The Progressive Rancher Nov/Dec 2019

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IN THIS ISSUE

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www.progressiverancher.com Guidelines for Soil Quality Assessment in Conservation Planning Growing Wild: Crested Wheatgrass and the Landscape of Belonging A Field Guide for Collecting Native Seeds In Nevada Conservation Easement Articles Differences Between High-, Mediumand Low-Profit Cow-Calf Producers Hard Copy Issues of this magazine are now only available in Nevada, Idaho, Oregon and Washington, DC so keep up with issues FREE at our website and on Facebook

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3 Riding for the NCA Brand

23 Reno Snaffle Bit Futurity

4 NCA Roundup - 2019 Annual Convention & Tradeshow

24 Van Norman 2019 Sale Results

6 NBC Checkoff News 7 NBC Recipe

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28 SRM - Native & Introduced Seed for Rangeland Rehabilitation

30 NRCS USDA - Healthy Soil 8 In the Mind of a Millennial Is Beef to Blame for Climate Change? 32 NFB - A Challenging Year 10 Eye on the Outside 33 NFB - Celebration Overcoming the War on Beef 35 News from UNR - Perry 11 Letter to the Editor - 4H Williams & Coretta Paterson Join UNRCABNR / Parcel Sale 12 Nevada Meat Science Understanding the USDA 36 Churchill Co Cowbells Recipe Beef Grading System 38 Shelman Family 2019 Sale Results 16 Nevada Cattlewomen 40 BLM Update by Kathryn Dyer 16 Interview with Jessica Mesna 42 Elko County Fair 2019 Results 18 In Memory of Fred Stewart 46 Nevada Stallion Stakes Results 20 Protect the Harvest 50 Range Plants for the Rancher Storm On The Prairie

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26 11 Tips for Growing Your Farm

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From the desk of your NCA president By Sam Mori, NCA President Hello Friends, My sincere hope you are all having a great fall. It is a rewarding time of the year and a time to enjoy the fruit of the harvest. We all deal with many challenges throughout the year, so it is so satisfying to see the results of our toil. The Nevada Cattlemen’s Association is still in the planting process of many seeds we hope will produce a good result for membership and our industry. We have been engaged in issues that include Fake Meat, Trade, Grazing Regulation Rewriting, Fire, Lahontan Cutthroat Trout Recovery Plans, Nevada Dept. of Agriculture Activities, Water Rights, Access Across Private Property, and many, many more items that our businesses deal with daily. Most of the things that pertain to ranching and farming in Nevada and the west will be addressed and discussed at our annual Nevada Cattlemen’s Convention in Elko on November 20-23rd. Please come join us for an educational opportunity and a good time. Your input is so very important to the direction of our industry and way of life. This is the last time I will have the opportunity to write this article as I will be retiring on November 22nd as your President. Feel very good that incoming President Tom Barnes and his fellow leadership team of Jon Griggs and Hanes Holman will do an excellent job for us all. We also have very capable people nominated to fill the 2nd Vice-President position.

It has been a very humbling responsibility to represent the most wonderful people in the world as your President. I have been ever so fortunate to have had the greatest leadership team as my partners in many challenges, thank you is inadequate to express my appreciation to you all. Thank you to our office staff for all you have done for me and our membership. In closing, I want to thank my family and our staff led by my brother Pete for allowing me to serve as NCA President. Your contribution to our association is huge. Most of all friends, thank you to each and every one of you who help make our industry and this world a better place. May God Bless You!

Sam

Sam Mori NCA President

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2019 NCA Annual Convention & Tradeshow By Kaley Sproul Chapin NCA Executive Director The Nevada Cattlemen’s Association Annual Convention is right around the corner! We have an engaging line up of speakers and events that will surely keep you informed and up to date with issues that impact our industry. This year’s theme is “Marketing your Cattle” with the second General session bringing that topic to life. We will have a panel of professionals that will give a brief a description of their operations and what they’re looking for when they buy cattle. There will be ample time for questions and answer and an open dialogue about the things on your mind when you market your cattle. For our inspirational breakfast, our keynote speaker will be Ethan Lane, former PLC Executive Director and current NCBA Vice President of Government Affairs. Ethan will be giving updates on what the

provide input to a committee chairman on any changes to a policy or a new policy that affects our industry and way of life. At Convention, not only the Nevada By participating, it is a great way to get Cattlemen’s Association (NCA) members involved and have your voice be heard in are in attendance, but members of the policy-making process. As always, top the Nevada Land Action Association government and industry officials will be (NLAA), Nevada CattleWomen, Inc., on hand to participate in the discussions Nevada Woolgrowers, Central Grazing and answer questions. Committee, vendors that provide services to the beef cattle industry and Registration for convention is on our guest speakers to celebrate the Nevada website and has been sent out by mail and Livestock Industry. NCA staff and email. If you are interested in attending officers are working hard to provide a and would like more information please memorable and educational experience. call the office at 1-775-738-9214 or Come to convention and learn more email nca@nevadabeef.org. The forms for about how NCA is working to increase exhibit booths and sponsorships have been public awareness of the Nevada livestock sent out. If you did not receive these forms and wish to receive one please contact us, industry. we would be happy to send one to you. The Along with the general sessions, Nevada Cattlemen’s Association would committee meetings take place to set like to thank the sponsors and exhibitors policies. This is a chance for you to for helping make our event a success. NCBA is doing for us as well as what they are diligently working on in Washington.

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Committees will meet on October 18th at the NCA office located 542 Commercial St. Suite 2A in Elko, NV, to discuss new issues or resolutions to be proposed at convention and review past resolutions. These meetings take place to set policies. This is a chance for you to provide input to a committee chairman on any changes to a policy or a new policy that affects our industry and way of life. By participating it is a great way to get involved and have your voice be heard in the policy-making process. For more information on each committee, please contact the Committee Chairs or the NCA Executive Director.

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NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 5


CHECKOFF NEWS New Campaign Sheds Light on Beef Animal Care Standards The Beef Quality Assurance program consumers with an overview of the BQA sets standards across beef industry, program and the ongoing commitment of leading to safe, high-quality beef. cattle farmers and ranchers to caring for their animals and providing the safest and Consumers will soon learn about the highest quality beef possible. steps beef farmers and ranchers take to care for their animals and to produce “According to market research, the majority high quality beef in a new promotion of consumers say they consider how and and advertising campaign about the Beef where their food is raised when making a Quality Assurance (BQA) program. meal decision,” said Josh White, executive BQA trains farmers and ranchers on best director of Producer Education at the practices and cattle management National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, techniques to ensure their animals a contractor to the Beef Checkoff. and the environment are cared for “The BQA program offers consumers within a standard set of guidelines. The assurance that there are consistent animal program began 30 years ago, and today care standards in place across the beef more than 85 percent of beef produced in industry. BQA exemplifies what beef the U.S. comes from a farmer or rancher farmers and ranchers have always cared who has been BQA certified. about – a commitment to caring for their animals and providing families with the The producer-facing BQA program will safest and highest-quality beef possible, now be introduced to consumers via a and we look forward to introducing this campaign designed to meet their desire to important program to consumers.” learn more about how beef is produced. The integrated marketing and communication The foundation of BQA is a set of campaign includes a new video from Beef. educational resources promoting animal It’s What’s for Dinner. bringing the BQA care practices that are based in science program to life by highlighting how cattle and align with governmental regulations. farmers and ranchers across the country These resources are reviewed by an expert raise cattle under BQA guidelines. The advisory group consisting of farmers video will be used in marketing efforts and and ranchers, veterinarians and animal is available to consumers on the new BQA scientists who meet quarterly to evaluate section of BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com. the program, discuss trending topics, Digital ads such as this are now featured on a variety review the latest research and make Consumers will also be able to learn more recommended changes or updates, as of platforms as part of this campaign. about BQA through interactive “BQ&A” needed. Instagram stories addressing common questions about how cattle are raised. The The BQA program specifically addresses should have the utmost confidence in the Not only does the BQA program provide video, website and social activations provide and provides training in the following beef they consume and purchase both at guidelines for proper animal care and areas, among others: restaurants and supermarkets,” White welfare, these management guidelines added. also result in the production of higher Are you Beef Quality • Cattle handling quality beef. In fact, the beef industry Cattle farmers and ranchers can become is producing more high-quality beef Assurance Certified? • Cattle health BQA certified by either attending a today than ever before, with more than Becoming BQA certified classroom course taught by a network of 80 percent of beef grading the highest • Cattle nutrition is easier than ever. If you hundreds of state BQA coordinators and available USDA quality grades of Prime would like to get certified, trainers or by completing a series of robust or Choice. • Cattle transportation or renew your certification, online courses. Certification is good for visit www.bqa.org to learn “With the vast majority of the beef supply three years, after which time farmers For more information about the more. Online certification is in the U.S. today coming from a BQA and ranchers must become re-certified BQA program and the high-quality free and available 24/7! BQA certified farmer or rancher, and many to ensure they have the most up-to-date beef produced today by U.S. cattle certification remains valid for packing plants and restaurant chains information and are trained on the latest farmers and ranchers, please visit three years. BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com. setting BQA requirements, consumers BQA guidelines.  6 NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

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Pistachio-Crusted Rib Roast With Holiday Wine Sauce By Nevada Beef Council Staff

The holiday season is upon us, so as you plan your next gathering of friends or family, consider this show-stopping recipe, which is sure to impress any guest lucky enough to sit at your table! The crunchy, salty crust pairs perfectly with the rich sauce made with mushrooms, shallots and red wine. Enjoy!

INGREDIENTS • 1 beef Ribeye Roast Bone-In (2 to 4 ribs), small end, chine (back) bone removed (6 to 8 pounds) Seasoning: • 1/2 cup unsalted shelled pistachios, finely chopped • 1/4 cup coarsely crushed coriander seeds • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh thyme • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil • 1 teaspoon coarse grind black pepper Holiday Wine Sauce: • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil • 4 ounces cremini or button mushrooms, sliced • 1/4 cup finely chopped shallots • 1 cup beef broth, divided • 1 cup Cabernet Sauvignon • 1 tablespoon cornstarch • 1/8 teaspoon black pepper • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves • Salt Courtesy of Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner.

COOKING INSTRUCTIONS • Heat oven to 350°F. Combine seasoning ingredients; press evenly onto all surfaces of beef roast. • Place roast, fat side up, in shallow roasting pan. Insert ovenproof meat thermometer so tip is centered in thickest part of beef, not resting in fat or touching bone. Do not add water or cover. Roast in 350°F oven 2-1/4 to 2-1/2 hours for medium rare; 2-1/2 to 3 hours for medium doneness. • Remove roast when meat thermometer registers 135°F for medium rare; 145°F for medium. Transfer roast to carving board; tent loosely with aluminum foil. Let stand 15 to 20 minutes. (Temperature will continue to rise about 10°-15°F to reach 145°F for medium rare; 160°F for medium.) • Meanwhile prepare Holiday Wine Sauce. Heat olive oil in large nonstick skillet over medium heat until hot. Add mushrooms and shallots; cook and stir 6 to 9 minutes or until mushrooms are tender and browned. Remove from skillet; keep warm. Add 3/4 cup broth and wine to skillet; cook and stir over medium heat 12 to 16 minutes or until reduced to 1 cup. Combine remaining 1/4 cup broth and cornstarch in small bowl. Whisk cornstarch mixture and pepper into wine mixture; bring to a boil. Cook 1 minute or until sauce thickens, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat; add thyme and mushroom mixture. Season with salt, as desired. • Carve roast into slices; season with salt, as desired. Serve with Holiday Wine Sauce.

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NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 7


In the Mind of a Millennial By Jill Scofield, Director of Producer Relations, California & Nevada Beef Council

Is Beef to Blame for Climate Change? I know that for many of you, the title of this issue’s column is enough to induce a massive eye roll. I get it – we’re sick of cattle being the scapegoat for anything related to pollution or climate change. For those of you who work your land and cattle every day, striving to be excellent stewards of both, I know this assumption is especially frustrating. When you consider the facts, it’s clear that ranching and beef production are not the climate change culprits they’re made out to be. Continuous improvements over the years have garnered a lot of positive results for producers and the industry in general. Today’s ranchers do more with less – producing the same amount of beef as in 1977, with 33 percent fewer cattle, for example. What’s more, U.S. farmers and ranchers produce 18 percent of the world’s beef with only 8 percent of the cattle.

“Beef production, including the production of animal feed, is responsible for only 3.3 percent of greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S.” Even more compelling is the fact that greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from beef production, including the production of animal feed, only account for 3.3 percent of U.S. GHG emissions. So with the amount of positive information available (that is based on thorough research, by the way) to counter some of the prevailing misperceptions, I thought it would be both enlightening and encouraging to share some of the ways in which the industry as a whole is dealing with this issue.

The following content is reprinted with The media quickly latched onto the permission, from the Cattlemen’s Beef Board inaccurate statements within this report via www.DrivingDemandforBeef.com: and distributed them to a wide audience. The conclusions within “Livestock’s Long From Meatless Mondays to the EAT- Shadow” were wrongfully drawn through Lancet initiative, the beef industry has seen inconsistent comparisons. the call for consumers to eat less beef many times over. A recent EAT-Lancet report While the report’s researchers measured out of the U.K. suggests the only way to beef ’s potential environmental impact save the planet is to eat less meat—and from pasture to plate, they only assessed more nuts and beans. Reports such as these transportation emissions that take place influence dietary guidelines around the while driving a vehicle – not those from world, so it is imperative the beef industry well to wheel. Jill Scofield is the Director of Produce both understands and shares the true facts Relations for the California and Nevada In a recent article, Mitloehner says leading about beef ’s environmental footprint. Beef Councils. She grew up on a cow-calf authorities agree that, in the U.S., raising ranch in Northwestern Nevada. A recent study shows that even if cattle and pigs for food accounts for about Americans removed all animal protein three percent of all GHG emissions, while from their diets, they would reduce U.S. transportation creates an estimated 26 • Sorry, But Giving Up on Meat is Not greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by percent.3 Going to Save the Planet. Frank M. only 2.6 percent. Dr. Frank Mitloehner, Mitloehner, Ph.D. 2018. professor and air quality specialist for the “Smarter animal farming, not less farming, Department of Animal Science at the will equal less heat,” says Mitloehner. • Would removing beef from the diet University of California says, “According “Producing less meat and milk will only actually reduce greenhouse gas emissions? to our research, if the practice of Meatless mean more hunger in poor countries.”3 Ashley Broocks, Emily Andreini, Monday were to be adopted by all Megan Rolf, Sarah Place. Oklahoma Americans, we’d see a reduction of only Today, beef production has less effect on the State University. BeefResearch.org. environment than ever before. According 0.5 percent.”1 to USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics • Environment – Don’t Blame Cattle Beef Checkoff research shows that Service, U.S. beef farmers and ranchers for Climate Change. Futurity. http:// removing beef from the diet would produce the same amount of beef with w w w. a p l f . c o m / e n - U S / l e a t h e r likely have negative implications on the one-third fewer cattle than they did fashion-news-and-blog/news/41599/ sustainability of the U.S. food system, in the 1970s. With enhanced genetics, environment-don-t-blame-cattle-foras cattle are able to convert low-quality heightened reproductive performance, climate-change feed into high-quality protein. With beef faster growth and higher-quality feeds, removed as a protein option, an equivalent beef farmers and ranchers are improving source of protein would need to take its beef production processes. place – and have its own GHG emission “A recent study shows Through its promotional and research consequences. 2 that even if Americans efforts, the Beef Checkoff works Mitloehner believes the majority of public alongside producers to improve consumer removed all animal confusion comes back to the wrongly confidence in beef to help drive demand. protein from their diets, reported environmental impact of meat When people view beef as a favorable product, they’re more apt to purchase it and milk in the 2006 United Nations they would reduce U.S. report, “Livestock’s Long Shadow.” The at grocery stores and restaurants. While greenhouse gas (GHG) document stated, “The livestock sector is climate change continues to be top-ofa major player, responsible for 18 percent mind for many, the checkoff will continue emissions by only of greenhouse gas emissions measured to educate and provide the industry’s real 2.6 percent.” in carbon dioxide equivalents. This is a picture so consumers continue to feel 3 confident in eating beef. higher share than transport.”

8 NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

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What the Checkoff is doing to drive demand for beef.

BEEF DEMAND

NUTRITION & HEALTH

Strong consumer beef demand is expected to continue through 2019 with the USDA predicting consumers in the United States will eat 8.9% more beef this year than in 2015. Much of beef’s demand is driven by ground beef and loin cuts, which are particularly popular with consumers at the grocery store.

The Beef Checkoff participated in the 2019 NBC4 Health & Fitness Expo in Washington D.C., the nation’s largest gathering of health and fitness professionals in the U.S., to educate consumers on the nutritional value of beef.

INNOVATION EXPORT GROWTH Through support from the Beef Checkoff ’s subcontractor, U.S. Meat Export Federation, U.S. beef exports grew 15% in 2018 to more than $8 billion, adding more than $320 per head of fed cattle.

The Beef Checkoff recently launched Chuck Knows Beef, an all-things-beef personality powered by Google Artificial Intelligence. Chuck Knows Beef can be found on the web and mobile devices and through smart speakers by Amazon Alexa and Google Home. Chuck can provide all information found on the “Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner.” website.

SAFETY The Beef Checkoff congregated at the 8th annual Antibiotic Symposium, attracting nearly 150 stakeholders from the “one health” community – including experts from animal health, human health and environmental health – to discuss antimicrobial resistance in the human population, and how our food plays a role in that issue.

CONSUMER TRUST Team BEEF is a Beef Checkoff project which enlists athletes around the country to spark conversations and provide beef education to consumers and other athletes at running and fitness events regarding beef’s unique nutritional benefits.

U.S. Department of Agriculture, November 2018  USDA ERS Livestock & Meat Domestic Data; USDA WASDE, July 2018  Tonsor, Schroeder, Creating and Assessing Candidate Food Service and Retail Beef Demand Indices, January 2017. IRI/Freshlook, Total US MULO ending 10/26/18; Categorized by VMMeat System  USDA data compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation

Read about these and other successes at

DrivingDemandForBeef.com. And to learn more about efforts right here in Nevada, visit

NevadaBeef.org.

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10/18/19 8:34 AM NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019  9


By Joseph Guild

Who is your customer? Who will be your customer in the future? Many ranchers might say the customer is the feedlot. Others possibly will say it is the person at McDonald’s who just ordered a Big Mac, the high paying patron at Ruth’s Chris or the supermarket meat counter shopper. In a way all these characterizations are right but also wrong. We cow/calf ranchers sell to stocker and feedlot operations. Ultimately, a packing facility buys the finished animal which processes it into a saleable product that ends up on a plate in a restaurant or at the final purchaser’s table. It is this final person in the chain producers must please. It is what they think about us that will decide the fate of beef cattle ranchers going into the future.

Let’s look at these allegations. Recently, a new study published in the “Annals of Internal Medicine” confirmed eating red meat does not expose a person to excessive health risks and in fact, people can “continue their current consumption of both unprocessed red meat and processed meat”. This is obviously a controversial conclusion, but the study was done by five nutritional scientists in multiple countries with the study concentrating on only two groups of people meat eaters and nonmeat eaters over a long period of time. They used no modeling and no animals substituted for people in their study. Not surprising was the backlash from two main groups - scientists whose research has concluded red meat eating is the cause for much human health misery and animal welfare, and climate change activists who correctly pointed out the study did not discuss meat’s alleged contribution to climate change and animal suffering.

There are reputed credible groups who claim meat eating contributes about fifty percent of all green house gas emissions. The real answer is all animal agriculture contributes around five to six percent worldwide. In the United States beef production only accounts for about 1.5% of all carbon emissions. Why then is this part of the story not being widely What do they think? Knowing this is the disseminated? key factor in the future of raising beef cattle. If you only read the press and propaganda I would argue that many reporters are of the adversaries, you would quickly lazy. If one study by a group with a global conclude beef is unhealthy because it clogs reputation concludes meat eating is unarteries, stymies creativity and contributes healthful for your body or the planet even to obesity. Furthermore, a new allegation is if that evidence was discredited years ago, gaining traction that animal agriculture is the reporter won’t do new research on the contributing to global climate change and issue and will just repeat the age-old lie. curtailing meat eating is one sure thing the The same thing happens on issues of average person can do to “save” our planet. animal welfare and the criticism of “factory Oh yes and along the way, we also treat our animals inhumanely and cause billions of creatures untold amounts of suffering and torture.

advocates almost all their lives are spent outdoors in pasture or uncrowded feedlot conditions, there is access to clean water, space and adequate feed and medical care if necessary. Admittedly, there have been abuses in the past, but those days are long gone and there is now an emphasis on humane treatment of animals and as much low stress handling as possible.

staged or taken out of context? These are valid questions because we know how we treat our animals on the ranch and there are laws protecting the raising of confined animals and processing animals for food which are in direct contradiction to the videos on display.

This inquiry doesn’t matter however because the audience for this anti-meat The cow and calf on pasture for most of and animal agriculture is not you; it is the their lives is the norm and high standards next generation of your customers. of treatment of those animals is not only encouraged but taught and practiced. Make no mistake, we are in a war for our Furthermore, there is no recognition by future. Each producer needs to become many of the opposition press that many engaged in some way to protect that livestock all across the world utilize future. Your adversaries are working hard grazing lands that are otherwise unsuitable every day to sway the next generation of for crop agriculture. This grazing practice your customers away from your product. is also a phenomenal source of carbon Only by banding together in industry sequestration, thus helping the global wide and state organizations can we even hope to overcome the propaganda seeking climate change situation. to destroy this industry. Please become However, if you google animal welfare involved even in some small way. and watch just one or two of the videos presented by the opponents of animal On a personal note, this edition will mark agriculture, you will be sickened and 20 years of my doing this column. I have disgusted by the view. There is, of course, enjoyed this regular visit very much and I no attribution to the images so an hope you have too. I wish you and yours a objective reaction begs the question: is blessed holiday season. this being done in the US; when were these videos taken; are some of the scenes I’ll see you soon.

farming”. The reality in our modern beef production cycle is animals are processed for meat within about 24 months of life. Unlike the false claims of anti-meat

10 NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

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Letter to the Editor: Make 4H Great Again 4-H. It’s a name, a term, an image that many people associate with childhood. Whether they themselves were in it, or their parents and friends were, you’d be hard pressed to find someone not familiar with the term. But that was twenty years ago. Currently 4-H nationwide is struggling. Looking for state funding, participation from youth, and competition from emerging youth groups. Community support is torn between 4-H, sports, and other charities. So where does 4-H go from here? I say it should go back. Go “back”? Yes, back to its roots. Folks are right. It absolutely is not the 4-H we grew up with and in some ways I’m glad. It now includes STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math). Agriculture is so closely intertwined with STEM and has always been, it’s fantastic that our youth can now find the resources and teaching it needs to continue to grow in that area. But, 4-H built its roots on four main principles. Head, Heart, Hands, and Health. Bring back the common sense, put your heart into a project, use your hands to build a stronger community, and spread the idea of a healthy nation!

Submitted by Sabrina Reed

the needs your community has that can be filled by 4-H members. Coat drives, feeding the homeless, planting trees for parks, helping seniors and the disabled, beautifying the public areas. These are all activities that help build a sense of pride and accomplishment. Spreading knowledge of agriculture to our towns and cities is becoming even more important than ever! If you would like your children or grandchildren to have that “4-H experience” that you did growing up it’s up to you. It’s up to us, the alumni, the parents, the community to make sure the legacy continues. We have to power to shape the curriculums, teach the skills needed, and to have a hand in making their memories. Please contact your local extension office or 4-H leader to let them know you’re ready to make 4-H in America great again.

Sabrina Reed

How can you help “make 4-H great again”? Well, you can start by VOLUNTEERING! 4-H is in desperate need of knowledgeable, experienced, and exciting volunteers and leaders! NOTHING IN 4-H IS POSSIBLE WITHOUT VOLUNTEERS AND COMMUNITY SUPPORT! You have something to offer, I guarantee it. If you have a skill please share it. Canning and preserving, sewing, raising animals, building construction, welding, shooting: these are all skills that are in need of teaching! How do you teach a sense of community? By doing. 4-H is learning by doing. Think of all

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with any order over $250 (prescription req outside NV)

Complete selection of animal health products, feed, and equipment for beef, dairy, equine, sheep, goat and small animal. Well-trained staff to help make the right decision for your herd – whatever the size. We have stores in Fallon and Gardnerville and can ship for next-day arrival. Fallon: 8:00 – 5:30 M-F | Gardnerville: 8:00 – 5:00 M-F The Progressive Rancher

NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 11


UNDERSTANDING THE USDA BEEF GRADING SYSTEM by Amilton de Mello, Ph.D. | Assistant Professor of Meat Science and Food Safety Cooperative Extension State Specialist, University of Nevada, Reno Select, Choice, and Prime are common terms that some customers are familiar Quality grades are assessed by evaluating physiological maturity (A, B, C, D, E), with when selecting beef at the retail case. But have you ever wondered about marbling degree (from practically devoid to very abundant). Lean color and texture how they are determined? are also attributes that are taken in consideration and may vary from A = light cherry read and fine textured to E = dark red and coarse textured. Although most of the As a farmer, you possibly know that these are some quality grades determined by USDA inspected plants use dentition to identify and segregate cattle younger than the USDA meat grading system. The USDA initiated the official grading due to 30 months, in theory, physiological age during grading is evaluated by determining commercial needs. At that time, it was necessary to establish ways to appraise the the degree of ossification (Figure 1), which is usually assessed in the dorsal tip of relative merit of meats and establish standards based on overall quality for trade the thoracic vertebrae. practices and preferences. Although the official grading and stamping system was established in 1927, in 1916, the USDA came up with tentative standards for beef carcass grades, which were intended to improve reports generated by the National Meat Market Reporting Service. After being reviewed, the standards were finally promulgated official on June 3, 1926. Standards were continuously revised and amended until the last version was published on July 1, 1996.

Figure 1. Young carcass (left) vs old carcass (right). Note the presence of white cartilage buttons on the top of the spinous process of the thoracic vertebrae. Source: StudyBlue.

The USDA inspection for wholesomeness is mandatory and paid by public funds but grading and stamping is a voluntary service. Processors and producers may request grading services through the USDA’s Agricultural Marketing Service, which are performed by federal licensed graders at a rate that may vary from $84.00 to $114.00 per regular hour (rates from 2019). Overall, grading separates beef carcasses into distinct uniform groups based on two major traits, quality and yield. Those are two different terms that provide information about eating experience and the amount boneless edible lean meat that can be obtained from a carcass, respectively. Both quality and yield traits are essential tools that translate grades to value and overall desirability to retailers and consumers. Quality traits are associated with expected tenderness, juiciness, and flavor of beef. There is a total of eight quality grades: Prime, Choice, Select, Standard, Commercial, Utility, Cutter, and Canner, which are categorized as shown in Table 1.

Table 1. Quality Grade Merit Guide.

12 NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

Source: USDA. Adapted by the University of Nevada, Reno - Meat Science.

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Figure 2. Examples of marbling degrees. Higher marbling content, higher the grade.

Moderately Abundant

Slightly Abundant

Moderate

Modest

Small

Source: USDA

Slight

Marbling is the amount of flecks of fat located in the lean (intramuscular fat) and is evaluated in the ribeye after the separation between the 12th and 13th ribs. As shown in Table 1, there are 10 degrees of marbling that numerically vary from 000 to 999. Higher marbling degrees indicate higher grades (Figure 2), which are usually associated to better eating experience as demonstrated in Figure 3. Yield grade estimates the expected cutability of the carcass, which is the lean obtained from closely trimmed, boneless, retail cuts from the major primals (round, loin, rib, and chuck). It ranges from 1 to 5, whereas yield grade 1 is the highest grade that indicates the greatest ratio of lean to fat and the grade 5 is the lowest ratio. In order to estimate yield grade, an equation containing values of fat thickness, ribeye area, estimation of kidney, pelvic and heart fat (KPH%), and hot carcass weight must be used:

YG = 2.50 + (2.50 x fat thickness, in.) + (0.20 x %KPH) + (0.0038 x HCW, lb.) – (0.32 x ribeye area, in2)

Figure 3. Frequency of steaks that received sensory experience scores >7.5 based on their degrees of marbling: TR = Traces, SL = Slight, SM = Small, MD = Modest, SA = Slightly Abundant, MA = Moderately Abundant (Adapted from Emerson et al., 2011)

SENSORY EXPERIENCE (panel rating ≥ 7.5)

Marbling Degree www.progressiverancher.com

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continued next page... NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 13


Figure 4. Fat thickness measurement location (blue line). Source: University of Nevada, Reno - Meat Science.

Fat thickness is measured over the ribeye around three-quarters of the length of the ribeye from its chine bone end (Figure 4). Kidney, heart and pelvic (KPH, %) corresponds to the total amount of fat internally found in regions adjacent to the kidneys, pelvis, and heart. For research purposes, weighing carcasses before and after the removal of the fat in those areas provides better estimation, however in commercial settings, KPH is estimated subjectively by the grader. Commonly carcasses have 1 to 4 % KPH. Hot carcass weight (HCW) is the weight of the carcasses after the removal of head, all internal organs located in the main cavities of the body (viscera), hide, and part of the limbs (metacarpus and metatarsus). In order to obtain HCW, carcasses are weighed before entering the chilling process. Ribeye area (REA) is also estimated between the 12th and 13th. Due to processing speed in large operations, federal graders estimate the area subjectively. However, it is possible to precisely calculate REA by using a calibrated dot-grid (with squares of 0.1 square inches) (Figure 5). The grid must be placed aligned to the long axis of the ribeye. Interior dots that are completely within the perimeter of the ribeye muscle and boundary dots which are on the perimeter of the ribeye must be counted. Both numbers must be input in the following mathematical (Pick’s) theorem: REA (in2) = [interior dots + boundary dots – 1] x 0.1

(

2

)

For example, for a 739 lbs carcass, with 0.4 in of fat thickness, 3% KPH, and a ribeye area with 93 interior dots and 22 boundary dots, calculations are: REA (in2) = [106 +

(

22 2

) – 1] x 0.1 = 11.6 in2

YG = 2.50 + (2.50 x 0.4) + (0.20 x 3) + (0.0038 x 739) – (0.32 x 11.6) = 3.196 YG is approximately = 3 However, there is also a second method to rapidly estimate the yield grade by using a preliminary yield grade, which is estimated by the thickness of the back fat (Table 2). Once the PYG is determined, adjustments based on carcass weight, REA, and KPH (%) (Table 3) are input in the following formula: YG = (PYG based on backfat) + (adj. for carcass weight) – (adj. for ribeye area) – (adj. for KPH)

For example, for a carcass with 0.4 in of fat thickness, weighing 700 lbs, with REA of 11.5 in2 and 3% KPH, Yield grade calculated via shortcut method is approximately 4. YG = (3) + (0.4) – (– 0.16) – (– 0.16) = 3.72. YG is approximately = 4

Expected cutability by grade is shown in Table 4.

Table 2. PYG estimation based on fat thickness Source: American Meat Science Association.

Harvesting and Processing at Wolf Pack Meats When harvesting and processing at Wolf Pack Meats, the University of Nevada, Reno USDA-inspected processing facility, local farmers may request estimations of Quality and Yield grades for a small fee. Although the estimations are not official, they provide to farmers an idea of quality standards of their livestock. Farmers must contact the plant manager Damon Ewasko for more information (775-857-3663).

Table 4. Expected yields (%) of boneless, closely trimmed retail cuts from the round, loin, rib and chuck Source: American Meat Science Association.

14 NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

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Table 3. PYG estimation based on fat thickness. Source: American Meat Science Association.

Figure 5. Grid placement and dots.

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Source: University of Nevada, Reno - Meat Science.

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NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 15 


InteRview: State Convention It's That Time of Year! By Staci Emm It is state convention time and we are excited about including Nevada agriculture youth in this year’s event.

Time just flew by this summer and now everyone is getting ready for winter. Oh, and let’s not forget about our hunting schedules. I am looking forward to some great days on horseback searching for that perfect deer with no cell service, no computer, and just enjoying the great outdoors. I want to take some time to discuss state convention activities. The Nevada Cattlemen’s Association State Convention is going to be held in Elko, Nevada this year on November 20-23, 2019. Nevada CattleWomen, Inc. will be hosting a social with sponsors on Wednesday night after the rangeland meetings. The social will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the Elko Convention Center. We hope that you can join us to visit with friends and have a great time. In addition, the Nevada CattleWomen, Inc. Executive team has been working to plan and provide some different events this year. The biggest event for CattleWomen is encouraging youth to participate at convention with activities specifically designed for them, on Thursday, November 21, 2019. This year there will be a meat judging contest, youth will participate as speakers at the luncheon, and there will be a Beef Sales competition in the afternoon. This is new and we are hoping to get Nevada FFA programs to participate. The Nevada CattleWomen, Inc. schedule is listed below. Before I close, there is also a new affiliate that would like to organize in the state. It is called AOB (All Other Breeds) Affiliate. This affiliate is not based in any county, anyone can join, and there is hope that they will get some collegiate participants. The first organization meeting will be held on November 3, 2019 at 1 p.m. at the Douglas County Extension office located at 1325 Waterloo Lane, Gardnerville, Nevada. We are hoping that this will be a successful affiliate and build Nevada CattleWomen, Inc. and American National CattleWomen membership. The proposed Nevada CattleWomen, Inc. schedule will be the following for state convention in Elko, NV: Wednesday, November 20, 2019 Elko Convention Center 5:00 p.m. Nevada CattleWomen, Inc. Board of Directors Meeting 6:30 p.m. Nevada CattleWomen, Inc. Social Thursday, November 21, 2019 Elko Convention Center 7:30 a.m. Nevada CattleWomen, Inc. Breakfast, Elko Convention Center 7:45 a.m. Nevada CattleWomen, Inc. General Membership Meeting 10:00 a.m. Welcome FFA Youth- Meat Evaluation Event 11:30 a.m. Lunch – Youth Speakers with Nevada Beef Checkoff 1:30 a.m. Youth Beef Sales Event 4:00 p.m. Youth Day Completed/NCA Reception in the Trade Show Begins Friday and Saturday, November 22, 2019 Nevada CattleWomen, Inc. members attend NCA events and meetings.  16 NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

My name is Jessica (Gibbs) Mesna, and I was born and raised in Nevada. I have lived on a cattle ranch in Northeastern Nevada, northwest of Wells, my entire life. My husband Wyatt, son Anton, and I help run our family ranch, the Gibbs Ranch. It has now been in the family for 103 years. Our son is the sixth generation on our ranch. My dad, grandma, and aunt also live here. We live 40 miles, most of which is dirt road, from the nearest town and over 100 miles from the nearest, what we consider a city( it has a Costco). Growing up we lived in two houses; one in Wells where we went to school and the other at the ranch. During the school year my two older siblings, our mom, and I lived in town. My dad would come in 2 to 3 times a week in the evenings, depending on what was going on at the ranch. On weekends we would all go home to the ranch. When I was home I usually followed my dad everywhere, because he got to do all the “fun” ranch stuff like feeding, riding horses, fixing equipment, irrigating, getting dirty, being creative, and just being outside. To me all that was way better than anything in the house. Mom worked alongside my dad as well, but she also did all the housekeeping that I did not enjoy so my dad was my excuse to get out of it.

In high school when my sister and brother got in to sports our weekends filled up with games here and there and we didn’t get to the ranch as often as I would have liked. Then I got into high school and got busy with sports as well. I still loved the ranch, but was distracted by all the fun of sports, especially basketball. As a child my dream was to play basketball for a living and if I couldn’t do that, I wanted to work on the ranch. I played basketball through junior high and high school, then I was fortunate enough to make it to the next level and I played two years of college basketball at a junior college in Idaho (CSI). After those two years I was being recruited by numerous four year colleges, but chose to go to University of Wyoming. There I played for two years, then student coached for one year so that I could finish getting my Bachelor’s Degree in Agricultural Business. Then it happened…my dream came true, I had the opportunity to go play professional basketball for two years in Sweden. Believe it or not ranching and basketball have a lot in common. They both take a lot of hard work, dedication, and of course both are very enjoyable to me. My dad used to tell my coaches that the reason I could read where the players were going to move or pass the ball, came from watching cows my whole life. Yes, cows can be teachers too. Two years professionally was all I played, because I met and fell in love with Wyatt. When we married we decided to move to Twin Falls, ID. This is where I became an assistant coach for women’s college basketball, the same place I played my first two years of college ball (CSI). We lived there for two years and had our first and only child. The day my husband told me he wanted the three of us to go live on my family ranch was one of my favorite days. I always wanted to come back to the ranch, but wanted to make sure Wyatt wanted that as well. So, thirteen years later we are still living and running my family ranch. Our ranch used to be a yearling operation, but has now become a cow/calf ranching operation. We really enjoy the cow/calf operation partly because it is a lot less stressful than when we were running yearlings. My typical day changes based on the seasons

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Jessica (Gibbs) Mesna

by Ruby Uhart

and homeschooling our son. We usually have several of our nieces or nephews out to help for the summer, but this summer we only had one niece. In the mornings, I get up and move sprinklers on our one acre yard (we share a yard with my parents and grandparents house as well), I water my flowers that I try to keep alive and make sure the dogs and cats have water. I wake our son and niece up so they can start their day. On Monday, Wednesday, Friday, our mail gets delivered so I make sure I have the bills paid if there are any to be paid. During haying season I get my tractor greased, fueled and ready for the day. I usually pick up bales, but I will rake, swath, and bale hay if needed. Some days we hay in the morning and have to move cows in the afternoon. Then come evening time we all sit down and have dinner together. Maybe if needed and time allows I will do a load or two of laundry throughout the day. When school starts for my son, I have to change things around a bit to make sure his schooling gets done in a timely fashion. Of course there is always a few odds and ends the happen during the day as well. In the fall, my day usually starts out with coffee on the porch (or in house if it's too chilly) with my husband, then some breakfast and get my son started on school. I try to do a few house or yard chores, while he works on school. Then in the afternoons when school is over, we help Wyatt on whatever project he has going on. Otherwise we, (Anton and I)ride to move cows closer to the fields for weaning time, unless of course, McKenzie and I have a pack out that day. If so, we leave pretty early in the morning so we can get back by the afternoon, hopefully to try and do a few things we need to get done. On the days I have a pack out, my son is on his own for school, which goes ok for the most part but usually ends up getting the rest done when I get back. Then of course, we have dinner together and watching some baseball to relax in the evenings. The most unexpected thing to happen on the ranch for me was the day my mom was killed in a car accident south of the ranch headed to Wells. Not only did I have to learn to live and get through every day without having my mom 50 yards away, but I had to learn to take on all of her responsibilities of book keeping for our family ranch. My mom and I had been talking for probably about 3-4 years that I need to learn how to do all the books for our ranch. Neither of us would make time to sit down and do that though. So when reality set in that it was in my hands now, I relied on a lot of help. Thankfully we have an accountant in the family that helped me a ton, and also our ranch accountant. Still three years later I am learning the ins and outs of everything that my mom did for our ranch.

One of my favorite moments on the ranch was during a branding a few years ago. We always have a big branding with a lot of my family, I am talking 30-40 people, come out and we get a lot of branding done along with a lot of laughs, good food, and great times. One year after a long hot dusty day of branding we were riding back home and came across a pond. My brother decided he was hot and took his horse right in for a swim, clothes, hat, boots, saddle and all. Before long all 13 of us riders (mind you majority of us where over 30) were swimming our horses through the pond. The best part was all of us laughing and giggling like we were a bunch of little kids. Dad was not very impressed we all went in with our saddles, but we had so much fun. I do have to say next time the saddles will come off!!

gets old watching a mama cow take care of her new baby. Branding season is wonderful time to get work done surrounded by family and friends. Not only do we have wonderful family that comes to help but our neighbors, who are good friends, make branding days a lot of fun. Haying season makes for some really long hours. It does help being in an air conditioned tractor while it is so dang hot outside.

Fall is a very busy time for the ranch in general, but I have also started a new adventure. McKenzie, my good friend and neighbor, and I got our sub-guide license four years ago and we pack out cow and bull Elk from the Jarbidge Mountain Range via pack horse during hunting season. It has pushed me to get out of my comfort zone in many different ways. Between all the weaning, school, shipping and wife duties, we fit in all the pack outs people call for us to do. Feeding season, which obviously comes when the snow starts falling is a lot more laid back for our ranch and a lot of fun. Not only do we get to see our cows every day, but we get to enjoy some recreational activities as well. We do as much snowmobiling and sledding as the snow and time allow. We even get a bonfire or two in with the neighbors. My favorite thing about ranching would have to be working alongside my husband and son every day. I absolutely love working with my family, from the laughs to the tears, from the lessons taught to the lessons learned every day is a blessing. Most people when they come out here they say, “you are in the middle of nowhere” and I honestly wouldn’t want it any other way. I love the view from our front porch and back yard!! The hardest part for me would have to be eating our vegetables fast enough they don’t get rotten but not too fast that you run out before you get to town again.

Stress is in everything we are doing, whether it be ranching life or city life. Ranching life I feel could have a bit more stress, just because things you can’t control are a big part of ranch life. Weather and cattle prices play a huge part of the ranching lifestyle that all of us would love to control but everyone knows we can’t. I would still much rather deal with the stress of ranching than the city stress of traffic, too many PEOPLE, or getting to work on time. The advice I would give young women wanting to pursue the ranching lifestyle would be don’t just focus on one aspect of ranching. There are so many different duties as a rancher that you need to be open minded and ready to learn a little bit of everything. It can seem very overwhelming but remember why you wanted to be there in the first place. Don’t forget to take time and look around at the beauty of ranch life. We wives do joke a lot about working cows with our spouses, and sometimes it’s no joke. My tip would be don’t take it to heart and always smile even though you know he is yelling at you for his mistake or yours. When it’s all over and done with for the day remember to give your spouse a big kiss and know it was just the heat of the moment.

How I prepare for complications: “WYATT HELP!!!!!” Oh wait… that would be after it already happens! To prepare for them, to be honest, I am a very easy going person so if something comes up to alter plans or stop tasks, my husband and I will go to plan B or C, there’s always something else that can be done or like my husband says,” let’s just have a beer!!” So we do and we take in the beauty that God has created and we get to live in together.

Ahh yes ranch seasons; I love all the seasons to be honest. That is one of my favorite parts of ranching, the tasks are always changing, whether it be week to week, day to day, or hour to hour. You are never doing the same thing all the time and by the time you are tired of it you are switching gears. Calving season: I love seeing the new baby calves hit the ground every year. We love the ones with white markings on them the best. It never www.progressiverancher.com

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NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 17


In Memory of Fredrick William Stewart Born December 22, 1959 in Winnemucca, NV Passed away September 23, 2019 in Paradise Valley, NV Fred was the only child of Leslie and Marie Stewart. He was named for his paternal great grandfather Fredrich Wilhelm Stock, who founded the family’s 1864 Paradise Valley ranching operation now known as the Ninety-Six Ranch. Fred was the fourth generation of his family to steward the iconic Great Basin ranching operation. Fred grew up on the ranch, and started going out with wagon for spring and summer on the range at age five. He attended the two room Paradise Valley School through grade 8, and then transferred in to Lowry High School. While a Lowry Buckaroo, Fred was an honor student who represented Lowry at Boy’s State, was a state champion shot putter, played football and earned a full athletic scholarship to Boise State University. He was a standout defensive end for the Boise State Broncos. After BSU, Fred attended Wyo Tech and completed their doctor of motors program.

Fred loved fast cars and built three dragsters from gas through Top Alcohol. He was also a student of history and enjoyed collecting firearms. He loved music and was a huge fan of AC-DC. In recent years he taught himself to play guitar and regaled his family with his rockin versions of his favorite AC-DC tunes as well as his favorite old western songs. Fred married his wife Kris in 1993, and in 1997, they welcomed daughter Patrice Marie. Fred, Kris and Patrice worked the ranch along with Fred’s parents Leslie and Marie.

Fred’s greatest hero, his dad Les, passed in 2006, and his beloved mom in 2018. Kris and Fred carried on running the ranch themselves and have enjoyed following Patrice throughout her junior, high school, college and pro-rodeo careers. Fred and Patrice also team roped together at rodeos like the Jordan Valley Big Loop. Fred was a volunteer fireman for over 25 years, a member of the County game board for over 20 years, a founding director of the Humboldt River Basin Water Authority, a director of the Buckaroo Hall of Fame as well as the Nevada Cattlemen’s Association.

Fred is survived by his wife of 26 years, Kris, daughter Patrice, sisters Debbie Stewart and Darlene Root (Frank), cousins Chris DeYoung( Joel) and Tim DeYoung(Leslie), mother in law Barbara Cook, sister in law Kelley Bell(Tom Donaldson), brother in law Dan Bell(Theresa), Brother in law Joe Cook( Jill), nephews Shane Bell, Brad Kaser, Frank, John and Jake Root, nieces Carly Bell, Amber Farris, Jennie Miller and Lana Gallant. He also left behind a lifetime of wonderful friends.

Donations in his memory are welcome at Paradise Valley Building Fund, care of Gary Echevarria, Paradise Valley NV 89426, the Cowboy Christian Fellowship, care of Wade Black, Treasure Valley Community College, 650 College Blvd, Ontario, Oregon 97914. Kris and Patrice wish to acknowledge the friendship, kindness and compassion of Shouping Li, MD and PHd and Dietrich Von Feldmann, MD. Our love and faith remain stronger than our grief. We wholeheartedly believe that the greatest tribute to Fred’s memory is gratitude for the lifetime of memories we share. We live in the surety of faith in our loving, living Savior that we will be together again.  18 NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

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OFFICE: 775-423-7760

Jack Payne Cell: 775-217-9273 • Alt: 775-225-8889 Cedarville - Archie Osborne 775-397-3645 Southern Nevada - Cole Reber 702-232-7351 Carey Hawkins 208-724-6712 | Frank Norcutt 775-223-7390

Full-Service Cattle Sales & Marketing - Serving Fallon, Nevada and the Outlying Areas.

UPCOMING SALES

TYPE #HEAD DESC. WEIGHT

November 7 - Special Feeder Sale November 21 - Special Feeder Sale December 11 @ 4pm - APPRECIATION DINNER December 11 @ 6pm - Special Bred Cow & Pair Sale December 19 - Special Feeder Sale January 16 - Special Feeder Sale Warm days, cool nights, dusty corrals and with no rain in the forecast. We jokingly call October “National Dead Calf Month” but when buyers are dragging off dead calves it’s no joke. If you can get a buyer to answer the phone in October you’re doing good, but it’s common to hear, “I can’t keep the ones I already own alive, why would I want to buy anymore?”. It’s not uncommon for bawling October calves to have a 5% to 7% death loss and in spots, much bigger wrecks than that. 7% death loss on $800 calves is $56/head in addition to the $20 to $30 you dump into them in medicine before they die. $76/head loss on the survivors is a lot of money when often times the buyer is operating on a $50/head margin. I talked to a buyer last week in California that buys 20,000 head annually. His cattle go to California for the winter and then to summer grass in Wyoming and Nebraska. He said he cleared $11/head on his 2018/2019 yearlings and felt damn lucky he didn’t lose $100. Kind of like sitting down at a Black Jack table with your last $100 and then going home at 4 in the morning with the same amount of money you started with and feeling like you won. Not that I have ever done that!! You can see it in the market reports nationwide, weaned calves with 2 rounds of respiratory shots are bringing a premium over bawling non-vaccinated calves. As a sale barn operator I always try to ask consigners what shots their calves have been given. You wouldn’t believe how many of them say, “I gave them 8way at branding and a Multimin”. Multimin is great and a really pretty color, but its not going to keep your calves from dying when the buyer gets them home. As a rancher, a sale barn operator and a guy that buys feeders, I see all angles of this feeder market situation. Buyers want the seller to give a live virus to his calves. The seller says, “when I wean these calves and give them a live virus they get sick, go through a sweat and lose weight. If I don’t vaccinate them, they don’t get sick. So this live respiratory shot is a joke”. Yes, they usually don’t get sick at home because they haven’t been exposed to all the bugs yet. However, put them on a truck and haul them 300 miles and then see what happens. Often times ranchers will wean their calves and then life happens, and they won’t get around to vaccinating those calves for a week or so. After a few days of walking the dusty corrals, they run them in and give them a live virus. A live virus doesn’t kick in and start giving immunity for 14 days. So you just gave a stressed calf with a 7 day wean a live virus and no protection. It is critical to give the shot the day you wean or ideally you would bring them in and pre-vaccinate them 14 days before you wean so they have that protection kicked in when you do wean. I encourage people to use weaning rings so the calf is still with the mom. On big Nevada desert operations weaning rings aren’t a great fit for everyone, but if you come into some meadows to wean, they might work for you. Get your calves weaned, get 2 rounds of live virus respiratory in them and come to the market a late as possible. Last year we saw a 40 cent jump in prices on 350 to 550 pounders between December and January. No guarantees it will happen again this year, but in the 13 years we have been in business here in Fallon, I have never seen light cattle drop in price in January. California usually has rain by then and eastern buyers start looking for spring turn out calves. www.progressiverancher.com

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STR 13 STR 14 STR 7 STR 15 STR 6 STR 35 STR 41 STR 9 STR 2 STR 11 STR 49 STR 9 STR 2 STR 6 STR 6 STR 5 STR 24 STR 6 STR 18 STR 4 STR 5 STR 12 STR 10 STR 10 STR 3 STR 5 STR 5 STR 11 STR 15 STR 2 STR 3 STR 5 STR 6 STR 5 STR 11 STR 8 STR 4 STR 7 STR 1 STR 5 STR 3 STR 3 STR 10 STR 1 STR 1 HFR 3 HFR 21 HFR 5 HFR 7 HFR 10 HFR 4 HFR 4 HFR 6 HFR 22 HFR 5 HFR 6 HFR 47 HFR 2 HFR 5 HFR 16 HFR 6 HFR 7 HFR 6 HFR 1 HFR 3 HFR 11 COW 1 COW 4 COW 1 HFRTT 1 BRED COW 2

MIX BLK BLK BLK BLK BLK BLK MIX MIX BLK BLK BLK BLK BLK BLK BLK MIX CHAR BLK CHAR BLK BLK BLK MIX MIX BLK MIX BLK BLK BBF CHAR MIX MIX MIX BLK MIX BLK BLK BBF RD BLK MIX BLK BLK MIX CHAR BLK BLK BLK BLK MIX BLK BLK MIX MIX BLK BLK MIX MIX CHAR BLK MIX BLK WFCX MIX MIX RBF HOL BLK CHAR BLK

346 460 421 483 377 494 519 477 405 554 572 602 435 545 453 554 581 547 676 569 612 668 629 793 587 717 748 621 718 795 590 688 807 555 710 845 700 629 790 586 627 590 864 795 1205 368 412 437 383 479 328 480 413 502 408 485 519 600 469 571 589 741 511 605 570 560 1405 1903 1400 1225 1218

PRICE CWT $1.81 $1.76 $1.70 $1.68 $1.63 $1.61 $1.59 $1.55 $1.53 $1.52 $1.52 $1.50 $1.50 $1.47 $1.47 $1.47 $1.46 $1.45 $1.42 $1.42 $1.42 $1.40 $1.40 $1.40 $1.40 $1.40 $1.39 $1.38 $1.38 $1.37 $1.37 $1.37 $1.36 $1.36 $1.36 $1.35 $1.34 $1.34 $1.33 $1.33 $1.33 $1.31 $1.30 $1.18 $0.90 $1.61 $1.53 $1.49 $1.49 $1.47 $1.44 $1.43 $1.41 $1.41 $1.40 $1.40 $1.39 $1.38 $1.36 $1.35 $1.33 $1.29 $1.27 $1.26 $1.25 $1.24 $0.70 $0.67 $0.61 $0.71 850.00/H

LOCATION Montello, NV Montello, NV Orovada, NV Denio, NV McDermitt, NV Ruby Valley, NV Montello, NV Orovada, NV Fallon, NV Dayton, NV Ruby Valley, NV Round Mountain, NV Bishop, CA Winnemucca, NV Lovelock, NV Round Mountain, NV Denio, NV Wadsworth, NV Denio, NV Fallon, NV Bishop, CA Dayton, NV Winnemucca, NV Denio, NV Washoe Valley, NV Bishop, CA Orovada, NV Winnemucca, NV Orovada, NV Dayton, NV Wadsworth, NV Winnemucca, NV Fallon, NV Fallon, NV Schurz, NV Austin, NV Fallon, NV Fallon, NV Alamo, NV Fallon, NV Fallon, NV Battle Mountain, NV Fallon, NV Eureka, NV Fallon, NV McDermitt, NV Montello, NV McDermitt, NV Orovada, NV Round Mountain, NV Round Mountain, NV Round Mountain, NV Fallon, NV Ruby Valley, NV Winnemucca, NV Orovada, NV Montello, NV Lovelock, NV Orovada, NV McDermitt, NV Winnemucca, NV Austin, NV Winnemucca, NV Orovada, NV Battle Mountain, NV Lovelock, NV Battle Mountain, NV Fallon, NV Lovelock, NV Fernley, NV Austin, NV

NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 19


Storm on the Prairie: American Prairie Reserve Tries to "Buffalo" Rural Montana

American Prairie Reserve Threatens Ranching in The West

protecttheharvest.com East Coast Biologist & Silicon Valley Entrepreneur Join Forces

The reserve was the brainchild of Massachusetts resident and former WWF Seeks To Create Largest Natural biologist, Curt Freese, who is listed as a Reserve in United States founding executive director of APR. Freese The American Prairie Reserve began in recruited Silicon Valley consultant, Sean 2001 as the Prairie Foundation, created Gerrity, who became another founder of by the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) APR. Gerrity came up with the plan to as a “land trust partner.” The goal of buy any ranches near APR that were put American Prairie Reserve is: on the market. In order to do this, they • To put together the largest natural created a non-profit organization and started collecting donations. In 2004, they reserve in north-central Montana began acquiring land. Since that time, • Recreate what famous explorers Lewis APR has made 29 land purchases and and Clark might have seen in 1805 amassed over 400,000 acres of land, which • The primary focus of the reserve is free- includes the grazing rights on BLM parcels attached to privately owned lands. roaming, naturally regulated wildlife • The total targeted area is 3.5 million This is not the first time something like acres, which is larger than the entirety of this has been proposed. In the 1980s, a Yellowstone and Grand Teton National pair of East Coast professors, Frank and Parks and includes the already preserved Deborah Popper, envisioned creating lands of the million-acre Charles M. the “Buffalo Commons.” The Poppers Russell National Wildlife Refuge and infamously sought to rewild the majority the 375,000-acre Upper Missouri River of the Great Plains, with de-privatizing and depopulating the region as key Breaks National Monument components. They stated that their wish Numerous Ranches Must Be was to return the area to its “original preObtained to Fulfill APR's Vision white state.” The remainder of the lands APR needs APR’s Vision of Rewilding to complete their vision is made up of privately-owned ranches interspersed Over two centuries after Lewis and Clark among millions of acres of Bureau of Land passed through the region, APR’s vision is Management (BLM) administered lands. creating great turmoil in the rural ranching The key to amassing the desired total communities of north-central Montana land is for APR to purchase the ranches because of what they aim to do. APR’s and therefore obtain the BLM grazing central goal, and reason for grabbing up rights attached to those properties. Read every bit of land they can, is to “re-wild” more about the practice of ranching on the area, which was identified by The federally administered land here: https:// Nature Conservancy as the "Northern protecttheharvest.com/what-you-need- Great Plains Steppe ecoregion" in 1999. to-know/ranching-in-the-west-setting- The area is already home to a great many species of wildlife, including elk, big horn the-record-straight/ sheep, antelope, deer, coyotes, mountain Impact to BLM Land lions, prairie dogs, and numerous species The problems with APR’s plans are with the of birds. bison themselves, as well as the way APR Nevertheless, APR is importing wants to manage them. It is important to “genetically pure” bison (or buffalo) in note that no one is protesting what APR an attempt to mimic the great plains of will do with their privately-owned land; yesteryear. The reserve is already home to the issues are what they want to do on about 900 of them, which are considered BLM land, and the effects it would have pure by APR since there are no domestic on the environment, ranch families, and cattle in their lineage. The long-term goal local economies. is to build a herd of 10,000 such bison.  20 NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

APR Uses Unethical Tactics

APR emphasizes that they only buy land from “willing sellers,” but finding those has sometimes proven to be a challenge. In many cases, APR has resorted to less-than ethical methods of obtaining land. In one case, a landowner decided to sell property, but not to APR. Then, upon selling the property to a third-party LLC, the seller found out that the LLC was a front for APR after all. APR researches property ownership and goes after what they consider to be easy targets. They are known to search out small enclaves of property with a different owner than the surrounding property, and aggressively seeking to buy it. If successful in such a purchase, APR then affects the larger ranch around the isolated property in numerous ways, from water rights to access easements.

for some residents who have struggled all of their lives to make ends meet, becoming a multi-millionaire by selling to APR is a siren’s song that’s hard to resist.

The Multiple Personalities of APR

APR has put substantial effort into public relations and keeping up appearances. Examples include offering a limited number of bison hunts, mostly to locals and Montana residents, paying incentives to ranchers who utilize APR-approved management techniques and marketing the beef they raise as its own brand, Wild Sky Beef, and leasing out grazing permits APR isn’t currently using. Permits are often leased back to the ranchers who just sold to APR, generating a very calculated but misleading sense of goodwill. Many locals see right through APR’s grandstanding. APR only leases BLM grazing back to sellers because of the BLM’s “use it or lose it” policy. If an Wealthy Donors Fund APR allotment is left un-grazed for too long, APR’s ability to buy out ranches is made the owner of those grazing rights can lose possible by a few incredibly wealthy them. By keeping the allotments in use, donors, among them former television APR is able to retain control of them. executives, Silicon Valley billionaires, and family members of a co-founder In ranching communities, it is common of Hewlett-Packard. APR also brings practice to help others in many ways, in foreign money through their sister but for APR that only seems to include organization, the German-based group publicity stunts. One local told of APR called Friends of the American Serengeti. making a great show of going to the In 2017 alone, APR raked in over $16 county fair and purchasing 4-H market million in contributions and grants. In animals, making sure to seem cooperative addition to having a board of directors, and philanthropic in the public eye. national council, and national scientific However, in private, APR had already advisory council, APR employs over 40 disallowed ranchers from simply moving people. Job titles range from Graphic their cattle across a section of the reserve Designer to Director of Philanthropy. In to a different pasture as they had always 2017, payroll was listed on the group’s 990 done in the past. form as over $3 million. “It’s not good, there’s nothing good about APR claims that they only pay market APR. They aren’t good neighbors—they’re value for land. However, property values not the kind that are going to stop and have been greatly inflated around the help you if you have flat tire on the side of reserve because of APR. What they pay the road,” said an area resident. for land is similar to extremely expensive APR Meeting Resistance from land in Western Montana, and does not A Variety of Stakeholders reflect the traditional land value of the area. When several existing ranchers APR is rightfully meeting resistance all might pool resources to purchase a ranch along the way, from private ranch owners property, they can’t compete with APR’s clear up to the state legislature. In fact, ridiculously deep pockets. The facts are that two bills aimed at issues with the reserve

The Progressive Rancher

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made it through the legislature, only to be vetoed by Governor Bullock. Signs are posted around the greater area that say things like “Don’t buffalo me, “No federal land grab,” and “Save the cowboy—stop American Prairie Reserve.”

land totaling 290,000 acres; and that the outer perimeter fence be “strengthened” with a single strand of solar-powered electrified wire. One Bozeman resident was quoted in the Tri-State Livestock News as saying: “If BLM changes its rules for APR then they’re actively empowering APR to bulldoze Montana families and communities.” A member of United Property Owners of Montana testified, “We should not let them conduct a radical experiment on BLM lands.”

donations and will be obligated to fulfill those goals they’ve promised.”

The Buffalo Roam

While the number of bison currently on the reserve is a mere fraction of what’s intended, there are already issues with Membership Denied to Montana keeping them where they are supposed Stock Growers Association to be. A number of area residents have APR went as far as to join the Montana already had stray bison appear on their Stock Growers Association (MSGA) as properties and found APR ill-prepared to an Allied Industry member, via an online remedy the problem. State representative portal. The MSGA Executive Committee Dan Bartel (R-Lewistown) stated: “My met immediately upon finding out, and constituents have brought to my attention Following The Law is “Difficult” rescinded APR’s membership due to significant technical, environmental and and “A Hardship” for APR conflicting policies and missions. other complaints that APR may not be a Further, APR is requesting a variance good neighbor with their existing bison America Prairie Preserve’s from ordinances in Phillips County operation.” Bison: Wildlife or Livestock? Conservation District that require that “all One local rancher told of reporting a 2 Categories for Bison - Free Roaming bison/buffalo must be tested and certified, stray bison to APR, only to have APR Wildlife & Privately-Owned Livestock by a state veterinarian to be disease free” employees show up with a helicopter and and that “bison/buffalo must be branded, tranquilizer guns, but no means to actually Bison are categorized in two ways in tattooed, tagged or otherwise identified to remove the animal from the property. Montana. Bison that are free roaming and track its health status.” APR cites “great According to the rancher, he was then told held in the public trust are categorized practical difficulties and unnecessary that if it happened again to “just shoot the as wildlife, but privately-owned bison hardship” as a reason for the request. buffalo.” This begs the question: if APR are legally categorized as livestock. The can’t handle one stray buffalo, how will APR website states that “Although APR’s The Phillips Conservation District (PCD) they handle 10,000? bison are managed as wildlife, as a legal had approved the bison grazing ordinances Bartel was quoted as saying: “Let’s say matter, they are privately owned domestic in June 2016. APR gets 10,000 bison out there. What livestock and subject to the same rules and Revised Proposal happens if the fences break? If the range is regulations as other livestock in Montana.” Is ‘Smoke And Mirrors’ overgrazed? If the money dries up and the Significant Concerns Regarding In late September 2019, it was announced whole scheme fails? What happens with APR’s Bison Management Plans that APR had scaled back its requests 10,000 buffalo? If APR falls apart, who The categorization of bison matters a substantially because of the intense will be responsible? The state of Montana? great deal, since livestock requires hands- resistance they have met, stating their The counties? The feds?” on management, such as vaccinations, for desire to be good neighbors. The revised Even the unlikely event that APR folds their own health, and management of proposal seeks year-round grazing on and there were no bison left, the effects their grazing patterns for the well-being 12,000 acres rather than 290,000, and of removing existing infrastructure would and balanced use of rangelands. Livestock removal of 40 miles of fence instead affect the area for many years to come. In owners are also responsible for keeping of 300. The revised proposal now also the slight chance that the area be allowed their animals where they are supposed to includes a request for rotational grazing to return to traditional uses, replacing be, whereas no one has such responsibility on 48,000 acres. An APR representative fences to reestablish grazing allotments for wildlife. It is of great concern that APR stated that, if granted, the new request would be incredibly cost prohibitive states that their bison will be managed as would last for 10 years, and assumes herd and involve the required lengthy BLM growth of 1,000 buffalo per year. wildlife, for a number of reasons. analysis process, further crippling the local ranching economy. Considering APR’s track record in the APR Seeks Special Treatment from area, those intimately involved in the issue BLM for ‘Radical Experiment’ Bison ‘No Easier on Riparian Areas can see right through this new superficially APR’s mission to devolve the area to its softened approach, and that the longThan Cattle’ condition two centuries ago would require term goal remains the same. The Save The Historically, ranchers have followed rest that the BLM throw away decades of Cowboy movement is a grassroots effort and rotation grazing practices rather sound, well-established range management to stop APR, and on their Facebook page, than the year-round grazing on BLM science and practice. Even while APR referred to the revised plan as a “shameless allotments that APR has requested. manages their bison as wildlife, they can’t ruse.” Range management specialist Terry Holst just turn out 10,000 head of bison on An organizer of the Save The Cowboy worked directly on some of the areas that their BLM grazing permits, which are movement stated: “APR’s platform has not are now part of APR. He was quoted in mandated to be multiple use and include changed—they want to establish a massive, Range magazine as saying: “…buffalo raising livestock, and declare those bison free-roaming bison herd in Central were always where the good water was. to be “wild.” Montana and eliminate our communities They’re no easier on riparian areas than Thus, the APR initially requested that the and our agriculture economy. They know cattle.” Proper management and carefully BLM convert the type of livestock allowed that convincing the BLM to go along timed moving of livestock prevent overuse on APR-held grazing allotments from with this plan, even on a single grazing and damage to sensitive areas. Since the cattle to bison; that 300 miles of fences allotment, establishes a precedent they can APR bison are legally labeled domestic, within the reserve be torn out; that their use to expand over hundreds of thousands but will be managed as wildlife, there will bison then be allowed to run year-round of acres. In the end the American Prairie be no such consideration for areas in need over a combination of state and federal Reserve has received millions of dollars in of more attention and protection. www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

The damaging impact that these unmanaged bison can have on sensitive areas of wildlife habitat cannot be underestimated. Free-roaming bison has been tried elsewhere, only to result in severe overgrazing and the rebuilding of fences to allow for rotational grazing. Range Magazine stated: “For all their romance and symbolism, bison in the flesh are actually pretty boring animals, until they aren’t boring. Nor are they magic miracle ungulates, which automatically leave plenty of graze for other species and riparian areas untouched. ‘That’s why we have range science and rotational grazing,’ (Montana Representative) Dan Bartel (Lewistown-R), points out. ‘All animals have their favorite places, cows, elk, deer, antelope. Bison are no different.’”

Bison Can Harm Livestock & Ranch Breeding Programs

In addition to potentially causing largescale damage to the environment, bison can be a threat to the overall viability of ranches for several reasons. Interbreeding with Cattle Bison can, and do, interbreed with cattle. When done intentionally with a certain ratio of bison to cattle blood, the cross results in a fully fertile and marketable “beefalo.” However, a situation with APR bison running wild, breeding neighbors’ cattle would be certain disaster for ranchers’ breeding programs and therefore overall ranch viability. Spread of Disease Another concern is Brucellosis, a bacterial infectious disease that can affect wildlife, livestock, and humans. It causes stillbirths in cattle, making the disease devastating to ranchers as their annual calf crop is drastically reduced. Bison are just one type of wildlife that can carry and transmit brucellosis to other species, both wild and domestic. Brucellosis has been an issue in and around Yellowstone, and a great deal of resources have been spent to control livestock’s exposure to potentially infected wildlife. APR has imported their bison from certified brucellosis-free herds; however, the animals can still become infected from other species and therefore spread the disease. For this reason, Montana code states: “the legislature finds that significant potential exists for the spread of contagious disease to persons or livestock in Montana and for damage to persons and property by wild buffalo or bison.” Further, code stipulates that a management plan must be developed before bison may be released or transplanted onto private or public land.

Avoiding a Full Environmental Impact Statement—Why?

When any major change on or affecting public lands is requested, a full

NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 21


environmental impact statement (EIS) is normally required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This is to examine potential effects of a proposed action. Seemingly aware that their proposals could easily result in ecological and economic disaster, APR actively sought to avoid an EIS. Somehow, instead, they managed to get by with a less thorough and detailed Environmental Assessment (EA). In the public scoping process of the EA, the BLM received nearly 2,500 comments that were sorted, categorized, and distilled down to 24 concerns. These concerns need to be properly addressed before an official change in the type of livestock allowed can be made. The Environmental Assessment is currently in progress.

sheep, and deer--and the livestock of ranchers that remain in the area--would undoubtedly be drastically affected. Even while APR and its donors are enamored with the past and wild carnivores, they conveniently ignore the role that humans played as apex predators in the grassland ecosystems of yesteryear. Out of necessity, native tribes practiced herd management, moving with migratory animals and utilizing them in every aspect of day to day life. The natives also hunted and killed wild predators. The damage that large carnivores do to livestock, and a ranch’s bottom line, is extreme. Gray wolves were first introduced to Yellowstone Park and central Idaho mountains starting in 1995, and since then have spread across the northwest. Wolves Bison Management Plan kill thousands of domestic livestock Reveals True Motives animals nationwide. USDA/APHIS data It is in APR’s bison management plan shows that in the year 2015 alone, 10,000 that their true motives and exceedingly cattle deaths were wolf kills confirmed convenient, if not outright intentional, by state wildlife agencies. Thousands ramifications become abundantly clear. more livestock deaths are not officially The first three objectives (there are eight confirmed as wolf kills, because many times, despite the lack of obvious external total) listed in the plan are: wounds, animals die from internal injuries OBJECTIVE ONE: Establish a self- or extreme stress from wolf attacks. sustaining, naturally regulated, and What do these objectives mean – ecologically effective population of at Grassland Fires? least 10,000 bison that is free of cattlegene introgression, semi-free ranging, and The presence of apex predators is not subject to all the forces of natural selection. the only threat to the communities OBJECTIVE TWO: Restore all native surrounding APR. Another concerning species and ecological processes and their issue is what they are calling “ecological processes”. APR intends to restore the natural interactions with bison. role of “natural grassland fires,” but it is What do these objectives mean – unclear how or to what extent. If a fire is Apex Predators left uncontrolled on reserve land, it could APR coyly states “if large carnivores very easily spread to neighboring lands. naturally recolonize the region,” they This ignores the fact that native tribes would cooperate with relevant agencies often utilized controlled burns to both in establishing management plans. In the manage the prairie and to control bison previously mentioned RANGE Magazine movements. In the days of Lewis and article, Terry Holst expressed his fear that Clark, fires started by man were managed. “natural regulation” of a free-roaming and OBJECTIVE THREE: Establish a expanding bison herd inevitably means population that serves as a source of importing large carnivores, such as wolves animals for bison restoration throughout and bears, to do the “regulating” of the the Great Plains. population. He stated that such a move What does this objective mean – would “crash game herds, just like wolves crashed deer and elk in Western Montana.” Spread of Bison onto Private Ranches? These smaller species of game are much APR plainly states on their website that easier for wolf packs to hunt than bison, they aim to “restore habitat contiguity… and therefore are more vulnerable. (on) both lands within APR and to nonIndeed, regarding bison population APR lands that are important as buffer management, Yellowstone’s website zones around the reserve and as ecological states: “Due to high rates of survival and corridors for wildlife movement between reproduction, the bison population is APR and other areas important for currently increasing by 10 to 17% per year. wildlife.” Predation by wolves and bears has little It is certainly interesting that APR talks effect on bison numbers.” of wildlife movement “between APR This goes to demonstrate that APR’s and other areas,” since they put on such bison population would remain largely a show of confidence in their “fortified” unaffected by apex predators, but perimeter fence and there are already populations of elk, antelope, big horn bison containment issues.  22 NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

rewilding campaigns are the Wilderness Corridor Act of 2019 and the proposed wildlife corridor in Ventura County, It is not as if the United States is lacking in California. Read more about them here: protected lands. The National Park Service protecttheharvest.com/news/what-you-needoversees over 85 million acres, and the US to-know-wildlife-corridors-conservation-actFish & Wildlife Service manages nearly of-2019/ protecttheharvest.com/news/ventura837 million acres. The APR website boasts county-wildlife-corridor-update-lawsuit-filed/ that “the Reserve is free and open to all walks of life,” but those millions of BLM What many people don’t realize is that equals “depopulating.” lands in question are already “free and “re-wilding” open to all walks of life”—there are just After all, it’s much easier to find “willing no bison on that particular land. However, sellers” when ranches and surrounding there are no fewer than four other places communities can’t survive. The presence in the region with well-established bison of bison themselves—especially 10,000 herds, including Yellowstone, where of them-- will be an immense challenge people can go to view bison. With many to ranchers neighboring APR for both other similar options for tourists and animal health and husbandry reasons. The recreationalists, it’s difficult to see what arrival of wolves and bears to serve as bison the draw for tourists to visit APR really is. population “regulators” is an obvious and daunting threat to livestock and producers. Glamour Camping and Reinvention of APR currently makes a great show of the Conservation Wheel community involvement and cooperation, While the wide-open spaces of the but the future looks uncertain at best for proposed reserve are “free and open” to the next generation of ranchers. Ranches the public, the reserve also offers glamour can’t survive if the APR achieves their camping in climate-controlled yurts, with goals and the area overflows with bison a gourmet chef on hand to cook every and predators. If someone new did want meal. In addition, luxury cabins are being to come to the area and make a go of built overlooking on bluffs overlooking the ranching, or if established ranchers in the Missouri River--definitely not something area wish to expand their operations, no Lewis and Clark would have seen as they one can compete with the kind of money canoed by. Having the largest reserve and behind APR. the biggest, most genetically pure bison As the number of productive ranches herd to view from luxurious quarters may diminishes around APR, the small towns seem on the surface to be just a rich man’s with their schools and businesses will also hobby reinvention of the conservation wither away. The tourism dollars APR wheel. But make no mistake—APR is might generate are a mere drop in the more than meets the eye, and there is truly bucket compared to the revenue created a great deal at stake. through ranching in the area. Simply put, without ranching, there is not enough American Prairie Reserve is a commerce in the region to keep small Threat to Rural Communities – towns going. And really, that seems to be “Re-wilding” Equals Depopulating the point. The wolves and bears haven’t The APR and its goals fall directly in officially shown up yet, but the biggest line with the world-wide trend toward predator of all has already arrived, and it’s “re-wilding.” Other current examples of called American Prairie Reserve.

Is There A Need for American Prairie Reserve?

The Progressive Rancher

Spayed Wild Fillies

www.progressiverancher.com


Reno Snaffle Bit Futurity and Wild Spayed Filly Futurity Contact: Emily Smith | Communications & Education Coordinator | Protect The Harvest | emilyk@protecttheharvest.com

Whitney Campbell The third annual Reno Snaffle Bit Futurity presented by Lucas Oil and Protect The Harvest was just held in Reno, Nevada the week of September 8 – 15, 2019. Along with the classic cow horse snaffle bit futurity classes, the show, again, included the 2nd annual Wild Spayed Filly Futurity presented by Protect The Harvest. The entire event was a great success. Nearly doubling the entries in both the futurity divisions and horse show classes from the 2018 show. Competitors, vendors and spectators came from all over the country to be a part of it. The Wild Spayed Filly Futurity is a unique reined cow horse competition showcasing spayed three-year-old mustang fillies from the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Facility in Burns, Oregon. The 11 fillies that competed were auctioned off last year during the Reno Snaffle Bit Futurity sale and purchased by trainers of all backgrounds; from NRCHA professional trainers like Jason Gay and Andrew Steiger, repeating competitors from last year’s event like Whitney Campbell and Tyler Johnson-Clark, to well-known mustang enthusiasts who were trying their hand at this discipline for the first time.

The Open Futurity Finals fell on Sunday, September 15th, with the highest scoring horses from the preliminaries coming back to compete. Nick Dowers and Smart Shiney Playboy, owned by Clinton and Kim Marshall, took home the championship and $50,000. Nick told Quarter Horse News “He was awesome from start to finish… Two weeks ago I couldn’t push on a cow like I did tonight, and so for him to come out here and just push that cow around... he just handled business, I’m very, very proud of him.” The 2019 Reno Snaffle Bit Futurity and Wild Spayed Filly Futurity reached people nationwide between the Protect The Harvest and Reno Snaffle Bit Futurity social media outlets and the livestream broadcasts.

The Wild Spayed Filly Futurity is slated to return to the 2020 Reno Snaffle Bit Futurity with the ten new fillies sold at this year’s sale. The 2020 trainers include NRCHA professionals, Non-Pro competitors, and well-known Mustang trainers. This important program has accomplished two important goals since its inception in 2017. It brought the issue of over-population of wild horses on American rangelands to public attention The Wild Spayed Filly Futurity filled the seats at the Reno Livestock Events Center. and demonstrated spaying as a viable and humane option to control that population. At the end of the night, Andrew Steiger with South Steen’s Maggie Magpie took home Additionally, the program also showed just how trainable and athletic these horses can the championship with a composite score of 673. They received several prizes including be, hopefully increasing adoptions of wild horses. a championship buckle made by Skyline-Vaquero, a championship saddle made by TBE Cowboy Supply and $25,000 sponsored by Lucas Oil. After the competition, Andrew The Reno Snaffle Bit Futurity is an important western reined cow horse tradition. mentioned that he was so proud of Maggie Magpie, saying, “she has never run that fast Thank you to Lucas Oil and Protect The Harvest, for keeping that tradition alive. down the fence before”. Another aspect of the Reno Snaffle Bit Futurity was the opportunity to celebrate the 2019 Lifetime Achievement Award recipient, Doug Williamson, during the Futurity’s Hall of Achievement Banquet. Doug Williamson has dedicated his life to preserving the traditions of the California Spanish Vaqueros and is a million dollar rider. This award was presented in conjunction with the National Reined Cow Horse Foundation. On Saturday, Phillip Ralls won the Reno Snaffle Bit Futurity Open Bridle Championship on Short N Catt owned by Sarah Davis. Jeremy Meador took home the Open Hackamore Championship on Upper Class Cat, owned by Redtail Ranch LLC. Saturday also included the Reno Snaffle Bit Futurity Sale, where some of the 2019 trained spayed fillies sold as well as the new batch of 2020 Wild Spayed Filly Futurity fillies. Champion filly, South Steen’s Maggie Magpie, sold to Ginny Griswold who has known her since the beginning and followed her journey through the last year. AQHA/ APHA cow horse prospects, broodmares, and trained horses also went through the auction – the high seller of the day was a 2018 red roan filly by Metallic Cat and out of a Shining Spark mare. Her final bid was $31,000. www.progressiverancher.com

Shelby Rosholt and fillies

The Progressive Rancher

NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 23


23RD ANNUAL SALE RESULTS Top ten averaged: $12,468 Average on 78 head actually changing hands: $5,542.41 For complete results, visit www.vannormansale.com

Two days of equinoxial rain of Biblical proportions ushered in the 23rd Van Norman and friends Production Sale weekend! Undaunted by sloshy footing and pools of water, Friday’s events went ahead as scheduled. As one participant aptly put it, we “muddled” through it! Prospective buyers had ample opportunity to view their catalog picks prior to the sale on the vannormansale.com website, which featured an individual page for each horse all of the catalog information, photo, and video. Friday afternoon featured a comprehensive preview of three year olds and older, with commentary provided by Matt Mori and Ty Van Norman who both added their insights and observations of each horse as they previewed. The preview was followed by the Youth Branding Contest which featured several of the sale horses. Anyone who missed the Friday action could see all riding horses and dogs preview once again on Saturday morning.

Lot 70, Washakee Cloud, a 2012 sorrel overo gelding consigned by Ike and Shanna Thomas of Grouse Creek, Utah, topped the sale at $17,500! He was purchased by John and Sabrina Reed of Pine Valley, Nevada. The overall sale average was $5,542. The demand for a well-broke horse is still high, and weanlings and yearlings were much stronger than in the past several years. The 24th Annual Van Norman and friends Production Sale will be held September 18 and 19, 2020. Make your plans now and look forward to seeing you next fall! In the meantime, visit us on Facebook and at www.vannormansale.com as we will be posting new information and features throughout the year.

Bidding was brisk in the barn, on the phone and on the internet throughout the sale. Video of each horse as it sold was displayed on two tv’s mounted on the wall behind the auction bloc. When the dust finally settled (literally), seventy-nine horses and two stock dogs had found new homes under the gavel of Muleshoe, TX auctioneer Steve Friskup, who was assisted in the barn by bid spotters Buck Waite and Justin Morris with the latest addition to the team, Matt Mori, who carried his familiarity with the horses and riders from the Friday and Saturday previews, to the sale barn. Phone bids were handled by Sam Mori, Pete Mori, Joe Cahill, and Allie Bear. Katie Colyer of LiveAuction.TV provided the live streaming to the internet which has also had positive reviews. At the conclusion of the sale, all in attendance were invited to an “after party” on the lawn by the beef barn. Michael and Alex Vipham provided a delicious taco supper, the bar was open, and musical entertainment was provided by Riata Brown and Marinna Mori. It was a fun opportunity for visiting and unwinding after an actionpacked several days!

10 & Under Champion Pete Mori

High seller! Lot 70 Washakee Cloud consigned by Ike & Shanna Thomas, Grouse Creek, UT purchased by John and Sabrina Reed of Pine Valley, NV

After party treat from Marinna Mori

24 NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

The Progressive Rancher

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What it’s all about

The spirit of competition

YOUTH BRANDING RESULTS 10 AND UNDER: 1st Pete Mori 2nd Mamie Rodriguez 3rd Skeeter Severe 4th Rio Thomas

11 THROUGH 14 1st Mountain Spring Walker 2nd Walker Jones 3rd Cleo Fowler 4th Maggie Van Norman

14-18 (HIGH SCHOOL) 1st Isaac Mori 2nd Brock Feyder 3rd Riley Roderick

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The Progressive Rancher

NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 25


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YOUR FARM

By Gil Gullickson “How many of you have sat down and made a list of all the opportunities you should be exploring now?” Mike Boehlje asked attendees at a recent Purdue University Top Farmer Conference. You could hear the proverbial pin drop after the agricultural economist posed the question. Boehlje slowly scoured the room, looking for any takers. Slowly and sheepishly, a few hands emerged followed by awkward silence. “So how many of you will think it will stay crappy forever?” he asked to raucous laughter. "That’s a typical reaction. We have a tendency when economic downturns occur to get so focused on the downside that we ignore the opportunity side,” says Boehlje. "So here's how to turn a down time into a opportunity..." Read the full, in-depth article at

www.agriculture.com/farm-management/11-tips-for-growing-your-farm 1. DECIDE WHETHER TO BUY OR RENT 2. TRY CUSTOM FARMING 3. BUILD WORKING CAPITAL 4. IMPROVE EXISTING FARMLAND 5. CONSIDER SCALING BACK 6. CONSIDER OFF-FARM CAPITAL 7. PAGE CASEY STENGEL (Identify & Fix Your Weak Spots) 8. ESTABLISH SOPS (Standard Operating Procedures) 9. BUY BETTER (Make smart decisions about what is or isn't working) 10. INVEST IN POCKETBOOK-PADDING TECHNOLOGY

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UPCOMING SALE

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Market your cattle with the professionals!

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The Progressive Rancher

NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 27


Native and Introduced Seed Mixes in Rangeland Rehabilitation The Use oF

Annually, rangeland rehabilitation efforts are conducted on rangelands following wildfires as well as on degraded rangelands that are in dire need of improvement to restore ecosystem function and decrease the dominance of invasive and exotic weeds such as cheatgrass. In an attempt to conduct rehabilitation efforts, a growing disagreement exists concerning using primarily native species or should introduced species be primarily used to achieve success. On Great Basin rangelands, cheatgrass is a major concern. Cheatgrass provides a finetextured early maturing fuel that increases the chance, rate, spread and season of wildfire. The ability of this annual grass to be a prolific seed producer, build persistent seed banks through the ability of seeds of this species to acquire dormancy, and its’ ability to germinate and emerge in such a range of temperatures and soils has led to its’ continued success at the peril of native perennial species. The best know method at suppressing cheatgrass is through the establishment of perennial grasses, such as bluebunch wheatgrass and crested wheatgrass. Traditionally, introduced species such as crested wheatgrass was widely used to increase success of rehabilitating degraded rangelands due to researchers and land managers experience and recommendations of achieving higher success with introduced species compared with their experience with native plant species, such as bluebunch wheatgrass.

chemical, seed treatments, transplanting, native and introduced plant materials) to accomplish the daunting task of restoring or rehabilitating degraded Great Basin rangelands.

By Charlie D. Clements, Dan Harmon & James A. Young

Figure 2. Effective weed control practice using a soil-active pre-emergent herbicide to reduce cheatgrass competition and improve success of seeded species. Without an effective weed control practice, successful seeding of desirable species is nearly impossible.

Over the years, more effective tools and improved plant materials have become available. We thought we would share our recent experience of using native, introduced and native/introduced seed mixes and how they performed on degraded Great Basin rangelands. In the fall of 2015 and 2016 we applied the pre-emergent herbicide Landmark (Sulfometuron Methyl Chlorsulfuron) @1.75 oz/ acre rate at two separate sites in northern Nevada, Bedell Flat 25 miles north of Reno and Izzenhood 30 miles north of Battle Mountain. Plots are 1.75 acres in size and replicated twice (Figure 2). The plots were fallowed for 1-year and seeded the following fall with the targeted seed mixes: Native Mix; ‘Anatone’ bluebunch wheatgrass @ 6 lb/ac, Sherman big bluegrass @ 2 lb/ac, Sandberg’s bluegrass @ 2 lb/ac, Wyoming big sagebrush @ 1 lb/ac and Rocky Mountain bee plant @ 1 lb/ac, Introduced Mix; ‘Hycrest’ crested wheatgrass @ 4 lb/ac, ‘Vavilov’ Siberian wheatgrass @ 4 lb/ ac, ‘Immigrant’ forage kochia @ 1 lb/ac and ‘Snowstorm’ forage kochia @ 1 lb/ac, Native/Introduced Mix; ‘Anatone’ bluebunch @ 4 lb/ac, Sherman big bluegrass @ 1lb/ac, ‘Hycrest’ crested wheatgrass @ 2 lb/ac, ‘Vavilov’ Siberian wheatgrass @ 2 lb/ac, Wyoming big sagebrush @ 1 lb/ac, bee plant @1 lb/ac and ‘Snowstorm’ forage kochia @ 1 lb/ac.

The first-year plots sprayed fall 2015 were seeded October 2016 and both sites received excellent precipitation from October 1, 2016 through September 30, 2017 which significantly added to the success of seedling germination and emergence.

The Bedell site received 19.8” while the Izzenhood site received 13.2” of annual precipitation, well above their respected site description of 10-12” for Bedell and 7-9” for Izzenhood. With excellent weed control, >99%, and favorable amount and periodicity of precipitation, seeded species germination and emergence was excellent (Figure 3).

Figure 1. Great Basin Rangelands Research Unit conducting plant material testing plots in 1989 using a half-sized rangeland drill.

For more than three decades we have been testing numerous plant materials to improve rangeland restoration/ rehabilitation success levels (Figure 1). One of our top missions with the USDA, Agricultural Research Service is to improve the sustainability of agricultural practices. To achieve this mission we have always been inclusive rather than exclusive in using tools available (i. e. mechanical,  28 NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

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Second-year plots seeded in October 2017 averaged less initial emergence of less than 10/ft² and less than 5/ft² by the end of the first summer at each site as well as receiving less annual precipitation. The Bedell site received 11.9” while the Izzenhood site received 7.9”, both within the reported site description range. At the Bedell site, the introduced mix established 4.4/ft², and native/introduced mix, 4.1/ft², out-performed the native mix of 3.4/ft². The Izzenhood plots struggled more to establish perennial grasses in the seed mixes as the introduced and native/introduced seed mixes both average 2.6/ft², while the native mix only established 1.3/ft², a 61% decline from 2016 native seed mix plots. Amount and periodicity of annual precipitation is well known as a key factor in germination, emergence and establishment of seeded species in restoration and rehabilitation efforts. Following two years of applying effective weed control practices using pre-emergent herbicides that effectively reduced cheatgrass competition by more than 99%, and testing selective native and introduced seed mixes, we were pleasantly surprised by the performance of the native seed mix at each site compared to past experiences (Figure 4).

Figure 3. In the absence of cheatgrass and other weed competition, seeded species perform very well and have high survival rates. Izzenhood plots April 2017. Initial seedling data recorded in May 2017 was exceptional as each site and averaged more than 15/ft² and by the end of the first summer averaged more than 7/ft², with little to no difference between mixes. Our goal at the onset of these seeding trials is to establish one perennial grass per square foot. At the Bedell site, the native mix averaged 8.4/ft² while the introduced mix averaged 8.0/ft² and the native/introduced mix averaged 7.2/ft². At the Izzenhood site, the average was 9.0, 8.9 and 8.4/ft², respectfully. These plots were recorded monthly through September of each year in which seedling establishment of seed mixes was recorded in September of the second year. The native mix establishment of 4.3/ft², out-performed the introduced, 4.0/ft², and native/introduced mix, 2.3/ft² at the Bedell site in 2016 seeding plots, while the native and introduced plots at the Izzenhood plots both established 3.3/ft² followed by the native/introduced plot, 2.4/ft² in the 2016 seeded plots.

Figure 4. Izzenhood native plot, July 2018, successfully suppressing cheatgrass and averaging more than 3 perennial grasses per square foot.

Figure 5. The use of native/introduced seed mixes can hedge against dry years while at the same time take advantage of favorable precipitation years and be dominated by native perennial grasses as seen here where bluebunch wheatgrass dominates the site over crested wheatgrass. With that said, the decrease in native seed mix performance on average or below average years was significantly less than introduced and native/introduced seed mixes. For example, the Bedell Flat study site is described as receiving 10-12” of annual precipitation, yet after 30 years of having an active rain gauge on-site, Bedell Flat does not receive more than 10” of annual precipitation 64% of the time. If we were to take the site description on face value, the suggested species for seeding on the site would in fact have greater chance of failure do to the site not receiving the estimated precipitation. Our experience over the years has led us to test native and introduced species in the same seed mix to hedge our bets in case average or below average precipitation occurs. For example, using a seed mix of bluebunch wheatgrass and crested wheatgrass @ 4 lbs/ acre each along with a couple of shrubs and forbs has resulted in a bluebunch wheatgrass dominate stand with favorable precipitation and a crested wheatgrass dominate stand with less favorable precipitation while both hold the site and suppress cheatgrass and associated fuels (Figure 5). The successful seeding of perennial grasses significantly reduces cheatgrass densities and associated fuels which reduce the chance, rate, spread and season of wildfires which in turn improves sustainability of grazing resources, improves wildlife habitat values and reduces the threat to adjacent critical habitats.

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The Progressive Rancher

NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 29


What Soil Does Healthy soil gives us clean air and water, bountiful crops and forests, productive grazing lands, diverse wildlife, and beautiful landscapes. Soil does all this by performing five essential functions: Soil health, also referred to as soil quality, is defined as the continued capacity of soil to function as a vital living ecosystem that sustains plants, animals, and humans. This definition speaks to the importance of managing soils so they are sustainable for future generations. To do this, we need to remember that soil contains living organisms that when provided the basic necessities of life - food, shelter, and water - perform functions required to produce food and fiber.

Only "living" things can have health, so viewing soil as a living ecosystem reflects a fundamental shift in the way we care for our nation's soils. Soil isn’t an inert growing medium, but rather is teaming with billions of bacteria, fungi, and other microbes that are the foundation of an elegant symbiotic ecosystem. Soil is an ecosystem that can be managed to provide nutrients for plant growth, absorb and hold rainwater for use during dryer periods, filter and buffer potential pollutants from leaving our fields, serve as a firm foundation for agricultural activities, and provide habitat for soil microbes to flourish and diversify to keep the ecosystem running smoothly. Soil Biology The creatures living in the soil are critical to soil health. They affect soil structure and therefore soil erosion and water availability. They can protect crops from pests and diseases. They are central to decomposition and nutrient cycling and therefore affect plant growth and amounts of pollutants in the environment. Finally, the soil is home to a large proportion of the world's genetic diversity.

• Regulating water - Soil helps control where rain, snowmelt, and irrigation water goes. Water and dissolved solutes flow over the land or into and through the soil. • Sustaining plant and animal life - The diversity and productivity of living things depends on soil. • Filtering and buffering potential pollutants - The minerals and microbes in soil are responsible for filtering, buffering, degrading, immobilizing, and detoxifying organic and inorganic materials, including industrial and municipal by-products and atmospheric deposits. • Cycling nutrients - Carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and many other nutrients are stored, transformed, and cycled in the soil. • Physical stability and support - Soil structure provides a medium for plant roots. Soils also provide support for human structures and protection for archeological treasures. Inherent and Dynamic Properties of Soil Soil has both inherent and dynamic properties, or qualities. Inherent soil quality is a soil’s natural ability to function. For example, sandy soil drains faster than clayey soil. Deep soil has more room for roots than soils with bedrock near the surface. These characteristics do not change easily. Dynamic soil quality is how soil changes depending on how it is managed. Management choices affect the amount of soil organic matter, soil structure, soil depth, and water and nutrient holding capacity. One goal of soil health research is to learn how to manage soil in a way that improves soil function. Soils respond differently to management depending on the inherent properties of the soil and the surrounding landscape.

The online Soil Biology Primer is an introduction to the living component of soil and how it contributes to agricultural productivity and air and water quality. The Primer includes chapters describing the soil food web and its relationship to soil health and chapters about soil bacteria, fungi, protozoa, nematodes, arthropods, and earthworms.

Understanding soil health means assessing and managing soil so that it functions optimally now and is not degraded for future use. By monitoring changes in soil health, a land manager can determine if a set of practices is sustainable. See Soil Health Assessment and Soil Health Management principles for soil health for more information.

The online Primer includes all of the text of the printed original, but not all of the images of the soil organisms. The full story of the soil food web is more easily understood with the help of the illustrations in the printed version.

Soil Health Assessment

To Learn More, Visit www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/ nrcs/main/soils/health/

Soil health is an assessment of how well soil performs all of its functions now and how those functions are being preserved for future use. Soil health cannot be determined Printed copies of the Soil Biology Primer may be by measuring only crop yield, water quality, or any other purchased from the Soil and Water Conservation Society. single outcome. Soil health cannot be measured directly, Go to www.swcs.org so we evaluate indicators.  30 NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

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Indicators are measurable properties of soil or plants Soil Health Assessment Guidelines that provide clues about how well the soil can function. Indicators can be physical, chemical, and biological "Guidelines for Soil Quality Assessment in Conservation properties, processes, or characteristics of soils. They can Planning" describes a step-by step process for assessing soil health. It will help you decide whether to do an also be morphological or visual features of plants. elaborate or simple assessment, which tools to use, and what management practices to use to address soil Useful indicators: health concerns. While the guidelines are presented in • are easy to measure, the context of the NRCS 9-step conservation planning • measure changes in soil functions, process, they are also useful in informal assessments, or as an educational resource for teaching soil health concepts. • encompass chemical, biological, and physical This guide uses the terms soil health, soil quality, and soil properties, condition interchangeably. • are accessible to many users and applicable to field conditions, and Download the pdf here: www.nrcs.usda.gov/Internet/ FSE_DOCUMENTS/nrcs142p2_051259.pdf • are sensitive to variations in climate and management. Soil Health for Educators Indicators can be assessed by qualitative or quantitative techniques. After measurements are collected, they can be Educator Guide Document ArraySoil Health Kit Guides evaluated by looking for patterns and comparing results and Videos help teachers and educators implement their to measurements taken at a different time or field. soils curriculum. Each guide includes an introduction to the soil property, discussion of the inherent and management factors influencing it, and explanation of Indicator Examples and the property's relationship to soil function. The educator's Relationship to Soil Health guides also include detailed information on a method to • Soil organic matter => nutrient retention; soil measure the soil property and interpretations of the test fertility; soil structure; soil stability; and soil results. Helpful to educators, the guides double as lesson erosion plans with thought-provoking questions so students can start to apply what they have learned. Videos cover the • Physical: bulk density, infiltration, soil structure concepts and soil properties from overview to testing. and macropores, soil depth, and water holding capacity => retention and transport of water and To view or download information on nutrients; habitat for soil microbes; estimate of everything mentioned below, visit this website: crop productivity potential; compaction, plow pan, www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/soils/ water movement; porosity; and workability health/assessment/?cid=nrcs142p2_053870 • Chemical: electrical conductivity, reactive carbon, soil nitrate, soil pH, and extractable phosphorus and potassium => biological and chemical activity thresholds; plant and microbial activity thresholds; and plant available nutrients and potential for N and P loss • Biological: earthworms, microbial biomass C and N, particulate organic matter, potentially mineralizable N, soil enzymes, soil respiration, and total organic carbon => microbial catalytic potential and repository for C and N; soil productivity and N supplying potential; and microbial activity measure Soil Quality Indicator sheets for all of the above are available for download here: www.nrcs.usda. gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/soils/health/ assessment/?cid=stelprdb1237387

Educators can download an example training agenda to develop their own session. Also available are pdfs / videos / overviews / tests etc for the following topics: Soil Quality Measurement

Soil health integrates the physical, chemical, and biological components of soil and their interactions. Examine field site or characterization and soil sampling guidelines. Soil Bulk Density/Moisture/Aeration

Bulk density is an indicator of soil compaction. Determine factors which affect bulk density and soil moisture, soil density problems and its relationship to soil function and measure bulk density and soil moisture. Soil Organic Matter

Soil organic matter is the organic component of the soil. Consider factors that affect soil organic matter, how to manage organic matter in soil, soil organic matter relationship to soil function and test for organic matter in the soil. Soil Respiration

Soil respiration is a measure of carbon dioxide release from the soil from decomposition of soil organic matter by soil microbes and respiration from plant roots. Learn factors that affect soil respiration, problems related to respiration, the relationship of respiration to soil function and measure soil respiration. www.progressiverancher.com

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Soil Electrical Conductivity

Soil electrical conductivity (EC) is a measure of the salts in the soil. Examine how to manage soil salinity, factors that affect EC, problems related to EC, the relationship of EC to soil function and measure soil EC. Soil pH

Soil pH is a measure of the acidity or alkalinity of a soil. Consider factors that affect soil pH, soil pH management options, the relationship of pH to soil function and measure the pH in soil. Soil Nitrogen

Nitrogen is the most abundant element in the atmosphere and is usually the most limiting crop nutrient. Investigate factors that affect soil nitrogen, nitrogen management and measure soil nitrate/nitrite. Soil Phosphorus

Phosphorus’ primary role in a plant is to store and transfer energy produced by photosynthesis for use in growth and reproductive processes. Analyze phosphorus management practices and test soil phosphate. Soil Infiltration

Infiltration refers to the soil’s ability to allow water movement into and through the soil profile. Check into management practices that impact infiltration, problems related to infiltration and measure infiltration in soil. For the complete video series and lesson plans, visit our partner site: CropWatch Youth Soil Quality Lessons and Videos here: cropwatch.unl.edu/youth-soil-quality-lessonsand-videos Soil Quality Test Bucket Educator guides are complementary to an abbreviated build-your-own soil health test kit known as the "Soil Quality Test Bucket." It can be assembled to meet your local needs at economical prices. It contains a wearable vest used for easy transport of test supplies in the field. Soil Quality Test Bucket - Assemble your Soil Quality Test Bucket using our checklist of supplies and possible vendors. Supporting Documents and Videos regarding Soil Glue, Estimating Soil Moisture, and Texture by Feel Procedure are also available. (Disclaimer: Trade names are used solely to provide specific information. Mention of a trade name does not constitute a guarantee of the product by the U.S. Department of Agriculture nor does it imply endorsement by the Department or the Natural Resources Conservation Service over comparable products that are not named.)

NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 31


NN evada Farm BF ureau evada arm

Bureau

2019 Will Go Down As A Challenging Year Just before getting started on writing this piece I was reviewing an electronic weekly newsletter that I use to keep current with the agricultural news and events taking shape in the Midwest.

By Doug Busselman, Executive Vice President

that prevented crops in large areas of the Midwest from being seeded. A United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) report from mid-August said that agricultural producers reported that Today’s newsletter was focused on the they were not able to plant crops on more coverage of the more than two feet of snow than 19.4 million acres in 2019. The that was dumped across North Dakota as news account went on to say that this well as the white stuff that hit portions of was the highest level of unable-to-plant South Dakota and Minnesota. Reeling acres since USDA’s Farm Service Agency from incredibly wet conditions already, started making this information available because of the extremely wet fall, harvest in 2007. It also compared the numbers for is not going well and probably won’t make this year against the “mere” 17.49 million much progress until the ground freezes acres of the same status last year. solid enough to keep harvest equipment Of the total prevented planted acres, more from sinking into the mud. than 73 percent were located in the 12 I was able to post on my Facebook page Midwestern states, keeping corn, soybeans a September 28th unusual snow storm and even some wheat fields from being photo from my home in the North Valleys able to be planted. of Reno. The somewhat sudden turn to Although not nearly as devastating as the winter didn’t produce two feet of snow, situation in the Midwest, I’ve not found but was enough to make things white until too many places in Nevada where farmers mid-day the next day. and ranchers have noted that the year Various Facebook video shots I’ve seen of 2019 wasn’t difficult. Again weather from friends in the Southwestern portion conditions in the spring set things off on of Minnesota have been sharing the scenes a slower start and in most areas the crop of silage harvest with the choppers looking cycles were a few weeks later than ideal. like they might need the use of outboard Summer rain managed to find more than motors to make their way across open a few acres of hay that won’t grade out as water in corn fields that aren’t supposed to quality, because of the showers. look like lakes. Equipment being used to Beyond the weather situations, the market receive the chopped silage were requiring news of continuing international trade tracked tractors pulling the harvest trucks strife hasn’t been any easier to deal with. through the fields where such traffic We’ve seen hard to come by market export wouldn’t have otherwise been possible. deals and trade agreements being mired in The challenges at the end of this year’s the Congressional quagmire of a political cycle haven’t been any easier than the situation where those in leadership rest of the season, which started out with positions in the U.S. House being more flooding and extremely wet conditions interested in other matters than giving

needed approval for the United States – Mexico and Canada Agreement. As of late some hopeful agricultural trade arrangements with Japan and even China have given some reason for hope. “Today’s signing marks the successful end to more than a year of negotiation between Japan and the United States.” American Farm Bureau Federation (AFBF) President Zippy Duvall said when the deal was inked. “This agreement means sharply lower tariffs on our farm and ranch exports with the promise of more to come.” Duvall continued noting, “And while we aren’t yet finished opening this market, the conclusion of these talks means we can now trade with Japan with the same advantages enjoyed by signers of the CPTPP trade agreement. That’s great news.” An economic analysis by AFBF economists shares if the new arrangements take effect in March of 2020, there could be beef tariff reductions 38.5 percent to 26.6 percent, a slight improvement and reason to believe it's possible to claw back into markets that haven’t been easy to compete in. On the Chinese side of things, specifically for soybeans, AFBF Chief Economist, Dr. John Newton recently posted details of the latest developments under the headline “We Can’t Rearrange These Deck Chairs,” drawing a comparison with the oftmentioned analogy to the frustrations of time spent straightening out deck-chairs on a sinking ship. Newton’s article drew attention to the problems for soybean exports to China not only stemming from the retaliatory

tariffs by China, but also the devastation to the country’s hog herd (one of the main reasons for Chinese soybean purchases) die-off from African Swine Fever.

His article shared that for the 2018-2019 marketing year, U.S. soybean exports totaled 1.748 billion bushels, the lowest level since the 2012-2013 marketing year and down 18 percent or 386 million bushels, from prior-year levels. China remained the United States’ largest buyer, importing 489.5 million bushels, or 28 percent of the U.S. exports. However, exports to China fell by 53 percent or 546 million bushels from prior-year levels. Exports to China during the 2018-2019 marketing year were the lowest since the 2006-2007 marketing year. U.S. soybean exports to the rest of the world increased by 15 percent or 160 million bushels, to 1.258 billion bushels The malaise from 2019’s agricultural year is going to take some time and a whole lot of progress to brighten. Testy frames of mind sets will need to be worked through and probably will require a lot better weather, improved crop production situations and market prices bolstered by trade pacts still in the works.

For Nevada -- good winter moisture and a summer next year of few fires will go a long way in paving the way to a good year. Recognizing, that for the most part, Silver State farmers and ranchers didn’t take the downside of as many problems as other parts of the country this year we need to find ways of taking stock of our collective blessings as we head toward that Thursday in November.

Western Area County Farm Bureau’s Raffle Tickets

Tickets: 1 For $5 3 For $10

Get your raffle tickets today for an All-Terrain Trailer Sprayer. Sprayer is as pictured and was graciously donated by Silverado Farm Supply. Proceeds go to improvements at the State 4-H Camp. Drawing to be held at the Nevada Farm Bureau Annual Meeting this November. Winner does not need to be present to win. For tickets contact the Nevada Farm Bureau office or Silverado Farm Supply in Yerington or Fallon.

Help us achieve our goal of $12,000 and get your raffle tickets today!  32 NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

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Celebration By Brittney Pericoli, Director of Communications

As summer comes to end District 3 held a collaborative BBQ to begin the centennial celebration leading into our annual meeting this November. District 3 includes: Churchill, Douglas/Carson City, Lyon and Washoe county. The BBQ was held at Bently Science Park in Minden, Nevada. It was a great turn out of Farm Bureau members throughout the area. A big highlight of the evening was when Travis LaChapelle, Deputy Northern Nevada Director to U.S. Senator Jacky Rosen, presented Nevada Farm Bureau President Bevan Lister and Vice President Darrell Pursel with a Certificate of Special Congressional Recognition. The Certificate of Special Congressional Recognition was presented to the Nevada Farm Bureau for 100 years of invaluable assistance, advocacy, and support to Nevada’s ranchers and Farmers. Western Area County Farm Bureau’s sold raffle tickets for an All-Terrain Trailer Sprayer, which was graciously donated by Silverado Farm Supply. Proceeds go to improvements at the State 4-H Camp. Drawing will be held at the Nevada Farm Bureau Annual Meeting this November. Winner does not need to be present to win. For tickets contact the Nevada Farm Bureau office or Silverado Farm Supply in Yerington or Fallon. Churchill County Young Farmers and Ranchers participated in the BBQ by selling raffle tickets for cornhole boards to raise money for events they will hold throughout the year. Raffle ticket sales will continue until November at Annual Meeting where one lucky raffle ticket will be selected. Collegiate Young Farmers and Ranchers also participated in the BBQ with the Time Capsule. People were encouraged to bring their brands to brand the time capsule and items they wish to be placed in the time capsule to be opened in 2069. Collegiate YF&R will be accepting brands until annual meeting. Physical brand not needed for branding. If you are interested in having your brand on the time capsule, or placing an item in the time capsule please contact Brieanna Valdez at, brieanna@nvfb.org. The BBQ was a great start to our Centennial Celebration and we hope you will all join us for our Annual Meeting November 10th through the 13th at the Silver Legacy Resort and Casino.

Guest Speaker American Farm Bureau President

Zippy Duvall

Travis LaChapelle, Deputy Northern Nevada Director to U.S. Senator Jacky Rosen, presented Nevada Farm Bureau President Bevan Lister and Vice President Darrell Pursel with a Certificate of Special Congressional Recognition.

Thank You! The District 3 BBQ planning team would like to thank all the people who made this event possible.

• Stanislaus Farm Supply • Jim Menesini Petroleum • Country Financial • Renner Equipment Widme & Mills • Big R Stores • American Ag Credit • Smith Valley Garage • Schroeder Law Office • Les Schwab Tires • Lahontan Valley Vet • Douglas County Park • Lyon County Farm Bureau • Churchill County Farm Bureau

REGISTRATION NOW OPEN!

100th Annual

Nevada Farm Bureau Meeting November 10 - 13th

Musical Performance by

Trinity Seely

at the Silver Legacy Resort & Casino Register at

NVFB.ORG

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The Progressive Rancher

NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 33


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News from the University of Nevada, Reno

Contact: Claudene Wharton Communications & Senior Marketing Specialist University of Nevada Cooperative Extension College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources University of Nevada, Reno / MS 405 • Reno, Nevada 89557-0404 whartonc@unr.edu • 775-784-7072

www.unr.edu/nevada-today Natural resources specialist studies statistics to improve wildlife conservation Researcher Perry Williams joins the College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources

University of Nevada, Reno welcomes Perry Williams as “I decided to work at the University of Nevada, Reno a new assistant professor in the College of Agriculture, because of the great colleagues and collaborators in the department,” said Williams, who is in the College’s Biotechnology & Natural Resources. Williams concentrates his research on statistical and Department of Natural Resources & Environmental mathematical methods for estimating population Sciences. “The opportunity to work with state and federal processes to improve wildlife management and agencies was also a highlight.” conservation. He has received grants from the National Park Service and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for his research on sea otters in southeast Alaska, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for research on common raven movement and habitat use.

Before he arrived at the University, he worked with wildlife in Alaska, studying various species and researching wildlife management conservation. He plans to perform similar research here at the University, as well as start investigating the wildlife conservation of sage grouse in Nevada, and waterfowl in the Suisun Marsh, California.

He wants to continue his research as part of the College’s Nevada Agricultural Experiment Station by starting and running a lab in statistical ecology to address natural resource management in Nevada.

“Perry Willams brings ... a unique skill set in statistical and mathematical modeling as applied to the conservation of wildlife populations,” said Peter Weisburg, chair of the Department of Natural Resources & Environmental Science. “His expertise adds to a growing cadre of applied scientists with cutting-edge quantitative skills, and we are very excited to welcome him to our faculty.”

Williams plans to continue research wildlife Photo byon Robert Moore. management in Nevada while teaching at University.

New faculty member to teach and advise veterinary students Coretta Patterson joins the College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources Dr. Coretta Patterson has joined the University of Nevada, Reno’s College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources as a lecturer and student advisor. This is the fourth university that Patterson has worked at, which has added to her experiences in both the veterinary and teaching fields. Currently, Patterson teaches undergraduate students in agriculture and veterinary science majors and advises pre-veterinary science students. Patterson completed the Walter and Pauline Adams teaching fellowship at Michigan State University in 2008, and in 2013, she completed the Post Graduate certificate in veterinary education at the Royal Veterinary College in England. “I wanted to work with undergraduate students because of the ways I could guide them,” Patterson said. “I can offer them options that they haven’t considered based on my experiences from working at different institutions.” Coretta Patterson advises undergraduate veterinary medicine students to help prepare them for their futures. Photo by the College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources. www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

Patterson plans to focus on continuing to help pre-veterinary students explore different options for graduate school as well as increase the number of veterinary students in the program. She also wants to concentrate on offering interesting and relevant classes to her students. NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 35


Churchill County Cowbelles Our Favorite Beef Recipes

News from the University of Nevada, Reno

Instant Pot Beef Bourguignon

www.unr.edu/nevada-today Sale finalized for 104-acre parcel at University’s Main Station Farm Escrow closed on deal for parcel that borders McCarran Boulevard north of Pembroke The sale has been finalized for the 104-acre McCarran Planned Unit Development adjacent to the University of Nevada, Reno’s Main Station Field Laboratory. “We are pleased to report that this transaction has now been finalized and all of the contingencies addressed,” University Vice President of Administration and Finance, Vic Redding, said. “The buyer, Reno Land LLC, has met all of the terms previously approved by the Nevada System of Higher Education, Board of Regents and the purchase price is $18 million.” Completing the sale of this property will now allow the University to move forward with projects and staffing initiatives identified as part of the BOR approval item, including: • develop research capabilities at the J Dow NAES wetlands

• construction of the Eureka Agriculture Center for Range and Sheep Improvement • development of the International Center of Dryland Agriculture

• create an endowed professorship for indoor/urban agriculture in Clark County

• renovations of critical laboratory facilities on the University’s main campus for the benefit of all students, research faculty and staff. The sale contract also provides the College of Agriculture, Biology and Natural Resources sufficient time (90 days after close of escrow) to complete the current research project underway on a portion of this parcel and otherwise wind down operations and relocate existing fencing and related equipment. The 802-acre Main Station Field Lab is a major research, educational, and outreach facility operated by the Nevada Agricultural Experiment Station within the College of Agriculture, Biotechnology and Natural Resources at the University. It has been home to herds of cattle and sheep and actively irrigated to grow alfalfa, hay and other crops since 1956. The field lab, commonly known as the Main Station Farm, is home to Wolf Pack Meats, one of the most technologically advanced meat processing plants in the region, which is used to teach meat sciences, used for research and is open commercially to the public. The BOR approved the sale of the McCarran Parcel on November 16, 2018.

36 NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

Pull out your pressure cooker and whip up this quick and easy Instant Pot Beef Bourguignon. You'll be enjoying a savory dish of fall-apart tender beef chunks and veggies quicker than you can say French Bistro. The key to this dish is the thick sauce which is made not only with wine, but with drippings from bacon and beef. I think it's a law that it must be mopped up with a big piece of crusty french bread. I like to use chuck beef, but the shoulder, shin, or any braising cut will work. Prep time is only 15 minutes, then the Instant Pot does all the work - only 45 minutes for what is normally a five hour braising time. Trust me, you'll want to make extra (it freezes well for up to 3 months). If Ina Garten and Julia Child created a beef bourguignon together – this would be it! Ingredients:

• build ADA compliant classrooms at Main Station Field Lab

Contact: Mike Wolterbeek Communications Officer University of Nevada, Reno/108 Reno, NV 89557 775-784-4547 mwolterbeek@unr.edu | www.unr.edu/nevada-today

by Pegi Witte

1 tablespoon oil 6 slices bacon, roughly chopped 3 pounds chuck beef, cut into 2-inch pieces 1 cup red cooking wine (you can substitute chicken broth) 2 cups beef broth 1/2 cup tomato sauce 1 beef boullion cube, crushed 1/4 cup flour

2 large carrots, cut into 2-inch pieces 1 white onion, chopped 1 tablespoon fresh garlic, minced 2 tablespoons fresh thyme, chopped or 3 teaspoons dried thyme 1 pound baby potatoes, any kind 8 ounces fresh mushrooms, sliced 2 teaspoons salt / pepper (more to taste) Chopped parsley for garnish

Directions: 1. Set instant pot to SAUTE. Drizzle with oil and sear bacon 3-4 minutes until cooked through. Use a slotted spoon to transfer to a paper towel lined plate and set aside. 2. Add the pieces of beef to the pot and sear 3-4 minutes, using tongs to rotate pieces periodically to brown them well on all sides. 3. Add red wine to the pot, scrape any brown bits off the bottom and sides of the pot and into the liquid. Simmer and reduce for about 5 minutes. Gradually add beef broth, tomato sauce, and boullion. Gradually whisk in flour. 4. Stir in bacon, carrots, onions, garlic, thyme, potatoes, mushrooms, salt and pepper. Cover and set to PRESSURE COOK or MANUAL. Set to 45 minutes. 5. Do a natural release for 10 minutes (do nothing, just allow to depressurize during this time) then switch valve to VENT and do a quick release. Once float valve drops, remove lid. Set to SAUTE again and allow to thicken for 5-10 minutes. 6. Stir well and taste; add salt and pepper if needed. Garnish with chopped parsley if desired. Serve by itself, or over wide egg noodles, rice or mashed potatoes. SLOW COOKER INSTRUCTIONS: Use a skillet on the stove over medium-high heat for steps 1, 2, and 3. In step 4, transfer everything from the skillet into a slow cooker, then cover and cook on low for 6-8 hours. Uncover, set to HIGH, and stir in a corn starch slurry (1 tbsp corn starch dissolved into 2 tbsp cold water, whisked well). Allow to thicken for about 30 minutes, then finish with step 6.

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NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 37


Cool spring weather and good horses greeted a record crowd of buyers and sellers at the 16th Annual Shelman Family Ranch and Performance Horse Sale in Burns, Oregon. The two-day event consisted of a full working preview. Every horse of riding age completed a lead in conformation preview, a ranch trail class and free style dry work demonstration. The Shelmans once again offered a stock horse contest which fielded a class of 10 horses shown in the Snaffle bit, hackamore, or bridle. The champion stock horse was Lot #25 “Olivias Pepinic” a 2014 bay gelding consigned Julie Pereira and shown by JR Marshall of Atwater, CA. He marked a 72 in the reining and a 74 on the cow work. JR won a Marsh Bros Spade Bit for his winning run. He was also shown in the team roping, branding and doctoring contests. The fancy bay gelding sold for $16,000 to the Fulmer Ranch in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. The Moore Ranch from Jordan Valley, Oregon won the fast time in the branding and doctoring contest and took home the .22AR long rifles. Dan Moore competed on Lot #45 “Docs Firewood” a 2010 bay gelding. The good ranch gelding and solid head horse sold for $16,000 to Ron Anderson from Central Point, Oregon. Tyrell Moore was mounted on Lot#48 “Docs Driftin Down” a 2007 bay roan gelding. He sold for $7500 to Fee Stubblefield from Seneca, Oregon. Kate Moore held up her end of the three-man contest on Lot #8 “Playgirl N Coveralls” a 2015 bay roan mare. She sold for $5000 to Demaree Ranch LLC from San Ardo, California Smoked Tri-tip and baked beans barbeque and all the fixings was served on Friday night and was enjoyed by all who wanted to brave the cool weather. Prepared and served by the ladies at Shelman Ranch, the homemade meal was a nice end to a chilly day. Special thanks to Buermann’s Ranch Meats for preparing the meat. Saturday morning June 8th dawned warmer and allowed sellers to show their horses dragging calves to the branding fire, head and heel style, in true eastern Oregon tradition. Following the calf branding, those who did not compete in the stockhorse contest were able to work a single cow and head or heel the animal in an untimed ranch roping demonstration. Buyers were able to the view the horses natural cowsense and stockhorse ability. Sellers were able to show their horses in ranch doctoring, tie off and show their ability to handle and hold heavy cattle on the end of a rope. The rope horses had the last show prior to the sale on Saturday and were well received by buyers and sellers alike. Many of the high sellers later that day were shown extensively in the team roping preview. Anyone who had advertised there horse as fast had the opportunity to prove it on fresh Corriente cross steers supplied by Dan Moore. Sellers had ample opportunity to rope on and score their mounts. Savvy buyers were able to inspect the horse’s ability run, rate and turn cattle and stand quietly in the box. Glenn Shelley offered the presale entertainment with his Old West Bronc Riding Contest. Colton Merrill, Taylor Merrill, and Paul Padilla each saddled and crawled across the snubbin horse to mount their bronc for a crowd-pleasing show. Paul Padilla took the reride option and rode a second horse for an 82-point ride on the good Shelley bronc “Three Quarters”. Paul also sold Lot #2 “JP Little Jacspin” a 2011 Dun gelding for $11000 to Miles Johnsrud from Mineral Wells, Texas.  38 NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

The sale started promptly at 2pm and was called by Auctioneer Blake Nuffer from Horse Prairie, Montana. Buyers at ringside and viewing from the live internet feed got down to business, with Lot #1 “Pistols Smokin Cinder” a 2016 roan gelding consigned by Cory and Jaris Shelman. The stand-up roan colt was the high selling 3yr old and sold over the phone for $7500 to Rick Jones from Stevenson, California. Lot #32 “I'm Stylish Royalty” a 2014 sorrel gelding consigned by Mary Nelson from Cool, California and ridden by Cole Hook from Red Bluff, California commanded the top bid of $20,500 from Abby Estes of Elko, Nevada. The handsome gelding was the best type and kind and was shown flawlessly in every portion of the preview. The reserve high seller was Lot #24 “Chromes Pink Floyd” a 2010 roan gelding consigned by Taylor & Amelia Wakely from Deeth, Nevada. The big roan horse was straight up in the bridle and family friendly. He sold to Lightning 7 Cattle from Preston, Idaho for $20,000. The third spot went to LOT #17 “Playin Stylish Zees” a 2013 sorrel gelding consigned by Landon and Annie Hall from Howell, Utah. The fancy ranch gelding with all the bells and whistles sold to Craig and Betty Rulison from California for $19,500. The high selling mare was Lot #44 “Scooters Firecracker” a 2011 chestnut mare consigned by Tanner and Stephanie Nielsen from Jackpot, Nevada. She was shown extensively in every portion of the preview and contests and was solid all the way around. She sold for $10,500 to Tom Strand from Terrebonne, Oregon. Grade geldings held their own, with the top 3 averaging $10,416. Lot #59 “Shorty” a 2012 sorrel gelding consigned by Scott Crozier of Roosevelt, Utah sold for $14000 to Doug Jackson. “Apache” Lot #28 a 2014 paint gelding was consigned by Cory Dean Shelman, he sold for $10,000 to Oregon Ranching Company from Long Creek, Oregon. “Ollie” a 2008 grulla gelding consigned by Jim and Allicia Bentz of Drewsey, Oregon sold for $7250 to Carol Dunten also from Drewsey, Oregon. The Shelmans finished the sale with a set of yearling colts and fillies. Lot #68 “Casino Chex Gold” a 2018 dun gelding consigned by Casey and Kristen Shelman tied for the high spot with LOT #69 “Docs Legacy Chex” a 2018 brown gelding consigned by Dean and Norene Shelman. Each brought a final bid of $2700. LOT #68 sold to Dan Crozier from Roosevelt, Utah and Lot #69 sold to Jeff Maupin from Riley, Oregon. At the end of the day 59 horses passed through the ring with 51 sales achieved for a gross of $517,100.00 and an average of $8915.52 a head. The top ten sellers averaged $17,250 apiece. The top 20 averaged $14375 each. Every horse under saddle (51 total) averaged $9839. Complete sale results can be found on the Shelmans website at www. shelmanfamilyhorses.com. The Shelmans wish to thank all the consignors, buyers, family, friends, sale staff and vendors who make this event possible. Mark your calendars for the 17th Annual Shelman Family Ranch and Performance Horse Sale to be held June 12-13, 2020 in Burns, Oregon.

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2019 high seller at the Shelman Family Horse Sale was Lot 32 consigned by Mary Nelson and purchased by Abbie Estes for $20,500.00

2019 Reserve high seller at the Shelman Family Horse Sale was Lot 24 consigned by Taylor and Amelia Wakley and purchased by Lightning 7 Cattle Co for $20,000.00

www.progressiverancher.com

The Progressive Rancher

2019 Third high seller at the Shelman Family Horse Sale was Lot 17 consigned Landon and Annie Hall and purchased by Craig and Betty Rulison for $19,500.00

NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 39 


Outcome Based Grazing History and Update Kathryn Dyer | kdyer@blm.gov. Thank you for maintaining an interest in the Outcome Based Grazing initiative. We are working on getting more information out to all of you through a variety of methods, including videos and other media, so stay tuned for more in the future as these projects keep progressing. There has been a lot going on, but many times things move slowly before they bolt. I hope you will find the below update informative, and that it will renew your interest in the initiative as we continue to move forward. BLM currently manages livestock grazing on 155 million of the 245 million acres of public land. More specifically, the BLM administers nearly 18,000 permits and leases held by ranchers who graze their livestock, mostly cattle and sheep, at least part of the year on more than 21,000 allotments under BLM management. In August, 2017, the BLM began a new initiative for Outcome Based Grazing Authorizations (OBGA). Under this initiative, the BLM worked, and continues to work, with livestock operators to develop OBGA that provide greater flexibility for adjusting grazing use due to changing conditions in order to achieve specific vegetative, habitat, and livestock operation sustainability objectives. In September 2017, the BLM issued a news release describing the OBGA demonstration project and requested interested permittees to work with their local BLM office for project submissions. The BLM received nearly 20 proposals. In January 2018, the BLM announced the 11 selected demonstration projects: • Lakeview Oregon, Fitzgerald Ranch • Burns Oregon, Roaring Springs Ranch • Craig Colorado, Little Snake L.& L. • Rawlins Wyoming, P.H. Livestock • Lewistown Montana, Elk Creek • Twin Falls Idaho, Deep Creek Ranch LLC • Carson City Nevada, Smith Creek Ranch • Battle Mountain Nevada, Willow Ranch • Ely Nevada, Uhalde Ranch • Elko Nevada, Horseshoe • Elko Nevada, Winecup-Gamble The local BLM field office will use selected demonstration projects to share experiences and demonstrate or develop best practices to apply beyond the demonstration projects. As the demonstration projects progress, they will give BLM and our partners information and experience for developing consistent national policy to implement outcome based grazing as a standard practice. The information acquired through this effort will also allow potential recommendations for regulatory modifications that could better provide for the ability to issue OBGA that maximize and normalize using greater flexibility when addressing changing conditions. In September 2018, the BLM developed the first national policy that defined the requirements for incorporating flexibility into grazing permits. The BLM Instructional Memorandum (IM) 2018-109, Flexibility in Livestock Grazing, specifies that ‘The BLM may authorize grazing permits and leaseholders (permittees) to exercise flexibility by making adjustments in their livestock grazing use to accommodate changes in weather, forage productions,  40 NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

effects of fire or drought, or other temporary conditions when flexibility is included in an allotment management plan (AMP) or its functional equivalent.” The policy also states that at least one of the alternatives in the National Environmental Policy Act analysis must describe and analyze the flexibility, including the objectives and monitoring plan. The BLM will address the flexibility in the grazing decision, and then incorporate the flexibility as a term and condition of the subsequent grazing authorization (permit/lease). Currently, prescriptive terms and conditions in grazing permits/leases often interfere with an operator’s ability to implement necessary and timely grazing management adjustments. The demonstration projects will use grazing authorizations as a framework for livestock operators to demonstrate their ability to achieve habitat and vegetation objectives by providing them flexibility to exercise their knowledge, experience and stewardship. For example, rather than specifying dates for moving between pastures or having strict on/off dates, management will focus on achieving end results using indicators like grazing utilization patterns (using utilization studies) and seasonal use/rest balance for the goal of balancing forage and habitat resources for the greatest mutual gain. Local knowledge and experience provides the foundation for broader implementation, providing BLM with a consistent approach to working with permittees to provide authorizations that meet conservation and restoration needs on public lands while meeting economic and social needs simultaneously. The process for developing OBGA will include the development of SMART objectives (specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and timely) through identification of vegetation and habitat needs on an allotment or multiple allotment basis. These objectives will be within the capability of the site (attainable), specifically described to meet habitat and production needs (measurable), and achievable in a specified time. These metrics will allow managers/operators to make timely adjustments to respond to the results of their monitoring. The monitoring also provides managers/operators the monitoring data to show results of flexibility after implementation. The authorizations will incorporate a monitoring and evaluation plan to ascertain achievement or progress toward achieving objectives, annual habitat conditions, and vegetative trends. The plan will identify the type of data/ information needed, data collection methods and standards, who will collect the data, the monitoring schedule, and the evaluation schedule. Included in each OBGA (permit) will be a cooperative monitoring agreement in line with the policy from Information Bulletin (IB) 2018-106 (Cooperative Monitoring Memorandum of Understanding between the Bureau of Land Management and the Public Lands Council). The demonstration authorizations will consider conditions and management on adjacent allotments to provide context for the demonstration area objectives. Where desired, the demonstration areas will include management objectives and describe coordinated grazing management on associated private, state, or other federally managed lands, similar to current Exchange of Use Agreements or Coordinated Resource Management Plans. The terms and conditions in authorizations will include actions to be taken when indicators or evaluation findings show vegetative, habitat conditions or objectives are not met, or a lack of progress toward meeting the objectives is identified. In addition, the requirements of the NEPA, CCC, and other applicable laws apply. The Progressive Rancher

Currently, a fully processed grazing permit contains the following components: • Data review/collection/analysis • Land health assessment/evaluation/determination • NEPA analysis • Proposed/final grazing decision • Permit/Lease issuance • Implementation • Monitoring (effectiveness and compliance) The OBGA demonstration projects have additional components. These include: • BLM field office staff, managers and headquarters representatives meet with project participants to discuss landscape concepts and develop ecological objectives. • BLM staff will use the information from the demonstration areas in the development of guidance to field office staff for identifying landscape and ecological objectives. • BLM field office staff, managers and others, as needed, meet to discuss economic/social (operational) objectives. • BLM staff will use the information from the demonstration areas to develop guidance to field office staff on operational objectives. • BLM staff will develop a comprehensive plan for the transfer of lessons learned and successes that can be applied beyond the demonstration areas. • BLM field office staff, managers and headquarters staff have monthly conference calls to coordinate and give updates, including sharing methods, successes, and lessons learned. • The field office staff, permittee participants, and others as appropriate, meet annually at a minimum, to share and discuss monitoring results and effectiveness, and any potential modifications.

Lakeview Oregon, Fitzgerald Ranch • 6 allotments (Abert Seeding, Coyote-Colvin, South Rabbit Hills, Shale Rock and Fitzgerald FFR) containing 196,000 acres of BLM managed land. • The focus of the project is primarily on meeting the average utilization levels by pasture and stabilizing or reducing headcuts in the stream system, and putting in additional range improvement projects (RIPs), which will allow for better distribution and less impact on riparian areas. In addition, this project includes grazing cheatgrass strategically and purposefully based on phenology. • The field office issued the final decision and revised EA on June 7, 2019. No appeal was received, and the permit was issued. • The field office has been actively working with the permittees to implement and conduct the field monitoring described in the cooperative monitoring agreement. A cooperative monitoring training was provided to ensure that all participants are comfortable with all monitoring techniques they will be implementing. The BLM, Intermountain West Joint Venture, and University of Nevada, Reno collaborated to provide the training. Burns Oregon, Roaring Springs Ranch • Three allotments (Basque Hills, South Catlow, and South Steens) containing 170,000 acres of BLM managed land. • The project focuses on the reduction of cheatgrass to improve ecological processes and reduce fire risk. It will also focus on improving riparian conditions, addressing juniper expansion, and coordinating grazing between livestock and wild horses. www.progressiverancher.com


• The EAs are complete for the Basque Hills and South Steens allotments, and include on-the-ground projects. The grazing permits are fully processed (issued in compliance with laws, regulations, and policy) for these two allotments and expire in 2025. • The grazing permit for South Catlow allotment has been issued in accordance with Section 402(c) (2) of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act as amended by Public Law No. 113-291. The field office is in the process of completing the Land Health Assessment and Evaluation (expected by early 2020), which will be followed by completing the appropriate NEPA analysis. • Roaring Springs Ranch hosted a BLM supported stockmanship workshop with Whit Hubbard and Steve Cote in June 2019. www.partnersinthesage.com/blog/ high-noon-for-low-stress Craig Colorado, Little Snake L. & L. • Three allotments (Ricegrass, Seven mile and Piskwik) containing nearly 17,000 acres of BLM managed land. • The project focuses on providing opportunities to manage across habitat needs and landscapes to balance the crossownership management and provide flexibility to respond to habitat and ecological needs annually. • The monitoring plan is not yet final and they are working to create a complimentary cooperative monitoring agreement. The field office will incorporate the monitoring plan and objectives into an alternative in the NEPA document. Rawlins Wyoming, P.H. Livestock • Six allotments (Tipton, Latham, Fillmore, Coalbank, Monument Draw, and North Wamsutter) containing nearly 115,000 acres of BLM managed land. • The project is focused on providing flexibility that will allow all six allotments to be managed together in order to balance uses and needs. • The project is working with the Wyoming Department of Agriculture, Sustainable Rangeland Roundtable and the University of Wyoming to incorporate social and economic objectives in the NEPA alternative and analysis. • The field office completed a watershed-based permit renewal on 3.22.19, of which 6 (OBGA allotments) of the 60 allotments in the watershed are included. • The field office anticipates completing the OBGA permit renewal in calendar year 2019. Lewistown Montana, Elk Creek • Four allotments (King, King 7-Heifer Pasture, King Winter Pasture, and Marsh Hawk) comprise nearly 9,000 acres of BLM managed lands. Also included are over 15,000 acres of private land and over 1,200 acres of State of Montana managed lands. • The focus of the project will be range improvement projects, grazing rotations, and habitat improvement. • The field office has completed data collection and plans to complete the Land Health Assessment/Evaluation and EA by the end of 2019. Twin Falls Idaho, Deep Creek Ranch LLC • Four allotments (Kerr-Berger, Ellis-Tews/Wrigley, Lierman-Wegener, and Tews Isolated) containing approximately 16,708 acres of BLM managed lands. • This project focuses on being able to maintain and improve wildlife habitat through vegetation treatments in crested wheatgrass seedings while maintaining the integrity and functionality of the livestock operation. www.progressiverancher.com

• The BLM and permittees have signed a cooperative monitoring agreement and 2019 is the first year of implementing the monitoring plan. • Idaho BLM has posted a couple of videos to increase awareness of this effort: • https://www.facebook.com/BLMIdaho/videos/ 559908497836397/ • https://www.facebook.com/BLMIdaho/videos/ 412049849625833/ Carson City Nevada, Smith Creek Ranch • Three allotments (Porter Canyon, Edwards Creek and Carson) containing approximately 194,579 acres of BLM managed lands. This project has a variety of conditions and resources present. Sage grouse and Lahontan Cutthroat Trout, as well as, other wildlife and associated habitat. The management plan for this area is to improve both riparian and upland resources. Some issues noted are cheatgrass increases, Pinyon and juniper encroachment, as well as monitoring and potentially helping manage wild horse overpopulations. • Range improvement projects will include piping water offsite into troughs to mitigate for horse impacts to the riparian areas while still providing water. Numerous treatments will also be proposed, as the change in ecological systems cannot be accomplished through changes in grazing management alone. • The Herd Management Area within the Smith Creek Ranch is currently on the Fall/Winter 2019 gather schedule. • The field office expects to complete a draft Land Health Assessment and Evaluation in calendar year 2019, followed by initiation of the NEPA analysis. • Success of a recent collaborative tour of the Smith Creek Ranch can be seen at https://www.facebook.com/ BLMNevada/posts/2762551440440376 Battle Mountain Nevada, Willow Ranch • The public land portion (51,297 acres) has nine pastures with variable ecological conditions to accommodate rotations. Older crested wheatgrass seedings are prevalent in the allotment. The project will focus on maintaining or increasing deep-rooted natives, maintaining or attaining proper functioning condition, and maintain seeding health. • The field office finished data collection in summer, 2018. • The field office has initiated a discussion with the Forest Service to discuss the potential for including a vacant neighboring Forest Service allotment. • The field office is currently working on creating an AMP. • The office is now pursuing the completion of a Land Health Evaluation prior to initiating the NEPA analysis, which will lead to a more holistic approach to objective setting and alternative creation. Ely Nevada, Uhalde Ranch • Thirteen allotments (Thirty Mile Spring, Badger Spring, Butte Seeding, Duckcreek, Jakes Unit Trail, Preston Lund Trail, Batterman Wash, Black Bluff, Murphy Gap, South Coal Valley, West Timber Mountain Worthington, and White River Trail allotments) with approximately 491,597 acres of BLM managed lands (in Basin and Range National Monument and Bristlecone FO), 22,560 public AUMs (13,868 sheep and 8,692 cattle). Six of the 13 allotments are common use allotments. Goals include improving or maintaining ecological conditions while The Progressive Rancher

providing the flexibility to respond to weather, and other changes in conditions. • There are horse overpopulations on the Thirty Mile portion (North). The field office is working with the permittees on how they are going to adapt grazing to accommodate where the horses are currently distributed. There are several permits that the Uhalde’s use less than 50% of their annual permitted use due to the horse impacts. • Data collection is nearly complete on all 13 allotments. The field office expects to complete the Land Health Assessment in early 2020 followed by initiation of the NEPA analysis for the OBGA permit renewal. Elko Nevada, Horseshoe • Two allotments (Horseshoe and Scotts Gulch) containing approximately 30,000 acres of BLM managed lands in a checkerboard pattern with state/private land. This project focuses on managing and improving cheatgrass dominated landscapes through the implementation of strategic timing of grazing. • This project strives to address a cheatgrass dominated landscape with minimal intermixed native perennials in order or stop the conversion to a cheatgrass monoculture. • The project will integrate new monitoring techniques that could prove to be affordable and functional for informing management. • This project was briefly postponed until the merger of Barrick and Newmont Mines (now Nevada Gold Mines) solidified. This merger occurred, and ownership of the company officially changed as of July 1, 2019. • Nevada Gold Mines and the Tuscarora Field Office reinitiated the effort in October of 2019. Elko Nevada, Winecup-Gamble • Four allotments (HD, Gamble Individual, Dairy Valley, and Pilot Valley) containing 390,000 private land (including third party private landowners) and 558,000 acres of BLM managed lands. There are over 52,000 AUMs permitted on the public land. There are 30 public pastures and 43 private pastures. This proposal includes multiple kinds of livestock, varieties of riparian and upland ecological improvements, and a variety of monitoring. • The project will integrate new monitoring techniques such as remote sensing and Grazing Response Index, which could prove to be affordable and functional for informing management. • Project objectives include increasing resiliency to fire, maintaining and improving wildlife habitat and riparian resources, and improving the condition of the land for all uses. The development of objectives ensuring the social, cultural and economic viability and enhancement is also central to this project. • The Winecup-Gamble Ranch has engaged with The Nature Conservancy (TNC) to facilitate an inclusive group to assist in the development of the Ranch Alternative. https://www.partnersinthesage.com/blog/ outcome-based-grazing-winecup-gamble • The field office anticipates completing the draft Land Health Assessment and Evaluation for all four allotments in calendar year 2019. I hope this article answered any questions you may have had, but if you have lingering thoughts or questions, please don’t hesitate to contact Kathryn Dyer at kdyer@blm.gov. Thank you again for your ongoing interest in this important effort! NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 41


Non-Pro Hackamore - Entries 3 Horse Owner Rider Last of the Legacy Zack Kelly Moonshine Amego Matt Marvel Cadallac Cat Matt Marvel

JM CAPRIOLAS OUTSTANDING HORSE Cayenne Cat • Owner: Ken & Lorna Jones ANDY STEVENS/CHAZ MITCHELL BEST ALL AROUND NON-PRO RIDER • Bea Lee NV COWBOY HORSEMANSHIP AWARD • Wyatt Lear Non-Pro Snaffle Bit - Entries 5 Horse Owner Reba Millie Wakley Cat At Heart Renee Jackson Smoothie Joi Brackenbury Hannah Teldin McLain

Rider 213 209 198 193

Open Snaffle Bit - Entries 4 Horse Owner Neat King Flo Casey Bieroth 47 Janet Kubichek Pepinics CD Sharon Rhoads Bolt Matt & Leah Mori

Rider Score Earnings Casey Bieroth 217 $476.00 Flint Lee 216 $282.00 Michael Vipham 207.5 $188.00 Matt Mori 206.5 $119.00

Non-Pro Cowhorse - Entries 11 Horse Owner Rider Cats Gotta Pepto Bea Lee A Rumor Has It Millie Wakley Surely Sophisticated Jamie Melarkey Ace Tanice Gardner

Score Earnings Fence $520.00 $315.00 $210.00 $130.00

Score Earnings Fence 196.5 $486.00 195.5 $281.40 195 $187.60

Nevada Hackamore - Entries 2 Horse Owner Uno Im Wright Michael Vipham Halo Ruby Tuesday Cindy Cullen

Rider Score Earnings Michael Vipham 216 $549.60 Flint Lee 210 $316.40

Two Reined - Entries 7 Horse Owner Cayenne Cat Ken & Lorna Jones Handy N Gotta Gun Flint Lee Peparoo Matt Mori Smoothie Taylor Wakley

Rider Todd Fitch Flint Lee Matt Mori Taylor Wakley

Nevada Cattle Working - Entries 13 Horse Owner Rider Cayenne Cat Ken & Lorna Jones Todd Fitch Neat King Flo Casey Bieroth Casey Bieroth Handy N Gotta Gun Flint Lee Flint Lee Persheys Nick Dowers Jacob McKay

Score Earnings 144 $784.00 141 $513.00 140 $342.00 68.5 140 $196.00 68

Score Earnings Fence 217 $608.00 213.5 $381.00 210 $254.00 209 $152.00

Score Earnings 147 $872.00 144.5 $579.00 139.5 $386.00 138 $218.00

Champion of the Two Rein Class, Nevada Cattle Working and Outstanding Horse Cayenne Cat owned by Ken & Lorna Jones and shown by Todd Fitch

photos provided by Elko Co Fair Board

Wyatt Lear won the NV Cowboy Horsemanship Award Prizes donated by Nic Dowers & JM Capriolas

42 NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

The Progressive Rancher

www.progressiverancher.com


Women's Class - Entries 9 Horse Owner Hesa Pleasen Prize Kyla Rianda Cats Gotta Pepto Bea Lee Cuchara Dr Playgun Riata Goemmer Rumor Has It Millie Wakley

Rider 217 214.5 214 208.5

Score Earnings $696.00 $447.00 $298.00 $174.00

Limited Non-Pro Bridle - Entries 7 Horse Owner Rider JP Colonel BlackCatt Anna VanNorman Dancing Ms Freckles Rachel Wines Surely Sophisticated Jamie Malarkey Persheys Jacob McKay

Score Earnings 210 $608.00 207.5 $381.00 71 207.5 $254.00 68 206 $152.00

Nevada Champion Cowhorse - Entries 7 Horse Owner Rider Nics Highbrow Jymme Dominguez 288.5 Little One Time Flint Lee 288 DW Dun Frettin Michael Mori 283.5 Fancy New Diamond Luke Logan Jake Logan

Score Earnings Fence $608.00 $381.00 $254.00 275 $152.00

Open Bridle Horse Little One Time Cats Gotta Pepto

Owner Tammy Lee Bea Lee

Bea Lee won Top Non Pro Rider Award donated by Andy Stevens & Chaz Mitchell www.progressiverancher.com

Rider Flint Lee Bea Lee

Score Earnings 218 $532.00 139 $313.00

Young Buckaroos Champ 8 And Under Louise Delong

Junior Riders 13-16 Horse Owner Fairlea Cherlena Guns DeLong Family Bay Max Amanda Draper JP Colonel Blackcatt Ty Van Norman Badger Justin Sorenson

Rider Score Earnings Billy DeLong 205.5 $256.00 Amanda Draper 204.5 $157.00 Anna Van Norman 203 $103.00 Keaton Sorenson 199 $64.00

Young Buckaroos 8 and Under - Entries 13 Horse Owner Rider Score Perry Delong Family Louise Delong 1st Sister Bug Mike & Theresa Marvel Macy Marvel 2nd Best Girl Wendys Little Lena Charlee Sestanovich Charlee Sestanovic 3rd Lady Bug Anna Rudolf Anna Rudolf 4th Roanie Pete Mori Pete Mori 5th Best Boy Easter Morning Shine Davis Family Ruby Jo Kelley Twist Lily Melarkey Lily Melarkey Isaac Mike & Theresa Marvel Mikey Marvel Conigar Wylin Mclain Wylin Mclain Spot Merkley Family Cray Tervort Shane Cotton Mckay Cotton Mckay Groot Maisie Melarkey Maisie Melarkey Chip Quirt Mckay Quirt Mckay Junior Riders 9-12 - Entries 14 Horse Owner Quigley Ira & Jaime Slagowski Twist Gary & Candace Wines Fletches Playboy Nic Dowers Dotty Ty Van Norman Rosie Mickey Mike & Theresa Marvel Tallulah Fox Delong Family Ben Zane Wines Reminics Kiss Sneaky Ella Roderick Jingles Buzzetti Family Joe Metoe Sharon Rhoads Fino Sharon Rhoads Doc Sorenson Family Tebow Tony & Tammy Buzzetti Princess Charley & Tanice Gardner Jazz Konda Wakley

Rider Score Ellie Slagowski 1st Taylor Gardner 2nd Best Girl Crue Dowers 3rd Best Boy Maggie Van Norman 4th Marianna Mori 5th Ben Marvel Matti Delong Zane Wines Hannah Rose Kelley Ella Roderick Jade Buzzetti Cooper Tervort Sarah Pfiefer Mamie Rodriguez Michelle Sorenson Ruby Buzzetti Bill Gardner Wade Wakley

Judge - Gary Stark | Scribes - Debbie Armuth, Kim Satterthwaite Kim Jackson, Daryl Santos

The Progressive Rancher

more ECF Results on the following pages —> NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 43


Women's Branding - Teams: 9 First Place C5 Marisa Julian Bailey Corkill Tess Turk Mattie Johns

Times $1,688.00 4:58:40 $422.00 $422.00 $422.00 $422.00

Second Place

Damele Girls Emily Carrasco Deanna Pollock Beth Damele Katie Damele

$1,012.80 5:09:85 $253.20 $253.20 $253.20 $253.20

Third Place

Lucas Livestock $675.20 6:26:33 Taylor Hurley $168.80 Desi Dotson $168.80 Jymme Dominguez $168.80 Jessica Kelly $168.80

Second Place Third Place

Iveson/Filippini $600.00 6:13:63 John Filippini $150.00 Austin Iveson $150.00 Garrett Brown $150.00 Snuff Peavey $150.00 Lee Stockhorses $400.00 9:24:75 Kenny Lee $100.00 Flint Lee $100.00 Cowboy Rodriguez $100.00 Jim Young $100.00

Co-Ed Branding - Teams: 30 First Place Walker Ranch Ira Walker Tilly Walker Allen Malotte Katie Cavasin

Second Place OE Bar Ranch Open Branding - Teams: 30 Times Bailey Corkhill First Place Mori Range Bulls $5,125.00 4:46:22 Retired Chad Zunino Accum Hanes Holman Michael Mori $1,281.25 $300.00 Asher Freeman Asher Freemen $1,281.25 $300.00 Marisa Julian Hanes Holman $1,281.25 $300.00 Quinn Mori $1,281.25 $300.00 Third Place Lazy JN Ranch Will Knight Second Place Walker Ranch $3,075.00 5:09:15 RC Crutcher Ira Walker $768.75 Jessica Kelly Will Knight $768.75 Timmy Lynn Delong RC Crutcher $768.75 Allen Malotte $768.75 Team Roping #11 Peyton Feyder Third Place Bute Boys $2,050.00 5:31:94 #15 Justin Martin $512.50 Cole Weston $512.50 Muley Roping - Teams: 120 KC Weston $512.50 First Place Range Martin $512.50 Barak Freeman Michael Mori Open Incentive Times Second Place First Place Deadman Ranch $1,000.00 5:57:60 Trenton Jones Trevor Carrasco $250.00 Austin Carrasco Austin Carrasco $250.00 Third Place Josue Madrigal $250.00 Trevor Carrasco Chance Kretschmer $250.00 Quinn Mori Fourth Place Barak Freeman Quinn Mori  44 NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

The Progressive Rancher

Times $4,960.00 4:13:19 $1,240.00 $1,240.00 $1,240.00 $1,240.00 $2,976.00 4:32:97 $744.00 $744.00 $744.00 $744.00 $1,984.00 4:44:28 $496.00 $496.00 $496.00 $496.00 Austin Carrasco

$1,700.00 $850.00 $850.00 $1,065.60 $635.00 $635.00 $850.00 $425.00 $425.00 $430.00 $215.00 $215.00

Fast Time First Round $235.00 $235.00

www.progressiverancher.com


NV Cowhorse Champ Jymme Dominguez

ECF Womens Class Champ Kyla Rianda

Open Branding Champs

Women's Branding Champs

Open Incentive Branding Champs

www.progressiverancher.com

Co-Ed Branding Champs

The Progressive Rancher

NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 45


X

71.5

$52.43

208

X

X

203.5

X

X

Smooth and Shiny 45

Smooth As A Cat

Janet Kubichek

Flint Lee

70

$43.69

66.5

Pepinics CD

Smart Little Pepinic

Dean Or Sharon Rhoads

Michael Vipham

70

$43.69

69

Janet Kubichek

Flint Lee

Rodney Koberstein

Michael Vipham

$34.95

64.50

NRCHA $1 NP LTD

X

X

Michael Vipham

NRCHA Non Pro Lmtd

X

$209.71

Rodney Koberstein

NRCHA $5 Non Pro Lm

$314.57

211.5

Hickory Holly Time

NRCHA NVNP Bridle

212

$34.95

Hickorys Monster Mash

NRCHA Int NP B

$87.38

71

17 18 19 26 27 28 NRCHA Non Pro Bridle

73.5

$52.43

NRCHA LAE NP FUT

NRCHA LAE OPEN FUT

NRCHA LAE Derby

NRCHA NP Hackamore

NRCHA Lmtd O Hackam

NSS LTD NONPRO B

NRCHA Open Hackamo

NSS Lmtd Hackamore

NSS NP LTD / DERBY

NSS Open Hackamore

$87.38

70

NRCHA $$

Ave Placing$

71.5

NRCHA Score

NSS TOTAL

NSS OPEN FUTURITY

19 20 21 10 11 14

Fence Placing$

87

$87.38

67

Flint Lee

6

FENCE/BOX

Janet Kubichek

5

Rein Placing$

CD Diamond

3

70.5

NSS OPEN FUTURITY Diamond AK 47

1

REIN

RIDER

Herd Placing$

OWNER

NRCHA REP- FLINT LEE HERD

SIRE

DRAW SHEET

NV STUD

HORSE

Saturday

NSS NP Lmt Futurity sn

REINED & DRY WORK

NRCHA LAE FUTURITY Diamond AK 47

CD Diamond

Hickorys Monster Mash

67

71.5

73.5

212

$440.00

X

X

70.5

70

71

211.5

$264.00

X

X

$176.00

Smooth and Shiny 45

Smooth As A Cat

Janet Kubichek

Flint Lee

70

66.5

71.5

208

Pepinics CD

Smart Little Pepinic

Dean Or Sharon Rhoads

Michael Vipham

70

69

64.5

203.5

Richard Yamasaki

Jason Gay

62

69

68

199

Smart Mamba

NSS & NRCHA OPEN HACKAMORE CLASSES -REIN & CALL FOR COW

NRC&CHA Approved

Mr Metallic Freckles

Gary Stark

Metallic Cat

Gary Stark

Very Smart Rey

Betsy Searle

71

Matt Mori

Hesa Pleasen Prize

Smokums Prize

67.5

$43.69

68

72.5

NRCHA NON PRO BRIDLE CLASS -REIN & CALL FOR COW A Rumor Has It

$43.69

$43.69

207

$131.07

135.5

0

72.5

72.5

X

X

X

X X

$460.00

X

X X

NRC&C NRC&CHA Approved

Taylor & Amelia Wakley

Amelia Wakley

71

71.5

143

142.5

Kyla Prunty Rianda

Kyla Prunty Rianda

71

70

141

141

$310.00

X X

X

X

X ECNRCHA NOVICE NON PRO BRIDLE Hesa Pleasen Prize

Smokums Prize

Kyla Prunty Rianda

Kyla Prunty Rianda

Kyla Prunty Rianda

Kyla Prunty Rianda

69

Malichi McLain

60

70

71

141

141

$205.00

X

NSS Limted Bridle Hesa Pleasen Prize DR Pepto Im Not Lonely

Smokums Prize Freckled Lil Pepto

X Malichi McLain

$52.43

210

$157.29

$34.95

66

$34.95

186

$104.86

X

X

NRCHA $1 NP LTD

198

NRCHA Non Pro Lmtd

$39.32

NRCHA NVNP Bridle

67.5

NRCHA $5 Non Pro Lm

$26.21

NRCHA Int NP B

$26.21

17 18 19 26 27 28 NRCHA Non Pro Bridle

$39.32

X

NRCHA LAE NP FUT

X

$157.29

NRCHA LAE OPEN FUT

$235.93

203

NRCHA LAE Derby

214

NRCHA NP Hackamore

$65.54

66

NRCHA Lmtd O Hackam

72.5

NSS LTD NONPRO B

65.54

NRCHA $$

69.0

NRCHA Score

$65.54

Ave Placing$

72.0

NRCHA Open Hackamo

NSS Lmtd Hackamore

19 20 21 10 11 14 NSS NP LTD / DERBY

NSS Open Hackamore

87

NSS TOTAL

6

Fence Placing$

5

FENCE/BOX

3

Rein Placing$

1

NSS OPEN FUTURITY

NRCHA REP- FLINT LEE REIN

RIDER

70

Herd Placing$

OWNER

60

$52.43

HERD

SIRE

DRAW SHEET

NV STUD

HORSE

Saturday

$34.95

71

NSS NP Lmt Futurity sn

REINED & DRY WORK

$52.43

NSS NON PRO LIMITED / DERBY Cats Gotta Pepto

Cats Gotta Diamond

X Bea Lee

Bea Lee

Arc Peptos Belle

One Time Pepto

Sharon or Thomas Kirkpatrick Carolyn Greene

69.0

$39.32

68

Halo Ruby Tuesday

Halreycious

Cindy Cullen

Cindy Cullen

64.0

$26.21

66.5

Cats Gotta Diamond

Bea Lee

Bea Lee

69

72.5

141.5

Alward Ranches Inc

Timothy Alward

70

63

133

Bea Lee

Bea Lee

69

72.5

141.5

Lynette Phillips Menke

Lynette Phillips Menke

68.5

67

X

X X

NRCHA Non Pro Limited Cats Gotta Pepto Select Code

$310.00

NRCHA $5k Non Pro Limited Cats Gotta Pepto

Cats Gotta Diamond

One Time Rey

$310.00

135.5

NRCHA $1000 Non Pro Limited Gunners Main Event Halo Ruby Tuesday

Halreycious

Arc Peptos Belle

One Time Pepto

Light Um Up

46  NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

Courtney Claypool

Courtney Claypool

Cindy Cullen

Cindy Cullen

69

67

136

$312.00

66.5

67.5

134

$104.00

Sharon or Thomas Kirkpatrick Carolyn Greene

68

66

Alward Ranches Inc

0

64

Katheen Alward

The Progressive Rancher

134

$104.00

64

www.progressiverancher.com


photo :www.nicolepoyo.com

photos provided by Elko Co Fair Board

Amelia Wakley on Rumor Has It took 1st in NRCHA Non Pro Bridle Class

Matt Mori on Peparoo took 1st in the Two Rein www.progressiverancher.com

Flint Lee on Diamond AK 47 took 1st in the Open Futurity The Progressive Rancher

NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 47


213

X

19 NRCHA NON PRO TWO RE

X

X

18 NRCHA OPEN TWO REIN

X

$157.29

14

NRCHA Open BRIDLE

213.5

13

NRCHA Lmtd Open BRIDL

X

$235.93

9 NSS 2 Rein/ Green Bridle

$393.21

7 NSS Open Bridle

216

13

NRCHA LAE FUT OPEN

69.0

$131.07

12

NRCHA LAE Derby NON P

$131.07

NRCHA LAE Derby

Casey Bieroth

72.0

NSS Open Derby

Dave Thacker

70

NSS LTD FUTURITY

73

$104.85

NRCHA $$

FENCE

$104.85

72

11

Ave Placing$

Rein Placing$

72.0

$78.64

4

TOTAL

REIN

$26.21

71.5

2

Fence Placing$

Herd Placing$

71.0

RIDER

3

NSS LTD DERBY

1

Dave Thacker

OWNER

HERD

SIRE

NV STUD

HORSE

NRCHA REP- FLINT LEE

NSS Open Futurity

DRAW SHEET

SUNDAY

NSS OPEN DERBY & ECNRCHA DERBY 4 & 5 YR OLDS OPEN REIN & Same Order for Cow Work Smokum Guns N Glory Cuttin With A Gun Neat King Flo

Fairlea Guns N Glory

X Dave Thacker

Spooks Gotta Gun

Sliding Sister Ranch

Neat Little Cat

Uno Im Wright

Hes Wright On

Gunnys Gotta Remedy

Fairlea Guns N Glory

Mr Metallic Freckles

Metallic Cat

Bieroth Ranch

72.0

$78.64

71.5

$52.43

Michael Vipham

66

71.5

209

X

Dave Thacker

69

71

68

208

X

Gary Stark

Gary Stark

71

69

67

207

X

X

Michael & Alex Vipham X Dave Thacker

$26.21

$52.43

ECNRCHA DERBY 4 & 5 YR OLDS OPEN Cuttin With A Gun

Spooks Gotta Gun

Sliding Sister Ranch

Dave Thacker

71.5

72

70

213.5

$332.00

X

X

Neat King Flo

Neat Little Cat

Bieroth Ranch

Casey Bieroth

72.0

69.0

72.0

213

$201.00

X

X

Debi Michaels

Dave Thacker

69

70.5

71.5

211

$134.00

Gary Stark

Gary Stark

71

69

66

206

X

X

Madison Bugni

Madison Bugni

65

68

68

201

Hot Damn Im Smooth Mr Metallic Freckles

Metallic Cat

X

NRCHA LAE Derby NON PRO Not Outa Luck

NSS & NRCHA Open Bridle Class REIN & CALL FOR COW Little One Time Proceed To Party

One Time Pepto Nic It In The Bud

Tammy Lee Aimee Sumner

X

$305.00

NRC&CHA Approved Flint Lee

70

$52.43

JD Thacker

66

$34.95

67.5

$34.95

72.5

$52.43

73

$52.43

210.5

$157.28

X

72

$34.95

210.5

$104.86

X

X

ECNRCHA Open Bridle Haida Lena Peppy

Diane Resetar

Jason Gay

69.5

72

141.5

Little One Time

Tammy Lee

Flint Lee

67.5

73

140.5

$460.00

X X

NSS TWO REIN /GREEN BRIDLE REIN & CALL FOR COW Peparoo

Smart Little Pepinic

Matt & Leah Mori

Matt Mori

71

$65.54 $39.32 $26.21

Handy N Gotta Gun

Spooks Smart Chic

Flint Lee

Flint Lee

68

GA Star Kitty

Smooth As A Cat

Taylor & Amelia Wakley

Taylor Wakley

67

$65.54

72

39.32

214.5

$235.93

X

X

67

26.21

72.5

65.54

207.5

$157.29

X

X

70

$39.32

65

$26.21

202

71.5

ECNRCHA Open Two Rein Peparoo

Smart Little Pepinic

Handy N Gotta Gun

Spooks Smart Chic

Light Um Up

X

0

Matt & Leah Mori

Matt Mori

71.5

72

143.5 139.5 67

Flint Lee

Flint Lee

67

72.5

Alward Ranches

Jason Gay

67

0

$249.00

X

X

$166.00

X

X X

Hi Point Champion Nevada Stallion - Fairlea Guns N Glory • Nevada Bred High Money Earner Award - Dave Thacker • Champion Stallion - Fairlea Guns N Glory Fairlea Guns N Glory

Nevada Bred High money earner Award-

Dave Thacker

Champion Stallion -

Fairlea Guns N Glory

photo www.nicolepoyo.com

Anna VanNorman on JP Colonel Blackcatt 2nd, Jr Riders 13-16

48  NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

Dave Thacker on ECNRHCA Derby Winner Cuttin With A Gun

photos provided by Elko Co Fair Board

Hi Point Champion Nevada Stallion-

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Flint Lee on NRCHA Open Bridle Class Rein Winner Little One Time

photos provided by Elko Co Fair Board

Dave Thacker on Open Derby Winner Smokum Guns N Glory

photo provided by www.nicolepoyo.com

Taylor Hurley First Place ECF Women's Branding

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NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 49


RANGE PLANTS FOR THE RANCHER Waterleaf (aka Ballhead Waterleaf) By Paul T. Tueller, Ph.D., CRMC

As we ride through the sagebrush country we see numerous annual and perennial flowering plants. Some are very showy and others are not obvious. However, they contribute to the overall vegetation complement found on the high desert rangelands of Nevada. The plant I wish to briefly describe is one that I champion because of it’s beauty and fact that it often is obscured by the leaves above and is of beauty when you finally see the blooms below. The plant I am talking about is waterleaf or sometimes called Ballhead waterleaf (Hydrophyllum capitatum). It is native to Western North America from British Columbia to central California, Utah, Nevada and Colorado. and is a member of the Borage Family (Boraginaceae). It is often found in areas of bare soil or in thickets, forest openings, or moist slopes from the foothills up to nearly the upper tree line. The genus Hydrophyllum contains just eight species, all native to North America. Linnaeus came up with the name based on two Greek words meaning “waterleaf ”, a term that has also persisted as the

50 NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019

common name. All of the waterleaf species are fibrous-rooted perennials with bell-shaped white to purple flowers and stamens that extend well beyond the rim of the corolla. Waterleaf (Hydrophyllum capitatum) is an easily identified species since the inflorescence is held well below the leaves, in a tight cluster, at the top of a spreading-hairy stalk up to 12 inches tall. Individual flowers are attached by pedicels (flower stalk) less than a quarter of an inch long, lengthening and becoming recurved during the fruiting stage. Flowers have a hairy, bell-shaped, five lobed calyx, and a pale purple, five-lobed corolla, the lobes of which are about twice as long (a third of an inch). The style and anthers are exerted. The cluster of flowers can occur along the short, leafy stem, or right at the ground surface. Having flowers and fruits at ground level is often correlated with distribution of seeds by ants. Leaves grow from the base, on long, short-hairy stalks. The blades are divided into 5, 7 or 9 leaflets, some partly lobed terminating in a short spike. Leaflets have a prominent midvein. The blades and petioles of the leaves are similar in length, up to 8".

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Traditionally, Hydrophyllum, Phacelia, and related genera have been placed in the Hydrophyllaceae family. The family has usually been considered closely allied with the phloxes (Polemoniaceae), nightshades (Solanaceae), and morning glories (Convolvulaceae) based on floral and fruit similarities. Recent studies emphasizing chemistry and genetics suggest that Hydrophyllaceae should be lumped with the borage family (Boraginaceae). This proposal remains controversial, as the two groups differ significantly in fruit anatomy. More research is needed to resolve the issue. In the past, Native Americans and pioneer settlers gathered the tender young shoots and fleshy-fibrous roots as a source of food. Young waterleaf shoots and leaves, collected before the flowers appeared, were used by native peoples and settlers as a cooked vegetable. They are best boiled in 1-2 changes of water and served with vinegar. Some tribes boiled or steamed the large and fleshy roots of ballhead waterleaf with the bulbs of yellow glacier lily. As for as grazing is concerned it is not a strong forage producer but is of interest to all of us as we roam around our Nevada rangelands.

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NOVEMBER - DECEMBER 2019 51