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Issue: July 2019

SCREEN TIME Show yourself some love by getting the right screenings at the right time.

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INSIDE FOUNDATION NEWS

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PREVENTIVE MEASURES AND GENERAL WELLNESS

Prevent Cancer Foundation highlights ®

ADVOCACY NEWS

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Turning the tide on the youth e-cigarette epidemic

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Cancer prevention and the LGBT community

IN THE WORLD OF CANCER

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Colorectal cancer on the rise in younger adults

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A picture can save a life: Danielle’s story

HEALTHY EATING AND FITNESS

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Marshmallows making a difference: Nomadic Kitchen

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5 steps to 5k

Shining the light on sunscreen regulation

MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Screen time

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preventcancer.org Turn your passion into a fundraiser

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CEO’s

Corner

PREVENT CANCER FOUNDATION® HIGHLIGHTS

Dear Readers,

DIALOGUE FOR ACTION® ON CANCER SCREENING AND PREVENTION From April 24-26, The Prevent Cancer Foundation® hosted the Dialogue for Action®, an annual national conference that convenes a diversity of stakeholders committed to improving cancer screening and prevention. View presentations and findings at preventcancer.org/dialoguetoolkit.

Summer is here! You may be planning a vacation, but remember, you can’t afford to take a vacation from cancer prevention.

The Foundation recognized leaders in cancer prevention and early detection at the 2019 Laurels Awards Luncheon. The Laurels Awards were presented to Dr. Sanjeev Arora (Health Equity), Dr. Cynthia Jorgensen (National Leadership), Ms. Chien-Chi Huang (Community Leadership) and Dr. Bernard Levin (Lifetime Achievement).

June was the official start of summer, but it was also Pride month. In this edition, you’ll read about some of the challenges LGBT people face with cancer care. And while school’s out, vaping is still in. Teenage vaping rates have skyrocketed, leading the FDA to crack down on electronic cigarette companies and distributors.

Save the date for our next Dialogue For Action® conference April 15-17, 2020.

You’ll also read about the FDA’s investigation into chemicals used in sunscreen, a personal account from skin cancer survivor Danielle Romanetti, and what you need to know about cancer screening guidelines.

PREVENT CANCER FOUNDATION® ANNUAL SPRING GALA On May 9, the Prevent Cancer Foundation® hosted its 25th Annual Spring Gala with the theme “Switzerland: Postcard Perfect.” The Foundation welcomed distinguished guests to the historic National Building Museum, including members of Congress, diplomats, and leaders in the business, government, medical, media, social and philanthropic communities.

We couldn’t do everything we do without support from so many of you. Thank you for being such an important part of our prevention team!

Carolyn Aldigé Founder and CEO

2 Cancer PreventionWorks: July 2019

ADVOCACY WORKSHOP On April 24, the Prevent Cancer Foundation® hosted its annual Advocacy Workshop, which focuses on novel approaches to cancer prevention and early detection through policy and advocacy. The Workshop featured a keynote speech from Sharon Y. Eubanks, Lead Counsel in the landmark tobacco case United States vs. Philip Morris USA. The Workshop also included a facilitated discussion on the economics of prevention and a panel on barriers to access in care with representatives from the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship, Arthritis Foundation, LUNGevity and Ovarian Cancer Research Alliance.

His Excellency, Martin Dahinden, Ambassador of Switzerland, and Mrs. Anita Dahinden served as honorary patrons of the event. Senators Bill Cassidy and Mazie Hirono were honored as 2019 Cancer Champions for their leadership in cancer prevention and other cancer-related issues. Gala décor was personally designed by weddings and celebrations expert and Foundation board member David Tutera. The gala was a rousing success, raising more than $1.5 million for cancer prevention and early detection.

BREAKAWAY FROM CANCER The Prevent Cancer Foundation® participated in Breakaway from Cancer, an educational initiative of the Amgen bike tour of California. In addition to providing educational materials and outreach to the public during the tour, the Prevent Cancer Super Colon® stopped at the Amgen campus kickoff to educate people about colorectal cancer.


ADVOCACY NEWS

TURNING THE TIDE ON THE YOUTH E-CIGARETTE EPIDEMIC The topic of e-cigarette use in youth has been in the news a lot lately, and for good reason. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the number of high schoolers who vape increased by 78% in the past year alone—and in 2018, one in five high school students used e-cigarettes. To combat these rising rates, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has taken steps to squash e-cigarette use among youth. Here’s what’s happened: • August 2016—FDA classifies e-cigarettes as tobacco products to be regulated by the agency • September 2018—FDA gives e-cigarette manufacturers 60 days to submit a plan for how they will prevent teens from using their products • March 2019—FDA issues proposed regulation to: » ban sales of flavored products to people under age 18 » add enhanced age verification requirements for products (which must be sold in age-restricted areas) » ban sales of products targeted to minors (e.g., candy flavored e-liquids) While we support the progress that’s been made, there’s still much to do to prevent kids and teens from vaping. We urge you to help end teen vaping in your community—talk with your local leaders and members of Congress about supporting policies that keep e-cigarettes from reaching kids and teens!

The number of high schoolers who vape increased by 78% in the past year alone.

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ADVOCACY NEWS

CANCER PREVENTION AND THE LGBT COMMUNITY June was Pride month, which celebrates the LGBT community and brings awareness to the inequalities LGBT people still face. While there have been many advancements in cancer prevention and early detection, LGBT people often miss out on access to quality health care. LGBT people have higher rates of and risk factors for certain types of cancer. Reducing health care disparities for LGBT people is imperative to saving lives through cancer prevention and early detection. HIGHER RATES OF CANCER LGBT youth and adults smoke at higher rates than the general population, which increases their risk for developing lung and other cancers. In fact, transgender adults are 2.1 times more likely than cisgender adults to smoke. According to the National LGBT Cancer Network, HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM) are 20 times more likely to be diagnosed with anal cancer than the general population, while HIVpositive MSM are up to 40 times more likely to receive the diagnosis. MSM are 17 times more likely to get the human papillomavirus (HPV) than straight men. HPV is responsible for at least six types of cancer, including anal cancer. Despite having higher rates of HPV and anal cancer, MSM are no more likely to get the HPV vaccine than straight men. Lesbians get vaccinated for HPV at significantly lower rates than straight women, putting them at risk for HPV-related cancers. Studies also show that lesbians are less likely to visit a health care provider for screening and other preventive services. There are many more increased risk factors and cancer cases throughout the LGBT community, all of which are exacerbated by disparities in quality care. MISSING OUT ON QUALITY CARE LGBT people often do not have access to quality care, for reasons including lack of insurance, financial barriers, and fear of discrimination or previous experiences of discrimination from health care professionals (leading to avoiding the doctor or not disclosing their LGBT identity).

WHAT CAN YOU DO? Here are a few things you can do to help advocate for LGBT people. For all: • Educate yourself and others about LGBT health disparities. • Report discrimination to your state insurance commissioner. Visit naic.org to learn more. For health care professionals: • Enroll in continuing education courses on culturally-competent LGBT cancer care and seek out other learning opportunities. • Create a welcoming space for LGBT patients. Visit the National LGBT Health Education Center to learn more (lgbthealtheducation.org). For LGBT people: • Visit the National LGBT Cancer Network (cancer-network.org) or GLMA at glma.org for an online directory of LGBT-friendly cancer centers in the U.S. and more information on LGBT cancer risks. • Visit CancerCare (cancercare. org/lgbt) for information on financial and emotional support. • Look for community health centers that provide low- or no-cost cancer prevention and early detection services.

Despite the number of health care professionals in the U.S., much of the curriculum and training in medical schools lacks culturally-competent language and information to address the needs of LGBT patients. In fact, according to the National LGBT Cancer Network, most medical students receive less than five hours of training on LGBT issues. 4 Cancer PreventionWorks: July 2019

Sources: Truth Initiative, National LGBT Cancer Network, the National Center for Transgender Equality, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


IN THE WORLD OF CANCER

SHINING THE LIGHT ON SUNSCREEN REGULATION Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the U.S. and most cases are caused by sun exposure. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a proposal for new sunscreen regulations to ensure only the safest and most effective products are on the market. Here are the highlights. INGREDIENT SAFETY AND EFFECTIVENESS The list of hard-to-pronounce ingredients on sunscreens may not mean much to you, but the FDA is taking a closer look at them. Out of 16 ingredients previously approved by the FDA for use in sunscreens, they deemed only zinc oxide and titanium dioxide safe and effective. Two ingredients—para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) and trolamine salicylate—were noted to be harmful and ineffective, though they aren’t found in sunscreens currently on the market. The FDA is calling on sunscreen manufacturers to provide information on the other 12 ingredients to help them determine which (if any) are potentially unsafe. TYPE OF SUNSCREEN APPLICATION Sunscreen comes in a variety of forms—oils, lotions, creams, gels, butters, pastes, ointments, sprays, sticks and powders. The FDA is calling for more data from sunscreen companies on powders to determine whether they are safe and effective. SPF AND BROAD SPECTRUM REQUIREMENTS The FDA is proposing the maximum SPF level be raised from 50+ to 60+ and companies not be allowed to label sunscreens with a value higher than 60+. It also proposes that any sunscreen with SPF 15+ must be broad spectrum (protecting against both UVA and UVB rays), and for UV protection to increase as the SPF increases. LABEL REQUIREMENTS The new proposal requires sunscreens below SPF 15 to include a “see skin cancer/skin aging alert” on the front and for labels to more prominently display SPF, broad spectrum and water resistance information. WHAT HAPPENS NEXT? The FDA will issue a final rule by the end of the year. In the meantime, continue to use broad spectrum sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher; wear hats, sunglasses and clothing that shields your arms and legs when you spend time outdoors; and avoid the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. To learn more about skin cancer prevention and early detection, visit www.preventcancer.org/skincancer. Source: U.S. Food and Drug Administration

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IN THE WORLD OF CANCER

SCREEN TIME

AT ANY

Getting recommended cancer screenings is one of the best ways to prevent cancer or detect it early, when successful treatment is more likely. Show yourself some love by getting the right screenings at the right time.

AGE

Screening is never “one size fits all,” so it’s important to talk with your health care professional about your personal and family histories of cancer and other diseases to find out when and how often you should be screened for certain types of cancer. Individuals from each age group should also be following the recommendations of the previous age group(s). Don’t know where to start? Check out the breakdown below and call your health care professional today.

MEN • If you’re at average risk for prostate cancer, talk to your doctor about the pros and cons of screening starting at age 50. > Early detection of prostate cancer followed by prompt treatment saves lives, but some men are treated for prostate cancers that will never cause them harm, and they must live with the side effects or complications of the treatment. It’s important to know that there are tests that predict whether a newly-diagnosed prostate cancer is likely to be aggressive. • If you were born between 1945-1965, you may be at increased risk for hepatitis C, a leading cause of liver cancer. Talk to your doctor about getting tested for this virus. If you test positive for hepatitis C, there are treatment options available that can cure the virus and prevent liver cancer. • If you’re a heavy smoker or former smoker, ask your doctor about the pros and cons of screening for lung cancer. It’s recommended that current or former smokers ages 55-80 with 30 pack-year histories be screened. > Screening for lung cancer with low-dose spiral CT significantly reduces lung cancer deaths by catching lung cancers in earlier, more treatable stages. • If you’re at average risk for colorectal cancer, start getting screened at age 45. At age 76, talk to your health care professional about whether you should continue screening. A colonoscopy is the “gold standard” for colon cancer screening, but the “best test” is the one that gets done. > If you can’t or won’t have a colonoscopy, talk with your doctor about other screening options, such as an at-home stool-based test.

IN YOUR

50s IN YOUR

40s IN YOUR

30s

• At age 20, talk with your health care professional about the testicular self-exam. It’s one way to get to know what is normal for you. If you notice a change, say something right away. • If you haven’t been vaccinated against the human papillomavirus (HPV), talk to your doctor about getting vaccinated now. HPV can cause at least six types of cancer, including oropharyngeal cancer, which is on the rise in men. • Ask your family about any history of cancer or other chronic diseases, age of diagnosis, any surgeries related to cancer, and the cause of death for any family member who is deceased. Your family’s health history can affect when and how often you should be screened. You can then share this information with your doctor so you can make informed decisions for your health. 6 Cancer PreventionWorks: July 2019

IN YOUR

20s


IN THE WORLD OF CANCER • Dentists are on the front lines of oral health! Talk to your dentist about screening you for oral cancer. • It’s a good idea to have your health care professional examine your skin annually for any irregular moles or early signs of skin cancer. • Hepatitis B is a leading cause of liver cancer, but there is a vaccine to prevent the virus. Adults at high-risk who were not vaccinated at birth or in childhood should get vaccinated now. There are curative treatments for hepatitis B—so if you weren’t vaccinated and you test positive for hepatitis B, you can still treat the virus to prevent liver cancer.

WOMEN • If you were born between 1945-1965, you may be at increased risk for hepatitis C, a leading cause of liver cancer. Talk to your doctor about getting tested for this virus. If you test positive for hepatitis C, there are treatment options available that can cure the virus and prevent liver cancer. • If you’re a heavy smoker or former smoker, ask your doctor about the pros and cons of screening for lung cancer. It’s recommended that current or former smokers ages 55-80 with 30 pack-year histories be screened. > Screening for lung cancer with low-dose spiral CT significantly reduces lung cancer deaths by catching lung cancers in earlier, more treatable stages. • Beginning at age 40, get screened annually for breast cancer if you are at average risk. Discuss the benefits and risks of screening tests with your health care professional > There has been a lot of controversy in recent years over when and how often you should get mammograms, but several organizations, including the Prevent Cancer Foundation®, still encourage annual mammograms beginning at age 40. • If you’re at average risk for colorectal cancer, start getting screened at age 45. At age 76, talk to your health care professional about whether you should continue screening. . A colonoscopy is the “gold standard” for colon cancer screening, but the “best test” is the one that gets done. > If you can’t or won’t have a colonoscopy, talk with your doctor about other screening options, such as an at-home stool-based test. • From ages 30-65, the preferred way to screen for cervical cancer is with a Pap test combined with an HPV test every 5 years (known as co-testing) or a Pap test every 3 years. • The best way to prevent cervical cancer is by getting vaccinated for the human papillomavirus. This prevents most cases of cervical cancer and at least five other types of cancer. The recommended age for the HPV vaccine is 11 or 12 years old, but the vaccine was recently approved for adults up to age 45—talk to your health care professional to see if this is an option for you, and if you have kids, make sure to get them vaccinated, too! • Begin regular cervical cancer screening at age 21. Women in their twenties should have a Pap test every three years. • From ages 25 to 39, have a check-up with your health care professional at least once every three years for risk assessment, risk reduction counseling and a clinical breast exam. If you are found to be at increased risk, you can talk with your doctor about the frequency of your visits. • If you haven’t been vaccinated against the human papillomavirus (HPV), talk to your doctor about getting vaccinated now. HPV can cause at least six types of cancer, including cervical cancer. • Ask your family about any history of cancer or other chronic diseases, age of diagnosis, any surgeries related to cancer, and the cause of death for any family member who is deceased. Your family’s health history can affect when and how often you should be screened. You can then share this information with your doctor so you can make informed decisions for your health. preventcancer.org 7


PREVENTIVE MEASURES AND GENERAL WELLNESS

ADVOCACY NEWS

COLORECTAL CANCER ON THE RISE IN YOUNGER ADULTS Colorectal cancer is often thought of as an “old person’s disease,” but recent data shows it’s becoming more common in younger adults. A 2017 American Cancer Society (ACS) study found that colorectal cancer rates among adults under the age of 50 have increased at the same time the rates for older adults have declined (experts credit this mostly to increased screening, when doctors can detect and remove polyps before they develop into cancer). In fact, adults born in 1990 have twice the risk of colon cancer and four times the risk of rectal cancer compared to adults born around 1950. In response, ACS lowered its recommended screening age for those at average risk to age 45 (from 50)—a decision the Prevent Cancer Foundation® supports. Lifestyle factors that can contribute to an increased risk of colorectal cancer include: not getting enough physical activity, drinking alcohol in excess, being obese or overweight, smoking and eating a diet high in red and processed meats. To raise awareness of this issue with adults ages 30-49, the Prevent Cancer Foundation® launched a new campaign called “Too Young for This Sh*t.” Through a series of cheeky social media posts and a new webpage, the Foundation aims to save more lives by educating adults about risk factors, symptoms and screening options for colorectal cancer. Check out the campaign and learn more about colorectal cancer at www.tooyoungforthis.org.

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PREVENTIVE MEASURES AND GENERAL WELLNESS

A PICTURE CAN SAVE A LIFE: DANIELLE’S STORY By: Danielle Romanetti

A few friends had mentioned a mole I had on my forehead, but every time I kept waving it off, thinking it had been there for years and was normal. Then it started to bleed. For a couple of weeks, the mole would open up and bleed and wouldn’t stop. I went back and looked at my wedding photos and other pictures of myself over the years, and realized that the mole hadn’t been there for years—it appeared in the last year and it had grown in size. I knew something wasn’t right. I made an appointment with a dermatologist, who said that it was basal cell carcinoma. She took a small biopsy and sent it off to the lab where that diagnosis was confirmed. When the doctor told me it was cancer, I wasn’t sure what that really meant. She was quick to let me know that while I had cancer, it was completely curable and the type I had was very common, which made me feel a bit better. I was glad that I came in, because even though my case was treatable, if skin cancer is left untreated it can lead to disfigurement or death. I had the mole removed successfully, and the surgeon that I was referred to was phenomenal. He made the entire experience much less frightening than it could have been. Through this process, I’ve learned to pay more attention to changes in my body. I was so busy that I failed to notice that a mole had appeared in the middle of my face and that it wasn’t there previously.

Danielle Romanetti is a successful small business owner, knitting aficionado and mom to an energetic kindergartener. After some friends mentioned a new mole on her forehead, she made an appointment with a dermatologist and found out she had basal cell carcinoma, a form of skin cancer. My advice? Take care of your skin every single day. Wear protective clothing, slap on some sunscreen and don’t be afraid to hang in the shade! The skin is our largest organ and so incredibly important. Make sure you see a dermatologist yearly and take note of changes in spots and moles—look through old photos to help see how much they have changed, if you have to! It could save your life.

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HEALTHY EATING AND FITNESS

MARSHMALLOWS MAKING A DIFFERENCE: NOMADIC KITCHEN Alexandra Shuman is a classically trained chef who turned her passion for food into a confectionary shop that provides fresh reinterpretations of a childhood classic: marshmallows. One day, Alexandra was watching a video where Nike Trail Athlete Chris Mocko talked about the aftermath of eating too many preservative-filled marshmallows—and she got an idea. Marshmallows for charity. What could be sweeter than that? “Whether it has been close calls, intense recovery processes, or the worst outcome you can imagine, Mocko and I have each seen it all when it comes to cancer. We’re tired of cancer and the hardships it brings,” Alexandra said.

Whether you’re looking for the perfect pairing for

These shared experiences led to her choosing the Prevent Cancer Foundation® to receive half of the profits from the Mocko’s Maple Peanut Butter marshmallow sales.

Mallows online to be shipped right to your door at

your s’mores this summer or just want to try some fluffy goodness without the preservatives, you can purchase a pack of Mocko’s Maple Peanut Butter www.nomadic-kitchen.com!

“Being a native Vermonter and a Vermont-based company, maple syrup had to be my starting point. What I ended up with was essentially a fluffernutter in a single bite: fluffy vanilla marshmallows swirled with house-made peanut butter, sweetened with maple syrup.” Needless to say, Mocko loved his custom marshmallows. They were so good, in fact, Alexandra decided to make them a staple in her online store so others could enjoy them, too.

5 STEPS TO 5K Exercise is essential in maintaining a healthy lifestyle, but the same old routine can get boring. Running your first 5k (3.1 miles) may seem intimidating at first, but there are so many benefits that go beyond health. Here are a few things to consider if you’re preparing for your first 5k (or if you just need to brush up): 1. Find a training routine. There are plenty of online guides that give you the steps needed to go from walking to running a 5k. Be sure to find one that outlines how many weeks you should train based on your ability. 2. Don’t worry about how fast you are. Many 5ks are community events, which bring together runners and walkers of all abilities. Oftentimes, 5ks are not competitive (meaning there is no winner) and are untimed.

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MAKE A DIFFERENCE

TURN YOUR PASSION INTO A FUNDRAISER Now you have an easy way to turn your passion into a fundraiser for cancer prevention! You and your friends can use the new Prevent Cancer Foundation® fundraising website. Do you love video games? Host a live fundraiser and add your stream from Twitch, YouTube or Mixer to get your followers in on the action. Getting married or having a birthday? In lieu of gifts, have your guests make a donation toward your fundraiser. Are you active online? In minutes you can set up a Facebook fundraising page and easily invite your friends to participate. You can use our new website to do it all. It’s easy to communicate with your donors—you can send text messages, emails and alerts all from one place. We look forward to helping you create your personal campaign as we work together to Stop Cancer Before It Starts!®

“Making sure you have the right people is big, but making sure you have the right motivation is even bigger.” – Mark Leoncyk, who raised $5,500 through his video game charity stream

Visit www.youcanpreventcancer.org to get started!

3. Bring a friend. Training and participating in a 5k with a friend is a great way to encourage each other and make the experience more fun. Or, if you plan on running it alone, ask friends and family to come cheer you on! 4. Choose a charity 5k. Fundraise and run for a cause you care about. Not only will you help others, but it will also keep you on track and discourage you from quitting! Plus, you may also get to enjoy other aspects linked to the 5k, such as a health fair or social event. 5. Know your body. Don’t push yourself. If you feel more comfortable walking for a portion or the entirety of a 5k, slow down! Exercising safely is key.

Ready, set, PREVENT! Save the date for the Prevent Cancer Foundation® Health Fair and 5k Walk/Run at Nationals Park on November 3, 2019. Register at preventcancer5k.org.

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Find this issue and more at preventcancer.org/newsletter

TO SUBSCRIBE, CONTACT: Prevent Cancer Foundation® 1600 Duke Street, Suite 500, Alexandria, VA 22314 Toll-Free: (800) 227-2732 Main: (703) 836-4412 Email: pcf@preventcancer.org Visit: preventcancer.org Cancer PreventionWorks is published by the Prevent Cancer Foundation®, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization dedicated to the prevention and early detection of cancer. All contributions are tax deductible to the fullest extent allowed by law. The Prevent Cancer Foundation® is a member of the Combined Federal Campaign (#11074).

1600 Duke Street, Suite 500 Alexandria, VA 22314

UPCOMING EVENTS AND NEWS September 26: Congressional Families Cancer Prevention Program’s 27th Annual Action for Cancer Awareness Awards Luncheon

IN THIS ISSUE

Cancer prevention and the LGBT community

A picture can save a life: Danielle’s story

Shining the light on sunscreen regulation

5 Steps to 5K

October 10-11: Quantitative Imaging Workshop November 3: Prevent Cancer Health Fair and 5k Walk/Run For more information visit PreventCancer5k.org

Profile for Prevent Cancer Foundation

Cancer PreventionWorks: July 2019  

Cancer PreventionWorks: July 2019