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WHY 89% OF CONSUMERS SAY PRINT PROVIDES THE SPARK THAT LEADS THEM TOWARDS PURCHASE

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I

AM A

BOOST TO

YOUR

ROI

I am the power of print. When using the optimal media mix for FMCG campaigns, which involves increasing magazine’s share, return on investment (ROI) will increase from 1.64 to a ROI of 1.75. By optimizing your print investments in FMCG you can increase your ROI by 17%. Read the BrandScience analysis for more details on www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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/ CONTENTS

12 | TAKE 5

20 | FASHION STATEMENT

FIND OUT MORE Print Power is a European initiative dedicated to strengthening the position of print media in a multimedia world. For more information, go to www.printpower.eu

04-10 Engage The latest European news, research, opinion and trends in the world of print and paper.

100% RECYCLABLE Print Power is printed on 100% recyclable paper from sustainable managed forests. All inks and finishes are also 100% recyclable and biodegradable. Printed using vegetable-based inks by an ISO 14001-accredited printer.

12-13 Take 5 From the strokable magazine cover to a 3D pregnancy journal, a selection of the world’s most creative and exciting uses of print.

PRINT POWER Published by Print Power www.printpower.eu Content by Soul Content www.soulcontent.co.uk Editor Sam Upton Design Ian Findlay Coordinators Martyn Eustace Sarah Collins Aneta Pawlik Print PCP Data management DST PrintPower UK iCon Centre, Eastern Way, Daventry, Northamptonshire, UK NN11 0QB info@printpoweruk.co.uk +44 (0) 1327 262 920 www.printpoweruk.co.uk #Printpower © 2014 Print Power

Sponsored by

30 | QUOTE UNQUOTE

14-15 Thought Leaders Futurologist and keen print fan Richard Watson describes the “extraordinary strengths” of print, while Eric Newnham, CEO of Talon Outdoor, explains how print works best with digital technology, not against it. 16-19 Conversation starter Discover why print is still the most popular starting point for any multichannel campaign and why marketers rely on it to grab the attention and lead their customers towards purchase.

40 | DESIGNER OUTLET

30-34 Quote unquote Five pages of thoughts, statements, opinions and views about print from some of the world’s leading figures in media and marketing. 36-39 Print vs screen Why is it easier to read from paper than a screen? Why do concentration levels fall when you go from print to digital? And why can’t the brain process the word ‘of’? Discover why your mind prefers paper. 40-44 Designer outlet Legendary designer and one of the original ‘Mad Men’ George Lois joins Charles Vallance, Peter Knapp and Robin Harvey for an exclusive roundtable discussion on the creative power of print design. 46-49 Red Bull Discover how the Austrian energy drink famed for its extreme marketing stunts uses print to get closer to its millions of customers worldwide.

20-23 Fashion statement The exclusive story of how international retail giant Net-A-Porter went from online to offline as they launched their own print magazine.

51-57 Knowledge From direct mail and customer magazines to catalogues and magazine advertising, discover why print media should be a key part of your marketing strategy.

24-28 Print works All the stats, all the facts: we investigate the effectiveness of print marketing using the latest research and insight.

58 Final word Tim Arthur, CEO of global listings bible Time Out, on the key part print plays in the magazine’s success.

www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 03

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ENGAGE T H E L AT E S T N E W S F R O M T H E WO R L D O F P R I N T

PRINT IS ‘INTENSE , PRECISE AND ENDURING’ VDZ, Germany’s top trade body for publishers, has released a groundbreaking body of research that provides marketers and advertisers with some of the most exhaustive and compelling evidence for the use of print in recent times. Print Wirkt (or ‘Print Works’) is a metaanalysis study that gathers data from a series of German and European studies that take in every aspect of magazine buying and reading, as well as the effects print advertising have on both the reader and the brand advertiser. The study focuses on the fact that print works ‘intensely’, ‘precisely’ and ‘enduringly’, with key findings including the fact that consumers trust print more

than any other media (GPRA, 2012) and the average length of time spent reading a magazine is 91 minutes – equivalent to watching a film (AIM, RFID, 2012). The ‘precise’ element of the study focuses on the fact that print quickly activates a large audience and generates clicks from accurately defined target groups. Key figures here include 39% of observers of a print ad with an interest in the product will visit the company’s website (AIM, 2013), while 53% of people agree that magazines “make me aware of interesting things”, compared to just 35% for the internet and 33% for television (Institut für Demoskopie, Allensbach, 2011). The ‘enduring’ factor is expressed in a

number of compelling ways, notably the fact that print ads stay in the mind, with 25% of readers able to recall a specific ad in a magazine. If the reader has an interest in the product that figure rises to an impressive 54%. Finally, magazines remain visible for a long time, staying present in the home weeks after purchase, as well as being passed on to other people after being read for the first time. This gives magazines not only the role of status symbol, but the ability to accumulate additional contacts, further increasing reach and presence. • To download the full Print Wirkt study and find out more about the effectiveness of print media, go to www.printwirkt.de

CON FI DENCE I N SOU RCES OF I N FOR MATION (%) Research results Recommendations of family and friends Print media article Online user rating Online article Corporate website Newspaper or magazine ad Brand sponsoring Radio ad TV ad Online ad Posters Social media

82 72 36 29 29 25 23 16 15 14 13 12 10

MINUTES

MAGA ZI N ES HAVE SOCIAL AUTHORIT Y (%) ‘Magazines are lying around, visible in the home’ 72 ‘I pass magazines on to others after I have read them’ 38 ‘I exchange magazines with others’ 20 ‘I keep magazines as a collection’

91 25%

17

THE AVERAGE AMOUNT OF TIME PEOPLE SPEND READING A MAGAZINE

OF READERS ARE ABLE TO RECALL A SPECIFIC AD IN A MAGAZINE

04_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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/ ENGAGE DIRECT MAIL MORE LIKELY TO BE ACTED UPON IMMEDIATELY THAN EMAIL A report by the Direct Marketing Association (DMA) has found that almost fourfifths (79%) of consumers will act on direct mail immediately, compared to just 45% who say they deal with email straightaway. The DMA’s first attitudinal print tracking report also discovered that direct mail is the preferred channel for receiving marketing from local shops (51%) and banks (48%). “People continue to value direct mail and printed communications from brands,” says Rachel Aldighieri, Director of Communications and Insight at the DMA, “finding that it plays a seamless role within their connected worlds, offers qualities not found in other comms, and is an essential part of the overall brand experience.” Personalisation was also mentioned in the report, with 74% of the 1,232 people surveyed saying this was important to them. “For brands to market effectively in a truly connected world, they must fully recognise the role that print comms play and will continue to play for many years to come,” says Aldighieri. • To find out more about the DMA, go to www.dma.org.uk “Although it’s tempting to see the recent changes in the way people consume content as a simple linear journey from analogue to digital, in reality we are actually seeing more of a shift from single channel to multichannel media experiences” Nick Blunden, global head of digital and content strategy, The Economist

THE LIKELIHOOD OF DIRECT MAIL TO BE OPENED IMMEDIATELY Supermarkets 42% Mobile phones 15%

Banking/ credit cards 20%

Charities 42%

Utilities 16% Catalogues 16% FAST.MAP, 2013

Travel/ holidays 19% Household/ clothes 20%

PRINT POWER MAGAZINE EXPANDS INTO EUROPE Print Power magazine is now being distributed in 11 European countries, delivering its unique blend of inspiration, interviews and information to over 80,000 people. Now over three years old, Print Power has become a must-read publication for senior marketers, brand owners and media agencies looking for the latest content about the value of print in multimedia campaigns. “This is a really exciting step to promote print media right across Europe,” says Martyn Eustace, Managing Director of Print Power. “With hard evidence, there’s no doubt that print retains a real power to influence, building brands and engaging with readers.” The magazine will be produced in 11 different languages, with editors in each country providing bespoke content that will appeal directly to their national marketing, advertising and media industries. “We want to deliver inspiration and creative ideas to our key target audience,” continues Eustace, “and our network of editors will ensure relevance of content, talking about the power of print in a global as well as regional context.” Want to receive regular issues of Print Power magazine for free? Turn to page 55 to find out more.

‘ME TIME’ TURNS INTO ‘ALL THE TIME’ New research has discovered that consumers turn to magazine brands at multiple times during the day, rather than the traditional ‘me time’ when they want to relax. The Connected Consumers study by IPC Media looked into the reading habits of over 3,500 consumers to provide indepth insight into how, when, where and why they interact with magazine brands across multiple platforms. The study found that not only do consumers engage with magazine content and advertising throughout the day, they do it to fulfil three key mind states: catch-up time, focus time and down time. Catch-up time is typically in

the morning when consumers turn to apps and social media to catch up on the latest news. Critical in this mind state is ease of access and the ability to get reliable updates to bring them up to speed quickly. Focus time is typically during the day, when consumers tend to be more time deprived. They know what information they want and how to get it. Print, social media, apps and websites all fulfil this need. Down time is when consumers are at their most receptive to advertising. This is typically in the evening, when people are relaxing. Content is consumed across all platforms when in this mind state.

The different platforms – online, tablet, print, mobile and social – all have important roles to play in influencing consumers throughout the path towards purchase, but print is the most influential when it comes to sparking ideas and actual purchase from a shop or online. 89% of consumers get ideas from print, while 45% of respondents indicated that print had inspired a purchase. Print also leads the way in generating word of mouth buzz, with 64% indicating they have shared information from print brands. • To read more on how print provides the initial inspiration that leads to purchase, see the feature on page 18.

www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 05

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ENGAGE

\ A N EW ROADMAP FOR MAGA ZI N E STR ATEGY

THE WORLD OF

PRINT

The brand new Innovations in Magazine Media 2014 World Report is now available to order. Produced by the worldwide magazine media association FIPP, this fifth edition of the report provides the international publishing, advertising and media audience with the latest insights into magazine innovations and strategy. Available in print, digital and app, the report features four of the major changes exploding on the magazine media front: mobile as the dominant platform, big data, video and native advertising. These phenomena are now critical elements of publishing. As well as these vital developments, the report features global case studies on subjects such as programmatic advertising, e- and m-commerce, print innovations, events and conferences, innovation labs and magazines making a buzz. There are even publications you can plant and the magazine that doubles as a mobile wi-fi spot. • For more information about the 2014 FIPP Innovations in Magazine Media World Report and to order your copy, go to www.fipp.com/innovations

• A Canadian ad agency has produced a door drop designed to appeal to cats. The piece of DM promoting Bulk Cat Litter Warehouse was covered in concentrated catnip, so that the cat of the house would start fondling the flyer as soon as it came through the door. • US scientists have discovered that laptops could be harmful to academic performance as they encourage ‘mindless transcription’. They found that students using pen and paper displayed a better grasp of concepts than those who took notes on laptops. • A Dubai ad agency went all James Bond when it wanted to hire a number of creatives. Instead of penning a normal ad, they hid mobile phones in fake books and sent them to the leading creatives in the country. Each book was personalised with details of the creative’s interests, while the phones were programmed with a single number. Filling all vacancies, the scheme saved the agency $80,000 in headhunter’s fees.

• DC Thomson, the Scottish publisher of world-famous comic The Beano, has joined forces with Dundee City Council to create a real-life Bash Street in the town. Named after the legendary Bash Street Kids, the new street boasts illustrated signs featuring the comic characters. • Johnson & Johnson have produced a print ad infused with the scent of baby powder. Designed to appeal to mothers, the full-page ad was taken out in a number of Indian newspapers, including The Times of India.

MIX OF TV AND PRINT MEDIA CREATES MA XIMUM ROI A report by German publishers Gruner + Jahr has found that a multimedia campaign featuring print and TV produces a significantly larger ROI than TV alone, with the mix of print, TV and online having a particularly high level of effectiveness. The G+J Cross Media Success Barometer measures the advertising effect across multiple media, tracing the customer journey from initial contact all the way through to purchase. The study asked a panel of 2,000 people in Germany a series of questions covering 15 product categories and 170 brands, and their use of different advertising media. Results from the brands looked at so far reveal that the triple mix of print, online and TV not only has the highest levels of passive advertising awareness and brand awareness, but also has the maximum influence on willingness to buy and usage. • To find out more about the G+J Cross Media Success Barometer, go to www.ems.guj.com

“If you build relationships through content on customers’ screens and print in their hands, your brand will live more strongly in their heads and their hearts” Jonathan Harman, Managing Director

NEW DELIVERY CHANNEL FOR DIRECT MAIL ADVERTISERS

Finding new ad space in an increasingly crowded market is becoming more and more of a challenge for brands and agencies. But a brand new service called maillinx could provide a cost-effective solution for companies who don’t mail on a regular basis. maillinx brings users of direct mail together, enabling bulk mailers to sell space in their envelopes to companies keen to keep their costs down. And by selling available space in envelopes to smaller advertisers, bulk mailers can directly reduce or even wholly mitigate the total cost of their mailed communications. “Direct mail is one of the least expensive ways to reach consumers,” says Andrew Price, Managing Director and CEO of PaperlinX, the print services company behind maillinx, “and by offering a new delivery channel for advertisers, we’re helping businesses deliver relevant marketing content to different demographics.” The service is ideal for brands who are looking for a cost-effective way to get their message into the homes of their potential customers. And for those providing the mailing, they reduce their costs by selling their available space to a non-competing brand. “Initiatives such as maillinx negate concerns about the cost of postal communications by reducing the overall bill,” says Andrew, “ticking the box for companies whose environmental focus means they are looking to reduce waste, both of which present a compelling case to print more, not less.” • For more information on maillinx, please email info@maillinx.co.uk

06_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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Redefining print as personal

www.dstwatercooler.com

www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 13

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We understand the power of print! In today’s world where digital communication seems to prevail, environments for live social interaction become increasingly important. Effective communication is a well balanced mix of on-line communication, print and live communication. We at Gielissen Exhibitions understand that customer engagement requires interaction and human contact. In today’s world where digital communication seems to prevail, environments for live social interaction become increasingly Contact Ronald andcommunication together withisour Creative Team will enable opportunities to and improve your international important. Effective a well balanced mixwe of on-line communication, print live communication. We customer’s of marketing investments: ronald.marien@gielissen.com. Requestand our human inspiration book or case study. at Gielissenreturn Exhibitions understand that customer engagement requires interaction contact.

We understand the power of print!

www.gielissen.com Contact Ronald and together with our Creative Team we will enable opportunities to improve your international customer’s return of marketing investments: ronald.marien@gielissen.com. Request our inspiration book or case study. www.gielissen.com 140422 - Gielissen Power of Prints4v2 [ff].indd 1 PP7_4-11_News_UK_final.indd 6

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9:01:08

/ ENGAGE

EVENT

DIARY 12-14 MAY 2014 Worldwide Media Marketplace 2014 WMM is designed for magazine media publishers interested in international licensing, joint ventures and content syndication. Whether you want to add a global magazine brand to your existing portfolio, are looking to publish a title in another country or are exploring tablet, app or website licensing, WMM provides a valuable opportunity to have face-to-face meetings with potential partners from around the globe. • Bangkok, Thailand www.wmm.net 22 MAY 2014 RE_INVENTED This unique event organised by the PPA will entertain, inform and demonstrate the influence of magazine and business media brands through classic big-name interviews, interactive panel discussions, demo areas and memorable keynotes. For one day, the magazine industry will come together to share, inspire and think collectively about the broader social, cultural and technological influences that are shaping the media world. • B1, Location House, London www.ppa.co.uk/events/ ppaconference2014 9-11 JUNE 2014 WAN_IFRA Global Conference The 66th World Newspaper Congress and World Advertising Forum is the most important annual

gathering of the world’s newspapers and news publishers. The event will see the major publishers, marketers and brands gather to listen to the leading industry experts on subjects such as new revenues, technology, innovation, publishing and advertising strategies, audience loyalty, advertising networks and multimedia operations. • Torino, Italy www.wan-ifra.org 16-17 JUNE 2014 FIPP Research Forum and Awards 2014 The FIPP Research Forum is a two-day event for publishers, researchers and marketing executives in the magazine business. With an emphasis on discussion and debate, the event attracts some of the world’s leading magazine research professionals, who meet to discuss the latest issues and developments in the industry worldwide. Following the event will be the FIPP Research Awards, which reward the best research studies that promote the use of magazine media as an advertising medium. • Gruner+Jahr, Hamburg
, Germany www.fippresearchforum.com 17 SEPTEMBER 2014 Euro Effies 2014 Now over 12 years old, the Euro Effies promote and recognise excellence in marketing communications among campaigns able to prove effectiveness in at least two European countries. Open to all agencies, the

CLOSING THE DIGITAL DIVIDE

One of the key questions marketers, advertisers and publishers have been grappling with over the past decade is how to move consumers quickly and seamlessly from print to digital. The ability to connect the two media so that customers can see something in print then go immediately online to find out more or purchase an item remains the missing link in the multichannel journey. Of course there are QR codes, but their antiquated ‘Ceefax’ appearance tends to put off a lot of potential users. Then there’s augmented reality, which promises a lot, but currently doesn’t deliver the stunning virtual experience people are expecting. There’s a gap that clearly needs to be bridged and Ricoh may well have the answer. Clickable Paper is a brand new interactive print service that enables consumers to point a smartphone at any printed surface and receive related online content. So that’s magazines, newspapers, direct mail, door drop, catalogues, packaging – even outdoor posters. And the online content it can access awards will be presented at covers the full digital spectrum, a gala evening in Brussels, from websites to video content, where Europe’s leading figures e-commerce and social media. But what really sets Clickable in marketing, advertising and Paper apart is its use of ‘hotspots’ media will gather to network rather than the monochrome box and celebrate the industry. of the QR Code. Once the free • Brussels app is installed on the phone, www.euro-effie.com it detects existing editorial elements on the page, such as 26 NOVEMBER 2014 images or pieces of text. Once it CMA International Content recognises the ‘hotspot’, the app Marketing Summit & will then give a choice of up to Awards 2014 six rich media links to go to, each one measurable in terms of clickThe International Content through and purchase. Marketing Summit is the “Clickable Paper brings world’s leading conference on the page to life, through the content marketing, featuring collaboration of online content insight, knowledge and and physical print media,” says inspiration for the publishing, Simon Tapley, Manager Workflow marketing and media Solutions at Ricoh Europe. “We’re professional. The programme really excited about finding more is tailored to everyone in ways to use the visual search and the marketing, advertising the app to better enable those in the advertising, marketing and and media industries who publishing space to open up new wants to know more about ways of linking their customers content marketing, with to the online world.” topics selected to give the • For more information, go to delegate an inclusive view of www.ricohclickablepaper.com

the industry, addressing both current and future trends. • Kings Place, London www.the-cma.com

www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 09

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ENGAGE

\

THE KEEP ME POSTED CAMPAIGN IS LEADING A REVOLUTION ACROSS EUROPE TO GIVE CONSUMERS THE CHOICE OF HOW THEY ARE CONTACTED BY BUSINESSES A stealthy revolution has been taking place in the UK and across Europe as businesses such as banks, mobile phone providers and energy services surreptitiously move their customers to online accounts – often without their consent and sometimes without their knowledge. Those wanting to hang on to their paper correspondence may then be charged a fee for receiving a hard copy of their bill or statement, something that was previously supplied for free. For example, in the UK, small business customers can pay £6 for a BT telephone bill. These excessive charges are usually way beyond the actual cost of printing and postage, estimated to be in the region of just 19p per item. The paperless problem The Keep Me Posted campaign is fighting for the right for a consumer to have free choice about how they are contacted by businesses, especially for the elderly or vulnerable members of society that value a physical piece of paper showing them how much they owe. Older people certainly seem to prefer paper bills, sometimes failing to get to grips with new technology or not trusting the security of online accounts. Around 80% of over-65s prefer to receive their bank statements on paper, rising to 91% for

FIGHT FOR THE RIGHT FOR PAPER those over the age of 80. But Keep Me Posted has also found that many disabled people don’t use the internet. According to the Leonard Cheshire UK charity, a third of disabled people have never used the internet, compared to just 8% of non-disabled people, representing a ‘digital divide’ of 25%. Also, many people in rural areas can’t get broadband even if they wanted to use an online service, while educational charities have reported young people getting into debt as they try to manage their financial dealings via smartphone or tablet. Small businesses have also complained that they are having to pay for previously free paper bills just to keep their finances up to date, while others have talked about the difficulty of getting mortgages or proving their address without being able to

“81% of UK adults want to choose how they receive important information such as bills and statements” show that vital piece of paper (printing a bank statement off yourself doesn’t count as a legal document in the UK). This all adds up to a huge amount of people that prefer to be contacted by paper – indeed, independent research demonstrates that 81% of UK adults want to choose how they receive important information such as bills and statements. Consumer delight Since being set up last year, the Keep Me Posted campaign has achieved phenomenal success, with more than 80 UK MPs

signing up to its pledge, as well as a number of members of the House of Lords. Almost 50 charities and organisations representing vulnerable groups have also signed up as supporters, while water supplier Wessex Water (2.7m customers) and the Principality Building Society (500,000 customers) have both adopted the Keep Me Posted pledge to keep sending out information, bills and statements on paper with no charge – to the delight of their customers. A global challenge The issue of paper bills being removed is so widespread that people have been registering their support from across the world, including countries such as France, Ireland, Spain and Portugal (one even arrived from New Zealand!). This has led to a decision to actively engage with print and paper companies across Europe and to brief European Parliament members about the campaign. Spain has already started a similar group and is seeking amends to its consumer rights bill. Keep Me Posted hopes its objectives can be rolled out across the continent, giving vulnerable people across Europe the right to choose how they want to be communicated with. • To find out more about the Keep Me Posted campaign, go to www.keepmeposteduk.com

10_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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Take a look at the world’s most eco-friendly calendar, a brochure created entirely without electricity and a personalised piece of print from LinkedIn

TAKE FIVE 2

1

Volkswagen As part of their aim to become the world’s most sustainable car manufacturer, Volkswagen has created a print calendar to send to customers, partners and prospects. But while sending calendars is nothing new in the world of business promotion, this one has one foot in the modern, connected world, as it folds into an iPhone stand. Dubbed The World’s Most Eco-Friendly Calendar, the mailing allows the user to

keep a constant check on their iCalendar, bringing print and digital together in an inspired and ultimately practical way. The stand was created by Memac Ogilvy using 99.9% recycled cardboard material. Of course, all materials can be recycled again, which ties into Volkswagen’s Think Blue eco initiative that aims to educate the driver on saving fuel and cutting down on CO2 emissions. • For more information, go to www.volkswagen.co.uk/ technology/think-blue

EDP Group Brochure Commissioned by electricity company EDP Group, an international energy company active in Portugal, Brazil and the United States, a team at advertising agency Leo Burnett Lisboa were asked to produce a brochure about the company’s Access to Energy initiative. The initiative aims to bring electricity to isolated communities in regions such as the Amazon and Sub-Saharan Africa, while raising awareness about the global consumption of electricity. In response, the Leo Burnett Lisboa team decided to produce the brochure without using any electricity. To do this, the team had to go back to basics, with all artwork done by hand and natural sunlight the only light source.

Paper sheets were pressed and left to dry, with all printing done manually using two colours. Finally, every one of the hundreds of brochures was folded by hand. The result is a stunning piece of work that outlines what can be done with a bit of ingenuity and a lot of inspiration. • To watch a film of how the brochure was made, go to www.leoburnett.pt/our-work (Even the film was shot using analogue cameras.)

12_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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/ TAKE 5

3

4

Bell-Net Mother Book The idea of pregnant women keeping a diary is nothing new – it’s a great time to document thoughts and feelings on a developing pregnancy. But Japanese ad agency Dentsu have gone one step further, creating a 3D journal that grows alongside the writer’s body. The book, created for Japanese obstetrics service Kishokai, features a design that mirrors the growth of a pregnant woman’s body. Every page turn represents a new week in the pregnancy, and while the left side is left blank for notes, the right side features a visual representation of what’s happening to the woman’s body as the numbers get closer to 40. Winner of the Grande Design Lotus at Adfest in Bangkok, the diary is a fantastic way to keep the brand in front of its customers, while as a document for one of life’s great events, it serves as a lasting memento of a unique experience. • To watch a film of the book, go to YouTube and search for ‘Mother Book’.

5

LinkedIn Business networking website LinkedIn has turned to print for its latest marketing campaign as it celebrates reaching 15m members in the UK. The campaign involved sending out mock newspapers to 50 key media targets with the aim of stimulating social media activity. The newspapers were personalised with the recipient’s name and their picture taken from the website, and were sent in a package also containing a press release, branded balloon and LinkedIn hoodie. The newspaper also contained details about the networking site, boasting the fact that it now has 227 million users globally, with UK members now including 66 rocket scientists, 59 body builders, 146 chimney sweeps and five mermaids.

People Management As the official magazine of the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), providing support, advice and education to the UK’s HR managers, People Management has a tough role. Making HR issues inspirational and entertaining enough for the readers to pick up the title and digest the contents is a job almost as difficult as the one its readers have. But with a clutch of awards under its arm, People Management has a proven track record in excellence. The most recent issue also proved how

print can drive social media, with its cover featuring a reclining cat that demands to be stroked fueling an explosion on Twitter. Signposting a feature about relieving stress in the workplace, the cover created a social media storm, with readers stroking the cover then Tweeting or messaging Facebook about it afterwards. Twitter followers were up by 93% and LinkedIn group members up by 204%, with some readers even uploading pictures of their pets as future cover stars. • For more information about People Management, go to www.cipd.co.uk/pm www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 13

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THOUGHT LEADERS

Eric Newnham, CEO of Talon Outdoor, explains why print will have a significant role to play in outdoor media for some time to come, while Richard Watson, futurologist and co-founder of Futures against you. When I think some of the classic digital couldn’t really add anything and House Europe, a specialist campaigns, sometimes less is more. Some of the great images my career are the Benetton ads and ‘Hello Boys’. scenario planning agency, ofThen, going back even further, the classic cigarette explores the unique advantages adverts. These are simply outstanding images and messages that would work on any canvas. paper has over the screen strong There’s a print campaign around at the moment for in outdoor media , people have talked in recent

Cadbury’s Dairy Milk and it doesn’t do much more than reinforce the famous purple branding. And it doesn’t need to – it’s a reminder of the brand and it’s very, very simple. Young people’s lifestyles may be increasingly oriented in different ways, around gaming and tablets and phones, and they play a big role in how they spend their time. But I still think that if they’re sat on a tube train, they will have the same take-out from a tube card or a magazine advert as adults will. I see print working together with new technology, not against it. With NFC and other new methods of combining a signpost to your mobile phone, there’s going to be a lot more interaction between media. And print has a major role to play in that.

years about print being overhauled by new technology, just as they have in other areas. But that’s still a long, long way from happening, and I actually don’t think it ever will. Obviously the digital element of our medium is the latest thing, and we make sure we’re up to speed in terms of technological developments in the industry. Yet the majority of both our investment and our clients’ is still in paper. Digital is not the be-all and end-all, and in outdoor advertising, print will have a major part to play as we go forward, which is true of most areas of the media. Of course, print has its strengths and weaknesses compared to digital. Obviously the entry cost is cheaper in terms of the structures that are there, because screens are much more expensive than your classic boards. Some of the weaknesses include the fact that it’s labour-intensive to actually put it up on site, compared to digital images, which, if the infrastructure is there, can be ERIC NEWNHAM changed instantly. But in terms of basic messaging, print has a major role to play. Quite often in advertising, when we’re looking at seconds to grab someone’s attention, over-sophistication works

“THE DIGITAL ELEMENT OF OUTDOOR MEDIA IS THE LATEST THING, YET THE MAJORITY OF OUR INVESTMENT IS STILL IN PAPER”

14_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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/ OPINION

i have quite strong opinions that

paper as a technology is actually far more sophisticated in so many ways than any screen we currently manufacture. Paper has some extraordinary strengths and we are just starting to realise this, while screens have a number of downsides that we are beginning to become aware of. If you need to find something quickly or you need to share something, screens are pretty useful. They’re also useful if you’re older and want to make the typeface bigger or you have problems seeing things and you want to have a more illuminated background. But paper is far better for something that’s complicated. If you have a complex RICHARD WATSON argument or you’re trying to get people to see the broader picture, paper is far superior. I recently read an article that said that if you’re reading on a screen, you’re relying on memory, whereas if you’re reading on paper, you’re argument or a set of board papers for a bank, I think relying on knowledge, so you understand it more. paper beats screen. Paper doesn’t contain hyperlinks (currently). Screens, The other advantage to paper comes when you’re particularly interactive screens, are full of distraction possibilities: looking for errors or mistakes. I write books, and while you can Google a word and never go back to the original text; you I used to write by hand and type it up, I now start on can have an incoming email that you get distracted by. a screen. But it gets to a point towards the end of the Screens are also more taxing mentally. Subconsciously, it’s book where I have to physically print it on paper, lay it much more taxing to actually navigate a screen than a piece of out and read it all again. When I do, I will spot things paper. For example, a book has eight corners and you can get that I have missed 40 times on a screen. a sense of physical progression. However, with a page on a screen, However, soon we’re going to have a hybrid between once you’ve read it, it’s gone. It’s not there. Yes, you have a bar paper and screen, with e-paper. We’re very close to at the bottom which tells you what page you’re on, but it’s foldable, rollable screens and I can see the situation practically meaningless. where we have a physical object that looks like paper So paper aids comprehension and understanding. Airport but acts like a touchscreen. You can touch it and it will trash, the weather forecast, stock prices, they are all fine on play a video or an animation. That’s when things will screen. But if you want to read a very complicated novel, a complex start getting really complicated.

“PAPER HAS SOME EXTRAORDINARY STRENGTHS AND WE’RE JUST STARTING TO REALISE THIS”

www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 15

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YOUR JOURNEY STARTS HERE

For many multichannel campaigns, print provides the initial touchpoint that leads the consumer towards purchase. But what makes it such an ideal catalyst and why is the world’s oldest media now seen as disruptive? B Y D AV I D B E N A D Y 16_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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/ CONVERSATION STARTER

whether it’s direct “Print is a place where you can inspire mail or door drop, newspaper or magazine and captivate an audience in an engaged ad, customer magazine or catalogue, has environment. For many fashion brands, a resonance and physical presence that’s TV is secondary to glossy print media” unmatched by the plethora of adverts on TV Liam Mullins, Head of Trading at screens, PCs, tablets and smartphones. international media buying agency the7Stars Screen-based ads are ephemeral. While they may leave an impression on the memory, a print ad stays in the hand. It can be carried around and notes can be Attention-grabbing ads scribbled on it. It can be cut out of a publication and Apart from the creativity that newspaper stuck on a notice board. It’s impactful and brilliant and magazine advertising allows, there’s for conveying a story. also the vital element of context. One of For certain products, print plays a pivotal role in the strong points of newspaper advertising launching a customer on a journey that leads to is that newspapers are thought to be purchase. In the fields of luxury, fashion, financial a trustworthy source of information, services and media, the print medium can be used to reflecting many people’s trust in newspaper make consumers sit up and listen to a brand’s message. editorial. That trust means they are willing They may see an ad in the press then go off and explore to act on this information. the brand in more depth on the web. A direct mailing A study by INMA, the International News for a car brand may lead them to request a test-drive Media Association, and RAM, Research or they may see a style they like in a clothing catalogue and Analysis of Media, found that 44% and buy it directly. of quality newspaper readers thought the Liam Mullins, Head of Trading at international advertising in their papers was attention media buying agency the7Stars, argues that print is a strong grabbing. Meanwhile, 43% of quality newspaper readers and 32% medium for catalysing the customer journey. “Print is a place of mid-market newspaper readers said they received important where you can inspire and captivate an audience in an engaged information from the advertising. And almost a third of quality environment, and it has a role higher up in the purchase funnel,” newspaper readers said that the advertising influenced them to he says. “An ad in the Sunday papers might inspire you to go onto purchase products. your tablet or mobile to make a purchase on a Monday morning.” A 2014 study by IPC Media, found that print still leads the way Mullins points to high-end fashion and luxury as sectors that in sparking ideas in its readers, with 89% of consumers getting still make great use of magazine advertising. “It’s print that gives ideas from print. This inspirational factor is followed through consumers inspiration,” he says, “and for many fashion brands, to purchase, with 45% of consumers indicating that print had TV is secondary to glossy print media.” inspired a purchase – more than digital editions, the web or apps. printed marketing,

89 % OF CONSUMERS GET

THEIR IDEAS FROM PRINT, STARTING THEM ON A JOURNEY TOWARDS PURCHASE

www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 17

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Laying on the emotion But while newspaper advertising is an effective medium, some turn to alternative forms of print marketing. Rob Rees, Interim Marketing Director at Denby Pottery, accepts that digital works out cheaper but says there are certain powerful uses of print. For instance, where colour is an important consideration – such as promotion for an item of clothing or a piece of furniture – print is essential as colours can often be seen differently in digital. But while advertising in colour supplements makes little economic sense for Denby Pottery, Rees says that catalogues, which can be picked up in any one of the 30 Denby stores around the country, are very important in showing off the range of products and getting the message out. “Flicking through a catalogue is easier than flicking through a website,” he says. “You don’t “Clients are starting to get an appetite back get that textual or emotional layer on a website. It can for direct mail, particularly with younger be really flat.” audiences. Their lives have been so digital The nature of the creative process is to visualise a that direct mail is hugely disruptive for them” simple striking image for an ad, so agency creatives Nicky Bullard, Executive Creative Director at often begin thinking about a multichannel campaign direct marketing agency Lida using an image that’s suited to the print medium. As Ross Keenleyside, Creative Partner at international ad agency OgilvyOne, says: “Print is the start of the creative idea. I’d say nine times out of ten you’ll be thinking of a creative concept in the form of a simple press ad or a simple poster, which is the simplest form of describing an idea. And it blossoms from there.” kept within the agency. “This is useful for anything where there’s a story,” she says. “Every copywriter should be able to write long The new disruptive media copy and hold people’s attention.” Competition from digital is putting pressure on print and threatens Ultimately, Bullard believes that digital will never replace the to undermine some of the core skills that give the medium its power of print. “Digital is a little bit cheaper and ties in with eCRM saliency. Nicky Bullard, Executive Creative Director at UK direct as it’s easy to click through,” she says. “But I think we miss the marketing agency Lida, laments a general lack of great direct mail physicality of direct mail, that brand in your hand, something creativity and suggests that some may have lost confidence in the that lives beyond its impact. The digital world is instant so I like ability of print to surprise and tell a powerful story. the fact that direct mail can live on the page. Print allows you But print is far from down and out, she believes. In fact, it seems to unpack the story, as with automotive ads that contain a lot of on the cusp of a comeback. “Some clients are starting to get an technical points to get across. Print is good for anything useful, appetite back for it, particularly with younger audiences,” she with numbers or information you want to keep.” says. “Their lives have been so digital that direct mail is hugely Direct marketers are getting increasingly skilled at using print disruptive for them.” to drive people to websites. This may be done by simply including Bullard is concerned that agencies should ensure they maintain a web address on a mailout, perhaps with a money-off incentive long-copy writing skills, which are vital in many sectors to spark or offer. There are also ingenious new techniques for bridging the the first-time interest of potential consumers. She says that Lida gap between the physical world and the digital world, such as QR has a team of three long-copy writers to ensure those skills are Codes and augmented reality applications. Lida used Aurasma 18_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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/ CONVERSATION STARTER

POLE POSITION

THREE MULTICHANNEL CAMPAIGNS WHERE PRINT COMES FIRST

FORD Tasked with bringing Ford’s new Lane Departure Warning System technology to life for consumers in a meaningful way, as well as convey Ford’s role in the everyday lives of its drivers, Ogilvy & Mather Paris created a witty press campaign. It aimed to show that when you go off-track in your life, it’s nice to have way of correcting your deviation. Examples of such moments are humorously played out in three different situations (see left). Most of us can relate to these moments and imagine that we would want someone getting us back into the driver’s lane when those ‘uh-oh’ moments happen.

technology in a mail-out for the O2 wallet card to drive people to a website containing more information. Introducing brand to customer Print marketing media such as direct mail and catalogues are ‘intrusive’ – it’s said that direct mail goes looking for customers, while consumers go looking for goods and services online. “Printed material can introduce customers to brands in a very evocative way,” says Ian Simpson, Managing Director of Catalogues 4 Business. “A catalogue has a high ‘pass-through’ rate in that it can be shared among people in a similar demographic. If you have a catalogue on your coffee table and it’s seen by your friends, they are likely to have similar interests and aspirations to yourself.” Print is also a good way of demonstrating the customer experience – a catalogue for a store or brand can reflect the brand visually and also through its weight and feel. Something light and flimsy communicates ‘bargain’ while a catalogue which is weighty and textured communicates quality. Printed marketing is a direct and forceful medium, which makes it ideal for inspiring people to consider a product or brand and seek out more information about it. Print can be a powerful catalyst for creating brand consideration and starting a journey that ultimately leads to a sale. A striking piece of printed marketing may well be the spark that sends consumers to check out a website, call a phone number, look at customer reviews online or ask their friends on social media about the product. In a world of multiple touchpoints with brands, it’s nice to know that marketers can still rely on print to create the initial desire to interact with a brand.

02 Last year’s Lida campaign for telecoms provider 02’s wallet card fused the worlds of physical print and digital. The mail pack used Aurasma technology, which gives an augmented reality effect. When recipients pointed their mobile at the printed pack, it came to life on their phones, with butterflies appearing to float in front of the printed page before the user is invited to click through to a website to find out more information about the wallet card. MOTOCROSS A supplier of motocross accessories had details of approximately 30,000 online buyers that were in the market for the latest versions of the race suits, which are released annually. Customers would often search the internet for these and there’s little loyalty to a supplier. Catalogues 4 Business suggested a small, post-friendly catalogue with large volumes, which established a more tangible relationship with the customer and helped engender a keen sense of loyalty. www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 19

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THIS SEASON’S LATEST LOOK Online fashion retailer Net-A-Porter have launched their own print magazine. On sale in 220 cities across 60 countries, this inspirational marketing move reveals that the top trend for global fashion brands is paper BY M A R K HOOPER

20_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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/ FASHION STATEMENT

When Net-A-Porter announced the launch of their new print magazine, Porter, the company’s founder Natalie Massenet said: “I know it sounds crazy, but we’re a multimedia company. And in the same way that you have to have a Facebook page and an Instagram account and be on mobile and have a website, you also need to be in print.” Which, when you think about it, isn’t crazy in the slightest. After all, a multimedia strategy without print isn’t truly multimedia. Porter is one of the highest-profile examples of a growing trend: internet-based brands turning to print to engage with their existing customers, generate new ones and sell more product. Just as crucially, many brands are now seeing themselves as content producers in their own right, creating a seamless, joinedup experience for their customers, whichever medium or channel they choose to engage with.

To die for Launched by Massenet in 2000, Net-A-Porter had always billed itself as an online luxury shop that presented itself as an upmarket fashion magazine, so it’s perhaps unsurprising that it’s launched a print title. With over 350 designers on its books, serving 170 countries and employing over 3,000 people, the company is a now serious proposition, worth over half a billion pounds. The magazine is for sale in 220 cities across 60 countries – a crucial global approach that sets it apart from its rivals. Massenet herself is a former fashion editor (for Tatler, W and WWD) and many of her high-profile appointments are from print titles: Porter’s Editor-in-Chief, Lucy Yeomans, was previously Editor of Harper’s Bazaar; Tess Macleod-Smith, who was Group Publishing Director at Hearst, is now Vice President, Publishing www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 21

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and Media; and Porter’s Creative Director Robin Derrick is the former Creative Director of Vogue. “Print is just another channel,” says Derrick. “No one’s going to un-invent print. A paperless society is as likely as a paperless bathroom.” What makes Porter magazine such a unique publication is that there was already a well-established audience – and revenue source – for its client brand before it even went to print. “The thing about Porter magazine is that everybody thought it was going to be a shoppable catalogue,” continues Derrick. “But it’s a print magazine aimed at the Net-A-Porter audience. Net-A-Porter has over six million women on their site every month. They know where they live, they know their shoe size. They know their tastes and how they shop. That knowledge of your audience and its demographic is something that the big publishing houses of this world would die for.”

“In the same way that you have to have a Facebook page and an Instagram account and be on mobile and have a website, you also need to be in print” Natalie Massenet, founder of Net-A-Porter

What women want Like Derrick, Tess Macleod-Smith is keen to stress that Porter works within a suite of communication channels – “the fourth brand powered by Net-A-Porter” – which also includes the website, weekly shoppable digital magazine The Edit, and Mr Porter – the men’s version of the brand. Porter uses interactive page-reading technology developed with Layar to allow the reader to view and buy featured products, visit featured brand’s websites, view exclusive video content and use a VIP concierge shopping service by scanning the page via the Net-A-Porter app. But there are other, subtler advantages to having a physical magazine: it’s a way of delivering aspirational ideas and inspiration to the audience, to get them excited about the product and see it within a fashion context before the point of purchase. For Derrick, the uniqueness of Porter isn’t the fact that it’s a magazine, but that “there’s a modern approach to an audience, an audience that’s already served by one part of the brand.” Is there a demand for print amongst this modern audience? Macleod-Smith is unequivocal. Citing a global content survey undertaken by the brand, she says Net-A-Porter customers talked about the “emotional connection and trust” that exists with print, describing their time spent with the medium as “luxury time” or “me time” away from technology. Authority and integrity were also key motivating factors, with over 80% of the panel claiming magazines were their number one inspiration when it came to buying fashion. “As most publishers are regional and not global,” she says, “we realised that we had a unique opportunity to create a new magazine for the 21st century, based

on what women really want today. Porter shortens the path from inspiration to transaction and links the physical to the digital.” Dan Rookwood, US Editor of Mr Porter, stresses the importance of this multimedia approach. “Online retailers have to look at more innovative ways to become part of the consumer’s psyche,” he explains, “and publishing is becoming a major part of this process.” A developing trend Net-A-Porter isn’t the only retail brand who’s using print to engage with its audiences. The retail brand Matches may be so committed to the online model that it’s been rebranded as Matchesfashion. com, but, as Editorial and Content Director Kate Blythe is keen to point out, print has always been a vital part of the business. “Our print magazines for men and women, each known as The Style Report, act as inspirational guides to the season, encouraging our readers to really understand the trends, the moods, the people of the moment, and to then come to the website to shop what they have seen and loved,” she explains. “In essence, we don’t consider them as two separate pieces of work, the editorial team here works on both print and digital, and we push all print content through the digital homepage, which gives the stories maximum impact.” She’s not exaggerating when she talks about the inspirational side to print either. “Our readers take the magazine into our London stores to shop full looks from the shoots,” she says. “A print magazine should become a fashion resource that you turn to time after time. It should

22_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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/ FASHION STATEMENT inspire you and excite you – not just for the season, but for years to come. Digital is incredibly powerful and it moves very quickly, so print offers something different to that fast-paced type of digestible content.” The ultimate online endorsement One of the least likely recent examples of an online brand adopting the ‘slow media’ route has been Google, who published the publication Think Quarterly, which was billed as “a breathing space in a busy world”. “The wrong position would be to say that digital media are irrelevant and antidemocratic and bad,” says Vince Medeiros, 1 Publisher at TCOLondon Media who produced Think Quarterly. “Digital media is great, but we also need less mediated, more real experiences, and I believe print is better at delivering that. Magazines offer the kind of tactile engagement you cannot find anywhere else. It satisfies the senses on many different levels – sight, touch, smell. That’s unique to print. Also, in a world where everything moves so fast – driven by the dictates of data and the digital world – magazines provide respite from all that: a moment of calm, contemplation, enjoyment.” And while it’s true that, as Derrick points out, digital allows you to measure your audience in ways impossible with print, Medeiros points to the immeasurable qualities that print excels at. “How do you measure value?” he asks. “Is it about reach? Is it about engagement? If so, how do you measure how deep the level of engagement actually is? Ultimately, print allows brands to connect with readers on a much more profound level. Readers have made a purchase, they subscribe, they have a relationship with the product. So for brands, by advertising or running a branded content campaign in a magazine, they are supporting content that readers themselves support and love – and that allows for a connection that transcends what you can get elsewhere.” From check-it-out to check-out Asos, Ocado, Achica, Style.com… the number of digital-first retailers now offering magazines is ever-growing. The Net-APorter model has proved not only how cost-effective, high-end e-tail fashion can be (poaching some of the biggest names in fashion publishing in the process), it’s also put its considerable weight behind the theory that there is a central, influential place for print within a joined-up, multimedia strategy. In short, print can join the dots between the efficient, hasslefree transactional role of digital and the less definable, but just as important, role of capturing the audiences’ attention and imagination: of delivering them to the check-out page with the goods in their basket. Magazines sell dreams; e-tail sites sell product, and ever the twain shall meet. • To find out more about Porter magazine and to subscribe, go to www.net-a-porter.com/portermagazine

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ON-TREND AND ON PAPER

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FIVE MORE ONLINE BRANDS WHO HAVE EMBRACED PRINT

1. MATCHES – THE STYLE REPORT Produced in-house by the Matchesfashion.com editorial team, the male and female titles are used as inspirational guides to the season’s latest trends, driving customers to shop for their favourite looks via the website. 2. GOOGLE THINK QUARTERLY Produced by TCOLondon Media as “a breathing space in a busy world”, Think Quarterly was conceived as a lean-back publication for the internet search company, extolling the virtues of print and encouraging the exchange of ideas. 3. BODEN – A THOUSAND LITTLE THINGS Produced by Sunday Publishing as a one-off book of inspiration for the mail-order retailer,

ATLT proved so successful in re-establishing the personality of the Boden brand that membership increased by 80%. 4. ACHICA LIVING Conceived by Axon Publishing for the online furniture and homeware retailer Achica, the magazine offers, in the words of Chief Marketing Officer Mark Hodson, “a tangible experience for customers, adding credibility to the online space.” 5. OCADOLIFE MAGAZINE Produced by August Media for the UK’s biggest online supermarket, Ocadolife is regularly distributed to over 200,000 customers. The magazine has a remit to “showcase the vast range of high-quality products and brands available while inspiring the reader with ideas-filled editorial content.”

www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 23

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THE TRUTH ABOUT PRINT

THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PRINT HAS BEEN A LONG-DEBATED TOPIC IN MARKETING CIRCLES, BUT A NEW AND EXCLUSIVE META-ANALYSIS PROJECT FROM BRANDSCIENCE HAS CONFIRMED THE ENDURING VALUE OF THE WORLD’S OLDEST MEDIUM BY MARK HOOPER

24_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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/ PRINT WORKS

it ’s customisable and interactive. It’s a sophisticated,

multi-dimensional medium that provides countless entry points for its users. Its audience dominates the market and it even has its own, well-established, highly developed ‘newsstand’ style interface. It sounds like exactly the medium marketers, advertisers and media buyers have been waiting for. But what is this apparent saviour of the communications industry? Clue: you’re looking at it. New research suggests that print remains the most effective and trusted medium for delivering advertising. Furthermore, when used in conjunction with other media, it has a cumulative effect, helping to increase ‘carryover’ and longevity for joined-up campaigns. In our rush to embrace shiny, new, digital forms of persuasion, it seems we’ve been a little too quick to dismiss the most established form of mass communication we have. Instead, we should be exploring what digital can learn from print and how the former can use the latter to extend its reach into longer, deeper engagement. Analyse this In an exclusive meta-analysis project carried out for Print Power, international research firm BrandScience have confirmed the enduring effectiveness of print as a medium. In considering all the factors influencing the key metrics of brands (including market trends, new product and packaging changes, advertising, promotions, competitors and external coverage), the BrandScience report provides a full and wide-ranging summary of the current marketing landscape. Crucially, it shows that print is proving increasingly effective when utilised as a key element within a multimedia campaign. As Sally Dickerson, CEO of BrandScience, explains: “It’s really important to think about not just whether an individual print ROI is better than somebody else’s, but how the inclusion of print in a campaign helps that overall campaign. Print is often going to be a secondary or tertiary medium, but

Print is often going to be a secondary or tertiary medium, but it gets to people and lets them find out more than a TV ad or an ephemeral online ad would do Sally Dickerson CEO of BrandScience

it gets to people and lets them find out more than a TV ad or an ephemeral online ad would do.” One of the most compelling arguments for a continued investment in print is also the one that marketers understand best: ROI. Looking at specific examples of magazine advertising for specific brands, the BrandScience project identified research that included a crucial IPC/Insight report that found that every £1 invested in magazines generated an ROI of £1.40.1 Furthermore, an Omnicom study found that print is the most efficient medium across a number of categories. For every £1 spent, magazines generate: £1.47 for FMCG clients, £1.89 for finance advertisers and an incredible £11.31 for telecoms advertisers. 2 The figures are even more impressive in the US where, looking at the return on financial investment of magazine advertising across 14 brands in four categories, Meredith determined that every $1 invested in magazines generated an average ROI of $6.61.3 When compared to television advertising, print’s ROI also provides considerable value. Across all Unilever brands, the magazine ROI was found to be 42% higher than the TV ROI. 3 Meanwhile, a PPA Maganomics study in conjunction with Mindshare, which analysed 77 campaigns with a spend of up to £6m to provide a comparative ROI reading across all channels,

ON AVERAGE, FOR EVERY £1 SPENT ON DIRECT MAIL, £14 IS GENERATED, WITH SOME CAMPAIGNS GOING UP TO £40 1 www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 25

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determined that magazines delivered the highest ROI of all media – 11% higher than TV.4 The BrandScience report concludes that newspapers and magazines do particularly well in the FMCG category in the UK – ahead of TV and online – and they still out-perform TV in the more challenging services market. Again, it’s important not to think of these figures in isolation, but instead as proof that print can still play a vital part in campaigns. Marius Cloete, Head of Research at the PPA, explains that their research shows how “magazines are consistently underinvested to the client’s detriment. In each of the cases we examined, clients could have enjoyed a significant boost to their sales, making greater use of magazines without increasing their budgets”. Print also performs strongly in terms of ‘carryover’ – how long media has an impact – with the Brand Science report showing it to have a consistently longer-term effect than online’s typical ‘short, sharp shock’ approach. “We certainly find that online activity nearly always only has an instantaneous effect,” explains Dickerson. “Print, because it can engage you and draw you in, can have a longer-term effect.

Obviously it doesn’t have the moving pictures and sounds that draw you in with a carryover medium such as TV, but it definitely has a carryover benefit over and above online.” Fact of the matter There’s a dangerous misconception amongst marketers when it comes to print that’s simply not borne out by the facts. Print advertising is seen as an expensive option, particularly as it loses market share in comparison with other media. But it can actually have high-impact with tight targeting, and due to a magazine’s longer shelf life, there’s little waste per dollar spent. “We consistently surpass client expectations when it comes to print media because there are so many misconceptions about it,” says Integral Media’s owner Eric Sims. Neil Thurman, author of a City University survey on the effect of online newspapers (using data from ABC, Nielsen and the National Readership Survey), points out that, “Newspapers still get over 85% of their advertising revenues from print. Given that time is money, we shouldn’t be very surprised that a similar amount of the temporal attention newspapers receive is also from print.”

ME STO R I

NG

THE CU

S KI

72% 97%

OF CONSUMERS ARE MORE LIKELY TO CONSIDER PURCHASES WHEN READING BRAND-PRODUCED CONTENT COMPARED TO NON-BRANDED CONTENT 6

PRINT ACCOUNTS FOR 97% OF THE TOTAL NUMBER OF READING MINUTES FOR NATIONAL NEWSPAPERS IN THE UK 5

SIX OF THE TOP 10 MAGAZINES IN THE UK ARE8 PRODUCED FOR BRANDS

NEWSPAPERS RECEIVE OVER 85% OF THEIR ADVERTISING REVENUES FROM PRINT5

26_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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/ PRINT WORKS

Thurman’s study looked at the total time UK readers spent with 12 major national newspaper titles in print and online, and concluded that print accounted for 97% of the total number of reading minutes. 5 The customer is king When it comes to customer publishing, the industry standard for time spent with the print medium has, according to the CMA/ PPA, remained consistently around the 20-minute mark.6 That’s a huge amount of time to be actively engaged with a brand, as Dickerson points out. “Online brands will talk about time spent with the medium, but it’s important to note that they are just talking about the channel,” she says. “Whereas with print you are choosing to read articles that are surrounded by advertising, so you are much more actively engaged.” Thurman echoes this wariness about online metrics: “Unique users may look good because they are high numbers compared with daily readership, but what it obscures is the attention that print editions get from readers. It may have accelerated the move

of advertisers away from print and towards online, but unique users isn’t a particularly useful metric.” “I think new platforms could do with learning a bit from grownup media in terms of research,” continues Dickerson. “You don’t know what is normal in terms of spend online because no one is cutting it accurately. There’s still very much a grey area. When you come to research, you’re completely at the mercy of Google to give you any figures on what is normal in that situation. If people talk about the number of page views, they’re not actually comparable metrics. It’s about having that discipline of measuring the inputs and the outcomes.”

Tried and trusted As ever, the proof is in customer behaviour. An online survey by Nielsen for the Newspaper Association of America showed overwhelming evidence that print newspapers are still the most effective advertising source, ahead of radio, internet and TV. Print’s unique position as a trusted, tried and tested medium is underlined by the audit of 5,000 adults, with 48% of respondents saying they “usually noticed” adverts in local newspapers (46% in national papers). Interestingly, the same percentage – 35% – claimed they were “likely to purchase” from ads they saw in newspapers as on Twitter or blogs – the highest figure, outperforming TV, radio and other online channels. Why do people reinvent But, significantly, 45% stated they found Twitter and the wheel? When you have blog adverts annoying (second only to social media in something that’s a winner, general at 46%), whereas local newspapers carried the you keep using that winner lowest annoyance factor of just 31%. until you have something A recent Adobe survey drew similar conclusions, with else that beats it 68% of consumers saying online ads are “annoying”, Drayton Bird, direct with 54% saying they simply don’t work.7

marketing legend

If it ain’t broke… If customers admit to being more open – and therefore susceptible to – print advertising, then it would make sense for marketers to ensure their campaigns apply appropriate budget to it. More cut-through, better ROI and an ability to extend carryover. Drayton Bird, the godfather of direct marketing, said: “Why do people reinvent the wheel? When you have something that’s a winner, you keep using that winner until you have something else that beats it.” As an example, he cites Maxwell Sackheim’s print advertisement, ‘Do You Make These Mistakes in English?’, which ran unchanged in newspapers for 40 years. Why? Because it worked. “I see this mistake time and time again,” says Bird. “The worst offenders tend to be business owners and marketing executives. The cost is crippling: in time, in money… and the reason they make it is laughably simple. They are bored with their advertising.” www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 27

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• 48% OF CONSUMERS SAY THEY ‘USUALLY NOTICED’ ADVERTS IN LOCAL NEWSPAPERS (46% IN NATIONAL PAPERS) • 35% OF CONSUMERS SAY THEY ARE LIKELY TO PURCHASE FROM ADS THEY SEE IN LOCAL AND NATIONAL NEWSPAPERS

OPTIMAL MEDIA MIX IN

EUROPE FOR FMCG, THE OPTIMAL MEDIA MIX IS PRINT/30% TV/40% ONLINE/6% OTHER/24% FOR SERVICES, THE OPTIMAL MEDIA MIX IS PRINT/35% TV/30% ONLINE/15% OTHER/20%

NG

PAPERS

S KI

NEWS

ME STO R I

THE CU

PRINT WORKS

CUSTOMER MAGAZINES ARE PICKED UP ON AVERAGE 2.7 TIMES AND KEPT ON AVERAGE OVER TWO WEEKS

R I FOR EVERY £1 SPENT, MAGAZINES GENERATE • £1.47 FOR FMCG CLIENTS • £1.89 FOR FINANCE ADVERTISERS • £11.31 FOR TELECOMS ADVERTISERS 2

MAGAZINES PRODUCED FOR BRANDS DELIVER 70% OF THE CIRCULATION OF THE TOP 10 MAGAZINES IN THE UK AND REACH OVER NINE MILLION PEOPLE8

DIRECT MAIL • 84% OF PEOPLE TEND TO OPEN ALL OF THEIR POST

• 48% OF ADULTS HAVE DONE SOMETHING IN THE PAST 12 MONTHS AS A RESULT OF RECEIVING DIRECT MAIL, INCLUDING 14.2M THAT HAVE PURCHASED A PRODUCT • 19% OF PEOPLE KEEP AN ITEM OF DIRECT MAIL FOR FUTURE REFERENCE • THE ONLINE COMPONENT OF CAMPAIGNS PAYS BACK 62% MORE AND THE TV COMPONENT PAYS BACK 37% MORE WHEN THERE IS DIRECT MAIL IN THE MARKETING MIX

68% OF CONSUMERS SAY ONLINE ADS ARE “ANNOYING” AND “DISTRACTING” 7

IPC MEDIA INSIGHT/NIELSEN AND MINDSHARE/ADVALUE – DOES MAGAZINE ADVERTISING DRIVE SALES?, NOVEMBER 2012 2 BRAND SCIENCE (OMNICOM’S RESEARCH DIVISION), ANALYSIS OF 750 ECONOMETRIC STUDIES, 2010 3 MEREDITH ENGAGEMENT DIVIDEND POWERED BY NIELSEN / MEREDITH INVESTOR DAY PRESENTATION, NOVEMBER 2012 4 PPA/MINDSHARE MAGANOMICS STUDY, 2012 5 CITY UNIVERSITY/NEIL THURMAN, NEWSPAPER CONSUMPTION IN THE DIGITAL AGE, 2014 6 PPA/CMA, ONGOING 7 NIELSEN NATIONAL CROSS-MEDIA ENGAGEMENT STUDY, 2013 8 ABC, FEBRUARY 2014

1

28_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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PP TNT Post idoordrop Ad AW.indd 1 PP7_24-28_PrintWorks_UK.indd 7

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Among its many qualities, print has a universal ability to inspire opinion, with everyone involved in the marketing, media and advertising industries having something to say about it. The floor is theirs‌ BY JOHNNY SHARP

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/ QUOTE UNQUOTE

“Print is trusted by consumers much more than any other medium, which forces advertisers to go back to the core of what makes people tick: powerful stories, plainly told.” ANDRE MATARAZZO, EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR, SID LEE

“PRINT IS A GREAT MEDIUM TO STREAMLINE YOUR MESSAGE. IF AN EXECUTION WORKS IN PRINT, IT’S PROOF THAT IT’S GOING TO TRANSLATE ELSEWHERE – AND NOT VICE VERSA.” ALVARO SOTOMAYOR, CREATIVE DIRECTOR, W+K AMSTERDAM

“Despite the increase in the use of digital media, certain activities such as outdoor events, watching television and reading books and magazines remain hugely popular. This highlights that old and new media will co-exist and evolve together over time.” DAVID ELMS, HEAD OF MEDIA AT KPMG

“In a digital age, print ads still rule, because it’s the root, the real essence of a great idea. There’s no narrative, no interaction, no technique. You don’t get a second chance to make a first impression.” DAVID SNELLENBERG, FOUNDER OF DUTCH ADVERTISING AGENCY DAWN

My daughter is 16 years old and she loves print and magazines. And there’s a good chance that her kids will love magazines if, as publishers, we can keep delighting and surprising. Print is a very seductive experience. There’s nothing like sitting down with a magazine. I travel a lot for a living and I see someone frantically swiping windows on a tablet and they aren’t as relaxed as someone who’s reading a magazine.” ELLIS WATSON, CEO, DC THOMSON

“We know from experience that advertisers prefer traditional mailings in real envelopes. However, for reasons of cost and efficiency, the market often prefers the quantity achieved through emails rather than the quality of direct mail. The envelope will develop its position today if the customisability and the quality of the medium improves, while at the same time the efficiency gains of electronic communication are reduced.” PHILIP SCHILLING, MANAGING DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING AGENCY RAPP GERMANY

www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _31

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“The future belongs to the courageous, particularly if we’re talking about the print context. The printed word and image on glossy or matte paper is a very effective way of getting a high-impact message across. Our view is that the web is not a great place to read anything, which is why most of our web content is video or audio-based.” TYLER BRULE, EDITOR OF MONOCLE

“Young people don’t seem to have a problem reading a magazine, despite what you’re told. They seem perfectly capable of focusing on print for 1,000 words. Other publishers say ‘you’re just niche; models don’t apply; your appeal is retro’. But then again there is a big young readership for Private Eye and none of them have this resistance to print.” IAN HISLOP, EDITOR OF PRIVATE EYE, WHOSE CIRCULATION HAS RISEN TO OVER 220,000 IN RECENT YEARS

“MAGAZINES CONTAIN CONSIDERED CONTENT AND SPACE, CALM CURATED IDEAS THAT HAVE BEEN METICULOUSLY RESEARCHED AND PUT TOGETHER.” nicholas coleridge, president of condé nast international

“No woman or girl is going to want to spend time looking at pretty dresses on the internet. Nothing can beat looking at a fantastic photograph or a double-page spread printed in Vogue, it’s unbeatable. The web can’t touch it.” FELIX DENNIS, PUBLISHER

“Saying that print is dead is just stupid. Cave painting is dead – you could say that. But walk into any newsagent or pass any street corner and they’re giving away thousands of free newspapers and magazines every morning. Now, if print is dead, how come everyone’s reading these publications? Print is just changing shape, that’s all.” DAVE TROTT, EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR OF AD AGENCY CSTTG

“Print is a wonderful medium, so use it where it’s effective. Make sure there’s an integrated cross-media range of channels in which each medium reinforces each other.” JOS VAN DEN BERGH, MARKETING MANAGER OF RENAULT NETHERLANDS

32_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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/ QUOTE UNQUOTE

“We are on all platforms, but we will burn if we give less priority to direct mail. DM can be more aggressive in areas with strong competition and, for us, it’s the only thing that really works.”

“Print is the greatest medium ever invented, but we give people the opportunity to have an Esquire experience in entirely different ways. It’s one of the great fallacies that life is an either/or proposition. If what you produce is good – and especially if it is great – it will thrive.”

ANDREAS NISS, CEO OF ELKJØP, THE LARGEST CONSUMER ELECTRONICS RETAILER IN THE NORDICS

DAVID GRANGER, EDITOR-IN-CHIEF OF AMERICAN ESQUIRE

“There’s definitely a premium role for print in that there’s something about the feel and solidity of having something in print, which means that for certain brands it creates a real connection. Print still has a premium factor for a lot of consumers. For luxury brands in particular it’s very important to be in print alongside all the new media. Print publications tend to get passed around between people and have a permanence, which isn’t true of digital. So I think that while digital is obviously winning out in terms of mass, instantaneous media numbers, print has a unique role to play, and the smartest publishers, marketers and advertisers are the ones that are aligning digital and print and playing to the strengths of both.” NICK COHEN, MANAGING PARTNER AND HEAD OF CONTENT OF MEDIACOM BEYOND ADVERTISING

“The thing with print is, one, it’s physical. And I don’t think you can underestimate the physical. The thing print needs to recognise is that it still has an immensely important role in a lot of consumer choices, such as holidays. I don’t see the Thomson holiday catalogue disappearing or the Argos catalogue disappearing. They might slim down, they might become something different to what they are now, but they will continue to have a presence in people’s homes for a long time to come.” CLIVE HUMBY, CHIEF DATA SCIENTIST AT STARCOUNT AND CO-FOUNDER OF DUNNHUMBY

“The one thing that magazines have got that no other media has is the power to make people seem important simply by featuring them. All these blokes with interesting haircuts who’ve been knocking out moneyspinning apps in Hoxton for the last few years crave nothing more than an admiring print profile with a groovy portrait. That way they can go home to Dewsbury or Droitwich, slap an actual magazine on the coffee table and say, ‘Look, mum, the world thinks I’m special.’ It’s an asset we don’t make anything like enough of.”

“In his multichannel environment, we have to allow people to consume in different ways, and therefore print will always be a part of the overall media mix. I believe that the print environment reinforces the brand message as it allows for greater time, longer format and can give a brand a real chance to show what it is.” IAN ARMSTRONG, GLOBAL MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR OF JAGUAR

DAVID HEPWORTH, EDITORIAL DIRECTOR, DEVELOPMENT HELL www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _33

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QUOTE UNQUOTE

\

“As a lot of other marketers cut back on print marketing, there’s an opportunity to stand out more. It’s not perceived as clutter – nobody has a bad impression of magazines and it can be a very useful way to drive traffic to your core property.” SUCHARITA MULPURU-KODALI, SENIOR RETAIL ANALYST AT FORRESTER RESEARCH

“There are great assumptions that the younger generations are more likely to purchase from digital marketing campaigns or online catalogues, however, all the global research conducted doesn’t support this. People retain messaging and engage more intimately with paper based communications, and catalogues are no different.” KELLIE NORTHWOOD, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE AUSTRALIAN CATALOGUE ASSOCIATION

“Customers need content to be interested. Some people just skim a paper, while others need the inside, in-depth details. What you present to customers and where you present it will determine how they engage with you. Formats and content of ads, direct mail, websites, banners and catalogues will all change more than before as we enter a more personalise-able and more personalised world. Targeted comms will rule, but content is costly to produce so planning, editing and repurposing will give maximum usage to investment in content creation.” IAIN MACDONALD, MULTICHANNEL MARKETING DIRECTOR AT CREW CLOTHING CO

“A QUALITY CATALOGUE CREATES THE PERCEPTION OF A QUALITY BRAND AND GIVES CUSTOMERS CONFIDENCE THAT THE PRODUCT WILL ALSO BE GREAT QUALITY.” MARK BINNINGTON, MARKETING DIRECTOR OF BODEN

“If you look at the way we

interpret information, it’s much more subtle than just, ‘Oh that is the message, I’ll take it on board literally and absorb it naively.’ In many ways, a local restaurant dropping something through your letterbox – a local pizza delivery firm or whatever – just feels kind of right.” “Print should be about providing focus and privacy. RORY SUTHERLAND, VICE-CHAIRMAN It should also use time as a currency. When someone OF OGILVYONE LONDON advertises a luxury holiday, it’s all about time, and the same should be applied to print. People like reading magazines and newspapers simply because it gives them time to themselves.” RICHARD COPE, GLOBAL HEAD OF INSIGHT AT MINTEL

34_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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WHICH DO YOU PREFER TO READ? THIS…

For consumers, reading on screen and reading on paper require different cognitive skills that could mean the difference between understanding your message and ignoring it completely. So why do we react differently when reading print compared to digital? b y pau l s i m p s o n the best way to understand how our brains react differently when we’re reading print or

on-screen – and why that matters – is to create a parallel universe in which the rules of website design are applied to magazines. Let’s assume that you open a print magazine and turn to a certain page in search of your favourite writer giving their opinion on a subject close to your heart. When you find the page, the copy hasn’t materialised. Instead, you watch a small blue bar crawl across the top of the page. When this laborious journey is complete, you are presented not, as you expected, with entertaining and thought-provoking prose, but with a car advert. You have to press this ad once, possibly twice, to get rid of it. The ad gone, you read the feature avidly until your eye is distracted by several plugs for other columns, blogs and a top ten list of eye-watering sports injuries. You hesitate for a nanosecond but return to the article only to discover, reading further, that you have to juggle the page to find the next paragraph. Your confusion is complete when the video ad you didn’t realise was in the corner of the page suddenly sparks into life and starts talking. >

36_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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/ PRINT VS SCREEN

OR THIS…

The best way to understand how our brains react differently when we’re reading print or on-screen – and why that matters – is to create a parallel universe in which the rules of website design are applied to magazines.

Let’s assume that you open a print magazine, and turn to a certain page in search of your favourite writer giving their opinion on a subject close to your heart. When you find the page, the copy hasn’t materialised. Instead, you watch a small blue bar crawl across the top of the page. When this laborious journey is complete, you are presented not, as you expected, with entertaining and thought-provoking prose, but with a car advert. You have to press this ad once, possibly twice, to get rid of it. The ad gone, you read the feature avidly until your eye is distracted by several plugs – for other columns, blogs and a top ten list of eye-watering sports injuries. You hesitate for a nanosecond but return to the article only to discover, reading

www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 37

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Jakob Nielsen, the guru of online usability, admits that the internet hasn’t yet cracked the issue of making reading easy on the brain

ONLINE VS PRINT

45% 31% OF CONSUMERS SAY THEY FIND TWITTER AND BLOG ADVERTS ANNOYING

OF CONSUMERS SAY THEY FIND LOCAL NEWSPAPER ADVERTS ANNOYING

Rewiring the brain Individually, the curveballs websites throw at readers seem an irritating distraction. Collectively, they mess with the networks our brains have created so that we can read. This is why studies consistently show that when we read on screen, we’re significantly less likely to comprehend the text, find the process more stressful – America’s OF CONSUMERS SAY OF CONSUMERS SAY Optometric Association officially ONLINE ADS ARE “ANNOYING” ONLINE ADS SIMPLY recognises computer vision syndrome – AND “DISTRACTING” DON’T WORK and are more easily distracted, typically changing tasks every three minutes. Today’s headlines regularly proclaim that the brain can be rewired by anything from premarital sex to smoking. Yet Professor Sophie Scott, Deputy Director of the UCL’s Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, says the cliché does actually apply to reading. “We have to be taught to read,” she says. “We also learn to speak but we don’t have to be taught. And reading, Print’s predictable familiarity frees our brain to do the important in terms of the way it works in the brain, is very parasitic on speech stuff: focus on difficult words, contemplate the text and – that’s why the hard of hearing find it more difficult to learn to comprehend it. Research by the University of Leicester found that, read. But there’s still a lot we don’t know about the way reading even when psychology students read e-books – usually designed affects our brains. For example, we don’t know why people who to faithfully mirror the printed product – more repetition was required to impart the same information, while readers of print can’t read struggle with line drawings but not with numbers.” As humankind only started reading around 4,000BC, it’s a skill digested the material more fully. In the words of Kate Garland, a lecturer in psychology at our brains aren’t designed to cope with. So they improvise their own circuits, drawing on neural tissue devoted to other abilities Leicester, students reading printed books knew rather than remembered, and knowing is better because recalling the salient such as speak, motor coordination and vision. “The thing that takes most of the time – and cognitive processing points is easier and faster. – when you’re reading is moving your eyes to the next word,” Scott says. “We don’t fixate on function words – tests show we The ease of reading struggle to remember how many times ‘and’ or ‘the’ appear in Publishers of books, magazines and newspapers have, over a paragraph – but focus on content words. The process works the centuries, perfected the art of easing our reading. “Look at the way the book has developed,” explains Scott. “The first because the brain is very good with predictability. “Think about how you read a book,” she continues, “how little you publications didn’t even have spaces between words, but today move, how you hold it at the exact distance that’s most comfortable they use typography, spacing between lines and other landmarks for your eyes, how you know you’re going from top to bottom down to make it easier for us to read. You see the same in newspapers: the page and from left to right across a spread, how you turn the Newspapers are perfectly designed so our eyes can read, with big page while hardly being aware of it, and how you always know type, narrow columns and large spaces between words.” The first website was only created in 1991 and Jakob Nielsen, the where you are in the text. In other words, how much you’ve read guru of online usability, admits that the internet hasn’t yet cracked and how far you still have to go.”

68% 54%

38_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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/ PRINT VS SCREEN ALL IN THE MIND

THREE COGNITIVE TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE HOW THE BRAIN READS COPY

TEST 1 CAN YOU READ THE FOLLOWING TEXT?

Aoccdrnig to rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn’t mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.

Print’s predictable familiarity frees our brain to do the important stuff: focus on difficult words, contemplate the text and comprehend it

Institute, which found that online readers were less likely to set specific goals, reTEST 2 read difficult passages or check whether READ THE TEXT INSIDE THE they understood and, troublingly, were TEST 3 TRIANGLE OUT LOUD overconfident about what they thought COUNT EVERY ‘F’ IN THE they knew. FOLLOWING TEXT So does this mean, as some commentators FINISHED FILES ARE THE RE
 argue, that the internet is making us SULT OF YEARS OF SCIENTI
 stupid? Scott scoffs at the idea, pointing FIC STUDY COMBINED WITH
 out that most advances in communication THE EXPERIENCE OF YEARS... have been greeted by dire warnings about dumbing down. How many did you find? There In Plato’s dialogues, Socrates warns that are actually six as the brain cannot writing will produce people who “will be process ‘OF’ tiresome company, having the show of wisdom without the reality.” In the 15th century, Italian humanist Hieronimo Squarciafico feared Gutenberg’s press would “enfeeble the mind”. Today, Scott says, “many of us use Google as a memory the issue of making reading easy on the brain. At their worst, aid but that’s hardly new; we’ve been using external memory aids websites encourage us to indulge in two kinds of bad reading: since we first painted on cave walls.” tunnel vision, in which we fixate on a single passage of text or Nor, she points out, does neuroscience suggest that print has a a keyword, and peripheral vision, where we are distracted by decisive advantage in its Sisyphean struggle with Facebook, reality blogrolls, invitations to click here to win a seductive prize and TV and Instagram. Many of the differences in comprehension a general sense that we should hurry up and start the next task. between print and screen will diminish as web design improves The unpredictability starts when we read the first line on screen. and the presentation of editorial and advertising messages online We often lack the cues we have in print to tell us how long the piece becomes more sophisticated than, in a worst-case scenario, ads is. If we’re reading on a monitor or tablet, email alerts may help us that randomly pop up over the text as you read. lose our place and scrolling can disorientate us. As a consequence, our brains become, in Scott’s term, “unmoored”. The conscious choice We then have to consciously decide if we want to keep reading, Print versus digital is not a zero-sum game. The famous viral and one study suggests that 35% of us of don’t. The unpredictably video ‘A Magazine Is An iPad That Does Not Work’, in which a increases exponentially if we’re reading on our cellphones: Nielsen one-year-old girl prods a magazine in mystified disgust because estimates we retain only 48% as much as we would when using it doesn’t work like her tablet says as much about the future of a monitor. the media industry as Kajagoogoo had to say about rock and roll. While websites engage in frenzied Darwinian competition to Is the internet making us stupid? develop sticky content, print retains a matchless ability to drive UCL’s research on two UK educational institutions discovered home a complex message and allow the reader the time and space that many online users power-browse: scanning titles, contents to comprehend the information it holds. Research shows that we pages and abstracts for quick wins. After one or two pages, users consciously value the weight, smell and feel of printed matter – stopped reading and rarely returned even to articles they had and, subconsciously, we still appreciate the fact that it doesn’t bookmarked. Such findings are echoed by the Technon-Israel make our brains hurt.

A BIRD IN THE THE BUSH

Look again: the word ‘THE’ is repeated twice

www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 39

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“IF PRINT D THE END OF CREATIVITY ADVERTISIN

BY SIMON CREASEY

40_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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DIES IT’S F TY IN ING”

/ DESIGNER OUTLET

If any creative knows about the value of print and its ability to cut through the mass of marketing to engage directly with the consumer, it’s the designer. So we have gathered four of the world’s best to debate, discuss and deliberate why print is so special. Black poloneck on? Then let’s go…

www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 41

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GEORGE LOIS Lois is an advertising legend who has been described as ‘One of the original Mad Men of Madison Avenue’. In his 20s, he was a pioneer of the creative revolution in American advertising and went on to run his own ad agencies. His groundbreaking work includes creating iconic covers images for American Esquire, devising the concept and design for the New York supplement for the Herald Tribune, and helping brands such as MTV and ESPN become global market leaders. He’s also written a number of books – his latest is Damn Good Advice (For People With Talent).

CHARLES VALLANCE Vallance began his advertising apprenticeship at Burkitt’s, before working at BBH and WCRS. In 2002 he started working for himself and, along with his three partners (Rooney Carruthers, Adrian Coleman and Ian Priest), set up VCCP. Their founding client was O2. Over the last two decades, Vallance has worked on and helped launch a diverse range of brands including O2, First Direct, Orange, Sony, BMW, Land Rover, Coca-Cola, Heineken, Dyson, Hiscox and easyJet.

PETER KNAPP Landor Associate’s global creative director has been with the company for more than 20 years. Knapp specialises in integrated branding programs where graphic, three-dimensional, digital and engagement design platforms are fused together to form total branded experiences. His clients include Marks & Spencer, BP, De Beers, Diageo, Ernst & Young, Hang Seng Bank, Land Rover, Morrisons, Preem, bmi, Gulf Air and British Airways.

The challenges facing brand designers, marketers and advertising creatives are constantly evolving thanks to the rise of new digital channels. Yet for the majority of brand owners, print continues to be the launch pad of choice for new advertising/marketing campaigns. Print Power invited Charles Vallance, founder of creative agency VCCP; Peter Knapp, global creative director at Landor Associates; Robin Harvey, founding creative director of Net-A-Porter; and George Lois, the original ‘mad man’ of Madison Avenue, What’s the key to generating to take part in a round table consumer engagement with print debate about the future of print advertising? marketing and discuss what Peter Knapp: You need the big hit – the changes these new digital thing that grabs you by the retina then draws you through to the brain. If you channels have brought about. don’t get the big hit, it doesn’t matter how clever it is, you’re just not going to get anyone to lock onto it. It’s eyes first, brains second.

Charles Vallance: Design can grab your attention and communicate the idea, but good content drives consumer engagement. The O2 ‘Be More Dog’ campaign encourages consumers to get excited and curious about technology. George Lois: When the idea is dramatised by a unique image in synergy with words that memorably communicate

ROBIN HARVEY Harvey is the former creative director of Rimmel, Max Factor and the founding creative director of Net-A-Porter. He currently heads up Spring Creative – the advertising and creative division of Spring London, whose clients include Versace, Max Factor, Target and Louis Vuitton. One of Spring’s most recent projects was the design and build of British Vogue’s iPad apps. The company also redesigned Harper’s Bazaar (US).

in a nanosecond, there’s always an immediate visceral response. Why is print such an effective marketing tool? Vallance: Print is effective because it has the benefit of a full-page ad. There’s no full-screen digital ad. A print ad can be more effective in a speciality magazine purchased by people passionate about a specific subject. There are no distracting links, alerts or videos. It’s a physical thing that uses the sense of touch. Research has shown that reading from a screen is 20-30% slower than reading from paper. Knapp: Print is so effective simply because it’s everywhere. There is a ubiquity to it in terms of one’s own personal environment. Whether it’s in a magazine, on a billboard that you walk past on the way to work or on the tube, there’s a ubiquity and scale to it, and that’s its effectiveness. It’s a very scalable medium. The interesting thing to me is that digital is different. People try to work out which is better or more effective, but they’re equally effective – the key is to employ them intelligently. Right time, right place.

42_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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/ DESIGNER OUTLET

Robin Harvey: Print is still an important part of the deliverables for a fashion brand. It’s where they can define their image, encapsulated on the pages of a fashion magazine or out of home. However, it’s not how they can truly engage with their target market. Digital allows brands to tell stories and create engaging content that reflects their values and personality more than print can ever hope to. Having said that, print is often still the first point of engagement that consumers have with a brand. It can be the beginning of the journey into the brand itself and the point from which the customer is led towards purchase. So it’s even more important now that print works hard to not just stand out but that it starts to tell the brand story. Lois: Print, driven by a ‘big idea’ depicting a mnemonic visual in synergy with mnemonic words, catches people’s eyes, penetrates their minds, warms their hearts and causes them to act. When designing a piece of work for a brand, what’s the very first thing you consider? Knapp: Each brief is different so you have to treat each project differently. For our company, the most important thing is to get the personality and the tone of voice appropriate for that brand, so it has its own unique conversation with the audience. Lois: I must come up with the ‘big idea’ that sears the virtues of a product into a viewer’s brain and heart, resulting in a sales explosion. Creativity can solve any problem – the creative act, the defeat of habit by originality, overcomes everything. Vallance: We consider what ‘tone of voice’ we are creating for the brand – clear and confident? Warm and friendly? Youthful and challenging? – and how we can communicate the idea in the clearest and most engaging way possible.

How does design for print differ from design for digital? Vallance: Design is communication. Communicating with people on paper or via digital media is all communication. There are common design considerations in print and digital. We consider the hierarchy of message, content, typography, colour, font, and size of text. Print and digital are just various forms of media. We might ask: what media can I use to communicate with people? The answer to this will determine these common design decisions.

Your idea must awaken, disturb, communicate, command, instigate and even provoke. You can be cautious or you can be creative, but there’s no such thing as a ‘cautious creative’ George Lois

Knapp: Designing for print and digital is very different. Print has a more expansive horizon line so how you perceive it is very different from digital. Depending on the scale of the content and format, print is potentially huge, so you relate to it in a different way. The way your eye consumes it is also different. Digital is more intimate in some respect because of the relationship that you have with the screen. As such, it’s a more personal intimate relationship – not better or worse, just different – and I think the digital channel invariably has a more kinetic quality to it, whereas print is more grand and static. Lois: I don’t regard myself as a ‘designer’. I am a ‘graphic communicator’ because I create ‘big ideas’, not designs. In this astounding new world of technology, all the tools and devices are meaningless without an essential idea. Therefore, design for print differs in no way than design for digital. The key trigger point is the idea, with memorable visual power synergised with memorable words. Many multichannel campaigns begin with print then move out into digital channels. Why is print often the best starting point? Lois: Print is the best starting point in conceiving the’ big idea’, nailed down to adapt to all multi-channel campaigns. Print is the architecture of the ‘big idea’.

If you don’t get the big hit, it doesn’t matter how clever it is, you’re not going to get anyone to lock onto it. It’s eyes first, brains second Peter Knapp www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 43

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DESIGNER OUTLET

\

Don’t think media, think creativity. But understand, your idea must awaken, disturb, communicate, command, instigate and even provoke. You can be cautious or you can be creative, but there’s no such thing as a ‘cautious creative’.

Ink on paper is a wonderful technology – fast to produce and you don’t need any device other than the human eye to consume it Charles Vallance

Harvey: The first thing we often consider is defining one image that can start the journey into the brand. So the philosophy of print is our starting point, but that soon gets blown out into different mediums. Vallance: A good print ad communicates the idea fast. It doesn’t need coding, user experience design or interaction design. Print designers can concentrate on tone of voice rather than technical design. A print ad contains the ‘tone of voice’ required to fan out into digital and social. Harvey: Digital shouldn’t just be the print ad in different formats – it needs to engage more, with its own strategy. This is often the best starting point, although not always, as it forces you to distil your idea into one moment. But if you can do that, you can generally expand on it. Do digital mediums require a different sense of creativity and set of creative skills than print? Harvey: Digital mediums definitely require different skills from that of print. The rules of engagement are different – a digital campaign is not just a re-purposed print ad. Lois: Creativity is creating, in any form of media. But aside from ‘big idea’ thinking, there is considerable skill needed to excitingly design words and imagery in unison – where one plus one equals three. Vallance: It doesn’t require a different sense of creativity; creativity or the idea should be clear whatever medium it’s in. In digital we have to consider the devices people use to consume content,

which requires creatives to think in a different way. Name a recent piece of print marketing that’s made you sit up and take notice. Vallance: Excluding our own offerings, the luggage tag print ads for Expedia – there’s a good level of craft in that. It’s a nice, relevant observation on the experience of travelling delivered with charm and wit. Knapp: The recent work for Phillips LED torches done by Ogilvy & Mather is really clever. There’s a singularity of colour, a singularity of idea and a singularity of deployment all the way through that campaign. It’s a big idea and it really grabs you by the eyes and makes you say, ‘That’s clever’. What’s the future outlook for print marketing? Can it survive for the next 30 years? Vallance: Print needs to keep innovating by inventing interesting and costeffective print techniques. The future of print media looks strong. After all, when TV came along, did radio die? Ink

on paper is a wonderful technology – fast to produce and you don’t need any device other than the human eye to consume it. Knapp: There is emphatically, definitely a future. Unless we are physically welded to our screens over the next few decades, there will always be a place for print to occupy physical spaces. Clearly there are more ways for people to consume stuff, so an important consideration is going to be the right time and place to put messages. Harvey: The future of print marketing is still good. Net-A-Porter has just launched its own printed magazine, which really says it all! Knapp: For print marketing to survive, you need to create cut-through with strong singular ideas, because there is more and more stuff that we have to absorb every day. Lois: Shockingly, most art directors today admit print is not their ‘expertise’. Huh? Once again, understand that print is your memorable selling idea, placed on paper. If print dies, it’s the end of creativity in advertising.

44_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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w

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Digital Print Replicas are poor imitations of printed versions of a work and clearly a step backward!

Digital consumers are looking for interaction, rich media and usability.

Choose a reading experience over replicas by taking a step forward with eDocker! Be a Frontrunner! We are looking for visionary partners to participate in the Digital Publishing Revolution. If you are interested, please go to www.edocker.com/printpower/index.html to get more information. Or, use the QR-code to the right. PP7_40-44_DesignerOutlet_UK_final.indd 7

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52 MILLION VIEWERS 50 COUNTRIES 24 MILES ABOVE THE EARTH 1 BRAND Red Bull is one of the world’s leading exponents of extreme marketing, pushing the boundaries of what can be achieved in both human endeavour and business success. Meet the energy drink with the world at its feet BY JOHN R EY NOLDS

of marketing and they will invariably come back with one name: Red Bull. The 26-year-old energy drink has ballooned into a byword for extreme marketing. Its iconic can, sports-team ownership, plus music and film offshoots may have helped make the brand a household name, but it’s Red Bull’s awe-inspiring marketing that has sprinkled stardust on the brand. Red Bull’s marketing has always had its feet firmly planted on the side of the adventurous, high-octane and inspiring, whether it’s challenging people to design homemade flying machines through its Flugtag event or The Red Bull Music Academy, its globe-spanning series of music festivals. But it was the 2012 Stratos skydive which cemented its reputation as one of the most powerful marketing brands in the world. >

PHOTOGRAPH / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

ask anyone to name a brand that’s at the cutting edge

46_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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/ RED BULL

www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 47

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beyond the ordinary

A BEYOND THE ORDINARY MAGAZINE

DON'T LOOK BACK! OUTSKIING AN AVALANCHE

MONEY LEGS

THE RISE OF JODIE WILLIAMS

DEC 2013 / JAN 2014

INTO TOP GEAR NEW VIDEO GAMES AND FITNESS TECH

LINDSEY VONN

PULLS NO PUNCHES the red bulletin 12/13-01/14 13.11.13 12:05

Dubbed ‘The mission to the edge of space’, the historic Stratos skydive featured Felix Baumgartner jumping freefall from 24 miles above the earth, making him the first human to break the sound barrier without engine power. Watched across 80 TV stations in 50 countries with a live webcast gaining 52 million views, it quite simply bought the world to a standstill and was the most watched lived streamed event in history. If such hype and media interest around a single marketing moment is ever to be matched again, there’s only one brand that could do it: Red Bull. House of the rising brand With its famed twin bovine and sun image, Red Bull now boasts one of the most famous logos in the world, adorning everything from F1 cars to skate ramps, from the lapels of snowboarders to the helmet of Baumgartner as he plummeted towards Earth. But alongside these supreme feats of marketing, Red Bull is also the owner of an international media empire, the Red Bull Media House, which oversees its flourishing publishing, TV, film and music operations. “Red Bull is first and foremost a drinks brand, then a facilitator of all things extreme and awesome,” says Alice Merrick, senior consultant at branding company Brand Union. “People talk about Felix jumping from the sky, but don’t necessarily connect it back to the Red Bull brand.” A crucial cog in the Red Bull juggernaut is The Red

Bulletin, the glossy magazine that Red Bull Media distributes and sells globally. The magazine has become a must-read for those fascinated by music and fashion, and a bible for those drawn 2.5m copies of Red towards extreme sports. Bulletin are distributed The Red Bulletin is also a key each month in four marketing channel for the Red Bull different languages brand, showcasing interviews with across 13 countries sponsored stars such as F1 champion Sebastian Vettel, skiing star Lindsey Vonn and skateboarder Pedro Barros. Paul Wilson is the editor of the UK and Ireland issue of The Red Bulletin. He believes that access to Red Bull stars is a considerable pull for readers of the magazine. “This year we will be doing a very big F1 preview,” he says. “It will be remiss of us not to access the Red Bull F1 team.” This level of access was best demonstrated in 2012, ahead of Baumgartner’s skydive, when the UK issue of The Red Bulletin carried exclusive content about the making of the capsule Baumgartner jumped from, as well as impressive access to his preparation for the historic event. “Stratos created headlines worldwide,” Wilson says from his office in London. “Our exclusive access to Baumgartner and his preparation gave us a big advantage over other media outlets. We still receive great feedback from readers – emails, Facebook likes and retweets – about our stories.”

48_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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/ RED BULL

good old-fashioned journalism with stunning images, outstanding narratives and excellent visual storytelling.”

Inherent in The Red Bulletin’s high-quality approach is a clear formula: use good oldfashioned journalism with stunning images, outstanding narratives and excellent visual storytelling Anna Berkl, International Communication Specialist, Red Bull

Singha OBC_Layout 1 08/07/2013 15:32 Page 1

beyond the ordinary

APRIL 2014 £2.50

BEYOND THE ORDINARY

INSIDE F1 2014

14-PAGE GAMING SPECIAL

AND THE CHAMP’S NEW CAR

INTO THE DEEP

THE ART OF FREE DIVING

A N E W A L B U M , T H AT H AT AND THE WORLD AT H I S F E E T

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the red bulletin 04/2014

Humble beginnings Today, around 2.5m copies of The Red Bulletin are distributed each month in four different languages across 13 countries, from Red Bull’s native Austria to the US and Kuwait. But like the drink itself – which started life as an obscure Thai energy drink chanced upon by an ambitious salesman – Red Bulletin’s roots are much humbler. In fact, just a few hundred copies of the first issue back in 1997 were published. “The initial idea was to inject some humour and fresh perspective into the tense and sometimes plain way the atmosphere of the Formula One pit lane is routinely portrayed,” explains Anna Berkl, International Communication Specialist at Red Bull. “So the editorial team created a smart, clever publication for the people in the Formula 1 paddock that looked at the sport from a different angle.” The format changed to its current incarnation in 2007 and, while it’s still loyal to its F1 roots, the magazine’s readership is now much broader, from fashionistas looking at the latest trends to extreme sports fans following their favourite stars. While Red Bull Media operates as a separate entity from the drinks business, it undoubtedly shares the same creative DNA – with old-fashioned journalistic principles thrown in. “The Red Bulletin is dedicated to outstanding storytelling with excellent writers, top photography and topics beyond the ordinary,” says Berkl. “Inherent in this high-quality approach is a clear formula: use

The international allure of print The magazine runs three different distribution models. It’s either sold (as in countries such as Mexico and South Africa), distributed with a newspaper (as in the UK and Austria) or both – in the US, it’s been sold in stores such as Barnes & Noble but also distributed free with newspapers such as the Los Angeles Times). Flick through a copy of the UK issue and you will see ads from big-ticket brands such as Helly Hansen and Singha beer – a testimony to Red Bull Media introducing advertising managers to each country edition of the brand as it looks to drive up advertising revenues. But while the magazine is available in digital format online as well as an app, it has a keen focus on print and what the medium can deliver for the brand. Berkl says that print suits many of its international readers best. “The Red Bulletin’s focus has always been to produce an international active style men’s magazine and to make it available to its readers through those channels that suit them best –offline, online or mobile,” explains Berkl. Wilson highlights the point: “Print is absolutely crucial to The Red Bulletin brand,” he says. “That’s how the brand grew and how it continues to expand, alongside the increased presence of The Red Bulletin on social media and as a digital magazine on multiple platforms.” According to Merrick, the key to The Red Bulletin’s success is that it resolutely reflects what the Red Bull LET’S brand stands for. Wilson, meanwhile, believes that, PLAY despite the magazine not having the social standing of GQ or Esquire, it publishes to the same editorial GUEST EDITOR standards, which means it punches above its weight. PHARRELL Berkl believes that The Red Bulletin will continue WILLIAMS to play an important role in the future of the Red Bull brand. She said that the magazine, like the Red Bull £3 brand, is about “striving to do something that tells different stories and engages audiences in new ways.” “It’s always been about giving audiences access to outstanding and authentic content,” she adds. “Not only in the form of amazing sports events, but also with extraordinary stories.” 18.02.14 16:26

Singha OBC_Layout 1 08/07/2013 15:32 Page 1

beyond the ordinary

FEBRUARY 2014

A BEYOND THE ORDINARY MAGAZINE

LORDE

THE RISE OF POP’S NEW PRINCESS

JUST

THE BEAT GOES ON NIGHTCLUB AT THE HEART OF A WAR ZONE

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beyond the ordinary

AUGUST 2013

UPGRADE NOW! TRAIN LIKE A WORLD CHAMP

America’s Cup

FIGHT the red bulletin 08/2013

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A BEYOND THE ORDINARY MAGAZINE

CLUB

Battle for the oceans’ greatest prize 16.07.13 19:40

How to top the untoppable So what next for Red Bull and The Red Bulletin? Baumgartner is unlikely to be able to top the Stratos jump – for Red Bull or anybody else – and he is on record saying there will be “no next”. Red Bull followed Stratos with a skydive from 23,667 feet up Everest and it seems more skydives will be undertaken – just not from space. But while there may be some uncertainty about Red Bull’s next marketing exploit, there is no uncertainty that print will remain a bedrock of the brand. “It’s not about topping certain successes,” explains Berkl. “It’s about striving to do something that tells different stories and engages audiences in new ways.” www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 49

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maillinx, backed by PaperlinX, is a new delivery channel for direct mail users. By bringing companies together, reducing the total cost of mailed communications, maillinx helps drive greater returns for advertisers.

sell space By selling available space in their envelopes through maillinx, retaining full control over any advert that joins their mailer, bulk mailers can directly reduce or even wholly mitigate the total cost of their mailed communications.

buy space Companies that don’t mail on a regular basis now have access to a cost effective delivery channel for their customer communications. They can search maillinx for campaigns by industry and location, and simply hitch a ride with a compatible company’s mailing, securing a stronger penetration to a targeted audience.

a compelling reason to print more For more information on maillinx, its benefits and how you can get involved, please email us: info@maillinx.co.uk

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KNOWLEDGE Over the next five pages, we’ll be giving you the latest research, information and insight into the five key mediums covered by Print Power. Each one has their individual strengths and advantages, but used in combination with each other, they can offer a powerful solution to any marketing challenge.

52

53

DIRECT MAIL

With an ROI of up to 40%, direct mail remains one of the world’s most effective marketing channels.

DOOR DROP MAIL The door drop market is rising by both volume and revenue, and is ideal for getting a great level of response from the most amount of people.

54

57

CUSTOMER MAGAZINES

One of modern marketing’s true success stories, customer publishing has swelled to a £10bn global industry thanks to the huge levels of engagement it offers brands.

If you would like further information on the vital role print plays in marketing, plus the latest news on print media around the world, go to www.printpoweruk.co.uk

CATALOGUES

56 MAGAZINE ADVERTISING

With over 50,000 magazine titles currently published in Europe, they are an ideal way to get your brand in front of a key target audience.

One of the oldest forms of marketing, catalogues are still a highly effective sales driver, with many consumers keeping them in their homes for up to a year.

www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 51

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DIRECT MAIL

7 REASONS

“The unique targeting opportunities that mail provides are clearly backed up by the number of people who think it is an appropriate form of contact” Murray Dudgeon, European Client Services Director, Acxiom

THE ONLINE COMPONENT OF A TYPICAL CAMPAIGN PAYS BACK 62% MORE AND THE TV COMPONENT PAYS BACK 37% MORE WHEN THERE IS DIRECT MAIL IN THE MARKETING MIX (BRANDSCIENCE, 2012)

1. THE MAIL MOMENT

3. PRECISION TARGETING

2. SENSORY EXPERIENCE

4. MAKE PEOPLE ACT

Direct mail enters an individual’s home and is consumed on a one-to-one basis. This gives you much more time with your customer, time to engage them in a relaxed environment at a time of their choosing. The physicality of a mailing adds another dimension to the brand experience. Using your customers’ senses you can stimulate and entertain, getting them to reassess your brand and drive response.

Direct marketing works best when it’s made relevant for the recipient, with tailor-made content appealing directly to the consumer. New digital printing technology can make this personalisation even easier. Direct mail is the most likely form of communication to get a response from a customer, with the cost of every response measured with accuracy. As it’s a tangible object, DM is also likely to hang around.

5. EFFECTIVENESS

Recent reports have demonstrated the enduring effectiveness of direct mail, with 48% of UK adults having done something in the last 12 months as result of mailing and 30% having bought something (Royal Mail, 2011).

6. GET CREATIVE

Direct mail is unique in that mailings can be produced in a wide variety of formats, using different shapes, sizes, colours and materials to create a surprising and memorable brand experience that will stay in the home for weeks and even months.

7. INTEGRATION

Adding direct mail to an integrated campaign can raise the campaign’s effectiveness by up to 62% (BrandScience, 2012), while bridging technologies such as QR codes and augmented reality make it simple for consumers to go from print to digital.

THE PRINCE’S TRUST COMMUNISIS

In an effort to reach out to the wider public for donations, youth charity The Prince’s Trust has launched its largest direct mail campaign to date. The campaign targeted 200,000 potential donors, sending them a piece of direct mail that was designed to make them aware of the organisation’s work in helping disadvantaged young people in finding training and work. Featuring the strapline ‘Save a young person’s life from falling apart’, the work includes tailored content for specific regions, emphasising the work the charity is doing in each area. “More than a million young people in the UK want to work but are struggling to find a job,” says Brette Alsop from The Prince’s Trust. “An increase in donations would enable the charity to extend its reach at a critical time.”

52_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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DOOR DROP

7 REASONS

“Door drop demonstrates an enduring cost-effectiveness in Europe, with its flexibility in responding to marketers’ needs being a key element of its continued success” Mark Davies, President, ELMA

THE DOOR DROP INDUSTRY IN EUROPE IS ESTIMATED TO DELIVER 108 BILLION ITEMS WORTH AN ESTIMATED €3.8BN OF MEDIA SPEND PER YEAR (ELMA, 2012)

1. IT DELIVERS ROI

Door drop drives rapid and measurable response. That response shows an impressive ROI – and it’s growing. In a study by ELMA, the door drop industry grew by 0.5% in volume and 1.5% in revenue over a 12 month-period (ELMA, 2012).

2. MASS-MARKET MEDIUM

Door drop is the only truly national mass media available to marketers, with a satisfying 100% reach. Despite the advances in other media, door drop is still the only way of delivering a document into the hands of millions of households.

3. RIGHT ENVIRONMENT

The fact that the consumer receives your material in their own home is crucial. They can take in and respond to the messages in their own time, never forced or coerced.

4. TARGETED WHEN

REQUIRED Using geomarketing, you can pick and choose which demographic you’re after, gathering vital data along the way. With this data, your campaigns can become more and more sophisticated.

5. IT’S CREATIVE

A lot of brands take advantage of the creative potential of door drop, with many using innovations such as holograms, scented paper, 3D techniques and pop-ups to grab attention.

6. SAMPLE DISTRIBUTION

Getting your product direct into the kitchen of your prospects is a fantastic way of raising awareness of your brand, as well as getting your customer to try it.

7. EASILY INTEGRATES

Door drop works harder when used as part of an integrated campaign, pushing people to go online or call a number for more information.

SPORT RELIEF ZAPPAR

This year’s Sport Relief fundraising events were given a huge boost of awareness thanks to a campaign which will see almost one million households receive an exclusive door drop. The door drop, featuring Cedric the Bulldog, hosts a number of features which can be accessed by a smartphone via augmented reality. The first part of the campaign used a stirring pep talk to encourage people to run, swim or cycle at the first ever Sport Relief Games. Then, in the second part, users can pose for pictures in various Sport Relief-themed headgear, medals and flags as modelled by Sport Relief ambassadors Jessica Ennis-Hill, Johnnie Peacock, Ellie Simmons, Rebecca Adlington and Victoria Pendleton.

www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 53

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CUSTOMER MAGAZINES

7 REASONS

“With more and more brands taking ownership of their own media channels, it’s clear that consumers are continuing to invest their time in high-quality editorial products” Clare Hill, Managing Director, CMA

CUSTOMER MAGAZINES DELIVER 70% OF THE CIRCULATION OF THE TOP TEN MAGAZINES IN THE UK, WITH THE TOP THREE ALL TITLES PRODUCED FOR BRANDS (ABC, 2014)

Audi magazine

Audi

Spring 2013

magazine

Spring 2013

UK £4.50

rise of the robots A n d r oi d s a r e s t e p pi n g o u t of t h e m ovies a n d i n t o o u r eve ryd ay l ives – b u t a r e w e r e a dy fo r t h e m?

1. SUBSTANCE

There’s nothing to beat the feel of a magazine. Taken with its portability, ease of use and sense of glamour, it offers the reader control and entertainment in one neat package.

2. ENGAGEMENT

Magazines are the most effective medium when it comes to engaging your customer, entertaining and informing them while delivering your brand messages.

3. TARGETING POWER

Since a customer magazine is so versatile with its content, it can target any number or group of people, from specialist interest to mass market.

4. EFFECTIVENESS

When it comes to results, customer magazines are among the best. Print offers a vital guarantee of measurability, with brand awareness, sales tracking and ROI calculated within days of the magazine’s release.

5. LOYALTY

One of the most common reasons for launching a customer magazine is increasing loyalty, with a brand achieving regular and reliable time with its customers.

6. ENTERTAINMENT

A magazine builds your customer’s faith in your brand by offering great content at little or no cost to them. Entertain them and you’ll have their attention all to yourself.

7. COMPLEX CONTENT

Print works fantastically well at getting across complex content or messages. So if you need to explain something in detail, a customer magazine may well be the best option.

AUDI MAGAZINE NORTHSTAR

Sent to over 365,000 Audi customers and prospects every quarter, Audi Magazine takes a refreshingly intelligent approach to a broad range of subjects, pushing the Audi strategy that puts a premium on loyalty, retention, up-sell and lifetime value. The magazine is designed to keep existing Audi customers up to date with the auto brand, offering a wide range of subjects from news on car launches to features about art, design, technology and innovation. While the print version is sent exclusively to Audi owners, the online and digital versions are available to a wider audience. The magazine regularly impresses awards judges and recently walked off with the prestigious Grand Prix award at the 2013 International Content Marketing Awards.

54_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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It’s free, it’s easy and it could transform the way you think about print. To receive your regular copies of Print Power, go to www.printpoweruk.co.uk/get-magazine and fill out your details. Alternatively, scan the QR Code below with your smartphone and you will be taken to the registration page automatically. www.printpoweruk.co.uk #Printpower

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Distributed across 11 European countries to over 60,000 readers, Print Power features: The latest print technology and innovations Inspirational case studies from the world’s top creative agencies Interviews with the top names in marketing, advertising and media How print can boost the effectiveness of multichannel campaigns Provocative opinions from Europe’s leading industry experts

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24/04/2014 15:25 18:00 25/04/2014


MAGAZINE ADVERTISING

7 REASONS

“The ads in [Vogue and InStyle] are as interesting as the photoshoots and the articles. I miss the ads when they are not there. I feel less fulfilled” Marissa Mayer, Yahoo CEO

PRINTED MEDIA PROVIDES THE MOST COST-EFFECTIVE ADVERTISING MEDIUM [NDP NEIUWSMEDIA/GFK, 2014]

MEDIA / ROI INDEX MAGAZINES / 130 NEWSPAPERS / 120 ONLINE BANNERS / 110 RADIO / 90 TV / 60

1. FANTASTIC REACH

3. FOCUSED ACTIVITY

2. FINE-TUNED TARGETING

4. THE TRUST FACTOR

With over 50,000 titles published in Europe selling in excess of 20bn copies per month, magazines are one of the most widely distributed forms of media in the world. Each magazine title is specialist in some way, reaching a certain demographic or interest group that will engage with relevant advertising or featured brands.

Reading a magazine requires high levels of concentration, the same levels of concentration that will be devoted to advertising as well as editorial content. Magazines are a trusted friend to their loyal readership, and any brand that places themselves in that magazine can capitalise on that trust and use it to foster a new relationship.

5. INTEGRATION

On average, more than half of all readers take action on magazine ads, a response that can be optimised when the ad is used as part of a wider campaign. Brand awareness, for example, can be doubled.

6. AWARENESS GENERATION Research shows that awareness generated by magazines and TV is roughly the same, but given that the expense of advertising in magazines is lower, they offer a more cost-effective solution.

7. DRIVING SALES

Research shows that magazines are a powerful tool in driving sales. A 2013 PPA study showed that 63% of readers were driven to action after exposure the magazine advertising.

SPORT MAGAZINE & NIKE MINDSHARE

Nike were keen to to ensure that its association with sport was maintained amid the noise of rival brands, so they commissioned the ‘Make it count’ campaign. Using Nikesupported athletes such as Mark Cavendish and Mo Farah, the campaign aimed to inspire people to get involved and shout about what they do. The first step in this multi-channel campaign was coverage in Sport magazine and Metro newspaper, with augmented reality used to bring the print ads to life. The campaign reached 8.85 million Londoners and the brand saw a 28% year-on-year increase in Nike Town sales. “The success in this campaign was how simple it was yet hugely impactful,” said Daniel Robinson of Mindshare. “It was completely immersive for the consumer.”

56_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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CATALOGUES

7 REASONS

OVER 70% OF CONSUMERS KEEP CATALOGUES IN THEIR HOMES FOR OVER A MONTH AND 34% FOR UP TO A YEAR

%

(DMA, 2013)

1. ACCESSIBILITY

3. SEDUCTION TECHNIQUE

2. INFORMATION-PACKED

4. BUILDING THE BRAND

The advantages of print catalogues is their ease of use, level of trust and accessibility. They’re portable, aspirational and designed to be picked up repeatedly. The catalogue is a lightweight and readily available source of information, with most questions answered within its pages. Price, look, colour, size, quality, performance, can all be communicated quickly.

For high-end products, a catalogue offers an opportunity to draw the customer into the brand’s world, giving them an experience that goes beyond the shop window. Catalogues offer the brand a significant amount of time with their customers, strengthening the relationship and building the brand.

5. TARGETING

OPPORTUNITY Since the main distribution method for catalogues is post, targeting is a key element to ensure you’re reaching the right prospect. Whatever demographic you’re after, you can reach them in a matter of hours.

6. BRAND LOYALTY

A well-produced catalogue which stays true to the brand will foster large amounts of brand loyalty, with the customer satisfied that their custom is worth the effort and cost involved in its production.

7. EFFECTIVENESS

Working alongside direct mail, online and digital mediums, the catalogue’s ability to have its results measured quickly and accurately is a significant advantage for the marketer.

“Catalogues drive online sales by creating product awareness, recruiting new customers and building brand loyalty” Jonathan Harman, Managing Director, MarketReach

BUTLINS AUGUST MEDIA

2013 was a pivotal year in Butlins history. The 77-yearold company underwent a complete rebrand, with new communication guidelines and a dramatic new look and feel. This new look and feel had to be incorporated into its latest brochure, with a brief to break all perceptions of the family holiday brand. This was achieved using a modern retro design and a new editorial structure, with real families interviewed and photographed to make them the heroes of the publication. And it worked: those that booked having requested a brochure spent significantly more than those that didn’t, while the conversation rate also dwarfed the regular DM rate. The brochure also walked away with the title of CMA Best Brochure/ Catalogue for 2013.

www.printpoweruk.co.uk | PRINT POWER _ 57

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FINAL WORD

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TIM ARTHUR Tim Arthur is CEO of Time Out and former editor-in-chief of the magazine that gave the global listings brand its name. He oversaw the London edition’s transition to a free model in 2012 and now oversees 46 print titles in 30 countries, across Europe and the rest of the world How has Time Out benefitted from the switch to a free model? It totally revitalised the brand in London. It was really interesting – it brought in a whole new demographic, a much younger readership who hadn’t engaged with our print product at all and only knew us from our online presence. They were suddenly finding it and loving it again, finding the magazine really informative, saying ‘I never knew this happened’, and so on. Was there a certain amount of uncertainty about the move? Yes, it was daunting. We went from a print run of just under 50,000 to 305,000, so just in terms of paper and printing and distribution, it’s a massive investment. What was interesting was that when we did it, people were saying, ‘Does this mean the death of Time Out as a print product?’ And we said, ‘Well, hardly – this is actually the single biggest investment in print in the history of the company.’ Did you find advertisers hesistant about investing in a print product? At first there was a wait-and-see period for agencies, particularly for the first quarter as they were wondering whether this was going to work. That was until we got the first bit of research back, which said that the readership was about 500,000 – a huge audience. And even though it was a shorter magazine than before, people were reading it for longer, which is what we wanted them to do. If you’re an advertiser, you want a mass audience, which we’ve got. But it’s still a quality piece of work and dwell time for the mag has risen, so the advertisers

came in really strongly. The last quarter of 2013, a year on, was the strongest the magazine has had in its history. Have you found your revitalised print presence has boosted your online product? Oh yeah. There are a lot of digital brands who would die to have the real-world advertising and marketing this scale of print product can give you. We were trying to put a price on it at one point, asking ‘What would it cost to get the kind of marketing our magazine does for our online products?’, and it was well into the millions. What do you see as the key strengths of print media? People still love print. They want to read it and there’s a huge perceived value to it. But for us it’s part of a portfolio of print, online and app products, all of

which work best when you understand the differences between the platforms. People like longer-form reading in print, and a magazine is a great browse-able thing that you can’t really get online. Our website is more of a directory, an incredibly useful hub, like a font of all knowledge. Then we’ve concentrated our mobile app on geolocation so people can find out what’s going on around them at any given time. How does the market for print differ around the world? We’re in 46 cities in 30 countries and most have a print product. In London there was already an established ‘freemium’ print market and that gave us the strength to go into that market. But in other markets like Delhi, if those markets don’t exist there’s a very successful paid-for market. In Dubai, the paid-for print product does incredibly well, while in Moscow it’s just gone free. Actually, they’re the first one to go straight into market free and it’s gone really well over there, with loads of buzz about it. It’s a franchise but we don’t just sell the logo and they get on with it – they have to keep our tone of voice and our template, so it’s very carefully managed.

“There are a lot of digital brands who would die to have the real-world advertising and marketing this scale of print product can give you”

58_ PRINT POWER | www.printpoweruk.co.uk

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Seize every opportunity to grab their attention.

Direct Mail. It’s still a powerful medium. People like it. Respond to it. Act on it. In a blended campaign, Direct Mail creates an impact that’s more effective than digital marketing alone. In fact in 2013 Central Mailing Services figures showed that nearly half the UK population responded to printed direct mail over the past year. And it’s now becoming so effective that its ROI has increased every year in the last decade.* At Ricoh we understand Direct Mail. From our Precision Marketing data analysis and campaign design services to our Clickable Paper interactive print solution, variable data software and leading digital production printing systems – we’ve created the tools for relevant, creative and of course cost effective printed mailings. Well, we wouldn’t want you to miss out on the Direct Mail opportunity, would we? * ’Direct Mail is Competing in a Digital World’ - Neil Falconer, Printfuture.

ricoh-europe.com This is a Clickable ad.

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Print Power magazine Spring 2014