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CONNECTIONS connections ThePrinceton Princeton Public Library Magazine Public Library Spring 2018

connections The Princeton Public Library Magazine

2018

JANE

and other festival highlights ... Page 3 Min Jin Lee highlights the Migrations series

Lisa See headlines the Book Lovers Luncheon


FROM EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR BRETT BONFIELD

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he most important outcome of the 2Reimagine project is unmistakable: the obvious pleasure you take in using the library’s renovated second floor. I cannot recall ever seeing a public space that served as a catalyst for so much individual and group productivity while also encouraging such a great deal of comfort and ease. Our community members love the second floor because it helps them inhabit their best selves. When we purchased carpet as part of the second floor project, we also purchased complementary carpet for the first and third floors. We knew the first and third floors would need a refresh in order to help them keep pace with the increased expectations the second floor would inspire. And we knew that re-carpeting would afford us an opportunity to take advantage of the skills we developed during the 2Reimagine project to create similarly welcoming and engaging spaces on the library’s other two floors. When you move shelves and other furniture in order to install carpet, you do not have to put them back in their previous location. On the third floor, this enabled us to create a renewed space for youth services that fits the needs you have shared with us, as well as our vision for the next stages in library services for children, teens and families.

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The third floor is arranged in zones, with collections and spaces designated for distinct age groups and activities. The Wiggins Street side of the floor is now a large area for babies, toddlers, parents and other caregivers. The Story Room is on one side of the room, a new Nursing Room on the other side, and in between we have installed browsing boxes, all at kid-friendly height to make picture books more fun to discover. We have created two areas for tweens, one for studying and small group work, and another, near the service desk, for computer use. We have also designated new areas for technology-focused work or librarian-led classes and other activities. In addition, echoing our design on the second floor, we have moved the collections toward the middle of the space, away from the windows, so you can enjoy natural light and open space, and can also more efficiently find the perfect book for a student’s research or enrichment needs. Painting and lighting updates are scheduled next, along with self-service on the first floor for the books you place on hold, as we complete this stage of the library’s updates. We look forward to seeing you at the Sands Library Building and to providing the personalized and personable services that turn a beautiful public space into an enduringly great library.

Princeton Public Library 65 Witherspoon St. Princeton, NJ 08542 609-924-9529 www.princetonlibrary.org

OPERATING HOURS Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.


ON THE COVER

2018

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he 2018 Princeton Environmental Film Festival (PEFF) opens Monday, April 9, and runs through Sunday, April 15. Screenings and events will take place at the library, Princeton University, the Princeton Garden Theatre and at the Hopewell Theater in Hopewell Borough. Since its creation in 2006, PEFF has become a signature event for the library. Through outstanding, thought-provoking films representing a variety of perspectives, the festival encourages the community to explore environmental sustainability together. “It’s a powerful way for the community to connect more deeply, both to the natural and built environment and to each other,” said Susan Conlon, founder/director of PEFF and Head of Youth Services. “Very often, people are profoundly affected and moved to personal action by what they learn from these films, and in that way, the festival has had real community impact.” The impact of PEFF extends beyond the Princeton community, too. This year, for the first time, a PEFF selection is being shown at The Hopewell Theater. “They were excited to collaborate with us in bringing a PEFF screening to Hopewell,” said Conlon. The high-energy documentary “Wasted: The Story of Food Waste” will be shown at the theater on Friday, April 13, at 7 p.m. It remains important to Conlon and PEFF associate director Kim Dorman to continue to strengthen ties to community organizations. “There are so many incredible organizations that​ work on issues around dignity of people and planet,” said Dorman. “For us, working with community partners is a win-win; we are able to raise awareness about the good work they are doing and often they are able to share local or national context for us about the films we are screening. Also, it’s another way of bringing communities together, which is critically important as we move toward a more equitable and sustainable future.​” From the documentary “Jane,” about Jane Goodall’s trailblazing research with chimpanzees, to “Dolores,” about Chicana activist Dolores Huerta’s

www.princetonlibrary.org

efforts to organize California’s farmworkers, to “Five Seasons: The Gardens of Piet Oudolf,” where we meet the influential garden designer, several of this year’s films introduce viewers to people who have devoted their lives to their work. “The subjects of these films and others that are part of the festival are people whose identities are closely tied to their life’s work,” said Conlon. “And the films themselves open the door for us to see the world in a way that we wouldn’t without them.” PEFF screenings are presented free of charge thanks to the generosity of sponsors, Church & Dwight Inc., The Nature Conservancy, Whole Earth Center of Princeton, Princeton University, Princeton University Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies and the Princeton Environmental Institute. For a complete schedule of PEFF films and events, visit princetonlibrary.org/peff. C ON T IN U E D

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ON THE COVER 2018

FIVE SEASONS: THE GARDENS OF PIET OUDOLF

DOLORES

Tuesday, April 10, 7 p.m. Princeton Garden Theatre This immersive film gives viewers a rare look at the creative process of influential garden designer Piet Oudolf. Featuring intimate discussions across all fours seasons in his own garden and at his signature public works in New York, Chicago and the Netherlands, the film also spotlights the opening of a major new garden Oudolf calls his best. 1 hour, 17 minutes.

Sunday April 15, 4 p.m., Community Room The personal stakes involved in committing one’s life to social change are brought to light in this profile of Dolores Huerta, now 86, whose enormous contributions as an equal partner in co-founding the first farm workers unions with Cesar Chavez have gone largely unrecognized. 1 hour, 35 minutes.

ALBATROSS Saturday April 14, 7 p.m,

Friend 101, Princeton University Campus On a remote atoll in the North Pacific Ocean, albatross chicks are dying, bodies filled with plastic. In his filmmaking debut, acclaimed photographer Chris Jordan unflinchingly shows the horror and grief of this tragedy, but ultimately brings us to a deeply felt experience of beauty and love for life on earth. 1 hour, 37 minutes.

WASTED!: THE STORY OF FOOD WASTE 4

Friday, April 13, 7 p.m., Hopewell Theater The global issue of food waste is highlighted in this film, produced by author and chef Anthony Bourdain, which showcases forward-thinking chefs and thought leaders who offer creative, often mouth-watering, solutions to this crisis. 1 hour, 25 minutes.

THE OYSTER FARMERS

THE IRON TRIANGLE Wednesday, April 11, 7 p.m.,

Friend 101, Princeton University Campus The working-class owners of a network of auto repair shops and junkyards in the shadow of New York’s Citi Field face off against gentrification and urban renewal in a fight for the future of their livelihoods and community. 1 hour, 23 minutes. “The Iron Triangle” is also part of the Migrations Series.

Sunday, April 15, 11 a.m., Community Room Once home to the largest source of seed oysters on the East Coast, New Jersey’s Barnegat Bay was facing oyster extinction. This film follows three sustainable shellfish pioneers leading the charge to bring back the bounty of the bay and restore oyster culture in the region. 55 minutes.

DIRECTOR Q&As April 10 April 11 April 14 April 15

Thomas Piper Prudence Katze Chris Jordan Corinne Ruff

Details: princetonlibrary.org/peff

“Five Seasons: The Gardens of Piet Oudolf” “The Iron Triangle” “Albatross” “The Oyster Farmers”


ON THE COVER

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igrations: A Princeton Community Collaboration continues through May with programs that explore the theme of migration from multiple perspectives. Lectures, exhibits, performances, workshops, author talks, films and discussions are being presented as part of the project by more than 20 community partners, including the library, and a host of Princeton University organizations. Many of the programs examine the massive refugee crises facing the world today. Not limited in scope to the crises, however, Migrations events also explore how people, animals, goods and even ideas move across the planet. “This project highlights two areas in which the library excels,” said Executive Director Brett Bonfield. “We see the world as rich and multifaceted, so it seems natural to us to explore an important theme like migrations in a way that celebrates nuance and interconnectedness. We also take pride in serving as a hub and catalyst for vital conversations, so it is satisfying to see such a large-scale, community-wide collaboration grow out of a series of lunches we host for area nonprofit leaders.”

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A list of the Migrations events happening at the library follows. For events and exhibits around town and for more information on the project, visit princetonmigrations.org.

BOOKS & AUTHORS Book Discussion: “Pachinko” by Min Jin Lee Thursday, March 8, 10:30 a.m. Librarian Kristin Friberg leads the Contemporary Fiction Book Group in a discussion of “Pachinko” by Min Jin Lee. The discussion is in advance of the author’s April 18 appearance at the library. Conference Room Book Brunch featuring Moshe Sakal The Diamond Setter Sunday, March 25, 11:30 a.m. Award-winning Israeli author Moshe Sakal discusses his first novel to be translated into English. Inspired by true events, the best-selling Israeli book traces a complex web of love triangles and family secrets across generations and borders, illuminating diverse facets of life in the Middle East. The book was translated by Jessica Cohen. Tea, coffee and a variety of pastries and fruit will be served. Community Room

www.princetonlibrary.org

Min Jin Lee appears April 18.

Min Jin Lee Pachinko Wednesday, April 18, 6 p.m. The national bestselling author discusses the paperback release of her novel about four generations of a poor Korean immigrant family fighting to control their destiny in 20th-century Japan “Pachinko” was a National Book Award Finalist and a New York Times Bestseller. She attended Yale, where she was awarded the Henry Wright Prize for Nonfiction and the James Ashmun Veech Prize for Fiction. She attended Georgetown Law and worked as a lawyer for several years in New York prior to writing full time. Lee has spoken internationally about writing, politics, film and literature. She lived in Japan from 2007 to 2011 while researching “Pachinko.” Labyrinth Books, 116 Nassau St. Co-sponsored by the library and Labyrinth Books. C O N T IN U E D

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ON THE COVER

David Bellos leads a panel discussion of book translators on March 15.

Artifacts from Princeton’s transportation past will be displayed on April 17.

LECTURES

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Panel Discussion “Words Without Borders: The Translation of Books” Thursday, March 15, 7 p.m. The translation of books facilitates the migration of text between languages and allows ideas and stories to travel to other countries. A panel of professional translators will discuss the craft and challenges of translation through the lens of migrating text between languages. David Bellos, director of the Program in Translation and Intercultural Communication at Princeton University, where he is also a professor of French and comparative literature, will moderate the panel. Panelists will include well-known translator Shelley Frisch and others. Community Room Open Archive: “Trolleys, Trains, and Transit” Tuesday, April 17, 6:30 p.m. The Historical Society of Princeton displays artifacts and documents from its collection that illustrate how integral transit has always been to Princeton life and identity. Stephanie Schwartz, curator of collections and research, will be on hand to share information and answer questions while attendees are encouraged to be the historians themselves. Discovery Center Co-sponsored by the library and the Historical Society of Princeton. Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

ARTS Exhibit: “Local Women in their Crowns: A Portraits and Stories Community Project” Through May 30 Photographs and stories of local and regional African American women wearing their church hats are exhibited

in conjunction with McCarter Theatre’s March 13-April 1 production of “Crowns.” The visual storytelling project, celebrating African American culture, tradition and storytelling, was a collaboration between McCarter and the Arts Council of Princeton. Technology Center Exhibit: “I Am Innocent: The Migration Back to Freedom for the Innocent in Prison” April 5 through May 30 Photographs and stories conveying the physical and emotional upheaval experienced by men and women who were wrongfully imprisoned and released are on view as part of Migrations: A Princeton Community Collaboration. The photographs were captured by Diane Bladecki of Centurion Ministry, an innocence organization that has freed 61 people since it was founded in Princeton in 1980. Reading Room and Second Floor Art Talk Thursday, May 10, 7 p.m. Kate Germond, Centurion Ministry executive director, discusses “I Am Innocent: The Migration Back to Freedom for the Innocent in Prison,” an exhibit of photographs and stories on view in the Reading Room and other second floor areas from April 5 through May 30. Captured by Centurion’s Diane Bladecki, the photographs and stories convey the physical and emotional upheaval associated with losing and regaining freedom and family. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Centurion Ministry.

MORE ON THE SERIES princetonmigrations.org Follow on social media at #princetonmigrations.


ON THE COVER

Film highlights include“Winged Migration,” above left, on March 11; “Shalom Italia,” left, on March 21; and “Human Flow,” above, on April 2. Dan-el Padilla Peralta will be interviewed for Randy Cohen’s public radio program on May 21.

Fred Miller Sunday, May 13, 3 p.m. Pianist and singer Fred Miller presents “1892-1919: How Ya Gonna Keep ´Em Down on The Farm? Immigration, World War and The New Music,” a lecture in song. Community Room Radio Interview Person, Place, Thing with Randy Cohen featuring Dan-el Padilla Peralta Monday, May 21, 7 p.m. Cohen interviews author and Princeton University Assistant Professor of Classics Dan-el Padilla Peralta for his public radio program, during which guests are asked to speak about a person, a place and a thing they find meaningful rather than about themselves. Padilla’s award-winning memoir is “Undocumented: A Dominican Boy’s Odyssey from a Homeless Shelter to Ivy League.” Cohen won multiple Emmy awards as a writer for “Late Night with David Letterman” and for 12 years wrote “The Ethicist” column for The New York Times Magazine. Community Room Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

FILM “The Other Side of Hope” Thursday, March 8, 5:30 p.m. In this 2017 Finnish comedy-drama, a poker-playing restaurateur and former traveling salesman gives refuge to an asylum-seeker in search of the sister he lost while the two were fleeing the Syrian Civil War. 1 hour, 38 minutes. Princeton Garden Theatre, 160 Nassau St. Part of the Princeton International Cinema Series, a collaboration of the International Employees Group at Princeton

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University, the Davis International Center, the Princeton Garden Theatre and the library. Tickets may be purchased online at thegardentheatre.com or at the door. For other films in the series, see Page 14.

Film and Speaker: “Winged Migration” Sunday, March 11, 1 p.m. In this critically acclaimed documentary, a film crew follows a variety of species of migrating birds through 40 countries and all seven continents. 1 hour, 38 minutes. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Festival.

“Shalom Italia” Wednesday, March 21, 6:30 p.m. In this documentary, three Italian Jewish brothers set off on a journey through Tuscany in search of a cave where they hid as children to escape the Nazis. Their quest, full of humor, food and Tuscan landscapes, straddles the boundary between history and myth. 1 hour. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and American Documentary/POV.

“Human Flow” Monday, April 2, 7 p.m. Director Ai Weiwei provides a detailed and heartbreaking exploration of the global refugee crisis captured over the course of a year in 23 countries. 2 hours, 20 minutes. Princeton Garden Theatre, 160 Nassau St. Film and Q&A: “Birds of May” Thursday, April 26, 7 p.m. This documentary tells the story of the federally threatened Rufa Red Knot and its annual visit to the Delaware Bay. The screening will be followed by a Q&A with filmmaker Jared Flesher. 28 minutes. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library, Princeton Environmental Film Festival and D&R Greenway.

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BOOKS AND AUTHORS AUTHORS Giles Milton Churchill’s Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare: The Mavericks Who Plotted Hitler’s Defeat Friday, March 2, 6 p.m. The author discusses his book, the true story of a group of men who made up a top-secret inner circle charged with plotting the destruction of Hitler’s war machine through spectacular acts of sabotage. Handpicked in 1939 by Winston Churchill, and aided by a group of formidable women, the organization changed the course of World War II. Community Room

Giles Milton, March 6

Daniel Golden Spy Schools: How the CIA, FBI, and Foreign Intelligence Secretly Exploit America’s Universities Tuesday, March 6, 6 p.m. The Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist exposes how academia has become the center of foreign and domestic espionage and why that is troubling for our nation’s security. Golden also wrote “The Price of Admission.” Labyrinth Books, 116 Nassau St. Part of the Library Live at Labyrinth series co-sponsored by the library and Labyrinth Books.

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Daniel Golden, March 6

Freeman Dyson Maker of Patterns: An Autobiography Through Letters Wednesday, April 4, 6 p.m. The renowned physicist and Institute for Advanced Study professor emeritus shares his life story and recounts many of the major advances in 20th-century science. Through letters written to relatives between 1940 and the early 1980s, an historic account of modern science and its greatest players is formed. Labyrinth Books, 116 Nassau St. Part of the Library Live at Labyrinth series co-sponsored by the library and Labyrinth Books.

Jim Bell The Ultimate Interplanetary Travel Guide: A Futuristic Journey Through the Cosmos Thursday, April 5, 6:30 p.m. The planetary scientist discusses his book, which offers space enthusiasts a visual experience of our solar system. Bell is professor in the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University, an adjunct professor in the Department of Astronomy at Cornell University and distinguished visiting scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. As president of The Planetary Society, he is an active public commentator on science and space exploration, earning the 2011 Carl Sagan Medal from the American Astronomical Society. Community Room Freeman Dyson, April 4


BOOKS AND AUTHORS Imani Perry May We Forever Stand: A History of the Black National Anthem Thursday, April 5, 6 p.m. The author and Princeton University professor of African American studies tells the story of the song “Lift Every Voice and Sing” and how African Americans have used music and culture to organize, mourn, challenge and celebrate for more than a century. Perry’s talk coincides with the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4. Labyrinth Books, 116 Nassau St. Part of the Library Live at Labyrinth series co-sponsored by the library and Labyrinth Books.

Julian E. Zelizer The Presidency of Barack Obama: A First Historical Assessment Wednesday, April 25, 7 p.m. The author and Princeton University professor of history and public affairs discusses his latest book, an original account of the Obama presidency from a group of leading political historians. The writers offer assessments of the big issues that shaped the Obama years and put the president and his administration into political and historical context. Community Room

Jim Bell, April 5 (see Page 8)

Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Mark C. Serreze Brave New Arctic: The Untold Story of the Melting North Wednesday, May 9, 6 p.m. The author and director of the National Snow and Ice Data Center describes how puzzlement turned to concern and astonishment as researchers came to understand that the Arctic of old was quickly disappearing, with potentially devastating implications for the entire planet. Labyrinth Books, 116 Nassau St.

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Imani Perry, April 5

This special event of the Princeton Environmental Film Festival is part of the Library Live at Labyrinth series co-sponsored by the library and Labyrinth Books.

THE FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY PRESENT THE

BOOK LOVERS LUNCHEON Featuring Best-Selling Author

Lisa See Wednesday, April 11, noon Springdale Golf Club Details: Page 26

www.princetonlibrary.org

Julian Zelizer, April 25


BOOKS AND AUTHORS AUTHORS Stephen Greenblatt in Conversation with Jeff Dolven Tuesday, May 15, 6 p.m. World-renowned Shakespeare scholar Stephen Greenblatt discusses “Tyrant,” his latest book exploring the playwright’s insight into bad (and often mad) rulers with Jeff Dolven, professor of English and associate chair, department of English at Princeton University. Labyrinth Books, 116 Nassau St. Part of the Library Live at Labyrinth series co-sponsored by the library and Labyrinth Books.

BOOK DISCUSSION MYSTERY BOOK GROUP

Mondays, 7:30 p.m., Quiet Room March 5, “A is for Alibi” by Sue Grafton April 2, “The Widows of Malabar Hill” by Sujata Massey May 7, “Spider Woman’s Daughter” by Anne Hillerman

CONTEMPORARY FICTION BOOK GROUP

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Mark C. Serreze, May 9 (see Page 9)

Thursdays, 10:30 a.m., Conference Room March 8, “Pachinko” by Min Jin Lee April 12, “Lincoln In the Bardo” by George Saunders May 10, “Swimming Home” by Deborah Levy

BLACK VOICES BOOK GROUP

Thursdays, 7 p.m., Princeton Room March 8, “Sing Unburied, Sing” by Jesmyn Ward April 12, “Devil in the Grove” by Gilbert King May 10, “Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and its Legacy” by Heather Ann Thompson

NEW GRAPHIC NOVEL BOOK GROUP

Mondays, 7 p.m., Princeton Room March 19, “Relish” by Lucy Knisley April 16, “The Silence of Our Friends” by Jim Demonakos and Mark Long May 21, “My Favorite Thing is Monsters” by Emil Ferris

GENTE Y CUENTOS

Mondays, 7 p.m., April 23, 30; May 7, 14, 21 Tuesday, May 29, 7 p.m. In discussing Latin American short stories in Spanish, participants recount their personal experiences and how they relate to the characters in the story. Conference Room Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Stephen Greenblatt, above, in conversation with Jeff Dolven, May 15

Books and Authors in the Migrations Series...Page 5


BOOKS AND AUTHORS HISTORICAL FICTION BOOK GROUP Scholars participate in discussions of the fictional elements and the nonfictional local and regional context of selected books at the Historical Society of Princeton, which co-sponsors the group with the library.

Tuesday, May 1, 6:30 p.m. The Last Town on Earth by Thomas Mullen Discussion led by Michael Merrill, professor of professional practice in the Department of Labor Studies and Employment Relations at the Rutgers School of Management and Labor Relations. Updike Farmstead, 354 Quaker Road

Michael Merrill leads a discussion of “The Last Town on Earth,” May 1

Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

POETRY SPECIAL EVENT

Book Launch: U.S. 1 Worksheets Sunday, April 8, 1:15 p.m. The U.S.1 Poets’ Cooperative launches Volume 63 of its journal, which contains works by 142 poets. In addition to verse by cooperative members, the journal includes works by poets from across the Americas and Australia. Doors open at 1:15 p.m.; readings begin at 2 p.m. Refreshments will be served and journals will be available for purchase. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the U.S. 1 Poets’ Cooperative. Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

POETS AT THE LIBRARY All events are in the Newsroom. Featured poets read from their works for 20 minutes each followed by an open-mic session. Co-sponsored by the library, Delaware Valley Poets and the U.S. 1 Poets’ Cooperative. Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Elizabeth Anne Socolow and Erika Wagner Monday, March 12, 7 p.m. Socolow is a founding member of the U.S. 1 Poets’ Cooperative. She was twice awarded a New Jersey state fellowship in the arts and won the Barnard poetry fellowship for her first published book of poems. Wagner received a degree in art history and painting from the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. Robert Carnevale and Emily Nguyen Monday, April 9, 7 p.m. Carnevale teaches creative writing and literature at Drew University, served as assistant coordinator of the Dodge Foundation Poetry Program and also worked on the Voices

& Visions film series on American poets. His poems have been published in The Paris Review, The New Yorker and many other magazines, and anthologies. Nguyen studied classical Japanese poetry at the University of Wisconsin. Her poems and translations from the classical Japanese have been published internationally. BJ Ward Monday, May 14, 7 p.m. Ward is the author of four books of poetry, most recently “Jackleg Opera: Collected Poems 1990-2013,” which received the Paterson Award for Literary Excellence. His poems have appeared in Poetry, American Poetry Review, TriQuarterly, The New York Times and other publications. He is the recipient of two Distinguished Artist Fellowships from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts.

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ARTS Gillian Sherry in “Sunset Boulevard,” March 4.

Conductor Teddy Abrams discusses Beethoven at a PSO Soundtracks program on March 14.

Diane Cypkin presents “In Words and Music: The Story of the Yiddish Theatre” on March 25.

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Ceol agus Cairde (Music and Friends) Saturday, March 10, 4 p.m. Helen O’Shea and Shenanigans, her band of Celtic musicians and singers, return to the library by popular request to celebrate St Patrick’s Day and all things Irish. Part of Makers Day. Community Room PSO Soundtracks Lecture “Teddy Abrams Talks Beethoven” Wednesday, March 14, 7 p.m. Teddy Abrams, music director of the Louisville Orchestra, expounds on the greatness of Beethoven and how he prepares his interpretations of the composer’s works. The talk is a prelude to Abrams’ debut as guest conduc-

tor of PSO, a March 18 program featuring Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6 (“Pastoral”) at Richardson Auditorium. Refreshments will be served. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Symphony Orchestra.

Performance and Discussion Maizie Brews a Business Thursday, March 22, 11 a.m. Historic interpreter Maureen O’Connor Leach gives a dramatic presentation as Maizie Stanton, a 1925 matron planning to open a Tea Room. Through this character monologue, during which Maizie shares her husband’s reaction to her announcement and how she is preparing for the undertaking, the audience will view the challenges faced by women of the era who were stepping out of the home and into the business world. Following the performance, Leach will participate in a discussion with the audience about the Tea Room craze and the evolution of women as entrepreneurs. Community Room This program has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the New Jersey Council for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the NEH or NJCH.

McCarter Live at the Library Friday, March 23, 6:30 p.m. Singers and musicians from the Einstein Alley Musicians Collaborative, including The Beagles and So It Goes,


ARTS

Maureen O’Connor Leach portrays Maizie Stanton on March 22.

Rudresh Mahanthappa directs Small Group A on April 22.

present interpretations of songs performed by Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis. The program previews McCarter’s April 3 production of “Million Dollar Quartet” and features a wide range of the most loved material from the four performers, who continued making notable music for decades after their celebrated 1956 jam at Sun Records. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and McCarter Theatre Center.

Diane Cypkin “In Words and Music: The Story of the Yiddish Theatre” Sunday, March 25, 3 p.m. Award-winning performer and professor Diane Cypkin presents a concert/lecture that tells the story of Yiddish theater. The performance features memorable songs written and/or popularized by unforgettable greats including Avrom Goldfadn, Boris Thomashefsky, Aaron Lebedev, Jennie Goldstein and many others. Community Room

PSO Soundtracks Lecture “Melding Cultural Sounds in Music” Wednesday, May 9, 7 p.m. Derek Bermel, artistic director of the American Composers Orchestra, and composer Saad Haddad discuss the interest and challenges inherent in integrating cultural sounds and Western Music. The discussion relates to the Princeton Symphony Orchestra’s May 20 premiere performance of Haddad’s new work “Risala.” Refreshments will be served. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Symphony Orchestra.

Jazz with Small Group A Sunday, April 22, 2 p.m. Jazz at Princeton University returns to the library to celebrate Jazz Appreciation month with a concert by Small Group A under the direction of Rudresh Mahanthappa. Compositions of the great masters of jazz will be performed. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton University Department of Music.

Derek Bermel

Saad Haddad

Arts in the Migrations Series...Pages 6-7 www.princetonlibrary.org

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FILM

“Beyond the Brick: A Lego Brickumentary,” April 3.

“BPM (Beats Per Minute),” April 5.

“The Other Side of Hope,” March 8.

“Bill Nye: Science Guy,” May 23.

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PRINCETON INTERNATIONAL CINEMA SERIES

FIRST FRIDAY FEATURE SERIES

All screenings are at the Princeton Garden Theatre, 160 Nassau St.

“Darkest Hour” Friday, March 9, 6:30 p.m. Gary Oldman stars as Winston Churchill in this 2017 British war drama that follows Churchill’s early days as prime minister at the precipice of World War II. The film explores how, as Hitler closed in on Britain, Churchill was faced with one of his most defining trials: to explore a negotiated peace treaty with Nazi Germany or stand firm to fight for the liberty and freedom of a nation. 2 hours, 5 minutes.

The series is a collaboration of the library, the International Employees Group at Princeton University, the Davis International Center and the Princeton Garden Theatre. Tickets ($11 general admission, $8 seniors, $6 Princeton University ID holders, library cardholders and Garden Theatre members) may be purchased online at thegardentheatre.com or at the door. The library will also offer a limited number of free tickets while supplies last for each screening. Call (609) 924-9529, ext. 1220 for availability. Free popcorn.

“The Other Side of Hope” Thursday, March 8, 5:30 p.m. In this 2017 Finnish comedy-drama, a poker-playing restaurateur and former traveling salesman gives refuge to an asylum-seeker in search of the sister he lost while the two were fleeing the Syrian Civil War. 1 hour, 38 minutes. Part of Migrations: A Princeton Community Collaboration.

“BPM (Beats Per Minute)” Thursday, April 5, 5:30 p.m. Set in the early 1990s, this French film depicts a group of HIV/AIDS activists associated with the Paris chapter of ACT UP. 2 hours, 20 minutes. “The Square” Thursday, May 3, 5:30 p.m. This 2017 Swedish satirical drama is about an art curator at a prestigious Stockholm museum who finds himself in professional and personal crisis after setting up a controversial new exhibit. 2 hours, 31 minutes.

All screenings are in the Community Room.

“Lady Bird” Friday, April 6, 6:30 p.m. This dramatic comedy is a coming-of-age story about an outspoken high school senior and her turbulent relationship with her strong-willed mother. 1 hour, 33 minutes. “The Post” Friday, May 11, 6:30 p.m. Steven Spielberg directed Meryl Streep as Katherine Graham and Tom Hanks as Ben Bradlee in the true story of The Washington Post’s decision to publish The Pentagon Papers, a classified government report containing undisclosed information about the United States’ 30-year involvement in the Vietnam War. 1 hour, 56 minutes.


FILM DOCUMENTARIES “Beyond the Brick: A Lego Brickumentary” Tuesday, April 3, 6:30 p.m. This documentary covers the origins of the Lego company in Billund, Denmark, and explores how Lego bricks became a phenomenon beloved by collectors, artists, innovators and builders of all ages. 1 hour 35 minutes. Community Room

Screening and Discussion: “Bill Nye: Science Guy” Wednesday, May 23, 6:30 p.m. This behind-the-scenes portrait follows the former star of the popular children’s show as he takes off his Science Guy lab coat and takes on those who deny climate change, evolution, and a science-based world view. The film features Bill Nye, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Ann Druyan and many others. Following David Alvarado the screening, Ingrid Ockert, a Princeton University doctoral candidate in the history of science, will interview David Alvarado, co-director of the film. 1 hour, 41 minutes. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library, Princeton University’s Council on Science and Technology and American Documentary/POV.

“Angst” will be screened April 19, followed by a panel discussion.

Film and Panel Discussion: “Angst” Thursday, April 19, 7 p.m. This documentary features candid interviews with kids and young adults who suffer, or have suffered, from anxiety and what they’ve learned about it. The film includes discussions with mental health experts about the causes of anxiety and its sociological effects, as well as help, resources and tools. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion. Please see the library’s events calendar for ticket information. Doors open for ticket-holders at 6:30; remaining seats will be filled five minutes before the screening starts. 56 minutes. Princeton Garden Theatre, 160 Nassau St. Organized by the library and the Waldorf School of Princeton with support from The Hun School, Princeton Learning Cooperative, Princeton Friends School, Princeton Common Ground and Princeton Fusion Academy.

Film and Panel Discussion: “Coming of Age in Aging America” Thursday, May 17, 7 p.m. A screening of the PBS documentary will be followed by a panel discussion moderated by Susan Hoskins of the Princeton Senior Research Center. The film examines the approach of a global demographic where the majority of the population will be more than 50 years old. The far-reaching implications for America’s social and economic institutions as they adapt to this transformation are also examined. 1 hour. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Senior Resource Center. See the library’s events calendar for related events.

“Stripped: The Comics Documentary” Saturday, May 5, 2 p.m. This 2014 documentary, being screened as part of Free Comic Book Day, is about comic strips and their transition from newspapers to the web. It features interviews with creators of more than 70 comic strips who discuss their trade and its prospects in the 21st century. 1 hour, 25 minutes. Newsroom

MORE MOVIES Sunday Tea with “Victoria & Abdul” Sunday, March 18, 3 p.m. Based on the book of the same name by Shrabani Basu, this British dramatic comedy stars Judi Dench and Ali Fazal in the story of the real-life friendship that developed between Queen Victoria and Abdul Karim, an Indian Muslim prison clerk who became her servant and friend. Tea and scones will be served. 1 hour, 52 minutes. Community Room

“Selma” Wednesday, April 4, 7 p.m. Based on the 1965 voting rights marches from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, this historical drama stars David Oyelowo as Martin Luther King Jr. and Tom Wilkinson as President Lyndon B. Johnson. 2 hours, 8 minutes. Community Room

Films in the Migrations Series...Page 7 www.princetonlibrary.org

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ENRICHMENT LECTURES “Innovations that Changed the World: An Introduction to the David Sarnoff Collection” Thursday, March 8, 7 p.m. Florencia Pierri, collections curator for the Sarnoff Collection at The College of New Jersey and a doctoral candidate in Princeton University’s History of Science program, explores the evolution of 20th-century industrial innovations rooted in New Jersey and the role Radio Corporation of America (RCA) played in their production and promotion. Artifacts from the Sarnoff collection which document the history of communications and electronics in the 20th century will be on display in the Discovery Center following the talk. Newsroom

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“Writing About Other People’s Memories” Tuesday, March 13, 11 a.m. Ellen G. Friedman, professor of English at The College of New Jersey and founding coordinator of the Holocaust and Genocide Studies Program, explores the challenges of oral history and why and how we share generational stories. The daughter of Holocaust survivors, Friedman was born in Kyrgyzstan in the Soviet Union while her parents were on the run from Hitler. Her new book, “The Seven, A Family Holocaust Story” is a family memoir. Community Room This program has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the New Jersey Council for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities or the New Jersey Council for the Humanities.

“Suppers Program Motivating Healthy Change” Thursday, March 22, 6:30 p.m. Mark Woodford, professor in the Department of Counselor Education at The College of New Jersey explains fundamental truths about the processes of making behavioral changes. He will also introduce principles of motivational interviewing, a model used in public health and addictions counseling to help people whose improvement requires behavioral change. Samples of some of the Suppers Programs favorite recipes will be shared. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Suppers Program.

“Beyond the ‘I’: When Memoir Meets History” Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m., April 3, 10 Through readings, discussion, and in-class exercises, participants in this two-session class taught by Mimi Schwartz will discover strategies for writing their life stories in ways that family, friends, or strangers will want to read. Open to writers of all levels. Schwartz is professor emerita in writing at Richard Stockton University. Her latest book is “When History Is Personal.” She is also the author of the award-winning “Good Neighbors, Bad Times” and co-author of “Writing True, The Art and Craft of Creative Nonfiction.” Limited to 14; register through the library’s events calendar. Conference Room Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

“Grounds for Sculpture: Looking Ahead” Thursday, April 19, 7 p.m. Gary Garrido Schneider, executive director of Grounds for Sculpture, shares what is on the horizon for the 42-acre sculpture park, garden and museum. Community Room Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Robert White Mountain Sunday, May 6, 3 p.m. The writer, humanitarian and activist reads excerpts from his upcoming book “The Indian Wars: 1492-2018” and shares the Hunkpapa Lakota vision for healing the earth. Newsroom “The French in America: From Fighting to Fashion” Tuesday, May 29, 6:30 p.m. Why did the French journey to North America in the 1600s and why did their efforts to establish a colony end in disaster ­— and set the stage for the American Revolution? Jeff Heller, a historical novelist, uses slides and commentary to present the fascinating story of how fighting, folkways and even fashion influenced the actions taken by the French in their bold quest to claim a continent. Newsroom Presented with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.


ENRICHMENT “Musical Comedy in Ancient Rome: The Genius of Titus Maccius Plautus” Thursday, May 31, 7 p.m. Denis Feeney, the Giger Professor of Latin at Princeton University, presents the opening lecture of the 2018 Princeton Festival. The lecture will concentrate on how Plautus anticipates modern musical comedy, as in “A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum,” which is based primarily on Plautus’ masterpiece, “Pseudolus.” Community Room

Princeton Area Community Foundation Family Giving Resources Open House Tuesday, March 27, 3 p.m. The Princeton Area Community Foundation works with hundreds of families to make effective, high-impact philanthropic investments. Do you donate to causes you love but don’t know how to engage your children in your giving? Want to share your family’s values while the kids are still listening to you? You’ll leave this open house with new ideas and resources to help you make giving a family tradition, and have fun while doing it. Facilitators will be Elizabeth B. Wagner and Diana D. Leighton of PACF. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Area Community Foundation.

Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Festival.

CIVIC LIFE AND RESOURCES Marijuana Reform Panel Thursday, March 1, 7 p.m. New Jersey United for Marijuana Reform hosts a panel discussion on adult recreational marijuana legalization as a racial justice issue, with a focus on the public health and public safety reasons to legalize. Panelists are Dr. David Nathan (pictured), founder and board president of Doctors for Cannabis Reform; Dianna Houenou, policy counsel, ACLU of New Jersey; and Dominick Bucci, New Jersey State Police (retired), Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP). Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and New Jersey United for Marijuana Reform.

PRINCETON PUBLIC LIBRARY IS PROUD TO JOIN

YWCA PRINCETON’S ANNUAL THE

STAND AGAINST RACISM Friday, April 27, 4:30 p.m., Hinds Plaza

www.princetonlibrary.org

Panel Discussion on Youth Incarceration Thursday, March 29, 7 p.m. In the wake of the closing of two antiquated juvenile corrections facilities, a panel examines the future of New Jersey’s juvenile justice system. Panelists include social justice activist Rev. Charles F. Boyer, James Williams IV of New Jersey Institute for Social Justice and Laura Cohen, director of the Criminal and Youth Justice Clinic and law professor at Rutgers Newark. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Students for Prison Education and Reform.

Mercer County Community ID Card Program Thursdays, noon-2 p.m. and 5-7 p.m., March 1-May 31 All Mercer County residents are eligible for this photo card, which has personal identifying information, medical risk factors and emergency contact information. Sponsored by the One Community Coalition, the privately issued card may be used at social service agencies, schools, clinics, parks, post offices and to access basic municipal or health services and as a form of identification for retail transactions. The Latin American Legal Defense & Education Fund, a nonprofit advocacy group, issues the card. Cost is $15 per card ($10 for under 21 and over 65) to cover expenses. Princeton Room Requires proof of identity with a photo (any state, county or country ID or driver’s license; passport or consulate authentication; green card or work permit; welfare card with original birth certificate) and proof of address in your name (lease, utility bill, financial account statement, money transfer order, hospital bill). For additional info, visit www.laldef.org. Co-sponsored by the library and the Latin American Legal Defense & Education Fund.

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ENRICHMENT

AARP Tax Help Mondays through April 16, 9 a.m. to noon by appointment

Seniors and people of low and moderate income can get free help preparing and filing their federal and New Jersey electronic tax returns by appointment on Monday mornings through April 16. Help is available for non-complex, individual returns only. Participants should bring a copy of their most recent return and documentation for the previous year’s income and expenses that may be deductible. Appointments may be scheduled through noon by calling (609) 9249529, ext. 1220. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and AARP.

Continuing Conversations on Race and White Privilege Mondays, 7 p.m., March 5, April 2, May 7 Members of Not In Our Town, the Princeton-based interracial and interfaith social action group, facilitate these discussions of race-related issues of relevance to our community and nation. Please check the library’s website for topics. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Not in Our Town Princeton.

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Voyage ESL Sundays, 4 p.m., March 4, 11, 18; April 22, 29; May 6, 20 Speakers of world languages who are learning English as a second language are invited to these 90-minute sessions. The winter session ends March 18; a new sixweek course begins April 22 and continues through June 10. Conference Room Money in the Garden State Mondays, 5 p.m., March 12, April 9, May 14 Ingrid Reed, retired director of the Eagleton Institute of Politics, moderates this discussion series about county, municipal and school budgets and the state’s laws governing them. The series, which continues in June, will conclude with a lecture on New Jersey’s new budget. Newsroom Meet the Mayor Fridays, 8:30 a.m., March 23, April 27, May 25 Princeton residents are invited to discuss concerns with Mayor Liz Lempert. Lobby

Citizenship Ceremony in the library Community Room, September, 2017.

Citizen Preparation Classes Wednesdays, 7 p.m., April 4-25; May 2-23 This series of eight sessions is offered by The Latin American Task Force to assist in preparing for the U.S. Citizenship Test. Classes include history and civics lessons and a review of basic English necessary for the citizenship interview. Conference Room except for April 11 and May 16, when sessions will be held in the Princeton Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Latin American Task Force.

SUSTAINABILITY

Both events are in the Community Room. Co-sponsored by the library and Sustainable Princeton with support from NRG Energy Inc. Refreshments will be served.

Princeton’s Community Carbon Footprint: What Is Our Impact on Climate Change? Wednesday, March 7, 7 p.m. Sustainable Princeton will share the results of a greenhouse gas inventory for the Princeton community and discuss potential actions to reduce our collective emissions. What is a Climate Action Plan and Why Does Princeton Need One? Wednesday, May 16, 7 p.m. States and cities across the nation are adopting plans to mitigate and prepare for the effects of climate change. Princeton is ready to step up and create its own plan. What does this mean and how can it be accomplished?

BUSINESS AND CAREERS Job Seeker Sessions Fridays, 9:45 a.m., March 2-30; April 6--27; May 11-25 The library and Professional Service Group of Mercer County sponsor sessions for professionals who are seeking new opportunities throughout the region. See the library’s website for specific topics. Community Room


ENRICHMENT PSG Workshop Mondays, 10 a.m., March 12, April 9, May 14 Professional Service Group of Mercer County presents a series of workshops designed to help those in transition build technical skills to use in their job search. Technology Center. Co-sponsored by the library and PSG of Mercer County.

SCORE Seminars Mondays, 6:30 p.m., March 19, April 16, May 21 The Princeton chapter of SCORE presents seminars on a variety of topics related to small businesses. For details, visit the library’s events calendar or princeton.score.org. Newsroom Code for Princeton Hack and Learn Nights Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m., March 6, April 3, May 1 Techies of all skill levels are invited to bring their laptops and join the hacking at this monthly meeting of Code for Princeton. RSVP on the Code for Princeton Meetup page. Technology Center Co-sponsored by the library and Code for Princeton.

ENGAGED RETIREMENT Both events are in the Newsroom. Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Senior Resource Center

The Conversation About Healthcare Decisions Monday, March 26, 7 p.m. Susan Hoskins, executive director of the Princeton Senior Resource Center and a clinical social worker discusses designating a healthcare decision-maker and outlining wishes for end-of-life care should we be unable to speak for ourselves. Necessary documents, ways to get the conversation started and other key issues will be covered. Volunteering Monday, April 23, 7 p.m. Sharon Hurley, director of support and guidance at the Princeton Senior Resource Center conducts an interactive workshop to match participants’ skills and interests with rewarding local volunteer opportunities. Newsroom

GROUPS FOR WRITERS Page 28

www.princetonlibrary.org

NEEDLEWORK

Both events are in the Conference Room. Co-sponsored by the library and Pins and Needles.

Learn to Knit Sunday, March 25, 1:30 p.m. Instructors from Pins and Needles hold a workshop for those with little or no experience who wish to learn to knit. Learn a Texture Stitch/Knit a Washcloth Sunday, March 25, 3:30 p.m. Instructors from Pins and Needles hold a workshop for those who wish to learn texture stitches that can be used to knit a washcloth. Participants must have prior knitting experience and know how to knit and purl.

MISCELLANY Origami for all Ages Wednesdays, 6:30 p.m., March 14, April 11, May 9 Anyone interested in the traditional Japanese art of paper folding is invited to meet for 90 minutes of new, often seasonal, folding. Beginners are welcome. Adults must accompany children younger than 7. Quiet Room Open Chess Play Fridays, 6:30 p.m., April 27, May 25 Chess enthusiasts of all ages are invited to meet to play chess. All levels of skill are welcome, but no formal instruction will be given. Community Room

Free Comic Book Day Saturday, May 5, 10:30 a.m.

Comic book and graphic novel fans of every age are invited to celebrate Free Comic Book Day, a nationwide event, with activities, raffles and, of course, free comic books while supplies last. The documentary “Stripped” will be shown at 2 p.m. in the Newsroom. Discovery Center and Third Floor

Research Your Roots Sunday, May 20, 9:30 a.m. Participants are invited to explore genealogy resources and tools to use for researching and preserving family history during this seven-hour workshop. Genealogist Christine CrawfordOppenheimer will be the keynote speaker. Participation is limited to 60 and registration is required; light lunch is included. Visit the library’s events calendar to register and for a full schedule of the workshop programs. Community Room

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CHILDREN AND FAMILIES

Playful Engineers return to the library April 3 for the Build a Better Rube Goldberg Machine program. See Page 22.

SPECIAL EVENTS 20

Hour of Code: Candy Land Wednesday, March 28, 4 p.m. Children in grades 2-5 are invited to complete an Hour of Code in this interactive session inspired by the board game Candy Land. Led by Princeton High School’s SiSTEM Club, participants will explore and learn foundational principles of programming. STEAM Studio Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton High School’s SiSTEM Club.

Build a Bot Monday, April 2, 10 a.m. In this hands-on workshop, children will design and create a robot out of everyday recycled materials. Cardboard boxes and other material will be provided, but feel free to bring your own from home. The workshop is designed for children ages 6-10, accompanied by an adult. Limited to 20, please reserve a spot through the library’s events calendar. Story Room “Super Jumptastic” Story Time with Katey Howes Tuesday, April 3, 10 a.m. At this STEAM story time, children’s author Katey Howes reads from her new picture book “Magnolia Mudd and The Super Jumptastic Launcher Deluxe” and talks about being innovative, making mistakes and bringing our unique talents to problem-solving opportunities. The story time will be followed by a rocket-launch activity that utilizes basic energy and engineering concepts. Community Room

Author Katey Howes leads a STEAM story program on April 3.

Dial-A-Poem

(609) 924-9529, ext. 1240

Youth Services staff read the Poem of the Day throughout April to celebrate National Poetry Month.


CHILDREN AND FAMILIES STORY PROGRAMS

All events are in the Story Room.

FEATURED STORY PROGRAMS Celebrate Earth Day! Sunday, April 22, 3 p.m. Ages: 5 and older Youth Services Department lead a program of sustainable stories and activities to mark the 48th anniversary of Earth Day. Season of Wonder Puppet Show Thursday, May 17, 10 a.m. Ages: 2-5 Guest Storyteller and Waldorf Early Childhood Teacher Amy Shor will celebrate the wonders of spring through songs, rhymes, and finger plays, using simple handmade puppets and surprises from the natural world.

WEEKDAY STORIES Little Pandas Mondays, 10 a.m., March 5-26; April 23, 30; May 7, 14 Ages: 2-5 Using books, songs, rhymes and crafts, children and parents (or caregivers) improve Mandarin language skills. Teachers from YingHua Internation School lead these sessions in Mandarin. Letra PequeĂąa (Little Letter) Mondays, 11 a.m., March 5-26; April 23, 30; May 7, 14 Ages: Newborn-4 years These sessions use books, activities and crafts to help children and parents (or caregivers) improve Spanish language skills. Sessions are conducted in Spanish by library staff; babies and toddlers must be accompanied by an adult. Storytime! Tuesdays, 10 a.m., March 6-27; April 24-May 15 Wednesdays, 10 a.m., March 7-28; April 25-May 16 Thursdays, 10 a.m., March 1-29; April 26-May 17 Ages: 18 months and older Baby Storytime Tuesdays, 11 a.m., March 6-27; April 24-May 15 Wednesdays, 11 a.m., March 7-28; April 25-May 16 Thursdays, 11 a.m., March 1-29; April 26-May 17 Ages: Newborns to 18 months Baby Playgroup Tuesdays, 11:30 a.m., March 6-27; April 24-May 15 Wednesdays, 11:30 a.m., March 7-28; April 25-May 16 Thursdays, 11:30 a.m., March 1-29; April 26-May 17 Ages: Newborns to 18 months

WEEKEND STORY PROGRAMS Saturday Stories Saturdays, 10:30 a.m., March 3-May 26 Ages: 2 years and older Sunday Stories Sundays, 3 p.m., March 4, 25; April 15, 29; May 6-27 Ages: 2 years and older Folktales: Your Passport to the World Sundays, 3 p.m., March 11, April 8 Ages: 2 years and older Members of the Princeton Storytelling Circle share tales of courage, kindness and cooperation from around the world.

WORLD LANGUAGE STORIES French Stories Saturdays, 11 a.m., March 24, April 28; Sunday, May 6, 4:30 p.m. Ages: 18 months and older French Stories for Babies Saturdays, 11:30 a.m., March 24, April 28; Sunday, May 6, 4:30 p.m. Ages: Newborns to 18 months German Stories Saturdays, 3:30 p.m., March 17, April 28, May 26 Ages: 18 months and older Italian Stories Sundays, 4:30 p.m., March 11, April 8, May 13 Ages: 18 months and older Japanese Stories Saturdays, 2 p.m., March 3, April 7, June 2 Ages: 18 months and older Korean Stories Fridays, 11:30 a.m., March 9, April 13, May 11 Ages: 18 months and older Portuguese Stories Saturdays, 11:30 a.m., March 3, April 7, May 5 Ages: 18 months and older Russian Stories Saturdays, 3:30 p.m., March 3, April 7, May 5 Ages: 4-7 Russian Stories for Babies Saturdays, 4:30 p.m., March 3, April 7, May 5 Ages: Newborns to 18 months Spanish Stories Saturdays, 11:30 a.m., March 10, April 14, May 12 Ages: 18 months and older

MORE INFORMATION: bit.ly/PPL1K www.princetonlibrary.org

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CHILDREN AND FAMILIES Playful Engineers: Build a Better Rube Goldberg Machine Tuesday, April 3, 3 p.m. Children, teens and families learn about basic forces and motion physics by designing, building, testing and redesigning a simple Rube Goldberg machine. Everyday objects such as dominos, Popsicle sticks, rubber bands, string, ping pong balls, pulleys, buckets, tracks, and ramps will be used in this fun, hands-on, problem-solving workshop. Community Room

Storytime and Music with Lolly Hopwood Wednesday, April 4, 10 a.m. Lolly Hopwood of Lolly & Yoyo presents a special story program featuring music from her new album, “Nice Things.”This interactive acoustic story time blends stories, music and movement with just the right mix of giggles, wiggles and smiles. For ages 2 and up accompanied by an adult. Story Room Children’s Books Come Alive Featuring Barbara DiLorenzo Thursday, April 5, 10 a.m. Author and illustrator Barbara DiLorenzo reads from her new picture book, “Quincy: The Chameleon Who Couldn’t Blend In.” She will also share the bookmaking process, draw for the audience and talk about her first book “Renato and the Lion.” Children will be invited to participate in an art activity as part of this interactive story time. For all ages, but geared specifically for children ages 3-7 accompanied by an adult. Story Room

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Barbara DiLorenzo reads from her new book, “Quincy: The Chameleon Who Couldn’t Blend In” on April 5.

Mo Wilems’s “Elephant & Piggie” books will be celebrated April 6.

Trivia Challenge Thursday, April 5, 4 p.m. Those 8 and older are invited to compete in a “Jeopardy”-style trivia match. Questions may include sports, movies, food and other topics. Community Room Elephant and Piggie Party Friday, April 6, 10 a.m. We’re celebrating the 10th anniversary of the publication of the first “Elephant & Piggie” book by Mo Willems with a special story time and party. Join us to mark a decade of friendship, fun and adventure with two of our favorite book characters: Gerald and Piggie. Story Room Wallaby Tales Saturday, April 14, 10 a.m. Wildlife educator Travis Gale returns to the library with a presentation for the whole family featuring live animals from all over the world. Entertaining, high-energy and educational, the program highlights the importance of


CHILDREN AND FAMILIES

The environmental science program “Science You Can!” will be April 21.

protecting the wildlife of the world. For children ages 5 and older. Part of the Princeton Environmental Film Festival. Community Room Science You Can! Saturday, April 21, 2 p.m. During this engaging and creative program, kids will explore environmental science by performing hands on experiments. Interactive experiments (such as UV color changing beads) will demonstrate that caring for our environment is not only important, but fun and exciting too. Careers in the environmental science field will also be explored. This program is for children ages 8-12 years old. Registration required. Please reserve a spot through the library’s events calendar. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton University.

Spring Science Day/Dia de la Ciencia Saturday, May 12, noon Join Princeton University’s scientists and engineers to learn more about the exciting new research going on in materials science. Visit the many table top activities and hands-on demonstrations, engage the scientists and engineers, ask plenty of questions (either in Spanish or English) and have fun with your entire family. Intended for children 5 and up with their families. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton University Department of Complex Materials and National Science Foundation, MRSEC.

www.princetonlibrary.org

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Travis Gale presents Wallaby Tales on April 14 as part of the Princeton Environmental Film Festival.

FREE HOMEWORK HELP AND MORE

Every day in the library and at home princetonlibrary.org/brainfuse Brainfuse is made possible by a generous gift from Princeton University.


CHILDREN AND FAMILIES

Twice-monthly Lego sessions resume March 5 in the STEAM Studio

REGULAR EVENTS Create, Design and Build with Lego and Duplo Mondays, 4 p.m., March 5, 19; April 2, 16; May 7, 21 Children in grades 1-5 are invited to participate in a noncompetitive community-based Lego session, including building time and round-table discussion. Duplo blocks will be available for younger children. STEAM Studio

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Chess Tuesdays, 4 p.m., March 6-27; April 10-24; May 1-29 Children can learn to play and practice chess at these weekly drop-in sessions led by Princeton High School Chess Club members. For children ages 5 and older. Meets when Princeton High School is in session. STEAM Studio

Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton High School Chess Club.

Code It Thursdays, 4 p.m., March 8, April 12, May 10 Those in fourth through eighth grade are invited to drop in for an hour to learn the programming language Python. Each session includes a core concept and exercise. No coding experience is necessary. Limited to 16 participants. Register through the library’s events calendar. Technology Center Acting Out Fridays, 4 p.m., March 2-23; April 13-27; May 11, 18, 25 Students in kindergarten through third grade are invited to engage in dramatic activity including discussions,

games, and other fun activities. No experience necessary. Princeton High School drama aficionados will lead the sessions. Story Room Caldecott Club Wednesdays, 4 p.m., March 14, April 11 Picture book fans in kindergarten through sixth grade are invited to read and discuss some of the best picture books published this year that may be contenders for the coveted Caldecott Medal. The medal is awarded to the illustrator of the most distinguished American picture book by the Association for Library Service to Children. We’ll explore new art forms, discuss award criteria, learn about publishing and more. Story Room Cover to Cover Book Group Wednesdays, 4 p.m., March 21, April 18, May 16 This group for readers of chapter books meets the third Wednesday of every month during the school year to discuss chapter books, short stories, graphic novels and other literary interests. Activities include group reads, writing short book reviews and posting reviews and booklists in the library’s online catalog. Suggested for third-, fourth- and fifth-graders. Story Room Chemistry Saturdays Saturdays, March 24, April 28, May 26, 1:30 p.m. Graduate students from Princeton University’s chemistry department conduct exciting hands-on experiments that make science fun. For children 3-13 years old; children 8 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. STEAM Studio Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Chemistry Graduate Student Organization.

SATURDAY, MARCH 10

An All-Day Celebration of Maker Culture Maker projects and demonstrations for all ages featuring: ° Pennington Quilt Works ° Robotics competition ° Coding activity with Montgomery Techsters ° Whiplash Smartphone Film Challenge ° Local musicians making music Complete schedule of events at princetonlibrary.org In the Community Room and on the Third Floor


TEENS SPECIAL EVENTS

library’s Teen Advisory Board. The season continues on the second and fourth Fridays from June through August, concluding Sept. 7. Hinds Plaza (weather permitting) or Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Central Jersey Dance.

REGULAR EVENTS Girls Who Code Club Saturdays, 11 a.m., March 3, 17; April 21; May 5, 19 Girls in grades 6-12 are invited to explore the core concepts of coding while building confidence, learning teamwork and making friends. Register through the library’s events calendar. Space for 18 plus those with their own devices. Technology Center Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton High School Girls Who Code Club.

Maker Day Whiplash Smartphone Film Challenge Saturday, March 10, 11:30 a.m. Budding filmmakers are challenged to write, shoot and edit a two-minute film in just five hours. Join PHS student Everett Shen and teacher Christian Gonzalez to receive a list of challenge guidelines and tips for creating and editing your films using your phone and iMovie on the library’s iMac computers. Submit your finished film by 5 p.m. Prizes will be awarded. For youth ages 8 years and older. Technology Center Co-sponsored by the library and 151MM, Princeton High School’s film magazine.

Preparing Students with Disabilities for Successful College Transition Thursday, March 22, 7 p.m. Author and Columbia University learning consultant Elizabeth Hamblet explains how the system for accommodations works at college and outlines students’ rights and responsibilities within that system. She also shares what the research says are the skills students should develop while they’re in high school to ensure success when they reach college. Story Room Teen Poetry Night Friday, April 20, 7 p.m. The library’s Teen Advisory Board brings Princeton’s teen poets and spoken word artists (grades 7-12) together for a fun, competition-free way to showcase their talents. If you are interested in performing, please sign up at bit.ly/2DRO1xq. Community Room Dancing Under the Stars Teen Night Friday, May 18, 7 p.m. Members of Central Jersey Dance give demonstrations and lead others in an evening of dancing. This seasonlaunching event will include favorite songs chosen by the

www.princetonlibrary.org

Poetry Off the Page Sundays, 4:30 p.m., March 11, April 8 Teens in grades 7-12 are invited to meet for an interactive and fun poetry workshop led by Princeton High School students who are passionate about poetry. STEAM Studio Go Between Club Saturdays, 2 p.m., March 10, April 14, May 12 All sixth-, seventh- and eighth-grade students are welcome to join us on the second Saturday of every month for a fun discussion of books and other interests. Conference Room VOICES (Voices on Important Conversations Engaging Students) Saturdays, 3 p.m., March 17, April 21 Meet other high school students who are passionate about activism at these moderated discussions of hot topics in the news such as racial profiling, climate change and international politics. Conference Room

Co-sponsored by the library, Redefy and Not in Our Town Princeton.

Girl Code Middle School Thursdays, 4 p.m., March 22, April 26, May 24 Girls in grades 6-8 are invited to an hourlong, all-female coding class that explores the Python programming language. In each session, a core concept will be covered, along with an exercise to put your new skills to the test. No coding experience necessary. Limited to 16 participants or bring your own device. Please register through the library’s events calendar. Technology Center To Be Discussed (TBD) Tuesdays, 7 p.m., April 24, May 22 All high school students are welcome to participate in this monthly discussion of great books, films, music, non-fiction, poetry, and all things cultural. Participants may also help create book displays and reading lists for the library, take group trips to see current films, and do group-reads. Story Room

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SUPPORT

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ith the Book Lovers Luncheon returning from a one-year hiatus, the library’s Program Team and the Friends of the Library wanted an event that matched the star power of previous authors in the series. What they got in selecting Lisa See was more: an author whose husband grew up in Princeton and whose work fits in with the community-wide Migrations series. “We didn’t set out to find someone for this event who would be consistent with the Migrations authors, but now that you mention it, Lisa’s work does dovetail nicely with Migrations,” said Public Programming Librarian Janie Hermann, who works with the Friends on the event. “Lisa and I were chatting on Twitter and it turned out that she was looking forward to coming to Princeton because her husband, Richard Kendall, grew up here.” The acclaimed author will appear Wednesday, April 11, at noon at Springdale Golf Club in a fundraiser for the library. She will join Jennifer Weiner, Ruth Reichl and Curtis Sittenfeld as authors who have appeared in the series. See transitioned from Publishers Weekly correspondent to book author in 1996 with “On Gold Mountain,” a critically acclaimed history of Chinese migration to California based on her family’s experiences. (Her great-great-grandfather arrived in the U.S. from China in 1867.) After a series of well-regarded Chinese-themed mysteries, See wrote her breakthrough work of historical fiction, “Snowflower and the Secret Fan,” a 2005 best-seller. She followed this triumph with a series of richly researched historical novels, including “Peony in Love,” “Shanghai Girls,” “China Dolls,” and “Dreams of Joy.” Her latest novel, “The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane,” revisits the Sino-American diaspora, examining the separate lives of a Chinese mother and her daughter, adopted by an American couple, and the bonds that connect them. “We are very pleased to have Lisa See speaking at our spring Book Lovers Luncheon,” said Friends President Helen Heintz. “Immigration and Chinese American cultural interactions are particularly topical issues in Princeton these days. We expect thought provoking discussions will arise at the luncheon and lead to more nuanced insights. Always good to walk a mile in someone else’s shoes, and Lisa’s book will do that.”

The Book Lovers Luncheon with Lisa See, hosted by the Friends of the Princeton Public Library, will be Wednesday, April 11, at noon at Springdale Golf Club, 1895 Clubhouse Drive, Princeton. Tickets are $75 and include a three-course meal and a signed paperback copy of “The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane.” Reserve at princetonlibrary.org/booklovers. Proceeds benefit the library.

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Check It Out

Dean Smith and Joanne Farrugia of jaZams, center, present a check with proceeds from the Princeton Childrens Book Festival to Youth Services Department staff, from left, Amanda Chuong, Katie Bruce, Caroline Quinones, Youth Services Department Head Susan Conlon, Development Director Lisa Ham and Executive Director Brett Bonfield. Proceeds of $11,340 will benefit Youth Services programs and collections. The 2018 book festival will be Saturday, Sept. 22.

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Executive Director: Brett Bonfield Assistant Director: Erica Bess Marketing & Communications Director: Timothy Quinn Development Director: Lisa Belshaw Ham Public Programming Librarian: Janie Hermann Head of Youth Services: Susan Conlon Head of Adult Services: Janet Hauge Events Committee: Erica Bess, Mimi Bowlin, Katie Bruce Amanda Chuong, Susan Conlon, Kim Dorman, Kristin Friberg, Janet Hauge, Janie Hermann, Jocelyn Jimenez, Martha Liu, Kelsey Ockert, Caroline Quinones, Hannah Schmidl Staff Writer: Amy Hiestand Editing and design: Timothy Quinn

GROUPS FOR WRITERS Writers Room Tuesdays, 7 p.m., March 6, 20; April 3, 17; May 1, 15 Writers receive constructive feedback at these sessions, during which participants read their work and members offer suggestions. The group is led by Loretta and Fred Wish. Princeton Room Writing Workshop Thursdays, 7 p.m., March 8, 22; April 12, 26; May 10, 24 Writers who are working on book-length work are invited to receive constructive critique from peers. Don Donato leads the workshop. Conference Room. Write Space Tuesdays, 7 p.m., March 13, 27; April 10, 24; May 8, 22 Led by local author Christina Paul, these drop-in workshops focus on the encouragement of writing, finding your voice, and the producing of words through guided prompts and other writing exercises. All levels of writers are welcome. Princeton Room

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Jim Neal in conversation with Brett Bonfield Tuesday, April 17, 7 p.m. American Library Association President Jim Neal engages in conversation with Princeton Public Library Executive Director Brett Bonfield. One of the most respected librarians in the world, Neal was vice president for information services and university librarian at Columbia from 200114. He has received many awards including Joseph W. Lippincott Award for “distinguished service to the profession of librarianship” in 2015. Neal is a frequent speaker, consultant and published author whose primary interests include scholarly communication, intellectual property, digital libraries and library cooperation. The program will include time for audience participation. Community Room

CALL FOR ENTRIES July 18 & 19, 2018 More information: princetonlibrary.org/psff

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Princeton Public Library Connections magazine Spring 2018  

The Princeton Public Library includes previews of the Princeton Environmental Film Festival, the Migrations series (featuring Min Jin Lee),...

Princeton Public Library Connections magazine Spring 2018  

The Princeton Public Library includes previews of the Princeton Environmental Film Festival, the Migrations series (featuring Min Jin Lee),...