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U NIV ERSIT Y CENT ER FOR HUMAN VALUES ANNUAL REVIEW 2016–17

Princeton, New Jersey 08544

uchv.princeton.edu

P RI NCE TON UNIVE RSITY

304 Marx Hall

Annual Review 2016 -17


Copyright © 2017 by The Trustees of Princeton University In the Nation’s Service and the Service of Humanity Princeton University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. The Center particularly invites applications from women and members of underrepresented minorities. For information about applying to Princeton and how to self-identify, please visit: http://web.princeton.edu/sites/dof/applicantsinfo.htm. Nondiscrimination Statement In compliance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and other federal, state, and local laws, Princeton University does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, national or ethnic origin, disability, or veteran status in any phase of its employment process, in any phase of its admission or financial aid programs, or other aspects of its educational programs or activities. The vice provost for institutional equity and diversity is the individual designated by the University to coordinate its efforts to comply with Title IX, Section 504 and other equal opportunity and affirmative action regulations and laws. Questions or concerns regarding Title IX, Section 504 or other aspects of Princeton’s equal opportunity or affirmative action programs should be directed to the Office of the Vice Provost for Institutional Equity and Diversity, Princeton University, 205 Nassau Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 or 609-258-6110.

Cover: Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Faculty Fellows John Doris and Melissa Schwartzberg in conversation prior to a James A. Moffett ’29 Lecture in Ethics.

Printed on 100% post consumer recycled paper manufactured in plants using renewable energy.


Contents 2

Letter from the Director

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Faculty Accomplishments

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Deepening Understanding Tanner Lectures on Human Values James A. Moffett ’29 Lectures in Ethics Program in Ethics and Public Affairs Ira W. DeCamp Bioethics Seminar Political Philosophy Colloquium History of Political Thought Project UCHV Seminars, Workshops & Co-sponsored Events

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Teaching and Learning Program in Values and Public Life Courses and Seminars Film Forum Student Prizes and Grants Human Values Forum

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Supporting Research Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Professor for Distinguished Teaching Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Faculty Fellows Harold T. Shapiro Postdoctoral Research Associate in Bioethics Postdoctoral Research Associate in Values and Public Life Postdoctoral Research Associates in Values and Public Policy Laurance S. Rockefeller Graduate Prize Fellows Faculty Research Grants

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People Faculty Executive Committee Laurance S. Rockefeller University Preceptors Faculty Associates Advisory Council Administration

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ANNUAL REVIEW 2016–2017

Letter from the Director This is my first occasion to introduce an annual review of the University Center’s contributions to Princeton’s intellectual life. In so doing I wish first to acknowledge that while a lucky few of us were enjoying a productive year together at the Center, many people in Princeton, in New Jersey, in the United States, and in the world more broadly were assailed or devalued, as basic aspects of human values have come under threat from many forces. In this context I hope that the Center will continue to serve as a place for connection and revitalization, to reorient ourselves to confront the world’s challenges. As you will see in the following pages, UCHV has experienced another rich year. We ran a full program of seminars, lectures, workshops, and other events, including the Tanner Lectures with Naomi Oreskes, which attracted a notably intellectually diverse range of attendees from all divisions of the University, including historians, historians of science, scientists, and many others, and Moffett Lectures by Nancy Cott and Martti Koskenniemi, each of which likewise deepened our intellectual bonds with historians and scholars of law in particular. I had the personal pleasure of directing the Graduate Prize Fellows seminar (this year, equally divided between philosophers and political theorists on the one hand, and historians, anthropologists, and a first-ever East Asian Studies student on the other, a division which however fails to capture the interdisciplinary insights that were generated). And the Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Faculty Fellows seminar continued to be a space for the probing scrutiny of work in progress, which this year included Princeton faculty engaged in social scientific research projects supported by UCHV Faculty Grants. We also experimented with a number of new formats and collaborations that are highlighted in this report. Under Anna Stilz’ dedicated leadership, the undergraduate Values and Public Life (VPL) program introduced two promising new formats. The first is an expanded Senior Thesis Workshop, with a syllabus to guide students, and work sessions scheduled throughout the year led by Minh Ly, our Values and Public Life Postdoctoral Research Associate. The second is a new approach to co-curricular activities, tying these closely to the VPL seminar courses; this year included both a series of Free Speech events linked to Susan Brison’s seminar on that topic, and an event on psychopathy linked to Monique Wonderly’s seminar on the ethics and pathologies of attachment. We had the opportunity to showcase our undergraduate and graduate student programs at a panel for the University’s Alumni Council Executive Committee in the spring that was praised 2


as “truly inspiring.” We also celebrated the second award of the Pyne Prize to a VPL student (Solveig Gold), and the award of 2017 Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans to VPL alumnae Mariana Olaizola and Shivani Radhakrishnan. All of these activities were produced with virtuosic care by the Center’s staff: Femke de Ruyter; Kim Girman; Andrew Perhac; Maureen Killeen, honored this year with Princeton’s highest award for staff, the President’s Achievement Award; and Susan Winters, honored this year for twenty-five years of service to the University. As one of this year’s visiting fellows put it succinctly: “the UCHV has the best staff in the world.” And all were overseen by the sixteen members of the Center’s Executive Committee, who devote hours of time and intellectual energy to maintaining and enhancing our collective vitality, while also garnering remarkable academic distinctions detailed in these pages. And they were subject to review by the members of our Advisory Council, whose 2016 report was discussed at the Executive Committee’s strategic retreat in the fall, and for whose guidance we are most grateful. Finally, in closing, I would like to pay tribute to my predecessor, Charles Beitz, whose unruffled calm and wise guidance are all the more impressive once one has learned from the inside just how many decisions and actions can be demanded of the director on a daily basis.

Melissa Lane Director of the University Center for Human Values; Class of 1943 Professor of Politics

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ANNUAL REVIEW 2016–2017

Faculty Accomplishments Johann Frick Short-term Visiting Fellow (Centre for Ethics, University of Toronto); awarded the American Philosophical Association’s (APA) Gregory Kavka Prize for the best paper in political philosophy of the past two years for “Contractualism and Social Risk”; and participated in a symposium held in his honor at the 2017 Pacific APA Eric Gregory Appointed Chair of the Council of the Humanities Melissa Lane Delivered the Keynote Lecture at the 7th Annual London Graduate Conference in the History of Political Thought and the Annual Public Lecture at the Centre for Political Philosophy (Leiden University); and published ‘Introduction’ in “Aristotle’s Politics: Writings from the Complete Works”

Jan-Werner Mueller, Professor of Politics

Stephen Macedo Published “Gay Rights and the Constitution,” co-authored and co-edited with James E. Fleming, Sotirios A. Barber, and Linda McClain; served as Vice President, American Society for Political and Legal Philosophy; and delivered two lectures and two seminars under the auspices of the Brockington Visitorship for “a person of international distinction” (Queens University, Canada) Victoria McGeer “Mind-Making Practices: The Social Infrastructure of Self-Knowing, Agency and Responsibility,” chosen by The Philosopher’s Annual as one of the ten best articles published in philosophy in 2015 Jan-Werner Mueller Published “What is Populism?” which has been or will be translated into 16 languages and has been nominated for the European Book Prize; delivered a Simon Wiesenthal lecture in Vienna, the Marchant lecture in Utrecht, and a Hamilton lecture at CUNY; contributed to many public debates on populism, including ones with the chancellor of Austria, the president of Switzerland, and a former prime minister of Italy. Philip Pettit Presented a New York TedX lecture on Freedom; gave the “Ethics in the Public Sphere Lecture” (University of California-San Diego), gave a keynote address at a National Sovereignty conference marking the centenary of the 1916 rebellion in Galway, Ireland, and served as keynote speaker in Paris at an event marking the opening of the European Center for Republican Studies; Free University (Berlin) held a symposium on his 2015 book,”The Robust Demands of the Good,” which also appeared in paperback in early

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Organization at Harvard Law School for spring 2017; and elected President of the Law and Society Association for a term to run from 2017–2019

Left Peter Singer, Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics in the University Center

2017; and made Companion to the Order of Australia Kim Lane Scheppele Delivered two named lectures this year: the Jorge Huneeus Zegers Lecture (Universidad Diego Portales Law School, Santiago, Chile) and the Cecil A. Wright Memorial Lecture (University of Toronto Law School), considered “the faculty’s most significant public lecture”; appointed Visiting Professor of Law and John Harvey Gregory Lecturer on World

Peter Singer Published “Ethics in the Real World: 82 Brief Essays on Things That Matter” and a revised edition of “One World” (“One World Now: The Ethics of Globalization”); edited “Does Anything Really Matter? Essays on Parfit on Objectivity”; awarded the Philosophy Now Award for Contributions in the Fight against Stupidity; received a grant from the Yale Center for Faith and Culture for a project on “Utilitarianism and the Good Life”; and gave the Knox Lecture (University of St. Andrews, Scotland), the Routledge Lecture (University of Cambridge), and the Jos de Beus Lecture (University of Amsterdam)

for Human Values

Michael Smith Served as the John Locke Lecturer, Oxford University (six lecture series) and received the Distinguished Alumni Award for the Faculty of Arts at Monash University

Stephen Macedo, Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Politics and the University Center for Human Values

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ANNUAL REVIEW 2016–2017

Deepening Understanding Tanner Lectures on Human Values The Tanner Lectures on Human Values are presented annually at select universities around the world. The invited lecturer presents a series of lectures reflecting upon scholarly and scientific learning relating to “the entire range of values pertinent to the human condition.” The University Center serves as host to these lectures at Princeton. November 30-December 1 Naomi Oreskes, Professor of the History of Science and Affiliated Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Harvard University, delivered the fall 2016 Tanner Lectures. Her lectures, “Trust in Science,” examined when and why we should trust science and when we should not, and how to make sense of competing claims. Oreskes argued that we should often trust science and explained why. She also considered under what conditions science can go wrong. How should we know

Melissa Lane in discussion with Martti Koskenniemi in advance of his James A. Moffett ‘29 Lecture in Ethics.

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when not to trust science? What should we be concerned about? And how should we interpret disagreement and dissent? Ottmar Edenhofer (Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research), Jon Krosnick (Stanford University), Marc Lange (University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill), and M. Susan Lindee (University of Pennsylvania) gave responses.

James A. Moffett ’29 Lectures in Ethics The Moffett Lecture series aims to foster reflection about moral issues in public life, broadly construed, at either a theoretical or a practical level, and in the history of thought about these issues. The series is made possible by a gift from the Whitehall Foundation in honor of James A. Moffett ‘29.


Tanner Lecturer Naomi Oreskes, Professor of the History of Science at Harvard University. Below From Left to Right: Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber; Ottmar Edenhofer, Marc Lange, Naomi Oreskes, Chair of the Tanner Lectures Committee Stephen Macedo, UCHV Director Melissa Lane, M. Susan Lindee, and Jon Krosnick

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ANNUAL REVIEW 2016–2017

November 10 Michael Blake, University of Washington “Migration, Mercy, Love, and Carrier Sanctions” December 15 Victor Tadros, University of Warwick, School of Law “Law and Morality of War” March 30 Kristi Olson, Bowdoin College “The Other Fairness” April 27 Ekow Yankah, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, Yeshiva University “Legal Hypocrisy”

LSR Visiting Faculty Fellow and marriage scholar, Linda McClain, together

March 9 Nancy F. Cott, Jonathan Trumbull Professor of American History, Harvard University “The Privileges of Marriage”

with Moffett Lecturer Nancy Cott, the Jonathan Trumbull Professor of American History at Harvard University.

May 4 Martti Koskenniemi, Academy Professor of International Law, University of Helsinki and Director, Erik Castrén Institute of International Law and Human Rights “Facebook, Global Community and the Law”

Program in Ethics and Public Affairs

Right Benjamin N. Cardozo School

The Program in Ethics and Public Affairs (PEPA) advances the study of the moral purposes and foundations of institutions and practices, both domestic and international. PEPA seminars seek to bring the perspectives of moral and political philosophy to bear on significant issues in public affairs.

of Law Professor Ekow Yankah speaks at PEPA seminar on “Legal Hypocrisy.”

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October 13 Juliana Bidadanure, Stanford University “Making Sense of Age-Group Justice”

Ira W. DeCamp Bioethics Seminar Seminars range across a wide variety of topics at the intersections of philosophy, ecology, biology, medicine, and public policy. The seminar series is made possible by a gift from the Ira W. DeCamp Foundation.


D E E P E N I N G U N D E R S TA N D I N G

Group of “Effective Altruism and Animals” symposium presenters, including Peter Singer and members from Animal Charity Evaluators.

September 21 Will MacAskill, University of Oxford “Should I Donate Now or Invest and Donate Later?”

University; Karen Swallow Prior, Liberty University; Sherry Colb, Cornell Law School; and Michael Dorf, Cornell Law School “Beating Hearts: Abortion and Animal Rights”

September 28 Stephen Gardiner, University of Washington-Seattle “Climate Ethics: Embracing Justice, Avoiding Extortion”

December 7 Monique Wonderly, Princeton University “Forgiving, Forgetting, and Un-Forgiving”

October 5 Joshua Greene, Harvard University “Judging, Feeling, Thinking: From Trolleyology to Compositional Semantics” November 11 Symposium sponsored with Animal Charity Evaluators and the Princeton Animal Welfare Society “Effective Altruism and Animals” November 16 Panel Conversation with Peter Singer, Princeton; Charles Camosy, Fordham

March 8 Andrew Michael Flescher, Stony Brook University “Would Legalizing the Sale of Organs Reduce the Organ Shortage Problem?” March 29 Coleen Macnamara, University of California-Riverside “Blame Without Standing” April 19 Dana Nelkin, University of California-San Diego “Frontotemporal Dementia and the Reactive Attitudes: Two Roles for the Capacity to Care” 9


ANNUAL REVIEW 2016–2017

Rob Reich, faculty director of Stanford University’s McCoy Family Center for Ethics in Society gives the inaugural Distinguished Teaching Lecture in Service and Civic Engagement.

Political Philosophy Colloquium The Political Philosophy Colloquium is co-sponsored by the Department of Politics. It presents talks by scholars from Princeton and elsewhere on a broad range of topics in the history of political thought, contemporary political philosophy, and related subjects. September 22 David Enoch, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem “Ideal Theory, Utopianism, and What’s the Question (in Political Philosophy)” February 9 Katrina Forrester, Queen Mary, University of London “The Origins of Contemporary Liberal Theory Revisited” February 16 Arash Abizadeh, McGill University “Hobbes’ Theory of the Good: Felicity by Anticipatory Pleasure” 10

March 16 Isaac Nakhimovsky, Yale University “Georg Lukács and Kantian Realpolitik” April 13 Teresa Bejan, Oxford University “Acknowledging Equality”

History of Political Thought Project The History of Political Thought Project provides a venue for Princeton students and faculty from different disciplines to discuss both substantive and methodological issues in the history of political thought and seeks to build bridges to comparative politics, comparative constitutional law, and area studies. May 17-18 Ancient Greek Political Ideas: Plato and Aristotle


D E E P E N I N G U N D E R S TA N D I N G

UCHV Seminars, Workshops & Co-sponsored Events

October 14-15 / American Studies Graduate Conference (American Studies)

(Organizing department is given in parenthesis)

August 16-19 / Athena in Action: Networking and Mentoring Workshop for Graduate Student Women in Philosophy (UCHV) September 9-10 / Comparative Literature Annual Conference “Aesthetics Afterlives: Memory, Transfiguration and the Arts” (Comparative Literature) September 21 / Distinguished Teaching Lecture on Service and Civic Engagement: “The Moral Quandaries of Public Service” (UCHV and Service and Civic Engagement Steering Committee) September 21-22 / Symposium on the Work of Alexander Nehamas: Plato, Beauty, Friendship, Nietzsche (Philosophy)

October 16 / Minorities and Philosophy Conference: Implicit Biases/Stereotype Threat and Pedagogy (Philosophy) October 16-17 / Slavic Graduate Conference “Philosophy and Literature: In Search of Lost Synergy” (Slavic Languages and Literatures) October 24 / Every 28 Hours (Lewis Center for the Arts) October 27 / “Bridges of Dialogue: A Princeton, New Jersey-Mexico City (Virtual) Roundtable on Ethical Dimensions of Migration across the Mexican-US Border” (UCHV) November 12-13 / Symposium on Multidisciplinary Research in Effective Animal Advocacy (UCHV)

From Left to Right: Dean of the Faculty Deborah S. Prentice; Executive Director of the PACE Center for Civic Engagement Kimberly de los Santos; Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science Emily Carter; Dean of the College Jill Dolan; and Vice President for Campus Life W. Rochelle Calhoun at the Distinguished Teaching Lecture in Service and Civic Engagement.

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ANNUAL REVIEW 2016–2017

February 28 / Martin Gilens on “America’s Ailing Democracy: What’s Gone Wrong and What We Can Do About It” (UCHV) March 11 / “Beyond Stonewall: New Histories of Religion and Sexuality” (Religion) March 14 / “Free Speech Now: Internet Hate Speech, Fake News, and Armies of Trolls” (*UCHV) March 17 / “New Directions in Columbian Cinema“ (Spanish and Portuguese) March 28 / “Free Speech Now: Free Speech In and Out of the Classroom“ (*UCHV) April 17 / Revisiting Maslow Workshop (Lichtenstein Institute on Self Determination)

November 17 / Book Talk with Jan-Werner Mueller: “What is Populism?” (UCHV) December 2 / In Conversation with John Cooper (Philosophy) December 2-4 / Classical Philosophy Colloquium (Philosophy) January 20 / Roundtable Conversation: “Global Liberalism in Crisis?” (UCHV) February 3 / Buddhist Ethics Conference (Center for the Study of Religion)

April 21-22 / Political Theory Graduate Conference (Politics) April 28 / Gender-based Violence and Safety in IT Design: Design Ethics Workshop (Center for Information Technology Policy) April 29-30 / Family in the Premodern World (Medieval Studies)

February 14 / “Free Speech Now: Why Fighting Online Abuse is Good for Free Speech” (*UCHV)

May 5-7 / Spinoza: Reason, Religion and Politics Conference: The Relation Between the Ethics and the Theological-Political Treatise (Philosophy)

February 21 / Panel Conversation: “The Post Fact Era? Democracy, Facts, and the News: A Conversation with Scholars and Journalists” (Council of the Humanities)

May 6-7 / “Undocumented: Belonging and Exclusion in the Age of Transnationalism“ (Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies)

February 27 / Panel Conversation: “Psychopathy, Emotion, and Moral Responsibility” (UCHV) 12

April 21-22 / Princeton South Asia Conference: “Space and Sovereignty in South Asia” (Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies)

May 11 / Roundtable Discussion: “Democracy’s Global Crisis“ (UCHV)


D E E P E N I N G U N D E R S TA N D I N G

May 12 / Rethinking Democracy Workshop, featuring the authors of “Democracy for Realists” (UCHV and Center for the Study of Democratic Politics) May 15-16 / Ancient Greek Philosophy in Early Modern Europe (Philosophy) May 23 / Workshop on Anna Stilz, “Territorial Sovereignty: A Philosophical Exploration” (UCHV and Politics) *Organized by the 2016-17 Visiting Professor for Distinguished Teaching, Susan Brison

The Center helped sponsor the following series:

Interdisciplinary Ethnography Workshop (Sociology) Minorities and Philosophy (MAP) (Philosophy) Comparative Literature Lecture Series (Comparative Literature) Filming at the Border Series (French and Italian) Program in Classical Philosophy (Philosophy) Lecture Series on Science in Russian Culture (Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies) Renaissance Studies Colloquium (English)

UCHV Presidential Debate Nights (UCHV) “The Prison & the Academy” (Prison Teaching Initiative, Teacher Preparation Program)

Princeton and Slavery Project (Council of the Humanities) Values and Praxis Labs (UCHV)

Princeton Workshop in Normative Philosophy (Philosophy) Discussant Jane Mansbridge, Harvard University’s Adams Professor of Political Leadership and Democratic Values, at

Ethics of Information Technology Series (UCHV/Center for Information Technology Policy)

“Democracy’s Global Crisis” roundtable discussion.

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ANNUAL REVIEW 2016–2017

Princeton graduate student and former VPL undergraduate student Elena Di Rosa at a UCHV-sponsored public lecture.

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Teaching and Learning

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ANNUAL REVIEW 2016–2017

Courses and Seminars

Anna Stilz, director of the Values and Public Life

Values and Public Life Seminars

undergraduate certificate program

Program in Values and Public Life Anna Stilz, Director Under the directorship of Anna Stilz, Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Politics and the University Center for Human Values, twenty-one seniors graduated with the certificate in Values and Public Life (VPL). Many of the students received department honors as well as named scholarships and impressive University-wide awards, including the Woodrow Wilson School’s SINSI scholarship and the Moses Taylor Pyne Honor Prize. In April, UCHV admitted 19 rising juniors to the program, joining the 29 members of the Class of 2018. In addition to the curricular requirements of the certificate program, VPL students participated in a panel conversation directly related to one of the spring VPL seminars and joined the ensuing dinner with speakers; went on an outing to McCarter theater to see the play Disgraced; and some of them presented at the Princeton University Alumni Council’s Executive Committee meeting. Students also benefitted from the newly formatted senior thesis workshops and the opportunity to showcase their thesis findings at the annual VPL Student Conference.

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The VPL junior/senior seminars aim to cultivate students’ abilities to analyze, criticize, and construct systematic arguments about values in public life. While the seminars vary considerably in their thematic content, they are linked by a common pedagogical purpose and an approach that emphasizes intensive small group discussion and advanced writing exercises. The seminars provide an explicit link between the core coursework of the certificate and the independent work requirement. Perfectionism and the Legal Enforcement of Morals POL 480/CHV 480 James Fleming Ethics and Pathologies of Attachment CHV 332/PHI 347 Monique Wonderly Free Speech in the Internet Age CHV 411/PHI 411 Susan Brison

Freshman Seminars Philosophy and Criminal Justice Gideon Rosen Dean Eva Gossman Freshman Seminar in Human Values What Makes for a Meaningful Life? Ellen Chances Kurt & Beatrice Gutmann Freshman Seminar in Human Values Philosophical Analysis Using Argument Maps Simon Cullen Peter T. Joseph ‘72 Freshman Seminar in Human Values


TEACHING AND LEARNING

Atomic-bombing and Firebombing Cities in World War II: Morality, Science, and Race Sheldon Garon University Center for Human Values Freshman Seminar Underworlds Esther Schor Class of 1976 Freshman Seminar in Human Values Law and Politics of Punishment Melynda Price Paul L. Miller ‘41 Freshman Seminar in Human Values Religion and Politics: Conflicts of Public and Private Values Stephen Macedo Professor Amy Gutmann Freshman Seminar in Human Values

Cross-Listed Courses

Ethics and Economics ECO 385/CHV 345 Thomas Leonard, Economics and the Council of the Humanities

Below top President Emeritus, Harold T. Shapiro,

Ethics and Public Policy WWS 370/POL 308/CHV 301 Stephen Macedo, Politics and University Center for Human Values

attentively listens to panel discussion on psychopathy moderated by Monique Wonderly, who

Explaining Values PHI 380/CHV 380 Michael Smith, Philosophy; and Victoria McGeer, University Center for Human Values

holds the UCHV postdoctoral research position in his name. Below bottom

Greek Law and Legal Practice CLA 330/CHV 330/HLS 340 Marc Domingo Gygax, Classics Introduction to Moral Philosophy CHV 202/PHI 202 Elizabeth Harman, Philosophy and University Center for Human, and Sarah McGrath, Philosophy

Matthew Talbert, one of four panelists at the “Psychopathy, Emotion, and Moral Responsibility” event held in conjunction with the VPL seminar, “The Pathologies of Attachment.“

Biomedical Ethics PHI 277/CHV 277 Hrishikesh Joshi, Philosophy Citizenships Ancient and Modern CLA 310/CHV 314/AAS 311/POL 310 Dan-El Padilla Peralta, Classics Clues, Evidence, Detection: Law Stories CHV 375/COM 364/ENG 374 Peter Brooks, Comparative Literature and University Center for Human Values Conceptions of Evil CLA 255/PHI 255/CHV 255 Christian Wildberg, Classics Consequentialism CHV 523/PHI 517 Peter Singer, University Center for Human Values

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ANNUAL REVIEW 2016–2017

Stolen Years: Youth Under the Nazis in World War II COM 362/ CHV 362/ECS 362/JDS 362 Froma I. Zeitlin, Classics and Comparative Literature

November 14 / Mário Peixoto Limite*

Systemic Ethics PHI 307/CHV 311 Gilbert Harman, Philosophy

November 28 / Andrei Tarkovsky Stalker

The Just Society POL 307/CHV 307 Alan Patten, Politics

November 21 / Terence Davies Distant Voices, Still Lives

December 5 / Gavin Hood Eye in the Sky December 12 / Robert Weine The Hands of Orlac*

Film Forum

Spring / Lost For Words

The Film Forum convened under the direction of Acting Director Andrew Lovett (Department of Music) for film screenings in Rocky Theater followed by comments from Princeton faculty and discussion. The series is supported by a gift from Bert Kerstetter ’66 and is co-sponsored by Rockefeller College.

February 6 / Roberto Rossellini Viaggio in Italia February 13 / Michael Madsen Into Eternity February 20 / Nicolas Roeg Walkabout

Fall / Sculpting in Time SPRING 2017

(L O S T)

September 19 / Joel and Ethan Coen O Brother, Where Art Thou?

FO R

September 26 / Yasujirō Ozu I Was Born But…* October 3 / Alain Corneau Tous les Matins du Monde October 10 / Sergei Parajanov The Color of Pomegranates

February 6

Roberto Rossellini

Viaggio in Italia

February 13

Michael Madsen

Into Eternity

February 20

Nicolas Roeg

Walkabout

February 27

Yaron Zilberman

A Late Quartet

March 6

Ciro Guerra

Embrace of the Serpent

March 13

Andrei Tarkovsky

Solaris

March 27

Tommy Lee Jones

The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada

April 3

Marcel L’Herbier

L’Inhumaine*

Fall 2016

Sculpting in May 1

in Rufus Norris Rocky Theater Werner at Herzog 7:30 PM

May 8

Charlie Chaplin

April 17 April 24

Mondays Wes Anderson

Time MONDAYS IN ROCKY THEATER @ 7:30PM

October 17 / Paolo Sorrentino Youth October 24 / Godfrey Reggio Koyaanisqatsi November 7 / Eran Kolirin The Band’s Visit

WO R DS

(* with live music)

London Road Aguirre, Wrath of God The Kid*

THE EVENTS ARE MADE POSSIBLE BY THE GENEROUS GIFT OF BERT G. KERSTETTER ‘66 AND ARE CO-SPONSORED BY THE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR HUMAN VALUES AND ROCKEFELLER COLLEGE.

Time

Sculpting in 19 September

Joel and Ethan Coen

O Brother, Where Art Thou?

26 September

Yasujiro Ozu

I Was Born, But…*

3 October

Alain Corneau

Tous les Matins du Monde

10 October

Sergei Parajanov

The Color of Pomegranates

17 October

Paolo Sorrentino

Youth

24 October

Godfrey Reggio

Koyaanisqatsi

7 November

Eran Kolirin

The Band’s Visit

14 November

Mário Peixoto

Limite*

21 November

Terence Davies

Distant Voices, Still Lives

28 November

Andrei Tarkovsky

Stalker

5 December

Gavin Hood

Eye in the Sky

12 December

Robert Wiene

The Hands of Orlac*

The events are made possible by the generous gift of Bert G. Kerstetter ’66 and are co-sponsored by the University Center for Human Values and Rockefeller College. *With Live Music

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Moonrise Kingdom


TEACHING AND LEARNING

Melissa Lane (center), Class of 1943 Professor of Politics, with her four VPL senior thesis advisees: (Left to Right) Nabil Shaikh; Ya Sheng Lin; Colleen O’Gorman, and Katherine Chow.

February 27 / Yaron Zilberman A Late Quartet

Student Prizes and Grants

March 6 / Ciro Guerra Embrace of the Serpent

Senior Thesis Prize

March 13 / Andrei Tarkovsky Solaris March 27 / Tommy Lee Jones The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada April 3 / Marcel L’Herbier L’Inhumaine* April 17 / Wes Anderson Moonrise Kingdom April 24 / Rufus Norris London Road May 1 / Werner Herzog Aguirre, Wrath of God May 8 / Charlie Chaplin The Kid* *with live music

Each year, the Center awards prizes to the senior theses that make an outstanding contribution to the study of human values. Nominations for the prize are made by departments across the University. Joani Etskovitz English “Girls Growing Curiouser: From Charlotte Bronte’s Bluebeard-Print through Alice’s Adventures” Colleen O’Gorman Politics “Lessons from Emily Doe: A Survivor-Centric Approach to Sexual Assault” Kevin Alexander Wong Philosophy “Counting Animals: On Effective Altruism and the Prospect of Interspecies Commensurability” 19


ANNUAL REVIEW 2016–2017

VPL Summer Research Grants The Program in Values and Public Life offers grants for students enrolled in the undergraduate certificate program to participate in values-related projects on campus; pursue values-related internships; or pursue senior thesis research.

Gabriel Levin, Politics William Mullaney, Comparative Literature Ngoc Ngo, Politics René de Nicolay, Classics Paulina Pineda-Severiano, Comparative Literature Jackson Smith, French and Italian Aderayo Sanusi, Anthropology Caitlyn Tully, History

Kabbas Azhar – Students for Prison Education and Reform (SPEAR) Conference Solveig Gold – Senior Thesis Research on “Deus ex Machina: Christ and Theatricality in the Philosophy of Late Antiquity” Nora Niazian – Senior Thesis Research on “Perincek v. Switzerland and Free Speech” Sarah Sakha – Senior Thesis Research on “Comparative Study of the Assimilation and Diaspora Mechanisms for Iranian Immigrants in Stockholm and Toronto” Aaron Sobel – Internship at U.S. Attorney General’s Office Eric Wang – US-China Global Governance Forum

Graduate Student Merit Awards The UCHV offers prizes to help attract graduate students to Princeton whose work explicitly focuses on ethics, political theory, and human values. In spring 2017, the following students were awarded these grants. Lina Ahmed Abushouk, English Rachel Brown-Weinstock, Sociology Simon Conrad, Near Eastern Studies Theophile Deslauriers, Politics Simrit Dhillon, Politics Kathleen Donnelly, Sociology Will Freeman, Politics Peter Giraudo, Politics Eleanor Gordon-Smith, Philosophy Candace Jordan, Religion Enoch Kuo, Religion 20

Political Philosophy Research and Travel Grants The University Center for Human Values, along with the Program in Political Philosophy, offers Political Philosophy Research and Travel grants to Princeton University graduate students working on topics in political philosophy and enrolled in the departments that participate in the program (Classics, History, Philosophy, Politics, and Religion). This year the following students received grants. Merrick Anderson, Philosophy John Colin Bradley, Philosophy Ian Campbell, Philosophy Jonathon Catlin, History Shuk Ying Chan, Politics Robin Dembroff, Philosophy Netta Green, History Emily Hulme, Politics Dongxian Jiang, Politics Suzie Kim, Politics Abigail Kret, History Thomas Lambert, Philosophy Sarah Matherly, History Joseph Moore, Philosophy Mary Nickel, Religion Ray Thornton, History Johan Trovik, Politics Raissa von Doetinchem de Rande, Religion Jiseob Yoon, Politics


TEACHING AND LEARNING

Short Movie Prize Sponsored by the Center, this award is given to the undergraduate who produces the best short film that addresses a given theme. The theme for 2016–17 was Fanaticism.

November 14 / Linda McClain “From the Bigot in our Midst to Good People with Hidden Biases” November 21 / Benjamin Morison “Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics III 3, §§10-20” November 28 / Christoph Winter “The Ethics of Traveling” December 5 / Katarzyna de Lazari-Radek “Liberalism vs. Conservatism – Is There Any Hope for Reconciliation?”

Short Movie Prize co-winners (left to right): James Tralie for “Virtual” and Elias Stern for “Whiskey Sour”

Human Values Forum With support from Bert Kerstetter ’66, the Human Values Forum (HVF) provides an opportunity for undergraduates, faculty members, graduate students, and faculty visitors to meet in an informal setting to discuss current and enduring questions concerning ethics and human values. HVF meets over dinner at 5 Ivy Lane most weeks during the academic year.

December 12 / Sarah McGrath “Should We Believe in Moral Experts?” February 6 / Karen Jones “Trust and Trustworthiness” February 13 / John Doris “Self-Ignorance” February 20 / Marc Fleurbaey “Rethinking the Welfare State” March 13 / Melissa Lane “The Rule of Law and the Role of Bureaucrats”

September 19 / Peter Singer “My Life in Ethics”

March 26 / No speaker “Healthcare and the Welfare State”

October 3 / Douglas Portmore “Moral Harmony and the Puzzle of Plural Obligation”

April 10 / Joshua Cherniss “Ethos and Elites: Thinking about the AntiLiberal Challenge and the Liberal Predicament with Aron (and others)”

October 10 / Uriel Abulof “Political Existentialism and Humanity’s Midlife Crisis” October 17 / Susanna Rinard “Happiness: What is it? What is its Value? Can it be Measured?” October 24 / Bernard Haykel “The Worldview of ISIS”

April 17 / Melissa Schwartzburg “Democracy and the Jury” April 24 / Simon Cullen “Moral Luck” May 1 / Lawrence Rosen “What’s Wrong with Polygamy? Or Incest?”

November 7 / David Welcome “Biodiversity Losses and Human Well-Being” 21


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UCHV Graduate Prize Fellow Lucia Rafanelli contemplates the topic of a UCHV public lecture.

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Supporting Research The UCHV seeks to advance original scholarship relating to human values by sponsoring visiting faculty fellowships, a visiting professorship for distinguished teaching, postdoctoral research appointments, and dissertation stage fellowships for outstanding Princeton graduate students. The research reports presented in this section illustrate the reach and quality of the work carried out under the Center’s auspices last year. A main feature of the visiting fellows program is a regular lunch seminar at which our visitors, together with the Center’s faculty members, present their work to an audience of peers. The graduate fellows meet regularly for their own research seminar, typically followed by a working dinner. As the research reports attest, the systematic criticism and discussion of work in progress is among the principal benefits of affiliation with the Center.

Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Professor for Distinguished Teaching This professorship is part of the 250th Anniversary Visiting Professorships for Distinguished Teaching program. Each faculty visitor teaches an undergraduate course and engages in other activities aimed at improving teaching at Princeton.

Susan Brison My year at the UCHV has been rewarding in more ways

than I can say. I have benefitted from countless conversations with the extraordinarily collegial and talented group of faculty, staff, fellows, postdocs, and grad students, as well as with the remarkable students in my undergraduate seminar on “Free Speech in the Internet Age.” As VPDT, I was able to organize a series of public lectures and panels entitled “Free Speech Now!” that brought leading legal scholars, philosophers, and computer scientists to Princeton to address issues ranging from cyber harassment to academic freedom. My seminar students also had the opportunity to meet with Danielle Citron, Fred Schauer, and Jeremy Waldron to discuss their work. On more than one occasion, my students met for a three-hour seminar, a two-hour panel, an hour-long reception, and a two-hour dinner with visiting scholars. As one

student e-mailed me, “Who knew that an eight-hour class could be so much fun?” In addition to participating in the weekly LSR seminar at the UCHV, I had the pleasure of participating in numerous events sponsored by other programs and centers at Princeton. I gave a “Profiles in Teaching” presentation at the McGraw Center on “Teaching Beyond the Classroom,” a guest lecture in Stephen Macedo’s graduate seminar in political theory, and a keynote address at the “Take Back the Night” rally. My own research was enhanced by the connections I made with computer scientists in Princeton’s Center for Information Technology Policy with whom I am involved in an ongoing project on ethics and artificial intelligence. In addition to presenting several papers and completing two articles, I worked on two books—a co-edited 23


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anthology, “Free Speech in the Digital Age,” and a co-authored book, “Debating the Ethics of Pornography,” both forthcoming from Oxford University Press.

Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Faculty Fellows These fellowships are awarded annually to outstanding scholars and teachers interested in devoting a year in residence at Princeton writing about ethics and human values, discussing their work in a fellows’ seminar, and participating in seminar activities.

Jonathan Beere I have had a wonderful year in Princeton, which feels like a highlight of my intellectual life. This is thanks to the Center’s Director, Melissa Lane, the Center’s marvelous staff, and the generally wonderful intellectual atmosphere of the Department of Philosophy, in which I’ve felt very welcome. My primary activity this year has been working towards 24

a draft of a book manuscript with the working title, “The Possibility of the Ideal City: The Political Significance of Plato’s Republic,” and I am very happy with my progress. I presented this work in talks at the Princeton Ancient Philosophy Colloquium, the Harvard Department of Philosophy, and a workshop at Princeton organized by Melissa Lane and me. Together with Ben Morison, I drafted a long paper with the title, “A Mathematical Form of Knowing in Greek Geometry: The Nature of the ProblemPropositions.” We presented this work at the University of Chicago and New York University. I was also an active member of the community of ancient philosophers. I attended Hendrik Lorenz’s graduate seminar on Plato’s Statesman in the fall semester and, Ben Morison’s graduate seminar on Aristotle’s Posterior Analytics and the Greek reading group in the spring semester. Additionally, two graduate students in the fall and two more in the spring visited Princeton from my home institution, the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, and were very active members of the community. I had many one-on-one meetings with a number of Princeton graduate students in ancient philosophy, strengthening the basis for future cooperation in graduate education in ancient philosophy.

Joshua Cherniss My time at the UCHV has been a great joy. I have spent much of the year enjoying the stimulating LSR lunch seminars, the Political Philosophy Colloquia, the Tanner and Moffett Lectures, as well as periodic attendance at LAPA events and the “Free Speech Now!” series. I have also found some time to work on my current book project, which reinterprets the conflicts between liberals and anti-liberals in twentieth-century politics as centering on questions of political ethics, and the concept of political “ethos” (a complex of temperament, sensibility, dispositions, self-understanding, values, and political style that shapes an individual’s or movement’s political action). A presentation of material from the first two draft chapters at the LSR workshop has been invaluable in helping me to refine the main conceptual framework of the project. I have also revised the third chapter (partly in response to a Political Philosophy Colloquium talk); finished a


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rough draft of a new chapter on Albert Camus; and pursued research for another chapter on Raymond Aron. In addition, I have finished two chapters, and done much of the editorial work, for a volume on Isaiah Berlin that I am co-editing for the Cambridge Companions to Philosophy series; published two shorter articles on Berlin; and written a conference paper on the Polish intellectual Adam Michnik’s account of democracy. I have also had numerous conversations that have, I am sure, planted the seeds for work in the years ahead. It has been both enriching and enjoyable to spend a year sharing the company of the other Center fellows, as well as the admirable Center staff; I am deeply grateful for the opportunity, and will long cherish the memory of doing so.

John Doris As one of two “repeat offenders” in the Center’s history, my second stimulating and productive fellowship term was haunted by my last book, “Talking to Our

Selves” (2015), which is the subject of a long target article I completed this year for Behavioral and Brain Sciences. Additionally, I was commissioned to do two “author meets critic” articles on the book (forthcoming in Social Theory and Practice and Philosophy and Phenomenological Research). I participated in the political psychologist Jesse Graham’s Values, Ideology, and Morality Lab at the University of Southern California and a paper we completed was accepted by the flagship Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Another major effort was developing, with my colleague Manuel Vargas (University of California-San Diego), “The Oxford Handbook of Moral Psychology,” which is now under contract. I also worked on a collection of my essays, “Character Trouble: Undisciplined Essays on Personality and Agency,” for Oxford University Press. I gave talks at the Harvard Business School, the Rock Ethics Institute at Penn State, and at the philosophy departments at Cornell and the University of Rochester. Especially significant personally was giving the 10th Annual John L. Doris Memorial Lecture at Cornell’s Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research, as part of a series dedicated to the memory of my father. As for my proposed book project, I will have to console myself with Director Lane’s wisdom, “We’ll be as proud of the

books you don’t write as we are of the ones that you do.” I did hit upon a book I can write (with my colleague Edouard Machery, University of Pittsburgh) on controversy and discovery in social science. After spending my career as a philosophical interdisciplinarian immersed in scientific psychology, I am delighted to be working on a systematic treatment of how the science works, and I am equally delighted to be developing the project with Rob Tempio of Princeton University Press. It has been a wonderful and productive year, and I am profoundly grateful to everyone at the Center, most especially Director Lane, and my daily comrades in Marx Hall: Femke de Ruyter, Maureen Killeen, and Susan Winters.

Karen Jones I am deeply grateful for my year at the University Center for Human Values, for the intellectual friendships I have made, for the conversations I have had, for the talks I’ve been privileged to attend, and for the time to 25


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have not just first thoughts, but a whole succession of thoughts. My main research goal was to write a book, previously quite certainly titled “Counting on One Another: A Theory of Trust and Trustworthiness,” but which may yet be titled “In Cahoots” (if I am brave enough). Six of its eight chapters are drafted and the final two feel inevitable. I am grateful for comments on and discussion of this project at the LSR lunchtime seminar and in Liz Harman’s graduate seminar. I have also had the privilege of presenting parts of the project to audiences at McGill, Davis, as keynote at the Columbia/NYU graduate conference, and as the Tamara Horowitz Memorial Lecture at the University of Pittsburgh. At Princeton, and in each of these other locations, it has been a real pleasure to talk with philosophy graduate students and postdocs about my work and theirs and about their vision for the future of philosophy. Side projects included co-editing and contributing to “The Many Moral Rationalisms,” which is now safely in the hands of Oxford University Press, and coediting “The Routledge Handbook of Moral Epistemology.” Special thanks for the friendly and expert support of the UCHV administrative staff.

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Linda McClain I have enjoyed a stimulating and productive year at UCHV. My thinking about my book project, “Bigotry, Conscience, and Marriage: Past and Present Controversies” (Under contract with Oxford University Press), benefitted immensely from the rich intellectual life at Princeton, including talking about my work not only with other fellows and UCHV affiliated faculty, but also with faculty in various departments and fellows in other programs, such as LAPA and the Center for the Study of Religion. I am delighted to have completed working drafts of several chapters. I benefitted from presenting chapters in the LSR seminar, the Center for the Study of Religion, Woodrow Wilson School’s “Crossroads in Religion and Politics” series, the Human Values Forum, LAPA’s workshop series, and Stephen Macedo’s Religion and Politics seminar. At the invitation of the Princeton Tory, I debated the topic, “Religious Liberty or a License to Discriminate?” with Ryan

Anderson. I also presented draft chapters in a lecture at Rutgers University, a workshop at Temple University, a law and religion roundtable (held at Notre Dame), and a New York Area Family Law Scholars workshop. It was enriching to attend events and dinners sponsored by UCHV, as well as by LAPA, and the American Studies and Gender and Sexuality Studies programs. A special treat was being on Princeton’s beautiful campus with my younger daughter, Katherine, a sophomore at Princeton, and my husband James Fleming, a LAPA fellow. I am grateful to the UCHV staff for being highly professional as well as personable and welcoming.

Adriana Petryna I am very grateful to the University Center for Human Values for a most memorable year of critical thinking and writing. During my year as a fellow, I completed a draft of my book, “What is a Horizon? Abrupt Climate Change and Human Futures,” which is based on long-term ethno-


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graphic research with scientists and emergency responders and will be published by Duke University Press. The book interrogates modeling of abrupt ecological change, its scientific and ethical underpinnings, and political stakes. It also explores how recent catastrophic events expose new normative vacuums, vulnerabilities, and needs. I significantly benefitted from the Center’s interdisciplinary community and learned much from LSR seminar discussions on harm, trust, and the nature of responsibility. Getting important feedback on my book project and ongoing conversations with faculty and fellows were invaluable. Participation in the Center’s rich programs, lecture series, and workshops provided great insight into pressing societal issues and their ethical dimensions. I especially benefitted from UCHV’s partnerships with Climate Futures Initiative and the Princeton Environmental Institute, and their workshops and lectures on the intersections of ethics and global climate change. In addition to working on my book, I wrote and published two peer-reviewed articles on epistemic uncertainty and the institutional management of risk; and two book chapters on climate change vulnerability and the ethics of emergency response. I presented my research at a Stanford University conference session honoring my earlier work on the Chernobyl nuclear disas-

ter and delivered lectures at The Graduate Center, CUNY, and Bennington College. My time at UCHV will leave a lasting mark on my academic path, and I am particularly grateful to the Center’s staff and Director Melissa Lane for creating a vibrant community in which we could all flourish.

Douglas Portmore I’m tremendously grateful to UCHV, Princeton University, and the faculty, students, and staff here for a tremendous year. My goal was to complete a draft of my book, “Opting for the Best: Oughts and Options,” and thanks to all the support that I received, I succeeded. It helped to be able to present several draft chapters in various venues, including the LSR fellows’ seminar; Peter Singer’s seminar on consequentialism; Liz and Gil Harman’s seminar on ethics; the Princeton Workshop on Normative Philosophy; and, my favorite, the mini-conference that Michael Smith organized entitled “Professor Procrastinate Day.” It was also great to receive helpful comments

outside of these events by faculty, students, and other LSR fellows. In this regard, I owe a special thanks to Liz Harman, Philip Pettit, Michael Smith, Peter Singer, Johann Frick, Susanna Rinard, John Doris, Hrishikesh Joshi, and Sam Preston. My year here was the most intellectually stimulating one of my life. There were, of course, more events than I could possibly attend. But it was nice to have such a wide variety to choose from. And it was great to meet the many interesting and important scholars that came through during the year. I particularly enjoyed the LSR fellows’ seminar series and the DeCamp Bioethics seminars. During my residency, I was also able to present my research at several venues outside of Princeton, including DEX V at U.C.-Davis, the 8th Annual New Orleans Invitational Seminar in Ethics, and the Philosophers Speak lecture series at Seton Hall University.

Susanna Rinard This has been an intellectually stimulating and invigorating year for me, as well as a productive one. In the fall I 27


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completed and submitted a manuscript defending a view I call Equal Treatment, according to which the question “What should I believe?” is to be answered in the same way as the question “What should I do?” On this view, there are only practical reasons for belief. This work was revised in light of the very helpful feedback I received after presenting it at the weekly LSR seminar, which has been a source of fascination and delight all year. In the spring I completed and submitted a manuscript applying Equal Treatment to the problem of skepticism. I argue that even if the skeptic is right that we lack good evidence for ordinary beliefs, we should retain these beliefs nonetheless, since we have good practical reasons for doing so. Throughout the year I benefitted greatly from informal discussion of my work, and others’ work, with the other LSR fellows, members of the Princeton philosophy department, and others affiliated with the UCHV. I had the great pleasure of presenting at the Human Values Forum, the Princeton Workshop on Normative Philosophy, and a graduate seminar run by Thomas Kelly. I am deeply grateful to the UCHV for these and other enriching experiences this year, including the large variety of talks, workshops, and conferences, and most importantly, for providing the time and the environment that enabled me to make such great progress on my writing. 28

Melissa Schwartzberg I am so grateful for my fellowship year at the University Center for Human Values. As an LSR fellow, I primarily worked on a new book, “Judging Democracy: Jurors, Voters, and the Creation of Equal Citizens”; I presented a chapter from that book, “Juries and Democratic Authority,” to the LSR seminar, and was able to discuss the jury and democracy with the terrific Princeton undergraduates at the Human Values Forum this spring. I also had several informal and formal opportunities to engage with UCHV Director Melissa Lane and other scholars of ancient political philosophy, commenting on papers on Plato and Aristotle, and continuing my research on ancient democratic institutions. Yet the freedom of the year at Princeton also afforded me the time to engage publicly with the 2016 election and its aftermath. Just prior to the election, I spoke at the Brooklyn Public Library on “Voting with deplorables: How to think about our fellow citizens’ judgment during and after elections,” and the

day following Donald Trump’s victory, Jennifer Gandhi (Emory) and I published an article in The Big Idea section of vox.com, on “How to coexist, after defeat, with citizens whose views you despise.” In addition, at a public event at Princeton in late November, I discussed faculty member Jan-Werner Mueller’s timely new book, “What is Populism?” It is hard to imagine a better community of scholars with whom to have weathered these challenging months.

Harold T. Shapiro Postdoctoral Research Associate in Bioethics The Harold T. Shapiro Postdoctoral Fellowship in Bioethics supports outstanding scholars studying ethical issues arising from developments in medicine or the biological sciences.

Monique Wonderly My second year at the UCHV has been a fruitful and rewarding one. The Center’s supportive and intellectually


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dynamic environment has energized my research along a number of dimensions. My primary project aims to show how a theory of emotional attachment can illuminate issues concerning the moral agency and ethical treatment of those who suffer from certain forms of psychopathology (e.g., addiction and psychopathy). This year, I presented research on addiction and attachment at both the International Neuroethics Society’s (INS) annual meeting and the UC San Diego Department of Psychiatry Colloquium Series; the former resulted in multiple prizes and a short publication. I also deepened my research on psychopathy and moral agency, both co-organizing an interdisciplinary panel discussion on the topic with Femke de Ruyter and publishing a related peer commentary article. In addition, I began a new project on the ethics of forgiveness and memory neuromodulation. I presented this work in the UCHV’s DeCamp Seminar series and at both the University of Colorado-Boulder’s Center for Values and Social Policy and the American Philosophical Association’s Pacific Division Annual Conference. I plan to submit three more papers for publication this summer. I also taught an upper-division undergraduate philosophy seminar and co-organized the spring DeCamp Bioethics Seminars.

Postdoctoral Research Associate in Values and Public Life The postdoctoral Research Associate in Values and Public Life appoints a highly promising scholar trained in contemporary political theory to provide support for programs in the University Center for Human Values and to carry on a research agenda in his or her area of specialization.

my book, I argue that democracy is grounded in the value of accountability to all of the people who are subject to public policies. I show that democratic accountability requires not only elections, but that governments must justify their policies in public deliberation, respect the equal rights of minorities, and uphold freedom of dissent. Because democratic accountability is owed to all of the people who are subject to policies, it must be extended to global decisions. A chapter has been invited to be revised and resubmitted by the Journal of Politics, and I will be presenting another chapter at the American Political Science Association conference. I have also published an article, “Rawls on the Justice of Corporate Governance,” with Theodora Welch in the Business Ethics Journal Review.

Minh Ly My research has focused on democratic theory and economic justice. My book project, “A Human Right to Democratic Accountability,” addresses the challenges to democracy resulting from authoritarianism and globalization. Governments are becoming more authoritarian as they shut down courts, silence the press, and persecute minorities, yet they claim to be democratic because they hold elections. At the global level, democracy is in decline as more decisions are made by foreign states and international organizations. In 29


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Postdoctoral Research Associates in Values and Public Policy The Values and Public Policy Postdoctoral Fellowship is a joint endeavor of the University Center for Human Values and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. It enables highly promising scholars trained in moral and political philosophy, political theory, normative economics, and related areas to develop a research agenda in the ethical dimensions of public policy.

Chloé Bakalar In association with the Center for the Study of Democratic Politics In my second year as postdoctoral research associate, I continued my research and writing on democratic and communicative theory. I focused on revising my book manuscript, “Small Talk: The Impact of Social Speech on Liberal Democratic Citizenship,” which utilizes an 30

interdisciplinary approach (combining political theory, Anglo-American legal theory and empirical social science) to identify and explain the effects of everyday talk on liberal democratic citizenship and political outcomes. It then suggests policy recommendations to promote democratically advantageous speech in the social sphere and to discourage speech that is likely to produce negative effects on liberal values. I had the opportunity to present a chapter on online social speech at an LSR seminar this spring, where I received valuable feedback. I presented that chapter at several external conferences and workshops as well. In addition, I developed two papers: one exploring the political thought of John Milton, which will be included in an edited volume on the history of free speech; the other considering the legal and philosophical challenges of regulating online hate speech. Throughout the year, I also participated in several events at Princeton combining political theory, public policy, and data science, including co-organizing a joint UCHV/MAP speaker visit.

Maddalena Ferranna In association with the Program in Science, Technology and Environmental Policy My first year at the UCHV has been very stimulating and exciting. I greatly benefitted from conversations and moral support from members of the UCHV and more broadly, from interactions with the Princeton community. I continued working on my research project on the cost-benefit analysis of public policies that involve risky social situations (e.g. natural disasters, climate change, technological accidents), and in particular, on how to merge efficiency and equity considerations when choosing the optimal policy. Moreover, I am collaborating on a project that aims at quantifying the role of risk on the design of climate change mitigation policies (e.g. the social cost of carbon). Specifically, we are looking at how different value judgements and different assumptions on the ethics of risk affect the timing and stringency of the policies. During the


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year, I participated in several conferences and workshops on public policy, economics and philosophy, where I had the opportunity of presenting my work. In addition to my research, I have helped design and teach the precepts of an undergraduate environmental class (ENV 200), with a focus on the social and economic analysis of environmental issues.

Sally Nuamah In association with the Center for the Study of Democratic Politics The UCHV community has been especially welcoming during this period. I have found it relatively easy to get to know people through the regular seminars and have found the academic environment stimulating! I am thankful for the high level of feedback I received from the other UCHV fellows, and broader Princeton community, after my seminar presentation in November. Since then, I have presented various papers for the Education Research Section

and the Center for the Study of Democratic Politics at Princeton, in addition to various institutions and conferences elsewhere. Two of these papers were recently accepted in a journal and an edited volume. Outside of my own work, I have engaged in the larger Princeton community through advising students who hold interests at the intersections of education and politics, acted as a panel chair for the graduate political theory conference, and contributed comments as discussant for a seminar on increasing voting turn out. Currently, I am working on the final empirical chapter for my book manuscript, “When Schools Close,” which examines how public school closures shape citizens’ beliefs in democracy. I look forward to utilizing the lessons learned, and the relationships built, during this fellowship to further develop as a scholar!

Daniel Putnam In association with the Center for Health and Wellbeing

In my first year as a postdoc at UCHV, I have continued to develop the core idea of my dissertation, which is that there are important aspects of the value of equality that can only be understood if we treat the concept of an interpersonal relationship as fundamental. One of the real privileges of being affiliated with the Center for Health and Well-Being is that I’ve become acquainted with relevant social science research—especially on stigma, stereotyping, and poverty—that helps specify the abstract normative ideal of relating as equals. More specifically, I have written six papers on this topic: one forthcoming, two under review, and three in the final stages of preparation before submission for publication. These papers include the following: “Disability and Democratic Equality,” forthcoming in “The Routledge Handbook of Ethics and Public Policy;” “Justice and Gentrification: A Relational Diagnosis,” under review; “Epistemic Inconsideration,” under review; “What is a Social Basis of SelfRespect?” presented at the University of Sheffield in July; and “Poverty as a Social Relation,” presented at the University of Salzburg and the Free University of Berlin. A sixth paper, “Freedom of Expression and Opportunity for Recognition,” was shaped in large part by the “Free Speech Now!” series hosted by UCHV this year and is 31


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currently in preparation. In short, I’m thrilled to have had the chance to work at UCHV this past year, and I do look forward to the coming one.

Laurance S. Rockefeller Graduate Prize Fellows These fellowships, made possible by a gift from Laurance S. Rockefeller ’32, are awarded to Princeton graduate students with distinguished academic records who show great promise of contributing to scholarship and teaching about ethics and human values. Fellows participate in an interdisciplinary research seminar throughout the year. In 2016–17, the seminar was convened by UCHV Director Melissa Lane (Politics).

Merrick Anderson Philosophy The Graduate Prize Fellowship at the University Center for Human Values has been a great help for my intellectual and professional development. Most importantly, the 32

time away from teaching has allowed me to work on my dissertation. My thesis investigates the relationship between justice or morality and self-interest in the ancient Greek thinkers of the fifth and fourth centuries. I completed the most philosophically demanding and difficult chapter of the dissertation, which concerns Plato’s philosophic masterpiece, “The Republic.” In this chapter I argue that Plato develops a new argument to show that human beings are happier and live better lives when they are just or act morally. Presenting this chapter to the interdisciplinary audience of the GPF dinner was also very helpful. It forced me to rethink the way one should present philosophic arguments. I had to innovate and discover new ways to discuss the very technical and (quite often) strange material one finds in the ancient philosophers. Being forced to present my ideas to colleagues from different disciplines has improved my ability to give talks and will help immensely when I enter the job market next year. Finally, the UCHV has held a number of great talks that kept me grounded and sane when I was stressing out over the dissertation work! It has been a great year.

Emad Atiq Philosophy The Graduate Prize Fellowship has afforded me time to work on my research in general metaphysics, the metaphysics of legal and moral normativity, and first-order legal and moral theory. I am grateful to the UCHV for its support this past year for it has been an especially productive one. I completed three papers, two of which form the core of my dissertation. In the dissertation, I critically examine essentialist claims—that is, claims about the essence or nature of things—in legal and moral philosophy. My paper in ethics engages with a long-standing debate over what makes someone a realist about moral properties like rightness and wrongness. The line between realism and anti-realism in ethics has traditionally been drawn in terms of theoretical commitments concerning the mind-independence or explanatory significance of moral properties. Arguing against these proposals, I argue that the line should instead be drawn


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based on a theorist’s account of such properties’ nature: whether, e.g., wrongness is conceived as having a nature amenable to empirical investigation like that of certain physical properties. I also wrote two papers in legal philosophy. The first argues that the philosophical debate over the nature of law has a surprising and significant upshot— namely, that judges are not even legally (let alone morally) obliged to follow the law in all cases. The second paper engages with an important common law and constitutional distinction between “questions of law” and “questions of fact.” I offer a theory of this distinction that, among other things, resolves a puzzle concerning the way judges have applied the distinction to normative questions arising in cases (e.g. questions concerning the reasonableness of a defendant’s conduct or the fairness of contractual terms). Apart from my research work, I attended the GPF seminar and seminars on metaphysical explanation and meta-ethics this past year. I also participated in several alumni panels with the UCHV.

an interdisciplinary audience. Being part of the GPF and broader UCHV community has been a productive pleasure.

Jessica Cooper Anthropology My year as a Graduate Prize Fellow at the University Center for Human Values was enormously productive and stimulating. Support from UCHV enabled me to devote the entirety of the academic year to my dissertation, which ethnographically explores systems of evidence and ethics in two of California’s mental health courts. Over the course of my time at UCHV, I was able to develop an overview of the dissertation and complete two chapters of writing, alongside two stand-alone articles that have been submitted for review. Further, the Center’s support enabled me to secure a Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowship for the upcoming academic year. The time availed for substantive work on the dissertation was invaluable. Also invaluable was the collegiality of my GPF colleagues. Our intellectual exchanges during the GPF seminar pushed me to think differently about my research and challenged me to make my work legible to

John DiIulio Politics My year as a UCHV Graduate Prize Fellow has been one of the most positive experiences I’ve had during my time at Princeton. I was able to make substantial progress researching and writing two chapter drafts of my dissertation, which explores the liberal theory of John Stuart Mill. The support of the UCHV enhanced my ability to explore and reinterpret lingering questions about Mill’s theory of happiness and liberty, and to discuss those ideas in a constructive, engaged, and collegial atmosphere. In the GPF seminar, I presented a working paper on the epistemological roots of Mill’s theory of the good life, and I received helpful questions and feedback from the seminar participants. The GPF seminar itself has been wonderfully enlightening and enlivening. Coming into 33


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immediate contact with such a diverse array of academic projects and backgrounds created a dynamic (and unpredictable!) seminar setting that proved consistently enriching. At MPSA, I presented a paper on Mill that in many ways reflected the comments and help I had received from my UCHV colleagues. I would like to thank the people affiliated with UCHV (and particularly Melissa Lane!) for all of their support and encouragement.

Emily Kern History My year as a UCHV Graduate Prize Fellow has been both intellectually stimulating and very productive. The time and space granted by my fellowship year freed me up to write drafts of three chapters of my dissertation, which explores the intertwined history of paleoanthropology, global politics, and race through the lens of the search for the “cradle” of humankind. I also presented

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at workshops in my home department, the Program in the History of Science; chaired a workshop on colonial and imperial history; and submitted an article to a peer-reviewed journal. Making progress on my research has been wonderful, but I’ve also been delighted by the opportunity that the GPF seminar presents for striking up new collaborations and friendships with graduate students from other disciplines. Presenting my work to my GPF colleagues was an excellent opportunity to gain experience speaking in multi-disciplinary settings in the future, and the generous questions and constructive feedback from the other seminar members helped me hone in on the central themes of my research and gave me a chance to explore the larger implications of my project from a fresh perspective. I look forward to continuing these conversations, as well as attending other UCHV events, during my next year at Princeton, when I will be supported by a Charlotte Elizabeth Procter honorific fellowship.

David Zuluaga Martínez Politics Over the past year, and thanks to the UCHV’s Graduate Prize Fellowship, I have had the wonderful opportunity to devote the majority of my time working on my dissertation about state legitimacy and citizens’ obligations to (dis)obey the law. I have particularly benefitted from sustained work on the most challenging portion of the research process, involving the historical study of early modern thinkers such as Hobbes, Rousseau, and Kant. The opportunity to delve into the vast literature on these authors has been invaluable in furthering my dissertation work. On par with that was the chance to participate in the GPF seminar. The seminar has not only challenged me to present my ideas in a manner that appeals and makes sense to an audience beyond my discipline, but it has also given me the opportunity to learn about the fascinating work being done in other areas and the many ways in which a sustained


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exchange can enrich our mutual understanding of the ethical and social issues that motivate scholarship in the humanities.

Anna Offit Anthropology The University Center for Human Values enriched my doctoral work in Princeton’s anthropology department this year. As a Graduate Prize Fellow I had the opportunity to present and workshop a dissertation chapter focusing on the role that jurors play in federal prosecutors’ case preparation in the United States. The broader study demonstrates that jurors serve as a vital ethical resource for prosecutors despite a documented decline in jury trials in the United States. The constructive suggestions I received during this seminar contributed to my submission of an ethnographic research article to an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed journal. My project also benefited from the insight and encouragement of UCHV visiting faculty fellows with overlapping

interests. While completing a draft of the dissertation with the Center’s support this year, I presented additional chapters-in-progress at professional conferences (e.g. the American Anthropological Association, the Association for the Study of Law, Culture, and the Humanities) and collaborative research seminars (the Georgetown University Law Center Fellow’s Colloquium, LAPA’s Law-Engaged-Graduate Student Seminar). During the GPF seminar devoted to other doctoral students’ research, it was a privilege to engage with the projects of such a supportive and collegial group.

Lucia Rafanelli Politics As a UCHV Graduate Prize Fellow, I was able to devote significant time to my dissertation, which is about the ethics of foreign political influence. In particular, there are many ways in which both state and non-state political actors can attempt to promote justice in foreign societies. My dissertation

seeks to develop principles to guide this practice, so it may align with our commitments to political-moral values such as toleration, legitimacy, and collective self-determination. Over the course of the year, I completed drafts of my second and third dissertation chapters (on toleration and legitimacy, respectively), and continued revising a paper that will become part of the fourth (on collective self-determination). The fellows’ seminar provided an excellent opportunity to get valuable feedback from an interdisciplinary audience, and to practice presenting my work to non-specialists. The discussions among fellows and with our faculty convener, Melissa Lane, were consistently engaging and illuminating. In addition to the fellows’ seminar, I presented my dissertation work in my departmental research seminar and Princeton’s Public Law Working Group. I also published an article on group agency and corporate rights in The Journal of Political Philosophy, and attended several UCHV events and conferences.

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ANNUAL REVIEW 2016–2017

Mercedes M. Valmisa Oviedo East Asian Studies I am grateful to the UCHV for inviting me to become a Graduate Prize Fellow and offering me generous funding for the last year of my graduate program. As a fellow, I have been able to complete my dissertation, entitled “Changing Along with the World: Adaptive Agency in Early China,” and secure a position for the fall after my graduation. During this academic year, I have also prepared a manuscript for publication in the Hong Kong journal Chinese Philosophy and Culture, and presented my research at two international conferences. I have greatly benefited from the interdisciplinary community at the GPF seminars, which have surpassed my expectations at all levels: even at Princeton, one will rarely find a more committed, intellectually engaged, and educated crowd of intelligent and curious graduate students of the most diverse interests and formation who can nevertheless address 36

issues of transversal relevance transgressing disciplinary boundaries. I have looked forward to each one of our meetings, as well as to other activities and events organized by UCHV. Discussing my research in Early Chinese Philosophy with such a diverse community has helped me anticipate questions and problems that I may encounter in a job talk, and inspired me to pursue new lines of inquiry.

half of the nineteenth century. Thanks to the UCHV community and seminars, in particular, I am now better equipped to address issues of responsibility and financial governance as well as the rich political theory literature on public debt and the state in my dissertation. During the past academic year, I presented my research in two workshops, one international conference, and served as the main convener for the Latin America Workshop in the History department. With the support of several departments at Princeton, I am also coordinating a project aimed at restoring and digitizing rare nineteenth-century manuscripts at the National Library in Brazil. For the 201718 academic year, I will be a Graduate Fellow at the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies.

Paula Vedoveli History My time as a UCHV Graduate Prize Fellow was incredibly productive. The fellowship provided me with a stimulating intellectual community where I was able to discuss and present my dissertation, “Private Capital, Public Debt: A Global History of Brazil and Argentina’s Integration into International Financial Markets, 1852–1906.” My dissertation examines how diplomats, businessmen, and journalists crucially shaped Brazil’s and Argentina’s access to international capital markets in the second

“…even at Princeton, one will rarely find a more committed, intellectually engaged, and educated crowd of intelligent an curious graduate students of the most diverse interests and formation who can nevertheless address issues of transversal relevance transgressing disciplinary boundaries.” —Mercedes M. Valmisa Oviedo, East Asian Studies, UCHV Graduate Prize Fellow


SUPPORTING RESEARCH

Faculty Research Grants The University Center sponsors a program of competitive grants for Princeton faculty members to support research, conferences, and collaborative projects on subjects relating to values in public and private life. In 2016-17, the following awards were granted as part of this program: Joseph’s Dreams – Modern Visions Conference (2017) Leora Batnitzky, Department of Religion 50 Years Later: Remembering Langston Hughes Conference (2017) Wallace Best, Department of Religion and African American Studies Fires of Gold: Law, Land and Sacrificial Labor in Ghana (2017) Lauren Coyle, Department of Anthropology Rawls on the Move: An Empirical Analysis of Migrants’ Ethical Views (2017) Alisha Holland, Department of Politics Theaters of the Mind: Conceptualizing Opera in the 21st Century (2017) Andrew Lovett, Department of Music (with Wendy Heller, Department of Music)

Within the Quota (Cole Porter) Performance (2017) Simon Morrison, Department of Music

Sex, Race, and Human Nature: the Descent of Darwin Conference (2017) Erika Milam, Department of History

Ethics and Informed Consent in Intra-Familial Kidney Donation in Japan (2017) Amy Borovoy, Department of East Asian Studies

Income Inequality and Social Norms (2017-18) Tali Mendelberg, Department of Politics

Re-thinking the Languages of Care (2017) Susana Draper, Department of Comparative Literature

Refugees and Native Reactions in Germany: Part II (2017) Rafaela Dancygier, Department of Politics (with Amaney Jamal, Department of Politics)

Ethics of Humanitarianism Manuscript Research (2017) Eric Gregory, Department of Religion African and African-American Diasporic Representations in Photography (2017) Deana Lawson, Lewis Center for the Arts

Information, Constructive Social Capital and Governance (2017-18) Leonard Wantchekon, Department of Politics The Psychology of Authoritarian Rule (2017-18) Rory Truex, Department of Politics

The Intellectual Lives of Hugo Grotius Conference (2017) Russell Leo, Department of English Princeton-Brown Epistemology Workshop (2017) Sarah McGrath, Department of Philosophy Religion and the American Normal (2017) Judith Weisenfeld, Department of Religion The False Saints: A Story of Remains (2017) João Biehl, Department of Anthropology and the Woodrow Wilson School 37


ANNUAL REVIEW 2016–2017

Victoria McGeer, Senior Research Scholar at the University Center for Human Values, enjoys a Center event.

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People Faculty Susan J. Brison Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Professor for Distinguished Teaching Peter Brooks Lecturer with the rank of Professor in Comparative Literature and the University Center for Human Values Christopher L. Eisgruber President of the University; Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Public Affairs in the Woodrow Wilson School and the University Center for Human Values Marc Fleurbaey Robert E. Kuenne Professor in Economics and Humanistic Studies; Professor of Public Affairs and the University Center for Human Values Johann Frick Assistant Professor of Philosophy and the University Center for Human Values Elizabeth Harman Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Philosophy and the University Center for Human Values Nannerl O. Keohane Senior Scholar, University Center for Human Values

Erika Kiss Director, University Center for Human Values Film Forum. Associate Research Scholar, University Center for Human Values

Anna Stilz Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Politics and the University Center for Human Values

Melissa Lane Director, University Center for Human Values; Class of 1943 Professor of Politics

Executive Committee

Stephen Macedo Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Politics and the University Center for Human Values Victoria McGeer Senior Research Scholar, University Center for Human Values Philip Pettit Laurance S. Rockefeller University Professor of Politics and the University Center for Human Values Kim Lane Scheppele Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Sociology and International Affairs and the University Center for Human Values Peter Singer Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics in the University Center for Human Values

Melissa Lane Director, University Center for Human Values; Class of 1943 Professor of Politics Charles Beitz Edwards S. Sanford Professor of Politics Sandra Bermann Cotsen Professor in the Humanities; Professor of Comparative Literature; Head of Whitman College Marc Fleurbaey Robert E. Kuenne Professor in Economics and Humanistic Studies; Professor of Public Affairs and the University Center for Human Values Johann Frick Assistant Professor of Philosophy and the University Center for Human Values Eric Gregory Professor of Religion; Chair, Council of the Humanities; Director, Stewart Seminars in Religion; Director, Program in Humanistic Studies 39


ANNUAL REVIEW 2016–2017

Eric Gregory, Professor of Religion

Victoria McGeer Senior Research Scholar, University Center for Human Values

Peter Singer Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics in the University Center for Human Values

Jan-Werner Mueller Professor of Politics

Michael Smith McCosh Professor of Philosophy; Chair, Department in Philosophy

Alan Patten Howard Harrison and Gabrielle Snyder Beck Professor of Politics; Vice Dean of the Faculty for Strategic Initiatives; Director, Program in Political Philosophy

LAPA fellows James Fleming and Cornelia Dayton at the Moffett Lecture: “The Privileges of Marriage.”

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Elizabeth Harman Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Philosophy and the University Center for Human Values

Philip Pettit Laurance S. Rockefeller University Professor of Politics and the University Center for Human Values

Stephen Macedo Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Politics and the University Center for Human Values

Kim Lane Scheppele Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Sociology and International Affairs and the University Center for Human Values

Anna Stilz Director, Program in Values and Public Life; Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Politics and the University Center for Human Values

Laurance S. Rockefeller University Preceptors Alin Coman Assistant Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs (2016 –19) Joshua Kotin Assistant Professor of English (2014–17)


PEOPLE

A pensive Charles Beitz, the Edwards S. Sanford Professor of Politics.

Faculty Associates Elizabeth Armstrong Associate Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School Leora Batnitzky Ronald O. Perelman Professor of Jewish Studies; Professor of Religion; Chair of the Department of Religion João Biehl Susan Dod Brown Professor of Anthropology; Co-Director of the Program in Global Health and Health Policy Jonathan D. Cohen Robert Bendheim and Lynn Bendheim Thoman Professor in Neuroscience; Professor of Psychology and the Princeton Neuroscience Institute; Co-Director, Princeton Neuroscience Institute

Alin Coman Assistant Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs; Laurance S. Rockefeller University Preceptor (2016 –19) Nathaniel Daw Professor of Princeton Neuroscience Institute and Psychology Mitchell Duneier Maurice P. During Professor of Sociology Nick Feamster Professor of Computer Science; Deputy Director, Center for Information Technology Policy Susan Fiske Eugene Higgins Professor of Psychology; Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs

Paul Frymer Professor of Politics; Director, Program in Law and Public Affairs Daniel Garber A. Watson Armour, III, University Professor of Philosophy Sheldon Garon Nissan Professor in Japanese Studies; Professor of History and East Asian Studies Sophie Gee Associate Professor of English Robert George McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence; Professor of Politics; Director, James Madison Program Eddie Glaude Jr. William S. Tod Professor of Religion and African American Studies; Chair, Department of African American Studies; Director, Program in African American Studies 41


ANNUAL REVIEW 2016–2017

Alan Patten and Brandice Canes-Wrone listen to the panel conversation: Democracy’s Global Crisis.

Gilbert Harman James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Philosophy

Robert Keohane Professor of Public and International Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School

Anne McClintock A. Barton Hepburn Professor of Gender and Sexuality Studies

Hendrik Hartog Class of 1921 Bicentennial Professor in the History of American Law and Liberty; Professor of History; Acting Director, Program in American Studies

Joshua Kotin Assistant Professor of English. Laurance S. Rockefeller University Preceptor (2014 –17)

Benjamin Morison Professor of Philosophy; Director, Program in Classical Philosophy

Ilyana Kuziemko Professor of Economics; Co-Director, Center for Health and Wellbeing

Alexander Nehamas Edmund N. Carpenter II Class of 1943 Professor in the Humanities; Professor of Philosophy and Comparative Literature

Brooke Holmes Robert F. Goheen Professor in the Humanities; Professor of Classics; Director, Interdisciplinary Ph.D. Program in Humanistic Studies Desmond Jagmohan Assistant Professor of Politics Mark Johnston Henry Putnam University Professor of Philosophy Thomas Kelly Professor of Philosophy

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David Leheny Henry Wendt III ‘55 Professor of East Asian Studies Thomas Leonard Research Scholar, The Council of the Humanities; Lecturer in Economics and the Council of the Humanities Sarah-Jane Leslie Class of 1943 Professor of Philosophy; Acting Chair, Department of Philosophy; Director, Program in Linguistics; Director, Program in Cognitive Science

Robert Nixon Thomas A. and Currie C. Barron Family Professor in Humanities and the Environment; Professor of English and the Princeton Environmental Institute Guy Nordenson Professor of Architecture Jeff Nunokawa Professor of English


PEOPLE

Serguei Oushakine Associate Professor of Anthropology and Slavic Languages and Literatures; Director, Program in Russian East European and Eurasian Studies Deborah S. Prentice Alexander Stewart 1886 Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs; Dean of the Faculty Gideon Rosen Stuart Professor of Philosophy Martha A. Sandweiss Professor of History Esther Schor Professor of English Harold T. Shapiro President of the University, Emeritus; Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Woodrow Wilson School Paul Starr Stuart Professor of Communications and Public Affairs in the Woodrow Wilson School; Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs

Advisory Council Danielle Allen ’93 James Bryant Conan University Professor; Director, Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, Harvard University Eric Beerbohm *08 Professor of Government; Director, Edmond J. Safra Fellowships in Ethics, Harvard University Ezekiel Emanuel Diane v.S. Levy and Robert M. Levy University Professor; Vice Provost for Global Initiatives; Chair, Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, University of Pennsylvania Bert Kerstetter ’66 President, Everfast, Inc.

Katherine Marshall ’69 Senior Fellow, Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs; Professor of the Practice of Development, Conflict, and Religion in the School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University Mark Rockefeller ’89 Founder and CEO, Rockefeller Consulting; Vice Chairman, Rockefeller Financial Debra Satz Senior Associate Dean for the Humanities and Arts; Professor of Ethics in Society, Stanford University Dennis F. Thompson Alfred North Whitehead Professor of Political Philosophy, Emeritus, Faculty of Arts and Sciences and the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University Professor Elizabeth Harman leading a session at the second networking and mentoring workshop of the “Athena in Action”

Jeffrey Stout Professor of Religion

project.

Robert Wuthnow Gerhard R. Andlinger ‘52 Professor of Social Sciences; Professor of Sociology; Director, Center for the Study of Religion

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ANNUAL REVIEW 2016–2017

Administration Femke de Ruyter Program Coordinator Kimberly Girman Staff Assistant Maureen Killeen Assistant Director Melissa Lane Director, University Center for Human Values; Class of 1943 Professor of Politics Andrew Lovett Acting Director, University Center for Human Values Film Forum; Professional Specialist, Department of Music Andrew Perhac Computer Support Specialist Anna Stilz Director, Program in Values and Public Life; Laurance S. Rockefeller Professor of Politics and the University Center for Human Values Susan Winters Administrative Assistant

Edited by Femke de Ruyter University Center for Human Values Designed by Phillip Unetic, UneticDesign.com Photographs by Anita Chevres Photography Frank Wojciechowski

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Copyright © 2017 by The Trustees of Princeton University In the Nation’s Service and the Service of Humanity Princeton University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. The Center particularly invites applications from women and members of underrepresented minorities. For information about applying to Princeton and how to self-identify, please visit: http://web.princeton.edu/sites/dof/applicantsinfo.htm. Nondiscrimination Statement In compliance with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and other federal, state, and local laws, Princeton University does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, national or ethnic origin, disability, or veteran status in any phase of its employment process, in any phase of its admission or financial aid programs, or other aspects of its educational programs or activities. The vice provost for institutional equity and diversity is the individual designated by the University to coordinate its efforts to comply with Title IX, Section 504 and other equal opportunity and affirmative action regulations and laws. Questions or concerns regarding Title IX, Section 504 or other aspects of Princeton’s equal opportunity or affirmative action programs should be directed to the Office of the Vice Provost for Institutional Equity and Diversity, Princeton University, 205 Nassau Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 or 609-258-6110.

Cover: Laurance S. Rockefeller Visiting Faculty Fellows John Doris and Melissa Schwartzberg in conversation prior to a James A. Moffett ’29 Lecture in Ethics.

Printed on 100% post consumer recycled paper manufactured in plants using renewable energy.


U NIV ERSIT Y CENT ER FOR HUMAN VALUES ANNUAL REVIEW 2016–17

Princeton, New Jersey 08544

uchv.princeton.edu

P RI NCE TON UNIVE RSITY

304 Marx Hall

Annual Review 2016 -17

University Center for Human Values, Princeton University, 2016-17  
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