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Montessori Teacher Training

Course Catalog

www.pctemontessori.org


Nondiscrimination Policy The Princeton Center for Teacher Education affirms its commitment to equal opportunity and nondiscrimination in employment and education for all qualified individuals regardless of race, religion, color, national origin, sex, age, sexual preference, or disability in the admission of adult learners, in the hiring of staff, and in the selection of supervising teachers. Advertising The program adheres to a policy of truth in advertising and, at no time, does it knowingly disseminate false information. By the use of accurate information in publications and by making this information available to staff, adult learners, and the professional community, the program attempts to educate both its clientele and the public as to its purposes and procedures, as well as to the nature and potential of Montessori education.


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f helping a child take on the world appeals to you, then the Princeton Center Teacher Education (PCTE) may be right for you. Founded in 1989, PCTE trains adults to find and cultivate the maximum potential in every child as the focus of its MACTE accredited and American Montessori Society (AMS) affiliated teacher-training programs. Its world-class facility within the Princeton Montessori School offers a hands-on learning experience by a highly trained and experienced faculty. PCTE graduates are credentialed AMS teachers of Infant and Toddler, Early Childhood, or Elementary levels. But the world waits for no one, so hurry. Contact PCTE today!

Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) - A joint offering between Princeton Center Teacher Education and The College of New Jersey!

PCTE Princeton Center Teacher Education • www.pctemontessori.org • 609-924-4594


Table of Contents General Information Message from the Director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Mission Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 PCTE Accreditation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Practicum Affiliation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Credentials Granted to Adult Learners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Career Opportunities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Infant and Toddler Program* Choose Your Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Program Options. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Standards for Practicum Site. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Standards for Master Teacher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Criteria for Successful Completion of Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Early Childhood Program* Choose Your Schedule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Program Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Practicum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Standards for Practicum Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Standards for Master Teacher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Criteria for Successful Completion of Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Elementary Program* Elementary I and II Levels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Program Format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Course Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Elementary I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Elementary II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Practicum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Standards for Practicum Site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Standards for Master Teacher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Criteria for Successful Completion of Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Administration and Faculty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Procedures and Policies Admissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . 32 Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Financial Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Attendance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Grading. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Adult Learner Records. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Child Development Waiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Time Extensions and Adjustments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Conduct. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Dismissal, Withdrawals, and Cancellations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Code of Rights and Responsibilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Program Rights and Adult Learner Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Adult Learner Rights and Program Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Master of Arts in Teaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

*Schedules and faculty updated each year.


General Information


Introduction A Message from the Director Ann Wilson

joy of learning.

Welcome to PCTE! It’s the Inside Track to Montessori training. Come and learn how to:

At the Princeton Center for Teacher Education we seek to instill this core belief in teaching and use the Princeton Montessori School model to set the standards for a successful and rewarding career as a Montessori-trained teacher in any school. This is the Inside Track. ___________________________________

• Prepare a Montessori environment • Observe children and assess their needs • Plan and implement programs responsive to children’s needs • Support children’s development • Prepare materials tailored for each developmental stage • Communicate effectively with parents and colleagues • Educate within the guidelines of your state

Mission Statement

The Princeton Center for Teacher Education’s mission is to educate and train adults according to the philosophy of Dr. Maria Montessori. PCTE prepares Montessori teachers of Infant and Toddler children (birth to 3 years old), Early Childhood age children (3 to 6 years old), and Elementary children (6 to 12 years old). It provides a complete education for prospective Montessori teachers, offering quality academic and practical instruction through the experience and observation of an on-site model.

PCTE continually strives to obtain the highest standards of program format and adult learner/faculty relations. While the principles and practices of Montessori are embraced and incorporated in the instruction, the teaching also takes into account various adult learning styles. PCTE offers a unique opportunity for prospective Montessori teachers to embark on an exciting new voyage: An exploration into Montessori training from the inside - inside children’s classrooms, inside environments filled with developmental materials so integral to Montessori philosophy inside the Princeton Montessori School. The Princeton Montessori School has Infant, Toddler, Early Childhood, Elementary, Middle School and Adult Education programs with an enrollment of approximately 320 and a staff of approximately 70 teachers. The head of school is Marsha Stencel, whose vision, passion, and leadership have made Princeton Montessori School a very special place for children and their families. Our teaching philosophy is to empower a child to learn, by developing the whole child. By teaching academic and social skills, as well as life skills, we build the foundation for purposeful, responsible, and fulfilling lives. We seek to ignite the innate and lifelong

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General Information ___________________________________

drive from downtown Princeton and Princeton University. From McCarter Theatre performances to canoe rides on Carnegie Lake, there is plenty to do for all ages. Princeton is a one-hour drive from Philadelphia and a one-hour train ride from New York City.

Facilities

The academic phase of the teacher education program is held on the campus of: Princeton Montessori School 487 Cherry Valley Road Princeton, NJ. 08540

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PCTE Accreditation

The school is conducive to learning with developmentally appropriate materials that give adult learners first-hand experiences in Montessori philosophy and practice.

The Princeton Center for Teacher Education (PCTE) is a program of the Princeton Montessori School. It is governed by the Princeton Montessori Society, a not-for-profit 501(3)(c) Corporation.

Adult instruction is continually supplemented with opportunities to observe children and their teachers in daily-life occurrences. PCTE adult learners learn from watching the interaction, listening to the conversation, and focusing on children’s unique ways of expressing themselves.

PCTE is accredited by the Montessori Accreditation Council for Teacher Education (MACTE). MACTE is an autonomous, international, nonprofit postsecondary accrediting agency for Montessori teacher education institutions and programs. The MACTE Commission accredits independent institutions that offer comprehensive, certification courses; and programs or departments located within colleges and universities. MACTE was granted initial recognition by the U.S. Secretary of Education in 1995, and this recognition extends through the year 2013.

The school building is situated amid farmland and trees in a campus setting. The interior is spacious and open; a peaceful learning environment with state-of-the-art conveniences. The facilities were designed while keeping in mind Maria Montessori’s reflection, “We must create a favorable environment that will encourage the flowering of a child’s natural gifts”. PCTE believes this is also true for the adult learner.

Contact information: MACTE 313 Second Street S. E., Suite 112 Charlottesville, VA 22902 Tel: 434-202-7793 • Fax: 888-525-8838 Email: Rebecca@MACTE.org

Teaching takes place in rooms that are large and comfortable with tables for group interaction and writing. Comfortable, adult-size furniture is provided for class instruction time. The Dr. Nancy McCormick Rambusch Library is named for the late founder of the American Montessori Society and former director of staff development at the Princeton Montessori School. The library contains pertinent resource materials and is accessible during normal summer class hours, as well as during the school year.

PCTE Affiliation

PCTE is MACTE accredited, a requirement for AMS affiliation. As an AMS affiliated teacher education program, it includes both an academic phase and a practicum/intern experience guided by dedicated professionals ensuring that adult learners receive an education consistent with standards for entry into practice at the chosen level. Upon successful completion of requirements, PCTE recommends the adult learner for an AMS Montessori credential.

Princeton Montessori School is centrally airconditioned during the summer session. All classrooms have individual climate controls as well as large, operable windows for fresh air and natural light. The school has two kitchens available for use, each with stove, oven, microwave and refrigerator. Restrooms are centrally located and are accessible to the physically challenged, as is the entire building.

The American Montessori Society (AMS), is a not-for-profit organization based in New York City, with nearly 13,000 members worldwide, is the foremost advocate for quality Montessori education. AMS sets the high professional standards that inform Montessori education as practiced in AMSaccredited schools and taught in AMS-affiliated teacher education programs.

Adult learners who attend PCTE for the summer may also enjoy entertainment opportunities offered in Princeton. The school is within a five-minute

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General Information Contact information: American Montessori Society (AMS) 116 East 16th Street, New York, New York 10010 Tel: 212-358-1250 • Fax: 212-358-1256 Email: ams@amshq.org

education program. AMS Elementary II (6-12 years) Full Credential Awarded to those who hold a college degree from an accredited college or university and have satisfactorily completed the Elementary I & II teacher education program. A college degree is required to enter the program.

Princeton Montessori School

The Princeton Montessori School (PMS) is accredited by the American Montessori Society (AMS), Middle States Association for Colleges and Schools (MSA). It is a member of the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) and the New Jersey Association of Independent Schools (NJAIS).

Degrees Outside U.S.A. College degrees received from non-United States colleges may not meet the degree standards required for the US. For an assessment of foreign degrees, applicants should contact a credentialing agency that is a member of the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES). To find a listing go to http://www.naces.org/

Credentials Granted Adult Learners

AMS Infant and Toddler Full Credential Awarded to those who hold a college degree from an accredited college or university and have satisfactorily completed the Infant and Toddler teacher education program.

AMS Non US Credential Awarded to those whose degree is earned in a country outside of the United States, has been evaluated by a recognized agency (NACES) in the United State but is deemed unequal to a Bachelor’s degree in the US. The Non-US Credential will state the name of the home country of the recipient “BA or BS Awarded in country name”

AMS Infant and Toddler Associate Credential Awarded to those who do not hold a college degree and have satisfactorily completed the Infant and Toddler teacher education program. The associate credential satisfies the necessary qualifications to teach in a Montessori infant and toddler environment in a recognized Montessori program in most states. However, some schools may not accept an Associate credential as the qualification for full teaching responsibility. Upon completion of a bachelor’s degree, the candidate may upgrade to a full credential.

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Career Opportunities

More and more people are seeking Montessori education for their children. The method has been recognized in all 50 states and in countries all over the world. Montessori education continues to expand and develop, answering the needs of all cultures, social strata, and age levels from prenatal to adulthood.

AMS Early Childhood Full Credential Awarded to those who hold a college degree from an accredited college or university and have satisfactorily completed the Early Childhood teacher education program.

Although PCTE does not guarantee employment, salary, or advancement, it makes every attempt to place its graduates if so needed. Some schools contact the training center to register vacancies, which will be passed on to the graduates. The American Montessori Society also has school employment opportunities posted on their website, www.amshq.org.

AMS Early Childhood Associate Credential Awarded to those who do not hold a college degree and have satisfactorily completed the Early Childhood teacher education program. The associate credential satisfies the necessary qualifications to teach in a Montessori early childhood classroom in a recognized Montessori program in most states. However, some schools may not accept an Associate credential as the qualification for full teaching responsibility. Upon completion of a bachelor’s degree, the candidate may upgrade to a full credential. AMS Elementary I (6-9 years) Full Credential Awarded to those who hold a college degree from an accredited college or university and have satisfactorily completed the Elementary I teacher

An AMS Montessori credential qualifies a person to be a teacher in a classroom in a Montessori school, as well as helps to prepare individuals to start their own school or day care center in the future. Montessori trained teachers can also provide adult and parent education in the private and corporate sector.

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Infant and Toddler and Early Childhood Montessori teachers will meet Department of Youth and Family Services (DYFS) qualifications for Head teacher after two years of experience.


Infant and Toddler Program


Infant and Toddler Program ___________________________________

cum phase. The academic phase includes a fall evening course in philosophy, a winter evening course in child development, four weeks in the summer, a four-day fall seminar, and a four-day spring seminar. The seminars occur during the practicum phase.

Infant and Toddler The Infant and Toddler program prepares adults for working with young children from birth through 3 years of age in a variety of settings which include home, school, and day-care.

In the academic phase adult learners attend classes at the Princeton Center for Teacher Education located at the Princeton Montessori School. The practicum phase is a nine-month period, which follows the four-week summer academic phase.

Choose Your Schedule The Princeton Center for Teacher Education understands that adult learners have different needs depending on their family situation, work responsibilities, and career aspirations. The training program has been designed to accommodate adult learners. We offer four different options for scheduling your training. The options for these programs are outlined below. Choose the plan that is right for you and decide if you would prefer to attend training during a condensed period of time or extend the training over a longer period. Consider whether you would like to take the academic phase over the summer exclusively or combine it with philosophy and child development evening classes during the year.

2 Year Option Calendar Philosophy 9 evening classes fall Child Development 9 evening classes winter Summer 4 ½ weeks, July-Aug. Practicum September - June Fall Seminar 4 days, TBA Spring Seminar 4 days, TBA 3 Year Option The length of the course is three years. The course has two parts: The academic phase and the practicum phase. The academic phase includes a fall evening course in philosophy, a winter evening course in child development, two weeks in Summer I, two weeks in Summer II. Following Summer II, practicum phase that included a four-day fall seminar and a four-day spring seminar.

Infant Toddler Program Options

1 Year Option The length of the course is one full year. The course has two parts: The academic phase and the practicum phase. The academic phase includes six weeks in the summer, a four-day fall seminar, and a four-day spring seminar.

In the academic phase adult learners attend classes at the Princeton Center for Teacher Education located at the Princeton Montessori School. The practicum phase is a nine-month period that follows the final two-week summer academic phase.

In the academic phase, adult learners attend classes at the Princeton Center for Teacher Education located at the Princeton Montessori School. The practicum phase is a nine-month period, which follows the six-week summer academic phase.

3 Year Option Calendar Philosophy 9 evening classes fall Child Development 9 evening classes winter Summer I 2 ½ weeks, July Summer II 2 weeks, July Practicum September – June (Following Summer II) Fall Seminar 4 days, TBA Spring Seminar 4 days, TBA

1 Year Option Calendar Summer, 6 weeks June – August Practicum September-June Fall Seminar 4 days, TBA Spring Seminar 4 days, TBA 2 Year Option The length of the course is two years. The course has two parts: The academic phase and the practi6


Infant and Toddler Program _______________________________________

appropriate environment. The following topics are examined: Interaction techniques with toddlers, rationale for scheduling staff as well as the schedule for the child’s day, management of the environment, and positive communication with toddlers and other adults in the environment while assisting the unfolding of the human personality of each toddler.

Course Descriptions Child Development There are two sections to the Child Development Course. Section I Child Development Theory and Practice Adult learners study the basic theories of child development according to the major contemporary child developmentalists. Stages of development related to the social, emotional, physical, cognitive, and spiritual development of children are examined. The course is presented through lecture, videos, and class discussions.

Section II Procedures for Toddlers Adult learners learn procedures of eating, napping, diapering, toileting, and orientation as it relates to developing an appropriate environment for toddlers. Section III Infant Pedagogy Adult learners study Montessori pedagogy as it relates to infants, birth to 18 months, during the Infant Section of the academic course in the summer. The following topics are examined: Interaction techniques with infants, management of the infant environment, and positive communication with infants and adults. Throughout the course the emphasis is on the organization and management of an infant environment while, at the same time, assisting the unfolding of the human personality of each infant.

Section II Child Development Prenatal to 3 Years Adult learners concentrate on the social, emotional/ psychological, cognitive, and physiological (physical, neurological, nutritional) characteristics of the child during the first three years of life. Adult learners also study prenatal development and childbirth. The course is presented through lecture, observation of children at various stages of the three-year development, and class discussion.

Montessori Philosophy

The study of the Montessori philosophy is essential in the preparation of a Montessori caregiver. This course is based on the principles of the Montessori method as found in the primary works of Maria Montessori and works of various contemporary authors who describe implementation of Montessori method for birth through six years of age in American culture today. Topics covered are the study of Dr. Montessori’s life, development of the method, preparation of the environment, observation, role of the adult, nature of the child, discipline, spiritual preparation and personal development of the teacher, and Montessori child care and its historical foundations.

Environmental Design

Section I Toddler Environmental Design Designing a suitable environment for children according to the principles of Dr. Montessori is the focus of this course. Topics include the study of developmental needs of the child as the basis of environmental design, arrangement of the room and its aesthetics and functionality, and materials and activities for which adult learners learn appropriate uses in the environment with the children. Underlying principles such as development of the senses, independence, order, space and safety for the toddler are studied, with a glimpse of the three to six year old as well.

Montessori Pedagogy

Section I General Pedagogy for Toddlers This course integrates the study of Montessori philosophy: The understanding of the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of the toddler, and the skills learned in designing an

Section II Infant Environmental Design

Adult learners study environmental design as it relates to infants, birth to 18 months, during the infant section of the academic course in the summer.

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Infant and Toddler Program Program Leadership and Administration

Personal Growth and Development This is an independent online course to be completed in conjunction with the practicum. Adult learners will learn the importance of professionalism, introspection, spiritual growth and ethics. The Enneagram, a personality typology, is introduced to the adult learners as a tool for self-awareness.

This course includes an introduction to administrative issues including financial, budgetary fee factors, funding and proposal writing, personnel matters, legislation, and standard human needs and requirements for children, families, and staff specific to all-day care.

Child, Family and Community

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Section I Parent Issues This course is designed to assist the adult learner in understanding the importance of parents, family, and community in the care of the young child. The course includes understanding the psychology of the parent/toddler relationship, and translating Montessori principles and accepted child rearing practices to the home. Adult learners will learn the importance of family and school as a partnership, need for mutual trust and respect, skills in communication, need and opportunities for parent education, and skills in offering practical help to the parents.

The Practicum Requirements for Practicum Requirements for Practicum Adult learners must complete the academic phase according to their program choice in order to begin the practicum phase. The preparation of an Infant and Toddler teacher involves both the acquisition of basic knowledge outlined in the academic requirements and the use of that knowledge in developing skills and competencies outlined in the AMS Competencies. The practicum in the infant and/or toddler environment provides a laboratory for the implementation of the theory, philosophy, and concepts that are presented in the academic phase.

Section II Parent Meetings

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the adult learner teacher with the structured parent interactions that occur during the school year. The course covers all of the Toddler Program parent meetings that take place at Princeton Montessori School as models to be adapted to the adult learners’ own settings.

The practicum begins the September following the summer academic phase according to the particular schedule in each option. Locating a practicum site is the responsibility of the adult learner. All practicum sites must be approved by PCTE prior to the beginning of the practicum phase.

Section III Infant Parent Issues Adult learners study family and community issues relating to children from birth to 18 months. Adult learners will learn about fostering communication between home, the infant center, and parent lifestyle issues.

There are three models of the practicum: The master teacher, the self-directed, and the alternative. The master teacher model is the most effective and the most desired model.

Observation Techniques The essential techniques of observation and recording are the focus of this course. Adult learners observe infants and toddlers, using a variety of methods, in order to prepare for observation assignments required during the practicum phase. The balance of the course is taught in a lecture and discussion format. The course is designed to provide a framework for observations that will be used in the other PCTE courses. 8

Master Teacher Model In the master teacher practicum the adult learner teacher works in an environment under a qualified master (supervising) teacher at an approved site for a minimum of 540 hours over a nine-month period. The adult learner does not assume total responsibility for a class without the presence of the master (supervising) teacher or other qualified staff person. A minimum of three on-site evaluation visits by a field consultant is required.


Infant and Toddler Program Infant (Birth – 18 months) Concentration This practicum provides a period of concentrated experience for the adult learner whose primary interest is the care and development of infants. The adult learner is required to participate in all facets of infant care, parent education, and administrative procedures.

Alternate Model This practicum is designed to meet the individual needs of a wide variety of professionals involved in child services; e.g., social workers, vocational childcare specialists, pediatric nurses, Montessori administrators and consultants, and others. The adult learner may fulfill practicum requirements by applying information received during the academic phase in a variety of settings. The practicum is codesigned by the preparation course director and the adult learner.

Toddler (18 months – 3 years) Concentration This practicum provides a period of concentration for the adult learner whose primary interest is the care and development of toddlers. The adult learner is required to work in a toddler environment under an approved master teacher.

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Standards for the Practicum Site

Self-Directed Model In some circumstances there is not an opportunity for an adult learner to work under a master teacher. In that case adult learners may do a self-directed practicum provided they meet one of the following requirements:

AMS Membership Practicum sites should be members of the American Montessori Society (AMS). If a school is not a member, PCTE strongly suggests that it becomes affiliated with AMS.

• A Montessori credential for another level • Prior experience as an assistant in a Montessori environment • Two or more years of experience working with children in a group setting • Written approval of the teacher education program director

Nondiscrimination Policy The school site must have a written nondiscriminatory policy for children and staff. Licensing The site must meet all local and state regulations.

All of the requirements for the master teacher practicum apply to the self-directed practicum with the additional task of the adult learner assuming full responsibility for the Montessori classroom without the daily guidance of a qualified supervising teacher in the classroom.

School Policies The school must communicate its policies to the adult learner and the teacher education program in writing. Job Description and Contract of Agreement The site must issue a job description and a contract of agreement to the intern. This job description or agreement should include the nature and type of remuneration given the adult learner, if any.

Because the adult learner has full responsibility for directing the class and does not have a master teacher, the practicum extends over a period of two years instead of one year as in the Master Teacher model. There is an additional fee for self-directed practicum. See the fee schedule.

Cooperation with the Teacher Education Course The school must agree to cooperate with the course in all matters relating to the practicum.

A minimum of six on-site consultation evaluation visits by a field consultant is required. In addition, adult learners doing a self-directed practicum are assigned a mentor, a schedule for communication with the mentor and observations at the mentor’s school.

Janitorial Service The school should provide janitorial service. Age Range of Class Children should be within the age range of the practicum model selected. 9


Infant and Toddler Program Supervision (in the Master Teacher Model) The adult learner may not be asked to assume total responsibility for a class without the presence of a master teacher or other qualified staff person.

Meetings The master teacher must schedule regular review sessions with the adult learner at least twice per month to assess progress in the above areas.

Environment The practicum site environment must be equipped with appropriate materials for infants and/or toddlers. These environments are characterized by order, simplicity, and aesthetics to meet the needs of the age group of the children.

Assessment The master teacher must complete and submit all evaluation forms requested by the teacher education program at the designated times. Communication The master teacher is to inform the teacher education program of any difficulties in the professional performance of the adult learner.

___________________________________

Standards for the Master Teacher

The Master Teacher Model The master teacher must be present in the classroom for the entire supervised portion of the intern’s schedule. If a supervising teacher has adult learner teachers from more than one program, the total number must not exceed three adult learner teachers for a single-session program, and two adult learners teachers per session for a doublesession program.

Credentials All master teachers must hold a Montessori credential from an AMS accredited program or the equivalent. Teaching Experience The master teacher must have at least one year’s experience of teaching after receipt of the credential.

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Adult Learner Experiences The master teacher is responsible for providing experiences relating to the following areas:

Criteria for Successful Completion of Program

• Preparation: Indoor and outdoor environments.

Adult learners must meet the following competencies in order to be recommended for an AMS Infant/Toddler credential:

• Observation and Recording: Observing, planning, assessing, and maintaining records.

• Demonstrates understanding of and implements Montessori Philosophy with a focus from prenatal stage to age three.

• Interaction: Relations among parents, staff, and children. • Instruction: Designing activities, individual and group presentations.

• Comprehends and utilizes an understanding of the stages of human growth and development with an emphasis on prenatal to age three.

• Management: Individual and group strategies. • Parent/Community Involvement: Family support and community service, parent education, interviews, conferences and meetings, and open houses.

• Demonstrates evidence of personal growth through self-evaluation and introspection. • Demonstrates knowledge of developmental and behavioral norms and potential recommendations toward early intervention services.

• Staff involvement: Participating in meetings and establishing team compatibility and problem-solving techniques. 10


Infant and Toddler Program • Demonstrates observation, documentation, and analytical skills necessary for planning and recording the progress of children. • Effectively interacts with the whole child and supports development in a culturally sensitive manner. • Demonstrates leadership skills and an understanding of professional standards. Incorporates an understanding of administrative functions. • Demonstrates an ability to design and integrate environments that meet the child’s need for exploration and independence in: o Sensory and motor experiences o Language experiences o Positive social experiences o Self-care o Routines and procedures o Peace education • Demonstrates an awareness and understanding of governmental regulations. • Develops supportive partnerships with culturally diverse families. • Demonstrates an awareness of community resources to support children and families. • Identifies and has knowledge of professional standards and associations.

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Early Childhood Program


Early Childhood Program ___________________________________

cum phase. The academic phase includes a fall evening course in philosophy, a winter evening course in child development, four weeks in the summer, a four-day fall seminar, and a four-day spring seminar.

Early Childhood

The Early Childhood program prepares adults to educate 3-6 year old children in environments, which are in keeping with the Montessori philosophy.

In the academic phase adult learners attend classes at the Princeton Center for Teacher Education located at the Princeton Montessori School. The practicum phase is a nine-month period, which follows the four-week summer academic phase. The seminars occur during the practicum phase.

Choose Your Schedule The Princeton Center for Teacher Education understands that adult learners have different needs depending on their family situation, work responsibilities, and career aspirations. Our training program has been designed to accommodate our adult learners. We offer four different options for scheduling your training. The options for these programs are outlined below. Choose the plan that is right for you and decide if you would prefer to attend training during a condensed period of time or extend the training to a longer period. Consider whether you would like to take the academic phase over the summer exclusively or combine it with philosophy and child development evening classes during the year.

2 Year Option Calendar Philosophy 9 evening classes fall Child Development 9 evening classes winter Summer 5 weeks, July - August Practicum September-June Fall Seminar 4 days, TBA Spring Seminar 4 days, TBA 3 Year Option The length of the course is three years. The course has two parts: The academic phase and the practicum phase. The academic phase includes a fall evening course in philosophy, a winter evening course in child development, two weeks in the summer, two weeks the following summer, a four-day fall seminar, and a four-day spring seminar. The seminars occur during the practicum phase.

Early Childhood Program Options 1 Year Option The length of the course is one full year. The course has two parts: The academic phase and the practicum phase. The academic phase includes six and a half weeks in the summer, a four-day fall seminar, and a four-day spring seminar.

In the academic phase adult learners attend classes at the Princeton Center for Teacher Education located at the Princeton Montessori School. The practicum phase is a nine-month period that follows the final two-week summer academic phase.

In the academic phase adult learners attend classes at the Princeton Center for Teacher Education located at the Princeton Montessori School. The practicum phase is a nine-month period, which follows the six-week summer academic phase.

3 Year Option Calendar Philosophy 9 evening classes fall Child Development 9 evening classes winter Summer I 2 1/2 weeks, July Summer II 2 1/2 weeks, July-August Practicum September-June (following Summer II) Fall Seminar 4 days, TBA Spring Seminar 4 days, TBA

1 Year Option Calendar Summer 6 1/2 weeks, June - August Practicum September-June Fall Seminar 4 days, TBA Spring Seminar 4 days, TBA 2 Year Option The length of the course is two years. The course has two parts: the academic phase and the practi13


Early Childhood Program ___________________________________

Course Descriptions

Sensorial This course prepares the adult learner to use the sensorial materials in a classroom setting. These include: Visual, tactile, gustatory, olfactory, and auditory materials. The adult learner examines the relationship between size, color, shape, and texture and relates these concepts to mathematical functioning. The course will include lectures, demonstration of lessons, readings, discussion, practice of materials and album preparation.

Child Development/Psychology Adult learners study the basic theories of child development according to the major contemporary child developmentalists. Stages of development related to the social, emotional, physical, cognitive, and spiritual growth of the child are examined. The course is presented through lecture, videos, and class discussions.

Mathematics This course focuses on the development of the child’s mathematical mind. Concepts studied in this course include: The numbers 1-10, the decimal system, linear counting, and the four basic operations of math. Adult learners learn to approach concepts using concrete materials. The course format includes lectures, lesson demonstrations, readings, discussions, and practice with materials and album preparation.

Montessori Philosophy The study of the Montessori philosophy is essential in the preparation of a Montessori caregiver. This course is based on the principles of the Montessori method as found in the primary works of Maria Montessori and works of various contemporary authors who describe the implementation of Montessori method in American culture today. Topics covered are the study of Dr. Montessori’s life, development of the method, preparation of the environment, observation, the role of the adult, the nature of the child, discipline, the spiritual preparation and personal development of the teacher, and Montessori child care and its historical foundations.

Language This course is designed to introduce the adult learner to the philosophy and rationale of language development. It provides instruction for preparing a proper language environment. Topics include oral language development, word composition, phonemics, reading, writing, creative expression, and literature. The course format includes lecture, demonstration of lessons, readings, discussions, and practice of materials and album preparation.

Observation Techniques The essential techniques of observation and recording are the focus of this course. Adult learners observe the Early Childhood classrooms using a variety of methods, in order to prepare for observation assignments required during the practicum phase. The balance of the course is taught in a lecture and discussion format. The course is designed to provide a framework for observations that will be used in the other PCTE courses.

Art This course is designed to give adult learners the tools they need to incorporate art into their early childhood classrooms regardless of their prior art experience. Adult learners explore art appreciation, art in the classroom, art in every day living, and art techniques.

Practical Life/Everyday Living This course is designed to introduce the adult learner to the philosophy and rationale of Practical Life/Everyday Living. There are four areas: Analysis and control of movement, grace and courtesy; care of self, and care of the environment. The goals of the activities are order, coordination, concentration, independence, cooperation, and sequence. The course includes lectures, discussions, practice, group work on albums, material design and variations.

Music This course is designed to give adult learners the tools they need to incorporate music into their early childhood classrooms regardless of their previous musical experience. Areas covered are: Singing, music appreciation, reading and writing music, listening, and rhythm instruments.

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Early Childhood Program Administration This course includes an introduction to administrative issues, including finances, budgets, personnel matters, licensing requirements, starting a school, legal structures of schools, and the role of consultations and accreditations in administrating a school.

Movement This course is designed to give adult learners the tools and experiences they need to incorporate movement into their early childhood classrooms. Adult learners will learn the importance of movement in the classroom, body awareness, basic loco-motor skills, stationary skills, games, and line activities.

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Physical and Life Science This course is designed to give adult learners the lessons and materials needed for preparing science materials and lessons in the early childhood environment, including botany, zoology, earth elements, and physical science.

The Practicum

Preparation of an early childhood teacher involves both the acquisition of basic knowledge outlined in the academic requirements and the use of that knowledge in developing skills and competencies outlined in the AMS Competencies. The practicum in the early childhood classroom provides a laboratory for the implementation of the theory, philosophy, and concepts that are presented in the academic phase.

Social Studies This course includes the philosophy and rationale of teaching geography and history to young children. Geography covers land and water forms, globes, maps, flags, and multicultural awareness. History includes time, calendar, seasons, and personal history.

The practicum begins the September following the summer academic phase. Adult learners must complete the academic phase according to their program option choice in order to begin their practicum phase. Locating a practicum site is the responsibility of the adult learner. All practicum sites must be approved by PCTE prior to the beginning of the practicum phase.

Classroom Leadership/Management This course is designed to assist the adult learner with the implementation of the Montessori principles in a classroom setting. The format of the class is discussion, observation, adult learner activities, and presentations. Areas of study are preparation of the environment, scheduling and curriculum planning, evaluation of children, techniques for discipline, communication, and problem solving.

There are two kinds of practicum: The master teacher practicum and the self-directed practicum.

Reflective Journal Introduction This class introduces and prepares the adult learner for engaging in reflective practice through the reflective journal entry form during the practicum. Parent Involvement/Education Adult learners will learn the importance of family and school as a partnership, the need for mutual trust and respect, skills in communication, need and opportunities for parent education, and skills in offering practical help to parents. This course covers different options for collaboration with parents, including parent meetings, telephone calls, parent-teacher conferences, and written communication. The instructor presents various models for parent interactions and encourages the adult learners to adapt these models to their own school situation.

Master Teacher Model This model is one in which the adult learner teacher works in the classroom under a qualified master teacher at an approved school site for a minimum of four hours a day, five days a week from September to June. In this model the adult learner does not assume total responsibility for a class without the presence of a supervising teacher or other qualified staff person. A minimum of three on-site field consultant visits is required.

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Self-Directed Model In some circumstances there is not an opportunity for an adult learner to work under a master teacher.


Early Childhood Program School Policies The school must communicate its policies to the adult learner and the teacher education program in writing.

In that case adult learners may do a self-directed practicum provided they meet one of the following requirements: • Prior experience as an assistant in a Montessori environment • Two or more years of previous teaching experience • Written approval of the teacher education program director • A bachelor’s degree

Job Description and Contract of Agreement The site must issue a job description and a contract of agreement to the intern. This job description or agreement should include the nature and type of remuneration given the adult learner, if any. Cooperation with the Teacher Education Course The school must agree to cooperate with the course in all matters relating to the practicum.

All the requirements for the supervised practicum apply to the self-directed practicum with the additional task of the adult learner assuming full responsibility for the Montessori class without the daily guidance of a qualified master teacher in the classroom.

Janitorial Service The school should provide janitorial service. Age Range of Class The children in the class should range in ages from 3-6 years of age.

Because the adult learner has full responsibility for the Montessori class and does not have a master teacher, the practicum extends over a period of two academic school years instead of one as in the Master Teacher model. There is an additional fee for self-directed practicum. See the current fee schedule.

Supervision (Master Teacher Model) The adult learner may not be asked to assume total responsibility for a class without the presence of a master teacher or other qualified staff person. Environment

A minimum of six on-site consultation evaluation visits by a field consultant is required. In addition, adult learners doing a self-directed practicum are assigned a mentor. Adult learners are required to follow a schedule for communication with the mentor and observations at the mentor’s school.

The practicum site environment must be equipped with the full complement of Montessori materials. A Montessori Early Childhood environment is described as a setting for children between the ages of 3 and 6 years. The environment reflects these characteristics:

• Curriculum materials are organized into logical groupings (e.g., by curriculum area).

___________________________________

Standards for the Practicum Site

• Within each grouping there is a logical arrangement of the materials (e.g., by level of difficulty or sequence of skill and concept development).

AMS Membership Practicum sites should be members of the American Montessori Society (AMS). If a school is not a member, PCTE strongly suggests that it becomes affiliated with AMS.

• Furnishings are of appropriate size for the children. The arrangement of furnishings offers a variety of activity spaces. • Activity spaces and procedures are organized to avoid conflict of interest.

Nondiscrimination Policy The school site must have a written nondiscrimination policy for children and staff.

• There is provision for display of visual stimuli and children’s work.

Licensing The site must meet all local and state regulations.

• Each activity is structured to provide purpose, procedure, closure, and opportunity for child’s success. 16


Early Childhood Program ___________________________________

The environment includes/offers materials and activities that encourage the child’s development of full potential: • • • • • • • • • • •

Standards for the Master Teacher

Concentration. Observation skills. Awareness of order and sequence. Large and small muscle coordination. The acquisition of practical skills relevant to care of self and environment. Perceptual awareness and discrimination. Concepts basic to the understanding of quantitative relationships. Language skills, including opportunities for listening, self-expression, and instruction in writing, reading, and other language arts. Understanding of nature and the physical universe. Experience with and understanding of the social sciences. Experience with critical thinking skills and problem-solving techniques.

Credentials All master teachers must hold a Montessori credential from an AMS accredited program or the equivalent. Teaching Experience The master teacher must have at least one year’s teaching experience after receipt of the credential. Adult Learner Experiences The master teacher is responsible for providing for the intern experiences relating to the following areas: • Preparation: Indoor and outdoor environments. • Observation and Recording: Observing, planning, assessing, and maintaining records. • Interaction: Relations among parents, staff, and children.

The particular materials/activities selected seem appropriate to the developmental period, abilities, and special needs of the children who use the environment. The environment: • • • • • • • • • •

• Instruction: Designing activities, individual and group presentations. • Management: Individual and group strategies. • Parent/community involvement: Family support and community service, parent education, interviews, conferences and meetings, and open houses.

Is clean and orderly. Shows care and precision in the organization and use of materials. Encourages child selection of activity. Encourages child participation in maintaining the environment. Demonstrates communication strategies for use of equipment. Acknowledges and demonstrates responsiveness to children’s emotional needs. Maintains adequate monitoring and overview of the environment. Communicates rules and procedures appropriate to the situation. Models and facilitates pro-social behavior and positive techniques for conflict. Demonstrates coordinated activities by responsible adults.

• Staff involvement: Participating in meetings and establishing team compatibility and problemsolving techniques. Meetings The master teacher must schedule regular review sessions with the adult learner at least twice a month to assess progress in the above areas. Assessment The master teacher must complete and submit all evaluation forms requested by the teacher education program at the designated times. Communication The master teacher is to inform the teacher education program of any difficulties in the professional performance of the adult learner. 17


Early Childhood Program The following standards are divided into two categories based on the nature of the practicum.

• Incorporates an understanding of administrative functions.

The Supervised Practicum (The Master Teacher Model) Attendance: The master teacher must be present for the entire supervised portion of the intern’s schedule. If a supervising teacher has adult learner teachers from more than one program, the total number must not exceed three adult learner teachers for a singlesession program, and two adult learners teachers per session for a double-session program.

• Demonstrates the principles of Montessori environmental and material design. • Articulates the rationale and sequence of the Montessori curriculum. • Demonstrates proficiency in applying Montessori principles in the context of the curriculum, didactic materials, and lesson presentations. • Designs and maintains a developmentally appropriate Montessori environment in response to the needs of adult learners. • Utilizes a variety of instructional strategies and assessment methods.

___________________________________

• Demonstrates an awareness and understanding of governmental regulations.

Criteria for Successful Completion of Program

• Demonstrates cultural sensitivity in communications and work with families and children.

Adult learners must meet the following competencies in order to be recommended for an AMS Early Childhood credential:

• Demonstrates an awareness of community resources for additional support of children and families.

• Demonstrates an understanding of and implements Montessori philosophy with a focus on the early childhood years.

• Identifies and has an awareness of available professional associations.

• Comprehends and utilizes an understanding of the stages of human growth, development, and educational theories with an emphasis from two and half (2 1⁄2) through six (6) years of age. • Demonstrates evidence of personal growth through self-evaluation and introspection. • Demonstrates knowledge of developmental and behavioral norms and potential recommendations toward early intervention services. • Demonstrates observation, documentation, and analytical skills necessary for planning and recording the progress of children. • Utilizes cultural sensitivity in support of the development of individual children. • Demonstrates an ability to implement effective classroom strategies. • Demonstrates leadership skills and an understanding of professional standards. 18


Elementary Program


Elementary Program ___________________________________ Adult learners complete the two weeks of their Elementary I second summer academic phase and begin their Elementary II academic phase the same summer. The calendar is designed to have the Elementary I and II courses taken sequentially. Elementary II is generally offered every other year on even numbered years.

Elementary I and II There are two levels of Elementary Teacher Training. Elementary I (6-9 years) The Elementary I program prepares adults to teach children ages 6-9 in classrooms that are in keeping with the Montessori philosophy. The academic classes are held at the Princeton Montessori School where adult learners have access to a number of elementary classrooms equipped with a complete array of Montessori learning materials. This unique feature of the program provides optimum learning experiences for each adult learner teacher.

Calendar

Elementary I (6-9 year olds) • First Summer Pre-requisite, 1 week Academic portion 6 ½ weeks June – August • Practicum: September – June • Fall Seminar: 4 days, TBA • Spring Seminar: 4 days, TBA • Second Summer: 2 weeks, June – July

Elementary I-II (6-12 years) The Elementary I-II program prepares adults to teach children ages 6-12 in classrooms that are in keeping with the Montessori philosophy. The academic classes are held at the Princeton Montessori School where adult learners have access to a number of elementary classrooms equipped with a complete array of Montessori learning materials. This unique feature of the program provides optimum learning experiences for each adult learner teacher. Adult learners must complete Elementary I before entering the Elementary II.

Elementary I-II (6-12 year olds) • All Elementary I requirements (6-9) • Summer: 4 weeks, July – August • Fall Seminar: 4 days, TBA • Spring Seminar: 4 days, TBA • Practicum: September – June (only if not completed in Elem. I)

Course Descriptions

Program Format

Elementary I

Elementary I The Elementary I teacher-training course has two parts: The academic phase and the practicum phase. Adult learners attend classes for seven and a half weeks the first summer, (six and a half if prerequisite requirements are met) and two weeks during the second summer. They attend two four-day seminars (spring and fall) during their practicum year.

Prerequisite Course (3-6 overview) This one-week course is offered prior to the first week of the summer Elementary I teacher training. All Elementary I candidates who do not hold a Montessori Early Childhood Credential must take this course. During this course, the adult learner will become familiar with the Montessori philosophy as it relates to the Early Childhood years, and study the Montessori rationale and basic methodology for the materials in the curriculum areas of practical life, sensorial, mathematics, and language. There is a separate fee for the course listed in the fee schedule.

Elementary I-II The Elementary I-II teacher-training course has two parts: The academic phase and the practicum phase. Adult learners attend classes for four weeks in the summer and two four-day seminars (fall and spring) during the following school year. Adult learners who have completed their practicum during the Elementary I portion of training do not need to do a second practicum during the Elementary II portion. 20

Montessori Philosophy & Human Development The study of the Montessori philosophy is essential in the preparation of a Montessori elementary teacher. The course is divided into sections.


Elementary Program Mathematics The focus of this course is the presentation of Montessori math materials to teach symbol and quantity, linear counting, the decimal system, the four basic mathematical operations, memorization of facts, laws of arithmetic, problem solving, measurement, and fractions. This course will include lectures, lesson demonstrations, group discussions, and practicum experiences.

General Philosophy Section I This section addresses the basic principles of Montessori philosophy as found in the primary works of Maria Montessori and works of various contemporary authors who describe the implementation of the Montessori method in the American culture today. Topics covered are the study of Dr. Montessori’s life, development of the method, spiritual preparation and personal development of the teacher, preparation of the environment, moral development, and discipline.

Geometry This course covers the advanced ideas and nomenclature of geometry using the Montessori materials. It includes a review of geometric forms and nomenclature, as well as a thorough study of geometric equivalence, area, volume and other topics accompanied by theory and rationale.

Elementary Philosophy Section II This section addresses topics concerning the elementary child as found in Dr. Montessori’s primary works and works of various contemporary authors. Other topics include the four planes of development, characteristics of the child from 6-12, implications for the design of the elementary curriculum, the Great Lessons, changes at the second plane, and the elementary classroom environment.

Language This course covers five areas of language arts: Grammar (advanced parts of speech and sentence analysis), writing (descriptive, narrative and expository), reading (comprehension skills, trade books, book reports, and integrated reading in the Montessori classroom), word study (prefixes, suffixes, root words, word etymology, spelling, and vocabulary), and punctuation (review of rules within the context of writing).

Philosophy Section III This course introduces adult learners to the developmental characteristics of the 6-12 year old child. Adult learners will examine the middle childhood years with regard to social and moral development. Adult learners will be required to comment upon Montessori theory regarding behaviors indicative of developmental competencies displayed in this age group. They will practice building peacemaking skills.

Geography This course covers physical geography including the child’s place in the world, vertical-horizontal knowledge of the earth, and geological and climatological phenomena of the earth. The course also examines economic, political, ethnological, and astronomical geography.

Classroom Leadership This course is a study of classroom management systems that will help adult learners create a classroom climate that enhances learning. Discussions will include elements of the Montessori philosophy that facilitate children’s academic and spiritual growth. Adult learners will learn communication skills that encourage positive interactions between themselves and parents, co-workers, and administrators. They will learn the importance of having a broad repertoire of teaching strategies that accommodate varied learning styles. Curriculum Implementation In this independent course, adult learners will design original materials using computer technology, and demonstrating an understanding of curriculum development.

History This course introduces the adult learner to the function of history in the elementary curriculum. It focuses on the concept of time; formation of the universe and earth, fundamental needs of people, the time-line of life, and the time-line of people.

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Biological Sciences The Elementary I Biological Sciences course has two parts: Botany and Zoology. Each covers concepts of living/nonliving, plant/animal, the five kingdoms, classification, characteristics and needs, including ecological responsibility. Literature, music, art, and story connections are an integral part of these fields of study.


Elementary Program Science This course is designed to give adult learners knowledge and understanding of the science curriculum. It is divided into two sections: Physical science and chemistry. Adult learners will learn appropriate activities and experiments for this age group.

Elementary II The courses for Elementary II (9-12) are a continuation of the Elementary I curriculum. Adult learners must have completed the Elementary I (6-9) training before beginning the Elementary II courses.

Movement and Physical Education

Mathematics This course includes history of mathematics, multiples, factors, divisibility, fractions, decimals, binomial, cross multiplication, squaring, square root, cubing, cube root, algebra, bases, ratio and proportion, probability/statistics, exponential notation, data and graphs, metric and customary measurement, and percentages.

This course covers coordination (muscular, eye-hand, hand-hand,

hand-leg), laterality, time-space relationships, position in space, balance, body image, integrative activities, and group games. This is a participatory class. Art This course is designed to give adult learners the tools and experiences they need to incorporate art into their elementary classrooms regardless of prior art experience. Adult learners learn how to integrate art and art history into the elementary curriculum and the time-line of life. They learn how to teach art in a simple, sequential, and comprehensive manner through lessons and activities.

Geometry This course includes the basic concepts of Geometry with a review of nomenclature and an introduction to equivalence, congruence and similarity, area and volume, and metric and standard measurement.

Music The focus of this course is on the development of elementary classroom musical activities for the elementary classroom teacher. These activities are designed for teachers regardless of musical background. Activities include singing, rhythm activities, and circle ideas.

Language Arts There are two parts to the 9-12 language arts course. Part I is designed to provide adult learners with a hands-on approach using Montessori grammar materials, as well as an overview of reading instruction using a reading workshop model.

Practical Life The emphasis of this independent study course is on the importance and philosophy of practical life for children ages 6-12 years. Adult learners learn how to implement practical life within the elementary environment, including ecological responsibility.

Part II covers all the areas of writing in the 9-12 curriculum, including writing as a process, journal writing, poetry, journalism, research report writing, and creative writing. Chemistry The focus of this course is the development of the child’s analytical mind. Concepts include the scientific method, matter, measurement, mixtures, the periodic table, and energy. Physical Geology The focus of this course is the formation of the universe and the processes involved in the shaping of the earth. 22


Elementary Program Physics The course is designed to provide adult learners with a basic understanding of the physics in the elementary classroom. Topics include buoyancy, gravity, inertia, simple machines, magnetism, electricity, and the electromagnetic spectrum.

the first summer academic phase or after the second summer of the academic phase. The practicum lasts a full academic year. Locating a practicum site is the responsibility of the adult learner. All practicum sites must be approved by PCTE prior to the beginning of the practicum phase. There are two models of practicum:

Biology This course will include lectures, discussions, and This course will include lectures, discussions, and experiences for Biology instruction of 9-12 year old children using the Montessori method. It is designed to provide adult learners with a basic understanding of the biological principles, as well as hands on activities, resources, and extensions for implementation within a classroom setting.

The Master Teacher Model The supervised practicum requires that the adult learner teacher participate five days a week, through two full semesters, for a minimum of six hours per day, in the classroom of a qualified teacher at an approved school site. A minimum of three on-site consultation-evaluation visits by the program representative is required. Self-Directed Model In some circumstances there is not an opportunity for an adult learner to work under a master teacher. In that case adult learners may do a self-directed practicum provided they meet one of the following requirements:

History/Geography This course will include lectures, discussions, and experiences for History and Geography instruction of 9-12 year old children using the Montessori method. It will cover presentations specific to the 9-12 classroom, including ways to integrate presentations and concepts with History and Geography, and examine possible extensions.

• A Montessori credential for another level • Prior experience as an assistant in a Montessori environment • Two or more years of experience working with children in a group setting • Written approval of the teacher education program director

Child Development This course is designed to teach awareness of the specific developmental issues of the 9-12 year old child. These include gender issues, puberty, peer relationships and play.

All the requirements for the supervised practicum apply to the self-directed practicum with the exception that the adult learner has full responsibility for the Montessori class without the daily guidance of a qualified supervising teacher in the classroom.

___________________________________

The Practicum

Requirements for Practicum Adult learners must complete a minimum of one summer of course work before beginning the practicum phase. The practicum must take place at an approved Montessori elementary program. Only one practicum is required if the adult learner is taking both the Elementary I and Elementary II training at PCTE. The function of the practicum is to provide the adult learner with a supervised teaching/learning experience and a period of observation, internalization, and further study. It is a time to bring together the theory with the practice of Montessori education. The practicum may begin the September following

Because the adult learner has full responsibility for directing the class and does not have a master teacher, the practicum extends over a period of two years instead of one year as in the Master Teacher model. There is an additional fee for self-directed practicum. See the fee schedule.

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A minimum of six on-site consultation evaluation visits by a field consultant is required. In addition, adult learners doing a self-directed practicum are assigned a mentor. Adult learners are required to follow a schedule for communication with the mentor and observations at the mentor’s school.


Elementary Program master teacher or other qualified staff person.

Standards for the Practicum Site

Environment The practicum site must be equipped with the full complement of Montessori materials. An AMS Elementary I-II environment is described as a setting for children between the ages of 6 and 12 years. It is usually divided into two environments serving the needs of 6 to 9 year olds (Elementary I) and 9 to 12 year olds (Elementary II). The environment must possess these characteristics:

AMS Membership The site must be an AMS Affiliate unless a request showing sufficient cause for an exception is made to and granted by AMS. Such an exemption may be granted for the same site for no more than a two-year period. AMS Membership Practicum sites should be members of the American Montessori Society (AMS). If a school is not a member, PCTE strongly suggests that it becomes affiliated with AMS.

• Curriculum materials organized into logical groupings (e.g. by curriculum area or function).

Nondiscrimination Policy The school site must have a written nondiscriminatory policy for children and staff.

• Furnishings of appropriate size for the children.

• Logical arrangement of the materials (e.g., by level of difficulty, sequence of skill or concept development). • Arrangement of furnishings offering a variety of activity spaces (e.g., individual or group, floor or table, noisy or quiet, active or sedentary).

Licensing The site must meet all local and state regulations.

• Activity spaces and procedures organized to avoid conflict of interest (e.g., noise-generating activity far away from quiet activity).

School Policies The school must communicate its policies to the adult learner and the teacher education program in writing.

• A provision for the display of visual stimuli and children’s work. • Activities and exercises structured to provide purpose, procedure, closure, and opportunity for child success.

Job Description and Contract of Agreement The site must issue a job description and a contract of agreement to the intern. This job description or agreement should include the nature and type of remuneration given the adult learner, if any.

• An environment that encourages: o Freedom of choice o Individualization o Concentration o Independence o Problem-solving strategies o Peer interactions o Experiential learning opportunities

Cooperation with the Teacher Education Course The school must agree to cooperate with the course in all matters relating to the practicum. Janitorial Service The school should provide janitorial service. Age range of Class The class should contain the full age span of 6-9 or 9-12, except in the case of a beginning class, which may contain an age span of less than three years. Supervision (For Master Teacher Model) The adult learner may not be asked to assume total responsibility for a class without the presence of a

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• Integration of curriculum in a multidisciplinary approach, including materials and activities that are developmentally appropriate for the development of understanding and skills in the following areas: o Mathematics o Geometry o Sciences o Language and literature o Geography


Elementary Program Assessment The master teacher must complete and submit all evaluation forms requested by the teacher education program at the designated times.

o History o Practical Life o Movement and Physical Education o Music o Visual Art

Communication The master teacher is to inform the teacher education program of any difficulties in the professional performance of the adult learner.

The particular materials/activities selected seem appropriate to the developmental period, abilities, and special needs of the children who use the environment.

The Master Teacher Model The master teacher must be in the adult learner’s classroom the full time. If a supervising teacher has adult learner teachers from more than one program, the total number must not exceed three adult learner teachers for a single-session program, and two adult learner teachers per session for a double-session program.

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Standards for the Master Teacher

Credentials All master teachers must hold a Montessori credential from an AMS accredited program or the equivalent.

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Teaching Experience The master teacher must have at least one year’s teaching experience after receipt of the credential.

Criteria for Successful Completion of Program

Adult Learner Experiences The master teacher is responsible for providing for the intern experiences relating to the following areas:

Adult learners must meet the following competencies in order to be recommended for an AMS Early Childhood credential: • Defines and implements an understanding of Montessori philosophy, cosmic curriculum, and peace education for the elementary years.

• Preparation: Indoor and outdoor environments. • Observation and Recording: Observing, planning, assessing, and maintaining records.

• Defines the principles of human growth, development, and educational theories with an emphasis on the elementary years from six through twelve years of age.

• Interaction: Relations among parents, staff, and children. • Instruction: Designing activities, individual and group presentations.

• Demonstrates evidence of personal growth through self-evaluation and introspection. Demonstrates knowledge of developmental and behavioral norms and potential recommendations for special support services.

• Management: Individual and group strategies. • Parent/community involvement: Family support and community service, parent education, interviews, conferences and meetings, and open houses.

• Demonstrates the ability to observe, plan and record the needs and progress of elementary age children.

• Staff involvement: Participating in meetings and establishing team compatibility and problemsolving techniques. Meetings The master teacher must schedule regular review sessions with the adult learner at least twice a month to assess progress in the above areas.

• Demonstrates sensitivity to the psychological and cultural needs of individual children.

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• Demonstrates the ability to personalize educational plans for a variety of learning styles.


Elementary Program

• Identifies and initiates effective classroom leadership strategies that build community. • Shows awareness of proper channels of communication, administrative functions, and professional conduct. • Implements an integrated Montessori cosmic curriculum. • Demonstrates proficiency in applying Montessori principles in the context of the curriculum, didactic materials, and lessons presentations. • Designs and maintains a developmentally appropriate Montessori environment in response to the needs of adult learners. • Utilizes a variety of instructional strategies and assessment methods. • Demonstrates an awareness and understanding of governmental regulations. • Utilizes cultural sensitivity in fostering professional school-family partnerships. • Articulates an awareness of community resources for additional support of children and families. • Identifies and has knowledge of available professional associations.

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Administration and Faculty


Administration and Faculty ___________________________________

Faculty and Staff

Administration

Judy Bauerlein, M.Ed. Judy is an AMS certified early childhood and elementary Montessori teacher working in the elementary programs in San Mateo, California. She is an AMS consultant and workshop presenter. Her experience as a teacher trainer on the elementary level covers over 20 years. Judy is an instructor in the PCTE Elementary programs.

The Princeton Center for Teacher Education is governed by the Princeton Montessori Society Board of Trustees. The Board of Trustees has appointed the following people who are responsible for the administration and educational quality of PCTE programs. Director Ann Wilson, B.A. Earned a BA in Geography and Sociology from the University of North Alabama, AL. She holds an American Montessori Society credential at the Elementary I level through the Houston Montessori Training Center, TX, and Elementary II level through the Institute for Advanced Montessori Studies, MD. Ann also holds a Level I credential in Montessori Applied to Children At Risk for Learning Differences (MACAR) through the Shelton School in Dallas, TX. She brings many years of experience from both private and public schools as a teacher, Head of School, Principal of a Charter School and Montessori instructor. She has served on accreditation teams for Middle States Association and AMS as well as task forces associated with the Massachusetts Department of Education. Ann is actively involved in the partnership between the Princeton Montessori Society and the Ukrainian Department of Education. She oversees Parent Education and Staff Development. She is currently the president of New Jersey Montessori Association Corporation, a Montessori administrator’s organization, and an elementary representative of AMS Teacher Education Action Commission.

Jerry Bradfield, M.A. Jerry is an AMI certified Elementary teacher who taught in the Memphis, TN Schools, and acted as a Montessori coordinator. Jerry also gave numerous workshops on Montessori and parent education in Memphis. Jerry is an instructor in the PCTE Elementary I program. Kathy Bradfield, B.A. Is an AMI certified Early Childhood and Elementary teacher who taught in a Montessori Elementary program in Memphis, TN. Kathy has many experiences teaching children from ages 3 through 12, which enhances the perspective she brings to teacher training. Kathy is an instructor in the PCTE Elementary I program. Rita Brenner, B.A. Rita is an AMS certified infant and toddler teacher. She teaches toddlers at Princeton Montessori School. Rita brings many years experience to her work with infants and toddlers. She works in Ukraine helping to initiate infant and toddler programs. Rita is a PCTE instructor in the Infant and Toddler program. Lynn Crow, B.A. Lynn is AMS certified in early childhood. She teaches at the Princeton Montessori School. Lynn has experience in both public and private school settings. She has been involved in Middle States Accreditation for the school, and is an instructor in the PCTE Early Childhood program.

Chief Operating Officer Marsha Stencel, M.A. Marsha Stencel is the Head of the Princeton Montessori School and a member of its Board of Trustees. She is certified by the American Montessori Society (AMS). She has many years of experience as a teacher and administrator in both public and independent settings. In addition, Marsha received her M.A. in special education. Her knowledge of Montessori philosophy, together with her ability to foster staff growth, make the Princeton Montessori School an exemplary model of American Montessori education.

Ginny Cusack, M.A. Ginny holds an MA from the New Brunswick Theological Seminary, NJ and a BS in Education from Alverno College, WI. Ginny is a New Jersey state certified teacher and received an Association Montessori Internationale (AMI) credential. She has had experience as a teacher, an administrator, a founder of a Montessori School, a lecturer and a parent education specialist in both public and independent schools.

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Administration and Faculty Pat Hansen Pat is an AMS certified early childhood instructor. Pat has had many years of teaching experience. She has been instrumental at Princeton Montessori School in the development of a full-day program. Pat is an instructor in the PCTE Early Childhood programs.

She has achieved national recognition for her work in the development of the Princeton Center Teacher Education (PCTE) programs, which is accredited by Montessori Accreditation Commission Teacher Education (MACTE) and affiliated with the American Montessori Society (AMS). Upon completion of courses and requirements Ginny was awarded a Leadership Coaching certificate from Georgetown University in 2010. Ginny is a leadership consultant for PCTE.

Huma Kazmi Huma received a BS degree in Chemistry with honors from the University of London, England. Prior to education, she worked in Business Development and Marketing. She earned an American Montessori Society credential in Elementary I-II and is an instructor with Princeton Center Teacher Education (PCTE), NJ.

Christine Frost, M.A. Christine is an AMS certified Montessori teacher for the infant and toddler level and the early childhood (3-6) level. Christine, presently teaching at the Albrook School in Basking Ridge, NJ, brings a varied background to her adult learners because of her many years of experience in both the primary and the toddler classroom. Christine is an instructor in the PCTE Early Childhood and Infant and Toddler programs.

Judy Laidlaw, B.A. Judy is a certified AMS early childhood teacher. She presently teaches at the Albrook School in the Early Childhood program. Judy has many years experience teaching in both public and private school settings in reading and the humanities. Judy is an instructor language in the Early Childhood PCTE program.

Lorraine Gahles-Kildow, Ph.D. Lorraine specializes in clinical behavior analysis, cognitive behavior therapy, and psycho-educational training for individuals, groups, agencies, and schools. Dr. Gahles-Kildow has many years experience working as a college adjunct professor teaching general psychology, developmental psychology, and psychology in business and industry. Dr. Gahles-Kildow is an instructor in the PCTE Infant and Toddler and Elementary programs.

Lisa Lalama Lisa is an AMS certified 6-12 elementary teacher.. She is an Elementary II lead teacher and program coordinator at Wilmington Montessori School in Wilmington, DE and is also a certified graduate of the Schools Attuned Program. Lisa holds a Bachelors of Applied Arts and Sciences in Sociology. She is an instructor in the PCTE Elementary I and I-II programs.

Gabriela Gimenez Gabriela is an AMS/NCME certified Montessori teacher for the 3 to 12 year adult learners with 22 years teaching in a Montessori environment. She was also a part of the SC Teacher Leading Teacher Program that was hosted by the Department of Education in Columbia, to improve physical Science and Math. Gabrielle is the author of 7 physical science booklets. She took the Orton Gillingham training to better help challenged adult learners and she tutors adult learners in Math, English, Spanish, and German. She is an Elementary II instructor for PCTE. Beth Grosshans, Ph.D. Beth was a clinical intern at Children’s Hospital in Boston and had an academic appointment as a fellow in clinical psychology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Grosshans has a private practice in Princeton, NJ, where she works with families, adolescents, and children. Her book Beyond Time-Out has gained national recognition. She is an instructor for PCTE Infant/Toddler and Early Childhood programs.

Rosann Larrow, M.A. Rosann is an AMS certified early childhood and elementary I and II Montessori teacher. Rosann is a Montessori intern coordinator and presents workshops and training presentations in Korea and many parts of the United States. Rosann is an instructor in the PCTE Elementary programs.

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Katie McDonnell-Manson Katie has an AMS credential in InfantToddler (PCTE) Early Childhood and Elementary I. Her 23 years of experience have taken her to many parts of the world, teaching both adults and children. She is a Toddler teacher at Santa Cruz Montessori School and a Montessori instructor for the San Francisco Bay Area Teacher Education Center, concentrating in Practical Life, Sensorial, and English as a second language. Katie translated into English Dr. Montessori’s book “Psychic Geometry”. She is the PCTE instructor for Early Childhood Geography and Infant/Toddler Music and Movement.


Administration and Faculty Gwen Shangle, M.A. Gwen is an AMS certified elementary I and I- II teacher. Gwen has many years experience working in the 6-9 and 9-12 programs at Princeton Montessori School. She presently teaches a 9-12 class. Gwen is an instructor in the PCTE Elementary I and I-II programs.

Vandana Monteiro Vandana holds an MBA with specialization in Human Resources and a BS in Environmental Science from St. Joseph’s College of Business Administration, India. She holds an American Montessori Society credential in Infant/Toddler through the Princeton Center Teacher Education (PCTE). Vandana’s philanthropic generosity and educational expertise has led her to begin the process of opening a school in India for Street Children. She is an instructor for the Infant/ Toddler program.

Sherry Schweighardt, M.A. Sherry is a physical education specialist and a doctoral adult learner in Kinesiology and Applied Behavior Analysis at Temple University. She is a Graduate Teaching Fellow of the University and a U.S. Forest Service Sustainability Science Fellow. Sherry holds teaching certificates in elementary and higher education, along with coaching certifications in multiple sports. She is an experienced teacher and teacher educator and a frequent presenter at national and regional conferences; she also consults with schools and community organizations. Sherry is an instructor in the Early Childhood and Elementary I programs.

Jennifer Morgan Jennifer is the award-winning author of Universe Story Trilogy, Born With a Bang, From Lava to Life, and Mammals Who Morph. She gives school programs for adult learners, teachers and parents on the Montessori Cosmic Education Curriculum including dramatic telling of the universe story. She has an MBA from Rutgers University and graduated cum laude from University of San Francisco with a BA in Theology. Ms. Morgan serves on several environmental and agricultural boards in Princeton. She is an instructor for the Elementary I and I-II programs.

Kathleen Sellers, M.A. Kathy holds a NJ certificate in Elementary Education as well as an American Montessori Society Elementary I and Elementary II credential. She presently teaches a 9-12 class. Kathy teaches in the PCTE Elementary I-II programs.

Erika Ohlhaver Erika received her M.A. Ed in Elementary Education from Central State University after completing her B.A in Early Childhood Education from Oklahoma City University. She holds AMS Montessori Credentials in the Early Childhood, Elementary I and Elementary II levels. She began her teaching career in 1979 and in 1992 became a Teacher Educator. Most recently she established and became president of Educational Training and Consulting (ETC.) She is an instructor for the Elementary I and I-II programs.

Susan Steidel, B.S. Susan is an AMS certified early childhood and elementary I and II Montessori teacher. She has many years teaching experience in public and independent Montessori schools including Princeton Montessori School. Susan is an instructor in the PCTE Elementary I program.

Maureene Peruzzi, M.S. Maureene has an AMS certification in both infant and toddler and early childhood. She is presently a teacher and administrator at the Montessori Enrichment Center in Howell, NJ. Her many years of teaching and administrative experience provide a richness to her presentations as an instructor in the PCTE Infant and Toddler programs.

Joyce Tatsch, B.A. Joyce is an early childhood AMS certified teacher. During her years as a teacher at the Princeton Montessori School she developed and refined a wellintegrated language program for the early childhood environment. She also serves as the PCTE field consultant coordinator and liaison between alumni and PCTE. Joyce is an instructor in the PCTE Early Childhood program.

Ayla Sen, B.S. Ayla is a certified AMS early childhood teacher. She presently teaches a 3-6 class at Princeton Montessori School. Ayla has experience teaching in Turkey and the United States. Ayla is an instructor of math in the Early Childhood program and the prerequisite course in the PCTE elementary program.

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Procedures and Policies


Procedures and Policies ___________________________________

• Adult learner provides a letter from previous training center stating he or she is in good standing and has fulfilled all financial obligations.

Admissions Requirements

Evaluation includes assessment of transcripts, previous work, written or oral exams, and demonstration of competencies. PCTE follows the American Montessori Society standards concerning the amount of credit given for previous training.

Infant and Toddler The minimum educational achievement level accepted for entrance into the Infant and Toddler program is a high school diploma, verified by an official transcript.

English Language Adult learners must be able to speak, read and write English. Proficiency in speaking is determined during the application interview. Proficiency in reading and writing is determined through a writing sample as part of the interview process.

Early Childhood The minimum educational achievement level accepted for entrance into the Early Childhood program is a high school diploma, verified by an official transcript. Elementary Candidates for the Elementary I and II Program must hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution, verified by an official transcript. An early childhood prerequisite course or independent study designed by PCTE is required if the candidate does not already hold an early childhood credential.

Adult learners who do not meet the above Admissions Requirements will not be accepted into the program.

Procedures Application and Fee The applicant completes the application. A nonrefundable fee is sent with the application. Refer to the current fee schedule. Registration deadline is May 15. Adult learners registering after May 15 pay a late registration fee. A discount is granted to applicants who apply before April 1.

Acceptance of College Credits College credits are recognized if earned at institutions listed in the U.S. Department of Education Directory of Higher Education and verified by official transcript.

Transcripts The applicant notifies his/her college or university to send two sets of official transcripts to the Princeton Center for Teacher Education.

College Equivalence Credit for work experience or educational coursework at an institution located outside the United States may be accepted only if the applicant has had certification of the credits by an approved institution of higher education in the United States.

Letters of Recommendation The applicant submits three letters of recommendation from people who know the applicant personally or through employment.

Transfer Adult Learners Adult learners transferring from another Montessori Accreditation Council for Teacher Education (MACTE) accredited course may transfer to PCTE based on the following conditions: • Adult Learner is with the three-year time-frame following the academic phase. • Is a current AMS member • A review of the courses taken and evaluation of the adult learner’s work deems the adult learner is qualified to enter the program .

Interview A personal interview in person, or on the phone or by Skype in special cases, is scheduled with a PCTE representative. The interview includes a timed writing assignment to confirm English proficiency.

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Acceptance The applicant’s qualifications and suitability are determined on the basis of the written applica-


Procedures and Policies • PCTE adheres to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act as outlined in the section on Adult learner Records in this Handbook. Adult learner records are confidential between the adult learner and PCTE. Under this Privacy Act PCTE may not provide any information to schools concerning an adult learner’s status, assignments or attendance without written permission from the adult learner even, if the school is paying the tuition and fees.

tion, previous academic record, and interview. When all required information has been received, a final review is made. The applicant is notified via e-mail regarding his/her acceptance into the training program. Program capacity Each program will enroll up to a maximum of 25 adult learners during one training cycle. Applications for a particular course cycle may be accepted up to the first day of the classes. However, adult learners are advised to enroll well before this date, and should allow no less than 30 days for completion of the application process and the preparation requirements.

Additional Costs

Associations Fee This fee entitles the adult learner to membership in the American Montessori Society (AMS) for two years and pays the Montessori Accreditation Council of Teacher Education (MACTE) and AMS fees.

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Financial Information

Books PCTE requires the adult learner to read and refer to a number of Maria Montessori’s books and other child development books. It is the responsibility of the adult learners to obtain their own books.

Tuition and Fees

Each year tuition and fees are set by the Princeton Montessori Society Board of Trustees and are published in the PCTE Fee Schedule that accompanies the brochure sent to all prospective applicants. Additional copies may be obtained by calling the office.

Materials In addition to the materials fee included in the tuition and fee schedule, adult learners may incur other costs during the training. Most adult learners find it essential to have a camera for taking photos during the academic phase.

• Payment Schedule and Responsibility • The payment schedule is listed on the PCTE Fee Schedule and Course Dates that accompany the brochure. Final payment is due by June 25. Failure to pay will result in halting Filed Consultant visits during the internship year and/or submission of transcript for AMS credential until fees are paid.

Field Consultant Visitation Adult learners pay for travel, food, and lodging expenses of the field consultant when the practicum site is more than 100 miles from PCTE. Late Fee A late fee will be charged per month until scheduled payments are made. See current fee schedule.

• When a school sponsors an adult learner for training by paying tuition and fees, the adult learner is responsible to provide all information for billing to the PCTE registrar during the application process. This includes:

Late Enrollment Fee Adult learners registering after May 15 pay a late fee. See current fee schedule.

Name, address, phone number, and e-mail addresses of both the school and the contact person. The school is required to follow the same payment schedule as outlined for adult learners and will be billed accordingly.

Returned Checks Any check that is returned will automatically be sent back to the bank for reprocessing. There is a charge of $35.00 for each check that is reprocessed.

The school makes payments directly to PCTE. The adult learner also receives a copy of all billing statements and records. 33


Procedures and Policies Refunds Course fees are refundable on a pro-rated basis According to the following schedule: Eight class hours or less, 90% 15 class hours, 75% 45 class hours, 50% 90 class hours, 25% After ninety hours, none Application and Material Fees are non-refundable. The Association Fee is refundable if withdrawal is before July 15. The adult learner is required to withdraw officially by letter or email addressed to the PCTE Director. Continuum Fee If an adult learner does not complete the program in the time allotted, there is an additional fee charged each year that the adult learner extends the time.

Financial Resources Financial Aid Financial aid for training programs is available through the following: Sponsorship Programs Some schools sponsor Montessori teacher candidates in exchange for a commitment to teach during the practicum year and a specified time as a head teacher. It is the responsibility of the adult learner to initiate a sponsorship program. Discounts • Register by April 1 - Save 5% • Register 2 from same school - Save 10% • Register 2 from same school - Save 15% • Register 3 from same school - Save 25% • Military Discount 5%

• SummerQuest programs at the Princeton Montessori School. Open to PCTE participant’s children, toddler through grade 4 (minimum of 4 weeks). 50% discount for SummerQuest programs.

• Dorothy Ohlhaver Scholarship The Dorothy Ohlhaver Scholarship program is aimed at serving the individuals who are pursuing their Early Childhood Montessori credential. Through this program ETC provides funds towards the tuition expenses associated with their training. Go to the webpage: http://www.edutc.com/ grantsDOS.htm Housing A listing of nearby hotels according to cost is posted on PCTE’s website. There may be rooms to rent in nearby houses. Westminster Choir College dorm space may also be available. More information is available through the PCTE office. Summer Programs for Children Princeton Montessori School offers summer programs for children age infant through ten years. PCTE adult learners who enroll their child(ren) in the summer program receive a 50% discount on the tuition. Contact the Princeton Montessori School Admissions Office through the website at www.princetonmontessori.org or call 609-9244594 ext. 227. ___________________________________

Attendance

Class Attendance Adult learners must attend a minimum of 90 percent of all class hours given within a particular section and/or the entire teacher education course. Attendance is taken at every session during the academic phase. Adult learners are expected to attend all sessions. If an adult learner is absent, class work must be made up, and a review with the course instructor and the Teacher Education Director is required. This may result in the adult learner being required to repeat a particular section. Adult learners are responsible to obtain all information, presentations, and demonstrations of the classes they were unable to attend.

• American Montessori Society Scholarships The American Montessori Society provides a Leave of Absence limited number of scholarships. Information is Written requests for leaves of absence will be available on the American Montessori Society considered and such leaves may be granted to adult website, www.amshq.org or by writing or calling, learners at the discretion of the program director. American Montessori Society (AMS) 116 East 16th Street, New York, NY 10010 212-358-1250 34


Procedures and Policies ___________________________________

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Grading

Time Extensions and Adjustments

All assignments, course work, and exams are evaluated as “accepted” or “not accepted” according to the following rubric. 3 Accepted 2 Accepted 1 Not Accepted Each course syllabus outlines the specific requirements for the rubric.

Ordinarily, adult learners complete the training program in the time allotted for the option schedule they choose. However, in certain cases, adult learners may need more time to complete their training. In such cases the program allows up to three years for a adult learner, whose academic phase and/or practicum phase is incomplete, to complete the requirement for certification. There is an additional fee for each year adult learners extend their time. The time extension period begins 6 months after expected completion.

Adult learners must receive at least a “2” on all assignments and exams. If adult learners receive a “1” on any assignment or exam, they must retake the exam, or resubmit the assignment a maximum of two times. Adult learners may be required to repeat the class. If an adult learner’s re-submissions are not satisfactory, PCTE will not recommend the adult learner for an AMS credential.

An adult learner who has not satisfactorily completed the academic phase and wishes to continue must:

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Adult Learner Records

• Submit a written statement of intent to complete the requirements in the next training cycle.

The school adheres to educational rights and privacy and is consistent with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. Adult learners’ educational records are in the custody of the school registrar. Access to any educational record may be requested through the registrar. Upon written request, an adult learner’s educational record will be made available and reviewed with him/her.

• Write a statement of intent, which states that the adult learner pays extra costs for staff services, travel, and lodging related to on-site assessment by a program representative. An adult learner who has not satisfactorily completed the practicum phase and wishes to continue must do so according to the following guidelines:

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• The director will make a plan that is tailored to the adult learner’s needs for improvement as indicated by the final evaluation of field consultant, supervising teacher, instructors, and director.

Child Development Waiver

Adult learners enrolled in a PCTE certification course that have completed a three credit Child Development class at a college or university and received a B or above may request a waiver of the Child Development course. Adult learners seeking an exemption are required to provide a course description, an outline of the course and a sealed transcript to PCTE. A PCTE representative will review the request and notify the adult learner regarding the decision. The PCTE course fee is not reduced when a Child Development course is waived.

Details of this plan require the following: • Classroom participation in an approved Montessori or equivalent environment, either under a supervising teacher or as a self-directed intern.

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• Self-documentation of experience through maintenance of a personal journal with entries made at least weekly, and other requirements as appropriate to the personal plan formulated by the director.


Procedures and Policies Principle I Commitment to the Adult Learner In fulfillment of the obligation to the children, the educator shall:

• After one semester in the approved classroom, the adult learner requests an assessment visit by the director or the director’s representative. The visit includes an observation of classroom performance and completion of the program’s standard evaluation forms, as well as examination of the required documentation. At the time of this visit, the adult learner’s immediate supervisor at the school site must provide a completed evaluation form for the adult learner. If other requirements, such as performance or written examination, have been specified in the personal plan as part of the final assessment procedure, they are accomplished as specified. Upon satisfactory completion of requirements and payment of fees, the program forwards the recommendation to the AMS office.

• Encourage independent action in the pursuit of learning. • Protect the opportunity to provide for participation in educational programs without regard to race, sex, color, creed or national origin. • Protect the health and safety of adult learners. • Honor professional commitments, maintain obligations and contracts while never soliciting nor involving adult learners or their parents in schemes for commercial gain. • Keep in confidence information that has been secured in the course of professional service, unless disclosure serves professional purposes or is required by law.

In the event that course requirements are not completed satisfactorily during the second cycle, the adult learner’s file is closed and PCTE has no further respite to the adult learner.

Principle II Commitment to the Public The Montessori educator shares in the responsibility for the development of policy relating to the extension of educational opportunity for all and for interpreting educational programs and policies to the public. In fulfilling these goals, the educator:

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Conduct

Adult learners are to conduct themselves in a professional, reasonable, and considerate manner at all times throughout the training. They should appear for class with an attitude of openness and receptivity to learning. Adult learners are expected to follow the policies of Princeton Montessori School and those of their practicum school regarding the use of facilities and grounds. Violation is just cause for dismissal.

• Shall support his or her professional society and not misrepresent its policies in public discussion. • Whenever speaking or writing about policies, the educator should take the precaution to distinguish private views from the official position of the Society. • Shall not interfere with nor exploit the rights and responsibilities of colleagues within the teaching profession.

American Montessori Society Code of Ethics “As American Montessori Society members, we pledge to conduct ourselves professionally and personally in ways that will reflect our respect for each other and for the children we serve. We will do whatever is within our talents and capacity to protect the rights of each child to have the freedom and opportunity to develop his or her full potential.”

Commitment to the Profession The Montessori educator makes efforts to raise professional standards and conditions to attract persons worthy of trust to careers in Montessori education. In fulfilling these goals the educator shall: • Extend just and equitable treatment to all members of the Montessori education profession. 36


Procedures and Policies Cancellation

• Represent his/her own professional qualification with clarity and true intent.

If an adult learner cancels enrollment before attending the first day of class, all moneys are refunded except the nonrefundable application fee.

• Apply for, accept, offer, recommend, and assign professional positions and responsibilities on the basis of professional preparation and legal qualifications.

In the event PCTE must cancel a course all applicants will be notified by email with a request for confirmation of receipt. The email will include information about alternate courses if available as well as future scheduling of cancelled course.

• Use honest and effective methods of administering duties, use of time, and conduct of business.” ___________________________________

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Dismissal, Withdrawal, and Cancellation

Code of Rights and Responsibilities*

Dismissal Dismissal of an adult learner is the decision of the director in collaboration with the faculty. Adult learners may be dismissed for the following reasons:

Program Rights and Adult learner Responsibilities The Princeton Center for Teacher Education maintains its rights as an institution of post secondary education and expects the adult learner:

• Unprofessional behavior • Instability with regard to the performance as a teacher of young children • Inability to perform academic course work successfully • Poor attendance • Nonpayment of tuition and fees • Plagiarism

In the area of academic programming: • To enroll only out of the need and desire to learn rather than a wish to manipulate the course for other means, getting a certificate without growth, or qualifying for financial aid as a adult learner rather than have a job.

Before dismissal is enforced, adult learners may be placed on probation for one or more of the above reasons. If, after one month, the adult learner’s performance is still unsatisfactory, the dismissal procedure is enforced. Tuition refunds for dismissal follow the same refund schedule as described in the financial agreement with the Society and are settled within 60 days of dismissal or withdrawal.

• To be informed by reading the information disseminated by the course. • To take an active part in planning and executing your course of study within the context of stated requirements and existing institutional resources. • To continually monitor academic progress. • To attend class and participate in other learning activities, come prepared, and complete assignments on time.

Withdrawal When adult learners withdraw from the program they must do so officially by submitting a letter of intent to PCTE. Refunds are computed upon receipt of the letter, not from the time when the adult learner ceases to attend classes. Tuition fees are refundable on a prorated basis as stated under “Refunds” in this Handbook. The application fee, AMS fee, and MACTE fee are nonrefundable.

• To embrace the principle of academic honesty. • To respect the freedom of our staff to inquire, publish, and teach. • To respect the facilities and property of the course, including buildings.

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Procedures and Policies In the area of finances:

• Insure fair and reasonable academic evaluation, with grades and evaluations that are meaningful, timely, and based on quality of adult learner performance. Maintain transcripts or records of grades properly and guarantee confidentiality and adult learner access to records.

• To be informed about the full cost, refund policies, and financial stability of the program, by reading published statements on fees and policies, and by consulting the administrators if questions arise. • To read and fully comprehend contracts before signing them, and to keep a copy of all contracts and receipts.

• Award certifications when they are merited. Inform adult learners regularly of their academic progress and award certifications after all stated requirements are satisfied.

• To report tuition costs completely and accurately.

• Provide adequate facilities and services to support academic goals.

• To satisfy financial obligations to the program in a timely fashion.

• Offer quality instruction through instructors who have appropriate training and expertise, are up-to-date in their fields, meet scheduled classes, come to class prepared, and are available to adult learners outside class.

In the area of admissions: • To be knowledgeable about other available courses/programs based on an informed decision. Published information should be read. Adult learners, former adult learners, and staff should be contacted and questioned about the level of satisfaction in their relationship to the course, ethics, and general quality and it is expected adult learners will do this with any other course/program they may be considering. • To call his or her state department of education about potential questions, when in doubt. • To represent his/herself honestly in applying to the course. • To complete the application process promptly by submitting requested materials and fulfilling pre-training requirements.

• Describe course requirements in clear, specific and accurate terms, in written form, and ensure that requirements are educationally meaningful. • Notify adult learners of unusual features of the course that cannot be readily anticipated. • Forego unconditional changes in requirements for adult learners who have already enrolled in the course. • Offer course work that is comparable to its catalog description. • Embrace the principle of academic honesty. • Publish causes for dismissal in clear and specific form. Dismiss a adult learner only for appropriate cause, and after due process.

Adult learner Rights and Program Responsibilities In order to preserve and protect the rights of adult learners, the program makes a commitment to the following responsibilities.

In the area of advertising: •Publish advertising that is accurate and reliable, up-to-date, and understandable.

In the area of academics:

In the area of finances:

• Emphasize quality.

• Inform adult learners of the full cost of education.

• Award credit where and only where it is due. • Maintain clear written policies for accepting credit from other institutions.

• Inform potential adult learners with regard to financial aid.

• Disclose accurate information about the acceptability of credit for this course to other institutions.

• Employ fair and accurate, published refund policies. 38


Procedures and Policies • Charge fair and reasonable fees for infractions such as breaking equipment or non-return of library books. • Assess reasonable tuition increases and provide notice of raises. • Keep records of fees paid by each adult learner. • Inform adult learners about financial instability in the event such a condition exists. In the area of admissions: •Make available written policies on admission. •Give prospective adult learners as complete and accurate a picture of the course as possible, encouraging them to visit the facility and talk with staff and adult learners. •Maintain clear and specific policies on job placement services.

*From, “Fair Practices in Higher Education: Rights and Responsibilities of Adult learners and Their Colleges in a Period of Intensified Competition for Enrollments”, a report of the Carnegie Council on Policy Studies in Higher Education (1979, Jossey-Bass). 39


Princeton Center Teacher Education/The College of New Jersey

Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) Joint Offering between The College of New Jersey Princeton Center Teacher Education

PCTE Graduates who hold an Early Childhood and Elementary credential earned between 1999 and present may transfer 18 Master credits into the MAT program at TCNJ. After completion of all requirements adult learner will be awarded a Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) and NJ Teacher Certification. PCTE Adult learners in the process of earning an Early Childhood and Elementary credential may begin the MAT program and earn both the credential and the MAT simultaneously.

Requirements:

• Maintain a 2.75 average • Pass The Praxis Series to receive a New Jersey Teaching Certificate • Pay a transfer fee to TCNJ for the PCTE Credential Credits

Courses:

• Collaboration, Consultation and Partnerships (3 credits) • Multicultural and Social Foundations of Emergent and Early Literacy (3 credits) • Curriculum Experiences for Young Children in the Inclusive Classroom (3 credits) • Teaching Young Children: Creating and Sustaining Classroom Communities (3 credits) • Two-part research course in conjunction with Regional Training Center (6 credits) For more information contact Ann Wilson, Director, Princeton Center Teacher Education at awilson@pmonts.org or 609-924-4594 ext. 308 Princeton Center Teacher Education 487 Cherry Valley Road, Princeton, NJ 08540


PCTE...Mean the World to a Child Š2013 by the Princeton Montessori Society All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the Princeton Montessori Society.

PCTE Catalog 4/5/13  

PCTE Course Catalog

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