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Peru State College Peru, Nebraska

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Steve Sims in memory of Sarah Sim Burgess


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THE 1920 PERUVIAN ::

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SENIOR CLASS BOOK NEBRASKA STATE NORMAL PERU

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ORDER OF BOOKS Administration Classes Organizations Literary College Life

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"Foreword" This h as been a year of r eco n struc tion. The w h o 1 e co u ntry has seen this g reat movement back to normal con ditions. During the past year Peru h as felt the i n fluence o f th e return of peace a nd sch ool ac tivities show the c h a n ge. The purpose of this a nnua l is to record this year of Pe ru" s life as faithfully as possible. As su c h an acc ount the n, we p r esent this book w it h a knowledge of its sh ort-comings t o who ever m ay feel a n inte r est in t h e a ffa irs o f this schoo l.

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To Dr. Howard and Mrs. Joy, the first class to graduate from the Peru State Normal, we the fiftieth class, respectfully dedicate the 19 20 Peruvian.

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To George Elliott Howard and Anna Morehead Joy Why a Colden Anniversary? Fifty years ago a young la d and maiden completed the required work and received their diplomas from Peru. The graduation of these two is insi g nifi ca nt co mpared with the gradua tion of over three thousa nd since that time. Yet we celebrate and dedicate to their honor - wh y? Not because of the number, not because of the event, but because these two lives h ave b een consecrated a nd devoted to th e golden service of education. George E. Howard and A nna Morehea d were the first two to rece1ve diplomas from a ny higher educational institution in Nebraska. On commencement day in 18 70, under the shade of a group of small oaks on the campus where now the great boulder marks the spot, th ese two young people delivered their oration s and were presented their diplomas by Hon. S. P. Majors. It is a n impressive fact that fifty years afterward, in 1920, there should be fifty times as many graduates to be g iven their d iplomas by Hon. T. ] . Majors, son of this same S. P. Majors. Little did the faculty and friends, led by Dr. and Mrs. M cKenzie, in congratula tin g these two young people, a pprec iate the fact that the young man, Howard, should in time become one of America's greatest educators, leader of thoug ht among the nation's most learned scholar s. Truly his life has been fifty go lden yea rs of service. Yet, the one who stood by his side on that graduation day, too h as given one-half century of service. Anna Morehea d served well her native state as a teacher for a few years after graduation, and then as Anna Morehead ] oy, gave that golden service of wife and mother. She reare d a family of five, who, in turn are now giving trained service to their country. The early standards and training of these pioneer days so indelibly stamped the fear of God in the life of the school, that it h as become the potent, as well as the fundamental policy of Peru. Each class, since 18 70, h as maintained the high standards of scholarship, morality and spirituality set by this first graduating class. The faculty today, led by our President, E. L. Rouse, stands for right, for righteousness sake, as did the faculty of 18 70, led by that father of education, President J. M. M c Kenzie. Fifty years- go lden y ears of history for Peru-have passed, yet never h as the banner of truth trailed the dust nor th e hi gh ideals set by this ~lass of 18 70 been lowered. But each year has this spirit grown richer and ncher until now, thr oughout the state and nation, our beloved institution is known, not only by its stately buildings, nor by its three thousand or more graduate~颅 the pride of Nebraska-but especially is it known as an institution of htgh ideals where predominates that l ove and service so familiarly known as the Peru Spirit. The class of 19 20, in dedicating the Peruvian Volume Xlll to Georg~ Elliott Howard and An~a Morehe~~ J oy, on t~e Golden Anniversary of thetr g r aduation, does so in JUSt recogmtlon of theu fifty years of Golden servtce.


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ANNA MOREHEAD jOY

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Anna Morehead ] oy Having reached that p e riod when p eople are spo k e n of as living in the past, it is rather pleasa nt to have our youn g friends as k u s f o r some of those r e mm1scen ces. After several yea rs of perso n a l experi ence rig ht her e, then seeing broth ers, sis ters, cousins, and lastly fiv e of my own c hildren e ducate d in this school, I would naturally have some experie n ces o f inte r est t o s tudents of th e present time. This sc hool, as you a ll know , was establish e d as a c hurc h school. a nd I am g lad to say that in a ll these fifty-three years, h as lived up t o th e hi g h moral standard set a t that time. The only m a rk I ever h ad again s t my co nduc t was for goin g walking one Sunday a ft e rno o n w ith my roommat e, on th e road west of t o wn, w h ere we called on a family we were ac qu a inted with . A nother thing that Professor M c Kenz ie instille d into u s, was to nev e r say can't, but to do whatever we undertook. This was brought up v e ry vivid ly to me three years ago w hen h e was telling of the troubles we h a d w ith the first o ld bell. H e wanted it run g at h a lf past five for u s to get up and go to s tudying. The b oy or man tha t was to do it was sometimes a little la t e, so my room m ate, Emma Brooke, volunteered to do it for a w hile. The very n ext morning when she a ttempted to rin g it, the rope was cove red with sl eet and fro zen fast, so sh e climbed up on a ladde r throu gh the a ttic a nd out on the roof and rang the b e ll. When sh e told me, I said, "Why that was a very dangerous thin g to do." " I know it," sh e said, "but I wasn't goin g to fa il, espec ia lly the v e ry first morning when I was expected t o do it." M a y the n e xt fifty year s mark a n even g r eater a dv a n cement than the last have done.


DR. HOWARD


Greetings to the Class of 1920 Your Class-Sponsor, Professor Jea n, has ex t ended t o me your g r ac ious co n g ratul a tions a nd your re qu est for a brief message out of my h alf-century' s experience since g ra duatin g a t the P e ru No rma l.. Accept my warmest th a nks and a n e xpression of my dee p r egret th a t in bodily as well as in sp ir itua l prese n ce I m a y not s hare in y o u r fes ta l hour. I salute you a lmost with a feeling of e nvy, eve n of aw e; for in my v ision I am ab le to p e rc e ive, a t l east in shadowy outline, the rich experiences, the g r eat achievem e nts whic h s ure ly a wait you to gether with the hos t of other teac hers who tod a y throu g hout th e la nd a r e c ommencing th e next half-century 's task. Grea t indeed h as bee n th e prog ress in American life and especially in Ame rica n e ducation since in 1 8 70 my classmate a nd I rea d our themes and r eceived our diplomas und e r the spreading branches of th e trees whi c h th e n g rew n ea r where the library building now stands. In that same year l began to t each ; a nd e v er s ince, save for a p a u se of six y ears ( 1872-1878) while equipping myself by further s tudy, t eachin g h as been my profession. To m e th e teach e r' s life h as bee n full and satisfying . It is a life rich in s piritua l if not a lways in t e mporal gains. At its b est, is not the teac her's fun c tion the b asic so c ia l service? It is a m a ny -side d service. During the plas tic y ears of youth, it is the t each er's hand , some tim es e v en more pote ntly than the hand of the parent, w hic h g ives the first ' 'set" or mould to perso n a lity. From the kinderga rten to the univers ity it is within the teac h er's power to a id c hiefly in pre p a rin g the c hild e ither for g ood or for bad citizenship . The public scho o l, like the public normal a nd th e public university, should be the semina r of d e mocracy. Thus far socie ty h as fail ed to evalua te jus tly the t each er' s service. Rel ative ly in e very g ra d e or rank the teacher h as been underpaid. A t this moment th ousands of men a nd women a re quitting the profession for better paid employments. The crisis is paradoxica l; for neve r , seeming ly, has the r e been disclosed in A merica such a d e m and for e duca tion as now. Due in p art to the Great W a r, a t last we are comin g to h ave a clearer und erst a nding of the r eal value of the trained mind. So l say. to you, do not a bandon the teac hing profession. I feel sure that a prosperous futur e awaits it. Enfranchised womanhood will not much longer suffer itself t o be exploite d for mea ger pay. Wome n h a ve h a d n early a monopoly of public schoo l te achin g ; and they h ave don e th e ir work efficiently and zea lously. When their possession of the ballot sh a ll have blotted out the sex-line politica lly and therefore economically, may w e not expect men a nd women more evenly than now to sh a r e in the profession which, directly or indirectly, should h ave as its goal the preparation of human beings for the duties of good citize nship? Onward, then , with high courage t o share th e great d estiny which awaits the true American t each e r! Yours frate rn a lly, GEORGE ELLIOTT HOWARD.


Man Weighing the steadfastness and '!tate Of some mean things which here beio w reside, Where birds, like watchful clocks, the noiseless date And intercourse of times divide, Where bees at night get home and hive, and flow e rs, Early as well as late, Rise with the sun, and set in the same bowers; I would, said I, my God would give The staidness of these things to man! for these To His divine appointments ever cleave, And no new business breaks their peace; The birds nor sow nor reap, yet sup and dine, The flowers without clothes li ve, Yet Solomon was never dressed so fine. Man hath still either toys, or care; He hath no root, nor to one place is tied, But ever restless and irregular About this earth doth run and ride; He knows he hath a home but scarce knows where; He says it is so far, That he hath quite forgot how to go there.

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He knocks at all路 doors, strays and roams, Nay, hath not so much wit as s ome s tones have, Which in the darkest nights point to their homes By some hid sense their Maker gave; Man is the shuttle, to whose winding quest And passage through these looms God ordered motion, but ordained no rest. -HENRY VAUGHAN.


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Only what thou art in th yself determines thy valu e, not wha t thou hast. - A uerbac h


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. ., . He is rich or poor according to what he is, not accordin g to what he has. - Beecher


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M en of character are the conscience of th e socie ty to which th e:y belong. - Emerson


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character. -Winter


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The futu re present.

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Charily is a virtue of the heart and not of the hands. - Addison

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Character is impulse that has been reined into s teady c ontinuance.

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Cod offers to ever.!J man his c hoi c c betDJ een truth and repose. -Emerson


R.VY lA 1.:

The world is too mu c h wi th u s ; J<,t c ;,nd ~10o n . Getting a nd s pendin g . w e lay w ;c. s t e o ur p o ....., c r s : Little we see in Na ture th a t is o urs : We ha v e g ive n o ur h ear ts aw a y, ;, so rd id h oo n I This sea th a t bares h er bos om t o th e moon. The winds th a t wi ll b e h ow lin g a t a ll h o ur::~ . And a re up -gath ered n ow li k e s lee p in g Oo w e r s; For this, for eve rythin g , we a rc o ut of tun c: It moves us no t - G r e a t God I I' d rat h e r h e A P aga n suckled in a c r ee d ou t wo rn : So might I, s tan din g on thi s p l easa nt lea, H ave g lim p s es th a t wo uld m a k e me l ess forlorn ; Have sigh t of Proteus risin g from th e s ea: Or h ear o ld Triton b low his wreath e d horn. - W o r d s wor th.


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By a ge nerous increase in salaries, Nebraska has give n just recogmtlon to the profession into which the class of 19 20 is to enter S eptemb e r first. The n ew sala ry schedules g ive due consid e rati o n to normal schoo l gradua tes a nd hold e r s of d eg rees. I a m sure each member of this class will ea rn m ore than s h e r eceives . The re will n e ver b e a time whe n one who e l ects to follow teaching as a profession wi ll not have to give up certain m a t eria l rewa rds. This will b e tru e even w ith th e new salary sch e dules. The r e will be spiritua l rewa rds tha t far more th a n offse t th e financial returns of o th er professions. Your opportunity to vita lize the youth durin g their impressionabl e yea rs is immeasurab le. M a k e th e most of it. Never was there suc h a dem and for trained, conscientious t eac h ers as there is tod ay. W. C. Bagley puts it thus: ''Western c ivilization h a n gs tod ay in th e b a lance. Every gain tha t th e r ace h as m a d e is threatened with destruction. Only a thin li ne separat es F r anee a n d England a nd Ita ly from the menace of b a rb a rism. Upon our Natio n m ay devolve the resp o nsibility of keeping th e torch a fl a m e. Upon th e trained inte lligence, th e clarifi ed ins ig ht an d th e disciplined wi ll of our p eople, in a ll likelihood, wi ll depend the fate of th e wo rld in the decades that a r e to come. First, last and a ll th e t ime it is an e ducationa l problem. It is your proble m an d my problem; your duty a nd my duty. At no time in the history of o ur profession h as the n eed for devoted, co nsec rated, a nd unite d actio n b een so imp erative as it is today. L et u s stand with unbroke n r a nks a nd see the b at tle throu g h to g lorious victory. " The s uffrage franchise which wi ll doubtless come to th e women o f the class thi s yea r will g ive you a dded prestige. You may h ave g r eat influence i n every community amon g the newly e nfra n c hised women. Make a s tudy of the duties a nd o bliga tion s d evolvin g upon you by thi s privil ege, that you may l ead in your community. You must l ay aside a ll party prejudices a nd pol itical biases. Meet the c hildre n a nd the patrons upon the broad p lat form of servi ce to the co untry a nd the world. With every assura n ce that each membe r of thi s class will be a worthy c hild of your b e loved A lma M a ter, and with confidence tha t each of you will m easure up to the hig h ideals of P e ruv ia n s, I wish each o f you a successful a nd a h a ppy first year in the pro fess io n. Cordially yours, E.

L. ROUSE.


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MATTIE COOK ELLIS. /\. M . Dea n o f Women


R. D . OVERHOLT, A. B. R egistra r

F . C. J EAN. A. M . Bio log ica l S c ie nc e

A. E. H O L C H , B. Mus. Associate Biologica l D e pt.

A. C R AGO, A. M . Edu catio n


H. C. HOUSE, Ph. D. En g lis h

MRS. ROBERT F. SEYBOLT, A. M. Expression

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ESTHER A . C LARK, A. M . A n c ient

L a n g u ages


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ABBA W ILLARD BOWEN, A. B.

ROSE B. C LARK, A. M.

Modern L a n g u ages

Geo g r aphy

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] . M . HOWI E, A. B.

C. F . BEC K , B . E d.

M a t h ema t ics

A sso c ia t e M a th e m a ti cs


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W. F. H OYT, A. M. P hysical S c ie n ce"

GEORGE W. BROWN Rural Edu catio n

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J OS I E H ANS I N G Teac h e r of Affilia t ed Rural S c h oo l


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j. B. SHOUSE, A. M. Supt. of Training School

0 . j. G A BEL. A. M. Prin. junior H. S .

LULU C. DANIEL, Ph. B. Englis h, La tin and History Training School

DORA KREBS Fifth and Sixth Gra d e s


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MAUDE ROUSSEAU

I' E/\RL KELLEY

Third and F o urth Grade8

Fir KI and Se-cond G rad es

LOU ELLA HOSMER Kindergarten Director

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ALICE M. BURLEY Principles and M e thods of Education


EDITH L. TYDEMAN Tea c her of Art

W. C. SPEER, B. Sc. Phys ical Trainin g for Men, Coach

RUTH S HIVELY, A. B. Physica l Training for W omen

HENRY TRETINA H ead of C ommerce


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NONA M. PALMER, B. Ed . Associate o f Commerce

VIOLA E. FOSTER Assistant Home E c onomics

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] . W . PAUL. B. S. Manu a l Training


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WM. SC HOENlKE Assistant Ma nua l Trainin g

MAMIE RUSSELL MUTZ, P h . B. Publi c S ch ool Art

N. MAU D CARPENTER P ub lic Schoo l Mus ic

WALTER HO:-JMANN P :a n o fort e and V o ice


CLARA M. DUN IGAN Assistant R eg istra r

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ELMA I. GOCKLEY

ELV A E. RULON . A. B.

Bookk eeper

Li bra r -a n


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LIBB IE BRANSON Assistant Librarian

MRS. ) . B. SHOUSE Assistant Librarian

A LMA TO LI N, R. N. R esident Nurse

ELIZABETH C LELAND Pre cep tr e~s


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J. A. H AYES En g ineer

F . W . I ~OE LS T O RF l l •·; , rl Jnni t o r


PI RllY I A.N.

MARY AGNES TYNON "She hath done what s he cou ld ." Nineteen hundred yea r s ago, in a home in Bethany, these s imp l e words o f com mendation were spoken to a woman, and the prophecy was uttered that throu ghout the whole wor ld that which s he h ad done would be spoken o f for a memoria l of h er. This woman brought precious and costly o i ntm en t a nd poured it over the h ead of h er Lord that s h e might s how h e r love for Him. M ary Ag n es T ynon gave a life frag r a nt wi th courte~y. sincerity, and unselfishness, thus un consciousl y showing her love for those s he served . For fourteen years, students and faculty members have go n e out from the Peru No rma l Library, some of th em to the ends of the e a rth, carrying with th em recollections of the quiet h e lpfu lness of this faithful wo rker. Could they add their testimony to ours, it would probably be that no more fitting memorial could be sugges t e d {or her than these words w hi c h have come d own to u s through the ages, "S h e h at h done w hat she c ou l d." H e r friends deemed it a r a r e privilege to know intimatel y a cho.racter so sweet, so gentle, and so lovable. H er w hole life was such a b eautiful influ ence tha t it is difficult to c hoose a few c hara cteristics of which to speak, but those who kn ew her b est wi ll n ever forget these two-her c hildlike faith in huma nity and h e r j oy in service. Unkind words or unjust crit icisms always g rieved h er. A life lon g h abit of lookin g for the goo d only h ad developed a swee t c h arity which made h e r blind to th e fault s and ke e nly apprecia tive o f t h e virtues o f ot h e rs. And you whom s h e serv ed, you realized that you were never turned away with a request unans wered, but you could not know, as some of u s knew, how cheerfully s he se r ved you, giving of h er tim e and str ength, r egard l ess of persona l sacrifi ce . Her hom e had a lways b een in P eru, among the hills, ce d a r s, and r ed bird s which s h e loved so wel l. Even in the la s t sl eep, nature sm iles upon h e r quiet resting pla ce o n Mt. Ve rn o n Hill. A cedar tr ee stands se ntine l over h er g r ave . Who can say but the r ed birds w ill build the ir nests in its welcome space a nd send forth their melodious notes from its topmos t branches? A tru e a nd faithful fri e nd h as gon e, but memories of h er w ill come back t o u s in the lives that have been en ri c h ed a nd e nnobl ed because s h e dwelt amo n g u s . "She hath done what s h e could."


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Dan M o rris

D. B. C r o p se y

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T. ]. Majors

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Mr. Clemmons wa s g ifte d in a la r ge d eg r ee v.rith th e tru e s r>~ nt of the teac her. No matte r h ow busy h e v.ras v.r ith adm ini s tr a tiv e duties he was a lways a class ro o m t each e r v.rhen hi s sc h oo l v.ras in seesion. He rea li zed that it is a uniqu e privil ege t o b e <:1bl e t o r eac h life in the formative period. M a ny o f hi s s tud e nts ha ve sa id t o m e , "I am g lad h e was my t each e r . H e und e r s t ood hi s s tud e nt s ... Throug h all the years hi s g r ea tes t sa ti s fac ti o n v.ras th a t th e gra du a t es of the Normal Department o f his sch oo l w o uld r e;.H.: h th o u sa nd s o f Nebraska boys and girls in th e common sc h oo ls o f th e s t a t e . H e realized that he was thus ab l e to pr o j ec t hi s l ife a nd id ea ls f a r o ut s id e the confines of the campus. For years, the Fremont Coll ege was th e o nly In s tituti o n in th e state open to men a nd wome n with a b e la t e d vi s io n o f th e full e r lif e. Many successful business a nd professiona l m e n a nd w o m e n wo uld have been los t to th e s tate if it h a d not b ee n f o r this in st ituti o n. These men a nd women w e r e a lwa y s w a rm fri e nd s o f Mr. C l e mmons and supported his policies loya lly. "The ideal teacher s hould h ave th e g ift o f g l a dn ess- t h a t j oy of living which ta kes life for g r a nted a nd prop oses to m a ke th e mo s t of every moment of consciousness ." This g ift Mr. C l e mmons h a d. We shall miss his cheerful words a nd s unny face. H e p l a yed the "glad game" to the very las t days of hi s life . H e w as never se lfi s h. His though t always was for the unfortun a t e boy o r g irl; m a n or woman, groping for a friendly hand leadin g t oward the li g ht. His close friend s were always c onscious of his ge n e r o u s s pirit. Even in the days when h e saw that th e need o f his p eculi a r typ e o f school-the private normal-was passing h e generously s upport ed the state no'rmal schools fully realizin g that th e y were suppl a ntin g his own school. Even for those who bitterly opposed his typ e of in stitution he had no h arsh words. His only a n s w e r w a s, "If my critics could find the youn g people hunge rin g f or knowled ge as I find t h em they would not stand on technica lities a nd close the doors of e du cational opportunity in the ir hopeful faces.' ' Education has lost a true friend. S c hool f o lk of th e s t a t e will miss him. If each member of this class will serv e h e r day and gen eration as com:cientiously and h e lpfully as did Mr. C l e mmons, she will make for hers elf a record of which h er friends will be proud.


Alumni THE ALUMNI OFFICERS

R. R. McGee, ' 0 7 David C ity .. ... .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . President Bess E. Anderson, ' I 7 Auburn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Vice-President W . N. Delze ll, '9 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Secretary M. C. Lefler, '09 Linco ln . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Treasurer

TRUSTEES G. Homer Wrightsman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . ' I 0 Syracuse Fred C. Morrow .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . '90 Central C ity John I. Winters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . '78 Los Angeles, Calif. C. R ay Gates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . ... .. .. .. '0 7 Columbus A. ] . Stoddard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 'I 0 Beatrice

1920 1921 1922 19 23 1924

PERU PROFESSIONAL PREPA R ATION The teac hing profession is a new professio n a nd is fast takin g its place s ide by side with the other professions w hic h h ave h ad long standing. In I 8 70 when Peru h e ld her first g radua ting exercise, two trained teachers began their career s. One of those two is still in the profession an d is truly a profess iona l teacher. Peru was one of the pioneer institutions which s tood boldly for requirin g a teacher to be trained for his work the sam e as a lawyer is trained for his work. Our institution was many years ahead of most colleges and Unive rsities in the matter o f training teac hers. At the present time , the Universitie s are awakening to the great importa nc e of t eachers' tra ining. The total number of g ra duates from Peru has passed the three thousand mark and is going rapid ly toward the four thousand. The r e is scarcely a town in Nebras k a but what h as or has h ad the benefit of Peru trained t each e rs in their schools.


Golden Roll Call-

1870

George E. Howard, of Lincoln . . . . . . A nna Morehea d j oy, of Peru . . . . . . .

Silver Roll Call-

. l 'rc n cnt

. Pr c,. cnt

1895

May me Agnes (Mrs. R. C. Ord) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 524 \V,- h .. t ... r S t.. o, n . • ha, ' c brn ,. kn •May L. Atwater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frank H . Beedle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . \ V av•·rl y , N e bra s ka • Elsie S. Bixby . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . · . · . . · .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Elizabe th M. Bratt (Mrs . W . A. Ba ldwin) .. .. . . . . . . . 28 14 J a c k " "" S t.. o .. , .. h a, i': c hrn s ka Minnie E . Chase ( married) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. .. . . . . . . . . . S ,cln c·y . , c-h rn s kn A. Kate Collins (Teache r ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 5 i': o. Myr.J J,.. t\v•· . . 1\lnnr<>vl ... C a l .fo rnin Tina A . Davis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. f..:. . , ., ~ .• ~ ( •t y . M, ,.,.o uri • M rs. Ca rrie Dun ca n so n Richard, . . . . . . . . .. . · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · E. 0. Garrett (American Book Co.).... ... . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I· n·•n o nt. ;-.,;,·hrn s k" Mellie C . Colden (Teacher) . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . .. · .. . . . . . . . . .. S, nht w r . :'-!t·hra s kn 0. Maurice Good (Banker) . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . · . . . .. . . . l' ,· n•. :-.:cb ra ,. kn Mrs. Mabel B. Cooze Elli o tt. . . . . . . . . . . ... .. .. . . . . 1 50 7 Wt· h ~ t P r ~ t . . C) n, . • ha · ,·hrn><ka Mrs. Estella Gra h am M cVicker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60CJ S r> c . Mut. l ~ld lo{ . . l.11t< o ln. i':··hra s kn O live Griffith . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bo x R ~ 4. (' ,., , •nnati. O hi o Emma Hart (Mrs. Full e r) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . · · . · · · · · · · · · ·' I ,., '"" " ' ·h. :--;,.braska Winnie H a rtl ey {Mrs. B. L. Fren c h ) . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . · · . · · · · · · · · . . . . . . M n .. , '"" · l dn h o Bertha J ohnston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . 1 32 1J I Rt h S t. . .·\uhu rn. N<"brn >< ka Cla ra M. J ones {Teac h e r ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . · . · · · · · · · · · . . . .. York. N t·hra s kn John]. King (Rea l Esta t e Agent) . . . . . . . . . . . 542 N . R,;,ytnoncl / \ v •· .. l'.,_,. ,. cl, . .,,. , ( · ·.d i f orn in Lydia Maika (Mrs. ] . A. Munk c rs ) .. . . . . . . . . . . 3 26 eord c au x , \v•· .. <. h adron. :--: c: hra 9 ka D. M. Ma rtin . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. H .. II y R<· <ord .. . ()ak la n d. Ca l if o rni a C. A. McMich ael (Y. M. C. A. Work) . . . . . . . . . . . · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ~-'·" K " · ' nr tl? .Dnko t n Lo uise W . Mea rs . . . . . . . . . . ... .. Mi lwaukee S tat e No rrnal S c h oo l. M d w auk•·•·. w,,. c o n s tn R . C. Ord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . 1 524 Wch ,. t <·r S t .. ()ma h a. Nc hra s k n O liver P. Palatine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . · · · · · · · . . . . F o l s on. Ca l ifornia C la ra Quante (Mrs. Rob e rt Bak e r) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ··. . · · · · · · · .. . lm pt·ria l , cb rn s ka Neva Ray .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H o,;p •tal for I n " ' ""'· L 11H· o ln . N e bra s k a Pearl Ro ckwoo d (Mrs. W. C. H a ll ) . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B ox 1 6 3. I.::. ,. t <·rvan, Sa s k . E. E. Sams ( Lawye r) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . · . · · . · . . . ora ta, Ok ln h oma Kat~ S mith (Mrs. j . L. Cod din gton) . . . . . . . . . . . N ew l lam.lt on .'\p t ,.. , ~)mah a. Neb r aska Sadte Smith (Mrs. Trai l) . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. S u pc nnt.c nd c n t S c h oo),., l a rl c t o n. t:-J c ?ras ka ]. E. S ta nford . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 595 Ltn wood Ave., S an Dt<!K O. C altf o rni a Min':'ie Sto rm ( Mrs. W. A. Rando l ) . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . Cl int o n. Ok l ahon'\a ~esste Tynon .. ... ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , '\u burn, N c b ra s ka Minnie Van Nostran . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mae Van Fleet (Mrs. L. H . Wright) .. . . . . . . . . 1304 S t. Br o w n e S L. S pokan e·. Wa s hin g t o n ~rs. Agn es Watt H ento n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L oydm tnt s t c r . i\lbl'r la . C a n a d a Maggie A. Wishard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · . .. . . • D eceas ed

Present Roll CallMary Caldwell Addie Coa le Fern F erree Zoe Carman Eth el Gunderson G lady s LaFra n ce A lma Lemke Celia Lora n ce Mabel Runyan Lin n ie Riecker Ba rbara Scoville Ira Sides Nelle Stewart W eltha Wilkie Helen Williams Erma Wils on Marie W ixon Eth el Barton G race Blou gh Dag mar Bonde A lice Bru n sdon

1920

Lu c ill e Fi s h e r O la Bu c kin gh a m D e lla Weath er ho g g L oy Ha c k e r Lu l u Dwy er Ruth Burc h Ruth Wo lf ord Le la H azzard C r a c e Grant Mabel Chapman Ella Woodard George H eywood Emma H agen'\an Doroth y Ma u c k M a ude Wright I ndi a Hu lbu rt Eth e l H a rnu•n George Meds k e r Emma A lber Ruth J o n es L or in J ones Emma Meyer A lvin a A m e nd e L a ura K oon Emma K e ll y Ma ttie Mil es Jes s ie Sprecher Milt o n Lando l t V e lrn a L a ub e r Rose Mill e r D o rothy R oe tt ger E l eanor L ee M yr tl e K oo n Lillie Olson H e len Tay lor Ne l li e M c A u le y C r. th c rin e L ; e n e n'\ann Mabel Parso n Es th er Co le Nettie M cCa rr o ll In ez L o n g f e ll o'\ov Cecelia Peterson Bra n t le y Cope nhaverCa rl M a c kprang Pa n s y M c K en n ey Fay Popplewell Martha Co rl ey D agma r M a ~ ne so n Lloy d Prante Lea h Culwell Edward M a t cjov s ky Thi lda Nel s on Ri c h a rd Over h olt Lucil e Ra n dol W ill ode n e Dau p hi n O la Be ll /\li ce P e s h e k H azel Emmert Ca rri e B ios" Leon Roettger Tillie Salzmann Be lle Erisma n Wi ll iam C a rt er El s bet h R oe,;s l e r Kathrin e Schill Frances Fau lkne r Gaylord C h as e Frr~ n c e s S h ea Matt ie C a pen Co r a C l ove r Glady s St e p h e n so n Isab e lle Sears L eo n e Va n c e Blanch e Seid A li ce Gilbert Th e lm a C o l e Warren Stephenson A lma Griffin H arvey C o tt l e William Thomas Gra c e Grimes S te lla Dau ~ h e r t y


I


路prRVV IA"1r'


W. ;" . DEl ./El. l . 1\dvi,.c>r .·\dv o ~r· r

LU C Y

HL ;\ i\.'KE~S J

Jff'

Engfi ,.h

Edu cal o<>n M o d(•rn

l .• •n ~.: u:t g f• s

:\1RS. MERLE BYHES Horne E c onomi c s

PhyHi caf S c ienc•· Eng l ish

GRACE G ILBERT E n glis h M ode rn LanguagcH


--

P EA RL K INT ON En g li sh M ode rn La n g uages H o m e E co n o mi cs

D ONA LD OVERH O LT M a nua l Tra inin g M a th e m a t ics En g lis h

M A BEL R OOT Ma th ematics M o d e rn La n g uages En g lish

V INCENT J AN D A Edu ca ti o n Scie n ce Ma th e m atics


路路-

H.

~.

BEDELL

E du c u ti on M n th c mat icH S <: ic n c cs

LILLIAN J E WE. L L Ed u c ati o n En g lis h a n d

BUH.R E LLE

Sc i ence ~<

LEVA SM IT H Hi s t o r y En g li s h a nd Edu c a ti o n-Minor

LEON L. ROETTGER Edu ca tion M an ual Tra inin g A thl e t ics


w-- -.J - 路===== ~~ ~

F. C. JEAN Senior Adviser


Class Dismissed . C lass dismissed. We h ave now come to the parting of the ways. Since th1 s class matriculated two years ago the world has passed through changes fa r -reaching a nd fundamental. A n internationa l conflict has been settled a nd the s~pr e macy of rig ht ove r mi g ht r ea ffirmed; a league of nations has been estab lis h ed a lthoug h unhappily with r e la tion to it, our government still hesitates and lingers; in many cou nt ries the interrelation of socia l gro ups has become an acu t e problem an d soviet adherents h ave promoted their propaganda a lmos t everywher e. In our own co untry prohibition h as been esta blishe d as a national policy; woman h as take n her place beside man at the ballot box and through her e nfra n c hisement a new and potent factor has entered American politics, and during th e period of your tra ining an almost complete rev olution in the a ttitude of the public toward the teacher has taken place. It has come to r ecog nize in the t eac h er and the school the most powerful of Americanizing for ces a nd h as raised sa laries a nd inc reased school budgets commensurately. These c h anges h ave come so fas t and have been so sweepi n g that society h as not yet been ab le to readjust itse lf. Governments and peoples, organizations a nd inst itutions are still in a tra n sie nt and unsettled s t a te. The old order has been overthrown but the new h as not yet been established. We are in a flu x bet ween the two. Into th ese s tran ge and perplexing co n d itions the members of the class of '20 must make their debut. Wonderful opportunity! Staggering responsibility! How sh a ll the issu e be successfully met? For the past two years you h ave been in l eague with the State prepa~i.ng for this very h o ur. Yo u h ave d evoted your time, your energy, and your ab ility to th e process of increasing your powe r, enriching yo ur lives a nd gaini n g a professional knowl edge of your tasks to be. The Commonwealth h as spe nt ~ h ousand s of dollars to g ive you this oppo rtunity and now hopefully a nd trustm g ly beckons yo u to come to her aid in the great, stupendo u s probl ems of r econstru ction. Now arises wit h tellin g force to the members of the Class, th e sobering question, "How a m I to meet t h e situ a ticn? Through what personal c h annels ca n I bring this n ewly acquired power to bear upon the problems of school. socie ty, and government?.. If your Sponsor may be permitted to speak to you as a class f o r the last time, it would be to say, th a t in his opinion there are three co n sideratio n s that n ow become transcendent to the individua l. They are h is power to th ink, his ideals, and his cour age. Straight, unconfused thinking is ind ispen sable. The school s and society need thinke r s; men a nd women who ca n lo o k n e w s ituations s traight in the fa ce, see all sides of them and ar n ve a t clear, assuring decisions as a basis of act ion. Likew ise, no life ca n be potent in society unless its expression be domi nated by unswerving idea ls; ideals th a t recognize every man's claim to cons id e r at ion and a square deal; that c urb selfis hness both in action and desire a nd


!A N

above everything else th at are m otivated a nd s prin g fr om a c a l m. un c o rnprom ising, serene faith in Cod. V an Dyke h as ex pressed m y th o u g ht b ea utifully in this stanza: "Four thin gs a m a n mu s t lea rn t o do lf h e would make his r eco rd tru e : To think without confus io n c l ea rl y ; To love his fe ll ow m a n s ince r e ly; To ac t from hones t motives pure ly; To trus t in God a nd Heave n sec ur e l y. " But high id eals and ke e n inte ll ec ts a l one a r c n o t adeq u a t e t o th e d e mands of this period. It tak es co urage, too, t o be a lea de r ; co urage t o ac t o n one's own decisions; courage to go east wh e n th e thou g htl ess c r owd s ur ges w es t; the fortitude to m eet defeat a nd th en to try aga in; th e intre pid it y t o loo k a m a n squarely in the face a nd calmly disagr ee with him; th e d a rin g t o fi g ht if the occasion d em a nds it. L o n g fe ll ow puts it in th ese w ords: "Write on your doors th e sayin g wise a nd o ld . 'B e bold I be bold!' a nd everyw h e r e 'B e bold; Be not too bold.' Yet bette r th e excess Than the defect ; b e tter th e mor e th a n less; Bette r like H ecto r o n th e field t o di e, Tha n like a p e rfume d P a ris turn a nd fly." As you go forth to your tasks the v e ry b es t wi s h es o f your A lm a M ate r will a ccompany you. We s h a ll s tay h ere and labo r o n, but w e s h a ll miss y o u. As we work, we shall think of you and eve r k e e p o ur e y e o n th e h o ri zo n for sight of the messe nger th a t shall brin g u s th e good n e ws of your s u ccess.

- F . C.].


MORR IS W ILLI AM ROETTGER Sen:or Mascot


.

4

Nebroska C it y Sec re tary o f Se n io r C l ub Coun c i l.

C la so .

G irls

C0 /11p0111 0 11.

ALVINA /\ME I' DE A .. oc ia te Counc i l.

Sy r acu se, Nebr.

Edi tor Normal it e .

to he lrappy."

"' To l>c c 111ployct! '·'

ETHEL BARTO l' "Th e h c.• t o f

Gir l s'

A rlin g to n , N e br.

lite '·' CO II\•cr.,ation ."

0LA BELL

Basse t, Nebr.

Basketba ll.

''Th y m odesty merit. '"

rs

a

ca t~ d l c

to

tlr -y


Pawnee City. N ebr.

··c OTJITH O II

.'SC II .H"

a/llJa);~

CO I'lJI'liQII t/s

r c.1p c cl.

CHACE BLOUG H

H e ndley . N ebr.

Drama tic C lub .

P e ru vian Staff .

.. Plump but her plump11c.<s clot/, 11 0t mar her beauty:·

D AGMA H BoNDE

O maha. N eb r.

Dramati c C lub.

Baske tball .

··1 ru a nt a hero. an u11c onunon tlJanl UJhcn clJcry _year ar~<l m o11lh sends

/or/h a

IICJIJ

O II C . ..

A u c E Bnu NSDO N

Peru. 1\!cbr.

Dramati c C lu b.

Basketball .

··Where UJa_y .

a

therc"s

IDill.

lh<rc"s a


01."

Bu cK I NC II AM

G irl; Coun c il. ' "f Jfain ' Jtll

R u nt

rv illunll P'''" /J o11./ , tr /,

B t· l lwood.

B u ll< 11

Y. \ Y/. C . , \ . ''()n c

n' itlr -

,\ ,l f'J Jll . .•

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noluni)J

c •.l .in <·l.

{c·w /-' C"fJ /c 11/ wl1on1 If"" Jl' ' t i ll \I I/, itt1! " ' <'U II . · ·

tllf..'

M ,\RY CAI.IJWf. I.J.

() ma h a .

Prcsicl cnl o f N. C . , \.

'"J\1/y lady lratlr a ·" "if,. fvr ull /1 /(i rufll) wnrd for '""' /, . ..

M ABE. I_ C HA P M AN

Peruvian S ta ff.

Nr hr .


=--

----

GAYLORD CHASE

Peru, Nebr.

Band. O rc hcs lrn . Glee C lub. Dramalic C lub. Foolball. "I am Sir Oracle, ( II Ili n>hcn I ope m.)l lip , let no d ol! bar/(."

C ORA CLOVER

A uburn, Nebr .

P rcsidc nl o f Philo, Dramalic Club, Gl ee Club, Peruvian S laff. "1-lcr frown s arc fairer fCJr, Than ' mile, of otlrcr m aide n.• arc."

ADD IE COALE

Bcnne ll, N ebr.

"There ·, a lim e f or all thin gs."

E sT HER CoLE

Peru. Nebr.

Dramali c Club. "I sa.)l ju, l what I thirrl( and nothing mere nor less. I cannot sa.)l one thing ancl mean another."


p

B rtA:-:TLEY CoP EI' It Avut

Syrtoc u H·. Ne-br.

P rc• id cnl o f Se nio r C ia •• · l'rru v ia n S ta ff . F oo tba l l. ··Varie ty i> the >p ice n f li fe ."

M AHTH A Com_EY

/\ d a m• .

N r h r.

P c ru v ian S ta If . "W c /il(c Ioc r l or what >h e i.,. "

ALYS CoTT LE

Y o rk , N e br.

P h ilo Trea surer. G lee C l u b. " S h e loa., 11 0 f aul ts or I n o f a ults sp y.

HARVEY C o TTLE

ca ll

Y o rk. N e bo·

Bu siness M a n age r P er uv ia n . Y. M . F ootb a ll. "f-Ie only is a well macl e man Wh o has a goo cl d e termina tion ."

C. A. Cab in e t.


_

J

r

..

L EA H CULWELl.

A ubu rn. Nebr .

Girl s' Counc il. Dramal ic C lub . ··A ,/auJ!Irlcr of tire gods clivindy fa ir."'

\Vn.LODENE DAUPH IN

Tilden. Neb r.

·· ' T is tltc quiet people tha t d o tltc w orl( ."'

HAZEL EMMERT

P eru . Nebr.

Drama lic C lub . Glee C lub . Orcheslra. ··~ m~rry heart d o th good lilec m cdicrn c.

BEL LE ERISMAN May Queen. ''Fair but not \>ain."

Peru, Nebr.


EMMA

r AL T

C) m"h" . Nchr

.. N ot only good. bul gna rl for .• o m ct/,in J.i:·

, \ulnorn. Ne br . V •c e - l' n • J t· nt Dramat ic C lul > f> c ruv •a n S taff. ''SI~t:

d nc ... n't

.\ l u di..; ,..,

/,(' li c v c

int er f ere

in

w it/,

lc..· ttin ~ ll t.' f r c~ ul fl r

h t! r

n•orl(· fun: ·

F ERN Fumu:

O ng. N,-1,- .

D ramatic C lub . P e ruvian S taff . .. A hear t to rc.w h •c . a lr .-ur/ tu co n/rive, and a hand t o c:xc c u/e .· ·

LUC ILLE F IS HER

P e ru. 1'\ebr .

unto l( iwl c.' t .. Swcci promptings deeds arc in he r ver y louie·'···


-~-

P laltsmo ulh. Ncbr.

路路 Hl lror11 ur c yo u lllil/r lon i!!lri ? ..

Per u . Nebr .

7.oE G ,\(I M ,\ N

P e ru v ia n S ta If .

.. T al( ill!! thin gs , if un tion

mit/r

;\un :

Gll. llEHT

G n ACE

G n AN T

em.\'.

rs "''

u iii(IIOll>l l

her.

Taber. Iowa

Fa irb u ry. Nebr .


GHIFI· I :" f';o ra . Nchr . G irl ; Counci l. Prc• iden l o f J.U.C. ''All { o r lol•e awl rw tlri11 g f o r

ALM ,\

r e ward ."

\VIL LARD

G nii·T I T II ;.

Y. M. C. !\ . C al rin cl.

Sa le m, Nebr . Glee C luh

" /-/ c >peal(·' · hclrol•c .> . a11t! net.,.

iu ."

a> Ire ough t ...

CHACE CHIM ES

C ham bers. Nebr .

"A good !rear( ., n>ortlr go /,/ ."

Cro llo n. Nebr. "Don't disturb m e, I'm tlrinleing."

ETHEL G u NDERSON


=-

Lov HA C K ER

Peru. Nebr.

"A lad of >tcrlin g llJorlh."

\ Vahoo. N ebr. "A co n .5c icntiou 5 .stu clcni.' '

Broadwater. Nebr . P eruvian Staff. " A great cleo/ of dignity clo ne up in a >mall pacl(agc : 路

L ELA HAZZARD

ETHEL HARM AN

Omega. Okla .

G irls' C lub Counci l. "/-fer \Joice llJa> cl>er >o ft, gentle. an,/ lollJ."

~IR.VVIA Y


c~. o 1tc ~.

1h.""'"""

Dram atic C luh . "Alas ! /1 /a.d T /, j , /a ,/,/i c /( " " " '·' t .... IIIU C II . •.

I N IJ I,\

, \lmc r ia. Nebr.

II U L UU HI

''/-f er l1air ;,,

""

111 orc

"' " " ' \)

t/,iuJ

h er lrt'nrl."

r~ u TH j oN ~- ~

Nt'm aha . N··IH .

"T/,e deed I intend to .f., is f! rc at !3"t mhat " ·' :ycl I l(n<n v n o t."

Lo111 N j or•a: s

1-'c ru ,

Nchr.

P e r u vian Staff .

" A s i n ce r e nJall i.., Jl,c b e ~ I of fri c n c/.o;, 7 he sa m e ye.• lcrday. today ""'' [ o rc1>er.


Peru. Nebr.

I:".MM ·' Ku .t Y

Dramatic C lub. Pt· ruvian S tnrT.

G lee C lub .

·· 1 l il(c a ll l>o \l.< l>u/ lnr.··

MYt!Tt.E:

11 o 11 c

Koor-;

President S tarT.

i11 particu ·

Bladen. Nebr. Girl s

C luh .

Peruvia n

O maha, N ebr. "W hal stature is she of .J ju st a.< lri glr t l s 111 y heart."

MtLTO I' LA N DO LT

Peru, N ebr.

Orchestra. "Quite a blo lll t•r ; that"-' wir }> Ir e's iu the baurl ."


V E LMA L AUIJER

"/-fer very reticence ,

A LM A

L E M KE

G e ne va, N ebr . a ch arm."

Ncbra• ka C ity

" In soul .,incer e. tn act ion f a ithful, in honor clear."

CATHERI N E L I EI"EM ;\ NN

Omaha . N e br .

j . U . G . T reasurer. "And still th ey ga zed . and still th e wonder gre w, hoT» o ne small he ad could carry all she lrncT» ."

I N EZ LoN G FELL Ow "Wha t's in a nam e? "

P eru, N e br.


_Pr]UIVIA~

Cr.I.IA L onANC£.

Auburn . Nebr.

"Sloe lo1•cs n o /loin!? m o rt• tloan a j o/1)1 'Co)/

Cloa.,c' ."

NELLIE M cAU LEY

Peru. N eb r.

Dramalic C lub.

"lvlan has lois JlJi//. lwi ""'""'" /o,•r D>o)l .

NETTIE M c CArtftOLL Drama lic Club. Orchesl ra .

Union. Nebr. Baskc lba ll .

"Y our s inging charms ; as clo tlr

)lour-

·•e lt."

CArtL M .\ CKPitAI'G Drama lic C lub. " / us / a llJcar)/ill' for you."

Peru, Nebr.


Prc•idc nl Y . \'i/. C. 1\. ··A ~ irl of higlr purf.J"·" · mitlr pl.:n r iJ n f ubi/it_y a 11cl tl c fto r rn inoli"" In fiCCO IIIpfi.\ / J J/ h' ltl . ••

E.r>W.\I<U MATEJOV!- K\

P re•idc nl Sc it· net· C lu b. P er uvia n Tn· ;" urn n ( S 1a fl . G lee Cl ul o. Se nio r C ia ... "f t i .'i ll' l / oo~'·' /lui ./cc·,/., i/1 o l c uu n t . ··

D onoTH Y MA ut K

Nelson.

•·h r .

Edilor- in-Chi cf of Norma lilc. ··f-Ie\ jiOfi C /111 / n n l f n r f2o lt.-n :·

GEOHGE ME DS KEr<

Troy. Kan.

·· )1,.. ·.. ,, dncr . .... tr o n g I n lah n r ..">uf e In nHrr.


\ Vesle rn, Nebr.

EMMA MEYER

"A

smile fr om

out th e h ear/ f or

e ve ryon e.路路

Hubbell, N ebr. "A P,ropcr maiden this and thought-

MATTIE MIL ES

ful.

R osE MI LL ER

B laden, Nebr.

Peruvian Staff . "Painfully serious."

RUT H

MY E RS

"I'm in lo\Je."

Po lk, Nebr.


O ng . N e br.

TH I LDA NELSO:-:

D rama li c C lub . " Tlr ou art llJ c iglr ccl in th e and

1101

balnt~ cc

found wonlirr f,! . ..

L I LLIE 0LS01'

Omaha, N e b r .

"Wlrcre com cl:y !!race a n d co 113/arrl virtue dtv c/1." '

c,_,,ovs ORo

Aubu rn, Nebr.

Senior V ice -Prcs id c n l. Orcheslra. " j us/ one s mall smile And /if c"s llJorilr IDhilc."

R I C HARD

OvERI-IOL T

Pe r u , N ebr.

Band. Orches lr a . Pres ide n l of Sc ience C lub . Dra m alic C lu b. Peruv ia n S1aff. "He must, l1c IS, he cannot b ut be 111 i.sc .路路


Valley. N.-br.

M ,\ll EL PARSON

Orche• lra.

P hilo Secrc lary.

" S ire is a fri e nd lo cvcrj; bodj;. A"'/ c\JcrJ;bodj; i, a fricml to

ALICE PES HEK

lr cr.

Fairfield. Nebr.

"Paddle• lrcr o wn canoe and tlocs it well."

CECELI A PETERSON

S lerling. Nebr.

Dramalic C lub . Peruvian S1aff. "Sire Ira• a 'will' of lrcr own."

FAY PoPPLEWELL

Reseve, Kan .

"Succc" is tir e re word o f tliligcncc."


LLOYD P RII NTE F oo tba ll. Baâ&#x20AC;˘kc tba ll . Y .M .C. A. Cabinet. G lee C lub. ''/ love a lm> ic. A B onnie. Bonnie Lassie."

Lu c tLE R ANDOL

1\uburn , N <'b r .

Girls' Counc il. "S he has a gentle, timid air ."

Lt NNlE RtECKER

Aurora, Nebr.

Glee Club. Pres ident o f Gi rls' C lub. "/(s the songs yc sing, and the smile., ye wear, that's mal( in' th e sunshine everyw here."

ELSBETH R oESS LER

P la tts mo uth, Neb r .

Glee Club. Bas ke tball. "TI1erc is no subst itute for thorough goin~: ardent, a nd sincere earnestness .


Dono rt-I Y RoETTCEH

Elmwood, Ncb(

Edito r-in-Chief Peruvian. "Fine p eople lil(c [me dccd.1 ncccl n o trumpet>."

LEO N

R oETTCEH

Elmwood , N ebr.

Capla:n Football. Baske tball. Basebal l. Y . M. C. A. Cabinet. Dra matic C lub. Peruv ian Staff. "Funn y, t!.at'5 m e all

M ABEL Ru NYAN

ol><' r ."

Edgar. Nebr.

"A ll!oman ll!it!. a purpo5c in lif e."

T ILLIE SALZMANN

Ainsworth, N ebr.

Peruvian S taff. Vice- President Girls' C lub. Basketball. " Say, l(id, li>len !"


-~ ~

--- -~

---

~~~

K ,\THH I :-IE SCII ILL

A ll ian ce. Nebr .

Y. W. C. A. Cabin eJ. Gi rls C lu b Council. ' ' /n faith lady you have a 111 erry heart."

8ARil AHA Scovi LLE

O mah a . N ebr. Treaâ&#x20AC;˘urcr of G irls' C lub. "Blithe. clrcc r[u l. and gay. He r'., i> a plea>ant way."

SEARS D eca tur. N ebr. Dramatic C lub . Glee C lub "A quiet maid with a winning wa y. "

I sA BELLE

BL ANCHE SEJD

N emaha. Nebr.

"Quiet- unlil{c m os t girls."


rrRVYih N

FRANCES SHEA

Fairbury. Nebr.

N. C. A. Secretary and Treasurer. "She loo/(5 pious, but mh en _you /(no n> lrcr- "

CLARA S I C K

Sterling. Neb r.

"Z cal om ye!l 111 oclest."

jESSIE SPRECHER

Omaha, Neb r.

Basketball. "/-/cal> en help us- n>c lral>c much to an.. mer for."

GLADYS PATTERSO N STEPHENSON

P eru, Nebr. Phi lo. T reas. Girls' C lub Council. "Married."

â&#x20AC;˘


STEPHENSON Peru. N ebr. P eru vian S taff Dramatic C lub. Glee Club. Football . B aseba ll. "Let's gro lJJ old logcll• cr. /I oney."

\'1(/,\n n E ,-,;

Cv,\

STEWART

"Whatever she accomp/i,,/,cs."

Auburn . Nc:br. u"'lertal(cs

~ · ELLE STEWAilT

Cortla nd, Nebr.

"Flirtation u allen/ion with out inlculia n.

H ELEN TAY LOR

"A mwll slJJecl silence ."

Be llwood, Nebr.


\VII . I.IAM

THOMA S

.-\l oxandria. Nebr.

Dramatic C lub. Y. M . President. "" A lice. where arl llro u ? ""

Lt: ONE. VANCE.

C. A.

Peru. Nebr.

·· W lr y is sire so it~lercs lc d in /-1 omc £conom ics? ··

Dt:.LLA Wt:.ATI-IE.RHOCG

Douglas. Nebr.

G lee C lub. Dramatic C lub. Peru· vi an Staff. ""Nc11er /rouble trouble till lroublc /roubles m e .""

\VE.L THA WtLK IE.

Boise. Idaho

Gi rls" C lub Council. ""Sire may ne11cr set lhc world on fire. bul she is mighty good al sparlr-

ir;g.""


1~ =--I.!:<I(EยงJi:;~

HELEN

W ILLIAMS

Atkinson. Nebr.

Basketbal l Cap tai n. "Oh dri"e dull care a~~>a_y.

MAntE W I XON

Papillion , Nebr.

"There is no royal ro cul lo l carni11~."

Run-1

\XIoLFORD

Trenton. N ebr.

" She has a pleasing ll>a_y a ncl a smile that matches 1he twinlelc 111 he r e_yc."

Tabor, Iowa "The mildest manners gentlest heart."

and

the


=:::::~

_ _.,_ ,._ ---===-===

ERMA

\V tLSOK

Drama tic C lub . G lee C lub.

-- 71'RVVIA~

Harvard, Nebr. Peruvian

S taff.

"/ lJJant m]l Choyce alllla]is."'

MA UDE \ V RIGHT

N .. Ison, Nebr.

" Be thy fame as unrivaled as th y rn c ril. 路路

PAN SY M c K INNEY G lee C lub.

Peru , Nebr.

"Too busy to be tall(cd about."

WiLLIAM

CARTER

P e ru, Nebr.

" U nc easing energy you have, but do ]lou neve,路 iirc?"


·.,

THELMA Cou: P e ru, N e br. "Bronm arc h er c.Yc> a > th e bcrrie• lira/ gro w b_y tir e wa_y,idc."

~AURA KooN

Bladen, Nebr.

Y. W. C. A. Cabine t. "A rrd /rue >Ire ;, a > >Ire lratlr pro\>crl Ir ene/f."

ur..u G.

DwYER

Nebraska City

"Studiou>."

CRACE LE E

Peru, Nebr.

"Crace l l vcr_y fond of Zoology. S he i> endeavoring t o catch a 'miller' D>ithoul wing>."


=-

------

Rachel Rebecca Hayes Seco nd daughter of ex-P res ident and Mrs. Hayes, die d at h er home in Lincoln, J anuary 5, 1920. She h a d for s o many years ""belonged to us"" and h ad g r ow n to suc h beaut ifu l young womanhood among us tha t we ca nnot think of her as h avi ng pa ssed to th e Gre at Beyon d. To us s h e is s till a happy livin g pres ence in cla ss room and o n campus, g iv in g generously of her t a le nt s t o dra matic club a nd Girls" Glee club, to Everett a nd Phi lomat hean s ocieties a nd to the Y. \V. C. A. \Ve s till fee l th e c harm of her grac ious manne r a nd kindly s peech. H er sincerity, h e r h e lpfulness, her thou g ht for o th e rs, h e r sy mpathy s till warm our hearts. To those present in the c hap e l one mornin g during the Great War. the memory of the b eau t y o f her face, a nd th e hig h pu rposes movin g her as s he pers onified the service o f the Such R ed C ross in thrilling ton es, will s tay forever. se r v ice s h e lon ged to g iv e n ot thinkin g t h at in a ll t h e little ways of li fe h e r se rvi ce co unted , too . S h e h a s a n s were d th is call o f the Mas ter to a n ew life of service f or which s he was so r ead y w=th a s mil e on her lips, a nd a g lory div in e in h er face. \ Ve are the ri c h e r for this fin e young life whi c h ca m e to Ro wer h ere. ""But when so m e s unny s pot in those bri g ht field s Needs the fai r prese n ce of an a dded Rower, D ow n s weeps a s tarry angel in the nig ht; At m o rn the r o s e h as vanis h e d from our bower." - Ha rriet Beech e r Stowe.

Carl ] . Flau h r';Yh e n t h e _war was over and the world seem ed to b ! 0 h dn gC ou{ n c h promi ses to yo un g men of s t e rl "n g ma :J h 00h 'd a r F la u was t aken. Ye s , the ca ll ca m e when e a r e a c h e d th e f ull s tre ngth of m a nh ood . . ~e was endowed for l i fe w ith a s trong body- a s tron3 m ln h-and with c oura ge t o do the b a ttle of life w h e n d eat ca me. h A t fir s t it was tho u g ht a s li g ht o p e ratio n wo uld be a ll that dds n eed e d t o resto r e hi m to p e rfect h ea lth: the n e n c han g e ca me a nd d eath triump h ed over li fe. t e su w

hTh ose who knew him will rem e mbe r the h appy b oy 0 was e ver rP.ady t o do goo d t o t h o s e around hi m .

He i s g o n e but the good h e h as don e will li ve throu g h路 out a ll tim e.

--- ~---

-

--


J.9.iQ

Peru Color Song Fling abroad our normal colors To the free Nebraska breeze, Blending heav' n' s own white and azure With the soft green of the trees r While o ur loyal hearts a nd voices With pride and joy unite, As we sing Peru's devotion To the pale blue and the white. CHORUS: While our loya l hearts and voices With pride and joy unite As we sing Peru' s devotion To the p a le blue a nd the white. Through the years of sun and sh adow, Mid the scenes we l ove so w e ll, 0' er our hearts our dear old colors Still weave their magic s pell; And wherever life sh all call u s We' ll strive with a ll our might To uphold the bra v e tradition Of the pale blue and the white. When the cares o f life o' ertake u s, Mingling fast o ur locks with g ray, Whe n our dearest hopes forsake us, False fortunes fade away, We sh all banish pain and sadness, By m em'ries fond a nd brig ht; Of the old Nebraska Norma l And the pale b lue a nd the white.


l' ER.\l~V LA 路N

-THE JlJNIOllS GOOSE-


-AUNT FERN -

-WAITING-

-ONE AT A TIME-

WINTER 0PORT B

WORKING?

- 路CHEER UP -


\

__

\


[9'!0

Ca meron

Be nn ett D elze ll

Bowen Huffer

R ouse Keith

R ose nqui st

Juniors When you're up , you're up; When you're down, you're down; When you' re up against the Juniors You're upside down! The Junior class is a concrete example of quality ra ther than qu a ntity. Althoug h there w ere only about seventy of us, shortly after school w as well beg un, we held a get -acquainted party, and y o u may be s ure we go t acqua inted, too. As a result of this event, the following corps of leaders was c hosen: "Shorty" Huffer, president; Mona Keith , secretary; Paul Bennett, treasurer; Esther Delzell, chairman of the Prog ra m Committee. Extremely satisfactory work h as been done by these officers, with th e a id o f the e ntire class. But rememb e r- all work and no pla y m akes J ac k a dull boy. In o rder to offset o ur stre nuous duties, we h a ve added several p a rties, a number of picnics, and a big Juni o r-Senior Banquet, not to mention a Junior-Senior g irls' bas ket ball game; we did not get the big end of the score, but we did secure a lovely, f e lt, Senior p e nnant, which, we a re prone to believe, is s till in cold storage! Great pla ns are in process of b e ing "put acr oss" to make our Senior ye a r the b est the old sch o ol h as ever known. Who knows? Drea m s often c ome true ! As one move towa rd this, the class is sending out a n a ppeal to all who a re eligible, to secure a chapel seat in the Senior section for next y ea r, a nd expand our ranks to one hundred s ixty stron g. Here's to the class of 路 2 I, a nd the glory of old Peru I


Huff

Gordon Bennett Mil es Adams Maxey Adams Huffe r Keith H oak Bol e j ack O r elup Lewi s Ellis

Juniors

Ivers Cowell

Brown

Gilliland Gilliland

Van Sa nt


Groscheck Clark Erisman Rogers Carr Veach McKenny L a n dolt Pa rriot t Farquhar L aw r e nce Eads Jarvi s Rams ey

Juniors

Dressler

Johnson M cNair D e lze ll Meyers Patitz Mathes Hi ckma n H a mmond

Barrett W ilso n Hickma n

Fen ske


路prRIIVI AN' :._._-. 路路----=:__--

Bize

S h arra r Shellhorn

Bi ze Prokup Fis her G lasgow

Burley Wedner Rhodus \Vest Weave r Petra sh ek

Juniors

Sta lder Scott Bla k e Knape Elliott Dowell M cColl Reddin g Schmidt J o n es Peterson Everett G riffith s


- vtlNIORS-

JUNIOR 3NAP6-

GOOD PALf,

-WAITING-

ZOOLOGfeAL NUTs

I

路I I

I

路\

l


=-:.._-

-_.,-;:-_..:_-

=---==~=

.

-- 路--

. pr Jtlilf1AH-


=-----=-- -=====

==-1 9~'1~0!====== ~~~

Sophomore Officers

Harman

Bates

H igg in s

C ooper

Sophomores An introduction to the class behind the purple a nd g old is h ard ly needed. W e are the folk tha t a t the end of the first semester h a d s o many 路'precious jewels" that the Juniors captured fourteen of o ur numbe r . In closin g the year, we p u blish this rec ipe for m a king th e a for esaid j ewels: A group of e n e r getic lads, mixe d with a numb er of wins ome lassies, b e at with h a rd study, seasone d with "p eppy" class chape ls, and fla vore d with d e lig htful parties. Leave it to the a dviser to a dd ingred ients as h e, or she, sees fit. The m a nner in which our class a d v iser, Miss H a rm a n, s o s kilfully a nd loya lly st eer e d th e Soph omore Ship is a pleasant m e mory to each sailor on dec k.

-

H.Y.


- - -=-==..c:::"--'-==

Weaver Schmidt D owell Adam s L o n g fe llo w Swa rtzweld er Miller Griffith s West Elkin s Oa k es L ewis

Sophomores

S h e llh orn Bize Sears Coop er K ize r Bize McKenny M oore H a ll Kelly G lasgow F ish e r Ba t es Gilbert ) o n es Br e h m E lli o tt


-==--

-

Pi: RJH

-MIX IN - 'BOYS. -

DOUBLE DUET-

-~--o


_ EERllYIA_N__

-

~~~路':llit<\.',~~~


' ..1910

T oble r Knapp

Mu tz H oy t

A nde r so n Sea r s

F is h e r M eye r

Freshies ? Y es, but full of p ep a nd ge ttin g rea dy f o r the tim e w h e n w e will b e m a kin g a S enior a nnu a l. C la ss cha p els ? W e've had som e goo d o n es, the B ees a nd th e Bugs a nd the Bats v ying w ith each other in puttin g o n inte r estin g a nd ent e rta inin g progra m s. Basketball? W e ll, w e' v e ha d a tast e o f vic t o ry a nd prac ti cally our wh o le team is m a de up of four-yea r p e o p le. N ext y ea r, a nd the n e xt, a nd the n e x t , lo ok out! Fun ? We' v e h a d that a ll th e time. Our firs t a ffa ir was a brea kfast. Sha ll w e ever forg et that snappy O cto b e r mornin g w ith j o lly ga m es a nd g ene r ous ea ts r o und a huge c a mp fire ? A nd w asn't th e w a t e rme l o n go od? In D ec e mb e r th e art ro o m w as b e d eck ed in C hris tmas g r ee n s a nd a cl e v e r e nt e rtai nme nt committee c row d e d a w h o le " Week o f D a t es" into one m e rry evening. A pril F ool t o o I Who w o uld h ave th o u g ht th a t th e time f o r o ur sed ate sponsor to e nterta in us in h er h o m e. But s h e did , thou g h w e sca r cely kn e w h e r in o ur cla ss cc lo r s as D a ffy D o wn Dilly. How h a rd it w as t o find out ju s t w hich o f o ur clas~mates was m askin g as Little Bo P eep, as a S p a ni s h D a n ce r, as a C olo ni a l D a m e o r a C lo wn. Th ink of our d ignifi e d class p r esid e nt as th e m iddle a ged Mrs. D eClin e, a nd h e r s im pe rin g d a u g ht e r D o lly as o ur buddin g young a rtis t! W e re y o u e ver served with excelsior sala d o r o ni ons m as qu e r a ding as nice fa t chocola t es? The n y o u d o n ' t know th e j oys of a n April F o ol P a rty. Wha t else h av e we d o ne? Our class pres id e nt is th e n e w sec r e t a ry of Y. M . f o r ne xt y ear. We h a ve m e mbe rs in Philo , Y. W . a nd Y. M., th e Girls ' Gl ee Club, th e Dra m a tic C lub, the o rc h est ra and b a nd. Yes! W e 've had a g o o d yea r. M a y a ll thos e t o co m e b e as p ro fit a ble a nd h a ppy.


Yeck

H arge r Tob le r Dye

Blythe G ri ffi n

Sears H eywood

Freshmen

Russe ll

Parriott M eye r

Bath Fis h e r

S hiv e ly Knapp

Ande r so n


-=--=-PrR.v-

FRESHMAN SNAPS


=--

::o_

---====-====

Bu e ttgenback Pra nte Schroeder Vande rfo r d H acker

Brown Fi s h e r H er~ick

H c u ~e

Specials and Trainers

S e brin g Williams Kruntrod

Moore Rin gswa ld juhl

johnston Sch r oede r Frederick son

juhl Hobso n H agema n


Whitfi eld Shouse

Bo g le Carr Herrick Vanderford Lewis Humbert Delzell Chase

Brunsdon R h ode s

Tenth Grade

Howe

Ca rter Bath Ri ggs Harajian

Barnes L a France

Wills Pettit Harajian Dy e

Doan e


Dallam Wright Barr Comstock Vanderford Nelson Fisher Parriott

Palmer Robirds Beck Neal Barn es D a u g h e rty

Fisher Sears

N inth Grade

Ye c k Hayes Taylor Cowell Ringwald Co tna y Coo k Meek

Parriott Scoville

Laug hlin Smith Scoville Ri echi e

Dillo n Wilson


~M : 路.

'OVERALLS''

SMILE -CURBED-


Coach Speer Early last fall the prospects for a successful football season l ooked very d a rk for old P eru from the fact that the outlook for a l arge e nrollment of boys w as anythin g but favo rab le. N o r h ad the appointment of a coach been made up t o this time. But one d ay s h or tly before the opening o f sc h ool o ur President announced that h e h a d obtained W. G . Speer from the. Kansas State Agri cultural Coll ege a nd that he was one of the best a thl etic coaches in th e middle w est. S p e e r was a favorite player of Coac h Mik e Ahearn at M anh attan , Kansas. He played one year of freshma n footb a ll, a nd three years of v a r s i t y football und e r him. In the fall of 1908- 1909 , h e succeeded in winning a birth on th e a ll Missouri eleven. H e h as a lso played four years of varsity b aseb a ll and one year of varsity basketball. In the fall of 1911 he was assista nt football coach und er Ahearn, havin g c h arge o f the b ackfield . Mr. Speer came to Peru with a wide reputation as a coach and th e opening of school found him at his post hard at work. He set out to accomplish two things ; first to put out a winning football team and second to win the confidence of old P e ru. H e su cceeded admirab ly in both of these undertakings and it was not long before "Bunt" was a n admired friend of every m a n in Peru. Through his patience and persistent e fforts he soon had e v ery cylinder of his "pep m achine" working in fine sh ape and on October 3 he ra n his machine out on the g ridiron a nd tuned up the motor prepara tory to his st arting on th e race for st a te c h ampionship. During the first lap of the race th e cylinders were a little s tiff but before the second la p of the r ace was over everything was working in excellent shape. Although at th e end of the r ace we were third in the confe rence yet taking all of the difficulties into con sideration under which Coach was forced to work, h e certainly had a victorious and highly su ccessful season. He put old Peru on the map this year and next fall we feel sure that h e will let the whole wide world know who Peru is a nd for what she stands. Too much credit cannot be given to Coach Speer for his excelle nt work in athletics this year and we wish him muc h success in his work in the future, and we feel as"sured that "Old Peru" will walk away with the championship the coming season .


Leon Roettger Capt a in Leon, commonly called " Fun ny," was a good st r ong player. Although playi n g a n ew position at ce nter, h e handled th e place with much c r ed it. Being in a position to talk to his n ew men in the line made him all the more valua ble in this po s ition. H e m ade h is lette r in 1917, wa s in c harge o f a thl eti cs at the school in I 91 8, a nd as ''Capta in" and a player this yea r k ep t his t eam to gether con s i sten tly; was a lways o ut t o practice amon g the first, working h ard to help build u p th e t eam. A good dea l o f credit is due "Capt ain" Ro e ttge r for the s ple nd id record a nd success of the t ea m of 1919.

Charles Gately First Y ear on T eam: Jr. Quarter Back "Chuck," as we called him on t h e g r :d iron, not only has ability t o pilot the team in excel lent form, but is a s h ifty, classy little p layer a t pa ssin g and ca rry in g t h e ball. Some ot h is long runs were as clever as hav e eve r been seen on the Peru gridiron. His unusu al ability t o handle the team in p in c h es, his excellent d e fensive work and the e nviable ab!l'ty as a player ea rne d for him h is uncha llenged position as Q . B. on the All-State t ea m.

Benesch Guard

It i s the "bulldog" d e t e rmina tion a nd "pep" tha t has distin gui s hed him as a footb a ll pla y e r a nd put him on the All-State t eam . We are all proud of Benesch and thought it only jus t when he was chosen o n the All-State team.


Waldo Rasch Firs t Year on Team: Jr. "Ca p tai n" Elect 1920 Full Back Wal do, our " Flyin g Dutchman , " was the fastest ma n o n the t ea m a nd a b ea r on de fense. Though he was not gra n ted this honor, h e was valuabl e enough to our t eam, and h ad the necessa r y qualifications for position o n the A ll State t eam. He ca rried the ball m o r e yards for Peru tha n any o ther player, some of h is lo n g runs being sensations of the season. At backing up the lines a n d ends h e h as no equal.

Sharrar End Known on the foo t ball field as "Fra n k , " h e made a s plendid record in footba ll. He s lips down the field into vacant places, and receiving forward pass is gon e fo r a touch dow n . Frank is a J unior. H e will remain another year with u s.

Prante Half Back Prante is a n ew man fo r Peru and h as won a war m p la ce in the hea r t of eve ry Peruv ia n. Prante n ever mi ssed a n i g h t's prac ti ce and is a firm be liever in tra ining. Prante grad uat es this year.


. PÂŁBJLYIA N

Copenhaver Tackle "Cope" was a heady, consistent player. He was always breaking throu g h the line and stopping his opponents' plays. His bulldog tenacity made him the football player that he was. "Cope" decided to become a pedagogue.

Shaver Tack le Shaver is a tackle for su re. He could always make holes in the line for the ball and wae a lways playing hard. Shaver left u s to take up o ther duties of a more serious nature. We all wish h im success in h is new work.

"Dad" Cottle Guard "Dad" Cottle was a b ra iny and reliab le player. His weight streng thened the line, and helped to op e n up holes for the back field. He is a senior, so hi s football days are ove r.


19':20

E. Rosenquist Half- Back "Rasey" was a good m a n in hi s pos1hon, was good ~rou nd gainer, r ece ived passes well, and s h owed ab'lity to analyze th e gam e. He h as one more year for Peru.

Higgins Guard "Higg" was a lways t h ere with t h e fight, and was n o t afraid to h a nd it to oth e r s. He, with Cent er and Tack le on eith er s ide, was invincible. "Higg" could be d epended upo n t o s t op every thin g that came his way. T he t eam n ex t fa ll will find "Hi gg" one of its " s t a rs."

Fisher E nd Fisher, a nother n ew man w ho s howed unu s ual ability at end. His specia l ty was san d, and l ots o f it . He w ill come b ack nex t year to reinforce the t ea m.


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Standley End Standley, another new man, d id some remarkable work for the team, particularly in breaking up end runs. He was fast and played a consistent game. He h as three more years to play for Peru.

Chase Half-Back C hase, another n ew m a n, sma ll, yet a fi g hter, s howed talent in carrying the pigskin. He was steady, eager to get into the game and played well.


Football Games, 1919 3-Grand Island . .... 0; Peru 10-Midland . ........ 0; Peru 2 4-W esleyan . ...... 20; Peru

Oct. Oct. Oct. 0; Oct. 31-Kearney 7; Nov. 7-Doane 0; Nov. 21-Wayne Normal ... 0; Nov. 2 7-Cotner University .. GRAND ISLAND GAME •

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Peru Peru Peru Peru

37 6 0 26 0 14 21

The day was hot and sultry, making it difficult for consecutive playing. While we had a few players with experience most of the Peru line-up felt their first real bumps and tasted their first football. Captain Roettger, Copenhaver, Sharar, Rasc h and Gately led the team's play on defense, R asch a nd Gately making several brilliant runs for Peru's scores. MIDLAND GAME The Midland game was hotly contested throughout. Two well executed passes, Gately to Sharar, beat Midland, while the stubborn defense of the line backed up by Rasch saved it at critical times. The game was marked by roug h play. WESLEYAN GAME The Wesleyan game was hard fought to the last whistle. While t he heavy Wesleyan line and fast backfield took advantage of some breaks by the Peru boys for th eir scores, the same e rrors in a ny oth er games p layed would not have cost us the game. K EARNEY GAME Kearney was completely outclassed in a ll departments of th e game. Copenh aver, Roettger a nd Sharar starred in this game on defense, w hile the Gately-Rasch scorin g combination piled u p a score of 26 to 0 . DOANE GAME

If there is such a thin g as a team being in a slump or in a row of hard luck, Peru certainly had its day a t Doane in this contest. Peru worked the ball up easily each time, ready to sco re five times and something invariably happened. Doane slipped a sco re across on their only one c hance in the last minute of play. Perhaps a little overc onfidence on the p a rt of Peru boys helped the Doanites. WAYNE GAME This was one of the best games of the season. While Wayne had no chance to score they gave the Peruvians a stiff battle. Through the clever work of our backfield and ends we worked over two touchd own s for the victory. COTNER GAME Though played on a wet field and with a cold, brisk wind, this gam e was full of good play. Peru's line was a ston ewall with t h e ends doing some stellar work on defense. T he thrills of the game were long runs by Rasch a nd · Gately through a broken field to to u chd owns. The season on the whole was a grand success. The men, though most o f them new at the game, had the o ld Peruvian spirit, were e a ger to learn and with p lenty of natural ability, developed into a spl endid team, as w as shown by their excelle nt work at the end of th e season.


Squad



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I Capt. C. Rosenq ui st, whose work at cen t er was seco n d possibly to th at of Johnson o f Doane, deserves a large a mount of credit for his team' s s u ccess. He was a good jumper at center, h an dl e d the ba ll ni c ely on t eam work. Was always coo l at critica l times and h ad abi l ity to sco r e.

C. Rosenquist

Buettgenbach at sta tionary g uard , was o ne of the most valuable and dep e nd ab l e men on the !920 sq u ad . ''Buettcould sol ve the opposi e n ent's plays, p i c kin g th e ~an that was to shoo t, this makmg him a g r eat fa ctor in ou r team's play . C lever on Aoor work to rest some of the oth e r men. Watch this youngster, he will be a world beater in a thl e ti cs for Peru.

Wa lt e r Buettgenbach

Ed. R osenquist, for wa rd, was our hi g h point m an 'With I 46. H e o nly missed p lay in g in one ga m e of th e season. Was a clever Ao or man.

Edward Rosenquist


Lo y d Pra nt e, runnin g g uard. thou g h pla yin g his b as k e tba ll , was o n e o f our m ost valuabl e m e n on t ea m . \Vas Aeet on hi s feet t a kin g up th e defe n s e d e velope d into a cl e v e r t ea m m a n . H e is a senio r th e t c ilm will mi ss hi s wo rk anoth e r yea r .

first the a nd a nd

Ra sc h , for wa rd, s howed 拢peed o n th e Ao or a nd, b e in g good o n lon g s hots , w a s a p owe r on the t ea m.

Wald o

L oy d Pra nte

R as ch

Higgins was an e ffi c ie nt m a n wh e n ca lle d upon to fill th e p la c e o f a ny o f the firs t five. Hi s g ood s ports m a n路 s hi p s tic ktoitiveness is a s ' g n fo r the P e ru a thl e t e.

Fl oyd Hi gg ins


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Stand l ey was a lso an efficie nt m a n w h o s h owed hi s a b i lity as a bas k e t ball player. Nex t yea r we a r e expect; in g g r ea t thin gs fr om B ur r.

Burr Standl ey

Normal Tea m


_ ~ l't&.\IY.IA N

Basketball Season The results of the 1920 basketball team were very gratifying, considering a ll the men were playing their first year of college ball. The men began working out sh ortly after football season was over. The coach sent the m en home for the holidays, with the knowledge in his mind that only h ard work would g ive results this season . The first of the year brought b ack the players and a n ew spirit came with them. Syracuse A. A. team came a long for a tussle, to work the Peru boys out before starting our regular season . P e ru won 2 1 to 1 7. The co nfere n ce season was opened with the mighty Doane Five, a t Crete, the Nebraska c hampions. This game went to the l oss column, 29 to 15. Next came York College and were easily defeated by Peru, 38 to 8 . Then came Ke a rney Normal. one of our big rivals in athletics; took them m to a tune of 28 to 12. To wind up this four-game trip, Peru dropped off for a combat with Cotner University. The team being s lig htly w orn o ut by the long trip, let the opponents off with three-point m a r gin. Cotner 2 1, Peru 1 8. Kearney Normal were n ext to play on local floor ; the gam e r esulted in a romp by P e ru b oys, 32 to 6. The second road trip of the season started with a loss t o Midland College, 23 to 22, in a rou g h and tumbl e game. Wayne Normal paid the n ext tribute to Peru, g iving u s a fast, clean game, 3 4 to 2 1. The Peruvians called upon Dana College, a t Blair, Nebraska , for a 42 to 1 7 v ic t ory. Nebraska W esleyan came into o ur territory for the next contest. This proved to b e the best gam e the P e ru boys put up durin g the season , defeating the Coyotes 2 3 t o 15. N ext o n the h o me prog ra m w as Cotn e r University, who were going at t h eir b est, and after a whirlwind contest th ey o ut-counted us 1 7 to 9. Pra nte, one of our very best players, was injure d during the week and w as not in this game and it w as quite evident that this was t h e r eason for our d efeat. The t eam was more or less broken up b y the l oss o f one or more of the first five p layers being out of the gam e. The third road t r ip was disastrous, with t h e team in bad condition, dropping games t o Wesleyan, 2 0 t o 12, a nd Omah a Unive r sity, 15 to 10. The final contest o f the seaso n was played with Midland College on th e P eruvia n s路 floor. The Peruvia n s, tho u g h m ore or less broken u p by th e withdrawal o f R asch , r eplaced the vacan cy w ith o ur "Shi fty Gat ely " and took r evenge. A la r ge c row d of e nthusiasts turned o ut to see t h e sport as u su a l a nd n o one was disappointe d. Peru boys s tarted o ut with a rus h, play ing Midla nd o ff their feet, winnin g 25 to 15 . The season, considering t he h andicap of a ll n ew material from whic h to build a t eam , was very s u ccessful, though not so victorious as some previou s years. Prospect s f or a splendid team n ext year a r e very g ood, so h e r e路 s ho p ing the 192 1 Peruvians will h ave the opportunity of r ecord ing c h amp ionship history fo r the team n ext y ear.


H. S. Fi ro t T eam

H. S. Second Team


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Senior Team

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Fres hm e l) T e am


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The Girls' Basketball Tournament w as unique this y ear in th e fact tha t each class in school was represented by a team of players and by t h e hi g h type of p laying which was done. The g irls mas tered difficult passes a n d clever team work, making the game more interesting. The Freshmen team was p a rticul a rly s tron g in team work, working to gether a ll th e time. The cleve r basket shootin g of the S ophomore forward, H a llie Weaver, m a rks the stron gest point in favor of th e Sophomores. The Juniors a nd Seniors were the most evenly m atch ed t eams the school has seen in a long while. The gua rdin g of L e nora Cowell a nd A d a Huff, was parall eled only by that of Elsbeth Roessler a nd Jess ie Sprecher. If the ball ever fe ll into the hands of the forwards there w as sure to be a goal, but it only arrived in the forwards' hands by dint of good team work. The interest created by suc h fine gam es cannot h e lp but live thro u g hout the school year a nd show itself in other s ports, a nd m ake th e g irls feel th e ir sh a r e in all the athletics of school.


P£ R..VYIA ~ --

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PHILO OFF ICERS F IRST SEMESTER Parson

Overholt Brown Van Sa nt Shively Ferree Clover

Philo

SECOND SEMESTER OFF IC ERS Bennett

Shively Brunsdon

S harrar Clover

Ove rholt Bonde

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PROGRAM COMM ITTEE Hoak Lorance Bennet C ulwe ll G:lbert Va n Sa nt Hou se Re use McCarroll

Philo

P H :LO S har ra r Weave r La ndo lt Griffith s McK enny Hulbu rt Prante

Dowe ll Mil es

McK enny A dam s

L ienemann


Overholt Prante Shaver C lark Olson Burch Schill Jarvis

Thomas Griffiths Ellis Wixon

Philo

Wi lson

Sick Pesh ek Randol

Fre derick son Keith Mauck Anderson

Dauphin Sprecker Heywood

H eywood Wolford Popplewell Yeck


Faraquhr Hacke r Gap en Bonde

Faulkner Matejovsky Shel~horn

K e lly

Grimes H ageman Overh o lt L a ndolt G lasgow C lover Peterson

Philo

Amende R ogers j ones

Eri s man E risman Ne lson Bol eja c k Wilson R o essler Ord Ca rr S c hroe d er B runsdon Cowe ll


Scoville C a ldwell

Corle y Wi ll iams Myers Moore McK e nny Mi ll e r Fi s h e r C ameron H o yt Dye

Ca m e ron

Shaver

Rou se

Koon

R o se nqui s t

Lee


Lon g fe llow Tay lo r

Ivers H acker West

Rouse Bu c kingha m Salzma n n

Brown Rei c ker Blaugh

Philo

Huffer Adams D e lze ll

Ca rr Wi lkie

F is h e r Adams Sears Gilb e rt

Baugh mann Miles


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Dramatic Club

(Adopltd oa v er waoeot 4J e:sh..~ lir tbe nramath: Club. )


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P!R.VYI.A N

Dramatic Club This may be considered one of the mos t s uccessful years o f the club. The members and friend s have immen sely enjoyed th e presentation of the fo llowing plays : "The Price of Coal," b y Harold Brighouse; a "one wo rd" play, "The Noble Lord," by P e rcival Wilde; "The L and of the r-"ree,·· by Bertha N. Graham, and "The Turtle Dove," a

Chinese p lay, by Margaret Scott Oliver . The progra m as planned for the remainder of the year includes "The Tra itor," by Perciva l Wilde; ·· 'Op o ' My Thumb," and two Irish plays, "The Workhouse Ward" and " The Land of Heart's D esi re."

At tryout s h e ld later in March, the following membe rs were added: M isses Sh ively, Glasgow, Loi s Griffin, Yec k, Hoake, She I h o r n, West, Moore, Edna Lew·s, Huff, R ed ding, Inez Peterson and Mr. Ca rl Rosenqui st. For th e attainments of the year we are g : eat ly indebted to our charming directo r, Mrs. R. F . Seybolt, whose ingenuity and ca p a bility have b een a g reat service to the club.

In the fall, the prominent parts in the product ion of '"Th e Forest Prin cess," by the school, were take n by members of th e club. The masterpiece of the year was seen in "The Rose of Plymouth Town. " Thi s .:lelightful old fine dra ma was :ru ly a fini s h ed bit of art.


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A Rose o' Plymouth Town

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A Rose o' Plymouth Town


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The Forest Princess


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Wilke

Root Meyer Van Sant Ha rman Stephenson Bonde Koon Lewis Randol Salzmann Reicker Ellis

LIN N IE REICKER President Firs t Semester

MATTIE C . ELLIS Advise r

Schill Magneson Culwell Griffin Buck ing h am Scoville

MYRTLE KOON P r esident Second Semeste r


"Oh G irl s Club, o h , jolly G irls C lub, Y o u a re a ll of o n e year o ld t oday, Y o u a re p e ppy, full of fun. M a ny a re the stun ts y o u' ve d one. Oh Girls C lub, oh, jo lly Girls C lub, You ' v e w on m y hea rt w ith you r gaye ty. M a rc h o n , m a rch o n, th rough a ll th e years to c ome . A n d when w e're gone fr o m o ld P e ru We will b e a n xious t o com e b ac k t o y o u . " " Wha t' s a ll this ro w abo ut ?" " Girls C lub!" " What a bou t the Girls C lub ? " " It's o n e year old t o d ay !" ' T o d a y " was F ebrua ry 18, 192 0, and th e " row" - -w e ll, t h e r o w was in C h a pel! A ll club m e mbe rs w e r e m a rke d with brig ht t ags, whic h told o f o ur b irthd ay, a nd M a ry a n d N e va sh owed o u r m asc uline c h eer lead e rs wh a t real yell in g w as. "One y ear old" -but we a r e a lready calling it, p a r a d o xi cally, the o ld club, because it is so d ear to o ur h earts. Last y ear wh e n w e wer e so v ery , ve ry y o ung, we la unc h e d th e point sy st e m w ith the stipula t ion tha t it must b e t ried at leas t for a y ea r . Tha t y ear is u p . The p oi nt sy st e m h as served us w e ll, fo r th o u g h every o ne s till w o rks th e r e is a standa rd a nd every g irl h as som e duty, but no g irl is over-burd e n e d. T o welco m e the n ew girls, the o ld g irls gav e the m a p a rty in S e pte mb e r a nd there w e m e t M o n a a nd Doro thy a nd " D ag" a nd H e le n Van a nd the y m e t Cor a a n d "Fritzie" an d H o p e a nd E r m a. Tha t was th e first p a rty. The nex t w as the Saturd a y following Tha nksgiving a t wh ich w e e nterta ine d the boys o f the sch ool, a nd the Hi Y co nve ntio n boys wer e o ur esp ecia l g u e s t s . In Februa ry we co n sole d th e K earney b ask e tba ll b o y s f o r b ea tin g th e m at a recep t io n afte r th e game. O f co urse we d idn't fo r get o ur ow n t eam th a t ni g h t. But behind the p oint syste m , b e hind these p ar ti es a n d fr o lics, h a s b een th e co n st a nt s t eady work o f the C ounc il a nd Miss Ellis a nd o ur two pre side nts, M iss Ri eck er th e fi rst sem est e r, a n d Miss K oo n the seco nd. It is the tire l ess e ffor t of these fo lks tha t h as m a d e everything th e club h as und e rtake n a su c c ess, a nd we o f the club in ge n e r a l , want the m to und e rs t a n d o ur a ppreciat io n of their sincere 路e ffo rts.


]. U. C.'S


Science Club In the b eginning of the school year whe n o th e r clubs a nd societies were b e ing revived, the Physical Science C lub was reor ganized. Its a im was threefold, n amely: to broad en our kn owle d ge of science a nd to acq uaint ourselves with the la test a dvances in the various departments of scientific inquiry, as a means of s timulating a deeper interest in scien tific tho u gh t , and for th e ext ensio n o f mutual underst a n din g between the science d epartments o f Peru Normal a nd the science departments of other institutio n s. An o rga niza tion committee drew up a co n stitution w hic h forty people sign ed. The officers for the fi rst semester were as follows: Edward Matej ovsky, president; George H eywood, v ice-presiden t ; Donald Overh olt, treasurer; Erma W ilson, secre ta ry an d Normalite r eporter, and H e len W illiams, sergeant-at -arms. In th e seco nd semester, Ric h ard Overholt, George Heywood, Katheryn Griffiths, Hildegarde Y eck a nd A lice Peshek, resp ective ly su cceed e d them . The bi-monthly programs in the fi r st sem ester and th e monthly meeting s in the second semest er, con sisted of interesting and e nte r taining discussions o f the electric furn ace, of Edison , of the wireless, a ir-cr a ft, h eavenly bodies a nd Ein stein. T h e m e mbers would like t o see the club accepted as a permanent organ ization, b ecau se it combines whol esome p leasure a nd valua ble ins truc tio n.


Senior Home Economics Class

Junior Home Economics Class


19~0

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_PI:RVYIA _N

Y . M. C. A. The school year s ta rted with a snap this fa ll on a ccount of the influence of the e ig hteen men who h a d the advantage of the confe rence at Estes Park last June. The activities of the year were influenced g reatly by different confe re nces held in this and n e ighboring states. In O c tober we h a d six men and two faculty a t th e York Co nference. W e h a d two delegates a t the big Intern a tion a l Conference a t D es M oines. In Marc h we se nt one delega te to Lincoln to the Stude nt Vo lu nteer Co nve ntion. During this same month w e sent three men (next year路 s officers) a nd one faculty member to the Fremont Confe r e nce. This conference w as a school to prepare them for next year's work as leaders, and from r epo rts the results are excelle nt. The Y. M. C. A. is inte rested not only in its own selfish inter ests, bounded by this campus. When the call came to support S teel e Holcomb, who is going as a missionary to Cairo, Egypt, we responded by sending $100.00. W e h ave h a d m a ny o utst a nding h o m e proj ects this yea r. The firs t, and one of the most significant, is the Older B oys Conference. A t this confere nce th e re w e r e hi g h sch ool boys fro m m a ny of the high schools o f southeast Nebraska. The boys came for two purposes: To have a good time, to b e helped morally a nd sp iritua lly by the inspiratio n of th e g rea t speakers a nd by forum discu ssion. Needless to say they went away satisfied. In this discu ssion of h ome projec ts we must not omit our weekly mee tings. Th ese m eetin gs h ave been a d ecided success. F o ur-minute t a lks b y s tud e nts an d lec tures b y m e mb ers o f the faculty and business m e n , w e re th e outstanding features of th e m eetings. The subj ects of these lectures had t o do with vi t a l w orld problems, su c h as the socia l, political a nd indus tria l proble m s of m o d er n Europe, a nd the important home problems discussed from the point of C hristian democracy. These were " b o iled down" t o a ppeal to s tude nts from a s tudent's v iewpoi n t. Duri ng this busy year the high sch ool boys were n o t forgo tte n . They w ere t a k en car e o f by th e Boys' C ommittee. The duty of the c h a irman of this committee was t o brin g closely together the Y. M. C. A. a nd the "Hi-Y" Club, so that both could work for the common good of the sch ool. The c h a irman h elped the hi g h sch ool b oys plan the ir m eetin gs, a nd specia l cam p a igns for hi g h e r ideals. The cabine t went on h ik es with th e b oys. The influe n ce o f th ese hi kes w as markedly b e n eficial. The work w ith th e hi g h school boys was p erh aps the most impo rtant work of the "Y" this year. A n oth er big mile-s tone in the car eer of the Y. M. C. A . this year was th e p a rt th a t we h ad in the Father and Son Banquet, held in the b asement o f th e M. E. C hurch. M a ny a fath e r a nd son left the b anque t feel ing drawn closer t ogeth e r by an invis ibl e b o nd o f fellowsh ip. A source o f enj oyment a nd o f b e n efi t to a ll h ave been th e j o int m ee tings of the C hrist ian A ssociatio n s of th e sch ool. A t th ese m eetings w e go t down t o bedr oc k . The di sc u ssion was genera l. and a ll le ft th e meetings feeli n g tha t h is c h a n ce to d o good in the world was not entirely e li m inated. About the middle of M a rc h the Inter-church Wor ld T eam came to P e ru. They broug ht a m essage from th e la nds across the sea. They spoke of the wonderfu l oppo rtunities for college gr adu ates in t h ese co untries. A lthough there were ma ny more things we wanted to do, we feel that m a n y we re be n efi ted by the work of the Y. M. C. A . this y ear. The d efi nite pla n s a nd a ims fo r n ext year's "Y" a re as fo llow s: I. Examina tio ns fo r a ll cabinet membe rs. General s t a t e m e nt from each member of his duties in his position. 2. 3. The Y . M . C. A inte n ds to edit a " h a nd-b ook ". This book will be a veritab le dictionary of information co n ce rnin g the sch ool a nd its activities; y e t it will be small a nd compact.


路- CITY PARK- DENVER -


'JA l-.'

VWI:A .


Y. W. C. A. ''Not by mi g ht, nor by power, but by my spirit, saith the Lord of Hosts." -Zach. 4:6. True to its motto, the Y. W. C. A. has tried t o be a c onstruc tive factor in the socia l and spi ritu a l life of the school. At the beg inning of the year, the e ntire membership was divided among its five committees, a nd these in turn o rga nized with su c h sub-committees that every g irl might share in the work a nd no one be overburdened. To the e ffective co-operation of cabinet a nd committees thu s secu r ed, th e su ccess of the year is large ly due. SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OF THE YEAR Shared with th e other C hristia n organizat ions in g1vm g the ~ig "getacq uainted" social a t the openin g of school. G ave a jolly H a llowe'en party for the Y . W. girls, October 31st. Outgoi n g cabin e t gave a surprise socia l hour to incoming cabin et, March 8th. Gave a spring party for Y. M. C. A. and Y . W. C. A., April I 7 th. Gave a n a nnua l May Morning Y. W. C. A. breakfast, May I st. Held regular devotional meetings a t 7: I 5 o n Thursday evenings. Held occasional open fo rum joint meetings with Y. M. C. A. Held Easter su nrise meeting April 4th. Contributed $5 0.00 to theY. W . C. A. work in China . Continued th e support of Jeanie Comptour, our little French war orphan . Sent three d e l egates to D es M o ines Student Volunteer co n vention, December 3 1s t , 19 19, to J a nua ry 4th, 1920. Co-operated with the Y. M. C. A . in arra n g ing for t he visit of the InterC hurch World Movement tea m, M arch 19th t o 2 1s t . P la n t o send d e l egates to Geneva Confe re n ce in August, and, if possible, to the National Y. W. C. A. C onventio n at C leveland, Ohio, April I 3th t o 2 0th . T o those w h o have sh ared its r esponsibil ities the y ear h as b een one of growth and the more a bunda nt living that comes only when we g ive our best in loving se rvice to o thers. It rema ins to us a year of warm frie ndships a nd p leasant m e mories. President . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. .... .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dagmar

Magneson

Secretary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lillian

Brehm

Membership C h airman a nd Vice-p resid e nt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . H el en Williams Advise r . . . . . . . . . . ... . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . Rose B. C lark Soc ial Service Chairman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katherine Schill Advise r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . Dora Krebs Social C h a irman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ruth Wolford Adviser. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . Ruth Shively Devotional C h a irman . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .. . Ruth Burch Adviser. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Esther A . C la rk


19~0

Normal Catholic Association The Normal Catholic Association is an organiza tion which unites a ll Catholic students of th e Peru State Norma l in a social as well as a r e ligious way. We meet every Sunday mornin g in th e room which h as been especia lly fitted for us. On a n average of once eve ry month, Father Weis, of N eb r aska City, comes to P eru. Services are then h e ld at th e h ome o f Mrs. J ack. This friend o f ours h as been very kind to us, and we w ill a lways r e m e mber Mrs. J ack for h e r splendid treatmen t o f the N. C. A. We welcome a ll Ca tholi c s tud en t s t o our N. C. A . a nd it is the wish of its members (present as well as past), that th e N . C. A. will co ntinue to grow.


=--=-=----== =

USIC

E.K.


____ u\__ N__

Boys ' G lee C lub

The Peru Glee Club H oMER C. H o u sE, D irec tor L ELA HARDY, Pianist WALTER H . HoHMANN, Accompan ist and Basso PROGRAM PART I. Still, Still W ith Thee G crri.<lr Wilder The Winds Are A ll Hushed Geibel Over the Fields at Early Morn B ach Prelude and F ugue in B flat minor Mtss HARDY W hen Day Fades Pari(s Over the W ay D orc Papillons Sc humanrr Mtss HARDY S unset T he Mighty Deep MR. H o HMAN N Onward! Geibel PART II. Missis Winslow's Soothing Syrup Harringt on United America In a R ose Garden College Life Five Minutes o f Fooling PAU L B ENNETT Indianola Lassus T rombone THE "jAzz" BAND T he F lag Without a S tain

White


Girls' Glee Club PROGRAM

Lacomb Tos ti

E studiantina Serenata FERN j oNES

Hatton Arditti

Bugle Song M agnetic Wa ltz MRs. Hous E

Harrison Wheeler Câ&#x20AC;˘ieg

In the G loaming Da nkie's Crad le Song Piano- To Spring MR. H oLCH

Schubert

Suenade Readi ng

Sclccied MRS. SEYBOLT

Marslo rr J\1assenel

Douglas Heriodiade ERMA W tLSON

Norton DcKoven Sullivan

j uanita The Owl and the P ussy Cat My Dear<'st H eart MR. HousE

W hen the Li llie O nes Say "Goodnight"


Band

O r c h estra


Annual Concert April 5, 1920 PROGRAM PART I.-Orchestra I.

2.

Va lse Danseuse R emembrance Polka ( Solo for Cornet) 0 . ]. G ABEL

3. Humorcske 4. Scene de Ballet (Solo for V iolin)

J\1/iles Simons Anion D\Joral{

Ather/on

HILDEGARD YECK

5. 6.

7. 8.

Mon P laisir R oberts S pa rks ( Due l for Corne ts) Simon., 0. j . GABEL AND RAYMOND HU FFER Au R evoir (Duet fo r Clarionc ts) Lie/mer Quartet from Rigo lc tlo V c rdi Verdi L EWIS B ENESCH AND ARTHUR Bu RLEY Fi fth Hungarian Dance ]oh. Brahms RuTH SHIVELY ,\ NO A LICE G LASGOW ( w ith Orchestra) INTERMISSION PART Jl. -Band

I.

2.

3. 4.

A merican Patrol '"Sextctle"' (Duc t fo r C larionet a nd Baritone) LEWIS BENESCH AND C. C. C HOYCE Ope ra t:c M ingle Werne r's Parting Song (Solo for Cornet) H ucH HousE

5. Lus tspiel Ove rture 6. The Lost C hord ( So lo for Trombone ) 7.

L AURANCE R ousE \ V he n You L ook in the I- Icari of a R ose ( So lo for Ba ritone) C. C. C HOYCE ( with B and)

8.

Selec Lio n

9.

March,

"The

j AZZ SEXTETTE Thunde re r"

i\1/eacham D onizeili

Berry Ness ler K eler-Bela S ulli\Jan ill/e tln>en

Sousa


My rna Sha rl o w Soprano

E a r nest Davi s

Sou t h wick Ba ritone

Etta Youn g Co nt ra lto


Senior Class Play (Synopsis) Mrs. Bumpstead-Leigh, Adelaide, formerly Della Sayles, of Missionary Loop, India n a, h as married into the Eng lish aristocracy and h a s now returned to America to engineer the marriage of h er sister, Violet, to Anthony Rawson, the older son of an exclusive and wealthy New York fa mily. If the Rawso n s were to discover that the girls, whom they believe to be de Salles, and of Norman Frenc h origin, a re rea lly d a ughters of Jim Sayles, of Missionary Loop, Indiana-Jim Sayles the patent medicine man-all hope of the marriage would be gone. A difficult situation for Adelaide arises when she finds herself suddenly confronted by Pete Swa llow, to whom she was once engaged. Becomin g suspicious of the de S a lles, Anthony contrives to bring Pete and Adela ide face to face, but Adelaide's acquired English m a nner and native cleverness save her from discovery. Her triumph is short lived, however, for Violet, who does not love Anthony and can no longer endure the deceitfulness which she and her mother a nd sister are practicing, suddenly tells the whole truth. The R awso ns, all but Anthony's brother, Geoffrey, are greatly shocked and refuse to recognize the d e Salles henceforth. Geoffrey now h as a chance to decl a re his love for Violet, who has fallen in love with him instead of with his brother. Although Geoffrey, who has become a ranc hman, is distinctly not in the good g races of his fa mily, Adelaide is rea lly pleased to h ave her little sister happy and considers that this connection with the R awso n s, though not the o n e she p lanned, may still be looked upon as a triumph.

"Mrs. Bumpstead-Leigh" CAST OF C H ARACTERS justin Rawso n . . . . . . .. . .. .. .. . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gaylord C h ase Miss Rawson, his sis ter . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Da g mar M agn eson Geoffrey Rawson, hi s younger so n ... . . . ... .. ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... Ca rl Mackpran g Anthony Raw son, hi s e l der so n . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . ... ... . . . . . . . . . . . Loyd Prante Stephen Leavitt . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Will "a m Thomas Mrs. Stephen L eavitt. ... ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . Isa belle Sears Peter Swallow ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. L awrence Rouse Kitson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Edward M a t e jovs ky Nina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. .. Frances Faulkner Mrs. de Salle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .. ... Cecelia Peterson Violet de Salle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Della Weatherho gg Mrs. Bumps t ead-L eigh ... . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . â&#x20AC;˘ . . . . . . ... . ... . . . . . . . . . .. Emma Kelly


BELLE ER IS MAN May Queen


Class Day 9: 30-May D a y Ceremonies D a nc e of the Flowe r Children D aisy Chain-] unior and Senior Girls Procession C o ro n a tion of the Queen Golde n jubilee Dancers-Bessie W est, E sther Delzell Mildred Fishe r, A lice Glasgow, Helen V a n Sant, H a llie Weaver, Grace Blough, M a ttie Miles, Nettie M cCarroll, F ranees F a ulkne r M ay Pol e Dance-Senior Girls Fina l Tableau I I :00-Services in Commemoration of the First Graduation Informal Talk-Mrs. Anna Moorehead J oy I I : 30-lvy Day Poem-Esther Cole Ivy D ay Oration-Harvey Cottle Presenta tion of Trowel-Bra ntley Copenh a v e r junior R esponse- Raymond Huffer 2 :00-0pe n Air C oncert 3 :00-Field Meet 8 : 30-Ciass P lay.


=

I

DR. FRANK SMITH Commencemen t Speaker


HARRY CLAYTON ROGERS Bacca laureate


-- -

PERUVI AN STAFF

--


PERU V IAN ST A FF


Peruvian Staff Dorothy Roettger ... . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... Editor-in-Chief Edward Matejovsky ... . .. . . . . . . . . . .. .

. A ssociate

Erma Wilson ... . . . . . ... . . . . . . . ... .. .

. Associate

H arvey ]. Cottle .. ... .. . . . . . . . . . .. . .. Business Manager B r antl ey Copenh aver .. . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Emma Kelly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Art Ed itor, Second Semester Zoe Garman . .... . . . . . . . . . . . .. Art Editor, First S emester Rose Miller . .. ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. L iterary Editor L ela

Hazzard . ... ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . Associate

Myrtl e Koon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Senior Edito r, F i rst S emest e r Mable Chapman . . . . . . . . . . . Sen ior Edi t or, Seco nd S e mester Tillie Salzmann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Photographer Grace Blough . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .. . . . . . ... Associate Cora Clover .. . .. . .... . ... . . . . . . . .. . . . Snapshot Editor Rich a rd Overh olt . . . . . . . . . ... .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . Associate Warren Stephenson . . . ... . . . . . . . .. ... . .. Athletic Editor Leon

Roettger .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Assoc iate

Fern Ferree .. ... . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . Calendar, First Semester Della Weatherhogg .. . .. . ... . .. Calendar, Second Semester Martha

Corely . . . . ... .. .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . Associate

Cecelia P eterson .. .. .. . .. ... . . . . . . . . . . .. .. Joke Editor Frances Faulkner . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Associate L orin Jones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . . .. Stenographer


~ ---

NORM A LITE STAFF

THE EDITORIAL STAFF D o rothy M a uck, '2 0 ... .. .... ..... . .... . Editor-in-Chief Alvina Amende, '20 ..... . . . ..... .. .. ... Associate Editor P a ul Be nnett, ' 2 I . ... ...... . .... . . . ... .. Assista nt Editor F e rn Adams, ' 2 I . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. .. . ..... Assistant Editor R aymond Huffer, '2 I . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Business M a nager Emma Woodie, sp ecial . . ..... Manager Mailing Department REPORTERS Celia Lorance ..... .. ..... .. .. . .... .. . . . . . . . . . . Senior Mabel

Dressler .. .. .. .. . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Junior

A lice Glasgow ... .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sophomore Hildegarde

Y eck ..... . .. ... ...... . ... . . . . .. Freshme n

Ida Fred erickson . .. .. . ..... ..... ... Specia ls and Tra iners William Thomas .. .. ....... · · · · · · · · ... . . .. Y. M. C. A H elen Williams . . . . . . . . . . . . · · · · · · .. . .. . . .. Y. W . C. A F e rn Ferree .... .. . . . . . . . . . . . · · . · · . . . . . . . . Girls' C lub Erma

Wilson .. . ..... . ... .. . · . .... .... . . Philoma thean

Della W eath erh ogg . ... . ... .. .. .. .. . . . . .. D ram a tic C lub Cath e rine Lie ne m a nn .... .. · · · · · · · .... .. . . . . . . . J . U . G.


-~

_ _1_'9~~~0==== (S2~';e;


-路Old Buildings in Peru (All Rights Reserved) (By Louise W. Mears, formerly teacher in the Peru Normal School, Department of Geography.) O ld buildings are b ut mute historians unloved and unwelcomed in any It remains f or some "oldest inhab ita nt" to read from them a histo ry of past event s that kindles an d delig hts the imagination. As a c hild, it was my rather stran ge pleasure to listen to th ese tales, as told by the sh oemaker, the carpet-weaver, and the aged citizen "reminiscing" in the snu g warmth of the v illage stor e. I have som e times thought th a t a c hild is indispensable in this world as an open-minded listene r to provide old people with th e unalloyed pleasure of "recollecting." Mine was the never-to-be-fo rgot t e n j oy of listening to th e stories of the villagers who had been to Pike's Peak for go ld, to Utah with the Mormons, or perhaps in Indian or border wars beside the Civi l War. wes~ern village.

A progressive Nebrask a village differs, perhaps for tunately, from the usual New Eng land village in the dispatch with w hich old buildings a re r eplac ed by n ew ones. Of most of the o ld buildin gs in Peru we must say, "They used t o be. " "Time was, ' 路 the golden h ead Irrevocably said; But time which none ca n bind, While fl owing fast, leaves love behind. -From Robt. Louis Stevenson. As one of th e devotees of the past, l think that some o f the old buildin gs h ad marks of beauty t h at their successo rs do not possess. Pre tty col onial c ottages were so m etimes repl ace d by nondescript n ew buildings. But, perh aps l s p ea k thus b ecau se memory has a proneness to soften o utlines, as ivy beautifi es any ruin, o r as a sketch differs from a photog rap h . If we were makin g a s urvey of Peru, how many o ld ho-uses, really oldtim e r s. would we find? Perhap s none in entirety, unless it be th e old mi ll - G r ee n' s Mill- e rected in 18 62 . But p a rts of many h ouses da te back to early days, and their his tory should be recorded. I a m happy to contribute so m e fac ts in this s k e tc h . All of the h omes had small beginnin gs, and as prosperity inc reased a nd fa milies g rew, roo m s were a dd e d, new b asements and second st ories developed. (That is why th ey were rambling struc tures.) On account o f the hilly b uilding sites, hi gh base ments were used as k it c h ens a nd d ining room s. The east e nd of D a vid J ack' s store, facing old M a in Street , was Mr. Barnes" ge nera l merc handise s to re in steamboat d ays. A small room o ff of T. E. Vance's store w as u sed as a class room for the first Normal Sch ool s tud ents. ( H ere is a n appropriat e place for a bronze tablet.) The h ome of D. C. Cole ( Hills of Peru, p. 6 7 ) h as in terestin g histo ric associations. Amon g others, I wo uld mention th ose of Dr. Captolia Graves a nd Mr. Mardis, at th e summit of old Main Street; of Mrs. Sam' ! Cu lbertson, in a g rove of nativ e trees, a nd Professor Birc h , better kn own as Professor D u ncanso n 's h o u se; of Professor M c K enzie, th e first Normal S c h ool president, occupi ed


(Picture 1, Cut No. 204) by Mrs. H ayes; of Professor Williams, a nother of the early school presid ents; of Mrs. Ball, occupied by Professor Brownell; of H. M. Mears (the one-story portion being fifty years old). A residence dating b ack to th e first days of the Normal School is the one then owned by Professor P erry Martin, ad joining the sc hool campu s on the northeast. ( Picture 2, Cut No. 205.)

Jacob Good , founder of the first b a nk m Peru, had a ge nius for restoring and transplanting old houses, as well as trees. He possessed the rare gift of seeing in a n old h ouse its possibilities for continue d usefulness under new environment. When the res idence portion of Peru s hifte d from the plain to the hilltops, homes still in their prime and re a lly beautiful were doomed to decay. A store building that :s still very muc h as it was in 18 70. is that erected


==-...c==~-

-

and occupied as a drug s tore by John Patterson. It became later, and still is, a variety store, much like Dic kens' O ld Curiosity Shop, now owned by Mrs. Kate Brunsdon (Picture 3, Cut No. 206). When we began to enumera te th e hous es in Peru that are n earing the half-century mark, mos t of them with new parts grafted on, the story g rows like a ball of yarn-always one more strand and then another. It is easy to see why telling a story is called spinnin g a yarn."" I beg the enthusiastic young student of local history to seek out the occ upa nts of these houses, and gather together the threads of the s tory before it is too late. Speaking for myself, I sh a ll co nfess without fear of being misund erstood, that of all Peru's old buildings, other than the Norm a l School, 1 love best the old g rist mill. Some of its early history, when it supplied the staff of life to white m en and India n s, h as been written in the Hills of P e ru, Chapter IV. T h e mill, like a man robb ed of his birthright, seemed to me to say, " H e r e I a m , b uilt st ron g fo r service an d long life I Must 1 waste m y s tre n gth and thwart the plans of my builders? '" Its owner, "Tom Green,'" h as died. S o und s of the Village grow s tiller and stiller, Stiller the n ote of the birds on the hill; Dusty and dim are the eyes of the mille r, D eaf are his ears w ith the moil of the mill. (From Keepsake Mill, Robt. Louis Stevenson.) When H. M. Mea rs bought the building, in 18 79, he la id a st rong hard wood Aoor in the second st ory, co nve rting the room into a "town h all. " Nowadays, when the modern welfare worker a dvances the id ea o f a co mmunity center, 1 think o f that roomy h a ll in the mill , with its home-t a le nt plays, c hurch festiva ls, political ra llies a nd sk a ting rink. It was a r eal o p en forum. V e ry o ften we listen ed to Col. Majors, who never failed to take a n ac tive p a rt in all affairs of local and state governme n t. In this room, wh e n I was a schoo lgirl, I s tood on a b ench t o hear and see t h e young ora tor, Willia m J e nnings Bryan. I can im agine that the early speeches of D a niel Webster a nd Henry Clay must h ave p roduced somewhat the sam e impressio n s on the listene rs. Lest I trespass too far o n the forbearance of my readers, I close with these lines: H e r e we had b est on tip-toe trea d While I for safety m a rch ahead ; F or this is that enchanted g round Where a ll who l oiter slumber sound. (From Historical Asso cia tions, Robt. Louis Stevenson. )


1.99.0

Old Buildings of Brownville Mid g lad g reen miles of tillage And fields where cattle graze, A prosy little v illage You drouse away your days. And yet-a wakeful g lory Clings round you as you doze; One living lyric story Makes music of your prose! - ] . G. Neihardt. Although in these d ays of rush and hurry few p eo ple have a ny time to look backward, a glance now and then into the past mi g ht be a goo d thing. Who has ever asked himself a qu estion a bout the hi story of hi s h o me town? Yet s uc h a knowled ge mi g ht vastly c han ge one" s opm10n of present day a ffa irs. One often hears j o k es abo ut the s leepy sm a ll v illages of today. But if we only knew the st o ries they could tell l A fine example of s u c h a p lace is Brownville, the sta te's oldest town, once pros perous, but now o nly a shadow of p ast promises unfulfill e d . To the casual visitor, there is nothing about th e village t o s u gges t its past. Here and there some sple ndid building , now fallin g into decay. might a rouse one"s interest; or the stree ts, wide and well laid out, mi g ht ca u se mild c urio sity, but nothing more. It is only when the to ng u e of some ea rly settl e r is loosened by a few tactful questi o n s about th e old d ays, that th e story is lea rn ed: The o ld s teambo at la ndin g, th e immig ra tion, the promise of the s t ate's ca pitol. a nd finally, the fa ilure o f these hopes a nd th e d ecline of the v illage. As proof of its bygone prosperity, Brownville still h as several o ld buil din gs that d a te back to th ese ea rly tim es. P erh a p s the m ost p ict u resque o f these is a n old Catholic church, w h ich stands a ruin, with its gap in g windows a nd r uined c r oss suggesting th e m a ny winters it h as w iths t ood.

' "Fallen columns disintegra t e d w ith tim e Sacred mounds insulted w ith the growth of sco rnful weeds. S hattered arch es h a unted by the lizard a nd the s n a k e ." -Neihardt. Ano the r mute witness of the faith of the e arly pioneers, is a n o l d Baptist c hurc h , built in 1860, whic h in its day se rved both as a h ouse o f worship and as a schoolhouse. This building is still in fa ir co ndition. No less interesting tha n these in its historical associations is the fr a m e h o u se w hich was the home of R obert W. Furnas, N e brask a's s e co nd gover nor.


= - -:.....-..,..-=====

Until a few months ago this h ouse was in the possession of a son of the governor, but has probably been destroyed since c h anging owners. What times it must have passed through I The campaign for governor in 1 8 7 2 was probably full of excitement for Brownville, since both candidates were from this town. During Governor Furnas' administration, Arbo r Day was established, and the first Arbor Day proclamation was given by him.

Perhaps the oldest brick dwe lling in the state is the Atkinson hou se, a s tately old Brownville mansion, nea rly as la rge as Peru" s dis trict school build ing. Althou g h the stones from the arches of its capped windows are fa ll ing from their p laces, the old h ouse still retains traces of its form er dign ity a nd attractiveness. Another old-timer, very similar in its style to this one, is the house, a t one time occupied by the fami ly of Muir, the state's advocate of prohibition. Mr. Muir is now dead.

T h ese two buildings, still imposing in appearance, must have been splendid stru ctures in the rising new Brownville, w hich as years passed they h ave watched crumbl e about the m.


They re present all th a t is now le ft of th e m o r e a ri s to c r a tic homes. Their size and beauty sh ow u s that they were inte nd e d to b e c ity r eside nces, a nd their very pretentiousness m a ke them seem out of place in the ir present s urroundings. Rel ics of pioneer d ays mee t the eyes of the Brownville v1s1tor a t every turn. One of these, now kn own as the P ar k Hote l, is n earing its fiftieth y ea r , a nd was a t firs t a dwe llin g house.

Another which was built b e for e the C ivi l War h as n ow been remodell e d into a bungal ow. Of a bout the sam e age is a brick building w h ose past h as been very eventful, h aving been a t o ne time a saloo n , later a ga mblin g hou se, an d finally a store.

In the immig ra tion perio d , the first legal office w as the land office, a nd B rownville boast e d the first building of this kind in the s t a te. For years this old o ffice was the scene of some rousing activities, and m a ny stories are told of the days of homest eading and pioneering. Perhaps the mo st interesting to u s of these s tories is tha t of the firs t homestead g ra nted in th e United States, which was g ive n from this office. On New Year's Eve, 1862, D a nie l Free m a n , h av in g com e from B eatric e in the hope o f r eceiving the first homestea d, r each e d Brownville. The Homest ead Act did not go into effect until the n ext d ay, but a clerk was persuaded to open the office a few minutes p ast midni ght for Danie l Freeman a lone , and h e became the first homesteader.


Another inte res tin g r e mind e r o f the old d ays is Brownville's cemetery, p e rh aps because of the r est and quiet which pervades the air, p e rha ps because of the trees, or the gray s tones against the green grass. As one read s the worn inscriptions, h e feels only inte rest in what is carved there, and no sadness, for the owners o f the n a m es h a ve depa rted so long since that even those who c h e r ished th eir m e mory a r e past one's recollec tion. just such a cem e t e ry is tha t of Brownville. It is o n a southern slope, and the evergreen trees planted years ago now form a dense sh a d e a nd tower far above the c rumbling 路 g ravest o n es. D oubtless people are becoming more unwilling to ta lk of the m selves than th ey formerly w e r e, or they may be less sentimental. At any rate, one sees no longer the full inscriptions tha t are found on the gravestones of a half century ago. On m a ny of th ese old stones, besides a record of their birth a nd dea th, severa l items con cerning the life of the individual are given. Place of birth, time of coming to America if foreign born, schools a tte nded and wh en:~. time of immig ration to Nebraska -m any such facts are stated by the worn old monume nts. "I see their scattered gravestones glea ming white Through the p a le dusk of the impending nig ht. e r a ll a like the imperial sunset throws Its golden lilies mingled with the r ose; We g ive to each a tend e r thought and p ass Out of th e graveyards with their ta n g led grass. " - Longfellow. To feel the true a tmosp h ere o f the early d ays, one should visi t some of these scen es or talk t o one of t h e o ld settlers. Most o f them a re very willing to go b ack for u s over history of the settlement a nd the fa ilure of their h opes. One of th ese, to whom this d epartment owes muc h of its information, is Dr. Crane, who was raised in Brownville a nd knows th e who le story. H e atte nd e d scho o l in Peru, and was a stud e nt of P r esident M c K e n zie, our first president. Some of his stories were too interesting to go unme ntioned, so they will b e briefly outlined h ere. He t o ld of the firs t two Nebraska state fairs h eld in Brownville. The o ld fa ir grounds have l ong since been t ake n by the Missouri Riv e r . H e h as seen thirteen steamers tie d up a t the Brownville dock a t one time, a nd can rem e mbe r whe n the streets of the village were crowded with ox-drawn prairie sch oo ners bound westward. A h a lf century or more has passed s ince these scen es took place, and only a few are found who r ecall th em. Who will be left a fter fifty more years that either knows or feels in terest in th em? The o ld la ndmarks are rapidly disappea rin g, and perha ps another decade will see th e last of them. "The monuments of mortals Are as th e g lory of the g rass; Throug h Tim e' s dim portals A voiceless, viewless wind doth pass, The bloss oms fa ll before it in a day, The forest monarchs year by year d ecay , And man's g r eat buildings slowly fade away." - V a n Dyke.

o路


Senior Dignity No, you would never have recog nize d it as a Senior p a r ty, if you had been at the old "Gym" on January I 7th, for a ll cares, including eve n practice t eaching , were forgotten in three hours of glorious fun. It was a n old fas hioned hard-times~ party, with informal games and e ats to fit the occasion. Tha nks a h undred fold to Miss McAuley and Miss Grimes for s uch dandy entertainm ent. : After an hour of merriment, "everybody" shouted "Movies!" so away we marc hed downtown to the thea tre to see Mary Pic kfo rd m " The Hoodlum... If the townspeople had not hea rd before that the Seniors were "out for a time, .. the y could not fail to di scove r it from the hea rty songs a nd y e lls. It was with no unpleasa nt sen sation with which we partook of th e treats proffered us by the various b u siness men in res ponse to our ''Fifteen Rahs J" for each of them. It cannot be denied that Miss Sears and Mr. M a t e jovsky a re exce llent entertainers; a nd what about Mr. Pra nte? Well, still in our ra gs and tags, we entered the theatre and enjoyed a good show, and at the close, it w as with re luc ta n ce that we d e p a rte d for hom e a t even so late an hour.

Senior-Sophomore Party Friday, September 19th, th e Seniors e nterta ined the Sophomores at a weinie roast in the woods a bout two miles so utheas t of town. After a brisk walk the two parties reach e d the scene of action whe r e they found a fire h a d a lready bee n b uilt by some of the gentle men of the crowd . As it was late when the y arrived, preparations for the "feed" were mad e at o n ce. T hi s co n sis t ed o f wienies, buns, pickles, hot co ffee w ith milk, marshmallows a nd ba nan as. After r e freshme nts, severa l brig ht classm e n e nterta ined th e r est with well- told funny st o ri es. E ven th e two class advisers w e re m a de to sh ow their skill a long thi s line. W h e n the fire died down the c rowd gathere d around the coal s a nd sa n g popular so n gs, finishing with the " Color Song." Then aft e r a n exchan ge o f yells b y th e two classes, g uests a nd hosts respec tively they started for h ome, each class w ith a feeling of g reate r comrad eship for the o ther.


The Training School Party The F acuity members 路 of the Training School entertained the Seniors on Saturday night, March 6, 1920. The party was held in the T . ]. Majors building, th e in terior of wh ich had been transformed to represent an old colonial mansion. At the entr ance, a dignified negro butler directed us to register and pass upstairs. At the first landing we d eposi ted our cards in the plate extended to us by another of those dusky, dutiful servants. On the second floor two dainty flo wer maidens directed us in disposing of o ur wraps and presented us with programs of the evening's entertainment which was as follows:

Senior Frolic Liszt of Symphonies (some funnies) Greet a nd H andel Bach's (box) humana Didactic Exercises Tarantella (tear and t e ll) Anthology of Popular Songs Recessional Lo! Minuet (Me an u et) La Serenata Corps de ballet

Tutti Salute Hurdy C urdy T. ] . Major Mode Be Sharp Major Premiere "Natural Tonic" key Every One That Thirsteth 20th Century Suites (Sweets) Flower (Flour) Song

Hymn of Praise Suspension a nd Dissolution Beat it Yours, Phor Phun. This program itself is truly most unique from a musician's standpoint. To him every bit is familia r through associatio ns in memory or h e reca lls it on the pages of his musical dictionary, a t least. Did you reflect upon your knowledge of the Ben Greet players as you read your program afte r passing the receiving line?


Didn't you conceive the Hurdy Curdy to be quite as interes ting and spectacular in its way as th e Denver municipal pipe organ? For instance, l et us $ay. And its music contrihnted in no small part to our deli g ht. Prof. Beck, in his u sual good form. conducted th e Didactic Exercises. 'tnd Miss Lillian Olson, "a Senior ~rave a nd wise," won th e diploma because luck was with her and she knows the nice distinction in the u se o f "have" and "got." You understand now the aporopriate significance of: Tarantella (tear and tell) B Sharp Major, which followed at this point, do you not'? The biggest number, no doubt, of the "Liszt of Symphonies" was th e Anthology of Popular Songs. The company was divid e d into six g roups. each of which dramatized one nf the following songs: "Comin' Thru the Rve." "Home. Sweet Home." "Seein~ Nellie Home." "Music in the Air." "Pack Up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit Bag." "Yankee Doodle." When these six son gs were sung by the ~roup leaders in the ''Natural Tonic" key. honestly now, could you recognize the song, not to so mu c h al> mention the key? During the Minue t (me an u et) were n't we delig hted with those dainty delicious refreshments? Didn't those 20th Century Suites sing charmir;gly in La Serenata ?

(Sweets)

that Seninr girl s octette

F.ve~body enjoyed Corps de Ba llet, Flower (Flour) Son j?. didn't they';\ And they p layed a nd sang it just as the y used to do wl>~n fi.rgt they began going t o parties. The Peru Color Song lends itself most beautifully t.n an occasiOn of this kind as a Hymn of Praise . .S!.lspension and dissolution, the u su al features of Ro harmonious a cornposition as this, brought the evening of enjoyment and entertainment to a most nti:mg and appropriate finale. We Seniors have no words with which to express our full appreciation of such a pleasureable affair, but it will r e main in our memories among the foremost of the very d e lightful events of the school year af 19 20.


September 8.

R egi s t ra ti o n begi n s.

9.

B i g a ttend a n ce a t the fr ee mov ies.

Th e G; rl s' C lub la un c h es the P r oct or syst em.

I 0.

New s tu dents h a v e f u n c h as in g d ow n class rooms.

I I.

M t. Ver n on gi rls a r e w ea ring b road g rins as th e n ew fur nitu r e arriv e s fo r t he H a ll. Fern car ri es a few so n g b ooks a n d b r eaks h e r arm .

F irst c h a p el o f t he year.

I 2.

Y es, a Sen io r p i c ni c t h e fir s t week.

13 .

Ge t acq u a inte d pa rt y.

14 .

A b u nch o f wo r t h y Sen io r g irl s h ave t h e ir r ep uta ti o n at stak e in a wa t erm e lo n a t th e d ormito r y a ft e r I 0 :3 0 P . M .

15 .

R eadin g o f th e r u les a n d regu la ti ons a t the d o r m ito r y. Som e h o p e e nte r ta in ed fo r preventi n g m i sdem ea n o r s s i milar t o th ose o f the previous n i g ht.

A goo d hik e , sple nd id e a ts, a nd a j o lly ti me.

Ju st da r e t o fo r ge t a n y o f the new st u dents

na m es now!

16 .

Som e j u ni or g irl s discove r~d look in g u p t h e defi n it ion of .. da t e ...

I 7.

J o k e o n e v e r ybody.

I8.

Th e Peru via n s t a ff a r e ap p a r ently s tud ious and inte ll igent d u ring t h e ir i mpromptu p r og ra m at S e ni o r class c h apel.

No sea t s were assi gned a t C h a p el.

I 9.

E very o n e seems t o e nj oy h is wa lks t o an d f r o m classes, esp ecia lly from .

20.

Eac h c hur c h entert ai n s h e r young people a t a sociab le.

2 I.

A r a iny Su n day a n d its inflict io n s.

2 2.

Inma t es o f th e D o r m itory e nj oy a genuine s urprise.

23 .

T h e G i rl s' C lub e ndure the u n com fo rta ble b leach ers m orde r t o c h eer th e foo tba ll b oys in p r ac ti ce.

2 4.

E xci t i n g ti me a t c h a p e l.

25.

Co p e e n te r s up on his d u ties as Se nio r class p r esident with a digni t y t h a t com mand s a tte ntio n. A t a ffy pull in the b ase ment of the M e tho dist c hu rch. No t enou gh f ru it-da t es h a d been orde r e d .

2 6.

The D o rm parlo r

Sa l e of b u dget ti c k e ts.

IS

u sed .

No g ra p es for sup p e r .

S ome s tu dent s buy t wo.

2 7.

In te r estin g meetin g o f th e Girls' C lu b.

2 8.

Q uiz o n th e m e m o ria l tra il is s u spect e d . A n um b er of stud ents c h ase this n ig h t t o r e view for i t . D ad Co ttl e l e arns th ro u g h experie n c e tha t so m e people culti va t e s unflowers for t h e sa k e of th e Rowe r s. It h as b een co nfid e nti a lly r e m arked t o M abel t h a t t h e foo t ba ll b oys r u n fast e r w h en th e g irl s c h ee r .

29 . 3 0.

New g irl s are welcomed.


October I. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 1 0. I 1. 1 2. 13. 14 . 1 5. 1 6. 17 . 18. 19. 20. 2 1. 22. 23. 24 . 25. 2 6. 2 7. 28.

Fa c ulty members si t on the p latform durin g chape l. Reh earsa ls f o r the outdoo r play eve ry spa re moment. Big ra lly for t h e com in g ga me. Hoorayl Peru wo n the footba ll ga m e from Grand Is lan d . Sco r e , 37-0 . The eyes of the world is in Peru. Cecelia and Griffiths st ro ll to Cemete ry ridge. Dr. H o lmes g ives her first of a se ries of talk s t o gi rls. A ll youngsters are res tless o n this pre tty a utumn day. Tillie Sa lzmann ge t s ca ll e d down in the Library. No chorus practice on acco unt o f the lig ht that failed. Dr. Holmes announces her last meeting. Footba ll victory for Peru. Midla nd' s fin a l convic tion : "Fight an d Peru wi ll h o ld t h e line." Budge t number, Sam L ewis and Company. The big pa r ade and s treet ca rniva l compe ls the s tud e nt s to r ea li ze th e capab ility o f Peru's home t a l ent. Philo entertainment. A pretty autumn e venin g and severa l dates. Boys retu r n from the Y. M . C. A. con ve ntion a t Y ork. A re Shorty a nd Weltha specia lizing in music? At a n y rate, th e y are p r ac ti ci n g m the music rooms. Sce ne taken from the Library-Cece lia beaming upon G riffith s w h i l e Griffith s laboriously draws house plan s. The s n ap-sh ot e ditor makes a good sil ent a nno un cement in C h apel. Coach Speer and som e o f his foot ball boys go t o see the Wes l eyan game. Outdoor rehearsal of the play the "Forest Princess." Frances F au lkner h a n gs a sign on h er door that r eads, "E n gaged. 路 路 Woe be unto th ose w h o are skip pi n g classes. The Girls' Club decide to invite the men to thei r n ex t pa r ty. Erma Wil son smiles blandly and Netti e McCarrol giggles in cessantly . Mr. Holch is late to class. S ix Ame ri can Beauties in Senio r C lass C h apel. Wesleyan accepts the football victory from Peru . Philo H a llowe 路 e n p a rty. Some girls s h ow th eir preference f or the M e thodi s t s. T h e Forest P rin cess i s played to an admirin g a udience . Litt l e O r p h an Annie, comes t o th e C hapel in the evening. The cast of the F o res t Princess taken. Bo nde took h er "Choyce" a nd see w h a t s h e got. Memorial exercises fo r Roosevelt.


November I.

Ghost Dance.

2.

Feed on second.

Third floor party.

3.

Excitement.

4.

Purp l e and w h ite sweaters seen all over the campus.

5.

Choyce goes to Omaha to have his shoulder X- rayed (?)

Tap, tap, ' "Girls, can"t I trust you}"

Red brings a bat into the L ibrary.

6-1 0. Bubbles burst.

To whom do they belo n g}

We have a vacation.

I I.

P leasures ended.

12 .

Dramatic C lub, Cece lia performs. to remove his hat.

School commences.

13.

Picture show.

14 .

Philo-Budget movie.

I 5.

Cope gets a him before."

Choyce calls at Dorm.

M iss C leland asks him

""Dorm windows tried."' n e w girl.

Her remark-'"Ye Gods, to think that I never h eard of

I 6.

Prevention of unprepared Monday l essons.

I 7.

O r chest r a 7 :3 0.

""Stay home from Sunday School."

18.

Office hours of the Dean changed.

19.

Parlor meeting.

20.

Miss Carpenter asks Loy to sing solo in mu sic class.

Why ch ange?

Miss Cleland instructs girls in etiquette.

2 I.

Budget movie.

22.

Bonnie dates with Patty.

C h ape l ra lly .

23.

Light Fantastic being displayed at the Dorm.

24.

A day of blues.

25.

Overho lt looking for Boe lstorf.

2 6.

Y. M. C. A.

Good attendance. Peru wins.

Wayne football game.

What's going to h appen?

2 7.

Cotner game.

28.

Boys' conference banquet.

29.

Girls' C lub party for ""Hi -Y" convention.

3 0.

"Hi-Y"'

breakfast.

Philo.


â&#x20AC;˘

December I.

M eeting of scie n t ifi c mind e d at S c ie n ce C lu b.

2.

M e lo dious and h ea rt rending tones is sue fr o m Dr. H o u ~e ¡ s r oom .

3.

Dra mati c C lu b.

4.

Footba ll ba n quet.

5.

Howd' ye l ike the m ovies?

6.

Ex c ite m e nt in th e a ir.

7.

Excitement more in ten se.

8.

Bla s t e d h opes. the m.

9.

C o a l s ituatio n g rowing wo r se.

I 0.

E v erythin g p e a ce ful unt il th e Dorm raid . Fi ne!

Tra in e rs start mo vi ng.

Gen e ra l s hif t in

c la s ses

to

acco mmodate

M o s t popular g irl present s Foot ba ll Ca k e , and s h e's a Se n io r t oo.

I 1- 12.

Art exhibit in Dorm d i n i n g r oom.

13.

Fres hi es indul g e in a party.

14 .

C hurc h es closed.

15.

Glee C lub g irls s orely disappoi nt ed: trip ca n ce lled.

Where s h a ll we go t o ni g ht?

16.

Girls Glee C lub co n cert in th e Dorm C h ape l.

I 7.

D ormito r y still pop ular.

18.

J oy .

19.

Vaca tion begin s .

Va catio n a day earli er; a ll a b oard. Merry Xmas.

Fine co mfort a bl e sea t s f or nothin g .


January 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. I 0. I I. I 2. 13. 14. 15 . 16. I 7. I 8. I9 . 20. 2 I. 22 . 23. 24. 2 5. 26 . 27. 2 8. 29. 3 I.

Big run on the bus line of Peru. We s tude nts return! Back to work aga in . H ea r the sa d news of the death of Rachael Hayes. As u s ual t h ose w h o were not over-burd e n ed w ith their s tudies went down afte r m a il. Morris William arri ved at the Roettger ho me Wednesday. B ud get number-Zoel ner qua rter. Regular full at tenda n ce at the little social gath e ring in Nebraska Cit y. Good d ay a t the cemetery for couples. Celia a nd Gaylord h ave their pictu res taken. Mr s. Sharrar a nnounces that th e boys w h o expect to h ave th ei r beds made must ge t u p b e fore 9 o'clock. C h oyce kidded L y nch abo ut hi s adopted mother. Everyone out to see th e " Turtle Dove!" Ga tely is so me Turtle Dove. Facu lty party a t Rouses. Poor student s d idn ' t get in on the good tim e . P hilo- "The M idland ga me"-we won . Wonder if Nevad a needs the sy mpathy that s h e gave to a disinterest ed party? Lyn c h and Deutsch spend Sunday a t the Kelly house. Jus t o ne more week of practi ce t eaching I T h e south s ide of t h e picture s h ow f u ll of couples. W h y did Burley t a k e the back sea t? Som ebody sa id that Choyce a ttended Y. M. C. A. A fin e class at chapel as u sual. Pea c h o f a g ame between Hi g h Sch oo l a n d Brownv ille. We won. ) . U. G. pa rty. Bette r ask some of those g irls if they had a good time. George H eywood spe nt a ll th e day o f rest w r iting last lesso n pla n for semest er. Dr. L evitt spoke in c h apel. Copenh aver passed in Junior Grammar. Lu cy Blankenship loo king around in Gi rls' C lub: " W h ere's Gately, he'll k n ow th e Fren c h assi g nment." Girls' C lub e lected Miss Koon p r esident. Senio r s r aide d a nd paraded C hap e l t o astonis hment of the faculty. Juniors receive a goose. Peru Normal defeated Syracuse Athletic Associa t ion, 2 1- 18. R e f e r ee, W. G. Speer. Business manager went to A ubu rn. Reports busin ess good .


February I. 2. 3.

4. 5. 6. 7.

8. 9. I 0. I I. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. I 7. 18. 19. 20.

21.

Miss In ez P e te rson out of town- Ra sch o ut of luck. Ground Ho g Day-Staye d inside a ll d a y . F ac ult y c h oose T e rrible catastrophe-traffic impossi b le . My kin g d om for a c inde r . middle of the road. D eserte d sid ewa lk s. Football boys receive s w ea ters. In ez Pete rson asks Wa ldo t o apo l ogize for-? Peru b eat K ea rney 33 -6. Girls' C lub gave a r ece ption t o the t ea m s , fac ulty a nd normal b oys. Goose berry s h erb e t was pronou n ced exce ll e nt by a ll th e boy s. Business manager s go to Lin coln. A tte nd e d "Liberty." Mr. Schoenike received his weekly a ll owance of tobacco . Girl s ' Gymna s ium exhibition. Busin ess manager s return-sobe r. Se ni or C la ss pres id e nt g ot a date-at last. Sun s h o ne. Chuck and R ut h ca ll on the cemetery bench. The Senio r Class is prese nted wit h a b eautifu l eg g , la id by the u g ly ducklin g junior C lass owners. G i rls' C lu b meeting-myste ry-som e thin g g oin g to h a pp e n. Bonde suggest s that we don't h ave the boys seve ral do rmit es a t the pi c ture s h o w . Summer weath e r turns to winte r. Mr. D e utsch froz e hi s ears. Wha t ho ! Dorm g irls a t the s how a gain. Tragedy. Window s fro ze n s hut. Miss Cleland on the job . P e ru Hi g h b ea ts Nebrask a Cit y second tea m. Mo re c hilli ness I Eldie Cameron makes his d eb ut at the d o rm c h ape r o n e d by S ho r ty Huffer. Mi ss Stalde r h a d to s tudy Sat urday evenings so -g ot s tung. Miss S ta lder's s tudying a ll d o n e. L ibrary closed all morni n g becau se of the c old weath er. Littl e Funny c r i e d so m u c h tha t the Edito r-in-Chie f was late t o s taff meeting. Glee Club m ee tin g ( a n oth e r one) I Senior C lass orders pins and rings. G a ylo rd C h ase orde r ed tw o. I wonde r why? Gu ess h e' ll wea r one o n each h and. Girls' Clu b one year o ld. Bi g t ime in C h a p e l. Peru wins fr o m o l d-tim e e n e m y , Wesl eyan, 23- 15. Good fa s t game. F ath er a nd So n ban quet a t the M. E. c hu rch. A ll report a g o o d t im e. We aren't me ntion in g t h e fo ur dish es of i ce cream that Red Brow n a t e. P hilo m et. Great m yste ry, M ay Q u een e lected by the Senior boys. Girls' C lub Colon ial party pos tponed beca u se o f the "flu." Ev e r y body we nt to t he mov ies.

22. 23 .

Presenta tion of M emorial War Certificates at Union Se r v ices in M. E. c hur c h. A number of P e ruvians a tte nde d Y. M . C . A . banquet at Auburn. Two b ashful s uperintend en t s a re seen about the ca mpus. O ne was finall y p ersuaded to " S ay a few words to the s tude nt body."

24 . 25. 26.

Boys' Glee C lub l eav e on a trip to H a velock, Be tha ny and Linco ln . Nothin g h appen ed. The d ay passed by. Our Senio r Class pres ident s tarts hi s announ c ements , "Word ha s c om e to Mr. jean," etc llCotne r b ask e tba ll ga me-l east said s oones t forgotten. Mr. G abe l returns from Lin coln. Miss S h ively mu s t have met him there beca u ~e we saw them come d own togethe r. Boys' Glee C lub con cert. Skinny B e nn et t gives the o ri gina l dance fr om the South S ea Islands . Mr. Barnes a nd Miss Tolin, school nurse, "Dodged" about the coun tr y f o r a while S un day P. M.

27. 28.

29.


:/' XE--_

March I.

2.

3.

4.

5. 6.

7. 8. 9. I 0. II. 12.

13.

14. 15. 16. I 7. 18.

19. 20.

2 1.

23. 2 4. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 3 0. 3 1.

Spring h as come at last. President Rouse speaks on "Opportunity School " at Denver, Co lorado. President Rou se r eceives telegram, ' 'I'm in jail. Don't hesitate, send Cu rl ey with th e key."-Dick Choyce. Anoth er fine day for the race-human race. Pee-wee C h ase has the " flu. " Eugene Deutsch was seen going to his 8 o'clock \Vednes day class at 4:3 0 Tuesday P. M . Co lder 'an Sam Hill . Pres ident Rouse continu es his t alk on the C l eveland doings. He is taken t o t h e dorm for isolation (?) Basketba ll boys l ose to Wesl eyan, 12-20. Peru loses again to Oma h a Universit y. Bitzie s hows hi s pugilistic turn o f mind. We wo nd er if the cold s pell wi ll eve r end . T ra ining t eache rs ent e rtain their wellbeloved h opeful s at a reception . Fine time, too. ]essie Sprecker has a date. S h e reports a good time. Copen h aver and Company spend th e evening "just snooping a r oun d ." They a l so r eport a good time. Della a nd Louis ra th er object t o th e " snooping ." More Dorm gi r ls come down wi th the " flu" -Mary Jarvis a n d Bonnie Ellis in parti c ular. T h e sad news of the death of o u r beloved librarian, Miss Ma ry Tynon. Mr. J ean makes a plea for la rger Senior attendance at Chapel. Peru via n staff ho ld s sec ret session. A ll are p lunged into deep, dark a n d g loomy despa ir. Prin ters h ave broken their contract, that is, they are trying to. Peru w ins from Midlan d. Hu rrah I Peru is in u pper division o f conferen ce . (Bet s )? Gabel and S h ive ly take a trip m th e C h evi , w h il e H iggins and Mabel ta ke a walk t o t h e river. j unior mixer. B ud get movie . Are you goo d at g uessin g one' s we i g ht ? What about Mi ss Reddin gs? A nd t h e c h air? Some one tri ed to get L ynch to go to chu rch . Well , he didn't. L ynch refuses another invitatio n - t o C hape l. Pi c tu re s h ow night- sma ll attendance a t Band, as u s ual. Norma l ite i s g iven over to a tribute to Miss Tynon. Enough cannot be said about h er untirin g serv ic e in the lib rary. M il dred Dye as s he g racefull y enters t h e window of the D orm, "Say, s weet potato, you b e s ure and s h ave b etter n ext time yo u come up." Myers, "A ll right, old dear, we'll see a bout it." Int er-c hu rch Worl d Movement team comes. We were kep t bu sy goin g t o t h e meeti n gs of the Team. It was t ime well spe nt. M ore meet in gs . C h ase , "What's the matt e r, Curley?" L. Rouse, "Ohl T h a t Ford sedan beat me out aga in." Blue Monday. But the Staff m eet anyway. Juniors are working h ard. Red Brown is s t ill hunting for an old-fashioned revolver. Ca n a n yone help hi m? "A Ro se of P lymou t h Town" is given by the Dramatic Club. It was sure g reat. T h e President buys a Dod g e.

Well, w h y not ?

C urley n eeded it bad.

Oh I H ow it blew ! The Band boys are sti ll working h ard. Robert Prokop, "Say, Dic k, how soon do you s tart try in g to get a date for t he banquet?" Tom or r ow is Apri l Fool. Look o ut for "Red" and "Cope."


April I.

2.

3.

4. 5. 6.

The lon ged fo r sp rin g vaca tio n - ? W h e r e i s it ? W h at co uld you ex pect w h e n Eas t e r comes n ear April Fool"s day? Pro f esso r Pau l is sen t t o t h e R eg i s trar's office by o r der of- Red Brown {get i t ?) Freshma n p a rty a t Mi ss Mutz's. Somew h at myster ious, fr om a ll r epo rt s . W ho was the "Di s in te r ested" Apri l foo ler? Scie n ce C lub mee tin g -n o li g ht s. B ill Thomas is in str u c t ed by L oy Hacker in "Study in g t h e S tars " - as tr o n om i ca lly. C urley tr ies o ut the n e w Dod ge. W e wonde r what h e d id 1n A u b urn. Went to the movies ? The j . U. G. party wh e n M iss Pa lmer r ea d s, "Let th e r est of t h e wo rl d g o by." The cast of the p lay, "A R ose o ' Ply m o uth T own" p i cnic. Talk abo ut Ap ril fool. T h at's what I call it-th at awful blizzard! An Ea s t er egg hunt in t e n - foot s now drifts. Everyo n e e njoyed the joint Y . M. a nd Y. W. sun rise mee tin g o n th e a thl et ic fi e ld {- ? - ) Band and Orch estra concert. O n e of the best e nt e rtai nmen t s of th e year . Miss Ca r penter {in instrumen tatio n class ) . "Wh at a r e t h e wood-wind instrumen ts, Mattie ? " {Mattie Capen) . Ma t ejovsky-"Fiut e , Pi cco lo , C ia rin et, Basso- ." Eve r ybody la u g h s. Matejovs ky sob e r. In a few minut es , Miss Ca r pen t er (a ga i n t o M attie Capen ): "What instruments do you h ear, M a ttie?" M atejovsky , "O b oe." {Another outroar.)

8. 9. I 0. I I. 12 . 13 .

Agent for ca r s is rej ected by Miss S hi ve ly. T h e big eve nt-junior-Senio r Banquet. Spud Mardi s appear s a t t h e D o rm for the fifth tim e . Rosenquis t sends Be nnett to bed. C urley comes into Obs and M e thods late. No thin g doin g. N o C h apel.

14 . I 5. 16. I 7.

Supt. Ada m s , of H avelock sch oo ls , speaks m C h ape l. Peruvian goes to press. Th e g irl s th ink it' s to o bad Carte r' s marr ied. Last nigh t's dance w as a g rand s u ccess.

18. 19 . 2 0. 2 I. 22. 23. 24 .

Co ra s urvives "fl u" a ttack. H er voice is h er s tron g e s t c ha racteristi c . Did you s e e a ll t h e Peruvian posters? D e lzell votes f or Edwa rd I. Edward s. Don't te ll a n yo n e. Peruvian sa le was a g rand s u cce ss. See Apri l 13 th . Ph ilo. The g irl s clean hou se at the Dorm .

25 . 26.

Prokop makes hi s debut a t t h e Dorm . I wonder wh o May Queen is?

27. 28. 29. 3 0. 3 I.

As t h e sch ool year nears t h e end, da t es are m ore numero us b ut n ot n e w . C h apel , fine a tte ndan ce as u s ual. Senior a nnouncements arrive. What of? On ly one more day in April. W e think this is the last day in Apri l.

No s u ccess.


I

I

,I

May I.

2. 3.

4.

5. 6.

7. 8. 9. I 0. II.

12. 13. 14. 15. 16 .

I 7. 18. 19 .

20.

Y. W. C. A. had a May Day party and hung baskets on eve ry professor's d oor. Nellie M cA uley lost th e jokes out of the Bibl e. It created quite a commotion . Snooze overslept th is mornin g . \ Vas it on acco unt of " sick"? Th ey The Sen ior g irls, who bou g ht c lass r in gs, ha ve the m for the little fin ge r. arc sav ing th e other finger. Dav id A nd e r son gave a talk today. General L eo n a rd Wood i s to b e th e nC\V president of our g r eat common wealth , so Mr . Hoyt think s . The last S c ience Cl ub meetin g was sma ll , but mighty. Prospec ti ve t each ers h ave a r e union at Bud Brown's park. Mi ss P e t e r so n, Mr. Griffiths and C h a peron Mrs. Seybolt are t h e trio that c an't b e beat for wa l king . Things a re co ming down. Even Mr. J e an. Ask Botany s tudents. No, the boy s don't smoke o n th e campus. But they leave the tinfoil fo r the kinderg arten c hildren. "S e nior D ay ." Un lu cky day. Y. W. C. A. held ov e r. Mildred D ye ju s t got t o the firs t s te p whe n the li g ht s went out. Compare these dancers with those of Octo b e r I I. Ze lda R e ddin g do es s ome poo r d odgi n g in the D o d g e. C url e y's h ad h ygie n e, too. Pra nte says: The differen ce between a s ewin g m achin e and a kiss is, a sewing machine sews seams nice and kiss seems s o nice. Miss Burl ey t o Bac o n : "What' s th e di ffere n ce b e tween a yellow do g and a yellow banana?" Ba con: "I don't know ." Miss B u r le y: ''I'll n eve r send you aft e r bananas!" Prof. Howi e t akes th e entire Trig. period in d iscussin g football in the Wisco n s in Uni. It beca m e ne cessary f o r C h oyce to carry a sp itto on in his coat pocket in Zoo. cla ss. Dr. H o u se: " In this se ntence, 'I ha ve co ld feet,' w hat is 'cold '?" Ed. Rose n quis t: "Why, you r fe e t, of co urse." Eldie C . aga in r eappea r s a t th-: Dorm . The Seniors g ot their s piritual se nd- off 111 th e mornin g . B accal aureate Sermon. Miss Branson: "Miss F a u lkner, you c an't turn yo u r b o oks 111 'til a ll fin es a re paid."

2 I. 22. 2 3. 24. 25. C l ass Day. 2 6. May F esti va l. 2 7.

Com m e n ceme nt.

I


TAKE IT AWAY-

'ROOTER5

DOMESTIC


路cop:e路路

uUST.

NOi~E~

NOTHING '1'0 5UPPOR'T'-


SOME JOKES A capital joke-]. "O.K."e. A tipsy joke -Joke . A s ta ndin g joke- ] 0

k e

Half a j oke-Jo. . The o ther ha l f-!<.e.


Graduation Apparel for Young Men and Women assembled with that unerr; ng judgement which makes such an event ccrlain of su ccess. M e n' s, Women's and Children' s Cloth es, Shoes, Hats, Furnishings and Dry Goods

We emphasize QUALITY in a most pronounced way Satisfaction or your money back

MAYER BROS. CO. ELI SHIRE, President


.

I

~


ONTiiE FENCE


Nebras ka's La rgest E xclusive M en 's an d Boys' St ore

Armstrong Clothing Company Lincoln

The Home of

Hart Shaffner & Marx Clothes ' Our Motto: "New Styles while they are New''

":\"o matte r how yo ung, h ow old or ho vv bus y , it does a man good to put off t h e garment o f the past season and b egin a n ew life w it h a new ou t f-i t f rom h e act to foot."


PERHAPS BOTH

S tati one ry, Roo ks " The School Supply S tor e"

Mrs. Tayl o r : 'T m sor ry you think th e c h ic k en soup isn ' t g ood/ told t h e cook h ow t o m ake it. Per h aps she didn' t catc h the id ea.·· B ill T h omas : ·'No ; I th ink it was th e c hi c k e n s h e didn't ca tch . ..

Toil et A rti cles . :\I u sic, Ca ndi es Prante: " W h at n a te' m ean? ·· M a tejovs ky: Prante:

does

'impo rtu -

"Pressin g ...

"H o w do you u se it?"

M at ie : "I a m importunatin g my trouse rs when I press t h em ."

BARNES PHARMACY Peru, Neb. S house h ad aske d for words havin g the word "form" as th e ir b ase - r e fo rm , perform and conform had been g iven, w h e n Wilk ie , aroused from a deep r every, desperately hissed " C hl oro form!"

See

" Th e m 's zactly ...

rny

se ntim e nt s,

per-

YOCK MICHEL fo r D r a,. a nd Baggage Deliver y

OUGHT TO KNOWBeck (S en i o r Arithmetic ): " Wh e r e d oes the g overnment mon ey co me from?'' C h ase:

"From taxes m e n pay."

B eck: "] ust men? Oh, w e ll, m a n embraces woman, so tha t takes them a ll in ...

P hon e 2

Peru. Neh . Do you know an epistl e wife of an apostl e?

IS

the


The Peru State Bank OL_, PERl: . ::\EBRASKA

S t ren~ o 路 t h . Co urt e s \ 路 S tab i 1it Y . ' . Secu rit\. and EfficiencY . -I l ave l\ l ade I t \ iV h at lt Is

.-\ c;ooD

B A~

K

IN

A GOOD TO\iVN

"When" When you're lo a fin' in the h a lls a nd h av in' pec ks o f fun, A laug hin ' an' a ta lkin' a n' a makin ' a ll things hum , You ' d better be a l istenin' an' sorter lookin' o ut, 'Ca u se Doc House' ll nab ya if ya don't watch o ut. When B ut t o You ' d ' Ca u s e

yer stayin' o u t of classes not ' zac tly jus t for fun, copy up a note -book t h at h ad oughter long been done, better eye the doorway, and be kinder loo kin ' out, th e Profs ' II see ya do it if ya don't watch out.

W h en yer actin' lik e yo u owned the earth , just ' cause ya go t a beauA Airtin' and a c uttin' up a nd a carryin' on so, You'd better ac t lady- li ke and be sort er l ookin ' out, 'Ca u se M a C l e land ' II g it ya if ya don't watch o ut. When ya h aven't And a foolin' a ll You'd better l ay ' Cau se the Dean

go t yer l esso n s, a nd yer b luffin' every class the t each ers, and s till thinkin' that you' ll pass, d ead low a nd a kinder l ookin' out, wi ll call ya over, if ya don't watch out.


What Does a Student Need? Well, that depends up o n the se x and the individual, whethe r he is s ick o r wa n ts t o " d oll up," feed up o r s tucly. No n1a t te r , we can supply m ost of hi s need s, for we h ave a

Real Modern Drug and Stationery Store DRUGS TOILET GOODS STATIONERY SCHOOL SUPPLIES Best Ice Cream Service in Town

FISHER BROS. Druggists PERU, NEH. 路

The Songs They Like to Sing I Want My Old Girl Back . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ros ie Have a Smile for E v ery One You Meet .. .. .. . . . . .. . . . . . . . Esther C lark I Ain't Got Nobod y Muc h . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . Neva Hoak C l over Blossoms . . . . . . . . . . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . L. V. P. Wait and See ... . . .... . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . .. . Dag Wha t Do You Want to Make Those Eyes at Me For? . . .. . . .. . ... .. Cope Somebody Cares . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chu ck What's the Use of Loving If You Can't Love all the Time? .. . . . . . . . . Spud They Always Pick on Me ... . .. . ... . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . Benn e tt I Love a L assie ...... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . Curly On the Road to Home Sweet Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lena Where H ave You Been Hiding All These Years? . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G a b e l L ove, H e re Is My Heart? . . . . . . ... .... ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Irma Just a Wearyin' for You. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Howard Home Sweet Home . .... ..... ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dorothy Brig hten the Corner Where You Are . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . Mr. Jean He Loves a nd So Do I ... . ... .. . .. .. ... . . . . . . ... .. . . . . . . . .. . . Cora


Lincoln Fine Art Shop Best p lace in the s tate to buy pictu r es and m emo rial s

M. C. WOODS, Prop. Lincoln, Neb.

\i\ e invi te you to call at o ur Barber Shop. Fir st-class \vork a nd courteous treatment. Basement Fisher's Drug Store

C. P. SCOVILL, Prop.

OCTOBER

Students' Tonsorial Parlor F ir :-;t-c la:-;:-; \\. o rk Courteous Treatment to ALL You're Next

The athe-a- le te w ill soon compete In stunts of av iation. With fearless eye he w ill d efy The laws of gravitation, And risk his sn oot in mad pursuit Of hi gh er education.

Milstead ' s Basement

A . W. CHASE, Prop. DOMESTIC SCIENCE NEWS

Individual Costume Tailoring

Have you h eard the latest about Co rn Flakes? No? Well, it' s a cereal to be co ntinued in next year's ISSU e.

Suits ancl Overcoats :\ l ade to Y out· l\{ eas u r e La r gest Selectio n G u a rantee of A ll P u re \Vool

I-1 and 'Tail o rin g D r -v C lea nino· P r essino· b• bl A lt e ri no· b Tailo r·, C lea n e r

]NO . A. CEJKA Pho n e 62

SOUNDS BAD Dick Overho lt : a minute!" A lice: "Well, h a nds are cold."

"Oh I A lice, wa it hurry

up,

my

"I don't like your heart actio n, " stated the n u rse after a thorough examin ation. "You h ave had some troubl e w ith Ziphgrostic." Rosen quist : "You're partly ri ght, only tha t isn't h er name."


WHAT-NO SOAP -! ~PRIZE-

- "CAUGHT- - 3'~ PRI'ZE -

- aTEPPING OUT? - 2~ PRIZE-

-PRIZE PAGE- 5LUMBER

P.AH'TY-

-4째 PRIZE -


- H\JG H (hoT

HuGE)

vOHN PAUL

M~DONALl)

BENNETT-

t

..

\


DRAMATICS Copenhaver : "When I left th e stage last night the audience went wild with applause."

CITIZENS STATE BANK

Chase: "Well, most likely th ey knew you weren' t co ming on again."

Banker: " Sorry, young lady, but your account is already overdrawn." Sweet young thing ( R. j.) : "Well, what of that, young man? Haven't I a right to do what I like with my own accou nt?"

/\ n o ld r e liabl e bank \ \' i t h a 111 p 1c fa c i 1i t ies fo r ca r i n ;:--, o路 f o r t 11 c n e e cl ~ o f i t s c u-stome r s.

The found ation yo ur hu s i n ess success w ill be yo ur b a nk account.

BRILLIANCY Father: "Get o ut, Emma, and look at the tire and see if it's Rat." Emma: "Well, it looks pretty good; it's only Aat o n the bottom."

CHATELAIN JEWELRY STORE Ive rs: " I saw your picture m Nebrask a City yeste rday." Woodie:

"Where?"

Ive r s: "On a salmon can, you poor fish."

P e nnant, Pill ow Top, Sch oo l p1n, Phil o - C lass Pins and L{in gs.

Sc h oo l S uppli es

INFORMAT ION BUREAU. First student: "Is it 'anterroposteriorly' or 'anteroposteriorly'? '' Second stud ent: George."

"Let' s take it to

] . C. Chatelain Peru, Neb .


---"'--'"'---- - - - --

Omaha High Spots I', •pulat iun . .?o.:;.ooo. l: ir:-: t in butter prt,duni o n. 1-'ir:-:t in pi;..: lead pr, ,dul'ti o n. l:i r :-: t in J>l'r ctpita autumo bilc:: 0 \\·ncr:-hip. :--;,. ~·· HH I i11 Jlt'l' capita tt•lcpho ne u:'e rs. :'l't' t> ltd curn market . :--:,·cund li,.,. s tut.· k n1ark t.:t. l'L' Illt'l' uf th irtt.'l'll nati u nal high\\'ays. l '• •ntnli :-:s ion iur111 ui !..!'0 \'l'rnm ent . Third a;..:ricultu ral in;pleme nt cc ntcr. F()urt h in pl' r ,·a pita hank clearings. l: ii th railro;ul center. Tl'nni nu :-: oi ); c \Y Yu rk-O maha aerial mail. \\ · .. IHkriul park and huul c,·a rd :-:Ys tem. );jil l' trunk lint':-: ni rnad- 22 bra1;ch c:'. l l"nH· , j tht' brt.:T:-:t Hui ld i1 w & l.t)an .-\ :;:;oc iation. Tilt· gatt·,,·a,· t o . an i mm en s~. . . ,n·al t h,· inland e mpire . llali- \\·ay :-:t;~tiun o n );e,,· York-San I; ra ncis cu air\\'ay . );'() :-: lunt s u r tt·nent t'llt s . a c it,· o f comio rtabl c ho mes . l . l'adi1t;..: n ·t ail l'l'lltn het \\'C CI; C hicago a nd Sa n Fra nl' Jscu. I l ea lth ,·. dry t· Iimat('. :\nnual m ean temperat ure. 50 <kgTt'L':' . . ~ixt een t h in ha nk clearin gs . alt ho ugh t h ir h·-fo urth 1n propul;ttion .

Opportunities in Omaha .< >mah;1 IIL'l'ds and can s uppor t mure tlo ur and cer eal 111 dl s . lll;illcahlc irun foundr ies. glucose and s t a rch mill s. autu truck fact o rie;; , s ilo iac to ri e:;. furna ce a nd s toYe facto t·ies. imp k tn L· nt iactories . \\' Ookn mill s . and w h o lesale m e n's c luth ; n .~· h o u ses. f.'or further d eta il s about t he a hu n · and man \· o th e r t)ppo rtun ities co n s ult

B u reau of Publicity

OMAHA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

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As Said by the Profs. Mi~s Bowen: ''Will the Juniors remam a moment after c hapel. m e eting under the clock? .. Mr. Crago:

'Tm satisfied that's true."

Mr. Overholt: Mr. Delzell:

" Say, have you seen Boelstorff? 路 路 "And this is what I said, get the idea? ..

Miss C leland: "And you were just the gi rl s I thou g ht Mr. Beck: " And it's a lways true." Or. House:

c ould trust.

"I w ish you folks would keep quiet m th e halls ."

Mrs. Shouse: Mr. Jean:

"I haven't time to watch you." "Yes, that's fine."

Mr. Gabel: "They're all fine youngsters, but a littl e out of p lace m the school room." Miss Krebs:

(Ask h er practice teac h ers.)

Miss Burley:

"And Arthur-"

Mr. Shouse:

(He rings the bell.)

Copenhaver:

"What do you people think about it ? .. ~

READY MIXED - READY TO APPLY Any plasterer may apply it. Because it is ready mixed it saves time, experimenting and money , besides saving from inexperience

FOR SCHOOL BUILDINGS FOR CHURCHES

FOR HOMES FOR GARAGES

- may be applied on concr ete, cement blocks, hollow tile, brick, metal lath, stucco board and wood lath

WRITE TO US FOR PARTICULARS

NEBRASKA MATERIAL Co. LINCOLN, NEBRASKA


Exchange Senior:

A p e r son lookin g for a job.

Ro as t s :

Co mplim e nts h a nded out by the joke sec tion.

Junio r :

One wh o n eed s fa th e r's ca re for another yea r.

Ca mpu s try: C h ec k:

A flirta tion w ith c upid.

A s urpri se from fa th e r.

A Ca rt o on:

A s k e tc h of o urselves as others see u s.

A D e b a tin g Room: Noise :

The firs t s ong in c h a p e l.

E x a m: Sluff:

A n ins trum e nt for di scov e rin g me n tal v acuums. To b e c ons pic uou s by y our a b sen c e .

Hot A ir : S oph:

Specia l ta lk b y s p ecia l ~p eakers in cha pel.

A harmless biped relyin g on th e hope of futur e a chieve ments.

Flunk: P e nn :

Libra ry .

Th e int e llec tu a l d a rk bro wn tas te of the mornin g after. Ca n 路 t d e fin e thi s .

N one of th e e ditors h ave ever seen one.

Fres hma n: A hi g hly c ombus tibl e c ompound of self-confidence , noise a nd uns qu e lcha bl e n ess.

WOOD U BY COAL OR LUMBER U f th e finn \\' h o G uara nt ee (!LA I_ITY S El~V l CE

SATI SFACTI ON 1 'h e n

tT Y

th e

WHITEBREAST COAL & LUMBER CO. Lincoln, Neb.

l 07

~ 0.

11th

s t.

\i\'h olesa le a nd Ret a il


1.Gittrnln

~usittr!lS

illnllrgr

F ully A ccredited by Nationa l A ssocia tion of Ac cred ited C o mm e rcia l S c hools

O ur inten sive t r ai ni ng pre pares yo u qui c kl y A sk fo r Catalo g

L . B. C. Bldg., 14th and P St., Lincoln, Neb.

F R OM THE DEPTHS

B ang l goes th e w ind o w .

(Sou n d s lik e dormit o ry. ) M o r e shiv ers, y a wn s , e t c. Fro m th e mid st o f pillo w s, cov e rlets, b oo k s, th ree hats, a coat, a glass tumble r, th e r e seem s to b e a n upnsm g . Yawn s, squ irm s, sigh s a nd quive r s. A ll is still f o r a minute, the n - a r e g ul a r uph eaval. ' 'Oh!"'- ( fr o m som e o the r r egio n o f the four-poster. ) " L a y d own , y o u clow n l! This room is a regula r ice b e r g ." "Well !

Yo u loo n! It' s time the re was a n a rising, if we're g oing to accept tha t in v ita tio n o ut t o breakfast this m o rn. A lso if y ou think it' s c o ld in h e re you'd b e t t e r ge t up a nd cl ose the wind ow-" "Ah! that's rig ht. W o nd e r wh a t we' ll h ave-co ffee, eggs o n toast, re a l c ream-" " U h! you fr owzal t o p , d o y o u t hink y o u ' re in t h e B l ack Stone? If yo u g e t a crust o f b r e a d a n d a glass of wat er y ou' ll d o well." "Well, perha p s it woul d b e a goo d id e a to crawl o ut a nyhow, t h ey ' ll n o t bring it in t o u s, I'm s ure- "

"Now, w h e r e' s m y o the r s h oe? .. " Dunno. St. Pa tric k

W h e re i n th e n ame o f IS

my sto c kin g ? 路 路

" Grea t S cott ! w a ist?

Tha t

Wh a t 's t his o n my

g um

th a t

you

acc i-

d e ntly mis placed las t e v e nin g , I pres um e !' ' " O h, gee ! ca n ' t help it.

Here, ti e

this string , wo n' t y o u, dearie ? Th a t' s a nice g irl-" "Can ' t yo u see I h ave my h ands full ? It do e s look as i f so m e peo ple co uld lea rn t o dr ess th e m selves, a t l eas t. " " Oh, wha t a sweet t e mpe r e d little thin g s h e is ! Supp ose you'v e fo r go tte n h ow I t oo k f o ur d o z e n h ai r pins o ut o f y o ur wo nd e rful twi s ty lock s o f h ai r last nig ht, a nd n e arly wo r e m y self out tryin g t o get it into so m e kind o f s h a p e s o you co uld a t leas t get your h ead d o wn on th e pil l ow. Y o u'd b ette r go b ack to b e d a nd get o ut on th e othe r side! "


lliturnln Thluntnr.aa Qinllrgr Fully Accredited by National A ssoc ia tion of Accredited Commercial Schools

O ur

int cn~ i\· e

trainin g pre pares .-\ s k f o r Cata log

YOU

quickly

L. B. C. Bldg., 14th and P St., L incoln, Neb.

''Here! you cat!

T a ke that!"'

Zip !

Angells Psychology la nds.

Psst.

Shash l

Clitter clatter I

A reg ular whirlwind of flying a rti cles-zip, bang l Whiff! whirr! Tap- tap-tapBang I

Si l ence reigns.

·'Come in... Weakly, gently open soft footsteps. "Girls, what is the meanin g of this? And just th e girls thou g ht I could trust, too.·· · 'Oh-Heavens I I thou g ht sure that was Mother! You heathen!" "Are you coming in to eat? It's five minutes of eight; we'll have to hurry.··

' 'Oh, little fishes and caterpillars, can' t now. I h ave a conference. If I'm three-quarters of a minute late, Mrs. Jean will have forty fits backward!" "Holy smoke l What have we been doing, anyhow? I've got a class. Daddy Shouse will glare a hole through me if I'm not there right on the dot! Where' s my notebook? Somebody stick in my shoe strings. Who's got my pen? Please to step out of my hat, will you?" "Get out of the way, there goes the bell. Save me a pancake. S ee you at c h apel. it ove r!"

If I get a letter bring

"Well, what do you know? at that room, w ill you?"

Look

The belated breakfast is returned to and room is quiet.


NEBRASKA CITY Extends You A Hearty Welcome

OUk

VvAT C H WORU

Co-operation

OUR SLOGAN "Advance Nebraska City"

Nebraska City Business Men's Association : : :


AVENUE STORE ( ;i ,-c:-; ,·alut.· in 11lcrcha n<l i ~ c . a 11 d " · c · r c ' · c n. · :-. o· c n -

Sc!J(HI]

··yeah. I have," cried all of his practice teachers. Prof. {calmly): "Well, picked up the elastic."

I just

Supp li c~ .

StaFount a in

and I \.· n~. l; r uit. CnnlcctionlT '· . ( ; r ( 1c c r i c ~ . \ I ca ts a 11 d \ · c g-c t a h 1c s . tHJJ1 Cn·

H.U.LANDOLT 73 I 1 hnn c

Prof. H owie: "Has anyone here lost a roll of bills with an elastic around them?''

7~

Mrs. Dorothy: "Did you know you're behind in your board?" Lynch:

"No, I didn't."

M rs. Dorothy: a month."

"You owe me for

Lynch: "Oh, I know t hat, b u t I considered I was just that much a he ad."

I >cru. :\ eb. Never do today what you can put off till tomorrow.

Dry Goods and Clothing

TOMPSON -PERRY

Furnishings Shoes

Auburn, Neb.

A woodpecker sat on a freshman's h ead , And set away to drill; He p ecked away for half a d ayAnd fina lly broke his bill.


. 路.

INDU5TRJEB-


Ath letic c;oods Baseball , F oo tball, T c: nni Co mpl ete line of Sport in g· and Uut ing· G(Jods Spec i a I a tt enti on g i v en t o o u t Ii tt i n g· S c h o () I :\ t h I e t i c Associa ti ons. Bes t of qu a lit y, lo\A.-cst pnces .

SCHMELZER ARMS CO. Kansas City, Mo.

Guest: "What makes yo u think Thomas will make a great doc tor?" Fond Moth er: "When h e was a little boy playing Or. with his p laymates, he said, 'Gentlemen, before we begin to operate, you h o ld the patient's h ands and fee t, and I' II get the 3 cent s out of his rig ht hand pocket.' "

WOW! Mr. Shouse: "Matej ovsky, did you h ave a mind when you were born? .. fV!~·· Matejovs ky:

WHICH ONE TONIGHT? Landlady: "What a r e you go in g to do thi s evenin g, Mr. Choyce ? " C la r ence: "I must as tronomy lesso n.··

study

my

SOME TEACHER l Practice teac h er : bohydrate? ..

·'What is a car-

Pupil : "A ca rbohydrate I S a hard s tuff which helps th e di gestion in the intesti n es ...

" I don't remem-

ber.

Never let your studies interfere with your ed ucaticn. -Della.

"You don· t hear any talk nowadays abo ut a more e l astic c urrency. "No; what we want tod ay more adhesive c u rre n cy."

IS

a


a worlrl clectr· Rractuatc o f toda)' enters •ca l. Gathe r ed fallS or g e n e rated frorn the dis tant w_at e relectric power is by the steam turbine~ s t c it)" o r t he transmitted to the bus•e 5 rnall est country p lace. . s T hrouc:h th

.

·"egen•u -

'-vith cnc:· eco.o rdin nti onof Jnventt in it re~ sources u'ne crinrr nnd m on ufucturnY ha~ 3 fostcrcct' n~c Genera l E lectric Co.m ~ st a t e ~f perfection t~ developed to n h lg 1 er npplt · cations. e s c nnc..l numerous o t 11 And so <!I . than th~ r,-radunte ertncit y , scarcely ?tdcr rnc ticlll. \-veil dev-.. o t oday • oopcn rs tn n P d eloped serv ice on every han ·

R ecognize · . ticotion :i to you r j· fi 1 ~ S Power, s t udy tt S ?PP t hC ut· m ost fo r \ c s Wo rk , nnd utilize. t t. to

t

n

G e n eral Office

Schenectady. N.Y.

1C

bene fit of a ll mankm d.

ctric

Sales Offices in all large cities

9S-246G


HOTEL FLATIRON

HOTEL KEEN

\-[anagement o i \I r. and \frs. G r ee r

Q ui et. Yet Close tu l·: ve rything-

( lpp(),.: itl' Co urt llou,;e. o n Lincoln l l ighway. l()c:ttc:d in the heart ()f the Tlwa t n · a tHl S h oppi ng f)i ,;tri c t. :--J<,,,. t h«' n'ugh ly moder n. hum c: li kc:. large. a in· t·oon J ~.. n"rth and l'a!-'t fro n t.

A Delightful Cafe ~foderate Prices

Tak<" ll:trt t<·_,. 11 r l:artl ;t ttl ca r ir11t1t d t·p .. t,;

17th and Howard St. , Omaha

l 'opular I 'ri cecl Ca fe in C() nn ect i()n

A Solid

Block of Stre<.:t f'ro nt Rooms with En:ry \lf ode rn Con ven iencc:

The Flatiron Company HARRY L. KEEN , Pres.

Harry L. Keen. Prop.

THAT'S LOGICAL

D. A. RAILSBACK Candies, Confectioneries Ca nn ed Goods. P icnic S u pplies

Funny: "Girls can s ubsti tute aesthetic dancing for g ym. By Jinks I If they can get a gym credit for dancing, I'm going to take it. too."

Faye Bakery

and Cafe Bakerv Good s !.ike :vr other \tlakes. A lways Fresh: Pri ces Reasona ble : Even in g I :unch es a Specialty.

YEA BO! Catherine (hopin g to obtain th e word interrogative) asks: "Now, class, what type of a sentence do I u ~e most in addressing you?" Ninth Eng lish class (wit h ·' Imperative.'' accord):

one

\ 'f eals at All 1-Jours Soda

Fo u ntain-the Best a nd th e Best Sen· ice

Eats

Ci,·e L""s a Trial and \\ . e Will Tnto Please Y ott

Frank: sports?"

"Are you fond of ind oor

Elsie: "Yes, if th ey know when to go hom e ."


N. S . Harajian, A.B ., D.D. S. Graduate Chicago College of Dental Surg ery DENTIST

Confectionery & Bakery G ood M eals, Reasonable Prices Good Stock of Candy Always on H and

Office Over Faye Bakery Peru. Neb.

1.Gtttrnln

~uatnrss

McCUBBIN Peru, Nebraska

(!lnllrgr

Full -'" ace red i t ed h,- ~a t ional Associat io n of .-\cere d i t ed Co mmercial Sch oo ls < h11路 Int en~ i ,- e

Train in g- P r epa r e ~ Y ou Quickly .-\s k fo r Catalog I .. H. C . Building路. 14th and P St .. Li ncoln . Neb.

How We Know Them George Heywood- By his arguments. Mr. Delzell-By h is fu nny face. M r. Rouse- Same as Delzell plus his b ase voice. Ne llie McAuley-She' s a little thin g. M a ry Jarv is- He r teeth. Pa ul Bennett-H is expansiveness. Hi gg ins-By t h e wave in his hair. Fern Ferree-''Oh, Sugar! " Benesch-B y Della. Mil dred Dye-By her silk hose. Ruth Lawrence-By her h a ir. Gaylord C h ase-By Celia??? Faulk ner-By her coat. D. Mauck-Her flu ffy hair. Cu rl ey- Say, g u ys. Gately-His winsomeness. H o lch-Milita ry walk. Steve Prante-His whistle. M at ty-By that intelligent lo o k. A lma Griffin-Her brillia n cy.


RATH ER EXPENSIVE. EH?

KODAK USERS . Cut Your Finishing Bill in Half Films D eveloped, Sc per Roll

Domestic Science Senio r : "Cora, don't bel ieve I ever wi ll get this budget mad e out. Do you suppose $85.00 will be en ough for oper a tin g expenses?路路 Cora : "I s h ould h ope so. You d on' t inten d to have your a ppendix removed , do you? ..

Prints, Any Size, 3c Each

"MUST OF BEEN RUTH? ..

Address

H e p ut his arm a round h e r, The color left h er c h eek. A nd it sh owed upon his overcoat For j ust about a week.

Camera ] ack Box 6007 University Place, Neb.

O H, CAY ! Beck : "How long w ill it take to cut a 50-yard strip of clot h in to yard p ieces, cutti ng off one yard per day?"

Text a n d Reference Books

Chase : ''Forty-nin e days, because the piece that you cut off the last day you cut off the day before . ..

K e\Y and Second-h and All Subjects Com plete Line of S tudents' Suppli es

COLLEGE BOOK STORE

WHO WAS THE EAVESDROPPER? Milton: "You' d better marry me. El:gible m en are sca rce." Isabel ( r e flectively) : " I s u ppose I could o ffer that as an explanatio n ."

1135 R St. Lincoln , Neb.

Cash pa id fo r Seco nd-hand T ext and Reference Books

WHA T NEXT? Prof. Brown (in c ivics class) : "Yes, they s hot G a rfi e ld in the depot."


NEBRASKA CITY J> O I> L L A TL ON 7.500

A City with a Great Future

A C ity of H o m e O wn er s, a good place t o li\路c. L ocat ion. no n e m or e Beautif ul a n d I >ic ttu路esqu e . Ri ch in H i to rical Events. I Jibra r y . Sch oo ls, Church es, fo r edu ca.-

ti o n a l a nd s piritua l \Y elfa r e of the va riou s d en01n ina t io n s w ithin our gates. The m a n Y lnclu s tries th at cr ea te a I-Iom e l\ I a d-:: e t f or a ll th e P r oduc ts of the surr o undin g Territ o ry, th er eby t urning them in t o 1i n is h ed com m odi ties fo r con s um pt io n , g ivi n g路 ready a n d re muner ative e m p loy tn e n t fo r a ll cl asses of labo r. R a ilvvay f acilities unequ a led by cities of tn u c h la r ger po pulation, h aving r eady access to a n y par t of t h e co m pass.

NE BRASK.A CITY BUSI NE SS l\I[EN'S ASSOCIATI ON


Miss Mutz (in drawing class): " I want you fo l ks to ge t a littl e p e p o r sna p in your drawings. ( L ookin g a t the drawin gs) : "W h y, what are thos e little spo t s? .. Pra nte: " Tha t is th e s nap you sa id to put in the drawin gs. the notes of 路yell ow Dog Blues'. "

"Say It With Flowers"

They a r e

GILMORE BROS . Ready-to-Wear

Ord er s taken for c ut fl ower s at a ll t imes. Co mplete line of pottecl plants for s pring trade. Funeral orders g 1ven spec ial a ttention.

Phone 189

Court House Square Auburn

Auto Livery Day and Night Car Hired With or Without Driver to R espon s ible Persons

MILAM AND HOLTZ

Prices Reasonable

22n d and 8th Sts.

Office Phone 70 Rear 167

Auburn, N eb.

D. A. RAILSBACK


UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC .-\DRIA I

l\ I. N E \i\ E NS . D IRECTOR

SUMMER SESSION JUNE, 1920 H. 0. FERGUSON. SCPER\ ISOR \\" E 11:\ \ ' E :'\l O RE C :\LLS F O R CO !\ IP ET E XT T E AC HER S TH A:\ WE C:\:\ SUP PLY

WR I T E US 11 th .-\ N D R STREETS,

LI NCOLN, N EBRASKA

A LMOST. B UT N OT QUITE.

W E W O N DER

" I c arne n ea rly sell in g R o use: my sh oes yes te rd a y . ' '

Miss Shively: " H a ve you broug ht m e a ny souvenirs ?''

C urly :

" H o w' s tha t?"

Mr. R o u se : so ld (sol e d) ."

"I h a d the m h a lf-

Mr. G a b el : ''Only this little bulle t th e Dr. took from my side.路路 Miss Shively: "I w ish bee n a G e rm a n h elmet.' '

it h a d

NAT U R A LLY M ab el ( in geogra phy) : " The r e is an a nim a l none o f y o u h ave m e nti o n e d . It does n't sta nd up on its legs a ll th e ti me. It does n ' t w a lk l i ~路 e o th e r a nima ls but ta k es funny littl e s kip s. Wha t is it?" C la s s {ye ll e d with o ne v o ice ) : " C h a rlie C h a plin ."

I ! !

You like to rea d, don't you? H a v e you red soxs?


''Sis" Tobler, hurrying pell-mell down the street during one of those biting, windy days, was watching the wa lk jus t a few feet ahead of him. It happened that a sweet young thing, also under the same handicap •. was also hurrying, but in the other direction. Smack! other. She: He:

They bumped into each

"I beg your pardon.'' ··you're welcome!"

"Name the forms of car-

Grandma: "Why, Lloyd, what are you shaking your littl e brother for?"

Huffer (thinking of the queen of his soul) : "Coal is important and so are diamonds."

Lloyd: "Well. Grandma, Steve, the silly little thin g, took his medicine and for got to shake it ...

Hoyt: bon."

IDqnman if(irkpatrirk Q.lo. High Grade Merchandise At Fair Prices ·Always

O l\IIAHA

NEBRASKA


GROCERIES, DRY GOODS, SHOES Your Patronage and Friendship Solicited and Appreciated

THE

CASH STORE Redfern and Ellenberger Phones 22 and 26

She w as engaged in a despe'rate e ndeavo r to drag conversation from the si lent youn g man, when the pia nola b ega n to play one of the airs from Meyerbeer' s operas. "Don't you love she as ked hopefully.

Shouse: "Those of us under ten years cannot realize this difficulty." Evidently a case of the royal "We'' or, h aving a birthday on the 29 th of February-leap year.

Meyerbeer?"

" I have never touch e d intoxica nts in my life," r eplied the youn g man coldly.

Rouse: 路'Was the company you were in seaso n ed troops, Copenh aver ?'' Snooze : "They ought to be. They were first mustered in by the ir officers a nd then p e ppe red by the e n e my.

Hoyt (conducting l esson on combustion-Prante s h owing signs of di s tress) : "Have you a question?" Prante:

"Yes, but it's on fire."

Pauline: "Do you know why they couldn't play cards in th e Ark?" Irma Wilson : "Because Noah sat on the deck. Don't tell Mr. Rouse, though.''


\\·e are ah,·ays e(1uipped and willin g to sho ,,· y o u t h e latest and best in seasonab le and stap le m e r c h a ndi se

QUALITY

STYLE

WORKMANSHIP

Th ese three word s ex press. as wel l a s th r ee ,,·o rd s can, the g rad e of m e J·c h a ndi se \·o u r ece ive w h e n purcha sed o f us.

We Feed and Clothe the Entire Family

RYAN COMPANY NO. 2 Chain Department Stores A uburn

"Chee r up, Bill. what are you looking so fed up about?" "Oh, I dunno-work, work, work from mornin' to night, a ll yer bloomin' life. Who wouldn't be fed up?"

Ne bras ka

Ruth Jon es (asked to s it next to the hostess oppos ite the goose) : "Am I to s it so close to the goose (suddenly feeling this m a y be misunderstood), I m ean the roast one.''

"Why, how l o n g have you been at your job?" ·'Start tomorrow.··

Miss H arman (in freshman English class) : "Is the word raven an a djective based on the ana lo gy of a participle?" Brite F r es hies: "Yes, it comes from the word rave."

M oth e r: "Is the clock runnmg, Raymond?" Shorty: "No, rna, it's just standing still and wa ggin' its tail."

W eltha Wilkie, recountin g her respectable sins after Y. W., mentions e g otism, discontent, jea lousy, falsehood and bigamy! Secret sin s?

Well, I g uess I


Mr. Beck (talking on th e s ubjec t o f int e r est in ar ithmetic): ''What is your a n swer?·· Pupil:

·

·s 1./2

d o lla rs. ··

Beck: "Aren't you talking in dolla r s a nd cents? I f you're talking in dollars a nd cents, why. t a lk in dollars with some se n se."

C u s tomer: "Bowl o f oyster soup, tw o scram bled eggs, co ffee a nd brown brea d.· ' C h oyce : "Marines in the mud, two squads, dep l oy 'em, c up of reville a n' co lored s ho c k troops."

If a burg la r entered the cella r would th e coal s hute ? No. but the kindlin g wood.

Did you know that our Editor-inC hief los t h er di g nity and lowered herself at firs t s t a ff meeting, to th e g reat deli g ht of her associa tes.

LINCOLN'S PRINCIPAL SHOPPING CENTER and thP mos t interesting department store in Nebraska. A good place to trade the year 'round. Make it Your store.


ISN'T THAT JUST LIKE HIM? Fa tty Bennett (on way home for Xmas vacation): "Conductor, is this a fast train?" Conductor: train.''

"Sure, this is a fas t

Fa tty: "I thought it was. Will you mind my getting o ut to see what it is fast to."

Who is this proud sen ior? Well. what a "funny" question to ask? WONDER HOW HE KNEW? Miss Clark: "Mr. Prokop, can you tell us what an oyster is?" Bobby: "Yes' m, it's a fish built like a nut."

ITS TO BE EXPECTED Freshie: "What is a parable?" Wise Junior : "A parable is a heavenly story with an earthly meanm g.

MILLINERY A ll Kinds of Hat Trimmmgs Specialty of Retrimming MRS. DILLON Peru, Ne_b.

BLESSED ASSURANCE Mr. Hoyt (chemistry class): " I suspect if a nything s h ould go wrong, we and the Laboratory with us will be blown sky high. Now. dearly beloved, come a little closer in order that you may follow me."

1.Gtnroln ftlu.atnr.a.a Qlollrgr l FullY accredited h,路 \'a t iona] Assoc ia tion of r\ccredited (路om m e r c ia] . 路 Sc hoo ls )

Our Intensive Training Prepares You Quickly Ask for Catalog

L . B. C. Building, 14 and P . St., Lincoln, Neb.


ATHLETIC GOODS Baseball, Tennis and Golf \\.hol e~ al e !>rice:-; to A ll T eam s \Y e O utfit K ocl a k s and S uppli es Con1pl e t e S t ock of S portin g a nd O uting Goo ds

THE TOWNSEND GUN CO. 1514 Farnam St., Omaha

The burning question of the hour is, "What was Gabel doing when the pebble hit the window?"

EARLY BIRD GETS THE WORM "] understand Mr. Choyce is a finished cornetist." Deutsch: "Gee! Is he? I was just trying to find courage to finish him up myself. Who did it?"

THE FAIR C O -ED SOME FUNNY THINGS DO HAPPEN Imagine Mr. Jean's c onsternation upon finding all his pet g oldenrods which he h a d so care fully and tenderly reared, a rra nged in a most pleasing and decorative row in his laboratory one mornin g , due to the kindn ess of Funny.

Steve went to college To ge t a sta rt in life, But instead of getting knowledge He got a little wife.

Stewa rt : "Here's your cap and I'll crank the Ford, but don ' t go!"


V\路e beli eve in t h e .P rin ciples o f Co-ope ra ti on , Fair Treatment, a ncl J)r ()gTess . Yo u a nd Yo ur F ri e nd s w ill :\ lwa\路s h e l\!facl e \ iVelcom e in thi s Cit\路. \i\lit h large and dependabl e assortme nt s of goods t o ch oose fr o m , P ri ces Jll ()S t r eason a ble, con for min g t o Q u a lity. We Invite Yo ur [n specti on, w i t h Se r vice as O ur 1\tlotto, a nd Courtesy as cmr G r eat est Asset. Ne braska City's P r os pe ri ty D e pe nd s Entirely U pon th e Good W ill of ib F ri end s, a nd sh e wants Your F ri e ncl s hi p.

Nebraska City Business Men


Lin co ln 's E xclusive

Weltha returnin g from the movies when Choyce had been the w retched (?) victim, is heard declining 路 'am o. " Is it possible?

Lacl ies ' l{ ead y -t o-\\ ear Store AT THE JR. -SR. BASKET BALL GAME

Cloaks Suits Dresses and Millinery

Questi o ns come a nd questions go Some interest, o the rs bore, But the one we find on every mind Just now is, "What's the score?"

LOST. STRA YEO OR STOLEN

THE FAMOUS 1109 0

Street

Mr. Hoy t (in first semester class): " Miss Griffiths. do you know why you are the most a ttractive g irl in sch ool ? " (Ka theryn gradua lly coloring.) Mr. Hoyt: "Because you can draw a "Ho use" o ut of its place.

The Store of Quality

One of th e b est places in th e w es t t o buy good tn e r ch a ncli se.

I .. owes t Prices

Herpolsheimer's L incoln, Neb.

Hug h. I think you h ad bette r ta k e your own seat."

Ben esch: "Like most men I suppose I h ave my sh ortcomings." D ella : "Uh l It isn't your sh o rtco mings. It' s your long-stayings that I obi ect to."

Pro f. G abel (afte r eati n g his third piece of pie ): "N~: thanks. I wo uldn't care for any. N eighbor (opposite side . of ta ble): "Why, you're n o t..suffenng from ind igestion, are you ? Pro f : "No-ah- er-politeness. "


Say It With Flowers Mail O rders Promptly Filled any Season of the Year

Oag : sugar.

'There

Landlady : co mplain.''

a re

ants

m

th e

''You are the first to

Oag: " I h ope you'll excu se me, but you see I'm a vegetarian.路路

] . K. HILTNER 1042 0 St.

Lincoln , Neb. LITERARY TENN IS

Hotel Rome Cafeteria

This classic, Mr. Editor, :ees uoy, htrof dna k cab n ettirw s l That is to s how the way 'twill go .em dna senizagem eht neewteB (Read it again.)

.\l us t Popular Dining- !'lace in O maha

.\ rodern-

Prices R easonal>k Sanitary

Open Day and Nig ht

Rome Miller

Visito r: ers?"

"Who are your teach -

K. G. Boy: "Oh. Miss B l o u g h teaches one tab le a nd M iss Wright the eth er." Visi tor: "Yes, but have another teacher, remember h er? " K. G. boy:

don't don't

you you

"No ...

Visitor: "We ll, what about Miss Hosmer; what does she do?" K. G. boy (brightly): just winds the clock."

"Oh, she

DO YOU KNOW? The nice thing abou t the Peruvian is that it takes time; t ime to plan, time to execute, time to print, time to sell, time to read, time to c riticize, and time to lau g h. But let me give yo u this ca ution: Remember there is a proper tim e and proper place for eac h and everyt hing . -Joke Editor.

A n English Lord, w h o h ad just arr ived from England, was tal king to a n Ame rican Boy S co ut. "My grand fat h er," he said , "was a very grea t man. One day Queen Victoria touched h is shoulder with a swo rd and made him a lord." "Aw, that's nothin g ," said Harland. " One day R ed Wing, a n Indian, touched my g randfath er on the h ead w ith a toma h aw k a nd made hi m an angel."


MAKE MEMORIES LAST H

O \\ . g ratef ul y ou will be each ne w year

that y o u o bey ed tha t impul se a n d h acl y o ur pi c ture ta k en. "If onl y I had clone so:'' is th e ech o of man,路 \Yho learn t oo la te. ?\ever \Yill y o u be again as yo u are t oday. L e t u :-> m a k e yo ur pi cture t oday . \ i\Tith u s, ph o t ography is a rt. v\ e s tri ve fo r personality in o ur por t rai t ure, and for tha t r ea son we u s ually produce even m or e than just a p ic ture .

THE E. ]. NEWMAN STUDIO PERU, NEBRASKA

Funny: non?"

路'Wha t is a

phe nom e-

Dad: 路'A phe nome non is m y wife' s idea of a mode l husb a nd ."

YES, IT DOES "Wha t' s your favorite tune ? " Hug h: "It v:aries-a g reat d eal - d e pending on what girl is singing o r playing it. "

THE PROPER TREATMENT "I h a ve a t e rrible cold ," co m plaine d Griff. " M y h ead feels a ll stopp e d up." Pra nte: "Have you trie d a v acuum cleane r?''

C urly {ro undin g a corner at full sp eed) : "Do y ou h ear those c ylind e rs kno cking ?" Z elda : "Isn ' t the cylinder! ; it' s my knees."

AIRPLANE ARITHMETIC. 2 5 c ents one g allon. 2 5 gallons, o ne flight . 2 5 flig hts, o ne funeral.

Wha t' s a pig doing wh e n it' s ea ting ? M a kin g a h og of itself.


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SUPREMACY For the past fifteen years the Educational Department of the Bureau of En graving, Inc., has been collecting a vast fund of information from the experiences of hundreds of editors and managers of A nnuals.

1.

This data covering organization, financin g, advertising, construction, sellin g and ori ginal fea tures has been systematically tabul ated and form s the subj ect m atter for our series of reference books. These are furnished free to those securin g "Bureau" co-operation in the making of engravings for their books.

Begin w h ere o th ers h ave left off. Profit by th eir ex perience and assure success for yu ur Ann ual.

BUREAU OF ENGRAVING!~S 17' SOUTH STXTH STREET

MINNEAPOLIS

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Reliable Printers ofHIGH SCHOOL and COLLEGE AN NUALS CATALOGUES BOOKLETS HOUSE ORGANS M AG AZINES PRICE LISTS

vVe S pecz'ali~e

TRADE PAPE RS

Z1Z

FLYERS and

Color W ork

C IRCULARS

GREAT WEST PRINTING CO. I NCORPOR ATE D

Pn"nters to the Particular Advertiser .'i !S-52 0-522 i:;ou t h Third Street

M I N NEA POLIS


Whe n we w e r e e lected t o this p os•tlo n, th e sc h ool a nnu a l was e ntirely fo r e ig n to our com preh e n sio n. But a fte r a v isit fro m J. J. S h e r a nd th e con sulta tion of a few o f o ur faculty m e mbe rs, w e b ega n t o see th e p o ssib ilities o f a Gold e n A nnive r sary A nnua l. Countless nights of anx iety and work were spe nt fi lling out 2 50 b la nk pages. The s taff was fi na lly selected an d collecting ou r materi a l fo r the book began a t o n ce. We h ad o u r p la n s well u nder way a n d most of o ur e n g r avin g done, w h e n a sh o rt n o t e came fro m th e p rinte r-like a bolt from a clear sk y-saying , ··your co ntract is ca ncelled , we ca nn ot d o th e work fo r y o u. " W e called a sp ecial sta ff m eeting a nd, und e r p ressure o f time, d ecide d up o n w h a t was t o b e d o n e. The fo llow ing day, Mr. C ottle a nd o ur C lass A d v ise r, Mr. F . C. J ean, m a d e a hu rried search fo r a new prin ter. They bro u g ht the n ews b ack tha t w e m ust h ave a paper -b o und b o ok. Yo u can easily pic ture th e disap p o intme n t a nd dissatisfac tio n t ha t m a rked the faces of the Seni o rs on the campus. This seem ed t o u s to b e so un satisfactory tha t w e calle d u po n Mr. S h e r t o h elp u s o ut. He m ad e a flyin g trip a n d we le t th e co ntract t o th e company h e suggest ed. Today th e last b it of e n g ravin g is in, o u r dummy is r eady, a nd m a few days Peru's Golden A n n iversary A n nual wi ll be a real ity. T h e r e are m a ny to w h om we a r e g ra teful for the wo rk t h a t h as been don e o n this b o ok. We w ish esp ecia lly to tha nk Mr. J ean, w h ose untirin g e fforts guided us o n throu gh oceans o f d isco u ragem e nt ; M iss M . Mutz, in h e r inva lu a ble h elp in the a rt d epartment. We certa in ly owe a deb t o f tha nks to J. J. S h er, w h ose sympa thetic and whole -h eart ed co-opera tio n w ith u s co ntributed a large part to th e success o f this a n nual ; to Mr. W. Kouba fo r his time ly s u ggest io ns o n the dummy; we desire a lso to thank th e rest of th e faculty a nd staff membe rs w h o h e lped m a k e this volume a success. T h e p ast year has been o n e o f pleasurable associa tio n s a nd h a rd w o rk, a nd if we h ave been forced t o g •ve up oth er thin gs for th e P eru v ia n, it h a s been e minently worth w hil e. DOR A T H Y R OETTGER H A RVEY ]. C OTTLE.


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Profile for Peru State College Library

1920 - The Peruvian  

1920 yearbook for Peru State College, Peru, Nebraska

1920 - The Peruvian  

1920 yearbook for Peru State College, Peru, Nebraska

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