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Issue: July 2017

IN THE WORLD OF CANCER

Breakaway from Cancer® Think About The Link®

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Change in prostate cancer screening Delay, delay, delay Let's talk about preventing melanoma

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PREVENTIVE MEASURES & GENERAL WELLNESS

How do I get involved? Talk to your dentist about oral cancer

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HEALTHY EATING

MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Fresh and fruity

Cancer prevention research saves lives

Restaurant road block p.

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FITNESS

Vacation from your work, not your workouts STOP CANCER BEFORE IT STARTS! p.

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Breakaway from Cancer® President’s

Corner

Dear Readers, Cancer screening guidelines have been controversial in recent years as experts debate the benefits and harms of screening. It can be a lot to keep up with— that’s why we want you to know you can count on the Prevent Cancer Foundation® to keep you up-to-date on the latest in cancer prevention and early detection. In this issue, we delve into USPSTF’s new draft recommendations for prostate cancer screening. We’re also bringing you updates on tobacco regulation and requirements for chain restaurants. And we’ll help you celebrate summertime with vacation workout ideas, a deliciously healthy limoncello fruit salad and reminders on sun safety to prevent melanoma from Dr. Sandra Lee (aka Dr. Pimple Popper). We are looking forward to a summer of healthy living as we strive to Stop Cancer Before It Starts!® Thank you for being a partner in our mission. Carolyn Aldigé President & Founder

Education is central to the mission of the Prevent Cancer Foundation® and talking directly to communities about the lifesaving power of cancer prevention and early detection is an important part of spreading our message. At the Amgen Tour of California cycling race, we had an opportunity to share prevention tips, screening information and more with thousands of fans as a partner in Breakaway from Cancer®. Breakaway includes four nonprofit partners, organizations working across the cancer spectrum from prevention to survivorship. Even though about half of all cancer cases are preventable, many people are still not aware of the steps they can take to help reduce their cancer risk. “I had no idea your diet plays such a big role,” said one mother as she looked through the Foundation’s Guide to Preventing Cancer. She picked up several guides to share with other parents to help teach their children positive habits and set them up for a lifetime of health. We are grateful to Amgen for providing us this unique opportunity to traverse California talking to people from all walks of life. Breakaway from Cancer® introduces new people to the Foundation’s resources and information to help them Stop Cancer Before It Starts!®


PreventCancer.org

FOUNDATION NEWS

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THINK ABOUT THE LINK PIENSA EN EL VINCULO The Think About the Link website is now LIVE in Spanish and Mandarin!

Many people are unaware of the link between certain viruses and cancer. As a result, you may not be taking steps to protect yourself and your loved ones from these viruses and, ultimately, prevent several types of cancer. Hepatitis B and C are leading causes of liver cancer, and together cause about 65 percent of cases. Liver cancer is an often-lethal cancer and the fastest-rising rate of cancer death in the U.S. Hispanics are at increased risk for both hepatitis B and C, and Asian-Americans are at increased risk for hepatitis B. That’s why we’re reaching out to these communities with two new versions of the Think About the Link® website—one in Spanish and one in Mandarin.

Learn more about viruses and cancer in Spanish at www.piensaenelvinculo.org. Learn more about viruses and cancer in Mandarin at www.chinese.thinkaboutthelink.org.


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IN THE WORLD OF CANCER

Changes in prostate cancer screening In April, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) released new draft recommendations on prostate cancer screening with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, which measures the level of PSA in a man’s blood. PSA testing has been couched in controversy in recent months, with critics saying the test leads to a high rate of overdiagnosis, and supporters saying the test, though imperfect, leads to crucial early detection that saves lives. The USPSTF’s latest draft recommendations upgraded PSA testing for men ages 55 to 69 to a “C” rating and says each man should discuss the potential benefits and harms of screening with his doctor. This is a marked change from their 2012 recommendations, which gave a “D” rating to men in this age group, and said any potential benefit from the PSA test was outweighed by possible harms. Men with prostate cancer will usually have elevated PSA levels, though high PSA levels can also be caused by several non-cancerous conditions, such as an enlarged prostate (BPH). Early detection of prostate cancer followed by prompt treatment saves lives. However, some men are treated for cancers that will never cause them harm, and they must live with the side effects and complications of these treatments, which can include incontinence, impotence and loss of fertility. Experts say the answer is in developing a better screening that can tell the difference between cancers that are likely to be aggressive and those that are likely to remain indolent and not cause harm. For now, there are some tests that can distinguish between these types of cancers and help guide biopsy and treatment decisions, including a blood test for three antigens in addition to PSA, Gleason scoring—which determines how much the cancer cells differ from other cells—and imaging tests. As with all screening recommendations, they are not “one size fits all.” You should also take into consideration your personal and family medical histories and other risk factors, such as age or ethnicity. If you are at average risk for prostate cancer, the Prevent Cancer Foundation® continues to recommend you begin talking to your health care professional about the pros and cons of screening at age 50. If you are at increased risk of prostate cancer, start this conversation with your doctor earlier.

For more information about prostate cancer prevention and early detection, visit www.preventcancer.org/prostate.


PreventCancer.org

IN THE WORLD OF CANCER

Delay, delay, delay The Justice Department recently delayed deadlines from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the regulation of e-cigarettes, cigars and hookah. These regulations were put forth under a 2016 deeming rule that grants the FDA regulatory authority over all tobacco products. Now, any deadline established under the rule set for May 10, 2017, or later has been postponed for at least three months. Postponed deadlines include: • Banning the use of terms like “light” and “mild” on labels • Submitting ingredients listings to the FDA (right now, only manufacturers know what is in their products) • Including warning statements on packages and advertisements Regulations that went into effect in August 2016, aimed at restricting youth access, will remain in effect. The FDA’s 2009 regulations on cigarettes, smokeless and roll-your-own tobacco will also remain in place. Tobacco use is the leading cause of cancer in the U.S. and nicotine is one of the most addictive substances there is. While e-cigarettes are relatively new devices, there are still many unknowns about the potential long-term risks. However, we do know that most e-cigarettes contain nicotine (typically derived from tobacco), which causes addiction and can harm brain development. In 2013, more than a quarter million middle and high school students who had never smoked regular cigarettes had used e-cigarettes.

For more information on tobacco use and cancer, visit www.preventcancer.org.

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IN THE WORLD OF CANCER

Let’s talk about preventing melanoma

By Dr. Sandra Lee aka Dr. Pimple Popper Melanoma is a type of cancerous growth that, like most cancers, is caused by damage or alteration to our DNA, typically as a result of exposure to UV radiation. What is particularly devastating about melanoma is that it often presents at a young age—when the last thing you’re thinking about is your mortality. There are many melanoma statistics, but the one I point to most frequently is that when melanoma is caught in stage 1, the 10-year survival rate is 95 percent. Unfortunately, this number drops significantly (to 10 percent) if the cancer is found in stage 4. What I want to share with you is that melanoma can be caught in its very early stages and is very treatable at this stage. It’s so important that you are diligent about checking your own skin because often, the patient can be the first person to bring a potential dangerous growth to his or her doctor’s attention. To minimize your chances for developing melanoma as much as you can, it’s crucial to stay out of the sun and use proper sun protection whenever possible. My other advice is to get your skin examined, and examine your own skin. You know your body best, and you probably have a gut instinct about something on your body that doesn’t look quite right. Ultimately, be vigilant about protecting yourself from the sun, checking your skin, taking responsibility for your health and being aware of what’s going on with your body. Don’t forget that when a melanoma is caught early, it’s almost always curable — it’s when they’re caught late, unfortunately, that they’re often incurable.

To learn more about skin health, cancer and dermatology, visit theprettypimple.com. Dr. Sandra Lee, also known as Dr. Pimple Popper, is a board-certified dermatologist who practices in Upland, California.


PreventCancer.org

PREVENTIVE MEASURES & GENERAL WELLNESS

Talk to your dentist about oral cancer Do you know if your dentist is screening you for oral cancer? At your next cleaning, talk to your dentist and dental assistant about more than just brushing and flossing—ask about screening for oral cancer. This year alone, nearly 50,000 people will be diagnosed with oral cancer and dentists can screen for early signs of the disease. If you notice long-lasting pain, white or red patches, swelling or any other changes in your mouth, speak up and ask your dentist to take a look. The most common risk factors for oral cancer are using tobacco, consuming alcohol in excess and having a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. If you currently use tobacco, it’s never too late to quit. For help quitting, call 1-800-QuitNow to be connected to a trained quit coach in your area. Limit alcohol to no more than one drink a day for women or two drinks a day for men. Fortunately, you can protect against HPV with immunization. The HPV vaccine can reduce your risk for several types of cancer, including oral cancer—but 54 percent of adults are unaware that most HPV-induced cancers can be prevented with immunization. The vaccine is recommended for girls and boys ages 11-12, but most young men can receive a “catch-up” vaccine until age 21, and young women can get it until age 26. If you or your children are in this age range, talk to a health care professional about getting immunized. Going to the dentist is essential for your health. At your next visit, talk to your dentist about getting screened for oral cancer—it just might save your life.

SYMPTOMS OF ORAL CANCER

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ADVOCACY NEWS

How do I get involved? If you’re passionate about cancer prevention and early detection and want to support policies that improve access, services and care in the United States, it’s time to make your voice heard. One of the best ways to communicate with your legislators is to schedule an in-person meeting.

1. FIND your elected officials.

Use our online tool at www.preventcancer.org/legislators to find your senators and representative. You’ll see their office information and any upcoming town halls at the bottom of the page.

2. SCHEDULE a meeting.

Every office has a preferred method of communication. Call your elected official’s office and ask to speak to the scheduler to learn how to submit a request for a meeting. It’s easier to meet with members of Congress when they are home (in-district), as their schedules tend to be more flexible.

3. PREPARE for your meeting.

Pick two or three clear, easy-to-understand points to focus on—most meetings are only about 15 minutes long. Know your elected official’s legislative background on the issue and the main arguments for the opposing viewpoint.

4. FOLLOW UP after the meeting.

Send a thank you email immediately afterward and, if possible, include some highlights from your conversation. Be sure to follow up with any additional information you promised to send.

Remember, your elected officials are here to serve you. Your experiences, stories and actions can increase government funding and resources, strengthen health programs and enhance awareness. You have the power to influence your elected officials and help others across the country Stop Cancer Before It Starts!®


PreventCancer.org

Fresh and fruity

HEALTHY EATING

Celebrate the summer with a mix of your favorite fruits in a Limoncello Fruit Salad. This tasty and nutritious snack is sure to satisfy any sweet tooth, without too much guilt. Try our refreshing berry combination to add loads of potassium and antioxidants to your diet! This recipe has been adapted from the Food Network.

Restaurant road block A law requiring chain restaurants to prominently show calorie counts has been delayed again. The law was enacted as part of the Affordable Care Act in 2010 and required the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to mandate all restaurants with 20 or more locations, such as McDonalds and Taco Bell, display calorie counts on their menus by May 2017. The measure is now delayed for the third time and restaurants have been given until May 8, 2018, to enact these changes. This is disappointing news for the health of Americans, since research shows poor diet can increase risk for colorectal, breast and several other types of cancer. Making nutrition information more visible to customers can help us all make smarter choices about our food and reduce our cancer risk.

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MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Cancer prevention research saves lives

Ligi Paul, Ph.D.

Derek Huffman, Ph.D. Dorraya El-Ashry, Ph.D. Janne Nappie, Ph.D. Pak Kin Wong, Ph.D.

Raymond Kunger, Ph.D.

An investment in cancer prevention is an investment in the future.

Without the generous support of the Prevent Cancer Foundation, the important studies which I am currently conducting would, frankly, not have been possible. Research grants are critically important for the advancement of new therapeutic targets, and to identify novel ways to predict and prevent metastatic breast cancer. Research in cancer prevention and early detection increases our knowledge and options regarding cancer, thereby ultimately providing us with longer, more productive and happier lives. There are urgent needs to improve our knowledge in cancer prevention, and to develop novel strategies for reducing the incidence of cancer. Since receiving the Prevent Cancer Foundation grant, I have gone on to obtain three different NIH grants that have allowed my research to progress nicely.

Each year, groundbreaking research goes unfunded. Your contribution will help change this. Together we can Stop Cancer Before It Starts!ÂŽ

GIVE NOW

www.PreventCancer.org/give


FITNESS

PreventCancer.org

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Vacation from your work, not your workouts Many Americans leave behind healthy eating habits and exercise when traveling. But research shows regular physical activity can reduce your risk of certain types of cancer, so you should make exercising a priority, even when you’re on vacation. Get motivated with these workout ideas—and don’t forget to wear sunscreen, avoid the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. and stay hydrated.

Beach workout

The beach is a great spot for exercising because the sand creates resistance, making your workout a bit more challenging. Plus, you can end your workout with a refreshing dive into the ocean. Warm up with a jog, then follow with two to three sets of crab walks, lunges, planks and burpees.

Swimming

Swimming is a full-body workout that also keeps you cool. If you don’t enjoy swimming laps, many typical gym exercises can be modified for the pool, including sit-ups, pull-ups, bicycles and scissor kicks. Use the side of the pool or a noodle to help.

Hiking

Hiking is an ideal activity for the whole family. Check out www.nps.gov or www. alltrails.com to help locate and plan your hike ahead of time. Pack healthy snacks or a picnic and plenty of water to stay fueled and hydrated.

Biking

Riding a bike is not only a way to stay active, it’s also a great way to explore your vacation spot. Most tourist destinations have bicycle rentals shops if you are unable to bring your own. Try a route with hills for a challenge.

OTHER UPCOMING EVENTS October 2-3: Quantitative Imaging Workshop


Keeping up with prevention

TO SUBSCRIBE, CONTACT: Prevent Cancer Foundation 1600 Duke Street, Suite 500, Alexandria, VA 22314 Toll-Free: (800) 227-2732 Main: (703) 836-4412 Email: pcf@PreventCancer.org Visit: PreventCancer.org Cancer PreventionWorks is published by the Prevent Cancer Foundation, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization dedicated to the prevention and early detection of cancer. All contributions are tax deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law. The Prevent Cancer Foundation is a member of the Combined Federal Campaign (#11074).

1600 Duke Street, Suite 500, Alexandria, VA 22314

Politics and prevention

Cancer prevention research saves lives

Delay, delay, delay

How do I get involved?

Prevention Works - July 2017  

Prevent Cancer Foundation Newsletter - July 2017

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