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ALSO An interview with Children’s Book Festival illustrator Sophie Blackall Roz Chast headlines the Friends Benefit Inside our book groups

THE PRINCETON PUBLIC LIBRARY MAGAZINE Fall 2011

A mix of old and new for students seeking help with homework

2 THURSDAY, SEPT. 1

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Sept. 6 to Nov. 16

Wed. 11 a.m. Thu. 10 a.m.

Sept. 7 to Nov. 17 Sept. 6 to Nov. 17 Sept. 8 to Nov. 17 Sept. 3 to Nov. 26 except Sept. 10

Sept. 4 to Nov. 27

Sept. 1, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Princeton Farmers’ Market Hinds Plaza Sept. 1, 7 p.m. Witherspoon-Jackson Genealogy Group — The group meets monthly to share ideas, listen to speakers and get beginners started with researching the history of families who lived in Princeton’s historic Witherspoon-Jackson community. All interested in the history of this community or in African American genealogy are invited to attend. Technology Center

MONDAY, SEPT. 5

The library will be closed 1 - 5 years

Sept. 6 to Nov. 15 2 p.m.

Sept. 8 Oct. 6 Nov. 3

5 - 8 years

2 - 8 years

Sept. 12 Oct. 3 Nov. 7

11:30 a.m.

Oct. 29 Nov. 19 Sept. 3 Oct. 1 Nov. 5

Stories in Russian

2 - 8 years

Sat. noon.

Sept. 10 Oct. 8 Nov. 12

NEW Playgroup for Babies

Come to the Lapsit Story Time on Tuesday and stay for Playgroup. Babies up to 15 months and their caregivers are invited to play and connect in a special and safe place. Playmats and toys will be available, but feel free to bring your own. NO BIG KIDS ALLOWED.

WEEKDAYS SCORE Small Business Counseling — By appointment through SCORE: Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6 p.m.; Wednesdays, Fridays, 10 a.m. Tower Room English Language Conversation Groups — Various Venues Call 609.924.9529, ext. 220 for details

THURSDAY, SEPT. 8

Sept. 8, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Farmers’ Market Hinds Plaza Sept. 8, 10:30 a.m. Fiction Book Group: “Blame” by Michelle Huneven Patsy MacLemoore, a history professor in her late 20s with a brand-new Ph.D. from Berkeley and a wild streak, wakes up in jail (yet again) after another epic alcoholic blackout. “OK, what’d I do?” she asks her lawyer and jailers. “I really don’t remember.” She adds, jokingly: “Did I kill someone?” Librarian Kristin Friberg leads the discussion. Conference Room

SATURDAY, SEPT. 10

Sept. 10, 10:30 a.m. Quickbooks — Certified QuickBooks ProAdvisor Oria Gonzalez provides basic training in the use of QuickBooks at this two-and-a-halfhour session. Seating limited to 8 students. Register at scoreprinceton. org. Technology Center Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Chapter of SCORE.

Sept. 10, 11 a.m. KIDS+ Princeton Children’s Book Festival — More than 60 authors and illustrators gather to interact with children and their families and discuss their work at this annual event. Books can be purchased and autographed and there will be live entertainment and activities throughout the afternoon. Hinds Plaza

Technology Center Classes — Please visit princetonlibrary.org or the library for a schedule of classes. Springboard After School Homework Help — Mondays through Thursdays, 3:30 p.m. , on days when Princeton Regional Schools are in session. Third Floor

WEEKLY

Reading with Emma — Mondays, 4 p.m. Story Room Citizenship Test Preparation Classes — Eight-week course, Wednesdays, 7 p.m., Oct. 5-Nov. 30 (no class Nov. 23). Conference Room Gente y Cuetos — Short story discussion in Spanish, Thursdays, 7 p.m., Oct.6-Nov.10. Princeton Room Game On! — Fridays, 4 p.m., board, video games and pingpong for children and teens. Third Floor

Co-sponsored by the library, Johnson & Johnson Consumer Group of Companies, Packet Publications of Central New Jersey, Terra Momo Restaurant Group and Jazams of Princeton. Please see feature story, Page 5

FALL 2011

SUNDAY, SEPT. 11 TEENS Sept. 11, 2 p.m.

Graphic Novel/Manga Book Club Teens in grades 6-12 talk about their favorite graphic novels and manga. Registration suggested; drop-ins welcome, too. Third Floor. KIDS Sept. 11, 4 p.m. Word For Word Club Children ages 10-12 are invited to come prepared to discuss the club’s title of the month. September’s book is “Heartbeat” by Sharon Creech. Study Room, third floor KIDS Sept. 11, 5 p.m. Heads and Tales Club This club is for children ages 7 to 9 who are reading on their own and would like to discuss the club’s book of the month. The September title is “The Year of the Dog” by Grace Lin. Study Room, third floor

MONDAY, SEPT. 12

Sept. 12, 7 p.m. Film: “Light in the Darkness” This documentary shows a town coming together after it is devastated by anti-immigrant violence. In 2008, a series of attacks against Latino residents of Patchogue, NY, culminates with the murder of Marcelo Lucero, an Ecuadorian immigrant who had lived in the Long Island village for 13 years. The story follows the mayor, the victim’s brother and town residents as they address the underlying causes of the violence, work to heal divisions and begin taking steps to ensure everyone in their village will be safe and respected. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Not In Our Town Princeton.

Sept. 12, 7:30 p.m. Poetry in the Library Featured poets Enriqueta Carrington and Hayden Saunier will each read for 20 minutes followed by an open mic session. Carrington has received the Atlanta Review’s International Merit Award. Her poetry in Spanish and English has appeared in a variety of journals. Saunier’s poetry has also appeared in a variety of journals. Her first collection of poetry, “Tips for Domestic Travel” was published in 2009. Fireplace Area, second floor Co-sponsored by the library, the US 1 Poets Cooperative and the Delaware Valley Poets.

Calendar continues on Page 4

Princeton Reads COVER STORY

Labor of ‘Love’ When Nicole Krauss switched from poetry to novels, she found freedom to create memorable characters By ANNE LEVIN For Connections

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efore she became a novelist, Nicole Krauss was a poet. By the time she reached her mid-20s, this young prodigy was finding that writing poems was not the gratifying release it had been for her in the past. So she took up the idea of a novel as a kind of test. “I had begun to feel trapped by writing poetry,” says Krauss, who will appear November 15 in Richardson Auditorium as part of Princeton Public Library’s Princeton Reads communitywide book discussion. “I had lost that freedom that keeps every writer wanting to write. I wanted to find that sense of freedom again. So I thought I’d switch for awhile.” As soon as she began “Man Walks Into a Room,” Krauss knew she had recaptured her creative spirit. The book earned glowing reviews and a six-figure deal for two more books: “The History of Love,” which is the 2011 Princeton Reads selection and was published in 2005, and “Great House,” which came out last year. “It seemed a daunting undertaking at first, but within the first pages of writing I found that freedom,” the 37-year-old Krauss recalls. “I found that novel-writing fit me.” “The History of Love” spans 60 years and takes readers from Nazi-occupied Eastern Europe to current-day Brighton Beach. At the center are two characters, a 14-year-old girl and an elderly man, whose lives are woven together in surprising, complex ways. The details Krauss provides about Leo Gursky, the retired locksmith who immigrated to

New York from Poland and worries nobody will notice when he dies, leads to a question Krauss is often asked: Was Leo based on anyone she knows? Her grandfather, or perhaps, an uncle? “It’s an interesting thing, how readers in general ask writers if characters are based on actual people,” she says. “We all ask that question, half-hoping that it’s true. But Leo is not modeled on anyone in my life. I knew I could say things in his voice that felt tender. It’s hard to articulate. But that’s what really excites me about fiction, in part.” A phrase that Leo uses repeatedly to end a thought (“and yet”) seems particularly personal, as if it came from someone in Krauss’ past. But it doesn’t. “I had a really long sentence (of Leo’s) at one point, and it started with ‘and yet.’ Somehow, it seemed to contain everything about him,” she explains, “that desire to expose himself, and the silence around him.”  Krauss lives in Brooklyn with her husband, fellow novelist Jonathan Safran Foer, and their two young sons. She grew up on Long Island and graduated from Stanford and Oxford universities. “The History of Love” made Krauss a finalist for The Orange Prize for Fiction, and is being made into a film by Alfonso Cuarón, the director of “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.”  The book was chosen for this year’s Princeton Reads because it provides a tie-in to the greater Memory and the Work of Art celebration that the Princeton University Art Museum began earlier this year. Memory figures highly not only in “The History of Love,” Krauss says, but in all three of her novels. “It’s been a particularly compelling force for me. I started with it (in “Man Walks Into a Room”) and sort of continued with it in ‘The History of Love,’” she says. “It’s about memory, but it became also about the role of

Nicole Krauss discusses “The History of Love,” this year’s Princeton Reads book, on Nov. 15 at 6:30 p.m. in Richardson Auditorium on the Princeton University campus.

the imagination. When we think of who we are, we’re really taking isolated incidences that have occurred over the years, and stringing them together in a kind of coherence.” Krauss says she is particularly interested in how people reinvent themselves in the face of catastrophic loss. “The History of Love” explores that concept in both of its main characters, and “Great House” delves into it from a different angle. Not surprisingly, Krauss is a prolific reader. She finds herself most taken by books that have been translated from other languages. Works by writers from Europe and Latin America have become part of her library. “I have always been interested in how people in other places think,” she says. “I find something in translation that I don’t always find in my native language.” Writing hasn’t gotten any easier for Krauss as her career has continued its trajectory. The fame, in fact, has created new

challenges. “With each book, my ambitions have changed,” she says. “When you’re young, you sort of declare yourself. Then when you’re older, you’re more and more aware not only of what others say, but of what you think of your work. A certain amount of perspective comes into it, and a kind of self-perception.” Nicole Krauss I Nov. 15, 6:30 p.m. Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall, Princeton University I Princeton Reads, part of Memory and the Work of Art, a Princeton Community Collaboration I Free Princeton Reads programming has been made possible in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities: Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities. For more on Memory and the Work of Art, please visit www.princeton.edu/memory

For more Princeton Reads events, see items marked P-READS on Pages 14-16

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4 Sept. 12, 7:30 p.m. Mystery Book Group: “Blotto, Twinks and the Ex-King’s Daughter” by Simon Brett It’s that glorious period between the two world wars, and the exiled king of Mitteleuropa is visiting the ancestral home of the Duke of Tawcester. When the ex-king’s daughter is kidnapped, noblesse obliges the Duke’s handsome, brave, and rather stupid son (known to all as Blotto) to drive off to the rescue. Luckily, he’s aided by his brilliant sister, Twinks. Librarian Gayle Stratton leads the discussion. Quiet Room

TUESDAY, SEPT. 13

Sept. 13, 6:45 p.m. Talk: The Business Plan as a Tool for Funding SCORE counselor Bill Litchman uses his decades of experience preparing business plans for companies of all sizes in the presentation of this seminar. The basic elements of a business plan, from vision through financials will be reviewed. It will also include a schedule, examples and an overview of potential sources of funding. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and SCORE of Princeton.

Sept. 13, 7 p.m. Talk: Reinvent Your Life “Autumn Love” author Carol Denker, who reinvented her life at age 55, talks about making dreams come true at any age. Part of the Next Step Speaker Series. Conference Room

Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Next Step Engaged Retirement and Encore Careers Program

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 14 Sept. 14, 10 a.m. Film: “True Grit” — John Wayne won an Oscar for his 1969 performance as an uncouth, one-eyed U.S. Marshal who reluctantly agrees to help a precocious 14-year-old farm girl track down her father’s murderer. Glen Campbell plays the unwelcome Texas Ranger who joins the pursuit. Part of the Western Wednesday series. Community Room

Co-sponsored by the library and Dispensa Café.

KIDS+ Sept. 14, 6:30 p.m. Origami Club — Anyone with a passion for paper folding is invited to meet for 90 minutes of new and interesting, often seasonal folding. Beginners are welcome. The club is not just for kids; adults are invited

The Greater Princeton Symphony Orchestra presents two programs in the Princeton Symphony Soundtracks series: “Visions of America” on Sept. 21 at 4:30 p.m. and “Dreams, Memories, Truth” on Nov. 9 at 4:30 p.m. See Pages 6 and 15.

too. In fact, an adult must accompany anyone under the age of 7. Activity Room

realidad compleja y exasperada de Colombia. Princeton Room

Sept. 14, 7 p.m. Author Howard Wainer (“Uneducated Guesses: Using Evidence to Uncover Misguided Education Policies”) A distinguished research scientist at the National Board of Medical Examiners and adjunct professor of statistics at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, Wainer was principal research scientist at Educational Testing Service for 21 years. His book uses statistical evidence to show why some of the most widely held beliefs in education today, and the policies that have resulted from them, are wrong. Part of the Thinking Allowed series. Community Room

NEW Sept. 15, 7 p.m.

Sept. 14, 7:30 p.m. Talking Politics Book Group: “Aftershock: The Next Economy and America’s Future” by Robert B. Reich Reich’s position that the reason for the foundering economy is structural and rooted in the increasing concentration of income and wealth at the top, is discussed. Joan Goldstein of Mercer County Community College is discussion leader. Quiet Room

The Knit Nook — Join old friends and make new ones at these monthly knit-by-thefireplace sessions, a follow-up to our successful World Wide Knit in Public Day. Bring your own supplies and share your stories and tips in a friendly gathering place for knitters. Please note: the Knit Nook is not a knitting class, but knitters with all levels of experience are welcome. Fireplace Area, first floor

THURSDAY, SEPT. 15

FRIDAY, SEPT. 16

Sept. 15, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Princeton Farmers’ Market Hinds Plaza

KIDS+ Sept. 16, 4 p.m.

Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton University Press.

Sept. 14, 7 p.m. Circulo de Lectura: “Delirio” por Laura Restrepo — Ganadora del premio Alfaguara de Novela de 2004, Delirio es una obra completa, en la que caben la tragedia y el humor, las pasiones más bajas y los sentimientos más altruistas, la crueldad y la solidaridad. Un caleidoscopio de la sociedad moderna, centrado en la FALL 2011

Sept. 15, 7 p.m. Author Jennifer Gardner Trulson (“Where You Left Me”) Widowed when her husband Doug Gardner, a Cantor-Fitzgerald executive, lost his life in the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, the devastated 35-yearold resigned herself to a life of being a single mother. Nearly a year later, when a chance encounter with a confirmed bachelor sparked an undeniable attraction, a precarious courtship began and her life took an unexpected turn. Community Room

Constitution Day Celebrate the Sept. 17, 1787, signing of the Constitution of the United States, and the many rights and freedoms it established, with fun, interactive games and quizzes for children in grades 3-8. Spectators welcome. Community Room

SATURDAY, SEPT. 17 TEENS Sept. 17, 11 a.m.

Go-Between Club — This club for middle school students meets monthly at the library. Talk about books and other interests, help with library events, plan programs with the librarians and have a say in Calendar continues on Page 6

Children’s Book Festival SPOTLIGHT 5

Poster perfect

Acclaimed illustrator brings her pals Ivy and Bean to the Children’s Book Fest By AMY HIESTAND Connections Staff Writer

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oung readers have probably noticed Ivy and Bean hanging around town lately. Literally hanging, that is, on bulletin boards and any number of other places. That’s because Sophie Blackall, illustrator of the popular book series that bears the characters’ names, created the poster announcing this year’s Princeton Children’s Book Festival. Blackall, who brings the unlikely friends in author Annie Barrows’s books to life, is the first professional illustrator to be asked to create a poster for the festival, and her contribution reflects the event’s growing status as one of the largest of its kind on the East Coast. “Having a professional illustrator create our poster is a wonderful complement to the Children’s Book Festival,” said children’s librarian Allison Santos who has coordinated the event since it began six years ago. “We hope to have a new illustrator every year, and Sophie has gotten us off to a great start.” The poster, which Blackall says “is about the joy of reading, however (or wherever) you want to do it,” shows the character of Bean hanging upside down on a trapeze, reading a book that is also suspended. Ivy, of course, is sitting demurely with her book. The image lends itself perfectly to the Princeton Children’s Book Festival as it shows that no matter their personality, most children share a common love of reading. “It’s important for kids to find their own way into reading,” Blackall believes. “And to find the joy in it rather than have it be a chore or prescribed homework.” Blackall, who lives in Brooklyn with her husband and two

children, discovered her own joy in reading during her childhood in Australia. “Whether curled up in a blanket on the sofa, or hanging from a trapeze or high up in a tree, which is where I did a lot of reading as a child,” she said, “reading is one of the great pleasures in life.” In addition to the seven books in the Ivy and Bean series, Blackall

has illustrated more than a dozen other children’s books including awardwinning picture books and “Are You Awake,” which she also wrote. Her editorial illustrations have appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Time magazine and other publications. Blackall’s latest project, her first book for adults, is a book of

art inspired by the Missed Connections ads that appear on Craigslist and in other publications. The posts reflect opportunity lost when no words are exchanged between people who notice each other but are too shy or busy to speak. “Missed Connections: Love Lost and Found” will be published about a week after the Children’s Book Festival. “This will be my first visit to Princeton,” Blackall said of her appearance at the festival. “I’m thrilled to be invited and very much looking forward to meeting kids and parents and my fellow book makers. Judging by the line-up, I’m in excellent company.” In addition to the more than 60 authors and illustrators, many of whom will read from their work or give demonstrations, there will be activities for children and their families throughout the afternoon. Live entertainment will include rocker Kenn Kweder, making his sixth festival appearance, and Mr. Ray, a favorite of the preschool set. During the festival, bookseller Jazams of Princeton will have a satellite store in the library where books can be purchased for signing. Princeton Children’s Book Festival Sept. 10, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hinds Plaza and inside the library Co-sponsored by the library, Johnson & Johnson Consumer Group of Companies, Packet Publications of Central New Jersey, Terra Momo Restaurant Group and Jazams.

OTHER FESTIVAL HIGHLIGHTS • John Bemelmans Marciano, who carries on the legacy begun by his grandfather, Ludwig Bemelmans, author and illustrator of the “Madeline” books. • Brett Helquist, illustrator of the Lemony Snicket books. • Will Hillenbrand, acclaimed illustrator of many popular

books including “Counting Crocodiles” by Judy Sierra and “Kiss the Cow” by Phyllis Root. • Dan Yaccarino, author and illustrator of dozens of books. • Eric Velasquez, 2011 ALA Pura Belpre Award winning illustrator and author

A complete list of authors and illustrators appearing at festival: www.princetonlibrary.org/children/festival

6 library services. New members are always welcome. Conference Room

to make a job or career change. Breakfast supplied by Dispensa Café. Community Room

Sept. 17, 2 p.m. Citizenship Workshop Trained, bilingual volunteers will be helping applicants with the completion of the N400 naturalization form. All the resources needed to complete the application process will be available. Community Room

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 21 Sept. 21, 4:30 p.m. PSO Soundtracks: “Visions of America” As a prelude to the Princeton Symphony Orchestra’s Oct. 2 Classical Series concert, “Visions of America,” featuring music written in America, this lecture focuses on artwork from the Princeton University Art Museum’s extensive American collection. The portraits and landscapes discussed during the lecture will be on display at a reception at the art museum following the concert. Community Room

Co-sponsored by the library and the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund. To register and for a document review please contact the Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund: 877.452.5333.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 18 Sept. 18, 3 p.m. Concert: Sarah Donner Singer-songwriter Donner, who is a Westminster Choir College graduate, premieres her video, “Going Under,” which features her performing with sock puppets (“sockstars”) sent to her by fans. She will also speak about singing and making a music video. Afterward, everyone who brings a sock will be invited to create a “sockstar.” Other materials will be supplied. Community Room

Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Symphony Orchestra.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 22 Sept. 22, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Princeton Farmers’ Market

Sept. 22, 7 p.m. Art Talk — Photographer Tasha O’Neill and painter Karen Stolper, whose works are on display in the library’s second floor Reference Gallery, will speak about their art and answer questions. Community Room

MONDAY, SEPT. 19

Co-sponsored by the library and the Arts Council of Princeton.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 24

KIDS Sept. 19, 11 a.m.

Talk Like a Pirate Day Preschoolers are invited to celebrate International Talk Like a Pirate Day with an hourlong program that will include piratethemed stories, a Pirate and Princess Parade, activities and crafts. Wear a bandana or eyepatch or full pirate gear or dress like a princess. Story Room Sept. 19, 7 p.m. Film: “Captain Blood” Based on the novel of the same name by Rafael Sabatini, this is the story of Dr. Peter Blood who is sold into slavery after being convicted of treason against the king. Blood becomes the personal physician of a local governor but escapes with his fellow slaves during a Spanish raid on their town. After stealing the raiders’ ship, they begin a life of piracy. Community Room Sept. 19, 7 p.m. Talk: Introduction to Your Lifestyle in Retirement — Carol King, director of the Princeton Senior Re-

KIDS+ Sept. 24, 3:30 p.m.

Painter Karen Stopler (“Union Square,” above) and photographer Tasha O’Neill (“Bounty,” left) will discuss their art on Sept. 22 at 7 p.m. in a program co-sponsored by the Arts Council of Princeton. Works by both artists will be on display in the Reference Gallery on the second floor.

source Center’s Next Step programs, offers an introduction to planning for retirement or a major lifestyle change. Options for dealing with change, managing time, identifying passions and volunteering are explored. Conference Room

Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Next Step Engaged Retirement and Encore Careers Program

TUESDAY, SEPT. 20

Sept. 20, 8:30 a.m. Talk: Succeed on Your Own Terms Patrick Sweeney, president of Caliper Corp., an international management consulting firm headquartered in Princeton, speaks at this Tuesday Networking Breakfast, a monthly meeting of those currently unemployed, under-employed or seeking

FALL 2011

Bach 2 Rock — This program, featuring violinist Caryn Lin, presents the simplicity of the solo acoustic violin and its origins demonstrated by performing a simple Bach minuet. Moving to the present day, Lin uses the five-string electric violin and sound effects to transcend the traditional sound, using looping to perform live duos and trios with herself. Community Room

SUNDAY, SEPT. 25

Sept. 25, 4:30 p.m. KIDS Children and Stories This monthly series is for children ages 5-7 who are not reading on their own or who are just beginning to read. Short stories will be read aloud, followed by a discussion. Study Room, third floor Calendar continues on Page 8

Friends of the Library SPOTLIGHT 7

Finely tooned

daughter — it’s in these characters that so many readers see themselves. One cartoon from “Theories of Everything,” sums them up best. Shown sitting side by side on a couch, Dad is lamenting how “Everything has gone downhill since 1964.” Consumed, as usual, by misplaced guilt, Mom frets that “Everything is my fault.” Clairvoyantly, Daughter glares at Mom and scowls “Everything IS your fault,” while preteen Son surmises, “Everything would be fine if I had a dirt bike.” Chast’s ability to pinpoint our collective anxieties may be rooted in her childhood as illustrated in another of her best-known cartoons. In it, she portrays herself at age 9, nose firmly planted in “The Big By AMY HIESTAND Book of Horrible Rare Diseases” with similarly titled volumes strewn Connections Staff Writer about her bed. A born worrier, she’s been fascinated by all things dark and creepy as far back as she can remember. or someone who says she has a hard time paying attention, Perhaps it was this trait that drew Chast to the ghoulish characters Roz Chast doesn’t seem to miss a thing. Little, if anything, of New Yorker cartoonist Charles Addams, whose influence remains about human nature has gone unnoticed by the cartoonist in her work today. Having been deposited in the browsing library who has been holding a mirror up to readers of The New at Cornell University while her parents, both educators, attended a Yorker for 33 years. lecture, the 9-year-old Chast discovered a book of his cartoons. “I Through snapshots of everyday existence, Chast may force us to thought they were so funny,” she says. “Maybe because they were so see what we look like through the eyes of a spouse, parent, child or subversive and allowed me to imagine stepping outco-worker. But in the process we get to laugh at ourside of being the good girl that I always was.” selves – and at life. As an only child of older parents, Chast spent a As the featured speaker at this year’s Friends of the fair amount of time in libraries apart from the one at Princeton Public Library benefit, Chast is likely to talk Cornell where she pored over Addams’s work. “I alabout some of the work that appears in “Theories of ways read and discovered lots of things through readEverything: Selected, Collected and Health-Inspected Cartoons, 1978-2006,” a collection of her favorite caring,” she said. “We would go to the main Brooklyn toons. Just don’t expect her to share how she does it. Public Library and also to our neighborhood library.” “I’m really not very analytical about it,” she said Chast continued the tradition of visiting the library recently from her home in Ridgefield, Conn. “I just while raising her own children, and has never stopped do what I think is funny.” going to “the great library we have here in Ridgefield.” Over the years, what Chast thinks is funny has As for e-readers, “I had my Kindle,” Chast said. made it onto the pages of The New Yorker more than “I thought I’d use it more, but I ended up giving it to 1,000 times including several covers. Her cartoons someone. Maybe because I’m on my computer have also been published in other magazines includall day, I don’t know, I just like books. I like to flip ing Scientific American, the Harvard Business Review back pages.” A self-portrait of New Yorker cartoonist and Redbook. Chast says she’s looking forward to her appearance Roz Chast, who appears at the benefit of the Chast uses drawings of everything from tombas part of the annual Friends benefit in October and Friends of the Library on Oct. 14. stones to trains to barnyard animals to convey her was thrilled to hear she’d be introduced by her old keen, if quirky, observations and exquisitely sarcastic friend and fellow New Yorker cartoonist Henry Martin. “Oh, I adore wit. But it’s the people in her cartoons who are instantly recognizable Henry Martin,” she said “He’s so great — he’s just the best.” to the many admirers of her work. Roz Chast I Friends of the Library Benefit I Oct. 14, 6 p.m. I Nassau Presbyterian Including a family with an identical make-up to her own — she Church I $200-$500 includes post-talk dinner in the library I For more informaand her husband humor writer Bill Franzen raised a son and a tion, call 609.924.9529, ext. 280

Cartoonist Roz Chast to draw on her acerbic wit as Friends Benefit speaker

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OCTOBER 21-23, 2011 Friday, Oct. 21 10 a.m.– Noon Preview Sale ($10 admission; Friends admitted free) Numbered tickets for sale at 9 a.m. No admission fee after Preview Sale Noon–5:30 p.m. Regular Sale Saturday, Oct. 22 9 a.m.–5:30 p.m. Regular Sale Sunday , Oct. 23 1–5:30 p.m. Half Price Sale 3–5:30 p.m. Bag Sale in the Tent on Hinds Plaza (Fill a bag for $5)

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MONDAY, SEPT. 26

Sept. 26, 7 p.m. Talk: Selling Your Strengths Tim Pitts, who identified common traits shared by the hundreds of successful people he hired during his 25-year career in the financial services industry, gives a presentation about selfpromotion for people in every stage of their career. Topics include identifying what you really want to do; identifying and dealing with your strengths and weaknesses; the art of networking and self-promotion; and communicating your value to a potential employer. Community Room

TUESDAY, SEPT. 27

Sept. 27, 7 p.m. Socrates Café — In the spirit of Socrates’ belief that the “unexamined life is not worth living,” participants seek wisdom and knowledge through interactive discussion, questioning, and presenting multiple perspectives on topics of interest to the group. Everyone is invited. Conference Room

TEENS+ Sept. 27, 7 p.m.

College Essay Night Learn more about what to write on a college admission essay and hear how admissions officers react when they read essays. The session features a panel of representatives including Shelley Krause of Rutgers Prep, Meg Caddeau of Stuart Country Day School and a representative from Princeton University’s Office of Admissions. The program is intended for high school students and adults. Community Room

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 28

Sept. 28, 10 a.m. Film: “3:10 to Yuma” — Glenn Ford and Van Heflin star in this 1957

classic about a rancher (Ford) who volunteers to take the leader of a gang of murdering robbers (Heflin) to the next town to board a train to jail. Part of the Western Wednesday series. Community Room

THURSDAY, SEPT. 29 Sept. 29, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Princeton Farmers’ Market Hinds Plaza

Sept. 29, 6:30 p.m. Film: “Luckey” This documentary tells the story of interactive artist Tom Luckey and how, after a fall left him paralyzed, his son Spencer helped him finish the enormous climbable sculpture he had been commissioned to build at the Boston Children’s Museum. The Luckeys have recently been working with Mapleton Nurseries to create accessible gardens for residents of Elm Court in Princeton and will be working on other projects in Princeton. Community Room

FALL 2011

Sept. 30, 4 p.m. Dance On! — Family dance party for all ages. Community Room

SATURDAY, OCT. 1

Co-sponsored by the library and Dispensa Café.

Sept. 28, 7 p.m. Talk: Learning Differences and Brain Development Dr. Gordon Sherman, executive director of the Newgrange School and Education Center, gives a presentation about dyslexia, learning differences, brain development and the future. Part of the Inside a Child’s Mind speaker series. Community Room

FRIDAY, SEPT. 30

Oct. 1, 9 a.m. Princeton Future Open Meeting Join a conversation about the proposed consolidation of Princeton Borough and Princeton Township. Representatives from The Consolidation Commission and the Center for Government Research will attend. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Future

SUNDAY, OCT. 2

Oct. 2, 3 p.m. Zentangle Workshop — Rose Crawford presents this 2½-hour workshop on the easy-to-learn method of creating beautiful images using repetitive patterns. Limited to 15 participants, registration is required and there is a $15 fee, which covers the cost of supplies. Conference Room

9 WEDNESDAY, OCT. 5

Oct. 5, 7 p.m. Citizenship Exam Preparation Class — The Latin American Task Force offers a series of classes to assist in preparing for the U.S. Citizenship Test. History, civic lessons and a review of basic English necessary for the citizenship interview are covered. Classes continue Wednesdays through Nov. 30 (except Nov. 23). Conference Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Latin American Task Force.

THURSDAY, OCT. 6

Oct. 6, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Princeton Farmers’ Market Hinds Plaza

Princeton-based American Repertory Ballet offers a preview of its upcoming season in an evening of dance and discussion on Oct. 13 at 7 p.m. See Page 12

MONDAY, OCT. 3

Oct. 3, 7 p.m. Talk: Freedom, Slavery and the Roots of American Music Musician Ray Kamalay traces the development of slavery from ancient times to its links with American society up to the early jazz age, putting American music in the perspective of world history. Community Room

Oct. 3, 7:30 p.m. Continuing Conversations on Race — Members of Not In Our Town, the Princeton-based interracial and interfaith social action group, facilitate these discussions of race-related issues of relevance to our community and nation. Princeton Room Oct. 3, 7:30 p.m. Mystery Book Group: “Starvation Lake” by Bryan Gruley — In the dead of a Michigan winter, pieces of a snowmobile wash up near the crumbling small town of Starvation Lake – the same snowmobile that went down with the town’s legendary hockey coach years earlier. But everybody knows the coach’s accident happened 5 miles away on a different lake. Librarian Gayle Stratton leads the discussion. Quiet Room

TUESDAY, OCT. 4 NEW Oct. 4, 6:30 p.m.

TEDxSalon — Humor is the topic of this first salon of the season featuring Matthew Inman, creator of the popular website theoatmeal.com, as speaker. Sarah Donner will perform her funny songs and talk about writing lyrics. Topical videos will also be shown, followed by a discussion, bookand CD-signing and networking. $25 includes dessert, a copy of Inman’s book and Donner’s latest CD. Please register by visiting the online events calendar at www.princetonlibrary.org. Community Room

Oct. 6, 6:45 p.m. SCORE Seminar: “Promoting and Advertising for Small Businesses” Advertising executive Alan Yarnoff draws on his many years of experience creating advertising for major consumer products and services to lead this seminar on making your advertising budget pay off. Learn the basic principles of creating sales-generating ads across all media sources from printed ads to television to the web. Presented in an easy-to-grasp manner for owners of businesses of all sizes and those who are contemplating starting a business. Fireplace Area. Co-sponsored by the library and SCORE

Oct. 6, 7 p.m. Film: “The Learning” This documentary tells the story of four Filipino women who reluctantly leave their families and schools to teach in Baltimore in the hope of lifting their families out of poverty. But the women also bring idealistic visions of the teacher’s craft and of life in America, which soon collide with Baltimore’s tough realities. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and POV/ American Documentary

Oct. 6, 7 p.m. Gente Y Cuentos — In discussing Latin American short stories in Spanish, participants recount their personal experiences and how they relate to the characters in the story. The discussions continue every Thursday through Nov. 10. Princeton Room Calendar continues on Page 10

10 Oct. 6, 7 p.m. Witherspoon-Jackson Genealogy Group — The group meets monthly to share ideas, listen to speakers and get beginners started with researching the history of families who lived in Princeton’s historic Witherspoon-Jackson community. Technology Center

Beginners are welcome. The club is not just for kids; adults are invited too. In fact, an adult must accompany anyone under the age of 7. Activity Room Oct. 12, 7 p.m. Circulo de lectura: De amor y de sombra por Isabel Allende — Publicada en 1984, fue el segundo gran éxito de la autora después de La casa de los espíritus. En sus propias palabras, es la historia de una mujer y un hombre que se amaron en plenitud, salvándose así de una historia vulgar. Princeton Room

SUNDAY, OCT. 9 TEENS Oct. 9, 2 p.m.

Graphic Novel/Manga Book Club Teens in grades 6-12 meet to talk about their favorite graphic novels and manga. Registration suggested; drop-ins welcome, too. Third floor. Oct. 9, 3 p.m. Film: “Bananas” — Filmmaker Fredrik Gertten sheds new light on the global politics of food in this story of Dole Food’s use of a banned pesticide that was known to cause sterility. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Global Cinema Café

MONDAY, OCT. 10 Oct. 10, 7 p.m. Author Linda Arntzenius Independent researcher and oral historian Linda G. Arntzenius discusses her book on Princeton’s Institute for Advanced Study. Founded in 1930, the Institute for Advanced Study was created as an independent institution devoted to the pursuit of knowledge. Opening its doors to scholars “without regard to race, creed or sex,” it provided a haven for Jewish intellectuals fleeing Nazi Germany including Albert Einstein, who remained on the faculty until his death in 1955. Community Room Oct. 10, 7:30 p.m. Poetry in the Library — Featured poets Matthew Brady Klitsch and Lois Marie Harrod read for 20 minutes each, followed by an open mic session. Klitsch earned his MFA in Poetry from Drew University this year. His poems have appeared in the Edison Literary Review and other literary journals. Harrod’s 11th book, “Brief Term” has recently been published. Her work has appeared in various journals including American poetry Review. Fireplace Area, second floor Co-sponsored by the library, the US 1 Poets Cooperative and the Delaware Valley Poets.

Author Melissa Harris-Perry discusses her new book, “Sister Citizen: For Colored Girls Who’ve Considered Politics When Being Strong Isn’t Enough” in a special appearance on Oct. 16. See Page 12.

TUESDAY, OCT. 11

Oct. 11, 7 p.m. Talk: What You Need to Know About Medicare — Fran Cancro of New Jersey State Health Insurance Program talks about Medicare basics including eligibility, enrolling, Medicare Parts A, B, C, Medicare prescription drug coverage and costs. Part of the Next Step Speaker Series. Conference Room

Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Next Step Engaged Retirement and Encore Careers Program

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 12

Oct. 11, 7 p.m. Talk: Gov. Jim Florio: Do Voters Really Believe in Change? — Former New Jersey Gov. Jim Florio expands on the op-ed piece he wrote for The Newark Star Ledger linking citizen discontent to rapid, dramatic change in every sector and the need for public policy to respond to it. Community Room

Oct. 12, 10 a.m. Film: “Cat Ballou” — Jane Fonda plays an aspiring schoolteacher turned revenge-seeking outlaw in this comedy that won Lee Marvin a Best Actor Academy Award for his dual role as a legendary gunfighter and hired killer. Part of the Western Wednesday series. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Dispensa Café.

KIDS+ Oct. 12, 6:30 p.m.

Origami Club — Anyone with a passion for paper folding is invited to meet for 90 minutes of new and interesting, often seasonal folding. FALL 2011

Oct. 12, 7 p.m. Author Nicholas Humphrey (“Soul Dust: The Magic of Consciousness”) The author, a psychologist and leading figure in consciousness research, proposes a startling theory in his latest book: that consciousness is nothing less than a magical-mystery show that we stage for ourselves inside our own heads. Part of the Thinking Allowed Series. Community Room

Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton University Press

Oct. 12, 7:30 p.m. Book Group and Author Talk: “Who’s in Charge” by Laura H. Kahn — Joan Goldstein of MCCC leads a special edition of the Talking Politics book group. Author Laura H. Kahn will be present during the discussion of her work, which explores the relationships between political leaders, public health officials, journalists and others to see why leadership confusion develops during public health crises. Quiet Room Calendar continues on Page 12

Homework Help SPOTLIGHT 11

Help is just around the corner The library offers a variety of resources, including a new online service, for students of all ages with homework issues By AMY HIESTAND

Connections Staff Writer

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f you’re a parent, you probably know about all the fun and engaging programs that take place at Princeton Public Library throughout the year for children and teens. But did you know that when it’s time to buckle down and get serious about schoolwork, the library has a lot to offer, too? The library’s Youth Services staff is always ready to provide research assistance and help students find books and other materials or assist in preparing a bibliography. Need help using any of the 25 computers for public use on the third floor? They’ll be happy to lend a hand with those and other library tools including the online catalog, databases and website. Homework help is also available at the library in two additional ways. First, there’s the library’s long-established Springboard program. A drop-in program, Springboard extends what the library does for children by working with them one-to-one or in small groups to complete homework assignments. Sponsored by The Concordia Foundation and the J. Seward Johnson Sr. Charitable Trust, Springboard takes place every Monday through Thursday when Princeton Regional Schools are in session. Students can come to the library between 3:30 and 6 p.m. where teachers, students from Princeton University and community volunteers are on hand to offer guidance about homework assignments. Help is available in English and Spanish for students in kindergarten through grade 12 from all schools. “Sometimes a child just doesn’t understand what they’re being asked to do in an assignment,” says Teen Services librarian Susan Conlon. “Other kids really seem to benefit from the structure. They show up at the same time each day and get their homework done. Springboard is a great resource, and we really hope students take advantage of it.” As part of Springboard, the library also offers Crunch Time study sessions in January and June where high school students can get extra help preparing for midterm and final exams. Subject-specific summer sessions were also available this year including Count Me In, a math program for middle school girls and The Epic and the Odyssey, a program for students entering high school who are required to read “The Odyssey” in their first term. New this year is BrainFuse, offering live, online homework help, skills-building, writing assistance and more. Students communicate their question and receive live assistance in real time from Brainfuse-certified teachers who help them understand the assignment’s underlying concept rather than simply provide answers. Sponsored by a grant from Princeton University, Brainfuse can also help students master the core academic skills they need to pass

Springboard homework help is available four days a week on the third floor. The library also offers a new online service, BrainFuse.

standardized tests. They can also prepare for SATs, ACTs and even a GED using Brainfuse. Another feature of Brainfuse is comprehensive writing assistance. Students may access live writing tutors online, which is particularly helpful for those who need help organizing outlines and developing general themes. There is also a premium-writing lab that offers students access to writing experts who will analyze papers submitted via a secure file-sharing feature. They then receive advice about the paper’s voice, word choice, content, sentence fluency and organization. Papers, complete with constructive comments, are returned to students within 24 hours. BrainFuse also offers a 24/7 Question Center where answers for students who need an extended explanation of a difficult concept are usually available within 24 hours. A language lab and adult learning center offering career-enhancing skills to job-seekers are also available through BrainFuse. BrainFuse is accessible from any of the library’s computers. Students can also use BrainFuse at home visiting the library’s website, www.princetonlibrary.org, and logging onto BrainFuse using their library card.

12 THURSDAY, OCT. 13

Oct. 13, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Princeton Farmers’ Market Hinds Plaza

THURSDAY, OCT. 20

Poet Vasiliki Katsarou reads from “Memento Tsunami” on Oct. 27 at 7 p.m.

Oct. 20, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Princeton Farmers’ Market Hinds Plaza

Oct. 13, 10:30 a.m. Fiction Book Group: “Exiles in the Garden” by Ward Just Alec Malone, a senator’s son who rejects the family business of politics for a career as a newspaper photographer, is forced to examine the choices he’s made as his life is turned upside down. Conference Room

Oct. 20, 7 p.m. The Knit Nook — Join old friends and make new ones at these monthly knit-by-the-fireplace sessions, a follow-up to our successful World Wide Knit in Public Day. Bring your own supplies and share your stories and tips in a friendly gathering place for knitters. Please note: the Knit Nook is not a knitting class, but knitters with all levels of experience are welcome. Fireplace Area, first floor

Oct 13, 7 p.m. An Evening with American Repertory Ballet — The Princeton-based company presents an evening of dance and discussion hosted by director Douglas Martin. In this season preview, resident choreographers Mary Barton and Matthew Keefe will talk about their new ballets and the public will have an opportunity chance to interact with the dancers. Community Room

FRIDAY, OCT. 21 through SUNDAY, OCT. 23 The Friends of the Library Annual Book Sale Community Room and Hinds Plaza. See Page 7 for details

TUESDAY, OCT. 25

Co-sponsored by the library and American Repertory Ballet

FRIDAY, OCT. 14

Oct. 14, 6 p.m. The Friends of the Library Benefit with Roz Chast See feature story on Page 7

SATURDAY, OCT. 15 TEENS Oct. 15, 11 a.m.

Go-Between Club— This club for middle school students meets monthly at the library. Talk about books and other interests, help with library events, plan programs with the librarians and have a say in library services. New members are always welcome. Conference Room

SUNDAY, OCT. 16 Oct. 16, 2 p.m. Author Melissa Harris-Perry (“Sister Citizen”) In this groundbreaking book, the author uses multiple methods of inquiry, including literary analysis, political theory, focus groups, surveys, and experimental research to understand more deeply black women’s political and emotional responses to pervasive negative race and gender images. Community Room

KIDS Oct. 16, 4 p.m.

Word For Word Club Children ages 10-12 are invited to come prepared to discuss the club’s title of the month. October’s books are “Maniac Monkeys on Magnolia Street” and “When Mules Flew on Magnolia Street” by Angela Johnson. Study Room, third floor

KIDS Oct. 16, 5 p.m.

Heads and Tales Club — This club is for children ages 7 to 9 who are reading on their own and would like to discuss the club’s book of the month. The October title is “The Hundred Dresses” by Eleanor Estes. Study Room, third floor

TUESDAY, OCT. 18 Oct. 18, 8:30 a.m. Talk: Job Search Skills for Ages 40+ Nancy Anderson, founder of Blackbird Learning Associates, looks at statistics facing older workers and discusses transferable skills assessment tools, choosing the appropriate resume format and examining a job description for key job skills and matches. Technological changes and social networking are also reviewed at this Tuesday Networking Breakfast, a monthly meeting of those unemployed, underemployed or seeking a career change. Breakfast supplied by Dispensa Café. Community Room

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 19

MONDAY, OCT. 17

Oct. 17, 7 p.m. Talk: Doing Good While Doing Well Carol King of Princeton Senior Resource Center leads this session on using your skills, knowledge and experience in an encore career in the education, health care or environmental fields. Fireplace Area, second floor Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Next Step Engaged Retirement & Encore Careers Program

Oct. 19, 7 p.m. Author Ellen Hopkins (“Triangles”) Written in Hopkins’ trademark hard-hitting free-verse style, the author’s first book for adults looks at the dark side of love and friendship for three women as they face betrayal, the trials of parenting and turning 40. Fireplace Area, second floor

FALL 2011

Oct. 25, 7 p.m. Socrates Café — In the spirit of Socrates’ belief that the “unexamined life is not worth living,” participants seek wisdom and knowledge through interactive discussion, questioning, and presenting multiple perspectives on topics of interest to the group. Everyone is invited. Conference Room

THURSDAY, OCT. 27

Oct. 27, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Princeton Farmers’ Market Hinds Plaza Oct. 27, 7 p.m. Poet Vasiliki Katsarou (“Memento Tsunami”) The author reads from her first collection of poetry, an assortment of abstract and lyrical poems that draw from a wide variety of cultural influences including her Greek heritage, background in European filmmaking and childhood among the ghosts of New England Transcendentalism. Fireplace Area, second floor Co-sponsored by the library and Ragged Sky Press.

Calendar continues on Page 14

For an up-to-date listing of all Princeton Public Library programs, please visit www.princetonlibrary.org

Book Discussion Groups SPOTLIGHT 13

Group therapy The library is the place for lively discussions with book-lovers By AMY HIESTAND

Connections Staff Writer hose who know the next best thing to reading a good book is talking about it with someone have plenty of chances to do so at Princeton Public Library. Discussion groups meet regularly at the library to share personal reactions and thoughts on books in a variety of genres. The groups include Contemporary Fiction; Mystery Book Group; Circulo de Lectura, a Spanish language group; and Talking Politics. An outreach group also meets at the Elm Court senior housing community. Most meet monthly from September through June and new members are always welcome. Anyone worried about reports of a decline in the number of readers would have been heartened to see the crowd gathered in June to discuss Ian McEwan’s “Amsterdam.” Held in the library’s second floor Conference Room, it was the Contemporary Fiction group’s last meeting before the summer break – and every chair was taken. Librarian Kristin Friberg, who more than one member credits with the group’s popularity, distributed a list of questions to the 18 women and three men in attendance. One man read a favorite passage from the book, and in no time the discussion took on a life of its own. Remarks about the relationship between two characters led to a discussion of how men and women approach friendship differently. Questions about morality, the differences between generations and whether to step in if a friend is doing something wrong were raised. The subject of the right to privacy even came up. That the discussion took so many turns was no surprise to Friberg who has been the Contemporary Fiction group’s leader for almost five years. “They’re fantastic,” she said of the participants. “They’re all really interested in discussing the book. I keep it on track as much as I can, but it’s fun sitting back in my chair and watching it all unfold.” Watching the discussion unfold in the Mystery Book Group for the 10 years it’s been in existence is librarian and group leader Gayle Stratton. The group reads a wide variety of mysteries including historical, international and contemporary selections. “Some are serious, some are light,” said Stratton adding that titles span the entire range of the mystery genre. “We’re a fairly small group,” Stratton said of the gathering that takes place at 7:30 p.m. on the first Monday of the month in the Quiet Room. “We talk about plot strengths and weaknesses, obviously. But it’s also a very collaborative group so there’s lots of sharing and recommendations of different books and authors.” When Circulo de Lectura meets in the library’s Princeton Room, selections written in Spanish are discussed. “The main idea is to explore new Latin American authors,” said librarian Lucia Acosta

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who has been leading the group for five years. “We read contemporary fiction, and I try to have a range of authors from Spain and Latin America.” Readers for whom Spanish is their first language make up most of the group’s 15-member base. But there are also attendees who are fluent in Spanish and want to remain so even though they don’t speak it all the time. Circulo de Lectura meets eight times a year on the second Wednesday of the month. The library’s Quiet Room may seem an unlikely spot for a diverse political discussion, but that’s where Talking Politics meets six Wednesday evenings during the year. Led by author, sociologist and Mercer County Community College professor Joan Goldstein, the group reads recently published non-fiction books that focus on current social, political and economic concerns mostly in the United States. Talking Politics attracts a diverse group of men and women of different ages, nationalities, backgrounds and viewpoints. Goldstein calls the discussions “highly interactive and lively” and stresses that everyone is welcome for one or all sessions. Librarian Linda Adams leads the discussions that take place at Elm Court nearly every month. The informal group reads both fiction and non-fiction and sometimes views the film based on a book they have read. Book group selections can be found on display tables on the first floor of the library. The library’s Youth Services Department hosts three age-specific book discussion groups that meet monthly on Sunday afternoon: Children and Stories (ages 5-7) Heads and Tales (ages 7-9), Word For Word (ages 10-12). See the Calendar for details of upcoming book groups.

14 FRIDAY, OCT. 28 KIDS+ Oct. 28, 5:30 p.m.

Haunted House Created and run by library staff and teen volunteers, and open after the annual Arts Council of Princeton Halloween Parade for children and families, the haunted house is geared for children up to grade 5. Community Room

whose story is told in the book and choral work “I Never Saw Another Butterfly.” As part of the Princeton Reads discussion of topics covered in “The History of Love,” Leo and his son, Jon, will talk about how Leo told his story to his family and how it will be passed to future generations. Community Room.

The Community Room is transformed into two age-specific haunted houses on Oct. 28 and 29.

Funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Princeton Reads, a community-wide book discussion of “The History of Love,” is part of Memory and the Work of Art, a Princeton Community Collaboration.

SATURDAY, OCT. 29 TEENS+ Oct. 29, 6 p.m.

Scarier Haunted House Some scary additions, such as interactive characters lurking behind every corner, are made to the library’s haunted house, making it more suitable for middle- and high-school students and adults. Created and run by library staff and teen volunteers. Community Room

SUNDAY, OCT. 30 P-READS Oct. 30, 3 p.m.

“About Family” — CWW On Stage presents a collection of monologues and skits focusing on the various ways in which we experience family. Part of Princeton Reads. Community Room Funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Princeton Reads, a community-wide book discussion of “The History of Love,” is part of Memory and the Work of Art, a Princeton Community Collaboration.

Oct. 30, 4:30 p.m. KIDS Children and Stories This monthly series is for children ages 5-7 who are not reading on their own or who are just beginning to read. Short stories will be read aloud, followed by a discussion. Study Room, third floor

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 2 P-READS Nov. 2, 10:30 a.m.

Book Discussion: “The History of Love” — Librarian Martha Perry-Liu leads a discussion of this year’s Princeton Reads selection. Quiet Room Funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Princeton Reads, a community-wide book discussion of “The History of Love,” is part of Memory and the Work of Art, a Princeton Community Collaboration.

MONDAY, NOV. 7

THURSDAY, NOV. 3

Nov 3, 10 a.m. Princeton Eats — Chris Albrecht, executive chef at Eno Terra, will offer up some unusual twists for Thanksgiving classics and other fall menu favorites in this cooking demonstration. Please register by visiting the online events calendar at www.princetonlibrary.org. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Terra Momo Restaurant Group.

Nov. 3, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Princeton Farmers’ Market

Nov. 3, 7 p.m. Witherspoon-Jackson Genealogy Group —The group meets monthly to share ideas, listen to speakers and get beginners started with researching the history of families who lived in Princeton’s historic Witherspoon-Jackson community. All interested in the history of this community or in African American genealogy are invited to attend. Technology Center

SATURDAY, NOV. 5 KIDS+ Nov. 5, 2 p.m.

Bravo Brass Princeton Symphony Orchestra musicians perform and teach the audience about their brass instruments during this family-friendly program. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Symphony Orchestra.

P-READS Nov. 3, 7 p.m.

SUNDAY, NOV. 6

Radio Diaries: 15 Years of Stories — Joe Richman, founder and executive producer of the NPR show “Radio Diaries,” for which people are given tape recorders to report on their own lives and histories, presents an overview of past work and demonstrates how the best documentaries are the ones that happen by accident. Part of Princeton Reads. Community Room

Nov. 7, 6:45 p.m. SCORE: Financial Accounting and Financial Projections CPA Leon Petelle gives this presentation designed for the non-financial person who wishes to learn the basics of accounting and obtain some practical advice on the management of a small business. Accounting basics, small business tax considerations and financial planning for a small business are among topics discussed. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and SCORE of Princeton

Nov. 7, 7:30 p.m. Continuing Conversations on Race — Members of Not In Our Town, the Princeton-based interracial and interfaith social action group, facilitate these discussions of race-related issues of relevance to our community and nation. Princeton Room Nov. 7, 7:30 p.m. Mystery Book Discussion: “A Beautiful Blue Death” by Charles Finch — On any given day in London, all Victorian gentleman and armchair explorer Charles Lenox wants to do is relax in his private study. But when his lifelong friend Lady Jane asks for his help, Lenox cannot resist another chance to unravel a mystery. Quiet Room

TUESDAY, NOV. 8 KIDS+ Nov. 8, 2 p.m. P-READS Nov. 6, 2 p.m.

Remembrance: An Intergenerational Perspective on the Holocaust Leo Lowy, pictured above, was imprisoned in Terezin and Buchenwald during World War II. He is one of about a dozen teen survivors of Terezin,

Funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Princeton Reads, a community-wide book discussion of “The History of Love,” is part of Memory and the Work of Art, a Princeton Community Collaboration.

FALL 2011

Preschool and Kindergarten Fair By meeting representatives of area schools at this two-hour event, parents can streamline the search process for a preschool or kindergarten. The schools will provide information about philosophy, programs, availability and the application process. Community Room Calendar continues on Page 15

CALENDAR 15 Nov. 8, 7 p.m. Talk: Taking Creative Gap Time at Any Age — Holly Bull, president, Center for Interim Programs, discusses the benefits of taking gap time as an older adult, exploring the options that are possible, sample gap experiences of past participants, getting a better sense of how to make it happen and helpful tips and resources. Conference Room

to meet for 90 minutes of new and interesting, often seasonal folding. Beginners are welcome. The club is not just for kids; adults are invited too. In fact, an adult must accompany anyone under the age of 7. Activity Room

Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Next Step Engaged Retirement and Encore Careers Program

Book Discussion: “The History of Love” — Librarian Janet Buschhoff Hauge leads a discussion of this year’s Princeton Reads selection. Quiet Room

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 9

Nov. 9, 10 a.m. Film: “Hang ‘em High” Clint Eastwood stars as a lawman turned rancher who barely survives a lynching after being wrongly accused of murder and cattle theft. Cleared of any wrongdoing, he picks up a badge once again and sets out to bring those who lynched him to justice. Part of the Western Wednesday series. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Dispensa Café.

P-READS Nov. 9, 4:30 p.m.

PSO Soundtracks: “Dreams, Memories, Truth” Princeton Symphony Orchestra Music Director Rossen Milanov leads a discussion in connection with the PSO’s Nov. 13 Classical Series concert, “Dreams, Memories, and Truth.” Tying the concert’s works to the themes of Princeton University’s ongoing community-wide project “Memory and the Work of Art,” Milanov will explore how memory shapes the creative process of composers and other musical artists, as well as audiences’ perceptions of music. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Symphony Orchestra

KIDS+ Nov. 9, 6:30 p.m.

Origami Club — Anyone with a passion for paper folding is invited

Fiction Book Group: “The History of Love” by Nicole Krauss — This year’s Princeton Reads selection follows the lives of an old man and a young girl whose lives are tied together through a novel the old man has written. Librarian Kristin Friberg leads this discussion of this year’s Princeton Reads selection. Conference Room Funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Princeton Reads, a community-wide book discussion of “The History of Love,” is part of Memory and the Work of Art, a Princeton Community Collaboration.

P-READS Nov. 8, 7 p.m.

Funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Princeton Reads, a community-wide book discussion of “The History of Love,” is part of Memory and the Work of Art, a Princeton Community Collaboration.

P-READS Nov. 10, 10:30 a.m.

Nov. 9, 7 p.m. Book Talk: “Estate Planning Smarts: A Practical, User-Friendly, Action-Oriented Guide” Deborah L. Jacobs, a lawyer and business journalist who has covered estate planning for The New York Times and other publications, discusses her bestselling book on estate planning and how it’s not just for wealthy or elderly people. Complex principles are explained in simple terms. Community Room Nov. 9, 7 p.m. Circulo de Lectura: “Adiós, Hemingway” por Leonardo Padura Con una fascinante mezcla de realidad y ficción, novela policial y biográfica, moviéndose entre el pasado y el presente, el autor captura los últimos días de Hemingway en Cuba. Princeton Room Nov. 9, 7:30 p.m. Talking Politics Book Group: “Empire of Illusion: The End of Literacy and the Triumph of Spectacle” by Chris Hedges Pulitzer prize-winning Hedges charts the dramatic and disturbing rise of a post-literate America that craves fantasy, ecstasy and illusion. Joan Goldstein of Mercer County Community College leads the discussion. Quiet Room

THURSDAY, NOV. 10 Nov. 10, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Princeton Farmers’ Market Hinds Plaza

Nov. 10, 4:30 p.m. Talk: Food for Thought: Tapping the Full Educational Potential of School Meals — Various efforts being made by area schools to make lunch a healthier, more responsible and more educational experience are discussed. Community Room

Co-sponsored by the library and OASIS (Organizing Action on Sustainability in Schools)

FRIDAY, NOV. 11

The library will be closed.

SATURDAY, NOV. 12 Nov. 12, 9 a.m. Princeton Future Open Meeting Join a conversation about the new Princeton Medical Center and the development plans for the hospital’s Witherspoon Street site. Community Room

Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Future

Nov. 12, 10:30 a.m. Quickbooks — Certified QuickBooks ProAdvisor Oria Gonzalez provides basic training in the use of QuickBooks at this 21⁄2-hour session. Technology Center Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Chapter of SCORE.

P-READS Nov. 12, 2 p.m.

PBS StoryCorps Shorts This program takes viewers on an animated journey through America with stories about an indomitable Sunday school teacher, a strong-willed grandmother and a husband’s love and loss on Sept. 11, 2001. Community Room

Co-sponsored by the library and American Documentary/POV. Funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Princeton Reads, a community-wide book discussion of “The History of Love,” is part of Memory and the Work of Art, a Princeton Community Collaboration.

SUNDAY, NOV. 13 TEENS Nov. 13, 2 p.m.

Graphic Novel/Manga Book Club Teens ion grades 6-12 meet to talk about their favorite graphic novels and manga. Registration suggested, drop-ins welcome, too. Third floor Nov. 13, 3 p.m. Lecture in Song: Fred Miller Returning to the library by popular demand, Miller presents an engaging, anecdotal, historical, musical profile of Jerome Kern. Community Room

KIDS Nov. 13, 4 p.m.

Word For Word Club Children ages 10-12 are invited to come prepared to discuss the club’s title of the month. October’s book is “The Kite Fighters” by Linda Sue Park. Study Room, third floor

KIDS Nov. 13, 5 p.m.

Heads and Tales Club This club is for children ages 7 to 9 who are reading on their own and would like to discuss the club’s book of the month. The November title is “The End of the Beginning” by Avi. Study Room, third floor

MONDAY, NOV. 14

Nov. 14, 7:30 p.m. Poetry in the Library Poets Eloise Bruce and David Keller read from their work followed by a 20-minute open mic session. Bruce’s first book of poetry, “Rattle” was published in 2004, and she has had various roles at the Frost Place Center for Poetry over the years. A recipient of a New Jersey State Council on the Arts fellowship in poetry, she is dedicated to expanding the role of the arts in education. Keller was the first Guest American Poet at the Poets’ House in Northern Ireland and for many years was director of Admissions at the Frost Place Center for Poetry. Bruce and Keller are married and live in Lawrence. Fireplace Area, second floor Sponsored by the library, the US1 Poets Cooperative and the Delaware Valley Poets.

Calendar continues on Page 16

Non Profit Org. U.S. Postage PA I D Princeton, NJ Permit No. 4

Executive Director: Leslie Burger Assistant Director: Peter Bromberg Communications Director: Tim Quinn Public Programming Librarian: Janie Hermann Princeton Public Library Sands Library Building 65 Witherspoon St. Princeton, NJ 08542 609.924.9529 princetonlibrary.org

Frıends of the

Princeton Public Library

Youth Services Team Facilitator: Susan Conlon Program Committee: Lucía Acosta, Leslie Burger, Susan Conlon, Kim Dorman, Kristin Friberg, Pamela Groves, Shelly Hawk, Janie Hermann, Amy Hiestand, Tim Quinn, Allison Santos Staff Writer: Amy Hiestand Editing and design: Tim Quinn

SAVE THE DATES A Cappella Night — Dec. 12, 7 p.m. Princeton Environmental Film Festival — Jan. 26-29 I Feb 2-5 I Feb. 9- 12, 2012

16 CALENDAR TUESDAY, NOV. 15

Nov. 15, 8:30 a.m. Tuesday Networking Breakfast — Karen Carson presents a reading of her play “Eating the Bear: Snapshots of the New Normal,” a collection of monologues about coping with job loss. Those currently unemployed, under-employed or seeking to make a job or career change are invited to gather at this monthly meeting. Breakfast supplied by Dispensa Café. Community Room

P-READS Nov. 15, 6:30 p.m.

Talk: “Writing The History of Love” — Author Nicole Krauss talks about writing this year’s Princeton Reads selection. Sponsored by the library, Princeton University Art Museum and NEH. Richardson Auditorium, Princeton University Funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Princeton Reads, a community-wide book discussion of “The History of Love,” is part of Memory and the Work of Art, a Princeton Community Collaboration.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16 Nov. 16, 7 p.m. Author Beth Archer Brombert (“Journey to the World of the Black Rooster”) — The author weaves the story of her marriage with the story of how she came to love Italy during many years of living there in a text that moves between past and present, America and Europe, Florence and New Haven, and Chianti and Princeton. Community Room

Nov. 16, 7 p.m. Ready to Read: Early Literacy Learning — Saroj Ghoting, an early childhood literacy consultant, speaks to parents and caregivers about early literacy skill building including ways to share books and language with children as they prepare to read. Follows an earlier session open only to librarians and early childhood educators. Part of the Inside a Child’s Mind series. Fireplace Area, second floor

THURSDAY, NOV. 17

Nov. 17, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Princeton Farmers’ Market Hinds Plaza Nov. 17, 7 p.m. The Knit Nook — Join old friends and make new ones at these monthly knit-by-the-fireplace sessions, a follow-up to our successful World Wide Knit in Public Day. Bring your own supplies and share your stories and tips in a friendly gathering place for knitters. Please note: The Knit Nook is not a knitting class, but knitters with all levels of experience are welcome. Fireplace Area, first floor

SATURDAY, NOV. 19 TEENS Nov. 19, 11 a.m.

Go-Between Club — This club for middle school students meets monthly at the library. Talk about books and other interests, help with library events, plan programs with the librarians and have a say in library services. New members are always welcome. Conference Room

MONDAY, NOV. 21

Nov. 21, 7 p.m. Talk: Job Search Strategies for Older Workers — Carol King, director of Next Step: Engaged

Retirement & Encore Careers of The Princeton Senior Resource Center, discusses strategies for competing in the new work place, updating your skills, networking, dealing with ageism, job searching on the internet and avoiding job scams. Conference Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Next Step Engaged Retirement and Encore Careers Program

TUESDAY, NOV. 22

Nov. 22, 7 p.m. Socrates Café — In the spirit of Socrates’ belief that the “unexamined life is not worth living,” participants seek wisdom and knowledge through interactive discussion, questioning, and presenting multiple perspectives on topics of interest to the group. Everyone is invited. Conference Room

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 23

Nov. 23, 10 a.m. Film: “High Noon” — Gary Cooper stars in this 1952 classic as a lawman who learns a man he sent to prison years before is returning on the noon train to exact revenge. Abandoned by the townspeople he long protected, he must face the man and his gang alone. Part of the Western Wednesday series. Community Room

Co-sponsored by the library and Dispensa Café.

THURSDAY, NOV. 24 The library will be closed.

SUNDAY, NOV. 27

Nov. 27, 3 p.m. Lecture in Song: Fred Miller Returning to the library by popular demand, Miller presents an engaging, anecdotal, historical, musical profile of Irving Berlin. Community Room

MONDAY, NOV. 28 Nov. 28, 7:30 p.m. Author: David O. Stewart (“American Emperor: Aaron Burr’s Challenge to Jefferson’s America”) Tracing Burr from the threshold of the presidency in the contested 1800 election, through his duel with Alexander Hamilton and beyond, the latest book from the author of “The Summer of 1787” explores the third vice president’s extraordinary attempt to lead a secession of the American West. Community Room

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 30

Nov. 30, 10 a.m. Film: “True Grit” — A 14-yearold farm girl enlists the help of a tough but aging U.S. Marshal and a hardened Texas Ranger to track down her father’s murderer. Jeff Bridges, Matt Damon and Hailee Steinfeld star in the Coen brothers’ remake of the 1969 original. Part of the Western Wednesday series. Community Room

Co-sponsored by the library and Dispensa Café.

Nov. 30, 6:30 p.m. TEDxSalon — Open Sourcing Science is the topic of the salon that features quantum computation pioneer Michael Nielsen as the speaker. $25 includes dessert and a copy of Nielsen’s book “Reinventing Discovery.” Please register by visiting the online events calendar at www.princetonlibrary.org. Community Room


Connections Fall 2011