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Dale G. Caldwell on finding a job

Spring 2009

How the library helps during hard times SCORE hosts a Small Business Fair Jeff Madrick’s Case For Big Government

Plus

Tech programs on job resources

Chess champ Jennifer Shahade

Passport to music Alive Mind films Spring Break Science


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March

April

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Duo Baval

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Read Across America 4:30 p.m. Page 14

3 p.m.

Page 12

Mystery Book Group 7:30 p.m. Page 6 3

Technology Talk

7 p.m.

Page 5

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Ask a Lawyer

7 p.m.

Page 11

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Alive Mind Films

7 p.m.

Page 8

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HiTOPS at the Library 3:30 p.m. Page 16

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Go-Between Club

10 a.m.

Page 16

Teen Advisory Board 11 a.m.

Page 16

7 to 8 Book Club

2:30 p.m. Page 15

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Princeton Singers

3 p.m.

Page 12

HeritageQuest I

3 p.m.

Page 11

Read, Write, Share

10:15 a.m. Page 11

Noodle Talk

7 p.m.

10

World CineClub

7:30 p.m. Page 9

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Homeschool group 9:15 a.m. Page 15

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Page 11

Readings Over Coffee 10:30 a.m Page 13

Cicrulo de Lectura

noon

Page 7

Data Bytes

1 p.m.

Page 10

Origami Club

7 p.m.

Page 15

Readings Over Coffee 7:30 p.m. Page 13 12

Contemporary Fiction 10:30 a.m. Page 7

Princeton Fest Preview 7:30 p.m. Page 12

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Chess event

2 p.m.

Page 20

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Scrapbooking Circle 2 p.m.

Page 11

HeritageQuest II

3 p.m.

Page 11

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Thinking Allowed

7:30 p.m. Page 6

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Guys Read

7 p.m.

Page 15

McDermott’s Handy 7:30 p.m. Page 12 18

Riddle of the Prize

7 p.m.

Talking Politics

7:30 p.m. Page 6

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Alive Mind Films

7 p.m.

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Homeschool group

9:15, 10:30 Page 15

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Learn to Quilt

10 a.m.

Page 10

Picturing America

2 p.m.

Page 14

Word For Word

2:30 p.m. Page 15

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Read, Write, Share

10:15 a.m. Page 11

Roland Laird

7:30 p.m. Page 13

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Organic Veggies

7:30 p.m. Page 11

Socrates Café

7 p.m.

Page 11

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Data Bytes

1 p.m.

Page 10

U.S. 1 Poets Invite

7:30 p.m. Page 13

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Robert Kegan

7 p.m.

Page 11

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Citizenship Workshop 3 p.m.

Page 11

Page 11 Page 8

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Writers’ Block

3 p.m.

Page 13

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Engaged Retirement 7 p.m.

Page 11

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Quilting Lecture

Page 10

7 p.m.

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5 6-10 6 7-10 7 8 9 11 13-17 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 25 26 27 28 30

Contemporary fiction 10:30 a.m. Page 7 Gente y Cuentos 7 p.m. Page 7 McCarter Live 7:30 p.m. Page 13 SCORE Fair 11 a.m. Page 4 Go-Between Club 10 a.m. Page 16 Teen Advisory Board 11 a.m. Page 16 7 to 8 Book Club 2:30 p.m. Page 15 US 1 Worksheets 2 p.m. Page 13 Spring Break Science 3:30 p.m. Page 14 Read, Write, Share 10:15 a.m. Page 11 Mystery discussion 7:30 p.m. Page 6 Spring Break Chess 3 p.m. Page 16 This I Believe 10 a.m. Page 11 Tuesday Tech Talk 7 p.m. Page 5 Homeschool group 9:15 a.m. Page 15 Readings Over Coffee 10:30 a.m. Page 13 Circulo de Lectura noon Page 7 Data Bytes 1 p.m. Page 10 Origami Club 7 p.m. Page 15 Atlas Brass 7 p.m. Page 12 Gente y Cuentos 7 p.m. Page 7 Eco Del Sur 3 p.m. Page 12 Tiger Team Readers 4 p.m. Page 15 Noodle Talk 7 p.m. Page 11 White Privilege 7:30 p.m. Page 11 Architecture Talk 7:30 pm. Page 10 This I Believe 10 a.m. Page 11 SCORE seminar 6:45 p.m. Page 5 Talking Politics 7:30 p.m. Page 6 Nancy Scott 7:30 p.m. Page 13 Nahid Rachlin 7:30 p.m. Page 7 Gente y Cuentos 7 p.m. Page 7 Homeschool group 9:15, 10:30Page 15 Picturing America 10 a.m. Page 14 Book Drive 10 a.m. Page 16 Word For Word 2:30 p.m. Page 15 Scrapbooking Circle 2 p.m. Page 11 Read, Write, Share 10:15 a.m. Page 11 Infant CPR 10 a.m. Page 15 White Privilege 7:30 p.m. Page 11 This I Believe 10 a.m. Page 11 Book Journeys 7 p.m. Page 6 Guys Read 7 p.m. Page 15 Art Talk 7 p.m. Page 10 Data Bytes 1 p.m. Page 10 Teen Job Fair 2 p.m. Page 16 U.S. 1 Poet Invite 7:30 p.m. Page 13 Gente y Cuentos 7 p.m. Page 7 Alive Mind Films 7 p.m. Page 8 Learn to Quilt 10 a.m. Page 10 Al-Bustan Percussion 2 p.m. Page 12 Genealogy class 3 p.m. Page 11 Elizabethan Music 3:30 p.m. Page 15 White Privilege 7:30 p.m. Page 11 This I Believe 10 a.m. Page 11 SCORE Seminar 6:45 p.m. Page 5 Socrates Café 7 p.m. Page 11 Book Journeys 7 p.m. Page 6 Gente y Cuentos 7 p.m. Page 7

May 1      Depression Films

4 p.m.

Page 9

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10 a.m.

Page 16

Teen Advisory Board 11 a.m.

Page 16

Go-Between Club 7 to 8 Book Club

2:30 p.m. Page 15

3       Scrapbooking Circle 2 p.m.

Page 11

4       Read, Write, Share

10:15 a.m. Page 11

7:30 p.m. Page 6

Mystery discussion

5       Tech Talk

7 p.m.

Page 10

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Depression Films

5 p.m.

Page 9

Anna Elliott

7:30 p.m. Page 7

7      Contemporary fiction 10:30 a.m. Page 7

Book Journeys

7 p.m.

Page 6

Gente y Cuentos

7 p.m.

Page 7

Alive Mind Films

7 p.m.

Page 8

Learn to Quilt

10 a.m.

Page 11

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Summer Volunteers 11 a.m

Page 16

Depression Films

2 p.m.

Page 9

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PLP The Unity

3 p.m.

Page 12

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Noodle Talk       7 p.m.

Page 11

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White Privilege

7:30 p.m. Page 11

World of the Child

7:30 p.m. Page 15

Summer Volunteers 4 p.m. World CineClub

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Page 16

7:30 p.m. Page 9

Readings Over Coffee 10:30 a.m. Page 13 Data Bytes

1 p.m.

Page 5

Origami Club

7 p.m.

Page 15

Thinking Allowed    7:30 p.m. Page 6 14

Contemporary Fiction 10:30 a.m. Page 7 Gente y Cuentos

7 p.m.

Page 7

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Word For Word Club 2:30 p.m. Page 15

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Digital Genealogy

3 p.m.

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Read, Write, Share

10:15 a.m. Page 11

Jean Hanff Korelitz

7:30 p.m. Page 7

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Depression Films    5:30 p.m. Page 9 Guys Read

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Page 11

7 p.m.

Page 15

Summer Volunteers 7 p.m.

Page 16

Dale Caldwell      7:30 p.m. Page 3 Talking Politics

7:30 p.m. Page 6

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Gente y Cuentos    7 p.m.

Page 7

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Socrates Café      7 p.m.

Page 11

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Data Bytes

Page 5

1 p.m.

Summer Volunteers 4 p.m.

Page 16

US 1 Poets Invite    7:30 p.m. Page 13 28

Princeton Fest Preview 7:30 p.m. Page 12

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P.E.A.C.E. Conference 10 a.m.

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LIBRARY HOURS Monday–Thursday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. / Friday–Saturday , 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. / Sunday, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.

ECONOMY

cover story

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A stable resource

During a time of economic uncertainty, the library remains a reliable source of help, enrichment and entertainment By ANNE LEVIN Connections Staff Writer

While commercial establishments of all sizes continue to close their doors in record numbers, the economic downturn has brought change of a different sort to Princeton Public Library. Here and at other libraries throughout the nation, “business” is better than ever. With free classes, readings, workshops and lectures, books and DVDs to borrow, Internet and Wifi to use to get online, assistance with job searches and numerous other services, people are flocking to public libraries in record numbers. According to the American Library Association’s 2008 State of America’s Libraries Report, Americans visited their libraries nearly 1.3 billion times and checked out more than 2 billion items in the past year, a 10 percent increase compared to data from 2001, the last time there was an economic downturn. Here at Princeton Public Library, there has been a noticeable increase in use. On the whole, the library has seen an 8 percent surge in the number of patrons since the last count at the end of 2007. For all those who are making use of the library’s considerable resources, there still may be those who are not aware of the multiple opportunities available for research, the all-important hunt for employment and entertainment. All of these resources are free. “Our library has so much to offer during these difficult economic times,” says Director Leslie Burger. “Aside from the usual assortment of the latest books, movies and audio books guaranteed to inform and entertain, we offer resources that can help job-seekers including business writing and resume preparation workshops. There is instruction available on how to find employment listings and apply for jobs on the Web, and SCORE counselors are here to assist in developing a business plan.” Those on a tight entertainment budget can attend film screenings, music and dance performances. The library’s after-school homework help program matches skilled teachers with children of any age who need some extra help with homework. “In good times and bad,” says Burger, “the Princeton Public Library and its staff are here to assist the entire community.”

Dale G. Caldwell appears on May 20 at 7:30 p.m.

Career opportunities Dale G. Caldwell believes the economic downturn can lead to a personal upturn By ANNE LEVIN Connections Staff Writer

Dale G. Caldwell is a self-described “eternal optimist.” Even in today’s scary economic climate, this author, human resources consultant and financial planner sees a light at the end of the tunnel. “You have to become comfortable being uncomfortable,” says Caldwell, who will give a talk, “Finding a Job,” at the library on May 20 at 7:30 p.m. “The world is changing and you have to be prepared for that change. It’s so easy to get comfortable. You have to be ready for something different.” Caldwell plans to gear his talk to finding a job, managing money, and enjoying life in uncertain times. These three themes are the basis of his book “School To Work To Success,” published last year. A graduate of Princeton University with a master’s degree in finance from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business, Caldwell also completed the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government Senior Executives in State and Local Government program. He is the president and CEO of Tempus Management Consulting LLC and the Founder of Residential After-School Program and Work for Peace, Inc. Caldwell’s volunteer work has included serving as president of the New Brunswick Board of Education, president of Crossroads Theatre Company, and president of the Middlesex Regional Educational Services Commission. Talking to Caldwell for five minutes is like a getting a dose of reassurance. To those of a senior generation who might be intimidated by technology, he says, “There are people in their 80s who are using Facebook.”  “There are actually a lot of opportunities out there,” he continues. “Some folks might have to re-educate themselves, but they might find that they have new skill sets they didn’t know they had. Losing your job can actually be a blessing in disguise.” Caldwell has been through the end-of-job cycle himself, so he speaks from experience. “I know what it’s like, but I have always come out the better for it when moving to a new position,” he says. “You just have to be open to change.”

Dale G. Caldwell / Finding a Job / May 20, 7:30 p.m.  


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cover story ECONOMY

Knowing the SCORE The retired executives who provide free counseling to entrepreneurs host their first Small Business Fair By ANNE LEVIN Connections Staff Writer

If there ever were a time when free business advice from veteran experts was a prime commodity, it is now. The current economic crisis has owners of small businesses scrambling to keep afloat. The statistics about failing firms and soaring unemployment are sobering. All of that, and more, will be addressed at a special Small Business Fair on April 4, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Princeton Public Library. A first for the library in partnership with the Princeton chapter of SCORE (America’s Counselors to Small Business) the fair will offer actual and would-be business owners an opportunity to speak with government agencies, banks, law firms and retired experts about resources and strategies. “We also want to make businesses aware of what public libraries have to offer in this area,” says Catherine Harper, a PPL librarian who specializes in business services. “I encourage people to come to the library to use our specialized resources and to take advantage of the expertise of our library staff. “Just a reminder for those who work at home that many of our digital databases are available online 24/7 just by typing in your PPL library card number.” The Princeton chapter of SCORE has been dispensing small business advice through programs and seminars at the library for the past four years. During that time, chapter

chairman Lou DeLauro has seen triple the number of small-business owners, entrepreneurs, and start-ups in need of counseling. There are 40 volunteers in the chapter; up from about two dozen when DeLauro joined in 2001 after retiring from his corporate career on Wall Street and as Director of Operations at ETS. “I’m surprised at how much my corporate experience relates to small businesses, and it is a pleasant surprise,” he says. “Over the past four years, we’ve recruited people with a lot of experience: corporate executives with backgrounds in sales, marketing, finance and technology, plus people who were entrepreneurs themselves.” The SCORE team has helped dozens of area businesses stay on track. Occasionally, they give advice that people don’t want to hear. “Sometimes you have to talk people out of going into business,” DeLauro says. “Many of us have persuaded people to think through the process more clearly. We don’t usually tell them not to, but we do want them to think it through before they decide.” The owners of the Rocky Hill Tavern and Eatery in Rocky Hill approached SCORE a year ago when the property was for sale. At the time, the restaurant was of-

Evan Blomgren, chef at the Rocky Hill Inn. Owner Bruce Blomgren says “SCORE’s counsel was invaluable in assessing the opportunity and bringing it to fruition. They share in the success we are now enjoying.”

fering Southwest-style grill food, which wasn’t attracting enough customers. After consulting with SCORE for much of the year, the eatery reopened offering contemporary American cuisine with French and Italian influences, under well-known area chef Evan Blomgren. Advice on financial statements of the previous restaurant, costs of refurbishment and day-today management made all the difference. “SCORE’s counsel was invaluable in assessing the opportunity and bringing it to fruition,” says owner

Bruce Blomgren. “They share in the success we are now enjoying.” Other clients who have benefitted from SCORE expertise include a retailer who was advised to redesign her floor space, resulting in a dramatic increase in revenues; and a couple who were dissuaded from using a chunk of retirement savings to open a risky restaurant franchise.   A small percentage of SCORE’s clients have existing businesses they need help in saving or expanding. But most are looking to start new ventures. “Some of these people have been laid off. Some are approaching retirement,” says

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SUBSCRIBE TO OUR MONTHLY LIBRAReNEWSLETTER Visit www.princetonlibrary.org to register for updated information via e-mail

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See them at the Fair Organizations participating with SCORE and the Princeton Public Library in the Small Business Fair on April 4 beginning at 11 a.m.

Small Business Administration Small Business Development Center New Jersey Economic Development Authority Mercer County Connections New Jersey Technology Center Rutgers University/Bio-1 Consortium Princeton University Students for Free Enterprise Club PNC Bank Magyar Bank Stark & Stark FranNet Heartland Systems Design Solutions

SCORE

•Continued from Previous Page DeLauro. “In most cases, they have expertise in the field, but not the business. They need help. Then we have requests from people who have a business background but don’t know how to start.” Clients range in age from 20s to 80s. Most are involved in businesses valued under $1 million, though some have bigger budgets. “If so, we’ll send a team,” says DeLauro. Whatever the age of the client or the nature of their businesses, helping them thrive is a gratifying experience for SCORE counselors. “It’s very rewarding because you get to use your expertise,” says DeLauro. “And it gives you a lot of satisfaction to help people.” SCORE / Small Business Fair / April 4, 11 a.m.

The second floor Tower Room is home to SCORE counseling sessions Tuesdays through Fridays.

SCORE Counseling and Seminars Counseling Service The 27 mostly retired executives and small business owners comprising the Princeton Chapter are available by appointment for counseling sessions four days each week for individuals who are considering starting a new business or are in business and are seeking advice. All counseling is free and confidential. Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays, 9: 30 a.m. Tower Room, second floor. Call 609.393.0505 to schedule a session.

SBA Financing Karen D’Antico, Economic Development Specialist from the Small Business Administration, tells how to secure an SBA guaranteed loan from a local bank. She reveals the loan process and the types of loans that are available. April 14, 6:45 p.m. Advertising for Small Business SCORE counselor Alan Yarnoff will focus on marketing and advertising basics, using first-hand experience and case histories in this event, suitable for existing businesses. April 28, 6:45 p.m. How To Hire, Motivate and Retain Great Employees SCORE counselor Jude Rich shares his experience in hiring, training and motivating. Author of numerous articles and a former executive with Johnson & Johnson, RCA and AT&T, he was formerly a partner with McKinsey and Co. and CEO of Sibson Consulting. June 18, 6:45 p.m. Quick Books to Help Your Business Grow Business and tax professionals Alfred Stephens and Stacy Svendor of Home Tax Pros teach the basics of Quick Books. This seminar is suited to both new and existing businesses. June 25, 6:45 p.m.

Technology Programs on the Economy Tuesday Technology Talks Series

Business and new media

This is the best time to boost and market your business while increasing sales, using low-cost, high-impact, Internet-based marketing tools. In this handson session, Alison Woo, Forbes. com’s new media expert and co-author of the book “How to Say It: Marketing with New Media,” will demonstrate which online tools are essential and what to say when you talk to customers using your website, e-zine, blog, podcast, Facebook and LinkedIn pages, and how to find time to do it all. New Date to be Announced, 7 p.m.

More Tech Talks and DataBytes Page 10

Online resources for job seekers

In this informative session led by librarian Cynthia Lambert, participants will learn about many of the free services available via the the library’s electronic databases. Learn where you can find information on careers, employers and job postings and which sites offer assistance with writing a resume or cover letter. Career advice, salary information, and resources for entrepreneurs will also be covered. April 7, 7 p.m.

Repeated as part of the DataBytes series

May 13, 27, 1 p.m.


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events

BOOKS AND AUTHORS

Thinking Allowed

Author appearances co-sponsored by the library and Princeton University Press

“The Case for Big Government” by Jeff Madrick While many argue for a small government, Madrick puts forth an argument that an engaged government, a big government of high taxes and wise regulations, is needed for the social and economic answers this country needs in changing times. The book, a practical call to arms, sets aside ideology and proposes bold steps to ensure the nation’s vitality. Madrick is a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books and a former economic columnist for The New York Times. He is the editor of Challenge magazine and a senior fellow at the New School’s Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis. March 16, 7:30 p.m.

Jeff Madrick

Talking Politics

Discussions led by Joan Goldstein of Mercer County Community College Conference Room, second floor

“Unequal Democracy: The Political Economy of the New Gilded Age” by Larry M. Bartels Bartels debunks many myths about politics in contemporary America, using the widening gap between the rich and the poor to shed disturbing light on the workings of American democracy. March 18, 7:30 p.m. “The Return of Depression Economics: Crisis of 2008” by Paul Krugman In this new updated edition, Krugman shows how the failure of regulation to keep pace with an increasingly out-of-control financial system set the U.S. and the world up for the biggest financial crisis since the 1930s. He also offers steps necessary to contain the crisis. April 15, 7:30 p.m. “Do the Right Thing” by Mike Huckabee When Arkansas Gov. Huckabee entered the Republican presidential race, he was the ultimate dark horse. This is his amazing story, in his own words, of how he built his campaign, from making commercials with Chuck Norris to meeting a Michigan woman who insisted on donating her wedding ring. May 20, 7:30 p.m.

Susan Stewart

“Love Lessons: Selected Poems of Alda Merini” translated by Susan Stewart

One of Italy’s most beloved living poets, Merini has won numerous literary prizes and has been twice nominated for the Nobel Prize. The distinguished American poet Susan Stewart has assembled the largest and most comprehensive collection of Merini’s poems in English, gathering lyrics, meditations and aphorisms spanning 50 years. Stewart is the author of five books of poems and a winner of the National Book Award. She is the Annan Professor of English at Princeton University and a chancellor of the Academy of American Poets. May 13, 7:30 p.m.

Book Journeys Knit-Along Journey

“The Time Traveler’s Wife” by Audrey Niffenegger What’s a time-traveler to do when landing in the next time zone without clothing? Knit along with librarian Cynthia Lambert during this special book journey. Cast your project in March, then grab a copy of the book and follow her progress on the Library Lounge blog.The April event features, a book discussion, a chance to show off your projects, free patterns, online resources and a raffle to win a pair of Adi-Turbo circular needles.

April 21, 7 p.m. Quiet Room, first floor

cooking demonstration and discussion

“North of Ithaka” by Eleni Gage A cooking demonstration by Nirit Yadin, chef at The Whisk & Spoon, will be followed by a discussion of the book led by librarian Kristin Friberg Leaving behind a successful career and busy social life, the author moved from New York City to Lia, the remote village in Greece where her father was born and her grandmother was murdered, an event her grandfather Nicholas Gage made famous 20 years ago with his international bestseller, “Eleni.” Despite warnings from her aunts that she would encounter the family curse, Gage was determined to come to grips with her family’s tragic history.

April 30, 7 p.m. (Discussion in the Quiet Room at the library) May 7, 7 p.m. (Cooking demonstation) Whole Foods Market, Windsor Green Shopping Center, Route 1, West Windsor. Featured recipes will complement the book. Please register at the Welcome Desk, or call 609.924.9529, ext. 218.

Mysteries Led by librarian Gayle Stratton

“The Pale Blue Eye” by Louis Bayard Set during Edgar Allan Poe’s brief time as a West Point cadet, this story involves a retired New York City detective and his investigation of a murder, with Poe’s help. March 2, 7:30 p.m. “Moonlight Downs” by Adrian Hyland A mutilation in the Australian Outback points to a local sorcerer. Half-aboriginal Emily Tempest must solve the grisly puzzle. April 6, 7:30 p.m. “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo” by Stieg Larsson This Swedish best seller is about the decades-old disappearance of a teen heiress from her family’s remote island retreat north of Stockholm, marking the fiction debut of journalist Larsson. May 4, 7:30 p.m.


LIBRARY HOURS Monday–Thursday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. / Friday–Saturday , 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. / Sunday, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.

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Writers Talking

The Caroline Llewellyn Champlin Writers Talking Series

 Anna Elliot “Twilight of Avalon” is Elliot’s first novel. Set in sixth century Dark Age Britain, the book is written in the spirit of the “Tristan and Isolde” cycles. Elliot is a longtime devotee of historical fiction and Arthurian legend. Her novel was inspired by a vivid dream in which she told her mother she was going to write a book about Modred’s daughter Isolde. May 6, 7:30 p.m.

Nahid Rachlin

Born in Iran, Rachlin is the author of the memoir “Persian Girls” and four novels. Her work has been published in Portugese, Dutch, Italian, Farsi, Arabic and English. Her short stories have appeared in more than 50 magazines and reprinted in several anthologies. Rachlin has taught at many well-known writers’ conferences. April 16, 7:30 p.m.

Fireplace Area, second floor

Jean Hanff Korelitz

This writer’s latest novel, “Admission” is set in a mythical Princeton University, a place she knows well. Korelitz’s husband, poet Paul Muldoon, teaches at the university. Her own resume includes novels, a book of poems, and several book reviews. Korelitz is a graduate of Dartmouth College and Clare College of Cambridge University. May 18, 7:30 p.m.

Círculo de Lectura

Moderado por Lisi Barros-Sehringer Sala de Conferencia, segundo piso

“Los adioses” por Juan Carlos Onetti Un hombre llega a una localidad de montaña a la que acuden a curarse los tuberculosos. De manera firme se niega a asumir esa vida de sanatorio que impregna la ciudad... Su unica ocupación son las dos cartas que recibe con regularidad y que le sirven de contacto con el mundo exterior. 11 de marzo, mediodía

“Memorias de un tiempo ido” por Jaime Acosta Allen En la encrucijada de una época precolombina con rumbo a un encuentro devastador con el imperio español, Kuktu emprende un largo viaje lleno de experiencias que enriquecen el alma. 8 de abril, mediodía

“Crímenes de Oxford (Crímenes imperceptibles)” por Guillermo Martínez Un estudiante argentino llega a la Universidad de Oxford para que el prestigioso profesor de lógica, Arthur Seldom, dirija su tesis. El primer encuentro se da cuando ambos descubren, por accidente, el cuerpo de una anciana asesinada en su propia casa. 13 de mayo, mediodía

Contemporary Fiction Led by librarian Kristin Friberg Conference Room, second floor

“The Thirteenth Tale” by Diane Setterfield A plain girl gets wrapped up in a dark, haunted ruin of the house that guards family secrets in this debut novel, in which the author pays tribute to Bronte and du Maurier heroines. March 12, 10:30 a.m. “Run” by Ann Patchett A Boston couple who wanted a big, lively family adopt two and have one of their own, but life is turned upside down when the mother dies. Class and belonging, parenthood and love are among the themes. April 2, 10:30 a.m. “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society” by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows A single, 30-something author in London, tired of covering the sunny side of World War II and its aftermath, discovers renewed inspiration and a new life when a farmer finds her name in a used book and writes to her about the German occupation. May 7, 10:30 a.m.

Gente y cuentos

Discussions in Spanish of Latin American short stories. Participants draw on their life experiences in discussing the features works in these weekly sessions. April 2, 9, 16, 23, 30; May 7, 14, 21, 7 p.m. Conference Room


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events

FILM

Alive on screen Distributor provides ‘transformational’ films for a new series By ANNE LEVIN Connections Staff Writer

Films with a focus on action and violence dominate the screens of most commercial movie houses. But for those with a taste for quieter, more thought-provoking films, there are alternatives. At Princeton Public Library this spring, four films from an innovative programming company promise informative, intelligent entertainment on a variety of topics. “The focus of our content is transformational,” says Elizabeth Sheldon, a Princeton resident who is the vice president of Alive Mind Education. The New-York-based company under the umbrella of Lorber HT Digital offers documentaries to the educational market (libraries, colleges, and other organizations) in an effort to stimulate discussions and provoke viewers to think outside the box. The library series begins March 5 with “Glass: A Portrait of Philip in Twelve Parts” and continues with “The American Ruling Class” March 19, “The Gates” on April 23 and “The Protagonist” on May 7. “We’re looking for films that are about cultural, spiritual transformation,” Sheldon says. “We have a growing collection and the reception has been really positive. Our films are awardwinning, by award-winning directors.” Take “Glass,” for instance. The profile of contemporary composer Philip Glass was shortlisted for an Academy Award in 2008. Filmmaker Scott Hicks followed Glass around for 18 months to shoot the documentary, celebrating the composer’s 70th birthday. “Philip Glass has transformed 20th century American music,” says Sheldon. “Likewise,

Alive Mind Film Series

“Glass: A Portrait of Philip in Twelve Parts” Filmmaker Scott Hicks followed composer Philip Glass for 18 months to make this documentary celebrating Glass’s 70th birthday. March 5, 7 p.m. 1 hour, 55 minutes “The American Ruling Class” This is a morality tale set to music about two Yale students seeking their fortunes after graduation, led by essayist Lewis Lapham. March 19, 7 p.m. 1 hour, 29 minutes

“The Gates” This film about the controversial Central Park art installation by Christo poses a central question: What is art? April 23, 7 p.m. 1 hour, 38 minutes ”The Protagonist” Inspired by Euripides and directed by Oscar winner Jessica Yu, this film interweaves the personal odysseys of four men and their individual revelations. May 7, 7 p.m. 1 hour, 30 minutes

‘Regardless of the topic, all of our films are very thoughtprovoking. And that’s the bottom line.’ — Elizabeth Sheldon

‘The Gates’ is about the transformation of Central Park and the vision of the two artists who staged the exhibit.” Filmmakers Antonio Ferrera, Albert Maysles, David Maysles and Matthew

Prinzing began filming for the movie in 1979 as artists Christo and Jeanne-Claude began actively pushing their revolutionary project to wrap portions of Central Park in fabric. Filming

continued until 2005, and the documentary was released in 2007. “The American Ruling Class,” which is underwritten by a Nathan Cummings grant, is a morality tale about two Yale students seeking their opportunities after graduation. Essayist Lewis Lapham hosts the film, which Sheldon describes as “an irreverent walk through the marble corridors of power.” “This is one of the most engaging documentaries I have watched, and I have watched a lot,” Sheldon said. “It’s a satirical look at what is supposed to be a classless society.” “The Protagonist” was inspired by the Greek playwright Euripides and is directed by Oscar winner Jessica Yu. Selected as one of the best documentaries of 2008 by Video Librarian, the film explores extremism through contrasting stories of four men consumed by personal odysseys. Alive Mind founding partner Richard Lorber has been in film production for 30 years and is known in the international film community. He started the company a year ago, and reception has been positive. “We have adopted a very aggressive approach to making these films available,” says Sheldon, who has her own impressive resume. “We also provide content for fostering discussions and we host blogs.” Speakers for at least one of the screenings at Princeton Public Library are to be announced. A scholar-led discussion and an appearance by at least one of the directors are in the works.. “Regardless of the topic, all of our films are very thoughtprovoking,” says Sheldon. “And that’s the bottom line.”


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9

Films from hard times

Hollywood Takes on the Great Depression “American Madness” Frank Capra’s 1932 work has striking visuals and editing. A sound community bank falls victim to a vault heist, which leads to a rumor that causes a bank run. May 1, 4 p.m.

Bruce Lawton presents movies examining Great Depression fantasies and realities

1 hour, 16 minutes.

By ANNE LEVIN Connections Staff Writer

Before the current economic disaster, there was the Great Depression. The infamous market crash of 1929 thrust the United States and the rest of the world into the mess used constantly as a yardstick by which we measure how badly we are doing today. Cinema helped sustain people during those difficult times, and Princeton Public Library pays homage to movies from and about that era with a film series titled Hollywood Takes on the Great Depression. Hosted and curated by Bruce Lawton, a film historian and archivist, the series opens May 1 with “American Madness” and will continue through May 19 with “Gold Diggers of 1933,” “My Man Godfrey,” “Sullivan’s Travels,” “Paper Moon,” “The Purple Rose of Cairo” and “Two Bits.” The series presents examples of class disparity, out-and-out glamorous escapism, or a combination of the two. Some are acknowledged classics, while others are lesser known. All the films chronicle the 1930s and mirror, in some ways, today’s situation. The release dates range from 1932 (Frank Capra’s “American Madness”) to 1995 (“Two Bits,” directed by James Foley). While “Gold Diggers of 1933” and “My Man Godfrey” (1936) drip with elegance in their Art Deco costumes and sets, “Paper Moon” (1973), starring the father-daughter team of Ryan and Tatum O’Neal, is shot in black and white and set in the bleak dust bowl. Lawton returns to Princeton Public Library for this special series. His previous library series have included include Great Artists Change, The Clint Eastwood Retrospective, Post World War II Films of James Stewart, Marlon Brando: Maverick/Eccentric, A Fab Four Weekend: The Beatles on Screen and Summer Spy Films. A historian, preservationist and showman, he has provided rare film sequences and archival material for the American Film Institute, Home Box Office, and Turner Entertainment. He worked on the D.W. Griffith series and assisted with the restoration of the film “The Gold Rush” for the Chaplin Estate. For the past 12 years, Lawton has been producing “live cinema” programs with silent film accompanist Ben Model in hopes of infusing future generations with an appreciation of the silent film experience.  

“Gold Diggers of 1933” 1 hour, 38 minutes

“My Man Godfrey” 1 hour, 33 minutes

This double feature starts with Busby Berkeley’s classic musical “Gold Diggers” starring Ruby Keeler,  Joan Blondell, Dick Powell and Ginger Rogers and a bevy of chorus girls in jaw-dropping numbers, and continues with the screwball comedy “My Man Godfrey” starring William Powell and Carole Lombard. May 6, 5 p.m. (Double Feature)

“Sullivan’s Travels” 1 hour, 30 minutes

“Paper Moon” 1 hour, 43 minutes

The focus is on the less glamorous citizens of Depression-era times in this double header. “Sullivan’s Travels” is directed by Preston Sturges and “Paper Moon” by Peter Bogdonavich. Saturday, May 9, 2 p.m. (Double Feature)

“The Purple Rose of Cairo” 1 hour, 22 minutes

“Two Bits”

1 hour, 24 minutes

The final double feature starts with Woody Allen’s “The Purple Rose of Cairo” starring Mia Farrow and Jeff Daniels, in which Farrow plays a forlorn New Jersey waitress who finds solace in the movies. The series wraps up with “Two Bits,” which also celebrates the magic of movies.. May 19, 5:30 p.m. (Double Feature)

World Cineclub “Persepolis” The animated film based on memoirs of Marjane Satrapi, who recounts her childhood in pre-revolutionary Iran and then under the fundamentalist regime and beyond. It begins with a child’s-eye view and then grows into an adult’s sensibility. March 10, 7:30 p.m. 1 hour, 35 minutes French, Persian and German with English subtitles

”Italianesk for Begyndere” (“Italian for Beginners”) In a small suburb in Denmark, a restaurant manager, hotelier, hairdresser and bakery clerk are studying Italian in an evening class to escape the social disasters and chaos of their unfulfilled lives. May 12, 7:30 p.m. 1 hour, 52 minutes In Danish and Italian with English subtitles


10

events

ENRICHMENT

Learn to Quilt Monthly Open House

Learn the age-old art of quilting in three sessions with Meg Cox, a journalist and passionate quilter. A former writer for the Wall Street Journal, Cox created one of the most up-to-date resource guides ever written for quilters, “The Quilter’s Catalog: A Comprehensive Resource Guide.”  She will bring pre-cut fabric for those who want to start a simple quilt project and will answer questions from anyone who is interested. March 21, April 25, May 9, 10 a.m.

Art Talk Nina Belfor and Edward Greenblat In this talk co-sponsored by the Arts Council of Princeton in conjunction with the exhibit in the library’s Reference Gallery, mixed media artist Nina Belfor and photographer Edward Greenblatt will discuss their distinct styles. Belfor has been an instructor at the Arts Council of Princeton for the past four years, has exhibited throughout the U.S. and has works in permanent collections in Chicago, Denver, New Jersey and New York. Greenblat, a photographer for Town Topics, the Princeton Fire Department and First Aid and Rescue Squad, is a founding member of Gallery 14 in Hopewell and the Princeton Photography Club. His primary photographic interest is people, reflected by recent shows featuring photos of the Princeton Fire Department and the dancers of the American Repertory Ballet. April 21, 7 p.m.

Above, “Creation Myth No. 17,” by Nina Belfor. Below, “Cis” by Ed Greenblat.

Architecture Talk Meg Cox Lecture

American Quilting, Then & Now

Cox will share some quilts from her own collections, from a family heirloom made in the early 1900s to an Obama quilt she bought online. Learn how computers revolutionized quiltmaking and why many men are joining the ranks. Bring a favorite quilt from home to show and share. March 31, 7 p.m.

While much attention has been given to urban redevelopment, there has been less of a focus on redesigning existing suburbs. Architect Ellen DurhamJones, co-author of “Retrofitting Suburbia: Urban Design Solutions for Redesigning Suburbs,” will talk about turning out-of-date suburban developments into urban, sustainable places. Raised and educated in Princeton, Dunham-Jones is the director of the architecture program at Georgia Institute of Technology’s College of Architecture in Atlanta, Ga. She has won several awards and lectures widely on sustainable design. April 13, 7:30 p.m. Fireplace Area, second floor

Technology Tuesday Technology Talks

Databytes

Creating Great Graphics John LeMasney details the basics of good graphic design with an emphasis on technology tools and resources. The session will cover planning a project, devising a message, choosing colors, picking fonts, acquiring images, respecting copyright, sketching a layout, finding great resources, choosing tools, and bringing it all together into great designs for most any purpose. May 5, 7 p.m.

Reference USA Learn about this database, which helps locate business and job leads. It can also aid in finding a doctor, dentist, or even the nearest coffee shop. The database is useful when writing a business plan or researching a company before a job interview. Janie Hermann, adult services librarian, will lead the sessions. March 11, 25, 1 p.m.

March and April Tech Talks and May DataBytes programs

Page 5

Technology Center, second floor

Our databases The library subscribes to more than 25 databases containing information in many areas. Learn how to make the most of these valuable resources and find information more efficiently. April 8, 22, 1 p.m.

In the Technology Center Internet Drop-In For an hour each week, the Technology Center welcomes visitors to drop in and practice their computer skills, learn about the Web, and get answers to questions about the Internet from a librarian or technology specialist. No sign-up is required for this “open surfing.” Thursdays, 3 p.m. Open Tech Time in the Lab The library’s Technology staff is on hand to provide hardware and software assistance. Registration is not required; just stop by. Scan photos, test drive equipment from our Gadget Garage, or just work on projects using such software as DreamWeaver and PhotoShop. Weekends and evenings; stop in to get the schedule. Scanning Lab This one-hour drop-in lab is devoted to learning how to scan and save photos and documents using the Technology Center’s scanners. A member of the staff will be present and participants are encouraged to bring in a CD or Flash Drive to save their documents. No sign up is required. Computer Classes All levels of classes are offered free by the technology training program to area residents, with preference is given to PPL cardholders. Classes range from Computer Basics to Microsoft Office applications to photo editing and sharing to Web 2.0, and are taught by qualified library staff in the second floor Tech Center. A schedule for these hands-onclasses is published monthly and is available at www.princetonlibrary.org/reference/techcenter/. Most classes require registration.


LIBRARY HOURS Monday–Thursday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. / Friday–Saturday , 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. / Sunday, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.

11

Self Expression

Read, Write and Share In these no-pressure sessions, participants are invited to share a short piece of their own writing or a short selection from a book they have read. March 9, 23; April 6, 20; May 4, 18, 10:15 a.m. Quiet Room, first floor. Register: 609.924.9529, ext. 228

Engaging Together to Explore White Privilege

In these four sessions presented by the library and the local interfaith social action group Not In Our Town, facilitators Sarah Halley, Ann Yasuhara and Pamela Freeman explore the meaning of “white privilege.” Video, audio and reading materials are used to help participants discover how they can be a part of solving related problems. Sources will include “Unpacking the Backpack of White Privilege” by Peggy McIntosh, “Learning to be White” by Thandeka, “White Like Me” by Tim Wise and the film “Mirrors of Privilege.” April 13, 20 and 27; May 11, 7:30 p.m.

This I Believe Keith Wheelock was 20 years old when he broadcast an essay on “This I Believe,” a popular CBS Radio program cofounded by his father, Ward Wheelock in 1954. This spring, the younger Wheelock will continue the program on four Tuesday mornings in April. Designed for those aged 55 and older, the sessions will include recordings of past and contemporary essays by people, about their personal philosophies. Participants will be encouraged to share their own feelings with each other during the course. The idea is to allow people to listen to the personal beliefs of others while exploring their own beliefs.

Registration is required. Call 609.924.9529, ext. 220

Conference Room, second floor

Ask a Lawyer Lawyers will be at the library for free private consultations and general legal issues. No appointments necessary; service on a first-come, first-served basis. Spanish translators will be available. March 4, 7 p.m. Conference Room, second floor

Co-sponsored by the Princeton Public Library, the Latin American Task Force, Lutheran Social Ministries of New Jersey, the Housing Authority of Princeton and the Mercer County Bar Association. For more information, call Lucia Acosta at 609.924-9529 ext. 316.

Citizenship Workshop This three-hour workshop will gather in one place all the necessary resources to begin the application process for U.S. citizenship. Immigrants who have been legal permanent residents for at least five years (three years if married to a U.S. citizen) and meet other requirements can qualify for citizenship. For those who may not meet all the requirements yet, or are unsure about whether they want to take the step, there will be presentations on what the process entails.  A group of trained volunteers will assist applicants with completion of the N400 form, a photographer will assist with passport pictures and translators will be available to review documents. March 28, 3 p.m.

Co-sponsored by the the library, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service and the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund, Inc. Registration required. To register, or if you are fluent in a foreign language and would like to volunteer for this event, contact the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund at (877) 452-5333.

This drama and storytelling workshop is designed to help participants make desired changes in their lives. “The Prize” is a dream come true. In “The Riddle” lies the answer to why we fail to do our best to make our dreams come true. Philadephia psychoanalyst Ann Goffe, founder of The Trickster Act motivational job-training, drug rehabilitation and clinical social work workshop, will take participants to the heart of The Riddle to open the path to The Prize. March 18, 7 p.m.

Co-sponsored by The Sentience Foundation.

Registration is recommended. Call 609.924.9529, ext. 220

Noodle Talks There are no right or wrong answers in these inspiring discussions; just the truth of experience. March 9, April 13, May 11, 7 p.m. Quiet Room, first floor Socrates Café In the spirit of Socrates’ belief that “the unexamined life is not worth living,” participants ask questions of each other and listen to responses, raise challenges and consider alternative answers. Everyone is invited. March 24, April 28, May 26, 7 p.m.

Help April 7, 14, 21, 28, 10 a.m.

The Riddle of the Prize

IN OVER OUR HEADS? ­— In a presentation subtitled “The Hidden Curriculum Of Everyday Life,” noted Harvard professor Robert Kegan will use stories and video to demonstrate the findings of a lifetime of research on the need for adults to keep expanding their capacities to understand themselves and the world they live in. Called “Harvard’s funniest lecturer” by The London Times, Kegan’s research on mental development in adulthood has been heralded throughout the world. March 26, 7 p.m.

Scrapbooking  Circle Assembling a scrapbook takes time and space to spread out. Both are offered at the monthly meetings of the Scrapbooking Circle. The library supplies a cropping station; scrapbookers bring their own books, photos and other supplies. Some sessions will have a consultant on hand. March 15, April 19, May 3, 2 p.m. Community Room

Organic Veggies Holistic health counselor Rochelle Blank will present “The Vitality of Organic Vegetarian Food,” a talk about how organic vegetarian food can be a boost to health on many different levels. Taste a few samples and enjoy the delights of nature’s green bounty. March 24, 7:30 p.m.

Citizenship Classes The Latin American Task Force offers a series of eight classes to assist in preparing for the U.S. Citizenship Test, including history and civics lessons and a review of basic English necessary for the citizenship interview. April 1-May 27, Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Conference Room, second floor

Engaged Retirement: Beyond Financial Planning Baby boomers nearing retirement age must plan not only for their financial futures, but for their lifestyles in general. This program from the Princeton Senior Resource Center addresses the issue, helping those approaching retirement to explore options, including time management, developing interests and staying active as a volunteer. March 30, 7 p.m. Conference Room, second floor

Genealogy Technology Center, second floor

Introduction to HeritageQuest Online Part I — Learn about a subscription database that can be accessed from home. The emphasis is on searching, navigation and printing in the Census section. We’ll also include brief information on PERSI and Revolutionary War records. March 8, 3 p.m. Part II — The emphasis here is on searching, navigation, and printing in the Books section. Included will be brief information on Freedman’s Bank and the U.S. Serial Set. March 15, 3 p.m.

Free Genealogy Resources Online There is a huge amount of family history information available for free on the Internet. Here, we cover introductions to six major free resources and links to a dozen more. April 26, 3 p.m.

Digital Collections for Genealogy Research This presentation of digital libraries and collections throughout the U.S. is based on a Princeton Public Library Web page. The emphasis is on how to explore and evaluate a new Web resource. May 17, 3 p.m.


12

events

MUSIC

Duo Baval

Pianist Elena Panova and violinist Milena Dawidowicz perform Roma music, the music of Eastern European Gypsies from Hungary, Russia, Romania, Bulgaria, Bosnia and Slovenia. In this program, geared toward adults and children, they will play folk music of the Roma people and talk about the origin and history of the music. March 1, 3 p.m.

Eco Del Sur

This ensemble of Latin American artists from various musical backgrounds returns to the library to perform ancient Andean music as well as contemporary selections from different Latin American regions. April 11, 3 p.m.

Al-Bustan Percussion Ensemble

The non-profit Arab arts education program Al-Bustan Seeds of Culture created this ensemble led by master percussionist

Joseph Tayoun. Guest percussionist Hafez El Ali Kotain joins the five young drummers, who range in age from 13 to 17. They have recorded a CD, accompanied adult musicians and performed with a Palestinian folkloric dance troupe of college students. April 25, 2 p.m.

McDermott’s Handy

Husband-and-wife duo Kathy DeAngelo and Dennis Gormley play traditional Irish music on several instruments, combining their talents on the harp, fiddle, flute, tinwhistle, guitar, bouzouki, and bodhran in this family-oriented concert. Wear green for St. Patrick’s Day. March 17, 7:30 p.m.

Brass on Broadway

The Princeton-based Atlas Brass Quintet, made up of Westminster Conservatory instructors and other locally based musicians, performs a lively selection of Broadway selections featuring such classics as “West Side Story,” “Rent” and “The Sound of Music.” April 8, 7 p.m.

sible made through possible through srary of the Library

Take a trip around the world with these diverse musical programs. Pick up your Global Music Passport at the Welcome Desk or at any concert during the series. Get it stamped to show you attended three or more concerts, and be eligible to win an MP3 player and other prizes.

PLP the Unity

The popular Philadelphia music ensemble celebrates Mother’ Day using African rhythms, drums, wind and native instruments as well as spoken word and storytelling. Using improvisational, soulful, jazzy style, Brother Robb Carter, Kitsi Watterson and Dominic Cartwright sing about justice love, prisons, mystery, magic and beginning again. May 10, 3 p.m.

G/YOURSUPPORT/FRIENDS ORT/FRIENDS

Silver Anniversary Celebration

The Princeton Singers

Come hear a preview of this ensemble’s upcoming concert, scheduled for April 4 at Trinity Church. This small, independent choral group, founded in 1983 by John Bertalot, will be celebrating its 25th anniversary with a diverse program ranging from traditional English cathedral works to contemporary pieces by Steven Sametz, who has been artistic director for the past decade. March 8, 3 p.m.

Princeton Festival Preview Midsummer Magic The Lunatic, the Lover and the Poet In conjunction with the upcoming production this summer of Benjamin Britten’s opera of Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” Betty Lies gives a talk focusing on love confusions in the Shakespeare play and in the musical “The Fantastiks.” March 12, 7:30 p.m.

Illustrations of Magic and Fantasy Marianne Grey lecture. May 28, 7:30 p.m.


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WRITTEN AND SPOKEN WORD

events

13

Roland Laird

Marc Damon Johnson and Keith Chappelle in the 2007 McCarter IN-Festival production of “The Brothers Size.”

McCarter Live at the Library The Brother/Sister Plays Tarell Alvin McCraney, one of the most celebrated young writers in contemporary American theater, will discuss McCarter Theatre’s upcoming production of his trilogy of new “brother/sister”plays, “In the Red and Brown Water,” to be presented over two evenings in performances from April 24 to June 21. Selected as a National Endowment for the Arts Outstanding New American Play as part of the NEA New Play Tarell Alvin McCraney Development Program hosted by Arena Stage, the trilogy of modernday urban stories of kinship, love, and coming of age pushes the boundaries of form, language, and sexuality. April 2, 7:30 p.m.

Princeton Writers’ Block

Mary Greenberg and colleagues present readings of one-act plays by Tennessee Williams, David Ives, and winners of the Actors’ Theatre of Louisville’s Ten-Minute Play Contest. March 29, 3 p.m.

Pat Connor

Pat’s potpourri Pat Connor will do a variety of readings, from “The Decline and Fall of the British Empire”; “Blood,Sweat and Tears”, the backs-to-the-wall wartime speeches of Winston Churchill; “Poets’ Corner,” edited by John Lithgow; and a special surprise reading to finish it all off. May 13, 10:30 a.m.

Nancy Scott

Co-sponsored by the library and U.S. 1 Poets Cooperative

Walt Whitman in Poetry and Music

Cecelia B. Hodges

The local poet and editor will host a book release event for her new volume of verse, “One Stands Guard, One Sleeps.” Author of a previous book of poetry, “Down to the Quick,” Scott has been published in numerous publications and is managing editor of “US 1 Worksheets.” April 15, 7:30 p.m.

U.S. 1 Poets Invite

I Hear America Singing

Hodges on Robeson Cecelia B. Hodges will present her annual tribute through music, video and spoken word to one of Princeton’s most famous sons, actor, athlete and activist Paul Robeson. April 8, 10:30 a.m.

Book Release Events Nancy Scott

The women of Princeton Writers’ Block.

Readings Over Coffee Baritone Robert Bullington, Whitman scholar Michael Robertson and pianist Dick Swain read from “Leaves Of Grass” and perform some of the many musical settings of those beautiful, Dick Swain moving and very American poems, from Americans Leonard Bernstein and Ned Rorem to Englishman Ralph Vaughan Williams and German-American Kurt Weill. March 11, 10:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.

Author and media executive Roland Laird will deliver his talk “Alternative Views on a Post-Racial Society,” which will also focus on his recent comic-strip-style novel “Still I Rise.” The book is about African American history, opening in Colonial times and taking the reader through the centuries to the present. Barack Obama’s presidency has introduced America to the idea of a “postracial” society, Laird says. “But does “post-racial” mean that society is now at a point where we can openly address the fact that black people and white people have different narratives in America?”, he asks. “Or will Obama’s presidency be used to negate any discussion regarding race issues?” A native New Yorker and a graduate of Brown University who now lives in Trenton, Laird is the founder and CEO of Posro Media. March 23, 7:30 p.m.

Harrod

Wilkinson

Willis

Gross

Harris

Halscheid

Lois Marie Harrod and Gretna Wilkinson Harrod’s chapbook “Furniture” has just been published. She won her third poetry fellowship from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts in 2003 and has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize seven times. Wilkinson, a native of Guyana, began her teaching career as a missionary there and then taught English at County College of Morris for 16 years. She teaches creative writing at Red Bank Regional High School. March 25, 7:30 p.m. Irene Willis and Luray Gross Author of two previous poetry collections, Willis’s new manuscript, “Those Flames,” was a finalist for the Philip Levine Prize. Gross is the author of three collections of verse, “Forenoon,” “Elegant Reprieve,” and “The Perfection of Zero.” A storyteller as well as a poet, she works as an artist in residence throughout New Jersey and Pennsylvania April 22, 7:30 p.m. Daniel A. Harris and Therese Halscheid Harris’s first collection of poems, Loose Parlance, appeared in 2008. He is the founder of the education program Jewish Voices: 200 Years of Poetry in English. Halscheid is the author of four poetry collections: “Powertalk,” “ Without Home,” “Uncommon Geography” and a chapbook, “Greatest Hits.” She was awarded a 2003 poetry fellowship from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts. May 27, 7:30 p.m.

BOOK LAUNCH — U.S. 1 Poets’ Cooperative holds a launch party for Volume 54 of its journal US1 Worksheets. This year’s edition features the work of 98 poets from New Jersey and throughout the U.S. and Canada. This eclectic mix of high quality work is dedicated to the Canadian poet John Falk. The event will feature readings from the journal and a chance to meet the poets. April 5, 2 p.m.


14

Ages 5 to 12 (kindergarten to grade 6)

Read Across America

Celebrate the birthday of beloved children’s author Dr. Seuss with special activities in the Youth Services Department. This is the 12th annual edition of this nationwide event. March 2, 4:30 p.m.

Piccarillo Sciencetelling This popular program returns to the library with the story Midnight at Normandy, to help kids discover many things about electricity. April 6, 3:30 p.m.

 Lynne

What’s the Story?

The library and the Princeton University Art Museum join forces for a special tour of the museum’s American Art collection, followed by a compare-and-contrast activity. March 21, 2 p.m. Princeton University Art Museum Ages 5-9 accompanied by a caregiver. Registration required. Call the library’s Youth Services Department at (609) 924-9529 ext. 240.

Cherry

The topic is climate change, and author Cherry wants kids to know they can make a difference. She has written more than 30 award-winning books for children, all with a message of respect for the earth. She will show an excerpt from her film “Children’s Voices on Climate.” April 7, 3:30 p.m.

Bill Boesenberg Back by popular demand, Boesenberg brings his slithery snakes to the library. April 8, 3:30 p.m.

 Volcanoes Up-close video views of volcanoes, including some Imax footage. April 9, 3:30 p.m. George Washington at the Battle of Princeton by Charles Wilson Peale, from the Princeton University Art Museum.

America’s Facebook

The library and the Princeton University Art Museum invite children and their families on a scavenger hunt through the museum’s American Art collection. Following the hunt, families can work on small art projects at the museum or take them home. April 18, 10 a.m. Princeton Art Museum Funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanties

 Dave

Maiullo

The force is with you! Maiullo returns to the library with his fascinating revelations about physics. April 10, 3:30 p.m.


LIBRARY HOURS Monday–Thursday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. / Friday–Saturday , 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. / Sunday, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.

15

For Parents Introduction to Infant CPR This is an introduction to CPR for family members, specifically geared to performing it on infants and older children who may be choking. April 20, 10 a.m. Register by calling 609.924.9529, Ext. 240

World of the Child This session geared to parents of infants and toddlers will use insights from the Montessori philosophy to

help parents understand their children and enjoy them more. Every toddler is unique, and participants will be encouraged to discuss the worlds of their children. What these little ones have in common is that they are not yet able to regulate themselves. The challenge for parents is to develop skills in diplomacy and patience while gaining independence. Rita Brenner, veteran toddler teacher and teacher instructor at Princeton Montessori School and Princeton Center for Teacher Education, will share ways parents can cultivate a sense of self-control in their toddlers. May 11, 7:30 p.m. Story Room, third floor

7 to 8 Club This club is for readers who were ages 7 and 8 at the beginning of the school year. March 7, April 4, May 2, 2:30 p.m. Conference Room, second floor

Word for Word Kids who were 9 or 10 at the beginning of the school year will enjoy this club. March 21, April 18, May 16, 2:30 p.m. Conference Room, second floor

Home School Book Discussion Group This is a monthly gathering for home-schooled children to meet and discuss the best in children’s books. March 20, April 17, 9:15 a.m. (ages 7-9) 10:30 a.m. (ages10-12) March 11, April 8, 9:15 a.m. (ages 12 and older) , Study Room, third floor

Early Elizabethan Music

T

Origami Club This club is an opportunity to meet fellow origami fans and learn different patterns and seasonal designs.

he music of the medieval world comes alive in this program, third in a series designed to bring the era’s

March 11, April 8, May 13, 7 p.m. Activity Room, third floor

music to life. The Guild for Early Music tells a musical

Tiger Team Readers Athletes from sports teams at Princeton University visit the library to share their favorite books with readers ages 5 to 8.

tale that includes knights, a friendly dragon, pilgrims, nuns, and village merry-makers.

April 13-17, 4 p.m. Community Room

father-child book discussion group Guys Read You don’t need to be a father to attend this gathering, but you do need to have a child between the ages of 8 and 10 in tow. PPL employee and library student Tom Hammel runs these book discussions of group-selected titles.

April 26, 3:30 p.m.

March 17, April 21, May 19, 7 p.m.

STORY TIMES program

Spring 2009 ages

day, time

dates

adult

Lapsits

To 15 months

Tue., 11a.m.; Thu, 11 a.m.

March 3-May 7

Must attend

Mother Goose Time

15 mos.-2 years

Wed., 10 a.m.; Thu., 10 a.m.

March 4-May 7

Must attend

Saturday Stories*

2 to 8 years

Saturdays, 10:30 a.m.

March 7-May 30

Must attend if child is 5 or under

Sunday Stories*

2 to 8 years

Sundays, 3:30 p.m.

March 1-May 31

Must attend if child is 5 or under

Toddler Stories

2 to 31⁄2 years

Tue, 10 a.m.; Wed, 11 a.m.

March 3-May 6

Must attend

Preschool Stories

31⁄2 to 6 years

Thursdays, 2 p.m.

March 5-May 7

Must remain in the library

Folktales From Afar*

3 to 8 years

Saturdays, 2 p.m.

March 14, 28; April 11

Must attend if child is 5 or under

Stories in Japanese*

3 and older

Thursdays, 4:30 p.m.

March 5, April 2, May 7

Must attend if child is 5 or under

Stories in French*

5 and older

Saturday, 11:15 a.m.

March 28

Must attend if child is 5 or under

Please register except where indicated by asterisk* Preference is given to library cardholders


16

events

TEENS

HiTOPS at the Library

This drop-in program offers middle school students a safe and relaxing after-school experience with a health education theme. DVDs, Dance Dance Revolution and other entertainment accompany each event, and healthy snacks are served. The session is sponsored by HiTOPS and supervised by its staff and members of its Teen Council. March 6, 3:30 p.m.

4/22 date

4/22

Call for Entries:

Sixth Annual Princeton Student Film & Video Festival

Students in high school and college or up to age 24 are invited to submit their original short films of 20 minutes or less total running time for consideration for the annual festival, scheduled to take place July 22 and 23. Those who have films selected will be invited to introduce and talk about their work during the two nights of the festival. Details and an entry form are available at www.princetonlibrary.org/teens/media/index.html. Submission deadline:  June 15

Spring Break Chess Tournament

This 21⁄2-hour event provides students in grades 10-12 an opportunity to meet with representatives from area businesses and organizations. The students can find out about and apply for summer and year-round paid employment, internships and volunteer opportunities. April 22, 2 p.m. Co-sponsored by the library, the Princeton Alcohol and Drug Alliance, and the Princeton Regional Chamber of Commerce. Businesses and organizations interested in participating should contact Susan Conlon, sconlon@princetonlibrary.org or Helane Staller, hstaller@aol.com

Summer Volunteer Opportunities

The library is accepting applications for teen volunteers (those entering seventh grade and older in September) to help with our Summer Reading Clubs. Applications will be available beginning April 15. Interested volunteers must attend one of four orientations sessions to be held in the second floor Conference Room on May 9 at 11 a.m.; May 12 at 4 p.m.; May 20, at 7 p.m.; and May 27 at 4 p.m. Applications will be available at the Youth Services Desk on the third floor and online at www.princetonlibrary.org/teens. Application deadline is May 15.

The Great American Book Drive

This four-day tournament is open to all middle and high school students, who will play in separate categories. Students should register at the Youth Services Desk and then check in each afternoon and report outcomes of the matches to the librarians, who will keep track of the standings. Interested players should register in advance of the start date. April 7-10, 3-5 p.m.

Chess master, author and editor Jennifer Shahade appears March 14. See Page 20.

Organized and led by high school students, the daylong P.E.A.C.E. (Proactive Education for Activism on Current Events) Conference includes workshops, speakers, networking and education in an effort to bring together youth from around the state. May 30, 10 a.m. Students must register in advance; contact Susan Conlon at sconlon@princetonlibrary.org.

The Princeton Public Library and Better World Books are teaming up to host a used book drive to support the library and literacy programs. Students from the library’s Teen Advisory Board and the Go-Between Club will join volunteers from area schools and student environmental clubs as well as area organizations to help collect the donated books. Other activities will include displays and demonstrations with an environmental theme. Live music will be featured throughout the afternoon. Individual students or groups interested in volunteering or anyone with questions about donating books should contact Susan Conlon, Teen Services Librarian, at sconlon@ princetonlibrary.org. It’s about literacy, not landfill. April 18, 10 a.m. 

Clubs

Teen Advisory Board Participants in grades 8-12 meet monthly at the library to make suggestions for the library’s collection and have a say in library services and programs. Healthy snacks are provided and new people are always welcome. March 7, April 4, May 2, , 11 a.m Conference Room, second floor

Go-Between Club The club for students in grades 6-7 provides an opportunity to talk about reading and other interests, help with library events and plan programs. New people are always welcome. March 7, April 4, May 2, 10 a.m. Conference Room, second floor.


SUBSCRIBE TO OUR MONTHLY LIBRAReNEWSLETTER Visit www.princetonlibrary.org to register for updated information via e-mail

LIBRARY COMMUNITY

spotlight

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January 20, 2009

The Princeton Community came out in force to witness as one the inauguration of President Barack Obama. More than 250 people filled the Community Room and watched on simulcast screens throughout the first floor. “There was so much positive energy in the library,” one blogger wrote, “that I thought the building was going

February 13, 2009 Historian and author Henry Louis Gates Jr. spoke to an audience estimated at 450 who watched in the Community Room and on simulcast screens on the first and second floors at a special Friday night event in the library. Gates discussed the many, often conflicting, views of Abraham Lincoln in a program co-sponsored by Princeton University Press, publishers of Gates’s latest book, “Lincoln on Race and Slavery.”

to levitate.”

NEW MEMBERS OF THE FRIENDS COUNCIL — Beginning their three year terms in January are, from left, Wendy Pierce Evans, a longtime community volunteer who worked in the mental health field and then started her own business selling antique and estate silver flatware; Jonathan Peele, computer manager at the Institute for Advanced Study; and Sherri Garber, who has been an active school volunteer after starting her career in information sciences.


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spotlight

FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY

Book lovers lend a loving touch to book sale By MARGARET SIECK Friends of the Library

There is probably more than a little touch of irony in the fact that it’s a used book sale that is a steady, generous source of funds for the Princeton Public Library. After all, don’t bookstores compete with libraries? Not really. There is plenty of room for both in a community of book lovers like this one. The book sales are run by the Friends with many devoted volunteers both on and off the Friends Council. They consist of an ongoing sale, located just beyond the stairs on the first floor, and the annual sale, held in the Community Room in October. The book sales have been going on in the library for the better part of three decades. The ongoing sale came first, and then the annual sale. They were originally run by library employees, starting with Eric Greenfeldt, then the assistant director of the library. “I organized the annual sale when it became apparent that the inflow of donated books far outstripped the everyday sales,” recalls Greenfeldt, “I processed the books in my spare time but as the success of the sale grew, Library Director Bob Staples felt that the sale should be taken over by the Friends.” The linchpin of the sale for two decades has been Stuart Mitchner, the Book Sale Director, a volunteer who simply loves books. He recalls falling in love with used books as a 10-year-old, combing the stores along Fourth Avenue in Manhattan with his father. In between the Fourth Avenue stores and the library sales, Stuart has worked at bookstores, book warehouses and in the publishing industry as a freelance editor while writing fiction, including a novel, “Rosamund’s Vision,” centered on an imaginary secondhand bookstore. His first job in Princeton back in 1976 was editing and writing entries for “A Princeton Companion.” He now contributes regularly to the Town Topics.

Stuart Mitchner in the storage area for the Friends of the Library Book Sale

Donating, not dumping, books The Library is always looking for good books in good condition. What the library doesn’t want are books in bad condition, Reader’s Digest condensed books, textbooks, encyclopedias or other books that are out of date. Travel and sports books tend to go out of date quickly. Unfortunately, books can’t be recycled because there’s no easy solution to undoing the glue or stitching that binds the books. When possible, books that can’t be sold by the Friends have been recycled to other countries, such as Ghana and the Philippines. It’s easy to donate. You go to the back service door (near the library’s door in the Spring Streeet driveway) and ring the doorbell during regular operating hours. If you have too much to carry, pull in the driveway, ring the doorbell and someone on the staff will come help you. For large donations, arrangements must be made in advance by phoning 609.924.9529, ext. 280. Donate responsibly!

Mitchner got involved in the Princeton Public Library thanks to some arm-twisting by his wife, who now works at Rutgers University Press. He soon found that his experience as a vicarious book dealer in the novel he’d written motivated him to stock and organize the library version of a used bookstore. A good part of Stuart’s job is sorting through the donated books. Unfortunately, not all of them are worthy of a spot on the shelves (see box). “The Bryn Mawr book sale people tell donors, ‘Don’t donate a book you wouldn’t take to bed with you,’ and it’s a good rule,” he says. He is quick to point out that many excellent books are donated each year. Mitchner’s involvement in the Princeton Library sales came about when Barbara Freedman, another book sale stalwart, was president of the Friends Council. They both recall that a good year in the late 1980s was $2,500 in sales. The total for December of 2008 alone was about $2,500.

•Continued on Next Page


LIBRARY HOURS Monday–Thursday, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. / Friday–Saturday , 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. / Sunday, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m.

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Board of Trustees President ⁄ M. Katherine McGavern

I

t’s hard to go anywhere these days without hearing about the economic problems affecting everything, even libraries. Here at Princeton Public Library, we are doing our part to minimize operating costs without compromising the services you expect and deserve. It’s a challenging task, as demand for all of our services continues to grow, mirroring the national trend of dramatic increases in library use during economic downturns. A few of the measures we are taking to keep operation costs under control might be of interest: Budget: We’ve submitted a zero growth budget for 2009 to Princeton Borough and Township. If this budget is approved, the library hopes to maintain all services without increased costs in 2009. Energy: We’ve reduced our energy costs by making it warmer in the library during the summer and cooler in the winter, by having all heating and cooling systems shut down at 9 nightly and by

Our own economic challenges

using, with few exceptions, compact fluorescent bulbs in all light fixtures. Lights are on while the library is closed only long enough for the cleaners to do their job, timers and photocells are installed on all exterior lighting, and all PCs are on autostart and auto-shutdown. Utilities: Whenever possible, we are purchasing energy, phone service and other utilities from resellers who can pass along savings to the library from bulk sales. Environmental Sustainability: We recycle glass, plastic, paper and cardboard,

and have eliminated most paper and plastic products in the staff room. Our newly remodeled café will use green paper products. Our reusable red library bags have replaced our plastic bags and we now buy green cleaning products from environmentally friendly companies. Staff: We are reorganizing our staffing to maximize its efficiency while providing adequate coverage during our 72-hour per week schedule. As vacancies occur, we are delaying hiring and looking for ways to deliver the same level of library service you have all come to expect. Employees are also working across departmental boundaries to help bridge staffing shortages. These are just a few examples of our efforts to keep costs down while providing the best possible service, even (especially) during these economically unsettling times. We thank each one of you for your ongoing support, and pledge to continue spending wisely in the year ahead.

Book Sale •Continued from Previous Page How did the sale get so much bigger? One element was when library Programming Coordinator Janie Hermann told Barbara about booksalefinder.com in 2001. “I couldn’t believe that it would help,” says Freedman. “So I paid for the first Annual Sale ad myself. Shows what I know – it attracted so many dealers that the Annual Sale exploded!” While regular customers may have been inconvenienced a little by the jostling that goes on when book dealers from all over come the first day and sometimes “sweep” the tables of books into large piles that they may or may not buy, Freedman concedes, “Dealers make or break the sale. For two years, there have been fewer of them, but they still spent the most money.” And money is, after all, what it’s all about. All the profits are turned over to the library for the purchase of new books and other materials, and thus the cycle begins again. But it isn’t really money that motivates either the volunteers or the shoppers. Says Bruce Kemp, long-time Friends member and book sale committee co-chair in 2008, “Generally, at any hour of the library’s day, you can find some patron looking for literary treasures.” And Mitchner, who comes to sort and price books almost every day, says of the patrons, it’s “the mystique of the book sale: the book of your dreams turns up, or you’re sure it’s going to. A piece of your past might come together when you find that special book.” Thanks to the donors and volunteers from the Princeton community, this year headed by book sale committee chairperson Eve Niedergang, those pieces will continue to come together.

Second Annual

Communiversity

BOOK SALE

The Friends will be on Hinds Plaza outside the library during Communiversity, offering a fine selection of gently used books at unbeatable prices

Saturday, April 25 Noon to 5 p.m.

Book Sale proceeds support library collections and programming


events CHESS

20

Our Red Bag feature will return in the Annual Report issue of Connections in June

The many moves of Jennifer Shahade The chess champion appears in a special event featuring a simultaneous match, film screening and book signing By ANNE LEVIN Connections Staff Writer

Jennifer Shahade has been playing chess since she was a little girl. All of that practice has paid off – the Philadelphia-based writer is a twotime American Women’s Chess Champion (2002, 2004). At the library March 14 at 2 p.m., Shahade will challenge 25 players at one time. This “chess simul” will begin with a talk by Shahade and continue with a look at “Hulachess,” the short film she helped create with some fellow chess enthusiasts. Copies of her book, “Chess Bitch: Women in the Ultimate Intellectual Sport,” will also be available. “I’m hoping that some girls and women will come to this event,” says Shahade, who co-founded 9queens, a non-profit that provides chess instruction to those most in need of its services, especially girls and at-risk youth. “Chess is great for kids because it helps with their concentration and confidence,” she adds. “Particularly for girls, confidence can lag, especially during their high school years.” The multi-faceted Shahade has

written for The New York Times, New in Chess, The Los Angeles Times, Games magazine and Chess Life magazine, for which she serves as Web editor. She contributed to a book about Marcel Duchamp and chess that will be available this spring. She is at work on a novel. Shahade also excels at poker. In semi-professional poker, she placed 17th out of more than 1,200 players in the 2007 Ladies World Series of Poker event and then placed 33rd out of 1,190 the following year. But chess is her main focus. She has performed at simultaneous exhibitions in which she plays up to 50 people in venues from Shanghai to South Africa. She also helped organize and has participated in museum events in New York, and at the Philadelphia Fringe Festival. “It is the combination of tactics and strategy, the endless balancing of those two things,” she says when asked about the lure of chess. “You never really know whether to go with your instincts or calculations, and that just makes it endlessly interesting.”

Jennifer Shadade shows the short film “Hula Chess” as part of her March 14 appearance at the library.

Jennifer Shahade / Chess event / March 14, 2 p.m.

Spring Break Chess Tournament for teens April 7-10. See Page 16.

Players of all ages and levels are welcome to partipate and should register in advance by calling 609.924.9529, ext. 240

Non Profit Org.

Library Director: Leslie Burger Assistant Director: Elba Barzelatto Programming Coordinator: Janie Hermann Youth Services Manager: Jan Johnson Public Information Director: Tim Quinn Program Committee: Lucía Acosta, Leslie Burger, Elba Barzelatto, Susan Conlon, Kristin Friberg, Pamela Groves, Romina Gutierrez, Janie Hermann, Jan Johnson, Terri Nelson, Tim Quinn, Allison Santos, Barbara Silberstein Margaret Sieck (Friends of the Library) Illustrations: Jenna Garrison Staff Writer: Anne Levin Editing and design: Tim Quinn

Frıends of the

Princeton Public Library

U.S. Postage PA I D Princeton, NJ Permit No. 4 Return Service Requested


Connections Spring 2009