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THE PRINCETON PUBLIC LIBRARY MAGAZINE Spring 2012


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March 20 to May 30 March 21 to May 31

(except May 23)

March 20 to May 31 March 22 to May 31

Family

March 3 to May 26 March 4 to May 27

(except April 8)

Sat. 11:30 a.m.

March 17 April 21 May 19 March 31

Stories in Russian

March 10 April 14 May 12

Sat. noon.

March 3, 10, 31 April 14, 21 May 5, 12, 19

PLAYGROUP FOR BABIES

Tuesday and Wednesday, after Lapsits. Babies up to 15 months and caregivers only.

WEEKDAYS SCORE Small Business Counseling — By appointment through SCORE: Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, 6 p.m.; Wednesdays, Fridays, 10 a.m. Tower Room English Language Conversation Groups — Various Venues Call 609.924.9529, ext. 220 for details Technology Center Classes — Please visit princetonlibrary.org or the library for a schedule of classes. Springboard After School Homework Help — Mondays through Thursdays, 3:30 p.m., on days when Princeton Regional Schools are in session. Third Floor

WEEKLY

Reading with Emma — Mondays, 4 p.m. Story Room Game On! — Fridays, 4 p.m., board, video games and pingpong for children and teens. Third Floor MacTime for Teens — Tuesdays through Thursdays, 4-6 p.m., teens-only creative collaboration, Technology Center

New iMacs, gadgets, instruction and more, all on the second floor Schedule: www.princetonlibrary.org

“But I’m A Cheerleader” will be screened at the GLBTQ Equality Film Festival on March 4.

THURSDAY, MARCH 1

March 1, 7 p.m. Princeton ArtWalk The library is a stop on the second Princeton ArtWalk, a self-guided evening of drop-in visual art activities in downtown Princeton. View one of our dozen pieces of permanent public art or visit the second floor Reference Gallery, which features works by painter Phyllis E. Wright and photographer Peter Cook.

FRIDAY, MARCH 2

March 2, 10 a.m. Film: “The Social Network” Adapted from “The Accidental Billionaires” by Ben Mezrich, this is the story of how Harvard undergrad Mark Zuckerberg launched the global social network Facebook from his dorm room, sparking a revolution in communication and making him the youngest billionaire in history. Part of the Friday Film Café Series. 2 hours. Community Room

NEW March 2, 10 a.m.

Parents of Preschoolers Discussion Group This is the first in a series of discussions intended to garner the thoughts and opinions of all our community’s caregivers. Each discussion will focus on a topic with a goal of learning what parents think about educational goals, theories and practices. At the end of the series, the library will compile these comments and share them with the community. Children may attend with their grown-up. Activity Room

KIDS March 2, 10:30 a.m.

Seuss Celebration Join us as we say happy birthday and celebrate Dr. Seuss with this special story time. Children 2 years and older will hear a few classic Seuss stories and then sing “Happy SPRING 2012

Birthday” to a very special guest, the Cat in the Hat. Story Room

SATURDAY, MARCH 3 KIDS March 3, 11 a.m.

Heads and Tales Club Children in grades two and three discuss what they are reading. Study Room, third floor KIDS+ March 3, 2 p.m. Chinese New Year Celebration Gung Hay Fat Choy! Celebrants of every age are invited to welcome the year of the Dragon — the most auspicious character of the Chinese Zodiac — with music, dancing and crafts. Community Room KIDS March 3, 2 p.m. Word for Word Book Club This club is for children in grades four and five who would like to discuss what they are reading. Study Room, third floor

SUNDAY, MARCH 4 TEENS+ March 4, 12:30 p.m.

GLBTQ Films and Discussion Organized and facilitated by Princeton High School students, this day of films with gay, bisexual, lesbian, transgender and queer themes includes discussions following some screenings. This is the sixth edition of the event. A 1 p.m. keynote address will feature T.J. Parsell, a writer and human rights activist dedicated to ending sexual violence against men, women and children in all forms of detention. A panel discussion will follow his presentation. Films to be screened and discussed include “Ma Vie En Rose” at 3:30 p.m. and “But I’m a Cheerleader.” at 5:45 p.m. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton High School Gay Straight Alliance.

CALENDAR CONT INUES ON PAG E 4


Robert Shiller COVER STORY

The human touch In his new book, Robert Shiller argues that finance must harness its power for the greater good By AMY HIESTAND

Connections Staff Writer

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few years ago, near the peak of the financial crisis that crippled the U.S. economy, Robert Shiller began work on a book to give his students at Yale some perspective. Most were preparing for careers in finance, and public fury toward the profession was fierce. “It was in reaction to the intense public anger,” said the worldrenowned economist and New York Times best-selling author about what prompted him to write his tenth book. “(By then) I had been teaching introductory finance at Yale for 25 years, training young people to go into the financial professions. I wanted to put the financial sector into a good perspective for them, in light of what it achieves for society as well as the problems it presents. I wanted to develop a moral basis for business activity and regulations of it.” The resulting book, “Finance and the Good Society,” publishing in April, will be the topic of Shiller’s presentation that month as part of the library’s Thinking Allowed series co-sponsored by Princeton University Press. In the book, Shiller acknowledges the serious errors on the part of the financial industry that led to the current crisis. But he also points to past contributions — the creation of insurance, mortgages, savings accounts and pensions — that have benefitted society. He envisions a future where financial leaders work together to harness the sector’s great potential to solve some of the world’s worst problems and where they work together toward innovation that promotes the common good.

Robert Shiller in his office at Yale University. He speaks at the library on April 26.

The common good was clearly low on the list of priorities for those whose greed was the root of the 2008 economic meltdown we’re still reeling from today. So does Shiller really think the worst elements of human behavior can be overcome by the industry going forward? “The challenge is to redesign our financial system to make these immutable aspects of human nature less of a problem,” Shiller said. “As I say in the book, we must ‘humanize’ finance.” While a financial system that benefits people across

the socioeconomic spectrum sounds promising, many unemployed and underemployed have given up hope that the economy will recover and allow them to regain a standard of living they once took for granted. “The recovery may be slow, and furthermore we were already undergoing a transition to a globalized information economy that makes some rich and ignores some equally capable people who are not positioned right for success,” Shiller said when asked what he would say to them. “Our society has to face the fact

of such trends. I talk in the book about what governments can do, and how young people can make career choices that serve them and society well.” Known for being ahead of the curve for his predictions of both the stock market bubble of 2000 and the real estate bubble that led up to the subprime mortgage meltdown, Shiller is the Arthur M. Okun Professor of Economics, Department of Economics and Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, and professor of finance and fellow at the International Center for Finance, Yale School of Management. He received his bachelor’s from the University of Michigan in 1967 and his doctorate in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1972. He has written on financial markets, financial innovation, behavioral economics, macroeconomics, real estate, statistical methods, and on public attitudes, opinions, and moral judgments regarding markets. Shiller’s repeat-sales home price indices, developed originally with Karl E. Case, are now published as the Standard & Poor’s/Case Shiller Home Price Indices. The Chicago Mercantile Exchange now maintains futures markets based on these indices. He also writes a regular column, “Finance in the 21st Century,” for Project Syndicate, which publishes around the world, and “Economic View” for The New York Times. Shiller intends to gear his April presentation toward a broad audience. “This is not going to be an esoteric talk about finance,” he said, “but a talk that should be relevant to everyone since we all have to live under financial capitalism.” Author Robert Shiller “Finance and the Good Society” April 26, 7 p.m. Part of the Thinking Allowed Series co-sponsored by the library and Princeton University Press. Other authors in the series are Andrew Delbanco (“College: What it Was, Is and Should Be”) on April 24 and James L. Gould and Carol Grant Gould (“Nature’s Compass: The Mystery of Animal Navigation”) on May 22. Details in the calendar.

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4 MONDAY, MARCH 5 March 5, 9 a.m. AARP Tax-Aide Help with individual federal and state tax returns is available for free by appointment to seniors and low- and moderate-income taxpayers. The appointments typically last an hour and are scheduled 9 a.m., 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. Program continues every Monday morning through April 16. Call 609.924.9529, ext. 220 to schedule. Community Room March 5, 7 p.m. Continuing Conversations on Race Members of Not In Our Town, the Princeton-based interracial and interfaith social action group, facilitate these discussions of race-related issues of relevance to our community and nation. Princeton Room March 5, 7:30 p.m. Mystery Book Group Gayle Stratton leads a discussion of “The Ninth Daughter” by Barbara Hamilton. Set in 1773 Boston, Abigail Adams stumbles upon a dead woman’s body while visiting a friend. Later, when the friend disappears and it looks as though her husband John may be accused of the murder, Abigail sets out to solve the crime. Quiet Room

TUESDAY, MARCH 6 NEW March 6, 7 p.m.

Opera Lovers Discussion Group Join New Jersey Opera staff and other opera aficionados as they kick off this new monthly series with a discussion of Puccini’s “Tosca.” Quiet Room Co-sponsored by the library and Opera New Jersey.

March 6, 7 p.m. Talk: “Introduction to Your Lifestyle in Retirement” Carol King, director of the Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Next Step programs, offers an introduction to planning for retirement or a major lifestyle change. Options for dealing with change, managing time, identifying passions and volunteering are explored. Conference Room

Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Next Step: Engaged Retirement and Encore Careers Program

The Einsteins return for the look-alike contest as part of Pi Day Geek Freak Weekend. See Page 6.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7 March 7, 4:30 p.m. Music Talk: “Shakespearean Drama” In anticipation of the March 18 Classical Series concert, Shakespearean Drama, this lecture explores the connections between Shakespeare’s plays and the music they influenced, including Mendelssohn’s “Overture to A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” Tchaikovsky’s “Hamlet,” and Prokofiev’s “Selections from Romeo and Juliet.” Part of the Princeton Symphony Soundtracks series. Community Room

THURSDAY, MARCH 8

March 8, 10:30 a.m. Fiction Book Group Kristin Friberg leads a discussion of “After Dark” by Haruki Murakami. Set in Tokyo during the witching hours between midnight and dawn, the book follows two sisters as they encounter night people haunted by secrets that draw them together despite the differing circumstances that might keep them apart. Conference Room March 8, 11 a.m. Indoor Farmers’ Market Locally made products such as artisanal cheeses and honey from farmers and the works of many craftspeople are available for purchase during this five-hour event. Community Room

Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Symphony Orchestra.

March 7, 7 p.m. Pi Day Book Discussion The 2012 Pi-Day Book Selection is “Einstein’s Dreams” by Alan Lightman, who will appear March 9 at the library. This novel examines Albert Einstein as a young scientist in Bern who is troubled by dreams as he works on his theory of relativity in 1905. The book consists of 30 chapters, each exploring one dream about time that Einstein had during this period. The book demonstrates the relationship each human being has to time, and thus spiritually affirms Einstein’s theory of relativity. Conference Room

March 8, 7 p.m. Author William Lanouette The writer and rowing historian will give an illustrated talk titled “Fine Art and Foul Play,” about the scandalous side of rowing in America. Lanouette is the author of the forthcoming “Racing to Oblivion” and of “Genius in the Shadows: A Biography of Leo Szilard, the Man Behind the Bomb.” His play “Uranium + Peaches,” based on Szilard’s story, will be performed March 10 at the Arts Council of Princeton as part of the Pi Day Geek Freak Weekend. Community Room

SPRING 2012

March 8, 7 p.m. Talk: “Conversations with Autism” This discussion includes Michelle Brooks, an outreach specialist for Eden Autism Services and Sean Fitzmaurice, a junior at Hunterdon Central Regional High School who is living with autism and is interested in a career that involves helping and advocating for students with disabilities. Part of the Inside a Child’s Mind Speaker Series. Fireplace Area, second floor

FRIDAY, MARCH 9

March 9, 10: 30 a.m. Pi Day Book Discussion “Einstein’s Dreams” by Alan Lightman. See description at March 7. Conference Room March 9, 6:30 p.m. Talk: Alan Lightman on “Science and the Humanities” Novelist, essayist, physicist and educator Alan Lightman speaks about the connection between science and the humanities in a talk that kicks off the library’s Pi Day Geek Freak Weekend events. Lightman is adjunct professor of humanities at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and has written extensively about the human side of science. He has lectured nationwide about the similarities and differences in the ways that scientists and artists view the world. His novel “Einstein’s Dreams” was an international bestseller and is the library’s Pi Day Book Pick this year. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this programming do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

See Feature Story, Page 7

SATURDAY, MARCH 10 KIDS March 10, 10 a.m.

Suzuki Violin Contest As part of Pi Day Princeton’s Geek Freak Weekend, young musicians ages 3-6 studying the Suzuki Method on Einstein’s favorite instrument are invited to enter a friendly competition for a prize of $314.15 in a new savings account. There’s just one catch: the young violinists CALENDAR CONT IN UES ON PAG E 6


March special events SPOTLIGHT 5

Science on the March With two special speakers and Pi Day, we have the month down to a science By AMY HIESTAND

Connections Staff Writer

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f your hypothesis is that Princeton is a town that loves science, for supporting data you need look no further than the library’s March calendar of events. There, you will find two distinguished speakers with local connections, physicist Alan Lightman and science historian George Dyson, along with a variety of events the library will host as part of the community-wide observance of Pi Day, which happens to be the anniversary of Albert Einstein’s birth.

Science and the Humanities As both a novelist and a physicist, Alan Lightman is among the few people acclaimed for his work in both the sciences and the humanities. On March 9, he’ll focus on the relationship between the two in his talk at the library. “I will talk about the similarities and differences in the way that scientists and artists view the world,” said the adjunct professor at MIT, who was the first professor there to receive a joint appointment in the sciences and the humanities. “For example, scientists work on questions that have definite answers, whereas artists work on questions that do not have definite answers, and sometimes no answers at all.” “The creative process is very similar in the arts and the sciences,” Lightman said about what scientists and artists can learn Alan Lightman from each other. “Beyond this, scientists can increase their understanding and use of aesthetic criteria by appreciation of the arts, and artists can learn the value of a logical approach to the world from the study of the sciences. Of course, sometimes a problem warrants the artistic approach and sometimes the scientific approach.” While scientists and artists can benefit from each other’s perspectives, an understanding of the two approaches is also relevant to those outside the two fields, Lightman said. “The relevance is that science and art are two different ways of being in the world and both are part of our humanity,” he said. “To be open to existence and experience in the largest possible sense, we should embrace many different models of understanding, just as we should embrace different cultures and ethnicities.” Lightman graduated from Princeton University in 1970 with a degree in physics. He received his doctorate in theoretical physics from the California Institute of Technology in 1974. He began publishing essays about science, the human side of science and the “mind of science,” in 1981 and in 1989 was appointed professor of science and writing at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he headed the Program in Writing and Humanistic Studies from 1991-1997.

His most recent book, a novel released early this year, is “Mr. g,” the story of creation as told by God. Lightman says the book brings science and religion together. The book has been compared to “Einstein’s Dreams,” Lightman’s 1992 international bestseller about the dreams the young Albert Einstein had while working on his theory of relativity. “Einstein’s Dreams” has been chosen as this year’s Pi Day book group selection. For details of Alan Lightman’s appearance, see the calendar entry on Page 4 .

A third slice of Pi Lightman’s talk is part of a series of events leading up to Pi Day, the worldwide celebration of the mysterious mathematical constant that has captured the imagination of people throughout the ages. Held on March 14 because 3.14 is the numerical value of Pi, the date also happens to be the anniversary of Einstein’s birth. So, when Princeton marks Pi Day, as it is doing for the third time this year, many of the events center around the eminent physicist who lived and worked here for more than 20 years. Coordinated by Pi Day cofounders Mimi Omiecinski of Princeton Tour Company and Joy Chen of JOYcards, events for people of all ages will be held at locations throughout the community over the March 9-11 weekend. Several will be at the library and more will take place the following Wednesday on Pi Day itself.

George Dyson

For a complete list of Pi Day events, including special offers from area merchants, visit www.pidayprinceton.org. For library events, calendar entries marked .

Dyson visits the ‘Cathedral’ Author and science historian George Dyson returns to his hometown to talk about his latest book on March 19. “Turing’s Cathedral” traces the digital universe back to its origins at The Institute for Advanced Study during the 1940s and ’50s. There, a group of scientists led by John von Neumann gathered for a joint project to create the theoretical “universal machine” that “can be used to compute any computable sequence,” an idea suggested by mathematician Alan Turing in 1936. The computer they built using five kilobytes of memory — that’s the amount allocated to displaying the cursor on a desktop computer today — led to the development of the hydrogen bomb. But it also led to the digital universe we know today. Son of physicist and author Freeman Dyson, who before his retirement was a professor at The Institute for Advanced Study for more than 40 years, George Dyson grew up at the institute. He left Princeton in 1969 at the age of 16 to pursue his interest in kayaking in British Columbia. He is also the author of “Baidarka: The Kayak,” “Darwin Among the Machines” and “Project Orion: The True Story of the Atomic Spaceship.” For details of George Dyson’s appearance, see the calendar entry on Page 8 .


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March 13, 7 p.m. Talk: “How to Make Your Retirement Portfolio Work for You” Shikha Mittra, president of ASNA Retiresmart Consulting, talks about making SMART (Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Reliable, Timely) choices with retirement investment portfolios. Fireplace Area, second floor

must dress as Einstein. The first 31 children to register by sending an email to pidayprinceton@gmail.com will be selected. Community Room

Co-sponsored by the library, Princeton Tour Company and Princeton Symphony Orchestra

March 10, 10:30 a.m. QuickBooks This free, hands-on workshop conducted by Oria Gonzales, a certified QuickBooks trainer, provides basic training in the use of QuickBooks. Registration required at www.scoreprinceton.org. Technology Center

Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Next Step Engaged Retirement and Encore Careers Program.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 KIDS+ March 14, 6:30 p.m.

Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Area Chapter of SCORE.

Origami Club Anyone interested in the traditional Japanese art of paper folding is invited to meet for 90 minutes of new, often seasonal, folding. Beginners are welcome. The club is not just for kids; adults are invited, too, and must accompany anyone under the age of 7. Activity Room

TEENS March 10, 11:30 a.m.

Mathlete Challenge Thirty middle school students will be put to the test in this second annual math competition held as part of the Pi Day Geek Freak Weekend. The winner will be awarded a new savings account with a starting balance of $314.159. Potential contestants should request to participate by writing to pidayprinceton@gmail. com. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Tour Company.

KIDS+ March 10, 1 p.m.

PiKu Children and adults are invited to drop in and create their own PiKu to add to the display board on the library’s third floor. While the Japanese verse Haiku is written in 17 syllables divided into three lines of five, seven and five syllables, Piku is eight syllables divided into three lines of three, one and four syllables. Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Tour Company.

March 10, 3:30 p.m. IkPi Families and friends are invited to pose with props celebrating Pi while local amateur photographers take keepsake photographs. Fireplace Area, first floor Co-sponsored by the library, Phanfare and Princeton Tour Company

SUNDAY, MARCH 11 March 11, 1 p.m. Pi Recitation Contest How many digits of Pi can you recite? Match your memory skills with contestants in your age group (7-13 years; 14-18 years; and 19 years and older). The youngest winning contestant will be awarded a savings account with a starting balance of $314.159. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Tour Company.

Gáinne Hambly and William Jackson perform March 13.

KIDS March 11, 2 p.m.

Pi Day Scavenger Hunt Children ages 6 and older are invited to a scavenger hunt where clues will be related to libraries, Pi or pie. Third Floor March 11, 5 p.m. Einstein Look-Alike Contest In this Pi Day showcase event, Einteins of all ages vie for the top prize. The first 100 contestants to write to pidayprinceton@gmail.com will be entered. Community Room

poetry initiative with his colleague Jim Haba to honor poets and elevate teaching poetry and the craft itself. “Whales Sing and Other Exuberances,” McVay’s book of poetry, has been recently published. Wilkinson was born and raised in Guyana and began her teaching career in the jungles there. Her poems appear in several publications, and her latest collection of poetry, “Opening the Drawer,” was published last year. Fireplace Area, Second Floor

Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Tour Company.

Co-sponsored by the library, US 1 Poets and Delaware Valley Poets.

MONDAY, MARCH 12

TUESDAY, MARCH 13 NEW March 13, 7 p.m.

March 12, 6:30 p.m. Python Users Group This monthly meeting is for anyone interested in the Python computer programming language. All age levels and skill levels welcome. Sessions include talks by other members and invited guests as well as interactive sessions. Register by visiting www.meetup.com/pug-ip. Community Room March 12, 7:30 p.m. Poetry in the Library Featured poets Scott McVay and Gretna Wilkinson read for 20 minutes each followed by an open mic session. Founding executive director of the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation, McVay established a

Princeton Documentary Filmmakers Group This new group is open to experienced and novice filmmakers and is an informal opportunity for networking, sharing ideas and trading skills. Please register from the events calendar at princetonlibrary.org. Technology Center March 13, 7 p.m. Masters of the Celtic Harp Gráinne Hambly and William Jackson, two of the foremost harpers of Ireland and Scotland, combine their talents on harp as well as concertina, tinwhistle and bouzouki. Community Room

March 14, 7 p.m. Ask a Lawyer Lawyers will be at the library for free private consultations on immigration and general legal issues. No appointments necessary; service on a first-come, first-served basis. Spanish translators will be available. Conference Room

Co-sponsored by the library, the Latin American Task Force, Lutheran Social Ministries, The Princeton Housing Authority and the Mercer County Bar Association.

March 14, 7 p.m. Film: “Ball of Fire” Shown as part of the library’s Pi Day observation, this classic “opposites attract” comedy stars Barbara Stanwyck as a nightclub singer recruited to teach slang to a group of culturally isolated professors. Gary Cooper plays Bertram Potts, the straightlaced scholar who finds himself romantically drawn to Stanwyck’s “Sugarpuss” O’Shea. 1 hour, 51 minutes. Community Room March 14, 7 p.m. Círculo de Lectura Memorias de un tiempo ido, por Jaime Acosta Allen. En la encrucijada de una época precolombina con rumbo a un encuentro devastador con el imperio español, Kuktu emprende un largo viaje lleno de experiencias que enriquecen el alma. Princeton Room March 14, 7:30 p.m. Talking Politics Book Group Joan Goldstein of Mercer County Community College leads the discussion of CALENDAR CONT IN UES ON PAG E 8

SPRING 2012


Local Author Day SPOTLIGHT 7

Author Day offers writers exposure, a chance to network By AMY HIESTAND

Connections Staff Writer

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ocal Author Day is more than a chance for readers to interact with area authors, although there will be plenty of chances to do just that. “It’s a day about networking and education as well as promotion,” said Janie Hermann, the library’s public programming librarian. “Local Author Day has really grown over the last few years,” said Hermann of the daylong March 24 event. “While the focus remains on authors from within a 25-mile radius of Princeton, there’s been a great deal of interest from well-known authors from New York and Philadelphia and other areas.” The gathering will begin with two morning workshops open to participating authors as well as the public. For details on the workshops, please see the calendar entries on Page 9 From 1-4 p.m., about 40 authors will display and sign their books in the library’s Community Room. The four featured authors listed below will read for 12-15 minutes each at intervals during that time, and 10 additional writers, chosen by lottery, will read or speak for 5-7 minutes each. The afternoon concludes with an appearance by the Philadelphia Liars Club at 4:15. (See calendar.)

Bart Jackson “Behind Every Successful Woman is Herself” Writer, world traveler and Cranbury resident Bart Jackson, whose Prometheus Publications produces the BartsBooks Ultimate Business Guides series, will talk about the guides while putting the focus on one in particular.

Read Local “Behind Every Successful Woman Is Herself” is a businesswoman’s guide to finding success and satisfaction in the workplace and includes strategies proven effective by many business leaders. “Creating ‘Behind Every Successful Woman is Herself’ has been a true challenge in nonfiction writing, and an immense education for me,” Jackson said. “Today’s women of business are infusing commerce and industry with new approaches that are resulting in a flourishing diversity. Using women’s own insights and experiences in this volume, we have tried to pass on the tools that will help others best guide their companies and careers.” A frequent lecturer to chambers of commerce and other business groups, Jackson has been a contributing writer at U.S. 1 Newspaper for 25 years. He is also the author of “Garden State Wineries Guide,” a resource that includes profiles of all of New Jersey’s 36 wineries. More: www.bartsbooks.com.

Caroline Leavitt “Pictures of You” Award-winning author and Hoboken resident Caroline Leavitt will read from her ninth novel, “Pictures of You,” a New York Times best-seller that’s been praised by Vanity Fair, Newsweek and many others. The story begins with an accident on a foggy highway between two women, April and Isabelle, who are both leaving their husbands. The collision leaves April dead, her husband Charlie devastated and her 9-year-old son Sam grieving and guilt-ridden. Feeling responsible and unable to move on with her life, Isabelle seeks out Charlie and Sam and embarks on relationships with them both. Leaving read-

ers wondering how well any of us really know the ones we love, “Pictures of You” examines grief, survival, and the secrecy that can exist within marriage. Libraries have special significance to Leavitt who is looking forward to coming to Princeton and interacting with readers at Local Author Day. “I love Princeton – it’s always a thrill to come there and wander around,” she said. “I have a soft spot for libraries because as an asthmatic child, libraries and librarians really saved my life. But the biggest thrill for me is meeting readers. So much of the time when I’m writing, I’m alone (or with my characters), and there’s a very special kind of magic that happens when readers and writers actually get to connect, and talk, laugh, and even argue.” In addition to her novels, Leavitt has written essays, stories and articles that have appeared in numerous national publications. More: www.carolineleavitt.com.

Amy Julia Becker “A Good and Perfect Gift” In her widely praised book, Becker finds herself confronting challenges she never imagined when her first child, Penny, is born with Down Syndrome. Initially fearful and crushed, Becker reveals in her book that during the first few years of Penny’s life, she began to reconsider what she valued in herself and others and learned to redefine perfection. With clarity, honesty and gentle wisdom, she shares how, through her faith in God, and with the love and support of her husband, family and friends, she found hope and joy in her daughter’s life. Becker’s strong ties to Princeton are included in her book. “The opening scene of ‘A Good and Perfect Gift’ occurs on Witherspoon Street, just a few steps away from the Princeton Public Library,” she said. “And much of the narrative centers around Princeton and Lawrenceville, from my time

as a student at Princeton University to our daughter’s birth at Princeton Hospital to our time living in a dorm at The Lawrenceville School. I’m eager to share from this narrative with a group of people who are familiar with the physical and emotional landmarks throughout the story, and I look forward to discussing some of the themes of perfection and the good life from the book.” More: www.amyjuliabecker.com.

Carla Ulbrich “How Can You Not Laugh at a Time Like This?” Serious illness may be no laughing matter, but singer-songwriter Carla Ulbrich managed to find plenty to laugh about during her struggles with lupus, strokes and kidney failure over a period of years. Ulbrich, who calls herself a medical musical comedian, became known as “the singing patient” when she recorded “Sick Humor,” a collection of parodies and songs about the trials and tribulations of prolonged medical treatment. Last year, Ulbrich’s book of humorous essays chronicling her medical experiences was published and well received by patients and medical professionals alike. A resident of Somerset, she tours nationally, performing for patients and caregivers. She is looking forward to her appearance at Local Author Day. “This is my first time at this particular event, but as with any book event, I look forward to meeting other authors,” she said. “I always enjoy being among those who love language and the written word. I also look forward to the opportunity to talk about health and humor, because it always opens up a great dialogue from those in attendance.” More: www.carlau.com.


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“Pity the Billionaire: The Hard Times Swindle and Unlikely Comeback of the Right” in which Thomas Frank examines the peculiar mechanism by which dire economic circumstances have delivered wildly unexpected political results, and the rise of the American Right. Quiet Room

THURSDAY, MARCH 15

March 15, 7 p.m. Talk With Your Farmers Two New Jersey farmers will share insight about raising pasture-fed poultry, eggs, beef and pork. Judith Robinson, manager of Princeton Farmers’ Market, leads a discussion about dietary and sustainability benefits to the public. Community Room

FRIDAY, MARCH 16

March 16, 7 p.m. Reel Rock The sixth annual Reel Rock Film Tour brings the best in climbing and adventure films to the library. The films highlight tales of superhuman skills, including climbing the world’s most difficult frozen falls and the hardest big wall free climb. Community Room

SATURDAY, MARCH 17 TEENS March 17, 11 a.m.

March 16, 10 a.m. Film: “My Sister’s Keeper” Adapted from the book of the same title by Jodi Piccoult, this is the story of a young girl’s effort to win medical emancipation from her parents who conceived her to be a bone marrow donor for their daughter with leukemia. Part of the Friday Film Café Series. 1 hour, 49 minutes. Community Room March 16, noon Talk: “Protecting Your Digital Footprint” Robert Lackie, a professor and librarian at Rider University, will offer 15 tips for preventing online identity theft at home, on the road and in the workplace. The session will cover who is at risk, the forms of ID theft and notable online identity protection and privacy sites. Community Room

KIDS March 16, 4 p.m.

Let’s Dance Join the fun as our staff members spin favorite tunes from the ‘60s through today to get the preschool set (and their parents) moving at this popular monthly program. Community Room

Go-Between Club This club for middle-school students meets monthly at the library. Talk about books and other interests, help with library events, plan programs with the librarians and have a say in library services. Conference Room March 17, 4:30 p.m. Composer Lowell Liebermann As part of the Princeton Symphony Soundtracks series, Lowell Liebermann discusses the creative process behind his Concerto for Flute and Orchestra, to be performed at the March 18 Classical Series concert, “Shakespearean Drama.” Guest flutist Eugenia Zukerman joins Liebermann in the discussion, revealing her experiences in performing the work. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Symphony Orchestra.

SUNDAY, MARCH 18

March 18, 3 p.m. Performance: The Sunday Opera Group Five young opera singers will perform selected arias and ensemble pieces at a special performance as part of the Crescendo series. Community Room

They Might Be Giants appear April 21 at 6 p.m. on Hinds Plaza in a special

MONDAY, MARCH 19 March 19, 7 p.m. Author George Dyson In his new book, “Turing’s Cathedral,” the historian and philosopher of science focuses on a small group of men and women, led by John von Neumann at the Institute for Advanced Study, who built one of the first computers to realize the British mathematician Alan Turing’s vision of a Universal Machine. Dyson has written on a variety of topics, including the history of computing, the development of algorithms and intelligence, communication systems, space exploration, and the design of water craft. He is the son of the theoretical physicist Freeman Dyson and mathematician Ver-

SPRING 2012

ena Huber-Dyson and the brother of Esther Dyson. Following his talk, he will sign copies of “Turing’s Cathedral.” Community Room See Feature Story, Page 5

TUESDAY, MARCH 20

March 20, 8:30 a.m. Talk: “Job Search Strategies that Work” Lloyd L. Feinstein, president of Creative Marketing Consultants of Murray Hill, and co-author of “Career Changing: The Worry-Free Guide,” will present a strategy for achieving career objectives. Topics include myths about career advancement, analyzing yourself as a competitive product, marketing strategies and networking. Part of the Tuesday Networking Breakfasts series. Community Room


9

March 22, 7 p.m. Film: “Miss Representation” Written and directed by Jennifer Siebel Newsom, the film exposes how mainstream media contribute to the under-representation of women in positions of power and influence in America. The film features provocative interviews with politicians, journalists, entertainers, activists and academics such as Condoleeza Rice, Nancy Pelosi, Katie Couric, Rachel Maddow, Margaret Cho, Gloria Steinem and others. 1 hour, 30 minutes. Community Room

SATURDAY, MARCH 24 March 24, 10 a.m. Local Author Day The day begins with morning workshops for writers that are open to the community. Area authors will display and sign books from 1 to 4 p.m. Four featured authors will read for 12-15 minutes each. Ten additional writers, chosen by lottery, will read or speak for 5-7 minutes each. The day concludes with readings and a meet-and-greet session with members of the Philadelphia Liars Club. Community Room See Feature Story, Page 7

event made possible by Princeton Record Exchange. See Page 13 for details. March 20, 6:45 p.m. Seminar: “Using Technology to Boost Your Business” Nita Menon and Ram Ramakrishnan, co-founders of the technology consulting firm elevate3, help small business owners identify challenges and present ways to use technology to stimulate revenue, reduce expenses and improve business processes. Registration required at scoreprinceton.com. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Area SCORE.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21 March 21, 7 p.m. Staged Reading: “Einstein’s Dream” Brandon Monokian, who directed three readings in the Page to Stage series last summer, returns to the library with his troupe of actors to present a dramatization of “Einstein’s Dreams” by Alan Lightman. Community Room

THURSDAY, MARCH 22

March 22, 10:30 a.m. Talk: “Meal Planning for Spring Holidays” Chefs from D’Angelo’s Italian Market in Princeton return to the library to share some delicious ideas for Easter and Passover celebrations. Part of the Flavors of Princeton series. Community Room

March 24, 10 a.m. Local Author Day Workshops Scott Morgan, author of “Character Development from the Inside Out,” leads a workshop on character development for fiction writers. At 11 a.m., Karen Miller, author of “Finish Your Book! A Time Management Guide for Writers,” discusses time management. Community Room March 24, 11 a.m. Children and Stories Book Club Children in kindergarten and first grade will hear a few stories and discuss them. Story Room March 24, 4:15 p.m. Philadelphia Liars Club Members of the group of Philadelphia writers will discuss the pursuit of publication to finish out Local Author Day. Fireplace Area, first floor March 24, 7 p.m. Film: “Sing Your Song” An encore presentation of the documentary chronicling the life of singer, actor and human rights champion Harry Belafonte. The film follows his rise from the jazz and folk clubs of Greenwich Village and Harlem to his emergence as a star. It also unearths his significant contribution to and his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement in America and to social justice

worldwide. 1 hour, 44 minutes. Community Room

MONDAY, MARCH 26 March 26, 7:30 p.m. Author Judy Michaels The newly retired Princeton Day School English teacher and poet in residence reads from “Catching Tigers In Red Weather: Imaginative Writing and Student Choice In High School,” her book about teaching writing in various genres. Fireplace Area, second floor

TUESDAY, MARCH 27

March 27, 7 p.m. Socrates Café Participants seek wisdom and knowledge through interactive discussion, questioning, and presenting multiple perspectives on topics of interest to the group. Conference Room

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28 KIDS March 28, 10:30 a.m. FarmYard Follies Youth Stages presents this part touring play, part interactive workshop for children ages 3-9 and their parents. A combination of stories and music makes for a creative retelling of classic folktales, fairytales and nursery rhymes. Community Room

FRIDAY, MARCH 30 TEENS March 30, 7 p.m.

Open Mic Night This evening of performances by and for teens is sponsored by What’s Up Princeton (the Arts Council of Princeton, Corner House, HiTOPS, Princeton Public Library and Princeton Recreation Dept.) It is open to teens only. (Sorry, no parents allowed.) Arts Council of Princeton

SATURDAY, MARCH 31 KIDS+ March 31, 1 p.m.

Nanoscience Expo This event will feature hands-on and interactive science exhibits that explore nanoscience, the study of atoms, molecules, and objects whose size is on the nanometer scale (1 to 100 nanometers). Community Room

Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Center for Complex Materials.

CALENDAR CONT IN UES ON PAG E 10


10 SUNDAY, APRIL 1 April 1, 2 p.m. Book Launch: “U.S. 1 Worksheets” The U.S. 1 Poets Cooperative will launch Vol. 57 of its journal, which contains works by 110 poets, including members of the cooperative and other poets from across the nation. Many contributors will read from their works in the volume. The U.S. 1 Poets Cooperative was founded in 1973 and meets weekly in the homes of members and co-sponsors monthly readings in the library. Community Room

MONDAY, APRIL 2 April 2, 9 a.m. AARP Tax-Aide Help with individual federal and state tax returns is available for free by appointment to seniors and low- and moderate-income taxpayers. The appointments typically last an hour and are scheduled for 9 a.m., 10 a.m., 11 a.m. Program continues every Monday morning through April 16. Call 609.924.9529, ext. 220 to schedule. Community Room

KIDS April 2, 10:30 a.m.

Happy Birthday Hans Christian Andersen This special story time will honor the great Danish author and fairy-tale writer. Story Room

KIDS April 2, 3 p.m.

Talk: “Discover Lenape Lifeways“ At the time of Columbus, about 10 million Native Americans lived in North America. Many thousands lived in “Lenapehocking,” the vast homeland of the Lenni Lenape, who were the first inhabitants of eastern Pennsylvania and parts of New York, New Jersey, Maryland, and Delaware. Admired and respected by William Penn, the Lenape were later

Piccirillo Sciencetelling presents “Sundown On Sycamore Street” as part of Spring Break Discovery Week on April 4 at 3 p.m. betrayed and forced from their villages by the policies of Penn’s sons and the infamous Walking Purchase. This program explores the life and times of these peaceful, progressive people, comparing and contrasting their social customs, history, religion, family life, agriculture, hunting, healing practices, arts and crafts, past and present contributions with those of the Europeans and Colonial Americans of their time. Part of the Spring Break Discovery Week. Ages 5 and older. Community Room April 2, 7 p.m. Continuing Conversations on Race Members of Not In Our Town, the Princeton-based interracial and interfaith social action group, facilitate these discussions of race-related issues of relevance to our community and nation. Princeton Room April 2, 7 p.m. Film and Talk: “Take A Bow: The Ingrid Clarfield Story” This documentary shows how Clarfield, professor of piano at Westminster Choir College of Rider University, overcame a stroke that left half of her body paralyzed. The film depicts how her love for piano, passion for teaching and dedication to her students allowed her to beat seemingly insurmountable odds. Clarfield and producer/director Lu Leslan will attend. Community Room April 2, 7:30 p.m. Mystery Book Group Librarian Gayle Stratton leads the discussion of Graham Moore’s “The Sherlockian,” a story about a Sher-

lock Holmes scholar who is killed before he can present a diary by Arthur Conan Doyle at a conference. Harold White is hired to solve the murder and find the diary. Quiet Room

TUESDAY, APRIL 3 KIDS April 3, 3 p.m.

Talk: “Eyes of the Wild: When Animals Attack” A look at how animals, including skunks, porcupines and armadillos, avoid becoming prey. Part of the Spring Break Discovery Week series; for children 5 and older accompanied by an adult. Community Room April 3, 7 p.m. Opera Lovers Discussion Group Join New Jersey Opera staff and other opera aficionados as they seek to answer the question, “Are HD Broadcasts Changing Opera?”Quiet Room Co-sponsored by the library and Opera NJ.

April 3, 7 p.m. Talk: “Doing Good While Doing Well” Carol King of Princeton Senior Resource Center leads this session on using your skills, knowledge and experience in an encore career in the education, health care or environmental fields. Conference Room

Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Next Step Engaged Retirement and Encore Careers Program.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 4 KIDS April 4, 3 p.m.

Demonstration: “Sundown on Sycamore Street“ Discover why Sycamore Street at sundown is a very scary place as siblings Bill and Terry journey

SPRING 2012

through town chasing floating ghosts, hiding from bullies and escaping from danger. Using fiery spiders, exploding water jugs, floating eyeballs, a whirlwind of toilet paper and amazing dry ice experiments, learn about the science of gas and air pressure along the way. Part of the Spring Break Discovery Week. Community Room April 4, 7 p.m. Círculo de Lectura “La Llorona,” por Marcela Serrano. La leyenda cuenta que La llorona es la madre que deambula por los caminos llamando a los hijos que ha asesinado. Conocemos a la protagonista de esta novela por su llanto invisible, el de una madre que ha perdido a su hija a los pocos días de nacer. Unida a otras mujeres en su misma situación buscará las respuestas, conseguirá alzar su voz y rebelarse contra la adversidad. Princeton Room April 4, 7 p.m. Spring Break Family Movie Night: “The Muppets” Amy Adams and Jason Segel star in the story of how the Muppets reunite to save their former stomping ground, The Muppet Theater. 1 hour, 38 minutes. Community Room April 4, 7 p.m. Citizenship Preparation Class First in a series of eight classes offered by The Latin American Task Force to assist in preparing for the U.S. Citizenship Test, including history and civics lessons and a review CALENDAR CONT IN UES ON PAG E 12


New Americans SPOTLIGHT 11

Meet our citizens Library classes are passports to new lives By AMY HIESTAND

Connections Staff Writer

M

ountains of paperwork, extensive interviews and hours of studying are among the hurdles that dot the path of those seeking to become naturalized American citizens. But if their path also leads through the doors of Princeton Public Library, they find support, encouragement and friendship, too. Classes that help immigrants prepare for their naturalization exam are held twice a year at the library in sessions that meet weekly over two months. English language classes and conversation groups are also available for the many people who come to our community from all over the world each year. The citizenship classes are co-sponsored by The Latin American Task Force and have been ongoing at the library since 2005. Over the years, immigrants from Burma, China, Colombia, Ecuador, Germany, Guatemala, Korea, Mexico, Morocco, Pakistan, Sudan, the UK and more have participated in the classes. Many are now American citizens. Manuel and Evangelina Pineda of Lawrence, who became citizens on Jan. 10 (20 years to the day that they came to the United States from Guatemala), are among the new American citizens who credit the classes they took at the library with their success. Both passed their examination on the first try, but Eva recalls being a little intimidated when she went to her first class. “When I saw the huge book, I was afraid and I said I can’t do it,” she said, referring to the textbook that contains American history and civics practice material. “But (studying) became part of my day, and it was exciting to learn. It wasn’t as hard as I first (thought).” Manny Pineda, who works in the construction field, recalls studying so much that he even dreamed about the test. “I learned all of the answers, not just one,” he said of the multiple choice study materials. Also originally from Guatemala, Mario Arias of Cranbury recently became a United States citizen after taking classes at the library. Wary when he discovered that the classes aren’t taught in Spanish, Mario worked hard to improve his English and learn the material covered in class. “I thank God for this moment,” he recalls thinking after passing his exam and taking his citizenship oath. Manny Penida recalls that on the day he and Eva were called to have their exam, during which potential citizens must answer six randomly chosen questions from among the hundred they study, “my heart was beating very hard.” After he passed his interview, he worriedly waited for Eva to finish. Eva describes the taking of their citizenship oath as “a very special moment” and says she was particularly moved by the video of President Obama congratulating the new citizens and welcoming them to the United States. “I wanted to cry,” she said. As program director for the Latin American Task Force for the citizenship classes and Ask A Lawyer program, Louise Sandburg calls seeing the classes lead to citizenship for participants “incredibly gratifying.” “This program provides us with a lot of satisfaction as we help our students gain the confidence they need to learn about American history and civics and pass the test to become citizens,” she said. Becoming a U.S. citizen is both an end in itself as well as a doorway to full participation to everyday life in this country.” Sandburg’s nurturing manner and confidence building are precisely what Ashraf Bano credits with her success in becoming a U.S. citizen recently. “You guys motivated me and gave me confidence,” Bano, originally from Pakistan, said. “ I couldn’t have done it without your help and support.” Laura Encivas, who, along with Sandburg, teaches the citizenship classes, believes they provide a turning point in the lives of the students, particularly for those who become citizens. “One cannot imagine the paths their lives have taken to get to the point where they are eligible to become citizens, and, once they are citizens, the impact it will have for generations to come,” she said.

Manuel and Evangelina Pineda are among the many new U.S. citizens from around the world who have studied at the library.

Mario Arias with teachers Laura Encivas, left, and Rossana Matiella.

The next session of citizenship preparation classes begins April 4 at 7 p.m. Classes will be held through May in the Princeton Room on the second floor of the library. The classes are free, but students are expected to purchase the textbook of practice material. Registration takes place during the first class. Ashraf Bano came to the U.S. from Pakistan.


12 of basic English necessary for the citizenship interview. Classes run every Wednesday at 7 p.m. through May 23. Conference Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Latin American Task Force.

See Feature Story, Page 11

THURSDAY, APRIL 5

April 5, 10:30 a.m. Fiction Book Group Librarian Kristin Friberg leads the discussion of Tea Orbreht’s “The Tiger’s Wife,” the story of a young doctor in a wartorn Balkan country who is compelled to unravel the mysterious circumstances surrounding her beloved grandfather’s recent death. Conference Room KIDS April 5, 3 p.m. Talk: “Discovering Insects” Explore the amazing diversity of the insect world and learn how animals and plants depend on them in this program featuring live and preserved specimens, puppets and other artifacts. Part of the Spring Break Discovery Week series. For ages 5 and older. Community Room April 5, 7 p.m. Author Helen Behr Sanford The author, whose grandparents survived the sinking of the Titanic 100 years ago this month, discusses “Starboard at Midnight,” her book about their lives. Community Room

FRIDAY, APRIL 6

April 6, 10 a.m. Film: “The Kite Runner” Adapted from Khaled Hosseini’s book of the same title, this is the story of a Pashtun boy named Ali and his Hazara friend Hassan, who is the son of a family servant. Although the boys were raised together under the same roof, jealousy and acts of cowardice and betrayal lead to a fractured relationship. 2 hours, 8 minutes. Part of the Friday Film Café series. Community Room April 6, 10 a.m. Parents of Preschoolers Discussion Group This is the second in a series of discussions intended to garner the thoughts and opinions of all

our community’s caregivers. Each discussion will focus on a topic with a goal of learning what parents think about educational goals, theories and practices. At the end of the series, the library will compile these comments and share them with the community. Children may attend with their grown-up. Activity Room

New Jersey Poets Prize for his poem “Leaving.” He received the 2010 Paterson Poetry Prize for Literary Excellence for his third book “Smoke Signals.” Laine Johnson’s poetry has appeared in the Paterson Literary Review and Edison Literary Review, among other journals, and was twice selected as Editor’s Choice in the Allen Ginsberg Poetry Contest. Fireplace Area, second floor Co-sponsored by the library, U.S. 1 Poets and Delaware Valley Poets.

TUESDAY, APRIL 10

KIDS April 6, 3 p.m.

Talk: “Discovering Physics” Dave Maiullo of Rutgers University brings his ever popular — and very loud — demonstrations of the basic laws of physics back to the library. Part of the Spring Break Discovery Week series. For children 5 and older with an adult. Community Room

SATURDAY, APRIL 7 KIDS April 7, 11 a.m.

Heads and Tales Club Children in grades two and three discuss what they are reading. Study Room, third floor KIDS April 7, 2 p.m. Word for Word Book Club This club is for children in grades four and five who would like to discuss what they are reading. Study Room, third floor

Co-sponsored by the library, Not in Our Town Princeton, Corner House’s Project GAIA. HiTOPS, and KidsBridge Tolerance Museum. 

April 10, 7 p.m. Princeton Documentary Filmmakers Group This group is open to experienced and novice filmmakers and is an informal opportunity for networking, sharing ideas and trading skills. Please register from the events calendar at princetonlibrary.org. Technology Center

SUNDAY, APRIL 8

The library will be closed.

MONDAY, APRIL 9

April 9, 6:30 p.m. Python Users Group This monthly meeting is for anyone interested in the Python computer programming language. All age levels and skills levels welcome. Sessions include talks by other members and invited guests as well as interactive sessions. Please register by visiting www.meetup. com/pug-ip. Community Room April 9, 7:30 p.m. Poetry in the Library Featured poets Lanie and Charles Johnson read for 20 minutes each followed by an open mic session. Charles H. Johnson won the 2011

April 10, 7 p.m. Talk: “Bullying – Changing the Culture: The Bystanders Dilemma” This program will address the internal conflicts for a bystander who witnesses bullying or other mistreatment and will give adults and young people the chance to get some practice and advice on handling situations in the community and in schools. Issues such as the role race plays and the result of intervening in such situations are explored. Second in a series on bullying and the community developed by Not in Our Town. Community Room

April 10, 7 p.m. Talk: “Sex and Aging: Changing for the Better” Melanie Davis of the New Jersey Center for Sexual Wellness leads this discussion. Davis is a soughtafter speaker and trainer for healthcare providers and educators. Fireplace Area, second floor Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Next Step Engaged Retirement and Encore Careers Program.

SPRING 2012

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11 KIDS+ April 11, 6:30 p.m.

Origami Club Anyone interested in the traditional Japanese art of paper folding is invited to meet for 90 minutes of new, often seasonal, folding. Beginners are welcome. The club is not just for kids; adults are invited, too, and must accompany anyone under the age of 7. Activity Room April 11, 7 p.m. Author Frank Ryle In “Keeping Score: Project Management for the Pros,” Ryle combines his extensive project management experience with lessons from a lifetime of golf to present a how-to approach to successfully accomplishing any project, any time. Community Room April 11, 7:30 p.m. Talking Politics Book Joan Goldstein of Mercer County Community College leads the discussion of “The Tea Party and the Remaking of Republican Conservatism” by Theda Skocpol and Vanessa Williamson, which explains the forces that gave rise to the movement and its impact on the GOP. The authors also offer possible implications of Tea Party. Quiet Room

THURSDAY, APRIL 12

April 12, 11 a.m. Indoor Farmers’ Market Locally made products such as artisanal cheeses and honey from farmers and the works of many craftspeople are available for purchase during this five-hour event. Community Room

SATURDAY, APRIL 14

April 14, 10:30 a.m. QuickBooks This free, hands-on workshop conducted by Oria Gonzales, a certified QuickBooks trainer, provides basic training in the use of QuickBooks. Registration required at www.scoreprinceton.org. Technology Center Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Area Chapter of SCORE.

April 14, 11 a.m. SCORE Small Business Fair This four-hour annual event brings together experts in entrepreneurship, financing, web design marketing and franchising for the benefit of those looking to start a new business or keep an existing one healthy. CALENDAR CONT IN UES ON PAG E 13


CALENDAR 13 Representatives from the Small Business Administration, SCORE of Princeton, banking and other industries will be on hand to lend advice and resources. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Chapter of SCORE.

April 14, 4:30 p.m. Film: “The Classic” This Korean Movie Night selection tells the love story of a young couple in South Korea during the 1960s. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Korean Community Center of Greater Princeton.

SUNDAY, APRIL 15

April 15, 4 p.m. Film: “The Price of Sex” This film documents how thousands of Eastern European women, many in dire poverty with little prospects,

are tricked and forced into prostitution abroad. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Global Cinema Cafe.

MONDAY, APRIL 16 April 16, 6:30 p.m. Princeton Family Dinner Week Event In association with the Princeton Alcohol and Drug Alliance and Princeton Family Dinner Week, we will host a potluck family dinner. Please bring your family and a baked good in a portion to serve eight to 10 people; all other menu items will be provided. Please register from the online events calendar at princetonlibrary.org Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Alcohol and Drug Alliance

TUESDAY, APRIL 17 April 17, 8:30 a.m. Talk: “Optimizing Your LinkedIn Profile” Matthew Levy, a job coach with two decades of HR experience, will show participants how to elevate the visibility of their profiles on the professional social media site. Topics include increasing profile views and connections, being discovered

JULY 18 & 19, 2012

by recruiters and creating a recognizable brand. Part of the Tuesday Networking Breakfasts series. Community Room April 17, 6:45 p.m. SCORE Seminar: “Promotion and Advertising for Small Businesses” Advertising executive Alan Yarnoff draws on his many years experience creating advertising for major consumer products and services to lead this seminar on making your advertising budget pay off. Learn the basic principles of creating sales-generating ads across all media sources from printed ads to television to the web. Presented in an easy-to-grasp manner for owners of businesses of all sizes and those who are contemplating starting a business. Registration required at www.scoreprinceton.org. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and SCORE.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18 April 18, 7 p.m. Talk “Reading the World and Other Miraculous Feats for People Big and Small” In a time when, as children’s librarian and literacy expert Kapila Love describes it, “reading, like education, seems to be a competitive sport,” she turns our attention toward “the fundamentals: a way to look at reading, and children’s reading particularly, that is compassionate, humanistic and downright magical.” Love is also the editor of the Collaborative Summer Library Program’s Early Literacy Manual. Community Room

THURSDAY, APRIL 19 SUBMIT YOUR WORK

High school and college students and other young filmmakers up to age 24 are invited to submit original short films of 20 minutes or less for the eighth annual festival. Submission Deadline: June 25

ATTEND THE FESTIVAL

Watch the selected films, meet young filmmakers and hear them discuss their work during the two nights of the festival in the Princeton Public Library Community Room. Festival Dates: July 18 & 19, 7 p.m.

DETAILS AND ENTRY FORMS ARE AVAILABLE AT WWW.PRINCETONLIBRARY.ORG/TEENS Princeton Public Library | Sands Library Building | 65 Witherspoon St. 609.924.9529 | www.princetonlibrary.org

April 19, 10:30 a.m. Talk: “Juice for Health” The staff at Tico’s Eatery will discuss the benefits of juicing and invite the audience to sample different flavorful combinations of fruits and vegetables. In addition, Costa Rican cuisine will be highlighted. Part of the Flavors of Princeton series. Community Room April 19, 7 p.m. Starting Your Own Organic Garden Judith Robinson of the Princeton Farmers’ Market leads a workshop on the fun and rewards of raising your own vegetables. Community Room

FRIDAY, APRIL 20

April 20, 10 a.m. Film: “Girl with a Pearl Earring” Adapted from Tracy Chevalier’s fictional book of the same title, this is a story of events surrounding the creation of the famous painting by 17th-century Dutch master Johannes Vermeer. 1 hour, 50 minutes. Part of the Friday Film Café series. Community Room KIDS April 20, 4 p.m. Let’s Dance Join the fun as our staff members spin favorite tunes from the ‘60s through today to get the preschool set (and their parents) moving at this popular monthly program. Community Room

SATURDAY, APRIL 21 April 21, 10 a.m. Book Drive Bring your used books to this daylong event to help support the library and literacy programs. Students from the library’s Teen Advisory Board and the Go-Between Club will join volunteers from area schools and organizations to help collect the donated books. Individual students or groups interested in volunteering or anyone with questions about donating books should contact Teen Services Librarian Susan Conlon: sconlon@princetonlibrary.org. Community Room April 21, 6 p.m. They Might Be Giants The celebrated pop duo (and self-proclaimed Brooklyn Ambassadors of Love) visits Princeton to celebrate Record Store Day with Princeton Record Exchange and to perform a free concert on Hinds Plaza. After a string of albums for young listeners, including the Grammy Awardwinning “Here Come the 123s,” John Flansburgh and John Linnell released “Join Us,” their first album of new material for adults in several years. Hinds Plaza

SUNDAY, APRIL 22

April 22, 2 p.m. Talk: “Reclaiming the American Way of Death” Josh Slocum, executive director of the Funeral Consumers Alliance and co-author of the book “Final Rights: Reclaiming the American Way of Death,” will report on the state of CALENDAR CONT IN UES ON PAG E 14


14 WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25 KIDS+ April 25, 10:30 a.m.

SUNDAY, APRIL 29

Play: “The Little Red Hen” Youth Stages presents this creative retelling of classic folktales, fairytales and nursery rhymes for children 3-9 and their grown-ups. Part-touring play, part-interactive workshop, the performance features a combination of stories and music. Community Room the funeral industry nationwide and in New Jersey. Slocum’s book examines the $15 billion funeral and burial industry, exposing consumer abuse, financial exploitation of the bereaved and problems government regulators have in protecting the grieving. He will discuss his lobbying effort to encourage Congress to pass a bill curbing abuses of cemeteries. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Funeral Consumers Alliance of Princeton.

TUESDAY, APRIL 24

April 24, 4:30 p.m. Greening the Curriculum Teachers from area schools talk about how they have incorporated sustainability and environmental literacy into their existing curricula. Professional credit is available for educators who attend this program. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and OASIS.

April 24, 7 p.m. Socrates Café Participants seek wisdom and knowledge through interactive discussion, questioning, and presenting multiple perspectives on topics of interest to the group. Everyone is invited. Conference Room April 24, 7 p.m. Author Andrew Delbanco In “College: What It Was, Is and Should Be,” the author warns how the traditional four-year college experience allowing students to discover their passions and test ideas is becoming a privilege reserved for the relatively rich. Delbanco demonstrates why making it available to as many young people as possible remains central to America’s democratic promise. Part of the Thinking Allowed series. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton University Press.

April 25, 7 p.m. Storytime for Grown-ups Sit back and enjoy a variety of picture books written for older kids that have plenty of adult appeal. This is a chance for adults to explore the best in children’s picture books. Intended for adults; children ages 8 and older may attend. Fireplace Area, second floor April 25, 7 p.m. Music In Versailles Pianist Catherine Sprague returns to the library to give a multimedia presentation focusing on the music of Imperial France. Community Room

April 29, 3 p.m. Talk: “Understanding the Medications Used to Treat ADHD in Children, Adolescents and Adults” ADHD expert Dr. Anthony Rostain, professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at the Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania and director of the Developmental Neuropsychiatry Program at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, explains how ADHD medicines work and the differences among them, and provides insight needed for informed decisions. Community Room

MONDAY, APRIL 30

THURSDAY, APRIL 26

April 26, 7 p.m. “Finance and the Good Society” Economist Robert Shiller discusses his latest book as part of the Thinking Allowed series. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton University Press.

See Feature Story, Page 3.

FRIDAY, APRIL 27 KIDS April 27, 7 p.m.

Library Spelling Bee Our third annual spelling bee will feature game-show-like rounds during which teams of students in grades four through eight spell their way to a final spell-off. There will be a prize for every participant and audience members of all ages will have a chance to showcase their spelling talents at the end of the bee. Space is limited, please register via the online events calendar at princetonlibrary.org or call 609.924.9529, ext.240. Community Room

SATURDAY, APRIL 28 April 28, 5 p.m. Pi Fight The library closes the annual Communiversity celebration of the arts with a performance by the classic rock band. Hinds Plaza

May 1, 7 p.m. Talk: “Job Search Strategies for Older Workers” Carol King, director of Next Step: Engaged Retirement & Encore Careers of The Princeton Senior Resource Center, discusses strategies for competing in the new work place, updating your skills, networking, dealing with ageism, job searching on the Internet and avoiding job scams. Fireplace Area, second floor Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Next Step Engaged Retirement and Encore Careers Program.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 2 May 2, 4:30 p.m. Music Talk: “The Art of Instrument Making” This talk explores the central role of instruments in an orchestra’s interpretation of compositions. Part of the Princeton Symphony Soundtracks series, this program will explores the building and refining of a new instrument, with a focus on instruments featured in the May 13 concert “Spun Beauty.” Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Symphony Orchestra.

April 30, 7 p.m. Talk and Performance: “An Innocent Diversion and Delight: Music and the World of Jane Austen” Music was of significant importance both in the life of Jane Austen and in her novels, whether she was practicing sonatinas or country dances on her piano for the amusement of family and friends or recording the delight music held for characters in her writings. In fact, nearly all of Jane Austen’s heroines were musical.  The program, presented by the Practitioners of Musick (John Burkhalter, English flutes; and Janet Palumbo, spinet), will include an illustrated survey of Jane Austen’s favorite holiday city of Bath and a survey of music from the family collection. Community Room

FRIDAY, MAY 4

May 4, 10 a.m. Film: “The Prize Winner of Defiance, Ohio” Based on the true story of Evelyn Ryan and adapted from her daughter Terry Ryan’s memoir, Jane Anderson’s film portrays the strong-willed mother of 10 who holds her financially desperate family together by becoming the most successful contest winner in the country. Written and directed by Jane Anderson, the film starts Julianne Moore, Woody Harrelson and Laura Dern. 1 hour and 39 minutes. Community Room May 4, 10 a.m. Parents of Preschoolers Discussion Group This is the third in a series of discussions. See description on Page 2. Activity Room

SATURDAY, MAY 5 KIDS May 5, 11 a.m.

TUESDAY, MAY 1

Heads and Tales Club Children in grades two and three discuss what they are reading. Study Room, third floor

Co-sponsored by the library and Opera NJ.

CALENDAR CONT IN UES ON PAG E 15

May 1, 7 p.m. Opera Lovers Discussion Group Opera aficionados discuss “Backstage at the Opera: From Concept to Opening Night.” Quiet Room

SPRING 2012


CALENDAR 15 KIDS May 5, 2 p.m.

SUNDAY, MAY 13

Word for Word Book Club This club is for children in grades four and five who would like to discuss what they are reading. Study Room, third floor

May 13, 3 p.m. Concert: Eric Mintel Quartet This popular jazz ensemble returns to the library to perform a concert of music by Dave Brubeck, along with original compositions. Pianist and composer Mintel, who founded the group in 1993, is known as a top interpreter of Brubeck’s music. The quartet released the critically acclaimed album “50 Years After… A Tribute to Dave Brubeck” in 2010. Community Room

May 5, 5 p.m. Cinco de Mayo Celebration The library presents Ballet Folklorico de Princeton at this annual celebration of Mexican culture and heritage. Hinds Plaza Co-sponsored by the library and the Arts Council of Princeton.

SUNDAY, MAY 6

May 6, 4 p.m. Performance: Stretto Youth Chamber Orchestra This Princeton-based ensemble of 35 musicians ages 7 to 18 performs a repertoire of string orchestra compositions from the Baroque to early 20th century. The ensemble has performed in Chicago, Paris, Essen, Düsseldorf, Florence, Prague, Montenegro, Croatia, Baden, Vienna and as part of the Philadelphia Bach Festival. Part of the Crescendo series. Community Room

MONDAY, MAY 7

May 7, noon Author Julian E. Zelizer In “Governing America: The Revival of Political History,” Zelizer examines the revival of the study of American political history and how it leads to a better understanding of American politics today. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton University Press.

May 7, 7 p.m. Symposium: “Bach’s Mass in B Minor” Frances Fowler Slade, music director of Princeton Pro Musica, leads this program exploring the Bach work to be performed by the ensemble May 20 in Richardson Auditorium. George Stauffer, dean of the Mason Gross School of the Arts and professor of music history at Rutgers University, will be part of a panel discussing one of Bach’s final compositions. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Pro Musica.

May 7, 7:30 p.m. Mystery Book Group Gayle Stratton leads a discussion of “Johannes Cabal: The Detective” by Jonathan Howard. A locked-room mystery meets steampunk in this swashbuckling adventure of murder, international intrigue, narrow escapes, and a luxurious airship. Quiet Room

TUESDAY, MAY 8

May 8, 7 p.m. Talk: “Ten Ways to Fix Some Financial Bloopers” Eleanore Syzmanski, longtime financial planner and investment adviser and founder of Princeton’s Financial Planning Answerplace, offers advice and answers individual questions about financial hazards. Fireplace Area, second floor Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton Senior Resource Center’s Next Step Engaged Retirement and Encore Careers Program.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 9 KIDS+ May 9, 6:30 p.m.

Origami Club People of all ages interested in the traditional Japanese art of paper folding are invited to meet for 90 minutes of folding. Beginners are welcome. Adults must accompany anyone under age 7. Activity Room May 9, 7 p.m. Circulo de Lectura Los informantes, por Juan Gabriel Vásquez Un magnífico y aterrador estudio sobre cómo el pasado puede invadir el presente, y una fascinante revelación de un rincón poco conocido del teatro de la guerra Nazi en Colombia. Princeton Room May 9, 7:30 p.m. Talking Politics Book Group Joan Goldstein of Mercer County Community College leads a discussion of “The Change I Believe In: Fighting for Progress in the Age

of Obama” by Katrina Vanden Heuval, who argues that entrenched interests will be overcome only by independent organizing, strategic creativity, bold ideas, and determined idealism. Quiet Room

THURSDAY, MAY 10

May 10, 10:30 a.m. Fiction Book Group Kristin Friberg leads a discussion of “The Submission” by Amy Waldman. When a Muslim architect wins a blind contest to design a Ground Zero Memorial, a 9/11 widow who admires the design finds herself at the center of a growing debate. Conference Room May 10, 7 p.m. Talk: “How to Publish Your Book” New Jersey authors Barry Sheinkopf, Carol Karels, Chris Rainey, Vicki Sola and Margaret Taylor will discuss their experiences getting their books into print. Aspiring, new and published authors are invited to hear about the benefits of independent publishing. Community Room May 10, 7:30 p.m. Gente y Cuentos After a moderator reads aloud a short story in Spanish, participants share their own life experiences and how they relate to the story. This program will be held every Thursday at 7:30 p.m. through June 14. Conference Room

SATURDAY, MAY 12

May 12, 10:30 a.m. QuickBooks This free, hands-on workshop conducted by Oria Gonzales, a certified QuickBooks trainer, provides basic training in the use of QuickBooks. Registration required at www.scoreprinceton.org. Technology Center Co-sponsored by the library and the Princeton Area Chapter of SCORE.

MONDAY, MAY 14

May 14, 10:30 a.m. Talk: “Spoonful of Flavor” The team from the Bent Spoon demonstrates how they create their unique flavors. Samples of customer favorites and new flavors will be offered. Part of the Flavors of Princeton series. Community Room May 14, 6:30 p.m. Python Users Group This monthly meeting is for anyone interested in the Python computer programming language. All age levels and skills levels welcome. Sessions include talks by other members and invited guests as well as interactive sessions. Please register by visiting www.meetup. com/pug-ip. Community Room May 14, 7:30 p.m. Poetry in the Library Featured poets Maxine Susman and Jessica de Koninck read for 20 minutes each followed by an open mic session. Susman’s poems appear in Paterson Literary Review, US 1 Worksheets and other journals. She has taught writing and literature at Rutgers, Seton Hall and Caldwell College. De Koninck’s poems appear in a variety of journals and anthologies including the Valparaiso Poetry Review, Paterson Literary Review, and others. Fireplace Area, Second Floor Co-sponsored by the library, US 1 Poets and Delaware Valley Poets.

TUESDAY, MAY 15

May 15, 8:30 a.m. Talk: “Active Interviewing” Eric Kramer, founder and president of Innovative Career Services, shares ways to brand, sell and present yourself to create what he calls a “hire me” plan for job interviews. Part of the Tuesday Networking Breakfasts series. Community Room CALENDAR CONT IN UES ON PAG E 16


Non Profit Org. U.S. Postage PA I D Princeton, NJ Permit No. 4

Executive Director: Leslie Burger Assistant Director: Peter Bromberg Communications Director: Tim Quinn Public Programming Librarian: Janie Hermann Princeton Public Library Sands Library Building 65 Witherspoon St. Princeton, NJ 08542 609.924.9529 princetonlibrary.org

Frıends of the

Princeton Public Library

Youth Services Team Leader: Susan Conlon Adult Services Team Leader: Erica Bess Program Committee: Lucía Acosta, Erica Bess, Leslie Burger, Susan Conlon, Kim Dorman, Kristin Friberg, Pamela Groves, Shelly Hawk, Janie Hermann, Amy Hiestand, Tim Quinn, Allison Santos Staff Writer: Amy Hiestand Editing and design: Tim Quinn

16 CALENDAR THE FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY AND McCARTER THEATRE PRESENT

May 15, 6:45 p.m. Seminar: “The Art of Closing the Sale” Business coach and entrepreneur Carmen Morris presents time-proven sales techniques and advice on how to handle any objection and close a sale with professionalism, confidence and skill. Community Room

through adulthood. Culled from interviews with Princeton area teens and adults, some of whom will be performing, “Learning” is directed by Adam Immerwahr, associate producer at McCarter Theatre and produced by CWW On Stage. Community Room

WEDNESDAY, MAY 16

TUESDAY, MAY 22

Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton SCORE

May 16, 11:30 a.m. Curious George Activities On the anniversary of her birth in 1906, we are celebrating Margaret Rey, author of the Curious George books, with activities related to the impish character she created with her husband Hans. Activity Room

FRIDAY, MAY 18

A SPECIAL EVENING FEATURING

May 18, 10 a.m. Film: “The American” When a previous assignment takes a troubling turn, an American assassin-for-hire hides out in Italy awaiting one final job in this 2010 thriller adapted from the novel “A Very Private Gentleman” by Martin Booth. Community Room

SATURDAY, MAY 19 The author of the best-selling “No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency” series is coming to McCarter Theatre and library supporters have a chance to meet the author, receive premium seating and a copy of the 13th book in the series, “The Limpopo Academy of Private Detection.” For $75, attend a pre-event VIP reception with the author and get the best seats in the house and a copy of the new book. For $50, receive premium seating and a copy of the book.

Details: 609.924.9529, ext. 280

May 19, 3 p.m. Lecture in Song: Fred Miller The singer and pianist, a favorite with library audiences, returns to present another in his series of programs examining American pop standards. This program focuses on lyricist, composer, pop singer and recording executive Johnny Mercer, whose many hits include “That Old Black Magic,” and “Fools Rush In.” Community Room

SUNDAY, MAY 20

May 20, 3 p.m. Staged Reading: “Learning” This performance is an intergenerational examination of what learning means from teen years

Co-sponsored by the library and Community Without Walls.

May 22, 7 p.m. Talk: “Finding the Right Volunteer Opportunity” Learn how to connect to volunteer opportunities that will help expand your horizons, create new relationships and further personal and professional goals while making a difference in the community. Conference Room May 22, 7 p.m. Socrates Café Participants seek wisdom and knowledge through interactive discussion, questioning, and presenting multiple perspectives on topics of interest to the group. Conference Room May 22, 7 p.m. Authors James L. Gould and Carol Grant Gould In their book “Nature’s Compass: The Mystery of Animal Navigation,” the Goulds explore the remarkable methods by which animals find their way both near home and around the globe. The Goulds will discuss their book, which explains how animals navigate, without instruments and training, at a level far beyond humans, using remarkable examples such as monarch butterflies, honeybees and homing pigeons. The authors ask if the disruption of migratory paths through habitat destruction and global warming is affecting and endangering animal species. Part of the Thinking Allowed series. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and Princeton University Press..

WEDNESDAY, MAY 23 KIDS May 23, 10:30 a.m.

Play: “Who’s in Rabbit’s House?” Youth Stages presents a creative retelling of classic folktales, fairytales and nursery rhymes and music for kids 3-9 and their parents. Community Room

SATURDAY, MAY 26 May 26, 11 a.m. Children and Stories Book Club Kindergarters and first-grader will hear and discuss stories. Story Room

SUNDAY, MAY 27

May 27, 1 p.m. Film: “The Best Years of Our Lives” This 1946 classic tells the story of three servicemen trying to piece their lives back together after returning home from World War II. 2 hours, 12 minutes. Community Room May 27, 4 p.m. Film: “All Quiet on the Western Front” This 1930 epic war film, based on the Erich Maria Remarque novel of the same name, is a realistic and harrowing account of warfare in World War I. 2 hours, 25 minutes. Community Room

WEDNESDAY, MAY 30 May 30, 7 p.m. Art Talk Aerial landscape painter Dara Alter and multi-media artist Christopher T. Wood, whose works are on display in the library’s second floor Reference Gallery, speak about their art and answer questions. Community Room Co-sponsored by the library and the Arts Council of Princeton.

May 30, 7 p.m. Storytime for Grown-ups Sit back and enjoy a variety of picture books written for older kids that have plenty of adult appeal. Intended for adults; children ages 8 and older may attend. Story Room

Profile for Princeton Public Library

Connections Spring 2012  

The Princeton Public Library Magazine

Connections Spring 2012  

The Princeton Public Library Magazine