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ISSUE 04

Roots, Culture & Rap

Rapper’s Delite Magazine Info@RappersDelite.com

Who Did What

Editor in Chief Rocker Will Loiseau Senile Editor Drew Spence

Forced to Work workforce Specialist/Manager Pedro Mojica Marketing, Public Relations Richera Jones Rapper’s Delite is created using Abobe Indesign CS5.5

Layouts Griffin Avid interns and outurns Abbey “notablondedike” Klondyke Barry “beetlejuice” Rivers Beastro “Maestro-Beastly Dude” Chris “Broken Axle” Axelrod Xodus “Master Beater” Phoenix

Hip hop isn’t what it used to be. Why should we expect anything to stay as such? Like so many other music genres, it has evolved into numerous subsets. The only constant in life is change. This young genre has produced a new generation of voices and stylistic choices. Do fans of the more traditional sound need some time to adjust or do they need to set better examples to influence positive change? Many of you have voiced your opinions on the decline of rap. In this issue we’re celebrating raps improvement. The essence of rap was birthed during New York City’s early battle and rhyme cipher circuits. It’s now emerging from years of mediocrity. Battle rap never left. It is being discovered by a growing audience of listeners. Some people thought the scenes from 8 Mile were overly-dramatized like the typical Hollywood movie. The passion, intensity and extra-ordinary mastery of words displayed by these artists are no longer a secret.

Read Dat! © Rapper’s Delite Magazine. No part of this magazine may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or resold without prior written consent of the publisher. Rapper’s Delite recognizes all copyrights contained in this issue. Where possible we acknowledge the copyright holder. All contributions are submitted and accepted on the basis of a non-exclusive worldwide license to publish or to license others to do so unless otherwise agreed in advance in writing

The 4 elements meet cutting-edge entertainment

Battles will always keep the raw street essence alive for those who may have forgotten the culture’s origin. There are no walls for studio gangsters to hide behind while on stage. Supporters of lyrical hip hop can sleep soundly and wake up refreshed, knowing that this aspect of the culture is in top form. We caught up with Harlem’s Loaded Lux who got everyone’s attention with a healthy flow and devastating delivery on battle rap’s biggest stage. Speaking of health, as is now customary with RD, we get some thoughts from dead prez’s stic.man and other players who share some insight on a few ways to help you make your life better. Conditioning and fitness is on our minds. Spring forward with us RD Massive. - Will Loiseau, Editor In Chief


LOADED IN THIS ISSUE


“…they don’t like Necro, a tough white boy that is Jewish, that will punch you in your face. That’s a menace to society

right there.


B

rooklyn, NY rapper/producer/director and label owner Necro is gearing up the release of his next anticipated conceptual works. In addition to feeding his cult-followers with gruesome beats and rhymes he’s also been cooking up some long-awaited solo and collaboration projects. He recently gave us the latest word on why he feels he’s been alienated from mainstream conversations and tells us what people can expect from his growing catalog of uncommon.

As the pioneer of the Death Rap genre, where are you looking to take this album creatively? Well, if you get to see the tracklisting, which is listed on the pre-order page on my site, we only have 3 Death Rap tracks on this album, then we have 3 thug tracks, 3 sex tracks, 3 Jewish Gangster tracks, and 3 random styles, this was just how it came about, I wasn’t focusing on making this super evil, as opposed to displaying different styles, this was an EP to hold the fans over which turned out to be more than that because I never release anything rushed so once i got into it, I ended up making it perfect, when I release new Necro albums in the future, like Death Part 2, that will be start to finish death rap, that’s coming, I already got the cover artwork and beats done.

Beastro: Explain the reason for naming this new project The Murder Murder Kill Kill EP. Necro: I wanted a name that was brutal, hard but simple, not something over thought, not trying to be clever and obscure, just brutal how my music is, MURDER MURDER KILL KILL. It’s an EP concept so it was more loose idea wise and it worked out cuz it inspired the best artwork of 2012, NOBODY WILL HAVE BETTER ARTWORK THIS YEAR, you can bet ya girl’s vag on it.

Where does the inspiration to continue to develop these brutal, gruesome topics come from? I just like how it sounds, I can’t find anyone on earth that raps this east coast, lyrically technical rap style with super brutal topics and rhyme schemes over the production I create, it’s like my music is the pinnacle of brutal and everything else is a notch softer at least, I love that my style is so vicious.

Words by Beastro


Who’s riding with you lyrically on this EP? Kool G Rap & Mr. Hyde are the guests on the album, but on tour - groupies ride my cock. Did you make the beats as you went along with this project or was the sonic landscape already laid out before you started writing? I had both, the majority were beats made already but I crafted some new things too, and the mixes were all fresh and the mix is what makes the difference between a banger or a piece of shit song. A lot of these rappers beats are like turds into my toilet bowl. Do you spend most of your time creating music or running your independent label? Both, sometimes I can go a month without creating a verse or beat and then sometimes all I will be doing for a month is listening to old records and rhyming, and nothing gets done business wise and my emails go into 3000 unanswered. I try to balance this shit man but it’s hard as fuck like my PEESH when I see hot 21 year old groupies in my hotel room after a show and they insist on being banged without a rubber and then I realize they are grimy dirt-bags and I just jerk off in their mouths. What’s the best advice anyone’s ever shared with you? Too much good advice! One thing you should never do is APPROVAL SEEK. Don’t seek the approval of others, be brave and take risks and trust ya instinct. What’s the most expensive item you ever purchased with money made off of music? My career, every dime I ever made went back into my Necro career, I made way over a million gross in 12.5 years but when-

ever $5k or $10k rolled in I would invest it right back into my brand. What was the last new movie release you’ve gone to the theatres to see this year? I saw The Avengers and it was fucking awesome, a little slow at the start but once the action started it was awesome, plus Scarlett [Johansson] needs my dick in her asscrack, I don’t even wanna fuck her ass, i just wanna rub her asshole with my tip, cuz she’s a fucking rubber. Hip-Hop has always been laced with aggression and violent themes. Why do you feel your music has been left out of the mainstream movement throughout your career? Cuz I’m a whiteboy! Racism, the powers that be- always hire tastemakers and people who are so called from the “STREET” but they are really just dressed the part and are on the low “SNITCHES” and they don’t like Necro, a tough white boy that is Jewish, that will punch you in your face. That’s a menace to society right there. How dare he?! Hahaha can’t win man. If I was pussy I would be called out for that, when I’m real they try to find a way to make me look fake or racist, or anything to divert attention away from my music. Will the roles you pursue in acting/directing allow you to gradually reach a wider demographic? I hope so, I assume it would. Are you planning on releasing any other projects in the near future? Next project after this new double EP, is The Godfathers, with myself and Kool G Rap, rapping verse after verse back to back over Necro


productions, it’s gonna be an event for those in the know, the rest won’t care cuz they are into swag rap now which is 11 year old rappers with socks up to their necks dressing up like women in their videos, it’s called faggy tranny rap. Will you be touring for this EP? Tell our audience where they can find you. I will tour next year when I feel I recorded enough shit that I could run my company from the road, right now I can’t yet but it will happen soon enough. I got 200 shows under my belt and been everywhere, so to come back it’s gotta be right. Thanks for taking time out to get with Rapper’s Delite. Thank you. Check out my new EP pre-order at http://www.necroproduct.com http://www.amazon.com/The-Murder-Kill-Double-Explicit/dp/B008BGFVN6


Jon Connor

The People’s Rapper “When you take all of the jewelry off, all the females are gone and all the partying is done I’m still a person. Fame is just an illusion. Everybody was blessed with a different gift.”


lint, Michigan native Jon Connor is an artist looking to make a sizable impact in music. Who F can blame him? Growing up in a musical family ignited high aspirations at an early age. His mother and sister sang while his father Jon Freeman was an accomplished musician who later became a Christian minister. Jon Connor would later hit the Michigan music scene and rock stages with KRS-One, 2 Live Crew, Jeremih and others. A string of successful mixtapes as well as Connor’s debut album Salvation have all been received with rave reviews. Jon recently performed “Push to the Limit” the intro theme song for CBS Sports’ Inside College Basketball. With more projects in the works he’s sure to be a name you’ll have to get familiar with. Growing up he was respected by his peers and known for his ability to encourage positive thinking among family and classmates. Not much has changed over the years. His lyrical prowess has only improved. Charismatic narratives and flow over popular and original production has gained the attention from the games top spittas. [Peep the mixtape here: While You Were Sleeping] we spoke with “The People’s Rapper” and found out what he’s been up to. Will: Can you remember the first rhyme you wrote that impressed your friends? Jon: I had friends who used to battle every day on the bus in elementary school. They would pass it over to me and I told them I couldn’t rap. I remember I went home and wrote two bars and made up my mind that I would spit them the next day. The following day, on schedule they passed a turn over to me and when I spit my bars the whole bus went crazy. I was like eleven or twelve and from then on it was on. I liked being able to make

people feel some type of way with words. From that point the kids started waiting for me to get on the bus and hear what I had to say in the cypher. There’s no better feeling than that. Were you a troublemaker or a peacemaker in high school? I was a peacemaker in my household and in school. That was always my role. Whenever my mother and father were going through it I was always the one even at a young age to


say “You know dad ain’t really mean any of that. You should talk to him.” A lot of shit in life is unnecessary. Few things are really that serious. When I was in school, all of the kids had to be there at 8:30 am and I had to be there at 7 am. I had so much influence over the kids that the teachers had me come early and asked me, “Jon, can you start making the kids do this or that? Or get this person to stop picking on that one?” I didn’t realize how wild that was back in elementary school. That’s one of the reasons why my music is so effective. I try to make people think twice. We get caught up in so much irrelevant and petty stuff. I feel that I can have an effect on the world.

I read that you’re managed by Mateen Cleaves, the former Michigan State Spartan. How did that come about? That’s my big brother. We co-own a company together. It’s crazy how we met because I was performing at this little bar in Flint [Michigan].

Growing up I always knew who the Flintstones [Mateen Cleaves, Morris Peterson and Charlie Bell] were. Mateen was like our hometown hero. I was performing like there were 20,000 people but there were only 50 people there that night. I try and give people the best experience possible each and every time. A dude named Ali was there and came up to me and told me I had to meet his brother. When he told me who his brother was it was a big moment. We used to have “Michigan State Day” when I was going to school. Kids used to go to school wearing Cleaves’ jerseys and Flintstones T-shirts. It was cool just to meet him. He even tripped out because he had been listening to the underground tapes that I was doing a year and a half prior. It was fate because he was trying to find me and I had happened to be in that place at that time. He told me that I had what it took and he wouldn’t stop until we get some Grammy’s. He’s been staying true to his word ever since. Hip hop fans responded well to The Blue Album and The People’s Rapper mixtapes. Did you expect that? Have you received any feedback from Jay-Z or Eminem’s camp? My brother told me to cater to your fans and not your critics. When I went in on those mixtapes I was only concerned with the people who already liked me. If they go and tell somebody what they heard and liked then I’m cool with it. Critics are always looking for something to criticize. They always need something to hate on. When The People’s Rapper started catching wildfire it surprised me in a good way and I was happy about it. I don’t expect anything from anybody. When I do get overwhelming love, it’s a beautiful thing. Denaun Porter [formerly of D12] reached out on Twitter and said that I was doing my thing right now. For me, that was dope. Critics can ask how


can I rhyme over Em’s beats or “Why would he do this?” If it was good enough for one of Eminem’s best friends then nobody else’s opinion matters. I don’t know if Jay-Z heard The Blue Album but I ran into Guru at South by Southwest. He also told me that I was doing my thing. That’s the man that records Jay. I ain’t trippin. Everybody’s a critic nowadays. Shout out to Royce da 5’9 who I have nothing but respect for. He’s feeling what I do so my support comes from the people. Are there any plans to continue the “Best in the World” series? That’s gonna continue for my whole career. Whenever I’m not working on my original projects, those will just drop randomly because they’re fun to do. I wanna bring new concepts that I haven’t seen anybody else do before. Re-inventing classic projects is where it’s at. What’s your definition of “The People’s Rapper?” I’ll forever be honest with the people. I have a passion for people. If I’m able to help a homeless person on the street I’ll do so. If they just got me for a twenty then they obviously needed it more than I did but that’s the way I am. I have a genuine love for people. My care and passion for people comes out through my music. No matter what emotion you may be feeling you listen to music. For some kids an artist may be talking to them more than their parents are. When they get mad at their mom or dad they go turn on a CD or MP3. So if music is a conversation and I’m talking to them hopefully I’m stirring them toward a positive situation. I bleed just like them. When you take all of the jewelry off, all the females are gone and all the partying is done I’m still a person. Fame is just an illusion. Everybody was blessed with a different gift. If given an all-access pass, what three producers would you pick to make a fantasy album? Damn, that’s a tough one. I love all my in-house producers. Kanye West is one of the greatest

musical minds of our time. Timbaland…I’d want my music to stretch far beyond just the hiphop artists…Jim Jonsin…I love big, cinematic sounded joints so to incorporate that with the imaginations of me, Ye and Timbo that would be crazy.

What’s the Blue City Club you frequently shout out in your songs? That’s the clique of my artists. The A Squad… the All Varsity Entertainment music group. Blue City Club is our mentality. It’s just the way we live. There was a group of actors back in the 80’s called Brat Pack. All of their movies were # 1 box office hits. What was dope to me was that they were friends in real life. You would see pictures of them partying and hanging together and all that…but when it came time to work they would deliver. It translated to me as you can play hard but also work hard. They were all young, successful, vibrant people. I took the title of their movies “Blue City” and “The Breakfast Club” and formed Blue City Club. We’re gonna make hard work look good.

Tell us about the next projects the people can expect from you this year. Unconscious Fate will be all original production by my home team. Season 3 will probably come after that. Also, look out for another Best in the World release. Thanks to Rapper’s Delite for taking the time to chop it up with me. Thanks to the people…you can follow me @ JonConnorMusic.


RAYDAR Rap music continues to surpass what were once limits in pop culture. Although the artists who perform the music have increased their mainstream exposure the fact remains that the art form began as an underground medium. Jazz has lent the art of improvisation, swing notes and other style gems to Hip Hop and continues to evolve with advanced concepts and new musicians. Brian “Raydar” Ellis has produced records for Grammy Award winning jazz bassist Esperanza Spalding and performed with Yasiin Bey (Mos Def). He teaches Hip-Hop Ensemble and Turntable Technique at Berklee College of Music. He’s also the creative director at The Revivalist. We spoke to him about his ideas on creative expression and his involvement in these two thriving musical languages. Words by Will Loiseau How did you become introduced to Jazz? Is there a particular instrument or song that stands out as the one that first captured your attention? RAYDAR: My parents had a large collection of vinyl. One day when I was a little kid rolling my G.I. Joe figures across the top of

the records I said “I wonder what this needle does and what music sounds like.” I started messing around with the stereo and figuring how things were plugged in. After school I started hanging around the crib messing with electronics. When I finally ran into Hip Hop it was on the T.V. with Yo! MTV Raps. I started listening and watching the videos and noticed that they sounded a lot like what my dad had. Oh! It’s a sample. So jazz was your introduction to music? Yeah, my family listened to everything from jazz, funk, R&B and all that kind of stuff. I was raised in an all-white neighborhood in [New] Jersey in the early nineties so the other side was when I went to school kids were listening to Pearl Jam, Nirvana and The Almond Brothers, I had a healthy dose of everything. The library had records that you could take out so I was checking out The Beatles, Alice in Chains, Soundgarden and so much other stuff. What instrument did you first hear that either made you want to play it or caught your attention to draw you in to listen to more of it? That’s a really awesome question. The drums were something that I always noticed but I think the minute I started to hear excitement was the synthesizer. Whenever I think of my parents I think of Marvin Gaye’s “After the Dance.” I don’t even think it was the vocal version but the long


"GrafFIti is a modern day hieroglyphic.

Music

was used in African villages to tell stories of family history. Hip Hop is like one of the kids in a family and it’s all in the same house." version with the synthesizer solo. It stuck out because it can be so many different things. It’s futuristic but it’s back then. It’s a footnote like this is what the world could be. The drums I could feel because they were instinctual but the synthesizer made me curious. Since its origin Jazz has always formed new shapes and blended with various sounds (fusions) which have helped grow its popularity. What makes the interaction between Jazz and Hip-hop so special? It’s the evolution of the language. You can look at the previous languages of civilization that existed thousands of years ago. In ancient Egypt the hieroglyphics were on the walls telling stories. Through those stories people are able to track history. It’s the same thing with graffiti. Graffiti is a modern day hieroglyphic. Music was used in African villages to tell stories of family history. Hip Hop is like one of the kids in a family and it’s all in the same house. Jazz, Reggae and Rock & Roll might be the parents. The grandparents might by Gospel and Classical. The twin sibling could be Punk Rock or an older brother Funk and a sister named R&B. When Hip Hop kicks it with Jazz it’s just spending quality time with the family. Some people may be big Jazz fans and don’t particularly care for hip hop and there are Hip-hop fans that don’t listen to much Jazz. The line between them is a fine one. I recently saw a documentary on Cab Calloway and that dude was the ultimate master of slang. The whole thing about being “hip” and calling someone a “cat” or being “cool”. He completely rewrote the slang book. You have groups like Wu-tang repeating terms he once

used. The majority of Hip-hop enthusiasts are not classically trained musicians. This led many critics to label the genre as a fad that wouldn’t last to see the 1990’s. Would you say there are more similarities or differences between jazz and hip-hop artists in regards to musicianship? Now there’s this whole thing about live bands on stage. I don’t feel like the barometer of it needs to be so text book. It’s like when people say a song is more musical because a person studied so much. Reading sheet music is a great skill to have but I have a problem when someone says you’re not a musician because you don’t do this or that. It’s really just about a feeling. James Brown, Miles Davis and all these musicians were composing based off of feeling. They may have used a chart to write down the formula but that doesn’t mean that as a hip hop cat because you don’t you’re any less of a scientist. Fortunately, there have been so many great artists who have come out within the last few years who’ve been raised to not see the difference between either of the two worlds. You look at a Robert Glasper Black Radio record or Esperanza Spalding’s Radio Music Society or all these other groups that are trying different formulas and they sound natural. There are some cats who’ll get up on stage and play their hearts out on an instrument and then they’ll go home and turn an MPC on, make some beats and cut up some records. It’s totally musicianship.


After the success of The Sugarhill Gang’s “Rapper’s Delight”, hip-hop seemed to go more mainstream with rock fusions. (Run-DMC, Aerosmith, etc.) Do you see future collaborations between jazz and hip-hop musicians reaching the masses in a similar fashion? Totally. Taking the music to a bigger stage is part of what makes it last. The thing with jazz is it takes time to re-introduce the public to something that tends to lean toward non-vocal performance. It may be harder to capture some crowds when there is no voice involved. We’re so used to having shorter hooks being put inside of a few minutes. Those minutes are being pushed on a timeline that you’re watching on your smartphone. I know we’re in this super-fast world but music should be something you can take your time and enjoy in its entirety. Enjoy the buildup of the song. Enjoy the nuances of all the people on stage interacting. When you take good music and get these musicians and you’ll get people who will walk away feeling like they had a full meal. It wasn’t just about showing up and watching. It’s about feeling something. It’s something I can try and capture on my phone but there’s nothing like taking it in. Technology is designing all of these tools for us to get close to each other but then when we come in contact with each other we’re propelled by the tools. People should try and go to shows with the intent of being in the atmosphere. There are times where you have to take calls and all that and you want to get a piece of the history but it’s hard to find concert footage on Youtube that would make it worth missing it in person. Is there a particular record that stands out in your mind as an example of an uncompromising union that workedwhen neither artist sacrifices style nor substance? I’ve seen Black Radio rock a bunch of times with Yasiin Bey (Mos Def). Their experiments can go off into another world with the performance. They may go from a De La Soul record into an Outkast record into a Herbie Hancock record and then right back into De La

Soul. They just seem to know it. Yasiin isn’t any less Yasiin and the Experiment isn’t any less of themselves. I’ve seen that a few times. I’ve seen it also with Phonte. They didn’t sacrifice anything…even going back to [GrandMixer] D.ST and Herbie Hancock and “Rockit” or A Tribe Called Quest and Ron Carter. I think it’s going to continue more and lead into other things. Recently, someone told me about the influence of the Ipod. Kids have 50 Cent next to Shania Twain on their Ipods and don’t think anything of it. The future is going to be kids having all of these records in their back pockets. When I grew up it wasn’t as simple as having all this music at the click of a button. If you didn’t get it from the library, the record store or if your friend didn’t have it then you would have to somehow run into that record. The future is going to be beyond jazz and hip hop. It’s gonna be a trail mix of music. There’s no other form of music like Hip Hop so I’m not too worried about it losing its edge. It’s one of the very few spoken genres of music. I see so many possibilities for collaborations in the future. What’s the best venue you’ve ever witnessed a live show? Le Poisson Rouge on Bleecker Street, it’s got really nice lighting, it’s real easy to see the show from wherever you stand, it’s got a good VIP section and a knowledgeable staff. The Jazz Gallery on Hudson St. We do a weekly jam session at Zinc Bar and that’s really cool because you never know who’s going to show up. So many different people stop by and let it all out. It’s a nice place to hang out and meet musicians. I tell emcees that if they wanna learn how to rap with a band, meet a band or figure out some of these samples that you’re rhyming over, go to the jam sessions because they’re on another planet. They’ve got the CD’s that you have in your collection too. Follow Raydar! h t t p s : / / t w i t t e r. c o m / R a y d a r E l l i s Thanks for your time.


The Wall Sit Have a seat.

Sitting, standing and sleeping is how we spend most of our lives. Yeah…and? Sitting or standing for long periods each day can be difficult for many of us. The American Physical Therapy Association revealed in a survey that nearly two-thirds of Americans experience low back pain at some point in their lives. If you’ve ever had to go through a day or longer period of time with this condition you already know how serious it can be. Proper diet and exercise is a major part of the solution. Your back, abdomen and legs are three of the most important muscle groups in the body. An exercise that can help you strengthen all three is the wall sit. The wall sit is an isometric exercise. This means that your muscles contract but produce little or no movement. All you need to perform this is a wall and some motivation to improve. To start, find a wall and lean your back against it. With your feet firmly on the ground and about 2-3 feet away from the wall lower yourself down into a sitting position. Keep your feet pointed straight and don’t allow your knees to pass in front of your toes. Make sure your legs are at a 90-degree angle. Place your hands out in front of you to work your shoulder muscles as well. Keep your hands off your thighs! No cheating. Breathe regularly and pay strict attention to your form by looking straight ahead and keeping your shoulders back. Hold for 1 minute and work to gradually extend your time. Trust me your legs will shake like Jello as you stimulate new muscle growth. The advice presented above is not intended for anyone with contraindicated health problems. You may feel the need to consult a professional’s opinion.


“If you keep the slave

drunk

and

high enough when will the slave come to the conclusion that

he

should

organize himself for his human rights?”

stic.man Talks Health, Fitness and New Music dead prez’s stic.man has been making real life changes. His latest album with partner M-1, Information Age, eases up on the hard-driven production- many of their fans have become accustomed to. In his personal life he’s lightened up on poor food and lifestyle choices and has adopted a strict dietary and workout regimen. He told us about his decision to make healthy living a priority and how it even spilled over into the music. It really is bigger than Hiphop. Words by Will Loiseau

When did you decide to make fitness and nutritional lifestyle changes and who/what influenced you to make that decision? It’s been a steady progression for the last decade or more. Even before that though Malcolm X’s autobiography hipped me to stop eating pork. I met my wife almost twenty years ago and she was basically a vegetarian and that encouraged me to go further. But I was still thuggin and smoking herb a lot and

drinking liquor and sneaking in a Whopper here and there…until I got gout. My left leg was outta commission and wifey helped me heal without medicines and I became a vegan based off what I learned about how my diet and lifestyle had caused me to develop gout. I wanted to get my leg back strong and so became a Kung Fu student in my hood. Today I feel better than ever!!!! I am what I call a sober soldier. No weed, alcohol or drugs…street or prescription. I’m training for a marathon and continuing my journey, sharing my enthusiasm through my new health and fitness album The Workout and the RBG FIT CLUB, building and growing. Was it a gradual movement or did you just quit certain habits once and for all? It’s been an ongoing process of learning, developing discipline, integrating new info into my lifestyle, adjustments, and then got it! So, not cold turkey but once I make a commitment I have an abundant amount of determination


to accomplish my goals. The challenge gives me energy itself. How difficult was it to give up things you had once craved? When you ready to make a change it’s not hard. I just had to let go of my patterns of self-destructive thinking and then the behavior was easy to shift. Exercise and martial arts gives me an alternative so I could experience a REAL natural high and not an artificial one. And the foods that I now eat give me abundant energy and I feel young as ever. Running 12 miles is my idea of getting a buzz these days. [laughs] How have those changes helped you as an artist in the studio and/or on stage? My passion for emceeing was resurrected with the lifestyle changes. I had been getting tired of saying the same things over and over. Instead of the negative protest type of attitude I have embraced a more positive proactive type of attitude and it has opened up a whole other source of creative inspiration. From my training there are so many metaphors and parallels that give my songwriting new angles and subjects to express. I don’t know if I would’ve even continued with dead prez if I hadn’t found a more conducive outlet for where my mind, body and spirit are evolving. So, I truly know that without my lifestyle shift over the years I probably woulda been out the game by now...but now I feel like I’m just getting my second wind and I’m excited and looking forward to doing so much more! What did you eat for breakfast this morning? An organic peach and some green tea with chickpea miso broth over organic brown rice and 26 oz of filtered water. There’s no health care in the music industry. Very few if any artists have anything in their contracts to account for a medical issue. How has this been allowed to go on for so long? That’s a great question. I don’t know exactly but I suppose it has a lot to do with the lifestyle of overindulgence and drugged out mania that is associated with the music industry. If you keep the slave drunk and high enough when will the slave come to the conclusion that he should organize himself for his human rights? There’s many angles to it. I think the music game has conditioned


“We need preventative, holistic, non-narcotic, self-healing, natural therapies more than ever. That’s not on the music industries or US government’s list of to do’s.”

most artists to want to get that chance to shine so bad that they don’t wanna do nothing to challenge their chance at stardom. People come from dire situations and just wanna cake up. A lotta folks ain’t tryna challenge the machine itself they tryna get in good with it. But I think that it’s not just that you want any old healthcare. You don’t want free access to more drugs and pills and pharmaceutical side effects. Now that’s what healthcare means in this country. We need preventative holistic, nonnarcotic, self-healing, natural therapies more than ever. That’s not on the music industries or US government’s list of to do’s. As an artist who’s been on many tours, you’re well aware of the poor food choices available on the road. How do you get around this, especially in other countries? When I can I hit Whole Foods and cook my own meals. When we order out we select the healthiest options of veggies and some fish at Thai food, Ethiopian, Mediterranean, Mexican, Chinese etc...Health food grocery stores, juice and

smoothie bars and things like that. Also our fans hit us and tell us the healthy spots to check when we get to their areas. You and M-1 made it clear that you haven’t ghostwritten for Nas but without naming names, have you ever ghostwritten for any artists we might be familiar with? I’ve written a verse or two for M-1 if we were pressed for time or if I’d had a specific vision for a song he’d be like write what you feel I should say... Not often but here or there. And when I write I ask EVERYONE in the room to help so there are many folks who don’t even rap that have contributed to my rhymes. I love input and instant feedback. My wife and son are probably tired of ghostwriting for me! Anything else you’d like to share with our readership? sticrbg.com Also to join in on the stimulating conversations at Facebook/sticrbg We be having meaningful fun chopping it up live all the time. RBGFITCLUB.com Salute. Dead prez – Information Age https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/information-age/id565661367


Robin Downes No matter how hectic our schedules may become creating balance becomes more important. Yoga enthusiast Robin Downes has been able to do this while continuing to expand. She describes herself as a multi-media healing artist. Among her many accomplishments, the Emmy Award winner has served as music coordinator for The Cosby Show, wrote and produced short film, deejayed with Chuck D at Adelphi University and was production coordinator for Spike Lee’s “Do the Right Thing”. We spoke with Robin about her commitment to fitness and wellness. The speed of life can at times seem to move faster for many of us as we get older. How did yoga become your outlet to slow things down? My wonderful, giving mother was losing her battle with cancer, maintaining my marriage and career was becoming extremely stressful. I

was looking for the tools to help me cope with stress and maintain my youthful vitality. Around 1995 I read one of Deepak Chopra’s books’ “Ageless Body and Timeless Mind”. In his book he mentioned Yoga as a tool to cope with stress and retain a youthful vitality. Soon after that, I was walking down the street and saw a sign for a free Yoga session. I went to the session and felt like I was home. My background in dance and gymnastics helped my body translate easily into the healing movement. What’s a common misconception that people may have about yoga? It is not a religion - it is an ancient practice that is spiritual and you can embrace your interpretation of religion. It was made popular by East Indians that are Hindu, and I encourage my students to interpret what works for your beliefs. It is not just for skinny


white rich women /people - all stages, all ages, all sizes, all races, male or female. It is not too hard - there are gentle restorative ways to approach the practice. Is it true that you introduced Russell Simmons to the discipline? He was my first celebrity client. No, I did not introduce Russell to Yoga. We have been long time friends since the early 80’s (actually met in the 70’s when he was at City College and I was across the way at the High School of Music and Art when it was at 135th Street and Convent Avenue.) During that time I went to school with Kurtis Blow and later our paths crossed and I appeared on one of his album covers. Russell and I started studying the practice around the same time. I got certified as a teacher right away and Russell dedicated himself to studying EVERYDAY with amazing teachers at Jivamukti and various other instructors. Tell us how

you got involved with the Feel Rich movement. I noticed Quincy Jones III was commenting positively on my Yoga post. When I checked out his profile I saw his affiliation with Feel Rich. Check out this link for a great quote from him and more details: http://archive. aweber.com/yoga-flava-tv/AVogs/h/Winter_ Solstice_Unity.htm What do you have planned for this year? Where can people contact you for more information? Right now I am the spokeswoman for the Feel Rich Goes Red Campaign, bringing heart health awareness to women. Check out my #feelrichgoesred playlist on youtube and subscribe: http://www. youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXrCY4-7yicUaFsj 8ICjyOW8VPIaAY125&feature=view_all http:// www.yogaflava.com Thanks for taking the time with Rapper’s Delite.


Food For Thought Words by Likewise Hernandez


Do you really know what you’re eating?

Most of us think we know but we have no idea. The majority of calories that Americans consume today come from processed foods. These foods can go years without molding or spoiling due to the preservatives they contain. Just think of how long they can potentially remain in your body…Yikes! You’d be hard pressed finding a product on your local supermarket shelf that doesn’t contain some type of corn, soybean, wheat or canola. Don’t believe it? Check the ingredients of that bag of snacks you’ve been dipping your fingers into. Most of these come from genetically modified seeds. Corn leads the way. You’ll find it in everything from potato chips to over-thecounter medications. Genetic engineering alters the structure of DNA. Some of the effects are noticeably visible amongst our peers while others won’t be seen for years after. Companies are not required to label any

Genetically Modified Organisms

(GMO’s) their products may have. The Whole Foods grocery chain has said that all their locations in the U.S. and Canada will label all GMO products by 2018. Chemicals injected in and fed to cows, chickens, turkeys, pigs and other animals

GMO’s are consumed unknowingly by most of us every day.

have produced much larger livestock in recent decades.

Why should any of this concern you?

The U.S. is only 37th globally when it comes to life expectancy. How many of your friends and family suffer from digestive disorders, obesity, high blood pressure, allergies, organ damage, etc.? The modern day processed food product isn’t what it was years ago. New combinations of chemicals and flavors seem to pop up weekly. What exactly is sodium stearoyl lactylate anyway? Heart disease, cancers, diabetes, strokes and a long list of other diseases are sky-rocketing at alarming rates. Could there be a correlation? Processed foods can be of great value. In places and moments where fresh foods are not available they can provide a welcomed option. The issue is that they have become a staple in too many diets. You’d probably be better off searching for foods with a limited number of ingredients. Share your thoughts with us. Should food manufacturers be able to not label what ingredients are added to your food?


Robin Downes No matter how hectic our schedules may become creating balance becomes more important. Yoga enthusiast Robin Downes has been able to do this while continuing to expand. She describes herself as a multi-media healing artist. Among her many accomplishments, the Emmy Award winner has served as music coordinator for The Cosby Show, wrote and produced short film, deejayed with Chuck D at Adelphi University and was production coordinator for Spike Lee’s “Do the Right Thing”. We spoke with Robin about her commitment to fitness and wellness. The speed of life can at times seem to move faster for many of us as we get older. How did yoga become your outlet to slow things down? My wonderful, giving mother was losing her battle with cancer, maintaining my marriage and career was becoming extremely stressful. I was looking for the tools to help me cope with stress and maintain my youthful vitality. Around 1995 I read one of Deepak Chopra’s books’ “Ageless Body and Timeless Mind”. In his book he mentioned Yoga as a tool to cope with stress and retain a youthful vitality. Soon after that, I was walking down the street and saw a sign for a free Yoga session. I went to the session and felt like I was home. My background in dance and gymnastics helped my body translate easily into the healing movement. What’s a common misconception that people may have about yoga? It is not a religion - it is an ancient practice that is spiritual and you can embrace your interpretation of religion. It was made popular by East Indians that are Hindu, and I encourage my students to interpret what works for your beliefs. It is not just for skinny white rich women /people all stages, all ages, all sizes, all races, male or female. It is not too hard - there are gentle restorative ways to approach the practice. Is it true that you introduced Russell Simmons to the discipline? He was my first celebrity client. No, I did not introduce Russell to Yoga. We have been long time friends since the early 80’s (actually met in the 70’s when he was at City College and I was across the way at the High School of Music and Art when it was at 135th Street and Convent Avenue.) During that time I went to school with Kurtis Blow and later our paths crossed and I appeared on one of his album covers. Russell and I started studying the practice around the same time. I got certified as a teacher right away and Russell dedicated himself to studying EVERYDAY with amazing teachers at Jivamukti and various other instructors. Tell us how you got involved with the Feel Rich movement. I noticed Quincy Jones III was commenting positively on my Yoga post. When I checked out his profile I saw his affiliation with Feel Rich. Check out this link for a great quote from him and more details: http://archive. aweber.com/yoga-flava-tv/AVogs/h/Winter_Solstice_Unity.htm What do you have planned for this year? Where can people contact you for more information? Right now I am the spokeswoman for the Feel Rich Goes Red Campaign, bringing heart health awareness to women. Check out my #feelrichgoesred playlist on youtube and subscribe: http://www. youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXrCY4-7yicUaFsj8ICjyOW8VPIaAY125&f eature=view_all http://www.yogaflava.com Thanks for taking the time with Rapper’s Delite.


Kathy Red


“I always tell my friends to do whatever makes them happy and not to worry about what others think. At the end of it all, you are the one that has to live with the consequences of your actions, so make sure your actions will lead you into your happiness.�


try to help you as opposed to hate on you. I had a-lot of connections in the nightlife industry and I thought that it would be a great idea for Strawberry Blunt to promote the brand at parties. I eventually became the events coordinator for the movement and now I book them at all the high end venues in downtown NYC like Greenhouse, WIP, & Kiss N Fly. What’s kinds of things do you look for in a man? The things I look for in a man are honesty, humor, respect at all times, sense of style, and of course, he must be successful! I don’t need a man for anything but i do need him to represent what I represent. I’m an honest person, so I want that in return. I happen to be very funny so I need a man with a sense of humor. I’m a little fashionista, so my dude has got to match my style. I respect you and vice versa. I’m a successful woman, so I want a successful man. I only look for the things that I know I can give back as a woman. If I was a liar, I could never demand honesty, you feel me? I want someone I can grow with, not depend on and not need, but grow with.... What’s a good date night restaurant in NYC?

Where are you from?

M

y name is Kathy Red. I am from Weehawken, NJ, but I’m from Dominican descent.

Your measurements are...? 34, 26, 37 Did you always want to model? Yes. Since I was a very little girl, modeling has been a passion. I remember always making my mother take pictures of me and me always posing for the camera. Poor woman, I never gave her a break! lol. The modeling world amazed me in so many ways and I was sure about wanting to be a part of it. When did you realize you wanted to do more? It wasn’t until this year that I realized that there isn’t much of a future in modeling. It’s more of a stepping stone to get into other things, which is why I’ve always done event coordinating on the side. I have also decided to pursue my acting career and shot my first short film this past month. How did you become involved with The Strawberry Blunt Ladies? I became involved with the Strawberry Blunt Girls about two years ago. I got booked as their makeup artist for their berry first photo shoot and they recruited me the same day! I was so excited to be a part of a movement that was ran completely by women. It’s a beautiful thing when you can work with women who

A good date night restaurant in NYC? Hmm… I wish I had enough dating experience to tell you but I honestly don’t date at all. What’s the best advise you’ve ever been given? I always tell my friends to do whatever makes them happy and not to worry about what others think. At the end of it all, you are the one that has to live with the consequences of your actions, so make sure your actions will lead you into your happiness. Where can we look forward to seeing you this year? I filmed my first movie called “Hotel Guests” this past month and I’m very excited and pleased to show the world this new side of me. Keep a look out for it. It should be out in early April and will be featured in the Harlem & Williamsburg Film Festival. You can also catch me at all the hottest parties in NYC partying with A-list celebrities. Tuesdays & Thursdays I’m at Greenhouse. Wednesdays I’m at Kiss N Fly & Sundays I’m at WIP. You can also stay updated with all my future projects & events by following me on Instagram: @Kathy__RED & Twitter: @KathyRED_


LIPMO THREADS T

he vision behind Lipmo Threads is simple mathematics. Prepare yourself for all opportunities that may come your way. Sometimes you only get one shot....sometimes you get multiple shots but preparation is key. Preparation + Opportunity= Luck; or what most would call luck. People do sometimes just fall into situations, but it’s either sink or swim when the situation arises. That is our whole mantra and with it comes the attempts to inspire others to embody it.

T

here are numerous deficits this world is externally facing. However, one of the most painful ones is an internal one--which is never realizing your dreams. Not to sound cliché but the whole sugary “reach for the stars” notion is a good one. Dreams can be achieved, the majority just let roadblocks deter them too easily. We aim to start at the root with the youth. Fashion is a very influential medium and if used correctly can guide people’s lifestyles and attitudes. ur team consists of 3 conceptual designers with one main designer (Mike Santos). We have reached outside and given opportunities to a few other artists for some graphic design work. They’ve gotten free range on style but the vision and approval still ends up being on our end. The open forum is what we’re all about. We want to push for others to express themselves artistically through us. So in the future, we will feature many more outside artist’s interpretations of our style. You can definitely look forward to a consistent body of work that stays true to our name! That is something that will never change and will only progress. Everyone can also look forward to us collaborating with many well known as well as underground artists in all fields. We are heavily involved in music and film and you will begin to see more and more collaborations with quality individuals.

O

T-shirt contest winner: Jessica Fjord


You can always check us out at: www.lipmothreads.com facebook.com/lipmothreads @Lipmo_Threads on Twitter @Lipmo_Threads on Instagram


Chet Haze

Chester Academy

“Chet”

Hanks,

Award-winning

the

son

actor

of

Tom

and Rita Wilson, is focused on making a splash. This budding singer, rapper, songwriter and actor has been building in the lab. Fresh off of the release of his latest single “Finest Girl” we caught up with the Northwestern theater major to talk music and film. Who were your first influences in Hip-Hop? Chet: What really made me fall in love with Hip-Hop was Biggie’s Ready to Die. I love classics like Nas’ Illmatic, Lifestylez ov da Poor & Dangerous from Big L, Enter the 36 Chambers from Wu-Tang, Jay-Z’s Reasonable Doubt. Once I started listening to classic Hip-Hop I couldn’t stop. Those are all some ill spittas. Do you plan to take your music more lyrical on future projects? We’ll have to wait and see but I have a few ideas that I’m sure people will like.

When did

you decide that you wanted to pursue music and make a name for yourself? It was right around my 20th birthday.

I was

going into my sophomore year of college when I started coming up with ideas. Do you plan on releasing a full studio album or will you keep banging out singles and videos? I’m working on an album right now. Along the way, I’ll put out releases to let people know I’m coming soon. Who do you want to work with in the studio? I’m a fan of Kirko Bangz. That’s someone I could see making music with in my lane. Who are you listening to in the car or truck when you’re riding around? Meek Mill and Rick Ross is who I’m listening to right now. Where can people find out the latest on Chet Haze? You can follow me @ ChetHaze and keep a look out for more projects.


My very first introduction into Hip Hop was from my dad. A distinctive memory I have was him showing me “Fight the Power� by Public

Enemy. Though I was

very young at the time I was absolutely taken back by the strong message and the emotion you got from it. I also have to credit my dad for my soul. (which I also consider a big part of the hip hop culture) The reason I credit my dad for this is because he was a huge James Brown fan. In fact when he was younger he went to a

James Brown concert and was the only

white guy there, but it was always about the music and this really rubbed off on me. I also was writing at a very young age. At first it would just be for English class, poems and what have you, but as I got older I realized that my writing was a gift and not everyone can do it. I used to believe everyone can write and I thought it was universal, but I began to see that this was something special.


Jason Diener

Tell us about your introduction to Hip Hop? When I was a freshman in high school I started to freestyle for my friends just for fun and many of them suggested I start to take hip hop and rap more serious. From there I had made a couple CD’s that I recorded on my computer using a computer microphone and beats from online sources. I did some local shows and would continue to do freestyles here and there. From that time I made it a point to better myself and to listen to any criticism, take it, and use it to my advantage. Since then I have never looked back and decided this is what I love and will stop at nothing to do this as a living. What makes you stand out from other rap artists in today’s game? I stand out from other artists in many ways. First is my main focus on what ignites me to go after this dream. My main goal is to inspire and motivate others through my music. This is what drives me. The money and fame that come with it are just tools to help get my word out there. Second,

my lyrics have a lot of meaning in them. If you listen to what I am saying the majority of my songs have lessons and strong messages that are even hard to catch at times, but just by listening I believe it can reach a level of the subconscious that will only promote positivity, strength, love, and truth. In addition I make it a point to not only write meaningful lyrics but also to keep my songs relevant and catchy. By combining both lyrics and relevance I believe I can reach all different types of people and not just one particular group. Finally, my style and my approach are unique mostly because I stay true to who I am and as I’ve been told numerous times I am one of a kind. Where can the masses hear new music from you? Being a fresh face in this game (at least on a larger public level) I am now currently working on putting out my music to the masses for the first time. When this article drops I should have


a music video out for my song Endless Roadz. (which is featured on this mixtape) Once it is out more songs will start to be released. I have a bunch of tracks complete and ready to go. I am just taking my time and doing this step by step to make sure everything runs smoothly. Patience is a virtue. To stay updated on when and where music is released these are the best sources: * Twitter: @RealJDiener www.facebook.com/ realjdiener Who are some of your influences in the game right now? When it comes to influences another thing about me is I am not inspired by just hip hop and rap artists. My style has been influenced by all different genres as I love music in general. To narrow it down my biggest influences are: 2pac, Oasis, Cam’Ron, Bob Marley, John Denver, Tom Petty, and Michael Jackson. One of the broadest ranges to be influenced by, but each of them has really influenced my sound in some way. What advice do you have for any artists that are trying to break into the hip hop scene? My advice would be that if you love it and I mean really love it do not give up. It’s not going to be easy and it takes a lot of dedication and hard work. Listen to constructive criticism and better yourself. As in anything in life, always strive to

be better no matter how good you are. Modestly climb and take advice on the way. I’ve come to realize that the most successful people are those who always want to better themselves. Also, be a people-person and network as much as you can. You never know who you may meet. On that note I also encourage you to help others feel as if they can be great. By helping other people you are actually helping yourself. Don’t waste your time judging others or hating on their success, focus on you. Take full advantage of all your opportunities. Finally, make sure you have a source of income because before you start making money you will have to spend it. Invest in yourself and above all BELIEVE IN YOURSELF. What should we look out for in 2013? 2013 is a big year for me. It is the first year that I will going all in and putting out projects to the public on a larger scale. It all will kick off with my music video for “Endless Roadz”. From there expect some other tracks to be released down the line. Also definitely expect shows in the NYNJ-CT areas. Towards the end of the year I will start looking into putting together a compilation of my music, but for right now the main focus is the music video and getting exposure. Rapper’s Delite thanks Jason Diener for taking the time to talk to us.


CLICK TO DOWNLOAD

Get your music featured on the Rapper’s Delite Mixtape. Every issue features the best of signed and unsigned talent. Get it early. Hit us up to find out how your song can be in rotation.

info@rappersdelite.com

Issue 04 ‘Fully Loaded’ Mixtape playlist Songs

FaSho ft. Future by LgWinnerzCircle Greatness ft. Joe Budden by Kimberly Greene Put Down Your Weapon by Young Eazy Bust It Open by Dirty Rhymes Endless Roadz by Jason Diener HustleHard by FreePeople Campfire Story by J-es-on Mind On My Green by The Sav Dreamin (Act 5) – Dirty by Momma’s Fat Boi My Dearest Hip Hop by Conceit She gon get the D – Mack ‘N Phre$h by TRIPPY MACK Get Down Low by TheRealLG Jason’s “Movement by Jason Diener Hanuman – Transcendance by RoméoLevi Got Everybody Talking by jgun Pray For Us by Zealstatic

Suffer by truth0315 Top of the Game by LXE Summertime by Filthy J Let’s Have a Good Night by Tai Lawanson And She Said by BLAKKWOOD Sacrifice by jgun Welcome To The Zoo by grisca Hands In The Air by Dirty da don

Instrumentals

In The AM (Prod. Right Beat Radio) Second Sunday (Prod. Right Beat Radio) Mind My Control (Prod. Right Beat Radio) Cruise N Vibe (prod. mo beatz) A Hustla’s Check List (prod. Ace Da Fella) Do Your Body Right (prod. Ace Da Fella)


You’d be hard-pressed to find an element of the Hip Hop culture that has remained Xerox since the creation of the art form. These current times may be remembered as the years rap music re-invigorated itself. Major and independent artists are releasing quality works that may impact later generations. Rap in its most basic form has also experienced some resurgence as of late.

Rap battles started as an alternate form of “The dozens” or “snap battles.” These competitions have been a staple in urban areas for generations. The term “dozens” originated during the Atlantic slave trade. Inbreeding among slaves lead to high numbers of birth defects. Deformed offspring and slaves that were punished with dismemberment for disobedience were sold for much cheaper. Poor white slave owners would purchase them under the condition that they had to buy a dozen at a time. Slaves that were included as a part of the dozens were seen as inferior and lived the lowest existence. In

a

rap

battle,

two

combatants square off against one another.

They spar

verbally attempting to insult the opponent into submission with testosterone-driven fury. A crowd judges whose punch lines, content and overall style they like better.


SMACK/URL’S Summer Madness 2: Return of the Legends was a rebirth of an art form that had been dormant for some time. New York City’s legendary Webster Hall was where more than a thousand battle rap enthusiasts packed in to witness history. The event even brought out the likes of Sean “Diddy” Combs, Q-Tip and Busta Rhymes among others. It had long been a mystery as to whether or not battle rappers were able to make a decent living off of their craft. Unlike their mainstream counterparts top tier battle rappers no longer feel the constant pressure of radio play spins and album sales. They cater to a more loyal fan base. Cash prizes for winners and losers of main events are only going up. The increase in exposure and popularity via YouTube and PPV now enable these artists to grind the circuit full-time without having to record a pop hit. Making the transition from the cypher to the Top 40 has always been a rare feat. The last battle rappers to make any real noise in the music biz were Eminem, Remy Ma, Cassidy and Meek Mill. Venues are selling out consistently and rap audiences are hungry for more. The passion and intensity displayed by some of these performers is something to watch. We recently chopped it up with a veteran participant as well as a catalyst of one of the standout moments in battle rap history, Loaded Lux. You gon’ get this work!

Will: What made you want to return to battle rapping after such a hiatus? Lux: I feel like I’m an artist that still has something to say in the culture. I understand the power of the word, lyricism and the impact that it can have in terms of keeping the integrity of the game. I’ve been talking to some artists, fans and trying to shed light on how I feel. Talking is one thing but leading by example is another.

Where do you see yourself going from here as far as battle rap or creating music? There are a lot of aspects to Loaded Lux. I am a recording artist as well. I want to continue

to express myself whether it’s through song, performance on the stage. I’m a big ball of creativity. I love to say my piece with some good music and cadences to back me up. It’s all about formatting the things that you want to say. We’re definitely creating right now. I got music available at www.loadedlux.com. I’m looking to drop some more material real soon. How long did you have to prepare for the battle? What if any obstacles were in the way for preparing for such a creative entrance and rhyme battle structure? I write everyday so it was just a matter of wrapping my head around what I wanted to do. I was ready…it was just about the structure.


“This

is all about performance art. People come and they spend their money and they’re looking forward to see a show. It’s about what you say and how you perform so I wanted to take it up another notch.” Who in the game do you want to work with right now? Kendrick Lamar. Lupe Fiasco already gave me the invitation to cook so I wanna get him on the right joint, Wiz Khalifa, MGK. I was creating for the battle at around the same time the Nas joint dropped. When he dropped that album [Life is Good] it was some more inspiration. I love wordsmiths so he’s definitely one of those. That would be my top five.

How did you come up with the idea for the casket entrance and weeping mourners? This is all about performance art. People come and they spend their money and they’re looking forward to see a show. It’s about what you say and how you perform so I wanted to take it up another notch. I thought it would be dope to spread all over the media outlets. People are waiting for us artists to think outside of the box. In the culture we use the term “body-bag” when you really kill somebody up on the stage. I said if they’re gonna die, let’s respect the deceased and come in there sharp. I’m from Harlem and a lot of great men come from there and they always did things with style. That night was an opportunity to set precedence all over again and really put on a show for everybody. I thought the hearse, casket and the obituary was a dope look. When I saw how the people were so receptive it made it more worth the while. Many battle rappers find it hard to make a living. Did you ever think about finding another line of work to put food on the table? What made you stick with rapping and keep your skills sharp? Some people may call this an occupation and it is a career but this for me is what I was bred for. It’s a lifestyle for me. I love what I do. I love the fact that I can communicate through conversation and provide for my family while doing so. Man in general has something that when they put forth a certain work ethic they receive a satisfaction. This society is set up where you can obtain money for doing what you love to do. Coming from where I come from I would be doing this regardless. Were you ever into freestyle or did you always plan a strategy and write rhymes for your opponents? I take more pride in premeditated murder. Ha!


There’s nothing wrong with improving…that’s cool but there’s nothing like a plan well thought out. That’s where I think you can really see the depth of a man’s thinking. It’s like speed chess as opposed to off the clock chess. You really get to sit down and think out the infinite possibilities. I’d rather gear up. In the studio, how does it feel having to make songs with hooks, melodies and standard arrangements? The music is what you vibe with to help you express thoughts…A lot of artists that I’ve spoken with who create the same way tell me the music speaks to you. What you say has to match the mood of the music. It’s definitely a whole new challenge and a new lane of creativity but I’ve been doing both for the same amount of time. The battling kinda came first hand coming up. As far as the music, I get to wrap my head around being who I need to be on a certain record. I’m an artist when I paint so I’m gonna always enjoy that. Thank you for taking the time to chop it up with us.


Poor Righteous Teachers The New World Order – Profile Records Words by Cee Brooke In 1996 Trenton, New Jersey’s trio known for “Rock Dis Funky Joint” released one of the nineties most slept on albums. After three critically-acclaimed albums (Holy Intellect, 1990, Pure Poverty, 1991, Black Business, 1992), The New World Order would be P.R.T.’s 4th and final group effort. Lead emcee Wise Intelligent nailed the group’s in-house production with unorthodox, poetic flows, passionate delivery and lyrical substance inspired by the teachings of the Nation of Gods and Earths. Although N.W.A. had disbanded years earlier, rap’s corporate decision makers had shifted the audience’s attention toward gangsta rap and aggressive, hardcore lyrics. (The “Culture Freestyles” skit may have hurt a few feelings.) Earlier that year, South Orange’s Fugees had broken the mold and found commercial success with The Score. Ironically, Wyclef, Lauryn Hill and Pras were featured on The New World Order’s fourth cut “Allies”. Lauryn spits, “The folklore you spread down over tracks/got you gassed on some shit, may I suggest Ex-Lax.” Music listeners lost when this highlight wasn’t promoted as one of this album’s lead singles. Positive, intelligent lyrical content was the total opposite of what mainstream radio stations were and are still playing and a danger to the status quo. Unfortunately, the video for “Word Iz Life” was the only video ever put out to support the project. The features from KRS-One, X-Clan’s Brother J, Junior Reid, Nine, DJ Clark Kent, and Miss Jones were all meaningful. P.R.T. took a risk by putting out such a politically and socially charged work but after almost two decades it remains a solid listen. The messages on this album are just as potent as they were in ’96 (The album’s outro speaks for itself). This work of art was well ahead of its time. Do yourself a favor and give it a listen.


1. Who did Loaded Lux square off against in SMACK/URL’S Summer Madness 2? A. Calicoe B. Jamie Foxx C. Chuck D D. Vanilla Ice 2. Who did Kool Moe Dee defeat in his legendary 1981 showdown? A. Drake B. Chief Keef C. Fred The Godson D. Busy Bee 3. Nas’ song “Ether” was directed toward which “Takeover” rapper? A. Will Smith B. Jay-Z C. Nicki Minaj D. Young MC 4. Which Brooklyn, New York rapper was targeted in 2Pac’s dis record “Hit ‘Em Up”? A. Notorious B.I.G. B. Spike Lee C. Joey Bada$$ D. Paula Perry 5. Who did Murda Mook square off against in SMACK/URL’S Summer Madness 2? A. Serius Jones B. Don Lady C. Kid Ink D. Iron Solomon

ANSWERS: 1 = A 2=D 3=B 4=A 5=D


Today’s artists in the battle circuit are the heart and soul of the thriving culture of rap. The relentless spirit of the underdog and an audience thirsty for competitive combat has helped to propel the art further mainstream. It has also allowed for the neversatisfied portion of fans to directly pick and choose who moves closer toward that limelight. Many of us have called for an alternative to popular radio raps for years. As battle platforms grow bigger we anticipate more new styles, cut-throat personal stabs and crushing punch lines worthy of ooohs, ahhhs and Youtube rewinds. We look forward to innovative ways of verbally dismantling an opponent. Here’s a toast to bringing it back and moving forward.

Will Loiseau Editor In Chief Rapper’s Delite


Rapper's Delite Issue 04 Loaded Lux  
Rapper's Delite Issue 04 Loaded Lux  

RD Mag reloads and loads up with Loaded Lux. It’s a packed issue with features and interviews. Don’t forget to download the Fully Loaded mix...