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CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO Newspaper of the Archdiocese of San Francisco

SERVING SAN FRANCISCO, MARIN & SAN MATEO COUNTIES

ICA Cristo Rey Academy

Convent & Stuart Hall Sacred Heart Schools, Atherton

www.catholic-sf.org

SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

$1.00  |  VOL. 23 NO. 11

NOTRE SACRED HEART PRIORY DAME CATHEDRAL WOODSIDE

BELMONT

ARCHDIOCESE OF SAN FRANCISCO

2021 2022

CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL ISSUE MERCY HIGH SCHOOL

SI

ST. IGNATIUS

COLLEGE PREPARATORY

JUNIPERO

SERRA HIGH SCHOOL

Archbishop

riordan

high school

Inaugural magazine coming

September 10, 2021

MARIN

CATHOLIC


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LETTER FROM

Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone

O

ur Catholic schools and, indeed, our world, have been through a lot in the past year and half. “Unprecedented” has been a common refrain in our discourse as families, teachers, and school communities have navigated numerous challenges brought on by the pandemic–from school closures, distancing, masks, and even the inability to encounter Christ in the sacraments. Perhaps everyone who faces great challenges in their time believes that what they face is unprecedented. However, as St. Augustine said, “Bad times! Troublesome times! This is what people are saying. Let our lives be good; and the times are good. We make our times; such as we are, such are the times” (Sermon 30 on the New Testament, 8). In the past year, while so many families around the world have been limited to virtual learning, Catholic schools in the Archdiocese, like so many Catholic schools across the country, have been open for in-person learning while maintaining the highest safety protocols to ensure the well-being of all members of our school communities. The Church’s great mission of evangelization and education does not cease when challenges arise, even when they appear to be “unprecedented.” On the contrary, it is precisely when we are in need of the Good News of Jesus Christ crucified and risen that the Lord raises up holy men and women to be leaven for the world. The reality is that Catholic schools have always served students and families in and out of season, through times of conflict, famine, distress, and yes, even in times of pandemic. When the cry of God’s children suffering from leprosy on Molokai went up, God raised up St. Damien to minister to them. When immigrants from every nation had no one to lean on, God sent Mother Frances Xavier Cabrini and her sisters to serve them. When indigenous people and African Americans had been forgotten, God did not forget them, calling St. Katherine Drexel to establish schools to bring them hope.

start of the pandemic. The Second Vatican Council’s Declaration on Christian Education, Gravissimum Educationis, states, “indeed the Catholic school, while it is open, as it must be, to the situation of the contemporary world, leads its students to promote efficaciously the good of the earthly city and also prepares them for service in the spread of the Kingdom of God, so that by leading an exemplary apostolic life they become, as it were, a saving leaven in the human community” (GE 8). It is the theological virtue of hope that enables us to look beyond the sufferings of this present age and to be witnesses of the Lord’s faithfulness. Bearing witness to hope is one of the goals of Christian education identified in Gravissimum Educationis, namely, that “...aware of their calling, they [students] learn not only how to bear witness to the hope that is in them but also how to help in the Christian formation of the world” (GE 2). I am immensely proud of our teachers for their perseverance and dedication throughout the past year for doing just that, reminding our students and our world that, despite changing protocols and mandates, God is always present and faithful to us. Our Catholic schools have been and will continue to be a sign of hope for the world. While times and challenges change, our mission remains steadfast. Unprecedented is nothing new. As we enter into this new school year, we pray for an increase in the virtue of hope, that we may be open to the ways in which the Lord is calling us to be leaven for the world and to be witnesses to the hope that we have within us (1 Peter 3:15).

I am reminded of the old Nike slogan, “impossible is nothing.” We might say that “unprecedented is nothing new” for the Church and her schools. As a reminder of the constancy of their mission, one high school in the Archdiocese even adopted the saying “mission as usual” as an informal motto at the

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Letter from Superintendent of Schools;

Notice of Non Discriminatory Policy. . CHS3 Steps for Applying to Catholic High Schools;

Archbishop Riordan High School . . . CHS11 Marin Catholic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHS12 ICA Cristo Rey Academy . . . . . . . . . CHS13

Graduation Outcomes . . . . . . . . . . . . CHS4

Woodside Priory School. . . . . . . . . . CHS14

Why Choose A Catholic High School?. CHS5

Junípero Serra High School. . . . . . . CHS15

Archbishop Riordan: New Students, same Crusader Spirit. . . . . . . . . . . . . CHS6

Convent & Stuart Hall and Sacred Heart Schools, Atherton. . . . CHS16

Fully Alive: The Catholic School Advantage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CHS8

Notre Dame Belmont . . . . . . . . . . . . CHS17 Mercy High School, Burlingame. . . . CHS18

Marin Catholic: St. Vincent de Paul Club brings faith to charity . . . . . . . . CHS9

St. Ignatius College Preparatory . . . CHS19

Open House and Application Dates . CHS10

Sacred Heart Cathedral Preparatory. CHS20

Most Reverend Salvatore J. Cordileone Archbishop of San Francisco

CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone Publisher Catholic San Francisco (ISSN 15255298) is published by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of San Francisco, 1500 Mission Rd., P.O. Box 1577, Colma, CA 94014. Periodical postage paid at South San Francisco, CA. Postmaster:

ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS $24 within California   $36 outside California ADDRESS CHANGE? Please clip old label and mail with new address to: Circulation Department One Peter Yorke Way, San Francisco, CA 94109 DELIVERY PROBLEMS? Please call us at (415) 614-5639 or email circulation.csf@sfarchdiocese.org


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LETTER FROM

The Superintendent of Schools

W

elcome to the Archdiocese of San Francisco’s High School Information issue. This certainly has been one of the most memorable school years on record. Despite the many challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic, our Catholic schools thrived. I could not be more proud. Catholic schools successfully transitioned to a virtual learning environment that was continually monitored and adjusted to meet the needs of all students and families. Mitigation plans were adopted that kept students and faculty safe throughout the pandemic. Our stats reflected national data that indicated schools were safe environments. As such, Catholic schools led the way in reopening for in-person instruction. We began welcoming students back on campus in mid-September and remained open throughout the pandemic. Faith and a student-first mindset were primary reasons for our success. Catholic schools of the Archdiocese of San Francisco will continue to lead the way. Our faculty use a range of teaching methodologies that maximize student potential in a faith-filled learning environment. Diversity of thought, a

challenging academic program and activities that promote and build upon a Christian community round out the student experience. I am delighted that you are looking at the Catholic high schools in the Archdiocese of San Francisco for your children. I invite you to visit their websites to learn more about the unique opportunities they offer. I am certain you will experience and appreciate the Catholic school difference. Many blessings,

Pamela Lyons Superintendent of Schools

Notice of Non Discriminatory Policy as to Students – Archbishop Riordan High School, San Francisco; Schools of the Sacred HeartConvent & Stuart Hall High Schools, San Francisco; ICA-Cristo Rey Academy, San Francisco; Junipero Serra High School, San Mateo; Marin Catholic High School, Kentfield; Mercy High School, Burlingame; Notre Dame Belmont, Belmont; Sacred Heart Cathedral Preparatory, San Francisco; Sacred Heart Preparatory, Atherton; St. Ignatius College Preparatory, San Francisco; Woodside Priory,

Portola Valley; admit students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color or national origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs and athletic and other school-administered programs.


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1

CONSULT with your eighth grade teacher/adviser on the high school admissions process. Obtain information and fillable PDF documents from your school.

2 3

Obtain the APPLICATION PACKETS from all of the Catholic secondary schools to which you plan to apply.

While the region still is impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, Catholic Schools have maintained safe learning environments for students and staff. Conditions may improve to permit inperson events (Open House, elementary school presentations, Shadow Day events, etc.) in the 2021-22 school year. It is advised that families LEARN ABOUT ON-CAMPUS INFORMATION EVENTS by visiting the school’s website. Events may vary by school and by county health guidelines they reside. Families should visit the school admissions website for Open House details and current information on recruiting events. Look below to view specific schools admissions offices. Considering your personal strengths and aptitudes, discuss with your seventh and eighth grade teacher(s), principal, counselor, pastor,

Steps for applying to

CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS

parents, guardians, the high school program that best meets your needs.

4

COMPLETE AND SUBMIT your application on time.

5

Not all ADSF High Schools require applicants to take an entrance exam (HSPT or SAT 8/9). ADSF high schools requiring an entrance exam will communicate the format for testing (on-campus or remote) for fall 2022

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admissions. Families should inquire with the individual school(s) they are applying to for further information on the ENTRANCE EXAM. The entrance exam may be taken only once, but on the form, list all the Catholic schools to which you have applied, so that your test scores can be sent there. Be advised, that ADSF high schools will use the lower scores of any applicant who takes an entrance exam more than once.

6

On March 17, 2022, letters will be sent regarding admissions status. Electronic notification will be sent after 4 pm on March 18, 2022. REGISTRATION DEADLINE for all schools will be March 25, 2022. Prospective students should contact the school for their registration deadline.

7

PAY REGISTRATION FEES to the school you plan to attend. Families should not register in more than one school.

8

For further information check, SCHOOLS.SFARCH.ORG.

GRADUATION OUTCOMES FOR ARCHDIOCESE OF SAN FRANCISCO CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS Guided by the mission of the Department of Catholic Schools for the Archdiocese of San Francisco, which is focused on providing quality leadership, offering programs of educational excellence and preparing students for a truly Christian life, Catholic high schools are an integral expression of the teaching mission of the Church, and are therefore committed to developing persons who are the beneficiaries of the rich heritage and legacy of the Church. In all of our educational endeavors, we believe our high school graduates have been given the skills and tools to adapt to a multicultural society and be productive members of the world community by exercising power and influence for the good of others as Christ-centered leaders of the 21st century.

Our Graduates form Christian Community and Understand the world’s diverse interconnectedness Collaborate with others to work for the common good Respect and demonstrate care for the environment as stewards of God’s creation Our Graduates express Confident Leadership to Empower others for positive transformation of society Lead by the authority of example to embrace change and confront challenge Take risks and learn from successes and failures Our Graduates promote in word and action Social Justice and Integrity to Address injustices and work toward change Demonstrate a reverence for life and a respect for all traditions, cultures, and peoples Confront the moral ambiguities promoted by contemporary culture

Our Graduates are persons of Faith and Spirituality who Live the Gospel values Respect and appreciate the diversity of religious expression Commit to integrating spirituality with their life work Our Graduates are persons of Intellectual Strength and Courage who Communicate effectively in speaking and writing

Demonstrate critical and creative thinking in problem solving

Understand and appreciate the value of lifelong learning

Rooted in the Archdiocesan Graduation Outcomes, these standards reflect the ideas of the individual institutions as well as the collaborative vision of what students must be able to know, do, and understand.


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CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS CHS5

TEN REASONS WHY CATHOLIC EDUCATION STILL MATTERS

Why choose a Catholic School? 1. An Incarnational View of the World Catholic School students learn that God is present and active in their lives and in the world. They learn to recognize the “footprints of God” in their daily experiences, especially in the midst of life’s challenges. They develop a sense of “sacramental awareness.” They see the signs of God’s love around them, and become instruments of God’s grace in their own neighborhoods, communities and the world. In an incarnational view of the world, there is no such thing as a secular subject as all learning helps to develop and bring to full bloom that image of God that is in each person. 2. Immersion in the Paschal Mystery Our lives are a series of small and not-so-small dyings and risings. In union with the Paschal Mystery, we realize that there is redemptive power in suffering and in the power of the cross. In it lies the answer to the mystery of all of life’s successes and failures. In the experience of the Paschal Mystery, we also realize the need for community. Like Jesus, we encounter our own Simon of Cyrenes to help us along the way. Wins and losses on the athletic field, A’s and F’s in class, and laughter and tears in our lives, are the ways we participate in Jesus’ dying and rising. 3. The Value of Relationships as a Reflection of the Divine Catholic school students learn to experience God’s grace and presence in their lives through their relationships with family, friends and teachers. The loving and supportive relationships they experience are reflections of the love and life-giving dynamic of the Trinity. As a community we celebrate our successes and achievements. We share grief and downfalls. We unite together in solidarity, and even challenge each other to become better reflections of the divine. We are made for community. 4. A Nuanced View of Scripture Catholic school students are given the opportunity to explore the beauty and richness of Sacred Scripture seen through the lens of faith and lived out in daily practice. They experience the ongoing revelation of God in Scripture as the One who leads the Israelites through the promised land, and who redeems them through His cross and resurrection. They also come to view the human person as created in God’s image and likeness, and destined for eternal life. They learn to apply Scripture to their own lives as a tool for prayer and the true guide for virtuous living. 5. Civic Engagement In recent research, it has been reported that private school graduates are significantly more likely to actively participate in civic activities than their public school counterparts. Catholic Schools were ranked No. 1 in the percentage of graduates who actively participate in civic and community activities such as voting, volunteering, letter-writing to legislators, Catholic Concerns Day, and donations to charity, not just for a tax write-off, but out of a sense of the requirements of justice.

6. Service for the Common Good Catholic schools promote service as an essential component of their curriculum. Many Catholic schools have service programs from kindergarten through twelfth grade. Higher education programs such as the Jesuit or Dominican Volunteer Corps promote service at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Diocesan organizations provide resources and help to people from all walks of life. Catholic school students learn that since community is at the heart of who we are, there are no strangers, only brothers and sisters in the Lord. We have a responsibility to respond to the needs of others because we are all part of God’s family. 7. Discipline as a Faith Expectation Catholic schools promote self-discipline through clarity of moral vision that is based on the Gospel. Students are challenged to be Christ-like in word and action. They are asked to examine their choices and actions in light of the Ten Commandments and the Gospel law of love. They are given a theological foundation for ethical behavior. Students are not good because they act in accord with rules and expectations. Rather, because students are good, i.e., sons and daughters of God, they are expected to act and make choices that are in keeping with this dignity. 8. The Centrality of Arts, Ritual, Drama, Music to the Life of Faith Through Catholic education, students are exposed to the richness of the religious tradition. Music, Art, Literature, Drama and Ritual are rooted in the rich history of the Church, and find their truest glory as an expression of divine praise. 9. The Fullness of the Catholic Identity at the Heart of the Church Catholic education has always been at the heart of the Catholic mission. Catholic education, and the students who are the product of it, have been called the “greatest work of the Church.” They have been entrusted with the fullness of faith and have been charged with the mission of evangelization. They are to go out into the world and share the gifts they have received as doctors, lawyers, policemen, firemen, businessmen and women, teachers, priests and religious, all as Catholic school graduates. Catholic school graduates are a leaven in society, helping the broader community to be the best that it can be. 10. Personal Excellence as a Spiritual Goal Catholic school students learn that excellence is a response to God’s blessings. Academic excellence is not a Gospel value in and of itself. The Sermon on the Mount doesn’t say “Blessed are you who get all A’s.” Education must have an altruistic orientation. Students learn so as to help others, and make a difference in the world around them. WRITTEN BY REVEREND RONALD J. NUZZI, PH.D., ALLIANCE FOR CATHOLIC EDUCATION , THE UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME, SOUTH BEND INDIANA .


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PHOTO COURTESY OF ARCHBISHOP RIORDAN HIGH SCHOOL

New RSP Director Stephanie Lundin with a few of her students.

New students, same Crusader spirit ROMAN PEREGRINO ARCHBISHOP RIORDAN CLASS OF 2018

On September 8, Michael Vezzali-Pascual ’88, woke up for the first day of school, ready to go like always. He pulled on a shirt and tie, some dress pants, and slipped on a pair of Birkenstocks. Just like last year he would be teaching Senior Lit and Comp, yet this wasn’t set to be anything like last year. For one, due to the nature of the COVID-19 pandemic, it was all done via Zoom in the comfort of his own home. But it was more than that, starting the moment he let students into class. “I just had to pause for a moment and look at the grid in front of me,” Vezzali-Pascual said. “And there were girls there. And it was just absolutely wonderful. Here they are, the newest Crusaders, and I just had to stop and appreciate it for a minute.”

A Momentous Decision

“The demographic outlook for boys wasn’t great,” Currier admitted. Vezzali-Pascual recalls that things were different when he was a student in the 80s. “When I was a freshman, we probably had 250 kids in our class, boys,” he said. “The city was just full of kids back then. And everybody was going to either an all-boys or all-girls school if you're a Catholic school kid, and nobody even thought twice about that.” In the 30 years since Vezzali-Pascual roamed the halls, things had changed. However, this wasn’t the only reason a switch was made. The closure of Mercy left many female students in a state of limbo, unable to know where their education would continue. “It was a scary time,” said Marvin Cortes ’85, whose daughter Elci ’22, was a sophomore at Mercy last year. “It’s hard to pick a high school and not know if it’s the right fit. And then your school closes in the middle of your education and now you’re scared.” So, Currier and his team embarked on a new model for the school. Riordan received 90 applications, from Mercy students and other schools, on the first day the application reopened. “The way Riordan transitioned to it, I thought was great with the closing down of Mercy, coming to our sister school's rescue,” Carl Jacobs ’80 said. Jacobs is the father of one of those girls who was left without a school for the next year. His daughter, Grace ’21, is a senior this year. While Jacobs hoped his daughter would become a Crusader, he didn’t try to sway her in any way. Luckily, Grace and her closest friends hoped to stay together, and it ended up being an easy choice. “They figured ‘we want to go to a place where we can graduate together.’ And they all decided on Riordan,” he said. “Her class made the decision, and I give those girls credit.” Grace is a part of 19 girls in the senior class, and 196 in the school as a whole. All told, Riordan’s size has ballooned from 665 students last year to 860 as of September when classes began. It now sits second in the Archdiocese in terms of size of student body. That is quite a feat for a school that made the transition rapidly and under scrutiny. There was not always total support for the decision. Some parents and alumni

'I just had to pause for a moment and look at the grid in front of me. And there were girls there. And it was just absolutely wonderful. Here they are, the newest Crusaders, and I just had to stop and appreciate it for a minute.'

After over 70 years of all-boys education, Archbishop Riordan High School announced on January 29, 2020 that it would begin to admit female students in the 2020-2021 school year. This decision came about in the aftermath of the closure of Mercy High School on January 10. Mercy closed after 68 years of educating young women, citing a steady drop in enrollment, growing expenses, and lack of a substantial endowment. At that point, Riordan was the last all-boys archdiocesan Catholic high school in San Francisco. For years it had resisted calls to move to a coeducational environment, even as schools such as Saint Ignatius and Sacred Heart went coed in the late 1980s. But this time was different. Riordan President Andrew Currier and his team realized there would never be a better time to inject new life into the school than at that moment. While Riordan was not operating with a mandate to increase enrollment, it was imperative to explore this option. Riordan had the smallest student body of all the schools in the Archdiocese of San Francisco and had seen other all-boys schools in California and across the country face a drop in enrollment in recent years. This was compounded by the fact that some long-time Riordan partner elementary schools had decreased in enrollment in recent years, reducing the prospective student pool.

SEE NEW STUDENTS, PAGE CHS7


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CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS CHS7

NEW STUDENTS: Same Crusader spirit FROM PAGE CHS6

took to internet comment sections to voice their displeasure and many raised their concerns to Currier and others. However, after the decision was made by Currier in conjunction with the school administration, the Archdiocese and Board of Trustees, the path forward was apparent.

Adapting to New Transitions

"There was a critical moment early on in the decision where we brought the transition team together and, to a person, they were saying ‘I'm in it. I'm here to make this successful. I just want to see this pulled off really well.’ And to a person they did. I mean, people dug in,” Currier said. The early days of the transition haven’t been perfect. The presence of the COVID-19 pandemic threw a wrench in everyone’s plans, but the path forward remained. Over the summer, the school updated many key facilities, projects that included adding more women’s restrooms and a complete retrofitting of the locker room, weight room and outer gym area, which will benefit all students once they return to campus. “I think that we have a contemporary design that meets contemporary needs,” Currier said. “It's cleaner, it's a better use of space.” Construction has not proven to be easy—ask anyone how hard it was trying to get the tiles off the floor in the locker room—but the work has gotten done right on schedule. All that is left is for students to return to the halls. The COVID-19 pandemic has no silver linings and has caused pain and suffering for so many. However, the fact that students began this semester online may end up being useful for a smoother transition. “Maybe it's a blessing in that they're getting to know one another first,” VezzaliPascual said. “All that remains is for the girls to begin to know their new environment when we come back together, and not having to get to know all the other students and the environment at the same time.” “I think the eventual return to campus will be almost purely joyful versus this anxiety of coming right in August,” Currier added. For the time being, students and their parents are looking forward to the day that the Crusader community is together again. While stressing that his focus is on Grace, Jacobs has also found himself excited to be on this Riordan journey once more. “I've been telling my family all my stories about the rallies in the gym, and just walking around campus,” he said. “I'll get to go back there with her and reminisce and have her see all the stories that I've told her come to life. I think it's gonna be great.” Al Lopez ’89 felt similarly and is overjoyed to know his daughter will be following in his footsteps, especially as he never thought he would see the day. “It didn't even enter my mind that she would ever go to Riordan.” Lopez is referring to his daughter Kyla ’24. As an eighth grader last year, there was a lot of pressure riding on her choice of high school. When Riordan became an option, she decided to follow in her father’s shoes and join the Crusader family. Now she is attending Zoom classes and trying to assimilate into the Riordan community which is not always easy. Vestiges of an all-boys atmosphere remain. Single gender classrooms will remain in many core classes that all students take. Classes such as AP European History, where there are fewer students, will be blended. Thus far, all of Kyla’s classes have been girls only. Lopez understands the importance of keeping the all-boys tradition alive, but does hope they get to a place of total integration at some point. “You have to give some consideration to bringing everyone together and being in class together and learning together and interacting with one another,” he said. “When they do go back to school, roaming the hallways isn't enough.” Currier says that the school is trying to preserve some aspects of the single gendered learning environment for now. Currier went to both a coed and all-boys high school, and and felt that single sex and coed environments both have their place. The logistics of the transition are not final, and maneuvering will be required. Yet, change is already on the way.

Welcoming Change

“I think the girls are gonna bring us all forward,” he said. “They're going to help [the boys] really kind of step up their game a little bit, so to speak. And maybe, soften some of the rough edges around school,” he said. “And then, I was thinking, all that I'm saying about the kids is going to be true for me too. So it's going to make me step up my game and force me to change some of the ways that I do things, which is a good thing. We're always changing and evolving.” Moving forward, the school is focused on increasing attendance and maintaining time honored traditions. Currier anticipates the student body reaching 1,050 students in the next five years, while nearing an even gender split. Vezzali-Pascual is looking forward to school spirit being evenly distributed as well. “I'm hoping to see some really great crowds, not only the basketball games and the football games, but also for the girls volleyball and basketball games. That'll be a lot of fun to see,” Vezzali-Pascual said. Cortes has had years of experience playing for, coaching, and watching Riordan sports. He and his son, Daniel ’16, were both Crusader baseball players, and Elci will hopefully be joining that lineage as a member of Riordan’s first volleyball team. “I've dropped her off at school a couple times and they're working out on the field,” Cortes said. “That's fantastic to see. I can’t wait until we get through this and I can be there in my Riordan gear.” So, at the end of the day, Riordan is not truly changing, just giving more stu-

Vezzali-Pascual, for one, is excited to see a bit of a cultural shift for both his students and himself.

SEE NEW STUDENTS, PAGE CHS8

CO-ED TRANSITION HIGHLIGHTS The largest student body in

35 YEARS

NINE

New sport teams

22%

Of our student body will be female with girls across all grades

PLUS

New boys and girls locker rooms and upgrades to our weight room facilities


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Fully alive: The ‘Catholic School Advantage’ I

n the past year, families have had to consider the hows and whys of their children’s education more than ever. When the pandemic hit, schools closed, and classrooms came into our living rooms, many families were forced to engage in their child’s education and formation in ways they may not have before. They had to consider and reconsider what RYAN MAYER their children were learning, how they were learning, and most importantly, why they were getting the education they were. Many families began to ask, in earnest “what kind of education do I want for my child?” As we begin a new school year, we once again consider the what and why of our children’s education and ask ourselves, why Catholic schools? While many schools around the country and even around the world were closed as a result of the pandemic, Catholic schools in the Archdiocese of San Francisco responded quickly to reopen for in-person instruction and were able to provide a safe, joyful, and in-person experience for our children. The ability to do this was not driven by any pragmatic principle, but by the incarnational principle. The Department of Catholic Schools in the Archdiocese believes that we are made for each other and that we– and our children– do best when we are together. In a word, Catholic schools in the Archdiocese were able to offer an advantage that other schools were not–the gift of incarnational, in-person leavrning.

The “Catholic School Advantage”

It is well-known that Catholic schools outperform their public counterparts in virtually every available metric, from academics, to community-building, to social and emotional learning. We know this, it is measurable, and it even has a name among education researchers– “The Catholic School Advantage.” We know, for example, that Catholic school

Our hope and mission is for your children to have life in abundance, to be fully alive, and to grow in the fullness of who God made them to be. graduates earn more over the course of their lives. We know that students who attend Catholic schools are more likely to pray every day, attend church, and continue to live their faith in adulthood. African-American and Latino graduates of Catholic schools are more likely to graduate from high school and 2.5 times more likely to graduate from college. We know that all Catholic school students enjoy greater academic success than their public school counterparts and, not only is the achievement gap smaller in Catholic schools, but students with multiple disadvantages actually benefit the most from attending Catholic schools. The Catholic School Advantage ripples out into our communities, too. For example, Catholic school graduates are more likely to vote, to be engaged in civic participation, and participate in service. Catholic school graduates tend to be more tolerant of diverse points of view and are less likely to be incarcerated, while Catholic school closures are associated with a rise in crime rates in communities and a decrease in social

cohesion. Catholic schools also save taxpayers more than $24 billion (with a “B”) each and every year. The above are just a few examples of the Catholic School Advantage. They are all excellent reasons, even taken by themselves to choose Catholic education for our children and they are, no doubt, at the top of the list for why many families choose our Catholic schools. As compelling as these reasons are, there is one difference that is the greatest difference a Catholic education can offer.

“The glory of God is the human person fully alive”

St. Irenaeus said that “the glory of God is the human person fully alive.” Human beings are not made merely to attend college, earn higher wages, or participate civically. Nor are we made to merely survive and become productive members of society. As important as these goals might be, we are made for something else. We are made to behold the face of God in eternity. We are made to flourish. We are made for

greatness. Catholic schools are able to do all the other things better than their public counterparts precisely because they have as their ultimate goal forming persons who are fully alive. St. John Paul the Great put it this way, “Catholic schools must help students to deepen their personal relationship with God and to discover that all things human have their deepest meaning in the person and teaching of Jesus Christ.” The mission statement of the Department of Catholic Schools in the Archdiocese of San Francisco is to “cultivate the virtuous life, nurture Christian community, and nourish a Catholic worldview.” The word “virtue” means fully alive. This is the greatest Catholic School Advantage, that our children are, to be sure, set up for success in life and in their vocations, but most importantly, that they are formed to become the person God has created them to be.

I have come that they might have life and have it abundantly.” (John 10:10)

Jesus said, “I have come that they might have life and have it abundantly.” (John 10:10) Our hope and mission is for your children to have life in abundance, to be fully alive, and to grow in the fullness of who God made them to be. We are grateful and humbled that you have invited us to be partners with you in the formation of your children, in participating in setting them up for life in abundance. As we begin a new school year, we recommit ourselves to this mission and pray for a spirit of the Joy that Jesus promised. For more on the Catholic School Advantage, see https://ace.nd.edu/catholicschool-advantage/catholic-school-advantage-fact-sheet and www.usccb.org/ beliefs-and-teachings/how-we-teach/ catholic-education/upload/CatholicSchools-FACT-Sheet-2016.pdf RYAN MAYER is Director, Office of Catholic Identity Assessment & Formation | Archdiocese of San Francisco. Hoxby, 1994 and Neal, 1997. Sander (2001). Neal, 1997. Neal, 1997. Dee, 2005. Campbell, 2001. Campbell, 2001. Brinig and Garnett, 2011. NCEA data.

NEW STUDENTS: Same Crusader spirit FROM PAGE CHS7

dents the opportunity to be a Crusader. Currier knows the core of Riordan will be remaining the same. “It's a wonderful place for students to be and it's accepting and hospitable. It's got the Marianist hospitality and we should all be proud of that,” Currier said. “Our families are wonderful, hard working people who sacrifice a lot to send their kids to Riordan. And it's always been like that,” Vezzali-Pascual added. “It's always been people who are down to earth, wonderful people of faith and people of goodwill. That's always been with us. And I think that'll always continue to be with us.” On that first Zoom call of the year, Vezzali-Pascual took his time looking around the room, noting the differences from previous years. However, his observation didn’t last too long. Eventually, he just got started. “On one hand, it's extraordinary. On the other hand, here we go. We're all together. And it's like we never left.”

Students on one of the first days of classes in hybrid learning.

PHOTO COURTESY OF ARCHBISHOP RIORDAN HIGH SCHOOL


CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO

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SEPTEMBER 2, 2021



CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS CHS9

St. Vincent de Paul Club brings faith to charity at Marin Catholic High School Activities include raising money to free slaves and build schools in Africa and helping coronavirus shut-ins in Marin County Raising money to free slaves in Sudan, protect Christian girls in Pakistan, helping shut-ins during the coronavirus pandemic and trucking cases of bottled water to victims of the fires in Sonoma County brings their faith to life for the students at Marin Catholic High School. These drives and many more are at the heart of the St. Vincent de Paul Club at the Catholic high school in Kentfield. “The club's focus is on raising awareness of the needs in our local community and worldwide while actively engaging in activities to help lessen those needs,” said teacher Joe Tassone, the club’s moderator. The biggest focus each year is around its Lenten Drives, but the St. Vincent de Paul Club also works all year round on smaller projects and educates the rest of the school about the causes it highlights each year. The St. Vincent de Paul Club raises awareness on international issues such as slavery, oppression, and health concerns. The club collects clothes for local drives every January, receives donations for overseas causes during Lent and holds regular bake sales in support of worthy causes. “During the decades of Lenten drives, the SVdP club has done some incredible work. One of the first direct actions we engaged was to send used school materials to an orphanage run by the Sisters of St John the Baptist on Catanduanes Island in typhoon alley in the Philippines,” said Tassone. “By having the students sacrifice something as part of their Lenten practices, and to donate in

their Theology classes to the drive, we were able to send them thousands of dollars in aid.” “We recently have worked with the Knights of Columbus and St. Isabella Parish to raise funds to build two schools in Western Uganda in the village of Father Samuel Musiimenta. Also, in western Uganda we helped to launch an entrepreneurial brick making company for the Catholic youth,” Tassone noted. “Twice we have had Walks for Freedom that attracted hundreds of walkers,” he said. The funds

raised freed hundreds of slaves in Sudan. Keer Deng, a freedman, spoke to the school and walked with the students in 2013 and again in 2019. Freshmen complete an anti-trafficking unit as part of raising awareness, he said. In 2020 the club sent thousands of dollars to help stop Christian girls in Pakistan from being trafficked to China and even helped get a girl legal aid to gain her freedom and hide her and the family from reprisal. The Marin Catholic St. Vincent de Paul Club was founded in the 1990’s at the behest of past chaplain, and later school president, now Spokane Bishop Thomas A. Daly. The club’s focus is on raising awareness of the needs in the local community and worldwide while actively engaging in activities to help lessen those needs. Every year the club holds elections and the upper division students fill in the officer roles. The lower division helps out and learns the ropes. The upper leadership leads monthly meetings and one past officer is now Brother Isaiah of the Franciscan Friars of the Renewal, who has spent a decade ministering on the streets of New York City, Tassone said. “The main activities have been joyous Christmas caroling at old folks homes, clothing drives for the local needy and fire victims, and Lenten Drives that are usually international in scope,” Tassone said. “Each year, all of the Theology students gather together in seven sections of 100-plus students to hear about past work we have done and what the current focus will be,” Tassone said. Marin Catholic received Papal recognition for the club’s work with the Knights of Columbus helping Chaldean victims of ISIS. The Knights also made a 4-minute documentary to use as an example to raise funds at other schools. But even while helping those around the world, the club does not forget the needy closer to home. “This year in 2021, we focused on COVID-19 shut ins in Marin. We gave over $300 in gift cards to over 20 clients of the 11 parish SVdP conferences in Marin,” Tassone said. “The students also wrote personal cards to each of them and baked them some home goodies.”


CHS10 CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS

ARCHDIOCESE OF SAN FRANCISCO HIGH SCHOOLS

Open House & Application Dates

CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO

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SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

OCTOBER

6 9 13 16 23 24 27

Convent & Stuart Hall, San Francisco www.sacredsf.org  |  Open House: 6-8 pm Woodside Priory School, Portola Valley www.prioryca.org  |  Open House: 12-1:30 pm Convent & Stuart Hall, San Francisco www.sacredsf.org  |  Open House: 6-8 pm ICA Cristo Rey Academy, San Francisco www.icacademy.org | Open House Sacred Heart Cathedral Preparatory, San Francisco www.shcp.edu | Open House Marin Catholic, Kentfield www.marincatholic.org  |  Open House: 11 am-1 pm Sacred Heart Preparatory, Atherton www.shschools.org  |  Open House: 1 pm Notre Dame Belmont www.ndhsb.org  |  Open House: 11 am-1:30 pm Archbishop Riordan High School, San Francisco www.riordanhs.org  |  Open House: 5 -7 pm

NOVEMBER

7 13 15 18 19 26 29

Convent & Stuart Hall, San Francisco www.sacredsf.org  |  Open House: 10 am-12 pm Junípero Serra High School, San Mateo www.serrahs.com  |  Open House: 1-4 pm Mercy High School, Burlingame www.mercyhsb.com  |  Open House: 12-3 pm Sacred Heart Preparatory, Atherton www.shschools.org  |  Open House: 1 pm Convent & Stuart Hall, San Francisco www.sacredsf.org  |  Open House: 10 am-12 pm St. Ignatius College Preparatory, San Francisco www.siprep.org  |  Application Due Date Notre Dame Belmont www.ndhsb.org  |  Notre Dame Night: 7-9 pm Marin Catholic, Kentfield www.marincatholic.org  |  Application Deadline Sacred Heart Cathedral Preparatory, San Francisco www.shcp.edu | Priority Deadline Archbishop Riordan High School, San Francisco www.riordanhs.org | Priority Application Deadline

DECEMBER

3 4 10

ICA Cristo Rey Academy, San Francisco www.icacademy.org | Priority Deadline Junípero Serra High School, San Mateo www.serrahs.com  |  Application Due Date Mercy High School, Burlingame www.mercyhsb.com  |  Early Bird & AMES Application Deadline Woodside Priory School, Portola Valley www.prioryca.org  |  Open House: 10-11:30 am Notre Dame Belmont www.ndhsb.org | Courtesy Application Due

Applicants should go directly to the Catholic high school’s admissions website to verify Open House information. Schools may adjust their plans due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Virtual Information Opportunities may also be found there.

JANUARY 2022

6 7 14

Sacred Heart Preparatory, Atherton www.shschools.org  |  Application Deadline Junípero Serra High School, San Mateo www.serrahs.com  |  Application Deadline Woodside Priory School, Portola Valley www.prioryca.org  |  Application Deadline Convent & Stuart Hall, San Francisco www.sacredsf.org  |  Application Deadline Sacred Heart Preparatory, Atherton www.shschools.org  |  Application Deadline Mercy High School, Burlingame www.mercyhsb.com  |  Application Deadline Notre Dame Belmont www.ndhsb.org  |  Admissions Applications Due


CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO

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SEPTEMBER 2, 2021



CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS CHS11

ARCHBISHOP RIORDAN HIGH SCHOOL

FIND YOUR FUTURE Riordan offers a values-based, Catholic, college preparatory education to prepare young men and women for leadership and lifelong success.

BIOMED

New this year, an innovative curriculum that connects science, ethics, and human systems.

BOARDING

ENGINEERING

A four-year honors program that bridges design, technology, and imagination.

The only high school boarding program in San Francisco, with students from across the world.

LEARNING SUPPORT

A specialized program of academic support that celebrates the diversity of learning styles.

HOUSE SYSTEM

A community of spirit, mentorship, camaraderie, and healthy competition.

PARENT TOUR

OPEN HOUSE

CRUSADER FOR A DAY

Visit our website for a virtual tour of campus

Recommended for 5th–8th grade families

An in-person visit for prospective 8th graders

Sign up for events at www.RiordanHS.org | Admissions (415) 586-1256 175 Frida Kahlo Way, San Francisco, CA 94112


CHS12 CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS

CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO

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SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

MARIN CATHOLIC 675 Sir Francis Drake Boulevard, Kentfield, CA 94904

ENROLLMENT

800

100%

COLLEGE ACCEPTANCE

33 HONORS

& AP COURSES

PRESIDENT Mr. Tim Navone PRINCIPAL Mr. Chris Valdez TUITION AND FEES 2021-2022 Tuition: $22,650 Registration $1,000 ADMISSIONS EVENTS Please visit marincatholic.org for up-to-date information about admissions events.

(415) 464-3800

www.marincatholic.org

44 TEAMS IN 27 SPORTS

OVER 30 CLUBS

TUITION ASSISTANCE Nearly one-third of Marin Catholic students qualify for and receive financial aid. Marin Catholic designated over $2.3 million in assistance for the 2021-2022 school year. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION admissions@marincatholic.org 415.464.3810 Janie Rockett, Director of Admissions Cameron Mahoney, Admissions Associate


CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO

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SEPTEMBER 2, 2021



Fast Facts

CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS CHS13

350 enrollment Corporate Work Study Program AP classes, Sports, Clubs Nursing Assistant Certification Code Nation partnership Class of 2021 100% enrolled in college 98% first-generation collegebound

Supporting women to and through college while providing professional mentoring from leading Bay Area companies.

Over $6 million in financial assistance and scholarships are provided to 100% of our students.

OPEN HOUSE October 16, 2021

www.icacristorey.org admissions@icacademy.org (415) 824-2052 at the corner of 24th & Guerrero


CHS14 CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS

CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO

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SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

Woodside Priory School At Woodside Priory School, our mission is to assist all students in creating meaningful and balanced lives, developing as lifelong learners and stewards, and productively serve a world in need of their gifts.

Facts about Priory Founded in 1957 by 7 Benedictine Monks from Hungary 400 students in grades 6-12 7:1 student-to-faculty ratio Over $3.5 million awarded in need-based financial aid

14 countries represented in oncampus boarding program 12 different sports, 18 teams offered Over 30 clubs including MUN and Robotics

community • hospitality • individuality • integrity • spirituality

302 Portola Rd. Portola Valley, CA 94028 www.prioryca.org/admissions (650) 851-8221 admissions@prioryca.org


CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO

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SEPTEMBER 2, 2021



CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS CHS15

QUICK FACTS Enrollment: 872 Average Class Size: 22 Student-Teacher Ratio: 15/1 Honors and AP Courses: 34 Faculty with Advanced Degrees: 80% Clubs and Activities: 40+ Sports Teams: 14 team sports, 34 teams Tuition and Fees: $25,340 Financial Aid: $3.2 million awarded to Serra students in 2021 College Enrollment: 99% percent of Serra graduates go on to college College Scholarships: $21.2 million awarded to the Class of 2021 Community Service: The Class of 2021 completed 18,000+ service hours Tri-School Program: A formal consortium with our sister schools, Mercy and Notre Dame, the program includes 22 classes on the three campuses, clubs, music, theatre productions, and social events.

Padre Experience Events

The Serra Brotherhood

At Serra, the tenet of brotherhood is taught, modeled and lived. It is a bond shared among Padres, past and present, based on the values of respect, integrity, inclusion and compassion. Padres hold themselves and each other accountable to these values every day, just as Jesus modeled in his own life.

Serra is located in the heart of the Peninsula. We strive for excellence in all areas—academics, performing arts, campus ministry, athletics and extracurricular activities. We are proud of our diverse student body and welcome students from all faiths and backgrounds. Serra’s rigorous academic program is designed to engage and support the ways that young men think, learn and grow—heart, mind, body and soul. Students are mentored by committed, caring educators who are genuinely invested in their students. Our faculty’s innovative and thoughtful teaching approach ensures a rigorous, transformative learning experience for our Padres.

For more information, visit

SERRAHS.COM 451 West 20th Avenue San Mateo, CA 94403 650.345.8207 Check out our VIRTUAL TOUR at www.serrahs.com/visit

Our school motto, Siempre Adelante, which translates to Always Forward, rings truer today than ever. The significant achievements of our graduates are proof that our empowering culture prepares Serra Padres for life after high school. They become compassionate leaders who care about their communities and make a positive difference in the world.

Serra will host creative in person and virtual events for students and parents throughout the 2021-22 school year.

Padre for a Day: September–January

Becoming immersed in Padre life by participating in a Padre for a Day visit is an important step in determining if Serra is the right community for each student.

Join us for Open House on Sunday, November 7

Visit www.serrahs.com/admissions to learn more!

Padre Admissions Chats:

In these intimate gatherings, students will have the opportunity to learn about the application and admissions process, discover what qualities Serra looks for in a student and obtain answers to specific questions that he might have in determining if Serra is the right community to spend his high school years.

Padre Previews:

Learn why Serra is the right choice for a student during the transformative years of high school, when character is shaped and foundational values are determined. This is an event designed for parents and prospective students to hear about life at Serra from Serra teachers, students and administrators.

To find out more about all of our admissions events, please visit WWW.SERRAHS.COM/ADMISSIONS.


CHS16 CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS

CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO

|

SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

Convent & Stuart Hall is an independent K–12 preparatory school in San Francisco rooted in the Sacred Heart tradition of Catholic education within a uniquely single-sex and coeducational environment. To learn more about the school, including our International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme, please visit sacredsf.org. For information about upcoming tours, open houses and other admissions events, please visit our High School Admissions page at sacredsf.org/admissions/high-school. We look forward to seeing you this fall!

For more information, please contact: Cesar Guerrero Director of Admissions & Academic Guidance cesar.guerrero@sacredsf.org

As part of the Sacred Heart Network with over 150 schools worldwide, our students and educators embrace the philosophy of our founders who first arrived in North America in 1818. Spiritually inclusive and with international roots, we are committed to providing excellence in education and preparing graduates to be active and informed members of a global society.

shschools.org Founded by the Society of the Sacred Heart, SHS is a Catholic, independent, coed day school for students in preschool through Grade 12. We invite you to discover love, confidence and purpose. Laying the foundation for a meaningful life does not happen overnight. We give students the love, tools and wise freedom to grow into their highest selves. As a result, Gators become compassionate thinkers who are curious about the world they live in and eager to make it better for others. To learn about the values that set us apart, please visit shschools.org. You can experience Sacred Heart through in-person and virtual events, and view important dates and deadlines in our Virtual Admission Portal.

For more information, please contact: Wendy Quattlebaum Director of Admission & Tuition Assistance admission@shschools.org


CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO

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SEPTEMBER 2, 2021



CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS CHS17


CHS18 CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS

CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO

|

SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

Mercy High School CELEBRATING

YEARS 1931-2021

At Mercy High School rigorous education is driven by faith, values, and care for the whole student. A Catholic all-girls school set in the historic Kohl Mansion, Mercy fosters a strong community where students are known and encouraged as individuals, and challenged to reach their unique potential.

Get To Know Mercy! Parent Talk & Tours Aug. 25, Sept. 29, Oct. 20 • 9AM Girls on the Green for 6th, 7th & 8th Graders Monday, September 27 • 3-5PM

Open House Sunday, November 7 • 12-3PM Shadow Days for 8th Graders Sept. to Dec.

Experience a day in the life of a Mercy student. A shadow day is required for all applicants.

FIND YOUR VOICE DISCOVER A PASSION BUILD A FOUNDATION BE CHALLENGED BE TRANSFORMED BE KNOWN

M E R C Y H I G H S C H O O L, B U R L I N G A M E 2750 Adeline Drive • Burlingame, CA 94010 • 650.762.1114 • admissions@mercyhsb.com www.mercyhsb.com/admissions During this 90th year in Mercy’s history we would like to express our deep gratitude for our Catholic elementary school principals and teachers for the religious, academic, and character formation of their graduates. The holistic education you provided served as a solid foundation as they continued their studies at Mercy.


CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO

|

SEPTEMBER 2, 2021



CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS CHS19

ST. IGNATIUS

COLLEGE PREPARATORY T H I S I S J E S U I T, T H I S I S S I

ABOUT US Student Body = 1,475 Average Class Size: 25 Student Teacher Ratio = 15:1 Average # of Applicants = 1,200 Every student receives a Personal/Academic Counselor and a College Counselor Myriad of Advanced Placement Programs offered 66 Athletic Teams in 26 Sports Performing Arts Program ranks as one of the top programs in the bay area and includes Drama, Dance, Choral Music, Instrumental Music and Tech Theatre Over 85 Student-run clubs, including Affinity Groups

ST. IGNATIUS COLLEGE PREPARATORY

OUR HOUSE IS

ALWAYS

OPEN

We can’t wait to meet you! Check out available tour dates and SI events online to plan your future campus visit.

99% of SI graduates attend a four-year college

WWW.SIPREP.ORG/ADMISSIONS


CHS20 CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOLS

CATHOLIC SAN FRANCISCO

|

SEPTEMBER 2, 2021

OPEN HOUSE Saturday, October 23, 2021 9 - 11 am

IRISH FOR A DAY 8th Grade Visits In September–November

s ue

E XC E

e p ur

CO M

ess , w

INNO

LE AD

Fe a r l

FA IT H

CLASS OF 2026 APPLICATIONS AND EVENT REGISTRATION

LLEN

MUN

Available in early September

CE

IT Y

VATI ON

ER S H

IP

SACRED HEART CATHEDRAL PREPARATORY is a Lasallian Vincentian Catholic, preparatory school located in the heart of San Francisco. We are dedicated to the intellectual and academic excellence of our students, and we strive to develop their unique talents and passions while preparing them to become service-oriented leaders committed to living the Gospel. Our devotion is illustrated in our enthusiastic and highly educated teachers, innovative curriculum, and commitment to service and social justice. Enrollment 1,350 • Faculty 104 • Tuition $22,000 • Financial Assistance $5.5 million awarded for 2021-22

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT TIMOTHY BURKE ’70, DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS • ADMISSIONS@SHCP.EDU 1 0 5 5 E L L I S S T R E E T, S A N F R A N C I S C O

415.775.6626

S H C P. E D U

Profile for Catholic San Francisco

September 2, 2021 – Catholic High Schools issue  

September 2, 2021 – Catholic High Schools issue  

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