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[proof] palo alto high school spring 2017


[proof]


cover by james poe; inside cover by emma cockerell


about Published three times a year, [proof] is Palo Alto High School’s fine arts magazine. Our production strives to cover all aspects and mediums of art, featuring student talents in addition to local and national artists. Our mission is to showcase student artwork, local events and educate others in the arts, promoting creative thinking in the minds of our readers. from the editors Hello, readers! After our successful Fall Issue, we are proud to present the Winter Edition of [proof]. In the following pages, expand your creative horizons by exploring international art forms such as East Asian makeup and Mexican indigenous art. This issue also shines a light on local and Paly-specific art, delving into topics such as the Madrigals Feaste and Paly Theatre while reviewing a handful of Bay Area museums. Finally, page through our gallery to view a diverse selection of student-submitted artwork. We hope you enjoy this issue and continue to support our magazine.

photography by jasper chang


editors-in-chief

staff

aidan maese-czeropski serina nguyen flora yu

abby cummings ahana ganguly alice on alyssa leong ashley guo catelina nguyen ellen chung esha junnarkar jasper chang jessie arons julienne ho kaitlyn khoe

editors photography // amy luo, emma cockerell, james poe design // jeanette andrews social media // angelina wang managing // tara madhav

julienne ho kaitlyn khoe lucia amieva-wang miranda li ria pai ruby shen shannon zhao soumya jhaveri suye shen thomas chapman xiaopei chen yue shi

advisor margo wixsom photography instructor palo alto high school mwixsom@pausd.org

contact Submit all artwork to proof.paly@gmail.com to be featured in our next issue. Our past issues can be found at http://issuu.com/proofpaly. We can also be reached by mail at 50 Embarcadero Rd, Palo Alto, CA.


CONTENTS

photo by jasper chang


LIFESTYLE 09

girlgaze

13

wanderlust

15

cafes of san francisco

17

brunch

19

yoga

FINE ARTS 23

madrigals

25

mexican cultural art

27

asian art museum

29

graphic design

31

east asian makeup

35

importance of being earnest

37

art of advertisements

HOW TO 41

portrait photography

43

hand lettering

45

terrariums

47

bullet journals

49

rain photography


[lifestyle]


photo by james poe


#girlgaze

09

lifestyle

story by: angelina wang design by: serina nguyen elizabeth rauner-swan


The female form has been molded and used for male pleasure throughout the centuries in art, but in the 21st century, women are taking back the spotlight.

girlgaze

10


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lifestyle


The female form has been molded and used for male pleasure throughout the centuries in art, but in the 21st century, women are finally taking back the spotlight. “Girlgaze,” a multimedia platform that supports girls behind the camera, was founded by photographer and actress Amanda de Cadenet in February 2016. The project has received widespread press and partnerships with media houses including Teen Vogue, I-D and Paper Mag. De Cadenet started the project as she became frustrated with how she was always portrayed as “sexy” in her role as a TV host, and wanted to create a way for women to have the ability to mold and influence their own images. According to de Cadenet, most creative photo projects that focus on women are actually executed by men. “Nine times out of 10, it is a fantasy of the female; it's their ideal female," de Cadenet says. Girlgaze photos aim to capture unique points of view through girls around the world, and to “represent the intelligence, creativity, complexity and diversity of girls’ experience,” as the website states. Many of the organization’s images focus on topics such as body image, sexuality, mental illness and objectification. The project also includes an exhibition at the Annenberg Space for Photography in Los Angeles, a biannual art installation, and offers grants through the Girlgaze Foundation to fund emerging female photographers and filmmakers.

girlgaze

12


wanderlust

written by: james poe & jasper chang design by: james poe & serina nguyen 13

lifestyle


travel photography

14


FO OD

IN SF 15

lifestyle


San Francisco is famous for its landmarks, parks and quirky culture, but a crucial aspect of the city’s structure is its cafes. The FreshMarket. The FreshMarket is located inside Neiman Marcus on one of the busiest streets of San Francisco. It has a sleek style with large windows, modern decorations and bright colors, creating an open and calm atmosphere. The FreshMarket serves casual lunches like sandwiches and salads for shoppers on the go; its mission is to give its customers the healthiest and freshest foods available, and recipes are consistently changed to stay trendy. Four Barrel. The cafe features a unique range of drinks and desserts such as milk chocolate passion fruit donuts and autumnal soda. Its wooden structure and boar head decorations add a rustic flair to its interior. Four Barrel is a great place to hang out with friends and family, with both indoor and outdoor seating, as well as a constantly updated art collection. Downsides are that the cafe doesn’t offer Wifi and the prices are relatively higher than other local cafes. However, if you want to have a comfortable and fun experience in San Francisco, then pop into Four Barrel cafe for some delicious snacks.

written by: ria pai // photos by: ria pai & serina nguyen // design by: flora yu & kaitlyn khoe

cafes in sf

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a brunch of fun shannon zhao Have plans next Sunday morning? Gather your friends together for an aesthetic brunch with scrumptious treats and a handful of photo ops that your Instagram feed will most definitely thank you for. Inspired by summertime, this brunch was decorated with floral details and colorful dishes. Mismatched plates were used to create a casual, yet quaint look without appearing too over-the-top. Food and drinks were placed on a large table, separate from the sitting table, to allow for a buffet style fare. Pro Tips: 1. Virtually any red-fleshed fruit will look vibrant on your brunch table. 2. Don’t be afraid to get creative with the table decorations. I used the head of a pineapple to add a tropical island flare to an otherwise dull plate of pineapple chunks. 3. Fruit platters can get pricey: Buy your fruit in bulk and cut them yourself. Avoiding pre-made fruit platters will not only save you money, it also allows you to customize the amount and type of fruit you want!

4. The trick with savory dishes is that you don’t need a lot of them. Smoked salmon plated with a dollop of cream cheese will upgrade any brunch, but this option can be expensive. Swap the salmon with your choice of dried fruit or avocado for a cheaper savory alternative. 5. French macarons always make any brunch look amazing. They’re delicious, elegant and impressive. But macaron stores can also be very expensive. Head to your local Costco and pick up a box of 20 macarons for $9.99 that will be equally as impressive without the cost.

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The Essentials Fruits are great for the light eaters and are even better for your foodie Instagram post. They add a pop of color to any brunch plate, while also helping you cope with the fact that the rest of your plate is filled with unhealthy cookies or pastries. Savory dishes are a must to finish off your brunchand counterbalance all those sweets. With a few simple items you can keep your guests satisfied without butchering your wallet. Budget-friendly breakfast staples include meats such as bacon and sausage as well as scrambled eggs. Cracker combinations with cheese (spread or sliced) or meat (salami, prosciutto, smoked salmon) are also must-haves. Baked Goods are the base to any brunch. They’re quick, filling and practically won’t do any damage to your wallet. Different types of bread (loaves, baguettes, rolls, croissants) are never a bad option, while sweet treats such as cakes, muffins and cookies will definitely appease your guests.

brunch

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YOGA the original art form

When one thinks of the arts, painting, dancing, and even synchronized swimming come to mind—but what about yoga? Yoga connects the body, mind and spirit to create a work of art observable in all aspects. Yoga allows people to detach themselves from the world, and it can create a peaceful safe haven. It is soothing to the mind, and helps one to express themselves in a mental and physical fashion. "Whether you’re an amateur photographer, professional filmmaker, summer knitter or weekend woodworker, art-making can give you the feeling of being completely present, awake and alive,” Yoga International writes. “While yoga is often thought of as a tool to help us find ease in the body, quiet the mind, and get in touch with our true nature, it can also be a way of helping us tap—and mine—our creative selves.” Yoga makes people feel a sense of beauty and power from the inside out. This is what makes yoga so significant; it provokes a feeling of strength and individuality that one does not often find unless experiencing an art form. Yoga focuses on the beauty of the inside as well as the outside. Sheri Mulroe is an experienced yogi who has practiced yoga for over twenty years. At Palo Alto High School, she is creating a new yoga class that will be offered next year as a year-long course. “Yoga is an expression of yourself and also how you interpret an asana (pose) as a form of art,” Mulroe says. “A good yogi or yogini’s asanas are works of art.” All art originates from this pure, individual expression from deep inside one’s spirit. Several yoga poses are core positions in dance, gymnastics and figure skating, and they can be spotted frequently throughout any performance. Yoga is also mirrored in several magnificent sculptures or paintings of ancient deities on display in museums.

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“Yoga helps me to be present and centered,” Mulroe says. “I find when I am in yoga class I am able to let all of the distractions of my outside life go for that time. It has really helped me in the parenting of my teenager as I’m able to stop, take a breath, and then respond instead of reacting to issues that arise.” Yoga isn’t just peace and relaxation, though. Several challenging poses can push one to test their physical limits. Mulroe says she also enjoys the challenges of arm balances, inversions and single leg standing poses as well “because they are such a challenge that you can really push to your edge.” Being able to walk on an edge is what constantly pushes art to develop further. Art used to be realistic and pleasing to the eye. Now art has branched out to be able to reflect several emotions.

Sometimes though, one must be able to just step away from the constant flow of life and take a break. “Students are constantly interacting with technology or involved in academics, sports, or other activities. Yoga gives youth an opportunity to slow down and just be instead of constantly doing,” Mulroe says. “Taking a moment to just exist and channel one’s individual expression instead of constantly bustling around is an essential part of art. Art was really made to be a creative outlet like an anchor in an ocean of chaos. Yoga, though often overlooked, can be one of the most encompassing art forms one can find.” written by: ashley guo // photo by: james poe // design by: kaitlyn khoe

yoga

20


[fine arts]


photo by amy luo


madrigal feaste emma cockerell As I walk through the doors of the Performing Arts Center, I am greeted by two choir members dressed in traditional English garb, resplendent in vivid fabrics. Throngs of people mingle about the spacious, festive room, posing for group photos with friends and family and stopping to grab refreshments from the many Palo Alto High Schoolw students that wander about bearing silver platters. The scene bears a strong resemblance to most choir receptions except for one small detail -the choir members passing are all dressed in colorful medieval outfits and address guests with British accents. Madrigal Feaste, a 50-year Paly holiday tradition that occurs every December, experienced a change of scene this year as the show was moved from the usual Jordan Middle School multi-purpose room to Paly’s newly completed Performing Arts Center. The show was altered to accommodate for the switch in seating style; previously, guests had sat at tables and ordered from a course menu while watching the show. This year, food and drink came during the mingling period before the start of the actual show, with a few acts performed in the mingling area but the majority of the show performed in the theater. The event also featured an all-new commissioned piece written by Daniel Elder titled “A King’s Lament.” “More people were able to come this year to experience the Madrigal Feaste because this year we had it in the new Performing Arts Center, which provides more seats than the Jordan multi-purpose room and even the old small gym,” senior Jennifer Zhuge said. “With a higher number of seats, the student tickets were a lot cheaper and affordable which let more students come to enjoy the event.” Individual acts were interspersed throughout the mingling session, and the premise of the story of King Henry VIII’s marriage woes was introduced. Members of court and royalty discussed Henry’s scandalous rapid succession of wives, all the while keeping in character with posh British accents. The beginning choir performed a beautiful piece using handheld celesta-like instruments, and an all-male trio sang a soaring harmony.

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fine arts


photos by: emma cockerell // amy luo design by: kaitlyn khoe // emma cockerell

madrigals

24


mexican folk art aidan maese-czeropski In a Eurocentric society, it is all too easy to overlook the artistic significance of our Latin American neighbors. While Mexican folk art may only serve as a passing interest to American tourists, it encompasses centuries of ethnic and cultural change, making it one of the the world’s most distinctive art forms.

Alebrijes

Perhaps the most notable Mexican art form, alebrijes are brightly-colored sculptures that represent imaginary creatures. Invented by artist Pedro Linares in the 1930s, these works quickly caught the attention of famed painters Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo and spread to mainstream Mexican media. According to legend, Linares dreamt he was in a landscape surrounded by mythical creatures when suffering from a fever and, upon awakening, decided to dedicate his life to the art form. While these crafts were initially composed of papier mache, sturdier statuettes are often made with wood or plaster bases. As each sculpture carries a unique, fantasybased design, the carving and painting process may take weeks. However, the lengthy process deters neither the artists nor the consumers, as alebrijes may be one of Mexico's most unique art forms.

Masks

Modern Mexican masks can be grouped into two broad categories: decorative and traditional. Decorative masks are mainly purchased for aesthetic purposes; local artists pander to tourists to make a profit selling these carvings. Traditional masks, on the other hand, are intricately designed to reflect the ever-changing customs and cultures of Mexico. Mask crafters can spend weeks carving, designing and dyeing masks before the production cycle is complete. In Southern Mexico, where the high density of indigenous populations ensures a thriving mask industry, craftsmen use wood, clay, stone and even papier mache to construct their sophisticated art. The creations are also rich with symbolism: The faces depicted represent ancient Mayan gods, while vibrant scarlet pigments allude to the former Mexican tradition of painting temples red.

Pottery

Unlike Mexico’s mask industry, which is based in the south, vases generally remain popular in the northern Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts. Here, descendents of the Pueblo Indians carry on their archaic creative traditions, using pottery to breathe life into their ancestry. Most vases feature swirling circular patterns that depict natural scenery such as blossoming flowers or colossal trees. Other pottery designers stray away from this imagery, instead focusing on simple symmetrical, geometric patterns that capture their viewer’s attention. The vases’ designs are not as richly symbolic as other art forms; however, they serve a useful purpose. For centuries, the Puebloans utilized vases and jars as storage containers, stockpiling food and other necessities. While this usage is now virtually obsolete, pottery remains an exquisite reminder of the daily lives of the Pueblo Indians.

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fine arts


photos by: amy luo

mexican folk art

26


japanese american museum suye shen

During the 1940s, when the US and Japan were deeply entrenched in war with each other, Japanese Americans developed unique lifestyles and art forms. The Japanese American Museum of San Jose has collected, preserved and shared their history and art in various forms since 1987. Depicted here is a replication of a barracks room, showcasing a trace of Japanese American history that will allow the viewers to experience their lives amidst war. The room, 20' x 20' in size, is an authentic replica of the barracks at California internment camp Tulelake. Most of the narrow space is filled with six "beds," or mattress sacks. Other than the beds, one stove, a light bulb and some wool blankets make up the essentials. Despite the room's cozy appearance, its former residents struggled even to sleep at night. Collecting hay to fill the empty mattress sacks was a daily chore, displaying the poor living conditions Japanese Americans suffered from in WWII. Residents also collected scrap lumber to build necessities like chests and chairs as they were unable to purchase furniture. Because of the miniscule size of the barracks, however, most residents were unable to own kitchens or bathrooms. As a result, residents were forced to use communal mess halls and lavatories. Privacy was an even greater issue within the barrack buildings. With six rooms in each building, privacy could only be provided by thin ropes and sheets. Meanwhile, residents' neighbors could easily hear one another's conversations due to poor building materials: large spaces existed between the floor and ceiling boards. This caused another paramount problem: sand, dust, and bugs entered the rooms and threatened the residents' health.

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fine arts


photos & design by: yue shi

japanese american museum

28


graphic design kaitlyn khoe

The graphic design elective, taught by Brett Griffith, introduces students to a palette fit for making any poster, animation or advertisement digitally. “The goal is ultimately to grow as an artist working with the 21st century digital culture,” Griffith says. Using Adobe software, such as Illustrator, Photoshop and After Effects, students learn the design process. The steps include thumbnailing various rough sketches, choosing a concept, building original assets like photographs or drawings and layering everything together for display. “First we imitate, then we innovate,” Griffith says. The class begins with a series of projects aimed at discovering how editing programs work and their important features. The first half especially highlights peer-teaching, the idea that experimenting leads to figuring out techniques that

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fine arts

can be shown to someone else. And undoubtedly, each individual’s artistic style will always be illuminated through these projects. Towards the end of the school year, the projects are reduced; instead the editing process lengthens to encourage time for more revision, details and collaboration. A popular assignment is creating Film Festival posters; groups are given a film created by Paly students, to analyze. Larger projects usually include a procedure where brainstormed sketches are shared to choose one or combine multiple for the concept of the movie poster. The completed drafts are shown to the rest of the class for further revision. The finalized posters are revealed during the Paly Film Festival. Other projects include lively animations, Tumblr headers, and advocacy posters.


“Drawing is a type of thinking,” says Griffith. Other than technical skills, the class pays attention to lasting mindsets such as habits of mind, the way one approaches struggle or a challenge, and Stanford’s design school thinking. Every project mimics at least one aspect of working for a real-life client, from the process to the organization and communication.

Graphic design gives students the rare opportunity to work with sophisticated programs and build on their distinctive artistry. “The first project is when I got to show who I was by putting different spring on things,” says Sarah Martinson, freshman. For beginners to intermediates and beyond, the graphic design elective breaks the mold of what is considered art. art by: alex tarng, yashvi tibrewal, anoushka sharma, eoin o'kramer, kaitlyn khoe

an elective introduction

30


makeup in east asia Matte lips, smokey eyeshadow and bronzing have long dominated the Western makeup industry, but recent years have seen the emergence of Asian makeup and skincare in America. Products by companies popular in East Asia, such as Etude House and Shiseido, have become more prevalent in the United States, as seen by the increase in Asian brand stores and online shopping websites like Memebox. Although traces of Western influence can be found in modern styles, the fundamental beauty standards of China, Korea and Japan are deeply rooted in traditional aesthetic ideals. Korean wedding makeup consists of three colors: white, black, and red. White makeup is placed on one's face and neck; clear and fair skin was traditionally a trademark of wealthy, elite women. Charcoal is mixed with water to draw natural, black brows, accentuating dark hair and pupils, and red from safflower powder and oil is used ostensibly on the lips and cheeks. During weddings, three red circles, approximately two to three centimeters in diameter, are placed on both cheeks and on the center of the forehead to represent fortune and good luck. The hair is typically parted in the middle and braided down the back, then twisted into a simple bun; however, one's age and social status can affect the choice in hairstyle. Much like traditional makeup in Korea, makeup in the Chinese Tang dynasty consisted entirely of white, black and red hues. Eyebrows were thin and dark, and red powder was used extensively on the eyes, cheeks and lips. The red was applied to flair out from the corners of one's eyes like eyeshadow, but was also placed on the bottom of the eyes as well. Because small lips were a symbol of beauty, foundation covered the entirely of one's lips, and lipstick was drawn only on the center of the lips to make them appear smaller. Blush was applied from under the eyes and down to the lips, and a red print, made to resemble flower petals, was drawn on the center of the forehead between the eyes. Hair was placed in elaborate buns along with extravagant jewels and accessories; the higher the social status, the more elaborate the hair.

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One of the most iconic looks in Japanese culture is the geisha makeup. The geishas — women who are trained extensively in traditional arts such as tea-making and dance — served predominantly as female entertainers to male audiences since their emergence in the 18th century.


Contrary to popular Western assumption, the geishas do not offer sexual services. In addition to their prowess in the arts, geisha women express themselves by applying a unique face makeup consisting of white rice powder that covers their entire face and neck. In addition, geishas don charcoal drawn eyebrows and a dab of bright red on their lips. A maiko, or a geisha in training, has the heaviest makeup to accentuate their youthful features. Eyebrows are drawn to be rounder, and lip stain is applied to only the bottom lip in the beginning of their training. Maikos that have progressed much of their training wear higher lipstick and have fuller lips. Finally, a three-prong shape is drawn on the back of the neck, which is traditionally considered as the most erotic part of the body. A maiko’s hairstyle will depend on her level of training and the occasion for the event, but will feature many elaborate accessories based on the month of the year.

east asian makeup

32


In the 1920s, Shanghai became the largest international port in China and was the home to some of the wealthiest merchants in the country who led extravagant lifestyles. Due to trade between Shanghai and overseas superpowers, Western natons constantly imported both their goods and their cultures. The mingling of Western and Eastern influences is what formed the iconic 1920s Shanghai look, which continues to be popularly heralded all over the world even today. The “Old Shanghai” makeup featured rouge lips, straight eyebrows and eyeliner that followed the natural curvature of the eyes to showcase sensuality and elegance without compromising the wearer’s natural features. Most women would typically wear their hair in marcel waves, which was the most stylish hairstyle at the time. Although current Korean makeup has evolved to become far more complex and modern, there is still strong emphasis on naturalness through accents of brown in the eyeshadow and brows, as well as soft gradients. The traditionally prized clear and fair-skin 33

fine arts

continues to be the standard; foundation is used to give the skin a smooth and dewy complexion and minimal contouring. Unlike current trends in the US, eyebrows are light and straight, eyeshadow is subtle, and lips are soft and moisturized instead of matte. As monolids are more common in Korea, eyeliner is frequently drawn on the eyes' waterline to make them appear larger, although it is a stylistic preference. The under-eyes are also highlighted to give a more youthful look. Similar to current Korean makeup, Japanese makeup emphasizes youth and naturalness, with exaggerated tones of pastel oranges and pinks. Eyebrows are drawn to be curved and light brown, and lower lashes are lengthened. Circular blush is placed on the center of the cheeks rather than angled upwards, and soft peach or gold eyeshadow is used to highlight the wearer’s charm. False lashes are added to increase volume. Unlike other popular makeup looks — which usually only touch up the top lashes — mascara is applied to the bottom lashes for wider-looking eyes.


models: georgia touloukian, soo kim & hana morita photos by: amy luo // makeup & hair by: alice on story & design by: flora yu

east asian makeup

34


the importance of being earnest soumya jhaveri Palo Alto High School’s 2016 fall play was The Importance of Being Earnest, originally written by playwright Oscar Wilde. It was adapted for the high school stage by director Kathleen Woods. The play opens with a performance by four singers and a pianist, followed by three acts and two intermissionsv. The play presents a case of mistaken identity, as two men, Algernon Moncrieff and John Worthing, J.P. (Jack) pretend to be named Earnest Worthing in order to convince the women they love to marry them. Jack resides in the countryside, taking care of his ward, Cecily Cardew. He claims to have a brother named Earnest who lives in the city and causes trouble, enabling Jack to visit the city whenever he wishes, under the claim that Earnest is in yet another scrape. Jack’s double life eventually leads to misunderstandings between many people.

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Additionally, much of the coordination for the film is difficult. The hardest part is “coordinating a lot of double roles and understudies as it is difficult to figure out who is rehearsing and performing with whom,” according to junior Emily Zhang, who is the understudy for the Hon. Gwendolen Fairfax. The understudies gave a special performance on Nov. 10, which was stunning, especially considering they were only given two onstage rehearsals. Emily’s favorite part of the play is that the set, costumes, hair and makeup all look beautiful. Another important part of the play is making sure it is authentic to the time period. The cast had to learn how to sip tea gracefully and use parasols, amongst other actions. They also brought in a British dialect coach, Claire Geber, to help with their accents. “All of us went into the play knowing some British dialect, but the dialect coach really helped. A lot of it is so nitty gritty and the language is more vintage, not modern-day British English,” says sophomore Derek Zhou, who plays the manservant Lane.


The sets are elaborately decorated and pay homage to the time period with their careful attention to detail. The sets were created with the help and hard work of many different people. They are very visually appealing but do not overpower the characters, who are obviously the main attraction of the play. The costumes, designed by Hannah Crown, Sophie Nakai and Helen Noroian, were intricately designed and beautiful.The hair and makeup, done by Sharon Ridge, Nina Lerrick and Emily Zhang, was also appropriate to the time period.

see - a tremendous amount of effort and hard work. The actors rehearsed for three months, the musicians for a month, and the tech crew for several weeks.

Different props are used throughout the play such as eyeglasses, tea, plants in a garden, furniture, and more, enhancing the story by adding detail and making it more believable and realistic.

It takes a massive amount of effort to pull together a production of this size and quality. Senior musician Edward Park says it requires “blood, sweat, tears and a lot of coffee,� to really get the play in shape. Park says that he normally drinks three to four cups a day, but the play has caused him to drink a whopping nine to ten.

Behind the elaborate scenery and incredibly convincing acting is something the audience does not

Behind the elaborate scenery and incredibly convincing acting is something the audience does not see - a tremendous amount of effort and hard work. The actors rehearsed for three months, the musicians for a month, and the tech crew for several weeks.

photos by: kristina vetter design by: ruby shen

importance of being earnest

36


the art of advertisement lucia amieva-wang

“Rebecca Van Dyck’s career is a chronicle of cool: She shepherded Nike’s ‘Just Do It’ campaign around the world, launched the iPhone and iPad at Apple, gave Levi’s its first global brand identity last year with the Go Forth campaign, and this past February joined the world’s largest social network.” - FAST COMPANY / Most Creative People 2012

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Logos are ubiquitous; they surround us on the seams of our shirts and sewn into the back pockets of our jeans. This is true for logos that are barely noticeable and logos that appear so often that they are connected in our brains with a single word; Nike, Facebook, Amazon, Apple and Twitter. A logo is a symbol. Take Nike’s “swoosh” for example, a brand made for athletes encompassed in the single onomatopoeia of the sound of wind passing by the human body as it runs. The design is meant to look like movement, vaguely like a wing; the wing embodying Nike, the Greek goddess of strength, victory, and speed. Every pair of Nike shoes has the “swoosh” imprinted on the side of the shoe, so every time a customer walks the streets wearing their products, Nike is telling its story.

“Logos provide a consistent identity for the company so that consumers become familiar with the company's name,” according to Facebook VP of Consumer & Brand Marketing Rebecca Van Dyck.”Ideally the logo also gives a sense of the company's personality or business purpose.” During her time in college, Van Dyck studied Psychology and how the human mind makes decisions. Along with that, she also studied American History where she found that culture, in all forms, acts as an archive of how people were feeling about their world at different times. “I grew to think about advertising as a form of historical text that was mirroring our ideas, fears [and] hopes” Vandyck said. “I began to see advertising as a kind of commercial art form that was reflecting our opinions.” The most important aspect of a logo, Van Dyck says, is simplicity. How much can you say while still being straightforward? Readability is also critical; a logo must be clear on a colossal billboard as well as on tiny cell phone icons. That is why logos are so important, they are like trying to tell a story, depict an identity, show a goal, in a single word. And just like how people grow and change over time, companies must be able to grow and change with the times. “The world changes, the consumer’s needs change,” Van Dyck said. “Often a company may evolve their identity and logo.” The Nike logo became so ubiquitous and understood throughout the world that the company dropped the name “Nike” and began only using the swoosh becoming the first company to “de-brand".

“I initially got into marketing because I liked using this art form to reflect consumer culture” Van Dyck said, “but then stayed with it because it allowed me to travel, test my assumptions about culture, build teams, and be creative in a business context.” photos & art by: ella thomson; logos courtesy of Creative Commons

the art of advertisement

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[how to]


photo by amy luo


portraits

affordable materials

written by: photos by: design by:

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how to

ellen chung xiaopei chen flora yu


Many prestigious art books and magazines display beautifully taken portraits that appear to require expensive equipment and a professional studio. Although portraits can be taken with professional cameras and backdrops, one can also use inexpensive materials from local stores. High quality portraits often incorporate an array of colors, and an affordable way to recreate this vibrant look is to use colored cornstarch, which can be homemade or purchased online.

1

Find a large and vacant room with natural lighting. You can either use an old bedsheet for a blank backdrop or a wall for a colored background. If the room has boxes, furniture, or other objects, make sure to cover them with paper, cloth, or cardboard so they don’t distract the viewer.

2

Make sure that your model wears clothes they do not mind getting dirty. Set up your camera or phone on a tripod, or place your phone on a pile of books.

3

Take the photos by placing the camera on a timer. Toss the colored cornstarch in front of your model and take as many photos as possible to ensure you catch the decisive moment and capture at least a few high quality shots.

4

Use iPhoto, Photoshop, or other retouch applications to edit the photos. In the end, you should have many beautiful portraits using only inexpensive materials.

portraits: affordable materials

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hand lettering story by: julienne ho // art by: julienne ho & belle doughman // design by: serina nguyen & jeanette andrews From wedding organization to graphic design, calligraphy has become a popular art form over the past few years for countless purposes. Calligraphy has adapted and morphed to suit our ever-changing culture, taking on a modern composition: hand lettering is the process of “drawing” letters and mixing handwritten “fonts” to create an effect that echoes typography. Professional hand letterers may decorate weddings and design logos. Cursive, serif, and sans serif fonts can be divided into three fundamental parts designated by the ascender line, descender line, waistline and baseline. However, the recent “bouncing script” trend disregards the uniformity of established lines, creating a modern, playful effect with copperplate script. Experimentation with the ratio between the lines as well as capital or lowercase letters can lead to a variety of personalized fonts. Experimentation with the ratio between the lines as well as capital or lowercase letters can lead to a variety of personalized fonts. Two writing utensils that offer the flexibility of natural variety in width are brushes and dip pens. Dip pens have a handle and a cheap, replaceable nib, but require the writer to dip the pen in ink every so often. Fountain pens, which are generally expensive and lacking flexible nibs, are not ideal for copperplate script. Brushes are easily accessible and can be used with paint as well as ink.

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BRUSH PENS

HANDLES

NIBS

- Crayola SuperTips - Tombow dual brush pen - Sharpie brush-tip - Faber Castell PITT pen - Pentel fude sign pen - ZIG clean color - Pilot pocket brush pen - Sakura pigma brush

Favored by few professionals, the straight handle is optimal for drawing, certain styles of calligraphy, and lefties. The oblique handle is popular among right-handed as it offers a smoother approach to writing.

As everyone has different preferences for nibs, it is difficult to determine which are the most popular, but the Brause 361 Steno and Nikko G are widely recommended for beginners.

hand lettering

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TERRARIUMS


materials • • • • • • •

sand rocks pebbles container succulents plant mister sphagnum moss

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add a thin layer of sand, which will work as a drainage layer

layer about a handful of large stones on top & use pebbles to fill up any empty spaces

carefully place activated charcoal so it covers the stone layer

pack down a generous layer of sphagnum moss

carefully depot succulents & pack soil down using a small spoon

mist succulents & place them in an area without direct sunlight

story by: serina nguyen thomas chapman photos by: james poe

terrariums

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Bullet journals, which serve as both a planner and and as a traditional journal, help keep track of one’s day-to-day goals and ideas in a convenient fashion. This creative outlet is perfect for those who wish to stay organized and jot down notes they want to remember throughout the day. While each bullet journal differs based on an individual’s artistic style, here are general tips and techniques to get you started.

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how to

written by: alyssa leong // photos by: emily soohoo // design by: serina nguyen

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Once you purchase your journal, number each page for maximum organization. You can also add an index or table of contents if you wish to return to certain pages later.

Create a legend to keep track of the symbols you use. An important aspect of bullet journalling is using different colors or creating emblems to mark certain categories in a more efficient way.

If you struggle with planning your weekly schedule, a written overview of your plans, called a “future log,” can be a major help. This includes information on school events, family vacations and more.

Expand on future logs by creating several monthly calendar pages. At the start of each month, create a calendar or list and fill it in with the events and plans you jotted down in your future log.

For each day of the week, write out your tasks or deadlines and mark them accordingly. Many bullet journalers also track their daily habits such as hours of sleep, hours of exercise, etc. The weekly spreads are the optimal place to unleash your creative side: Many people add printed pictures and drawings to this spread. Try experimenting with different layouts or adding some fun doodles.

materials a journal writing utensils washi tape (particularly from MT) highlighters – zebra midliners stickers

bullet journals

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rain photography

esha junnarkar jessie arons

When it starts to rain, some people immediately leap inside their houses to avoid the downpour, while others take advantage of the opportunity for a photoshoot. Rain can be the element a photo needs to freshen it up and make it appear brand new. Try these tips next time when it’s raining and you don’t mind getting a bit wet. Focus on the rain drops Use a low depth of field, high shutter speed, and a wider open shutter. This will create focus on the rain drops with a unfocused background. Take a picture of a window If you are sitting in the car and looking out the window, you can pull out your camera to snap a picture of the raindrops flitting across the car window. Try puddle reflections If it is not pouring outside, it may be difficult to get a clear picture of the raindrops; puddles can be a good visual clue to show that it is raining. You can capture various different objects in the reflection. Use an umbrella Umbrellas can protect your camera from water damage or shield your photo from bright light reflecting off of the clouds. A crowd of people holding umbrellas can also make an interesting shot due to the array of colors, and a single umbrella can add a pop of color to make it stand out to the viewer. Make water splashes Capture a picture of someone splashing around in the puddles. If there is a big puddle, grab some rain boots and jump in!

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design by: flora yu


rain photography

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[gallery]


photo by jasper chang


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Lucia Amieva-Wang


Kristina Im

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Nura Mostaghimi


Xiaopei Chen // Sabrina Martin

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Katherine Sung


Sydney Liu // Zoe Wong-Vanh

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Kristina Im // Esha Junnarkar

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Anna Tomz // Abby Cummings


Patille Papas

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[proof] Spring 2017 Edition  
[proof] Spring 2017 Edition  
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