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2013 VISITORS GUIDE, MAY 3-12 INSIDE Schedule | Sponsors | Fun Places to Visit | Black Swamp Bird Observatory How to Get Started in Birding | Festival Schedule | Bird Conservation


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Index

How to Use the Visitors’ Guide 7 Optics Alley 9 Black Swamp Bird Observatory 10 Free Activities 1 2 Outdoor Afro 13 Punk Rock Birder 17 Conservation Initiatives 19 Binoculars & Birding 101 20-21 Birders’ Marketplace 22 Logo Artist Darin Miller 23 Drew Lanham and Doug Gray 24-25 Urban Bird Walk 25 Int’l Migratory Bird Day 27 Festival Schedule 29-32 Blog Team 33 Warblers Gallery 34-35 Fun Places to Visit 37-41 Magee Boardwalk Anniversary 44-45 Responsible Wind Energy 48-49 Helium Balloon Dangers 54 Bird-Friendly Coffee 56

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Bayshore Supper Club 52 Bayview Bed & Breakfast 42 Beacon Point Golf 56 Bench Farms 28 Big Apple Deli 52 Birds & Beans Coffee 57 B.J.’s Hide-A-Way Steakhouse 52 Black Swamp Conservancy 46 Blackberry Corner Tavern 23 Bono Tavern 52 Carruth Studio 42 Christy Farm Nature Preserve 20 Cousino’s Steakhouse 52 Crazy Lady Saloon 53 Crosswinds Restaurant & Bar 26 Cullen Park 4 6 Denny’s Restaurant 52 Destination Toledo 6 DG’s Soft Serve 53 Eagle Optics 8 The Five Bells Inn B & B 4 3 Lake Erie Shores & Islands 28 Leica 60 Majestic Feathers Birding Tours 20 Marblehead Galley Restaurant 56 Maumee Bay General Store 53 Maumee Bay Lodge 26 Metroparks of the Toledo Area 51 National Bank of Ohio 51 Nature Travel Network 28 Oregon Inn Restaurant 52 Ottawa NWR Association 45 Our Sunset Place B & B 43 Partnership for Int’l Birding 14-15 Rockjumper Worldwide Birding 47 Rotary Int’l Port Clinton 45 Sabrewing Nature Tours 55 Schedel Arboretum & Gardens 53 Sunny Side Tower B & B 43 Swarovski 59 Tee~Dee~Kay Bird Feeders 42 Time & OpticsLtd. 36 Toledo Mud Hens 3 Toledo Zoo 8 Vanguard 16 Victor Emanuel Nature Tours 11 Victorian Inn B & B 4 3 Waldo Pepper’s Bar & Grill 23 Water’s Edge Restaurant 52 Wildside Nature Tours 27 Yellowbilled Tours 26

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A welcome message from Kimberly Kaufman Executive Director, Black Swamp Bird Observatory

On behalf of BSBO and our co-hosts at Maumee Bay Lodge and Conference Center, Destination Toledo, and Lake Erie Shores & Islands, I’d like to welcome you to The Biggest Week in American Birding, and to fabulous northwest Ohio, also known as “The Warbler Capital of the World.” Our theme this year is, “Birding is for Everyone,” and as you turn the pages of this guide, you’ll meet some people that really clobber that tired, old stereotype of what a birder looks like. We hope their stories will inspire a lot of new people to come out and try birding for the first time. In addition to information about the festival and the region, this year’s guide also carries several thought-provoking conservation Kimberly Kaufman messages. From the importance of properly siting wind turbines and keeping cats indoors, to the value of drinking bird-friendly coffee and how helium balloon releases endanger birds and wildlife, we hope these conservation messages help all of our readers understand the impact that our actions have on birds and the natural world. Special thanks… I want to give a major shout-out to Pat Eaken, John Szozda, Ken Grosjean, and Abbey Schell at the Press Publications. They were pillars of patience as I agonized over every word that appears in this guide. They are great partners and I am honored to work with them. Thanks to the talented staff mentioned above, last year’s Biggest Week Visitors’ Guide was awarded first place in its category by the Ohio Newspaper Association at their annual award ceremony: always nice to see bird-related material being recognized! My heartfelt thanks to the team at Black Swamp Bird Observatory. They put their heart and soul into this festival, and their commitment to bird conservation—and to connecting people with the joys of birds and birding—inspires me every single day. And finally, I’d also like to thank Scott Arvin for designing another marvelous cover, Brian Zwiebel for sharing his stunning bird photos, and Kenn Kaufman for his editorial input. Birding northwest Ohio in the fall… Yes indeed, the birds pass through this region in the fall, too! And this year, fall migration takes on a whole new level of excitement when Midwest Birding Symposium returns to Lakeside, Ohio! Mark your calendars for September 19th – 22nd, and come back to visit us again and experience northwest Ohio—and the warblers—dressed in fall colors! It’s more than just great birding… If you’re visiting for the fi rst time, you’ll soon discover that, while the birding is indeed world-class, it is the wonderful people who live and work here that make it a truly superb place. I encourage you to extend your visit—or come back again when the birding isn’t so good that you can’t tear yourself away—and visit some of the other wonderful places this area has to offer. With museums, historic lighthouses, the world-famous Toledo Mud Hens, waterparks, great fishing, and of course, the charm and charisma of the Lake Erie Islands, northwest Ohio is one of the country’s most alluring travel destinations at any time of year. We hope you’ll come back again, soon! We have some great things in store for this year’s Biggest Week, and we hope you have a safe and sensational experience. Sincerely, Kimberly Kaufman

Biggest Week in American Birding Visitors Guide Published by the Black Swamp Bird Observatory in conjunction with The Press Newspapers and The Beacon. Kimberly Kaufman, Executive Director, BSBO, www.bsbo.org 419-898-4070, 419-898-1363 (fax), kimkaufman@bsbo.org John Szozda, General Manager, The Press Newspapers John Schaffner, General Manager, The Beacon J. Patrick Eaken, Editor, Visitors Guide, 419-836-2221, ext. 20 Editors/Graphics..Tammy Walro, Ken Grosjean & J. Patrick Eaken Sales/Graphics...Lesley Willmeth, Alyce Fielding, Leeanne LaForme, Abbey Schell, Julie Gentry, Angie Dine, Connie Roberts & John Schaffner Cover artwork graciously donated by y Scott Arvin, Indianapolis, Indiana. Bird images donated by Kaufman Field Guides


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

Black Swamp Bird Observatory offers sincere gratitude to our Biggest Week Co-hosts, Sponsors, Visitors’ Guide Partners, Tour Company Partners, Major Supporters, and of course, our outstanding team of volunteers! Without them, the festival would not be possible.

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TOUR COMPANY PARTNERS

CO-HOSTS MAJOR SUPPORTERS

VISITORS’ GUIDE PUBLICATION PARTNERS

SPONSORS

With special thanks to our partners at The Press Publicaons for their unwavering support for the fesval, for BSBO, and for bird conservaon.


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Great waterfront dining, river cruises, shopping, historic tours and more!

Welcome to Greater Toledo, Birders! Visit our world-renowned Toledo Museum of Art, new Hollywood Casino Toledo, famous Tony Packo’s Café along with a variety of great restaurants. Spend some time exploring Toledo and you’ll discover one visit won't be enough. Visit www.doToledo.org for more details!

Toledo Museum of Art & Glass Pavilion

A collection of more than 30,000 works of art ranks among the finest in the world.

Tony Packo’s

The original location of Tony Packo’s made famous by Jamie Farr of M*A*S*H fame!

The Toledo Zoo

Come see the twin polar bear cubs & the new Wild Walkabout exhibit of Australian animals!

Hollywood Casino Toledo

Featuring 2,000 slot machines, table games, a sports bar, restaurants and entertainment.

Maumee Bay Lodge & State Park

Enjoy swimming, golfing, fishing, biking and wildlife viewing.


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HOW TO USE THE BIGGEST WEEK VISITORS’ GUIDE If you have already registered for the Biggest Week In American Birding, this guide offers you the overall festival schedule (centerfold), travel tips, coupons, many conservation messages, and much more. If you’re new to the area, the ‘Fun Places To Visit’ section is something you should check out. In addition to the fabulous birding in this area, we also have an outstanding variety of activities to partake in while you’re here this spring—and when you’re planning your return visit! Take in a Toledo Mudhens game, visit the Toledo Museum of Art, have your picture taken in front of the Marblehead Lighthouse…the possibilities are endless! If you have NOT registered for the Biggest Week In American Birding, there’s still time! While there are many free activities during the festival that do not require registration, registration IS required in order to participate in many of the programs, bus and boat trips, workshops, and presentations. Additional benefits of registering include access to free guided birding walks every morning at Magee Marsh from May 3rd through May 12 at 8:00 and 11:00 AM; evening socials at Maumee Bay Lodge and Conference Center; and discounts at dozens of local businesses through our Biggest Week Birder Discount Program. You just show up and flash your Biggest Week name badge to cash in on the savings. Register online now at: www.bwiab.com.

www.facebook.com/TheBiggestWeekInAmericanBirding www.twier.com/BiggestWeek

A message from your friends at Black Swamp Bird Observatory… It’s important to note that you do NOT have to register for the Biggest Week In American Birding to come out and enjoy all of the wonderful birding we are so fortunate to have in this area. The festival offers a wide variety of quality activities, field trips, and presentations—so of course we hope that you WILL register. But everyone is welcome to come out and go birding whether you register for the festival or not. And there will be lots and lots of birders to help you spot and identify birds, too. So, if you’ve never gone birding, this is the perfect time to give it a try! Birders are among the friendliest people you could ever hope to meet, and we encourage everyone to come out and go birding with us.

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BSBO Staff, Volunteers, and Friends Celebrate Birds and Birding.

Black Swamp Bird Observatory

The group behind ‘The Big Week’ Black Swamp Bird Observatory is much more than the organization behind the Biggest Week In American Birding. “Bird conservation is the core of our mission.” says BSBO executive director Kimberly Kaufman. “In everything we do—research, education and outreach, and The Biggest Week—the overarching goal is building support for bird conservation.” BSBO’s research team has been conducting studies of migratory birds in this region for more than 20 years. BSBO operates one of the country’s largest songbird banding operations, banding more than 550,000 birds in its history. The data collected by BSBO’s research team helps private land owners and government agencies manage habitat for birds. The data gathered is also helpful to birders, as it has helped to pinpoint the timing of arrival of many of the most sought-after species of birds. BSBO is determined to help connect young people with the marvels of migratory birds and the importance of conserving their habitat. Their programs for schools are offered free of charge. These programs bring thousands of students out to the marshes for hands-on, stan-

dards-based learning. Students help collect data by banding wild songbirds before releasing them back into the wild. These programs are a partnership with Magee Marsh Wildlife Area and Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge. Students visit all three locations during each visit. BSBO is also the founder of the Ohio Young Birders Club, a statewide club for young nature enthusiasts aged 1218 that takes students on monthly field trips across the state. In recent years, BSBO has made strides to connect the Lakeshore communities with the valuable asset that birds and bird habitat represent for this region. Ecotourism, or more specifically “bird-tourism,” has become a major part of BSBO’s conservation efforts. BSBO’s goal for organizing the Biggest Week In American Birding is to generate support for habitat conservation. While birders are here, BSBO gathers economic impact and travel data. These figures

help build support for conserving the habitat these birds depend on for their survival—and that the region has come to depend on as a source of revenue. In 2010, BSBO collected economic data from participants in Biggest Week In American Birding. Using data from Ohio Division of Wildlife documenting visitors to Magee Marsh for a one-month period, they estimate that birders spent more than 19 million dollars in this area between mid-April and mid-May. In 2011, visitation climbed significantly, visitors stayed longer in the region, spent more as a result, and the fi gure for the same time period rose to just under 29 million dollars. That trend continued in 2012, when birders spent more than 37 million dollars in the area during spring migration. Birds and birding business have become an important source of revenue for this region. Businesses are opening earlier in the spring season, expanding their hours, and hiring more people. Working together with visitors’ bureaus, chambers of commerce, and their business alliance partners, BSBO has built a tourism season where there hadn’t been much happening before. This makes bird conservation relevant to an ever-increasing audience and allows the BSBO team to speak to more and more people about the value of habitat conservation.

BSBO is a nonprofit supported by members and donations. For more information on supporting their work, please see page 11 of this guide, or visit them online at www.bsbobird.org BSBO is located at the entrance to Magee Marsh Wildlife Area. They maintain year ‘round hours in their gift shop and window on wildlife where visitors can observe birds visiting the feeders.

Young Birders Club promotes service, career opportunites The Ohio Young Birders Club (OYBC), created in 2006 by Black Swamp Bird Observatory, is now expanding to include chapters throughout Ohio. The OYBC is for young peo-

ple age 12 – 18 that have an interest in birds and nature. Members go on monthly outings, conduct service projects, and host an annual conference where the students give all of the pre-

sentations. This year’s conference will be held in conjunction with the Toledo Zoo! To learn more, visit the OYBC website at: www.ohioyoungbirders.org


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

worldwide birding

since 1976

 Victor Emanuel Nature Tours 

BLACK-CAPPED VIREO © GREG LASLEY ◆ CST2014998-50

VICTOR EMANUEL NATURE TOURS

VENTBIRD

info@ventbird.com | 800.328.VENT | 512.328.5221 | ventbird.com

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New to the Area or to Birding? Visit Black Swamp Bird Observatory (BSBO) for FREE birding maps of the best places to go birding in this area.

Subscribe to VENTflash for news about our tours and special discounts.

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Magnolia Warbler (Kenn Kaufman)

Each map includes information on when to visit and what to expect when you go. BSBO is located at the entrance to Magee Marsh Wildlife Area 13551 West State Route 2 Oak Harbor, Ohio 43449 Open every day in May!

BLACK SWAMP BIRD OBSERVATORY www.bsbobird.org Northwest Ohio’s Premier Bird Conservaon Organizaon

BECOME A MEMBER TODAY and help support all the great things the Observatory does for birds and birders!

Join Black Swamp Bird Observatory or renew your membership between now and May 12th, 2013, and you could win this Leica Trinovid Binocular!

$15 STUDENT . $25 SENIOR $35 INDIVIDUAL . $40 FAMILY $100 SUPPORTING . $250 FRIEND $500 SUSTAINING

To join or donate call 419-898-4070, visit www.bsbobird.org, or stop by and visit us at Black Swamp Bird Observatory 13551 W. State Route 2 Oak Harbor, Ohio 43449 (Just inside the entrance to Magee Marsh Wildlife Area)

facebook.com/bsbobird

Already a 2013 member? Simply renew for 2014 and you, too, will be eligible for the drawing on May 13th! Visit www.bsbobird.org or call 419-898-4070 to join or renew!


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BIGGEST WEEK ACTIVITIES THAT ARE FREE AND OPEN TO EVERYONE! GETTING STARTED IN BIRDING: EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW! Presented by Jessie Barry and Chris Wood Sponsored by Cornell Lab of Ornithology These FREE indoor workshops will be followed by a bird walk around Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Date(s): Thursday, May 9, 2013 at 3 p.m. Second Workshop offered on: Sunday, May 12, 2013 at 10 a.m. Where: Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Visitors' Center Cost: This workshop is free and open to the public! * Binoculars and field guides will be available to borrow for this workshop.

You've decided birding sounds interesting and you'd like to give it a try, but what do you do next? In this fun and easy workshop, Jessie Barry will walk you though everything you need to know to get started birdwatching. FAMILY BIRD WALK Sponsored by Birds and Blooms Magazine! Date: Sunday, May 5 Time: 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. Where: Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Visitors' Center 14000 West State Route 2 Oak Harbor, Ohio 43449 Meet on the patio behind the big green building

URBAN BIRD WALK: BIRDING THE CITY OF TOLEDO Date: Tuesday, May 7th Time: 9:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Where: Swan Creek Preserve Metropark Meet at the Yager Center Address: 4659 Airport Highway, Toledo, Ohio 43615 You do NOT have to hike out to some remote forest to find wonderful birds. In fact, the City of Toledo is one of the 'birdiest' cities in the Midwest, and the Metroparks of Toledo offer amazing opportunities to enjoy birds. This trip is presented with a very relaxed approach that will make it fun for everyone, even if you've never gone birding in your life! Our field trip leaders, Drew Lanham, Doug Gray, and Rue Mapp are expert birders, but they're also just really great guys who truly enjoy introducing people to birds and birding. They'll bring binoculars and bird books that help you learn how to start identifying birds. SONGBIRD BANDING AND MIGRATION PROGRAMS Date: Saturday, May 4th Time: 10:00 AM Where: Black Swamp Bird Observatory 13551 West State Route 2 Oak Harbor, Ohio 43449

Gather up the kids and join us for a family nature walk. We’ll provide binoculars, field guides, and the birds, you simply provide enthusiastic families.

Date: Saturday, May 11th Time: 7:00 – 11:00 AM Where: Black Swamp Bird Observatory 13551 West State Route 2, Oak Harbor, Ohio 43449

CONSERVATION PROGRAMS Date: Saturday, May 4th and Sunday, May 5 Time: 3:00 p.m. Where: Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge

These programs offer detailed information on BSBO's migration studies, provide up close looks at beautiful spring warblers, thrushes, vireos, and other migrants, and share more about the critical stopover habitat that the Lake Erie Marsh Region represents. Basic bird identification will be included, so bring your favorite field guide!

May 4th: Balloons Blow: Helium balloon releases and the devastating impacts to wildlife and the environment. May 5th: Bird-friendly Coffee: why shade-grown coffee is critical for migratory birds! WORLD BIRDING PRESENTATIONS Daily from Sunday, May 5 - Friday, May 10, 2013 Time: 11 a.m. Where: Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge (ONWR) Our tour company partners lead birding trips to some of the most astonishing destinations on the planet. In these fun, informative, and lavishly illustrated presentations, our partners will take you around the world and into the lives of some of the most beautiful, bizarre, and fascinating birds in the world.

For more informaon visit www.bwiab.com, call Black Swamp Bird Observatory at: 419-898-4070, or email staff@bsbo.org

YOUNG BIRDERS FIELD TRIP (AGES 12 - 20) Date: May 11 Time: 9 a.m. to ?? Where: Meet in the parking lot at east end of the Magee Marsh Wildlife Boardwalk Area 13229 West State Route 2, Oak Harbor, Ohio Call 419-898-4070 if you have any questions Join us for this special field trip with Kenn Kaufman, Chris Wood and Jessie Barry, designed for birders ages 12-20. Opportunities for teenaged birders to get together are few and far between, so here's a chance to head into the field with your peers.

BIGGEST WEEK BIRD TATTOO CONTEST Saturday, May 4th at 5:00 p.m. Maumee Bay Lodge and Conference Center This year's festival will feature a bird tattoo contest judged by Paul Riss: the dude who did a Punk Rock Big Year, Lester Peyton: a very rad birder dude from southwest Ohio, and the Bird Chick—Sharon Stiteler! There WILL be prizes and they WILL be awesome! So bring your (publicly shareable!) bird tattoo and prepare to impress our judges for your chance at fabulous prizes!

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING 2013


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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OUTDOOR AFRO COMES TO THE BIGGEST WEEK O

utdoor Afro is a social community that reconnects African-Americans

with natural spaces and one another through recreational activities such as camping, hiking, biking, birding, fishing, gardening, skiing — and more! Outdoor Afro disrupts the false perception that black people do not have a relationship with nature, and works to shift the visual representation of who can connect with the outdoors. We remember our history in nature, leverage social media, and support relevant local leadership to create interest communities, events, and partnerships that support diverse participation in the Great Outdoors. During her childhood, founder Rue Mapp split her time between urban Oakland, California and her family’s working ranch in the Northern woodlands, where she cultivated a passion for natural spaces, farming, and learned how to hunt and fish. As a youth, her participation in the Girl Scouts and Outward Bound broadened her outdoor experiences, such as camping, mountainOutdoor Afro disrupts eering, rock climbing, and road bicycling. But was troubled by the consistently low the false perception that Rue numbers of African Americans participating in black people do not have these activities. So for two decades, Rue has used digital media as an important and a relationship with napractical tool to connect with people of color who share her outdoor interests. Outdoor Afro emerged naturally from ture, and works to shift these experiences.

the visual representation of who can connect with the outdoors.

Rue has a B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, where she was inspired by her study of the artistic representation of the American forests. She is also a successful entrepreneur whose game and hobby store start-up (It’s Your Move) remains an important part of the Oakland community. In 2010, Rue was honored to be invited to the White House to participate in the America’s Great Outdoors Conference where President Obama signed an historic memorandum to help reconnect all Americans to the Great Outdoors, and was invited back to take part in a think-tank to inform the launch of the First Lady’s Let’s Move initiative. She was also appointed program officer at the Stewardship Council’s Foundation for Youth Investment where she served for two years to manage its grant making program. Recently, Rue was named a Hero in Backpacker Magazine, honored as part of the Root 100 of the top black achievers and influencers for 2012, and received the Josephine and Frank Dunaneck award for her humanitarian efforts. Rue is a proud mother of three active children – Seth, Arwen, and Billy, lives in the beautiful San Francisco Bay Area, and especially enjoys hiking, camping, biking, birding, and kayaking.

Outdoor Afro’s Appearance at the Biggest Week is sponsored by Swarovski Opk North America

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Over 100 Trips Scheduled Small Groups

Top Local Guides

Six Continents of Birding

Save 20% or More

Save an Acre for Bird Conservation Meet us at the Biggest Week in American Birding: Booth in Maumee Bay Lodge: Sign up for discount coupons on future trips. Coupons available only during this festival. Learn more about our trips. Evening Social: May 8 (5 PM to 7 PM) at Maumee Bay Lodge. Presentations on Birding: Birding West Coast (May 5) and Birding in South America (May 8). Meet our Guides: Daily bird walks. Also, helping you find birds along the boardwalk at Magee Marsh. Staff at Festival: David Trently, Harry Fuller, John Drummond, Xavier Munoz, Charles Thornton-Kolbe, Mercedes Rivadeneira and Gwen

Central and South America: Ecuador: 6 different routes. 20 plus trips per year. Peru: 3 different routes. 6 to 8 trips per year. Brazil: 6 different routes. 6 to 8 trips per year. Colombia: 3 different routes. 8 plus trips each year. More in Region: Bolivia, Chile, Galapagos, Guyana, Costa Rica, Panama and more. Festival Specials: Ecuador bird-watching for $1,990. Brazil bird-watching sale: Pantanal for $1,890, $100 off Brazil Amazon and/or Atlantic Forest. Fall specials on Peru.

Important Details for Learning More and Saving More: Festival Specials: At our booth, sign up for exclusive discount coupons. Discounts good for trips in Fall 2013 and into 2014. Limited to first 100 bookings in next 45 days. Save an Acre for Bird Conservation: If you book any trip for 2014 six months or more in advance, we will purchase in your name an acre of wilderness for bird and wildlife conservation through the US World Land Trust. Complete Itinerary and Trip Details: Website: www. pibird.com Toll Free: 888-203-7464


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North America: California and Pacific Northwest: 3 or 4 trips each year. Colorado: 3 Colorado grouse trips each year. Southeast Arizona: 2 trips each year. Florida: 3 or 4 trips each year. Texas: 4 or 5 trips each year. More in Region: Alaska, Newfoundland, Minnesota, Tennessee and North Dakota. Festival Specials: $100 off fall trips to Arizona or Pacific NW. $200 off Colorado Grouse Tours in 2014. $990 early sign up special for Minnesota Owls.

Africa: West Africa: Ghana; Gambia and Senegal. 7 trips per year. East Africa: Kenya and Uganda. 7 trips per year. Southern Africa: South Africa, Namibia and Botswana. 17 trips per year. Madagascar: 9 trips per year. Festival Specials: $200 off Uganda in November. $200 off Kenya in June. Gambia and Senegal in November for only $2,890 for 16 days.

Asia & Oceania: Australia: 2 routes, and 2 trips per year. Papua New Guinea: 3 or 4 dates per year. New Zealand: Every 2 years. India: 3 routes and at least 3 or 4 dates per year. Sri Lanka: 1 trip per year. More in Region: Thailand, Malaysia, Vietnam and more. Festival Specials: India for 15 days for $2,990. $100 off any bird-watching tour in Asia, booked 8 months or more in advance.

Toll Free: 888-203-7464

Learn More: www.pibird.com

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Come see us near the Black Swamp Bird Observatory REBATES UP TO

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Punk rock birder

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By Mark Griffin Press Contributing Writer news@presspublications.com Close your eyes, and in your mind’s eye picture what you think a typical bird watcher looks like. Paul Riss used to see the same vision. “People always think bird watchers are little old ladies,” said Riss, a 42year-old Canadian. “I thought I would try to change that (stereotype) by making a documentary, called ‘Punk Rock Big Year.’ People say I don’t look like a bird watcher.” Riss is one of the keynote speakers at this year’s Biggest Week in American Birding, which will be held May 3-12. He has been “birding,” he said, since he was 10 or 11 years old. “My dad was kind of looking for a way to spend time with his son,” Riss said. “One of his buddies said, ‘Take him to the conservation area.’ That very first time, a Chickadee landed on my hand and that was it. I was hooked. Ever since then I’ve been crazy about birding.” The term “crazy” may be putting it mildly. Riss has covered his body in 88 bird tattoos, and he plans to increase that number to more than 200. Born and raised in a small town about an hour east of Toronto, Riss and his wife, Rachel, are the parents of 5-year-old boy and girl twins. The family produces 8 percent of its own food, Riss said, and built a greenhouse in the backyard. The tattoos, he said, are a tribute to his love of birding. “I want people to say, ‘He did what? That’s crazy!” Riss said. “When people meet me or read my blog, they say this guy’s really not nuts, he’s just passionate about this. I have a very good job, and a wife and 5-year-old twins. When people watch my film, I want people to understand bird watchers aren’t necessarily what you think they are. “Maybe they’ll pay a little bit more attention to someone who is covered in tattoos and interested in punk music. Birds are kind of the gateway ‘drug’ to the rest of nature. Kids love them. We have a bird feeder in our backyard and my son says, ‘Dad, I wish I was a bird.’ I say, ‘why?’ He says, ‘Cause I wish I could fly.’ If we can gets kids into it, that’s awesome.” Oak Harbor resident and famous

Paul Riss is changing the stereotype of birders.

birding author Kenn Kaufman, who is also a naturalist and conservationist, was the inspiration for Riss’s film “Punk Rock Big Year.” Riss said being a keynote speaker at this year’s Biggest Week in American Birding is “quite an honor.” One of Riss’s tattoos. “ K e n n Kaufman is kind of a birding hero for me,” Riss said. “There are two sentences in his book, Kingbird Highway, where that really gave me the inspiration for doing the ‘Punk Rock Big Year’ thing. Kenn dropped out of high school as a kid and hitchhiked 70,000 miles to see as many birds as he could in America. He was going someplace to see these crows. He got picked up and said he was a bird watcher, and they said he didn’t look like a bird watcher. They said bird watchers are blue-haired and 70 years old.” On Jan. 1, 2011, Riss decided he was going to take an entire year to try to see as many different species of birds as he could in the Ontario area. “Punk Rock Big Year” tells that story. “I’m trying to do something different to catch peoples’ attention,” Riss said. “I grew up listening to punk music. I vowed to tattoo the Latin name of every bird that I saw on my body. I ended up seeing 234 birds, and I have 88 (tattoos) done so far. I had a fulltime job in advertising and I had to work with my wife and our kids. Had I

had more time, I could have gotten to 300 birds easily. “The documentary creates a little bit of drama. Friday after work I would drive home, kiss my wife and kids, drive 1,500 kilometers (932 miles), see one bird and drive 1,500 kilometers back. I did that several times.” Paul and Rachel have been together for 15 years and married for nine. Ironically, she isn’t quite the bird enthusiast as her husband. “Rachel has no interest in birding at all,” Paul said. “It’s kind of interesting. I try to plan vacations and be real sneaky about it and make them birding vacations. Sometimes my plans work out, and sometimes they don’t. Her dad is very much into birds. He was a conservation officer and they always had bird feeders at their house. Because her dad was so interested in it, naturally, she wasn’t.” “Punk Rock Big Year” is in the editing stages right now, but a few scenes will be shown at the Biggest Week in American Birding festival. Riss said he is pretty much funding the documentary by himself. “There’s some interesting stuff there,” he said. “My editor, Kyle McNair, is a super talented guy and is also covered in tattoos. At the very latest it should be completed at the end of the summer. I lined up half a dozen cameramen. They were like photographers and directors, friends of mine. I just basically drive to their house, pick them up and we drive to see the birds.” Riss, who is schedule to speak at the festival at 7:30 p.m. on May 4, said his favorite bird is the brown thrasher. “I have no idea why,” he said. “I love the look of it - stern face and curved bill. Just a beautiful thing.”


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JOIN US FOR EVENING FUN AND EXCITEMENT! After birding your brains out all day, make plans to join us every night during the festival from 5 - 7 PM in the lobby of Maumee Bay Lodge for all kinds of special activities! Various organizations and companies will be hosting these free events featuring refreshments, special raffl es for really cool prizes, live music, a special Birds & Beers with the Bird Chick, a pizza and karaoke party with Birds & Blooms Magazine, and even a bird tattoo contest! Our Birder’s Marketplace is open from 3 - 9 PM so the evening parties will give you a chance to visit our vendors, too! *You must be registered for the Biggest Week and show your festival name badge to participate in the evening socials. Register online at bwiab.com. You may also register at the registration table at Maumee Bay Lodge. The Biggest Week In Birding draws birders from all over the world. (Photo by Kim Kaufman)

The Biggest Week

It’s all about bird conservation By Mark Griffin Press Contributing Writer sports@presspublications.com Thousands of birding enthusiasts will fl ock to Northwest Ohio on May 312 for the fourth annual The Biggest Week in American Birding event. The three previous Biggest Week events drew more people than the one before it, and this year’s festival will draw birders not only nationally but from such countries as Panama, Ecuador, Guatemala, Canada, the United Kingdom, Japan and China. Kim Kaufman, executive director of the Black Swamp Bird Observatory in Oak Harbor, said that’s no accident. “We have put tremendous effort into marketing this area and using a lot of partnerships, like Birds and Blooms magazine, BirdWatching magazine, Bird Watcher’s Digest, Audubon Magazine,” she said. “Last year we were featured in Spirit Magazine, which is the infl ight magazine for Southwest Airlines. “Nationally and internationally, this festival is becoming one of the top birding festivals in this country. Certainly, word of mouth is a component, but our (BSBO) marketing effort has been reaching a lot of people. We’re including a strong tourism component into our mission.” Kaufman said this year’s theme is “Birding Is For Everyone,” and the event will again include birding workshops and bus trips to various birding loca-

tions in Ohio and Michigan. “We had just under 64,000 people here between the end of April and the middle of May last year,” Kaufman said. “I expect that number to continue to increase every year, because it has been. Our marketing efforts are reaching more and more people. “Black Swamp added the new website (biggestweekinamericanbirding. com) this year. We wanted something fresh and new. We’re adding new events and activities that outgrew the reach of the old website. This allows the new website to be treated almost like a blog, where we can add content in a much more fluid way.” The festival headquarters will be Maumee Bay Lodge and Conference Center, but there will be a lot going on at BSBO, Kaufman said. “Bus trips are taking people into four counties – Lucas, Ottawa, Erie and Sandusky,” she said. “We’re also running some trips into Michigan this year, to Point Mouillee State Game Area in Monroe County. All of our bus trips leave out of Maumee Bay and go out to birding areas. Point Mouillee has always been really good for shorebirds and waterfowl. It’s an interesting place and not that far to take people.” The goal of each The Biggest Week festival is to raise awareness and appreciation for birds and habitat conservation. In 2012, The Biggest Week helped raise more than $25,000 for local bird

research, education and conservation in Northwest Ohio. The festival also raised funds to purchase 200 copies of Guia de campo a las aves de Norteamerica, Spanish-language bird guide that serves as a valuable tool for diversity outreach programs in the desert Southwest and northern Mexico. Proceeds from the 2012 Biggest Week also provided funding to help build a new shorebird viewing platform on the Boss Unit of Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge, and continued development of the new Crane Creek Estuary Trail near the Magee Marsh Boardwalk. Hundreds of different kinds of birds will be on display during The Biggest Week, but the “stars” of the annual spring get-together in this part of the state are the warblers. “This is one of the best places in the world to see so many warblers in one place,” Kaufman said. “Last year birders saw 222 (bird) species, including 37 warbler species.” Kaufman added that BSBO is “really pumping up our efforts” to get local people to come out and try birding. Several workshops have been set up to teach people about bird watching. “This festival is so unique,” she said. “We get birders from all ages, all walks of life. This is a massive influx of people and birds coming together in Northwest Ohio. We’re doing some Urban Bird Walks with Toledo Metroparks. We’ll visit Toledo Metroparks and try to get people out birding.”


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Black Swamp Bird Observatory offers simple, fun, beautiful, and even tasty ways to help give something back to the birds that bring such joy to our lives. Buy a stamp, drink bird-friendly coffee, take a kid (or any beginner) birding, and help us help the birds. 1) HELP US SUPPORT RESPONSIBLE WIND ENERGY IN NW OHIO

Wind turbines are creeping their way into the Lake Erie Marsh Region from the east and west. They are being proposed for schools, small businesses, and private residences. These are not the massive commercial turbines, but “smaller” units, seemingly innocuous by comparison. But there are some facts that everyone should know. These so called “midsized” turbines can exceed 300 feet and there are currently no regulations whatsoever to control where they are installed in relation to bird and wildlife sensitive areas. Visit www.bsbobird.org for more information.

2) DONATE THE GUIA PROGRAM Visit Black Swamp Bird Observatory to learn how you can donate copies of the Guia for important bird conservation programs through our partners at Sonoran Joint Venture and Connecting Cultures. They help us distribute copies of Kenn’s Spanish language bird guide to people across the southwestern US and northern Mexico. These books will be used as valuable tools for bird guide training workshops.

3) DRINK SHADE-GROWN COFFEE Drinking certified shade-grown coffee is an easy way to support bird habitat conservation. This brand can be purchased at the Black Swamp Bird Observatory Gift Shop. Your host at the “Biggest Week” is happy to recommend Birds & Beans for all of your shade-grown coffee needs.

4) DON'T RELEASE HELIUM BALLOONS: They can kill birds and other wildlife!

Releasing helium balloons seems innocent enough - and many people release them to celebrate events or memorialize a lost friend or loved one. Sure, they look nice going up, but once they come down they create horrible looking litter and they pose very serious dangers to birds and wildlife. We know that most people just don't understand the dangers and we're trying to help get the word out. We also believe that no one would want to celebrate some event or memorialize a friend or loved one in a way that could kill a beautiful bird, sea turtle, or other wildlife. For more information visit: www.balloonsblow.org.

5) PUT YOUR MONEY TO WORK HELPING BIRDS: LEAVE A BIRDER’S CALLING CARD Pick up these cards at event site locations and use them when you visit area businesses. We want the region’s business owners to know that you are here because of the great birds you will see so they will lend support to habitat conservation!

6) PURCHASE CONSERVATION STAMPS

All of these conservation stamps are available for purchase in the Black Swamp Bird Observatory visitors’ center.

OHIO WILDLIFE LEGACY STAMP Buying this collectable wildlife stamp will show you support for: x Habitat restoration, land purchases, conservation easements x Keeping common species common

x Endangered & threatened native species

x Educational products for students & wildlife enthusiasts

x Wildlife and habitat research projects FEDERAL DUCK STAMP

Federal Duck Stamps are a vital tool for wetland conservation. Ninety-eight cents out of every dollar generated by the sales of Federal Duck Stamps goes directly to purchase or lease wetland habitat for protection in the National Wildlife Refuge System. The Junior Duck Stamp is another stamp that every birder should purchase! The Junior Duck Stamp is a pictorial stamp produced by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to recognize the conservation efforts of young people and support environmental and conservation education programs in the United States. The stamp design is selected from a national student art contest.

7) TAKE SOMEONE NEW BIRDING The future of bird conservation depends on keeping the next generation tuned in to nature. Take a few minutes to take your kids out for a walk. Volunteer to lead nature hikes for kids at a nature center, for your local Audubon Chapter, for your family and friends.

2013 Biggest Week in American Birding


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Binoculars for beginning birders By Nina Cheney Eagle Optics

less bright, and more narrow the field of view will be. A wide field of view is beneficial when trying to locate a bird or follow its movement.

Just because you’re a beginning birder doesn’t mean you don’t deserve a good quality binocular. In fact, when you think about it, beginning birders benefit more from good quality glass. Why? Because better glass means better resolution: clearer, brighter, and sharper images than in less expensive models. While more experienced birders are familiar with birds’ flight patterns, coloration and characteristics, beginners are just learning these things. So, seeing the best detail possible now, combined with lots of practice time in the field, will get you on a fast track beyond the greenhorn stage. When recommending binoculars for the beginning birder, we first consider size and specifications. With a wide variety of shapes and sizes available, the choices can seem daunting. Before you buy, it’s good to educate yourself about the basics of optics. If you’re more of a visual learner, many of these concepts are explained in our YouTube videos on the Eagle Optics web site (see “Understanding Optics” in our playlist). Magnification Let’s start with the numbers on a binocular. What do the numbers mean? The power and size of a binocular is defined by numbers. A fullsized 8x42 binocular is by far the most popular choice for birders, for several reasons. The first number, 8, refers to the magnification, which in this case enables you to view something 8 times closer than you would with the naked eye. While some birders may prefer a 10-power (10x) magnification for more detail, there are tradeoffs. The 10x is harder to hold steady than the 8x. That’s why we give the nod to 8x42 for those new to birdwatching. Magnification also greatly affects the field of view, the distance seen from

Objective Lens Size The second number, in this case 42, is the size of the objective (front) lens, measured in millimeters. The objective lens is the light gathering lens; the bigger the lens, the brighter the image. That brings me back to the newcomer with the low-quality compact: the small lens of a compact binocular gathers less light, making it difficult to see details, especially in low light conditions. Remember, birds are more active during dawn and dusk. Also, birding often takes place in the woods or under a canopy of trees where sunlight is diffused.

While it isn’t necessary to spend a lot of money on binoculars, be aware that the more you spend, the better the quality of the glass, and the less need to upgrade in years to come.

side to side through the binocular. This is something that is built into the optics of the binocular, but generally speaking, the higher the magnification, the

Features Eyeglass wearers, take note: If you want to use your binocular with eyeglasses or sunglasses, look for one that offers 15mm or more of eye relief. Eye relief refers to the distance images are projected from the ocular lens to their focal point, and the measurement can vary from 10mm to 23mm. Close focus is another feature to consider when buying a binocular. Many prefer a close focus (3’-6’) in order to observe butterflies, dragonflies, and wildflowers. For birdwatching, consider a binocular with a close focus of 10 feet or less. Also, waterproofing and fogproofing are fairly standard in today’s optics. We recommend buying a waterproof and fogproof binocular; you won’t have to worry about using your binocular around water and in any type of weather. It makes sense to spend as much as you can afford. It’s possible to spend upwards of $2,000 for a binocular. We stock nearly every major brand, and we’ll be happy to consult with you one-on-one.

The Christy Farm Nature Preserve (CFNP) welcomes birders to northwest Ohio for the Biggest Week in American Birding! Learn more about CFNP's history and conservation efforts at: www.christyfarmnp.blogspot.com Or Follow us on:

Christy Farm Nature Preserve @ChristyFarmNP Christy Road, Fremont, OH 419-332-9999


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Birding 101: How to Get Started... By Kenn Kaufman So you’ve caught the buzz about birding. You know that thousands of people have taken up this hobby, or outdoor sport, or whatever it is, and they’re having a great time. And now you want to give it a try, but you’re not quite sure how to start? First thing to know is that birders are an incredibly friendly and welcoming bunch, always glad to welcome new people into the fun. If you show up at a birding site and admit that you don’t have much experience, you won’t be shunned – more likely, you’ll have people wanting to share information and show you birds that you haven’t seen before. There’s no secret handshake and no test that you have to pass. Just say that you’re interested, and the birders will accept you as part of the gang. But here are a few tips to help you get started. Question: Do I need a lot of special gear? No, there’s hardly anything that you really need at the start. When I got into birding as a kid, I had nothing except a burning interest. But things became a lot easier after I got my hands on a field guide and binoculars, and those two items are almost essential – along with some kind of small notebook and pencil, for jotting down notes. Question: What’s a field guide? A field guide is a special kind of book, designed to help you figure out what kind of bird you’re seeing. Usually it’s a fairly small book, so that you can slip it into a large pocket or day pack to carry along. It won’t tell you a lot about each kind of bird – just the basics for telling one kind from another. Question: Couldn’t I just go online and look up the birds there? Well, you could, but that could turn out to be a slow, frustrating process. How do you look it up if you don’t know its name? You could look through thousands of pictures online, and maybe find pictures that matched the bird you saw, but it could take hours. With a field guide, you could look it up on the spot in mere minutes, because these books are designed to get you to the answer quickly. Several good field guides are available, and for 20 bucks you can save yourself hours of online frustration. By the way, here’s a good tip on choosing a field guide, if you can go to a store that has a good selection (like a bird observatory, nature center, or wild bird store). Choose a bird that you already know well – a cardinal, maybe, or a robin, something like that – and look it up in each of the field guides. Find which book has your favorite treatment of the bird that you chose. Chances are, you’ll like the way that book illustrates and describes other kinds of birds, too. Question: What about binoculars. Are they really necessary? As a kid, I got started bird watching without binoculars, and learned some birds that way; but when I finally saved up money to get binoculars, it made a huge difference. Suddenly I could see all kinds of details I had missed before, and I could tell different birds apart so much more easily. The article in this publication by Nina Cheney from Eagle Optics has good advice on how to choose your first binoculars. Question: Where should I go to look for birds? You can find some birds practically anywhere, including back yards and city streets. To see more different kinds of birds, visit more habitats: the birds that like open fields are different from the ones that live in the forest. Areas near

Birders using the Kaufman Field Guide. (Photo courtesy BSBO) water often have more variety of birdlife, and edges between habitats – such as where a meadow meets the edge of a woodlot – can be very good as well. If you’re in northwestern Ohio, you can find maps and directions for several good birding spots at http://www.bsbo.org/birding/birding_hotspots.htm Question: Is there some kind of birding uniform? Will other birders know I’m a beginner if I don’t wear the right stuff? No, there’s no uniform! Just go for comfort. Sometimes you can get closer to birds if you avoid bright colors and bright whites, but often it makes no difference. If you’re going to be wading in swamps or snowdrifts, rubber boots may be necessary; but most of the time, tennis shoes will be fine. When the day starts cool and then warms up, it’s helpful to be dressed in layers that you can peel off as the temperature rises. Squeaky windbreakers or raincoats can be a pain if you’re trying to listen for bird calls. Sunscreen and bug repellant can be useful accessories. But again, comfort is the main goal. Question: Any other advice for getting started? As long as you’re not harming the birds or their habitat, or trespassing on private property, or causing problems for other people, there’s no “wrong” way to go birding. The best approach is the one that works best for you. Don’t get discouraged if you can’t recognize every bird you see – just make the most of the ones that you do recognize. Birding is something that we do for enjoyment, so if you enjoy it, you are already a good birder.


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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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Shop the

BIGGEST WEEK BIRDER’S MARKETPLACE MAUMEE BAY LODGE AND CONFERENCE CENTER

BIRDER’S MARKETPLACE

Shop the Biggest Week Birder’s Marketplace 3:00 PM to 9:00 PM, May 3rd—May 11th. The Birder’s Marketplace will feature birding

Interested in a booth in the Birder’s Marketplace? Contact Julie Meltzer at jmeltzer@xanterra.com or by calling 419-836-1466 ext. 513 More details at: www.biggestweekinamericanbirding.com/ SPECIALEVENTS/BIRDERSMARKETPLACE

and outdoor gear, crafts, jewelry, artwork, optics, unique bird and nature related items,

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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

New logo is something to warble about

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By Tammy Walro Press Staff Writer It’s truly something to warble about –The Biggest Week in American Birding has a brand new logo – a colorful, eyecatching design created by wildlife artist Darin Miller. The logo incorporates ďŹ ve of the species that make this area so spectacular in spring – Kirtland’s Warbler, American Redstart, Mourning Warbler, Blackburnian Warbler and the Blackand-White Warbler. Miller, a self-taught artist from Fremont, Ohio says he was intrigued and excited when approached about creating a logo for the festival. “I’d known Kenn and Kim Kaufman for a little while,â€? he said. “Apparently they had been looking at some of my work on the Internet, and then Kim asked if I would do the logo. “Kim had a decent idea, specieswise of what she wanted, which included species that generally people are going to see when they come to the lakeshore,â€? Miller said. “We felt it was important to include the Kirtland’s Warbler since we’d been having more and more sightings along the lakeshore in the springs.â€? With the concept in mind, Miller went to work on a design. “The idea came together pretty quickly, though it was a challenge as far as foot placement and bird placement,â€? said Miller. “I tried to balance out the colors – the oranges, yellows, blacks and blues to make it visually balanced. “It took a little work to squeeze that Black-and-White in there,â€? he added. The birds in design were painted from reference photos that Miller – who describes himself as an avid birder and nature lover – had taken himself. “Every

The new Biggest Week in American Birding logo, designed by artist Darin Miller, includes ďŹ ve species that make birding in Northwest Ohio sensational each spring. See more of Miller’s work www. horizonďŹ neartgallery.com.

single one of the photos I used as a reference was taken at Magee Marsh, which is kind of nice, I think,� he said. Over the years, Miller’s many trips to Magee Marsh photographing migratory songbirds have inspired a number of paintings, along with a growing knowledge of songs and nesting habitats. Miller works in a very detailed style of oil painting. He believes painting an animal’s habitat is equally as important as the subject itself and he strives for his work to be as educational as it is decorative. In addition to donating his time and talent to create the logo artwork for the Biggest Week in American Birding, Miller is donating the original painting of the design to be auctioned during the festival. Proceeds raised from the auction will help support local research, education, and habitat conservation – a cause close to Miller’s heart, as his commitment to natural resources is re ected in more than just his artwork – he is also an active volunteer on many

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The Biggest Week in American Birding logo.

conservation projects in the area. Miller, a Signature Member of the Society of Animal Artists, has exhibited in numerous gallery and museum shows across the country, including the San Diego Natural History Museum and the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum. As a recipient of the Don Eckelberry Scholarship Award, he was able to spend some time at the Asa Wright Nature Center in Trinidad, studying and gathering reference on many of the island’s species.

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Urban birders

An interview with Drew Lanham and Doug Gray By Kimberly Kaufman The following is an interview with Dr. Drew Lanham and Doug Gray: two African American birders who are part of a national initiative to engage more people of color in birding and outdoor recreation. Both Drew and Doug will be in the area leading walks and giving presentations during the Biggest Week In American Birding. I was honored to spend some time chatting with these two remarkable fellows and learning more about their efforts to diversify the faces of birding and conservation. Kimberly: So, the obvious question: How did you get interested in birding? Doug: My grandfather inadvertently introduced me to birding. I grew up on a farm in Tennessee. One day when I was a young boy, while riding with my grandfather on his tractor, a bird caught my attention as it hovered nearby. I shouted to my grandfather, “What kinda bird is that?” and he said it was a “sparrow hawk”: a common name for the American Kestrel. That was the moment and bird that sparked my interest into the world of birding. Drew: The fi rst push came from wanting to fl y. As a kid I jumped off of everything there was to jump off of, even strapped cardboard wings to my arms and imagined myself tied to a kite big enough to take me aloft. I saw birds and I saw them fl y and I wanted to do what they did. I grew up in the country – and birds were a part of my life from the time I was a kid. I grew up on a farm in the middle of a forest. There were birds everywhere in my life—I didn’t always know the names of the birds—but they were always around me. And they were going places I wanted to go. When I was a kid, I dreamed of being a fighter pilot, a world-famous ornithologist, and a cowboy. I lived through birds. Kimberly: What is it about birding that you find most enjoyable? Doug: For me birding is just fun! But I do enjoy birding for many different reasons. When I’m looking for peace or escape from a very busy world, I fi nd that in birds. Sometimes I want to be challenged, and I can challenge myself to go out and identify birds that are hard to identify. I’m a minister, and my birding friends sometimes refer to me as “The Good Reverend of Birding.” If I’m in need of inspiration or illustration for a sermon, I can always find it in birds. Drew: It still seems that birds (be it some new bird – or something I discov-

Doug Gray and Dr. Drew Lanham.

er about a bird that I’ve already seen) take me places I wouldn’t have gone otherwise and introduce me to wonderful people. The experiences on the boardwalk at Magee Marsh during last year’s Biggest Week were remarkable. At one point I was standing shoulderto-shoulder with hundreds of people I didn’t know, but before long it was as if we were all longtime friends. Birds can break down barriers between people. If you’re standing alongside someone who happens to be a different color and you’re both looking at something like a cardinal, then guess what – you’re the same color through your mutual enjoyment of birds. You take your bins down and you are suddenly friends because the way you see each other first is through the birding lens, and it makes people essentially the same. Birds are an equalizer and not many things have the power to do that. Kimberly: Do you have a favorite place to watch birds? If so, where? Doug: One of my favorite places to bird and favorite birding experiences is the Biggest Week In American Birding and the areas pertaining to it. I also enjoy birding in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas. I love birding National Wildlife Refuges and Fish and Wildlife Areas here in the U.S., and I can hardly wait to travel outside the country to bird. Drew: My favorite place to bird is the next place I go birding. No matter where I’m birding, I want to claim the place I’m in and feel connected to it and the birds and the people of that place. My favorite place to bird might even be

my own yard, when some new bird or new behavior captures my attention. Kimberly: How has your interest in birds and nature made your life better? Doug: For me, birds make my world better by introducing me to an extremely varied group of folks who share my interest. Folks that I probably wouldn’t have met otherwise. Though we might disagree on many issues, we find common ground through our mutual interest in birds. For this reason and many others, birds have made my life better and made me a better person. Drew: Birds constantly put me in my place—in a good way. Birds make my world better because they give me an appreciation for life. Birds put things in context. As tiny as songbirds may be, they can do things I can’t do. Birds are all these things that I can’t be, so why should I be arrogant about being a human being when birds can do all of these miraculous things. Birds make my life better by introducing me to kindred spirits. As I’ve grown older, the circle of people that I trust has gotten smaller. I know lots more people than I ever have, but that circle of trusting friends, well, birds have introduced me to many of those in that inner circle. When you connect through birds, many of those friendships are lifelong. Kimberly: Currently, there aren’t that many black faces in the birding community. What do you see as the biggest obstacle keeping African-AmerContinued on page 25


Interview Continued from page 24 icans from becoming birdwatchers? Doug: This is complicated, and the reasons are multifaceted. 1) First, I feel there is a lack of awareness in the African American community of birds and birding, and of our historical contributions in this area. 2) I’ve found that another obstacle is that we as African Americans have lost our connection to the great outdoors. 3) Racism, both real and perceived. I am reminded of a photo I shared recently of an old black woman posing with a young black girl. It’s actually a family photo. The older lady was my great-grandmother, her mother was born a slave. The young girl is my daughter. Slavery was not so long ago, relatively speaking, and is why many of us are still impacted by what some only think of as “ancient history.” I believe the many complexities of our racial heritage is something that keeps African Americans from an interest in birding and the outdoors in general. I spent a lot of years in the military and traveled widely, and I’ve never experienced racism in the same way I have here at home in the U.S. It’s deeply rooted in this country, even while most people don’t want to talk about it, it’s there. But I do want to say that I feel great optimism. I’m optimistic in a strange way because of the tension that exists. This tension is a result of us starting to talk about issues that we historically haven’t talked about, and that’s true in the birding world, too. Just by the sake of these conversations, things will get better. It’s similar to how the weather changes between seasons. There’s always a period of agitation between the seasons. There’s always a period of storms between the seasons. We’re in that “between the seasons” period now. Drew: 1) Lack of outreach and education: The birding community has to open their arms and black folks have to open their minds. With a birding community of buddies that all look the same, the fire continues to burn in a circle. You have to reach out and engage people in this pastime. Birders are comfortable with who their buddies are and who they’ve always birded with, and they haven’t yet seen the need to expand the birding circle. 2) Cultural Challenges: Self-limitation. If you tell yourself that you can only be what other people say you should be, or what others become, then you

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

URBAN BIRD WALK: BIRDING THE CITY OF TOLEDO Date: Tuesday, May 7th Time: 9:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. Where: Swan Creek Preserve Metropark Meet at the Yager Center Address: 4659 Airport Highway Toledo Fee: FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

You do NOT have to be registered for the festival to attend this walk! Call Black Swamp Bird Observatory at 419-898-4070 if you have any questions. You don’t have to hike out to some remote forest to find wonderful birds. In fact, the City of Toledo is one of the ‘birdiest’ cities in the Midwest, and the Metroparks of Toledo offer amazing opportunities to enjoy birds. are defined by your own limits. When I was a kid, I never saw black cowboys, or black birders, or black fighter pilots, but that didn’t stop me from wanting to be those things. As black people, we have to see ourselves beyond those self-imposed limits. There are personal trails to be blazed to create your own pathway to the person you can be. If you’re going to wait for somebody who looks like you before you try something new – then you might wait a long time! 3) Some might think birding isn’t cool. Birding may not be considered cool by some, but as far as I’m concerned, if I’m doing it, it’s cool. Kimberly: You are part of a growing movement to engage more people of color in birding and conservation. Why is that important to you? Doug: Part of my optimism lies in the fact that the birding community has great potential to reflect what racial reconciliation should look like in our country. The diversity of birds is a visible example of diversity being a good thing. As a backdrop to that thought, bird diversity requires habitat diversity, and protecting habitat requires cultural diversity. We need all hands on deck, so we need people of color to be involved, and giving input on conservation matters. Drew: This might sound corny and cliché, but I think our future depends on it. The world is changing and we have to change with it and expand the way we involve people. We must understand that we have a place in nature. If species become increasingly imperiled because of loss of habitat, pollution, or toxins, that bears a warning for all of

2013

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us. So the more people we involve in conservation, through conserving birds or conserving other things, the better the chance we stand of getting it right. I think about this family I know. The father asked me to help them with some land they owned. He wanted to hold on to the land, but other family members wanted to sell. They hadn’t been on the property in decades, and his son (in his thirties) had never even been on the property. I showed them around and they started touching the trees and digging in the dirt. Eventually the son began to cry. He was feeling suddenly very connected to this land that his ancestors had been a part of, and he did not want to see the land altered or sold. There’s a thrill in connecting people with birds and nature and a world beyond themselves. Dr. Drew Lanham is a lifelong birder who has been practicing his craft since the second grade! He is currently a Professor of Wildlife Ecology at Clemson University where he teaches courses in field ornithology, wildlife management and conservation ethics. He is also an active researcher who studies the impacts of forest management on songbirds and other species. Among his other conservation-related activities, Drew is a widely published nonfiction nature writer and “struggling” poet. His favorite birds are wood warblers, accipiters and owls. Visit Drew’s blog, Wild and In Color at: www.wildandincolor.blogspot.com Doug Gray currently resides in Franklin, Indiana and is a Senior Engineering Specialist in Parenteral Engineering with Eli Lilly and Company, but he admits he’d “rather be birding”. Doug is a former board member of Indiana’s largest Audubon Society Chapter (Amos W. Butler Audubon Society) and is currently the contributing writer of the “Bird of the Month” for the Indiana Audubon Society. Doug has led bird hikes in many states, and is known for introducing people of color to the world of birding. He also speaks about the ever growing need for “Diversity in Birding” at bird related conferences around the country. However, Doug’s favorite birding events are with children as he loves engaging with the next generation of birdwatchers.

Across the Color Line

Drew Lanham will be presenting a keynote presentation during the Biggest Week In American Birding. His presentation, CONSERVATION ACROSS THE COLOR LINE: SAVING BIRDS WITH CULTURAL AWARENESS, takes place on Monday, May 6 at 7:30 p.m. The cost is $10 and registration is required at www.bwiab.com


26

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2013

Experience the beauty of the birds Wisconsin - Lake Michigan & Interior May 6-10 & 13-17, 2013 Nome, Alaska June 1, 6, 10 & 14, 2013 Northern New Mexico August 5-9 & August 11-15, 2013 Belize February 2-9, 10-17, 2014

Custom California ďŹ eld trips year round

Yellowbilled Tours For details and registration visit www.yellowbilledtours.com 925-353-0266


Saturday, May 11

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2013

27

International Migratory Bird Day ACTIVITIES NEAR THE MAGEE MARSH BOARDWALK

History of International Migratory Bird Day IMBD was created in 1993 by visionaries at the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center and the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology. From 1995 to 2006, the program was Environment for the Americas. IMBD continues to focus attention on one of the most important and spectacular events in the life of a migratory bird -- its journey between its summer and winter homes. Today, it is celebrated in Canada, the U.S., Mexico and Central America through bird festivals and bird walks, education programs, and Bird Day! We invite you to join us in this important celebration!

5am-5pm - TOM BARTLETT’S BIG SIT FUNDRAISER FOR EDUCATION 7am to 5pm - BSBO Traveling Store Many booths and displays ACTIVITIES AT OTTAWA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE • 8am-4pm - Self Guided Auto Tour • 8-9:30am - Family Bird Hike • 9-10:30am - Birds and Branches • 10am-12pm- Bike the Dikes • 10am- Vulture Vomit • 1pm- Those Amazing Owls • 1:30-3:00pm- Birds and Branches • 3pm- Iceland: Land of Birds, Fire, and Ice

Local activities include: ACTIVITIES AT BLACK SWAMP BIRD OBSERVATORY CENTER • 7am-7pm - IMBD Hours • BSBO Gift Shop Specials - Special prices on books, clothing, and other items! • 7am-7pmOPTICS ALLEY – Browse a wide variety of optics and birding gear • 1-2pm - MULTI-AUTHOR BOOK SIGNING Featuring: Don & Lillian Stokes, Kenn Kaufman, and Sharon Stiteler, The Bird Chick • 7am-Noon SONGBIRD-BANDING DEMO

ACTIVITIES AT SPORTSMAN’S MIGRATORY BIRD CENTER

Tom Bartlett’s Big Sit will run from 5am - 5pm. All donations to this year’s BIG SIT will be MATCHED dollar-for-dollar, up to $5000! So please make your contribution TODAY at www. bsbobird.org or by calling 419-898-4070!

• Maumee Bay Carvers Demonstration • Live Birds of Prey from Back to the Wild • Activities for Kids


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2013

DFRPPXQLW\EORJIRUELUGLQJDQGQDWXUHWUDYHOHUV

Č?*UHDW'HVWLQDWLRQV Č?7UDYHO6WRULHV Č?)HVWLYDOV (YHQWV Č?%LUGLQJ7UDLOV Č?5HYLHZV  &ODVVLČ´HGV Č?7UDYHO5HVRXUFHV

ČŠ1DWXUH7UDYHO1HWZRUNLVDJURZLQJUHVRXUFHIRUELUGHUVZLWKD PLVVLRQWRLQVSLUHDQGLQIRUPELUGLQJDQGQDWXUHWUDYHOČ‹ Laura Kammermeier

Check out recent posts: A Travel Guide to Africa: Top 10 Destinations Israel: Timeless Appeal & Unforgettable Birding Birding Belize Birding Arizona 5 Top Spots for Bird Photography in Florida We also accept guest posts and travel stories from intrepid travelers...like you!

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• Perennials • Crafting Gourds

Bench Farms St. Rt. 2

FARM MARKET & GREENHOUSE Owners: David & Cindy Bench

Open Daily April - October Where gardening friends gather 9151 Jerusalem Rd. (St. Rt. 2) Curtice, Ohio 43412 (2 miles east of N. Curtice Rd.)

419-836-9443

www.benchfarms.com

~Located in the barn~ Open Thursday-Sunday A country-primitive, gift shoppe

Welcome Bird Watchers

READY. SET. RECHARGE.

2KLRŇ‹V/DNH(ULH6KRUHVDQG,VODQGVKDV HYHU\WKLQJ\RXQHHGWRUHFKDUJH\RXUEDWWHU\WKLV VXPPHUIURPPLOHVRIFRDVWOLQHWRWKULOOLQJ FRDVWHUVLVODQGFUXLVLQJZDWHUSDUNVDQGVRPHRI WKHEHVWELUGLQJLQ1RUWK$PHULFD

Plan your getaway at SHORESandISLANDS.com 888-848-ERIE (3743)

•Primitives • McCall’s Candles • Unusual Plants

Nature Travel Network

•Heirloom Vegetables •Unique Homemades•Rare Herbs

28


ACTIVITY

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE SHAWNEE STATE PARK MAGEE MARSH WA

$45 $45 $45 $25 $75

BUS #3: OAK OPENINGS PRESERVE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #4 & #5: BIG DAY GUIDED BUS TRIPS BUS #6: THE WILDS OF ERIE COUNTY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #7: POINT MOUILLEE STATE GAME AREA BIRDING BY CANOE BUS #1 & #2: LOCAL HOTSPOTS GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #8: BIRDING FOR BEGINNERS GUIDED BUS TRIP WORKSHOP: DIGISCOPING BASICS MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK SONGBIRD BANDING & MIGRATION PROGRAM MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK BUS #1 & #2: LOCAL HOTSPOTS GUIDED BUS TRIP WORKSHOP: IDENTIFYING & APPRECIATING SPRING WARBLERS WORKSHOP: BALLOONS BLOW: DON'T LET THEM GO EVENING SOCIAL: Bird Tattoo Contest / Birds & Beers PROGRAM: PUNK ROCK BIG YEAR WOODCOCK WALK BUS #3: OAK OPENINGS PRESERVE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #4: NORTHWEST BAY PRIVATE LANDS GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #5: SOUTH BAY PRIVATE LANDS GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #6: THE WILDS OF ERIE COUNTY GUIDED BUS TRIP

SATURDAY, MAY 4

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$45

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE SANDUSKY PARK OFFICE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE OTTAWA NWR

$45 $45 $25 $45

BSBO

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$45 $45 $45 $45

$5

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE BSBO

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

OTTAWA NWR

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE OTTAWA NWR

MAGEE MARSH WA

$10

$10

$25

FREE

$25

MAGEE MARSH WA

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$45

$30

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$45

$5 $10

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE BSBO

$10

$10

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE OTTAWA NWR

MAGEE MARSH WA

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$45

$25

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$45

BUS #3: OAK OPENINGS PRESERVE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #4: SOUTH BAY PRIVATE LANDS GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #5: PRIVATE MARSHES GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #6: THE WILDS OF ERIE COUNTY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #7: PICKEREL CREEK/SANDUSKY BAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #8: CATAWBA/MARBLEHEAD GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #1 & #2: LOCAL HOTSPOTS GUIDED BUS TRIP BIRDING WITH GREG MILLER AT SHAWNEE STATE PARK MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK BUS #1 & #2: LOCAL HOTSPOTS GUIDED BUS TRIP WORKSHOP: BASICS OF IDENTIFYING SHOREBIRDS OPENING NIGHT EVENING SOCIAL - Hosted by BSBO and OOS PROGRAM: AND THEN I MET A GRAY CATBIRD WOODCOCK WALK NIGHT HIKE

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE PORT CLINTON DOCK

LOCATION

$85

FEE

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING 2013 SCHEDULE

PT. PELEE BOAT TRIP (SELF-GUIDED) (TO REGISTER, CALL JET EXPRESS) FRIDAY, MAY 3

REGISTRATION IS OPEN MAY 2 TO MAY 9

THURSDAY, MAY 2

You must register for the festival to participate. Register at www.bwiab.com.

6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 7:00 AM 7:00 AM 8:00 AM 8:00 AM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:00 PM 1:00 PM 3:00 PM 5-7:00 PM 7:30 PM 8:15 PM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM

6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 7:00 AM 7:00 AM 8:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:00 PM 1:00 PM 5:00 PM 7:30 PM 8:15 PM 9:30 PM

7:00 AM 7:45 AM

START

4:00 PM 4:00 PM 4:00 PM 4:00 PM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 3:00 PM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 1:00 PM 4:00 PM 2:00 PM 4:00 PM 8:30 - 11 PM 8:30 PM 9:15 PM 4:00 PM 4:00 PM 3:00 PM 4:00 PM

4:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 4:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 11:00 AM 3:00 PM 10:00 AM 1:00 PM 4:00 PM 2:00 PM 7:00 PM 8:30 PM 9:15 PM 11:00 PM

7:00 PM 6:00 PM

END

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING 2013 29


ACTIVITY

BUS #3: OAK OPENINGS PRESERVE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #4: NORTHWEST BAY PRIVATE LANDS GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #5: PRIVATE MARSHES GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #6: THE WILDS OF ERIE COUNTY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #7: CATAWBA/MARBLEHEAD GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #8: BIRDING TOLEDO METROPARKS GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #1 & #2: LOCAL HOTSPOTS GUIDED BUS TRIP KELLEY'S ISLAND TRIP (KELLEYS ISLAND FERRY DOCK IN MARBLEHEAD) MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK WORKSHOP: DIGISCOPING 101

TUESDAY, MAY 7

BUS #3: OAK OPENINGS PRESERVE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #4 & #5: BIG DAY GUIDED BUS TRIPS BUS #6: THE WILDS OF ERIE COUNTY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #7: PICKEREL CREEK/SANDUSKY BAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #8: LITTLE PORTAGE REGION PRIVATE LANDS BUS TRIP BIRDING BY CANOE BUS #1 & #2: LOCAL HOTSPOTS GUIDED BUS TRIP MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK TRAVEL TALK: THE NATURAL HISTORY OF SOUTH AFRICA BUS #1 & #2: LOCAL HOTSPOTS GUIDED BUS TRIP WORKSHOP: UNDERSTANDING WHAT YOU SEE FOR BETTER BIRD ID WORKSHOP: BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY BASICS WORKSHOP: BIRDS TO WORDS NATURE WRITING EVENING SOCIAL PM PROGRAM: CONSERVATION ACROSS THE COLOR LINE PM WOODCOCK WALK

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAGEE MARSH WA

$25

FREE

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$10

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE SANDUSKY PARK OFFICE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAGEE MARSH WA

$45 $45 $45 $25

$25 $10

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MARBLEHEAD DOCK

$45 $45 $45 $45 $25 $60

OTTAWA NWR

MAGEE MARSH WA

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$25

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE $45

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE BSBO $45

$5

$10

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

BSBO OTTAWA NWR

$25 $10

OTTAWA NWR MAUMEEE BAY LODGE OTTAWA NWR

FREE

MAGEE MARSH WA

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$45

$30

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$45

$5

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE BSBO

$10

FREE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

OTTAWA NWR OTTAWA NWR

$25 $10

OTTAWA NWR MAUMEEE BAY LODGE OTTAWA NWR

FREE

6:00 6:00 6:00 6:00 6:00 6:00 7:00 7:45 8:00 8:00

AM AM AM AM AM AM AM AM AM AM

6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 7:00 AM 8:00 AM 11:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:00 PM 1:00 PM 2:00 PM 3:00 PM 5:00 PM 7:30 PM 8:15 PM

6:00 AM 6:00 AM 7:00 AM 8:00 AM 11:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:00 PM 1:00 PM 2:00 PM 3:00 PM 5:00 PM 7:30 PM 8:15 PM 9:30 PM

START

4:00 PM 4:00 PM 3:00 PM 4:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 11:00 AM 4:00 PM 10:00 AM 10:00 AM

4:00 PM 4:00 PM 4:00 PM 3:00 PM 4:00 PM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 10:00 AM 1:00 PM 12:00 PM 4:00 PM 2:00 PM 4:00 PM 4:00 PM 7:00 PM 8:30 PM 9:15 PM

3:00 PM 4:00 PM 11:00 AM 10:00 AM 1:00 PM 12:00 PM 4:00 PM 2:00 PM 3:00 PM 4:00 PM 7:00 PM 8:30 PM 9:15 PM 11:00 PM

END

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

MONDAY, MAY 6

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

MAGEE MARSH WA

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$45

LOCATION

$45

FEE

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING 2013 SCHEDULE

BUS #7: CATAWBA/MARBLEHEAD GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #8: LITTLE PORTAGE REGION PRIVATE LANDS BUS TRIP BUS #1 & #2: LOCAL HOTSPOTS GUIDED BUS TRIP MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK TRAVEL TALK: WEST COAST BIRDING BUS #1 & #2: LOCAL HOTSPOTS GUIDED BUS TRIP WORKSHOP: RAPTOR IDENTIFICATION FAMILY GUIDED WALK PROGRAM: BIRD-FRIENDLY COFFEE: SHADE THE COFFEE SAVE THE BIRDS EVENING SOCIAL PROGRAM: CHALLENGE OF CONSERVING THE CERULEAN WARBLER WOODCOCK WALK NIGHT HIKE

SUNDAY, MAY 5

You must register for the festival to participate. Register at www.bwiab.com.

30 2013


BUS #3: OAK OPENINGS PRESERVE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #4: NORTHWEST BAY PRIVATE LANDS GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #5: PRIVATE MARSHES BUS TRIP BUS #6: THE WILDS OF ERIE COUNTY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #7: POINT MOUILLEE STATE GAME AREA BUS #8: LITTLE PORTAGE REGION PRIVATE LANDS BUS TRIP BUS #1 & #2: LOCAL HOTSPOTS GUIDED BUS TRIP AM WORKSHOP: BETTER BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY PT PELEE BOAT TRIP (TO REGISTER, CALL JET EXPRESS) MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK TRAVEL TALK: BIRDING PUERTO RICO AND DOMINICAN REPUBLIC BUS #1 & #2: LOCAL HOTSPOTS GUIDED BUS TRIP WORKSHOP: BASICS OF IDENTIFYING SHOREBIRDS WORKSHOP: GETTING STARTED IN BIRDING (walk may run over) EVENING SOCIAL: Hosted by Kaufman Field Guides PROGRAM: UNRAVELING SECRETS OF BIRD MIGRATION WOODCOCK WALK

THURSDAY, MAY 9

BUS #3: OAK OPENINGS PRESERVE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #4 & #5: BIG DAY GUIDED BUS TRIPS BUS #6: THE WILDS OF ERIE COUNTY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #7: SOUTH BAY PRIVATE LANDS GUIDED BUS TRIP BIRDING BY CANOE BUS #1 & #2: LOCAL HOTSPOTS GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #8: BIRDING FOR BEGINNERS GUIDED BUS TRIP AM WORKSHOP: BETTER BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK TRAVEL TALK: BIRDING SOUTH AMERICA BUS #1 & #2: LOCAL HOTSPOTS GUIDED BUS TRIP WORKSHOP: PRINCIPLES AND PITFALLS OF BIRD ID WORKSHOP: BIRDING NORTHWEST OHIO HOTSPOTS EVENING SOCIAL: Hosted by Partnership for International Birding PROGRAM: THE BIRD AND THE BUSH WOODCOCK WALK NIGHT HIKE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 8

MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK TRAVEL TALK: BIRDING ECUADOR BUS #1 & #2: LOCAL HOTSPOTS GUIDED BUS TRIP WORKSHOP: BASICS OF IDENTIFYING SPARROWS WORKSHOP: BIRDSONG EAR TRAINING TECHNIQUES EVENING SOCIAL: PROGRAM: SPARROW TALES WOODCOCK WALK NIGHT HIKE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE OTTAWA NWR OTTAWA NWR

$20 $10 $10 MAUMEEE BAY LODGE BSBO MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$10

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE SANDUSKY PARK OFFICE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE BSBO

$45 $45 $25 $45

OTTAWA NWR

$10 $10

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE BSBO MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$10

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE BSBO PORT CLINTON DOCK

$45 $45 $45 $45 $25 $85

$10 FREE

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE BSBO

6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 7:00 AM 7:30 AM 7:45 AM 8:00 AM 11:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:00 PM 1:00 PM 3:00 PM 5:00 PM 7:30 PM 8:15 PM

6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 7:00 AM 7:00 AM 7:30 AM 8:00 AM 11:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:00 PM 1:00 PM 3:00 PM 5:00 PM 7:30 PM 8:15 PM 9:30 PM

11:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:00 PM 1:00 PM 3:00 PM 5:00 PM 7:30 PM 8:15 PM 9:30 PM

4:00 PM 4:00 PM 3:00 PM 4:00 PM 4:00 PM 4:00 PM 11:00 AM 10:30 AM 6:00 PM 10:00 AM 1:00 PM 12:00 PM 4:00 PM 2:00 PM 4:00 PM 7:00 PM 8:30 PM 9:15 PM

4:00 PM 4:00 PM 4:00 PM 3:00 PM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 3:00 PM 10:30 AM 10:00 AM 1:00 PM 12:00 PM 4:00 PM 2:00 PM 4:00 PM 7:00 PM 8:30 PM 9:15 PM 11:00 PM

1:00 PM 12:00 PM 4:00 PM 2:00 PM 4:00 PM 7:00 PM 8:30 PM 9:15 PM 11:00 PM

2013

$5

$10

OTTAWA NWR

$25

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

OTTAWA NWR MAUMEEE BAY LODGE OTTAWA NWR

FREE

MAGEE MARSH WA

MAGEE MARSH WA

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$45

$40

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$45

$5

$10

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

OTTAWA NWR MAUMEEE BAY LODGE OTTAWA NWR

$25

MAGEE MARSH WA FREE

$40

MAGEE MARSH WA

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$45

$30

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$45

$5

$10

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

OTTAWA NWR

MAGEE MARSH WA FREE

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING 31


ACTIVITY

SATURDAY, MAY 11 (INTERNATIONAL MIGRATORY BIRD DAY)

SUNDAY, MAY 12

If you would like to donate an item to our auction, please contact Black Swamp Bird Observatory at 419-898-4070, email biggestweek@bsbo.org , or simply drop it off at Maumee Bay Lodge or Black Swamp Bird Observatory during the festival.

Proceeds will benefit local bird conservation, education, and research.

Bid on some sensational items and help raise money for bird conservation, research, and education! Donated items include Pictures, Bird Feeders, Optics, Artwork, Jewelry, and much more!

Maumee Bay Lodge May 3 - 8, 2013

BIGGEST WEEK SILENT AUCTION FOR CONSERVATION

MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK WORKSHOP: GETTING STARTED IN BIRDING (walk may run over) MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE SANDUSKY PARK OFFICE MAUMEEE BAY LODGE MAGEE MARSH WA MAGEE MARSH WA

$45 $45 $25 $50

$25 $10

MAGEE MARSH WA

OTTAWA NWR

MAGEE MARSH WA

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

MAGEE MARSH WA

MAGEE MARSH WA

MAGEE MARSH WA

MAGEE MARSH WA

BSBO

MAGEE MARSH WA

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

8:00 AM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM

5:00 AM 7:00 AM 8:00 AM 9:00 AM 11:00 AM 1:00 PM 7:30 PM

10:00 AM 12:00 PM 1:00 PM

5:00 PM 12:00 PM 10:00 AM ?? 1:00 PM 2:00 PM 8:30 PM

4:00 PM 4:00 PM 4:00 PM 3:00 PM 3:00 PM 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 10:00 AM 12:00 PM 1:00 PM 12:00 PM 4:00 PM 2:00 PM 4:00 PM 4:00 PM 8:30 - 11 PM 8:30 PM

END

Enjoy the refuge from the comfort of your car! The 7-mile route departs from the visitor center parking lot. Gates open at 8:00 a.m. and close at 4:00 p.m. The Auto Tour will be open every day during the Biggest Week In American Birding May 3rd—May 12th

SELF-GUIDED AUTO TOUR OTTAWA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE 14000 West State Route 2 Oak Harbor, Ohio 43449 419-898-0014

FREE

$12

FREE

FREE

$10

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

BSBO OTTAWA NWR

$25 $10

OTTAWA NWR MAUMEEE BAY LODGE OTTAWA NWR

FREE

6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 6:00 AM 7:00 AM 8:00 AM 9:00 AM 11:00 AM 11:00 AM 12:00 PM 1:00 PM 2:00 PM 3:00 PM 5-7:00 PM 7:30 PM

START

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

TOM BARTLETT'S BIG SIT SONGBIRD BANDING & MIGRATION PROGRAM MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK YOUNG BIRDERS GUIDED WALK MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK BOOK SIGNING: (Kenn Kaufman, Don & Lillian Stokes, Sharon Stiteler "Bird Chick" ) PROGRAM: BIRDING IN OUTER SPACE

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$45

MAGEE MARSH WA

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$30

MAUMEEE BAY LODGE

$45

LOCATION

$45

FEE

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING 2013 SCHEDULE

BUS #3: OAK OPENINGS PRESERVE GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #4 & #5: BIG DAY GUIDED BUS TRIPS BUS #6: THE WILDS OF ERIE COUNTY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #7: PICKEREL CREEK/SANDUSKY BAY GUIDED BUS TRIP BUS #8: BIRDING TOLEDO METROPARKS GUIDED BUS TRIP BIRDING BY CANOE BUS #1 & #2: LOCAL HOTSPOTS GUIDED BUS TRIP MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK BIRDING TRIP WITH STOKES, KAUFMANS, AND BIRDS & BLOOMS MAGEE MARSH GUIDED WALK TRAVEL TALK: BIRDING COLUMBIA, EQUADOR & PERU BUS #1 & #2: LOCAL HOTSPOTS GUIDED BUS TRIP WORKSHOP: IDENTIFYING & APPRECIATING SPRING WARBLERS WORKSHOP: BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY BASICS WORKSHOP: BIRDING BY EAR EVENING SOCIAL: Hosted by Birds & Blooms - Pizza Party / Karaoke PROGRAM: BIRDING AND PHOTOGRAPHY

FRIDAY, MAY 10

You must register for the festival to participate. Register at www.bwiab.com.

32 2013


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

2013

33

Blog team includes new and familiar faces The Biggest Week in American Birding is thrilled to welcome back some members the blog team from 2012 and to warmly welcome some new members to the team. The 2013 blog team includes: • Dawn Simmons Fine, a Biggest Week All-Star, who assisted in coordinating the festival blog team. Dawn and her husband Jeff are full-time RVers who travel the country on one birding adventure after another. Follow them at dawnandjeffsDawn Fine blog.blogspot.com. • Birds & Blooms Blog Team featuring Stacy Tornio & Kirsten Sweet, editor and associate editor for Birds & Blooms magazine. They love sharing their love of birding with their 1 millionplus readers. Last year, they Stacy Tornio & Kirsten Sweet put together an “I Like Birds” video, and word is, they have something up their sleeves for this year. Follow them at birdsandbloomsblog.com. • Jerry Jourdan, a Michigander and bird photographer hobbyist who has been birding for more than 30 years. Like most avid birders unable to afford “the big glass,” he discovered the art of “digiscoping” or photographing birds through a spotJerry Jourdan ting scope with a pointand-shoot camera. Learn more at jerryjourdan.blogspot.com. He also writes a blog dedicated to digiscoping at jerryjourdan2.blogspot.com. • Laura Kammermeier, blogger and website consultant, grew up, went to college and discovered birding in Ohio. She is known for her “Birds, Words & Websites” blog, found at laurakammermeier.com/ blog/. She consults with nature and tourLaura Kammermeier ism clients through her freelance business, My Digital Nature (mydigitalnature.com). • Greg Miller, blogger and Biggest Week Field Trip Leader, has been birding for almost 50 years and has visited all 50 states. In 1998, he did a “Big Year” in an effort to see as Greg Miller

many species of birds as possible in one calendar year. He and two others broke the 700 mark. To learn more about him, visit www.gregmillerbirding.com.

Nemesis Bird Blog Team

Nemesis Bird Blog Team –www.nemesisbird.com. • Anna Fasoli, is a field biologist who has traveled all over the US working on different research projects.

AnnaFasoli

Drew Weber

tural practices.

• Drew Weber, an ornithologist from PA, now living in central NY while pursuing a master’s degree at Penn State studying grassland birds and their relationships with various agricul-

• Melissa Penta, began her passion for birds through a camera lens. After many not-so-great photos, she realized she’d get better photos if she knew her subjects better, so she studied field guides to learn about local birds. In 2010, she moved to Melissa Penta upstate NY where she was surrounded by nature and her love for birds took off. See her work at mydigitalmind.com. • Rob Ripma, blogger, Field Trip Coordinator and Trip Leader, is a lifelong Indiana resident who has birded extensively in the Midwest for 10 years, and has also traveled extensively to pursue his passion. He has served on the executive board of Rob Ripma the Indiana Audubon Society for three years (currently as Vice President), is a co-founder of the Indiana Young Birders Club and he recently joined the Black Swamp Bird Observatory Board of Directors. His personal blog/website is available at www. nuttybirder.com. • Linda Rockwell, a New Mexican

and lifelong “social” birder and bird photographer was fortunate enough to have parents who love birds, and to grow up near Bitter Lake National Wildlife Linda Rockwell Refuge in Roswell, NM. In 2009 she began photographing birds with a borrowed camera. This casual hobby became an avid one, and she now travels to birding areas across the US in pursuit of her interest. She blogs and shares her photos at photofeathers. wordpress.com and photoflurries.wordpress.com. • Robert Setzer, aka “Dr. Bob” and his wife Judy have been birding since 2009 after Bob escaped the “cubicle world.” He holds a Ph.D. in marine biology (seaweeds) and traveled and taught marine biology on the Robert Setzer West Coast for a dozen years before moving to a new career in software engineering. Follow them at drbobsbirdblog.blogspot.com. • Kim Smith, an Ohio native who now lives in Michigan, can’t figure out how she lived almost 40 years before discovering the amazing world of birds. Now she’s trying to make up for the decades of non-birding life, sharing her wonder at Kim Smith NatureIsMyTherapy. com. • Chris West, blogger/writer, photographer and Field Trip Leader, is a lifelong birder whose travels have taken him to every corner of the U.S. and Canada, as well as to the American tropics. He loves to share the beauty and knowledge Chris West he’s soaked up over the years at swallowtailedkite.blogspot. com. • Jennifer Callaway, (Birdfreak’s sister), is an avid birder and blogger with a teenaged son that is also into birding in a major way. Jennifer earned a degree in Geography with an emphasis on Natural Environmental Systems and a GIS Jennifer Callaway Certificate at Northern Illinois University. She helps Birdfreak write many of the posts and brainstorm for new ideas about conservation.


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6954 CR 77 Millersburg, OH 44654 P: 330.674.0210 F: 330.674.0920

Show this Ad at our booth and get a Free Micro Fiber lens cloth, May 2-11, 2013. Only 1 per Ad, limited supplies.

Free Expert Binocular c leaning on site!

We will also have a booth at the Maumee Bay Lodge from May 2-11 in the evenings.


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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Fun Places to Visit Toledo Museum of Art

Experience one of the fi nest and most diverse collections of artwork in the country at the Toledo Museum of Art. Discover treasures ranging from ancient Egypt to contemporary art, including glass, sculpture, European and American painting, African and Asian art, graphic arts and decorative arts. Other highlights include the Sculpture Garden outside and the architecturally renowned Glass Pavilion, located across Monroe Street. 2445 Monroe St., Toledo 419-255-8000 or 800-644-6862, www. toledomuseum.org

Toledo Zoo

The Toledo Zoo is recognized as one of the world’s most complete zoos, and one of the region’s top family destinations. It boasts over 6,000 mammals, fish, reptiles, amphibians, birds and invertebrates representing over 750 species, and innovative exhibits also get you up close to many of your favorites. Each year, nearly one million people visit the zoo to experience the wonders of the natural world, stroll the scenic grounds and explore the historic WPAera buildings. Zoo highlights include the Arctic Encounter, the Africa! exhibit, Nature’s Neighborhood children’s area, the Tembo Trail, and the new Australianthemed Wild Walkabout, which opens May 24 and more. 2 Hippo Way, Toledo 419-385-4040, www.toledozoo.org

Imagination Station

Ready to experience the unexpected? Explore the exciting? The Imagination Station – Toledo’s hands-on science museum – promises to immerse visitors of every age in a multi-sensory experience that’s as fun as it is educational. Defy gravity as you ride the High Wire Cycle 20 feet above the atrium; or visit the Learning Worlds designed to focus on a specific science genre – Energy Factory, Mind Zone, Water Works, Little Kidspace, and more. A number of special exhibits and events are planned throughout the year, including “Grossology, The (Impolite) Science of the Human Body,” which runs May 18-Sept. 2. One Discovery Way, Toledo 419-244-2674, www.imaginationstationtoledo.org

Toledo Botanical Garden

Originally consisting of 20 acres do-

nated by George P. Crosby to the City of Toledo, Toledo Botanical Garden now encompasses more than 60 acres of beauty, tranquility and opportunities for exploration and reflection. It is currently a public/private partnership between Metroparks and the non-profit Toledo Botanical Garden Board, Inc. in collaboration with the City of Toledo. A living museum for plants, Toledo Botanical Garden’s notable gardens include shade, perennial, English border, aquatic, herb, rose, dahlia and grass, among others. Special events include the Spring Plant Sale (May 10-12), Crosby Festival of the Arts (June 29-30), summertime jazz concerts, and Heralding the Holidays (Dec. 6-8), a seasonal celebration showcasing the numerous resident artistic guilds. 5403 Elmer Dr. Toledo 419-536-5566, www.toledogarden.org

Tony Packo’s Café

Tony Packo’s is famous for its Hungarian-style hot dogs, for its hot dog buns signed by movie stars, other celebrities and U .S. Presidents and for its frequent mention by Toledo’s Jamie Farr on the TV series M*A*S*H*. In addition to the fl agship eatery, Packo’s has a location across from Fifth Third Field, home of the Toledo Mud Hens. 1902 Front St., Toledo 800-366-4218, www.tonypackos.com

The Butterfly House

Hundreds of live butterflies from North America, Central America and Asia can be seen in a beautiful indoor garden setting. Open May 1 through Sept. 30 and weekends in October. 11455 Obee Rd., Whitehouse 419-877-2733, butterfly-house.com

Sundance Kid Drive-In

The drive-in, located across from Pearson Park, features four first-run fi lms on two screens April through October.

The Sundance Drive-In.

Tony Packo’s Cafe

The 50’s style drive-in has all the nostalgia and the best in FM Stereo sound. The concession stand will make your mouth water with all your drive-in favorites. The Butch Cassidy Canteen, an outside concession wagon, serves up carnival favorites. Admission prices are $8.50 per adult and $3.50 each for children 6-12. (Children ages 5 and under are free.) 4500 Navarre, Oregon 419-691-9668, www.greateasterntheatres.com

Green spaces

• Metroparks of the Toledo Area preserves many of Lucas County’s most unique natural areas, from the Oak Openings to the Lake Erie coastal zone. Locally, Pearson Metropark, located at 761 Lallendorf Rd., Oregon, is one of the last remaining stands of the Great Black Swamp, a notorious forest that once blanketed much of Northwest Ohio. The thick woods and location close to Lake Erie make Pearson a favorite stopover for a wide variety of migrating birds. Open 7 a.m. until dark every day; extended hours for winter recreation. Metroparks of the Toledo Area 419-407-9700, www.metroparkstoledo.com. • Maumee Bay State Park at Cedar Point and North Curtice roads along the Oregon-Jerusalem Township border offers a two-mile elevated boardwalk plus an observation tower amidst swamplands, marsh, scenic meadows and woods that are teeming with wildlife and birds. The park features lakeshore and inland beaches, a marina and a conference center and resort hotel that also has a golf course and rental cabins. 419-836-1466, www.maumeebaystateparklodge.org. • The Wood County Park District oversees several park facilities in the county, including Cedar Creeks Preserve, a 42-acre tract located east of Walbridge where Woodville Road (SR 51) crosses Walbridge Road. The park is an excellent example of the former Black Swamp that once covered a large portion of Northwest Ohio and includes hiking trails, a footbridge, picnic tables, restrooms and an information kiosk. 419-353-1897, Continued on page 38


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Fun Places to Visit

Fun at Maumee Bay State Park. Continued from page 37

woodcountyparkdistrict.org • The Sandusky County Park District operates 10 facilities, including the 93-acre Wolf Creek Park, 160-acre Blue Huron Reserve, the Mull Covered Bridge, the 310-acre Creek Ben Farm and others. White Star Park, located south of Gibsonburg on SR 300, has a quarry up to 40 feet deep that is used by scuba divers throughout the region as well as for non-power boating and fishing; a beach with changing rooms and a concession stand, and a campground located across from the park’s main entrance that has electric and water hookups and primitive campsites on a reservation basis. In addition, the park offers picnic tables, grills, well water, restrooms, volleyball courts, horseshoe pits, playfield, nature trails, mountain bike trails, shelters, day camp area and more. 419-334-4495, 1-888-200-5577, www.lovemyparks.com • East Harbor State Park, 1169 N.

Buck Rd off SR 269 in Marblehead, on the shores of Lake Erie. The park has unlimited opportunities for outdoor recreation. Boating, fishing, swimming, picnicking and camping are popular while nature enthusiasts will enjoy the abundance of waterfowl, shorebirds and other species of wildlife found in the park’s scenic wetlands. 419-734-4424, 1-866-664-6727, www.eastharborstatepark.org • Marblehead Lighthouse State Park, 110 Lighthouse Dr., Marblehead. One of Lake Erie’s best known and mostphotographed landmarks, the lighthouse is one of Ohio’s newest state parks. The grounds surrounding the lighthouse offer excellent picnicking and views of Lake Erie, Sandusky Bay, Kelleys Island and South Bass Island and Cedar Point. Tours are offered on summer weekdays after Memorial Day until the Friday before Labor Day and on the second Saturday of the month June through October. 419-734-4424 ext. 2, dnr.state.oh.us/parks

Schedel Arboretum

The Schedel Arboretum was home to Joseph and Marie Schedel for more than 50 years before opening to the public in 1991. The arboretum has more than 17 scenic acres that border along the Portage River just outside of Elmore. See gardens of nearly 20,000 annuals, roses, perennials, irises and lilies, including a Japanese garden complete with Torii, waterfall, pools, lanterns, bridges and a pagoda. A number of special exhibits and events are planned throughout the year, including exhibits in the Trellis Gallery, which has become a showcase for local artists. Group tours of the grounds and mansion are available by appointment. Regular hours May-October, Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sunday 12-4 p.m. Closed Mondays. 19255 W. Portage River South Rd., Elmore 419-862-3182, www.schedel-gardens.org

Religious sites

The Marblehead Lighthouse. (Courtesy of The Beacon)

Our Lady of Lourdes Grotto The grotto at Our Lady of Lourdes Church in Genoa is constructed of “tufa,” fossilized vegetation found in the “blue hole” at Castilia, O. A ground-level statue of a praying Saint Bernadette Souberious looks up admiringly at Our Lady. The

grounds include a small altar, an adjoining bell tower of tufa, arches and outdoor Stations of the Cross in hand-carved Italian bronze. 204 S. Main St., Genoa, 419-855-8501 Our Lady of Toledo Shrine Our Lady of Toledo Shrine is a place of prayer, quiet refl ection and healing. All faiths are welcome. The garden and well are open during daylight hours. 655 S. Coy Rd., Oregon, 419-6977742 Holy Rosary Cathedral Visitors will be moved by the beauty of the cathedral’s Old World style, and by the visual strength of its symbol as the primary church of Roman Catholic Diocese of Toledo. The cathedral is Spanish Plateresque in design – the only one of its kind in North America. Thousands have been inspired by the graceful beauty of its piers and arches; by the richly decorated nave ceiling with scenes from the Old Testament, the halfdomed apse embellished by frescoes in the Keim process, and by one of its most striking gems, the Rose Window, which sparkles and radiates in the changing light of the eastern sun. 2535 Collingwood Blvd., Toledo 419-244-9575, rosarycathedral.org Sorrowful Mother Shrine The Sorrowful Mother Shrine features 120 acres of wooded splendor, plus 40 points of interest including grottos, Sorrowful Mother Chapel, Pieta Outdoor Chapel, plus the Stations of the Cross. Founded in 1850, the original shrine is the oldest place of pilgrimage dedicated to Mary in the Midwest. Cafeteria, picnic area and gift shop available. Handicap accessible. There is no cost, however freewill offerings are accepted. 4106 SR 269, Bellevue 419-483-3435, www.sorrowfulmothershrine.org

African Safari Park

Come for a day of fun, education and entertainment at African Safari drivethrough safari, home of more than 400 of the world’s most beautiful and exotic animals. Safari fun also includes camel and pony rides, entertaining and educational animal shows, pig races, a gift shop, picnic facilities, a snack bar and café and grill. Open through Dec. 1 (subject to change). Open daily rain or shine. 267 S. Lightner Rd., Port Clinton 800-521-2660, www.africansafariwildlifepark.com Continued on page 39


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

Fun Places to Visit restaurants, retail shops and adjacent marina. 2001 Cleveland Rd. (US 6), Sandusky 419-627-2500, www.castawaybay.com

Soak City

Splish splash till your heart’s content at Soak City, an 18-acre waterpark next to Cedar Point. The park includes Splash Zone, a huge bucket and multistory play area; Breakers Bay half-million gallon wave pool; body slides, tube slides, and inner tube rivers. Choo-Choo Lagoon and Tadpole Town offer big fun for little ones. For adults, there’s Bubbles Swim-Up Bar a special area with a hot tub. Soak City guests can also enjoy the sandy Cedar Point Beach on Lake Erie. Open Memorial Day through Labor Day. 1 Cedar Point Dr., (off US 6) Sandusky 419-627-2350, www.cedarpoint.com. Monsoon Lagoon. Continued from page 38

Cedar Point

The ideal location for your family’s getaway, with more than 150 rides, shows, and attractions, Cedar Point will debut the new world-record-breaking GateKeeper coaster in 2013. GateKeeper will be the longest winged roller coaster and boast the longest drop of any winged roller coaster on the planet. Of course, Cedar Point also offers more than 50 other rides from mild to wild, along with “Dinosaurs Alive! on Adventure Island,” an incredible display of 50 moving and roaring life-size animatronic dinosaurs, live entertainment, a wide array of dining options and much more. In September and October, HalloWeekends offer even more screams, as amusement park thrills combine with spooky chills for familyfriendly fun during the day and terrifying nighttime frights. Open May 11 through Sept. 2 daily, then weekends (Fri. evenings, Sat. & Sun.) through Oct. 27. 1 Cedar Point Dr., Sandusky 419.627.2350, cedarpoint.com

Challenge Park

Located between Cedar Point and Soak City, Challenge Park activity complex features the RipCord Skycoaster, two high-speed go-kart tracks, Challenge Golf and Skyscraper, a thrilling ride that spins riders in a circular motion 16 stories above the ground at speeds of 55 mph. Admission to Cedar Point or Soak City not required. Each attraction has a separate fee. Open daily May 10-Sept. 2 and weekends through Oct. 27. 1 Cedar Point Dr., (off US 6), Sandusky 419-627-2350, www.cedarpoint.com

Ghostly Manor

Experience the scariest haunted house you will ever encounter, ride the fastest virtual roller coaster in Ohio, experience a one-of-a-kind interactive 3D blacklight mini-golf journey or get your heart pumping even more with a whirl around the skating rink. In December, visit the Winter Wonderland walk-thru. Open year-round. Call for hours. Call for hours.

Castaway Bay

The Caribbean meets Sandusky at this resort destination for vacationers. With its tropical theme, guests at Cedar Point’s Castaway Bay feel like they have just landed on an island paradise upon entering this lush indoor waterpark resort. Castaway Bay features 237 hotel rooms and suites including family-oriented units, a 38,000-square-foot indoor waterpark with water activities for all ages, a day spa, fi tness center, arcade, a craft and child activity center,

2013

3319 Milan Rd. (US 250), Sandusky 419-626-4467, ghostlymanor.com

39

Glacial Grooves

The world’s largest accessible glacial grooves, these scars in the limestone bedrock were carved 18,000 years ago by the ice sheet that covered part of North America. Open year-round during daylight hours. Division Street, Kelleys Island ohsweb.ohiohistory.org/places/nw08

Great Wolf Lodge

Great Wolf Lodge is an all-suites, full-service, family destination indoor waterpark resort featuring a Northwoods atmosphere and family-friendly amenities including a 41,000-square-foot indoor entertainment area featuring a grand-scale waterpark, spacious outdoor pool, arcade, fi tness room, kids’ arts and crafts center, family restaurants, gift shop and performing Great Clock Tower. 4600 Milan Rd. (US 250), Sandusky 800-641-WOLF (9653), www.greatwolf. com/sandusky/waterpark

Kalahari Resort

At Kalahari resort, visitors can surf indoors 365 days a year or take on the Zip Coaster uphill water roller coaster at America’s largest indoor waterpark. The resort also offers a spa and salon, Candy Hut, Ivory Coast Lounge, Great Karoo Marketplace Restaurant, Zakanaka Kids, Madagascar Indoor Mini Golf, Safari Adventures and much more await. Catch some rays at Kalahari’s outdoor pool complex from Memorial Day through Labor Day (weather permitting). Call for day pass information. 7000 Kalahari Dr. (off US 250), Sandusky 877-KALAHARI(525.2427), www. KalahariResorts.com/oh

Monsoon Lagoon Waterpark

Monsoon Lagoon waterpark and family entertainment complex features aquatic adventures including six waterslides, a lazy river, an adult pool with swim-up Tiki bar, and Adventure Island Tree House with 17 levels. Miniature golf, bumper boats, grand prix cars and a gaming arcade round out a day of family fun. Open May 25Sept. 2. Routes 2 & 269 (1530 S. Danbury Rd), Port Clinton 419-732-6671, monsoonlagoonwaterpark.com

Seneca Caverns

Go caving at “The Caviest Cave” where you can walk natural stone steps and pathways through “the earth crack” and past the Ole Mist’ry River. Pan for gemstones at Seneca Mining Company. The Caverns are open seven days a Great Wolf Lodge.

Continued on page 40


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Fun Places to Visit Continued from page 39

week Memorial Day through Labor Day, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. The last tour departs one hour before close. During the months of May (prior to Memorial Day), September (after Labor Day) and to mid-October, the Caverns are open weekends (Saturday and Sunday) only from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.. The last tour departs one hour before close. 15248 E. Twp. Rd. 178 (off SR 269 S), Bellevue 419-483-6711, senecacavernsohio.com

Brandville School

The Historic Brandville School, built in 1882, has been refurbished and now houses the Or e go n - J e r u s a l e m Historical Society. Local history memorabilia, artifacts and a Civil War collection, including the refurbished 19th century oil painting of the 1864 Volunteer Light Artillery Group, are featured. The museum complex is open 10 a.m.- 2 p.m. Thursdays (excluding holidays). Call to arrange tours for groups of four or more. No charge; donations accepted. 1133 Grasser St., Oregon 419-693-7052, www.ojhs.org

Elmore Depot

The Elmore Historical Society purchased 1860s Elmore Depot in 1981, along with 2.5 acres of land. The society undertook an extensive renovation, and the building now houses memorabilia from Elmore’s past. The Society also owns and maintains an 1840s log house; In 1983, society members dismantled, relocated and rebuilt the Heckman log house, adding an elaborate flagstone fi replace and porch, and furnishing it with artifacts from its era. Ory (Depot) Park, Elmore 419-260-1282, www.elmorehs.tripod.com

Woodville Historical

Woodville Historical Museum, operated by the Woodville Historical Society, features materials and artifacts documenting the rich history of the small vil-

“The War of 1812 on the Ohio Frontier,” an exclusive exhibit detailing how Northwest Ohio was pivotal in turning the War of 1812 from a defeat to victory. Artifacts and manuscripts from the Hayes Presidential Center Collections, area museums and historical societies and the private collection of Lou Schultz are featured. Corner of Hayes and Buckland Avenues, Fremont 800-998-PRES (7737). www.rbhayes.org

Marblehead

Verandah concert at the Hayes Presidential Center.

lage located on the banks of the Portage River about 20 miles east of Toledo. Museum visitors can learn about the 1900s oil boom, Indians in the Woodville area, lime plants, early schools, the Lake Shore Electric rail system that once traveled between Toledo and Cleveland and more. The museum is open Wed. and Fri. 2-4 p.m. Other times by appointment. 107 E. Main St., Woodville 419-849-2349

Veterans Museum

The Northcoast Veterans Museum is a tribute to those who have served in the uniformed service of the United States, especially those who have lost their lives in combat or training. The dramatic and colorful military displays include weapons, uniforms, pictures, memorabilia, military accessories, tents and fi rst aid from the Civil War to present. Williams Park, 411 North Main St., Gibsonburg 419-332-5912

Hayes Presidential Center

Original White House gates lead the way to the nation’s first presidential center and museum, – a tribute to 19th U.S. President Rutherford B. Hayes. The facility is built on 25 acres of the President’s beloved “Spiegel Grove” estate and includes his 31-room Victorian mansion, museum, library and burial site. The exhibit galleries house nearly 1,800 artifacts on permanent display, including exhibits devoted to President Hayes’s military service, his political roles and details of his personal life. Through Oct. 7, in commemoration of the bicentennial of the War of 1812, the Hayes Museum is presenting

Ferguson Gallery & Studio Visitors to the gallery of internationally recognized glass artist Cary Ferguson can enjoy glass-blowing and cutting demonstrations. Four showrooms are fi lled with jewelry, accessories, nautical decor, antiques and works of local artists. ADA accessible. Call for hours. 5890 E. Harbor Rd. (SR 163), Marblehead 419-734-0600, fergusongallery.com Johnson’s Island Confederate Officers Prison Cemetery The historic cemetery is the final resting place of more than 200 of the 9,000 Confederate soldiers once imprisoned here. Open year-round, daily dawndusk. Gaydos Drive, Marblehead www.johnsonsisland.org Keeper’s House The oldest surviving home in Ottawa County offers visitors the chance to experience the history of lighthouse keepers. The 1822 home was the residence of the fi rst three keepers of the oldest continually operated lighthouse on the Great Lakes. 9999 E. Bayshore Road, Marblehead 419-798-9339, www.thekeepershouse.org

Kelleys Island Ferry Boat

The only daily passenger and automobile transportation to Kelleys Island from Marblehead, departing every halfhour during peak times. Available yearround, weather permitting. Late boats on weekends. There is a nominal parking fee. 510 W. Main St. (SR 163), Marblehead 419-798-9763, www.kelleysislandferry. com

Lakeside Chautauqua

Lakeside, the Chautauqua on Lake Erie, is a family destination that has pioneered the act of nurturing mind, body, and spirit for more than 135 years. Lakeside offers spiritual, educational, cultural, and recreational opportunities. Groups welcome year-round. ADA accesContinued on page 41


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Fun Places to Visit world’s largest recorded geode, located directly below the winery. Tours offered daily May 5-Sept. 25, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Winery open daily mid-April through late October, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., except Sunday, when opening time is at noon. 978 Catawba Ave., Put-in-Bay 419-285-2811, www.heinemanswinery.com

Perry’s Monument. (Courtesy of The Beacon) Continued from page 40

sible. 236 Walnut Ave., Lakeside 866-952-5374, www.lakesideohio.com

Lake Erie Islands

Perry’s Victory & International Peace Memorial The nation’s third-tallest memorial structure, the 352-foot tall column commemorates Oliver Hazard Perry’s victory over the British during the War of 1812, and the lasting peace between the U.S., England and Canada since that time. The visitor’s center features displays, a video theater, ranger talks and interpretive programs offered free of charge and a gift shop. For operating hours for the Visitor Center and Memorial Observation Deck, call or see website. 93 Delaware Ave., Put-in-Bay 419-285-2184, nps.gov/pevi Heineman’s Winery Founded in 1888, Ohio’s oldest family-owned winery offers tours, a tasting room and wine garden with light snacks. Tours include a visit to Crystal Cave, the

Lakeside Chautauqua

Kelleys Island The largest American freshwater island on Lake Erie, Kelleys Island is an outdoor enthusiast’s dream, with 600 acres of Ohio State Park land, 17 miles of beautiful coastline, miles of nature and hiking trails, a fossil-fi lled quarry, wetlands, and wildfl owers. Located in the western basin of Lake Erie, the island’s scenery can be discovered by foot, bike, golf cart, or kayak. Abundant waterfowl can be seen, making this a popular spot for birding enthusiasts, and each year in September, thousands of monarch butterflies. 419-746-2360, www.kelleysislandchamber.com Lake Erie Islands Hist. Museum Displays include more than 65 ship models; the South Bass Island Lighthouse Fresnel lens; and artifacts from the Battle of Lake Erie, island life and the Ford Tri-Motor and great hotel eras. There is a theatre, research library and bookstore. Hours (subject to change) mid-May, June and September daily 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; July and August 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and October weekends 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 25 Town Hall Place, Put-in-Bay 419-285-2804, leihs.org

Put-in-Bay/ South Bass Island

The Victorian-era village of Put-in-Bay on South Bass Island has been attracting visitors for nearly 150 years. Hundreds of thousands travel here annually to enjoy family fun activities, outdoor recreation and a large variety of special events. Many start out with a narrated tour on the Island Tour Train. For those

Glacial grooves at Kelly’s Island

Miller Boat Line. (Courtesy of The

Be acon)

wishing to go at their own pace there are golf carts, scooters and bicycles to rent. Families will find plenty to keep the kids entertained including a butterfly house, miniature golf, gem mining, cave tours, arcades, a carousel and go-kart racing. History enthusiasts won’t want to miss Perry’s Victory and International Peace Memorial. 419-285-2832, visitputinbay.com

Port Clinton Jet Express The Jet-Express offers high-speed passenger ferry service from Port Clinton to downtown Kelleys Island and Put-inBay. Ride in the comfortable passenger cabin or on the open-air sundeck. Latenight service, evening discounts, familyfriendly-child rates and group tour rates available. See a complete schedule at www.jetexpress.com. 3 N. Monroe St., Port Clinton 800-245-1538

Miller Ferries

Passenger/vehicle ferries operate round-trip between the northern tip of the Catawba Peninsula and Put-in-Bay or Middle Bass Island. Summer trips to Put-in-Bay run every half hour with limited free parking and value/group fares available. ADA accessible. Visit the website for ferry schedules, island coupons, and event information. 5174 E. Water St. (SR 53 North), Port Clinton800-5002421, www.millerferry.com

The Jet Express


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Bayview

Bed & Breakfast and Tea Cottage Welcome to Oregon Ohio

Quiet • Country • Elegance Bayview B & B is an historic home situated on 20 acres and located adjacent to Maumee Bay State Park. On the shores of Lake Erie. Come and enjoy a blend of fine furnishings, antiques and whimsical treasures. Stroll the park like grounds, visit our unique perennial gardens or watch the clouds go by in the reflection of the pond. Pamper yourself in one of our six private rooms featuring fine linens, televisions and private baths. •Smoke-Free Environment •Park like setting on 20 Acres •Fresh Baked Goods & Beverages •No Children or Pets Please •Gift Certificates

Hosts Dee and Jim Davies 7250 Cedar Point Road, Oregon, Oh 43618 419-836-1444 • bayviewbandb.com

TEE-DEE-KAY BIRD FEEDERS Oak Harbor, Ohio

VISIT OUR BOOTH AT MAUMEE BAY LODGE DURING THE BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING! TEE-DEE-KAY feeders are our all-time favorite feeders. Each one is handmade in the USA by people who truly care about birds, and the birds really love the wide edges for perching! - Kenn and Kimberly Kaufman Kaufman Field Guides

TEE-DEE-KAY feeders are available in MANY colors, patterns, and themes! Also available at Black Swamp Bird Observatory


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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Teacher models his ‘Big Year’ after movie By J. Patrick Eaken Press Staff Writer Brandon Brywczynski has been a bird watcher since he was 10-yearsold. Now he’s a young, married adult with one child and another on the way who substitute teaches at Four County Vocational School. His birding had always been a pasttime, but he became serious about it after watching the movie “The Big Year� starring Jack Black, Steve Martin, and Owen Wilson. The movie is based on the true story of Greg Miller, a computer consultant from Canton, Ohio. Miller had gone on a quest to identify more than 700 bird species in 365 days during his Big Year, 1998. So, Brywczynski’s Big Year is 2013, and you can read about its progress online. A University of Toledo alumnus with undergraduate degrees in social studies and history, he became interested in technology integration in the classroom for his masters degree. Now, when he spots a bird and wants to write about his quest, he posts it online at www.brandonsbigyear.blogspot.com.

“I have always loved birding, but this year it has become an obsession to be sure. The good kind of obsession though.� Brywczynski posted. “I mean, I’m not a creeper who really likes feet... you know? This infatuation has af- Brandon Brywczynski forded me opportunities to meet some really cool people and to see some really cool birds.� It was the master’s degree classes that motivated Brywczynski to create the blog and post his writings and photos on the web. It’s birding and technology wrapped into one. As he posts the birds he’s found, he also posts where he found them. Locations are numerous and diverse. They include along the Lake Erie shoreline, across Northwest Ohio and Michigan’s countryside, and in state and national parks around the country. “I would like to average a bird a day.� Brywczynski wrote. “I am ahead of that pace right now, but that is mostly due to the fact that Elissa and I took that trip

down to the Everglades. The ducks are starting to roll in now, but I got most of those down in Florida, too. In order to stay on track I will need to make trips for speciďŹ c species. To pick up a few more, Lis and I might head up to Port Huron, Michigan in two weeks to hopefully see Black, White-winged, and Surf Scoters. Long-tailed Ducks will also be a target. It will be nearly the end of migration for these cold weather waterfowl, but that is the earliest we can get up there.â€? Brywczynski’s blog includes links to other bird watching websites and he’s even gotten a response from another birder following his progress. Brywczynski can be found volunteering during this year’s Biggest Week in American Birding. “I recently volunteered to be a driver for a couple of tour groups during the peak of Spring migration,â€? Brywczynski announced. “On the morning of Saturday, May 4th I will be driving other birders to local hotspots like Maumee Bay State Park, Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge, Metzger’s March, and Magee Marsh. On Sunday, May 5th I will be a driver for an all day affair in Erie County. I am especially looking forward to this trip because I really haven’t done any birding that far east.â€?

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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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Birders on a recent field trip to Magee Marsh.

Magee celebrates 25 years of fantastic birding If you are in the area for the Biggest Week In American Birding Festival, you will no doubt at some time be on the boardwalk or “Bird Trail” at Magee Marsh Wildlife Area, managed by ODNR Division of Wildlife. This trail is the main reason that the area is often referred to as the “Warbler Capital of the World!” Construction on the renowned boardwalk began in 1988, using funds from the “Do Something Wild!” state income tax check off program. Funds from the “Do Something Wild” program are used by the Division of Wildlife for wildlife diversity projects, including wildlife viewing areas such as Magee Marsh. Following construction in 1988, the boardwalk was officially dedicated in the spring of 1989. The concept and design of the almost 5,000 foot boardwalk was the result of collaboration by the Division of Wildlife with the Toledo Naturalist Association, Cleveland Audubon Chapters, Toledo Blade newspaper, and other partners. Today Magee Marsh Wildlife Area hosts more than 150,000 visitors annually from all 50 states and many countries. Visitors come to bird, hunt, photograph, fish, walk, and to just enjoy the beauty of the 2,200 acre wetland and Lake Erie. Magee Marsh officially became a state wildlife area in 1951 when the Division of Wildlife purchased the property. The Sportsmen’s Migratory Bird Center was built in 1970 and is a great place to stop by during your visit. Here you can pick up a bird checklist, see what birds have been seen recently, use the restrooms, and talk to one of

The boardwalk at Magee Marsh.

the friendly staff or volunteers. Also inside the Bird Center are unique displays, exhibits, and many educational materials provided by the ODNR Division of Wildlife. Black Swamp Bird Observatory (BSBO), a private nonprofit, also maintains a facility on the area, offering picnic tables, portable toilets, free area birding maps, and the John

Gallagher Memorial Walking Trail. If you enjoy your visit to Magee Marsh, or if you saw a life bird during your visit, you might want to consider purchasing an Ohio Wildlife Legacy Stamp, available at the Bird Center and at BSBO, to help conserve Ohio’s wildlife diversity. The sale of this stamp supports wildlife diversity projects and habitat management at Magee Marsh and other wildlife areas throughout the state. Maintaining the boardwalk at Magee Marsh Wildlife Area is only one example of how these funds help birdwatchers and other wildlife enthusiasts every day. A special “Warblers of the Eastern United States” photography exhibit will be on display at the Bird Center during the months of April and May. This is being sponsored by the National Center of Nature Photography and will feature the work of local photographer Brian Zwiebel. The Bird Center will be open every day in May from 8 am until 5 pm. The boardwalk is only one of many fantastic birding trails that you can enjoy while in the area. When the boardwalk gets too crowded, you might want to check out the nearby Beach Trails. There are also two “partnership” trails that will take you to the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge and Black Swamp Bird Observatory. The Crane Creek Estuary Trail is located across from the boardwalk and will take you over to the estuContinued on page 45


Magee anniversary Continued from page 44 ary of Crane Creek. This trail is where the Kirtland’s warbler was spotted in 2012! Another trail, located across from the Bird Center, is about a mile long and will also take you over to Ottawa NWR. Finally, there are some wonderful, often less crowded walking trails located behind the Bird Center. Maps are available at the Bird Center showing the location of all these trails. So how can you help with the maintenance of the boardwalk and habitat management on Magee Marsh Wildlife

BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

Area? The $15 Ohio Wildlife Legacy Stamp is a bargain to support wildlife conservation in Ohio. Ohio residents can make a donation through the “Do Something Wild!” state income tax check-off. The purchase of an Ohio or Federal Waterfowl Stamp directly benefits wetland management on Magee Marsh Wildlife Area and neighboring Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge. Another option is to purchase an Ohio hunting or fishing license. The funds from the purchase of an Ohio hunting or fishing license go directly to the ODNR Division of Wildlife that can then receive additional funds from a federal excise tax placed on hunting and fish-

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ing supplies. If none of these options appeal to you, you can make a direct donation to the Wildlife Diversity Fund. You can view all of these options at www.WildOhio.com. Stay tuned for special events that will help The Division of Wildlife celebrate the 25th anniversary of the boardwalk! The Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Wildlife welcomes you to the area and we hope that you enjoy your visit! If you would like to reach our staff at the Bird Center, you can call 419-898-0960 and we would be happy to assist you!

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BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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Come bird with us! q Migratory bird stop q Active Eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nest q Three walking paths for viewing q View of the Maumee River & Bay q Free Boat Launch q Bus Parking q Free Parking q Local Eateries & Lodging 4500 N. Summit St. Point Place (Toledo) OH 43611 Just past the big lighthouse

www.cullenpark.org


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further details regarding birding at Maumee Bay, contact the naturalist at 419-836-9117. For information about the park, call 419-836-7758.

Red-bellied Woodpecker. (Photo by Maggie Dandar/MDandarPhotography.com)

Maumee Bay, Pearson thriving By J. Patrick Eaken and Tammy Walro Press Staff Writers Located in Oregon, Maumee Bay State Park boasts a variety of easily accessible bird habitats, including the open waters of Maumee Bay, a sand beach, inland ponds, a swamp forest, a wetland meadow, an upland meadow and cottonwood/hawthorn/dogwood thickets. Take St. Rte. 2 to Curtice Rd. and turn north to reach Maumee Bay. The state-of-the-art Trautman Nature Center, which is naturaliststaffed and open fi ve days a week, features information about native wildlife, interactive displays and a working lab with live animals on display. A two-mile elevated boardwalk trail winds through 80 acres of wetland habitat, perfect for spotting migrating songbirds. More than 300 species of birds have been recorded at the park, with shorebirds such as snipe, great blue heron, common gallinule and ring-billed gulls residing with waterfowl including Canada geese, pintails, redheads, and ruddy ducks. Songbirds include the red-winged blackbird, yellow warbler, killdeer and swamp sparrow. Spring migration brings many others, including the colorful warblers. In addition, the Lake Erie shoreline sets the stage for the comeback of the bald eagle in Ohio. The park’s plant life is diverse as well. Cattails, buttonbush, phragmites, bur-reed, cottonwood and black willow are just a few examples of the marsh

Birders at Pearson Metropark’’s “Window on Wildlife” at hte Packer-Hammersmith Center. (Photo courtesy of Toledo Area Metroparks)

plants at the park. The park’s campground has a 2.5mile mile perimeter trail edged in shrublike habitat great for roosting owls. The 1.5-mile sandy beach fronts Lake Erie, and is a great spot for picking out gulls, terns and waterbirds. After a busy day birding, enjoy a meal at The Water’s Edge dining room, located at the Lodge and Conference Center. Finish your evening with comfortable accommodations either in one of 102 rooms overlooking Maumee Bay, or in one of the luxury cottages located along the Scottish-Links golf course. Maumee Bay State Park is located at 1400 State Park Rd., Oregon. For

Pearson Metropark: The under story in Oregon’s metropark, with its good cover and food supply, is a boon for birds. The thick woods and proximity to Lake Erie make Pearson a favorite stopover spot for a wide variety of migrating warblers, or songbirds. Pearson is located along St. Rte. 2 (Navarre Ave.) Other species to look for are woodpeckers, oriole, red-eyed vireo, ovenbird, scarlet tanager, redstart, woodthrush, hermit thrush and Acadian flycatcher. Occasionally, visitors will see predatory birds, such as screech and great horned owls and sharp-shinned hawks. A “Window on Wildlife” at the Packer-Hammersmith Center in the center of the park provides a quiet retreat where you can observe birds and other animals in their natural environment. The 300-acre addition to Pearson north of Starr Avenue offers a unique perspective on the benefi ts of wetland habitats. Visitors will notice that water on the land is a magnet for birds. Already, water-loving birds from killdeer to red-wing blackbirds, great egrets to great blue herons and a wide variety of warblers have discovered the site. When mature, this area should attract migrating birds like thrushes and warblers. Visitors are also likely to see sandpipers, red tail hawks, eagles, green herons and the Great Blue Heron, said John Jaeger, retired director for natural resources at the Metroparks of the Toledo Area, The springtime woodland will offer important foraging areas for neo-tropical migrating birds such as warblers and thrushes. Jaeger said he has observed 24,086 birds in the 300-acre expansion area, with 15,462, or 64 percent, on the northeast side. The remaining 8,642, or 34 percent, were found on the southwest side. He observed 97 different species with an average daily diversity of 22 species. On May 29, 2009, he observed a high of 37 species. He counted 6,846 birds, the most on a single day, on October 10, 2009. On an average bird day, he counted 831 birds (24,086 divided by 29 days). More importantly, he says, is finding unique species, such as the return of the whip-poor-will or the Dunlins. About 34 Dunlins were hanging around the Johlin Cabin one day, he said. Other species include killdeer and marsh hawks. Jaeger counted 2,061 waterfowl (nine percent), 4,568 shorebirds (19 percent), 298 wading birds (one percent), and 148 birds of prey (.6 percent), but he explained there will be an effort to reduce the number of geese.


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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Helping Our Neighbors Preserve Their Investments Financing for Local Businesses

Oak Harbor š Curtice š Port Clinton š Oregon š Fremont š Perrysburg

1-877-311-8517 • www.nboh.com

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Dining Guide Same Place • Same Quality Since 1982

THE BIG APPLE DELI

NEW YORK STYLE DELICATESSEN

Birder Boxed Lunches Sandwich, Salad, Chips are & Dessert $8.49 Drinks available 2118 Woodville Road Oregon (419) 698-2344

The Water's Edge Restaurant at

Good Food? Just Ask Anyone!

1842 Woodville Rd., 419-693-0862

The Closest Restaurant to Maumee Bay State Park

Steaks • Prime Rib • Seafood • Italian OPEN Everyday at 11am Kid’s 506 S. Lallendorf • Oregon Menu 419-690-1555

Watch Eagles, Ducks & Geese From our own peninsula!

Sonny Berry’s famous

BAYSHORE Supper Club

qFarm Raised American Catfishq

BreakfasUtLVODIt%JOOer Open at 5:15 a.m. May 3 - 12

419.836.1466 ext. 4

• Prime Rib • Steaks • Lake Erie Perch • Seafood • Salads 6067 Bayshore Road 419-697-1000

Welcome Birders! • Happy Hour 11am-1pm, 4pm-6pm, $1 can beer • Wed. Night FREE Pool 7-9 pm -½ Price Select Appetizers • Fri--Karaoke/DJ by B-Rad 8pm-Midnight. • Sat. & Sun. Breakfast 8am-11:30am

Bono Tavern 842 Main St., Bono 419-836-8786

Featuring Our Famous Lake Erie Perch & Whole Pickerel Dinners

Also Serving Steaks, Shrimp Dinners, Breakfast, Noon Lunches, Complete Bar Service

5307 Bayshore Rd. 419-698-8106

Open: 8 am-10 pm Mon. - Sat.

Would you like to participate in next year’s

Open 24 Hours Now at Flying J Plaza

26415 Warns Rd. at I-280. Exit 1

20% OFF

One coupon per guest check per visit. Coupon has no cash value. No change returned. Taxes & gratuity not included. Beverages not included. Valid at participating Denny's. Selection and prices may vary. Use only original coupon - no photocopied or internet printed coupons. No substitutions. BSB

Entire Guest Check with Purchase of two beverages. Orders to-go taken at 419-837-2033

“Biggest Week in American Birding” Dining Guide? Call 419-836-2221 for more information.


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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2013

To all of our birding customers... We are here to serve you in one convenient location! 419-836-5027 • Sandwiches • Salad • Breakfast

• Snacks • Pop • Beer • Ice • ATM • Ohio Lottery

(419) 836-4049 Open 24 hours/7 days

• Pizza • Burgers • Hotdogs • Sandwiches Lake Erie Yellow PIZZA & KITCHEN Perch Sandwich or Basket 419-836-7151 Daily Lunch Specials

Joe’s

Located on the Corner of St. Rt. 2 & North Curtice (Approx. 2½ miles south of Maumee Bay State Park)

BirdLocated Watchers Welcome!! a few miles South of Maumee Bay State Park Wed ~ Deluxe Nachos, Burritos & Taco Pizza Tacos 3/$3.00. Dine-in only Thurs~50¢ Jumbo Wings~after 3:00 - Dine-In Only While they last through Saturday Sat ~ 2 Coney Dogs & Fries $4.50 Liver & Onions-Last Week of Every Month

Come Visit!

April - October Tues. - Sat. 10-4pm, Sundays 12-4pm Closed on Mondays

Call for other Specials Open 10:00am Monday-Saturday Closed Sundays

19255 W. Portage River S. Rd. Elmore, OH 43416 419-862-3182 schedel-gardens.org

22645 W. Front St. 419-972-4077 Curtice, Ohio 419-972-4077

For All Your Sweet-Tooth Needs! • Shakes • Ice Cream Sodas • Sundaes • Slushies • Cheese Cake on a Stick • Malts

«Quick Meals Too« • Hamburgers • Hot Dogs • Chili Dogs

Tell Us You’re a “Birder”

& Receive 10% OFF Your Entire Order! Just a few miles from Maumee Bay State Park

DG’S

DG’S

DG’s Soft Serve & Fast Foods 10609 Jerusalem Rd. Curtice, OH 43412 419-836-7254


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Helium balloons: ugly litter, danger for wildlife By Chelsea and Danielle BalloonsBlow.org So you let a balloon go, where will it go from here? You will probably watch the balloon until it fl oats out of sight. But many may not realize that what goes up must come down. And come down they do, as litter on our planet. The balloon will continue to climb in elevation until the atmospheric pressure will cause most to pop and some to slowly defl ate and float down to Earth; but all will then descend to Earth where some will fall on land while most will fall in the vast ocean. This is where the balloon is clearly considered litter. After landing, the balloon (with or without ribbons) become a ticking time bomb. The balloon can have devastating impacts on wildlife and the environment. Balloons take years to break down. This gives plenty of time for wildlife to encounter this seemingly harmless, killer. Growing up on the East Coast of Florida we have been cleaning the beaches since we were very little and we have witnessed the effects of balloon releases on wildlife and the environment. Not only collecting a growing number of balloons every year off of the beach, on hiking trails, and in our neighborhood but also fi nding them wrapped around a dead pelican’s beak, starving it to death, entangling a baby sea turtle, killing it before it even reached the water and a threat to any predator that dare tries to make use of the body. Most balloons pop, fall, and end up in the ocean like most trash that is not disposed of properly. Many will fall on land. Once the balloon lands this is where the balloons pose more of a threat to wildlife than some of the other kinds of litter. The balloons are mistaken for colorful foliage or take the shape of a jelly — a food source for many marine creatures. It only takes a single released balloon to kill a bird or any animal. No animal is safe whether it is wild or domestic, marine or terrestrial. When swallowed, the litter can choke the animal or eventually get lodged in the digestive tract, both leading to starvation and death. The ribbon can also entangle any animal that comes in contact with it, slowly killing it. Millions of animals die every year from swallowing and getting entangled in balloons and other human trash. We have found thousands of balloons over the years. We once found a bouquet of balloons, still enact and slightly infl ated, with a logo on it for a festival in Nashville, Tennessee. The balloons had traveled over 800 miles and washed up on the beach from the ocean. Balloon releases are becoming popular with charities and grieving

Guillemot killed when entangled in balloons. (Photo by Richard Gilbert)

groups. Many are misinformed by the balloon-sellers claims that latex balloons are environmentally friendly and harmlessly biodegrade. Some don’t realize that even things marketed as biodegradable will still become litter when they are tossed into the environment. With the rise of Facebook & Twitter, one can organize a mass littering event (balloon release) that goes worldwide in minutes. Celebrating or honoring a life should not cause needless harmful litter. Would they be happy knowing that their balloon could potentially kill another life? We don’t think anyone with any compassion or value for life would. A celebratory item should not become a lethal weapon.

fl ect our supply. In 1996 the Helium Privatization Act of the U.S. Congress required the helium held underground in the West be sold off at a fixed rate until 2015 regardless of market value. This was done to pay off the original cost of the helium reserve. This U.S. facility called the Amarillo storage facility holds about half of the Earth’s stock of helium. Currently the U.S. supplies 80% of the world’s helium demand. Richardson said that it has taken 4.7 billion years for the Earth to accumulate our helium reserves. The United States’ reserves were purchased in 1925 and will be gone in only a hundred years from getting it. Once the helium is released into the atmosphere it is gone forever. There is no chemical way of manufacturing helium. The reserves the U.S. has come from very slow radioactive alpha decay that occurs in rock. It cost about ten thousand times more to get helium from the air than it does from rocks and natural gas reserves. A recent report from the US National Research Council recommends that the US reconsiders its policy on the selling of helium.

How to Help Education is the key in the fight for the planet, on this issue and all environmental issues. People need to know that by using science we can make informed, non-biased decisions. We have created fact sheets & info cards that others can print out & share to inform others of the dangers of releasing balloons. http:// balloonsblow.org/fact-sheet Don’t be afraid to speak up and speak out. Write to local stores or restaurants if you see them passing out helium balloons. Is your school releasing balloons? Write to the principal and all participating parties about alternative ideas so the school does not unknowingly add to this problem. Helium Depletion… Get involved in local, state, and federal As the Nobel Prize winner in 1996 issues! for his work on superfluidity of heAs a democracy, politicians are lium, Robert Richardson has issued a supposed to represent the majority. warning that our supplies of helium By sharing your side you can influare being used at a unimaginable rate ence how they vote. Here are some tips and could be gone within a generation. on writing to offi cials in government, Helium is not only used to fill balloons. schools, and pretty much anyone: It is also used in cooling the supercon• Identify the issue. Make it clear ducting magnets in MRI scanners at and to the point. Be polite and support hospitals. There is no substitute be- your reasoning with facts. cause helium has the lowest boiling • Express yourself in a professional point. It is also required for fiber optics, manner. sea/space exploration, welding, super• Encourage them to take action to sonic wind tunnels, cooling nuclear re- prevent balloon releases from continuactors, life-saving medical procedures ing. Tell them about the depletion of and diagnostics, cryogenics, laboratory helium, how important it is to conserve research, lasers, LCD’s (ie. flat screen it, and why. TVs), helium dating, rare document •Encourage your friends, fampreservation & even to help premature ily, and colleagues to call and write as babies breath. Liquid helium is also well. used in cryogenics. • Write to big and small businessThe price of helium does not re- es.


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Why drinking bird-friendly coffee matters Most of the coffee sold in America today is literally killing the songbirds we love â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and destroying a sustainable method of farming that supports rural communities in Latin America and keeps farm workers and their children away from toxic chemicals. Care about bird conservation? Then donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t drink or buy coffee without this logo on the bag. Tanagers, thrushes, orioles, warblers, oven-birds and many other songbirds nesting in North America ďŹ nd sanctuary in the rustic canopy, tropical forest-like environments of family coffee farms that carry the The Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center (SMBC) Birds FriendlyÂŽ certiďŹ cation. Sun grown coffee â&#x20AC;&#x201C; genetically modiďŹ ed and heavily dependent on chemical fertilization, pesticides and herbicides â&#x20AC;&#x201C; adds to the destruction of critical bird habitat in Latin America â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it literally kills birds we love and is harmful to farm workers and their families. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Birds & Beans the good coffeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x201E;˘ is part of the solution. We want to help add thousands of hectares of shade grown, organic coffee habitat to the family farms already producing a truly sustainable and environmentally responsible crop. SMBC has developed strict scientiďŹ c certiďŹ cation standards for coffee farming which is organic, shade grown, sustainable and environmentally friendly. The SMBC certiďŹ cation is the best assurance coffee drinkers can have that the coffee they are drinking is helping preserve habitat needed by migrant birds. Many of our most loved birds depend on environments such as

Have a GREAT cup of coffee AND support bird conservation. BIRDS & BEANSâ&#x201E;˘ Bird-friendly Coffee Bar Open May 3rd â&#x20AC;&#x201C; May 12th from 5:30 a.m. to 2:00 pm. and 4:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Visit the Birds & Beans Coffee Bar in the lobby of the Maumee Bay Lodge and Conference Center! Many of the birds that pass through NW Ohio each spring and fall, and many of our favorite summer birds like orioles and hummingbirds, spend the winter in shade-coffee farms in the tropics. Drinking bird-friendly coffee helps ensures that this critical habitat is protected.

Home-grown coffee-plant. (Photo courtesy of Kenn and Kim Kaufman) those provided by â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Rustic Canopyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; coffee farming for sustaining their populations â&#x20AC;&#x201C; perhaps even for their survival. The development of GM coffee that can be grown in full sun with heavy chemicals, the growth of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;factoryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; agriculture in the coffee lands and the destruction of tropical forest make it increasingly difďŹ cult for many species to maintain viable population levels. Organic, shade grown coffee farms â&#x20AC;&#x201C; family farms â&#x20AC;&#x201C; are the best protection we can provide. However, the SMBC â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Bird Friendlyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ÂŽ certiďŹ cation has not yet become the consumer â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;gold standardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; for sustainable coffee. Birds & BeansÂŽ coffee ďŹ lls the void and promotes the certiďŹ cation. The only way you can be certain that the coffee in your cup is Bird FriendlyÂŽ is if the Smithsonianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seal is on the bag! By buying certiďŹ ed cof-

Birds & Beans Coffee is also available for purchase year â&#x20AC;&#x2122;round by the bag at Black Swamp Bird Observatory. Visit www.birdsandbeans.com for more information fee you can become part of a truly sustainable chain from seedling to cup. Be part of the solution to a better life for all and enjoy the best coffee youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever tasted. About the Birds & BeansÂŽ Company The Birds & BeansÂŽ story began in Toronto in 1998 when Madeleine and David Pritchard opened their CafĂŠ and Roastery â&#x20AC;&#x201C; serving only â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Bird Friendlyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ÂŽ coffee. Ten years later Scott Weidensaul (Pulitzer prize ďŹ nalist author and naturalist, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Living on the Windâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Of a Featherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;) and Bill Wilson took up the cause to shift coffee drinking behavior of bird lovers in New England, New York and eventually across the US.

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KEEP CATS INDOORS

The Challenge There is no queson that birds are beer o when cats stay indoors. Exact numbers are unknown, but sciensts esmate that every year in the United States alone, cats kill hundreds of millions of birds, and more than a billion small mammals, including rabbits, squirrels, and chipmunks. Feline predators include both domesc cats that spend me outdoors and stray cats that live in the wild, somemes as part of a colony. Life for outdoor cats is risky. They can get hit by cars; aacked by dogs, other cats, coyotes or wildlife; contract fatal diseases, such as rabies, feline distemper, or feline immunodeciency virus; get lost, stolen, or poisoned; or suer during severe weather condions. Outdoor cats lead considerably shorter lives on average than cats kept exclusively indoors.

harder to catch in a mely manner before they infect other animals or humans.

Primary Birds Impacted Millions of common songbirds, such as the Cardinal, Blue Jay, and House Wren and long-distance migrants such as Indigo Bunng, and Yellow Warbler. Rare and endangered species, such as the Piping Plover, Florida Scrub-Jay, and California Least Tern. Birds that nest or feed on the ground, such as the California Quail.

For more informaon visit www.abc.org

Free-roaming and feral cats also pose a health hazard to humans from the spread of diseases such as rabies and toxoplasmosis. In April 2010, the Volusia County Health Department in Florida issued a rabies alert for 60 days following two unprovoked aacks on humans by feral cats within a month. Two cats had tested posive for rabies in the area. The CDC states that “Unvaccinated dogs, cats, and ferrets exposed to a rabid animal should be euthanized immediately.” Even in ‘managed’ colonies all cats cannot always be vaccinated, and infected animals may be even

Soluons

Cat owners should keep their cats indoors. There are a number of ways that people can help their cats adjust to an indoor lifestyle, and ABC provides a wealth of resources to help them. Many veterinarians and animal welfare organizaons support keeping cats indoors for their own safety, as well as to prevent them from killing wildlife. Outdoor cat colonies, sustained through the pracce of Trap Neuter Release are also bad for birds, do not help reduce the overpopulaon of feral cats, and are inhumane for the cats, who lead short, harsh lives. Instead, feral cats should be kept in enclosures, trapped and adopted to loving homes, or euthanized.


BIGGEST WEEK IN AMERICAN BIRDING

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59


Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just see it, feel it.

NEW!

The all-new Leica Trinovid 42.

The completely re-designed Trinovid entry-level performance binoculars make you a part of the action. State-of-the-art technologies and the highest quality materials elevate these binoculars to Leica-standard best in class. The magnesium housing is as elegant as it is robust, designed to withstand the roughest treatment. Thanks to its ergonomic design, the Trinovid 42 offers superior eye comfort and handling during lengthy observations. The all-new Leica Trinovid 42. Entry-level performance never looked so good. ___ exceptional optical performance ___ perfect contrast and high color neutrality ___ waterproof to 16.5ft ___ with HDCÂŽ multicoating ___ available in 8x42 and 10x42

Come see us at the Black Swamp Bird Observatory during the Biggest Week!

For more information, please visit leica-sportoptics.com Join the conversation on Facebook at /LeicaBirding

Biggest Week in American Birding Visitor Guide  

Black Swamp Bird Observatory is proud to host The Biggest Week In American Birding along with our our co-hosts, Maumee Bay Lodge & Conferenc...

Biggest Week in American Birding Visitor Guide  

Black Swamp Bird Observatory is proud to host The Biggest Week In American Birding along with our our co-hosts, Maumee Bay Lodge & Conferenc...

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