Page 1

5 l

ex 2

--

“r

»

--v

|—-,‘ ‘

W“

\

§

.

Tell

me, how

,,

does

F

.,

this

..

seem

to have

..

been

a?

botherlnq you?

.. -‘

""

"

long

«

l

yr

é

,

W

>f

l

READY

,

”MK

"

,. ,

f

,,

\,\5\ \‘

is

3 1

\ ‘»\\

'

7

{zsf?‘f‘

;

yourAtarl mto psychotheraput

Turn a

lg}

era-we: -~

if

.

5

7

n

.

\ ~

i-

,,W,

The ST in colour: '~

amazing pictures

Guy Fawkes: sparkling fast—action arcade game

“MW

w????f

_

,

,

M

s1A

Fifty Chest; games to

33

Wen

r;


If you run any kind of cash-based business and you want total financial control without knowing anything about accounting. take a look at Cash Trader. It's been designed to address the problems you most commonly face in running your business and to solve them. simply. No knowledge of accounting? If you can distinguish income and expenditure. you can run your book-keeping and accounts With Cash Trader Can't Type? Most Cash Trader operations involve usmg arrow» keys to select what you want to do from a menu of options typing

|.

i

f

2 i

reduced to an absolute minimum

is

Randomly accumulated piles of paperwork? Simply enter them as they accumulate Cash Trader puts an end to Dre-sorting into type and date order Not quite sure of the state of your business? As you

.

a"'

»~

2,11

,. '

jg“

enter each transaction. your Profit and Loss Account and Balance Sheet are instantly updated and are constantly displayed bang up to date on the upper part of the screen

1 . z

f _

;:

Vt

.x

"5

Bogged down by VAT? Cash Trader automatically extracts and accumulates VAT and reports on all VAT transactions,

'

,

53"

g

*

1

>

g

f

'

.f

..

s

g

f’“

M‘

gm N

\A. ‘

g

"

magi“

.

'.»

J;_

N“

f,

'

master before you can use

g

..

i-

-~

In addition to these features. Cash Trader also gives you total erXibiIity in creating your own anaIySis heads and With Analyser. a module which extracts information under any criteria you care to define. you can produce reports and analyses at the touch of a key. H M Customs and Excise recognizes the sunability of Cash Trader reports for VAT purposes and. as a recent rewew concluded. "Cash Trader WI|| be welcomed by accountants and auditors alike and should pay for itself Within a month"

'

g

_'

say—am”

~

*

-.

*‘

l

..v,,/ "ff-“T

‘.

afiwgf?‘w;

THE END OF THE

BOOK-KEEPING & VAT NIGHTMARE

i

4

To see Cash Trader in action is to appreciate its benefits instantly, so for a demonstration copy, fill in the form below and send it to Quest today. Of course, if / "

'

1._

_

..

.

1

rim»

,,

gs?ggze see i j“

$~mp

....,._,‘

-

7

“T

CARDS o

%

a

M '

Ls ..‘5

.

—--_

=ng1

. '

'

é

.

y

W;— 2.1.5.

l,

..

H

4

or“?

,

.

. . I

§==l‘l-—== .l-,k—i_-i'=

W-ssnmwh. mo we“

*

.;A&T?é?/

??w

\ '%ii';.\.

“A”,

J?f?f/

/"

\

\.

.

/

_ —

W

Mangers “fwd

=gg —»::;.. =_jg.

IEJEJEEEJ

_

‘QL Cash Trader. available from Sinclair Research Ltd and its stockists

at

'

1

BEWARE OF MORE EXPENSIVE

“wags new ,, wd‘qubW aw

Fa' am"‘hui?’"c2?np‘fwn "at 0pm“. P‘Y’f. wk" an °‘.' rib“

”as f

_

”$23. 7:27:3&533 if? $332

efficient and profitable business, there‘s no need to have a demonstration first.

.\

.

"

"

”47ngng

e

egg

'

g

amen-

(“no

5

..

.

-

40710 ”or

“"

M

”is, 'f

NL

..

leggings- \

With your actual busmess

it

figures _-

\

Can‘t use a computer? A comprehensive manual containing key~by~key instruction and copious examples is only the first step. the Cash Trader program also contains a number ol training exercises which you must

/

debit my Access/Visa/American Express card

Please

Please send me CASH TRADER @ £1 14.95 inc. VAT D Please send me CASH TRADER with ANALYSER @ £14945 I?C. VAT [I Please send me an evaluation copy @ £17.20 inc. VATD Please send me further information D

Dim

?‘

E

1:1} l£J M

no.

Delete those not applicable

It for any reason you find Cash Trader unsuitable for your purposes, send the evaluation cooy back within 14 days for a full refund. t

M'icrocomputer in use _

Evaluation copies are usable but a restriction on the number of entries exists: on payment of the balance (£97.75 for Cash Trader only, £132.25 for Cash Trader with Analyser) you will be given a password to remove the restriction and enable full use to be mad3 _

\

Name \ Add ress \ _

_

_

_

\

-

-

November 7985

_

Type O f B No. Of employees \ us'm?“ _\_ Quest International Computers Limited, School Lane, Chandlers Ford Hampshire 505 SW Tel- (04215 ) 6 6321 Telex. 47326 QUEST G ”as" ”a“ “Wes Questlnternational ,

2 A TAR/ USER

enclose a cheque for I

Tel. No:

\

.

Pavab'e to Computers Ltd.


METACOMCO PRESENTS ITS NEW RANGE OF SOFTWARE FOR THE ATARI ST: A SET OF POWERFUL PROGRAMMINGLANGUAGES FOR PEOPLE WHO WANT TO WRITE PROGRAMS FOR THE ST.

b MA 0/70

Mil/Will?

£49.95

A high specification macro assembler, complete with linker and screen editor. Assembler is a fundamentallanguage, useful for all kinds of programming particularlywhere speed and compactnessare important.Essential for all serious programmerswhowant -

to exploitthe ST’s full potential.

b MH/I

PAM/ll

£89.95

A powerfulPascal compilerdesigned to meet the exacting ISO standard. This Pascal is already widely used on the Sinclair CL and the CommodoreAmiga. A fast, single pass compiler, generating native code. Complete with screen editorand an extensive user manual.

AVAILABLESOON:

The well knownLattice C compiler: a full Kernighan and Ritchie implementationwith isatrademark comprehenSivelibraries. Lattice

of LATTICEINC,

ALL METACOMCO’S LANGUAGES FOR THE ATARI ST INCLUDE METACOMCO’S POPULAR SCREEN EDITOR, AND A DETAILED MANUAL.

b

Metacomco are leading suppliers of systems software for 68000 based microcomputers. As well as these titles forthe Atari ST, Metacomco have avery successful range of programming languagesforthe Sinclair QL, now widely used throughout the world. Metacomco was also chosen by Commodore to provide the operating system and a suite of languages for the new Amiga computer.

?

”3x:

3

C?

D

?

26 PORTLAND SOUARE, BRISTOL BS2 8RZ, UK. TELEPHONE: BRISTOL (0272) 428781

%Bg% g % l “D 8 %®% <3

-

<3

-

,_PHONE TODAY, OR POST THIS COUPON PLEASE SEND ME: | MACRO ASSEMBLER

| | I

£49.95

FOR THE ATARI ST

META PASCAL FOR THE ATARI ST

MORE INFORMATION

£89.95

D D D

<:>

PricesincludeVATand P8P UK mainland only. Deliveryallow upto 28 days

TO: METACOMCO,26 PORTLAND SQUARE, BRISTOL BS2 I

ENCLOSE A CHEOUE FOR 2

MY ACCESSNISA NO. CARD EXPIRY NAME

DATE—__—_

——————

ADDRESS——_—

IDIIIIIIIDHID

OR

8Rz._|

DEBIT

|

| | I

LS_IGNATURE__— POSTCODE—___TELNO_——m_|

!


in

use-a

‘ -

e

?

'

f i

.

§

\ ~~

3

WM

,,

_

I cr 0L, ”k This month's update on news from Britain’s electronic mail service.

M

Turn your Atariinto apsvthothcrapm

_

ihe

ST in

amazing

Vol.

com":

pictures

1

Guy Fawkes: sparkling last action arcade game

Fifty games

:

November 1985

No. 7

ST

amazed at the graphics of capabilities the 5208T.

,

4

Graphics

Stand and

,

1 1

If m Ch?‘g‘?

ManagingEditor: Derek Meakin FeaturesEdierS: Cliff Mthnight "We 3'be ‘ Editorial Team: Alan McLachlan Kevin Edwards Pete Bibby Roland Waddilove Technical Editor: André Willey ProductionEditor: Peter Glover. LayoutDesig‘n: Heather Sheldrick Newsed'm” Mil“ c°W|°Y A dvertisement Manager: John Riding Advertising Sales: John Snowden Editor/n Chief: Peter Brameld

1

7

All the latest developments in the expanding world of Atari computing.

5’

.

'

be

1

2

1

5

.

ST Software Latest update on software for the SZOST. There's lots of it already. .

Editorial: 061-456 8835 Administration: 061—456 8383 Advertising: 061—456 8500 Subscriptions: 061—4800173 Telecom Gold: 79:MAGOOl ”Telex: 265871 MONREF G Quoting Ref. 79:MAGOOl Prestel Mailbox: 614568383 ’

.

.

Published by: Database Publications Ltd, Europa House, 68 Chester Road, Hazel Grove, Stockport SK7 5NY.

Subscription rates for 12 issues, post free: £12

'~

UK

_~

£40

_

es 0 wor su ace §"et‘5;e”'"?d°("lvr)f

in

Roland Waddilove

offering,

)

Rest of world (airmail)

[3

latest

1.

\ ii) 1 MR§

\=TV

8

1

J;

,

-“

\ti\.\__

\

_,<\

.

all—rights basis. e 1985 Database Publications Ltd. No material may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission. While every care is taken, the publishers cannot be held legally reSponsible for any errors in articles, listings or advertisements. “A tari User" is an independent publication and Atari Corp (UK) Ltd are not responsible for any of the articles in this issue or for any of the opinions expressed. News trade distribution: Europress Sales and Distribution Limited, 11 Brighton Road, Crawley, West Sussex RH10 6AF. Tel: 0293 27053.

_ ,

1

_

22

Your chance to win one of 50 copies and all you have to do of Chop Suey, IS read on. .

November 7985

3

_

“Atari User" welcomes program listings and articles for publication. Material should be typed or computer-printed, and preferably double-spaced. Program listings should be accompanied by cassette tape or disc. Please enclose a stamped. self—addressed envelope, otherwise the return of material cannot be guaranteed. Contributions accepted for publication by Database Publications Ltd will be on an

4 ATARI USER

4

Gunp°Wder'treasf’” and, mo" the are seasona! Ingredients

Competition

_

_

gig

d s 455—

Game

.

.

’ \

/\j‘\§\ \

-'

..

\ \“-~~I

.

Graphics

/

”N

"

/

®®j \\‘\\-\“

23

.

l All

..

—=

l“

|

..

/.~

A

\

A

\ \\ f l)"\\\\

,

,

\

W '

.

i'

i

§

\ ”xv

Let Dave Russe” Ie 3 d yo u 96 n“ Y thrOUgh those GTlA modes.

,<\"°§§\\ i

\

t

\

N‘\

i

':$‘\§7\

“rigs;

\\‘i.’> I

A

W&% A I'

.

/,//< ///>':

6/7 \ /


Contents

————————

Software

Microscope A at

Bob Chappell works his little fingers to the bone this month,assisted by David Andrews. Together they bring you this month's software reviews.

detailed look

and fl”

26

\

i

M

Display Rowe

.

LlSt

34

grips with .to in Part V of his

gets horizontal scrolling series.

'

_,

j

1

y

T

a? 7,

'-.

38

-__.--

;_

95?

gal“

‘.

“x («g \hl

-

f

,

-

-

é' 4\ Jig»;

~

~

-.

w

5=

W‘W ii?

“ll

_

~

.'

“7,

j

Adventuring his views on

52

Wise

Mike Bibby concludes his series intricacies of binary numbers.

on

43

the

Mailbag Five of ~.£/

c? M ?i 1.» (?r mé‘i’r‘k’v?‘. “We .. a... Gd .$ / '-‘"L,%“34V Qyzh_/‘§Lgagf/ f;\\e;——~./4/ <(.(. \7 v ,

._

l

t

«A

\ \

i

.

.

. l%§‘?;'$r?lily. W/

My

.

.

.

Order Form One Simple form on which you can order everything from adust covertoa .

-

monthly cassette.

é/l

uri/ru/ e‘eslliii‘e)ia//i>\ $5. ”QT-Twist» sK/? (A

Be

w

a

I ‘

string?

Read Mike

Bibby's regular guide through the programming jungle and find out.

45

/———4

Superb maChi‘m pinball game-is FREE W'th th's months disc and tape

COde

Edwards

subroutine operators.

to

i

,.

is...

-

presents

a

useful

provide bitwise

inlm??lluiI'wl?liuilll ,

.

..

?ijg) 04?

4

;

,

.'

/

4.7

l

®

\%

1. \/

\

“ML??x?hyi

\£¢

Utility Kevin

.

h

innesr-

is Howglong

55

pages your letters questions answered, praise graciously accepted.

,

\\

_

<

:i_a_

Brillig gives Level 9's new Red Moon their first Atari adventure with graphics.

Bit

.‘

'

A,

32»

Teach your Atari to be a psycho— therapist and learn about file handling into the bargain.

.

‘.,_-_;

* ..

a,

Converse

d

_

,

/'..__

g

_.1,

iii” ”‘r',;~

"

__

Mike

50

prosram to draw

"

.

a

a CIFCle-

\‘l\

{so /

Q

/

/

/'.

See

Page 60

November 7985 ATARI USER

5


7};

E,

,,

4 m

Q

"

i

g

_,.x/

{f

ink“

E

f:

you

you'd

seen

\

-

* A m

Karate

’;

Li (J

C.64,Amstrad and

game

know, like the Martial Arts, Perfection the CNN accepted Standard, SO play nothing until you play SYSTEM 3's INTERNATIONALKARATE

AS YOU

H

,

For the Spectrum

thought a

~

593

//4‘

f

,,And

////,,

//;,//

annaskiAtaris

at

09“

7

IS

,7

,

, _

SYSTEM 3 SOFTWARE. SOUTHBANK HOUSE, BLACK PRINCE ROAD. LONDON SE1 TEL:

01-735 8171. EX. 68


I

__— ./

00

0

e

0

/

-

STs prlce ays A t a r I

cut

-

5

ATARI UK has described reports ofcut—price5208Ts flooding into the country through the back door as “suspect to say the least". The company has gated several stories ning possible black machines and found be

investiconcer—

market them to

without foundation. "All the leads we have

followed up in this area have proved to be fruitless", says Max Bambridge, Atari UK's general manager. “Naturally because of the intense interest generated by the SZOST some people will have gone to considerable lengths to get their hands on them", he said. "But if there is such a market it is much more likely to be grey rather than black". However one major distributor still insists there is an

.

under—the—counter

involving hundreds of mach— ines. These are allegedly being offered for sale at discounts of more than £70. These claims come from Tony Deane, a director of Silica Shop, the Atari dis— tributor for Greater London south of the Thames, Sussex, Kent and Middlesex. “We believe that these machines are comingin via the back door from sources in the Far East and Holland”, he told be true because dealers m our WV.” area have bOUQh‘them-Th's's all making a mockery Of the Atari the distributionplan for ST WhICh effectively carved the company up into regions". Tony Deane added a warn— ing for both dealers and customers that they may well _

BENCHMARK test Of com— puter speed has proved conclusively that the 52OST can show a clean pair Of heels to the Apple Macintosh. Set Up by Antic,an American computer magazine, it saw the Atari flagship machine execute a program in 3-8 seconds WhiCh t00k the Mac from 7 T0 13 seconds. Using the most widely accepted standard in the computer industry, the procedure involved turning the micros loose to find all prime numbers between 3 and 13:681BY turning in a time Of 3-8 seconds, the 5208T revealed itself to be as fast as minicom— puters running on the Unix system.

Mirrorsoft

Spot the Ball Thorn EMI

Pole Position US Gold

®

Kissin’ Cousins English

@ @ W @ @

.

get their fingers burned if they do not buy from legitimate sources. "If a machine has not been purchased through normal channels the guarantee is not valid", he said. “So if it goes wrong there is no~comeback for the buyer. “Then they will realise that, even if they have bought it cheaply it certainly won't be good value for money".

Chop Suey English US Gold

~—~——-——~—————————

Raf/313°"

————-

?e...“

@

Barges-gear! galeyhTI'hompson's a"

323;

———-—EI—t———-——-————

gigbw

.

Dr, ve

Atari USEf”We know this to

on SGhOOIS

ATARI is poised to gain a foothold in the UK educational market with a discount scheme aimed at schools and colleges. The company has announced that it is offering 10 per cent offall8bit

hardware, peripherals and software. In addition it is aiming to win over the colleges computer

with 15 per cent off the ST machines and their associated peripherals and software.

arget is 20 million

The Mac A

operation

Compiled every month for Atari User by Blood Distribution Ltd. Terry

@

-

programs

04

o

,

Top selling

ATARI

has

targetted

potential worldwide

a

market

of up to 20 million customers for the ST range. This was revealed by the corporation's Chairman Jack Tramiel during a recent visit to London. Discussing

strategy

the

long

term

behind the global

marketing of the ST, he told Atari User: ”What We have OUt there are 20 million people Who

have already bought

8

bit

machines. “NOW these people are l00king T0 upgrade them.They want something that's faster and easier and at the right price. Well that is just what Atari is offering them". Jack Tramiel believes that his

team will set the pace because its members have a better understanding of what the end user really wants. “The majority of manufacturers do not understand the customer", he insists. “A|| of them believe that with advertis— ing they can reach the position that General Motors once held. That being they were able to persuade people that all they wanted out of life was a yellow car.

The outspoken

entrepreneur

is unflinching in his belief that it will be the informed computer user who will make Atari number one.

”When left Commodore knew that the only way to bring this business back alive was to continue my philosophy of the most giving the end user intelligent person in our society the best technology available at the time", says Jack Tramiel. "As far as am concerned he has had enough of 8 bit products, even with all the advertising that's been done. “The launch of the ST was the bestlhave been involvedin since the beginning. It proved to me once again that the end user knows best what he wants. I

I

I

“Well that

was okay until the

Japanese arrived and offered blue cars of better quality at a lower price. Suddenly nobody wanted the yellow cars any more.

"That‘s what

is now happen-

ing in the computer

industry",

November 1985 ATAR/USER

7


#

?

of approval’

‘seal

Atar' THE creme de la creme of Atari XL and XE software is now instantly recognisable, says Atari, having just initiated its own software "awards”. It is giving Atari Approved Software labels to what it believes are the best titles available in five categories small businesses, education, recreation, utility and creativity, They are to be presented on a regular basis. Software houses and dis— tributors have already been invited to submit titles for evaluation by Atari and an outside examiner. Criteria for approval include quality, value for money and suitability to the machine. A licence fee is not being charged for the labels. _

or

0

Atari has already decided on its first winners and one company which has fared

Also included were Rescue from Fractulus and Ballbiazer from Activision, Zorro and Ken— nedy Approach from US Gold, Microbase+ from Silicon and »P—Forth from Bignose Software. Atari have been commended on the approval-scheme by Mike Rowlands—Jones of Software Express. “It is not only a good

extremely well in the listings is

distributor Software Express. The distributor’s approved titles are Earthviews, The

Paperclip,

tory,

ware

so

Fac—

Syncalc,

B—Graph, Actionl. Basic XE, Bank Street Music Writer, Print Shop, Hitch Hiker's Guide,

incentive

for the software

houses, but a great help to customers", he said. “Customers usually have several titles of a similar nature to choose from. If they see a label of approval from the machine’s manufacturer they at

Kennedy Approach and Space Base, a number of'which are American imports. Ariolasoft was next in line with Seven Cities of Gold, 8 130XE version of Paperclip and B—Graph.

least knOW it must have something going fOT W3 "In the charts approval is given to a title because it is in the top ten that week. In three months it could be gone. believe the titles which should be rewarded and there are some out there are the classics". The approval scheme has alreadytaken offin America and is working well, said Rowland— Jones. “And it will work here as long as it is not a five minute publicity gimmick. It needs publicising and for all software houses to become involved”. I

-

_ "

.

.

,

,

l

.

.

3

Computer

.

a

,, v

I.III k 8 i 0T

fmsmw «were

1;

begun its work of linking various

denominations and promoting the use of micros in church activities. Association secretary Philip Clark toldAtari User: ”There is a

u

.,

,.;:':‘"

i

'

.

_

activities". The aim 0f CMUA is

10

concentrate on the DODUIar computers like the Atari and it has already unearthed a significant number of programs based on Bible studies. The Association intends to produce a quarterly magazine called Christian Micro and, from next launch a of January, series for magazrnes specrfic tape micros.

Its other

activities

include the formation

will

of local

groups. 8 ATAR/ USER

November 7985

h;

”W“

,

,

A VIDEO digitiser for the Atari 800, SOOXL and 130XE has been produced

.

Called Computereyes, it has been adapted for the British and European PAL video standard from the original NTSC model

assisting/MES

mn‘“"‘*“"”?t;~nomm

,

"

”MW

x”’C

.

’ /4_’ /,////’//,/,57

02

277

.

X

Z“.

,

I

contact with the individuals and companies producing ‘Christian software'. "We also need to share the expertise and ideas of the many who have sought to use micros in their church—related

..

,<.~

7 //////

.

""'»‘.f

'

-

,

MM t’

.

e

W”

THE rece ntIy—form ed Christian Micro Users Association has

lluleo d.l?l1.IS!"

.

_

,

,

,

DOUble Challen e on the ST

TALENT Computer Systems is providing users of the SZOST with a double challenge in its latest release. The single 3.5in discincludes two fast paced adventures West and The Lost Kingdom of Zkul. West acts as an introduction to the more demanding dun— geons and dragons scenario of Zkul. The aim is to track down a notorious gang of bank robbers who have gone to ground in an abandoned mine in Indian —

territory. There is gold to be collected, clues to be solved, and Indians, rattlesnakes and robbers'

tured by Digital Vision in the USA. Computereyes will digitise from any standard video source including video recorder and video disc. ‘

bullets to dodge in more than 130 locations. Zkul is a classic and complex adventure with in excess of 200 locations and a huge vocabu— lary.

Users

Images

are

placed

the hi-res graphics

in

area

savedtodisc if desired. Special high contrast and grey-scale capture routines are included. The system costs £139. and can be

find the last

must

refuge of the dwarves, the Domed City, and the precious secret of the old civilisation. It is a real time adventure with tasks to complete, puzzles to solve and mazes to negotiate. The two-in—one disc costs

£24.95. ~

Pascal for ST FORTRAN 77 and Pascal are to be developed

forthe Atari STby

Prospero Software, which

hopes to have the two language programs available at the end of this year.


PROTEUS

ON

Gem Is

.

SECRET software product with the code name Proteus is

A

g

London headquarters of Softek. It is an intregrated suite of programs which has been de— signed, says the company, to sit on top of GEM. "There has been nothing like it seen on the market before", says Tim Langdell of Softek. “We are convinced it will rival both Jazz and Symphony in its imDaCt-“

”?v?wmwv

j/f ffm” a; zy?g’e 17/2 ///,, gauww’ %€Z%Z m~ 3

currently being developed atthe

.

Enhancml

.

. .

My,

.

'

,

,

foreca st

%%%

,,

. ‘ ' .

»”

m

a.

,

“"

'

,

1

?

, ,

. ,

,.

//M

,//z

'

'

:“‘I:”

l

.

utc

so

or

on s

o

A MAJOR row between the Apple Corporation and Digital Research has been settled in such a way that Atari may emerge as the eventual winner. Digital Research has agreed to pay Apple an undisclosed sum and amend its Gem programs to avoid any possible infringement of copyright. It is these programs that are being offered with the new ST

One result

of the

com-

promise settlement is that new versions of Gem are to be produced, "designed to be substantially different to Apple's Macintosh personal computer in both screen appearance and

e

operation". DUTCH children have begun to learn about computing, and the Atari 800XL is the machine chosen by the education authorities to do for Holland what the BBC Micro did for Britain. A series of radio and television programs featuring the 800XL is being broadcast to Dutch elementary schools. Its aim is to introduce youngsters to information tech— nology and smooth the process of learning to use micros. The project is being super— vised by the Dutch school radio foundation SNS, a combination of the school radio services of

00 L ?mirmf'?fff " h

s C H

R

'

A

D

I

100,000 800XLs in Holland. Pupilswilllearnthe historyof

0

?ies

communication,

i of iklL Ltttttpppld A V

R

0

VA

,

R

A

AVRO and VARA, founded

in

1951. Other participants involved, apart from SNS and Atari, are the department of education at Amsterdam UniversityandWol— ters Software. Atari Benelux sales and marketing manager Wilfred de Graaf says the project could lead to sales of more than

how to use the

800XL, solving problems computer, programming

by

and

other skills. The SNS is encouraging pupils and teachers to develop their own software to add tothe library of programs broadcast on the schools radio network for downloading on to cassette. Two 15 minute television programs featuring the 800XL will be broadcast each week in the afternoon so that they can be watched during school lessons.

__——__—_—____—.

.

aw BIG chief Jack Tramiel has to the aid of the Mohawk Indians in Canada, the country where he had some of his earliest business successes. The Atari bOSS presented the first of 10 5208Ts to band councillor Murray Maracle at the 1985 Computer Fair in Toronto. The machines will be used for training at the First Nations

8

S a B .

Technical Institute, but their donation is of much greater value than that to the Indians. For Atari has commissioned the Mohawks' educational arm to develop a syllabic fount for

in developing

software

in

the many North American indie” languages. The syllabic fount will be based on an alphabet of '

pictogram-like marks, or picture symbols, developed to repre— sent words and phrases in the Indian tongues. When the development work is done the Mohawks will become value added re—sellers for Atari, marketing the SZOST to native groups all over the .

.

North American contlnent. The idea Of developing a syllabic fount for use With the 5205T was discussed during

come

use

ar I '

meetings

between

the

Mohawks and Atari Canada. “Being 90°d Canadians, and thelndians have been here long before us,wethoughtwhydon't we try to do something for them”, says Atari Canada gen— eral manager Ian Kennedy. "Then we spoke to Jack Tramiel about it and he thought

it

was

a

great

idea

and

sanctioned the donation of the 10 machines for training and software development".

This is viewed by the industry a move by Apple to counteract Gem providing the ST with a Macintosh type environment. For this had already earned the Atari machine—some half the price Of the \Mac its nickname of the Jackintosh. as

'

.

However Max Bambridge, Atari UK's boss, seemed unper— turbed by the news when it was broken to him by Atari User. “As this involves an agree— ment With Which we are not directly involved, it is really nothing to do with us", he said. “But it would seem safe to say that if the Gem packages available for the ST have to be changed they will naturally be '

”And this may well mean that the ST will be able to score even more

~

heavilyagainsttheMacin—

tosh".

Meanwhile Apple has dis— closed that it has pressurised Digital Research to take immediate action in the modification of three specific proGem Desktop, Gem grams Paint and Gem Draw. However until the new ver— sions ofthese become available, the current ones available for the ST will still be marketed. Digital Research has given the assurancethatallitspresent range of programs for the ST will operate in any future Gem environment. _

_

_

Nbvember 7985 ATAR/ USER

9

.


50 F I WA R E EXPRESS

EUROPES LEAD.“

1

MAIL ORDER SPECIALISTS

_

INTERNATIONAL

=—;n

HARDWARE 130 XE COMPUTER 128K PACK includlng software AggTE/TSBO me ace 1029 DOT MATRIX PRINTER _

wszooo MODEM MODEM INTERFACE JOYSTICKS

0 a II

FS. 11

Subloglc F15 Strike Eagle Solo Flight Space Shun"? Spitfire Ace

233.33 '

199.99 149 55 '

Vlewterm software .

59.95

NEW “5 Homepack B—Graph

”00

.

Atarl Collection .

Mapping the

VOI. I

AtariXL/XE

Atari ST Companion AtariXL Handbook Technical Reference Notes The First Atari ST Book Hackers Handbook Speedscript + 75p post & packing

Prinrshop Kennedy Approach

11.95 16.95 9.95 5.95 17.00

_

9.95 Call

One on One Chop Suey

(C/D) (C/D) (C/D)

29.95 37.95 9.95 6.95 (D)

9.95/17.95 39.95 9.95 43,95

32_95

”95 37.95 '

.

(D)

37.95 2995

MAGAZINES ATARI USER 1.00 PAGE 6 .90 ANTlC 3.00 ANALOG 3.00

(C/D)

Reforger88”

(D) (D)

37 95

1495

(C)

9.95/1295 895.1295

9.95/1295

1

UTILITY Basic XE

(R+DI

Action Action Tool Kit

(R) (D) (R) (D)

Basic XL Basic XLTool Kit The Writers TOOI

Available“ New ALL

OTHETBTTAELSiGESgRQéA'LABLE MAC/65 ATARI 520 ST 512k Personal Computer B/W Hi Monitor 500k Disk drive Mouse

MAC/65 Tool Kit res

-

-

ERDINGTON, BIRMINGHAM

824 8HA

(R) (D)

US Doubler 80 Column Chip

ADDITIONAL HARDWAREEMQ'99 Call Colour Monitors (various) Call Printer(varlous) l +1Mb Dlskdrlves Call 2 Made to order Cables SOFTWARE Zorkl,Wishbringer, Hitchhikers Guide Now Now Assembler/Editor, Spreadsheet,VlP -

9.95

9.95 (Rom) Rescuefrom Fractalas (C/D) 9.99/14.99 Ballblaser (C/DI 9.99/14.99 Call Spy’s Demise Star League Baseball (D) 21.95 Smash Hits (C/D) 14.95/17.95 Smash Hits 11 (C/D) 14.95/17.95 Smash Hits 11 (C/D) 14.95/17.95 7.95/10.95 (C/D) Hijack Summer Games 33.70 (D) 1

g'?‘hH'k‘irSGU'de 5 282 8““Specii“) 6-95

31 STONEYHURST ROAD

November 7985

'

9.95/14.95 Miner 2049'er

75.00 75.00 27.95 60.00 27.95 75.00 75.00 27.95 79.95 69.95

OFFERS

SP_EC|AL 69.99 SOOXUJoystlck/Game 99.99 800XIJ1010 + software 1020 Prlnter/Touch tablet+S/\N 109.99 Antic + Analog back issues 2.00 .

PHONE US FIRST

HOTLINE

SEND SAE FOR OUR PRICE LIST.

70 ATAR/ USER

49-95 Call Call

Computer Quarterback

Bounty BOb

19.95

.

-

9.95/12.95 5595

3395 33.95 29.50 36.95 55.95 62.75 45.95

.

INFOCOMS INVISICLUES .

Call Call

32,95 39.95

(R)

Alley Ace

Mercenary

37.95 29.95

,

35.95

(C)

29 95

.

Desert(D)

Whirliwords Blue Max 2001

(128k) 3) (D) (D) (D) (D) (D)

14.99

14.95 14.95 14.95

Deadline Dungeon Adventure Emerald isle Enchanter Hitch-hikers Guide to the Galaxy The Hulk (C/D) Infidel (D) (13)

3995

3595

Pinball Construction (D) Seven Cities of Gold (D) Conan (D) Music Construction Kit(D)

M19

19.95

(C)

Mindwheel

9.95

(D) (D) (C) (C) (D)

35.95 39.95

Crusade ofEurope

Zone Ranger

UltimalIl—Exodus

ofTime

-

9.95/14.95

(C/D)

8.95 4.95

9.95

Mask ofthe Sun Mind Forever Voyaging Spellbreaker(Enchanter Seastalker Sorcerer Starcross suspem Suspended Wishbringer (mfocom) Wltness Zork1 11 111

95

'

3395

ENTERTAINMENT

Adventure Quest

Lords

I 9

(R)

Haley’s Project (XL/XE) (D) Decision in the

Hacker(D)

ADVENTURE

CutThroats

9.95/14.95

(C/D)

”V'PORTS

59,95 49.95 69.95 39.95

Paperclip

BOOKS

“9 “a”

(D) (D)

BroadSides (m Colossus Chess 3.0 (C/D) Operation Market Garden (D) Computer Ambush Battalion Commander Panzer Grenadier (D) Eagles Fleld of Fire (D) Fortress (D) Gemstone Warrior Kampfergruppe Rails West (D) .

PADDLES

De

43.95 1495

.

.

c/w

STRATEGY

SIMULATION

21

MONDAY TO SATURDAY


N0. 3

'

l mICtOL’ok

November

1985

in association With

-

_

TELECOM GOLD 5 _-

mm

:

5 g

i:

-

_-'

:

E -—=_ I: g:

E ,"-

5:5

.

ABBWE BE” T! SE" “E A v THE

F

E

E F? g: .———— .-‘ -'—_‘ _—_— : E _.'—— —r —'— $4

i

= r,’.

_

E g :

_.-

_

:

.-': -——'

.—'__

z

5 rgi

E};—

PE

——' 5:

'——-—

—-_

_

few

'

.

n

Austraha

have

a

livered in Telemessage cg actually tie}, before England 56 nd

it!

PCrOLink’s the speed Of' Mai—viceand electronic difference mal'lmse the ten hour UK and AuS— between the U tralia’s cast was}-

st ance . for S ay mribel‘ Ned MicroLink sub.“ for his KellV is boil in _

We‘ll?) morhing billy remembers svdney when it’S the w'ith horror hhat a Doolittle, birthday of LIZt on holiday the sheila be me he hasnt Earls Court. a nd F

132m a card-

.

65P card-

So Ned’s lohga L‘Z ro mance With £2Sthan for les

overseas now

easier andfaster.

ts

Prevzously user was asked when‘a system Tlx, Key plus or Code?” he had to access an alphabetical

list of countries and read through it appropriate code

to get the

member

C l 0.0“? l who until his was head of iS

As

secretary to the Deanery of Clare in the

Diocese of

St.

Bury

Edmunds and Ipswrch he uses his Tandy Model I and Miracle Modem as often as possible to communicate electronic mail and telex by with other church officials. And he is also a member of the Church Computer User Groupz whose patron is the Archbishop of York and whose aim is to spread the gospel of high tech among church administrators. A

prime target for

distance is saved

a

telecomputi'ng Rural Dean, thebaptism is 'his RevAndrew Haig,whohasaCommodore 64 but hasn’t yet got modem.

a . .

'

hoping he’ll obtain one very soon”. Christian. “I can says Col. contact our Deanery Treasurer’s Apple II via Prestel .

MicroLink’s

and I can use telex to

facility communicate with the R

D'

number of the country he was sending to. Now hecanjusttype in the name of the country, telex number, and the answerback code where appropriate, and press Return before {wing in the text

of the message wants to send.

~

quarters-

System speeds up a telex message via MtcroLtnk

.S

retirement

'

SENDING

5 FE".- _.'

telegraph and data systems at British Telecom head

-

“I’m

~

E

.z

.5

K.A. Christian,

,

Tuesday evenwhich is5.303mM0nday 7130 nerve Link’5 Micro ing at lf an hour centre, and haadline for be fore the de next day delivery guarantee d es It’S

of TelemeSsag

v

,

-

-—__

—'

A MICROLINK with a mis io n

.

1

telecossible by wizardry is made -

fl

the greenpg 500“ ages g ’ 5151-123 nsmitted to Mlcro onto Sea where tram ispas local dthery of?ce. 3-01.55 on withher fe lloW In Co?mwer sellers, lea mark“ on very early :So getsber I[?lial-[may NeCl S gl‘eet‘fng1 on a 115 coloug at arrive:Ssage card — Telem lfiah morning he dit Tuesdayf hour he re he tral'lSmltte oLink‘ to Mer for Ned Even better news traha is on the _beca“§e AUSPacketSwitch— mternatlonal k he is able to stream acrOSS “.etworssage his shoot the 10500 mics for 159- The mflabout 0 equivale‘ht MicroLl?k Telemessage £195, plus itself COSts for theNancy greeting 11

omputing

This feat of

and hasl‘wastgnggrds ction

,

p —-—'

.-=

in to h by telex

l l

.

s '__F-

._'—

._-__

F

.

Ned

_ b ut B ELIEVE lt or “°-tbers in subser‘ k’s MicroLm_

.n!

'

t

.

‘ssszztwss'seiypta.

get?efzfegig?léoagzgf?gg we could show

so

telecomputing

can administrators tion more church

how

help func—

efficiently”.

he

,

-

YOU R chance to 10 in MicroLink

turn

to

Page .


a,

—_

?g.

""

'

Q

.'

4‘

,'

"

\.'

r f

f

$

$5 "

f

::;:;:;,-;:;.;f 7.0»..f‘aff

_Q’

i

51:22:55.1???»

w

_%£ ""

f

fiftgi':

,_:, 2:22.

-

'

,

--———-

_

7 5

_

»

74:2“{thlfr—M‘f—mw‘rii’:

f: Liftoff _,

Lt

«ff

f

“é"

5.

z

A

v___

,

i

?

—v—

-

“a

,

a

\

-

_

A

_4

3 -

THE 5205T sitting in the Atari User Of?ce has obviously been the centre of attention recently. few However, it was almost the scene of tears a the for discs demonstration three days ago when America. from arrived 5205T Tears of elation, then? Not so for the package had been damaged in the post. Fortunately, the of story has a happy ending. Despite the ramblings Francisco in San Mail Processing of the Director cause on how “insecurely enveloped" mail could had discs three the their machinery to jam, survived intact. The collective editorial sigh of relief was heard several offices away. The monochrome pictures in the “slide show" demos were pretty impressive, but when we monitor kindly rushed to us colour a hooked up in amazement, gaped everybody Silica Shop by The quality is so good that we've reprinted them here. If you think they look good, you should see them in real life.

,,

;

i ?

i

i

_ w 3”

‘\

?

-

__‘ v

.

."'

A‘annnq “

.

,

j?

,

—-

Jam-

, h

?—t

"

f

7.

.

298». 2:33

,

if"

1

_ l j,“

‘T

;.

4M

v‘

f;_

5

'

,

_£_ 1

\

A"

,.-

an“,

7

5

'

f”

.

'

Q .

m

..__ '“‘

5:4. lfza’féz?j?z"

w;

,

5

“?g~

“?ll—?"

:

5

v

»

?

.

.

.

r

.

.f’

[2/5

3

5 ' '

'

?

V5 5'

4.”

'

'

ski/5

(Ifg?i'fxaf’?gng?i‘.1 if

tr p; ,._

i

f" ,.,

(23,12

'

,,

"

a

g 933

33

$3 a,

,

g:

“‘

”‘w

a

f-: .

72 ATARI USER

.

M

November 7985

1.5... Aw..."

-'

-,-

1‘

‘1-32',’

5-539

,_

~»,-r'-

"

45

la“V

,

.

7"

'

if

'—

'

7,

7 7

c,

s;

‘H


“AM

-

A“,

m ii

g

A

,

<5" Jr.

'

,

AAA

e

in

n

s l

5

Q

A -

f.

"

in"

V

m

"

1

'

performance IS super b , t 00

'

>

,

f‘

11

a

A

i 7

7.

m

"‘

x

r

-

y..

3

A

-

'

x

a;

'

as:

_"

,

_

_,

2 ,, . 7

lli

A; -~-.

y» "~

A

> ,

‘~

L

a

a

a

A

r

h’

t

.

i

.

,

,_

m

’*

r

a

H

._

«A

”v

|+ r

Z

3:

WW yms

r

|

A

y

,

Q

I

”2, '

1,421,22.’ 4 D

A

2

A

g

2

,

my

~

.,

,

A

i

~

s

.

j?

3'

.

.,

A‘s.1“,

?g

7/1

, _

;

AffAAh;

”spa

5

._

7

:

w

A

2

,

.’

"

j

,

g

e

g

?uff;

cm

» ,

”225W 2

.

22

”w,

2

W

w

A,

2

/

”My/f

2,2 . “2-22.

22”

[w

$272

/

WA? ,

'

“w,

w 1

Wm?“

A

AA

,,

,

y

21

5

'

2"

l

1

4m (52.

November 7985 ATAR/ USER

73


7

1,

»7' 7.

-\("'——‘-—""

[Tl-”?r“,

/ -...w..,é,£.,

~

'

w

g

m4“,

, C

.

Cnmpumart

*

~

3

f

,

(cow

331

r.,....4

ii”’

;.17.sa'.°'«‘.357‘;'».';1_

37'

.-..(.._

3“;

1123253

Ag"

a,

.

7

'

~M

7

s

7

771';

“”

.

' ’

-—

_

u

r-

-

.

3

'

7

-

,

““‘

37753».

'Z:§~-"'

,>“\:"

V”:

.7. ’

o,

.75~;,

7_.:;;..;;-,,,v}';,5’~.f;~.5

. 3

7a;

”57777 r

K

.;~’,7~n~17;?“:

7

47

,

14225?

73.733-

37,3»

“77

"

m2

3713

.

‘7

"-i

‘E~V~j*~?“’/Z’

7; ”77 w? 777? 7&7” 57 “77773“? 377 7357737337 3g? ,3 3333§§§wg33337 3?g??w 737 ‘7933; 7371277 3 333,313; 77,3 7” 7:27. 47777777373“ ?f?z?‘f3 “777 7’§”““ 73 72§3$73’% 7755?“ 7‘7 z 3“ $*‘ W4 Pf}.3341537 473 %3%% ?g?igrg §n3373@3§m§¢7 zigy?iw “2&3“ £173“ ’{w ; lay? 333,33 7.7423? QW 3772777 3 7g” 2 3 73377 1777 §7§33 77 $77; 777327 7737 ," 3,71 5-37; “3? 3; r “7733, Q if? 7&7;;.771”“m%7: is vi «a?? ”W“ “Q 7. kl”, PW: 27mmr l f 315; 3335; §§?~5§$~* 7373 ?égigi?f? ?ng’ 3337373 ”7&5?“ 33,““.;~f7‘ 7;,<~~',

771223,

4737

31237;

”(711

73,

37

_,3

3577335735143

.

3

£53

33735713

;

‘-

-

3

3341-5153?»

'

"“7

7

3:31!

,'

,_ 3: *‘

73.3333 ,,

;*

7

753

,

.

,:*,W't‘£. W‘? 77 7‘”°‘ 7371 1771777731?

7

7.

q

7

«1

,

_-l

'~

.

73

,,

$7737“

“557

‘~

Ataliww 8s1Disanve (wrth E Homee?le Manager, Payoff

“'=

.7

f“”

7“3

~

75175?” 7‘ 1

.

.,

.

£234.

Adventure~z&~lemo Drsks)

334333

£3

°

a;

-~

7

-

.

,

3

$7

35:13:33

$7; J

~

7

_-'»'

7

_.

.—

1,732,336?” Q=§§f§§§y 3

.

,1

17’3’2;

‘(il??f

~

.,

75

7

‘;"'7~3;,77i£;:::,

,:

_,

7

7

77

~

.

,

, ~

3777237

3

+ 53

p84,

,

;

:

,

I:

, ‘ 7

f

,

1

3,1,

7

P

~

,

DISK Dnve 130XE3<1050 ., (W|th FREE Home We Manager, Payoff Adventure & Demo Drsks)

Atan 1

.

.

.. ,

{

,

.

.,:3?i,,y

95

,

$1,

,,

O

.

—— 1

+ 53

p3,p:.

Goods despatched: SAME DAY PARCEL POST 12 Month Warranty: ANY PRODUCTFOUND TO BE DEFECTIVE W|THIN 12 MONTHS OF —

PURCHASE WILL BE REPLACED

Access

A

cheques/postal orders to: Compumart,(Dept ) 11 Gracedieu Road, toughborough Leics. LE11 OQFTeI (0509) 262259

f, \é

Please send

‘l’

7

_

33: 74 ATARI USER

FREE OF CHARGE

November 1985

Q

QQ.

9Q

5

c,\"’

«Q

Q,

90


I

I

a

m 3]

Q

g \

L 5

01

8

3 N

g

fa

3

2

4

.

.

Intelligent'Software Island Logic Llamasoft Mark of the Unicorn Michtron Michtron Michtron Michtron Microdeal Paradox Software Penguin Penguin Penguin Penguin Sierra On Line Sierra On Line Sublogic sumogic Talent

ff: 9

L cm L an d 0

ues t Ellimaoii mgs FIightSimuIatorII

_

Chess

ka u I&W es t

Goldrulnner Mud Pies FI'th S'mUIHIOV Lands Of HaVOC Caverns Pensate Transylvania XYDhUS Crimson Crown

IlI Suskpended Zor Three Dimensional Polyscan Colourspace Hex Flip Side

New OW

ow NOW Now

Now

NOW

ow New Dec 85 Jan 86 Nov 85 Now NOW Nov 85 Now NOW NOW Now NOW NOW

“2x

siestalker ness

:n;ocom n ocom Infocom Infocom

|

N OW

Now Now

Enchanter Infidel PIanetfaII

°

New Now Now

85 85 85 85 85

Infocom Infocom Infocom

miss

Hitch Hikers Guide to the Galaxy

Zork “ Starcross

Zorkl

New OW Now

Infocom Infocom Infocom Infocom

'

azx??tnger

Imggm

~

Rec ow Now Now

.

un 09 —t h e F rozen L egacy gtarglider ForeverVoyaging Deadline

.

AMind

.

Dec Dec Dec Nov

Jan 86 Feb 86

Baron Tycoon Millionaire Hyperdrive

SOFTWARE

The Music System Fleet Street Editor

Now New

Now Now Now Nov 85 Dec 85 Jan 86 Now Now

Bluechip Software Bluechip Software Bluechip Software English Software Software FT Oasis Firs/bird Infocom Infocom

ENTERTAINMENT

Mirrorsoft

Island Logic

HomeAccoumm

Checkminder

HOME FINANCE

Habacom K—Comm PC/Intercomm MI—Term Comms Ascii/Prestel Comms Ascii/Prestel Local Area Network Chat

SOFTWARE

CREAT|VE SOFTWARE

Micmgndmc

Haba Systems

PERSONALAND

Haba Systems Kuma Computers Mark ofthe Unicorn Michtron Miracle Technology Softworks Software Punch SST Systems

COMMUNICATIONS

Company

Expactad availability date

I

|

I

I

I

I

I

I

|

I

|

I

|

I

I

I

I

|

I

I

'

I

I

I

I

|

I

I

|

l

I

I

I

1

I

I

I

I

|

I

I

,

I

I

I

|

|

I

I

I

I

;

|

.

l

|

I

|

I

.

.

_

Research

Haba Systems

808

SPREADSH EET

Databench Fydler Kuma Computers Lasersoft Precision Software SM Software Stoneware Talent

805 808

DATABASE

Mirage Precision Software SM Software SM Software

Mark ofthe Unicorn Me‘ammco

Haba Systems Haba Systems

de|::

BOS Digital F dler Fydl

WORD PROCES S| N G

Com p an v

I

'

-

'

.

l

l

.

Bosplanner Habacalc

AutocIerk Autoindex Optimum Datastate K—Data Laserbase Superbase Filemanager DB Master FlexFiIe

_

Mince Editor 50 Express Letter Processor Su erscri t Wgrd Progessor Spelling Checker

K-ordw

Boswriter Gemwrite Mailmate S elImate Viyordmate Haba Letters Habaword

0 Whats being written . Who 3 prOdUClng It ‘ When It S avallable ,

complete list of

P'Onee’mg Programs

n

The

Now TBA

Now Now TBA Nov 85 Now TBA Jan 86 TBA Now Jan 86

Now NOW Now J 86 TaBIIt TBA

Now TBA

N3x85

_

N°W85

N

Now Now

Expgc‘gd

availability data

e

r


2

Company

KumaComputers Mosaic 5M Software VIP

BUSINESS GRAPHICS Digital Research Digital Research Fydler Rising Star

Systems Systems Systems Systems

OFFICE MANAGEMENT Fydler Haba Haba Haba Haba

K-Spread TWIn Spreadsheet The Professronal

Gemdraw Gempaint Mastergraph Cadcam

ADDOimmGSIET Haba Dialer Haba Window Dialer Haba Dem Haba Window Calculator

Integrated-7 Desk Diary Project Manager Valdocs ll Timelink

Protemeader

Degas

MISCELLANEOUS MANAGEMENT Batteries Included oatacodesvsxems Mosaic Paradox Software Planner Rising Star Softechnics

_

F'Xed Assets Control Inventory

'”V°'°I”9

Taurus Stock Control Taurus Invorcmg Taurus Accounts Cash Trade' Sales/Debtors Ledger Stock Control System

Negqtlator Nomlnal Ledger Payroll Purchase Ledger Sales Ledger Sales Order Processmg Small Busrness Accounts Sales/Purchase/Nominal .

Ledgers

,

Taurus Printers Package Administrator Wasp Insurance Brokers Wasp Printers Estimating Diary System Wasp Accountants Wasp Membership Accounting Records Wasp Incomplete Time Recording Wasp Accountants Wasp Legal Accounting Wasp Legal Diary System Wasp Time Recording

VERTICALAPPLICATION Execon Software Fydler Whitendaie Whitendaie Whitendaie Whitendaie Whitendaie Whitendale Whitendale Whitendaie Whitendaie

'

Acco U NT' N G BOS

505 305 BOS BOS

805 808 803 BOS Cheltek Systems Chipsofr Execon Software Execon Software Execon Software Quest International Quest |merna?ona| Quest International

Expected tv an.

avallablll

NOW

NOW

NOW

TBA

Now Now N°V85 Dec 85

NOW

NOW

Now Now Now

Now TBA Jan 86 Now TBA Nov 85 Now

Nov 85 Now Now Now Now Now Now Now Now Now Now

New New NOW NOW NOW

N°W NOW OW

Now TBA Nov 85 Nov 22 NOV 85 DOV85 90, TBA TBA

I

l

: I

I

I

I

1

I

'

I

I

j

I

I

I

I

I

|

|

I

|

I

: I

I

:

|

I

l

|

l

I

|

I

I

1

I

I

|

|

I

'

I

l

I

|

I

I

I

l

|

I

I

I

|

I

I

,

I

I

l

l

I

1

.

C

ompany

E

D U CAT I O N

Quest International Quest International Quest International Supplemental Software Towngate

Academy Deltron Scarborough

E

OPERATING SYSTEM 805

UTILITY SO FTWAR

GST Systems

Michtron Michtron Michtron

_

TBA TBA TBA Now Now

ova a ExPch?gy date Purchase/Creditors Nominal/General Sales Invoicing 2—Key Accounting Cash Manager

Now Nov 85 TBA

Ledger Ledger.

Typing Tutor Home Planetarium Master Type

Now TBA

Now Now Now

BOS/5 Operating System CP/M 2.2 Emulator

'

Now Now

85 85

85

Nov85

TBA Now Dec Now Nov Dec TBA Now Now TBA Now Now Now Now Now TBA TBA Now Now Now Now Now Now Now Now Now Now Now Dec

86

Now Now Now

'

IBM Ascii File Transfer M/Disk Soft Spool

x

orth [Leveu eve 21x Iliorth C Compiler Macro Assembler/Monitor Hippo C Compiler Pascal Compiler C Compiler Devpac K-Seka Assembler/Monitor Lisp CCompiler Pascal Compiler Basic Interpreter Basic Compiler Pascal Compiler Cobol C Compiler Fortran—77 ISO Pascal ModuIa-Z P»System

Basic Compiler Microcobol Compiler Basic Interpreter Assembler/Monitor CCompiler Pascal Forth ST Basic ST Logo Forth Accelerator

LANGUAGE

Breakout Calculator Rhythm

DESKTOP ACCESSORIES Atarisoft Digital Research Softechnics

PROGRAMMING 805

Atarisoft BTMSoft Computer One Computer One Computer One Computer One Digital Research Digital Research Dragon Group Dragon roup Dragon group GSTS ystems GST Systems Haba Systems Hisoft Hisoft Hisoft Kuma Computers Metacomco Metacomco Metacomco Metacomco Philon Philon Philon Philon Philon Prospero Software Prospero Software TDI TDI .

3

0)

g ':

o

a;

E

g

a

5

3)

it

<(

E q x Q N


I '

C

er The Computer that 5 been glvmg you such a ?ne time Wlt compu run to real you some Helping money. games is now ready to earn you chance to earn £6 or more your own business or giving your wrfe the an hour for word processing/secretarial work. All because of the brilliant new word processmg package, Wordstar the world s SuperScript from MicroPro the makers of best selling word processing packages for microcomputers.

:

3

E ;

2

(l,,_//_,_-./«

i

1‘

5:51”

1

i‘ ,

i

a

ii

M“

i

it

3‘

2

;

t ,

,

.,

l. 1

f

SuperScript combines word processor, all in one package. So spelling checker, calculator and mail—merge facility, SuperScript gives you all the tools you need to produce high quality reports, tables, lists, personalised letters and prints labels quickly and efficrently.

Versatile SuperScript

ma”

35?“

Each command is a single wor an or each comman cursor. You don't even have to type the command. ,

3

.

,.

.

-

_

.

_

With SuperScript Word Processmg Software 15 availabledirect complete Comprehenswe User Manual. Only £79.95 including VAT and Postage. OR FROM ALL GOOD DEALERS .

gives you all the editing options of

a

word processor, with full block manipulation for cut—and-paste; business-“style

overtype or text insertion modes; search and replace with pattern matching and optional case discrimination; backward search, case shifts for single words or larger blocks of text. And much more.

M t '

NEW WOR D

W W“

'

3

.

Mum“

'_

Gm“ .

PomsagPHianA'reom

01me

_

Malllngs WIlh SuperScript

Personalised mailings are easy with SuperScript. You can enter the data manually or use data extracted from your spreadsheet or database. Merging can be selective. A mailing labels template is included to help you complete your mailing and you can alter the template to suit your own label format.

C

t

0

/?£ guy

experienced

Attention Easy Script users! If you‘re already an Easy Script user. then SuperScript is the obvious next step. With its enhanced features and more powerful facilities, you'll be able to do so much more. There are no compatibility problems either. You can run your Easy Script data or Easy Spell dictionary disks under SuperScript. And by returning your Easy Script disk can obtain an upgrade for £49.95. .

m M.

,

PRocE SSI N G

user SuperScript also gives you Powerful tor the the ability to cut work down to a minimum by storing your own command sequences or text on single keys. This means that with a single keystroke you can reproduce commonly used phrases or multi-Iine addresses from a glossary, load in document formats or execute a preAprogrammed sequence of operations.

3

4:

5

/~/

gar“

g

i

_ ,

ll

..

M

J

'

'

M lcro Pro I nte r n Oil 0 n O Ltd House. 28‘31 ngh Slreel. Wlmbledon l

M ICI'O p I'D.

ORDER FORM —

Hoygorth

.

Village.

London SW19 58V —

_

gupglg/C??

-XBBHj

_

To Dept ATl, CUMANA Ltd, Pines ltading Estate, Broad Street, Guildford, Surrey GU3

Please

QT

Y

supply the following:

D D

”mp“ t e'

SuperScript £79.95 (includes P&P) for‘

QT Y tUpgrade for EasyScript £49.95 (includes P&P) for' t(Your existing EasyScript disk should be returned with this order.)

,

OR ORDERDlRECTBY

I

PHONING

enclose remittance for

(Cheques

=€

___

___

‘Commodore 64, 128. Atari SOOXL

,

computer 130XE. Apple llc, lle

made payable to CUMANA Ltd). Or charge my credit card

.

Access/Visa No.

0483 503 .I 2 ]

QUOTINGYOUR CREDIT CARD NUMBER OR BY COMPLETINGAND RETURNINGTHE ORDER FORMWITH YOUR CREDITCARD DETAILS

m

.

The build-in spelling checker goes right through your text, checking for errors. You have the option to correct any error, ignore it, or add the word to its 30,000 word dictionary.

ASK YOUR LOCAL DEALER FOR THE SUPERSCR|PTPACKAGE

-

-

1

Good wIth spelling, too

0 RD E R BY P H o N E

a

”MM sees»

,.

211,133" 0 .’ 233)??? ATARI (820021? c, || e

you simp y

Good with numbers Superscript allows you to extend your editing line up to 250 columns for wide documents like ?nancial statements, and with decimal tabs it's easy to enter properly justi?ed tables of numbers. or SuperScript's complete set of calculator functions can be used interactively from the you can operate on numbers from the text of your document. Apart and divide, usual mathematical functions like add, subtract, multiply, percentages, you have the ability to add rows, columns or even whole tables.

options SuperScript

.

AVAl L ABLE FOR

Simple for the beginner If you are a newcomer to word processing, mm“ move m e d

Edi?l‘l

"I“.

/

writes letters, inv01ces, reports, tables, documents, it stores, edits and even checks spelling.

(60

34,

/

,

_

~

,'

»

/

Signature

ia?cms—————'—— (Mm,

————————Postcode_______ If you are intending to

use

SuperScript for

a

speci?c purpose,

we

should

be

interested to have details. Thank

You

I

I November 7985 ATARI USER

17


;

-

_

1M

T

,

>

\

5144

SE fr: ;-z

5

‘i'

[m ”l"

u"

..--

1;

l-

4TT':'

1I,"WW“

f.

SE

4 ‘

'

'

'

AT

TVS—t;

,’

I

44442444441,"..i':;;‘-...4r\“2

4

-\

k

r?

,;

if

5»\\\\\‘;L~«~..\ "c:-

'l\\\\"n

4:;,;:’" 444441434 3m” 114534441.

.

cit/55:35; / 4

"frij?i?smy "s mm; T.

754>Wfr‘\ '44§41’4%%‘-3¢\ M3 .‘L’.

z'

f;

.f'

~

,

w:

"

ti"?

I

m

\

_ L

Q

in}

T

as. ??lrrn§m 7:

\T

T

”144er

f

'

5

x.\

\

T

§§4HITMN 5.1 '-."::?‘*

~

~

~

\

&

WV—T

\

N

'

a

.-....'."-s.4.

~~~s~

,

2

~

“f“

, TT

sites», KAT

T_

,

I

l

'

_

m

x

t

x"

7

M?g?‘é?i“ .\\s. \~i%?-\

Te:

~

_

‘N

“a“.‘i?iix

"1.

414474445144

"

44,2444. T-

.TT

T;=Tg§lm.m\\v.’-.~\T\T

'

-

I:

"i7'*\."

SN

\

FMMMM ..“h. \_

Am,“

~£c

T,

.

§§Q=&%\

4

TTTTTT

-

-

IT. rag-1

V

'

\

"75x-

.

4

.

V

I

4

»»

T

(a: ?...

-"

I?

T'

'

‘-..-:,=,=T:g

a.

w,

5

FREE

Lk‘.‘

‘T.::.? jTT' A7"? l "

_

,

.7

,

3;

4

_

T‘

/*— .

_TT

13

‘ELH' ill]!

4:5 4

’ 7754!» U

it

_

"

T‘

f

h

\,

S:

ti"

9:

'

1.)

\

‘/

thmif‘i‘

\

4"

I,

g'

,,

4sz

T‘,.

lQTT4T

igffj-

‘»

,

T"

'

"TEE l'!

l

<

4412-4. iii-“T

-.

n”an":Tf-‘417-‘174’T'42T341T \\\ :;?-_ ::;7—Z;é 1:»\\ 51; 55411: "55:15:

U":

n

;».

T

:

,.

T‘T'i!

'

555.51;

l‘

,

E’

455," IT'S NovemberSthandtheplotto “was; g l' z§:;;,,..\ ,j 4// H’ ,4.:. 4 blow up the Houses of Parliament ,/ k stat: fu'MM f has been foiled. Guy Fawkes has T“ T T'T4‘Ti4'4‘ / T; T (u) ‘? 2 4 been discovered in the basement IT g» .__; TT/ ff, with a barrel of gunpowder, just 4 T. M TTTTT m. ”m“ ‘° “9“ the “se' 4:2 ' .\ Ta3 1k He's on the run now and the 4444. f (?v/‘f‘ v? guards are hot on his tail. Every flit /’.w‘ "T way he turns there seem to be TT/ / T T‘ TT] a: T more and more guards. Can you ‘ TT "3 n Lf I him x'f‘ help escape? 4444 I TTTTT’ $2; ‘ 1 ?? All he's got is the spade he ?it: ,’ used to dig his way into the T .MTJJTH fl basement. He can use this to dig Q , holes in the floors. luT TTT,_ Q With a bit of luck the guards TT _' \ TTTTT4 TTTTTT_\__ won’t see these and will fall into 4TTTTTTTTT . V4 them. But be careful though. If TT “3A ;TT=4TTT,T4TT, f you fall down one of the holes 4 TTxTTTTTT,.TTT j T Yourself you've had it. é \‘ 'T»~;'i‘ \ Guy Fawkes is a fast ladders T T} Q \\ and levels game with 15 screens. T 4" T'4-.T \ There's a catchy : tune to ,~ TTTi “ TTTTT T — i ; Q\ accompany the title page and 14314“ '

»;'

.

,

'

-

;

T-TTT'T;

/

'

"

444,45

4

E‘

TTTT

.f

5

TE

..

~

T

/ My

-_

,

m

‘T

z

.TT,

T

4

/

,

T

v

L4

“f"g

"4x

T

f

.

T

% \X\‘TT{//’

_

“(IN

T

T

T

.

,

‘T

\\ \\//

-.

T

f‘

~

T

'

.

TT

I

4T

'

f}:

W?'

T‘

T

41

4'

T

/,TT

T

;T

T

,

g

T

f

..__

4

'

d... statements starting at line 5163 and the |aVOUt can be Changed by changing the data. You could also add another set and randomly select one or the other for variety if you're feeling adventurous. ..

November 7985

*

T

T

T

-j~‘.‘.

‘~'

é

4?» ;

’-

-

w‘ufj’

\*\\~.\ T

é};

:

—,

T

-

‘ &

4.

/

s

TTTT

.

\//

i

v

Ts}-

T; ~

34?

3635.1;

x

_

m

4

KN

,

T

TTT

T

,

T

~

T

T

1

4454T

0

0

T

4.

{4}

-

4T 144“

«w

4

f,"

I‘f‘t .

1\\:\§ 3} \

”f

,

TT ., 4

I

.

T

..

T

TT

.

.

«with, .

T

..T-

..«p’l‘i;

his“, w

W": T_

;'

-~

"414

In

44;

fin

,.

.

.

T

".“TNF‘QQ

~§§.

.

T

"?rm?“

_

.~§&T\\§\T\

-\_\\\\

4

.

;j\;\\

'

"

,

_

~‘ 5“

TTTT

T???

.

"

xs

7?’§\‘41\-

«a

T,_..

.

TwTTTTTT

x

4'95

1&3-??‘ \\

.,:_

T

f

T

/:t‘f’;,.; ‘T

’~

.

_

MT

T

!

;..

T4

TTT

4

T

-

.

"V

T

1

-

TTT

f

instructions.

78 ATAR/ USER

.T

T.

T

é T.

T

T

w\\ l

V

I

f

w

T

T,

.

A, .—

TTT

;

TT;

T

‘W

\

T

.’

,‘

g?'é

4‘

® as?

-T

.,

4

!

TT

Iv

.. ,

T TTTT

. T

T.

.

‘.

. TT

T


A seasonal Ll

fast ladders and levels

“Hg: 8st .

E3

f

game by R0 LAN D

7

.

of whet}?r you are RAM ' dead Or NUmb er of Qua d

0K L

i

.__

n:

, I?

I

\

'

9

\

II

“III II:

Mg

II,” "9,9

‘e

I”

II

is“

II

g

9A}

'

/

7

"I?"

/;/“///

I

'

/é%/

<4,

{///f// ,

//

//’

,,,//'

(“f

m

\

4

1

l

IIIIEI‘

1

I

=

wa

I

,

I

I

I

I

;

u:

”I;"II“ 11

I

,

A

I

I

I

I

“I!

I

M

»

'

'

I

.

"’““

.

»§§;f;;i;;?ai;¥"“ .u

9,1

Z

(IEIIIIEH

, ‘ ' '

"

1

I

I

If

I

9

I

IL;

1 , .

_ '

II

'

I

11,-

I

~"

»

'

II

/

r”

__,,__..__

III

A

III" ”II'EI'III‘

I

22192,

é

"

-,\

1—

I]

-

I

I

1

A

w“

7

2)

7

9!

A 25

4’

‘2

IIIII ‘

\‘

I

I1quat?

"II,

"12:

II! If, SS? ”1: {III/M I

-

,

5”;

f

,

57 ‘:\\’

is, $3

g

i

2

44"

z\\

§=

_

-

a

I

,

\

1/16?

§

"a

=

,

A

)

-.

,,

jig;

«z;-

~

'

.

I

1‘

I

Initialise

,

0112

1515

on (1:11 a»

1:7) THE! '

.

0,60,10.0:0=s+1+m0:1r

PEE

p:0(0.0):o=0(l,1):1r

pm

THE! 05

10011

1

M \___) «Ar \“IIIIIII11\\;U.:1::...’::MI"” If!

nu,.n(2

J(0 THE! M 1:11

THE! 0:0

r

s'

9

u

0

1500 REM ----— Hove Guards ----1505 son» 1,103.10,4:u=m1:1r 0:51:05:

1530 IF

00.0):4 TllEl omnwoxz 0&20,0:L=L-1:0£Tuml

'

,

,

1090 mm P,194*(Mll,Y):2):PllKE 0.113: n:1—x:x:1:v:.|:souun 0.0.0.0:0Hun

,

,_

N/f'

IF 11055 tutu 150 005110 450mm Rating com 100mm another gane

I

\

”00:05"

1070 SOHID

,

,.

005110

amn-

'

,

442,27

:J=v—(.mv:14n(.|0v:1x):If no 00 D10 men

,

”1&4

,¢3

/ 2.2/1'f;~_f/_1“

1051 If 1055 IF

if:

*\~'>"—-,r?—"“‘—_‘1‘=?fi

I,

\,

/-’//; 55 ”my,”

1060 JOY=STICK(O):I:lt-(JM:11H(JOY=7)

_

-

J

'

I

I” .

0133 THE! 0K:0:llETlllll

§ §}

~\Q,gyu

9

\\\_ >

"I

1

1015 IF numtnu TIIEI I=ll:J=Y+1:lillTll 1979 55 \3 1020 IF 510101003 000 0 THEN mum” 1)=4:POKE p+o+20,0:0zmnu

I

,

\

y/kz I

L

3

.

w

y

%k

in

\

=

,,

/

x

'

5 '

£00 1000 RE" --—-—nave Han -------1010 P:S+X+Y*20:IF 001,013 00 mam»

S

fig?” 1;

In

v/II" “I ‘lfb/‘l 3 l I NK I // \III I I“) I /,; I I I“I I '

z, 2

<.

x?

,_

2

_

”m

_

I

$44; Ex 4% \\\9

I I

,

”2

\ \ I\'\~f’\?\ is; ? ii/ ?g? 9§\\\\\I i? \\\\\ é

r

1

I

w

f

\,

\\§\( 9

WI

I

9

9

\

\

.‘

\

"

..

Mg‘\\\‘ \ film I 1.533.m l,

I .

o

,

-

Ir”

\I

\‘

f

:

I

‘ I

,

_

I

I

a

2;

'

I I

,

\_ f”

.

T.

71»

2,

I“

I

III

'

1,

II\

,

A",

.

I

I

9

'

g,

'

I

,

I

9

I

.

III

._ __

,_1

" .

’\5 I

III

I

-

.

“ii

=

9

"11

330 350 400 500

-

I

*”2“

I. i\ 9/2“ ’ J I ‘I

If?” ?f'

150 005110 500mm! Screen 150 005110 500mm" Start 200 005110 1010150500 1505 100 IF on an» 1 men 200 310 If on THE! senszuzscnssuu 320 IF not 011 mu 005110 7000

”r

..,,...;9;.,;

I

”H9.

__

50 505110 05005191 Instructions 100 LIVES:3:SCREEI:1

' II“ '/[_.‘

"~

I

I

4.

I“

‘9

1

9

;. .\‘ ll

‘I‘ \

I.

9

"I

.

I

/

{IV

4

J

._.-

‘9

.

_

2&5, s—

1

,;u_

l

g.

IIIIE I“

I

11,12,

‘I u

9

'—

“L;

’ ,,

33 new mitten on Mari 000 RL 35 not: 1062055xt1051—4zcnnpn105 37 ? =? “Tl-mung..."

51:59

“I \‘-_m:_,

~'f-

,

,

f <

|

-

A,

all

'

/

.

E

10 RE]! Guy Fawkes 20 HEN By 0.0.Haddilove

If? Hi

“I {5—H

,_

'

”'

”A

/

I”

9

9 _

‘-

///

I;

=II=+

n

II~ -

,

'

,/

/

II

1‘in

~

.

g; .~-.'

,

I“

i

//;///{/J//f//// %’//f/

xx? ;

XIII

_

4

“19.5

?‘

‘HIHH

9

"qu 1111.1“.

1

‘E“:'_:‘=‘=.” wmw ~

”‘I

if

«

54,9 »/’7% 11,5215/V?g???

fit“;

2

if

5&7",

\

If

“tag-"T 5:7

9

.

""

;

HIM i

.j!__.— . ‘j"- .'

i;! is: i,- iM?ii

,

"luzf?L-‘f-

”I

II

I

r”

“z-

:

,

-

“I

_ .

”‘f?gf sfagxig-jéééiiz:=‘..-"-.‘-i§§§?fr“f!

,

I

-

-..Ifiii-a_1;9;9a1;

“NW'n

I

-‘.

III \III LII

11

.

-

yfvzx$-?i a~--.~-4-~1;~‘,\.‘. " 411265512 i ”in“ «.:‘.\:t“,r::‘~“"?

5

u'iII-‘I‘qu; II‘ 5625493},III

I‘m

I

_

BIIVe_

nag-«mt.

,II'f““;-“~s\ I In

IIIIIII-f'.

"2-31.

w ::‘4—:3~=-3'

I

'

: a

1

"

L

j] I

m%

'

-

, f

“I”

"

,

-

,‘_b“w”_

<4.— ‘“

“'

.

l

,

«2

,.

,

w

'-

h

'

X

.,

i

e;

A th e Seree 4423623) ,1) Th copC‘O, Dl30) Of 411.6 r t gu ard Wheef?eordénates 3,135, d ead, Xg TYour coordiiaig‘a'ds 3he

WADDILOVE

a

left,

Cl’ee

'

f é _,\,2\‘ A 2/ij

5;

VA R , A31

,

5+“

9-

November 7985 ATARI USER

19


/, ,,-1540 15 010.0111z4 1o

1550 1.

51; 011:0:011:1111:1:o3:3:| 55), on 1,0 j 25;— 0101.01 (2 F M 5 9; L~_—;; 01011,1m<2 {11 1”

“moon-111111115

.

iL’“El15-':°L°'t

1115

j.

“mama-1110135

5211117 f jngf M"=lm

L1

111

'

01:0

_

1610 0o115 510+0*20,104*(010,111:2):Po115 5+011+011120,60:0(11.0):01110(11,1):01 1700 500110 1,0,0,0:1151111111

? L_ 1.11,“

1

.,

3:4

“"-1r——

'

1

‘I?/\

‘1‘ 111;.* _/3§~ ,,,~~’15/‘1._1\~.“,.211";y,/v-\ " a; a; ,di,5\1\§‘:/1\‘i,‘g:":\

it.

,~:_—;, Mon—ea

a

--

?r,

4600 115510115 470015011 1:1 1o 501155111115

__

00 115:115111 1 12 12 12 "

11

0 1 1

11

1;

4620

2

:? 12 1?

"

46‘9

?

1? :?

:?

Fire f?l‘ no

“100 901110..." 4650 sosuo 0000 1111111101

mm!“

very Good 11001101014720 0010 m Fantastic m,“ 11 o u 111 1111001,“ moazing! 11011-1111, **

11

1:

010110110101»

E

4000 115101111 5000 11511 ———-— Screen —,——————5005 ro11 1:0 10 01500110 1.0,0.0:115111 1 5010 5110011105 17:00115 756.PEEK(106) 5020 SETCOLOR 0,3,6:SEIGOLOR1,7,8:SET COLOR

2.12.0:551001011

3.1042

5011

1:0 1o 10

5075 15:11511111 5000 15 1s:"*" 111511 5000 15 15:"." 111511 5100 15 1s:--11" 111511

5150 5150 5151 5153 5164 5165 5155 5170 5180

1

115111

J

011.113 011,11:0 011.11:2:110115 11.10

111511

011.1):1100115

6020 FM! to

“25

10 SMEEl?-l

D(I)=0

6030 B(I,0):1+IIT(RID(1)*18) 5035 011,11=I111 (5110001111114 6040 00115 sthosztIALM 5045 115111 1 6050 1:1 6109 POSITION 0,22”? m;'-:";LIUES

115:"-:";SCREEI

1

5150 0K=1:l:0 5200 115101111 7000 RE" —-—--taught -----7010 111155111155-1100115 5111111020403 5011110

11 4,0,5100115 755.0 0505 005111011 0.21? "1;

5

2.1/4.1012150?lb

7060 NEXT I 7200 115101111 0000 REM ---—-—--—-

3,300~I,10,1

1:0

111511

J:0 IllF

11

r

v

0

11

0500 2 1? 12 "me plot to 511111 up the houses of parliament has been foi1 ed and the" 0500

2

of “guards are hot on the trail Fawkes. Can you help him 05500

'.'

:? "The guards

can be diSPOSOd

digging a hole in their pat h. non-t fall in yourself though!" 8620 '! :? "Pressing the fire button 111 95 a 11010 in front of you so watch on t_.. 0640 2 :2 :? 12 "Press Fire hutton..." by

0700 005110 0000

as“

“In“

-———— 0000 11511 ————- Initialise 9005 POKE 755.0 9.19 115511)“ 3039 0020 0111 115120),0110,231,p(0),c(0),151

1),0(00,1),01:10) 5011 1:1 1o 010500 J:011):.1:11500

0040

:1:(1):.11115111

1:0

THEN

1.01.1),10,4:15

.1

x

9.“ mm 1,299,173,azae,173,szzo,zu,a 220,230.0200,173.0200,173,0220,2:10,022 0,230,0240,120 0005 2 12 "Got to concentrate..." 0000 11:055111106111255zrol11:47 10 1023: 00115 111,0551115734411m15111

9595

q

0104

5011

1?

1

"15.1.1“;1:0 1o 47:11500 J:POKE

-

11+1,J111

1

5111

0200

115101111

,

0500 11511 character data 9505 Dam a,o,o,o,o,o,.,g 0510 0010 251,251.251,251.0,223,221,22 3

--~——--——

Tune

11

51.

.

0520 0010 55.126,55,55,66,126,65,65 05:10 0010 0,0,0.0,0,0,0,0 0540 0010 16,55.16.124.254,105,40,100 0550 0010 15,55,16,124,106.55,40,100

JIJfl:GOTO 8.5

0

0000 5011110 0,1,10,10 0100 15 05511120)“ 111511 0100 8110 POKE 28,0:IF STRIG“) THE. 0070 8120 RETURN .

.

. . .11

maul-1mm

0010 ::::11::::11:::::::11:: 0010 111111

111111

0010 mailman-101111011111.

20 ATARI USER

2,810,050!!!»

1,0,0,0:somlo

310.010 7040 5011 1:109 10 255 51511 2 7050 SO!!!» $1,111,451!!!“ 1.1/2.10135

8070 REM)

0010 1111 0010 1111

00111

0575 sosuo 0000 0500 5110011105 01551001011 2.0.015510010

9?“ 8619

5000 RE! ------start -------6010 H:10:V=20:P0l£ SHIW'HOJH

.1|~11-19111-11-1111*11-1111-11-1511-111111~.

0010 . . . . .1|. . . . .11. . 0010 .mm 0010 .:I|::::::::::::Il::::

00111

A1" 1 14.11.

0040 1:1:500110 2,101,10,3

Dan .||::::::||::::::::||:. 0010111111 0010 111111 1111111 mm" DM'A :::::||:::::||:::::::|| 5190 0010 111111

5200 5210 5220 5200 5240 5250 5250 5270 5200 5200

11,1

"

5.41? usr-cuv 5010155" Mari User“ oress Fire out

ton";

Guy

0050 115510115 P(J):50IIID

051111111 1111111

1.

5340 0010 4111101111111-1111111110111111111-101 5350 MT“ -===================

MIND

115111

.

5300 MM =H=======H====H====5319 0010.11..........1|...1|.. 5329 N“ "H"

7030

4

5110 15 1$:":" 5120 11:11+1

~\

-

\~_;;\f\f?‘ m

11005111011 10.23:?

5040 011115 755.0:05510115 5161:0o115 77,0 5045 5:05511100112551105511100)10:5 5050 5011 1:0 10 21 5050 11500 115 511711

8565 ? " 0570 2 12 1?

bf

4710 0010 m0 011 m,” Not bad 1000111,“ ouite good

0

x,

.

U abysmal lit-KW,” 1101 very 90011 181.1!“ 000 poor 1101-11-11,1111* satisfactory m

4700 0010

,_.\.

Q‘

f_1‘

-

'

1

\__‘

"1115 PI‘GSS

_;7

"g:§-"~."f:‘: ~ 5:14:15

gM‘

"

1011-11-11

i

.

_

5,11

2

'

0113.12 0520 005111011

'

4500 11511 --——oating —----—---— 4505 5011 1:0 1o 1:5o11110 1.0.0.01115111 1 4530 5110011105 0:551co1_o11 2.0.0100115 75

4510

0510 0110011105 2100115 755.0 0515 s511:oLo11 2.5.0:5511:o1.o11 4,3,01551

.'

7

“z,

1500 511

111511

151.

November 7985

8200 MW 85.96.7619617219615419615719

5,50,05,47,06,50,05,47,06,47,50,57,47,

.

50,S7,47,50,57,47,47,47,0 0220 0010 47.50.47,50.57,50,57,64,57,5 0,57,50,47,50,47,0 0240 0010 54,57,72,54,76,72,05,76,05,0

5,05,102,114,120,144,153,173,103,171.1 53.144.120,111,102,153.144.120.114 11250 0010 102.9100

0500

11511

—-———

Instructions

--——-

-

Tired Of typing? Take advantage ofour finger-saving offer on Page 61-


N0.

FOR A I ARI

1

520 ST

Atarl

PRICES ST PACK INCLUDES:

520 ST Meg. Floppy Drive HI_Res BAN Monitor Plus software listed below

. .

GUARANTEE

”g

, 1

EXCLUSIVE DireCt Exchange Guarantee is available FREE OF CHARGE to all our customersIf a product purchased from OUI’

.

WW .

,,

':",:.,3::.:..'IԤy}.,?,g.;s.;.s

I

I”

I

g

"

M/

'

4/7/62,

C

WWW”

g. . ..

.

.‘

£749.99 Bas'c' L090! GEM WR'TE' GEM PAINT and GEM 808 .

waaa a?’wwggZ/Z/

if” M/ fag; am W/ wMngma. £54444 ”W. 3“ wff;

gigs;

"

if??? py/f

Final prices and specs may be subject to change.

f.

$1”;

due to a manufacturing or component defect, within ONE YEAR of purchase, we will, subject to availability, exchange for new.

%

gjgpg

::;

. .

-i

POWER wn-HOUT PRICE

p ' ,

i .

'

'

Chipsoft Integrated Accounts Package:,

.

0

'

, ,

.

Nomina'l Sales and PUfChase

M

'

A

513224

ST to Centronics Printer Lead ,

£29.99

' "

p.”

“awl...

Warsaw f M

”map/MM

,

,, ,

,

r

w

ST Midi Lead p

£14-99

M

wwféJpw .

,

?aw/mama

.

'

specs 512K RAM.

"

Expandable Rom. MIDI Interface. R3232 Serial/Centronics Parallel Interfaces. Floppy Disk and Hard Disks Interfaces. RGB Video and TV outputs. Sound Generator with 3 channels. 2 Joystick Ports. 3 Graphics and Text Modes 320x200 z 512 colours, 640x200 : 4 colours, 640x400 BNV. 16 Bit Motorola 68000 Microprocessor running at 8 mHz.

i

THE

“l

«»

//

"

m”

"

,/ ,

.

SILICON CHIP LTD, Showroom address: 302 High Street, Slough, Berkshire. Tel: 0753 70639 *

Atari Business Centre. lst Dealer for 730 XE. * lst Dealer for 7029 Printers. * lst Dealer with our own Software House for Software Support. * lst Dealer for 520 ST Please phone or write for full details. 7

st

*

(DealerEnquiries Welcome) November 7985 ATARI USER

27


prizes 'n 0 great free competition “? rmD a 52

THIS month we’re giving away 50 copies of Chop Suey, the great new Kung-Fu game, courtesy of English Software. All you have to do is study‘the word square below and find as names of Far Eastern many countries as you can. Then send the coupon back to us with the names neatly circled. We also want you to tell us how many you discovered we’re not telling you how many there are, but it's in double

a

00253

1

7

UBEDD

.

71

7??ij

113241“: Ti?‘e?? §§1~Nf fprmT?" v

,

24

,

7

T“:

_

.

g

AAAAAAAAAAAA?? ;'

a; a; g, g, A

s,,

:;

..

r;

r;

”TA A A? A ”?fbAAAAAAAAA&A*K€** masseswmus messswpou: A“

”l? AA‘AA

j

H

A

A;

‘_

$3“

figures!

Closing date for the competition is November 30 and the winners will be the first 50 correct entries picked out of the editorial hat. It's not too hard, so why not enter? Remember, there are 50 chances of winning, so give it a "V-

'

_

WI”

_

Of 50 COPIES Of Chap Suey, the IateSt, greatGSt tGSt Of Skill In the art of K ung-Fu one

'

-

=IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIll-Ill...III-IIIIIIIII-I-I-II-II= ZYAAMZEZBNAITWNAEAON. s uey .c hop l TYGFOENROBQNLAXZNZHG. =compet,t,on IDLAVEMLRBISPVRWKZSZT=

.

..

I

MTXEFRZARMXRGKAVAJNOI

,

=Name___—_ OZCZBNNRBWAMNFERNIOI= =__——_RNP'GUECEUEMLSTAVIT|8= GRPRRBCDYGYIAHCIHAYN.

IAddress I I

NFUYMBTTNMEKGYNZCPZH.

l

=———’_—_—ZGGCAEFVAAETIXAEGEGL= .-———_—MCVNAPAJNBLVAFZQHDSGR. = SLUMVMEKEZIIABASHMDO: = AWUKAYWHVTLWAIXXIRBF: . TIARTAMUSHMAYHLQGYOA.

=

Numbefofnamesfound

D

=

I

= = .

v

I

J

N

c

u

M

H

L

u

|

N

s

Q

T

o

o

E

D

|

AKECGPZKRQQFEQKBGH‘ADI

EGSMGYFVFVOQXCGQANTO:

=

ReturnbyNovember30,

R

B

G

o

|

G

w

N

E

J

o

H

B

x

B

v

Y

I

o

B

l

1985 to Chap Suey Contest, AtariUser, Europa House,

0

F

X

M

A

2

W

A

V

I

E

T

N

A

M

N

M

B

B

M

I

o

T

o

M

L

R

x

s

T

v

A

M

F

2

v

T

P

v

A

=

gizg‘gsr‘geRg?ckpm

=SK75NY.

'K

MYDGIWIIPHDUNAFYJACC=

IIIIII-IIII-IIII-IIIIIIIIl-IIllI-III-lIl-IIIIII-II 22 ATAR/ USER

November 1985

I


—————-——__

Graphics

_

;

SO far in this series we've looked at Modes 0 to 8. If you have one

of the older Atari 4003 or 8003 that's as far as you can go. This month’s article assumes that your machine has a particular chip which some early models lacked. The chip in question is referred to as GTIA, or Graphics Television Interface Adaptor,and its predecessor was referred to as CTIA. Unless you've had your machine since 1981, the chances are that it contains the GTIA. If you have got an old machine and don't know which chip it contains, try

' 0" CA" GE 1

.

entering Program I, a simple routine which cycles through colours and Iuminances. |f you do have the GTIA the whole of your television screen will cycle throu h the colours because the

bordegrJand background are indis— tinguishable. However if your machine contains the earlier CTIA the border will be a different colour from the background and so M” be V's'ble‘ Break or Reset

Press

to stop the

program.

that you re SU“ With Assumlng then, I" take a I°°k at modes ,

_

,

,

,9'

me 10

and 11‘ You can access these in the same way as the other modes we ve

considered, using the Graphics

com—

mand. to get an empty Mode Press Reset Oscreen With the Ready prompt at the top. NOW type:

and

press is

been executed the

system reverts to Mode 0.

Ifyou want

Mode 9 you've QOt to keep It there somehow. In fact we saw the method used tO see

'

,

1. m 2. m 3. n!

’ g. y. 15 L=¢ “ “

a 557m“ ”at so nu ma; ft scam

10 70

m

It!“

u are

my

l. 9 20 ‘

Program!

system into a never-ending loop. With a program you can simply use a line which GOTOs to itself. For

S

a display list interrupt and/or redefine the character set. If you've been following Mike Rowe's series in Atari User you'll know what to do, but for now HI

that these modes don't have text any capabilities. You can produce a Mode 9 screen with a separate window at the bottom very easily. Simply tYDe GRAPHICS 8 and then POKE 523,54- HOWGVGF if YOU try this VOU'“ soon see Why used the phrase ”useful text window" earlier. In Mode 9 you can only use one colour, but you can have up to 16 Iuminances Of that C°|0UT 0” the screen. Mode 11 is the opposite, with 16 available colours but only one

assume

example:

10 GRAPHICS 9 20 GOTO 20 In immediate the can use

I

to use

last month to keep a full—screen Mode 8. All that's involved is putting the

execution FOR ‘

mode '

an

you

NEXT

'

endless

loop. For example, type:

Return. The brief flash Mode 9, but once the

has

Part seven Of DA VE RUSSELL series an Atari graphics modes

construction to create

GRAPHICS 9 you’ll see command

I

FOR A=1 T0 2 STEPO: GRAPHICS 9:NEXTA and press Return.The fact that we've used a step size of 0 means that A never reaches its upper limit so the loop goes on forever. The blank screen which confronts you is Mode 9. Unfortunately there's not much you can do with it in this state. The machine is locked in the loop and so most of the keys produce no response. You can Break out of it, though,or Reset the machine. Modes 9, 10 and 11 all have the same resolution of 192 rows x 80 columns with no possibility ofa useful text window unless you're prepared

luminance.

,

Mode 10 is a bit different in that it allows one background and eight foreground colours. However usnng C°|0U’5 from Basu: IS “Qt as these s1mple as for the other two modes, so we'll leave Mode 10 until the end. In Modes 9 and 11 we use a combination of SETCOLOR and COLOR commands. Only colour register 4 is used, so in Mode 9 the

—____' November 7985 ATARI USER

23


#

colour

is

selected with:

1. Wales a mug; so serene.“ 40 m 3:0

SETCOLOR 4,co|our,0 _

11 the luminance Wh?e '” Mode seleCted With: .

.

.

'5

so )

SETCOLOR 4,0,Iuminance

If

need

as“ ' 7

1:

200 core 20

Program ll

should see the same starburst pattern but in a multi-coloured single— luminance form rather than the single—coloured multi—luminance Mode 9 version. You might think that having only one,colour available, as in Mode 9, is. a severe limitation on what you can display. However the fact that you can have 16 luminances means that you can produce some stunning 3D graphics. Rather than tax my brain to produce an example ofsuchadisplay,

pattern which cycles through the colours and luminances. When you've had enough of that

Break out and list the program. To convert it to Mode 11 we need to

change lines 10 and 30_ Alterline 10 to read: 10 GRAPHICS 11:C=0 and alter line 30 to read: 30 SETCOLOR 4,0,C _

If

you fancyadifferent colouryou'll to alter line 10. As usual, a well—placed loop will cause the program to cycle through all the colours. To see the sort colourful effect of that Mode 11 can QIVe: enter and run Program IV. Its squashed appearance illustrates the pixel shape In these modes. With more rows than columns, pixels are long and thin. Mode 10 allows nine independent colours, each with its own luminance, but there aren’t nine colour registers, are there? Certainly the SETCOLOR command can only be used to access registers O to 4. This is the problem with colour selection in Mode 10. Some of the registers can be accessed via SETCOLOR but the others must have the appropriate value POKEd in. Rather than try to mix the two

to 15

332“;

n ma ” mu

starburst

'

Program III does thejob admirably. It was sent in to the Atari User offices by Dean Rossiter, of Wellingborough.

no

mmanmmnuzmtmmun

:

In Mode 9 the COLOR commandis used to select one of the 16 levels of luminance, while in Mode 11 the same command is used to select one of the 16 “hours. To see the difference between the two modes type in Program H and run it. This produces a simple Mode 9

”a. cus “i. 4,c,.

you now run the program you

ATTENTION All BlIDDIfJG PROGRAMMER?! ORDER FORM

Please rush me:—

"1 .

(Cass) @

£4.95

(Disk)

@

£6.75

ea.

Qty

Vol. 2 (Cass)

@

£5.75

ea.

Qty

Vol. 2 (Disk)

@

£7.45

ea.

Qty

Vol.

Qty

Vol.

_

1 1

ea. 1 : I

Prices include

P.

Maybe you’ve just acquired your ATARI” 8OOXL/13OXE or you're tired of usmg it /ust to play games! You want to start programmingand eventuallybecome an

a

P., etc.

expert— here’s how. 1

1

Dll(/l{0bl?(,l{l?

17

l

3X

1

sqomm

|

InteractiveEducationalSoftware package to teach you all you need to know about Computer Numbers BITS, BYTES, BINARY, HEXADECIMAL and BINARY MATHS, it’s all here. A MUST forthe newcomer to computing.

: An

~

FREE: Memory map wall chart with a” orders over £10.00!

|

: I

Name

——

Address—

:

|

post Code

|

:

Cash, Cheque or R0. to

1

|Mltlwslstllla

1

17

1

if

,,

l S vommez

manipulate COLOUR and SOUND easily and effectively Learn the programmer’s“Tricks ofthe Trade”from novice to advanced level. Essential informationfor would be ATARI experts!

: How to

—__—

|

_____________________

Q

Time as wbetter way to [cam about your ”MP, 00mm,-

m.

Shamrock Quay, William Street, Northam, Southampton so1 1QL. Please allow 14 days for delivery.

5322?le Software 24 ATARI USER

1

1

l

November 7985

from

SET

Software

for

Education and Training

ATARI is a trademark of ATARI CORPORATION


a

—————————

Graphics;

,

I /\\

"

I ‘

4

/\?5§§ \ Il§e\‘“f\\

i‘

/'

\ @®)

?}

r

\

--

\

){/

.

3

A

\\‘

?

\ ‘2

,'

' .

'

ii"

\

:I

"

.

?ax k“ /,k\\\§\\\‘\\\\ ‘\‘\“ K?) =\§§§§;\A@2V/: / W' wA //// Ti,"

.

'

M -"'

\

Q

iii/l, ”it i

.'

"

\\‘\\7\

_

\-§-

'

/'

_-

..

"-

J

1

?es / \

\

\

and we can use

.

\

li‘

“circle" of colour,

a

of this to produce an effect movement. If your eyes aren't feeling too tired, try entering Program V. to Wit[Fines ran C110 om va1?0loadéhehregidsters ues an t en raw bands of these colours across the screen. Each band is five rows deep. 130 to 190 then shuffle the Lines registers around constantly, producing the movement effect.

~

-

Ali

/,\\

\

,

1

1.1],

\.'

\

~

\

"“Q

_/

to produce some interesting effects. Suppose, for example, that we load the registers with particular values. We can then move the values ”along" one register and move the last value back to the beginning. This will have the effect of creating

Since the colour mgthOds'

I

Mode

recommend

that when

always POKE the usmg COIOU' registers. Of the two methods 10 you

this

is the only one which can be used on all the registers, and so is simpler. To be we don’t actually

accurate,

poke the registers

themselves. poke their "shadows" in

Rather, we RAM. However this is a detail which we need hOt take any further here. The locations WhiCh contain the colour information are 704 to 712. These locations correspond to the commands COLOR 0 to COLOR 8

respectively. The value which is poked into the register needs to contain hOt only the 5 mim 5

DEERE?

“E" m

518!

_

Lazamgalz?zx?z‘

2! Limammsswzuwxzcnii?u 30 GOSIIB 10.03!“ Mani! 1m a L?zlxzmsswzn=PR=67=PY=50 u enses “mum Mean: 2m so szugnxzszwzuwmumn 70 cm “amen mu 3m

1: izllfzéz’W" l

1

I

mytitng‘mzti’uxmu

1012

vz?lmi?

an

mot

Program ///

ozmr

”Juneau

3° FOR A

Program IV

colour informtion but also the luminance information You arrive at the value b y usin g theiformula' X = (Colour ' 16) + Luminance where X is the value which gets poked into the register. '

_

background colour by poking location 704_ Using the ?ght purple co|0ur that we've just calculated as 88, try entering the following: FOR |=1 TO 2 STEP°:GR'1° =P°KE 7041881NEXT Once again we've used the STEP 0 trick to set up a perpetual loop so that the Mode 10 screen is constantly displayed. If all has gone according to plan, your screen should be filled with combination 88, or colour/luminance "9m purp|e' We can use the fact that the registers are all in adjacent locations |

1:1:

T

0.6

0 0°”"0'S the ahd this comCO|0Ufi baCKQFOUhd mand corresponds to the register in location 704, we can change the

am _

’.

a"

amzmo

Since COLOR

"

_

mums

ilk—011260

=

0 7° 8

Because these modes require the GTlA chip, you'llsometimes see them referred to as the GTlA modes. This Chip's jOb is to interpret the data passed to it by the Antic chip, and in fact Modes 9, 10 and 11 are

three different interpretations of Mode 8. Consequently they require the same amount of memory 8k. 0 Next month we'// finish off this series with a look at Modes 72 to 75 which are available to XL and XE owners from BaS/c. —

I...

'

0

m”

are

t808be

so Pm

77,0359“) so m at“ m “ail! mti“ 1001 mum! 7:2 to 1am“ I 1“: PM“ ”1.71“. “,Y 1m vzvu?lsn t we run 1:14 To 2 STEP dammit 1005 PL“ ”mama rim 1.“ twat“ T 1007 Ysz? rzz to income 1

To 40 70 PL" 00 if!"

(

For example, suppose you want to specify Colour 5 with Luminance 8, a sort of light purple colour. The value * poked would be (5 16) + 8 :

“l“

‘9

1. mos. 11 2. “Lanna 30 F0: to to 13 u wanna so mg. m 6. IF m“ Bit m“

values

selected randoml ,the dis la will be different each rime yoii ryun the program. Use Break to give your eyes a rest every now and then. If you want to choose a random background colour too, change line 30 to read:

u can 1. mums u 30 in 4:1 to 3 40 "Kt mm,nnmmms: SI Ex! 0 5. FOR 73. W 180 STE? 5 n czcuzlr cu mill 3:1 3! mm 0 N Fm 2:0 to 4 m Put wanna“ 79,v+z 11. next 1 129 "a“ V 13. Minus:

1‘s:

x?tzzzm? '

1:

?

m 1”

P“

Program

:12,A

mutt 6°" 13!

to 2.2.5“

“L“

V

November 1985 ATARI USER

25


m

to

at Mo

‘wfw"

~:“-"r'

7

3g.

I

might

expect

a

game called

The Great American

Cross—

Road Race to be all

Country

about marathon running shades of Flanagan's Run, —

Loneliness of the Long Dis— tance_Runner, and all that. A gruelling race game this certainly is, but not on foot. A powerful racing car is your

"33

~ ?ts

7

452?

374»: a

3&1”

age;-

\'

«Egg ”a:

35,4.“ "at

’-

T;

£3;

-*”‘”§"J&f; i;a? $951}; {g w “if“ésgf; z“V“ 1’ 3;

.

"

‘E‘X'?i‘

i

.

‘lf

.

§

A"‘

3

-. N

*

j

.

4

g

ém

"

'

A

IT was a wet night when I arrived at the mansion. As I e n te re d, m y re p o rte r' s instincts made me wonder whether l might be a little too conspicuous. I needn't have worried.

Over by the

fireplace

six—foot rabbit

man-sized

cavorted witha

peanut butter

sandwich. Three mice in dark glasses brushed past Pacman. An astronaut strolled up to the bar. Near the entrance a gorilla was doing a splendid job of looking afterthe guest's coats.

queen of the fairies, was chatting up a sheik. She was going on about one of her horses, name of Lurking Grue. A vampire seemed to be

discussing everything from politics to local scandals while the more athletic took to

enjoying himself hugely.

the dance floor.

Titania,

26 ATARI USER

November 7985

A

Other assorted weirdos

were

By

com-

,

t

'

;=.=1“-—4‘.——""“'~. "\

~‘

1“

4. 5.4}

'

against other drivers

of Veronica

, \

'

n

w

f".

(3377? 6:“

.

\

_

timer

358 V} “Isl/j; (é‘:1}? mp?b$,}f;..,1_g.

an

p arison ' the cowboy looked the very model of sobriety and good taste. The man in the outlandish cowboy outfit was me. I wasn't havingabad dream the nightmare would come later. No, I was attending one

;:/~,~l;_:y/,.,\_,,

?'f

.-——-——-—4'—$4.

past everything on four wheels. To begin with, you can try to compete against any one of nine fields of already established times. Each field consists of the best results of 10 drivers. Then there are four west to

1

A“,

;,

,~

3?

race

mine} s». 45W 2‘

“0

'

across America. But there's more to it than just welting

”472:

a.

ef?g?i??if,"

=--.. ,

'

».

if its

f“

-

»

we ‘

ii

mode of transportRoad Race (well, I'm not typing that title out again) is Activision's latest and follows in the best traditions of Pole Position and Pit Stop. My thanks to Software Express of Birmingham for speedily arranging to let me have a review copy as soon as it became available here. At bottom, the game is a

simulations, you

athletics

'

“a,

grue mg C h a II enge

-WITH the current trend toward

"

55:7?52-1‘155?

Ashworth's

famous hallowe'en parties. Actually I was mixing business with pleasure. Pleas— ure because I had been invited as a friend of the hostess. Business because my editor thought there might be a good story in it. The fairy queen, none other than mine hostess Veronica, had clearly been knocking back the Buck's Fizz from quite early on. Her words were slurred and she was none too steady on her fairy pins. Emphasising a point to the sheik, she waved her glass on high and succeeded in slop-

east coast crosscountl’Y races to choose from: Los An99|_es u? Seattle to New York, IVllaml. San Francusco to Washington, latterlsa and the US Tour. The toughie snnce itrequ1res you to drive through every CITY 0" the map. The map [Jobs UP once selected your race. And yqu'ye is much, much more than this abut ofgloss—carefulplanning

ping alcohol and ice cubes all down her tinseled dress. Usmg a would make an word_that elf’s halr curl, she staggered off to clean up. A little later, I saw Veronica again. She was slumped on .

the

floor

.

of her office

elsewherein the mansion. She was less than dead drunk—she was dead, period. And if that wasn't enough to dampen my party spirits, my cowboy's Iariat, which I could have sworn I hung up in the closet with my damp coat, was wrapped tightly round her pretty little neck. Just to putthe cherryonthe cake, a bullet lay by the body. Guess whose gunbelt had one empty cartridge loop? I could almost hear the click of the jail cell door. So there I was, plunged deep into Suspect, a superb new text adventure from .


I”.

-

and selection at this stage should help you achieve good times. Equally, slapdash selection may well be regretted before you even reach your first checkpoint. A flashing circle on the map denotes your point of departure, while a pulsating arrow indicates a possible next stop on your route. By joystick movement, the arrow can be positioned to another desti— nation city. Only those cities cgnnected by a major road to your departure point are avail— able for selection. A scrolling bulletin across the top of the screen tells you the conditions on the road you have chosen. You have to be careful ~ things like lane closures, the dreaded road— works or oil slicks could cause you to lose valuable time. The weather conditions are no less critical in your route selection. Just like our good old Met Of?ce maps, this one has plenty of those cute little symbols. Snowflakes and rainclouds indicate just that .

.

while

clouds without

rain

indicate fog. It all seems more like Britain than the US of A! A clock indicates your time of departure. It can be set to any time you like. But watch it you could end up driving at night or arriving at a city in the middle of the rush hour. Now the race is on. The screen changes to reveal a Pole Position type scene: blue sky, green sward, a city skyline and your car sitting on a central road which tapers into the distance, At the foot of the screen, reading from left to right, is a fuel gauge, 3 rev counter,

pays to burn rubber. The mileometer also counts down, telling you how much further to your target city. The radar warning lights up when 6 police speed trap lies ahead you'll know anyway because sirens start blaring. You have two choiceswhen slow down or hitting a trap try to outrun the white police car. If you're caught, you stop

timer, mileometer, speed-

showing how much time

remains for you to complete this leg of the journey. Failure to reach your destination before the timer reaches zero disqualifies you from the race, and that means you'll have to start all over again. If you beat the clock the spare time is added to the time allowedforthe nextstage,so it

of and, coupled with the appropriate engine noises, adds much to the motor racing atmosphere of the game. There are four gears. Shift too soon and the car will respond sluggishly.'Shift too late and you could blow your engine and have to push the car to the next service station. Pushing is accomplished by tapping doggedly away at the fire button. You'll also have to push if you run out of petrol. Warning messages are given when you are approaching a service station. The station is shown as a pink petrol pump and you must pull up beside it. Your car will be automatically refilled and/ or repaired. lt's all too easy to overshoot, or stop by mistake at a cactus, when you’ve been haring along at 150mph. if you're not driving very fast, other drivers— and there are lots of them go flashing past but never hit you from behind. The same cannot be said for you.

ometer and radar trap warning. The timer counts down,

gears down. All very easy to get the hang

dead, the police

car

pulls

alongside, a sardonic message is displayed. like 'Where's the fire?" and you're stuck there for several precious seconds. At least you don't get hooked! Left and right movement of the car is controlled by similar movements Of the lOYSthk. The fire button is used to accelerate, and pulling back on theioystick applies the brakes. Gear changing is neatly handled. When the rev counter reaches the 9 o'clock position and by then the engine is the fire beginning to scream button is released and a quick

forward tap of the joystick causes

a

change up- Similarly,

aquick backward tapshiftsthe

.

you hit a car while overtaking your car instantly If

switches to bottom gear and slides over to the side of the track. Luckily, it hasn’t stalled. Arrive at the city within the time limit and you'll be greeted with a jolly tune and a welcome Sign. Then it's back to the map To seleCt the route for your next leg. Run OUi Of time and YOU” be tOld “SOWW and be OUt Of the race. The sound effects certainly add to the air of excitement and joystick response is per-

lnfocom. Suspect is one of their best and follows in the footsteps of Deadline and Witness, their earlier detective adventures. Deadline called you in to

investigate

a

suspicious

suicide, while Witness placed you as an eye witness to a dastardly crime. In Suspect you find yourself far more embroiled in murder most foul than ever before—all the evidence points to you as the prime suspect. Unless you can find out who really dunnit and pronto, your reporting days are over. The case is stacked against

you from the outset. There's the rope for starters. Then there's the bullet and gunbelt. You're also an outsider. Yes, it'saset—up all rightbut since you know you’re not a kiIIer, it follows that the real murderer must be among the

motley collection of

upper—

crust characters present at the

party. The police are soon on the scene,among them Sgt. Duffy, of Deadline fame. What you must do is to build up a case by exploring the mansion and grounds, watching and talking to the various characters, and analysing and deducing. Only by gathering enough irrefutable proof and presenting it to the police can you establish your innocence and another's guilt. You can't make a citizen's arrest you have to convince the detective to do that. You can accuse people though, but much good will it do you if you go around making wild allegations. You have but a few hours (game time) to solve the mystery. Failure to do so will result in your being arrested —

and found guilty of second degree murder. Suspect is graded as an advanced adventure, so it's likely you'll be arrested and

convicted many times

over

many weeks. Never mind, the preceding stimulation and entertainment more than com—

pensates for being falsely imprisoned. All the lnfocom hallmarks -are here, massive vocabulary, sophisticated input parser, dazzling and detailed prose,

fect. l

in skylines,

twists and turns, good humour, plenty of original puzzles and multiple solutions. No doubt about it, this is yet another excellent adventure from lnfocom how do they keep it up?|accuselnfocomof brilliant. being maddeningly —

Prove their guilt beyond

a

shadow ofa doubt yourself by buying SuSpect. l rest my case.

Bob Chappell

The graphics are first rate—— especially liked the Changes

darkening

'

the gradually‘ Scene

as

night

descends and the anOOth high Speed scrolling. Add these qualities to the planning elements, the combi— nations of possible routes and the variety of the challenge, and you have a very good race game indeed. This, is one I recom— would unhesitatingly mend to any race game fan. .

Bob Chappell November 7985 ATARI USER

27


-

SUPERB tALUE

S"

60/510

~

absorbingtext adventures ZKUL and WEST. These games are already best-sellers on the Sinclair QL. The special pack combines both adventures on a single 3’/:" disk. Full instructions plus a helpful Bluepnnt for Adventurers are included. WEST iS a fast-paced action adventure WhiCh acts as an introduction to the more demanding 'dunge0ns and dragons' scenario Of the classic adventure,ZKUL. A demandingand exciting text TWO

__

ST

WE

over 200 words and as many phrases. There are over 130 locations to search — not all ofthem easy to ?nd. Events happen in real-time outside your control — Indians charge, rattle-snakes slither past and robbers appear and shoot at you. How long can

'

°$t

l

adventure,using

i‘ I;

.

.

..

.

~

KINGDOM or zxur. ‘the quality of the game is superb the others have to beat'

(Add 50p postage & packing in U.K. £100 for overseaS)

WEST will please anyone who ever frowned intoa puzzle of any sort' 0L User

i,

,

'

i 2409 5

wesr

I

f

,

you survive?

.

6°" of

4

l

LOST

You are on the track of a notonous gang of bank robbers who have gone no

,

town deepin Indian territory. Your 125k to outwrt and outgun the robbers, collect as mUCh loot 35 DOSSIDIe and piece together clues on how to escape. and ST are the Registered

Trade

Marks

of the Atari Corp.

-

4

_L

_

the Eéplgre

IS

COMPUTES

Adv e" tu W

_

Of

ancre’nt dvngIIW-leace

A classic,

gomplex the experienced games player, with

SYSTEMS

Of

CURRAN BUiLDiNG, 101 ST JAMES ROAD,

a

|°tc.at'°n'f_g.nd "$1192 vtgscalégeglgfanrd iggzelsmf gvnld5025; note-pad feature to aid you. hundgeds

GLASGOW G4 ONS 24 Hour Credit Card HON-me 041'552 2128

Ltd.

_

the standard

255.3. Quintana;9.553... text adventure for

.

Atari

. ' A

.' 5. u,‘

ninin

an

this

M' '°'°

.

SOFTWARE FROM SCOTLAND

the only company that WI-" persona II y d e l.|ver an d In?a II

We

are

_

1

a“ Ata" computers

19... Bruce

Flight

Drop

Zone

Chop Suey Pole Position

Hardware:

.

P009

printerand modem i3DXE(withlreejoystickorgame) 800XL(withfreeioystickorgamel free

Starter

BDDXL

Pack

(computer +

£749.90

cables)

+

Invitation to Programming)

1050 DiscDrivelDUSZ.5+5blankdisksl 5%"Biank0isks(each) 3§”Blank?isks(eachl AtariDotMatrixPrinler.................................___..................................£149.99 TurhoPrintInterlace £5995 Epsom

011

One

Smash Hits] Smash

Hits

Smash

“$3

2

Summe'G?mes

£15990 £5900

tape deck

£950

Lee

Solo

One

5205leith

em.

BountyBob

Printers

£99.00 £199.00 £1.45 £3.50

ColosussChess F1 5 Strike Eagle

A'C'W"

”WNW E"°°_"‘“9’ Centipede

(ringforhestlhall

KWWWAPWOBW K'SS'“ K°“5'"5

..

_

XUS

£50.00 £27.95 £75.00 £27.95

XL

Basic

BasrcToolkit Mac65 Mai:

65 Toolkit

?czlonle CID"

00

ll

£1995 £795

28 ATAR/ USER

FourCoIour

Picture

Disassembler

UtilityPacane £795 Utility PaekTwo

Dump

£10.50 £35.95 £7.95 £75.00

.

FiIeLoader

Printer Initialiser

£995

23.32

£79.95 Ultimon.................,.......___,,,,£49.95 80 Column Pack £69.95 UverwriteBlU £795

BadSector

Ultra

BasicXE

US Doubler

Tripler

Translator

1020

£9.95 £19.95

November 7985

Books MasterMemoryMap..................£15.95 £11.95 MappingtheAtariXL/XE Machine LanguageforBeginner £11.95 TechnicalUserNotes..................£17.00 De ReAtari £17.00 MusicaIAtari £14.95 lstBookoiAtariGames £10.95

“4-95 N/A

£195 NM £935 £195 £935 {5-95 N/A {5-95

a...

N/A £12.95 £12.90 £14.95 ill/A £12.95 £12.95 N/A N/A N/A 533-7“ {12-95

Rescue

“435 “235 £1235

“230 N/A

£3535 N/A

Attack of Mutant [luasimodo Packmari

£935

N/A £14.95 N/A

Seven

N/A

£3235

Cities

a-..

5.1

N/A N/A £9.95 N/A N/A £8.95 £9.95 £17.95 £9.95

“edMou?

£735

£34.95 £34.95 N/A £14.95 £29.95 N/A N/A N/A £12.95 N/A

“Filer

59-50 N/A

£1235 £2835

£935

“235

Ball

Mr

Fractulas

From

Blaser Do

Conan

Zork Ghost

1-29 Chaser

Decathlon Hero

Mule

RaiIsWest

Super

29440"

_

"M

{29-95

N/A

£3735

£935

N/A {32-95

“lich‘H'ke's?mde Dead'me, L°fd50f7m9 StarCross

"M

Biorhythms CutThroats Sea

£6.50 £9.95

Camels

Utilities:

£10.90 £9.95 £9.95 £9.95 £8.95 £9.95 £14.95 £14.95

55

Stalker

Wish Ultima

Bringer III

Sorcerer Mask

ofthe

Sun

{7-95

NM

"M

{29-95 £32.95 £29.95 £19.95

N/A N/A N/A N/A ill/A

{3195 £43.95

___—_—

PROGRAMMERS:URGENTLY REQUlRED FOR FREELANCE WORK ON PROJECTS

__——

COMPUTER SUPPORT LTD, 25 5930011"

“03d, Abbey Wood, London 552

Tel: 01-311 7339

9UWX-


as:

F595§1

7,

7

7

it

I

25:11:

(”RE

Arcade 2‘

.

'

,

actlon

.. g

I

deep m the pond take you there with Savage Pond, their "11”me can

ation of wild life under water. Quiet it may be, peaceful it certainly isn't. In this fast arcade game you start by playing the role of a tadpole struggling to survive to adult— hood. Just like the inhabitants of any country pond, you have to

avoid the perils of other insects and animals striving to live in there with you. Survival of the fittest would appear to be an apt rule in this scenario.

Using the keyboard

worm

count reaches five a beetle larva appears and if you can polish this offyou take another step along the long path of evolution. In stage one a multi—

coloured dragonfly buzzes about above the pond dropping its eggs into the water. It is vital that you eat these as

they

settle into the cover of deadly hydra and become irretriev— able. When they hatch at the bottom of the pond a larva dashes off the screen only to return as a deadly dragonfly

nymph whose staple diet .

.

$1

g

..

t.

G

a

3 .

.

.

him out by outsw4m— you tire mung him over the screen. In stage two bulldozer a comes adding .

along, another radloactlve hazardasnt dumps waste into the pond. If you can survnve all this and manage to become a frog, with a flick of your long sticky _

can

tongue. you

catch

pestering dragonfly buzzes overhead.

thanks

for you.

that

as

There

it3

got this far you have had all your eggs and tadpoles destroyed, the com— If

_

havnng

.

puter dating agency comes action and provudes you into With a lady frog. Aftera lovmgembrace you provrde a specnmen of frog spawn and departfor pastures new.

The spawn comes to rest at the bottom of.the pool before hatching to give you another to start all over again. chance As the pro— it progresses gram introduces many more wonders of such as the deep blood worm, jelly ?sh, spiders, water fleas and bumble bees.

They all have their role to play in this real life adventure. Overall the game is fun to play and has very good graphics. The sound is effec— rive and compjemems the game very well. The instructions are Clear and concise and give a good insight not only to the game, but to the species that you~will meet and their descriptions. The 16k cassette costs £7.95 a bargain in my opinion,

‘l

David Andrews

or

digesting amoeba. Now and again a fat juicy worm falls into the water and eating this increases your worm count by one.

they sink, otherwise

:

O

joystick you must guide your .. immaturity, fattening it as you guide it round the pond

Every time your

s‘f‘asr~

g

.

WHY not take a break from those shoot—em—up arcade games and take a visit to a quiet country pond? Starcade

is.

243.1754"

1.

.

g

yes, tadpoles.

He relentlessly chases you until he either catches you or

A touch of the Bruce Lees SIT down at your Atari, hold your joystick at an aggressive angle, screw up your face, let rip a bloodcurdling go to it.

shout and

Well, even if you're not acting this strangely at the start of playing English Software's

Chop Suey,

I

guarantee you willbeafterjust a few minutes. This martial arts simulation really gets to you. if you thought you werejust a gentle pacifist at heart, better think again after you’ve tried this game. You might discover a latent Bruce Lee has been lurking undetected under your skin. The action takes place, not

in

the

fresh

air

gymnasium, but appears to be

a

or

a

in what

theatre.

lnfactit'sverysimilartothe traditional setting used for the weightlifting events at the Olympic Games. In the lower

portion of the screen, looking up at an enclosed stage, are three rows of spectators who fidget around from time to time to let you know they’re Wide awake. On stage is Where all the leaping, kiCkiNQ and punching takes place. The tWO dreadlocked Kung—Fu participants are dressed similarly loose, white pyjama-like costumes complete with black belts. There are three options: player versus player, player versus computer and, if you want to select demo mode, computer versus computer. The demo mode will automatically begin if you just sit there and do nothing. In addition you can choose .

between named

Slow

the

slow

laughingly

or fast

modes.

mode is quite fast

enough, thank you very much. Fast mode has the two

players dashing around like characters from one of those old Keystone Kop movies. Move up to this level only when you've become really adept at the art. There are eight moves at tWO shuffles, your disposal three kicks, one jab and two jumps. A” are executed by moving the joystick to the appropriate compass position. Pressing the fire button lets you make one further move—a smart about—turn from the direction you are currently facing. The quick shuffles take you to the left or right. The one punch in your repertoire is a stiff—armed jab. Used well it -

can

have very

gratifying

results: Kicks come in three sizes: the low sweep to the opponent’s legs, the sharp kick

November 7985 ATARI USER

29


to the midriff and, my personal favourite, the high kick. Executing the high kick when your opponent is some distance from you is most you are smoothly satisfying

SLDH T

,

,

DU ,

dangerously

as

a

E.«

a”

*

a

A

,,

" ,

5

1

~'

§§§§§5é\:§jlf’?gv f‘f‘s

leg outstretched

.

,"::fxijfg§:~

through the air with your leading

We;

s

*

as

it

warrior's

lance. There are two leaps. One is a simple vertical jump into the

__ -‘

A

sligg

taking you right ove r t h e to p of ‘yo u r opponent's head tothefarside of the stage. At the bottom ofthe screen, each player hasa Powlgauge, pain—level indicator. Itchanges colour as punishment is soaked up. When it starts to flash the player is in a fragile state of health and one more thump will bring him to the floor. The player recovers after a brief respite but always has a residual pain-level which rises after each knockdown. When this reaches an intolerable level that player is retired and the opponent declared the winner. It is comforting to note that nobody ever gets completely flattened —falling down on one knee and grimacing at the floor is the worst that can happen to

.

Iii

yr

:_f

le‘ff?zigk?

£1

k‘“‘““§372;f“?

sk‘f

somersault

.

T

A

«

\!¢§""

'

Akswksks ks ks?hé?ks Ak’sk-sks “'

(A A _

“i“ A

_‘

W‘h"!

A A k. A;:,“_.A

A A

A

A

f" f

T

_

Z'

,_

ff“ “5“ “5 fa” “s“ _

AWQ '

fists and feet, there is one other hazard. From time to time an air vent opens in the stage ceiling and a large scorpion drops down to scuttle across the stage. You have to leapto avoid its .

poisonous bite. Attenborough would

David

not be amused scorpions are supposed to have Iethalstings, not bites! The scorpion interludes de— tract somewhat from the main business at hand and the game is exciting enough without them. Even so, they do present an added challenge. Scorpions aside, the only minor criticism have is that the contestants are identical —

you. Apart from your opponent's

_

7

I

twins.

1

_

ks A AVA.»

..

_

i

'

_

‘,

‘_

u.f“

you've both just

If

finished cavorting around the stage and have ended up close to each other, it is possible to get in a muddle as to which

fighter

is yours. Differently coloured belts or hair, for

example, would have helped. The two—player option is hugely entertaining but no doubt much of the time you'll play against the computer. And that option isjust as much fun, The computer opponent seems pretty easy meat to start with, a few swift jabs usually sufficing to bring him quickly to his knees, However, you mustn't let that mislead you into leaving your Atari and

picking a fight with the local Third Dan. For once duffed up, the first c o m p u te r o p p o n e n t i 5 immediately replaced by another but considerably more skilled fighter. And there's six more where those came from, each more experienced and tougher than‘the last. The challenge lies in seeing if you can out-Kung all eight con— One item intrigued me. The cassette inlay hints that excellent play may be rewarded. Rumour has it that the famous Kung—Fu talent scout Foo Yung (groan) and his son, Spling Loll (ditto) are in the audience. You'lljust have to play W6" to see if that’s of any my play wasn't significance even up to beating opponent three. CO|0UF is excellent While sound effects, introductory music, whooshes and beeps enhance the enjoyment. But it is in the animation where the game excels. The players' movements are very realistic the smoothness of the ?ying kiCk alone has to be seen to be believed. Chop Suey is superb, and at 0le £835, this has 901 to be one of the best Atari buys of the year. Go get it, grasshop— —

per.

Bob Chappell

Sa 119 a |if¢ I'QQlIiI‘GS

from BIO-DEFENCE, Tymac, appears to be an

idea in computer software. The object of the game is to keep a patient's temperature below the level at which he dies. There are two separate parts to the game. In the first an outline of the human body is displayed horizontally across a grid of approximately 500 squares. Using a joystick, you move a cursor from square to square within the body outline until you find an area of infection. There is no skill attached to it just suddenly finding this appears, indicated by a orange dot. From here you progress on to part two. This scenario is

2

original

November 7985

.

Ica

acted out in the infected area, which is laid out like a maze. You play the part of what appears to be a white cell, looking something like an amoeba, and your task is to soak up most of the bacteria around you. say "appears" because there were no instruc— tions with my advance review copy and surprisingly, none on the screen. There are, in fact, several different sizes of bacteria and you should only be chasing the smaller ones. Anycontact with the largest variety results in a darkening of your colour. I

30 ATARI USER

I

-

Io n

Should you contact these too often within a short space of time, you turn black and die and the patient's temperature rises by one degree. You can eat the big blobs but you've got to time it right, hiding in your niche at the bottom of the screen. Of course, while you're hiding the bugs are multiplying. Should you succeed in absorbing all the bugs, you automatically return to the first part of the game and start to search again for another infected area. Once you find one it's back

toworkasabuggobbleruntil

such time as you get zapped too often by the big boys, and the patient's temperature gets so high that he snuffs it. The more successful you are in your bacteria bashing numerous and the more vicious are the enemy in subsequent locations. The graphics are quite nice but don't really do the Atari justice, and the sound is nothing to write home about. An attempt has been made to synthesise speech, but the result is almost unrecognisable. The game was fun the first few times I played it, but didn't find enough variety to maintain interest. I

David Andrews


!!E!!!!;!!!

f

, ,

/'¥5i‘“

"

.

g

;,

,

es,

;

.

1

,

.

_

'

'

_

-'

, —

"

ff

n

'

ii

'

H

s

n-

E n-

i ll

35

_

so»

in

i!II

ii

Iii?iE?IE-?

FEW ,

“ -»

F

..

rill?“ in:

III m"

g

7,

" —

.

.

Illll

7 _

? '

>

{Hi-n:

' ,

'

. '

~

7.

,

~

~

. =

un-

"

. . l .

iiiii?i.

. .

.

Fm.

.

,,

personal passport

fr "

,

I!

r,

f;

world of communications

to

the with

3

r

H

,

I

,

. ,

{ll} ill:

w;:,, lit;

{a}

,

il?l

llllllllll:

==

“l"iililiii!

“ll

,,

iiiimn

.

ii

“a!

.

is i

llmlmm “In

lilqggggli

H

Illl

'l l

l a.

l

'

liiil iiiiiiii "IHIIIIII:

‘ '

llll?lllill‘

' lillmmil I. I in! lgglgliggiiil l... II mmmm‘ i!“"3313

'

1,

llllllili!!!

~

: ‘

'

,,

E.

iiI i!

l'.

tel

,

.

j

. .,

llll. ll lilil

777;

'

llii

HM:

,

"

"l-

ll

a

7

‘I

'I

"

"""""

EN

iii iiiiii ital ill-liman; 5: a! iiiif'iii“ I?

,,—

use

a

?‘?h“: a m"-

,

'

~

T;

f

pm“:

ll

m

'

_,

i:l”

l“

= 5

£5

_

, '

ll

a

z:

.

w

.

H

E

'

f

ii

-

{5}

55:3

w

.

i

inn-z liilil'? um:-

1

I!‘

S Imm”

,

é

ll

i:

H

.

.,

,.

,,

if

a

"

==== --=

.

.

ii

E

'

l

iiiiiiiiiiiiiilz "in! nr

,

55313,

1

i

".

,:,:'-'--

;

.

'- w-‘J “t. L;

i”

,

$5av

25m 5: lill'lliii

iiil

ll'.

r,"“""""

f."

'

‘="'i-

.

112;

,

..

.:.3’

n ”a lllllllllllli ig-‘lll'lllllm ”3&3 E§EG$YW,............_:H l l EH“! ll-iimlil .' iiiiiliiiiiilliii lit: 3“ mun. .= llllll gm, lIIIlIIIilllI |

.

.

see;

..

:,-=

n:

i“-'

lllsililil -..,,, llliiililli

.

,

“~»v%~ese?r:~w

i'. m

,

.

,

,

,

S‘:“r°3s~:v-wfa

'

.

g.

,

mu

t...

Fri“

,

I.

all”

iii.

5 1

gm;

lllllliiiu'ii

E

,

is

e

"

.

'-

at

3

Hum.

~.

ll i:

"i"

. ‘ .

iiéigi'i?‘e

.,

illl!

311

. .

Y .

f"

llllllll

iii-ii

lillilili?ii ll “mill llli'llill"

'

.

»_

l

I

l

,

H

liiliilliiilll

,

lllllllllil' wgin;

sf: 4}?

f

Illl!

"l"

—=,

i; ,.

mi.

,

i

,

"iii-ill

it'll

A‘

_.

-

_.

-

.

l ELECOlMI

,

GOLD

3 '

Tyler mi 4

'

W

at It

0

ff

ers

t h 3 At an

—_—-————

——_—*

Give your micro mainframe power

We’re only a local p h one ca " away

____—_____.___—__

—‘_“—'————

.

With MicroLink yourmicro becomesaterminal linked directly to the Telecom Gold mainframe C0mPUleri and able to tap its tremendous power and versatility. Right away you’ll be able to use giant number-crunching programs that can only run on a mainframe. You can set up your own computerised ?ling systems, store and update statistics and other information, cross-reference material between ?les selectively extract the information you want, perform massive calculations and design reports to display information from any of the ?les and in any format you choose.

The biggest bulletin board Of them a“ “—

The number of bulletin boards is growing rapidly. New ones are springing up in all parts of Britain and all over the world, with people of like minds chatting to each other on all manner of subjects. The only snag is that the vast majority are Wthh means l0l5 Of other single-user boards people are also "31an to make contact and all too often all you get is the engaged tone. BU! with the MicroLink bulletin board there is no limit to the number of PeOPle using it at the same time. And no limit to the number of categories that can be displayed on the board. —

MicroLink.

"

user...

W

The mailbox that i 5 al W ays Open MicroLink is in operation 24 hoursa day, every day. That means you can access your mailbox

.

llfllli'llil1’L47l[filll‘ifl IP/e(0rniinr3 3-ns

communicate directly to 96,000 telex subscribers in the UK, ii million worldwide and even with ships at sea via the telex satellite network. Business people can now send and receive telexes after of?ce hours, from home or when in a telex travelling. Youscan key during theday and instruct MlcroLlnk not to transmit it until after 8pm ‘ and save 10 per cent Off the 505“

Telemessages at third Of the

rillsa

-

More than96percent ofMicoLink subscribers can connect to our mainframe computer in London by making a local phone call. This is possible because they use British Telecom's PSS system, which has access points all over Britain. A local phone call is all you need, too, for access to the international Dialcom system through

a

( u

whenever you want. and from wherever you are even a hotel bedroom home, of?ce, airport or golf club! No~one needs to know where you are when you send your message

C051:

.

The modem equivalent Of the telegram is the telemessage, which if sent before 8pm undjliv)ered ay by first post the following day (except Sis Originally designed for people to phone their message via the operator, the service cost5_£3~50 for 50 words. Now it’s available via MicroLink and costs only £1.25 for up to 350 words! .

.

.

M-

What does It a" cost? '

Considering all the services you have on tap, is remarkably inexpensive. You pay a once-only registration fee of £5, and then a standing charge of just £3 a month. On-line costs are 3.5p a minute (between 7pm and 8am) or 10.5p a minute during of?ce hours. There is an additional 2p a minute PSS charge if you are calling from outside the 01- London call areaCharges for telex, tele-messages and storage of ?les are given on the next page.

MicroLink

.

Send and receive telex messages With MicroLink you can'turn your micro intoa telex machine, and can send and receive telex messages of any length. You will be able to

pk


_______________.._

.

.

.

Software over the telephone

to use MrcroLrnk

How much It costs

_______._.__.____-

MicroLink is setting up a central store of

Initial registration

[71°0me telex:

for each CO‘TeCtly _50P addressed telex delivered to your mailbox. Obtaining a mailbox reference from the sender incurs a further charge of 50p. It is not possible to deliver a telex without a mailbox

fee: £5.

.

month or

Def calendar

Standing charge: £3 part.

Connect charge: 3.5p per minute or part cheap rate; 10.5p per minute or part— standard —

ra t

e'I

software programs which you’ll be able to download directly into your micro. The range will include games, utilities, educational and business programs, and will cover all the most popular makes of micros.

I

[Whom a a telex reference. If mallbox is received reference the sender will be advised of nondehvery and asked to provide a mailbox address. Each user validated for telex and using the facility will incur a charge of 6 storage units a month. Further storage charges could be incurred depending on the amount of telex storage and the use made of short COde and message ?le fac'm’es'

.

I

,

to t h e S ervlce.

connection

Applicable for duration of 1 minute. Minimum

charge: Cheap rate 15 from 7pm to 80m~ Monday to Friday. all I

and

o n ?y Zunday7and15ubtljlc pm on W troIlIldgys: extilrrlllrg?lrlrlfcflri’lldags

gay jagurday

20p per unit of 2,048 characters per month. Applicable for storage Of inlo'miall'on, such a telex. short codes and mail ?les. The numberof units used is

Telemessages: £1.25

Filing charge:

on average calculated by reference to

Information Databases:

\

-

by sate 11.lte

__'______.___——-—————

MicroLink is partofthe international Dialcom network. In the USA, Australia and a growing number of other countries there are many thousands of users with electronic mailboxes just like yours. You can contact them just as easily as Britain the only difference is V ou do users in from that messages yourIkeVboafd 90 the 51999de around the world Via satellite.

for up to 350 words.

,

Various charges,

.

Talk to the world

If you have a BT Radlopager you can be paged automatically whenever a message is waiting in your mailbox.

daily sample.

a

.__——-—-——————————

Radiopaging: No charge.

.

g

'

.

I

Any charges that may be applicable are shown to you before you obtain access lo the database

lntemational Mail: For the first 2,048 characters 20p to Germany and Denmark; son to USA, Australia, Canada. Singapore, szegnw au u r g?rfgsgkbl’sc? p per2335321112“;an Hon Kon and Israel. For additional 1,024 (1200/75 baud). magmas? 10p- 15p 01n yapp rres t ousers Ga ts‘dth e e 011. on d on ca H area —

,

,

What you need 'to ‘

I

'

1

—_————-—_—"—'

'

1

MrcroLmk

access

l

.

of charges relate to the transmission information by the Dialcom service to other Dialcom services outside the UK and the Isle of Man. Multiple copies toaddresses on thesamesystem hostincuronly one "ansm'ssmn Charge“ These

Telex registration:

£10.

telex:

100 characters (UK); llp per 100 (Europe); 16513 per 100 (N' America):£1.15 per 400 (ReSt Of world): £275 per 400 (Ships at sea).

Outgoing

5.513 per

,

, Blllrng and Paymentle charges

quoted are exclusive ofVAT.Currentlyall bills are rendered monthly,

Deferred messages sent on the night service are subject to a 10 per cent discount.

.

“to

n,

.

.

.

.

““

"'

w

0

Appllcatlon

Allow 10 days for validation of mailbox

l

J)

.

enclose my cheque for £5 payable to Database Publications as registration fee to Micr oLi nk. also wish to use Telex.

l

,

authorise you to charge an

.i".' °

Date

7

,

,

.

(Enter full postal address of Bank Branch)

W [cw mm

im?

.

,

Direct Debltrng Mandate

rrorrmnanam ovmsvearsoiase

srgnam

D1

.

additional more my initial bill for validation. D

19

Whilst Database Publications Ltd is the supplier of all the services to you, the commission and billing thereof will be handled by Telecom Gold as agents for Database Publications Ltd, Date of first payment to be on 15th of month following commencement. Please complete billing authonsatron form A, B or C below.

.

I

E! I

[1213151133

Payment

11

l/We hereby apply to 10m MicroLink .

D3

Please indicate month of commencement

Form AT

.

Day?metelephone

Commencement of Service

'

0

D

DIDZEED

r

lTELECOM GOLD

J)

postcode

company

__v—____—

(

Address

m mm W

Posm'on

“nth

assoc'atw"

m

[Dim

Name

.

You must have three things in order to use MicroLink: a computer (it can be any make of micro, hand-held device or even an electronic typewriter provided it has communications facilities), a modem (it can be a simple Prestel type using 1200/75 baud or a more sophisticated one operating at 300/300 or 1200/1200 baud) and appropriate communications software.

._~A__~A__—,f,.

l/We authorise you until further notice in writing to charge to my/our account with you on or immediately after 15th day of each month unspeci?ed amounts which may be debited thereto at the instance of British Telecommunications plc TELECOM GOID by Direct Debit. Bills are issued 10 days before debit is processed.

7

lintend to use the following computer 7____.

Name of Account to be debited Account Number

FOR OFFlCE USE ONLY: ,

debit my/ our Access/VisaPAmerican account number

B. Please

,

Mailboxassrgned Start date

W

—"'

—"

,77.

"

.,

,

.,i..,,

Password

,

7

7

,

..

m

Overseas subscribers only

l/We authorise you until further notice in writing to charge to my/our account with you on or immediately after 15th day of each month unspeci?ed amounts which may be debited thereto at the instance of British Telecommunications plc TELECOM GOLD. Bills are issued 10 days before charge is applied to your account. —

Database Publications Europa House 68 Chester Road Hazel Grove StOCkpon SK7 5NY. Telecom Gold

Express

A

SEND TO: MicroLink

m m

is

a

trademark of British Telecommunications

5‘|gna m re

pic.

————

.,.

.

”7777777777777,

..

Date

.

,

C. Please invoice the company/ authority. If you select this option, which is ONLY AVAILABLE to government establishments and Public ( J) D Limited Companies. you will be sent an authorisation form for completion which will require an official order number to accept unspeci?ed amounts.

.


From

.

.

.

Computer Support "TH

E

UTILITY SPECIALISTS"

A fine selection of software and hardware its makers Something for every A TA RI ULTIMON!

A

of

PORTPRINT

_

,

NEWEtS-SE

_

high_quality printed Circuit board allowmg the ATARI‘ XD’XE range to have 3 separate operating systems on one machine. selectable before powerup. Very easy installation.

A

XOS

NEW LOW PRICE £8.95 FILE LOADER self booting menu and mini DOS system which purely loads files, saves at least 60 sectors on every disk. ‘BOOT LOADER £14 95 If W... '°

completely revised operating system for the ATARI‘ XL/XE range. Compatible With more software than the original XLrXE 0.5 with XOS you‘ll probably never have to use the TRANSLATOR again. XOS also has some totally unique functions including: CARTRIDGE T LE A FASfTER rec OPTIONFIOROCE?AgVARBMgTéART, comes ,and ANTI-COLDiLAsRT, CASSETTE, HOLD OVEIRIDE, many more, w... so cowwv men ummon ixuxs oniv-i A

E

A

'

-

I

XOSTRANSLATOR The can

NEW £9.95

'

Si?lgégselfgse of all yourdisks 3150 saves remov'n 9 m 9 W” N?we pLtzwtll’lgllCEEZSi TO e a e ona '5 you simply want to update. Installation very simple. C

cart

Bounty Bob Strikes 29.95 14.95 9.95 9.95

Miner 2049er

9.95 9.95 14.95 cass

A’Ch0” Rea m° fl m°°ss Bruce Lee |

Decathlon Pitfall II

Murderonthe Zin Mr Robot

'

Dropzone Bounty Bob F—1 5 Strike Eagle Mig Alley Ace Conan Pole Position Beach Head

-

***

SPECIAL OFFER

.

Oils Well cart. '

1

2.95

9.95 9.95 N/A N/A 9.95 9.95

N/A N/A

9.95

N/A 995 9,95 9.95

Encounter Rescue on Fractulus ""

d'Sk 12-95 12.95 14.95

9.95 N/A

Mercenary

'

9-95 9.95 14.95

14.95

'

Tel: 01-31

All prices include postage

Jungle Hunt Pacman Centipede Donkey Kong Jnr.

'

or

postal order to:

COMPUTER SUPPORT LTD Seacourt Road, Abbey Wood, London 352 9UW

.

Back BC's Quest

'

We are continually adding new and exciting products to our range please send SA‘E' for mom details. ATARI“ IS a trademark (”ATARI CORPORATION

Mail order only, to order send cheque

ARCADE

'

USER GROUP DEMONSTRATIONS ARRANGED

inf-T

icartrid e software uickl and e?ecivEelvv IV 'Lotw us wn e o a £19.35 geovnéiOEpNali'ljdLgt-ertgg location then the cartridge9 RAM area iecorilles ROM, canyaljso be used to Stagecilulg cartridges. For 8K & 16K programs, can be switched out if not required.

26

.

NEW LOW PRICE £9.95 Density smart fully automatic. NEW LOW PRICE £1235 ‘128KDISK BACKUP Same as above but specifically for the extra memory of the 130XE. 0 Sold subject to not Infringing Copyright. OTHER PRODUCTS AVAILABLE: MAILING LIST £72.95, BIORHYTHMS £7.95, ZAPPING ZOMBIES £6.95, ULT/LITY PAC ONE £8.95, UTILITY PAC TWO £8.95, UTILITY TAPE ONE £7.95, MACRO LIBRARY £72.95, CARTRIDGE BACKUP £75.95, CASSETTE BACKUP £9.95 and SERIAL l/O PLUG £2.99

,

,

.

s

‘DISK BACKUP

THE GAP! £29.95 Fill the 4K gap in your 400/800 w'th th‘s ha d od'f'cat' ?t or 48K machine there will be 52K of user IRAM.ICanIi.)eiNuaerdrTczn “3K l6i)22ol<niflsaclzhiiiz'ieSisalug in installation.

I

.

83332355399259999935519.95.25

operating system described above in the form of a TRANSLATOR. This means you have all the functions of XOS when you want them.

.

£29.95

Run a standard centronics compatible parallel printerfrom the joystick ports. Includes a relocatable handler, runs with most boot programs. Complete with lead. PRINTER INITIALISER NEW£9.95 An autorun batch file that automatically flushes the printer and presets printer defaults, such as font styles etc. Completely reprogrammable. SUPER DISASSEMBLER £24.95 Disassemble any disk, cassette or cartridge. Uses XL system labels, separate input to The end data result file can be customised then re—assembled ore-determine bytes. using an assembler.

80 COLUMN PACK! £59.95 A built in 80 COLUMN text mode, enabled by holding the lSELECTI key down during powerup- Great for word processors. works on a normal TV. Compatible with most software. _

enthusiast

BAD SECTOR £19.95 hardware modification. Write bad sectors to any disk, can be used for custom creation bad sectors or to backup some protected disks. Comes complete with sector writer and sneed checking software-

£49.95

built in machine code monitor capable of stopping any program on the fly, functions include: DISPLAY/ALTER REGISTERS/MEMORY, MOVE MEMORY, FIND STRING, SINGLE STEP, DISASSEMBLE MEMORY, FORMAT DISK, READ FROM DISK WRITE TO DISK, and many more. This is the most powerful and the lowest priced on—board monitor available for the ATARI" dont take our word for ”' "V onel A

TRIPLE“!

directly from *

14.95 14.95 14.95 14.95 14.95 14.95 14.95 14.95 14.95 12,95 12_95 14.95

&

Ball Blazer Great American Road Race Hacker Hard Hat Mack Mule One On One Pinball CORSt. set Music Const. Set Seven Cities of Gold AxisAssassin .

.

ADVENTURES

7339

9.95

Hitch Hikers

W'shbr'ngef Red Moon Emerald isle Dungeon Adv

UTILITIES

1295 1435 1235

Typesetter

14_95 14.95 14.95

SIMULATIONS

7.95 cass

9.95 d''s k 2995

33-32

Paper Clip a

Homeword Data Managerll The Page Designer U.S. Doubler

9-95 8-95

17-95

N/A

29-95

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A H/VV 0888

F'"3 Id

f F'”e

0.

Broadstdes Objective Kursk Eagles 50 Mission Crush -

-

-

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

cart

Action

Magnipnnt”

9.95

1135 995 N/A N/A N/A

75.00 75.00 N/A

Basic XL

.

14.95 14.95

995 935

Return to Eden The Hulk Seastalker

M.M.G. BaSIC Compiler

9.95 N/A

6-95

3”°Wba“

cass

14.95 .

N/A N/A N/A 695

Clitfhroets

For FREE Catalogue send

1

packing. Same day dispatch.

Railswest

Colonial Conquest Gemstone Warrior Six Gun Shootout Cosmic Balance Cosmic Balance II Warin Russia

N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

Kampfgruppe Operation Market Garden N/A Break through in the Ardennes N/A Carrier Force N/A

disk 59.95 25-95 48.95 29.95 34.95 29.95 79.95 d'IS k 36 95 '

36.95 36.95 36.95 36.95 36.95 36.95 36.95 36.95 36.95 36.95 74.95 55.95 55.95

_

59.95

loose stamp. Send cheques P/O to:

55.95 55.95

DATASCAPE 4 6' Huntsworth

Me w

5,

Tel: 01—723 0562 November 7985 ATARI USER

33


m

_ I

M)“ \

/‘3/7,'

,

l /

HORIZONTAL scrolling is essentially achieved in a similar way to the vertical scrolling described in my previous article. However, as you will see, things are never quite that simple. You will rememberthat coarse vertical scrolling can be achieved by moving the start of screen memory down the screen data one line at a time. Horizontal scrolling can be similarly achieved by moving the pointers for screen memory along one character at a time. This is shown in Demo #1. Firstly you need to decide what data you want to show. have chosen to hold thedata in a string (A$). You will notice that you have to use CH R$(O) that is Control (the heart symbol) to represent a space. This is because when printing to the screen a space is CH R$(32) but the Atari converts this to a O in screen memory. In fact all the numbers printed are stored as a different number in screen memory. Play around with A$ to confirm this. Back to the program. The high and low bytes of the address of A$ that are calculated is, screen memory EXP? E 33g E 530W? and stored in L0 OLDLO HI and 3335333333 3 3323633 “3 OLDHl A custom, display list is created m Page F (memory locate” hereaaeetzet emptiness;3” 1536), and the Operating SYStem ls , a,“ IS iH a" low $253“?- if (3? hi??? an tolgaha}: the?rby e ctirokilng lSt into '9 I;yteso ISP av the a , 563 333323 {333 how a;3} decimal 560 and 551. Now we are ready to scroll. Firstly gist“; 15331; M 33 tag? {at increase the low byte of the address in sis" a if???) 1! REH— ewes, .v,333333333 3333333333333333333 1n m ?(1“):?$(1,20)="m as“ m':a5u1,1u)=nsu,zo)men I

,

I’ l.”I

'

3-3"

I

.

1

. l ' '

I

231'

if";

.

W

/'

4,’

5 f,

.-

Jf

f

.

1'

3‘) 13,4,“

.

1

‘3

.'“.

,

JI'

{I

'

1,

,,.-

“ll"

'm‘

i

.

in?w'X?llmm 731

”(V J

/‘

\‘

@

1

Obit/r)

W.‘ 3

' 3

J

~

&

.

.

.

_

.

m “E" 1“ DIN “(unasr'matan'user MW“ in ' ”E “u _

,

5

1

'

-

,

120

.

,,

-

,_

_

a

toms

mm ME

,zo') Is 20 (cm. comm 11a AStu,80)="atari'user"'publishedv

byuatansevpuuicationsvunitedmwem. cums M Ell). ' : cmL n

BE‘HEEI nouns

120 n1=1unnnu5v25m unzmm? 256:REN mo llllllliESS or tissue:

& s

411!

no 0LDLO=L0=0LI7HI=III=K=1HIE" Start: on Islam. LDCMIOI or as 190 RE" CREME uspuw LIST 1! "GE 6 no unanimous DL.112:POKE DL+1.112: "WE DULHM'WE “HRH!“ 3 “M“ Ln“ "W5 was “5mm“ , 1 “51" 2“ p“! ”L“"-°”°“ nusmnnin Lo“ n” "I“ "755 or 5°35“ M“ “m 2” M" ous.11z:mxz ounsswox: I“ “Aware DLHJHIEH 1 lion: Burnt LINE 1151 ' Punt to stun or 1151 ' m 230 port: summon: 561.6:REH TELL or: um: svsren memoir or mt LI“ ‘” RE" 5” Loztouur Lonss "I“ Lozomlznn mm “mm“ m 3 "I "155 or Later m. or 56,55. itmnv 520 azuuztr 11:31 THE! x=1:u1:oum1:m zoLoLomEn men was so mes eraser 540 PM! DLM,L0:MKE DL+5,llI:liEll rout new names or to t u: 5er or sens:if!!!“ INTO DISPLAY LIST 5“ F0“ 1:1 10 50mm ”if“ DEL“ 5” 5°" sums" M" “?ll Demo m

is greater than 255 the” reset L0 toO and increase H) by 1You now have the new address Of screen memory moved along by one one character. These values byte can now be placed in the two bytes

RE!—

see Fort 1:0 to 15mm

5427s,1:ron J=1 to zamzxr Jauzxr mien sworn scum 1s nut-15 5211 run 1:15 to 0 STEP -1:POKE s4z75,1 mm J=1 to zuusxr 1:11:17 I:REH scant L sack mm 590 com sums up mm .

Dem, 412 '

following the LMS command (Load Memory Scan —see previous articles) as in line 210. Repeat this and there you have coarse scrolling of one line. Smooth scrolling is again similar to vertical smooth scrolling. Demos: 2 shows how this is used. A similar display list is used buta decrmal.16 lS added the to mode byte. This IS 71 that Anne _15, mode 7 + LMS instruction 64. Adding a 16 enables smooth scrolling in that line. The horizontal smooth scrolling register is decimal 54276 ($0404). This can be poked with numbers up to 5 which will move the line along one pixel ata time up to a maximum of 16 two Graphics Mode 2 characters. Now obviously combining these two techniques will result in true smooth horizontalscrolling. Demo#3 is essentially the same as Demo .

.

.

.

.

.—

1

41:1

November 7985

499

memory bV1-3fthe number

Of scree"

“13,71,“

MRS uu,10:poxs 9145.11: 229 port: immune“: ou7,ss:pox£ u +8,.:POKE "39,5 no POKE summons summer 51mm ssr up as II pm an

-

_

DL,112:POIE n1+1,112:

DL+2,112:POKE

2111

.

.

llI=IlT(MIl(A$)/256):L0=?bl!(a$)-III*

200 “answers

,

T

34 ATARI USER

.

'

.

11s kill

_

but with the smooth scrolling added

to it.

Now we begin to get the first drawback, screen flicker. This is because the changes often occur part way through the creation of the on the screen televrsron. Things can belmproved somewhat of the more by making some changes rapidly in machlne code, as in Demo 3:4. The machine code here simply pokes each memory address with the byte following it but much more rapidly than in Basic. Okay, so we have reasonablygood smooth scrolling of one line. Not going to make much of a game is it? The next step is to extend this to full or part screen scrolling. Unfortunately things are not as simple as in vertical scrolling, where _

.

.


'

D"isplay List

———————

//W”M

_.___________________

I

f. ‘

J

.

z

l r

-r,. f/

9]

, ,

,

/

l

” f

.

{7

I}

f

'

,

,

,‘/l'] 1/.

r,

J

t '

1.

fa.

IO J'l“

n. u.

v,._-_r=w

'

"

?

.

421? ’

l;_‘

shu‘

I'

l’

////\/::“\ “Cl/{ll J“; y\}

/

M4

—--

,

3/1”

s

,

fl.l'

I

7?

'

0M

.

4,

-/@@‘W

.

.

\

,

,',"'7.

x

_

V.

-

N

,

40 MN

byvdatabasevpuuicationsvlinitedmw-

104,74,170,160,|,1“,133.255,1 04,133,254,“4,240.4,200,145,254,135.1

19 an: 1“ DIN asuooz):as=-'atarivuserv":ron 1:12 To sac erp 11:0$(I):QS:IERT 1:nE l! CITL com on“ atari & user

120 ulzll‘lmDM?SNZSS)1L?=abltaS)—HI*

04.145.254.202.2oe.237.96

258

255

100 DIN asunumsu,20):"m :A5 (1.20) m':05u1,1u1 110 0501.80)="atari'user""published'

120 0111 1:10:10).itm1(1o).Lo(1a).liIt 10) 190 RE" NEH 915?an 1151

by'database'publitations'linitedm 12. ?lzllttnwtnSHZSS):Lo:ADR(QS)-IIII

2“ PGKE 1535.112=POKE 1537.112H’OIE 1 533.112=IEH 3 BL“! LINES 210 F0! 1:1 10 10:11:11 10 GMPHICS 2 11 HES HITII LMS INSTIIICTIMS FoLLOIED In SCREEN it!!!" 1012011015 220 NIKE 15:50:53.71

1. RE!

10 RE! 100 on!

AS(100):Q$(1,20)="W m':a$(a1,1oa):nsu,2n no §$(z1,ao):"atarivuser¢"pub|?sh“.

us ouLo:Lo:oL|m1:n1:x:1 2.0 oszssswoxE DL,112:P0[E “31,112: POKE DL+2,112:poxE “03,714“ 21a pox: pu4,Lo:poxE pus,“ 220 NIKE oLfs,112:voxE DL+7,65:POKE m. 48,8:POKE 9139.6 210 POKE somewoxs 5

4”

II DE!»

561,6:REH

SET up a

IE!"

1:11:11

to 162mm» 0mm uncut-E com um

1.11:

256 130 DLDLO=L0:0|.DIII:1|I:x:1 200 DL:1536:POKE bL.112:Po|(E 5141.112:

”RE DUIAIZHWKE “43,714“

111

RE"

500 Lozumzlf

30 Fort 1:16“

unzss THE! Lozomxznn

210 POKE DL+4,L0:POKE pus,“ 220 you DLM,‘112:POKEbu7,ss:poxE M.

or sanEu DEM“ 1mm 111mm" sun 520 x:x+1:1r 11:81 rnEu x:1:u1=oum1:10

230 POKE

=0LDLO

soo L°=LM1=1E 119255 mEll Lozozulznn

540 POKE 54276,7:PoxE DL+4,L0:POKE 01+

cmumcrEn 566 Fan 1:6 10 0 STEP -1:ron J:1 to 10 niexr J:POKE 54275,1:||Exr 1=nEn sworn seem. 0 wins 590 com 500mm semi s,u1:nEn

conRSE

scuou

1

08,0:PoxE 9149.5

summon

561.6

11:81

THE! x:1:n1:oun1:|.o

the

f?“

screen

scam.

41111051

sxerMlEousu sworn

_

fl rst line.

wider. Therefore using operating system commands such as DRAW or PRINT are really out of the question. Secondly each line needs to have its own LMS instruction. Therefore the display list will consist of groups of three numbers. The first will be a 64 (LMS) +

10

240 L0(I)=L0:III(I)=III:L0:LM1N:IF Lo) 255 "IE! L0=L0-256:||I=IIIM:REH mm s

Em“

250 MIKE

LDCM’IOIS Ill mums

Ell-MI).L0(D=POKE mmnn,

Illa)

W'” f°”°W the

Firstly the screen memory needs to be considered. In vertical scrolling the screen is the same width asa normal screen. However in horizontal scrolling the screen is going to be much

Eltouu1sxs¢nx+1=|tm1(Imam

mumEn sronE 015»an 1151 time? canons II annnvs

260 lExT I 270 ”IE 1571.65=POKE 1572.0:POKE 1573 ,6=REH Ell» 0159an 1151 280 POKE 560.0:POKE 561.6:REH MINT 05 10 HEN 0159an LIST

Demo#4

the

:L0=Al)ltm$)-III*

=0LDLO

:||Exr J:poxE 54276,I:IE)¢T mm! scnou 7 PIKELS 598 com 500 Of

230

“Hummus/255)

540 a:usn11soo,s427s,7,»1+4,Lo,bus,n1 HREH mcHIIE CODE to smorn & coMtSE 550 ron 1:5 10 a step —1:Fon 4:1 m 10

Demo?”

110

CREE!

1

520 K=i?l=IF

I/

M

M iii”!

-

01t51dewa ,

,/

/

0

I.

,

1"

mode number + 16 (for smooth scrolling).The LMS instruction means that the next two numbers will be the low and high bytes of the screen memory for that line. Now we have a display list individual consisting of numerous lines each similar to the single line in Demos 1:1 to 4. To scroll these you need to move each of the memory location pointers along one byte at a

500 RE" ExscurE senou. 510 FOR 1:1 to “mm a. cons:

mm.

S

520 FOR 1:1 to 10mm 10 LIIES 530 mmnomuur Lounzss TIIEI L0 (1) :|.o(1) -2ss :||1(1) :u1 (1) +1:REN mun.

ME 1. I“ 111 5 L0 “155 54. “an 1 550 FOR 1:1 to 1&qu manuhwm: POKE mlummnnmExr mm! mm IE H BYTES IITO DISPLAY L151 5“ "El" J 5“ “MW!“ 0 Demo#5

time.

Demo 11:5 doesjust this in Basic. As you can see, the "scroll" goes in __._______> November 7985 ATARI USER

35


D'lsp I ay L'is t

——

mi‘l

a,

,

I

.

.

down the screen. Basrc

waves

IS

‘l

.

.,

J in.“ ""‘~f"‘"s~.

10 line direction

.

.

10

RE!

screen

scrolling

in

HORIZONTAL

SERDLLING

DEMO

.

,

.

one

us FROG

I’M

10 RE"

,

255

renouomtmluoi,Lo(10),nlt

1.) 1535.11zwoxe 1517.11zwoxe

1

538,112 210 eon 1:1 to 10 220 pone 1535+1*3,71

23. IEHJHI)=1536+I¥3+1=IEHII(I):DE|I.0 (I){1 24‘ Lo(I)3L0!“I(I):HI!L0=L0*1°°=IF L0) 255 men Lozto-zssmxzulu 250 POKE

EuMIhLMIHPOKE

200

next

1572.05woxe

15

73.0:poxe 1574,5 200 pone 550.0:poxe 551,5:0en ser up 0 s 10 Dem 115 500 nen execute senou 51. mg m m 5. 520 eon 1:1 to 10 L0(I))255 ”HIE! L0 530 L0(I):Lo(I)+1:IF

.

622,255 then press Return. Thirdly type GRAPHICS 0 then Return. Now

117

,

list the program

204. 150 . 0. 24. 177. 204. 105, 1. 145. 204. 20 10 nen HDRIZONTFL SC’F’OLING LEHO as 3. eon 1:17“ n 1759515” 4"me 1,0:

255

50 mm

1" 01" mun“),iem1(10),10(10),nn 1.) 2.0 POKE 1535,112:P°KE 1537,112:POKE

10.31.159,743,203,141,4,212.230.4.5. 173,4,6,2.1,234,2.?,2,15,,. 5. par“ 152'0‘157’4’5'232’232'232'22" 30,208.2‘5,75,’8,228 100 010 nsu000):0s:"atari0userwww-

“HT IIRE" URI “curl-E 40 mm 104,159,0,141.4,212.133.203,15

2,6,160,181,169,7.75,’2

1

1:1 7“ 19

250

FORE

“ND 2“ "El“

renounmmwoxe

220,190.203,155,203,141.4,z12,

mm 1:10 to 2900 5mm“ I 110 L0)

STEP

15:03(I):0$(1,1

HIZIIHMRMSNZSS):L0:M)R(a$)—III*

255:||I:||I+1:L0:0 120 DIN

000mm.

mmoun?emlue).Lo(10),nn

1.) 200 POKE 1515.112woxe 1537.112wmte

1

530,112 2“ run In

270 Poxe 1571,112:poxe 1572,55:Po|(e 15 73'°=P°KE 1574-5 280 PM! 560.0:90KE 551.5135" “NIL“

To

1.

220 pone 153541x3.71+15 239 E010“)zlsxsuxylgtm1(nzmlo

mu

59W“ 5“ RE" HEW“ 51. FOR le to as 520 eon 1:7 to 0 51:0 -1 550 mute 54270,I:nen FIIE 500011. 0 pm “5 535 FOR DELM:1 To Zoilfx'l' DEL?Y 5“ m" I 550 0=IISN1700.1540):REH MCHIIE cove ”10" 70 “ml“ CNNSE scuou 5“ if“ J 6.0 GMPHICS 0

240 L0(I)=L0:llI(I)‘-'III:III=I|B1

f... GMPIIICS .

Demo #

Demo #6 36 ATARI USER

.

November 7985

7

1

_

SETIIP

,

too

.

maul)-255:u1(1):nxm¢1

550 next J

are

complicated to discuss at the end of this article, Demo 1:8 will give you some idea of how much improvement they can give in scrolling. Asa parting note, on the XLand XE models smooth, upward vertical scrolling is very easy in Graphics 0. Try this. First load a relatively long .

540 next 1 545 RE" IISE ”CHINE CODE FOR F?ST ”LT IPLE poxes 550 aleSNHOOJEllMD.L0(1),L0(2),L0

(”Jim‘hl??-W‘S’-L°‘7’-L°m-l°‘9 ),L0(1.)) 555 ?leSINHOOJEIIIIU),HI(1),HI(2).III mnu“),u1t5)mnmmunmlmmna ”mun

.

Basic program. Secondly type pOKE DEMO

mu 2“ UND=L0=HI(I)=HI=L0=l°?“=IF L°=l°‘255=“1="1*1 255 "l“

1

270 pone 1571,112:POKE

.

Although VBl routines

229 "ME 1536"I*3:71*15 230 mu)(nusxeu?u”alumna“

11mm,

.

0,177,2M.105.0.145.2M.200.200 50 0010 202.208.237.” 1... DIN 050.002) :AS:"atari'user"':F0lt 1:12 W 9“ STEP 11=“5(1)=05='5'" I 11, “121.1 month” 1255) 1L0:”R(“s)-HI*

538,112 210 F“

rum

.

during the vertical

each screen).

30 eon 1:1700 to 173mm» 0:0er 1,0: NE“ I=REH RE“ 1" ”CHINE 50“ “MM 104,152,10,104,113,205,104,1n

2.2.3.245,” 1” DIN 05t1002):A$="atariwse?“:Fon 1 1:12 to 900 STEP 11:05m:0s:lext (05) -III* 110 01:11" (000 (05) /255) mm»

FORE

SCRDLJNG

,,,/.‘;.“1

.

.

.

HORIZONML

r-

-v

blank interrupt (for new readers this lS the small delay between the drawmg of

.

4,150.0,104,104,145,254,200,200,200,20

200

.

.

40 0070 104,170,104,133,255,104,133,25

120 m4

w

'

-

code

.

I

'

20 nen H snue aerope RUNNING as Ran HILL CORRUPT ITSELF H MPO“ To Hume” 30 eon 1:17“ cone next Izl'lEH new name

0 |

he,“

~~

-

g".

f

3'

.

.

.

.

.

,

You now have your smooth horizontal scrolling. Disappomted? would be, because there 5 that flicker and flashing again. as The same problem arises before, because the changes happen part way through drawing the screen, only now things are worse because so many alterations are being made to get smooth scrolling. As in vertical scrolling, the only way around this is to use machine

.

.

-~

i" 1."

A

.:'

we,

.

.

_

was

.

.

.

_’

0

0

f.

single block. The n e xt ste p is to add the smooth scroll. Demo 417 does this With an improved machine code routine for the coarse scroll. However it IS less generalised, and Will only work for a .

,

.

Th ere , s th a t fl laker agaln-

W

Demo tt6 IS the same program with a machine code routine doing the job of increasing the 10 screen Ioc a tion p ointers in the dis p la list. V. Now the screen moves along in a

ll

~’

'.

'

21"

too slow. -

I

v’r,’

.

just

259 POKE

.

EIO(I),L0(I):POKE

gnu“),

mm 2“ m“ 270 ME

I 1571.112woxe 1572,55:POKE 15 73,0:POKE 1574's 200 note 550.0:Poxe 551.5:Poxe 205.5:0 mg 2.4,4 500 nen execute 500011 510 azusnunonnen Insenr 001

5“

so“

Demo #8

60.


Moode modem“ + Gown “?ance -

.

,

,

/

gave

-

5,157

.,‘,, .ig'. stWiExT

.

~

5-

,.

’§23‘3*’m

5

I

I

to

52535.)

GARNER

the

om

;

——

I

.,

22g?

\'7

m

LQCAL rest

~

.5

TEST

.

1

MODE

modemmaooo

TECHNDIQGY

IONS

—————-——'———_

m

Q,

,

I

communlca r evo u Ion

5.

1

.;}.u.';‘.

u

—— i.

5,

555m.

DATA

been

Ail—mm

.,

,

I

PDWE,.

R!

Amoney-saving special offer from

,

:'

APP

use

u

.::':,'"“‘—"’ “ma (“1.77.1

.

nu

them“

_

-

onus

uv

Price includes VAT. post & packing

IT‘S by far the fastest growing field in micro-computing, All over the world micros are talking to each other over the telephone line, As well as to the ever-increasing number of public and private databases. bulletin boards and even giant mainframe computers. We want all Atari User readers to share in the new technology that makes all this possible, So we’re offering a unique starter pack at an unbeatable price. lt gives you everything you need to get in touch with the big wide world outside: _

Modem/Software/Serial Interface. The modem is the amazing Miracle

Te°h”°'°gy WOO“ 05,505.55 m“

6.5

l

I,»

‘j ‘

axles: ~§§§w§§

M

if“

f

as:

I I I

an

dt

o

e

x __

~

.,;~f;»~5~~jj_.~1\,s.ns:,5.

dig?

1:5".‘3

s”

.

5

, .

t

{Sages ,,

.

a liizitg‘ls‘;

? TeIeLink No.

‘-

”Sig:

i

.

liurisri'zii:

”ii 1!

i

”1°“

if?

"f

in"?

-

e

we, to hitting?

ea

a

|

a

55;

55515,”

£5. 5

,

_

55a

shakes;—

,

r,‘

Err?

ou 5”?

1”?

m

.‘

5

{5.5 5

55,55:

r

5

4

55.1;

5-

-

1:

,

f

5

,

mu

:

' =‘

‘.

-5

TeIeLink No. 3

News, highlighting all on financial, legal and to Knowledge Index, survey on portable

Issue Issue Issue Issue Issue

———

'

£7.25 £7.25 £7.25 £7.25

I

El

I

I

p

I

—'——'—

I

__

Total ——

card account: M

Access u...__.|__i Visa H—J—‘A

l._l_l._-I—’

L—l—l—L—l '_‘_"—'

H_‘—‘

.

'

5007 5005 5005 5007 5008 5009 5070

£725

D Cheque enclosed made payable to Database Publications Ltd.

I

C

I

£7.25

I

my credit

——|

(j) [72 00C:

IssueGlSept/Oct1985)

.

es

—}

(Nov/Dec 1984) 2 (Jan/Feb 1985) 3 (Mar/Apr 1985) 4 (May/June 1985) 5 (July/Aug 1985) 1

Debit

_

is

.

I

'

TeIeLmk No. 4

,

(Commence with Issue No.

Special supplement: Guide to Communicating with your Micro. All about user—to—user communications, protocols, how modems work, an introduction to networking and P53. Plus a guide to 39 modems listing all their special features. Special supplement: Guide to Bulletin Boards in the UK. An in-depth survey of what bulletin boards offer and what they cost, how to access them, interviews with 12 leading sysops. Plus a complete listing of 39 bulletin boards, pinpointed on a map of the UK.

Subscription to the next 12 issues ofTeIeLink ,

1

TeIeLink No. 2

»5jg

I—ORDERFORM——— Please supply the followmg. .

I

-

51: t‘.‘

'

Special supplement: Guide to Microcomputing on Prestel. Contains hundreds of page numbers covering games, education and business and utility programs for the BBC, Apple, Commodore and Spectrum. Plus hints, tips and reviews of comms products.

.,

(airs unit:

.

i}:

tier

5‘3125; .

2

insist (i

*5

.

azme

ou

555551???

on Page 61

the ma

_____.___.___—

and ?iiii?‘tift _,

.

IS IS

1

Includes the first Teletext 8; Viewdata the latest' industrial news. Plus features educational databases, start of a guide how to work out your phone bill and a micros with comms. facilities.

Use the order form —

even to download free software programs

~

\

W”‘e’exmessages"°g°‘e‘e‘5“°”’i”g'

powerful on the market, its simplicity itself to

"as"?

directly into your Atari. You will be able to join Micronet/Prestel, which will immediately open up to you a vast menu of 750,000 pages of information '— instant world news, sports, holidays, hotels, train and airline timetables, all regularly updated. And you can become one of a growing number of enthusiasts who are joining MicroLink, the giant database set up in conjunction with Telecom Gold. But ?rst, send for the Miracle package and enter the fascinating, limitless world of communications!

use. Just plug it into a standard British Telecom jack and you’re away! The package also features the superb Datari serial interface, which links the modem directly to the Atari’s peripheral port without the need for the 850 serial interface. The best hardware deserves the best software to drive it, and with the specially written Multi-Viewterm program the package is complete. It supports all the standard baud rates 1200/75, 75/1200, 1200/1200 half duplex and 300/300 full duplex. Your Atari User package will allow you to talk directly to other computers, to send your

l—‘l—‘A

I '

Name ___—S|gned___—___ _

\

Address

_

_

I

I

Special supplement: Guide to teletext page design. A leading expert tells how to achieve eye-catching viowdata graphics. Plus coin-operated Prestel, setting up educational viewdata systems, using packet radio to cut phone bills, on-line credit

reporting.

_“'

'

"

I

I

——_—_—__— .

.

Post to: TeleLlnk, Database Publications, 68 Chester Road, Hazel Grove, Stockport SK7 5NY.

TeIeLink No. 6

I

___—________—.

TeIeLmk No. 5 Special supplement: Guide to Communications Software. A survey of 37 communications software packages for 11 of the most popular micros. Plus advice on viewdata graphics, description of the de facto standard for UK bulletin boards, Xmodom, and online humour from Punch editor Alan Coren.

|

_

_

I

Phone orders: 061—4800171 Telecom G o/d: Mailbox N o_ 72:M AGOO1 pmstel: Key ‘89. Mailbox No. 614568383

I

Don't forget to include your credit card number and full address.

I

I I I


__—____—_—_

D E N IS Kl NAN E comes up With a program to teach your computer how to wm an argument

_

CONVERSE is an Eliza type pro— gram which simulates a conver— sation between the user and the computer but differs from similar ones by allowing theAtari to learn new key words and replies. It thus learns from conversations continuously and eventually will be able to converse without recourse to the learning procedures.It can also be altered easily to give the computer different "personalities". Atari Basic has often been criticised for its lack ofstring handling functions and for not supporting string arrays. This program providesa fairly extensive demonstration and tutorial on both string handling and file handling with the Atari. It includes informative REM statements and should be easy to follow. The string handling routines include simulating a string array in Atari Basic,a string searching routine, routines for joining and patching up strings and exchanging words within I a string. The disc handling techniques used are standard ?les for printing and inputting, NOTE and POINT commands for random access of files and the PUT/GETfilesforhoIding numeric variables. All of these files can be updated during a program run, and are used in all subsequent program

.

.

.

. _

' ’

.. 0 '

v

3'

¢

-

.

'

f '

= -

'

'

'

. . . ’

.

.

.

.

.

,

runs.

'

, . ’

. _ . '

”g”

"

T

-

f

. ’

_

'

Finally the program can be easily used with the SAM and Reciter programs available from Don't Ask Software, thus allowing the computer to voice the replies rather than typing on the screen. To do this simply add

the following

lines:

,

1“

.

V

“3

7

“5119

,

,

. a '

f

~

g

elf Stale massagmtnm

1353

1355

.

PM

?g?ma?g)

Atar’ ~

.

E"

,

-

,

k

'

In ween

simulating a conversation bet— the computer and the user, Converse initiates the conversation and then accepts a sentence inputted

by the user. This sentence is then searchedfor specific key words which are con— tained in a me created on the first run of the program.

simulated string array and the keywords taken from the array for the search procedure. On subsequent runs the keyword ?le is simply read and the contents placed in the simulated string array. This simulated array is necessary as Atari Basic does not support string arrays.

Atari Basic does not have an INSTRlNG or specific string searching facility, so Converse uses an instring routine to search the input string to find keywords. On locating a keyword the program gets a reply, chosen at random from a variable number of suitable replies forthe given keyword, in the reply file. The reply is examined to see if it requires addition of a terminal phrase from the userinput. lfsothe phrase is examined for words which will be required to be exchanged in order to preserve grammatical sense when the phrase is returned by the computer. These words called SWOD words are personal pronouns and verb conjugations read from simple data statements within the program. Once the word is swopped the phrase is reconstructed and tacked on to the reply and the complete reply is printed. The program loop is then begun again as‘ the user is prompted for the next input. If during the conversation the program does not find a keyword in the input the user is prompted to teach the computer a new keyword and some suitable replies. These are saved to disc and used in all subsequent program runs. Ifyou choose the program to run in Learn mode any input that has no keyword will cause the program to ask for new keywords and replies. If the program is "Ct in Learn mode and does not recognise keywords in the input it Will give a f'bllJff" type —

-

'

response.

Thus the conversation is continued without the computer actually know— ing what it is talking about a situation find myself in all too often. When the new keyword is inputted —

I

.

38 ATAR/ USER

November 1985


replies to 90 With lt aftd are prompted to type in suitable replies for the _

_

_

keyword. require the terminal phrase user input to be tacked on to the end of the reply then the last character in the reply should be an asterisk, *. For examples Of this see the initial reply data in the program If YOU

of the

listing. Once the keyword, number of are replies and the actual replies the user are inputted by they printed to their respective files. The new

keyword andthe numberofrepliesfor

this keyword are printed in the KEYWORD-FM file. The total number of keywords and replies are then PUT into the NUMBERS.DAT file. The REPLY.F/L file IS finally updated With the new replies for the new keyword. As the REPLY.F/L file is being updated the sector and byte of each reply is saved in the P0/NTS.DATfiIe. The sectors and bytes for these replies are then placed in a numeric array as the program is rerun. This allows for random and speedy access of the reply file. Keywords and the number of corresponding replies are stored in the KEYWORD.F/L file. This is created on the first run of the program from the keyword data ofthe program and can be

updated during program

usage. In subsequent runs the data in the”

an

nil! ”mm“

1.05 till

all

IIEII

(1.1.5 R5" '

* it

3?

KEYWORD.F/L file, which has or has not been updated, is directly inputted into the keyboard array. The simulated array is formed by inputting the keywords, all made to eight characters in length, into one (ARRAY$). large string The string isthen accessed at eight character intervals for the individual keywords. There is a random choice made for reading the keywords from this array either in the normal or —

reverse

order.

This is so that certain specific

1120 F0! 1:1 re

* it

9mm ms F. um:

mm“

'

‘3

1m 1m lusts tr FILE “Emma!!!“ 1070 ens: tum m,4,i,"l:m.r El! 119mm mo Inf-muss mien at 50 FILE IS Pli?lm ms 15 1080 IE! is! FILE Is mat m FIRST m, mans FILES 1090 it" man FILE! mats tam 11“ t " Inn 15 “IE Ernst m - PLEA SE inn FIN? SEems En FILES to It SH m"

81,8...“ IK

keywords do ”Oi dominate others by always being searched for first due to being in an earlier position in the keyword ?leStandard files, Print and Input, are used for the replies (REPLY-Flu, but the pOSitiOh 0f each fep'Y is noted in terms Of Its Starting sector and byte value. This is achieved using the NOTE and POINT disc commands and permits completely random access to the disc files. These seCtO' and byte values are stored in a standard file,PO/N7'S.DAT and are read into numeric arrays 0” running the program. The numeric arrays are accessed for the seCtOF and byte value Of a partICUIar reDIy by the program- The POINT command then pOSitIOI'IS the reply ?le at the partICUIar seCtor and byte and the correct reply is read. Numeric variables are used for the total number of replies and keywords and as they are constantly being

updated during

and

in

subsequent

program runs, they are stored by the PUT and GET command into a numeric file that holds single byte data that is, numbers between 0 —

and

255.

This need not limit the number of replies and keywords that files may contain as, for example, it is a simple matter to allow two numbers to be used which can be added, allowing twice the number of replies, and so

1238 Min MEI 5mm 10 IMME

was to: Ema x it IMP Imam: f [KEV(I)]m

up

“1,4,0,"D:KEMN.£

mam-ma

at:

1

"man“ nuttLaxE?I M? 3:1:MP=IMP*L:IIIIQEND 12“ IF LEItKS) (8 "El (Stl?milu)=“ mack “wants to a "were mum LETTERS II LEI/51m hr. 1270 mavsuzummsnxnxa?t? now 551 so am use than man“ mu [Ems I sanEll 5» um 1280 m mean Inna. 15mm 1290 F$:" HELLO - 1 sum.» LIKE to En

a ?,s,l,"s:MEls.Mt'-=mt ? ILWWLOSE 115. IE! NE! W REPLY FILE AID SET poms fen aEPLxEsal-u museum 1150 ml ?,8,0."9:l€PLY.fIL“:RESWRE lEmnmPEi ax,t,o."banuts.nt"=ro a 1:1 to master: 1mm: 1170 at» “a? nus” ax;r;“,";a:mt 1mm czmuSE l: not m m m lunch or ?rms or REPLIES(Wk)! (in m m

1253 run 1:1 to

as!

turn we - new.» cmmsnnu ?ll me to nu tum IE?“ m cm 09 You a 13“ 1 “s":nsnml 2,83? .. mIs to Fm an IE Lem

ml

'

11” mos: tum “un?nwnsm m summer immmcuSE B? mats um! Fall 1200 m m an 1' “LES En muss was metals m M? FILE steam 121. cLBSE 1mm nanommmllts.» ovum

In 122. FM 52}. m murmur

(5.3)=P:ats,n=e:mt

alumna

SscLoSE at:

»

on.

3 (among men 1248 CUBE “HOPE!

nimmsmzmmu

“IBM

amountnoncnnuw?n Jsuuanuu).REPLY$mn,3smn,s Juntsumt nesmnmc?un

muslin

I:CLBSE a

1

1140

1050 DIN

mo nos: nzmzm

mum» K$,L:? tuna?

ummmiunxt 113. Bill in new news:

u:- m mxunu‘s?nmmm “3! Fustm=x1utmm=imm?nv MKIWzP?temzl?ill?mMT-l? HSMTAHSSOSIEMTT-‘l?l mt mmmmmzmmnsmm 2750:le mm,mun},stzss,1 ),x$'tu:lEll [Eva mzunmmxzzss

slimmnngmstm

WHEN typing in Converseall REM lines and statements can safely be omitted. The data, particularly the swap words, should be typed in exactly as in the listing, as all the spaces, etc, 3,9 important. Changes can be made to the basic program if required, and completely different rep/[es and keywords used to create different personalities. A copy should be kept on a back-up disc as the program requires to run with a non-write protected djsa / should be delighted to hear from any readers with improve— ments or interesting applications or personalities for Converse. Because the program relies on random aggegs ?les it"s, OfCOUI'SE, only suitabfe for use with a disc drive

.

«1!th? xsur x$:"v" WEI Lamina it! If Lina OFF ms! LEm = 0 Lone Hakim 1310 ms macaw

estimation 1305 mm

’ November 7985 ATARI USER

39


m

1320 mi 1330 IF

mun“: rs we cm F$(LEI(F$)):“§“ THE! mums

?

2,0:2 rswsrmn

"ls-unsure:

:

?

use new I$:IS(LEI(I$H1):“ "tIF LEI ? "5411 met rm (15) (a nu Tim PLEA 5: m-T e: sew-more use 1360 use ?seme mm Foe new 1370 use as! GET items Fem new mm not uznuunur "(0.5 "El 14003514 mouse me me Times at: same EB roe II 1am 1390 For» 1:11! To 1 STE? ~1=cem 1410 14“ re: 1:1 10 in:

1:11:11

am mum

. I . I l l

'

DRAW BOX DRAW CIRCLE

SAVE p|CTURE

a

cs:"":cs:ccs=core mew“ REM men-Inc ewrncm

1550 1670 £680

DECOGIISE m Kim Sterne: - me me race it a IE" on: (Ir/1m" 1590 1mm xszxr xs:"||" I'IIEI ? "Tim I s A PITT. I LIKE To LEAR! LETS KEEP TALKING “run-users 135. 1?“ ? "TYPE III 0 KEY!!!» PLEASE" 1710 II?!“ xsur mitts»: men at "Te: 5 Item 15 we Lone Team If a sec em term-ween 1710 1720 ? n mu m REPLIES (1-41 seem 1 am roe nus Item» ‘.m 173: new 1:1? DA on L<1 men 2 "m

ms

1)

1:11

z? "I

THE

cam

“we

ELM!

h

[ax/W

it

4”

4

ON CASSETTE FOR a

BIT COMPUTERS

'

fa? ‘

WM“

.

,

4 '

”?y;

a

,.-

LOAD PICTURE

SEPARATE PROGRAM TO DISPLAY picwRE

-

DEMO PICTURE

Transparentto all s/w

driver programme necessary conned dlreCt to 600 0r BOO/XL -

ALSO AVAILABLE BLACKJACK(16K) Realisticcard display................... £1.95

-

no

Of 130 XE ”213025;53£?EF..‘?3’§?.T.“.Y.‘.’..‘.’_'.‘i‘.?ffi.‘?............... £2 95

FRLllT o mas SALAD ermin (36K)

FRUIT PICKIN (16K)Arcadeaction (Order both FRUIT SALAD & FRUIT PICKIN

for only

£2.95 £2.95 £2.95 £4.50)

Cheques & P.0.'s to: (Overseas orders for

RR SOFTWARE (Dept AU) 14 KIRKSTALL AVENUE

single programs

umsao

M“

£05”

40 ATARI USER

November 7985

ROUGH

lANCS- ("15 9JA

__

,,

(Previous purchasersof Art Atari can upgrade to SMART ART for only £1.00)

PICTURETORMENT(16K)Verydifficult Colourful version

/

'

f

3

ALL ATARI

P

sum

INTER, ACE

OVER 80 DIFFERENT COLOURS CAN BE

BRUSH SPEEDS AIR BRUSH MODE PLOT AVAILABLE DRAWTO

saws

CENTRONICS

DISPLAYED AT ONCE l INTERRUPT DRIVEN CURSOR l 4 BRUSH SIZES l I .

or cs Per mm cos

nu ecs use ecsurmccsvums(Leanna-1)an en mast mm of cs melee 011 am:

em 111mm: Fee seems 1! es: seems one reason“ norms no lie no cosmonauts 1590 assume mature: 11:1 70 15:11: All es,sm$:1r LEI(B$))LEI(¢S) use It

GET

WT

ecsueuccn +11=sms=e?i

15“

151m

“SOFTWARE I

use rmsr IIT

1570 chLEMcSHuz" "mill To 1:5

1

mm

mm

ssmse-mwzussmzeznssm tsunami" u;m1¥$=F$=REPl-Y swwse ?zchose a: 1530 IF FSKLEltFSDOW' "El 5070 m chzm In 1:5 “WIRED 1540 DEN ms 15 enema 5° extent t 3 mm E» of 15 m mm ”MESS!“ 1550 use ms 15 ALL of 19 men me 1: Hue» 1m use: mum-z» m 1588 thism?jltssnur cs:" " mill G on Pmmeezeen IF no 65 WEI coin

L:KENI):IMEP:MEF(I)=IIEB 51mm» 1 eosxrmn ll stun: or term (I) 1420 IF K$(LEI(K$M:" " Time (3:15 (1.1 sears-11:60") “amen manor spa czs non ms um or we nee-mm use If Lill «shuns; “It! IE!“ 1 1“. “5" “1.51513; nmrmmszsmus stances» roe uszsmm same In : 11: resume II Iszmtevuim men use es:|(s:roe 11:1 10 Lama—Limes): If ?rmwaresnx—nzns Tees! we were

on

TIIEI we more um:

1610 mu men mean mmz?e r: an on IF I0 mes FM 1520 ecu max-111: en» es um um sun es meow 1530 ces:m-:1r 101 Teen cc$=c$u,x—u:

mom

swarm-7:?zmnvsmrmsrwn:

Fee 11:1 To Lente51~LE||usnxr

x,1€ute$1+x—11:es

1520

returner: use next

set a

1m

v coerce

11

1410

are

1470 IF Lem

)):(:S 1:10

nuts m

it! m was seen rm Tm me Lian-enemas" an; IF Lem Tm» are men men In mm 1mm 15 mm use mnnmmuneesune meme lumen 3:1 re mums» 55mm mean meanness GET men m7 new use me mar mm 15“ cLese uncles: 1mm- ez,4,e,-1: REPLY-FIL“=0PEI n,4,e.--e:eems.nt? 1510 mnrmuuwumeu emu! ml 5

-

or to d'80

m—

drive If fitted

FCC

SYSTEMS LIMITED THE LODGE MOORLANDS ROAD

MERRIOTT SOMERSET TA16 5NF TEL: CREWKEHNE (0460) 73442 PRESTEL MA'LBOX 046073442

£59 99

_+

P&P at£1.00 and VAT : 270-14 Ma" Order

A .

DEALER ENQUIRIES MOST WELCOME


Converse

—————_ 05010 0L5055":0010 17:10

17‘0 IL":?

CLQSE

2000 0010 m

01:0?“ 01,9.0,“D:KEYMD.F

01;L=0L055 01 1750 050 100100015 05111 FILE

& 001111 F

1150000 1700 (1055 02:0L055 03:0050 02.9.0.“0: 050L1.51L":0750 01,0.0,"0:001015.001" 1770 500 0:1 10 L:? "1105 10 05er "n!

5 1011 100 00010 2110 nil! ml “Tim

2470 050 mg; 7000000 2400 0010 0001 055015 1 000

2120 0010 1:1 15 11 1001 100 1015055L1 0151105 0

2490 0010 000 100 5100010 1011 100 005 051100 15 00 10 2500 0010 155 — 700 0001.0 000000” 05 01501 1001 1 000

Fact Tu“? you ml!

21:10 0010 100 500010 101 10 05 0005 10 1.50011 050 2140 050 0000110015000“ 2150 0010 1 000 0 501500 0005 11 005 0 0 mm 5000 005 or 105 00150 040001 55 2150 0010 0 00150510 00010 1105 0105 0

1" 500 105 0510000 “um" 015055" 1700 0015 02,0,0:10w1 050115:7 02350 “5:1 0:1;0;",--;0:0501 0:01.055 02:01055 03 1750 050 0000015 u 0 00101500 0010550 1000 00101500:00m500+u00=00+1:0050 04

,0.0,-'0:0m5051001":001 04,001701 04, “summer-5

05 00 0550 500 5015005 00 0101551501 my 5001 2170 050 00000050000

1020 050 10105000 0010000000 1030 0010 0155L5 ,10005515, 10005515 , 075115, 100 005 , 1 00, 1 00 , 100 00 5. 1505 , 1015, 005 . 1505, 1000 , am 1040 0010 m , 1000. 1 0005 . 000 0005 00 1 , 005 700, 0 , 700 0005 , 1 0005, 05 You , 00 1, 15 , 700, 1 , 100 1045 0010 100 ,15

2100 0010 1 51a 11 01510011 10 000501 1001 100 51» it 0005 - 005 100 001 0 5105 an 0 L11115 0050450511105 2100 0010 1 10100 100 005 00110150 000 51111 10 5050551 001 00100150 00100 5 050 001050 10 05 00050 2200 050 warm 2210 0010 01 00010 15 50000005 000 000 0010110001 501115 0050101011100 2223 DIN 00 01050 CMTER 000 COOP“

04 1010 7 "10000 700 500 15000100 15, L51 5 055015 000 000050501100":000

/

2100 0010 5001010 10 15 10 511005 1500

00501100 1001 1 000 2450 D?T? I] 15 ceva 5001 1 000

ll 7“

0mm?

00 100 0005 15 00001 011

1353 an ”015? PM!” 1000 0010 1-017 15 11 100 050111 0005 00 10100 0005 10150551100 10 501 10 152 1370 our“ may . BMIIG rm OF PERSON 100 005! mu

ESE on I “ILL

E

00001 5015111101: 5155 PL 50 T0 SLEEP

1000 0010 10011 1 00 0511100 0 L111L5 80050 0110 1000 000050501100

500m 0

on!“ "HUGS mat you 5100 £09111 x on “109055550 MTG m 1m RE“ “51“, 1510 0010 22,155,2.05LL0.2,10|01.2,0000 015.2,1 $01,701 0015,2,ruuo.2.0005. FEEL,2 2,30DHTER,2,I “u“,2.1 1920 0010 m001,2,0000010,2,1 1105,4.1 00,4,100 005.5,005 100.4 1030 0010 05L0,x.5001 00,1,015055,4,101 E

c“

"mu “pm“

1390 mm 15 nun I: To mu m1

0,3, 00,2,“

you

1040 050 1011101 00015015 Of 05va 5

F1].

1949 050 000001st 1950 0010 000 000 000 05 50 5005? 1900 0010 1 1105 90511105 0500L5 1570 0:0 menomn 1000 0010 05110 50010110:

1 L105 505

5110051005 L105 100 1590 0010 501100 05LL0 15 0 501010 100 05 0110 0050555001 0051115 05100 10

2000 050 mum-000 2010 0010 1 0001 0501Lv FEEL L105 0050 50100 101010 2020 0010 0L5055 00 001 050 0 50501510 00551100 5000 05 101010 2010 050 2040 050 00000000050000 2050 0010 000-1 100 10 5100 15 1015 00 1 115055 2000 0010 1 0001 0001 10 501 0000015 1

'0 L105 10 1010 10 700 2070 050 0001 000100000 2080 MIA ill? BI 50010 500m» 5005005 05 511915 05 100 00010

.

"I“!

OF

I!

0?

2570 0010 1 0111 001 5100 1400100 10 v

M 50 0001 5000551 11 1580 MN I 10101 100 005 90105110 15L LI“ it to sum IIP 2590 0010 1 055055 10 5001 00 so 00 00 1 1000 15 055 2000 050 ma?a-? 2610 0010 WI! MI! 0005 10 501 PL5055 1-H DENIAL 2520 0010 00 001 500501 15 10 05 00111 — 1051 0500055 700 055 105 00

I I!” 225.

SE

.

2310 0010 1 00 001 00 0000010 00 0 000 01 2320 0010 00000105 005 50050100 051005 ,

2330 050 1-01 11050-00000 2140 0010 1 0001 00115 10105051000 - 00 0 100 15LL 15 10W 100 11050 2150 0010 00010 100 5L0000015 00 1011 v 00 501 100 LIKE! 2300 0010 10015 000 - 1 0150 LIKE! 2170 0010 1 00 001 5000055 11 15 00050 0L 10 LIKE!

1“

2550 0010 700 050m: 00 0550 5015 05m 500101100 2560 REM ”Sum 00“!

5 10 vou

IITEIESTI“ FRIENDS THERE M7! 10m WES 7°“ “I!“ 2255 REM WI Humans 2260 NH“ “01115 FBI]? - BECAHSE SOIE'I’I E5 I FEEL” 2255 “T“ I m? if M WING “PM“ 001 I C“ FEEL ? lITTLE ILL ' ”01100 mu ”5" ”95555“ “3°" "M5 “P 227° 95" WWW 22“ ”I“ BE 0005 RESPECIFW. TMKING T ' 9 “3°75 °F 01 50050100 “055 2200 0010 1 0015 on 000015 - 1050 005 ”1&110 1005011005 2300 1150 000000010000“

"u"

251. M". 10101 0155505005 0055 11 mg W 000 IF I 000 2520 RE" 010105me 2510 0010 100 0001 15 10 05m 1002 2540 0010 10101 5001 or 051.» oo 100 055

2230 if" “H 1010000000 2140 “TA I ?lm I ”Ill. IOTRE! If u 0000 “55 it?“ T??l' "Elf ‘ M mm

ME

[M

at "£055 2030 0010 MN

ITS I!“

00515 1115 507100 0L50

“pnfcl?jgp

2040 0010 115 0105 10 0500 5015005 501 1.5 "10055 000 “p 00010 2550 It“ mvm 2560 0010 HIV M) PEQPLi 0110115 SAY ill? REALLY OIE 5000L0 SM HIV 001! I IS me“ ”E 90517105 257“ NT“ “H “I 100 “PEN E W has KR "it“ 2689 Mini N 100 REQLLV 0000 “W YOU h 05 050100 1: 10m ?

T

2590 050 0000100000000 2700 0010 1011 001 5001011007 2710 0010 000 000 001 0110 1000 010000 0010 05 50 050011051 2720 050 00000 100000 2710 0010 1010 05 00 100 001050 10 50 0 5010: 15 10 2740 0010 0501 1 5000055 00105 1 000 2750 1000 40000:500:0550(1551z50L=0550

(107)*250+0550(1051:15 500:170 000 510 :1070 1050 0010 51051000 2700 7 "50000";500:2 "50000 1105-';50L

2100 050 00-01 0100100000 2300 0010 1 HILL? 0000501015 000 11s 0 051 110511 1001 100 0050 2400 0010 1 5100 11 0 111115 0111015055 1100 1001 700 0050 2410 0010 1 000 0005051000 000 000501 15 100 0050 2420 0010 11 15 5110111 10105L1500015 10 01 100 0050 2430 050 000000 0050000 2440 0010 1 050000 11 15 0051 01010511

"MT I W 2450 0010 1 050m: rm

.

Tired of

typing?

Take advantage of our finger—saving offer on Page 61.

11 015110101 0

November 7985 ATAR/ USER

47


_

THE GRAPHICS

_

Self-adhesrve contrOIgraph’cs for the 600/800Xl. Free yourself from your reference manual You know the problem, typing in a listing from any magazine or book. You are suddenly faced with line after line of “Special" characters that are not shown on the keyboard, and that means searching th roug h your r e f eren ce manual 'us t to t yp e a program in. Well! now you can forget that problem with Graf-Stix controlled graphical characterfixed You can ?nd to theufront _°f”eaCh md'V'qual key. those SpeCiaI Characters mStantly- And they are really easy to f‘XJ

_

SendCheque/PO forf4.95 inc .

Selectawdeo 5

14

.

Other

'“°_'“de severa Tesg’res erem S'Zes'

.

_

'"

'“

“SF

raw c "we 3“?“my ofdte’“ V3” FEJ'CIEU'GS _e m°.°’ draw, Circle draw, Triangle draw, Kaleidoscope draw, Square draw and Ray line draw are but a few of .'

the drawing features available.

Invert/Rotate/Mirror/Flipand

a

move feature make for

easy design. The move feature allows one to move any part of a picture to the location of their choice. You can use the 40 paint brushes available or create your own

and save

paint, fill mode

Computers

The GAD works with all printer modes, its absolutely true. You can use pictures created with the GAD in your etc. There have been several own programs/software graphics packages, but none that satisfied all your needs. Now at last the GAD has arrived. Don't believe us, see for yourself you'll be amazed.

daysfordeliverv

E56

“o

The GAD is the most powerful, most versatile graphics design program available for the Atari Home Computers. Its simplicity of use make it a joy for people of all ages to paint with. It has more than 30 different commands. An incredible 128 different colours can be used in any one picture. A three stage Zoom feature allows one the ability to do very deta'led and mmcate work‘

them to disk. Edit character sets, pattern and rainbow special effects make the GAD the best graphics program available for your Atari. If you own a printer you can obtain a printout of your creations.

TandP&Pto:

Belmont Road, Astley Bridger Bolton BL1 7AF Allow

9 63

VA

DEPARTMENT

ART

«9

Disk Only £29.95. Available now. Ask your dealer for

D UAL OPERATING SYSTEM You could have a dual operating system with the flick of a switch. This will allow you to run all known software written for the 400 and 800 computers or your XL.

small circuit board which computer. No soldering required. It consists

of a

5‘imp y I

ARCADE

plugs into your

a

now!

demonstration

CONSTRUCT|ON

SET

'

IS

.

Price £29.95

YOU!

A

’ STSREQSEAR er COM|NAGSOI1|rT|3 ovem van a e

Mail Ordertn:

3

G. PAUL Francis Ward Close, Hilltop, West Bromwich, West Midlands B712PY

MlD' SYNTHESISER INTERFACE .

'°’“‘e “a" 400/ 5°“ sooxu sooxu 13°“

Control MIDI equipped electronicinstruments from your Atari. Hardware comprises MIDI IN, THRU and OUT ports. Complete instructions and example programs supplied. Disk drive required. £59.95 inclusive.

RSZ32 PRINTER INTERFACE Connectyour Atari to R8232 printers. Workswith BASIC, ATARIWRITER etc. Disk drive required. £39.95 inclusive.

LOOK OUT FOR OUR ADVENTURE SERIES AND STATE OF THE ART ARCADE G AM ES DATABYTE products

are

available from:

SILICA SHOP 01-309 1111, SOFTWAREEXPRESS021—384 & sous 5080, SILICON cm? 0753 70639, As. woononi 0270 214118, MICROBYTE 051-630 6933, DATASCAPE 01-723 0552, LADBROKE COMPu‘?NG 0772 21474, |NTOT0 0602 410987 ORDEM 0734 583062, SUNARO and other good comput'er stores. -

-

-

have c equ Ziigegespsrgngcisbe obgaxililnghany problzmsgn or er irec. t”hi/0“ en you can made payable to DATABYTE' POSt to. .

MULTI TAPE TO DISK UTILITY ‘TransfersingIeAND

multi-stagetapestodiskand

then runthem

from a fast, autoload menu. The only one that can handle five stages. £14.95 inclusive.

CASSETTE BACK-UP UTILITY '

Pie-records cassette software atany ofthirteen difterentspeeds. Can even handle non-standard format tapes. £6.95 inclusive.

DATABYTE suite 31 A Grove Terrace L on d on NW5 1 PL '

Cheque/P.0.to:DIGICOMM 170 Bradwell Common Boulevud, Milton Keynes, '

42 ATARI USER

These products

should not

November 1985

he

used on copyright

.

.

Bucks MKIJ IIBG. material.

'

Highgate Road '


BitWise

———————————

LAST month

©@

how the

saw

we

binary operators AND and OH can be used to combine pairs ofbinary

?g®80@ 0

A_t0uch of Q m9“: With bin ary Dumber \‘\-— s

The example we used that of turning machines on and off under computer control. Of course these operators have far more uses than this. To illustrate one, consider the Ascii character set. The codes for A to Z are in the range 65-90, while their lower case equivalents, a to z, are in the range numbers.

§

o

was

V

Qw 0

;

Looked at in this decimal way, there seems little relation between the upper and lower case sets. If we look at them in hex, though, we can

i

f \-\A\\ $17“ N

do a

a

’ 9 (?, f a

N? m

23 g“ O

97—122.

0

O

that: A. .2

0

0

a

Q\\\

runs from &41 to &5A runs from &61 to &7A hope you can see the pattern.

I

.

.

0

(3

Q

C)

.

.

.

0

0

see

a

0

_

2

Ascii In fact the numerical difference between a lower case and its upper case character is equivalent always &20. Looked at

iogtggégdti: Lihsrlxsrzj:nt§te?vz £31528” £59252?“

remember' we Startw'th

For example, the code for A is:

a

is:

So:

mutate ltlie code for 1) m l ( the cast .m1um ' ’ f" ( the “m 281mm m“

Similarly, the code for z is:

further use for AND isto testif a particular bit in a byte is set. Wejust AND that byte with a mask consisting One

z is:

1 1 1010 ‘701 °

In both cases the only difference is in bit five. So if we have an Ascii code for a letter, we can force it to be uppercase by clearing bit five to zero.We can do this by AN Ding the code for the letter with the mask %11011111 (&DF). Remember, the bits in the mask will leave the that contain in, the Ascii code bits corresponding for the letter unchanged in the resultant byte, whether they be 0 or 1. On the other hand,the bit in the mask with O in it will force the matching result bit to be zero. So: 1

?" 5°" for i 111511“! (the list - “Fl i the £66! {or Q all“!

“HM!

.

Alli)

gives

-

an

%01011010

,,

the be OS mask will %oo1ooooo,_the Ieavmg things unchanged ln the resultant byte, the forcmg a in bit five of the corresponding 1

401100001

the code for

the procedure

result bit.

0

and

1

%01000001 whereas the code for

reverse

’ l

It won't surprise you to learn that

in the bit being tested, with Os in all the rest. The bits with O in them, of course, set the corresponding bits in the resultant byte to zero. Since the rest of the bits are already cleared to zero by the mask,

of

a

1

willltbnei tllle coértzslplgndirlgogesulthbit in

ate between fairly eaSlIy.

Let's see how this works in practice. Ifwe were testing for bitfour being set, the mask would be

%00010000-_ and also with

non—zero.

0

If

the bit being checked

is

clear,

%oo101 100,where bit

the clear, and you H see that zero an non-zero are reSUIt'nQ bytes

four

|_S

respectlvely. lts Of EOR/XOB? Well, 80. what If the pair a ls to of return anCt'Or.‘ and O b'ts differ, 09mm?" [belng they re identlcal. Given th'sg we San _

1

"C

mm XOR to test use Wh'Ch differ. For example.

yte

m a

11310111! 111301151 -——————

XOR ‘

gives “1100011

investigation: 0 If that bit is

1

_

,

%OTOF1V1(?’gg'whe‘rt‘e'ihvzzfisw

the only thing that could stop the entire resultant byte being zero is the value derived from the bit under set, the corresponding z result bit will be set also (1 AND 1) so the resultant byte will be

we can differentizero and non—zero bytes

machine code

b'ts neatly mark '

the

where differlng We

set palrs. can also

use

OU"

the

EOR/XOR

to

a

byti, bl; 0 or'tNhOT a mas WI EOOme'leme'n: ing I

BI BBY concludes his series on blnary numbers MIKE _

%11111111. Since the mask is all 15, the result depends entirely on what's in the byte under investig— ation. Bits that contain 15 will give 0 _ November 7985 ATARI USER

43


Bit Wise

(since

1

EOR

contain zero

1

0), while bits that

z

1

willgive 1,since0

EOR

110101119

1.

=

This

exactly what we want to happen with a NOT change the Os to ls and vice versa. For example:

gill" “09991“

gill"

191019910

l the

manhunt

which

whatever it is we’re on to the background, it drawing will be displayed in the resultant colour number. It's rather like mixing

of course, non—zero, srnce the bytes differ. We've probably already "19000th the use of EOR ln graphicsappllcation

l

.

IS,

are

when-we EOR 1szero,they must have been of bits identicalsmce every pair must have Q'Ve” Wh'Ch only zero, happens when the bit values are the

colours mathematically. To get rid of what we've drawn, we draw it again with the same colour n u m ber, once more u nder the influence of EOR. Of course EORing twice with the same byte gives us the original byte back. This results in whatever it is being drawn appearing in the original, background colour. Hey presto it’s gone! Well, that’s the end of the series. H 006 f U II V you ,” h ave gamed some idea of the power of binary numbers and the ways they can be combined. Ive only touched on a fraction of the n tral uses, but ll be well pote you equrpped to work things out for

same. ,

"0”‘Zer9 ave Sba 99” a pa" 0 refsg'i”We at m.“”flame so the two under '

differ,

101911109

S

run

bytes

consrderation must differ. ple' -

-

-

For exam—

1

second

byte

1

result

l

101110010 -—-—-—

I second

byte agam l first byte hack., l

I

.

.

.

,

'

11.191“.

We use this EORlng technique to draw things on a background and _

m

‘[

OMPUTING ru r

n

e

r

Iv e

o

r

rv

4

.

'

A

ATARI

yourself from

now on.

FOR SPECIAL OPENING orrsns PLEASE SZOST 512k Computer + 3.5” Disc Drive 500k + Hi-Res M0110 Monitor + 5 Disks

L

111101115

Normal

749.00

AND GAMES sorrwms 10 95 AVAILABLE LOWEST PRICES

ALL 91 BUSINESS

130 x5

£15999

[lixlcarti 800XL54kC0mputer+

£299.95 £147.97

12911 Computer 130XE ' 1050 Disc Drive e Home Filing Manager + Pay on Adventure + Games MasterDiscI9.95l

+J0ystick

a

"f,“ deg,

“$15“ 3}

E?RXDI-ngRE 130 XEa'nge ,5 512 STS

raj»? Jr“

bf; 9in £3?! .’

Pay Off Adventure Printerlnterlace 11.0.5. PERIPHERALS

Epson Printers Interfaces

SOFTWARE

.

it's available we have it!!! Arcade Adventures Educational

£28.99

Manager Drscl9.95l

.

£259.94

£240.00

£89.95

£79.95 579-95

£99.99 +

£219.95 £399.00

£249.55

(100005)

£469.00 £49.99

£45.95

599-99

£8995

PRICES

Cartridges

£4,552”

$35" :egg,

Star

All latest titles

Space Shuttle, Fighter Prices lrom £4.95.

.

CQL/

,

_—

.

All

g

,

5"i J: {‘ ’A‘ {tug -..v/V4l gr”. K? , 4g, / ‘\' ‘ ,

*

N

.

\

‘)/,:'I /

_.

""

% 00I ,, 5445 \ 1 1,0 13 §\ ; v. «7.

m

~4‘ (-

q:

,

\

~

A“

. ‘

dedicated magazines

in

4

R. lng

stock Atari User

Page 6 Amie, Analog

us astan d 1

"a;

prices.

Please

plume

for

full

details

of stocks.

ConversationalFrench/urSpanish German/orltalian Conversational

522-99 £22.89

£2039

lcassl£9.95

(casslfSBS

Superscript Word processor Homeward (Sierra word processorl Magiprim Home Filing Managerldiscl

£20.99

£l2.95ldlsc) £12.951dlsc)

£69.95 £48.95 £25.95 £24.99

CD.C.DlscslSS/DDll?lnhox Memurex DiscslSS/DDIIDinbox Discs ‘l?in Library

Style Doubler

Joystick

-

“?gi?ag?gr'z?gf’h'”

November 7985

plus many

AssemblerEdilor

05

PM 20?

: Lozzggggggiimam?pm —6pm—9am VISA andACCESSwelcome

44 ATARI USER

Pengon,

at discount

“0-99

All

0151:

Case

disc

£14.99

{£1022

carrrerfor

50 discs

£16.95

£7999

your

£65.00 £45.95 £22.95

£15.99 £19.09 £19.99

costs

£7599 750 835“

lnsertslrepairkitl 5

u etm oar Bnqrirorgsr:

Pilot,

available

52239

“Wood“

.

'

etc.

0&1ng 0275398010039qu

,.

33 o "mm"

software

Atarisoit

Maxell

05:1?)(fk00flfj'lzgrlfgjrs Check our_BulIetin Board for latest imports dlrect from our USA Branch

h 7

Out. Centlpede

others.

HUME/BUSINESS

4

Q;

Krazy Shoot

Maths ‘0' Level Course. YearI—4 Maths ‘0' Level Course.Vear5Revisi0n

4

I

.

Packrnan,

EDUCATION/PROGRAMMING

‘-

..

Raiders,

llc?aigg‘fellswer.

/ 4.1193

f:

12

at;

SOFTWARE

£59.99

.

550'“‘9"359 SPECIAL

£13000 £255.00

£139.33 £223.32

Mannesman Tally MTBS CX77 Touch Tanlet + Atari Art Salt

-

re

Game Master

1020 Printer/Plotter Mannesman Tally MT 80

If

Modems Full Supporting peripherals Full Service support etc.

3:21?”

t

,

AT THE

£34.99

Program Recorder 1050 Disc Drive + 005 3 + 00s 2.5 800XL + l010 cass. + Joystick + 2 Games + 1050 Disc Drive * Home Filing 800XL 1010

‘ --

Our Price

£179.00

£199.00

lmthediscdrive

SF314Dnlsided

SOFTWARE

less

'

-

I

DIRECTAMERICAN IMPORTS FROM OUR USA BRANCH PLUS BULLETIN BOARD WITH PUBLIC DOMAIN DOWNLOAD

I.

-

.

ADBROKE

,, 9,

1

_

XOR

119191019

if?

1

1199191110

201011100

OW”

first byte

xgmbm '

-

XOR

I

Of

-

programs where It 3 Widely used for Its hey presto effect. This 15 based on the fact that if you EOR a first byte With a second and then EOR the result of that once more With the second byte, the flfS’f byte reappears. Look at this, if you dont believe me:

We can also to test {159 EOR/XOR two bytes identical. If the result

_

if

number

“It“!!! 111111111

M

XOR

is

X08

move on, leaving the back— ground unchanged. In this case the first byte is the background colour number. |f we then EOR our second byte corresponding to the colour

then

whereas:

1

use the

B.side.

Disc

Notcher

£5.99

mm to availability. All prices inc. VAT P&P extra please enquire. 116 EDLESTON ROAD, CREWE,

CHESHIRE 0270414118


Beginners .

,

33!“ *

s A)

\

w,

f

(i, ‘ ;

“M

VV

""\

:; m.‘

“~

vy‘

f

/

)

'

‘i’!“\\ "g?“

ow

,,

Q/

/

ITOLDyouaIieIastmonthwhenI we'd be continuing with loops! Before that we've an interesting diversion into the world of strings. Strings are simply groups of said

numbers

characters,

letters, marks and so on, ”strung" together. The micro remem— bers them as a group. More often than not, they're words or sentences or

-

,

.

Q

Q

. . \‘ ““"‘ \,mimm

.‘

I

. .

/

MIKE

-

happened

This is

a

String

Notice the quotes they're the to the Atari that it's a we way signal string we're dealing with. Also, whatever's between the quotes is reproduced exactly so: PRINT 'Thii is a string' —

8

This Is

38 Dill STRING‘lbl _

only

esnxc cage, fTR/lNG$chan ers Inbth'_5 ever Ira-c °."9' course, it can can the be over S'X’ undgrsnx as longniltnust rogram ilustrates. run If you H see the

'.t'

strtng'

123456 1 23456 123 I

think you

can

YOU

mind

string being shorter

than by its

maximum size, as shown 12345 (Win? heDDNYaccepting as YOU can lengthen And JUSt strings, SO YOU can Shorten them, as shown by the assignment of 123 in line 100. After running the program, enter: PRINT

STRINGS

you'll find that it's 123, program left it. Now enter:

and

outp1u;.345

.

a

the 1234567

I,

w

_/

However, the micro doesn't the

they're going to be. That is, you have to DIMension them as in:

and: ‘

T0

v

ter.

.

you followmg

/ '4\

I

size

I

?"

y‘

it assigned to STRING$ in line 80 was one character too long, so the Atari simply iQhOFGd the last charac—

punctuation

'

-

‘\

1

gu’de through the m'cro jungle

as in:

'

a». u Ja4a—wl Mu

.

Cw?iiliiikss;é Jill! Mtge—? s“,

VII Of BIBBY .

C

1/

m taon3!

c mm Réa‘ ?

Part

l

<

~

'

l

l

b.—

\

-

L...

,

STRINGS

'

as

the

"

Notice that the two quotes go directly with nos p ac e b e t ween.

side b y side

guess what's

,

Then enter.

/

will give different outputs,

.

since the second has two spaces between the quotes and the first word. We saw that we can label strings with variables as in: STRINGS

=

llThis is

a

string'

The rule for string names are identical to those for numeric variables, except that string variable must end With a $.130 Perhaps the most important thing about strings is that you have to tell the micro in advance the maximum names

PRINT

10 RE" PROGMH

STRINGS

I Th' t'ime instea cl f printing 123 o. as t hls value of the string, absolutely _e ”ommg appears °” the screen .Sa‘fe for the READY prompt. This Is because the value of STRING$ is absolutely nothing since: .

N "I" 30 DIN 40

CHRSUZS)

STRINGS“)

smack-12145"

56 PRINT STRINGS “ 60 STRINGS-"123456“

70 PRINT STRIIG$ 80 as

5TRIIGS:"1234567" pun STRINGS

.

,

STRINB$=" b t een the t y th' h b strin 9 eve 203 sing pac eeTvi‘Zis quaitae8,$2 0Ute I

STRINGSZ"123" 118 PRINT STRINGS

v,

w/

/

in

e\ /

/

/

“as WM

PRINT

t/4

...

Q

\

\

A'.'

0:0‘?s Q .

J!

>

\

,

.

i”

@°@

as

,

W/ W N» “hf/C's” A‘ 1&3“, "“

.

.

K”

_

\_._

'

PRINT

‘W'

~

f:

'

,

"j:<,,»-'.‘,-

<

I

1

it i /“':... a | re /\ /L".((‘5A}' .~; "ct-x ‘V‘ W v...¢. ’\l “pt/AA:—

.

(

g

so

,

% xv

/

l

.

_——-——>'

Program/ November 7985 ATARI USER

45

/


m

string.

of To see some more. aspects on the Atari, aSS|gn: strings

a e nu Y9u'1hriii've rovrn

.

reii§°y“o§eifavii?é Aspifr‘lé'fié‘r’lél‘fé

We’ve used it with a string variable, but you can, if you wish, use it with a string in quotes as in: is.

we

it, it can be

.

an

and

you'll

see HELLO

1

appear. NOW

PRINT

try: PRINT

leSS-

to

Of

STRING? LLO' .W|t.h STR/NG$(” the whole StFmQ ls means the printed out since the slice starts at the first letter. On the other hand STRING$(5) gives us a single character slice, since the fifth letter of the string is also the last. See what happens when you try:

PRINT 57311455“)

you’ve already dimensioned it? Don't forget, though, that a string doesn't have to be the size you've dimen— sioned

the th'rd letter tfr'om e end, glv' ng

_

message, smce dimensioned. Anyway, at present STR/NG$ should hold the value HELLO. Try entering the fo||owing:

This might seem a bit cockeyed to you, though. Why do we need LEN since if the string's in quotes you can see how long it is, and if it's a variable

.

o W0“ thelgtfingfinighessggjgeGesn/gff give us

error TEST$ hasn't been

LENl'ABCD'l

PRINT

.

string. The start of the slice will be the character whose position in the string is given by the number in brackets. lt

TESTS='HELLO'

get

.

iiz'azruwajrne jstfgtngsllsiczrgtfh $5,522

been able

Incrdentally, we V? only to to do all th'3 STE/NG$ assigning because we've dimenSioned n when we ran " tried to assign Program ”W? ‘° a “W “a“ab'e as

5 .

flhs‘irizgsg?rsiszggf'

zbsolugelyno characterswhatsoever.

You should receive the answer:

what:

STRINGSlSl

gives you! What's happening is that by following STRING$ with the brack—

.

,

LENGTRING”

PRINT

LEM")

PRINT

the” enter: PRINT

pmr smmssm will produce LO. No prizes for guessing

.

STRINB$='HELLO' and

will give you LLO, while:

LEN lets you find out so you can, for instance, allow for different lengths in your screen layout. Before we leave the LE.N,try-tofind null of the With: length string

is called the null string and we use it when we wish to wipe out, or nullify, a

STRINGS“)

Programllgivesagraphic example of this slicing using a FOR NEXT loop. Here the loop variable START decides the starting position of the slice. Each time through the loop the slice starts further up the string.

”mm,

.

You're ”Sing lN’PUT string variable, YOU wont be too sure how long the string will be.

Often: When W'th a

arrive.

and ELLO should

PRINT STRINGNIS)

..

10 REN PROGIMN II

J ‘

20 PRINT CNRSHZS)

5

30 DIN STRINGSUD)

\

|

40 STRINGST'QBODEFGHIJ"

\

'

50 FOR STARTLI T0 18 l

60 PRINT STRINGSHTART)

\

s,

m!-

"? N“, A M /”it“ /~l‘. ‘ ‘ér‘kf?—?g'

ar‘ ”M

Q 4

e

v

sea-i

if

i-

-

‘/

...;3.

l

; l

Program //

/

n

«—

/

(&/%l F3; “(Vi—3...‘ . 0 ?s‘ Gog o o y/ 49 3 are. ‘§/E\'Q\§if//% Q '. '.\~ fi€w 4 "‘-—\’ '_Y‘C-§/\127 in) ' o. .0‘ f?’ “sates &. ‘Qp 0

..

ti, \

,

,

1.

.

4

<\

\

.?.

.

,

1M4

t??f ‘P-si—r

(J V

60 PRINT

g”

'

-

IS

-

in

/

l".

A; 50.

1/

u.

46 ATARI USER

‘l't'A'JmilAlexé-gi' 1

November 1985

-/

%\

Wu“

-

_/

\__.«

‘1

y

l

.4\ ??/Qén

sritiiissisrmiii

effect:

>Q§////®\\\ jli/s i%\\'\\\\\\\\//// WgA/?‘?jy /,\//%§ ?g'f-QJM/A/L ‘::v%’3@ig?égg& ;

i

1

-

3

The first START has time. through the value so line 60:

-

0

l

EABCDEFGHIJ. 00p-

v

———‘

i

Let's look at this in detail. The first part of our program clears the screen then sets STRING$ equal to We then enter the

Mr

.

/

~.

70 NEXT STMIT

4

N’

/

,

'

60 PRINT STRINGS“)

If you’ve been following this see it means we can print out

~

_,

,

you’ll from

the first character of STRING$ to the

-

i


———————_—Beginners last.

That

is

it prints:

10

“WHEN” time thr

then? 222m is

u h

the

s?)?ne so

2,

so

we

can

PRINT

lOO

is E2

4. “Ruckummmw.

at the

STARTis 3,

"FINISH“;

Input FINISH 100 mam smtucStsmnt,F1utsm 90

W PRINT STRTNSNMM

line Program ”I

60 being: STRING‘“)

80 PRINT

program ”I actually works. Lines 60 80 prompt for an input value for the aptly named numeric variables START and FIN/SH. Line 100.

'

and

which gives you:

Since STRING$ starts at its first character and finishes with the tenth, the whole of the string is printed out. take a l°°k at Program V' Pinallyl, We re “5'”9 the fact that: PRINT

CDEFBHIJ

100 PRINT

and so on.

Finally, 373437- has the value 10, so line 60 prints out the slice from the

10th character to the end—the single letter J_ Actually we can slice offany part of a string we want by giving two numbers in brackets separated by a comma. The first number specifies the start of the slice and the second the finish. Enter the following (assuming you've run Program II): PRINT STRINGNZ,“

You'll get back: BCDEF

Remember,

STRING$

eXp'GCt-

Program lll allows you to experi— ment with slicing STRING$. Initially STRING$ is printed out,then you'llbe prompted for the number of the character YOU want to start from, and the number you want to ?nish with. The slice you've requested will be printed out, and the process repeated. (You can escape from the loop by pressing

.

5

STRINGHSTART'HNISH) us exactly the slice

we

want. For instance, if we wanted

a

slice

from the second character to the sixth, we would input 2 for START and 6 for FIN/SH. Line 100 then becomes effectively: 1"

PRINT

19 RE" PROGRQH

30 D11! STRINGSuG)

‘9 Slnl?ssz'mBWEFGHI-l" 50 FOR LETTERZI T0 18 60 PRINT STRINGStLETTER,LI-:TTER) 70 IE!“ LETTER

P’og’am

the Break key-l

Play around with various slices until you're sure you understand how they operate, then have a look at how

V

made the loop variable, to 10, LETTER, which ranges from

we've

1

so line

60

60 PRINT

TheIoopformedbylinesSOto70 does the actual

printing out. The slice always starts at the first character of STRING$ so the firSt number inside the brackets in line 60 is fixed at l:

V

20 PRINT CHRSHZS)

STRINS‘Q'M

which gives us the slice we require, starting at the second character of STRING$ and finishing with the sixth. Program IV uses this slicing technique to give us the inverse. of Program H by printing out the W“ character of the then the first string, two, followed by the first three and so

STRINS$(5,5l

prints out just the fifth character of the slice starts and STR/NG$, Since ends ?fth character. Instead W'ih the Of Spec'fvmg a number, however,

on.

is

ABCDEFGHlJ, so STRING$(2,6} gives us the slice with its second letter, B, and finishing with its sixth letter F Notice you get five |ettersl not the four that 6—2 might lead you

to

then gives

smmssu.temsmnssn

As you’ll see, the whole of STRING$ is printed out. The reason is that LEN/STRING$} gives us 10, the length of STRING$. This means that what we’ve entered above boils down

119 PRINT 120 “To 50

gcpgpguu

60 PRINT

PRINT

IIPIIT sum

7a

second

character of STRING$ and continue to the end to give:

On the next cycle,

CHRSSZS)

2: 23:1 "5:33:55 7";

STRINGM)

start

further along STRING$, giving us our triangle of letters. After you've run Program IV enter:

III

PROGRQN

29 PRINT IO DIN STRING (19)

effect: “l

“E"

_

_

reads: STRlNBSlLETTER,LETTER)

This Will pick and print out each letter Of as you ” STRING$_'” turn, see When YO“ “m 't' we COUId have written By the “he 50 as.Way' _

,

.

_

65 PRINT STRING$l1,FINISHl

FIN/SH varies from to 10 throughout the loop, so the end of our slice gradually gets further and

50

FOR

LETTER

=

T0

1

LENlSTRINGSl

1

10 RE“ PRnERnH I" 20 PRINT CHRNHS) 30 DIN STRINGSHO)

4. STRINGS:"ABCDEFGHIJ" 59 FOR Flulsnzl m In 60 mm STHIGStLFIIISH) 70 HEN FINISH

Program /V

Since LEN/STRING$) is 10, this is equivalent to the original line 50- it has the advantage that, ifyou missed out one Of the letters Of STR/NG$ when you tYDEd in line 40, the LEN/STR/NGW automatically compensates for the error, calculating the true length. t Well, perhaps d'df' m'SIGad.y°“ too badly V9 used qmtea afteraII—we few |°095 th'S month. And "EXT _

,

.

I

month there'll be even more! November 1985 ATARI USER

47


With the Multl-Vlewterm/Datatan modem serial interface plus software package from Miracle Technology. .

.

fix/W”; ”’

.

UL

This unique comms package gives ATARI‘ users full Prestel* faculties, including graphics, and allows access to Micronet‘", Viewdata systems, telex, electronic mail, bulletin boards and databases. Datatari handles baud rates of 1200/75, 75/1200, 1200/1200, 300/300. 850 interface not required. .

.

.

.

”j’“

PH E STEL

[f

A»;

/’///y

ATARI

{ff/59W

z”

”W, was»;

?.1¢v)7/j§z§v{.;.i‘,‘:“:I‘v/«v,/““:‘Ivv:::nz

M

(I

:

t.

'

7’ 4;

Need

i

.

?waifw’?

E '

t

e'jioaf” we”.

24

' ,

. .

2;

t

Alf/w

.

WW

1‘

,

i

W

W

”22222

i

'f:‘::

.

f

.

.2

THE HUNG-FU CHALLENGE'

clip the coupon today.

'

—.

_

For ATARI 400/800/600 10.1 800 x L/13 O XE 4 8 K

E] Multi-Viewterm/Datatari packages @ £59.95 inc VAT + £1.15 UK P/P. D enclose cheque/postal order D charge my AccessNisa card no:

_

o

from

Nooo

_

ENGLISH SOFTWARE

I

.

—p??— en"

OUR PRICE Disc 8.95 13.45 8,95 13.45 895 13.45 13.45 8.95 8.95 8.95 13.45 8.95 Cass

ACTIVISION Ball Blazer Decathlon Ghostbusters Gt Amer Road Race Hacker Pitfall II River Raid Rescue on Fractulus Space Shuttle

ADVENTURE I N T ERNAT| ON AL 15.95

Hulk

1535

iderman

oo-ooooooo Archon

10-45 6-95

Axis Assassin

Mack

8495

aartaEHat

13-35 8-95 11-45

10-45

Mtlrderon Zinderneuf Music Cons Set

12-355)

13-45 '

.

g?‘évozagilghp Pinball Cons Set Realm of Imp055lblllty Seven Cities ofGold -

-~

95

$1322

8.95

13'45 11.45 13 45

8

'

'

'

BEYOND SSA C h'Il es

g

I

'

95

ELECTRIC DREAMS Spy's Demise + Spy Strikes Back

8.95

—————————BEWARE

Please Send: Cassette/Disc

ENU‘-'—I “t‘M TheEHGLISHSOFTWARECo. North Gardens, E R Manchester M60 18x 1

Parade, Parsonage

“H‘MIRACIE “n TECHNOIOGY

'

A

_

x,»

' _

_

en:

‘1

8

Midgrove, Dolph, Oldham 0L3 OUR PRICE Disc 8,95 Cass

ELITE Airwolf

ENGLISH SOFTWARE

55.1.

Machine Code Tutor

1

7.95 8.95 6.95 5.95 13.45 13.45 13.45

11.45 11.45 9.95 15.95 15.95 15.95

8495

895

Blue Max Bounty Bob St Back

A

11-45 11-45

ORIGIN Ultima llI

.

_

17.95

SOFTWARE FACTORY Maths 0 Level Year

LEVELS

[2

Beach Head

13.45

Encounter Mercenary

Bruce Lee Caverns of Khafka Conan Dig Dug Drelbs Drop Zone Forbidden Forest Fort Apoco|ypse F15Strlke Eagle Ghost Chaser .

I

8.95

11.45

Maths 0 Level Year4 Maths 0 Level Year 5

2-32 8.95 8.95

11-32 11.45 11.45

A

A OUR PRICE Cass Disc 13.45 895 13,45 895 13.45 1345 13.45 7.95

1345 13.45 8.95 8.95 7.95

835 13.45 8,95

13.45 13.45 13.45 13.45

.

coarser?

Dungeon Advenijufe Emerald isle Lords ofTime Red Moon

3-32 8.95 5.95 8.95 5.95

Eden now a geturrt‘l)t<|:>I Worm in Paradise

3.32 8.95

I'

.

International Karate

mtgcéommander

Compu‘erwar Java Jim .

R'VerRescue s D otthe Ball Submarine Commander

7_g5

Whirlinurds Zaxxon

1345

Ouasimodo 5.50

Slinky

Solo_FIight Spit?re Ace Strip Poker Up~‘N'D °Wn

7-95 7.95 7'95

6_50

Tank Commander

7.95 7.95

8.95

US GOLD Aztec Challenge

795

550

335 8'95 8:95 8.95 7.95 8.95 13.45 8'95 8.95 8'95 8.95

Pacman Pole Position

Snokie

6.50

Boulder Dash

.

THORN EMI

AttackofMUtam Colourspace Hover Bower

SYSTEM3

.

.

LLAMASOFT Camels

1258531235

-

11

'

45

13.45 13.45 13.45

”45

13'45 13.45

C15 Computer Cassetes Box of 10)

£450

OF CHEAP BOOTLEG SOFTWARE —ALL OUR TITLES ARE ORIGINALSIl-------'

ALL OUR PNCES INCLUDE VAT AND CAR R IAG E

Price

Cheques (Please name card no,

an

reversei/PO'S

8

TOTAL

NAME

ADDRESS...........................................

in

PERIPHERALS Midgrove, Dolph, Oldham 0L3 5EJ TeI:Saddleworth(04577)5229 HAYSTACK

November 7985

ti ‘

l

__

no

OUR PR|CE Cass Disc

NEW GENERATION NOVAGEN

Chop Suey Collosus Chess 3.0 Hijack Kissin' Cousins Smash Hits Smash Hits 2 Smash HIIS3

f

HaY stack

—/vm 5229

Tel: 04577

-

A

'

48 ATARI USER

.

MIRRORSOFT 11_45

we”

.

concerned

H ays t ac k

.

-

_

.

.

v'

_ _

send to. Atari Support 3, Miracle Technology (UK) Lid, St Peters Street, lpswich IP1 1XB. Tel 0473—21614

S D

.

cassette £8 9 5 DISkette £12 9 5

— Postcode

_

Address

_

«5.

;

”/m?mmwotw?w

_

..

Access “DE“ NOW TAKEN

mwwwwwy

”?nd/2:1.”

5-

.

W

suitable modems.

or the companies

,/,

”r

f

ffffijffffzgft'

For models 400,800, 6OOXL, 800XL,

"reg'd trade marks

'

W;

~

f”

we,

it

Eggs

3“

Lofwzg

Mow 2,233sz-

WWW, ,

1.

i

‘1

‘\

,

ff)

o

o

, g

‘i.

"

‘i

x,

” ,

7,---'

‘r,

1

f

WWW

.

a ‘

WW,

H

// "35341

;1 rim

;

{gm

. '

'

'

'

1

!

"27ao?'l’www

fear " "

/

"

1

W47,2L:

'

.'

(1

iv,

~~

of

Z/W/WW Wm/

U S ERS '

aw ,/,4\.

,

/

1"

J

V

f

“M”

i.

fWWf/ZZ/QW/wa/W WWWMWMW/

,,_.jlf.’{’:

~

1

f

F0 R

.

.

”’

,

(”om

Phone

NO.

AccessNo.


Make

yourself

w

it

a

.

.

below shows how the two numbers

.

w

s

§§s$?§esss?iwe??ss

2'

sfiwswt

3“

g)~.\*m§~1“aivix§z~“€s‘“;w¥~§:§j§ ?rs?ig?i?is‘ess?fftint?s‘fsw With these routines szfgweg

by

”mm“

74“

6,

GOSUB

73

my mum result

9“

PM"

“55

9“ m

KEVIN ED WARDS

'

603“ 7'“ “5“ "if t“

you change line 60 to GOSUB 7309 the TWO numbers Will be ORed. See lf YOU can WOI'k OUT the line for EORIf

THE program listed here contains three useful subroutines to provide bit by bit (bitwise)

operatorsfortheIogicalfunctions

AND, EOR and OR.

Atari Basic already recognises the two commands AND and OR, but these are treated as logical operators. In other words

their result will be

either true (1) or false (0). To illustrate this we'll use Basic program:

You can find more information on this subject in the Bit Wise articlesin Atari User for August and September

1985. The machine code routines provided by Program permit you to use all three of the bit by bit operations on two 16 bit numbers, Table II lists the start addresses for each machine code routine. I

a simple

Start address

Operator Subroutine line number

10 A=1218=l3

20 lF A=12 30

AND

1552 1572 1592

a=13 men PRINT'YES'

As you can see, it tests to see ifA is 12 AND B iS 13- Since this is true (1) the THEN statement is executed. But if B were changed to 100 the result would be false (0) and the THEN statement would be ignored.

However the operators can be used in bitwise fashion not using Atari Basic commands, though. With bitwise operations all corres— ponding bits of two numbers are compared to produce another bit th e result blt. Table lists the result bitsforAND, EOR and OH operations. _

-

-

son OR AND

7200 7300 7400

1st bit

2nd bit

Result

0 0

0

1

0

0 0 0

1

1

1

0 0

0

0

1

1

1

o

1

1

1

0

1

..

OR

onwards.

that's

.

ltThere’s plenty Of things YOU cando W|th them. Why "Qt a at have go printing hexadecrmal and b'nafy numbers? _And

2:

use: 7mm" sew w News Imzzsswmlzzxs I110 12” 505“ 72.3335” 5“

Tab/ell—Startaddressesforeach routine '

_

Each been operator has 9M?” "(S own Basrc subroutlne WhICh It _from be saves you .

should called. This repeating lines and lines .of USR commands. the routlnes can Before be

the vanables

used

and

A/UM7

NUM2 be set up mm the two must. numbers wh|ch‘are to be compared. The appropriate routine '3 then called and the result

is

returned in the

0 0

0

0

1

1

1

0

1

1

1

1

Tab/el—Resu/tbitsforAND,EOR andOR

varlable RES' The end column '“ Table II shows the Basic line number for each operator. ,

_

,

You can, |n

_

routmes

fact,'call the a blt yourself,'although |t.s rnessy. First assrgn two variables W|th the numbers to be Operatéd Upon VA_RI and VAR2 the location say. Nextfmd of the requtred funCtIOH—See Table II. -

Once this has been done the USR is used to execute the com-mand routme and return the result:

m 1“

“5“

150

‘3

? RES

'

730011511 W

RES

740mm m

150 51mm 170 ? RES

18! 5“ 7m mu“ nan mm nu F” Loan. to n “ 355: $3“E (map ’ $521.41 7.“ 5," 1°"

7,5. “Em” mm 32 ' 75 ’ 5 ’ 17: ' m ' 5 ' 77 ' “2 31,212,173.1.1,s.77,103,5 7100

7110 um

’ 5' 1

133,213,95,32,76,6,17x,180,6

,13,182.6.133,212,173,1u ”2.

”m

5.13.1“.6,133,213,96,32,76,

6.173.-100,5,4s,“2,6,133 7130 urn u:,173,1u,s,4s.ux.s,133.2

13,9s,1u,z4,us,1,1u,ss 7140 um 5,104,141,”.5,104,152,341“ ,157,mo,s,2n,1s,z49,7s 7150 MIA zss,zss,o,c,o,a 7200 tti? EM

xi: ?i?‘mz'WLM’

wusmmmmwnz) A will now contain the result. The line

if: inf-10:31:

m

I

EOR

l

.

EN!)

AND

number A” “he numbers below 7000 in are there tO test the-three Program f9Ut'_neS- When YOU_ feqUife the b'TW'Se operations In your OWN programs YOU 0h|Y need lines 7000

is

subroutine at 7000. for poklng the machine

responsrble

“me data

mm memory“ This must be called at the start of any program whlch makes use of the .

bitwise routines. The example listed

73“

“E“ “9

33:

?zzrlusn'm'm’

nu

l?l m ° 741. nes-usmssz 7420 11mm

1mm' mm

Program/ November 7985 ATARI USER

49


\‘«

“of;

Scope CIRCLE computes a circle and draws it on a graphics screen chosen by the user. It uses the XIO command to fill the circle as it's drawn. If you remember your school maths you'll know that the general equation for a circle is R 7: X2+ Y"’.

'

v

® /

N.“

v

/

10-20 "

"I“ 2” “PM 10

.

Graphics Mode... .

"_

-

'

30

G

6:80L0ll UPGKE 755,1 "Centre (H,\’)...";

38 GR?PllICS

‘9 "I“ 59 INPUT 60 PRINT 70 30

Input nzzm

90 PL?T

I!

80

“0,70...“

m -R STEP 110 xzsnnmz—(r?n FOR

130 140 150 150

DMHTO IERT v

17“

PLOT

180 190 200 210

IF 0050020 THE" 6010 200 no 1a,us,a,o,"5:" "E," v

_1

“+3130”

F“ V?“ T“ 9 xzsaumz- (“YD

90 100-140

“0-11.70“!

0010 10

November 7985

and receive the desired graphics mode. Set up the mode and colour. Location 765 tells the fill command which colourto use. Ask for and receive the centre and

Ask for

radius of the circle to be drawn. Note that no error checking is done to prevent the cursor going out of range in the chosen mode. Square R. Since the radius is a .

1“

50 ATARI USER

40-70

10.“ "ltadius...";

Y=R

-

150 160—170

180 190 200 210

Circle being drawn, constant for any to it once its calculate more effluent outS|de loops than drawmg the main repeatedly msnde the loops. Plotthe first point on the circle. Drawtheright—handhalffirst. Compute the position to be drawn to using the circle equation.

Start

ofloop to draw

5

i

left—hand half.

,

Compute each pointand plot it. Checkfortop and bottom pixels. Fillthe circle asit’s drawn. End of loop. Go back and start again.

~


Super Savers from 4 fabulous action games / (as by K-BYTE \

SiTlCD?

.

..

7

r'6g,)

-

..

""’"°" it;

“swarm“

20"! tarif‘ camidgemrth/e 400/soowsoo 800 XL/

(f

soxe

(G‘ V41

.

r

k'.°'

'.".'\'~ :- -'

”j,

,

1

a!“I ’/\‘./‘ /[§::N’\"~i§?~ I 7¢AELL¢N§<Q K ‘. :\2(/.*____ “w (" '

5”*~\N .

"-'.

-.--

.:

=‘

4g]; .

->\

"?zz:

s“

-,

.

z: :-

.

3 PE 0 IAI. MAIL ORDER PRICE

In

_

w

Alien

...;5.

'

4m”; q

000!"

5 19

IIIIIIIII'I'IIIII

mm; “T quest for diamonds and the

A

mystic Temple Crown! Get your treasure back through the caverns to the mountaintop

.

_

scan»:

.

3"— '_ '____

an“, .

l

n

m .

'-'

'

A

Includin g P&P

Of

z;

(°"§'4'—-:“‘__—N

°

°°.°

.___ -—_—-.

—,

”f 12 3 ‘

o

'

.

_-

.

_._—

n‘

\

l“

'

e

CBS

747K ‘

A

K

,

" '=

-‘

/

\

£0 ‘S“

?“_i

mm"

‘A

1

ROM Cartridge for the Atarii 400/800"/600/800XL/130XE

may"

v‘ A? "r

at

Q

hip

.

82 London Road, ngston-Upon—Thames

\\

and

5

“l

-

ttBEIi'i

..

“?r-BB“ m

7

53-06]

M

ID

-

"an

M

,

P

liltecT§|fylf 9" sprea 99czet¥16|§ an ry 0 m9 ungus Elrdts

.

turn your cave explorers into

fossils! Tunnel underground, blast away boulders to get to safety.

before the cave bats close in! Dangerous spiders, musical clues.

Elm“

1:

7"=f——'—_

NUA\

sir, l“ —1~

,

”w 5:75“

Trim,

if“

H

r"""4<’;.31"’*

Z; A ,

I,

1,“

_

A

(g,

7 27;

§T”M“ \\\\,

77,

,

j

m

_

f’_;{jiv="ai=ijj‘

7-

/,,

,

3—45 4”;

(i / 5,

[iii/l ,'

=

57

’%/ l 4/7

/,

a '?

, .

r

f

W 03:2,”

'

|_:«':':—

\

7A

(J, gt—L—l—J— “' f”/7 (“if/A LN x! '

2“,

,

I

4

«Ir/77”. J

/

W7

,é,/ ?

g’

,

z

I.

if ”ff/c;

75

Wl‘

mg? W i

5, ex

,”

‘* ,

1

N,

-

/E;

"41/71

if“???

/

?§i

"

3"'""'.m3'-"; ------—--——-————-—--—-——---—-————-

i‘ jfl’mx?l'm‘h —

H

N

H?!

.

mum

Autlxs

4

.

with dangerous Droids! You’ll need fast reflexes and precision marksmanship. And watch out for the radioactive walls!

rile";

9

-

4

f

.

,

\

4 \.

Trapped Within deadly control sectors, you must shoot it out

“'"-1’—°=&E5W qW é, .

y

-.

{Q w

sum-“moat

l‘

}

a

"

_l:r

7 7"

7

"k

7“;

EHZTM

‘,,;‘_ x4,»

_

ir-mizv

st

‘TT

W2

[7—7“?

7

I |

Send to. .

“if.

|PANGBOURNE, m T

Defend your anthiIIs against enemy éntS! 'f “11331 don’t get you, their exploding eggs might. Watch out for the anteater’s tongue and the ?OOdS-

l |

Ltd, PO BOX 22 BERKSHIRE R68

D

MOUNTAIN KING El BOULDER AND BOMBS

I | am | | £4.99

£4.99

?ggzéug?m

NAME

—————————

ADDRESS

=

| ENCLUSE A CHEQUE/PO PAYABLE T0 | ———————— | i.c.E. LTD FOR £ | | Chipresewetherightto substitute | I —----———--------—-——-——--—-———-——-

=E]

21:33

BLOCKLETTERS

=

I

:

Silicon

I | | I l

p

POST CODE November 7985 ATARI USER

| | I

57


E V

“fr——

%\ 5.7 / ‘

I

r’ x»!

"$31

rap

i '

j)

:

"

.-

Kt

/

% \_lSN‘

)\

.'

)(

_

/ \ [A143$1 5)“ ’ sf/G??g/L 17g 76 £5 TM £25,

5

5

-

;

E:

,.

[?zz/z"

%\

J?)m i

g '

E

'~

~_ l

‘1,

l

7“

_7—:A

:

aE ’

f":

g

g '

j: " . .

\

\

E

l

\

4

.

..',-

1

E_: ’ "

,,

.""~==t \ ~

fl/

'

w \\5 {a // ; ". §\ _

':'

-

-.

7,

i;

\

i’

_=,’

f‘

'

?

r

r

N

’l

(

I'

”E: /Q)

Q

__

/

_

I

,,

&’

/,‘\ ‘

/

&'

5&1?i

%<

{$1

{l' (l,”l “ég

?}

e

\\\\

4

d

E

35;

J

we/ fa?W-‘E/ "/

5

E

"

,,

W

i

«' //l illill)

/

)

x

/

,

,

\_

gijxi<‘\\ E

/I

f'

A

/

/

?*'—

November 7985

%

2

k1

\ \\,

g Ere—$5: I; m4—‘1—2?a—f‘Tr—zgff— 52 ATARI USER

a

consequence so did Majik.

Obviously the Magicians' Union was none too pleased and so, in the moon tower of Baskalos, it placed a moon c 'y stal p owerful enou 9 h to cover the whole kingdom. So what is the problem, you may ask? Well some little thing has nicked the crystal— and off you go to find it. Two new elements appear in this game. First the use of spells, through a CAST command. Each spell requires a focus object~ listed on the inlay. It might have been a bit more of a challenge if you had to discover which object was a spell focus. Some of the connections are a‘bit remote. A pearl is the focus for the SNOOP spell and gloves for discover— ing whether or not TREASURE is valuable. .

_

v‘lé?ryz J ’ K/{K‘ .\ i\(’ Wt ‘Q ‘\\\ /

y '

$—

A

LEVEL 9's Red Moon is now in the shops and doing well by all accounts. It's the first Atari version with graphics, and part of Level 9's new strategy of releasing lower priced games between their normal priced "theme" games. At £6.95, the same price as Emerald Isle, Red Moon is EBCheaper than the Silicon Dream Trilogy, the final part of which, The Worm in Paradise, will be launched soon. in the meantime we adventurers are to get to grips with the first Majik adventure from Level 9. The story goes, as recounted on the inlay, that when Majik was at its most powerful so was the moon which glowed surprise surprise deep red. The moon and sun,however,didn't get on so well together, and whenever their paths crossed they tended to have a bit ofa battle, and so the moon grew weaker and weaker. As

'T

17?er

3

-

g:

E;

,

g

' (l f///7r'/ '

AX.

I

/

-

-

-

f

V

E ‘—

exac

tcs

00 91' 221

r)»

use?

=

Li

T—?-

/'’

,

.

'i—z,

,

yr n/

_-

(if «if

giggik é

a

/

/“/

A‘Qs

,»'

,— -

Also SAVE and RESTORE are listed as spells. No focus object is required, but it means that, as with

the other spells, they will not work in the presence of iron, which can be a bit of a bind. The other addition is of combat, as some of the treasures are guarded by the mythical beasts of the kingdom. This is the weakest of the new elements, since the combat routine is repetitive and is, in effect, a stand up battle between you and your opponent until one keels over. The first screen sets you on a grassy plain and gives you the first taste of a slickly drawn colourful, yet somewhat two dimensional, graphics screen.

The plain is a sheet of green, with what appears to be six tufts of grass. The screen also refers toayellow sun, but unless my Sony is playing up, or that is the RED moon up there, the sun is anything but yellow. Just to help you at the start, you own nothing. By following the guide sent to reviewers you are able to quickly acquire several useful pos— sessions. The ubiquitous axe and lamp, and by drawing the lake, a pearl, not from an oyster but oyster fun 9 us— shades of Return to Ed n 9,3. In fact there IS a great sense of de/a vu about the whole game. The graphics mean that the text is not as voluminous as usual and the whole .

game seems

to consist of rooms,

corridors and caves, with few interes— ting articles or problems other than a knock 'em down fight to the death. The problems are not as involved as we have come to expectfrom Level 9, and some problems are recognis— able from other adventures, such as getting past the watchdog. Anyone who finishes The Pay—Off will have no problem here. reserve my final comment for Level 9's graphics. Let‘s face it, they add little or nothingtothe game. They merely depict the fixtures of the I


————————Advenfuring in which you stand. Even the more interesting charac— ters, such as 809 the Newtling and the Rat, are not drawn. At £6.95, Emerald Isle is a definite step forward by Level 9, a good cheap adventure with bags to do and lots of atmosphere, Red Moon ioses much of rooms

that involvement through including graphics, and to my mind the sacrifice is

too ”great. On to a game which requires no

introduction following the review in the August edition of Atari User, Infocom's Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy. in that review the problem of how to get the Babel fish was touched upon, and it is an extremely entertaining puzzle which unfolds as you try to prevent each successive Babel fish from disappearing in an even more convoluted way. It is not my policy to give away the answer to a problem. This particular problem, however, had me so enjoyably bamboozled that, step by step, shall take you through how to l

solve it. People wishing to extend them— selves should read no furthur, but jump to Wizard of Akyrz later on. Now then, as Arthur Dent, recently of no fixed planet, l have come to my senses in the hold of a Vogon space ship, and have a sleeping Ford Prefect

and a Hitch company.

Hiker’s

Guide for

Knowing from the books that

l

now need to insert a Babel fish in my ear in order to understand the wider universe and its various tongues, i press the button on the Bable fish dispenser, only for it to shoot across the room and vanish through a hole under a small hook! No problem. Simply remove my dressing gown (i hope no one comes in), hang it on the hook, and try again. This time the Babel fish slides down the sleeve of the gown and slips

through the previously unnoticed gratmg on the floor and down the

wall. After several attempts at catching the robot eventually hit on trying to block the panel. Several bulky objects later, includ—

thrown overboard is translated

ing myself, the panel.

place the satchel next to

i

Press the button and this time the robot ploughs into the satchel and the Babel fish arcs gracefully into the air, where a top half of the cleaning robot zips out and grabs the fish in mid-air and vanishes. The next few hours are spent flinging a succession of objects into the air and watching a succession of extremely efficient cleaning robots gather them up, plus Babel fish. Even summoning the Sirius Cybernetics Corporation engineer robot did

Adventure international, where Simon Ashford keeps finding his spectacles falling off. Early in the game, Simon, you should find a painting held on the wall by a fine chain. That should fix you up all right, but carry plenty of objects as mapping this Mysterious Adventure is as tedious as ever. Finally Glitch of the Month this time goes to SP. Banit of Daventry and concerns The Pay-Off from Atari. Not the two responses that he got from the game, however. They are both quite deliberate, and you should geta chastening response for one of the things you typed. No, the glitch belongs to the Atari Helpline, which told Steve that by cutting a notch in his disc he would corrupt it. In fact that is the only way to save the game position on the disc provided, which comes with the Atari disc promotion package. Failing that, any disc formatted to standard DOS 2.0 will enable you to save your position. Tut Tut Helpline. A medium T shirt is on its way to you

0

0

B P111]

B

only repairs the automatic thumb tried throwing in the air. Finally a brainwave. Instead of throwing things into the air before getting the Babel fish try and get them there at the same time. Carefully piled the mail on the satchel, and pop out comes the Babel fish, down the sleeve of my gown, onto the towel, scooped up by the robot which smashes into the satchei, sending the whoie kit and caboodle into the air. So while the top half of the cleaning robot is frantically gathering up junk mail the Babel fish slithers neatiy into my ear. So now when the Vogon announcement that Ford and are to be no good. You see, he l

l

Steve. Also, move things around in the bank to find an exit you ought to realise is there, and you‘re almost home and dry at Luigi’s.

l

_

7;

7

aw‘is g

L.

§;_

,

l

i

2

"

.

g

f

7

i

_

.

A...

lll

/ ‘

_

?

;

drain. Curses!

a.

1

..

l

.

7‘

Pi

'

'

-

,

é

s, _

’-

-

'

~’ '

‘ . ‘ .

'

_

.

.‘_—¢. -' '

.

“ii /

E

_

,

K

f

.

«

.

,

'

'

if

I

—_-%agg‘¢g

\‘W

(X

3?!“ Pixel“ m' .

,7

%\ ‘

..‘

I

“a

'

"

4,

10

“1

_.

f

7

—E

U

\' \

\

-

_

313

——_

-

i

ls?x/

,

2'-

<1".

?léiu? e: jg?” if 3/-

.

'-.

-

' '

_:

-

__

_

i;

,.

l

iii

.-

»

{a 'i%%/

/,5(if l ii

1 ‘

E

1

ll

1

T

_

Eventually, as no hoopy frood should be without it, place my towel on the grating. It fits, and lo and behold the next Babel fish slithers neatly onto the towel. Behold also the zippy little cleaning robotwhichwhizzesthrough at breakneck speed, picks up the Babel fish and disappears through a sma” pane' a few "mes h'gh '" the

can

l

still smile. The HHG is Without doubt the zaniest, funniest adventure yet writ— ten. even if much of the action simply unfolds before you. it's an absolute must for fans and non-fans alike. This leavesme time to have a quick look at Wizard of Akyrz from

l

"-

=

s

,

November 7985 ATARI USER

53


,-

W W?mm N

.

f;

;

Tf-c

I

Space Drelbs,

£14.50“ £14.50ll £14.50: £14,504, £950. £1450 £950 £14.50

Ghosthusters Conan

MrRohot MrDo Bah Strikes

Rate

TheGTAmmanR?ad ”109 SUEV

13OXE SZOST

N/A

£6.50 WA 53-50

coming soon more titles available

{48

“450 “2-50

E

5g

Disk/O StarterPack

Phone

PRONE 7

£95.00 £245.00 £260.00

Starter Pack 800XL&Cass 800XL& Disk/D Starter Pack

:

{950

Back

InternationalKarate

IOOO's

Cassettes . M|GALLEVACE CHUCKIE EGG AIRWOLF 747 FLIGHT SIMA

Disk

“Umah'g‘

DAYS

DAY SENT SAME ORDERS 24 hr, ANSWER A WEEK

VISA

A

A

01-691 0207

DRGPZONE ARCHON ONE ON ONE

48k 48k 48k 48k 48k

New titles P "m

tape to disk, multi tape to containing multi mover of liles and disk, multi tape to menu. Comes packaged on three doutile sided Memorex disks. £25 POST FREE.

Beloie

Now brought only availab|e on ICIDXE We are always first to you by STOCKSOFT With new ideas. Load DOS only once. Recall at

DISK UTILITIESPAC No.

press. £10

was

7.95 7.95

iver aid c alligAgeyAI“ 0 ropzonetcl Ghostousterstd) NirOnici I

DISK CRUSHER

1

disk

Disassemnles

“0 °"

BOULDERUASH ARCHON HARD HAT MACK EAGLE F.153TR|KE

postage

'

11

11“

59:95 12,75 12 75 13‘95 12‘75 10:95 12 75 I

RUM

20495

MINER

8.75 13.25

TIRES

0UESTFOR H.E.R.O. P|TFALL||

1535 1395 1335

DECATHLON

TEN

V

a

POST FREE

disk.

on

(CI

'

available

RACE

AVAILABLE ON CASSETTE DISC AND CARTRIDGE Just mm at this small se|emiun fmm a Big range.

»

Gives power Without the mice 4 disks Racked thats less for only £25 wnh our 60 than 5051 amazing but true. Comes prog

'" cl " d °

RD_

SUNARO SQFTWARE(_CA) PO Box 78 Macclestield Cheshire SK10 3PF

ol copyright).

used tor infringement

always '

'

AMERchN BEACH HEAD

[31>

10095 12.15 9.50 10.95 37.50 49.95

SPARTADOS HDMEWORDlW.Proc.)

1295

supmscmpr

2535 I9.95

URUPZUNE Hi—JAEK ONEON ONE

8.50 8.50

Disks MR ROBOT

75.00 57.50 57.50 37.50 37,50 25.95

ULYSSES DARK CRYSTAL MISSION ASTEROIO NATO COMMANDER

9.95 8.50 9.95 3-50

26.95

AFFORDABLE SOFTWARE

RAM DOS XL

be

550 850 350

16k

Amrom-nrrronnenom TRANSFER PACK REVISION" disk to disk.

5.50 0.95

40k 48k

HOMEVIEW NOW RING 321 BROCKLEV RD, BROCKLEY, LONDON SE4 202

(These are not to

48k

** STAR ** **CHQ|CE**

26.95

disk disk

Disks WAR IN RUSSIA KAMPFGRUPPE CARRIER FORCE so MISSION ORUSR SIX OUN SHUUTDUT

0.50 5.95

850

RiOACK COLOURSPACE RIVER RAID

CALLERS WELCOME ACCESSSrVISA

Four disks

48k

WHIRLINURUS BOUNTY BOB STRIKES 64k BACK 04k STRIP POKER

SERVICE

-

c a H f or B es t P rices CRED|T CARD HOT LlNE

GRAPHICSART DEPARTMENT ARCADE CONSTRUCTION SET

40k 43k

MOLE

OPEN

-

"

STAR

"CHOICE“

2049er. Oils Well, Decathlon, Pitfall II, tor Tires, B.C.'s 0uest Tennis, Shuttle, Fort Apocalypse, Bruce Lee. Pole Position, Solo Flight. Boulder Dash, etc. T : Coming soon Atariwritei

£14.50 £14.50

N/A N/A £9.50

’*

W

'

Plus Miner

Disk £13.95 £12.50

Cass. £9.50 £9.50 £9.50

Chess Colossus OuaSimodo FISStrlke Eagle Blue Max 2001 New York City

sumosofware

W

ATARI400-300-500XL800XL13m

Drop Zone

BOUNTY

r;

g.

~

to screen

Lists

and/or

printer

'

_

?'sk- POST FREE

7

'

Chess

Colossus Co

95

I

7.95

(17)

ossusl] h essldl

10

Edentol

to

Return

Lords

7

of Time

Em era Id Isle

95

5‘45 8.95

ChUCkIE E99 (c) Decathlon (c)

12.95 7.95

.

Adv. Dungeon Red Moonlcl

(C)

zo4eerir)

Miner

95

7.95 5.45 7'95 5.45 1095

(0) 10)

a

two

on

packaged FREE.

Sided disks

double

MUSIC DISK No.

POST

at £25

music Four disks packed with synthesized to turn including graphic display and programmed Comes packaged your Atari into an electric organ. FREE. P051 t £25 5 a k E Is d d' 8 SI ol “d D" it 0" two

XL FIXER Will

you to play games °" I'm" XL

allow

800 "m9? Tape WISH," Disk version For

details

written

101

400,

EBA

ALLOW

POST FREE.

£10

our other

01

unusual

also game packs With

utilities

1

games

loi

7

‘ _

All

each,

send

large

Del’t-

SAE to

AWAY

AND

WE

WILL

SPECIAL SUMMER PROMOTIONS

TAXAN/KAGABIONLDPRINTER EPSUN LXBO NLO PRINTER PHILIPS 75020REENM0NIT0R12”20MH1 ‘ COLOUR MONITOR AMSTRA08128 ATARI 5205T FHAHDUISC/PRINIER 52081’ MONITOR STAND + IMB DRIVES FUJ|3

5”0|SCS

ss 1351PI—BUX‘S

OFTEN

AU”,

Bounty Bob Poker Strip aser gthrlp 05: Faker

{£22

ol the other

services

we oHer,

{22900

VAT

{330 00

. VAT

7

£253.35

7

(o‘n?gg 10818552 i:

c

54 ATAR/ USER

BY

PRIOR

November 7985

.

.95

“HMS

amtRe;.i‘ff“"“"”‘”

‘(UIIOBE

Conan

(En'gg

(0795 ..............(d)m.9:

MrOo

Ernriusiiii’?'rr?'s'i”""""'” '

“Nansen

"""""'"'"""01111195

NatoCummander

cnosmcnss ,.i:::1:1:1::::1:::::::::::, rngtgr _..,...(d)12.95 ColossusChess ChuckieEgg Decathlon Decathlon

(c)8.95

(c)955

.................(m4.85 pnrnrz ..............:1:..:':':i::j1j‘:" nnr'gs .?iiriisiga Hero Archon 101095 1012.95 Archon” Mule iciss= .

.

..jT'??????ll??'iriiiz'sé

Muie MurdevOnThe

..................01112195 1:15.95

Miner2049 Hitchhikers.

mama" "

.

,,

.,

.

,,

Unnoe??A?VBnlUfe Snowball REGMDOH

anki,z,3

Add

(1:17.95

Bolderdash 0e5ignandPen0iI

.........,,............Rom9,95

002795

CutThroats

5” M'ss'm‘cms“

-~~~---~---~-~-~-~(”2335 (102895

(dI2895 --------------‘“’39-95 °°’"°-“‘"“"“’"‘" cusm'CBa'ancez -”'“"-“"""““"-(MB-95 (“895 was “mom” (“2895 Fume“""‘""""“""""""""""(M2395 “lgh‘snese” '"”'""""“""""“'I'm-95 Ra'hwe“ (“2895 W995 WW“ ""”“""'“'““““"'(”2835 Vlgels'asnpw (“5495 °"'°"' Sa'G'" g?s'a """"“"“““'”HMS Fm“;(“3995 “gt "

1111.2

(”5-50 (”7-95

..

..

Returnmsuen LordsofTime Emeraldlsie

(1:17.95

................(dl10.95 Ballnlazer..................,..............(d)29.95

BanleoIShiloh BroadSides...

(111332

02011252915 g puma“

w:sifConstruction irinurds WI'IIIIIOUIUS.............

BattIeNormandy.........................1d)28.95

ee

contact:

APPOINTMENT ONLY

(c)

IdI1095 (dl1095 Emmi” ruce lol795 Oiopzone (dl1095 Dropmne PolePosition oe USIIIDH

47

WESTWOOD LANE, WELLING, KENT DA16 2HE Telephone: 01-301 3745 (10am-10pm) CALLERS _.————_———

50x.

"‘“(d)34'95 ..................(d)29.95 ...,,......,..id)11.95 .S..... et.................(0111.95 Set ..............1dl11.95

IEnchanter Wish Bringer |§_evieri"(:étiesoIGoId inna onstruction

_

go:o€:ig:t10)1095 ..........,..........(d)19.95 Polopigt

“795.0

SPECIALPACKAGEDEALOFFEH MORE COLOUR MONITOR ADAPTER £2600 + VAT £20.00

(compungn mscnum’gnoup) a

(c)7_95

..

MigAIleyAce.......,.....................(cl10.95

K.E.C.M. \

TNZZ

(05435) 3577

.

AllpricesaxcludecarriageEVAT.Wecarrymostleadiiighrandnames?leaseringtocon?rmlatastprioas— Vouvnll find us unbeatable. For moreintormationonhowtogetwrmonthly pricelistolgenuinediscount details

SM

Chadsmoor S‘a?s. WS11 2DD

(”735

plus

E831

SPECIAL: Encounter (c) 0.95 (it) 9.95

MONTHS

?ips/35min ce ey ig

£249 00 Amstrad6128 Green Monitor Atari52OST'1500K Disc/Hi-Res Nani0505576501"é‘r'a)“““'"“""“‘ zeoaioo Atari Monitor/DriveStand (Deluxe) £2600 PHONEFDR OETAiis Double Sided DISC Drives Atar152OST PHONEFURDETAILS ComSa-tlble35” rivesm MonitorStand Atar152OST3.5” £1500 Lead AtariSZOSTCentronicsPrinter 1:12.00 AtarrszoST Serial Leads £11.00 RGBLead Atari £10.00 nee Lead Video/Ka%a T/Ferguson Atarivide0520 £11.00 RGBLead Atari Vide052OST/Microvitec & Other/Own Products including Software Atar1520_ST DETAILS PHONEFUR Hard Disc and ReaiTime Clock etc. £277.00 BBC ModeI‘B' . £343.00 DFS BBC ModeI‘B' . Enhanced DFS....£395.00 BUBCModeI"BPIus’(NewModel)64KUserRAM £99.00 40/BOT DSDD(Acorn Compatible) 5/[400K 5 800K40/80T0uai(AcornCompatibie).........,....,.....,,,,..,,...............£220.00 Cannon1080A NLQ £26000 Juki6100 Daisvwheel £29500 MP165 Printer165CPS PLUS N_LQ (Atari5208TCompatibIe)..........£219.00 Sakata SCPBOOFourCoIourPrinter/Plotter £16500 Trl_u_mphAdlerTRD7020 Daisywheel £30500 Pnrirpsjooz RGB/CTVCoIourMonitor £18900 Microvnec RGBMonitorsfrom £16900 prices,

J + J verm“ Rnad- ua?ddv

cannOCK.’ Tel.

{153700th1 £226.55 4:74.75 £6500 ”I” +

to:

payable

221 0307106" Roadr

PRICES AND A FAST FRIENDLY ATJUST GIVING COMPETITIVE DISCOUNT GROUP. WE ARE ONLY A PHONE CALL OUR COMPUTER BOARD SERVICE OUR OWN ZAHR. BULLETIN SOON BE OPERATING FOR AN EVEN FASTER SERVICE.

,GCC,J k. Acorn,ApricotAtanAmstrad,Biothei.Cannon.Commodore,Cumana,EnterprseEp Mannesman Opus, Oiic. Philips, Sanyo. Sakata, SDIIWIWemIS'SEOYOUSFngIaII.IJSUKIIUISR, Tally. Mitsubishi Tatung. Torch, Triumph Adler

£2222

Order

UE

sroe

.

Postal

SOFTSALES (Mail Order)

ooTesu'r Y NO JOIN sgg‘l’llégEcvi/JCE I

or

cheque

STOCKSOFT 1

'

<

list.

Tiiis

15 Woodbrooke Road, Birmingham 830

and packing.

postage

fszrngnace or PIEBSETzendd;5:8m?idthaetldalgzszd?gll‘lefl?get riy

DAYS DELIVERY

only £2

'

include

prices

..

,,

“13.95 (0095

QWS’WM'KM'E

Ch“"s“" u"

M”

Memm’v "ma"

(BIB-95 0112.95

.............................(d)2495 .....................0112935

(132235

“95 535°“’Z°"F’“‘“'“‘"""""'"“'““"“mm “m" 107.95 SW” “W095

?eswemm‘a'“ Sw?zm" “I “m“ “

M735

SWHume'

"

”“"”"m“0’95

(”785

PM?” appei SummerGames

B'”9Ma"2°°' ?ltghlfggg?m Hitchhiker

f

‘c'8'95

'““°95

(018-95

(08.95

""“"““““'“°‘95

.

......

....t......t......1d)IO.95 (“1095 (”7-95

STd‘dHZggg nn

ISE

.

.....................STonOise29.95

isacar vve comes. comm...V,....,,,£.....I.....sron55.29.95 ”hf,“ atestreeases. AM“ easep one ort in UK and is FREE £1.00 per item for overseas orders. Post Package Fhonefor new range of Musu: Compactdist:


—————————Moilbog RECENTLY

purchased an

/

.

reliability complaints with the 7070 cassette unit / settled down to the keyboard and taught myself the majority of Atari Basic. However it does not supPO” 3” the WWW“ modes 0" the GTlA chip, in particular the mode which allows 76 colours with a resolution of 80 x 792.

So i am left in a position where/know it’s in there but/ can't get to it. Are there a few simple pokes to put me in this mode? /f not, can you suggest a book With a routine to do this.

Atthemomentalllhaveisa few American books and they seem to deny the existence of such a mode. in reference to the new XE

range which I'm told will have improved disc drive available, shouldl buy a 7050 or will the new disc drive be compatible with the 800XL

a new

disc and the available M. Wilson, software? Yeovil. 0 You willbe delightedtofind that Atari Basic does support —

the

extra graphics modes, even if the books you have been reading don't. After Mode 8 there are another seven modes (or three on the old Atari 400/800). Briefly, Mode 9 has one colour and 16 brightnesses (80 x 192). Mode 10 has nine full .

Gra

8

0 n — colour/brightness combinations (80 x 192). Mode 11 has 16 colours and brightness (80 x 192). Mode 12 is multicoloured text (40 x 24), Mode 13 is multicoloured text (20 x 24). Mode 14 is 2 colour (1 60 x 192), 1

lVlode15is4colour(160

which lights quite brightly on the power supply at the

joystick port on my 800XL. / wondered whether you could zei/ me how/could turn it off and then on again, What software would have to be written to achieve this and which two pins would the lamp have to be fittedto on the _

Dean

iter, Wellingboro,

Ross—

North—

ants. 0 André Willey replies: The fact that the bulb may light

><

192). See Dave Russell's Gra— phics column for more details. We wouldn't bother waiting for the new drives —for quite a while yet software will be only available for the old drives, and a 1050 is quite cheap now

anyway. -

_

Barushlng

have had. The first of these mind bogg/ers is that/ was wonder— ing whether the video touch pad from the Console game (7200) Star Raiders is compatible with the joystick ports

of my Atari 800. /f so, how is it possible to “read” the various buttons of the pad? Second/y, / have discovered in theAtari manual ”YourAtari

Computer" the peek/poke location for allowing up to files

open

simultan—

modore/BBC domination, good old Atari have finally

quite brightly does not necess— arily mean that the computer is rated to run it. The +5V DC output on Pin 7 of the joystick is only rated at connector 50mA maximum drain, which is not really enough to run even a small bulb. the The PIA output ports —

are joystick connections rated for TTL levels, one load. This means that you can't directly run a bulb from the —

port.

if you

run

a

from the TTL port

should be allowed seven ?les open at once (i only require four) so what is the problem?

Finally, I was wondering whether you know of a program that could handle vertical and horizontal scrol— ling in various graphics modes. R. Chapman, South-

ampton. table of the to see if a console key has been pressed: PEEK (532 79}: You will get a value 0-7 and the following explains the meaning of each: P.S. Here is

O

START —

1

2 3

START —

4 START 5 6 7

,

x

,'

x being the amount

offi/eslwanted

my disgust this failed to work even after sustained To

efforts to discover the problem and l have vicious/y savaged various pieces of my Atari equipment. / am sure / have enough

scene and switch a bulb/battery then the sky's combination, your limit. If you go one stage further and use an opto—isolator or relay, you can even switch mains indeed, I've built a module to do that very thing. The software would be very simple indeed, needing only 3 very few POKEs. If anyone would like to see an article on plugging Ataris into the outside world, then |et US know and we’ll plan one forafuture issue.

START —

SELECT OPTION SELECT OPTION OPTION OPTION SELECT SELECT —

——

to open atone

time.

a

peek location

full paragraph carefully explained that / should poke

'

micro

memory?ndusing 005 2.03!

eous/y.

7807

HAVING been an avid Atari user for many years now, I recently bought your mag— azine which I found, to my delight, was that which I had been waiting for. AfteryearsofSinc/air/Com-

However

andotherAtariUserslknowof

A

b 099 I ers

transistor

woken up theirmagazine/soft— ware markets which pleases me no end. lam writing in the hope that you can solveafewproblems/

seven

'

IHAVEasma/lamperagebulb

alore

hues

Lighting up the

joystick port?

O

0 Firstly, assuming that the video pad from Star Raiders works in the same way as the ordinary key pad for the VCS, there isa little program to read the buttons in the Atari Basic that's Reference Manual the original loose leaf manual released with the old 400/800 machines, which is still available from Atari. —

enable extra buffers DO work,

but don't forget that they won't come into effect on?) you hit the System Reset button.

Better still, POKE the

num-

you require, then go to DOS and format a new disc. Once you’ve written the DOS mes to that disc, the new con?guration can be booted up évery time. For anyone who wants to try for themselves, location 1302 contains the number of drives activein bit-coded form. bers

. November 7985 ATARI USER

55


_—_—_____——

Thus

you have

800, but when/ran the game

Drive only, 3 means Drivesl and 2 are active, 7 means i, 2 and 3, etc. Each new drive requires more buffer space to work, so if you only have one drive, POKE with to save memory. Location 1801 contains the number of active buffers. Each open me you wish to use simultaneously needs one buffer, plus each active drive will need two buffers. Change this number if, for instance, you want more than three files open at the same time. Don't forget, though, to either hit Reset, or format a new DOS disc and re—boot before you try to use the newly—set up configuration.

the screen was disturbed by ye//0W and orange f/ESheSis there anything wrong With the program? / also tYPed in Treasure Hunt. i had not ?nished the program hilt/had 10 90 001280 / taped the program With my Atari 7070 recorder. When / returned and tried to load the program, the computer loading sound was distorted and "Error 740” appeared on the screen. $0 / reloaded the program. This time the message "Error 738" appeared. The whole program had gone. Please can you explain Kalwhy this happened? pesh Tanna, Kenton, Mid-

1

means

1

1

Bomb Run flashes WHEN I received the July issue of the Atari User I typed in Bomb Run on my 76kAtari

lOWN a BBC Micro and am considering purchasing an Atari, due to its excellent graphics and colour, and also as it uses the same 6502

whose microprocessor, assembly language / am accustomed /

know

with.

that

the Basic

provided with

the machine is quite good, but is not struc— tured. / shou/d therefore like you to tell me what is the best Basic tobuyforit,ifnecessary, which has structured pro— gramming and is generally similar in concept to BBC Basic. lhave heard that Basic XL is excellent, and would be pleased if you could give me any details on this. I have also heard ofa language known as Actionl, and would like to know the purpose of this. / would like to know the best assembler cartridge {disc} to buy. / already know the 6502 operation codes, but do

notknowtheAtaricomputer's

built in machine code routines, 56 ATARI USER

November 7985

dlesex. 0 As far

as we know there is no problem with Bomb Run.

Check all data statements and any pokes made from items read from data. A faulty poke could easily crash the computer. Also, see the modifications offered by Peter Appleton on Page 58 in last month's Atari User.

and the start

of

screen

locations, and how they are constructed. lshould therefore be gratefu/ if you could tell me the names ofany books giving the relevant information, that is, a book like the Advanced User Guide for the BBC, except obviously for the Atari. lknow sprites are provided memory

with

the computer, and wonder how many there are, and whether they can be multi-co/oured as are the Sprites on the Commodore 64. Also can you give the name ofa book which had this sprite information in it? is itpossib/e to use one disc drive between two computers,

without actually/raving toplug

and unplug the drive between each computer? Final/y, do you know whether there is going to be a £400Atari ST, andifso, when is the 'ST'rangegoing to be on sale? N .C. J udge, —

Ashford.

O André Willey replies: Both

The problem with your crashing tape sounds like the age-old bug in the operating system of the 400/800 computers—it was corrected from the XL range onwards. Basically, the tape recorder buffer area can be left full of random data and this is not cleared before writing to the tape, To correct this, anyone using a 400 or 800 computer should always type LPRlNT before saving anything to tape. This will clear the buffer by to a sending the contents printer. If you don't have a printer, you will get an Error 138, but the buffer will still have been cleared, so you can ignore the message.

was a headache in. You have a

typing them monthly disc with the programs on, but why not a monthly cassette? This is quite irritating because l have no choice but to type them in. lsuppose that other Atari users think the same.

Also,

when

type

/

in

graphics Mode8 on my 400 it shou/don/y be one colour, but when / start drawing lines, they end up in lots of different colours. Why is this?

Final/y,

can

you

name

anywhere where/could

buya 73-pinAtariinput/outputp/ug

like the

ones

the tape

on

yourmagazine, lnoticedthat it

deckSP—A. Groves, Bristol. 0 The multicolour lines in Graphics 8 are not the fault of the computer, but of the TV you are using. The British TV system is made up of tiny patterns of red, green and blue dots. By turning three adjacent dots on “full", you get a white image on the screen. The problem is that a Graphics 8 pixel is about the size of one of these small

Basic-XL

editor/assembler,

-

-

PlX'Iated _

plxels lOWN an Atari 400 and both 470 and 7070 recorders. LOO/(1779

more

at the programs

(and

in

its new, even big brother

powerful,

Basic-XE) and Action! are products of 088 in California, and can be obtained from many dealers or from the UK distributors, Software Express. They each have their own advantages.Basic—XL/XE have many features not available in normal Atari Basic, including structures, sprite handling, better I/O, etc. They are also about three times faster than Atari Basic. Action! is a very high speed editor/compiler system which behaves like C and runs faster than anything else on the Atari except machine code. It is also quite easy to write in, with a format nearer to structured Basic than C. use both extensively, and I

recommend

them without

question to any serious Atari programmer. Your second question boils down to 088 again. Mac-65 (cartridge or disc) gives you speed, macros, etc. It also is an

though it

doacompletedisc—to-disc

can

assembly if required. For the technically minded, |

recommend

three

main

books: De—Re—Atari

tutorial/guide

(Atari) is a to many

features of the hardware and OS.

Mapping the Atari (Com—

pute! Books)

is

superb

a

find it memory map, and quite invaluable. Once you l

know the system, this book would be referred to more than any other. Tech nical User N otes (Atari) are the complete notes, including circuit diagrams, for the computer. You also get a full operating system listing and full OS documentation. The above books cover Sprites too, in great depth. There are eight, single colour, sprites (four large, four small), but these can be multiplexed and so forth ”on—the-fly".

The cheapest

ST, the

26OST, will be around £500.


Moi

then Control—Q and we're Oil-line. Have fun!

”colour gun" dots, and so as the TV turns off all adjacent thus it can't properly dots balance out the first colour with two others you get a

AWAQU

-

colour bias. If you use a high resolution monitor the effect becomes much less noticeable.

However, the effect

.

avanaiii see

Page 61.

30 enlour /

AM looking for

.

1

.

book with this information

in.——

Shane Bradbury, Hartwell, Northants. 0 That's an easy one. Try Compute's First Book of Machine Code,in conjunction

system

with their Mapping the Atari three-

a

colour drawing dimensional Atari. for the system / have seen two advertised already, Atari World and 30 Super—Graphics. Both were advertised by Map/in in 7983, but when/rang them they had never heard of them. They are made by United Software of America. Do you know anyone who stocks them or is willing to order it? / have tried Silica Shop, ll/lap/in and Zoomsoft. Has Nigel anyone heard of it?

Books’, available (Compute! most good Atari specialists). Also recommended, but on 6502 machine code generally, are Rodney Zaks’ Program— ming the 6502 and Lance A. Leventhal's 6502 Assembly Language Programming. Don’t forget that with the last two a good book on the workings of the Atari is also essential,such as Mapping the

from

Atari, or Atari's own De—ReAtari and the Technical User Notes.

Mirza, Rainham. 0 Both Maplin and the Atari Center in Broad Street, Bir— mingham, have had these

'

.

titles in stock at one time or another, but if they have sold out. Perhaps Software Express can get one for you, as they Specialise in getting special order items in from the States. You may, of course, find that these items have been discontinued.

Banks on machlne code _

-

WOULD you please be so kind as to tell me where / could obtain a machine code book for theAtari, or the name ofa

Ma'lbag

'

s avulg data flles

actually be quite pleasing if you utilise it well. See Dave Russell's Graphics column in the October issue for a good example program. 13-Pin I/O plugs are quite hard to get hold of, but you

now

1

0

about your WE welcome letters from readers experiences using the Atari micros, about tips you and about whatwould like to pass on to other users in issues. see future like to would you The address to write to is: Mailbag Editor Atari User Europa House 68 Chester Road Hazel Grove Stockport SK7 5NY

can

could try Silica Shop or Software Express. As for monthly cassettes of AtariUser ro rams, these are

0

"

Logglng 0“ -

.

to M'Cf?llnk I

HAVE

Atari 800 com— 850 interface and a

an

puter, an WS 2000 modem. / have until recently used Hometerm software by Batteries Included to access bulletin boards. Two weeks ago I paid a subscription to MicroLink but on trying to use this excellent program on MicroLink l was unable to log on to thesystem.

lam howeverab/e to/ogon with my 52057 with the inbuilt software, so there is no problem with the modem. / have printed a complete disassembly of Hometerm

but

am unable to

find where

.

lWOULD like to congratulate you on your superb new magazine it’s about timeAtari users had their own pub/i-

.

cation. l recently purchased a 7050 disc drive and at the same time Microsoft Basic ll. However I can’t seem to save data files successfully, although I know you should use the OPEN, CLOSE and

the R3232 port is configured only a beginner at machine code. lwould be gratefu/ifyou or anyone else couldte/lmehow to correct thisproblem aslam reluctant to change this excel— lent program. —R.A. Homer,

as / am

Sheffield. Q We had exactly the same problem with HomePak as you seem to be experiencing. After trying other programs much less user friendly, bUT we easier to re-configure found the problem was with the PSS system, not with HomePak. What HomePak does in Ascii mode is to send a line

feed

after

every

Return

character. This causes Gold, and most other boards we have tried, no trouble at all. However PSS needs two

Returns with

nothing be-

tween, so the line feeds throw it off completely. The cure is to switch into Atari mode from menu, and whenever you ShOUld TVDe Return (at ends of lines, etc), just type Control—M instead. Once logged on, that is as soon as you have typed in your password, hit Control—S to pause the system, return to Ascii full-duplex mode, and use Control—O to restart

MicroLink. We have configured

3

defaults file on HomePak to start up in Atari mode, and stored a macro to do all the

work for

us.

All we then need to do once the macro is complete is hit Select (for menu).A(forAscii), Return (for main screen again),

I need EOE/522272525

to be able to do this for my 0 level

project

Might/suggest you starta page for classified advertise— ments which should also include the names andaddress D. Hanof user groups? _

sen-Luke Pulloxhill Beds . As fa'r as we, know Microsoft Basic II works fine as far as l/O goes although the commands arealittle different to those in standard Atari Basic There may be some problems when trying to use it with some DOS variations such as

DOS

3

so

perhaps your

problems lie there?

Anyway

if

aftervtrying with

another DOS you still have contact the Atari problems Helpline on 01—309 7770 '

_

Pr|nter

f or

l a b e Is

NEED a roll feed printer with ratchet for printing labels. l have an Atari 800 computer with disc drive and tape recorder, sol would like any available information about the interface and software to go with the printer. As it would be used to print /

labels and product information, the software

address must

be able

to store

the

necessary addresses and information ready to print. P.I.C. Gooch, Brighton. 0 Atari's own 1029 printer is —

__________> November 7985 ATARI USER

57


h

probably the cheapest avail— able with friction and tractor feed, and it has the advantage of

machine. it allows graphics printing, bUt is rather DOOHY supported by software. Print quality is OlllV fair, bUt it retails at about

£200. afford that little bit extra, pfObablY the beSt printers to lOOk at forlinking t0 ah Atari are the EPSOH range, especially the established RX 80 F/T or the new LX 80 near—Ietter—quality model With optional tractor feed. These are supported by a wide range Of software Wthh also allows YOU to print graphics. They use a Cen— tFOthS connection, 50 Will work With ”108t commercial Atari 850, printer interfaces Blackthorn, FCC Systems. It is really a case of horses for courses though, and if you find a cheaper printer fits the bill exactly, then buy it. The other thing to bear in mind isthat ifyou maywantto use a modem in the future try to get hold of an 850 module, because that has both serial and parallel ports. On the software side, a good database to try is Synapse’s SynFile +, which is not too expensive and is very versatile. It will allow storage to any density of disc drive, plus full |f YOU can

list/label options for your

printouts_ It is also driven by pop-up menus, which makes it very easy to use. .

connectlng .

a

prllltef

AM interested in buying a printer for my Atari 800. l actual/y require a letter quality printer, but the market for all types of printer seems rather /

limited.

There were virtually no adverts for printers in the ?rst issue ofAtari User. Please can you tell me what is available. Does anybody besidesAtari themselves manufacture printers direct/y compatible with the Atari bus? What is the specification of 58 ATAR/ USER

November 7985

A

.

DO you know of anywhere l could get a case in which to keep my Atari 800XL and

7070 recorder

0

for keeping

case I've

seen

them for a couple of other types of computer but not for the Atari. A dust cover isn't really protective enough, so at the

moment / have to use the enormous cardboard box in which it came, soacase would be really very useful. Also could you recommend a book for the 800XL which will actually get. me doing

‘things on it. At the moment I seem to use it solely for games, as my very basic 0 level computer studies doesn'texactlyprovide

It clean

much inspiration. Finally, a problem / have relating to the game Citadel Warrior from Atari Smash Hits

pute! series of Atari books are very extensive, and feature articles on many diverse aspects of Atari computers. We wouldn’t really recom— mend all of them for someone who is just starting with their

Vol. 3.

There seems to be some— thing in the program which stops itafterseven minutes, so how is it possible to get beyond the first part of the

second level?

machine, but you have obvi— ously got to grips with Basic already. They contain programs and tips on all sorts of subjects, and would be a good starting point for developing your own ideas. Contact any Atari dealer or mail order specialist for details of the range, which is quite considerable. Would anyone else care to comment on Citadel Warrior?

Deborah

Thompson, Nottingham.

0 We don't know of any cases for the 800XL plus recorder, but someone out

there probably makes them. If anyone knows of such an item, perhaps they could write in. As for books which get you doing something, the Com—

,

— the

connectorfortheAtar/bus,

that is what signals what pins as well

are as

on

the

connector type? Final/y, what are the disad—

vantages of connecting printer via a joystick port? D.A. Wilson, Reading. 0 Atari makes

a

letter quality

the 1027, but it is printer very slow and noisy. it does, however, connect directly to the Atari without an interface, —

which

saves

you

a

bit of

money, It is the only letter quality we know ofwhich can connect

directly to the Atari bus. Most types of printer Will connect via a Centronics type connector, and any computer shop will be able to show you printers which can do this. The bus is a special 19,200 baud serial interface, and can’t be linked to printers without a lot of extra circuitry to convert the serial signal to the parallel Centronics standard. You can buy such inter— faces, and there are about ha|f_a-dozen currently available from various companies— see adverts in this issue. You can connect a printer via the joystick ports if you write a machine code handler routine, but it would 0n|y work with,your own programs, say Basic listings, Any commercial software at all will expect the

allowed deto be created 0" a Graphics 8 screen, manipulated, rotated, ?lPDEd: etc. Routines were "10“!de for lines, circles, POlYQO'TS, overlays, moving blOCkS' changing the scale Of portions Of the design and three different text overlays. YOU C°U|d also transfer

be attached via the and it would be almost impossible to modify for joyStick port use.

a —

Master, Wthh

printer to

signs

bus,

.

Dr?Wlng

software know Of any technical drawing/drafting software which is available for the Atari 800XL? DOES anyone

Numerous

packages

exist

for the Apple and BBC computers Wh/Ch use the same processor, the 6502, as the Atari. The Atari Touch Tablet shouldbe an idea/inputdevice a program. The increasing use of CAD (Computer Aided Design} in engineering ShOU/d [VD/77019 a greater interest in this type of application on home computers, particularly those with the graphics capabilities of the

for such

Atari. Schools and technical colleges would also appreciate such an application no doubt.

Anybodygotanyideas?—A.c.

Chamberlain, Tunbridge

Wells. 0 We don't know of a specific CAD package for the Atari, but

Datasoft produced something called Graphic

very similar

portions

between

work

screens and the main design screen, and use a system of icons, for example electronic component symbols. Once drawn, the images created COU|d be stored 0” disc or printed on an Epson or NEC—type printer. It's quite an old program, but well worth searching for. If you can't find one see if someone like Software Express can import a copy for V0“-

Problem -

-

WIth BaSIG HAVE a problem with Atari Microsoft Basic V1.0. lhavejust boughta 730XE to replace my old 800, at the same time / receiVed my copy of 0032.5 with the Ramdisk utility. What / would like to knowis, can I use the Ramdisk with Microsoft Basic booted, /

'


———_—Moilbcig and how can it be done?

/

o The old MicroSoft Basic was recorded on a master disc

I," ff

Z

/

//

'

/ /~'A ---,-

r, ,

If

,

f

/,

4514.29.

f

,

"‘3

,,f

?f”

A

'

?H/DEH [777 i

x

»-

////_

_‘

'

"

/

/

eiJle’lmui ’/:~:&5?f$ézé{;:};é;£§%§éi§

to... 033.

/

‘lif'ff'

//47' 1

r

,

?'} ft f}.-

0

iV

1

y

\

,

which included DOS 2.0 and then protected. This means that short of copying it to another disc and re—protecting it a complex job it can't be used'with a different DOS. However, Microsoft Basic 2 the cartridge can be used with DOS 2.5, as can Basic—XL

into the extra socket at the back of the last one, like a daisy chain. The best way to connect machines together is via the joystick ports. We hope to have an article detailing this technique in a future issue.

J‘WA

-—

George Lusher, Erith.

"7

l

,

Data 0“ disc drives

)

_

4

you do decide to upgrade,

we recommend Basic-XL over Microsoft, as it features

almost all that the MSB-ii does, plus better graphics routines and memory man— agement.

M ore support needed

lHAVEa

64

1MiG/ӣ9 0 uy 9 if?ar/ CPg'Zggfe

TrOUb|e on “He 1020

a

adventures 3° ’ fan of typed/n Raider 7997 as soon

”(gm

,

Havrng only 76k / can tbuy so you can any adventures imagine my annoyance when/ got an error 5 at line 7020. Please tell me what C0_U/d YOU might be wrong With It?

think you should

I

CAN you send

_

my COPY oftheAugust

edit/on.

Also,

.

,

and/am

600)“

We“

have more

_

_

and competitions rewews. Andy —

software Latto, ‘Fife. 0 ve probably made a You typing error somewhere. Check line. 110‘ where B$ should

micro other than for theAtari. / 5m thankful for your .

excellent magazine from which/ will be able to send off for software. Why is there so little support for Atari computers thatare inaclass oftheirownil‘ Andrew Sharp ' Sale ' Cheshire. ‘ Support for Atari machines _

to be increasing all the time. Keep asking for Atari software in the shops and maybe they'll get the messeems

sage

'

Shorter programs CONGRATULATIONS on yet another excellent issue ofAtari User.

It is

a

pity, however, that ?t to devote letter

you see space to games scores. This is of sort of information interest only to its sender, usurping space which couldbe put to better use. Could you please at least ration the coverage given to this tedious andgratuitous ego

.

.

Interest your for putative con— ' ' ' tributors. While It must'be agreed that they are sensrble and well

thought out,.they

”DU/“ls? b?a”“’e’es”’.c""e'

whom

-

-

Pl“ outs

'

~

p I ease

a suggest/on.

800XL to another my 800Xl. room. / In the next know this IS pOSS/b/e but / don't know how. I would like to be able to ask a question on one 8OOXL and answer it on the secondonel/can'tsee any reason why/ shouldn’t be able to continue to add 800XLs ad infinitum. So how about an article for the technically minded ones of us that haveaso/deringiron.—

minor

effort provmg acceptable.Accordingly/have '

.

Could you not Inst/gate a regular Shorts feature? Sub— missions could be accepted in the form of listing + documentation, under the under— standing that any not used would be binned. / am sure that you would attract plenty of material, and so could be very choosy. The financial incentive need not be particularly high, and the extra workloadon editorial

staff

minimised.

Woodland,

Bruce

Harlesden,

London. 0 Submitting

anything

should only cost you postage both ways. Any disc or tape will be returned. The "shorts" is a good idea, but even they need to be typed in so they can

the

‘can give YOU information YOU requtre. We recommend the would 1050, as it can store more is more compact and data, qmeter. Otherw'se' there '5 "o Tea" difference between the drives

listed legibly and it be alltakes time a rare commodity around here.

Your ”is/319,709 on (1,30 or could result cassette support in a dearth of the very useful short program. Sure/y only the most fanatical or opulent among your would willingly shell readers. out a fiver on the chance. of

their

Waterlooville,

if you want details on disc drives is to contact either your local dealer or Atari in Slough, both of

be dimenSioned 20.

IHA

-

-

'

.

except that

a

few

_

a

very few,

old about five or Six programs WOUld ”Oi load correctly on the new drives. ——

VE/ustpurchasedanAtari

‘SOOXL It.

some

Hants. . The best thing to do

— W/th

me

details on the 7050 and 870 disc drives, The Thorn game Tennis does not seem to work on my 800XL. Why is this? Can / get acartridge orcassette that‘will get this game to work?— S.T.

Dunn,

'

farrfiirrfi arsysehvsrrjésh/oais 23/1; tripping? / andsoftware read Ataricomputers guide/mes for just about, every home

_

Can

and

am dew/{19d W/{h

youpr/nt theprnoutsm yourmagazme-aslam/nterested In

a dISC drive,

connect/rig and printer all at the modern

same time. / would like to run a lead to

connect

John Hopkins, Wisbech. 0 Pin outs are given in the

Technical User Notes, along with timing diagrams that you can purchase from Atari. However you can simply plug a disc drive, printer, interface for RSZ32, cassette and so forth into the machine at once. Each new unit plugs

New versuons of these titles been brought have, of course, stock out, but if a shop_has over two years old u could be suspect. The problem with Tennis is more fundamental —many Qld programs Will not work With the XL computers at all. This is due to the software houses not having followed Atari's guidelines correctly, so the program won't work on a new machine. Thorn/EMl Tennis is so old that we don't even remember it, but the best solution for a .

_

cassette-based system is either XL—Fix or Computer 80 Column Pack. translator is good, but is only available on disc. The 80 Column Pack has the very useful side—effect of converting the XL operating

Support’s

Atari's

own

system

into

an

enhanced

version of the old Atari 800 one.

November 7985 ATARI USER

59


, af?ll'f far ?”

mg

08W

f‘gr 3“

fl

Here’s

r.

f

f"'v,..wff" ;,

p

.. »

,

1

~

'

"

5; '

x

,

~

g

2

g

~

e§§§§;;

A?

,

,

.

,

-,

s; s

§

is;

i

7

{ago

7

7

2:

Q

1’vn"§i

Keying

.

long programs

m

Then give your fingers a rest by sending for y isc or cassette containing all the programs om each issue 0 Atari User. See

W

————————-—' combination of colour, sound and animation makes this early learning gameawinner with the children. Sounds Interesting: Drive your neighbours potty with these ready-made sounds. Hexer: Enter, display and run machine code programs with this hexadecimal loader. Attack Squasthfast-action game to keep you on your toes. Reaction Timer: See how fast your reactions really are. Binary: Convert denary numbers to binary notation.

The

JUNE: Frog Jump: Guide the frog across road and river to his home in this version of arcade classic. 1300XE Ram Power: Use extra 64k of memory to good effect, or use

the the the the

drawing routines to produce some pretty displays. Scuttle the submarines. Etcha-

Submarine:

60 ATARI USER

_

November 7985

is

much

Filthy Fifteen happy in their cells?

JULY: Bomb Run: Flatten the deserted city and land safely. Disassembler. Find out what’s going on Atari. Treasure Hunt: Use deep inside your logical thmkmg to ?nd the treasure. Password Generator. Keep generating passwords ?ll you find one you like. Convert your micro Keyboard: into an organ. Quasrmodo: Can you sort outthe mess Of mpes in the belfry?

AUGUST: Assembler: Make machine code programming easier. Fruiti Gambler. Save fruit machine simulation. thisex patterns non?ylwiéhomp easy..Protec.an- alga. made om prying programs eyes, 89m] rated-38m emonstratron programs. Raider 153,75? '

's_t‘,

text adventure. Touch Tablet: utunstrc D emonstratron programs.

SEPTEMBER: Maze Munch: Help Horace the

To start the ball rolling, this month’s offering

too

Sketch: Draw pretty pictures with only a joystick. Random Numbers: Get random numbers from machine code. Filthy Fifteen: Can you keep the

Starting this month we are giving away an extra game along with the monthly cassette or disc.

/

_

£395

our mont

MAY: Alphabet Train:

Made in three $11,295}. Small 34 ‘36 36n'38" Medium 33.40" Larg e

The T-shirts are also on sale at £4.25. Please order on our of?cial order form.

g. .

users!

Worth £4.25, it will be sentFREE with every new subscription ordered on the form on the right!

.

:

.

This top-qualityT-shirt, woven in an attractive shade of grey with the Atari logo in red, is a genuine American ‘Fruit of the Loom’ product, made from 5096 cotton/50% polyester.

"

35

really

for all Atari

,

it;

a

CREE’SHOW,

a superb machine-

of

achore? £5.95

a

Blob munch the maze monsters’ morsels. Data Maker: Convert your machine code routines to DATA statements. Display List: Demonstration programs. Screen Dumps: Dump your Mode 8 screens to a 1029 printer. Bl’iCkS: Solve the Bricks problem. \

OCTOBER: Pontoon: TWiSt? BUS? Memory Dump: Examine memory in hex and ASCiiDisplay “St: Demonstration programs. Wrap Trap: AChO" game for one or two players. Computer Canvas: Make your OW“ micro masterpiece. Assembler Update: Improvements for the RAW Ram Disc: Make the most assembler. Of the BOXES extra memory. NOVEMBER: Guy Fawkes: Help Guy escape from the guards. Converse: Teach yourAtari tobe a psychotherapist. Display List: Demonstration programs. Bitwise Operators: Utility to provide logical functions. Circle: Draw and fill a circle. Plus: Freebie of the month Creepshow machine code pinball game. —

code pinball game which will keep you glued to your Atari for hours. And remember, you won’t find it listed in the magazine it’s only available if you buy the monthly cassette or disc.

lift?

-

/”9/if

F

ml

to i


Back .,.

1

issues

my“:

”$3“

.

in

l,

“st

-‘;==

7,3

,

_

it

\

fa"

g

-

My

M

1

u

,.

”M

-.

a

,

-

;

_

, '

,,

I subscription

.

I,

Commence with

£24,”

W

,

£175 Europe £2.25 Overseas Air mail

\\\\:&\‘ \“‘“

7008 7009

AUQ

Sept

——.——_

.

Monthly Cassette/Disc May issue: Profile of Jack Tramiel, preview of the new machines, Attack Squash, Adventuring, Alphabet Train, Hexer utility, Software reviews, Sounds, the 6502, Microscope, Atari Insights regular series of tutonals: Bit Wise, Beginners and Gra p hics. —

.

.

I |

of the 5205T, program protection

Fruiti Gambler, Assembler, Touch Tablet pro—

routines,

grams, ?rst look at Logo, Raider 1997, D05 25 upgrade offer, Display List Tutorial, Microscope, Software reviews a Insights regular series Of tutorials: BitWise, Be 91'nners and Gra p hics. 8—page September speCial on the 5205T, Mode 8 screen dump routine, Maze

Software

Munch, Data Maker, Display List

reviews,

Frog Jump,

Microscope, Sounds, Atari regular series of Insights _

tutorials: Bit Wise, Beginners and Graphics special 12 page feature on Communications, ,

issue. ' Disassembler Bomb Run, DOS 2.5, 17 Command— merits, Adventuring, Display List Tutorial, Software reviews, Power Functions, Treasure Hunt, Key-

July

board Sounds Microscope Insights Regular series of _

tutorials; Bit Wise, Beginners and Graphics.

August issue:

In-depth analysis

.

.

October Canvas

issue:

X/ '\l‘},‘;? aw / 1

_

Only £3.95

,

7022

JL

lncludin softw andAtansinterfaif

7033 [—_—|

.

TOTAL Small 7047 Medium 7048 Large 7049

[Z]

7031

__

mder I B—__——'

[I]

7029

£3.95 UK

OverseasAirmail£695

£5195 Europe -

Bush Doubler

+

£9.95 (UK & Overseas)

130XE Ram-disc .

_

free DOS 2.5

705112]

'

assembler, utility, first ST book on offer, Hex/Ascii memory dump utility,

STC ompamon 300k

68000 operating

D

Access/Mastercard/Eurocard

D

Barcla W ardMsa

E

7054

———£9495UKandoverseaS

Pontoon, Software reviews,

Paymentpleaseindicatemethodlv/l

enVironment, Wraptrap, Insights— regular series of tutorials: Bit Wise, Beginners and Graphics.

.

,

,

,

I

__

(130XE only) £395 UK £4.95 Europe and Overseas

Computer

Vour

I

5

Dust Cover

hics ro ram U p dates Sforpthe RXW965021

How to kee E

5,

§

Gaol?” if???)

N

£5.25 Europe £5575 Overseas Air ma“

ra

,

Protect your 1 30 XE With our luxury dust cover made of soft. pliable, clear and water-resistant cotton VINYL bound With strong with the and decorated magazme s logo.

september '

T-Shirt

7019 7020 7021

£425 UK

Tutorial, 68000. addressing With modes, list processmg Logo, Software reviews, Insights regular series of tutorials: Bit Wise Beginners and Graphics.

5

58};

£282 [EJK WOW/overseas

£195 UK £205 Overseas (Air mail)

issue:

Disc

Tape

$325 Ju1y August

£35952“le £495 Europe/overseas Disc

M'iracle Modem

,

.

June issue: In-depth analysis of the 13OXE, Submarine, Adven-

turing, Random numbers,

=

issue

,

”2

-

7001 7003 7004

(Sterling only) Europe £15 Overseas (Air mail) £30

.

.

.

1121: g;

UK&EIRE £12

Annual

.,

5,

.,

‘D

-

H

agar:

\§\~s"‘

f?y?z l‘

All prices include postage, packing and VAT. Valid to November 30. Overseas orders despatched by Air mail Please enter your requirements by ticking boxes p (/ ) 53

1

,

“N o'h"

W

'

so

w

m

1

If; ¥§s§§x§ s‘ 21

JR

?l$f€“‘

< Trweihmaldskmm‘m

~

-

.,

?y,

“is

.

,

;\ $4551 as, if, ”fax 3?

Eras,

a

r

5rd

{git-“m

r

.,

,

,

I

TOTAL ,

,

,

,

,

,

,

I

,

,

,

,

,

I

I

ID

Cheque/PO made payable

Credit card expiry date

to Database Publications Ltd

I

/

(M

Name

Bound in chocolate brown pvc

Address

and bearing the Atari User logo, this handsome binder will hold a year‘s supply of the magazines firmly secured in place with metal rods,

\ Q7

\ ,,

es

\\,..-

1},

/

———_—-—————————

Signed _——————_

|

(No stamp needed if posted in UK)

_

I

I

Send to: Atari User, FREEPOST, Europa House, 68 Chester Road, Hazel Grove, Stockport SK7 5NY. Please allow 28 days [or delivery ,

l

Only £3.95 (UK)

___—_—_

Orders by phone: 061-480 0171 by Prestel: Key *89 Mailbox No. 614568383 by Telecom Gold: Mailbox No. 72:MAGOOl

-

-

_

-

f”; ‘dfmge‘ C’L'idunz'flz'g full address.

_

_

‘° d.

23"

I

J

AT11

November 7985 ATAR/ USER

67


INDEX

ADVERTISERS

, .

I

A .

'

'

._...

__

...._.

Bampumart

1

_.{. i

73

t

5.3.

I

.

“!

1".

,

Compumart Computer Support Databyte.

_____.__.;.___

l-

Chips Computer Centre

Datascape

Digicom

I

1.

an

.

1

1 1,

1/

' .

if? *

1,173.

,.

Ladbroke Computing Level 9

44

S-Tewe"

62

Talent Computer Systems

..

mwmww

._

may BMNKDlSKSthFREEStOfas-em 5g.

.,

,.

7

'

o

»

/

~

£13’ £49

50—5%"DOUBLE SIDED/DOUBLE DENSITY BLANK DfSKS (with FREE Storage Box)

95:

ATARI S P E CIA LISTS

.

fig, .

.

.

mnmmmmmmm

B UY, s ELL, PART EXC HAN G E ALLTYPESOF-COMPUTER EQUIPMENT

WE

,, was» W—

THE BEST PRICES POSS/BLE

95

+ngpa,

Wm??wmammwm

‘,

“Mmjmm

7

mmdwmmw;

E _

&$9“ e.

«off-es"

"mm“, m‘mm?imm

JE-

“?gs“

XL, XE, ST RANGE ALLIN STOCK E.G. 130XE £1 20 including VAT 1050 £1 so including VAT

,

plug 48K

the supplied RAM minimum

cartridge required,

ROAD,WORTHING,SUSSEX BN11 5NB

specify

Q

board and load the

Simulator

tape

or

.

“3!

TEL: (0903) 40509 (24 hours)

get-ff”

in

'

CHIPS COMPUTER CENTRE 53 RUGBY

CARTRIDGE TRANSFER SYSTEM your cartridges to disc or tape. Simply tape/disc copy as you would any other program.

Transfer

52 28

,

59‘3; +9334:

.,

10-1 5? DOUBLE SlDE?iDGUBTE’DENSITY . BLANK DlSKS immense case)

50_

10 21, 51 62 42

Software Express Silicon Chip Strategic Plus Selectavideo

54 54

-

messages m)

6g 24

Homeview J&J Softsales

'

10—5¥'SlNGLE$?EHM£DE?SHY BLANK

QUGStS Silica hop S‘E‘T'

1-

???t?saaoqw?ké ..

40

42

i/W/

a

RF. Software

48

/

W

WWW

W,

WW

mi?

'

.

//f/éW/§§Z

51?

3131—7

..

Wit-“3:-

eff

/

17 48 54

Haystack Peripherals

7—1,

I

Micropro International Miracle Technology Miles Better software

G. Paul

1

1

14W; 2??? $51?

48

EngliSh Software

1.

»

62 14, 62 28, 33 42 33 42

disc version.

2 '

600/000”. version £25.00 £15.00, (Works on all models) £30.00

400/800 version lJIJXE/universal

a . ..

FAST LOADER Reduce the loading time of almost (up to 49?» faster). Fast Loader

all of your single/multistage

tapes

by

them at

re-recording

a

faster data rate

£600.

CENTRONICSPRINTER INTERFACE Operation

stmilaitothe

850 buthasahuiltin characterbuffertofree 7K buffer 1K buffer version £59.00

version

{5900

Strategic

PROM PROGRAMMER

are

fully

inclusive,

no

more

to

S.

pay.

The

above

products

are

suitable

for

any

of

the

TERRELL Peterborough PE7 3I‘IJ

are not intended for and should not

be

Plus the only people in the UK who

Uur

17 Cock c|ose Road, Yaxley, These products

WARGAMES AND ADVENTURE GAMES FOR YOUR COMPUTER machine in quality computer games for the discerning

vourcomputerloretherwork.

and tape or disc software to perform all usual Programs both 2784s and 271 285. Supplied with lull instructions prom programmer functions. Make your own cartridges using the blank cartridge boards with sockets for i or 2 2764s. Prom programmer UM Eraser £30400 £00.00 RIM" cartridge boards £8.50 Prices

used for infringement

adventure speciality isAguality strategic. APP"? family. Am" and IBM computers.

a l’

A V. to)

gainer.

games from the USA. Canada and Australia

forthe

Send for our free 20 page '85/’86 catalogue, ratings for each game.

which

has

a

large selection

of titles,

with

descriptions

and

complexity

Our aim is to make you a part of Strategic Plus. so if you have any comments or require any information our catalogue or games available for your computer please call Simon or Steve on 01—970 2587.

regarding

Hows:

Business

of copyright.

9 “V \, A. téA. \, Ma T

and simulation

Whatever your interest or level of play, the games we offer provide challenging and stimulating entertainment, either for solo play against the computer or for interactive play against fellow gamers. Many provide multiple for extended play over a period of time. scenario options and ‘save game' features. allowing

Or

/

7

write

to:

Strategic

108m»6pm

Plus Software,

P.0.

Mon-Fri.

”MIMI“

Box 8, Hampton,

Sat,

Mi?dImx TWlZ

AV.tQAV. té AV. \9

The computer’s choice

3XA.

A."6 Vt b

6

£9.95 on AMSTRAD, ATARI, BBC, CBM, msx, SPECTRUM etc. a Qt“ a t av V "av avaav “av “av AV tQ WV a" A. \9 AV \Q AV. xé 4649 '9i'v AV. tQ AVtQ AV \91

/

i

'

Available from

62 ATARI USER

November 7985

'

Level

9

Computing. PO Box

39.

Weston»super-Mare.Avon 8524 9UFi


i,i"i?,‘f§r\ii

' .

my

.

i

g

i.

“Jeep?

3.

. .

"'l:wf~:«;f.§<

i.i.sii,sze§s§é-”§s§;serfs

.

it?

-

it, 35><g57<e<25i¥§ myopia“.

.i

..

.,

»

2

‘.

:>»««_

s

a,

.‘

.

"

t'

}

A

“c

a"

g-

:

{Ice}:

;,~

5:'

w

.

e»i m

.

As;

~

5

emigre)“ 7.

~ -

W

sa‘i‘sc

' .,

7

t ,,

f

-'

'

s

’ E—‘Egc‘sg/agw new ."

»;

-

is.

r'

' ..

,,

'°“"‘~ ?g,-

5—

to

32—>3‘;,iZ—£'~rx§f

W

.

;;

Wm.»

'

7

.

.‘

‘-

”1?“

*&

.

'

A,

mA“

=

'

:

if.

s_

’ ‘ ~

-

..

Q’V’E'Eftl?fc?r—w-E.

.'

.

MM '

45“—

.

~

j

e

u

4:1

‘ ;

-,

, '

J

'

' .

_-

1

'

,.

_

. __,

_

j‘

"

'

q

'

"<;r

Egan

,

"5-5

;" *‘-~sL‘“

fa“.

c

;

.;

.t

,

-

.

,’ p

o

eel

_

—¢,.

KOO/é??? 31s.

.

'

are

,,

i‘

S—

$3315"“

s:

.

-

f

-'

r

i§z¥4%r‘i'**"_i?g;t

~,

.

'

431; ail 4 £1» “'“rials? ssrr‘ a“: .

v: Ea;v=;>.‘.,-,- $2

E‘s/y

..

~

.—

Eiggeg?vjs ,?f§:f§’§\;

,;

,,

if

1.13133»? 7“

152§53rfs3§z33

.

.

5-11.

,

»

.

~'«:'— alas};fgzszz—nffé-iszia‘i.E”i£¢::es‘$‘ifj9‘VZI-E:"IEJ:‘V

1.

'

.

f

'

%efr

cl:

genes

e...

e x

we“: 743 e.,geé< for)“. ctr; {meg/?, ‘ m”. Wu;

i‘:—‘i.‘1““;.l“ilw"if?'g‘?’%§§%y chi-i.

r

t’férefas

m7“?

'

_

\-

s

as;

iii

i

' .

—7

.

THE NEW ATARI SZOST

'

,

"lucky

'

V|DE° FONTS

I?nwm‘??m'gmk a 0 expert

mk plop-in Ponxtoroegdnl aw T operating ly??rl

mg

“imagine

h Dbpley-lw?eaolutugn-locolrmm vatuCOIl Medium mesa output ntonmplmsonmonoaironetaiact emit-i

ROM cartridges

cupmcs

(and/wt»)

Bidirectional osntro?iel

bit-mapped

djmgnphtca colours tapas: owruolinlon 4 am: I: colouramhmfuuern) ‘9 15 “6-019.“ In m° ”mm 5,2man|m,"m/Mimm a

n

int-deco

pat-allot

ror

in red, green

Wmm

Highm'apuzdwmdu?m

“WWW

Wmmmw??l

port-(ens rorzbtmoit mot-a) Mini instructor-trainer mantras-inn

‘mwmw?ww new"

>m'm'_“‘"lm“°' Geu?-wwon?wmmm

mnunnmunm'.’ “mum-m,Wm iGMdltabiu/‘abltaddnuba

Gnnm'w" haul

inert-rouse

.

.

m.

W-MWWW mewaosmmm

.

mtui?umamdimioodayiioppydmnngum Wlmlwm term GEMPAINTgr-pka‘csmprmsym andGEM WMTEwi-nrpmceuor 5 o "ND AND “0 SIC PersottdBASlC-ndQlTLogo inmahapingeoundih additiontaanot-genantor

mmwwvoimcommu Mmm_ (WILM- m?l Nth-I _P“‘" ”I" Wml???'?‘? “We "PM

VARIOUS

Diim

' ARD leir?atemd microprocessor air/saw mud-rd

“mama

typ-vrrtm

a“ glance-duet) mmammw) (m1) moonlit-ix WW” "‘°"“°"

'

qlsd'uhllgrl m on med?— is keysincluding ENTER one touch curler control keypad l

Nun‘ieyr‘ic

Price

“Alarl'a new corporate image as an aggressive iot- coat computer makar is likely to mirror that or Commodore where Tramiel establilhed the maxim that ‘auslneu is war'." 21" 1934 "chm‘ mass

“W"

"This Is the only personal computer know or that cornea with Midl rnterIlce at standard." Mm" 1985 "no“ comma! WORLD Pm“ BW'" “The term) var-ion running on the Atari scope machines will hate the additional mum?- cl luvi?n the PC mm" “Mona; comm; standing." Any" em lass i

a

»

mm tn“ GEM 0m" tm Mm" ”1 loss W

"I found lmwelsad hardware Peter

ll

iGEMl

_

stay in

extremely»

Ind

use

ill-curry

~l’_ "in! unl?eirylr

Ill2th0001. tha'wlY mlwhlclh cm! U Yr: I?? uh 3 null“. m] W! bright Feb tees reason".comreriwonu: I’

4

i‘

ATARI

r-I

'

.

lll’

C

MC .

-II

II "

(“5

or

II

I

mumm "wading

VAT

t

gy n—M :

l

B/w MONITOR *500K 3_5 ,, D, D *KEYBOARD (95 KEYS) *

.

limo: -

i

I

,

-

.

--

,.

"

I

I

._

-"‘"

-.

4-

POST ll PACKING ON MAIL ORDERS NEXT DAY SECURICOR DELIVERY INFORMATION MAILING SERVICE TECHNICAL SUPPORT TEAM HIGHLY COMPETITIVE PRICES AFTER SALES SUPPORT SERVICE REPAIR SERVICE ON ATARI PRODUCTS

HOTLINE

*512K RAM *M *GEM

molar

i

oi art The heart "It (the ST) uses the most modern technology that is the most powonul “tom“, in . mange "m gill” l, protmtoml |mprgu|of|," in lo row-m It rovuuri cowu‘nao WEEKLY May 23rd 1985 in a 23m ci urour'i‘d anla? emac"1:innea mintliars? e ops. I'll of at the lront epnd gr the queue to buy gr?" "The Atari ST is one or the most elegant Quinn: have seen an ongirill and elegant method or memory warm," JIM was reason“ coWTEl wonm Atari has usedwhich should makethasr taster than any other management “This machine is lipnl?canllv mom comm“ "W1 In IBM PC Pc on the market in any price bracket The “K dollar it it‘s possible to design . aura-lire winning machine. this is question ,; would go out and spend money ior one? To it." comma news which the only answer is 'Try and stop mel' May rtth teas mom 4°“ “mm" "My 19“ “imam” ‘ COMTING r... the use or GEM makes the new range or Atari computers so similar to the Macintosh (with the added lttrlctron or “The szosr iamcymiutly excellent The szosr hardware I! colour), that they are already being aired ‘Jackmtoohes‘ the new standard by vmtch omen irriii be lodged MI Y 2m 1m com J” “5 vourt co u E work one ol a

.

r

ll you would Ilka lo

l

SEND FOR FREE AIARI SI LI I ERAI URE -

be registered on our malllng Atari computer owner, or as a person let us [molested In buying an Marl machine, know. We will be pleasedto keepyou up to dale with new Alarl developmentsfree or charge. So, relum rho coupon today and begin experiencmg a specialist Ararl service that I: second to none. Ilst

1

SILICA SHOP LTD, 1-4 The Mews, Hatherley Road, Sidcup, Kent, DA14 4DX

ATARI SPEGIRLISTS ATARI “K's m“ ever the" ?rst dedicated

SILICA m /

_

£1185‘VAT

'"‘°’°"‘"g“‘"e “m”

as below: pauages 1) TOS -Tramiel Operating System based on CPM sex. 2) GEM Graphics Environment Manager by Digital Research (DR) giving a WIMP (Window. icon. Mouse. Pull down envtronment. DR GEM Paint lor DR GEM menu) 3) creating graphics masterpieces. 4) Write Ior word processing. 5) Logo learning language to enable you to write your own programs easrly using turtle graphics. 6) DR Personal Basic a power1ul user friendly version or the Basic programming 7) aos operating system giving you language access to dozens ol business applications packages already available on the market. in mind. the ST also leatures a host of di?erent Designed with luture expansion interlaces to the outside world and an impressive list ol accessories is planned. Atari will soon be releasing a IOOOK (TMB) ztva inch disk drive. and a 15MB hard disk storage system as well as a mass storage compact disk (CD) player capable of storing an entire 20 volume encyclopedia on one disk A luII range ol inexpensive printers are dot matrix and thermal colour printers. With its planned including dalsywheel unbeatable graphics, speed and software at a price which is far below that ol any comparable personal computer currently on the market, the ST is all set to do battle with the competition. To recalve luriher details ol the ST lrom Silica Shop. just ?ll in the coupon below with your name and address details and post it to us. Slllca Shop Prlcs: £651.30+ £97.70 var = £749.00 This price Includes:

_ .»

"m” °' mm“

FREESOFTWAREAND FUTUREEXPANSIONlisted The Man 52OST comes supplied with seven tree software

512K“ W m Drive MVAY ”V“.

Wm —-m-“I

f“;

complete system (an: va

to Atari At Silica we have been successfully products appeared on the UK which we practice and to the user market. We can attribute our success largely to the Atari specialisation at a of Atari hardware Silica we Rest assured that when you Will be fully buy piece back-up provide, you supported Our mailings giving news of software releases and developmentsWill keep you up to date With the Atari market and our technical support team and sales staff are at the end ol the telephoneline to With our speClaIlst bias. we aim to keep stocks of. deal With your problems and supply your every need We also stock a wtde range 01 all the available Atari hardware, software, peripherals and accessories American Atari Atari dedicated books and through us. the owners on our list can subscribe to several as dedicated magazmes We can DFOVIde a full service to all Atari owners and are now llrmly established Here are lust some of the things we can oIIer to our customers. the UK's NUMBER ONE Atari specialists.

if

_

I

VA“

since

i t *

"We

.

WE ARE THE

t FREE it FREE

USER FRIENDLY GEMOPERATINGSYSTEM

The power or the ST is harnessed and made user lriendly by the new operating system ‘GEM‘ lrom Digital Research. GEM stands lor Graphics Environment Manager and allows a user lriendly colour or B/w graphics interlace which closely resembles that ol the Mactntosh. This similarity extends to the use or moveable resizeable icons to windows. represent obiects such as disks and disk drives. and the use or pull down menus and a mouse The advantage or all this is that the computer becomes for the Acorn. ACT. Atari. extremely easy to use. GEM has now been implemented IBM. ICL, and Olivetti. Software written tor GEM on one computer should also run under GEM on another computer. This will enable the market to quickly produce a

"TrienewAtari 51 computers truly represent to the consumer what Jack TramieI is saying sasy-te-use computing power withoutthe price." mm, was mum couptmm; "The electronics in the machine are or the 5205? la a Motorola some.

._

__

~"*"

=

l

..

”$22“,

ld?éomm'?g “

.,.

F

“IGE

NmazmadmaMManmmmmba-bmbm Mr.

=

,

.

SVa"

Prtos 0'

kin/mammal balmy-swing mmcmcompinde-c Loom-2mm

>

WY,

m_lmm—-zm_h4¢ed j 2:an mm“ —m

LANGUAGES

mammochrornemlution

"It would

[EB—m

_

m—m 330x1£7x50 “?u,“ Km“, "do,” "hm.“ I7‘szs‘ltxi Il‘lxai'hn‘l: m swcom?u‘umm“) mm“ _ DI DI'W’“ ”35mm“ WIMP (W'MW‘ but “9“ ACT Actlvl m -EE:_ms-—m MMMMWW __x__E_ “mm-H,“ —_-Z{Gen "0m“ arallet “_‘35f’??l?m mac-M WWW m—“ Hard DMA intuit-ca m—‘zFull 31m Item-d vs vs Numberol “1300“de “_‘VESUS Kay!) m nmm-IECum WM m—m mans—“m“ armaments-xxx —m—m GEE—mm“ Numm’mq " i“ --"UMP" °' colours —-E--32MexSoreen Rmolimon (pints) m—m _mmiza— mm "Wm “a“ _-:__-x_ _-x_-x_m mms M Inter ace -§I_ m “ WEEK—“_wm-_ use video Output “_— 8

BASlCALDGOswp?ed

MONITOR rTwmn-hlghmmnochmmmcnltor

.

v

lncludee a/w Monitor mm mm board size'ins LxDxH)

9-

w?wgm? “an"

mm km

_

.

,

_

.

mm!“

may “Mm-m,

_

7

Wmmm pet“

7

mmmmmmtomam Mommas-mgr 3m(m) Maggi-Mummy.“ WWW-um

lugs:

among}; sex]$512“mayo“1,232$3525?“33530'é9rrtos?g?z;(whfhnf?ztf?f?

mouse controller. monitor (640x400). 95 key keyboard high resolution monochrome (with la key numeric keypad), MIDI interlace. GEM and a 500K av2 inch disk drive, all lor the package price or only £651.30 («VAT £749), Dubbed the ‘Mac beater‘ and the 'Jackintcsh' (alter Atari‘s Chial. Jack Tramiel), Atari's new machine has been directly compared with the Apple Macintosh RRP £2595 (~VAT £2985) which ollers similar leatures and capabilities but at a much higher price. Favourably reviewed by the UK's critical highly specialist computer press. the 52057 is likely to make a great impact in this country as a sophisticated alternative to an lBM PC, APRICOT or APPLE MACINTOSH. Unlike its overpriced competitors. the Atari 52DST can be linked up to a colour monitor to unleash a choice ol up to 512 colours The addition at colour brings out the lull potential at graphics packages such as GEM

K

‘M‘mmwm’mmm

‘ Mmmlxwmmwl .

Under the new leadership 01 Jack Tramial (lormer boss and lounder ol Commodore Business Machines), Atari corporation have marked their entry into the world ol business/personal computers with a machine which leaves the competition standing. Tramiel's slogan 'Power Without the Price' has been implemented in the manufacture oi the new 512K Atari szosr colour computer which ollers the user amazingly high erIorma c at edibl Io h t

lar

Disk

TOSJWWSYM

.

DISK DRIVE

timoioouoaiandar

?mu?mawuybm

RAJ“ Stgdwz

a

P

50m

gummn?tmn‘ampum M ‘W ”W'I?mwwmm “Wm .n.

bigger screen.

_

QBl?BTaB?ao?iTm

Im "lode-15mm.

lat-lad

a

l

---)

GE“ W' MP ENVIRON'IENT menswmmmmm Twm"mm

emu:

ammoniummnw

"mug

I

K

2m

andbiuo

ARCHITECTURE

but with

.

.

pnmormooureoss'aibuoii?lnpwmm 98232030“ modeml mor terrace st_2Temimai

,

m

7

the Start Apple Macintosh

COMMUNICATIONS

32K

lndlvlduallyaddreeublo with

Blew-la ole-ch

-

o w a is 3:6s.exce gagrgoqu?hrnmn'gekm?ads?gw y u we rnd colourmTr-tt turrets? ork-lyi. mporlantt rigs. First the Atari seems raster. seoohd the Atari system is about one third oi the price." June 1935- m" SDW'Q'G' "Hemm- WWW“

screen

MD!

Fat Man

a

ov

'

‘---------------~

11/85.

To,SiIicaShtn1Ltd,UeptA_I'US

0“

l

M’lMW/Mi

I

Address:

/

.

THE .

Initials.

.

'

1-4 The Mews,

"E"

Hattierley

ltuiiii,

ATARI 5208].

SIdcuD. Kent.

DAM4DX

l

coMPuTm

I I

Sumamei .

as an

-

I

I

“W Do you already own a computer It so, which one do ou own?

~-------------

'

’ November 7985 A TAR/ USER 63


z

l

-~

4

,;

=

x

if

.:

g

f

gs

A

g

’ '

, >

es

,—_~*

,

_

|

D/

..<-

/",7-;.

_

'-'

' u ',

7,“1.

l”‘

1

0

~/-

v

"lf"""'"‘-

l“

er‘zl'.

>

O

A superb range of STware mcludlng:

?ve“

\

7

.

user

system w1th

n

Its

mouse-driven icon‘ selection and multl ''

fl,

wmdf’w

—\/ ’

fnenfily.GE

”ffcffi Qé‘w

A

?ggel?"

{24

/4¢ /"" 4%¢‘ /

git

gééé‘iggéif?’?x

?fe??? geese

1‘

Presentatlon'

ll "figé?é

[I

}

(“i

.O

_

\

15

t

.

meeSSIOnal

PaCkage combines fun

I

RAM capacity with its fast processmg Speed and facilitates easy data transfer with the KUMA

lax‘Q l

.

’¢~l g?“ ’ ’

and communications

r ,

iii;

,

,

"

word-proceSSIIlg, database

,,

?t“;

.

”l

'

,

,

?st

"left“

-

-

Please send further details of the Kuma Atari range. I

paCkageS.

Name '

~

.

Ava11ab1efrom your ST-Dealer

Address

.

Get down to busmess w|th Kuma ?rst off the mark for the ST 0

-

Kuma Computers Ltd., Unit 12, Horseshoe Park, Horseshoe Road, Pangbourne, Berks R68 7JW.

l

.

a,

w

l

.

\

/

”My,

“(f

benefits of the

M,

“ND“Sf//

SPREAD// emoyingthe

,/""//M

M_//,/‘

//

’//

Spreadsheet

‘\.h——/l

.‘

..............................Hi...n...-....“nu“...n...-nu..--.----..---..........

0

0

|

CW”: ra d e Enqumes _

hm— —

,

1 I I

Phoel

43:5”“6 — J

Pb one 07357— — — —

Profile for Paul Rixon

Atari User Magazine Vol 1 Issue 07  

Atari User Magazine Vol 1 Issue 07 - magazine for Atari home computer users, published by Database Publications.

Atari User Magazine Vol 1 Issue 07  

Atari User Magazine Vol 1 Issue 07 - magazine for Atari home computer users, published by Database Publications.

Profile for prixon
Advertisement