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NCA 2009 President’s Award Recipient


IN THIS ISSUE 3

NCA - Roundup

25

NDA

4

Livestock monitor

24

NV Cooperative Extension

6

Nevada Cattlewomen

28

American Lands

8

Look up

30

USDA

9

Sage Grouse

32

NV Farm Bureau

10 NCBA

36

SRM

12 Budd-Falen article

40

HWCWMA

14 Eye on the Outside

43

Snyder Sale Report

16

Checkoff News

44

Sandoval Article

18

Fumes From the Farm

46

Remeber Randy Branch

19 Amodei Amendments

The Progressive Rancher Owner/Editor/Publisher – Leana Litten Carey progressiverancher@elko.net

Graphic Design/Layout/Production – Joshua Rinard Josh@LifeSpringDesign.com

Cover Photo by: Jessica Olson

“Vice-Versa”

Sagebruch Ecosystem Council Staff Report

Published 9 times each year, The Progressive Rancher is mailed to more than 7,000 approved addresses, and has digital and print readership reaching more than 30,000. The Progressive Rancher is published monthly. The views and opinions expressed by writers of articles appearing in this publication are not necessarily those of the editor. Letters of opinion are welcomed by The Progressive Rancher. Rates for advertising are available upon request. Advertising in The Progressive Rancher does not necessarily imply editorial endorsement. Liability for any errors or omissions in advertisements shall not exceed the cost of the space occupied by the error or omission. The Progressive Rancher is free to people working and active in the livestock industry. The Progressive Rancher is donated to the agricultural industry. If you are not currently receiving this magazine on a regular basis, and would like to be a part of The Progressive Rancher family, contact us by e-mail at progressiverancher@elko. net, today, so we can include you on our mailing list. If you have moved or changed addresses, please notify us, by e-mail, so we can keep you informed. All requests for the magazine must be made by e-mail. © The Progressive Rancher Magazine. All rights reserved.

Leana Litten Carey, Owner/Editor

1188 Court St., #81, Elko, NV 89801 (208) 358-2487 • progressiverancher@elko.net

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 2 March 2017

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Nevada Cattlemen's Association Springtime Update By Kaley Sproul, NCA Executive Director

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t has been a very busy month at the Nevada Cattlemen’s Association office! The Fallon Bull Sale that was held in February was a great success this year. We have just finished closing up everything from the sale and we would like to once again give thanks to all of our consignors, buyers, sponsors and volunteers for your support this year. Please mark your calendars for next year’s sale which will be held February 17th, 2018. As I am writing this NCA update I am also getting ready to attend the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and Public Lands Council Legislative Conference in Washington D.C. for the week of March 27-30th. Also attending this conference from Nevada will be David Stix Jr., Joe Guild, JJ Goicoechea, Ron Cerri and Shane Bell. In DC we will have the opportunity to represent members of the Nevada Cattlemen’s Association by meeting with key congressional and agency influencers to talk about certain industry policies that affect the state. I will provide a follow-up of this event within the next issue of this publication. In January NCA hosted some Permittee Outreach Workshops throughout Nevada. Due to weather the workshop in Ely had to be canceled. The workshop has been rescheduled to April 7th from 2:00 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the Bristlecone Convention Center (150 W 6th St., Ely, NV 89301). There has been a location added to the workshops which will be in Austin Kaley Sproul, NCA Executive Director on April 8th. It will be

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from 12:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Austin Courthouse conference room (122 Main St. Austin, NV 89310). These workshops are to provide updates about the implementation of the Greater Sage Grouse Land Use Plan Amendments in regards to livestock grazing programs in Nevada and Northeastern California. Two other workshops are being held in April that will demonstrate how to use the Wyoming Ranch Tools website using real ranch situations. The Wyoming Ranch Tools website was developed to help producers make marketing and economic analysis decisions (www.uwyoextension.org/ranchtools). The workshops, “Making Everyday Decisions to Manage Your Beef Cows,” will be held in Fallon at the Fallon Convention Center on April 18th and repeated in Elko on April 19th at Great Basin College. The workshops will be held from 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. at each location, and a meal will be provided. Please register by April 14th by contacting Bridger Feuz at masterstockman@outlook.com or 307-799-8740. The cost of the workshop is $15 and will be collected at the door. The workshops are offered in partnership with Nevada Cattlemen’s Association, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and Master Stockman Consulting. Funding for this workshop is provided through USDA Risk Management Agency grants. The NCA will be hosting a Legislative Breakfast at the Carson City Legislative Building in room 3100, Tuesday, April 25th from 7:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. This breakfast brings Legislators, NCA members, and other agricultural friends together to get acquainted and discuss issues important to agriculture. Though this breakfast is sponsored, reservations are encouraged by calling the NCA office. Lastly, the NCA is seeking graduating seniors interested in pursuing an education in an agricultural related field to apply for the Nevada Cattlemen’s Association Annual Scholarship. The NCA will be giving this year’s outstanding graduating senior a $1,000

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scholarship to attend any junior college or four-year University to study in any agriculture related field.

Eligibility requirements for the Scholarship include: • • • •

Student must be a senior graduating from a High School in Nevada Student must plan to attend a Community College or a 4-year College or University Student must be seeking a degree in an agriculturally related field Student must have at least a 2.5 GPA

In addition to completing an application, candidates must also submit: • • •

A typewritten essay of 1,000 to 1,500 words on any current issue involving the beef industry including references cited A copy of the student’s official transcripts Three letters of reference

Scholarship application forms can be downloaded from the NCA’s website at www.nevadacattlemen.org, or applicants can call the NCA office at 775-738-9214 or send a request to nca@nevadabeef.org for a copy. Completed application form and all required information must be postmarked by Monday, May 1st, 2017. If you are not currently a member of the Nevada Cattlemen’s Association, I encourage you to join. Become part of an Association that is working hard to protect and promote the future of ranching in Nevada. To learn more about the association or to become a member, please call the NCA office or visit our website. We look forward to hearing from you! If you are currently a member, we thank you for your continued support. Without your membership, the voice of the Association wouldn’t be as strong as it is today.

March 2017 3 


Livestock Monitor

A Newsletter for Extension Staff Livestock Marketing Information Center

State Extension Services in Cooperation with the USDA

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rends . . . LIVESTOCK SECTORS BENEFIT FROM STABLE CORN PRICES So far this quarter, the corn market has been reflecting the effects of last fall’s huge harvestmatched up with good overseas buying interest and accelerating usage from the US corn ethanol industry. The 15.1 billion bushel corn harvest of 2016, an 11.3% increase from the prior year kept corn prices on the defensive during the last half of last year. Using Omaha corn prices as a proxy for Western Corn Belt corn values, price bottomed out last August at an average monthly price of $2.98 per bushel. Over the course of the next four months, corn prices were able to move up 10 cents. Since November, Omaha corn prices have added on another 30 cents. By comparison, Omaha corn prices between November 2015 and February 2016 went down 8 cents per bushel. In terms of use, corn export volumes were up

 4 March 2017

more than 80 percent from a year earlier during the harvest quarter (September-November 2016) from a year earlier. Weekly export data for the December 2016-February 2017 quarter shows exports up about 50% from the same period a year earlier. Domestically, corn consumed by food and other industrial processes (e.g. ethanol, corn sweeteners) during the harvest quarter was up 54 million bushels from a year earlier, which compares to a 16 million bushel increase during the harvest quarter of 2015 relative to 2014’s. Corn used for alcohol and other uses in the latest reported month (January 2017) was up 7% from a year earlier, a bigger percentage year-over-year increase than was posted during the prior quarter (SeptemberNovember 2016). The potential for corn prices to sustain the uptick compared to the lows that began last fall will depend on exports and domestic industrial use posting gains relative The Progressive Rancher

to the spring and summer of 2016. The USDA’s World Agriculture Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) for the corn market, that was released a couple weeks ago, implies that usage gains in the second half of the year will not be as big as the first six months following last fall’s harvest. In fact, corn export projections for the last six months of the crop year come up short of a year earlier by about 100 million bushels (5%-10% less). Corn used domestically for food and industrial products is forecast to maintain an increase in the next six months similar to the increase that has been registered in the first half of the year. Last spring, Omaha corn prices moved up 20 cents per bushel from the winter quarter. If usage gains decelerate in April, May and June, prices may struggle to increase by more than 10-15 cents per bushel on a quarterly average basis. During the last two weeks, Omaha corn prices have declined 25 cents, into the $3.15-$3.20 per bushel range, compared to the January and February monthly average of $3.39. Assuming a winter quarter average corn price at Omaha of $3.35, the prospects for an average Omaha corn price for the spring quarter may be close to $3.50. This compares with a spring quarter 2016 Omaha corn price of $3.66. Translated into nearby corn futures market terms, a $3.80 price would be consistent with seasonal basis relationships between the Omaha market and nearby futures.

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U.S. CHICKEN INDUSTRY UPDATE

The confirmed detection of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI) in a Tennessee meat-type(broiler) chicken breeder flock on March 4 prompted immediate efforts to depopulate that flock and limit transportation of poultry in and out of the area. The location of the outbreak, Lincoln County, Tennessee, adjoins Alabama, which has also raised its precautionary efforts to prevent a significant disease outbreak. Since the initial HPAI outbreak, there have been five other detections of HPAI in the Alabama-Tennessee area, of which one was a backyard flock and one was at a flea market. The number of birds destroyed from the commercial flocks totaled less than 200,000 and does not have a significant impact on supplies of poultry in the US. January broiler production was up 7% from a year earlier, boosted by one additional processing day versus January 2016. On a per-day basis January slaughter was up 2%, in line with hatchery output in late 2016. Average bird weights at time of processing were only up by a fraction of a percent from a year ago, as industry efforts to reign in problems associated with breast muscle texture (“woody” breasts) result in lighter bird processing weights. February chicken production will be down from last year due to the “Leap Year” effect of one less day this year. Chicken production for the current quarter is expected rise 1-2% year-over-year; and for the entire year to increase by 2-3%.

U.S. BEEF SECTOR NET TRADE VALUE IMPROVED

After a very difficult 2015, on a dollar basis the U.S. beef industry returned to being a net exporter in 2016. Here we summarize trade across the industry which includes more than just beef, those non- meat items include: variety meats; tallows and greases; hides; and live animals. In terms of U.S. exports, the largest value contributor (69% of total sector sales in 2016) was beef and veal. Value wise, beef and veal exports were essentially unchanged from 2015’s level. It is critical to note that U.S. beef tonnage exported during 2016 increased 13% year-over-year, but the prices at which sales were made were below 2015’s. The next largest contributors to export value were hides and skins (14% total value), then variety meats (13%). Total sector exports were $7.85 billion, down 1.6% ($132 million) from 2015’s. On the import side, the year-over-year change was dramatic as both tonnage and prices were lower. Beef sector imports by the U.S. fell by over $2.03 billion in 2016 from a year earlier. That decline was led by a drop in the value of beef and veal imports of $1.43 billion compared to 2015’s. In 2016, the value of cattle imported by the U.S. declined by $582 million year-over-year. The two largest categories of imports are beef and veal (71% of total beef sector imported products) and live cattle (24%). The difference between beef sector exports versus imports was positive in 2016, making the U.S. a net exporter on a value basis for the year. Net exports totaled $882 million, a dramatic change for the negative posted in 2015 (-$1.01 billion). Still, 2016 net exports remained well below the level recorded in the years from 2010 through 2014.

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By Duane Lenz, General Manager

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ENTENNIAL, COLO. (February 27, 2017) –Todd Allen, a cattle feeder from Newton, Kan., has been elected 2017 President of CattleFax, one of several new officers elected at the 49th annual business meeting of the organization on Feb. 2, 2017 in Nashville, Tenn. Allen has been involved in cattle feeding throughout the Central Plains for over 35 years. He has served on several committees and in leadership positions for Kansas Livestock Association, including President. At the national level Allen has served on the Executive Committee for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and has served on various NCBA committees, including Beef Safety, Live Cattle Marketing and Product Science and Technology. President Elect is Dale Smith, a stocker Operator from Amarillo, Texas.  Nick Hunt of Atlantic, Iowa was elected to replace Jamie Willrett of Malta, Ill., representing the Midwest region. Don Quincey of Chiefland, Fla., was re-elected to a four-year term representing the Southeast region. Other directors currently serving terms for CattleFax are: Pono Von Holt of Kamuela, Hawaii; Mark Frasier of Fort Morgan, Colo.; Jerry Adams of Broken Bow, Neb.; and Jeff Sparrowk of Clements, Calif.  Tom Jensen of Omaha, Neb., will continue as Finance Director.

New CattleFax officers Dale Smith, President-Elect; Todd Allen, President; and Jeff Sparrowk, Immediate Past President.

The Progressive Rancher

March 2017 5 


CattleWomen Host Annual Region Vl Region Meeting By Sidney Wintermote

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reetings! Spring is near and I can hardly wait for some warmth and sunshine. This winter has been long and cold in Northern Nevada but the snow and moisture we have received to relieve those suffering from the drought was much needed and I think we can all say we are very blessed this year with the abundance of water. This past January, I among many other CattleWomen throughout our country traveled to Nashville, Tennessee for the 2017 Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show at the Gaylord Opryland Convention Center. The ANCW meetings were held January 30-31 in conjunction with the convention. One of the many highlights of the annual convention was the selection and installation of the ANCW leadership for the coming year. ANCW’s 2017 executive committee consists of 15 members including officers and region directors. Leading the CattleWomen as the organization’s 66th president is Penny Zimmerman from Foley, Minnesota. Zimmerman is the first-ever ANCW president from Minnesota. The theme for Zimmerman’s year as president is “Alone we can do so little. Together we can do so much,” a quote from Hellen Keller. Advancing to president-elect from vice president is Gwen Geis from Gillette, Wyoming. Elected to the leadership team as vice president and beginning her three-year assent to president is Wanda Pinnow from Baker, Montana. Ann Nogan, Tompkinsville, Pennsylvania, completed her year as the 65th ANCW president and now remains on the executive committee as past president. Nogan’s excellent leadership was vital to the success of ANCW as the organization embraced new opportunities and focus this past year.

The seven region directors also serve on ANCW’s executive committee. Serving as our region VI director for 2017 is Pam Griffin from Arizona. Region VI consists of Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah. This spring, Nevada has the privilege of hosting the Annual Region VI meeting. The meeting will be held in Elko, April 27-29, 2017. The Nevada CattleWomen, Inc. have been working nonstop to plan a weekend that you will not want to miss. You do not have to be an ANCW member to attend and I encourage you to gather your mom, sister, best friends and even your husbands to travel to Elko and join us for this great weekend. The meetings will start on Thursday, April 27th with a Herds and Harvest Workshop, made possible by the University of Nevada, Cooperative Extension. Speakers for our meeting include UNR Meat Scientist, Amilton DeMello, Agriculture Advocate and Radio Personality, Trent Loos, and UNR Extension Educator, Lindsay Chichester who will be hosting a Social Media workshop. We will conclude our meetings on Saturday, April 29th with a tour to Maggie Creek Ranch and J.M. Capriola, Co. The meetings will be held at the Red Lion Inn and Casino, for registration details please email us at cwnv.inc@gmail.com or call 775-397-4750, details are also on the Nevada CattleWomen, Inc. Facebook page. The Nevada CattleWomen are currently selling raffle tickets for a por-

You are invited to

You are invited to

COWBOY CHURCH!

COWBOY CHURCH!

Bible Study Fri @ 9 am

Sunday @ 11am services

4275 Solias Rd Fallon, NV

Bible Study Wed @ 6 pm

table Powder River chute, made possible by Boss Tanks and Powder River, a wooden patio cooler filled with 20 pounds of cut and wrapped beef, donated by Buckingham Bar X Ranch and Kelly and Sidney Wintermote and a patio barbecue, donated by Mike and Melinda Sarman. Tickets are $5.00 each or 5 tickets for $20.00. Please contact any NV CattleWomen member for tickets. Funds from this raffle help make it possible for us to host the Region VI meeting as well as send our NV CattleWomen President to be a voice on a national level. The Nevada CattleWomen, Inc., consists of members from across state and has a 59-year history of uniting women in agriculture to focus on its core concepts of beef promotion, education, and legislation. By becoming a member, you will become part of a professional networking group who strongly support the cattle industry and Nevada’s agriculture community. For more information about Nevada CattleWomen, Inc. or to join today, please visit our Facebook page or email us at cwnv. inc@gmail.com.

Are you having a Rodeo or Livestock event? Give us a call. We would love to come to your event or ranch and host Cowboy Church for you.

Harmony Ranch Ministry 3767 Keyes Way  Fallon, NV 89406 

Tom J. Gonzalez | Diana J. Gonzalez, Pastor

 6 March 2017

threecrossls@cccomm.net 

(775) 240-8870 Cell (775) 867-3100

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The Progressive Rancher

March 2017 7 


Aren’t Cows Funny?

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by Pastor Diana Gonzalez

sn’t it funny how some cows just line out and move when you are changing country with them, and then there are the other ones who fight you all the way. They try to stay in the same old driedup pasture instead of going through the gate that leads to the tender new grass. They will try and out-dodge your horse, brush up or just plain insist on going the wrong way. They are the ones that hang up in the corner with the gate two feet away, then try and jump the fence. Now the trail that leads to green grass might have some rocks and hills to climb, but you get your cattle there sure enough. The cows that lined out for you get there with ease; the ones that fought you got more tired and put sweat on your horse, but they all got to the new, tender grass just the same. Funny how the ones that fought so hard to stay where they were are now the most hungry and are eating with more relish than the calmer, wiser cows. I had a very deep and profound revelation one day. I figured out that God gave us cows so we would know what He has to put up with. However, God doesn’t handle His sheep quite the same way as we handle our cattle. He doesn’t rope us and drag us through the new gate. He doesn’t tie us down and beat on our heads with a rock so we look for new pasture (not saying I’ve ever done that). No, God is a gentleman. The Bible says He stands at the door and knocks. You have to open the door and let Him in. Revelation 3:20 -- Behold I stand at the door and knock; if anyone hears My voice and opens the door, I will come in and dine (eat) with him, and he with Me. NAS Praise God, the very One who bled and died for us is willing to abide with us. In John 10:11 Jesus says, “I am the good shepherd; the good shepherd lays down His life for the sheep”. Isn’t that exactly what He did? John 10:14, “I am the good shepherd; and I know My own, and My own know me.” NAS Now I don’t have much use for sheep, but if Jesus says I’m His sheep, then I’m His sheep -- end of story. John 10:27, “My sheep hear My voice, and I know them, and they follow Me.” NAS Jesus doesn’t drive us, He leads, and if we’re His sheep (and smart) we’ll follow Him. But to get into the Jesus f lock, we have to come through the Jesus Gate (or door). In John 10:7-9 Jesus said, “I am the door of the sheep. All who came before Me are thieves and robbers, but the sheep did not hear them. I am the door; if anyone enters through Me, he shall be saved, and shall go in and out, and find pasture.” (Good pasture.) Jesus said in John 14:6, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life; no one comes to the Father, but through Me.” There’s no other way to the truly good pasture.  8 March 2017

Acts 4:12 says – And there is salvation in no one else; for there is no other name under heaven that has been given among men, by which we must be saved. No other way. Jesus said, “I am the door.” You may say, well I know some folks who look like they are grazing in pretty tall grass, and they’re perfect heathens. In John 10:1 Jesus said, “Truly, truly I say to you, he who does not enter by the door (Jesus is the door) into the fold of the sheep, but climbs up some other way, he is a thief and a robber.” He is a goat. Let’s read in Matthew 25:31-46 and see what happens to goats. Not pretty, is it? Folks, let’s make sure we get cut into the right pen. Let’s at least be as smart as a sheep or a cow. Let’s be like my good little spotted cow. She’s only a 2-year-old, but when she comes to the gate she’s supposed to go through, she throws her ears forward, looks down the trail she’s supposed to go on, then goes through the gate and the others follow her through to the good pasture. Spot has a good future with us; she’s a good leader. However, we have another 2-year-old that’s a goat cow. She doesn’t go through the right gate; she enters over the fence where she’s not supposed to be. Even though she gets to feed that looks good to her, her future isn’t so bright. She’s about to get cut into the goat pen. Happy trails. May God richly bless you. We love you and would love to hear from you. If you would like someone to pray with, or just have a question, please give us a call at (775) 867-3100. ‘Til next time….

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New research shows that greater sage-grouse travel further than previously suspected

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reater sage-grouse are thought to return to the same breeding ground, or “lek,” every spring. But some scientists wondered how populations avoid becoming isolated and inbred. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications used thousands of DNA samples collected at leks across four states to reveal that some sage grouse travel more widely than anyone suspected. By dispersing across larger distances, a few individual sage grouse make the overall population stronger by tempering inbreeding and isolation. This genetics study opens an exciting new door into understanding the landscape dynamics of this bird. Using genetic markers in DNA extracted from 7,629 feather and blood samples, Todd Cross, a Sage Grouse Initiative scientist in partnership with the U.S. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station, worked with colleagues to identify more than 3,000 individual sage grouse that visited leks across the northeastern portion of the birds’ range over seven years.

A few individual sage grouse venture further than average each breeding season, spreading genes and boosting the health of the population as a whole. Photo by John Carlson. The study used samples collected from 835 leks in Idaho, Montana, and North and South Dakota between 2007 and 2013. Seven birds made movements of over 30 miles, six of which occurred within a single breeding season. “Our research demonstrates that greater sage-grouse are an even more mobile species than we had realized before, moving large distances of up to 120 miles in a single breeding season,” says Cross. “These findings highlight the importance of landscape-scale efforts that conserve movement corridors.” While the results support the idea that most grouse are faithful to their chosen lek sites, some individuals clearly make long-distance movements, which could help prevent inbreeding within leks and expand the size of the genetic neighborhood. “Even contemporary telemetry techniques woefully underestimate animal dispersal,” says Sage Grouse Initiative coordinator Thad Heater. “New molecular techniques employed here for the first time enable us to quantify the appropriately large scales at which to deliver conservation strategies.” Stay tuned this spring for the Sage Grouse Initiative’s upcoming Science to Solutions article, which will feature: 1) a summary of Todd Cross’ long-term sage grouse genetics research, 2) what it tells us about the health of the species as a whole, and 3) how proactive, voluntary conservation on private land is making a difference to conserve the large landscapes these birds need to thrive. www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

March 2017 9 


Cattlemen, Public Lands Council Hail Senate Passage of Resolution Rolling Back BLM Rule: “Strike Two for 2.0” 

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Contact Ed Frank and Shawna Newsome

ASHINGTON (March 7, 2017) – The Public Lands Council and the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association today hailed Senate passage of the resolution to repeal the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM’s) Planning 2.0 Rule. Passage in the upper chamber takes the rule one step closer to the President’s desk and putting this damaging rule to rest once and for all. “This is Strike Two for 2.0. Streamlining is needed in the planning process, but not at the expense of input from local communities and permittees or elimination of economic analysis requirements,” said Dave Eliason, PLC president and Utah rancher. “The final rule also shifts away from BLM’s mission to protect multiple uses of public lands, and it disregards both local input and economic analysis. We look forward to the President quickly delivering the third strike by signing this resolution so that BLM may begin a new, inclusive process.” “Senator Lisa Murkowski and Congressman Liz Cheney deserve a great deal of credit for successfully moving this resolution through Congress, and NCBA

and PLC are proud to have worked closely with them throughout the legislative process,” said Craig Uden, NCBA president. NCBA and PLC have long expressed concerns about BLM’s Planning 2.0 Rule, which would represent a wholesale shift in management focus at BLM by prioritizing “social and environmental change” over ensuring multiple use of public lands, and by eliminating stakeholder and local input into the planning process. The Obama Administration finalized the BLM Planning 2.0 Rule in December. Under the Congressional Review Act, the U.S. House and Senate have up to 60 legislative days after a new rule becomes final to approve a joint resolution of disapproval, which will fully repeal the final rule if and when the resolution becomes law. PLC and NCBA stand ready to assist the BLM in the crafting of a new planning rule that streamlines the process and makes decision-making easier and more efficient, while ensuring that impacted stakeholders have the ability to be part of the process and to have their voices heard.

Secretary Zinke Headlines Public Lands Council Legislative Fly-in

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YOUR SLICE OF THE PIE

Contact Shawna Newsome

ASHINGTON (March 28, 2017) – U.S. Department of Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke addressed the livestock grazing industry today during the annual Public Lands Council’s legislative fly-in, in Washington D.C. Secretary Zinke said the agency hasn’t been the best neighbor, but he will be holding the agency accountable and will restore trust in the department. “We’re going to manage our properties just like you (ranchers) would manage your private lands,” said Zinke. “ Washington D.C. needs to understand that we work for the people, not the other way around.” The Public Lands Council represents the 22,000 ranchers that utilize grazing permits on federal lands. PLC President Dave Eliason said Zinke was a welcomed addition to the conference and that the ranchers are looking forward to his tenure with the Interior Department. “Secretary Zinke has consistently been an advocate for western communities that depend on the ranching industry,” said Eliason. “Ranchers have been marginalized and overlooked during planning processes for far too long. We believe Secretary Zinke will bring stakeholders back to table and stand up for those that have invested their time and livelihoods into the management and improvement of our federal lands. We look forward to working with him in his new role and restoring balance to the management of our Western Lands.”

Once again American AgCredit is paying cash dividends to our members — $50 million for 2016, and more than $350 million since 2005.

Call 800.800.4865 today or visit AgLoan.com A part of the Farm Credit System. Equal Opportunity Lender.

 10 March 2017

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March 2017 11 


Consistency Review By KAREN BUDD-FALEN BUDD-FALEN LAW OFFICES, LLC

P

resident Trump and Interior Secretary Zinke have made promises about moving federal agency decision making back to the local level, putting Americans back to work and ensuring that the public lands are managed for “multiple use.” While that sounds wonderful, making those promises means more than a directive from Washington D.C., it means that your local governments have to take the lead in dealing with the federal agencies. Local decision making is not just for counties with federal lands, but federal decisions can impact the use of private property as well. There are three major ways that a local government can influence federal agency decisions; the type of process used by a local government will depend on the type of decision to be made and the time constraints of the local government. One type of local participation is not “better” or “worse” than another type, again, it depends on the type of decision to be influenced and the preference of the local government. So, again, I would pose the question, is your local government prepared for local decision making? The following should help: I. CONSISTENCY REVIEW The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the Federal Lands Policy and Management Act (FLPMA) mandate that federal agency actions be as consistent as possible with local land use policies or plans (LUP) and that the federal government must attempt to reconcile its federal decisions with the local LUP. Those provisions are key in implementing the President’s promises, but there is a catch. In order to require this “consistency review,” a local government has to have a written local LUP, otherwise there is nothing for the federal agencies to be consistent with. In my view, first, a local government should start with a review of the federal actions that the local government thinks will happen within the area. For example, are there threatened or endangered species or species of concern that will impact your constituents’ private property; is the BLM or Forest Service revising its land use plans or implementing their land use plans; was a local area included within a National Monument meaning that a management plan will have to be prepared; are there any special designation lands that have been proposed like wild and scenic rivers, wilderness or conservation areas; or are there  12 March 2017

other federal decisions that may impact the private property of your constituents and/or the public lands? Second, the local government should determine its processes for dealing with the federal agencies. When do you want to update the federal agencies regarding the local government’s activities and when does the local government want updates from the federal agencies? How do you propose transmitting the local LUP to the federal agencies and offices? What is the local government’s view of “early consultation?” How does the local government want “coordination” to occur? These processes should be carefully articulated in the local LUP. Third, the local LUP should discuss the “custom and culture” of the citizens, the history of the area, and the environmental features important to the local government. This information can come from historical accounts, personal stories, and environmental descriptions such as state wildlife habitat maps, National Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) soil descriptions, forage surveys, and other data. I do not believe that a local government has to gather new data or participate in new studies, but it is important to compile existing data from as many sources as possible to support your policies. Fourth, your local LUP should include economic data and analysis. This should be more than just gathering employment statistics, rather, the economic data included in the local LUP should support the local governments’ policies. For example, if agriculture is important to the local economy, the local LUP should describe the economic detriment of a federal decision that would reduce Animal Unit Month (AUMs) on public land or restrict grazing on private land. Most land grant universities have good statistical data that can assist you with this analysis. You should also include information like circulating dollars, job numbers for the various economic segments, etc. Finally, once the data is gathered, the local LUP should include the policies that the federal agencies should use for consistency review purposes. I believe that these policies are always stronger and provide a good basis from which the local government can work, if they are based on the data described above regarding custom and culture, economic stability and environmental protection. I do not believe a simple “wish list” from the local government is a strong basis for protecting your constituents. Additionally, The Progressive Rancher

in making decisions in compliance with NEPA, the federal government must use the “best data and information available.” The best available information about the local effects of a federal decision on the local custom, culture, economy and environment should come from the local government itself. Note that your local LUP has to be compliance with federal statutes and regulations with the “full force and effect of law.” However most federal statutes are very broadly written and allow for the survival of the local citizens, businesses and economies; the local government just has to assert those requirements. II. COORDINATION FLPMA and the National Forest Management Act (NFMA) also require “coordination.” Coordination is a process; not a result. Additionally, while your local government should “coordinate” with the federal agencies to protect their constituents and influence federal decisions, there is no statute dictating the specifics of the coordination process. Because the elements or steps of coordination are not statutorily defined, local governments should use their local LUP to define what coordination means and how it should work. III. COOPERATING AGENCY STATUS NEPA also allows local governments to participate in agency decision making process as “cooperating agencies.” An applicant for cooperating agency status must both (1) be a locally elected body such as a conservation district board of supervisors or a county commission; and (2) possess “special expertise.” A local government’s special expertise is defined as the authority granted to a local governing body by state statute. Being a cooperating agency allows the local government to participate in the “identification team” with a federal agency. It is just another tool that a local government should consider when dealing with federal agencies. IV. FINAL THOUGHTS Local governments can have a major impact on federal agency decisions if they are prepared and willing to take on the challenge. There are over 1000 counties in the U.S. with a population less than 10,000 citizens. Each one of these rural counties should have a voice in federal decisions that impact it. Is your county prepared? www.progressiverancher.com


Bliss, Idaho

www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

March 2017 13 


By Joseph Guild

Home Means Nevada

B

efore he was the world famous writer Mark Twain, Samuel Clemens spent time in Nevada. His brother, Orion, was the Secretary to The Territorial Governor, James Nye. Most Nevada school children know this as well as they know the song “Home Means Nevada”. Many mythological sayings were attributed to Twain, the budding newspaper reporter on the Comstock’s Territorial Enterprise. Some of those quotes relate to legislatures and in particular Nevada’s. Since the bi-annual session is now meeting in Carson City I thought we should bone up on our knowledge of the legislative process since so much of what legislatures do affects the daily life of every citizen and resident. Nevada’s Constitution now limits the legislative sessions to 120 days every 2 years. Before the voters changed it the limit was 60 days every two years. Clemens is supposed to have said: “It’s far better the legislature meet every sixty years for two days than every two years for sixty days”. This quote has never been verified but it certainly is a good story and reflects Twain general attitude about legislatures. For example, he also said; “No man’s life, liberty or property are safe while the legislature is in session.” Most people think they know about their legislature. After all, they took a high school civics class at least and they also might have voted for a member of the legislature in the last election. They know these are the people who pass bills that are signed into law by the executive. Good ideas get proposed in a bill and the body votes the good ones into law and the bad ones fail. It seems pretty straight forward and black and white until you spend some time at a legislature and see how an idea really becomes a law. Compromise for most folks in this scenario is a bad word because they believe they are right and only their idea of good stuff should become a law. This is way too over-simplified because just as in every other human endeavor making laws is complicated and even messy. Personalities and conflicting points of view must be taken into account. And, these are not just the ideas and personalities of disagreeing members of the public but those of the members of the legislature too. Let’s look at the Nevada Legislature as an ex 14 March 2017

ample. The legislature has 42 Assembly members and 21 Senators. Of these, 15 Senators and 31 Assembly members represent all or part of Clark County. Of interest to this readership, five Assemblymen represent all or part of a rural county and three Senators represent all or part of a rural county. This means some 73 percent of Nevada’s Legislators are elected by Clark County voters. To be fair, in my experience, most legislators think about the state as a whole in making their decisions except in very rare parochial disputes. It is clear however, most of them do not know very much about rural interests or concerns. Depending upon how the steps are counted, there are as many as 25 decision points and votes before an original idea for a bill becomes the law of the state signed by the Governor. That is 25 places in the life of the idea where it could succeed or fail. At those points in time people are involved. A citizen has an idea and takes it to their representative. The member agrees there should be a law. The idea is drafted into a bill and is introduced into the Senate or Assembly. Then the real work begins. The bill is referred to a relevant committee and is heard. Before that time the bill is probably discussed by those in favor and those against with the members of that committee. This is called lobbying or petitioning your government for redress which is enshrined in the Us Constitution (1st Amendment) and the Nevada Constitution (Article I, section 10). At the hearing the committee will hear testimony in favor and against the measure. At another meeting of the committee, in what is known as a work session the committee will deliberate usually without any more testimony and then they will vote on the bill. A favorable vote sends the bill to the whole house and an unfavorable vote ends the life of the bill except in rare instances. The bill is then heard in the whole house and amendments not considThe Progressive Rancher

ered in the committee are heard and acted upon. A third and final reading of the bill results in debate before the whole body and the bill is voted up or down. If passed it is sent to the other house for the same process and if the legislature agrees it is sent to the governor to sign or veto. If it is signed it becomes the law of the state. At every step of the way in the above rendition many people are involved in the process of making laws. Inevitably, differing points of view and conf licting opinions are expressed. Not every person with a single point of view prevails. Most issues are compromised and a middle ground is reached for a bill with conf licting ideas to become a law. Many people have a problem with compromising because they hold their own views so close but that is the way laws are really made. Our very system of government in this country was created when the founding fathers came together and compromised on a Constitution which has lasted for over two hundred years with very little amendment. Why should we expect it to be any different when our elected representatives get together every two years from very different places and with very different backgrounds confronted with differing points of view to create laws for a growing changing state? The only way to change things you disagree with is to participate and make sure your voice is heard. Just do not be surprised if yours is not the only voice. I’ll see you soon.

www.progressiverancher.com


Carey hawkins

Jack payne

Cell: 208-724-6712

Cell:775-217-9273 Alt: 775-225-8889

OFFICE: 775-423-7760

Full-Service Cattle Sales & Marketing serving the Fallon, Nevada and Outlying Areas. Seller

City

#

Desc

Type

Weight

Price CWT

Green Goat

Winnemucca

5

MIX

STR

384

$170.00

Tom Madole

Fallon

1

BLK

STR

405

$170.00

Robert Parlasca

Reno

10

BLK

STR

419

$170.00

Sunrise Ranch

Yearington

9

MIX

STR

446

$175.00

Blake & D. Lambert

Winnemucca

3

BLK

STR

468

$172.00

Eugene & K. Hooper

Duckwater

12

BLK

STR

475

$180.00

Jersey Valley Cat Co.

Fallon

6

BLK

STR

478

$178.00

Robert Parlasca

Reno

17

MIX

STR

510

$170.00

Jersey Valley Cat Co.

Fallon

12

BLK

STR

563

$157.00

Cross L Ranch

Tonopah

5

BLK

STR

591

$156.00

Marvel Family

P Valley

4

MIX

STR

620

$151.00

Bruce Humphrey

Fallon

10

MIX

STR

665

$145.50

David C. Piquet

Winnemucca

47

MIX

STR

669

$140.00

Five Fingers Grazing

P Valley

44

MIX

STR

695

$135.00

Robert & D. Gordon

Winnemucca

8

BLK

STR

738

$135.00

Calvin & B. Sample

Lovelock

9

MIX

STR

741

$128.50

Joe Baptist

Yearington

13

MIX

STR

750

$128.50

Jerry Todd

Eureka

3

BLK

STR

782

$127.00

Mouras

Lovelock

20

MIX

STR

797

$126.75

Donald Harmon

Fallon

5

BLK

STR

828

$125.00

Heart J Ranch

Reno

4

RD

STR

840

$126.50

David C. Piquet

Winnemucca

23

BLK

STR

847

$126.25

Five Fingers Grazing

P Valley

14

MIX

STR

849

$126.25

Tex & L. Northrup

McDermitt

2

MIX

STR

358

$154.00

Berg Ranch

Round Mnt

5

MIX

STR

428

$150.00

Bruce Humphrey

Fallon

4

MIX

STR

496

$167.50

Veronica Cervontes

Elko

1

BLK

STR

505

$160.00

Trevor & Jake Wade

Alamo

9

MIX

STR

506

$170.00

Blaise Berg

Round Mnt

9

MIX

STR

507

$167.00

Tim Lawson

Fallon

4

BLK

STR

514

$163.50

5 Mile Ranch

Dammeron

18

MIX

STR

531

$154.50

Marvel Family

P Valley

18

MIX

STR

545

$164.00

Kevin McElhannon

Fallon

3

MIX

STR

558

$150.00

Todd Weagant

Orovada

3

BLK

STR

573

$149.00

David C. Piquet

Winnemucca

10

MIX

STR

580

$156.50

Robert Nuffer

Winnemucca

2

BLK

STR

593

$140.00

Calvin & B. Sample

Lovelock

8

MIX

STR

611

$145.00

Robert Parlasca

Reno

11

BLK

STR

645

$142.00

Roger Johnson

Winnemucca

17

MIX

STR

652

$144.00

Sales Results from March 16th, 2017 Feeder Sale

Next Feeder SaLe April 20th 2017 11:30am

May feeder Sale will be held in conjuction with our regular Wednesday Sale WatCh for 200 head of freSh CorrieNte heiferS aNd SteerS at our apriL SaLe. Good ropiNG CattLe!

Calving is in full swing with branding time around the corner... Come see us at...

Nevada Livestock Vet Supply LLC 131 Industrial Way Fallon NV 89406

Shop in store or call for delivery

775.624.4996

www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

Seller

City

#

Desc

Type

Weight

Price CWT

Brinkerhoff Ranch Cross L Ranch Roger Johnson Leon Frey Sunrise Ranch Kenny Smith Roy & Ken Smith

Lovelock Tonopah Winnemucca Winnemucca Yearington Winnemucca Winnemucca

6 11 2 1 24 3 1

BLK BLK BLK BLK BLK RD BLK

STR STR STR STR STR STR STR

700 703 775 845 872 892 420

$128.50 $132.00 $126.00 $120.00 $124.25 $121.00 $148.00

Arlemont Ranch Tom Weddell Jeff Goings Lazetich Ranch Johnathan Young Ninety Six Ranch 5 Mile Ranch Marvel Family Eve & B Tschannen Henry & Joi Brackenburry Robert & D. Gordon

Dyer Fallon Fallon Reno Round Mnt P Valley Dammeron P Valley Fallon Yearington

3 1 5 4 2 23 6 11 8 14

RD BLK BLK BLK BLK MIX BLK MIX MIX BLK

STR STR STR STR HFR HFR HFR HFR HFR HFR

578 580 678 984 388 397 418 509 516 603

$140.00 $140.00 $133.50 $104.00 $150.00 $160.00 $160.00 $140.00 $140.00 $131.00

Winnemucca 61

BLK

HFR

611

$134.75

Selmi Bros. Mouras

Carson City Lovelock

22 32

BLK RD

HFR HFR

801 824

$122.00 $122.50

Richard & C. Hutchings Green Goat Andrew Dave Ninety Six Ranch Tim Lawson Blake & D. Lambert Todd Weagant Karl/Dada Weishaupt Randall Emm Nuttal Livestock Michael & M. Gottschalk Marge Shepard Peraldo Bros. Berg Ranch Marcella & K. Northrup Eugene & K. Hooper Trevor & Jake Wade Tex & L. Northrup

Fallon

2

BLK

HFR

240

$168.00

Winnemucca McDermitt P Valley Fallon Winn Orovada Fallon

6 1 47 2 5 7 2

MIX BLK MIX BLK BLK MIX BLK

HFR HFR HFR HFR HFR HFR HFR

408 445 445 448 453 458 535

$158.00 $132.50 $155.00 $146.00 $150.00 $145.00 $130.00

Schruz Fallon Lovelock

2 5 44

BLK BLK BLK

HFR HFR HFR

613 701 708

$123.50 $126.50 $125.75

Fallon Fallon Round Mnt McDermitt

6 9 7 1

BLK BLK MIX RBF

HFR HFR HFR HFR

774 797 312 365

$120.50 $120.25 $149.00 $136.00

Duckwater

5

BLK

HFR

461

$145.00

Alamo McDermitt

10 2

MIX BLK

HFR HFR

461 468

$146.00 $143.00

Orovada Fallon

1 3

BLK BLK

HFR B/C

765 250

$105.00 $181.00

Fallon

1

CH

B/C

483

$155.00

Mader Richard & C. Hutchings Eve & B Tschannen

Consign early - Call Jack payne 775-225-8889 Carey hawkins 208-724-6712 March 2017 15 


CHECKOFF NEWS: Beef Checkoff Wraps Up Sucessful Online Retail Test

O

n both a national and state level, there are multiple checkofffunded efforts to engage with and provide educational resources to retailers. These efforts include education on beef cuts, point of sale displays and marketing, in-store promotions, and consumer research that helps inform the industry and retailers about what moves beef at the retail level. Along these lines, the Beef Checkoff Program recently worked with Amazon – one of the world’s largest online retailers – to provide materials and web content for the company’s “Beef Category Page” as part of its Amazon Fresh Prime Program. Amazon Fresh is a subsidiary of the popular online storefront, offering grocery items available for home delivery in key metropolitan markets. During the last three months of 2016, Amazon Fresh utilized the checkoff’s investment in consumer videos, recipes and photography in a test to motivate more online steak, roast and rib sales. Overall, there was a 16 percent increase in beef units sold during this period, thanks in part to the checkoff’s content and placement. A combination of seasonal message banners, education about meat cuts and meal inspiration via recipe videos were tested to help better understand the types of content shoppers use to make their purchasing decisions. Results showed that online grocery shoppers first want help finding the right fresh beef products and then more information about the beef – including tips for cooking it. The recipe video received higher engagement than the top banner, indicating the opportunity for more video engagement and recipe inspiration. Another key finding was that messages focusing on product qualities and sensory details rather than the potential meal experience, were more effective with online shoppers. This is a key insight that helps address the challenges of selling beef online, where the consumer can’t see or touch the package, and something to continue to test in the future with additional digital supply chain partners.

Engaging with Retailers at Annual Meat Conference The Annual Meat Conference recently took place in Dallas, bringing together more than 1,300 retailers and retail influencers from across the country, with the Nevada Beef Council’s Director of Retail and Foodservice Marketing, Christie Van Egmond, among those in attendance. During the event, the checkoff sponsored a panel discussion, The Farmer’s Perspective and Industry Transparency. Given the increased desire by consumers to know and understand where their food comes from, this candid conversation allowed attendees to hear firsthand from the daily decision-makers about the challenges that exist. Producers on the panel were Masters of Beef Advocacy graduates, including Joan Ruskamp, Nebraska feedyard operator and CBB vice chairman; Gary Price, Texas cow-calf operator; and Matt Byrne, California rancher. Approximately 200 people attended the session. It was also an opportunity to address hot topics like antibiotics, animal welfare and sustainability with this important audience. The trend of shoppers seeking transparency and more information about the production process of meat was highlighted throughout the conference. The beef checkoff will continue to work with the beef supply chain to help them understand how beef is raised, and is in the process of de-

veloping more resources that can be used specifically to show this to retailers to help them capitalize on the transparency trend.

American Heart Association Heart-Healthy Recipe Collection The American Heart Association’s® Heart-Check logo is used by 72 million adults to make decisions about selecting healthy foods and beverages, making it among the most established and trusted nutrition icons on food packaging today. The checkoff has been working with the American Heart Association® to develop Heart-Check certified recipes as part of a new certification program. The collection of 10 easy beef recipes features American Heart Association® Heart-Check Certified beef cuts and is now available on BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com. Four of the recipes have already been incorporated into a health professional brochure on the topic of lean beef in a heart-healthy lifestyle. The brochure will be extended through state and national checkoff programs reaching health professionals, including registered dietitians, medical doctors and nurse practitioners. What are the AHA Certified Beef Cuts? Nine fresh beef cuts are certified to display the coveted Heart-Check mark, signifying they meet the American Heart Association’s® criteria for heart-healthy foods as part of an overall healthy dietary pattern, including: • Extra lean ground beef (96% lean, 4% fat) • Bottom round steak* • Sirloin steak • Sirloin tip steak* • Top Sirloin Petite Roast, Boneless* • Top Sirloin Strips* • Top Sirloin Filet* • Top Sirloin Kabob* • Top Sirloin Steak, Boneless, Center Cut* *USDA Select grade

For more about the Nevada Beef Council, visit www.nevadabeef.org.  16 March 2017

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


Chimichurri-Marinated Strip Filets From James Winstead, RDN, Director of Food and Nutrition Outreach for the Nevada Beef Council

UPcoMiNG SaLE

April 12th Visalia, Ca

May 4th

Cottonwood, CA

Catalog Deadline: April 19th

There’s nothing tastier – or simpler – than a home-cooked steak dinner. Sometimes it’s fun to change it up a bit with a new marinade or rub to bring out a fresh flavor. This chimichurri marinade brings a refreshing, citrusy taste to the meal, and is perfect for a warm spring evening barbecue. Throw some of your favorite veggies on the grill to accompany the steak, and you’re all set! Ingredients - Makes 4 servings • 4 beef Strip Filets, cut 1 inch thick (about 4 to 6 ounces each) Chimichurri Sauce: • 2 cloves garlic • 1/2 cup packed fresh cilantro • 1/2 cup packed fresh parsley • 1/4 cup olive oil • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice • 1/2 teaspoon salt • 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated lemon peel • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper Instructions 1. Prepare Chimichurri Sauce. Place garlic in food processor container. Cover; process until finely chopped. Add remaining sauce ingredients. Cover; process until well blended. Reserve and refrigerate 1/4 cup sauce for serving. Place beef filets and remaining sauce in food-safe plastic bag; turn steaks to coat. Close bag securely and marinate in refrigerator 15 minutes to 2 hours.

May 25th Cottonwood, CA

Catalog Deadline: May 17th WATCH & LISTEN TO THE SALE on the Web at:

For details call (530) 347-3793 or the representative nearest you:

Gary Nolan

Mark Venturacci

(775) 934-5678

(775) 427-8713

Elko, NV

(775) 761-7575

or email us at wvm@wvmcattle.com Look for the catalog and video on our website www.wvmcattle.com

3. Serve filets with reserved Chimichurri sauce.

www.progressiverancher.com

Steve Lucas

Paradise Valley, NV

Brad Peek— (916) 802-7335

2. Remove filets from marinade; discard marinade. Place filets on grid over medium, ash-covered coals. Grill, covered, 12 to 15 minutes (over medium heat on preheated gas grill, 10 to 13 minutes) for medium rare (145°F) to medium (160°F) doneness, turning occasionally. Find more delicious beef recipes, nutrition information, and prep tips at www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com.

Fallon, NV

Market your cattle with the professionals!

The Progressive Rancher

March 2017 17 


FUMES FROM THE FARM By Hank Vogler

Hanks Perspective

W

ell it is time for my annual pilgrimage to my accountant’s office. Yes, it sounds quite braggadocio to call him my accountant. To say such a thing you think you would need to wear a suit and tie just to utter such a comment. I think I can get away with it now that I know that Donnie paid thirty eight million in taxes in 2005. That was twenty five percent of his taxable income. That is more of a percentage of taxable income than Mitt Romney, Warren Buffet, O’bummer and Pinky Bernie paid? I say to you Donnie, fire your accountant!!!! You can surely get that tax rate adjusted with the laws made by lawyers to enhance income for tax attorneys. My attorney, Loop Hole Jones, would be a good fit for you Donnie. My accountant works for Dewy, Cheatum, and Howe. George is a senior member in the firm. George and I have been friends since his mother sent him to summer school catechism when we were in grade school. We sat in alphabetical order in those days so V sat directly in front of W. George always said he was beholden to me as Sister Mary Katherine would usually give herself out beating me with her steal ruler and so George always thought he got fewer whacks. I always try to go to George’s office on or near St. Patrick’s Day, not only do we have a good chat but also George is double bred Irish, so it’s a double fun day for everyone. George goes in at six while its quiet and as I sit in his waiting room, I can see him setting at his desk through the mirror. I hear the inter COM buzz as his secretary announces that yours truly, Hank Vogler is here. George gets a startled look on his face. Must have forgot that this is the big day. He reaches into his desk drawer and starts tugging on a bottle of Jamison’s Irish whiskey and chasing it with some Pepto-Bismol and eating some tums like popcorn. It must be an Irish tradition or a new drink that I have yet to try. Let the games begin. Ordinarily Loop Hole would come with me but he said he was out of Valium and he didn’t think his ticker could stand the stress. He runs several miles every day; hard to figure why a tax return would wind his watch that tight. Doesn’t seem to bother George, much? George’s secretary says I can go into George’s office. She has tears in her eyes. I guess the bond of over fifty years of friendship has her emotions soaring or maybe after I left last year, I heard it took George several days to get over my visit. It’s so nice to have such good relations with your accounting firm. As  18 March 2017

always I have my shoebox full of receipts and notes. George shakes my hand. His hand is shaking badly. It must be running that adding machine a lot this time of the year? George always starts the visit with his usual disclaimer about he was just writing this stuff down and by no means takes responsibility for any of the deductions, write downs, depreciations, or dependents claimed. He even has me sign a letter to that effect. Boy, all the dumb rules and regulations creeping into every facet of our lives, its ridiculous. Will this year I am loaded for bear. I have been slaving over my books since five this morning. I have this stuff tuned up like a well-oiled sewing machine just humming along. I have my list of X-wives that I am supporting. My list of liquor stores and bars that are dependent on my loyal support. The guy at the liquor store had to lay off several people when I was sick with pancreatic cancer as his sales receipts dropped precipitously during that period. The local saloon even has a brass plaque where I set during a runner. Deducting all the bureaucrats is a no-brainer; they have driven me to drink. The tickets that the police give me for speeding is surely a charitable deduction, how else would they get money to pave all the streets without my patronage? Just because most of my kids don’t claim me, doesn’t mean that I can’t claim them and the grandkids too are part of that package. My anger management drunk driving combo schooling is a medical issue. I do take umbrage with the anger management however; people just have to quit making me mad!!!! The accelerated depreciation schedule works beyond my wildest dream. I have taken it upon myself to reappraise my machinery as antiques and at a much higher value. Just because several of my buildings have fallen down in disreThe Progressive Rancher

pair shouldn’t change their property tax schedule. The people are always stealing the wire off my fences to make antique barbwire displays so my repair bill is a little high and going to Acapulco for a month to recruit workers is within the boundaries of my business model. George has remained seated and silent during my dissertation. His face is bright red and he looks like a deer in the headlights. He calls his secretary to bring more whiskey and Pepto-Bismol. Then with lips as tight as piano wire he says he will do his best to scratch something down that will at least keep him out of solitary confinement and oh, don’t call me I’ll call you. That’s a little inside joke as George hates to talk on the phone anyway. Well that about sums it up. George only charges me five thousand for completing my 1040 EZ return. Money well spent!!!!! Hang and Rattle! Hank Vogler

www.progressiverancher.com


Amodei Submits Three Amendments to the American Health Care Act

W

ASHINGTON, D.C. – Congressman Mark Amodei (NV-02) today released the following statement after submitting three amendments to the American Health Care Act (AHCA), a proposal to replace portions of the Affordable Care Act.   Under the AHCA, individuals deciding to re-enter the market after not maintaining continuous coverage would be required to pay a 30 percent premium surcharge. Congressman Amodei’s first amendment would exempt individuals living in a county with only one insur-

www.progressiverancher.com

By Logan Ramsey

March 21 2017

ance provider – as is the case for residents in 10 Congressman Amodei, “I look forward to each of them being made in order and having an opcounties across Nevada – from this charge. portunity to vote on them in the House before Additionally, the AHCA provides certain voting on the AHCA Thursday.” tax cuts to health care companies. To ensure Background: insurance companies are held accountable to the American people, Congressman Amodei’s other The House Rules Committee will meet two amendments would require health care pro- tomorrow, March 22 at 10:00 AM ET to rule viders to verify a decrease in people’s premiums in order any amendments to the AHCA. More in direct relation to the tax cuts received under information about this meeting and Congressthis proposal. man Amodei’s amendments may be found on the House Rules Committee’s website. “After having the opportunity to provide testimony on each of these amendments,” said

The Progressive Rancher

March 2017 19 


Wet winter means more noxious weeds By Sean Gephart, Noxious Weed Program Coordinator

It’s no secret northern Nevada received heavy precipitation this winter. While that’s great for our agricultural crops, rangelands and restoration efforts, the wet weather also means increased noxious weeds. Noxious weeds are plant species that can be detrimental and destructive to Nevada’s landscapes, property value and wildlife habitat. Some species, like Yellow starthistle, can even be toxic to livestock, while many others create a fuel source for wildfires. Our program coordinates resources and efforts focused on proactive prevention, control and management of invasive weed species in Nevada to benefit all land users.

Now is the best time to control noxious weeds on your property

Per statute, all landowners are responsible for control of noxious weeds on their property. This is going to be an aggressive season for noxious species, so it’s important to get a head start on treatment now. As young weeds begin to emerge, spring is the best time to control noxious weeds, whether manually or chemically. A strategy of integrated weed management, combining multiple control methods, is the most effective approach. As you prepare, consider these valuable integrated weed management recommendations. • • • •

Continuous monitoring and early detection are key. Control methods may require multiple applications in one growing season or over several growing seasons. Plant desired competitive species to reduce recurrence of weeds. Follow label instructions when using pesticides.

Species to look for

Perennial pepperweed (often referred to in Nevada as “white top”) is widely known and one of the most widespread noxious weed species in the state. This invasive species grows best on moist sites, and is often found in floodplains, pastures, meadows and along waterways. With incidents of flooding across northern Nevada this winter, expect to see Perennial pepperweed infestations spreading to new locations. Early detection is vital in fighting further spread in all Nevada counties, as mowing, tilling, burning and grazing are not effective. Spring is also a great time to remove any dead material to help curb new growth of this invasive species. Medusahead is a winter annual and should be visible very soon if it isn’t already. Medusahead will show  20 March 2017

Yellow starthistle often infests rangeland and pastures and can cause “chewing disease” in horses by damaging the area of the brain that controls fine motor movements, particularly of the mouth, resulting in starvation or dehydration. Photo courtesy of Jack Kelly Clark, Regents of the University of California, copyright 2008.

Medusahead reproduces by seeds from long, stiff, barbed awns that can easily catch on fur or clothing. Photo courtesy of Nathan Belliston, Uintah County Weed Department.

up early as a bright green, thick patch among other dormant or immature plants. Similar to cheatgrass, it likes to grow on clay soils and often infests rangeland. However, unlike cheatgrass, Medusahead is often less desirable for grazing animals. Many other control methods, including tilling, mowing, burning and herbicides are effective in fighting this weed, which is not yet widespread in Nevada.

Things to remember • •

Clean your vehicle, clothes and pets if you have been in an infested area. Use certified weed free seeds, forage and gravel materials on your property to ensure you are not bringing noxious weed infested materials onto your land. Use the online complaint form to notify the NDA of areas near you where statute enforcement is needed to prevent treated areas from becoming re-infested or populated by seeds. The Progressive Rancher

Perennial pepperweed is found in all Nevada counties, especially in floodplains, pastures, meadows, hay fields and along waterways. Photo courtesy of Nathan Belliston, Uintah County Weed Department.

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Resources for noxious weeds If you’re not sure what treatment to apply or if you need help identifying a plant, there are many resources available to you: • NDA, for help with weed management planning, including the complaint form and identification quick guide – agri.nv.gov/ NoxiousWeeds • Find a Cooperative Weed Management Area (CWMA) that serves your area –agri.nv.gov/ cwma • UNR Cooperative Extension (UNCE), for help with identification – unce.unr.edu • Download the EDDMapS app (available for iPhone and android) to monitor treatments and help the NDA manage throughout the state • UNR College of Agriculture, Biotechnology and Natural Resources (CABNR) – cabnr.unr. edu • USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) – nrcs. usda.gov • BLM Nevada – blm.gov/nv • Nevada Division of Forestry – forestry.nv.gov

NDA announces new deputy director and Plant Industry division administrator

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By Russell Wilhelm, Nevada Department of Agriculture Seed program manager

he Nevada Department of Agriculture (NDA) recently announced Jerri Conrad as deputy director. Conrad has worked at the NDA for three years as the executive assistant to the director, and has more than 20 years of experience in both the public and private sector as a facilitator, communications professional and personnel manager. She received a bachelor of arts from the University of Nevada, Reno’s Reynolds School of Journalism and a masters of business administration from the University of Phoenix. In her new role, Conrad will oversee agency operations and personnel. Lynn Hettrick was selected to lead the Plant Industry division as its new administrator. Hettrick most recently served as the executive director of the Nevada Dairy Commission and the deputy director of the NDA. He served as a Nevada state legislator for 14 years, including ten years as the minority leader. The Nevada Department of Agriculture (NDA) promotes a business climate that is fair, economically viable and encourages a sustainable environment that serves to protect food, fiber and human health and safety through effective service and education. NDA includes the divisions of Administration, Animal Industry, Consumer Equitability, Food and Nutrition and Plant Industry.

Contact us for additional resources • Sean Gephart sgephart@agri.nv.gov (775) 353-3717 • Jake Dick jdick@agri.nv.gov (775) 353-3673 agri.nv.gov/noxiousweeds

Jerri Conrad

Lynn Hettrick

Spread of equine strangles has slowed in Nevada State veterinarian urges caution, biosecurity for horseowners

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PARKS, Nev. – The spread of equine strangles in Nevada has slowed significantly over the last two weeks; however there are reports of new cases, predominantly in western Nevada, as recently as March 12. Though the Nevada Department of Agriculture (NDA) has not issued any additional requirements, according to the Nevada High School Rodeo Association executive secretary, the Association has elected to require a health inspection within 72 hours for all horses that will be competing at the Moapa Valley High School Rodeo. “I support this requirement as a way of limiting potential exposure of more horses to the disease,” Dr.

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By Rebecca Allured

JJ Goicoechea, state veterinarian, said. “We recommend and encourage horse owners to remain vigilant in their biosecurity measures, doing everything they can to reduce the chances of the spread of disease and continue decreasing exposure.” Nevada Certificates of Veterinary Inspection for interstate movement may be used for these intrastate inspections. Veterinarians may simply write “for intrastate use” on the certificate. There is NO negative Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) test required for this intrastate use.

Dr. JJ Goicoechea The Progressive Rancher

March 2017 21 


$250,000 offered through Specialty Crop Grant Letters of intent are due April 14 By Rebecca Allured

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evada Department of Agriculture officials are pleased to announce funding for the Specialty Crop Block Grant Program (SCBGP). Approximately $250,000 will be offered to projects that serve to enhance the competitiveness of Nevada’s specialty crops. Specialty crops are defined as “fruits, vegetables, tree nuts, legumes, dried fruits, horticulture, and nursery crops (including floriculture).” Eligible crops must be used for food, medicinal purposes and/or aesthetic gratification. “Enhancing the competitiveness of Nevada’s fruit and vegetable crops helps diversify and sustain the industry,” Ashley Jeppson, NDA program officer, said. “This grant allows the NDA to support Nevada’s growing availability of specialty crops.” Grant funds through this program have been used to establish many community projects such as Great Basin Community Food Coop’s Distributors of Regional & Organic Produce & Products (DROPP) Program, the Fallon Food Hub, and the Desert Farming Initiative’s high altitude vineyard project at the University of Nevada, Reno. Projects that promote and enhance specialty crops through research, marketing, education, and produc-

 22 March 2017

tion are encouraged to apply. Project proposals must have multiple beneficiaries and may not be used to only benefit one individual or organization. Individual agricultural producers, non-profit and tribal organizations, minority groups, disadvantaged farmers, agricultural associations, industry groups, community based organizations and academic institutions are encouraged to apply. Letters of intent are due by April 14, 2017 and full applications proposals are due by 5 p.m. on Friday, May 5, 2017. To see the request for proposals or past funded projects, more information can be found on the NDA website.

Nine projects were awarded SCBGP funding in 2016 Nevada Specialty Crop Education at the Nevada Small Farms Conference A partnership between the NDA and Western Nevada College (WNC) Specialty Crop Institute will

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increase specialty crop education by allowing WNC to secure industry expert speakers for the 2017-2019 Nevada Small Farms Conferences. The goal is to increase new and experienced growers’ knowledge on specialty crop production topics that will positively impact their business. Beneficiaries include Nevada fruit and vegetable growers and individuals interested in pursuing a specialty crop business. Edible Reno-Tahoe Farmers’ Market and CSA Guide To support local specialty crop growers, edible Reno-Tahoe will create a Farmers’ Market and Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) guide as a printed insert in the July/August 2017 issue of the magazine. The guide will highlight farmers producing Nevada specialty crops and will serve as a resource for consumers, retail, or restaurant food purchasers, detailing seasonal availability in the area and procurement options. The overarching goal of the guide is to help consumers identify locally produced food and support Nevada specialty crop producers in marketing their products. The guide will also connect restaurant owners and buyers to local food, as they’ll have increased awareness on seasonal availability. Beneficiaries include Nevada specialty crop growers, consumers of local products, and local retailers/ restaurants. Organic Specialty Crops Education A collaboration between the Healthy Communities Coalition and Basin and Range Organics to cultivate new organic specialty crop growers, increase the production of organic specialty crops and provide hands-on education to youth by introducing organic farming techniques. The goal of the project is to increase the number of certified organic specialty crops by 10 percent by providing technical assistance to interested growers. The effort will also create four online trainings to help new farmers and school youth garden managers understand organic certification processes, and train nine student garden managers on organic practices who will educate roughly 3,600 students in organic farming processes. Beneficiaries include interested organic growers, student garden managers and Nevada youth. High Altitude Vineyard: Part II The Desert Farming Initiative at the University of Nevada, Reno, will support vineyards and wine industry expansion through coordinating trials on new varieties of grapes appropriate for high altitude climates. The goal is to increase specialty crop farmers’ knowledge on grape production in high altitude regions. Four new growers are anticipated as a result of this project. Beneficiaries The Nevada wine industry and Nevada high desert growers interested in grape production. www.progressiverancher.com


ers and Clark County School District students to be educated in sustainable farming methods. The goals of this project are to assess the probability of successful implementation of a food education hub in Moapa Valley, including the environmental possibility of growing specialty crops in the region, and develop a business plan to outline the project in greater detail, including identifying potential community partners, food education hub location, funding options and methods for becoming self-sustaining. Beneficiaries include the eight specialty crop growers in the Moapa community anticipated to participate in the development of a community business plan and Moapa Valley community members. Branding Nevada Melons Desert Farming Initiative at the University of Nevada, Reno will partner with both private and non-profit agencies to brand the “Nevada Melon” as a high-quality specialty crop. The goal of this project is to determine the dollar amount of existing sales of melons in Nevada, and work toward increasing sales for existing growers. This project also aims to increase consumer awareness of Nevada melons. Beneficiaries are Nevada melon growers and consumers. Winter Field Lettuce Production Research The Desert Farming Initiative at the University of Nevada, Reno will use space at the Main Station Agricultural Experiment Station to test the viability and success of multiple types of crop covers for field lettuce production. This study will be replicated from a successful study performed in Australia that provided increased protection from pests and winter weather. The goal of the project is to increase the season extension potential of field-grown lettuce and decrease the time of harvest. This project will also provide a viable prevention strategy for foodborne illness along the vegetable food chain. Beneficiaries include leafy greens producers and consumers. Study of Healthy Convenience Stores for Marketing Specialty Crops in Small Communities Canyon Gardens LLC will collaborate with the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension to conduct

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a case study in Lincoln County to evaluate a healthy convenience store as a new business model for marketing locally grown specialty crops. The case study will work with local producers to create healthy convenient options for consumers to use their specialty crops. The goals of this project are to increase local specialty crop sales and the sustainability of small specialty crop growers in rural communities, and collaborate with producers to increase access and consumption of specialty crops by providing a tested business model that producers in other rural communities can adopt. Beneficiaries include Nevada farmers, interested new growers and consumers. Moapa Valley Specialty Crop Education Hub The Nevada Community Prevention Coalition will perform a feasibility assessment on developing a specialty crop education hub in Moapa Valley. This project will identify whether the education hub can eventually serve as a central location for local specialty crop grow-

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Fallon Food Hub Specialty Crop Promotional Marketing Plan This project, initiated by the Fallon Food Hub, will create and implement a marketing plan that will raise awareness of specialty crops sold at the food hub through customized specialty crop events. The goals are to implement a strategic specialty crop marketing plan, and increase specialty crop sales by 20 percent for the 2017 growing season. Beneficiaries include Nevada specialty crop growers and consumers. The Nevada Department of Agriculture (NDA) promotes a business climate that is fair, economically viable and encourages a sustainable environment that serves to protect food, fiber and human health and safety through effective service and education. NDA includes the divisions of Administration, Animal Industry, Consumer Equitability, Food and Nutrition and Plant Industry.

March 2017 23 


Nevada’s Best Kept Secret

Conservation Districts (History and Functions) part 1 of 2 University of Nevada Cooperative Extension Gary McCuin, Eureka County Extension Educator

Second VP Nevada Association of Conservation Districts “As a governmental agency, CD’s possess perhaps the most unique ability of any public or private entity. This is the ability to work across boundaries of both public and private land. Districts are able to, and often do, work in cooperation with other CD’s to address problems on a watershed basis. For this reason, many federal and state agencies look to CD’s to address and implement natural resource projects” (NV State Conservation Commission Strategic Plan 2010-2015). Conservation Districts (CD’s) grew from public concern for the condition of our natural resources in the early 1930’s; think the Dust Bowl and “The Grapes of Wrath”. In 1935, while on Capitol Hill testifying about the extraordinary erosion problem in the U.S., soil scientist Hugh Hammond Bennett threw back the curtains to reveal a sky blackened by dust originating from the Midwest. That year Congress unanimously passed legislation declaring soil and water conservation a national policy and priority. Because nearly threefourths of the continental United States was privately owned in the 30’s and the various agencies working towards conservation ended up competing with each other, Congress realized that only active, voluntary support from landowners would guarantee the success of conservation work on private land. Local leadership was needed to coordinate agency efforts and tie them into local conditions and priorities. Subsequently, in 1937, Congress developed a model Conservation District law, for consideration by state governments. Many states, including the Nevada State Legislature passed an enabling act establishing conservation districts the same year. CD’s were charged to direct programs protecting local renewable and natural resources. In The Worst Hard Time, by Timothy Egan, he states that “In 2004, an extensive study of how farmers treated the land before and after the great dusters of the 1930’s concluded that soil conservation districts kept the earth from blowing - this study found that what saved the land, was what Hugh Bennett had started: getting farmers to enter contracts with a soil conservation district and manage the land as a single ecological unit. Hugh Bennett’s legacy, the soil conservation districts, spread throughout America and is the only New Deal grassroots operation that survives to this day.” Presently, there are nearly 3,000 conservation districts across the U.S. almost one in every county. Nevada has 28 districts which cover all 17 counties. Conservation is the ethical use and protection of valuable resources, such as trees, minerals, wildlife, water and others. It focuses on maintaining the natural world in order to protect the sources of resources. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 24 March 2017

“The central thing for which conservation stands is to make this country the best place to live in, both for us and our descendants. It stands against the waste of natural resources which cannot be renewed, such as coal and iron; it stands for the perpetuation of the natural resources which can be renewed, such as food-producing soils and forests...” Gifford Pinchot Conservation Districts were founded on the philosophy that conservation decisions should be made at the local level. The function of a Conservation District is to take available technical, financial and educational resources, whatever their source, and focus or coordinate them so that they meet the needs of the local land users for conservation of soil, water and related resources. They often work in cooperation with counties, the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, as well as other public and private entities. By developing and utilizing partnerships, CD’s can have positive influence and involvement on natural resource issues and significantly multiply funding and subsequent local benefits through “on-the-ground” conservation projects and management that is beneficial to both the local community and natural resources. This is their strength and unique opportunity. CD’s develop and implement programs to protect and conserve soil, water, prime and unique farm and range land, woodland, wildlife, energy, and other renewable resources on private and public lands. Districts can stabilize local economies and resolve conflicts in land use and management. Nationally, conservation districts operate under the following general policies: • • • • •

That conservation should be led by local citizens; That the final responsibility for conservation lies with the landowner; That landowners have legitimate operating goals; That conservation districts are responsive to landowners, operators, and the community as a whole; and That the best agricultural land should be maintained for agriculture.

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The Nevada Conservation District Program in the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources provides administrative support to the State Conservation Commission (SCC), which develops policy and regulations for Nevada’s 28 locally elected conservation districts. Information on the Nevada Conservation District Program may be found at http://dcnr.nv.gov/ conservation-district-program/. The mission of the Nevada or State Conservation Commission (SCC) is to provide leadership for natural resource conservation issues for the citizens of the state of Nevada, by facilitating CD goals and public and private partnerships, dispensing conservation funds, advising and overseeing CD’s, and administering Nevada Revised Statutes 548. The Nevada Association of Conservation Districts (NvACD) is a non-profit, nongovernmental organization made up of three area associations of conservation districts and serves as a state voice on state policy, legislation, communication, and funding for CD activities. NvACD also provides forums to inform, train, and educate supervisors, and recognize outstanding district individuals and programs. The National Association of Conservation Districts (NACD) is a non-profit, nongovernmental organization representing over three thousand districts and their state associations in the fifty states, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. NACD lobbies for federal conservation legislation and funding in Congress. It also provides brochures, reports, conservation films, training, and education www.nacdnet.org. Conservation districts are subdivisions of state government. Each district is governed by a board of six or more supervisors. Supervisors are locally elected residents who serve without pay. They serve as grass roots representatives of landowners and the general public in your community, providing leadership and direction to bring volunteers and agencies together for natural resource conservation programs. Supervisors carry out the responsibilities of their position in accordance with

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with the Nevada Conservation District Law NRS 548 and NAC 548. In many Counties the Conservation District may be the only entity capable of developing and formalizing a natural resource plan (Conservation Plan) or policies that are District or county wide and they have the ability to work across boundaries of both public and private land. Districts can work in cooperation with other CD’s to address problems on a watershed basis. For this reason, many federal and state agencies look to CD’s to address and implement natural resource projects (NV State Conservation Commission Strategic Plan 2010-2015). Conservation district supervisors develop a wide variety of programs depending on local needs. Examples of successful conservation district programs include: • • • • • • • • •

Develop Natural Resource Conservation Plans and Policies; Serve as a cooperating agency for Federal actions requiring NEPA; NRS 548.113 (GRSG LUPA’s and table 2.0); Receive and administer grants; Coordinate and develop projects, i.e. wildlife habitat and/or grazing management; Provide technical assistance, materials, and equipment to control soil erosion ; Sponsoring youth conservation camps (Nevada Youth Range Camp); Implement Best Management Practices (Irrigation efficiencies, Grazing practices, etc.); Assist wildlife habitat, including actions supporting Sage-grouse; and Lead or sponsor local working groups for Coordinated Resource Management Projects or “Locally Led Conservation” projects.

Under these and other authorities in NRS 548 Nevada CDs are doing thousands of acres of weed control and inventory/monitoring each year, clearing and snagging and bank stabilization on the Carson River, sponsoring rancher-led groups such as SANE, implementing urban gardens, improving storm water treatment to keep sediment-laden highway runoff out of Lake Tahoe, clearing thousands of acres of PJ encroachment to improve water availability and rangeland condition, providing education and outreach, assisting the Diamond Valley Groundwater Management Planning Group, supporting soil and snow surveys, making equipment available to local producers, providing annual tree sales of locally adapted plants, maintaining buildings important for local uses, seizing the moment to remove sediment from the Walker River, and reviewing Washoe County planning projects, among numerous other projects. To develop and maintain effective programs, CD’s identify local conservation needs; set corresponding goals; develop a plan/s to achieve those goals; ensure implementation of the plan/s, and evaluate district program effectiveness. Planning is the basic tool for developing effective CD programs. The Annual Plan outlines specific objectives and activities to achieve long range goals. If a CD is ambitious and aggressive with their plans and goals, the workload and funding requirements www.progressiverancher.com

often outstrip the Supervisors capacity to achieve those goals. The good news is that CD’s can accept grant funding and form partnerships that can greatly expand their immediate capacity, resources and social support. CD’s can appoint volunteer committees to address various needs and functions. Membership on these committees need not consist entirely of CD supervisors. A group such as Stewardship Alliance of Northeast Nevada (SANE), a group of eight ranches in northeastern Elko County whose focus is onthe-ground habitat projects and long term collaborative solutions to sagebrush habitat related conflicts, could serve as an ad hoc committee to the local CD or group of CD’s providing input on Sage-grouse projects and collaborative solutions. In return the CD/s can obtain grants and other funding to implement the projects and collaborative mechanisms identified by SANE. Multiple parties can benefit by working together without losing or sacrificing individual or group identity and values. This is especially true when the groups utilize facilitation and consensus building processes such as those employed by the National Riparian Service Team. CD’s can integrate desired projects into NRCS funding pools and planning mechanisms, serve as an official cooperating agency with BLM, USFS and USFWS on NEPA processes and become the entity to embody and magnify local interests in Sage-grouse planning, land use management (Grazing, mining, energy, etc.), and project implementation across all of Nevada. Through partnerships and coordination local initiatives gain the critical mass and funding necessary to be efficient and functional across a broad area. CD’s are statutorily recognized as the local conservation entity in state and federal statute; we simply have not utilized this authority to its fullest potential in Nevada to date. The “Restore New Mexico” initiative is a perfect example of the potential CD’s have for local communities to address resource issues across private, state and federal lands at a state wide scale. Their goal was to pool their resources to restore hundreds of thousands of acres of land each year within priority watersheds, regardless of land ownership, leading to the restoration of landscapes to their full ecological potential. Through this initiative The Progressive Rancher

Restore New Mexico have developed and funded over 170 Coordinated Resource Management Plans and completed 62 watershed /landscape scale treatments through 13 CD’s and treated 2 million acres since 2005. All of this was achieved by local citizens working with BLM and other agencies to utilize their Conservation District and State CD Association to engage in partnerships to gain the support and funding necessary to accomplish landscape restoration while maintaining and

enhancing local ranching and natural resource values critical to them. Hopefully, this article has provided the background about CD functions and authorities to inspire people to contact their local CD to investigate their activities and volunteer to serve on a committee, help implement a project, or even serve as a Supervisor. I have often heard the desire of Nevadan’s to be heard and participate in conservation and management of our natural resources at the local level. This is your opportunity to accomplish just that and utilize the CD system to its fullest potential. In the next article I will provide more details about CD’s statutory authorities and the intent of Congress and State legislature to lead and implement conservation efforts at the local level through implementation of community based and locally led conservation. March 2017 25 


2017 Winnemucca Ranch Hand of the Year

Garley Amos

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arley Amos was honored as the 2017 “Ranch Hand of the Year.” It wasn’t the first time the longtime Humboldt County resident, rancher, community enthusiast and activist was recognized for his contributions. “Garley is one of those people who make up the backbone of Humboldt County,” said Maher. “He served in so many capacities in this community, on local boards, as a local rancher, as a mentor and a good friend. He really epitomized everything good that we stand for in this area.” Amos was born in Winnemucca, the son of Garley Sr. and Helen. His father arrived in Winnemucca on a freight train during the Depression where he worked at various ranches. It was here that Garley Sr. met Helen, Amos’ mother. “It was love at first sight,” laughed Amos. The son says it must be true that opposites attract because his dad was a buckaroo who didn’t finish grade school while his mom held a master’s degree from Mills College in language. You would have never put them together, added Amos’ sister MaryAnna Enochson, but it worked. When Garley Sr. died, the couple had been married over 50 years. A short time following their first meeting, the couple married in 1942 and soon moved on to the Dolly Haden Ranch to begin the second generation of Amos’ in Humboldt County. At the time, the ranch was such a long way from town that young Garley actually had to board in town to attend the first grade.

 26 March 2017

It was also far enough away that when Amos’ older brother, John, became ill, the family wasn’t able to seek help in time. He died at age four. The family moved to the River Ranch where they spent 13 years. In fact, Garley Sr. was just getting ready to buy the place when its owner, Charley Hillyer, died. That cast the family into another struggle. From there they moved to the Clear Creek and Great Western ranches, back to the River Ranch, to the Diamond S, out to Crescent Valley, to a farm at Dutch Flat and the Grayson Ranch in Paradise Valley, the same ranch that Amos’ brother, Charley, ran for many years. Amos said his dad was his inspiration through it all. He belonged on a horse and so does Amos. In fact, Amos said he couldn’t remember too many times when there wasn’t a rope in his own hand. “My aspiration was to learn to rodeo and rope calves; that was my passion in life.” He added, “That’s what I set out to do when I was young and I hope that’s what I’m doing when I’m buried.” Amos, who along with his brother Charley roped many a calf in the lot where Ridley’s now stands remembered well the call that went out for volunteers to help build the new rodeo grounds at the Humboldt County Fairgrounds. He said the two figured it was a good way to do what they loved most while getting some much needed R&R from school. We really thought we were sneaking away,” recalled Amos. That is until the boys were each recruited to pound nails for hours and hours. He laughed, “We were so sore, it wasn’t as much fun as we thought it would be.” After graduating from Cal Poly at San Luis Obispo in Animal Science, Amos settled into his lifelong dream. “I always wanted to have my own place and my own bunch of cattle.” He ran about 500 head at the Garteiz Ranch. Following many years of service to the National Guard, Amos also recently completed 12 years as a Humboldt County Commissioner. He also served over 20 years as a member of the Agricultural District No. 3 where he was instrumental in bringing several major events to Humboldt County, including the United States Team Roping Championship Northwest Finals as well as the Superior Livestock Auction. Amos laughed at that. “I am tooting the horn, I guess,” he said. “I’m pretty proud of that.”

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Amos was also a leading force in building the Winnemucca Event Center. He also was heavily involved in this area’s Friday night ropings, which led to improving the Winnemucca Events Complex grounds to the point that Winnemucca now is able to host roping events from across the country. It was during those weekend mini-competitions that many of Humboldt County’s finest young ropers got their start. “Garley was and is always there to support the kids,” said Winnemucca Convention & Visitors Authority Director Kim Petersen. Amos also has played a pivotal role in helping to grow and develop the Winnemucca Ranch Hand Rodeo weekend. Seven years ago, Amos was recognized by then-Governor Jim Gibbons for his years of dedicated service. The proclamation noted that as a native of Humboldt County, a rancher, a former member of the Humboldt County Agricultural District No. 3 Board and a (then) member of the Humboldt County Commission, Amos “has utilized every position and opportunity over the past decades to strengthen both his hometown and regional cowboy communities, and . . . has profoundly influenced the great sport of rodeo through his efforts.” Petersen said the proclamation was well-deserved, not just for Amos’ work with the Ranch Hand Rodeo, but for his help with many, many other special events. “Garley has been such a huge part of our success,” said Petersen. “He definitely deserves our highest praise and thanks.” The “Ranch Hand of the Year” award is sponsored by the Agricultural District No. 3 as a way to recognize those men and women who make their living in the ranching industry. Past recipients include Frank Loveland, Loui Cerri, Harold Chapin, John and Tim DeLong, Buster Dufurrena, Jane Angus, Larry Hill, Louie and Frank Bidart, Sammye and Dan Ugalde, John Falen, and Lilla and Woodie Bell. “We wish to recognize the outstanding people who have contributed so much, not only to the ranching community, but to cowboy heritage itself,” said Petersen. Garley Amos was presented with the 2017 “Ranch Hand of the Year” award on Saturday, March 4, before the kickoff of the 28th annual Ranch Hand Rodeo. Garley passed away on March 20, 2017 in Winnemucca, Nevada.

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Nevada Rangeland Resources Commission Approves the 2017 Funding To Promote Public Land Ranching

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his year the Nevada Rangeland Resource Commission (NRRC) will be supporting the livestock and grazing industry by partnering and funding the following organization’s activities. These are consistent with the NRRC’s mission to reach out to the public and help them understand the value of public land grazing. Golden Productions They are a video production company based in Reno, Nevada and San Diego, California. The media company will be producing a 30 minute documentary on the 57th annual Nevada Youth Range Camp to be held at the Smith Creek Ranch in Central Nevada. They will also air “The Arid West” which is a 60 minute documentary in a 30 day Charter Media campaign. In previous years they have produced and aired television commercials and they will again create 4 commercials to promote the weekly airings of the Range Camp and Arid West documentaries in Northern Nevada. This is all in addition to continuing to fund the successful “Responsible Ranching Television Ad Campaign during the summer and fall of 2017. Websites and Facebook have become the “go to” sources for information in our technologically oriented society, thus Golden Productions will continue the maintenance and optimization of both. RANGE Magazine Their charter is to provide and disseminate information about the use, care and maintenance of natural resources. RANGE reaches more than 170,000 readers, half rural half urbanites. RANGE will renew 500 gift subscriptions for doctors’ and attorneys’ offices back East, which will say “Compliments of Nevada ranchers.” (As a side note RANGE magazine is reported to be stolen often from their waiting rooms). In addition, all four issues of RANGE will have a full color page ad on the back cover. Lastly, RANGE’S new book, Cowboys & Critters: Symbiosis in the American West,” will be mailed to all 652 Nevada libraries for art, literature and history classes. Lastly, C.J. Hadley reported, that she has more paid subscriptions to RANGE at Treasure Island Federal Penitentiary in Dwight Hammond’s cell block than any other publication. Great Basin Water Network Founded in 2005, as a volunteer organization, when Southern Nevada Water Authority (SNWA) re-activated its groundwater applications all over Nevada. The wideranging Network works vigorously to oppose SNWA’s massive water exportation project. Their goal being to educate as many rural and urban people about the economic, environmental, and social impacts of the proposed SNWA project as well as legally responding to court rulings. They continue to produce and distribute the Water Grab newsletter, reinforce messages on the radio and in magazines with their “Ranches to Ratepayers” campaign, and are preparing for a fourth hearing before the Nevada State Water Engineer on SNWA’s applications in Spring, Care, Dry Lake, and Delamar Valleys. Nevada Rancher Magazine The oldest independent livestock monthly magazine in Nevada, whose mission is to inform the reader about agricultural related news. The magazine is distributed in Nevada, Idaho, and Oregon. The funding will promote NRRC ‘s message by placing ads and a written column throughout the year regarding the Commissions efforts to educate the citizens about public land ranching. The Progressive Rancher Founded in 2001 to honor agricultural traditions, while embracing modern education. The funding will promote Nevada Rangeland education materials to an audience which is affected financially by the health of Nevada Rangelands and to educate the readers both in the magazine and on the internet as to how the livestock industry continues to improve and steward the land. The NRRC is governed by a commission of nine voting members. These members are nominated through each of the grazing boards, Nevada Cattlemen’s Association, Nevada Woolgrowers, and the Nevada Farm Bureau; then appointed by the Governor. The NRRC has one part-time staff person. For more information about the NRRC please visit our website at www.nevadarangelands.org or join us on facebook.

Nevada Ranchers Caretakers of our

Rangelands

Cowboys and sheepherders produce food and fiber for the nation. Growing food on Open range is a natural biological process. Grazing actually benefits the land with hoof action and natural fertilization. Plants are healthier and regenerate faster after the herds move to a new range. Antelope and other game animals and birds take advantage of the improvements

Grazing cattle and sheep coexist peacefully with native wildlife and, in fact, make a friendlier habitat for many species.

Sheep often graze on steep terrain and can control cheatgrass, a major fuel for wildfires. Nevada Rangeland Resources Commission was created by the State of Nevada to promote responsible public land grazing. Representatives come from Nevada state grazing boards, Nevada Woolgrowers, Nevada Farm Bureau, and Nevada Cattlemen’s Association.

4780 East Idaho Steet, Elko, NV 89801 • 775-738-4082 WWW.NEVADARANGELANDS.ORG

This ad is funded through the NRRC’s assessment of 10 cents an AUM paid by public land ranchers.

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The Progressive Rancher

March 2017 27 


2017 Progress with #FreeTheLands

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o far, 2017 has seen a great deal of activity in Western states around the issue of the transfer of federal land to willing states. Many western state Representatives and Senators have introduced legislation to consider and study the possibility. In Montana, two proposed (joint) resolutions were introduced in opposition to the idea but were roundly rejected by House and Senate committees in late February. Utah’s HB407 would set up a framework in the state to keep public lands public.   At the national level, in January the U.S. House made a simple change in its procedural rules that will facilitate bringing public land management closer to home. Currently, there are discussions of the budget for the federal government’s 2018 Fiscal Year.  In his comments on the budget, Rob Bishop, Chairman of the House National Resources Committee, stated “It is time to reconsider how the federal government can be more responsive to the needs of the nation’s counties and provide for them a greater say over how these lands in their backyards are managed.” (Bishop’s remarks are well worth reading.) As a result of all this positive activity, news media outlets have also raised doubts about the motivations and potential outcomes of the Transfer of Public Lands (TPL). As outlined in its public policy statement, the American Lands Council advocates the transfer of ordinary public lands to willing states: NOT wilderness areas, NOT national parks, NOT monuments, NOT areas of special concern, and NOT Indian Reservations.  Once transferred, ALC advocates that these transferred lands are retained as public lands. (BTW: Watch this video of green groups who oppose legislation to keep public lands public.) Here are responses to some of the questions arising from recent media discussions, and we hope they are useful for you.    

Consider the U.S. Forest Service, which acknowledges that at least one-third of its own lands are in desperate need of treatment. Catastrophic wildfire (CW) is a real and imminent threat on those USFS lands, because mismanagement and lack of due care has caused fuels to become unnaturally dense. The environmental impacts of CW cannot be understated: sterilization of soil, harm to watersheds, erosion, devastation of wildlife habitat. (Not to mention the threat of human devastation through loss of property, livelihoods, infrastructure, economic and recreation opportunities.) Year on year, the USFS finds itself unable to cope with the financial burden of fighting CW on its lands. In FY2016, over half of the agency’s budget ($3.9 billion out of $7 billion) was related to wildfire management.  Adding to these woes, the USFS once returned money to the U.S. Treasury; now the U.S. taxpayer subsidizes the agency. With its multi-billion dollar maintenance backlog (just like the National Park Service and Dept. of the Interior), the situation can only get worse – especially when more and more of the agency’s budget is consumed by fire suppression costs. Instead of being treated like an asset, the federal lands have become a burdensome liability and the American taxpayer gets stuck with the bill for mismanagement, increasing costs and declining revenue streams. This should worry all of us, given the trillions of dollars of debt that our government has racked up – like a credit card bill of $260,000 for every American family, says Rick Mulvaney, head of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget.

Will States be able to afford to manage the lands that are transferred?

ALC’S RESPONSE: States need to possess the ability to balance economic development, revenue generation and environmental amenities. The TPL can bring management closer to home and enable far greater accountability in decision-making. Today, America’s states and counties have little if any say over the management of federal lands within their boundaries. The federal government hasn’t been paying its way either: the “Payment in Lieu of Taxes” is almost negligible, and the Secure Rural Schools Act was not renewed by Congress. Generating self-supporting finance should be a management priority for any lands that are transferred.

Who supports the TPL?

ALC’S RESPONSE: The people most eager for change are in America’s communities and counties surrounded by federal government lands, which have become increasingly unhealthy, unsafe, inaccessible and unproductive. They want to experience the benefits of good stewardship combined with more local accountability. Around the country, a growing movement of people understand that this is a much needed change of course. Over recent months an artificial dissent has been stirred up by well-funded and well-heeled green groups whose vested interests fundamentally are at stake in this debate. Subjecting current federal lands to more state and local control would diminish their influence. So they continue to advocate the status quo, with hardly any constructive solutions to bring to the table. They seek to marginalize anyone who might have a different view or experience.

Wouldn’t the TPL undermine our nation’s federal lands heritage?

ALC’s RESPONSE: The U.S. federal government has proved to be a distant, unaccountable, archaic and inefficient landlord. Green groups have targeted its land management agencies with a persistent combination of regulation, frivolous lawsuits and other litigation, lobbying and intimidation techniques. Their “lock it up” agenda has become the default approach to policy, rather than the idea of “multiple use”.

 28 March 2017

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


Sign up for Amazon Smile and support American Lands Council Foundation!

The evidence indicates that western states are far better than the federal government at generating revenue off their own lands (i.e. school trust lands). Thorough analysis showsthat states are less bureaucratic, more nimble, accountable and productive in managing their assets. As noted by economists Terry Anderson and Peter Hill, “the discipline of the bottom line is crucial to changing government land management. Unlike national agencies, state land managers do not have a bottomless trough from which to draw their budgets.” By contrast, the four agencies managing public lands don’t have to generate their own operating revenue, since their budgets are granted by Congress. As such, the federal government spends a vast amount of money and still runs a financial deficit – such as the$18 billion maintenance backlog across those four agencies, for things like roads, buildings, trails, bridges and other structures. Inevitably there will be issues associated with any transition of management. With land that might potentially be transferred to states, ALC seeks to equip relevant agencies with resources to enable a successful transfer. In those areas where the federal government has caused problems because of its neglectful mismanagement, it must equally assume fiduciary responsibility for the problems it has caused – for example, with resources to fight catastrophic wildfire, until that situation can be rectified.

Will the TPL mean that recreation revenue dries up and disappears? ALC’s RESPONSE: A balanced stewardship approach would enable many tangible and intangible outputs to result from public lands – for employment, for generating revenue for county, state and federal government entities, for a healthy environment, abundant wildlife and ample recreation opportunities. The “recreational user” lobby (which seems to be a combination of influential green groups working with retailers of outdoor goods and services) has positioned itself as paramount to all other public lands users, implying that the TPL to willing states will entail lost opportunities and lost revenue. Of course, the “lock it up” tactic of recent decades has by necessity meant that the federal government has not facilitated multiple use, and recreation revenue is perhaps one of the more visible outputs today. This revenue results from, effectively, a huge subsidy, as argued recently by Terry Anderson: “For every dollar that the U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management spent on recreation from 2009-13, they took in less than 30 cents” (See “Divided Lands” study for more info.) Because of road and trail closures and maintenance backlogs, recreational users of the public lands increasingly have been blocked from access. On that topic, recreation and green groups mostly are silent. Blog post URL: http://www.americanlandscouncil.org/tpl_progress_in_2017 www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

March 2017 29 


News Release

USDA Designates Two Counties in Utah as Primary Natural Disaster Areas with Assistance to Producers in Nevada

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Contact: Latawnya Dia

ASHINGTON, Feb. 27, 2017 — In response to a request from Jeanine Cook, Farm Service Agency’s (FSA) acting State Executive Director in Utah, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated Juab and Utah counties in Utah as primary natural disaster areas due to losses and damages caused by a recent drought. Farmers and ranchers in Carbon, Duchesne, Millard, Salt Lake, Sanpete, Tooele and Wasatch counties in Utah also qualify for natural disaster assistance because their counties are contiguous. Farmers and ranchers in White Pine County in Nevada also qualify for natural disaster assistance because their counties are contiguous. All counties listed above were designated natural disaster areas on Feb. 23, 2017, making all qualified farm operators in the designated areas eligible for FSA’s emergency (EM) loans, provided eligibility requirements are met. Farmers in eligible counties have eight months from the date of the declaration to apply for loans to help cover part of their actual losses. FSA will consider each loan application on its own merits, taking into account the extent of losses, security available and repayment ability. FSA has a variety of programs, in addition to the EM loan program,

to help eligible farmers recover from adversity. Other FSA programs that can provide assistance, but do not require a disaster declaration, include Operating and Farm Ownership Loans; the Emergency Conservation Program; Livestock Forage Disaster Program; Livestock Indemnity Program; Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program; and the Tree Assistance Program. Interested farmers may contact their local USDA Service Centers for further information on eligibility requirements and application procedures for these and other programs. Additional information is also available online at http://disaster.fsa.usda.gov. FSA news releases are available on FSA’s website at www.fsa.usda.gov via the “Newsroom” link. USDA is an equal opportunity lender, provider and employer. To file a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (866) 632-9992 (Toll-free Customer Service), (800) 877-8339 (Local or Federal relay), (866) 377-8642 (Relay voice users).

News Release

USDA Designates Two Counties in Nevada as Primary Natural Disaster Areas with Assistance to Producers in California

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Contact: Latawnya Dia

ASHINGTON, Feb. 27, 2017 — In response to a request from Janice Kolvet, Farm Service Agency’s (FSA) acting State Executive Director in Nevada, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated Esmeralda and Mineral counties in Nevada as primary natural disaster areas due to losses and damages caused by a recent drought. Farmers and ranchers in Churchill, Lyon and Nye counties in Nevada also qualify for natural disaster assistance because their counties are contiguous. Farmers and ranchers in Inyo and Mono counties in California also qualify for natural disaster assistance because their counties are contiguous. All counties listed above were designated natural disaster areas on Feb. 23, 2017, making all qualified farm operators in the designated areas eligible for FSA’s emergency (EM) loans, provided eligibility requirements are met. Farmers in eligible counties have eight months from the date of the declaration to  30 March 2017

apply for loans to help cover part of their actual losses. FSA will consider each loan application on its own merits, taking into account the extent of losses, security available and repayment ability. FSA has a variety of programs, in addition to the EM loan program, to help eligible farmers recover from adversity. Other FSA programs that can provide assistance, but do not require a disaster declaration, include Operating and Farm Ownership Loans; the Emergency Conservation Program; Livestock Forage Disaster Program; Livestock Indemnity Program; Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybees, and Farm-Raised Fish Program; and the Tree Assistance Program. Interested farmers may contact their local USDA Service Centers for further information on eligibility requirements and application procedures for these and other programs. Additional information is also available online at http://disaster.fsa. usda.gov. FSA news releases are available on FSA’s website at www.fsa.usda.gov via the “Newsroom” link.

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


News Release

USDA Designates 24 Counties in California as Primary Natural Disaster Areas with Assistance to Producers in Surrounding States Contact: Latawnya Dia

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ASHINGTON, Feb. 27, 2017 — In response to a request from Jacqueline Johnson, Farm Service Agency’s (FSA) acting State Executive Director in California, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has designated 24 counties in California as primary natural disaster areas due to losses and damages caused by a recent drought. Those counties are:

Calaveras Fresno Inyo Kern Kings Los Angeles

Riverside San Benito San Bernardino San Diego San Joaquin San Luis Obispo

Madera Mariposa Merced Mono Monterey Orange

FSA’s emergency (EM) loans, provided eligibility requirements are met. Farmers in eligible counties have eight months from the date of the declaration to apply for loans to help cover part of their actual losses. FSA will consider each loan application on its own merits, taking into account the extent of losses, security available and repayment ability. FSA has a variety of programs, in addition to the EM loan program, to help eligible farmers recover from adversity. Other FSA programs that can provide assistance, but do not require a disaster declaration, include Operating and Farm Ownership Loans; the Emergency Conservation Program; Livestock Forage Disaster Program; Livestock Indemnity Program; Emergency Assistance for Livestock, Honeybees, and FarmRaised Fish Program; and the Tree Assistance Program. Interested farmers may contact their local USDA Service Centers for further information on eligibility requirements and application procedures for these and other programs. Additional information is also available online at http://disaster.fsa.usda.gov. FSA news releases are available on FSA’s website at www.fsa.usda.gov via the “Newsroom” link.

Santa Barbara Santa Clara Stanislaus Tulare Tuolumne Ventura

Farmers and ranchers in Alameda, Alpine, Amador, Contra Costa, Imperial, Sacramento, San Mateo and Santa Cruz counties in California also qualify for natural disaster assistance because their counties are contiguous. Farmers and ranchers in the following counties in Arizona and Nevada also qualify for natural disaster assistance because their counties are contiguous.

Those counties are:

Arizona La Paz and Mohave Nevada Clark, Douglas, Esmeralda, Lyon, Mineral and Nye All counties listed above were designated natural disaster areas on Feb. 23, 2017, making all qualified farm operators in the designated areas eligible for www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

March 2017 31 


N Farm Bureau Nevada evada Farm Bureau

Recap of the AFBF Fusion Conference

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he Nevada Farm Bureau Young Farmer & Rancher (YF&R) and Women’s Leadership Committee (WLC) members attended the American Farm Bureau (AFBF) FUSION conference in Pittsburgh, PA February 10-13. The YF&R Committee members in attendance were Kari Lyn Brough of Elko County and Anna Lekumberry of Douglas County. Cindy Hardy, the Women’s Leadership Chair for Nevada was also in attendance at the conference. The FUSION conference is put on every couple of years by AFBF to bring together the WLC Promotion & Education, and YF&R members all together at one conference. Where as in the off years the WLC meet in Washington DC while the YF&R hold their own conferences elsewhere. The FUSION conference puts on a variety of diverse informational breakout sessions anywhere from financial safety on the farm to the powers of social media in agriculture. One of the main goals of the FUSION conference is to highlight the different programs and opportunities the YF&R members and the WLC members can take back home to their individual states as tools of their own. The Collegiate Discussion Meet also takes place at this conference. Cindy Hardy, Nevada WLC Chair, had this to say about the conference, “We learned lots in Pittsburgh, every breakout class I attended was extremely

 32 March 2017

By James Linney Director of Field Services

informational and beneficial. Two in particular was a presentation on GMOs in today’s market and the new Purple Plow program for schools.” FUSION pulls together both the WLC and YF&R programs, an idea that is beginning to bloom here in Nevada. Both the YF&R and WLC programs within the state of Nevada both have the same goal, community outreach. Hardy also commented, “We need to combine more programs with the WLC and YF&R together. It would be great if the YF&R and WLC within each county work together on activities like Ag in the Classroom. Younger women within the YF&R program need to reach out the WLC women, for one day when we all age out they’re going to be the next in line. There isn’t any reason at all that the donating both programs do couldn’t be combined into one, we are all after the same goal.” Member involvement is key when it comes to well-planned out successful volunteer community outreach. Unity conquers greatness. It’s with bright determination that the Nevada Farm Bureau’s Women’s Leadership Committee and Young Farmer & Rancher programs in the future will orchestrate the successful community outreach that is the grassroots advocacy Farm Bureau stands for.

The Progressive Rancher

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N Farm Bureau Nevada evada Farm Bureau

Nevada Farm Bureau Dave Fulstone II Scholorship award

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ave Fulstone II was a past president of the Nevada Farm Bureau who dedicated his life to the well being of Nevada Agriculture. He was passionate in his support of a sustainable agriculture industry in Nevada and was never afraid to tackle the tough issues or face strong opponents in defense of the agriculture industry and producers. The scholarship committee desires to provide financial assistance to students who exemplify those characteristics. Amount: 2014: Two $1000 awards will be available. Application deadline: Must be postmarked by March 31, 2014 Who may apply: The 2014 scholarship award is open to any student graduating from an accredited Nevada High School in 2014 and furthering their education in a course of study pertaining to agriculture. Application procedure: Students wishing to apply for this scholarship should send the completed application along with a copy of their most current high school transcript and two (2) letters of recommendation to: Dave Fulstone Scholarship Committee c/o Nevada Farm Bureau 2165 Green Vista Drive, Ste. 205 Sparks, Nevada 89431 The successful applicant of this award will be the student who best portrays the ability to be successful in their post secondary education and exhibits the potential to give back to the agriculture industry and benefit agricultural producers by completing their course of study.

Brittney Percoli

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James Linney

The Month Ahead By James “Hank” Combs, President, Nevada Farm Bureau Federation

F

ebruary has been an interesting month for us in Nevada, as we had record-breaking weather. Between the recent snow, rain and flooding in some parts of the state it is probably safe to say that while we’re grateful for the moisture we are all looking forward to the warmer months of the year. In the last issue of the Nevada Farm Bureau Agriculture & Livestock Journal I explained the importance of getting involved in the legislative session. Now, with the legislative session in full swing it is more important than ever as Farm Bureau members in Nevada to get involved with both state and national issues. This month several Farm Bureau leaders from Nevada will be traveling to Washington D.C. to attend the 2017 American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) Farm Bureau Advocacy Conference. This group is being lead by Nevada Farm Bureau Vice President Bevan Lister, who is also serving as a chair to an AFBF issue advisory committee on public lands. The conference will be an excellent opportunity to attend interactive workshops and in-depth training sessions, while networking with Farm Bureau leaders from across the country who share a passion for agricultural advocacy. The Nevada group is also planning to visit members of the states delegation who represent us in the House and Senate. By attending this event we will be able to advocate agricultural issues that affect our state. Farm Bureau works hard at the local, state and national levels to make sure our members are represented. While attending this conference we will make sure Nevada agricultural issues are heard on a national level. One bill of particular interest in Washington, D.C. is Senate Bill S. 273 and House Bill H.R. 527. These Bill are known as the Greater Sage-Grouse Protection and Recovery Act of 2017. This would allow states to implement their own specific conservation and management plans to protect greater sage-grouse populations and their habitats. The Nevada Farm Bureau Federation supports having state developed conservation plans acted on. Bevan Lister is a member of the Nevada Sagebrush Ecosystem Council as on of the agricultural representatives. The Nevada Sagebrush Ecosystem Council developed Nevada’s conservation program. These are just a couple of many legislative ideas we are advocating on to protect the agricultural development in Nevada. We would also like to thank our members who have actively participated in reaching out to our state legislators. For those who have not reached out we strongly encourage you to do so and would truly appreciate it if you did. Lets all have a fantastic March! Hank Combs

The Progressive Rancher

March 2017 33 


NNevada Farm Bureau evada Farm Bureau

2017 Nevada Legislature Update By Doug Busselman

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he Legislative process is as much about process as policy on proposals and deliberations for changes in law. This is especially true when it comes to the system of deadlines for the 120-day regular session calendar. These deadlines begin with the time limits for introductions of bills, starting with March 20 as the deadline for individual legislator introductions and followed a week later by the deadline for committee bill introductions.

April 14, 2017 is the day on which legislative committees must give their approval for measures, introduced in their legislative body, they have been assigned. All non-exempt Assembly bills that have been sent to the committee, sent to them by the Assembly, must be passed out of committees or they will die and the same will be the case for Senate bills that have not been passed by the Senate committees. April 25, 2017 is another extremely important deadline. This is the date that bills, which have not been granted exempt status, must be passed by the legislative body in which they were introduced. All non-exempt Assembly bills that have not been passed by the Assembly will die and the same will be the case for Senate bills that have not been passed by the Senate. Exemptions are primarily for money-related legislation and the status of “Exempt” is noted on the legislation. Given the unpredictable course of how legislative ideas may take and the likely multiple changes which can befall any bill, the Nevada Legislature’s website --https://www.leg.state.nv.us/-- is a must internet bookmark to use in interactions for those wishing to stay in touch with specific measures or to be aware of hearing schedules. An extremely useful section to check is the “Calendar of Meetings” link, located in the upper righthand corner of the webpage. The link also provides the ability to connect for viewing legislative hearings and floor sessions.

Policy Ideas Of Importance In The 2017 Legislature  34 March 2017

Water -- Various bills have been presented for the priority subject of water. These have included ideas brought forward by the State Engineer as well as by individual legislators and respective natural resources legislative committees of the Senate and Assembly. Noteworthy water bills that have been heard and weighed so far in the committee process: • SB 47 seeks various adjustments (including clearer language) in state law for appropriation of groundwater; •

SB 51 relates to adjudication of vested water rights;

SB 74 and AB 138 which mirror one another in proposing to grant authority to collect precipitation, without a water right, from a roof-top of a single-family dwelling as well as a wildlife guzzler managed under the authority of the Nevada Department of Wildlife.

AB 209 addressing consideration of relaxed forfeiture of water rights connected to nonuse when drought conditions are occurring or in water basins that are significantly over-appropriated.

Additional water bills that are expected to be presented and bear continued attention include legislation anticipated to cover domestic wells and updates to 3M plans (which deal with “monitoring, management and mitigation” of water resources). Along with protecting the property rights of existing water right owners, Nevada Farm Bureau has also been involved in stressing the importance of following the process of current law in notifying water right owners of possible forfeiture of groundwater when the State Engineer’s records show four consecutive years of non-use. Farm Bureau was involved in the legislative process in the mid 1990’ies to gain adoption of the 1-year notification system for non-use, prior to forfeiture taking place. There may need to be changes of existing law to reinforce this requirement. Agricultural Labor -- Agricultural employers and those they employ have also been on Nevada Farm Bureau’s radar screen. A proposal in the Senate (SB 106) calls for minimum wages to be raised to $11 and $12. A bill in the Assembly (AB 175) calls for minimum wages to be increased to $14 and $15. The Progressive Rancher

Both bills call for their sought-after increases to be phased in over time, with the Senate proposal establishing an annual increase of 75-cents and the Assembly version setting up a $1.25 bump each year. Each bill is also based on the lower amount to be the requirement for employers who provide health insurance benefits and the higher amount to be required for employers who do not. Another common foundation for both bills provide for the current exemption of state and federal law for “Employees engaged in an agricultural pursuit for an employer who did not use more than 500 days of agricultural labor in any calendar quarter of the preceding calendar year.” Minimum wage requirements, spelled out in the Nevada Constitution would still be in effect. Additional attention has also been given to SB 157 from Senator Patricia Farley of Clark County dealing with changes to state law for overtime. As introduced, the bill called for removing the current exemption provided to agricultural employers from paying overtime. Follow-up with the bill’s sponsor indicates that the intention for the legislation was not to wipe out existing exemptions, but was offered to deal with recent requirement changes for 8-hour days.

Nevada Farm Bureau Legislative Involvement Based On Organizational Policy Farm Bureau’s lobbying activities stem from public policy positions adopted by Farm Bureau voting delegates. The strength of these positions are further reinforced through the involvement of Farm Bureau members who stay in contact with their representatives in the Nevada Legislature. Questions or discussion regarding Farm Bureau’s work in the legislature should be directed to Doug Busselman, Nevada Farm Bureau Executive Vice President. He can be reached at 775-870-3349 or by email at doug@nvf b.org.

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The Progressive Rancher

March 2017 35 


Plant Material Testing and Methodologies for Great Basin Rangelands Charlie D. Clements and Tim Rubald

Program Manager Conservation Districts, Nevada Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Authors are Rangeland Scientist and Agricultural Research Science Technician, USDA-ARS Great Basin Rangelands Research Unit, 920 Valley Road, Reno, NV 89512 charlie.clements@ars.usda.gov

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he Nevada Section, Society for Range Management hosted a winter big sagebrush and pinon-juniper are also weeds in certain circumstances and warrant meeting/symposium January 10th at the Nugget in Sparks which control efforts as well. Dan focused on the mechanical and chemical (herbicides) focused on plant materials and methodologies for successfully treatments to control rangeland weeds, which have experienced as much as 95-99% restoring/rehabilitating Great Basin rangelands. The meeting temporary control of such weeds as cheatgrass, resulting in that temporary window started out with a presentation from Jay Davison, Alternative Crops of opportunity he referred to earlier. Dan also pointed out on the importance of and Forage Specialist with the University Nevada Cooperative Extension. Jay’s proper timing of weed control treatments. Discing should be done in the spring prior presentation, “Challenges in Restoring and Rehabilitating Arid Lands” pointed to cheatgrass seed maturity and then summer fallowed and seeded in the fall before out some very revealing on-the-ground realities, the majority of Nevada is very inclement weather limits seeding efforts. Spraying of soil active herbicides like Plateau, arid…less than 8” annual precipitation is very common and just about 90% of LandMark or Matrix should occur in September to early October before fall cheatNevada receives on average less than 10” (Table 1). grass green-up, then fallowed for one-year to allow the herbicide residue to decrease to In Lahontan Valley of northern Nevada, Jay pointed out that precipitation has levels that will not harm fall seeded species seedlings when they emerge in later winter only been above 8” in 4 of the last 36 years. It is very hard to find desirable plant to early spring. These herbicides residues are affective for about a 12-15 month period. materials that can establish as seedlings and persists on these arid lands. Because Resources on these arid lands are very limited therefore, active weed control programs it is so difficult to seed perennial grasses, forbs and shrubs on these very arid lands, are critical in most rangeland rehabilitation efforts. If cheatgrass competition is not transplanting of shrubs like four-wing saltbush, winter fat, shadscale, greasewood and decreased prior to seeding you lose nearly half your soil moisture. For example, seeding forage kochia can provide a better chance of getting plants established and stabilizing into a 12” precipitation zone without decreasing cheatgrass competition is really like the site from further soil erosion. Short-term irrigation can significantly increase trans- seeding into a 6” precipitation zone, which leads to failure. ‘‘Who weeding slacketh, planting success, but this adds costs to the project. Jay pointed out the importance good husbandry lacketh.” of rehabilitating degraded rangelands, including abandoned agriculture fields, because these lands will only result in excessive wind erosion and on favorable years be invaded by exotic and invasive weeds. Robert Blank, Soil Scientist USDA-ARS, presented on his research “Cheatgrass Soil Engineering and Perennial Grass Suppression of Cheatgrass”. Dr. Blank reported that cheatgrass is engineering the soil for itself as to better take advantage of limited resources. This engineering has resulted in more mineral nitrogen and when he planted other species into cheatgrass engineered soil, they grew better as well. Dr. Blank presented on research in which he planted long-lived perennial grasses like crested wheatgrass and bluebunch wheatgrass, and then planted cheatgrass at various distances from the established long-lived perennial grass. Cheatgrass barely survived from 4-6” distance, but did much better at the 10-12” distance. One of the reasons Dr. Blank believes this cheatgrass suppressing is occurring is that as the established long-lived perennial consumes soil moisture, the mineral nitrogen becomes less available, negatively affecting cheatgrass survivability and growth. Dan Harmon, Agricultural Research Science Technician, USDA-ARS, presented on “The Role of Weed Control in Rangeland Rehabilitation” where he focused on what, how and why it is important to conduct weed control. Dan presented examples of weeds such as; Halogeton–first major weed of concern in the Great Basin, a poisonous plant that caused major domestic sheep dieoffs in the early to mid-1900s, and Cheatgrass, even though nutritious, a grazing resource, and reduces erosion, has significant negative impact on ecosystem function due to its’ flammability and associated increased chance, rate, spread and season of wildfires, which warrants control efforts. Controlling weeds opens a temporary window of opportunity to conduct range improvement practices like rangeland seeding to improve perennial forage, soil stabilization, decreased wildfire frequencies and alFigure 1. Letty Vega being congratulated for finishing 3rd place in the low succession to take place. Dan also pointed out that native species like Society for Range Management Youth Forum in St. George, Utah.  36 March 2017

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Thomas Tusser, (Five hundred points of good husbandry 1557). Letty Vega, senior at Elko High School and Nevada Section SRM Youth Forum representative presented the audience with her “Keeping Up With Conservation” as a practice for the Society for Range Management National Competition in St. George, Utah in February 2017. Letty did an excellent job pointing out the benefits of what she refers to as “buckaroo conservation” and the importance of good stewardship from those that not only live on the land but also are closely associated to any changes that occur on the land. Letty’s passionate for multiple use and good stewardship and conservation was very well articulated and she handled questions from the audience superbly. This effort by Letty resulted in her taking home the 3rd place honors with a very competitive pool of more than 50 participants at the National SRM Meeting (Figure 1). Congratulations Letty! Dr. Kevin Jensen, Research Geneticist, USDAARS in Logan, Utah has more than 30 years of experience in improving rangeland plant materials to meet the demands of rangeland resource management. Dr. Jensen pointed out that more than 30 million acres of Intermountain west rangelands have been invaded by the exotic and invasive annual grass, cheatgrass. The accidental introduction and subsequent invasion Figure 2. Successful seeding of long-lived perennial grasses significantly decreases cheatgrass fuel loads, of this species has significantly altered rangelands by which decreases the chance, rate, spread and season of wildfires. This success improves sustainable grazoutcompeting native perennial species at the seedling ing resources, allows succession to take place, protects adjacent habitats and improves wildlife habitats. stage. The USDA-ARS Forage and Range Research Unit has been working very hard to improve desirable should be part of the management options. Kirk Ellern, co-founder of AboveNV.com native and introduced perennial grasses in an effort to improve germination, seedling vigor and establishment traits to not only compete presented on the many options of using drones to monitor projects, disturbances and with such species as cheatgrass, but also persist in arid environments. Selections of wildlife counts through the high resolution data provided as well as the potential of bluebunch wheatgrass, squirreltail and Indian ricegrass have come a very long way, these drones to monitor hard to get to locations. Kirk pointed out the ability of this but with that said introduced perennial grasses such as crested wheatgrass and Sibe- resolution to provide data on weed invasions as well as identify bighorn sheep lambing rian wheatgrass performed better than the natives. Even though some of these native counts as well as certain bird species nesting/eggs/chick numbers. Kirk’s presentation selections improved in germination and emergence rates, establishment rates fell of provides some very innovative approaches that can immensely improve data needed by as these selections did not persist and decreased by nearly 30% in a very short 5-year resource managers. The Q&A session particularly focused on the fact that many of period. Native selections actually performed better and showed longer persistence the individuals that are in the position to select seed mixes and restoration/rehabilitawhen seeded with Siberian wheatgrass in their trials. Such selections as Snake River tion practices are absent from such meetings/symposiums. Frustration has built up wheatgrss has shown a 74% increase in establishment through the breeding programs over-time as restoration/rehabilitation practices are measured by the efforts put forth performed by ARS. Dr. Jensen mentioned thatin the Intermountain west, introduced rather than the actual successes on the ground. This panel has a combined experience species like crested wheatgrass and Siberian wheatgrass does not keep natives from of more than a century and half. The experience these researchers provide should not be taken for granted and if used properly would only improve on the ground sucestablishing within those seeded/treated areas. Dr. Kirk Davies, Rangeland Scientist with the Range and Meadow Forage cesses of restoration/rehabilitation efforts on Great Basin rangelands. The Nevada Management Unit in Burns, Oregon presented on the importance of revegetating Section, Society for Range Management is dedicated to providing this most useful rangelands to increase diversity, improve forage for livestock and wildlife and decrease information and engaging all those interested in improving our valuable rangelands. wildfire frequencies. To do this it is critical to conduct effective weed control practices Presentations are available @ Nevada.rangelands.org and establish long-lived perennial grasses. Long-lived perennial grasses are the best known method at suppressing cheatgrass and medusahead and allowing succession to take place. Dr. Davies presented data from his research that yielded burning by itself is not successful, but in combination with certain soil active herbicides the establishment of long-lived perennial grasses increased. Burning initially decreased cheatgrsass, but by year-3 cheatgrass was more than 15/ft², which is not effective. Burning in the early fall, followed by a herbicide application of Plateau @ 8 oz/acre rate, fallowed for 1-year and seeded to perennial grasses resulted in nearly 1 perennial grass per ft². Dr. Davies also researched the establishment of native versus introduced species in these treated areas. Native species, bluebunch wheatgrass and squirreltail, established at 0.22/ft² compared to 0.7/ft² for crested wheatgrass. The fact that the native species demand higher levels of precipitation zones significantly limits their ability to provide cheatgrass suppression and decrease the chance, rate, spread and season of wildfires on millions of acres of rangelands (Figure 2). Mechanical treatments increased soil disturbance, but in specific cases is a viable tool as well and www.progressiverancher.com

-Las Vegas 4.2” - Tonopah 4.95” -Hawthorne 3.7” -Yerington 5.14” -Fallon 4.99” -Reno 7.4” -Lovelock 5.29”

-Winnemucca -Austin -Eureka -Caliente -Ely -Elko

8.29” 12.47” 11.83” 9.13” 9.72” 9.56”

Table 1. Average annual precipitation for selected Nevada cities. The majority of precipitation occurs during the cold winter months.

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March 2017 37 


Winnemucca RHR Ranch Hand rodeo 2017 Winnemucca Events Complex

FINAL 2017 RODEO RESULTS

1st- Owyhee Guys – Beowawe, NV 2nd- JJJ Rodeo Co. – Reno, NV 3rd- TL Ranch – Bruneau, ID 4th- DeLong Ranch – Winnemucca, NV 5th- Bar W Ranch – Jordan Valley, OR Top Hand- Junior Harney- Owyhee Guys – Beowawe, NV Steer Stop- Katie McFarlane – Mackenzie Ranch – Jordan Valley, NV Saddle Bronc- Junior Harney- Owyhee Guys – Beowawe, NV Branding- Jim Ranch – Owyhee, OR Mugging- Misfits – Reno, NV Ranch Doctoring- JJJ Rodeo Co. – Reno, NV Team Roping- Bar W Ranch – Jordan Valley, OR Trailer Loading- Maher Ranch – McDermitt, NV

Sheree Tibbals, Marshall Smith, TimmyLyn DeLong (Calcutta Winner), Woody Harney, Junior Harney, Bailey Bachman, Will Knight, and High Desert Queen Mackenzie Fears

www.RanchRodeoNV.com 2017 Stock Horse Challenge Open Ranch Horse Champion Nics Highbrow- Owner Jymme Dominguez- Rider: Jymme Dominguez Open Snaffle Bit/Hackamore Champion Katattitude- Owner: Janet Kubichek- Rider: Leonardo Valdez Non-Pro Snaffle Bit/ Hackamore Champion Very Slic 45 – Owner: Bret & Amie Paulick – Rider: Bret Paulick Non-Pro Two-Rein/Bridle Champion Nics Highbrow– Owner Jymme Dominguez- Rider: Jymme Dominguez

Junior Harney - Presented by Ray Zabala

Pictured: Katattitude- Owner: Janet Kubichek- Rider: Leonardo Valdez

2017 Winnemucca Ranch, Rope & Performance Horse Sale Overall average - $ 5,262 Top ten average - $9,820 High selling horse- Lot 45- Tequila - $15,000

Consignor: Dawn Christiansen - Winnemucca, NV Buyer: Dana Moore – Wellington, NV  38 March 2017

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2017 Ranch Hand Rodeo of the Year – Garley Amos – Winnemucca, NV www.progressiverancher.com


2017 Winnemucca Cow Dog Trials

Intermediate Class Champion- Jaime Gonzalez & Oaktree Rusty Trial Director TM Casey, Miss Winnemucca High Desert Queen Savannah Foley, Jaime Gonzalez & Oaktree Rusty

Brace Class Champion – Levi Harris with Huck and Chip Trial Director TM Casey, Miss Winnemucca High Desert Queen Mackenzie Fears, Levi Harris with Huck & Chip

Ranch Champion- Justin Christensen and Sleeve Trial Director TM Casey, Miss Winnemucca High Desert Queen Savannah Foley, Justin Christensen and Sleeve

Open Pro Champion- Robin Brown & SCR Reinee Trial Director TM Casey, Robin Brown, Miss Winnemucca High Desert Queens Savannah Foley and Mackenzie Fears, and sponsor Chaz Mitchell

Nursery Champion- Nick Greenwood & Kip Trial Director TM Casey, Miss Winnemucca High Desert Queen Mackenzie Fears, Nick Greenwood and Kip www.progressiverancher.com

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March 2017 39 


HUMBOLDT WATERSHED COOPERATIVE Weed Management Area Providing land managers, owners and local weed control groups assistance through funding, agency and weed group coordination, communication and cooperation

Meduahead and Ventenata Submitted By: Brad Schultz, Extension Educator, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Winnemucca, Nevada

Invasive annual grasses, such as medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae) and ventenata (Ventenata dubia) are negatively impacting millions of hectares of US rangelands every year. These native annual grasses have become a serious problem for perennial forage producers in the western United States. Both Ventenata and medusahead are winter annual grasses that germinate in the fall, a few weeks after downy brome (cheatgrass). Pastures and hayfields that become infested with these grasses will have significant yield reductions of 50% or more within a few growing seasons. Ventenata is not palatable to livestock, in part, because it has nearly the same amount of silica as medusahead wildrye. With loss of productivity, land condition and land value declines. Recently, the export market for Timothy hay was valued at around $350 per ton. However, Timothy hay that contains ventenata and/or medusahead is unsuitable for export leaving farmers only a local market at about $150 per ton. Ventenata and medusahead are difficult to control using common weed management strategies and have seriously impacted forage producers by reducing forage yield and quality throughout the west.

Medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae)

Medusahead, one of Nevada’s state listed noxious weeds, was first described in the United States in Oregon in 1903 and as of 2005, medusahead has infested approximately 972,700 acres in 17 western states (from North Dakota south to Texas and west to the Pacific coast), and spreads at an average rate of 12% per year. Since its roots develop early and reach deep in the soil, it outcompetes native plants for moisture. It flowers in early spring, and by June or July its seeds, which are covered with tiny barbs, are mature. The barbs help the seeds attach to livestock, humans or vehicles that pass by. As the grass grows it accumulates silica, making it unpalatable to livestock except for early in its life cycle. It creates a dense layer of litter, and because of the silica content, the litter decomposes more slowly than that of other plants. This litter suppresses native plant growth while encouraging the germination of its own seed, and after a few years it creates an enormous load of dry fuel that can lead to wildfires. Stands of medusahead vary in density from several hundred to 2,000 plants per square foot. This variance is directly related to annual precipitation, soil type, and other vegetation in the area. Since it matures later than most other annuals, it is easy to identify as it is often bright green when other annuals are brown. As it matures, it turns shades of purple and eventually tan.  40 March 2017

Medusahead can also be easily confused with squirreltail or foxtail barley. Medusahead ranges in height from 20 to 60 centimeters. It has slender, weak stems that often branch at the base. It has spike inflorescences similar to those of wheat or rye. The grass spikelet or lemma, has long awns and the glumes have shorter ones, giving the seed head a layered look. As the awns dry, they twist and spread in all directions, similar to the snakecovered head of the mythological Medusa. The barbs on the awns help the seed drive into the soil. The grain-like seed may remain viable in the soil for a number of years.

nial forage producers in the Pacific Northwest. Ventenata is an introduced annual grass, native to central and southern

Ventenata (Ventenata dubia)

Ventenata is a plant that is not currently listed as one of Nevada’s state listed noxious weeds, but has shown itself to be highly invasive in surrounding states. Ventenata commonly referred to as wiregrass, has become a serious problem for peren-

Medusa Head Seeds

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hich enEurope, Asia, and Africa. The first recorded sighting of Ventenata in North hanced the potential for maximum herbicide contact, uptake and movement to the America is action dated 1957; more specifically, in Kootenai County, Idaho. Since then, site of in the plants. confirmedThe sightings have been in the states of Washington, Oregon, California, work at Chimneymade Dam showed that perennial pepperweed up to two years Idaho,old Montana, Wyoming, Utah, Wisconsin, New York, Maine and now Nevada has could be successfully treated with Cimaron®Max provided their leaves were been added that list.to the herbicide. Complete documentation of the effort to control readilyto accessible Identification of Ventenata in the fall Dam after seedlings in the earlypublicaspring perennial peppewweed at Chimney Reservoiremerge can be and found in two can betions difficult. Ventenata seedlings can often be found beneath litter created from the available on the internet at the URL addresses found at the end of this article. previous growing season in the fall and spring. Ventenata is a basally branched, tufted Two additional papers focus on perennial pepperweed treatments and the response winterofannual grasshay thatmeadows has rolled or the folded leaves and membranous ligules. native grass along Humboldt River. In this study, controlOpenly of mabranched panicles are pyramidal in overall shape and have spikelets comprised of typiture perennial pepperweed with chemicals that did not adversely affect the creeping cally 3wildrye florets.resulted The awns some to of four-fold the floretsincrease are bentinand twisted. inflorescence is in of a three canopy coverThe from the meadow an open panicle, pyramidal in shape, and 2.8 to 8 inches and leaves mostly occur on the grass one year after treatment. lower half The of the and have openinleaf Keynot identification traits for Ventenata usestem of herbicide names thissheaths. paper does imply any recommendation from include: reddish-black nodes in late spring; the long, membranous leaf ligule; inthe University of Nevada Cooperative Extension. Perennial pepperweed can be the treated florescence is an open panicle in June-July; upper floret awns that are twisted and bent. successfully with a number of herbicides and any applicator should know the benefits Ventenata growsofineach a variety of dry, disturbed habitats, and constraints herbicide and open makeand theiroften selection based upon theirtending specific to prefer sites that are inundated in early spring but dried out by late spring. It is circumstances. commonly found on south-facing hillsides with shallow, rocky clay or clay-loam soils, though it can be found on other aspects and substrates. In a survey of land managers throughout eastern Oregon, central and eastern Washington and northern Idaho, Ventenata was found growing in areas receiving 13.8 to 44.1 inches (35 to 112 cm) of annual precipitation and elevations of 33 to 5906. It grows in rangeland, dry meadows, pastures, roadsides, rocky swales, open forests, and sagebrush communities, including areas previously dominated by or having cheatgrass present. As always, please notify the HWCWMA if you see Ventenata or Medusahead growing within the Humboldt River Watershed. We have an opportunity to stop invasive species from spreading if we act quickly and our staff can provide the property owner or appropriate public agency with site-specific treatment options for these plants. The HWCWMA also maps and monitors heavily infested sites in the watershed which allows the HWCWMA the ability to provide educational and financial assistance to land owners and groups in their management efforts, ultimately improving all of the qualities of the land and water in our watershed. The HWCWMA has also developed a website to serve as a clearinghouse for information on invasive weeds in the Humboldt Watershed. Our website (http:// www.humboldtweedfree.org) contains fact sheets for state listed noxious weeds in Nevada, Board of Director’s information, funding partner’s links, and many more features including a detailed project proposal packet that you can print, fill out and mail back to us at your convenience. We are looking to expand our project area outside of the Humboldt River and always welcome new funding opportunities. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Andi Porreca, HWCWMA Coordinator at (775) 762-2636 or email her at aporreca@humboldtweedfree.org. Ventenata

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March 2017 41 


S

nyder Livestock hosted a large crowd of bull buyers in Yerington, NV on March 11th and 12th for the seminar, sale, and social. Over 150 producers participated in the Taking the Bull out of Genetics seminar and Bull Buyers’ Social. 350 enjoyed a tri-tip lunch cooked by Doug and Loree Joses. The sale barn was packed with buyers and onlookers for the 18th annual bull sale.

Bull Test Winners High Point Bull Kris Gudel Calving Ease Angus Sired by Conneally Black Granite Champion Growth Angus Flying RJ Ranch Champion Red Angus Trotter Red Angus Champion Charolais Fred and Toni Jorgensen Champion Composite Steve Smith Champion Hereford Lilla Bell Volume Buyer Top Consignor Lucy’s Award

Fred Jorgensen, Champion Charolais

Bentley Ranches Charlie Hone of Hone Ranch Cecil Felkins of Phillips Red Angus

Averages 92 Angus 2 Balancer 8 Charolais 13 Hereford 3 LimFlex 8 Red Angus 1 Sim Angus 127 Total

$4038 $3575 $4375 $3719 $3500 $4756 $4000 $4052

 42 March 2017

Charlie Hone, Best Consignment Bill Airola purchased the High Point bull, a Conneally Black Granite son consigned by Kris Gudel, for $9500. Jamii Pura of Los Banos Creek LLC purchased the high selling Hereford, sired by CRR 4037 Durango and consigned by Bell Ranch, for $7000. Will and Debra Cockrell purchased the high selling Red Angus, sired by LJT Citadel 812 and consigned by Lana Trotter, for $5250. Pete Delmue of Lazy D Livestock purchased the high selling Charolais, sired by Raile Soveriegn J827 Y064 and consigned by Fred Jorgensen. Clint Oney purchased the high selling composite, a Limflex bull sired by PA Power Tool 9108 and consigned by Tom Easterly, for $4000.

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Richard and Jerrie Libby, Flying RJ Angus with grandson Mitchell Carlson Champion Growth Angus Dan and Lilla Bell, Champion Hereford Bull

Lana Trotter, Champion Red Angus

Steve Smith Champion Composite

Highpoint bull and champion calving ease angus Casey Gudel (Kris was home taking care of twins with Gentry and Kade www.progressiverancher.com

Tucker Felkins Phillips Red Angus being recognized as a consignor

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March 2017 43 


Update on State Solicitation for Conservation Credit System Projects SUMMARY The purpose of this item is to discuss moving forward with the selection of six proposed projects to complete full project proposals related to the State Solicitation for Conservation Credit System (CCS) credit projects. These six projects represent the highest ranking projects proposed within the 11 letters of interest which were received. All incorporate greater sage-grouse habitat preservation and enhancement. In total, these projects represent over 30,000 acres of greater sagegrouse habitat across three counties and three WAFWA Management Zones. BACKGROUND Below is a map to display the distribution of our 2016 state funded credit projects and the 2017 credit projects we are recommending to develop full project proposals.

 44 March 2017

Sagebrush Ecosystem Council Meeting March 3rd, 2017

In November, the State again announced up to $1,200,000 in funding through the Sagebrush Ecosystem Program (SEP) for projects that will enhance and restore high quality greater sage-grouse habitat within the State of Nevada. The purpose of these funds is two-fold: (1) Improve greater sage-grouse habitat, and (2) Create a supply of “compensatory mitigation credits” to be used in the Nevada CCS. Private landowners, businesses, conservation organizations, mitigation bankers, and state agencies were all encouraged to apply with potential projects to enhance and protect habitat within the State of Nevada. Each interested project proponent was asked to submit a Letter of Interest (LOI) to the SEP to be considered for funding. LOI’s were due in January, and the State received 11 LOI’s from potential project proponents. The Sagebrush Ecosystem Technical Team (SETT) along with representatives from the Nevada Depart-

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ment of Wildlife (NDOW) then worked to evaluate the 11 projects according to defined eligibility requirements which included: • Location – Projects must be in recognized greater sage-grouse habitat as defined by the SEP Management Categories Map. • Timeline – Projects must be able to begin implementation in 2017. • Willingness to Participate in the CCS – Project proponents must be willing to participate in the CCS by enrolling their credits in the system. • Habitat Quantity & Quality – Project size, and expected habitat quality relative to all projects submitted. From the initial 11 projects, all were determined to meet general eligibility requirements, although one project was eventually withdrawn from consideration. The projects were ranked by the SETT and NDOW, and six are now being recommended by the SETT to be selected to develop full proposals. The SETT will continue to work with each project proponent to collect additional information necessary to further evaluate each project, potential funding needs and amounts, and additional project site information.

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The six projects we are recommending for development of full proposals are in consideration for funding to support implementation of habitat improvements, including on the ground enhancements, the development of management plans, analyses of habitat quality through the HQT, and completion of all materials necessary to allow for credit release through the CCS by as early as this fall. In addition, all projects awarded funds must commit to maintaining the post-project habitat function for at least five years and funding for maintenance must be included in the request unless committed to as in-kind project match. The full proposals will be evaluated using the following criteria to ensure selected projects create meaningful benefits to greater sagegrouse and leverage the State’s funding:

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1. Current Habitat Quality – Estimated landscape-scale and local-scale metrics in HQT. 2. Assessment of Anthropogenic Disturbances – Within the vicinity of project areas, anthropogenic disturbances will be assessed that may indirectly impact greater sage-grouse, their habitats, and the potential generation of meaningful credits in the project areas. 3. Habitat Improvement & Risk Reduction – Estimated increase in habitat function based on proposed conservation actions. 4. Credit Generation Readiness & Probability – Ability to complete the project this year and commitment to participate in the CCS. 5. Cost Effectiveness of State’s Investment – Esti-

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mated credits generated per dollar invested by the State. 6. Other – Very meaningful characteristics of the project not captured by other criteria. RECOMMENDED PROJECTS FOR FUNDING The SETT is recommending that the Council approve the six projects listed below for full proposal development. This approval will not be a guarantee of funding, but will allow the SETT to work carefully with a few selected project proponents that have a high probability of generating meaningful credits.

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March 2017 45 


“Remember the Good Times”

Randy Bunch

Becky Prunty Lisle and Linda Drown Bunch

Randy and Linda at Van Norman Sale

Rolly Randy and Tyler

andolph “Randy” Cooper Bunch passed away peacefully at his home in Tuscarora on March 15, with his wife of 52 years, Linda, and their canine menagerie nearby, just a few days short of what would have been his 78th birthday. Randy was born March 18, 1939 in Twin Falls, Idaho, to Arville and Mary “Molly” Bunch. He grew up in Battle Mountain but quit school to become a full-time buckaroo under the tutelage of the likes of Tom and John Marvel, Everett and Melvin Jones, and Lass Mendietta learning the old time-honored ways of horsemanship( with a little old-time mustanging on the side) of the Great Basin. In 1956 he moved north to cowboy at the IL under cowboss Marvin Jones who he always referred to as the best man he ever worked for. He moved on to Independence Valley where he worked for Willis Packer and Charlie Van Norman until he was drafted into the army in 1961. Upon returning from serving his country in late 1963 he returned to Independence Valley where he continued to work for either Willis or Charlie until he took the position as buckaroo boss for the YP Ranches in March of 1965 where he remained until March of 1967. It was during this period that he met Linda Drown who he married on August 21, 1965. In March of 1967 they moved to Three Creek, Idaho, where Linda’s parents owned a ranch on Deadwood Creek, and worked for Swan Livestock and Owen Barton. This marked a major milestone in his life as during this time he fell under the influence of his father-in-law Bill Drown, Frank Shively, Bert Brown and his 45 Ranch on the Owyhee Desert , and legendary lion hunter Fred Preston. All of these men were throwbacks to an earlier time. Their knowledge and expertise as well as their unique personalities stoked the fires for trapping coyotes and lynx cats , hunting mountain lions with hounds, or ranching in isolated enclaves of the Owyhee Desert while pursuing a path of rugged individualism which found fertile ground in Randy who carried it beyond most of his mentors. Another turning point in Randy’s life occurred when in 1980 he changed directions and went to work run-

ning heavy equipment for Hunewill Construction as the first mining boom struck Elko County. Another powerful force in the form of a fiery individual named Jack Steinheimer, his boss at Hunewll, recognized the drive, intelligence, and fearlessness of his newest employee and sent him on the path of the next ten years working for him and then Freeport McMorans Jerritt Canyon Gold venture in the Independence Mountains not far from his home. Typical of Randy he excelled and became a first class dozer operator. The politics and structure of modern corporate America held little appeal for him so after ten years he turned his attentions elsewhere and spent the next ten years trapping, hunting cats, raising horses, developing an outstanding horse breeding program, developing a ranchette at Lamoille, and later the Manuel Antone homestead near Tuscarora in Independence Valley which he and Linda purchased in the late 90’s. This is when he realized a goal he had had for years of learning to weld. The monument to this talent may be seen on the flat between Taylor Canyon and Tuscarora where his white pipe fences that he built to accommodate their horses and bucking bulls dominate the landscape. Offspring of Gray’s Staright, Boonlight Dancer, and Playgun share the manger with Reindeer Dippin and Whitewater stock. While he loved and appreciated his warm comfortable home and the conveniences of modern life, he was not a slave to them, and he spent many a night camped alone on the snowy high desert as he checked his trap lines or in his pickup waiting for his hounds to finally quit a cat track and come back. As he grew older, he spent fewer nights out among the wild things and more at home watching PBR or NBA basketball, especially the Golden State Warriors, who he watched hours before his passing. While Randy and Linda had no children of their own, Randy loved children—especially to tease and spoil—and made it a point to have king-sized Snickers bars or some other sizeable treat on hand for his younger visitors, and a notoriously lukewarm Budweiser in his “B.S.” room for the older ones. Just as Randy learned the old cowboy, horsemen, and hunter’s ways from legendary

R

 46 March 2017

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Doing what he loved men, he generously shared them with his own friends. It was his nature to help those he cared about in any way possible He never lost his love of a good adventure, and even in his later years, his help and humor were needed and appreciated in neighbors’ branding pens. He and Linda blessed numerous young people with colts or calves from their breeding programs, and Randy would do anything within his power to help the people he cared about. He may have been as tough as nails, but underneath was truly a heart of gold. In many ways, he was an element of a lost time that few understood, and truly one of a kind. He was not for everyone, but those who loved him loved him dearly. Randy was preceded in death by his parents, by brother Bud Bunch, and by sisters Mary Ellen Schroeder and Kate Barredo. He is survived by his wife, Linda, and by a close-knit network of dear friends and adopted family. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Friends of Tuscarora and Independence Valley Association (FsTIV) c/o of Julie Parks , Tuscarora, NV 89834. This is a community organization donated to preserving Society Hall (formerly the Tuscarora Tavern), the Tuscarora Cemetery, and the history of Independence Valley and Tuscarora. His ashes will be turned to the wind on the Owyhee Desert by some of the wonderful men who stuck with him through good times and bad. A celebration of his life will be held May 13 at 1:00 pm at Society Hall in Tuscarora where friends will gather for food, drink, laughter, tears, and stories.

Dragging one to the fire www.progressiverancher.com


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March 2017 47 


 48 March 2017

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The Progressive Rancher - April 2017  
The Progressive Rancher - April 2017