really so hard, though, after all, you he.ve Jindra, Crawford, Mary, Snyder and all the members to correct you when you make a mistake. If instruction plus practice makes perfect, you soon will be, for you will receive plenty of both, if you stick with the band.

p

so many bright posters on the cam- sense and to improve the American P .. us this week with the above mot- institutions. The chi.ld of toda.y toes? Perhaps you've already guess- must be able to stand the stress · kw k' ed it. Yes, this is Boo ee ·. and strain of this ever changing Students in colleges and universi- life; the teachers are held respont ties all over the United Sta es d bare sible for the attitudes and welfare seeing similar posters flashe e- of the children they teach. fore them in this national camFollowi~ convocation Kappa paign. Delta Pi fraternity held a luncheon Many of you need no encourage- for the speaker and for fraternity ment to delve into the mysteries of members. ' book leaves. Some of you may pro- Guests at the dinner were Dr. test with a sigh that you never find· 2.nd Mrs. Hobert corning, Dr. D. E. time to read. Tope, personnel director of the Take advantage of this opportun- Omaha schools. ity. Join in the crusade for wider The luncheon was served at the reading! Methodist church and unique autJ. ;. J. umnal decorations were used . BAND INITIATES NEW FRONTS ;. ;. ;. Hour dancers in the Mens Dorm A senior class committee composon Oct. 6 saw the colleg·e swing ed of Jeanne Spier, Cecil Walker, band performing from a new van- Katherine Bartling and Jack Mc t~ge point. Intire met Nov. 6 to select the anThe piano was moved from the nouncements for the class of '41. first floor to the new orchestra J. J. J. "pit," and from behind their blue GAMMA CHI SCHEDULES TEA Hnd white Bobcat fronts Warren Bollmeier's "eleven" enacted a bal- A party to be held on Nov. 13 and a formal tea on Dec. 12 are social cony swing-scene. events scheduled for the 115 memJ. J. J. bers of Gamma Chi by the council at their meeting· on Nov. 6. The council also voted to modernize the constitution and by-laws which have been used for 15 year~. Following the meeting, a .council supper was held in the cafeteria. Sunday Musicale-goers saw and heard the followi.:ng, varied program. Nov. 10, in the Music Hall: Now Let Every Tounge Adore Thee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bach Hospodi-Pomilui . . . . . . . . . Lvovski TUiESDAY, NOV. 12 Day is Dying . . . . . . . . . Christensen YMCA, YWCA, CCA .... 7-8 Perusingers Valse Triste ......... Jean Sibelius THURSDAY, NOV. 14 Echo Elaine Lum, piano Freshmen Clubs ......... 7-8 The Blind Plowman Robert Clarke Tally-Ho ............ Franco Leoni FRIDAY, NOV. 15 Max Manifold Peru at Wesleyan ....... 8:00 Janet Ebers at the piano SATURDAY, NOV. 16 Allegretto from Trio ...... Mozart Londonderry Air ...... TranscribGirls' Formal .......... 8:00 ed by Frits and Hugo Kreisler MONDAY, NOV. 18 Melody in F .......... Rubenstein Instrumental Trio Alpha Psi. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. 7-8 ( Alla Turca ........... '. . . . . Mozart International Relations Ciub Clifford Harding, piano

Sunday musicale Features Soloists

Calendar

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PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE TWO.

Published Weekly by The Peru State Teachers College Peru, Nebraska

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER

Guys, Gals! R Few Essential Hysterical Points On How To Enjoy Formal History

"Gardenias, you lucky thi,ng." up your evening bag, or wrap, and Entei:ed at the Postoffice at Peru, Nebraska, as Second "Gee, that dress is a honey." "Just the boutonniere which you have so . , . ,, thoughtfully purchasect for him and ten more minutes, Im so exerted. march forward to the "battle." Class Matter. $1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc Those are expressions which bring U . . t . . pon arrrvmg a the prom. g1r1s back wonderful :nemorres to upperIf t t k . · . ' 0 , ' . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ed't a e your wiap R ose M .r c G mms r or classmen · But pErhaps to ,"OU. fresh. excuse to the yourse dressina room Returning • Ed' men they arouse only bew1ldermg . . " · ' M aryon Th omas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A ss1stant 1tor e t· If f t th Th you wrll fmd yourself before the re'll B k S Ed' qu s wns. so, orge " em. . e ceiving line. If you are tempted to B1 roo s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ports 1tor answer to all of them rs: Act your- . . . , · M c K enney .. · . · · .. · · . . . . . . A ss1s ' tan t S por t s Ed't self." Of course ' that doesn't mean skip shun it,_1t don M e 1vm I ·or How .that much llne, moreorcourteous is tot. M . h J' C R d cross your legs, and chew gum, but t k f . t t eredit imerson · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · opy .ea er it does mean that with just a few al e at ,;Hw mdmu es do, ~~Y Lyour · K anel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . p roo f R ea d er suggest10ns · o-youong Nma anyone of you can go P easan t' ow. .th os. · Ad · to the formal and be perfectly at convers~ wn is net er necessary, M. Florence Martm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v1ser • nor desl!'able. ease. If receiving lines are new to you, Reporters: Milton Schul;;, Margery Kinsey, LeRoy Redfern, ~ou fellow_s .n."edn'~ worry about here are a few pointers. Upon ar-. taking the mrt1al step thrs time. riving introduce your escort to the Betty Miller, Mona· Morelock, Jean Haith, Janet Harris, Since this activity is sponsored by first person in the line who will Jeanne Spier, Myrton Hall, Phyllis Wilberger, Dorothy the Gifis club, it rests upon you no doubt, be the president of th~ . . . . . . girls to trot dow:i to the dorm de$, Gamma Chi cabinet. She in turn Armstrong, Harold Lantz, Ardis Carmme, V1rgmia Kmg, secure uour invi-ation a~d send·it _. 11 . t d . 0 • , • , , · • , • wr m ro uce hrm to the person Ruth Stoneman, Sarene Hauptman, Marione F1dermutz, Then rest peaceably for an answer. standing next to her and so on Tod Hubbell, Anselm Johnson, Jack Mcintyre, Emma Ro- Yes, fellows, the least you can do down the line. Merely say: "May • k El S h h I b I T B'll Z b . k L R is to RSVP and strck by rt. Smith· Clark Gable." If the name sic y vera c ac t sa e ynon 1 ur nc , e oy .. . ' . ' ' ' From then on exc1tmg moments gets lost or Jumbled along the way, Durst, Ralph Locke. fill the air. No doubt, you will have help out by repeating it. already chosen a formal. If not, you Your reply to the introduction or needn't think d:;,d will have to sell greeting of a person in the line is: IT'S ALL OVER, NOW_:_ his farm before you can purchase "How-do-you-do, Mrs. "So and So" You don't see many Willkie pins, now. Even the Roose· one. Don't hope to pretend you are or "Professor So and So," as the someit;hing your aren't. The girl case may be. The "Mrs. So and So" velt boosters have decid;d not to gloat any more. ·enjoying the formal the most is should always be spoken distinctly, the one who is keen and alert, in- so that she will feel you are inAll the mud-slinging has stopped and we can once more terested in the people she meets, terested enough to remember her :turn on our radios and hear favorite programs without the thinking more about thell). than of name for the moment at least. . the impression she may be making. In going down the line, wait for fear of hearing that "the time has been relinquished," so some Her naturalness, not her clothes, the person in line to offer his hand, <>ffice-seeker can have his say. will be _her greatest asse~. Of course, He may merely bow to you, instead . she wrll not appear m a sport of shaking hands. Willkie will soon be the forgotten man. Terrible Terry outfit, but come dressed for the oc- When you have reached the end, • · And ,i b k t casion. you will receive a dance program. can go back to: hIS gas pumps. we can i;O ac 0 our However, her :ormal, which may Here's where the fellows begin normal :way. of living. Republic:ms and Democrats can again be of most any :naterial, will make functioning actively. The exchang. · · . . her appear he,r loveliest. Simplicity, ing of ·da;ices rests entirefy upon walk peacefully; together down· the street and resume their remember, is still the key note to you, although the girls may "sugpoker games. And tl:ie curb-setters can go back to talking good taste. gest." The fellow will bring his .. · · .; · . Fellows, while you, too, are as- friends to be introduced to you and .aoout cabbages and bngs; sembling your best looking dress having been introduced they are exPeople can stop saying, "I'm a Democrat," or "I'm a Re· outfit, be mindfd of your girl pected to ask you to dance. · . friend's frock. Perhaps a casual in- If any. of you girls shoud get publican" and can go back to saying, "I'm an American." quiry about the color of her dress stuck :with a partner with whom will prove helpful, for you don't dancing is not going so good, you want to purcharn a beautiful cor- can always ask to stop for a glass sage of Americar_ roses to be pinned of punch. But for some reason, on a switching yellow taffeta. the girl isn't the one to sugg'est sitONE FOURTH. OF THE WAY THROUGH Finally, that evening has arrived. ting out a dance. The sugg·estion The first. quarter is over Everyone is st:rrin~:arly/ You, comes from .the boy. . too, should begrn stmmg early m . When leavmg, th;nk either of the It couldn't have gone faster; order to have! ample time to as- Qeans or any one of the recervmg semble yourself, so you may appear lme near the door for the lovely Mama! Call out our pastor! . . . . promptly m a aool fi~ished manner. time. . . The. dean gives me a dubious look, "Your escort rs m the lobby," Artd you will have a lovely tune, telephones someone. Calmly pick if you know the rules. When I pass him, classes bound.

I guess I'd better dust off that book Before next semester comes around.

~here

So when I go home I won't get skinned And

I won't have to slide through!

CLEANER-UPPERS . . . . Have you ever noticed how clean our 1amtors keep the institution buildings? H~_._rdly ever do we see dirt or dust in · their domains; · d I' Have you ever notice how wil mg they always are to help us? Especially, when we want to decorate, arrange furniture for a special session, etc. Have you ever noticed how they're always on the job, every day? Always putting things in the proper places, answering questions, or doing extra jobs for this one or that. Have you ever noticed anyone forgetting to thank them for a favor? Some do. Regular fellows-George, Billy, Gro~soehme, Dahlstrom, Brown.

THE BARE FACTS While ye editor trots off to Detroit and points east to do a bit of campaigning for the Ped, ye assistant-editor rises from her lowly position and takes over. So,

if the Ped this week has any resemblance to Peds liv-

ing or dead, it is purely coincidental.

two years and matriculated in

1936.

MAXINE PERSHING, class of

I'll get my second _quarter wind And not disgrace the white and blue,

12, 1940.

'40, is teaching junior high school

mathematics and physical education at Inwood, Iowa this year. ~ Maxine was president of Gamma WAYNE WEARE, Peru graduate Chi last year as well as being electand brother of J.IJ.iss Edna Weare of ed representative student. the faculty and Kathryn Seymour MILDRED FILMER, class of Durham ~ere married March 9. 1937, is teaching commerce and art Both Mr. and Mrs. Weare taught in in the Shickley high scho?l. .Mildred the Windsor Colorado schools. Mr. !s the sister of Wayne Filmer, who Weare rece~tly has been employed is a Junior in school at present. in the industrial arts department in GALE CARTF,R, class of '40, is Colorado State 6ollege at Gunni- teaching English and dramatics at son Colorado. Aragon, South Dakota. Ga.le will ' be remembered for his work in CEDRIC CRINK, class of _'29, is dramatics. His sister, Hope, is a professor of speech educatwn at freshman this year. Culver-Stockton College at Canton, LOREN REDFERN, a Peru alumMo. nus, and a brother of LeRoy RedBratton Unicn tootball team, fern, Peruvian business manager, coached by Peruvian Jack Floyd, has a clerical position in California. class of '40, won the Little Ten six He has been there since early July. man football cor.ference for the . The marriage of ESTHER WILLthird time. They are undefeated and IAMS to Charles Haar has been anuntied. They will go to Union on nounced. Mrs. Haar is a graduate Nov. 11 to play Bob Halladay's of the Peru State Teachers College team. These tw:i teams are ranked in the class of 1938, and has been as Nebraska's No. 1 six-man foot- t.eaching at Clarks. She will cornball teams. Halladay's team has plete her school work there. taken one defe;it from Thurman, JOE HOLTMAN of the class of Iowa. '37, who is teaching his fourth year JOHN COLLIN, class of '39, is at Smithland, Iowa, attended the teaching at Elida, New Mexico this Peru-Hastings game. year. John is a brother of Mary ;. ;. ;. Elizabeth Collin who is in school Mrs. F. M. Gregg, wife of Dr. at the present time. Gregg", former head of psychology . ANNA WILLIAMS, also a former department at Peru, visited in Peru Peruvian, is teaching in the same this week. She mas enroute to system. Washington, D. G., to visit her DOROTHY FISCHER is teaching daughter, Genevieve, a Peru gradat Blanchard, fowa, tor the second uate. year. Dorothy attended school Accompanying Mrs. Gregg was

By Grace MuetJchau

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HOW THINGS CHANGE! Legislative act creating Peru State Normal School stated: "Peru . . is the only CITY on the Missoun R'.rver worthy of berng · ti1e 1ocat·10n of State Institution. Small towns as Plattsmouth, Nebraska City, could not, of course, compete with a metropolis such as Peru" ... That was in 1867 ... In the days when Main Street ran to the river ···

• ANOTHER SMILE " One newspaper's explanation: The college was placed at Peru because rt contamed none of those places of vice, immoral!ty,. or rum holes to make parents anx10us lest . . then· children, when not under pare~t care, should ~e _entic~~ away f!om the path of 1ect1tude.

• HAVE YOU FOUND PERU'SPikes Peak ... Indian Hill ...Mt. Vernon Hill ... California Street ... T .J. Majors Elm tree ... Glacial rock . . two seventy-year old oaks ....

• WHO'S WHO ON FIRST CAMPUS HISTORY! Thomas Jeffersor, Majors-founder ... Major William Daily-donor of first hundred dollars ... Honorable J. M. McKenzie-first instructor and first president ...

THINK IT'S TOUGH NOW! First entrance requirements: Pass exams in Arithmetic through fractions ... Geography through R. S. and general questions . . . English Grammar to syntax . . . Reading ... writing . . . Spelling . . .

STUDENTS HEADACHES IN 1867 Room rent-$ 4.00 per term . . . Board $3.00 per week ... Some of first courses-Sound and Powers of Letters ... Discipline and Physical Ele nta D . . me ry rawmg . . . 0 rgaruzation and Goverment of Schools.

HAVE YOU HEARD That the first classes in Peru were in on old saloon, later a tin shop just north of T. E. Vance grnccry store . . . That the overflow met in basement of H. Howell residence north of Peterson Photo Studio ... That in 1866 they moved to district school . . . That soon moved .into chapel of Mt. Vernon :8'all-f1rst college building ... That rt burned: but was reconstructed in 1897 as grrls dorm ... Th~t in 1921 became four year college 1ssumg A. B's. on same basis as all standard colleges · · ·

AND LOYAL PERUVIANS ALWAYS REMEMBER! Peru haS-Oldest college in state ' .. Only one of kind for 38 years . . . Still growing. J

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COMMITTEES CHOSEN FOR FALL FORMAL Committees for the annual AllGirls formal have been announced by Faye Bouse, president of the dormitory council. Chairmen for the committees are: Kay Bartling, decorations; Ruth Stoneman, invitations; Harriet Maxwell, programs; Elvera Schacht, floor show; Mary Olive Richardson, refreshments. The clean-up committee includes Bernice Neddenreip, Elvera Schacht and Carolee Garver. - - - - - ~------­ Miss Doris Hayes, daughter of former president D. W. Hayes. She is employed by the U. S. Forestry Service in Washington, D. C.


TUESDAY, NOVEMBER,

12, 1940.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE THREE.

Watch· The Bobcats Battle Wesleyan Friday! What Makes Peru's Team Click Un beaten Peru Ties Ft. Hays 7-7

MERCHANTS _JJ-;-; WISE ~,

ROSS ORGAN is '.;he powerhouse javelin in track and plays forward at left tackle, at i;rhich position he on the basketball squad. earned all-state rEcognition last ;. j. j. year .

.Advertise!

Ross is one of the few members BILL CHANDLER is the fresh- ::u.5:55J::Si5:=5:! BOBCATS KNOT COUNT of the squad who has made the trip man sub at right end who has con- • IN FOURTH QUARTER to the altar, but he doesn't let that sistently shone with his offensive interfere with his at:1letic activities. play. igJ[iJJ[ij][ij][ij][ij]

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noon to remain undefeated this will be raring to go in '41. year and made it as a fullback one year as they tied the J?OWerful Ft. Organ gi~es his home address as other season. Shoe Repairs of All Kinds Hays Tigers 7-7. ~dgar. He 1s an mdus~nal arts maChandler injured his ankle, and [1;]/g][ij][ij][ij][g][ij][ij][ij]lllJliJT[gj[gJ[ij][ij]:E;illJ§§lllJillJllll[iJ]i1!J Peru kicked off to the Tigers, who 10" !El was forced to miss the Ft. Hays llll PERU BOWLING ~ got off with .a rousing start by • i . gai.ne but hopes to see act10n a- rgi:1~ CLUB rill marching deep', into Bobcat terri1 ~ 1 gamst Weseyan. n • t!Iil1i tory. They had a first down and WENDELL HANDLEY the under-• . . l;J Ladies Welcome at All Times@ o-oal to go when Peru came up with ' Bill has already earned his letter [gJ Ben II lo M l1ll "· . ' . study of Henderson at J~t half wl)o with 20 quarters of service to his § an n gr. ~ their goal . !me defense that has tosses those perfect passes for Peru. credit. !SJ M. G. Heuer, Owner lli1 been a h1ghllght of the current He weighs only 160 but can take IEI . illi campaio-n They held the vaunted care of himself . . ar:ybody .s game.. , mJ[g][glillJ[lj)[ij][ij][ij][ij][;JlllJ;g;ilJ:lllJ[i1'igjlllJ[iJ]llll[gJ!EllllJ[ij]@ m ,., ,., ,., Tigers and took the ball only a few Handley lettered four years in ~IEJfilJllll!EllllllllJIEJ[ij]lllJlllllilJllllillilllll!Jllllllll:1ll' feet from their own goal. Mather both football and basketball at McCUTCHEON. Mac fills in at i i: got off a good kick which was .re- Nemaha. He also came through Mt end and plays a bang-up game ~ Peru Recreation Parlors , turned to midfield. Ft. Hays with two-letters in track. For three on both offense and defense. He ~ Wesleyan, weak POOL AND SNOOKER . . sister . .of the mect·iat e1y proce ctect t o repeat the1r straight years he made all-confer- is another bright spot among the !ill "" NCAC will furmsh oppos1t10n for f" t d · · d d · ~i . , . . . . !rs nve, usmg en e:"eeps . ~n ence half-back in the Nemaha Val- crop of freshmen who will have ~ Otto Boellstorff Pr unbeaten Peru on .their own field,m tricky reverses to land m posit10n ley conference plenty of time to display his wares. ~ ' op. Lmcoln, Friday mght. f r eld 1 The attempt was Handley is only · """'"""""' ~ or a 1 goa · a ireshman but is He accumulated eight letters at '"'"":;;,""""lllllilJ[g]lllJ[ij]lllJlllJlllllllli1>illllmig The Methodist Plainsmen have · d by Fl d who broke through . t y k t rume oy. ·t well headed for a :etter this fall. He Grand Island, three in football and J;;J[ij][ij]!llJ[ij][ij][ij]lllJ[g]lllJIEJlllJllll[ij][ij]lllJ[ij][ij][ij][ij]lilJ[ij][lj) 0 to block the kick. Peru then ook will bear plenty of watching in the basketball and two in track. While ~ on1Y. a 6.-0 v1c ory ove.r. or it credit this year. Their best apthe ball and displayed their .power future . . "" DR. G. H. JODER ,, . . _ . w1·th th e "thi r d-c1·ty,, t earn h e gam"" their credit this year. Their be.st and ~peed as they blasted their way "Squirt" Handley is a cousin of ed all-state .honorable mention in l !I -Physician and Surgeon- ii ap~earance .was agamst Doa.;ie, 1::1" to the 20 yard line. They were his, another one of the tribe who three seasons of basketball. He is I@ Office at Milstead Corner which a field goal proved their stopped there as the quarter ended. helps boost Peru to athletic heights one of our '"white hopes" to streng- llll Office Phone 33, Res. 39 downfall. Peru has already taken DEFENSE HOLDS AGAIN with his ability at throwing the then our basketball squad this year· the measure of Doane with a. 20-7 In tJ:ie second canto trouble was victory. LastJ~ar the :cats- piled once more thrust at the fighting illl(g]lg][gj@[lj)[lj)[g][lj)lg]lg][lj)[lj)[lj][ij]~ill][lj)[lj)[lj][ij][g][gj[gf up thefr best score .of the season in •cats as the Tigers completed a their 32-0 conquest. of the hapless long pass to put the ball in the We Call For And Deliver Plamsmen. · shadow of the uprights. A spirited ~ Keep Your· Business At Home ll!) While the W¢sleyan· crew has defense was more than their line ~ [~ been short on scoring, al.so have bucks and end plays could over~ PERU CLEANERS ~ other teams 'in contests with Peru. come, so they were again denied riiJ Phone 62 ~ By Ralph Locke The 'Cats have, had' o~ly 27 points the admission into pay dirt. Tte ~§}:[[gJ~~[g][g][[[gj[gj[[§[g}[gj~fg][g][g][g][g)[g]~ chalked up against t,\:lem to date remainder of the period was even, "'=~========================~ as they have ran up I66 on opposing and the gun sounded as Henderson NIAA IN UPROAR chance to claim a championship in [g]§;gJ§§illJ§Jllillifiilllll§ilillilJlilJlllliill:gj·lilJ!Elllllllll!illiiW. elevens. They have a game average returne.d a punt to Ft. Hays 45. Heated and bitter have been the basketball. ; @ of 21 points, ·and should easily FT. 'HAYS SCORES Early in the race fans will se- jj DR. H. C. DALLAM l!ll maintain ~hat level in the Capital. An inspired Tiger eleven came arguments as to who is to receive lect their favorites and follow them ~ !El city Friday evening. back in the second half to sweep the bunting in the NIAA confer- through thick and thin in tra- ill11 DENTIST llll The Bobcats will.be favored by well into Peru territory. They en- ence. In pre-season negot Iat wns ditional "flatbush" fashion. Hot ~~ Office Phone 3Z, Res. 196 [ij] ~ a considerable matgin, but don't tertained the large crowd with a Peru and Chadron failed to agree contests are tq be a feature of this f)ll forget - football games are seldom series of passes intermingled with a on terms, there~y neglectmg to season's program, and excitement iilJlilJ[ij][jj;jg]@lilJ[iJJ§ll!i[ij]IEJ§~llllllllllll§mig;rgi won Gn paper. few deceptive reverses that put ~chedule their anrn;al game Later should highlight the activities. ~!El!EllllJ[iJJ§lllJllllllll!EllllllilJi1l:!El!Elillillllllll§llll§§illl!Ell h th o to th m the season Peru and Wayne, top llii f)li . ;. ;. ;. , t em on e 2 . Paron en car- ndend r tied 7_7. Kearney and .The support. of the student body lili THANKSGIVING il!I ~ ried the mail on a double reverse Wco tehs, d f O"lll. will be essential to the success of ~ l;J en c1:;i,more. or rec b - tl·1ese games; so come on over to @ ,;;, llli around 1eft end to score. The con- . ayne • • • •~ 1 version put them ahead 7-0. t10n as the only possibl~ teams that the gym and enjoy the comedy and @ Get your Thanksg1vmg lllJ MATHER BREAKS LOOSE could claim the flag, masmuch. as ·~port with the rest of us. ~ Greeting Cards now. Re· ~ Peru and Chadron were not playmg 'ff b II f · d ~ The Bobcats were by now thor- f f h d 1 K. ney ~ mem er a your nen s i€l By Jack Mcintire .. . u11 con erence sc e u es. ear ~ • "" oughly irritated and they fought . . t d W • ii;J and relatives. § ~··. . e1mmae ayne 1ast we.ek from Lg] § 1 bitterly as they returned the kick- th e t op byv1·rtue0f ,a 14- 0 t rounc FORGOTTEN m uAN l'il l~l ~llllONE YEAR AGOoff . They were stoppe d, an d a mg . of M ornson . ,s men. Th ey (Kear DO YOU NEED :: it r;:J . punt exchange followed. Mather ) th 1 .d 1 1 . t 0 the Definition-In sporting circles [ij] lllJ 1932 FQr the first time since Peru returned the Tiger kick fifty yards tney h Tenh ai ddlso eh c abim ar- this particular fellow is one whc rel FILM? @ possessed the football laurels of .. rop y. e mu e as een c1e "" for a touchdown that was null1f1ed d h t b th t works his heart out for the team illi the NIAA conference. The 'Cats. . . e somew a y e arrangemen s !El :: journeyed to Chadron and crushed by a cl!ppmg penalty: This was a for the Peru-Chajron tussle to take yet seldom receives recognition fol !El We a full line :: break that would discourage the 1 . G d d Th k his deeds This neglect is usually l!ll carry llll a highly favored Eagle team by the best of teams, but the Wheelermen P. a~e mD rainf P1s1an on atnthse- due to the fact that his work Ii!~~ of Eastman Film and I@ overwhelm,ing score of. 26-0. t· · . , g1vmg ay. eru comes ou ·· ' K d k con mued to play with the ne er. t th . b" d o a s. it . .. • v1c or ey w111 ~ crowne the though valuable 'is not as spect- ~-)( say-die spmt. that cannot be beaten:· h ·th t f th d Ch d acular as others. :< G y S d • c amps w1 ou ur er a o. a et our tu ent )( MASON IN SCORING ~OLE ron, by winning, would be tied with On our team is such a lad, who : :: TWO. YEARS AGOPeru completely dommated the Kearney. It's all up to coaches wears himseU t~ .a frazzle e.very Directory Here:<. Peru out-downed and out-yarded last stanza as .they took the ball Wheeler and Jones to point the cont:st and 1s :mumg at all times the Hastings Broncos but fumbles and ran the _Tigers ragged. They Bobcats for the Chadron mix, and to give everythmg he has for the llll !g)I d tl · h t · them employed their double wing back if they do as well as they did for the team. fa this case his showing at ®' )( Pthro~eh ctos Yd enfoug12 7 givd~ t formation to advance goal-ward. Hastings game--all's well the north end position is outstandesorenoa -ver1c. · · · !El The old tackle pass was brought mg but never has he gotten any ~ Murt Campbell and Luther Hut- into use as the two ends played the • mention for his valor. students- !El ~,!JI ten were constant threats, as War- right e1*l, ;of the line to make _ I raise my right eyebrow in salute lill )( ren Garrison led the winning at- Mason eligible to receive a pass. ~~~~~S PLA:!i T to the boy who has held his position ~ Peru, Nebr. Phone 112 tack. Henderson flipped the forward to TAINMEN _ down to perfection all year. His l lJ Where your m!lney buys more tllJ • Mase who trotted ten yards to Fun, plenty of it, is in the mak- name is BILL BROOKS, and at !lll _ _ _ ~ "" = ,.., Ill! mark up his first touchdown of ing. Coaches AI and Art are com- any home game you will find him !l!llllJ[ij]lllJ[ij][ij][ij][ij]lllJlllJ[ij][ij]lllJi1>J[ij][ij]i1>JlllJl<;illlll1"llllllll[g} the year. He then kicked from bining their collective ingenuity to at his station on the north end of The college is doing even better. FIVE YEARS AGOplaicement for the point to tie the provide entertainment for all. After the bench. Their team is laying claim to two The Bobcats enjoyed an open game up. The 'Cats got the ball lengthy discussions to iron out titles, embracing a bracketful of date to enable them to gain their after holding Ft. Hays after the minor details they will produce our • competition that is equal to any fet~le for the Kearney Antelopes, kickoff, and the line opened up for intramural program for the coming PERU FANS ARE GETTING team in its ovm c:lass. They have their opponents the followmg week- Lantz, Mather and Henderson as season. A TREAT been tied twice, once by the Ft. end. they carried the leather toward the Their objective is to present to Hays Tigers who are rated well Peru Prep downed Talmage 13-0 promised land once more. A fum- every boy in school a chance to The 1940 grid season is one that above Peru's level. on a muddy field. The entire Kit- ble stopped them, and the Tigers play basketball, volleyball, and soft- is giving Peru fans a thrill that The foundation of both Cat and ten squad showed vast improvement had the ball as the game ended. bell; and to give sideliners a thrill- they will long remember. Both our Kitten success lies in one thingover their previous appearances. PERU OUTYARDED ing time following this modern pigskin representatives are unde- superlative coaching. Wheeler and The Bobcats were outgained on vogue of guerrilla-type warfare. feated to date. Prep has won every Jones, for the Bobcats, have handthe ground 378 yards to their 193. New plans wi:I be patterned on game but one, the exception being led the players well, pointing them This was due to the fact that they the order of last year's. By-laws a 6-6 tie with the Tecumseh In- for the right games with uncanny '['EN YEARS AGOwere outweighed as a whole by 165 will be in effe~t to assure every dians. They have won the laurels foresight. Fisher has remodeled an The Kearney Antelopes felt the pounds. member that he will see action in of the Nemaha Valley conference, indifferent training school team full power of a Peru attack as they Bands from 14 high schools put every game his team is a part of. A and appear to be headed for an into an aggregation that plays his were subjected to a 45-0 overhaul- on an exhibition between the halves league will be formed and in the unmarred record in Nebraska com- aggressive type of ball. He gets ing. Young and Hatcher ran wild for the crowd's entertainment. The court sport a split-season will be petition. Their big worry is the work out of his lads that an ordinin the center of the nation as they tie leaves Peru among the few un- run off in rour.d-robin style. This strong Rockport team from the ary leader would find impossible to led the 'Cat offense. beaten college teams in the nation. will give more than one team a show-me state. command.

SPORTS

Cats Wi 11 Invade Wesleyan Friday

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CATERWAUL

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Sports Of Y~steryear

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Chatela1"n'S Jewe1ry . :)( ·


PAGE FOUR.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1940.

STUDENTS WIN CONTEST mother Had To ffiake ffiargie Practice INH. S.CITIZENS P•1ano Lessons Wh en SheWasWee Tot . Sounds like Margie! Have you pends upon the mood she's m but ever said that? Someone says, "Mar- semi-classical is always good. Degie is tickling those ivories again. hussy and Berlin are her favorite modern composers. For dancing Let's go listen awhile." she'll take Glenn Miller any day. Now to get you better acquainted Margery not only plays but comwith Margery Evans, she's a senior poses music. She has several comfrom that .little town of Shubert. positions of her own. Just sitting Margery began studying the art of down to the piano and making up piano playing at the age of four. ~nd music as she goes along is her a half years under the supervision hobby. If you've heard her you will of her mother, a music teacher at agree. the time. Five summers and on~ In the spring of this year Maryear in college total the time spent gery will present a recital. Her taking lessons. main work will be one of Beet"Mother had to make me prao,t- hoven's Sonatas and compositions ice," says Marge, "I was-:just like all by such famed composers as Schuother children. Standing at my man, Debussy and Bach back she'd clap her hands to, help · "My ambition is to entertain over me beat the right time. I'd get the radio," says Marge. Upon gradtired and start to leave Il).Y perch; uating she plans to teach music and then dad would add his bit by put- piano for a few years, then go on ting me right back on the bench." with a "Masters" in music as soon The type of music she plays de- as ·possible.

H

A;nnounced as winners in the Young citizens' contest for this county were thre= Training School students. They are: Bob Brown, junior; Arthur CJ;~ment.s, junior; and Mary Shirley Jimerson, senior. Other winners were Marv Alice Lehr of Auburn and Ker..neth Garber of Brownville. In a letter fro:n the WorldHerald, Mary Shi:ley Jimerson was informed that she was one of the winners in the district contest and is eligible to compete in the state contest to be held in Omaha on Nov. _ . 18 19

The 1940-41 Edition Of The Peru State Teachers College

The contest J;,., sponsored by the American Legion and the WorldHerald.

Student Directory

Freshman Party Plans Made By Committees The freshmen fall party is to be held on Nov. 30 in the Music Hall. Committees for this annual event are headed by Camelia Connelly, Margaret Goodridge, Julie Thomas, Melvin McKenney a::id assistants.

PERSONALITY CLUB Tri-Beta Party Postponed )))HAS ETIQUETTE QUIZ Cider and sandwiches were served Six~een members were present at· to Beta Beta Beta members on HOME EC CLASS TRIES the Personality C[ub. meeting "on Monday, Nov. 4. A steak fry had EXPERIMENT ON BIRDS Oct. 31. · been planned, but cold weather kept Marie Grotrian, Wilma Bartunek the members inside the laboratory. and Idella Buell were appointed, to A short business meeting was held the room committee, and Irene to vote on new members. Zimmerman was elected reporter. ;. f ;. A short etiquette quiz was led by Harriett Maxwell. ~j At the close of the meeting games were played under the direction· of ~o :Miss Lillian Thomas, and re.freshments were served. The next meeting will be held on Nov. 14. 1 On€e in a polka-dot moon, a f ;. ;. . .· stonn-walk's good for the soul. ArPeru Players Were entertamed on range an unhurried south wind Nov. 7 by ten-minut.e skits pr~sent- pushing warm, oblique rain . . . ed by sman group!\. ears 'kerchief-tied and galoshes A short business meeting" pre· squeaking damply. ceded the skits. ,

f p Ik D t a 0s

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.·k Ex h1'b"Its H·aRd"l•WOr . ,: ·:

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Girls of the ninth gr~de hoµie mecl1anics class have an mterestmg exhibit in Redfern's store windOJ"S· Some excellent pieces of work have been done by this class under the direction of their student teacher, Jerome Barnell. J. J. > Freshmen future dancers met on · . t d Nov. 7 t? review d_ance s eps 1earne at prev10us meetm~s of. Learn-t~Dance. Janet Eber~ provided music . and Edna Mae Peterson was agam the instructor. -f

Now Obtainable At The Following Places

In PERU EARLS CAFE

Girls Mechanics. Class '

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From the training school comes a first-hand account of an exper!ment by Miss Brackney's home economics class of ni::J.th grade boys. "Our experiment has been 'With two pigeons, one black and one brown. When we got the pigeons the bla'ck one weighed more and was. stronger. We fed the black one polished rice, which is high in Vitamin B, and the blsck one unpoiished rice, which is :1ot. Now, in the seventh week, the black pigeon has iack of nerve control, is unable to :.tand alone, and sits around with its eyes shut and has no appetite, while the other sit.s on it.s roost and coos.

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HOW TO GET DRESSED IN TEN MINUTES Obviously, this advice to follow is not for male consumption. Firstly, no inan would consider wasting ten minutes to dress; secondly, what man takes advice from a lowly woman? So fems listen-who knows, perhaps tomorrow morning you will. have to dress in ten brief minutes. In• order to insure positive surefire suceess, observance of a few simple rules the night before is required. Pick out the next day's costume, sew up all the bursted seams, secure a button for each button hole, .press out the wrinkles and lay away for rapid donning next morning Since there is a possibility of sleeping until 7:45-wouldn't that be terrible-set the alarm clock. Various make-up essentials should be gathered toge.ther-one can't afford two minutes to find a stray lipstick or comb. Let's pretend the alarm has just gone off. You dash to the sink, wash and then dash to where the c'.othes are. :'his writer always advmes appl1cat10n o_f clothes before make-~p-maybe its . slappy but supposmg you got behmd schedule. If you're the neat sort, you perhaps llke to make your bed before noon. This can easily be done during the few seconds remaining. Showers, breakfast can be had only on a half-hour schedule. There are, naturally, a few limitations to getting dressed in ten minutes-one of which is looking just like you'd dressed in ten minutes.

"The same thing will happen to St d N P k' to human beings, if there is lack of an on our own ea1 ar s p v·t . . . h'IJ d th th t 'of Pe 1 amm B, only there will be d1f1 ~n wa c a corner ru, ferent symptoms known as berisky~ht between thunders. We're beri." ' tembly small and harmless and the world could function rather well without us.

AVENUE STORE PERU CLEANERS BARNES PHARMACY

Football Banquet Plans

Made By Bobkittens

THE PERU POINTER

Birch firs, intermittently illumi- Plans for the hig'.J. school football nated like battered harpstrings a- b_anquet are under way .. ~e tenta. t' th k If th 't trve date for the affair 1s set as gams e s y f . • ey aren N birch firs, nature study sharks have ov. 29 · lost the mood. Maybe they're not T~e. ·chairmen are as follows: b"ireh f"irsat a. 11 won't f orget t o Juamta Connelly .' .general chairman·' 1'Ut them in a poem sometime, Ruth Kennedy, tickets; Bonnie though. Keoppel, program; Bob. Brown, decorations; Oscar E:mith, dance; • Wilda Hazelton, toqds. 1:

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CHATELAIN'S JEWELRY RED And WHITE STORE PERU RECREATION PARLORS SKELLY SERVICE STATION

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A typewriter clicking next door is ruffling. Nosing through a current Irene Bentzinger was elected basmagazine, you're vaguely jealous of ketball leader at the WAA meeting whoever's getting something done. held on Nov. 4. Practice~ will begin this week, according to the decision made at the meeting, and will be held in the e·vening, The hour for Other dorm sounds ... too noisy the practices will be posted on the clocks in lots of rooms,· · · shuffling bulletin board. bedroom slippers after eleven . . . "Chico's Love Song" in the Rec [gjmiilli!lJm[gj@m[gjiilJ[gji!lJ@§§§i!lJ§!lil[g]:r,J. Hall competing with "I Need Thee FOR SATISFACTION IN Every Hour" pianoed in Mount Ver- il!I non parlor. FOODS • § lllJ ~· MARDIS GROCERY ~ Nothing like wearing red for a pick-me-up. If that's why Whizzer 'll5.@§[gj[g]rg:§m§§!lil§[gjmiill§llil§§§[filj;j wears it, he gets results. Other !lll§m!lillllJ§§§§m[gj§i!J'lllli!lJiillillJlili§m11lli favorites in fabric . . . Jeanne Look no farther-look your bell$ Spier's autumn gold coat with the ll Haircutting A Specialty Paris Tag ... Kay Samuel's retiring , rig off of the size-12-for-boys coun- il!I Md B b Sh ~ ter . . . Prof. v. H. Jindra's six § BILi ern ar er LL3~n feet of roughest green suit, tailored ~ to the Nth degree. mJ!ili[gj§mmm[gjfilllllJlili!lilmlllllilillll[g]m~

PARRIOTT 66 STATION THE CAMPUS SHOPS

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HILL'S DRUG STORE PERU LUMBER CO.

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E. L. DECK & CO.

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Patronize The Rdvertisets Who ffiade This Directory Posisble!

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Leadin~ nominee for budlding llil

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artist-Marvin Thomas ... Notice IDGHER QUALITY MEATS § the Bobcat drumhead next time l !I LOWER IN PRICE l !I Cece Walker beats out swing @ C. H. KIZER, Prop. h th Phone 115 § r Y m. lg] • §filllllJfill[gj[gjlllJfill[g][g]g][ijjmfillmfill[gjj

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Lord Beaconsfield: "The secret il!I [11: of success is constancy of purpose." [gj E. C. McALEER ll!I Bet he thought of that while sawing l)l] Physician and Surgeon fill a well-exercised flank steak. Our Glen Bldg. AUBURN chef doesn't often oblige with pro- l1ll llil per setting for such mental pro- ~ Office, 5 - Residence 56 ~ fundity. · ;§~[g][g]§1filll[g]illlm§d

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Student Speaks ..

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By LeRoy Redfern

Tod Hubbell, Guest Writer

Last, week's column, written by a guest writer, Richard Severson,

brought such· a vast amount of eollllllent that I appealed for an opposer to refute it. After a certain amount of persuasion Tod Hubbell,

VOLUME XXXVI.

NUMBER 8.

PERU, NEBRASKA, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1940.

ffiale Choral Group· Scheduled

Lee Williams Swings Out at Formal "Ball Patriotique"

TO Rppear as December Event

an outspoken critic of the column, volunteered. _Thus all the credit and blame for th~ words to follow go to Hubbell.

150 Couples Dance at Annual Affair

• consideration

After duei I ha"\le Soft blue light, decoration in national colors and Lee accepted the open invitation by Williams "stepping tone" rhythm set the stage for the "Ball the writer of this column to refute. '· Patriotique" Saturday, Nov. 16. the article written last week by Mr. ' Each of the 300 "patriots" entering the gymnasium saw Severson. Before I go any further,· I wish to classify myself by stati>ng on the west side "God Bless America" in huge white letters that I, too, am a republican, poson· blue background. Two flags were crossed at each winsibly a stronger anti-new-dealer dow and red, white and blue United States shields decorated than the writer last week.. If I the south wall. Above the blue-clad band stand an eagle could have had the opportunity. to spread its wings, and lights made graceful red, white and vote this year, I may have voted a blue arcs overhead. straight republican ticket but that is beside the issue. The· question is: Received by Mrs. !nice Dunning, Did Mr. Severson rightly condemn . Mrs. Genevie Marsh, Faye Bouse, President Roosevelt? u Carolee Garver and Grace Muen• chau, gentlemen were given lapel In debating issue\; one of the flags and flagged dance programs. three primary factors that are ' Almost 150 gowns of different needed to make your case· concluscolors and fabrics made a colorful . 'Die .Marcnmg Men o:t:ong · · · K enne dy appeare d ive is whether it is practical or not. piet ure. Marione In the article which Mr. Severson The Marching Men of Song, a songs and sea scngs. The Peru students whose names rn blue satin; Betty Jean Miller in has presented, he has failed utterly male choral group, will be presented The program includes costumed will appear in the 1940-41 edition demure white lace on black taffeta; and completely to back his state- here on Dec. 6 by the budget com- dance numbers by the tenor-direc- of the "Who's Who Among students Elda Wyatt wore black net; Phyllis ments by anything practical.. He mittee. tor, Mr. Olark. in American Universities and Col- Dammast, Nina Kane!, Jean Winstates Willkie made a complite fail- Under the direction of Phil Clark,.. Uniforms of "gob" white, military leges" have been announced. kelman, Zola Vofsger and Elvera ure in the Hague' and Kelly' mach- the group features selections from coats and evening dress will be Mary Olive Richardson, Jeanne Schacht prnved the lasting popular!ne controlled areas and by· this ljght opera, grand opera, student worn by the men. Spie\l', Kay Bartling, Faye Bouse, 1ty of their different shades of pmk point he naturally infers the area Ross Russell and LeRoy Redfern and rose. Bee Fulton wore plaid was controlled ty Roosevelt votes. are the seniors who ha-ve been ta.ffeta and Helen Mastin a clever If we examine the complete return& chosen for this year's edition. cllecic. In picturesque hooped skirts of New Jersey and Illinois (Hague Jun i 0 r representatives include were Barbara Beal, Nancy Ellen and Kelly areas), we 'tind that Grace Muenchau, Janet Harris, Jones and Mary Grovenburg. Roosevelt ekeq a victory. out of Bill Fankhauser and Jack ColCarolee Garver wore candy . New Jersey by a scant 18 ·per cent glazier. stripes; Faye Bouse, bustle-back of the state's p'opi:rlar votes and Who's Who has been published taffeta and velvet in blue; the silver WiUkie Jost, in Illinois· by a 1.1 per "It was very_ worthwhile educa- poration, who escorted them home annually since 1934. It contains a sparkle in Erma Meier's red head cent of popular voltes- :Even though Uonally and socially," said LeRoy in his chauffered Chrysler. biography of the students and their added glamour to her black and attempts by Tammany to thw.art Redfern, in describing the Associat· Round table discussions were fol- answers given to a poll of fifty white . costum~. . tb,e reel.ectio!l o,f :rra.nklin R9<JSevelt ed Collegiate i>r.ess Qonveption heldjoW(!d l:/y.recreatio):lal ,p)lr!lµits. ,';l:'p,e .questions. The selections are1 ma(je. A girlish pmk nbbon gave con~'''f\Weef;;t11'e'''lrii'ck'it!g1'"~e!i''.1:l'f'lttfe~''ffi':fmtrolt~'frov1'11;-g;ia1fct~~'''"'1''''"1"'1'"''P'~'fii'·gr15u~'fii~Cl.'cf'1ji;".trlpm~O'"'d~n11··,'.By"'i{''f!i'.cl.11tf' commttt'ee:'''-·"'' ''1111 ''••··, .• ,,trast-·to,,Bl:lteen ·,Meier!s· aqua· ··for-· Wall Street politicians to .Wendell Peruvian delegates to the cooi.- ada after offehng sufficient identi- To be included in Who's Who ma!; M~dge Crump .w~re a fragile Willkie was only too conspicuous. vention were Rose McGinnis, editor fication to satisfy immigration a student must be outstanding in ~lue net, Je~nne Spiers black vel~ • . of the PEDAGOGIAN; Dean Karr, inspectors. They return® over the character, leadership, scholarship vet ~pht skirt showed blue. lace,. The United States News recently editor of the Peruvian; LeRoy Rea- Anibas...<ador sUspension bridge. and have potentialties of future Hamett Maxwell wore rust ~affeta., said, "The ~ecord now 1: seems to fern, business manager; Harold On the return trip to Peru they use.fulness to business and society. Kay Bartlmg black and whit~ flo- · suggest that it has been the person- Dallam, staff member and i>rof. R. took the lake shore drive into Chi- The purpose of the book is to wered stripe, and Margery Kmsey,. ality am.d · policy· of Mr. Roosevelt D. Moore, sponsor. cago, where they remained over serve as an incentive for students, plaid taffeta ~nd wme velvet. that has produced the hold on the · night. a recognition of past accomplish- Ice blue satm set off Grace Bovf f l' About 520 delegates came· from .. · · k' bl d 1 M t G d · ~e~ple and ·not the ~ fortsfo pohi- the four corners of the nation ac- The :local delegation agre~d '.~at ments, a standard of measurement m s b~n cutr fsf, t ~rgHare car nt er t1c1ans or the workmgs o mac ' they didn't car 0 much for big cities for students and a recommendation wore ac1c a e a, ope ar er; · cordtng to Rose ' and · · ' . · Hayes, aqua lnes." . . most. of them because "the people are too cold to the busmess world. pow·ct e1• blue sat'm,· Lms were from regions. She an d .·d.IS t an. . t" · "Is N eras b ka m . the taffeta' and Pat Patrick blue !net· • . the Dnae . f ·1- f It is time that we are in the was dehg~te~ with the r~al south- Union?" questioned- Pittsburgh deJean Hoa.gland's blue taffeta bore d bv $45 000 000 000 but this fact ern hosp1t~l1ty, and fascmated by I t 0 f P .. " little pink bows down the back and re ' ' .' ' ' . the southern drawls. "I was thrill- ega es eruni;.ns. ie balanced with the pomt that the . . . aGeneral satisfactiOlll with the trip . . Billy Dean utermohlen s lavendar level of ~mployment and of pay ~d at meetmb so. man7 glamorous, was expressed ty Harold Dallam taffeta changed with the lights. rollls is rising above that of 1921. mterestmg and . l!ke.~ble people m who said enthusiastically, "I've C 00 Other •Smart taff~tas were Marj. The steel industry is operating .at such a short time, Rose stated. never had such a wonderful Evans' black, Bermce Neddenriep's .. . t 1s · · · "The bo"s capacit]', emp1o:ymen nsmg . '. from Texas Tech · wore . before, and dJn't suppose I trip will Under the di'recti·on of P1·of · G · bl, ue, an d BettY Mcc·ardle •s bell-ofthrouP'hout industry at a faster rate the trickiest boots. No one coUJd . . .. Holt Steck, Peru's vocal departmetnt the-ball red. Red was also charmthan ~ever before that the arma- keep a long face long in the midst agam. was host to 61 singers, representing· ing on Vivian Tiehen; wine taffeta ment fact1iriesl ln .the east are of the Conventioneers," she added. ;. J ;. ten Nebraska high schools, Satur- was Phyllis Benson·~ choice; spanghummiing \vith foreign and domes- She refused to reveal her "salary" day, Nov. 16. led gold satin Pauline Stark's tic orders 'that total $5,000,000,000. to the Minnesota Daily editor and As students and teachers arrived Christine Alger's, crisp r'd and • . business manager who receives $100 to exchange ideas, the Perusingers v;hite. Willkie's. campaig'll was somewhat monthly for journalistic services. were in rehearsal. Following· a deDozens of individual styles in of a tribute to the last eight years Dean Karr, in discussing thEJ monstration by this group, instruc- satin, net, brocade, lame, velvetof F. D. R's. adn'l.inistration because meetings and speakers, stated, A Wilcox~Gay recording machine tors met with Prof. Steck for a demure, sophisticated, tailored, girlof the fact that hi& platform co- "Contacts made with students from was purchased this week by the rour;1d' table discussion 'and the ish. Coiffures up, down, laced, ribincided perfectly with those of the other schools were very valuable. English and speech departments for vocalists were divided for a section- boned, spangled. Slippered feet in New Deal; disagreeing only on a The biggest aid came in discussing classroom use. al rehearsal of Bach's "Now Let silver, gold, red, white and bluethil'd term issue, privacy of the mutual problems with other edit- The purpose of the machine is Every Tongue Adore Thee." now moving in time to smooth destroyer deal and a few other ors." In his·· opinion, the meetings to rer:_iove defe~ts in ones' speech. Presenting suggestions and prob- shuffling rhythm, again pausing for minor points. conducted by Medlin of Ka111sas . A 2 ~ 0 fee will be .charged for ~ny !ems for solution in the teachers' (Continued on page four) • University were especially interest- mdiviaual who desires a recordmg session were Georn·e Anderson 0 ..--~~~~~~~~~~ of his vmce. l ing and practical. If Severson condemns t he P,an Brock; Isabelle N. Swanson, Ham-• of goven_iment, he in turn con- Convention-goers met and talked J. ,. ;. burg; Leol\9. Libhart, Tecumseh; demns W1llk1e. About as 1.nconsist- with experts in many fields and Ruth Chatelain, Syracuse; Anne . ~nt as the man who d1dnt believe listened to nationally known speakWiebe, Dawson; Jack Hazelton, De m God and yet h~' stood on a so~p ers. Charles F. Kettering, inventor, 1 I Witt; Amelia M. Petersctn, Pawnee TUESDAY, NOV. 19 box and shouted, Thank God, Im engin~er, scientist, spoke to dele- 1 City; Lois Norris, Table Rock; an ateist." gates at the dinner in the Grand I. - - ' Ralph Chatelain, Peru; and Dwight · • Ballroom of the Book-Cadillac Students wio are completing E. Catlett, Wymore. But these are not the main argu- Hot e 1 convention headquarters their work at ~he end of this semConsidering the musical, social ments with which I contend, but where they were guests of General ester for a degree or a one, two and psychological principles of high rt~ther t~ey a~e smal'. compared to Motors Corporation at a five-course or three year diploma are asked by school choral conducting, they .. e cons1dera~10n whrc~ we. shoul_d banquet. LeRoy Redfern suggested E. H. Hayward to leave their ap- touched upon plans for extra sec;~ve o~r 0 '.ll.ef ex~~~tive 1~adt~is that W. C. Foder, foreign news an- plications at ~he registrar's office tional rehearsals, for alternate arime ?. crr~rs. . our e . mg alyst, was especially interestiillg. this week. rangement of singers, for consolidaauthorrties will admit ~he Pl'esident HighJights of the trip included a All applicatio:is are presented tion of various music groups mamelected, whether y.71llkie or Roos~- tour of the Plymouth plant by the first to the facuty for approval and tained by almost every high school Separate Convocations. 10:00 v~lt, must be receaved ?Y the public delf,jgates as guests of the Chrysler then to the s;;ate board of educa- and for meeting difficulties preSchdlarship Club ........ 7-8 w:th_ the greatesit consideration and corporation. It is reported by mem- tion; therefore, it is very important sented by a shortage of singers who Future Teachers of dignity. ~he case. :"hich has been bers of the Peru party that Harold that any stu:lent completing his could carry parts well. ~resented m oppositwn to ~osevelt Dallam and friend became lost at work at the end of the semester After lunch, guests danced to the America .. . .. .. . . .. .. . 7-8 ,I 18 an examlpe of ill-logical and this time and were rescued by the leave an application for his diploma college swing band in the student L Pi Omega Pi . .. . . .. .. . . . 8-9 (Continued on page four) vice president of the Chrysler cor- or degree at tte registrar's office. (Continued on page four)

Who's Who" Studen ts named

East Meets West at Detro1't c0IIeg1ate ,· press conventton ,

Cl'1n'1c Draws H'1gh Sh I S ingers

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Recording machine

STUDENTS

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PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE TWO.

Published Weekly by The Peru State Te.achers College .Peru, Nebraska

19, 1940.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER

Faye Bouse, Dunbar Lass, Known r......... . -- ... • Cat Claws As Midnight Philosopher l____~

"Sleep is a waste of timei' an- in the principles of a girl known Ye columnist does not claim to Entered at the Postoffice at Peru, Nebraska, as Second · hb . be an authority on the subjects • 11ounced Faye Bo·JSe, Dunbar, sen- t o her dorm ne1g ors as the "Mid. . Class Matter. $1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc . . night Philosopher." Frequently the contamed herem. Rather, glean. • . 10r, as she set out at sunrise for bb k ings from various sources have been Rose McGmms Ed't . . 1o Y c1oc tolls wee hours as pals . Th · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·A·· · : · .' · · Ed!tor cold autumn ten!l!S. "It's IIke gathered in room 102 enO'age in jotted down for the benefit of the I or spinach-good for you but leavin<> . . topic . more b M aryon I h L k omas . · ... · . · · · . · . · · · · · . · ... · . . ss1sfant S · . ' b g2.b sess10ns-mam often weary coed who has had time only for term papers and tests duri.ng R a p . oc e ........................... ; . . . . ports Ed!tor it out you can get so much more life than Jove. Melv1~ Mc~enney ................ Assistant Sports Editor cake." "Don't you think we are 94 per the past wee~, lest the other side Meredith Jimerson ·. ·. · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Copy Reader Faye wouldn't tell her physiology ·cent responsible for shapin<> our of her educatwn be sadly .neglected. 'na Kane! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Proof Rea der and h,yg1ene · . pro fessor th at , but m · dest·1mes. · ?" she senous . 1y quest10nb . To · any . man who has . disregarded Nl . Ad · th 1· ht f h d' . 'f' d · t d th . b · 1 . · the title and read this far-con1 . orence ar m . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v1ser e 1g o er 1vers1 1e m er.. e e. ga c1rc e recent y. Then, t' f M t M FI · t ·t · tl th 'di becau h · f k d inue, or you may get to underReporters: Milton Schulz Matgery Kinsey LeRoy Redfern es s, I is apparen Y more an I e . se s e is ran an unassum- t nd th d . t b' t · ' .' . ' theory. Aside from her teachers mg, laughed at her own "sermon- s a e coe JUS a wee it bet er. Betty M11l~r, Mona Morelock, Jea~ Ha1~h, Janet Harns, training (about which she is very istic" phraseology. She believes it Fair dam~tls, are you hav'il!lg Jeanne Spier, Myrton Hall,, ~hylhs 'Yilberg~r,_ ~or~thy mrnest) this hqnor sturlent of the though, and declares that with de- difficulties in getting your man? Armstrong, Harold Lant:t', Ardis Carmme, V1rg1ma Kmg, commerce and math departments termination and will power anyone Perhaps your technique is all Ruth Stoneman, Sarene Hauptman, Marjorie Fidermutz, finds time to engage in her favor- cap carry out. a plan within his wrong. Rufus H. Jones, writing for Tod Hubbell Anselm Johnsofl ·Jack Mcintyre, Emma Ro- ite sports, hit pin and basketball, capacity of achie,vement. "Madamoisellel' lists these methods sicky, Elvera' Schacht, Isabel Tynon, Bill Zurbrick, LeRoy to read Carl Sand·ourg, to swim, to Born at Dunbar, Faye is third which he maintains have worked Durst Ralph Locke. dance and to est Jonathan apples from the top in a family of eight successfully for others: , ' in amazing quantities. A member girls and two boys. She has never 1. Companionship approach. He of the Pe[·uvian staff, Kappa Delta owned a doll or a girl's toy. At likes bird-banding; you do too. Pi, Scholarship Club, Commerce 11, she had 10 pocket knives, a 2. Material. Se\v~·-on-his-buttons NOVEMBER 21 Club, Sigma Tsu Delta, Gamma toy train and three pairs of overalls. approach. America's great Thanksgivings have fallen' in her sever· Chi and Alpha Mu Omega, she per- Today she isn't domestic; (eligible 3. Feed him and listen. How-Iforms solemn duties as dorm coun- bachelors will kindly drop out here. do-admire you stuff. est struggles. The Puritans, ill their dire need and danger, cil prexy, and three times a month Bousie wouldn't make a good old 4· You-fallcinating-man angle were possessed with a thankful h~aft. Thankful people fre· lets Freshman Learn-to-Dancers maid) can't cook, prefers yard a11ct trefld on her toes. garden work to sewing and dusti:nop He'll love you for appreciating him. quently are, those who po§sess little, yet feel the goodness and "What do I expect from four swinging. 5. Different-from-the-other-men years at Peru?" ''I came to prepare Twelve o'clock and the Midnight approach. It's such a relief to know the worth of life. for teach1·ng and ~ow along wi·th Philosopher saunters next door. Re- a man who is interested in "OU for In the complexity of the ph.sent day many are orphaned that, most of' us are·'learning to Jive spending absently to her neighbor's your mind, you convey subtly. , from the stimulating source of gratitude. But in the harvest purposefully." "Have a Bed," she begins, "You 6. I-know-you're-not-interested"To live purposefully"-key words !:r.ow, I've been thinking-" in-women-angle. Get him on his blind side. festival of Thanksgiving we may recapture something of its 7. Dependent approach. You can't native spirit, and with it, a sense of the reality and color and Sigma Tau Delta and Kappa Delta live without him. · Art Club Will Pi organizations. simple joy which belongs to everyone. 8. Helpless>-babe angle. He's so Exchange Block Prints Betty Irwin and Les Gump were big and strong. The Art Club will exchange block married September 11. They are prints made at Peru with other living in Nebraska City, 9. Orchids-and-taxi stuff. An ex· college,1; and schools in the United pensive woman may flatter his THANKSGIVINGt t t 't ~ States. 50 prints made by students 1 vam y. .· Europe, 1620, ~a land of war and rumor of war, persecu- in American schools will be received 1" I '1' Def'mitely-not-interested-in· tion and hate. in exchange for those sent from S marriage line. He'll change your Peru. These exchange prints will be ._. mind (you hope). In America a small band of religious fanatics with cour• exhilli.ted later in tr.e year. 11 Busy-this-evening approach. .t Id d f. d th . h' h Soap carvings by the Art 306 The thrill of voting in your first Mehtion your studies or another age enough to raee unto angers to Ill e possession W IC presidential election - your candi- man. h h h' G d h . h d class are being exhibited in the case d t 1 ;i:hey held most dear,,t e rig t to wors 1p o as t ey WIS e • on the second floor of the library. a e oses. 12. Run-the-qther-way ·business. Despite their suffering from famine and disease, despite The1~ carvings are models of ~tay horn~ ~rom a good show, Hard t? get, eh? He'll get you. some, style of building or some Imm the m1dn1ght 011, p~epare for 13. Silent-mystery angle. He can't -·tfie foss of aearly half .their .number whom they dared not architectural feature Much has the test even so fa: as cnb notes:- understand you; keeps coming back been studied recer.tly. Greek tern- the professor calls rt oft for more. give decent burial for fear of exposing their weakness to ples, Roman temples, Roman tr!- Rush madly to an eight oclock 14. Wide-~yed button-twisting umphial arches and models of r:a~s, congratulate yourself on ar- approach. Pnm1t1ve stuff. hostile Indians: these people set aside a day of thanksgiving Doric, Ionic and Corinthian col- nvmg. a moment before the last In case you're undecided as to umns were most popular. bell nngs-the. prof. <ioesn't show what technique to try first, 1-6 are to the Lord who had given them a bountiful harvest. J. J. J. up. . recommended; 7-13 are frequently Europe 1940, a land of war and rumors of war, persecu· The ideal man approaches in the effective while 14 is dangerous and library, you think, now he's going :not new. tion and hate. A land when the Four Horsemen of this /'ii •...••• : to Mk for a. date-"Say, what's So here's to all males, however ~ ll«J.J., 1.his about a test in government?" sappy. Apocalypse run rampant. Your roommate tells you that you It still takes a man. to make a In America a grateful nation sets aside a day to return By Grace Jfuenchau have a letter, must be cash from woman happy! home-a library fine. f J. f thanks to the Lord who has given them peace and plenty in a

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ACP CONVENTIONSuch a professional gathering of young people as that attended by four local students in Detroit last week is significant in these times. In ho other nation would such a meet. . • ing of young people be possible. In no other country m the world today is there such comparatively unrestrained free-

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Study like a good one, while your

Have you received your copy of

A. L. Biehn, Pe::u-vian, wrote an article entitled "?rom Hothouses in to Life" which was recently published in the Nebras'.'a State Educational Jommal. At the annual teachers convention, Mr. Biehn was elected president cf District 1. c. H. Rhodes, county superintendent of ;;leward county, is treasurer of the same county. Wayne Reed of Nebraska City was elected vice-pre-

friends read magazines -and enjoy bull sessions-they pull down the good grades. A package slip, wonderfuli to contemplate, coull be food from home or candy from the boY friend-Your laundry. . . . Sunday night, the telephone rmgs, must be a date-sorry, wrC/llg nun_iber: . Life is llke that!

the schedule of the 1941 basketball season? If not, you may secure one at any of the local business places. These cards are compliments of the Peruvian advertisers. Show them your appreciation by giving them your business. J.

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New records and a dancing contr.st featured the high school dance held Friday evening, Nov. 15.

sident to District 2, and .All.en ~· Lichtenberger of Beaver City rs With this freedom, so unique in the contemporary world, president of District 5. goes the responsibility of the nation's youth being SO well Grace M. Peterson, Peru librarprepared, so well read and widely experienced, tha~ they may ia,n, wrote about "Teacher's Opporbe conscious the opportunity for carrying on this tradition. ttmity" which article appeared in . the current issue of the Nebraska Great European journalists have fled to this country as to a State Education:al Journal as well " refuge, a haven of opportunity. Last week's Associated Col· as an article by Mrs. Viola Wea- And it came to pass in those And they arose and went forth le"iate Press Convention with its f h g f 'd f therfield of Auburn on the "Nern- days two damsels were abiding in giving all dfiligence to the way "' ree exc an e o I eas o • aha CoU11ty Rhyth:U and Tonette the same room. which they had chosen. fers hope for the ftture. Band." There were accompanying Spoke one unto the other saying, For many days they abideth by J. f J. pictures of the grot:p0.• "A dire disaster has befallen thee the covenent. Blanche Freeman is teaching at a~d me. Wherefore we would be And on the twentieth day the secAuburn, Nebraska. She has charge sl!m and g~aceful even as. the· wil- on~ damsel spoke unto the first CRUEL WORLDof the commerce department there. ~o: .:ree, daily we gameth m pound· saymg, "Be not deceived, though Pernviilll1S return:ng at formal- g · , . . we bestow all our nch food unto Life is cruel! Instructors vie with one another pouring ·me·-D N D And the other answenng said, the poor and consumeth nothing tl . an auman_ arre1 1 a· "A . t . . ' work on jaded. students. The weather is miserable, featuring hodney Ra - Lindeku~el S ·lvia Ulye, sis ~r, woe Is .to me and to yet do we wax fat. What say ye . A' Y . " ' J' thee. Daily our raunent groweth nGw, wise sister?" icy walks which are trodden with fear and trembling; and a me1, gnes Harrisor., Lorrame Baub' d. Wl t room, so cold in the morning that your teeth can't stay in one man Maurice Martin Rus ell Ba'_ m mg. . ia · suggesteth And the first damsel, sorrowing 1 more 'B b H ' s thou, who are wiser than me?" most of all made answer "Yet shew place long e1;1ough to be brushed. That check from home 1ey, 0 a11aday, ~aymond Sears Th th th f t · · r ' Russell Wallace, LucJle Sherman' loud ~~i~uon t~ i~s ' s~~ng. i~: L ~nto thee a more excellent way. hasn't put in an appearance yet and the bid for the formal, Marguerite Robison Blanche Free~ d' t' e 1 e . m1 er, Joice . e us thence to the land of the h ·ch w s · tl1e bag h ws u ·n your roommate's cket man Elda V", tt F', ie mg never fail th. Let us hence- Cafeteriaites and there eat and be w I • ·a. m ' S O PI PO • • ' .J a • .rn.e walkeL. forth and straightway make a cov- merry for dieting profit us inoY es, hfe 1s plenty black. Two Peruvians tes,chmg at Doug- enant one with the other to be not thin"'." But .wait-there's a rift in the clouds. "Bake" announces las are. Marjorie EUil and Marie partakers of rich meat and bread." A~d they did go and thev did . f . (A d . Wellms1ck. Marjorie was Peru's And they made a convenant one eat and they did make merr " a cut m ood pnces.. penny save 1s a penny earned, you 1939 . May Queen with the other sa,,· · I say unto youy. diet. . . . .. . Jmg, "Wherefore ven·1y, verily, know). Moreover, JOY of JOYS! shortened schedules Wednes· M1s.s V1rgm1a Tnvel~, '40, is I will not be negligent to put you ing damsels of the land of the day before Thanksgiving. A new lease on life is now in teachmg English and music ~t Cook, al~ays in .remembrance of these Cafeteriaitei>, go thou and do likeorde R S Nebrask:a.. She wa~ active m cam- things when temptation over- wise. For if! a damsel be fat let r • • Pus affairs, partic:ilarly in the whelmeth thee." her be fat. '

dom of national press as in the United States.

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para bl e 0f o·1etrng . DamseISReveaIS we·ighty moral to Co-eds


PERU PEDAGOGIAN

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1940.

PAGE THREE.

Carve the Chadron Eagles for Thanksgiving! Bobcats to meet l'Wh;;t"M~k~;·reru's Team Click) Prepsters Point Eagles for nIAA 1 For Final Game At Rock Port Champ.1onsh·1p H:I!:m!:~:o~o~:~= i~~e~a~~ ;::~sht~pco::.

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By Barney Haith

Bobcats no end in

lettered two years each in football and track. He was conference winner of the mile last spring.

Game To'Be Played At Grand Island

SPORTS

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.ryeaT · 1,· Sports Of Xeste

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. By Jack Mein. tir~ . . ,

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ONE YEAR AGOThe Bobcats ran up. , their biggest score of the year, a 32-0 conquest of Wesleyan's Plainsman. The ct appitol ctarrielitthetahttack o eru In e ll'S Q\lar er, reatening to score several- times. Baldy Henderson ran 84 yards to score on the first play of the second quart(jr. This WB.9 .the six-ply wallop that set the precet'!ent for the Cats for the. remainder. of the evening.

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.... TWO YEARS AGO. AIthough out-played, the Wesleyan team upset Peru 6-0 in Lincoln. The outstanding play of fresh-

• Pe.m's fighting Bobcat~ will be playmg for all or nothmg when they engage the Chadron Eagles at Grand Island Thursday. The stakes will be the· NIAA Championship and top honors in the state league. The Wheelermen will be in top condition, and should be able to play their best brand of ball. The Eagles will be very hard to beat because of their 26-0 trouncing last year in ·the final game. They will be keyed to the highest pitch. They are plenty tough any time and ·will be doubly bent oo winnin~ now. Organ will be back, and will be very valuable at his tackle position. Dougherty is mended and nothing short of death will stGp him when he ,gets on a rampage. Peru's. ground attack mixed with their aerial offensive will be hard to beat, but if Chadron gains a break or two the outcome will be in the hands of fate. Jack Mcintire,. Ross Adams and Ross Organ will be pla:ying their final game for their Alma Mater. Those three will be worth watching as they wind up their football careers. Mather and Henderson will

'• ies Red Dean and Coodles McHugh caught the eye of Coach AI Wheeler as the fighting Bobcats went down to de.feat.

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FIVE YEARS AGOThe Wildcats of Wayne scored thrill' . t f ht' mg 7-6 VIC ory over a ig mg Peru eleven. The game was the best of the season. Peru's attempted field goal in the fourth quarter was blocked by Wayne to enable them to hold their lead · .

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'TEN YEARS AGO-

coach Lon Graf's team handed the Omaha Indians a wilting 50 _0 trouncing to keep the cats in the winning column. The Bobcats tied for honors in the NIAA that year. i

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Dougherty Conscripted ·Allison Dougherty received his papers to fill in for enlistment in the national draft last Tuesday. He is the only man in college to get the call, and he will not have to go to camp until next J:une. )

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Both Teams Have Unbeaten Records

• Coach Harold Fisher's elev€'!1. will tangle with Rockport high school Thursdav, over in the show-me state. • They will be fighting in defense • of their unbeaten record. To date they have won every game but one J·E RR Y ~IVINGSTON plays RED HINES plays right tackle. in which they· tied Tecumseh's Inguard. He hailo from Rowdy Mc He has not seen much service this dians 6-6. ;>,j Intue's town of Nebraska City, Last fall but s:hould have plenty of Rockport' will have a weight ad-' year he was pushed by several chances to strut his stuff next sea- vantage of better than five pounds newspapers . for aU-state, but he son. Red lettered in all three to the man. They are generally narrowly missed recognition. sports at Barneston. He holds the rated as the pre-game favoritesAthough he may not letter this 8?utheas~ Nebraska record in the but not in Peru. Prep will have a.. fall, he is a valuable player and discus with a toss of 130 feet. lighter and faster squad and if the turf is slick and muddy they wilt. be able to run circles around their w .. ' ' · opTpohnents. ! e members o the Kitten team are very confident of a victory; By Ralph Locke ,Most of them say by two touchdowns. If they do even half as ••• • • • • • • • • • ••• •• • • • • •. •... • • • • • • .. , • ,, •• ~ well as they seem to think they As the 1940 grid season draws to Mather's 72 yard kick L t k will they should win by at leas'\: . . - an z crac - 30 points. a close, now would be an appro- 1~g ~he lme to finally score-The Bob Brown, who has been out of priate time to look back over the h'.lanty of the team after Mason action due to a fractured .t highlights of the season, as they kicked the point to tie the game. will be in there part of the ~:e: happened in each game. • He thinks that Rock Port will leave • the game with their record broken, d ,Hastings game - Mason's long an Peru Prep will ha.ve their first :n th2 York Game-Peru's touch- kickoffs-Peru's machine-like march perfect season in several years bbel wkin~ll resttedall, atnhd if th!ey hget atny down on their first ;:il:l.y of the sea- for their first score-Mason's fi'eld Rock Port will be depending on oc g a ey W1 I s ow he Ma Fl tl · . · th . son- ther's four touchdowns- goa1- oyd's two blocked kicks and ie1r power, and will probably use 1 more heels run a centipede H~~dlet§ .11assi.::ig-:::::T:he ,,.Cats hold, general .line play-Peru's goalline t~eir strong ground attack: Preµ ~;es a· ing York who had a first touch- stand stopping the Broncos-Mac's will probably resort to their aerial. Lyle Mason will be ready to pot down on our three-Floyd's touch- smart signal calling when he sent attack, and the deception of their poiillts after touchdowns or .!tick down when he .recovered our kick- Lantz for three line bucks till the end sweeps and reverses. field goals as chance will have it. off in the end zo::ie-Mason's extra end of the first half-Mather's other li~emen Roberts and Floyd points. thrilling run for his touchdown- ™llfilfililllil[i!J~~ al?ng with Callan . at quarterback Robert's block and the last man on Look your best will be primed for line play as only • that scoring play- Smith's fine Ha.trcuttmg A Specialty they can produce it On paper Peru h · looks ood but· ,,;at h t-:.th . Up at Doane _ Mather's two ~ owmg at end-Organ's outstandgt od c ou eir touchdowns ag•tnst the ability of mg play until he was injured-HanModern Barber Shop opponen s are ~o , too. flashy Red Ni~hart-:.Peru's hand- dley ~ying d~wn with the ball till ~ BILL LLOYD )I The game will be sponsored by ful of partisans drowning out the ~he f1.nal whistle sounded. It was \1llillJ[i!J[gji!WiJll!Jm11li[i!Jllilfi<i!WiJi!WiJ[i!Jll!Jli!Jflilllil'if"" the Grand Island Chamber of Com- 11 rm· f th D d m this game that two spectators " u ~ ~~'bJi1!1 c ee g o e oane . pep squa . were . """"="'"'"~ ~ merce. overheard as Hastings had a i1lli1!Jl!!Ji1llMi1!J[gjli!J[gji1!Jli!Jli!J~[g]rgj[g]lliJl!1J[g][g]"-

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ROCK RACHOW is the 205 pound bulwark at left tackle. Rock hails from Carleton where he worked under Les Mosely, former Cat athlete. He has already earned his numeral and will bear much watching in the future.

• DUANE WHITE, the six footer at left end who shines at snagging passes. Whizzer is a former Superior star. His athletic inclinations vary, as he is a high hurdler in track and plays a pretty salty game of b~~ket ~all; . w. ite didn t letter this fall, but suff'.cient unprovement on his defensive game should enable hm to garner a "P" in football next fall. •

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PERU PREP BANQUET FRIDAY, NOV. 29 The annual Peru Prep football banquet will be hald Nov. 29, at 6:30 p. m. in the Home Ee rooms' of the training school. It is open to alumni and high school members. · li'ickets are now on sale and may be secured ·from Ruth Kennedy, 'DQ!lna Steffen, Ralph Cle.venger, . Patricia Hill, Billy Redding, Paul Ogg or Bonnie Arstrong. The price is 35c and tickets will not be available after 6 p. m. on Nov. 26. J. J. ,.

· Hu tt on In Ca l1'f orma Luther Hutton, versatile midget a.thlete, is now in Los Angeles, cal., according to recent reports. He left school in October, hitch~king down to Alberquerque, New ;~x. He visited there with relatives. . and went on to tlie coast. He plans !Jett.urn to school for the set:ond ...,mes er.

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n~ fa~her-look

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Thei boys in blue will have plenty of support as the marc4ing band is to make the trip. They have chartered a bus, and with the aid of :Athletic department funds will be able to meet expenses. They are scheduled to march on an exhibitio,n between balves.

> > > BOXING CLUB NOTES . . Shmy Durst's ooxmg cl~? '.1ow has a membership of 25 ~ug1l!st1c characters. The group 1s composed of collqge students, faculty members, business men and several of Peru's men-about-town. """ . orgamzed . f i ue c1ub 1s or recreat!onal purposes and to teach the art of self defense._ Jerry Garbe;r .mamages the busmess end of affairs. . . diAs'dinstructor, . t LeRoy'thDurst th gives m vi ua.1 pom ers WI e hope of producmg a Golden Gloves squad to compete in the cJ.istrict meet. The monthly fee of 75 cents provides for aJll expenses incurred and has paid for the complete regalia of equipment including: ring, light and heavy punching bags, skipping ropes, training gloves and regulation mitts.

e When Midland came here-Peru stopped them five times when they had a first down and goal to goMcintire·s tack!~ that stopped the opponents on a fourth down-Floyd blocking a punt :md recovering to set up the first touchdown-Mason's perfect extra point, and the comp'.ete deception of the seco~d one when he passed to Math.er m the flat-:.Linder's injury in one of the goal line standfc-Freshie Richards tossing aside his helmet as he blocked for ball carriers-Atwood's touchdown on the end-around.

first down on Peru's five-One had ~ baen here for the Midland game is: Peru Recreation PJirlors , and the other was from Hastings- ~ both were rooting for the Broncos. ~ POOL AND SNOOKER Said the fellow from Hastings-"Oh ® Otto Boellstorff, Prop. Boy! We outta get a score now!!" ~ Other fan replied "Aw H-1! r saw /®[i!J[i!Jllillll]ilJi[g][i!Jl!1J[i!J'.illllilllil[1!J[i!Jli!J[g][i!Jl1lJ[g]§rg:[[!fil t?e Midland game and they had a f'.ilJ[gjl1lJ§[g]§j[g][g][g][i!J:gj[g][i!J:gj[g][g]§rgj[gjifill!J§fli1'it first down and ten on Peru's six [1!J ~; inch line nine times and never did ~ PERU BOWLING iliJ score.'_' Another amusing incident CLUB ~ of this game was Mcintire: yelling [gJ Ladies Welcome at All Times ll!l at Handley to let the ball roll every llil Ben Hanlon Mgr. 1€1 inch. ~ M. G. Heuer, Owner ~ llli ~ • rniml!ID!lll!lli!J~llfilfilil!llJ[!j]i!WiJfl!i~li!J[i!J@

At Kearney- Mather and his 35 yard touchdown jaunt-Peru's 20-6 . tha t opene·:i th eir . conference wm act1·vi't1·es -Buc k Dougher t y ma king his touchdown.

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At Ft. Hays-The program booklets filled with pictures of Bobcat players-Perus three staunch goalline stands-Masons touchdown on the1 age-old tackle pass-Floyd blo ck.mg th e T.1gers attempted field goaI t o keep the game tied-Mather's 65 yard touchdown run only to be called back-. '

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When Tarkio was here, for Homecoming-The fever of the occasion which was spread through the crowd-Familiar faces of yesteryea.rs, happy recollections, etcMather's first tJuchdown on Snider's reverse -Henderson's broken field running and his scoring thrust The club meets twice weekly in through tackle-T::ie color of the the City Hall on Tuesday and marching band as they appeared Thursday evenings. Bi-monthly boxing cards are arranged with mem- for the first t:me in their new bers pa1·1.1·ng off for the pro11:ram. uniforms-The high school bands ~ that marched-especially Nebraska Two such exhibitions have been City's with their seven M:ajorettes. held to date, and both times more than 250 spectators have turned out to enjoy the show. The next card • open to the pulllic will be held on At WaYne-Dean's injury in the ~ei ;r:l;!~~y; ey~~: following the fµ-§J; pµi,y::;:-Pe,t:lJ.'s ,Jam~c.i gqa!line rn..nksgiv!ng vacation. stand being effective once more-

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THANKSGIVING

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DO YOU NEED

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ICY FIELD CANCELS PERU-WESLEYAN GAME Th

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member all your friends llll and relatives. ,rgi

Chadron- ? ? ? ? ? ? ?

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Get your Thanksgiving ~

Greeting Cards now. Re·

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bt [gJ e annu game e ween Peru ~ and Nebraska Wesl~yan was can- [gJ celled last week due to weather "" ~j "' conditions and the condition of the ~ playing field at Wesleyan. The turf ~ [gJ was frozen solid, and any attempt [gJ i1ll to play on such a surface would [gJ illl be very dangerous to players. : The only game left is the Chadron tussle to be played in Grand Island.

We carry a full line of Eastman Film and Kodaks.

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Peru, Nebr. Phone 112 IE Where y~ur money buys more


PAGE F~UR.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN Lee Williams Swings Out at Formal "Ball Patriotique"

;Estes Conference Reviewed at YW In an atmosphere suggestive of Estes campfire ID:eet~ngs, Faye Bouse directed the smgmg of Estes ~ymns at the joint YW-YM meetmg, Nov. 2. Reports cancer.mg various activities at c~mp were given by stu~ents atte.ndmg the Rocky Mountam district session last summer. Faye l!ouse spoke on "The\ Daily Scheduie." . V~ous metho~s other orgamzat1ons use to fmance their activities, as revealed irr the Asct:ociation Leadership meetlnts, were re~i~wed by G~ace ~uenchau .. Bob Williams explame~ · 'I'!;e Regi?n~~

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Original contributions were read and discussed :Jast Thursday when the Scribblers met at the home of Mrs. B. K. Baker. Rogene Rose reported. to the group on "English Usage." June Hamilton and Ervelyn Rogers were appointed as a committee to plan a party for next meeting. J.

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SOPHOMORES PLAN PARTY

TO BE HELD NOV. 29 The sophomore class met last Monday to discuss plans for a class party to be held in the Music Hall Nov. 29. · Tickets will be on sale at 25 cents each until Wedneooay, Nov. 27. Tlle entertainment committee·· plans games and dancing.

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Physician and Surgeon ~ Electric S:koe Shop ~ ~ Glen Bldg. AUBURN ~ Shoe Repairs of All Kinds ~ :~ Office, 5 _ Residence 56 @ ~

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ChnIC D~aws High

Student Speaks

(Continued from page one) radical composition which will hinder rather than aid this aim. Never before in the past generation has there been such an immediate need for unity among the people of Aerica. We must work with and J. J. J. for our President. AS Wendell Willkie, the defeated candidate C. C. A. Hears Lives ·said, "He is your President and my President." ' Willkie continued to Of Two Archbishops. . stress the need for working with At a meeting of a. a. A. Nov. 12 rather than condemning our Presiltosemary Tiehen read artides con- dent, pledging· himself to this purearning .Catholic education. Edna pose. Mae Peterson gave brief biographies 1 -of two famo~s Catholic archbishops. Of course, some of you will say Betty Miller and John Schutz this is contrary to the principles of Will lead the discussion at the free speech. We will become sub. meeting Nov. 26. versive to a one-man government. Plans were discussed for a win- Fear ye not, for the past presidenter party. tial campaign was the greatest ex~ ~ -,. ample that our freedom of speech . M ud and act 1011 w1'11 cont'mue. Maxwell Gives Frosh slinging and demonstrations by the · Pointers On Etiquette public made this one of the hottest contested campaigns for a long 15 Personality club m®lbers time, this acting to . guarantee a heard Harriett Maxwell speak on continuation of our freedom and general etiquette Nov. 14. As a sup- riahts. · plement to the etiquette quiz given b 9 during the last 111eeting, behavior our newspapers are beginning to :1n the cafeteria and on the campus realize our necessity for unification was discussed. . . and are helping the administration The next meetmg wrll be held greatly by their columns and ediDec. 5. torials. Thanks to \such men as ~ ~ J. Raymond Cla.pper, Walter Lippman SCRIBBLERS READ, DISCUSS and Roger Babson (defeated Prohibition candidate for President). ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTIONS

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Gamma Chi Revises Present Constitution

(Continued from page one) ~ cider, wafers and orchestra special- A revised constitution was adopt- ~ ties-all part of the kaleidoscope ed at the meeting of Gamma Chi JljJ fil] lffi @ that is Peru's fall formal. last Wednesday evening. t;!Jfil]fil]~fil]fil]fil]cgJlifillifil]fil]fil]fil]§illJfil]fil]fil]fil]§~ ilfilll1fil]fil]fil]fil]fil][g]fil]fil]fil]fil]fil]@lfilj;i§§i1JJ@:gJfil]fil]~ In charge of decorations were Foll~wing thE- business meeti~g fil]fil]@fil]fil]fil]fil]fil]li!Jfil]fil]li!Jfil]§fil]fil]§§fil]fil]fil]fil]§Oi1 · Kay Bartling and Edith Willey. Bob the girls danced. Janet Hams, l!ll ~ Koontz assisted. Responsible for Grace Muenchau, Joyce Stark and FOR SATISFACTION IN KIZER'S MARKET invitations were R,uth Stoneman and Phyllis Benson taught a novelty FOODS ~ " HIGHER QUALITY MEATS committeemen, and for refresh-. dance. fil] ~ LOWER IN PRICE ments, Mary Olive Richardson. Ber- The entertainment committee, § C. H. KIZER, Prop. nice Neddenriep directed post-for- consisting of Pauline Stark, Bernice MARDIS GROCERY @ Phone 115 ma! clearance. Faye Bouse, dorm Ne~denriep and Marjorie Wich@fil]fil]l!!jfil]fil]fil]filfil]fil]§fil]fil]fil]@fil]fil]~ lmigjllli~li!Jfil][lllj]§fil]fil][gjfil]fil]§§§li!Jfil]§@ council president, was in general merer, sponsored a relay race. charge. Apples were served at the end of ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ;. J. J. the hour. Have your : . • • J. ;.. J. THANKSGIVING TURKEY DINNER :

Meeting. Recre~tr~ School Smgers was discussed by Mary E. Collm. (C t' d f om page one) Mary p!ive Richardson in spea!E--_ . on mue r . . . ing on "The Religious Sida at Es- umon room. Meetmg m the MUSIC • t d "Th · ·f· t f t· ""all again the singers were introtes" s.a e , e srgm rcan ac ,. ' , f ~bout the entire camp was that duced ~o ~of. Steck s system 0 religion. can be vital and should alte11I1atmg smgers, an? for alm.ost be vital." two hours a chorus .with chang:ng Thanksgiving vesper service personne'. ~arned d1ffer~n.t tun~ng .sponsored by the devotional com_! up exercises and ear trammg d.nlls Jllission under the 1leadership of and worked on the selected Bach ,Juanita West, will be .presented at ~umber. At three o'~lock the.Peruthe next m~eting. · smgers were called mto service aJ. >' l" gain, continuing to demonstrate the value of learning by listening, the keynote throughout the clinical .Far· East Situation activities. Dis~ussed At Meeting. Instructors meeting afterward to "Should the. United States resist, exchange' reactions urged that anby armed force if necessary, fur- other clinic be held in January. ther Japanese aggression in the Miss Amelia M. Peterson express. . ·1n· Far East?" for · was the topic . · a ed. prevarlmg sentr ent when she . ·.round table disctIBsion held at the said, "We are all ~o pleased. with meeting of the Internati~nal Re- the results and. amaous for another Jations club Nov. 13. ' one. Both students and t~achers Ruth Stoneman was chairman. can leann so much and profit from The speakers were Margaret Stiers, the exchange of methods-not exDoreen Meier, . Tli-d Graves and elusively in music. such clinics :Richard Severson. . . foster interest in other schools, J. J. J. youngsters make. broadening acquaintances, and we accomplish so H. S. Students' Art much with the spirit of rivalry completely absent." , Exhibited. In .Film · ). ;. ). A movie of the Young America l!'aints Exhibit in .New York City was shown· to the. junior and sen•.ior high school, Friday, Nov. a. Alt'though not distinguishable in the film, the work of Peru students, AUenby Velvic~, Bob Brown and ;t.awrence Good; are on display at this exhibit.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1940.

At EAR L'S

Orchestra Rehearses for Convo Program

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Committee Heads Choose

commr'ttee h eads for a part y ann ounced the names of th err . assrs . tants at a meetir:g of the freshman class Monday, Nov 11, after convocation. The party will be held Nov. 3 in the Music Hall. Miss Grace Tear, class sponsor, spoke on party etiquette.

Printing ... 111111111111111111111111111111111111~1!

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W. T. Davis ('06) visited the campus Thursdzy, Nov. 14, with the special purpose of seeing old friends, particularly Preside~t W. R. Pate and "Sam" Clementi who taught him while in, school at Elmwood. J.

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The "smart set'.' steppt!d out when Alpha Erudito held a dance at t.he Music Hall Friday night. About 60 persons were present. Refreshments of hot chocolate and cookies were served. J.

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Whatever your needs, this

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The annual :unior-senior prom. will take place the first part of April, according to plans outlined at the junior c:ass meeting, Nov. 11. ~li!lli!lfl!Jliilll!Jfil]rgjl!ill!J[g]!i!Jl1filll[gj[g@lllfil]fil]fil][g][1IDll ~ W l!!J

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PHONE NO. 3 FOR APPOINTMENTS

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Assistants For Party

Since the fall of France, we have become even more conscious of the need for closer cooperation. The French Republic fell partly because of the lack of unity in their government. Let us remember the words of Abraham Lincoln when in similar position to Mr. Roosevelt, said, "If we do not make common to save the good old ship of the union on , this voyage nobody will have a chance to pilot her on another voyage." The experienced judgment of the American people -winners or losers-in our best assurance at this time that there will be no division to hamper proceedings in America today. • To Mr. Seversoo may I say, "I am a republican, but I am an American first.'~

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Com p/ete Bus Connections Over the Holiday

The college symphony orchestra is planning to p~esent its first program at convocation early in December. Tschaikowsky's "Waltz of the Flowers" taken fro:n his Nutcracker Suite and "The Norma Overture" are numbers which will probably be presented by th'" orchestra at this time . J.

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Th e Pt RU POlnTtR Telephone 30

Peru


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Student Speaks j I

.. By LeRoy Redfern

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"During the next four years d!> you think there should be more or - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - or less regulation of business by the VOLUME XXXVI. PERU, NEBRASKA, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1940. NUMBER 9 federal government than at pres-

More business reguiations ___ .. 0 Less -------------- ·----~------ 21 Same _______ ------ ·------------ 4

Bobcats Bag NJ.A.A. Title

'.Ihe last two columns, as written · by guest writers, were conceyned with comments on the result of the - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

~1;~~=::::=~:0:i~~~~::;: Lindstrom Given Ma~y Leave of Rbsence tor~ hav~

fican.ce of the election.

educato: and commentaclaimed election· results mean the American people have . turned liberal, that they willfully ·d' are accepting socialization. •

It probably goes without saying

that this belief i.s /at least partially true. medicine · · Socialized · ·t dis surely gamm~ m popu1ari y, an . ~ove~nment ~terf~rei:ce and part1C1patwn in IJusmess is v1~ed more tolerant~ ~day than it was a few years ac · • But the real issue is whether peoPie are really in support of limited democratic socialization; it· is questionable at the least. · • , In a poll of the question above the attitude of Peru students can be easily detected. None of them · wanted more. government regulation, four wis!f.ed the same and . twenty-one indi~ated that they favored less. . .

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E. Stanley Jones' Book Reviewed at Y.W.

"I shall not be too disturbed at the tread of .jictators. I know they Larson To Act As can cause 1 terrible amount of de2truction. But they have their Temporary Instructor day and cease to be ... (The KingProfessor c. R. Lindstrom, in- dom of God) is an everlasting structor .in mechanical arts, has Kingdom. It will outlast and out been granted a leave of absence wear all the kingdoms founded on ·t'l Sep t . 1, 1941 , by th e St ate sdfishness and fear and blood." UJ, i Board of Education at the meeting Mary Olive Richardson quoted held in Lincoln Nov. 25. Mr. Lind- tl«ese words of encouragement from strom will accept a position with E. Stanley Jones' new book, "Along the federal government as Air the India Road," which she recorps instructor. viewed last Tuesday in Y. W. . · t to f th Mae Jane Young led the deTemporary ms rue r or e · 1d t t · p f vcti<inals, folbw,ed by the usual h mec amca epar, men 1s . ro ess_or group singing. A. V. Larson, h ea ti of t he mdust na1 arts department. " f f A desk set was presented to MI. Bradford to Give Synopsis Lindstr?m by the i~d.ustrial arts fratermty m reeogmt10n of his Of "Time of Your Life" work. Dr. A. L. Bradford will review f f f William Saroyan's play, "Time of Your Life" Wednesday, Dec. 4, at the college Little Theatre at 4 p. m. This play, a comedy, was awarded the Pulitzer prize last season.

watChthe e·ird•ie Cl ements urges

The fdilowing are a few of the remarks they made concerning the . quest10n.. RUTH McDONALD: Less, do we · a d..1c t a,mg •. f want orce to ru1e us fl "Hold hli htit!" b lbsaY.S 1ad voice, b f and a 9cimpletely? .. · · •..· ·••·••· •.· .•. ··. . . as g. . ~ . expo es e ore you. .'.. ' ..

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Fros h Dance

Peru Clips Chadron Eagles 26-0 in Grand Island Meet ffiather, Lantz and Henderson Crack Line In Nebraska East-West Classic Backfield speed combined with a spirited drive in the line gave Peru's Bobcats another N. I. A. A. championship title as they rammed their way to a 26-0 victory over Chadron at Grand Island, in a Turkey day meet. The colorful P. S. T. C. marching band maneuvered at the half. Billed as the "Nebraska East-West Classic'·, the g~me was broadcast from Ryder Park. A crowd of 2000 saw gridmen Ross Adams, Jack Mcintyre play their final game of college football as they led the Bobcat line play. 1

PSTC Dance Band To Play Off-campus The status of the college dance orchestra has been defined in stipulations agreed upon and sig·ned by President w. R. Pate, Prof. Victor H. Jindra, Warren Bollmeier ,,nd intisi.ci·a· n".·· 0

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The running ability of Jim Mather and Bob Henderson, along with the great plunging of "Hod" Lantz, kept Coach Armstrong's men in constant headaches during the en· tire afternoon. The Eagles, though they outweighed the home team, never threatened after the first few minutes of play. Quoting from the Grand Island p2.per: "Peru's offense was particularly effective'. It was launched off a. double wmgback formation, usually

l''nder the new terms the swing- with Harold Lantz taking the ball from center and spinning half arOUlid tO ·.tither fake Or hand the approved by Prof. Jindra, faculty ball to one of the criss-crossing advisor. backs. In the third quarter his Granted the use of college instru- full spinners into the center of the ments and practice room in the line worked consistently for yardMen's Hall, the group rehearsed age. last week on music rumored to have The Bobcats scored once in the been shipped by refrigerator car. first quarter, twice in the second Hour-dancers Wednesday night quarter: . stepped to six recent additions to Late Ill the first frame Peru tacthe band's repertoire, including kle Rachow covered a Chadron "Boy Meets Horn" which features fumble on the Eagle 27. Jim Crawford's trumpet, and theme PERFECT DECEPTION song "Mood Indigo." Jim Mather swept around right. The band played at Steineur, end for 16, Bob Henderson went Thursday, Nov. 28. around the opposite end for seven f f 1!!lore, Lantz struck through center for two and then drove through the same spot for the touchdown. Ma:>on's place kick for point was

tI.,A,;x~?;;;••1itr{A••*i'f~~~~~A~"-."'~·a·.··m···e·•,·•~''"!;!~!l.~~R!~1!~~~ :'~,.~.:.l~~'~i}l, 1 f:lu }Al· 2...r. .'rt!t,a.:M,,C:}lla.·J.•A·· b~ndplays for cainpus dances and r: 1!'11 "V•!V•utn:H'-i an ,. may'pfay' Ollt~Of-t~Wll engagements 1v.t

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It seems -to 2e doing 0. K. now.

taken by the new photographer for the Peruvian.

REUBEN FANDERS: Less, too much government control kills initiative and leads to dictatorship. • BERTHA CLAYBURN: Less, government control is necessa1:y for efficiency but too much control prevents individualism which is necessary in democracy. • MAX MANIFOLD: Same, our democracy is too strong to become dominated by a dictator or any totalitarian form of government. • RUTH STONEMAN: Less, in a democracy there must be individual

Dean Karr, Peruvian editor, has announced the appointment of Dick Clements as staff photographer. Because candid shots will not 'wait until "Pete" Petersen, photographer, can arrive from Auburn, Mr. Petersen ha.s loaned a camera to the Peruvian staff. To insure a complete coverage of campus events, Dick Clements will be on hand with the camera at all social functions.

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enterprise,

• Of course, it goes without saying that over one half of tl:l:ese students are Republicans but the mere fact that several are Democrats, that they favored Roosevelt is enough to Lridicate that partisanism isn't the only facto1; in.. their opinions. • 'Ihe American Institute of Publie Opinion shows the same thing; in a. recent poll 27 per cent of the :i;eople voted for more business regulation by the government and 51 per cent voted for less. • Judging from the reasons given in the two polls, the war in no way influenced the vote, thus indicating that these are fundamental beliefs. • To me it seems a bit odd that someone didn't use the international situation as a reason. Precedent proves to many that immediate govemment interference in a time of emergency is inadvisable. • After the war, then what? Unless something unexpected happens it seems certain that there will have to be some kind of reorganization, some way to regulate distribution, or the American people will find themselves faced with overproduction and lacking an adequate system of distribution.

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F. T. R. Get Pointers On "How to W'1n Fr'1ends" Everyone's problem, "How to Win Friends and Influence People," was discussed at Futme Teachers of America, Monday, Nov. 25. Portions of Dale Carnegie's book on that subject were reviewed. Wilma Wager presented, "Six Ways to Make Friends." Marjorie Gillam discussed "Winning People to Your Thinking." Kay Leigh summarized "Changing People Without Giving Offense." I To develope poise !n carrying Oil! conversation Dr. B. K. Baker, sponsor, sugg~ted a visiting projeo.t whereby the members would make friendly calls on certain people. The club voted to carry out the proposal. The social meetin§l for December will be planned by Mary E. Collin, Katherine Scott and Nina Kane!. • Prof. G. Holt Steck will sing at a vesper service in Seward on December 15. Alice Auxier, former graduate, teaches music in the schools there.

Hear the Marching Men of Song, male choral group, to be presented by the budget committee Friday, Dec. 6.

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Annual Party Features Class Talent Dancing, games and card phying at the freshma.n perennial was varied with performances by Tony De:vlaro, trumpet soloist; Lutie Jane Hmeline, tap-dancer, and Phyllis Jean Brinson, training school aerobat, Saturd_ay,. Nov. 23 in the h'.gh school aud1tonum. As the college dance orchestra reiaxed, Tony performed Del Staiger's arrangement of "Carnival of Venice," acccmpanied by Janet Ebers. Doris Brinson played rhythmical Indian music for her sister's dance, and Gertrude Kiburz played for Lutie Jane. Refreshments, in charge of Melvin McKenney, included ice cream, cake, pop, oranges and Beech-Nut gum. Other committee heads under Miss Grace Tear, sponsor, clasi;. pr~sident, Willard Wilson and vice president, Jimmie Howe, were Margaret Goodrid,ge, entertainment, Julie Thomas, rooms and Camelia Connelly, arrc,ngements. f

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n1umn'1 mus'1c'1ans

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T0 be Featured Dec. 8 Two alumni musicians will be featured at the SU!llday afternoon musicale to be given December 8. They are Ruth Chatelain, pianist who teaches iln Syracuse, and Helen Margaret =:.arson, soprano who teaches in Wales-Lincoln ConsolidaFterdofs.chVo.olH, .IoJwi·nad. ra wi'll open he program with several violin solos, accompanied by Prof. R. T. Benford. Echo Elaine Lum and Betty McArdle will plz,y a two piano number, the Minuet from L'Arlienne Suite by Bizet. Vocalist fJr the day is Katherine Bartling, soprano. The program will be held in the Music Hall Ai:ditorium.

Instrumental Trio

Performs at convo

Guest artists at convocation on Nov. 29 were members of the college instrumental trio, made up of .Jea.nne Spier, violin; Rachel Wieneke, cello; and Margery Evans, piano. Numbers played by the trio were "Cavalleria Rusticana," "Londonderry Air" by Kreisler, "Cavatina" by Raff and "Gopach" by Moussorgsky. Violin solos by Jeanne Spier were, "Thais Meditation" by Massenet, "Valse Bluette" by Drigo and "Indian Snake Dance" by Burleigh.

Ca Iend ar TUESDAY, DEC. 3 YWCA, YMCA, CCA .. · .. 7-8 THURSDAY, DEG. 5 Freshman Clubs ......... 7_9 FRIDAY, DEC. 6 Marching Men of Song Budget Event ..... ·'· ..... 7-9

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MONDAY, DEC'. 9 Kindergarten-Primary Club · · .. · .... · · .. · .... 7-8 Epsilon Pi Tau · · · · · · · · · · 7-3 Lambda Delta Lambda · · 7-3 Sigma Tau Delta · · · · · · · · · · 8 ·----------------

wide. Midway in the second period Peru end Dougherty intercepted a pass thrown by Chadron end Bruer, and raced 50 yards before finally being downed on Chadron's 13. Mather picked up two yards over right tackle and then, on one of those beautifully executed reverses zipped through the right side of the line and over the goal line. The blocking in the line and the deception in handling the ball was ~u good on this 'play that not a Chadron man touched Mather. A wagon could have driven through the hole in the line and not a secondary defense man sensed that J\'1ather had the ball until he was on the goal line. Mason, who came back to do some of the kicking, faked a placekick and passed to Mather in the end zone for the extra point. RESERVES SCORE Late in the period Peru back George Atwood intercepted another Chadron pass to be downed on the Chadron 20. Handley, one of the Peru reserve backs, twice . struck through the line to take the ball down to the 8 and Jack Snider, another secondstring back, went wide around end for the touchdown. Lantz plunged through center for the extra point, Peru got its final touchdown late in the third frame on a 57 yard (Continued on page three)


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TWO.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

. /)MIL OJRfiarpJljituL "

Published Weekly by The Peru State Teachers College Peru, Nebraska

Good Old Dorm Days Required Dean's 0. K. Before Date

Fellows, how would you like to Second write a note to Mrs. Inice Dunning Entered at the Postoffice at Peru, Nebraska, as as1'ing for a date with "Susie?" Class Matter. $1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc Believe it or not, the coeds of Rose McGinnis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editor M Th A · Ed' aryon, om~s '· · · · ·' '· ''' · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ssistant '.tor Ralph Locke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sports Editor Melvin McKenney ................ Assistant Sports Editor Meredith Jimerson ......... , .............. Copy Reader . , Nma Kane! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . Proof Reader M. Florence Martin, ........ ·...................... Adviser Reporters: Milton Schulz, ·Margery Kinsey, LeRoy Redfern, Betty Miller, Mona Morelqck, Jean Haith, Janet Harris, Jeanne Spier, Myrton Hall, Phyllis Wilberger, Dorothy Armstrong Harold Lantz Ardis Carmine Virginia King Ruth Ston~man, Sarene Hauptman, Marj~rie Fidermutz: ·1 J h J k M I E R T o d H u bb e 11 A nse m. o nson ac c ntyre mma o· . ' ' . ' • s1cky, Elvera Schacht, Isabel Tynon, Bill Zurbrick, LeRoy Durst, Ralph Locke.

Education vs. Education "I am so rushed I can't keep up with the funnies,

yesterday were c.ated via a note sent; to Mattie Cook Ellis. She read the note and if it met with !1ei· "oppr·o"al, she allowed ' " tl1e coed to 1vrite a note of acceptance. U:nique facts unr1weled themselves_ as Mrs. Dunning related interestmg changes at Mount Vernon and Eliza Morgan Halls. . "When I first came up the walk I resolYed to make the dormitory grounds beautiful," reminisced the dean of women. Interrupted by an ir:quiring student, Mrs. Dunnig resumed her place at her desk and continued by narrating the n:any changes that have occurred smce . . the first dormitory was erected. There are no longer stoves or kerosene lamps in the rooms. The dining hall has been replaced by a cafeteria, radios, pia:ios, telephones, magazines and da:Jy newspapers have aided in mociernizing the dormitories. "Bake" Steiner now occupies what

let alone

the front page." Have you ever caught yourself saying this in an injured tone? If you have-take heart, you are not alone. This is a chronic ill suffered by college students who are so busy trying to get

an

education that they don't have time to

. The marriage of FLORENCE , The war could be won and lost, the peace signed, and they NEVE to Rd OYR KELLOGGhhas been announce . oy 1s ~ coac and m . '' . . . . would never know, unless. mama ment10ned 1t m a letter charge of commerc" at Waterloo. . Both of t~em _are Peru . alumm. from home. Florence R ·v;as graduated m 1939, 1 1940 1 A cure for tliis ill? Did you ever stumble into that news an~lfti~~ ~and · i-.a~ received unsolicited alumni con~ributions from R.S. rack in the library? BETTY PANCAKE ('34 ), of Shenandoah·, LORENE MOOTHART ('32) of Hamburg; ROY KELLOGG c4o) of Waterloo; and. DORIS S'IARKEBAUM (mat.' S) of Lin-

. get one.

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Football Banquet?

TUESDAY, DECEMBER

coll1. FRED ROHRS ('36) is editor of

3, 1940.

Looking On With Brooks

was the first president's hom~, which, incidentlly, is the only section that didn't burn when the former Mt. Vernon Hall was demolished by flames. The first dean of women was fluttery, petite, firm and one who upheld conventions. Sixteen years ago no student was allowed out after nine-tllirty at night. Freshmen were forbidden to ieave the dormitory. When the Jibrary was open evenings, students were allowed to study there if they secured and filled out a library permit card which stated the subject they were going to study and the name of the instructor of that subject. Eliza Morgan Hall was opened in 1929. At the hou_sewan:hing an orchcstra played m the recreatwn hall. The students took advantage of the music and danced-thus scandalizing the campus. When questioned concernin"0 the duties of a dean of women, Mrs. Dunning chuckled and said, "Everything from feeding a girl a dose or medicine, to taking the hat off a man in the parlor."

A dictionary of terms often seen in print these days:

Anarchy-The state that will exist if the other fellow's party gets in or continues in power. Blitzkrieg-Why go into this? Capital-The stuff that it takes to :nake a l'eal interesting wa;" Dive Bomber - CNo connection with a fellow who blows up ;peakeasfos.J A plane which fights armies by scaring women and _children to death. Era-The period of prosperity promised after one nation has rescued another from their prezent rotten financial and social system. :Fascism-The process of turning your rights over. to someone els~ so that he can protect and pres"rve th f . em or you. Germany-Same old country, now run by a paperhanger instead of a wood chopper. Horror -Air raid conducted by the opposi11g iorce3. Invincible-A general's description of his own forces. Jeopardy-What civilization is in today. jLie-A statemenc by the high DOROTHY MOORE (mat. '38) is command of the enemy-anything duing clerical work in Beverly Hills, to one's discredit. C<iiifornia. Dorothy attended school )M,asses-C)J.Pnon fodder, J:ll'Ople here one year, and taught for one who do the fighting while the big year near Nemaha. shots stay in the rear. JACK BROWN ('41) has accepted Ocean-Good place to stay away a position as senior typist in wash- from during a war. ington D. C. He is to report there reace-Obsolete; see any diction· , . . this ",,,ry of 1920-1930, me . 1usJVe. . on December 2. Jack received appointment through the Civil Ser- Queen-Power behind the throne . exammat1on . . system, and left ,oac k m · th e good oId days. v1ct school on Thursday of last week Rights-What you don't have if to ta1'e up his new work. Jack was if ;you are under a dictatorship. . . m . commerce here at Peru. s· o s- Musi·c 1·n the ea.rs of a maJormg AD~E . PENTERMAN ('36) is submarine· commander. teachmg. m the schools at Platts- Threat-Obsolete; was succeeded burg, Missoun. Adele was elected by "invitation to accept our pro· rep,1esentat1ve student from Peru, tection." ""Ci se1·ved as p e id t f K Useless-The enemy's resistance. ~-· . . r .s en .o . appa _Delta P1 and Peruvian editor 111 her Yrrtue-Your cause. senior year. War-It hasn't changed since ;. ;. ;. General Sherman's time. In fact, Sherman underrated it. l'·

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"The Pedagogue's Pointer," a mim- ' II of East River with $14.95 in his eographed magazine which is pub_ pocket. Hffe's a chance, I thought. Plaudits to the N. J. A. A. champs! Convocation speak· lished monthly under the auspices I shall write an article denouncing h . d h of the Ontario Elementary Teachers the inaccuracy of the press. I had ers have spieled about them; ed1tona S ave praise t em; Club, at Ontario, California. Eight I my opening sentence on paper. "In and the PEDAGOGIAN has willingly supplied headlines. schools are represented in the the first place, gentlemen, no col· . newspaper which hc.pes to be "an By Lloyd Dunlap lege student ever had $14.95 in his The Bobcats have broken into the victory column for the effective agent in promoting a pocket." The second sentence was . . . friendly feeling of unity among tihe to have been: "no student ever second consecutive year. But for the third consecutive total elementary . education .staff" "Beach - Nut" Rose McG'mms, . haci $14.95, and if he had $14.95 the : ,, f b ll b h b b f .Rohrs wa_s particularly. active m otherwise an intelligent and cap- greater part of it would have been year, t h e "annua1 oot a . anquet as een an a sent eature mtercolleg·iate tenms while attend- able editor, has made an error. She in chips." mg school here at Peru. has asked me to contribute a little After two such brirliantly analyamong campus events. RUSSEJLL SAU!TER ('32J and something for this copy of the t.ical sentences I reasoned, someWith Turkey Day, comes the closed season on football GEORGE HASKIJSS ('34! he~d and Peciagogian. Before condemning what soundly, you may be assured, ass:stant coaches at David City, led me for saying "little something,, that it would be foolish to continue. and the squad is quietly removed from the public eye. No their football team to the Central lel me explain the phrase In the I'll rest on my laurels and spend Six C~arµpionship this season. It first place, whatever I sa; will be man! enjoyable minutes contem· • noise, no ballyhoo, no rallying 'round the banquet table de· won eight games dunng the year, little in the sense that it is going platmg ~h.e cil.agrm that leadmg spite .P. S. T. C.'s season of ~ictories climaxed by the pos· lcsmg only \.? Aurora, 7 to O. to be shorter than a Scotchman's pross officials would have under" K~NNEI'H KNAPP ('40) c?ached telegram. In the second place, it gone had I finished my ringing insession of the N. I. A. A. championship. Such a situation " successful football team this sea- is going to be something. What, 1 d1ctment of theU' fraudulent pract· son. They suffered only one defeat don't know. The boys in the back ices. certainly offers .exploitable possibilities. -:-from Oortland. Sterling has a room are giving three to one that The .remainder of my search for I six-man football tealll. Knapp you won't either. Even though I ~ sub,Ject 1s .m the nature of an How many would like to see this year's calendar sched· gra~uated la.st yea'. with a mathe- do inveigle you into reading this odyssey .. Havmg_ been both unduly ule such a football banquet, worth twice the price of ad· matics, physical science and physi- to foe end. conscientious (Miss Parker wouldn't · cal education combination. ' " . . have seen it anyway), and smug on 1 DR. AND MRS. JOE JONES of ~a~ thouoht .s~me of wntmg my two previous attempts, I took a mission? Austin, Texas, aIL1ounce the birth a scmtillatmg, brilliant expose of firm stand. I walked slow'ly to the of Susan Zabel Jones on November ho~r dance~. Not that .1 have any- mirror. I looked at my reflection 15 Mrs. Jones was formerly Joh- thmg. aga:n . the. tl!11e-honored there. I winced. Then I said, reanna Zabel. : practice of md1scr1mmate. and pam- covering my ego, "I will find a s. c. Law.rence of Auburn passed Iu1 mob affronts to Terpsichore, but subject." PcycholO:gists say such away recently. H:s four daughters I h~d" read Domthy Parker's "The a procedure is great stuff. Don't arc Peru alumni. They are MAUDE :Val z · My motive. s ~ 0 u 1d be believe it. I thought for three LAWRENCE HESKETT ('21) of clear after that ~dmisswn. Yes'. I mi..'1Utes and reasoned that perhaps You owe it to yourself to take a look at the recording Nemaha; HELEN LAWRENCE plarme~ to disgmse some of :Miss a more literary appearance would MORGAN ('19) cf Crested Butte, Parkers remarks an? pa.ss them stimulate creative thinking. I machine purchased by the college for the public speaking C o 1or ado; RUTH LAWRENCE off as m~ own .. For instance w~en reached for my pipe, filled it, and READ (mat. '19) of Lincoln; and the herome .repl!'.:5 to an mvitatwn found, that I hadn't a match. A department. ·CLARA LAWRENCE COVE (mat.- t? dance with,, Why, .thank y.ou. trip to the next room produced '26). . Id love to. It.s ;-a me: to fmd a match and also an hour and a You'll enjoy watching the instrument record your voice. JAM:ES E. PERDUE ('37 ) has somebody who isn t afraid of my half discussion on-well thin s in . . . . . . ·tt . . ~ . . Ben-Ben." r say, "Why, thank you. B . . ' g You'll observe the magic eye which 00 1ves you a v1s1ble nicture wn en tv;o articLs which will be I'd 1 t . Its . . genera·1 Y this t1111e I needed a ' published in "The Clearing House" ove 0 : . ~o mce to fmd pipe cleaner. Now here is where I of every voice fluctuation as you speak. And you'll be dis· c. journal publish~d in New York. ~o~~b~d~ who i~n t af:·aid of my made my greatest mistake. I should . . . fc.r Junior and srnior high school .e g a. Mea_s es or sn:allp?x have never gone out after that pipe mayed when the harmless lookmg little disc shows up that teachers. He is ar. instructor in would do as _we!L The pomt is, clrnner. I found a pipe cleaner, but • tile Fort Morgan, Gclorado, schools. the thought is Mi_ss Parker's, not I lost the following items. (1) Three m1dwestern twan,,6 of yours. Announcement has been made of n_ime. And there Is honor among hours sleep; (2J A great deal of

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Reporter I

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Voice a la Disc

C.'s latest item on the budget may arouse more the ~irth of a da.ughter, Charlotte Jqnnme, to MR. AND MRS. ELDdown-right interest than any addition Peru has made for RED DOUGLAS on November 12. Eldred is teaching science at Chappen, Nebraska. some time.

P. S. T.

Semors. · After allowing my scruples to overcome my bett_el judgment, I turned to a news item I found. A college student had been fished out

confidence in_ myself as a cool and analytical thmker; (3) Any ideas for a subject I may have had; (4) Much of my standing as a conscientious student; (5) 84 cents.


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PERU PEDAGOGIAN

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1940.

PAGE THREE.

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Peru Grid men IWhat Makes Peru's Tearn Click j Kittens Defeated Dominate All-State l l Rt Rock Port Honor Rolls ~~E·I;,~--~~~~~E --;1:;s·:::-:;r:·1:e-~l:}~e~ unde~;:;; For Only Loss By Barney Haith

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Mcintire Outstanding

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where h's 215 pounds are a distinct advantage in the pcwer of the line. He topped his faree years of high school football by playing in Missomi's All-State hig·h school game last fall. He hails from Rock Port, where he starred in line play for three years. His ability ·.vm be va1uable next year in the B)bcat's quest of their th'.rd straigtt conference' title. ROY SCHEIDLER, the 170 pound guard from Wymore. Roy saw little ~ervice this fall, but should see action a good part of next year. His former teammate, Lyle Mason, and he, will be part of the starch ttat will make up Peru's line, and ;;hey should make it interesting for the best of opponents. BOB RICHARDS ls Red Dean's frosh understudy at the blocking back post. He hails from Auburn,

gins. Bob's size is one hindrance, but he has speed to ~.pare to more than make up for it. BILL EGE is a former member of the Tigers of Falls City. His outstanding performance this year came in the Peru-Tarkio Frosh eucounter. He plays left guard, 8,nd has a g·ood chance to go places for Peru in seasons to come. ART RONHOVDE is the lad who is now destined to fill Mcintire's shoes next year. He has been working conscientiously on his offensive game, and will be a leading candidate for the pivot post. He is only a freshie so he has plenty of time to show his stuff. BOB OAKMAN is the other freshie understudy for Mcintire. He saw some service at end this fall. He runs the 440 in track, and will be an aspirant for his first "P" next spring.

Bluejays Too Heavy

Peru State's 1940 football team, Coach Harold Fisher's Bobkittens under the able tutelage of Coaches closed a very successful season at Al Wheeler and Art Jones will go Rock Port in a Turkey day contest. down in history as one of the outThey bowed to the Bluejays in their standing aggregations ever to reonly defeat of the season. They present the college colors. · have an unbeaten record in NebrasTheir entire starting eleven gainka competition. recognition en the !ill-state seThroughout the game the Prep· lections, six of them being on the sters played valiant ball, but Rock first two teams. Port's weight advantage was tooc The all-state honor i oil as semuch to be overcome. lected by United Press acting on Shortly after Rock Port made nominations of coaches, officials their first touchdown, the Fisher• and out-state sports ¥!Titers are men drove deep into Bluejay terri· listed below. tory, and were threatening to score. The tackle pass narrowly missed First Team. (Continued from page ·one) fire on the twenty on a fourth Lindahl, Wayne, le downfield drive launched fr?m the Swanda, Mildand, lt down, to stop them, and they had Peru 43. to relinquish the ball. If the play Ogden, Doane, lg. had been good, followed by con• Henderson led off wi\h 2 yards Mcintire, Peru, c over left guard on a double-reverse Adams, Peru, rg BOXING CLUB NOTES ...--~------~-..-..~ version, the Kittens would have· been in the lead, and the outcome and Lantz went through center for Cramer, Hastings, rt The Durst-Garber establishment would have probably been far dif· 10 yards on one of his full spinners. Blescing, Kearney, re down in the City Hall continues to ferent. Henderson picked up 3 around Hill, Midland, qb do flourishing business. New memB J kMI · Next year should bring another left end and Lantz, on two full Mather, Peru, lh bers still are enrolling, and the Y ac · I c ntire fine season for the Training School spinners into the center of the line, Best, Wayne, rh bi· montb:ly cards attract large • •••• • • • 4 as there will be 17 lettermen re. added 11 yards. After Mather lost 3 McGinnis, Chadron, fb crowds each time. ONE YEAR AGO-turning. yard~ at right end, Lantz hit Hen· Second team: Last Tuesday :iight four bouts ·h Peru Bobcats lead by Murton tierson with a short pass over the Ric endifer, Hastings, le were staged. The r,airin1rs were as center of the line for 5 yards and N 1 " Campbell allld Jim Mather trounced ewe l, Kearney, It follows: then spun over center for 14. Mat- Roberts, Peru, lg the Tarkio Owls to the tune of 18 : Jerome Barnell-Red Williams to O. It was the swan song for three her shook off two tacklers to place Belka, Doane, c Ole Johnson-Tom Sherman the ball on the Chadron 6. Burden, Chadron, Peru State Athletes, Leonard Greatrg Myrt Hall-Bill McNally , Henderson went over center for Mason, Peru, rt house, Elmon Velvick and Gilbert 1 Fe&ture bout:Pui·uckei·. tBY RALPH LOCKE 3, Lantz st rnc. k for 2 an d th en JI b y k -a erman, or , re Red Graber-Bhorty Sharp of I I came back to the same spot for the Magnuson, Wesleyan, qb Nebraska Cit.-. • ~-----------~ ,touchdown. Niehart, Doane, lh A few of the ~eetin1rs are spent TWO YEAR~ AGO-Final tabulaU.ons ()n the past Masori's placekick was blocked. H d The Tarkio · feated "l1e en erson, Peru, rh correcting foot-fa'llts ar.d showing · · Owls ae · " grid season produce the following CHADRON'S ONE CHANCE___ Shada, Kearney, fb mistakes made in the bouts on the Cats 9 to O in the final game of the results. n was midway in the fourth Honorable mention: cards. Defense is also stressed. To- season. Luther Hutton sparked the frame that Chagron finally was Einds-Bruer, Chadron; Haug, monow night a team will be se- Peru attack with his spectacular Peru's total points mounted to: able to launch a drive.· Hastings; Doug·herty and Floyd, lected to go to Tecumseh to parti- runs. It was the last time seniors 1~2 AGAINST 26 for the opponents. It started from the Chadron 20. Peru; Smith, Wayne. cipate in a boxing program. Nelson, Boyer, Sheeley, Mort, MosTheir point-per-game average was and with Finkey and Coleman drivTackles-Organ, Peru; Johnson, f f f ley, Ogg, Dean and Majors wore 21 113 while the opponents were ·mg h ard off the t ackles an d st·me- Chadron; Braasch, Wayne; Edthe Blue and 'white for Peru. eBuy ·your Chnstmas Cards in held to 2.9 points a game. mark picking up nice yardage on wards Doane· Van Dyke Hastincrs· quantities for imprint.ing. You can • end-around plays penetrated down Snyd~r. Kea;ney; Marriil, wesl;y~ afford it at Chatelain's. FIVE YEARS AGO-to the Peru 22 before finally halted. an; Schmeckpeper, Midland. A squad of 30 basketball players Rex Floyd blocked 3 punts, 1 1 ; Peru had 10 first downs and 227 Guards-Smith and Shelmadine, W. A. A. Practice Basketball including six lettermen reported to smeared kickers twice for losses, yards from rushmg and passes to Kearney; Hintz, Midland; Butler, Coach Ernest "Dutch" Lorbeer for and blocked a field goal to hold Chadron's 8 fivst downs and 132 Chadron; Bascom, Hastings; Childs 'The girls are practicing basket- the opening practice. outlook for the Ft. Hays game to a tie. yards froni rushes and passes. Until and Ooryell, Wayne; Bauer, Doane. ball technique ir. preparation for the season was very bright with a the fourth quarter Chadron gained Centers-Ulbrick, Kearney; Webb, the tournament~ Teams will be veteran in every position and a fine Lyle Mawn converted 11 times but 56 yards from scrimmage.. Wayne; Willits of York; Johnson, chosen this week. freshman aggregation to build up in 17 attempts, 3 of which were Chadron threw 8 passes, com- Chadron. f ,. ,the reserve strength. blocked-leaving him an average of pleted 1 and had 4 intercepted. Peru Backs-Wilmot, Capellan, Hollen- Silk Hose special 69c, 89c and $1 • ~785. He also kicked one field goal threw 10 passes, completed 2 and camp, Kearney; Cdleman and Filll- at Hill's Drug Store. TEN YE;ARS AGO-in two tries. had. one intercepted. key of Chadron; Dean and Lantz The Tarkio Owls held a strong Biii Bruer, E. Johnson and M. of Peru; Little and Warnick, of in votes. for a first team position. Peru team to a slender 6 to 0 Johnson were standouts in the Hastings; Parsons, Midland; Ger- Ogden of Doane had the edge of victory. Hurtz who was the hero Peru was held from scoring whenc Chadron line with Goleman, Fin- mer, Doane. votes for the first string guard and also the goat of the game ran they were inside the opponents HJ' key and McGinnis carrying the According to UP correspondent position, but Adarr,s ran a good sec- the opening kickoff back ninety yard line only 6 times this season. load in the backfield. Charles Arnot Mcintire was the ond over his teanimate Roberts and yards to what he thought was a They :Stopped the opponents 13· PI:.RU'S STANDOUTS most outstandi~g player of t~ state. Burden of Chadron. touchdown. Due to snow piled be- times when they were in similar positions. In Peru's line Adams, Mcintire t.his fall. His selection was made > J. J. hind the goal line he stopped on the and Mason were the standouts with with 47 votes out of a possible 50. eSee our stock Jf Christmas Gift five yard line thinking he had Jim Mather, Lantz and Henderson Iviather led the backs of the state Wrappings and Seals. Chatelain's. scored a touchdown. "The INDIVIDUAL SCORING ran as follows: checking in great ' games in the backfield. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Mather . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Henderson . , .. .. .. . . . . .. .. 30 The lineups: Mason · ... , ..... , . . . . . . . . . . 20 CHADRON POS. PERU Lantz , .... , , . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. 19 Bruer le Floyd Snider ..................... 18 E. Johnson It Rachow Callan ..................... 12 lg Roberts Floyd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 M. Johnson c Mcintire Dougherty .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. 6 Butler rg Adams Atwood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Smith rt Mason Handley . ... .. ...... ....... 6 \Vitte re Dougherty Chandler ... ............... 6 qb Callan White . .. . .. ... . ...... ...... 1 lh Mather rh Henderson Final standings in the state col• fb Lantz lege ranks ran as below: Substitutions: Chadron-Cadwal. Peru lader, Hooper, Edd:\i, Hamilton PatDoane rick, Houser, linemen; Keen.' WilKearney son; Finney, backs. Peru-Bauman, Hastings Chandler, Caudle, Hines, Linder, Wayne Mccutcheon, Smith, linemen; AtChadron wood, Handley, Smith, backs. Midland Officials-Craig', Fisher, Farley, Wesleyan Lincoln." . • York -Grand Island Independent In the NIAA conference: J. J. J. Peru Bottom row, left to right: Lantz, Rosenthal, Elliott, Smith, Livingston, Scheidler, Star~ Handley, Floyd, Most complete line, of Christmas Linder Mcintire, Henderson, Roberts, Dean, Adams, SECOND Rnw: Gorthey, Ege, Coleman. Jun, Weyers, Kearney ' gifts now on display at Hill's Drug Roper, Williams, Whitten, Atwood, Snider, Mather, Strouse, Callan, Horton. THIRD ROW: Brooks, Caudle, Chadron Beatty, Carpenter, Hall, Severson, Chandler, Oakman, Allgood, Orgain, McCutcheon, Witte, Mason, RaStore. Wayne. chow, White. TOP ROW: Sehnert, Wa.Jker, Coach Jones, Coach Wheeler, Manager Anderson, Hubert.

SPORTS

Bobcats Bag .N.l.R.R. Title

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IlSports Of Yesteryear k

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Peru's 1940 Championship Squad

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PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE FOUR.

Prep .Squad · Holds ~anquet Slinker, Rogers Chosen As Honorary Captains Neal Slinker and Charles Roger; were announced as co-captains, • 20 squad members present en 11nu with letters by Coach Harold Fisher at the high school football banquet held in the Home Economics room, Fric\llY, Nov. 29. Ralph ·Clevenger acting as toastn:aster ~ailed for speeches ·from ·Dick Clements, Lawrence· Good, Prln. L. B. Mathews, co-captains Neal Slinker and Charles Rogers, and Coach Harold Fisher. Supt. s. Clements led the ·guests in singing selections from the 1940 hit parade. Ruth Kennedy, tickets~ chairman, reported a sale of 113 tickets with a dozen more requests when the ~upply ran out. The names of 22 college students appeared on the ticket sales list. Four 16ng tables placed in a rectangular formation (decorated with football centeri>ieces, pu@le and goip" candles, candy goal post favors, and placecards representing football helmets) seated those attending. Following the banquet· a dance was held in the gaily decorated high school gymnasium. The evening's entertainment officially ended at L.

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This season's high school football lettermen are as follows: Paul Ogg, lq; Gordon Palmer, rh; .Herby Nincehelsor, rh; Arthur .Clements, qb; Charles Rogers, qb, (co-captain); Bob Bronn, fb; Marvin Brown, fb;· Dean Smith, le; Jack Whisler, It; John Tishner, It; Charles Henning, lg; Jerold Clayburn, Jg; Willard Redfern, c; Grant Devore, c; Verne Cotton, rg; Ward , Adams, rg'; CJJyde Hunzeker, rt; Jack Cejka, rt;· 'Neal Slinker, re (co-capfain); Eldon Nincehelsor re. · '

~. H.

Pate Attends Conference Of Educational Examiners

Hayward Speaks Rt Commerce Club "Pi Sigma Chi" is the Greekletter name cho~en to represent the Commerce Club by unanimous vote of the members Monday night. "What r would Expect of a Good

Secretary" was the subject of E. H. Hayward's address to the group. IV!iss Nona Palmer talked briefly about· the pending Civil Service examinations. Both speakers urged that the commercial students take advantage of this opportunity. /. > J. •see our stock of Christmas Gift . L • , Wrappmgs and Seals. Chatelam s. J.

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L·ibrary Furn·ishes NoveI Magazme •

nesota. /. > > Mary Shirley jimerson, Leonore Larson arid Pakicia Hill attended the music clinic held in North Platte, Nov, 28, 29 and 30. The ciinic was state wide and included both vocal and ins~rumental music. 1~~!!!'.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!i

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1 O O christmas cards for 85c. • ,

Chatelam s.

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'J:iave you disicove!l'ed the new weekly publication called "The Hemisphere" among the currant magazines in the library? If you wan~ to keep well-informed on news and trends in Latin America and Canada, be sure to read this confidential weekly report. It is compressed from exclusive information of 'lon-the-spot" correspondents in 21 Western Hemisphere countries and from "complete cov·era:ge·" of au~horitative domestic and foreign sources. ~1 · t· d t· t t l 11s 1me1y an per men repor is publi:h<1d by the Hemisphere Corporation. It is of great value to "wide-awake" business men and college students in keeping pace with the recent activities of Latin America. On the inside cover is a comment column entitled "Up and Down the Hemisphere." Each week some special article is featured. "Skyway Bat~le over Americas" and "Argentma s Internat10nal New Deal" are found in the 'last two publications. Other typical current ·issues dis-

"All good Personality Club· members should know what constitutes a pleasing personality," stated Lois Glasgow at a m.ee~ing of the club last Thursday. In contiriuing her report to the 18 members present, Loir discussed the various types of personality one mc.y ~ave. At the beginning of the meeting, Lois Wagoner read the minutes of the last . meeting and conducted other busmess.

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The tentative dates for the annual Perusingers trip. are March 30 to April 6.

> ;,. /. Sop homores Dance At Annual Party Sophomores danced to the tune cf Warren Swain and his orchestrai

Friday night, No'r. 28, in the Music Hall. Hot chocolate, cup cakes and candy bars were served.

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READ THE AD$ Along With the News

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cussed in this magazine are: the Anglo-Argentine-U. S. Trade Ag- = reement; Brazilian-U. S. Co-operatiO!il; Latin Expansron Criges in Montevideo; Guatemalia's Coffee; Canadian H. c. L.; Women of the Americas Meet; Good Will Squad; Scribblers and their friends met Chilean Nitrates to Spain; Surplus in the Music Hall Thursday for a Saved; FinanClng; Labor and Poliparty. June Hamilton and Alveen tics. THURSDAY, FRIDAY Glllispie directed pencil and paper J. J. J. games. . The lucky winners were Most complete line of Christmas AND SATURDAY Joan Flau, Wilma Wager, Nina gifts now on display at Hill's Drug December 5, 6 and 7 Kanel, Mae Jane Young, and Mrs. Store. 13. K. Baker. t. J. J. ,. Following the games, the partye 12 Hallmark Cards for 29c. Chat- . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - , goer~ were served cocoa and cookies. elain's.

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Scribblers Hold· Party In music Hall

Peru Theatre •

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Training Schoo! Serves

Hot Lunches Daily

,~ll!ililllilllilllill~lillm~lilllilltllJmlillmlil)·"'·

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FOR SATISFACTION IN

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~ FOODS ~ Sponsored by the Kiwanis Club, l!!I hot lunches are served during the ·~ noon hour. in the Training Scho?l ~ MARDIS .OROCERY ~ Home Ee._ room. 116 partook of this ·@llllllJJllllllllli.limlllJlllJm~lllJl1lllllJlllll1lll1lllllll season's first meal, Nov. 25. , Payment fwlunches is not speci- ~l!lf@lllJlllllllJlllJlllJlllllllJlllJlllJlllllllJlllllfillJJllllillll1lllllllllJllll~ fled but is made i:& cash, work, or liJ DR. G. H. JODER lllJ food donations. Surplus commodities are also furnished by the gov-Phys1c1an and Surgeon- llll ernment. Office at Milstead Corner J. > J. Office Phone 33, Res. 39 ~ •Buy your Chrisi;mas Cards in llll \lll quantities for imprintkig. You can lll!i1lllfillJJ!l!J[jj]lllJlllJfiillii[jj]llllllJlllJllll~llllliilllllll!J IN PLACE OF "ESCAPE"

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afford it

at Chatelain's. > > "

Learn·To·Dance Club Bees Posture Demonstration

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KIZER'S MARKET ~

~ HIGHER QUALITY MEATS ~ LOWER IN PRICE

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Edna Mae Petersoo. and Fred Gebers demonstrated the correct posture and position for dancing to the Learn-to-D?-llce members last Thursday. During the remainder ct the meeting, the freshmen practiced dancing. Music was furnished by Margie Evans at the piano.

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C. H. KIZER, Prop. Phone 115

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PERU BOWLING CLUB

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l!!l ; Ladies W.elcome at All Times lill .f. .f. > l1!l Ben Hanlon Mgr. l1ll Ruby's Beauty Shoppe, Phone No. M. G. Heuer, Owner Im 9 for appointment. l!!l ~

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J.P. CLARK Electric Shoe Shop

Shoe Repairs of

Ii The More Folks You Tell PERU CLEANERS i The More Goods You Sell ~lillm~!illill::~:lilllillmlillmJ. pPVfJrtlS~ H~

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We Call For And Deliver

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Keep Your Business At Home

E. C. McALEER Physician and Surgeon

President Pate will accompany other members cf the State Board of Educational Examiners to Minncapolis, Minnesota, to atten·d the eleventh annual Minnesota conference on the Education of Teachers to be held at the University of Min-

> > > Lois Glasgow Reports To Personality Club

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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1940.

ml~ert's~offee ~~o~ + + + COMFORT ABLE DINING ROOM

+ + + FOODS COOKED TO ORDER

+ + + WE USE THE BEST QUALITY OF FOODS COFFEE

+ + + Prices Reasonable

F~J.GILBERT 1 Block North of Boys' Dormitory.

Phone 214.


VOLUME XXXVI.

PERU, NEBRASKA, TUESDAY, DECEMBER

10, 1940.

NUMBER

10

Bradford Reviews Y.W.C.R. Discusses marching men of Song Perform "T" f y L"f "meaning of Christmas /~.eT~or toob~r I e m;~:::= =~~~ ~ Before Budget ~vent Rudience • But why? What is the purpose of . . this sudden outburst of ·patnot1sm? Are we really more patriotic than we were two. years ago or even ten . years ago or are we just plam wared? ·

• If the reason is supposed to be unity for national defensr, we are barking up the wrong tree. Can flags guard a coastline? Can a song defeat an enemy; can colorful patriotism give us• the stron~ mechanized army We feel is necesi:ary? 11

• Not more than a year ago everyone claimed. America was faced w.ith domestic problems which in their complexity and severity surpassed any in the . past. They said the unemployment of so many people m'arked a .defin\te fundamental problem that, in one way or another had to be solved. Some were pesshmstic enough to view it as the doom .of democracy.

• That wai5 a year ago; what,about the attitude today? What is the popular ·, reaction toward these prob• lerris? The slogan answers it, "We are 100 per. cent Americans." America is perfect. Domestic problems, -.how foblish, we live in A-

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'41 Peruoian Monday, Dec. 9, begins the Peruvian sales campaign for the 1941 Peruvian. The sale will last only one week, so be sure to order your book at once. A one dollar deposit during this week will reserve a yearbook with your name engraved in gold, free. After this Sale' gold names Can not be secured without extra cost. Don't pass up this chance!

···"'~'''''''''*'~L••~:~:.~:;~.;:~:.'" Baton TWlf. Iers Trained in H.S.

• ~ Behind the banner;Of patriotism We are hiding the bare truth. The !act is that in spite of the tremendous increase in business, d~e to war industries, there are still about ten million unemployed. With production at a peak never before reached we still can't find jobs for one fifth of the working population. •

What can we look for in the future? The eventual slowing up of war industries will undoubtedly place many more on the relief roll. Something basic has to be done.

Next Reviewer Dr A. L. BradfOJld m>Qewed " . · f y L'f ,, b Willi Time o our 1 e Y am S. t th A A U W b k aroyan e . . . · oo . Dea 4 reviThiew, .c. ·. . dr . ht s pnze-wmrung ama lnlg " . be called a hymn to the. mherent ,, _ goodndin.ess tof hDumanB bdemfgd,s, afc co11 g o r. ra qr or througlh?ut the play this th~me is emp~as1zed. The plot cons1~ts of a senes of sket::hes .of maladJusted ~nd frustrated mdividuals who pass m and out of a waterfront saloon. William Saroyan reveals the prob!ems of the . characters oppressed by modem C!Vll!zation. . . Professor J. W. Tyler will review Christmas literature at the next book review on Dec. 18.

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: Phyllis Jean Brinson and Shirley Rogers are instructing a class of 14 high school girls in baton twirling. The eight showing the most progress.will appear in the program ut the annual Ohristmas concert of the high school band. Lorene Clayburn, Donna Lee Parriott, Ruth Eschen aind Norma Barton have been men~i~ned ~.showing the most prom1smg ability.

YW Tuesday, Tue. 3. While candles burned brightly, H~rriett Maxwell, disc~ssion leader, directed group thmking on such t' "ls Ch · t ques 10ns as ns mas over· 11ze. . ?" "Is g1'ft g1vmg · · escommercia sential?" "How should we observe . ,, Ghnstmais day? To 11ve . th e Ch · t mas spm · ·t 365 · ns days a year was the final challenge pr sented ~arge~ Denison read thoughts for meditation i;,s Grace Muenchau played the piano. Maryon Thomas rnng "Christm~ Bells." .J.

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c011ege Qrehestra Plays at Convo Introducing the college orchestra for the -first ti:ne this year, Prof. V. H. Jindra conducted a convocation program FTiday, Dec. 5. "La Ferria;· for full orchestra, was followed by a French horn solo by Jack sn,,"cler. Mr. Snyder, from gridiron to concert stage, played Gottwold's "Friendship." Concluding number was from T~chaikowsky's "Nutcracker Suite, tte "Valse de Fleurs." New additions to the 35-piece orchestra are bass clarinet, alto clarinet and oboe, making an instrumentation mo:e complete than that of last year. f

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Judy Garland's paren ts v·ISi•t· Her~ Visitors on the campus Dec. 5 were. Mr. an@. Mrs. w. P. Gilmore of Los Angeles, Calif. Mrs. Gilmore is the mut;1er of Judy Garland, movie act.1ess. She and Mr. Gilmore, who attended Peru in J.908-09, were visiting relatives in Nebraska City. .J.

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Reflective of the Christmas spiri11 are the decorations found in the cafeteria. At each side of the fireplace is a large tree lighted · by electric candles.

"We like to sing for

audiences like this," said Phil Clark,

tenor-director of the Marching Men of Song, a male choral group which was presented by the budget committee on Dec.

6. According to Mr. Clark, the Marching Men all prefer to sing classical music, but the program included a variety of popular and classical music, and light opera. Attired in military costumes with red coats, the Men of Song marched on the stage and began a program which varied from Hoagy Carmichael's "Stardust" to selections from the light opera "Pinafore" by Gilbert and Sullivan. A candle lighting ceremony was Negro spirituals and songs from used by Tri Beta Monday night in such operettas as 'Blossom .Time" the initiation of four new mem- and "Rio RJta" were sung by the bers Vincent Dreezen Reuben Fan- group. In white sailor costumes, ' . .' the Men of Song presented a colders Gilbert Schremer and Fred- Iection of sea songs. Evening dress erick· Gebers. The initiation was was worn by the group for the held in the faculty room. Refresh- last part of the program, which ments were served in the biology closed ~.ith the song "God Bless America. lab. The young·est member of ,the Men I- I- Iof Song is 21, said Mr. Clark, and . the oldest is 32. The men are from. n 1J t f th • • M. a pars o e country, and were crganized three years ago at Chih cago, w, ere most of them were· OSary f IC s,u dents. Mr. Clark was born in T exas and went on the concert. At the Dec. 3 meeting of the C. stage at an early age. At he· 17 C. A. John Schutz read articles in- began a coast to coast tour as a

Tri Beta's Initiate Four

C C Hears R At" Ies

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;::;~~g ;:t~y· m~:::rsto~:o~~ ~~: :~~is;~gu~: i!::re~n~/e~~; ~;~~ gram and he is a dancer as well Norte Dame University located at . ' . The Men Song average 14 per-. Wilcox, Saskatchewan, which is formances a week, Mr. Clark stated, of

called the poor man's college. Committees for the Christmas ' . pa;rty were announced by the president. Entertainment committee consists of Nunzio Lazzaro, Mary Ann Kean, Ruth Claire, John Schutz, and Rosemary Tiehen. El!en Ryan, Mary Ann Schutz and Wilbur Ege wiil form the refreshment committee. 'Ray Bauman and Wilbur Ege will lead the discussion at the Dec. 10 meeting.

and usually two in one day. They expect to be on the road until next May.

music Students Play For Pawnee Concert

Margery Evans and Jack Snider were guest artists at the annual faJJ concert of the Pawnee City high school, Friday night, Dec. 6. Snider played several French horn solos and he was accompanied by Margery. This was the eighth annual fall concert presented by• the Pawnee City music department. It was under the directorship of Amelia Peterson, voca1 instructor, and Art"But .the,, boys appreciate man- hur Schrepel, band director. nerly girls. Tod leaned earnestly over tdhe sbp eakefrf's stand. "And the unpar ona 1e o ense 1s ravmg about other boys to your date · Don't do that!" Confidential tips were, "Boys like TUESDAY, DEC. 10 compliments and they like to be YMCA, YWCA, CCA .... 7-8 babied." "Now this hasn't been a talk on Basketball Game at Tarkio 'How to Win and Influence Boys'," said Mr. Hubbell in conclusion THURSDAY, DEC. 12 ''I've tried to tell you in a straightGamma Chi Tea . . . . . . . . 4-6 forward way what the boys want Freshmen Clubs ........ 7-9 you to know." He added hastily, "And they aren't necessarily my FRIDAY, DEC. 13 personal sentiments either." . "I know there are things about Dramatic Club business us you don't like. I was told that meeting .......... 11:30 Peru men aren't neat enough. Is Basketbrull that true?" (Spontaneous, affirmPeru vs Alumni .. .. .. 8 ative applause). , Basketball. Mr. Hubbell then told his audPeru Prep at Auburn .. 8 ience that Peru men think the coeds are, "generally speaking, very MONDAY, DEC. 16 intelligent and are good company. freshman Council . . . . . 1():30 "If you take some of these sugAlp'ha Psi .. . .. . .. . .. .. . 7-8 gestions to heart," was the final International Relations warning, "don't make the reform too sudden. Peru men might be real Olub ...... : .. .. .. .. . 7-8 men, but they're still easily frightKappa Delta P1 .. .. .. .. 8-9 ened."

P. S. T. C. Fellows Give Fems Cruel Facts· On What They Don't Like Rbout Dates

Webster says a patriot is "one who loves his country and zealously guards its welfare." Judging from this definition he who waves the !lag ~n't necessarily patriotic. He who attempts to monopolize, for individual gain, industries such as "You asked for it,'' declared Tod that broken record to. herself, and nitrate doesn't "zealously guard the Hubbell at girls' ·convocation, Mon- (tsk-tsk) before mornmg the news welfare of his cquntry." It is not d!o.y, Dec. l, and almost 300 co-eds wah~ thhoroughly dormdisspread.t· All otf words but action that makes a . . w IC was very concer mg o . ' future. hung on h!S words. For this Auburn the man involved nation's . · sophomore, answering a challenge "Many of our co-eds Jack sophise made by Dean Inice Dunning, who tication;'" said 21 per cent of the . . . . addreo.~ed the men on Nov. 28, was fellows, who thought both dress and It is no~ t!aimed by .this writer exposing for his colleagues Wh3.t action should be more mature. that the smgmg of. patriotic ~y~s they did and didn't like about their When asked for opinions conand flag ceremorues are evil~ I.n ladies. cerning attire, 12 per cent -voted the~selves. Surely some of It 15 Questioning a cross section of Peru for longer dr~ses and 20 per cent desirable if not esse.nt1al. But there men, tlnbbell discovered that 13 out for shorter skirts. "Thumbs down," is an ext~eme that works to arouse of 14 considered a girl's personality was the reactio:i of 49 percent to the emotions of the pe?~le to the more important than her looks. Out three-quarter lellf;th sox. Others extent that ~hey are. will~ to do of' 50 men questioned, 80 per cent conceded that as Jong as campus almost anythmg. Bemg their emo- definitely opposed girls smoking. 20 sox keep Peruvians warm, they t!ons and n~t their thoughts that per cent were indifferent and no shouldn't object. are arouse.d, 1t threate?S the peace one approved wholeheartedly. Mr. Hubbell frankly told his audand security of Amenca. We are "We like natural beauty," said ience that a fifth of those questionchalleng~d to i:neet these threaten- the 23 per cent who think Perufems ad thought the co-ed's mannem ing emotions with concrete thoughts wear too much makeup and the 45 could be ~mproved, and 14 per for the future. per cent who objected to loud fin- cent believe the potential school gernail polish. teachers are too independent. "We Pleading for broadmindedness like to pay those little courtesies." , If in a year or two a half-clo- Mr. Hubbell continued with the asserted the speaker. "Let us open thed, starving mob stands in the complaint that girls are too con- doors for you, help you on with street listening to a "strong armed" fiding in their roommates. He cited your coats and precede you down man advocate dictatorship, don't an example, an occasion. upon an unushered aisle. If we don't do expect them to answer negatively which a true-to-the-hometown-gal these things, it's because we don't with "give me liberty or give me fellow stepped out for the first know the rules, not that we are death." time. The lucky date couldn't keep deliberately rude.'~

male Choral Group Appears in Costume; Audience Gets Director's Stamp of Approval

Calendar

iI .


PAGE TWO.

PERU PEDAG0GIAN

Published Weekly by The Peru State Teachers College

Peru, Nebraska Entered at the Postoffice at Pern, Nebraska, as Second Class Matter. $1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc Rose McGinnis ................................... · t M aryon Th omas· . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A ss1stan Ralph Locke ............................... Sports · M c K enney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A ss1s · t an t S por t s M eI vm

Editor Ed't .I or Editor Ed't 1 or

Name the individual who has not at one time or another looked upon the college-goer and asked, "What is the younger generation comlng to?" -or the more recent version, "When :is the younger generation coming to?"

These are the cold

,calcuiations of our elders who have placed their offspring in <CO

r

.

II ege .d urmg . t h. o~e a arnung £our years b etween a d oIescence

and app4oximate maturity. The day of reckoning has come for straightening out a relationship between elders and youn~ers

which. has been horribly twisted all because men

refuse to leave creation

to the Deity and attempt rather to

make college students into images that satisfy their temporary cravings. The student has been piaced on the dissecting table and

10, 1940

What Don't You Want for ·atwnni Jllailj Christmas . Shopping Hints t By Grace Muenchau

Only 12 shop1;ing days until Christmas. What do you want Santa'to stuff in your sock? That is the question of the day. But the vital questicn in the opinion of this writer is: What don't you want? A poll of students, chosen at random, has been taken in an attempt to answer this question. The results I feel will prove in-

Meredith Jimerson · ........................ Copy Reader valuable to the hurried shopper . f R d who strives to :ilease. Nma Kane! ........ ; .. , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Proo ea er · .,., . Ad . ROGENE ROSE: "I'll take anyM · F lorence .ivlart1n .' · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·· · viser th1"no· If I dori't like 1·t I can g1·"e . ~· · ' Reporters: Milton Schulz, Margery Kinsey, LeRoy Redfern, it away next year. "Anything Betty Miller, Mona Morelock, Jean Haith, Janet Harris, WILLIE KOHRS: but a slip from the Dean." Jeanne Spier, Myrton Hall, Phyllis Wilberger, Dorothy IRENE NISPEL: "Red fingernail Armstrong, Harold Lantz, Ardis Carmihe, Virginia King, polish. I got three bottles last year and I hate the stuff." R~th Stoneman, Sarene Hauptman, Marjorie Fidermutz, BUCK DOUGHERTY: "A milkTod Hubbell, Anselm Johnson, Jack Mcintyre, Emma Ro· ing machine. If I get one I'll lose sicky, Elvera Schacht, Isabel Tynon, Bill Zurbrick, LeRoy my job." . DONNA DUERFELT: "A pair of Durst, Ralph Locke.

Ps,uedo-Intellectualism?

TUESDAY, DECEMBER

Girls Enforce Quiet Rules for Dorm

orange and green striped campus socks." BOB ASHTON: "Surely not a time piece. They're too alarming." ELAINE BRIER: "An assignment to do during vacation." HORACE RZEHAK: 'Tl! take anything. I figure rm 'The Economi·c Man'." MARGARET STIERS: "I have no statement for the press. I distrust my friends." LER.OY REDFERN·. "I can't think of a thing I don't want." From these opinions it is clear that most people have definite gift dislikes. · Only 4 out of ll, or a little more than 25 per cent failed to give a direct answer. Three of these were for pure"ly mercenary reasons and the fourth a social reason. The remaining eight were emphatic enough. This proves, I believe, that to avoid a faux pas, gifts should be chosen with utmost care.

l Did You Know? j t•

• .,

JAY TROXEL, class of '40, is coaching and teaching mathematics at Wilsonville. Jay was a desk assistant at the lib;·ary while he attended school here. 9

EULA REDENBAUGH, class of ''10, is in charge of the commercial department at Tobias. Eufa wa.s active in YWCA, serving on the regional. cou.ncil of the Rocky M t oun am reg10n, and was a Peru Y re.presentative at Estes two success1ve summers: She also was affiliated \nth Sigm. a Tau Delta, and K D Jt p appa e a 1· 9

F!RANCTB L. "PAT" HAP.RIB, who ".'as gra~ted the AB degree hi 193~, .1s t:achmg school at Arcadia. T~1s is ?JS fourth year there teaCihmb social science and history m ?,oth,,junior and senior high school.. Pat . is a brother of Janet Harns, a Jumor now 111 school. • JACK ASHTON, class of '35, is superintendent of schools at Dunbar. This is his second year there as superintendent. Jack has two brothers, Graydon and Bob, who are attending Peru at the present time.

Eliza Morgan and Mt. Vernon women at the house meeting on Dec. 2 saw council members present a short skit C.epicting problems arising at meetings. President Faye Bouse discussed the need for obsorvance of study hours and led a discussion on ways of improving Lving conditions in the dormitories.

".'hat cold cream was just as • popular in the first century B. C B~TIE BOOM, class of '39, is m Rome when Galen mixed th~ teachmg departmental art and prescription as it is today. third and fourth grades at Milligan. She was particularly active in That a recipe for making per- Sigma Tau Deltan work on Peru fume is found in the Book of campus. Exodus. • . . CLARA DUNN, class of '33, is ·t. dTh~t th! e Eg}ptrnln lad1ebs twtent teaching in the schools at Hamburg, . 0 acldit·on ay s .g· amour one e er~ Iowa. Clara will be particularly rem to usmgir s ebrow 1 1 1 oRuby"s Bea·1ty Shoppe. Phone d. . · . k g ey penci1s membered for her participation in an 11pst1c they concealed little w. A. A. No. 9 for appointr.:ient. glass globules containing their fa0 f f f vorite perfume in their hair. BERT HALL, class of '40, is Klllitting needles clicked as Kappa That Roman face cream was coaching at Stromsburg and teachOmicron Phiers rr_et Monday evening, Dec. 2. Scarfs, sweaters and made of the fat of lion mixed with ing English. He was voted most roses, popular student in 1939, and held mittens are fast taking shape. Plans were discussed for the "That the Act of Parliament of responsible .positions in Everett . virgin, . L1terarv Founder's Day banquet. l ~170 was passed to "pumsh . · Soc1etv· .and. YMCA · "c·11·s. · ~ f f z:r.a;d or widow that seduced and Be1 t Hall, nee Maaonna Adee, is eBuy your Christmas Cards in betrayed into matrimony his ma- a Peru alumna. ' 0 quantities for imprinting. You can jesty's subjects by means of scent, afford it at Chatelain's. paints, cosmetic washes, artificial WALT ER BUETTGENBACH, •f f > hair, Spanish wool, iron stays, ;·Bits~" to P,eruvia~s, who. teaches hoops, high-heeled shoes or bolster- n Everton, ,vro., v.s1ted fnenas m ed hips." Peru during Thanksgiving vacation. "Bit.sy" played six years of interHere's hope for the college girl. collegiate athletics, was rated by According to a "MadamoLelle" sur- several newspapers as the "best vey of college graduates, 90 per cent back in the Ivliddle West." His Peru The waltz step was featured at favo red marrymg ' · a co11ege graduate c.weater has eleven stripes, five for the Learn-to-Dance meeting on .over th . e pos t - debut an te or career championships and six for partiDec. 5. . girl. Of the married men polled cipation in various sports. He was Members had married college a member of th e p eru basketball · . practiced the new . step exactly half . and reviewed those pre v Io us 1 Y graduates and "a surprisinoo!y high team whi·ch 56 t · 1 d 1 d th b , won games s ra1ght, earne . Margery Evans P aye e percentage - almost half - went to without a loss. "Bitsy" plans to piano. teacher's colleges." send his three boys to Peru.

Dancers Practice ment. Although we students are not firm believers in the • Waltz Step perfectibility of the race, yet it seems that on-lookers have the verdict is that the species is in need of distinct improve-

carefully nurtured this pedestal position for us. Our critical 1elders have taken the bye-gone schofar back in naught age and compared him with the twentieth century imitation.

The critic. looks fondly back upon the former

scholars whose works have carried their names down to the present.

Obviously they were the great men of their

time. But when our elders speak of the present-day student they speak of the immature, inexperienced youth who has

!Looking On [ With Brooks

Just thinking out loud this week: One of the nice things about living today is that Confucius isn't Is it possible to become an intellect without an initial being mentioned any more: News Item: "A New Yorker was groping, without premature error, or even without an un- fined $100 for saying: 'Hello, baby,' to a girl." In many a case it has warranted cockiness which the student wears to gain the cost considerably more than that to say goodbye to one. _ recognition he must have? Can one validly criticize such F. B. 1. n.ger.ts refuse to assist persons who complain of one kind a student who is trying to form his first impressions of a of threatening Letter they have received. They say that the Dean has world he has not quite realized? a perfect right to send out those notices concerning convocation To carry on academically is something of a job by itself; skips. Weakly Pome: wh~n added to that there is the job of adjustment to a new Somebody asked me if I'd say That gambling is a sin. life, the resulting total makes a first-class dilemma. Yet our 1 guess I'd answer him this way: It is unless you win. elders, who have supposedly probed ;the situation, will main· Art Note: If a row of columns is a collonade, a row 1:1.f lemons must tain that the nihilistic atmosphere of Joe-college has seeped be a lemonade. Timely Ob~rvatlon: You don't into our blood. have to build a better mouse trap . , • • ·to get the world to beat a path to We realize that we are m our salad days-green m iudg. your door. _Did you ever try sleep· late on Saturday morning? Ill"' 0 ment, but we are confident that the spirit of education which f f f e Dunk your doughnuts at Gilhas given us our greatest Americans will prevail. bert's Coffee Shop. just come ,into .contact with truth and life.

Peru History Reveals 1000 Received Degree Since 1921 1in 1865 a group of citizens ineluding Dr. John Neal, Major William Daily, Rev. Bunch, S. P. Majors (father of the late Colmel Thomas Majors) and others decided to organize an academy, and they secured the services of Dr. J: M. McKenzie and Mrs. McKenzie for mstructors. The first school was ~eld. in a store building still standmg m down town Peru. .rn 1866 the same group of men with ma~y. other citizens constructcd a building on the1 tree-less hilltop where school was held in 1866. The s~hool was under the general supervi.sion of the Methodist Con· frrence. . In 1867 under the leadership of young ?olone! .Thoma~ J. Majors and. MaJ~r Wilham Daily, members of the f.1rst State Legislature, the aeadcmy was taken over by the Stute, and NeiJ.:asirn's first State Nct'111al School w~; e:;Lablished. lhus begar. th•: 1.eacber training work, not only in Nebraska, but in th e t em··tory wes . t of the MlSsoun · . river, as Peru is the oldest state Teachers Training Institution west of tht !1:iissouri.

The tract: tions of Peru are rich in rnng and story. The old bell that has rung since in the GO's still rings each school day with tne same clear tone that it had seventy years ago when it was purchased. Peru Slhrted as an Academv ;n 1865, betame a State Normal Scho~l in 1: r'.', and sine'; 1921 has beer a State Teachers College, issuing -A.B. degre68, and now is in class "A" of the American A.ss:iciation of TeP,chers Colleges and also in class "A" of the North Central Association uf Colleges. Thousands have attended Peru since it was first organized in •67, and over 5000 .have received diplomas, and since 1921 more than 1,000 have received A. B. degrees. There are thousands of students who received their inspiration in the old school who are teaching throughout the state, the nation and the world. Wherever a Peruvian is found, he shows the same devoted loyalty a d . f . .. n Pl o esswnal spmt . h. m is work as he always has shown for his beloved institution from which he was graduated.


TUESDAY,

D~CEMBER

10, 1940.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE THREE.

Watch the Bobcats Battle Galaxij ~f ~tars To Return for

Alumni Game

• Cats First Home Game

SPORTS

Alumni

• • • •

IWhat Makes peru's Tearn Clicklfis~er rlease~

i

By Barney Haith

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eye for the hoop. He handles tlle ball with precision, and seems to bl on his way to a great future in Peru. He will bear watching thi~ season as he will be a great part of the Bobcats scoring punch.

l

Pre~ urnout .

for ~asKetaall • Seven Lettermen Out


PERU PEDAGOGIAN

Worthy Use of Leisure Time Aduocated for Cafeteria Linemen ~ +

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noon when the cafeteria line .entertain you for as much as three .stretched back to the door and feet. Now, of course, you and the

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Her home is at They met in the training school , gymnasium, Where they battled for

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receiv_e·d· her.· ." two- Basketball enthusia.st.s. turned out year diploma m 1939, IS a pnmary at the Y. M. meeting, Tuesday, Dec. teacher at the Tennant. Iowa, ·Con- 3. . tiolidated school. Council Bluffs.

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Chosen from more than 10 thous- Tournaments of sh.uffle board, and Iowa teaooers by photographer ping pong and darts wer l nn d John . Neagle, , Margare~'s picture by the committee. e Pa e appeared in the Des Momes Regis-

like .."Miss ~erica" than the popula1 conception of a school teach-

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Christmas Gifts at CHATELAIN'S.

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A committee to plan noon hour e.ctmt1es for the trammg school is Max Rogers, chairman; Virginia "Miss Iowa s~h?<Jl teacher of 1940" StepaJU, vice chairman; Dorothy ~

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-Alumna Chosen T. 5· Organizes· ... noon Recreation 1940 la Teacher

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.said to yourself, "I'll go to my room, and wait till the line is gone." If. you. . Besides amusing yourself it you did, you belong to a rare group will give you till.at philanthropic in campus society. feeling-,. (and confidentially noProbably you said, "I will--ilave to thing beats it). get in line now or that caramel Of all the attempts to entertain • 1 pie will be gone." The real reason one's self the most satisfactory is of course is phychological. It is this: the desire of a hungry person to First, pick out a spot on the get as close to food as possible and wall. Now after studied considerathen stick like a leach until ·he tion lay a bet with yourself as to £ets some. how long it will take you to proIn hopes of speedi~ the cloc_k gress to that point. Then, fixing you may take a book along. If i~ one eye on your watch, the other .is a text book you are almost sure on the spot you will suddenly disto fail to divert yourseytf !rom your cover the suspense is terrible. You bunger; even if it is. a novel you find yourself so interested that.a.re very apt to.find yourself won- and there you are, right at the dering if the steak is tender just door. as the hero takes the heroine in Besides tJhe pleasure arid diver.his arms. sion which this form of sport gives At that point you will probably you, there is always the added close tJhe book-you looked silly with chance that you will some day give it anyway-and start listening to yourself enough odds and then the girls in front of, you. Some- make a good enough calculation to times they are interesting. If the become independently wealthy.

+

E. C. McALEER Physician and Surgeon

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"How can a well balanced per- Lutheran _student Assooiati.on at J!l0Il3..lity be developed?" was the their meetrng on Dec. 1. sltbject of a discussion by Idella. The business meet~ was _conBuell when Personality Club met ducted by the president, Wilbert on Dec. 5 at the Training School. Kohrs, and the Rev. Schill.tz of "Can a girl know too much about Nebraska City Jed the ev€ning disherself?" was reported by Lillian cussion. Thomas. Lois Wagoner answered Committee chairmen f?r the the question, "What personality party are Robert Grefe, invitation; traits are essential for the ideal Anna Mangold, entertainment; and college roommate?" Marle Grotrian, refreshments. Following,the reports, each mem- The n~xt meeting will be held at ber received a. chart with which to the MUSIC Ha~ on Dec. 15. ratie her own personality. ,. /- f At the business meeting, the • For h~r-;-Silk hose with a members planned a tea to be given guarantee. Hills Drug Store. on January 16. Upperclas5men who J. J. f were former members of PersonalThe annual Christmas cOl!lcert ity Club will be guests. s~onsored by the high school band d 1 · . . . will be held Sunday afternoon Dec I el a Buell, Maria Grotnan, Lms in th h" h h • · Wagoner and Lillian Wulf were 15' . e Ig sc oo1 auditorium. appointed to head committee Th~ h1_gh school or~hestra and the f I- > s. beginnmg band Wlll also particiCot Ev . . P . H d t pate. The public is invited. • y, erung m ans, u nu , f f ). and all known brands of perfume eDupont Pyrolin toilet t t and sets at Hill's Drug Store. Hill's Drug store. se s a

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Basketba 11 1940-41

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GAMES AT HOME

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JAN. 11_:.U. OF MEXICO JAN. I7-KEARNEY*

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JAN~ 31-WA YNE*

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DEC. 19-WEST TEXAS

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GAMES AWAY DEC. IO-TARKIO AT TARKIO JAN. IO-DOANE AT GRETE JAN. 24--WESLEYAN AT LINCOLN JAN. 28-MIDLAND AT FREMONT FEB. 14--KEARNEY AT KEARNEY*

.

FEB. IS-YORK AT YORK FEB. 2I-WAYNE AT WAYNE

*


ERRY Student Speaks By LeRoy Redfern

1

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~~~~~--------~~·~

BRITAIN?

VOLUME XXXVI.

PERU, NEBRASKA, TUESDAY, DECEMBER

~;;;';'~:;:, 0:n'':.'h:C~,:0~,~;; Gamma Chi Girls

sponsor Tea

Christmas Poetry Read B W'lma Parnell at YW

17, 1940.

11.

NUMBER

Y. W. C. A. to Present c·h r1s, tmas pagean t

to do .... with your help .... -we are sure of victory," sa\d t~e late Lord I Lothian, ,Engl;sh Ambassador t~ "Religious Poetry" wa~ presented United States. The ambassador con ·' .. . to Y. w. c. A. members Tuesday, tinued, in his speech of a week A Christm11s .spmt prevailed at Dea. 11,. by Wilma Parnell. past, telling in so tnany words that the Gamma Chi tea on Dec. 12 m As lY.tarv Olive Richardson read this war means as. much to A- Elliza Morgan Hall. Guests at the the Biblic~l Christmas story, Grace merican security .as it does to Eng- tea were the college women. Muenchau played the piano softly. !ish. His motive undo1;1btedly. bemg A white cake lamb, surrounded President Mary, E. Collin conductto speed _up congr~ional action on by pine branches and red berries ed the song service and business "aid to Britain." . . formed the centerpiece at the t.ea mfeting. . Day by day United States is bemg table as Nancy Ellen Jones, Harriet Final arrangements for the traConvocation goers who refuse to skip convocat10n on warned that the arming of Britain Maxwe11, Marjorie Kennedy aml ditional Christmas pageant were Frid~y, Dec. 20 will have the privilege of seeing a presenta· might not always be a cash busi- Pauline Stark poured. Giscussed in the drama commission, tion that has become a tradition with Peru College students. 1 ness, that s9me arrangemen~ in re- During the tea, music was pro- directed by Wilm.a Parnell. . Sponsored each year at the Yule season by the Y. W. C. A., gard to and will have ided by pianists Ruth At a meeting followmg the Christmas pageant was orginall.y written by former Y. W. to be made. . . and &:ho Elaine Lum, and a.stnng the program it was to hold members Elaine Shaefer, Mary Lizabeth Werner and Mary The Johnson act forbids pnvate trio composed of Rachel Wle!tlcke, only a short vesper service program Ell SI k The setting of the pantomime JS interests to m'ake loans to World Jeanne Spier and Margery Evans. on Tuesday, Dec. 14 and to go en ac · in the stable on the outskirts of War debt defaulters; Britain has The guests were greeted by Caro- caroling after the basketb.all game. Bethlehem as Mary, the mother of defaulted some 5% billion' dollars. lee Garver, Grace Muenchau, Ber- This will be a joint y actmty. J'esus, played by Kay Barling; The Neutrality Act doesn t allow nice Neddenriep and Erma Meier. J. J. J. ../ watches over the mang·er conta~ntquipment for Britain on credit. M Er bef Collin arranged ing the Ghrist child. The narrative Under existing· law it would be legal the and the food of the .biblical story is read .by for the government· to make a lo~n, committee included Phyllis Damat the Mary Ohve Richardson and Juamta the appropriation by congress. bemg Ruth Johnson and Marjorie "The Middleto,n Fan;;1y ._ West. the only legislation necessary, but mast, New York Worlds Fair, a techm The scene depicts the presentSecretary of the Treasurer Morgen- Kenrnedy. colored movie was shown 111 the ing of various things to the new thau. has st.ated that such action 1 1 1 auditorium on Dec. 1. . born infan,t by such individuals as: woµld violate the spirit of the law, F. T. A. Holds Yule Meet The sixth volume of "Si.fting .Sc$.es from the Westm;ghouse Crime, Mary Horton; Greed, Maude that the.. repeal of the Johnson act At Baker Home Sand," Sigma Tau Delta's b1-an- building . provided the ,educat10nal Daft; Poverty, Dorothy Teachman; must precede any loan. nual 'publication, is off the press. information while Bob 5 romance Cruelty, Maxine Keys; Driving What .is the reaction in Washing~ F. T. A. members met at the Twenty-five stuC:ents, !aculty an.d with her art teacher added human daves, Virginia King, Grace Muenton? home of Dr. and Mrs. B. K. Baker alum;ni contributed to create this interest. chau and Emma Rosiscky; War, Senator King, Democrat of utah Wednesday afternoon, Dec. 11, for year's collection of poetry and J. J. J. Ruth Johnson; Disease, Janet Hara.nd the introducer of a measur:e a Christmas party. prose. .. K a Delta Pi Has ris; and a Blindman, Carolyn Flemto relaJ> the Johnson act, made this After singing Christmas songs, led The original wntmgs of the fol- app . ing. At the manger they find their statement in reference to the prob- by Mary E. Collin. the group play- lowing individuals appear in this Annual Christmas Party loads suddenly lightened and the lem .. ''I" would be a terrible catastro- ed Bingo and exchanged gifts. issue: Nancy Ellen Jones was hoste;s disease and afflictions suddenly phe if B~itain should be defe~ted. In recognition of . their interest Joy C. Baker, Phariss B~~df?rd, .. to. t!Je"me.m{l1>rs of~K.Rpp2.:cDelta J:"~ ('1:1~ed:,. ·aS -the' ligt~ ~f tt'~lE: udys . ~!~.\yo,rl~ un~~~·t~~ l'.1):1~.2!.Ii~~t~r,. £l1C:ow11d~rthe· PT'11;1't:i;S ·-ef·tlre ~r"'-N'eta'"~iles;;"-c'ia'ri> ___f'..9l·e; Eelloeh their annual Christmas party. and the songs of the angel host · Stalin, Mussolim and Japan would ganizatio;n; Ma1,jorie W!schm:e1er, Fan{!ers, June Hamilton, Janet Janet Harris directed games_, and greets them. The trio of voices is be an ~ns1aved world, a dark and vice president, presented Dr. and Harris, Arlene Heir.1.er'. Dr. John A. the singing of Christmas carols. composed of Mary Grovenburg, tragic world." Mrs. Baker with a gift from the Jimerson, Meredith JlIDerson, Roy Gifts were exchanged. Nancy Henderson, and Margie FraSenator Nye, North Dakota Re· club. Kellogg, Dr. Selma Konig, M. F'lor;. ;. f ser. publican, says the "allotment of ence Martin, Rose McGinnis, Mary The pageant this year has as the 1 aircraft to England Would jeopardize 1 1 Olive Richardson, Moothart, director Wilma Parnell with Grace our defense. Any dollars we lay T I Betty Pancake, Evelyn Rodgers, Muenchau assisting. on the line (for Britain) We Will Rogene Rose, Jeanne Spier, Doris The fact that you have seen trus

y

Conoocation to Reflect Yule Spirit For Fourth Gonsecutioe Year

~reaitshould

McDon~ld

cabin~t

vo~ed

us·1ft·1·ng Sand"

~~le ~!~ora~ons

comes Off press

Students See movie Of W Id' F , , or s air

;t

Lo~e

s·IQffia l'aUS Heaf .

never see again." Adams, Dempcrat of Qolorado, believes "as long as England has planes Hitler is not going to try to attack the United States." President Roosevelt, in the el~ction campaign, out. for mcreased aid to Bntam, while Margenthau has ~greed with ~es~e Jones that credit to Great Bntam is a good risk. . It appears as 1f Senators George and Nye have convmced congress . as well as the Foreign Re1ations 5 Committee that action on the que tion should be postponed pen?i.ng an investigation of the Bnt1sh negotiable assets in this country T.hus, from all appearances congr~ssonal debate has • been ~uspenaed till January 3 when the 77th congress convenes. . What Will come then? . It still seems that Bnt,. !sh m and Amenca cientLatm for at least might a year.beItsuhfas-

c~n:e

p~obable.

inv~stments.

~mted St~t~s iv~lli

. df bi! been estimated lion in United they Statesexcee and a b1 on. . b. 0 in Latm gested their it unts m Laet·m touch mvestmen

Ame~dca ~t h~es~a .ee~l SU~~ :W ~

America if for no other reason than f th ke Of future trade relaor e sa t!ons. But official sources are conVinced · that popul ar op:mon · · . w.1·u not sanction loans until Br1tam either offers collateral or uses her investments in America. Collateral isn't generally asked for by sovereign powers and isn't considered polite but under such conditions ma Y be waived. Another possibility is the purchase of the British West Indies. Lord Lothian has continually maip.tained that British subjects are not (Continued on page two)

oppo~ition

Original Contributions

starkebaum, Dorothy Teachman, G;race Tear, Wilma Wager and Juanita West . . Illustrators, under the direction of Miss Norma Diddel, include Mary Collin, Meredith Jimerson, Margaret Meier, Mary Stevenson and Wilma Wager Dr. A. L. Bradford, Florence Martin and C1ara Eyre were the editorial board. . "Sifting Sand" is on sale this week. ;. > J. At the weekly meeting, Y. M. discus:ied the question, "Should the Y. M. be continued as a campus organization?" ;. J. ;.

Original contributions were read at the Sigma Tau Delta meeting on Monday, Dec. 9. Selections were given by the following members: Mrls. In!ice Dunning, a poem, "The Hopi Saga;" Muriel Reuter, a short story, "K. w. B.;" Wilma Parnerl, "Two Poems;" Juanita West, a poem "The Dreamer;" Harold Dallam 'a short story, "Goon Hunting;" 'Max Manifold, an essay "Music in My Life;" Reuben Fanders, two essays, "Conrtast in a Wheat Field" and "Snapshot;" Janet Harris, excerpts from 'Loves Chrqnological1y;" Dean Karr, several short poems. The program was followed by a · 1 hour. Dr. Arthur Bradford socia won the prize for the highest number of points in the games played. An intelligence test was given in "Afterthoughts of a music meetwhich the read "refreshments i.r.g" "" score ,, · ' was the tit:e ·of an, article - by . are servou. Prof R T Benf:ird which was m Sandwiches, hot chocolate, wafers, the issue' of the Nebd f d B h Nt . can Y avers an eec - u gum raska Educatianal Journal. were served by Sherry Hauptman, Professor Benford has received an Ruth M"ll Marshall and Betty Jean invitation from the. National As-

Benford Rrticle Rppears In Ed uca t'rnnaI Jour nal ·De~ember

"· i er.

;. ;. J.

Cafeteria Workers Take A. Holiday · at Yule Party · . Cafeteria work~rs forgot , t~eir dishwashing and ice cream 16 Monday evening, Dec. • to JO!ll in a Christmas party. Relay races, guessing contests and exchange of gifts were of the evening's entertainment which was planned by Harriet Mawell, Hope Carter and Nina Kanel. Ice cream ~antas, cakes and Christmas candies were served by "Bake" Steiner.

dip~i~g

par~

sociation for Amencanb ?tom~o?er~ and Conductors T to su m1 ongma orchestra compost IOns. T S G' I GI J. ;. CI ;. b • • Ir s ee u Sings for Convocation . h . ls club The high sc 001 gir g1ee · under the directi?n of Kfay B~r~'.~g presented selections rom c i .kowsky's Smte" at Friday convocation. . Margery Evans and ~cho Ellame Lum played the two-piano accom~animent, and Prof. R:· T. ~enfor~ mtroduced each selection with ex planatory comments.

"Nu~cracker

15

ln'it'iated at

Dramatic Club Banquet~ one. year makes you wan~ to see it agam, for the lmpressiveness of

Both the formal and informal candle 'lights, the faint light that ceremonies were used in initiating falls as a halo on the manger and l5 new members to the Dramatic Mary, the arched window through Club at a banquet Saturday, Dec. which the angel host appears as 14, in the Home Economics room. though by magic, all serve to Jive The new members are Nancy in your memory throug·hout trus HQnderwn, Eugene Lurk, Emma season. Rosicky, Helen Jean Saville, Juan-f -f -f ita West, Doris Parish, Margery Scribblers Compile Book Ann Kinse" MarJ·orie Wischmeier, Of O . . I p Audrey Zastera, Betty Jean Pat- · . • ' Prose '' ngma. oetrv rick, Nina Kane!, James Sandin, " Alveen GiUespie, Rogene Rose warren Bollemeier, Lester Ruetter "nd Ruby Risc~mg are makJ:r;g and Carrol Jones. pla~s for, the Scn~blers scrap book, Black and white .pledge _ribbons which will contam work done by were presented to the new mem- mem?ers. . . bers. Warren Bollemeir and Janet This comm1.ttee was chosen at Harris led group singing and Dean Dec. 12 meetmg at the hom,e of Karr headed the informal initia- Mrs. B. K. Baker. Members o. the t·ion st aff . club read ong1nal ;. ;.prose ;. and poetry, Menu for the banquet consisted • • of cider-mint cocktail, breaded pork Physical Science Frat cutlets, potatoes au gratin, harvard Initiates Seven Members beets, ff pear d · salad, rolls and jelly, Lambda Delta Lambda initia'ed '

Maurie~

co ee an ice cream.

seven new members Monday night They were·· Carl Wirth ' Anderson Wayne Buhrmann Max Jackson ,Eldon C!Jark Lynn 'James and Kingsol;er. ' .

Ca Iend ar TU)EJSDAY, DEC. 17 YMCA, YWCA, CCA .... 7-8 Basketball · Peru vs · Sioux Falls . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 THURSDAY, DEC. 19 Freshmen Clubs ........ 7-9 Basketball: Peru vs. West Texas Teachers .... 8 Peru Prep at Dawson

Ri~hard

At. least . a "B" average 1:1 the physical t sciencel"fdepartment is ne· ~essary o q~a i _Y f or membership m this orgamzat1on. ;. J. J. Buffet Supper Featured

I At International Relations

II

FRIDAY, DEC. 20 Classes . close at 12:30 for Christmas vacation. Resume January 6 at 8 a m. •••••

• • • • ••• • • • • •••.&

International[ Relations cl u b members met for a buffet supper Monday evening. Nancy Ellen Jones, junior representative of the group, conducted a current event round table. Each member submitted a news item of national or international significance.


Peru, Nebraska Entered at the Postoffice at Peru, Nebraska, as Second ' Class Matter. $1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc .•

, Rose McGinnis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editor . A . Ed' Maryon T homas · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ssistant ~tor Ralph Locke . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sports Editor Melvin McKenne.y ................. Assistant Sports Editor . . C R d Meredith Jimerson · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · opy ea er Nina Kane! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Proof Reader M. Florence Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adviser .·

Thumbnail Info on Origin

i~j;;;;Ji,1

time-sign hanging in your room tells you its only a week 'til Christmas A look t the pre-homctay . a . . world conf1rms the news with signs of the season. Christmas trees, greeting cards and stockin:lgs for Santa. Maybe you're not interested in their origin fo::- the sake of knowledge, . but it does. make go?d conversat10n. For mstance, if your best date. hasn't . read her PED . by 7:24 tomg·ht, mstead of remarkmg drably as you buckle her overshoes, "Well, radio reports say it'll freeze tonight," cast a reflective glance at the lighted tree lobbying _in Eliza Morgan and amaze her with your timely informar,ion.

ALUMNI returning for the Al• umni game Saturday night were: Bond Kenned, Russ Wallace, Alice Organ, Gerald Tyler, and Wfliam Davenport. ELIZABETH GLOSSER class of 1940, is teaching at Crab' Orchard, Nebraska. Elizabeth was active in Sigma Tau Delta 1ast year Her . sister, Ethel, is a former assistant librarian of Peru. BERN ARD GOERKE class of '39 , is · t eachmg · ' at Diller,; Nebr. Carl :Ludington, superintendent of · schools there is a Peruvian and iis a brother of Ruth, now i~ school. BENJAMIN W BURKE . intendent of s~hools at is ~~p~r. . is n, Nebr. He is a former Peruvian, and his sisters, Hazel, and Florence attended scho 1 h t ' o ere 1as summer. RUTH CRONE JAC • K BROWN, and . GOODREAU. SOPER, ~re Per~t~ians now holding Cm! Service pos1 ions m Washmgton D c Goodreau accepted his p~sitio~ i~ 1939, and Ruth and Jack in 1940.

~fon~~'r'.~!~~!, ~~~::•'~~~~:,,then= L~~-~'.'~' ~~~~,:~·

Published Weekly by The Peru State Teachers College

·

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1940.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE TWO.

and put burning candles on the branches. A girl with a taste for sensationalism would lend a receptive ear to the Scandanavian mvth about a tree which sprang fro~ the blooddrenched soil where two lovers were killed. At certam mghts dunng the Christmas season, reads the story, mysterious lights flamed from its . branches, and no wind could extmgmsh them. An unenthusiasti c "G~e tfhat's v , · pretty," when she shows you a Christmas ca1•d from her other steady, could be l'aplaced with: "That reminds me. --Did you know t~e first cards were 'Christmas pieces' elaborately decorated by old school masters and used by school

Reporters: Milton Schulz, Margery Kmsey, LeRoy Redfern, Betty MiUer Mona Morelock, Jean Haith, Janet Harris, . . ' · . • Jeanne Spier, Myrton Hall, Phyllis W1lberger, Dorothy . c . v· . . K' Armstrong, H aroId L antz, A r dIS armme, 1rgmia mg, Like this: "You know, it took boys for carefully written letters ex• lo't' th · . . Ruth Stoneman, Sarene Hauptman, Marjorie F1dermutz, the Egyptians to think of something P. i mg eir progr~ m composithat's bright

Once a winter they t1on and chirography. '

(If

her eyes

Tod Hubbell, Anselm Johnson, Jack Mcintyre, Emma Ro· decked branches, worshiping God· widen at the latter ten-center, exsicky, Elvera Schacht, Isabel Tynon, Bill Zurbrick, LeRoy dess Isis. Each of the 12 branches plain, "Writing, to you.") . . Durst, Ralph Locke. stood f~r a month, symbohz;ng the . By that time she'll. be wondering

~omplet1bont'toft onteh yeahr. We ve frun - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - . , . . - - - - - - - - m a su s 1 u e oug , smce irs, "MERR Y CHRISTMAS!" not palms, grow in our back yards. . If she is the domestic type, tell If you were in Bethlehem today you would turn your her the German version: Martin eyes to those fields where the shepherds heard long ago "the Luther'. trying to describe to wife ,, • . . and children a "snow-covered forest Song of the Angels. It was a qmet event, though trad1t10n under the glittering star-sprinkled here says that the sky was illuminated with many bright sky," dashed to the garden, felled lights, for it was night. Not in a palace with luxury and a little fir (probably in a single

wealth, but in a lowly manger came the Man of men. The · teaching and influence of that Life has spread into every ·heart that is receptive to its benignant influence. And yet there are the eyes of men which have been · 'blinded by selfish greed: There is a lack of the true sense of values. Men have thought that possessions and power bring them happiness. So they have despised the little things 'f 0 f l1 e. . . . . Contrasted to a world filled with grievance, malice and bloodshed our country still signalizes peace to those who ' · . . h . want freedom and a nght to appmess.

-~-c~;~~;TMAs

1940=---------,------

·-~--~

1940 A sad year ... ,

··---

if you're really a walkmg Britannica Vol. 3 and may start asking questions. When she inquires why we - - - - - - - - hung up our stockings before we THE REX came to college, you can tell her ALL BEAUTY the Dutch youngsters started the SHOPPE baH rollmg by putting out their . wooden shoes, but we "get-all-youComplete Beauty Service can" Americans put out stockings Permanents - Machine or because they'll stretch. Machineless

Language Students Await Santa'S Visit at Santa Claus will be a guest the foreign languages party to be held in the Music Hall auditorium Dec. 19. According to Frank Larson, genera! chairman, Saint Nick will distribute gifts to members of the first and second year German classes and the • second "ear French J class.

we trim the tree on Christmas night And trim the house with holly bright; But poor old DadHe gets trimmed first, And what is more Gets trimmed the worst. But still he never mys a wordSo here's to Dad! . . . A game old bird'" . ;. ;. ;.

i\'.frs. Lee Wright Miss Elaine Bailey

~~llllllllllillllJlllJllllllili1fillllllJlllli1lll!ii~w:g;l!fill;~

§

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J. P. CLARK

~

E lllJ lllJ lectric Shoe Shop [~ ~ Shoe Repairs of All Kinds i" "" ::~ .,, iiJJ

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-~~~~~~~Grace1t·Pefersen-1s-~· --r:~~~~::~:~®:~:~i~; Short skits in German and French wm be presented by. the classes. Members of the committee arc Vincent Dreeszen, James Steele, Jean Hoagland and Meredith Jimerson. ;. ;. >

Sad for the mothers who weptAlone For childrenHungry For scientists, doctors, philosophers .... For men of good faith Everywhere. Sadly they saw their world Blown up! In a mighty explosion of hate and fear . , . and greed and madness!

Popular Prices at BARNES PHARMACY

MERRY CHRISTMAS, DAD!

The Rev. Bauman Lectures to C. C. A.

Hostess to· Librarians In a colorful Yuletide atmosphere the librarians entertained th_e library staff at the home of Miss Grace Petersen Sunday, Dec. 8, from 3 to 5 o'clock A brightly decorated Christmas tree reflected thGe holiday spirit. ames were played, and prizes were won by Miss Libbie Branson, Jim Sandin and Reuben Panders. Old-fashioned plum pudding and Christmas fruit punch were served to the guests. Bill Fankhauser led in the singing of Christmas carols. ;. ;. ;.

I~ ~

[ij

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FOODS

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MARDIS GROCERY ~

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DR. G. H. JODER -Physician and Surgeon-

"Sacrifice is the essence of re~ Office at Milstead Corner ligion," said i:ay Bauman in his Office Phone 33, Res. 39 lecture concermng the altar at the [gJ_ Dec. 10 meeting of C. C. A. lfillll!liillllllJlllJ[ijllllllJ[ijlllJ[ii!liilllJ~!ll!it~[gj'lllJ[ij[gj~ Wilbur Ege, Mary Ann Kean illl!liii1filllllllllllill!lii[ijlllJlilJ[ijlllJl!iJ[gj[g)JlllllJ[ij!ilJ!!lJ§i1ll[jj) and Ellan Ryan are to _have charge llll PERU BOWLING of the January 8 meetmg. ~ :; Fina:! plans were made for the lill CLUB ; 1940. Christma~ danc~. at which every Edna Weare Ente~tains l lJI~ Ladies Welcome at All Times ~ But wait! member is to brmg a guest. Home Ee. Fratermty )I Ben Hanlon Mgr. it Isn't it Christmas eve? ;. }. ,. M. G. Heuer, Owner (Wasn't it written, "Fear not! Light from a colorful Christmas For beholdtree cast its rays on the members lillllilllilllilli1fillllilli1filllr!lilillmmlilllillll!Jl1llt~~lillilii of the home economics fraternity, ll!Jll!filiifil!llilllillllillill[ij]lilJlilJilfillllillf!lll!ll[g]iilJlllJ\lfillll!iliili ! bring you good tidings of great joy ~lementary Kappa Omicro~ Phi, as Miss Edna ~ Wasn't it?) Weare enterta.med at her home ~ DR. H. C. DALLAM ~ Tomorrow A crache, a miniature nativity Thur~d~y evenmg._ lill ; You'll hear the clear sweet songs scene, was the central decoration for Kmttmg and bridge were follow- iilJ DENTIST · Of children , .. Early Elementary Club's Christmas ecl by an exchange of Christmas ~ . 0 Christmas bells ... party last Monday. gifts. Miss Eperva Weare served ~ fflce Phone 32, Res. 196_ ~ Laughter. Grouped around this scene the date pudding, coffee and candy. lillllllllillillilil!liilillllllllllill!liililllllllllllillllll!l!:{filg]!liill!Jllliill~ You'll see again members listened to the Christmas ;. ;. ;. lil!ll!Ji!lllllllilllllJllll!liillllllillllli1fillli1llllllOOijjji1filll[g;[gjll!J:1li" The glory of Man story and sang carols after .which -STUDENT SPE·AKS llll 11!1 they played Norwegian games and . ~ We Call For And Deliver ~ Who gives ate 'lollypops. (Contmued from page one) [ill Keep Your Business At Home lliJ -because he loves! J. ;. ;. for sale and President Roosevelt ~ · lftl You'll say has declared the idea silly. it PERU CLEANERS ii It's good to be alive! England is hardly in the position Phone 62 Good to live in America! to dictate and Roosevelt made the ;ji! .Fear? No. same remark when questioned on llllllllc,;lilJllillllJm So long as there's a Christmas • the possibility of bases for old age Fllll!filil!ililll!illilllillll!JlilllillOO[l;iil!i!Ji1llilJil!liill~ . Margaret Meier. was elected pre- destroyers. At least the idea isn't . Look no farther-look your best There'll be courage ... sident of the Art .Club for the next out of the realm of chance. Haircutting A Specialty Courage, and a humble prayer semester at the meeting held Dec. A two point plan has recently )I That soon will come 2, Meredith Jinerson is the new been suggested and seems to be Modern Barber Sho ~ The dawn. vice president and Marcelle Red- meeting popular approval. It pro- : BILL LLO~D -"Highways of Happiness" ding is secretary-treasurer. vides: _ !ilJ Members of the club decided to 1. Britain use her own invest- lliilllllJlllJlllJ[ill~illilil!liiiillll!J!liilllJ!lii[ij[ll]lllJlllJiill!lii!lll J. .J. make art metal work a project ments in this country till they !illilll!liiiillllll!liiilllllllilllllllllJ!liillll!liii~[gjlilJiilJll!Jiilliilliilllilliill for the next semester. run out. iill l'l: SEASONAL GREETINGSAn amendmer.t to the constitu- 2. United States would make a II\ E. C. McALEER ~ Christmas invariably fill us with delight, plum pudding tion was ado~ted whic~ makes .any flat promise to grant loans when Physician and Surgeon and a glowy time. And this year as we are catapulted into ?tudent pl.annmg to maior or i:im?r these resources .were exhausted. !ilJ Glen Bldg, AUBURN llll • . · • m art el!g1ble for membership m The problem is ours. yuletide days the PED staff has somethmg to tell you- the club, as well as those who Loams to Britain? !ilJ Office, 5 - Residence 56 illl "MERRY CHRISTMAS!" have had four hours or' art work. Credit to Britain? ;iilllillll!l!lliill@J!lfilillllfillji1fmil!iJlllil!l!!lii!illilllillilil!liid

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Crache Forms Theme At Club Party

.

I

1i

Art Club Elects m ffieier Prexy

I

I i i

I

.

.

i I


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, I~.

PERU PEDAGOGlAN

PAGE THREE.

Watch the Bobcats Battle Sioux Falls, West Texas ~··

World's Tall est

.

Bobcats Score 52 Points to Defeat

SPO R·TS Wheelermen Drop Game at Tar.kia •

Totals ......... 23

lineups included: Pos AlU1Unf F Halladay F Handley C McCormick G Sheeley G Mccutcheon

Dakota Champs Test Cats Ton ite f

>.

f

Peru Prep Loses Opener to Ruburn •


PAGE FOUR.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1940.


•j Student Speaks· By LeRoy Redfern

.J1 q

Last week ~ chanced to hear a "man on the street" program discussing the president's message to congress. One of the several who comni.ented favorably was asked if ·he thought totalitarianism could !!nd would b~ defeated· now that Unltecl· States i§ to act as an arsena:l for the democracies. His answer was "I don't think, I know, we have the materials to do it and God is on our side."

Mrs. Roosevelt has spoken harshly of those who had the audacity not to applaud many sections of the president's speech. ·There is no doubt in- her mind just as there was no doubt in the mind of this man on the str~et that President Roosevelt's speech gave the most logical, the right course for United States to follow.

Yet, there are persons who will take issue with the President's point of view in spite of how obviously correct many believe him to be. One of the most interesting of this school of thought is the once notable, now suspicioned, Anne Morrow Lindbergh.

VOLUME XXXVI.

PERU, NEBRASKA, TUESDAY, JANUARY H, 1941

Budget Events Third musicale Ritz Trio Presents Program Previewed ~arly Features Chorus Of Varied novelties at Convo Budget events for the second semester will include "America's Foremost Autograph Collector," who will appear here on April 4. He is Edwin A. Rowlands and will be presented by the budget committee. He will speak on "Hobbies." E:ince 1036 JI.Ir. Rowlands has t:aveled,.from ~ast to coast a:'d has obtained au1'Jgraphs from iwo t'housand famous persons, includ .. ing such no ta bl es as A1bert Einstein, ' Amelia Earhart, Eduard Benes, Shirley Ter:lpl? a::d Paderewski. Virginia and Betty Jane Hol:mn will present a concert on March 25. The Holman sisters will be featured in two-piano numbers.

The Perusingers will spon:or the third in a series of musicales to be p:·esented Sunday, January 19, at 4 p. m. Alice Auxier of Seward, soprano, will be a guest singer, and she will be accompanied by Ruth Chatelain, music instructor at Syracuse. The instrumrntal trio will appe~:· on the program, and the chorus will sing under the direction of G. Holt Steele The past two musicales have attracted visitors from Falls City, Wymore, Shubert, Verdon, Auburn, Nebraska City and Omaha. f

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next R.R.U.W Review

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profe.s.sor of Ptysicai Sciences, has accepted a Civil Service position in Washington, D. C. He will be a chemist in the Department IQf :;1terior, Geological Survey, Quality of Water division. Dr. Seegmiller became a professor on the Peru campus in the fall of 1939. He taught chemistry, physics and g:ound school aviation. Dr. Seegmiller plans to leave for Wasbington, D. C., Jan. 15.

·{~~:r:~:±i··~e~~.te~~~n!~;;~.;~~~~•.,;!~~f:~··~Q~'fu6~/3~~'~1Wi~ft~"~~,. Peel I'iiniertw1~·'.itnr

What, then, ·is your conclusion to this discussion? may be justly asked of me. Do you urge a defeatist acceptance of the inevitable 1 . No, I cannot pledge my per(Continued on page four) ·

Director Displays Versatility On Four Different Instruments

Dr. Seegmiller "~mbezzled He;ven" to be Accepts U.S.Job

Althoug·h few of you have had the opportunity to read, most .of you have undoubtedly heard of her recent book THE WAVE OF THE FUTURE. It is very interesting to read both this short bOok and the President's speech in ·one sitting. "Embezzled Heaven" by Franz Try it some time when you have Werfel will be reviewed by Mrs. A. a few hours to just stop and think. G. Wheeler, Wednesday, Jan. 15, 4 I P m. at the College Library. Mrs. Lindbergh declares her Franz Werfel, author of "The work to be "... not a solution but Forty Days at Musa Dagh" which a record of my attempt to recon- was a best seller, is now exiled cile the many conflicting points of from Germa!lY and living in the view which have assailed me in United States. His latest novel is travels abroad and at home." She the story of Teta, a seventy year points out how her generation has old Austrian cook, and her attempt seen their beliefs, formulas, and to buy herself a sure place in creeds which they trusted SG mu?h, Heaven. More than a story of one

ful nations being overrun by aggressors and innocent people punished. • "It is with these facts· a·s a. bas. is," says Mrs. Lindbergh, "that my Ally and Pro-Ally friends claim they are the Forces of Good, fighting the Forces of Evil. And t.hey are right," she says, "but oniy relative to the small stage at which they are looking." No one seems to have looked at the blind, selfish, irresponsible actions of the "Democracies" or their resistance to change. "Perhaps ... had post-· war RepubJ..ican . Germany been given more support by the Democracies . . . there would have been no Naziism and no war.'' • "No," continues Mrs. i,indbergh, "! cannot see the world as a 'crusade.' If I could label it at all, I would label it part of a vast revolution . . . I feel that had the world been ab!e 1 by peaceful revolution, to foresee a;nd forestall the Cha ng·es, to cor·rect the .a.buses that pushed behind the communist and Fascist revolutions, we would not now have to come to them by such terrible means. The world.. has been forced to its .knees. Unhappily, we reldom find our way there withou~ being beaten to it by suffering." • " . . . the things we dislike in Naziism are not the forces of the. future. But it is to say that somehow the leaders in Germany, Italy and Russia have discovered how to use new social and economic forces. • ... They have sensed the changes and they have exploited them. The evils we deplore in these systems are not in themselves the future; they are scum on the waves of the future."

NUMBER 12

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Ritz Trumpeteers Combining novelty, harmony and comedy, the Ritz Trumpeteers entErtained at convocation Friday, Jan. 10. Featuring bra:s e!;semble, the program was varied by combinations with saxophone, clarinet, and bassoon by the trombo!1ist-di-

sen held a trumpet tone after the· next relea::e. Artists waited patientIy for hlm to subside, then approached him with amazed curicsity at the tone continued. Other m~.g!c feats performed in the comic interlude were plucking the tone

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usual in the present materiaJ.istic Minnesota Newspaper world in which Teta's accomplishA new primer will be responed, agreeable, well-to-do employ- sib!e for publication of the Pedaers perish. gogian when Roy M. King goes t Cr ksto . t Townspeople and students are o oo n, Mmn., o manage a invited to attend this review, paper there. another in the series sponsored by Howard C. King, his father, will A. A. U. W. succeed him here.

ano introduced the group with tive Elide operating by the two "Barnum and Bailey's March," fol- trombonists. lowed by a selection from the Liszt's "Liebestraum," "Finlandia," "Chocolate P<Jldier." Mr. Ritzentha- by Sibelh1s and operatic arias !er then played one of his original made up the next medley. Pianist solos for saxophone, "Enchant- Austin Warner played "Chopin's ment." "Octave Eltude in B Minor," and Del Stager's arrangement of tMhe diRrecto~. a bdassoon soldo, "Old "Carnival of Venice," played by an ,wer, an a come Y pertrumpet soloist Mr. Joseph Thomp- formance of "Oh, Dem Golden son was followed by a brass fan- Slippers." fare. Releasing the chord Mr. RitGther features were national conzenthaler and Mr. Thompson sta:ed test winner, Mr. Ramond Cooley, in horror as trombonist Mr. Rich- playing Arthur Pryor's trombone ard Cooley tongued a loud and <cb, "ThOi.:ghts of Love," and spesurprising di'sonance. Hard locks de! arrang·ements of modern and from the other artists seemed to pcpular numbers. assure no further disturbance, so "Your Land and My Land," a one?) rnyway. don't you thin..li: they tried again. The audlence's p2triotic medley, closed the pro .. those band unifo.ms ought to be in laughter inc,·err~ed as Mr. Th0:01p- grar::J.. a showy place ... ? The members? Where else would they be but in - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - them, the uniforms, I mean-now wait a minute, just why did I PUO·h my way up from the bottom of dummy sheets, sample pai5eS, pictures write-·1ps and etc. to tell you all this w~1en it doem't make sense anywa,,-oh yes, all in the line "Looking Forward" was the key' note of Mrs. Genevie H. Marsh's TUESDAY, JAN. 14 of duty-now we can go on. ··After aa'ddress to Y. W. members Ja:J. the opening section, comes the fac- ~ YWCA, YMGA, CCA .... 7-3 ulty. Why faculty, simple-who '·Basing her thoughts on Bruce Peru Prep vs Nemaha, here ever heard of having students be- Barton's book, "It's a Good Old fore you had a faculty, or have World," she commented: "It is the WEDNESDAY, JAN. 15 you? Then the classes seniors, jun- ,iob of youth to look forward. Our iors-you know the rest and their problems are not so different, but Band Concert (Budget Even~) paddlings are :oo recent to remind are on1y new t o us; th at's wh y them - organizations - athletics, they seem so despairing." THURSDAY, JAN. 16 what with Aill-State players and Freshmen Clubs ......... 7-9 All-State championships coached by She challenged the group to

Peruv1'an_ secrets D1'v-ul9ed Bf J Ed' Dean K ·. 1tor .·arr :J .

BY DEAN KARR Recently members of the Fed sts:ff breezed into the 1941 PERUVIAN office and demanded that you . be told some of the inn~: workmgs of the book, o( course t argument that "who should know more about the. biook than the editor" kind of hit my soft spotsoThe cover has been picked, ·11 its be of a prettY · · · · · · · an d WI contrasted by · · · · · · · Don't you think that will be attractive? Oh yes, the design, well, it will be strictly modern, strictly modern(which. could be anythlng) · Now that we have that matter takend , b care of, lets open the oak up an see what we can see. This being a year of patriotic sentiment and what not-now, wait a minute, who said we were waving the red, white and blue, but-gosh -who can halp it if the waving of the "pale blue and white" coupled with the singing of that glorious "Fling abroad our college colors" brings the lump to the throat and all students to their feet in attention-could be, could be. The arrangement wil\ be informal (show me a college annual that isn't nowa-days). Aind gee whiz-I almost forgot, since they had a tag day to help outfit the band or somethin' (by the way, why did I buy

G ,. m h u enevte arS fges YW's to Look Forward

Calendar •

"Al" and "Art," its only logical they should come i::i. for their share of the glory in a record for the 1941 PERUVIAN-and last, but not least, CAMPUS LIFE-that thing that every one of YOU is a part of-,How often ha-;e you said "remember the day'.'-we broke classes for the first football game-we pranced at the homecoming hop, -the night we dressed fit to kill to go to the formal-flowers and all-the night we stepped out a la Sadie Hawkins -those banquets we were stuffed with food and speecl\es-Cwho said (Continued on page three)

have hope based on faith and to believe in the future, for therein lies progress. N y Th ht db ew ear oug s were rea Y Carolee Garver, who had charge of devotions. According to President Mary E. Collin, a "War Sacrifice Service" 'ill b h ld t th t t' " e e a e nex mee mg, Jan. 14, from 5:30 to 6:30 p. m. The offering received will be forwarded to headquarters to \help finance some college student through C<?llege.

FRIDAY, JAN. 17 Peru vs Kearney here SUNDAY, JAN. 19 MusicM ................... 4 Lutheran Club ........... 7-8 MONDAY, JAN. 20 International Relations Club ...... '. ........... 7-8 Alpha Psi ............... 7-8 Freshmen Council .... 10:30 Kappa Delta. Pi ........ 8-9

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PAGE TWO.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

O'JlJUL

p~qia!L

Ancient Parable Presents Adoice for College Student

Published Weekly by The Peru State Teachers College Peru, Nebraska En(ered at the Postoffice at Peru, Nebraska, as Second Class Maher. $1.00 per year. Single 'Copy Sc . . h · M G" · Ed't 1 .Ko·s.e c ·mms · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · or Maryon Thomas ............· ... : .......... Assistant Editor Ralph Locke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sports Editor · M K ··A · t t S t Ed't 1 or M eIvm c enney · . · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ssis an por s Meredith Jimerson ........................ Copy Reader Nina Kane! ..... , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Proof Reader M. Florence Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adviser

Reporters: Milton Schulz, Margery .Kinsey, LeRoy Redfern, Betty Miller, Mona Morelock, Jean Haith, Janet Harris, Jeanne Spier, Myrton Hall, Phyllis Wilberger, Dorothy Armstrong, Harold Lantz, Ardis CJrmine, Virginia King, ' . . . Ruth Stoneman, Sarene Hauptman, Mar1or1e F1dermutz, Tod Hubbell Anselm Johnson Jack Mcintyre, Emma Ro· · ky, Elvera ' chacht, 1·sabel T' ynon, B'll · k, L eR oy sic 1 urbnc Durst, Ralph Locke.

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 14, 1941

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And in tho~e days, among the hills of the ancient city of Peru, on the banks · of the River Miss~ ouri, there dwelt a certain youth, called College Student. And College Student was content. And he spoke unto himself saving, "For lo these many days r ·have dwelt in the city of my fathers with other• of my tribe. Each day bringing forth in )l.ue season its pleasu:e and joy. And he went forth among his friends and they reveled one with another. And lo, one appeared among them who was given to sobriety. And he' spoke unto the revelers ih a loud voice saying, "Behold I bring you sad tidings. The days of merry making are consumed. I be~eechG thtehe, ento·:mgh of bthisk mafdness. o ou your oo s, or the day of reckoning approacheth." And the assembly was confused some therefore saying one thing, and some another. And College student spoke unto

BEGINNINGS-

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I LOOKING BACK sick in the name of Yule, have .become memories. Though t_ __

!It1.lumni ]'Mill. . J

them saying·, "Fear not, for this is a false profit bearing false witness. Be not deceived, the day of reckoning is not yet." And when they had heard that they entered unto the place of learnir;g, praising College Student. And when they had entered unto the place of learning, a man of great reknown, called College Professor shewed himself unto them. And he made speech with them saying, "Verily, Verily, I say unto you, the day of reckoning is at hand. Go thou, and prepare thy

By G"" Mumhou

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OMAR GOTTULA, class of '38, is teaching commerce and social science and coaching 2.t Endicott, Nebra·ika. He is the brother of Melvin, now in school. ROLAND EDIE, former Peruvian, is principal of the high school at Hebron, Nebr. He was pa1ticularly active in athletics, when he attend• ed Peru.

MAXINE GALBRAITH, class of '39, is teaching commerce at Minden, Nebr. Maxine was a member rnlf." And when he had spoke there of the student c:oeial committee was a great dearth all over the here in her senior year and was ls.nd. Laughter was turned to active in various .campus organizations. mourning and joy to heaviness. And the multitude cried one to MISS SADIE E. CRINK died another saying, "Who now is a Sunday in Fremont. Miss Crink false profit bearing false witness?" was graduated from Peru and Verily, Verily, I say unto you. taught school in Douglas and college Student of this day in the Dodge counties for many years. ancient city of Peru, meditate upon ROY L. KLAURENS, a Peru these things that I have told unto graduate, formerly of the North you, that you may save thyself. Bend school, has been elected coach and social science instructor at Burr. Klaurer.s formerly had an insurance agency at Nehawka.

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LORENE NORTON ('35) anrl Frank Schrimsher were married I Jan. 4 at Wee Kirk of the Heather . in Los Angeles. They plan to live 11 we're hard put to find a single soul with ac good word for End of the semester, eh? Well, I in Los Angeles, where he does aero1 . nautic construction work. departing 1940, the· task of ringing out the old year has been figure instead of lookini' back on I my prospects for a "C," I'll page .i VIRGINIA NAVIAUX is Deputy District Clerk at Nebraska City. accomplished. Conse~uently, the appropriate time has arriv- through some back Peds to see Did you knowwhat the g·ang was talking about That the name Marjorie. with its DOROTHY HARKSON ('33) and ed for turning over· new leaves, establishing magnanimous way back invariations in spelling is the most Arthur Skaar of Davey, were marJanuary 1940 common girls' name on the cam- (ed Dec. 24, at Jerusalem Lutherresolutions for the future and charting new beginnings. Prof. Thorson Returning To pus? Eleven girls are so named. an Church in Baltimore, Maryland. "Make History." The most common boys' name is Dorothy has been teaching En· Mankind likes beginnings. The pilgrims set ·sail on an January 1939 Robert-with 16 men answering glish at Syracuse. "Swamp Spirit" Haunts Convo- to it. A daughter, Pamtla Jane, was unknown sea to land on a wild and hostile shore, hoping to cation. That other popular girls names born to MR. AND MRS. JATl'l.ES .,. ._ January 1933 are Mary and Ruth used by nine PERDUE, JR., of Fort Morgan, Colo· carve out a better civic life. The pioneer turns his face to- Girl on 2nd floor addressing girls each, Dorothy belonging tc James ('37) is an instructor in the ~ward the unknown wilderness. The explorer dares the haz· Christmas Cards. A sound believ- eight girls, Evelyn claimed by six Fort Morgan schools. er in "mail early and avoid rush." girls and Doris and Helen used by NANCY JANE KEHOE and BOB ·ards of travel and climate· and savage !ife to come upon new January 1937 five girls each. BLANKENSHIP will be married "Man-on~the-Campus" F i n d s TI1at 12 fellows answer to the Jan. 19, at Humboldt. They will· lands. Science adventures continually, reaching. into the in- SLuderl'ts Veto "Love at First name James, 11 to William, seven live in Los Angeles where BlankSight." to Jack, and six to Donald and enship is employed. Both are form_visible w,orld. January 1935 Richard. . er Peruvians and Miss Kehoe is Peru to Have New Post Office. That combiBations of names ~e remembered for her outstanding Everyday is a time of beginnings, hut by common con- January 1935 popular among the girls. For ex- work in the music department. CoUege Parade Pleases Many. ample, there are three Betty Jeans. JEANNE HUMPHREY (mat. '38) -sent a day is set to mark the beginning of another year. Pickle Eatir.g "Ghost" Prowls in Others found include Barbara Ann, spent the holidays with her pari\lt. Vernon Halls. Echo Elaine, Rosemary and Caro· ents in Auburn. Jeanne teaches at Here we take stock of our progress thus far and gird our· January 1934 lee. Sargent. Portrait of u. W. Unveiled in That one name is sometimes MARY MAT;I'HEWS ('39) and selves for further progress in the year ahead. Training Schoc,l. spelled different ways. Catherine, LOUISE MATTHEWS (mat. '3G) Kathryn, and Katherine and Mar- returned to their teaching posiIt is likely that there may not be a new job, a new i 1 i jorie, Marjery, Marjory and Marg- tions at Taylor and Burwell, reie are listed in the Student Di- spectively, after vi2iting their par.'School, new surroundings nor new associates. yet it is pos· rectory. ents, Mr. and Mrs. Homer I. Matt· That there are many unusual hews, who live near Auburn. sib1e to take a new spirit into the iob, and the school and the names on the campus. Examples MR. Af'lD MRS. GEORGE 0 are Twilde, Unadean, Idelia, Phi- KUHL visited in Auburn and Tesurroundings. The age old problem of ordin- Iena and Orrillia for girls and Wor- cumseh recently. Both Mr. and ary children vs. the especially gift- try, Giaydon, Fay, cashus and Mrs. Kuhl are Peru alumni. Mrs. As the old year closes behind, put behind that old self ed one is the su3ject discussed in Clairon for men. Kuhl, formerly Vivian Hawkins, an article by Prof. R. T. Benford taught in the schools at Eagle, and with his intolerance and faint heart, and take into the new appearing in the January-February Mr. Kuhl is a former superinten·issue of Education Music Magadent of schools at Julian. year, a new self who can take the blows' of unkind fate. zine. . . MISS HELEN WILBERGER ('40) A picture of Prof. Benford and visited her parents at Julian over Beginnings! Now is the time for them. his Training Sch-:iol music project the holidays. She teaches in the accompanies the article which is Art metal projects were discussed htgh ·school at Raymond. entitled, "Should Every Child Have 1 i f by the Art Club in a meeting last During tthe holidays, MR. AND Music?" MRS. RICHARD SHERMAN of Monday evening. THE BANK OF TIMEWork was begun Wednesday on Julian entertained the faculty of i " f paper knives and small trays to be the Julian Public School. Among If you had a bank that credited your account each morn· Tri Betas Discuss made from copper and decorated their guests were Mr. and Mrs. Censored Topic with etched and pierced designs. Wayne Wilson, CMrs. Wilson, forming with $86,400, but carried over no balances from day to Beta Beta Beta met on Monday, The completed articles will be dis- erly Vivian Lambert), and Miss played in the second floor library Regula Baltensperger. Mrs. Sherday, and allowed you to keep no cash in your account, and January 6. man is the former Corinne Barnts. Members of the organization re- show case. 1 1 1 every night canceled whatever part of the amount ·you had fused to release information con- Announcement of Marriage All are Peruvians. GLADYS RUDDY ('31) and Ercerning the subject discussed. Of Virginia Nelson nest Borne were married in Aufailed to use during the day-what would you do? Draw 1 i f The marriage of Virginia Nelson, burn, Jan. 3. Miss Ruddy has been South of the Border Senors freshman from Panama, to Mr. teaching in Las Animas, Colo. Mr. out every cent, of course, if your I. Q. is in the upper Wayne Bates which occurred octo- Borne is connected with the WestSing for Our Sweet Senoritas brackets. ber 25 at Belleville, Kansas, has ern Contracting Corporation. Mr. "Ah sweet senoriatas, bonita mu- been announced. At the end of the and Mrs. Borne will live in Rolla, Time is such a bank. Every morning it credits you with chachas," these tender words float- semester Mrs. Bates will leave to Mo. ed up to the balcony of the girls join her husband at Panama, where MR. AND MRS. GLENN YONT 86,400 seconds. Every night it writes off as lost whatever of dormitory. Under the spell of a he of Sutton spent their vacation with is coach. bright Nebraska moon and the Glenn's parents at Brock. these you have failed to invest to good purpose. It carries strains f f f of a quita::', the senors from MR. AND MRS. WALLACE Margie Fraser Marries SUDGEN and daughter,. JANET over no balances. It allows no overdrafts. Each day opens south of the border serenaded the Gene Blankenship senoritas of Eliza Morgan Hall SatBEI'H, of · Grand Island visited Announcement has been made of relatives at Johnson during the a new account with you. Each night it burns the day's record. urday night. Thus the seno:s of Old Mexico the marriage of Margie Fraser to holidays. Jl.ll·s. Sugden was formerly There is no drawing against the morrow. You mus.t live proved they perfcJrmed well un- Gene Blankenship, January 7, at Ellen Wilson ('31). Mr. Sugden, der a balcony as on the maples of the Lit.tie CMrch of the Flowers, cheerleader for three years, was in the present-on today's deposit. the gym. Los Angeles, Calif. graduated in 1932.

The two weeks in which one. eats, drinks, and becomes

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FACTS FROM

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T'Hf DIRECTOR i.·-----------.I

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Benford Contributes T music magazine

Art Club Discusses ffietal Projects

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 14, 1941

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

Bo~cats Oro~

1 Caterwaul 1Wneelerman irounce

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mexico U. 42-J~

SPORTS ~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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Sports Of Yesteryear j By Jack Mcintire

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ONE YEAR AGO-

Playing 9ne of their toughest games of the season, the Bobcats defeated the Milwaukee State. Teache1 s 45-32. The contest progressed on even terms throughout the fir:ot half, but HalladaY, warmed up the second half to lead Peru to a victory. Halladay gTabbed high point honors with eighteen markEro as the Cats added to their growing victory stling.

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Peru stopped the York Tigers with a convincing 65-53 overhauling on ti1e York floJr. Greathouse and Halladay led the Wheele_r quint w:th a Lota! of 47 points ~etween them.

FIVE YEARS AGOThe ·Bobcats scartcri their new year with a new coach, Mr. Stuart Baller, who succeeded Dutch Lorbeer as head mentor in Cat Camp. Baller came here from Lincoln high, where he had guided his Red and Black proteges to several state crowns.

BY RALPH LOCKE

Peru's Bobcats swung along in stride Saturday night to submerge the University of Mexico's fast team 42-39, in the first international game of the year. In the preliminary g-ame the "B" squad rolled over the Red Oak Junior college, winning by a considerable .margin. The. Cats got off to a charp lead, but were hotly pursued in the scoring melee of the first canto. The half time score found Peru with a bare l\largin of three points. The Bobcats tigl?tened up their defense to begin the second half and the Mexicans promptly cut loose from far out-court with long shots to move up into a tie at 25 all. There were 10 minutes left when Grubaugh came into the game an~ sco~ed three quick bucket:; to push the Wheelermen into .a lead that they held up to the final gun. Peru standouts listed Mcintire, Walker' and Pascal. other bright spots in the game was the floor game of Byers and Grubaugh's speed on the fact breaks. Lineupc included: Peru Mexico U. Walker Salazar .Vlhite Flores Grubaugh f Martinez Morri sey f S. Hinandez Bye's c Diaz Hiatt c Rodriguez Mcintire g Elias g· Pascal Hidalgo Snider g A. Hinandez Heugal g Sarrelangue

TWO YEARS AGO-

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Peru Plaijs Kearne~

Peru Prep downed the Syracuse team 29~28 Friday night in their clo •est game to date. · Kirkwood for Syracuse gave the Bobkittens all evening as he potted points with either hand. The floor has been used for dancing, and was in poor condition for playing, and considerably bothered both teams throughout the game. Smith led Peru with 9 poi~s fol-' lowed by Clements with 8. The Kittens were forced to overcome a Syracuse halftime lead of three points as they pulled uphill to win their third game in four starts. P~ep will play Nemaha here to-

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FOODS

Peru inaugurates its conferences activities here next Friday night, when they will take the floor against the Kearney Antelppes in defense of their co-title :of the NIAA conference. The game will be the .Cats second .in state competition, and they will be engaging the darkhorse of the circuit. Kearney has suffered a defeat at the hands of the favored Wayne five. The Bobcats have just rounded into shape, and will be trying for their second straight game ~ state competition, as they vie for, their third consecutive state bunting. ·Kearney has the bulk of their of· fensive power in their all-conference guard, Blessing. Peru will have a well balanced quint, with any of the starting lineup able to give the Antelopes trouble under the bucket. A good game is in prospect, and the Cats give all they have as they tcy to get off to a running start in the circuit.

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DR. G. H. JODER

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-Physician and Surgeon- lllll Office at Milstead Corner Office Phone 33, Res. 39

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I ll!! I Ladies Welcome at All Times ii ~

PERU BOWLING CLUB

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~ Ben Hanlon Mgr. ~ M. G. Heuer, Owner llll ~

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Modern Barber Shop BILL ii)(

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(Contfnued from page one) that)-those and many more will be . there to make your narrative more vivid by the use of p'ctures . What I have said-probably noc much but remember-if the book comes out in ~ed and pink with nothing but adertising-you have concrete evidence that it was the work of my business manager, because I've told you my plans . . . ?

CENTRAL OFF1Ct: 17 ~ICHH MAIN ST.

COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA

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PRINTING • • •

"T'he Art Preservative"'

In Peru THE POINTER is adhering to the fine tradi· tions of progress and skilled craftsmanship that links the names of Gutenberg,_of Bodoni, Caston, Franklin snd many other to the industry as we know it today .)

MARDIS GROCERY

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Dean Kerr Divulges Secrets-

from ~ijracuse 2~-2~

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Ooane liijers J4-21

Bobcat fans felt their hopes soar In the intramural tournament, skyward FTiday night after Peru the race has already simmered dumped the Tigers of Doane 34-21 do'lln to a hot pace in the early on the Crete maples. stages. Team F has grabbed the lead with four straight wins. All Walker led the attack as the the games to date have been close ctorming WheE11ermen poured in and exciting, thereby proving the points that built up a halftime worth of Coach Jones' new system. lead of 20-7. The Bobcats stopped the vaunted Tigers cold with their In addition to the heated battle zone defense, as they bottled up for team positions in the standings, a battle is being waged for scoring pfays repeatedly: honors by several boys representing The last half was evenly played, most of the top teams. Bob Mcas each squad rang the bell for 14 Alexander rangy center of the leadpoints apiece. ing F team, is setting a warm pace with 39 points in his four games. Peru picked up nine points early Close behind is Gene Lurk with 30, in the game and were never headed followed by Jun with \ Hines as they ran roughshod over the with 28, Dreezen with Graves startled Haylett qf\llint. The Cats' 25, Mencl 24, Millikan '.ements stars were Walker, Mcintire, Pas- and ·Jack Atkins eacl Ith HI cal and White. Be~ka and Weber tallies. looked best for Doane. The feature of the campaign took place last Thursday when the two Winning this game was a treundefeated leaders, F and K, met mendous boost for the Bobcats. and fought it out bitterly to the Doane is rated by many as the final whistle. The final gun saw tops in the NCAC conference, and team F leading by a slim 13-12 are supported soundly as favorites margin. to claim the mythical state league The standings of the teams are crown. Peru's chances rest on the listed below. ability of the coaches to polish off G w L Pct. an inexperienced squad into cham- Team 4 0 1.00(1 pionship calbre. This game was F ·············· 4 .75(t 3 Peru's first in' state competition, K .............. 4 2 .666 A ·············· 3 and their first victory: .666 D .............. 3 Ll.neups: .666 H .............. 3 Doane 2 .500 Peru J .............. 4 Gilliland Walker 2 f 1 .500 c night in what promises to be a ·············· Hiatt E .............. 4 1 f 3 .250 good game. Students will be admit- Belka Weber White B .............. 2 0 2 .000 ted on their budget tickets. Niehart g Mcintire I .............. 3 0 3 .000 ., '( 1 g .001} Lidolph 0 Pascal G .............. 2 Rex Boyd accompanied Roy M. King to Crookston, Minnesota, last \\'eek. ;.

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Win or lose the Bobcats have something this year that the majority of teams do nllt have. The whole student body is back of them, and i:'. anybody doubts that fact, all the proof that is needed is preEent at all the home games. To date, the old gym has housed more enthusiasm this season than has been shown in many years. The marvel of it all lies in the fact that the team has just hit their stride, and have not wan all their games as they have the past three years. The team that has such support in all its encounters this year, without winning the majority, has the backing that is needed to encourage the boys in blue to meet the best the stat~ has to offer, and fight the battle through without faltering. The coaches and players both appreciate those cheers that take all the sting out of the bitterest of their defeats, a:id the best they can do to express their gratitude is to continue to play with all they have, and never lie down. The band and cheering section merit special a~tention for their fine efforts, and it is hoped that their spirit follows those Bobcats through the season and right into the tournament at Kansas City.

TEN YEARS AGOIn their first cor:.ference mix, the Peru Bobcats clawed the Chadron Eagles 37-29. The home team used l'~~!!ll!!llll!!!!ll~l!!l1!lll!J!lil~[g]!!lJ:g]f.i!J . their fast break very successfully to .offset the Eagle's long ::hots. J. P. CLARK Peru emerged from a last half riot tc claim the victory. t!lJ Electric Shoe Shop !!!ii '(

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THE

POINTER

Phone 30

Peru, Nebr.


Home Be's Observe Founding of Frat

Anna Irwin Loan Is Now Available To Girls Lacking .Junds The Anna Irwin Student. Loan a memorial service for her. At this Fund which was founded by the service this fund was dedicated to Peru Chapter of the American &,- her to be known from that time sociation of University Women is as The Anna Irwin Student Loan again available to stude.nts on this Fund. campus. The fund is a memorial Any woman student who has for Miss Anna Irwin, a former but one semester of work to commember of the college faculty. plete in order to secure an A. B. Several years ago a young wo- degree or a two year diploma i3 man student on the campus lacked eligible ·to borrow from the fund. but one semester of work but felt Any amount up to ·$50 may be borthat due to finances she could no;; rowed for one year at a low rate of continue her college course. Beca~e of interest. As the interest accumshe was very deserving the mem- ulates the fund will increase. It is bers of the A. A. u. w. contributed n-0t necessary for the whole amount to a loan fund which enabled! her to be b-Orrowed by one person. to secure her diploma. Miss Anna In order to borrow from the Irwin was one of the instrumental fund the candidate must present organizers of the fund. Since sl:1e · eridence of satisfactory scholarship was the treasurer of the associa- 5nd character. Thus far but four tion it was her duty to look. after students have received the loan. the administering of th~ fund. "I'm The club boasts that all the girls the watch dog of the student loan have paid it back promptly in spite :fund," was the answer she invar- of heavy family responsibilities and iably gave when the club joking·· in one case a very low salary. ly suggested borrowing from it. Any one interested in/ borrowing Miss · Irwin · died in April, 1936. the money should see Miss Mary The next fall the A. A. U. W. held Hileman.

EXAMINATION SCHEDULE Firs: Semester, 1940•41

January 22, 23, 24

Plans for a buffet supper in honor of Founder's Day were completed Monday night, Jan. 6, at the Kappa Omicron Phi, home economics fraternity, meeting at Miss Fdna Weare's home. The observance was held Friday, Jan. 10. Tentative plans for a Washington Tea were made. 1

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Lum, McArdle Furnish Music for Woman's Club Echo Elaine Lum and Betty McArdle gave a sho~t musical program at a woman's club meeting at the home of Mrs. Peter Holdorf Wednesday evendng, Jan. 8. Echo Elaine played a piano solo, "Nocturne" by Chopin; Betty sang "If God Left Only You" by J. H. Desnsmore. The girls concluded with the piano duet, "Festival Processional March" by F. G. Rath-

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Mr. C. F. Kemp began a course of mimeograph instruction Wednesday, January 8. The course will last six weeks. Eighteen members were present at fae first meeting. The A. B. Dick Gompany is furnishing the entir~ class with stencils and mimeosc,}pes for further work. This is a valuable experience as a course of this kind would cost several dollars in tuition at any school.

T. S. Girl Is Winner In Rubinoff Contest

26. President Robert Williams was in charge of the business meeting. Plans for future meetings were Katheryn Benford won second discussed. place and a silver medal at the Rubinoff Violin Contest held in Beatrice, Wednesday, Jan. 8. Katheryn is a sophomore in Peru high school and a daughter of Prof. Robert T. Benford. Dr. Rector presented a talk on cancer to the high school at 11: 00 on Monday, Jan. 13. The tenth and eleventh grades of the Training School had group is aot an experiment. For 22 years pictures taken for the Peruvian we have been in business in Lincoln, Monday, ·Jan. 13. ' Nebr. We have placed many thousands of teachers. We have the exHigh school band and orchestra perience. We have the hook-ups. posed for Peruvian pictures TuesWe c.an serve you better now than day, January 13. eYet before. Ask your school friends. 1' .f .f Write today for literature. The priest's vestments worn at the mass were discussed at c. A. A. Jan. 8. Ellen Ryan and Mary Ann Kean led the di~cussion. Josephi~,e Kelly and Helen Wylie will have charge of the Jan. 28 meeting.

Presents 'The Peru College Band

(Continued from page one)

In

MID-WINTER CONCERT Wednesday, January 15 College Auditorium

8:00 P. M. Featuring Solos, N_ovelties, and Concert Numbers

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Admission: Bud get Ticket or 25c Children 1Oc

W~enWinferC01es lo The Highwavs ! -------~~-

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YMCA Meets-

Y. M. C. A. met on November

Peru State Teachers College

• Student Speaks

S:00-9:50--All 8:00 classes except: abroad." Consumer Problems 3'17 • Principles of Geography 101 (10:- In conclusion Mrs. Lindbergh 00 section) says, "Reform . . . should be a re10:00-11:50formation of our beliefs, and exIntroduction to Literature (10:00 tension of them to· wider 'fields and 2: 00 sections) and deeper rece:ses. It need not Children's Literature 103 (both mean abandoning our fundamental sections) principles . . . it should not mean Commerce .Methods 308 forsaking the beacons which have 1:00-2:50-All 11:00 classes except: led us in the past . . . And like (1) Art Appreciation 306 all acts of creation it will take (2) Shorthand 207 labor, patience, pain-and an in(3) Intro. to Education 108 finite faith in the future." (4) Fund. of English 100 3:00-4:50-AlL3:00 classes except: (1) Intro. to Education 108 (2) .:..:hildren's Literature 103 (3) Fund. of English 100

8:00-9:5'0-All 10:00 classes except; (1) Intro. to Literature 102 {2) Prin. of Geography 101 10:00-11:50-All 2:00 classes except: (1) Intro. to Literature 102 (2) International Law 401 1:00-2:50-Consumer Problems 317 . General Art 103 (9:00 section) 3:00-4:50Fundamentals of English 100 (11:00 and 3:00 sections)

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Class In ffiimeography Draws 18 Students

sonal allegiance to those sys;.Bms WEDNESDAY I disapprove of or those barbarisms 8:00-9:50-All 1:00 classes except: I oppose from the bottom of my (1) General Art 103 heart, even if they are on th~ wave (2) Commerce Methods 308 (3) Intro. to Education 108 of the future. Nor do I propuo~ the (4) Teach. of English in Jr. H. surrender of our basic. beliefs. But s. 205. I do feel that it is futile to :;et · 10: oo~ 11: 50-Introduction to Education (106) into a hopeless 'crusade' to 'save' civilization. I do not believe civili(all sections) Art Appreciation 306 zation caA-be 'saved' simply by goShorthand 207 ..ing to war. Neither can 'democraInternational Law 401 cy' or 'liberty' or 'our way of life' 1:00-2:50be saved by any such ne:;f!.~iYe All 9: 00 classes except: point of view. If we do not better (1) General Art 103 , cur civilization, our way of life, (2) Introduction to Education 108 and our democracy, there will be ;!:00-4:50no use trying to ·save' them by General Art 103 (1:00 section) fighting; they will crumble away Teach. of English in Jr. H. S. under the very feet of our armies 205 ... our task . . is !to reform at ~ home rather than to crusade THURSDAY

FRIDAY

TUESDAY, JANUARY 14, 1941

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

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Student Speaks By LeRoy Redfern

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Do you favor United States providing for the sale, leasing, lend>'mg or other disposition of any war materials to ·"any country whose defense the President deems vital to the defew:e of the United States," including both new material and equipment now on hand?"

JOHN RHODUS, Yes, it will be cheaper to assume part of the cost now than to take on the fun load later.

. " WOODROW ~AMBELET, No, i~ "!1e take a part m such a program it will develop into war. • HERBERT KNUTSON, Yes, . if we do not aid England now then eventually when England loses United States will have to fight ~·

HOD LANTZ, Yes, in the event England lose3 it will be up to us to conquer · Hitler; we must do everything possible now. 0

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PERU, NEBRASKA, TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1941

VOLUME XXXVI.

NUMBER!' 12 '.,._.,,,. 1

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Rawsoo ~njoys new Position "I enjoy my college and training £chool work, and there is nothing J would rather be doing," stated Prof. El. F. Rawson who succeeds Prof. C. R. Lindstrom in the industrial arts department. Prof. Rawson, an alumnis CJf P e r u training school and co•1e g e, received his degree in 1936. Following graduation and before returning to Peru as an i n s tr ·.<1 ctor, Prof. R·awson taught in Creston, Iowa, Prof. Rawson is sponsor of EpsiIon Pi Tau. He was active in this organization as a student. Mrs. Rawson, who is teaching in Creston, Iowa, will join her husband at the close of the school

Prof Sharp Tells Role of Chemistry

College Band Concert Student Directors

"The Role of Chemistry in National Defem.e" was the subject of Prof. Clinton Sharp's address at convocation F':'iday, Jan. 17. He explained the huge task chemistry has to accomplish in replacing foreign products with syntbetic materials. The talk dealt largely with the part chemistry played in aviation, ammunition, rubber . and medical Miss M. Ference Martin reviewed "World's End" by Upton Sinclair supplies. Monday night at the Kappa Delta 1' 1' f Pi meeting.

martin Reviews "World's Enf'

Speech 'Classes w.l 11 Use Recorder

This novel is the s'.ory of L2nny Budd, son of a great An1e ican armaments manufacturer. The authar de=cribes the boy·s life in high society in England, Germar.y and especially along the Riviera in France before the World War. Among his adventures, be meets 10'ith Zarhoff, the armaments king of Europe and serves as interpreter for one of the members cf the council deciding the peace terms of the Treaty of Ve!·saJles. Ee finally reject3 a chance to te ar~ mament salesman to all Eciropc, choosing rather to give his life to art, settling down at cote de Azur to "wait for the end of . the world!"

Beginning with the second semester of the pre:ent year, voice recording and analysis will be reguJar features of certain courses in ·speecb, D!'. Arthur L. Bradford, Head of the Department of EnERNIE. HILL, Yes, any materials gJi· h, has announced. die.posed of in this manner should The department recently secured year. help to destroy. Hitle1 ism. . a voice recording machine and the 1' 1' 1' office of Prof. Moore, just off the Little Theatre stage, has been conDICK CLEMENTS, Yes, we are verted into a recording studio. The bound to g·et into the war if th~ recorder, which Prof. Moore has British lose. If we can help the already used to some extent in re. English win now we may avert war 1 f 1 cent weeks, will be employed in the later. Rubbng elbows with' the literary diagnosis and correction of speech were Sigma Tau Delta members defects ar.d in voice and speech R0'13ERT JEWELL, Yes, I be- Monday, Jan. 13. Mrs. B. K. Baker training of students of public lieve it may be possible to. accom-·, read from the "Tanager," Grinnell speaking, actir.g and interpretation. plish with materials what it took College publication, her poem, In order fo pay for the machine ''""OWe1w to ' aecom·~H->.' · t"'..~.,~ail'~tes;:,,~,~g~Ol.W,,Al.~Q.,..~,l!Y(,,.lJ,,.,~;;,d,,? t .~:?v1'd: •..f or. the blank discs ,.. _.,..., ..m,., last war. I believe we should December "Nebrru;ka Parmer,"' in and r~oramg· b'U]Jplrns 11ece::mry 'i':rs,the•·strlng.trio and. ,Dprano,.sowhich her illustrated "Old Run- for its operaton, a laboratory fee lcist, Alice Auxier, Peru alumna, • down Place," prize-winner in a of $1.00, effec:ive with the beginn- in its concert last Sunday. DEAN CLARK, Perhaps, I'm not contest of over 600 entries, i>p- ing of the second semester, will be The musicale featured Perusir.gsure the President should be the peared. charged in connection with speech The entjre program was as folProgram chairman Mary Olive courses in which the im:trument lows: one to determine what country Richar d· On announced that Harold will be used exten:jvely. These are should get the materials. Let con• D , Song Without Word3 .................. Tschaikowsky gress along with the president de- a11ams "Coon Huntin'," short as follows: decide and I will say yes. story read at the December meetEnglish lf12-Fundamentals Jf ing, has been accepted for publica·· Speech Une ,Lorme .......... Mous:orgsky 0 tion by "Liberty" magazine. English 254-Publ'.c Speaking Trio MARGARET STIERS, No, how Dean Karr read two poems, "Un- English 255-Elementary Drama. can United States legally take part finished," litera:7 counterpart of tics Sketches of Paris in the war wi.thout active partici- Schubert's "Unfinished Symphony"; English 357-Interpretative Read... Kathie.en Lockhart Manning pation of our people? "Habit of Conceit," and a "hort, ing Alice Auxier, Ruth Chatelain, pia;10 e short story, "Ashes of Yesterday." Tbe $1.03 laborato'y fee secures Allegreto, Trio in G Major The poll thi; week was, to me, "Parable of the College Student'' for the ctudent four six-inch dou........................ Mo;;nt not only a surprise but a great dis- was Ruth Stoneman's contribution, bliHace discs for recordings Traumerei ........... 2chumann appointment. A majority of those, and Maryon Thoma'.3 read her s'.ory throughout tbe Trio ~h d' semester. that in the poll indicated they fa'I''· for youngs ters, "The First Night ··di· e' reco:· mg se:,vice, Dr.t dBrad- Echo Song · · · · · · · · · · · · ,Ei,hop ' · · t JI ove<,ed the president's "all aid to Away F rom Home." Pe~ sonal ex- fo · s,a,es is open o a s u en ts, Lo, Eear The Grntle Lari; .. :2ichop the democracies" plan, just a perience> were related in Betty whether or nJt they are regi-tered • ""' t f 'n °011r · h Th h Alice Auxier, Janet Harris, flute month ago in answering the ques- Mill er s i:;xcerp s rom My Diary," 1<tud • v e c arge to Day is Dying· t ses m speec th . .. C'iristiai:sen tion whether United States should an d Kay Bart Iing's "One Summer," -<peeenh s or o· ers not taking th· t f' Oh, Suzanna .......... Foster-Cain t f help England at the risk of getting an accoun o her recent trip to · c. courses is 1r y- 1ve cems Into war or stay out, voted to stay Mllwaukee. for each 'ix-inch record made. Ye Watchers and Ye Holy out. Giving or. selll:ng war mater- Mrs. Arthur L. Bradford, whose Ones · · · · · · · .l7 Century German 1 1' 1' lals to a belligerent by a "neutral" style is familiar to "Sifting Sand" J'1merson Speaks g·overnment isn't risking getting in, rea dec, gave her "To a Rag Doil," it' is getting in. United States has and "I Know Not Whence These At Eps;Ion Pi Tau recognized this as a principle of in- Waters Come." The group heard Dean J. A. Jimerson spoke at a ternatior,tal law and told England Virginia King's "Student Lament" meeting of .Epsilon Pi Tau on · · the c·1v1·1 war. and "Snow." so durmg Monday, Jan. 13. "The Philosophy THURSDAY, JAN. 21 • In Lloyd Dunlap manner was of Industrial Arts" was the sub7-8 .... YMCA, YWCA, CAA One thing I just can't under- the humorous soliloquy of a man ject of the di:cussion. Methods for Peru Prep vs Bratton Union, stand· ·is why every one if! so sure hearing the call of woods and sho- teaching shop courses, and buildhere. that a.n English defeat will inev- vel, "Night Song for Schmitty." ing projects were suggested by the itably mean that Germany will Final contribution was by Mary speaker. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 22 attack 'Quited States. Is it possible Horton, Rose McGinnis and Juan- A round-tz.ble discussion by the Children's Musical Recital. tha't Germany can obtain enough ita West, who collaborated on group on the subject, "Methods of THURSDAY, JAN. 22 support in Europe and can muster ice cream, cake, coffee and Beech Teaching Industrial Arts" and a sufficient military equipment to at- Nut gum. short business meeting was held. 7-9 .......... Freshmen Clubs. 8-9:30 ........ Dramatic Club. tack the Americas? f 1' 1' conquest. None of the modern hisFRIDAY, JAN. 24 Miller Wins Annual tory books I have seen give evisecretary of State Hull said, if dence to support Mr. Lansing. Elaine Miller was the 'lucky one First Semester Ends. Britain were defeated "Germany Peru vs Wesleyan, there. to receive :he certificate for a could easily cross the Atlantic." In conclusion I say, knowing Mr. free Peruvian at convocation last MONDAY, JAN. 27 Roosevelt will not read this and Monday. 10:00 .. Separate Convocation. You say Hull should know if thus call me a rotten, unsports- LeRoy Redfern held the basket 7-8 ......... Scholarship Club. containing the names of all stumanlike, disloyal, unpatriotic, misanyone does. Granted. But so 7-8 ...... Future Teachers of should Secretary of State Lansing guided, foolish American, the pass- dents and faculty members while America. have known twenty-five years ago. age of this bill will mean "the Arthur Jones drew the lucky name. 8-9 ........... Pi Omega Pi. A dollar deposit was required to plowing under of every fourth AmYet he talked of the Kaiser's aims, make one eligible for the contest. plans and possibilities of world erican boy." HUBERT HUNZEKER, Yes, to the extent he uses equipment that would not weaken our present defenses.

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Sigma Tau Deltans Read Originals

musicale Features

Soloist, Trio

Fankhauser, Crawford, Sandin, Rnnan, Harris, Tynon, Ashton Climaxing a semester of musical activity, the College Band presented a concert on Jan. 15 at the college auditorium. The program was under the direction of ctudents, William Fankhauser, James Crnwford, James Sandin, Bob Ashton. j\forvel Annan, Isabel Tynon and Janet Harri.s, and guest-director. Poalph Chatelain of Peru, alumnus '29.

Featured soloists were Prof. v. H. Jindra and Lola Yates, A cornet trio compo:ed of James Crawford, James Sandin and Tony Del\~aro played "Flirtations." Numbers played by the ban:! were: "I Am An American," by Benjamin Neal; "Atlantis Suite The Lost Continent," by Safranek: "The World is Waiting for the Sunrise," Lockhart-Seitz; a clarinet solo "Concertina," Weber, by Lois Yates; "Teddy Bear's Picnic" Bratton-Yoder; a violin solo, "Lo~­ donderry Air," an old Iri.oh Melody, by V. H. Jindra; cornet t1io, "Flir-

tation," Herbert L. Clarke; "Star Dust," Carmichael-Yoder; a novelty radio movie "Uncle Tom's Cabin," Harry L. Alford, with Fred Drexler, reader; . and the "Color Song" t!irected by James -craw'fo1·d: The band began the year by organizing a 40-piece marching band. the first of its kind to appear on the campus. Under the leade: ship of Prof. V. H. Jindra, members of the band held early morning practices for almost a month. A color guard was organized to accompany the band and Mary Grovenbmg became drum majorette. Two flags were purchased by the organization from the funds obtained on "Tag· Day." College students bought band tags to finance the project. The first appearance of the marching band in new blue military unifo:ms was at Homecom1'ng·. On· Thank'.:giving the Band accompan. ied the football team to Grand Island where they marched during the half-time period of the PeruChadron game. Fresent activities of the band include twice-a-week practices, and 2,ppearances at basketball games and rallies. Tue personnel of the concert band is the same as that of the marching band with the exception of a few members. Band personnel includes Jean Bend, Doran Teague, Dick Clements, Leatrice Hauptman, Willard Hunzeker, Elda Hamel, June Hamilton, Nunzio Lazzaro, Janet Harris, L-0la Yates, Shirley Schuldt, Wilda . Goings, Sarene Hauptman, Ralph Hays, Doris Brinson, Gretchen K1burz, Grace Bovink, William Fankhauser, Maryanne Walker, Mildred Mason, Eleanor Hall, Fred Drexler, Marvin Thomas, Tony DeMaro, Bob Ashton, Bill Burger, Joan Jelinek, Isabel Tynon, Murvel Annan, Melvin McKenney, Echo Elaine Lum, Evelyn . Ghristiancy, Mary Shirley ,Jimerson (High School), Donna Duerfeldt, James Lambert, Joan F1au, Harold Macomber, Hubert Hunzeker, James Crawford, James Sandin and Jack Snider.

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PAGE TWO.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

Published Weekly by The Peru State Teachers C o!lege Peru, Nebraska

TUESDAY, JANUARY

Modern Collegians Speak .Language of Ancients '·If I only had more dough!"

make this skit fit into a play con. cerned with the seventeenth century. The dialogue could be kept as is, for "racket" and "hick" have been traced back to 1690 and "grub" to 1659. "Lousy" belongs to the same century. The following terms may still be uced but the calendar year in which they were new began with 18-; bluff, chump, loaf, colaboose, dry up, cave in, chink, dumb, and sap. Dating back the fuartherest is the use of "bones" when speaking of dice. That started in 1386. Much of today's slang goes back into what is practically ancient

You've said ttat often enough . and so have others because the Entered at the PostoHice at Peru, Nebraska, as Second slang term "dough" goes back at least to 1851. "Cute" originated in Class Matter. $1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc England about 1780. Clothes have been known as "duds" since the Ruth Stoneman .................................... Editor sixteenth century. In modern movies, gangsters invariably refer to Tod Hubbell ............................. Assistant ~ditor women as "molls." Nothing new Ralph Locke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sports Editor here-more sixteenth century. l\folvin McKenney ................ Assistant Spo'r-ts Editor The scene: Mac's. The charac"·! d' h J' C R d ters· two college men iv. ere it imerson · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ofiy ea er D1:c'"~ ·. I wonde1· what. tl1at.. "rackNina Kane! · · · · . · · ... · · · · · · , . · · .. · · · · · · · · · · Proof Reader ct" is? M. Florence Martin ...... : ........................ Adviser Tom: Probably 3ome "hick" complaining about the "grub" we get Reporters: Milton Schulz, Margery Kinsey, LeRoy Redfern, here. history. If you argue that everyBetty Miller, Mona Morelock, Jean Haith, Janet Harris, Changing the scene to a medieval thing you say is the latest, you're Jeanne Spier Myrton Hall Phyllis Wilberger Dorothy dining hall is practically all the ' ' . , '. , . revision that would be needed to just "blo1ving" (1400). Armstrong, Harold Lantz, Ar<bs Carmme, Virg1ma Kmg, Ruth Stoneman, Sarene Hauptman, Marjorie Fidermutz,

Ro.. .--Dean ·Dunning Describes Rose Day Festivities

Tod Hubl:iell, Anselm Johnson, Jack Mcintyre, Emma sicky; Elvbra Schacht, Isabel Tynon, Bill Zurbrick, LeRoy Durst, Ralph Locke.

CLASS ISSUEDid you notice the change of personnel in the masthead? No, it's not a misprint. The Newswriting Class 1s re· sponsible for' this "Ped." So accept our apologies please, and don't heap your crit· icisms on Rose:

CRIBSThe question of the "'.eek: "Have your crib made yet?" Strictly speaking

a crib is something for cattle, horses,

or children, but one week ~ semester "cribs" seemingly be,;come a. necessity to some of the upper class of intellects, college students. Hours are spent m seclu~ion devising marks on legs, handkerchiefs, ritz crackers, ·and what have you-until there

Mrs. Inice Dunning, Dean of Women, realized the dream of mo3t Peruvians when she attended the Rose Bowl game, along with 10,GOO other Nebrask::cns. She was a guest at the T-party given by Coach Shaughnessy for Coach Biff Jones' Cornhuskers. At the game ohe screamed, gnawed fingernails, jumped, stampe.d and grew weak from excitement just as we did in front of our radios. Outstanding players, to her, were Albert and Kmetovic and Nebras~ ka'o ever charging Francis. "Nebra£ka's band put on a glorious show. During the half they marched into the formation of a huge bell and played, "The Bells cf St. Mary's." A h·Jsh fell over tile stadium of 92,000 impressed spectators. As a conclmion to the half tim~ period, three .bands played en m;s.e, "Gcd Bless America." Before the game 1,500,000 watch-

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ed the Rose ,parade wh!ch included 55 floats. "Nebraska's float," described Mrs. D·.'.,Lt i..g, "was made of yellow, g. l:l o.nd white blornoms. A large .N which rotated, formed the background for Nebraska's sweetheart. On one side, in flowered letters, was written 50th Anniversary of Football and on the other side, 75 Years of Statehood for Nebraska." In all the floats 16 million blossoms were med and each blossom was put in place with hot glue. "All the Nebraskans were treated royally during their visit in California." Mrs. Dunning continued, "the spirit at the ganie almost made up for the loss." It was an established fact, Mrs. Dunning said, that there never was a finer game in the Rose Bowl and from her erithusiasm it is now an established fact that she has already had a good beginning for s. Happy New Year.

John E. Prlchet.t (Ruth Howe) Arlington, Va.; Mildred Speedie, Linremains only enough time before the appointed hour to stuff coln; Adele Penterman, Plattsburg, Mo.; Gail Kuwitzky, Nebraska that personal integrity you once had into the discard along City; Kathryn Roszell, Laurel; By Grace Muenchau. Blanche Freeman, Auburn; Charwith the rest of grandma's old fashioned ideas, and· to join lotte Martin, Big Springs; EJ.izabeth Bartling, Benson High, Omathe crowd. ROSS RUSs:EiLL was recently ha; Katherine Bartling. elected to a position as mathe- The engagement of MISS ELBut what's the value m a grade if self respect is lost? matics and science instructor in EANORE RAWSON of Indianola the Table Rock high school. He to GEORGE HASKINS Of David -N. .K. began teaching Jan. 2. Russell was City has been announced. Both are activ~ in· campus activities, and former Peruvians. Haskins is math was president of Alpha Mu Omega instructor at David City. at the time he Mt school. MISS MARIE WIELAGE, a for· HARVEY T. NICKEL ('32) has mer Peruvian, was manied to MEXICO VS. P. S. T. C.devised a new current affairs test Floyd Wheeler recently. Saturday, January 11, was an important date in the ath- which has been given considerable MR. AND !vIRS. KENNEI'H publicity. Mr. Nickel is superintenPACE have a daughter, Karen, letic history of this college. On that day the Bobcats played dent of schools at Oxford. born early in December. Kenneth DOROTHY KEYS (mat. '38) and was graduated from Peru in 1935, their first international game-that 'with the University of Clarence Iverson were married Jan. and Mrs. Pace, nee Katherine Berg4, in Nebraska City. Maxine Keys, man, attended 1930-32. a Peru student, attended the wedMexico. DR. MARCELLUS SHURTLEFF ding. The significance of. this game IS even greater. It is. H. W. GLASGOW, a Peru alum- has been transferred to Pensacola, nus, was recently named field rep- Florida, where he is studying flythrough such contests, being encouraged by the countries resentative for the out-of-school· ing. He is a naval surgeon. He atdivision of the N. Y. A. in Iowa. tended Peru from 1930-32, and has o1 the western hemisphere, that good will and understanding His daughter, Lois, is a freshman been located at Portland. at Peru at the present time. JOHN NEMAN. a former Peruis fostered .between nations. As· the game was played both MISS MARGARET MEIER has vian, who has been coaching at been elected to a position in the Herman, has been elected as high the teams and. the audience gained a new perspective of the city schools at Hastings. She will ~chool principal at Minden. begin teaching there soon. JESSIE CLEVELAND, a teacher other. DOROTHY TYSON (mat. '38) is in the McCook schools wrote an - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - t e a c h i n g near Palmyra. She has a article on "Professional Welfare" chant as they consult the OUJll sister, Irene, at school in Peru. which appeared in the January isGamma Chi Party · MRS. ROSS ORGAN (Alice De- sue of Nebraska Educational Jourboard owned by Maude Daft. Gamma Chi. members played Tenal along with an article about vore '39) has a teaching positioPtalpha at their meeting last Wed· Ever since its arrival on Jan. 11, RUSSEiili SOMMERS who receivat Alda. She began her work there Jiesday evening. the oujii board has been busy aned the Louise Mears geographic Edna Mae Peterson was first swering the questions of curious Jan. 2. Mrs. Organ teaches com- award from Peru last year. merce, English and a class in sciprize winner, Grace Muenchau sec- girls. Everything from marriage to R. W. TRENHALM was re-elected ence. ond high and Phyllis Rudolph low grades in semester courses and chairman of the vocal division of Eleven Peruvians and former Pein the alphabet game. when the United States will enter ruvians attended a reunion lunch- the Nebraska Music Education As1 1 1' the war, has been predicted, leav- eon at Hotel Cornhusker in Lin- sociation. Supt. M. C. ROCKWELL Oujii Board Tells All ing some surprised at the correct- coln on December 27. They were: of Sumner was elected president "What's my future going to be?" ness of answers and others skep- Anna Williams, EliC.a, New Mexi- of the Wood River Valley ConferThus the girls in the dormitories tical. co; Evelyn Jones, Cambridge, Mrs. ence. T. W. ROUTH is president

llalumni Jllail Il

21, 1941

Y.W.'s Hold Sacrifice Supper "To hold together in an disinte· grating world the fellowship of stu· dents is the purpose of the World Student Christian Federation," stated Mary E. Collin at the Y. W. War Sacrifice meeting Jan. 14. "This is accomplished through student relief funds, magazines,, news letters and missionaires," she enlarged. From the organization's national paper, "The Intercollegian," Mary Olive Richardson presented news items about college students abroad. Concerning the Chinese students che read: "Five cents will shelter one Chinese student a week; 15 cents give him food 'for a weet, $5 provide winter clothing for 60 students, and $350 build a hospital. Closing she quoted Dr. T. Z. K noted Chinese lecturer: 'If we let; one generation go how can we hope educated." At the busine:s meeting President Collin submitted the following nominees for office next semester: President Grace Muench11u Harriet Maxwell Vice President Nina Kanel Mae Jane Young Secretary Mary Horton Josephine Boosinger Treasurer Dorothy Teachman Jean Bond Theze will be voted upon reg13. tration day, Jan. 27, on payment of dues. of the Lodgepole Valley Activities Acsociation with LLOYD MCCANN of ·Lorenzo as reporter. WILEY REMMERS of Garland is president o! the Seward County Activities Association. REV. WILLIAM SW ARTZWELDER is assistant to the pre3ident of Hastings College. He is a former Peruvian. BILL BROOKS reports having seen ENID STOFFERSON, DOROTHY EWIN and GAYLE MILLER in Kansas City recently. Gayle has been. attending the National School of Aeronautics in Kansas City, and was recently employed as a mechanic in an aircraft plant in Tennessee. Announcement has been made of the engagement of MILDRED PARLI, ('38) to NORMAN STALDER, Humboldt. ~lillll!Jlili!llr~llll§lilililiiilJ~iil][gf:g]llilJiill!~lililili~~

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TUESDAY, JANUARY

21,

1941

PAGE

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

Bobcats Subdue Kearney 42-36 In nlAA Opener . .

Kittens Down Nemaha 22-12

' Caterwa uI 1 :

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SPORTS

Wheelermen :m·eet Wesleyan Friday

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a sport has an indefinite number of attractive points of interest for both spectators and players. However, as the situation stands the majority of_ the bleacherites do not or cannot appreciate a third of what is taking place before them on the floor. In any ordinary game, the average individual, even the insignificant female (??), can sit in the bleachers and enjoy tl;le sport. All they see is 12 men running all over a floor, two of which are officials. They throw a ball around that is abourt a foot in diameter, and endeavor to throw it through a hoop that is fastened on a board that is suspended about 10 feet in the air and ill perpendicular to "the floor. As the game progre8ses, they hoot and howl if their team is ahead, a.nd if th~y are losing they sulk a bit and b:ing forward their "ifs" on this play and that one. Then too, they do get awfully aggravated at those birds in the striped shirts ttat make a habit of taking the ball a.way from your team and let the other side take a free shot, and right when we were about to make a basket too! ! On the other hand, there are those who know what is going on, and the entertainment is doubled as they watch the game. They are the select few who can sen.se set plays, thrill at a trick pass on a, fast break or ur.derstand that the officials garb is for distinction and not to represent an institution they seem to have been a part of. When asked what they considered one of the higher points of interest in the recent game with

; ::£ I°what Makes Peru's Tearn Click j ~Y

Sports Of. Yesteryear 11.

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sBY RALPH LOCKE

Coach Harold Fisher's Bobkitt~ns overcame a serious illness handicap to claim their fourth .consecutive· win, beating Nemaha 22-12 on the college maples Tuesday night. In the prehmmary 1"nl Lurk's reserves showed the res~lts · of some very fme coaching as they played consistent ball LO scalp the Nemaha seconds 24-9. With two regulars on the bench, the Bobkittens grabbed an early 10 point Jead to clinch a win over their oppone.nts. Redfern and Og5 turned in fiJtal_ accounts. for thei:iselves as they led the nddled Kittens another step closer to the Nemaha Valley Championship. The score at the half read l0- 2 in favor of Peru Prep, and the ftnal gun sounded as Nemaha scored to run their total to 12 as against Preps' 22. Brown and ·The Peru quintet will attemp:; to Smith, both regulars, were t~e ~oys add to a four game winning streak who were forced to the sidelmes in Lincoln F:iday night against with severe colds. Wesleyan, the weak sister ot' ti1e Nemaha had no luck at all in NCAC conference. brea.king into or through the FishThe contest will be the first be'- ermen's zone defense, and were tween these two teams this season. compelled to attempt their shots Peru will be slightly'· favored de- from a distance, with no man on spite the fact that the\' ·have t'.1!'0e their team able to connect sar.freshmen in the starting lineup isfactorily. Their boy, Chandler, Wesleyan has five veterans back looked best for them, being the from last year in the ctarting lineup. most capable ball-handler on the To date they have lost to Wayne, team. He is a brother to Bill Kearney and Doane in state comp~- Chandler who lettered in football t.ition. The Plain: men are under the ·tflis fall ~t the end position. tutelage of a new coach, Farley, and Prep's next game will take plac0 their team i'i highly improved over on the college floor tonight as they that of last year. They will be more square off against the Jack Floyd's or less pointed for the Bobcats, and. unbeaten quintet from Bratton a:iything can happen._ . Union. Floyd graduated from Peru Probable lineups will mclude: last year, and the team he is Feru Wesleyan coaching now, won the state class Grubaugh f Geis C charripioriship last year. Walker f Vauglian

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Mexico U. three out of five bleacherites would cite some pretty shot or sensational pass interception. I think that the other portion would be likely to name one incident that drew their attention the most. In the closing minutes of the game Peru was under the basket attempting to score. The ball got away and Mcintire and one of the Mexicans were tussling for possession of the ball. In some miraculous manner, Mac's elbow accidentally came in sharp contact with the dark lad's chin. In turn, he happened to have his fist clenched, and in the midst of his wild antics, it thoughtlessly, although very appropriately, landed full in Jack's breadbasket. When they got up for the jump ball in the free throw lane, they both eyed each other appraisingly. The Mexican swore fluently in surprisingly good English. If that poor guy had chosen to continue his pugilistic relations with the Rowdy One, there would have been a million and·a half Nebraskans paying taxes to repair the hole in the wall that poor helpless fellow would have made as he flew tBrough for points south, after Mac laid one on him. The moment was a tense one and in the excitement of the close game anything could have happened. As it turned out the game went on and a good many fans quit holding their collective breath.

By Jack Mcintire

ONE YEAR AGO-

The Peru Bobcats smashed the Doane Tigers 50-30 to remain the only undefeated team. in the state. Greathouse and Halladay led the Cat attack.

TWO YEARS AGO-

Revenge was sweet, and the Wheelermen enjoyed one of their best evenings as they upcet the Tarkio Owls 46-30. The game was broadcast over KMA by local sports announcer Art Jones.

FIVE YEARS itGO-

Playing their first game under their ·new coach; Stuart Baller, Peru topped Nebraska's B equad 30-25 in a close game. Captain Bus Moore led the · Bobcats with 14 points.

TEN YEARS AGO-

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Barney Haith

OTHELLO "BUZZ" BYERS-

A freshman from' Glenwood, Iowa, where he had lettered three years, and received honorable mention for the all-state selections as well as being named on the Allsouthwest Iowa team. Buzz is one of our mo:t promising · freshmen and will likely see plenty of action this• season. He has a fine arch shot from around the foul line, and deep in the co~ners. CHARLES HIATTHails from Spaulding, Nebr., and garnered four letters at center and boosted to all-conference. center for twe years, as well as honorable mention on the all-state team his senior year. He is playing the forward and center positions for Peru as a regular, and is very handy at converting rebounds into baskets. He stands 6 feet and three inches.

DUANE ELDO:'.i! WHITELettered three years at Superior in his high school career, and made his all co::iference team two of those seasons. He is the tallest man on the squad standing 6 feet and four inches. The Whizzer has been working hard, and sees his share of action in the games. 'RICHARD PASCALSlug, as he is known, is rapidly coming into his own, as he· holds down a regular guard po:ition on the varsity. He came here from Weston, .Nebr., where he played high school ball. He is the surprise package of the year for Coaches Wheeler and Jo:ies; and will hear plenty of watching as he continues to fill out his career here on the Campus of a Thousand Oaks. An eight man squad will be sel€cted from the names above, the selections based on their appearance Thursday night in the ring. Up to the Falls City trip, the club will hold workouts for team members every evening.

I B0 XIN G Cl UB1 1

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!L-----------"' NOTES

Peru lost a tough game to Kearney by tP.e slim margin of one I point ·as they dropped into a tie , for second place in the NIAA standings. ·Walcott, ·Kearney for- The Peru Boxing Club held a ward, earned high point honors boxing show Thursday night in preparation for the tournament at with 17 counters. F'alls City on January 28 and 29. i i i Results: W. A. A. Tournament On Bill Rachow over Wilbur Egge. The W. A. A. basketball tournaBill Mencl over Ralph Beatty. ment began Monday evening, Jan. Tom Sherman with Shorty 20. The members were divided int0 Sharp-dra.w. three teams with Adris Carmine, Jim Mather over Bob Williams. Irene Bettzinger and Elaine Brier Tom Sherman with Red Garberacting as captains. draw. Following the close of this tourShiny Durst over Buck Doughernament volley ball will be played. ty.

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Pate Presents Gold Footballs to Lettermen President W. R. Pate presented twenty lettermen of the 1940 championship football squad with gold footballs. The members of this team won both ' State and NIAA Championships in a .season that was marred by no defeats. Following the awards by President Pate, Coach A. G. Wheeler presented the :TIAA trophies for 1940 championstips in football and track.

Grubaugh and Walker Account for 26 Points TO Lead 'Cats Pascal Outstanding On Defense

The Bobcats opened thefr confereEce title chase Friday night with a rousing 42-38 conquest of Kearney's Antelopes. Peru's fine defense was more than Kearney could cope with, as they failed repeatedly to break throug·h. Only in the last half did they outscore the Cats, as Journey started hitting from he side. Kearney got the first score, but. Grubaugh promptly dumped in one from the side, and Pascal followed with another, and the Cats g·ai!ned their lead that they held for the remainder of the game. Grubaugh tossed in 14 points for high point honors, closely followed by Walker with 12. The half-time score read 20-13 in favor of Peru, and the thrill of the contest came with only three minutes left. Peru led 40-34, then McIntire fouled out. Pascal and Walker then directed a stalling game well in Kearney's end of the floor. The Bobcats whipped the ball around rapjdly as all five of them rotated {n offense, and Kearney players could do little about it. Prep Will Vie In Box ScoreJohnson Tournament Peru fg ft pf . Walker f 5 2 1 Peru _Prep's basketball team is Gruba~ h 7 0 2 entered m the 'Nemaha County In- H' tt g ' 3 1 2 vitational tournament" held in \' c 111 e, c 2 0 1 Johnson, Wednesday, Thursday, 1 0 3 and Saturday nights, Jan. 29, 3() Pascal, g 1 1 4 and Feb. 1. Cecil Walker is sched- Mcintire, g 0 0 1 uled to officiate. Byers, g fg pf ft The program for Wednesday ~~~~~: f 0 3 2 night puts Peru Prep against Ju(): 3 . t N Journey, f 4 lian at 8:00, Johnson aga1ns . e-t Blessing, c 2 4 3 maha at 7:00, Talmage agams Wilson, g 3 1 :1 Brownville at 8:00, and Brock McCullouch, g ()" 0 0 against the Auburn Res. at 9:00. Falene, f 2 0 1 Admission "is set at 15c and 25c Newcome, c 0 0 2 except Saturday evening when it Lewis, g 0 0 2 will be 15c and 35c. Menagh, g 1 2 1 Officials: Roper and Pressly. Judge of thine improvement, not i f i by what thou speakest or writest, That charity is bad which takes but by the firmess of thy mind, and from independence its proper pride; the government of thy passions and from mern1icity its proper and affections.-Fuller. shame.-Southey.

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 1941

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE FOUR.

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College Band Conceit Criticised by Benford By R. T. Benford Those attending the concert put ed by the audience, Mr. Jindra on by the band Wednesday even- having to take a curtain call. The ing, Jan. 15, were given. a very in- ensemble was ably directed by Ralph Chatelain, a Peru Alumnus. teresting treat. After getting off to an uncertain The Cornet Trio with Bob Ashstart William Fankhauser led the ton as director gave a good account group through "I Am an American" of themselves. However, here again, by Neal in a fine manner. The the Trio could have had more supmellow tones of the clarinets were port from the group thus giving well supported by the brasses and mo::e background for the pyrotechthe "whole" put one in the mood nics the cornetists were able to put for what was to come. across. • The "Atlantis Suite" by Safranek ·"Star Dust" by Carmichael-Yowith its four contrasting move- . der and directed in able manner ments was carrit:d through by by James Sandin, was received James Crawford. At times the har- very .enthusiastically by the listenmonies were rather vague, but the ers. Starting out in a smooth slow climaxes left no doubt as. to JV hat ·manner, and with lighting effects, happened to the "Lost Continent.'.', the whole thing kept building Ull The contrasting moods of t)le ·woqd to, first, a short section well play. winds and brass, and the !nter.~ ed by Crawford on his cornet, then weaving of second melbdies was an increase in speed and climaxes distinct throughout. The third until the final chord, which was a movement had the effect of a Bar- brilliant combination of tone and carolle and the opening chords of light. the fourth section gave the effect Enthusiasm from the audience cf the surging waves. brought a repitition of the last The third number was well di- part, 'starting with the interlude rected by Janet Harris. She played by Crawford. brought out the rhythmic swing that is enjoyed so much by' listen- The Radio Movie "Uncle Tom's ers, as well as emphasizing the Cabin" was different. Fred Drextune of "The World is Waiting for !er who made his debut on Freshthe sunrise" by Lockhart-Seiti, so man Talent night, gave the lines, that the audience could clearly un- and each was illustrated by apderstand that well loved melody. propriate thematic material from The Cfarinet solo "Concertina" the band, each character having was a larger and more pretentious its own theme. number. Lola Yates, the soloist, Murvel Annan, directing the mucarried her part off very well. sical interludes, gave them the While the band gave a very good touch that made the whole number accompaniment one felt that 'very entertaining. little ·stronger support froin the The program ended with James group would have given the solo· Crawford directing the Color Song. ist a little more confidence in her.- I believe the audience left with self, and consequently given more the feeling of having spent an enbigness to the number. Although joyable evening. there is always the danger of the After having spent most of the soloist becoming ove:~ado~ed by fall term as a marching band, t)le group. It gave e so oist a they are to be commended on havchance to show her ability on h~r in,g accomplished such an entertaininstrument. The number was agam ing concert of an entirely different directed in a fine manner by Jan- nature. et Harris. This performance also marked Isabel Tynon directed the "Ted- the first "concert" appearance in dy Bear's Picnic" by Bratton-Yod- the new uniforms, having been Although somewhat reserved, used before only at athletic events. she still brought out the contrasts The hats with their waving white cf melodic ideas and the tricky plumes were worn on the ·first and rhythmic patterns. The whole group last numbers and then placed be'let out a Jot more and took us side their chairs for the other right along to the picnic with groups. them. 1 1 1 The next number gave a· director a chance to show his musicianship. Margaret Meier has accepted a Mr. Jindra played as a. violin solo, position at Hastings and will teach the "Londonderry Air" in his us- the third grade at Lincoln School. ually fine manner. This outstand- Sh~ will begin teaching on Moning Irish melody was well receiv- dsy, Jan. 20.

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C. P. T. To Open Spring Unit The second Civilian Pilot Training Unit sponsored by the Peru State Teachers College._ and instructed by Frank I. Bringham, owner and operator of the Bring· ham Flying Service, is almost completed. The Pilots have to complet8 flight tests which l'lill be given as soon as good flying weather permits. A move is now under way to get students for the spring unit wh: ;:1 will begin Feb. 1 and close in April. The full quota has not be<on reached s.1.d there is still time to sign up at the College Office. Both men and \:lomen students between 19 and 25 who have completed one year of college are eligible. A fee of $15 is required for which the student receives a physical examination, an insurance policy, a ground school course and 35 hours of actual flying time. 1

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Cafeteria Cook 1,eaves Bruce Bell, cook at the colleg') cafeteria, has resigned to accept a position in Falls City. Harry J. Steiner, head manager, will fill the vacancy until a new cook can be provided. 1

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Dunning to Review "No Place Like Home" Mrs. Inice Dunning will review the book "No Place Like Home" at the next A A. U. W. book review, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 4 p. m. at the College Library. The book is a humorous report of conditions abroad written by Patience, Richard and Johnny Abbe, the three children of an American photographer in Europe. These children are alert, witty, and as they played, and listened and saw, they remembered. They have reported the devastating truth about what's wrong with Europe with an innocence which make this usuallv tragic story highly humorous. Towrn:people and stud en ts are invited fo attend this review. i

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Personality Club Sponsors Tea Patriotism furnisted the theme for a tea given by the Personality Club Jan. 16 in the recreation parlors of Eliza Morgan Hall. Former members werB honored guests. Crossed flags fonr_ed the centerpiece of the tea table as Lois Glasgow poured. IJ.ed, white and blue streamers decorated the room. Pianist Echo Elaine Lum played during the tea. Idella Buell and Lorene Lindberg received the guests. i

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Trio Tours Oeighboring Towns The instrumental trio, composed of Margery Evans, Jeanne Spier and Rachel Wieneke, played at four high school assemblies on Monday, Jan. 13. They were accompanied by Dean J. A. Jimerson, who introduced the group to the audiences. Another trip is planned on Feb. 3. The trio will go to Beatrice, Wymore and Fairbury. Towns visited during the day were Burchard, Pawnee City, Table Rock and Dawson. " " i Commercial Students Use Mimeoscopes

is not an experiment. For 22 years we have been in business in Lincoln, Nebr. We have placed many thousands of teachers.' We have the experience. We have the hook-ups. We can serve you better now than ever before. Ask your school friends. Write today for literature.

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Mimeoscopes, furnished by the A. B. Dick Company, Chicago, were

used for the first time by the mimeograph class last Wednesday night. Mr. Kemp, the instructor from Lincoln, explained to the class how the mimeoscope is of help in making ruled forms, drawings, illustrations and hand lettering. The mimeoscopes will be here for the class to use at any ,time during the next two weeks. 1

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A basket 12 inches in diameter made by Irene Tyson is now on display in the second floor library art case together with those of the other 28 members of the general art class. Especially good bac.kets were submitted by Kathryn Urich, Lenora Zenter and Mary Stevenson. Irene Tyson·s oa.:xet is the largest made from sewed raffia for many years. "

Second Semester Students Plan to Get Your

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. N. Y. A. workers who are not colleg~ students are repairing fur. niture in a small sl:op beneath the Industrial Arts building. According to George Dasher, sponsor, more than 50 chairs have been repaired in addition to other furniture.

Good Printing Always!

THE PERU POINTER

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I.:~;~~~:, ;~d~=~ I From all appearances the lease tend bill will go through with flying colors. .Yes, a few amendments · are being tacked on but apparently of several objectors.

VOLUME XXXVI.

PERU, NEBRASKA, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1941

Dr. Ralph Wager Clements Elected to ln~c~~~~~;:d fi;nt:e~~::~!t~:; ffiusic Committee :i~ :i;~ u~~e~~,~~;:i:eve~~~e: To Open Classes superi~tendent 0

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1

NUMBER 13

Enrollment Boosted By New Students

s . . L. c1ements has agam been appomted by the . State Managing Board as a memStimson put it, the president has. Dr. Ralph Wager, newly appomt- ber of the State Music Contest Compower under the constitution to ed Professor of Physical Sciences, mittee of the District 2 committee. direct naval movements. ·Thus will begin his class work this Mr. Clements has received this Chairman Bloom has made ·it clear .week. . 1 honor for the past ten years. that this amendment, to the lease Dr. Wager replaces Dr. Char es lend bill, in no way affects the Seegmille; who accepted a position Plahs and preparations are beconstitution or any existing statutes as chemist with the Department of ing made for the Diiltrict No. 2 which might give the . president the Interior. Music Contest which will be held power to call out the navy. Dr. Wager received his B. A. and April 18 and 19 in Auburn. M. A. degrees at Emory University, i i i Atlanta, Ga. He was research asFrom this it can easily be seen sistant at the University of Illinois that the amendments will have from 1937 to 1939 and received his Ph. D. from that institution in little importance, as far as chang- 1939 . ·• Ing the fundamentals of the bill In June, 1939, he accepted the position of Professor of Pharmocois concerned. fogy at Louisiana State Medical Grace 'Muenchau was elected • College. He resigned to accept a president uf Y. W. C. A. at the reg-· istration day poll. Secretary of war Stimson, in his research position :With the NationNina Kanel is the new vice presstatement before the senate foreign al Biscuit Company, working under ident, Mary Horton is secretary and relations committee, suggested that the National ?ommittee .for ReDorothy Teachman is treasurer, the probability· of an ultimate search, c~mpletmg w9rk with that according to results announced at British victory would be "over- company m January. .._ . . 28 Enrollment figures for this year Beulah Habrich was a candidate, ~helming" if the British Isles sur- Dr. and Mrs. Wager arnved m the meeting on .Janua:y · The new president is _a member were boosted to 578 with the reg- for a one-year diploma. ·vi~e the crisis this spring and sum- Peru February 1. of Kappa Delta P1 Sigma Tau . . . . > . ' st aff , an d 1s . 1strat1on of 21 new students. Semester w1thd1awals were rrIn continuing he claimed that ., -< i De1ta th e Peruv1an . . , th,e lease lend bill is just the thing Music Trio Appears '. ed't . This marks a 10 ,per cent m- ·olaced by 21 new students on the· a1umm 1 or for the Pedagogian. last years 525.. • that can make this British victory In Surrounding Towns 1 She pans t o a tten d a grauae . . campus. The new seniors are Flord t crease over ssible. school after her graduation from . Followmg· are the reg1strat1on ence Burke, Beatrice; Mary Ogg Musical 'activities for the week P figures for the past two years: Dezell, Peru· Louise Meier Du eru. . ' . ' of the string trio included appear- Nina Kanel is upper class span1940 1941 Bois; Elman .Velv1ck, Peru. . of War ances at Tecumseh, Beatrice, Wy- sor for the Scribblers' Club and at- Pov~ Graduates 2 Helen Harned, York, and Allee British- more and Fairbury. t ds tin f F T A Dra t- Semor .................. 53 55 Trayer, Falls City, join the junior Selections f H d d M ;en mee gs 0 • · ., ma J ni 61 g 1 .. •·• rom ay en an o- is Club and Internaticrnal Relations u or . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. c ass; Russell Searcey, Liberty, the ';ij~s.t didn't dare say America. For, zart were presented before the Ne- Club,. • Scphomore ............. 158 152 sophomore. fellow students, when the En·. braska City Music Club on Tues· Mary Horton numbers among Fres~en .............. 254 271 Freshmen newcomers are Norma .ready:,f.or t!ieir.. !)Qntli;ierik,d~.Y, -!~.nH~rY ..~... .·... . ... ·.. her activili&es•Sigma..1'au·•·Deltaand Specials . , .... , ....... : .. .. 6. Ba;--nhouse, Eldon, Mo.; Alta Fern al attack, granting they ever do, The group will appear _at John- Kappa Omicron Phi. She is a At the _end of the first semester Bncker, Grenwood; Don Olen the good old u. s: A. is going to be son on .January 6, and w1l'. be ac- Iiome Economics major. the candidates for B. A. degr~es Crook, Salem; Paul Raymond Dalright beside her. comparued by Dean J. A. Jl1l}erson. Dorothy Teachman is a member were: Isabelle .Anderson, Ludw.1ck ton, Nel~gh; Keith Hannah, Beav• f f i Of Alpha Erudito and Sigma Tau Jun, Ruth .Ludmgton, Erma Meier, e~ ?rossmg; Donald Lienemann, PaDelta. Mark Mullms? ~ss Russell. p1lhon; Wayne Parks, Dorchester; We are the ones, you and I, At the final meeting of the se- Three-year diploma candida~es James Ray, Shelby; Wilma Russthat are to wear the four million mester Mary Olive. Richardson re- w.ere Sarene Hauptman and Wm- ell, Burchard; Dorothy Slack, Rock Identification tags the army has lated the stories behind several mfred '."fcCall. Port, Mo.; Hazel Spicer, Ames, just contracted ~or. "We won't hymns. Candidates for two-year diplomas Iowa; Eleanor Welty, Shenandoah, nee'd men in 1941," said Churchill, were Ruth Clare, Gertrude Nichol- Iowa; Bonita Wert, Elk Cl'eek; thus we have a year to prepare for f f f son and Carol Prine. Marion Whitfield, Ames, Iowa. the great adventure. President Convocation-goers hear<i Prof. R. Fellows Outnumber Gals Roosevelt's promise to send no ex- T. Benford's program of piano seAt Hour Dances peditionary force abroad, we will lections Friday, January 3L First Round of Ping soon discover, was merely a pro- A dance, "Gavotte," by Bach An extended hour dance was Pong Starts Today mise of, so called, political necess- !opened the program. "The Revolu- promoted, January 27, by energetic . tty. tionary Etude" by Chapin and "The students who realizetl the mid-seBoys and girls of high school, • Fawns" by Chaminade, was fol'.. mester lull. Junior hi·gh school, and elementary lowed by "Carnival in New Orleans" College students danced in the . • k · Persons who express such views from "Louisiana Suite" by Ne!- Men's Hall from '7:00 to 8:30 p. ran are P1aymg ping pong. In as these are labeled, by many per- mann. m. Monday. The Perusingers will appear in order to pick the outstanding playsons, as either pro-German or just An old fiddle tune "The Lone Women's choice and women's tag their fourth musicale February 16. ers the first round games in a plain pessimistic. But to many, of Appendicitis" arranged by Prof. became a feature of the dances as Miss Alice Auxier, guest soloist ping pong contest will start Mon-. · no t a b'1g bad wolf Benford showed his ability as an the men outnumbered the women. at the last musicale, wrote ex. day, February 3. us H1'tler is that has . brought the world . to arranger as well as a composer and ., f pressing appreciation for the op1 chaos, he is a symbol of an exist- pianist. For the encore number, March 31 to April 6 is .the date portunity to appear with the chor·tng situation in the .world today, Prof. Benford chose a modern tan- set for the Perusingers' spring us. Miss Auxier says: "It is an inhis defeat would not solve the go "Santanna" by Bryan. tour. spiration to be so well received problem. It is not that simple, it ' upon returning to Perusingers' is much more deep, more complex - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - concerts ... I am anxious to have than that; it a basic condition in f,. all my choir members and the peoMONDAY, FE:B. ~ the world today, a conditiOJl Which p!e in this part of the_ conn.try Hitler and Mussolini have taken hear your group on their spnng 7:00 to 8:00 .... Kindergarten advantage of, a condition that must' tour. They will be a big help in 10:30 .. . .. . ((lass Meeting~ be recognized, that must be taken impressing upon the min!ls Of my Primary Club. into account if we wish to make choir members what a well train1:00 to 8:00. Epsilon Pi Tau the world secure for humanity. ed and balanced group sounds like." "Who would you pick for Peru's and honestly acquired? Miss Auxier is a Peru alumnus 7:00 to 8:00 .. Lambda Delta 1941 representative students?" Do they have your idea of now teaching at Seward. Lambda "Oh, let me think a minute." "school sp1rit"-not necessarily B:OO ...... Sigma Tau Delta 1 i 'f Dr. Hutchins, President of Chi· Standing on the library steps, making the most noise at every cago University, expressed it well a Peruvian staff member over- game, but boosting old college up Mary Hileman Fractures TUESDAY, F'EB. 4 In his recent speech. heard that dialogue and chuckled. a notch? Ankle in Fall Talmage High School, there A minute's thought to pick Peru- Are they in school for the bang Wesleyan ........... . here ian's representative of over 500 they get out of it, or do they have Miss Mary L. Hileman, Super"Hitler," . declared Hutchins, students. a purpose that earns your 0. K. visor of the third and fourth WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5 "sprang from. the materialism and Then suddenly he sobered. He stamp? . grades of the Training School, repaganism of ·our times. In the long had been asked that, question once. Is their school life well-rounded? ceived a compound fracture of the 7:00 to 8:00 .... Gamma Chi run we can beat what Hitler stands He had thought a moment. He and Have they effected a happy me- ankle when she fell Thursday. She Culver Stockton game, here for only by beating the materialism some 500 others. What a short time dium between hibernation and is being treated in the Nebraska THURSDAY, FEB. 6. and paganism that produced him. to make a significant choice. dabbling? City hospital. We must show the world a nation Monday, February 10, PERUVIAN Are they regular fellows-sports- Mrs. Castle M. Brown, former 7:00 to 9:00 Freshman Clubs clear in purpose, united in action extends to you an annual privilege manlike, democratic, in character, Supervisor in the Training SChool, and sacrificial in spirit. The influ- -that of choosing outstanding, on the level? will fill Miss Hileman's place until FRIDAY, FEB. 7 elice of that example on suffering promising 1941 grads. PERUVIAN Get out your directories and have she returns. Tecumseh here (after.noon) humanity everywhere will be more urges you to ask yourself these in mind six Seniors you'd stack i 1 i Doane ................ here powerful than the combined armies questions: up against any guys and gals in of the axis." rs their scholarship creditable the 1941 college parade. Patronize Ped advertisers. convoys. But, as Secretary of war

ffiuenchau, Kanel To Guide Y.W.C,A r

:ttiet.

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Prof. Benford

Plays at Convo

perus1ngers • T0 ··R ppear Febf

16 .

Calendar

Time to T'"', About y·.our ('"'1101ce , fllnr< For ·1941 Representative Students

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PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE TWO.

0JPlllL QJ~qian, Published Weekly by The Peru State Teachers College

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY

Milton Schulz's Idea of Typical Day. at Ole Peru State

Peru, Nebraska

What goes on in a typical day at Peru State, the abode of the - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - scholars? What do these phenomEntered at the Postoffice at Peru, Nebraska, as Second enal creatures do all day? A page from the diary of a member of this Class Matt~r. $1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc select group will shed a little light - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - on this subject. So here comes R M G' · . Editor something that you can't get on '- ose c mms · · · · · · · · ' · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · your ice cream at Macs PlaceMaryon Thomas ............•............. Assistant Editor the inside dope.

Brooks .... "Three .... Indicative and imperative .... " 1:30 .... Fanders: "It's all very confusing." 2:00 .... General chemistry.... Prof. Sharp: "To learn how to measure gas volumes and to calculate the volumes which gases, measured under laboratory conditions, would occupy under standard

Ralph Locke ............................... Sports Editor h:~~~; j .. Brrr-rr-r--ung! Zzz-zz-zz- co~~~!~~s ~~r;~~~ ~~~."isn't it?"

MR. AND MRS. DEAN McC MICK are parents of a daughter, born January 30. " will be remmebered for his parti pation in athletics, .particul basketball. Mrs. McCormick, Ardist Christian, was president W. A. A., and a library desk a• ant, as well as being actiye in organizations.

Melvin McKenney . ~.... : . ........ Assistant Sports Editor 6:30 .... Zzz-zz-honk!! Zrrr-rr-r- 3:00 .... Nothing to do. Guess I'll • . C R d ung! ! .... Bang! R-i-p .. (The sleep- go down to the dorm and play · At the weddinli of MISS NAN Meredith Jimerson · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · opy . ea er er is tearing himself from the some table tennis. con the way to JANE KEHOE to BOB BLAN Nina Kan el . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Proof Reader arms of Morpheus.) the dorm stops at Gym). (Sees ENSHIP on January 19 , a num Ad . 6:45 .... (Yawn) .... "Hey, you go- McGinnis and Lurk there) (Walks of Peruvians attended. Among M. Florence Martin ........ · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · viser in' to breakfast?" .. (Yawn) .. "Yeah, up to them and says): "I ·wonder them were DORIS GRAY, ROSE • k t ·I am" .... <Yawn) .... "I guess." if anybody really knows what bas- McGINNIS KAY SAMUELS MRS · urve nan am es usen b arnc _ . . ' . , •· B J l An . ' REPORTERS ·. .M . . 6:05 .... Zip! Splash! Brush! ketball is all about. How many are C. H. MARSH, BOND KENNEDY,: Maude Daft, Wilham Fankhauser,· Mar1one Kennedy, Ruth 7:15 .... Breakfast. Squirt .. .. supposed to be on a team in this DEAN J. A. JIMERSON AND Marshall, Carol Prine1 Erna Steffen, Pauline Stark, Harold Crunch .... Trickle. game?'' FAMILY, JACK GABUS, ERNEST· . J H . ·.· · 7:45 .... -@Thr*Th&,.:;Th&;? 772 34 Lurk: .... "! don't know. Five I HORACEK. Both Jane and Bob are J en k ms, anet arns. . s·oo G · t 1 s" · · · in Cal• ' . . . . . overnmen c ass. . . . gues · Peruvians, and are l!vmg Dr. Brown: "Today we shall Finally Drexler comes across with ifornia. study the national constitution. the information that there are sevGRADE n' ThingsSandin will you please read Article en on a side. e Students shake their craniums vigorously and try to IV. Will some give Sandin a text 3:45 .... Plays table tennis till MR. AND JIM HARRI· book? Thank you." 4:30. SON f T MRSh. h d h ' ·· 4 30 N. t th· t d o ecumse , ave a auli • · .... Newswntmg ...... Z Z Z : .... o a mg o o.... t b ti Mr H . Clear t he mid-year spin. Students look serious these days-al· 9:00 zzz Wh z d h0 1 t t 0 d0 1·t 'th er, orn recen y. s. arnson .. · . · · · · · · ew · · · · · · zzzz · · · won er w can ge . WI was formerly Miss Lucy Anderson most as if they had caught a distant' glimpse of the Judg- only one more hour of sleep to me. Guess I'll go to the Library d k ' '• catch up. a.r..i 'ook at THE ESQUIRE: an was we11 nown on the camment Day. Students have received their grades. 10:00,. .. Convocation .... "Bz-Bz- 5:Bn .... Supper.. .. no com- pus. Bz-You did! For goodness sake! Bz ments. 0 The importance of grades is impri~ted annually upon Bz." Dean Jimerson: "Convocation 6:00 .... Miscellaneous things. dismissed." 7:30 .... Go to library to sharpen MAXINE SHERSTEAD, DELTON Freshman minds. Quote catalogue: ··~cholastic honors ~re 11:00 .... Nothing to do but to pencils. Go back to dorm. Go to GOERKE AND JOHN A. BATH wait fer dinner. ·see someone just so I don't give attended the Wayne-Peru basket• ~·Of two types-honors and high honors. Students who have 11:30 .... (Standing in front ot anyone the impression I'm not a ball game. WENDELL HUTCHIN. Ad. Building) .... Is that thunder? sociable person. son visited on the campus this ~ point average of 22 will earn honors"; those who 'have a Oh, no. That's Steck in music 8:30 .... Go to library to see a week. class. man about some polka dots. point average of 2.7 will earn high honors,'' etcetera and et· Prof. Steck .... "Mr. Steele, your 9:00 .... Mac's place.... • · audition report." 9:15 .... Freshman gals have to be MARGARET SAVILLE, class ot Mr. Steele .... "Domestic respon- in. '40, is teachillli home economics at cetera. Eibilities prevented me from putt- 9:30 .... Go to Mac's again t1 Verdon, Nebraska. She was active What good, we might ask, is this imµ1e co!1cern over A's, ing in my customary fifteen min~ have that extra coke. in Sigma Tau Delta and other ac· utes on music last night." 9:45 .... Have a conference in the tivities on the campus last year. B's, C's, and D's? lt has been proved that grades are a 12:00 .... Dinner. room with a whole gang sitting in. She is the sister of Helen Jean, 12:20 .... Match you for your des- QUIET HOUR!!!! .... Ssshhh. who is a junior at Peru this year. meagre indication of a student's worth. Graders oft' times sert. Heads. o. K. you win, but you 11:30 .... Do some German. cheated. 12:00 .... Wake up someone :have such curious foibles-for instance, the odds are defin· 1:00 .... Grammar 215. ask the time. GERALD FICHTER and IREN£ . Bradford .... "Brooks, can you 12:30 .... Entertain nightmares. WESTERMAN, 'who teach at Siditely in favor of a p1,tper read after, rather than .before din- tell me how many moods there are That's life at Peru State. ney, Iowa, visited .in Peru last week in grammar and name them?" 'Sfunny, but we love it. end and attended the Wayne-Peru ner. lt is a n_iatter. of record, that given the same s.et of pa· - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ' - - - - ' - - - game. FAWN ANN LOWRY was also· a campus visitor. GLEN pers twice, an individual will grade them differently. Given Gamma Chi Plans S. Hauptman Elected SHEELY attended the game. For Costume Ball Prexy of Phi Sigma Chi the ~ame paper, moreover, various individuals will assign it

to

Important at the monthly meetgrades ranging from. D to A. While ene department may ing of Phi Sigma Chi was the re· t "i.ve as many as 40 per cent of. their student.s A_ 's, others election of Sarene Haup man, pres"' ident; Faye Bouse, vice p':esident, and Elvera Schacht, secretary. in the same institution allow only 5 per cent of the same Barbara Beal was unanimously

With a program favoring the holidays Gamma Chi council has ' planned a patriotic party for .Feb. ruary 12; and the annual costume ball for February 15.

students to get the highest marks.

Gamma Chi has decided to purchase two full pages in the 1941 Peruvian. Old members must pay their second semester dues if they . . want ·their pictures m the Gamma Chi section.

elected to fill the vacancy left by Erma Meier as treasurer. Marks provide the outward and visible sign of the whole Phi Sigma Chi yoted to purchase · . ., a full page in the 1941 Peruvian. academic tradition. Stated by Roger W. Holmes m l he Members voted for a formal ar· rangement instead of the infonnal American .Mercury, "Someday we shall have the courage to style used last year.

t JAhY TROtXhEL, t~Iass odf '40, his eac mg ma ema 1cs, an coac ing at Wilsonville Jay was a d k . . : · es assistant m the library. • LENA BOUSE, teaching English Anderson, Iowa. active in Sigma in dramatic club. of Faye Bouse, a

scuttle the whole marki,ng system."

NEw DRAFT oF

REPoR~E~s-

First semester newswriters have relinquished reins of

Benford, Jindra Collaborate In Pupils' Recital

authority, arid reporter's notebooks go into the hands of

The training school pupils of Clark Maxwell. Ina Jane Hollyhocks, Risher, Jindra presented a recital WedG:iin Solo: their necks out for campus approval for the remaining is- nesday evening, January"22, in the Aid Varis', Dancla, Max MathMusic Hall auditorium. _ews. The program was as follows: sues of the PED. Ninth Concerto; DeBeriot, PatriViolin Solos: cia Hill f f f Swanee River, Wallace Reiff. Piano. Solo: . C. E. J.P.Theme with Variations, Papini, Romance in G Min.,. Bradshaw, Margaret Ann Ulbrick. Jack Maxwell. Have you noticed the shelf in the library reading room Plano Solos: Organ Man, Gundy, Sammy Aragonaise, Massanet, Billie Jean Miller. marked C. E. 1. P.? Kennedy. May Day, Rathbun, Margaret Baritone Horn Solo: This group of books, valued at more than one hundred Ann Ullbrick. Corinthian Polka, Losey, Sammy After the Ball, Ward, Belva Par- Bradford. dollars, is a gift from the Carnegie Endowment for lnterna· nell. String Orchestra, directed by Jeanne Spier: Clarinet Solo: tional Peace to the International Relations Club. Angel's Serenade, Braga, Hilary Don Juan, Mozart; Church Bells, Gounod. Bradford. "Why War?" "Japan in China" and "Dictatorship in a Violin Duet: Accompanists: Margery Evans, Holiday March, Kimball, Margar- Evelyn Trunkenholz, Doris Brinson, Modern World" are a few of the titles. et Ann Ulbrick and Wallace Reiff. Betty Kennedy, Mrs. Dr. Bradford. Piano: Members of the string group These books are for the use of the whole student body. Sparking Spray, Overholt, John were: Patricia Hill, Max Mathews, Clements. Florence Gockly, J;lonnie ArmWhy not dip into one during that spare half hour?. Waltz No. 15, Brahms, Paul strong, Violins; Mary Shirley Jim-

~·amateurs" this week. Ten new journalists will be stickini Prof. R. T. Benford and Prof. V. H.

'f

class of '40, is and History at Lena was very Tau Delta, and She is the si.ster senior.

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Flu Bug Holds Up Honors Report As a resul.t of the flu epidemic, affecting both students and faculty, the announcement of the honors for the past semester wm not be made until a later date. Miss Norma Albrecht, assistant registrar, announces that this was done in fairness to students who still have work to be completed which will entitle them to honors; also, to members of the Honors Committee who have be.en unable to complete t~eir work m time for the preVIously set date for announcement of Honors. f

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eFOR RENT-Two ,room fur· nished cottage. Water, light, circulating oil heater, $10 per month. Write Mrs. W. R. Pate or phone No. 4 or 137. Patronize Ped advertisers. erson, viola; Phyllis Brinson, Verda Hauptman, 'cellos; Betty Kennedy, piano; Betty Collin, Charles McCauley,. Bass Viols; Kathryn Benford, also violin.


PERU PEDAGOGIAN

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1941

Bobcats Bow to Strong Wayne Five 34-2 0

Loss Was First In State Competition

l Caterwaul 1Peru Wins Pair

I

From Wesleyan and 1 •IdIan dcagers ·------· m eBY RALPH LOCKE

2 0-0 l Bahk 0-0 0 l Payne 1 1-2 l Krenzein 16 7-12 18 Totals Referee, Grossman, Omaha; umpire, Rosenberger, Omaha.

"

The Wheeler-Jones 1' 1' fast stepping The sports picture here in Peru Bobcat!! made it five in a row Friunderwent a drastic change at the day night, January 22, as they close of the semester. Some letter- It was the sixth straight for completely took the measure of the The Wildcats of Wayne clawed men returned to the fold to bri.iht- Peru, as Midland fell 46-39 i.n a Wesleyan Plainsmen on the Lintheir way through a vicious second en the prospects for the future, close game. Mcintire and Walker coin floor. half, after trailing in the initial and one left to make 1 the contrast. led a J::iarrage of torrid shooting Wesleyan got off to a four point. frame 10-6, to emerge victors over . . . ·. early in the second half to salt lead, but was quickly passed, as a sadly off-form team of Bobcats . Leavmg was Jim Mather, veria- down the win. Grubaugh and Walker found the ,,_,,_ _,. by a count of 34-27. tile kathletet m . both fooftillbaldl atnhd Midland made a heated contest hoop. The cats piled up a lead, - - - - - - - - - - - - · The Bobcats defense worked trac · Las sprme- he e e of the first half and the 1ead (Continued on page four) wonders in the first half, as Wayne bill as the. individual star that changed hands with nearly every was limited to one field goal. Their helped considerably to boost the score. Peru connected for several offense, however, failed to click Bobcats through the spring for an counters at the close Of the first rmllillil@l!illllm~iiiliiillfilllllll~ due to hasty passing and the alert undefeated track season. In addi- canto to build a 26-19 lead at the iiil play of the Wayne cagers. In the tion, he gained runnerup. hon.ors in half. Mac and Cec came through ~ Peru Recreation Parlors la.st canto the Cats were ~it hard the Kansas Relays, placmg m the to clinch matters in the second half ~ POOL AND SNOOKER with petsonal fouls, Mcintire, Wal- broad JUmp. and the Bobcats replied on their ~ . . ker and Pascal being forced to the Coming back Hannah and defense for the remainder of the ~ Otto Boellstorff, Prop. sidelines for hitting the limit. The are game llll r d t b ttl f . sl Hutton. Both lettered on the bas· ~iiiliiiliiiliiiliiilfllll!liiiliiilllliiiliiil~!llin i: ll team con mue . o a e unou. · Y, ketball team last year, and will be The victory boosted the Cats but failure to hit the hoop consist- very valuable in aidine- the Cati to farther out in front of the pack ently cost them the game. defend their State .and NIAA laur- in the state league, . and added Hannah, Wal~er and Grubaugh els this season. their fourth win in state competipJayed outstandmg ball for Peru, . tion against no losses. diEplaying fight and, aggressiveness People can speak of rruraclei:, but Box Score-at all times but the fast break was few can offer better concrete ex- Peru fg pf ft something that cats. couldn't con- amples of superhuman achieve4 3-4 3 ·t th Walker Bargain Night' Feature trol Friday night. ment than those who c1 e e w~rk 5 1-3 2 of the Wheeler-Jones coachmg Grubaugh ii at • experiment. For 22 years Box Score: 2-4 1 0 we hne been in business ia Lincol1, combination in putting out a win- Hiatt 0 2-3 1 Nelir. We ha•e placed many thoaPascal fg ft pf ning basketball team. Peru's Bobcats will tangle with Peru Mcintire 4 4-9 sands of teachers. We have the ex3 1 0 the highly touted Missouri team, Walker, f4 Right now I imagine there are Snyder ,.,ience. We hne the hook-1ps. 0 0-0 3 1 2 Culver-Stockton, next Wednesday Grubaugh, f 1 several individuals arou~d the ~tate Handley W1 can serve you better now than 0 0-0 0 2 night in an encounter billed as Snyder, f 0 0 that are scratchine- their cramums Wh'te - before. Ask your school friends. 3 0-0 1 Write today for literature. 2 0 the Southeast Nebraska Booster Hiatt, c 2 reflectively, and wonderine- if they Bye~s 0 0-0 0 game. White, c 0 0 O can believe what they see when Ronhovde 0 0-0 0 0 The Culver-Stockton team is rat- Ronhovde, c 0 ./,~ . I 0 they see tJ:\e Bobcats play. Those Totals 17 12-23 13 ed one of the top teams in the Mcintire,• g 3 0 ~/,~ 4 fellows are the coaches of the Midwest, and have always been Pascal, g 0 fg 3 other colleges, and they probably Midland pf ft 2 a hard team to beat. Coaches Hannah, g 2 2 figured on taking advantage of Draemal 4-5 3 Wheeler and Jones are featuring Byers, g 1 4 1 1 Peru this year, and wanted to bal- Fetrow, f 0-0 4 0-1 the game and making a "Bargain Tctals 10 7 17 ance the count with us for losses Schaffersman 3 4 2 1-2 Night" out of it. Fans from all 1 of the past few years. Their chan- Schneider, g fg ft pf ces were nol; too slim, either, as Knockstedt over the southeastern part of the Wayne 2 1-2 1 4 7 3 Peru had only two regulars, and state will be cordially invited to Vi0utmore, 0 0 see these two teams meet in one of .Nitz, f O some freshman material. They fig0 the basketball classics of the season. Mag~onz, · f l ured without counting on the abil0 0 The Bobcats are smarting from G_othier, c 2 ity of the coaches, and now they the taste of defeat in the recent Fitch, c ~ ~ ~ probably realize their mistake-but Wayne game and will be primed Aberon, g 1 3 for victory in this inter-state clash. Rttzlaff, g A good game is in prospect, and Anderson, g l ~ GOLDEN GLOVES 2 Wednesday night everyone is in- Best, g "' Representatives of Peru State 11 2 14 vited to turn out and boost the Tctals College showed up very well In the Bobcats. 1' 1' 1' District Golden Gloves Tourpament Peru should be able to put a:n McGinnis Leaves for Job held in Falls City last week. improved team on the floor, as they Mac McGinnis, former Peruvian DougheM:y, Sherman and Ray have bolstered their power with the and past sports editor of the PED- fought their way through undefeataddition of veteran Hannah, who CENTRAL OFFICc 17 NORTH MAIN ST. COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA 'II b d ed. Greene and Durst lost, Greene e emp1oye as a b TKO · th · th' d d d plays all positions, and is a dan- AGOGIAN ' WI sports writer for the Nebraska Y a m .e. 1r roun. ' ~n gerous man on either offense or st t 'J al b · · F b Durst, by a dec1s10n, after wmnmg a e ourn egmmng e ruary his opener by a knockout in the defense. 15 · second frame. i 1' 1' i 1' 1' The State meet in Omaha,. to be The mind unlearns with diffi- held soon, will see some more of culty what has long been impressed 'Peru, as Dougherty and probably • ARE YOU PREPARED? • on it.-seneca. Durst will enter there. i 1' 1' Durst's boxing club ls responsible : We Carry a Complete Line of Cold Remedies. : The charities that soothe, a.net for the fine showing of the boys, heal, and bless, lie scattered at the and is probably the first of its : St. Regis Kleening Tissues, SOO's .............. 23c : feet of men like flowers.-Wards- kind to be an active organization • Mentholatum, large .......................... 53c • worth. of the campus.

Hannah Shines

SPORTS

. Wheelermen rengage Culver-Stockton In · 'nebr.BoosterGame'

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!• Winter Weather ffieans Colds 5•

Prep Loses To Brock 18-12 In County Finals

Peru's Bobkittens encountered trouble and tough breaks ·!IS they lost In the final round of the Nemaha County tournament to Brock by a score of 18-.12. From the beginning the team was hit hard by the flu epidemic. Smith, stellar guard, was' forced to the bench and saw no action at all. others were able t-0 play but were not in prime condition for tcurnament play. . The prepsters fouled freely in the final game, but Brock only took advantage of a small percentage t-0 hold the score down. In the opening rounds, Prep took the count of both Julian and Nemaha, by the respective scores of· 23-13 and 23-18. They lost the final by an 18-12 verdict. This week the Kittens meet the R-Ockport Bluejays in the preliminary to the Culver-Stockton game. The team should be back at full strength, and a good game should be the result. The game will be played on Wednesday, and play will get under way at 6:30 p. m. 1'

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AUBURN THEATRE (Auburn, Nebraska) SUN. • MON. • TUES.-FEBRUARY 9-10-11 "THIS THING CALLED LOVE"

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PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE FOUR.

United Press l audsWh ee Ier as "m·nae1e m ·an,

C. C. A. Members Welcome New Students

Few people on the campus Jmow what C. C. A. is. It probably doesn't mean anything to some. Everyone knows what Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. stand for. on· this campus C. C. A. is College Cathelic Association. This organization is made up o! A news story from Lincoln writ- the Catholic students on the camfen by Charles Arnot releas'ed by pus. All are eligible and all are exUnited Press, was ~arried in a pected to belong. ~e club meets .nu ber of Nebraska dailies Sun- eyery other Tuesday m the Faculty da: adding to the reputation of room. Co;ch Al Wheeler of the Bobcats Father J. F. Hennessy, chaplain and to the reknown of the teams'.. a~ S~. Mlary's Hospital, ~ebraska Here's the story: ?1ty, 1s sponso.r and Dean Jimerson . is faculty advISor. Peru Tea.chers fmally grabbed The purpose of the club is to the brass rmg on th~ merry-go- bring the Catholic students toround of Nebraska college sports th d · , · . Al Wh 1 ge er an discuss Catholic questeams because gema1 ee er •ions believed there had to be some ar- • · · . could be i i i t!stic success before it

Pe'ru w·1ns Pa·1r

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Sports Of Yesteryear By Jack Mcintire

By Yahooti ONE YEAR AGO-

The Bobcats pounded furiously down the stretch in preparation for the southern jaunt to the tournament in El Paso, by k:noeking off four of the top teams in the state. They won the four games with a bare total margin of only 14 points, as B~iley, ace guard, was injured in the first encounter. . Wayne, Midland, Hastings and Doane fell in order as they withered under the blasting of the Cats . · big guns. Freshman Hannah came th h t· ll t 0 fill B ·1 roug sensa IOna' Y ai ey's place.

Because God is ever present, no boundar! of time _can separate ~s from Him and the heaven of His presence; and because God is Life, all Life is eternal.-M;ary Baker Edd y.

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-Physician and SurgeonOffice at Milstead Corner Office Phone 33, Res. 39

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Modern Barber Shop BILL LLOYD

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PERU BOWLING CLUB 1· L d' W 1 t All T' " a ies e come a imes " Ben Hanlon Mgr. lill M. G. Heuer, Owner f1IJ

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practical. J. P. CLARK rsi;~" ~ Three years ago Wheeler .came · . ': acing the task of pulling the TWO YEARS AGOElectric Shoe Shop West f · · d Id \Continued from Page Three) Bobcats out of the athletic o • The Whee1ermen spanked MidShoe Repairs of All Kinds rums where they had languished and tightened their defense, and land on their own floor as Halla- [jjJ through four campaigns, except for moved on to a decisive victory. day, Mosely and McCormick led ll!!ljj]lill[jj]§lilJ!llJi1lli1ll!llJm[l;Jlilllillilli@i1ll!illlill· a brief excursion into the basket- The Methodists were held to a the Cats to an important win. ball_ spotlight. mere five field goals, but took adThe extraction promised to be a vantage of twenty-odd gift tosses long and painful process. Peru had to run their score up. For them FIV·E YEARS AGObeen cuffed around at random in Metzler ·and Geis looked best, football and even oasketball was .while' Mcintire, Walker and Hiatt The Bobcats warmed up and still a problem. despite., a success sta:rred for the rampaging Cats. grabbed two games from Kearney preview before coach Stu Baller Box •Scoreand Doane after getting off to a departed for Omaha university. Peru · fg ft pf slow start. Riggs, Halladay and Wheeler's first move was to or- Walker, f .4 4-4 3 Greathouse starred. der an obituary for the school's de- Snyder, f O 0-0 1 transfusion of new spirit into the Grubaugh, f 3 0-3 4 featist complex. Nex~ came a Morr'y, f 2 0-0 3 TEN YEARS AGOstudent body. Ronhovde, f 1 0-0 O "We had to build a desire to Handley, f 1 0-0 o Coach Dutch Lorbeer and his win before ever thinking of build- Hiatt, c 4 0-0 3 protogees enjoyed a thrilling week Ing a team," he explained. "That White, c o 0-0 2 as .they won three out of four imwas one of the hardest jobs." Mcintire, g 7 3-8 2 portant tussles. The Eagles of ChaThe state college ,record book Byers, g O 0-0 O dron were forced to split their twin since 1931! substantiates the practi- Pascal, g 1 0-1 2 bill with the Bobcats as Hurst came cal success of Wheeler's formula. 23 'T-16 20 through to give them unexpected 118 for the "artistic" angle, rival wesleya,n trouble, while they were concentracoaches agree emphatically that Geis, f ting on Hatcher. In other games, 1 1-1 current Bobcat editions lack no .de- Pieper, f 2 Peru won over Wayne and Omaha 1-2 3 sire for victory. Parmtn'r, f 2 U. 1 3-5 Peru's football renaissance was Vaughan, f O 0 0-1 i i f not achieved overnight. The Bob- Milier, c 1 0-0 cats still showed traces of groggi- Guest, c 4-4 2 , ness during Wheeler's first year Metzler, g 1 6-7 0 ':' and won only one game. But in Bowm'er, g 0-0 0 0 basketball they rolled along pros- Owen, g 0 0-1 4 perity road, winning the N. I. A. A. Barry, g 1-1 1 0 championship, reaching the semi9 16-22 12 The W. A. A. basketball tournafinal round in the National Interment was run off last week, as ". i i collegiate tournament at Kansas teams under their captains, BentCiy, Mo., and finishing a great F. 1". A. Sp~llbound zinger, Carmine and Brier finished campaign with 22 victories in 27 By Ouija Board in that order. games. In the opening game, BentzinThe Bobcats were more versatile An Ouija Board held the spot- ger's basketeers had things their 1n 1939-40. They won all the major light at the meeting of the F ..T. A. own way as they ran roughshod N. r. A. A. championships, domin- on Jan~ary 27, as m.etnbers discus- over carmine's team to get off to at!ng football, basketball and track. sed various superstitions.. a rousing start. The next evening, Their football record showed seven The discussion was under the di- they ran into a pack r' trouble, victories in nine games, and in rection. of Elaine Brier, Donna. and were forced to fight to the fibasketball they swept 19 of 25 en- Duerfeldt and Audrey Zastera. nal to claim a narrow three point gagements, reaching the second Members voted to buy a half victory over Bier's cagers. The round of the National Intercolle- page in the Peruvian. win clinched the championship for giate meet. " i i them. No one challenged Peru's claim to the state college football title Kitty Rhodes to be In the consolation mix, a desperlast fall. The Bobca.ts were undeNew Cafeteria ~ook ation heave by Phyllis Benson in feated and tied only by Wayne and the last three seconds of play won Ft. Hays, Kas. A powerful team re- Miss Kitty Rhodus, Peru, Nebras- the game for Carmine's aggregavolving around center. Jack' Mcin- ka, has accepted the positon as tion, and with it runner-up honors. tire and Halfback Jim Mather cook in the college cafeteria. The program is well under way blasted Chadron on Thanksgiving "It doesn't even seem like work," now, and tournaments in volleyball ' Day to retain the N. r. A. A. crown. she answered when asked how she and softball are yet to be played. Not even Wheeler knew what to enjoyed her present work. "All I Hit-pin ball and basketball are the expect when the current basketball do is try to fix things like 'Bake' other sports that are parts of the campaign opened. Only two veter: says the kids like them, and that's annual activities. ans were available and freshmen not hard," she added. i i i .showed undetermined capabilities. .- i -1 Peru dropped its first three Marjorie and Verna Rogers gave games, just as Wheeler fii;ured. their prize-winning 4-H demonstraThen Veterans Cecil Walker and tion before the State Dairymen's Mcintire teamed With three fresh- Association at Lincoln last .week. men for a. winning combination. These girls have won several medPeru considers Wheeler some- als and commendatfon on their 4th!ng of a miracle tnan. His teams H work. According to Prof. v. H. Jindra, keep winning and home games are i 't i the next concert by the college drawing the largest crowds in hisband has been scheduled to take tory. The Rev. D. S. Coad, former min- place in March. The band is workThe three yearlings-Charles Hi- .ister of the local Baptist church, irtg on a program of musical vaatt, Spaulding; Merle Grubaugh, attended the B. Y. P. U. Rally riety, as well as good solid numAinsworth, and Dick Pascal, West- here, ~anuary Z5. The Rev. D •. S. bers. ern-took leading roles as Peru Coad. is now pastor of the First " . ,, r-01led 0 D u · 't Baptist Church in Hastings. Such numbers as Headlmes, a ver oane, ruvers1 Y of modern rhapsody by Carleton ColMexico, Kearney and Nebraska -1 'f 'i by concert marches and selections Wesley~n. Now the Bobcats have They that know God will be fr~m Stephen Foster will be pretheir sights leveled on another N. humble; they that know themt d I, A. A. title-and the mythical selves cannot be proud.-Flavel. sen e · '( -( '( state crown. Coaching is not a new business Six new batorIS are being plac-. to Wheeler. He spent nine years Peru. ed into routine by the new beginat exclusive Amherst college in Al Wheeler was doubtful at first ners who are being trained by Massachusetts before heading for -but now he's glad he came west. Laurine Cfa,yburn.

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THE REXALL BEAUTY SHOPPE at BARNES PHARMACY Careful, Complete Competent Service t Call No. 3 for a,ppoin ment or drop in any time

Bentzinger's Team Wins W.A.R. Cage Tourney

Schedule Concert for ·March

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Peru Pointer

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1~-s~~d~~~ Speaks II

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By Tod Hubbell .

In the past we have often heard of "our ever changing foreign policy" but have you ever paused to think of our "ever-changing public opinion?" The uncert\\inty of what we think and do tomorrow is

VOLUME XXXVI.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1941

PERU, NEBRASKA,

ffirs. t. Dunning Reviews Child Authors' Book

State norma\ Board Begins ~i:1~t ::2disw;~rc~:: i~u~;ic~:~~ Discussion of School Budget

::et~;:;~;~yi:~f::a:a~e t~:~r p:t:h~e lie opinion forced Wilson into

ion into the second world war.. Let us enlarge on this strange statement.

• Those individuals who have recently seen the picture "The Ramparts We Watch" will realize how

Cochran, Griswold Disagree on Issue

thoroughly and efficiently public The school budget for the comopinion worked to force us .into ing year was the subject for disthat conflict. Committees for the Cussion when the State Normal Board, together with the presidents preservation of d~moc.racy were t . • . of the. four eachers colleges,. met formed, senators we1 e oscrac1zed, at Lincoln on February 3. anti-war feelings were unpopular, · . . . . '. The group discussed at a ·hearboys f1ghtmg m France were hail- 1 · f th C "tt A ng o e omm1 ee o.n pproed as heroes, and letters, telegrams priations of the state legislature and petitions were sent to Wilson, the' amount Of f1,1nds needed for the one of our greatas~ prcsiclrnts. On next t\"o years. April 6, 1917, the inevitable news came when the president declared the U. S. at war with the Imperial German government.

, According to President W. R. Pate, former Governor R. L. Cochran had recommended that the teachers colleges be given a cut which would represent the same percentage of reduction that was given other state institutions, so Nov. 11, 1918, and the war ende.d. far as proceeds from the property The final chapter of the world war tax were con«erned. was much different than the preCochran's Recommends face. It was a war-weary, broken tl1 t greeted the Governo:· Cochran, however, statt. down na ion a ed that it was his belief that there news of surrender· Public sentiment was no longer need for normal was unanin:ously for peace .and training in high schools. He recom.n,ever aga:i.11 we1:e we. to ;;end .boys mend~d.. tl:lat the equivalent of.the to war. Pacifism was at its height. money appropriated by the last legislature for normal training in Nations gathered together and si15Lhigh schools, which was approxied peace treaties. The greatest of mately $94,000, be given to the four these was the Kellogg Peace Pact of state teachers colleges and the University of Nebraska. The total of 1928. his recomi:nen~ation for Peru was $254,116. Conditions like these ran parallel Griswold's Suggestion until the Italian invasion of EthioGovernor Dwight Griswold in his pia. Then we felt the League of budget message questioned the deNations should take a hand but sirability of discontinuing the ap· never the United States. The Pa- propriation for nqrmal training in nay incident brought public opin- high schools, and• recommended ion to a boil bc:t it soon simmer- that -the appropriation for thi~ purpose for the next two years be reed down. stored. His budget recommendation for Peru was $238,116, which was approximately $17,00{) less than Then in Septembe:-, 1939,war was Mr. Cochran's recommendation. declared in Europe. Underneath all the public feeling was the fear of Board Favors no. Change

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another war, but yet how useless. America was to guard the western hemisphere. If England fell, there might be sor,ne repression but no naticn 3,0QO miles away could cross the Atlantic. Then France fell, tl{e Maginot line was useless. English propagandists went into action. If Germany won,. our economic' system would collapse, the ' United States would be surrounded by to-

Edwin C. Crites, president of the State Normal Board, in speaking for the teachers college group, asked that the appropriations committee recommend for the teachers . colleges not less than the amount appropriated two years ago. If this amount were to be appropriated, Peru's budget for the next two years would be $256,039.

C.P.T. Course To be Repeated

but with a newspaper photographer father and a travel-loving motber, not much time is spent at the ranch. In the book the children tell of their travels in Europe before the present war situation. Because the book was written by child!·en it was not so heavily censored as it would have been had the authors been adults. The authors record their thoughts, adventures, conversatiom and philosophy. Jll...rs. Lillian Barnes will give the next A. A. U. W. book review on February 19.

Forms Cog In Defence

Peru will have a Ci vii Filo t Training unit, which will start flying activities on or about February 15. Ground school will be held here three nights per week and flight training will be given by the Missouri Valley Flying Service at Auburn. f f f This program forms a cog in the wheel of National Defense by providing pilots with the preliminary training required for Army pilots . Students taking this course receive 35 hours of flight instruction and 72 hours of ground instruction consisting of Meteorology, Aviation, and Air Laws which enables them to qualify for a Private Pilot's Certificate. The above mentioned instruction would cost at least $450 at zny flying school, but only $35. wb.en.:.taken .. with Ci;;il Aeronautics aid. If any students more than 19 The Valentine theme has been years of age are interested in taking this course, they should con- chosen for the Gamma Chi Costact the Bursar immediately. tume B~ll to be held on Feb. 15. 1 1 -t Prizes will be awarded at the ball Phyllis Dammast Elected to the best costumed fellow, girl Inter-Frat Member and couple. Pictures of the prize Alpha Mu Omega held its reg- winners will appear in the Gamular meeting on Feb. 5. Phyllis ma Chi section of the Peruvian. Dammast was elected as inter-fraCouncil members in charge 'of ternity banquet representative. the ball are: Grace Muenchau, Following the business meeting geneml chairman; Pauline Stark, reports on ma.thematics, articles, entertainment chairman; Mary Colwere reviewed by Phyllis Dammast, lin, decoration chairman; Edna Frank Larson and Edith W'ley. Mae Petersen, refershment chairOfficers for this kemester will man; Janet Harris, dance chairbe elected at the next meeting on man; Ruth McDonald, music chairFeb. 17 . man; Betty Miller, costume chairman.

Gamma Chi Plans Valentine Ball Pri'zes Offered For Best Costume

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WEDNESDAY, FE:B. 12 G!lcmma Chi ............ 7-8

THURSDAY, FE[B, 13 I Freshman Clubs . . . . . . 7-9

Already Reduced Budget!

FRIDAY, FEB. 14 Dramatic Club Business Meeting ... , . . . . . . . . 11:30 Brock High School . . Here Kearney . . . . . . . . . . . . . there SATURDAY, FEB. 15 Gamma . Chi Costume BaU York .. ~ ............. There SUNDAY, FEB. 16 Lutheran Club

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TUESDAY, FEB. 11 Yi\ICA, YWCA, CCA .. 7-8 Talmage High School . there Wecleyan ............. here 1

Bradford Story To be Printed· O

Short Story to Appear "Home" to the young authors of In Y::ile Rev'1ew the book is a ranch in Colorado, u

Mr. Crites pointed out tb the talitarian nations, we must aid committee that the teachers col- . I Britain. lhges were· already operating on greatly reduced budgets. The difSomehow or other your columnist ficulty of securing and keeping a competent instructional staff at is prone to believe that a secret alpresent salaries was emphasizd. liance had already existed between the two governments before war Senator John S. Callan, chairman of the Committee on Appr~pria­ had start~d .. This with the aid of tions, said in closing the hearing, our administration, propagandists 'I think I can assure you that the and our foolish but human instinct teachers colleges' will be taken care of fear we are gradua1ly being lead of." to the brink of war. Assuming that we did go to war and accomplished The student council, February 3 nothing, this same metamorphosis decided to again present a May would be bound to follow. I believe Fete. Plans are being made for a coronation ceremony and dance rePuck is right-"What fools we mor- cital, followed by an all-college tals be." dance.

Mrs. Inice Dunning reviewed "No Piace Like Home" by Patience, ' Richard and Johnnie Abbe at the A. A. U. w. book review on February 5.

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NUMBER 14

7-8

MONDAY, FEB. 17 Freshman Council .... 10:30 Alpha Psi .............. 7-8 International Relations Club ...... : .... : . . . . . . 7-8 Kappa Delta Pi . . . . . . . . 8-9

O Accepted for publiqition in the Yale Review magazine is a short story written by Dr. A. L. Bradford, head cf the E1nglish department. The story, for which Dr. Bradford will be paid $75, is titled, "Ain't Nobody Perfect." , E'..rongly regional in flavor, the story h2s for its loc1le the foothills of the Ozarks, where the author lived fcrmerly. Interest is based on chan::.ctcrization and dramatic incident. i

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Y.W. Cabinet Installed! In Candlelight Service Grace Muencha was installed as of Y. W. C. A. at· a candle light service on 'l'uesday, Febru2.ry 4. Other officers installed were: Nina Kane!, vice president; Mary Hort.Qn,, ... se~retm:y; Dor.Q.tl:iy J'eac]1c man, treasurer; .Mae Jane Young, fellow~hip ch8irman; Jaunita West, drama chairman; Mary E. Collin, creative leisure chairman; Harriet Maxwell, music chairman; Faye Bouse, public.'ty chairman; and Nina Kane!, candy chairman. Old cabinet members formed the symbolic Y triangle. Mary El. Collin,· retiring president, installed Grace Muenchau who in turn installed her• cabinet. Ruth MacDonald and Bertha Clayburn were in charge of the music. p:·~cide!lt

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Ludvik Jun, who received his degree at the close cf the first serr.ester, is doing sub~titute teaching

at Ju"lic,n.

Peru Senior Writes Article For Peabody Journal "Why I Look Forward to Trnching," an article written by Ruth Johnson, senior, was published in the January, 1941, issue of the Peabody Journal, an education magazine edited by the Peabody College, Nashville, Tennessee. Each year the college sends letters to the 200 state teacher's colleges in the United States asking for articles written by one or two seniors from the college on the t,opic, "Why I Look Forward to Teaching." The articles are to be based on the student's own ideas and are chosen for their possible inspirational values to other students and the c0mposition. From the 200 entries this year, five other students received recognition: Elizabeth Coppedge, East Carolina State Teachers College, Greenfield, North Carolina; Glen Davis, State Teachers College, Canyon, Texas; John Meyers, Teachers College, New Britain, Con1:1.ecticut; Thelma Sprow, State Teachers College, Shippensburg, Pennsylvlania; Katherine Bennett,

State Normal School, Oneonta, New York. When asked how she was informed of the acceptance u£ her article, Ruth laughed, "Last Friday I received three copies of the Peabody Journal in the mail. No letter or notification accompanied them. When I saw my name, I looked for sure to see if I was the Ruth Johnson whose article was published. My roommate said I cad the oddest expression on my face when I i;ealized that I was the one! It was the first article I had ever written and I certainly never expected it to be published." Ruth spent about two weeks "off and on" writing the article. It was between 500 and 60() words long. In preparing herself to write, Ruth gave this information: "When Dr. Baker asked me if I wanted to enter, I had to confess that I didn't even know what the Peabody Journal was. So, I went over to the library and read the articles (Continued on page four)


PAGE TWO.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1941

\tllamni JMil1 Sunday musicale Published Weekly by The Peru State Teachers College

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Peru, Nebraska

Entered at the Postoffice at Peru, Nebraska, as Second Class Matter. $1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc Rose McGinnis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editor

RICHARD KRATZ, mat. '33, was married on Feb. 2 to Marjorie Hines of Falls City. The couple will live in Fremont where Richard is employed in the American Hatcheries. MISS CLARA C. MOONEY, mat.

Maryon Thomas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Make-up Editor '30, left Lincoln on Feb. 2, for R Jh L k S t Ed't Washington, D. C., where she will a P oc e · · · · · · · · · · · ·' · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · por s I or be employed in the navy departMelvin McKenney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Assistant Sports Editor ment as a senior typist.

Meredith Jimerson ......... , ............... Copy Reader BURTON EVERETT, mat. '40, N' K I p f R d has accepted a position with Ben'J ma ane · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · roo ea er Hairdressers in Lincoln. He was M. Florence Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adviser formerly op~rator of the Campus Beauty Salon.

REPORTERS: Murvel Annan, James Busenbarrick, MISS SYLVIA ULMER, mat. '38, Maude Daft, William Fankhauser, Marjorie Kennedy, Ruth has accepted a position in WashMarshall, Carol Prine, Erna Steffen, Pauline Stark, Harold ington, D. C., as a typist. Jenkins, Janet Harris. MARTHA GORDER who has •'NOSE TO GRINDSTONE" IDEA

More than one-third of the P. S. T. C. student body choras, "I'm working my way through collitch." Plaudits to this working third, for according to statistics, this group 1s more likely to be employed than the colle~e playboys, A recent survey of 186 American colleges and UI).iver· 'Sities by the Bureau of Industrial Service, Inc., reveals that :all-'round students, especially those who worked their way ;through college, have a better chance of getting a job after graduation than the campus hero or the college "grind."

been in the athletic department at Pueblo, Colorado, for four years, reports that MERL PEEK, a Peruvian who was employed in Clarinda, Iowa, schools, has recently been elected to a position in the athletic department at Pueblo, where he began work Feb. 3. BILL SHUMARD is teaching at Las Animas, Colorado. Lawrence, his brother, has gone to New Mexico where he is teaching. RUSSELL BAILEY and JOYCE ANN SALMONS, both Peruviahs, were married on Feb. I. They are living in Fairmont where he is head of the athletic department.

Athletes and beautie'!l, according to the survey, are not being sought unless they can offer to their prospective em· MONA MONTEETH SCHROEDployers SQme substantial qualities, as character, scholarship, ER:, '29, lives at Grant, where her adaptability, leadership, or personality. husband is in charge of a newspaIt is a present-day trend for American: employers to become more exacting in their requirements, preferring employees capable of being developed into exec~tives within the next decade. The student who today works his way through •,college, following the old proverb about hay and sunshine, ::and thus earns his educational expenses in whole or part cart be counted on to solve diHiculties after graduation. Fur· thermore, the value of college work lies in its development of new skills and interests, improved abilities in learning to work with others and experience gained. 0

Years ago a great minister said, "Woe is me if I do not preach the gospel." There was a feeling behind that statement that without an attempt on his part to objectify the statement he had made, life wou!d be colorless and unfruitful for him.

In like manner, 'educators maintain that the working student generally has a deeper appreciation than the average student of the necessity for an education-a greater appre· ciation of the opportunity to study and a deeper sensitive· ,ness concerning the value of knowledge. ' Stated in another way, this feeling of the necessity and worth of an education is the stimulation that seems to give the working students a stronger, more persistent drive in their educational adventure tl).an non-working students sometimes have. i

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Dlll'TATQR ·FASHION The frostbitten fad of socks that reach only to a girl's

per there. Mr. and Mrs. Art Miller live in Vallejo, Calif., where Art is an architect and contractor. MRS. MILLER, formerly Jo Rogers, is a Peru alumna. The basketball squad of Coach EARL DASHER, at Comstock, retained the Middle Loup conference title by defeating Scotia in the finals. Earl is a Peru alumnus and is the son of Mr. Dasher, an employee of the college. · Bratton Union's undefeated basketeers have won 12 games to date. Their coach, JACK FLOYD, is a Peruvian and a brother of , Rex Floyd, a junior.

To Bring Rlumnus l • Fankhauser, Bartling To Solo

String Trio Plays fit Johnson Banquet

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"Did you say the W. P. A. had taken over Dr. Winter or he the W. P.A.?"

"We receive excellent food at the hands of our new cook, but oh! such small, small :rervings"-any Guest artists at the father and Dorm girl. son banquet at Johnson on Feb. 6 Have you ever noted the Beech· were members of the college string Nuts jaws keeping time with the trio. B. B. boys feet every second lialf Numbers played by the trio were: in yon local gym? "When Twilight Comes"-TandThe wings and rings of the curler. rent season are still in the air. "Habenera"-Zamecik. Why doesn't someone start a "Londonderry Air"-Irish Folk Wholesale-Retail agency for Profs. or where could we re-order a Dr. Tune. of Chemistry quick. Encores played by the group were: FILMER looks like "Custer's Last "Cavatina"-Raff. stand." MARSHALL your courage "Gopak"-Moussorgsky. for "Love Conquers All.' Margery Evans played two piano soloes, "Dark Eyes" and "One O'clock Jump." Dean J. A. Jimerson accompanied the group to Johnson.

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Forty Egg

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Fisher Leaves For Treatment

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Cak~

Recipe

To Be Featured at Tea

Harold E. Fisher, assistant librarian, has entered the ho:pital at Iowa City for treatment. During his term there, Mrs. Richard T. Sherman is acting as substitute. Mrs. Sherman (Corinne Barnts, '37) has for the past three years been teaching at Scotia and Loup City. Last August she was married to Richard T. Sherman ('37J, superintendent at Julian. Both Mr. and Mrs. Sherman were assistants in the library during their college years.

The Truth About How Slur and I Did It •

In -a letter to V. H. Jindra from

So, first semester has passed;

recting the presentation of an op-

sometime or other so you kno,w h t .

ankles or just belo.w her knees, continues to leave observers DOROTHY SNIDER, mat. '36, hope you did too. If you did, o:· cold, numb with cold. And it must be admitted that it's Dorothy mentions that she is di- even if you didn't, you have passed

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Forecast for February 14-Valentines day, you mugs. Stormy, turning colder, brisk winds as local prof receives missles of war. That was you in Detroit, wasn't it?

"Pardon please," quoth Sandin. 'Do you have a bit of mascara or eyebrow pencil to deepen the hue Perusingers will present another of this bit of down?" i:r: the series of musicales Sunday, The Training School deserves a February 23', 1941. hand for backing the College win or lose, sorry we can't say the Katherine Bartling, soprano, and same for ourselves. William Fankhauser, bass, will be Wanted: Capable bridge and pithe soloists. Margery Evans and nochle players. Mac's 10 A. M. Doris Brinson will accompany to 5 P. M. Auction or contract, sinthem. gle or double deck. Solitaire may be played on request. The girls small group of Talmage 'Tis a pity the rest of the faculHigh School under the direction of Ralph Chatelain, who is a Peru ty aren't "given" budget tickets. There is always such a paltry repalumnus, will also appear, as will resentation of them at every game. the Peru chorus directed by Prof. Several mistook that balmy day G. Holt Steck. for spring and now wear headgear to shield their exposed scalps from frost.

The 40 egg "Great Cake" recipe of Martha Washington, will be feaHUBERT HUNZEKER, mat. '38, tured at the Kappa , Omicron Phi has enlisted in the navy. Hubert tea on February 27. Mary E. Colwas a member of the dance band lin will be in charge. 8,nd attended schocl the first semester of this year. At the business meeting on February 3, Josephine Boosinger was MR. and MRS. MERLE STONEchosen to represent the organrnaMAN live at 864 Ardmore Ave. in tion on the inter-fraternity banAkron, Ohio. Mr. Stoneman teachquet committee. es there. They have two children, Dean and Anne. Mrs. Stoneman, nee Lucille Irwin, is a Peru alumnus and a niece of Miss Anna Irwin, formely a member of the Peru faculty. LANNING ANDREWS, a former Peruvian, is at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, .where he is employed as a government engineer. His home was formerly at Auburn.

ICAT CLAW]

ward for the entire gang but there were twenty in the gang so we set out to find the missing rustler We had to return empty-handed though. As we couldn't collect the reward on part of the gang we dropped the other nineteen rust-

enough to shIVer anyone s ttm ers m t IS zero atmosp ere. eretta, "Love Pirates of Hawaii" on w a new c1asses mvo1ve. . k D' F h' A H' I II Feb. 16. She teaches kindergarten My newest involvement concerns lers into a ravine. But you can ,t 11c , 1ctator as ion. It er or an . and grade school music at Hill Duce would be gunned for if they attempted to force socks . sub-zero weather, down to the an kl es or below the knee m but let Dame .Fashion just so much as suggest the idea and she carries .every state in the union below and above the Mason-Dixon line. Despite the fact that campus socks are obviously designed for those. svelte, celestial figures that flow through the fashion shows and bear little relation to the average fe. male leg, the coed must wear them and freeze if fashion dictates.

an assignment for the Pedagogian. "That's funny," I said, "I threw Consequently, at this point let me over ten. Did you just drop over She says, "I'm really busy with relate the story of how Slur and I ni'ne?" the operetta. We have a tap danc- happened to come to Peru. ing class after school with which "Nope," replied Slur, "there I help. Beside this I give piano, Slur and I were out on the were ten in my pile." western front, counting our own clarinet, saxophone and drum les"Mighty poor counting on our sons." Dorothy is a sister of Jack c'ows. We weren't scared of the rustlers and I guess they weren't part," I said, "guess we ought to Snider, a freshman scared of us for one night they go to college and get educated." MRS. T. c. YOUNG, nee Ruby tried to make off with our cows. "So here we are." Damme, has accepted the position of general secretary of the YWCA The fight was a gory affair so Forgot to add that we lassoed the at Hastings. She was at one time in I'll skip it and get to the place bodies from the ravine and colthe physical 1education department where we counted the carcasc;es- lected the reward from the sherat Peru. She is very active in civic of the rustlers. Slur had ten in his iff. How else do you think we'd projects at Hastings. pile, I had nine. There was a re- pay our way through college!

City, Kansas.


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1941

PAGE THREE

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

Cats• Lose Overtime Thriller to Doane 52-49

1 Weber and Belka l Caterwaul I Sports Of Yesteryear i Peru Prep Blasts Rack Up 44 Points •BY RALPH LOCKE By Erna Steffen Tecumseh 44-32 ..... For Invaders • By Erna Steffen When anyone sparks a conversa• Coach Harold Fisher's Bobkittion concerning Peru's fine coachONE YEAR AGO Walker Out With Flu tens made it two in a row with a ing staff, the chatter will invarconvincing 44-32 victory over Coach Halladay and Walker led the )ably shift toward the personage of • Hatcher's Tecumseh Indians here The Bobcats cf Peru went down the popular Art Jones. Some know Wheelermen to a 61-35 win over I

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SPORTS Wh eeIermen Engage Th ree State Tearns This Week

fighting every inch of the way Friday night as they lost an overtime game to the Doane Tigers 52-49 on the local maples. Peru relinquished an early lead, and were forced to trail the raging Tigers until the closing seconds. All through the first hal; the scor;ng was run even, with Doane picking up a few to commarid a 24-18 lead at intermission. in

I~r~~~. l~~ ~~f ;;~:;e ~~~e~e~~~

whe:·e he came from, what he has accompli1hed, to what school he went and other important facts about him-others .do not. For. their information I have glean.ct from various sources the following information. Jones has as his home town, Avoca, Nebr., from where he left high school for the University of Nebraska. There he proved that dynamite comes in. small packages when he lettered on the wresting squad in major competition. Jones left the University and returned to Avoca, to guide the Avoca High School team through a fifteen game ceason with only one loss. The next stop for Jones was Elk Creek, where he proceeded to prove that his previous record was no fluke. His teams at Elk Creek went far in the State Tournament three years in a row, and one year they came through all the way, and copped the Class B crown .. Nebraska City was • the following step for the rapidly rising sports mentor, and his work there speaks for itself. Peru College had an opening for a fellow with such promise, and Jones landed the job.

who poured point after point through the hoop. They had a ten · pomt lead with 4 mmutes to go, when Peru came through on baskets by Hannah, Pascal and McIntire along with. a few gift tosses to pull up to within two points of It's into the stretch for the Bo~­ Doane. Then with the gong ready cats this week as they drive int0 to rnund Hannah cut loose \V:ith a three games that will prove their one-handed shot from the side to fett1e for the crucial contests comknot the score. In the five-minute ing up in the latter part of Febrovertime, Doane connected with a ary. pair of long ones to get a lead that This week they meet Wesleyan, they managed to hold until the Kearney and York in that order. final whistle. Wesleyan visits Peru tonight to seek Failure to nit from the penalty revenge for a previous loss in Linstripe and wild passing in the first coln. The Bobcats will have their half cost the Bobcats a victory. hands full, as the Meth.odists have For them i\lcintire, Hannah and a potential powerhouse in their Pascal shone, as Weber and Belka Here in Cat Camp, he has coniineup, and are not to be treated captured the spotlight for Doane. sistently proved himself worthy of lightly. Weber lead the scoring parade with his position. as he and his staffOn Friday night the Wheelermen 25 points followed by Mcintire with mate Wheeler pushed the Bobcats take to the road, and venture into 22 ·and Belka with 19. in for championships as fast as the Antelope fold at Kearney. They they were open for the winning. have downed the Antelopes once Box Score: pf One of his personal ventures in this year, but only by a small mar- Peru fg ft gin. The Kearney outfit is much Snider. f 2 campus activities is the intramural 1 0 tougher on their home grounds Grubaugh, f 4 program. His director, Walter Hu1 3 2 ber. is very much enthused over it, and the game is the key to further Hannah, c 4 0 and thinks that it is a great imhopes of capturing the NIAA flag Iv;cintire, g 8 3 provement over those of other for the Cats. The boys will . be Pascal, g called on •o give their best to stay Beyers, g 0 1 1 years. in the race with Chadron and White, f 0 He lists as one or his hobbies, 0 1 Wayne. Williams, 0 0 0 his study of the bleachers' reactions Saturday night the Bobcats will S. Handley, f O to the various phases of sports. Of 0 0 stop in at York to take on the sur- W. Handley, f 0 0 his son, he blurts, "Little tackle prise package of the NCAC Con- Hiatt, c 1 1 nothing, he's gonna be a fullback." 0 ference. York has been going great Totals 20 8 17 i 1 i guns in their league, and is very Doane pf fg ft dangerous. Peru wilt need this Grosscup, f 0 2 game to keep at the top 'of the Weber, f 11 3 State league scramble, and the Belka, c 7 5 Panthers will be ,out to stop the Lidolph, g 0 0 Cats for the first time in several Gilliland, g 1 1 2 seasons. Bailey, f 0 0 0 Coach Jack Floyd's undefeated These three games are vital to Niehart, g 0 0 3 Bulldogs were forced the limit to the Peru team, and should they Loetterle, c 0 0 0 edge out a 2 point victory over the win all three they will find them- Juarez, g 0 0 0 Bobkittens. The battle was staged selves very much back in the race Petering, g 0 0 1 on Bratton Union's court. As in the previous game, when for both State and NIAA honors, 21 16 Totals 10 Bratton Union nudged the Bobafter their recent setback at the Officials-Backes and Voltz. kittens 24 to 22 in an overtime hands of the Wayne Wildcats.

; Kittens Drop Close· One ! To Bratton Union 18-16

Peril

Bob~at

Friday afternoon. The prepsters built up an early lead that they kept adding to all through the contest, as they garnered an easy win. Smith, Rogers and Clements led a basket barrage that the invading Indians could not match, although Piersol fired an attack that failed repeatedly as the Hatchermen moved in to pay territory. High scorers TWO YEARS AGO Clements, Smith and Rogers starThe Peru quint rolled over Kear- red for the victors as Piersol and ney 52-44 to pile up their 13th Tucker stood out for Tecumseh. stright win as they moved on in Box Score: conquest of NIAA and State chamft pf fg Peru Prep pionships. 4 1 Slinker, f 2 2 Cotton, f 0 4 Rogers, f FIVE YEARS AGO 0 1 6 Smith, c 0 l 3 Redfern, c McCormick and Dean led the 0 1 0 Ogg, g Peru assault as the Bobcats earned 0 2 4 Clements, g a pair of victories over Doane and 0 0 0 DeVore, g Kearney by the respective scores 0 0 1 Brown, g of 25-15 and 34-23. 2 11 22 Totals ft pf fg Tecumseh 1 0 1 Grell, f TEN YEARS AGO 0 0 0 Powell, f 4 4 0 The protegees of Coach Dutch Piersol. c 0 0 1 Lorbeer pushed Peru into the lead Kerth, c 2· 2 in the NIAA circuit with a victory Osterthun, g 2 0 4 orer Kearney by a score of 35-26. Tucker, g @ 1 0 Earlier in the week they measured Geiser, g 0 2 0 the Omaha Indians for a 22-12 vic- Carmen, g 0 0 Johnson, f tory.

the Haskell Indians. Peru garnered 10 points in the opening minutes of the game before the Indians counted, and in the initial plays of the second half they had eight more before Haskell could drop in a counter. The reserves played most of the final period.

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Totals period, the Bu1ldogs were forced to pull the game out of the fire in the final seconds of the game.

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Fishermen Wallop Bluejays 28-16

Although handicapped by the Bulldogs' small court, Peru commanded a .9 to 3 halftime lead. They were, however, unable to pro0 tect their 6 point margin. When the final gun sounded, the Bobkittens Playing their second game in as were on the short end of an 18 to many days, Coach Harold Fisher's 16 count. Bobkittens came seeking revenge Rogers and Clements were the for the setback handed them by big guns for the Kittens, while Bratton Union. They found their Leech and Miller led the way for revenge, when they smothered the Rock Port Bluejays 28 to 16. the Bulldogs. This game was a preliminary toi i i the Culver-Stockton-Peru Bobcat game. The first half was sluggish, with neither team able to hit a good per cent of its shots. The lead changed hands many times, and neither team was able to command more than a 3 point lead. Prep left the floor at the half with a 11 to 8 margin. During the second half, the Kittens found their basket eye, and Peru had a team in the first half began bombarding the hoop from last Wednesday night that looked all angles. When the bell sounded, like the Bobcats of old as they the Bobkittens left the court with surprised even Coach Al himself another victory tucked beneath as they eked out a thrilling 26-25 their belt. Feighner and Slack led the atwin over a fast-stepping CulverStockton team on the local maples. tack for Rock Port, while Smith, Slinker and Clements were the In the first half the Bobcats Prep mainstays. were five combined whirlwinds as they swept through the MissourBox Score: fg ft f tp ians' defense for basket after bas- Rock Port 2 3 1 7 ket to pile up a halftime lead of Fieighner, f 1 0 1 23-12. ec Walker and Mcntire Crane, f 0 4 1 4 lead the scoring rush as Cec shot Slack, g 1 1 0 3 the short ones, with Mac pouring Andermann, g 0 0 4 0 them in from out court. Boettner, c 0 0 Kimbrough, f The 1ast stanza was a different Sweeten, g 0 0 0 story, however, as the Wheelermen Peru fg ft tp bogged down and were limited to Rogers, f 1 0 4 2 three points. A one-handed shot Slinker, f 0 6 by Snider in the waning moments Ogg, c 0 2 was all that saved the Oats as the Clements, g 4 4 6 clever Culver-Stockton boys fin- Brown, g 0 0 0 ished strong to throw a last min- Redfern, g 0 ute scare intc the Peru outfit. Cotton, f 2 0 4 The Bobcats defense pulled them S1nith g 0 6 through thoug·h, and they held off Devore, g 0 0 the attackers well enough to claim 12 4 15 23 Totals the spoils.

Bobcats Edge Out Culver-Stockton Team 26-25 •

Cage Squad For 1940-41 Basketball Season

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1941

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE FOUR.

Dean Jimerson ··-- tssence

of Democracy

Talks at Convo

Peruvian Pictures Taken of C. C. A.

j Peru Senior

Jo Kelly and Helen Wyiie led the discussion at C. C. A. of the fundamental parts of the mass. Pictures for the Peruvian were considered. Vera Custard will have charge (Continued from Page One) of the next meeting on Tuesday, written last year on the same sub- February 18. 'iect. While looking through the i i ( Patronize Ped advertisers. magazines, I found articles written by Dr. Bradford and Mr. Benford." As a backgound for the composition, Ruth used her ten years of 4-H work. After summarizing her · four years of education at Peru State, she used as her main theme, her major field, Home Economics. She gave these main reasons for looking forward to teaching: (using Ruth's own words) "I want to teach my pupis practical material. I want to teach them the things which will help them get the most out of life."

Writes Rrtide

• Parliameptary Law Is Topic Discussed • Parliamentary procedme was the

subject of a discussion led by Dean J. ·A. Jimerrnn at convocation -0n Feb. 7. With assistance of students a brief <;lemonstration of the principal .types of motions was presented. · In introducing Dean. Jimerson, Pres. W. R. Pate stated that he considered knowledge of parliamentary procedure one of the most important things that a stu· dent could learn. He recalled that· i i i Prof. F. M. Gregg, author of the manual "Parliamentary Law," con·Fern Palmtag was chosen sports ducted a class of parliamentary leader for volley ball at a meeting law in Peru a number of years of W. A. A. on February 3. ago and that students of Professor Phyllis Benson, president, apGregg had later taught principles pointed Eldna Mae Petersen, Faye of parliamentary procedure in Bouse, Margaret Gardner and Wilmany high schools of the state. . . da Goings as a committee to nomWhen asked in an interview as inate new officers for next year. to the origin of his interest in the ~~LgJX~[gjgillTW§:gJ[g)[gJ~.;;».m~rnnB1w~f"[IBJ~1 study of parliamentary law, Dean Members discussed plans for a Jimerson stated that he had been ~ FOR SATISFACTION IN ~ birthday party at the W. A. A. ~ ~ in Prof. Gregg's parliamentary law cabin sometime in March. Each ~ FOODS ~ class at Peru. His interest in parmember will take a gift which can ~ liamentary law was further increasbe used in the cabin. ed when he served as parliamenMARDIS GROCERY i i i tarian for the Nebraska State :<hli!:~~:g}[g]gj!ll§llJ@m[§(g@ljj[glID'llJ[!l]1jj Teachers Association. Tarkio to Sponsor He was drafted as parliamenMusic Festival tarian for the associatio:o. when a bitter contest grew out of an atThe training school plans to entempt on the part of some of the ter soloists and small groups in members to abolish the office of the Tarkio College music festival to Treasurer and combine it with the be held during the firct part of Secretary's office. Friends of the Boy Scouts through!lut the ~ountry. celebrate the 31st anniver• April. incumbent of the Treasurer's of- sary Qf the movement m America durmg the '!eek of Feb. 7·13. In commenting on foe festinl. fice, skilled in parliamentary pro- While· the slogan on the poste~ above emphasizes,, the fact t~at Supt. S. L.. Clements said, "We feel . cedure, stalled the convention and "Scouting strengthens and invigorates democracy all America, that we can benefit from the exprevented action of aiw kind for agrees that Scout membership is in itself the essence of democracy,; perience of public appearance be11everal hours. Dean Jimerson was unanimously selected"as parliamen- .----~--------------'--------- fore we enter the district contest in Auburn." tarian for the session. In a short T. Alumni to Play. i i i time the business of the assoclaAt Peru-Brock Game tion proceeded. , Infinite toil would not enable A training school alumnus band you to sweep away a mist; but by Dean Jimerson believes that a fa- • will be featured at. the Peru vs accending a little you may often mmarity with simple parliameatary rules should be a part of the Brock basketball game on Feb. 17, look over it altogether. So it is equipment of e,·~ry member of a· Mary Elizabeth Collin was. elect- at 8 P. M. Twenty-eight prep band with our moral improvement; we wrestle fiercely with a vicious habcommunity. Particularly is this. ed president of the Art club at alumni will play. This will also lie parents' night. it, which would have no hold upon true in regard to teachers and the meeting held on February 3. school administrators who are call- The new president, who held this If parents come together, admis- us if we ascended into a higher ed upon so often to assume posi- office formerly, was chosen to fill sion will be 30 cents, but if they moral atmosphere.--Sir Arthur tions of responsibility in civic and the vacancy left by Margaret come i°ndividually, the regular price Helps. iJ 90t m UJ>eriment. For 22 years professional organizations. Meier. will be charged for each. Admiswe hne bwl iii business in Lincola, He expressed a willingness to as~ sion for high school students will After the business meeting Mary Nebr. We !me placed many thoasist students on campus whenever be 15 cents. THE REXALL sa11ds of teachen:. We hne the exit was felt his advice and assist- Elizabeth Collin presented a dem- The baton twirlers will drill at BEAUTY SHOPPE perience. We have the hook-ups. onstration of etching. ance would be helpful. the half-time intermission. We can serve you better now than at ner before. Ask your school friends. i i i " .( i Write today for literahrre. BARNES

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Co11·1n Chosen n Mrt.. Cl nb·Head

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Grover Railsback Wins Ping Pong Tournament

PHARMACY Careful, Complete Competent Service

Final results of the training school ping pong tournament. show. Grover Railsback as winner of the elementary division and Stanley Cameron at the head of., the junior high division. Robert Walker, finalist of the senior high division has been ill; and resuits for this division have not been ·announced. Wavering between the AIIAmerican ferward and the potential pillar of the scientific world in selecting your 1941 representative students? Looks now as if you'll have time to even consider his table manners, for Judgment Day isn't until Monday, February 17. so keep an eye open, and come to convo with your thinking cap on!

Ruth Ludington, who was grad· uated at the close of the first semester, is now teacJ:iing the first grade at Nebraska City. i

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The Y. M. C. A. will elect officers at its regular meeting tonight, February 11. All men who are interested are invited to attend,

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Call No. 3 for appointment or drop in any time

THEATRE

(Auburn, Nebraska) CONTINUOUS SHOWS EVERY DAY

CENTRAL OFFICE: 17 NORTH MAIN ST.

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With

Lane Sisters

I

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{Auburn, Nebraska) SUN. • MON. • TUES.-FEBRUARY 16, 17, 18 "TRAIL OF THE VIGILANTES"

With Franchot Tone

Peggy Moran


(2)

Library ,

. .S~~d~~~ l

Speaks

1

By Tod Hubbell

Among

authorities

today

:be 'an

almost

there seems to

unanimous a:greement as to

the vulnerable spot of Amer·

20

ican defense. The

nations

tO the south of us which bear th~ name of South ·America :mdoubtedly

is

our

spot., These

nation~

weak

look upon

us as the "Colossus of the North." Many of these

~a­

tions feel a somewhat strong.

er tie to Germany, both political and economic.

In

some • o( the schools German IS. taught and spoken as the Ian· guage. Several of the various !J!.ilitary forces. axe patterned after German tactics. Extensive barter agreements have existed with the Nazi prior to the war which re· suited in Germany becoming the top trading nation. One thud

of

the population

VOLUME XXXVI.

'Tl:>:y, Fiddle, Play," by Deutsch wa& Prof. Victor H. Jindra's theme song when he played a series of ;-iolin selections at convocation on F'ebruary 14, with Prof. R. T. Benior<l at the pian,o. 'Il;e, program included "Memories" by ezerwonky, and "Intermezzo" by Provost. As an encore, Mr. Jindra•., played "From the Gan€ brake" by Gardner. "It wasn't Mozart and Bach/' Mi. Jindra stated. "The program wao made up of informal music like, that, heard on the radio." f

in

1

f

"Prologue to Glory" Germany To Be Reviewed

ian descent, and short wave from

have been offered these na· tions.

"Prologue to Glory'.' by Peru's E. F. Conkle will be reviewed by Mro: w. W. :Barnes Wednesday, February i9, 4 p. Ill· at the College If one examines Hitler's Library. methods of invasion they will 'Thi& play, discussed as .a possitillty for the Pulitzer Pnze, was find & three-fold plan-econ- ~ tlected bY Burns Mantle as one c,mic, political, a:Qd military._ cf the ten best of 1939. The life • 3£ · Lincoln before he became a qi.tier.al figure ls the subject, of • Cunkie'~ tlra:ttm. Since its success ·• . . . . . . . . • . ,,, .....•..•• jl~.••~!-a.;l'•.cQ~~kle;llas ...i:eV#Sed ··~~····Ftrst·trad1l ties nre. streng. ,,r.o added to his Lincoln story . thencd with that nation ,then ior a radio drama entitled "Honest ' . • 1~be," which may be heard each slmYlv ~ "··ctay mo_..,,. ' • but surely poht1cal .oaow •....._. pressure !s brought to bear . E. P. Coilkle is now in th'e bv means 01 some weak mt•. bpeech Department of Texas Uni• . . . ' 'trsity. nonty. This is followed by 'lownspeople and college stu~nternal sabotage, actions of a nbilts are invited to attend this fiith column and the German review sp011ll0red by A. A. U. W.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY

Jindra Plays v.w. Service Has Patriotic motif At Convo •

Brazil is of German and Italhoadcasts

PERU, NEBRASKA,

The patriotic motif was the . theme of the Y. W. C. A. service on February 11. "The Man Without a country" by Edward Everett Hale :was read ty Grace Muenchau, and Harriet Maxwell led the group in singing. After the service the cabinet Lele. a short business meeting.

18, 1941

NUMBER

15

ffiildred Pate Returns .From Japan On Advice of State Department "Sifting Sand" Issues Call for Writing

• Has Been Teaching In Kobe College •

Contributions of poetry or prose 'f f 1 Returned January 14 from Jato "Sifting Sand" will be welr an is Miss Mildred Pate, daughl'Omed, not only from members of te; of Pres. W. R. Pate. During the fraternity, but from anyone on her five month stay at Nishinimatt.e campus until the deadline, set ifa, l\~iss. Pate was a teacher at ·for March 10. Alumni are also urgIl..obe college. Ed by the president, Clara Eyre, to In an interview, Miss Pate exsena in compositions. ulai:ied: "Kobe College is a Chris• "Sifting Sand" is the bi-annual i.;on girl's college founded by the "Val," Edna Mae Petersen, en publication of Phi Alpha chapter Conpegational Church, but it is at "Tine," Phyllis Benson; Queen, r•f 5lgma Tau Delta. Sale of the thE present time controlled by the Ardis Carmine; King, Audrey Zas- rublication will begin April ~5. tera; and Newspaper Queen, Mary In "The Rectangle," the national j«par ese government. It has about Collins won the prizes for costumes i. ublication of Sigma Tau Lelta, rne thousand girls, both high at the Gamma Chi Costume Ball :tv;erEdith Jimerson and Clara ~<hoc; and college age, and about.. February 15. Fyr!> received recognition this year . l!iiiet, teachers, seven of whom:. "Val" en "Tine"' wore red and Tbeii' selections appeared L1 the arc Americans. Our work on tlll.e:·, white costumes emphasizing valen- December 1940 "Sifting Sands'' and wholE, is the teaching of English in classes of conversation, sighttine ciay by he&t shaped jackets an~ a& follows: and hats. The King and Queen ''To Venus in the Park'' by Mer- rnading, grammar and rhetoric.. wore white with red crown and edith Jimerson, and a bit Jf pros~ WE teach entirely by the direct a floor length dress of newSPapers "Over Her Shoulder" by Clara metrod using no Japanese at all. ('There is at the present time a . capes. The Newspaper Queen wore Evre. covered with i:ed hearts. • movement in Japan by certain Truth and Consequences provid'f f · f g1 oups to eliminate English frcm" ed consequences consisting of skits, tne schools, but in ·as much as if! pantonrlnes and stunts. Red heart is th_e commercial language Of the cakes and. brick ice cream decorwor!Q, they. really can't afford to ·· · · eiiiniriate it'.i · ated with .h<eaxts were served; ·

Heart Party Gives • Six Costum·e PflZeS

1

1

1

B. McAlexandeT Elected d f S h ea o op omores

H

·Bob McAlexander has been elrcteo president of the sophomore class for the second semester. : ames Sandin is vice president, E!ain~ Brier, secretary, and the ~.ev; treasurer is Carl Wirth.

Classes choose ffiay Fete Regents •

"VVe lived in modern homes with all modern conveniences. They are of American architecture, very modern, and very comfortable, except that due to the scarctty of fuel, we were not as warm as we would iike tt be. 'The buildings are made of uoment and brick, and are therefore, cold and damp, and the heat was not turned· on until December tenth. There was no particular complaint from the girls or the teachers because they are willing to do their share. toward helpmg the government in its present struggle."

Nominated. by their clas£mates fo1 May Fete regents are seniors Elrera Schacht, Kay Bartling, LeRo~, Redfern and Ernest Huegel. Ji;r,iors chose Barbara Beal, Nancy EJlrn Jones, Rex Floyd and Donald army. Already the first tvrn- - - - - - - - - - - - ' - - - - - - - - - - - - - > "Red" Dean. ·Betty "Pat" Patrick, Christine Alsteps have been efficiently gn, George Atw.ood and Harold executed. Lantz were sophomore choices, and freshmen selected Hope Carter, Virgie Lee Johnson, Melvin McKinney 0 anu Richard Pascal. Mi:>s Pate stated that she left. Students will chpo£e by popular ,1apan because things were getting vote a king and queen from this a little tense, and President Roosecontinue with the third step Marjorie Sheeley and Neil Good gi oup to reign during the spring Jean Hoagland velt had advised all Americans to frte, others will attend the monwhen he has defeated Eng- toppE·d the honor students for first v; illard Hunzeker rnturn home. She left on the "Nitarchs. land. But if by any chance semester, each with a perfect point Linn James ta Maru," December 26, and arManaged by Miss Phyllis David· f average of 3.0. John Schutz ran a Rctert James rivea in San Francisco, Jan. 9. we expect the cooperation o close second with an average of llieredith Jimerson son, the May Pete is' annually one Eht visited her sister in Corpus South America , when those 2.9. Other students receiving high oi the highlights of Peru's §Pring Virgie Lee Johnson Cristi, Texas, two weeks before reseason. clays of trial come, it will not honorf with a point average of at Nar.cy Ellen Jones l turning to Peru. . · ll ·g · g lea.Et 2.7 were as follows: Nina Kane! f 1 1 be bY con t mua In explaining how simple it was y s1 nm a "orthy Argabright Marjorie Kennedy to obtain her position in Japan, Pan-American 'treaty which Martin Bausch Virginia King Mis~ Pate said, "I went to the Inis consistently violated by ArJ0&ephine Boosinger Herbert Knutson stitute of International Education . h b . Bertha Clayburn Wilbert Kohrs gentm,a or some ot er repu • Li.mar Bray in New York City, which is not a Inez Longfellow t.eacbcrs agency, but often makes l•c. Rather this cooperation R.u 5sell Gorthey Mildred Longfellow f:rraIJgements for teachers. This v• ill come tlir.ough joint as· James Howe Rose McGinnis 'nstitute was in touch with the Ruth McDonald Jensen .~.)stance with ·these small ~a- Betty TUESDAY, FEB. 18 Kobe College Corporation, and just Frank Larson Rtth Marshall a week following my application, I t1ons. We must continue on Rotert McAlexander YMCA, YWCA, CCA . . 7-8 Harriet Maxwell J,ad the position. I wanted to go Marthabe11e Minnick wi.th the policy advocated by Doris Parrish THURSDAY, FEB. 2G m;yw!1ere, and Japan was not necBess Ray Nadine Morehead our administration. Buy their A. A. U. W. Tea .. .. .. 4-6 essu·iJy my first choice because of Honor students with a score of Grace Muenchau the dangers in that region, but it beef and other products, ex· at least 2.2 were as follows: Freshman Clubs . . . . . . . . 7-9 Althea Nispel seemed to be the only opportunRuth Adamson M<:rjorie Nisp l tend them loans, present FRIDAY, FEB. 20 ity. I took it, and I do not regret F ar,ny Alberts Ros~ Organ ~hort wave broadcast&, let Dawson High School · Here i1 in any way. They are without Dorothy Armstrong Richard Pascal doubt; the five most interesting and them know we are not the Maurice Anderson LeRoy Redfern f :here · rxciti.ng months I have spent in Barbara Beal Mary Olive Richardson bogey Qf the north. 2 m~ life." Phyllis Benson Ross Russell Separate Convocation . 10: 00 M;ss Pate· is scheduled to give Rebert Bland Evelyn Slagle Scholarship Club ...... 7-S I more detailed accounts of her exJean Bond · Jeanne Spier Now is our chance to of· Faye Bouse Future Teachers of Ruth Stoneman 'I periences later at a convocation progr::;m. America .............. 7-8 Maryon Thomas :\:et these people our friend· Wayne Burmann 'Thomas Dean .Pi Omega Pi .. .. .. .. .. 8-9 Lois Wagoner 1 f 1 f,hip. Germany is temporar· Vincent Dreeszen Rachel Wieneke i.-----~------' Miss Mary Hileman is expected ily cut off from the western Lloyd Dunlap Edith Willey - - - - - - - · - - - - - - l'.ome soon from the St. Mary's Margery Evans Mary Winkler hemisphere and the time is l.·ospital at Nebraska City. Miss Norman Flau Carl Wirth vast semester according to records, hilcman received a c0mpound ripe for friendly penetration Carolee Garver The number of students receiv- compares very favorably with the !! acture of the ankle in a fall a into South America. Clifford Harding ing honors and . high honors this i:umber in previous semesters. few weeks ago.

ffiarjorie Sheeley, neil Good Lead as!u~:t ~h:~yi~i~:; e:~~ Honors Class With 3.0 Average •

f"t-·-·-·-·-----·----., I

Calendar •

0

Wayn~0~~~;,· ~~.·

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PAGE TWO.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

Published Weekly by Th-e Peru State Teachers College Peru, Nebraska

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY

18, 1941

]!tail]

MiSs F. Haruey Receives Letter 1tllu.mni F~om Former Stu,~:~:~~.:~~!~~~ B, a"'' Mumh"

l

RUTH LUDINGTON, who re· ceiv£d her degree at the end of Entered at the Postoffice at Peru, Nebraska, as Second tht first semester, was elected to Class Matter. $1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc teach the first grade in the Ne· br&.ska City Schools. She began work there February 5. Ruth was . .. . active in Kappa Delta Pi and Rose McGmms · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Edttor 1arlJ Elementary club. Maryon Thoma~ ........... : ............ Make-up Editor DAYID ZIERS and Jewell Cald· well were married February 4 in Ralph Locke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sports Editor i..,incoln. Dave attended Peru in Harold Jenkins ......................· Ass't. Sports Editor '.D38-39 and is attending the Uni· 1 e1sity of Nebraska at present. Meredith Jimerson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Copy Reader Nina Kane! ........................ '. ....... Proof Reader re1ghborly arrangements of berths Ftorees1KcbapSeyarigaan1·nfowrcheesn, oFn1l·yar:tco htoav,e Ar,r.ouncement has been made of and rn forth aboard, I guess you • e o,c the marriage of MARJORIE HULL M. Florence Martin ................ , ............. Adviser were just thankful tp get back' th€ count. More evasions and dis- to \Valter Zink. They were married an;1how, broke or not. One gathers guises, and a wild chain of zig- October 12, Marjorie was graduat· REPORTERS: Murvel Annan, James · Busenbarrick, it was 'not' from the formidable zag dodgmg from Egypt to Cyprus eel at the end of the first semester Maude Daft, W.illiam Fankhauser, Marjorie Kennedy, Carol llst of things you contrived to pack and thence to Malta, and then, l<.st year. She was Peru May in during that hectic stay in the chased by Italian submarines up Queen in 1939. Marjorie has been Prine, Erna Steffen, Pauline Stark, Harold Jenkins, Janet East to I/Iarseilles and finally out past teaching commerce at Douglas. Mr. Gibrnlter in a fruit-boat and so at anc Mrs. Zink will live in Sterling Harris. ' Let me send you all the best last to Liverpool. Ii here he is employed. wishes for Christmas and for a "Now they live only to attack Puuvian visitors on campus last ---------------~---,---·------Nm Year full of happy days untroubled by the grim spectres that German planes-they are coldly cer- week end include ALLAN WITTE, "WHAT PRICE GLORY"a1e haunting this side of the At- taiD that they will be killed at DALTON GOERKE, WENDELL lantie.. With Roosevelt (I can't tht job, but they don't care. It was hU'ICHINSON, EULA REDEN· Do not labor under. the childhood delusion that Abra· recollect whether he still uses the extraordinary to hear them talk BAUGH, GERALDINE BURNS. Dutch way of spelling it) once about things-such boys, and yet MR~. E. P. CONKLE and MRS. ham Lin001n's greatness was ~ result of his rail splitting mort at the White House, and witb such searing experiences. ORVAL GARST visited in Peru the election fever subsiding, pre- Y;iii;, they were transferred three l&st week. Mrs. Conkle. was form· ability. The fact is the man of February 12 be-came great sum~bly the perspective of things week~ ago to Blackpool, we hoped rrly Virginia McNeal, president of will lengthen out a bit more and they would have three or four days Kappa Delta Pi and Mrs. Garst because he was the• kind of ,man who chose to split rails your people will be able to see leave for Christmas, . but this week Ii ao formerly Belva Carte«. They more clearly how they stand with they wrote and said they have were roommates for four years onlJ 24 hours, so they can't come. i;;h!le attending college at Peru. when there was nothing else to do rather than idle his rrgarci to Europe. We are very sorry-they have lost Mi. Conkle is head of the drama· "We manage fairly well," conall their own people and we'd have tic department in a Texas college. time- .away. t in es the writer, "and though last likec. to give them a friendly A serial of his, "Honest Abe," is night and tonight are black as home to come to. However, we've heara on Saturday morning from Egyi;t's night we aren't grousing, While the modern individual may feel that he should fc1 Jerry is overhead in consider- &ent today a hamper of eats and 8 :~0-9:00 over KOIL. He i~ a formsmokes to console them, and are er Peruvian and honorary member " t!e numbers and he surely can't have no more than an 8 hour day and a 5 day week, Abe seE much of Hereford, even if he h0pm5 that the Chaplain at Cre- o:l s;gma Tau Delta. crnhill may send us another couwanted to. The siren sounded last C. W. GRANDY, a former Peru· Lincoln's full scheduled day was followed by hours of study night, but I haven't heard it to- ple of their compatriots to depu- vian, wrote an article on "Teacher tise tor them for Christmas Day. night so we go on just as usual. Contracts" which appeared in the by the flickeTing light of a pine . knot. He was to prepare "I simply don't know what to I've asked one English soldier as last issue of the Nebraska State well, so if all goes well we should :en you by way of news-there ishave quite a social and interestc Mucations.1 Journal. Grandy is for something better in the futurt. r 't "ny that is of general interest l':upe1 intendent of Schools at Mir· ine afternoon and evening. that your own wireless won't give 1orc.J, Nebr. "1 don't know whether our two JOHN NEMAN is the new prinWhether "rail splhting" is the best thing to tackle, is you hot from the oven, and of othe1 sorts there is singularly lit- were typical Poles, but their man- c1pa'. at Minden, Nebraska. MAX· Lers were beautiful-.something a question for each to decide for himsdf. Those who have ti£. H. T. C. goes on its way as !NE GALBRAITH is head of the placidly as usual, occasionally tak- quite un-English in their elabor- c~mmerce department there. ate courtesy; a rnrt of 18th c.en ~ . the ambition, the errergy, the Jorce of character that Lincoln ing z vacation night in the cellar MRS, E. P. CONKLE (Vlrginia anc looking like nothing on earth turr grace about them, and yet llici!leal, '32) and daughter, Elene, they were full of high spirits and next day in lectures, but fortun· .had will do ,the thing that needs doing most. cf Austin, Texas, were visitors on etely that has happened very few fun ihE campus Febrnary 12. Mrs. Contimes. I go to bed as usual, prefer-· "Chaplin's film "The Dictator" is klf 'c husband, who is the ~uthor of Martin Luther studied to be a lawyer. But it happened rmg to peri:h between warm blan- commg on January 13th to the the play "Prologue to Glory" and kets with a hot-water bottle prop- Odeon," the writer concludes, "so that as he and his' best friend were walking once, a storm e.i;, adjusted, rather than with we are counting the days till its is a former Peruvian. c'.'l: l' t.!'ing teeth in the garden, showing. It is creating a furore in She was accompanied by MRS. -overtook them, the friend at Luther's side was struck by these December nights. Tcwn, evidently they broadcast OR-VAL GARST (Belva Carder, "We had hoped to have had l'iti of it from one of the thea- \· 2) and son, Dickie, of Watson. lightning and instantly killed. Then LutheT resolved to twc rather interesting visitors for treo the other night, and the gales MISS REVA WALBRID::XE, mat. Chri5tmas-two of the Polish pi- of laughter that came sweeping '35, a:id RALPH KENNETH SEW·make his life count. loto whom we had been introduced over the mike quite drowned the ARD, mat. '37, were marrieu Feb to &.nd asked to befriend while d1a1ogue and set us laughlng too." ruary 9 at Falls City. KEITH THORNliURG, mat. 39, Alexander Campbell was no different from other men is stationed with the air corps at Fensacola, Fla. who had for his ambition the gaining of material wealth. At a musicale given by Mrs. Dv.lght Griswold at the g,; •ernor's Then on one occasion, he< was on the sea, a storm ship· nansion, ERNEST ULMER, mat. ·n. recently played a pia.10 wlo ·wrecked the vessel. Campbell crawled upon the wreckage f;1d accompanied Cleve Gcnzlmg. Wayne Filmer and Miss Ruth H soloist. ~and meditated. The result was that he gave the rest of his Prof. V. H. Jindra was guest ton- Mrrrshall, seniors in the Peru State MISS MILLICENT ORME beette demonstrator and supervisor at Teachers College, were married came the bride of Harold Gregory )ife to the service of humanity. the Pawnee County Rural School September 16, 1940, at Hiawatha, Busacker of Brock at St. Mary's '1 eachers Institute at Pawnee City Kans. Mrs. Filmer is the daughter church in Nebraska City, February When Jane Addams left college she was in such poor February 8. Mr. Jindra helped or- of Mr. and Mrs. R. D. MarsnaE of 11. The bride is a graduate of r:.eaver City and Mr. Filmer is the Peru and Mr. Busacker is a grad· health that physicians told her she could not live more than ganize and make selections to be son of Mr. and Mrs. c. A. Filmer uate of the University of' Nebras· uoca in future programs. of Peru · ka. They will live in St. Louis. six months. Immediately she resolved to take that six months Miss Mary Clark, Pawnee county Mn;. Filmer is a graduate of the t t t superintendent, sponsored the in- Brnv£r City high school and Mr. Prof. G. Holt Steck has been ill and get as near as she could to the one thing she wanted to stitute. l"ilmer of the Peru hlgh school. with the flu. He will receive hls A. B. degree The musicale scheduled for Sundo for humanity. Can anyone doubt that Miss Addam's long ~ t t ilorn Peru in May. After gradc..a~, February 16, at 4 p. m., will uation Mr. Filmer plans to teach Fanny Alberts to Head years of usefulness were due to the same spirit of determin- re given February 23, due to the commerce. Elementary Club Mrs. Filmer has returned to illneso of Prof. G. Holt Steck. ation that characterized the immortal Lincoln, or the immo· Beaver City where she will be em-( ~ ( Marjorie Wischmeier is in the ployed. vable Luther, or the persevering Campbell? Fannie Alberts was elected presiLutheran hospital at Beatrice re· t t t Judge at the Tarkio Music Festi- dent of the Early Elementary The obstacles Lincoln· was forced to overcome, and covering from pneumonia. Mjrs. val March 7 will be Prof. R. T. Ciub to fill the vacancy left by h1arsr" reports that Marjorie plans Benford. He will judge piano and Ruth Clare. Gertrude Nicholson the privations he had to endure, served to develop in him to re-enter school the fourth quar- ali vocal solos and group events. v ili take over the reins of Ruth tet. This will be Mr. Benford's second Luci.ington, former .vice president. year of judging at this contest. The program of the evening was the qualities of greatness. He thrived on adversity. t t t The Peruvian staff, Harold Dalin charge of Delphlne Bucher. Har· t ~ t lam, LeRoy Redfern, Dean Karr Mrs. Whitten, one of the house- riette Greedy will have charge of ' Bear up! Perhaps your difficulties, like those which :me: Horace Rzehak, were in Oma- ke(pers at the girls' dormitory is tl1e meeting next month. Follow· ha Saturday soliciting advertising mwly recovering from pneumonia. i!,g the program, refreshments Lincoln experienced, are preparing you for greatness. for th~ college year book. \I ere served. t t f New& from Hereford, England, cmtained in a letter to Miss Frauces Harvey from one of her former pupils. 11";:;.s Harvey made the acquaintance, of the English teacher when shE taught last year in the Herelore.: Teachers College. The letter begin2: "Trank goodness that you DID r;et safely back-it looks as 'if you only just went in time, so despite alj the inconveniences of such wa~

very much, and despite their limited command of English vocabulary, they managed to tell us a lot about themselves. Their stories were tragic, and thrilling beyond bellef. They had both escaped in tbeiJ respective planes when Polan,a went d@wn, and got, one into Hui;gary, the other into Rumania, and then after a nightmare series of adventures and disguises by sea &.nd land had met each other again in Beyrout and joined the

Jindra Demonstrates at Filmer, ffiarshall Reveal Tonette Qrganizat1on • • September nuptials


--_-::::..-=:;.:;::::;,

Slinker Gets Winning .Shot

• Slinker's one-handed push shot, rarly in 1the second overtime, gave the Bobkittens a 27 to 25 verdict r·V(l a fast Talmage five. Tlic batrle took place . Tuesday £vemng on: the Talmage maples. At the end of a defensive first hall, Prep 'commanded a 9 to 8 1eaci. The third period was all Pe;:u, 1:.ut Talm.age came back in the fi1. ai quarter to deadlock the count at 25 all. Du"ring the first overtime period, 1.either team was able to score. 'Iher> Slinker dunked in the. two point~ that won the game for the Fishnmen. Talmadge's Snyder lead the scoring parade with 14 points, while Cotton lend the Kittens with 8. Hi.;nzeker played a good defencive game for the Bobkittens. · j:1: the opener, the '.Peru Seconds ;aade it a double victory, when they dumped the Talmage Reren e~ 20 to 10.

.. SP0 RT.·S Cats· Pin· nlAA .Title Hopes on Wayne tngagement '

• "De or d!e" will be the· watch-

PAGE THRHH

Bobcats Double Score OnPlainsfllen 50-25 Fishermen Claim 27-25 Win Over Talmage In Two Overtime Periods

·

.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1941

,1 1

I

1rn Caterwa UI • BY RALPH LOCKE

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. Arguments fly thick and fast when the subject of subsidization c1 athletes is brought forwar~. Sports-minded people, . in their comersation, ,will mvanably brmg up this topic for its periodical dusting off. Being more or less of a dubious character, there is uothir;g J enjoy more than a good spirited argument. This week I wili waste a half-galley of type nnd space defending the practice, and next week I will invite the Lrst person who opens their head in objection, to be guest wnter 101 this column and attack the r.ractice of subsidization. Ar I look at it, subsidization of a;,hletes is to be found m even the smallest of high schools that sponsor sports as one of their school activities. coaches fin<;. it quite advantageous to produce wmning teams, and the best and practically the only way to provide 101 a winning congregation of athides is to get out and get some

invite anvone to look at the ct11e1 schools enrollment records. "York is an example, as is Weleyan For three years their teams have been beaten soundly and repeated1,. Every one of those years has left itb mark on th·? registration f!gu1es. Now is there anyone whr lloes not think that a winning team o'r teams is not essential to the success of a school in this sports-minded nation of ours. And sport~-minded we should be-in other nations people take up arms ana fight a war or two to wear off their thirst for excitement-In Amerfca people satisfy their craving foi combat by participating or wituessing sports. The only answer to tlie problem is to find a better wav of putting out good teams without good athletes. After all isn't it only fair to give the fellow who puts in a large part of his him working for the school on the practice field and on the field of action to give him the greatest &mount of consideration? I think it is only just. However, I realize that there are many who do not reason as I do, and I will be glad to have a volunteer steo up and have his say next week. •

Inl RH muHHl

• d fficlntire an White TOSS

In 27 Points for

Winning Cats • The Wesleyan Plainsmen were no match for the Bobcats Tuesday mght as they fell by a score o! 50-25. The game was Peru all the 'Way, and at no time after t,h:e op· rning minutes were the Cats tl-.ri:atened. The Peru attack led by Mcintire, White and Grubaugh functioned smoothly throughout the first half to pile up a 31-15 halftime lead. Or· the defense, Hannah and McIntire and Pascal were ha1d boys to ge.t around as they 3quelched threat after threat. Hannah was intomparable as he used hiS t eight to reach up and bat down sho~s repeatedly. His work was very valuable, and more than ever J-,if presence in the lin:mp wa~ felt. For Wesleyan Mille: and Metzler sparked the futile a~· trn1pts of .the Methodists. 8hcrtly after intermission the ILserves were called into action and proceeded to give good ac-

gooc1 material. In rural districts, ~ Cuunk of themselves as thev easily i:,romising prospects are furnished held the margin that had been transportation or given a job in tuilt up for them. In the prelimin· 1he school. If these advantages Hy game the B squad tied the ,,eie not presented to the pros- . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .! Shensdoah Junior College at 37ft pf pective athlete, he would find it With teams D and K Si':~ting a 3~ when Jim Nixon tossed in a. fg 1 easy to attend a school in some torrid pace, Intramural basketball pail of gift tosses as the game 0_0 2 other town that would be as close !ini,hed its first round activities. drew to a close. Limited time caus· 0_0 0 0 _0 2 hb home. 4 1 earr, D fii:ished first with K close ed the two teams to call it a on ;r to permit the Wesleyan game 2 Ar.ether angle is the viewpoint at tlleir heels. 2 0_0 Student Manager, Walter Huber, to g~t under way. 0_2 0 a::: presented from the players pos2 o o 00 it1on. It would be safe to say that summarized his views of the first Box Score1 3-4 o two-ttirds of the athletes in !'ound activitie> in the '0Jo1ving Peru fg pf ft Hiatt, f 1 0_0 o srho.ol today would not go tu high- statement. 2-3 0 0 2 0-1 2 er institutions of learning, but "I think under Art Jones' new White, f 4 1-2 3 12 3• 7, 9 wot.Id get a meagre educati8n, and &ystem the teams are more even1y Handle", 0 0-0 1 J ft pf take some job . that would never raatched than ever before. The Grubaugh, f fg 3 0-0 2 0 0 0 provide for a future. Financ1_·a1 _ba_r- :"irsi half was an exciting race, Ronhovde, f 1 0-0 3 0 riers are common to those mdlVld- :;no everyone seemed to enjoy Snyder, f 3 0-1 0 0-0 2 1 us.l&, and the easiest way 'o get tf;emselves-thereby accomplishing Williams, f 1 1-2 0 0-0 0 0 them to come is to see that they -to provide fun for those interest- Hannah, c 6 2-3 3 1-1 0 get an inside chance for the best ed. Fl.-Owever, I would. appreciate a Mcintire, g 0 o-r 7 4-6 2 4 JC°n< the college has to offer. There Dttle mo1~ cooperation from the W. Handley, g 1 0-3 0 0-0 l is a loud squawk forthcoming from . 11 3-10 0-0 0 6 many ' . t . T'"Hey say, playen, and also see more students 0 on tha t pom . · pWiers,1 g 2 1-2 why not give those jobs to stu- in the ble~cher3, rootmg for their asca , g ~. '( f 0 1-1 1 dent& who come to school to really ±avvntes. Id like to see this last Beyers, g Gothier Har.nab 0 0-1 0 get ahead and need it sorely. The half the best ever." MaTsootna,ls g c 20 10-16 15 an 3V1er to that, is, whic 1 does The teams standing. on the won Iliclntire Retzlaff fg moi e for the school, the ath!ete and lost percentage basis for the Wesleyan ft pf Andersqn F asci:.1 that helps put his school on the first round were: Parmenter, c 0 0-0 4 g 2 map, or some student that buries 1 ea1v Wogn Lost Pct. Pieper, f 0-0 3 ,.. If m · a co 11ege for four years, D 1 .900 Geis, f 3 2-4 0 1i1msc 2 8 0 graduates, and never is heard of K .800 Bowmaster, 1-2 1 3 A 7 3 1-1 4 i:.gair1 in nine cases out of ten? ·700 Miller, c 6 E 4 .600 Guest, c 0 0-0 2 Of course it would be fallacy to :F· 4 .400 Metzler, g 6 0-3 1 &rgut for those schools that H 5 .500 Berry, g 5 0-3 1 plainly hire athletes to come to B 6 .400 Owen, g 4 0 0-3 1 Mh0ol, · even guaranteeing them J 4 6 .400 Vaughan, g Cats Trail Entire Gamet 0 0-1 0 certain grades. Such schools as C 3 7 .300 Totals The Bobcats wound up with a tJ1cr are, not attempting to build 1 8 .200 Officials-Mueller 10 5-16 16 2 and Jennings. short jaunt on the road in York ui: their school as much as they G .IOO 1 9 The TJ.'aining school gym buzzed Saturday night, as they toppled an, ir: collecting handsome profits v. itb activity Tuesday afternoon as before a scoring barrage that cost at th~ turnstiles for certa;,1 realhe local Junior high basketballers them a 41-33 setback at the hands ~Ln&. l am defending the ;huation mixed with their neighbors, the of the hands of the York Pa~- in which the athlete is in1iteJ tc Auburn Juniors, in a game that thers. fci,ool, and is given first co;1~"'!era. ,found the locals on the shOrt end The Panthers struck early to lion for honest jobs that are acof an 11-10 count at the end of a garner a lead that they managed tua:ly important jobs. I would heated battle. to hold throughout the rest 0 ( the never try to stand up for the Calvin Reed was at the turn- game. Kaeding with 13 and conditions in which an athlete is stiles as the Bobkitten fans turn- Shaneyfelt with 19 points ied the hireo to wind a clock-and usually Not JACK of All · ed out to get a preview of the scoring parade. For Peru Walker tho&€ clocks are electric. _ PrepsLers of tomorrow. They saw with 9 markers was high. I1 you don't think that a winLewif and Clayburn pile up four The Joss completely, eliminated ning sports representation from a -Final Spurt Clinches Win We Specialize In Radios pomtr, each to. lead the Peru squad the Bobcats from any further pos- school builds it up more than any CALL 244 ns lntgal and Meeoy duplicated sibilities of sharing in the mythi- 0ther single item, I can cite you a The Kearney Antelopes could We Repair All Makes tLeh scoring feats for Auburn. cal state title. Their objectives now >ery good and concrete example- not match the pace set by Bobcats Work Guaranteed During the contest six !ouls were will be to point for NIAA laurels. I eru. The past four years the Mcintire and Hannah Friday evenSEE THE NEW c.alleu, four of them on the They have four games left to be tulk of championships open for ing as they fell before the Wheel'Training school boys. That small etaoin shrdlu cmfwyp etaoinhsrdlu tiaim have found their way into ermen 54-43 in a rough battle. phase of the box score possibly in- played and three of them are con- the trophy case in the college of- Peru got the jump on Kearney ciicates that the college is due for ference games. fice, right here on the campus of as they built up a 22-16 advantage c, iew Mcin:tires in a few short -1 " 'f 2. thousand oaks. rn: those four at intermission. In the second half :1 ears. Time will tell. On the sideJ ears. every registration day has Kearney closed in steadily, but a lines. an enthusiastic ' cheering C. Smith, McNally, Straus iecorded a new raise in enroll- final spurt in the closing minutes Sfctjon kept the. Bobkittens on ment. Where do those students found Peru with an 11 point mar- - - - - - - - - - - - their toes, fighting every minute. Initiated in Epsilon Pi Tau coming in get any news of Peru? gin at the bell. The win was an important one The Joss was hard to take, but 'i'he:1- get it from the newspapers The game was a lively mix, in tne purpose of those games are to Clarion, Smith, ;Bill McNally and that carry the accounts Of victory which 42 personal fouls were as it keeps the Cats in the runnteach i>portsmanship as well as Err;u-.t Straus were initiated into after victory. They get more from called. High scorers for Peru were ing for a share of the NIAA buntal:ility in basketball, and the kids the Epsilon Pi Tau, industrial arts grads who go out and tell them Mcintire and Hannah with 13 and ing. To mount to the top of the took it well. They are anxiously crgan;zation, Monday, February 10. glowing accounts of how the Bob- 12 respectively. For Kearney Jour- NIAA standings the team will be forced to win their three remain;;waiting the day that they go Since this was a meeting for in- cats beat an opponent-all thrill- ney and Blessing were all the Aning games, one with Wayne this over to Auburn, hoping to even the itiat1cn, all bu~ness was suspended i11g and very interesting material telopes had to offer in the way of week, and two from Chadron next ccunt with those PUPS. for the occasion. to :; prospective pupil. rn: contrast, opposition. week. v. ore< as the Bobcats roll into Wayne Friday night in the game that .can keep them in the '1'1'1AA race should they win. ·Following their win over KearBox Score: ney last week, the Cats ha.ve .a · Peru 1 ecorci of only one Joss in the Rogers, f conference and should they come Hunzeker, f through i~ this encounter, their Cotton (cl, chr,nces will be considerably better. Slink~r, f Hamw.h, Mcintire and Walker Smith, ,c wil1 be relied upon to lead the :Erown, c Cat&, and thfir work is cut out for Ogg, g them Wayne at present is the top Redft!rn, g tram. in the standings, and they Clements, g haven't had an easy trail to i n Totals 1h&t !Jonor. Peru will go into e Talmage game as the underdogs, chiefly be- vaD Winkle, . f cause of their prGvious loss to the Bolken, f WilC:Lats on the home floor. Fri- Schaffer, f clay night the story will be told. Snyder, c Probable lineups: Meyer, g Peru Position · Wayne Kreimer, g Walker Whitmore Totals f Referee Ossian Nitz Grubaugh

Peru Jr. High Kittens Lose Heartbreaker to Auburn Jr. Pups JJ-10

a

Peru Bows Out of State Title Chase; Lose to York 41-33 •

Wheelermen Stay In Conferenee Race; Tip Kearney 54-43

~l!J:iJ RADIO SHOP

Trades

1941 PHILCO


PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE FOUR.

Dr. H. Cole On Round Table • When Peruvlan's listened to the· Round Table discussion last SunC3y, they were pleased to hear the voice of Hugh Cole, substitute pro1t.SSor of English and European Ii.story in the oummer of 1936. In talking with Dr. Winston B'. 'lhorson and Dr. Castle M. Brown, cne learns that Dr. Cole left a 1 er!· favorable impression on the nJnd& of summer school students. Harly, stlidents ask of Dr. Cole and his work. Dr. Cole's classrooms· -\\>el e conducted in a very informal manner. Dr. Cole· has appeared three times on the University of Chicago's Round Table wi'h.'n the fal!t eight months. His interest is m111tary history.· Dr. Cole received his B. s. from Wheaton College, Wheaton; Illincii, his M. S. and Ph. D. from tl1e University of Minnesota. Ili l.93t he joined the teaching staff at the .University of Chicago as an .i112tructor of European history, tioth on campus and in extension

The local Boy Scout Troup and their parents met Monday evening, February 10; in the training st hcol. Before the cafeteria style rnriper, games of shuffle-board, basketball and 3-11-33 were playea. After the supper, a Scout program was presented. . f f f James Velvick who volunteered in the·u. S. Army received his paptrs this week assigning him to the mechanical department of the anr.:y for three years. james left for Omaha where he wiL receive further instructions. f

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Helen :Rhodes Chosen Outstanding 4H-er • Helen Rhodes of Howe will

See the New

ROSE GOLD

Learing February 6, D. J. Nat crs' debators tour Arkansas winding up the tour at Conway, Arlc, where they will enter the MidSouth tournament. Mr. Nabors was formerly speech instructGr at Peru 1efore going to East Central State College at Ada, Okla. JV..r. Nabors, besides directing de~ bate is head of the speech departn1enl and supervises the radio t roadcasts from the East Central R.adio Workshop over KADA. ~

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18, 1941

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D. J. nabors; Debators Tour

Local Boy· Scouts Entertain Parents

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY

is DOt aa experiment. For 22 years

ELGIN

we hne beea in business in Lincoln, Nebr. We have placed many thoasands of teachers. We have the experience. We hne the hook-ups.

WRlLHfS

We can serve yoa better now than ner before. Ask your school friends. Write today for riterature.

DAVIS SCHOOL SERVICE "a ~ TeaduM- 01e,nc4(( 6H STUART BLDC • LINCOLN, NEBR;'

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Musicians Have Chance to Join ·Stokowski AllO A mencan rchestra . Nemaha county musicians who are above average have a chance to join the Stokowski. All American Youth Orchestra which will make a tour of the United States, canada and Mexico this year. One hundred members are to be chosen from every section of the nation. The tour starts in May and continues through June. Five Nebraska youth will be selected as this state's contribution to the orchestra personnel, and each will draw union salary and each must be between 17 and 25 years of age. Should any reader of The Pointer be interested, they should con. sult the NYA area supervisor <lt Nebraska City.-(from The Peru Pointer.)

Specials never before equalled by the Elgin National Watch Co. 15 J ewe! Watches for $24.75 TRADE IN YOUR

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~igjli!Jigj~rg:milllii"ll!l!Rll@llll@l!ll'.l!Jigjigjflij

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J. P. CLARK

OLD WATCH

~

We have several good

r;;J

used watches in stock at this time because of .the popularity of the new

Electric Shoe Shop ~ Sh R · 0 f All Kin oe epairs ds ~

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refljll!]liiJliil!g]il!JfiIDlllg][ij]mi!!llfill!lmi!!lm~llll ceive a gold medal for rendering Rose Gold. The'Y are lllllllll!g]fiIDlllg]fiIDlllg]fiIDll[!j]fiIDll!g]fiIDll[;!j!g]il!Jml;lllt! th( most outstanding ser-;;ce to guaranteed and are pric~ DR G H JO ~ 4· B clubs in Nemaha cou.~,y last ~ · · · DER i!lJ j ear. ed to sell. [)jJ -Physician and Surgeon- iill She .is one of 46 club members i!lJ Office at Milstead Corner i!lJ in the entire state to be selected \\Oik. ' ·. :Both Dr. Thorson and Dr. Brown by· the Knights of Ak-Sar-Ben for ~ Office. Phone 33, Res. 39 l)i1 [jjj "" jolIJe6. in saying "But his greatest this special recognition, <ic.;crding ~!g]!g][!!]fiIDllmliil§liil[!!][!j]l1l]il!J[glllJ~llllmd :tailing ·is that he doesn't write, to word just received by County [!j]il!]rgj~[ID:llJ[!j]il!J!g]i!lJ[gj~[!j](l!i'~.1 Extension Agent Owen Rist. .tven to his friends." Th~se medals were ·offered this Look n~ far~her-look ~our best f f f :· rnr for the first time, to be H. S. ·Alumni Dance' Ha1rcuttmg A Specialty frWarded in counties taking part lg] ll To Warren Swain in Lhe Ak-Sar-Ben livestock show Modern Barber Shop ~ A high school dance to which the ai Omaha. Similar awards will be BILL LLOYD ~·~ .alumni of the training school were made again next year for outstand1:~ The man who confers a kindness ~ !J:ivited, was held February · 15. [!j]§!g]!l!llfilllllljjlg]fiIDllll!JliIDllliIDll~§[!j]lil1!l.m!J~ •••••••••••••••••••••••• ing; eervice to club work.· Ehould be silent concerning it; he The students dancea. to the mu1 1 1 t1ho receives it should proclaim it. sic of Warren Swain and his orNemaha County Quota for Seneca. thestra. March Call Fixed at Two Men Willard Redfe~n Wins liiJ!g]lg]!g]!g]lg][g]!g][g]lg]lg][!i]lg][g]!g]§!g]~m:1il State selective service headquarPERU BOWLING (Auburn, Nebraska) Sfnior H. S. Ping Pong ters on Thursday· issued a call for lg] "" ll!l CLUB "' CONTINUOUS SHOWS EVERY DAY WillarEl. Redfern was the winner 252 men for the citizens training iill lg] €! Ladies Welcome at All Times lg] -0f the senior high school ping, army to enter th~ service early in 11!1 Ben Hanlon Mgr. ~ 2:30-11:30 pcing tournament. last week. March, and Nemaha county will SAT. • SUN. • MON.-FEBRUARY 22-23-24 Another tournament is under be required to furnish two men for M. G. Heuer, Owner ~ l:ay. The winners of the pre- her part. Already on file with the. OOllliililliililliililffi!ii~~m!llKii:mm@gllil "SANTA FE TRAIL" fiouc contests are not entered this county draft board at Auburn are ~i!!llfill!J~ Starring time but are participating :Jy help· the names of two men who have .1!J ~ ll ll ~~il!J§liili!!llfill!J~~1 Errol Flynn Olivia de Haviland Raymond Massey in!i officiate. volunteered for servce. iill FOR SATISFACTION IN Also f f 1 A second call is expected before FOODS the end of the month with the ~ Cartoon and News proability a larger number of men will be assigned to Nemaha. MARDIS GROCERY (From the peru Pointer.)

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I ~~atelain's

Jewelrij . rnone 112

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Peru Prep Bl astS Brock Team 27-10 • Kittens :aste Revenge Teams Havei Lost

Both

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Heaven must be in me before

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I can be in heaven.-Charles Stan-1 ford. Peru Recreation Parlors Happiness is neither within us only, or without us; it is the union POOL AND SNOOKER of ourselves with God.-Pascal. ~ ~ Otto Boellstorff, Prop.

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Peru Prep tasted sweet revenge Fnda:y night a~ they plastered a 2'1-lC defeat on the same Brock team that blocked t)leir path to tbe Nemaha County Championship a few weeks ago. :F'o1 Prep, Ogg and RJgers led ·the way as they piled up a 12-3 lead at intermission, limiting Brock to three penalty tosses. After play got under way in the fi. 11.al llalf, Brock steamed up to garner a pair of ·field. goals, but were stopped, to make it their only serious threat. In the preliminary the Prep reserves set the pace for the varsity cy downing the Brock seconds 22lt' f

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There is no humiliation for huJllility.-Joseph Roux. "Charity suffereth long and iS kind," but wisdom must govern charity, else love's labor is . lost and giving is ·unklnd.-Mary Baker Eddy. ~

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True humility is not an abject, groveling, self-despising spirit, it is but a right estimate of ourselves as God sees us.-Tryon Edwards.

+ + +

AUBURN THEATRE

(Auburn, Nebraska) SUN. • MON. - TUES.-FEBRUARY "SPRING PARADE"

23-24-25

with Deanna Durbin

Robert Cummings Also Cartoon and Sports Reel

The Lafayette Life Ins. Co. OF LAFAYETTE, INDIANA Announces the appointment of COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA

HOLLY OSBORNE of Brownville, Nebraska

BARNES' REXALL STORE,. PREMIUM AUCTION February 20th

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Human pride is human weakness. Self-knowledge, humility, and love are divine strength.-Mary :Baker Eddy.

STATE THEATRE

as DISTRICT AGENT for NEMAHA COUNTY

• A Mutual Legal Reserve

AT THE STORE

Old Line Life Insurance

Bring in Your Auction Money and Buy a Premium.

Company

Plan will be discontinued after this date.

BARN ES PHARM~CY

"Once Acquainted, Always Friends"


,............... ···-·1

I Student Speaks I By Tod Hubbell •••••••••~•u••••••

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England has lost another diplomatic move. The Bulgaria-Turkey non-aggression pact re•cently signed with the Nazi government seems to · give Germany the go-ahead signal in thei Balkans. As yet the "democratic" forces have failed to win any diplomatic man· euver, let alone any European military campaign.

• .As I write this column, the Germans have as yeit to enter Greece. The only positive as· surance those brave Grecians now have of any a5sistance is from England and this help is somewhat dubious, although for the past four months the · British h:;ive been unload· ing troops, planes and mater· ials on this peninsula.

• alternative to

The other a war with Hitle·r . is for the Grecians to agree to an imme· diate armistice with Italy and consequent hard peace terms. The going in Albania has be·en too smooth for Athens to agree to anything like that. The '',zero" hour for this struggle has been set for to· day (Tuesday). It may be that while you ·read this column th~ promised offensive· is already taking place. C

H~rr Hitler in his brazen

VOLUME XXXVI.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1941

PERU, NEBRASKA.,

Perusingers Give Essays of First Wor.ld S. T. Fleharty Joins Staff as · . War Read at Y. W. Concert · · Science Professor Josephine

Boosinger

was

in

charge of the Y. W. C. A. meeting· • The Perusingers presented their on February 18. She read several fourth musicale Sunday afternoon. Katherine Bartling, soprano, and Wi1liam Fankhauser, basso, were the soloists. The guest for the pro· gram was the girls sextette from Talmage High School. The program was as foiiows: Fiddle 'n I-by Goodeve. Ma.y, The Maiden-by Carpenter. The Gypsy Trail-by Galloway Mr. Fankhauser, Doris Brinson, pianist. Beautiful Savior-A Crusaders Hymn. The Lost Chord-by Sullivan. When Children .Pray-by Fenner. The Girls Sextette. To Be Sung on the Water-by Schµbert. Secrecy-by Wolff. Mathew, Mark, Luke and Johnby Gaul: Habenera, from the Opera ''Car~ men," by Bizet. Miss Bartling, Margery Evans, pianist. Clouds-by Charles. Sapphic Ode-by Brahms. What ·e'er May Vex or Grieve Thee-by Bach. • The Girls Sextette. Ye Watchers and Ye Holy Ones -A; 17th Century German Melody. Death and The Maiden....:..by SchbertcAsqhenJ:>renner.

manner has .. proclai1:ned J~at ''tli~",fi:;;~·· ;t~p~i~g ~iii ''b~i;g '6rr'~~usan'rlt:-nrr:•6st~11::rnmr about a more intensive war.· fare with an unsurpassed U· boat campaign. If Hitler can effectively operate such sub· inarinei warfare, the English 1 1 1 . case f or "democracy" IS Vera Custard read doomed. The longest England, the Vati~an at the c. could possibly h o 1 d out ing on February 18. aoainst restricted shipping read two 1ette:s from

Is Graduate of Hastings College

essays that were written at the time of the first World War, and compared them with the writings

and situations of today. May Jane Young led the devotions and the singing was directed by Harriet Maxwell. Carroll Moon, Reg·iona1 Secretary of Y. M. and Y. M., will visit on

"The calibre of the staff at Peru is something really to aim for,'' Stephen T. Fleharty, latest addition to the science department was very earnest.

the campus next week. He is from Topeka, Kansas . .,.

.,.

Havi,ng arrived in Peru Tuesda7,

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At a meeting held on Monday, February 18, the "P" Club voted to have each member contribute one dollar for a banquet. No date has been set for the occasion.

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Calendar 1I I • I AAUW Sponsors [ Seni~r Girls Tea

·····Tea·· - ,

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An art exhibit was a feature at the tea given by the A. A. U. W. on February 20. College and high school senior women were guests. Work of Nebraska artists Kady Faulkner, Dwight Kirsch and Leonard Thiessen was on display and included watercolors, oil paintings, etchings and sketches.

ICh:;~~R~~~'. ~RC~h~re) I

a paper on

c. 'A. meet-

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SUNDAY, MARCH 2 Lutheran C1ub . . . . . . . . 7-8

Betty Miller I MONDAY, MARCH 3 Bisho~ Kir· WAA Club; "P" Club 10:30 " couea concerning a new pnest to Alpha Mu Omega . .. .. . 7-8 would be about nine months replace Father Hennessy who was Art Club .. .. .. .. . .. .. . 7-8 to a year. transferred from Nebraska City to Tri Beta .. .. . .. .. .. .. . .. 8-9 David City. Kappa Omicron Phi . . . . 8-9 According. to the outlook Mary Ann Schutz and Marion Music Club .. . .. .. .. . .. 8-9 today the spring struggle is Stych will have charge of the ' • • program at the next meeting.

not far aheiad. Diplomatic maneuvering in the Far East seems to .indicate a stand whereby the Japanese would protect the ·. Chine-se against planned. British aggression. This kind of e~cuse was first used by the Nazis when prior to the invasion of the lowlands they claimed the English had actually started · movements for the invasion of Holland, and naturally Germany had to protect her· self and the Dutch. Whether Japan is wisei enough to re· main aloof from this conflict has not yet been determine..1 .by military force but is sti!l a matter of question. •

German troops have been . d · S · ·h h move mto pam wit t e assumption that Hitler's eye is on the gateway to the Med· 'terranean, Gibralter How· l ·

ever, Spanish authorities flat· ly deny any Nazi intention and claim their movement is (Continued on page four)

February 18, the instructor was faced, mid-quarter, with two classes in chemistry, one in quantitative analysis and the supervision ot physics laboratories. In his second floor office late that Friday afternoon, he was probably relaxing for the first time.

Allison "Buck" Dougherty, first A graduate 0'f Hastings College, draftee from P. S. T. C., left Monday, Feb. 24, for one year's train- 1937, with a major in chemistry and minors in physics and matheir.g at Ft. Robinson, Ark. matics, Mr. Fleharty was granted i ·i i I an assistantship in s~ience at the TUESDAY, FEB. 23 I University of Nebraska. After do· YMCA, YWCA, CCA .. 7-3 ing graduate work there for one Midland .. .. . .. . .. . . .. here year, he accepted a position as THURSDAY, FEB. 27 superintendent of a Seward CounFreshman Clubs . . . . . . . 7.-8 ty school where he taught in Kappa Omicron Phi Silver grades seven and eight.

Fireflies-A ·Russian Fo1k S0ng. FRIDAY, FEB. 28 He N~ver Said a Mu~bl)n' Word Talmage High School (here) 1 -arr. by Krone. Chadron . .. . . .. . .. (there) Now Thank We All Our Godby Bach. The Perusingers.

NUMBER 16

Tables were decorated by two white pottery vases holding white snapdragons and American beauty roses and flanked by tall white tapers in blue holders. The patriotic color theme was carried out in napkins, sandwiches, cakes and mints. Mrs. Everett Good and Mrs. . J. W. Tyler poured. Miss Edna WeM'e, president of - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - " ' - - - - - - - - - - the organization, welcomed the guests. The history and purpose of A. A. U. W. was explained informally by Mrs. L B. Mathews. A piano selection was played by Mrs. W. B. Kirk and Miss Norma Did· de! discussed briefly the art exhibit. Miss Grace Tear was general chaiirman; Mrs. J. A. Jimerson, in· vitation chairman; Miss Norma Miss Mildred Pate, recently returned from Kobei Col· Diddel, exhibit chairman and Mrs. lege, Nishinomiyia, Japan, climaxed a series of college ap· A. L. Bradford, table chainnan, pearances when she spoke at convocation on February 21. assisted by Mrs. A. G. Wheeler. Miss Florence Martin and Mrs. The American's social attitude made unfavorable comparison as - - - - - - - - - - - - - J. W. Tyler were in the receiving Miss Pate told of Japanese court- When boarding a train, the woman line. esy, the important place of religion buys the ticket, rushes on the in Japanese everyday life, and the train, obtains a seat. Then when near-reverent attitude toward her husband arrives, she gets up and lets him have the seat. Furtherteachers in the school. In telling of the Japanese mar- more, he accepts it." riage customs, Miss Pate said that In speaking of forms of worship, her Japanese students were unable Miss Pate said, "Religions in Japan to understand a system where the are as great a part of life as sleepp.arents did not arrange the mar- ing and eating . . . Religion is "Progressive education and nat· nothing to save until Sunday, nothnage. "In Japan, for a girl to look di- ing to apologize for, or to make ional defense" was the subject of a round table discussion at Kaprectly at a young man is a bold fun of." pa Delta Pi on February 17. The Miss Pate told of her life and thing indeed, and she would be work in Japan and some of the discussion was led by Calvin Reed. considered forward and brazen,' she said. "A woman in Japan is effects the present conditions had Members of the round table were Phyllis Dammast, Edith Willey and not on an · equal footing with a on her. Jeanne 'spier. In answer to the audience's apman. She must serve her husband Refreshments were served after plause, after she closed, Miss Pate and make his life happy. "Japanese women handle the used the Japanese custom of form· the program by Edna Mae Petersen and Phyllis Benson. money and attend to an expenses, al bowing,

------------..i

ffiildred Pate Given Student Rpproval on Convo Speech •

Kappa Delta Pi-ers Conduct Round Table

St\mmer found him working in Hastings State Hospital at Ingleside, and in 1939 he taught math· ematics and science in Alma, Ne· braska, high school. In the fall of 1940 Mr. Fleharty joined the Lakeside, Nebraska, faculty as superintendent and instn1ctor of math and science. Here he revived his o1d interest in physical education. A high school basketball star, Mr. Fleharty had at Hastings traded his Keds for a rubber apron and dug his toes into the science department. With poised and reserved friendliness, the tall, blond teacher submitted to questioning about first impressions. "The work is more difficult than the teaching I've been doing in high school," he said thoughtfully. But judging from student comments, this already popular faculty member is really "in the groove.'' "Peru," he added, "is one of the finest equipped places I have run across." Mrs. Fleharty, a major in ele· mentary education, taught near Hastings for four years. Question· ed about the "rest of his family" his direct blue eyes twinkled. "We have an eight and a half months· old baby.'' (He is less modest about her than his steady rise in his own field). "She IS pretty," he volun· teered, and gentlemen friends in the mens' dormitory, which has been temporary residence, confirm this statement of the active little blonde who daily covers consider• able ground a la perambulator. The Fleharty's will live in the Milstead Apartments. '(

i

"

Students Dance< to Canned Music as D. Clements Snaps Pictures Students danced in the Men's Ha11 from 6:45 to 7:45 February 19. Music was furnished by recordings. Dick Clements, Peruvian photographer, took shots of the dance for the yearbook.


PAGE TWO.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

Published Weekly by Tke Peru State Teachers College Peru, Nebraska

Entered at the Postoffice at Peru, Nebraska, as Second Class Matter. $1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc

. · Editor R ose M c G mms ··································· Maryon Thomas · · · · · . · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Make-up Editor . Ralph Locke · · · · · · · . · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · • · · · · S ports Ed itor Harold Jenkins ...................... Ass't. Sports Editor

M

d'th J' Copy Reader I , imerson . • ........ :............. Nma K'anel ................................ Proof Reader ~re

Idle Recollections of when Grandma Wore a Ruffled Nightcap Ooer Her Curls •

In Grandma's time the little girls Wore ruffled nightcaps on their curls, And in their bonnets, prim and white Climbed into four-posts beds at night. A gusty seven-year-old, happily off key, I once sang those words to my music teacher. It didn't occur to me that they painted a quaint picture. My retiring rig was fluffy white flannelit had "gramish" feet and includ-

M. Florence Martin .............................. Adviser ed a ruffled cap because I had REPORTERS: Murvel Annan, James Busenbarrick, Maude Daft, William Fankhauser, Marjorie Kennedy, Carol . Prine, Erna Steffen, Pauline Stark, Harold Jenkms, Janet Harris, Ted Thompson.

NOT SO SOFT· · Medical officers who have been examining draftees re· port them as showing a high average of physical fitness. And

it is

n<;>t. a surprising fact that today's young men are strong-

er mid in "pinker condition" than their fathers. To under· stand. this fact requires no more concentrated attention than

tpe er

' remembrance of the highest diamond in the ninth trick

t'o

what steel. preferred fell in the autumn of

1914.

early been charmed with Grandma's headgear. A decade later, college bred, r realized how naive the little song really was as the lights went out at l0: 3o and dormites shuffled parlorward for midnight study. I looked up from a biology book (I must have looked up from a biology book often) and studied ready-1for-bed appearances. There wasn't a curl in the room. They were all in the mold-some on bob-pins, others with waves clamped. One freshman didn't get over rag-winding for a week. Few head kerchiefs harmonized

ITraining School

over the sixth grade in a basketball game February 19 at the training ter century has been one of marvelous progress in the -scischool gym. They chalked up 15. points to the sixth graders' seven ence connecte·d with making and keeping people well. While counters.

a specialist could afflict the reader with pages of this· sort

Butter and grapefruit have been thing, it is enough to say that with children's diseases al. added to the not lunch menus at the trail}ing school. most at the· vanishing point, this means not merely that fewCalvin Reed left Thursday for er young people have died, but that fewer have .been weak- Chicago, m., where he will take an examination for advanced graduate ene-d by diseases from which they recovered. standing· at Northwestern University. Mr. Reed supervises junior high If these improvements were not already showing in the teaching in the training school.

of

The second ping pong tourney at the training school puts · Dean might well be surprised. Good luck to the healthy Sarg Smith as finalist of the high school division and Dean Adams as winwhose ancestors had fair sufficiency of iodine in their ner of the ·elementary grade. The junior high finals have not yet food . and whose development proceeded without undue been played. better physique of young people• just reaching maturity; one

a.

The boys of the fifth and sixth. grade woodworking class at the ~ration is ·a healthy one, and beirig healthy it is not physi- training school have been constructing kites. They plan to have a kite flying tournament soon. ~ally soft.

ICAT CLAWJ

t

'Ain't Nobody Perfect,' to the highbrow YALE REVIEW.

· "That is an outstanding literary achievement but we wonder

if Dr. Bradford didn't let himself in for a lot of

troubles when he picked his title. Many

a

ireshman English

student probably will reproach the professor with the crit-

icism

that 'That ain't no way for an English teacher to talk.'

Probably the title, 'Ain't Nobody Perfect,' will be used as

.an alibi in his classes

from now on."-The Falls City Journal.

Mumh ..

Edu-

cational Music Magazine for March. Mr. Benford has had many of his recent articles published.

• •

• •

A patriotic theme was carried out in the decorations at the· high Atwood and Trunkenbolz are school dance on February 15. Al- this column's nomination for the most 120 dancers kept time to the couple most likely to keep that music of Warren Swain and his look in their eyes. orchestra. It's easy to tell the seniors this Peru will play Lewiston at the time of the year . . they begin class "B" district basketball tour- to take on dignity, what with pernament to be held in Humboldt sonals coming up and au. March 5, 6, 7, 8. This game will I thought Santa brought Doris be March 5. Brinson a diamond. Edna Helms transferred from the • training school to. Ablburn High Those people who are always asking you if you have your Unit School February 17. done are philosophy students. { { { A play, "Low Bridge," was given • by Betty Katherine Cole's group at Is Edna Mae anticipating anothPeru Players February 20. er betrothal? A party was held backstage after the presentation of the play. Gripe: Can't the dance band James Huey was in charge of the raise enough money to buy at least one new piece? entertainment. Jim Howe won a prize for the Comforting tho ts: Only five best imitation. weeks until the fourth quarter and ti 1' 1' then only a quarter until summer Patronize Ped advertisers. vacation.

department at Peru College. Just recently he sold a story,

a, c""

MERRIT JENSEN, class of '40, is t>eachmg commerce and physical education at Bassett. Merritt was new ass't. librarian. elected representative student last Cute cookie duster Fanders has year and was also May King. under his nose . . . wonder what happened to Sandin's. BETTY GARD, mat. '39, has recently been employed as an assist·Karr and Bartling are making a ant in the office of a physician in Iola, Kansas. Betty was a member pretty couple l~tely. of Kappa Delta Pi and was active Believe It or Not: Nobody rushed in Y. W. C. A. She was also sn () u t of convocation when the assistant in the science department. Betty is is niece of Blanche speaker finished Jast Friday. Gard, primary supervisor in the training school. Newest coup!~: Phoebe Anderson and Les Ruetter's kid brother. ED FALLOON, mat. '37, is attending Nebraska University and Soon be getting wa~m enough is working toward a M. D. degree. for couples to decorate the campus Ed was an active member in caminstead of the library. pus organizations ai1d was selected last year as the Peru Man of ToF Gebers and his old flame seen morrow. walking along in a dream last week . . . the rest of you gals will CLARK ROGERS is coaching just have to give up the ghost. junior high athletics at Gurley. He Why doesn't Unk Hutton give was an active member of Lambda some of the Peru gals a break? Delta .Lambda and Alpha Mu Om· ega. Surely he's not carrying a torch? • CATHRYN ERFM:EYER is at The new professor's cute offspring created mild revolution in &ending Northwestern University Boy's Dorm ... that's a blond for this year. Cathryn was a sophoyou. more at Peru last year.

A. L. Bradford, head of the English

l

MERLE STONEMAN, teacher at the University of Akron at Akron, Ohio, wrote an a.rticle which ap- - - - - - - - - - - - peared in SCHOOL EUIPMENT with their owner's pajamas. A Chi- NEWS for February, 1941. It is entitled, "Planning and Equipping cago Exposition pattern nodded Combination Rooms." over a pajama crepe of blue and white lambs. "Country cousin," I MAXINE KEYS has recently labeled it. been employed as a stenographer My neighbor in a chic multi-col- in the County Court House at Sidored housecoat had anchored her ney, Iowa. Maxine matriculated at ears with pink polka-dots. Peru in 1939 and attended college Curled in the biggest chair was until the end of the first semester a blue robeful of shy brunette. By this yea,r. day, she was carefully combed and undistinguished. Now her hair was Announcement has been made of tied atop with a shoestring, shower the marriage Of MILDRED FILMstyle. She looked petite and utterly ER and ELl\ION VELVIK. Mildred disarming. is teaching at Shickley, and "BrowI hadn't realized that that soph- nie" is finishing a 4-year course at isticated redhead's .ears were set at Peru thi~ semester. Both are Peru a 90 degree. angle, or that a red alumni. Mildred is a sister of bandana with a soft lavendar Wayne Filmer, now in school. nightie looked like a poppy and sweet pea on the same stem. ERNEST BROD is attending the Oriental house slippers, cute and University of Nebraska graduate clumpity, fiesta robe and scarlet school. He was gradua.ted with Peru kapusha symbolized melting pot high honors and received a scholAmerica. arship to the university. He is aJso Incongruouslyi I hmnmed the an assistant in the department of last line, "Climbed into four-post education. Mr. and Mrs. Brod visbeds at night." Times have chang- ited· briefly in Peru on Saturdav. ed indeed! Today's collegians often Mrs. Brod was formerly Ma~y leave climbing into bed completely Duerfeldt, also a Peruvian. off the schedule.

I • News Notes • ~ I . I Who has been lucky enough not •........•...• to have gotten called down by the . The eighth grade was victorious

"Our hat's off to Dr.

Ci.lanmi JJt.aill

1

An article by R. T. BENFORD.

In deciphering the remote past one finds the past quat·

AIN'T NOBODY PERFECT-

25, 1941

"How Do You Rate as a i----------1 ' ... .. . ........... 1 entitled Mus.ician?" appeared in the

~-~·-····

n1ental stress or sudden prenatal shock. The younger gen-

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY

DORIS WEILER, 'mat 38, is teaching in the elementary grades at Palmyra. Doris was active in musical organizations. Reports from HAROLD FISHER, assistant librarian who recently underwent an operation at Iowa City, indicate that he is much improved and that his condition is very satisfactory. A daughter, Linda Lee, was born to MR. AND MRS. ROY LIVELY of Table Rock on February 19. Mr. Lively is a Peru graduate with the class of '39 and this is his second year as band and industrial art teacher at Table Rock. H. L. CHATELAIN '17, presented a sixty-five piece band in its first concert of this year last Tuesday. Mr. Chatelain is music instructor in the high school at Hebron where JEAN WAGNER (mat. '36) and HOLLIS HUTCHINSON ('34) also teach.


TUESDAY FEBRUARY 25, 1941

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE THREH

Bobcats Drop Title Bout to Wayne 48-32 • Wildcat Spurt In Second Half Sinks Peru for Loss

I Caterwaul

I

•BY RALPH LOCKE

1

1------------

SUBSIDIZATNION IN COLLEGE

my opinions.

The following is an attack on

Wheelermen Play Best the practice of subsidization. Hod Ball of Season in Torrid Lantz is the guest writer, and the Opening Half following remarks are his, and not

SPORTS ffiascot Predicts . . Victory. Tonight •

Doctor Scene-Living room in .Joder's residence. '.Dime-Bedtime for busy little men. '.o~casion-Interview with Donn\e Joder. popular mascot of Peru Bobcats. . E'erched comforatably on the arm ol. ~ easy chair, snugly robed in his dressing gown, Donnie Joder brightened considerably as he re · "plied, "'It's a lotta fun," when asked how he liked his duties as team mascot. Looking forward to tonight's game, he scuffed his foot • · about as he predicted: "Peru is •gonna beat them Midland guysand bad too." Here's hoping he is right. Of his contacts with Peru State's coaching staff he offers, "Boy, Al Wheeler sure is a swell pal of mine, and I like Art Jones too." Continuing, he remarks, "And Jack (Mcintire) is one of my favorite buddies, arrd he sure is a real guy." Asked what he lists as his favorite sports he enthusiastically named football and basketball. Cheerfully he announced, "I'm gonna go to Peru when I grow up, and I'm gonna play center· on the football team just like Jack Mcintire does." Putting his visitor more or less on the spot he queried, "Jim Mather was a dandy player wasn't he?" Of his life's ambition, he casts an admiring eye at his father as he blurts "I'm gonna be a doctor, and . a good one I bet. Right now I know lots about it, and I'll learn lots more besides." Given his choice of entertainment, he selects a ball game as Lops with his idea of having a regular good time. Old man . Morpheus then began to claim his dues, and the small head 'nodded drowsily as he politely awaited further questioning. Being a human person, the correspondent tactfully expressed his grati tude for the interview, and arose to leave. bonnie accompanied his visitor to the door, bidding him a · courteous goodnight. As a parting shot he shouted, "See you at the game tonight." f

f

f

Bobcats Face ffiidland Tonight • Peru's Bobcats will be hosts Tuesday night to the Midland Warriors on the college floor. A preliminary game with Omaha · U's frosh squad and the Peru B team is scheduled to complete a double-header for the benefit of the crowd to be there on this annual "Auburn Night." Midland bas been going strong of late, and are at present at the tOJ? of the NCAC scramble. The War·· <Continued on page four)

Football is a great game, a growing sport and is rapidly becoming emphasized to such an extent that it is looked upon by some "socalled institutions of learning" as a business. Many colleges believe in a system of open recruiting and make no pretense about going out and hiring a particularly good guard or halfback. This, sooner or later, will destroy one of the finest sports that has ever been invented. When a team takes on such a commercial aspect that their players are individually ·grouped on cards according to their abilities the time has come for a general cleanup. The South-East and South-West conferences have their players weaknesses recorded on cards. If he isn't adept a.t passing or punting, it is checked on his card and the coaching staff sees to it that each boy spends his spare time working on his weaknesses. Frequently boys are high-pressured into enro1ling at colleges where spending money, clothes, t.uittion, board and room are free, merely for playing football for the school. What the unsuspecting f f { hig•h school boy .doesn't know is that they have to try out for the squad in the same manner as professional baseball players. If they ' are good enough they are taken care of. If they fal !short, and fail to come up to the standards, they have to get back home on their Spurting in the final penoa, own. Coach Harold Fisher's Bobkittens In the; over-emphasis of this were able to slide past a stubborn grand A1;1erican game, colleges, Dawson crew 16 to 12 Friday. night. alumni and backers have overlookIn a previous meeting Prep bounc- ed the fundamental purpose of athletics-which is to give the ed the Dawson crew 29 to 15. The first half was a defensive game to the student body, and to battle with both teams relying on !:mild a team from boys within the long shots. The Bobkittens com- state in a manner that doesn't manded a 3 to 2 edge at the quar- violate all principles of amateµrter mark, and increased their lead ism. Instead they have substituted winning as the only worth-while to 8 to 6 at the rest period During the third quarter, Daw- aim, and character leadership, and son pulled into a 10 all deadlock other qualities of which prepare a with the Bobkittens. It wasn't un- boy for the responsibilities of cittil late in the final quarter that izenship after g~aduation, are sacthat their school will !le Prep hit a warm streak and gar- rificed nered four points to ice the garne. put on the map as a result of a Cotton held scoring honors for winning team. the evening with five points, while It is unfair to a boy to make him Etter was collecting four to lead fell that he is no less than a sup" erman by comparing his 80 yard his team mates. The Peru seconds made it a dou- touchdown sprint with the battles ble win, when they copped the of Napoleon and by filling newspaopener from the Dawson reserves per columns with all the superlatives and exaggerated rhetoric in 15 to 5. Next Friday, February 28, the the English language. Upon his Bobkittens will be host to the fast graduation he will, by bitter exTalmage quintet. In the previous perience, find that the newspaper game played at Talmage, two over- clippings of his gridiron exploits, times were necessary to break a honor sweaters, and gold footballs 25 all deadlock. Peru was finally won't buy him meals or clothing. victorious 27 to 25. This is expect- He will discover that he is just ed to be another close one, so another ex-player. America is a nation of hero worshippers. The don't miss it. :pf halfback making the winr.ing Peru fg ft 2 touchdown run receives the praise Rogers, f 0 1-4 Brown, f 0-0 0 0 and adoration today, but tomorrow Slinker, f (c) 0-1 2 4 he will be forgotten and it will be Cotton, f 2 1-1 2 some other boy who will come Smith, c 0 1-2 2 through at a tight moment and Redfern, c 0 0-0 0 make the people in the packed staClements, · g 1 1-1 1 dium stand and cheer. Ogg, g 1 0-1 1 The bot-beds of subsidization are Hunzeker. 0 0-0 0 the South East and the South Totals 6 4-10 13 West conferences, and it is here Dawson fg ft pf that athletes must play the game B. Auxier, f (c) 0 0-1 4 the year around. There is no let-up, Durey, f 1 0-1 0 save for the few weeks following Ray, f 3-5 0 1 the fall campaign, which usually Etter, f 2 0-0 1 lasts until the start of the new Beachy, c 0 0-0 0 year, with spring football following D. Auxier, g 0 2-3 3 soon and then summer sessions. A Vassen, g 0-0 0 0 boy who goes to college under R Auxier, g 0 1-2 0 these condtions cannot hope to Totals 3 6-12 9 gain an education which will be of The Bobcats met disaster in Wayne Friday night as they succumbed to a second half basket barrage to drop out of the NIAA race to the tune of 48-32. As Jack Mcintire says, quote, "the reason we lost that game lay in the fact that we couldn't get the ball through the hoop as fast as they could." The Cats struck early, and built up a 12-3 lead at the mid-point of the first half, but let down to hold only a 16-15 lead at h:.termission. In the last stanza Wayne swished t h e m through 'from all angles, to sink the Peru five with ', 16 points to spare. The win gives Wayne a cinch for a ~hare of the title, and. should the Bobcats win one of their games from Chadron, Wayne will hold undisputed claim to the trophy. In the State League, Wayne remains at the top, with a very bright chance to remain there for the rest of the current campaign. As a result they stand as the logical choice to represent the College circuit at the Kansas City Tournament this year.

Prep Drops Dawson Friday 16-12 •

so

benefit to him after he graduates. The Pacific Coast Conference was just as bad as the South until former G-Man Atherton de-emphasized the sport to such an extent that the· coast· schools are now playing on a more amateur basis. When a game is emphasized to the point that a coach must put a winning team on the · field or lose his job, it is evident that the sport is going to be harmed, and that if winning at any cost becomes the accepted theory, it will quickly destroy the game itselL Pittsburg became so powerful they had difficulty in filling their schedule because schools competing on an honest basis didn't have a chance. As a result, Pittsburg had to take steps to eliminate open subsidization and recruiting of pro~pective stars. The collapse of Chicago can be attributed to the same reason. During the Golden Age of Stagg's powerful Maroons there wasn't a team in tpe country that could. stay in the same field with them, consequently the game became so over-emphasized that it killed itself. Now Chicag·o, the one-time-power of the Big Ten, has been forced to withdraw from the conference because of the perpetual defeats they suffered after they reorganized their athletic sy~.tem. These schools must be eliminated from the schedules of the colleges who are consistent with the laws of amateurism, and only rescbeduled when they are willing to come back and play the game according to the code and compete on an equal basis with other institutions. Football is the greatest team game that has ever been produced. It has become firmly imbedded in tthe hearts cf the sports-loving public as the most stimulating and exciting of all athletic contests. We have an obligation to the boys of the coming generation to protect a game which is so richly worth preserving and eliminate all the evils which will tend to detract

CENTRAL OFFICE< 17 NORTH MAIN ST.

Bobcats Start Final Jaunt this Week • The Wheelermen will take their final road jaunt of the year . this week end as they travel to Chadron for a tough two-game series. The games will determine the winner of the NIAA, inasmuch as Wayne has only one defeat, as has Chadron. Chadron must win both from Peru to say in the first place tie. Very likely Chadron, on the strength of two wins over Peru would be given an inside chance to. be invited to the tourriaa1rnt in Kansas City. The Bobcats are out of it, and they have a real grudge to wear off against those Chadron Eagles. Last year them came dow11 here, and won one of two games played here, forcing Peru to tie (Continued on page four) from its wll.olesome influence upon the citizens of tomorrow. ·

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PAGE FOUR.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

Library Receives • Final Jaunt Copy of General Pershing Biograp·hy

Student Speaks

(Continued from Page Three)

with Wayne for the conference. 'I11is year the Cats will be aching

·

• library

' The has . just received from the Pershing Memorial Commission a copy of a biography of General John Joseph Pershing en.titled, "A Great American." This is a new publication which is of particular interest to Nebraskans because General Pershing is said to be Lincoln's first citizen. In the foreword of the book, Mr. Addison E. Sheldon of the Nebraska rustorical Society says: "The author, Harry Follme~. has created an important, historical document . . . In classical, narrative d'orm he has condensed the story of General Pershing's life; of the greatest war in history; of the mission of the Ali\erican Republic; and .finally, \lf Nebraska and I,incoln-the home group that gave young Lt. Pershing the atmosphere in which his .genius grew during the forma.tive years of early manhood." i

i

.tor satisfaction and they will be there to get it. Chadron, due to her location, has played ~ea.ms from Colorado, South Dakota and Wyoming· as well as Nebraska teams. Her record. is a good one this year, proving their worth. r11ey recentl:i split a double bill with Wayne, thereby making it a race between themseJves and Wayne. Wayne had only one game left with Peru. The Eagles have tw0-on those games rests the championship.

'.Announcement:; h\we .been sent out to surtounding high schools in•Viting them to the First Annual Choral ,CJinic ·at 'Peru, March 21 and 22.· Jack Snyder tried out for the All American Youth Orchestra at Lincoln on February 22. This orchestra will be directed by Leopold Stokowski. Genera.1 requirements for members are good tone, rhythm, sightreading, phrasing, and ability to sttart a tone saftly, increase to gTeat volume, them diminish to a 'complete fade-out. Jack is a freshman and plays the french horn.

(Continmd from Page One)

2:30-11:30

primarily for relief purposes of certain stricken areas.

In

London there has bC:·en a temporary lull while bus· iness is being transacted in the Balkans. For all we know it may be the calm before the storm. .

Inl fl ff ffi UR Rl S •..__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __...

THEATRE (Auburn, Nebraska) CONTINUOUS SHOWS EVERY DAY

This is a similar condition to the one that existed prior to the attack on Poland, Den· mark, Norway and the Low Countries. Nothing definite can be said about this "war of nerves." WheTe, when, and how Hitler will strike, no· body knows. Only assumpt· ions and assertions can re· lieve the public mind.

SAT.· SUN.· MON.-MARCH 1-2-3 Filmed in Beautiful Technicolor Zane Grey's "WESTERN UNION"

with Robert Young Virginia Gilmore Featurettes-Jan Garber and His Orchestra Latest News Reel

+++

AUBURN THEATRE (Auburn, Nebraska) SUN. • MON. • TUES.-MARCH 2.3.4 Another Guaranteed Road Show Attraction Filmed in Natural Color "TRAIL 0:{? THE LONESOME PINE"

_Starring In the Intramurals race for suHenry Fonda Sylvia Sidney premacy, team J is leading the pack with four wins and no losses. Featurette-"Wild Oysters" Battling it out for second place, and close on the heels of team J with three wins · and one loss, are teams A, E and F. Lurk, .Hines, Heugal and Larson According to the outlook of teams G, E. G and B are leadone might guest that a blitz· ing the scoring parade. These men Electric Shoe Shop ~ ~ Office at Milstead Comer are being hard pressed for their krieg would open up against positions. the English in Gibralter, and ~ Shoe Repairs of All Kinds Office Phone 33, Res. 39 . Of the t:wenty games played in blasting in all directions from :!i]fi.illj]ljijliilillJlg]:ll]lii]lilJliilil]liilillJillJiii1illllillliilillllillliilill1ilJJ :_;;ill]lg]lii][gj:gj[;;J@rgj!ijllii]'.it§i!llliilliiilillllllliiill!l~lillill1im this half no game has developed into a rout. On the contrary, many London to the Balkans, while games have been won or lost by the eastern axis partner lends one point. a somewhat helping .hand in Merlin Broen is the only casualty China. But thoughts and op· of this half. He suffered a broken inions have been found use· arm when he ran into a wall. less m this war. The standings of the tea.ms at the end of the fourth round: GI Team Pct. Won Lost It is not longer necessary J 1.00-0 4 ~ for Germany to win this war A .750 3 1 by lightning strokes and quick E .750 3 F .750 3. 1 victories. Today Germany is 2 500 B better off than at the start of 2 ..500 2 D the war, according to Will· .250 a .250 3 iam Shier, news analyst. The I 3 British have done little dam· .250 E •l .000 0 G age on the continent and with the opening of the Balkans

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Just Received New Stocks in

~Wedding

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Sports Of Yesteryear

there is a clean path to the Near East oil fields which By Erna Steffen are so essential. The German •••••• • • • • • • • - - ~ people are not starving, and with each victory their mo· ONE YEAR AGO

ii not an experiment. For l1. years we have been in business in Lincoln, Nebr. We have placed many thou-

sands of teachers. We have the ex-

perience. We have the hook-ups. We can serve you better now than

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. . fif The Bobcats enJoyed their teenth win a.s Wesleyan fell to a Write today for literature. final 65-44 score. The Plainsmen took an early 3-0 lead only to have it taken from them as H1fiton made Peru's first basket. MOR. Greathouse immediately followed leaving . the Plainsmen behind for the remainder of the game. HalliI {/JJtJd Jrof'kM. flr;~ !) day lead the scoring with 19 points. :. 64-l. STUART BLOC.· LIHCDLll, NEBR, . · '. • .~ll.!lllllli!J~ll.!llllllill~lill~ll.!llllllilll!!llIDlil TWO YEARS AGO l~ PERU BOWLING t I( The Peru five again trounced ' CLUB· Wesleyan 44-28. The game was an Ladies Welcome at All Times Peru's from the first period out. Ben Hanlon Mgr. Mosely scored 13 markers with HalM. G. Heuer, Owner liday, Walker, and Huegel doing illlllllllllJllllli!Jitll!i]llllli!Jlljlilllllllllllilllilllillllllli!JlillliIDlllilllllllill their bit.

mr before. Ask your school friends.

~ DAVIS 5[HOOL SERVICE: I

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~liIDllli!llilllllllllllilllllllllllllli!J:ilJllllliilll!llilllllllllllilllillllll":

Look no farther-look your best Haircutting A Specialty . Ill! Modern Barber Shop JULL LLOYD ~

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till Peru Recreation Parlors

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POOL AND SNOOKER

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!IDlillllllli!Jlilllilllilllilllilllilllillliilil!lliilll!llilllilllillliilillllilllillliil•ii!J FOR SATISFACTION IN lill

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FOODS

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MARDIS GROCERY

TEN YEARS AGO

~ Otto Boellstorff, Prop. ~lilllilllillllllli!Jilliillilillliilll!lllllli!Jlillliilliiililllillllllli!Jlill _

FIVE YEARS AGO . Peru rose to second place in their conference as they tamed ~he Kearney "Wildcats" by handing them a 40-27 de~eat. Halliday's. 12 points and Bailey's outstandmg floor play were the important factors in the game. Free throws were time wasted as Peru hit two out of six, Wayne five out of twelve.

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"Dutch" Lobeer's men needed only one more 'victory to claim the N. I. A. A. title after winning from Wavne 31-28. Coach · Priefert's Kittens won their district tourney from Brock, 29-16. Riggs and Fisher lead the way with 20 points.

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Patronize Ped advertisers.

rale increases. .. These are the cond1t10ns that the world faces today. The German army is' threat· . . e n· l n g Greece, Gtbralter seems less secure, England is quiet for the time being and h bl J the poor um f' aps are confronting the Australians in Asia. Something is bound · to break. 1

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Invitations

~nnouncements

• Correspondence· Cards and lnuitations • Better than 'Ordinary' Bond Papers for Business and Personal Stationery

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The college band will appear m concert formation again, Marcb. 14. Prof. v. H. Jindra will conduct. This will not be a budget event and there is no admission charge. ·Dean J. A. Jimerson is contacting high schools for dates for the college band and orchestra to appear.

ffiidland Game Tonight (Continued from Page Three) riors have felt the Bobcat's claws on a previous occasion in Fremont, and will be primed for revenge. Peru's team is now out of the tight pinch they were in a week ago. Their loss to Wayne dropped them entirely out of any future title picture this season. With the pressure off the freshmen should play improved ball, and a gobd ball game should be the result. The Auburn High School band is to be here is guests of the Sports department, and will add to the color of the game.

• ••

The ...

Peru Pointer Printers


Studen~-S-~~~k~ ·1 By· Tod Hubbell ·

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America is today discour· d. Politically' and econom· lly we stand face· to face a European war. Labor nditions are unsatisfactory. e average American is dendent and . discouraged, not so with Rog~r abson, noted economist. Mr. ··. :ab~on states that the businss outlook for 1941 should be e best this cauntry has ever itnessed. A 100 per cent in over 1940 and eve~ything om cradle·s to coffins will e sold. The employment pay rolls will be at peak fig. ures. A 5 to 7 per cent gain in sale~, • while prices will · be somewhat hiohe<r. T., fri; is

VOLUME XXXVI.

moore Chooses Spring Play 0

Tom Taggart's thre-act comedy, "The Saturday Evening Ghost," an ada.ptation from Oscar Wilde's short sto~y "The Canterville Ghost," will be presented by the dramatic• department. the Sir Simon de Cantervil!e, ghost, who because of some youth0 Jul indi::.cretion, is doomed to walk the ·prophecy. of a niah who the earth. every Saturday night, Jor the past several years has searching for a girl wpo knows had uncanny . accuracy to· how to bake a real old-fashioned ward .the. future outlook:·I be- plum pudding, will be portrayed by James Howe. Other members of lieve that no man can deny the clast are Wilbert Kohrs, Lord the fact that business is ap- Archibald otis; Carroll Jones, Hiparently on the upgrade. ram Otis; Virgie Lee Johnson; Virginia Otis; Wilma Parnell, Mrs. Thus;·. all, Americans cannot· Lumley; Pa.tsy Benford, Pet; and say th(lt. the future 1s pessi·. Louis Steck, Sonny Boy. The play will be directed by mistic. ·· Prof. Robert D. Moore .

The Associated Pre•ss recently states that the average American will be better fed, better clothed and better housed in 1941 than he was in

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H.S. StundentS Furnish Convo Program

PERU,_ NEBRASKA,

Carroll moon Welcomed By v.m.c.A.

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Carroll Moon, . regional secretary Of the YWCA and YMCA, was a guest speaker at the supper and joint meeting held in the Music Hall February 24. Mr. Moon spoke on, "The Student Ch1istian Movement at Work." Dean Clark led the singing and Mae Jane Young was in charge of the devotionals. Harriet Maxwell, accompanied by Grace Muenchau sang "Bless This House." The committee in charge or the supper was Mary Horton, Ferne Peterson, and Bertha Clayburn. Abc~t 55 students were present, 1

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Dramatic Club Sponsors Play • THE FINGER OF GOD, a oneact play, was presented for a group of Pawnee City High School and

Junior High School people, Friday, February 21, by members of the Peru Dramatic Club. Participating 1940. Pay checks will be • in the production were: James higher. All these things will Violin music was the program for Sandin, as strickla'lld; Nancy Ellen result in raising our standard convoqi,tion goers on F_ebruary ,28. Jones, the girl; Harold Dallam, the · ,; 1'ts Patricia Hill, Kathlyn Of Jl.vi'n,;.s wh'l1 e "mcreasm · Benford . and va1et; Wilber. Kohrs, student · direc5 Max Mathe}Vs were the soloists and tor; and Wilma Parnell, make-up ... · :t:od.y.ctio.n.:ot.,,ai;mam.e1(1ts~,.a,...wem~difi\5it~a;~~t"'''.edtrs"•Bl'i'.tt::"di-roetor-. •• ........ ·· ····· ·· · · feat which is unknown in Eu- son and Prof. R. T. Benford. The ·The event was under the sponrope. Whether 1942 will· show program was as follows: sorship of the F'ederated woman's "The Dream Melody," by Her- Club of Pavmee City. c,ontinued increase it is not bert-Patricia Hill, Doris Brinson. known for certain. The econ· "Flower Song" by Lange, "Noromist, however, agrees that if wegian Dance" by Grieg-Max we are in war by then, the Mathews, Doris Brinson. "lndian Summer" by Herbert, feverish pace of wartime ef. "Fiddlin' the Fiddle" by Rubinoffforts would draw men from Kathlyn Benford, Prof. R. T. Benfarms and factories to peace· ford. • time conscription and there· "The Old Refrain" by Kreisler, "Elves Dance" by Jenkinson-Pa- Mrs. J. w. Tyler has selected

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ffirs. Tyler to be Next Reviewer

fore result in a declining ~~~: ~:;ns~~~ Kathlyn Benford, "Charlotte Bronte" by E. F. Benstandard of living.

• Other experts

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predict the national income will rise Lee Williams to Play from 80 to 85 billion dollars, For Spring Formal a, bullish outlook for selected Lee Williams and his Stepping stocks and a gradual uptrend Tones will provide the music at ·the Spring Formal, April 5. in the markets.

True, these are merely ·the predictions and hopes of var· ious economists but they warm the "cockles of one's heart." At the start of the last decade we• had experienced the entrance of a ·great de· pression which resulted in stifled business, closed industries, low wages and unemployment. At the turn of that decade we find ourselves greeting a stimulated busin· ess, defense industries working night and day, increasing wages and less unemployment.

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.I believe that we can rightfully say that our "tomorrow" is dark and dim. For after all, security and unity is base·d on strengthened business and increased la(Gontinued on Last Page)

A "Storybook Ball," featuring Humpty Dumpty, Jack Spratt, Little Boy Blue and other Mother Goose characters will provide the theme for decorations. Carolee Garver is decoration chairman.

son for the A. A. U. w. book hour, Wednesday, March 5.. This biography presents the three Bronte sisters and their brothers as they grew up in the Yorkshire parsonage on the moors. Here Emily wrote the strangely powerful "Wuthering Heights," and Charlotte produced "Jane Eyre," for which she is most remembered today. The review will be given at 4 p. m. in the Library. Anyone wishing to attend is invited.

Preuiew of Next Band Concert March Fourteenth •

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When the college band presents its next concert March 14, a wide variety of numbers will be used. The two most contrasting possibly are "Prayer and Dream Pantomime" and "Headlines." "Headlines" is a modern'. rhapsody composed by Carleton Colby and scored for band by Fred K. Huffer. It is an impressionistic reflection of the violent pace of modern life. The music does not seek to imitate, but rather to reflect in modern music idiom a cross section Of me from the standpoint

of a press room. It resounds to the rhythm of daily hm:ilan struggle, the rhythm of life. The opposite type of music is found in "Prayer and Dream Pantomime," taken from the opera, "Hansel and Gretel," by . Humperdincf;. It is the picture -of two children lost in the woods, who kneel at nightfall, say their prayers, and fall asleep as angels watch over them. Its slow, sustaining tone character essentially differs with the every varying dynamic modern harmonies of "Headlines."

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TUESDAY, MARCH 2, 1941

NUM

R 17

Forty Egg Cake Featured At Kappa 0micron · Ph'1 Tea •

WELCOMED

Patriotic Theme In Decorations

The Great Cake made from Martha Washington's recipe formed the centerpiece for the tea table at the George Washington Silver Tea sponsored by Kappa Omicron Phi. Candles and flags also decorated the table. Mary Elizabeth Collin was in charge of the tea. Guests were greeted by Sarene Hauptman and l\'Iar jo1ie Kennedy. Ardith Christancy, Ferne Peterson, Betty Mil1er, and Betty Galloway poured as Josephine Boosinger and Margaret Gardner cut the Professor . S. T. Fleharty,, the cake. Mary Horton acted as hostlatest addition to the P. S. T. 0. ess. science department. Mmic was furnished by Grace JV!uenchau, Jeanne Spier and Margery Evans.

T.S. Pupils Give Recital

The cake was baked by Emma Rosicky, Edna Mae Peterson and Miss Weare and required three hours for mixing the 40 eggs, four pounds of butter, four pounds of sugar, five poun~s of flour and five pounds of frli1t. The cake re• CEived constant attention for the Training school pupils of Prof. V. H. Jindra presented the following sh hours that it . was baking. The rcc;pe was copied from the original program in the Music Hall auditorJJy the committee. ium February 26. 1 f f Solos Violin: F. T. A-er's Get Test Pony Race, Krogman-Patsy Benford. On Their .Poise Little Jack Horner, Kelly-Mar· Alice Trayer, Carolyn Fleming ilyn Lavigne. ar.d Rosemary Tiehen led the F. T. La Tyrolienne, Kern-Wallace A. meeting February 24. Reiff. Reverie, Tolhurst-Margaret Ann A test was administered by the entertainment committee to check Ulbrich. the groups' posture, proriunciat!on, Baritone Eorn: and enunciation. Mighty Lak' a Rose, Neven-Sam Ruth Johnson called the business Bradford. Clarinet: meeting to order. Semester dues Londonderry Air, Irish Folk Tune of twenty-five cents for each. member were levied. -Hilary Bradford. Clarinet Polka, Polish Folk Tune -Hilary Bradford. Violin: The Dream Melody, HerbertPatricia Hill. Flower Song, Laage-Max Mathews. Nor~egian Dance, Grieg-Max Mathews. Fiddlin' the Fiddle, RubinoffTUESDAY, MARCH 4 Kathlyn Benford. YMCA, YWCA, CCA . . 7-8 Indian Summer, Herbert-Kathlyn Benford. Tarkio ......... ~.... (here) Ensemble Violin Duet: THURSDAY, MARCH 6 Cherries are Ripe, GreenwaldMargaret Ulbrich and Wallace F'reshmen Clubs , .. , . . 7-9 Reiff.

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Calendar •

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Zamecnik; Spinning Wheel, . Zamecnik, Kathlyn Benford, Phyllis Brinson, Doris Brinson. Violin Duet: The Old Refrain, Kreisler; Elves' Dance, Jenkinson-Patricia Hill and Kathlyu Benford. String Orchestra: Dark Eyes, Gypsy Folk SongJeanne Spier, Director. Margery Evans, Doris Brinson, Grace Muenchau, Betty Kennedy, Mrs. Arthur L. Bradford and Prof. R. T. Benford were the a.ccompanists.

FRIDAY, MARCH 7

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Dramatic Club Play Budget Event MONDAY, MARCH 10 Class Meetings . . . . . . . . 10:30

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Kindergarten Primary Club . , ................ 7-8 Epsilon Pi Tau .. . . .. .. . . 7-8 Ls.mbda Delta Lambda . 7-8 Sigma Tau Delta . . . . . . 8-9

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PAGE TWO ..

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

So·me Things Your Best Friend Wouldn't Tell You

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Published Weekly by The Peru State Teachers College

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A. B. degrees are handy things. Lying smugly aniong old wiils and papers ten years hence, they'll be your sole hieans of proving to the Entered at the Postoffice at Peru, Nebraska, as Second younger generation that you know more ,that Great-grandaddy Jones. Class Matter. $1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc 125 college hours behind' you might someday result ih your promotion from the basement packing room, Restwell Furniture. Co., to doorman, Rose McGinnis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editor first floor. Or you might get $6.41 Maryon Thomas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Make-up Editor more a year typing form letters. S Ed' Of course, said A. B. with a cerRalpli Locke · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · " · · · · · · · · · · · · · ports itor tificate might lead to a teaching Harold Jenkins ...................... Ass't. Sports Editor position. That means vacation in the summer. A. B. degrees are hanMeredith '.Jimerson ..... · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Copy R ea der dy things. Nina Kane! ..............................· . . Proof Reader Every good Boy Scout and friend . . Assistant Editor of the national administration Maryon Th omas · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · knows "Be Prepared" is next to the Golden Rule. To teachers collegiate, R}!:PORTERS: Mu.rvel Allnan, James B'1senbarrick, this 1pointer in vacational guidance might be in order. It is, in short, Maude Daft, ·William Fankhauser, Marjorie Kennedy, Carol a solution of the packing problem. Prine, 'Erna Steffen, Pauline Stark, Harold Jenkins, Janet Packing might well become a te·Harris, Ted Thompson. dious job. A systematically conceived list of don't forgets starts as ~~~~~~~--~~~--"---

EDUCATION AND THE PRESENT CRISIS-:

an~ the facts of the present situation which should

JllOSt concern educationalists? affiliated with the Institute of Inter· N·.orman An<>ell, o national Education, advance·s such facts as these: "The nfost . •learned generation the world has ever known seems to be · in a fair way of proving itself the most foolish and cruel, the

~ost destructive of its own happ.iness. Never before in history have men had at their disposal so much accumulated knowledge, so many records, libraries, newspapers, schools, colleges, lectures, and profossors; never before in history have men possessed such amazing instruments (e. g.) the radio) for the exchange of information and ide'lls. Never before has nation been able to speak to nation, instantan· eously across the width

of the earth, as nations can speak

today. "Yet as a result of it all men seem less capable of man· aging their society than they were twenty-five l.mndred years ago i·n, say, Athens, which had very few

books

indeed and

no newspapers, no radios, no printing, and twenty-five hundred years' le~s of accumulated knowled,ge than we have. Tqday the most learned nation of the world, the most scho1astically drilled, possessing proportionately more professors •and teachers than any other, is precisely the nation which is showing itself politically the least wise . • • The governments which driftecl to war in 1914 were for the most part . made up from the most ·highly .educated classes. The .diplomacy which led to that war had been in the hands of highly . educated men. "One can indeed .venture this proposition: If ihe world has nearly destroyed itself, it is not from lack of know. ledge in the sense that we lack the knowledge to cure can· ·.cer or release afomic energy (this last, incidentally, being ;·piece of knowledge which would probably finish civllized rhankind) but is due to the fact that the mass of men have not applied to public policy knowledge which they already possess which is indeed of almost universal possession, deducible from the facts of everyday life.

off

"If this is true-and it seems inescapable-then no edu· cation which consists mainly in the dissemination of "know· ledge" can save us. If men can disregard in their policies the facts .they already know, they can just as easily disregard new facts whicih they do not at present know. What is needed is the development in men of that particular type .of skill which will enable then to. make social use of knowledge already in their possession; enable them to apply simple, self. evident, truths, to the guidance of their common ·life. . .. "A large part of Western Europe has repudiated that truHi, repudiated it, perhaps, because our very elaborate educatio~ does not manage somehow to make certain elementary truisms clear to the multitude; does not give the millions that pass through its mills an understanding of the society of which they are a part, and which, as citizens and voters, they are called upon to manage and direct.'! .

2, 1941

ItUmnni Jllail]

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By Gm" Mumt.au

A.

Peru, Nebraska·

What

TUESDAY, MARCH.

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a smali matter, but objects enum- ZOLA NOFSGER, who attended erated in the end fill the fust five suitcases. Five suitcases on a trip school here first semester, was are five nuisances. Nuisances mar;ied to Harold Brammer February 23. squelch the spirit of a trip. S.ome normal people have short• ened a five-suitc:i,se list by the Alumni seen at the Midland process of elimination. I once game were: NORMA HELMICK, knew ·a college senior who shorten- MARVIN SCHACHT, ANN HOL· ed one with a pair of. shears. . SCHER, WANDA PAYLOT, HEL· Another chewed up the list and EN JANECEK, MRS. JOY HUT· took a toothbrush only. The list TON, MR. AND IViRS. RICHARD was in Scripts' Permanent and I SHERMAN, ROBERTA PITTMAN, should have reminded him to in- WENDELL HUTCHINSON, DELclude Tums. He didn't, though, and TON GOERKE, RALPH CHATEspent a rather horrible vacation. LAIN, LUDVIK JUN, ivms. IRENE ' The 1dea of just taking a tooth- JONES, ·PAUL ARMSTRONG and brush has merit, though. A tooth- former· coach "STU" BALLER, brush (1) is not cumbersome; (2) now coach at Omaha u. holds its bearer to a certain re• sponsibi!ity-that of using it twice a day; .(3) if red, amber or green JAMES F. LARSON ('37) who makes bright spot in any hotel has been in the industrial arts de· room or box car. partment at Farnam has recently been elected to a· position in the Besides, one should always have a toothbrush. Pink toothbrush is Kearney schools. James is a nephbetter than none at an, and even ew of Prof. A. V. Larrnn. your best friend won't tell you. O CHARLES GABUS, ('41}) director of the band at Loomis, writes that they have started a Band Mother's Club and have purchased new uniforms through its efforts, The uniforms are green and white. "Charlie" directed the college pep band last year.

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~CAT CLAWS j "----------·~ Do You Know: 1. What two smart gals ·have been seen trotting down Park Avenue on dark nights? Losing weight? 2. How to catch a life-guard in three easy flops? 3. vVhat Doogy Neuman keeps under his bed? 4. What "freshman fellow haJ found something to cheer for in the Training School?. Jim Busenbarrick's latest puzzler: v\'ho would win if Tarzan and the Super· Man were staged in a battle? .... Men-get-your-woman campaign begins again as the Spring Formal appears on the horizon .... Few dates, few wallflowers, no admission-no wonder students turn out for hour dances .... Now You Know: 1. Bartling and Stark. 2. Ask Marge Denison. 3. A saxophone. Where HAVE you talent scouts been? 4. F. Drexler.

• GLADYS GROSSOEHME and RONALD CLARK, Peruvians, at. tended a band concert by the Scottsbluff High School band under the direction of JAMES JOHNSON· 0

Several Peruvians have coached championship basketball teams this searnn. Among them are FRED SHESTEK, She%y; SPENCER LEGER, Burchard; and EMIL WISINA of Ainsworth.

MISS MILDRED PATE Daughter of ,P-resident and Mrs. w. R. Pate, whcse talks on Japan The engagement of MISS MAXINE METCALF ('39) to Lester have proved interesting to College Pankonin of Tampa, '.Florida, has and local audiences since her re- been announced. turn home.

RITA RUSSELL, ('40) who is teaching the fifth grade at Scotia, "No Place Like Home" visited her mother, Mrs. Ruth Rus"No Place Like Home," by Pa- sell last week end. tience, Richard and Johnnie, Abbe • . was reviewed by Dean Tnice Dunn.S iiy.g a.t women's separate convoca- Announcement ·has been made of the marriage of LOUIS·E MULtion on February 24. LEN (mat. ;38) to Mr. John TurnBorn in France, the children now ' - - - - - - - - - - - - - · c a l l a ranch at .San Louis, Colo., er, Humboldt, December 24. Junior high boys are now cen- heme. "No Place Like Home" retering their interest in the basket- lates their experiences while tra- school trio, Laurine Clayburn, ball tournament at the training veling with their mother. Kathleen Whitfield and Billie Jean school Twenty-eight boys are par- Grace Muenchau :read a poem Miller sang, "The Lord is My Shepticipating in one Of the five teams. for the devotions. The junior high herd." Each team Will play four games and the team with the highest percentage of games won ·will be the champion. The teams · and their captains are: Good for Nothin' Termites-Gerald Clayburn. The Gogetters-Mark Col!ins. Hoosier Hotshots-Eugene Henning "extravagant" students turn out To whom it may concern: Hell Cats-John Lewis. Today I was wishing that I were and pay 15 cents to dance, and reGreen Mountain Boys-Richard still back in high school. To add lo- mark how mercenary we are. We Good. cal color to my memories I glanced ,shc.uld blow our lungs out purely Prof. Calvin Reed and Coach through "Cat-Claws," Fed's gift to for the sake of art. From a gate Harold Fisher are supervising the campus children. amounting to a few paltry pentournament. High school boys will In this column of delayed 1912 nies we are given 41} per cent to referee the games. humor a gripe had stated, "Can't divide among ten men. My comthe dance band raise enoug·h mon- mission (14 cents)) wouldn't buy Prof. R. T. Benford and Prof. V. ey to buy at least one new piece?" the flute section a part for "DarkH. Jindra presented a convocation Dear Editor, will. you please tell Town Strutter's Ball." program at the training school me just who said that? I want to This year we have developed a February 21. Patriotic songs were learn if that person thinks he de- library of over a hundred numbers. -. also sung, the flag salute given and serves any new music? We will gladly accept donations to a short talk made in comme1'].or- We have played for Dorm dances buy more. ation of Washington's and Lincoln's -for experience. Experience does Sincerely, birthday. not buy music. We have also playA broken down, beat up, half i i of ed for all-college dances. A few starved, second rate musician. Patronize Ped advertisers.

!

Inice Dunning Reviews

Tra .1n·1ng School •.New Notes •

A Who Dunit Letter to Cat Claws by an Irate ·1ndiuidual •


PAGE THREE

TUESDAY, MARCH 4, 1941

_,.--wheelermen Dump Midland Warriors 40-31 -Ill"""'...

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Beyers and Walker Sports Of Yesteryear 11 Peru Prep Seeded 1 RR ~ RR Shine on. Offensive; By Erna Steffen 1 Team in Humboldt!._____, Hannah on Defensive ONE YEAR AGO

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The Bobcats returned from their rnuthern tour With two victories and two losses. The Hardin-Simmons University team of Abilene, Texas was their first victim as tl1e result' of a 54-40 final score. The second victory was taken from the New 'Mexico State team, 66-25. At half-time, "Ding" Bailey was announced All-American guard because of his performance at Kansas City tne year before. The West Texas "World's. Tallest Team" d~feated the Bobcats 81-63 and the New Mexico Normal of Albuquerque dealt them a 81-49 loss.

Peru Comes From Behind

The Bobcats overcame a spirited Midland team here Tuesday night, winn·ing 40-31 with a scoring drive in the last half that netted them 22 points against 11 for the Warriors. During the first half, the lead changed hands five times, Midland finally grabbing a 20-18 lead at the intermission. Peru came back strong in the sec011d half to forge ahead, and build up a six point lead that they held to the gong. The house was packed for the TWO YEARS AGO annual "Auburn Night," and the Auburn High School band furnishThe Peru team gained its 16th ed part of the band mu.sic, as victory of the season from Wayrie Mac and Gee in Finale guests of the Athletic department. Teachers as movie-star Wayne At intermission, Baton twirlers put Morris looked on to see the game on an exhiibtion. end 55-34. The Wheeler,rner. entertain last In the preliminary game Omaha . Bob Halliday, ·forward, and Rusyear's nationai colleg\ate champ- u.'s frosh downed the Peru B sel Bailey, guard, were named first iom, the Tarkio Owls, Tuesday squad· 40-30 !n an exciting qontest. all-starers, and Leonard Greatnight. The Ne\lra~ka City Junior For the Bobcats, Hiatt, with ten house, forward, received ~econd Chamber of Commerce is sponsor- points in the first hi1Jf; and Bey- team honors, as a result of an AHing the game as Nebnaska 'City ers · with eight in the last canto Oonference pick. Night, and the Nebraska City High led the offense. Hannah played a School band· and pep squad will stellar floor game, shining on deperform, befog guests of the Peru' fense. as well as offense. Draemel, ., FIVE YEARS AGO

SP-0 R.TS Bobcats Hosts to Tarkio Ton~ght

Athletic department. The High Payne and Schaeffersman shone for School band is the same one that the defeated Warriors. copped first prize in the Aksarben Box Score: and Peru Homecoming contests this Peru ft fg pf year. walker, f 'l 5 1 The .preliminary game, starting Ronhovde, ·f 0 0 0 at 6 :45 will see Burchard High Hannah, c 1 2 School taking . the floor against Hiatt, g 2 4 . Peru's B squad. The Burchard team Mclnt!re;·g·".' 2 0 4' has had a very fine season, winn- Pascal, g 0 2 0 ing 20 of 21 games this season. Beyers, f 3 2 3 · The feature game, Peru vs Tar- Grubaugh, f 1 0 0 kio should be a good one, despite TOTALS 12 10 14 the fact that the Owls convince- Midland pf fg ft 3 ingly downed Peru earlier in the Draemel, f 4 0 4 seasori. The game will be the last Petrow, f 1 0 one this season for Peru, and vets Buhk, f 1 3 Cec Walker and Jack Mcintire will p ne c 0 be in the lineup for their farewe11, K~ockstedt, g 0 1 0 appearances for the Blue and Scheaffersman, g 3 1 White. Schneider, g 1 0 f f t Krenzzian, g 1 1 3 3 14 TOTALS 15

Wayne Riggs lead the way with 16 points to a victory over the Nebraska B team, 48-34. Freshman Halliday was close behind with 14. A 42-26 victory over Kearney gave the Bobcats a tie for the Conference Crown sharing honors with Wayne Teachers.

• TEN YEA..LtS AGO 'The N. I. A. A./ conference title

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" Wayne, Chadron Tie

John Lewis Cops Crown In Second Ping Pong Meet John Lewis took championshi~ honors in the junior high division of the second ping pong tournament at the training school last week. f

The Peru Bobcats lost both ends of their double bill with Chadron the last week end. They lost the first game 62-48, and the second 44"26. The two victories put Chadron into a tie with Wayne for the conference title .. Peru had trouble hitting the bucket throughout the series. In . the first half of the last game they made three out of 48 open shots. Their only game left this season will be with Tarkio here Tuesday evening. The two losses shook the Cats down to 9 losses against 12 victories this year, which is not as bad as many expected, inasmuch as they started the campaign with only two veter<>ns. Next season should see another winning· quint for Peru-so the curtain falls on the 1940-41 season Tuesday evening, as Bobcats meet · Owls in the season's finale. "

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Midget Majorettes Charm Basketball Audience Twenty-four baton twirlers were featured at the half of the Peru vs Midland basketball game. The midget majorettes were led by Lorene' Clayburn, and Phyllis Jean Brinson was at the head of the older group. f

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Patronize Ped advertisers.

new c .amera •

Illuminating flashes from the Peruvian's new Speedograph camera warn students there is a· cameraman in the crowd and caution them to look pleasant. The· camera, operated by Dick Clements, local cameraman, is the type Used by large newspapers and has all the latest flash equipment available. Dick has taken more than 200 pictures of organizations and campus activities with the new camera in the past two weeks, most of which will appear in the Peruvian. According to Dean Karr, editor of the Peruvian, much of the Peruvian copy was sent to press last week. He added that the Class Panels of the '41 Peruvian will be the largest ever.

If the Kittens emerge victorious from the District meet, they will be eligible for the State Toumament. However, the Prepsters will have a tough row to hoe at Humboldt. To win the District the Prep Crew must defeat Lev..iston, runner-up· in the Pawnee County Tournament, Shubert, Humboldt or Barnston and the winner of the lower )lracket, which includes the strong Talmage and Dawson fives. Coach Fisher will take ten players with him. to Humboldt. The

Teams J A E F

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Patronize Ped advertisers.

Their Record: starting lineup will probably con- Peru Bobkittens Opponets sist of Rogers and Cotton at the Peru 17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Auburn 18 forward spots, Clements · amd Ogg, Peru 29 ............ '. ... Dawson 15 guards, and Smith, center. The re- Peru 30 ................ Auburn 14 mainder of the ·team will be com- Peru 29 . . . . . . . . . . . . Syracuse 28 posed of Brown, Slinker, Redfern, Peru 22 .............. Nemaha 11 Hunzeker and Devore. Peru 22 ... : . . . . Bf'a.tton Union 24 Of these ten players, Rog·ers, Peru 28 . . . . . . . . . . . . Rockport 31 Slinker and Smith are the only se-, Peru 16 . . . . . . . . Bratton Union 18 niors. Peru 44 . . . . . . . . . . . . Tecumseh 32 "I hope we are not over confi- Peru 28 . . . . . . . . . . . . Rockport 16 dent, and hit the tournament at Peru 27 . . . . . . . . . . . . Talmage 25 our best," was Coach Fisher's pre- Peru 27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brock 10 tommey comment. Peru 16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dawson 12 Throughout the 1940-41 season, Peru 22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . JuU.an 12 the Fishermen have piled up an Peru 22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nemaha 18 imp~essive recorq of 12 wins and Peru 12 . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . Brock 18 5 defeats. Peru 28 . . . . . . . . . . . . Talmage 31J

Until March 15th ... Commission obligations cease for men when they are conscripted into military duty ... Now these new advantages are offered by the same reliable servi~"'- whose facilities and experienced guidance are constantly at your command. Nebras· ka and all neighboring states our field. / ,~. Write today. ~vu;-/,~ ·A

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DAVIS SCHOOL SERVICE 643 Stiiorl Bldg., Uncolo, Ntbra1ka

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THEATRE (Auburn, Nebraska) CONTINUOUS SHOWS EVERY DAY

2:30-11:30 THURSDAY. FRIDAY-MARCH 6-7 Frederic March Betty Field "VICTORY" Plus MARCH OF TIME. SAT .• SUN.• MON.-MARCH 8-9-10 "KITTY FOYLE" With Dennis M organi Ginger Rogers James Craig Plus Cartoon and N fWs

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AUBURN THEATRE

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The Fre~hman Council met on February 17. The admittance of new members into freshman clubs was discussed.

te~! ~h:s :~i~l ~:adti~~ t~:t~e~~~~:~

age column with an unblemished record of six wins and no defeats. With each team having four vicPlay Starts Wednesday tories and two setbacks, A, E and G are battling it out for second place. In the Class B district tournaRhodus, P. Lurk and Peterson, o(, ment to be held Wednesday teams A, E and G lead last, weeks through ·Saturday of this week at point parade. Humboldt, Coach Fisher's BobkitThis week will end the regular tens is the team picked to come round robin for the second half, so out on top. Dawson, Humboldt and why don't YOU come and root for Talmage are also seeded. your favorites? _,

again belonged to the Bobcats as -~-----------------------they closed their season by whipping Kearney 30~17, SJnd stealing .two games from Chadron, 38-11 and 31-24,

~ Peruvian Gets

Peru Drops Two to Chadron

Class BTourney

CENTRAL OFFICE, 17 NORTH· MAIN ST.

COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA

(Auburn, Nebraska) SUN.• MOl\l' .• TUES.-MARCH 2-3-4 Orrin Tucker and Orchestra • "Wee Bonnie B~ker" A Hollywood Novelty SUN.• MON .• TUES.-MARCH 9-10-11 "YOU'RE THE ONE"


PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE FOUR.

Glimpsing An Hour of Terpsichoring • How everyone goes for both the hot and the sweet .... swishing and 1flying hemlines ... :Karr's keen way of whirling Bartling, Stark, Kinsey, ,Benson, and other lucky coeds .... jumpin' and jivil;l' Harold "Shadow" Douglas .... smoothie RI ·e x Floyd gliding over the maples .... Coleman covering floor space, but· quickly .... "activities man" McKenney doing his bit either at the "percussion" or on the dancing· floor .... popularity of tag dances .. ~ .Red Behrman moving nimbly in his usual fine style .... wonder-•• ment as to how the gals can dance so well in rubber-soled "flB,tties" .... Bollmier and Pete twirling rapidly to the rhythm .... female pedagogians showing more than a Superintendent S. L. Clements little knee .... Rolfing's shuffle rhythm, all right! .... Brooks' genial has begun the task of placing grin as he plucks away on .his guj.- Peru grads. With 100 per cent retar .... more about beaming ~·ount­ ceiving positions as a record for enances · - Ronhovde's friendly last year's A. B.. students Supt. smile .... Merlin (two arms, woo, Cietnents has a goal to attain in Woo; one arm, WOO) Broers sitting them all out these ·days .... those 1941. who would rather .dance than eat, Beal, Bouse, Muenchau .... Chandler and Jelinek "jitterbugging", ... "Blondie" McDonald 'putting her dancing shoes to good ·use .... dancin' man Pascal with a serious look on his face as he "goes t~ town" (Continued from Page One)· .... noticed Frankhauser and Spier turning the corners ~oothly and bor. Neither do I wish to gracefully .... Bea Fulton and partner seen burning up "the floor with le·ave the inference that I bee neat bit of jive ..... another lieve our economic future smoothie, Ern_ie Heugel. ... more will be a "howl of cherries," who would rather dance that etcetra, Carter, Evans,. McCarty, Cus- rather, less we forget, history tard, Brinson, Hamel. ... heard as has warned us that business we left the jive session, "Wish it recessions most often occur would last for an hour and a half." following a stimulated, businThe weekly hour dance was held ess prosperity. in Eliza Morgan on February 26. 'f 1 'f Students will dance at. Eliza Blind Man's Bluff was one of the Morgan one week and at the Men's games played by Commerce Club Dorm the following week. The next members at the meeting on Februhour dance will be held in the ary 24. Janet Ebers was entertainMen's Hall. ment chairman. ~l!ll~m!IDlil~l!llml!!liill Members discussed plans for a FOR SATISFACTION IN till pa:ty. Sa~ene ~auptman was .auth~ oz1ed to mvestigate open dates on FOODS the school calendar.

TUESDAY, MARCH

2, 1941

You are Cordially Invited to Call and Inspect 'The Peru Pointer's N_ew Line of Wedding Announcements Party Invitations

Calling Cards

Business Stationery

• Student Speaks •

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!L~DIS GROCERY ~ ~~lil®liID!JlilJlilJlilJ!iiii!JlilJlill lml!mlliilllllll!ll!lii!Jli!lll.!li!~mml!i!

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P. CLARK

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Electric Shotl Shop !!l1 . [ii Shoe_ Repairs of All Kinds ~ ~li!lmli!JIIDlil~lilllilllilJ!ill!illlilllilllfil<ll

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DR. G. H. JODER ·i!jj -Physician and SJXrgeon- !lll lllJ Offlce at Milstead Comer )( Office Phone 33, Res. 39

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Scribbler's Club Meets Scribblers' Club met February 13 at the home of Mrs. B. K. Baker. Virgie Lee Johnson pa:sted contributions of the group into a "Scribblers Scrapbook." Nina Kanel and Wilma Wager typed copies of the contributions for each member. It was announced that Miss Grace Tear has consented to speak on the subject, r.Preparing Manuscripts," at the next meeting. The club enrollment has increased, according to president Alveen Gillespie, who urges anyone interested to become a member.

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Scholarship Club iTries

1mllllllllilJli!Jlillli!Jli!Jli!JlillilJlilJli!Jlillllllli!JlilllilJli!Jlilllillllll!il](gj l!!l Quiz on Members PERU BOWLING [ljJ . CLUB ~ A musical Professor Quiz contest Ladies Welcome at All Times ~ under the direction of Nina Kanel, Ben Hanlon Mgr. li!J Ruth McDonald and Muriel ReutM. G. Heuer, Owner fl!I er provided entertainment at lilJ . li!Jlill&JlilJlilllilJli!JIIDlillilJ!illlilll!illi!Jlillli!Jlillli!lm Scholarship Club February 24. Bob Ashton received a prize for lilllilllillll!lilllillli!lmlilllilllillli!Jlilllilllilllillllil high score. Dick Clements and Look no farther-look your best Echo. Elaine Lum were awarded Haircutting A Specialty additional. prizes. · Ruth McDonald was elected as Modern Barber Shop li!J vice president to act as program BILL LLOYD chairman.

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The best thing to give to your enemy. is forgiveness; to an opPeru. Recreation Parlors ponent, tolerance; to a friend, your heart; to your child, a good example; to a father, deference; to POOL AND SNOOKER your mother, conduct that will Otto Boellstorff, Prop. make her proud of you; to yourself, ·lliJlll~l!lll!ll!ill!liJ[ljj!§lilJlilllilllilllilllilJlilJi1illlllilJlilJ§!liililJlilllllJ rfespect; to all men, charity.-Balour.

THE PERU POINTER

PRINTERS


Student Speaks ] By Tod Hubbell

•.....................• On Nov. 30, 1939 Russia egan an undeclared war on inland by bombing the Fin.nish capital Helsinki. And

VOLUME XXXVI.

PERU, NEBRASKA,

TUESDAY, ~ARCH 11, 1941

NUMBER 18

so opened a new chapter in 'the second world war. It is about that brave stn.~ggling democracy that your columnist wishes to write today.

• For three months Finland

Pate Rttends CPT Ground School Gets Under Way New Jersey Meet · •

, President W. R. Pate was a conthan held her own vention attender in Atlantic City, against tremendous odds. As N. J., February 21 to 27 · early as January the Russ· The convention consisted of a meeting of the American Associaians had reputedly lost as high tion of Teachers Colleges, for all presidents of the state teachers as 75,000 men without >vincolleges of the United States, and ning an important objective. a meeting of the American As:ociation of School Administrators, Then in mid-February. the for high school principals and school supermtendents of all the Russian artillery opened - cities of the United States. on the Mannerheim line. The The theme of the convention was

up

Red Air Force· systematically THE PREA!vIBLE TO· THE CONSTITUTION

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bombed important objeetives "Provide for the common Defense," and by early March the Finns "Promote the General Welfare," were defeated.

• The Finns fought· iike demons for almost five inorttl;is. On March 13, 1940, when the hostilities .ended .there were 22,000 dead Finns; 75,000 wounde·d and 600,000 refugees from the areas seized by Soviet Russia.

• Finland gave 10 per cent of her railroads away and leased her peninsula for 30 years. The war cost $600,000,000 for . a nation whose income is al· most two-thirds of that.

.o But 1941 will be the worst year in Finland's history. The ration of butter and all fats is about six ounces a week. For want of coal they have cut 17,000,000 cubic meters of wood. Rec,ently Finland's Minister to U. S. said, "If we can't get help, we will starve and freeze." Grain in the warehouse is down to a threemonths supply.

• The cruelest blow was the refusal of the U. S. to lend money to them for food. For Finland is under suspicion of letting food trickle through to Germany. Actually there is small basis for this belief. The northern parts are blockaded and under strict control. Imports for Finland and Swe· den are the only countries given consideration and Finland needs everything she can get for herself.

• This is the story of Finland who had not asked for war, yet fought like a giant with admirable skill and courage. · .. ·Most important of all, the · Finns face peace with as much courage as they faced war.

and "Secure the Blessings of Liberty." Highlights of the convention were addresses by John W. Studebaker, United States Commissioner of Education; Phillip Murray, president of the C. I. 0.; and Harold E. Stassen, governor of Minnesota. Peruvians whom President Pate met at the convention were: former president J, vV. Crabtree; Joy Morgan, editor of the Joumil of Education for the National Educational Association; Professor Benson of ,the New York University; and Alexander J. Stoddard, superintendent of Philadelphia schools, who was also a speaker at the convention. i

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Readers Interpret Rt Friday Program

A program ·of monologues was presented at convocation on March 7 by members of Prof. R. D. Moore's interpretative reading class. Reuben Fanders gave two selec· tions in dialect. The first an "An Italian's View on the Labor Question." His second reading was "My Little Yacob Strauss."

The spring Civil Pilot Training unit has been organized and the ground schoo1 is under way. Flight training will start as soon as the Frderal Government gives its approval. It has been announced by th~ science department that four hours credit will be given those 0 students who complete the course. Tl!ey will be graded both on the Dean Clark is the newly electground school tests and their pro- ed president of Y. M. C. A. Bob Mcgress in the actual flying of the Alexander is vice president; Carl plane. Wirth, secretary and Willard MilStudents of this unit will receive likan, treasurer. additional ground instruction and a chance to get their fingers dirty The new cabinet at its first meetw1~h the actual grease of the plane, in~ planned a series of three meet11 hen a plane will be brought to ir,gs on the subject "Racial Pride Pnu and given a major overhaul- rnd Racial Prejudice." Dr. J. M. in in the basement of the Adminis- Vvinter will speak on that subject tt•night (Tuesday). His talk will ~ration Building. be followed by two discussion meetThose taking the course are i11 bs. A'll men are invited to hear Maurice Anderson, Worthy ArgaDr. Winter at 7:00 P. M. in the bright, James Busenbarrick, Clair Callan, Vincent Dreeszen, Neal lounge.

Clark tlected Y. ffi. President

Good, Nunzio Lazzaro, Lance Ray, Clairon Smith and Jared Smith. i

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~'ath C'.u b met Mond ay n1·ght , iv1 March 3 for the purpose of electing new members. A. short business meeting W;J,S held.

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Dan1111ast gave "Vera Cheern's Program." This selection was a satire on. modern radio programs. It featured the slogan "Plunkin's Pink Pill for Pale People" and ·the ever recurring phrase "Ju'st sehd ii:! fifteen box tops." Lester Reuter's "Jimmie Jones Studie.3 Jograf.y" was a portrayal of a small boy's efforts to study geography. Jimmie read and reread that the world is a sphere although he was much more inter· ested in the fly he had captured and dewinged. Margie Ann Kinsey presented the last monologue entitled "Gloria Whittington Gushing." This reading was a satire on the way that many up-ar:d-coming mothers today sometimes neglect their children.

~Ballad'

March 16

Tlle college band under the direction of Prof. V. H. Jindra will present the following program March 14 at the college auditorium. March of the Pioneers-Carleton Golby-"-WT: by ::<red Huffer. Frayer and Dream PantomimeHurnperdinck-arr. by Joseph Mad: dy.

Swiss Boy-arr. by Paul de Vi1lc. Headlines-Carleton Colby-.arr. by Fred Huffer. My Heart at Thy Sweet VoiceSaint-Saens-arr. by L. P. Laurendeau. Legend of Sleepy Hollow-Dave Bennett. Southland-Medley-arr. by Paul Weckesser. Funiculi Funicula-P. Denzaarr. by Weckesser. Trumpet Trio. Bolero-Ravel-arr. by Mayhew Lake. There will be no admirnion charge.

Calendar

----·---The studio audience cheered for 15 minutes at its conclusion, the switchboards in the New York and Hollywood studios were unable to handle the telephone calls regarding this rousing composition, and an unprecedented amount of mail requested a repeat performance. Those were the effects of the first sti~ring performance of "Ballad for Americans" sung by Paul Robeson and chorus, which the Perusingers will present March 16 in the college auditorium. This modern cantata is based on four high spots in our national history: the Revolution, the growth of the Union, the Civil War, and the Machine Age. The figure of the soloist is an epic one in the sense that Abraham Lincoln, Paul Bunyan and John Henry were epic figures. Towering above the people, he embodies their yearnings, their .§powledge of this history, their enctl:ess curiosity about each other and their basic hope in the future. Although sometimes dramatic, the general characteristic of the number is its

simplicity and realism. John Latouche, who wrote the words for "Ballad for Americans" attended Columbia University where he won the Poetry Awards for two successive years. In 1937, he felt an urgent necessity to combat intolerance and prosecution, s.nd wrote the original poem in ballad form, using the narrative history of the United States as a guide to Freedom and Democracy. Earl Robinson studied music at the University of Washington where he was graduated in 1933. During July and August of that year he traveled in the Southern States collecting folk songs and folk material which he recorded for the Library of Congress. "Ballad for Americans" will be heard again and again, because no composition interprets so vividly, so truly the character, philosophy and spirit of the American people, the pattern for universal happiness and freedom. This number is being presented by the chorus through special permission of the copyright owners.

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Perusingers to Produce Popular

T. S. musicians Win Honors Rt Tarkio Festival

• TUEShAY, MARCH 11 WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12 Gamma Chi (entire group) . . . . .. . . . . . . . . 7-9 THURSDAY, MARCH 13 Freshmen Clubs . . . . . . . . 7-9

FRIDAY, MARCH 14 Dramatic Club Business Meeting ..... , . . . . . . 11:30

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SUNDAY, MARCH 16 Musicale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4'.00 Lutheran Club . . . . .. . . . 7-8

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MONDAY, MARCH 17 Freshman Council .... 10:30 Alpha Psi .............. 7-8 International Relations Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-8 Kappa Delta Pi .. , . . . . . 8-9

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Training School musicians earned six superiors and one excellent out of seven entries in the music and speech festival at Tarkio College, Mo., F'riday, March 7. Donna Steffen, competing with 21 other clarinet soloists, played Bouillion's "Shower of Gold," to earn one of seven superiors g·iven. Donna rated excellent in the district contest at Auburn last year. Flutist Mary Shirley Jimerson, with superior and excellent ratings to her credit, played "Nocturno," by Doppler, receiving one of two superiors granted in that division. Both Mary Shirley and Donna are high school seniors. ' Junior winners were Lawrence Good, who performed Clay Smith's baritone sole, "Thoughts of Yesterday,'' and Patricia Hill, playing from the ''Duberiot Concerto No. 9" for violin. Patty during the past two years has received two superiors and one excellent. in district r.nd M. I. N. K. contests. Kathlyn Benford, sophomore, who has in two district contests and one M. I. N. K. won two exccllents and one hig·hly superior on violin, this time entered a viola solo, Grieg's "Ballad," receiving an excellent rating. Brass sextette members, Arthur Clements, Willard Redfern, Beulah Spoor, Ralph Clevenger, John Lewis and Lawrence Good played "La· Fiesta," by Guentzel, to win their ffrst diviSfoh ribbOn. The clarinet quartet, including Donna Steffen, Billy Jean Miller, Wilda Hazelton and Nancy Steck won their rating by "Procession of the Sardar" by Ippol'itov-Ivanov. One Of 47 schools entering a to-· ta! of 285 events, Peru Prep earned· 26 points to tie for fifth place in Class B. Judges from Peru were G. Holt steck and Robert T. Benford, voice and piano; Mrs. Anna Best Joder · and Robert D. Moore, drama and speech. Violin instructor Victor H. . Jindra ciecihred ah invitation to . judge st1ing entries for the seventh consecutive year, preferring to enter private pupils Kathlyn and Pat-·

ty.

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Supt. S. L. Clements, director of training ·school barid and for years M. I. N. K. contest chairman and district contest official, was asked hew it felt to attend a contest with comparatively little responsibility. "I'm enjoying myself," he replied amiably, "but it makes me want to have a M. I. :N. K. Contest next ye[J.r." Others makjng the trip were Mrs. Robert D. Moore and Mrs. Everett Good; accompanists Doris Brinson, Betty Kennedy and Janet Harris; and Leonore Larson, soloist on piccolo, an instrument not included in competition at Tarkio. Winner of excellent and two superiors in M. I. N. K. and district contests, Leonore rated highly superior in national competition at Kansas City last year. She, along with Friday's contestants and several large vocal and instrumental groups will represent Peru Training School in the district (Continued on page four)


r nn.u rnuA.uVv1Al"I

TUESDAY, MARCH 11, 19

Rooing Reporter Probes Published Weekly by The Peru State Teachers College

No. I Dance Man, Floyd

Peru, Nebraska

Entered at the PostoHice at Peru, Nebraska, as Second Class Matter. $1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc

. · Editor Rose McGmms · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ,,. · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Ralph Locke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sports Editor A ' Sports Editor Harold Jenkins · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ss t. . Meredith Jimerson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Copy Reader Nina Kane! ................... · · . · · · · · · · · · · · Proof Reader REPORTERS: Murvel Annan,. James Busenbarrick, Maude Daft, William Fankhauser, Marjorie Kennedy, Carol Prine, Erna Steffen, Pauline Stark, Harold- Jenkins, Janet Harris, Ted Thompson.

WEEKEND TREKThe "sign out" list at the girls dorm regularly carries ;the names of some hundred plus names each week endh · b' d h II h'!1 more than half the residents in ,t e com me a s-w · e t~.e Men's Hall "pull.out" is equally astounding.

These columns, in ari. earlier issue, devoted inch after inch of space to the "patching of holes in our pockets." Add to the mending list-this week erid trek homeward. Education, according to worthy authorities, is a prepar· ation for life. Absorption @f classroom instruction is one means of attaining that goal. But quote Lowell, "The better part of education is that which one gives himself." Therefore, despite the broad sweep of our academic knowledge can students afford to walk out every Friday night only to

h~rry back Monday morning to. rest up for the next weet ·end in the home town? It must be admitted that week ends -are wonderful-day in and night out-but ah, for the drone of the classroom, the quiettude of book-lined rooms. Colleg<: i.s restful ! Passing over the academic lifeo, what is to be said for the ·extra· curricular world where one supposedly wins .friends, influences people, and perhaps develops his personal side? Are four arid one half days per week sufficient for this part of education? .Consider the greater possibilities which occur from Friday to Monday! The majority of committees on campus function most actively during the week end. Only by participating in such activities can one best pick up an occasional bit of learning not gleaned from text 8ooks. Failing to attend such Sunday musicales as the calendar regularly schedules, is further defeating the very reason you are here. While or )ortunity still lingers on the front stoop, why not make college life somewhat more interesting, and vast· ly more fun? T.ry putting the hometown come hither element on the shelf

~nd

learn your responsibility by doing it, not

by skipping out on it!

----ca---"The first time was a hit and miss affair and the lights were plenty low. Confidentially, I was glad when the piece was over, but anxious to try it again." Rex laughed and continued, "The girl seemed a bit doubtful as to my ability f" Really Rex came into the limelight as a dancer. at the age of seven. when he won a Charleston contest. After much persuasion he admitted t]1at he once won a "Big Apple" contest, also. , That Rex started dancing was partly due to his coach. "Our football team was using the Notre Dame system and our coach encouraged us to dance for the rhythm which would help our shifting. Then, too, my friends danced and I went along just to listen to the different bands." As a favorite dance spot, Rex lists Turnpike and Lakeside Parl1 in Denver as second. Dick Jergens and Kay Kyser tie for favorite dancing band with Will Osborne rating first as a listening band. "I'll take the trombone as my favorite instrument, which, by the way, is featured by Will Osborne." Rex named more than twenty big time bands which he had danced to, including Cab Calloway, Kay Kyser, Blue Baron, Glen Grey, Dick Jergens, Guy Lombardo and Sammy Kay. The whirl serves at the basis for Rex's dancing, but he does all of the new steps including· some of his own originals. One original. the "Riverside Stomp," is a combination of the Suzy Que, Lindy Hop, whirl and slide. Rex does jitterbug, but he thinks there's a place for it. He also likes to waltz-with a girl who can waltz. ,;Few girls are good

waltzers," according to Rex. "An ideal partner is one about three inches shorter than myself or just short enough that I can see over her. She must be smooth, able to whirl indefinitely, follow any step, know when to break, close-in and should know the courtesies· of dancing such as when to stop, start, talk and speak to others." Rex thinks that any girl who likes to dance, can dance. Concerning moods Rex states, "The mood doesn't matter, your feet will move anyway." On the Peru campus,. Rex acts as a sponsor of Learn-to-dance club. He has also given lessons to boy friends, playing the role of a girl. "Ifs easier to follow a strong leader than to lead, but every beginner shoUld be able to follow and lead," comments Rex. "Straight rhythm tunes are best for dancing. I really haven't a spec!al tune, my taste runs along with ethers. My favorite right now is "Goodby Now" but I like all of Ronnie Kemper's songs." M a ~'p-notch dancer Rex lists Caesar F~cr:iero and thinks George Murphy an all right dancer. Being a first rate football play·er, Rex thinks that dancing and football do mix and that the rhythm from dancing helps in any sport. Re:: r;ouldn't commit himself on d8ncers in Peru but he thinks ti; ere aren't enough all-college dances. He has a better time at iMc;·mal dances but thinks formais are great things, for fellows rave a chance to dress-up and see correct dancing. "And," Rex finished, "I always dance in old sh~s ! "

Band to Interpret Kappa Phi Plans

'Sleepy Hollow'

Kansas City Trip 0

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Industrial points of interest in Do you remember "The Legend Kansas City wil1 be- toured by Kapof Sleepy Hollow" by Washingtcn pa Omicron Phi members of May Irving? The college band will give 9 and 10. Mary Horton and Maryou their version of it at the con- jorie Kennedy are making plans for the tour. Edna Mae Petersen will cert March 14. arrange for transportation. "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" Plans were made for initiation. ls a descriptive American fantasy, composed and arranged by Dave which will be held April 7. Active Bennett. It is based on Irving's members took the national test. immortal classic of the post-Revo- Papers will be sent to the national secretary for grading. lutionary War days. Monna Morelock and Ardith The number begins with an auHollow, Ichabod Crane receives an Christiancy will have charge of tnmn afternoon in peaceful Sleepy serving the Sigma Tau Delta baninvitation to merr~aking ·at the quet March 31. Van Tassel farmhouse and the merrymaking follows. At midnight, tales of witchcraft and the Headless Horseman are told. Ichabod starts home on hi.s hors~. Gunpowder, and as he approaches the haunted bridge, . the· Headless Horseman appears out of the shadcws. Ichabod flees wLh fae ho:·seMiss Grace Tear spoke on "The man in pursuit, and unfcrtunately Preparation of Manuscripts" at the is struck by - a pumpkin and falls February 27. meeting of Scribb1ers off his horse and rolls on the Club. ground. IchabOd disappears and se"One way to know what type of renity returns to Sleepy Hollow. contributions to send to a magaFletcher Cline, a senior member zine is to be familiar with the of the band, will be trombone so· magazine," commented Miss Tear. loist in "My Heart at Thy Sweet VG\ice." This number is taken from Seasonal articles· are wanted by the second act of the opera, "Sam- magazines, the group was told, and son and Delilah," by Camille Saint- these should be sent in six months Saens and was arranged for band· before the season. by F. P. Laurendeau. This aria, A stamped, self-addressed envelwhich is the most PoPular of the cpe should· be enclosed if a reply is entire work, is sung by Delilah as desired, according to Miss Tear. she schemes to win the confiJ. J. J. Prof. R. T. Benford judged piano deuce of Samson. "Bolero" by the French compo- and all vocal work at the Tarkio ser Maurice Ravel and arranged by Music Festival March 7. J. J. J. Mayhew Lake contains some char· Mr. and Mrs. Robert D. Moore acteristics which fascinate both the performer and listener. The "bo- and Prof. R. T. Benford were judlero" in Spain, is a national folk ges at tl)~ Tarkio music and dradance. In this number, on rhythm matic nfi!et Friday, March 7. pattern is sustained by the drums, while a weird solo ·is given by tomary in the dance, the piece the other instruments. As is cus- gains tempo a.s it moves along.

Grace Tear Enlightens Freshmen Scribblers •

Thomas-Adams marriage Announced 0

The marriage of Miss Mary Thomas and Ross Adams was nounced this week. The cerem was performed August 3, 1940, the Christian parsonage at Hia tha, Kac.. Rev. Lomax, pastor the church read the marriage Ii Mrs. Adams is the daughter of :Mr; and Mrs. Wm. Thomas and MI\ Adams is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Mrs. Earl Adams.

MILDRED W. WILSON, formerly Mildred Williams a Peru graduate, had her picture published in tM February issue of the P. E. o. Rec• ord. She is at present Idaho State President of P. E. 0. Mr. Wilson is· superintendent of the Mullan, Ida· ho school.s. They have two child· ren, Molly-Jean, a junior at Ste· phens College, and Elmer, Jr., a high school pupil.

MERLE PEEK, '35, recently el· ected physical education director iP the Pueblo, Colo., Pubiic Schools writes: "School is going very well. I have 450 'kids' twice a week in gym wor.k, plus 150 once a week in hygiene. My work, too, consists of the organization of intramural ath· letics. we have about 1800 students here."

o· DORIS MAE STARKEBAUM, (mat. '38) recently was chosen associate editor of the Wesley Circuit F.ider publication of the Wesley foundation of the University of Ne· ~raska. One of her poems a ::>1Jr:ars ln the current issue of the publi · ca ti en.

Peruvians attending the Tarkio· Peru game were: JEANNE WINK· ELMAN, MARTHA AND HAROLD BOATMAN, ALLAN WITTE, COR· INNE AND ROBERT SHERMAN, SPENCER M. LEGER, MINNIE MEAD, MARILYN -WITTLER, MR. AND MRS. HARVEY COLE (Lois Metcalf), MARY ELLEN SLACK. FLOYD LAWRENCE, MARGIE LAWRENCE, JAMES STEELE, DR. ROBERT COLE, and MILFORD SEARS.

JOHN WHEATLEY ('34) is minister of the First . Presbyterian Church at Shelby, Iowa. John was an active member of the Dramati.c Club, and carried the mail on the campus. John attended the Presbyterian Theological Seminary in Omaha and has been preaching for two years. MRS. WHEATLEY, nee Virginia Muncy, is alsoa Peruvian. 1

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ffirs. Tyler Reviews 'Charlotte Bronte'

"Charlotte Bronte" by E. F. Ben· son was reviewed by Mrs. J. W. Tyler at the A. A. U. W. Book Re- \ view March 5. "Receiving the book for Christmas was like an ?.nswered prayer." said Mrs. Tyler. "It is one of my most prized possessions." This biography, the most auth· entic one on the market, was writ· ten by an Englishman whose fa· tht>r was headmaster of an English college. The Bronte children grew up in a parsonage at Haworth on the noors of England. Their father was a minister of a small church. The mother died when Charlotte was five years o1d. Charlotte, Emily and Anne are the best known of this family of six children. Charlotte wrote the one-time best seller, "Jane Eyre." Emily wrote "Wuthering Heights" and Anne wrote "Agnes Grey." The Bronte sisters wrote under the assumed names of Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell.

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PAGE THREE

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

TUESVA Y, MARCH 11, 1941

Peru Bobcats Lose Finale to Tarkio 55-31 Owls Displayed Flashy Brand of Ball to Win

lsports Of Yesteryear 1Jack

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Floyd Proves By Em• s1o1fon Ability As Prep ······:! Sports mentor

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Peru Prep Loses Semi-Final Tilt to Humboldt 35-26

ONE YEAR AGO e Chadron and Peru split a twogame series for co-championship The tall Humboldt cagers gave 0 . Crowd Largest of Year N. I. A. A. conference honors, the dope bucket a kick, when, in Chadron taking the first game 42Unbeaten in Two Sports the semifinals of the district meet e 27 and Peru the second 47-45. at Humboldt, they upset the Bob· The Peru Bobcats closed the bas- Greathouse was high man with 9 kittens 35 to 26. ketball season last Tuesday even- points in the first game and a tie Peru had fought their way to ing as they lost one to the fast- with Halliday, 15 each, in the final. Another Peruvian gives his school the semifinals by smothering Lewstepping Tar~io Owls, last years a boost as he goes about his work iston Wednesday night 37 to 28 national intercollegiate champions TWO YEARS AGO -and that fellow is Jack Floyd and Shubert Thursday evening 31 by a verdict of 55-3~. , The 'Cats were crowned again for ('40) who is now coaching at to 19. Peru grabbed an early. lead, but a third consecutive N. I. A. A. Bratton Union. The Humboldters took a 5 to 4 soon the scoring punch of the championship as Chadron went With only rn boys enrolled in lead at the close ~f the first quar· Owls began to tell, and at the half, down twice to give Peru leads of school, Floyd gmded them through ter and althou"h the count was Tarkio led 29-16. Tlle Missouri team 53-28 and 44-32. an undefeated season of six-man de~dlock~d at 14' all early in the wa~ very impressive as they sifted football. In .basketball the. story is third period, the Kittens never hit through the Bobca,'s defense rethe same; with every boy m school their stride and were unable to FIVE YEARS AGO peated1y. Their team is easily the Captain-elect Riggs, Howard out for the team, the Bratton Un- forge into the lead. best that has p1ayed on the Peru Dean and Bob Halliday of the ion Bulldogs have s.wept through a The game was fast and rugged · maples this' year. Lewis, forward, Champ team rated 5, 7, 10 on indi- 22 game season w1t.hout a. smgle with a total of 27 personal fouls and McPherson, guard, played bril- vidual scoring in the N. I. A. A. setback marked. agamst thelll. In charged to the tea;ns. liant ball, and as teammates they conference. those 22 victones the team has Smith paced th{ Fishermen with stole the show, both for that game, collected three trophies. Among 10 points while Sandfort was col;,nd for performances here throughthem is th~ir fifth straight District lecting 9 ' for Humboldt. TEN YE'.ARS AGO Box score: out the season. Homer Hatcher was chosen pilot cup, and Little Ten conference troe The game was the• feature of the for the coming season as the sea- phy. Peru fg pf ft On the team are several lads Cotton, f annual "Nebraska City night," and son ended with still another conTough Season Ahead 1 4 1-2 who have been teammates sine~ Slinker, f there was a very large crowd out ference title. 0 1 0-0 they played together in the sixth Rogers, g to see the sport, At the halftime 0 1-6 3 grade. The Bratton Union ~porting Redfern c int-ermission the Nebraska City 0 0 0-0 Coach Al Wheeler issued equip- high school band and pep squad contingent now turns their atten- Smith 'f (c) 5 1 0-2 ment Thursday to a turnoµt of 53 paraded, adding to the co1or of the tion to the state tournament com- Ogg, c 1 4 0-0 track candidates .. ·The size of the occasion. ing up in Lincoln soon. Two years Brcwn, g 0 2-4 0 group reporting for. duty was very in the preliminary tussle, the B ago the Bulldogs won the Class C Clements, g 1 2 4-6 pleasing, and of the· coming season, squad downed the Burchard High state championship, The question TOTALS 9 15 8-17 Coach Al says, quote,' ·"Tb.is year School team 37-20, winning over now confronting former Bobcat Eumboldt fg pf ft we lack individual performers, al- coach l.€tiger's championship sqaud Jack Floyd and 13 Bulldog cagers S&,ndfort. f 3-5 2 is, "Can we do it this year?" The though prospects are very good f9r without much trouble. Mayer, f 0 0-1) 0 a well-balanced team. It looks like Tarkio fg answer is to wait and see. The team ft M1:·:-;JrniL f 3 1 0-0 we will have to work for seconds. Arneal, 4 won their qualifying game in the 2-3 In an exciting overtime tussle, Hubka, f 0 0 0-0 and thirds to win our meets, and Lewis, f 9 5-6 the Bobkittens edged the fast district playoffs, downing Brock by Yocum. c re) 2 3 3-6 one point. from that angle it will take plenty Martin, c 4 0-0 1 Dawson crew 25 to 23 in the DisKaiser~ g 2 2-3 of tedious toil. The boys will have. McPherson, g 1 0-0 2 trict consolation flight Saturday Floyd attended Peru four years, Fr;Pdly, g 2 4 3-3 lettering in football and track. His to get into top condition and stay Crawford, 2 1 night. Clement's one-hander prov2-3 :Parker, g 0 2 0-1 active career as a player ended, there. With their best cooperation, Spitzmesser, f o 1-3 1 ed the margin of victory. TOTALS 12 12 11!18 I think that we will give a credithowever, when he sustained a knee O At the rest period Peru com1 0-0 able· account of ourselves." Wake, f 1 1' 0 manded a 15 to 7 lead, but Dawson injury which has forced him to the Barnstoff, g 1-1 sidelines. Now he is out · among . oSt. Regis Kleening Tissues. 500 veterans reporting for . .repeat Graham, g o 0-(J 'f staged a last half' rally that deadhigh school students, teaching them for 23c. Hill's Drug Store. performances were: Dashes-At- Hines, g o 0 locked the teams at 23 all. 0-0 the way to play the game the kins, Floyd, Hender~on and Ashton. Kyle , o o Smith again lead the ,Prepsters right 0-0 1' 1' 1' way-and that's the "Bcbcat" Distances-Koontz, Atkins, Organ, Peru fg f with 10 markers, while B. Auxier ft way. President W. R. Pate was guest Floyd and Ashton. Weights: Lurk, Walker, 2 rang up 11 for Dawson. 0-0 speaker at the Peru Kiwanis club Hannah, Mason, Mcintire and Byers, f 3 ft 2. Peru fg 1-1 meeting last Tuesday night, giving Handley. Jumps-Handley, Hannah Hiatt, c 1-1 3 cotton, f 1 1 0-0 a report of observations made at and Walker. The hurdles corps will Mcintire, g 4 1 Smith, f (c) 5 0-2 4-5 the recent Atlantic City educational have to be selected from first year Hannah, g 1-1 1 Slinker, f 1 0-1 1 meeting. men, due to the absence Of Bert Ronhovde, f 0-0 O Ogg, c 0 0-0 0 Hall, Harold Fisher and Mather Grubaugh, f 0-2 0 1 Redfern, c 0 1-2 0 who are not in school this semes1-6 o Roger, g 0 3 Quote Knutson: "The most im- jorie Ann, all by her lovely loneHandly, f 0-0 0 t~r. Mather is absent, now taking Wh't 1-2 o Clements, g 2 4 portant people in the world pass some-but Pensacola's only six 0-0 1 his place in the National defense ,d1 e, c 2-3 o Brown, g 0 O through this door (They are our month's distant .... Whizzer White Sm er. g 0 0-0 program. Last year he averaged 0-0 2 Hunzeker, 0 1 vi~itoro) .... Little Looie Steck's ne\.. "rusting" on his high school laurels 1-2 1 0 1614 points per meet and will be Pasca' g ,6-17 TOTALS 9 '15 pride in Sat. eve Ghost role ........ New low in Sat. nlte dance . Half score 16-29. missed very mucl;J.. Greathouse, , . . . fg Dawson tt pf Pardon me, but are you two mar- attendance .... Skirts are getting another reliable graduated, as did Offlc1als. Craig and Roper. Etter, f 0-0 0 O ried? .... California dew in Busen- longer, please, says the writing on Bert Hall. Fisher and Brown of 'f " " 1-6 B. Auxier, f 5 1 barrick and Lang's domicile .... Re- the wall-So down with hems and last year have jobs this year. Ray, f 0-2 0 o cruits- for the college band, Slug up with socks (For last line see Promising freshmen turning out 1-3 R. Auxier, f 0 1 Pascal and his Guy Lombardo zax bulletin board over 'Liza Morgan are: Dashes-Frye, Richards and Blosser, c 0-0 1 -Newton's hot trumpet .... Mar- way) .... Meouw! 0 White. Distance-Allgood, OakBeachy, c 3-3 1 2 man, Howe and Hines. WeightsForbis, g (c) 1-1 4 0 Hines, McKenney and Rachow. O'Grady, g 0-0 1 0 Pole vault and high jump-Beatty 0 Duryea, g 0-0 0 1 and W. Handley. TOTALS 7-18 13 8 J. J. J. In anticipation of meeting the the U. S. Naval Reserve Aviation demand for pilots that will be ocBase, Kansas City, Kansas, will casioned by their increased buildbe in Peru the morning of March ing program, the U. S. Navy has 12th. not only expanded their base at The members of the Board, EnPensacola, but have built new adsign T. H. Jenkins, a Naval aviavanced training bases at Jacksontor, and Lt (jg) F. A. Speer, MedThe WAA members held their ville, Fla.; Miami, Fla., and Corpus ical Corp, will be at Nebrask'a State annual election. last week, electing Christi, Texas. The new training Teacher's College at 9:30 a. m. CENTRAL OFFICE, 17 NORTH MAIN ST. COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA new officers for the coming year. base at Jacksonville has been· re- where they will show a short film Discussed at the meeting was a cently commissioned and Aviation of aviation training at Pensacola proposed trip to a state conve~tion Cadets are now being trained there and then conduct interviews and to be held at Wesleyan soon. Fur- in numbers comparable to those physical examinations for interther deliberation will be necessary trained at Pensacola. The Naval Air ested men qualified educationally before definite plans are made. A School at Corpus Christi will be for flig·h t training. committee was chosen to confer commissioned on March 12th, and i\ flying student in the Navy rewit!' Director Miss Phyllis David- Aviation Cadets wm probably be cehes one month's training at one Sl'U to decide on the four.th sport ordered there about the first of of the sixteen reserve air bases in to be installed in the present set- April. Until March 15th ... Commission obligations the United States and is then sent In order to supply these advancup, in competition for WAA letter cease for men when they are conscripted into military duty to one of the advanced Navy trainawards. ed training bases with students, ... Now these new advantages are offered by the same rei1;g centers located on the Gulf of The 'new cast of officers include: the sixteen Naval Reserve Aviation l'able servb> whose facilities and experienced guidance are J\fexico. Upon completion of the Elaine Brier, President; Fern Pahn- Bases throuhgout the country are constantly at your command. Nebrastraining, he is then commissioned l:a. and all neighboring states our field . . / ;~ .. _ , · t.ag', V:ice President; Doreen Meier, training more students than ever as Ensign in the Reserves and Wnte t.oday. ~ft~ S(•cretary; Ardis Carmine, _Treas- before. In connection with this in$pmds three or more years as an DAVIS SCHOOL SERVICE MOR, urer and Christine Wilkinson, Point cr.ease in training facilities a travofficer and pilot in one of the 643 Stuart Bldg., Lineoln, Ntbreslt :Recorder. eling Flight, Selection Board from aviation squadrons operating with

S~ORTS

Coaches Issue Track Equipment To 53 Candidates

Fishermen Win Consolation Game from Table Rock

pi f

Flight Selection Board Visits PSTC Tomorrow • tO TeII f SefVICe

W.R.R. Elects Officers For Coming Year

the Fleets.

CAi.CLAws ]


PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE FOUR.

Howe's Laurels Come to Light

Thorson Gives musicians Histo~cal Facts

• This interview with James Howe, who plays the part of Sir Sim,on de Contervme in the spring play "The Saturday Evening Ghost," which will be presented on April 18, wm be the first of a series concerning the whole cast, Jim attended Barneston High Sch9ol where he was very active in extra curricular activities, During his freshman year in high school he was entered in the humorous division of dramatics and won the district contest but was defeated in the state contest He had parts in the. freshman, junior, and all-hig!l, school plays " and the lead in "Cloudburst." in 19S6, Jim substitu·ted in a production 'of the Collier Stock Company because .of an ill~ · ness in the troupe .. Jim played the violin three years in .the high school orche~tra and. sang with the Glee' Club and. the Boy;s Quartette. · · He lettered one year in. track and two years in football. Jim was Valedictorian Of his class an'cJ. won the Regent Scholarship. He was . graduated in 1939. i

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• Musicians Win Tarkio Honors • (Continued from Page One) contest at Auburn next month. Helen Margaret Larson, 1939 Peru graduate teaching in Wales Lincoln consolidated School, Emerson, Iowa, had a number of high-ranking contestants in both speech and music, tying for third place sweepstakes in her music division. Cagers Willard Redfern and Arthur Clements zoomed from music festival to basketball tournament at Humboldt, while Mr. Clements and his carload stayed for the evening program, made up of out-

Prof. Wiuston B. Thorson spoke to the advanced music appreciation class last Wednesday concerning the governmental policies and political uprisings in Europe between 1789 and 1914. In correlating the political status of the continent and the ~usic written during that time, it is easily understood why music cLanged so greatly in harmony alld in form. Mr. Thorson said "music is the expression of the soul" and the composer is broughtup in revolutionary envir'onment and · sustains revolutionary ideas, the music which he creates will also convey such standards.

mInKcontestants i

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To Record Vo ices •

" " " "" """" """ • " "" -Ij "Training SchooI

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FOODS

The junior high school girls' physical education class is now centering its interest in volleyball.

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MARDIS GROCERY

Peruvian Snapper, Clements, Talks Shop Click! There's t.hat man again. It's Peruvian camera-man Dick Clements shooting from under chairs, hanging from trees, and from behind buildings, trying to get those funny ang'les which are his specialty. Dick is the enthusiastic user of the newly purchased 4x5 speedraphic camera which retails at $180, and which he says is "just about as good a camera as you can buy." All this craze for snapping photos came about eight years ago when Dick's uncle gave him a developing outfit for Christmas, and he started on his way with a b()X camera. In 1936, Dick shook the pennies out of his piggy bank to find that he had enough to invest in a $20 job. By this time he was able to print and develop all the shots which made him the Training School's "Public Pest No. I.'· Last year, he bought an enlarger About the Peruvian work, Dick explained, "Mr. Peterson was kind enough to let us use his camera during ·the fall. We had such success in getting the. type of pictures we wanted that we were able to make the purchase of the camera," (which he expects to be a real asset on the campus since pictures can be taken at the best possible moment and not so much to fit the photographer's schedule.) The record of the Peruviian staff is 175 pictures in two weeks, and for an amateur crew, they are proud of the fact that 75 per cent of all their pictures will be used in the Peruvian at a cost of only ;5c per picture for c1eveloping and

s. L. C~ements attended the clinic on visual education ~ which was sponsored by the U..J:li~ versity of Nebraska in the Student Union building M•arch 8.

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J. P. CLARK

Electric Shoe Shop

Shoe Repairs of All Kinds

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1i!Jllll~llllmm~~lllllll®ltl

DR. G. H. JODER -Physician and SurgeonOffice at Milstead Comer Office Phone 33, Res. 39

In the junior high basketball tournament, Clayburn's "Killerdillers" and Henning's "Hot Shots" are tied for first place each with a perfect standing. The Collin's five and Good's team have each lost two games and won one. So far, the "Hell Cats" haven't come through and still stand with a zero percentage.

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PERU BOWLING CLUB · .La.dies Welcome at All Times Ben Hanlon Mgr. M. G. Heuer, Owner

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Dorothy Fike entered the ninth grade at the training school last week. She comes from Nemaha. i i i eNew Shades .in Silk Hose. 69c89c-$1.00. Hill's Drug Store.

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. The Teachers Placement Bureau is getting statistical infonnation available for teacher applications which are now being filed at the office.

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Look no farther-look your best Haircutting A Specialty

~i Join! Each year several hunModern Barber Shop dred reserve Naval officers ar: ~eBILL LLOYD ~ lected for a permanent comm1Ss1on lllill!Jli!lilllilllillllllliiilllillllilllilllllll!!filiJillli!iilllilllllll!ifilllilll~ in the U. S. Navy ·and can expect to make Naval aviation a lifeilllilllilllllllilllilllilllilllilllilllllllllllilll®illlilll!!!i ti~e career. After serving severai years with the fleet, the flyer is Peru Recreation Parlors returned to civil life with a cash ~ bonus of $500.00 for each year of POOL AND SNOOKER ~ commissioned service, and has the llll Otto Boellstorff, Prop. ~ technical knowledge and experience till · ~ to step into a lucrative position in lfilillliiilllllllllillllllllll[jjjlllJ(gj[ijj[l;]lllJ[l;]!iiilllJilllll.lJ!llililimiill commercial aviation.

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Soap carving was a feature at the Art Club meeting on March 3: A short busine:s meeting was conducted by Mary E. Collin, president. It was announced that Miss Grace Tear will speak on "Antique Glass" at the next meeting, March 31. i i i Quiz Questions were in order for Tri Beta members last Monday night. The questions were on the general subject of Biology.

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e Films Developed, Plain or Dec-

i i i M. Florence Martin directed the Nemaha County Spelling contest on Saturday, March 8, in Auburn.

orated border, 25c. 2 free enlargements. Hill Drug Store. Patronize Ped advertisers. '

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STATE THEATRE (Auburn, Nebraska)

CONTINUOUS SHOWS EVERY DAY

2:30-11:30 SAT •• SUN •• MON.-MARCH

15, 16, 17

A Picture You'll Never Forget. .Filmed in Magnificent Technicolor. "VIRGINIA"

With Madeleine Carroll Fred Mac lllurray Featurettes-:-The Cracked Quail. News Reel

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AUBURN THEATRE (Auburn, Nebraska) SUN .• MON•• TUES.-MARCH

16, 17, 18

"HIGH SIERRA"

With Ida Lupino Humphey Bogart Featurettes-What a Little Sneeze will Do. Rodeo Goes to Town

·Again • that Good Skelly Service in Peru .... ...,........,....................

11liil~illll!!l;gillJ:gllllilll§ll:m~~; Supt. ~~ll!fJfil!Jll!@~~

Soa;p Carving Ability

his camera experience, Dick said, "I intend to use it only as a hobby, but since I am going into engineering, a knowledge of the camem. and the use of the camera should be very valuable." · of

11, 1941

Artists Display

____ ., ____

A new feature of the ninth annual M. I. N. K. Dramatic Arts Contest which will be held March 2&, wm be the voice recording serv:ce. Any contestant may have his 1·oice recorded for a small fee. Sch~ols may enter one-act plays, hun1orous and dramatic declamati011s, oral interpretations, and original oratory. The 230 schools invited have been divided into three classes according to their ·size. Sweepstake trophies will be awarded t.o , the school in e<:ch division that receives the dghest number of points. Entries will be rated as superior, excellent, good, or fair. Certificates will be given to the groups and individuals who rate superior or excellent. pr~L1ting, makin.; a 50 per cent savThe committee in charge of the ir,g en their photography bill. contest includes Dr. Arthur L. Wl1en asl,ed about the value of Bradford, Professor Robert D. Moore, Wilbert Kohrs, Clara Eyre, Freddie Drexler, Lester Reutter and Margery Ann Kinsey.

~~ [ • News Notes FOR SATISFACTION IN

TUESDAY, MARCH

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T IS WITH PLEASURE that we an. nounce the opening of the SKELLY SERVICE STATION where Peru community motorists may again get that good Skelly Service ••• that good Skelly Gas and Skelly Greases and Oils. We have taken over the Patterson Garage and Station and are carrying Skelly Products ••. Users know there are none better . . . They know that Skelly Service sets a standard of excellence that is hard to beat .••. that users of Skelly Gas and Tagolene Motor Oils get that extra "follow through" which gives long mileage and carefree motoring. We will be glad to have you again as a Skelly Service customer••.• Drop in on us at our new location-Across the street from the postoffice and let us serve you.

Skelly Service Sta. Peru, Nebraska

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Stude.nt Speaks

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By Tod Hubbell

It is always !interesting to

watch the e'Vents that trans· pire before a .country enters VOLUME XXXVI.

a· war. U we as calm, even· tempered· ' human beings . could· stand back and observe· •the gradual process leading . to the inevitable caldron of

.

war it woulif be psychologi· cally_ profitable.

• In September, ·1939', Presi· dent Roose'Velt .· aff~xed sig11ature Act

his

to .the Neutrality

whereby

the

United

K• t R• on1g . 0 ev1~w 'B.oloved Rave·n' ~

• Dr. Selma Konig will .review "The B~loved Return" by Thomas Mann. Wednesday, March 19. Based on the life of the poet, Goethe, in 1816, just after the Napoleonic wars, the book received its titie from the return of doethe's early love, Lotte. This is the latest riovel by the great German writer, known to many through his "Jo>-

PERU, NEBRASKA, 'TUESDAY, MARCH

18, 1941

NliMBER 19

Jindra Presents Concert Band at Rnnual Spring PerformaQce

States will remain aloof from eplfl series and '·The r~-.rag·;c Mountain." Althoug-h an EnglisiJ this second W~rld War. For translation appeared last year, Dr. the first few months \ve were Konig· will g·ive s, review of the original. truly neutral according to the This book hour, sponsored by the law. We .. protested the British A. A. u. w., will be held in the·' blockade of German exports College Library at 4 o'clock. and the censoring of Ame·ri· TowD2people, faculty and students are invited to attend. can mail to Europe. We ac· tively engaged in peace ef.

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Thomas Dean 2.nd Pauline Stark forts by sending Myron C. were elected Student Advi:ory Taylor to the Vatican in Council members for next year at the junior class meeting· on March Rome. The airplanes that 10.

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Peru State eachers Coliege Band

Great Britain and France re· ceived were · sanctioned '

'

by

the cash and carry clause. Truly, America was a neu· tral. Maybe we had at last found the• solution to our age old

problem

of

remaining

neutral.

• June,

1940-and

£ell before stroke

France

a

lightning-like

of the

Nazi. army.

Great Britain was left alone to prote~t the world from this "international g a n

gs

t e r."

Democracy and Christianity hung in the balance. Imme· diately our attitude changed. Congress

appropriated

$5,·

000,000,000 for National de· fense. The, Burke-Wadsworth draft bill was rushed through Congress and became a law on Sept. 14-all aid to England short of war.

Duo-Pianists wi.11 Perform for ffiarch Bd € 25 · U·get'. ·V6At

phony Orchestra, at the ages of 16 and 18, both pos~ess the gift cf "perfect pitch." Their ensemble is distinguished by their -power of synchronization. On one occasion when a radio engineer failed to have two pianos in their studio for a broadcast, the si0 ters played from separate studios. Completely_ out of sight and sound of each other, and guided only by colored light signals, they broadcast a program without error. All of the Holman sisters'· early training was received at the Mary Blackwell-Stevenson 'Piano School . near St. Louis. In the pa.st few years they have been under the 1 1 1 tutelage of E. Robert Schmitz, Calvin Reed led a· group discusFrench pianist. Selections from Bach, Mozart, sion at Y. M. C. A. on March 11 Rachmaninoff, Saint Saens and on the question "Are the Youth of Arensky will be presented. today less spiritually minded than the Youth of the past generation." All men are invited to come to Y. M. c. A. tonight <Tuesday) at 7:00 in the study room of the Mens Dorm.

fr••

Id

I

idly being neared two weeks

TUESDAY, MARCH 18 Y. M. C. A........... 7:00 Y. W. C. A........... 7:00

Lease-Lend bill and Senator George Norris open!, advo· intervention. America

THURSDAY, MARCH 20 Freshmen Clubs . . . . . . . . 7-9

has failed in her endeavor to neutral.

We

FRIDAY MARCH 21 ' of Boy Scout Court Honor ......... , ...... 7-10 SATURDAY, MARCH 22 Choral Group

must

loan, give and carry to . Brit· ain her immediate needs. We hate Hitler. Hitler· must be

MONDAY, MARCH 24 Separate Convocation .. 10:00 Scholarship Club ........

defe~ted, therefore we open·

ly align ourselves with Great Brit~in

and

the

fight

Christianity or chaos.

!

7-8 7-81

F ..T. A................. I Pi Omega Pi . .. .. .. .. .. 8-9

for \'irginia and Betty Jane Holman, Concert

pianists.

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Chorus Leaves for Tour ffiarch 30th

ago when Congess passed the

remam

0

Original ~ntributicns by members were read at the meeting of Sigma Tau Delta on March 10. Miss Grace Tear presented four poems; two of which have been accepted for · publication. "If Autumn Comes" appeared in the 1939 Fall Edition of P@ETS ON PARADE. On April 28, 1940, her poom "April" was published in the SWDAY WORLD HERALD. Other poems re.ad . by Jl4iss Tear were "Daffodils" and "Curtain Falt" Selections were also read by the fellowing members: M. Florence Martin, a letter, "Dear Tim;" Tu;. A. L. Bradford, . a short story\, "Brother Botts Takes Up an Infidel;" Inez Longfellow, a poem, "To a Wild Crocus." Delphine Bucher read a poem, "Memories;" F«lith Willey, a poem; Phyllis Benson; two poems, "I Want to be a Nothin'" and "A Tribute to Dr. Brawn;" Edna. Mae· Peterson, a poem; Rose McGinnis, an essay, "In Defense of Faces;'" Alice Trayer, a short story, "Sun;" and Corinne Whitfield, a poem,. "Faith Begorry." Refreshments were served after· the program by Muriel Reuter, Virginia King and Nancy Ellen Jones.

Calendar 1'

Then the climax was rap·

cated

HearOrigin~lWorks

0

A . musical program under the direction of Prof. R T. Benfcrd was presented at convocation on. March 14. Introduced as "informal and L"11nromptu" the program opened with Mr. Benford and Margery Evans at twc pianos playing "March Milit.aire." After "Firebrands," the piarnsts swung into a "Jazz Study.' Lorene Coatney, Marian Deck and Leonore Larson, training school trio, appeared singing "Rackety Coo," an original arrangement by Mr. Benford, which has just been published. "Lady Moon," ar.d "Playmates," were ·sung by the trio, and the program closed with their version of "Dark Town Strutter's Ball.''

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Virginia and Betty Jane Holman, duo-pianists, who will be presented by the 'budget committee on March 25, list Paul Whiteman as a major influence in their career as concert pianists. Whiteman described the sisters as "two great genius artists-the best duo-pianists · I have ever heard." They appeared on a series of transcontinental broadcasts with the "King of Jazz" and were with his organization on a personal appearance tour. "I was amazed - at their outstanding musiicanship," said Dr. Antonia Brico, condu_ctor of the New York Women's Symphony Orchestra. "One is blonde, quiet, pensive; the other brunette, active, vivacious-but musically they are identical twins." The sisters, who made their concert debut with the i3t. Louis Sym-

Sigma Tau Goers

musicians Entertain Convo Audience

•••••••••aas•a••~

The Perusingers will begin their annual spring concert tour March 30 and will be gone for a week. Towns included in their itinerary are: Syracuse, Weeping Water, Dawson, Humboldt, Talmage, cook, Beatrice, DeWitt, Seward, Ulysses, North Bend, Omaha, Joslyh Memorial (Omaha), and. Nebraska City. · On March 23, the chorus will present concerts in Brock and Salem. ..

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Patronize Ped advertisers.


PAGE TWO.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

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Peru, Nebrasha

Entered at the Postoffice at Peru, Nebraska, as Second Class Matter. $1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc . "'

. Rose. McGinnis ... : ........................... · · · · Ed itor Ralph Locke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sports Editor 1 • A , S Ed' Harofd J enl,<ins .. · · · · .' · · · · · · · · · · · · • · · ss t. ports itor Meredith Jimerson : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Copy Reader .• · Nina Kan~!· ....... ~ . : ........ : · · . · · • · · · · · · ·, Proof Reader Murvel

Annan,

James

Busenbarrick,

Maude Daft, Wiiliam Fankhauser, Marjorie Kennedy, Carol Prine, Erna St~Hen, Pauline Stark, Harold J erikins, Janet Harris, Ted Thompson.

WE HATE TORR/NG THIS UP, BUTClass

enthusi~sm

scraped a deep gorge m its all-time

low last week when nine votes elected a junior representative

tto the student~council.'

1 loo memb ers

This mear.s tlrnt the j~::ior class o f near y

1s satisfied to let the candidate of nine person's choice cut the junior class swath in the student governing body. , f h Since the ;'1~r'.:::'.lc:es d business have never made or t e romantic life (Dale Carnegie notwithstanding) perhaps it is only logical for college students to deftly avoid class · · D · meetings in preference to more lively activi~y. ue mentrnn must also be made of the senior in our midst (filled with four years of higher learning) who boasts a record of never having attended a class meeting. It would be a ridiculo'\J.s departure from practical thought to urge students to consider conscientiously the qualifications of candidates for various posts, to determine with an open

"When you finally realize an am- ing to fly," was Chub's comment oition of 17 years, it's quite a on the flying school Thirty-five thriIJ" was Willard Millikan's re- hours of flying and flying instrucaction as to how it feels to be· a tion is given to the students by pilot. Frank Brigham of the Auburn Mu"I was given an airplane ride for nicipal Airport. Flying school inwinning a Model Airplane Con- eludes eight hours of dual control, test. This was my first experience five hours of dual and solo work, in the air, and it was great. I got and 11 hours maneuv· d of dadvanced · a real thrill, and I've enjoyed ev- ers. 1n a vance maneuvers you ery hop I've taken since." He con- are taught 360 degree landings, spitipued by saying he had never rals and figure eights. "The best t aken a .parachut e Jump, · but is · part of the fly1·ng course ' at least looking forward to the time when in my estimation, is the cross he can. "I understand it is quite country flight. I took off from Aua thrill" was his remark. burn and flew to Hebron, Crete "Chub," as he is known to his and then back to A.uburn," explainmany friends, hails from Rockport, eel Chub with a gleam of exciteMissouri, and needs no introduc- ment in his eyes'. tion to most Peru Co!1ege students. In ground school, which was But for those who don't know him, taught by Dr. C. G. Seegmiller and, he is that tall, handsome, curly- is now lleing offered by Professo~ headed chap you saw wearing a Clinton Sharp of Peru· College, Civpurple and gold satin jacket. Chub il air rules and regulations, meterhas recently finished his C. P. T. eolog·y, navigation and aerodynamP. course, and is now a holder of a ics are taught the future pilots. civil pilot's license. Seventy-two hours of class attendThe meaning of C. P. T. P. is ance is necessary for ground school. after which a Gove:·P.ment test of "Civil Pilots Training Program." This training is sponsored by the )00 r~1e,tons mmt be passed. government with a slight cost of Fif.y, ixty and sixty-five h. p. fifteen do'llars to the trainee. "It's Cub trainers are used for flying surely worth the time and mon- instruction. Willard gave his preey" was Chub's hasty remark. ference by saying, "I liked the sixThe original purpose of this pro- ly-five h. p. best. It seemed to me gTam was to· create a greater in- lhe easiest to handle." te:est for aviation among the men When asked his opinion of the and women alike, but now it has C. P. T. P., Chub became serious. become an important cog in our "I think it is a great opportunity. government's defense program. Everyone who can should take adBefore you are permitted to en- vantage of it, because it offers an ter the course of instruction, you inexpensive means to have good must be 20 years of age, have one flight trnining." . , chouId be cont·mJ•ear· of college, a11d pass a r1·g1·d "It cer t am,y ez.amination. r.n this check up, sped It · d t f. d t Uc · IS a goo Way O Ill OU cial attention is given the eyes and whether or not you want to get heart. into the ever growing field of aviaA unit, which is composed. of ten tion," was his reply to the continstudents, is necessary before the uancy of the c. P. T. c. course may be offered. The amount "C. P. T. P. has proved to me of time given to each unit to fin- that flying is what I want to make ish the course in three months. my profession. It has made me "The assignments were stiff, but alert and more o13serving of the with a little hard studying I pulled happenings around me." through," he declared. As a climax to his civil pilots The program is divided into two training, Chub has made arrangedivisions. "The hardest and yet the ments to fly as one of Uncle Sam's most interesting to me was learn- "flying cadets."

mind the one who should be elected, and then to march with hard set jaw to the polling place and cast a ballot.

In

18, 1941

C. P. T. C. Grad Gioes Slant ltilumni ]hail] on Flying Course

Published Weekly by The Peru State Teachers College

REPORTERS:

TUESDAY, MARCH

fact it

would be almost as ridiculous as asking a class presidf'llt to prevail upon his members to vote because it is their "duty

Training School Girls Dorm Peeks .- News Notes • Into Gripe Box

By Grn" Mu,.,haa

MISS EVELYN DA.Ml\'IE (mat, '38) who teaches in the Magnet public schools, recently was honored when two of her pupils placed as champion and runner-up in a recent county spelling contest. This is Evelyn's first year there. ~iARY LIZ WERNER, class of '40. who is teaching English at Arling· ton, recently conducted a novel ex· periment in her class room to de· termine whether people really see what they think they do. Six members of her speech class rushed in and busied themselves at a var· iety of activities and as suddenly rushed out again. Then the stu· dents were asked to write what they had seen. The results were both amusing and amazing. A long article appeared in the Omaha World Herald about this test. Mary Liz was editor of the 194() Peruvian Representative Student, active iri· Sigma Tau Delta, dramatic club, Alpha Psi Omega, and the Art Club.

A daughter, Beverly Jean, was born to MR. AND MRS. GEORGE GARDNER of Tecumseh. Both Mr. and Mrs. Gardner are alumni; Mrs. Gardner, (Marilyn Hunt) is a sister of Rachel Hunt, also a Peruvian. George's sister, Margaret, is a sophomore at Peru this year. PEGGY O'NEAL, mat. 39, is working as a steongtapher in an AAA office in Sidney, Iowa. She is a cousin of Barbara Beal, a Peru junior. l\IARJORIE COATNEY TURNER is Visiting at her home •in Peru .• She had been teaching in Colorado, but was recently married. HENRY KELLOGG has passed his test in solo flying and radio code work at Sandy Point station, Seattle, Wyo., and expects to be called to Pensacola, Fla., soon to finish the cour~e. Henry is a graduate of P. s. T. c. and taught three years at Humboldt. For the last several summers he was in government service in Yellowstone National Park. His brother, Ray, is a secretary at Elie Boeing plant at Seattle and Ray's twin brother, Roy, is an instructor in the high schools at Waterloo. HARRY STROH (mat. '34) is teaching at Powell. He will enter the army in June. His sister, Ruth, (mat. '38) is teaching at Fairfield.

to the college." The· PED doesn't really advocate a vicious free-for-all.

Helen Oldfield has enrolled in the tenth grade. She formerly at. intensive campaign to select a member for this body of tended school at Brownville. figure-heads-but it does seem as if it's time some

sem~

blance of vitality is injected into class meetings. i

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TT'S SPRINGSpring has come so often it's a classic. But it is still uppermuch in the· mind, when the birds begin to sing and little green sprouts rear their head and dad says, "Son,

I

think we'll do a little diggin' tomorrow." Spring is one thing which Hitler ~asn't gotten around to ~

making the Germans believe is something else. College students could discover the vernal equmox by glancing at the calendar to see that _Friday is the 21st

of

March, but other criteria informs the average campus trotter that spring has started to creep stealthily over the landscape.

The Pep club girls sponsored a high school dance in honor of tlae Bobkitten "P" club members Saturday night. Records furnished the music. The hit of the year-Bagmar Vela's three act comedy entitled "Tangled Yarn" has been chosen for the senior class play, to be presented April 4. Wilma Parnell and Dean Karr are the student directors. The following cast has been selected: ·. Camilla, Leanore Larson. Cora, Donna Steffen. Vivian, Lorene Coatney. Stuart, Ralph Clevenger. Alex, George Edmondson. Sadie, Shirley Jimerson. Speed, Dean Smith. Michael, David Warnock. Mrs. Morgan, Jo Setzer. Joshua, Charles Rogers. Mrs. Brand, Anna Burch. Mrs. Page, Betty Kennedy. Members of the production staff are: Student" manager, Wilda Hazelton. · Business manager, Max Rogers. Publicity manager, Betty Collin. Property manager, Wilma Walker. Miss Mary Hileman returned to

TOM MAJORS and JACK GAB· US, both Peruvians, are now in the A "gripe box" revealed many army. suggestions for improvement · in the women's dormitories at the The Seward junior high school house meeting on March 10. Most basketball team won five games of the suggestions were for enforc- and lost one this season. ROBERT ed quiet hours during study hours PUNCHES '35, is their coach. and after 10:30 in the evening. Girls signed slips with a "yes," Reelections for next year include "no" or an "undecided" as to SPENCER LEGER at Burchard, whether or not they would attend PERRY JORN at Nora, La., M. C. the spring formal. It was an- ROCKWELL at Sumner and VIR. ncunced that students may secure GINIA TRIVELY at Cook. invitations for alumni or friends E. M. ALLSMAN, superintendent off campus. at Byron, is entering the field of i .. f aeronautics at Tulsa, Okla. Civil Service Elxaminations for . ROMA JEAN RETHMEIER, prijunior typists and junior stemi- mary teacher at Bushnell, writes: graphers wi.11 be given in the near "Teaching in western Nebraska is future for men .over 18 years of most enjoyable. Last Saturday age. Stenographers' positions pay night at the Lodgepole Valley Bas$1,400 a year and typists', $1260. ketball Tournament, I saw the Applications should .be filed with following Peruvians:. CLARK ROGthe United States Civil Service ERS Of Gurley, VERONA KLONE, Commission, Washington, D. c. LESLIE OPPENHEIMER a n d ,i

.,.

Miss Maxine Galbraith, '39, ahd Ernest Huegel were married Saturday, March 15, in Lincoln. Maxfoe is teaching at Minden. "Ernie," a senior, is a college mail carrier.·

DEAN POMERAY.'' Roma Jean was granted a 2 year certificate in '39. Both she and Eula Redenbaugh '40 have sent in contributions to Sigma T a u Delta's "Sifting Sands." Eula is teacher of English and commerce in Tobias.

her classes last Thursday. She has been absent five weeks because of a fractured ankle. The training school band will present a program for college convocation on March 21.

JACK BROWN, mat. '38 writes from Washington, D. C., that he plans to finish school in Peru. He received a civil service appointment in December. Jack was a commercial major at P. S. T. C.

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PERU PEDAGOGIAN

'TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1941

PAGE THREE

'

Team 'J' Tops Final Intramural Standings •

All-Star Tearns ·Selected for 1940-41 Cage Season

l Caterwaul 1Interviewing a Superintendent is e BY RALPH LOCKE 1~~~~~~~-A '1'

a Cinch ... Howeuer Self-Analyzation and these Tips wiU Help

One of the qualifications of a coach is the ability to guide his With team J setting a pace of team into .the big tournaments. In ume wins and no defeats in the Nebraska high school circles the Musings of seniors and those peo- Remember that you must sell ceconcl .rcund robin, the c1rtain highest goal for the prep sports was drawn on another Intramural mentors is the annual state meet ple who are contemplating inter- yourself. Show the superintendent haslrntball season. Team I was close held i:1 Linc3l'l. A glance 2.t the views soon-or even sooner: "How that you're a good conversationalon J's heels with seven victories entries si1ows wh:iJ teams are up does one go about impressing a ist by monopolizing the conversathere and under the tutelage of superintendent? What sort of tech- tion. He'll be interested in hearing and two setbacks. nique is best?" of tiie college pranks you've proAtkins, McAlexander, Sehnert former Bobcats. In class A is the 98% per cent of the time it's mottd, how you bluffed the inand Peterson of teams J, I, H, and Wahoo outfit. Their coach is the progressive applicant who gets structors or any other incident G hold the scoring laurels for the Wayne Riggs, a standout for the the job! Analyzation brings out told in that strictly collegiate way. Bobcats in three sports in his seventh and eighth rounds of the Once in a while ·superintendents these hints: athletic career here at Peru. final round robin. have a question or two to ask, so Appearance IS essential! Dropping into class O there are The team standings at the close You're just out of college so answer quite abruptly and then dino less than four teams that work of the second round robin: for Peru grads. One of the favor- dress the part. Superintendents rect the conversation to topics that Pct. L ites is the Bratton Union team, like to interview women whose interest you. Team w and The exit IS to be effective! 1.000 J 9 0 with Jack Floyd at the helm. Bur- clothes attract attention, .777 2 chard cagers do the bidding of above all they do like an excess F 7 Create a lasting impression. If 4 coach Ledger, and the Duncan of make-up. (It's so collegiate!) the superintendent seems to have A .555 5 B .555 5 4 team has as it.s coach James Mc- There's the possibility of the bright fmished, keep talking. Don't be in .555 4 Allister, another popular Peru man. blue, red and yellow combinations a hurry to leave for superintendE 5 .444 4 5 Still in Qlass A is Omaha Central, -or just anything that is effect- ents have plenty of leisure tin1e. G c .333 6 coached by Buising, a Peruvian ive. If you have a hat handy, it's Take for granted that the position 3 all right to wear it but as college is 'yours and leave words similar to D .333 3 6 who pushed his way to the top . H .333 6 Speaking of tournaments, the women rarely have accessories they these echoing in his ears, "You 3 I .111 1 8 tops for Peru ambitions is the Na- are really not expected. Fellows, can send the contract and I'll sign Although the race for percent- tional in Kansas City held each keep in mind that plaid sport jack- -unless I get something better!" age standings is over, a tournament year. This year there are five op- ets are always good and that nothcomposed of the six highest teams ponents of Peru battling for the ing is smarter than your oot at in the percentage column of round honors; namely: West Texas, one that jaunty angle. If you like robins one and two is being. staged. of the seeded teams, _Sioux Falls, ties, a striped bow tie would go Every afternoon the athletic r, F, A, B, E and D are the teams Culver-Stockton, a Bobcat victim, nicely with the jacket. First impressions ARE importfield is a scene of activity. Calis- eligible to participate. Tarkio and Wayne. Of the five, thenics, . sprinting, jumping and West Texas and Culver-Stockton ant! f f f Girls, take the boy-friend along warming up exercises are duties were among the teams that went that are conscientiously pursued by After a careful study of the abil- through the first round unbeaten. or vice versa. Not only will the more than two-score of thinclads ities offered by the participants, Against such competition as that it superintendent be impressed with as they prepare for the season these men were selected for the is remarkable that the inexper- the fact that you're popular but ahead. The workouts have been "All Intramural" teams. ienced Wheeletmen came through chatting with the friend until your light so far, conditioning being the First Team Second Team with a record of 11 wins against 10 turn comes is more pleasant than sitting alone. ' object in view as the candidates Dreezen Lurk losses. go through their paces. Softened Atmosphere IS necessary! Right Forward muscles are toughened, lungs are Atkins York tI ·········-···········~ For greeting the superintendent tested for their capability and Left Forward there are several approaches. You pounds are trimmed off as those P. Lurk McAlexander might use · the slap-happy apboys build up their endurance for Center I proach. Slap the superintendent on By Erna Steffen the work in store for them. Stark Millikan the back and with a "Hi ya, prof Right Guard The first meet ls scheduled for ~~~~~~~~~~~..... old boy," you'll no. doubt create an Sehnert April 12, and it leaves only four Heugel atmosphere. There isn't such a ONE YEAR AGO Left Guard short weeks to get that old feeling thing as appearing overly anxious of power back that is necessary to These men were pressed hard The Bobcats journeyed to Kan- so if you want to have your hand Not JACK ot AD I win. Care must be taken not to by Beatty, L. Rutter, Larson, Hines, sas City to participate in the Nat- extended for a hearty pump han.overtax some of those languid mus- Peterson, Snider and Clements. ional Intercollegiate Basketball dle shake when half way up the des or ligaments, as an injury (Note: These selections were Tournament where they defeated steps it's perfectly permissible. could easily result. based on careful scrutinizing, and Augustana College of Rock Island, Conversation IS a major facto~! We Specialize In Radios CALL Z44 Just what "those boys can do re- we believe they are as they should Ill., 49-46. Their second game endWe Repair All Makes mains to be seen. Last year the be. All gripes, who dunnits, and ed the '40 season as the Maryville, Work Guaran~ Bobcats were invincible as they threats will please be sent to- Mo. team took a 43-41 final score concoction in the Men's Dormone dozen oranges well mushed, SEETHE NEW battered all their opposition for an Dead Letter Office, Washington, from tJ:te Wheelermen. add a bucket of water and spread unmarred record. They had two· D. C.) e gently over the floor! .... Too bad men that accounted for nearly half 'f f .TWO YEARS AGO representative _students can't revel -Of those vital points, this year they The national crown was not too in their "representative glory" be,are gone along with several others far away with victories over High fore May 5 or isn't that the date that picked up firsts. The situaPoint, N. C., 55-46; Trinity College, of announcement? tion is not as promising as it was Waxahachie, Texas, 48-42; Warthis tin1e last year. There is some rensburg Mo., State Teachers Colnew blood that could easily lege, 45:31. San Diego, Calif., destrengthen the team; whether it is feated the Cats 45-31. · successful or not' is an unanswered problem. The team will be fore. ed to exert its efforts toward secFIVE YEARS AGO FREE ENROLLMENT FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS onds and thirds in nearly every Until March 15th ... Commission obligations No game. Bakery had a two for event to win their meets. Can they five cents special on jelly roTis . cea:e for men when they are conscripted into military duty do it? April 12 will be the day ... Now these new advantages are offered by the same reWashburn New Opponent that part of the story will be told. f .. '( liable servir-" -;vhose facilities and experienced guidance are '( '( '( Patronize Ped advertisers. constantly at your command. NebrasThe football slate for the 1941 ka and all neighboring states our field. /,~_ ,. •, g-rid campaign has been completed, Write today. (A:..-(T,' /, ~ and released by the Athletic deDAVIS SCHOOL SERVICE partment. Former opponents miss643 Stuort Bldg., Uni.In, Nebmb ing from the schedule are Wesleyan, Hastings and Ft. Hays. The new opposition will be in the form of the team representing the Anticipate some super-knock-out Washburn Ichabods of Washburn numbers at the formal with all the c:ollege of Topeka. The game will girls keeping their dresses under be played in Topeka. cover until April 5.... Tod Hubbell The Peru Bobcats thinclads have -campus stage-door Johnny .... The schedule: a busy season ahead in their a11Sept. 26-Doane at Peru. Mail box in Mt. Vernon appears nual track and field laurel chase. more colorful with decorated enOct. 3-Midland at Fremont. The schedule as released by Coach Oct. 11-Kearney at Peru, Home- velopes from the army, navy and Al Wheeler is as follows. coming. marines .... Note to all prospective April 12-Peru at Maryville. Oct. 18-Chadron at Chadron. economics students-Better brush April 17-Meet with Tarkio. Oct. 24:--York at York. up on your sixth grade arithmetic. April 20-Kansas Relays. Oct. 31-Wayne at Peru. What prominent freshman basMay 2-Peru hosts to Omaha U., Nov. 7-Washburn at Topeka. ketball player demands, "Let's talk Doane, Tarkio, Wesleyan and Mid-· Nov. 14--0pen. about ME now?" .... Where did Jand. COUNCIL BLUFFS, IOWA Nov. 21-Tarkio at Tarkio (Miss- Fanders ever get that nickname, CENTRAL OFFICE, 17 NORTH MAIN IT. May 9-State meet at Wayne. our Turkey Day Gamel. "Pretty-boy?" .... Latest third floor

************************

Track Squad Begins Outdoor Warmup Chores •

The Peru Pointer

l Sports Of Yesteryear

l

[3li:f4 RADIO SHOP .,

Trades

1941 PHILCO

·Coach nM I

Releases 1941 Grid Slate •

Peru Thinclads Face Rugged Track Slate for 1941 •


PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE FOUR.

Critic Expresses Views on Spring Band Concert ----·---By Prof. Robert 'f. Benford, Score another triumph for the "Concert" band. Before an enthusiastic audience they gave a fin,e program, on Friday evening, March 14. The opening number was the "March of the Pioneers," by Colby. This was entered into with fine ~pirit by all the players. They gave a good rendition, · with smooth, clear tonalities. The second number was announced by Wm. Fankhauser, who gave us the setting for the "Pray. er and Dream Pantomime" frortr the opera "Hansel and Gretel" by Humperdinck. The quiet peaceful harmonies gave the feeling of the peace and contentment the children feel when they go into the ~oods, and fall asleep. The flowing flute melodies ushered in the heavenly beings who came to protect them. The return of the p:·ayer theme was climactic but not blaring. The en: semble ably showed their ability in·bringing out these effects. "The Swiss Boy" a ciai'inet duet by deVille was well played by Miss Yates and Miss Schuldt. It is to be remembered how well Miss Yates did her Concerto at the first concert. Miss· Schuldt carried her part well on this duet. The band gave her a good supporting background. Their encore, "Pepperino" by Endreson, was a aelightful number and well played. Again Mr. Fankhauser told us what to expect when we read the "Headlines." The continued change rrom pleasing to wierd harmonies and shifting of chordal progressions from one section to the other, gave us the different slants on the news. At one time I thought an oriental dancer had made the headlines, but she didn't stay long enough to get acquainted. Practically every section of the band had lts chance to "give their bit of news." Do you read the headlines? Now you can hear them, and I'm sure nothing will be lost if you are a good listener. The always loved Oratorio me!ody, "My Heart at Thy Sweet Voice,'' from Samson and Delilah by Saint-Saens was well played by · Fletcher Cline, the trombone solo1st. The band .came through again with a fine ·background for his solo. Mr. Fankhauser told us of the "Legend of Sleepy Hollow" by ·Ben-

net.

·

The music. started with peaceful chords giving us a quiet afternoon. ~ater we hear of the invitations to merry · making, with rhythmic melodies, and wierd harmonies telling us ghost stories. The rhythm pattern told us of the horse that was taking Ichabod Crane t10me and of his being chased by the headless horseman. And did you hear the thud when he fell off his horse? After it was all over, peace and quiet returned. The trum"1et trio consisting of James Crawford, James Sandin ar.d Tony DeMaro gave us some fine blendings on the "Southland" by Denza-Weckesser. And the Funiculi-Funicula was given with such a fine snap that the audience brought them back to repeat a pa.rt of it. And last but not least we had "Bolero" by Ravel. This wild dance is all that it is described to be. The continued drum rhythm gave a monotonous effect to the background of the theme which was tossed about from section to section. The dance starts quietly but soon works up to a fine climax as expressed by the wierd harmonies and increasing tonal effects. The frenzied chords just before the last let the people know just to what point the dance has been worked up to. The audience

demanded a repetition of the last part of the work before they would let the Director leave the stage. On the whole, this program seemed to be finer finished than the previous one. Tones were smoothed and blended and there was plenty of climax without the blasting so many bands seem to get. Mr. Jindra is to be complimented on his fine performance. We need more of them. f

f

f

Gamma Chi Enjoys BingQ Rate • Bingo was featured at the Gamma Chi party, on Wednesday, March 12. First prize for the highest score went to Virginia King. Second prizes were given to those girls who bingoed at least once during the evening. The proposal by Grace Muenchau, president, that the next meeting be ari outdoor picnic was approved by members. Rerreshments of green and white candies tied in shamrock-trimmed napkins added a St. Patrick's day touch. f

f

f

Snyder to Head Freshman Class

Charles , Snyder will head the freshman class this semester. Serving· with him will be: Melvin MeKenney, vice president; Robert Oakman, secretary; Clifford HardIng treasurer. Newly elected Student Council members for next year are Virgie Lee Johnson and Robert James. At the class meeting on March 10, freshmen set April 19 as the date of their spring party. Com~ mittee heads are: Program, Mae Jane Young; Refreshment, Eleanor Hall; General Arrangement, Catherine Adams; Room, Orthello Byers. < -1 1

Wellensiek and Gardner Serve as Hostesses

TUESDAY, MARCH 18, 1941

Authorities Report Peru Men in Top Shape

• Peru's young men are in fine physical shape, according to mem~ bers of the Naval Flight Selection Board who visited the campus March 12.

THEATRE (Auburn, Nebraska) CONTINUOUS SHOWS EVERY DAY 2:30-11:30 SAT .• SUN.. MON.-MARCH 22-23-24 Carole Lombard

Robert Montgomery

When asked how Peru men comin pared with those of other colleges, Ensign T. H. Jenkins replied, "The "MR. AND MRJS. SMITH" young men of eastern Nebraska, at least those we've examined, are in Featurettes-Cliff Edwai·ds and his Buckaroos much better shape than those of News Reel the west. In one western college we examined 26 men before we found one that might have a chance in the final physical exam. We examined 15 men here and five of them passed the prelimina;y (Auburn, Nebraska) exam. This gives your Cornhuskers , a 33 per cent average, which, as SUN.. MON .. TUES.-MARCH 23-24-25 you can see, is a lot better than Charles Boyer M ar.l!aret Sullivan some of the colleges in western Nebraska have done." in Ensign . Jenkins attended the "BACK STREET" University of Missouri and has flown for American Airline.~. When Featurettes-Cartoo1i and News Reel asked about the number of hours navy pilots fly each year, he answered, "The pilots usually fly about 300 hours a year, however, we do not all get that much time. For instance, I have a friend who fifes with a Patrol Bomber Squadron, and he piled up 1700 hours last year, while I do very well to get in 3 hours of time a month, because of my duties with the board." By Murvel Annan "Sportsmanship" was the topic of Ensign Jenkins described navy ,, pan€! discussion held at Y. M. Bill Fankhauser and the Perulife in the air corps ·and told his C. A. March 11. audience that the navy afforded singers under the direction of G. Phyllis Dammast, chairman of H. Steck bi:ought their version of the program committee, was as• q fine future for its aviators. "Ballad for Americans" to Peruf f f sisted in the discussion by Margvians last Sunday. The ballad was ery Dennison, Mary E. Collin, AudAuburn to· present Play the climax 0f the last musicale. rey Gowan, and Jean Bond. by Peruvian at M. I. N. K. As a member of the Perusingers, Mae Jane Young was in charge I felt that even though parts of "The Perfect Gentleman" by the program weren't quite as fin- of devotionals. Harriet Maxwel,J, Peru's Anna Best Joder will be ished as we have sang them, the 2.ccompanied by Grace Muenchau, presented by Auburn High School program as a whole was as good d]rected the singing. in the M. I. N. K. D1-amatic con- as usual. Whatever mistakes · the f .f f test on March 28. chorus may have made were well Robert James is recovering from Nebraska City, Auburn, and Bell- balanced by Bill's fine work in thR an attack of the flu at the home evue have entered all divisions of of his sister in Rockport, Mo. ballad. the contest. Sidney, Iowa, wjll preThe Piano Trio turned in their f f .( sent a play and Tabor, Iowa, will usual brand of .good music well ent.er all divisions. Epsilon Pi Tau met March 10. presented. Plans were discussed for the anEntries in the contest are inThe program was as follows: e1·easing each day. nual spring tour of Nebraska The Perusingers schools. f f f Ye Watchers. and Ye Holy Ones -17th Century Melody ~~~~@ll!J®[;l][g]~~~illJilfilj][!fil;]~~~ Now Let Every Tonge Adore ~ FOR SATISFACTION IN Thee-by Bach Rll FOODS He Never Said a Mumblin' Word -Arr. by Krone Death and The Maiden-by MARDIS GROCERY Schubert-Aschenbrenner "I'm terribly frightened before I Now Thank We All Our God- Rilli~~ii!llill~illlilfililll]~~'g][gj~~[ijj@ go on the stage," Virgie Lee John- by Bach son frankly admitted. "But after The Piano Trio I'm out there, and see the ·audtence, Finale-from Trio in G Minorthey always looks so nice and pa- by Hayden tient I Jorget all about being Andante Cantabile-by Tschaifrightened." kowsky Virgie Lee will p!ay the part of Dance Characteristic-by RebiVirginia Otis, a 21 year old girl koff in t.he college ~ay "Saturday EvThe Perusingers ening Ghost" to be presented ApEcho Song-by Orlando 'di Lasso ril ..18 . 'iffiillIB:!jjj®[g]~~~illJ[;l][g]~~ill]lg]~fil:@]lll][g][g]~] Red River in The Night-by "My dramatic career started in ~ ~ Shure ~ DR. G. H. JODER ~ Sunday School when I was a small Oh Susanna-by Foster-Cain child," she explains, "I took part ~ -Physician and SurgeonDay is Dying-by Christiansen in church programs and gave readi1li Office at Milstead Corner l!iJ Chillun' Come on Home-by Cain ings. The Piano Trio ~ Office Phone 33, Res. 39 ~ "In junior high school I began ~ Angels Serenade-by Braga-Rit- ~ g·iving dramatic selections and later ~illJ:gj[gj[l;!1J][g][iI§:gj[gjlil:~m"'"""illJ:g:[g][j;l1lJ · to.ok up interpretive reading. A~ ter J;;[g]illJillJ[i]iiiillJilll!ll!®lllim~~~m!l1lmi1mfilll Anitra's Dance-by Grieg the M-I-N-K I received a superior B William Fankhauser, Basso, and a rating." PERU The Perusingers Besides dramatic readings, Virgie Ballad for Americans-by La Lee was cast in the junior and ~ Ladies Welcome at All Times senior plays and one contest play. Touche and Robinson ~~ Ben Hanlon Mgr. !lll This is a Patriotic cantata writ[g] In collaboration with a friend, 11!! M. G. Heuer, Owner @ Virgie Lee once wrote, cast and di- ten in the modern style.

+++

AUBURN THEATRE

Perusi ngers Please Y. W. Views in Sunday Concert 'Sportsmanship' •

Virgie Johnson Traces Dramatic Career

Green and white were the colors used in both luncheons, served on March 12 and 13 by the Table Service class. Frieda Wellensiek was .hostess and Margaret Gardner, assistant hostess to the group on Wednesday. Margery Ann Kinsey served the luncheon which consisted of seallcped spaghetti and eggs, green beans, grapefruit and orange salad, rclis and butter, jelly roll and coffee. Althea, Nispel, hostess, with Doris Nelrnn, assistant hostess entertained the Thursday group. Sarene Hauptman served the fruit salad, mock drumsticks, new peas and rected a play in her senior year in potatoes, relish, celery, jelly, rolls, high school. tapioca pudding, coffee and mints. "The school schedule was so full," f f f she recalls, "that we weren't· a1'le to present it and it slowly died out, Dr~ Bradford Attends but it was great fun." Nebr. Teacher Council A graduate of Auburn High Dr. Arthur L. Bradford served on School in 1940, she lived at Nevada, the' nominating committee at the Mo., until her junior year. She is meeting of the Nebraska Council a freshman at Peru and is majorof Teachers of English held at the ing in English. She was an honor University of Nebraska on March 8. student last semester. While attending the meeting Dr. In addition to her extra-curricuBradford heard two round table Jar activities, Virgie Lee confesses. discussions, "Propaganda .and the to having two hobbies. She collects English Teacher," and "Linguist- cactii and baby pictures of her tics and the composition Teacher." friends. ·

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cli~LING

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1K~!llJlJj[;;;i15J~m~~m~mililillllil!m~ f f f The sacrifices made during Lent @[g;~illJj~illJ~~illJJ~[g]1m1ill~~~~~:lllilll~~~~i~ were explained at the C. C. A. Look no farther-look your best meeting on March 11. Marian Stych Haircutting A Special_ty and Mary Ann Schutz were in charge of the discussion. "Stage make-up" was discussed by Mary Olive Richardson at a meeting of Peru Players March 6. Her talk included a demonstration [:li[;l][g]:ijjillJ!lliillJillJ!lliillJ:ijjillJl!iilllillJllliilli[gJ~;JilliillJllli@[l' of various kinds of makeup. ill] ~

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~ A new course of study in sheet ~J metal will be offered Peru students ; next quarter. The Industrial Arts department has received tne equip- ; ment the course requires.

P eru R ecreat10n . P arIors ~~ POOL Al\'D SNOOKER Otto Boellstorff, Prop.

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, •...... ·············1

Student Speaks By Tod Hubbell

···.·l

. ····-·-···-······

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The question mark in the world today is the sid~ on will align herself.

America

but

those

de·sires

were dimmed when on Aug.

· 23,

1939,

the

Soviet-Nazi

. non-aggression pact was sign. ed.

VOLUME XXXVI.

has

hoped that it would be with England

t:

~

finally

Since then Russi.a

has

heretofore South

received

America.

from

Stalin has

last year

and

a

half

has

brought twenty million more subjects into

the

realm

of

communism by annexation. of parts of Finland, at Latvia, Estonia,

Lithuania,

Eastern

Poland and Northern Buko· vma. • The "sleeping giant of Eu· rope" has gained too mucl:~ as a neutral which he otherwise might have lost by war. In· stead it may be \that Stalin will continue to maintain an equilibruim among the two powers, balancing one against the other. Then the Soviet

• Clayburn Receives "Silver Beaver" 0

Presentation of 114 :>wards to 94 Scouts at Peru, March 21, made this district's biggest Boy Scout C:mrt of the year. The Court of Honor was p:esided over by Clyde Sergie, executive officer from PlattsmDuth. Preceding· the court ce:emony, Scout Master, Prof. A. 'B. Clayburn's troop of Peru presented "Jerry's Job" and "Bugs, Incorporated." ·"Jerry's Job" showed the influence of a scout, Max Matthews, over a "toughie," Ward Adams. The action centered around the office of John Lewis and his assistant, Jefald Clayburn. "Bugs, Incorporated," revealed the plot of high school chemists, Willard Redfern, Lawrence Good and Wf:rd Adams to become famous. The boys planned the action for commencement day but had wme difficulty keeping their secret because of "Sissie," Art Ciement's threats to tell. Just after the professor, Ralph Hays, introduced the main speaker, John

::.:dic,at9~1!Vt!:i):li~!1~1i:Y:itt;~~.;·.~~~Mlh~~~:;i.~il~J~~~~i . war by default-to allo~ the ists c me belligerents to wear them· selves out in a struggle of 1

mutual devastation. And then step in and take the spoils. Stalin's

dreams

of

world

domination are as grandiose as Hitler's but circumstances have compelled . him to go

tors and were ilnmediately established as heroes. Music for the program was provided by the college band. The opening speech was made. by President W. R. Pate. Outstanding award was that of the Silver Beaver to Pref. Clayburn. The Silver Beaver is the highest award one can receive under Boy Scout rules, there being only five others in this district.

Training school musicians appeared in full band and instruJ e·anne Spier Quizzes mental groups at convocation March 2. Kappa Delta Pi Supt. S. L. Clemento, director, Answering the questionnaire told the story described by Buch- sent out by the Whitewater, Wis. tel's "Crusader Overture." As the chapter provided the program for band played, placards which told· Kappa Delta Pi on March 17. of the theme were displayed to Jeanne Spier was in charge. the audience. In this way it was In St. Patrick's Day motif Hereasy to follow the composer's ideas. bert Knutson and Thomas · Dean The clarinet quartet including served sandwiches, carrot-pineapDonna· Steffen, ·Billie Jean Miller, ple sr.fad, pickles, ice cream and Wilda Hazelton and Nancy Steck cup cakes. played the oriental "Procession of the Sardar" by Ippolitov-Ivanov. The Spanish "La Fiesta" was played by Arthur Clements, Willard Redfern, Beulah Spoohr, Ralph Clevenger, Lawrence Good and Richard Good. The flute trio, Leonore Larson, 0 Betty Kennedy, Mary Shirley JimSchools entered in the ninth erson, played the modern "Alle annual M. I. N. K. dramatic conCamera" and a n~velty, "Three test to be held here March 29, Blind Mice," arranged by Colby. include Nebraska City,' Auburn, "American Legion," a march by Hamburg, Iowa, Cook, Bellevue, Parker, played by the band closed and Tabor, Iowa. Deadline for the the program. entries is March 25. Judges for the contest will be: f f f Mr. and l\frs. Robert D. Moore, Dr. and Mrs. Arthur L. Bradford and Miss Florence Martin. Student chairmen will preside at each meeting. TUESDAY, MARCH 25 YMCA, YWCA, ,ccc . . 7-8 Bu et Event , 11

MINK Thespians To Compete

Calendar

men Schedule

I II

c~~~:D!~~=:~' ' :::&mtt·'Pdrnra1''·':: . . •· ·.·-

Freshman Clubs . . . . . . 7-9 . Club . . . . . . 8-9 :30 Drama t rc FRIDAY, MARCH 28 · Dramatic· cont.est SATURDAY, MARCH 29 Dramatic Contest MONDAY, MARCH 31 Sigma Tau Delta Banquet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5:30-8 Commerce Club . . . . . . . . a ___

!

• Plans for a. mens' formal were confirmed at a meeting of the men at the boys' dormitory March 17. The date has been set for May 17. The foJlowing committees were appointed: Invitations, Freddie Gebers; band, Cecil Walker; platform, Lloyd Sehnert; refreshment, Wm. Fankhauser; decorations, Ray Colemal).

about realization in a cunn· ing exploitation of other na· tions' wars rather than by di· rect conquest. Every ton oi: bombs that falls on Germany or England is so much gain for Stalin since it weakens ·

Perusingers Launch Annual Spring Concert Tour

his chief rivals.

•. However, if it came· to is· sue over Germany's coveting the oil and grain of the rich Ukraine, Russia would in all probability fight. Hitler has recently been trespassing on Russ,a's sore spot by upset· ting the Balkins. In

1914 Rus·

sia entered the war to pro· tect the south Slavs of Serbia but then her purpose was different, her government has changed', and it is now the world's domination by the Communist International.

has ceased

Nl

25, 1941

Scouts Hold T. s. Band Presents Vocal Clinic Rttracts Contest tntrees at Convo Court of Honar · 350 High School Sing

copied the traits of the ag. gressive Nazi and during the

TUESDAY, MARCH

e---20

'-4 ER

·:

s'upplied Germany with some of the essentials that she had

PERU, NEBRASKA,

,.

Peru State Teachers College Chorus

The Perusingers under the diWhen this war rection of G. H. Steck presented and the peaQe terms are dis· programs at Brock and Salem last cussed you may rest assured Sunday. This trip sei-ved as a sort of Mr. Stalin and company will preliminary for the annual spring have reserved seats. tour which starts next Sunday.

The programs given Sunday were the same as the program at the last Sunday Musicale except that Bill Fankhauser sang between groups instead of the Piano trio. The trip was made in cars. Those taking cars were Ralph

Chatelain, Haney Milstead, Miss Elma Gockley, Dr. P. A.. Maxwell, Dean J. A. Jimerson, Miss Nona Palmer and Dr. T. 0. Odlaug. This· is off the record but a remark heard at Salem, "Boy! Can those Salem ladies turn out a swell meal."

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Steck Comments On Technique

• Not to win blue ribbons, but to exchange criticism and assimilate new ideas, 350 singers and teachers attended the choral clinic at Peru March 21 and 22. Conducted by G. Holt Steck. director of the Perusingers, informality was a keynote, and musiQ-, ians trained by Ruth Cochfatt, Falls City; Helen Baldridge, Au~ burn; Dwight E. Catlett, Wym~; Ann Wiebe, Dawson; Virgittia Trively, Cook; George Anderson, Brock; Ralph Chatelain, Nemaha and Talmage; and Louis Knopp, Malvern, Iowa, took part in demonstrations designed to throw light on music teachers' problems. As soloists and small group.s performed on Friday afternoon, Mr. Steck and the instructors wrote comments and · suggestions whifu were discussed in a later sessio!'l. Tha1 evening, singers gathered in the Music Hall to question l\fr. Steck about voice mechanism, tone production, breathing kid many other problems. Using the youngsters themselves for guineapigs, "Pop" explained and instructed., . 'F\i~;igr<il.IP:.~al'Jlestly · w.at9lled

tiieii: 1dends

iinitatitffre':'w11rs£~s:

sing with pencils in their mouths and skate-waltz as points were made, and · after· a two-hour session stayed to ask more questions. "Why does my voice vibrate too much?" "What causes the 'bumps' in my trill?" "How can I make my words understood?" "Why do we stiffen and fose vitality when we sing?'' "Why is it so much easiei- to· act than· to sing?" They were all given: serious consideration. Mass singing of "The Star Spangled Banner" and "Row, Row, Row Your Boat" started things Saturday morning. . Performances by mixed choruses, girls glees and mens glees were in the college auditorium from 10: 00 to 12:0.0 and 2:00-4:15. After each gTOup sang- two numbers, Mr. Steck used them to demonstrate certain effects in choral singing. Balance, intonation, pronunciation, neatness of moving parts and . rhythm were worked out in turn as teachers and students observed various ways of achieving results. Mr. Catlett put his Wymore groups through routine tuning and ear-training exercises and also tried the mixed quartet arrangement of the Perusingers for demonstrative· purposes. It was noted that Mr. Anderson's mixed chorus was arranged in that way, which was discussed at the teachers round table in the November choral clinic here. Dancing· and ping-pong in both dorms entertained visitors between morning and afternoon sessions, and ideal spring weather invited cainpus tours. Questioned about reactions, the teachers responded: "It's an inspiration to go home with new ideas and suggestions." "Not participating- for competition, young·sters are less keyed up, and seem to learn more." "Just like any new wrinkle, those taking part will learn more as they become educated to it."


TUESDAY, MARCH 25, 1941

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE TWO.

Published Weekly by The Peru State Teachers College

Frosh Half-back Plays Six Musical Instruments

Peru, Nebraska

Eliminations for formal bids: Legally: Adams Huegel Velvick Filmore Organ Mcintyre Invited: Callan Walker · Busenbarrick Floyd Boatman "Red" Dean Bollmeier Etcetera Training school sub-debs cutting out college coeds-to Jimmy Howe and Freddie Drexler. · Now that the snow is off the campus benches .... Naturals: Good for Goodridge. , Merry Macs-McDonald and McKenney .... Subject to change-weather and couples .... Larson asks nature study class: Is a forest fire wood finishing? .. , . Ad-nauseaum: Steutville's tele· phone sound effects ....

-~--·--Did you know that the No. 42 Jae;,, but shaking his head confla.sh on the gridiron lact fall is tinued, "I turn thumbs down when also a versatile .artist of five other they start tearing it to pieces or Entered at the Postoffice at Peru, Nebraska, as Second instruments besides the French start jamming it because that takes Horn. To "fill-in" in his father's away its musical quality. Class Matter. $1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc band Jack Snider learned to play In reply to the question about the alto horn, vio1in, drums, trom· his favorite radio program, Jack bone, and trumpet. commented, "I like the Ford Sunday Evening Hour best, but any "I was four years old," began Rose McGinnis .... , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editor Jack as he looked up from his trig- symphony or symphonic band runs Ralph Locke . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sports Editor nometry paper, "when I received a a close second. My chief criticism of these programs is that they play . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ass 't . Spor ts Ed"t H aroId J en kins 1 or tin drum for Christmas. That was my first start in music. I played music which is not generally underMeredith Jimerson .... , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Copy Reader drums in a small grade band while stood unless you have a score to follow or know its musical backNina Kane! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Proof Reader ~o:~s a~d ~~tilk~~e~~~~~n ::d~~~ ground." Concerning the experience of tryIlenltleman." REPORTERS: Murvel Annan, James Busenbarrick, After moving from McCook tQ ing 011t for the N. Y. A. orchestra at Lincoln, Jack explained, "they Maude Daft, William Fankhauser, Marjorie Kennedy, Carol Benkleman, Jack's father changed took my name and called me when his occupation from plumber to Prine, Erna Steffen, Pauline Stark, Harold Jenkins, Janet school musician. In band, certain my turn came. I was asked to instruments would be lacking, so transpose, sight-read, demonstrate Harris, Ted Thompson. Jack learned to play the different different dynamics, and especially instruments needed to provide the to produce a good tone. For those proper balance while in his fourth who make the trip, all expenses will be paid and also a union wage over year of schooL Throughout grade school, Jack a period of two months. The orHOPE JN HOPELESSNESSplayed whatever instrument was chestra will be under the direction needed, but his desire finally set- of Leopold Stokowski." Colle·ge editors throughout the country have been ex· tled down to a French horn. He Jack thinks that this orchestra :pressing with a wistful naivete their desires for peace and became acquainted with a boy who would be beneficial to anyone meeting its requirements. "It is the ;their fears for the future. Disquieting as this note may seem played French horn, and liking to climax to the desire to play in a play "after-time" and also a little :to our elders, the hopeless undercurrent in much college melody mixed in with it, he decid· good orchestra, makes you learn to :analysis of the world situation may bear within it the germs ed the compromise would be to get transpose to any key, and makes a French horn. These two reasons, you a better all-around horn playof a better world. strengthened by his rival's receiv- er." ing a new instrument stiniulated Besides music, Jack is interested Says the Stanford Daily: "We thought maybe it would· his desire to such a degree that he in sports and scouting. His football ability last fall showed that an ath· happen agai~~ We figured that, after the last war, when received one for Christmas. lete and a musician earl' be the Jae!' attended high school at ~P,e post-war escapists had blazed through the jazz age and same person. He has also reached Wilber where his father became :settled down into left-wing radicalism during the back- director the rank of an eagle scout. He says of instrumental music. that probably his most fascinating wash of the depression, the whole show was over. While in high school, Jack was pastime is keeping a scrapbook. a member of the orchestra, band, "My musical ambition," Jack boys glee club, mixed chorus, and "And now nations are cutting each other's throats again. went .on to say, "is to l!Ometime boys quartet. He also participated ~merica faces the all-too-grim prospect of another fight to in all three sports. He received a play in a professional band or symphony. (New York Philharmonsave a cause.or .an ideal. And with it, the prospect of anoth- first division horn rating at 'the ic would do.)" district contest at Geneva lasl ·er.post-war age of 'tired young men'." No wonder Jack is musical. His year. When a freshman he rated father ·plays any instrument and excellent in vocal solo at the dis· his brothers and sisters play at .. ·The Daily Tar Heel said editorially: "By vote of 1,. trict. least three. He explains that such tl03 to 572 we announce our readiness to throw our demo· When asked whether he had ability comes easily for him. cracy, our lives, and our wealth into .the maelstrom. No par· composed any music, Jack enthus· "I came to Peru," Jack remarkiasticaily replied, "I am writing a ticular claim to clairvoyance is here made, but it is easy to solo for French horn. Mr. Benford ed seriously, "because I wanted to play football here. They have a see that the 1,-003. who voted yes will say ten years after said that he would go 50-50 and good music department and that is the war, 'Why?' Their fathers did. Those who are living, write the accompaniment. I'll let what I want. My father and the those whose .tortured bodies wilt let them speak, will say, :you hear it when I get it finished." rest of the family came here to "I like swing music and I think school and I couldn't break the .'Why?' And from the graves of the dead of 1917 and the that there is a lot of good music family tradition. And now,-I'm burial holes: of the more recent dead will come an echo, written along that line," remarked glad I did, becaw:e I like it here."

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·'yes, why'?" From the Michigan Daily: "If we are a scholastic failure this semester, we believe we can attribute it (with· ·Out rationalization) to the possibly irrational idea that study ·at this time is largely inconsequential. It seems extremely stupid to spend four years of your life in an attempt to learn how to live when you see all around you forces, vicious forces, working for your death, either intellectual, or phy. sical." These are the kind of statements which have been call· ed defeatist, and de·structive .of morale in a nation which must pour every ounce of energy into a defense effort. They are more surely the sentiments of a generation which feels doomed before it begins to live, a generation which asks for peace and security and finds only holocaust and bloodshed. Some would call them indications of weakening moral fibre in American youth. They could more justifiably be looked upon as a long. ing for social stability and economic balance which it may be America's destiny to build. History may show that these members of the rising generation, with their sluggish response to the war drums and the battle cries, were not justified in their short range view of the necessity of war. Only time will prove the validity of their ·pessimistic predictions. But in their desires for a secure existence, their vivid horror of war will eventually he found the impetus for the establishment of pernianent and equitable peace. -Reprinted from The Daily Californian.

Ped Goes A-birdin' When a doctor makes a mistake -he buries it. When a carpenter makes a mistake it's just what he expected. When a lawyer makes a mistake it's just what he wanted because he has a chance to try the case all over again. When a judge makes a mistake it becomes the law of the land. When an actor makes a mistake it's just the thing he should have done. When a preacher makes a mistake no one knows the difference. BUT LET THE PED MAKE A MISTAKE-ALLAH, ALLAH. "The Beloved" had no business "Raven" in last week's headlines.

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Training School • News Notes • ....

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Gerald Clayburn was severely burned on the face by a kerosene explosion. The accident occurred while he was fixing a fire in the furnace. ?he beginning band under the direction of Janet Harris and Jack Snider is making rapid progress The newest members are Helen Freeman, oboeist, and Jack Max· well, flutist. Miss Blanche Gard and her mo· ther drove to their home in Kansas last week end. The local school placement bureau reports that vacancy indications show a much larger turnover this year, particularly among the men. The junior high school basketball team will play the Brock ju· nior high team .March 27, 2:30 p. m., at Brock. The high school chorus under the direction of Prof. Robert T. Benford, assisted by Marjorie Evans, will present "The Resurrec· tion Story" by Carrie B. Adams, April 9, in the college auditorium. Grace Muenchau is the accompanist.

sic department on March 14. LE· ORA LIBHART is teaching music there. Leora was a music major, LESLIE OPPENHEIMER resign- and was active in various camed recently from his position as pus organizations, particularly Y. superintendent of schools at Lisco w. C. R. GATES, Superintendent of Nebraska. He is going to Kansa~ City for a month before complet- of Schools at Grand Island will ing his naval aviation training at be a speaker at the Nebrask~ As· Pensacola, Florida. He was on the sociation of Church Colleges when campus on his way to Kansas it meets at Nebraska Wesleyan City. With him was Otto Wellen- March 21 and 22. Primrose high school basketball siek, attorney from Nebraska City. who expects to take the same team was runner-up in the Cedar training. Wellensiek did one year Valley conference recently. OR. f f f of pre-law work here at Peru. Un- VILLE PUGH, a former Peruvian The marriage of LORENE LIND- til the death of Mr. George Hein- athlete, teaches there. At the preBERG, Shenandoah, to Dallas L. ke, he was practicing law as his sent time, the school is working on Bartlett of Baltimore, Md., took partner. He is the brother of Fri- the second annuar declamatory contest. place March 4 in Baltimore. eda and Marie Wellensiek. Both BERT HALL, class Of '40, was The bride attended Peru the of these men who plan to go into first semester. training for aeronautics are form- recently re-elected to his coaching and English position at Stromser Peruvians. f f f burg, Nebraska. Bert is a. former At the Visual Education Clinic, C. P. T. Men to coach of the Bobkittens. sponsored by the Lincoln Public JERE MICKLE, '26, was a vis· Rebuild Plane Motor Schools and the Extension Diviitor on the campus on March 21. sion and the Teachers College of He is on a vacation from his pos0 the University of Nebraska, March ition as a member of the staff of CPT men have received prelim· 8, at the Student Union Building, the Division of the Humanities at •inary instruction concerning level in Lincoln. Superintendent ·paul the U. of Chicago. Mr. Mickle was Combs of Valley, was one of the flight, turns and gliding. active in dramatics when he was a A plane has been placed in the main speakers. s. L. Clements also student here. · attended the clinic. basement of the Administration HUBERT HUNZEKER visited on Building, where CPT students will The high school operetta "An the campus on March 21. He is assist mechanic, Edward Heng, in Old Kentucky Garden," was' giVen stationed with the Great Lakes rebuilding it. by the Tecumseh high school mu- Naval Station on Lake Michigan,

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TUESDAY, MARCH 25, 1941

PAGE THREE

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

fficlntire Chosen for Rll-State Team IInlR Rmufl ALllJ it 1Prep Abandons Track for

Four Wheelermen Recognized On Ril-State Honor Roll

Sports Of yesteryear

I.. . . -- -- -- .. .. .. .

By Erna Steffen

With 30 seconds remaining in ONE YEAR AGO the overtime period, Dreezen of Coaches Al Wheeler and Art The Lincoln newspapers all- team A bucketed a two-pointer Jones awarded letters to ten Peru that tripped team F 41-40, and at state college team selections have Bobcats cagers for their fine seafour of the Peru B.obcats on their the same .time gave team 'A the sons showing. Seniors receiving Coach Harold Fisher has antenor lists. The four boys are: Mc- championship of the play-offs in awards- were: Russel Bailey, Len nounced his intentions of dropping the intramural league. Intire, Hannah, Walker and Hiatt. Greathouse, Gilbert Purucker and track in the training school, and Mcintire Jed the list with a pos- Holding a twelve point advant- Bob Halliday. Juniors lettering in its place softball will be introition on the first team-being one age with only a bare five minutes were Mcintire, Walker and Hand- duced. _,,___ of the guards. Hannah was named remaining, A lost two of their reley. The other three were Luther Equipment will be checked out one . of the second team guards liables, Rhodus and Jewell via per- Hutton, sophomore, and Hannah this week, and a good turnout is and Walker and Hiatt, forward sonal fouls. Team F lost no time and Carpenter, freshmen. expected. The prepsters hope to and center, were on the honorable in taking advantage of the break TWO YEARS AGO have a successful season, and an.d fielders by McAlexander and mention. Equipment was issued to 49 want to schedule the college team In a poll of sports writers for Chandler and a gift shot by Gor- track candidates for the '39 season. for practice sessions. the World Herald, Mcintire again they knotted the count at 37 all Included in the list were ten veter- The schedule has not been com• was named for the first team with seconds to play. ans, including: Greathouse, Bail- pleted as yet, but with a few more guard, and Hannah and Walker The end of the regular playing ey, Collin, Halladay, Horacek Hall of the surrounding schools lined were on the honorable mention list. time saw the teams battling it out Floyd and Mosely. ' ' up, the slate will be full. in a bitter deadlock. An exciting list. FIVE YEARS AGO i ~ f For Mcintire, this is the first overtime followed with the lead President Pate and Dean Delchanging hands several times. time in his career that he has zell were awarded honorary memmade the first team in the cage Gorthey came through again with bership in the "P" club at a 5 a. se!~ctions. In football however, he a brace of gift shots, only to have m. formal initiation. The affair h2s been the unanimous choice Living·ston reply with a bucket to was under the direction of Alvin for first string center for each of knot the count. Graves tossed in Story, president, Lowell Lewis, cohis three years of service-a mark a one-point lead for a short time . captain of football team, and Bus •4 .Iii that few Peruvians have accom- another for team F, and they held Moore, basketball captain. Dreezen then grabbed· the spotlight VolleybaJl is now destined to beApril 3 has been the date cet plished. More power to the Irish! TEN YEARS AGO by flipping in the deciding bucket, aside for the intra-squad tangle Lettermen Hatcher, Saulter, Liv- come the sport in which nearly 15(} i f f and also putting his team on top on the athletic field. The purpose ermore, Littrell, Gaines, Tolly, students will participate. W. A. A. of the playoffs. of this meet is to put all the men Ackerson, Dahlgren, Fisher, Dash- has set the stage for their an• Rhodus of team F led the scorthrough their paces and test them er, Pedersen and Bruse were nual spring tourney, and the ining parade with 15 points, hotly under fire before intercollegiate among 30 gridders checking out tramural spotlight also shifts to pursued by Dreezen with 12 and ccmpetition is undertaken. equipment for two strenuous weeks the sport. McA!exander with 11. Contrary to the opinion of many The times will all be checked, of spring football practice. people, volley-ball is not a soft Box Score: and the entire squad will be under i i i game. It takes real ability to set careful scrutiny as they undergo pf Team A fg ft up shots to be slammed from right the proving process: The competiGorthey, f ........ 1 0 4 above the net. If anyone thinks it tion in the javelin toss should be Hunzeker, f ...... 0 0 0 is easy. to serve in this ga!lle they very keen, with Mcintire, Handley Norton, f .......... 0 1 0 e ought to step up and try to send and Mason competing. Freshmen McA!exander, c .... 4 3 3 Ten of the Bobcats that repre- R. Hall, f .......... 1 that ball spinning over the net, Frye, McKenney, Richards, Hines, 0 0 and still be accurate. Oakman, Allgood and others will sented the Blue and White for Chandler, c ........ 2 0 0 The games will be well underway all have their chances to earn Old Peru the. past basketball sea- M. Hall, g ...... 2 1 1 A meeting for the purpose of in the coming weeks, and Jones themselves places on the varsity by son have been recommended for Dreezen, g ........ 4 4 2 organizing a college softball team their "P" letter awards. showing what they have. TOTALS .... .. 14 10 6 for the remainder of the term and Huber, directors of the In· tramural program invite all the The squad has been working Of the ten men eaming the Team F fg pf f~ will be held in the study room of hard getting into the pink of con- awards, seven are freshmen-which Rhodus, f ......... 7 1 4 the Men's dorm Wednesday even- fans to turn out to boost things a bit. W. A. A. is also worthwhile. dition and injuries have beeri few makes prospects for the coming Jewell, f .......... 3 0 4 ing at 7:30. The girls, on the average, are not thus far. Of course there are the 1941-42 campaign more .of a plea- Graves, c ........ 2 1 2 All boys interested in playing few strained , muscles, stiff ankles sant nature than they were at Randall, c ........ 1 0 1 are urged to be present. The team far behind boys at this game, and this time last spring. and other common ailments, but . Clark, g .......... 0 1 4 already has games lined up with in some cases, could probably give Only two of these ten will grad- Ray, g ......... ,, .. 0 none serious enough to be con0 1 the Peru Prep high school team, some of the top intramural squads sidered a threat to the success of uate-Cec and Mac-leaving· eight Livingston, g ...... 2 1 0 and plans are underway for sched- a very good tussle. men for repeat performances. Crook, g ........... 3 It would be very interesting as the team in the near future" 0 0 uling games with town ·teams of well as entertaining if the champ• Hannah was the only cager outside TOTALS ....... 18 4 16 the neighboring communities . i i i of Cec and Mac to repeat for ionship WAA team could be matThe top six teams from the their letters. miilJ[!j]§illJ§:Eilllimiilliillmiill@lli~:ilJ[!j][!j]lilJilf ched against the top-flight repre· Those recommended for letters: standings including both round ~ ~ sentative of the Intramural ranks. Mcintire, Walker, Hannah, Pas- robins were eligible to participate ~ Peru Recreation Parlors ~ Anyone having ideas as to how cal, Grubaugh, Hiatt, Snider, By- in the playoffs. When any team w that could be arranged is invitsuffered its second loss in the ers, White and Ronhovde. POOL AJl.'D SNOOKER ~ ed to brilw forward their suggesplayoffs it was automatically elimOtt B list ll tions. All supporting the plan are i i i inated. Below are the · results of 0 Clayburn's Killerdillers made a oe orff, Prop. ll also welcome to make themselves the playoffs: clean sweep of the Junior High ®lll~!lllll~rum~ll1la~iill~illli1:: ll1lll1liillll1liillm@ifilg[!j] heard. Monday, March 10 Intramural basketball tournament F 20, J 19; E 29, D 30; A 38, r~-~~~~ with a record of four wins and B 28. no setbacks. The Killerdillers outTuesday, March 11: scored their opponents 93 to 56. E 58, B 28; D 18, F 29; J .38 A They bucketed an average of 23 31. ' points a game, while their rivals Wednesday, March 12: were collecting 14. ' D 26, J 32; E 27, F 38. Hemming's Hell-Cats bowed only Thursday, March 13: to the Killerdillers, and emerged Peru sports mentors, Al Wheela close second with three victories er and Art Jones, were guest A 26, F 24. F then drew bye and one defeat. When the Hell- speakers Wednesday evening at a to finals. cats walloped Good's Grape Nut banquet presented in honor of the Monday, March 17: Boys 17 to 10, a three way tie Otoe high school basketball club. A 3J, J 28. Independently owned and operated by E. E. Elliott Wednesday, March 19: resulted for third place. The banquet was well attended, A 41, F 40. and continuing as the Auburn Cleaners. . First column, team; second col- over 150 fans and guests being umn, games won; third column, present for the ceremonies. We want the many patrons of the Auburn Cleaners games lost; fourth column, per- Wheeler spoke to the lads letic activities. Jones followed centage; fifth column, team points; praising them on their season'~ with his peppy assortment of storto know that we will continue to maintain the same last column, opponents points. work and encouraging them to ies and was well received as he high stand.ard of . quality cleaning that has long been Clayburn realize the full value of their ath- delivered his address. associated with the Elliott Cleaners in other commun. (Killerdillers) ... .4 O 1.000 93 56 ities where we are so well established. Hemming (Hoosier GUARANTEED CLEANING SERVICE Hot Shots) .... 3 1 Collin It has been, and always will be, the policy of the (Go Getters) .... 1 3 associated with the Elliott. Cleaners in other commun· Lewis be satisfied. <Hell Cats) .-..... 1 3 Good you.Wo hm S·hour doonffig '""ioo. it! It'• foe (Grape Nut Boys) 1 3

Softball •

SPORTS Track Opener April 3; Intra. Squad Tangle

Coaches name Ten Bobcats for Cage Letters

Softball meeting Wednesday night

. Killer Dillers Win Junior High Tourney

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Wheeler and Jones Guest Speakers at Otoe Cage Banquet

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Auburn, Nebr.


PERU PEDAGOGIAN

PAGE FOUR.

Eyre Relates Drama ~xperiences •

Artists Compete for Subscription Award

TUESDAY, MARCH 25, 1941

Y.W.C.A. Discusses STATE THEATRE (Auburn, Nebraska) Scholarship Problem

Art Students may. compete for an a ward of a one year subscription to the art magazine, American Artist. The student who has earned the highest grade point average in art courses during the year and does the best piece of original art work and a special assignment will win the subscription. All the students in the drawing and painting classes this semester a.re submitting work to be judged in this contest.

"I made my debut in college ~ramatics when I was a freshman. I don't even remember the name of the play now. I was one of the three maids who entered bearing large silver platters of food and had to wait for the king to insnect it. I was so frightclid~ I think the dishes rattled." ). > ). This first dramatic experience proved to be one of many in Clara Eyre's career. Roles in "Post Road," Cinderella" and "Uncle Tom's Cabin" are found among her memoirs. Besides these Clara ha.; the honor of being a charter memller of Alpha Psi Omega on the campus. "The Shakespeare of Germany, "My interest in dramatics didn't begin," Clara recalled. "It was al- Goethe, lived during the late 18th ways there. I took dramatic lessons and early 19th centuries. He is the when I was a small child and greatest genius of German Literahave given readings practically ture." In such a manner, Dr. Selma since I began talking." .In the Omaha-Benson Schools. Konig introduced the book "The from which she graduated in 1935, Beloved Returns" by Thomas Clara found plenty of opportunity Mann at the A. A. U. W. Book Reto develop her dramatics. Besides view March 19. Dr. Konig reviewenrolling in various dramatic ed the original although an Enclasses, she took part in high glish translation by Porter was published la.st year. ,school plays and gave readings. "Lotte en Weimer," the title of "Children are born actors and it the original, is based upon the life carries over into high school. It of Goethe in 1816, after the Nahelps a lot to be able to drama- poleonic Wars. It portrays the retize things that come up." turp. of Goethe's • early love 42 "Property manager is an exciting years after he thought the episode job," according to Clara. "At the ended. M-I-N-K Dramatic Contest once The Author, Mann, was born we had to provide a lot of sttaw. Lu Beck in 1866. His father was a We were forced to go rural for German planter and merchant. that. Last fall we had great fun His mother was a Creole. Since he collecting guns for the Homecom- is part foreign blood, and his wife ing Play. And as we bottled the is a Jew, Mann was forced into exroot beer substituted for the real ile at the beginning of the Hitler thing, well-that was a 'foaming' regime! He is how living at good time." Princeton. Clara is President of Sigma Tau Mann is a psychologist as well Delta, and a member of Kappa as an essayist. Throughout the enDelta Pi besides other organiza- tire book, he tries to plaee himtions on the campus. self in the roles of the characters and determine how they felt· and of of of what they thought. Sheet Metal Course The success he attained in character portrayals reveals that To Be Given Next Quarter Mann, himself, is a genius.

"Scholarship" was the discussion topic at Y. W. C. A. March 18. Janet Ebers, chairman of the program committee, was assisted by Carolyn Fleming, Mabel Drake, Dorothy Eichsta.edt, and Donna Duerfeldt. Does intellectual ability alone make up scholarship? How can scholarship help to make Y. W. a.i;i advancing organization? These were a few of the questions discussed. Dorothy Tiller was in charge of the devotionals. Margery Denison, accompanied by Grace Muenchau, directed the singing . f f f

Konig Reviews 'Beloved Returns' •

CONTINUOUS SHOWS EVERY DAY 2:30-11:30 THURS. ·FRI. · SAT.-MARCH 27, 28, 29 Robert Taylor . Ruth Hussey "Fl,J( ;11T ( :oMvL\NJ)" Included-Information Please 1

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(Auburn, Nebraska) FRI. - SAT. - SUN.-MARCH 28, 29, 30 10c-28c DOUBLE FEATURE 10c-28c

I like my room as it is; I can find anything you'd like to borrow within three days after you ask for it, even sooner if I want to lend it to you. My books are placed under my bed. My clothes are draped over my desk and chair. Trousers hang from my dresser drawers. I ma\{e my bed once a week and if I am careful it could, go two weeks only my mother insists that I send my sheets home every week. My soiled shirts, socks, etc., are piled_ in the bottom drawer or in a corner of the closet. You probably wonder why I am not mote careful of the appearance of my room. There are two reasons: first, and most important, freshman initiations have been over for about four months. The other reason may seem trivial to you but . it reoresents an important philosophic tone-if I save my energy anc: do absolutely no unnecessary work, I'll have all my energy saved up and when some emergency a.rises I'll have it all stored up. You may wonder who I am, f f f Well, name almost any man at"Racial Minorities in our Dem- tending school here and that's proocracy" was the subject for discus- bably me. sion at Y. M. C. A. on Tuesday, f f f March 18. Herb Knutson and Carl Wirth directed tb,e meeting. Calvin Reed will lead a. group discussion on "isms" at the next meeting on March 25.

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THE YOUNG CROWD MEETS IN OUR CAROLE KING SHOP

Jan Ebers Rates 'Life' Publicity •

"When I saw our pictures in LIFE magazine I was surprised!" said Janet Ebers. Janet, a freshman on the campus, lives on a farm near Milford. "I didn't know it was to be published so soon," she explained. In answer to the question "What is the technique of crashing the pages of LIFE?" Janet answered that the World Herald had given a. good summary of what happened: "The picture magazine, LIFE, wanted to show the changing color pattern of the four seasons on the farm. Herman Ebers, near Milford Seward county, gave permission t~ make pictures on his farm. Richard Hufnagle, regional photographer for the Soil Conservation Service, did the shooting, and the results appear in Life's current is-

sue." [gJ[gJ[gJ[g[gJ[gJ[!j][gJ[g][!jj[!jj[gJ[gJ[gJ[g[gJ[gJ[!jj[gJ[g][gJ[!j][gJ[ID

I I

PERU BOWLING CLUB

~ ~

~ Ladies Welcome :i,t All Times ~ [gJ Ben Hanlon Mgr. I@ M. G. Heuer, Owner

i

Ella Margaret Shop "THE SHOP OF QUALITY" Auburn, Nebr.


(2)

Student .Speaks

1

By Tod Hubbell

1

........... I

The civilized world mournthe death of President ranklin D. Roosevelt last

.NUMBER 21

TUESDAY, APRIL 1, 19•i1

PERU, NEBRASKA,

VOLUME XXXVI.

eek. At this crisis in our world history it seems a work .of ill fate that our great dembenefactor

should

his life.

• Hostilities

toward

Ger-

many continues to grow as investigations proceed to uncover evidence which points

State Grants Wreck Hall •

Queen Revealed For 1940-'41 Again •

.as a Nazi ag.

Blue Prints Include: 'Oak Bar,' Dance Hall and Grill Nearing completion are plans for a $371,659.81 Wreck Hall which will be located east of the president's Green and White• House. This is the spot where collegians once played tennis.

Spring Recess begins April· '9. Glasses will resume April 16.

.Plans have been completed for a Wreck Hall at an .estimated cost of $371,695.81.

In all probability it was

Dorm Radio Rent To Be ~liminated

a Hitler agent out the mortal

life of our great president as he left his yacht, The Poto-

Yes, We Have No Raclio Rent We Have No Radio Rent Today

mac, after ~pendil'lg a restful week end fishing. The Pres· ident was especially elated he

had

several

strikes while fishing. It is be• lieved Mr. Roosevelt was

1

TESSIE STRINGAHOLT

'ti&·~i&l'~1f'"'~tll·.iff,,,~,,µ~~§;~."1

91J••

adjourned

the

latter part of last week and all of Washington was silenced. Throughout the nation flags were lowered and business was temporarily closed by the nation's greatest shock smce the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

• The result of our President's death will have far reaching effect upon the world. The democratic forces will suffer a relapse in morale and our armament program will be definite!; slowed down.

• Henry A. Wallace took the presidential oath of office Monday soon after the assassination and he pledged to "continue to bolster and maintain America's position as the arsenal for ~democ­ racy." In President Wallace's short address on the white house veranda, he mourned the death of so great a man and spoke of Mr. Roosevelt as "my friend, your president and our saviour."

Further quote: "I expect to wear red, white and. blue in keeping with godblessamericanism." Tessie shifted her Beech-Nut as she commented-"! further expect to be the climax to a Queeny year, .including Apple Queen, Grid Queen, Homecoming Queen, Vacation Queen, Easter Queen, and etcetera, etcetera-."

dormitory residents who will experience. difficulty in disposing of Due to the fact that the facultheir 50c pieces, f~rmerly cough~ up monthly for ~1s collos~al p~i­ ty is finding it increasingly diffivilege of tuning m on their Phil- cult to find students who are cozies. smart enough to rank in the up~ J. J. ~ per one-tenth of their class, HonSomehow or other this edition of ors and High Honors are rapidly the "Ped" doesn't stack up just ac- becoming past tense. cording to Hoyle. What's wrong? "It is high time the college started subsidizing scholars smart enough to add 2 and 2 up more WEATHER than ·once and still get 3.99999999," · Long range forecast: SUl)'.lsaid Mr. Wayward. "To get smart scholars we should spend a few mer expected to be hot. dollars," he (continued on page 5)

All-College Vote Reoeals Jindra and Representatiue Student for 1940-'41 0

complete modern eq¢pment.

in;!~""'··!ID~7' . . ~;~~~~::~;.~~~-~v~;.;::. ..Warnard.Jrowns. Th" I ·1 ·t . ·n lik I t d . 1:3 ~o ca am1 y wi . e y mee On Scholalstic Rwar s with mJured J~oks on the pu~es of

by the student Convocation to po~ered rifle which is cap· rain for Monday one day as Queen of 1940-41 num)Jer 143 ~ · able of being fired accurate- Quo~ from int~rvi~w with Miss Tessie: "Hellno, I'm not surprised. ly several miles away. I expected it all along. What do. you think I've been campaigning for anyway?" -

Congress

"We shall. eliminate radio rent," head of the radio-rent department said, when interviewed about radio rent. "What was good enough for. my grandfather ought to be good enough for my grandchildren," he added. "My grandfather didn't pay radio rent, therefore my grandchildren shall not pay .radio rent. In

There will be some Most "ah'd" at part was the kind of an important spacious second floor Oak Ballroom, with its smooth-as-glass meeting in either the floor and chromium plated bar. (Cokes, 7-up, strawberry pop, 5c; Administration Buildtomato juice, me). Gigantic globe ing, the Infirmary, or light revolves to illumine the floor someplace. Jmportap.t . in. multicolor. business will be taken ~otted palms and fem grace the up along with other imroom's wide shoulders, and adjoining it are smart powder and smokportant stuff. We don't ing rooms. know exactly what i( is First floor offers a grill with but you better be there.

-1'

Cla~burn

Students chose Seniors Victor Jindra and Ansel Clayburn repre-. ~ sentative students by all-college vate Friday. With character, ~ sportsmanship, leadei·ship, s9holastic standing and achi~vement on campus in mind, collegians created a local landslide. Vic has for four years been active in Math Club, which awarded him the Apt. in Arithmetic Medal as a Freshman. Upperclass sponsor of Freshman Waltz Club, he has taught more coeds how to · dance than Arthur Murray. Language Club members recall their · prexy's ice breaking stunt-singing Bohemian nursery rhymes, and football fans the flashy figure he cut as acrobatic cheerleader. ANSEL CLAYBURN VICTOR JINDRA All~college marble champ when a Sophomore, he was runner-up in the bowling tourney this year. With three track letters to his ity has been his organization of by playing his violin until the credit, he this spripg broke the the Senior rhythm band and ocar- dean arrived to tell them about quarter mile hoop rolling record. ina quintette. the Northcentral .Association. Other broken records are several Vic \\'as recognized as an outAnsel has been active as geoloSousa marches with which he standing· leader last Homecoming gist, actor, organizer and musician. practiced. discus throwing. when he subdued' rally-mad root- "National Geographic" recently

For recreation students find six ping-pong tables, a basement minature golf course, target games, cards and dozens of table games. Adjacent to the gr!il is a small dance floor with nickelodeon. Dance hours will be 4:00-6:00 daily, student sponsored . Taken via elevator to third floor, visitors discovered the recreational library. Books are largely fiction, travel, adventure, biography, philosophy and vocation, and magazines range from "Madamoiselle" to "The Hibbert Journal." Visiting moms, pops and little brothers can find such at-homes as "Country Gentlemen," "G o o d Housekeeping" and big little bOOks. Music lovers' treasure house incrndes recordings from Palestrina to Schoenberg,· played electrically, and a library of scores, instrumental and vocal solos . which can be checked out to students and public. Lining the walls are pictures of famous composers, teachers, musicians and contemporary musical organizations. Dance orchestra will practice in a sound proof room with recording and broadcasting facilities to be used by Perusingers, Dramatic Club and other organizations. (Continued on page twoJ

=

Li&SI&

w

SENIORS, WHERE

TO NOW?

Green ·Gables offers free enrollment to college graduate·s. No references request eel

\Vrite Today,


PAGE

TWO.

PERU PEDAGO(HAN

Published Weekly by The Peru State Teachers College

Goodman and Kaye To Battle at Formal •

Peru, Nebraska

"King of Swing," Benny Goodman, and "Swing and Sway" Sammy Kaye are to battle at Spring Entered at the Postoffice ~t Peru, Nebraska, as Second Formal. The Council has gone "bigtime" to engage the best for Class Matter. $1.00 per year. Single Copy Sc dear old Peru.

R ose McGinnis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editor . R a I·Ph L ock e · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·" · • · · · · S ports Edttor . / Harold Jenkias ...................... Ass't. Sports Editor Meredith Jimerson •.............. -. . . . . . . . . Copy Reader

TUESDAY, APRIL

Alumni, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers are returning to the campus for the formal. Astaire and Rogers are to give an exhibition of the "Peu r -Le.}.·"-th d they ru e.ance are introducing for the first time in dedication to their alma mater. Following the exhibition, the two

1, 194

MEN

dancers will give lessons to couples interested in learning the "Peru-Leru." An orchid setting has been adopted as the theme. Escorts will be given orchids as favors when passing the receiving line. The gym is to be transformed into an orchid paradise, the ceiling and walls being covered with orchids. Tickets are now on sale at $7.50 per couple in the Ad Building. Faye Bouse, ticket chairman, announces the advance sale to be above the 500 mark with 1,000 tickets expected still to be sold.

men

men

men

men

men

men

MEN!

?

Nina Kane! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Proof Reader REPORTERS:

Murvel

Annan,

James

Busenbarrick,

Maude Daft, William Fankhauser, Marjorie Kennedy, Carol Prine, Erna Steffen, Pauline Stark, Harold Jenkins, Janet Harris, Ted Thompson.

Steck Aw read what it sez

~~Pop"

WHY LIVE ALONE?

Why Not?

Seward, Nebr. Really, I myself have b~n im~ April 3, 1941 proving. We have sung all of our concerts wlithout one .single misDear Homefolks: The best-laid schemes o' mice and men 'an' the PED This traveling is great stuff. take, but as you all realize; that There is only one drawback-the is quite the usual thing. staff gang aft agley~particularly on April 1. gang is so dull and dry this. year. At every concert we have sung All Of the boys ride Oll the right to a packed audience. They really - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - side of the bus and ,the girls on go for our brand of stuff, too, be, the left. All that they do is sit in cause we have averaged over $3.0 the bus and ride; never say a per concert offerings, beside the guarantees. Why, we'll come home word all day long. Boy! but you should hear them this year with a $5 bill in each at night or concert, though. Then hand and still have some money they really cut loose. They have left in the treasury. been singmg magnificent concerts, Somebody please remind my way above their heads. Public School Music class that they . Night before last, an Evans and should study for the test I promSalter booking agency scout heard ised them when I got back. Lt's the concert and has signed us up going to be a "sticker" and that's for a six weeks tour during the no "hay." summer for $25 a week and ex- If anybody should wish to corpenses for each singer. After the respond with us, send the mail program he telegraphed back to to the Paxton Hotel, Omaha, in New York and arranged an audi- care of'the Pel'USingers. Make the tion w1tn the Metropolitan Opera address legible so ,that Neumann Co. for Fankhauser on April 17. can read it. He's the boy who alBill says that he doesn't know ways gets the mail. how he will get there, but he's Love, going if he has to hitch-hike. "Pop" Steck.

Tlf,IS IS NO EDITORJ4L,, I , · ·

'

' ' CAT CLAWS' By E.G. GROSSOEHM:E

ain't this the worst headline you ever saw

Death and destruction swept over the campus of Peru State Teachers College taking the lives of about 30 students, and leaving many others seriously injured. The morbid tragedy occurred at 7:49, a. m. in the usual early morning panic a& the students furiously pressed toward their several classrooms, keenly desirous of beginning the day's duties. This is the Jong feared result of the uncontrollable anxiety long associated with Peru. Control measures were being brought about but the action was .too slow to cope with the inevitable.

.,. .,. .,.

,...._----····· ···Training School •News Notes • ................

····-~

Examinations will be eliminated this quarter. All students have grades ranging far above the usual B average. All elegibility slips have been signed with only the most favorable comments. .

.

• No more walking up ,these blasted hills after dinner or when coming home from a show. All you have to do is place your dainty form on. one of the revolving steps at the bottom of the hill, and the escalator will deposit you safely at ,the top of the hill. No aches, no pains, no nothin' after the ride. These escalators are being built for the single purpose of keeping the girls from becoming muscle bound. • Coaches Wheeier· and. Jones will , find these valuable in keeping their athletes in shape. While the girls ride, the men are expected to run. up the hill beside them. 1

1

Wreck Hall Nears Com.pletion

Guaranteed to kill giant black

spiders instantly

almost within the next ten years maybe.

HAIR

STRAGGLY?

NAILS BRITTLE?

INGROWN TOENAILS?

DISCOURAGED?

So do we.

L~VE SEATS

INSTALLED PERU THEATRE

We Ask Your Patronage

(you'll get it)

(Continued from Page One)

Each floor has its luxuriously The senior c!ass has unanlmotisly voted to charter a Greyhound comfortable lounges with radios bus for their sneak-day trip. They and pianos. will leave April 2, 9 p. m. Interesting provision is for a Pageant of Peru museum, to be The junior class has made elab- developed cumulatively. orate plans for the junior-senior banquet, the date of which has not yet been established, .to be " held in the "Blue Room" of Hotel the senior class flower, orchids, as Ritze. the main unit for decorating. A fio nal ballot on ,the orchestra for The theme wm be centered the occasion has not yet been around the idea of spring, using taken.

,(Censored)

Escalators To Be Installed- On Hills

Spider Die

PILES • of people are having lots of fun. Are you? Send for free booklet.


PAGE THREli

PERU PEDAGOGIAN'

TUESDAY, APRIL 1, 1941

'Cats of '41 to Cavort in $325,000 Stadium ~

------------

Prep Girls Take ! Caterwaul 1j Sports Of Yesteryear 1 • It I Softball Reins L_ ..... ~ from Fellows

State Board Passes Rppropriation; Work Begins in July

By Erna Steffen

eBY RALPH LOCKE

___j

ONE YEAR AGO Often, I've wondered why Peru Coach Jones' well trained team did not accept the invitation to showed great skill with their little the Rose Bowl last fall. Only re- pink ·and blue model airplanes in The spring session of the state cently, I have discovered reasons the intercollegiate contest Friday. board of education canie up with for the move. and now I am of Walker placed first in a distant a surprise last week, as they apthe firm cc -,yiction that the Peru test with his own Sparton ,;Exe- propriated $300,000.00 for the reconstruction of the Oak Bowl in If Coach Harold Fisher has any- Athletic department made a very cutive." Hannah's newly christen- Peru. thing to say about it, the soft- wise decision. ed "Daisy Mae" received a yellow The present field will be reFirst in line, there was such a ribbon in the endurance contest. ball team representing the Bobcovered with a special turf, and huge budget alloted the athletic kittens this year will be made up TWO YEARS AGO completly surrounding the field in department, that the coaches, as Derby Champs "·Speck" Nelson of a rosterful of girls. well as members of the team, and "Red" Mosley guided their the shape Of a huge oval will be The surprise move came Thurs- thought it would be smart to stay the bleachers with -a seating caday, after the girls had challenged at home and try to spend at least soap box automobiles around the pacity of 75,000. track for a nothing flat record to the boys to a practice session. a fraction of it, and not meander defeat Training School contend- Before construction begins, the Final score: Girls 23, Boys 5. Fish- off to the golden west, where rigid ers, Louis Steck and Freddie Cle- oak trees surrounding the present er threw up his hands in disgust, training rules would have to be ments. When interviewed, the field will have to be cut down; and declared on the spot, that the in force. If the boys had to train, champs stated that they .owed all Jack Mcintire has offered to buy girls should continue to come out they could not easily be out every cf their success to daily diets con- them to be sawed up into toothfor workouts, but the boys could night, and then how could they sisting of not more than two picks for his campus shop. The bleachers will be five tiers high, do ae they pleased. The girls took spend much money? Another rea- ounces of goatmilk. 8.nd there will be 15,000 seas in their triumph with good grace, son arose from the taint of HolTHREE YEARS AGO each tier. and are planning to give the boys lywood. A few of the team memA much needed vacation was de- A special feature of the bleach• a chance to even the score-they bers were married, and if they are considering spotting flhem 20 went west, saw some of Holly- ciared for the over-worked ath- ers will be the reserved seats to wood's best, domestic strife would letes. The poor fellows had been be built in the top two rows. Probruns. inevitably result. Peru then would training constantly, appearing on ably never before in the annals 1 1 1 suffer continuously, and the result the track just as the sun peeked of human history has such mod· would be a sadly arringed won over the oaks, and staying until ernistic craft been employed, as and lost column for the 1941 sea- the city officials began to com- there will be in these seats. Each plain. Fearing the team would seat is to be a separate booth, acson. spoil its chances for ,taking the commodating two people, furnishOther objections arose from the t ed with radio, soda fountain and Bobcats, who dearly love their own Brownville meet, Wheeler and Jones sent the boys home for a a small lounge. • • stamping grounds. Why would a week's rest with pay. 1 1 1 . No foolin'-the tennis courts are bunch of healthy boys want to FOUR YKARS AGO Peru student~ may well look for- open for use now and an all col- leave such a fine busy place as The whole school turned out to ward te the 1941 football season lege tournament ' is being slated Peru? Just consider how dead that see "Ding" skip rope. He skipped wit!J. eagerness. The reason-our the latter part of this week for Tournament of Roses would be af900,919,295 times without stopping coaching staff has secured a host men. At present there are 26 net- ter having spent ma!J:k evenings on -frontwards, backwards, salt and of new .. blood that promises to sters signed for the , elimination the third floor of the Men's Dorr:i! pepper, blue-bells, high-water, low.build the Bobcats into ~ team that brackets, and others not already With only a mere 90,000 people m water, etc. will go down in h~tory, signed· should see Ralph Locke im- the stands, how would the Bob1 1 1 Coach Al Wheeler has been anx- mediately. The· purpose of the· cats get· along for encouragement, Bobcat track mentors, Wheeler iously scouring the country all tournament is to give candidates after playing a seaso~ before huge and Jones have reason to feel a. spring for football candidates to for the college team a chance to mobs of wildly cheermg students? bit more optimistic towards the bolster the Bobcats in .their de- strut their wares, and gain posiThen, too, there is the matter coming cinder season. The number fense of NIAA and State grid tions on the "ladder." of the gate. Nebraska only got a of men out has climbed from 53 titles. His search was fruitless unIntercollegiate meets will be measly $100,000.00 for their tro~­ to 74 in the past week. til he happened to visit the cam- played with other colleges, and bles, and they . haven'~ got. the:r In early practices, the weight pus of. Vassar college last week. team members winning either four check yet! ~fter their gigantic men have been showing promise, Accordmg to reports, he has met singles or ·four ·doubles matches profits on trips around Nebraska, some good-looking material, and will be eligible to receive a letter'. such a paltry pile mazuma would Miss Phyllis Davidson, director and if improvement keeps its prehas siiotted several promising At present there is a budget short- be belittling for Peru to accept. of womens' athletics, has handed sent pace, some NIAA records are backs. Of course, with some good age that prohibits a full schedule Why, that wouldn't even pay half in her formal resignation, which due to be bettered in the coming conference tangle on May 9 at is to be effective immediately. b.acks on t~e team with good for the spring campaign, but tent- of our coaches wages! "Davy" is very happy to be Wayne. arms, Peru will be forced to resort ative matches are in view with So now you see why Peru turnAlthough the field squad looks leaving Peru, and is to accept a to passes to get anywhere, but it's Tarkio, York, Doane and possibly ed down the bid! the stronger, the cinder men have position with the Salvation Army all ~ part of this great national Omaha u. The season opener with 1 1 1 as soon as two years' back pay is some point-getters in the distance pastune. Maryville is to be played the date paid to her. On her change she corps, as well as in the dashes. . So! ! -When the curtain lifts of the first track meet on the loThe intra-squad meet is due to offers: "I have recently felt the on this 1941 season, remember cal concrete courts. ' feature this week's program, the divine urge to devote my life to "Anything can Happen." In explanation of the "ladder" squad being divided into two facChristian endeavor, and I lost lit1 1 1 -all aspirants for team positions tions, the blues and the whites. tle time in reaching mY decision." will be ranked according to abilFreshmen especially will get their Her little work with the Salvaity on a list., The men that earn cl;tance Thursday to earn berths on tion Army will send her to her the top four· positions will be the post at the corner of 14 and Far- the team that will participate in ones selected for competition. Any"I'm not the muscle bound .ath- num in Omaha where she will the Maryville meet next week. one .lower than the top four, can lete that most students think for 1 1 1 work up there by beating out all really I'm just a home-body." And sell pencils. \Of her work she sa.ys, men above him. Any man has the thus Jack Mcintire exposed· his "I have always been fascinated ~~li!llii]ll!ll;J~ by pencils, antj, I am so very, very • right to challenge two places above true personality. happy that I will get to spend Peru Recreation Parlors The w. A. A. officers held a his position, anrt in the event of Mac attributes his state-wide more of my · time with them." short meeting last week at which a win he takes his victim's place. recognition as a first-rate athlete In "Davy's" , place, Mrs. 'Inice POOL AND SNOOKER routine business was tak~n care of In such a manner it is possible for to the fact that he has developed Dunninli will be installed for the ,and a new rule adopted. ' the bottom·m~~ to work into the beautiful hip action:· Unbelievable remainder of the term. She is otto Boellstorff, Prop. The rule requires of all aspir- 1jop four, pr.ovidm.g he, has the skill as it may seem, Mac developed delighted with the prospects her ~~ll!ll;J~:lillil~ ants for letter awards all former to accomplish victories over the this hip-action when a boy by sit- new field will hold for her. Mrs. requisites, plus ample. ~roof of the men ranked above him. ting at his mother's sewing ma- Dunning predicts, "For years I've ~1l!l1l!lilll®1l!lifilll1l!l(filfiliji1l!l1l!l1l!lmifil member's marriage, which must 1 1 ~ chine, pedaling. The way Mac han- wanted to have a chance to teach PERU BOWLING dles a football or basketball is those girls how to play football have taken place at least 24 hours Industrial Arts Students CLUB : before the claim to a letter is largely due to his nimble fingers so that they will appreciate those Ladies Welcome at All Times made. Start Bird Housing Project from knitting, crocheting and nice young men that play for Peru. ~ Ben Hanlon Mgr. The adoption of the new rule , basting. Now that my opportunity has arM. G. Heuer, Owner has been enthusiastically accepted • Coach Jone's comment, "Tha.t rived, I intend to illustrate what by the girls, and the membership The Industrial Arts Department Mac, he's cle1er," is applicable to those gladiators go through for ~1l!l1l!llfilil!llilllllllJflllll!ll;J~1l!lll!ll!®l!lilllll has tripled in the organization in is to embark on a $500 Bird House the nth degree. ~liilli!!1l!lllll~li!l1l!l1l!l~~(filfiliji[g]1l!J1l!lli!l1l!lli!l1l!l~ their school." a period of only four days. Building Project April 11. The 1 .. { Look no farther-look your best 1 1 1 . The College office !J.as served no- houses are being built by students Haircutting A Specialty tice that they are fully supporting to give them carpenter practice t~e new plan, and Miss Gockley and to furnish comfortable quarModern Barber Shop ll will perform the nuptials for a ters for our feathered friends. BILL LLOYD ll nominal fee of 86 cents of which There are to be 1000 houses ~ 27 ce~ts must be deposited in the built; one for each of the oaks. Plans are now underway f~r the ion square feet of hangar space [;]§lHJrgJ~rgJ[gj~~§~~[!;i§;gJ§i~I;J~~[}51[g] athletic fund. Ea ch house w1·11 h old but one new 10 million dollar airport to will be provided. The hangars ~liilli!!li!l1l!l1l!l~~!lffil]~~1l!lfillli~~§~~li!l1l!ll 1 ·1 1 family of birds, but if necessary be situated on the river bottom will run along the south edge of the wrens will be asked to double J. P. CLARK just north of the railroad station. the field, and the proposed bomber plant will .be placed back from .r.L up. Electric Shoe Shop P' The houses are to be built of 5,0(}0 foot runways will be con- the field at the foot of the bluffs. structed running north and south, work will commence on the airworm w~d a;d bir:·~ eye maple. east and west, and northwest and port on the s.econd Tuesday of il!I li!J[g][gjliiJli!!liiJli!!iill~(filfiliji[g][gjj Patronize Ped advertisers. southeast. Approximately 2 mill- next week.

..

SPORTS

Bobcat Gridders Of '41 will be No Foolin' BeautifuIto See. Tennis Starts

Track Men Increase from 53 to 74 •

Davidson Resigns; Dunning Succeeds •

Md ntire Discloses Secret Hobby

New WAA Rule Demands Wedlock

I I I

$10,000,000 Rirport Goes Up for Peru Pilots ----·----

:iiiiiiiml' c?f : fAVORllf WlnlfR SPORT

1

I

Ii

I I I ~


PAGE FOUR.

PERU PEDAGOGIAN

Salem Entertains Chorus On Concert Appearance

Calendar

\

Holman Sisters Play For Budget ~vent fl

Virginia and Betty Jane Holman, duocpianists, w:ere presented by the budget committee on March

25.

the chorus began on a different one .. <We were right for, once.) It must have not made any difference. to the audience, though, for they brought us back for an encore. In fact, after the offering, we knew it didn't make any difference. During intermission, Marge Evans gave the listeners her usual finished presentation of Bach and Beethoven. Then came "Ballad ·for Americans." "Seabiscuit" Howe came through with his horse race, along with. "Cowboy" Neumannn and the rest of tthe chorus. The audience showed their approval of this rousing composition by asking the director and soloist back again. We fooled them, .though; we didn't sing any more. So our concert ended, but with each chorus member wishing that the following week would pass in a day, so that they could get started on a real singing tour.

I

THURSDAY, APRIL 3 Freshmen Clubs .. .. .. 7-9

MONDAY, APRIL 7 W. A. A.; "P" Club . . 10:30 Alpha Mu Omega ...... 7-8 q;.i ...... Art Cluo ..... :.. .. .. .. 7-8 Tri Beta .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 8-9 Kappa Omicron Phi . . . . 8-9 Music Club . .'.. .. .. .. .. . 8-9

·-o

I

I

l

MER

I

At any sorority house.~ '";./

T C p·lan·IStS Present Recital

11-

!!!

axe."

Tom values his collection at about $75 but he would not sell it. "The Smithsonian Institute offered me $10 for the axe as a representative of the type of work done by the Indians of this territory. I have also been offered $10 for a pipe and $5 for a knife." When asked if he planned to continue his work, he answered

'"STRAWBERRY BLONDE"

Ann Rutherford and John Shelt~n in

II

"KEEPING COMPANY" .,. .,. .,. SUNDAY - MONDAY· TUESDAY-APRIL 6, 7, 8 Gene Tierney, Chas. Grapewin, Marjorie Rambeau in

"TOBACCO ROAD''

.,. .,. .,.

I AUBU.RN THEATRE (Auburn, Nebraska) SATURDAY - SUNDAY-APRIL 5, 6 T/11> Dead End Kids in 1

'GIVE US WINGS" Co-Feature

Tim H oft and Virginia Dale in

GESUNDHEIDT

WANTED~-.ui

I I II

SUNDAY, APRIL 6 Lutheran Club . . . . . . . . 7-8

Dean Deloes Into Indian Mounds/

I

James Cagney and Olivia DeHaviland in

FRIDAY, APRIL 4 High School Senior i Class Play - .. .. .. .. . .. . 8 SATURDAY, APRIL 5 Girls Formal

THEATRE

(Auburn, Nebraska) CONTINUOUS SHOWS EVhRY DAY 2:30-11:30 FRIDAY - SATURDAY-APRIL 4, 5 DOUBLE FEATURE DAYS

TUESDAY, APRIL 1 YMCA, YWCA, CCA .... 7-8

Oh Sprig is here Dat Glorious time When zilly boets dry do rhybe Dad glad do' tibe is here ad lasd You're grazy do ting Winder's pasd Now childred sig av gay Sprig's treat And Dad bods ashes .on\i da street Da birds begin do bill and goo And wabbit do what wabbits do I'd dri~d to sig dis do song do please, ~ Sprig's dear undo my hard But tibs draws shor.t and we bust pard Tramping old river beds and ex- I've god do hunt by skis. ploring former Indian camp:: grount!s provides a fertile field .for ~. ~ .,. Thomas Dean's collection of Indian relics. · • • , . . .Trus · Ju?ior . w~o ~omes ~rom Humboldt is maJonff~ m chemistry d d t·10 ks t th · an. . e. uca . n, wor a e brary, and is an active member of •

The sisters' careers began. at the ages of five_ and seven, and since that time they have combined radio, stage, movi~ and4(toncert appearances. Therr power of syn" chronization has attracted the attention of psychologists. . . . t , Selections from Bach, Mazar , . f Schumann, Rachmamnof , ussy Ravel Arensky strau · DU· . . . ·· • ' . ' d' Kappa Delta P1 and Tri Beta. kas Moussorgshy and Gou! were T h ·ks d h d · ' . oma aw an · arrow ea s mpresented. teres't Tom most. In his collection .,. .,. 'f he has 30Q arrowheads and about W. A. A. recreation center will 25 tomahawks. become a. reality. Plans are· being "Besides tomapawks and arrowcarried out to convert the upper heads, I have knives, axes, scraprooms ·of the gym into a game ers, needles, .drills, pipes cl~ts, hicje room. It will be equipped for ar- scrapers, grmders and hammers. chery ping pong and shuffleboard. I've found most of my pieces in ' northwestern Missouri and south~~!!lllIDllJ§;]i!ID!Jl!!J!illl!!llil!~ eastern Nebraska though I have FOR SATISFACTION IN found some pieces in North and South Dakota, Iowa, Minnesota, FOODS Canada, Colorado, and Arkansas." Casually Tom added "The tribes MARDIS GROCERY ~ representec\_ include the Pawnee, Sac and Fox, Sioux, Cheyenne, 1 1l!f~lill!IDllllilllillfi5llliil1f!!!r;J!!!Jl!!Jlil!~ Crows and Pueblo." agj!lj]ll!Jll!Jll!lll!ll!!llil!llilllffil®:!lilillll~l Studying the work of Indians /i'!I aroused T~m's interest in 1935. DR. G. H. JODER ~ "In Indian houses and graves, -Physician and Surgeon-1 I ~ave found ?eads, arrowheads, Off" . t Mil t d. C . kmxes axes.' pipes, and pottery. ice a . s ea. orner ll. Graves fascmate me.'' Office Phone •3 Res 39 · .,,' · • ll In answering what his most inlllillillli!llllJ~iij]!ilr~lill!Rml~dililillllll! teresting· piece was, Tom described . an axe. "It weighs seven and a half pounds and was found in the Nodaway River bed in Missouri. The axe is of green granite with green stones embedded in the

J:b .

S.TATE

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Interested was their expression, but fixed was their idea-the idea of "Sing, you sinners, sing." Thus, "'the Perusin:gers were greeted by their audience of 150 listeners in the Salem high school auditorium. But before the concert, the singers really shone. Not musically, but instead, at the supper table. For after-dinner humor, they kindly reminded ·Fankhauser to get his elbows off the table. Ebers helped to present some kind of entertainment; either by some wise crack or by exploring some new part of the building. Seven-,thirty, and we were all in the dressing room raring to go. Eight o'clock: we were on the stage singing the first numbers. By their applause, the audience seemed to like it. After the bass soloist had finished, we were back on the stage. Everything went well until "Pop" started directing one number and

TUESDAY, APRIL 1, 1941

lOc

"ROBBERS OF THE RANGE" Plus SeTial 20c

Name Jindra and Clayburn

Robert D. Moore will give a review of current magazine vene Wednesday, April 2, for the A. A. U. W. book hour at 4 p. m. in the College Library.

(Continu'd from Page One) published his "My Technique on a Rock Pile,'' and students voted HIS the most attractive MAP on the campus. Last year he played the tattle role in "Gray Monday" and this fall did Shakespeare's "Om and Hamlette for Sturdier Youngsters." .As student s~ou.t, master, he instigated the bmldmg of the troop cabin west of Peru. and persuaded state legislators to pass a bill permitting left-over lumber to be · used for dog and cat kennels to · It ts · house facu y pe . Musicians remember his literal rendition of "Riggolettoomuch" as clarinet soloist with the college band. He has for three years sung bass in the male quartet featured largely at local funerals, and last spring gave his Junior cymbal recital. Chairman of the Leisure Time Activities Committee, he organized the Try Your Hand at Handball Club and the Future Kiwanians of Peru. Greatest ambition is to be a Lion Tamer or middlewestern college professor. Recently turned down an offer to model Dream Hair Glorifier to do ori~inal research in the U.S. Bureau for Investigating the Manner in _;vhich Various Ig.neous Rocks penetrate the Overlymg Strata. .,. .,. .,. Tne meeting of the International . .. Relations Club was under the mrection of Dr Brown whose discussi<in was on de Victoria's contribution to international Jaw.

~

Drop in after a hard test.

Training school pupils of Prof.. ' Robert T. Benford presented a piano recital Wednesday evening, March 26, in the Music· Hall auditorium. · Piano solos played included: Dream B6at ... :~..... Williams Tweedle Dum and Tweedle Dee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Williams Sammy Kennedy Woodland Waltz . . . . . . . . Gwynn Woo, Goes the Wind .... Pietsch Louis Steck Song of the Kitchen Clock . Blake Patricia Ann Benford Happy Farmer . . . . . . Schumann Ina Jane Good In a Ricksha . . . . . . . . . . Hopson John Clements · Minuet in G . . • . . . . . . . Beethoven Paul Clark Maxwell Habanera .................. Bizet Billie Jean Miller Song Withot\t W9rds . . . . . . Feil John Lewis . . Valse Brilhante .. ·. · ·.. Benford Jack Maxwell Piano Duets: Birds in the Branches . . Rolfe Muriel and Jane Johnson The last meeting of the organiLollipop Parade . . . . . . . . . . Briggs zation, April 21, will take the John Clements and Paul Clark form of a buffet supper. Maxwell Dance of the Sunbeams . Cadman Jack Maxwell and John Lewis ialt · from Smithsonian Institute form a background for Tom's study of Indian relics. definitely, "Yes." He plans in the Ehthu£iastically Tom said, "My future to explore the Cliff dwell- hobby is definitely worth whileings of C6lorado, Arizona and Cal- it proves educational, provides ifornia. He is now looking. for a fresh air and exercise besides the complete pottery dish. thrill one gets from eXploring. Too, Geology, Boy Scouts, and mater- it is really very inexpensive."

Zombies,

Boilermakers

and Mickey Finns a spe· cialty mixed by Little Nellie Kelly.

The

Campu~

Tea Shop THE PERU DRAMATIC CLUB PRESENTS "THE SATURDAY EVENING

GHOST"

STARRING RONALD COLEMAN

& VIVIEN LEIGH with