Page 1


..


EX-LIBRIS


IN MEMORIAM TO

G. W. BROWN who gave of himself that the tree of learning might flourish in Peru.


1867

1934

FLORENCE MARTIN cdd:ot. DANA SCHNEIDER 7Tl_anatfeiL

Engra'Ving by

Photography by

ARTCRAFTS ENGRAVING C'O. PETERSON STUDIO St. Joseph, Missouri Auburn, Nebraska

Printing and Binding by

ECONOMY ADVERTISING C'O. Iowa City, Jo\va


~ L...D

~s<.ol t)...j

?ti 1

~ ~'-~

HOYT HALL

The basement of the home of T. H. Howell was utilized as a class room when the first school in Peru outgrew the little store building which had housed the seekers after learning in "Peru Landing"


THE

A PRESENT ACCOUNT OF PERU STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE TOGETHER WITH ILLUSTRATIONS THAT BRING BACK AN INTERESTING PAST

ON C E A SALOON , THIS BUILDING WAS ENLISTED AS THE FIRST HOME OF NEBRASKA'S FIRST NORMAL SCHOOL

1867

cL!uJJ-Lio__J-u!__ cL th..e <S.tudentL ue~~~

&t~t~

(}-en

lf tfLe

Qe~e~~~L Co_LLe.-9_e_ a_-L cfl- ~'LlL, C/t'"e_(rt__a__'j_/ca___

VOL. XXVII

I )


Dedication Time in its trek has brought out of the Past the fruits of the Present. To those attainments which lie beyond the horizon, to the Future of Peru State Teachers College, we dedicate this, the 1934 PERUVIAN.

Major Daily conceives the idea of a Public School at Peru while agent to the Otoe Indians


Prof. J. M. McKenzie under whose inspired presidency, 1867-1871, this college began its career.


THE COLLEGE


FIRST FACULTY-1867

J. M. McKENZIE-principal, teacher of mathematics, chemistry, natural science and Latin, and janitor MRS. C. B. McKENZIE-preceptress and teacher of rhetoric, geography and history

THE FACULTY


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Faculty Historical Sketch of Departments The history of the scholastic departments in Peru is a checkered one. The organization and classification of subjects in the early curricula seem hardly logical to us toda y in the light of the present organization ; still, in the early curricula appeared the seeds from which, rapidly or slowl y, depend ing upon the department, grew the present arrangement. So gradual or halting have been some advances that the assign ing of definite dates is impossible or inaccurate . The Normal School proper began in 1867 with a faculty of two teachers, Mr. J. M. McKenzie , who taught chemistry, mathematics, natural science, and Latin, and

RUTH

AH LBE~G

R. N ., A . B.

School Nurse

CASTLE M. BROWN Ph. B., A.M., J.D. Professor of History and other Social Sciences . Head of Department. A. B. CLAYB URN A. B., A.M . Professor of Geography and Gaology.

BARNEY K. BAKER B. S., A. M., Ph. D. Associate Professor of Education.

ROBER T T. BENFORD A. B.

Instructor in Piano and Organ . Director of Public School Music in the Training School.

IDA MAE BRACK NEY B. S., M. S. Assistant Professor of Home Economics .

Ll BBI E A. BR AN SON A. B. Ass istant Librarian.

ESTH ER A. CLARK A. B., A . M. Professor of Foreign Languages.

S. L. CLEMEN TS A. B., A.M. Superintendent of Train;ng School.

PHY LLIS DAVIDSON B.S., M. A. Director of Physical Training for Women.

W . N. DE LZ ELL Executive Dean and Director of Extension.

NORM A L. DIDDEL. A. B., A.M. Associate Professor of Art.

!N ICE M. DUNN ING

RUTH G. BRANDT A. B.

Principal School.

Junior

High

A. B.

Dean of Women.


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Faculty Historical Sketch of Departments Mrs. C. B. McKenzie, who taught history, geography, and rhetoric. Soon all of the subjects taught were classified into four divisions or departments, mathematics, natural science, language, and history and philosophy. Thus it may be seen that mathematics, language, and the sciences were fairly well established with the school. Mathematics from the beginning held a fairly large share of the curriculum. Latin, Greek, German, and French have been taught at various times. The sciences have grown gradually, the most important single step in their history probably being their division into departments in 1892 . The separation of ELMA I. GOCKLEY

MARIE H . FAULHABER A. B., A.M. Associate Professor of English.

BLANCH A. GARD A. B., A.M. Supervisor of First and Second Grade Teaching .

GLEN GILKESON A. B., M.A. Director of Physical Education for Men.

Bursar and Secretary to the President.

FRANCES HARVEY A. B., A.M. Supervisor of Junior High School Teaching .

E. H. HAYWARD

FRANK H. HECK B. A., M.A. Associate Professor, of History and Other Social

MARY L. HILEMAN A. B., A.M. Supervisor of Third and Fourth Grade Teaching.

A. B.

Registrar. (On leave of Absence.)

A. B.

ScitJnce.

ARTHUR L. HILL A. B.

Professor of Mathematics.

of

ANNA IRWIN B.S ., A. M. Associate Professor of Commerce and Instructor in Palmer Penmanship.

PEARL A. KENTON A. B., A.M. Associate Professor of Foreign Languages.

SELMA S. KONIG A. B., A. M., Ph. D. Professor of Modern Languag ~s.

C. A. HUCK A. B., M. A. Associate Professor Mathematics.

15

V. H. JINC'RA A. B.

Director of Band and Orchestra and Instructor in Violin.


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Faculty Historical Sketch of Departments geography from the social sciences is comparatively recent. Instruction in English and professional work was incidental with the beginning of the school. English work was done in the first courses in rhetoric and grammar, though most English work was looked upon as a prerequisite. The greatest diversity of origin may be assigned the departments of music and physical education because of their spontaneous qualities . Certain it is that singing groups were organized nearly as soon as the school . At first athletics, as music, were extracurricular, though gymnastics were in the first years made curricular. After the turn of the century, athletics began to become "respectable" as a part of the curriculum. Though work in art was done

A. V. LARS ON B.S., A . M. Supervisor of Manual Arts.

J. 0. LAWRENCE B. A. , M. S. , Ph. D. Assistant Professor of Physics and Chemistry.

C . R. LINDSTROM B.S., M.S. Assistant Supervisor of Manual Arts.

ERNEST LORBEER B. S. Assistant Director of Physical Education for Men.

MONA L. LYON

ELIZABETH McCOLLUM B. E., A.M. Director of Kindergarten.

GENEVIE H. MARSH Dormitory Assistant.

ISABEL MASON A. B., A.M. Supervisor of Fifth and Sixth Grade Teaching.

A. B.

Ading Registrar.

1.. B. MATHEWS A. B., A.M. p, inLipal High School.

P. A. MAXWELL

W. T. MILLER

B. S., A. M., Ph. D.

B. S., A . M., Ph . D.

Professor of Education , Head of Departr1ent.

Associate Professor of History and other Social Sciences.

PATR ICK H. NORWOOD A. B., A.M. Supervisor of Junior High School Teaching.

NO NA M. PALMER A. B. Professor of Commerce.

16

D. J. NABORS A. B., M. Ph. Assistant Professor of English and In structor 1n Speech Education.


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Faculty Historical Sketch of Departments very early informally, it was not until 1896 that a faculty member, Henry H. Bagg, was appointed to devote his entire time to instruction along that line. The department of commerce, as such, was organized in 1906, under the present Dean of Men, W. N. Delzell. The work in home economics was begun at nearly the same time, under Alice M. Loomis . Work definitely in instruction in the industrial arts began about 1912, under F. C. Smith . Hygiene instruction originated in other classes, but not until 19 15 was it added to the curriculum.

EMILIE B. PAPEZ A. B., A.M . Assistant in Art.

GRAC E TEAR A. B., A. M.

Professor of Pri nci pies and Methods in Education.

GR ACE M. PETERSEN A. B., B. S. in L. S. Librarian.

GEORGE W. SM ITH A. B., M.A., Ph. D. Professor of English, Head of Department.

G. HOLT STECK B. Mus. Instructor in Voice.

J. W. TYLER A. B., A.M. Associate Professor Education , Director Rural Education.

FRANK E. WARE B. S., M. S., Ph. D. Professor of Chemistry, Head of Department.

EDNA WEARE B.S., A.M. Assistant Professor Home Economics.

of of

DOROTHEA J. WEST Bookkeeper.

JOHN WINTER B. Sc. , M. A., Ph. D.

Professor of Biology, Head of Department. GENEVIEVE KIEFFE (No picture) A. B.

Acting trar.

Assistant

Regis-

17

of


To the Graduates of 1934: You are graduating at a time which will be known as one of the epochs of history. Old landmarks are going. Civilization is moving into new paths, where many of the old signposts are not directing us to security as they did in the past. Your college training should have prepared you to pioneer in the new field and assist in bringing order to a somewhat chaotic world. You have difficult problems to solve. May you find success and enjoyment in solving them. Sincerely yours, W. R. PATE, President. ( 1923-1934)


Anna Moorhead Joy and George E. Howard, on the present site of the Philo Rock, become the first graduates of The New State School

-1870-

SENIORS


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Seniors

LOVISA ALBERT Plattsmouth Education Philo; Art Club; Dramatic Club.

JEANNETTE BARRETT Omaha Music Sigma Tau Delta; Y. W. C. A.; Club; Dramatic Club.

Girls

MATHILDA BARISAS

CLYDE BOLE

Omaha Elementary Education C. C . A.; Everett; Dramatic Club; Art Club.

Reynolds Music Alpha Mu Omega; Mens Club; Orchestra.

ORVILLE BUEHLER

GEORGE E. CAMPBELL

Crab Orchard Industrial Arts- Physical Science Alpha Mu Omega; Epsilon Pi Tau Lambda Delta Lambda; Alpha Erudite Y. M. C. A.; Mens Club; Dramatic Club Tr ack.

Osceola Education

VENUS CAMPBELL Osceola Education Dramatic Club; Chorus; Geron.

Chorus.

LEROY COLE Nebraska City Physical Science- Mathematics Y. M. C. A.; Mens Club; Philo; Track.

THOMAS COLLIN

GILBERT COOK

Auburn Industrial Arts-Art Epsilon Pi Tau; Y. M. C. A.; Mens Club; Philo; Art Club; Dramatic Club; PER UVIAN .

Brock Latin Phi Lambda Alpha; Al pha Erudite; Y. M C. A.; Mens Club; Philo; Track.

MELBA COPE

BURDETTE COWEL

Peru Physical Education- English Alpha Mu Omega; Sigma Tau Delta; W.A.A.

Auburn Mathematics- Manual Arts Epsilon Pi Tau; Phi Lambda Al pha; Mens Club; Football; Basketball: Track.

20


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Seniors

FLORA DASHER

HUBERT FILLEY

Peru Elementary Education Pi Gamma Mu; Girls Club; Orchestra.

Diller Physical Science Alpha Mu Omega ; Beta Beta Beta; Lambda Delta Lambda ; Y. M. C . A.; Mens Club; Everett ; Chorus.

HELEN GILBERT

RO Y GINGLES

Peru English- Latin Kappa Delta Pi; Sigma Tau Delta; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo; Orchestra.

Douglas Mathematics Alpha Mu Omega; Y. M. C. A.; Mens Club .

CLAYTON GO IT

JO YCE GRUBB

Johnson Manual Arts Phi Lambd a Alpha; Mens C lub; Football; Basketbal l.

C ounci l Bluffs, Iowa English - Mu sic Pi Gomma Mu; Sigma Tau De lta; Y. W. C . A. ; G irls C lub ; Everett ; Drama t ic Club; Orchestra; Band.

FREDA MAE HAGEMAN

WILLIAM HAUSER

Ithaca Art Girls C lub; Art Club.

WILMA JEFFRIES C hester Education Sigma Tau De lta; Kappa Delta Pi; G irls Club.

Ben kelma n Physical Science Alpha Mu Omega ; Mens Cl ub ; Everett; Dramatic Club .

BEULAH JOHNSON Hamburg, Iowa Education Y. W. C. A.; G irls C lub.

MABLE JONES

HARRIETT ANNE KINGSOLVER

Salem History- Social Science Pi G amma Mu ; Alpha Eru d ite; G irls Club; Chorus.

Peru Latin- English Kappa Delta Pi; Pi G amma Mu; Sigma Tau Delta; Girls Club ; Orchestra.

21


T HE

1934

PERUVIAN

Seniors

CLAUDIA LUSE

LORA MAJORS

Omaha Geography Pi Gamma Mu; Alpha Erudito; Girls Club; Chorus.

Peru English- History Pi Gamma Mu; Girls Club; Orchestra.

M. FLORENCE MARTIN

LO IS E. MAY

Falls City English Kappa Delta Pi; Sigma Tau Delta; Alpha Erudito; Y. W . C. A.; Girls Club; Dramatic Club; PERUVIAN.

Reynolds English Sigma Tau Delta; Y.W.C.A.; Club; Philo; PERUVIAN.

Girls

EDNA MA YSTRIC K

ELLEEN MEANS

Omaha History Kappa Delta Pi; Pi Gamma Mu; Alpha Erudito; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo; Dramatic Club.

Beatrice English- Geography Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; W. A. A.; Dramatic Club.

EDITH MEEK

MARJORIE MENDENHALL

Omaha Home Economics Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Basketba ll; W .A.A.

Fairbury Physical Education- Art Girls Club; Art Club: Dramatic Club; W.A.A.

LOIS METCALF

BERNIECE MILLER

Beatrice Elementary Education Gir ls Club; Dramatic Club.

FRIEDA MUELLER Omaha Education Girls Club; Kappa Delta Pi.

22

Kappa

Omaha Education Delta Pi; Girls Club; Chorus.

MARJORIE NELSON Omaha English- Education


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Seniors

HAZEL NILES Omaha Education- English Sigma Tau Delta; Y. W. C. A.; Club; Dramatic Club.

BETTY PANCAKE Girls

Shenandoah, Iowa English- Education Sigma Tau Delta; Y. W. C. A.; Club; Dramatic Club.

Girls

ROBERT PATE

LLOYD PERRY

Peru Mathematics Kappa Delta Pi; Alpha Mu Omega; Lambda Delta Lambda; Phi Lambda Alpha; Mens Club; Football; Track.

Ellis Mathematics Alpha Mu Omega; Phi Lambda Alpha: Y. M. C. A.; Mens Club; Orchestra; Band; Track.

INEZ PETTINGER

REX RUCKSDASHEL

Syracuse Art- Early Elementary Education Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Art Club; Dramatic Club.

Seward Chemistry- Social Science Pi Gamma Mu; Y. M. C. A.; Mens Club; Dramatic Club; Debate; Band.

DANA J. SCHNEIDER

GLEN A. SHAFER

Sterling Chemistry- Mathematics Alpha Mu Omega; Beta Beta Beta; Lambda Delta Lambda; Mens Club; Philo: Dramatic Club; PERUVIAN; Orchestra ; Band.

Liberty Mathematics Alpha Mu Omega; Phi Lambda Alpha; Y. M. C. A.; Mens Club; Philo; Dramatic Club; Football; Track.

MORAS SHUBERT

WILMA SILENCE

Falls City Physical Science- Biology Kappa Delta Pi; Alpha Mu Omega; Beta Beta Beta; Lambda Delta Lambda; Y. M. C. A.; Mens Club; Band.

Rock Port, Missouri Music Pi Gamma Mu; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Orchestra; Band.

BEATRICE STOFT

LANGFORD WAGGONER

Papillion Education- Geography Pi Gamma Mu; Girls Club.

Johnson Manual Arts- Geography Y. M. C. A.; Mens Club; Everett.

23


THE

1934

PERUV I AN

Seniors

JOHN W HEATLEY

MILDRED WHEELER

Lincoln Biology Beta Beta Beta; Sigma Tau Delta; Y. M. C. A.; Mens Club; Dramatic Club.

Nemaha Latin Kappa Delta Pi; Sigma Tau Delta; G irls C lub; Philo.

PAUL VANCE

MARJORIE YOUN G

Reynolds Mathematics- Manual Arts Alpha Mu Omega ; Epsilon Pi Tau; Y. M C. A.

Peru Ed ucation- English Y. W . C. A. ; G irls Club; Philo; Dramatic Club ; Chorus ; Orchestra.

* SEN IORS WHOSE PICTURES DO NOT APPEAR EUGENE HERTZ, Malvern , Iowa

IVAN NEWTON, Peru

ANNE JENSEN , Omaha

MARION REISINGER , York

LLOYD McCANN , Edi son

IVA SHUBERT, Shubert

GERALD TYLER. Peru

24


The third Junior Class, after the school became a four year college in 1905, gives a Valentine Party to dedicate the new Library building -1907-

JUNIORS


THE

1934

PERUV I A N

Juniors

RACHEL ALBRIGHT Peru Art Girls Club; Art Club .

MABEL ANDREWS Tecumseh El ementary Education History- Social Science

DONALD BLOUNT

DOROTHY BRENNER

Auburn Mathematics Alpha Mu Omega; Y. M. C. A.; Mens Club; Philo .

Falls City English Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Dramatic Club.

HELEN BROOKER

LORA DICKERSON

Omaha Early Elementary Education Y. W. C . A.; Girls Club; Art Club; Pedagogian; W. A. A.

Brock English Kappa Delta Pi; Sigma Tau Delta; Y. W. C . A.; Girls Club; Dramatic Club; Chorus.

ARDIS EDIE

OPAL GAINES

Pawnee City Early Elementary Education Girls Club; Art Club.

Geneva Elementary Education Dramatic Club; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Everett.

BETTY HANNIGAN

GEORGE HASKINS

Omaha Elementary Education

Lin coln Math ematics Kappa Delta Pi; Alpha Mu Omega; Beta Beta Beta; Y. M. C. A.; Mens Club; Philo; Dramatic Club; Track.

JOY HAUPTMAN

VIVIAN HAWKINS

C. C. A.

Nebraska City Biology Mens Club; Football; Ba sketball.

Aubu rn Early Elementary Education Girls Club; Art Club.

EVELYN HOCHHEIM

DORIS HOGUE

Cortland Mathematics- Commerce Alpha Mu Omega; Alpha Erudite; Y. W . C. A.; Girls Club.

Murray Commerce Alpha Mu Omega; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Pedagogian; W. A. A.

26


THE

1934

PERUVIA N

Juniors

LOREN HUNZE KER

LY LE D. HUNZEKER

Humboldt Mathematics Alpha Mu Omega; Beta Beta Beta; Mens Club; Orchestra; Band; Chorus.

Humboldt Physical Science Delta Pi; Y. M. C. A.;

Kappa Band.

Philo :

WILMA JAMES

HUSTON KINGSOLVER

Omaha English- Early Elementary Education Sigma Tau Delta; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Pedagogian .

Peru Science Kappa Delta Pi ; Beta Beta Beta; Lambda Delta Lambda; Aloha Erudite; Orches路 tra; Band: PER UVIA N.

ALFRED KNA PP

CATHERINE LIMA

Nemaha Mathematics Alpha Mu Omega; Lambda Delta Lambda; Y. M. C . A. ; Mens Club; Philo.

Omaha History

HELEN LINVILLE

JACK D. MILLER

Odell English- History Sigma Tau Delta ; Alpha Erudite; Girls Club; Philo.

JOHN A. NEMAN Shubert Physical Science Alpha Mu Omega; Lambda Lambda; Mens Club.

Girls Club.

Nebraska City Chemistry- Mathematics Beta Beta Beta .

ELOISE NOA

Delta

Stella Early Elementary Ed ucatio n Y. W. C. A.; Philo; Art Club; Dramatic Club.

KENNETH PACE

G W ENDOLYN PAYNE

Council Bluffs, Iowa English Y. M. C. A. ; Mens Club; Everett; Orchestra; Band; Chorus.

Shenandoah , Iowa Music Kappa Delta Pi : Pi Gamma Mu; G irls Club ; Everett; Chorus.

MERL PEE K

CHARLES PENNEY

Tecumseh Physical Education Kappa Delta Pi; Beta Beta Beta; Phi Lambda Alpha; Y. M. C. A.; Mens Club; Orchestra ; Band; Football; Track; Pedagogian.

Beatrice Chemistry- Mathematics Alpha Mu Omega; Lambda Delta Lamda; Y. M. C . A.; Mens C lub ; Everett; C horus; Football.

27


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Juniors

TRU XTON ROUTH

MARGARET SHOEMAKER

Carbon, Iowa Biology Beta Beta Beta : Mens Club: Dramatic Club: Band.

De Witt Commerce Kappa Delta Pi: Y. W. C. A. : Girls Club: Philo: Dramatic Club.

W ILLA RD SHU MAR D

RO LAN D N. STEPHEN SON

De Witt English Pi Gamma Mu: Y. M. C. A. ; Mens Club: Philo: Dramatic Club: Debate: Tennis.

Peru Mathematics- English Y. M. C . A.; Mens Club: Philo: Orchestra .

LEW IS TH O MPSON

MAXINE TRAUERNICHT Wymore English Sigma Tau Delta: Y. W .C. A. ; Club; Dramatic Club.

Cheney, Kansas Social Science Men s Club: Philo: PER UVIAN.

ALTON W AGNER

LO IS VELMA TRO YER Friend Music Girls Club: Everett: Dramatic Orchestra: Band.

Girls

Club:

DW IGHT WALDO De Witt Eng /ish Kappa Delta Pi: Pi G amma Mu: Sigma Tau Delta: Y. M.C. A. : Mens Club: Philo: Dramatic Club: Debate: PER UVI AN .

Vesta History Kappa Delta Pi: Beta Beta Beta; Y. W. C. A.

DELBERT WALKER De W itt Mathematics Alpha Mu Omega; Mens Club.

LUCIL LE WHITE

MARGARET WINTER

Omaha Home Economics Y. W. C . A.: Girls Club : Dramatic Club.

Beatrice Eng /ish Kappa Delta Pi ; Sigma Tau De lta; Y. W. C . A. ; Girls Club; Everett ; Dramatic Club.

OLIN WITT

KENNETH YOUNG

Syracuse History Phi Lambda Alpha: Y. M. C. A.: Mens Club: Track .

28

Peru Social Science- English Mens Club.


Sophomores exert their 01uthority by dismissing the faculty and assuming control of all classes and activities for one day

-1874-

SOPHOMORES


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Sophomores

RACHEL MAE ADAMSON

Beta Beta Band.

Tabo r, Iowa Music Beta; Y. W. C . A. ;

Philo;

ALICE MAE BISGARD Harlan, Iowa Elementary Education Y. W. C . A.; Girls Club; Everett; PER UVIAN .

CHESTER BOWEN Tecumseh History Mens Club; Chorus; Band.

HAZEL CHASTAIN Rock Port, Missouri Early Eleme ntary Education Girls Club ; Art Club.

CLARENCE CRANDELL Nebraska City Music - Commerce Y. M. C. A.; Orchestra; Band.

EVELYN DAVIS G e neva Elementary Education Y. W. C. A.; Girls Cl ub; Dramatic Club.

MARVIN E. DRAKE Steele City Ma thematics Alpha Mu Omega ; Y. M. C . A.; Mens Club; Phi lo ; Dramatic C lub ; Track.

HELENE EHMEN Ster ling Elementary Education Alpha Erudito.

30

ALICE AU XIER Salem Mu sic - Mathematics Alpha Mu Omega; Everett; Chorus.

RUTH BOTTORFF Gretna Music Y. W. C. A.; Girls C lub.

ZDENKA CHARVAT Omaha Early Elementary Ed ucation Sigma Tau Delta; G irls Cl ub; Philo ; Dramatic C lub; C . C . A.

LEAH RUTH CORNELIUS Humboldt English Y. W . C. A.; G irls Clu b.

ETHELYN CRAW FORD Hastings, Iowa Home Economics Girls Cl ub; Philo; W. A. A.

HELEN DAVEY

G irls Cl ub; W. A. A.

W ilber Commerce Everett; Dramatic Club;

HARTLEY DUNLAP Palmyra Mathematics- Social Science Mens C lub; C horus; Track.

VIOLA FENTIMAN Unadilla Junior High Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club.


THE

193 4

PERUVIA N

Sophomores

HAROLD FI SHER Peru Eng Iish

ORVILLE GAINES Geneva Manual Arts Mens Club; Everett; Cheer Leader.

Y. M.C . A.

JOHN GEHLING

DARRELL GENZLINGER

Falls City Bi.ology C. C. A. ; Mens Club; Philo; Dramatic Club; Chorus.

Burr Commerce Mens Club;

lONE GIBBS

Basketball;

J. ORLAND GILLILAN

Elk Creek Early Elementary Education Alpha Erudite ; Dramatic Club.

BERNARD GOERKE Burr Commerce Y. M. C. A.; Mens Club; Basketball; Track.

Y. M. C. A.; Track; Tennis.

Hardy Social Science Y. M. C. A. ; Mens Club; Chorus; Basketball; Track; Band.

CAROL HACKER Auburn Special

Pedagogian;

BUTLER HARKIN S Superior Biology Philo; Dramatic Cl ub.

CAM ILLA HAS KINS Stel la English- History Girls C lub; Philo; Dramatic Club; Pedagogian.

LORE NA HUNZE KER Humboldt History Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club.

KATHR YN KIM SEY Stella Elementary Education Alpha Erudite; Girls Club.

HARRIETTE HARNEY J ulian French Alpha Erudite; Y. W . C. A.; G irls Club.

BETTIE HINCHEY Omaha Elementary Education Y. W. C . A.; Girls Club; Orchestra.

DOROTH Y JENNINGS Omaha Mathematics- Chemistrv Beta Beta Beta; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Dramatic Club.

GAIL KUWITZK Y Nebraska C ity Early El ementary Education Y. W. C . A.; G irls Club ; Everett ; Dramatic Club.

31


THE

1934

PERUV I AN

Sophomores

CLYDE LARE

BEU LAH LI VINGSTON

Nebraska City Junior High Mens Club; Dramatic Club.

Falls City Elementary Education Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; W. A. A.

GRANT McCLELLAN

EVELYN LOK EN Petersburg Elementary Education Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club.

Edgar History Pi Gamma Mu; Sigma Tau Delta; Y. M. C. A.

HELENE McCO Y

ELEANOR E. MAY

Glenwood, Iowa Education Girls Club.

Alpha Club.

RAYMOND MOORE Nemaha History Mens Club; Philo; Football; Basketball; Track.

HELEN CLAIRE M ULLEN Omaha English Sigma Tau Delta; Alpha Erudite; C. C. A.; Girls Club; Everett; Dramatic Club.

DALE NICHOLLS Edgar Music Y. M. C. A.; Orchestra; Band; Football.

Reynolds Elementary Education Erudite; Dramatic Club; Girls

CLAYBORN MORT Edgar History Y. M. C. A. ; Mens Club; matic Club; Chorus.

Philo;

Dra-

JANET E. M URPHEY Clatonia Elementary Education Girls Club.

FAYE ORGAN (PERRY) Edgar Elementary Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club.

EA RL OSTEND O RF

NEAL PARSO NS

Odell Mathematics Alpha Mu Omega; Y.M.C.A.; Mens Club.

Verdon Mathematics Y. M. C. A.; Mens Club; Football; Basketball; Track.

PHYLLI S PASCO

A DELE PENTERMA N

Auburn English Beta Beta Beta; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo.

Lincoln English- Latin Beta Beta Beta; Alpha Erudite; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Dramatic Club; Band.

32


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Sophomores

HENRY RAILSBACK

EILEEN PUGH Falls City Education Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Dramatic Club.

Peru Chemistry Beta Beta Beta; Mens Club; Philo.

GRACE REIFF

FRANCES RAY G rand Island Special Y. W. C. A.; Gir ls C lub; Philo.

Beatrice Elementary Education Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club.

FRED ROHRS Peru History- English Pi Gamma Mu; Phi Lambda Alpha; Mens Club; PER UVIAN; Tennis.

FRANCES SCHMIDT W ymore History - Home Economics Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club.

VIVIAN A. SHLAES Omaha English Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Pedagog ian.

DOROTH Y SCHNEIDER Wilber Early Elementary Education Girls Club; Dramatic Club .

FRANCES SHELDON Percival, Iowa Elementary Education Y. W. C . A.; Girls Club; W. A. A.

MILDRED SPEEDIE Nebraska City His tory- French Sigma Tau Delta; Alpha Erudite ; Y. W. C. A. ; Girls Club; Everett; Dramatic Club; PER UVI AN .

HAROLD J. STOLTZ Peru Physical Science Y. M. C. A.; Mens Club.

EUGENIA SUNITA Omaha Mathematics Alpha tv1u Omega; Sigma Tau Delta; Alpha Erudite; Girls Club; Philo.

RACHAEL VIERS

GEORGINA UJCI K Omaha Elementary Education Girls Club; W . A. A.

Diller Elementary Educatio n Y. W . C. A.; Dramatic Club ; Orchestra.

ELEANOR WALLIN

LAWRENCE WANDS

Farragut, Iowa Elemen tary Education Y. W . C. A. ; G irls Club; Philo; Chorus.

Fairbury Business Administration Club; Everett; Track;

Mens Leader.

33

Cheer


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Sophomores

JUANITA WEST

ANNA WILLIAMS

Dawson Commerce

Elmwood Music Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo; Orchestra; Chorus.

GRETA WO ITZEL

MARY WR IGHTSMAN

Girls Club.

Greenwood Elementary Education Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club.

Peru Junior High Beta Beta Beta; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Everett; W. A. A.

TW I LA BEARCE

BETTY ZAJICEK Wilber Early Elementary Education Girls Club; Art Club.

*

Coin, Iowa Elementary Education Y. W. C . A.; W. A. A.

JUNIORS NOT HAVING PICTURES Jack Ashton, Lorton Eunice Burbridge, Peru Robert Carmichael, Filley John Crawford , Peru Rosalie Critchfield, Springfield Beryl Darting, Glenwood , Iowa Pearl Jean Doig, Fairbury George Gates , Omaha

Arthur Harris, Wymore Laura Hickson, Omaha Alice Kaminska, Beatrice George Kuhl, Elk Creek Len n Loken, Albion Helen Loney, Peru Harold Luttman, Thompson

Delbert Miller, Peru Lilla Naviaux , Nebraska City Ruth N aviaux, Nebraska City Robert Punches, Wymore Darrell Railsback, Peru Wayne Reed, Douglas Robert Sayer, Nemaha Hubert Wall, Unadilla

SOPHOMORES NOT HAVING PICTURES Laning Andrews, Auburn Kenneth Ault, Cedar Creek Merrill Banks, Stella Thelma Barnes, Beatrice Velma Barstler, Sterling Elizabeth Bartling, Nebraska City Harold Blount, Auburn Homer Boyer, Cambridge Wayne Burney, DeWitt Warren Calland, Beatrice Mae Christian, Peru Robert Christian, Peru LeRee Clarke, Brock Marguerite Coatney, Peru Madlyn Collins, Auburn Leona Colson, Dawson Lowell Cross, Sidney, Iowa Daisy Dahlstrom, Peru Laura Danczak, Loup City Doris Deaver, Omaha Albert Epley, Syracuse Melvin Ethington, Edgar Wendell Fisher, Peru John Foster, Benkelman

Marietta Goding, Omaha Martha Gorder, Plattsmouth Gera Graham, Lincoln Isabel Graham, Omaha Edith Grossoehme, Peru Avery Hall, Falls City Barbara Hallenbeck, Peru Ruth Hanlon, Peru Francis Harris, Jr., Peru Kenneth Heywood, Summerfield, Kans. Marjorie Hull, Palmyra Marion Irwin, Bronaugh, Missouri Max Kerns, Humboldt Donald Knapp, Nemaha Lowell Lewis, Shubert Harvey Loken, Albion Eleanor Majors, Peru Harvey Michels, Reynolds Marvin Miller, Ewing Marian Munn, Hastings Dana Nixon, Auburn Velma Novotny, Diller Doris Packard, Cortland Leo Perti, Garland

34

Dale Pike, Albion William Reid, Farragut, Iowa Maxine Robertson, Cortland Darlene Rowen, Nemaha Marcella Ryan, Dawson Harriett Scott, Wymore Louise Scott, Fairbury LaVern Setzer, Peru LaVerne Shafer, Nemaha Howard Smith, Auburn Alvin Story, Tecumseh Alice Ulbrick, Auburn Wilma Vaughn, Fairbury Eramus Vickers, Eagle Wayne Weare, Peru Otto Wellensick, Lorton Wayne West, Unadilla Raymond Wheeler , Howe Hubert White, Hamburg, Iowa Dorothy Wiebe, Beatrice Mae Wielage, Dorchester Ferne Williamson, Barada Rex Wilson, Peru Phyllis Young, Syracuse


Freshmen find this ruling: "No young man shall come within ten feet of a young lady when on the street or campus. When seeing a friend home in the evening he may take one side of the road and she the other." -Thus the mutilation of Peru woods and a shortage of ten foot poles

-1867-

FRESHMEN l'


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Freshmen

PAUL AUE

PAULINE AUE

Auburn Philo; Peru Players; Orchestra; Band .

Au burn Girls Club; Peru Players.

MARG UERITE AYRES

CORINNE BARNTS

Alva Alpha Erudite; Girls Club; Peru Players .

Odell Minerva Club; Alpha Erudite; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo.

NELLIE BEC K

RUTH BENTZINGER

Panama Peru Players; Girls Club.

Deweese Y. W. C. A.; Peru Players; Girls Club; Philo.

RUBY BEVA N

LUCILLE BIC KNELL

Falls City Personality Club; Girls Club.

Elk Creek Peru Players; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club.

EVE RETT BLANCHARD Friend Crawdads; Y. M. C. A.

Syracuse Y. W. C. A.; Philo.

DOROTHA CARLI SLE Salem Y. W. C. A.; Kodak Club; Girls Club.

MILDRED CAVEY Alpha Club.

Albion Erudite; Girls Club;

NORMA CHASE Omaha Y. W. C. A.; Kodak Club.

36

BILLIE BU NTI NG

MARGARET CASEY Johnson Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Chorus; W.A.A.

DOROTH Y CAWTHORNE Dramatic

Peru Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo; Dramatic Club; Orchestra; Band .

RUTH CHATELAIN Peru Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo; Orchestra; Chorus; Peru Players.


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Freshmen

GENEVIEVE COCKERAM Wymore Kodak Club; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo; Dramatic Club; W. A. A.

LUENA COOK Peru Kodak Club; Y. W. C. A.; Girl s Club.

MAXINE DENNEY

LUCILLE DEWEY

Fairbury Peru Players; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo.

Wymore Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Everett; Chorus.

MARJORIE DONNER

LESLIE DUNKLE

Malvern, Iowa Peru Players; Alpha Erudite; Y. W. C . A.; Girls Club; Philo; W. A. A.

MAXINE EMMERT Salem Peru Players; Girls Club; Chorus.

MILDRED FILMER Peru Peru Players; Girls Club.

ALMA FREESE Plymouth Art Craft; Girls Club.

EDNA GERWECK Falls City Kodak Club; C. C. A.

Burr Crawdads; Y. M. C. A.; Basketball.

EDNA ENGBLOM Ashland Alpha Erudite; Girls Club.

NORMA FREEOUF Personality Club.

Wilber Club; Y. W. C. A.;

Girls

EDWARD GARNER Rockville Y. M. C. A.; Philo; Orchestra; Band.

DOROTHEA GEWECKE Burchard Peru Players; Alpha Erudite; Y. W. C. A.

ROSS GLOVER

ISABEL GRAHAM

Meadow Peru Players; Y. M. C. A.; Mens Club; Chorus.

Omaha Kodak Club; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo.

37


THE

1934

PERUV I A N

Freshmen

BON NIE GREEN Diller Y. W . C. A.; Girls Club; Philo ; Chorus.

El LEEN GREEN Diller Y. W. C . A.; Girls Club; Chorus.

Philo; Band;

RON ALD GRUBB

DO ROTH Y HAN SEN

Council Bluffs , Iowa Y. M. C. A.; Dramatic Club; Orchestra; Band.

Bellevue Peru Players; Y. W . C. A.; Girls Club; Ph ilo.

FERN HEI SER

GW ENDOLYN JAC KSON

Salem Kodak Club; Girls Club.

MAX INE JARVIS Beatrice Peru Players; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo; Orchestra.

Shenandoah, Iowa Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo; Chorus.

RUTH JODER North Platte Minerva Club; Girls Club.

MARGARET JO HN SON

VIRGINIA JO HNSO N

Shenandoah, Iowa Kodak Club; Y. W. C . A.; Girls Club; Philo.

Omaha Minerva Club; Alpha Erudite; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club.

EVELYN JONES

EILEEN JOY

Wymore Art Craft; Alpha Erudite; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo; Dramatic Club; Chorus.

KEITH KLEIN Burr Crawdads; Y. M. C. A.

RICHARD KRATZ Falls City Y. M. C. A.; Football.

38

Salem Peru Players; Girls Club.

HELEN KNISELY Falls City Peru Players; Y. W. C . A.; Girls Club.

RUTH KRCAL Omaha Peru Players; Girls Club; Y. W. C. A.


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Freshmen

VIVIAN LAMBERT

JUNE LORIMOR

Shubert Peru Players; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo.

Bartlett, Iowa Peru Players; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo; W. A. A.

ETHEL LUECK

TRUMA McCLELLAN

Talmage Peru Players; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club.

Edgar Minerva Club; Y. W. C. A.; Philo.

LETA McLEAN

CHARLOTTE MARTIN

Coin, Iowa Peru Players; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Orchestra.

Blue Springs Peru Players; Alpha Erudite; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo; Orchestra.

RUTH MARTIN

DOROTHY MA YSTRICK

Tecumseh Peru Players; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; W.A.A.

Omaha Minerva Club; Alpha Erudite; Girls Club; Philo; Dramatic Club; Orchestra.

RUTH MEAD

RUTH MEHAFFEY

Perciva I, Iow a Peru Players; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club.

North Bend Kodak Club; Alpha Erudite; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Dramatic Club.

EDYTHE MERCHANT

MIRIAM MILLER

Bradshaw Peru Players; Alpha Erudite; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club.

Shenandoah, Iowa Y. W . C. A.; Girls Club; Philo; PERUVIAN; Chorus; Geron.

AGNES MOONEY

VIRGINIA MUNCY

Burchard Peru Players; C. C. A.; Girls Club.

MADELINE NELSON Shenandoah , Iowa Kodak Club; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club.

Tecumseh Minerva Club; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Dramatic Club.

MILDRED PARLI Axtell, Kansas Kodak Club; Y. W. C. A.; Peru Players; Girls Club; Dramatic Club.

39


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Freshmen

LOUIS PASCAL Weston Peru Players; Alpha Erudito; Orchestra; Band.

MAXINE PIERCE (HAUPTMAN) Bartlett, Iowa Peru Players; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo.

HELEN PAYNE Rock Port, Missouri Peru Players; Y. W. C. A.

WILLIAM PLUCKNETT Alpha Erudito; Club; Debate.

DeWitt Y. M. C. A.;

Dramatic

JOSEPHINE RARICK

MARY KATHERINE RHOADES

Auburn

Nemaha Peru Players; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo; Dramatic Club.

HELEN E. ROBERTS

JOSEPHINE ROGERS

Filley Kodak Club; Alpha Erudito; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club.

Johnson Minerva Club; Scribblers Club; Y. W. C . A.; Girls Club; Philo; Dramatic Club; W.A.A.

GENEVA SAATHOFF

AVIS SAILORS

Girls Club.

Odell Peru Players; Y. W. C. A.; Girls C lub.

Peru

LOMA SAILORS

ANNA MAY SANDIN

Peru

Plattsmouth Art Craft; C. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo; Dramatic Club; Chorus.

MURIEL SCHAFFER

ANNE SCOLLA

Auburn Alpha Erudito; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Dramatic Club; Orchestra; Band.

RICHARD SHERMAN Stella Crawdads; Peru Players.

40

Omaha Kodak Club; C. C. A.

BONITA SHRADER Nebraska City Art Craft; Y. W. C. A.; Everett.


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Freshmen

EVELYN SLEPICKA

JEANNE SLINKER

Wilber Peru Players; Y. W. C. A.; Girls C lub; Everett.

Peru Alpha Erudito; Philo; Dramatic Club.

MARGARET SMITH

HOBERT SORRELL

Rulo Minerva Club; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club.

Salem

HELEN SPEICH

ARLINE STASTNY

Stockham Kodak Club; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club.

Crete Personality Club; Y. W. C. A.; Club; Philo.

Girls

HATTIE STEINBERG

AMOS SULLIVAN

Bradshaw Kodak Club; Alpha Erudito; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club.

Rockville Peru Players; Crawdads; Y. M. C. A. ; Alpha Erudito; Mens Club; Philo; Football; Basketball.

DORIS TRIMBLE

LYDIA MAY WHEELER

Humboldt Kodak Club; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo.

Nemaha Peru Players; Alpha Erudito; Y. W. C. A.; Girls Club; Philo.

LEONA WIECHMAN

EVALIN WI LES

Cook Art Craft; Alpha Erudito; Girls Club.

ARLENE WOCHNER

ZELLA WITTWER Personality Club; Philo.

Humboldt Club; Y. W. C. A.;

Syracuse Peru Players; Orchestra; Band; W. A. A.

Girls

Lorton Peru Players; C. C. A.; Girls Club; W. A.A.

41


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Freshmen Not Having Pictures WARREN ADAMS, Peru CECIL JOHNSON, Verdon DOROTHY ALLEN, Auburn HENRY KELLOGG, Nebraska City FAYE ANDREWS, Auburn FRIEL KERNS, Hu mboldt FRANK ANVILLE, Peru DOROTHY KERR, Virginia LUCILLE ARNOLD, Syracuse JAN ICE KNOUSE, Beatrice CARL BALTENSPERGER, Nebraska City IVAN KRAFT, Syracuse REGULA BALTENSPERGER, Nebraska City WAYNE LAVERICK, Cambridge DORIS BARKER, Nemaha ERMA LEECH, Humboldt FLOY BEACHLER, Reynolds WALTER LIEN, Fairbury JOHN BECKER, Belgrade OPAL LYON, Nebraska City EUGENE BECKHAM, Salem GAIL McCORMICK, Sidney, Iowa EUNICE BERGMAN, Tecumseh MARGARET McKNIGHT, Auburn WINNONA BOATMAN, Nemaha LUCILLE MEREDITH, Bellwood LOIS EVA BORCHER, Burchard ALFRED MOORE, Cambridge GAIL BOTHWELL, Reynolds HAROLD NATION, Salem MARJORIE BRIGGS, Auburn FRANK NOFFKE, Ewing LUCILE BROOKS, Falls City CHARLES NOVAK, Wilber WILLIAM BURKE, Bridgeport WARREN ODELL, Omaha RACHEL BURNS, Verdon VENA PADGITT, Bartlett, Iowa RUTH BURNS, Verdon MERRILL PENNEY, Beatrice WALTER BURNS, Verdon BEULAH PLANK, Thurman, Iowa ROBERT COLE, Falls City EDNA PRICE, Fal ls City MARJORIE COLLINS, Auburn GWENDOLYN PUGH, Stella ERNEST RAWSON, Peru CLAUDE COOK, Watson, Missouri GLENNA COULTER, Peru WEN DELL REDDING, Syracuse GERALD COWLES, Cambridge WILEY REMMERS, Auburn ROBERT DENNEY, Fairbury ARTHUR REYNOLDS, Fairbury LAWRENCE EMIGH, Sabetha, Kansas WAYNE RIGGS, Shubert MARY LEE ERWIN, Rock Port, Missouri LEONARD ROSAKRANS, Tecumseh KATHRYN ROSZELL, Beatrice LANDON EVANS, Shubert VICTOR SAILORS, Peru LAVERN FISHER, Verdon EVELYN SCHMITZ, Paul ROBERTA JEAN FLATT, Alliance BERNICE SCHNEIDER, Gretna MAXINE FORNEY, Thurman, Iowa KATHRYN SEEGAR, Glenwood, Iowa KATHLEEN FRAZIER, Burchard NELSINE SHAFER, Shubert RUTH GILLILAND, Peru BETH GLASSON, Tecumseh IRMA SHEELY, Elk Creek LLOYD SNIDER, Benkelman RUTH GRAVES, Beatrice CHARLES SORRELL, Salem KEITH GRIFFIN, Crab Orchard FAYE SPECHT, Otoe MABEL HANSEN, Hardy ALBERT SPURGIN, Bridgeport ALMA HARKENDORFF, Verdon RUTH STOCK, Verdon MARY DALLAS HARRIS, Peru LENORE STONE, Auburn HARRY HAUSCHILD, Syracuse GERHARD STRASBURG, Talmage VERNA HAYWARD, Tecumseh ALLEN STROH, Plymouth ETHEL HILE, Cortland LOUISA STUTHEIT, Cook EVELYN HOLSCLAW, Peru LOUISE SWAN, Dalton, Missouri RALPH HOPP, Cook VIRGIL THOMAS , Hanna, Wyoming GEORGE HOSTERMAN , Brownville JOHN TYNON, Peru CLARICE HOTTLE, Elmwood ALOYS VENHOUS, Cambridge RUTH HOWE, Barnston HARDIN HOWORTH, Tecumseh ALICE WAKELIN, Brock MELBA HUDDLESTON, Peru LAWRENCE WEST, Peru LUCILE WI ELAGE, Dorchester HILDA HUEBNER, Falls City JOE WILDS, Auburn DOROTHY HURD, Shenandoah, Iowa EVELYN WILLIAMS, Peru RAYMOND HURLBUTT, Bellevue WILLIS WIRTH, Dunbar REYNOLD HURST, Peru MILDRED YOUNG, Nehawka

42


The first Model school West of the Mississippi, tand one of the first in the United States established in connection with a Normal and under its entire superv!sion is constructed -1886-

TRAINING SCHOOL


THE

19 3 4

PERUV I AN

Seniors

RUTH ABLE

HAZEL ADAMS

Girl Reserves; H ome Economics Club; Glee Club; Chorus.

Girl Reserves (Sec'y and Vice-Pres.); Dramatic Club; Glee Club; Chorus; Orchestra.

LAWRENCE ANDERSON Glee Club; Track; Football.

MILDRED CAMPBELL Girl Reserves; Home Economics Club (Sec'y-Treas . ); Glee Club; Chorus; Class Sec'y-Treas., '34; Yell Leader.

ROBERT COULTER Glee Club; Orchestra; Basketball .

KENNETH KELSO Football Track.

(Cap't

31-32);

DOROTHY BURBRIDGE Girl Reserves (Treas.); Home Economics Club; Orchestra; Band.

Basketball;

GLEN CLARY Basketball; Football; Track.

ROBERT HARRIS Dramatic Club (Sec'y-Treas .); Chorus Glee Club; Odette; Boys Quartette Orchestra; Band; Football; Basketball PERUVIAN.

PERCY LEAH Y Dramatic Club (Pres.); Chorus; Glee Club; Quartet; Football (Cap't '32); Basketball: Track (Cap't '33); Class President '34.

LOUISE MciNICH

ORVILLE PUGH

Girl Reserves; Home Economics Club; Glee Club; Chorus.

Football (Cap't '33); Basketball; Track.

EUGENE ROWAN Orchestra;

Band;

Football;

Basketball.

ELAINE SHAFER Girl Reserves (Pres .) ; Home Economics Club; Dramatic Club; Glee Club; Band; Orchestra; Class Vice-President, '34.

ELMON VELVICK

MAREE WILLIAMS

Dramatic Club; Glee Club; Chorus; Football; Basketball (Cap't '33); Track.

H ome Economics Club; Dramatic Club; French Club; Glee Club; Chorus; Class Reporter '34.

44


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Juniors

FIRST ROW: Thomas Majors, Harlan Good, Loren Redfern, Delbert Parriott, Harley Palmer. SECOND ROW: John Dunne, John Collin, Ruth Applegate, Harold Sherman, Gene Setzer, Jack Hazelton. THIRD ROW: Iris Sailors, Helen Margaret Larson , Helen Railsback, Verna Holman, Lillian Mclnich, Mildred Williams. FOURTH ROW: Beth Whitwell, Elizabeth Sultzbaugh, Marjorie Coatney, Gladys Medley, Mary Mathews, Joe Anderson.

*

FIRST ROW: Bennie Han lon, Wilbur Stromquist, Roland Cowell , Dale Rowan, Lester Holman, Eugene Kline. SECOND ROW: Jeanne Wagner, Dorothy Ann Coatney, Louise Math ews, Lu cille Hazelton, Wilma McMahon, Paul Baltensperger. THIRD ROW: Lucille Burns, Mildred Able, Marjorie Harris, Alice DeVore, Ardis Christian, Ida Walker. FOURTH ROW: Marie Holsclaw, Fern Morris, Elizabeth Tynan, Lucille Patterson, Fl orence Sultzbaugh.

Sophomores

45


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Football

FIRST ROW: Garland Nincehelser, Gene Setzer, John Dunne, Harold Sherman. SECOND ROW: Bob Harris, John Collin, Roland Cowell, Delbert Parriott, Harley Palmer, Coach Roland L. Edie. THIRD ROW: Jack Hazelton, Tom Majors, Orville Pugh, Percy Leahy, Elmon Velvick, Kenneth Kelso.

*

Fl RST ROW: Coach Roland L. Edie, Gene Setzer, John Rhodus, Neil Good, Robert Coulter, John Collin, Bennie Hanlon, John Dunne, Frank Larson. SECOND ROW: Bob Harris, Kenneth Kelso , Dale Rowan , Jack Hazelton, Harley Palmer, L. B. Mathews. THIRD ROW: Roland Cowell, Elmon Velvick, Orville Pugh, Percy Leahy, Delbert Parriott, Tom Majors.

Basketball

46


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Orchestra

FIRST ROW: Sultzbaugh, Redfern, Good, M. Sultzbaugh, Smith, J. Hazelton, Williams, Tynan. SECOND ROW: Larson , DeVore, L. Hazelton, Adams, Gaines, Vanderford, Shafer, Mathews, Vasberg, Collins, Medley. THIRD ROW: Dunton, Larson, Mclnich , Christian, Burbridge, Dasher, Coatney, Hayes, McMahon, Mathews, Mason. DRUM: Dick Clements.

*

FIRST ROW: Setzer, Harris, Velvick, Leahy, Redfern, Parriott, Majors, Palmer, J. Hazelton. SECOND ROW: Christian, Able, Sailors, Williams, Mathews, Coatney, Wagner, L. Hazelton, Collin , Holsclaw. THIRD ROW: Mathews, Whitwell, M. Able, L. Mclninch, M. Harris, Cowell, R. Applegate, McMahon, Larson, Dunne, Railsback. FOURTH ROW: Adams, Burns , DeVore, M. Coatney, Loken, Benford, Medley, Tynan , L. Mclnich, M. Williams.

Chorus

47


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Ninth Grade

Fl RST ROW: Pasco, Good, Redfern, Pummel, Rowan, Koeppel, Foster. SECOND ROW: J. Koeppel, Adams, Rhodus, Andrews, Crannell, Larson. THIRD ROW: Flau , Smith, Dunton, Graves, Holton , Anderson, Beason. FOURTH ROW: Whitfield, Vanderford, Morris, Gaines, Crabtree, F. Pasco, Nincehelser. Fl FTH ROW: Goings, Fraser, Able, Rogers, Filmer.

*

FIRST ROW: Oppie, Burtivell, Tynon, Connor, McKnight, R. Oppie, Grafton. SECOND ROW: Straight, Collins, Adams, McConnaughy, Bvtler, A. Flau , Turner. THIRD ROW: Polston, Burtwell, Umland, Rader, Hays, Lehrman, Dasher, Jones, Fisher. FOURTH ROW: Bennett, Dunton, Medley, Sultzbaugh, Vosberg, Lehrman, McMahon, Mason, J. Harris. FIFTH ROW: Applegate, Turner, Erlman, R. Mason, T. Sherman, Crannell, T. Christian, Adams.

Seventh and Eighth Grades

48

*


* Characteristic scenes of junior and senior high school activities featuring especially those who presented the junior high St. Patrick's day program, girls from gym classes, members of the band and play groups.

Upper left, Rowen and Harris earn their way into the lettermen's club. To the right is the high school mixed octette with the girls' sextette appearmg lower left. Center right is the boys' trio, and lower right a view of Percy Leahy.

*


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Sixth Grade

FIRST ROW: Billy Rowan , Dean Coatney, Ray Grafton , John Rowan , Robert Leahy. SECOND ROW: David Warnock, Dick Clements, Emery Mathaes, Ralph Hayes, Robert Loney. THIRD ROW: Wilda Hazelton, Mary Jane Duncan, Leona Ashcraft, Betty Brown, Camellia Connely.

*

FIRST ROW: J. W. McMahon, Homer Harris, Edward Warman, Charles Henning, Neil Slinker. SECOND ROW: Charles Bascomb, Lester Rader, Vera Osborne, Jeanne Patterson, Gordon Palmer. THIRD ROW: Eleanor Butler, Mayme Sherman, Betty Co ll in , Irene Ead s, Elizabeth Coatney, Leanore Larson .

Fifth Grade

50


1934

PERUVIAN

First Grade

FIRST ROW: James Eads, Charles Edward Tyston, Eugene Tyston , Frank Denning, John Henry Straw, Richard Good, Dick Holman , Harold Jarrett. SECOND ROW: Darwin Hamel, Nancy Steck, Margaret West, Mary Lou Gilliland, Marion Hays, Fern Oppie, Laurine Clayburn, Marilyn Standley, Billy Matthews.

*

Richard Rader, Ina Jane Good, Carol Palmer, John Clements , Bobby Brown, Betty Vance, Margie Neal, Lois Jean Holeman, Billy Jean Miller, Helen Oppie, Edna Bascom, Orde Jones.

Kindergarten

52

*


The T. J. Majors Training Building

Fifth Grade Mr. Mclnich, Janitor

3:30 at the Bus

Marbles Gym

12:20

On the Swings

Jr. Hi . Program The Band Marching

* Band Fl RST ROW: Tynon, Sultzbaugh, Palmer, Burbridge, Dunton, Harris, J. Hazelton, Good, Smith, Clements, Larson. SECOND ROW: F. Sultzbaugh, Patterson, Larson, Cowell, M. Mahon, Sultzbaugh, M., McMahon, B., Burtwell, Crabtree, Mathews, Jones, J. Harris. THIRD ROW: M. Williams, E. Rader, Whitefield, Crannell, Mason, Wagner, Mathews, W. Hazelton, T. Mason, DeVore, Dasher, Medley, Flau. FOURTH ROW: F. Larson, L. Hazelton, Mclnich, A. Christian, Shafer, M. Harris, Hanlon, Gaines, I. Dunton, L. Redfern, Good, L. Redfern.

53

*

4


R. D. Moritz, who captained and coached the first official football team, 1892. Today he is numbered with the faculty of Nebraska University.

*


j

~ ;

~\~

-~/ :,;1/tf!(frll ~~~ -., _

ATHLETICS


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

ATHLETIC DIRECTORS

.

COACH GILKESON

COACH LORBEER

PEP BAND Hoo-rah! Hoo-rah! Hoo-rah-rah! College! College! Nebraska! Hoo-rah! Hoo-rah! Hoo-rah-rah! College! College! Nebraska!

Head Football Coach, Glen Gilkeson, has completed his fourth consecutive year of tutoring Bobcat football teams. True, his splendid 1933 team did not successfully defend the state championship but it merited that of the previous year. But there are standards of judging the worth of football teams an<l!. coaches that are not measured in terms of gold footballs. No trophies will adorn the watch-chains of the 1933 players, but imbued within their minds is a definite concept of the worth of a coach who builds strong bodies and character -Glen Gilkeson. Than head Basketball Coach, Ernest E. "Dutch" Lorbeer, there is no more respected and likeable man on the campus. He works his men hard but sensibly, and they respond with a willing, confident zeal because "Dutch" is one they know and like. His congenial personality, however, in no way overbalances his knowledge. "Dutch" is himself a famous athlete and so has that practical experience so invaluable to a college coach. He is thoroughly "basketball wise", his teams always having finished at or near the top.

White and Blue, White and Blue? What's the matter with Old Peru? Blue and White, Blue and White, Teachers' College, she's all right!

On to Victory! 'Twas they who spurred those Bobcats on, the Pep Band and the Cheer Leaders, Gaines and Wands. These pepsters were a power behind the team, always letting them know that they were backed in victory or defeat by the student body. Every contest on the gridiron or court found these blue-jacketed enthusiasts along the side lines. To Midland and Omaha University this group followed the team carrying the school spirit. Peru is proud of them. PEP BAND AND CHEER LEADERS

56

*


THE

19 3 4

PERUVIAN

FOOTBALL From outlaws to heroes has been the progress of the Peru gridsters. Those first footballers, who in 1884 retreated to a pasture east of the athletic field that they might enjoy their favorite sport, were violating a specific ruling of the administration. This first group was divided into the "Blacks" and the "Whites," "Bill" York was chosen to officiate the tussle, not because he was an apt scholar of the game, but rather for the reason that his muscles bulged larger. Fiery disputers were quickly and effectively rebuked. D. D. Ashley, now a prominent New York City physician, captained these pioneering footbailers. The first official Peru football game was Bobcats journeyed to the old Nebraska City C. A. team of Omaha. Mr. "Bill" Davenport, the Omaha tribe for one lone touchdown ~t

staged some nine years later. In the fall of 1893, the fair grounds where they engaged in combat the Y. M. none other than our present town board member, eluded his efforts were in vain as the Peru squad was defeated.

Keeping stride with the progress of the Bobcat team, the administration formulated plans for construction of the athletic field. Accordingly in 190 I the field was completed and the dedicatory game was played; the high school team of Falls City afforded the competition, but were outclassed by a 30 to 0 count. Another Peruvian still in our midst was a potent factor in this game, Harry Hutchison, local elevator man. And so we have traced, briefly, the history of our football progress through its three most significant phases. That Blue and White teams of the future shall, even as this year's team, prove themselves worthy successors to their athletic heritage, is the confident hope of all Peruvians.

THE SEASON 20

Peru Peru Peru Peru

13 13 7

Marysville Midland Wesleyan Hastings

0 0 0 6

Peru Peru Peru Peru Total: Peru 70, Opponents 55

13 0 0

14

Kearney Omaha U. Chadron Wayne

0

13 22

14

CAPT. MILLER

ANDREWS

CARMICHAEL

COWELL

ETHINGTON

FISHER

s~ck

Back

Back

End

Tackle

Back

57


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

FOOTBALL SEASON Captain Delbert Miller is one of the most dependable backs ever to don Bobcat moleskins.

Quiet and

unassuming,

"Deb" is not a flashy player, but is invariably where he should be at the right time, executing his assignment effectively. He was a competent leader, and Peru is indeed fortunate to hav~ access to his services again next year. FOOTBALL SQUAD

The 1933 Bobcat eleven made an auspicious debut against Marysville Teachers on the Missourians' own gridiron. Steve Gaines' generalship featured in a game that saw Carmichael and Story doing some excellent ball lugging. Peru scored a touchdown in each of the first three quarters and tapered off by scoring a safety in the last canto. The final reckoning credited "Gilk's" boys with a 20 to 0 victory, it being the worst defeat a Marysville team ever suffered at Peru's hands. The boys enjoyed a week's rest following the Marysville fray, again invading foreign soil the following week to tackle the Warriors of Midland College. Midland's vaunted aerial attack was completely frustrated by an alert group of Bobcat backs. With this, Midland's most potent offensive threat checked, the Warriors were forced to resort to defensive tactics. "Babe" Story, however, eluded their most careful efforts and ran to touchdowns in the first and last quarters. A tenacious defense also played an important part in the Bobcats' splendid 13 to 0 victory. The feature of the 1933 Homecoming festivities was the football game with the Plainsmen of Wesleyan University. The tussle presented several new 58


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

FOOTBALL However , this reputation was short-lived as Omaha's Red Birds journeyed to Peru and garnered a 13 to 0 victory. The Peru defense bogged as a brilliant trio of Cardinal backs took turns at puncturing the Bobcat line. The Bobcats enjoyed some very good moments, but failed to sustain a dri ve for an y length of time . The game, as is typical of mo st Omaha -Peru conflicts, was an unusuall y rough affair, both teams drawing numerous penalties . After the Omaha mi x, the Peru vians journeyed to the extreme northwestern corner of the state to engage in battle the champion Eagles of Chadron. Here the Bobcats encountered a superior team and were quite decisively outplayed. Coach Rufus Trapp used his remarkable reserve strength to full advantage in wearing down the Peruvians . The red-garbed Westerners ha~ a brilliant array of performers, Christianson, halfback, and the redoubtable "Indian" Miller, tackle, being outstanding. The final score read 22 to 0 against Peru. The last game of the season was played on the home field against the Wayne Wildcats. B"adly perturbed by the disturbing antics of Wayne's shifty halfback, Gast, the Bobcats were trailing 14 to 0 in the last quarter. Then it was that a splendid Peru rally revealed a marvelous fighting spirit that carried the blue and white clad boys to a 14 to 14 tie. A remarkably executed barrage of passes played the major role in the attack that resulted in two touchdowns, with both extra points converted. Thusly did a successful season know its fitting end in a surge of undeniable Peru Spirit. With all lettermen but four returning to the fold next year, prospects for a winning team are exceedingly heartening . Those graduated are: Gaines, Goit, Cowell , and Pate.

PAT E

PE EK

PE NN EY

PIKE

PUN C H ES

Tackle

G uard

Guard

End

Center

60

RIGGS

End


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

BASKETBALL Since it knew its inception here as a major sport in 190 I, basketball has constantly been a Peru favorite. The Bobcats chose a team of national reputation as their first opponent for the 1933-1934 season. The famous Marysville Bearcats furnish the opposition and were hard pushed to win a 25 to 20 verdict in a well-played game staged on the Missourian's own court. Lorbeer's basketeers also played their second tussle in the "show me" state and this time emerged victorious over Tarkio College. Carmichael led the scoring for the Peruvians as the "T arks" .,.ook a 29 to 25 beating. The first home game of the season was a return mix with Tarkio. Forward "Bus" Moore was hitting from all angles, and the Bobcats finished ahead 3 I to 2 I. Probably the most thrilling game of the season was played with the Lincoln Federals, a team composed of Hokuf, Fisher and other former Nebraska U. luminaries. After trailing most of the first half, the Lincoln squad rallied and eked out a 35 to 33 victory. This encounter was followed by a two-game series with Chadron 's Eagles, defending champions. Feathers flew as a hungry Bobcat atoned for a humiliating football loss by taking both games. The first night, Chadron submitted to a 29 to 12 drubbing followed by a 24 to 19 loss the succeeding evening. The next brace of conference games saw the blue and white quintet breaking even. Wayne lost a 22 to 25 thriller in a scramble that resulted in the loss of Carmichael, star pivot man. The rangy center sustained a broken arm, and his absence was felt keenly when the Bobcats journeyed to Omaha the following week and dropped a 29 to 17 decision.

STORY Back

ANDREWS Forward

BANKS Forward

CARMICHAEL

Center

61

ETHINGTON Guard

FISHER Forward


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

BASKETBALL Coach Karl Lawrence 's highly efficient Midland Warriors invaded the Peru camp and merited a 41 to 27 victory. Champions of the N. C. A. C. Conference for four successive years, they displayed a smooth working outfit, featured by the uncanny offensive work of the midget all-state forward, Kounouvsky. The Bobcats broke even on their next two games; both played on Peru maples and BASKETBALL SQ UA D both conference frays . Moore led a great second-half rally as the Peruvians nipped Kearney's Antelopes by a 47 to 33 tune. Following this, Omaha Uv clinched the championship by virtue of a 38 to 25 win . The remaining four games on the schedule involved a pair of road trips. The Bobcats fared rather disastrously on the first, losing to Midland 22 to 15 and Wayne 35 to 29. They fully redeemed themselves by taking a 37 to 36 win from Kearney and second place in the conference. Hebron was the last victim, losing a 36 to 33 encounter. Captain Punches ably led the Bobcats through their successful season . The big dependable guard was a bulwark on defense and his return next year should materially aid the Cats in their quest for the championship.

THE SEASON Peru . . 20 Peru. .29 Peru. . 31 Peru . . 33 *Peru. .29 *Peru . . 24 *Peru. .25 *Peru. . 17 Peru . . 27 *Peru . . 47 *Peru . . 25 Peru .. IS *Peru .. 29 *Peru .. 37 Peru . . 36

Maryville ... 25 Tarkio . . 25 Tarkio . .. 21 Lincoln Federals . 35 Chadron . .. . 12 Chadron .... 19 Vluyne .. . .22 Omaha ... . .29 Midland .... 41 Kearney ... .33 Omaha .. .. 3o Midland .... 22 Wayne ..... 35 Kearney .... 36 Hebron .... 33

*Conference Games LEW IS Guard

MOORE Forward

62

RI G GS Forward

CA P'T. PUNCHES Guard


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

TRACK Bobcat track teams, especially under Gilkeson's tutelage, always make creditable showings. With eleven letter men this spring returning to the fold, the 1934 cinder artists should prove no exception. Robert " Bob" Carmichael, versatile three-sport letterman, steps into his first captaincy as he leads the Peru tracks~rs through the season. His specialty is clearing high jump standards set at six feet. Ex-captain Cowell, judging from past performances, should be the Bobcats' most valuable point-getter. Ably assisting will be the nine remaining lettermen. These are: Luttman, javelin thrower; Shafer, Andrews, and Newton , middle distances; Perry and Cook, long distances; Witt, sprints; and Pate and Punches , weights. The 1933 performers enjoyed one of the most creditable seasons of Bobcat track history, being all-victorious in their trio of dual encounters. Led by Captain "Bo" Cowell, versatile sprint, hurdle, and jump artist, Peru barely eked out a win in the season's opener over the strong Marysville aggregation. The succeeding meet found the Bobcats invading Missouri to contest with Tarkio, and winning their second victory of the season at the expense of opponents from the "show me" state. Omaha's Cardinals came here for the closing meet of the season and were crushed by an overwhelming score. Peru dominated both track and field events. Last year's team closed a successful season by copping second honors in the State College Meet held at Lincoln. One notch higher and the championship forms the goal for this year's performers. THE SCHEDULE April 5 April 14 April 20

Marysville (there) Hastings Relays Wesleyan (here)

May 4 Tarkio (here) May I I Omaha (here) May 19 State Meet at Wayne

* TRACK SQUAD

63


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

PHI LAMBDA ALPHA Honorary Athletic Fraternity OFFICERS MERL PEEK President ROBERT PUNCHES Vice President ARTHUR HARRIS . Secretary-Treasurer COACH GLEN Gl LKESON Adviser COACH ERNEST LORBEER Adviser

Phi Lambda Alpha is composed of Greek letters symbolic of the meaning of this organization, P. L.A. standing for Peru's Loyal Athletes. Those men who have lettered in any of the sports through intercollegiate competition, football, basketball, track, or tennis are eligible for membership. From 1920, the date of its origin under Coach Speer, until 1929 this organization was called the "P" Club. The purpose has ever been the fostering of sportsmanship. The alumni- varsity basketball game which brought Joe Krejci, Ernie Rothert, "Swede" Hertz, Bernard Galloway, Homer Hatcher, Edward Peterson , "Brigham" Young, and other famous Peru athletes again to the campus was one of the many activities sponsored by the fraternity . In April the Spring Review proved a most entertaining program . Phi Lambda Alpha and the Dramatic Club joined forces to make this a success. One of the outstanding social events at Peru is the annual "P" Club dance. Members of the basketball and football squads were special guests of the group this year. Thirteen new members , after undergoing a week of severe trial of their strength and stamina, were allowed to enter the fold of the organization in 1934. Phi Lambda Alpha provides a unifying agent whereby all those who possess superior athletic ability in any of the sports may work together toward the maintenance of high athletic standard s. Andrews Cowel Harris Lutt man Pate Pike Shafer

Banks Ethingto n He rtz Mille r Pee k Pun che s Shu mard

Carm ichae l Fisher Lewis Moo re Penn ey Ri gg s Sto ry

C ook G o it Lo ke n Newt on Perry Rohrs Witt


Women of the college permitted to practice Dio Lewis Gymnastics and Musical Dances -1874-

W. A. A. and

MINOR SPORTS


THE

1934

PERUV I AN

WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION

* First Row: Mendenhall, Casey, Sheldon, Wrightsman, Cavey, Davidson, Cope, Hogue , Means, Munn, Hile Second Row: Haskins, Bergman, Lorimor Third Row:

Pugh, Naviaux, Wiles,

Deaver,

Darting,

Rogers,

Scott. Hanlon, Setzer, Davey

The W. A. A., an outgrowth of the G. A. A., was organi?ed in 1924 under the direction of Ruby Damme. Since that time no organization has been more vitally alive. To the athletically inclined girl it opens a most varied program of health and recreation: hit-pin ball, volleyball, baseball, basketball, hockey, swimming, pyramid building, and hiking. The tournament games played at the end of each sport season prove of interest to the general student body as well as to the participants. Points are awarded for entrance into the various activities. Five hundred such points entitle a girl to a letter, and for earning one thousand she is awarded a sweater, which it is possible for a girl to earn within a period of two years. To build a cabin was the goal set for this year. Through sponso ring an all-college dance, and pre路 senting, among other activities, a Sport Review , one of the most unusual, successful entertainments given at Peru, they have raised sufficient funds, and the cabin has become a reality. To any girl is extended the opportunity of becoming a member of W. A. A. OFFICERS MELBA COPE MARJORIE MENDENHALL HELEN DAVEY

President Vice President Secretary

ELLEEN MEANS Corre sponding Secretary BERYL DARTING Treasurer PHYLLIS DAVIDSON Faculty Director

SPORT LEADERS RUTH HANLON MARIAN MUNN . MELBA COPE LaVERNE SETZER. LaVERNE SETZER .

Hit-Pin Ball Basketball Volley Ball Hiking Baseball 66

DORIS DEAVER BERYL DARTING LOUISE SCOTT HELEN DAVEY

Swimming Swimming Swimming Swimming


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

RED CROSS LIFE SAVING

* FIRST ROW: Banks, Boyer, Calland, Gates, Gehling , Shumard, Cook, Penney, Gaines SECOND ROW: Davey, Haskins, Darting, Gorder, Mendenhall, Deaver, Scott, Davidson , Huddleston, Harris

RED CROSS Life Saving Tests were first conducted on the Peru campus in the fall of 1932.

Edward Wood of Nebraska City gave the first test in October. At that time eleven qualified as Senior Red Cross Life Savers. The following month the Red Cross sent a special Field Representative to the campus to give the Examiners Test. The successful passing of this qualified six Peruvians to conduct Junior and Senior Tests.

Again in the fall of 1933 a Field Representative was sent to test applicants for their Exami ner's badge, at which time ten examiners qualified. The last tests were given in March, 1934. Again, several Peruvians met satisfactorily the Senior Test qualifications at that time. During their two years of existence here, these tests have known a successful and commendable growth. Credit for this, in a large measure, must be given to Miss Phyllis Davidson , women's athletic director, who has conducted seve ral life saving classes during the past two years. A list of the tests given since 1932, and those who successfully passed them, follows: Beginners Swimmers

130

Junior Life Saving Test

45

Senior Life Saving Test

Examiners

2 31 12

67


THE

1934

PERUV I A N

TENNIS

* MAXWELL (Coach) , WEST , ROHRS , SHUMARD , MILLER

The 1933 Bobcat netsters enjoyed a highly successful season. They dropped a single meet, being eked out by the crack Tarkio outfit in the season's first game. Cotner College of Lincoln invaded Peru for the home opener and were repelled by a 5 to I count. Cotner's Misner measured West for his team's only tally. Next came a slightly overconfident band of netsters from Omaha University. They paid the bill by submitting to a "white-washing." The Douglas County clan failed to garner a single point as compared to Peru's six. Tarkio followed Omaha 's fruitless invasion and the Bobcats completely avenged their early season loss by copping a 6 to 3 win. The victory embodied special significance for Peru inasmuch as it wa s Tarkio 's first defeat in three years. Marysville followed Tarkio to Peru and were dealt the same fate as their Missourian predecessors. The Bobcats journeyed to Omaha for a return match and again finished on top, this time by a 5 to 2 margin. Peru's return engagement with Cotner again found the Lincoln crew unable to cope with the Peru netsters. The Bobcats won by a 5 to I count. The nucleus of the 1933 team returns to the fold this year. If West's threatened ineligibility materializes, Fred Rohrs and Delbert Miller will probably vie for the number one position. The 1934 schedule, as yet incomplete, will be essentially the same as that of last year.

1933 SEASON At Peru Peru Peru Peru

5 6 6

Away

Peru

I

Cotner Omaha U. Tarkio Marysville

0 3 0

68

Peru Peru Peru

4 5 5

Tarkio Omaha Cotner

5 2


THE

193 4

PERU VI A N

ATHLETICS THROUGH THE YEARS AT PERU Prior to 190 I, Peru students were forced to forego the advantages of a suitable field for athletic sports. The only place sufficiently level to afford competition was on the "flats" northeast of the depot Obviously enough, the inaccessibility and absence of school control rendered these "fields" unsatisfac路 tory. Hence about the only sport left was footracing-Normal Avenue being the scene of numerous hotly contested racing duels. With the increased interest in athletics among secondary schools throughout the state came the realization that if the Normal School should do its full duty by the students, it must provide for the various forms of athletic contests. Accordingly, plans for the building of the present Athletic Field were in full sway by the fall of 190 I. There was no fund available for the meeting of construction expense, and so Professors Howie, Whitenack, and Porter bore the financial burden. The above named men personally guaranteed the money necessary for construction, and the work was begun early in October of 190 I. Space forbids details of that eventful Saturday when, to quote "The Normalite," school monthly magazine, "every young man in school, including members of the faculty, appeared at 7:00a.m. in overalls on the slopes of the hollow east of the building and began to make 'dirt fly .'" That was the beginning of our Athletic Field. Since that time, improvement has rendered it one of the best in the central west. This same year witnessed Peru's entrance into organized athletics. On Thanksgiving Day of 190 I the first football game was played, Falls City High School furnishing the opposition. This was the dedicatory game and proved to be a gala day as the Falls City aggregation was repulsed by a 30 to 0 count. That year, and for several years later, victory in college games was not hoped for. Comparison of that position with the one Peru now holds is sufficient summary of our progress. During these years of advancement certain men, both coaches and players, maintain outstanding places. Peru athletics have made their most conspicuous advance during the Spear, Graf and Gilkeson regime. This trio of mentors have been at the helm since the Blue and White won state and even nationwide fame. As inseparably linked with these coaches are certain stars of the period-the great "Bitzy," "Gilk," "Swede" Hertz, and more recently-Homer Hatcher, all-state performer and captain of both the football and basketball teams. The year 190 I also marks basketball's beginning in the institution. Especially did the girls enjoy success in this field. During the first six years of intercollegiate competition, the girls had the enviable record of averaging a single loss per year. Three of these were at the hands of the State University of Lincoln. The male basketballers were somewhat slower in getting started, but once under way achieved real fame by establishing a world's record of 54 consecutive victories. Our own Coach Gilkeson was instrumental in attaining the record. The great "Bitzy" was also a member of the "world's record" quintet. Tennis and track development in the college have been less conspicuous but fully as important as growth evidenced in the fields of sport already discussed. Tennis advancement has been most rapid in recent years. Two years ago three new clay singles courts were added to the two concrete ones then in use. Last year, the Bobcat netsmen closed what was probably the most successful season Peru ever enjoyed, winning six of their seven intercollegiate matches. The Tracksters have also been highly successful in recent years, and bid fair to go far in the seasons to come. Baseball is the only sport to have been dropped from the athletics program. This is due largely to the lack of a field, and the general absence of interest in Nebraska intercollegiate baseball. Coach Lorbeer, big league catcher, has given some valuable first hand information in his classes, concerning the game's fine points. Unlike the women, the men's sports program is largely on an intercollegiate basis. Especially during the past two years, however, Coach Gilkeson has given special attention to an intramural sports tournoment. Through participation in this every boy in school is given an opportunity to engage in his favorite sport. Basketball, tennis, track, handball, swimming, and volleyball comprise the various divisions of the tournament. And so, Peruvians of 1934 look with just pride upon a sports program that is highly commendable. May the inevitable future development of Peru athletics further enhance our sports reputation.

69


Wilson E. Majors, who served as president of the forerunner of all organizations in Peru, Philomathean

Literary Society, established

*

1867.


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Student Advisory Council and Social Committee 1933 saw the first Student Advisory Council in Peru . At that time a boy and a girl were elected f rom each class to represent the student body. Following this precedent the same form of organization was utilized this year. This council was organized for the purpose of suggesting to the administration those ideas originating with the student bod y and deemed worthy of adoption by members of the co unc il. Many of the present social and campus innovations ha ve come about through the recommendations of the council. To direct the social activities of the campus the Social Committee was appointed. Outlining the social program of the year is one of their duties, and they have been most active in arranging and sponsoring the all-college dances of the year. Miss Phyllis Davidson and Professor Larson are the faculty sponsors of this group. These two organizations form the connecting link between the administration of the school and the student body. DANA SCHNEIDER JEANNETTE BARRETT OPAL GAINES ROBERT PATE CLAUDIA LUSE THOMAS COLLINS

STUDENT COUNCIL DWIGHT W ALDO EVELYN DAVIS SOCIAL COMMITTEE DOROTH Y BRENNER JOHN FOSTER

*

First Row BA RRETT BRENNER

COL LIN S DAVIDSO N Dt\VIS

Second Row DO IG FOSTER

G A IN ES KNAPP LA RSO N

Third Row LUSE PATE

SCH N EIDER WA LDO W H EELER

71

DON KNAPP LYDIA MAE WHEELER ROBERT DENNEY PEARL JEAN DOIG PH YLLIS DAVIDSON A. V. LARSON


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Girls Club

T

HE Girls' Club is a live and important organization open to every girl on the campus. Now in its fifteenth year, it is continuing to accomplish the aims of its founder, Miss Mattie Cook Ellis, by uniting all girls in friendly cooperation and love. The high ideals of the club have helped to raise the social and ethical standards of the campus. It has also given financial assistance to many needy girls, who otherwise could not attend college. The council is made up of the officers and representatives: two elected from each floor of the dormitories and one from the west, east, and south sections of town. Mrs. Dunning, the sponsor of the organization, is vitally interested in each girl as an individual personality, and she strives to assist that girl in making decisions necessary to planning her college career. At each meeting of the club she brings to the whole group some thought worthy of consideration.

OFFICERS LORA DICKERSON LUCILLE WHITE HAZEL NILES

President Vice-President Secretary

MRS. INICE DUNNING

.

LOIS MAY

Treasurer

OPAL GAINES

Program Chairman

DOROTHY JENNINGS

Program Chairman

Adviser

*

COUNCIL First Row BARTLING DAVIS CAWTHORNE DICKERSON GAINES

Second Row HARNEY JENNINGS

LUSE M cCOY MAY

Third Row NILES SCHMIDT

72

SHAFER WHITE WILLIAMS


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Girls Club The Valentine Party this year was an artistic masterpiece. Alice Mae Bisgard, as the queen, stepped through a large heart to the view of her subjects, and seated in majestic sweetness on her throne, watched and listened to the elaborate program. To the queen and her attendants, Claudia Luse, Marjorie Hull, Opal Gaines, and Evelyn Davis, Dan Cupid presented the valentines of the years. From this door issued the colonial girl playing on her violin "The Old Refrain," the Floradora girl sextet, six school day sweetheart tap dancers, a valentine which could be called only "My Darling," a heart of Ireland, and last of all the proverbial comic valentine. Eunice Bergman and Charlotte Martin were awarded prizes for the costumes of greatest beauty, while Eileen Means and Marion Munn as Raggedy Ann and Andy carried off the prize for the funniest costumes. The men of the campus were invited to a special Chapel Program presented by this group. The bi-monthly meetings of the girls held in the College Auditorium carried out in their theme the ten aims of the club to: Cultivate inner poise and grace. Help girls as a group to work together toward a common goal. Promote friendship and good fellowship. Stand for unity of action. Create a cultural and appreciative atmosphere. Manifest co-operation for the betterment of the social and ethical standards . Make a place for real fun and pep at the proper time. Create a spirit of individual devotion. Form a worthwhile relaxation period. Aid in a financial crisis.

*

VALENTINE PARTY

73


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Y. W. C. A.

T

O rea lize a full and creative life through a growing knowledge of God, to ha ve a part in making this life possible for all people , and t o see k to understand Jesus and follow him are all embodied in the purpose of the Young Women's Christian Association . These aim s have been carried out in the acti vities of this organization since the granting of its charter on October 19, 1887. Y. W . C. A. gives e very girl an opportunity to pause each Wednesday night for a quiet hour and become better acquainted with herself and her God. During the week she is we lco me at any time to enjoy the reading room which has been established in Mo unt Vern o n Hall by the organization. In this room are kept the books of the circulating library . A "watermelon frolic " the first night of school introduced the freshmen and all girls new at Peru to the Y. W. C. A. organization. The work done by Miss Stella Scurlock, regional secretary, proved so outstanding last year that she was again invited to the campus in 1934. A group of Y. W . C . A. workers attended t he district conference at Fremont in March, and se veral of the members plan t o attend t he National Con fere nce a t Estes Park this summer. To co-operate with theY. M. C. A. in all rel igious activities has been the endeavor of the women's organiza t ion, and they have presented several joint meetings, one on life motivation, led by Miss Stella Scurlock, and one on the qualifications of an ideal girl or boy. CABINET President EVELYN HOCHHEI M MARJORIE YO UNG Secretary MILDRED SPEEDIE ELI ZABETH BARTLING General Cha irman DORI S PAC KARD DO ROTH Y JENNINGS BEULAH JO HN SO N General C hai rman MISS MARY HILEMAN MISS EDNA W EAR E . A dviser

Vice-President Treasu rer General Chairman Advise r

*

First Row

BARTL ING H ILEMAN

H OCHHEIM JEN N INGS Second Row

JO H NSON PA CK A RD

74

SPEED IE WEARE YO UN G


T HE

1934

PERUVIAN

Y. M. C. A. The Young Men's Christian Association is a union of students and faculty members for the purpose of learning to know God. The association does this both by study and through experience . The group strives always to be progressi ve and seeks to find the application of the ideals of Christ to modern problems , in the belief that this is one of the needs of the times. 1886 saw the beginning of Y. M. C. A.'s many endeavors on this campus . A large number of varying activities have been sponsored by the "Y" during t he past year . A church-program service has been maintained and deputation teams have been sent out to man y churches, affording, among other things, training in Christian leadership. It has been the policy of the "Y" to bring speakers and "Y" leaders to the campus, both for the benefit of the Y. M. C . A. and for the inspiration of the general student bod y. C. D. Hayes, traveling secretary for the district, has twice visited the campus in the la st year. This spring the newly elected officers were sent to the Spring Officers' Training Conference held a t Midland College. Members of the organization also participated in the Rocky Mo untain Field Council Meeti ng. During t he winter months a series of Su nday morning meetings was held . At these meetings Bruce Curry's out line of studen t problems was followed . The annual Father and Son Banquet was sponsored by the "Y" jointly with the Kiwanis Club on December 12. The Wednesday night meetings are t he main channel through which rel igious inspiration is offered t o the boys of the campus . CABINET

MERL PEEK HAROLD FISHER CLAY BORN MORT GRANT McCLELLAN GEO RGE HASKIN S L. B. MATHEWS

Presi dent Treasu rer Deputa t ion Chairm an Retreat Chairma n Publicity Ch ai rm an Advise r

ORVILLE BUEHLER OTTO WELLENSIC K . ALFRED KNAPP ROSS GLOVER . DW IGHT W ALD O A. B. CLAYBURN

*

First Row BE UHLER CLAYB URN

FISHER GLOVER H ASK INS Second Row

KN A PP McC LELLA N MATH EWS

MORT PEEK WALDO

7S

Vi ce-President S ec reta r~

Devotional Cha irman Reading Cha irma n Program Cha irman Adviser


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Freshman Clubs Freshman Clubs, organized in 1929, have now an important place on the campus. They se rve to introduce the new students to college social life, to encourage their individual interests and hobbies, and to help them make helpful, happy contacts with their classmates. While only freshmen may be active members, upper classmen may continue as associate members. One or more of these former members are chosen as club sponsors. Each club is aided also by a helpful faculty counselor. The leadership of the Freshman Class Adviser serves to co-ordinate the activities of the various clubs.

ARTCRAFT First Semester EVELYN JONES

Second Semester EVELYN JONES

President

Sponsors VIOLA FENTIMAN and LAURA HICKSON MRS. DUNN ING, Counselor The Freshman Artcraft Club was organized for the purpose of enjoying the various types of artcraft including wax and clay modeling , oil and water-color painting, yarn weaving, and crepe paper novelties. Meetings are held in the art room of the dormitory. The activities during the first semester consisted of making many Christmas gifts. In this club the girls have an opportunity to express their own individuality in terms of artistic craftsmanship.

CRAWDAD CLUB First Semester AMOS SULLIVAN

Second Semester AMOS SULLIVAN

President

Sponsor BILL SH UMA RD COACH LORBEER, Counselor The Crawdad Club loves to swim and dive. The membership has been large this year and they report that they have had a lot of fun in learning new strokes , perfecting their diving and just swimming. A deeper spirit of companionship has been developed between the college men in this club as a result of their common interest-swimming.

KODAK CLUB First Semester ISABEL GRAHAM

President

Second Semester GERHARD STRASBURG

Sponsors DOROTHY JENNINGS and CATHERINE LIMA MONA LYON, Counselor The Kodak Club was organized for the purpose of allowing students who own kodaks to get together and take pictures. Their aim is to produce artistic effects in taking, developing and printing. Members of the Kodak Club have taken pictures of the various Dramatic productions on the campus during the school year.

* 76


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Freshman Clubs MINERYA CLUB First Semest er LUCILLE BROOKS

Second Semester President MARGARET SMITH Sponsors EDNA MAYSTRICK and VIVIAN SHLAES GRACE PETERSEN, Counselor This is a Freshman Club which aims to interest the members in reading. The social side is also taken into account. The interest this year has been outstanding. The first semester we had a variety of entertainment and programs, which were developed about books and authors . The second semester the members leaned more to book reviews and biography of authors, thus making the club more serious in nature.

PERSONALITY CLUB

..

Second Semester President AR L1 N E STASTNY Sponsors MILDRED SPEEDIE and VIOLA FENTIMAN IDA BRACKNEY, Counselor The Personality Club a1ms to develop the personality of the individual regardless of any handicaps. Among the timely topics that were stressed in the meetings this year were-the bringing out of personality in dress and appearance, personality in travel, personality as an asset to the school teacher, differences in personality between races, and personality plus. The values of social contacts and responsibility has brought out unknown qualities in the members of the organization. First Semester ARLI NE STASTNY

PERU PLAYERS Second Semester President WILLIS WIRTH Sponsor HAZEL NILES D. J. NABORS, Counselor Upper Class Group Leaders ELOISE NOA RACHEL VIERS MARJORIE MENDENHALL ELEANOR MAY ADELE PENTERMAN MARGARET SHOEMAKER "The play's the thing"-has been the watchword of Peru Players this year and through the efforts of the students, sponsors and Professor Nabors the members of the club have acquired poise and self-expression . Keen competition was inspired by dividing the group into six divisions and by the use of the point system. The members of the club were guests of the Dramatic Club several times . . The goal of Peru Players is to help the freshman student find himself and to prepare for entrance into the Peru Dramatic Club. Fi rst Semester AMOS SULLIVAN

SCRIBBLERS CLUB Second Se mester President . HELEN BROOKS Sponsors WILMA JAMES and BETTY PANCAKE MRS. B. K. BAKER, Counselor The Scribblers Club this year has been an active, enthusiastic group, interested particularly in short-story writing and poetry. As the aim of the club is to develop the interests and abilities of young writers, present trends in the field of modern literature have been studied and discussed. First Semester JA NICE KNOUSE

* i_

77


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1934

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Alpha Mu Omega National Mathematical Fraternity OFFICERS First Semester ROY GINGLES EVELYN HOCHHEIM GEORGE HASKINS

President Vice- President Secretary-Treasurer

Second Semester CHARLES PENNEY . President Vice- President MORAS SHUBERT LA VERNE SHAFER Secretary-Treasurer Faculty Advisers C. A. HUCK A. L. HILL

AUXIER Fl LLEY HILL A. KNAPP OSTENDORF SCHNEIDER

BEUHLER GINGLES HOGUE D. KNAPP PATE SHAFER

BLOUNT DRAKE HAUSER HASKINS HUCK HUNZEKER MILLER NEMAN PENNEY SAYRE SHUBERT SUN ITA WALKER

T6

Alpha Mu Omega, through the direction of Professor A. L. Hill, was established as the honorary mathematics fraternity of Peru, in the summer school session, 1927. This organization is a branch of the National Council of Mathematics Teachers. An invitation to become a member of Alpha Mu Omega is extended to the student who has attained certain scholastic standards and has completed a required number of courses in mathematics. When the charter was granted, eleven names appeared on the roll. This year, 1934, finds thirty members with fourteen of those thirty having been awarded membership during the past term. Bi-monthly the members meet to enjoy programs conducted by the students. Besides increasing the recreational phase of mathematics the purpose of these meetings is to promote and develop interest in mathematics and provide an opportunity for the discussion of related subjects which are not presented in the class room. Subjects interesting to prospective teachers are topics of discussion at these bi-monthly meetings. Demonstrations of unusual and intriguing problems are often presented, and the use of mathematics in other vocations pointed out and illustrated. Such activities have developed a deeper interest in mathematics and served as an inspiration to the future teachers in this field. In addition to the members whose pictures appear, Melba Cope, Dorothy Jennings, Max Kerns, Lloyd Perry, Robert Punches, Paul Vance, and Otto Wellensick are included on the club roll.


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Beta Beta Beta International Biological Fraternity OFFICERS HUBERT FILLEY HUSTON KINGSOLVER

President Vice- President

JOHN WHEATLEY

Secretary

DR. J. M. WINTER

Adviser

"I speak not for myself but for the Age unborn I caught the fire from those who went before , The bearers of the torch who could not see The goal to which they strained , I caught their fire And carried it, only a little way beyond; But there are those who wait for it, I know , Those who will carry it on to victory. I dare not fail them. " On February 13, 1928, Dr. Wm. Goldsmith , national president of Beta Beta Beta, installed Pi chapter of that fraternity on the Peru campus. The charter members were selected from the membership of Sigma Beta Rho, a local honorary biological fraternity . Dr. A. E. Holch was i+le first sponsor. Tri Beta was organized for the purpose of supplying for the Biological Sciences an honorary undergraduate fraternity. Membership comes as a reward for active interest in the study of the Biological Sciences and as a recognition of attainment above the average in the courses offered in the college curriculum. The organization has a threefold purpose: first, development of sound scholarship; second, dissemination of scientific truth; third, promotion of research. Associate membership is open to lower classmen who show especial interest and aptitude in biology. ADAMSON FOSTER KINGSOLVER PASCO RAILSBACK WAGNER

The official publication of Beta Beta Beta is "Bios," published quarterly . At the present time there are thirty-one chapters of the organization 1n var1ous colleges in the United States and abroad. 79

FILLEY HUNZEKE R MICHELS PEEK ROUTH WINTER

JENNINGS PACKARD PENTERMAN SHUBERT WRIGHTSMAN


THE

1934

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Kappa Delta Pi National Honorary Education Society The annual Kappa Delta Pi banquet and initiation were held at Homecoming, so that the alumni members were privileged to be present. It is hoped that this plan will become a tradition with the society. Weekly book reviews were inaugurated by Kappa Delta Pi. These, however, had to be abandoned after almost a semester because no time could be obtained for them. Kappa Delta Pi members took charge of the chapel periods during National Education Week, using as the theme of their programs the outline suggested by the National Committee. Kappa Delta Pi is also supervising and directing the leveling of the land and the building of tables to convert the Dutch Oven into a suitable picnic place. Other organizations on the campus and in the town are each paying for the construction of one table. In 1932 the sponsoring of the Inter-Fraternity Banquet given during Commencement week became an established function of the organization. Every alternate year one delegate from each chapter is entertained at the annual convocation of chapters which convenes at the time and place of the meeting held by the Department of Superintendents of the N. E. A. This year the meeting was held at Cleveland, Ohio. Beta Mu Chapter was very ably represented by Florence Martin, the president of the local chapter. The vows taken by those received into membership in Kappa Delta Pi have served as the theme of the programs carried on throughout the year at the monthly meetings. To develop a higher degree of professional fellowship is one of the main objectives of Kappa Delta Pi. To insure a participation of each member in every program, fitting responses were required in answer to roll call. When Dr. T. C. McCracken, the National Executive President, installed Beta Mu Chapter, twenty-eight members were included on the charter roll. The present membership is slightly larger, thirty-one; so one may see that Kappa Delta Pi has constantly maintained its position on the campus. "The Kadelpian" is the official publication of the fraternity.

MAYSTRICK MUELLER PAYNE SHUBERT WAGNER

81

*

MILLER R. PATE PEEK TEAR WALDO

DR. MILLER W. PATE SHOEMAKER TYLER WHEELER WINTE~


THE

1934

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Lambda Delta Lambda National Physical Science Fraternity OFFICERS HUBERT FILLEY CHARLES PENNEY DANA SCHNEIDER MORAS SHUBERT ALFRED KNAPP

President Vice-President Treasurer Secretary Sergeant-at-Arms

193 3-34 saw the installation of the newest national fraternity on the campus, Lambda Delta Lambda. The local group, the Kappa Chapter, was installed June 27, 1933, at which time nine members were initiated. The charter members of this chapter are Ora Ferguson, Hubert Filley, Alfred Knapp, Charles Penney, Moras Shubert, Elizabeth Sprague, and Dr. F. E. Ware. Initiates added to this list the first semester were Huston Kingsolver, John Neman, Robert Pate, Darrell Railsback, and Robert Sayre. The first chapter of the fraternity was organized at Fairmont, West Virginia, in 1925. Since then nine other chapters have become affiliated. The second chapter to become associated with this honor society is located at another of Nebraska's State Teachers Colleges, Beta Chapter at Wayne. There is also a chapter at Kearney.

BUEHLER

FILLEY

KINGSOLVER

KNAPP

NEMAN

PATE

PENNEY

RAILSBACK

SAYER

SCHNEIDER

SHUBERT

WARE

To promote interest in the study of the Physical Sciences is the aim of Lambda Delta Lambda. This purpose is accomplished in two ways: first, by scholarship restrictions for membership, and secondly, by a requirement that each member complete a project in these fields. This project must show some originality. It may be a demonstration or model pertaining to some principle of physical science, or, if in the form of a report, it must be the sum marization of extensive reading on a chosen subject. These projects are presented at a regular meeting for approval. The programs are devoted to setting forth and discussing subjects of latest scientific interest, stimulating at all times a desire to read current science periodicals.

82


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pj Gamma Mu National Social Science Fraternity OFFICERS EDNA MA YSTRICK Presideni LORA MAJORS Vice-President MABEL JONES Secretary-Treasurer DR. CASTLE M. BROWN Adviser Nebraska Gamma, the local chapter of Pi Gamma Mu, was installed in April, 1929, and has been an active organization since that time. The Peru chapter was the seventysecond to be formed. Leroy Allen originated the idea of Pi Gamma Mu in the early spring of 1924 at Southwestern College, Winfield, Kansas. Pi Gamma Mu is not an ordinary honorary fraternity. It has no national ritual and no secret features of any sort. Its name is simple and modest, merely the initials of the Greek words meaning "Students of Social Science." The motto is "Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free." The purpose of Pi Gamma Mu is the inculcation of the ideals of scholarship, scientific attitude, method and social service in relation to all social problems. Members are elected from juniors and seniors of superior scholastic rank who are majoring or minoring in history or other social sciences. No particular theme save the general purpose of the group has been carried out in the programs of Pi Gamma Mu this year Some of the meetings are devoted to a detailed study of current events, such as Russian recognition . A social meeting in February was one of the most enjoyable. At this time the society was entertained at the home of its adviser, Dr. Brown . At another Miss Frances Harvey shared some of the material she had discovered in doing research in Texas history. At the January meeting Mrs. Campbell reviewed her trip abroad. The organization is seriously contemplating the purchase of various social science periodicals which will be of interest to the entire group .

BROWN HARVEY KINGSOLVER MAYSTRICK SHUMARD

83

CLAYBURN HECK LUSE MILLER SILENCE

DASHER HILEMAN McCLELLAN ROHRS STOFT

GRUBB JONES MAJORS RUCKSDASHEL WALDO


THE

1934

PERUV I A N

Sigma Tau Delta National English Fraternity OFFICERS HAZEL NILES President WILMA JAMES Vice-President HELEN GILBERT Secretary-Treasurer MRS. !NICE DUNNING Historian DR. G. W. SMITH Adviser Sincerity, Truth and Design, the three elements of good writing, are symbolized in the name of this fraternity. Sigma Tau Delta is a national English fraternity aiming to promote the mastery of written expression, to stimulate worth-while reading, and to foster a spirit of fellowship among men and women specializing in English. In order to become an active member of Sigma Tau Delta a student must major in English, maintain high scholastic standing in all subjects, and publish a specified number of words in student newspapers or elsewhere. The society is an outgrowth of the English Club at Dakota Wesleyan University, Mitchell, South Dakota. Plans worked out for the local group there mel the approval of heads of English departments in other institutions, and resulted in the nationalization of the order under its present name, in 1924. There are more than seventy chapters in the United States. The preliminary work of organizing was done by Professor J. Q. Owen, who is now executive secretary, with offices at Wayne, Nebraska. Phi Alpha Chapter was organized at Peru State Teachers College by Professor E. C. Beck in 1926. It was at that time the only national fraternity on the campus, and is still one of the most active. Dr. Beck is now at Central State Teachers College, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, and is making a study of the lumber-jack ballads of the Michigan "shanty-boys." In a visit to Peru last fall he entertained the student body with some samples from his collection. CHARVAT CRAWFORD DUNNING GRUBB KINGSOLVER

BARRETT CLARK DICKERSON GIBBS JAMES Ll NVI LLE

BRANDT COPE DIDDEL GILBERT JEFFRIES McCLELLAN

Sigma Tau Delta has monthly meetings, each based upon some phase of literature. The Christmas meeting is always devoted to the reading of original contributions by the members. This year the Freshman Scribblers were Christmas guests. 84


THE

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Sigma Tau Delta National English Fraternity Each year Sigma Tau Delta is accustomed to entertain some notable speaker as the principal event of the year's program. Both this year and last year it was honored by Dr. John G. Neihardt. poet laureate of Nebraska. Every year, in order to stimulate interest in the society and in creative writing, a gold medal is awarded at Commencement time to the freshman who has written the best essay. Literary efforts of the members are published quarterly in "The Rectangle," the fraternity's official magazine. The local chapter has been represented in this and other publications during the year. Marion Marsh, Mrs. Norwood, Mrs. Lon Graf, Mrs. B. K. Baker, Miss Grace Tear, Hazel Ditloff and Betty Pancake have had work recognized. Three plays written by Phi Alpha Chapter members have been presented on the college stage. Anna Best Joder's one-act farce, "The Decimal Point," was given as Sigma Tau Delta's annual convocation program, and her tragedy, "The Shadow," won second place for Peru High School in the M. I. N. K. Dramatic Contest. In March the college Dramatic Club presented "In the Shadow of a Rock," written by E. P. Conkle, a Peruvian who is achieving nation-wide fame as a playwright. Phi Alpha Chapter has a very creditable number of other members who have become outstanding figures in their fields. The following poem was written by one of the society's best-loved members, Miss Esther Ann Clark, and has been set to music by another member, Evelyn Brecht. The words were inspired by a particular friend, but Sigma Tau Delta has adopted them as the perfect expression of its spirit of fellowship.

BY THE WAY Side by side we walked together For a while, Two good comrades of an hour Or a mile; But the whole day long was brighter And its steady trudging lighter For your smile. It was more than just a meeting Of the day, For the earnest of its handclasp Lasts for aye; And it makes all friendship sweeter, Yes, and life itself completer All the way.

MARTIN MULLEN PANCAKE SMITH TEAR WHEELER

85

MAY NABORS PETERSEN SPEED IE TRAUERNICHT WINTER

NILES SCHMIDT SUN ITA WALDO WRIGHTSMAN


THE

1934

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Everett Literary Society OFFICERS First Semester OPAL GAINES President CHARLES PENNEY . Vice-President MERL PEEK Secretary MARGARET WINTERS Program Chairman Second Semester President CHARLES PENNEY MARGARET WINTERS Vice-President LAWRENCE WANDS Secretary EVELYN DAVIS Program Chairman P. H. NORWOOD, Adviser Five years after the Philomathean Literary Society was established coincidentally with the school a rival society was organized, the Everetts. To enable the student to learn how to express himself in public, and to give the listeners something both interesting and valuable was the original aim of the initiators of the society. The competitive spirit first given voice in debates between these two societies has continued through the years. This rivalry, however, has never been an antagonistic one, and this year, as last, the members of both united in a Philo-Everett dance in the high school auditorium. The original activities of music, dramatics and debate have through the progress of the school become centered in the various departments and the fraternities. Therefore, the society now attempts to fill the position of a social organization . Carrying out the society's present aims of work, play and study, several unusual programs have filled the Thursday night meetings. A most enjoyable, humorous debate and a broadcast given by the new members are especially worthy of mention. General programs by talented students and faculty members have proved most satisfactory. Peek's Peaksters assisted by other Everett members arranged a very successful convocation program. AUXIER DEWEY GRUBB

BARISAS Fl LLEY HAUSER

BISGARD GAINES KIMSEY

McCANN

MULLEN

NORWOOD

PACE

PAYNE

PENNEY

SLEPICKA

SPEEDI'E WANDS

ROHRS TROYER

SHRADER VAUGHN

WINTER

WRIGHTSMAN

WAGGONER

DAVEY GAINES KUWITZKY

86

Eighteen new members have been received as Everetts during this year. Sixty-three years of such activity as has been shown in the endeavors of the Everett Literary Society can be boasted by few societies in western colleges.


THE

1934

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Philomathean Literary Society OFFICERS First Semeste r LEWIS THOMPSON DORIS DEAVER . DANA SCHNEIDER MARJOR IE YOUNG .

President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer

Second Semester President ROLAND STEPHENSON Vice-President JEANNE SLINKER Secretary CLAYBORN MORT . Treasurer DOROTHY CAWTHORNE MISS GRACE PETERSEN, Adviser The first organization in Peru holds a history rich in memories and traditions. The Philomathean Literary Society was organized soon after the establishment of the school as a state institution and has continued active down to the present time. Its founding was due in a large measure to Perry M. Martin, one of the school's first instructors, and Wilson E. Majors, a student. Wilson E. Majors then became the first president. When organized the society had twenty members representing the best talent of the new school. In 1870 when G. E. Howard, later Dr. Howard of the state university, was president, the society was incorporated under the laws of Nebraska. This charter now hangs in the faculty room and furnishes one of the bits of atmosphere that makes traditions for the school. Philomathean is probably the oldest society of its nature in the state. Philomathean is defined as meaning "lovers of learning," and the group has clung to its high ideals of learning by expanding into eve ry field of intellectual activity which is popula r. At the time of its inception the society filled a large place in the student's education now take n by the curriculum and other activities .

ADAMSON BANKS BLANCHARD CHARVAT

ALBERT BARNTS BLO UNT CHASTAIN

AUE BENTS INGER BUNTING

AYRES BRENNER CAWTHORNE

CHATELAIN

COLE DEAVER

COLLINS DENNEY

COOK DONNER

COCKE RAM CRAWFORD

FISHER

GARNER

GEHLING

87

DRAKE GILBERT


THE

1934

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Philomathean Literary Society Debates, largely impromptu, were a large item on the "literary" menu. Papers on any number of various subjects were written by the members and were read at the meetings-while some other member held the lamp to make the reading easier. An old melodeon was donated to the society and became its first musical instrument. The first meeting room was so small that it became the object of humorous remarks. Under President Crabtree the society obtained a permanent room on the third floor of the old Normal Hall, which has been replaced by the new science building. The organization now meets bi-monthly in the high school auditorium of the T. J. Majors Training School. The object of Philo has been to develop the particular talents of its members by giving them an opportunity to participate in the programs, and a history of Philo programs is a history of talented productions. The programs have always responded to the times, dealing with current happenings. Today, the usual entertainment at the meetings consists of music, speeches, and a social discussion. The typical Philomathean is neither a "grind" nor a "dig" nor a frivolous butterfly, but is one who cares for both intellectual and so cia I interests.

GLOVER HANSEN HUNZEKER

GRAHAM HARKINS JACKSON

B. GREEN HASKINS JARVIS

E. GREEN HASKINS JONES

JOHNSON

A. KNAPP

D. KNAPP

KUHL

LAMBERT

Ll NVI LLE

LORIMOR

MARTIN

MAY

McCLELLAN D. MAYSTRICK E. MAYSTRICK

MILLER

MOORE

MORT

Philo is proud to number in her ranks many men and women who have gained places of prominence in the field of education; and many of the successful lawyers and doctors of the state were at one time active Philomatheans. Among the outstanding Philo members might be mentioned the late Hon. T. J. Majors and Wilson E. Majors; C. Ray Gates; M. C. Lefler, superintendent of the Lincoln schools; J. W. Crabtree, one time president of the school and now of the National Educational Association; E. L. Rouse and V. E. Chatelain . There is also a number of the present faculty who are members.

NOA

88

*


THE

1934

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Philomathean Literary Society Philomathean has many times in her history made contributions to the school. The Philo rock, which adds such delightful atmosphere to the school, is an example. This rock was brought to the campus and dedicated in May, 191 I, to mark the site of the first graduation exercises of the normal school in 1870, when two students received diplomas. In 1928 J. D. Graves of Peru presented to the organization the quill pen which was used by the governor of Nebraska in signing the bill which transformed Peru from a private to a public school. This pen is now on display in the administration office. Also in 1928 the society received the money for the Liberty Loan bonds which it had purchased during the war, and part of this money was put into a perpetual student loan fund, to which contributions have since been made. Money was also given to make the final payment on the electric bell system which is now in use. Many of the original purposes of Philo are being filled by the newer organizations-dramatic, musical and forensic. It is believed, however, that a literary society still has a place and a program to present. The social functions have expanded during recent years as others of the activities have declined, thus filling a need for more social life. This year a dance was held jointly with the Everett Literary Society. The Philo convocation program this year was r.otable. It was a review of the different activities of the group, as represented by the various talents of the members. The success of the society throughout the year has been due in a great part to the untiring efforts of the adviser, Miss Grace M. Petersen, who has given advice without making it mandatory that the society accept as final her opinion.

PASCO H. RAILSBACK SANDIN SHOEMAKER STEPHENSON TRIMBLE M. WHEELER

89

rCTERSEN RAY SAYER SHUMARD SULLIVAN WALDO WILLIAMS

PIERCE RHOADES SCHNEIDER SLINKER SUN ITA WALLIN WITTWER

D. RAILSBACK ROGERS SHAFER STASTNY THOMPSON L. WHEELER YOUNG


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Alpha Erudito Scholarship Society OFFICERS First Sem ester President FLORENCE MARTIN . Vice -President HELEN C LA IRE MULLEN Secretary MABLE JONES Treasurer MARK MULLENS Program Chairman EDNA MAYSTRICK Reporter JACK SULLIVAN

Ayres C oo k G ewec ke M. J o nes F. Ma rti n Me rchant Plucknett Stei nburg

Bar nts Donn e r Gibb s Kin gso lv e r Ma y Mul lins Roberts Su lliva n

Bu e hl er Ehme n Har ne y Lin ville D. Ma ystrick Pa ce Sha ffer Sunita

Ca vey En g b lo m J o hn so n Lu se E. Ma ystri ck Pa scal Slinker We ic hma n

Second Semester President FLORENCE MARTIN . Vice-President HUSTON KINGSOLVER Secretary EVELYN JONES . Treasurer JANICE KNOUSE Program Chairman EDNA MA YSTRICK Reporter JACK SU LLI VAN . S. L. CLEMENTS, Adviser Al pha Erudito, commonly known as the Scholarship Club, was organized in 1929. It is a local organization to which only possessors of Nebraska State Normal Board Scholarships are eligible. Each year its membership increases. The twofold purpose of the society is to encourage ma intena nee of high scholastic achievement in college among those who have been outstanding students in high school, and to encourage those who find it impossible to keep up the same relative ranking in college. A small program of the activities of the year was given to each member at the first meeting . The central idea of the entertainment at these meeting s was embodied in the letters A. E. F. These symbols stand for aim, effort and future . To indicate the aim toward which each person should put forth his greatest effort to attain a successful future was the purpose of the various talks , musical numbers and other activities of th e year. Alpha Erudito affords an opportunity for social life and a study of educational activitie s, especially for those underclassmen who are not yet eligible to membership in a major fraternity. Members of Aloha Erudito have been outstanding in all campus activities. During its short life of five yea rs two of its number have been selected by Kappa Delta Pi as the outstanding freshmen fo r that year and five have been elected representative students. Mr. S. L. C lements succeeded Mrs. Marybelle Norwood, the first sponsor of the organization . His interest in each individual member has done much to keep the "flag of the organization flying."

C le me nts Foster E. J o nes C. Martin Meha ffey Pe nterma n Speedie Whe e ler

90


THE

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Organizations of Peru A large chapter in the history of Peru Teachers College would necessar:ly be devoted to its organizations, for they are, and have been from the very beginning, an integral part of the life of the collec:;e. The destinies of the students have been determined just as surely, if not in as great a degree, by ihe training they have received in these organizations as by their more strictly academic work. The shifting fortunes of these groups of people with like interests have woven many bright spots into the fabric of the school's history. Literary societies played the largest part in the early history of th6 school, Philomaihean being organized soon after the opening of the school, and Everett in 1872. These organizations have continued active down to the present. At times, however, other literary societies have been in existence also. For example, two were organized in 1893-the Wellingtonian and the State Normal Junior. The Christian organizations appeared on the scene quite early. The establishment of a branch of the Young Men's Christian Association in 1886 was followed a year later by the founding of a Young Women's Christian Association. In 1906 the College Catholic Association, then the Normal Catholic Association, was brought into being by a group of Catholic students, directed by faculty members. At one time, also, an Episcopal Guild was numbered among campus societies. In the middle period of the school's history debating societies were prominent, and a zeal was displayed for the forensic art which is hardly understandable today. In the late nineties two societies were formed. These met regu 1arly for discussions. The one for the young women was called the Athenian, that for the young men the Ciceronian. The Webster debating society was organized shortly after the War, as the result of a revival of interest in debating. The Dramatic Club, organized in 1908, has proved its worth and is now one of the most prominent organizations on the campus, a tremendous amount of work being done by members superabounding in enthusiasm. A movement is now afoot for the securing of a branch of a national dramatics organization to further promote the work in drama. Musical organizations of some kind have always existed, but because of the nature of the work, they have always varied greatly. An interest has recently been stimulated in obtaining for the music students a more permanent and professional organization. Athletic organizations are much like musical groups in that the "clubs" formed are usually rather ephemeral. A unified Athletic Association was established, however, with the awakened interest in athletics after the beginning of the century. The present organizations, the W. A. A., dating from 1924, and the "P" club, Phi Lambda Alpha, dating from 1920, are well established and may be called permanent because of their inclusive interests. The Girls' Club came into existence in 1919 and the Men's Club was called into being soon after. They are now the means of carrying forward a variety of interests in connection with the general student life. The advent of the organizations which are more strictly departmental and which' have national affiliations is relatively recent. Some of them, though, had previously existed as local organizations, under a different name. Sigma Tau Delta, the English fraternity, became the first national group on the campus, in 1926, due largely to the efforts of Professor Beck. The latest addition was Lambda Delta Lambda, Physical Science fraternity, which received its charter last summer. Because of high national qualifications and the small number of people eligible for membership the activities of some of the departmental honor societies have been suspended. Alpha Erudite is an organization not readily classified. It came into existence in 1929 and is open only to those students who upon graduation from high school have received Normal Board Scholarships. The Freshman Clubs were conceived a few years ago for the purpose of providing a mutually interesting and profitable activity in a congenial grouo for each freshman. Some of these activities prepare the way for membership in other organizations. Purely social groups have never found a lasting place in the activities of the students, though most of the clubs and societies perform social functions in addition to their other activities. Many are the groups which were once in existence, but now have nearly been forgotten. Some of them served a need which was merely temporary, then passed on; others died of sheer inertia. Such groups as the Deutscher Verein, Agricultural Society, Symphony Club, Mandolin Club, Camera Club, the Scientific Society, and the Health and Efficiency Club served their purpose then faded from the campus picture. No organization can in Peru live a charmed life; it must fill a need and prove its worth. 91


Colonel T. J. Majors, who as a member of the first Nebraska legislature, 1867, began his never-ending a ctivi ties for Peru and education throughout this state.

*


ACTIVITIES


THE

1934

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College Orchestra The College symphony has launched out on another successful year. Making an early beginning these musicians have made several convocation performances. The organization assisted in this way when the College was host to the State Normal Board. A Sunday evening appearance at the Methodist Church gave the orchestra the opportunity to make a very creditable performance of Beethoven's "First Symphony." This year brought back something which has not been tried for several years. The entire orchestra journeyed to Nebraska City and gave a Sunday evening performance at the Methodist Church. Selections from the old masters were used, supplemented with numbers by the string quartet, a violin soloist and the violin quartet. The spring concert, now becoming an annual event, took place the first week in May. In arranging this program, Professor Jindra selected a variety of compositions from classic favorites by the old masters to catchy, modern arrangements. The last number on this performance was one of the most unusual numbers ever attempted by the orchestra. At first are heard faint snatches of the familiar tune "Dixie"; then it is repeated in the aboriginal. Next it becomes a minuet. The piccolo and drum follow showing that Dixie has reached the year 1775. It takes on the rhythmical flow of a valse Iento, disguises itself as a slow drag 1n rag time and finally bursts forth as grand opera in all the pomp and glory of a Tannhauser. The program was as follows: Overture Barber of Seville Rossini G Minor Symphony . W. A. Mozart Allegro nolto Minuetto Allegro assa1 Intermission Ballet Music from Faust Gounod Liebestraume No. Ill . . . . . . Liszt Violin Solo Varspiel from first movement of the Bruch concerts for violin, Clyde Bole Evolution of Dixie N. L. Lake

* 95


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Violin Quartet Meet the "baby" musical organization on the campus. Not only is it the smallest but the youngest, too, having come into being in October, 1933, when it played for the Woman's Club. After this appearance the members felt it worthwhile to continue practices together regularly, and the quartet has become one of the most "up and coming" organizations on the campus. During the year it has played for the churches of Peru, the Kiwanis Club, the District American Legion Convention, campus activities, including the Sigma Tau Delta banquet, the athletic banquet, fraternity meetings, convocation and a Sunday dormitory recital with the Geron. It has co-operated with the Dramatic Club, furnishing all the period music for "In the Shadow of a Rock," and the Christmas Guest Night plays. This spring it accompanied the Dramatic Club on out-of-town trips to Julian and Pawnee City. The College Orchestra concert at Nebraska City was supplemented by this group. All of its entertaining was not done assisting others, for the quartet played several selections at Rockport, Missouri, at Auburn for the Kiwanis banquet, and Hamburg, Iowa, which made arrangements for a return engagement. "Serenade" by Slunicho has proved their most popular number this year. Wilma Silence, who plays third violin in the group, presented her Senior recital in April, while Ruth Naviaux and Eunice Burbridge both gave their Junior recitals in March. During their entire college careers all four girls have been most active in the musical field, three of them playing other instruments than the violin. Just fifty minutes after six in the morning seems an unusual time for practice, but that is the regular period selected by the group. The girls of the quartet have two souvenirs in particular of the year's work, a recording made by Mr. Kettering of Doane, and the memory of one broadcast from KMA. RUTH NAVIAUX EUNICE BURBRIDGE

First Violin

WILMA SILENCE

Second Violin

HELEN GILBERT

. .

* NAVIAUX, BURBRIDGE, GILBERT, SILENCE

96

Third Violin Fourth Violin


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

College Chorus G. Holt Steck, the director of this group, has exerted great effort and devoted much time to its growth and improvement since his coming to Peru in 1928. Professor Steck's talent lies not alone in the directing field , for he is an excellent soloist furnishing numerous convocation and other programs . He has been a member and director of the Peru Geron , a vocal octette of mixed voices which has assisted the chorus. "Students are taught vocal music" is a line from the 1895 Peru Bulletin, but it is to Perry M. Martin that Dr . McKenzie gives credit for organizing the first "singing class amongst the students" of Peru a few years later. The Peru chorus was established as the vocal representative of Peru G. HOLT STECK State Teachers College in 1930. It has grown from a small body of eighteen conscientious students, who were willing to choose singing as their major activity, to its present size. Its size has grown in direct proportion to its quality and balanced ratio of parts. It is rapidly taking its place among the finest college groups in the state. Concerts have been given in many Nebraska and Iowa towns by the chorus and subsidiary groups, and each year return engagements as well as several new ones a re filled . "Seraphic Song" by Anton Rubenstein with violin and piano accompaniment has been included on the chorus concert program for the past two years . "The Sleigh" by Kountz has proved most popular as has Lavouski's "Hospodi Pomilui" as well as have several Latin sacred numbers by Palestrina. The chorus has made a specialty of very unusual arrangements of Negro spirituals; "My Lord What a Morning," " Deep River ," "Swing Low Sweet Chariot," "Listen to the Lambs" and "Dig My Grave." Many of the traditional and old favorite songs of the ages are included in the chorus repertoire, selections from Brahms and Beethoven being given an important place, as the "Junita," "Annie Laurie," "Drink to Me Only with Thine Eyes" and "Cousin Jedadiah."

* 97


THE

Color Song Published in the "Golden Rod" 1902 Fling abroad our College colors To the free Nebraska breeze, Blending Heaven 's own white and azure With the soft green of the trees; While our loyal hearts and voices With pride and joy unite, As we sing Peru 's devotion To the Pale Blue and the White. (Chorus) While our loyal hearts and voices With pride and joy unite, As we sing Peru's devotion To the Pale Blue and the White. Through the years of sun and shadow Mid the scenes we love so well, O'er our hearts and dear old colors Still weave their magic spell; And wherever life shall call us We'll strive with all our might To uphold the brave tradition Of the Pale Blue and the White. (Chorus) When the cares of life o'ertake us, Mingling fast our locks with gray, Should our dearest hopes forsake us, False fortunes fade away, We shall banish pain and sadness By mem'ries fond and bright Of the Old Nebraska College And the Pale Blue and the White. (Chorus)

98

1934

PERUVIAN


Peru Dramatic Club enacts its first play, "Land of the Heart's Desire"

-1908-

DRAMATICS and DEBATE


THE

1934

PERUV I AN

Peru Dramatic Club D. J. Nabors has set the goal of Peru Dramatic Club higher than ever before. Since his coming to this campus in 1931, no production has seemed too difficult for mastery under his direction. With him leading the dramatic endeavors Peru is placing its banner on the top-most peak.

D. J. NABORS

Ever since that first play, "Land of the Heart's Desire," thrilled the Peru audience in 1908, the silver and black colors of the Peru Dramatic Club have been flying over this school. The silver has a double significance this year for 1933 marks the 25th anniversary of the organization. Daisy B. Nettleton Taylor directed that first group of Nebraska college students that decided "the play is the thing," and organized to study and present dramatic productions.

1933-1934 has been a greater, harmonizing note in the traditions which envelop the club. "Sun Up," "Doll's House" given while Mrs. Anna Best Joder was director, "Peter Pan," "Berkeley Square," "The Royal Family" and numerous others in the past few years indicate that the "show is going on"-only the best, and most successful of shows! "Gold in the Hills," the summer melodrama, the spectacu1ar "Warrior's Husband," "The Poor Little Rich Girl," a story of fact and fantasy, the comedy, "One of the Family," and climaxing the year's club productions, "In the Shadow of a Rock," based on the founding of the little river town, Peru, Nebraska, have added a new chapter to the history of drama in Peru. Drama is a composite thing. A play utilizes divergent talented types-costumers, designers, carpenters, electricians, make-up artists, and actors. Peru Dramatic Club, recognizing that acting is not the whole of drama, trains its members in the expression of all of their abilities that each individual may have the satisfaction of having produced something worthwhile.

GOLD IN THE HILLS

100


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Peru Dramatic Club

THE WARRIOR'S HUSBAND

Trips-they've introduced Peru Dramatic Club to all of Southeastern Nebraska . "The Boor," "The Doctor in Spite of Himself," "Sparkin'." "Little Prison," and "Everyman" will always call to the mind of the persons who enacted them visions of numerous scrambles for make-up and costumes just before an evening's performance in some school or town. Sponsoring the M. I. N. K. Dramatic Contest the club has made its reputation more than statewide. Each year a larger number of towns compete in the numerous divisions, and work of a higher quality is entered by the high schools from Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska, and Kansas . Christmas guest night did much to arouse the true holiday spirit. To develop the most varied arts which make up true drama the purpose of each meeting, and to encourage creative ability an original one-act play contest was sponsored. As a climax to the year's activities came the annual luncheondance. Real life is offered anyone who, endowed with the mysterious gift of one element of drama, gains admittance to this club. Having an inestimable heritage, Peru Dramatic Club has upheld its traditions in 1933-1934 and turns with expectancy to meet a new year, knowing that the future dawns rich with opportunity to add to the glories already entered in its name.

THE POOR LITTLE RICH GIRL

101


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

DEBATE Other activities have had their beginnings, but debate has been always with Peru. The literary societies found debating one of the best entertainments at their meetings and argued the pro and con of numerous sub jects. About 1896 several enterprising young men organized the Ciceronian Debating Society, and in 1899 , not to be outdone by the men, the ladies of Nebraska State Normal School organized the Athenian Society. In this same year George N. Porter called some boys together to discuss the advisability of securing a debate with the State Normal School at Emporia, Kan sas, and by 191 I four annual intercollegiate wrangles were entered. Although the societies have not been in e xistence for several years and debate is not the only important activity of the campus , it is still in the limelight. The debate squad closed the 1934 season with a fifty per cent rating in the class " A " State Debate Tournament, March I0. This tournament clima xed a full schedule of debates for the squad. Thirty-eight intercollegiate debates were held this year, double the number of last year and more than ever before held in one season. As is now the common custom among colleges, the debates, except those held in the state tournament, were not judged, attention being concentrated by the debaters upon winning popular support. The season opened with attendance of the Marysville one-day invitation meet , and soon after this Marysville and Morningside were debated at Peru. One of the larger events of the season was a four-day trip into Missouri and Kansas, during which debates were held with six schools. Chadron was then entertained here. The State Forensic Meet was held at Hastings. The Pi Kappa Delta question was discussed exclusively during the season-Resolved: That the powers of the president of the United States should be substantially increased as a settled policy.

* First Row Nabors

McCann Pluck nett Second Row

Shumard

Ruchsdashel Waldo

102


"The Normal Courier," initial publication of the college, goes to press -1892-

PUBLICATIONS


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Pedagog ian The College Newspaper

* WILMA JAMES

CAMILLA HAS KINS

M ERL PEEK

TH E STAFF WILMA JAMES Editor-in-Chief CAMILLA HASKINS . Business Manager J. W. TYLER .

MERL PEEK GERA LD TYLER

Business Manager Make-up Editor Adviser

The school grew, and there came a time when the students who attended desired some record of the society meetings, debates, campus life and a publishing of articles inspirational to the prospective teacher and alumni in the field. That desire taking form in the minds of Peruvians became a reality in "The Normal School Courier," 1892. That forerunner of the newspaper was more nearly a magazine as was its successor, "The Normal School Messenger," 1898 . The best in literature from the campus and the world found its way into the pages of these little magazines, and the records of the campus activities show that Peruvians were truly enjoying themselves . "The Normal School Journal" came to life in 1905, only to give way to "The Normalite" the following year. Though still in magazine form and published only once a month until 1915, when it achieved t he size and form of a newspaper, the Normalite gives readers a distinct picture of Peru athletics, organizations, music, debates, social life until 192 I, when the changing of the school from a normal to a state teachers college necessitated another name. The Peru Pedagogian most aptly named proved its worthy successor. Certain persons must ever be indelibly linked with these campus records. T. L. Van Vleet was edito r of the 1892 "Normal Courier" with James E. Delzell and James H. Ha yes as business managers, and J . A. Beattie edited the "State Normal School Messenger" of 1898. J. L. Akers, J. E. Morgan, John Hanna, Bert Swenson, Delzells, and D. H. Weber labored to publish the first Normalites. When the name became Pedagogian Paul Wilcox headed the staff. Names of those of jo urnal istic leanings since that date seem more familiar to readers today: Arthur Ma jo rs, George R. Willy, Merritt Whitten, Jere Mickel, Joe Jones, C. E. Lefler, J. A. Jimmerson, John S. Boswell, Nona Palmer, Don Tyler, Merna Brownson, Iva Pierce , and Florence Martin. 104


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Pedagogian The College Newspaper Those who became heir to the Pedagogian in 1933 proved no less capable and dependable than staffs of the past. Hours of collecting, checking copy, proof reading, trips down the hill to the print shop, of thinking over headlines and page make-up all pass behind the scenes. The readers never know, but these tasks come wrapped up with the editorship of any publication. Wilma James, as the 1933-1934 editor, has not for one moment relaxed her grip. The Pedagogian has noticeably achieved progress as a reliable , worthwhile student organization in its constant endeavors to mirror both curricular and extra-curricular college life; to record college activities; to report college news; to feature alumni, student and faculty achievements; and to afford avenues of expression to those of journalistic leanings. Faculty members edited the first publications, but the Pedagogian of today is an expression of student ideas and contributions. The " who , when, and where" of Peru is spread abroad through its pages. Prize stories and poems from the Sigma Tau Delta Christmas program furnished much of the reading in a December edition . Peru Dramatic Club provided copy for the edition preceding the M. I. N. K. Dramatic Contest. Book week found recognition in another and Epsilon Pi Tau recorded its activities and history in a fourth. Every editorial published this year was pertinent to the life and happenings of the week. "Art Lamebrain" gave the "inside dope" on many who might have "got by" with much had he not always been a keen observer and an excellent listener. Two columns given over to a training school staff gave the high school and grades an opportunity to make known their achievements in athletics, dramatics, and music and to chronicle their social activities of the year. Balance in reading matter has been an aim of the 1933-1934 Pedagoglan. The Bobcat on the editorial page stands on the top of a hill, tense, prepared, sending forth his far-reaching cry, a true emblem of the Pedagogian and its dissemination of Peru news to high schools, colleges and alumni throughout the state.

*

First Row BOWE N BROOKER DRAKE

GOERKE HOG UE LO. HUNZEKER

Second Row MORT PARSONS RAY

SH LA ES G. TYLER J . W. TYLER

105


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Peruvian THE STAFF M. FLORENCE MARTIN ALICE MAE BISGARD . THOMAS COLLINS JOHN FOSTER ROBERT HARRIS . HUSTON KINGSOLVER LOIS MAY .

M.

.

Editor-in-Chief Stenographer . Art Editor . Snapshot Editor Training School Editor . Feature Editor Class Editor .

How strange that first little annual, the "Golden Rod," appears today with its corded tie holding the pages of a year's history together. Those pages turn. There's the color song, "The Pale Blue and the White" published for the first FLORENCE MARTIN time, a record of that dedicatory game on the athletic field and a section devoted to the beginning of official basketball gafi!~S. On the staff appears the names C. W . Buckley, editor and Hattie Halcomb andTrank Munday, business managers. On down the years in 1907 came the "Oak Leaf," with Earl M. Cline and Myrtle Krebs as editors, and F. D. Brooks, now at Johns Hopkins University, business manager. These little annuals struggled for existence, many times seemed defeated, but always came up smiling, paving the way for the PERUVIAN in 1908. John A. Hanna, a doctor at Columbia University, edited this original PERUVIAN assisted by D. L. Carlson, business manager. Once or twice the fight for an annual record of Peru's life seemed almost futile, but the copy went to press. Old man depression struck a blow again in 1933, but the PER UVIAN came out! Onward-conquering all has been the progress of the school. The yearbooks of Peru symbolize that spirit, each one showing its readers the new heights of achievement on which Peru State Teachers College has placed the Pale Blue and the White.

*

First Row BISGARD

COLLINS FOSTER

Second Row HARRIS

KINGSOLVER MAY


THE

1934

P ERUVIAN

Peruvia n THE STAFF DANA J. SCHNEIDER MIRIAM MILLER . FRED ROHRS . MILDRED SPEEDIE LEWIS THOMPSON DWIGHT WALDO . DR . F. E. WARE .

.

.

Busin ess Manager Fres hm an Ed itor . Athletic Ed itor Organization Editor Assistant Busi ness Man ager Assistant Ed itor and Historian . Advise r .

To deal in platitudes concerning the staff is unnecessary. It is the y who have made this PERUVIAN. To say where one has surpassed another in service is impossible. All must receive honorable mention . For three consecutive years the DA N A J. SC HN EIDER PERUVIAN Key has been awarded those who contributed most to the production of the annual. The quality of the work done by the members who shall this year wear the key may not have excelled that of others , but their tasks necessitated longer hours and more patience. These rece ~e the gold key: M. FLORENCE MARTIN DANA J. SCHNEIDER DWIGHT WALDO LEWIS THOMPSON LOIS MAY Weaving the woof of the past with the warp of the present the 1934 PERUVIAN has throughout its pages looked toward the future. The staff has caught the spirit that has dominated Peru through its sixty-seven years of progress, and herein each in his own sphere passes it on to you. With this as a background may you feel again the thrill of that Homecoming football game, the excitement of that winning Bobcat basket, laugh again at the plays, sports reviews, revel in a college dance, see those personalities who came and went across these hills, and live again this college year as you turn the pages of the 1934 PERUVIAN.

*

First Row TH OMPSON

WALDO SPEED IE

Second Row MILLER

ROHRS WARE

107


Miss Eliza C. Morgan, who, as preceptress of Mount

Vernon

Hall,

was

guardian

of

the

"Queens" for over a quarter of a century,

1872-1898.

*

l


FEATURES


Clauaia Luse Representative


Dana J. Schneider RepreBentati-oe


*

M. Florence Martin Representative


Merl Peek Representative


Pioneers of Peru FacultyDean Delzell Esther Ann Clark 1-2-3-4 Collin Housethe prize winner 2/ 3-Miller and Jackson Color Song F E R A-Blanchard & Harris Brew Dr. Miller

"M y Dar I.mg - Faye Andrews II

First floor entertains "Baby" Joder Rohrs What a wonderful bird the frog are! BiologistsFoster and Kingsolver Marj. Young Over the rocks at the Dutch Oven-Parli and Mehaffey


Emily Post or the campus intelligentsia? Lewis House Amazon Warriors Brenner-Antiope Dickerson-Hypolita "When I was in Oklahoma" West and Kerns Open air taxi! I.

w. w.

Slightly mixed octette Drake The money manPenney Grins I Gaines Hall Martin and Luse Ideal RoomiesAdele and Rachael Mae They keep the campus looking fit


Speedie and Gail Annie Non-participants at P Club initiation Swanson Hall Jimmie lost a nickel! Campustry? Dana Nixon "Art Lamebrain"Mort Casey and Bicknell Peruvian Business-Men Grace personified Close Harmony Peru Basketeers in action What won't that Hurst House do next? Gates Why didn't they learn that color song?


Where ALL Green things thrive! 10:29 6 ft. 6 in. of Noffke Gehling and Shafer Don and Red Profile study of Miss Diddell From Cemetery Hill Hurst House wakes up W. A. A. pyramids Bus and Jack Death from "Everyman" You can't go to breakfast I m your P+ s. •

I

Speich and Hansen won't ever grow up Twentieth century Dianas "Give that snapshot to the PERUVIAN!" Why the river, Vi? Night Mares


From a Dormitory Window

Gilliland and Schneider

Ring around a treeHochheim, Hickson, Shoemaker, Hannigan

Button, Pluckie!

The Nigger in the woodpile-Eddie Garner.

What the second semester brought to first floor

So this is the way you get your lessons?

Gerweck and the Wielages

Stone Steinberg Joder Jones

Pig-skin flat!


P. D.

The old Mizzou

3/ 3-Miller, Jackson, Green

Second Floor

Dave His-self!

That reprobate, That ingrate, Waldo's Roommate!

Why, Moore and Banks! Starting in early, aren't you?

8 minus 6Lorimore and Sheldon

Willie, Marge and Bert

Mount of Flesh


Punch, Miller, Lewis

Yes, girls, those P Club fellows have to take it!

Nell and Max

Peru entertains M. I. N. K. contestants

Payne, Noa, Linville

Sunday Afternoon

This is the way Little Orville runs a machine

Wall can't mark Shaffer absent

Meet the Mrs. Hauptman

Sentinel Duty! Lock stepMarsh and Dunning


The Campus HeroOur Mailman!

You're framed, Martie

And we'll turn our memories back

Scrimmage

Ecologists-Haskins and King

A Rooshian Buggy RideMende

Millie and Tillie

W. A. A. picnic

Three Kings: Baron Laverick, Nero Novak and Louie 14th

Afternoon Sun


TWO BY TWO

Lora and Harold

June and Don

Rex and Mary

Kike and Davey

Jo and Red

Muckle and Max

Winter and Wands

Alice Mae and Freddie

Jennings and Michaels

Jim and Margaret


Where's the fish? Is it Ethie or Bill?

Hurry, Waldo!

Pin me up-

II

'S a rrnger, . say II

Snider and Haskins

Johnnie

Frankfurters

Glover and Blanchard

But B. never lost her smile

Where the little Puddle Jumper goes

Our KeepersVance and Dahlstrom


THE

1934

PERUV I A N

Sixty-Seven Years at Peru 1867-1934 The unskilled writer of history who is unable to temporize between the facts of history and the human aspects which give the facts meaning is forced to choose between them. One may easily learn the historical data concerning our school, stated as bare facts, but only by conscious, laborious effort can he learn the real significance of "Peru" as it may be read into these facts by the story of the efforts of those who have labored to make this school a worthwhile institution. A history of our school as it should be would be the story of different personalities interwoven into one grand pattern. The facts may only be interpreted in such a way. Institutions, however great, are not of themselves something; institutions do not have ideals and aspirations, hopes and fears; these exist only in the minds of the people who compose them. To say that J. M. McKenzie was the first principal of the school is little; to know his ideas and ideals as a Christian gentleman is to understand the early life of the school. It is impossible, or at least inaccurate, to assign the founding of our school to any particular person. Peru is the result of the labors of many, of the strivings of a group, not of an individual. But of course some figured more prominently than others, and the story hinges upon them. The settlement of Peru began about 1855, the year after the organization of Nebraska as a territory. It grew up as the result of the establishment of a boat landing, and was named "Peru" by some settlers from Peru, Illinois. It was one of the earliest towns in the territory, and it grew rather rapidly, soon becoming a thriving little center of trade. For it served in trade an increasing number of people, having access to the river transportation of the days . It goes without saying that life in the frontier town was crude, but some of the far-seei ng and progressive spirits were looking toward the future, and as early as 1860 a charter was granted by the territorial legislature for the estab lishment of a school of college grade in Peru. Time passed, however, and for five years the seed which was to be the college lay dormant. Then the seed began to sprout; through a series of incidents an interest in a school was renewed. Reverend Hiram Burch, pastor of the Methodist C hurch in Peru, came to Maior William Daily and asked for a subscription to a fund for a new church building. Previously, in 1862, Mr. J. M . McKenzie, of Upper Iowa University, had come to Nebraska with the ambition of establishing an institution of higher learning; he had, by great effort, begun an academy in Pawnee City and was enioying some degree of success. Maior Dai ly was the Indian agent for a tribe of Otoes west of Pawnee City, and he frequently visited the academy on his trips to and from the agency. He thus became interested in establishi ng such a school in Pe ru. Therefore, when Reverend Burch solicited his aid for the church building, he refused, saying that he would gladly contribute to a school fund instead-adding that the school could be used for church purposes. He was active in interesting others in the idea, and finally it gained a sufficient number of converts, including Reverend Burch, and a board of trustees was appointed to carry forward the work of raising funds and beginning the construction. It was planned to establish the school and offer it to the Methodist conference as a seminary. As a suitable location was needed, Dr. J. F. Neal, Reverend Burch, and Mrs. C . B. McKenzie donated sixty acres of land to the trustees; Maior Daily also contributed indirectly. It was planned to erect a three-story building of brick and stone, and as a site the top of the hill where the Mount Vernon Dormitory now stands was chosen. The cornerstone for the building was laid in the spring of 1866, when eight thousand dollars had been secured by the trustees. There was nothing inviting or hospitable about the site of the school then. The hills were covered with shrubbery, with only here and there an occasional tree, and over all wild life was abundant. The true beauty of the location was not appreciated until later. The work of the building proceeded slowly for various reasons. There was some difficulty encountered in collecting the subscriptions. Suitable materials for the erection of a large building were difficult to secure. When cold weather set in late in the fall, the difficulties were multiplied, but the work continued. Meanwhile, because of the enthusiasm, the educational work had begun. Mr. J. M. McKenzie was elected principal and Mrs . C. B. McKenzie preceptress, and the first term began late in August, 1866, 125


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

Sixty-Seven Years at Peru 1867-1934 The men who have successively held the president's chair are: J. M. McKenzie, 1866-1871; H. H. Straight, 1871; A. D. Williams, 1871-1872; Gen. T. J. Morgan, 1872-1874; Rev. Azel Freeman , 18741875; S. R. Thompson, 1875-1877; Robert Curry, 1877-1883; G. L. Farnham, 1883-1893; A. W. Norton, 1893-1896; J. A. Beattie, 1896-1900; W. A. Clark, 1900-1904; J. W. Crabtree, 1904-1910; D. W. Hayes, 1910-1918; E. L. Rouse, 1918-1922; and A. L. Caviness, 1922-1923. Since August of 1923, W. R. Pate has held the office of president. Temporary arrangements have been made at times in the presidency. Each of these men has contributed his part toward making the school what it is. A desirable tendency may be noted in the trend toward a longer period in office for the president. This makes possible the carrying forward of a consistent educational policy. The growth of the school has not been a steady and uninterrupted one. There have been periods of "hard times" for the school as well as for society in general, but each period of hardship has been succeeded by a spurt upward-beyond any frevious achievement of the school. The periods of hardship may easily be discerned in any survey o the school's publications, just as the history of a tree may be read in its annual rings. The story of the growth of the school may also be read in the increase in the amount of its equipment, from one poorly furnished building to the present group of modern and attractive buildings. The original structure was further conditioned by an appropriation of ten thousand dollars in 1869, but the need was soon felt for more classroom space. Accordingly, the money was appropriated, the work begun, and the new four-story building, which came to be known as "Old Normal Hall," was completed and dedicated in 1873. It occupied the space that the new science building now occupies. Later, in 1885, it was enlarged, a "wing" being added where the auditorium now stands. This was followed in 1887 by the erection of a frame library. This arrangement sufficed in most respects for a decade; then the original building was destroyed by fire, and was replaced the same year by the Mount Vernon Dormitory. About 1900 began the steady growth which has continued ever since. In 1901 the athletic field and greenhouse were added to the school's equipment. A critical point in the school's history came in 1903, when there was discussion as to whether the school should be maintained. The securing of an appropriation for a new chapel and gymnasium building was the deciding point. The new building was dedicated in 1905. Meanwhile work was also in progress on a new library building, which was completed in 1906. The old library was doubled in size, brick veneered, and equipped as a science building. Then the need was felt for a new administration building, and in 1909 the appropriation was secured. Two years later the present administration building was completed. In 1915 plans were made for the T. J. Majors building; this was completed in 1917. In the early part of the last decade the present auditorium was constructed on the site of the south wing of "Old Normal Hall." The chapel and gymnasium building was remodeled so that it could be devoted largely to athletics. Two of the more recent and finest buildings were completed in 1929the science building, on the site of "Old Normal Hall," and the girls' dormitory, named for Eliza Morgan, whose services as preceptress in the school's early history will long be remembered. Some important matters in the growth of the school 's scope of activities and status in the educational world should be observed. As early as 1873 the summer school sessions were begun-to accommodate those who could not attend the regular term. There has been considerable shifting in the lengths of the school's terms at times, however. In 1915 the school was admitted to membership in the North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, with the status of a teacher training institution, and in 1932 it was transferred from this status to that of a regular college. One of the major events in the history of the school took place in 1922. At this time, by act of the state legislature, Peru Normal School became the Peru Teachers College, with the right of issuing the A. B. degree in education-in addition to the one and two-year certificates. Traditions, mighty as the hills among which they were builded, are the heritage of all who go out from Peru. To uphold these is their privilege. To instill in your minds a solemn reverence for them is the purpose of this chronicle of a year's activities and its background. 127


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

KATTY KORNER The Bobcat walked out of his cage, sat down, flicked an ear and yawned. You'd yawn too if you had to look at what he does day after day, year after year. Peru collegians are queer, almost as queer as Peru faculty. Licking a paw he remarked, "Things don't change. Why, back in 1913 somebody asked in the 'Normalite' how many hours of credit one got for attending the Mount Vernon lectures. "You should read the poetry of 191 0"-and with an aesthetic sigh he caught a tear on the tip of his tongue and began, " 'May I print a kiss upon your lips? She nodded her sweet permission, So they went to press, And I rather guess They printed a whole edition.'Just like they do on that bench by my cage today." Again the Bobcat flicked his ear. There must be something bothering him-something in that ear. Scratching it thoughtfully he suddenly thrust his paw inside and brought forth a book all bound in Blue and White-such a huge book and such a little ear; but, oh, what it must have heard! "My record of 1934 to pass on to '35," he cried and began to read in a wailing tone,

"By Their Words Shall Ye Know Them" "Ladies and Gentlemen . . ." "Gentlemen on the front row, please." "Er-ah." "You'd better quit using your book as a pillow." "Pardon the personal reference, but "When I was in Whichita . . ." "I 'll grant you that"-though. "It makes my Susie seem so inadequate." "I have two announcements." "There'll be a college dance. This is the first one we've been able to have without anything on." "Wagon Wheels!!!-o-!!!" "The Training School band will now give its dress rehearsal without the dress." "Here comes Heck." "We will continue from this poi[lt tomorrow." "Convocation is now dismissed." "Adjourned." 128


THE

1934

PERUVIAN

KATTY KORNER Shaking his head from side to side the Bobcat read the clippings he'd cut from "Peds," picked up from passers-by as they cast their remarks and jibes, and we copied them down as he read. A new degree has been granted on the campus this year-P. A. was awarded Winter, Coatney, Nabors and Norwood . A Pedagogian ad: Any old bottles, horns, or pictures-especially pictures will be heartily accepted and proper settlement made.-Adv. Deluxe Picture Snatcher Corporation, John Samuel Fostetti , president. Knows Aue Hears Aue Sees Aue -Jackson Mrs. Dunning: "Bonita , it's time for all freshmen to come in." Shrader: "Just a second." Mrs. Dunning: "And if I'm not mistaken there's already been a third and a fourth." Mr. Nabors (coming upon Marjorie Young playing the clarinet): "What was that piece you just played?" Marj.: "'Drink to Me Only with Thine Eyes.' " D. J.: "That must have after the drink!" With a tear in his voice he read on: Headlines from the Peru Pedagogian: DEBATE HELD IN CHAPEL Stately court ceremony followed by Dancing and Judging of costumes. ----perhaps Monday? GIRLS CHOOSE QUEEN OF HEARTS Waldo and Shumard on the affirmative. Whiting and Johnson negative. Perhaps the "Peek" of a "Doig's" life isn't so bad after all, and the Bobcat took time out for another of his aesthetic sighs. 129


PERU STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE

• THIS COLLEGE IS MAINTAINED BY THE STATE OF NEBRASKA TO PREPARE NEBRASKA TEACHERS

• Well equipped laboratories-extensive librarycompetent instructional staff offering courses of college grade make this college the ideal place for teacher training .

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-.

((For want of a nail the shoe was lost'' -Poor Richard Almanac 1758

â&#x20AC;˘ BEN] AMIN FRANKLIN- Master

Printer-- believed that perfection was attained by attention to details. Between good presswork and perfect presswork there stands a vital detail. Be sure your next Annual is protected and perfect satisfaction assured by having it printed and bound at . . .

â&#x20AC;˘ Economy Advertising Co. lOWA CITY, lOW A

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... ............ ............................................. FOR HEALTHY MINDS AND BODIES EAT FRESH FRUITS TWICE DAILY

â&#x20AC;˘ GEORGE F. BURT & CO. LINCOLN, NEBRASKA

You can lead a horse to water, but a pencil must be lead. The Bobcat lifted an eyebrow and went on: We heard that Max Robertson made a slight error the other night. It is agreed now that "Muckle" will NOT carry a flashlight. Louis Thompson : " Haven't I seen yo u somewhere?" Dana S.: "No, I haven't been anywhere!"

............................................................ STYLE WITHOUT EXTRAVAGANCE Pay Us a Visit While in Nebraska City

F. W. CLEVELAND AND SONS

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A Deluxe Line of ....

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CLASS RECORDS TEACHERS PLAN BOOKS ATTENDANCE REGISTERS DIPLOMAS CERTIFICATES

• HAMMOND & STEPHENS CO. FREMONT, NEBRASKA

'

.......................................................... . Licking his paw, Bob turn ed a page, a nd gave voice to anot he r of his li te rary achieveme nts, dedicatin g it to Michaels: My ste nographi c f rie nd She's just t he type . Dr. Maxwell: "Why don't yo u finish correcting that test?" Perry: " It says to stop and wai t for f urt her instructions."

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CARSON NATIONAL BANK A Reliable Bank AUBURN, NEBRASKA

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PETERSON STUDIO PERU and AUBURN NEBRASKA

* WE ARE PLEASED TO REFER YOU TO THE ILLUSTRATIONS IN THIS PUBLICATION AS SAMPLES OF OUR

PHOTOGRAPHS

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... ................................................... ..... .

PERU BAKERY

• "QUALITY PRODUCTs··

• PERU, NEBRASKA

.............. .............................................. Convocation, February 19: Mrs. Dunning-If you know what I "Means." The Bobcat cocked his head and said, " Does that train whistle 1n Peru just to keep up its cou rage?" Gehling: "How do they grow these injected frogs?" "-and he seemed like such a nice boy," and the Bobcat brushed a tear aside.

LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING

THE FAMILY FAVORITE

GREENE'S ICE CREAM Ask any answer is have but our lives, we'd

member of the family-the always the same. If we could one dessert for the rest of we'd not only want to, but almost have to choose

Done the Right Way and At Popular Prices

NEBRASKA CITY LAUNDRY

GREENE'S ICE CREAM

D. P. Helm, Agent

Always Good

NEBRASKA CITY, NEBR.

GREENE 'S ICE CREAM FACTORY Nebraska C ity, Nebraska

Trips to Peru Wednesday & Saturday I0 Years Service to Peru

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135

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IOOo/o INVESTMENT "No Speculation" Your Future Earning Power Has Value IF You Have a Future LIFE INSURANCE REMOVES THAT "IF"

• BANKERS LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OF NEBRASKA F. L. McPHERRIN, Gen. Agt .

AUBURN, NEBRASKA

...

............................................................ "When a man thinks he has wings sprouting he should brush his coat, it may be lint."-Dean Delzell in the Normalite, 1913. Dr. Winter reports his baby to be a howling success with full scream lining. Geo . Gates: " How do you feel?" Coll ins: "Ripping. How are you?" Gates: "Oh, sew, sew."

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• COMPLETE GRADUATION SERVICE

• • • •

• • •

Class Jewelry - Trophies - Announce· ments - Personal Cards - Annual Awards - Yearbook- Albums -Caps and Gowns- Diplomas.

RICE & THOMAS • •

418-19 Kresge Bldg .

LINCOLN

We Are Proud to Have Known An d Served You

· Seright Publication · Bureau •

Under Milstead's "IT PAYS TO LOOK WELL"

C. G. Kingsolver Under Barnes' Pharmacy

• 136

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. ... . ... . ... ...

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THE PERU STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE

Dormitory Dining Room Serves Butternut ... Coffee Exclusively: Also Butternut ..

.. ... ... ... . ... .. .

Salad Dressing, Butternut Jell and Paxton & Gallagher Fancy Goods

F. J. GILBERT

. ... . ... . ... ... .. ..

Manager Dining Room

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Dr .. Coat ney : "What do you do Arbor Day?" Irwin: "Sleep."

Miss Tear: " Everything's so fresh an d gree n in Peru." Sul livan: " Did you hu rt you r head?" Hi le: " Do you t hink I look like t hi s all t he ti me!"

·-

............................................ . .: A Good Clean Tasty Bite We Take This Opportunity of ... Served Just Right Wishing You the Best .. of Good Luck . . ... . • .. .. WARMANS . • .. BOB KNAPP'S .. STEAK SHOPPE PERU, NEBRASKA

BARBER SHOP . I~•. .j•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

~ · ~ · ·~ ·~ · ·~·~ ·~ · ·N:·~ · ~ · ·~·1/< · ·~·~ ·~ · ·~·~ ·~ · ·N:·~ · ~ ·

137


A Final Good Wish

A VENUE STORE

We take this opportunity to extend to all of you friends the best of good luck. When you are comfortably situated-years from nowremember "Old Peru" and with Old Peru remember the "Little Store" downtown where you used to buy your school needs. When in need of DIAMONDS, Watches, Silverware or that Degree pin you couldn't afford in 1934 . . . Remember, order backWe still will save you money.

. ~

We are glad to welcome our old and new friends to Peru and hope to be of some service to you. SCHOOL and COLLEGE SUPPLIES, Confectionery, Fruits, Lunch Goods , Groceries and Fresh Meats. Our lunch counter is a good place for hot or cold drinks, sandwiches and ice cream. The handy place to trade opposite the Training School.

CHATELAtN•s JEWELRY

H. U. LANDOLT 73 Phone 78

In Business in Peru for 37 Years

PERU, NEBR.

............................. ............................ . ............................................................ Shumard: "Some people are born great, others achieve greatness Waldo: "And some just grate upon you! " What did the goldfish say to the cat?- Ask Novak. "Do you know," the Bobcat said, "I've discovered the unpardonable s1n. -To publish a Pedagog ian without a joke about Rex and Mary."

............................................................ ............................................................ NEBRASKA CITY BOTTLING WORKS COCA COLA BOTTLERS Quality and Service Always

Sanitation First

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139


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REDFERN·s STORE We Thank Your Class of '34 for Your Business and Appreciate Your Patronage and Good Will COME IN ANYTIME- YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME

L. D. REDFERN

............................................................ ............................................................ CASH HAS NO ENEMY We Want You to Come In and Look Our Complete Stock Over We Have Something New Every Week It Will Save You Money BARGAINS EVERY DAY

·-

T. C. COLLINS ............................................ Phone 114-115

PERU, NEBRASKA

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Pulling a whisker, the Bobcat went on . Dr. Coatney: "We really don't know what death is or when a person 's dead- Some I'm sure are dead and still come to class." She 's only a photographer's daugher. She sits in a dark room and waits developments.-Ped .

............................................................ : ......................... : ............................. . VISIT ~ .

Ladies· and Gents• Furnishings

~

. THE BOBCAT INN

YOUR PATRONAGE APPRECIATED

FOR

.

0. J. MILSTEAD

TASTY LUNCHES

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Serving Peru Students for 2 I Years

140

E. P. COLLIN, Prop.


BARNEs· PHARMACY The Faculty and Students Supply Store

i

30 Years in Peru And Again We Thank You •

PERU

THE REXALL STORE

i

NEBRASKA

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FINEST LINE OF QUALITY READY-TO-WEAR AT LOWEST PRICES Eckomoor-Printzess-Famous Nelly Don For Men-Stetson Hats-Interwoven Socks

L. WESSEL·s SONS & CO . NEBRASKA CITY, NEBRASKA ...........................................................

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Be like t he grave digger. Throw yourself into yo ur wo rk. Tillie : "My shoes are just killi ng my feet." Sir Morte m: "They 're kill ing mine too." F. Martin: "Do you remembe r t he nig ht I made such a fool of myself in the lobby? " Winter: "Which night?"- and t he Bobcat sa id somethi ng about an overcoat!

. . ............................. -~ . ··········. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • <t>v

You Can't Afford Not to Paint

Boomers Mid-Western Teachers Agency

• Pittsburgh Plate

30 1-302 Kresge Bldg.

Glass Co.

LINCOLN, NEBRASKA

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........... .. ... ............... .. ...... ..........

FARMERS ELEVATOR COMPANY COAL. GRAIN AND FEED C. C. COATNEY

W. H. HUTCHINSON

Phone 19

.... .... ........ .. .............................. ........... .................................................. Music hath charms - ask Dale Nicholls!

Even the PERUVIAN staff is

applying for an hour of credit in Music depreciation after a year of violin s t o the right of them!

Cornets to the left of them!

Clarinets above them ,

and Pianos below them! St. Peter: " How did you get here? " Citizen: "Flu ." A dvice to a prospective school teacher . . . " Vier" not a " Penney" f rom your goal.

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............................................................ ............................. Say Peter Pan Bread to Your Grocery Man

Dr. N. S. Harajian DENTIST Res. 32

Phone

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"FROM

A FRIEND"

142

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MODERN EQUIPMENT Electric and Acetylene Welding

:

AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR WORK OF ALL KINDS

:• :

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. :. PRYORS GARAGE :. • PHONE 77 ............................................................ .• .. ............................................... ......... . ~ PERU CLEANERS AND TAILORS ... .. Dry Cleaning and Pressing .. .. Hat Blocking ... JOHN A. CEJKA, Prop . Phone 62 .. . ............................... .. ......................... ... Glen H. Joder ..: Dr.Physician .: F. M. MERRICK .: and Surgeon .. . • ..• . ... • Optometrist : ... .: . . • ..• ..• ... • : AUBURN, NEBRASKA ..: .. . .. .. .. LANCASTER BRAND PRODUCTS .. . The Family Flavored Kind Are Served in the DINING ROOM ... at the COLLEGE at All Times .. .. LANCASTER PACKING CO . . LINCOLN, NEBRASKA ... .. The Home of Meat Products . ............................................................ .

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•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 0 ~~~

Offices in Ground Floor of Telephone Building

Res. 39

Phone

Office 33

•••••••••••••••••••••••

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143

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r:;;. . . . . . . . .: ·~;~~~· ~~·~· ~·~~·;~ ~~~

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ALWAYS SEEN

*

CRYSTAL THEATRE

AT THE

• •

WE TRY TO PLEASE

W. S. WHITFIELD, Mgr.

PERU, NEBRASKA

.•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• .

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Denney (Hitch-hiking home): Hi, Mac." Bothwell: "Mac who?" Bob: "Mac Truck."

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Wanted: A cartoonist to draw a sketch of Dale Nicholls next time he starts playing Tarzan in that tree in front of Collins Apartment.-Ped.

Acd th, Bobcot got "P ocd wolk,d owoy.

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IN APPR ECIATION OF WHAT THE GRADUATES OF 1934 HAVE GIVEN TO OUR COMMUNITY

• PERU LUMBER CO. PETER HOLDORF, Mgr.

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ADVERTISERSâ&#x20AC;˘ INDEX Artcrafts Engraving Co., St. Joseph, Missouri ........... . .. . . . . 139 Bankers Life Insurance Co. of Nebraska, Auburn , Nebraska ....... 136 Barnes' Pharmacy, Peru, Nebraska. . . . ................. . 141 Boomers Midwestern Teachers Agency, Lincoln, Nebraska . . 141 Burt, George F. and Co., Lincoln , Nebraska . . ............. ... .. 132 Carson National Bank, Auburn , Nebraska ............... ... .... 133 Cejka , John A., Peru, Nebraska . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...... . .. . .. 143 Chatelain's Jewelry, Peru, Nebraska . . ... . ....... 138 Cleveland and Sons , Nebraska City, Nebraska . . . . 132 Collin, E. P., Peru, Nebraska ......................... . .. 140 Collins, T. C., Peru, Nebraska .... . ............ . . . .... 140 Crystal Theatre, Peru, Nebraska .... .. .... .. . . . .. ............. 144 Economy Advertising Co., Iowa City, Iowa . . . . . ......... . ..... 131 Farmers Elevator Co., Peru, Nebraska . .. ...... . ...... . ....... . 142 Friend , From a ............ . . . ......................... . .. . . 142 Greene's Ice Cream Factory, Nebraska City, Nebraska ...... . ... 135 Hammond and Stephens Co., Fremont, Nebraska ....... .. . . .... 133 Harajian, Dr. N. S., Peru, Nebraska ....... . .. .......... .. ..... 142 Joder, Dr. Glen H. , Peru, Nebraska ... ..... . .................. 143 Kingsolver, C. G., Peru , Nebraska ..... . ......... . ... .. .... . . . 136 Knapp Barber Shop, Peru, Nebraska .... . ... . . ... .. . . ... . . . . . .. 137 Lancaster Packing Co. , Lincoln, Nebraska .. ........ . .... . . ..... 143 Landolt, H. U. , Peru, Nebraska . . ... . ... ... . . . ...... 138 Merrick, F. M., Auburn , Nebraska ........... .... . . . ....... . .. 143 Milstead, 0. J ., Peru , Nebraska . . . . . . .......... 140 Nebraska City Bottling Works, Nebraska City, Nebraska ... . . . . . 138 Nebraska City Laundry, Nebraska City, Nebraska . ...... ........ 135 Paxton and Gallager, F. J. Gilbert, Mgr. Dining Hall P.S.T.C ... ... 137 Peru Bakery, Peru, Nebraska. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Peru Lumber Co., Peru, Nebraska .............. .... .. . ... .. ... 144 P. S. T. C. Administration, Peru , Nebraska . . . . . . .......... 130 Peter Pan Bread .. . . . . .. . .. ........... . .. . .. . ............... 142 Peterson Studios, Peru and Auburn , Nebraska ..... ....... . . .... . 134 Pittsburg Plate Glass Co. , Omaha, Nebraska .. . . . . . . ... .... .. . .. 141 Pryor's Garage, Peru , Nebraska ......... .. ..... ... ....... . ... 143 Redfern, L. D. , Peru, Nebraska .......... . ..... .. ....... . ...... 140 Rice and Thomas , Peru , Nebraska . ... .. .......... .. .. . ...... . . 136 Seright Publication Bureau, Lincoln , Nebraska ... . .. ........ .. ... 136 Warman's Steak Shoppe, Peru, Nebraska . . . . .. . .. .. ...... 137 Wessel's Sons and Co. , Nebraska City, Nebraska ............. . .. 141

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INDEX A

Blount, Harold , 34, 87 Boatman, Winnona , 42 Bole, Clyde , 20 Borcher, Eva , 42 Bothwell, Gail , 42 Bottorff, Ruth, 30 Bowen, Ch este r, 30 , I 04 Boyer, Homer, 34, 67 Brackney, Ida Mae, 14 Brandt, Ruth G., 14, 84 Branson, Libbie A., 14 Brenner, Dorothy, 26, 71 , 87 Briggs , Marjorie, 42 Brooker, Helen , 26, I 04 Brooks , Lucille, 42 Brown, C. M., 14, 83 Brown , G. W. , 5 Buehler, Orville , 20, 75 , 78, 82, 90 Bunting , Billie, 36 , 87 Burbridge, Dorothy, 44 Burbridge , Euni ce, 34 , 96 Burke, William , 42 Burney, Wayn e, 34 Burn s, Ra chel, 42 Burn s, Ruth , 42 Burns, WaIter, 42

Able, Ruth, 44 Activities Debate, Dramatics , 99-102 Music , 93-98 Publications , I 03-107 Adam s, Hazel, 44 Adam s, Warren , 42 Adam son, Ra chael Mae, 30, 79 , 87 Ahlberg , Ruth, 14 Albert, Lavi sa, 20, 87 Albri ght, Rachael, 26 Allen, Dorothy, 42 Anderson, Lawrence, 44 Andrews, Faye, 42 Andrew s, Lanning, 34, 57 , 61, 64 Andrews, Mabel , 26 Anville , Frank , 42 Arnold, Lucille, 42 Ashton , Jack, 34 Athletics Basketball, 61-62 Directors , 56 Football, 57-60 History, 69 Life Saving , 67 Pep Band , 56 Phi Lambda Alpha, 64 Tennis, 68 Track, 63 W. A. A., 66 Aue , Paul, 36, 87 Aue , Pauline, 36 Ault, Kenneth, 34 Auxier, Ali ce, 30, 78 , 86 Ayres, Marguerite, 36 , 87, 90

c Calland, Warren, 34, 67 Campbell, George E., 20 Campbell, Mildred, 44 Campbell , Venus, 20 Carlisle , Dorotha, 36 Carmichael, Robert , 34, 57 , 61, 64 Casey, Margaret, 36, 66 Cavey, Mildred , 36, 66, 90 Cawthorne, Dorothy, 36 , 72 , 87 Charvat, Zd enka, 30, 84, 87 Cha se, N orma, 36 Chastain, Hazel , 30, 87 Chatelain, Ruth , 36, 87 Christian , Mae, 34 Christian , Robert , 34 Clark, Esther Ann, 14, 84 Clarke, La Ree , 34 Classes Freshmen, 35-42 Junior, 25-28 Senior, 20-24 Soph omore, 29-34 Clary , Glen , 44 Clayburn, A. B., 14, 75, 83 Clements, S. L., 14, 80, 90 Coatney, Marguerite , 34 C ockeram, Genevieve , 37, 87 Cole , Leroy , 20, 87 Cole , Robert , 42 Collin , Thomas, 20, 71, 87, I 06 Collins, Madlyn , 34 Collins, Marjorie, 42 Color Song, 98 Col so n, Leona, 34

B Baker, Barney K., 14 Baltensperger, Carl, 42 Baltensperger, Reg ula , 42 Banks, Merrill , 34, 61 , 64, 67 , 87 Barisas , Tillie, 20, 86 Barker, Doris, 42 Barnes, Thelma, 34 Barnts , Corinne , 36 , 87, 90 Barrett, Jeannette, 20, 71, 84 Barstler, Velma , 34 Bartling , Elizabeth , 34 , 72 , 74 Beachler, Floy, 42 Bearce, Twila , 34 Beck, Nellie , 36 Beckham, Eugene, 42 Becker, John , 42 Benford , R. T., 14, 80 Bentzinger, Ruth , 36, 87 Bergman , Eunice , 42 , 66 Bevan , Ruby , 36 Bicknell, Lucille, 36 Bisgard , Alice Mae, 30, 86, 106 Blanchard , Everett, 36 , 87 Blount, Donald , 26, 78

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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146

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.. ......... .. ............................................... Cook, Claude, 42 Cook, Gilbert, 20, 64, 67 , 87, 90 Cook, Luena, 37 Cope, Melba , 20 , 66, 84 Cornelius, Leah Ruth, 30 Coulter, Glenna , 42 Coulter, Robert, 44 Cowel , Burdette, 20, 57 , 64 Cowl es, G erald , 42 Crandell, Clarence, 30 Crawford, Ethelyn, 30, 84, 87 Crawford, John, 34 Critchfield, Rosalie , 34 Cross , Lowell, 34

G Gaines, Opal, 26, 71, 72, 86 Gaines , Orville, 31, 67, 86 Gaines, Stephen, 59 Gard , Blanche A., 15 Garner, Edward, 37 , 87 Gates, George , 34, 67 Gehling, John, 31, 67, 87 Genzlinger, Darrell , 31 Gerweck, Edna, 37 Gewecke, Dorothea , 37 , 90 Gibbs, lone , 31, 84, 90 Gilbert, Helen, 2 1, 80, 87, 96 Gilkeson, Glen , IS , 56 Gillilan, Orland, 31 Gilliland , Ruth, 42 Gingles, Roy, 21 , 78 Glasson , Beth , 42 Glover, Ross, 37, 75, 88 Gockley, Elma 1., 15 Goding , Marietta, 34 Goerke, Bernard, 31 , IOS Go it, Clayton, 21, 59, 64 Gorder , Martha, 34, 67 Graham , Gera, 34 Graham, Isabel, 37, 88 Graves , Ruth, 42 Green, Bonnie, 38 , 88 Green, Eileen , 38, 88 Griffin , Keith , 42 Groeshomme , Edith, 34 Grubb, Joyce , 21, 83, 84, 86 Grubb , Ronald, 38

D Dahlstrom, Daisy, 34 Danczak, Laura , 34 Dartin g, Beryl, 34, 66, 67 Dasher, Flora , 21 , 83 Davey, Helen , 30, 66, 67, 86 Da vis , Evelyn , 30, 71 , 72 Davidson, Phyllis , 14, 66 , 67, 71 Deaver, Doris, 34, 66, 67 , 87 Delzell, W. N., 14 Denney, Maxine , 37, 87 Denney, Robert, 42 Dewey, Lucille, 37, 86 Dickerson, Lora , 26 , 72, 84 Diddell, Norma L., 14, 84 Doig , Pearl Jean, 34, 71 Donner, Marj orie , 37 , 87, 90 Drake , Marvin , 30, 78 , 87, 105 Dunkle, Lesli e, 37 Dunlap, Hartley , 30 Dunning , lnice, 14, 80, 84

H Hacker , Carol , 31 Hageman , Freda Mae , 21 Hall, Avery, 34 Hallenbech, Barbara, 34 Hanlon, Ruth, 34, 66, I09 Hannigan, Betty, 26 Hansen, Dorothy, 38, 88 Hansen, Mabel, 42 Harkins, Butler, 31, 88 Harney, Harriett, 31 , 72, 90 Harkendorff, 42 Harris , Arthur , 34, 64 Harris, Francis, 34 Harris , Mary Dallas , 42, 67 Harris , Robert , .44, I06 Harvey , Frances , IS, 83 Haskins , Camilla , 31 , 66, 67 , 88, 104 Haskins , George, 26, 75, 78, 80, 88 Hauptman , Joy, 26 Hauschild, Harry, 42 Hauser, William, 21, 78, 86 Hawkins, Vivian, 26 Hayward , E. H., IS Hayward, Verna , 42 Heck , Frank H., IS , 83 Heiser, Fern, 38 Hertz, Eugene, 24, 59, 64 Heywood , Kenneth, 34 Hickson, Laura, 34

E Edie, Ardis, 26 Ehmen, Helene , 30, 90 Emigh , Lawrence, 42 Emmert, Maxine , 37 Engblom , Edna , 37, 90 Epley, Albert, 34 Ethington , Melvin , 34, 57 , 61 , 64 Erwin , Mary Lee, 42 Evans, Land o n, 42

F Faculty, 13-18 Faulhaber, Marie H. , 15 Feature Section, 108 Fentiman , Viola, 30 Filley, Hubert , 21 , 78, 79 , 82, 86 Filmer, Mildred , 37 Fisher, Harold, 31 , 75 Fisher, LaVerne, 42 Fisher, Wendell, 34, 57 , 61, 64, 87 Fiatt, Roberta Jean, 42 Forney, Maxine, 42 Foster, John, 34, 71 , 79, 90, I06 Frazier, Kathleen, 42 Freeouf, Norma , 37 Freese, Alma, 37

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... ........ ............. .............................. ...... Knisley, H elen, 38 Knouse, Janice, 42 Konig , Selma S., 15 Kraft, Ivan, 42 Kratz , Richard , 38 Krcal , Ruth , 38 Kuhl, George, 34, 88 Kuwitzky, Gail, 31, 86

Hile , Ethel, 42 Hileman , Mary L., 15, 74, 80, 83 Hill, A. L. , 15, 78 Hinchey, Bettie, 31 History Athletics , 69 General, 125-127 Organizations, 91 Hochheim , Evelyn , 26, 74 Hogue, Doris, 26, 78, 105 Holsclaw, Evelyn , 42 Hopp, Ralph, 42 Hosterman , George , 42 Hottle , Clarice, 42 Howard , George E., 19 Howe , Ruth, 42 Howorth, Hardin , 42 Hoyt Hall , 8 Huck , C. A. , 15, 78 Huddleston , Melba, 42 , 67 Huebner, Hilda, 42 Hull , Marjorie, 34 Hunzeker, Loren, 27, 78, 79, 105 Hunzeker, Lorena, 31 Hunzeker, Lyle, 27, 80, 88 Hurd , Dorothy , 42 Hurlbutt, Raymond, 42 Hurst, Reynold, 42

L Lambert, Vivian , 39, 88 Lare, Clyde, 32 Larson, A. V., 16, 71 Laverick, Wayne, 42 Lawrence, J. 0., 16 Leahy, Percy, 44 Leech, Erma, 42 Lewis, Lowell, 34, 59, 62, 64 Lien , Walter, 42 Lima , Catherine, 27 Lindstrom, C. R., 16 Linville, Helen, 27, 84, 88, 90 Livingston , Beulah, 32 Loken, Evelyn, 32 Loken, Harvey, 34, 59, 64 Loken , Lenn, 34 Loney, Helen, 34 Lorbeer, Ernest, 16, 56 Lorimor, June, 39, 66 , 88 Lueck, Ethel, 39 Luse, Claudia, 22, 71, 72, 83, 90, 110 Luttman, H arold, 34, 59, 64 Lyon, M ona L., 16, 80 Lyon, Opal, 42

Irwin , Anna , 15 Irwin, Marion, 34

J Jackson, Gwendolyn , 38, 88 James, Wilma , 27, 80, 84, 104 Jarvis, Maxine, 38, 88 Jeffries, Wilma, 21, 80, 84 Jennings, Dorothy , 31, 72 , 74, 79 Jensen , Anne , 24 Jindra, V. H., 15, 94 Joder, Ruth, 38 Johnson, Beulah , 21, 74 Johnson, Cecil, 42 Johnson, Margaret, 38 , 88 Johnson , Virginia, 38, 90 Jones, Evelyn, 38, 88, 90 Jones, Mabie, 21, 83, 90 Joy, Eileen, 38

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M

K Kaminska , Alice, 34 Katty Korner, 128-129 Kellogg, Henry, 42 Kelso, Kenneth, 44 Kenton , Pearl A. , 15 Kerns, Friel , 42 Kerns, Max, 34 Kerr, Dorothy, 42 Kimsey , Kathryn , 31, 86 Kingsolver, Harriett A nn, 21 , 80, 83, 84 Kingsolver, Huston , 27 , 79 , 80, 82, 90, I 06 Klein, Keith, 38 Knapp, Alfred, 27, 75, 82, 88 Knapp, Donald, 34, 71, 78 , 88

McCann, Lloyd, 24, 80, 86, 102 McClellan, Grant, 32 , 75 , 83, 84 McClellan , Truma, 39, 88 McCollum , Elizabeth, 16 McCormick, Gail, 42 McCoy, H elene, 32, 72 Mc l nich, Louise, 44 McKenzie, C. B., 13 McKenzie, J. M., 12, 13 McKnight, Margaret, 42 Mc l ean, Leta, 39 Majors , Eleanor, . 34 Majors, Lora, 22, 83 Majors, T. J., 92 Majors , Wilson, E., 70 Marsh, Genevieve, 16 M artin, Charlotte, 39, 88, 90 Martin, M. Florence , 22, 80, 85, 90, 106, 112 Martin, Ruth, 39 Mason, Isabel, 16 Mathews, L. B., 16, 75 Maxwe ll , P. A., 16, 68, 80 May, Eleanor, 32, 90 May, Lois, 22, 72, 85 , 106 Maystrick , Dorothy , 39 , 88, 90 Maystrick, Edna, 22, 81, 83, 88, 90 Mead, Ruth, 39 Means, Eileen, 22, 66

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148


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.

• •••• • • •• •••••••••••••••• ~ ••••••••••••••• :

Meek, Edith, 22 Mehaffey, Ruth, 39, 90 Mendenhall, Mariorie, 22, 66, 67 Merchant, Edythe, 39, 90 Meredith, Lucille, 42 Metcalf, Lois, 22 Michels, Harvey, 34, 79 Miller, Berniece, 22, 81 Miller, Delbert, 34, 57, 64, 68, 78 Miller, Jack, 27 Miller, Marvin, 34 Miller, Miriam, 39, 88, 107 Mooney, Agnes, 39 Moore, Alfred, 42 Moore, Raymond, 32, 62, 64, 88 Moorehead, Anna, 19 Morgan, Eliza, 108 Moritz, R. D., 54 Mort, Clayburn, 32, 75, 88, 105 Mount Vernon and Eliza Morgan Halls, 7 Mueller, Frieda, 22, 81 Muncy, Virginia, 39 Mullen, Helen Claire, 32, 85, 86 Mullins, Mark, 90 Munn, Marian, 34, 66 Murphey, Janet E., 32

N Nabors, D. J., 16, 85, I 00, 102 Nation, Harold, 42 Naviaux, Lilla, 34, 66 Naviaux, Ruth, 34, 96 Nelson, Madeline, 39 Nelson, Mariorie, 22 Neman, John, 27, 78, 82 Newton, Ivan, 24, 64 Nicholls, Dale, 32 Niles, H azel, 23, 72, 85 Nixon, Dana, 34 Noa, Eloise, 27, 88 Noffke, Frank, 42 Norwood, P. H ., 16, 86 Novak, Charles, 42 Novotny, Velma, 34

p Pace, Kenneth, 27, 86, 90 Packard, Doris, 34, 74, 79 Padgitt, Vena, 42 Palmer, Nona M., 16 Pancake, Betty, 23, 85 Papez, Emilie B., 17 Parli, Mildred, 39 Parsons, Neal, 32, 105 Pascal, Louis, 40, 90 Pasco, Phyllis, 32, 79, 89 Pate, Robert, 23, 60, 64, 71, 78, 81, 82 Pate, W. R., 18, 81 Payne, Gwendolyn, 2 7, 81, 86 Payne, Helen, 40 Peek, Merl, 27, 60, 64, 75, 79, 81, 104, Ill Penney, Charles, 27, 60, 64, 67, 78, 82, 86 Penney, Merrill, 42 Penterman, Adele, 32, 79, 90 Perry, Lloyd, 23, 64 Petersen, Grace M., 17, 85, 89 Petri, Leo, 34 Pettinger, Inez, 23 Pierce, Maxine, 40, 89 Pike, Dale, 34, 60, 64 Plank, Beulah, 42 Pluck nett, William, 40, 90, I 02 Price, Edna, 42 Pugh, Eileen, 33 Pugh, Gwendolyn, 42, 66 Pugh, Orville, 44 Punches, Robert, 34, 60, 62, 64

R

0 Odell, Warren, 42 Organ (Perry), Faye, 32 Organizations Alpha Erudito, 90 Alpha Mu Omega, 78 Beta Beta Beta, 79 Everett Literary Society, 86 Freshman Clubs, 76, 77 Girls Club, 73 Kappa Delta Pi, 80, 81 Lambda Delta Lambda, 82 Philomathean Literary Society, 87, 88, 89 Pi Gamma Mu, 83 Sigma Tau Delta, 84, 85 Student Council and Social Committee, 72 Y. M. C. A., 75 Y. W. C. A., 74 Ostendorf, Earl, 32, 78

149

Railsback, Darrell, 34, 82, 89 Railsback, Henry, 33, 79, 89 Rarick, Josephine, 40 Rawson, Ernest, 42 Ray, Frances, 33, 89, 105 Redding, Wendell, 42 Reed, Wayne, 34 Reid, William, 34 Reiff, Grace, 33 Reisinger, Marion, 24 Remmers, Wiley, 42 Reynolds, Arthur, 42 Rhodes, Mary Katherine, 40, 89 Riggs, Wayne, 42, 60, 62, 64 Roberts, Helen, 40, 90 Robertson, Maxine, 34 Rogers, Josephine, 40, 66, 89 Rohrs, Fred, 33, 64, 68, 83, I 07 Rosacrans, Leonard, 42 Roszell, Kathryn, 42 Routh, Truxton, 28, 79 Rowan, Eugene, 44 Rowen, Darlene, 34 Rucksdashel, Rex, 23, 83, 102 Ryan, Marcella, 34

s Saathoff, Geneva, 40 Sailors, Avis, 40 Sailors, Lama, 40


Sailors, Victor, 42 Tyler, Gerald, 24, IOS Sandin, Anna Mae, 40, 89 Tyler, J. W., 17, 81, lOS Sayer, Robert, 34, 78, 82, 89 Tynon, John, 42 Schaffer, Muriel, 40, 90 Schmidt, Frances, 33, 72, 8S Ujcik, Georgina, 33 Schmitz, Evelyn, 42 Ulbrick, Alice, 34 Schneider, Bernice, 42 Schneider, Dana J., 23, 71, 78, 82, 89, 107, Vance, Paul, 24 I 13 Vaughn, Wilma, 34, 86 Schneider, Dorothy, 33 Velvick, Elmon, 44 Scolla, Anne, 40 Venhous, Aloys, 42 Scott, Louise, 34, 66, 67 Vickers, Eramus, 34 Seeger, Kathryn, 42 Viers, Rachael, 33 Setzer, LaVerne, 34, 66 Shafer, Elaine, 44 Waggoner, Langford, 23, 86 Shafer, LaVerne, 34, 72, 78, 89 Wagner, Alton, 28, 79, 81 Shafer, Nelsine, 42 Wakelin, Alice, 42 Sheeley, Irma, 42 Waldo, Dwight, 28, 71, 75, 81, 83, 8S, 89, Sheldon, Frances, 33 102, 107 Sherman, Richard, 40 Walker, Delbert, 28, 78 Shlaes, Vivian, 33, IOS Wall, Herbert, 34 Shoemaker, Margaret, 28, 81, 89 Wallin, Eleanor, 33, 89 Shrader, Bonita, 40, 86 Wands, Lawrence, 33,. 86 Shubert, Iva, 24 Ware, F. E., 17, 82, 107 Shubert, Moras, 23, 78, 79, 81, 82 Shumard, Willard, 28, 64, 67, 68, 83, 89, 102 Weare, Edna, 17, 74 Weare, Wayne, _34 Silence, Wilma, 23, 83, 96 Wellensick, Otto, 34 Slepicka, Evelyn, 41, 86 West, Dorothea, 17 Slinker, Jeanne, 41, 89,90 West, Juanita, 34 Smith, Howard, 34 West, Lawrence, 42, 68 Smith, G. W ., 17, 8S West, Wayne, 34 Smith, Margaret, 4 1 Wheatley, John, 24 Snapshots, 114-124 Wheeler, Lydia Mae, 4 1, 7 1, 89, 90 Snider, Lloyd, 42 Wheeler, Mildred, 24, 81, 89 Sorrell, Charles, 42 Wheeler, Raymond, 34 Sorrell, Robert, 41 White, Hubert, 34 Specht, Faye, 42 White, Lucille, 28, 72 Speedie, Mildred, 33, 74, 8S, 90, 107 Wiebe, Dorothy, 34 Speich, Helen, 41 Wiechman, Leona, 41,90 Spurgin, Albert, 42 Wielage, Lucile, 42 Stastny, Arline, 41, 89 Wielage, Mae, 34 Steck, G. H., 17, 97 Wilds, Joe, 42 Steinburg, Hattie, 41, 90 Wiles, Evalin, 41 Stephenson, Roland N., 28, 89 Williams, Anna, 34, 72, 89 Stock, Ruth, 42 Williams, Evelyn, 42 Stoft, Beatrice, 23, 83 Williams, Maree, 44 Stoltz, Harold, 33 Williamson, Ferne, 34 Stone, Lenore, 42 Wilson, Rex, 34 Story, AI vi n, 34, 61, 64 Winter, J. M., 17, 79 Strasburg, Gerhard, 42 Winter, Margaret, 28, 81, 85, 86 Stroh, Allen, 42 Wirth, Willis. 42 Stutheit, Louise, 42 Witt, Olin, 28, 64 Sullivan, Amos, 41, 89, 90 Wittwer, Zelia, 41, 89 Sunita, Eugenia, 33, 78, 8S, 89, 90 Wochner, Arlene, 41 Swan, Louise, 42 Weitzel, Greta, 34 Wrightsman, Mary, 34, 66, 79, 8S, 86 T

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w

y

Tear, Grace, 17, 81, 8S Thomas, Virgil, 42 Thompson, Lewis, 28, 89, 107 Training School, 44, 53 Trauernicht, Maxine, 28, 85 Trimble, Doris, 41, 89 Troyer, Lois, 28, 86

Young, Young, Young, Young,

Kenneth, 28 Marjorie, 24, 74, 89 Mildred, 42 Phyllis, 34

z

Zajicek, Betty, 34

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AUTOGRAPHS


Profile for Peru State College Library

1934 - The Peruvian  

1934 yearbook for Peru State College, Peru, Nebraska

1934 - The Peruvian  

1934 yearbook for Peru State College, Peru, Nebraska

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