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THE PRINCETON PUBLIC LIBRARY MAGAZINE Summer 2011

ALSO ‘Madoff’ author Diana Henriques ‘Pastry’ filmmakers Chris Hegedus and D.A. Pennebaker Summer Reading Clubs go global Theater from literature Student Film Festival Friends celebrate 50 years ‘History Of Love’ selected for Princeton Reads

Special events and memories mark a milestone


2 THURSDAY, JUNE 2

June 2, 7 p.m. Gente Y Cuentos — In discussing Latin American short stories in Spanish, participants recount their personal experiences and how they relate to the characters in the story. Conference Room June 2, 7 p.m. Witherspoon Jackson Genealogy Group — This group meets monthly to share ideas, listen to speakers and get beginners started with researching the history of families who lived in Princeton’s historic Witherspoon-Jackson community. All interested in the history of this community or in African-American genealogy are invited to attend. Technology Center June 2, 7:30 p.m. Musical Preview of the 2011 Princeton Festival Season — Artists performing in “The Rake’s Progress” at the upcoming Princeton Festival will present arias from the opera. Members of the Young Artist’s Showcase will preview Sandy Wilson’s “The Boyfriend.” Festival Artistic Director Richard Tang Yuk, pictured at left, and Stage Director Steven La Cosse will discuss the ideas behind the productions and their experiences in creating the season. Community Room

“The Big Lebowski” kicks off the Monday Movie Mania series on July 11. Film critic Dan Buskirk will lead a post-screening discussion.

SUNDAY, JUNE 5 June 5, 1:30 p.m. Concert: Moving Vibes — The world of improvised music comes alive in this performance drawn from the jazz repertory. With clear explanations and demonstrations, the musicians make sense of the art of improvisation. Community Room

MONDAY, JUNE 6

June 6, 9:30 a.m. Infant CPR — Registration is required for this two-hour program, co-sponsored by Princeton Healthcare System. Community Room June 6, 1 p.m. Community CPR — Registration is required for this session cosponsored by Princeton Healthcare System. Community Room

June 6, 7:30 p.m. Author Talk: Diana Henriques This senior financial writer for the New York Times will discuss her new book on convicted Ponzi scheme criminal Bernard Madoff. Henriques has covered business governance and regulatory issues for The Times since 1989. She was a member of a reporting team that was named a Pulitzer finalist in 2003 for its coverage of the aftermath of the Enron scandals. Community Room See Feature Story, Page 5

June 6, 7:30 p.m. Mystery Book Group: “Provenance: How a Con Man and a Forger Rewrote the History of Modern Art” by Laney Salisbury and Aly Sujo — Two investigative reporters wrote this narrative chronicling one of the most far-reaching and elaborate

deceptions in art history. Librarian Gayle Stratton leads the discussion. Quiet Room June 6, 7:30 p.m. Continuing Conversations on Race — Members of Not In Our Town, the Princeton-based interracial and interfaith social action group, facilitate these discussions of race-related issues of relevance to our community and nation. Princeton Room June 6, 7:30 p.m. Lecture: “William Hogarth: The Painter’s Travels in London” Marianne Grey, docent at the Princeton Art Museum, will examine the origin of the paintings that inspired Igor Stravinsky to compose “The Rake’s Progress,” the opera being presented this season by The Calendar continues on Page 4

WEEKDAYS SCORE Small Business Counseling — By appointment: Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6 p.m.; Wednesdays, Fridays, 10 a.m. Tower Room English Language Conversation Groups — Various Venues Call 609.924.9529, ext. 220 for details. Technology Center Classes and Open Tech Time Please visit www.princetonlibrary.org for schedule of classes and Open Tech Times. Springboard After School Homework Help Mondays-Thursdays, 3:30-6 p.m., through June 16.

WEEKLY Princeton Farmers’ Market —Thursdays, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Family Stories

Lapsits

0 - 24 months

Mon. - Thu. 10:30 a.m.

June 6 to Aug. 11

Tue. and Wed. 11:30 a.m.

June 7 to Aug. 11

Must attend


Books and Authors SPOTLIGHT

All grown up The final Summer of Harry brings memories of a phenomenon By ANNE LEVIN

I

Connections Staff Writer

t is the end of an era. “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows,” the seventh and final installment in J.K. Rowling’s series of Harry Potter books, was published in 2009. Part 2 of the film of the same name, also the last in a series, is scheduled to be in theaters July 15. And all over the world, millions upon millions of fans, young and not-so-young, are adjusting to the idea of a world without Harry. At Princeton Public Library, devotees of the fantasy novels about the young wizard and his friends will salute the series with a weeklong festival of all seven films, leading up to the release of “Deathly Hallows.” The marathon will also include a July 7 “Harry Potter Filibuster,” in which participants will take turns reading aloud from “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone,” the book that started it all in June 1997. It was just about that time that librarians Allison Santos and Susan Conlon arrived at PPL to work in the Youth Services Department. Right away, they knew something unusual was happening in the world of juvenile literature. “What we were looking at was the beginning of a phenomenon,” says Conlon. “I call it ‘growing up Harry.’ There just is nothing to compare it to.” Even those who have never read a word of Rowling’s prose or watched one of the films made from her books are aware of the bespectacled, youthful protagonist and his magical powers. The stories chronicle the adventures of the adolescent wizard Harry Potter and his best friends Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger, all of whom are students at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. The main story concerns Harry’s quest to overcome the evil wizard Lord Voldemort, whose aim is to conquer the wizarding world and subjugate non-magical people. In the process, he commits to destroy all those who stand in his way, such as Harry’s parents. From the publication of the first book, the library’s copies of Harry Potter books were constantly circulating. The one copy kept on site for youngsters to read while at the library was always in use. More than once, the librarians observed children breaking down in tears while reading the books’ sad parts. “It wasn’t just Harry Potter in this phenomenon,” says Santos. “The Harry Potter books sparked an interest in reading that kids didn’t know they had. They would ask, ‘What else do you have that’s like this?’ Then you could get them to read a mystery or something else.” The influence of the Harry Potter series on children’s literature, not to mention the film business, is unprecedented. There are the stunning statistics about sales of the books and attendance at the movies. There are the stories of long lines of fans snaking around corners outside bookstores, desperate for the latest installments in the series. The New York Times was motivated to create a separate bestseller list for children’s literature in 2000, just before the release of “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” which was the fourth in the series. “It probably revived children’s and teens’ literature, not to mention literature for adults,” says Santos. “It was unifying for

When they were young: Ron, Harry and Hermoine in the 2001 film version of “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.”

all ages. Conlon adds, “The appeal crossed genders. There is such a wide cast of characters in the books. You got invested in the characters and the sub-plots. J.K. Rowling developed a whole world that you could visualize in your mind as you read.” A big part of the Potter appeal is the character of Harry himself. “It’s not just that he was the underdog, but it is the fact that he was average, until he became special,” says Conlon. “And here is somebody, an orphan, who gets rescued from his foster parents and awful cousin,” adds Santos. “There is the magical realm, but what is really magical is this rescue, and the fact that he can change his life, but reluctantly, always with a bit of self-doubt.” The librarians have watched their charges grow up with Harry Potter. “We have kids in here who are in college now, and we remember them spending a whole day reading the latest Harry Potter book,” says Conlon. “Now, we’re looking at a post-Harry world. Other books have certainly come along since then, but nothing of this magnitude, this scale, this scope. We don’t know what’s next, and of course there will be a next. It could be quietly brewing. It remains to be seen. And that’s exciting.” For a listing of all Harry Potter events, see Pages 8-9. Register for the July 7 Harry Potter Filibuster through the online events calendar at www.princetonlibrary.org.

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4 TUESDAY, JUNE 14

Princeton Festival. Stravinsky first saw these paintings when they were on loan to the Art Institute of Chicago in 1947. Fireplace Area, second floor

June 14, 6:45 p.m. SCORE: Access to Capital Onica E. Browne, lender relations specialist with the U.S. Small Business Administration’s New Jersey District Office, will share details about the SBA’s business loan programs. What goes into a good loan proposal? How can you increase the chances of getting a loan? Information for small-business owners about SBA’s no-cost business management counseling programs, and how they can assist you with preparing the business plan and loan proposal, will also be provided. Community Room

TUESDAY, JUNE 7

June 7, 7 p.m. Tuesday Technology Talk John LeMasney, manager for educational technology training and outreach at Princeton University, will explain GIMP software. Gimp is the GNU Image Manipulation Program, a freely distributed piece of software for such tasks as photo retouching, image composition and image authoring. Community Room

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8 KIDS+ June 8, 6:30 p.m.

Origami Club — Anyone with a passion for paper folding is invited to meet for 90 minutes of new and interesting, often seasonal folding. Beginners are welcome. The club is not just for kids; adults are invited too. In fact, an adult must accompany anyone under the age 7. Activity Room

THURSDAY, JUNE 9 June 9, 10:30 a.m. Fiction Book Group: “Amsterdam” by Ian McEwan In the affairs of his dead wife, a British publisher discovers compromising pictures of the foreign secretary who was her lover, providing an opportunity for revenge on both the political and personal level. Librarian Kristin Friberg leads this discussion. Conference Room June 9, 7 p.m. Gente Y Cuentos — In discussing Latin American short stories in Spanish, participants recount their personal experiences and how they relate to the characters in the story. Conference Room June 9, 7:30 p.m. Film: “Bag It” — When Jeb Berrier, an average American guy who is admittedly not a “tree hugger,”

Clifford Zink discusses his book “The Roebling Legacy” on June 13.

makes a pledge to stop using plastic bags, he embarks on a global tour to unravel the complexities of our plastic world. This film examines our society’s use and abuse of plastic. The screening is the official kickoff of the Sustainable Princeton “BYOBag” campaign. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Sustainable Princeton.

SATURDAY, JUNE 11

June 11, 10:30 a.m Quickbooks Workshop Oria Gonzalez, a certified QuickBooks ProAdvisor, provides basic training in the use of QuickBooks at this twoand-a-half-hour session. Seating is limited to 8 students in order to be able to provide individualized instruction. Technology Center Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton chapter of SCORE.

June 11, 11 a.m World Wide Knit in Public Day Bring your knitting, crocheting, and yarnwork projects and join this international celebration of knitting. Learn to knit or swap yarn, projects, and ideas. Please bring a chair. Hinds Plaza (rain location: Community Room)

SUNDAY, JUNE 12

June 12, 4 p.m. Poetry Reading: Philip Fried This New York poet’s writing has been in journals and anthologies. He is the founding editor

of The Manhattan Review. He collaborated with his wife, fine art photographer Lynn Saville, on the book “Acquainted with the Night.” Community Room

MONDAY, JUNE 13 June 13, 7:30 p.m. Author Clifford Zink (“The Roebling Legacy”) This local historian spent years researching his book about the family who designed and built the Brooklyn Bridge with wire rope manufactured in their Trenton mills. The Roebling operation employed generations of immigrants in Trenton and in Roebling, a company town. The book begins with the family’s beginnings in Germany and ends with the adaptive re-use of the Roebling factories today. Community Room June 13, 7:30 p.m. Poetry in the Library Poets Rachel Bunting and Anna Evans will read for 20 minutes each, followed by an open mic session. Bunting’s poems have appeared in many print and online journals, and she was nominated for a Pushcart Prize. Evans’ work has appeared in the Harvard Review, Atlanta Review, and elsewhere. She currently teaches poetry at West Windsor Arts Center. Presented by the library, US1 Poets Cooperative and Delaware Valley Poets. Fireplace Area, second floor   

SUMMER 2011

June 14, 7 p.m. Retirement Talk: Voluntourism Carol King talks about volunteering overseas, a different way of seeing the world and meeting people while helping out and giving back. Conference Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Engaged Retirement & Encore Careers Center at the Princeton Senior Resource Center.

June 14, 6 p.m. GIMP Class — The first of five sessions on how to use GIMP software, taught by John LeMasney, manager for educational technology training and outreach at Princeton University. Gimp is the GNU Image Manipulation Program, a freely distributed piece of software for such tasks as photo retouching, image composition and image authoring. Technology Center

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15 June 15, 7 p.m. Film: “Kings of Pastry” This documentary follows three renowned French pastry chefs as they compete in Lyon for the honor of being declared the best by President Nicolas Sarkozy. The grueling final competition, among 16 entrants, captures the high drama of the quest. The filmmakers will attend this screening. Community Room See feature story, Page 7

FRIDAY, JUNE 17

June 17, 10 a.m. Movie: “Eat, Pray, Love” Julia Roberts stars as an unhappily married woman who travels to Calendar continues on Page 6

For an up-to-date listing of all Princeton Public Library programs, please visit www.princetonlibrary.org


Books and Authors SPOTLIGHT 5

Off to see ‘The Wizard’ In ‘Wizard of Lies,’ Diana B. Henriques frames Madoff as ‘Shakespearean’ By ANNE LEVIN

A

Connections Staff Writer

s a New York Times reporter covering Wall Street, Diana B. Henriques spoke frequently to a man named Bernard L. Madoff. The now-notorious trader was the head of a small firm that did business after the market’s 4 p.m. closing time, making him a source for information if news broke late in the afternoon. Never, in any of these interactions, did Henriques suspect that Madoff would be the mastermind of a $65 billion Ponzi scheme that would rock the world of finance and shatter the lives of countless investors. The 2009 arrest of Madoff, the unraveling of the scandal across the world, and the destruction of the Madoff family – his son Mark committed suicide last year – are the subject of “The Wizard of Lies: Bernie Madoff and the Death of Trust,” published this spring by Henry Holt and Company. Henriques will appear at the library June 6 to talk about the book. “It is Shakespearean,” she says of the Madoff saga. “Like every journalist, I’ve got the novel in the bottom drawer of the desk. I don’t have to worry about that anymore. This novel was handed to me and it’s all true. It’s an amazing human drama.” The book is not Henriques’ first. A Times financial writer since 1989, she is also the author of “The White Sharks of Wall Street” and “Fidelity’s World.” Henriques began her career at a Packet newspaper, living in Lawrenceville for 12 years. “I have a deep affection for the Princeton area and am so looking forward to coming back,” she says. The next stop in Henriques’ journalism career was The Trenton Times, where she worked for a few years before moving to The Philadelphia Inquirer. It was at that paper that she first began covering business news. When an opening came up in The New York Times Wall Street bureau in 1985, Henriques was hired. “I came up to Wall Street and never looked back,” she says. “I fell in love with the characters, the issues, the ubiquity of it. Coming to business coverage from a

‘This is a guy who was ripping people off from Palm Beach to the Persian Gulf. It was staggering. I knew right away that this was somehow the climax of that fall’s financial scandals. But I didn’t quite appreciate the agonizing human drama I was going to be wandering into.’ – Diana B. Henriques background of government and general news really allows you to see how incredibly important business is to the rest of our lives, from the nature of the hospitals where we are born to the quality of the food we eat to everything else. Younger business reporters, I think, don’t necessarily appreciate the power of the institutions they cover to shape every minute of our lives. Everything is driven by business, so the better we understand it, the better off we are.” Henriques met Madoff early on. “I had known him in the wild, before he was in captivity, when he was an important voice in the backstage debate about how our stock market should function, when old notions were changing,” she says. “Madoff was a voice for modernization, for faster, cheaper, more global trading. It made him

immensely unpopular on Wall Street but very quotable and accessible. That’s who he was to me until the day he was arrested.” As the magnitude of Madoff ’s crime became evident, Henriques began close coverage of the story. “This is a guy who was ripping people off from Palm Beach to the Persian Gulf,” she says. “It was staggering. I knew right away that this was somehow the climax of that fall’s financial scandals. But I didn’t quite appreciate the agonizing human drama I was going to be wandering into.” Since Madoff was sentenced to 150 years at the Federal Correctional Complex in Butner, N.C., Henriques is the only journalist to have interviewed him twice. Madoff has also communicated with her through email, letters, and phone calls. That unprecedented access, plus research on her own tracing the financier’s modest beginnings in Queens, N.Y. to the stunning Ponzi scheme he ran, formed the basis for her book. Henriques’ second interview with Madoff at the prison was last February, not long after the suicide of his son. “The man I saw was a shattered remnant of the man I had seen on earlier visits,” she says. “He says he is remorseful. But what I was struck by, more than remorse, was this sense of unreality. I don’t think he has fully wrapped his mind around who he is now and what he has done. He’s still dealing with his crime in an extremely cerebral way. The words are there, but the most powerful emotion I felt in him was denial about what he did and who he is.” Madoff’s sons, brother, niece and wife all worked in the business. Just how much they knew, if anything, about the true nature of the company’s activities, has been a subject of embittered debate. Henriques presents her conclusions in the book: they didn’t know. “I lay out my reasoning and hope the reader will approach it with an open mind and make their own decisions,” she says. “I know some will think I am naïve and have been misled. But I do not believe they knew. It never made emotional sense to me. I’m an old fashioned girl. Everyone is innocent until proven guilty. I just never reached a point where I could find any credible evidence that they were anything other than people who thought they were the lucky beneficiaries of a hugely successful, self-made man.” Author Diana Henriques (“The Wizard of Lies: Bernie Madoff and the Death of Trust,”)

June 6, 7:30 p.m. / Community Room


6 Italy, India and Bali in search of her real self. The 2010 film is based on Elizabeth Gilbert’s book. Part of the Friday Film Café series. Community Room

the high-tech, treasure-hunting game played throughout the world. Equipped with a GPS, children and adults can find hidden containers called geocaches and record their finds online. If you have a GPS, please bring it with you. Community Room

June 17, 7:30 p.m. Lecture: Igor Stravinsky: The Rake’s Progress Neo-classical or Classically New Timothy Urban, professor of music at Rider University, will discuss the new and the old in the opera “The Rake’s Progress,” being presented by the Princeton Festival this summer. Presenting an insider’s view of the opera, Urban will also address the music of the mid-20th century and the effect of this opera on future works. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Festival.

SUNDAY, JUNE 19 June 19, 3 p.m. Lecture in Song: Fred Miller Returning to the library by popular demand, Miller brings a new program about the music and lyrics of George and Ira Gershwin. Miller presents this engaging anecdotal, historical, musical afternoon from his seat at the piano. Community Room

MONDAY, JUNE 20 June 20, 7:30 p.m. Gone Fishing in New Jersey Why spend a fortune to go to exotic destinations for fishing when there are great opportunities right here? As part of the New Jersey Travel series, Manny Luftglass will reveal the 100 best spots to fish in the Garden State. Community Room

June 20, 7 p.m. Encore Careers: Doing Good While Doing Well — Carol King of Princeton Senior Resource Center leads this session on using your skills, knowledge and experience in an encore career in education, health care or the environment. Conference Room

Co-sponsored by the library and the Engaged Retirement and Encore Careers Center of the Princeton Senior Resource Center.

Chef Christopher Albrecht will kick off the Princeton Eats series on June 21.

TUESDAY, JUNE 21

June 21, 8:30 a.m. Tuesday Networking Breakfast Joyce Tyler, director of Career Services at Rider University, will talk about job search strategies. Fireplace Area, second floor

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22

Co-sponsored by the library and Terra Momo Restaurant Group.

KIDS June 21, 4 p.m.

Dewey’s Amazing Race Loosely based on the TV reality show “The Amazing Race,” this program explores subjects in the Dewey Decimal System with stories, games, and other activities. Youth Services Department June 21, 6 p.m. GIMP class — The second in a series of classes on using GIMP technology, taught by John LeMasney, manager for educational technology training and outreach at Princeton University. Technology Center

MONDAY, JUNE 27

June 27, 7:30 p.m. Retirement Talk: Job Search Strategies for Older Workers This 90-minute program addresses issues such as the changing structure of the job market, ageism, using the Internet for job searches and networking, and avoiding online job search scams. Conference Room

Co-sponsored by the library and NJ Unemployed

June 21, 10 a.m. Princeton Eats — Chef Chris Albrecht of Eno Terra returns to the library to lead his popular cooking class using local produce and healthy ingredients. Advance registration is required. Please register via the online events calendar at www.princetonlibrary. org. Community Room

June 25, 3 p.m. Talk and Performance: Opera New Jersey Summer Preview — Join artists from the Princeton-based company as they describe their upcoming season, featuring Rossini’s “The Barber of Seville” and Gian Carlo Menotti’s “The Consul,” among other offerings. Community Room

June 22, 7 p.m. Film: “Biblioburro” Watch this one-hour film in advance of its PBS broadcast. It tells the story of a librarian, and a library, like no other. A decade ago, Colombian elementary school teacher Luis Soriano was inspired to spend his weekends bringing a modest collection of books to a poor, violence-ridden area. He braved armed bands, drug traffickers, snakes and heat to reach the children with his library, carried on the backs of two donkeys. His story attracted worldwide attention. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and American Documentary/P.O.V.

SATURDAY, JUNE 25 KIDS+ June 25, 11 a.m.

Geocaching: Digital Treasure Hunting — Join Shaun Pall as he explains the world of geocaching,

SUMMER 2011

Co-sponsored by the library and the Engaged Retirement and Encore Careers Center of the Princeton Senior Resource Center.

TUESDAY, JUNE 28 KIDS June 28, 4 p.m.

Dewey’s Amazing Race Loosely based on the TV reality show “The Amazing Race,” this program explores subjects in the Dewey Decimal System with stories, games, and other activities. Youth Services Department June 28, 6 p.m. GIMP class —The third in a series of classes on using GIMP technology, taught by John LeMasney, manager for educational technology training and outreach at Princeton University. Technology Center June 28, 7 p.m. Socrates Café — In the spirit of Socrates’ belief that the “unexamined life is not worth living,” particiCalendar continues on Page 8


Film SPOTLIGHT 7

Not exactly a puff piece

Filmmakers Chris Hegedus and D.A. Pennebaker will discuss their film “Kings of Pastry” at a post-screening discussion on June 15. By ANNE LEVIN

Connections Staff Writer

I

t could only happen in France. As part of his duties as chief executive, President Nicolas Sarkozy appears at a gathering of acclaimed pastry chefs to declare which, if any, are worthy of being named to the prestigious Meilleurs Ouvriers de France. Otherwise known as the MOF, the competition is a grueling undertaking that is the subject of “Kings of Pastry,” a documentary by filmmakers D.A. Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus to be screened at Princeton Public Library June 15. The filmmakers, whose resume includes the acclaimed documentary “The War Room,” secured exclusive access to the MOF competition for “Kings of Pastry.” They followed three contestants as they sweated through the final competition, under the constant scrutiny of master judges and renowned chefs. The pursuit of the coveted blue, white and red striped collar worn by the winners is a serious business. For each of the competitors, acceptance to the MOF is a dream, an obsession, and the ultimate recognition of their craft. “It takes a certain type of person to put themselves under that kind of stress,” says Pennebaker, who along with Hegedus will appear at the PPL screening. “It is an amazing pursuit of perfection.”

In ‘Kings of Pastry,’ acclaimed filmmakers capture the drama of a French competition The filmmakers first got the idea for a documentary about the MOF competition after a friend who was attending the prestigious French Pastry School in Chicago invited them to visit. The only accredited French pastry academy in the U.S., the school is run by two French chefs who started it more than a decade ago. “Our friend told us about Jacquy Pfeiffer, the co-founder, who was going to compete,” says Hegedus. “The MOF is actually more like an examination than a competition. You get the distinction of being a member. It covers more than 200 trades, and pastry-making is among the most prestigious.” In their fly-on-the-wall style, the filmmakers followed Pfeiffer as he left his family to journey back to his childhood home in Alsace, where he practiced for the contest. They also tracked chefs Regis Lazard, competing for the second time, and Philippe Rigollot, from Maison Pic, France’s only three-star restaurant owned by a woman. The film puts viewers on the edge of their seats as the pastry marathoners race the clock during the final hours of the competition. Watching them hand-carry the towering, fragile sugar sculptures they have painstakingly created, through a series of rooms to the display area, is almost painfully suspenseful.

And there are some heart-wrenching disasters captured on screen. “I filmed some of the crashes,” says Hegedus. “These were very devastating moments. But what really interested me was how the other chefs reacted. It was the total opposite of what you might see on a TV reality show. They gathered around and gave support, helping out the one who was in trouble.” Pennebaker was amazed by the chefs’ dogged pursuit of perfection. But he found that in a way, he could relate. “I could understand it,” he says. “I remember making airplane models when I was a kid. You wanted to make one that was perfect, and you just kept working on it to try to achieve that perfection. It’s kind of like making wine, except that making wine takes a long time. With pastry, it’s right away.” The MOF competition is judged on three levels: artistry, presentation of the final buffet, and taste. “Some of the most famous chefs in France were there, tasting,” Pennebaker says. “It’s hard, because it’s a very subjective thing. There is also the workmanship – everything has to be measured exactly. There can be no waste. And they must be immaculate at their work stations.” Asked if they got to taste the confections as the chefs practiced in front of the camera, Pennebaker responded, “Please! When Jacquy was making a cake that we tasted, we practically clawed our way over the table to get more.”

“Kings of Pastry” / screening and discussion with filmmakers D.A. Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus / June 15, 7 p.m. / Community Room


8 pants seek wisdom and knowledge through interactive discussion, questioning, and presenting multiple perspectives on topics of interest to the group. Everyone is invited. Conference Room

June 28, 7:30 p.m. Talk: Ghost Towns in New Jersey – Longtime Burlington County resident and author of “Ghost Towns and Other Quirky Places in the New Jersey Pine Barrens,” Barbara Solem-Stull will speak about the ruins of towns that rose up around the iron furnaces, glass factories, cranberry farms, and brickmaking establishments of years gone by. Part of the New Jersey Travel series. Community Room

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29 June 29, 7 p.m. Ask a Lawyer — Lawyers will be at the library for free private consultations on immigration and other issues. No appointment necessary. Service is on a first-come, firstserved basis. Spanish translators available. For more information, call Lucía Acosta at 609.924.9529, ext. 245. Conference Room Co-sponsored by the library, the Latin American Task Force, Lutheran Social Ministries, The Princeton Housing Authority and the Mercer County Bar Association.

June 29, 7:30 p.m. Film: “Motorcycle Diaries” This 2004 film dramatizes the motorcycle trip that changed the life of a young Che Guevara, sparking his revolutionary spirit. Make an evening out of it with dinner at Mediterra, at 5:30 p.m. A three course themed menu will be offered for $30 per person, plus tax and gratuity. Call 609.252.9680 for reservations. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Terra Momo Restaurant Group.

A scene from “Inside Job,” to be screened June 30.

THURSDAY, JUNE 30 KIDS June 30, 3 p.m.

Magic Show — “The World of Magic” features magic from China, India, France, England, Russia and even a tribe in Africa. Community Room June 30, 6:30 p.m. Film: “Inside Job” — This documentary about the recent financial crisis won an Oscar for Best Documentary this year. Director Charles H. Ferguson divided the film into five parts, interviewing financiers, politicians, journalists, and academics. The conclusion is that despite recent regulations, the system has not changed. The remaining banks are only bigger while all the incentives remain the same. Guest speakers to be announced. Community Room

MONDAY, JULY 4

The library will be closed

TUESDAY, JULY 5 KIDS July 5, 4 p.m.

Dewey’s Amazing Race Loosely based on the TV reality show “The Amazing Race,” this program explores subjects in the Dewey Decimal System with stories, games, and other activities. Youth Services Department July 5, 6 p.m. GIMP Practice Session With two more classes to go, we

open the Technology Center for class participants to practice what they’ve learned. Technology Center

WEDNESDAY, JULY 6 TEENS July 6, 5 p.m.

Writing Workshop Sara Wegman, a recent graduate of Princeton High School, returns to the library to lead this four-week fictionwriting workshop for middle school students. Please register at www.princetonlibrary.org. Conference Room KIDS July 6, 7 p.m. Wizards: Race Around the World — Learn about the science of illusions with visual experiments and exciting audience participation. Community Room

THURSDAY, JULY 7 July 7, 9:30 a.m. The Harry Potter Filibuster Take turns reading aloud from “Harry Potter and the Sorecer’s Stone” as we begin our celebration of Harry Potter. Ages 7 and over. Please register for 15-minute readings via the online events calendar at princetonlibrary.org. Hinds Plaza (Rain venue: Community Room) July 7, 7 p.m. Witherspoon-Jackson Genealogy — This group meets monthly to share ideas, listen to speakers and get beginners started with researching the history of

SUMMER 2011

families who lived in Princeton’s historic Witherspoon-Jackson community. All interested in the history of this community or in African-American genealogy are invited to attend. Technology Center July 7, 7 p.m. Film: “Harry Potter and The Sorcerer’s Stone” We celebrate the end of an era with our Harry Potter Movie Marathon. The screenings start with this film, which chronicles Harry’s arrival at Hogwarts and first encounter with Lord Voldemort, and continue through the “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hollows Part 1.” Community Room

FRIDAY, JULY 8

July 8, 3 p.m. Film: “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets” Our Harry Potter Movie Marathon continues with the second in the series of films, in which Harry squares off with Tom Riddle and learns more the secrets about Hogwarts. Community Room

SATURDAY, JULY 9

July 9, 11 a.m. Film: “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban” Our celebration of the tenth anniversary of the Harry Potter film series continues with the introduction of Sirius Black. Community Room


9 KIDS+ July 13, 6:30 p.m.

Origami Club — Anyone with a passion for paper folding is invited to meet for 90 minutes of new and interesting, often seasonal folding. Beginners are welcome. The club is not just for kids; adults are invited too. In fact, an adult must accompany anyone under the age 7. Activity Room

Dumbledore’s Army is formed in “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix,” to be screened on July 10.

July 9, 2 p.m. Film: “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire” The Harry Potter Movie Marathon continues as Harry enters the Tri Wizard Tournament and witnesses the return of Lord Voldemort. Community Room

SUNDAY, JULY 10 July 10, 1 p.m. Film: “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix” As the Harry Potter Movie Marathon continues, Harry and his friends unite to battle Voldemort and learn about a mysterious prophecy. Community Room

TUESDAY, JULY 12 KIDS July 12, 4 p.m.

Page to Stage is funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in these programs do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Dewey’s Amazing Race Loosely based on the TV reality show “The Amazing Race,” this program explores subjects in the Dewey Decimal System with stories, games, and other activities. Youth Services Department

THURSDAY, JULY 14

July 12, 6 p.m. GIMP class — The fourth in a series of classes on using GIMP technology, taught by John LeMasney, manager for educational technology training and outreach at Princeton University. Tech Center

MONDAY, JULY 11 July 11, 3 p.m. Film: “Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince” Harry suffers another personal loss as the wizarding world finally accepts the return of Lord Voldemort, but seems powerless to stop him. Community Room July 11, 7 p.m. Film: “The Big Lebowski” Jeff Bridges stars in this tale of mistaken identity in which the laid-back, unemployed guy known as “The Dude” is erroneously believed to be an eccentric philanthropist. Part of the Movie Mania series. Community Room

WEDNESDAY, JULY 13

July 12, 6:45 p.m. SCORE Seminar: Intellectual Property Protection Carole DeNatale leads this session about intellectual property and how to protect and enforce it in today’s business climate. Intellectual property is a key investment consideration for angel investors, as well as government grantors. Community Room

July 13, 7 p.m. Lecture: Erica Nagel on “Eurydice” — Nagel, McCarter Theatre’s artistic programs associate, will talk about the history of adapting literature for the stage in this preview of the July 27 performance of “Eurydice.” Nagel’s lecture, and the performance of playwright Sarah Ruhl’s adaptation of the Orpheus myth, are part of the Page to Stage series. Community Room

July 13, 1 p.m. Author Appearance: Jennifer Weiner — Just one day after the release of her latest novel, “Then Came You,” the best-selling author returns to the library by popular demand. Weiner, a Princeton University graduate, is the author of such novels as “In Her Shoes,” “Fly Away Home” and “Good in Bed.” Her new book is about four women, bound by obligation and opportunity, who struggle to become a family. Community Room

TEENS July 13, 5 p.m.

Writing Workshop — Sara Wegman, a recent graduate of Princeton High School, returns to the library to lead this four-week fictionwriting workshop for middle school students. Sara was the winner of a certificate of merit in the 2008 PUSH novel contest. Conference Room

July 14, 7 p.m. Film: “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1” In the seventh and final film in our Harry Potter Movie Marathon, Harry, Ron and Hermoine leave Hogwarts to prepare for the final showdown with Lord Voldemort. Part 2 of “Deathly Hallows” opens in theaters at midnight. Community Room

FRIDAY, JULY 15

July 15, 10 a.m. Movie: “Under the Tuscan Sun” Diane Lane stars in this 2003 film based on Frances Mayes’ memoir about a San Francisco writer who moves to Italy after the discovery of her husband’s infidelity leaves her with a big case of depression and writer’s block. Part of the Friday Film Café series. Community Room

MONDAY, JULY 18

July 18, 7 p.m. Film: “The Princess Bride” This classic tale of love and adventure starts with a kindly grandfather reading his grandson a bedtime story that has passed down from father to son for generations. Calendar continues on Page 10


10 THURSDAY, JULY 21

As the story is read, the action comes alive. Part of the Monday Movie Mania series. Community Room

TEENS+ July 21, 7 p.m.

Princeton Student Film & Video Festival The eighth annual festival concludes with more original films created by high school and college-age students, with filmmakers on hand to discuss their work. This program is intended for teen and adult audiences. Community Room

TUESDAY, JULY 19 July 19, 10 a.m. Princeton Eats: Denis Granorolo — The master baker from the Terra Momo group of restaurants will demonstrate some of his favorite recipes. Please register via the online events calendar at www.princetonlibrary.org. Community Room

MONDAY, JULY 25 July 25, 7 p.m. Film: “Mystery Science Theatre 3000” — A hapless human and his two quirky robot sidekicks are exiled to the far reaches of outer space in this big screen version of the cable series on Comedy Central. The trio is forced by two evil scientists to watch an endless stream of cheesy B-movies as part of a fiendish experiment. Part of the Monday Movie Mania series. Community Room

Co-sponsored by the library and Terra Momo Restaurant Group.

KIDS July 19, 4 p.m.

Dewey’s Amazing Race Loosely based on the TV reality show “The Amazing Race,” this program explores subjects in the Dewey Decimal System with stories, games, and other activities. Youth Services Department July 19, 6 p.m. GIMP class — The final in a series of classes on using GIMP technology, taught by John LeMasney, manager for educational technology training and outreach at Princeton University. Technology Center

Denis Granorolo presents the second Princeton Eats program on July 19.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 20 KIDS July 20, 10:30 a.m.

July 19, 7:30 p.m. Film: “Ciao Professore” Lina Wertmuller directed this 1994 film about a northern Italian teacher who gets dumped in a southern Italian town due to a bureaucratic mixup. His journey from initial disappointment (only three students show up) to establishing a bond with the students is the focus of this touching, often funny feature. Make an evening out of it with dinner at Mediterra, at 5:30 p.m. A three course themed menu will be offered for $30 per person, plus tax and gratuity. Call 609. 252.9680 for reservations. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Terra Momo Restaurant Group.

“Two Marys, Five Jacks and a Very Big Shoe” Youth Stages will engage young children with songs, finger plays, recitations and acting out popular nursery rhymes. You’ll consider Mother Goose nursery rhymes in a whole new light. Community Room

TEENS July 20, 5 p.m.

Writing Workshop Sara Wegman, a recent graduate of Princeton High School, returns

to the library to lead this four-week fiction-writing workshop for middle school students. Please register at princetonlibrary.org. Conference Room

TEENS+ July 20, 7 p.m.

Princeton Student Film & Video Festival This annual event, in its eighth year, screens original films created by high school and college-age students. Filmmakers will be on hand to attend and discuss their films. The festival is intended for a teen and adult audience. Community Room

JULY 20 & 21, 2011

TUESDAY, JULY 26 KIDS July 26, 4 p.m.

Dewey’s Amazing Race Loosely based on the TV reality show “The Amazing Race,” this program explores subjects in the Dewey Decimal System with stories, games, and other activities. Youth Services Department July 26, 7 p.m. Socrates Café — In the spirit of Socrates’ belief that the “unexamined life is not worth living,” participants seek wisdom and knowledge through interactive discussion, questioning, and presenting multiple perspectives on topics of interest to the group. Everyone is invited. Conference Room July 26, 7:30 p.m. Talk: Beach Bums on the Boardwalk — Retired educators Dick Handschuch and Sal Marino, authors of the book, “The Beach Bum’s Guide to Boardwalks,” Calendar continues on Page 12

SUMMER 2011


Theater SPOTLIGHT 11

Around the world in 60 days

Summer Reading Club is a multicultural odyssey, including a race through the library’s collection By ANNE LEVIN

Connections Staff Writer

T

his year’s Summer Reading program at Princeton Public Library is focused on young patrons. With a theme of multiculturalism and world travel, the program is divided into three levels: Wee Reads, for babies through pre-schoolers; Kids, whose slogan is “One World, Many Stories;” and Teens, whose program is “You are Here.” At the center is “Dewey’s Amazing Race,” a 10-week competition for children ages 8 through teens. Loosely based on the popular television show “Amazing Race,” the program explores subjects in the Dewey Decimal System with stories, games, and other activities designed to challenge the participants. Staff members will work with competitors in pairs. The program leads off with a library scavenger hunt on June 21. “We will definitely utilize the entire library,” says Youth Services librarian Allison Santos. “They’ll learn about parts of the building they wouldn’t necessary be allowed to enter.” Preschoolers taking part in Summer Reading will be able to choose from 50 early-literacy-based activities. These “Wee Readers” register with parents or caregivers. Everyone wins a certificate for an ice cream treat from Thomas Sweet Ice Cream.

Those in sixth grade and older will be eligible for a free ice cream treat after they complete 25 hours. Keeping in line with the travel theme, those who get to 50 hours can compete to win one of two Kindles being raffled. Returning this year is a program for teens entering ninth grade at Princeton High School based on the epic poem “The Odyssey,” which is part of the freshman curriculum. Copies of the poem by Homer will be available to read at the library, and students can get assistance with this challenging work at a special The Epic and the Odyssey course from July 11 to14, 12:30-3 p.m. each day. Teacher Margaret Spear will lead these classes. Attendance is limited to 12 students and registration is required. Participants should register for all five classes by visiting the events calendar at www.princetonlibrary.org. Another success story from last summer is returning. Count Me In, a math enrichment program for girls entering grades seven through nine will be June 27-July 1, 9 a.m. to noon each day in a third floor study room at the library. “We will explore collaborative math in an experiential and lively group environment,” says Annie Rorem, a math teacher at St. Paul’s School in Princeton. Attendance is limited to 12 participants and registration is required. Participants should sign up for all five session from the library’s online events calendar at www.princetonlibrary.org. While previous Summer Reading programs have included initiatives for adults, this year’s is geared solely to a younger audience. “We’re all about the kids this year, and we have a lot to offer them,” says Santos. “We’re very excited about it.” Summer Reading Club / June 21-Aug. 21 Count Me In / June 27-July 1, 9 a.m. to noon The Epic and the Odyssey / July 11-14, 12:30-3 p.m.


12 talk about where to find the best boardwalks in New Jersey. Part of the New Jersey Travel series. Community Room

Part of the Monday Movie Mania series. Community Room

TUESDAY, AUGUST 9 KIDS August 9, 4 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 27

Dewey’s Amazing Race A weekly program that is loosely based on the reality show The Amazing Race. Each week we will explore a different subject in the Dewey Decimal System with stories, games and other activities. Youth Services Department

KIDS July 27, 3 p.m.

“One World, Many Stories” Storyteller Helen Wise will bring to life tales from near and far about children from all around the world. Community Room

TEENS July 27, 5 p.m.

Writing Workshop Sara Wegman, a recent graduate of Princeton High School, returns to the library to lead this four-week fiction-writing workshop for middle school students. Please register at princetonlibrary.org. Conference Room July 27, 7 p.m. Play: “Eurydice” by Sara Ruhl In this retelling of the Orpheus myth, the story is told from Eurydice’s perspective. Funny and heartbreaking, it takes the tale in new directions. Part of the Page to Stage series. Community Room

Page to Stage is funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in these programs do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

THURSDAY, JULY 28

THURSDAYS, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Through Nov. 17 / Hinds Plaza MONDAY, AUGUST 1

THURSDAY, AUGUST 4

August 1, 7 p.m. Film: “The Adventures of Priscilla Queen of the Desert” Terence Stamp is beautifully decked out as a regal old girl who calls herself Bernadette in this sentimental road picture set against the spectacular Outback of Australia. Stamp is one of three drag queens who are accompanied by a down home Aussie named Bob as they travel halfway across the Land Down Under in a bizarre look at an offbeat culture. Part of the Monday Movie Mania series. Community Room

TUESDAY, AUGUST 2 KIDS August 2, 4 p.m.

Dewey’s Amazing Race A weekly program that is loosely based on the reality show The Amazing Race. Each week we will explore a different subject in the Dewey Decimal System with stories, games and other activities. Youth Services Department

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3 KIDS+ August 3, 7 p.m. July 28, 7 p.m. Seinfeld Trivia Night Calling all fans of Jerry, Kramer, George and Elaine: test your knowledge of the famous television series; compete on a team with other experts on yada yada yada, the Soup Nazi, the Puffy Shirt and other classics from the show. Community Room

Geo-Bee — Teams of four, in grades 4-8, will join forces to test their knowledge of geography in this contest, back after a popular debut last year. Prizes will be awarded. The audience can also get in on the fun. Sign-in begins at 6 p.m. Register at princetonlibrary.org. Community Room

August 4, 7 p.m. Witherspoon-Jackson Genealogy — The group meets monthly to share ideas, listen to speakers and get beginners started with researching the history of families who lived in Princeton’s historic Witherspoon-Jackson community. All interested in the history of this community or in African American genealogy are invited to attend. Technology Center August 4, 7 p.m. Films: P.O.V.Shortcuts This one-hour collection of documentary shorts by established and emerging filmmakers includes “Big Birding Day,” a glimpse into the world of competitive birdwatching; “Flawed,” an animated film by Andrea Dorfman; “StoryCorps Shorts,” animated shorts set to original NPR recordings; and “Miss Devine,” an animated film about a beloved Sunday school teacher, among others. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and American Documentary/P.O.V.

MONDAY, AUGUST 8

August 8, 7 p.m. Film: “Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory” Gene Wilder and young Peter Ostrum star in this story of four grossly gluttonous girls and boys who win the opportunity to tour an eccentric recluse’s magical candy factory and the chance to win a lifetime supply of chocolate, in this adaptation of Roald Dahl’s classic. SUMMER 2011

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 10 KIDS+ August 10, 6:30 p.m. Origami Club — Anyone with a passion for paper folding is invited to meet for 90 minutes of new and interesting, often seasonal folding. Beginners are welcome. The club is not just for kids; adults are invited too. In fact, an adult must accompany anyone under age 7. Activity Room August 10, 7 p.m. Play: “Jookalorum! A Collection of Stories from O. Henry” Adapted by Joellen Bland and named after the author’s own term for something special or spectacular, this collection of stories has been adapted for the stage. Three narrators lead the action. Part of the Page to Stage series. Community Room Page to Stage is funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in these programs do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

THURSDAY, AUGUST 11 August 11, 7:30 p.m. Talk: Wonder Walks and Coastal Heritage Trail — Patricia Robinson leads this session about special sites in the Garden State. Part of the New Jersey Travel Series. Community Room

MONDAY, AUGUST 15

August 15, 7 p.m. Film: “Local Hero” — An oil billionaire (Burt Lancaster) sends an emissary (Peter Riegert) to a remote Scottish village to secure the property rights for an oil refinery they want to build. Once negotiations start, Calendar continues on Page 14


Theater SPOTLIGHT 13

Literature live

A young director hosts readings based on works of literature By ANNE LEVIN

L

Connections Staff Writer

ast October, Brandon Monokian directed a staged reading of the book “Revolutionary Voices” at Princeton Public Library. Noting the audience’s positive response to the action, Monokian and Janie Hermann, the library’s programming coordinator, were struck by an idea. What about a whole series of performances based on readings from literature? How would that work? Come July 13, Monokian and PPL patrons will find out. “Page to Stage,” a new series for the library funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities and curated by Hermann, will continue that evening with a lecture and continue with three performances directed by Monokian throughout the summer. The actors are theater students or recent graduates of the theater department at Monokian’s alma mater, Montclair State University. The series starts with a talk by McCarter Theatre’s Erica Nagel about the history of adapting literature for the stage, followed by a discussion of playwright Sarah Ruhl’s adaptation of the Orpheus myth in her play “Eurydice.” A performance of the play follows on July 27. On August 10, the young performers will present “Jookalorum! A Collection of Stories from O.Henry,” adapted by Joellen Bland. The series concludes Aug.24 with “Jack and the Beanstalk,” adapted by Bill Springer. All performances take place at 7 p.m. in the library’s Community Room. “I think this is a great opportunity to expose people to literature in a different way,” says Monokian, who is 24 and graduated from Montclair State last December. “It is theater presented in a very animated and physical way, which hopefully inspires audiences to go to the source material.” Children are among the potential audiences of “Page to Stage,” and the final program of “Jack and the Beanstalk” is geared to young audience members. All the familiar characters from the classic fairy tale are ‘I think this is a great opporhere, with a bit of a modern-day, comical twist. Gullible, inquisitive tunity to expose people to Jack and his poor mother; a smart, determined cow; the magical egglaying goose; and a not-so-scary Giant and his wife are all part of the literature in a different way. action. Jack’s cow refuses to be sold and is constantly chased across the It is theater presented in a stage, first by the bean seller and then additional characters from other fairy tales. The smart- aleck Narrator almost gets into a fight with the very animated and physiMother about the magical qualities of the beans, and the Giant’s wife cal way, which hopefully insists he mow the grass. With “Eurydice,” playwright Ruhl retells the Orpheus myth, in which inspires audiences to go to he must rescue his wife Eurydice from the Underworld on their wedding the source material.’ day, from Eurydice’s perspective. Ruhl’s take is at times funny; other times heartbreaking, and propels the story in intriguing new directions. – Brendan Monokian “Jookalorum” is a term coined by O.Henry to define something special or spectacular. The term has been borrowed as the title of this collection of his short stories, adapted for the stage. Three narrators carry the audience through the stories as they lounge on lawn chairs by a pool on a lazy summer afternoon. Fans of O.Henry will recognize “The Ransom of Mack” and “The Pimienta Pancakes” as they come to life onstage. “I see this as a great opportunity not just to entertain, but to promote literacy,” says Monokian. “We are very excited about it.” Page to Stage series / July 13, 7 p.m. / July 27, 7 p.m. / Aug. 10, 7 p.m. / Aug. 24, 7 p.m. See listings for Page to Stage events on Pages 10 and 12 Page to Stage is funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in these programs do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.


14 locals are eager to get their hands on the loot but a local hermit who owns the crucial beach has other ideas. The spell of the town and the sea soon overtake Mac and the oil billionaire, who is more interested in the Northern Lights anyway. Part of the Monday Movie Mania series. Community Room

TUESDAY, AUGUST 16 August 16, 10 a.m. Princeton Eats: Luis Martinez The chef from Teresa’s Caffe does a cooking demonstration to wrap up this series. Please register online at princetonlibrary.org. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Terra Momo Restaurant Group.

KIDS August 16, 4 p.m.

Dewey’s Amazing Race A weekly program that is loosely based on the reality show The Amazing Race. Each week we will explore a different subject in the Dewey Decimal System with stories, games and other activities. Youth Services Department August 16, 7:30 p.m. Film : “The Talented Mr. Ripley” This 1999 psychological thriller directed by Anthony Minghella, adapted from the 1955 Patricia Highsmith novel of the same name, stars Matt Damon and Gwyneth Paltrow. Make an evening of it by having dinner at Mediterra at 5:30 p.m., where a three-course themed menu will be offered at $30 plus tax and tip. Call 609.252.9680 to reserve. Community Room

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17

KIDS August 17, 1 p.m.

Concert: Yosi’s Friends Around the World — At this multicultural, interactive and educational sing-along, learn songs and dances and explore musical instruments from around the world while getting a special lesson about friendship and making music. Community Room

Luis Martinez closes out the Princeton Eats series on August 16

THURSDAY, AUGUST 18 August 18, 6:45 p.m. SCORE Seminar: “How the New Tax Laws Benefit Small Business Owners” — There have been a number of major changes to tax laws, and the Internal Revenue Service wants you to know about them. How do those changes affect small businesses in New Jersey? Todd Cresci, a stakeholder liaison at the IRS, will speak about major changes in tax law and regulation affecting small business, changes in IRS outreach methods, and the impact of those changes on New Jersey businesses. He will also discuss small business health care coverage, provisions of the Affordable Care Act, self-employment tax changes, and several other topics related to tax law changes and small business. Community Room

FRIDAY, AUGUST 19

August 19, 10 a.m. Film: “A Month By the Lake” Starring Vanessa Redgrave, Uma Thurman and Edward Fox, this film is about a group of English and American vacationers at Italy’s Lake Como, circa 1937. Part of the Friday Film Café series. Community Room

MONDAY, AUGUST 22

August 22, 7 p.m. Film: “Mean Streets” A small-time hood struggles to succeed on the streets of New York’s Little Italy in this film directed by Martin Scorsese and starring Robert DeNiro and Harvey Keitel. Part of the Monday Movie Mania series. Community Room

TUESDAY, AUGUST 23 KIDS August 23, 4 p.m.

Dewey’s Amazing Race A weekly program that is loosely based on the reality show The Amazing Race. Each week we will explore a different subject in the Dewey Decimal System with stories, games and other activities. Youth Services Department August 23, 7 p.m. Socrates Café — In the spirit of Socrates’ belief that the “unexamined life is not worth living,” participants seek wisdom and knowledge through interactive discussion, questioning, and presenting multiple perspectives on topics of interest to the group. Everyone is invited. Conference Room

SUMMER 2011

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24 KIDS+ August 24, 7 p.m. Page to Stage: “Jack and the Beanstalk” — Adapted by Bill Springer, this staged reading brings all the familiar characters from the classic fairy tale to life, with a little bit of a modern-day twist. Gullible, inquisitive Jack and his poor mother; a smart, determined cow; the magical egg-laying goose; and a not-so-scary giant and his wife are all part of the fun. Part of the Page to Stage series. Community Room Page to Stage is funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in these programs do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

MONDAY, AUGUST 29

August 29, 7 p.m. Film: “Pee Wee’s Big Adventure” The cartoonish and child-like character Pee Wee Herman goes on a big adventure for the first time ever when his beloved shiny new bicycle is stolen by his nemesis Francis Buxton, a neighborhood rich “kid.” Part of the Monday Movie Mania series. Community Room


Friends of the Library SPOTLIGHT 15

Friends at 50 At the half-century mark, the Friends continue ‘to stimulate library growth and progress’ By ANNE LEVIN

T

Connections Staff Writer

he year of celebrations that marked the centennial of Princeton Public Library ended when 2010 became 2011. But the current year brings another milestone into focus: The 50th anniversary of the Friends of the Princeton Public Library. The Friends exist to support the library three ways: They solicit donations through an annual appeal, hold an annual fundraising benefit, and run the library’s famous three-day book sale in the Community Room. In recent years, the Friends have also turned the second-hand bookstore located on the first floor into a popular and lucrative destination. It was in 1961 that a group of volunteers was appointed to consider ways to support the library. Its statement of purpose: “To maintain an association of persons interested in books and libraries; to foster closer relationships between the library and the public; to increase knowledge and understanding of the services and needs of the library; and to stimulate library growth and progress.” There was no reference to finances. But a year later, the library Board of Trustees asked the Friends to assume some fundraising responsibilities and the group reported total assets of $4,594. What a difference five decades makes. “I remember years ago they only did this once or twice a year,” says Mary Wisnovsky, who has been director of the Friends since 2005 and will retire this year. “Now of course, the role of the Friends has greatly expanded and will raise approximately $300,000 a year for the library. These funds go toward the purchase of new books, services, and library programs – the municipalities cover mainly operating costs and salaries.” The Friends today operate out of an office on the library’s third floor. Funded by former Friends president Barbara Johnson in honor of her parents, as her capital campaign pledge when the current building opened in 2004, the office was a major step up from Friends’ headquarters at the former building – “not more than a broom closet,” as Johnson recalls. Johnson joined the Friends’ Council in 1998, a year after she retired from her job as editor of Town Topics newspaper. It was in Town Topics that she wrote an important story about the library’s need for more space when discussions about a new building were underway (the library’s former building was a smaller structure on the site of the current location). “I realized that if the library was going to be bigger, it would require more help from the Friends,” says Johnson. “I started off in spring with a concert by Tom Chapin, with an ice cream social, at McCarter Theatre. We didn’t make a heck of a lot of money, but it was a delightful event.” It was Johnson who instituted the Friends’ annual benefit, now a much-anticipated event on the Princeton social schedule. Her first attraction was a reading by author John McPhee and his wife Yolanda at Nassau Presbyterian Church, with a dinner at the Nassau

Former Friends Council President Barbara Johnson instituted the Friends Annual Benefit. This year’s benefit will feature New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast Oct. 14.

Club. In ensuing years, she snagged Paul Muldoon, Robert Fagles, and Jim McPherson as celebrity speakers. “I was sort of limiting it to Princeton professors,” Johnson says. “Now it’s been taken way out of that realm. It’s really terrific.” Last year’s centennial benefit featured National Public Radio interviewer Terry Gross; those attending the upcoming benefit in October will hear a talk by New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast at Nassau Presbyterian Church before strolling down Witherspoon Street to the library for a gourmet dinner. Other speakers in recent years have included Calvin Trillin, Richard Ford, and Evan Thomas. The Friends today send out a mailing to 6,000 people soliciting funds. “We no longer call them ‘friends,’ we call them supporters,” says Wisnovsky. “We don’t have an annual meeting or membership cards. And lately, we have tried to solicit all of the users of the library. Soliciting the community is a big part of what we do.” The major appeal goes out in November, with a substantial follow-up effort in February or March. Approximately 1,000 people had responded by this writing. Since Wisnovsky took on the position of Director of the Friends in 2004, the position has broadened as activities have increased. A Princeton native who first patronized the library as a child when it was located in Bainbridge House on Nassau Street, she brought her vast experience working for several non-profits in the Princeton community to the job. “I feel very ambivalent about leaving,” Wisnovsky says. “I’ve had wonderful jobs in Princeton. But working for the library has been one of my most favorite. To me, it’s the perfect endgame to a long and fulfilling career.” Johnson reminds members of the Friends how fortunate they are to be associated with the library. “We have no rent, no phone bills to pay,” she says. “We get a lot from the library. It’s a wonderful, symbiotic relationship. We give to the library and the library gives an awful lot to us.”

SUMMER 2011


Non Profit Org. U.S. Postage PA I D Princeton, NJ Permit No. 4

Executive Director: Leslie Burger Assistant Director: Peter Bromberg Marketing and Communications Director: Tim Quinn Programming Coordinator: Janie Hermann Princeton Public Library Sands Library Building 65 Witherspoon St. Princeton, NJ 08542 609.924.9529 princetonlibrary.org

Youth Services Team Facilitator: Susan Conlon Program Committee: Lucía Acosta, Leslie Burger, Susan Conlon, Kim Dorman, Kristin Friberg, Pamela Groves, Shelly Hawk, Janie Hermann Tim Quinn, Allison Santos Staff Writer: Anne Levin Illustrations: Lauren Acevedo

Frıends of the

Princeton Public Library

Editing and design: Tim Quinn

16 UPCOMING Events for Fall

Become a part of ‘History’ ‘The History of Love,’ by Nicole Krauss, is the Princeton Reads book for 2011

P

rinceton Reads has become a tradition at Princeton Public Library. An effort to unite the local community through works of great literature, the program has been enthusiastically embraced over the past several years with works by Chinua Achebe, Chang-Rae Lee, James McBride and Greg Mortenson as the popular selections. This year’s book, “The History of Love,” by Nicole Krauss, was chosen as a tie-in to the greater Memory and the Work of Art celebration that the University Art Museum began earlier this year. “ ‘The History of Love’ is a perfect book choice for Princeton Reads,” says librarian Kristin Friberg. “This is an intricately woven and complex book that can serve to remind us how our individual stories bind us to a greater collective whole. We are collecting, forming, making memories every day and it is what we do with those memories and experiences that contribute to our actions and our being.”   This haunting novel, which features two characters whose lives are woven together in a story spanning a period of over 60 years, takes readers from Nazi-occupied Eastern Europe to present day Brighton Beach. At the center of each main character’s psyche is the issue of loneliness and the need to fill a void left by lost love.  Leo Gursky is a retired locksmith who immigrates to New York after escaping SS officers in his native Poland, only to spend the last stage of his life terrified that no one will notice when he dies. Fourteen-year-old Alma Singer is searching for her namesake, a character in a book titled “The History of Love,” which Leo wrote for his own love decades ago, while still in Poland. At the same time, Alma is searching for a way to lift her mother’s veil of depression and trying to prevent her brother Bird, who is convinced he may be the Messiah, from becoming a 10-year-old social pariah. As the connection between Leo and Alma is slowly unmasked, the desperation, along with the potential for salvation, of this unique pair is also revealed.   “The History of Love,” the author’s second novel, was published in 2005. A year later, the book made Krauss a finalist for The Orange Prize for Fiction. It will be made into a film to be released next year. Krauss will appear in a free program Nov. 15 at 6:30 p.m.in Richardson Auditorium of Alexander Hall on the Princeton University campus. Princeton Reads is funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in these programs do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

SAVE THE DATES Sept. 10 Princeton Children’s Book Festival Oct. 14 Friends of the Library Benefit with cartoonist Roz Chast

Oct. 21-23 Friends of the Library Annual Book Sale Nov. 15 Princeton Reads Author Event Nicole Krauss

Profile for Princeton Public Library

Connections Summer 2011  

The Princeton Public Library magazine.

Connections Summer 2011  

The Princeton Public Library magazine.