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JAMES BOND 007”

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MARYAMd’ABO JOE DON BAKER ART MALIK

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Producmon Designer PETER LAMONT Music by JOHN BARRY Associate Producers TOM PEVSNER and Produced by ALBERT R. BROCCOLI and MICHAEL G. WILSON Direcred by JOHN GLEN Screenplay by RICHARD

BARBARA BROCCOLI MAIBAL'NIand MICHAEL G. WILSON


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Vol.

No.3

July'1987 Managing Editor: Derek Meakin Featums Edna" Peter Davidson 3

Production Editor: Peter Glover

readers.

our

[I

Mini Office

An in-depth look at

MlcroLmk

14 a

low-cost integrated business package.

News

16

More about Britain’s nationwide online database for micros. 17 a

price everybody can afford.

_

20

enjoyment out of games with help from readers.

22

printer utility for your Atari 1029

or

Epson printer.

3D Platter

25 _

A program to demonstrate

rotating shapes.

Solutions

Software

29

Our resident expert solves your programming problems.

:

..z:*:i.°::.:"::;°éi:".::at.d

Hazel Grove. Stockport SK7 5N\’-

1986

Subscription rates for 12issues, post free: UK

by

module to give the power of speech to your Atari.

A superb

Published by:

533

in

Dump 15

0614568383 061-456 8383 061-456 3500 Subszngigzi, 0514805171 Telecom Gold: 72:MAGOO1 Telex: 265871 MONREF G Quoting Ref. 72:MAGOO1 Prestel Mailbox: 614558383

'

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Get more

Nora Lawton

-

More of the prize-winning mini—programs sent

H’" ts and 77!”

AJi‘ff’ssggv?ifs’

512

bit Atari.

9

_

Advertisement Manager: Tony Nowell

33,573 Januarydune,

8

.

Five Liners

Music software at

Technical Editor: André Willey

I,

changing world of

ever

.

.

An Editor: Heather Sheldrick Reviews Editor: Christopher Payne News Editor: Mike Cowley

Editorial: Administration: Ad rt"

of the

news

.

Microrhythm

7

5

The latest

Build

m?i?i?g"

%%

News

gurope verseas

“Atari User" “homes program “stings and articles for publication. Material should be typed or computer-printed, and preferably doubleespaced. Program listings should be accommpanied by cassette tape or disc. Please enclose stamped, selfaddressed envelope, otherwise the return of material cannot be guaranteed. Contributions accepted for publication by Database Pub?ca?ons Ltd will be on an anqights basis.

@ 19a7 Database Publications Ltd. No material may be reproduced in whole or in permission. While every partwithoutwriten care is taken, the publishers cannot be held legally responsible for any errors in articles, listings, or advertisements. ”Atari User" is an independent publication and/Ammo“, (UKMtdare notresponsible for any of the articles they contain or for any of the opinions expressed. News trade distribution: Europress Sales and Distribution Limited, Unit 1, Burgess Road, lvyhouse Lane, Hastings, East Sussex TN35 4NR. Tel: 0424 430422.

30

ROUIOC .

More help and hints from

our

expert adventurer.

32

Map A

guide round the city

in

Alternate Reality.

34

Game of the Month

Play Duckdash: Save the ducks from the impending hurricane. .

.

.

m Action 37 Calculate how much wallpaper you need to decorate your home.

Computing

38

18 Commandments Find out the best way to submit articles to this magazme. _

4 1

ReVIeWS A look at the latest software: Arkanoud, Phantom and more _

e Another collection of colourful masterpieces from -

-

our

mailbag.

.

46

Spec’al Effects The start of

_

a series

.

_

_

showmg how to create amazmg displays.

5

I/o Channels -

.

.

45

P a I e tt

-

.

-

Part SIX of our series

on

'r

the Atari

-

s

-

1

-

input/output faCiIities. -

_

55

Mailbag _

The chance to get your news, Views,

moans

and

name

into

_

print.

July 7987 Atari User 3


-

Lmk your

I

Atari

outS|de

'

Electronic mail — The cheapest and fastest form of communication possible ll com the same to send a message to one mailbox as to 500!

.

I

to the

'

-

world

'

W|th...

'

'

When you jom MicroL_ink _you ve got the world of communications at your I fingertips 24 hours a day. You II have immediate to access “If" su scri-_bunk_uphwnSKse.ogo1tselex ersmr e an million worldwide. You can even ALL the facilities offered by send and receive telexes after office hours or while travelling. Telecom GOId and a great deal

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...

.I O

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more

Telemessages - Type in your message before 8pm and delivery is guaranteed by first

?

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pOSt

ne'Xt ere in t (ljiayLierceztSERdaYL e an anyw tiri‘e

. I

train and details thealtjre W°’ W'tcljckets, er mm a “St e' °' °’cl'éeckfflight from flowers range of products to floppy discs. —

Tele-boqking

Telesoftware — Download directly into your Atari any program from

the$v§|r9rovarl9“Lterirv aval a e on mo in Eon/1 0

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any ~$;/ 1 3”

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Company searches —.Obtain facts about British limited any. and f'." seconds; cornpancy ana yse in orma fully on inanCla ion over 100 , 000 major companies

don’t have an interface: Miracle wszooo v21, v23 modem + cable + Datatari Jiewterm soinftterface ware. : £749 95 Tote l

(£19.95). Total price: £136.10.

.

Typesetting

_

Send

from

CODY

V9” W0“? processor-together With details of type size and style, and you’ll receive pages ready for printing within 24 hours.

II

WhEQhever equipment y_°u use, you Wlll be able to call MicroLink, open your mailbox, save to disc any messages waiting for you, and disconnect n as “?le as two ”1an t es .

_————'

\"‘\

W’ V'

.

.

.

"//-*—

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prihce With eit er combination you can also log on to other databases and bulletin boards all round the worm.

.

.

I

If you

.

_

m 5p

“—*——\/\ 4 \

More than 90 per cent of subscrlbefs '

.

can con“

the Mi croeff m to computer at |o¢a| call

'

rates.

News — Use the powerful search commands to pinpomt Vital business information from the world's leading news services, .

.

.

newspapersandperiodicals. If you also have Radiopaging pocket radiopager you'll be a|erted each time an Urgent —

'

r a

'

rsnessaqe 0 YOU re alTlVeS a ways In ytOUI' OUC rallbox' '

.J

an 850 interface:

.

If)

\

Two recommended packages

Ifyou have

_

.

,

Office

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m

5

games and utilities.

.

,

E

ca mi e liacebl‘l?gggi?el';gfsgahmdem

-—

,

- I

_

Reservtj3

I

All you need apart from your Atari is a modem, which plugs into your telephone wall socket, plus suitable communications software. We have provided two possible options on the left.

F1

.

Gateways — Get through to New York in just five seconds or key into the EEC computer in Luxembourg' WhICh Ilnks YOU to 600 databases throughout Europe. —

-

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| l l I

' | I l I

————————————-—————————-——-. Please send me full TO FIND OUT MORE Fill in the coupon and it the address S€l|ld be ow to’ou \.'."I|| lith,‘l\/L‘ full details of SQ'HVlL't'S and costs together \.‘.l|lh an application form Complete this and within days vou and your Atari will be able to use all the StfvaLrE> ul MicroLink and Telecom GO“,

details about MicroLink, and information the fonowmg hardware and ”mare Optlons

(532225522751? '

l]

P ace paCkage

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Name\ A

ddressx

\ P

(jam-max

Send to: MicroLink, Europa House, 68 Chester Road, Hazel Grove, Stockport SK7 5NY. _

_

L__________________£&_h l

4 Atari User July 7987


.

A

Ata g ?ared II p for

d I

prices

g—|(

pped ATAR'

.

8 km games

producer

STV Software has slashed prices 0” ”3 current and future arcade-style programs Recently released doe 8‘ the Nuclear WlII now Caverns COSt £799 disc and £339 0.” on cassette instead Of £1099 and £7.99. The same new prices W'“ due out apply to Darg late .

and Pothole 'Panlc (featuring J'oe) Wh'Ch ls due m the autumn. for’release After to d's' —_

_

talking. trlbUtOFS handling' .

0L”

products we have decided to go for quantity saws mSteed

holding Up prices", said Peter 0 Carroll, managing director of STV Software Of

ATARI

-

space Sh'p-

Pothole Panic W'” be a f0||0W'UP to Joe & the NUC‘ lear Caverns With Joe lost underground. and havmg to dynamite h'S way to the surface. _

some stiff in what is be a bonanza market for games machines this year, particularly at Christmas. The company’s new consoles will come up against

opposition from Nintendo and Sega.

.

_

,

QFOUD

Wh'Ch

for the WHY 't prowdes computing adVlce has

YVO” praise

and

assistance

to local vol-

untary organisations.

has

just

deal for the UK disrights to the Sega Games Console and claims: “This is a very important

Signed

a

tribution

.

hardware ‘and software dur'hg the S'X'day eXh'b't'qn' it IS the latest community

venture by the

a,» ”

when revised hurredly advance orders for 70'000

>

units were placed in the first weeks of the year. The company began talking about selling at |east.200,000 and possibly a quarter of a million - games machines in 1987. And: With orders for VCS machines currently standing at 90,000 units, even this

few

Atari’s XE games system

properly in

1985 or 1986.

”This means there are a lot of under 105 out there who aren’t really ready for a proper micro but are keen to get their hands on a games

figure looks

like being exceeded before the begin— ning Of 09)“ year.

machine.

“And it doesn't hurt Atari’s prospects that we already u

I

l

Is h 0 tt In

project for us — consoles are going to be very big sellers this Christmas”. But Atari would appear to have the edge over the

competition. The Ninentendo Entertainment System marketed in the UK and Europe by Mattel costs £130 and the Sega Games Console £99 compared to the Atari XE at —

Mastertronic

Serious

.

_

pute rs and games consoles in 1987- BUt this figure had to be

£89.95.

And while the Sega machine will be launched

g

Hp

with only 12 games cartridges and the Nintendo with about 27, Jack Tramiel has already promised the XE will be backed by more than 400 pieces of software. In addition, Atari has the lead in persuading High Street stores to stock its new product. and Dixons, Currys

Woolworths are virtually certain to give shelf space to

the XE, and W H Smith another probable outlet.

I

Ill

THE ‘hrwmg SthPSh're Ate” User Group took its message m 0” to the streets dune F0 people ”5 micros m SthW ac '°”An estimated 200'000 V'S't' ors to Telford Town Centre saw demonstrations Of Ata” .

faces

competition expected to

action .

,

m

have a games software range that is second to none”. Atari originally estimated it W0U|d 89” 150,000 8 hit 00m“

www?re

-

compete With’them Th'S month 3 new_release, Darg, features an alien who crashlands 0,” earth and mu.“ locate and d'g for the speCIal crystals he needs to refuel h'S

I

”Wipe/151W“ if“,

c om p e t I t I0“

[have

MIC'OS

~

;%,f%/

and

million-selling

f

w“

_—__—_————_————

among the biggest sellers to and we

_

20

r

,

"

“we expect a major revival in the video console sector during the Iastquarter of 1987 if not before”, a company spokesman told Atari User. ”We believe the average age of prospective buyers is getting younger because the big market for sub-£100 hardware was not catered for

(021-770 1003). "A look at the latest charts shows that budget games are

today

its 130XE

complement

'

.

oin

redesigned 2600VCS.

_

JU'Y

to be a dramatic upsSrgegin the games machine market this year, and Atari is determined to be ready for it. It is no accident the company brought out the XE computer games system to

THERE is

b

attraction

MINI OFFICE II is well on its way to becoming the biggest selling serious software package ever produced for the Atari 8-bit range. Launched at the Atari Computer Show in London in April, the product was an instant hit with the thousands of visitors who flocked to the Novotel. Several standholders stocked the package and they were impressed by its

enthusiastic reception

and

a”

-

a

bumper saleS-

with its The £19.95 disc word processor, spreadsheet, —

database, graphics, comms and label printing modules is continuing to dominate its —

sector of the market. Mike Jones of leading dis— tributor Software Express told Atari User: “Mini Office II is a fantastic product, which is why it is selling very well in all parts of the country even had an order for 10 from Ireland the other day". And —

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John Hambly Of Silica Distribution said: “There is nothing to compare with Mini Office II in the Atari 8 bit market. The nearest

American

competition and

twice

is

the

price”.

— July 7987 Atari User 5


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MICRO RHYTHM

Firebird

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DEATH RACE ‘

Atlantis

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Compumart’s 130XE bundle

COLONY

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Shorta

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FRENES'S ~

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| BRITAIN’S biggest Atari dealer being

8

bit

Compumart says it is driven out of the 130XE

market because the price of the machine has increased and supplies of vital peripherals have dried up.

Compumart managing director Steve Burke told Atari User: “In one fell swoop Atari has pushed the recommended retail price of the 130XE from £99 to nearly £130 and at the same time stopped providing disc drives and printers. ”We are losing between £5,000 and £7,000 a week in lost sales because the 1050 disc drive and 1027 and 1029 printers are not available.

“These peripherals

essential

are to our 130XE sales and we are trying

strategy desperatelyto find alternative replacements at prices our

customers can afford but without much luck”. To combat the Atari price —

increase

Compumart rently bundling the 130XE with four arcade games cartridges, Microblaster joystick is cur-

with micro switches and Atari 130XE handbook for £125 ~ £5 less than the official RRP for the machine alone. ”This adds up to a saving of over £60", said Steve Burke. “We have about 50 Atari 130XES to bundle, and after “12W are $0|d we are NOT gomg to carry on selling the machine on its own for 6 Atari User July 7987

Mastertranic

-

GRIDRUNNER

es

mm...

£130 it just isn’t worth our

«4

while”.

Atari UK spokesman Peter Walker defended the company’s decision to increase the price ofthe13OXE.“When the present management took over it inherited practices it didn't like", he told Atari User. “For instance, a word processing bundle including the 130XE, 1050 printer and 1029 printer with software

GUN LAW MaStertromc

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exercise and because of new

market expects. “Steve Burke has got it wrong about supplies of disc drives and printers. We have adequate stocks of 1050 drives and 1027 and 1029 printersin the UKtoIast untilthe end of this year, based on current demand. ”In September we are launching a replacement for the single 1050 disc drive the XSD551 double sided drive. “And later on we will bring out the XMM801 dot matrix printer as a replacement for —

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Compiled by Gallup/Microscope Gauntlet enters the chart this month at number one, while Microrhythm from Firebird and Mini Officellfrom Database offer non-games packages for your Atari — reviews of both are in this month’s issue.


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ORGAN from L. Golding TURN YOUI' Atari into an electronic, organ in just five lines of Basic? Well, not quite. You only get one voice, there aren't any black notes and the sound comes in

glorious monophone but it will certainly repay five min— utes typing time. Here is how it works. Whenever you press a key, its internaI code number (which is not the same as its Atascii value) is stored at

location 764. The program translates these keycodes into numbers which

generate specific musical pitches

when used in a sound statement. An°thef address (753) indicates when the key is released, and this is used to turn the sound off by reducing the volume to 0. The 14 top row keys play a scale from B to A, which is a pretty useful range. The tricky bit is converting keycodes into their respective pitch values, especially since the codes don’t follow any logical sequence. It could be done by 14 lF....THEN statements, such as: IF KEYCODE=31 THEN PITCH=60, but this would slow everything down far too much. It would allow you to play the Dead March convincingly but if you wanted something jazzy it would not be possible to get the speed.

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Our solution is to store the pitch values in array(A) which can be indexed directly by keycodes,|ikethis: PITCH=A(KEYCODE) Line 10 sets up the array, reads the pitch values from line 20, inserts them

all in the right places and disables Break. Line 30 just makes the screen a bit prettier and line 40 handles the

keycodes. Address 753 contains a value of 3 if any key is being held down oraO if all keys are released. Address 764 contains the keycode of the last key pressed, so by using both of the values held in the locations together you can see which key is being used and for “OW '°"9As it happens the top row keycodes are all used to

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between and 32. These are point to individual elements in 1

the array and so retrieve the correct pitch values. The IF...THEN statement at the end of this line disables most of the remaining keys, and the zero elements in the array take care of any that slip through the net. Line 50 generates the sound using a to control Bololean vo ume. Theexpression( value of K>0) will be if K is truly greater than zero, or 0 otherwise. And K, You Win remember can be 3 Of 0. SO the expression K*3-(K>0) evaluates to 8 if the key is

pressed or 0 when it’s released and this is precisely what we need to switch the volume on or off in the sound statement. There are no sharps or flats available so you will need to get semitones in the right places for different tunes. Even so the instrument will cope with most nursery rhymes, a wide range of hymns and carols and a fair selection of popular songs. ill GRAPHICS 2+16:DIM N(32):FOR X=ll T0 32=READ D=N<X)=D=NEXT X=P0KE 16;i12=P0 K5

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Gadgets

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any situation where visual or text

WE described a gadget that responds to your voice in the March 1987 issue of Atari User. Now here’s one that gives your Atari the power to talk back.

output is inappropriate. It also has great novelty value. How about an adventure game with talking

relatively inexpensive, straightforward to construct and easy to program. You can use it as a signalling device for visually handicapped people, an educational aid for students with reading difficulties or in

Now we’ll describe how to build and test it and next month-we’ll cover its operation in detail, showing how you can easily add speech output to your own Basic programs.

monsters or a speak and spell gram for young children?

It’s

pro-

Figure

I

shows

the circuit. Because

thegadget draws over 100 milliamps at full output it cannot be powered directly from the joystick ports so some external supply is needed. BR1, IC1, C1 and C2 are included so that you can use any AC source around 6v to 9v, provided it can deliver at least 150 milliamps. The transformers supplied with disc drives, 850 interfaces and 410 pro-

gram recorders will work satisfacand for this reason we’ve suggested using a power socket which will accept the plugs fitted as standard to those transformers. Don’t use the power pack which supplies your computer itself as there could be a danger of overload. In any case, the PSU supplied with XL/XE machines won’t work with this gadget, since it delivers 5v DC. A 6v or 8v bell

torily,

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works well, and has the advantage of being fully shrouded to reduce the risk of mains shocks. You can of course, buy a transformer for mounting perMaplin type manently in the case YN14O is suitable. Current drain is around 35mA even when the unit is not speaking, so battery operation is not practical. IC2 is the voice chip and it can produce 64 different speech sounds called allophones which, when -

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Tu’" ‘0 Page 12 ’ July 1987 Atari User

77


combined correctly, can generate any word in the English language. Each allophone has its own code number from O to 63. To use the device set one of these numbers on the address lines in binary form,wait for pin9to go low then send a negative pulse to pin 20. all the hard The chip work and does outputs a digital Signal at pin 24. A low-pass filter (R3, R4, C6, C7) converts this into an audio signal which is then amplified by IC3 and appears as the chosen speech sound at the

28

25

Cass.

Atari Aces Shoot 'em up

Summer Games Arcade Classics Temple of Apshai Trilogy Uitima Raid

Hardball Fight Night

Beach Head ll Leaderboard Super Huey Field

Of

8.95 6.00 8.95 8.95 10.95 7.95

IV

Over Moscow

7.95 5.95 7.95 7.95 8.95

Fire

Vietnam Gauntlet Alternate Fleality II' Phamasy Gettysburg Panza Grenadier War Game ConstructionSet

8.95

Mech Brigade

LeaderboardTournament Gauntlet Deeper Dungeon War in Russia ENGLISH SOFTWARE Smash Hits Vol. 5 Smash H'ts V°L 6 Smash Hits Vol. 7

4.99 4.99 Cass. 8.95

.

éCTIVISION hostbusters CODE MASTERS BMX Simulation Red Max DOMARK Trivial Pursuit ‘Phone bravailability 72 Atari User July 7987

Disc

1695 25.99 25.99 35.00 17.00 17.00

II

Platform Perfection Beer + Dropzone +Cavems

M

I

o

n

+

0

8!

AC in

0-0 -

Figure

//_-

The p03 (fu/l size}

low-voltage AC supply is wired to the PCB connecting block through a

and IC3 are fitted the right way round (IC3 is upside down) and that all pins

sit

correctly

into

their

switch controlled by VR1. You could use a cheaper unswitched pot if you are prepared to unplug the transformer whenever the unit is not in use. When assembly is complete, inspect the board carefully to see that all

intended

sockets.

The screw terminal blocks make assembly and testing easy but you can omit them if you don’t mind soldering leads directly to the PCB tracks. The

A

221 Cannock Road, Chadsmoor, Cannock, Staffs W511 200. Tel: (05435) 79099

I

Disc

I!

I

C8, C9 and C12. BR1 has + marked

Graphics

n

+

DBP14

+

n n

+

2 g’

n

a

0“

2 "U Q m t "I

while the electrolytic capacitors all carry a grey band with chevrons and 0 to indicate the negative side. All other capacitors and resistors can be fitted either way round. Bend the leads of IC1 and bolt it into place along with its heat sink before soldering theleads. Make sure that |C2

GOLD Wizards Crown Battle of Antitam Kamtgruppe Printshop Graphics Disc

um

9.

Figure III shows the component layout. Note the polarities for BRl, Cl,

US

1

0-0—1-

speaker. The PCB foil pattern is shown in Figure II and, as always, an etched and drilled PCB is available from RH Design who, incidentally, can also supply ready—built versions of this and all other gadgets in the series.

A

8-95

8.95 Cass. 8.95 Cass

11.95 16.95 11.95 10.95 11.95 11.95 11.95 11.95 1195 11.95 11.95

16.95 16.95 25.95 22.95 16.95 25.95 6.99 6.99 25.95 Disc

12.95 1295 12.95 Disc

1.99

1.99 Cass 12.95

Disc 16.95

ELECTRIC DREAMS Spindizzy MIRRORSOFT Spit?re 40

DIGITAL INTEGRATION Pilot

Fighter

Tomahawk NOVAGEN Mercenary Second City MercenaryComp. Paar DATABYTE Boulderdash Spy V Spy II Graphics An Dept Aztec Greatest Hits Spy V Spy Montezuma's Revenge Boulder Dash Construction Kit Spy V Spy Ill' IMAGINE Amanoid Green Beret I

'

INFOCOM

+

c

0

Cass. 8.95 Cass. 8.95 Cass. 8.95 8.95 Cass. 7.95 5.35 12.95 Cass. 8.95 7.50 7.95 8.95 8.95 7.95 8.95 8495

Cass. 7.95 7.95 Cass.

HitchhikersGuide to the Galaxy Hollywood Hi Jinks Cass. MASTERTRONIC Kick Start 1.99 1.99 Vagas Jackpot Last V8 2.99 2.99 Ninja S.W.A.T. 1.99 Molecule Man 1.99 c W stai Raiders 1.99 GU" Law 199 Mutant Games 1.99 Frensis 1.99 Hower Bower 1.99 RAiNBiRD Cass Jewels 01 Darkness 12.95 .. Silicon Dream 12.95 The Pawn BUBBLE eus Cass. 75° S'afquaks

Disc

12.95 Disc

11.95 Disc 10.95 12.95 Disc

10.95 8.95 14.95 Disc

12.95 12.50 19.00 12.95 12.95 12.95 12.50 12.95 1295 Disc

11.95

GREMLIN GRAPHICS Trail

Blazer

Disc

7_g5

Footbdler 01 the Year SYSTEM 3 mgr-national Karate

p55,

Theatre Europe SEGA Zaxon Pooyan

“MesonJet Set

595 c.,,_ 550 Cass.

menopnosg Silent Service F-15 Strike Eagle Solo Flight ii

Battalion Commander Decision atthe Desert Conflict m Wetnam 0.0.5. son-wring Collosus Chesslv ATARI SOFTWARE srar names .

7_95

7‘95

cut 7,95 795

595 Cass.

9.95 1195 1395

cs”, 3,95

a“;

Disc

‘1-95

7_g5

10335

Disc

299 1.99

Master Chess Spiky Harold 1.99

8.95 3.95

HARDWARE Decathlon Atari Cassette£6.50 520 STFM + Mono Monitor £499.00 520 ST FM +Colour Monitor £699.00 1040 STF Now only £599.00 Epson LX86 Primer £247.25 xmz mssette unit £34.00 Atari 1030 XE Comm“ £99.99 1029 Printer including cut n paste £128.00 d'5“ A B” SZOSTFM " 5 D °.'"° + 5 blank ms“ * InternationalKa'am 2399-00 For full list of ST 50mm see our in the Atari ST User advert

Disc Disc

1095 10,95 10.95 1035 1535 1595

.

.

.

.

.

.

Disc

.

1395

_

8.95 a_95

Al

are correct

prices

9.95 7_g5

7,95 8.95 8-95

Tennis

space Lobsre, Sprung Gumbles Crisis Sawing m?gs River Rally

7_95

Disc

Disc

JOUS1

Disc

Disc

Cass. Poker 299 Whirlynurds 2.99 Boumy Bob 2.99 Dimension X 2.99 2.99 Alleymt 1.99 Colony War Hawk 1.99 Football Manager Strip

c‘f'?dg?

-

12.95 12.95 16.95

Disc

BUDGET TITLES

12.95

H

Millipede RED RAT SOFTWARE Astro Droid

1195 1395 my; 10.95

13.50

on; 395 935

star Raiders Defender Final Legacy Qix Paoman Miss Pacman

_

Disc

1295

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Mme, Olympus Rally Speedway FDM only phamom DATABASE Mini of?ce H

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535

Phone

or

5,95 6.95 6,95 2.99

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10 A=32zREll code number for allophone to be tested (can be G to 63) 25 POKE 54018,56:POKE 54016,255:POKE 5 4E18,6D:POKE 54516,B:REH set up ports for output 30 POKE 54016,A+128:REH send code with. strobe high to 1; PEEK(644)=1 THEN «men wait for ”ready" signal so POKE 54316,A:POKE 54016,A+128:REM p ulse strobe tine low, then high again 60 FOR li=1 T0 5?zNEXT lil:REll short dela y to avoid sharp sound cutoff

=

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inserted the correct way round. When all is well, type in Program and run it. The box should say “OW". Now you can experiment with other values for A (line 10) to explore the range of sounds it is possible to produce. Many of these are not recognisable as speech sounds until they are strung together with appropriate delays and pauses between them. We’ll explain how to make this possilble next month. Fitting the unit into a case presents no major difficulties, but be sure to 1

1

Parts

required for

VR1

100k Brown/black/yellow 4.7k YallOW/Viole t/ red 33k Orange/orange/orange 33 ohm Orange/orange/black

1ohm

10k

Brown/black/black Log pot (switched)

mfd 100V 100 mfd 10V 220 mfd 16V 1

so 16625

drill an accurate hole for VR1's spindle. It will move about 4mm verticaIIy and 2mm from side to side so you must be within these tolerances. The AC socket, if you’re using one, needs a 9mm square hole which can be cut with a fretsaw or carefully pared out from a 9mm round hole using a Stanley knife. The speaker can be attached to the case by self— adhesive pads and a pattern of holes will serve in lieu of an expensivegrille. Next month we’ll print out the allophone set and show you an easy way ofgenerating meaningful speech.

Maplin Code

Miscellaneous 8 ohm miniature speaker

M100K M4K7 M33K M33R M1R FW63T

C

,

0

C10 1

1,8

BL17T FL58N RK74R

12W” PC termina' “0°" 2-way PC terminal block

2.5mm power socket Control knob for VR1 Case leg Maplin ABS box M85) Pack of 1/8 ,, x SBA spacers Pack of 1/2" x SBA c/s bolts Pack of 68A nuts

FF1GS FF01B FF10I. FF13P

of Adhesive pads

”333 FT97F FE758

VN4°T FW33L BF

8&3le HBZZY

'

12pf Ceramic (marked 1:12p") 22nfCeraml_c (marked “22n”) .22nf Ceramic (marked “n22”) .22 mfd polyester film

YR73Q WX45Y WX78K

All ava'l bl 3

TBA820M Power Am D 1'|f ter _

f Maplin Electronic Supplies Ltd. PO Box Rayie? 9 he' éom ssex’ SSS BLR‘ C°St mun" 513-30

Plus

case '

BX78K 1

ec?gulator 2136820556USCPZV rocessor chip

.

wxsoQ

Semiconductors lCS

BL21X

TW'Sted'Vane heatsink

Pack ‘

YW53H

.

28 pin DIL socket 8 n DIL SOCkEt p'l

Other capacitors CZ,C3 , C13 .01 m f d disc ceramic

egg?

tnsun

30 11363 60 164015

~

_

SI“tale-endedElectrolytic Capacitors C1 470 mfd 25V

C8 C9 012

LINE

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_

R2 R3,R4 R5 R6

.

speech synthesise.-

MaplinCode

.

Resrstors .

O

layout

polarised components are the right way round, all leads are correctly soldered and there are no stray blobs or threads of solder bridging adjacent tracks. Attach the two joystick leads and plug the unit into the computer, ensuring that lead goes to port1 and lead 2 to port 2. Now plug in the AC supply, switch on and adjust the volume controlto its haIf-way position. You should be able, to hear a faint hiss from the speaker. If not, unplug everything and check the board again paying particular attention to components that must be

R1

tur

off

5mm

—__—__——_—_

Figure

POKE

sound

.

can

.

_

® —

.

_

QL31J QYSOE

W063T

2

PCB (Order code DBP14, price £2.95) Joystick extension leads (order code .

AT711, price £2.99 each} ‘

-

A variablefrom RH Desr 9", .

Harrogate,North

37 StonefallA venue, Yorkshire, HG2 7NS 1

July 1987 Atari User

73


_———*

“y‘metexmt‘mmte if” sgx?eteeemg?mmmtt §ttww?nmmmmmmeiw ??émtw4§$ ?wf‘e" N?m “Merit 5».»;-:"

j

32???“

package useful

home and

in

both

?fett‘t

_

integrated system consisting of the six most essential pieces of business software in a single, user-friendly integrated package.

Mini Office II, from Database Software, has taken the 8 bit business market by storm. It puts together a range of programs you’d expect to be available only on more powerful computers. comes

on disc and is

supplied complete with a weII-written manual. There are six constituent parts to Mini Office II: A word processor, database, spreadsheet, graphics system, communications system and a label printer program. Each of the six modules is selfcontained and functions independentl y of the others, et remains faithful to the deSign philosophy of an integrated suite of programs. The solid base from which Mini Office II operates is the framework of an excellent menu-driven system which is standard throughout the six .

.

.

.

.

modules.

.

.

.

.

.

superlative quality

Atari User July 7987

MENU

.

Tgx?

Merge

{git Text,

2693315329, "I“! Office

node

11 "911" .

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ules your work can be output to either an Epson compatible printer or directly to an Atari 1029 dot matrix printer. Print commands are available from the menu or can be embedded

into text. They can cope With different styles of print, line spacing, margins, header and footer offsets and number of copies. Text files which are too large to sit in ram can be chained together when printing out. In the field of business software, databases

are essential.

The one

in

allows five types of field: Alpha, decimal, integer, date and formula. It's the final field which probably has the greatest power with not only the standard operators but many others often in only found Mini Office

II

spreadsheets.

database and your records are done from se arate screens and both are easy operations. Records can be scrolled forward and backwards either singuIarIy or in groups of 10 or 100. Individual records can be marked manually or automatically, and marked records can be used to create a sub database from your main one which can be saved to disc as a separate file. Searching for data follows the same easy style: Select on any field using standard operators such as equal to, not equal to, greater than or less than.

Creating

enterin

.

.

“Fla“

333222”?

Egg;

“3,-

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feet,“

.

Edit Text Prevreu Text Print

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74

II

uonb PROCESSOR

and

effiCiency. When you boot the disc you are presented With the main menu where you select the required module using the cursor keys and Return. The computer accesses the disc for the module to be loaded into ram and each one has its own series of menus from which options are chosen. Looking at the word processor first, there are lots of further options avail-

.

Office

Mll’ll

x

twt‘yttt?? giant?

Wm

ity ofcommands directly into yourtext without even Ieavin .9 the editin 9 screen. In common With all the mod-

They ease the user into a friendly environment and yet tackle the many different and comprehensive features head on With

o

isms“

“x“At?»eupe?e t

G5

.

able. Text can be created in either 20 or 40 column mode, edited and then previewed in 80 columns on another screen. There are so many features in the word processor that there isn’t room to describe them all here. Suffice to say that standard features such as Search and Replace, Cut and Paste, Justification, insert and Overwrite modes are available. Other features are Headers and Footers, automatic Page numbering, Merge text and Caps conversion to name just a few. Some features that you would expect to find on more expensive word processors are missing butthe features in the Mini Office II word processor are more than adequate for most situations. Many of the commands are available from the built-in menus but the have also included a p ro g rammers mechanism for embedding the majora

M ”w' it ”Ms; .

wee

_

5&5??th wag?

0 ff-ice

THE Atari 8 bit computer, so long seen as only a games machine, takes on a new role with a feature-packed

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Sorting data can be progressive all over your fields and indexed in ascending or descending order. Mini Office II has some of the best facilities seen in an 8 bit database. Not only can you calculate formula fields on screen but any numerical field can be totalled across a who|e data file.

ti“

5ng

if?

t


Merging with another Mini Office ll file presents no problems. When it comes to printing records you’ll find all the commands and database

structures that were so evident in the word processor, Records can be

printed vertically

or

horizontally

across the page and printer commands can be typed in to customise style and pitch. As you’d expect from an integrated package, all the data can be used in either the word processor or label wish all databases printer modules. could be this easy to use. Mail merging is one of the additional niceties of Mini Office II. By usin the word rocessor to define yourgletteryou caFrlsend many peop|e the same letter personalising each by merging their names and addresses from your database to the letter. An essential feature of a successful |

office environment is the ability to forecast cash flow and financial viability. Spreadsheets are ideal for this and the one in the Mini Office II package is more than capable of looking after all that number crunching. You enter data into cells by placing the cursor on top of the cell, typing in your value and pressmg Return. Columns can be sized up to 18 characters wide and all the standard found In most spreadsheets operators are available. Calculations—the main — can be part Of any spreadsheet or camed °”t aUtomat'cf’HV m_a““_a_”y' Cells may be replicated, Justified and formatted to accept the USUEll types Of commands and styles 35300" numbers and With ated large monetary applications. Formulae can be replicated either

ing spreadsheet data that has been previously stored on disc. Graphs include Bar, Line and Pie Charts with further options of2D or 3D displays. Up to three data sets can be used to create your graph and each data set can hold between two and 20

values. Scaling of graphs can be manual or automatic with a grid option for visual clarity. Text can be added and overlaid -

-

llllll

,

using the effective ’Goto’ command and titles can be centred and frozen to assist input. The formulae constructions can be displayed on either screen or printer and the expected range of commands are available for

the printer routine. An impressive help screen is available for the numerous commands associated with managing the module and to wra u this section there’s the ttfsave up to 20 rows or opportunity? columns to disc in a form that enables the Graphics option of Mini Office H to read in as

a

data set.

The Graphics module provides

a

Mini Office

II

II.

powerfulfeature ofthis module is the macro keys which allow you to define a single key press to send quite One

,

long and complicated messages to the remote computer. Up to ten keys can be defined With 240 characters reserved for each macro. The module is ideal for accessing systems such as MicroLink or bulletin cant be

332912,azgéslsirgrcggtttépately

'

'

Office

'

.

The final module

GTaPhICS

Eigegrighh £31365??? goad gate Diggctaorg "h“ °”'°°

.

.

is m

the

Label printer bUt when

a ”5:8” héndy feature combined With information from your nice auto database makes labeller. a.

T

be

Labels

cantsaSiLyt e e '°r' _deSignedt_on ”3.an m ata asemg scfreen ormation f rom your indcorpgra reqUired. You can produce address 'abe's's‘°°k'abe's °ranythm9 V9“ set '

H

“e“

up to wor do Aalternaéivelly, enty } rom mg t e ude uce up to a ataCS” ase to proindepen 100 repeated "ibe'sThe label printer can print text or data fields an where on the label b Th d h yd 'dth 0:2 be 522m; ”22:16trollled if); thaery than one web wide. Label formats can be saved to disc so once you’ve createdadesignitcan be accessed atany time. Test prints and printer controls are menu options that can enhance the Quality of your labels. There are a number of features not yet discussed that are available in every module. The screen colours can be changed right through the whole 256 variations, there’s an invaluable

yr?” e daéabase t

k

u

h

.

.

absolutely or relatively or even a miXture of both. Some of the more powerful replicate functions of more powerful spreadsheets are lacking but the features available are adequate. Loading and saving the Spreadsheet is standard, and partial save is also available. Cells can be jumped by

Microlink/Telecom Gold at 300/300 and 1200/1200 baud rate are part of the main menu. Communication protocols between other systems can be customised and links to bulletin boards worldwide can be set up with

powerful yet simple way to get your computer to display numeric data in an easy-to-understandform. It can be used in two ways: By entering data directly from the keyboard or by Ioad-

(c) Database “TWA"

1937

'

F''gure

.

Grap h'“75 Opt'ons .

//~ '

anywhere on the screen. lCOhS, normally only seen in 16 bit programs, add a visual effect to an already impressive diSpIay of graphical data representation.

Pie charts can be selected from any

of the three data sets with a range of fill options to ease identification of

data. The bar graphs can display all three data sets at once either side by side or stacked. Negative values can be displayed visually and accurately. Individual screens can be saved to disc and if required, printed out any time by Mini Office II or independently by a suitable graphics program. Alternately, the stored screens can be used in other slide show.

applications such

as a

Again, print routines are for both Epson and 1029 printers plus you can print to a disc file for insertion into a

word

processor

How’s that for

file between text.

integration?

Going online with Mini Office ll takes all the hard work OUt of linking your computer to another. The Mini system

has

Officedll Comrétunications to work with bOth the been esigne Atari

850

interface and suitable the Miracle Technology's

modem_and DatAtari R8232

interface cable and

modem. Standard protocol options such

overwrite/bak option when saving files and a mini dos Sits in memory allowing you to see directories and such as use associated functions delete and format. Without doubt Database Software has broken all records in producing an excellent suite of programs useful both in the home or small office. The result is a superb blend of stand alone programs packaged together for the price ofasingle program. It maylacka few of the features of more expensive packages but at £19.95 it’s the best value business program available for the 8 bit Atari market. .

.

Of?ce” .

gifgxg’ lDatabase

Software, Europa House, 68 Chester Road, Hazel vae, Stockport SK7 5NY

supp/fer.-

as July 7987 Atari User 75


MicroLink lll-1N?lnldillnlulih

TELECOM GOL?

5 5

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Take °ff

Legal advice goes online

I

W|th

MICROLINK has scored yet another world first by taking on board a unique electronic legal and financial service for firms and

-

-

MlC'Ol-lnk THE

.

.

.

A'rl'ne .

B.”t.'5h

.

Pilots

Assocrati'on—BALPA—has “5

mafkfed.

9.0'def‘

JUb'lee

individuals. Insight provides round-

by iorning MicroLink. Trade .u”'°.n for 6'000 BALPA commercial pilots, W'th 3.0 .UK negotiates airlines and a srmilar

the-clock legal advice, help with tax and VAT problems, and insurance cover against the cost of litigation. it serves a wide range of personal and business needs resulting from minor problems like disputes with neighbours up to full scale Customs &

.

”Umber

carriers

foreign flag

Of

who employ ”5

members. We

our

celebrate

50th

birthday th'5 year, 5,0 't seemed an apprOpriate .

221; f?gggrtrz?go?" 22228 ,, nology said a spokes'

Excise

investigations.

Personalfinancial advice

.

Calling all subscribers

gigiia-Veotieimce

THE latest

“A very high proportion of our members are computer and communications

technological

advance on MicroLink allows subscribers to enjoy all the communications benefits of radiopaging for as little as

enthusiasts when they’re not f|ying_They’||be happy now MicroLink has for provided facilities two.way e|ectronic mess. aging between themselves and BALPA. ”Apart from improving contact with our members, we’ll be able to use electronic mail and telex to communicate with airlines and other pilot associations throughout the world”.

36paday.

Thanks tO a

link-up

Wlth

British Telecom's national radiopaging service, it means that MicroLink electronic mail and te/ex transmissions need no longer

stayunnoticedon reaching their

And destination. users won’t be put to the trouble of accessing their mailbox when it’s empty.

associatibn of community groups

A

UNIQUE

involved in computing on-Iine

has

with

gone MicroLink. Hackney Info Tech Con— sortium is a non-profit company formed by 45 adult education instituteS,

training schemes and local voluntary organisations in the London borough. it supports member

the

of

including

London that use Polytechnic computers for administration, maintaining datain bases, and courses programming, business computing, design and desktop publishing. Consortium executive director David Cheetham said:”MicroLink will help our assessment of socially

YOUR chance

City

.

call.

”is“?

t ors

an d

t

pro t ec t'ion. .

TWO

brat}? bnewflnsight fifewichffnvgi enefitMrom L'nk comfnuantiytc') n 5“ "?g” filrst p rovide (if-Iii rte TQ‘O m oran 3T“? quotations gage matron for property '

with their base.

finance,

established

to 10m MlcroLmk

to set

up

turn

Of

funding for businesses

insight, operated by Investment Marketing Services, iS an electronic mail extension Of the iRPC legal and tax advisory service Which has been operating for seven years and has half a million UK subscribers.

groups". —

capital

forms

and start up schemes alike.

online

community database. “We envisage starting with a directory of education, training and leisure information then gradually allowing local organisations, co-operatives and closed user

supplies

venture

and Other commercial

applications of new particularly technology the potential for developuseful

trades unions

I'C)IfeSp-

sional’fees for re grin a case is includpedpin 3163

local

f

5

_

$1222?“geapn'gi?gfngfs";

radiopaging like keeping users constantly in touch

a

-

gt: tpro est

to {259000 towards

of

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drafw gin advice from Revenue and Customs & Excise

The same procedure takes place in the opposite direction messages to other people can’t be ignored or overlooked if the addressee carries a radiopaging device. There are also all the other of advantages

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select any one of 29 patterns. You can all at once or individually. Edit displays a grid containing the selected pattern with the drums listed

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abovethe ladders. Move the Goonie at the bottom onto the machine and this will move the rock. Move the other Goonie on to the barrel and move him out a bit. Move the first Goonie to the left, dodge the pots, jump on to the ledge and get the key. This will open the door at the bottom.

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1029 or Epson compatible printer. To use this utility you must have GR.15 pictures already stored in file format on disc. The kind of file produced by pressing the insert key while using AtariArtist or any of the Micro Painter files that have been convetted are good examples of pictures to use. When you run the utility the screen will go blankforafew moments while

the program initialises, then you will be asked to input your printer type Atari or Epson. After replying A or E you are asked for the picture filename which must always be entered in the form: D:FlLENAME.EXTENDER.The program will then lead the picture and display it in four shades of grey. If the luminance distribution is not how you want it, press C and a single beep will sound. You can then swap the luminance value of the colour registers around by pressing the numeric keys 0 to 3 inclusive. The program takes the key presses in pairs, so if you press 0 and the values of these two registers will be exchanged. You may continue to swap the values untilthe luminance of the picture is to your liking. Once you have the picture how you like it, press Escape followed by P. Two beeps will be heard and the pictu re will then begin to be printed out after a slight pause. It takes a while to print out a full screen and it is printed four lines at a time with a pause as the next seven screen columns are —

1

calculated. Essentlally the program works by 22 Atari User July 7987

seven columns of screen display into four rows of printer information. This is achieved by using the colour register information gained by the LOCATE command to index a series of arrays, which will give the pin density pattern required for the luminance obtained. This is then fed into a further series of arrays ready for printing. The screen display contains four Iumin-

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gives rise to the high number of pattern arrays holding the decimal equivalent of the pin patterns. For example PAT1(0,0) holds the first This

column of pattern 0. Each pattern array has a direct relationship with one of the printer row arrays PR1 to PR4. The contents of the pattern arrays are sent to the printer by lines 275 to 310 of the program. The CH R$ statements in the first PRINT statements set the printer up for high density (GRAPHICS) printing. Line 315 prevents the program going into the attract mode, and line 320 indicates the end of the loop. The FOR...NEXT loops of X and Y control the area of the screen being translated. Once the pictu re has been printed the program returns you back to Basic. If you want to print another picture, just type RUN.

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RETURN

RETURN

1035 POKE K1,PEEK(K2_) 1010 POKE K2,B 1045 GOTO 1000 1100 SOUND 0,121,10,8 1105 EOR D=1 TO 20:NEXT 1110 SOUND 0,0,0,0 1115 RETURN 1200 CLOSE #2:OPEN #2,6,0,"K:" 1205 GET #2,K:CLOSE 12 D

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200 11 x+1>159 THEN P5=3:P6=3:P7=3:GOT 0 230 205 LOCATE X+4,Y,P5:P5=INT(PEEK(REG(P5

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Turn to Page 24 > July 7987 Atari User 23


10 1:READ A:PATéB(X,Y)=fR:NEXTY:NEXT x

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.

MANY Atari flight simulators and

other games, such as Mercenary, use vector graphics to give the illusion of moving through three-dimensional — space. This program — 3D Animation demonstrates some of the techniques used to manipulate vector graphics. Type in the Basic listing and save it in the usual way. Unfortunately, because of the large area of ram used for storage and the use of Graphics 14, the ro ram will onl y work on an 800XpL ogXE.

When you run it you must first plot a shape on the screen by moving the cursor within the framed section using a joystick. To prevent an out of range error when the shape is plotted the cursor will not move to the far right or left of the screen. To plot a point simply press the fire button and after the first point has been plotted a line will be drawn back to the last one. Points can either be plotted as foreground or background: To change, press 1 for foreground or2 for background before plotting the point. After drawing a shape press Start to go to the plotting routine to set the number of plotting parameters. The first is the angle of rotation which is a value between 0.1 and 0.9. A value of 0.1 means that each shape plotted will rotate by a small amount and a value of 0.9 performs an almost complete rotation. Then set the direction in which the object rotates (forwards or backwards, clockwise or anti-clockwise). There are three types of axis rotation and all give the effect of the shape going into the distance and then coming closer again. Rotation spins the object on a flat plane and does not highlight the foreground/backgroundillusion. Rotation 2 makes the shape rotate through axis and rotation 3 a horizontal through a vertical axis, while rotation 4 is a combination of rotations 2 and 3. The computer calculates and draws the 13 individual shapes that make up the animation sequence. If the 1

a n I u a In

40

points

takes a is drawn a machine stores it in ram.

.

vecto

h Ics

ra

r

,

shows STEPHEN WILLIAMSON how to ammate shapes -

ground and background points affect a shape by entering the pyramid

Let’s look at how the program works. By convention, in a two dimensional shape the horizontal position of a point is known as X and the vertical position as Y. So if you use the command PLOT 40,20, a pixel will be plotted at a point 40 pixels across the screen and 20 pixels from the top of the screen. In order to represent a third dimension depth we can use the letter 2. Without the benefit'of 3D Holograph TV we cannot actually plot 3D shapes using an Atari computer — but by clever use of perspectivethe mind can be fooledinto thinking thata3D object has appeared on the screen. Figure II shows the three coordinate principle. Line X of the cube drawing represents the horizontal X axis and line Y is the vertical Y axis. Line 2 is the depth orZaxis. Any point on lineZ can be thought of as a measure of how far away the point is from the observer. The program scales the Z axis so that a value of 0 gives the effect of an object on the surface of the screen. A negativeZvalue meansthatthe object has left the screen and is near your eye, while a positive one takes it behind the screen. So, theoretically, an object can hit you on the head or disappear into the innards of your TV. Such is the paradox of a two dimensional world trying to simulate a three

with all points as shown in Figure foreground — then animate it. Then return to the plotting section of the program and plot the shape again but with the points marked F as fore—

I

ground and point

B as

background.

To do this correctly make sure that you are in Foreground mode (FOREGROUND is highlighted by inverse Ietters) to begin with and plot point F1. Move and plot F2, then F3 and back again to F4, (previously F1) in order to

complete the outer triangle. Press 2 to change to background and move to 85. Then change to foreground before plotting F6 (the same position as F3). Return to background and plot B7 and finally change to foreground to move to F8. You’ll notice that the point in the centre of the triangle is a background point and lines F3, F1 and F2 are con-

nected to it. Because all lines are connected to each other it is often necessary to draw over a line more than once, just as if you were drawing the same shape on a piece of paper without your pen leaving the surface of the paper. When the pyramid with background point is animated, it will appear to be in three dimensions and not as the flat surface of the shape plotted without the background point. A maximum of can be plotted at any given 40 points time.

Turn to Page 27 >

used this few minutes and as each shape

maximum

.

are

F1(F4) -

code routine

To animate the shape another machine code routine transfers the stored shape data from the ram storage area to the screen ram area. The high speed of machine code gives the smooth animation effect. To stop the animation press the spacebar and you can then either draw another shape or animate the same shape with different parameters. You can demonstrate how ‘fore—

_

'

/

.

2

F2<F8)

F3(F6)

/

<—————-X————> _

Figure

I: The

pyramid shape

Figure

II: The

_

three dimensmnal View July 1987 Atari User 25


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dimensional environment. The theory [behind 3D vector plotting is complex, but a study of the program willshow some ofthetechniques used. The variable PNT(N,1) is

rotations. Try altering the rotation equations (lines 1370 to 1490) or change the link relationships (variables LINK{N,7) and LINK(N,2)) and

complex 3D animation sequences can be displayed without using vast amounts of complicated machine code.

Experimentwith various

used to hold the X coordinate of each d d' at N,2 h Y IT‘heevaarlignglz?—ge{Lozrdiz‘gct’er kee p d 3 bl es [LINK/N' 7) E” LINKTN , 2) ”aCk OfWhPh ROW“, "nks ‘0 Wh'C h 1550 lines 1360 The routines

see what happens.

shapes and

'

'

.

.

.

10 20 30

REM

31>

ANIMATION

REM

BY

STEPHEN

REM

FOR

1.0

REM

50

REM

ATARI

239

t?

If)

Includethe equationsforchangmgthe

80 90

(see ?ne 380). and store them In ram. Line 500 finds CALE var'a bl eYV h'“3 h rusmgt h e 2 th coofdmafe' determmEE Fhe 308"? Of the shape. The smaller it IS the further into the distance it appears to recede. Lines 510 to 560 draw the pixels on to the screen. Note that all points are made relative to the centre of the screen by adding 79. (The program 14 screen of 160x 160 usesa Graphics .

.

.

pierS).

com

A:POKE 1536+I,A 1

2911

PNT(4?,3),LINK(4?,2),M(Z?lll)

3M sung“?

1M

DIM

120

POKE

7

11,9

764,255:? CHRSHZS); Press to plot shapes ”Press OPTION to erase current

32I

SF.

151)

IF PEEK(53279)=3 0T0 110 1613

2211

?

"ANGLE

DIREcr10N=2

GOTO

THEN

GOSUB

1220:G

AXIS=2

THEN

GOSUB

141.8:GOSUB

41

370 IF

AXIS=3

THEN

GOSUB

1510:GOSUB

41

THEN

eosua 1440:Gosua 15

0

W

(.1

INPUT ANGLE IF NNGLE<N.1

T0

oR

DEA" SHAPE

_ S

zgt?égugxtjéa

.9)

..;

ANGLE>0.9

THEN

390

NEXT

J

400

00m

6110

1911

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41

IF

360

1911

THEN

marily to

CENTEC

ANGLE=-ANGLE

THEN

CHR$(125)

g

AND 173 130fE?n??l?gélTE

2111

2317

_

3411

WW 15“

lell

THEN

50 FOR J=? T0 650 STEP _ _ _ IF J-? THEN ANGLE1-ANGLE.ANGLE-E ANGLE=ANGLE1 IF J>N THEN IF 1x15=1 THEN GOSUB Immosue

330 5

AXIS>4

OR

2611

IF

350 STORE=66 IF PEEK(53279)=5

4)

(1 0R 2) "; CHR$(125);”DIRECTION INPUT DIRECTION IF DIRECTION<1 OR DIRECTION>2 THEN

2711

hape"

The program has been written PNbe fun and to showthat fairly

7

NEXT

130

,

_

Zen 2811

81

,,

as

INPUT AXIS IF AXIS<1

READ

LECT

.

.

251

2417

USER

INITIALISE

w eosua 1220 70 FOR 1:0 T0

coordinates of the points after each shape has been plotted. AXIS 4 uses both the AXIS 3 and AXIS 2 routines

-

ROTATION (1

";

WILLIAMSON

-

_

cmmsnmxrs

?

“In”

1mm 1.17

.

.

,

.

s’e’at‘rle'ussa'mtl’mm

rearranges-stem. m mmnusw

1:23.53” $2121

5

E

99am.

I;7... 7

I}.

sQ/sfrgrxwxsf?zfaw»N¢A\\$M«>f

vs-n‘?rzz-zr-?

July 1987 Atari User 27


1020 6070 870 1030 REM PLOT POINT AND 1040 GOSUB 1330:FLAG=1 1050 NUM=NUM+1:IP NUM=40

410 GOSUB 1220:GOSUB 1260 420 ? CHR$4125178HAPE N0.’7SHAPE:SHA PE=SHAPE+1 430 FOR I=1 TO NUM 440 450 460 470 480 490

X=PNT(LINK(1,1),1) Y=PNT(LINK(I,1),2) Z=PNT(L1NK(I,1),3)+J X1=PNT(LINK(1,2),1) Y1=PNT(LINK(I,2),2) Z1=PNT(LINK(I,2),3)+J

0

1060

500 SCALE=300/(300+z):8CALE1=300/4300+ 21) 510 520 530 540

XPL=INT(X*SCALE+79) YPL=INT(Y*SCALE+79) X1PL=INT(X1*SCALE1+79) Y1PL=INT(Y1*SCALE1+79)

I=1 TO 13 PEEK(764)=33 THEN 690 FOR O=1 TO 20:NEXT O IF

PLOT

UH,2)=Y 1090 IF

10

TO

PNT(NUH,3)=50 THEN PNT(NUM,3)=25 X+79,X+79:PNT(NUM,1)=X:PNT(N

NUM>1

THEN

ORAHTO

THEN

PNT<NUM-1,1)

120

MACHINE

CODE

:GOTO

POP

120

I

860 870

"Draw

1

"1

2

=

AXIS

FOR

N=1

TO

NUM

LINK(N,1)=N:LINK(N,2)=N+1

1170

NEXT

1180 1190

L1NK(NUM,1)=NUH:LINK(NUM,2)=NUH M1120+NUM)=NUM:M(160+NUM)=NUM

1200 1210 1220

RETURN

N

GRAPHICS 14 SCREEN GRAPHICS 14 COLOR 1:POKE 708,14 REM

P

710,0

1230 1240 1250 1260

POXE

752,255

RETURN REM

ORAN

PLOT

159,43

ORAHTO

1270

PLOT

0,43:ORAHTO

159,43:ORAHTO

ORAHTO

1290

PLOT

0,113

ORANTO

1,44:ORAUTO

ORANTO

1,114

764,255:GROUND=1:PNT(1,3)=-50 x:g;y=9;p=1;FLA5=g;Nun=g PLOT

IF

IF

PEEK(764)=31

THEN

6ROUNO=1:POXE

=

=

2

BACKG

ST=STICK(0) IF PEEK(53279)=6

THEN

1330:R

GOSUB

11:

snugmpa

THEN

1105113

101,15

11:

31:14

THEN

Y=Y-1:IF

X=-33

961 1; 51:13 =32

THEN

y=Y+1:IF

1:33

11:31:11 X=-50 980 1; 51:7

11151111=x-1;10x=-51

IF

X=-32

THEN

,

979

LOCATE

THEN

x=x+1

x+79,1+79,1

I;

x=51

I; A<>0

15:1 1090 1010

2 TO

NUM

L=PNT(N,2) 1460 PNT(N,2)=INT(PNT(N,2)*COS(ANGLE)PNT(N,3)*SIN(ANGLE)+0.5) 1470 PN1(N,3)=INT(L*SIN(ANGLE)+PNT(N,3 )*COS(ANGLE)+0.5) N

RETURN 3 TO

NUM

L=PNT1N,1) PNT(N,1)=INT(PNT(N,1)*COS(ANGLE)+ PNT(N,3)*SIN(ANGLE)+0.S) 1540 PNT(N,3)=INT(-L*SIN(ANGLE)+PNT(N, 3)*COS(ANGLE)+0.5) NEXT

N

FOR

N=1

15

1580 1590

PNT(N,1)=M(N):PNT(N,2>=M(N+40> PNT1N,3)=M(N+80):LINX<N,1)=M1N+12

RETURN TO

NUM

0,43

158,44:ORANTO

15

ORANTO

REM

1600 1610

NEXT

1620

REM

1630

DATA

N

RETURN MACHINE

COOE

OATA

104,104,104,141,25,6,169,72, 141,21,6,169,148,141,22,6,160,0,162,0 1640 OATA 189,72,153,157,0,141,232,208 ,247,238,25,6,238,22,6,200,192,5,208,2

1,44

SOUND

1650 OATA 96,104,104,104,141,63,6,169, 72,141,65,6,169,148,141,66,6,160,0,162 1660 OATA 0,189,0,117,157,72,153,232,2 08,247,238,63,6,238,66,6,200,192,5,208

edit

{9&/

1670

DATA

-

LINE

CHsUM

LINE

CHsUM

10

3162

20 50 80 110 140 170

5422 3133 3689

LINE

234,96

CHSUN

1

+79

50 990

N=1

'

COLOR

51:15 111511 1:01; 0:1 TO 5:NEXT D: COLOR 0:PLOT X+79,X+79:FOR D=1 TO 5;Ng XT O:COLOR 1 PLOT X+79,Y+79:GOTO 870 930 poxg 77,0 940 IF FLAG=0 THEN COLOR 0 PLOT X+79,X 950

AXIs

FOR

1550

RETURN

r‘

ETURN

920

REM

1570

8,114

POXE

764,255:?"1

910

.

N

0):LINK(N,2)=M(N+160)

1280

START”

ROUND”

890 900

NUM

15

PRAME

0,43:ORAUTO

DELAY:SOUN

L=PNT(N,1) 1390 PNTIN,1)=INT(PNT<N,1)*COS(ANGLE)<PNT(N,2)*SIN(ANGLE)) 1400 PNT(N,2)=INT(L*SIN(ANGLE)+PNT(N,2 )*C05(ANGLE))

REM

N=1

NEXT

1

TO

1500 1510 1520 1530

FOR

BACKGROUND"

X+79,Y+79 PEEK(764)=30 THEN GROUND=2:POKE z = 764,255:? "1 = FOREGROUND

880

N=1

NEXT

CALCULATE LINKS

30

34

shape...then press

=

AXIs

FOR

1480 1490

RETURN REN

733 1" ?

REM

1370 1380

NEXT

8

820 830 34g 850

RETURN

RETURN

60808 1220zsosus 1260

810

1350 1360

1410

LINX<NUM,1)=NUM:LINX1NUM,2)=NUM+1

To

0,0,0,0

1420 1430 1440 1450

1300 1310 1320

O

DELAY=1

FOR

1100 1110

9,113

710 STORE=STORE+5:NEXT I 720 FOR 1:15 TO 1 STEP -1 730 IF PEEK(764)=33 THEN

0,128,10,15

SOUND

+79,PNT(NUH-1,Z)+79

9,113

700 A=usR11577,STORE>:REM ANINATION ROUTINE

740 FOR 0:1 10 20:NEXT 750 A=USR11577,STORE) 760 STORE=STORE-5:NEXT 770 POKE 77,0:GOT0 650 780 REM MOVE CURSOR

1070 1080

OKE

:GOTO

POP

"MAXIM

1

1):M(160+N)=LINX4N,2)

590 RETURN 600 REM ANIMATE SHAPES 610 GOSUB 1220 620 1 "PRESS TO STOP” 630 GOSUB 1260 640 FOR DELAY=1 TO 30:NEXT OELAX 650 STORE=66 660 IF PEEK(764)=33 THEN 120 FOR

THEN

1150 M1N)=PNT(N,1):M140+N)=PNT(N,2) 1160 M180+N)=PNT(N,3):M1120+N)=LINK1N,

570 NEXT 1 580 A=U8R11536,STORE):STORE=STORE+5:RE M STORE SHAPES IN RAM

680

D

OF

IF GROUND=1 IF GROUND=2

1120 1130 1140

550 PLOT XPL,YPL 560 ORAHTO X1PL,X1PL

670

NEXT

1330 1340

LINE

POINTS":FOR DELAY=1 DELAY:POP :GOT0 120

NUMBER

UM

ORAN

IF

11:0

COLOR

THEN

1:PLOT

01,154 X+79,Y+79

28 Atari User July 7987

THEN

Y

THEN

THEN

THEN

x: 11

40 871 2291 70 100 4965 130 10115 160 7184 190 1737 220 6268 250 5248 280 8647 310 1980 340 4775 370 6729 400 1618 430 2889 460 3709 490 3762 520 3947 550 2605 580 11322 610 1943 640 5659 670 2281 700 10923 730 6488 760 4253 790 3912 820 10087

200 230 260 290 320 350 380 410 440 470 500 530 560 590 620

3901 1745 1623 3417 6183 5812 6495 3950 6741 8687 3912 3410 3559 6204 4138 3241 1498 6320

650 1745 680 6488 710 4247 740 3601 770 3456 800 21275 830 6390

3496

850

1395

60 1943 90 1345 120 11715 150 5348 180 5925 210 2381

30

880 910 940 970

18179 5324 7198 6798 3353

1000 1030 1060

240 270 300

2300 3431 3554

330 360 390 420

6241 6735 1347

1150 1180 1210

8105 3415 3565 3940 4141 1345 3718

1240 1270 1300 1330

450 480 510 540 570 600 630 660 690 720 750 780 810 840

1963 4292 3601 3378 3362 3092 8054 4688

1090 1120

5520 5949 9689 4054 5219 6477

860 890

2854 2170

920 20624 950 6824 980 6750 1010 4350 1040 3247 5941 1070 1100 6802

870 900 930 960 990 1020 1050 1080 1110 1140

1130 1160

2894 9628

4294

1190 1220

5980 7760

1170 1200 1230

1498 7083 4672 2893

1250 1280 1310 1340

2888 4658 1498

1260 1290 1320 1350

1360 1390 1420 1450

1872 9919

1370 1400 1430

8049 2894 8773 1873

1480 1510 1540

1355

1580 1610 1640 1670

1498 1942 2894 9556 5337 1498 11175 1902

1460 1490 1520 1550

18183 7488 1797 6631 7008 1643 18797 7777 1498 4650 1355 1498 2110 7083 7092 2019

1380 1410 1440

1498 1937 1355 2894

10447

1470

9418

1498 1937 3174

1500 1530

1874 10435 2894

1590 9545 1620 4020 1650 10791

1570 1600 1630 1660

1355 10600 10785


Pro 9 rammin 9

————‘——__——

Driven Skate

Crazy

WISH to complain about the game Skate Crazy that you published in the April 1987 issue ofAtari User. ltyped it in exactly as it was printed, but when / ran it the title screen appeared, followed by an error message for line 2140. lchecked this line and it was just as you had printed it in the magazine. I took this line out of the program and ran it again. This time the error message was for line 3570, so I took

-

A

I

,

,

_

Your programming prob|ems solved by ANDRE W|LLEY 2140

is

2.3076th thigglirgenouégafjnwetli;eWhieine/ / deleted

reached. Thus, when you 2140, the error then occurred

appeared with no error message. thought I had corrected it but nothing

With the next READ statement (on line

else happened. There is nothing wrong with my computer so is there something

there_isalot_moredata laterin the program it is unlikely that an error

wrong with your program? Also, how do you use the Get It Right! table mentioned in the text? _ Victoria

Crisp, Braintree, Essex. The listings that we

print are taken directly from working copies of the programs, so we know that they are correct. So why didn’t this one work? Well, you don’t really go into enough detail in your letter about what type of error occurred, but I'd hazardaguess that it was most likely an error number 6 or

.

number 8.

.

These relate to the READ statement

which occurs in both of the lines you had trouble with, and you will probably find that the problem is with the DATA lines associated with the READ on line 2140. If

you take

a

look at the listing you

will see that lines 1050 their numeric data from

and 1060 read lines 1000 and

1020. Since these are both okay, the problem must be with the data which follows on lines 2000 t° 2127This should be inpUt Via the READ command on 2140, so any typing mistakes w'll onl y show u p when line I

.

“av-“9

. e ms

gemto ,

W‘“

”work? user. Atari programs ‘.° Road. soul?onséheste' Yo‘kwal’e 58 5° 5NYHouse.

Are you ,

rt5K7

3

we

anY as Euro? Grove,5t0°kP° as answer Atal'l user It; wi“ “3&3 939es ocannot give the we can snith'm but. unfortunate” rePr‘es'

Pe'so

nal

3579). Since

_

'

6 (DATA exhausted) has occurred, s_o the error type you are encountering is more than likely an eight—telling you that the program expected a numeric value but found something else, such as a letter or punctuation mark. Check through lines 2000 to 2127 to make sure that all of the numbers are and that yo_u_haven’t mistyped correct, out a digit, or typed a full or missed stop instead Of a comma. Any Of these cause the sort Of error you COUId, describe. You should never try to correct a an program by Simply removmg because Th's Is line. offending partly the programmer has .°bV'OUSIy put each line m for a speCific purpose, bl“ we have seen) the also because (as error is very often caused by a mistake on a completely different line. The Get It Right! table is one sure way tocheck that you haven’t made any typing mistakee- Details of how to it were printed l“ the AU9U5t1986 use ‘ssue °f Ate” use"

to know

oy_s “m"

STRIG. The first

STICK.and

which direction thejoystick is tells you pomting, and the second tells you whether the button is pressed. is followed by a _Each command Single number in brackets, normally a a one, and this speCifies which

'zero or joystick socket you want to use. Thus return the position of STIC_K(0)_wou.Id the first joystick, and STRlGl1) would if the button on the second tell you pressed. STRIG joystick has beenzero whenever the of result gives a_ and a one at any pressed, buttonhis other time. The numbers returned by STICK are as

follows: 14

10\

/6

l

11:15:17 5 9 I

13 '

followmg short .

The

program

how to move an object demonstratesan asterisk) around the (in this case scree“: ,

4

.

lg g?igilfjgkpgKEEfz'li-i- P I T )S(hail: Lu)? itOINT 30 Cl-lLOliniZ?3551 All

IF

lil:REM

J

.

STRIG(D)=1 oi STICK(0)=15 ROUND

GO

LOOP

IF

N0

THEN

1.

MOVEMENT

= : $RiSEEzolIliiT 23 gngthlgi(;§0hX§LEzEc

t-lc k

=

ill 8G

[OWN 3” Atar’aquL anda 7070 d?“ / ?nd your magazine “909W?" and and crammed action-packed .Wlth I am Intergreat reviews of games. ested in programming but have a problem with inputtingjOystick move.

ments.

IF IF

STICK(0)=13 STICK(E)=11

in?rm

Y=Y+1:REM

DOWN

THEN

X=X-‘I:REM

LEFT

i”i"iéi*ll;ii"iiiill =

>

110 IF x<ll 12ii IF Y>23 135 IF Y<?

THEN

THEN THEN THEN

149i

com 4mm

in

FOR

ib?

GOTO

:

.

X=39:REH

i=ii:REii Y=23:REH

LEFT EDGE? BOTTOM TOP

X,Y:REM PLOT NEii I=1 T0 25:NEXT 1:REM PAUSE lilll:REM GO BACK AGAIN _

Could you give me an example to show me hOW to move using the joyP. Daystick and the fire button? Essex. ment,Basi|don, 0 There are two commands you need —

EDGE?

EDGE?

_

nor

.

Mostj'oystick routines Will be Similar to this one, but you might like to use it in conjunction with our recent series on Player Missile some great effects.

Graphics

to

get

July 1987 Atari User 29


_.__——____—__

L

E.

5

TALK about exhausted — there I was, minding my own business when these five Nazguls came into the local

inn and started pushing and shoving people around. Well, not one to be slow in getting into a good fight, brought out my trusty sword and laid I

into them.

The actual fight lasted no more than few minutes —well I do have rather a lot of experience in these matters — but the real reason for my tiredness was because of all the free drinks that the landlord gave me. He was so grateful for my assistance that we celebrated all night. In fact I have just got back to my cave in time for the postbag and this month’s column, so without much more ado let’s see what’s new in the a

world of adventure. The first bit of good news have for you is that there is a new Infocom adventureabout to be released called The Lurking Horro and it's full of ghastly surprises and unspeakable I

fear. Any horror fans who haven’t quivered to the chilling classics of Steven King and H.P.Lovecraft or shrieked at the frightening images in The Shining and The Exorcust cannot call them selves horror fans. Now you can experience what horror is really like with Infocoms’s change from witty spoofs to interactive nightmare. As the main character in the story, you have enrolled at the George Edwards institute of Technology, and have heard nothing else except the stories about the old campus basements and storage rooms, some so ancient that they contain only rotting piles of unidentifiable junk. You have heard about the decrepit underground tunnels crumbling into hazardous piles of concrete, and have vowed never to set foot in any of them. You do, of course, one night with a blizzard raging and the wind howling, when a strange force draws You into the dark nether regions of the institute. Then an eerie sound grows closer...Stop, enough of this. l’m starting to get edgy myself. Suffice it to say that the adventure has been written by Dave (Zork, Spellbreaker, Suspect, and Starcross) Leblmg and all the usual bits and -

_

-

.

30 Atari User July 7987

.

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pieces are in the package. Make sure you read Atari User for a full review in the future. The second bit of good news this month is that there is another new Infocom release imminent, and this

. .

one is called Stationfall. Yes, it is a sequel to Planetfall: After three years and countless requests, author Steve Meretszky has brought back that lovable robot Floyd in an adventure

which puts the fate of the whole

Galaxy in your hands as you are enlisted in the Stellar Patrol. Your heroics in Planetfall earned you a promotion from Ensign Seventh Class to Lieutenant First Class in the very boring paperwork task force. Life isjust verytedious,and to cap it all you are assigned to travel to a nearby space station to pick up some forms. Imagine your surprise when you discover that your companion for the journey is the mischievious and playful Floyd. When you both arrive at the station, all is not well. The place is deserted save for an ostrich, a balloon creature and a brainy robot named Plato. Something is very wrong... but what? This game is a worthy sequel to

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found

Well, just type the actual SOLUTIONS Calvin. And don’t mess

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SPELLBREAKER. The ticket is used by inserting it in the turnstile, if you examine it you will find a slot. THROCK is used by planting the weed in front of the Ogre and envoking the said spell, which will aggravate his condition long enough for you to get past. Phil Hardy cannot get out of the City in Lapis Philosophorum, even though he has the amulet after returning the cat to the old lady. The answer is to dangle the amulet in front of the guards’ eyes: They will be hypnotised, and forget

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This is the world of Autoduel, a role playing adventure game in the Dungeons and Dragons vein but with a futuristic bent to it. You begin with $200 and just your legs for transport — which in Autoduel is decidedly unhealthy — so you need to get cash quickly to buy your first car and then begin your duelling career. New recruits start in the arena on Amateur Night, where you are given a car to use on the track against five other hopefuls. If you win you get $1500 and can start buying new equipment to add to your car. As in all role playing games, your character develops as you progress in the game, and as you reach each new city the chances of getting more exciting jobs increase. In each city there are a number of locations to visit where you listen for rumours, get repairs or buy new weapons. You can even sell off salvage from your on the road duelling and best of all is to become an FBI marshall and clear all the outlaws from the

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July 1987 Arari User 33


_—_—

(5;

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33

3

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BY JOHN GYMER

-

;

HURRICANE Harriet is heading towards your farm. Heavy showers have already turned your yard into a pool of mud and the worst is yet to come. All the animals have been put in barns and old sheds — except for those dratted ducks, who refuse to be rounded up. And you haven't got long before the hurricane hits. So you, farmer Dash, must hurry around the yard and collect all the ducks as quickly as you can. Now this sounds very easy but there are dangers in the yard. Two deadly farmer-eatlng spiders have decided to shelter from the storm there, so as you race around collecting the ducks you must avord them — -

-

-

or die. The main

problem with your yard is that as you run, your feet dig up the ground, and if you ever come in con_

tact with one of the holes you lose a life. You also lose a life if a spider eats you or if you run out of time when the 5t°"“ hitsAlso in the yard you'll find sticky pools of mud which trap you — briefly if you stand in them. They can also trap the spiders and this can add more gamesmanshlpto play. When you ?nally escape from the pool of mud which (shows on-screen as a white cross) it will change into either a hole or a safe square you can walk on. Two players can play the game with one player as the farmer plugged into port 1 and the other as the spider in port 2. This option can be selected from the main menu and _

_

2:35: tyotjhizlrlogrbacglt. the 3121155231:

and 9. the start ke V' ca" °°"°°t — yellow dots — that are scattered around the yard. Once all the ducks on screen have been collected you are awarded bonus points for time remaining and you move on to the next screen which will have more ducks ' more coins ' . . “we St'cky P°°'s 3“ faSte’ SP'de’s' 'f “me '°“ 3 V°“ 3“ any "fe_ V°" continue on the same screen untll you game

b V P ressin

b°““5 P°'"t5 V°“ f°’°"t_’a the coms shown as

34 Atari User July 7987

or until all your lives are lost. The game then ends and you are returned to the main menu where you can select one of six levels. One is easy and six is very hard, with the bonus points at the end of each screen calculated according to skill level selected.

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EN

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480 REM cOLLEcT DUCK 490 A=255:X3=2 500 SOUND B,A,12,12:A=A-X3:X3=X3*1.25: IF A>0 THEN 500 510 SOUND 0,0,0,0:RETURN

REM FOR

N:SOUND

-1:SOUND

0,20,1

0,0,0,?:RETURN

,8:SOUND 1,A+1,10,8:NEXT N:SOUND 0,0,0 ,0:SOUND 1,0,M:60T0 560 580 FOR N=0 TO 200:NEXT N:RETURN 590 REM n SPIDER MOVES ** 600 IF TNT(RND(0)*(7-SK>)+1=1 THEN 620 610 S=INT(RND(0)*4):RETURN 620 IF X>X3 THEN S=0:GOTO 660 630 IF x<x3 THEN S=1:GOTO 660 640 IF Y>Y3 THEN S=2:60T0 660 650 S=3 660

RETURN

Turn to Page 35 >

July 1987 Atari User 35


670

REM

**

680

FOR

N=TIME

FOR

A=15

SCREEN

T0

0

**

1070 X=INT(RND(0)*18)+1:Y=INT(RND(0)*1 9)+4:LOCATE X,Y,A:IF A<>247 OR (X=9 AN

-20:SC=SC+SK:

STEP

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STEP

5

A:POSITION

NEXT

690

COMPLETE

TO

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Y=13) THEN 1070 1080 POSITION X,Y:? #6;"Z";:NEXT N 1090 REM PLOT OBJECTS 1100 FOR N=1 T0 LEV*S 1110 X=INT(RND(0)*18)+1:Y=INT(RND(0)*1 D

16,0

#6;INT(N/4);" ";:POSITION 6,0:7

?

#6;SC; 700

NEXT

UND

0,0,0,0:FOR

N:POSITION

LEV+1:GOT0 710 REM **

16,0:? #6;"0 ";:SO

N=0

400:NEXT N:LEV=

TO

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980

720 IF SC>HISC THEN HISC=SC 730 GRAPHICS 2+16:LEV=1:LIV=5 740 RESTORE 1470 750 READ A:IF A=0 THEN 77I 760 READ X:FOR N=0 TO X/8:SOUND

9)+4:LOCATE 0,A,10

1'5=?

820 POSITION

1,10:? #6;"last score

(PL):FOR N=15

TO

0

PLOT

REM

was

9)+4:LocA1E D 1:13) THEN 1260 1270

NOT

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REM

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=NEXT

870 880 80

10 15

IF IF

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0.5:SOUND

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LOOP=1

FOR

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9

TO

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”;8

202,208,240,96

113 221;

133£32;

140

150 180

m 290 320 350

m

940 950

READ READ

1520

1360

A:IF

A=0 THEN X3:FOR N=0 TO

RETURN

X3/8:SOUND

EAD

0,11,

1370

POS=CHACT+1CHAR*8):FOR x=0 A:POKE (POS+X),A:NEXT x NEXT

TO

7:R

m 651, 680 710

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373 §SZE*;5;"1713§5311533_gs“ ’ 559 ’ 34. . l . LEV-I-SC-?-LIV-S-RETURN '

This is one of hundreds of

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980 GRAPHICS 1+16:POKE R

2,0,14

*3:? #6;”)”:FOR

N=4

T0

POSITION

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l,23:?

HHHHHHHHHVH";:REH

20

1020

N=4

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SCREEN

1040 1050 1060

HHHHHHHHHHHHHH #6;"HNHNNNNHH

IN

TO

TIME=(LEV*3)*(75-LEV) PLOT

FOR

N=1

DUCKS T0

36 Atari User July 1987

LEV*3

available d-

1

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REM

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7

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22:POSITION 1,N

1111101013’Wmm 1010

FREE

756,HEN:SETCOL0

1380

DATA

0,254,198,170,146,170,198,25

1390

DATA

1400

DATA

0,16,56,16,681238;6810 0,254,254,254,254,254,254,25

4

4

1410 1420

DATA DATA

60,90,126,6I,231,165,165,129 0,24,60,255,255,60,24,0

143001“ 487209149763'6313548724

1440 1450 1460

POKE

756,0EU:RFTURN

REM

**

REM

TUNE

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CHAR

DATA

**

3361 3683 5674 3363 3683 18185

500 8887. 530 11818 560 3394 590 4155

7417

RESTORE

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ERNIE LITTLE eases the task of wallpapermg WHEN buying your micro, did you ever think: ”It’ll even help with the housework"? And have since spent many hours trying to justify that very statement? In response to all those letters we get pleading for more domestic utilities, we've come up with a program to help you calculate how many rolls of wallpaper you Wl|| need when you decorate a room. When the program is run you are requested to input the size of the room that you wish to decorate, both in

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__—___—_—_____

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skiiied w how 3“ an are. alreadv WE ”longer-s w. Atari p_ creative ard to ‘e ceiving Vol." bhca?cn look User. articies ignalzrd

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to '

masterplece wanting to put proa creativity into

straightiacket, we’ve found that life

can be made easier for the magazine, our readers and the programmers themselves if we stick to certain

standards. It has also occurred to us that it’s no good our just knowing what we want: We have to tell you, our potential contributors. So here are our 18

commandments. Don’t be too daunted by the list— it’s and good mostly just commonsense programming practice. 0 Send us your programs on tape or There’s no point in just sending a disc. listlng and asklng |f we’re interested you can’t expect us to evaluate a program from that. We may be good, but we're not that good! A cassette or disc with the program on is a must. We rarely use two-part programs in the magazine. Games in two files may look professional, but they’re the kiss of death as far as the magazine is concerned. Too much can go wrong when people type them in. 0 Avoid using characters in variable names that lead to confusion such as as and /, 0 and O. Meaningful variable names help as well ALIENS is far more understandable than AL. 0 Tell us what the program is supposed to do and refer to it by name. You’d be amazed at the number of programs we get where the author forgets to tell us what it is all about. In any subsequent correspondence, reference to ”my program” can cause problems by it’s vagueness. Okay, we’d have the program on record somewhere, but life would be a lot easier all round if its author were less modest and admitted he was the genius behind Mega-invaders. 0 Label everything with the program's title and your own name and address. Keep your own copy, too. So far the only existing copy of one particular —

7

38 Atari User July 7987

'

presentmg for

classic game hasn’t disappearedin the but there’s no reason to run the post risk of yours being the first. if it’s a game let us know how to “cheat” so we can test out the higher Ievels.We're getting ona bit here and our reactions aren’t as good as they used to be (not that they were up to much when they were as good as they used to be...) And an adventure-type game or whatnot should come with a map of the rooms and any other relevant crib sheet. Much as we’d like to, we just don’t have time to guess the name of Rumplestiltskin’s brother, no matter how much we admire your ingenuity. (Anyway, he works in our artroom.) 0 Put more than one copy of the program on your tape or disc. And if you wantyour submission back let us have a stamped addressed envelope with the name of the program on it. You won’t appreciate this unless —

run a computer magazine, but you use tape please send each program on a separate cassette. lf not, we just can’t handle them. The rule is, one program per cassette — though recorded several times on it. 0 Let us have a printed listing if possible. Screen dumps or off-screen photos are much appreciated,though not vital. Diagrams are always of use: Oftena point that’s difficult to putinto words becomes clear as crystal when you sketch it out. 0 Give a description of the program, what it does, why you wrote it, and outline the way it works and its vari-

you’ve

your

'

'

publlcatlon readers will.

Every subroutine must be titled clearly with a REM and should be referred to by it. Again, make the title

meaningful. Also, when you GOSUB,

REM to indicate which use a subroutine you're using. For example: 1”

GOSUB

WW:

REM

ll0VE

HAN

-

'

'

MM

RE” “H

119g

RETURN

MOVE

MAN

H“

At first this may seem to be far too fuss, but it's not just for the readers' bene?t As your programs grow you’ll ?nd that such REMs more than repay the effort by allowing you to keep track of your work. When you write out your list of subroutines _ which is vita| —try to do it in this form; much

if

ables and

subroutines.

it's a game let us have a plot. You'll get an idea of the sort of thing by reading the instructions to one or two of our games. Maybe you could also give a few ideas for its improvement or expansion. Even if you can’t get your upgrades to work, there’s a good chance that one of our talented If

we EXAMPLE Shows how Holds tings 200 DELAY

we “ant. up...

.,

where the line numbers refer to [the lines in which the subroutine is defined. Again, this helps by making things clearer to our readers — and you. We don’t expeCt your program descriptions to be classics of English literature, but it does help if they make sense and are easy to follow. Try reading them out loud — You'd be amazed how much such a simple technique can improve your writing. Also, if YOU get StUCk trying to pU'f something into words use this trick: Tell someone what it is you're trying to put into words —then write it down. Before you reject this hint,tryit-more than one professional writer owes his career to it. 0 Make sure that the program actually works. Try it out on your friends for


muttering through clenched teeth,

“How could anyone be that stupid?" — cast out (the answer is ”regularly”) the mote in your own eye and alter your program to take account of the feedback. It's not easy to do, as the all-toofrequent bloodfeuds among the editorial staff here testify, but it's worth it. Instructions can make or break a game. Make sure that yours really do instruct. They should be complete and it helps if the spelling and grammar are correct. Apart from causing confusion, such errors also make programs look amateurish. As well as misspellings, bad gramand general mar, split words untidiness are all to be avoided. Following even the simplest program can cause problems for the most

experiencedprogrammer

don’t

work, include a

option. . One of the major grams

on

a

causes

is because

crashing

of prothe user

monochrome

TV—and vice-versa. If possible, try your program on both types of television. User groups are invaluable here, as they are in all

friends. 0 Another irritation for

SPACES

n spaces.

,

Fettling

reView.

telephone number ,

bOth and work ”W'th the correct STD home '3 really useful, and can save a |°t code

Also

a

Here endeth the 18 rules. |f YO_U fOHOW these you submit

something to .

us

When

a

you“

bettethance °f

I‘m/"39

_much stand ‘t pUb"Shed-

becomeafar programmer.

More importantly, you more professnonal

H

And the better you become the

more sat'SfY'W -

It IS-

,

gg‘thngtéZr/IforS/ngugirszztrotoé House 68 Chester Road Haze?! Grove ’ [Stock p on SK7 5NY' '

reader

a

aspects of program development. 0 Please do put lots of nice explanatory REMs in your programs. A couple of REM statements with nothing after them at the beginning of the program gives us room to put in our

is

.

.A

\

'

messages without messing up all the line numbers you have referred to in

_

time.

Of

work as it's supposed to that you just can’t make the mental leap needed to see it as the passively malevolent reader does — so try it out on your

in an

. Tell “5 who you are. We “k? t? know 't '5 also your Chf‘St'a” name, and to know your_ age and interesting profession. After all,.we m'ght r91“)Ct your program, bUt ‘f we knew you were a fetlock fettler we d have been s Obscuresoft send able .to fetlocksY,°uon the 130XL for

add

your program description. 0 Avoid having lines with just a REM and nothing else. It may make the program, look neater, but we won’t welcome letters asking what the missing words are. Remember, people will be spending hours typing your programsinto their micros. Make theirlife easier if you can. 0 Double space all your written matter. This means leaving a blank line between each line of text which is vital from our point of view - try to follow our style. We have our own ways of doing things: For example, we press the Return key, not the RETURN key as you might expect. Just look how we do it in the magazine. Our programs are Program I, Program II and so on, our diagrams Figure I, Figure II. Q If you must use long multiple lines don't go over 114 characters by using abbreviations for commands as

for

hOW many blanks is he to enter?

”RE"

PRINT”

telling

inputs something the programmer wasn't expecting. All right, the idiot shouldn’t type in -999 when you ask him his age, but believe us, they will, out of sheer peversity particularly if the program is educational. There is something about CAL programs that brings out the devil in us all... So try out all the unlikely options— if you don’t, some poor user will. Actually, it takesa lot of skillto idiotproof a program, as it is delicately known in the trade. Often you're so involved in getting the program to

modifications incompatibility. You can develop a beautiful program making use of all the splendid colour the Atari has to offer, only to impenetrable fog

Exactly supposed Use:

that it is your own work, has not been offered elsewhere and that we have your permission to print it. If you don’t we’ll have to return it. 0 It’s always nice if a program can have an alternative key or joystick

colour/monochrome

find that the action disappears

page

separate

PRINT“

us

to them unnecessarily. One major cause of having to return programs for is

when he sees something like:

people then complain the lines are too long. 0 Don't use abbreviations in text. — They’re exceptionally easy to miss for the sake of typing two extra characters you can save our readers hours of frustration. 0 Please, when you send us your

their criticism (painful though it may be). The acid test is to ask them to type it in. And — when you find yourself

'

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1987 Atari User

39


DEDICAI ED

So

Don’t get confused. PAGE 6 is a totally independent magazine for Atari users that will compliment and expand your Atari world.

66

'

Long program listings - not just games but also utilities, applications, education and more in both BASIC and machine

WCLUDING

code '

51m

son 57

s, cans

1 0g 511+,

Programming articles, hints and tips

'

In depth reviews - would you believe pages to one review! That’s in depth!

we once

devoted

four

Comprehensive ST section

CHECK US OUT

stiff ..

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£31233;

you won’t regret it.

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software, books

.

u

?t Q i

We also have a complete collection of PD and accessories available to subscribers.

$21

a ,g.:?lo

.

we. l

are

will get you a sample copy. £7 will get you a years worth

(6 issues)

and a

lot more besides!

SUBSCR|PT|ON

Overseas subscriptions

HOTL'NE 0785 21 3928

Mail Europe Surface outside Europe

£10.50 Air

£16.00 Air Mail or £10.50

PAGE 6, P.O.BOX 54, STAFFORD,ST1 6

1

I

DR

Entertainment from S.T.V. SOFTWARE

"WORLD CUP MANAGER" AN EXCITING TELEPRINTERTEXT GAME '

Lead Your team to the World Cup Final! (If you're good enough) Cass £8.39 Disk £11.19 including Post and Packing

"JOE 8: THE NUCLEAR CAVERNS" overheating and the only way to get to it is through the caverns below. Unfortunately,for security, they are protected by:— of Electronic Rays, Pools Acid, Radioactive Birds and many other hazards. Joe has the job of collecting from each cavern and reaching the core to shut it down. He needs your help badly. six uranium pods A new exciting arcade style game New Budget Price Cass £3.99 + 20p p&p Disk £7.99 + 20p p&p

The Nuclear reactor at Bizwell

is

Coming Soon ||

“as

s.

“one ego“ “0 0“°sol\t'°‘

1°“P;\_°co\

u

DARG with variable

Arcade style graphics speed. Release date late July/August New Budget Prices to be advised Full details in next issue

W0,

“oer” 0”le

Son»: f'on,

Send cheque or P0. to: S.T.V. Services & Software, 9 Chiswick Walk, Cheimley Wood, B'ham 637 61A Tel: (021) 770 1003 (NOTE S.T. GAMES WANTED) 40 Atari User July 1987

,

’el~/°U39

.


Shivers

down

'

the

spine "

Pro ram'Phantom Prici: £7.95 (cassette), £9.95 (disc)

Supplier: Tynesoft, Addison Industrial Estate, Blaydon, Tyne and Wear, NEZ74TE. Tel: 097—414 4611

occurrences. So whenlpicked up my copy of

creepy

Tynesoft's latest game Phantom, shivers ran down

my spine. You are a professor of astro-physics who happens to be interested in psychic

phenomena and builtaportable nuclear accelerator, presumably in his garage. hole

in

a

spooky

phantoms. So with reactor in hand you are well prepared for the horrors that face you, or are you? On loading l was greeted by the control panel featuring score, reactor level, heart rate (in beats per minute) and an electrocardiograph (ECG), which resides on the bottom right of the screen. Now it appears that you only have one life and the BPM indicator increases every time a ghost comes into contact with you—once this reaches 100 your old ticker will give out. You arrive at Ye Olde Inn, and are metwithaplan view that looks more like a maze.

l

.Q-_'.;1151-15““.~“—‘“.-";~“;‘Z~“'giggili'lglflgfi

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reactor and if you empty it you are in deep trouble. New ones are scattered about the inn, but as discretion is the better part of valour, you can dodge the spooks instead. You have to battle your way round four screen levels of the inn, collecting keys and other items on your way. You eventually battle with a large and very nasty ghost. At this pointl realised that my heart rate did not go down in the move from one level to the next. lndeed it

when settled completed the Inn and moved on to the Dungeon where a completely different set of nasties decided to

only

I

have me for breakfast. With 64 different rooms and the mansion and castle to exorcise there is plenty to keep you on your toes — especially as the difficulty

and

quality of

used graphics throughout are first-rate coupled with a wonderful The

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is original and well worth buying for the sheer pleasure of playing it. So when it comes to the final conflict and you have rumbles in your attic or

racter. My only quibbleisthatthe spooks can get you without you being able to shoot them. This is not a major problem because if you are good enough you simply sidestep them.

“Who yer gonna call?” TyneSoft. Neil Fawcett —

Instead of rampaging around the screen hacking

gem): Wiggle/[Sty

and slashing your enemy, with Phantom you must use tactics to negotiate each screen. This evasive angle adds a very addictive quality

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with the nuclear accelerator and poof, the spooks begin to vanish in clouds of ectoplasm. This is a pretty neat weapon as it wipes out

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m

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Weary waggl | ng particular

, .

.

Sr/ce.. uppller. Mastertron/c, 8-70 Paul Street, London EC2A j

Tel: 07-377 6880

ALTHOUGH Frenesis describes itself as a game guaranteed to bring you near total nervous collapse, my guess is that it is more likely to be caused by boredom from monotonous gameplay. You are armed with a Statron which is actually two thick bars, one running vertically down the screen, the other horizontally. Each bar can be moved

separately against a plain backdrop, the vertical one going left and right and the horizontal bar, up and

down. The movement is controlled by an appropriate tug on the joystick. Enterthe aliens, stage left, right, and all ways. These

S

are not

either circular, diamond or Other sharp-angled Shapes-

horde before progressing to the next level. The way to exterminate the infestation is by moving one of the bars across its path —the aliens explode on impact. If aliens are heading from the right, sweep the vertical bar from the left. Pink arrows on the bar point the direction the bar is currently facing. You also have some smart bombs at your disposal, triggered by pressing the fire button.They will rid you of all the aliens in the —

immediate vicinity.

And that’s it, really. There are40waves ofaliensto get through and while it gets faster and more furious, you are still simply waggling one of two bars back and forth. l grant that dextrous

you

I

pogo

'

.

(cassette), £9.95

Frigiécf7'95 Supplier: Red Hat Software, 77 Fennel Street, ManChester m4 aou Tel: 061-835 7055

THE

main

character in sort of demented Aussie jumping around on a pogostick. lt brings tears to my eyes just thinking about it. Anyway, you set off to find the fabled Lost Golden Pogostick, spurred on by the wailing of Danny Boy. While l like to think have an open mind on musical matters, I was glad to be able to turn

Sprong

is some

I

this particular cacophony off.

You are given five lives to begin with and there are chances to win extra lives. Each screen has to be completed inside a time limit and there are 50 -

-

42 Atari User July 7987

screens to pogo

through. Movin from left to ri ht your pgogress may gbe

by a number Of obstacles and hazards. These include lava flows, raging fires, laser beams, acid rain, bomb-dropping helicopters, meteors and one or two others. These can be dodged by Cheeked

carefultiming ofyourmovement or avoided by hopping on to and across platforms, conveniently strewn about the place. The platforms can be of the rock-steady or dis-

tinctly temporary variety. You hop gently along, moving left or right. Pressing the fire button increases the height and length of the jump. The springing movement is good and bouncy and adds to the difficulty when trying to assess particularly tricky jumps. Should you lose your last life 38 screens into the , game, you dont have to go

I

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mmmu?m”““u!“““ w =

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handling of your Statron

Better graphics, less simplicity and much more gameplay variety might

is

needed to make progress but the game failed to catch my imagination. It’s all too much of a muchness. Frenesis was written by Tony Takoushi, well-known arcade games fan. Despite his wide experience of arcade action, I’m afraid he hasn’t produced a stimuIating game. Frenesis doesn’t come

anywhere

near

have awakened my interest. As it is, although this game is cheap, you’d be advised to have a look at some others in the Mastertronic range. This is not one of their finer offerings. Bob Chappell Sound5

generating

Graph/CS

the sort of excitement that many other games fOr the Atari have managed to deliver.

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back to the beginning next time round. On restarting you can choose to begin at screen 10, 20, 30 or 40 depending on how far you reached. Even as an absolute beginner you can start on any screen between 0 and 9. The graphics are bright and cheerful, though blocky and rather uninspired. The raging fires are little more

than glowing embers, the background scenery could have come from Legoland and as for the lava flows , well lve seen more anim-

ationin our pumice stone on bath night.

There’s

nothing

new

under the sun, so goes an old adage — and Sprong by

Red Rat Software certainly does nothing to try to disprove it. On the other hand

Sprong is well put together is reasonably challenging.

and

Niels Reynolds

Sound Graph/Q-~~-~~--~--~~-~--~----

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Supplier: Mastertronic, 8-70 Paul Street, London ECZA 4JH, Tel: 07.377 6880

GAME about lawn mowing by Jeff Minter? What, he of the megatomic, all-action, rip-roaring, blastem—out-of—the-sky fame? No, it can’t be the same Minter. But it is. Hovver Bovver is not a new game — in fact it came out on the Commodore 64 way back in ‘83. The game has you A

a

neighbour’s

hover mower to cut a series You’ve barely started cutting your first swathe when the neighbour of lawns.

.

decides he wants his mower

back.

Then

begins the

Breakl

I

hedges

the pursuit. One way of fending off pursuers is to set Rover, your faithful dog, on to them. The gardener and Rover, sensitive souls, will never

flower bed unless you have slashed a path through it. Not so the neighhour, who will trample anything in his desrre to cross

a

.

.

.

.

recover the mower. it pays to play the vandal to keep

m

seas.

M

u

5NS.

Tel; 067-832 6633

WHO would have thought that the game of ‘87 would be a relative of the Iegendary program Breakout? it has

winner with its latest release Arkanoid. it looks like Breakout but has many hidden surprises.

a

from

imagine has already converted the original arcade

version of Arkanoid on to other computers including the ST with considerable success but l’m sorry to say that the Atari 8 bit version is well below average. The game has a very simplistic form—you control a bat in the form of a short tube. This must be used to keep a bouncing ball from reaching the base of the screen. The ball must then be ricocheted among a

destroy appears

soon

as

you

one the capsule and falls down for

you to catch.

Each capsule has a different colour, identifying label and different effect. Catching a new capsule will negate the operation of any previously caught capsule. The best capsule in most cases is the Lfor Laser. Your bat turns into a double laser which can blast the bricks. The instructions do say that D capsule exists breaking the ball in to three — but never got one. a

I

,

Bob

directly overhead

Chappell

Sound.,................................9 8

Graph’??"""""“""“""""““

which, although it now looks a bit dated, IS cleverly .

9 PlayabII/ty........,.............,.... Value formaney....,..,....... 10 9 Overall

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done. MUSlC (a

jaunty rendition

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of “in an English Country Garden") and sound effects Hovver are excellent. Bovver offers many an enjoyable, fast-action bout of daffy fun. Should be top of your shopping list.

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the edge on them. You have three lives and 16 gardens to conquer. Thereafter, you get the lot again at a faster speed. You can begin on any of the first eight lawns you like and have a one or two-player

ng out

Street, Manchester M2

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coloured bricks, maze‘ break'w d°wn the we” “m" 3” are deStroyed and the" YOU go On to the next level. know it sounds exactly the same as Breakout but there are nice additions to make it more fun. Each level has a different pattern of bricks and various bricks need more than one hit to remove. Some have one-lettered coloured

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mower ploughing across one of the many flowerbeds, an angry gardener joins in

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the neighbour

h°t DUFSU'tIf you go too berserk With the mower, it overheats and cuts out, causing a hiatus in your manicuring exploits until it has cooled. Should you send your '"

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chase, you racketing around and the ?ower

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Released

at

intervals

slots at the top of the screen are aliens that cause great confusion between you and the ball. If the ball collides and kills an alien the ballcan rebound in

through

any direction. There are 32 screens to work through before the climax confrontation with the Dimension Changer, whoever or whateverthat is. Arkanoid can be played by one or two players and the bat is controlled by either paddles, joystick or the keyboard. lhaveseen and playedthe ST version and this makes me

feel

even

more

2

"

*

T“.

7‘"

gramming version.

J

of the

8

bit

in The lacks game graphics, the colours clash making the game at times to see, there is impossible no music and it seems to give capsules out by the dozen making each level too easy to complete. feel that a lot more could have been done especially with such an easy programming task as Breakout. Richard Vanner l

Sound

4

G’aPh‘??-~~~~~---~---~-~---~--

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07,2210,money"”""""”“'

4

July 7987 Atari User 43


Don't miss out! Keep right up to date with all the latest developments in the exciting world of the Atari ST with Britain's top-selling Atari ST

magazine!

,

.

.4

~

.

4

' "

”We? ‘MWm?W

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Reduction of DriveWEAR and TEAR: now whole tracks can be stored In the Intemal 16k RAM.

-

If, Ply/27

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features y ou'lI find in the

'

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review of three sound samplers — ProSound, O‘A.n in-depth D'g'd'um and ST ReP'aV~ 0 Golf: Type in and play this exciting pitch ’n’ put game0 Part one of a new series discussing the techniques involved in writing databases using ST Basic. _

_

0 A comparative review of SuperBase Personal and Trimbase~

"

See the very best in ST graphics in GaliervUse your 8-bit Trak-ball on the ST. Easy step by step instructions for this DIY conversion.

0 0

Are you affected by the provisions of the Data Protection Act? Find out with our factual guide. 0 Fancy a change from Basic? We review two impressive developement packages - Cambridge Lisp from Metacomco and HiSoft’s DevpaC0 Reviewed: Arkanoid, Crafton and Xunk, Boulderdash Construction kit and Xevious. And on the Adventure scene Bureaucracy and Passengers on the Wind are explored.

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Mailbag, Scrapbook and all

Available NOW from your newsagent or larger computer dealers. Or why not fill in the subscription form below to be to date with all the latest sure of always keeping yourself up '" the Am" ST mm" dew/”mm —

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Card

[CED lIElzi

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Post to: Atari ST User, Europa House, 68 Chester Road, Hazel Grove, Stockport SK7 5NY. Do 'r r or to home d :061-480 0171

TeljerczgirGéZlif:Mailbox No. 72:MAG001 PresteI: Key 039. lliaiiim lilo. 614568383

44 Atari User July 7987

This complete

package

58995 inc. Post/Packing and twelve months guarantee

(A SAVING or $24.95 on PREVIOUS ADVERTISED PRICE)

I

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please contact manufacturersfor update)

NOW ONLY

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Signed——__—._.—__—

comprehensive hi-speed back-up utility disc, complete with manua’

(Existing owners

|

Nam...

I

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GREM LIN GRAB BER ll

Cheque/PO made payable to Atari ST User.

El

standard Speed)Supports double, Dual and Single Densities. Sector SKEW is now no longer required to obtain Hi-speed as with us Doublers. Other Special features are: Slow down, Fast write, Fast read, Drivewrite lock, Skew on/off, Fast formatting. Fast write with verify. This system Is fasterthan other systems which write without verify. A double sided operating system dlsk ls supplied which offersthe following: IS Doubler, US Doubler,Standard 1050 and Archiver emulation. Track Tracer,Diagnostic tester, 48k and 128k Disk Backup utilities, The PLATE can be made Invisible to software detection by either Slow down or 1050 emulation. Supplied with detailed Information regarding software drive control to allow you to access the full potential of the PLATE. Will run all dVdildble disk operating systems (Dos) Including: Spartados,Happy warp speed Dos, and other HlGH speed systems, With this system, up to sixteen drives can be connected and used. A comprehensive 30 page bound manual is supplied. This includes ?tting |nsfmc?om. All registered owners will be supplied Wll’h any software updates etc for the price of Disk and return postage. I supplled W Th

The

/ IEXPW datel

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D A ccesslMastercharge/Eurocard/BarclaycardNisa

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PiATE can READ/WRITE a whole track In a standard 1050 drive to READ/WRITE a single sector (up to FIVE times

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A I l ENTION ALL 1050 D'SK DR'VE OWNERS ll

ym’l'rcrzgil card, number and full address.

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53 Rugby Road, West Wo?hing, Sussex BN" SNB Tel: (0903) 40509 (?lm) (0903) 503711 (Bulletin Board 300/30024hls)


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Going loco July 7987 Atari User 45


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N IN this new series we'll delve deep into the unknown areas of your Atari computer. FX will give you some insight into what can be achieved by using a little imagination and harnessing the many hardware functions

avwlgbslfértoff this month with

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Screen This shovgiJ/sSow it is ossible to chan e the la er missilep ra hic (PMG) a 095015 as the e?ectF:on beam movgs down the screen Both a Basic version and the machine code source ro ram are iven T e?nt?1e Basic Iiitin save it and Rumpit A breakdown of i’ow it works is giveh in Table After a short pause the screen will display diagonal lines and stars moving across the screen. I

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ls screen an begm rea 2183686de neary[near tlhe a new y 0 re-

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frame. Location 20 is increased by the Operating System during the vblank a new posmon for

e ShengS/iéVht'Ch s o s finite? a rom.

Don't worry

if

you don’t understand

46 Atari User July 7987

use the grams.

routines

in your own

pro-

Another limitation in the program is the fact that it spends all its time changing positions and checking for the Start key: To overcome this probIem you must use a feature called the Display List Interrupt (DLl). 0 Next month we’ll look at how to set up a DL/andgive you listings that will splitsprites and colours which will run independent of your Basic program.

Sets up 1k of space for PMGs and sets up A$ which holds the machine code. Tells the ANTIC chip-enable PMGs and sets the player address pointers. Ciears aII player graphics memory. Fills each player with some form of data. You can change this to your own require-

.

ments. Copies machine code data into A$. E

.

rSeestSeéiY/Zil. tso323032 451ia?g/i?éf?etsz values. Low values for lines and high values for star type effects. Sets player widths. Values poked here can be 0 or 2 normal, double or 3 for quadruple size. 1

'

,

.

how the machine code works, because the Basic program has been written so that you can use the code in your own programs. You could try altering the two angle variables ANGLE7 and ANGLEZ or change the widths of the player missiles and the data stored within them. Unfortunately, when you change graphics mode the PMG area becomes corrupted, so make sure you're in the correct mode when you

onhi?eesz?zehh?gvsrii Shrilsydfg£7pxg|s ' ,

“a ‘i

420-440 450

450 2000-2400 Table

I:

Prints a message on to the screen. Calls the machine code that is stored in A$

with the two p arameters ANGLEi and ANGLEZ. Ends the program. Holds the data for the machine code.

Breakdown of the Basic program

'


f__ \

,‘

‘@

*

§

a“ s

A

REN

*

REM

*

50 60

REM

*

REM

“HHHHHHHHHun“

150 160 170 180

1

5‘s

.-

umn?un?mnnnn

REM

110 120 130 140

2,2

"

REM

450 x=NSR(ADR(AS),ANSEE1,ANSEE2) 460 GRAPHICS 0:END

*

SPRITES’

#1 ‘FLYING

DATA 104,104,104,133,208,104,104, 133,209,173,11,212,208,251,165,20,141, 0,6,141,2,6,24,101,20,141,1 2100 DATA 6,141,3,6,141,10,212,173,0,6 ,141,0,208,141,18,208,173,1,6,141,1,20 8,141,19,208,173,2 2200 DATA 6,141,2,208,141,20,208,173,3 ,6,141,3,208,141,21,208,24,173,0,6,101 ,208,141,0,6,24,173 2300 DATA 1,6,101,208,141,1,6,56,173,2 ,6,229,209,141,2,6,56,173,3,6,229,209, 141,3,6,173,11 2400 DATA 212,201,120,208,174,173,31,2 08,201,6,208,145,169,0,141,0,208,141,1 ,208,141,2,208,141,3,208,96

P

*

RUNNING

BEFORE

2000

*

RESET

SYSTEM

PRESS

7

,

7

A

53277,3 559,62 623,33

POKE POKE POKE

54279,HEM PLAYER1=HEM*256*1024 PLAYER2=PLAYER1*256 PLAYER3=PLAYER2+256

POKE

PLAYER4=PLAYER3+256

'

A

FX

70 REM AEEocATE TOP FOR PMS DATA 80 DIM AS4400>,BS41):MEM=PEER(106)-8 8 90 POKE 106,HEH:GRAPHICS 100 GRAPHICS 0 INIT PHGS m 105 REM m

'-

:

10 20 30 40

185

REM

m

CLEAR

190 200 210

FOR

A=0

TO

PLAYER1+A,0 PLAYER2+A,0

POKE POKE

220 230 240 245

~ A

,

PLAYER3+A,0 PLAYER4+A,0

POKE POKE NEXT REM

m

AREA

PMS

255

A

m

IN

POKE

m

DATA

PMS

7

15.

221 S?'éehi?ié?ififzss 27

P

PLAYER2+A 255

KE

10

283P8“ PLAYERMH 290

PDKE

PLAYER4+A,128

300

NEXT

A

310 RE” m 320 330

FOR

10

DATA

COPY

A=1

135:READ

T0

“5“

“(Almzmsmn

53257’1 393 POKE 53258’3 400 PM 53259’1 SE; 410 m m

420

0160 ;System equates =

0190 0200

VCOUNT

0210

new

XPOS1

0220 XPOS3 0230 xpos4 0240 HPOSP1 0250

$0600

=

$0601

= =

mm

80602 $0603 = $9000 =

'

SD001

;START

OF

CODE

;#of args off

PLA

stack 0390

PLA

0400

PEA

0410 0420

STA

PLA PL8

;Angle1 ANGLH

0430 7499192 STA ANGLEZ 0440 0450 WAIT LDA VCOUNT wait for tap ENE 11le 0460 ;of screen LN 20 0470 ;Set PMS

positions

STA

XPOS1

0490 0500 0510

STA

xpos3

ADS

20

0520

STA

XPOSZ

0530 0540 0550

STA

XPOS4

0560 0570 0530 0590 0600 0610 0620

0360 ; 0370 BEGIN 0380

0480

0630 0640 0650 0660 0670 0680 0690 0700 0710 0720 0730 0740

#1”

"Stars _,

0260 HPOSP3 = MM 0270 HPOSP4 = SD003 0280 PCOL1 = $0012 0290 PCOLZ = $9013 0300 PCOLS = $0014 0310 P6044 = $0015 0320 ANGLE1 = $00 0330 ANSEE2 = SD1 0340 ; 11350

FX

_

PRESS

Stripes"

+

SAR,

,o

LOOP

STA

HYSNC

EDA

XPOS1

STA STA

HPOSPJ PSDE1

EDA

XPOSZ

STA

HPOSPZ

STA

mm

EDA

XPOS3

STA

HPOSP3

STA

PCOL3

;Set PMS ;X-Positi'on 1

;8 Colour

;

;Set

PHG

2

;

;Set

PMS

3

;

STA

XPOS4 NPSSP4

STA

PCOL4

EDA

;Set

;

;Set

New

x for

;

cm EDA

XP051

angle

PMS

4

5534 5034 5485

30

3323

”63

19“

60 90 110 140

238“

4078

170

4082

12“ 150

3729

200 230

3216 3225

210 240

3219 1329

220 245

3222 5059

280 310

3224

290 320 350

3601 4266 3524 2120

300 330 360 390

1329 2831 3875 2127

42“

“149

450

44313

1329

“W 430 460 2200

screen

;SYNC with

20 50 30 105 130 160

E

cm

4063 5652 6038 2039 1973

340 370

m

752,1:SETcoEoR 2,0,0:POSITION

POKE

$MB.PDSIT10N10,10..

=

m

SCREEN

UP

11 7,7 DATA“ USER 430IP031110N 12,8:?

$D40A =

As

m PM

7

3123(”SM

m

DAT

350 ANSEE1=5:ANSEE2=70 m mm 360 m m

0110 ;START ADDRESS 0120 ;Program is relocatabte. 0130 ; *= $4000 0140

40 70 100

0750 0760 0770 0780 0790 0800 0810 0820 0830 0840 0850 0860 0870 0880 0890 0900 0910 0920

2116 2122

350

7336

440

“9

3552

4552 14449

4475 2136

2M“

21”

5457 13444

11212?2300

12607 800 2400

14708

ADC

ANSEE1

STA

XPOS1

;Add angle1 sent ;From BASIC prog

m EDA

XPOSZ

ADS

ANSEE1

STA

XPOSZ

;Add ang1e1

SEC EDA SBC STA

XPOS3 ANSEEz XPOS3

;Subtract angEez

SEc

SEC

XPoS4 ANSEE2

STA

xpos4

EDA

NSDUNT

CMP

9120

EDA

;Subtract ang1e2

;

;End of screen? loop back

BNE

LOOP

;No

0930 0940

EDA

$D01F

;Start

CMP

#6

0950

BNE

11411

;No

0960 0970 0980

EDA

#0

;Yes

STA

HPOSP1

;X-PositT'on

STA

HPOSPZ

;PMSs and

STA

HPOSP3

;Back to BASIC

STA

HPOSP4

0990 1000 1010

key? ,

Zero of

exit

RTS

July 7987 Atari User 47


f“; .

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O

new 520 STFM from ATARI has been an instant hit since its announcement. The design has gained from experience with earlier ST Md STM machines and'the “5m? '5.3 practical and superbly engineered COmPUFW that W’" 939” ?nd "5 place '" your home as well as In your bUS'"955-

The

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Mlbl INTERFACE: 520 STFM has 3 programmable sound voices and a Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) to allow direct connection to a wide range of musical organs and synthesilers such as the Casio The

CZZSOS. .

The basic 520 STFM has 192K bytes of ROM, an optional 128K 0‘ DluQ-in ROM cartridges and 512K of RAM. The MEGAPACbytfs 5 0 STFM has bigger memory a full ONE MEGABYI’E of RAM, like the —

STF.

.

.

.

.

.

.

has": 520 STFM has a b‘l'm'" S'".9|e's'ded. disc drive. The MEGAPAC 520'STFM comes “m.“ two drives, one internal and one external. The '?"°i' isdoubIe-Sided, offering twnce the capacity (720K) of the built-in drive (360K), Your disc bill can be cut by almost half when compared with that of basic 520 STFM users. The

MOUSE: 520 STFM

The

has

hardwae

its

own dedicated mouse as

D

art of

standard

its

A

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520 STFM can be easily expanded by plugging in 'add-ons' through its ports. They will accept printerlCentronics port), Modern (RS232 port), musical instruments (Midi port), sensors (joystick port) and fast intelligent devices such as network, Winchesters, laser printer etc (SCSI port).

The

BUILT-IN SOFTWARE IN ROM:

PROCESSOR: _

_

.

_

TheCentralProcessor unit(CPUlisa Motorola 16/32bit680000hip, running at a clock sweet! of 8 MHz. It lsfunher enhanced bv Atari s OW" 005107“ “35 D'OVldl?g 3 DWEC‘ Memory ACCESS (DMA) channel for fast data transfer wnhotherpennheralssumasthe ATARISH204 Winchester drive ortheAtari Laser printerlavailable soon)anda real time clock.

%

.-

520 STFM has 192K bytes of permanent software in ROM. This comprises GEMDOS, the disc operating software which is now becoming the dominating standard for 16 bit computers, and GEM, the Graphic Environment which uses pictures and drawing instead otcryptic messages to communicate withthe userandtheelectronic Mouse in place ofme keyboard to enter the user's commands.

The

3,

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.

SOFTWARE ON 5 DISCS:

DISPLAY: 520 STFM can display40 orBO columntext on anydomesticTVor colour monitor such as the Philips CM8533 or the dedicated ATARI SM125 high resolution monochrome monitor.Graphic IS 600 X400 pixels on the SM125,600 x 200 pixels ind coloursor320><200 pixels in 16 colours on a colour monitor or TV. The colour palette contains 512 possible colours. Some ATARI software indeed uses the exceptional display hardware to produce stunning graphics with up to 256 colours at once. 3

The

MEGAPAC 520 STFM comes with 5 discs, containing an impressive collection of software by any standard: number 1; contains the BASIC language. Disc number 2; contains Logo, + DOODLE + MEGAROIDS. and STWRITER a WORDPROCESSOR program Disc number 3. contains Neochrome, a painting program and demo pictures. Disc number 4; contains CPM utilities. Disc number 5: contains the CP/M emulator.

.

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Disc

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520W”camnmrkevbaa'd“abovebu'w'fh

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52057FM+ with monochrome/SM725lmonitor.....,....£533.00 MEGAPAcszoerM....,...........,,.,...................,,...,..,....£539.00 MEGAPAC520 STFM with monochrome monitor.,..,...£633.00 8 104OSTFcomputerkeyboard, internalPSU, internal £555.00 double-sidedl720Kidisc drive, MB RAM, 5s/w discs 9 7040er with monochrome monitor £649.00 10 MEGAPACIO4OSTFltwin doobiesideddrives/...,,..,.,£655.00 11 MEGAPACttMOSTF withmonochrome monitor ,..,,..£749.00 12 SUPER PACKSZOSTM with FD200+Mouse£34900 5 s 7

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3 Philips CM8533- 4 " medium resolution colour

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video leads for Sony or Grundig connector, Philips CM8533 £1500 Araridrive leads £1500 Printer/cad; £1500 Modem leads £1500 RGB

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Stand-alone PS.” l‘" the above ifrequrredleg 520 5” ~~£25-°° 5 7W’" ”0°C 57 1519900 6 A.S.&7'. 70001-'W'fhPSWO’HO —5'/. double-sideddrsc drive, 720K, alternative choice to SF374 or A.S.&T. IOOOC out with 40/80 track switch for IBM PC and compatible discs £ 1 24.00 7 Stand-alonePSUfortheaboveilreauired..........,........,.,.£25.00 8 SH204—20Mogabytehalddisc (Winchester)...................£599.00 9 SH204—40 Megabyte harddisc (Winchester)..............--21,149.00

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your ST system, on every level. A.S.&T. MEGAPAC SZOSTFM is quite simply very good value for money. We add all the goodies to an already superb computer before you have it. This cuts costs. If for example, more RAM is to be added later to the 520 STFM, extra steps will have to be taken such as check—in and check-out and the workwill becarriedouton a one—offbasis. Itwilltherefore cost more. Buying an A.S.&T. MEGAPACinstead of a basic 520 STFM means that you will have a complete system with everything added right from the beginning. After all, why shou Id you make do with half the memory and put up with swapping discs with just one disc drive?

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OVER the past few months we’ve looking at facilities provided by the Central Input/Output System — or CIO. You should now be familiar with the way that the operating system uses CD to pass data to and from the various peripherals, and how you can use those same CIO handlers from within your own programs. One of its most powerful and useful facilities is to supply a common protocol for data transfer. This allows a program to send or receive bytes of data the W'thom been

.

knowing'anything about 't 's accessrng. hardware dev1_ce

accessed on each disc and these must be capable of being read or updated and then deleted again when they are finished. There should also be a set of housekeeping routines for such tasks as copying files, altering the names of files, making new or backup discs and so on. The disc drive is actually only cap-

Part 6 Of Andre Willey's On the serles

in a special enhanced density mode which contains 1040 sectors instead of 720 thus giving a

formatting

.

driT/ZIrssToar?zgxi/siixgezg$1312;ng

allows plenty of space in the Handler Address Table for just such a purpose. The most complex driver that you are likely to come across is the disc operating system (or Dos as it is better known), and over the next couple of months |'|| be showing you in more detail how it works. There are many different types of Dos available, but the most common is the well known Atari Dos 2.0. This has been expanded recently to give us Dos 2.5, but the main principles of operation are exactly the same. Various other manufacturers have produced their own Dos software but most of them use the same basic disc format. Many also add their own special facilities, but for the moment we'll concentrate on the standard Dos 2.0/2.5 format. The first thing to realise is that a disc drive differs from most other peripherals in that it is a random access device — it can read and write data at various different positions on the disc under software control. While a cassette must be set for record OR playback by the user, a disc is perfectly capable of being written to or read from whenever the computer requires. This opens up the possibility of transferring data between files on a single disc, or changing the data contained within one file — both of which are impossible when using tape. Any Dos must therefore provide a number of operations. It must allow many different files to be stored and

Each of these is 128 bytes long so a full disc can store 92 160 bytes (90k) The 1050 drive is also capable of

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able Of five very simple operations. The first is to Formata blank disc. This effectively partitions the new disc into 720 separate blocks of data known as sectors (see Figure |)-

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single density Dos 2.5 disc July 7987 Atari User 57


operation it completed and the type of disc in the drive. In addition, you may recall from Len Golding's series on autobooting that the OS isonlycapableofaverysimple boot operation —that of loading a set of consecutive sectors from the start of whichever disc is in drive one when the power is turned on. All this leaves us with a picture which is a far cry from the all-singing Dos specifications outlined earlier. if all the computer can do is manipulate these sectors containing just 128 bytes, hOW can DOS ever do all those clever tasks we are by now used to? Perhaps now you understand why stated that Dos is probably the most complex — and largest of the device drivers. It’s also why Atari decided to load it in from the disc at powerup time rather than permanently use up an extra 10k of memory Space that would be completely wasted as far as tape users were concerned.Thewhole of the original 08 only took up 10k. so incorporating Dos as well would have doubled the rom space required. I

The veryfirstAtariDos(DosI,would you believe?) loaded this entire 10k block of machine code into memory in one go, thus reducing your work space in Basic to a meagre 27k on a 48k machine. It was

quickly realised, however,

that not all that program code was needed all of the time. When programming in Basic all that you require are the raw Open/Close file and data transfer routines, plus a few XlO commands for other functions. Certainly

cxsx

opsnorrns 1984

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DIRECTORY CQRTRIDGE COPY FILE RUN

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DISK

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there is no point in wasting the extra memory taken up by the menu system which is only needed occasionally. Dos 2.0 splits this software into two parts: Part one, contained in the DOS.SYS file, is the actual 5k disc handler routine used by ClO. Parttwo, the 5k DUP.SYS file which is only loaded when you type DOS, contains such as all the menu facilities duplicate disc and copy files (See Figure II). The routines contained in the DOS.SYS file allow the user to do all the things we require of a disc system without concerning ourselves with which sectors are being used. Dos works out which sectors it will have to use for which files, and all we need worry about are filenames and the bytes of data contained in them. You may have noticed a slight discrepancyin what I’ve said so far. lfthe file DOS.SYS tells the computer how to treat sectors as separate files, how does the DOS.SYS fi/e ever manage to load itself into memory? Well, the simple answer is that it doesn’t! The first three sectors of a Dos format disc are reserved for a special bootstrap loader capable of loading and running the DOS.SYS file itself. These sectors load at $700 via the normal disc autoboot method and are also responsible for setting up the DOSINI, DOSVEC, MEMLO and HATABS pointers. These allow Dos to act within the CIO environment, and prevent it from being overwritten by any other software (such as your Basic program). In

I J. K.

_

FORHQT 013K DUPLICQTE. 0135 BINQRY SQUE

h' attest N: caeo‘re 0. P.

1533

addition this code will be run again whenever System Reset is pressed in order to reinitialise the disc handlers. Once the boot process is finished you will see the familiar READY prompt from Basic. If you type PRINT FRElO) you will get a result of 32,274 bytes — or about 32k. Without Dos this

figure would

once again.

At this point it’s worth mentioning one of the major differences between Dos 2.0 and Dos 2.5 —the ramdisc. As you will know if you use a 130XE, Dos 2.5 allows you to use that extra 64k of banked memory as a second disc drive. It also stores DUP.SYS and MEM.SAV on the ramdisc which means that there is no appreciable delay while the save/load operation

takes place.

you don’t have a 128k machine a normal ?oppy disc for the MEM.SAV file it takes a little over 21 seconds before the menu appears. Without MEM.SAV this is reduced to just seven seconds, so many people resort to simply SAVEing their programs before typing DOSTo understand the disc system a little better, let’s look at the way the |f

and must use

Seeee

He; sees

FILE DUPLIcoTt-z FORHQT “SINGLE

1'3 4-359 360 361-368 369—719

720

35

L EC T

I TE"

OR

m

FOR

MENU

be 37,902, so Dos has in

fact taken up 5,636 bytes of memory. This doesn't include the disc utilities menu, which is only loaded from the DUP.SYS file when you type DOS. This uses up an extra 5k of memory, which will, of course, wipe out any Basic program you might be working on. To avoid this, you can set up a file called MEM.SAV on your Dos disc. When this is present, the first 5k of your program space is saved into this file as soon as you type DOS. Then, when you have finished with the utilities menu and you enter B to return to Basic, the contents of the MEM.SAV file are copied back into memory and your program is intact

Seeeeee B°°i

.

'"f°,"“a“°“ Freeforflles

VTOC Directory information Free for files Not availablefrom Dos

Figure //I: Disc sector map for single density Dos 2.5 discs

computer uses those 720 (or 1040) sectors to store your programs. Figures Ill and IV show the disc format for a Dos 2.5 disc in single or Figure l/: The Dos 2.5 menu 52 Atari User July 1987

Turn to Page 54 P


-

so every 16_bytes long, 885515? 32:1“, details of up to of 64 9 a max'mum eight files cgcit?n files per (15ng JUSt' prior to th e direCtory sectors numbered COmes the VTO C semi: 360 Th'ls ls probably the most mportant sector on the di sc because It- h Olds the table Of free S a Ge WhICh '5 to referred to each timp IS

Sectors

c on

1-3

lOn BOOIeirnf‘zrmat'

4_359 360

Free for files vroc Directory informat‘‘On Free for files Not a vai-| able from Dos

361'368 369-1023 1024-1040

-

-

'

'

i

Figure Iv; Disc sec tor map for enhanced density Dos 25 d'“CS ‘

lsc. Write any information $8ch all/ant IS filled Up' D05 |00kS 0 ind th e “GXt availab|e at??ee?bsfit"; unu 88d sector. Wh 9” this sector h as b 93” allocated to a me it is removed marked as from the VToc free |. ou Y When being unavailable if; nalnd dele file from the disc are thgse as again being free. sectttfrsa the disc The rensfrkfd on are availablgfdrgtsgctors Orlng the flles themSelves With Of sector 720 0h 3 sithe|exgeptiOns “9 e ensity disc a ” d sectors 1024 to 10 40 in the ca 39 Of enhanced densit V d'Iscs. When D ?rst deVeloped, ors the softwaggaz-ghwas Wmtetheir brand .

enh ance

.

f'rSt three sectors age?imsy?use ”(If forth e bOOt mel’manon Th ese ma {not be u3ed for me Storage, even If you don’ t act have a DOS SYS H e on that u'ally -

.

-

.

I

l

particular disc.

There are of sector On the disctil—recejz'othertypes sectors, file data sectors and ltrregtsry olume Tab|e of Contents (VTOC)_ The directory f IS CO”' tained in eight sectnofsrrnatlon near the middle of the disc (3 ect0rs 361 t 0 368). It IS here that all of the me names are stored , plus an Information about the files Sui/moi? Stamng -

.

i

.

-

seCtOF, status

and so

ofngth’ .

.

drivewige

desrgners of the old 810 disc

programmed the unit a sector numbering to 720— Systempgn' Sing "U.”“befs from most unusua' '” Computer t erms,

to “gs

WSW“ to

1

HenCe DOS 2-0 Couldn’t Sector 720 use and the hard were could nt use seem"

.

-

.

hard

_

.

-

'

-

-

~

new system touu Se all 720 dISC sectors, ”Umberin 9 th em from 0 to 719. The

much

How

does

on

Telex?

do

I turn

it

Zero_

On a 1040 se denSity e u disc, sector 720Cti2rfsnhdariced bUt In this case tJhGStllalzte W faeny Ors Can’t b e accessed be Cause of a $32? ||m|tat|0n 0 f t“810-bums 3 eCtO' ”U!“berm?! System used b Y Dos 2.0 Which was never d to go beyond 1024 This mSSIgned ans you lose 17 Sectors end of each disc' Ate” deSignecj the 1050 to use this uy system Of 1040 128-byte sector’susx?l en the eStabHShed norm for Capacity Was by then Stogage 20 256-byte 3 eCtors, no to 3:3?Just one IS q u-t'95Ure—but the upshot of it all IS that you |°Se about 2k 0 f 5 ac e fr om density disc? -

_

-

~

.

,

,

.

,

'

ax)?

'

,

.

.

. Neizery enhantied well continUe looking into the Zrne lsc SVStem and see how it stores keeps track of all of your files anijngare. See you then,

cost

The cheapest will Telex machine, a dedicated and buy also need a will You conventional way Cheetah). (the £2,892 a total outlay You could go the dearest That’s rental. a Whisper), the cost you £1,604 (the to install, plus £404 year £10) costing VAT.) line, include separate telephone a minimum of £2,109. (All prices to double as a — use your micro of are doing over the first year users Atari what more and more Or you could do ordinary telephone! use your And just Telex machine.

to

1 r “1

go

How into

a

Telex

my Atari

machine?

the

(see communications software and appropriate to MicroLink. is a modern subscription a need and All you in this issue), a telephone, to Atari users on advertisements of services available teleshopping, number it happens, go as of a growing one news Telex isjust mail right round can also read the electronic you and MicroLink MicroLink. With and much more. send telemessages micro closed user group, directly into your create your own programs free telesoftware the world, download .

a

ou

54 Atari Use ’ J [W 1987

use

Telex?

.

.

Today between businesses. 2 million of instant communication than means more and Because it's a standard machines in use in Britain —just as Telex business communications there are 150,000 up copy of hard speed a used to dramatically because you have worldwide. It's far more efficient, but the phone quick as using for your records. for Telex that the every “conversation" use MicroLink when you bonus you get But there's a big doesn't offer. or receive Telex conventional way office to send HAVE to be in your even a portable), don’t home (or at you \X/ith MicroLink use your computer for you — as easily waiting can just Telex messages messages. You there are any whether can check business efficiency? So now you How's that for your anywhere, anytime. ee Page 4

But

why


'

—————_—Moilbog .

broken key with it. I recently did the same thing to my 1070 tape recorder and I replaced the broken key with the Pause key. I then found that Silica Shop actually sell replace— ment keys for this tapedeck. I sent off for two keys and

.

Mini Office II supports the Atari 1029 printer throughout the entire package as well as allowing the all Epson

Dos files available but is probably adequate for your

a

of

r ,n e r

e

Sharp, Teeside.

use

tO Stilt

PIG9 ram

AM considering buying Mini Office II but would like a few points clari?ed. Would my Atari 7029 printer work with this particular program as most of the other utilities I own totally ignore this printer. Also will the communi— cations program operate using split baud rates and if it will not can you please explain what baud rates are A. F. available to me? I

received

the

keys

very

promptly fora price offi. 12 which included.VAT, posrage and packing. Silica Shop can be contacted on

compatible

printers.

07 30.9 7711.

allows you to create graphic dumps of all forms of graphs on your Atari 1029 printer as well as working perfectly with the modules OfMlnl Office ?ther In regard to V°“.’ other The package

Kevin Kings-

disc.

?nitely 5d” rom

and one

"END?“ ‘SC 0

aangthie?

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05?' Si ?fehv': rythgrf?j? -

OWN an Atari 800XL and and am now tape recorder , , considering buying a disc drive. I am unsure about what I get when I buy one, which Dos is the best to buy

/

_

_

use ’t?lo/r; er comman Vléhat 5 WI

3121":sz u o

get and do

"

Rep I acn‘g

1

this Dos— every

df/Ve? erpool-

keys

W-

need to load time] use my Golding, LIV-

Q When you buy an Atari 1050 disc drive you will get a power pack, serial l/O lead and discs. On one of these discs you will find Dos 3 which is not the best of the

WITH referenceto a letter in the July 1987 issue of Atari User concerning the moving of the Pause key on a 7010 tape recorder and replacing

09mm”that°P“°"s “F W” WI“ DOS 2.5 IS the ?nd

most fnend|

and eas y to

y

use.

so?w are DI'Oblems MY friend has recently bought a new Atari 1040er computer and it comes with

built-in mouse. This has a connector that looks the same as the joystick one on my Atari 800XL. Does this mean that I can use the a

'

i

l

I

Connectmg up to MlcroLmk I

OWN an Atari 800XL, disc

drive and printer and wish to expand my system to include a modem. I was wondering if ljoined Micro-

Link would/be able to have it charged directly to me instead of to my parents on the phone bill. My other problem is that my system is in a converted attic and the phone is on the

ground floor. Would the

modem and the phone have

to be side by side? — N. Broadbent, West Yorkshire. O The only charge on your phone bill will be the cost of the telephone calls to the MicroLink computer. MicroLink charges are billed to you separately and payment is by a direct debit from your bank account. To work out how much you would owe your parents forthe use ofthe phone, the MicroLink bill specifies the

value

location 54016

in

($0300 hex) when you move it. The problem is that no software is yet available which recognises the values output by the mouse.

on

Bu y in g

a

Yorks. 0 The connection is the same on both mouse and joystick and you will find that the mouse produces a

‘You_rece|vea comprehen-

Slve “st of commands

your screen when you load format Dos, allowmg you to d'SCS' COW P03 dlscs and

dlsc dnve

query, the communications package does not allow split baud rates but does offer 300' 600' and 1200 baud, which facilitates most of the modems on the market for Atari computers.

When working from Basic you must load your computer with DOS first or you will not be able to save any programs to disc once you have written them. You do not always have to load Dos. When _you load most games you sumply use the game

north, Banbury.

'

needs.

mouse on my 8.13]: Atari?— D. Redmond, Harrogate, N.

connect time to the system at both peak time and off-

peak time. You will, therefore, be able to calculate the total phone call charges. Because your

system is in the attic, it will be necessary for you to get an extension from the tele-

phone socket downstairs to the attic. It is possible to buy such extensions from most electronics a socket in

shops.

_

Mus'c on call THIS must seem a very simple question, but is it possible to play normal music through the Atari 1070 tape made, and 3,50 IS itposs1ble to turn the recorderon andoffvia Basic without using the CLOAD or CSAVE command? ,

_

_

This came to mind when

,

tried to write a program to play some Christmas carols and found that/couldn’t get the hang of the sound channe/s so lgave up in (jasper. amen, Then / wondered

if it was possible to play and control music through the recorder and so solve my problem. 8. Buxton, London. . Yes, it is possible to play music through your 1010 _

tape recorder but the sound w speaker and may sound a little distorted depending on the age and quality of the speaker inside your TVThe way that this iS accomplished Wiii answer your second query as well. it is possible to control the recorder from Basic but it is

ever documented in manuals. To turn it 0" YOU simply type POKE 5401852 then press Return. if YOU put a music tape in,

hardly

Turn to Page 56 > July 7987 Atari User 55


press Play on the recorder and turn the volume on your

fligssinnghrrnngrIz-znml:dygg

can have exerting musm Without the effort of pro— .

.

.

WE welcome letters from readers about your experiences usmg the Atari micros, about tips you on other and about what would like to users. to pass in issues. you would like to see The address write future IS. —

.

.

NA [RU Ma'lbag ©§§® °

TV up you will hear the music. if you want to turn it off type POKE $4018.60 then

.

.

grammlng it.

.

.

.

.

to

Ed'm' Ata" User Europe House 68 Chester R°°d Hazel G’°"° Stockport SK7 5NY

Marlhag

SO| tware

Cheekmate a news

.

,

_to

IN

.

item in the June

of Atari User it states that CD5 Software claim issue

know more on the technical side of how it is done. Also, what is this Pokey chip that is often mentioned in artic/es. — A. J. T. Buckton, Manchester. c The way that the Atari writes information to the

ff,"

rgaster aroun as een SOftWBrs ountry20/700 much longer so I feel that Len the claim is invalid. Fett,Sunderland. tape recorder is length blocks at —

in fixed600 baud

(physical bits/second). Then

Atari

a

tape

serialtransmission is

tell me how the Atari micro writes information to the tape recorder. This point is of particular interest to me after reading your autoboot series and I would like to COULD you please

Ada ptlng

drives

are

single side,

double density, 40 track, 80 sectors per inch. Inside the drive there is a disc

analogue

card, so can

you please explain to me 56 Atari User July 1987

an

then by 128 data bytes and finally a checksum byte. The chip that you have heard referred to as Pokey is in fact the sound chip and was given this name when the machine was first built. The chip was new and is not available in any other micro and like the other new chips inside the micro such as Anticand GTlA was given 3 name. The Pokey chip also creates all the sound outputs that are available from Basic allowing you to obtain superb sound simply.

A pp le drlve

why I cannot use these drives on my micro. What modifications would I need to make and would/need to use the interface card? If so how would it connect to my 800XL. Would I also need a separate power supply as the drives take their power supply from the computer, and when connected would commercial software run on this drive? J. A. Oatham, —

This is why the interface card must be bought to use with the Apple II. Unfortunately an awful lot of work on the electronics would have to be done to make it compatable with an Atari computer. It would probably not be worth the trouble when you could sell the drives and put the a fully money towards compatable Atari 1050 disc

drive.

Essex.

O The disc drives on the

Apple

nificant bit first, The recorded block is 132 bytes long and is broken down into marker characters for measurement of speed followed by a control byte

.

-

card. I have one of these, and now know that the

used

to read or write data to the recorder. The sound chip inside your micro handles any data streams coming into or out of your Atari in a set order: 1 start bit (space), 8 data bits (0 space, 1 mark), then one stop bit (mark). Your sound chip sends or receives a byte by least sig-

IRECENTLYacquiredapair of Apple IlE disc drives which firm had my scrapped. When / tried to plug them into my 800XL I found that there appears to be no socket for it to ?t in. On the back ofthe disc drive there is a 20 way ribbon cable and a label giving a warning—connect the cable only to the Apple II interface

7

8

-

warnlng IN THE article “Check up on the taxman" published in the June issue ofAtari U ser there were some error s. Overall it would be unwise for your readers to rely on the accuracy of the routine for checking their PA YE tax deductions. For the majority the routine will be in error by pence only, but for those whose taxable pay averages over about £340 per week, the error could be quite large. G. 0. Lawton, Inland Revenue. —

that their chess program is the first 30 chess program for the 8 bit Atari. / WOU/d like to [30th (Wt that Chess-

on

Taxman

ll

computers are rather different from most other drives as they usea lot of electronic interfacing.

You would get Dos, and the correct lead and a power supply and you would have no problem running any of the commercial software

available.

Wrong '

'

ll?lngS? [READ yourmagazine GVGW month and find it very interesting. BUt whenever / type in one Of your listings it never works, 50 I retype It and retype it checking every character and they Sit/l never work 50 l have come to the conclusion that none Of them work and that your listings are all printed wrong. Could you please explain hOW the SOUhd channels W0fk- - G- Gulline, Fife. 0 All the listings are taken directly from working programs and they are checked before we publish them so that they are correct. The Problem is that_evenasmall WP")? error W'" StOP them WOT king. Take a lot of care when YOU type them if) and make use of the Get it Right program that we published in

the August 1986 issue of Atari User. This program will help you in your efforts, correct your typing errors and get a working program. There are many complex ways ofproducing sound on Atari home computers, but

it nearly always comes back to the Basic sound command. This takes the form Of SOUND 1.10110,10 and the numbers shown can


Mailbag

changed to any other number within the parameters of the SOUND be

statement. The first numberindicates which sound channel you wish to use in the range 0 to 3 and the second number indicates the note you want to use. This can range from 0 to 255, giving you a lot of variety. third The number indicates the distortion level Of the note With the number 10 indicating a pure note. This number can range from 0 to 14 in even numbers only. Finally the fourth number indicates the volume level of the note and this ranges from O to 15 with 15 being the loudest. By experimentwith this command you ing W'” be_able to create some very interesting sound effeqts’ gmj ‘f YOU refer to the five liners section of this issue of Atari User you will ?nder program thatWIllturn your computer into an electronic organ

Unfortunately you cannot access Prestel through

MicroLink at present, but it may be possible in the

future although

no date has been set.

de?nite

-

"Ollday tlps .

-

.

.

YOUR readers may be interested in an idea I recently used to help me enjoy my holiday better. One of the things I dislike most is

Add|ng a “10

d em

IAM interested in adding a

modem to my Atari 800 setup so that I can access MicroLink as advertised in Atari User. However, I am not clear exactly what sort / need and what additional software and interfaces will be

required. Can I access Prestel through MicroLink? Chris Read, Milton,

-

Keynes. O Addin a modem to your not as expensive system ices,g as many people think and can be very useful. There are several available for you to choose from. Prices range from £100 for a manual modem to a few

hundred pounds for ones which will dial the MicroLink number for you automatically. You will also need an 850 interface box or a lead to connect your Atari micro directly to a modem. You also

require a communi-

in the June issue of Atari User, the text is hidden in line 2 by POKE709,0. I suggest POKE709,10. I’ve also included a POKE 752,7 in line 5 to inhibit the cursor in the window when an error message is displayed. You seem to have used POKE 82,3 on these five-liners.

writing postcards

so I used Mini Of?ce II to help. Before Ideparted I set up

database file of my friends'names and used the label printer to print them a

out on sticky labels.

Then

I

printedoutanaqua/number Of labels With the following text on them'

.

.

Havtng

a

Heather

great/Lousy .

time.

-

sunny/raining/dull.

Hotel excellent/good/poor. Food scrumptious/enable! we just use the chip Sh0p_ Locals

_

I’ve hardly been able to get near my Atari for my wife playing on the bandit. It’s a great program, and if she paid me what she’s lost / could probably afford an ST

by now. Finally, in the mass formatter by Colin Froggat

-

.

will

cations program.

are

iriendly/hosti Le.

It was then just a matter of fixing two stickers and a stamp to the cards, deleting

support missin g [N the May issue of Atari User, which my son buys every month' there was a I etter f rom someone who

hadsent forsometh/ng from C omputer Support UK, advertised ”7 your maga.

.

Zine- They had "at rECEiVEd it.

[also sent for something from them costing £39.95. We have been trying to contact them since August

7986. Although we asked the _help of consumer fag 275,755’?,f’.§17,’e,”2‘2’,§’§ all we got was pro— servrces time saving idea will enable mISGSyour readers to enjoy their After letters sent bl’ OUf holidays rather than waste solrcrtor there was_still no them writing cards. And answer, 80 we applied for a when it comes to Christmas court summons. We were I’ve got the names on ?le; a judgement against 9M?" ready to address the Mr Lawson Of CompUtef _ of the cards. envelopes lain

Jones'

CI WV d '

converter converted G. WATSON’S ?ve-line decima/ to Hexadecimalconverter in the May issue ofAtari

User

rather

is

great. However, than

entering A=USHI7600,number), I ?nd that adding :GOTO50 to the end ofline 50 makes the routine more useful. Since typing in Dave White’s Fruit from the March issue of Atari User

Support UK

The bailiffs have told us

any thatdthere1 5 at £5?20arroc one};grtreet. 900 — Mrs. M- C. Sanderson,

Growthorpe, Rotherham, Yorks.

M ass

across was in the Five Liners Mass Formatter program. In lines 3 and5 the listing

showed three brackets which are not on the key-

board. They are meant to be the

clear screen character is (CHR$(725}) which obtained by pressing Escape+Control+Clear. A. B. O’Neill, Hants.

.

Dlsplay Ilsts .

_

HAVE had an Atari 800XL

I

for two years and would like to know what a display list is? I know it has something to do with the graphics mode but that seems to be the limit of my knowledge th's SUb/eCt‘ B' Wise, 0? Didsbury, Manchester . The display "St is a series of numbers that describes the way '” Wh'Ch the T

fa p hi CSC h''P —A n t'‘C dis p la y the screen.

formatter WHEN I received the June 1987 issue of Atari User / got

very great enjoyment out of reading it. Iwouldlike to say it is one of the best issuesl have read since its start. The only problem I came

_

9_

-

”Enter

address

m!

must The

where

the display list begins

is at location 560561 ($230‘$231)The July to December 1985 issues of Atari User con-

tained a comprehensive guide to the subject.

c lll‘SOI' ?aShlng .

I

WAS delighted to see my

cursor

flashing routine

printed

in the

Five Liners

section of the June issue of Atari User. Unfortunately I have to admit there is a bug in the

as printed, WhiCh results in cassette users not

00673

the

having

.

-

-

protection

393m?!” system resets as promised in the text. The program does work for disc users. The fix _

'

15

m

seventh number

replace the in

the data

on line 20 (a 74) by 70. Line 20 ShOU/d ”OW read: 20

M“

104 165

12,165 12 121

4g

Al 1 240 ' 3 ’ 125’13 ’ ' 5

9

41,44,g,139,1§3 -

B-M- Black, Preston, Lanes July 1987 Atari User 57


'

mm 1l 11 “I“ ‘“ 011111111 MAIL (11m «

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Build up a library of fun and Imowledge from our back Issues. I '

7

May-November1985

March

c°gf?ggisues

CONTENTS INCLUDE: A profile of ., a

Attan: bgsi iiizzrggalzel,

mic; 12

four Atari'

with

10

-

”forgessor' Basic f mm ape feature'o

,

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Ju

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files and memory with our data editor; and tips from our adventure

Need a binder f 0 r y? ur magaZIneS. 7

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6800

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LOTS OF GAMES

trips;

tzesggucl‘te -

Ilow- Me CMNHt‘ Marceau Compendium

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cam—“mnmm 58 Atari User July 1987

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Here 5 all you need to get the last ounce of fun and excitement out of one of the most talked-about games of 1986. This is what this package contains: Escape from Targ. A unique combination of ?ight simulation, adventure and arcade action, PLUS high speed , BD vector graphics! You crash-land on planet Targ 5 Central to eSCapel City and you have but one aim Targ Survival Kit. For help when you need it most. Includes maps of Central City and its subterranean complexes. And a novelette, “Interlude on Targ", with more hints and tips. 1110 Second City. Thought you’d got away? Then load in this extra data set and think again! No hints or clues this time you're on your ownl

Horse Play, Cavern

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Escapet Mancuna, SpaceMaze, Frank Fiend, Fence Burlder, Cubes

We,” send one for only £4.95

and

nh; —muc

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CONTENTS INCLUDE: — Speed up Basic programs with our compiler; disc index utility; player missile graphics series; five exciting hardware projeects for you to tac_kle;'fix the

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Atari User 59

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Award-winning software house Level 9 has extensivelyre-written some of its best-selling adventures, and released them in two trilogies: Jewels of Darkness and Silicon Dreams. in the Jewels of Darkness trilogy you start with Colossal Adventure, containing all the treasures, creatures, rooms and puzzles of the mainframe original. In Adventure Quest you must discover the Old Roads to the Dark Tower, Fortress of the Demon Lord. Only there can you defeat him. There's magic in the air in Dungeon Adventure. Can you discoverthe treasure while facing the perils of skeletons, carniverous jelliesand orcs? .

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The first adventureinthe Silicon Dreams trilogy is Snowball. You awake from suspended animation to find your spaceship on acollision course with Eden. In Return to Eden you must prevent the defence robots from destroying your ship. You have lost your memory in the Worm of Paradise, and you may have to join the governing party to regain it.

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| Back Issues UK I £1.25 £1.75 Europe 8: Eire | £3.25 Overseas I

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1987 Atari User 61


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Profile for Paul Rixon

Atari User Magazine Vol 3 Issue 03  

Atari User Magazine Vol 3 Issue 03 - magazine for Atari home computer users, published by Database Publications.

Atari User Magazine Vol 3 Issue 03  

Atari User Magazine Vol 3 Issue 03 - magazine for Atari home computer users, published by Database Publications.

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