Page 1

NCA 2009 President’s Award Recipient


IN THIS ISSUE

27

Cowgirl Thinking

3

Riding for the NCA

29

Look Up

4

Nevada Cattlemen Assn.

30

Retroscape Bullhogging

6

100,000 Miles in the Saddle

32

Nevada Farm Bureau

8

Nevada Cattlewomen

36

SRM

10

Beef Checkoff

38

Managing Conflict

12

Eye on the Outside

42

Shoeing A Horse

14

Plain and Brown

43

Water Rights Review

19

Mind of Millenial

44

USDA

18

Water: Use it or Lose it

45

In Memoriam

22

BLM

46

Ramblings of a Ranch Wife

24

Min Foothill Abortion

47

American Lands

The Progressive Rancher Owner/Editor/Publisher – Leana Litten Carey progressiverancher@elko.net

Graphic Design/Layout/Production – Joshua Rinard Josh@LifeSpringDesign.com

BLM Finalizes Rule to Make Land Use Plans More Responsive to Community Needs Determining Profitability of Alternative Crops Soil and Climate Considerations of Alternative Crops Western Governors open 2016 Winter Meeting with discussions on Presidential transition, state-federal relationship The satellite that could help detect forest fires before they get out of control, to save money and lives Jury acquits leaders of Oregon standoff of federal charges

Water Marketing, Groundwater Banking & Drought Management in California V106_A5Following the Law in Idaho Evaluating Low-Water-Use Crops for the Great Basin- Curriculum

Cover Photo by: Stacy Butler “The Good Girls”

Published 9 times each year, The Progressive Rancher is mailed to more than 7,000 approved addresses, and has digital and print readership reaching more than 30,000. The Progressive Rancher is published monthly. The views and opinions expressed by writers of articles appearing in this publication are not necessarily those of the editor. Letters of opinion are welcomed by The Progressive Rancher. Rates for advertising are available upon request. Advertising in The Progressive Rancher does not necessarily imply editorial endorsement. Liability for any errors or omissions in advertisements shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by the error or omission. The Progressive Rancher is free to people working and active in the livestock industry. The Progressive Rancher is donated to the agricultural industry. If you are not currently receiving this magazine on a regular basis, and would like to be a part of The Progressive Rancher family, contact us by e-mail at progressiverancher@elko. net, today, so we can include you on our mailing list. If you have moved or changed addresses, please notify us, by e-mail, so we can keep you informed. All requests for the magazine must be made by e-mail. © The Progressive Rancher Magazine. All rights reserved.

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 2 January 2017

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NCA President's Message David Stix Jr.

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y friends, Happy New Year and what a great year it was and what an even better year we’re going to have as we look forward. The Nevada Cattlemen’s Association has a lot in store for you so please look for educational opportunities in your area. We will start off with the second round of the NCA’s Greater Sage Grouse workshops during the week of January 16th. An overview of the last workshop will be presented as well, as a promised follow up by Bureau of Land Management on the ever-changing aspects of the Sage Grouse plan and table 2-2. The last tour was well received so please join us and yes, we will

be covering what was discussed at the 1st tour. So if you couldn’t make it to the first tour come on down for this one! Look for locations and times near you on our NCA webpage at www.nevadacattlemen.org. The Fallon Bull Sale will be held on February 18th. It looks like we’ll have plenty of bulls and prices will be good for you cow-calf folks looking to build that herd up. Everything looks like we are going to have a fun year, wow! Moisture levels are starting out great so we should see good range and feed conditions. Prices have slowly recovered from a year ago, and politically this could be what really caps off 2017… a new administration! I thought I’d never be so happy to see an execu-

tive branch that will hopefully just enforce the laws and not make laws up to advance a political ideology. The one thing I do not look forward to, and it reminds me of a Mark Twain quote “No man’s life, liberty and property are safe when the legislature is in session”. Nevada is officially a blue state and it will show early in 2017. But please don’t take me wrong, we at NCA will be on our toes and Neena Laxalt is in the bull pen ready to go as our lobbyist. NCA will let all know if we need help at the session this year but believe me it won’t be pretty. Thanks for all your support! David Stix Jr.

Broadening Our View on Beef Promotion

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By Steve Hanson Chairman, Federation of State Beef Councils Member, U.S. Meat Export Federation Executive Committee Elsie, Nebraska

ou’ve heard it before: 96 percent of the world’s consumers live outside of United States borders. The statistic has been shared so often it’s become cliché. Lesser known but equally powerful is the fact that millions of consumers in many other countries are increasing their standards of living and buying power every year. Clearly, if the U.S. beef industry is to maximize its profitability, significant focus must be placed on consumers internationally. The Federation of State Beef Councils and our partners in state beef councils throughout the country recognize this critical point. Through our partnership with both the Cattlemen’s Beef Board and the U.S. Meat Export Federation, we are allocating many beef checkoff resources in those foreign markets that have the greatest potential for increasing demand for beef. This allocation includes checkoff funds from the national half of the $1-per-head mandatory beef checkoff assessment, which is invested through the Beef Promotion Operating Committee, and the state-directed half of the checkoff dollar, which comes through individual state councils and the Federation of State Beef Councils. On Nov. 1 the Federation Executive Committee, recognizing the struggling cattle market and the increasing supply of beef in this country, voted to reach into Federation reserves to boost beef export promotion conducted by USMEF by $640,000. The source of Federation reserves is voluntary investments from state beef councils for enwww.progressiverancher.com

hancement of national and international programs. Of the total, $400,000 will be invested in national and regional retail promotions for U.S. beef in Japan, the largest value destination for U.S. beef. The Federation also invested $200,000 in a U.S. beef promotion with South Korean discount chains. Korea represents an increasingly attractive market for U.S. beef. Meanwhile, another $40,000 was allocated to an Asian island promotion that targets the quickly growing tourist trade in that region. All told, these promotions could move about 15 million additional pounds of U.S. beef. The Federation Executive Committee also allocated $300,000 in reserves to a promotion targeting millennial consumers in larger U.S. cities through an app for smart phones called Ibotta, which encourages greater beef purchases in U.S. retail stores by sharing beef information with consumers and allowing them to obtain cash rebates based on their retail beef purchases. In total, the Federation is investing nearly a million dollars in short-term promotions designed to increase immediate demand for beef. This was a prime example of the state/national beef checkoff partnership at work, and it happened at an impressive pace. Export projects were researched and recommended by USMEF, whose mission is to put U.S. meat on the world’s tables, and plans and funding were reviewed and finalized by the Federation Executive Committee, which deliberated on which projects would The Progressive Rancher

do the most good, and do it the most quickly. Through my association with USMEF, I have seen how valuable our outreach to consumers in other countries can be. The nonprofit organization has offices in more than a dozen countries, and does work in more than 80 countries to develop markets for beef and other U.S. meats. They have found that foreign consumers respect U.S. beef, and will purchase it when they have the opportunity. More important, however, is that when given the opportunity the U.S. beef industry can very successfully compete in the world market. Promoting beef to consumers – both in the United States and abroad – is important to improving our bottom lines. Working as a team of volunteers and professionals, we’re stepping up to get that work done. The Federation of State Beef Councils is a division of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA), which is a contractor to the Beef Checkoff Program. The program is administered by the Cattlemen’s Beef Board, with oversight provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Beef Checkoff Program was established as part of the 1985 Farm Bill. The checkoff assesses $1 per head on the sale of live domestic and imported cattle, in addition to a comparable assessment on imported beef and beef products. States retain up to 50 cents on the dollar and forward the other 50 cents per head to the Cattlemen’s Beef Promotion and Research Board. January 2017 3 


By Kaley Sproul, Nevada Cattlemen’s Association Executive Director

2016 NEVADA CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION ANNUAL CONVENTION

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By Kaley Sproul

Award and recognition for the 100,000 Mile n December 1-3, 2016, the Nevada Cattlemen’s Association (NCA) held Awards. At the discretion of the organization’s president, these awards are given annually to their 81st Annual Convention and Trade Show in Sparks, NV. This con- individuals in recognition of significant convention was joined with the Califor- tributions to the NCA, their community, the nia Cattlemen’s Association and it brought together land and the beef industry. In attendance to also Cattlemen, Cattle Women and Wool Growers from present certificates to award recipients were Gratboth Nevada and California to discuss issues of im- ton Miller, Regional Representative for Senator portance and establish policy to direct leadership Dean Heller and Martin Paris, Rural Representative for U.S. Congressman Mark Amodei. of the Associations. The Cattlemen of Year Award was presented During the three day event, the NCA’s five policy committees met to establish policy on animal health by Dave Armstrong from American AgCredit to and livestock issues, legislative affairs, public lands, Dave Stix of Stix Cattle Company. He was preprivate lands, and research and education. In addition sented with a certificate for a custom hat donated to reviewing and establishing policy, this year’s con- by American AgCredit. This award is the most vention had an excellent line up of speakers. The first prestigious award that NCA bestows upon one general session featured Brett Stuart with Global Ag- of its own. It was established to recognize NCA ritrends to give an update on U.S. Beef and the Global members who have made significant contribuBeef Market. Zoetis’ Cattlemen’s College featured K. tions to the livestock industry. The Allied IndusAllied Award presented to Jim Vann of Darrh Bullock, Extension Professor at the University try Award was presented to WSR Insurance. The WSP Insurance. Dave Stx Jr presenter of Kentucky, and Che Trjo, Beef Technical Service NCA thanked WSR’s representative Jim Vann for Veterinarian at Zoetis. Along with valuable informa- being a strong ally to the Association. tion such as using the tools of the trade in mating systems to maximize profit and long term impact of heifer development. An update on the current beef industry supply and demand trends was by CattleFax Market Analyst Duane Lenz at the CattleFax Breakfast. The Annual NCA Awards Banquet was held on the evening of December 2, during which President David Stix Jr. announced this year’s recipients for the 2016 Cattleman of the Year Award, Allied Industry Award, President’s Jim Barbee Director of Nv Dept of Ag awarded Dave Stx Sr recieving The Cattlemen of the Year Award The Presidents Award by Dave Stx Jr. from Dave Armstrong of American AgCredit  4 January 2017

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Each year, the President honors an individual who they feel have served the industry with dedication and passion by presenting them with the President’s Award. This year’s recipient of the President’s Award was Jim Barbee, Director of the Nevada Department of Agriculture. Jim was presented with a custom pad folio from J.M. Capriola Co. of Elko, NV. The next presentation was for Phillip Dell, 2016 Teacher of the Year Award. The Nevada Agricultural Foundation presented a certificate and a grant of $1000.00 to go towards school supplies for the recipient. Phillip is the Culinary Arts teacher at Rancho High School, an inner- city at-risk school in Kaley Sproul, Las Vegas. He has expanded the program to not only NCA Executive Director include commercial culinary skills but also the importance of agriculture in the culinary field. He has created a garden on the school campus so that students understand the entire process of growing fresh produce from seed to harvest. This year, the prestigious 100,000 mile award was given to two recipients, Jerry Chapin and Hank Filippini. Jerry’s grandson Chase Chapin introduced his grandpa and presented his story of years in the saddle. Martin Paris presented his grandfather, Hank Filip-

Chase Chapin ( L) presenting Jerry Chapin the second 100,000 mile award Dave Stix NCA President( R). pini, with his 100,000 mile award. Both men received standing ovations to celebrate their lifetime accomplishment. At the conclusion of the Awards Banquet President Stix thanked NCA membership and NCA Staff. Sharon McKnight, long-time Executive Secretary of NCA for the past 18 years, was presented with a token of appreciation for the steady pace she has kept throughout the years and Kaley Sproul, NCA Executive Director was also recognized as a valued team member to the NCA. President Stix thanked everyone for a successful convention and looks forward to serving the industry as Nevada Cattlemen’s Association President for another year.

Dave Stix Jr and NCA Excutive  Sec. Sharon  McNight

Dave Stix Jr. and Kaley Sproul www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

January 2017 5 


100,000 Miles in the Saddle Club hank Filippini

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ank Filippini, son of Henry and Rose Filippini was born on June 7, 1932, and unbeknown to him was destined to become a rancher. In 1871 his grandfather, Angelo Filippini, immigrated from Switzerland to Eureka, Nevada. His America beginnings started by riding mules out to the mountains before dawn to cut wood, pack it on the mules, and deliver it to the Eureka mines by night fall. He also furnished wood for the furnaces and smelters at Cortez, which was a flourishing mining camp in those days. While this business required handling a mule team of 10 or 12 animals, Angelo Filippini gradually built up and managed a herd of cattle with the help of his mules. This hard work led to what we know as the American dream. Angelo, and his sons, Martin, Ed, Dan, Joe, and Henry owned ranches throughout northern Nevada including, the Carico Lake Ranch, the Horse Ranch, The Hot Springs Ranch, The Green Ranch, The Argenta Ranch, The Mule Shoe Ranch, The Dean Ranch, and the Childers Ranch. Hank’s dad, Henry Filippini ended up with the Carico Lake Ranch and Childers Ranch. In 1969 the ranches were split up to his sons. Hank became the owner of the Childers Ranch 20 miles South of Battle Mountain while his brother John ended up with the Carico Lake Ranch. Hank’s Grandfather and father laid the roots of hard work that Hank has lived by all his life. Hank started buckarooing when he was a kid about 5 years old. During Hank’s years as a young boy growing up on the ranch he would mount up on his mustang horse named “Darkie” and go along with his Dad gathering, branding, and working cattle. He tells stories about those days. Hey, did I ever tell you about the day I became tough? “I was 11 years old helping my Dad push cattle home from Hot Springs; it was a cold, wind-blowing day and with about ½ way to go, it starting blowing snow straight into to our faces and would not let up. I got so cold I cried, and from that day on I vowed to be tough.” Anyone who ever rode with him will tell you, come rain, sleet, snow, or 20 below zero the only thing he ever wore was a Levi jacket, a scarf, and Handy Andy gloves. Another story that sticks in his head is the day that will live in infamy. He was nine years old and when his Dad and him were getting home from a long day’s ride, his mother met them outside and told his Dad, Japan had bombed Pearl Harbor. Even as a rough and tumble 9-year-old he knew the significance by looking at his parents’ faces. As a 13 year old he tells about trotting 18 miles from Carico Lake to an area by Fire Creek to gather the horses for summer haying and returning at dark that night with  6 January 2017

Facts Compiled by the Filippini Family

the horses. In those days, they used work horses to run the mowing machines, sulky racks, and the stackers. During these years from 5 years to 13 years old we calculated approximately 4500 miles in the saddle. As a high schooler, he helped buckaroo on the weekends and holiday breaks when he didn’t have football or basketball games. Hank’s summers were filled with cow work and putting up the hay for the winter. During the years from age 14 through 17 we calculated 9500 miles of riding time. After high school graduation Hank spent many great years buckarooing with family and friends. With no boarder fences cattle could roam 20 miles North to Battle Mountain, 70 miles south of the ranch to Austin, 35 mile east to the Grass Valley ranch, north to Dean Ranch, over to Beowawe, and 36 miles all the back to Battle Mountain. Hank would serve as the “rep” for the ranch and ride with other ranches and drive their cattle home after the cattle were worked. Many years he would be gone a month or more. Although these were long, tiring days, they were enjoyable days spent with colorful characters of the American West. He tells great stories of talents, like the Marvels, Hhorns, Melvin, Marvin, and Everett Jones, Max Allred, Sam Jury, the Rufli brothers, George Schwin, the Inchauspes, Molly McGee, Big John Ansalbear, Johnny Diaz, the Dahls, Marie Armachea, Jess Laucirica from the Saval Ranch, Bob Chiara, and many more. When Hank was around 20 he helped build the first rodeo grounds in Battle Mountain, and on Sundays in the summers for the next 30 years he would team rope there at the Battle Mtn. Roping Club. How many miles of team roping was hard to calculate, so we’ll just call it a good time with friends. Also during these years, they spent days running and roping mustangs. Many of the ranch horses were mustangs that they had caught, broke, and trained. In those days ranchers had a practical way of dealing with the wild horses. First, they bought a permit from the county commissioners, then they would gather and cull them, keep some to break and ride, ship the worst ones, and turned the rest back out. This was a very practical way of keepThe Progressive Rancher

December 3, 2016

ing the populations down and was good for all parties. During these years from age 18 to age 36 we calculated approximately 76,000 ridden miles for Hank. Hank was 37 years old when he took over the Childers Ranch 20 miles South of Battle Mountain. These years were trying times after the ranches were split up, but very satisfying times too. These years between 37 years old and 65 years old were also productive years of growing his cattle herd and expanding his ranch properties by buying the Schwin Ranch, the Thompson Ranch, the Farm 20 miles south of the ranch, the Cottonwood Ranch 35 miles south of the main ranch, and the Badger Ranch next door. Because of the expansion of properties, it seemed like there weren’t enough days in the year to get the riding done, but you know Hank always got the job done! During this span of years from age 37 to 65 we calculated 112,000 miles alone. In the years of age 66 until present there were still many hard-working days in the saddle, but a few less. Dad and Mom started to take a little time for themselves. They took up fishing, did some traveling, followed their grandchildren around to their rodeos and other sports, and just did many things they normally would not do. During these years, we calculated 8000 miles ridden in the saddle. Some people run for President, some people sit behind desks, other people build cars, but we ranch, with all the good and bad that goes with it we wouldn’t trade for the world. Congratulations Hank for the award of 100,000 horseback miles, and most of all laying the roots of hard work and goodness to your own family.

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100,000 Miles in the Saddle Club Jerry Chapin

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any Nevada natives would recognize the 1950s through 1970s as the last “Golden Age” of open range ranching and cowboying. It was a time before the mechanization of the business. There were no gooseneck horse trailers, hydraulic chutes or cell phones, and pickup trucks were rare. It was a time of large ranches and large circles. Ranch work was done horseback and was accomplished often only by logging long hours and many miles in the saddle. Jerry Chapin grew up in and became a part of this generation of proud cowboys and well respected horsemen. He was born to Ed and Alice (McKnight) Chapin in 1938. The youngest of five brothers (George, Charlie, Vernon, and Harold), Jerry was more than likely riding horses before he could even walk. Most of his life has been in the saddle, he even rode horseback to school in Jiggs, NV all throughout grade school. He spent his childhood on Nevada ranches cowboying with his father. In fact the basis of Jerry’s knowledge came from Ed as he was well known as a fine cowboy, horseman, and above all a mentor throughout Northern Nevada. Jerry continues that tradition to this day. Jerry has had a hand in starting and finishing more than his share of horses. He began honing these skills full time fresh out of grade school. He rode colts at the Elko Stockyards for Lawrence Reed while finishing high school. He also worked on the 25 wagon for Tom Marvel during the summers and rode 25-30 head of green adult horses. This became the norm for a few years. Jerry did not just ride ranch horses; he broke 20 head of mules one year with Bill Kane. Alternately, Jerry started and breezed race horses at the Elko Fairgrounds, but was scolded for putting too good of handle on the racers. He continued starting ranch horses on outfits such as Moffat’s, the 25, the YP and the Muleshoe Ranch. All this time cowboying one would think he didn’t have time for any fun but that couldn’t be further from the truth. For several years Jerry and his brother Harold hit the rodeo trail throughout Nevada, even venturing into Idaho and Oregon at times, although at one point they agreed to quit rodeoing when the price of fuel reached the outrageous cost of 35 cents per gallon. They rode saddle broncs, bareback horses and team roped occasionally. Jerry won many rodeos

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Facts Compiled by Chase Chapin and Family

and eventually accumulated several championships including NCA Saddle Bronc Rider of the year five times and All-Around Champion once in the 1960s. Incidentally, Harold held one of the last permits in the United States to run and capture wild horses on the public range. Jerry was a constant fixture in that operation. You can imagine the wild times that ensued in the running of mustangs on horseback. As Jerry’s professional career advanced so did the opportunities with the ranches on which he worked. In 1966 he started out as cowboss at the YP Ranch. Some of his fondest memories came from those years on the Owyhee desert where he helped the ranch increase its herd almost tenfold in as many years. While there, he had many good young men pass through looking to further their cowboy education. Jerry gained a reputation as a good man to work under, and being a fair and capable leader of the crew. In fact he was known by many hands as the “best man they ever worked for” and above all a man of wide experience who would freely pass on advice and knowledge. Thanks to a pay raise and three growing boys, Jerry decided to leave the beloved YP and head back to Battle Mountain, this time managing the Muleshoe Ranch, which he has been doing for the past 41 years. He is quick to note he only intended to stay “a year or two.” While there he has been caretaker to an average of 2000 cows per year, with anywhere from

December 3, 2016

The 100,000 Mile Club award is an honor bestowed on cowboys who have ridden 100,000 miles or more in their lifetime.

The Progressive Rancher

12-15 different irons. It is worth noting that in those 41 years, through wet and dry years, that he only had to cut cattle numbers two or three times, which speaks well of his knowledge and stewardship. He has been a fixture in the Great Basin for decades, rarely missing any event that has to do with horses, cattle, or horsemanship either as a spectator or contestant. He is famous for having patience with horses, cattle and cowboys (especially young ones). Taking in all of these facts and events within Jerry’s lifetime, it is easy to note he has ridden well over 100,000 miles in the saddle. I am proud to be able to call Jerry my Grandpa and to present him with the award of 100,000 Horseback Miles Club.

January 2017 7 


Greetings

CattleWomen and Cattlemen

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By Sidney Wintermote

uring the 2016 Joint Annual Cattlemens Convention in Sparks the Nevada CattleWomen, Inc. met for our general membership meeting and breakfast. It was a pleasure to have a few guests present during our meeting. Our first guest was Dr. Amilton de Mello from the University of Nevada Reno-Agriculture, Nutrition and Veterinary Science Department. Dr. de Mello’s research focuses on production costs, meat quality attributes, and animal welfare that have positive impacts on the meat industry. He spoke to our group about a new specialty cut of beef called the Bonanza Cut. Our ladies and guests were able try this delicious cut of beef during our breakfast. I encourage you to ask the meat counters at your local grocery store if this cut is available and if so, don’t pass it up! Our second guest was Senator James Settelmeyer. James Settelmeyer is a Republican politician of the Nevada Senate in the United States of America. He represents Churchill, Douglas, Lyon, and Storey Counties in Senate District 17. Senator Settelmeyer spoke to us about the upcoming changes our state will see after the November 8th election. We also had the pleasure to host ANCW (American National CattleWomen) President, Ann Nogan at our meeting. She was full of enthusiasm as she enlightened us on the events of ANCW and encouraged us all to attend the National Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA trade show. This convention will be held in Nashville, Tennessee, February 1-3, 2017. I am sure you are all anticipating the results from the vote which took place this fall on whether we remain a 100% state or not. We were surprised by the amount of ballots returned and we thank you all so much for your participation. The majority voted that our 100% state status be removed. When you pay your local dues you will no longer be required to pay on a national level. You will pay your local and state dues only. However, if you wish to remain an ANCW member we encourage you to do so. That membership will be paid directly to ANCW. I would like to take this time to say thank you to our past Secretary and President, Tracy Shane. She put her heart into being our Secretary for the last year and made the decision to step down in order to spend more time with her family. She is an incredible woman that has a passion for the Ag and beef industry and she will be missed on our officer team. Thank you for your dedication to Nevada CattleWomen, Tracy! Melinda Sarman, from Spring Creek has so graciously agreed to fill the position and we couldn’t be more excited. She also has the desire to help make our incredible industry the best it can be and we are thrilled to welcome her to our team. The rest of our officer team will remain the same for the upcoming year, Stacie Emm as President Elect, Linda Huntsberger as Treasurer and I as President. We love what you are doing for our state and encourage you to keep up the good work! Nevada will have the pleasure of hosting the 2017 ANCW Region VI meeting. Region VI consists of Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah. The event is scheduled for April 28-30, 2017 in Elko, NV. We have some wonderful tours planned for the upcoming meeting that you will not want to miss. Registration for the meeting will be available for you by February 20th, 2017. Updates will be made on our social media pages and I will send the registration forms to your local Presidents. I wish this New Year finds you in high spirits with beef on your table and family and friends by your side.

 8 January 2017

UPCOMING SALES

January 26th

Tehama District Fairgrounds, Red Bluff, CA Consignment Deadline: January 18th

March 3rd Cottonwood, CA

Consignment Deadline: February 23rd

WATCH & LISTEN TO THE SALE on the Web at:

For details call (530) 347-3793 or the representative nearest you:

Gary Nolan

Mark Venturacci

(775) 934-5678

(775) 427-8713

Elko, NV

Fallon, NV

Steve Lucas

Paradise Valley, NV

(775) 761-7575

Brad Peek— (916) 802-7335 or email us at wvm@wvmcattle.com Look for the catalog and video on our website www.wvmcattle.com

Market your cattle with the professionals!

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The Progressive Rancher

January 2017 9 


CHECKOFF NEWS: Adapting Technology to Address Consumer Trends

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or any business, adapting and evolving with ever-changing consumer preferences and behaviors is imperative to staying competitive in the marketplace. And for the Nevada Beef Council (NBC) and Beef Checkoff Program, finding new ways to engage with consumers across increasingly competitive platforms and channels is necessary to continuing our efforts to positively impact consumer demand for beef. Like other state beef councils, one area that has long been a focus for the NBC is partnerships with retailers that aim to increase beef sales and movement at the meat counter. These promotions have traditionally involved a specific retail chain that would partner with the NBC to offer in-store cost savings or on-pack coupons, increase the beef featuring in store ads and circulars, and sometimes include additional elements such as in-store demos. When it comes to such partnerships, and specifically the use of on-pack coupons, consumer research has indicated for years that shoppers – particularly those in the millennial audience – are turning away from the physical coupons and moving more toward mobile-based apps or digital coupons. This trend is starting a new phase for various state beef councils and the beef checkoff in their retail and consumer promotions. This year, the beef checkoff and numerous state beef councils are partnering

with an increasingly popular consumer mobile app. Ibotta (pronounced “I bought a”) is one of the most frequently used smartphone apps for shopping that is making waves in the marketplace. The company partners with leading brands and retailers to offer rebates on groceries, electronics, clothing, gifts, home and office supplies, restaurant dining, and more. The consumer unlocks the qualifying rebate on the app, purchases the item at the store, and verifies the purchase for a rebate that comes in the form of cash or gift card from Ibotta. As an added element, the brands featured on Ibotta can use their placed rebate as an opportunity to poll consumers. Thus, working with Ibotta allows a company or organization to not only offer incentives to sell their product, but also engage with app users to gain additional consumer insight to shape future campaigns and consumer outreach. If all of this sounds too arduous to be widely adopted, think again. The numbers back up the app’s success: Ibotta has been downloaded over 18 million times, has paid out more than $100 million in cash back to its users, and has experienced massive growth – in both size of the company and in numbers of partnering retailers – since its launch in 2012. In addition, 79 percent of app users are female, and 89 percent are under age 45, which speaks directly to our target market. Launched in June, these carousel ads have helped drive traffic to Beef

For more about the Nevada Beef Council, visit www.nevadabeef.org.  10 January 2017

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AFTER-WORK BEEF POT ROAST DINNER From James Winstead, RDN, Director of Food and Nutrition Outreach for the Nevada Beef Council

its WhatsforDinner.com and continued to grow the community of beef lovers online. The ads have reached more than 34 million Facebook viewers and outperformed the platform’s industry benchmark for click-thrus. As the largest social platform, Facebook plays a pivotal role in the checkoff’s direct-to-consumer campaigns. Be sure to follow the “Beef. It’s What For Dinner.” Facebook page to see daily updates and promotions, and share on your own pages!

Serving Up Creative Storytelling for Beef

The checkoff’s “Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner.” social-media platforms reach consumers in a variety of ways, providing meal inspiration, tips and nutrition insights for consumers who are actively seeking information online. A component of the new “Families in Motion” campaign is a series of Facebook carousel ads, debuted to share more lifestyle and recipe inspira tions to the target audience of millennial consumers. This format enables use of multiple images, videos and links in a single ad, and adds value through efficient storytelling.

Consolidating Websites

In an effort to create a “one-stop shop” online for all things beef, the checkoff is working toward consolidation of nine checkoff-funded websites into one powerhouse site at the existing BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com. The new website will combine resources from: Facts About Beef; beef nutrition; beef retail; beef foodservice; Explore Beef; BSE Info; and Beef Innovations Group sites, among others. The benefits of bringing all of these online properties together are myriad. A consolidated site will provide a more cost-efficient and resource-effective way to develop content and drive more visitors to beef information. The site will appeal to all types of users – including consumers, food and health influencers, and beef supplychain audiences – with a rich variety of relevant tools and beef-centric information. This effort also includes improvements to the existing site’s content-management tools, including a complete redevelopment of the recipe system that manages the checkoff’s repository of nearly 2,000 triple-tested beef recipes. A more powerful Interactive Butcher Counter will support consumers and business audiences better. Look for the launch of this updated site in October 2017. For more about the Nevada Beef Council and Beef Checkoff, visit www.nevadabeef.org, or www.mybeefcheckoff.org.

Let’s face it, things don’t necessarily slow down after the holidays. Life goes on, the kids go back to school, and the new year gets kicked off into high gear with a new nutrition plan of your liking. However, your time doesn’t need to be crunched when it comes to cooking healthy meals. This recipe will allow you to feed the family and keep your New Year’s resolution intact without having to spend hours in the kitchen. Simply add the ingredients in the morning, and then let the food cook itself while the busy day goes on. For more great beef recipes, visit www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com. Total Recipe Time: high 5 to 6 hours, low 8 to 9 hours Ingredients - Makes 6-8 Servings • 1 beef Shoulder Roast boneless or Bottom Round Rump Roast (3 to 3-1/2 pounds) • 1 envelope (0.7 ounces) Italian dressing mix • 2 large onions, each cut into 8 wedges • 2 cloves garlic • 2 red bell peppers, cut into 1-1/2 inch pieces • 1/2 cup beef broth • 2 zucchini, cut into 1/4-inch thick slices • 2-1/2 tablespoons cornstarch dissolved in 2 tablespoons water • Salt and pepper Instructions 1. Press dressing mix evenly onto all surfaces of beef pot roast. Place onions and garlic in 4-1/2 to 5-1/2-quart slow cooker; top with pot roast. Add bell peppers and broth. Cover and cook on HIGH 5 hours or LOW 8 hours. Add zucchini. Continue cooking, covered, 30 minutes or until pot roast is fork-tender. 2. Remove pot roast and vegetables. Strain cooking liquid; skim fat. Combine 2 cups cooking liquid and cornstarch mixture in medium saucepan. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly; cook and stir 1 minute or until thickened. 3. Carve pot roast into slices; season with salt and pepper, as desired. Serve with vegetables and gravy.

www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

January 2017 11 


By Joseph Guild

I might be a Cynic

S

o winners were cheering and losers crying after the results of the latest Presidential Election were known. And, there were a lot of cynics saying not much will change. I hate to be the guy who spilled the coffee on the printed election results and breakfast cinnamon rolls, but I might be in the cynic category. If we cynics are correct and not much will change there will be a lot of I told you sos and even more disappointed supporters of our president-elect. Let me explain. There is no doubt with every new administration changes do come to Washington D.C. I am writing this the day after Mr. Trump announced he would nominate Scott Pruitt, the Attorney General of Oklahoma to be the head of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This announcement sent shock waves through the environmental activist community because Mr. Pruitt and many other Attorneys General had sued the Obama Administration over the issuance of the clean coal regulations the EPA promulgated and others the President had created by Executive Order. On the other hand, many people who believe the EPA has overreached, in the last eight years, were excited there would be some relief under a new administration. Not surprisingly, many of these folks live and work in red states where Mr. Trump won overwhelmingly. Another example, as I write this, is the proposal to name Representative Cathy McMorris Rodgers, Washington(R) as the Secretary of the Interior. Again, there were cries of outrage from the environmental community. However, Ms. McMorris is the highest ranking woman in Congress. You do not rise to that level of leadership without some intelligence and talent. So I would say to the critics, maybe you should wait a while and see if there is actually something she does you do not like before you call her to task. However, as I edit this, it has been announced the President-Elect has chosen first term Representative Ryan Zinke (R.Mont.) for the post of Secretary of the Interior. So much for certainty and consistency. By the way, I do not remember if I have ever written about this, but I really have a problem with the characterization by the media and others of the so-called “environmental community” as some sort of special interest who are the only ones with any concern for the environment. Farmers and ranchers are the original and best “environmentalists”. Who better to take care of the environment than those who actually live in a place and derive their living from that same place. We need to say it over and over – we care about this earth and its resources because we care for the earth and its resources! So, back to the main point; my cynicism. Some things will change. A President Trump will appoint different people than a President Clinton would have. In fact, there are about 4,000 appointments any president has in our current governmental structure. However, that is a small fraction of the over 2 million civil service employees of the federal government. These are the career employees of the Executive Branch administrative agencies and career employees of the Judicial and Legislative Branches over whom the president has no constitutional authority. The President does have that theoretical authority over his branches’ agency employees but they also have institutional knowledge, history and their own personal political philosophies and agendas over which the President has limited or no control.  12 January 2017

Agencies have evolved over the years of our Constitutional democracy to have more and more power that exists outside Congressional and Judicial constraints for the most part. The Constitution says this about legislative power: “All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States”. When Congress passes a law such as the clean water act, as an example, it gives the agency with the relevant power of enforcement latitude to create regulations to further the intent of the law. The key concept here is the congressional intent. Too often the intent is loosely interpreted by the agency. Unless checked by the courts for arbitrary or capricious action the agency can grow its power over the ears by incrementally making changes to the law which go beyond the power originally granted by the enabling legislation. This is exactly what the EPA did in recent years by creating the regulation redefining “the waters of the United States” (WOTUS) and thereby expanding its jurisdiction under the Clean Water Act to virtually every body of water in the United States from major lakes and rivers to small farm ponds and ditches. Congress finally woke up to the calls of outrage and concern from the far reaches of our country and voted to curtail funding for the implementation of the regulation with strong opposition from the EPA. However, in passing a continuing resolution to fund the government for a few more months during this transition period, Congress neglected to also curtail the EPA funding for its WOTUS effort. This controversy continues even though the EPA knows it is exceeding its authority because internal documents from the Army Corps of Engineers, the sister agency of the EPA under the CWA, told the EPA it was exceeding its authority. Our Constitution was written to limit the power of the Federal Government over the people in whom ultimate power the founders expected that power to lie. Administrative law has crept into our culture and psyche to such an extent that most people do not even realize how much power the people have abrogated to administrative agencies. Part of the problem is of all the major democracies Americans participate less in the choosing of their government than almost any other by not voting as much as other [privileged peoples on this planet. And, if the career employees work behind the scenes to undermine the expectations of those who voted for Mr. Trump, there will be a lot of discouraged, disgruntled voters to confirm my cynicism. But an even more sinister problem is the acquiescence by our populace to the increased administrative power exercised by the Executive Branch Agencies. Nobody I know wants to breathe dirty air, drink polluted water, or travel on unsafe public conveyances. However, when an agency has the power to levy a $30,000 per day fine on a rancher who makes a farm pond bigger so he can more efficiently water his livestock without due process of law granted to him by our Constitution, we all are harmed by government overreach and capricious action. I hope the experience of the next few years and the changes that will come to Washington D.C. will be enough to prove me wrong and overcome my cynicism. I hope there is real change and a reduction of administrative power. If there is it will only be because the American people recognize the danger in our midst and actually do something about it. I’ll see you soon.

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


Carey Hawkins

Jack Payne

Cell: 208-724-6712

Cell:775-217-9273 Alt: 775-225-8889

OFFICE: 775-423-7760

Full-Service Cattle Sales & Marketing serving the Fallon, Nevada and Outlying Areas. Seller

City

#

Desc

Type

Weight

Price CWT

Tracy Clark

Reno

9

BLK

STR

493

$146

James & M Morgan

Fallon

1

BLK

STR

435

$153

Ron Lee / T Berg

Round Mtn

7

MXD

HFR

453

$126.50

Wesley Behimer

Austin

3

MXD

STR

465

$140

Sterling Lambert

Fallon

7

BLK

STR

533

$150.50

Richard Hucke

Fallon

5

BLK

STR

671

$121

Fish C Ranch, LLC

Eureka

8

MXD

HFR

538

$122

H & J Brackenbury

Yerington

17

BLK

STR

531

$152.25

Irvin Plank

Eureka

2

BLK

STR

378

$176.00

Matt or J Beebe

Fallon

3

BLK

STR

493

$142.00

Kenny & Flint Lee

Fallon

3

CHA

STR

450

$145.00

Alan Mendes

Reno

36

MXD

STR

577

$142.50

Alan Mendes

Reno

33

MXD

STR

663

$127.75

Jake & L Dempsey

Winnemucca

4

MXD

STR

608

$128.00

Cody Barkdull

Winnemucca

3

MXD

HFR

503

$115.00

Kenneth & T Lee

Fallon

17

MXD

STR

449

$170.00

Kenneth & T Lee

Fallon

12

MXD

HFR

548

$118.50

Mario Forgnone

Winnemucca

4

BLK

STR

941

$100

Kylie Amos

Fallon

30

BLK

STR

644

$140.25

Kylie Amos

Fallon

49

BLK

STR

561

$144.50

David & P Cannon

Winnemucca

3

BLK

STR

782

$119.50

L & E Wadsworth

Hiko

10

BLK

STR

395

$178.00

L & E Wadsworth

Hiko

6

BLK

HFR

400

$134.00

David Lee Hinkey

McDermitt

5

MXD

STR

436

$165.00

Susan & David Kern

P. Valley

8

MXD

STR

628

$136.00

Bobbi Jo Evans

Fallon

3

BLK

STR

562

$117

Coyote Creek Ranch

Imlay

78

MXD

HFR

626

$116

Coyote Creek Ranch

Imlay

36

BLK

HFR

544

$123.00

Travis Agee

Alamo

16

BLK

STR

730

$123.50

Buck Scott

Reno

2

BLK

STR

518

$145.00

Jerry & N Harper

P. Valley

4

BLK

STR

493

$148.50

Richard Rosaco

Golconda

6

MXD

STR

734

$124.50

Ted Renfroe

Fallon

3

MXD

STR

427

$141.00

Robert Parlasca

Reno

3

MXD

STR

610

$137.00

Tyson Torvik

Fallon

41

BLK

STR

644

$140.25

Jim Champie

Austin

13

MXD

STR

442

$168.50

Joe McKay

Juntura

51

BLK

STR

580

$145.00

Peter & K Marvel

P. Valley

41

MXD

STR

732

$130.00

Annie Joanette

Fallon

1

BLK

HFR

460

$113.00

George Manley

Round Mtn

6

BLK

STR

538

$138.00

Timothy Lawson

Fallon

24

BLK

STR

538

$142.50

Timothy Lawson

Fallon

28

MXD

STR

476

$161.50

Miles Hastie

Genoa

1

BBF

BUL

520

$120.00

Ed Laca

Fallon

3

BLK

STR

458

$154.00

Julian Cattle Co

Fallon

3

BLK

STR

698

$121.00

www.progressiverancher.com

Sales Results from December 15th

NEXT Feeder SALE

January 19th Starting at 11:30am

in conjunction with our regular Wednesday sale

Mark your calendar early for

February's Sale February 16th 2017 starting at 11:30am

WE HAD A GREAT DECEMBER SALE! OVER 3800 QUALITY FEEDER CALVES SOLD.

A HEARTY “THANKS” TO ALL OF OUR BUYERS AND SELLERS! CONSIGN EARLY - CALL JACK PAYNE 775-225-8889 CAREY HAWKINS 208-724-6712 For all of your animal health needs see us at Nevada Livestock Vet Supply, LLC 131 Industrial Way Store Hours M-F 8:00 til 5:00 Store # 775-423-3038 After hours # 775-624-4996 Fallon, NV 89406

The Progressive Rancher

Seller

City

#

Desc

Type

Weight

Price CWT

Dale Johnson Inc Tyson Torvik Melvin & D Howard Gary Snow Kelly Hoekenga Michael & C Casey Joe & Sam Harper Justine & A Snow Judith Byler Derek Sammaripa Cody Baldwin Cody Baldwin Scossa Ranch LLC Tom Weddell Jerry & C Sestanovich Jessie & R Nuttall Jessie & R Nuttall Berg Ranch Star Creek Ranch Robert & C Fowkes

Lovelock Fallon Win Fallon Eureka Fallon P Valley Fallon Fallon Fallon Middleton Middleton Gardnerville Fallon Eureka Fallon Fallon Round Mtn Imlay Fallon

3 35 4 47 4 6 1 7 6 2 10 14 21 5 17 36 29 7 6 4

BLK MXD BLK BLK BLK MXD BBF BLK BLK BLK BLK BLK BLK MXD BLK BLK MXD MXD BLK MXD

STR STR STR STR STR STR STR STR STR STR HFR STR HFR HFR STR HFR STR STR HFR STR

465 586 796 513 511 592 715 437 451 549 447 474 450 663 492 521 567 320 1018 405

$151.00 $141.50 $119.50 $151.00 $135.00 $135.50 $117.00 $178.50 $159.50 $135.00 $135.00 $165.00 $130.50 $115.00 $158.50 $127.50 $142.75 $140.00 $89.00 $160.00

Corkill Bros Inc James & Jean Kinney Juniper Mtn Cattle

Fallon Win Fallon

6 10 10

BLK

HFR STR PAr

638 595 per h

$118.50

BLK BLK

Dan & L Whitmore Wild Horse Cattle Co Cross L Ranch LLC Toby Rollins LC B Land & Cattle Young Bros Young Bros Sunrise Ranch LLC T QuarterRanches Inc John & Jhona Bell Robert & D Gordon Robert & D Gordon Crawford Cattle LLC Emily Payne Crawford Cattle LLC Rand Collins Rand Collins Bruce Ranch LLC Bruce Ranch LLC Kevin Tomera Kristi Tomera Keystone Ranch Stone Cabin Ranch Katy Gralian Fredric & B Stodieck

Tonopah Fernley Tonopah Tonopah Eureka Austin Austin Yerington Winn P Valley Winn Winn Winn Fallon Winn J Valley J Valley J Valley J Valley S Creek S Creek P Valley Tonopah S Creek Minden

2 28 19 11 5 21 67 13 8 7 35 55 40 2 36 18 24 15 22 2 6 7 28 1 6

MXD MXD MXD BLK MXD BLK BLK MXD MXD CHAR MXD MXD MXD MXD MXD MXD MXD MXD BLK BLK BLK MXD CHAR RBF MXD

STR HFR STR STR STR HFR STR PAr STR STR STR STR STR STR HFR STR HFR STR STR STR STR STR STR STR STR

443 490 448 510 690 363 463 per h 341 446 740 624 593 493 341 550 542 600 496 715 685 909 414 605 715

$150.00 $125.50 $177.00 $155.00 $118.00 $147.00 $169.85 $1,785 $160.00 $160.00 $133.00 $142.75 $138.00 $110.00 $143.50 $142.25 $118.75 $142.75 $158.50 $125.50 $122.50 $115.00 $174.50 $130.00 $130.50

$141.50 $1,580

See All At the Ring Side 2017 January 2017 13 


Cattle Outlook - Plain & Brown By Ron Plain and Scott Brown

U

December 9th, 2016

SDA made modest changes to 2017 beef projections in today’s monthly WASDE release. The 2017 average mid-point fed steer price is now projected at $107/cwt., up $1 from the projection made in November. Despite the slightly higher projection, USDA still pegs next year’s fed steer price more than 10% lower than 2016. Beef production is estimated at 26 billion pounds for 2017, up 800 million pounds from this year and the largest since 2011. Cattle and beef prices lost some ground this week. Through Thursday, the 5-area average price for slaughter steers sold on a live weight basis was $110.31/cwt, down $4.07 from last week’s average, and $8.14 lower than a year ago. The 5-area dressed steer price averaged $170.50/cwt, down $4.87 from the week before, and $16.87 below last year’s level. These losses erased last week’s gains and then some. Beef cutout values were down this week, though not as much as the cattle. This morning, the choice boxed beef cutout value was $190.25/cwt, down just $0.04 from the previous Friday, but $12.80 lower than a year ago. The select carcass cutout this morning was $171.85/cwt, down $1.74 from last week. At $18.40/cwt, the choice-select spread remains relatively high, even accounting for holiday beef demand.   Beef exports in October were at the highest level since August 2014. Shipments to Japan and Korea continue to run well above last year’s levels, with the YTD growth in those two markets now near 23 percent. Total U.S. beef exports are now nine percent higher on the year, with further gains needed to support prices as beef production increases continue. Preliminary December consumer confidence numbers were just shy of the highest levels since 2004, with much of the consumer optimism centered on expectations for President-elect Trump’s economic policies. This bodes well for domestic meat demand moving forward, a necessary condition to move heavy meat supplies for the next couple of years. This week’s cattle slaughter totaled 611,000 head, down 5,000 head from last week but up 5.3% from a year ago. The average steer dressed weight for the week ending on November 26 was 916 pounds, 2 pounds lighter than the week before, and down 7 pounds from a year ago.   Cattle prices were steady to lower this week at the Oklahoma City auction. Feeder steer prices were steady to $5 lower with steer calves steady to $3 lower compared to the week before. Prices for medium and large frame #1 steers by weight group were: 400-450# $169.50-180, 450-500# $150-$170, 500-550# $140$165, 550-600# $136-$151, 600-650# $120-$141.50, 650-700# $124.50-$137, 700-750# $119-$133, 750-800# $125.50-$133.50, 800-900# $120-$135, and 900-1000# $124-$132.75/cwt. Cattle futures were higher this week even as cash prices declined. The December live cattle futures contract settled at $108.90/cwt today, up $0.68 for the week. February live cattle gained $1.88 this week and closed at $110.75/cwt. The April contract settled at $110.22.  The January feeder cattle futures contract ended the week at $125.97/cwt, up $1.37 from a week earlier. March feeder cattle gained $1.08 this week to settle at $122.60/cwt. April feeder cattle settled at $121.90/cwt.  14 January 2017

December 13th, 2016 Tuesday Recap Live and feeder cattle futures continued higher today, live cattle closed $0.50 to $1.02/ cwt. higher, while feeder cattle futures closed $0.42 to $1.22 higher. The CME feeder cattle index reported $0.11 higher to $130.14/cwt, and the CME lean hog index reported $1.19 higher to $55.52/cwt. Lean hog futures closed mixed, from $0.42 lower to $0.55 higher, with the first two contracts lower. There was no major changes in USDA Beef Complex grain futures with corn closing 1-3/4 cent higher Item Price Change in the December contract trending to 1/4 cent Choice $191.73 $2.17 lower in the March ’18 contract. Soybean futures Select $175.34 $1.39 closed 2 to 3 cents lower and KC wheat closed 2 Drop Credit $11.47 ($0.20) cents lower to 1-3/4 cents higher. Oklahoma City stockyards sales today, feeders were $1-$5/cwt. higher, steer calves steady to $5/cwt. lower and heifer calves were steady. The USDA daily cutter cow cutout moved $1.62 higher to $155.52/cwt. today, supported with 90 percent lean moving $2.95 higher to $194.91/cwt. on a daily basis. Non-fed slaughter levels will dictate the price trend going forward as demand remains seasonally weak. Check out today’s Chart of the Day For recent market news and analysis, visit CattleFax.com To prevent CattleFax emails from being blocked by antispam software, include CattleFax.com and cfax@cattlefax.com to your list of contacts and safe senders, and please ask your ISP to include them as well.

Futures Market Summary Nearby Elec. Contract Close Change HighLow Live Cattle $111.125 $0.775 $111.725 $109.950 Feeder Cattle $128.975 $0.425 $129.800 $128.650 Lean Hogs $57.175 ($0.200) $57.500 $57.025 Class III Milk $17.23 $0.06 $17.25 $17.19 Corn $3.5625 $0.0175 $3.5900 $3.5350 Soybean $10.2800 ($0.0300) $10.3875 $10.2525

$194.77/cwt, up $4.52 from the previous Friday and 14 cents higher than a year ago. The select carcass cutout this morning was $180.70/cwt, up $8.85 from last week.  This week’s cattle slaughter totaled 599,000 head, Ag Economics, MU   December 16, 2016 down 2.0% from last week, but up 2.2% from a year ago. The average retail price of choice beef during  The average steer dressed weight during the week November was $5.764 per pound.  That was 2.7 cents ending on December 3 was 913 pounds.  That is down higher than the month before, but 44.5cents lower 3 pounds from the week before, but the same as a year than in November 2015.  Prior to November, choice ago.  This follows 30 consecutive weeks with steer beefprices had declined for four consecutive months.  The average pricefor all fresh beef last month, $5.542 slaughter weights lighter than a year earlier.  Cattle prices were mixed this week at the Oklaper pound, was lower than both the month before homa City auction. Feeder steer prices were $1 to and a year ago. $5 higher but stocker calves were steady to $5 lower The five-area average price for slaughter steers compared to the week before.  Prices for medium and was $109.30/cwt in November.  That was up $7.60 large frame #1 steers by weight group were: 400from October, but down $19h.00 from 450# $166-172, 450-500# $155.50-$166, 500-550# November 2015.   The broad measure of the U.S. dollar against $142-$156.25, 550-600# $130-$147.50, 600-650# foreign currencies is the strongest since May 2002.  The $125-$142, 650-700# $118.50-$137.50, 700-750# strengthening dollar is a problem for exports, as it makes $125.50-$138, 750-800# $129.50-$135, 800-900# U.S. products more costly on foreign markets. That will $128-$136.50, and 900-1000# $126-$129.50/cwt.  Cattle futures were higher this week.  The Debe particularly tough on agriculture since such a high cember live cattle futures contract settled at $112.32/ percentage of U.S. farm products are exported.   Fed cattle prices were higher this week on light cwt today, up $3.60 for the week. February live cattle gained $4.83 this week and sales volume. Through Thursday, the 5-area average closed at $115.35/cwt. price for slaughter steers sold on a live weight basis was The April contract settled at $113.60, up $3.35 for $110.23/cwt, up $1.34 from last week’s average, but the week. The January feeder cattle futures contract down $6.43 from a year ago.  The 5-area dressed steer ended the week at $129.90/cwt, up $3.95 from a week price averaged $170.31/cwt, up 35 cents from the week earlier.  March feeder cattle gained $3.80 this week before, but down $13.05 from a year ago.  Beef cutout value was higher this week.  This to settle at $126.30/cwt.  April feeder cattle settled at morning, the choice boxed beef cutout value was $125.60/cwt.

December 16th, 2016 CATTLE OUTLOOK

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


December 16th, 2016

U.S. Cattle Market Drivers

Cattle prices began to decline dramatically about mid-year 2015 and that general trend continued in 2016. In 2016, the impacts of increased beef production, competition from pork and chicken, and rather large processor margins translated into lower cattle prices. Prices during the year were both lower and much more volatile than forecast. When this article was written (mid-December 2016) for calendar year 2016 the Livestock Marketing information Center (LMIC) projected that U.S. commercial beef production at nearly 25.2 billion pounds, the largest since 2013’s. That was more than expected 12 months ago, with most of the surprise occurring the final quarter of the year due to continued large cattle slaughter levels. U.S. beef production in 2016 posted its first year-over-year rise since 2010. Calendar year 2016 beef industry exports improved compared to 2015’s disappointing sales. Still, exported beef tonnage was projected (as of mid-December, 2016) to be about 12% below 2011’s record high. U.S. beef imports declined dramatically compared to 2015’s level, which on a tonnage basis was the largest since 2005. Domestic beef output appears set to continue growing significantly faster than the U.S. population for at least two more years. Output of pork and poultry also should continue increasing throughout 2018. The rate at which beef production increases year-over-year will be a market driver. With increasing domestic production, foreign markets will be another key driver of U.S. cattle prices. Demand for beef - both domestically and especially that of foreign buyers – is the major uncertainty. U.S. beef exports levels in the next two years could cause weaker or stronger cattle prices than currently forecast. Year-over-year declines in cattle prices are forecast for the next two years. However, the pace of price drops is expected to moderate significantly compared to that of the last two years.

2016 U.S. Market Review

The USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) Market News negotiated 5-market average slaughter (fed) steer reported prices for 2016 is projected by the LMIC to be in the $120.00 to $121.00 per cwt. range compared to $148.12 in 2015, dropping about 19% yearover- year. Lower fed cattle prices, combined with cattle feeders adapting their feeder animal bids after record large financial losses in 2015, pulled the rug out from under yearling and calf prices. Using AMS reported auction prices for 700-to 800-pound steers in the Southern Plains, LMIC projected 2016 price was down 30% yearover-year, on an annual average. For the year, Southern Plains prices for 500-to 600-pound steers averaged nearly 34% below 2015’s. Overall, annual average cattle prices in 2016 were the lowest since 2011’s. U.S. beef production in 2016 was about 25.2 billion pounds, rising 6.1% year-over-year. That was the first time annual output was above the prior year’s level in six years. In the last three months of 2016, beef production was larger than any quarter since the third quarter of 2013. During the summer months, slaughter of heifers www.progressiverancher.com

and cows started to post increases compared to 2015’s. As calf prices crumbled, cow-calf producers quickly began adjusting their production plans, but that also added to tonnage in the marketplace. Domestic consumer demand measures softened some as 2016 progressed. Still, compared to prior years, demand remained strong -- calculated demand indexes based on retail prices as reported by USDA remained above 2014’s throughout the first three quarters of 2016 (latest data available). A factor in softening beef demand was very competitive pork and poultry prices. U.S. output of pork and poultry remained large in 2016 however, their growth rates slowed year-over-year. After posting a pork production jump in 2015 of 7.3% relative to 2014, that year-over-year increase moderated in 2016, rising 1.6%. Year-over-year changes in total poultry production went from up 3.0% in 2015 to increasing 2.3% for 2016. Price competition between animal- based proteins in wholesale markets has been active the last two years. For example, weekly wholesale chicken breast prices in late November 2016 dipped to the lowest level for any week in 10 years.

International Trade and Announcements in 2016

For the U.S. beef industry, international trade aspects improved in 2016 compared to a very difficult 2015; export tonnage increased and imports declined. From January through October, U.S. beef export volume increased 9.4% compared to 2015’s. U.S. exports of variety meats and other non-beef items also improved. Several factors, including herd liquidation due to a multi- year drought in Australia, caused a surge in imported beef during 2015. In 2016 Australia began herd rebuilding, that was a strong influence on January-October U.S. imported beef tonnage which dropped 13% year-over-year. By country, the major U.S. export markets are Canada, Japan, Hong Kong, Mexico, and South Korea. In 2015, those top five countries represented 80% of U.S. fresh and frozen beef export tonnage. In total the U.S. exports beef to over 100 countries, according to USDA-ERS reports. In 2015, the U.S. struggled in all five major markets except South Korea. This year, through October, Japan, Mexico, and South Korea have all increased their purchases of U.S. beef year-over-year. Volume of beef shipped to Canada and Hong Kong are still lagging behind last year’s totals though. Two key announcements occurred during the second half of 2016. As of the beginning of August, USDA The Progressive Rancher

announced the opening of fresh beef trade with Brazil. Second, as of mid- September, China’s government lifted its 13 year ban on U.S. beef imports (under 30 months of age). The ban is still in place for beef that is over 30 months in age. While the two announcements impact the U.S. beef industry differently, both countries are important. Based on size of the industries and recent herd growth, only a few countries - including the U.S. and Brazil, are in good position the next few years to fill demand for beef of countries with growing incomes. Australia will be on the back burner as an exporter for a while as they transition out of a multi-year drought and begin to rebuild herds; currently cattle prices are record-high there. Importantly, even with Brazil selling fresh and frozen beef to the U.S., LMIC forecasts the total tonnage of beef imported by the U.S. will continue to decline from the very high levels of 2015. The more important longerterm story may turn out to be how well the U.S is able to compete with Brazilian product in foreign markets like Mexico and Asian countries. Brazil also offers some potential for U.S. exports, especially to higher-end restaurants. Small shipments of high quality U.S. beef began to be exported to Brazil in late 2016. As with many other markets, the future potential of the Brazilian market comes as their economy recovers and with that the ability of the middle and upper class income consumers to afford high quality, grain fed U.S. beef. Moving on to China’s announcement to finally reopen their markets to U.S. beef, it indicates important

progress has been made. The ban on U.S. beef imports had been in place since 2003 and was due to a case of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE). Currently, there are major caveats regarding the details which are still to be worked-out. So, the timeline is very uncertain and the details will be important to how quickly exports ramp-up. China is a difficult market, even Australia has recently had issues exporting beef there and they have rather open access. In the long-term, the U.S. is rather well positioned to sell more beef to China. January 2017 15 


More Tonnage and More Price Erosion Likely in 2017 and 2018

During mid-November 2016, cattle prices bounced-up off their calendar year lows and generally increased through year end. Cattle prices may continue to gain some strength seasonally into early 2017. Importantly, throughout 2017 cattle prices are forecast to remain below a year earlier. In calendar year 2017, the current LMIC forecast is for fed cattle prices to decline 7% to 10% year-over-year. The LMIC forecasts feeder animal (700-to 800-pound steer) prices to decrease around 8% to 13% and calves (500-to 600-pound steer) to decline 8% to 17% year-over-year in 2017. Cyclically, annual cattle prices are forecast to post year-onyear declines throughout 2018. Importantly, LMIC forecasts are for the percentage declines in 2017 cattle prices to be smaller than 2016’s and smaller again in 2018. On a quarterly basis, the largest year-over-year percentage declines are likely to be in the first two quarters of 2017, because that is when cattle prices were highest in 2016. In the second half of the year, price drops relative to a year earlier could moderate significantly. Another rather large U.S. corn crop in 2017 would support that scenario. The major factor behind forecasts for declining cattle prices is increased beef tonnage being produced due to increasing cattle slaughter. Cattle slaughter in 2017 will be supported by rather large (often double digit in percentage terms) levels of heifer slaughter compared to that of recent years. Cow slaughter rates also are forecast to pick-up significantly year-over-year. Steer slaughter gains are expected to be more modest. If female slaughter unfolds as anticipated, as 2017 progresses, a clear-cut dampening in the rate of growth of the U.S. beef cowherd will become more apparent. LMIC forecasts that U.S. beef production will continue to exceed the prior year’s level in 2017 by another 3% to 5%. For 2018, output may increase another 2% to 5%. In 2017, U.S. beef production is expected to exceed 26.1 billion pounds, which would be nearly the same as 2011’s. We can translate that production into per capita beef disappearance by adjusting for both import and export tonnage and dividing by population. Here we use the LMIC’s forecasts and convert to a retail weight basis, which would put per capita beef disappearance in 2107 at just over 56 pounds, the largest since 2013. For 2018, that disappearance would be the highest since 2012 (about 57 pounds). Trade relationships and economic growth rates in other countries all impact the export demand profile. Exchange rates also have been a factor influencing U.S. exports and imports. Those are difficult to anticipate, especially in the current geopolitical environment.

Nevada Ranchers Caretakers of our

Rangelands

Cowboys and sheepherders produce food and fiber for the nation. Growing food on Open range is a natural biological process. Grazing actually benefits the land with hoof action and natural fertilization. Plants are healthier and regenerate faster after the herds move to a new range. Antelope and other game animals and birds take advantage of the improvements

Comment: Perspective for Producers

Cyclically larger cattle supplies were the dominant factor pressuring cattle prices in 2016. In 2015, some different factors collapsed fed cattle prices and hence those of calves and yearlings, especially late in that year. Those factors included delayed fed cattle marketings, over finished animals in feedlots, and international beef trade. In a positive light, the industry did not experience those same issues in 2016. For at least the next two years, yearover-year increases in cattle supplies will likely remain a headwind dampening cattle prices. From a producer perspective, for the few years leading up until 2015, betting on higher cattle prices worked well, but that story has changed. Cattle supplies and beef production are now consistently growing rather than shrinking. During the next two years, time may be well spent developing a clear marketing plan (including risk mitigation options), understanding cost structures, and preparing for opportunities before they arise. Compared to when cattle supplies were shrinking, now producers that act quickly and decisively to adverse events (drought, higher feedstuff costs, etc.), may be much better off than those waiting and hoping for their cattle to bring higher sale prices. The cyclical price pendulum may begin to swing back in 2019; cow- calf producers that begin preparing now will be in a good position to quickly implement plans. For stocker operations and cattle feeders, opportunities in 2017 will likely be improved compared to the red ink of the last two years, still careful consideration should be paid to any opportunities to lock-in profits.

NRRC is accepting applications for funding of projects which promote public land ranching. Deadline for application is Feb. 15th. and applications will be reviewed in March.  16 January 2017

Grazing cattle and sheep coexist peacefully with native wildlife and, in fact, make a friendlier habitat for many species.

Sheep often graze on steep terrain and can control cheatgrass, a major fuel for wildfires. Nevada Rangeland Resources Commission was created by the State of Nevada to promote responsible public land grazing. Representatives come from Nevada state grazing boards, Nevada Woolgrowers, Nevada Farm Bureau, and Nevada Cattlemen’s Association.

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January 2017 17 


 18 January 2017

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In the Mind of a Millennial By Jill Scofield, Nevada Beef Council

J

Connecting with Shoppers

mation about beef is Google. And considering that there are 5.5 million food-related online searches on a daily basis, the audience is significant. The beef checkoff uses data from Google analytics to determine what consumers are searching for, which is helpful in guiding how information is shared through channels such as www.beefitshwatsfordinner.com and in resources developed for retail partners. And while connecting with all shoppers about beef purchases is important, a focus on Millennial moms continues to be a priority, not just for the beef industry, but for retailers as well. About one in four Millennials are already parents, which means they are influencing the eating patterns of their families. And Millennial mothers specifically embrace the Internet as their key information source. According to a 2015 Forbes article (Brands Connecting with Millennial Moms Capitalize on Healthy Food Trends, Convenience and Community, 10/01/2015), they use online information for exposure, but still value the personal recommendations of others. Thus, “the lines of exposure and personal recommendations blur with one another creating an overarching macro trend called Momsourcing.” Momsourcing is when moms create online forums such as blogs or websites and What are consumers searching for most? utilize their social profiles to educate one another, The average monthly searches of beef consumers and share tips, recommendations, product reviews • Popular diets: 7,000 monthly searches for the DASH diet, 28,000 monthly searches for and personal experiences. paleo The article goes on to state that “the Milliennial • Most searched meals: dinner takes the lead with 1.2 million searches, with 700K searches mom is a busy woman that looks for ways to provide for breakfast, and 271K for lunch. her family with the right nutrition to fulfill a healthy • Top three beef soup searches: cheeseburger soup (22K), vegetable beef (18K) and beef lifestyle. To stay relevant with this Millennial conbarley (18K) sumers, valuable digital content and partnership • Trending health terms: protein had 1.7 million more monthly searches than calories with popular mom blogs will allow for easier access • Top three beef cuts searches: ground beef (463K), short rib (101K) and brisket (95K) to Momsourcing opportunities.” how they’re gathering information when they make shopping decisions, These are among the reasons the beef and more. This research is then used to inform retailers and provide help- industry continues to work to engage ful resources that allow them to better market beef to consumers at the with Millennial consumers – especially meat case, which is sought-after information by retailers. After all, meat parents – by creating the type of digital department sales are an important indicator of a store’s health. They ac- content that will be helpful and in line count for $53 billion annually, and meat department baskets are among with the needs of these shoppers. the most valuable to the store, with a 70 percent higher ring than the For more information on some of average basket. the shopper insight available through In this month’s checkoff update from the Nevada Beef Council, you’ll the checkoff, visit www.beefretail.org. read that using emerging technologies such as the popular retail app And of course, to find your own beef Ibotta is helping beef councils and the beef checkoff better engage with inspiration of your own, don’t forget to consumers when they’re at the grocery store. Using a smart phone app check out www.beefitswhatsfordinner. to bring beef savings to consumers is in-line with what research shows: com. You might find more than a few tips Jill Scofield is Director of Pro47 percent of millennial smartphone shoppers use their phone to make and recipes that will make meal planning ducer Relations for the Nevada and California Beef Councils. You shopping lists, and 38 percent use them to look up recipes. for the rest of January a breeze. can reach her at jill@calbeef.org. The first place millennial consumers look when searching for inforanuary is here! The remnants of the last of the holiday parties have been cleaned up and put away, the Christmas trees and lights are starting to come down, and we’re busy stowing away the treasures of another holiday season as we think about what’s to come in the year ahead. For the Nevada Beef Council and Beef Checkoff Program, it’s always important to plan ahead, regardless of what season it is. In these updates, I’ve shared a lot of insight about trends and behaviors consistent with the Millennial generations, much of that insight provided by valuable checkoff-funded research and data analytics. The checkoff is a treasure trove of good data and useful research that helps better target campaigns, improve technology platforms so they’re consistent with consumer preferences, and help guide and prioritize program areas to ensure they are the most effective use of checkoff dollars possible. One area in which there is a lot of data collected and analyzed is in shopper insights. The beef checkoff does a tremendous job of gleaning as much information as possible about what consumers are searching for,

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The Progressive Rancher

January 2017 19 


University of Nevada Cooperative Extension

Water: Use it or Lose it in the West Staci Emm, Extension Educator

Introduction

In the western United States, hydrological cycles have changed considerably in the last 50 years. This is largely due to anthropogenic intervention (human involvement), and research predicts water supplies will reach a crisis stage (Barnett et al., 2008). As populations in western states increase, urban and commercial water demand increases competition for available supplies for agricultural uses (Diaz and Anderson, 1995). Water is an increasingly scarce commodity in the West. As more water is diverted from agricultural use to residential and industrial purposes, producers in the Great Basin are facing the challenge of sustaining the economic viability of their enterprises with less water. A professional development program was funded by the Western Sustainable Agriculture Research and Extension to look at water and low-water producing crops in the Great Basin. This fact sheet focuses on the “use it or lose it” water policy in the four different states, which include Nevada, Utah, Idaho and Oregon.

Water in the West

Managing fresh-water resources is complex and intriguing, as water rights and allocation methods are derived from a mixture of common-law heritage, constitutional and statutory law (federal, state and local), local custom, judicial decisions and international convention (Adams, 1993).

Carol Bishop, Extension Educator

continues down the line, as long as the water still flows. Only utilitarian extractive uses such as mining; farming; ranching; and municipal, industrial and domestic uses that physically take water out of the river are eligible. Once the water is diverted, a water user automatically acquires a vested property right protected by the state constitution (Wilkenson, 1997). This vested right means that the recipient is legally entitled to the water (benefit) and may seek relief in the court system if the benefit is not given.

Current Water Law in West

Each state in the West regulates its water through state statutes and governmental departments. Investigation of four different states illustrated water law is not much different among the four states. Specific focus was on whether or not a state had a “use it or lose it” policy.

Nevada

Current water law in Nevada contains a “use it or lose it” policy for groundwater rights. Groundwater rights, once granted by the state engineer, are subject to abandonment and forfeiture as described in NRS 534.090. For groundwater rights, the forfeiture time is five years of non use. Surface water rights are subject to abandonment but only after a period of 10 years of non use. As described in NRS 533.060, the right to use surface water has not been abandoned if, within the 10 years preceding the forfeiture claim, the owner of the right can show receipts or other documentation that any of the following occurred: “(a) The delivery of water; (b) The payment of any costs of maintenance and other operational costs incurred in delivering the water; (c) The payment of any costs for capital improvements, including works of diversion and irrigation; or (d) The actual performance of maintenance related to the delivery of the water.”

Utah

Prior appropriation was developed in the western United States due to water scarcity in the mining camps. The foundation of prior appropriation is seniority, “first in time, first in right.” The first user is guaranteed supply (subject to flow and water availability); the next senior has the second priority, the process

 20 January 2017

The “use it or lose it” law also applies Utah. The current law states as follows in Utah Code Section 73-1-4: “When an appropriator or the appropriator’s successor in interest abandons or ceases to use all or a portion of a water right for a period of seven years, the water right or the unused portion of that water right is subject to forfeiture in accordance with Subsection (2) (c). . ..”. As long as the child eats the full gallon of ice cream at least once every seven years, the child retains the right to the full gallon.

Idaho

Idaho water law Title 42-104 states:“The apThe Progressive Rancher

Ce’arra Holton, Program Coordinator

propriation must be for some useful or beneficial purpose, and when the appropriator or his/her successor in interest ceases to use it for such purpose, the right ceases.”

Oregon According to information provided by the state of Oregon Water Resources Department, “Except for municipal rights and in certain other cases, if any portion of a water right is not used for five or more consecutive years that portion of the right is presumed to have been forfeited and is subject to cancellation. For example, if your water right is for irrigation of 40 acres and you irrigate only 20, the portion of land not irrigated for five consecutive years is subject to cancellation. However, diverting less than the full amount of water allowed under your right to irrigate the full 40 acres will not result in forfeiture, if you are ready, willing and able to use the full amount. If you have reduced the capacity of your water delivery system, you may lose any water not used beyond the capacity of your system.”

If I could lose my water rights, why would I consider conservation? As water rights are possibly the most valuable asset owned by a producer in the western region, it is important that Extension educators and other consultants know the answer to this question. Although most water legislation in western states has not historically promoted using less water than was appropriated, this is changing due to conservation efforts. Some states in the western region have compiled differing strategies to reduce agricultural water use without penalizing those producers attempting to conserve.

Nevada According to the Nevada State Water Plan (1999), “Water users have expressed a desire to obtain credit for water they save through conservation. With this credit, the water user could be allowed to use the saved water on additional lands or for additional homes, lease or sell the saved water, or dedicate the saved water to instream flows. The State Engineer has explained that this option is already available under existing water law. In fact, the State Engineer has approved applications allowing the use of existing water rights for expanded uses, as long as the expanded uses do not increase the total consumptive use, does not impact other water right holders, are not located in a fully-appropriated basin,

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and actual water savings can be demonstrated over time. Data shows that few water users have taken advantage of this option or even know it exists.”

Utah Bill HB0051 was brought before the General Session of the Utah State Legislature in 2008. This bill changed the nonuse period of a water right from five to seven years and protected a water right from forfeiture if the land where the water is used is under a fallowing program. This bill is now part of Utah Code Section 73-1-4.

Idaho Idaho law allows for leasing of rights under Title 42-108B. This would allow a producer to implement a low-water-use crop and lease the unused portion of allocated water without forfeiting the right to its use.

Oregon Oregon is the least restrictive with regard to forfeiture and water use. As stated in the previous section, you need not use the full amount of your allocation. The law only requires that you be “ready, willing and able” to utilize the entirety of your water rights.

Conclusions Although agricultural producers in the West may be willing to adopt conservation practices and crop mixes that conserve water, current water law across the western states may reduce producer incentives to do so. The real question is what the incentives for

conserving water are. A 2007 survey of Walker River Basin agriculture producers shows that nearly half of surveyed producers are interested in alternative watersaving crops and/or irrigation strategies (47 percent alternative crops, 48 percent irrigation strategies). The survival and success of ranching and farming operations in the West will depend on innovative and insightful producers who are willing to adapt production techniques and diversify products based on profitability and available resources (Bazen et al., 2006). Water acquisition poses risk to the economics of farming and cattle ranching, and different use-it-or-lose it strategies may be utiltized to lessen the impact to agriculture and maintain production and economic profitability. Additional agricultural producer input and involvement is needed in designing appropriate tools and educational materials and programs to enable agricultural producers to successfully transition to different conservation and irrigation strategies.

References Adams, D. A. (1993). Renewable Resource Policy, The legal-institutional foundations. Washington, D.C.: Island Press. Barnett, T. P., Pierce, D. W., Hildago, H. G., Bonfils, C., Santer, B. D., Das, T., Bala, G., Wood, A. W., Nozawa, T., Mirin, A. A., Cayan, D. R. & Dettinger, M. D. (2008). Human- induced changes in the hydrology of the western United States. Science, 319, 1080-1083.

Curtis, K. R., Emm, S. & Entsminger, J.S. (2008). Landowner willingness to adopt alternative cropping and irrigation Strategies in the Walker River Basin. University of Nevada Cooperative Extension Fact Sheet 08-19. Diaz, H. F. & Anderson, C. A. (1995). Precipitation trends and water consumption related to population in the Southwestern United States – A reassessment. Water Resources Research, 31, 713-720. Gaur, A., Biggs, T. W., Gumma, M. K., Parthasaradhi, G. & Turra, H. (2008). Water scarcity effects on equitable water distribution and land use in a major irrigation project-case study in India. Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering-Asce, 134, 26- 35. Nevada Division of Water Resources. a.(2008). Nevada water law – an overview. Retrieved from: http://water.nv.gov/Water%20Rights/ Water%20 Law/waterlaw.cfm. Nevada Division of Water Resources. b. (2008). Nevada water law – water permits. Retrieved from: http://water.nv.gov/Water%20Rights/ Water%20 Law/water_permits.cfm. Oregon Water Resources Department. (n.d.). Retrieved from: http://www.wrd.state.or.us/. Robinson, C. (2007). Irrigation Methods in the Great Plains. Ask Dr. Dirt.

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1

12/15/2016 3:19:43 PM January 2017  21 


BLM Nevada News - For the Rancher’s File

BLM Finalizes Rule to Make Land Use Plans More Responsive to Community Needs Rule reinforces BLM’s relationship with tribes, state and local governments, and the public By Adrienne DiCerbo

T

he Bureau of Land Management (BLM) today issued an updated rule that will make its land use planning more accessible to the public, more responsive to the changing conditions on the public lands, and more efficient. The BLM developed this rule through years of work with state and local governments, cooperators, communities, stakeholders, and the public at large.  The rule updates regulations that are more than 30 years old, provides additional and more robust opportunities for input into the agency’s planning process, and ensures that science is a cornerstone of the BLM’s planning work.  The BLM launched this effort after hearing from stakeholders that the current planning process is too slow and cumbersome.  “Planning is the cornerstone of managing our nation’s public lands and balancing their many uses and values,” said Assistant Secretary for Land and Minerals Management Janice Schneider. “Allowing additional opportunities for public engagement will improve responsiveness at the local level and help address the chal-

lenges of managing public lands in the 21st century. The BLM manages 10 percent of the nation’s land and 30 percent of its subsurface minerals. Federal law requires the BLM to develop land use plans, which are essential tools for balancing the many competing uses and values of the nation’s public lands.  “Under the current system, it takes an average of eight years for the BLM to finish a land use plan.  Too often, by the time we’ve completed a plan, community priorities have evolved and conditions on the ground have changed as well,” said BLM Director Neil Kornze.  “This update to our planning rule allows for a more streamlined process that also increases collaboration and transparency.” The final rule recognizes the vital partnerships that exist between the BLM and tribal, state, and local governments by providing special opportunities for cooperation and collaboration.  The rule also enhances the consistency between the BLM’s land use plans and the plans of other governments.  The rule creates a new, up front process to gather data and hear concerns from all parties, and gives the

public access to early draft plans. The agency anticipates that this early engagement will help make planning efforts significantly more efficient. The rule also continues to support the use of high quality information, including the best available science. This information will be critical as the agency works to address the major challenges facing our nation’s public lands, including increasingly severe droughts and wildfires, the planning and development of clean energy sources, and changing conditions for key wildlife species like sage grouse. This year is the 40th  anniversary of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act, which directed the BLM to develop land use plans for all of the areas under its care. Using the critical lessons learned from those decades of planning work and close collaboration with communities and partners across the country, this rule will lead to ever-better stewardship of the places that the BLM has the privilege of managing The final Planning 2.0 rule can be accessed at

www.blm.gov/plan2

Also vhiew on www.progressiverancher.com

BLM Seeks Public Comment on Targeted Grazing Fuel Breaks Project funding generated from public land sales under the Southern Nevada Public Lands Management Act

E

LKO, Nev. – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Tuscarora Field Office is seeking public input for the proposed Targeting Grazing Management Project. The Tuscarora Field Office has prepared a draft environmental assessment (EA) to strategically graze fuel breaks on degraded sagebrush steppe grasslands that have become dominated by annual invasive or introduced grasses. The targeted grazing treatments are proposed to be conducted on four BLM livestock grazing allotments: the T Lazy S,

 22 January 2017

By John Mitchell

Hadley, Carlin Field, and Blue Basin allotments. BLM conducted both internal and external scoping for this EA; one public comment letter was received and is addressed in the EA. The Targeted Grazing Fuel Breaks EA is posted for a 30 day public review period through January 12, 2016 at: Http://bit.ly/2cAoTjQ Comments can be emailed to TuscFO_NEPA@ blm.gov or submitted to BLM, Attn.; C. John Mitchell, 3900 E. Idaho St., Elko, NV 89801. The BLM manages more than 245 million acres

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of public land, the most of any Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM’s mission is to manage and conserve the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations under our mandate of multiple-use and sustained yield. In Fiscal Year 2015, the BLM generated $4.1 billion in receipts from activities occurring on public lands.

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January 2017 23 


UC Publication on Management to Minimize Foothill Abortion By Glenn Nader and Mike Teglas

General Information on the Disease

T

he Pajaroello (pa-ha-WAY-lo) tick (fig. 1) transmits the deltaproteobacterium that causes Foothill abortion when the tick feeds on a pregnant cow or heifer. This soft-bodied tick resides in dirt or litter under trees and bushes, locations where deer and cattle typically bed down. It does not embed itself in animal flesh, but rather feeds rapidly (for as little as 20 minutes) and drops back onto the ground. A tick feeds every 60 to 90 days and can survive for years in a dormant state without taking a blood meal. The bite of the Pajaroello tick (and transmission of the agent that causes the disease) on nonimmune pregnant heifers or cows 100 to 145 days before giving birth can result in abortion or the birth of weak calves. The impact of tick feeding between conception and 60 days of gestation is unknown, but contraction of the disease at this stage may cause early embryonic loss or late-term abortion. Therefore, tick exposure should be minimized just prior to breeding and at any time early in pregnancy. The tick has been found in foothill areas of California, northern and central Nevada, and southeastern Oregon (fig. 2), as well as in Mexico, at elevations of 600 to 8,000 feet. Only a small percentage of ticks carry a sufficient number of the bacteria to infect cattle (Chen 2007; Teglas 2006). This concept is supported by how difficult it is to transmit Foothill abortion via artificial feeding of ticks on individual pregnant animals. Thus, it is probably not necessary or feasible to totally eliminate ticks from pastures to reduce losses from Foothill Abortion. Although the disease occurs wherever the tick is present, it may not be recognized because tick numbers were not high enough to cause obvious losses, aborted fetuses were not recovered, or the disease was not diagnosed. Foothill abortion (and therefore the tick) appears to be moving north and east, based on outbreaks reported in southern Oregon. Any arid regions in the West with a thriving deer population could serve MIKE OLIVER, University of California as habitat for the Pajaroello tick. Staff Research Associate, School of Veterinary To develop management strateMedicine, University of California, Davis, gies that minimize the impacts of the (Emeritus); GLENN A. NADER, University disease you must know of California Cooperative Extension Farm • whether ticks are present in a Advisor (Emeritus); JOHN MAAS, Universipasture (identified by dry ice trapping; ty of California Cooperative Extension Veterisee below) narian (Emeritus); MYRA BLANCHARD, • the time when ticks are active Specialist, University of California, Davis, (i.e., whether they were active in a School of Veterinary Medicine; JEFFREY pasture that a heifer or cow grazed 100 STOTT, Professor, University to 145 days before a calf was aborted of California, Davis, School of or born weak) (fig. 3) Veterinary Medicine; MIKE TEGLAS, As• the stage of pregnancy of a sociate Professor, Department of Veterinary heifer or cow when grazing pasture Medicine, University of Nevada, Reno; THERESA BECCHETTI, where ticks may be present. University of California Cooperative Extension Livestock and Natural Resources Farm Advisor, San Joaquin and Stanislaus Counties; We would like to thank Mike ROBERT BUSHNELL, University of CaliTeglas, who is one of the authors, fornia Cooperative Extension Veterniarian for all his help and the UNR (Emeritus) cattle to work on this troublesome disease.

O coriaceus feeding Photo courtesy of University of California Ag and Natural Resources.

Read the full article at www.ProgressiveRancher.com  24 January 2017

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Identifying Pastures that Have Pajaroello Ticks

Before any management strategies can be developed, you must identify pastures that have Pajaroello ticks. This can be done either by identifying ticks in bedding areas using dry ice (see below) or by identifying the pasture in which a cow was bitten (subtract the disease incubation period of 100 to 145 days from the date of the abortion or the birth of a weak calf).

Areas that May Have Ticks

Places in pastures where deer bed and where deer activity is obvious usually have the Pajaroello tick. If deer numbers are down in your area, you may need to ask others about what the local deer populations were several years in the past. Observe protected areas where cattle bed in hot weather. Ticks have been found under oak, pine (including pinyon pine), and juniper trees, manzanita, high brush, and protected outcroppings. Wet areas or irrigated pastures are usually free of the tick unless they have trees or brush on dry areas.

Using Dry Ice to Trap Ticks

the ground, and place another piece of dry ice on a white paper or cloth. Repeat this procedure, moving in a circular or looping pattern in the pasture. Check each piece of dry ice every 10 minutes or so, as it will evaporate and eventually disappear. Look for ticks crawling toward or resting near the ice. The ticks may stop moving when you first walk up to the dry ice. Be patient. Moving ticks are best detected by looking slightly to one side of the suspected area instead of directly at it.

Cattle Management Strategies

Three management strategies can minimize Foothill Abortion: avoidance, changing breeding seasons, and regulating the exposure of cattle. Because each ranch is unique, management strategies should be clearly thought out by considering all factors involved in the economical production of cattle.

Avoidance

◊ Do not graze tick-infested pastures when heifers are under 6 months pregnant ◊ Graze stocker steers through a pasture first

Change breeding dates or season Exposure

Attracting Ticks

Dry ice can be used to attract Pajaroello ticks (see Hokama and Howarth 1977). This method works best in warmer weather and in pastures that cows have not grazed for at least 2 months. The dry ice gives off carbon dioxide (CO2), which simulates a host animal’s breathing. Ticks come to the dry ice from many feet away prepared to feed. For best results, trap ticks during the peak tick activity period for the location. This will normally be May to October for most coastal and Central Valley areas and June to September in the Intermountain Area. Abnormally warm years can extend tick activity dates for 30 to 60 days. Collect ticks before livestock are placed in a pasture. Remember that ticks feed only every 60 to 90 days. Thus, if cattle or deer have been in the area prior to collection, the ticks may have already fed and will not be attracted to the dry ice. Field experience indicates that ticks probably will not be found brush (where ticks are) due to hot weather in areas where ants are numerous, either because animals do not bed there or ants may prey on the ticks. Wear gloves to handle the dry ice to prevent freeze burns. Dry ice can be obtained from a variety of stores or markets or directly from ice distributors. Schedule dry ice deliveries, since it may not always be available on demand. Use an ice chest to store the dry ice during transport and collection. Dry ice can be stored in a freezer overnight if needed. Dry ice requires good ventilation because it can be dangerous to humans in a closed, confined area such as a car or a small room. Place dry ice in deer and cattle bedding grounds under brush and trees. When working on hillsides, the downhill side of trees or shrubs is best. Avoid creek beds, flood plains, and wet areas. Wear protective clothing (high boots, long-sleeved shirts) to avoid personal tick exposure. Consider using a tick repellent on your socks and pant legs, since the aftermath of a Pajaroello tick bite can be quite painful.

Trapping Methods

One method uses a 1-inch-deep pie pan to carefully screen a relatively small area (fig. 4). Bury the pan so the edges are level with the ground surface. Place the dry ice on top of an inverted paper cup in the center of the pan. (If you place the dry ice directly on the bottom of the pan, the ticks may crawl onto the ice and be frozen.) The slick side of the pan prevents ticks from crawling out. Leave the site for 30 to 60 minutes before checking the pan for ticks. A second, faster, method is useful for screening a wide area. Under suspect trees, clear debris from the ground in a circle 18 inches in diameter and place a piece of dry ice 3 to 4 inches in size in the center of a white paper or cloth, which will make ticks easy to see. Select the next location within sight of the previous location, clear www.progressiverancher.com

◊ Expose cattle to ticks before breeding ◊ Expose cattle to the tick after 6 months of pregnancy ◊ Both pre- and post-exposure are more effective in the mountainous areas of California than in the Central Valley and coastal areas.

Avoidance

Avoiding the ticks, and therefore the disease, can be accomplished by grazing cattle in pastures where they will not be exposed to ticks (such as irrigated pasture, wet meadows, or tick-free pastures identified by trapping) during the first 6 months of pregnancy. A short breeding season will make this method easier to implement. Another option is to run stocker cattle in the pasture first to graze off the best forage and get bit by the ticks. Given that ticks usually feed only every 60 to 90 days, this provides a two-month window that likely has a reduced exposure for grazing heifers or cows. Change Breeding Dates Calving dates were traditionally oriented to match range resources so that breeding would occur during the highest nutritional phase of the year. Altering the breeding season can reduce the risk of tick exposure to pregnant cattle. For example, in the Intermountain Area, the best time to breed cattle to avoid tick activity would be in the fall (see fig. 5); in the inland valleys, the best time for breeding would be in the spring (see fig. 6).

Pre-Breeding Exposure of Heifers

Heifers can be exposed to the tick before breeding, causing them to develop immunity to the disease. Recent research (Stott 2016) suggests that animal age and sexual maturity do not influence the ability to develop immunity following infection. The impact of maternal immunity on the ability of calves to develop natural and longterm immunity is unknown. Given that antibodies are not the primary immunologic mechanism of immunity, the impact of maternal immunity is probably negligible. More likely, development of immunity in calves and weaners depends on how much tick exposure they receive prior to breeding. Pre-exposure has been used in coastal areas of California; the degree of success of pre-exposure depends on the density and feeding habits of the ticks. Pre-exposure may also require a change in grazing patterns, reserving the worst tick-infested pastures for use by heifers. Operations with both spring and fall calving have incorporated switching replacement heifers from one herd to the other and breeding at 18 months of age to minimize Foothill abortion. For example, heifers from a spring herd can be bred at 18 months of age in a fall herd,

The Progressive Rancher

January 2017 25 


and their financial impacts with your local veterinarian and UCCE Livestock Farm Advisor.

References

Bushnell, R., M. Oliver, G. Nader, and B. Norman. 1991. Foothill abortion. University of California, Davis, Veterinary Medicine Extension, Cooperative Extension, School of Veterinary Medicine. Chen, C. I., D. P. King, M. T. Blanchard, et al. 2007, Identification of the etiologic agent of epizootic bovine abortion in field- collected Ornithodoros coriaceus Koch ticks. Veterinary Microbiology 120: 320–327. Hokama, Y., and J. A. Howarth. 1977. Dry ice (CO2) trap for efficient field collection of Ornithodoros coriaceus (Acarina: Argasidae). Journal of Medical Entomology 13(3/4): 627–628. King, D. P., C.-I. Chen, M. T. Blanchard, et al. 2005. Molecular identification of a novel deltaproteobacterium as the etiologic agent of epizootic bovine abortion (Foothill abortion). Journal of Clinical Microbiology 43(2): 604–609. Stott, J. L. 2016. Unpublished data. Stott, J. L., M. T. Blanchard, M. Anderson, et al. 2002. Experimental transmission of epizootic bovine abortion (Foothill abortion). Veterinary Microbiology 88(2): 161–173. Teglas, M. B., N. L. Drazenovich, J. Stott, and J. E. Foley. 2006, The geographic distribution of the putative agent of epizootic bovine abortion in the tick vector, Ornithodoros coriaceus. Veterinary Parasitology 140:327-333. The authors would like to acknowledge the University of Nevada, Reno, for their important role in Foothill abortion research and the California Cattlemen’s Association’s Memorial Livestock Research fund for financial support.

which had the advantage of avoiding tick activity in the Intermountain Area during the susceptible period. Heifers from the fall herd are bred at 18 months and exposed to ticks during the summer prior to breeding in the fall. This system decreases Foothill Abortion, but it requires 6 extra months before obtaining a return on investment. The cost of this delay should be compared with the losses from Foothill Abortion.

Post-Breeding Exposure

Keeping heifers and/or cows in pastures not infested with ticks until all of the cows are beyond the sixth month in pregnancy, then placing them in pastures with high numbers of ticks can increase natural immunity to Foothill Abortion while having minimal or no impact on the majority of fetuses. This strategy may not meet vegetation goals on public or private lands. The success of this strategy depends on the tick activity during the period of exposure and the number of ticks that are within the rangeland.

Loss of Immunity

As with vaccinations that require annual booster shots, immunity to the bacteria that causes Foothill abortion requires the cow to be exposed to tick feeding annually or bi-annually (boosted) in order to continue that immunity. Studies have shown that immunity lasts at least 2 years but will likely wane over time unless the cows are re-exposed (Stott 2016). Tick density undoubtedly impacts the length of immunity. Only a small percentage of ticks carry sufficient numbers of bacteria to transmit disease; therefore, movement of cattle through tick habitat does not guarantee exposure. Cattle that aborted in the past may produce a second abortion upon being returned to Pajaroello tick habitat.

An Intermountain Area Management Example

A Lassen County ranch near Susanville had a level of 50% Foothill Abortion. These cows calved in February and March and were grazed on Forest Service permits in the mountains. The ranch had a four-pasture system on their Forest Service summer range. By subtracting 3 to 4 months from the time of the abortions and dry ice tick trapping, one pasture was found to be the major tick source. Ranchers created a September to October calving herd to run in this pasture that would be over 6 months pregnant when they were exposed to the tick. The spring-calving herd grazed the other three pastures with lower tick populations. The tick-free pastures were comprised mostly of meadows, and the tick-infested pasture was predominantly timber or brush with rock outcroppings. Also, the springcalving herd calving date was moved from March to April. The spring-calving cows went on the Forest Service pastures on June 1. The combined efforts of this strategy reduced the ranch’s Foothill Abortion rate to near zero. Since each ranch is a unique operation, you may want to discuss the various solutions

 26 January 2017

For More InForMation

To order or obtain ANR publications and other products, visit the ANR Communication Services online catalog at http://anrcatalog.ucanr.edu/ or phone 1-800-994-8849. You can also place orders by mail or FAX, or request a printed catalog of our products from University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources Communication Services 1301 S. 46th Street Building 478 – MC 3580 Richmond, CA 94804-4600 Telephone 1-800-994-8849 510-665-2195 FAX 510-665-3427 E-mail: anrcatalog@ucanr.edu ©2016 The Regents of the University of California. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, PO Box 1866, Mountain View, CA 94042, USA. Publication 8566 ISBN-13: 978-1-60107-969-5 The University of California, Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources (UC ANR) prohibits discrimination against or harassment of any person in any of its programs or activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, gender, gender expres- sion, gender identity, pregnancy (which includes pregnancy, childbirth, and medical condi- tions related to pregnancy or childbirth), physical or mental disability, medical condition (cancer-related or genetic characteristics), genetic information (including family medical history), ancestry, marital status, age, sexual orientation, citizenship, status as a protected veteran or service in the uniformed services (as defined by the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act of 1994 [USERRA]), as well as state military and naval service. UC ANR policy prohibits retaliation against any employee or person in any of its programs or activities for bringing a complaint of discrimination or harassment. UC ANR policy also prohibits retaliation against a person who assists someone with a complaint of dis- crimination or harassment, or participates in any manner in an investigation or resolution of a complaint of discrimination or harassment. Retaliation includes threats, intimidation, reprisals, and/or adverse actions related to any of its programs or activities. UC ANR is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment and/or participation in any of its programs or activities without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, age or protected veteran status. University policy is intended to be consistent with the provisions of applicable State and Federal laws. Inquiries regarding the University’s equal employment opportunity policies may be directed to: John Sims, Affirmative Action Contact and Title IX Officer, University of California, Agriculture and Natural Resources, 2801 Second Street, Davis, CA 95618, (530) 750-1397. Email: jsims@ ucanr.edu. Website: http://ucanr.edu/sites/anrstaff/Diversity/Affirmative_Action/. An electronic copy of this publication can be found at the ANR Communication Services catalog website, http://anrcatalog.ucanr.edu/. This publication has been anonymously peer reviewed for technical accuracy by University of California scientists and other qualified professionals. This review process was managed by ANR Associate Editor for Animal, Avian, and Veterinary Sciences Carol Collar. web-10/16-SB/CR

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Thinking

Cowgirl

“Do to others as you would have them do to you.” Luke 6:31

You will never be disappointed, if you treat others the way you would want them to treat you.   In fact, you will discover greater and greater blessings will come to you when you adopt and practice this simple principle.   Many in our world are trying to achieve success by using and/or abusing other people – but ultimately they will fail.   Those who have achieved true success are abiding by the Golden Rule. Mark your calendars for our

28THannual

WinnemuccA R HR

28th annual event March 1 - March 5 , 2017

Join us at the Winnemucca Events Complex to experience Nevada’s largest & most exciting Ranch Hand Rodeo and Horse Sale! Over 30 teams compete for prizes and bragging rights!

Ranch Hand Rodeo Weekend

Ranch, Rope & Performance

Horse Sale March 4, 2017

2016 Top Ten Average ~ $10,440 High Selling Horse Not Smart Smokin~ $17,500

Special Events All Weekend!

Winnemucca RHR Barrel Bash Cow Dog Trial ~ Stock Horse Challenge

Tentative Schedule Wed & Thurs, March 1-2, 2017 Cow Dog Trial and Finals

Friday, March 3, 2017 Stock Horse Challenge & Horse Sale Preview Winnemucca RHR Barrel Bash

Saturday, March 4, 2017 Ranch Hand Rodeo Winnemucca RHR Barrel Bash Ranch, Rope & Performance Horse Sale

Sunday, March 5, 2017 Ranch Hand Rodeo Winnemucca RHR Barrel Bash

2016 Ranch Hand Rodeo Winning Team

TL Ranch - Bruneau, ID

For More Information: (775) 623-5071 or www.RanchRodeoNV.com www.progressiverancher.com

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January 2017 27 


 28 January 2017

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white lives? And what’s more colorful than something that you have affection for and that has a story with it? So, trust in the Lord and do good. And remember your stories, even if you’re the only one they entertain, because your stories should reflect the goodness of our having a Father in heaven. Scripture reading; Psalm 37, Matthew 18:21-35, Matthew 19:16-30, II Corinthians 9:6-15. Pastor’s note: Be sure to enjoy the blessings in the new year. God’s blessings are there. It’s up to you to enjoy them. Happy trails. May God richly bless you. We love you and would love to hear from you. If you would like someone to pray with or just have a question, please give us a call at (775)867-3100. ‘Til next time….

Stories

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by Pastor Diana Gonzalez

ames 1:17 – Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above and comes down from the Father of lights, with whom there is no variation or shadow of turning. NKJV Every gift the Father gives is good and perfect. As I write this morning, it’s at that very small minute of time between Thanksgiving and Christmas. I was thinking about how very blessed we are in this country. How the good Lord has truly blessed my family and I myself with many good and perfect gifts. We are very blessed in our blood family (relatives), our church family and our family of friends. Having a loving Father in heaven (John 3:16) and having people made in His image (Genesis 1:27) to love, are the greatest gifts, however, our Heavenly Father knows our hearts and heart’s desires. He should. He made us. (Isaiah 44:2, Jeremiah 1:5, Psalm 139:14). So, I’ve noticed over the years how the Lord also blessed me with good horses, cattle, bits, spurs, and saddles along with good friends. I was thinking the other day as I was telling a long drawn out, boring story about one of our cows, that it is the cows, horses, bits, spurs, saddles, guns and friends that have a story that I most treasure and tend to hang on to. We are blessed this year to have a nice bunch of registered red Angus bulls for sale, however, my brother noticed a black bull in the middle of them. Well, I could have said, “You know, some people like to buy black bulls”. But, I told the truth. His mother is black and a personal pet, and of course, she has a story. My sister was looking at our purebred herd and asked “What’s that spotted cow?” Well, that cow has a story. She goes back to the first heifer our Dad and I ever bought together in 1980 and she was made famous back in 2004 in a cow country church article named, “Aren’t Cows Funny?” She was the sheep cow, the goat cow (my husband’s favorite) and is no longer with us. Our granddaughter is very lovely and well versed in the Bible; a real blessing. However, she’s also a line bred horse trader; (very dangerous). She recently managed (in her cute unassuming way), to cheat me out of nice big paint horse; not only him, but also the fairly new saddle that fits him. However, I do have a neat grey gelding and an older, but better saddle that she’ll have to wait to inherit because they have stories. I believe it’s ok to have and enjoy things in this life’s journey as long as the things don’t have us, as long as they don’t take God’s place and God’s love. If God says to let go of something, we do it with a happy heart. II Corinthians 4:18 – For the things which are seen are temporary, but the things which are not seen are eternal (everlasting). NKJV We must remember the things we have today can be gone tomorrow. They are temporary. However, God and His love are eternal. God alone makes provisions for us (Deuteronomy 8:18, Proverbs 10:22). It’s God and Him alone that we worship and serve. Psalm 37:3-4 – Trust in the Lord and do good. Dwell in the land and feed on His faithfulness. Delight yourself also in the Lord and He shall give you the desires of your heart. NKJV Yes, God gives us the desires of our hearts, and our desires should be what He desires. Could it be that God blesses us with His blessings to bring color to black and www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

January 2017 29 


Retroscape BullHogging

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By Lane & Susan Parker

ane and Jared Parker saw the need for Range restoration in their own livestock operation, by improving forage and water in an arid climate, through removing invasive species like Russian Olive trees, and old growth plants such as Sage Brush, Juniper, and Pinion Pine trees. “Having seen multiple ranching operations, and various attempts to improve the range and pasture,’ says Parker, “we became aware of the advantage of complete mulching and removal of those invasive plants and trees.”  Thus, the idea of bringing a Bull Hog Mulcher into the Intermountain area was launched, equipment purchased in 2014, and now we “are going full steam ahead” to assist land owners in clearing their land of unwanted growth. As a family owned and operated business, we now incorporate two-wheeled articulating tractors with mulching heads, and two 300-class Excavators with mulching heads, and portability of moving on to most any size job, local or remote, anywhere in the Intermountain area. We have recently completed contracts on both private, BLM and State ground, in excess of 7000 acres in 2015-2016. Our home base is in northern Utah. For more information visit our website retroscape.net Or contact Lane Parker 435-757-4643.

 30 January 2017

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N Farm Bureau Nevada evada Farm Bureau

Important Work Ahead In 2017 For Fixing Government’s Broken Regulatory System

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ith the changes taking shape in Washington, D.C. as the result of the past election and the framework in place to make improvements to the extremely flawed system of how federal agencies have been working to initiate their agendas for command and control regulations, the coming year presents an excellent opportunity to correct what’s been going wrong at an ever-increasing pace. A broad-based group of agricultural interests have been working cooperatively to put together a plan to pave the way forward for regulatory reform in 2017. A plan entitled “Regulatory Improvement and Reform: A Priority for American Agriculture” has been presented to the incoming Trump Administration and is also making the rounds within those who will be serving in the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives in the next session. A copy of the white paper is available at this link: http://www.fb.org/files/Regulatory_Reform_White_Paper.pdf With the egregious actions of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and their attempt to dictate their agenda through the proposed regulations of the Waters of The U.S. (WOTUS) serving as a posterchild for the need to address run-away federal agencies who fail to understand the need to follow the law with their regulatory conduct, the need for fixing a broken system is self-evident. Other federal agencies also provided their examples of the same type of an agenda-driven mentality of over-reach, but EPA set the standard for how bad an out-of-control bureaucracy would attempt to take things. The main points for the regulatory reform package that agricultural producers are working to accomplish seek to…

• Emphasize and utilize sound science in developing regulations. • Call for greater congressional oversight of rules and for congressional approval of major rules. • Charge agencies with greater accountability in data utilized in developing and finalizing regulations. • Require agencies, when developing regulations, to look more closely at the costs and benefits of their rules.  32 January 2017

By Doug Busselman

Guarantee a minimum 60-day comment period for stakeholders affected by major rules. Prevent agencies from using social media to effectively lobby in favor of their own regulatory proposals. Reinvigorate the role of judges in interpreting the law and do not leave it solely to agencies to interpret the law and their own regulations. Ensure that the rulemaking process is open, transparent and respectful of the rights of all affected parties. Restore equilibrium to the federal-state relationship by strengthening Federalism principles. Reform the Equal Access to Justice Act where necessary and prevent abuses in sue-and-settle litigation.

Congressional Members Need To Hear From You! Ideally, the new leadership of federal agencies are motivated to reverse the course of regulatory patterns pursued by the past administration, but there also needs to be attention by lawmakers for bringing about the required structural changes that are necessary. Major legislative proposals will be introduced and considered in the U.S. House early in 2017 and a focused effort to secure sufficient support in the U.S. Senate will be required to get past the 60-vote road-block for that legislative body to enact meaningful regulatory reforms.h Long-term, Congress needs to put on their own shoulders the responsibility of doing a better job of spelling out clear directions in laws and then following up through oversight to insure that agencies are properly following the intentions spelled out in laws they have passed. A very viable and likely necessary action would be changes made to address this by establishing a process for up-or-down votes, by Congress, to determine whether major regulatory proposals should advance or be required to be scrapped. Judicial reform is also necessary and will be part of the overall improvement project, revamping the current misguided application of how judges defer to agency’s The Progressive Rancher

interpretations of the law or their own regulations. Another aspect of the necessary changes in the judicial area involves the reform of the Equal Access to Justice Act and the working reality of how advocates of using the judicial process to advance their agendas also have turned the process into a business model for tapping into federal funding through the misapplication of lawsuits for fun and profit. Reforming the regulatory system that has taken root as an oppressive federal bureaucracy, extending their command and control demands on the private sector, beyond the parameters of the laws enacted by elected representatives, will not be easily or quickly accomplished. A strong response of engaged constituents will be essential to get through the push-back from activist who wish to further constrain productive and responsible use of natural resources as well as entrenched bureaucrats who been working successfully to bring about the conditions that now exist.

Reflection on November Elections and Looking Ahead

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By Hank Combs

hank you to all of the members who attended our 97th Annual Meeting in Elko Nevada last month and a special thanks to all of our great sponsors who helped us to put on such a great event. This year’s meeting was highly attended with a wide array of different informational speakers, speaking on the issues that impact the farmers and ranchers of Nevada. If you missed this year’s conference be sure not to miss out on next year’s Annual Meeting! November is now past us and not only on the National level did we see a historical moment in politics but also on our state level here in Nevada. Donald Trump was elected President Elect to begin his term in 2017. We have seen all over television and in other media outlets since November 8th, cities burning, protesting gone out of control, all in reaction to President Elect Trump. But on a more rural note, what does a ‘President Trump’ mean for agriculture? The American Farm Bureau Federation, AFBF, has been in close relationships with the President Elect since the announcement of his victory. They having been working hand in hand with the Trump transition team www.progressiverancher.com


NNevada Farm Bureau evada Farm Bureau on the issues Trump campaigned on and how those issues could affect agriculture across the nation as a whole. In a conversation had with AFBF President Zippy Duvall, President Elect Trump told Duvall while still campaigning that fixing agriculture within the government was number five on his list of major issues he wishes to fix if elected President. AFBF’s biggest concerns they have been working on with the Trump transition team has been the appointment process to support candidates for Secretary of Agriculture, Trump’s potential immigration reform and what that means for farm labor, and Trump’s plan to abandon the TPP trade agreement. It is difficult to tell at this time what the final outcomes will be of a President Trump on agriculture, but we are all hopeful that the regulations holding back agriculture can be alleviated under this new administration with Donald Trump in the White House and both Congress and the Senate changing control from the previous administration. Time will only tell. The Trump victory and changes in both houses on Capitol Hill were not the only altering moments in politics, but here in Nevada there has been a transition in majority rule within the Nevada State Assembly and the Nevada State Senate. Both houses are now majority Democratic control following the November elections. All of the ballot question passed here in Nevada as well. Looking forward we will have to keep up to date on our State Legislature and what bills are passed and put into law that affect agriculture both beneficial or harmful. Our policy development is what keeps Farm Bureau a grassroots organization, and this year’s policy is as strong as ever and will aid in advocating for the voice of Nevada agriculture in the state legislature come January of 2017. On behalf of the Nevada Farm Bureau Federation, I would like to wish all of our members and the readers of this magazine a Happy Holiday season and a Happy New Year. Happy Holidays to you and your family.

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Nevada Farm Bureau Submits Comments To Shape The Scope Of Navy’s EIS

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By Doug Busselman

evada Farm Bureau recently submitted the organization’s comments for the U.S. Navy’s public scoping comment period regarding the Fallon Range Training Complex Modernization Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Public comments for this process were needed to meet the deadline by December 12, 2016. The main themes of the comments that Nevada Farm Bureau offered for the Fallon Range Training Complex Modernization put an emphasis on drawing attention to the impact that the proposed action for closure (in whole or in part) of 11 livestock grazing allotments will have for ranchers who own these allotments. “The burden of this loss will be significant for some of the grazing allotment owners and could be catastrophic to others, who could have no sustainable alternatives for continuing in business as the result of the loss.” Farm Bureau commented. Farm Bureau called on the Navy to consider in their National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process every possible alternative for avoiding, minimizing and mitigating negative consequences of their proposed actions. “The unavoidable impacts should be completely balanced with alternative solutions.” Farm Bureau’s comments stressed. Nevada Farm Bureau’s recently enhanced public policy on military impacts was also included in the comments, sharing: “We propose that farmers and ranchers be properly compensated by the military branches or the federal government for any adverse economic impacts, short and long term, of new and existing military activities, reservations or restricted areas. This speaks to the long term economic viability and sustainability of the entire agricultural operation.” In responding to the scoping process, Nevada Farm Bureau worked cooperatively with the Nevada Cattlemen’s Association and the ranchers who potentially will be impacted to gain recognition of the property right attributes connected with livestock grazing allotments on federally-managed lands. Federal law and precedence has established that doing the right thing includes compensation for the loss of grazing forage as well as for loss of water rights and other privately held range improvements. “We want to clearly indicate that while proper military training and readiness are critical considerations associated with the Fallon Range Training Complex Modernization project, Constitutional protection and recognition of private property rights are also core values that cannot be glossed over.” Farm Bureau pointed out in summary, “Where negative consequences result, compensation for the loss of private property, including loss or reduction of livestock grazing allotments need to be appropriately evaluated, documented and honored.”

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January 2017 33 


N Farm Bureau Nevada evada Farm Bureau

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Highlights of 97th Annual Meeting

evada Farm Bureau held it’s 97th Annual Meeting in Elko Nevada at the new Elko Conference Center. The event was held over a three-day period from Monday November 14th to Wednesday November 16th. The event is the one time a year that Nevada Farm Bureau members from all over the state get together to meet, gather information on different changes in Nevada agriculture, and vote on policy to be carried on to the legislature to create the voice for Nevada agriculture. This year’s event had over twelve sponsors and ten exhibitors from corporations involved with Nevada agriculture. Our platinum sponsors included Newmont Mining Corporation and Country Financial Insurance. The informational presentations given at the Annual Meeting included topics of Nevada Water Law, the new Vet Feed Directive, Federal Lands Becoming Nevada Lands, Becoming an Agricultural Advocate, Working With Federal Land Managers on Sage Grouse Conservation, and Your Role in Growing An Effective Farm Bureau. The speakers throughout the Annual Meeting were David Hillis Jr of Turnipseed Engineering, J.J. Goicoechea, Nevada State Vet, Dan Lotspeich the Managing Director for the Nevada Lands Council, Lacey SproulTom, Clark County Farm Bureau Member, Matthew Magaletti of the Nevada BLM, Terry Padilla of US Forest Service, and Robin Kinney the Director of Membership and Program Development with American Farm Bureau. Jill Douglas, a representative from Country Financial spoke to the crowd during the Country Financial Luncheon on Tuesday November 15th. During the Country Financial Luncheon, Jill Douglas and Nevada Farm Bureau presented Elko County Country Financial Agent Barbara Maple an award for her almost thirty years of service to the company. Tuesday also saw different Young Farmer & Rancher, YF&R, events throughout the day including American Farm Bureau Representatives speaking to Nevada YF&R members on how to have a beneficial state YF&R program. The annual Nevada Farm Bureau Young Farmer & Rancher Discussion Meet also took place on Tuesday with the general rounds throughout the day and the final four round during the awards dinner, with the winner being Charlie Mann, an FFA Teacher from Gardnerville, NV. The awards dinner took place Tuesday night and Nevada Farm Bureau President, Hank Combs, presented the Members in the crowd with their awards. These awards included: Recognition for Membership Growth at the county quota level, presented to the county presidents from Churchill County, Lyon County, Humboldt County, Clark County, Elko County, and Douglas County/Carson City. A highlighted award  34 January 2017

By James Linney - Director of Communications

Nevada Farm Bureau Board of Directors.

2016 YF&R Discussion Meet Winner, Charlie Mann from Carson City.

Board members who had 100% cooperation in all board meetings in 2016 Julie Wolf, Churchill County FB President; Carla Pomeroy, Area 3 Director; Jim Hardy, Area 1 Director; Cindy Hardy, Women’s Leadership Chair; and Craig Shier, Area 2 Director The Progressive Rancher

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N Farm Bureau Nevada evada Farm Bureau

was given from the Nevada Agricultural Foundation for Outstanding Ag In The Classroom Volunteer presented to Diana Vesco of Humboldt County. And recognition was given to the State Board Members who had 100% cooperation in all the board meetings throughout 2016. Wednesday morning, Farm Bureau Bank sponsored a breakfast where Nevada Farm Bureau President Hank Combs spoke on behalf of the bank. Following the breakfast, the delegates from each county went into a General Session where Nevada Farm Bureau Vice President Bevan Lister and President Hank Combs orchestrated the meeting. The delegates sat by county in the auditorium and as the revised and new policies were presented to them they had the floor for discussion on the issues and the option to amend the written language if they wished which then led to voting on the policy to pass, fail, or be tabled. Overall it was a productive and informative General Session that resulted in reworded policy as well as some new policy. Be checking back here with nvfb.org in the coming week to view what those policies were. Following the General Session, the Election Committee presented their nominees for the State Board and the delegates sent in their secret ballots. President Combs was reelected into being the 2017 Nevada Farm Bureau President. Bevan Lister was reelected to Vice President. Cindy Hardy was also reelected to Women’s Leadership Chair and Marlene Shier was reelected to Women’s Leadership Vice Chair. All of those above stated board of director positions holding a one-year term. Craig Shier was reelected to Area 2 Director, holding a two-year term. Overall the Nevada Farm Bureau’s 97th Annual Meeting was a success with a large turn out of members, along with a successful venue, informative presenta-

Counties that increased membership quota with country financial include Douglas, Churchill, Lyon, Humboldt, Elko, and Clark, Diana Vesco Not in Photo

tions, great atmosphere and food, and a very productive General & Voting Session. The picture above is of the Nevada Farm Bureau, NVFB, Board of Directors and was taken at the Awards Dinner Tuesday Night of the 97th Annual Meeting Elko, NV. Pictured from left to right, back row include: NVFB President Hank Combs, Clark County FB President Rick Huskins, Area 3 Director Carla Pomeroy, Churchill County FB President Julie Wolf, YF&R State Chair Dann Mathews, WLC State Chair Cindy Hardy, Lyon County FB President Darrel Pursel, White Pine County FB President Tom Baker, Humboldt

County FB President Marty Muratore, Area 1 Director Jim Hardy, and Area 2 Director Craig Shier. Pictured left to right, bottom row: Douglas County/Carson City FB President Woody Worthington and NVFB Vice President Bevan Lister.

Nevada Agricultural Foundation’s award recipient for Outstanding Ag in the Classroom Volunteer, Diana Vesco of Humboldt County. www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

January 2017 35 


Lawson Aerator Applications on Rangelands By Charlie D. Clements, John McLain, Mark Weltz, Jeff White and Dan Harmon Rangeland Scientist, Great Basin Rangelands Research Unit, US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, 920 Valley Road Reno, NV 89512 charlie.clements@ars.usda.gov Habitat Supervisory Biologist and Supervisory Wildlife Biologist, Nevada Department of Wildlife, Vice President, Elko Land and Livestock, and Agricultural Research Science Technician, US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service

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eavy duty implements designed and built for manipulating rangeland vegetation and soils have been around for many decades. In the 1950’s, the early developments of Rangeland drills resulted in the effective seeding of hundreds of thousands of acres of deteriorated rangelands to perennial grasses in an effort to curb erosion and increase the forage base for the livestock industry and reduce the spread of the noxious weed, halogeton. Rangeland drills, brush hogs, Dixie harrows, tandem discs and other equipment have played an important role in treating degraded rangeland environments. The Lawson Aerator is one of the newer implements to enter the scene for rangeland improvements. The Lawson Aerator, designed as a pasture renovator in southern states that were being invaded by woody species, has earned a solid reputation and since found its way West. The aerator has significant weight distributed over 2 tandem drums that are typically 12’ x 3’ diameter with an option of adding liquid to the drums for additional weight. The drums display angled, protruding and spaced 8” x 4” x 1” steel plates with sharpened ends for effective chopping of woody material and penetration into soils for aeration (Figure 1). The variable pitch between the bladed drums can be adjusted to reduce or increase the impact to vegetation. Here, we report on two case studies using the Lawson Aerator to reduce decadent brush stands and early Pinon-Juniper invasion to increase desirable herbaceous species. A small Creekside fenced pasture on the Flying M Ranch, located 110 miles southeast of Reno, NV is a degraded/decadent Wyoming/ Basin big sagebrush plant community with a very sparse understory of herbaceous species. In the fall of 2012, working cooperatively with a number of state and federal agencies, we treated approximately 15 acres of rangelands using the Lawson Aerator to crush the decadent brush, while at the same time pulling a rangeland drill behind the Lawson to test the seeding of 4 seed mixes (Figure 2). The site was blocked into three 5 acre plots in which each block received a seed mix as well as a greentrip mix on the edge of the plots. Plot “A” was seeded with ‘Roadcrest’ crested wheatgrass (11 lbs/acre rate), ‘Nezpar’ Indian ricegrass (4 lbs/ac), Yellow sweetclover (4 lbs/ac), Pubescent wheatgrass (3 lbs/ac), western yarrow (.15 lb/ac), ‘Sherman’ big bluegrass (.25 lb/ac), ‘Toe Jam’ bottlebrush squirreltail (.25 lb/ac), and Falcata alfalfa (2 lbs/ac) for a total of 26 lbs/acre rate. Plot “B” was seeded with a seed mix of ‘Vavilov’ Siberian wheatgrass (6 lbs/ac), ‘Jose’ tall wheatgrass (11 lbs/ ac), ‘Paloma’ Indian ricegrass (4 lbs/ac), alfalfa (4 lbs/ac), Pubescent wheatgrass (6 lbs/ac), Western yarrow (.25 lb/ ac), ‘Sherman’ big bluegrass (.25 lb/ac), ‘Immigrant’ for 36 January 2017

age kochia (.25 lb/ac) and bee plant (.25 lb/ac) for more than 33 lbs/acre rate. Plot “C” was seeded to a seed mix of ‘Vavilov’ Siberian wheatgrass (11 lbs.ac), ‘Nezpar’ Indian ricegrass (5 lbs/ac), Northern sweetvetch (4 lbs/ac), Blue flax (.25 lb/ac) and ‘Sherman’ Big bluegrass (.25 lb/ac) which equaled

21 lbs/acre rate of seed. Each site received a greensrtip mix on the edge of the plots which consisted of ‘Vavilov’ Siberian wheatgrass (11 lbs/ac), Sandberg’s bluegrass (.25 lb/ac), ‘Immigrant’ forage kochia (.125 lb/ac) and ‘Snowstorm’ forage kochia (.125 lb/ac). The use of

Figure 1. Lawson Aerator purchased by the USDA-ARS, notice the size, heaviness and steel plate teeth to crush old and decadent shrubs.

Figure 2. Lawson aerator application pulling a rangeland drill with specific seed mixes. The Progressive Rancher

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Figure 3. Perennial grass density in the spring of 2015 following a 2012 Lawson treatment and 2013 fall seeding application.

Figure 4. The application of the Lawson Aerator resulted in this habitat becoming a sage grouse breeding ground. Notice the succulent forbs, grasses and shrubs released from this management activity. the Lawson Aerator does not result in 100% death of big sagebrush, and if treated correctly in the fall months while big sagebrush seed is on the plant can actually result in the seeding of big sagebrush, therefore resulting in and added edge effect to the habitat as well as enhancing stand age diversity. In the spring of 2013 we recorded seedling density of seeded species as well as any release of residual vegetation and big sagebrush. Plot “A” averaged 37 seedlings/m², Plot “B” had 15 seedlings/m², Plot “C” equaled 37 seedlings/m² and the greenstrip seed mix averaged 29 seedlings/m². Through the summer months, seedling density decreased and seedling predation by black-tailed jackrabbits was especially heavy. All of the seed mixes were near or under 4/m² by September. By September 2014, the treated plots averaged less than 1 seeded species/m², but showed an increase residual plant species such as creeping wildrye, 2.6/m², and big sagebrush resprouts and seedlings at 0.08/m². Even though these numbers look very bleak, the site received 3.56” of precipitation in 2012-2013 and 6.8” in 2013-2014. Applying range improvement techniques to rangelands along with seeding various seed species on arid rangelands is always a very challenging task, yet with such aridity and predation, the use of the Lawson Aerator www.progressiverancher.com

rangelands to improve wildlife and grazing resources. Following the Lawson Aerator application in 2011 and 2012, Jim Baumann drill seeded 8 lbs/acre rate of crested wheatgrass and broadcast seeded another 2 lbs/acre rate of ‘Immigrant’ forage kochia to the majority of the treated areas in the fall of 2013. The seeding was very successful as witnessed by the perennial grass, crested wheatgrass, vigorously growing in the seeded rows, 10/ m² (Figure 3) and “Immigrant’ forage kochia densities averaging just over 2/m². As mentioned earlier, the use of the Lawson Aerator does not kill big sagebrush at 100% and in fact stimulates resprouting and seedling establishment. The use of the Lawson Aerator in sites that receive higher precipitation levels, and therefore have higher site potentials, actually results in the release of numerous grasses and forbs that were not seeded (Figure 4). The application of the Lawson Aerator at the Simpson Creek Ranch resulted in an improved vegetative class and structure that resulted in a new sage grouse breeding ground (lek) and increased wildlife use as well as more than a 300% increase in herbaceous grazing resources. The treated areas that did not receive a followup seeding responded very well with such plant species as globemallow and numerous other forbs while at the same time not causing a cheatgrass problem that would increase the chance, rate and spread of wildfires. A closer look at plant communities reveals plant communities with too much disturbance (i.e. cheatgrass dominance) or too little disturbance (i.e. decadent shrub stands, Pinon-Juniper invasion), the Lawson Aerator provides a management tool to reach desirable vegetative results if used properly. The ability of private land owners like Jim Baumann to work closely with organizations like the Wildfire Conservation Group and the USDA, Agricultural Research Service, Great Basin Rangelands Research Unit, who purchased the Lawson Aerator used in these projects, made this project a success and provides a template for private landowners and public land managers alike to accomplish range improvement projects that improve grazing resources as well as be benefits to numerous wildlife species.

improved the herbaceous component of the site, experienced no cheatgrass invasion, and added a much needed edge effect and improved succulent shrub stand that will benefit numerous wildlife species. With that said, this IMPORTANT CORRECTION: The last SRM article entitled site did not improve perenCOLLABORATIVE CONSERVATION EFFORT HELPS KEEP NEVADA’S nial grass density enough to improve sustainable grazing COLUMBIA SPOTTED FROG FROM FEDERAL LISTING had the wrong credit. The credit goes to Kent McAdoo, Natural Resources resources. Simpson Creek Ranch, Specialist, Cooperative Extension and Chad Mellison, Biologist, U.S. located just south of Eureka, Fish & Wildlife Service. We appologize for the mistake. NV, was treated with the Lawson Aerator in 2011 and 2012. Ranch owner The Society for Range Management (SRM) is “the professional society dedicated to supporting persons who work with rangelands and have a Jim Baumann, in coopcommitment to their sustainable use.” SRM’s members are ranchers, land eration with Jan Schade of managers, scientists, educators, students, conservationists – a diverse the Wildfire Conservation membership guided by a professional code of ethics and unified by a strong Group, treated 160 acres land ethic. This series of articles is dedicated to connecting the science of of rangelands on the ranch range management with the art, by applied science on the ground in Nevada. to reduce old-decadent BaArticles are the opinion of the author and may not be an official position of sin big sagebrush stands SRM. Further information and a link to submit suggestions or questions as well as decadent Wyoare available at the Nevada Section website at http://www.ag.unr.edu/nsrm/. ming big sagebrush stands SRM’s main webpage is www.rangelands.org. We welcome your comments. and Pinon-Juniper invaded The Progressive Rancher

January 2017 37 


Managing Conflict Lessons learned from Idaho’s Snake River Basin Adjudication

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ecently a small delegation of water leaders from California were invited to Boise, Idaho to observe and participate in a conference highlighting the 27year long process that resulted in the Snake River Basin Adjudication (SRBA), the largest adjudication ever in the West. Simultaneous to the conference in Boise, the California legislature was in the final week of session debating historic legislation to regulate that state’s groundwater management. Although surface water rights in California have been regulated since 1914, groundwater in California had not been subject to significant state regulations. The legislation that ultimately was approved late that week ushered California into a new era of groundwater management. Consequently the conference in Boise provided a timely opportunity to interact with Idaho water policy leaders and learn firsthand from their experiences related to implementing and managing surface and groundwater water conjunctively in a regulated environment. What follows is a brief report on what we observed, heard and learned from that visit. CONFLICT AND APPROACH The state of Idaho has regulated water use, both surface and groundwater, for many decades. The Idaho Legislature determined that groundwater was subject to appropriation in 1951. Since that time, the Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR) has been the lead agency overseeing water rights, the issuance of permits and resource planning. The Snake River Basin includes about 85 percent

 38 January 2017

By Randy Fiorini Chair, Delta Stewardship Council

of Idaho’s landmass and water rights. The area is equivalent in size to our Sacramento River and its tributaries. Over the years conflicts arose over water rights between upstream water users and water for power generation. The Swan River Controversy, as it became known, resulted in costly litigation. The legal proceedings served a useful purpose to focus attention on the concerns about the uncertainty of future water availability, but failed to resolve the conflicts. By 1984 then-Governor John Evans, Attorney General Jim Jones and Idaho Power Chief Executive Officer James Bruce agreed that they had “reached the point of diminishing returns in pursuing further judicial resolution of this water rights controversy.” This realization led to an agreement signed by the three leaders entitled Framework for Final Resolution of Snake River Water Rights Controversy. The following is an excerpt from that framework agreement describing a new approach to resolving the long standing water right disputes. “Litigation is not the most efficient method to resolve complex public policy questions. Moreover, adversary proceedings may not necessarily yield solutions which reflect the broad public interest as well as the interests of the proceeding’s participants. In order to resolve the controversy and settle the pending litigation, we have identified a series of judicial, legislative and administrative actions which we agree should be taken in the public interest, and which would resolve the outstanding legal issues to our mutual satisfaction.” The settlement discussion focus included: • Establishing minimum flows for the Snake River • Limiting new development based on water availability to protect agriculture and hydropower water rights; commence a general adjudication of the entire Snake River in Idaho • Encouraging the establishment of an effective water marketing system • Initiating and sustaining state-funded hydrologic and economic studies to determine the most cost effective and environmentally sound means to implement the state water plan and manage Snake River flows, and • Creating legislation to clarify that proceeds from water rights sold would benefit rate-payers. At the outset of the adjudication process it was acknowledged that this would be a lengthy process in need of a long-term commitment from all three branches of state government. During the course of the proceedings the conflict that began as a struggle between hydropower and irrigators escalated to The Progressive Rancher

groundwater vs. surface water users and then groundwater vs. aquaculture. The commitment to deal with these conflicts during the ensuing three decades included six gubernatorial administrations: Democrats John V. Evans and Cecil D. Andrus and Republicans Phil Batt, Dirk Kempthorne, Jim Risch and C.L. “Butch” Otter. The Legislature committed more than $3 million each year. All told, it cost the state more than $97 million. The Idaho Supreme Court appointed a District Court Judge, the Honorable Judge Daniel C. Hurlbutt, to preside over the petition for General Adjudication of Water rights in the Snake River Basin. A special court house was established in Twin Falls, a location considered more convenient for the water rights holders. During the 27 years, Judge Barry Wood, Judge Roger Burdick and Judge Eric Wildman each served successively after the retirement of Judge Hurlbutt. Some of the things we learned about and from the Idaho process include: CLEAR OBJECTIVES • The need to clarify Federal and Tribal water rights. • The need to let people know where their water rights, both surface and groundwater rights, • lined up under Idaho’s priority rights system. • Ironically there was a need to quantify water rights because of the perceived threat that water could be exported to California. • The need to determine the quantity of water available for future development. www.progressiverancher.com


FUNDING

The state tried unsuccessfully to charge the Federal government a fee to help pay for the adjudication process. As mentioned above, the Idaho Legislature eventually committed $97 million.

LEARN FROM OTHERS

Prior to issuing his Commencement Order, Judge Hurlbutt visited with leaders in several western states to learn as much as he could about how to structure a successful process. Much of the SRBA success can be attributed to Judge Hurlbutt’s early research and the wisdom he applied to initiating a very effective process.

VENUE

Establishing a court house in Twin Falls instead of Boise placed the court in a more central and convenient location. In addition to the centralized court house, the Judge regularly traveled in the region and held court in remote locations.

STEERING COMMITTEE

Judge Hurlbutt formed a steering committee that met regularly to monitor and advise the Judge when the process was initiated. This was helpful and acknowledged that the adjudication process materially affected a number of interests that needed to be involved with the process.

SPECIAL MASTERS

It was evident from the start that state magistrates were too busy with their normal case loads. That is why a District Court Judge was assigned to oversee the process. In support of the process, special masters were assigned to handle field investigations and to help centralize knowledge in support of the process and the Judge.

INVENTORY OF WATER RIGHTS

Perhaps obvious, but none-the-less imperative to successfully resolving disputes, was the need to create an inventory of water rights.

MONTHLY INFORMATION MEETINGS

Monthly the court provided progress reports for the public and all interested parties.

were presented to a District Court Judge intimately familiar with the issues.

OUTREACH AND CASE MANAGEMENT

The outreach by the State of Idaho was remarkable. Not only did this include siting the Courthouse centrally in the region in respect to citizens who had to travel, but also to the extensive mailing of information and the mobile IDWR units that travelled across the region holding public meetings, the helping of local farmers and ranchers complete the paperwork and verify that claims were filed correctly, and the opening of IDWR district offices. With 156,000 claims to process it was necessary to create a separate file for every claim.

to a list of “x plus a bunch.” Apparently not all wells in use had been documented by IDWR. •

Effectively managing groundwater required the need to develop a groundwater model for the Snake River Basin, which is an area about the size of California’s Sacramento River watershed. Initially IDWR staff began with a widely used U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) model created the first comprehensive groundwater model. A modeling committee that represented all the various parties managed decisions on the model development, calibration and validation. Peer review of select aspects of the model also strengthened the trust in the model results.

The University of Idaho Water Resources Research Institute was invited to assist and helped further refine the model that IDWR manages very effectively now. Today, version 2.1 of The Snake River Aquifer Model provides IDWR with up to date and accurate data regarding surface and groundwater rights and is the tool employed to inform decisions when curtailment notices are necessary. A former Director of IDWR told us, “many aspects

TECHNOLOGY

Technology helped develop a fair and transparent system that was extensively used during the life of this process to provide and manage information necessary to support effective outcomes. •

Theinventoryofexistingwaterwellsinthebasinbeganwithalistofwellsthathadbeenissued permits by IDWR since 1961. To validate the IDWR list, satellite-imaging technology was enlisted to map all wells. In the words of one Idaho official, this led

SETTLEMENT FIRST

The Idaho Department of Water Resources (IDWR) served as the court’s technical expert. The process required the Director of IDWR to meet with water rights holders to reach settlements and provide the Twin Falls courthouse with a monthly Director’s Report describing the settlements reached for court review and approval. If the Director was unable to achieve a settlement, subsequent appeals then went directly to the SRBA Court in Twin Falls. The Idaho Supreme Court mandated that any appeals out of the Twin Falls court were to go directly to the Supreme Court and were then to be treated on an expedited basis. This process worked well and is credited with successfully resolving most of the complaints without the need for costly litigation.

APPEALS

The Supreme Court, in support of the settlement, required all appeals to go to the SRBA court first. This was to ensure that the appeals www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

January 2017 39 


of the adjudication have been challenged in court, but the model to date has not.” The early application of GIS also made the recording of water rights available for landowners to verify that maps of water rights were accurate and contributed to the transparency and fairness of the process. IDWR also pursued support from NASA and collaborated with the University of Idaho to develop methods for estimating water use (evapotranspiration) remotely that resulted in greater efficiencies in tracking water. Commitment to technology has continued with new technology being used recently to determine groundwater levels utilizing telemetry from drones. This has been used effectively to update and maintain the groundwater model.

CONCLUSION The complexity and the success of the SRBA are compelling. Twenty-seven years sounds like a long time. Idaho started after attempts in other western states and is the first adjudication on this scale to be completed. The most successful water rights adjudication ever in the West was the result of an agreed upon problem statement, a shared goal to resolve the problem because it was the right thing to do, an enduring commitment from all three branches of state government to stay the course even when the conflicts among water

rights holders escalated, a coordinated and well thought out approach to resolve 156,000 claims, utilization of best available technology and science and an acknowledgement that a settlement first approach was preferable to endless litigation. The process was not perfect and it will continue to be difficult, but the Idaho experience illustrates what can be done. What started as a struggle between hydropower and irrigators, escalated to groundwater vs. surface water users and then groundwater vs. aquaculture. Yet the continued commitment to stop neighbor vs. neighbor or surface water vs. groundwater users has yielded significant dividends, even in a state not noted for its commitment to government regulation. Change is not easy; many of the pioneers who pushed these concepts on the legal, technical and management side were criticized. Although now this is recognized as an extraordinary achievement and the right thing to do for the people of Idaho, several public servants suffered professionally. This may be inevitable, but consideration should be given to protecting public servants who have nothing to gain from the outcomes and implementing what is right in their best professional judgment. California has recently entered into a new frontier of groundwater management and regulation. Combined with the century-old surface water rights system,

successfully merging surface and groundwater management conjunctively will require cooperation, commitment, flexibility and leadership. We should consider the experience of Idaho and other western neighbors, seeking to learn as much as we can to ever more effectively manage our precious natural resource, water.

Paul Bottari awarded

“Nevada Realtor Active in Politics”

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ells,Nevada Realtor/Broker Paul Bottari , ALC was awarded the “Nevada Realtor Active in Politics” Award by the 15,000 member strong Nevada Association of Realtor’s at their Annual Meeting and Installation ceremony in Las Vegas last Thursday December 8, 2016. This award is given annually to a member who has gone above and beyond to make sure members and their industry is heard when it comes to political and regulatory matters. Bottari has been a realtor for over 30 years. In past roles he has been a member of the NVAR legislative committee , RPAC committee, and NVAR Board member. He served as the Elko Co. Assn of Realtor’s President in 2008, served on it’s board and as a long term Chairman of the ECAR Public Policy Committee. He served on the National Associations of Realtor’s Land Use, Environment and Private Property Rights Committee beginning in 2008 as a Regional Representative and has been on the Committee since 2010 Representing the Realtor’s Land Institute for which he also serves on their Government Affairs Committee. Bottari is a strong advocate of private property rights and states’ rights.

 40 January 2017

Paul Bottari receiving Nevada Realtor Active in Politics Award

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

January 2017 41 


Shoeing a Horse

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By Becky Prunty Lisle

n November 20, 2016, a unique horseshoeing clinic was hosted in North Fork, Nevada. With each of them having worked as both cowboys and professional farriers, Shawn Biggs and Rolly Lisle came up with the idea of offering their knowledge in a hands-on workshop setting. “There’s always something you can learn. We wanted to teach what we wish someone would have taught us when we first started out--the stuff that’s taken us years to learn,” said Lisle. Both instructors’ education began with their fathers, continuing through professional horseshoeing schools and a combined total of nearly 60 years as working cowboys. Biggs started shoeing at 13 years old, and the following year found him working at the Spanish Ranch in Tuscarora, Nevada, where he was required to shoe his string of cavvy horses. By the time he was 18, he was shoeing a few outside horses, and in 1998 he started into a full-time career. He graduated from Oklahoma State Horseshoeing school in 2003, and 35 years after his father first taught him, he is still at it. After watching and helping his father, Jack, shoe horses throughout his youth, Lisle graduated from Western’s School of Horseshoeing in Phoenix, Arizona in 1996. He shod horses professionally before going to work as a fulltime cowboy with his uncle Webb, where he gained a great deal of experience in every-day ranch shoeing. Most clinic participants brought their own horses, and several other horses were also available for hands-on experience, including two with problem feet requiring special shoes. Two propane forges and two coal forges ran all day, with six anvils set up. The instructors did demonstrations and worked one-on-one with participants, integrating the science and precision of the professional farrier with common-sense cowboy experience. Instructors emphasized the importance of horsemanship and safe handling of difficult horses, and that “just knowing how to tack a shoe on isn’t enough.”

Rolly Lisle demonstrates the hot-shoeing technique of “burning one on.”

Shawn Biggs shows a bar shoe made to remedy a split hoof.

Rolly Lisle demonstrates a method to help safely shoe a difficult horse. Clinic participants work together on a coal forge “Rolly and Shawn did a good job making it informative and enjoyable. I picked up some good techniques for shaping and setting shoes better and I understand more of the science of shoeing. I hope they hold another clinic in the future,” said Jasper Knight. Biggs and Lisle are considering making the clinic an annual event, with the possibility of expanding to two days and inviting other well-established cowboy farriers to offer instruction.

Jasper Knight shapes a shoe.

From left: Coleman Kassick, Conor Leveille, Shawn Biggs, Jasper Knight, Joseph Knight, Rolly Lisle, Chase Lewis, Justin Knight, Zack Braswell  42 January 2017

The Progressive Rancher

Shawn Biggs discusses the different types of shoes and their uses. www.progressiverancher.com


Idaho Completes Massive Water Rights Review

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ug. 24th Idaho’s lawyers and judiciary come together Monday to mark the end of the Snake River Basin Adjudication. The adjudication is the largest ever completed and covers all of the water in the Snake River Basin that begins in Yellowstone National Park, stretches west to the Oregon border and north to Clearwater County. This review has secured the fortunes of thousands of farmers and dairies who control 93 percent of all water in the basin. Its results are also vital to fish processors and other water-intensive businesses in the basin. The Idaho Supreme Court, the Kempthorne Institute and the University of Idaho College of Law will hold a two-day conference Monday and Tuesday commemorating the end of the process. Monday evening on The Grove, the signing of a unified decree will mark the completion of all but about 50 disputed water rights. “The resolution of more than 158,000 claims … reflects the rule of law as the bedrock of Idaho,” said Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden. Besides defining their rights, the adjudication means many farmers and communities who pump their water out of the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer — a Lake Eriesized reservoir that underlies Southern Idaho from Ashton to Kings Hill — now face the same concerns over low water years as farmers using surface water. The connection between groundwater and surface water was clearly recognized in the adjudication, and the law now reflects how pumping affects surface water rights in dry years. But it also lays out the legal infrastructure to ensure pumpers have access to water as the state’s economy and population shifts. IDAHO ESTABLISHES CONTROL The adjudication began in 1987 as a result of the Swan Falls Agreement between the state and Idaho Power Co., which resolved a lawsuit over the utility’s water rights for the Swan Falls Dam on the Snake River south of Kuna. Jim Jones, who as attorney general negotiated the agreement for the state, credited then-Gov. John Evans for insisting that it include an adjudication of all Snake River water rights. Jones, now a Supreme Court justice, called the adjudication “a model for its conduct and efficiency.” It has cost the state of Idaho more than $93 million, but other Western states have spent far more on lawsuits over tribal water rights and similar disputes. The adjudication also ensured that Idaho controlled its water. Prior to the process, American Indian tribes and the federal government all were making claims on water they say was reserved in treaties and in federal laws that set aside public resources. By calling an adjudication, the tribes and federal agencies had to get their rights resolved in state court under a federal law called the McCarran Amendment, passed in 1952, which waives federal immunity in water right cases. www.progressiverancher.com

By Rocky Barker and The Idaho Statesman

Before adjudication, “we didn’t have any protection on what the feds might do in the future,” said John Rosholt, a Twin Falls attorney who was involved in the Swan Falls Agreement. The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes reached an agreement with the state that recognized its claim to more than a million acre-feet of water flowing in rivers and stored underground and in reservoirs. Some of the water is used by farmers on the Fort Hall Reservation. Other water is allowed to flow down the Snake River to help the salmon that are a critical part of life for the American Indians. In 2000, the Idaho Supreme Court reversed a 1999 decision and ruled that the Wilderness Act of 1964 did not create an implied right for the federal government to the waters in and flowing through the Frank ChurchRiver of No Return, the Selway-Bitterroot and the Gospel Hump wilderness areas. That’s different from the law creating the Hells Canyon Recreation Area, which expressly reserved water to the federal government, the court ruled. The court did recognize federal reserved water rights for the Salmon River protected by the 1965 Wild and Scenic Rivers Act. A settlement was reached as a part of the adjudication that did not substantially change the river’s existing rights. It does mean the high flows boaters love are protected and new development won’t dry up the river in the future. The most sweeping agreement was reached with the Nez Perce Tribe on its claim to all the waters in the Snake River Basin to protect its right to fish. Under the agreement, the tribe waived a portion of its water rights claims for a package of protections for salmon, minimum in-stream flows for hundreds of streams, benefits for the tribe and other actions by the state and federal governments. To meet some of the minimum flows, ranchers in the Salmon River Basin are leasing water to the state, paid for with federal dollars in market transactions that benefit both the ranchers and the fish.

GROUND, SURFACE RIGHTS TIED TOGETHER

Water law in Idaho and all of the arid West is based on a simple idea: first come, first served. Known as the prior appropriation doctrine, this principle of “first in time, first in right” means that the first farmers, canal companies and miners that diverted water for irrigation and industry owned the first rights to use the water. When the system was tied solely to surface water, it was relatively easy to administer: As water flows dropped during the summer, the users with the newest rights were turned off first. There were exceptions, but even in droughts the prior appropriation doctrine laid out a clear priority system. The huge boom in the development of cropland by pumping ground water, beginning in the 1940s, laid the stage for the most divisive disputes between the people The Progressive Rancher

AGUST 24th  2014

who pump their water from groundwater and those who depend on the springs that naturally flow out of the same source, the Eastern Snake Plain Aquifer. Previously, groundwater pumpers were allowed to water their crops without limit even when their neighbors’ canals from the Snake River and its tributaries were shut off because of drought. During adjudication, state courts recognized that the groundwater and surface water were connected and had to be administered together. DECADES ON THE JOB For Idaho’s water attorneys, the adjudication has dominated their lives. Water users paid them tens of millions of dollars, a point most are very sensitive about today. But they laughed at themselves in a cartoon published in the April 1988 issue of the Idaho Bar Association’s newsletter, “The Advocate,” offering commemorative T-shirts saying “I retired on the Snake River Adjudication” or “I put my kids through college on the Snake River Adjudication.” Current Idaho Chief Justice Roger Burdick, the third of five presiding judges on the adjudication, is part of an oral history of the SRBA published this week: “Through the Waters,” edited by Randy Stapilus and the water law section of the Idaho Bar. Burdick said the lawyers acted reasonably for the most part, fighting for their clients’ interest but also quitting when appropriate. “You know, a lot of people think that the lawyers have just used this as a Full Employment Act,” Burdick said in “Through the Waters.” “Quite frankly, I don’t think we succeed at all … without them wanting to get it finished, also in their clients’ best interests.” Two of the judges who oversaw the adjudication, Daniel Hurlbutt Jr. and Barry Wood, ended their terms by retiring from the bench. But for Burdick and current Idaho Court of Appeals Judge John Melanson, stints in the state’s highest courts followed their time as water judges. Counting Jones, three of the judges in the state Supreme Court or Court of Appeals now have ties to the adjudication. After he completes the Snake River adjudication, current water Judge Eric Wildman will continue handling a similar adjudication in the Coeur d’Alene Basin as well as other water resources cases. WHAT’S NEXT? Adjudication won’t end water disputes, but it does lay out for water users what they have to fight over and what the ground rules would be in the future. Continuing administration issues will keep water attorneys busy for years to come, including determining how communities will have secure supplies to meet future growth. That means the tensions between senior and junior water users will continue to play out in court at times. The adjudication also gives water users and the state the tools to slow or reverse the 60-year drop in groundwater supplies. Rocky Barker: 377-6484 January 2017 43 


News Release

USDA Rural Development Invests $188 Million in Rural Nevada in 2016; $1.35 Billion Over Eight Years

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arson City-Dec. 2, 2016— USDA Rural Development (USDA RD) invested over $188 million in support of housing, community facilities, water systems and businesses in rural Nevada in FY 2016, with a total of $1.35 billion obligated statewide since 2009. Of that, more than $1 billion was in the form of loan guarantees for rural homebuyers and businesses, which the agency’s director called “light on the taxpayer wallet.” “I was surprised and pleased that our eight years topped $1.35 billion,” USDA RD State Director Sarah Adler said during an on-air radio interview with Jon Sanchez. “While the largest portion of that is in business and home loan guarantees, which are basically a guarantee to a private lender in support of a home purchase or a business expansion, another $69 million is in the form of rental assistance to very low income rural Nevadans living in apartments we finance. The contrast between loan guarantees and subsidy shows that while there is growth in the middle class into homeownership and business ownership, there is also a real need for a rural safety net, and USDA Rural Development is here for both.” More than 600 families were able to purchase homes using either the Guaranteed or Direct Home Loan Program in 2016. Affordable housing investments totaled $133.4 million for purchases, repair, or rental assistance in rural communities. Nearly all of Nevada is eligible for the very popular home loan programs, with the exception of metropolitan Carson City, Washoe and Clark counties. The agency’s Water and Environmental Program obligated over $20 million in FY 2016 to build a wastewater treatment plant in Winnemucca. The new mechanized system will be located out of the Humboldt River

By Kelly Clark, Public Affairs Specialist

watershed and applies water saving methods that will household income is low. The agency’s Community and benefit area farmers. Economic Development staff worked in depth with the In 2016, the agency’s Community and Business Moapa Tribe to develop a strategic plan, the town of Programs both broke records. The Community Fa- Beatty regarding nutrition and banking issues, Tonopah cilities Program invested over $16 million to support to assist with formation of a youth commission and enessential community facilities like the Churchill County hanced interchange with the Great Basin College. CurDetention Center as well as many small community in- rently, staff are completing plans for a Tribal Economic vestments, such as senior vans and patrol vehicles. Development Forum Jan. 10, 2017 in Fallon. The Business and Industry Loan Guarantee ProUSDA Rural Development has offices in Carson gram had its best year yet, with more than $18 million in City, Fallon, Las Vegas and Elko. For more informaloan guarantees. Tourism in rural areas benefitted from a tion, contact the state office at (775) 887-1222 or visit multitude of guaranteed loans for hotels and resorts, in- the USDA RD website at https://www.rd.usda.gov/nv cluding an $8.2 million loan guarantee for Charm Hospitality’s Holiday Inn Express in Elko and a $3 million guaranteed loan for the Comfort Inn in Fallon. The Value Added Producer Grant provided $99,499 to local producers to assist them with marketing and outreach efforts. Across all programs, the agency has focused attention USDA Rural Development Nevada invested $188 million in rural communities in FY 2016, on highest need and $1.35 billion over the last eight years, for housing, business and community infrastructure improvements like the waste water treatment plant  shown here. The City of Winnemucca communities where unemploy- used an $18 million loan and $2 million grant water from USDA’s Water and Environmental ment is high and Program  to fund the improvement project, which relocates and upgrades the town’s wastewater treatment plant. The project is scheduled for completion in the fall of 2017.

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In Memoriam John Carpenter

Georgie Sicking

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uneral services for Georgie Sicking, 95 year old Kaycee resident who passed away Sunday afternoon at the Johnson County Memorial Hospital in Buffalo, will be celebrated on Saturday, November 19, 2016, at 1:00 p.m., at The Gardens Funeral Home in Fallon, Nevada with Jerry Harper officiating. Graveside services will follow at Churchill County Cemetery. Visitation will be November 19th, from 11:30 until the beginning of the service. Donations in Georgie’s memory may be made to the Hoofprints of the Past Museum in care of the Harness Funeral Home. Online condolences may be made at: www.harnessfuneralhome.com. Georgie Connell Sicking was born May 20, 1921, in Seligman, Arizona, to Oscar and Mayne Connell. Georgie received her name because her parents who were expecting a boy, and George was the only name they had picked out. Her father, Oscar, was a rancher, cowboy and mustanger in the desert of Arizona.  Georgie grew up in this lifestyle, and became one of the first women to gather wild cattle and horses in Arizona.  She became a legend in the area, riding, roping, branding mavericks and promoting the western way of life.   She could shoe her own horses and doctor them when needed. She married Frank Sicking in 1940. Together they worked for various ranches in Arizona. Georgie worked alongside the other hands, although not always for the same salary.  The men learned to respect her ability to ride and rope with the best of them. Her goal was always to be a “Top Hand.”  From early on, she had no use for the word “can’t.”  She knew there was always a way to get things done, and taught her kids to believe that as well. Together Georgie and her husband had three children:  Joe, Sue, and Eddie.  The family moved throughout Arizona, California and Nevada for many years, working for other ranchers, gathering wild horses and cattle.  When they moved to Fallon, Nevada, they owned their own.  Georgie was in a world of her own running and roping wild horses. Frank became a brand inspector in Fallon, Nevada; and Georgie began barrel racing successfully. Frank was killed in a woodcutting accident on November 7, 1974.  Georgie worked various jobs to keep the family going; she worked at various stock yards and ran cattle. After a few years she went back to Arizona, and worked for a ranch gathering cows. While there she acquired enough cows to take back to their place in Fallon, Nevada. During her life of hard work, Georgie wrote poetry. A poem would occur and she would scribble it down on whatever was handy. She kept these poems, but never really performed them until 1985, when she was invited to attend and present her poetry at a Cowboy Poetry gathering in Elko, Nevada.  This was the beginning of her career as a cowboy poet.  Her standards for poems were “Keep it cowboy and keep it clean.” She was invited to numerous Cowboy Poetry Gatherings, and always had her poems memorized. In 1989 she was inducted in the National Cowgirl Hall of Fame as the 1989 Western Heritage Honoree; she received the Pioneer Woman Award at the National Cowboy Symposium and Celebration in Lubbock, Texas.  In 1994, she received the Gail Gardner Award for “Outstanding Working Cowboy Poet,” and various other awards through the years.  She published three books of her original poetry, a CD of cowboy poems and a documentary about her life.  At the age of 56, Georgie began to lose her eyesight, and began to depend more and more on her memory to compose and recite her poems.  She moved to Kaycee in 2001, to be close to her daughter, Sue. Georgie continued to recite her poetry and attend cowboy poetry gatherings.  Her latest poem, entitled “When I Get to Heaven,” was featured in the October 11th issue of the Kaycee Voice. Georgie is survived by her daughter, Sue Jarrard and her husband Sonny of Kaycee, Wyoming, son Joe Sicking and his wife Nancy of Winnemucca, Nevada; sisters Emma Jane Brocchini of Oklahoma and Sammie Brockenbury of California. She is preceded in death by her husband, Frank Sicking; son, Edward Sicking and her parents, Oscar and Mayne Connell.

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ong time Assemblyman John Carpenter passed away on Saturday, November 19th at home at the age of 86. Born in Fallon, Nevada but raised in Ely. He graduated from White Pine High and immediately went into the ranching business with his Uncles. Prior to serving 24 years in the Nevada State Assembly, he served as Elko County Commissioner for 14 years. He was a beacon for the community, dedicating his life to public service and always fighting for his beloved hometown and state. He was named to the Assembly Hall of Distinction in 2011. He is survived by his cherished wife Roseann of 64 years and seven children – John “Jet” Carpenter (Tina), Scott Carpenter, Elizabeth Carpenter, Susan Carpenter (Kim), Doug Carpenter, Lois Carpenter and Linda Meo (Nick) - as well as 19 grandchildren and seven great grandchildren, his cousins Paul Carpenter and George Carpenter, sisterin-laws Florence Roberts (Wayne) and Teresa Slater and many many nieces and nephews with whom he maintained close relationships. He was preceded in death by his parents John(Jack) and Lucille Carpenter, his in-laws Clarence & Genevieve Slater, sister Phyllis Hand, brother Jake Carpenter and his brother-in-law and best friend Larry Slater. John, a long-time rancher and real estate broker, led with a quiet strength, supporting not only his family, but the land and community at large. He was a very passionate gardener and cultivated beautiful flowers (most notably, his famous tulips and gladioli), as well as fruits and vegetables, which he shared with his neighbors and the Elko Senior Center. He will also be remembered for his Christmas lights, which were a favorite holiday tradition and stopping point for the community. He enjoyed the challenges when it came to fighting for rural Nevada such as the Kelly Springs project, Jarbidge Shovel Brigade, Elko Convention & Visitors Authority, Educational funding, Vitality Center, California Trail Interpretive Center, Northern Nevada Community College (aka Great Basin College), Northeastern Nevada Museum, Peace Park, Elko Senior Citizens Center, Elko General Hospital, Snow Bowl and Sherman Station. He was also instrumental in starting the Basque Festival along with Jess Goicoechea and supplying the sheep for this event for many years. In addition, he was a member of Elko Rotary, Knights of Columbus, Cattlemen’s Association and Past President of National Woolgrowers. John died as he lived – surrounded by his family, the people he loved most in the world. Services will be held Saturday November 26, 2016 at 10:00 am at the Elko Convention Center. A Rosary will be held on Friday, November 25, 2016 at St. Joseph’s Church. A lunch reception will be held immediately after the service in the annex of the Convention Center. In lieu of flowers, the family request memorials be sent to Northeastern Nevada Museum, Northern Nevada Autism Network, the California Trail Interpretive Center or a charity of your choice.

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January 2017 45 


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years ago the Cowboss and I were trying to come up with a sport for our boys to participate in. We wanted them to learn team work, sportsmanship, and keep them active, especially during the winter months when they get home from school in the dark. We wanted a positive outlet from some of this extra energy they have. TR and QT are built like rough stock riders, but they don’t like topping off broncs. Or calves. Or sheep. They are too small to be football players. Too young for karate lessons. Too manly for gymnastics. Too short to be basketball players, and baseball is during branding season. That is just too big of a conflict for us! We settled on Wrestling. I had no idea how intense of a sport it can be. It is mentally, physically, and emotionally demanding. It teaches personal accountability and control. We practice 3 nights a week. These practices are grueling. They jog, they sprint, pushups, sit ups, halfway backs, forward rolls, supermans, fishflops, the list goes on. Then they learn new skills and get to practice them with their teammates. They are members of a team, but responsible for their own performance. If they lose a match it is all on them. They are learning discipline, camaraderie, mental toughness, becoming stronger, and it may open a door to furthering their education after high school if they continue with the sport. Our first tournament was a huge culture shock

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Wrestling for me. I couldn’t believe how competitive some the parents can be. We all want our children to win in the worst ways. I decided that day that I wanted to be a positive mom. The mom who positively encouraged my child no matter what. The one who set a good example of sportsmanship. It isn’t always easy either because we win some we shouldn’t and lose some we shouldn’t. While we want to win every time, it is also important to learn how to lose. TR is very competitive. He is very confident in his strength. He hits the mat and strong arms his opponent into submission. He loves wrestling and wants to win. He is devastated when he doesn’t beat everyone. QT on the other hand is very technical. His technique is perfect, but he is slower (because he is making sure he is doing each move perfectly) and doesn’t have the strength yet his brother has. QT hasn’t had the success in wrestling his brother has had because he is just there to have fun, he doesn’t care if he wins. QT decided he wasn’t going to wrestle this year. Getting pinned all the time really isn’t that much fun and he (like his mom) hates to run. Anytime his wrestling was mentioned, he would get very mad and insist he wasn’t going to compete this year. Until the day before sign ups. He realized that wrestling is a good skill to have if you

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by Jennifer Whiteley want to be a fighter. I explained to him that being a fighter might not be the best idea for my sweet, caring little boy. He informed me that “Sometimes you just have to fight. I’m a Wild Whitely, that’s what we do!” While I don’t condone fighting, the Cowboss and I were thrilled he was going to give it another shot. We feel that this could be QT’s year. The switch has been flipped. He wants to win and is constantly challenging himself to make himself a better wrestler. The determination and drive both these boys have, and a genuine love of the sport of wrestling makes us both very proud of them. While they continue to improve their skills as wrestlers, every day I continue to strive to be the positive mom, and I have to tell you every day is a struggle. Even cowboys need an outlet for extra energy during the long winter months of northern Nevada. Wrestling is a positive way for cowboys, their moms, and dads to blow off some steam while learning new skills that will make them stronger, mentally tougher, learning more discipline, and working as a team when the weather turns warmer and there is cowboy stuff to be done.

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Exciting times!

merican Lands Council is excited about your enthusiasm and support of our efforts to secure better management of our public lands through state and local control! As promised, we are forwarding you this correspondence regarding membership to our growing organization. It’s crucial that we continue to grow this effort to free our lands so we can manage these precious environments more like a garden, and less like a “hands off, don’t touch” museum! This truly is The Only Solution Big Enough to ensure better access, improved health, and enhanced productivity for our public lands. We are getting closer and closer to making this a reality! American Lands Council is a membership driven organization and your membership is critical so we can continue this important work. Please join the hundreds of legislators and existing members by becoming a member! You can complete your membership application here: http://www.americanlandscouncil.org/memberships or mail to 859 West South Jordan Parkway, Suite 100, South Jordan, Utah 84095. Over the past year, with the support of members and enthusiasts like you, the Transfer of Public Lands has become a full-fledged national movement, gaining support of hundreds of organizations, elected officials, and candidates at the local, state, and national levels. In our quest to free the lands, The American Lands Council continues to deliver jaw-dropping presentations, dominate debates, advance legislation, counter misinforma-

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tion, and distribute factual information in favor of Transfer of Public Lands legislation and legal action. We have developed a vast network nationwide and we are ready to launch a new ground game and legislative plan to get this job done! Your membership and yearly contribution makes it possible for ALC to continually spread awareness and gain the support needed to free the lands from a one-size-fails-all federal bureaucracy. Again, we thank you so much for your support and look forward to working together with you as we move forward. If you have any questions about your membership feel free to contact our office at 801-252-6622. Sincerely, American Lands Council Board of Directors http://www.americanlandscouncil.org/

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 48 January 2017

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