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Issue: Mar.-Apr. 2018

PREVENTIVE MEASURES & GENERAL WELLNESS

Co-test is best A strong recommendation can go a long way

Awesome Games Done Quick Think About The Link Tour with Alejandro Escovedo p.

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IN THE WORLD OF CANCER

FITNESS / HEALTHY EATING

Indoor fitness trends What's next for lung cancer screening

How to switch up your fitness routine

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Restaurant rules

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MAKE A DIFFERENCE

ADVOCACY NEWS

Your donations are still 100 percent deductible Gal PALS New bill in Congress aims to improve prevention services

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Stop Cancer Before It Starts!

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FOUNDATION NEWS

President’s Corner Dear Readers, There’s no magic button for cancer prevention. It takes a steady drumbeat to get the message out on how to reduce your cancer risk with healthy lifestyle choices and recommended screenings. The Prevent Cancer Foundation is continuing to march toward prevention with efforts to standardize low-dose spiral CT screening for lung cancer, protect access to co-testing for cervical cancer, and help you make smart decisions when you eat out. We can’t do it alone. The new tax bill means big losses in charitable donations, so your support means more now than ever before. Thank you for helping to Stop Cancer Before It Starts!

Carolyn Aldigé President & Founder Prevent Cancer Foundation

Awesome Games Done Quick

Another awesome week is in the books with the 2018 Awesome Games Done Quick (AGDQ) video gaming marathon. This year’s event was held January 7-13, and broke last year’s fundraising record of $2.2 million by raising a whopping $2.3 million. The marathon also broke attendance records, with more than 1,800 gamers from around the world attending in person and millions of viewers streaming live via Twitch. Over the last eight years, the AGDQ marathon and its community have become a warm and nurturing environment, giving attendees the opportunity to do something they love while giving back to a cause close to their hearts. “Happy to make this donation in support of Awesome Games Done Quick and the Prevent Cancer Foundation. I found this community when I needed it most, just after I lost my dad to cancer. It was early detection that gave him 12 more years with us,” one donor wrote. Another shared, “This donation is for my mother who has been diagnosed with breast cancer twice and a stomach tumor. She has gone through all of this and still walking strong!” Funds raised from the annual marathon are supporting important research globally, funding community programs to provide education and screenings to the poorest populations, and providing fellowships to physicians, clinicians and researchers that allow them to receive hands-on training at some of the top cancer centers in the world. “The Prevent Cancer Foundation is extremely humbled by the support of this incredibly generous community,” said Jan Bresch, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of the Prevent Cancer Foundation. “Video games are proving to be a powerful tool in the fight against cancer.”


FOUNDATION NEWS

PreventCancer.org

Think About the Link® Tour with Alejandro Escovedo

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A passion for music and cancer prevention collided when Think About the Link spokesperson and musical artist Alejandro Escovedo launched a 14-city East Coast tour. The tour kicked off January 13 at the Austin City Limits – Moody Theater in Austin, Texas, and ending February 9 at the Heights Theatre in Houston. The Think About the Link tour showcased Alejandro’s 2001 album, A Man Under the Influence, in its entirety, providing the audience with a memorable musical experience that included surprise guest artists and an educational twist—raising awareness of viruses that can cause cancer. Alejandro seamlessly wove his personal battle with hepatitis C into his performance, along with the stories of other artists who have battled hepatitis C and liver cancer, and some who did not survive. He didn’t shy away from sharing the agonizing details of his 20-year battle with the virus, which intensified due to his lack of medical insurance at that time, and his road to recovery. Alejandro never developed cancer, but he is one of the lucky ones—hepatitis C is a leading cause of liver cancer. An estimated 3.2 million people in the U.S are living with chronic hepatitis C and most are unaware they are infected. Now cured of his hepatitis C, Alejandro is using his music to spread the word and is getting people talking about being tested and treated for hepatitis C to prevent cancer. Now that’s something to sing about!

Austin City Limits Live at Moody Theater Austin, TX The Hamilton Washington, DC City Winery New York, NY City Winery Boston, MA

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World Cafe Live Philadelphia, PA City Winery Chicago, IL

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The Castle Theater Bloomington, IL

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City Winery Atlanta, GA City Winery Nashville, TN

10 The Mansion Uptown Minneapolis, MN 11 Knuckleheads Kansas City, MO

12 The Kessler Theater Dallas, TX 13 The Heights Theater Houston, TX 14 Sam's Burger Joint San Antonio, TX


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PREVENTIVE MEASURES & GENERAL WELLNESS

Co-test is best

Cervical cancer is highly preventable; yet, nearly 13,000 women in the U.S. are diagnosed with this disease annually and 4,000 women in the U.S. die from cervical cancer every year. Research has shown that more than 90 percent of cervical cancers are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), for which there is a safe and effective vaccine. (Regrettably, vaccination rates in the U.S. remain low.) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the vaccine for all girls and boys ages 11-12, and a “catch-up” vaccine is available for teens and young adults. However, even women who have been vaccinated should begin regular cervical cancer screening at age 21 with a Pap test (also called a Pap smear), which can detect precancerous or cancerous cells in the cervix. Women ages 21 to 29 need a Pap test every three years. Women ages 30 to 65 should have either co-testing with a Pap test and an HPV test every five years (preferred) or a Pap test every three years. While organizations like the Prevent Cancer Foundation, American Cancer Society and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists agree on these recommendations, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) released draft guidelines in September at odds with these standards. The USPSTF draft guidelines recommend women ages 30 to 65 get a Pap test every three years or an HPV test every five years, but do not address cotesting. Because insurance companies follow the recommendations of the USPSTF, this means millions of women could lose coverage for their co-testing, or may forgo comprehensive cervical cancer screening—and that means even more deaths that could have been prevented. The USPSTF has not yet finalized these guidelines; the Foundation has voiced its concerns and hopes they will reconsider the importance of co-testing with both a Pap test and an HPV test for women ages 30 to 65. In the meantime, you can take charge of your health. Talk to your health care professional today. Get vaccinated, screened and/or treated for HPV and cervical cancer. Get your kids vaccinated, and encourage your friends and family to do the same.


PreventCancer.org

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A strong recommendation can go a long way

It’s a smart move to get your children vaccinated against a cancer-causing virus, but HPV vaccination rates in the U.S. are far below the Healthy People 2020 goal of 80 percent. As of 2016, only 43 percent of teens were up-to-date on all recommended doses of the HPV vaccine. Research indicates that a strong recommendation from a health care professional makes a big difference in whether or not someone gets vaccinated for HPV, but giving that recommendation is not as easy as it seems. Because of the social stigma around the HPV vaccine, health care professionals must be prepared to have potentially uncomfortable conversations with patients and parents. Here are a few tips for improving patient-provider communication when it comes to the HPV vaccine:

Use the sandwiching method

Active listening

Create a sense of urgency

Ask your patients and their parents if they have When recommending the You can “sandwich” or any questions about the vaccine, be sure to include bundle the HPV vaccine vaccines you are the word “today.” recommendation with recommending—and (Today, we have three other vaccines your then truly listen to their vaccines for your child.) patient needs (e.g., concerns. Be prepared Don’t provide an Tdap, meningococcal with responses to opportunity to put conjugate). common concerns about things off. the HPV vaccine. After hearing a confident, clear recommendation from their health care professionals, patients (and their parents!) trust that they are making the best decision. A short conversation could be the key to preventing HPV-related cancers in the future.


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IN THE WORLD OF CANCER

PreventCancer.org

First reports of the success of low-dose spiral CT scans for detecting early lung cancer

Most of the world is skeptical of these results, but the response from the Prevent Cancer Foundation is markedly different. The Foundation gets to work exploring the potential of this game-changing technology.

The Prevent Cancer Foundation launches the Millennium Lung Cancer Workshop

Discussions at the Workshop center on a follow-up randomized clinical trial to prove that lung cancer screening of high-risk individuals can reduce lung cancer mortality. Dr. Richard Klausner, then-director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), attended the Workshop and subsequently determined that the NCI should undertake this trial.

NCI runs the National Lung Cancer Screening Trial

This is the largest clinical trial ever sponsored by the NCI. The trial proves that lung cancer screening through low-dose spiral CT can detect lung cancer early and save lives. In fact, this type of screening was shown to lower the risk of dying from lung cancer by at least 20 percent. Lung cancer screening of high-risk individuals is now covered by both private insurance and Medicare and Medicaid.

The Prevent Cancer Foundation launches the Quantitative Imaging Workshop (QIW)

The Workshop is intended explore the management of early-stage lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and coronary artery disease detected by spiral CT and to address concerns about false positivity in screening (detection of lung lesions that are not cancer). At the QIW, academic, federal government and industry experts explore how to more precisely and accurately measure indicators of early-stage disease.

Experts at the QIW focus on improving low-dose spiral CT imaging and decreasing the impact of variations in machines

The goal is to ensure the new process of measuring changes during lung cancer screening can be done simply, but precisely, despite differences in the various CT scanners being used worldwide. This affects not only screening for lung cancer, but also for COPD and coronary artery disease.


What’s next for lung cancer screening

IN THE WORLD OF CANCER

In order to see where we’re going, you have to understand where we’ve been! What’s next?

Standardizing CT screening around the globe Working with leading federal, industry and academic imaging experts, the Prevent Cancer Foundation is providing a grant to test a new reference tool for low-dose spiral CT screening. After a rigorous, multi-stage review and approval process, the Quantitative Imaging Biomarker Alliance (QIBA) of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) is now working with the Prevent Cancer Foundation to build evidence that lung cancer screening can be done accurately in any medical facility in the world. This is the first time QIBA (a group of academic imaging researchers) has collaborated with an advocacy organization to accelerate progress in saving lives through the early detection of lung cancer, COPD and coronary artery disease. The potential of this technology to save millions of lives around the globe cannot be overestimated. In the past decade, we have seen incredible progress in the early detection of lung cancer. By standardizing CT screening around the world, we hope to detect more lung cancers early, when successful treatment is more likely, and reduce the number of lung cancer deaths.

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FITNESS / HEALTHY EATING

How to switch up your fitness routine

So many of us experience that feeling of dread when you just don’t want to go to the gym. It gets easier to make excuses to miss workouts when you’re doing the same old routine, but don’t let boredom stop you from exercising. Regular physical activity is a great way to reduce your cancer risk and it is crucial to your overall health. Here are some tips to help you stay interested in working out and motivated to keep moving.

Try something new

Compete with friends

If you’re sick of the standard treadmill and weight machine routine at the gym, try a group class. Take on a new challenge like kickboxing, cycling, barre or a dance fitness class.

Upgrade your entertainment

Make some new playlists, keeping in mind music with a strong beat has been found to help your movements stay consistent during exercise. For longer activities like walking, biking or jogging, put on a podcast or audiobook—your interest in getting to the next episode or chapter will keep you motivated.

Adding a social element to your workout can help eliminate boredom. A workout buddy will hold you accountable for showing up and will push you to try harder if you have a competitive streak.

Skip the gym

That’s right! A change of scenery may be just what you need to enjoy exercising again. Mix it up with hiking, swimming, golfing, ballroom dancing or kayaking, or join a team sport like kickball, volleyball or flag football.

Restaurant rules A healthy diet is an important part of reducing your cancer risk, but it can be difficult to eat healthy when

you’re eating out. The average restaurant meal contains about half of your daily recommended calories, and even salads can be misleading.

But there are ways to make sure your dinner out doesn’t derail your health. Here are a few tips: Look at the menu before you arrive Decide on a healthy option beforehand, so you’re not tempted by that burger and fries. Pay attention to calorie counts if listed. (Larger chains are now required by the Food and Drug Administration to list calories.)

Order first

You’ll be less likely to change your mind if you order before your friends.

Share with a friend

If you can’t resist a burger or dessert, split it with a friend or two.

Make substitutions

Sub a salad or steamed vegetables in place of fries, order an item grilled rather than fried, or request sauce or dressing served on the side. Even if an option isn’t on the menu, ask the waiter, who may be able to accommodate your request.

Save half your meal for later

Restaurant meal portions are often out of control. Box up half your entrée before you begin eating and enjoy it as leftovers.


ADVOCACY NEWS

PreventCancer.org

Gal PALS With the passage of the omnibus spending bill signed into law in late March, Congress extended the

expiration of a moratorium on current breast cancer screening guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) until December 31, 2019. The move continues to protect access to mammograms for women ages 40-49. The USPSTF screening guidelines could reduce access to breast cancer screening for women under age 50. According to the USPSTF, most women ages 40-49 do not need annual breast cancer screenings, giving a “C” grade for women in this age group. This could result in millions of women losing insurance coverage for their mammograms, forcing them to pay out of pocket or avoid the exam altogether. Medical experts agree that mammograms save lives. That’s why Congress passed the Protecting Access to Lifesaving Screenings (PALS) Act in December 2015. The PALS Act placed a two-year moratorium on the USPSTF guidelines so concerns from the medical community and patients could be properly addressed, maintaining access to mammography for women ages 40 and older with no copay. The Prevent Cancer Foundation stands firm in our recommendation that all women of average risk begin breast cancer screening at age 40. We applaud this measure to ensure more women have access to affordable, lifesaving cancer screenings.

New bill in Congress aims to improve prevention services

You may not realize it, but the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) probably determines which cancer screenings you get. Under current law, insurers (including Medicare) follow the USPSTF guidelines, and are only required to cover services given an “A” or “B” grade by the task force. But the guidelines—and the way they are developed—are highly controversial. That’s why Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) is seeking to improve the process with a new bill, called the "USPSTF Accountability and Transparency Act." This bill would amend the process the USPSTF uses to create its recommendations through several provisions that require the USPSTF to:

1) Publish its research guides and supportive evidence 2) Make these guides available to the public 3) Standardize the grading system to make it more difficult to change guidelines without review 4) Establish a preventive services board to advise on developing, updating and publishing the guidelines The bill would also bar insurers from denying coverage of a service solely based on its grade given by USPSTF, so that health care decisions can be made by you and your doctor, not by a task force. This could be a much-needed first step toward clarifying the way preventive guidelines are developed, which can increase access, to preventive services and Stop Cancer Before It Starts!

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MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Your donations are still 100 percent deductible Congress delivered a major blow to the nation’s nonprofit sector and the communities it serves with the new tax reform bill, but the good news is charitable contributions are still 100 percent tax deductible for those who itemize.  

The new tax bill doubles the standard deduction, meaning fewer people are likely to itemize their deductions, and an estimated 90-95 percent of filers will take the standard deduction under the new law. The bill hurts charitable giving, since 80 percent of donations come from people who itemize deductions. This change will reduce charitable giving by an estimated $13 billion a year. Nonprofits, including the Prevent Cancer Foundation, need you now more than ever. If you itemize your tax deductions, remember—your donations are still 100 percent deductible.

Your donations are the lifeblood of our mission of saving lives across all populations through cancer prevention and early detection. Thank you.

World Cancer Day February 4, 2018

“We Can. I Can.”

Fundraisers and events in more than 123 countries More than 460,000 tweets with the official World Cancer Day hashtags

1 goal for a cancer-free future


TO SUBSCRIBE, CONTACT: Prevent Cancer Foundation 1600 Duke Street, Suite 500, Alexandria, VA 22314 Toll-Free: (800) 227-2732 Main: (703) 836-4412 Email: PCF@PreventCancer.org Visit: PreventCancer.org

Marching toward prevention

Cancer PreventionWorks is published by the Prevent Cancer Foundation, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization dedicated to the prevention and early detection of cancer. All contributions are tax deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law. The Prevent Cancer Foundation is a member of the Combined Federal Campaign (#11074).

1600 Duke Street, Suite 500 Alexandria, VA 22314

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Cancer PreventionWorks - Spring 2018  
Cancer PreventionWorks - Spring 2018