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If you run any kind of cash-based business and you want total financial control without knowing anything about accounting. take a look at Cash Trader. It‘s been designed to address the problems you most commonly face in running your business and to solve them. simply. No knowledge of accounting? If you can distinguish income and expenditure, you can run your bookkeeping and accounts With Cash Trader Can't Type? Most Cash Trader operations anO|Ve usrng arrowtyping keys to select what you want to do from a menu of options is reduced to an absolute minimum Randomly accumulated piles of paperwork? Simply enter them as they accumulate Cash Trader puts an end to prevsorting into type and date order Not quite sure of the state of your business? As you »

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enter each transaction. your Profit and Loss Account and Balance Sheet are instantly updated and are constantly displayed. hang up to date. on the upper part of the screen

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Bogged down by VAT? Cash Trader automatically extracts and accumulates VAT and reports on all VAT transactions Can’t use a computer? A comprehensive manual containing key-by-key instruction and copious examples ls only the first step. the Cash Trader program also contains a number of training exerClses which you must master before you can use it With your actual busmess figures In addition to these features. Cash Trader also gives you total flexibility in creatlng your own anaIySls heads and With Analyser. a module which extracts inlormatlon under any crlterla you care to define. you can produce reports and analyses at the touch of a key HM Customs and Excrse recognlzes the smtablllty of Cash Trader reports for VAT purposes and. as a recent reVlew concluded. "Cash Trader Will be welcomed by accountants and auditors alike and should pay for itself Within a month".

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The computer that’s been giving you such a fun time with games now gives you the chance to earn some money. Helping you with word processmg, secretarial work and even runningyour own business. All because of the brilliant new word processing package, the makers of WordStar the world’s SuperScript from MicroPro best selling word processing packages for microcomputers. —

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The build-in spelling checker goes right

through your text. checking for errors. You have the option to correct any error. ignore it, or add the word to its 30,000 word dictionary.

options

SuperScript gives you all the editing options of a Editing business—styleword processor, with full block manipulation for cut-and-paste: overtype or text insertion modes; Search and replace with pattern matching and optional case discrimination; backward search, case shifts for single words or larger blocks of text: And much more.

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If you are a newcomer to word processing. Simple tor the SuperScript puts you immediately at ease. Each command is a single word, and for each command you simply move the cursor. You don’t even have to type the command.

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Powerful for the experienced user

SuperScript also gives you the ability to cut work down to a minimum by storing your own command or text on This means that with a single keystroke you sequences single keys. can reproduce commonly used phrases or multi—lineaddresses from a glossary. load in document formats or execute a prerprogrammed sequence of operatlons.

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Personalised mailings are easy with SuperScript. You can enter the data manually or use data extracted from your spreadsheet or database. Merging can be selective. A mailing labels template is included to help you complete your mailing and you can alter the template to suit your own label format.

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Attentlon Easy Script users! If you're already an Easy Script user. then SuperScript is the obvious next step. With its enhanced features and more powerful facilities, you'll be able to do so much more. There are no compatibility problems either. You can run your Easy Script data or Easy Spell dictionary disks under SuperScript. And by returning your Easy Script disk can obtain an upgrade for £49.95. ,

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The long—awaited GemWrite and Gem Draw have now arrived. Read Jeremy Vine's impressions.

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Technica/Editor: Production Editor: Layout Design: News editor: AdvertisementManager: Advertising Sales: Editorin Chief:

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December 7985

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Subscription rates for 12 issues, post free:

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Published by: Database Publications Ltd, Europa House, 68 Chester Road, Hazel Grove, Stockport SK7 5NY.

all—rights basis. e 1985 Database Publications Ltd. No material may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission. While every care is taken, the publishers cannot be held legally responsible for any errors in articles, listings or advertisements. “A tari User" is an independent publication and Atari Corp (UK) Ltd are not responsible for any of the articles in this issue or for any of the opinions expressed. News trade distribution: Europress Sales and Distribution Limited, 11 Brighton Road. Crawley, West Sussex RH 1 0 SAP. Tel: 0293 27053.

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"Atari User” welcomes program listings and articles for publication. Material should be typed or computer-printed, and preferably double-spaced. Program listings should be accompanied by cassette tape or disc. Please enclose a stamped, self—addressed envelope, otherwise the return of material cannot be guaranteed. Contributions accepted for publication by Database Publications Ltd will be on an

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061-456 8835 Administration: 061—456 8383 Advertising: 061-456 8500 Subscriptions: 061-4800173

Gold,

that thinks it

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Roland Waddilove AndréWilley Peter Glover Heather Sheldrick Mike Cowley John Riding John Snowden Peter Brameld

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Editorial:

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December 1985

No.8

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Managing Editor: Derek Meakin Features Editors: Cliff McKnight Mike Bibby Editorial Team: Alan McLachIan

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Contents

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Checksum

By public demand, Atari User's own check sum program,

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Get It Right! From now on,a|l our listings will be accompanied by a check sum table to help in your debugging.

Graphics

The end of the series, as Dave Russell runs out of graphics modes.

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to Convert your Joystick left-handed the a'd Of a

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pages of letters. This is the bit couldn't do without your help.

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something better? Read. Stephen Donoghues rewew of Basrc XL and

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with Atari Basic? Looking for

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Game Remember Channel 4's television game Countdown? Now you can play the Atari version, with Mike Rowe's program as master of ceremonies.

We've got ten sets of 4 US Gold to give away and all you have games to do IS... read on.

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38 Order Form

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Four pages of offers and one simple form on which you can order everything you need.

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non—standard modes and a non—standard display provide Mike Rowe with the material for the last article in his series.

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FREEBIE .

Disco Your Atari will be the light and soul of the party with Stephen Prince's program to set the lights flashing.

49

This month’s Freebie for Atari Userdisc and tape purchasers is guaranteed to entertain and delight you. And there’s not an alien in Sight. /

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how to produce those special characters from the keyboard, this page will solve all your problems. If

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Page 66

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December 7985 ATARI USER

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At last, your computer can have an Epson printer. Even if it’s only supposed to be compatible with ‘own brand' printers (like Atari). Our latest printer, the GX—80, has a revolutionary new interface called PIC (it means Printer interface Cartridge and that's it on the right). The cartridge slips into the back of the GX—80 and enables the GX to understand commands from the host computer. j 80 if you’ve ever wanted to have an Epson 2};

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printer for your micro but thought you couldn't, here it is. But first, read about the GX—80’s other cracking advantages .

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What happens when change computers? Gone are the days when you had to scrap a perfectly good printer just because it ‘didn't go with’ your new computer. Once bought, your GX—80 stays put. (Epsons tend to stick around for ages anyway; now we’ve taken tradition a little further.) When the time comes to upgrade your computer, you simply go back to your Epson dealer and buy the corresponding new PlC. It’s a far sight cheaper than being forced to sell/scrap out your printer only to buy another one. And in effect it makes the GX-80 your printer for life.


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Sheer, unremitting boredom. The GX—8O takes all the fun out of printer ownership. You can’t shout, “Lousy printer! It’s fouled up again!" because it won’t. It'sjust as reliable as every other Epson. Nor can you gleefully chuck it merely because you’ve PlC’s seen to that. changed computers But all is not lost. You could change your computer a bit more often. Just for fun. —

EPSON

Epson (UK) Ltd., Dorland House, 388 High Road, Wembley, Mlddlesex HA9 6UH. Telephone 01-902 8892.

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Special supplement: Guide to Microcomputing on Prestel. Contains hundreds of page numbers covering games, education and b“3"‘°53 and utility programs for the BBC, App”, Commodore and Spectrum. Plus hints, tips and reviews of comms products.

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S?ence ATARI

bosses

were

prises

the company

I s

being

tight-Iippedabout what

sur-

exhibition in Las Vegas.

Rumours circulating in the trade during the count—down to the show said the firm was poised to announcea numberof new additions to its STfamily— among them a 1mbyte model, the 104OST. One report said the new machine would be offered here with a colour monitor for about £1,000, be upwardly com— patible with both the planned 2605T and existing 5205T,and feature a built—in 720k format— ted capacity disc drive. It was also thought that Atari W0U|d preview its 32 bit workstation, the TI', based 0“ the 32032 DFOCGSSOFBUt sales and marketing manager ROb Harding diSmissed the rumours 85 "pure

speculation, completely Uh“ founded". He toldAtar/User."'l have no knowledge of these products being shown at Comdex, but even if they were it wouldn’t necessarily mean we W0U|d bring them on to the market. "We tend to use exhibitions as Shop Windows to Show we “are capable of producing certain types of products.

”Mass production doesn't after all, necessarily follow look what happened to the —

13OST”.

ATARIispoisedtodominate

the UK micro market this Christmas as a result of striking a multi-million pound deal with Dixons.

It involves the sale of the entire stock of 800XLs some 100,000 machines to the High Street giant. Now Dixons are slashing the price of the 800XL package by —

50 per cent,

THE long—awaited ROM version

operating

system should be available here before Christmas.Butitwillcost ST owners about £25 for the kit to upgrade their machines.

Although the ST

was

originally expected to arrive on the market with a ROM system, the machines sold in the UK up tonow haveallbeen discbased. Many people who bought these machines did so believing they would eventually be ableto

bringing the

cassette version down to just £99.99 in the run up to the festive season. The cut price offer includes an 800XL, joystick, 1010 cass— ette recorder and five pieces of software, which would have usually retailed for a total of

£197. At the

same time the 800 stores in the Dixons chain which now also includes the will also be Currys outlets offering the 800XL with disc drive and three pieces of —

software

at

a

bargain price of

£169.99, down from £300. ”They will be selling an awful lot of 800XLs in the run up to Christmas”, says Rob Harding, Atari UK's marketing boss. "In fact this will mean that this yearAtari will notsimply be

leader

a

but will

actually

dominate the entire market”. The company has gone to considerable lengths to ensure that independent dealers are not left with stocks of 800XLs and so be unable to compete withthe new High Street prices. ButAtari has retainedasmall stock ofthe machinesto ensure that any outstanding Christmas orders can be filled. However production of the

'

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T

A NEW utility enabling one or more RAM discs to be set up on Atari ST micros for increased speed of operation has been released by Kuma Computers. The company says its K—Ram package enables files to be accessed and written to between 40 and 50 times faster than with a normal disc drive. Additional features include 3 Help facility and an option for decreasing floppy disc write times by up to 50 per cent. K—Ram can also enable the user to gain more free RAM by configuring the operating system, says Kuma. Price: £29.95.

”HM "FDA 5208T's

r Is m a s

would

spring on the computer industryatthe giant Comdex

of the

e

.

E A _

make discs—for-ROMs trade-ins at little or no cost. But this is not to be the case. Atari UK marketing boss Rob Harding said: "There will be a small charge to existing ST owners for the upgrade kit. expect it to be about £25. ”I believe this to be reason— able. The disc operating system was never intended to be a stopgap until the ROM version became available. "It has always been an .

I

.

.

.

option, just as the ROMs Will be an option when they become available any day now. “Many existing ST owners aren'tinterested in running Gem programs—they are quite happy with the disc operating system in view of all the 808 software

800XL will now cease, with Atari concentrating on the 130XE as its ongoing machine in the 8 bit market. “We are currently looking into special packages involving 13OXE as well", Rob Harding told Atari User, “and these will be available any day

the

now”.

Production is also to end of the 1010 cassette recorder and this will be replaced by a new XCL model. Made in Japan, this will be powered internally from the 130XE, and will retail at the

price as the 1010 £34.95. Atari has also announced that it is to slash the price of its 1050 disc drive from £199 to £130 "With what we are now same

offering the public, there will be nothing to prevent Atari running away with the market this year", says Rob Harding.

— 1

2-3 clone released

_

AN enhanced Lotus 1-2—3 clone has been released in the United States for the SZOST. Called the VIP Professional, its extrasinclude GEM interface, 16 colours multiple windows, mouse compatibility and DU” down menus.

Available from VlP Tech-

nologies of Santa Barbara, California, its current $99 price claimed to be three times tag lower than that of its rival is d u e to rise to $149 in November. A full tutorial is included in the price. _

_

that

is available". An informed source says the 5208T ROM chips are currently

completing their Beta testing before going into full duplication and should be available soon.

_ December 7985 ATARI USER

9


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Hacker em" ator ATARI

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usertodecidehowtoproceedin search of information which will help save the world.

The usual instruction book and hints have been deliberately left out so once the computer has been given the logon command the user is on his 0W”-

Prices are {14-99 forthe diSC version and E999 for cassette.

house Software celebrating its first birthday this month.by giving presents to its customers.

..'

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ware.

One is for the best birthday card designed by computer graphics and can be submitted either as a print out or screen photograph. In the seCOnd competition contestants have to guess the actual day in December on which the firm's birthday falls. The third competition involves identifying a product in the firm's catalogue with the

.. .

BI RTH DAY

currently negotiating for the rights.to the p-System, min/operating system for software de—

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general In Howells said: addition each week during the

.

a

selected range

.

.

Include high Other topics quality code generators, low

managerJerry month

WIN/766

g” is

whose company

cryptic clue. Software Express

help of

W1”

The'keynote address

be delivered by

BO NANZA

owners

three free competitions offering prizes of software and hard—

main on the agenda at topics the eighth USUS—UK con— ference at Oxford Moat HOUSE, December 72 to 14.

g

917"

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who have bought goods from the firm have been sentan entryform for

ADV/CE and information about p-System for the Atari szosr will be one of the

,

MAIL order

Atari

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Express

the 520 ST

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p-System for

,

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1/5

emulate hackers the electronic bur— glars who break into computer but without fear Of systems being caught. it is all thanks 10 a NEW adventure—type game called Hacker from Activision. The company claims it is a challeng— ing simulation of what a user might experience if he were 10 "accidentally stumble" into a foreign system, The aim of the game isforthe users

i

"M ,,

of

cost

Will have their prices products down the bone. to cuturight we have a And will [also speCial phone-in Make us an offer' service where customers beinVited to name their own will prices for the goods they want.

ing,

CAD systems, network~ there Will be

and.

presentations by software that

houses mu/ti-user

have developed applications. .

Overseas companies this attending. year'include

Stride Micro and Com— Elia pater from America, Focus from Germany, f’O’" Versal Sweden and Symbiotic from Norway.

0 The Software Express team picture above (left to right) Ken Howe/ls, Jerry Howells, Mike Jones and Pete Fellows.

.

at

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ment environment for the 800. Among many features nor— mally only found on mini and “in?ame systems isthe abi'itv to run Simultaneous tasks on the

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joystickforthe

built to withstand

claims immense punishment, Cheetah Marketing. It also has three fire buttons. Two the trigger and thumb buttons are on the moulded handgrip. The third, for twohanded firing, is on the base. There is also an auto fire switch. The base can either be hand held or stuck firmly on a table using its under base suckers. Price: £8.95. —

10 ATAR/ USER

Used in conjunction with a serial comms card the system allows the 800 to be used as a multiuser development system or to serVice several. incoming

December 7985

on

a

board buugt'n Price: £4995“

Simultaneously. _—""———

TEACH_IN FOR THE ST PUBLISHERS Glentop are producing a range of teachyourself style books for the SZOST. Titles have yet to be finalised but five books are due, covering subjects such as an introduction to the machine, Basic, machine code, ST Logo, graphics and the advanced user.

,.

» -

approval is

pForth, multitasking system from Bignose Software said to

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New l’nk to THE near letter quality GX—80 nine—pin dot matrix printerfrom Epson features a printer inter— face cartridge which makes it compatible with the Atari 600 and 800XL. Based on the LX—80 laun— ched earlierthisyear, the printer a

new

method

of

connecting up to a computer. At its back, instead of the normal Centronics connector, there is a space for users to fit the PIC of their choice with a cable and plug all in one. An optional tractor feed and cut sheet feeder for word processing input are available.

v.

.

.

.

features

z,

.

mlcro

Printing

is

bi—directional in

draft at 100 characters per second and 160ps second pass, in Roman NLQ.

The printer incorporates fount selection from the front panel to give choice of Pica, Elite and Roman as well as condensed and emphasised, double strike Pica.

Italics, sub/superscript, emphasised, enlarged and underlining are also available through Epson software control. Price of the GX-80 is £249, the printer interface cartridge E50, sheet feeder £55 and tractor unit £20.


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_ DISTRIBUTOR

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_

Com—

puters chose to step back into the past when introducing the latest Atari technologyto 100 of its dealers from the Midlands and North. The company hired a steam engine and old fashioned car— riages preserved and operated by the North Yorkshire Moors Steam Railway fora scenic trip from Pickering to Grosmont. During the Journey a range of .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

,

.

.

products from Atari, including the new 8 bit 13OXE and 16 bit 5208T were demonstrated. Guests from as far south as Birmingham Viewed the new range of products now available to them courtesy of Eltecs recent contract With Atarigivmg it distribution rights throughout the North. Eltec sales and marketing director Roger Purssglove said .. afterwards. Both products .

.

,

.

.

.

.

.

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.

.

demonstration

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total package but also fill a large gap in the market ,, at an extremely realistic price Atari UK sales and marketing manager Rob Harding desembed the novel computer

.

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received. The

Atari machines not only offer

.

.

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very well

were

.

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.

.

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fiCial busmess relationship tween Eltec and Atari

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THE controversial war game Theatre Euro e from PSS has been releasgd for the Atari 400/800 XL series Based around. a conflict between Nate and the Warsaw Pact countries, Theatre Europe is a Simulation of the pOSSIble outcome of World War III. The player has the choice of Sides With the computer as the opponent. Chemical or nuclear weapons may be used to the pomt of world destruction. Price is £9 95 .

.

.

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.

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of published in a recent issue Nugget, the user group 5 news— letter, attacking piracy. "This to have article appears Atari owner andl upsetacertain have received a hoax parcel and letters thanking several me for prOViding contacts dealing 'n_ software told Atari ,he pirated

“m;naggresswe

UseK/I y name is b eing use d on disc files containing pirated software Which are being

.

opponent

,

an d outspo k en

of the micro cheats,

Ward believes the current campaign against him was spar k e d b y an ar t' 'C e h e -

,

.

a r

THE preSident of an Atarruser group has become the Victim of tech character assassinahigh tion. Ken Ward, leader of the Norwich User Group, says smear tactics are used to being his name W'th ”Rk software the Atari frater— piracy among

.

.

.

I

half a lot of years have put work into building up a respec— table group and newsletter. ”We have gained a status and respect that is the envy of other groups. “We have members all over the country and we are slowly gaining the confidence of the software industry. ..| don‘t intend to let a sick A ta” user U“ d “mme t h at respect and confidence, .. and am ma k'm9 my own e n qUirie etc try and track down this person and get more evidence so can take action against him. I

,

-

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.

.

passed around the Atari com— muni 't y. 0 ver the p ast two and a

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—————————————————

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F0 U R FOR TH E STs SOFTWAREhouse Microdea/has licensedfourprogramsfor the Atari ST range from American publisher Michtron and will be releasing them during the nextmonth. They are an arcade game, Mudpies, anda boardgame, F/ipside, each priced£79.95,a Ram disc emulator, M—Disc, and a print spooler, Softspool, each at

£29.95.

SOFTWARE house Activision released its text/graphic adventure Mindshadow for the Atari 800XE and XL. The player finds himself on a deserted beach suffering from amnesia and must make a has

l

“This speCimen

that

particular IS

he '5 an

“He's

under

the

nasty de|U§10n

intelligent Atarian.

wrong

snivelling little

he's just

a

pirate who

should be put down before he does any more damage".

complex journey round the world to rediscover his identity. Described as "a living com—

novel", Mindshadow

puter

costs {14.99 on disc. .

S c" f.I adventure WORM

.

_

,

the Fh'rd Paradise, part of the Silicon Dream trilogy from Level 9 Computing has been released for the Atari 48k machines. It fo||ows Snowball and Return to Eden and is described as a political science fiction adventure set a future state in. has gone where something With man S dreams and lNrOng Ideals and the player has to beat the system and escape to reality. Price: £9.95. '”

.

3_

December 1985 ATARI USER

77


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_____—__________

Research, responsible for the Gem operating system, has now got its act together and is producing packages to take the fullest advantage of the Gem working environment. two of these The first Gem are about to appear which the bundled is Write, and Gem word processor, Draw, a software package for diagrams and drawings. Here are JEREMY VINE's impressions of them both.

launched to expectant computer audience eager to use the latest technology at a fraction of the

THE Atari ST

was

an

price.

The thorn in the side of the launch was the conspicuous absence of software, including a large amount of the bundled packages to be included with the machine. This is no longer the case, with a wide range of software beginning to appear. Digital

WORD PROCESSING is almost certainly the most common appli— cation in business computing. Even f°f the “we a W“ pm... has become an essential package to possess. Gem Write is a basic word processor which offers the essential commands for writing documents. As a thrown-in part of the ST wasn't expecting too package, much. So how did it fare? As a technical journalist have probably used more word processors than care to remember, and one outstanding feature of most packages

— -

Easy to get along WIth ye t pa we, f u I enoug h f or th e a vera 9 9 user

I

I

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whoever that may be. It would not be an exaggeration to say that all of Gem Write's com— mands can be learned in the same time it would take to learn the basics of another package. This owes much to the Gem philosophy. user

the amount of time it takes to become acquainted with just the rudimentary commands, let alone all the facilities. Gem Write is almost unique in being delightfully simple to use yet powerful enough to offer sufficient facilities to provide for the average is

On loading Gem Write the user is faced with a blank window. The

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74 ATARI USER

December 1985

-

-

only move the cursor to the beginning of the text to be affected and drag the cursor mouse button held down over the desired area. This causes the text to be highlighted in inversevideo white text on a black background. It is then only necessary to choose the desired command from the —

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Using the mouse, the user need

3

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facilities of inserting, deleting and centering lines and movmg, copying and deleting blOCkS Of teXt- These commands, as for many others, rely on the user the text to be highlighting affected that IS, moving a block of text. This couldn't be simpler. —

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The Edit menu offers the standard

5 E

cursor, a flashing bar, can be moved to any part of the screen by using the keyboard arrow keys or the mouse pointer. This doubling up on com— mands is present throughout the package and allows interaction between mouse and keyboard controls oriust keyboard, though the former is the most likely scenario. The typing starts from wherever the cursor is placed and text is automatically wrapped round at the


STSoftware

________,

commands using the keyboard function keys, sometimesin conjunction with the Control or Shift keys. But that’s old fashioned. Well, it’s there if you like it that way. In a similar way the Font menu can pull—down menus. These can be carried out by

to change the style of the text. This turned out to be quite a be used

disappointment, as there was little choice of styles, Gem Write only allowing the text to be printed in normal, bold or italic print, plus the facility of underlining. In comparison, Gem Draw reviewedbelow had more text variety on offer, which seemed slightly strange. It would have been no problem to provide a range of font styles, and this was certainly a weak point in this package. All changes made to text are shown on screen, which makes a pleasant change tojust seeing control codes all over the place, Howeverthese —

codes pressing

can be seen a

by the user on

function key.

Graphics can be cut into the text using the Insert Graphics command

GEM DRAW is one of two drawing packages to be released by Digital Reseamh, the other being e eeeie painting package, Gem Paint. Gem

Draw is intended as a computerised drawing board, allowing the user to mix text and graphics on-screen, to create diagrams or drawings. Like all Gem packages, Gem Draw takes full advantage of the Wimp (windows, icons, mouse,pointer) system andthe package is entirely controlled from

from the File menu, as can text from another document. Whereas inserted text appears in the document, graphics from Gem Draw or Gem Paint did not on my version. It seems that an embedded command is placed at the appropriate spot in the document and on printing the picture is cut into the document. The user can specify to see the picture

which was annoying. A Shortcuts option on the Options menu acted as a help guide to the function keys, which was necessary as there is no way to remember what each function key did on the ST keyboard.

VERDWT: As part Of the ST package Gem Write is a 900d

using the Turn Graphics On command, though l could not get this to work. Rulers, tabs and margins can all be set from the Page menu, as can the format of the document — justification, pagination, line spacing, page length, margin, etc. The Search menu allows text to be found and replaced, the user also being able to specify which page to be shown on screen. At the end of each physical page,

word

processor.

itseparately

|

reservations.

H

|

had to

buy

WOU|C| have more hit as it Stands

Gem Write does its joband Wi“ needs Of many 5T owners. WOUId be more than happy to use it and probably WillMY only gripe was that it did not haveaword count facility— useful to us journalists, bUt maybeljust expect tOO much. The more demanding Of us may have to wait for another word bUt as a processor, freebie P30kage really can't SUit the

|

notthe screen page,apage—breakline is shown. The arrow keys on the keyboard allow the document to be scrolled in either direction vertically, with jumps of a page facilitated by use of the arrow and Control key. However there didn’t appear to be a means Of scrolling by each screen,

Ge

|

complain.

D raw

m

— -

Not a prOfeSS’ona’ CAD pac k age] b u t lt’s I’ne ln lts I’ne -

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the mouse.

'

The menu bar runs across the top of the screen and offers eight pull—down menus, excluding the Desk one. They are used in conjunction with a range of drawing tools shown vertically on the left of the window. Options range from drawing cir— cles, ellipses, rectangles and squares to the user drawing in his own free—hand style. Text can also be

freely mixed into the drawing. But more of this later. When first loaded Gem Draw displays a blank area within the window on which the user draws. However it is not the entire area on which the final output will be printed,

but merely a window on a much larger drawing board. Moving the mouse pointer over the second option on the vertical menu causes Gem Draw to show a reduced version of the entire board. This is particularly useful on plans and diagrams that spill beyond the drawing area usually shown. It is also of assistance when using the Zoom facility (see later). When anything is drawn, regardless of size or shape, a box is immediately placed around it. The boxed area defined is determined by the end of a drawing action by the user. In other words, once the user

releases the mouse button which usuallytriggersthe particulardrawing event the last element drawn is —

surrounded by a box. At a later stage the user can then place the mouse pointer over a certain part ofthe picture and find out how many elements make up that

area of the drawing. Each of these boxed areas can be moved independently on the screen. This means that a drawing of say, a camera, might be made up of several component parts, each of which can be separately manipulated.

If the lens of the camera

is

_-—-> December 7985 ATAR/ USER

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appropriate size. Once the mouse button is released box is shown around the drawing element completed. Before going any further, the user can at this stage use the Pattern, Line or Colour menus to complete the drawing element. The Pattern menu displays 39 shading patterns which fill the area shown by the box. Therefore if the user hasjust drawnasquare it can be filled in by pulling down the Pattern a

choosing a specific pattern

brick wall, vertical lines, and so on. Like all Gem commands, the mouse needs only to be clicked over the desired option and the shape is redrawn with the chosen pattern filling the area within the shape. The Line menu allows the user to choose how thick a line is drawn, whether it is broken, dotted or connected, and also adds a nice touch —

December 1985

=

t

*

A wide choice of lines available

button. The pointer then changes shape from an arrow to a cross—hair and the option chosen is highlighted by a black background. Executing the drawing action is then a case of holding down the left mouse button and dragging the

76 ATARI USER

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surrounded by a boxed area the user can then remove the lens by pointing to the box and dragging the lens to another part of the drawing. In this way the user can breaka drawing into its smaller component parts and fit them together at a later stage to make a complete picture. The options for drawing ellipses, circles, rectangles and squares are activated by placing the pointer over

the

7,

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Gem Draw: A delight to use

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of placing arrows at the ends of lines very useful if you are drawing flowcharts.

Finally there is a colour menu to choose a drawing colour, providing of course that you have a colour

monitor. If using a monochrome monitor there is only a choice ofblack or white.

There is, of course, a File menu which offers all the usual filing

utilities

such as

Saving and Loading

pictures, and the output to a printer. The format of the page document size, etc— is changed using the Page menu,as is the use ofgrids and rulers. The size of the grid can be changed using one of six preset sizes and 3 ruler can be displayed horizontally along the top of the window if needed. The Page menu offers also a Zoom facility which, as the name suggests, allows a specific area of the drawing to be shown in closer detail. This is an excellent method of touching—up and examining the finer details of a —

drawing. As the zoom facility is used the picture often zooms into an area which the user does not wish to enlarge. This is where viewing the entire drawing board is useful, as the user can then see exactly what area is being magnified (shown by an outline box). The outline box represents the window in which the user works, and this window can then be placed over the area to be magnified. Text can be placed anywhere on the screen and the Font menu allows the user to specify different character

fonts, size, italics, and so on. It was interesting to note that the Font menu offered more choice than the equivalent option in Gem Write. Elements of a drawing can be deleted,and undeleted, using the Edit menu, which also has a Duplicate option to make a copy of any drawing element. Finally comes what wasfor me the best part of Gem Draw—the Arrange menu, which aids the user in placing

objects or elements of a picture wherever the user desires. Drawings can be specifically placed behind or in front of another drawing. The user merely has to identify the drawing element and then place it over another drawing. Thefacilitycan alsoaligndrawingson the screen, as well as centering drawings on the page.

VERD'CT: A“ in all, Gem Draw was a delight to use and like Gem Write could be put to work immediately. “3 useswill “0 doubt be varied, though it W3“ probably appeal to less

professional useFor computer aided design applications the package does "01 have sufficient options to make it a professional's tool. A pity really, hilt l suspect this is N“

the

intended

market.

enjoyed Having said that, using the package and it is a |

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addition to my P70-

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With MicroLink your micro becomes a terminal linked directly to the Telecom Gold mainframe computer, and able to tap its tremendous power and versatility. Right away you’ll be able to use giant number-crunching programs that can only run on a mainframe. You can set up your own store and update computerised filing systems. statistics and other information. cross-reference material between files, selectively extract the information you want, perform massive calculations and design reports to display information from any of the files and in any format YOU ChOOSQ-

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The modem equivalent of the telegram is the telemessage. which if sent before 8pm undelivered ay by first post the following day (except Sis Originally designed for people to phone their message via the operator. the service costs £350 for 50 words. Now it’s available via MicroLink and costs only £1.25 for up to 350 words! .

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MicroLink is setting up a central store of software programs which you’ll be able to download directly into your micro. The range will

Incoming telex: 5013 for each CO‘TeCtly addressed telex delivered to your mailbox. Obtaining a mailbox reference from the sender incurs a further charge of 50p. It is not possible to deliver a telex without a mailbox without a a telex reference. If mailbox isvreceived. reference the sender will be advised of nondehvery and asked to provide a mailbox address. Each user validated for telex and using the facility will

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charge of 6 storage units a month, Further storage charges could be incurred depending on the amount of telex storage and the use made of short COde and message ?le ”dunes“

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Billing and Paymentle charges quoted

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.


METACOMCO PRESENTS ITS NEW RANGE OF SOFTWARE FOR THE ATARI ST: A SET PROGRAMMINGLANGUAGES FOR PEOPLE WHO WANT TO WRITE PROGRAMS FOR THE ST. OF POWERFUL

P

MA 680 MAT/WIN? with linker

£49.95

A high specification macro assembler, complete and screen editor. Assembler is a fundamentallanguage, useful for all kinds of programming particularlywhere speed and compactnessare important.Essential for all serious programmerswhowant -

to exploitthe ST’s full potential.

b MH/I

PAM/ll

£89.95

A powerfulPascal compilerdesigned to meet the exacting ISO standard. This Pascal is already widely used on the Sinclair 0L and the CommodoreAmiga. Afast, single pass compiler, generating native code. Complete with screen editorand an extensive user manual.

AVAILABLESOON:

The well knownLattice C compiler: afull Kernighan and Ritchie implementationwith LamceisatrademarkofLATTlCElNC. comprehenSiVB libraries. ALL METACOMCO’S LANGUAGES FOR THE ATARI ST INCLUDE METACOMCO’S POPULAR SCREEN EDITOR, AND A DETAILED MANUAL.

b

Metacomco are leading suppliers of systems software for 68000 based microcomputers. As well as these titles forthe Atari ST, Metacomco haveavery successful range ofprogramming Ianguagesforthe Sinclair OL, now widely used throughoutthe world. Metacomco was also chosen by Commodore to provide the operating system and a suite of languages for the new Amiga computer.

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| | | l


From

.

.

.

Computer Support A fine selection

of software and hardware directly from Its makers Something for every A TA RI * enthusiast

.

1

ULTIMON!

519-95 BAD SECTOR hardware modification. Write bad sectors to any disk, can be used for custom creation of bad sectors or to backup some protected disks. Comes complete with sector writer and speed checking software.

£49.95

built in machine code monitor capable of st ping any program on the fly, functions include: DISPLAY/ALTER REGISTERS/MEMSJETY, MOVE MEMORY, FIND STRING, SINGLE STEP, DISASSEMBLE MEMORY, FORMAT DISK, READ FROM DISK, WRITE TO DISK, and many more. This is the most powerful and the lowest priced on—board monitor available for the ATARI', don't take our word for it, try one! A

A

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80 COLUMN PACK! £69.95 A built in 80 COLUMN text mode, enabled by holding the [SELECT] key down during powerup. Great for word processors, works on a normal TV. Compatible with most software.

”EM/“9,95

A_

NEW 5935 memw“

Th‘ '5

THE GAP!

£29 95 Fill with this hardware modification, once fitted to a 48K mactheine 4thap t ere wi inlrgur52?(O/f800 e 0 user RAM. Can be used on 16K & 32K machines. PI “9 in insiaiianon. OVER—WRITE!

'

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_

féz'ghzlfgnsi‘éfj

£14.95

“DISK BACKUP

NEWl-OWPRICE 59-95

Density smart, fully automatic.

“128K DISK BACKUP Same '

as

NEWLOWPRICE?Z-SS

above but specifically for the extra memory of the 130XE.

Sold subject to not infringing Copyright.

AVAILABLE: MAILING usr £72.95, B/ORHYTHMS £7.95, ZAPPING ZOMBIES £6.95, ULT/L/TY PAC ONE £8.95, UT/L/TY PAC TWO £8.95, UTILITY TAPE ONE £7.95, MACRO LIBRARY £12.95, CARTR/DGE BACKUP £75'95’ CASSETTEBACKUP £995 and SERIAL l/O PLUG £299 OTHER PRODUCTS

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ROM EMULATOR! NEW LOW PRICE £19.95 Develop and debug cartridge software quickly and effectively, just write to a specific then the RAM area becomes ROM. can also be used to backup cartridge location cartridges For 8K & 16K programs, can be switched out if not required.

Tel: 01‘31

MappingtheAtariXL/XE Machine Language forBeginner

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7339

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£16.95 £11.95 £11.95

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1+freeprinterandmndemcahle) £79900 520 ST with 500k Disk Drive + Med-Res Colour (+freeprinterandmodemcablel 09900 520 ST with mom Disk + Med-Res Colour Fidelity

Fidelity Monitor

£949.00

Monitor

sr500kDiso0rive+2iree3yDisks £14900

STlUUOkDIskDrive+2fr9931'1”Disks£19900 STFideIityCDIourMonitnr...,..,..,...,........,,,..,.,..........,,.........................£199.00 STPrinterDrModemCahIe CALI. AtariColourMonitDr cm EpsonLX~80Printer £23900 STMonitDrStand £2995

cALL

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CALI. 10500iso0riveioosz5+shiankiiisks) CALL 5%”Blank0isks(eachl £145

MusicalAtari lst Book of Atari

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AtariRSZ32Int9rface

(ringforbostdcal)

£3995

5011115"?! Pole Posmon

810

£7.95

£1995 £795 Printerlnitialiser £995

£1515

Une?n?ne SmashHitsl SmashHits2 SmashHit53

£1435 “4-95

SummerGames

N/A

£14.95

C?l?sussf-‘hess

£935

FlSStrikeEaule

N/A

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Packman Oveniiirite

N/A {12-95 £12.00

RescueFrDmFractuIas

£1435 £935 NM £1135 £1235 59-95 £1235

Uuasim?do

Utilities:

Gums

prZone

Centivede

£5995

£150 510-9“

Disk

£935

Encounter

Printers

CM!

SDIoFIight

Mercenary

£350 syaiankuisksieachi AtariDorMahixPrimer...........................,.............,.............,................f.CALL TurboPrintInterface

BUUHWB“

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N/A

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£1230

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BasicTooIkit Mai:

65

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£75.00 Toolkit

Toolkit

USlDoubIer

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£50.00 £27.95

RedMoon

“PP“ Rai'sww SUPE'ZHXW"

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Sorcerer MaSk

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20 ATARI USER

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Bad Sector

£27.95 £75.00 £27.95 £79.95 £49.95 £09.95

December 7985

x03 Translator 1020 FourCquurPictureDump Ultra

Disassembler

UtilityPackUne UtilityPackTwu BasicXE

DEDUCT 500 FROM EACH GAMES SOFTWARE PRICE £19.95 £9.95 £10.50 £35.95

£795 £795 £75.00

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£935 £935

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£17.00 £17.00 £14.95 £10.95

non...

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(+Ireeprimerandmudemcable),_,,_,_,_______,_,,_____,___________........,....,.......£749,011 520 ST with mom Disk Drive + BlW Hi-Res Monitor

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NEWLOWPRICEETQS d'Sk

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completely revised operating system for the ATARI” XIJXE range. Compatible with more software than the original XL/XE 0.8. with XOS you'll probably never have to use the TRANSLATOR again. XOS also has some totally unique functions including: CARTRIDGE OVERIDE, FORCED WARMSTART, ANTI~COLDSTART, FASTER CASSETTE, HOLD [OPTION] T0 ENABLE BASIC, and many more. xos comes free With 80 COLUMN PACK and ULTIMON (XL/XE version: only).

FILE LOADER

XOS

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NEW£9.95 and presets printerdefaults,

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TRANSLATOR

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An autumn/batch file that automatically flushes the printer such as font styles etc. Completely reprogrammable.

high quality printed circuit board allowing the ATARI“ XL/XE range to have 3 separate operating systems on one machine, selectable before powerup. Very easy installation.

¥hos e operatin th f f system desc "b d b TRAN 3 LAT o R. can have allgthe functions Zfexcfs‘??e'? We“ $5233.51“,

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A NEW is

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found that it was guy who Sorcerer gave and Hitch—Hiker's, and that it was only available for the ST, being much too large and complex to fit into the 8 bit range, was doubly interested. Thus, the very next day, thanks to the efficient staff at Software Express, | sat down at my desk, powered up the ST, and placed the A Mind Forever Voyaging disc in the drive. Add l suddenly discovered that my entire life to date was nothing more than an electronic illusion created inside the massive memory banks of the Prism super-computer. This fact is, perhaps, a little disconcerting, so l'lI explain: Early in the 21st Century, Doctor Abraham Perelman was involved in a project that would bridge the gap between computer "Expert Systems" and the workings ofthe human brain. He proposed an artificial intelligence simulation which mimicked in every way the

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provide the substance of the simulation fed into Prism. It would be fed from the outside world with everything a normal child could see and hear, and its reactions to this

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)w91m watch the recording Pereisaa iaais intrigued. "tou‘ve recorded somtlliag eh? Let a: yet a few at 59 isterestil’, l'l let gal be! together, and we’ll view the buffer. teen we're close, celleaztes a as?" lle leaves the roan. Mater sun a ttaa note 1

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siisn. Pragect iasttei Ceater tau see a large, vell-orgamzed rm tilled iiitl'l basis at tem'uls at similar lies- awl receptors but up the buzz of has meet-sans. wetsuit. Bet-er drains lS Sitting in a swivel chair, reading a 1m mat-t.

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a small boy up in Downtown Rockvil. He went through all of the normal growth pains of any child in middle America. He got lost in the local supermarket, was bullied at school. wanted to become a

was growing

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input would cause the Widetion to alter accordingly. This process would take many years to complete, ill the same way that the human learning process takes many

5,

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When

w

é; 7? 3

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Securlt BLUE

10

as

and

node. Far access, eater >is 20

years in the

intro.

tie

Security

illusion

generated by the

mind? As they talked, everything around him simply faded away, and he heard the voice of Abraham Perelman, talking

for the firSt time directly

10 his creation, Prism. Given this background, you are also informed that the world situation is grim. Crime and urban decay are rampant, and there is extreme and poverty. overpopulation

a Plan Renewed proposed for the Nat'or-‘a' Pumse arid mtem'on '5 to use Pnsm to create and study the effects of this plan on a simulation of the W0“ 10 years hence. if this were an Ofdlnarv adventure, you would expect to play Perelman and the computer would follow your orders to gather. information. However this is no ordinary this is a e _ art n adventulref— statz—of— an gag}? a“33 ”5“ V°“ “ma V Pay must explore for yourself reporting back to Perelman via the keyboard. You can contact him, and '

_

_

_

To";

_._______> December 7985 ATARI USER

27


m

other members of the research

team, via communications outlets around the establish— ment (a little like Hal’s voice/ vision terminals in the film

2001). You may also communicate any one of the five

with

simulation control computers and give them new instruc~ tions. You can even tie into a vast library and into the world news network. received my instructions I

from Dr. Perelman, and activated the simulation mode. After entering the

cassette—based adventure, things would end there, but not with Infocom. Perelman also told me that had the information that provided had enabled his team to extend the simulation by a further 10 years. He seemed rather tbo busy to give me further detailed instructions, so, being the inquisitive computer I am, I set off to see for myself. .. And the world has become a shadowy place, full of gloom and suspicion. The secret I

relevant colour codes from the provided in the package, I was transported from my cosy world of 2031 into a simulation of 10 years hence. A map of Rockvil circa 2031 is provided, but this

with. Gone are the tricky prob— lems and funny solutions of Steve Meretzky's last game, The Hitch-Hiker’s Guide to the an excellent game in Galaxy and in their its own right place isafrighteninglyrealistic view of a future we all hope we can prevent. I'll let you know how I get

Against this nightmare

of 1984 and Brave New World, the saga

combination continues. can

recomto anyone who likes a challenge and wants to get the most I

mend

Th

code—wheel

from their ST, as it is perhaps the most fascinating concept that Infocom has yet come up

raid my house, and terrify Jill. My brother seems to be in some sort of trouble. The plan has obviously backfired, and it seems to be up to me to find out why, and warn Perelman before it's too late. police

thoroughly

this

adventure

Id 2

André Willey

to

n

uch

ca 5

sa ves

a

on.

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IF

£612 aioumvgjg: snifSiiigrezliii landmarks, as much develop— ment has taken place by now, ‘s a lot Of crty to

22501er

took the underground to the other srde of the City, being careful to record myjourney to I

.

.

.

play back to Perelman later, and a meal at a rather had expensive restaurant. Qurckly finding out wherel |' I then tracked ived, down my “me and V's'ted J'” apartment and our little-baby. Those familiar With Infocom prose will know that the take place are that. vrvrdly described, and take 0" the same degree of reality that agood novel would as you lose

8,“ij

”721592énn'gfapsafef'om any .

Infocom. titles,

however,

the

Sgsmo‘rfh £2 zgo‘bTertis—slcflv'ig;

control of the situation you're involved in °Ut Y_°U mid rntrrgurng Of about F't‘bfts information. life the future, meeting and in to people as YOU 90chatting SH”: I 500" fOU"d that l had completed all the tasks set by I reverted to Perelman, and mode to tell communication. “If“ what |d and discovered, based on my Information, the plan was approved. -

_

_

.

_

Perhaps 22 ATARI USER

on

a

standard

December 7985

you've had your Atari for any

length

Of

and you re at

time

all

wssfsffijlerdgibnensoi’ijtgewfvc; i

|

fortune Th e two

pornts

aren

is «s_

.

'

.

Tapper, Up'n Down, Spy Hunter and Zaxxon.

Tapper is one of those owes its ga mes which existence to the old stage act of Spinning plates on sticks. The idea is that you've got four soda counters to look after. You must slide sodas along to the customers and collect the

l’

£555

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unrelated. It costs money to import software. In the past I've been sent free review copies of software from the States and been charged an arm and a leg in VAT, import duty and Post Office handling charges. Of course more games get written in America because the Atari market is bigger over there. Not fair, is it? Fortunately, US Gold is in to business solve this?problem. Basrcally, Gold buy a game from America in the form of a licence and sell itlover here at prices. llehss—than—Statesme at way American we get games at British prices. The latest batch of games to be released by US Gold are

nod

x

as:

,

_

P au 5 e

l:

g

xiii

lot of

things. Firstly,_a games n A m e ri c a o r g l n ate Secondly, they cost a small

6

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.

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YOU

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If you miss an empty empties. glass it crashes to the ground and that's one of your "lives" gone. other way you _The faills by being over—zealous and-sliding a soda when there isn t a thirsty customer—not like any bar I’ve ever been in! When you slide a soda the customer retreats and the way to complete a level is to satisfy all customers. On level it's not too dif?cult. Of course things get harder as you work your way up the levels, with more customers '

.

1

and

consequently

more

empties. There are also bonus

rounds when you must watch carefully. The Soda Bandit shakes ?ve of the six soda cans on the bar and shuffles them then around. You ve got to open the unshaken can. Success brings a big bonus, failure brings a faceful of soda. It's a frantic game which has you leaping about while trying to develop strategies. It's also slightly unusual for an arcade game in that it's essentially non—violent. The worst that happens is that glasses get broken~no worse than the average home. Up'n Down is a bit hard to


terrain the weapons truck 4 3 3a

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£94 PP?

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appears and you can get some more weapons. To do this you must let the truck pass you and then "dock"into the back of it. It took me a bit of time to get the hand of Spy Hunter— I kept shooting innocent moto— rists and getting the "No Points" message. Once got the hang of it, though, it was fun to play. Finally, Zaxxon is one of the all—time classics. It was one of the first games to give the impression of 30 by using a sort of diagonal scroll. “Height" in the playfield is controlled by forward and backward joystick movement, with lateral movement being controlled correspondingly. I

gas;

”g iii i!”

P ,

Up'n Down.

. .

cans and chaos

describe. lt's a sort of car—driv— ing game, but not in the Pole Position mould. The road is a narrow latticework that scrolls down the screen and as soon as you press the joystick forward your car starts along the road. Every so often there are flags and as you pass them they turn white. Completing the “level" involves turning all the flags white. To hinder you there are trucks going in your direction. if you hit them you disintegrate. There are also wrecks sliding back down the screen, and ifthey hityou it's curtains. Because there isn‘t much of the road system on screen at any one time, you don't get

any warning of either the trucks or the wrecks. Also,

Since you're constantly moving forward, you don’t

thing.

Spy Hunter is another driving game, but more in the

have to worry about the third dimension. However you do have to worry about the many hazards, bOth passive and active. On

Fliver Raid genre. You are a world classspydrivingforyour life. The road is crawling with enemy agents bent on your destruction and they'll stop at nothing, so neither can you. What this means in practice is another vertically scrolling screen. The game starts with the weapons truck pulling over and your car sliding out of the back, armed with machine guns. The road branches as you move forward and you've got to be careful to stay on the road. The enemy agents will soon have you crashing off so there's a fair bit of dodging as well as shooting. Each time you enter a new

THERE was once

time when

a

the average price for Atari software was about £30. Then along came Jack Tramiel. Hardware prices tumbled and in their wake software prices fell. Nowadays, with most pro— grams costing around £10,

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considerably

Without

realising

it, I've

arranged them roughly

in

"violence" order, from Tapper with its broken glasses to Zaxxon with its full—scale destruction. arcade fan, chances are one of them would suit you. As an arcade addict, I've been spoilt for choice, shoot-’em-up If

you're

an

Pat Cookson

n

ultimate in mayhem

anything for less than a ?ver is regarded with suspicion. So it was with some apprehension that l 3pm“ched Smart Art, a graphics picture—drawing utility from P.F. Software that retails at £3,50_ Could it really be any good for such a small amount? Well, Smart Art certainly lacks the sophistication of the Atari Touch Tablet and its accompanying graphics cartridge, but that does cost well over 10 times as much. included with the package is a demonstration picture Mickey Mouse in magician's uniform in a scene reminiscent of Disney's Fantasia which proves that it is possible with skill and practice to produce high quality graphic pictures with Smart Art. On loading the program a of cursor appears at the screen and a statuscecijwtrel ay isp the lS at the bottom. Usmg a ~—

.

.

Zaxxon-

until

—-

1

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one

which l ll iust have one more game go l" lt's challenging enough to be fun if you like that sort of

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of those games had me saying "silly '

It's

-

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.

JUSt to keep th'"95 movrng, whole game IS timed, w_|th the different bonuses depending fast you complete the

s.

-

Y

.. -.

which

l

'

4

Four games

recently would have cost

e u n l O c kl“ s l ra h I c s t a I e “t

'

.

game. So there you have them.

-

because the road system isn't

_

many versions around. If you've ever played it you'll know that it is a great arcade

.

Ver extensive, there's often "0 way Of dodging either foCkS °f wrecks. HOWEVEV the car 13 unusual in that it canjump. Landing on VO‘" opponents brings points, 3'50 jump from bUt you can road to one section of the another. You can iump Off the too, bUt that loses you a road

the passive side there are all sorts of things into which you can fly, with the resultin loss of life. On the active sidegthere are missile silos, enemy aircraft and lethal electronic barriers. The chances are that you've seen Zaxxon in one of the

_

.

December 7985 ATARI USER

23


_ W

joystick the

can be moved around the 160 x 150 pixel graphics screen and a line or single pixel plotted. Initially three colours and a background colour» useful for erasing — are available. Any of the three can be changed by se|ec?ng from Atari’s large palette of colours. To obtain more the colour registers can be changed part way down the screen and the new 0010“, used for any drawing done below the level of the change. Up to 80 colours can be displayed on the screen at once. Four brush sizes are available that affect the size of plotted pixels and there is an airbrush mode that creates a textured drawing effect. I would have liked to see more brush modes incor— porated to provide varied types of textured and shading effects. As we all know, Atari Basic cursor

_

'-

.

v

—"—"'

ORDERS NOW TAKEN

-

,

Smart Art-

-

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4

15.95 15.95

Hu‘lk

ARIOLASOFT Archon Archon Il" Axis Assassin Hard Hat Mack MULE Murder on Zinderneuf Music Cons Set New Papercllp One on One Pinball Cons Set Realm of Impossibility Seven Cities of Gold

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Mr Do

SYSTEM 3 International Karate

8.95 8.95 13.45 7.95 13_45

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17.95

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THORN EMI 5.50 6.50 6.50

A

Disc

NOVAGEN

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OF CHEAP BOOTLEG SOFTWARE — ALL OUR TITLES ARE ORIGINALSI.-------'

Price

ALLOURPRICES INCLUDE VAT AND CAR R IAG E Cheques IPlease write card no. on revuse)/P0's

TOTAL

NAME

ADDRESS...........................................

to:

PERIPHERALS 8 Midgrova, Dolph, Oldham 0L3 5EJ Tal:SaddI!Ivorth10457715229 HAYSTACK

December 7985

16k and

Stephen Williamson

oun pmce

Machine CodeTutor

LEVEL9 Adventure Quest Colossal Adventure Dungeon Adventure Emerald Isle Lords ofTime Red Moon Return to Eden Snowball Worm in Paradise

Please Send: Cassette/Disc

24 ATARI USER

home compute:

above. It is only available by mail order.

p “(?zzltdj

Tel: 04577 5229

new GENERATION

8.95

MOSAIC

ATARI

denied to the Basic programmer with no knowledge of machine code, Smart Art runs on any Atari

_Haystack__

OUR PRICE Cass Disc

.

unlock a lot of the Atari's hidden graphics potential

slow down to enable more detailed work to be carried out. Once you have drawn your multi—coloured masterpiece the picture can be saved to tape and loaded again at another time. There is also a separate program to load a saved picture.

Mldgrove, Delph, Oldham 0L3

8

Secret Diary of Adrian Mole

--—-——-—-BEWARE

'

.

Spy's Demise + Spy Strikes Back

11.45

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I

DREAMS 8.95

There may be better pro— grams on the market to aid Atari artists, but this'one does

'

1—

fun to use

mands. Smart Art includes some useful extra commands circle, fill and box. Box, as the name implies, draws rectangles. There are three brush speeds. The cursor can whip along at fast speed or

Boulder Dash ELECTRIC

"'

in all but the most elementary graphics com-

1

Splderman

is lacking

1345

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ACTIVISION Blazer Decathlon Ghostbusters Gt Amer Road Race Hacker Pitfall II River Raid Rescue on Fractulus Space Shuttle

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a

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ACCESS

“I the A" Smart instruc— tlons there 15 no explanatlon of to Incorporate a plcture how lnto your own programs. As the load program IS Basrc and short, wrltten l'" eas1ly listed, lt should be POSSIbIe 10 use this as the has of a subroutlne ln your OW“ program. C°U|d have your _Then you allen planet as a landscape baCRQTOUNd over Wh'Ch star ?ghters fly at great speed. fun to Smart and Art IS. use for the price 15 certalnly no

Phone

NO.

A ccess N O.

..........................................


Be 9 inners

—————————

S I 'ng the

at

sec

_ AS

I

more

time,

promised last month, we've FOR NEXT loops this .

.

.

30 if

you're "011 too sure Of them perhaps you'd better find a few minutes for a bit of quick revision. Actually Program should be fairly straightforward. All it does is to print I

A BLACK B°x “three times. The loop variable COUNTER keeps track of how many lines 50 to 80 the body of the loop, between the FOR and NEXT— are repeated. Since line 30 reads:

times

30 FOR

CUUNTER=1

T0 3

this will be three times. Notice that lines 50 and 60 have semi—colons to "glue" the words together. Line 70 omits this, though, as we want to move on to a new line. to REH Panama 1 20 PRINT CHRSKITS) 30 FOR

counrsuzx to

50 PRINT 60 PRINT

_

?gtwiif

it “Ex?ys

“it"; " 6mm“:

why in a minute. Returning to Program I, as I've stressed it doesn’t matter what went inside the loop formed by lines 30 and 90 it would be done three times. see

gmg?h 1.

“jun“

“w

sf \\

manner let's pm a mp inside the loop of Program I. We'll take the loop of Program n lines 50 to 70 and put them in place of the lines that give the “A Black Box" message in Program I— also lines 50 to 70 (now you see one of the reasons forthe line

box to be aware of this. There are stupid exceptions to this which we'll involve bad meet, but they program— ming, WhICh, of course, you won

interested

in

.

.

pgnf

23

numbers).

t be

H "5" "059“ III N ”I" CHRSUZS) 39 F0“ COUNTERH W 51 FOR LO0P:1 m 4

”gnu-5)

59 Fail mm,“

um

m

4

Pro g ram //

look at

II. Now take Program Again,a Simple loop. Nothing there to trouble you it just prints out: DOING LOOP

Program In _

Program IN IS the result. We now have two loops, one nested inside the other like those Russian dolls. In fact we call them nested loops. And you

“I" 7? 8° "I“ 9“ "E“

u

80)!"

mun“

Program! _

-

30 Why the message ”A black box"? Well, the idea is to stress that it matter what’s inside doesn't really the box formed by the FOR and NEXT, it will be done as many times as is specified in the FOR Statement. Admittedly our knowledge of Basic isn't yet so encyclopaedic that we could think of many otherthingsto go inside the box, but we can see the possibility. The point is, given lines 30 and 90, whatever lies in the box between them will be done three times and you don't have to know what's inside the

3

70 usxt Loop 3“ PRINT 38 NEXT counter:

Loop

a

.

10 REM PROGMH II

n 3

and Program I, come to program that— is that our line numbers haven't gone up in consecutive tens. You'll

four times. Lines 50 to 70 form the chunk of program that prints this

won't be surprised to learn that we

out four times.

message

The only odd thing about this

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December 7985 ATARI USER

25


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‘ the loop that outsi the ethe outer loo goesdr?urtd ,an t eoneon the inside the inner FIjoop. Before you run it, see if you can think through what happens. Lines 30 to 90 ensure that we do the intermediate lines three times. Of these lines, 50 to 70 form a loop printing out ”Doing loop" four times, followed by a blank line (line 80). So the outcome is that we get the message ”Doing loop" 12timesin all,

The start

and finish of the mner loop must fit neatly insrde the start and flnlSh Of the outer,

call

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program. After your experiments restore the original Program IV, swap lines 70 and 90, then RUN the result. You should be able to work out what's going wrong. Remember, they're nested loops the start and finish of the inner loop must fit neatly inside the start and finish of the outer. Anyway, untangle yourself from llnes back —

-

-

-

2:3 Tsssgiylfr?agglrttgzthe 53 FOR

LOOP

=

1

TO

SET

then run it. You should get:

DOING LOOP

1

D°|NG LOOP DO'NG LOOP

2

DOING LOOP DOING LOOP DOING LOOP

2 3

We're still doing the outer loop three times, so we still get three sets of output from the inner loop. Now though, because of the change to line 50, the number of times the inner loop is done varies, depending on the value of SET. That is, the number of 26 ATARI USER

December 7985

i:

szglzflzérrg-z? '

5“

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"MI“ "E” L009 88 PRIIT 99 “El" 5“

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Program IV .

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the lnner loop 5 done depends value Of the outer I00ps .

tlmes

on‘the

varlablel

.

m the tooth the longer outer ls the more the the loop 0m?“ IS done. lnnerlloop The effect lsfhét '” theres one (“ore Domg loop In this case

each set. successwe we refer (As we ve already seen, to the as outer andlnner. Some loops as

Ipet>opllefllkeht9 e UISB thesehwlmdi GODS p t em ‘e S

ka 0th'. grrogram 6,0relnterprets trac Peep rogram N In Personallycl me”if-way

Egeftzryrglgge

o‘ful labels

-

ltS

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uses

.

ldea

Of

Program the maklng the number of tlmes we do thelnnerloop dependent on the outer loops variable to print outa triangle of asterisks.

When deciphering what’s going Oh _

m m

manual

Program V

I

use

Vausimiladr to pro uce technique a trlang e 0 ir:c letters. Here the outer loop variable, F/N/SH, ranges from one to LEN— P rogram

(STR/NG$}. Since STRING$ is ABCDEFGHlJ, this boils down to our familiar from one to ten. I've chosen F/N/SH as a label because its value determines where

0

20 PRIIT cmuzsn 30 FOR ("175113 To 3 40 PRINT “SET“;OII'I'EI! 50 FM DIET-1 T0 4 50 Pull" "Dolls mop

7. "an IIIER 80 FRI“ ” NEXT our“

100931 70 4

1

1

.,

have Wlth.neSted loops ”S. helpful to a QUICK look llne the .at the dieflnlng ln thls case llne 30 outer loop to get an idea of the range of its variable. Then concentrate on the inner loop here lines 40 to 60. The effect Of this inner loop is to 0L” print LENGTH “qmber Of asterlsks on a llne: Our‘ lnner loop from one to a 906? LENGTH and semlcolon fOHOWS the m asterlsk the PRlNT Statement of line 50, Wthh the body of the loop. After fofm? prlntlng the required number Of line 70 “5 on to the asterlsks, moves next line of the dlsplay. So looked at asa black box, what's inside the outer loop (lines ,40 to 70) simply prints out a separate line of LENGTH asterisks. We repeat this 0“th loop 10 times, with the value of LENGTH from one to ten. So the first varying “me .r°“”d the outer loop we get one asterlsk on a llne, the second time two asterisks, and so 0”—

_

“SET ";SET

to mark off each set. Note this line is inside the outer loop but outside the inner loop, so it only appears each time the outer loop is done. I've also altered line 60 so that the variable LOOP is printed out as it cycles through its various values. To get a feel for nested loops, try changing the limits of the loops in lines 30 and 50, predicting what you'll get before you run the altered

Iv

20 PRIHT CHRSHZS)

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16 RE! PROGMH

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another version. l'vge changed the loop variable in lines 30 and 90 to

\

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-

sets of four, each separated by a blank line. To help you see what's going on more clearl Pro ram lV gives

,

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woman 01 PRIII CHRSUZS) 30 FOR LEIGTllzl n 10 40 FOR ASTERISRI To LEIGH! so Pill" "is"; 5. NEXT 0515215! “10 Pill" 80 “a“ LEIGH! 10 RE" 20

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Program

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—-——————Be 1. RE" PROGMH 011 20 MINT CHRSHZS) 3. “I" STRINGSUOI 40 SIRIUGS:"0800EFGHIJ" 50 run Fl?lsnzl To LEItSTRIIGS) so Fol! LETTEltzl m FINISH 7. pun STRI.G$(LETTER,LETTER); 33 IE!“ LETTER 9; "I“ 100 IE)“ FINISH

'

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ng’am

V”

72 PRINT

STRINGSlLETTER.LETTERl;

TTER v ries fr m t EZNLGETH Remeinber' STDR/Nggfl ' 73 p'CkS ”p the ”St “me” Of STR’NG$« the and so on“ STRING$(2,’2) second, The semicolon Of hhe ensures '

'

.

.

70_

-

all the same hhe' they appearon Once the the mnerloopiscompleteand hhe “he 90 moves to afresh “he hh'Shed’, Of display.

the FIN/220331: g kir015reZsLhdenb yregistefo' ', .

,

t h''5 time our inner oop W',“ phht out one extra character from ,

that

I

STR/NG$ and

so on‘ we could accomplish all Actually th's W'th far less effort, as we saw _

from IV last P'F’Q’am month. However n the techniques illustrates Of

aestedlkoopsl quite “Eel" ’

that W'“ later. nested loops °°.me The idea Of the program ls to add all the whole numbers _

_

together

number the result. Oht you input 5’ the

(integers) between one you ve input, then_pr|nt For instance,

If

and a

50 PRINT 50 tonne 70 FOR

moment, think about how like 1+2+3+4. The answer doesn't just leap into your head all at once. You do it by adding two of the numbers, then adding the answer to the next number, then adding that new answer to the next a

you do

number

IlTEGEltzl to mm

mulzmmuxnsszu

-

H

35 N" “NE“ ‘5 ”TN-?

m 19

INTEGERZI To MIGE

51? FOR

60 PRINT

INTEGERV'w;

70

TOTaLzmmLfIITEGEn

3.

NEXT

1.7555“

cunsuo) ;":";TOTM.

mm 100 IE!“

90

RAISE

ng’amlx

a sum

and

endpoints for the ranges I'm totalling over from oneto ten (lines 30,100). In other words get all the totals for: I

1

1+2 1+2+3

SO OH..

In words you think One and other two gives me three. Three and three give me six. Six and four give me ten. No more to add, that's the answer". We call it keeping a running total. This is how the micro does it, adding each new number to the answer arrived at

far. To see how Program VIII works, assume you've input 4, so we're the micro to do the sum we've asking just worked through.The actual work of adding is done in line 80, the body of the loop. This adds the integer we're considering to the total so far. INTEGER goes from to 4 successively. Since TOTAL is initially zero, the first time through the loop line 80 boils down to TOTAL = 0 + 1, so

1

so our total so far is one correct. We don't actually do this first 0+1 step when we do it in our heads, but the micro is a very formal beast.

Next time through the loop, INTEGER is 2, and the current value of TOTAL is one so, TOTAL: TOTAL+INTEGER,which boils down to TOTAL:1 +2 and TOTAL assumes is

three, so line 80 becomes in effect TOTAL:3+3 and TOTAL adopts the value six. The next time through—the final in this case line 80 is equivalent to TOTAL:6+4 and TOTAL becomes ten. We then drop through the loop and print the total out with line 100. Program lX uses exactly the same but time wrap the technique, this whole thing up in an outer loop that "does the input" for me, giving —

,. IE!" INTEGER 1“ PRINT "Total is “HM“. Program Vl/l

SvatmleldngczsgAL

the new value three. Next time through, INTEGER

1. “E" "MM" VIII N "I“ “mum 3. “I“ "W5" "3 49 INN" “NEW

no

I

1° “E" "on“

29 PRINT CHRHHS)

answer, 15. As you can see, the numbers we add go up in steps of one, so it's a natural for a loop. The number we're going to total up to is called NUMBER. Lines 30 and 40 get its value for us. Our answer is going to be stored in the appmpriatelv which we set to zero

VIII

Ehhlaasnrj't Befofelvygi ztgrtolgoki‘rtig got

«

would‘ do the sum program l+2+3+4+5 and print out the

For

we end our printing Of characters from STR/NG$ in the inner I00l3The inner loop prints OUt SUCCGS‘ sive characters from STRING$ by picking them OUt With:

9 inners

I

and so on. I've also gone to some trouble to

of the improve the appearance output. Just before add lNTEGERto the running total (line 70) print it out, together with an accompanying + sign (line 60). Thus the effect of the I

I

inner loop is that not only do we calculate TOTAL, but all the integers being summed appear on the same line with + signs between them. When wedropoutoftheinnerloop we then print out the answer. However, we need to do a bit of tidying up first. You see, each integer is followed bya +,from line 60. After thelastintegerthough,wedon't want a +, we want :_ Well, once the cursor has printed the final + it moves on to the next space on that line of the screen (the effect of the semi-colon). All we do is to move the cursor back with the magical CHR$(30), overprint our + with an : and print TOTAL. Line 90 shows how it's done. Then, of course, line 100 loops us back if we haven't done all our totals. A final point. Before each rep— etition of the inner loop, in other words before we do each running total, we set TOTAL to zero. It's vital we set it back to scratch this way each time, otherwise we’ll be adding in the previous running total to our current one. Try leaving line 40 out and running the program if you don't see

what

I

mean.

0 That's enough for this month. Next we’ll have a look more of the at fundamentals ofBaS/c— and you can be sure

loops play

a

vital part.

December 1985 ATAR/ USER

27


w

'SEASONS greetings to all you adventurers out there! This being the time of year when you may be contemplating either the pur— chase or receipt of some software here’s my own Atari Top Ten for

9

9

Cit a (disc

The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, lnfocom

ther/Woods mainframe adventure, complete with the bird and snake, mazes galore and with an extra 70 location endgame as a bonus to boot.

only £29.95}.

As I've said before, and will keep saying until you all have them, if you do not own a disc drive then the purchase of an lnfocom adventure should be the reason for going out and

-

-

2

solution

of Time, Level _

9

(£995 cassette). Written by Sue Gazzard and _

_

_

programmed by the Austins, this game gives an authentic feel to each of the nine time zones portrayed. There is more meat in the plot than in some Of the other Level 9 offerings,

Isrllll

found the game thoroughly enjoyable. More for the experienced adventurer than the novice.

and

.

Savage Island, Adventure (as Al

International

other

games}.

_

Savage it certainly is, as this is a real toughie for Scott Adams fans, and all you get at the end Of it is the password for Savage Island H reward in itself for any adventurer _

The Count, Adventure International (as Adventure—

-

l

8

settle for less. Fascmatmg problems and 9°°d W‘th the interaction WI“ meet on your you characters journey add to the fun.

discwith ra hics£1595l The orig in; micro adventure from Scott Adgams and still the best introductor Y one about It pro b 3 bl Y that long, bUt by WOhit keep Y0_U taxed ll be hooked, the time finish it you you and that ls the whole idea.

.

.

_

.

B

zfgsi’237giznzaéggfng

worth his salt

land). This game has a very special meaning for me as it is the first l ever completed. A typical early Adams gggmf/jaig-‘(Jffgggazféggz‘js effort with a little more lateral Atari £5 95 cassette fr m Bi nose} thinking required than AdventureThis freebie adventtTrefrgm the Atari disc pack-and they tell me the Iang. ay w h at you l'k e, b utt h e 8 cott notches Adams adventure series has a neat he“; ls paCkSiSlLTUId incitiiide progression about it. You get the

B

truly awful

as some

Lords

0730)-

_

_

well

as

on

you do have a drive and have a yen to go exploring underground, then the Zork trllogy, of which this is the first and best, is number one for you. Level 9 provides an accessible bUt if you want to alternative adventure with a drive then why

bar none.

Mtge

jokes. lfyoufound some adventuresa bit tough,orAdventurelandabiteasy, then this is the one for you.

If

-

this year

I, lnfocom (£29.95

Zork

getting one immediately. This is, quite simply the bestofthe recent lnfocom releases being both a well crafted adventure and by and large, faithful to the book—at least at the beginning—as well as depicting the characters exactly as Douglas Adams created them. Absolutely the best adventure released

ac

mys

0

'

Mask of the Sun, Broder— bund (£43.95 on disc).

@

At last a graphic adventure, hear you say. Wellthisisapersona/topten and my predelictionisforthepurityof text and imagination than pictures. Graphics strike me as being the I

,

|

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T

if;

aAsziivatlriike euizursiirrter adventure as there are got too many

impression that

clues around at the start, but as you start to get into character the

wrolie a tcheim,dand we Vlse to sfo CHOW them

he was

learning as he beginners ale

\

in

.

”0523712552;ghil?kczgseifjtiormat

sequence. This one has

from the original authors, under licence, for non-driving adventurers.

%

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is

beautiful twist in the

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(? “iii/b} /)ji\>\,,lp.h $7

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ColossalAdventure, 9

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(£9.95 cassette}.

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This is another for those of you without drives, the best cassette implementation of the original Crow—

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————————_—Adventuring more new faces on the adventure scene to break the Scott Adams/

lazy adventurer's way of getting into character, and in all honesty you shouldn't need them. If graphics are your bag though, this is a fairly

lnfocom/Level 9 stranglehold. To that end Bignose Software is releasing Opera House,aghostly tale about a theatre terrorised by the

adventure, although

atmospheric

bit too much driving along roads for me to go overboard. But once you get into the tombs it is really rather good.

there

is a

Isle, Level

?©£merald budget mode at

'

Phantom. You play the hero in a complex quest to save your career, plucked from chorus line obscurity, before it has even begun. Available on disc at £9.95 and cassette at £5.95 it looks a worthy follow up to The

9 (in 0”

£695

cassette).

Pay_0ff_

The last of the non—graphic Level 9 efforts. and as a big Sprawlinggame it actually works, with a neatly constructed plot, a 900d dose Of humour and plenty Of problems TO $0|V€-

* * *

into various Christmas stockings this year. Next year promises to be an exciting one, with the ST perhaps helping to break the mould of Atari

adventuring. Certainly the lnfocom range is there already, and Talent is conver— ting the CL adventures West and Zkul. It would be good to see some

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”51,

v3

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"in",

padding and a sensible error message. "Wirts Mirts Bud” cannot be seen as an intelligent advance on "Arf/e Barf/e Gloop". lnfocom: Follow up Hitch Hiker’s and don ’t put graphics in any game they ever release. International: Adventure Actually to release Ouestprobe//I —TheFantasticFour,andtomake it a gem of an adventure rather than an adventure of

gems. M \\\////iil Brian Howarth: To find a /,/’ ‘i‘illii in one of his Christmas ‘l\\ %/~ compass ”CI and use /t /n his next ‘ //; ‘t \\l / ‘~ cgacketrs, V8" WEa l?\ \\\\‘\ ///lll (“130,0— ,

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Adventure Quest. In the Orc's tower on the mountain there is a rope. Now where there is a rope there is somewhere to tie it. Say ”Tie Rope" and guess what you will find hanging from the stalactite when you get to

slipping

is

.

month's glitch was spotted by Geoffrey McHugh in Level 9’s This

* * *

what BriIIig

So that is

the Abominable Snowman's cave? "Mark Williams has the problem in Hulk, from Adventure International, of ending up dead whenever he finds himself in close proximity to the Natter Energy Egg.The Hulk can go to work on an egg if he takes his doctor's advice. It is not the Nightmare problem you think, Mark! Merry Christmas and an Adventur— ous New Year to you all!

7

'

December 7985 ATARI USER

29

.-

1


No. 4

o

I mK [O L'Dk

1985

December

in association Mm

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instance, the Who reveals Who’s that one head» line maker has the middle names of once worked as Marles. a reporter on Practical Wireless and unwinds by He is none reading poetry. other than Sir Clive Sinclair.

_to extend it to MicroLmk. updated by ourConstantly team of

SySt'e‘ilimerestSer (10h.n spec‘atems 15 manqgcroL'mk M‘ 531550“ Says help out

in the world

microcomputing. And have they dug up known facts to some little~ help make the electronic pen portraits come alive.

smce

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the fastesthelping to make MicroLink growing international electronic communications system is the remarkable way its fame is spreading around the world. From the Sultanate of Oman, chartered to say howengineerS.R.G. Rajah wrote he had heard all sorts good things of about MicroLink and could he please become a Rajan, general subscriber. Industrial Gas manager of the Oman Company, is the latest of many subscribers in the East.

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CheckSum

-————-

—-

EVE R since we asked for readers'

of on the subject check-sum programs we have had a steady stream of letters.

opinions

,

Almost without exception these have been suggesting that we use such a program in conjunction with our listings in order to assist in debugging. to this demand ln response have written Get It Right! The idea is that you use this utility to produce a list of numbers from your program. You then compare these numbers with the list we'll print at the end of each program in the magazine. differ for any If the check—sums lines then they are the lines where

_

I

you've entered something slightly differently. Of course a different REM line shouldn't affect the running of the program. If program lines are at fault it should be a simple task to edit or re—enter the lines and repeat the process until your check—sums agree with the printed ones. Once you have typed in the program you wish to check, save it to disc or cassette so you've got a secure copy in case anything goes

wrong. Now make

a list copy of the program using LIST"C:” (for cassette

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users) or LIST“D:fiIename" (for disc users). It is this version of the program that will be used. Load Get It Right! and position the tape at the start of the program to be or make sure the correct checked disc is in the drive. Now run it and the —

file will start loading. Note that Get It Right! assumes the listed program file is called TEST, but you can easily alter this by changing line 1000. Cassette users will find their version of line 1000 in the REM

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statement in line 999. Get It Right! will take each program line, calculate the check—sum, and print it to the screen. If it's a short program the whole check-sum table will fit on the screen. However for larger ones use Control—1 to stop the table scrolling off the screen until you've compared your values with the printed values. All that remainsisfor you to typein Get It Right! and you should have no more debugging problems. We've even printed the check—sums for the er, isn't there a program itself logical problem there somewhere? Oh well, just make sure you Get it

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2

Dave

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Russell concludes hrs series on A tan graphics wrth a look at the rest of the modes

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IN this, the last article in the series, I’d like to take a brief look at the remaining modes which XL and XE owners can access from Basic 12, 13, 14 and 15. Early Atari 400 and 800 models were capable of displaying these modes, but they required the building ofa custom display list. Since that'sa topic better suited to Mike Rowe's series, l'II confine myself to using the modes from Basic. Modes 12 and 13 are very similar in behaviour and only really differ from each other in pixel size. Both are split screen modes, with Mode 12 having 40 columns x 20 rows and Mode 13 having 40 columns x 10 rows. Both have a four—line Mode 0 ——

teXt WindOWif you type GRAPHICS 12 and

Return you'll be presented with a largely black screen. The familiar blue text window and the Ready prompt should be at the bottom. In many books on the Atari's graphics you’ll read that text is difficult to display in Modes 12 and 13. You can demonstrate this to yourself by typing PRINT#6:“ATARI USER" and pressing Return. With a knowledge of what it's press

34 ATARI USER

December 7985

7! supposed to say on the screen, you might be able to decipher it. No prizes for Iegibility though. For this reason books that don't say these modes are difficult usually choose to ignore them completely. It makes you wonder why some books list them as text modes, doesn't it? Now, thanks to G. Thornton of Hordle, in Hampshire, we're able to bring you a method of putting legible text on a Mode 12 or Mode 13 screen.

Type in Programland run it. Voila! instant Mode 12 text without redefining characters. I've adapted Mr Thornton's original listing in order to encourage 1s GRQPHICS 12 29 SETCOLOR 30

s,1z,7

sarcoma 1.0,0

40 SETCOLOR

2.0.0

50 SETCOLOR

3.12.7

7° Pm" 8° "I“

4.0.0 “Si""?s 15 NORML text" “F"‘MS is “W9" “59 “n"

9° "I“

“55"_

60 SETCOLGR

-' 1“

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_" Program/

“5"'——

8 C experimentation. With each of the SETCOLOR commands on a separate line it's easy to REMove them either individually or in combination and observe the effect. Just use the cursor and control keys to move up to the line, insert four spaces and type REM after the line number. When run the program will ignore the rest of the line. To restore the line use the cursor and control keys to delete the REM. This method allows you to insert and delete lines repeatedly without having to re—type them. Modes 14 and 15 both have the same resolution of 160 columns x 160 rows and both have a four line text window. Mode 14 allows two colours and Mode 15 allows four. This makes Mode 15 useful because it has reasonable resolution and four colours while requiring the same amount of memory as Mode 8. As with previous map modes we've considered, the COLOR com— mand selects the colour to be used and SETCOLOR can be used to alter

the contents of the colour registers. lnfact you can think ofMode 14as Mode 6 but with 160 x 160 instead of 160 x 80 resolution, and Mode 15


_———————_

2 D

Graphi cs mode

M Ode

M

N°‘ °f

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2 3 4 5 6 8

i)

GRAPHICS GRAPHICS

GRAPH/cs

12 13 14 15

GRAPHICS GRAPHICS GRAPH ICS GRApHICS

5 5 4

24 48

80

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Mode 7 with the same increase in resolution. had intended to write a brief resumé of all we'd covered in this series. However my natural laziness led me to write Program ll instead. It's a "Russell Special" in other words, not quite finished. What I've done is to provide a simple demo for graphics Modes 3 to 8. The program waits for you to as

I

10 GRQPHICS 2+16 29

rostrum

in

PRINT

3.5mm”

nawcnooss

a

no»

20

40 750 160

70

760 160

,

31 72

9 16

1732 22 4 72 192 192

a mode and then reads the dimensions from the appropri— ate data statement. It then draws the pattern in the appropriate mode. It will carry on drawing it until you either hold the Start key down or

select

screen

press Break or Reset. As I said, I've done the easy bit and stopped at Mode 8. If you want to

improve the program suggest you extend it to include Modes 9 to 15, I

240 IF pssxtsxznnn 259 pong 77,9

40 PRINT

-

262 30 FOR

IZUERT

men

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assuming that your machine is capable of displaying them. You'll probably need to revisewhat we’ve said about the colour registers, but maybe you could incorporate choice of registers in the data statements along with the screen size.

One non—graphics problem which you'll have to overcome results from my use of the GET statement. Line'50 opens the keyboard as a device and line 60 returns the Atascii code for the key pressed. The trouble is GET only takes a . smg'e key—press so you can t use K to enter say 15 as a chorce of mode. Of th t h an one way t 0 course are s’more isnt there? mpm' fee? ld that you recommend ”Per" ment With all the programs We listed in the series. That way YOU,” reach a better understanding of what you can -

-

,

,

5151» 3

do with each mode and therefore be able to choose the best one for each

job. With a bit of luck you might discover an unusual effect,just as Mr Thornton did. if you do make a discovery, don't forget the guysin the Atari User office —- they'd love to hear from you. December 7985 ATARI USER

35


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ABC339°C°"‘P”e’-----------------------79-95 BattleforNormandy.......................37.95

BattleforShiIoh..........................37.95 5795 greakthrough/Ardennes roadsndes...............................33.95 CarrierForce................_.,,,_ CoIoniaICon quest.........................37.95 CombatLeader............................34.95

GeneralManager/Owner............__.._._soon

31,2325

now

Essex...IIZIIZIIIIIIIIIIZZIIZZZIIIZI?IIZIés.95 Synfile...................................49S95 Syntrend.................................39.95

57.95

an k s t

-

't mpsmwruer........................now HalleyPro;ect.._.............................now now CrosswordMa B

9

CosmicBalance...........................33.95 CosmicBalance11........................33S95

Eagles.S.Sm.............................37S95 Epidemic............................S....29.95

FieldofFire...............................37.95 Fortress..................................29.95 GemstoneWarrior........................37S95

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0-5-5

Action....................................75.00 ActionToolkit......................-......27v95 BasicXEmm...“--.----.......-.-.-.-.75-00 BasicXL..................................60-00 BasicXLToo'kit..........S...-...........-27-95

DOSXLIHCBU965-~---------------------27-95 MEG/55~--~--------~--«----------~-------75~00 lmperiumGaIactum.......................33.95 Kampfgruppe...._.__,___,_,,,,_“_.____._57‘95 Mac/65Toolkit...........................27.95 Writer'sTool............-...........-----.69-95 KnightsoftheDesert......................34.95

£1 DEF USE 36 ATAR/ USER

317523553212 85

December 7985

0

ROYALSOFTWARE TriviaQuest................................now

ComputerAmbush.........S..............49.95 ComputerBasebaII,.,_,_,,_,,“‘_'____””37,95 ComputerQuarterback“,,_,_,,..__,”,__._37,95 TriviaUtiIitydisk............................now

O

0

SYHCGIC------------------~----~-----~----49~95 MINDSCAPE INC.

.

O

Q

1984Teamdisk............................soon AIIstarrosterdisk..........................SOON FranchiseTeamdisk..............._.,.....soon

Mindwheel...............................39.95

SSl

BattalionCommander.....................37S95

O

O

“f“53de'."5”'099-~-~-~--~~~---------~35-95 3995

Datadisk12295 Datadisk2...............................22.95 Printsho aer...........................19.95--—

O

Deadline

O

29 95

Cut—Threats >

IMPORTEDSOFTWARE KybrdTemplate/Syncalec._,_,_,',,_”_.___.soon

O

O

ShatteredAIIiance........................34.99 SixGunShootout.........................37.95

BIueMax2001....._,,_,_,,,.,.,_.,9_95/14,95

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Reforger‘88..............S...............45.95

TheatreEurope......................,......9.95

O

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PanzerGrenadier-.............-.-........37-95 Questron.................................57S95

Banblazer.....-.....................§.95/14.95

O

ERDINGTON, BIRMINGHAM.

O

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ITS OUR BIRTHDAY BUT YOU GET THE GIFT


75m O

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'A FULL RANGE OF HARDWARE & PERIPHERALS

ALWAYS IN STOCK'

FTL/OASIS SOFTWARE

HIPPOPOTAMUS

HippoStUlitities..........................49.95 Sundog...................................39.95

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O

EXECON SOFTWARE

TALENT

ZkuI&West,_....._......,,_,....,_._._.,29.95 FIexifiIe..................................69.95

O

DRAGONGROUP

4xForth(|eveI1).........................99.95

4xForth(leve|2)..........................SOOn ForthAcceIerator.........................74.95 SOFTLAWCORP.

O

V|PProfessionaI..........................phone GSTSYSTEMS

CCompiIer...............................59.95

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TaurusAccounts........................250.00

Tauruslnvoicing.....................,..135.00

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TaurusPrinter’..........................500.00 |NFOCOM

MindForeverVoyaging....................44.95

Cut-Throats...............................39.95 Deadline.................................49.95 Enchanter................................39.95 Hitch-HikersGuide........................39.95 Infidel....................................44A95 Planetfall.................................39.95 SeaStalker...............................39.95

O

MacroAssembIer.........................39.95

Sorcerer..................................44.95

HABBA/HIPPO

Suspect..................................44.95 Suspended...............................49.95 Wishbringer..............................39.95

O

MICHTRON

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CCompiIer...............................79.95

CheckbookMinder.........................soon MIRAGE

ExpressLetterwriter.......................49.95 METACOMCO

Assembler................................49.95

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Starcross.................................49.95

Witness...............................‘..39.95 Zork1....................................39.95 Zork11...................................44.95 Zork1114495

FlightSimulator....................‘......39.95 CAssembler..............................89.95 Flipside...................................34.95 LispDevelopmentKit......................89.95 Goldrunner...............................29.95 Pascal....................................89.95

IBM-ASCIITransfer.......................39.95 M/Disk(Ram

FYDLER MICROPRORAMMING

Administrator...........................249.95

Disk)

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MI/Term(Comms)........................79.95

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Appointmaster............................74.95 MudPies.................................29.95 Soft—spool................................34.95

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Datamaster.........,.....................59.95 Datastate2.............................390.00 Mailmate.................................39.95

KUMA

Mastergraph.......,......................29.95 K—Comm......................,.....,,.._.49.95 Spellmate................................59.95 K—Data...................................49.95 K—Seka...................................49.95

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K-Word...................................49.95

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0

PLEASE CHECK AVAILABILITY BEFORE PLACING ORDER

.

TELEPHONE ORDERS NOW BEING TAKEN \‘

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w

-——,

"® v

x“

§

“n'llne (02mm 5080

PLFASE NOTE ALL ORDERS TAKEN WITH EITHLH FULL» PAYMENT OR DEPOSIT WILL NOT BE CLEARED UNTIL YOUR ORDER IS READY TO BE DESPATCHED.

Access

A December 1985 ATARI USER

37


_-_-_____-—————

.

THIS game ls based on the well-known television game Countdown on Channel 4, which has nine rounds of three different kinds. First comes the word game, in which you pick nine letters, either C (consonant) or V (vowel), which are then

chosen

at random

-

g

F

r

3

0.

.

.

i .

by the

computer. The computer will pick the more commonly used letters in preference and each time a letter is used it reduces the chances of it occurring again. After all nine letters are picked the computer will start a 30 second countdown during which time you must find the longest word you can make from those nine letters. Each letter can be used only once. At the end of the 30 seconds the computer will ask for the length of your word. It will then ask for your word. You have only a limited time to answer and if you delay too long the computer will show its annoyance with a tone and tell you that your taking too long. You must quickly press a key. After having typed in your word and pressed Return, the computer will check the word for validity of

length

and

letters

It cannot check

used. if

the word isa real

word—butyou wouldn’tcheat,would you? Next comes the numbers game. Here you will be asked forthe number of high numbers you want. Try two initially. It will then choose, at random, six numbers, four of which will be between and 10. The two 1

,

high

numbers will be 25, 50, 75 or

100. The computer will then generate a random number between 100 and 1,000 as a target number. As you might guess, the object is to get as near to this number as you can using each number only once and the four functions + * /. will be Again a countdown presented. After it the program will ask for your number and you again have a limited time to enter it. If your number is within 10 of the target numberthe computer will want to check it. This is done calculator style using the numbers, the above four functions, and equals. Any other key, including Return will erase that line. As well as the six numbers given originally you can use the numbers calculated once each. Here is an example: —

50

100

5

1

T

100 500 10

20 550

lf you try to use a number twrce or non-existent number the computer will tell you of an error and give you a

*

2 t N

10

b 569 ayrge Number er 569 5 022mm" 50 550 i 20 2 _

f

I :

569

1135 1166 1165 1216 1236 1326 1376 1516 1666 2666 2636 2116 2166 2226 2256 2266 2326 2356 2376 2466 2426 2526 3636 3116 3146

965 2636 2669 626 3566 2974 474 2933 1427 1194 3466 2965 731 4561 3676 1636 4739 3463 1217 1357 3612 1626 3335 3361 1696

1

+

19

T

19

no points.

The final round

is the conundrum. letter word isjumbled up and you have 30 seconds to unscramble the word and enter the correct original. Any round can be terminated early by pressing the key which you would

Here

a

nine

expect to press at the end of the round, for example the length of the word or the first figure in your

calculated number. The object of the game is to as many points as possible.

score

For those of you who write your own programs wasted at least two hours in writing this game due to a bug in the old Basic cartridge. I

Having originally designed the on an 800XL with version B

game Basic

I

came across

a

bug.

After saving a program several times your version B Basic will occasionally scramble your Basic program and lose it completely. This is due to the fact that the B version kindly adds 16bytestoyourprogram when you save it! Listing your program to tape or

Q

r‘

I

.

,

W 1

16 166 115 136 156 175 216 316 346 416 446 516 546 1616 1636 1116 1117 1121 1129

38 ATARI USER

1713 676 3664 621 474 4671 5991 3254 2624 2529 1395 621 1346

6:1

3726 6797 5356 1396 1746 665

2

26 165 116 146 166 166 226 326 356 426

.456

526 556 1615 1646 1115 1116 1122 1136

1176 5556 1261 4515 3253 2334 2796 1599 2574 555 937 565 925 555 2515 2513 565 667 1393 4259

December 7985

3

46 116 126 149 176 266 366 336 466 436 566 536 1666 1626 1166 1115 1126 1125 1131

1319 496 1566 1466 565 5666 3467 533 552 2599 1395 3652 979 1261 5643 796 1415 3976 971 1743

1133 1367 1156 474 1166 2666 1266 1352 1225 4667 1316 799 1346 666 1566 5374 1536 1256 1626 663 2626 3264 2166 2264 2156 757 2216 4731 2246 626 2276 1266 2316 1674 2346 1566 2366 1215 2396 1225 2416 2126 2566 2733 3616 2732 3656 2666 3136 2187.

1146 1965 1176 623 1196 1916 1226 596 1366 3669 1336 475 1396 665 1526 1612 1616 626 2616 3727 2646 4176 2126 1279 2266 3634 2236 1496 2266 5336 2366 665 2336 1965 2355 1421 2366 1221 2465 1536 2436 665 3666 1631 3646 3415 3126 612 3156 1466

3166 3196 3226 3561 3564 3567 3516 3513 3516 3519 3522 3525 3526 4666 4696 4166 4125 4146 5666 5636 5656 5666 5696 5116 5146

2652 2246 626 1663 1639 1651 1675 1653 1659 1675 1166 1667 1163 1399 2426 3266 2577 1669 2697 3157 4962 1966 474 2967 554

3176 3266 3499 3562 3565 3566 3511 3514 3517 3526 3523 3526 3529 4676 4166 4116 4136 4156 5616 5635 5666 5696 5696 5126 5196

1366 5263 1755 1667 1666 1676 1676 1661 1657 1669 1676 1629 1665 3466 2993 6761 3126 3654 4413 1554 2769 4665 2999 935 565

3166 3216 3566 3563 3566 3569 3512 3515 3516 3521 3524 3527 4666 4666 4165 4126 4135 4266 5626 5646 5676 5695 5166 5136

623 2256 1656 1662 1675 1656 1666 1666 1661 1666 1697 1694 1266 1616 2834 2162 3631 496 1616 4226 2176 5965 1666 1753


-

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~

,

Can you unscramble; MIKE ROWE' 3 I ° tt 9? 3" d number puzzles before .

,

.

,

,

~

'

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'

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,

.

your ,

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l.

'

up?

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this.

I

.

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E/ n].mn7??"14?

started to use my old version A Basic cartridge to finish Countdown. Suddenly th e b er c h ec k'mg num routine went hayW|re. After much cursing and chewing of pencils traced this to the VAL( function which apparently does not operate correctly after using it once.

1035333 éoop.

150490 200-220 300-350

_

400—550

I

)

.#6,B in line 340 WhICh prints the value of 8 out of View behind the text window for some reason clears this and allows the program to function normally. hope this saves someone else a lot of wasted time. Th e

,

7

,

.

\

PROGRAMMAP

therefore

,

_

1090-1620 5300-2520 00—3200 4000—4200 5000_5190

routine.

Vélfntdown " f°' answer-

Check for valid n Check number roUrtnbers. u me. Sound routines MA |N Letters game. NEXT variables. Che°ker a nd Numbers game. J FOR in number | and pans, Conundrum game. A5 used m many lettersgameScore a ge. as yourwofd‘“ ran dom chmce. .D Ids consonants” I nmalise. Cho'‘ce

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Used

mm? 05;" "wanna! 0,1:? In" "505 1300 Fill! 1:1 to LEI(05)H1EH CHECK VAL! Dr“ OF my

"was:

10 INEISE

December 1985 ATARI USER

39


_ 131. FOR J=1 TO 9 132. IF 05(I,I):CI|.5(.(J)) THEN ALDZO mop :GOTO 137. 133. NEXT J 134. GOTO 1... 137. NEXT I 139. GOTO 15.. 150. IF L:S THE. L:1.:1 “O 9 LETTEQ M an bonus POIITS!":GOSIl. snwosun so .:GOTO 152. 151. 2 causuzsn? -- cmmm - ";l.;" SCORE."

POINTS

152. SCOREZSCORE?. 153. GOSIIB 50.5010 4“. 1... ? "ENNOI! - NO POINTS" um sosnn no 162. GOTO 4... 2... “EN NOIIEIIS ONE 2.1. GROPHICS 1:5ETCOLOR 2,...:SETCOLO n

3,0.s:szrcown 0,3,0

2.2. DL=PEEK(56.)‘I'PEEHSSDHQSGWOKE L43,71:PONE OL+7,7 2.3. POSITION 3,.:?

“?amers

D

93k":

”511m. .,2 2.4. ? "ENTER NIH-E. OF NIGII NMEllS l EOIIIIEO":INPIIT I"? CNN$(125) 21.. FOR I=1 TO “DEN CHOOSE 6 IIITDERS 211. IF IDZI TNEN .(I)=25*(INT(IND(.)¥ 4)‘|'1):GOTO 215. 212. .(I)=INT(.N.(.)*1.)*1 215. ? “mun" "; 216. NENT I:? O. 22.0 T=INT(IN.(.)§.9941..):.EN CNOOSE ..NOON TORGET NONE! 221. ‘.’ “6:1 N5;'_ ";T:IEN INOEIISE

222. POSITION .,.:‘! li;"COIINTOOlI":GOS II. 1..:POSITION .,.:2 1153“ "

223.

? "ENTER

71“

505W 15'

VOII. NINE."

225. INPIIT m=POSITION .,5:? “3" ,Oll l‘ number ";NI|||:? NO 226. IF O.S(T'NIIHT)1. TNEN ? “NOT “IT" IN 1. OF TONGET " NO POINTS":GOS|IO 4.. 2.1“. 4... 227. 2 "lETS CNECN "MT" 2ch ml CHECK c?LCOLATIOIS 230. V:7:INOEI(=1. 231. POSITION .,'I:COSIl. 3.02.13! 2320 IF 0042 on non no 0045 an 45047 TNEN POSITION .,\’:? N6:" ":GO m 2310 233. POSITION 5,7” I6;CI|IIS(0);:C=. 234. POSITION 733505“. 3.0 235. IF ?OSI THE. ”5171“ .,Y:? Oh" "5010 2310 2355 POSITION 12,7:2 “Pt“ 235. IF (01:42 THE. Dz“. 237. IF in“ THE. 0:5“:

23:

i:

21223132:

213: -

2400 9051110; 14 ' in? 35-9 '

24.5 GOSH. 2..:O=C:COSII. 2“ 241. “(INOETO=O=Y=V*1:INOEN=INOEN*1 40 ATARI USER

December 7985

242. IF OZNM THEN ? “CO"ECT - Ell. . ONE!"=GOSIB 5..:GOTO 25.. 243. GOT. 231. 25.. IF T-NIMZO THEN SCORE:SCO.E+1.:GO TO 4... 252. SCORE:SCO.E+7:GOTO 4... 3... DEN CNN“!!! 3.1. GROPNICS 2:5ETCOLO. 2..,.lSETC.LO I!

3.9.8

(mu 3.3. POSITION .,1=? “Haunt“ aim-3.4. POSITION .,2:FOI 1:1 TO 19:? N..'.C Ill5(255);=NEXT B? N. 3.5. POSITION 1,.:? ?r'COIlNTOO'" 311. RESTOOE RNO(O)*3.*350.:REN CHOOSE no» “on LIST 312. NEG. 05:15:05 313. FOR I=1 TO ”RE" NIN II. LETTERS 314. R:INT(RNO(.)*S+1) " run 314. 3150 IF “(mm-316. B$(I,Il=?$(l.l):.$(lt,l)=" "z?lt I 317. POSITION 4,5:‘! N6;l$ nu cos“ 1“ 319. ? "ENTER IQ..“:G.SO. 15.:INP.T ls 32.. IF 05ch TIEN ‘.' CN.$(125);"CO..EC ° T 1. POINTS“:SCORE=SCONE41.=G.SII 5. .:G.TO 4.“ 321. ‘! "TRON. i... 50.27 " ”IITS“ 322. GOSH 4.. 34” IE]! mos F0. comm 35.. “T. "OCTICM. 35.1 ”T. ENECII‘I'I“ 35.2 MT. TELEPWE 35.3 MT. RELIGIOOS 35.4 "T. INOELIOLE 3505 OAT“ INOICOTOR 35.5 p.“ APOITTENT 3507 “n“ "ma?a“

4... OL=PEEN(5..)*PEEK(5.1)*25. 4.9. NIKE M21.,6:POKE “012.5:PONE N. 414.6 410. POSITION 2,1:? N5;“(mtdom S(.l‘ es" 41.5 POSITION 2,23? 116;"_— _“ TNEN POSITION 5,5:? 11. 41.6 IF mun, “GP" PM 411. IF MN.(9 TIIEN POSITION 3,55? l.

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Wild W IN INOENSE 412. "51710. 5.75? ?r‘SCOlE ";SCOI!E 4125 POSITION 3.9:2 ?g'??-SCORE ";PEE (£1536) 4130

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WHITE!

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5... POSITION 1.,5:? 19.5" 5.7. POSITION 4,1.:‘.' 5...» POSITION 5,12:? 5.9. PONE O7,7:COI.OR

“63".9 like O... I6;"PIESS STORT" 116;"TO BEGIN“ 2=N1=75=Y1232=RO=

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351. Day“

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3511 3512 3513 3514 3515

35“ 3517 3513

351, 352. 3521 3522 3523 3524 3525

352. 3527 3523

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DOT. OONISSION

pgt?

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DOT. CELESTIOI.

p." ELOCOTION MT. FORMITT mm gum“; O?T. QEcmn um SECRET“? mm "mung DOT. YESTEMY mm DECIMIOIIS um, muons" MT. “011:st DOT. (”may um inc-fuzz MT. MEDIENCE “n. “mung; MT. gums“ ”“ “mm“

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47


0

O

THIS month's article, the last in the series, takes a look at some non-standard graphics modes and rounds off with a non-standard

display.

Olng out In

_

Right at the beginning said 16 modes were available to the Atari user, but this can be stretched by a further 12 modes when you include text windows where available. In reality things are not this simple. These 28 modes are only those I

— .

directly available

using the operating system on XL and XE models only. Graphics modes 12—15 are avail— able on the 400 and 800 but omy by creating your own display list as demonstrated in the second article in the series. In reality it is possible to get many more modes than this would you believe over 100 different graphics —

modes?

— M | KE ROWE conCIUdes hIS serles on hOW to produce _

_

_

another Antic mode which is not supported directly by any of the current machines. This is Antic Mode 3, which can be obtained easily by creating your own display list. It is essentially similar to Graphics 0 but with one difference it allows true descenders. That is, thetail in the smallycomes properly below the rest of the letter. This is because it interprets the data for the character differently. A normal character is 8 pixels wide by 8 lines deep. In Antic Mode 3 it is 10 lines deep and the two bottom scan lines appear blank. In addition some characters, notablylower case as well as a few others, are displayed with the first two bytes of the character appearing at the bottom of the character (see figures to 5). As you might imagine, the standard character set would not be suitable for this mode. You really Firstly there

is

~

1

brlghter dlsplays

I

III III

II

I

need a custom set. In the example in Demo have used the internal set for briefness. 1

However

have offset the character set one byte lower and moved the lower case set’s last bytes to the first bytes. This gives a workable version of the character set. In addition, to show the true lower have redefined some of the case, characters to give true descenders. Secondly several useful modes are based on Graphics 9, 10, 11.As Dave Russell mentioned last month, the first Ataris produced did not have Graphics 9—1 1. Before late 1979 the computer had a chip called CTIA, which provided Graphics 0 to 8 only. After thistheyfitted the GTIAchipaIIowing I

I II I II II III III III IIIIIIII _

III III III

II

======== Figure //.' Capital letter in Ant/“c 3

42 ATARI USER

December 7985

modes. 'If in Graphics 8 you POKE 623,64 (bit 6) you get Graphics 9. POKE 623,128 (bit 7) gives Graphics 10, and POKE 623,192 (bits 6 and 7) gives Graphics 11. Leading on logically from this, the same could be donein any mode.This

theoretical maximum of 52 modes and a further 52 modes with text windows. That is a staggering 104 graphics modes. Don't get too excited. This is indeed possible, but most ofthem are quite useless, some are identical to others and all the text windows are illegible. The last point can be circum— gives

a

full screen

I I

Ell“!!!

Normal cap/za/ letter

l

I

Figqre

/,-

player-missile graphics to decide priority that is, which player shows in front or behind what. However numbers from 64 up bits 6 and 7 will enable the GTlA —

IIIIIIII

IIIIIIII I II I II II III III

_

the three new modes. In fact the display list is exactly the same for these modes as it is for Graphics 8. The secret of the difference lies in memory location 623. Numbersfrom 0 to 15 are poked here in the use of

Figure ///: Normal /0W6'f

Case

Figure / V: Lower case yas redefined


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//

December 7985 ATARI USER

43


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44 ATARI USER

December 7985

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D'tsp I ay L'15f

————————

Col

°°'°"'

regié’t‘é',

locat''°" expected but are as in Table I. Apart from this, the mode is just like Graphics 10 but with half the

vertical

resolution

704 705 706 707 708 709 710

and half the

memory usage. Similar hybrid modes can be used with Graphics 9 and 11 but are probably less useful. Demo IIl isa seven colour 20x12 text mode which IS across between graphics 2 and Graphics 10 (by usrng a seven colour 20x24 Graphics mode can be obtained). Again, because of the way the operating system works, seven colours as above are available. Also, as in Graphics II proper, only 64 different characters can be displayed at once— characters 32 to 95 space to 2. If the other characters are printed

711

712

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Demo /// December 7985 ATARI USER

45


character. This new mode is more like Graphics 12 (Antic 4) in that the eight bits give a horizontal resolution of four per character that IS, eaCh pixel of the character iS COMFOHGd by tWO bits allowing COMFO' over the COIOUF is Of each pixel. The character therefore laid out as in Figure V|ln Graphics 12 this gives four colours (five with inverse) but in addition to the other method ofcolour selection mentioned before seven colours become available in the new mode. Therefore a custom character set is essential. Due to the peculiarities of this mode, normal capital letters do not show up. Lower case and inverse will print the character in different colours as will printing characters 0—31 and 96—127 normally and in inverse. This is not straightforward in the way it occurs, and is best discovered by —

experimentation. All the GTIA modes

window is easily obtained, however, by using a Display List lnterrupt to change back from the GTIA mode at the text window. This is shown in Demo IV, but the principle will work with any GTIA mode.

problem posed by Simon Crawley. He a display comprising one row of Mode 2, 112 rows of Mode 15 and eight rows of Mode 0. Although quite possible this is far from the easiest combination of

Some of the examples above may dif?cult to grasp at first, especially I”, but if studied carefully they are

screen modes. Firstly he has based his screen on an 8k mode Graphics 15.

text

be

You may remember mentioned any screen display crossing a 4k boundary needs a new load memory scan instruction in the display list where the 4k boundary is crossed. In the 8k modes this therefore means that the list of mode numbers is interrupted half way down by three numbers. The first is the mode number say 14 for Basic mode 15 + 64. This tells the operating system that the next two numbers are the low and high bytes of the screer'i memory after this point, that is it points to the next 4k block of screen memory. If you now interfere with the display list above this the screen I

interpret Figure VI: Graphics

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Atari130XE Atari 1050 Disc Drive

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location 53775 will be 123. If you play sound into the micro, the values will also be 109 and 105. Normally the value will be 127. If you then press Reset and run the program the values found in the location will be 239 when there is sound ofa strong enough level, 251 when a key is pressed and 255 normally. When you want to use the program press RUN, then Reset. Place a music cassette in the recorder and press Play. POKE 5401 8,60 will disable the tape recorder.

5401 5 which come in gaps of 16, that is 53775 + 16 = 53791. These locations react dif— certain ferently, depending upon things. If you switch on and type

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53823, 53839, 53855, 53871, 53887, 53903, 53919, 53935, 53951, 53967, 53983, 53999,

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5° 100 210

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0250

450 000 710

5000 4793 5310 1021 1015 1072 1375 1074 3522 1071

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33:

52g

1010

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12“

3"

330 300

3” 42.

7° 110 220 310 340 370 400 439 500 010 1100

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012 559 1019 1013 1070 1073 1377 4174 040 5140

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1.

Take advantage of our ?nger—saving offer on Page 69.


Those spec

'

RECENTLY we've had several enquiries about how to produce the "special" characters which sometimes appear in our listings. It's because of this uncertainty that we prefer authors not to use such characters. However, we recognise that sometimes it's the simplest way and occasionally it's the only way of doing something. For this reason we're printing the two tables below. These show how to produce the special characters from the keyboard. We’ve drawn a box around the characters so that you can see their position more clearly. These boxes won’t appear either on-screen or in the listings we print. The Control and Shift keys are used by holding them down while you press another key. For example, if you read CTRL A, you hold down the CTR LlCONTROLon xr. machines) key and press A. The ESC key is like a normal key, simply press it. For example, if you read ESC DELETE, you press and release the ESC key and then press and release the DELETE key.

I h

The ReverseVideo Mode key has been abbreviated On early machines this key bore the Atari logo A,while on XL machines it has a Edesign

to REV. it.

on

this key is pressed

If

release REV key to turn 0" Reverse Video _

7'

Zi‘zand '

-

“9

mm mm

E% m

e

4

V’'d 90

It's easy to make mistakes with the special characters, which is why we prefer not to use them. If you do use them, take extra care.

REVE RSE

V'DEO

.

Em an“ Em lam BM n$ BM “m

am

m @

Elm Elm mm

M

E

Em Em E

key and press and release P key.

Fe 5" d ”3 / ease3);5 V key to W" Off?eve’” M’ess ode.

W “mm %m -_ - m

~

“gig?

5' Zo/ld ease 4”

-

I%

released once, all

and

subsequent input will appear in reverse (or inverse) on the screen. You turn Reverse Video Mode off by pressing the key again. For example, ifyou read REV CTRLPthe sequence of operations would be:

NORMA |_ vaO

um nm

t

nam

m MM

December 7985 ATARI USER

51


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Revuew

——

'

HAVE you ever felt left out in the t° Basic °°'d when it ”mes and

BBC

B?S'C XI. —

programming on your Atari, especially when you compare it to the Amstrad models?

.

Micro

Well there's no need to hang your head in shame any longer. With the aid of Optimized Systems Software's Basic XL you too can turbocharge your Atari. Basic XL is an alternative Basic to the one you were supplied with by Atari, either in ROM form for the 400/800 series, or built in on the

_ ‘

XL/XE series. Since Atari basic was written by in the first place, you can be sure Basic XL as fully compatible with any programs you already have. But more about that later. As supplied, Basic XL comes as a bright orange ROM cartridge, com— plemented by a beautifully—produced

088 that

.

A5 yellow ring binder containing more than 300 pages of information about the software.

The manual is split into two parts. The first section, and also the largest, is a comprehensive tutorial on how to program in Basic for the complete novice upwards. The second half of

the manual details each of the commands available with Basic XL. When you think of the appalling documentation supplied with the XL machines, the manual supplied by 088 is welcome news indeed. As for the ROM cartridge, it's really a wolf in sheep's clothing. Basic XL is a full blown 16k ROM, but because of clever software and hardware engineering inside the cartridge, your Atari only loses 8k of RAM when installed. In other words, you get the benefit of 16k Basic, taking up no more memory than the standard Atari 8k Basic. Truly a case of squeezing a quart into a pint pot. So what’s special about Basic XL? Well you get 45 extra commands not included in Atari Basic for a start. If you’re a disc user bet there's been many a time you’ve cursed not been able to find out what files are on your disc without having to go into the l

DOS menu. With Basic XLaIlthe commandsto list a directory, lock and unlock files, rename files and deletefilesfrom disc

STE P H E N D0 N 06 H U E pUts an QXtended Bas._c language '

paCkage through

there at your fingertips. The ability to do those on their own is worth the purchase of the cartridge in itself. Still not convinced? Read on. Basic XL doesn't give a hoot about how you type in your commands. It will quite happily accept lower case, inverse video, or any combination of typing style that suits you, all without are all

_

_

_

_

too

you

can

turbocharge your Atari ——

lines of Basic program out as syntax errors. When you list your program, Basic XL has converted the textinto normal video with variables beginning with capital letters, and the remaining letters in lower case. Not only that,

throwing your

but

all

FOR

.

.

.

NEXT

loops

are

lts

paces

indented for ease of reading. Program logic is more controlled. Besides IF also have lF .

.

.

.

.

TH EN statements, we ELSE ENDlF, and .

.

.

.

WHILE... ENDWHILEstatements to play with. The string statements, LEFT$,

RIGHT$, MID$, are supported, as as the normal Atari sub—string commands. String arrays are supported, and if

well

you intend to use a string variable in your program and its length will not exceed 40 characters, there is no need to DlMension it beforehand. Player/Missile commands direct from Basic are there to be explored. I'd never bothered with player graphics before, mainly due to the enormous amount of work needed to create the shape, place it in memory, then animate it. With no prior knowledge of player/missile graphics, picked up I

——-—————-' December 7985 ATARI USER

53


—————— the manual and within 15 minutesl had a spaceship whizzing around the screen underjoystick control. It's that easy.

While we're joysticks, besides

subject of

on the

the normal STICK

command, we also have HSTICK and VSTICK.Thesecommands sense only the horizontal and vertical motions of the joystick respectively, and help simplify controlling movement. How many times have you written or had use of a p ro 9 ram that re q uests

the bene?t 7—— '

'

-

'

16k ROM for

no

more

memory Standard Ata"

Of

'

than 8k

______

input, and wish that irritating ? would disappear, or better still, replace it with something more user

useful? Once again, Basic XL has the answer. U sing on e of the 3 S ET comma?ds, you can have any character you like as the prompt to an INPUT statement, Jr if you desire, no character at all. 1

OtherSETcommandsaIlowyouto

disable theBreak key, set TAB stops for the comma in Print statements, choose how your program looks when it is LISTed, and decide whether you wish just error numbers to appear when you make a mistake, or to have printed a short message explaining the error as well. One other command that proves useful is MOVE which can copy blocks of memory at machine code

you've ever

needs.

wrote a program to compare the two methods and Basic XLwas about 57 times faster than its Atari I

counterpart. For program development you can have automatic line numbering, line re-numbering and block deletion of lines.

your program has a bug in it you can use the TRACE command which lets you see at which line number the If

December 7985

By the time de—bugged and

the program

fully functional it

was was

nearly 20k long. As an afterthought, decided to add another subroutine which madea nice presentation screen for the beginning of the program. Having nowhere else to put it, this subroutine I

_

_

.

.

.

_

Wlth

no

prlor

knOWIedge Of

graphics

.

_

_

spaCGShlp WhlZZlng -

-

around Wlthln minutes

15

the program.That way,

counterpart

was at the very end of the program, and was the first one called. By use of the FAST command the opening screen appeared almost instantly and ran smoothly as designed it to be. As an experiment timed the opening subroutine to see how long it I

I

would take to execute with the FAST command removed from Basic XL. The difference was very noticeable Basic XL took 20 times longer to execute the subroutine. In other words, without this unique command my program could not run —

I

intended

without

a

major

re—write.

That covers some of the new commands of Basic XL. There are a whole lot more haven't even attempted to describe, but are just as I

| had a _

_

Basm XL Is about 57 tlmes faster than its Atari

as

_—

subroutines.

__

Make FAST the first line of your program, and things really begin to move. In eneral, Basic XL runs about 20 per cant faster than Atari Basic when running standard benchtest programs. But that doesn't tell the whole story. If you understand anything about the way Basic works you'll know that it is an interpretive language. By that I mean it has to translate into machihe code each and everyline ofyour program at run time. Not only that, every time a GOTO or GOSUB statement is executed, in order to find the targetline referenced Basic must read all the line numbers from the beginning of the program to find out where it has to go. This is one of the main reasons that Basic is so slow, and also why Basic programmers keep all theirfrequently called subroutines at the beginning of

re—defined a charac~

ter set, you know that every character has to be moved byte by byte from ROM into RAM where you can then alter the characters to suit your

54 ATARI USER

does.

__-—

speed. If

is currently. If that's not enough,you can alsolisttothe screen or printer every variable and string variable used in your program, and what lines they were referenced on with the LVAR command. My favourite, and the one I've kept until last, is the FAST command. As it's name implies, that's just what it

program

Basic

finds its

way around much quicker. What the FAST command does is pre-compile every line number called in a GOTO, GOSUB,TRAP statement and so forth. When the program is

running‘each target line

is

found

instantly.

much fun to use.

Furthermore, if OSS's DOS XL

is

used in conjunction with Basic XL, some very interesting, and useful, new features come into play. But

that's another story. So is Basic XL worth buying? At a price of £75 or so, it's almost the cost of an Atari 800XL. However you do get a powerful Basic which is more friendly and if you're new to the programming game, the accompanying manual is an immense help. As for compatibility,95 per cent of your programs will still run but faster. —

To give an example, wrote a Basic program for my eight—year—old niece which helped her with simple addition, subtraction and multipli— I

cation sums. The program made extensive use of the Atari’s graphics 18 mode, and was made up almost entirely of

Don't forget,

Basic

XL

was made

to be compatible with Atari Basic, not the other way around.

With

all

those wonderful

new

commands at your disposal, who wants to use old fashioned Atari Basic

anyway?


S?if

if TH

E

Use your micro speed up your

e RAPH Ics ART DEPA RTM

mat E NT

; ‘

.

draw, Circle draw, Triangle draw, Kaleidoscope draw, Square draw and Ray line draw are but a few

!—

1

_ '

;. ’

f

-

:$i=-‘

7

'

'

7

H

' " A

7, .

. .

.

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.

'

..

5"; ~

.

7

7

.

..

:

."

_ '

.

and neXt'day .

.

delivery IS guaranteed! Everyone knows that “first class" mail is far from perfect. The Consumers’ Association reported in June that two out of every five first class letters fail to be delivered the day after they are posted. 80 if you have an urgent letter that just HAS to be delivered tomorrow, what do you do? If you have a home or business computer the answer is at» your fingertips. You compose the letter on your computer. Then, in a simple operation that takes only a few seconds, you send it down the telephone line to MicroLink. the electronic mail service 0 erated in association with Telecom Gold. That’srfhe end of your part in the story. From now on electronics take over. Your letter is fed automatically into the national British Telecom Telemessage service. It's switched to the delivery office nearest the recipient’s address, where it’s printed out on a letter-quality printer and put into a distinctive yellow envelope. And providing it was sent any time up to 8pm, it is delivered by the local postman by breakfast time the next day. Exactly as you’d typed it out the day before. And how much does this ultra-fast service cost? From just £1.25 to send a letter of up to 350 words to any address in the UK (and an extra £1.70 to any address in the USA). You can also have it accompanied by a colourful greetings card (choose from 16 different varieties) for another 65p. Telemessages is just one of many services offered by MicroLink that are designed to speed up communications. Find out more by returning the coupon below. —~-— — — — -_ — .

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01 _482

4

.

>

.

.

d“???

The GAD works with all printer models, its absolutely true. You can use pictures created with the GAD in your etc. There have been several own programs/software graphics packages, but none that satisfied all your needs. Now at last the GAD has arrived. Don't believe us, see for yourself you’ll be amazed.

'

ail".

,

1

'

v'

.

_

if

' ' ~

'

frf‘é’s’s, §f¢?€§§

_

'

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.

a move feature make for allows one to move any feature The move easy design. part of a picture to the location of their choice. You can use the 40 paint brushes available or create your own and save them to disk. Edit character sets, pattern paint, fill mode and rainbow special effects make the GAD the best raphics program available for your Atari. If you own a pig-ginter you can obtain a printout of your ”am"

_

iég‘ Abi?l

;

% I

eijifgjijsif‘: gig;

of

Invert/Rotate/Mirror/Flipand

ARCADE

7,

”33

the drawing features available.

demonstration

_

7.73119}.

Other features include the use of text in your pictures in several different sizes. Velocity draw mode, Eclipse

a

,.

°

The GAD is the most powerful, most versatile graphics design program available for the Atari Home Computers. Its simplicity of use make it a joy for people of all ages to paint with. It has more than 30 different commands. An incredible 128 different colours can be used in any one picture. A three stage Zoom feature allows one the ability to do very detailed and intricate work.

Ask your dealer for

to

q r Please send me information about your speedy Telemessageservice and other aspects of MicroLink. I I Name—“— I I Address———————-— I I Send MicroLink, mK‘OL'Dk Europa House, 68 Chester Road, I Hazel Grove, Stockport SK7 5NY.’ _ J _ _ — — — — h _ more

_

.

.

to:

...

mm...“

M...


o

Technical

Tip

——

6 "2\

‘?

HAVE you noticed how many “lefties" there are these days? No, I don't mean the sort that the Tory party rail against, I mean left-handed people. Joystick manufacturers seem largely to ignore the problems which

A

\

a

Q

2) -||

-

'\

Brown

Wh'te '

-|| _

m Q T“!

users ofinght—han— ded joystlcks, and the Atari Joystlck 5 no exception.

Black

l!

faceleft—handed

Blue

-||

The normal playing position puts firing button on the left and the player moves the joystick with the right hand,

Green

-||

the

Orange

_]' The original wiring

e

-

7.

e

an

This means that lefties have to use their stronger hand to push the button and their weaker hand to move the stick. This is great if you're playing a

'

.

I

- .

left—handed person in competition, but not so great if you happen to be that left—handed person. If you have an Atari joystick, it can easily be converted for left—handed use as follows: Open the joystick by removing the four screws from the bottom and pulling the top off. In the base you'll a printed circuit board with six find er63 attached. In fact there are two types of board the type we’ve shown here with all six wires on one side, and another type with three wires on each side. In fact, it doesn't matter which type you have because they follow the same colour coding. Make the wiring changes by unclipping the wires from the circuit board and clipping them into the new positions. They should just pull off and push on the board with no problem. When you've got the wires in the new positions, screw the whole thing back together and ignore the word “Top" that's embossed into the case. Simply hold the joystick so that the firing button is on the right—hand side and move the stick in the normal way. There you have it a left—handed —

a

9 3:

/}

A

@

0

2) -'_I

,

\

6M“ «—

Blue Brown

||

-|i _,_\

ll

—l' The left-handed wiring

B'aCk Green

White 'Oran

ge

_

joyst|ck. It will improve your performance and cause

no end

your right—handed 56 ATAR/ USER

December 7985

of confusion for chums!


——————————Moilb

RECENTLY/ bought what

was

described as a business package consisting of an 800XL computer, a 7050 disc drive, a

7027 printer, Visicalc and tar/Writer. At the time it seemed an excellent bargain, and it turned out to be very good value, particularly the printer. However there was one

09

BllSiIIGSS p acka g0

A

snag.

The AtariWriter program came on a disc, the reverse side of which printed the manual. This contained no mention ofthe international characters,

which include the English pound sign, which is essential for business purposes. [learned that the cartridge

version

of this program

includes control commands which produce all the interna— tiana/ characters. For example Ctrl-08 produces the pound sin, but this does not work wilth the disc. Is the disc version an inferior program, or dyes it have commands for the pound sign and other international characters available but not c_o_ Dubourg, published? _.

Mansfield, 0 The disc version of AtariWriter does have the feature you mentioned, but in order to use a pound sign, which is Control—O followed by 8, as you say, you must first set the printer to use the international character set.

This

the

is

printer's

Inter

cannot find any reference to the pin configura— tions of either the serial or para/le/ports in eithertheAtari manual or any books available locally in the shops. I would be grateful if you could publish this information for the benefit of myself and other users interested in the

756,204

of POKE

screen.

To do this use Control—O, followed by 27,then Control-O and 23. Once you have done this

you

can

print any of the

international characters listed in the book. These codes apply equally to the cartridge and disc versions of AtariWriter, and are the equivalent to LPRlNTing the key sequence: ESC ESC W.

Missing some

games

l OWN an 800XL, but before that l had the 2600 VCS and some of the games, for example Starmaster by Act/vision, were good games but are not available for the home computer. Whyis this so?Aftera/lthey did it with River Raid, which is also a good game. Is there some problem with putting them on cassette, disc or another cartridge? 8. —

Lloyd, Brighton. 0 Not all games

from all

companies are brought out for all computers. The only way to get companies to bring out titles for the Atari is to make them know you want them. You can do that in two ways. Firstly write to them, and get your friends to do the same, telling them how many copies they'd sell if they did release it. The second, more general, point is this. When they do releaseagame you like, buy it, don't accept a copy of it. The last thing a company is to do is specially prepared. commussnon a game to be written costing tens of thousands of pounds then have it ripped off left, right and centre. -

"I

Hall] the manual lT was with much interest that lread the letter by RB. Moss, in September’s Mailbag. I too had suffered the same prob— lem with my printerand Home Filing Manager.

Star Micron/cs 86-70, andl found upon further reading of the is

a

——

Huddersfield. 0 In order to interface a serial printer to the Atari you will need an RS-232 interface.The best is Atari's 850 module, but these are now very difficult to obtain. If you find one buy it! Otherwise a number of companies are bringing out their own modules, but we have not yet seen one on sale. if you are very technically —

minded, you could try to design your own interface via the joystick ports. However unless you are an experienced machine code programmer with a fairly good knowledge of electronics, our advice is: about it.

Don't

Antic magazine

3/12) carried

a

even

(Vol.

think 3/9 to of

series

articles about developing a serial interface for the FBI bus connector at the back ofthe XL computers.

So a simple LPRINT state— ment sets up the printer. Then boot Home Filing Manager

andno more weirdcharacters. The SG- 70 is Star's replacement for their Gemini 70X, one that many Atari owners will have heard of if they have access to the American magazines Antic andAna/og. / would enter one plea to Star Micron/cs. As they now

produce the 86—700, a Cammodore compatible version of

theSG-70,howaboutanAtari compatible version? That is, one that requires no separate interface. [1,5 {00 late f0f me, but/am sure it wouldboost theirsa/es to Atari owners. Final/y, thanks to Atari User and RB. Mass for the letter thCh prompted me 10 read my printer manual again. / have found several USEfU/ tips 7" Mai/bag. Bruce Allen, —

Burton-on—Trent.

ChBCk lt

again of

I WROTE to you a couple

to a rmter

more technical side of Atari C.L. Durkin, computing.

manual that it has the capability of 7 or 8 bit operation from software control.

.

My printer

Q

am

printer Vll. I

equivalent

for the

.

/ HAVE recently bought an Atari 800XL and wish to interface it to other equip— ment, in particulara Tandy/inc

However

Munch game, and my dif?culty in getting it to work properly. we”: having (7901'de to take the advice You always other readers, l my typing by typing MUST 70 “ST 20 etc" through the complete pragram, and found "OM/779

give

10 ChEC/(ed

_

wrong. 50 / did the same again. Nothing. After doing this four (4) times, / EVehfua/ly founda letter 0 where there Shall/d have been a number 0 AIM

. December 7985 ATARI USER

57


————————

the game runs perfect/y. As I said in my earlier letter, lhave owned my 800XL only

/J"

now

week

owne’s

mistake, CHECK YOUR TYP/NG! Look for silly mistakes, not obvious ones. h W’h all be worth while i" the ehd‘ / have h'St fihiShed typing in Raider 7997 from the August Atari User although / don't '

errors. / don't

_

to do th’s

”he“

every time, but at least/know that all that checking is so very worth while. Peter Hunter, Norwich. —

Math paCk I0ck_up HA VE found on a few occasrons that while entering a program into my 600XL the computer Will 90 faulty. It doesn’t print any charac—

/

~

-

~

ters on the screen and does not carry out any instruction / give it. Howey” Whe" / press Reset the computer prints

READY and lets things in. But as press the Return

me type soon as / key / can’t

”7/31” anything again. Richard E- Newbould, Har— _

t t * I HAVE tried to program the Alphabet Train from your first issue on my 800XL. When I reach the end of line 490 the uter no Ion er responds to affy key pressegi,apart from Reset. This of course, clears the screen but then after typing LIST or RUN the same thing occurs. The keyboard gives no response to any combination of keys pressed. This problem is most fruscom

58 ATARI USER

December 7985

11)

DOS d’30 and prints fi/enames to the screen (2 on each line}. /OCB stands fOf input/out—

put contro/ b/ock. Porter, lsleworth-

trating as thereisno error/can correct andit results in the loss D.J. of many hours typing. —

Sharratt, Wolverhampton. .

sounds as though you both have a computer with the infamous math pack lock-up. This is due to a small problem with timing on the Atari 6502 chip, we gather, and can be easily fixed by replacing that chip with one of the newer versions. Consult your dealer and if it's still under guarantee they should replace the computer. a If similar anyone gets problem With an. old Atari solution even is 409/800 the in easrer. The problem your case is a bug in the Basnc cartrldge. |

_

a th's “hm cam'dge you ” get _

If.

Y°“

_

replace

ReV'S'O”

C

no more

lock-ups.

“sum ”1,6,0,"D:*.*":REH

THE LnST 49 ? “55 n

"

m,as:nr.n & CHECK

“RE"

Chris

50 CLOSE 70

don'tlock

on toasignalaswell as the more expensive ones.

Also, the computer signal could well be drifting as it gets warm. Perhaps you should con— sider taking your computer back to your dealer, or better still contacting Atari's Service Department in Slough.

User group

sought trying to make withausergroup.l’ve

I’VE been contact

written to E/mbridge Computer Club at Walton—on. Thames anda MrAdr/an Miles -

in Wellington, Surrey, enclosing an sae but have received no reply from either. / can only think that both

groups, so perhaps you or your readers may know of a local

hag/f:£86k us '

..frxgzczzzc'tgzzsi the picture moving

about. / it was my TV and 100k ”70”th

group.—P.D. Little, Carshalton. 0 You've tried the only two addresses we have in that of has up-to—date

infor

222ng

”0 ”Of/05”

Recent/y / bought it new 00/0‘” TV and the picture St’h keeps moving. H is ”7051 aggravating. C?U/d you 17/9339 "9” me Why ” does th’s'

_

Spec|a| IntereSts '

Matthew

Kemp,

Farn-

bO’OUQh0 You could have a faulty modulator in your computer, or the TV tuners could be at

fault. Generally the cheaper TVS

/

2 SMCES

curse Inca

mums

plutures WHEN / got my 800?“ / only and White TV to

1 FILE IF IT 15

REM) SEE

5“

Mov'ng .

to

50 GDTB 30

groups no longer exist. / phoned Atari Helpline, but "0 ”the’ they “Md ”We“

_

SET UP IOCB

RE!» ”Inform”

30 mar autumn um. mm usx

“mahsme d”ec.mryfmma all the

a

and, really hke the game —.probably because I keep “had getting. as a spy / typed h W’th No

20 OPEN

has“

0’

purchasers is go ahead anddg it, don't buy games, type them yourself fromAtari User, join your/oca/ group, but most of all, if you

make

1° DI"

HERE is a short program which will come in handy for any Atari owners who use a disc W” a“!

PO‘em’a’ ofAtariequipment

new

roa d er

nos disc diroe t or,

Before takin the ZZdeltlfoughtyou hadgo be some kind ofwhjzz kid to usea computer. All/can saynowto all those .

AM startingaspecia/ interest

group forA tari computer users which wil/ concentrate on matters other than games music, robotics, computer art and other specialist activities. The idea is to promote the —

of

serious applications

more

Atari home computers. The group Will initial/y

Offer

two main services, a news/et— and a contact tar/magazine

serwce.

Members

.

_

lA/lSthQ article for

1?

produce an publication Will not have it. refused on the grounds that It Is ofa too specialized nature, The contact service is for members who wish to exchange ideas With other members. if the basis Of the ideas fo the layout and programme Of rea thedgr07pnvagpffaéfn ers toovii/zit]; . to / a 68 for an enc osmg orm.— . L ea d er, app[7.8

[cation 143 Richmond

g

Road, Ley— 1: ons tone ' London E1 1 4BT ' * * * COULD u lease tell me the /

st til/3b pro Ki/marnock

ICDgfreiianMcCIuske y, Kilmarnock. . There is a Glasgow group. Contact Mr Fletcher c/o 11/4 27 Castleba Drive Milton Glas ow Asyfar as we know, that}: thé nearest to y DU ’

'

”B“ "m“

'

Puland l BOUGHT an Atari 800XL cassette starterpack andNoI Atari User magazine in London last month. The pack contains the Pole Position game, which appears to be defective. When /start to load after 1 5 seconds loading soundl hear “beep" and the cursor disap— pearg/can see I in the right bottom corner at the same time. The tape is rolling but/


0

don't hear a loading sound. After another 10 seconds the loading sound once again.

is heard

Other software, and the Atari Demo, which is on the other side of the cassette, works very well. / am a beginner in micros, so l'm very interested in your exciting magazine Atari User. Would you like to advise me if there is any possibility of getting other copies, because in Poland there isn’t anyAtari

service

M magazine. Witold, Gliwice, Poland. . YOU Wi” probably find that or

——

the game is still loading quite correctly. The pause is simply while the computer CheCkS that the memory is OK to run Pole Position, then the rest of m

such units to an Atari are via the RS—232 port on the 850 module. Alternatively, use the joystick ports as simple parallel or 1-bit input/output ports to custom designed devices.

Try contacting any

com—

pany advertising such devices

for other machines to they would be RS—232

see if com—

patible.

Board open

f or

ca H 8

valid data to a file. This originating program would be run on several occasions before the secondary program was required. The handbooks I received with the computer and disc drive give me next to no information on writing data to and reading data from disc and into programs. Please could you advise me whether or not this can be done and also recommend a reference book on the subject.

M.C. Powell, Bristol. 0 You re rig ht, The handbooks provided with the 800XL are, shallwe say,a little lightweight. The program

[AM writing to you on behalf of the Birmingham User Group, which has recently opened up a new bulletin board, the Central Bir— mingham Atari Bulletin Board

'

which you outline is, ofcourse, very simple to write given the

‘ '

software/hardware items are available by mail-order to anywhere in the world. Why not try Silica Shop or Software Express, or one of our other advertisers? You could also contact some of your own computer storesin Poland, and complain

Ma'lbag .

of Atari

/

Maze MUM” touwork.

get Er f or 8 th’s

llooked

$352thth

Ataf’

I cant

_

,.

line 9006 my manual ,

e."

UP ”7,

’t ’S

at; e

attem ted trgorin— t nume?c vam ,-,,,§"a

'

"W” "user

jumgg 0

variable" Can ou hel me clear thi 5 PyR ' . Ha?nI L elg h -onsizes u

p

-

_

can produce printed output, SO wouldn't/tbe niceiftheycou/d accept visual, printedand even

visual and

spoken input?

l would llke to develOP software to allowmy8OOXL to "see", "?ea"? Speak and lead and hape that you can provide the name of a company which and audio

dig/risers, voice synthesisers and optical character readers, compatible with theAtariZ—N. Buz—

zard0 The sort of items you ask about are available for many machines, but software is up to you, l'm afraid. You also will be talking of thousands of pounds worth of equipment.

Service, Our phone number is

027-430 3757, The board runs 24 hours a day, closed only on a Thursday. reapening again on Friday

7800

hours. Mick Coleman. sysop. Birming— at

ham. _

_

nghtwelght handbOOk lBOUGHTanAtar/BOOXL and a 7050 disc drive in the hope

of writing programs that would be able to use data stored on disc by another program which accepted INPUT data, made certain checks on it and then write the

If

W/SH to write a small auto-run program that will load a Basic program which will be a menu to load more Basic programs. / hope to be able to boot straight in to my Atari 800. I have a 7050 disc drive. A.J.

.

Lowe, Leigh on Sea. O The

COMPUTERS

to connect

User, get [t

provuled

Inputs

The best way

game '” the September

/

Mailbag Editor Atari User Europa House 68 Chester Road Hazel Grove Stockport SK7 5NY

.

Williamson, Leighton

,

_

'

visual

nigg/e about the

P rogram

1

WE welcome letters from readers about your experiences using the Atari micros, about tips you would like to pass on to other users. and about what you would like to see in future issues. The address to write to is:

AIternatlve

makes

a

V,E

'

C

productS! ,

the maze I HA

Oheck your listing! you cant stand to check it again, the cassette offer on Page 2818

7

Many magazines and

lack

'

L OSt In

O

minutes after the ..!.. appears, and you should be racing.

the

version, which has some extra information regarding the XL range.

.

magi/neelioacflzrln’gcgcrjnjet 83;

about

forget to ask for the updated

right information Basic uses the normal mm” and pmNT commands, but you will also need to know how to use OPEN, probably with both normal and random access files. The best book for this sort of information is "Your Atari

Computer", from Osborne/ McGraw Hill. This covers ri

Basic from first m

DOS 2.5 disc has a program on it which does what you want! See the order form at the back of this magazine to send for your COPY if you 9ff havent yet got one.

Co pyin 9

programs OWN an Atari 800 and lndus disc drive. / don‘t mind buying software but what I do mind is the chance of a speck of dust sending £75 hard I

GT,

earned 232,25“ggaZLiéjsaaéii’i?zgan: complex I/O control, which is what you want. It doesn't come cheap about £17 but it’s worth every penny. lf you can't get one from your local stores try one of our mail order advertisers. Don’t —

cash down the drain.

Any respectable disc drive owner would make a back UP ofsuch programs andl WON/d lfl could, ”W theprogramsare protected. So could you POSSlblV _

. December 1985 ATARI USER

59


o

—__—_—

Mailbag

_

review

copying pro-

some

Also,

/

considering

am

n s I u

buying a printer, 80 a printer review would be useful. —

'

Parvin Bengal, Hartlepool.

s t rlng

-

m: mozfudzgaselzlspf?nzgeigf software industry. Because of the danger of misuse and impending legislation, we will not be publishing any reviews or adverts of products de-

-

for

-

ngigrgnmanly You have

,

raised

valid

a

point regarding personal back—ups of software, but until the public can be trusted not to .

,

arrays from character 10to character

40

St’i'79 arrays and I it foruse

10

D|MA$(1°°°)

23232?“ -

D aVId

wich ' 0 Atari ,

Stockton, North _

Basrc

_

have it string arrays such, but and does “long have 5_t”n95

be "sug-strinhgs" whichdcan use to t e same en A is simply 3 a gig/co“orega'cizgsenyvg:iz1ha%§long string of string set up for .

characters long whole of

Z?f?g?gr??m

have had problems with character de?ning. Another thing / would like to know IS ifmy can computer be upgraded With more memory, and if so, how high

can/go?

_

Congratulations

on a very only one

good magazine, suggestion / would make, 50 ATARI USER

December 7985

_

is a

P$,(S|_ZE) n With spaces:

f|||

A$(1)=u

":A$(MAX

‘SIZE)=“ To set '

":A$(2l=l\$ element lTEM in our

INPUT B$

+1,ITEM‘SIZE)=B$ read element lTEM back To again, use:

B$=A$((ITEM—1)’ S'ZE+1"TEM'S'ZE) Thus, your example (assuming up to 40 characters per item) becomeS:

1

address of $4000 will not be useable, since that is actually beyond your machine's RAM

capacity. Try using

$3000

instead. Since the random numbers program is assembled at $4000, it will not run on a 16k machine as printed, and would need to be modified byte-by—

byte by

a

programmer

machine

code

in order to work.

Just changing the start won't make it run, unfortunately. You can upgrade a400 toa address

Memory update 'h to Wl/lfh an I get one,mezzo/CVOW mucer; can WI” It cost fOI' a RAM pack IO upgrade 1’0 48k? Where can/getandat what price a book explaining as fully as possible the POKE commands? HOW do you reload a tt program l' d me 5 C. using LIST [starry/706538. ._ kave eep get— eyeryth/ngnach/Iu'st ting ERR

I

HAVE

and

ah600XL f e

upgrade

Brooker,

Poole,

-

the first _On two points, try Silica Shop ortrv ringing some our Pf advertisersfthey. cant include everything iii theiradSlike to Th? bOOKVOii’ mighl ls the Mapping investigate Atan by Ian Chadwuck at a COSt ofaround 515To reoload a LISTed pro— gram, try ENTER ”C1" _

IN the October issue of Atari User you published a letter from Mr Dunstan of Cornwall

0 Most listings we print are for more than 16k, I'm afraid. Hexer will run on a 6k machine, but its default

by

Momtor

_

Tyne.

attempted

-

This is little than the but it a more complex TI verSion, the JOb' all Bas'°"_XL Microsoft Basrc, etc, have array operations bunt 'n', so th's technique becomes usmg any Of these _when redundant Andre Willey. languages.

be

._

A$((|TEM—1)’SIZE

d°?s string

however. How about telling us poor folk with smaller machines how much memory is needed per listing? G. Davidson, Newcastle upon

.n°t the nowce.

I' e Bolznt

A rray”, use:

COUNTER*40)=BS

random

/

Then,

r

40 LsT COUNTER=COUNTER+1 50 GOTQ 20

run on an

“ke the

A$(MAX.SIZE)

10 DIM A$l1000*40l, B$(40l 20 A$(1)=“ ": A$(1000'40)=" ":A$(2)=A$ 30 INPUT as: A$((COUNTER—1)'40+1,

me

l have tried a number of times, only for the program to crash after printing very few random numbers. l would also like to know if the listings printed in your brilliantmagazine—BombI-?un and Frog Jump are suitable formyre/ic fromAzari’s pastas

_

of portion. any string, accessed by usmg two numbers m brackets after the string name. For example, A$(10,40l would mean a smaller string

you please whether your Hexer program

and the subsequent

thousands

an_array.

A sub—string

6k tell

DIM

.

-

1

.

does not

as

country.

Hexer on

string,array Letssay

40

COULD

Of A$~

routines. want to DlMa we for up to Simulated string array MAX items, each of up to SIZE characters long. Let's use ITEM to indtcate which element we’re talking about (B$ will be a temporary holding string). First, you must DlM the string With:

22:23;

Running

,

The problem is, how to get in Basic, The format would be in a similar manner to this, but with a different approach:

string arrays

20 INPUT A3 (COUNTER) 30 L E T C 0 U N T E R =

protected, the company who make the program should provide you with a replace_ ment at nominal cost provid— ing You send them the faulty disc and a CODY ofyour receipt.

,

pu tTlt'iese?'tiwotfeatutres oge er 0 wri e ou031;vi

.

.

,

thanA$,containingeverything

on would/ggJ;1—convert my

It pirate software by. copying illegally for their friends, such "Ct only protection bUt Val“ ecome more

There are devices which can copy protected software none of which will fit an Indus GT— but due to the possibility of misuse, they are not generally imported into the

Showd

involves

.

internal,

Fitting

t e requires so isering on to arid so motherboard, computer's

IVE written a database program for my T799/4A which

-

copYinQ

full 48k, but you may ?nd it difficult to get the upgrade board these days. Try the major mail order companies, or a local Atari speCialist.

.

grams?

2:47; nghgzzpjfézgijhjg

800XL from Silica Shop and joined their user’s club he received no information or news—sheet from them and neither did his brother. In the reply to this letter,

you stated

that the Atari

Owners Monitor is only pubIished quarter/y. lwou/dlike to clarify some points here. First, Monitor is a magazine published by the UK Atari Computer Owners Club every quarter and has no association with Silica Shop. The Club isanindependent organisation set up in 7979

——-__>


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by the available fessional/business programs are only now, only a on disk and not cassette. Until owners Atari Computer of small proportion the power and have been able to benefit from to are Silica pleased Now speed of the 1050. a new low price of be able to offer the 1050 at delivery. FREE and only £129 including VAT Atari We also offer credit facilities allowing 12 months for owners to purchase it over total The purchase only £12.46 per month, with interest at a flat price over 12 months, rate of only 16%, is only 12X£12.46=£149.52 never been a better has There (APR 32.3%). a Disk Drive! time for Atari owners to buy

the only good news credit terms yith HFC FREE soft— negotiated favourable a bank account to Disk Drive now comes with three 2.5 Disk Trust. You do not need is ware titles, in addition to the DOS credit with HFC, and no deposit out take The is Payoff these and Manual. The first of Repayments can be made by post, required. in which you local adventure new game on disk, a or personally at your On the reverse side of standing order, these facilities, play the leading role. HFC office. if you wish to use this disk is a demonstration program showing return the coupon below. and complete Also in— simply and sound graphics. further details and an Atari’s amazing which will We will then send you cluded is Home Filing Manager form by return of post. application It allows you to files. help you organise your of books, birthdays, catalogue and file details or anything else which UK's your stamp collection to use filing cards. We are now firmly established as the you would normally reqwre so when you which comes free with the Disk NUMBER ONE Atari specialists, at Silica you The software a retail price of £34.98 buy an Atari computer product keep Drive carries normal will be fully supported. Our mailings and '5 as '°"°‘”5releases so?wam of news 524-99 with date MANAGER you up to team on a HOME HUNG 439-99 and developments. Our technical support of information that can be stored of THE PAY OFF ADVENTURE The disk drive. This refers to the amount FREE sales staff are at the end of the telephone and number The 7050 is a dual density a particular disk format: & MANUAL of DISK 2.5 the denstty DOS Three things determine FREE of tracks per disk. Single line to deal with your problems and supply Sing/e side of a disk. SOUND Bi GRAPHICS DEMO per track and the number total to stock all available each sector, the number of sectors £34.98 of their 40 tracks, thus givinga as capacity Normal cost of FREE software __ bytes your every need We aim 125 byte sectors on each and single as large are eighteen formats that the give Density Mice Atari hardware software peripherals of formats give sectors Density Double a 760 bytes. This of 78x128x40or 92, We also stock a Wide range on 0/1522 ari’s new Acapacny are capable of holding 256 accessories— will}; Here us and one y l e & is sectors iectolr, ic each w dehstty lay/455ensity FREE dedicated books and magazmes. third format, Dua BFPO are sent Atari k'lob tes er disk. There is also a2.5 it has 26 of the 125 byte sectors on each ofits 40 tracks, givinga faCIIIIIES we can offer: of Mail Orders to the UK and We are some Of the many dis/(73mg with oosum DOS which after formatting comes down to 727K. The 1050 is capable with post and packing FREE. Silica from DOS 3. or 2.5, DOS 133 kilobytes, to despatch iFREEPOST & PACKING ON MAIL ORDER aim can run either 0052, total capacity of and and service hour density 24 dual is a or either single provide old style software. The 1050 them. * FREE NEXT DAY SECURICOR DELIVERY running disks formatted in run a 400 orders on the same day that we receive compatible with all of the previous if this makes the machine completely new XL/XE series of Atari computers. However, you * INFORMATION MAILING SERVICE and the The 1050 has a 400/600 the with in your of memory computer. compatible iTECHNICAL SUPPORT TEAM haveat least 32K RAM for automatic standby capability. 12 or 000 you would need to already system ROM operating *H|GH LY CO M PETITIYE PRICES and and an onboard a fU” 1 year W'm comes has a ‘Disk Busy' indicator It 1050 modes, built-in 6507micro processor DISK DVIVE to enhanced density ?AFTER SALES SUPPORT SERVICE Manual, the The It has automatic switching from singleat once. Included with the Disk Drive is the Owner’s disk drive guarantee. Sillca Will replace any faulty 1050 iREPAlR SERVICE ON ATARI PRODUCTS The 1050 this can be controlled within drives period. unit Mains Adaptor 4 disk new and to a with up Disk Drive Reference Manual, l/O Data cable DDS 25 Master Diskette, need to plug it in and use it immediately. comes with everything you

Atari specialists. Silica Shop, the UK's leading a mass— based in Sidcup Kent have announced 1050 Disk ive drop in the price of the Atari the with use for Drive. The 1050 is compatible and allows Atari 400/800 and XUXE computers softdisk-based access to a range of over 450 with D03 25, ware titles. The 1050 comes other Atari Disk and can also be used with with it compatible Operating Systems, making and Third the complete range of Atari Corp B-bit computers. The Party software for Atari a great enhan» addition of a disk drive is increasing cement to any computer system, information access storage facilities and cutting the minutes taken of instead time to seconds

OUR SPECIALIST SERVICE

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309 1111 Kent. DA14 4DX Telephone: 01 Sidcup. Road. 1-4 The Mews. Hatherley Silica Shop Limited, ...-.......-..-.-.......-.....===============================“=III ee_------..-.n.....-.....iiiiiiiii=========..-......liiiiiiiiiii=========...-.....iiiiiiii================. __

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get your hands on a brand 8—b|t computer and you have a credit card or charge card phone our hotline now! We accept Access, Express, Barclaycard, Diners Club, interwar? erc arge and Visa. Telephone our hotline wittf yourlcard numberandyour address details and we Will dispatch a disk drive to you TODAY! also call the hotline to request acredit Youl'can a lC form if you Wish to take out credit fapplhfation Ci ies With HFC Trust. If

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June issue: In-depth 130XE.

analysts of the

Submarine,

Random

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reviews. Frog Jump, Microscope, Sounds. Atari Insights regular series of tutorials: Bit Wise, Beginnets and Graphics, speCia] 12 page feature on Communications. July issue: Disassembler, Bomb Run, DOS 2.5, 17 Commandments, Adventuring, Display List Tutorial, Software reviews, Power Functions, Treasure Hunt, Keyboard Sounds, Microscope, Insights—Regular series of tutorials: Bit Wise, Beginners and —

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Password Generator. Keep generating passwords till you find one you like. Keyboard: Convert yourmicrointo an organ. Quasimodo: Can you sort out the mess of ropes in the belfry? AUGUST: Assembler. Make machine code programming easier, Fruiti Gambler, Save money with this fruit machine simulation.

Mandala: Complex patterns made

easy.

Protection: Protect your programs from prying eyes. Display List: Demonstration programs. Raider 1997: Futuristic text adventure. Touch Tablet: Demonstration programs. SEPTEMBER: Maze Munch: Help Horace the Blob munch the maze monsters’ morsels. Data Maker: Convert your machine code routines to DATA statements. Display List: Demonstration programs. Screen Dumps: Dump your Mode 8 screens to a 1029 printer. Bricks: Solve the Bricks problem.

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Dump: Examine memory in hex and A50“ Display List: Demonstration programs. Wrap Trap: Action game for one or tWO players. Computer Canvas: Make your own micro masterpiece. Assembler Update: Improvements for the RAW assembler. Ram Disc: Make the most Of the 130XE? extra memory. NOVEMBER: Guy F?WkESZ Help Guy escape from the guards. Converse: Teach your Atari to be a psychotherapist. Display “St: Demonstration programs. Bitwise Operators: Utility to provide logical functions. Circle: Draw and filla circle. Plus: Freebie Of the month Creepshow —

machine code pinball game.

DECEMBER: Countdown: Micro version 0f the famousTVgame. Get It Right!: Atari User’s own check-sum program. Disco: Son et lumiére on your Atari. Display List: Demonstration programs. Plus: Freebie of the month Jane’s Program machine code entertainment. —

OCTOBER: Pontoon: Twist? Bust! Memory

month freebie is a delightful machine code program that defies description. Drop blocks of colour, watch them bounce. and listen to the musical sounds. Called Jane’s Program by its author Douglas Crockford, it’s one of the most unusual programs we’ve seen in a long time. And remember, you won ’t ?nd it listed in the magazine it’s only available if you buy the monthly cassette or disc. This

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The modem is the amazing Miracle Technology WSZOOO. One of the most powerful on the market, it’s simplicity itself to use. Just plug it into a standard British Telecom socket and you’re away! The package also features the superb Datatari serial interface, which links the modem directly to the Atari’s peripheral port without the need for the 850 serial interface. The best hardware deserves the best software to drive it, and with the specially written Multi-Viewterm program the package is complete. It supports all the standard baud rates 1200/75, 75/1200, 1200/1200 half duplex and 300/300 full duplex _

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Clef Climber a musical challenge. Finders Keepers a visual perception and memory game. Follow the Leader sounds and patterns are created it’s your job to copy them and it gets harder! —

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ADV

for the Atari 400/800/600XLl800XL/130XE Control MIDI equipped electronic instruments from your Atari. Hardware comprises MIDI IN, THRU and OUT ports. Complete Disk drive required. instructions and example programs supplied. £59-95m0'uswe-

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Profile for Paul Rixon

Atari User Magazine Vol 1 Issue 08  

Atari User Magazine Vol 1 Issue 08 - magazine for Atari home computer users, published by Database Publications.

Atari User Magazine Vol 1 Issue 08  

Atari User Magazine Vol 1 Issue 08 - magazine for Atari home computer users, published by Database Publications.

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