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THE MODERN CLASSROOM

Strategic insights for school leaders


Our traditional system of education is rooted in a model first developed in the Industrial Age. It assumes that knowledge is transferred from an external source – teachers, books and schools – to a student… learning that takes place outside class does not count for credit, nor is it even formally recognized. This long-held model is struggling to engage a new generation of students for whom learning is happening all the time – online, off-line, in classrooms, as well as after school, in libraries and at museums. The connected learner can access tutorials, lessons and entire courses online while participating in afterschool programs such as code academies and maker labs. The Aspen Institute 1

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http://csreports.aspeninstitute.org/Task-Force-on-Learning-and-theInternet/2014/report/details/0046/Task-Force-Introduction-and-Challenges

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CONTENTS 4

WHAT THIS EBOOK IS ABOUT

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WHAT MAKES A CLASSROOM ‘MODERN’?

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THE 4 CATALYSTS FOR LEARNING

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THE 6 C’S TO ACHIEVING DEEP LEARNING

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USING SPACE

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USING PEDAGOGY

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USING TECHNOLOGY

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UNDERSTANDING THE BARRIERS

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MANAGING POLICY

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RE-IMAGINING YOUR CLASSROOM

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CASE STUDIES

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LEARN MORE

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ABOUT PROMETHEAN

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

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WHAT IS THIS EBOOK ABOUT? The world is changing fast, and education systems need to modernise and adapt to new ways of teaching and learning and embrace the new opportunities that exist. Erasmusplus/EC 2

Educators are required to do so much more than teach. They must also manage the many factors which affect the impact and sustainability of teaching and learning. A substantial proportion of these factors are concerned with the function of the classroom: What happens in the classroom? What is the role of the teacher? How much teaching is directive, and how much do students explore for themselves? How is technology used, and whose hands is it in? How is the classroom laid out, equipped and furnished? Do the classroom’s four walls constrict or enable the way learning happens? The concept of the ‘modern classroom’ understands that new answers to these questions will lead to a transformation of everything we know about teaching. The classroom of today is already unrecognisable from 20 years ago, so what will the classroom of tomorrow look like? And how can schools get there in the least painful, most cost-effective and most impactful way?

The challenges for educators For educators, key considerations will include: Where to invest in order to reap the greatest rewards How to avoid short-term, low-impact ‘fads’ Adapting best practice for their own local context How to manage change with minimal disruption

The growing evidence base Fortunately, research is helping to provide some answers to these challenges. The flagship four year iTEC (Innovative Technologies for an Engaging Classroom) pan European project across 2000 classrooms focussed on designing and trialling learning scenarios which exploited the new pedagogies and boundaries of the modern classroom enabled by technologies. The FCL (Future Classroom Lab), in Brussels, is another project led by European Schoolnet, a network of 31 European ministries of education, which is working with schools, teachers, researchers, and industry partners, including Promethean, to explore what the modern classroom might be. The lab invites educators to explore new digital pedagogies, and the concept has been replicated in many education institutions, particularly across Portugal.

Space, technology and pedagogy Informed by iTEC, FCL, current research and Promethean’s own direct experience, this ebook looks at 3 key aspects of the modern classroom (the learning space, the technology and the pedagogy), and how these can be adapted to support the 4 catalysts which motivate students to learn. 2

Retrieved from the Erasmus& EC report Changing Lives, Opening Minds http://ec.europa.eu/programmes/erasmus-plus/documents/erasmus-plusleaflet_en.pdf

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WHAT MAKES A CLASSROOM ‘MODERN’?

A new mindset of teaching through technology must emerge, which depends on a vital shift in teacher / student roles 3

Creating a modern classroom isn’t as simple as making a change once and for all. Instead, the classroom is continually optimised to facilitate learning. It’s a flexible approach which takes into account factors such as: The latest research and best practice The culture and context of the school The subject matter in question The demands of curricula and assessment Advances in equipment and technology Because schools are dealing individually with these and other variables, our goal with this ebook is not to be prescriptive. Instead, we are: Sharing what we know and believe Raising important issues for educators to consider Pointing to research Highlighting good practice Asking questions

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https://www.naesp.org/sites/default/files/Blair_JF12.pdf

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What the modern classroom offers Motivation for students to own their learning and continually improve Skills students will need for work, higher study and life in general Real, relevant and purposeful activities which engage students Improved standards of education and behaviour Improved efficiency within the school, including more time available for teaching Competitive advantage Professional development for teachers and the senior management team Keeping pace with regional, national and international education standards

The 3 elements of the modern classroom The modern classroom is created when three key elements come together in harmony:

1 Pedagogy 2 Technology 3 Space Each of the three elements has an important contribution to make, and deserves significant attention. For example, the diagram below highlights what can happen when attention is only paid to two of the factors, rather than all three:

Technology

1 Space

Modern Classroom

3

2

Pedagogy

1

When you disregard pedagogy, you get ‘same old’ – without a pedagogical model which takes advantage of space and technology, the class will continue to do the same thing and will be unlikely to achieve improved results.

2

When you disregard technology, you get ‘extra teacher workload’ – the teacher must operate without the efficiencies which technology can bring.

3

When you disregard space, you get ‘constrained activity’ – this may be the least problematic scenario, but constraints will arise in the use of collaborative and active approaches (for example, if students are forced to sit in rows facing the front).

Wherever you see this symbol

in the text, we’ll be referring back to this diagram.

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THE 4 CATALYSTS FOR LEARNING All learners and educators need a sufficient degree of digital age literacy, where media, digital and social-emotional literacies are present, to be able to use these learning resources to learn through multiple media confidently, effectively and safely. Every student must have a chance to learn these vital skills.4

Promethean has identified the following 4 catalysts for students’ motivation to learn, and it’s essential that any work done to create a modern classroom is designed to maximise the effectiveness of these catalysts: Catalyst 1: Engagement What does it look like? Teachers and students are actively engaged in developing knowledge, and students demonstrate attention, curiosity, interest and optimism during learning. What is the range? Engagement is on a continuum from rebellion to purposeful learning.

Catalyst 2: Personalisation What does it look like? Students are engaged in informal, independent learning and selfreflection. Activities are customised according to individual learning preferences and educational needs. What is the range? Personalisation is on a continuum from uniform to fully individualised activity.

Catalyst 3: Collaboration What does it look like? Individuals are involved in activities which demand interdependence in order to produce successful outcomes, and there is shared responsibility for decisionmaking. What is the range? Collaboration is on a continuum from no interdependence to completely interdependent.

Catalyst 4: Feedback What does it look like? Feedback is used to alter the gap between current performance and the ideal, and students have tools and skills for giving and receiving feedback on their own and others’ work. It includes real-time, instantaneous feedback from effective questioning and tasks, promoting important classroom dialogue and the planning of next steps in learning. What is the range? Feedback is on a continuum from no feedback to information flowing seamlessly between students, teachers, parents and leaders. The following sections look at how space, pedagogy and technology can help to support these catalysts. So wherever you see this symbol in the text, we’ll be referring back to these 4 catalysts.

4

http://csreports.aspeninstitute.org/documents/AspenReportFinalPagesRev.pdf

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THE 6 C’S TO ACHIEVING DEEP LEARNING According to New Pedagogies for Deep Learning (a global partnership of researchers, families, teachers, school leaders and policy-makers), every student needs 6 core skill sets to achieve ‘deep learning’, so that they are prepared to excel in today’s complex world: Collaboration Creativity Critical thinking Citizenship Character Communication This deep learning is achieved through a balance of: Learning partnerships – cultivated between and among students, teachers, families and the wider environment Learning environments – fostering 24/7 interaction in trusted environments where students take responsibility for their own learning Leveraging digital – accelerating student-driven access to knowledge beyond the classroom Pedagogical practices – for designing, monitoring and assessing learning These four factors are easily mapped to the Promethean model of the modern classroom:

Leveraging digital

Technology

Modern Classroom Space

Pedagogy

Learning environments

Learning partnerships Pedagogical practices

In the next sections, we look more closely at the modern classroom’s 3 essential elements of space, technology and pedagogy. In particular, we explore how, for each element, attention can be paid to promoting the 4 essential catalysts for learning.

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USING SPACE

A school’s physical design can improve or worsen children’s academic performance by as much as 25 percent in early years. University of Salford/Nightingale Associates 5

‘Space’ is a broad term, and educators interested in creating modern classrooms will need to consider: Layout aspects – such as how the space is divided and used, where equipment and furnishings are placed, and how flexible the arrangements are Human aspects – such as the spatial relationship of the teacher to their students (is the teacher at the front; do they have a desk?), whether students can move around, and how students are positioned for activities Physical aspects – such as the state of repair of the room and the age and quality of its furnishings and teaching equipment Environmental aspects – such as air quality, noise pollution, light quality and temperature When space is well planned, well used and well cared for, students are more engaged, activities can be more easily personalised, collaboration is facilitated, and feedback is more effective.

Space as one of the 3 elements In relation to technology – According to Gina Sansivero, director of educational sales, at FSR, Inc in the USA, the way space is used is critical to the effectiveness of technology: “Technology in the classroom is only as effective and useful as the environment allows it to be. Limiting the potential for interaction, engagement and collaboration will reduce or eliminate the advantage of having a technology-rich classroom. The unfortunate feedback to the administration will be that the technology doesn’t seem to help all that much, and that the equipment, software, required maintenance and training is cumbersome.”6 In relation to pedagogy – A study of new learning spaces at the University of Minnesota found that changing the pedagogy to suit the space meant that students outperformed their final grade expectations: “When instructors adapted their pedagogical approach to the new space by intentionally incorporating more active, student-centred teaching techniques, student learning improved.”7 5 6

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/03/school-design-studentgrades_n_2404289.html http://www.fsr.education/designing-modern-classrooms-step-1transforming-the-traditional-classroom-into-an-engaging-learningenvironment/ http://er.educause.edu/articles/2011/12/pedagogy-and-spaceempirical-research-on-new-learning-environments

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A traditional space constrains the effectiveness of more studentcentered approaches. Learning that is active, participatory, experiential and cooperative requires a flexible space. In this way, physical space is viewed as an agent of change.8

Applying the 4 catalysts…What good space looks like Catalyst 1 Engagement

Space encourages students to discover things for themselves and facilitates active research Opportunities to research across a variety of media, for example textbooks, audio, images, websites, blogs, webinars, reports and data Students can investigate by reading, observing, conducting experiments and surveys, and using coding and robots

Catalyst 2 Personalisation

The informal space is more relaxed and less monitored Learners are encouraged to self-reflect There is space for teachers to support personalised learning There is space for learners to develop their interests The learning space can include alternative school settings, community settings and home

Catalyst 3 Collaboration

The layout is flexible and no longer based on a traditional layout Fast, easy rearrangement means students can be positioned differently for different contexts There are connections with the outside world

Catalyst 4 Feedback

Results can be shared in a dedicated area for interactive presentations Interaction and feedback are encouraged There is interaction with a wider audience There is feedback from peers and teachers

8

http://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/cgi/viewcontent. cgi?article=1022&context=mkt_fac

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Rather than systematically accumulating static ‘stocks’ of knowledge, students now need to learn how to actively participate in ‘flows’ of knowledge by engaging with others in the construction of new knowledge… curiosity and creativity become critical skills (or dispositions) that motivate students to seek answers to the questions that most interest them – an ability that will serve them well throughout the rest of their lives.9

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http://csreports.aspeninstitute.org/documents/AspenReportFinalPagesRev.pdf

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USING PEDAGOGY The modern classroom unlocks new ways of learning; some through design, some through technology. New pedagogies are increasingly being shaped by the learners themselves: these ‘neo-millennials’ are already engaging with useful, enjoyable technology in other aspects of their lives, so there’s every advantage in capturing that engagement and enjoyment and extending it to the classroom. Understanding the neo-millennial learner Neo-millennial learners are fluent in multimedia and competent with technology: All learning is interactive They engage with vast amounts of media-rich, interactive digital content from multiple sources They consume and produce content and are able to provide evidence of learning They are comfortable with being connected and collaborative They are connected to teachers through various personal computing platforms They enjoy a progressive educational experience (collaboration, blended/hybrid learning, flipped classroom, projects and inquiry-based tasks) They edit and contribute to ‘front of class’ materials

Pedagogy as one of the 3 elements In relation to space – As teaching methods continually develop, the learning space must support the teacher’s objectives. Stern Neill and Rebecca Etheridge of Cal Poly State University: “Pedagogical innovation demands a space that enables exploration by both teacher and student. To be effective, this space should allow for multiple modes of instruction and learning.”10

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http://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/cgi/viewcontent. cgi?article=1022&context=mkt_fac

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In relation to technology – Futurelab11 proposed a framework of digital pedagogy in which a range of activity types can be selected and/or blended to promote enhanced learning. Educators can map current teaching and learning methods across to these activities to deliver the same targeted learning outcomes – but with a potentially greater chance of success. Activities can be: Behaviourist – promoting learning as a change in learners’ observable actions Constructivist – in which learners actively construct new ideas or concepts based on both their previous and current knowledge Situated – promoting learning within an authentic context and culture Collaborative – promoting learning through social interaction Informal and lifelong – supporting learning outside a dedicated learning environment and formal curriculum Learning and teaching support – assisting in the coordination of learners and resources for learning activities

Applying the 4 catalysts…What good pedagogy looks like Catalyst 1 Engagement

Students are engaged in ways which are relevant to them Students are actively involved in creating their own content Real and authentic projects can be aimed at improving the school or the community (digital leaders might support younger learners in the same space; parts of the school might be redesigned to be more inclusive)

Catalyst 2 Personalisation

Teachers tailor content to suit each individual Students are set goals or challenges to resolve, developing their problem-solving skills Challenges can be set by the student (around their strengths, target areas and interests) Students can work independently at their own pace

Catalyst 3 Collaboration

Student-to-student collaboration is a valuable life skill Collaboration encourages inclusion Teachers and students can choose to investigate real-life challenges and data Strategies for problem-solving can be shared

Catalyst 4 Feedback

Teachers plan lessons which allow students to add a communicative dimension to their work Students develop skills in listening, peer review, and constructive feedback Teachers can use the feedback to adapt lessons in real time

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http://archive.futurelab.org.uk/resources/documents/lit_reviews/Mobile_ Review.pdf

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USING TECHNOLOGY Schools and education systems are, on average, not ready to leverage the potential of technology. Andreas Schleicher, OECD, September 2015 12

Over the past 20 years, UK schools have seen an extraordinary transition from the precious single desktop computer to a proliferation of high-tech teaching aids plus handheld devices for students to work on – both provided by the school and admitted under Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policies. According to the British Educational Suppliers Association (BESA), UK schools spend around £900m every year on technology; they have bought over 1.3m desktop computers and 840,000 laptops13, and around 721,000 tablets14. Technology is essential… Students expect it: Mark Chambers, CEO of Naace, claims that students regard curricula which don’t integrate technology as ‘irrelevant’.15 It delivers a fast, easy route to learning: ICT is the ‘only way to dramatically expand access to knowledge’, according to Andreas Schleicher, OECD’s director for education and skills.16 It provides effective preparation for life: Students will be in contact with technology throughout their lives, including further/higher education and employment, so they must learn core ICT skills at school.17

…and yet technology produces disheartening results If educators have expected to see a dramatic increase in achievement as a result of all their investment in ICT, they have largely been disappointed. BESA claims that 22% of the technology in our schools is ‘ineffective’18. A major report published by OECD in September 2015, Students, Computers and Learning: making the connection, highlighted “A weak or sometimes negative association between the use of ICT in education and performance in mathematics and reading… other activities, such as using drilling and practice software for mathematics or languages, show a clear negative relationship with performance… The most rigorous impact studies also show no effects of investments in computers on students’ non-digital performance.” Students, Computers and Learning: Making The Connection. September 2015, page 190. http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264239555-en 13 http://www.readybusinessbritain.co.uk/digital-learning-for-the-future/ 14 https://www.tes.com/news/school-news/breaking-news/use-tabletcomputers-schools-continues-grow 15 http://agent4change.net/policy/ict-provision/2409-computers-andlearning-making-the-connection.html 16 http://www.oecd.org/education/new-approach-needed-to-deliver-ontechnologys-potential-in-schools.htm 17 http://www.computingatschool.org.uk/data/uploads/ CASPrimaryComputing.pdf 18 http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-34174796 12

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As important and credible as the OECD report is, it was widely misreported. Headlines such as ‘Don’t bother buying computers for schools’19 interpreted the report as suggesting that technology is a waste of money, whereas the authors’ intention was to highlight the fact that technology alone is not enough; it must be deployed in the context of a well-informed digital pedagogy. In other words, it’s not having technology that matters: it’s how you use it.

How students see technology The US report Creating Our Future: Students Speak Up about their Vision for 21st Century Learning took into account students’ own ideas on leveraging technology within learning, and reported three preferences: Social-based learning – students want to use emerging communications and collaboration tools to create and personalise networks of experts to inform their education process. Un-tethered learning – students envision technology-enabled learning experiences which transcend the classroom walls and are not limited by resource constraints, traditional funding streams, geography, community assets or even teacher knowledge or skills. Digitally-rich learning – students see the use of relevancy-based digital tools, content and resources as a key to driving learning productivity, not just about engaging students in learning.20

Technology as one of the 3 elements In relation to space – The conventional classroom may be able to house new technology, but that’s not the same thing as enabling that technology to have its desired impact – so the return on investment can be severely limited. “Wearable devices and universal wireless coverage mean that access, information, and computational power will no longer be tied to physical space... Students will distribute many activities across space and time, so institutions will not need to tailor space to particular purposes. Virtual simulations will complement equipment-based science labs.”21 In relation to pedagogy – While creating an effective space is essential, so too is choosing the teaching styles, and this needs to be done as part of the earliest planning process: “Today’s technology installations aren’t effective if the idea of traditional teaching isn’t re-imagined…the re-evaluation of these existing or new spaces should likely start prior to the room design by understanding the teaching style most likely to be used in that room.”22

19

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2015/09/15/dont_bother_buying_ computers_for_schools_says_oecd_report/?mt=1442290050253 20 http://www.tomorrow.org/speakup/pdfs/ su09NationalFindingsStudents&Parents.pdf 21 http://er.educause.edu/articles/2005/1/planning-for-neomillenniallearning-styles 22 http://www.fsr.education/designing-modern-classrooms-step-1-transformingthe-traditional-classroom-into-an-engaging-learning-environment/

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Applying the 4 catalysts…What good technology looks like Catalyst 1 Engagement

Technology encourages engagement through interacting with learning content, e.g. using the interactive display with media-rich content and student-response systems Offers different ways for students to design, create and disseminate their content Fit-for-purpose technology provides real-life data and tools to examine and analyse data

Catalyst 2 Personalisation

Technology provides opportunities for students to be active within their own learning styles Accessible platforms which move away from ‘one size fits all’ teaching materials 1:1 computer programs for more personalised learning Supports students in preparing personal learning portfolios Supports teachers in recognising learning

Catalyst 3 Collaboration

Technology facilitates collaborative learning (eg pupils solving a problem at an interactive display) Provides new ways to collaborate and communicate Allows students to get involved through hands-on learning Not limited by face-to-face and in-school learning Accommodates online learning and out-of-school learning

Catalyst 4 Feedback

In-the-moment feedback for formative assessment and classroom dialogue Automated feedback for diagnosing misconceptions Periodic feedback for recording progress against standards

Learning spaces should be designed to support multiple modes of learning (discussion, experiential learning, reflection…) Few spaces are used for a single type of class, hence the need to support multiple modes. Because active collaborative learning is important, space should support authentic, project-based activities.23

23

https://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/NLI0447.pdf

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UNDERSTANDING THE BARRIERS Today’s educators are not properly trained to embed ICT in their pedagogical practices in order to increase personalisation and collaboration. European Commission, 2013 24

In order to participate fully in the hyper-connected, digitised societies of the 21st century, schools should be aware of certain challenges when it comes to introducing technology into the modern classroom: Infrastructure Schools must ensure that connectivity and bandwidth, both into the school and within the school, are optimised and can support the school’s modern learning objectives.

Digital literacy Teachers – Schools will need to commit to recruitment and development policies which emphasise digital pedagogy skills among teachers. The European Commission’s Opening Up Education communication in 2013 noted that 6 out of 10 teachers had never had any training on how to use ICT in the classroom. Students – The Horizon 2014 report, which looked at technology’s potential impact on teaching and learning over the next 5 years, noted students’ low digital competence. Despite their familiarity with a range of technologies, students need to learn to use technology in a way which enables learning, and which delivers skills for employment and/or further study.

Getting the basics right first That said, the OECD report Students, Computers and Learning: Making the connection reminds us that students also need basic literacy and numeracy skills before they can use technology effectively for learning.

Purchasing & implementing technology In order to exploit technology within their schools, educators will need to be well-informed as to the latest equipment available and its pros and cons; low-quality software and courseware can impede rather than advance learning, and will frustrate students and teachers alike. Educators need to track best practice, review what’s available, seek third-party opinions, and understand how to install and use the technology. This may be time-consuming, but the alternative is considerably more painful.

Awareness of the risks Educators need to be aware of the potential risk of learner addiction to handheld devices, and understand that learners need to be protected, and know how to protect themselves, online. However, with proper implementation, the advantages far outweigh the risks. 24

http://ec.europa.eu/smart-regulation/impact/planned_ia/docs/2013_ eac_003_opening_up_education_en.pdf

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MANAGING POLICY

Good leaders take responsibility, and it’s time for the national leadership to work with its own school leaders and relevant organisations to meet the challenge set out by Andreas Schleicher [in the OECD report] 25

Vision – While there may be planning, infrastructure, training and budgetary issues, the most

significant consideration is whether or not the school’s senior management team has the vision to understand and adopt the modern classroom. For example, the modern classroom cannot be achieved with inflexible space, rigid pedagogies and unexploited technology.

Leadership – Above all else, there must be strong leadership. The modern classroom can

deliver better educational outcomes for students and a competitive advantage to the school – but it requires commitment across every aspect of the school, and careful management. A hybrid between a modern and traditional classroom will simply be an ineffective and confusing compromise.

Engagement – The success of the modern classroom depends on a number of stakeholders, including teachers, parents, students, governors and third-party suppliers. Engagement with these stakeholders will be critically important. Continually communicating the objectives and the process will be essential – not only for taking everyone on the journey, but also ensuring that they’re tolerant of the mistakes which will inevitably be made (or cynicism and frustration will take over). Attitude – The modern classroom takes a different approach to control. Teachers must be not

only willing but keen to share the production, presentation and assessment of content, and to be learning even as they teach. They must be willing to see themselves as facilitators of learning rather than as teachers in the traditional sense. Not all teachers may be comfortable with this.

Contextualising – There is no blueprint for the modern classroom, simply an approach which schools can adapt. Therefore, schools must be open to ideas from all stakeholders as to how to contextualise and improve the approach for their own setting.

Accessibility – All learning spaces, physical and virtual, must be able to accommodate and support persons with disabilities. Acceptable use – Clear policies must be communicated around the acceptability of ‘bringing your own device’, how devices are used, how students are protected online, and exposure to offensive materials. Testing and failure – Testing and trialling will be necessary. There must be a willingness to

accept that some efforts may falter, but that these won’t undermine the greater plan. Flexibility and agility will enable the school to adapt to its own learnings.

Recruitment, training and development – Teachers will need support in understanding how to blend new approaches to space, pedagogy and technology, and how the success of each depends on its relationship to the other two. Gauging teachers’ flexibility and attitudes will be an important part of the selection process. 25

http://agent4change.net/policy/ict-provision/2409-computers-and-learningmaking-the-connection.html

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RE-IMAGINING YOUR CLASSROOM

As the shift from traditional teaching pedagogy continues to transform to active learning, schools will find it necessary to invest in evolved classrooms.26

In the classroom Ensure that the space and technology are in place to support the different types of pedagogical activity most likely to deliver the required outcomes of the modern classroom. The Future Classroom lab (FCL)27, identifies specific aspects of learning and teaching to help reimagine physical space, resources, the changing roles of student and teacher, and how to support different learning styles. Whole Class Teaching

Team Collaboration

Small Group Work

Out of Classroom & Anytime / Anywhere

Independent Working 26 http://www.fsr.education/designing-modern-classrooms-step-1-transforming-

the-traditional-classroom-into-an-engaging-learning-environment/

27 http://fcl.eun.org/learning-zones

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The aspects of learning

CREATE (imagine, explore)

EXCHANGE (support, encourage)

DEVELOP (plan, examine)

INVESTIGATE (research, discover)

INTERACT (discuss, question)

PRESENT (share, listen)

Consider how to implement a combination of the following: Team Collaboration

Whole class teaching

Small group work Out of classroom learning

Independent working

Consider how to support a variety of pedagogical practices including learning that is: Inquiry based

Questioning and feedback based

Flipped

Active

Design based

Student led

Collaborative and Cooperative

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Beyond the classroom The modern ‘classroom’ can be anywhere and everywhere – it accepts that learning can be just as relevant and valuable outside of the traditional classroom environment. Students have instant access to information from a near infinite number of sources, so they should have the opportunity to contribute their ‘anytime learning’ and to have it recognised. Educators might consider: Different environments – such as libraries, museums, schools, after-school programmes, and the home Online opportunities – including search engines, blogs, wikis, journals, podcasts, videos, social networks, massive open online courses (MOOCs) and open educational resources Infrastructure – broadband connections can be wired and wireless, with access devices ranging from desktops to mobile (smartphones and tablets) People – both online and off-line, teachers, parents, employers, industry experts and other educational stakeholders can actively inspire, guide, validate and protect students

Designing the modern classroom In developing a modern classroom for their own context, educators will benefit from: Creating a design brief which takes equal account of space, pedagogy and technology – and the relationships between them Engaging all stakeholders (pupils, staff, parents, governors, partners and suppliers) in understanding and supporting the design brief Providing additional staff training in technology and how to use it in teaching and learning Considering the relative roles of the teacher and students: who’s producing the content, who’s presenting it, who is feeding back on it? Considering the relative positions of the teacher and students: who is at the front? How are the students seated and arranged for different activities? Introducing different methods within the classroom: collaborative learning, social learning, flipped learning, design-based learning, feedback-based learning and enquiry-based learning Exploring how ‘connected’ learning (outside the classroom) can be encouraged, captured, recognised and shared

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Promethean Modern Classroom Professional Development and Consultancy Services In order to develop a systemic plan of action and change, including strategies and a comprehensive professional development plan to increase the technology integration of teachers in the modern classroom Promethean consultants can lead and support schools and educational systems reimaging the classroom through two customised toolkits.

The Promethean Future Classroom Toolkit This toolkit has been adapted from our work in iTEC, FCL and Erasmus+ projects and provides a series of activities, processes, resources, tools and guidance for the creation of an educational vision. It helps educators to innovate through the exploitation of technology at the level of the classroom or wider system. The toolkit is divided into the 5 sections: Toolset 1: Identifying Stakeholders and Trends – web-based tools for identifying trends locally, nationally and globally Toolset 2: Self-Review Maturity Model – Self-review question sets for teachers and school leaders, helping to identify current practice against the learning objectives and assessment, including the roles of the teacher and student plus management of change Toolset 3: Creating a Future Classroom Scenario and Learning Story – A resource bank of stories and scenarios adapted by teachers in real classrooms for trialling by other teachers Toolset 4: Designing Learning Activities and Tools – A resource bank exemplifying learner activity and how technology will enhance the learning Toolset 5: Evaluating Innovation – An education community for sharing and validating the tools and process through teacher/student reviews, blogs, webinars and forums

The Promethean Technology Integration Toolkit The Technology Integration Matrix (TIM) and the Technology Uses and Perception Survey (TUPS) tools were developed by the Florida Centre for Instructional Technology in the College of Education at the University of South Florida. The tools are research-based and statistically validated. Toolset 1: The Technology Integration Matrix (TIM) Provides a framework for defining and evaluating technology integration Sets a clear vision for effective teaching with technology Gives teachers and school leaders a common language for setting goals Helps target professional development resources effectively Toolset 2: Technology Uses and Perception Survey (TUPS) Provides valuable data to guide school and across school level decision making Helps identify technology professional development topics that teachers want and need Helps to identify how well prepared teachers are to integrate technology in meaningful ways

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The TIM tool consists of classroom observations completed by a well-trained team. The TUPS tool consists of an online survey that teachers will complete. Promethean’s consultancy team will work with school leaders to analyse the results of the TUPS and the TIM tool to provide recommendations. Based on the reports, the Promethean team will work with the school and/or educational system to develop a systemic plan of action and change, including strategies and a comprehensive professional development plan to increase the technology integration of teachers in the modern classroom. The Professional Development Plan will consist of customised modules that will guide teachers and school leaders through the courses, while allowing for exploration, modelling and guided practice. The goal is to support the movement of the teachers along a continuum in their utilisation and integration of technology. Inquire about either of these consultancy services: consulting@prometheanworld.com

Traditionally, students have composed their work for an audience of one – the teacher. By using technological resources to establish authentic audiences for student work, we tell students that their work is worth seeing, worth reading, and worth doing.28

28 http://fcl.eun.org/future-teacher-education-lab

https://www.naesp.org/sites/default/files/Blair_JF12.pdf

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CASE STUDIES The “Sala De Aula Do Futuro”, Dom Manuel Martins school, Setúbal, Portugal

This Modern Classroom began with a vision to build in Portugal a classroom that resembles the European Schoolnet (EUN) Future Classroom Lab (FCL) located in Brussels. Over two years, Carlos Cunha, Microsoft Innovative Expert and FCL classroom lead, supported by his networks investment and a lot of perseverance realised his dream. The ultimate aim is to improve the educational attainment in all three years of middle school, using inquiry-based learning methodologies in order to increase the motivation of students. “We were facing a problem with the results of our students,” Cunha explains, ”because regular teaching wasn’t giving the right answers. We really needed a space (that is) different from the regular classroom with rows of table and chairs facing the blackboard. The Future Classroom is an open space divided into five different zones, where the students face different problems, different equipment and different technologies in order to answer a question posed by the teacher. It’s like project based learning, but shorter, its inquiry based learning.” As well as reporting more engaged and excited students, the school has witnessed teachers more willing to collaborate with each other. The space supports cross curricula professional development where for example mathematics and science teachers come together to explore and develop their own understanding of key concepts, such as speed, distance and time. Seeing the connection between a theoretical model and a practical application using data loggers and sensors allows teachers to reflect on their own pedagogical approaches and to plan their lesson content to enable the development of a truly integrated and interdisciplinary experience. The Sala de Aula do Futuro supports the national goals of the DGE (Directorate General Education), whose sees effective pedagogical teacher training, particularly in the STEAM field of great importance for the successful retention and outcomes of students in school. Promethean is proud to be one of the industry partners in this Modern Classroom. For more information or even to arrange a visit http://cunhacj.wix.com/saf-setubal

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L’aula del futuro - 3.0 Modern Classrooms in Italy

In Italy, there is a national initiative, PON, to promote innovation in Italian schools. It is just the beginning of this initiative, yet we are already seeing results in these early adopters of 3.0 modern classrooms such as the, Liceo Scientifico Scacchi in Bari, scuola secondaria di primo grado, Piero Calamandrei and the Instituto Avogadro in Turin. The Ministry of Education expects the PON initiative to bring this Modern Classroom innovation to many more Italian schools. One of the aims of the Avogadro “Aula del Futuro” project is to enable local partnerships and multi-dimensional networks that have been created between schools, universities, businesses, educators, Government, European Schoolnet to equip classrooms so they can support training and research across educational institutions. The Classroom 3.0 in Avogadro, Turin, provides the space, technology and pedagogical support for educationalists to reflect on their practice. The University of Turin and Genoa have designed a programme that enables teachers to take part in action research to compare and test different pedagogies supported by an expert researcher. The teachers will be encouraged to think the new roles of the classroom, the teacher, the student, the space that go beyond the traditional model. The classroom can actually change according to requirements to facilitate group work, presentations and research. The Avogadro Classroom 3.0 will move the classroom from not just a place where knowledge will be transferred but to a place where knowledge will be created. The project aims to extend its findings to a network of other universities and schools across Italy. More on how Promethean supports PON initiative http://bit.ly/PrometheanPON

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ColĂŠgio Monte Flor Learning Lab, Lisbon Portugal

Monte Flor Learning Lab is a learning Lab for differentiated learning where the aim is that students work in a PBL dynamic (Project Based Learning) where students are the producers and are able to develop skills that will allow them to learn, grow and live in a increasing technological, collaborative, interactive and global world. The space is divided in different areas, each one corresponding to a scenario with a designated learning activity.

Dream: In this space, students work as a group, discuss ideas, debate working proposals and start to decide some of the aspect of the task (organisation, calendar, role in the group, final product typology and target audience.)

Explore: In this area, students can investigate, discover, share ideas and use computers, interactive surfaces, lab work with microscopes etc. Here they use an interactive digital surface for search and information collection.

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Show: Here students use an interactive whiteboard, in a presentation area that facilitates and promotes skills on communication and the ability to speak to their peers and in front of an audience. In this area students present their work and show the project’s final results.

Create: The lab does not have a specific space to create final products, although the lab has computers, photographic and video cameras, Lego robots and several collaboration spaces, that allow students to create different resources depending on their choices. The creation process implicates a previous planning and allows creation of conceptual maps that will allow students to structure ideas and organise their collaborative work.

Play: This is an area that introduces students to the gamification concept. A zone where the games allow students to develop skills in problem solving, logic and critical thinking.

Watch a video and hear from ColĂŠgio Monte Flor teacher, Rui Lima http://bit.ly/MonteFlorVideo

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Future Teacher Education (FTE) Lab Project – University of Lisbon, Portugal

It’s well documented that teacher competences are at the heart of an effective education system and yet the European Commission’s Opening Up Education communication in 2013 highlights that six teachers out of ten have not received any training on how to use ICT in the classroom. The EC’s major Survey for Schools: ICT in Education (2013) recommends that ICT training should be made a compulsory part of all ITE programmes. The Future Teacher Education Lab project at the University of Lisbon is leading the way on researching and implementing strategies for initial teacher ICT education that can induce innovation in classroom practice. The key problem underlying the FTE project is to find an answer to the following question: How does technology in learning spaces offer opportunities to provide innovative ways of designing teacher education for the future? The hypothesis: Web environments and digital technologies facilitate the creation of new types of physical and virtual learning spaces, providing opportunities for a more effective, personalised and sustainable learning. They will be built upon the premise that the future will blur the boundaries between living, learning and working and this will result in the creation of flexible multiuse spaces that can accommodate different activities and serve different learning purposes. Therefore it will be necessary to rethink educational spaces and pedagogical approaches involving a wide range of stakeholders in the process. This project by allowing experimentation, analysis and development in initial teacher education courses, placing a strong emphasis on digital pedagogies, will build upon work already carried out by the University’s research team on teachers’ 21st century skills. The Project defines the following research questions: What is distinctive about teacher education in technology enhanced learning spaces and how might it change teachers’ views about the future of schooling? What key competences should be part of teacher’s repertoire for the future school? How can technology enhanced teacher education improve the quality of Initial Teacher Education programs? The project assumes that student teachers’ engagement in experimentation in technology enriched and flexible spaces provides a context for reflection and discussion that is at the core of preparation of teachers for the future learning spaces. The FTE consortium led by the Institute of Education of the University of Lisbon (IEUL) includes a group of 5 educational technology partners, including Promethean, acting as key participants in the design and setup of the FTE Lab and the implementation of the dissemination and mainstreaming strategies. The Lab is part of the European Schoolnet inspired network of FCLs29 and is also partnered by the Portuguese Ministry of Education. For more information about the FTE lab contact Neuza Pedro (IEUL) nspedro@ie.ulisboa.pt 29 http://fcl.eun.org/future-teacher-education-lab

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LEARN MORE To read Students, Computers and Learning: Making the connection – OECD http://www.oecd.org/education/students-computers-and-learning-9789264239555-en.htm 10 Schools for the 21st Century – Innovation Unit http://www.innovationunit.org/sites/default/files/10%20Schools%20for%20the%2021st%20Century_0.pdf 10 ideas for 21st Century Education – Innovation Unit http://www.innovationunit.org/sites/default/files/10%20Ideas%20for%2021st%20Century%20Education.pdf Recommendations for optimising learning and innovation – The Aspen Institute http://csreports.aspeninstitute.org/Task-Force-on-Learning-and-the-Internet/2014/report/details/0043/ Task-Force-Executive-Summary-English Designing the Future Classroom – European Schoolnet magazine http://fcl.eun.org/documents/10180/16159/FCL_magazine_No_2_2014_EN.pdf/485d930e-1b1d-40c186a5-2a6567857a10 Learner at the Center of a Networked World – The Aspen Institute http://csreports.aspeninstitute.org/documents/AspenReportFinalPagesRev.pdf Designing Schools That Work: Organizing resources strategically for student success – Education Resource Strategies http://www.erstrategies.org/cms/files/2422-designing-schools-that-work.pdf

To watch Interactive classroom: Cloud learning in a flexible classroom – European Schoolnet (5 minutes) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HLwDN636wYo Rethinking Learning: The 21st Century Learner – MacArthur Foundation (4 minutes) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0xa98cy-Rw What 60 Schools Can Tell Us About Teaching 21st-Century Skills – Grant Lichtman (TEDx Talk) (15 mins) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZEZTyxSl3g

To browse iTEC- Designing the Future Classroom http://www.prometheanplanet.com/en-gb/professional-development/best-practice/itec/ Future Classroom Lab http://fcl.eun.org/ Building your Roadmap for 21st-Centry Learning Environments http://www.roadmap21.org/

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ABOUT PROMETHEAN Promethean is a global education company which motivates students to learn by developing, integrating and implementing innovative 21stcentury learning environments, making everyone more engaged, empowered and successful. Teachers and students in today’s connected classroom have access to limitless learning and teaching resources. Together with over 2 million teachers around the world, Promethean’s mission is to improve education by partnering with teachers to create dynamic learning environments which motivate students to learn. Promethean believes that education technology solutions must enhance four critical capabilities for schools, teachers and students: 1. Increase student engagement by creating active learners who are intellectually curious. 2. Provide learning feedback by providing teachers with real-time insight into student learning progress, empowering them to adjust their lesson content and delivery approach to ensure a higher level of student understanding. 3. Personalise instruction by customising activities based on learning style, learning preference and level of mastery, giving students a stake in the lesson and their learning. 4. Foster collaboration – by enabling a full range of collaborative instruction and learning models, including whole-class, individual, small-team and multi-team settings.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR Gill Leahy Senior International Education Consultant, Promethean Gill’s research interest is in exploring and facilitating technology’s role in realising more effective educational systems through the themes of curriculum development, teacher effectiveness and assessment. She leads the design and implementation of the modern classroom toolkits. Gill is the Promethean lead on several EU projects including Erasmus+, EUN and iTEC. She is part of the global consulting team. She is an ex-mathematics faculty head and an advanced skills teacher. She was also part of the UK government’s national strategy team which developed Assessment for Learning (AfL) and Assessing Pupil’s Progress (APP) materials which are used by schools throughout the country.

If you found this guide useful, why not take further steps? Read our ebook about collaboration in the classroom Talk to one of our education strategy consultants Talk to us about technology for the modern classroom

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Call: +44 (0) 870 241 3194 Email: Learn@PrometheanWorld.com Visit: www.PrometheanWorld.com Follow: @PrometheanUKI Promethean House, Lower Philips Road, Blackburn, Lancashire BB1 5TH UK

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The Modern Classroom - Strategic Insights For School Leaders  

The concept of the ‘modern classroom’ understands that new answers to these questions will lead to a transformation of everything we know ab...

The Modern Classroom - Strategic Insights For School Leaders  

The concept of the ‘modern classroom’ understands that new answers to these questions will lead to a transformation of everything we know ab...