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20 Environment Award

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Croke Park’s greener initiative wins gold.

News from home and abroad.

PA G E 1 8 7 Environment & Energy Management

Kenneth Matthews, chief executive, IWEA.

PA G E 3

21 Sustainability

Air Quality.

Achieving green goals at Croke Park.

Abbott Diagnostics Sligo is leader in energy and waste management.

25 Exhibition

13 Energy Supply

PA G E 2 1

Resource Ireland 2012 – 17th-18th October - RDS Dublin.

Croke Park.

EirGrid delivers East West Interconnector on time and under budget.

PA G E 5 Recycling.

29-32 Energy Point

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Latest energy developments in Ireland and overseas.

ICOE 2012 -17th-19th October Convention Centre Dublin.

PA G E 3 2 Energy Efficiency.

Wave and tidal energy – A sustainable future.

PA G E 7 18 Renewable Energy

Abbott Diagnostics Sligo.

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19 Resource Efficiency BeGreen Autumn Roadshows 2012 Helping businesses to reduce costs, improve profitability.

PA G E 1 3 Energy Minister Pat Rabbitte, TD.

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E N V I R O N M E N T

N E W S

I AIR QUALITY

Air Quality in Ireland is Amongst the Best in Europe he just released EPA report ‘Air Quality in Ireland 2011 – Key T Indicators of Ambient Air Quality’ - shows that air quality in Ireland is generally of a high standard across the country and is among the best in Europe. This is due largely to prevailing Atlantic airflows, relatively few large cities and the lack of widespread heavy industries. However, Ireland faces a number of challenges in the near future when trying to meet our obligations under EU legislation. Levels of nitrogen dioxide in traffic-impacted city centre areas will continue to be a problem due to the difficulty in achieving large-scale reductions in road traffic numbers. Emissions from residential solid fuel use contribute to high levels of particulate matter and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in villages, towns and cities. Based on particulate matter concentrations for 2009-2011, Ireland is I ENVIRONMENT

Global Demand For Food Presents Major Sustainability Challenges For Irish Industry Food production will need to increase by 50% by 2030 to feed the world’s population but this cannot be achieved without dramatic conse-

quences for the environment, according to management and technology consultancy BearingPoint. The findings are revealed as part of the BearingPoint Institute Report which includes a landmark study – ‘Will your company pass the sustainability stress tests?’ “The growth in world demand for food offers major opportunities for Ireland but the environmental challenges are massive and will require a different approach by business,” comments Peter Minogue, managing partner, BearingPoint Ireland. Irish agri-food exports rose by 12% to Eur8.8 billion in 2011 according to the Department

of Agriculture and Marine. The BearingPoint study quotes research which finds that in Europe the greatest environmental impact in the agricultural sector is not just from industrial processing (11%) but more significantly agricultural production (49%) and the use of products by consumers (18%). “Thus in order to survive, organisations need to partner along all stages of the supply chain including protecting natural resources, working with the farming community, triggering product innovation and responding to the increasing health consciousness of consumers,” adds Peter Minogue.

Abbeyshrule is Overall TidyTowns Award Winner Abbeyshrule in County Longford is the winner of the SuperValu TidyTowns Award for 2012, from among a record level of 855 entries. Abbeyshrule also claimed the award for Ireland’s Tidiest

required to reduce exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) by 10% between 2012 and 2020. This challenging reduction will require an integrated approach across a number of sectors including industrial, transport and residential emissions. Micheal O Cinneide, Director of the EPA’s Office of Environmental Assessment, comments: “Whilst we welcome the findings of this report, which show Ireland’s air quality is generally of a high standard, we recognise also that Ireland faces a number of challenges to meet our EU obligations.” Village. Other winners included Clonakilty, County Cork which received the award for Ireland’s Tidiest Small Town; Westport, County Mayo which received the award of Ireland’s Tidiest Large Town; and Ennis, County Clare which was named Ireland's Tidiest Large Urban Centre.

Recipients of 2012 Local Agenda 21 Environmental Partnership Fund Grants Announced The Government has announced the recipients of grants under the 2012 Local Agenda 21 Environmental Partnership Fund. These projects are cofunded by the Department and local authorities. Eur337,000 has been provided by the Department and Eur337,500 is being provided by local authorities, bringing the total funding to Eur674,500 for 2012. The Local Agenda 21 Environmental Partnership Fund promotes sustainable development by assisting small scale, non-profit environmental projects at a local level. Projects are recommended for funding by local authorities following an open call for applications. A total of 490 projects have been funded this year. The funding goes to a wide range of local environmental initiatives right across

ENVIRONMENT & ENERGY MANAGEMENT, SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012

the country; including community gardens, waste reduction and biodiversity projects.

Trials to Achieve ‘Perfect’ Transatlantic Flights NATS, the UK’s leading provider of air traffic services and solutions, has signed a contract to lead a pioneering project trialling environmentally ‘perfect’ transatlantic flights. The project, entitled TOPFLIGHT, will look to put into operational practice something that has only previously been possible in single, one-off flights. Phase one will see 60 transatlantic flights where many factors within the journey – from pushback from the stand and taxiing to an optimised flight profile and continuous descent approach – has been optimised to achieve minimal emissions and delay. The aim is to prove that the concept is scalable and can be implemented for many flights at the same time without penalising those in the surrounding airspace.

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E N V I R O N M E N T

N E W S

I RECYCLING

Repak Celebrates 15 Years of Packaging Recycling Success epak is celebrating 15 years of recycling success in Ireland R with consumers recycling more than ever. In total since 1998, Repak has helped increase packaging recycling up from under 15% in 1998 to over 66% in 2011, with over 6.3 million tonnes of used packaging diverted from landfill. Recent research by Repak, conducted by MRBI amongst a representative sample of 1,000 adults, shows a dramatic improvement in their recycling habits both in the home and a marked improvement in the office, but still shows areas for improvement. The average claimed household recycling rate increased from 58% in 2011 to 65% in 2012. Also the number of people claiming to recycle regularly from around their homes and their offices has increased. The research also showed that the average claimed recycling rate in work increased from 56% in 2011 to 63% in 2012, but recycling from the office desk at 35% and workplace kitchen at 44% lags behind recycling in the home. This shows I AIR QUALITY

New Smoky Coal Ban Regulations to Bring Cleaner Air The Government has given effect to new consolidating ‘smoky coal ban’ regulations. The Regulations provide for expansions of the ban areas within most of the 20 cities and towns already covered by the smoky coal ban, and seven new towns being included under the ban from May 2013 onwards. The new Regulations include the following provisions: • Most existing ban area boundaries are being extended to take recent urban development into account. The revisions are based on Census 2011 data; • The ban is being extended to all of Dublin County, including outer suburbs and satellite towns; • Seven new towns are to be included (with effect from May 2013) - Greystones, Letterkenny, Mullingar, Navan, Newbridge and Portlaoise – which exceed the designated minimum population threshold of 15,000 following Census 2011, and Wicklow Town following representations from the

there is a lot more we can all do in helping to increase our workplace recycling. The increases highlight the nat-ionwide success of packaging recycling over the last 15 years. In fact, packaging recycling rates for 2011 at 651,000 tonnes – represents a 650% increase since 1998, when Ireland was recycling only 101,000 tonnes per annum. Ireland is now ranked 7th in Europe for Packaging recycling.

public, Wicklow County Council and elected representatives; • A prohibition on the burning of bituminous or smoky coal is also being introduced to complement the existing ban on the marketing, sale and distribution.

European Union's Total Greenhouse Emissions Down 2.5% in 2011 Greenhouse gas emissions from the European Union (EU) fell by 2.5 %, despite higher coal consumption and a growing gross domestic product (GDP), according to new estimates from the European Environment Agency (EEA). Emissions fell even further in the 15 Member States with a common commitment under the Kyoto Protocol (EU-15), going down by 3.5 % between 2010 and 2011. Based on these EEA estimates, EU 2011 emissions stand approximately 17.5 % below the 1990 level. The EU-15 stands 14.1 % below the base-year level under the Kyoto Protocol. The main reasons for the decrease in emissions were a milder winter in most parts of the EU, which resulted in lower heating demand from households, and reduced nat-

ural gas consumption. Renewable energy consumption also continued to increase in 2011, which contributed to the observed decrease in emissions. The economic sectors not covered by the EU Emission Trading System (EU ETS) reduced emissions by approximately 3.1 %.The sectors contributing most to lower emissions in the European Union in 2011 were households and the service sector. The transport sector also contributed by reducing emissions for the fourth consecutive year. Emissions under the EU ETS were cut by 1.8 % in 2011.

ans Cleaning has delivered its own winning performance at the London Olympics having cleaned up more than 550 tonnes of waste left in Hyde Park and Victoria Park, where more than a million visitors passed through over the twoweek spectacular. During the course of the two weeks, Ryans employed more than 3,600 staff to meet the demands of the operation, using 63,000 refuse sacks and 5,400 pairs of gloves in the process. With a turnover in excess of £4 million, Ryans Cleaning employs more than 70 people full-time and 150 seasonal staff serving the requirements of fixed venues, international events, tradeshows and exhibitions as well as commercial, office and industrial cleaning premises in the UK and Ireland.

I WASTE MANAGEMENT

Olympics Cleanup is a Winner For Ryans Cleaning Tipperary firm Ry-

ENVIRONMENT & ENERGY MANAGEMENT, SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012

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I ENVIRONMENT & ENERGY MANAGEMENT

Abbott Diagnostics Sligo is Leader in Energy and Waste Management Abbott Ireland has achieved a number of impressive environmental and energy efficiency targets at its diagnostics facility in Sligo and continues to lead by example. eflecting its success, the Sligo site was named Abbott Manufacturing Large Plant of the Year 2011 within the Abbott Environmental Health Safety and Energy (EHS&E) Awards Programme, which is open to all of the global health care group’s 90 sites worldwide. Indeed, Abbott Ireland has been an innovative leader in energy and waste management for a number of years. At the inaugural Green Awards in Ireland in 2008, the company won both the Green Large Manufacturer and the overall Green Business Award. Abbott Ireland operates eight manufacturing facilities and employs almost 4,000 people. “Certainly within the global Abbott network, Ireland has a very strong track record in energy efficiency and waste management,” explains Conor Murphy, Site Director of Abbott’s diagnostic facility in Sligo. “Significant investment in ‘green’ initiatives has been undertaken by Abbott in Ireland resulting in increased recycling and reduced waste, decreased water and fuel consumption and reduction in C02 emissions.”

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Abbott Diagnostics Sligo Abbott’s diagnostic facility in Sligo is a stateof-the-art facility specialising in the manufacture of diagnostic products that are exported globally. Opened in 1994 with just 25 employees, the site has expanded seven times in the intervening years and now employs more than 400 people. Innovation is crucial within the diagnostics

market and the Sligo facility has been responsible for a number of major new product launches such as a new version of the Hepatitis B qualitative assay in June 2011. It is also engaged in manufacturing diagnostic products in the key areas of HIV, hepatitis A, B, and C, cancer markers for pros-tate, ovarian, testicular and non-specific tumours and congenital markers for CMV and rubella.

Conor Murphy, Site Director of Abbott’s diagnostic facility in Sligo, with the Abbott Manufacturing Large Plant of the Year 2011 award.

Safeguarding the Environment Safeguarding the environment is one of Abbott Ireland’s four priorities within the group’s corporate social responsibility strategy. Abbott’s diagnostic facility in Sligo has achieved a number of environmental goals including zero-waste-to-landfill, a 30 percent effluent load reduction and a recycling rate of 90 percent. The site also reduced its water usage by 26 percent in 2011 and cut CO2 emissions by 32 percent. Energy and Water Management Energy efficiency initiatives implemented at the Sligo site include the installation of occupancy activated lighting in areas of large floor space and low/medium occupancy, (e.g. warehouses, mechanical rooms, coolers) resulting in 218 tons of CO2 reduction annually and boiler consolidation whereby two less efficient units were replaced by a single high efficiency boiler, resulting in 1420 tonnes of CO2 reduction. Furthermore, converting the site’s boiler system from diesel oil to liquefied petroleum gas has reduced the facility’s annual energy consumption by 18 percent, CO2 emissions by 1,420 tonnes and eliminated 28

tonnes of SO2. On the water management front, rainwater is now harvested from the main building and used for flushing toilets and urinals, resulting in the reuse of 4.2 million litres of water annually. The site also reduces energy loss by recovering steam from various processes and utilising it as boiler make-up water, saving 1.5 million litres of water annually. A further 2 million litres of water are saved annually by optimising process water rinses. Many of these initiatives are also employed in other Abbott sites across Ireland. Environmental Performance As a global group, Abbott consistently sets challenging environmental performance targets. In 2009 a new series of global targets were established to further minimise environmental impact by 2015. “Since 2009, Abbott Ireland has prioritised reducing waste in the manufacturing process and at sites, with the goal of eliminating all waste sent to landfill. The first four manufacturing sites across Abbott’s global network of 90 manufacturing sites to achieve this status are here in Ireland,” Conor Murphy remarks. The four successful sites are Abbott’s diagnostics sites in Longford and Sligo, its nutritional site in Cootehill and the vascular facility in Clonmel. “The impact of undertaking zero-waste-tolandfill across these four Irish sites has been

ENVIRONMENT & ENERGY MANAGEMENT, SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012

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Kirby Group is an international multi disciplinary engineering services contractor. We are proud to be associated with Abbott Ireland and their commitment to environmental and energy best practice throughout all their sites.


significant - 340 tonnes diverted from landfill since 2009 across the four sites, the equivalent of eliminating the waste of 420 Irish households per year,” he says. “The cost savings are not that high and indeed are not that important. More important is the fact that reducing the amount of non recyclable material sent to landfill supports Abbott’s global goal to be a leader in safeguarding the environment.” Zero-waste-to-landfill Strategy Abbott’s zero-waste-to-landfill strategy encourages sites to eliminate all waste sent to landfill and divert it to become a resource for other beneficial use. “We’ve embedded a zero-waste-to-landfill philosophy in our company culture. It influences our decision making at every level and we employ high performance waste management practices to ensure zero-waste-tolandfill criteria are met through our purchasing decisions, in our manufacturing operations and in our daily activities.” Conor Murphy elaborates: “We focus on the ‘Waste Hierarchy’ - looking at all the alternatives to disposal that can be incorporated into our facility. Reuse, recycle and most importantly waste reduction and prevention initiatives are now an integral part of business. All non-recyclable waste is sent for ‘Waste to Energy’ where the heat generated on incineration is captured to produce electricity.” To achieve zero-waste-to-landfill, Abbott’s diagnostic facility in Sligo developed a zero-waste-to-landfill team who completed a waste stream analysis quantifying and qualifying waste. Subsequently a colour coded and lab-elled waste manage-

ment system was introduced to areas within the facility that were appropriate and easy to use. Segregation of waste at source was key to the success of the project. Employee awareness and training was instrumental in ensuring correct segregation and to ensure only non recyclable material went waste to energy. The segregated waste streams are bulked on site prior to collection thus reducing transport costs. “Site Leadership Teams are instrumental in maintaining zero-waste-to-landfill by including it in site strategic plans, while Business Excellence Teams play a critical role in finding efficiencies and more opportunities to reduce waste,” he adds. In addition to waste reduction targets, other key global goals set by Abbott for 2015 (against a 2005 baseline) include: A 15 percent absolute reduction in direct emissions and purchased electricity and a 50 percent reduction in water use – adjusted for sales growth.

identify and develop innovative practises and procedures. They are assisted in their efforts by a Global EHS & E Management team which defines EHS & E standards which each facility works to. They also identify goals to reduce waste generation, water usage, carbon dioxide emissions and energy usage throughout Abbott’s global operations.” The ADD Sligo Site Director continues: “The teams are critical to the strong track record in Environmental, Health & Safety enjoyed by Abbott Diagnostics' Sligo site, but it must be said that every employee plays their role in helping the facility to achieve excellence in EHS & Energy Performance. There is a strong EHS culture which in 2011 saw zero lost time accidents and zero recordable accidents cases.”

Aoife Conway (left) and Karen Craig, two members of the EHS Team at Abbott Diagnostics Sligo. Global Award Being named Abbott Manufacturing Large Pl-ant of the Year Lessons For Others 2011 within the Abbott Environ-mental So what lessons are there to be learned for Health Safety and Energy (EHS&E) other Irish companies from Abbott Ireland’s Awards Programme is recognition of the experience? commitment of all employees at ADD “The first lesson that we learned was that Sligo to the global health care group’s significant reductions in waste disposal Environment, Health & Safety standards. could be achieved simply by doing some Abbott’s diagnostic site at Longford, basic things very well,” he replies. which like ADD Sligo achieved zero-waste- “Awareness campaigns ensure employees to-landfill in 2010, won the Abbott and contractors (catering, cleaning and conManufacturing Small Plant of the Year struction) contribute to achieving zero2011 award. waste-to-landfill and awareness programmes The Abbott EHS & E Plant of the Year encourage greater participation and influawards is an internal recognition process, ence employees’ behaviour.” based on the concept of continuous EHS The Abbott Ireland experience also highimprovement whereby Abbott Global out- lights that moving to zero-waste-to-landfill lines the pathway and key performance requires robust administrative practices to areas for achievement to all sites. continually assess and manage the zero“The Abbott EHS & waste-to-landfill programme, including full E Plant of the Year waste inventories and opportunity assessAward is open to all 90 ments, waste stream evaluations and inspecAbbott manufacturing tions etc. sites worldwide, which “However, through well managed site coputs the achievements of ordination and planning, existing structures the Irish facilities into can be leveraged.” Conor Murphy conperspective,” Conor cludes: “Another lesson learned, is the value Murphy comments: of ‘knowing your waste’. ADD Sligo has “Dedicated teams of seen the value of analyzing all raw material Environmental Health packaging and partnering with vendors, to and Safety specialists identify opportunities to change packaging work in each of our to allow for better waste management solumanufacturing sites to tions for the packaging.” I

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I WASTE MANAGEMENT

Indaver – Total Waste Management Partner for Pharma Industry ndaver’s Total Waste Management service Inational is designed to meet the needs of large interindustrial companies, primarily from the pharmaceutical and chemical sectors. Indaver manages all waste streams generated on a customer’s site in accordance with the EU waste hierarchy and in full compliance with ADR and IMDG legislation. Their service, characterised by flexibility, dynamism and commitment to continuous improvement has given customers proven efficiencies and cost savings year on year.

This commitment can also be seen in the company’s investment in powerful data management systems, providing customers with secure online access to an unparalleled level of information about their waste streams, displayed in clear, easy to read reports. European Network Indaver’s European network of hazardous waste processing facilities and integrated management systems, ensures they have the flexibility to meet customers’ needs and the ability to provide full traceability from the point of collection to final disposal. Assets in Ireland Indaver’s facilities in Ireland include the EPA licensed Dublin Port Hazardous Waste Facility, incorporating a transfer station, a laboratory and a state-of-the-art solvent recovery facility. For non hazardous waste, Indaver has constructed Ireland’s first Wasteto-Energy facility in Duleek, County Meath.

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The Eur140 million facility has been operating since August 2011, and is helping Ireland meet its EU and national objectives by diverting 200,000 tonnes of household and similar commercial waste away from landfill. The location of a recovery facility in Ireland is already reducing waste management costs for industry, and Indaver is aiming to reduce export costs further by seeking an amendment to the facility’s waste licence to treat a broader range of waste streams. With over 30 years’ experience, Indaver has the expertise to provide sustainable, cost effective and tailored waste management solutions to offer customers the lowest total cost of ownership. I

ENVIRONMENT & ENERGY MANAGEMENT, SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012


I ENERGY MANAGEMENT

Understanding Energy Needs and Providing Solutions As the leading provider of LPG to the Irish market, Calor understands that businesses are looking for the most effective and efficient energy solutions to meet their needs. PG is the lowest carbon fuel used by domestic, commercial and industrial customers in the many parts of the island who are not connected to the grid. It serves tens of thousands of domestic customers for household cooking, hot water and heating, and several thousand businesses for heating and process applications. Calor are part of SHV Energy, the world’s largest distributor of LPG and with the largest secure storage of LPG in Ireland, they are well placed to ensure customers benefit from the security of reliable supplies of LPG whatever their scale.

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Abbott Ireland Project Calor were required to specify the LPG requirements for the Abbott’s Sligo Nutrition and Diagnostics sites as part of

Calor were required to specify the LPG requirements for the Abbott’s Sligo Nutrition and Diagnostics sites as part of the on-going energy strategy and resulting Diesel-to-LPG conversion.

the on-going energy strategy and resulting Diesel-to-LPG conversion. LPG burns cleaner than diesel, because it releases fewer particulates and has a lower carbon-to-hydrogen ratio. This means that it releases 11% less C0 2 per unit of energy produced than diesel does. These qualities make it friendlier to the environment and more sustainable in the long term. The use of LPG powered appliances can also bring other advantages for the industrial sector. There is a potential to achieve further ongoing cost savings through a reduction in maintenance costs as LPG appliances such as LPHW boilers and steam boilers employed typically require less maintenance than oil burning appliances. Turnkey Installation The requirement for Calor was to design an LPG storage system that would meet the factory’s current needs and also provide scope for future expansion. The LPG solution that they provided was a ‘turnkey’ specialist installation of not only the LPG storage tank but also the vaporisation equipment, associated boiler and control panel to power the vaporiser. The vaporiser system ensures that Abbotts has the capacity to cater for the factory’s gas needs even during periods of exceptionally high gas demand due to increased production and during extreme cold weather periods. Another feature of the LPG solution is the built in telemetry system which enables Calor’s Distribution Depot to track volumes in the customer’s LPG storage tank and deliver when neces-

sary, rather than on a predetermined schedule. This eliminates the need for technicians to monitor tank levels and place LPG orders. Carbon Emissions Reduction The Calor LPG infrastructure is currently operational at both the Sligo Nutrition and Diagnostics sites and has already resulted in an overall carbon-emission reduction of nearly 2,407 tonnes for both sites, or a 14% reduction in overall carbon emissions. For further information or enquiries about Calor LPG energy solutions contact Calor on ROI 1850 812 450 / NI 028 9045 5588 or visit www.calorgas.ie. I

The vaporiser system ensures that Abbotts has the capacity to cater for the factory’s gas needs even during periods of exceptionally high gas demand due to increased production and during extreme cold weather periods.

ENVIRONMENT & ENERGY MANAGEMENT, SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012

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I ENERGY MANAGEMENT

Kirby Group Offers Energy Consumption Reduction Services irby Group have a long and successful K relationship with the Abbott Ireland Sligo and Longford manufacturing sites. Kirby Group’s main activity centres on the provision of mechanical, electrical and instrumentation services. A current project on the Abbott Pharmaceutical site involves the installation of all mechanical piping, HVAC building services, electrical and instrumentation works associated with their production expansion project. “As part of our Energy Consumption Reduction(ECR) service to our clients,

we have been working with Abbott on the implementation of environmental and energy efficiency technologies,” says Michael Hennessy, Associate Director of Kirby Group. “We regard the successful application of such systems as being instrumental not only to our client's corporate social responsibility commitments but to the continued success of plant operations.” Recent examples of Kirby Group’s ECR involvement with Abbott include the replacement of large steam boilers on the Abbott Diagnostics site with a combination of gas fired LTHW boilers and smaller steam boiler plants. On the same site Kirby Group have installed PIR's for increased lighting efficiency and variable speed drives (VSD's) on the pumps and motors. This year also saw the installation of a new waste heat boiler on the Abbott Pharmaceutical site. The application of environmental and energy technologies by Kirby Group extends beyond the life science sector to data centre facilities. The company

works closely with key clients such as Vodafone and IBM in the specification and installation of dry coolers systems, free cooling hoods and cogeneration. Involvement can begin at detailed site surveying stage, carry through to financial assessment leading to installation and commissioning on a turnkey basis. A recent example involved the specification and installation of three dry air coolers on a Vodafone Data Centre facility in Dublin. The environmental and energy results have been very significant a 918,000 Kg reduction in C02 emissions per annum combined with a reduction in energy consumption amounting to 1,723,996 kWh per annum. I

I CLIMATE CHANGE

Diageo Recognised by Carbon Disclosure Project as Best Performing iageo has been recognised by the D Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP), as the best performing beverage company in the world for climate change disclosure. Diageo was the only UK-based company ranked in the top 10 highest performing companies in the world, ranking as the second best performing company in the consumer staple category. Diageo was also awarded membership on the CDP’s ‘Carbon Performance Leadership Index’. Companies included in this index are viewed as having best practice in terms of governance, strategy and emissions reductions and strongly out-performing the rest of the CDP Global 500 population in all of the key metrics. Diageo was also awarded a place on 12

the‘Carbon Disclosure Leadership Index’, making it the only beverage company to be listed on both. The Carbon Disclosure Leadership index highlights the constituent companies within the FTSE Global Equity Index Series (Global 500) which have displayed the strongest approach to climate change dis-

closure. Achieving a high score indicates good internal data management and understanding of climate change related issues affecting the company. Paul Simpson, chief executive officer of CDP, comments: “Companies that make the Carbon Disclosure Leadership Index have demonstrated strong internal data management practices for the measurement of greenhouse gas emissions and energy use. They are also giving clear consideration to the business issues related to climate change and their exposure to climate-related risks and opportunities. This is vital to realising greater efficiencies, protecting the business from risk and capitalizing on opportunities.” I

ENVIRONMENT & ENERGY MANAGEMENT, SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012


I ENERGY SUPPLY

EirGrid Delivers East West Interconnector on Time and Under Budget Ireland’s first electricity link with Great Britain has been opened by EirGrid. he largest State energy infrastructure project since Ardnacrusha, the hydroelectric scheme developed in the 1920s to meet Ireland’s electricity needs, the EirGrid East West Interconnector runs between Deeside in north Wales and Woodland, County Meath, where it connects to the Irish national grid. Approximately 260km in length, the underground and undersea link has the capacity to transport 500megawatts – enough energy to power 300,000 homes. Part of the engineering project entailed laying 186 km of sub sea cable which were ready to operate within just three years of receiving planning permission. The EirGrid Interconnector will carry electricity both ways, benefiting consumers by helping to improve security of supply, increase competitiveness and to encourage the growth of renewable energy generation.

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Ambitious Challenge Dermot Byrne, chief executive of EirGrid, comments: “The Government asked EirGrid to deliver on this strategic infrastructure by 2012. EirGrid took this ambitious challenge and ran with it. We put in place the necessary structures to deliver this major infrastructure on a tight timeline. It was a challenge and it was an achievement delivering the complex project on time and approximately Eur30 million under budget.” In the National Development Plan 2007 – 2013, the Irish Government has identified the need for a strategic energy link, in the form of an electrical High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) interconnector, to be developed between Ireland and the UK. ABB, the Swedish engineering firm was awarded the contract to design, manufacture and install the interconnector. Dermot Byrne elaborates: “The interconnector ties our energy markets closer together. It gives all concerned additional assurance of supply and it is the single most important step in allowing Ireland to exploit and to export its enormous

resources of renewable energy. Critically it also allows us to access energy from Britain and from across the European continent which will result in more competition to the energy market and put downward pressure on prices” The Interconnector was developed by EirGrid, working closely with the Commission for Energy Regulation. The interconnector was estimated to cost Eur600 million and received a grant of Eur110 million from the European Union. Long Term Approach “Energy infrastructure investment is a long term play. This interconnector is part of a series of major grid development projects which the Government has charged

Pat Rabbitte TD, Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources, with UK Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, Edward Davey MP, pictured at the opening of the East West Interconnector, Ireland’s first electricity link with Great Britain.

EirGrid to complete over this decade,” points out Pat Rabbitte TD, Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources. “Delivering such projects on budget and on time is essential so as to keep consumer electricity prices as low as possible.” Minister Rabbitte adds: “The fact that it was delivered on time and well under budget by EirGrid, is a vote of confidence in Ireland’s ability to deliver complex projects, with the support of the international banking sector.” The East West Interconnector is expected to bring multiple benefits to the British and Irish economies. The UK Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change, Edward Davey MP says: “This new connection between our electricity grids will improve our mutual energy security, it will improve competition - bearing down on the price ultimately paid by consumers - and it will allow more of Ireland's abundant wind energy access to the massive UK customer base." Building a Single European Energy Market According to EU Energy Commissioner Oettinger, who officially opened the East West Interconnector: “The need for energy infrastructure development is one of the biggest energy challenges facing the EU. The need for action is clear. Ireland’s East West Interconnector will double electricity interconnection between the UK and Ireland and will provide a greater opportunity to trade electricity between the two markets. It is a keypart of building a single European energy market.” I

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Join AWS – Engineer The Future Our aim is to engineer the technology of choice for utility scale wave power generation. AWS Ocean Energy is a leading company in the wave energy industry. Headquartered in Scotland with abundant natural resources on our doorstep, we have taken an honest and pragmatic approach to creating smart wave power solutions.

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Our technology is clean and deliverable, made possible by our innovative team and a rigorous approach to harvesting the potential of wave power.

Senior Wave Power Performance Engineer

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If you want to demonstrate your expertise; learn more along the way; live in a wonderful part of the world; and make a difference, then you’re going to want to work with us. Especially if you want to play a part in producing a wave energy solution that is seen as history in the making. We do not just offer jobs at AWS, we offer significant opportunities for career development within a high growth, leading edge technology company.

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For an informal discussion about career opportunities with AWS please contact our Office Manager, Shona Coyne, on 01463 725410 or email your CV application to careers@awsocean.com


I MARINE ENERGY

ICOE 2012 –17th-19th October – Convention Centre Dublin Dublin will stage the 4th International Conference on Ocean Energy (ICOE), the global marine energy event focused on the industrial development of renewable marine energy. osted by the Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland (SEAI) in partnership with European Ocean Energy Association and the IEAOES, the event will take place from Wednesday 17th to Friday 19th October 2012 at the Convention Centre Dublin.

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The goal of the conference and exhibition is to share recent experiences from research and demonstration efforts. It aims to accelerate the development of the industry by stimulating collaboration networks between companies and research and development centres. It also specifically targets engagement of the experience of operators in related marine and power industry sectors. International Expertise Over 750 international experts and worldleading companies in ocean energy will gather in Dublin. Global industry and academic experts in marine renewable energy will present over a hundred papers on themes important to growing this new marine industry. The conference provides

an opportunity for a trade exhibition where many of the top industrial players will demonstrate the latest technologies in harnessing renewable energy from the sea. Held every two years, the International Conference on Ocean Energy comes to Dublin after successful events in maritime centres, Brest and Bilbao, In the decade in which ocean energy will become a significant player in electricity generation, job creation, and a bright hope for the future of the planet, the fit with Ireland’s clean energy and economic goals makes this Dublin event unmissable. Highlights Keynote and featured speakers at ICOE 2012 include: • Fergus Ewing MSP, Minister for Energy, Enterprise and Industry, The Scottish Government; • Arlene Foster MLA, Minister of Enterprise, Trade and Investment, Northern Ireland Executive; • Pat Rabbitte, Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources, The Irish Government; • Eddie O’Connor, CEO, Mainstream Renewables and Founding Member of Friends of the Supergid; • Peter Wesslau, UK Country Manager, Vattenfall; • Sean Kidney, Chair, Founder, Climate Bonds Initiative; • Xia Dengwen, State Oceanographic Administration, People’s Republic of China; • Kai Koelmel, Vice-president, Renewable Energy, Siemens;

• Paul Holthus, Executive Director, World Ocean Council; • Miguel Marques, Economy of the Sea Executive Director, PricewaterhouseCoopers Portugal; • Alla Weinstein, President & CEO, Principle Power. Exhibitors include: Arup, SKF, Bosch Rexroth, Blue Power, Canadian Pavillion,

DEXAWAVE, Invest NI, Open Hydro, Planet Ocean, Enterprise Ireland, ESBI and VattenFall. ICOE 2012 will feature demonstrations and displays, along with working kit from ocean energy and related sectors either in the river or nearby. Related Events A number of related events will take place over the three days of the conference, including a welcome reception on Wednesday 17th and a gala dinner in the renowned Trinity College Dublin on Thursday 18th. Once the formal proceedings end, delegates will have the opportunity to take a guided tour to the OpenHydro factory in County Louth and the MCT Seagen turbine in Strangford Lough. I

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I MARINE ENERGY

Arup – Servicing the Ocean Energy Industry By Julie Ascoop reland is excellently placed to harness Iplaced wave power, and Northern Ireland is well to harness tidal power. In the case of Ireland, no country in the Northern hemisphere has a better wave climate, with relatively deep water close to shore. Traditionally Arup has worked on ports, harbours and coastal engineering projects. Recent changes to the traditional engineering market have resulted in Arup exploring a broader base of work. We have started to apply our engineering skills and vast experience to other projects. Arup has invested in developing the skills that are required to service the ocean energy industry. As such the firm is well positioned to provide all of the services required from site selection, environmental impact assessments, cable layout design to complex structural engineering. Given our global presence we are also in the unique position of being able to access a global skills base with specific expertise in Ocean Energy.

Julie Ascoop.

The ocean energy projects that we are currently working on allow us to train our staff in offshore skills, which are not only suitable for wave and tidal projects, but also

for offshore wind and oil and gas. An added bonus is that with this expertise we are now able to attract work from outside Ireland. Founded by Ove Arup in 1946, Arup is one of the largest consulting engineering practices in the country with over 300 personnel. We provide a full range of multidisciplinary engineering services from our offices in Dublin, Cork, Limerick and Galway. Innovative design solutions and value-engineered projects characterise our work. We are a member of the Arup Partnerships Worldwide with over 9,000 staff working in more than 90 offices in 37 countries. Julie Ascoop leads the maritime engineering group of Arup in Dublin. Julie’s paper at the ICOE 2012 conference, written in conjunction with ESB International, Ocean Energy Development Unit (OEDU), SEAI and Aquavision Ltd discusses ‘Stakeholder input into the design of the Atlantic Marine Energy Test Site’. I

The UK Braces For a Tidal Wave of Funding For Marine Energy he UK has huge potential for marine T power and is considered the most attractive destination to develop marine projects in Europe, states a new report by energy experts GlobalData. The new report shows that the marine energy industry is in the emerging stages of development, and the UK is home to the R&D resources needed to further develop these power generation technologies. Energy from the ocean could play a vital role in the UK’s ambition to achieve an 80% cut in carbon emissions by 2050, with the UK government setting a target to develop 2,000 megawatts (MW) of marine installed capacity by 2020. It was estimated by the Department of Energy and Climate Change that the country has wave energy potential of approximately 50 terawatt-hours (TWh) per year and tidal energy potential of approximately 17 TWh/year, which represents an enormous 50% share of Europe’s marine 16

potential. Thanks to this capacity, the UK has become a hub for marine research centers and leading marine energy companies, and boasts the world’s second largest tidal range in the Severn Estuary. The country is testing a large number of wave and tidal tech-

nologies with the support of the European Marine Energy Centre, which has 14 fullscale testing berths in the Orkneys region. As a result of this, the UK is heading the innovation race in marine energy technology, boasting the highest number of projects in a single country currently being actively demonstrated. The UK Marine Energy Program, established in 2011, focuses on augmenting the research, development and deployment ability of tidal and wave energy devices. The program acts as a supporting pillar in the industry, addressing issues related to planning and consent of projects, and forming a network for the sharing of marine intelligence. The Scottish government is also playing a major role in the development of the UK’s marine energy industry, introducing a number of schemes to harness the energy found in some of world’s strongest tides in the northern part of Scotland. I

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Wave and Tidal Energy – A Sustainable Future By Jim Marnoch, Ocean Energy Manager, SKF Though Oil and Gas will undoubtedly play a key role for many years to come, with operators finding new ways of extracting more hydrocarbons, it is simply not sustainable for future generations. recent report from Exxon Mobil indicated global energy demand will be about 30% higher in 2040, worldwide demand for natural gas will rise by 60% over the next 28 years and by 2040, we will have used half of the proven oil reserves in the world. Furthermore, the recent Fukushima Nuclear disaster, and the Macondo oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, provide stark reminders of the risks within the traditional energy sector. This reinforces the case for alternative energy generation from Renewables, with Wave and Tidal having an important role to play. Within the industry, it is recognised that reducing the cost per unit (KWhr) towards a level where it is competitive with traditional means of power generation is key to long term viability. Although incentives such as Renewable Obligation Certificates (ROCs) scheme are currently available to create a more level playing field with traditional power generation methods, questions remain with respect to whether the system will remain in place indefinitely. It is therefore preferable if not essential, as a long term objective, that the industry aims to "stand on its own two feet" or get as close as possible to this situation. Over 100 years of experience in working with many industries around the world has given SKF the technical knowledge and innovativeness to address this challenge. SKF are committed to developing and delivering products and services to improve the efficiency of today's installed equipment and provide advanced solutions needed to support tomorrow's low carbon and renewable energy technologies. We believe that through openness, innovation and teamwork with our customers and partners we can work to reduce CO2 emissions globally and positively influence climate change. With this in mind, the emerging Wave & Tidal power industries are particularly relevant to SKF and very much align to our long term sustainability objectives.

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Life Cycle Management SKF adopt a "Life Cycle Management"

approach throughout industry, the aim being to help customers reduce Total Cost of Ownership (TCO). This approach is equally applicable to the emerging Wave & Tidal Energy sectors where cost reduction is a key driver. Consideration of Reliability, Availability and Maintainability at the prototype design stage are absolutely vital in order to have a positive financial impact in the array production phase. Lessons learned from the Oil and Gas sector show that by adopting a least Capital Expenditure (CAPEX) approach at Concept and Design stage will undoubtedly have detrimental consequences in terms of Operational Expenditure (OPEX) throughout the life of the asset through to decommissioning.

Our Ocean Energy team, based in Scotland, currently support Wave and Tidal device developers as well as power companies in the UK & Ireland, extending to upcoming key markets all over the world. SKF work collaboratively with prototype device developers, to help them design in reliability at an early stage, thus ensuring they meet their future availability and production targets. We also take into consideration maintenance strategy and maintainability, recognising the harsh and inaccessible environments in which these devices operate. Drawing from our extensive portfolio of bearings, seals, lubrication systems, services and mechatronics, SKF have the capability to meet the technological challenges and requirements. We can provide

standard products that can be customised to individual requirements or create new bespoke solutions to meet specific technical needs.

From 2014 onwards, when we see the deployment of small-scale arrays, SKF can provide Condition Monitoring and Reliability Management Services from our Remote Diagnostic Centre in Aberdeen as well as similar centres overseas. With over 50 technical resources, the Aberdeen Centre have provided support to the Offshore Oil and Gas sector in the North Sea for over 30 years. The methods and tools deployed can be utilised to great effect in the emerging Wave and Tidal Industry. One such tool, called “Results Reporter” allows the capture and codification of machine component exceptions and failures on a day to day basis. “Mining” the historical database allows our consultants to identify and quantify trends of poor reliability in machines/components (i.e “Bad Actors”). SKF then feed this information back to Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMS) and work collaboratively with them to help improve machine design incorporating SKF solutions. For further information, contact:Michael Baumann Business Engineer, Michael.Baumann@skf.com Tel: +44(0)1506402894 Mob: +49(0)1701100939 Jim Marnoch Ocean energy Manager Jim.Marnoch@skf .com Tel: +44(0)1224723321 Mob: +44(0)7746881211 I

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I RENEWABLE ENERGY

Wind Energy Has Potential to Create 30,000 Jobs by 2020 The Irish Wind Energy Association (IWEA) is calling on the Government to put in place the framework to allow the delivery of energy exports to create jobs and investment. he IWEA’s new policy paper – ‘Export Policy - A Renewables Development Policy Framework for Ireland’ - outlines specific areas of the Irish economy which would benefit economically if Ireland’s domestic energy export potential was realised. In order to realise this potential however, IWEA has outlined a series of recommendations which must be enacted to achieve Ireland’s renewable energy opportunities.

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National Opportunity Kenneth Matthews, chief executive of IWEA, comments: “Renewable energy exporting is a significant national opportunity that needs to be seized. Ireland must create new export-led growth and our policy paper is the first of its kind to clearly outline the framework needed to realise this potential.” He continues: “Ireland has the potential and resources to not only meet our own renewables targets but to assist other EU countries in meeting theirs. This could lead to significant job creation, R&D opportunities and greater investment. However, Ireland must be ready to seize the opportunity and IWEA’s recommendations aim to help Government ensure the framework is correct to realise this potential.” Recommendations The IWEA recommends the following five measures: 1.Government policy to facilitate the achievement of 6GW of energy for export. 4GW of wind energy produced for our domestic market and 6GW for export can deliver up to 18,400 jobs by 2020. 2.To fully unlock the jobs potential, renewable energy divisions need to be created in IDA, Enterprise Ireland and Forfas – if State agencies work in tandem with industry they could attract turbine manufacturers to Ireland, as well as supplying tur18

bines to projects here. An Irish base could then be used as a launch-pad into the European onshore and sizeable UK offshore market. This co-operative approach could unlock an additional 9,000-12,000 jobs, bringing the true jobs total up to 30,400 by 2020. 3.Government must develop a joint Irish-UK government policy. The UK needs 18GW of wind energy before 2020 and a policy should facilitate the achievement of a least 6GW of wind energy for export from Ireland. If such enablers are achieved, Ireland can attract and manage an investment of more than Eur18 billion into our economy. 4.The establishment of a GovernmentIndustry Implementation Group to maximise the opportunities for Ireland from exporting renewable energy by bringing together the necessary private and public stakeholders, agencies and private capital, to determine the goals and then lead the implementation. 5.Government to set 2030 EU targets for wind and marine energy.

the keynote address at IWEA’s recent Autumn Conference, states: “Ireland has come a long way in recent years and is working to realise its renewable energy potential. Creating an energy export-led country adds another layer of opportunity and this policy paper provides both industry and Government with a roadmap to Benefits Minister for Arts, Heritage and the achieving this. We cannot underestimate Gaeltacht, Jimmy Deenihan TD, who gave the benefits that wind energy could bring to local economies around Ireland.” Stephen Wheeler, managing director of Airtricity and IWEA chair, says: “All of these benefits are within Ireland’s reach but the approach for Ireland in terms of energy should be much more ambitious than what exists to date. The UK is now a net energy importer and over a fifth of the UK’s existing generating capacity will be coming off stream before 2020. Where energy needs meets ambition Ireland has the answers. The rest of Europe and in particular our closest neighbours the UK need renewable energy, Pictured at the IWEA Autumn Conference were: Kenneth Matthews, chief Ireland, has the resources, the executive of IWEA; Minister for Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Jimmy comparative advantage and the Deenihan TD; and Stephen Wheeler, president of IWEA. talent to deliver.” I

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BeGreen Autumn Roadshows 2012 – Helping Businesses to Reduce Costs, Improve Profitability ollowing the Spring series of National Roadshows, the Green Business.ie Programme using the BeGreen brand will repeat this successful venture in October/November 2012 in eight venues nationwide, in conjunction with other business support organisations promoting Resource Efficiency. Attendance is Free. This is an opportunity for businesses to meet the leading State support organisations and find out how they can assist the business sector in reducing costs through better Resource Efficiency – targeting Energy, Waste and Water costs. This support is free to businesses. BeGreen will be partnering with the Small Firms Association (SFA) in promoting the roadshow to the business sector. It is particularly important that small businesses receive information and support on how to manage costs during these difficult economic times and organisations like the SFA can take a lead in encouraging members to take these important steps. Many hundreds of small and medium size businesses have received support from the partners at these workshops and saved themselves tens of millions of Euro – mainly at no or low cost/quick paybacks. This is an opportunity to identify actions to reduce business costs.

general business sector, alongside a select number of supplier companies that can assist businesses on a national scale.

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Purpose of the Roadshow The purpose of the roadshow is: • To introduce businesses to the concept of reducing their costs through good environmental awareness and resource efficiency. • To identify to the businesses the support available through various state and local agencies in achieving these reductions, generally Free to the business. The workshops will address key opportunities in reducing energy & water consumption and minimising landfill waste and better resource efficiencies. Attendees will be able to meet State funded organisations who can directly assist businesses in making these reductions in costs, mainly at no cost to the business. The workshops will bring together in one room all the agencies tasked with supporting business and industry in improving their environmental performance. Attendees will also be able to review a

series of successful case studies from many companies who have substantially reduced energy, waste and water costs, and will be able to hear directly from some of the leading experts in the field. Attendees will be able to talk directly to all the agencies present. The roadshows will consist of an exhibition area running from 12 noon to 8.00 pm daily with two opportunities for delegates to listen to formal presentations on reducing costs in the business sector – at 1.30 pm and at 5.30 pm – designed to allow any business to benefit from the information available. Attendees can talk to the support agencies present, study the case studies and listen to the presentations. Attendance is free and any businesses that are concerned about the rising cost of energy, water, waste or raw materials are urged to attend and find out how they can take some simple steps to reduce the burden these place on businesses – and what free assistance is available to them to guide them in the best way. This set of workshops will reinforce the message that all the State and Semi-State support services can act together to promote a cohesive approach to Resource Efficiency and Environmental Improvements to the

Who Should Attend? Any business owner or manager who is finding Energy, Waste & Water costs high and/or rising and wants to find out how to reduce and control them. The roadshow will also be ideal for any local business support organisations in finding out what State Support services are available – generally for free – that will assist them in improving their local service delivery – local business support organisations, consultants, advisors, local authority environmental business support services etc. How to Book Attendees are asked to register in advance so that numbers can be assessed. Book online by logging on to www.greenhospitality.ie /BeGreeRoadshow and follow the online instructions If you cannot book in advance and wish to turn up on the day please do so. All businesses are welcome. Display Area There will be a set of case studies displayed, drawn from each of the organisations and from business. Each organisation represented will also have a stand where attendees can source literature and ask questions. A small number of suppliers may also be in attendance. I

BeGreen Autumn Roadshows 2012 – Locations, Dates and Timing Location Waterford Dublin North

Date Oct – 23 Oct – 24

Venue Tower Hotel, Waterford City Hilton Hotel Dublin, Charlemont

Web Address www.towerhotelwaterford.com http://www3.hilton.com/en/hotels/ireland/ hilton-dublin-DUBDUHN/index.html http://www.radissonblu.ie/hotel-dublinairport http://www.hodsonbayhotel.com/ http://www.radissonblu.ie/hotel-sligo http://www.carltonhotelgalwaycity.com/ http://www.radissonblu.ie/hotel-cork http://www.castletroy-park.ie/

Dublin Central Oct - 25 Radisson Blu Hotel, Dublin Airport Athlone Oct – 30 Hodson Bay Hotel, Athlone Sligo Oct – 31 Radisson Blu Hotel, Sligo Galway City Nov - 1 Carlton Hotel, Galway City Cork Nov – 6 Radisson Blu Little Island, Cork Limerick Nov - 7 Carlton Castletroy Park Hotel, Limerick Times: Display opens: 12.00 noon 1st Workshop: 1.30 -3.30 pm 2nd Workshop: 5.30 – 7.30 pm Display closes: 8.00 pm (Please note that both workshops are the same – 2 separate times to allow any business to attend).

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I ENVIRONMENT AWARD

Croke Park’s Greener Initiative Wins Gold First time nominee, Croke Park, has been honoured with the Excellence in Environment Award – Large Indigenous Company for its initiative, Greener. On and off the pitch, at the ninth annual Chambers Ireland Corporate Social Responsibility awards. he awards were partnered by Business in the Community Ireland, run in association with the Department of Environment, Community and Local Government The independent judging panel is made up of respected individuals working in the field of CSR and were impressed with Greener: On and Off the Pitch’s achievement in reaching successive environmental goals in order to maintain Croke Park’s position as a world leader in venue sustainability.

environmental and sustainability performance. Croke Park is proud to be a venue leader in the area of sustainability and the goals of our new ‘Greener – on and off the pitch’ initiative has some challenging but exciting goals,” comments Alan Gallagher, Head of Stadium Operations. Croke Park has become one of the first sports stadiums in the world to achieve certification in the recently released ISO 20121 Event Sustainability Management System InterPictured (left to right): Minister of State for NewERA, Fergus O’Dowd national Standard. This certification Greener. On and Off the Pitch TD; Tracy Bunyan, Croke Park; and Ian Talbot, CEO, Chambers was awarded to Croke Park in June The aim of Greener. On and off the Ireland. 2012 for achieving the highest stanpitch is to: dards in sustainable event manage• Minimise the environmental impact of • Maintaining Croke Parks’ position as ment, demonstrating commitment to conevents at Croke Park; one of the most sustainable sports stant improvements in the stadium’s sus• Encourage environmentally responsible venues in the world; tainability record and showing that sustain• Increasing recycling at Croke Park with a ability is at the centre of all stadium actividevelopment and staging of events; • Raise awareness amongst stakeholders, focus of achieving zero land fill by 2014; ties. ISO 20121 is designed to help events contractors and staff to carry out their • Continuing to reduce electricity, gas and organisations such as Croke Park and the water consumption; work at the stadium in a sustainable GAA to recognise their impact on the econ• Developing effective and consistent com- omy, society and the environment. manner. munication tools to communicate the The sustainability project focuses on key sustainability message to staff, stakeholdarea’s such as: ers, patrons and the public. The project has been developed and implemented in conjunction with key stakeholders who are represented on the Stadium’s Environmental & Sustainability Man“Croke Park Stadium is delighted to have agement Group (ESMG) and achieved the ‘Excellence in Environment’ play a key role in setting, dri- Award in the 2012 Chambers Ireland CSR ving and monitoring the sta- Awards. The achievement recognises the dium’s environmental & sus- emphasis which has been placed on tainability goals and objec- Environmental & Sustainability practices at tives. Croke Park since 2008. The Award is predominantly the result of the teamwork Sustainability approach taken by stadium staff, stakehold“Sustainability is the key pil- ers and members of the public in achieving lar in how we manage our environmental objectives and implementPictured (left to right): Elena Costin, Grosvenor Services; Ger Dorgan, business and being awarded ing green initiatives which are embedded Community Liaison Officer; Edward Brennan, Facilities Officer; Tracy the ‘Excellence in Environthroughout our operational practices,” says Bunyan, Events and Operations Executive; and Alan Gallagher, Head ment Award’ shows our comTracy Bunyan, Events and Operations of Stadium Operations. mitment in building on our Executive. I

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Achieving Green Goals at Croke Park Croke Park is not only one of the largest and most modern sporting arenas in Europe but is also one of the ‘greenest’. arlier this year, Croke Park became one of the first sports stadiums in the world to achieve certification in the recently released ISO 20121 Event Sustainability Management System International Standard. Croke Park was awarded the certification after an audit by SGS Ireland in May 2012 for achieving the highest standards in sustainable event management, demonstrating commitment to constant improvements in the stadium’s sustainability record and showing that sustainability is at the centre of all stadium activities. ISO 20121, which was developed specifically for the London 2012 Olympic Games, follows on from the BS 8901 sustainability certification achieved by Croke Park in 2010. Croke Park had already achieved ISO 14001:2004 environmental management system certification in 2009, making it one of the first net-carbon neutral stadiums in the world.

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Green Leader “Croke Park has been a leader in the green game since 2008 when the stadium developed and implemented a range of sustainability initiatives and projects. Through our Sustainability Management System Croke Park encourages environmentally responsible development and staging of events,” explains Alan Gallagher, head of stadium operations at Croke Park. The stadium’s Sustainability Management System focuses on the three pillars of sustainability - 1 environment, 2 economic, 3 social. Its work is guided by the Environmental & Sustainability Management Group, which comprises of representatives from the departments within Croke Park including Operations, Marketing, Commercial, the GAA and key stakeholders/contractors such as electricial, mechanical, cleaning and catering at the stadium. By focusing on these three areas, the stadium seeks to continually improve through the implementation and delivery of a wide range of environmental and sustainability initiatives and projects such as Cul Green and more recently Greener: On and off the

pitch. The system seeks to achieve objectives and meet annual targets. Greener. On and Off the Pitch The aim of the Greener. On and off the pitch initiative is to build on the previous Cul Green joint energy saving initiative between the GAA and Electric Ireland to minimize environmental impacts of events (both on and off the field) at Croke Park. The Greener. On and off the pitch programme focuses on maintaining Croke Park’s position as being one of the most sustainable sports venues in the world by taking a collaborative approach with key stakeholders involved in staging games and events. It also aims to increase recycling at Croke Park with a target of achieving a 0% landfill by 2014, while continuing to

reduce electricity, gas and water consumption. For instance, a weekly reporting and monitoring system has been developed and implemented with the stadium’s electrical and mechanical contractors to identify and track patterns of usage in electricity, water and gas and provide explanations for increases and decreases in usage. Another key aspect of Greener. On and off the pitch is the development of effective and consistent communication tools to convey the sustainability message to staff, stakeholders, patrons and the public. Environmental Journey “Croke Park began its environmental journey in 2008 by retrofitting an Energy Management System (EMS) and Building Management System (BMS) as part of a wider state-of-the-art environmental improvement programme covering the stadium's electricity, waste and water management systems. The EMS/BMS is designed to maximise energy efficiency. This is a computerised system for centrally managing and operating energy using systems within the stadium.” Alan Gallagher continues: “The day to day electricity consumption was reduced by

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using the BMS to control the lighting, electrical heating and air handling units according to the scheduled activities taking place within the stadium. Passive Infrared (PIR) lights were also introduced in some of the areas that are used on a daily basis. These lights detect motion and then activate a switch to turn on when required and off when no motion is detected after 15 minutes.” Impressive Results The installation of a stadium-wide BMS has produced impressive results. Electricity usage has been reduced by 31% and gas usage by 29%. Combined that equates to over 3,500,000kWh per annum. Croke Park has also implemented a recycling programme which has seen 62% of the waste generated on site diverted from landfill. Facilities on-site include cardboard baling, compacting and composting of all food and grass. Recycling stations are placed on all floors in the stadium, staff canteens, offices and all staff and contractors receive on-going training in relation to waste disposal and recycling. “Patrons are also encouraged on event days to contribute to our waste management procedures through the clear and prominent provision of recycling bins and

information on public levels. A new compositing initiative currently underway hopes to increase our recycling rate to 80%,” he remarks. Furthermore, water usage has been reduced by 28% (2010-2011 figures) through the installation of solenoid valves on urinals in public levels and other engineering initiatives allowing the stadium to save 370,000 litres of water per day. The overall saving made from the introduction of these valves equates to approximately 108 Olympic sized swimming pools per year. Alan Gallagher comments: “Total investment in energy reduction initiatives has been about Eur1 million which now allows Croke Park to have fully automated energy

management and control from a previous manual system. With the phenomenal results achieved, our payback period was approximately three years.” So what lessons are there to be learned by other stadiums/events facilities from Croke Park’s achievements and experiences? “The key lessons learnt regarding sustainability is that simple initiatives can have really positive results,” he replies. “However, there needs to be a framework which pulls all of these initiatives together. Croke Park has gone down the formal route of ISO 14001 and ISO 12001 which suits our needs but the framework can be less formal for smaller organisations.” I

“Croke Park has been a leader in the green game since 2008 when the stadium developed and implemented a range of sustainability initiatives and projects.”

Manutec Ltd., Ballingarry, Co. Limerick. Ireland Tel: +353 (0) 69 68144 Fax: +353 (0) 69 68360 E-mail us: info@manutec.ie Manutec is a wholly Irish owned company based in Ballingarry, County Limerick. Since 1979 our highly qualified and experienced team of engineers have been meeting the control requirements of leading organisations in the pharmaceutical, healthcare, industrial and commercial sectors. Our objective is to provide a complete Computerised Control System solution to clients. Our range of products and services include:

• Motor Control Centre Design and Manufacture • Process Control and Automation • Building Management Systems • Maintenance, Calibration & Validation Services 22

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I ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Energy Partnership Between the GAA and Electric Ireland Cul Green was the joint initiative between the GAA and Electric Ireland which has helped Croke Park Stadium become one of the most sustainable stadiums in the world. he initiative began in 2008 and huge strides were made as Croke Park installed Energy Tracking Systems, Building Management Systems and continued to undertake studies at the stadium aimed at sourcing local renewable generation. The stadium’s electricity continues to be sourced from renewable generation and is supplied by Electric Ireland. The partnership between the GAA and Electric Ireland yielded fantastic results over the lifetime of the Cul Green project: • 31% reduction in electricity usage • 29% reduction in gas consumption • 28% reduction in water usage • 62% of stadium waste diverted from landfill to recycling. All over Ireland, people supported Cul Green and responded positively to this energy saving initiative. Almost 150,000

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energy saving pledges were made at culgreen.ie Ordinary people did their bit by turning off unnecessary lights, not overfilling the kettle and turning thermostats down. Visitors to Croke Park also got involved by car pooling or travelling to the stadium by public transport. A target of 15,800 tonnes in CO2 savings was set in 2008 and this milestone was not expected to be achieved until 2013 but the project was so successful that the target was achieved in early 2012 Given the success of the relationship between the GAA and Electric Ireland a new partnership will shortly be announced as Electric Ireland becomes the Energy Partner to the GAA. It is expected that this partnership will help GAA clubs and GAA communities to become more efficient in their usage of energy and to reduce their energy costs. I

Ireland Unlikely To Meet EU Energy Targets 0,000 Irish buildings will need to 9 undergo significant energy upgrades every year up to 2020 if Ireland is to achieve its legal obligations under the EU Energy Efficiency Directive, which was adopted by the European Parliament in September 2012 and is expected to come into force in November. EU Members States will eventually face fines if they fail to comply with the new Directive, which is aimed at driving energy efficiency improvements in households, industries and transport sectors.

According to research conducted by the Tipperary-based SERVE (Sustainable Energy for the Rural Village Environment) Project, one million Irish buildings will be required to undergo energy upgrades by 2020 in order to comply with the Directive and the National Energy Retrofit Programme. It warned, however, that Ireland is unlikely to meet the target in light of its research indicating that less than 50,000 buildings will undergo energy upgrades in 2012. It pointed to a reduction in Government grant levels, the lack of public investment in energy efficient projects due to the economic downturn, and lowering public support for energy efficiency measures as principal causes behind the poor figure. The Project’s research has found that fewer Irish people feel that the environment is a priority due to the economic crisis. In 2010, 37% of those asked felt that the environment should be given priority

over competitiveness, whereas this has reduced to 25% in 2012. The EU-funded SERVE Project carried out its research in the context of a five-year project in North Tipperary that has delivered an investment of Eur10.5 million in sustainable energy in the region. The project has resulted in 400 buildings receiving significant energy upgrades, and the development of an eco-village in Cloughjordan that is 100% supplied by renewable heating system and has the largest solar array (506 sq m) in Ireland. “Only full implementation of the National Energy Retrofit Programme, development of alternative financing measures, increased public investment in energy efficient projects, and a national shift in opinion in favour of energy efficiency measures, will ensure Ireland achieves its legal obligations under the EU Energy Efficiency Directive,” explains Seamus Hoyne, manager of the SERVE Project. I

ENVIRONMENT & ENERGY MANAGEMENT, SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012

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Our extensive experience of undertaking strategic and site-specific flood risk assessments allows us to offer our clients best-practice and cost-effective services Increased frequency of f lood events have identified the need for f lood risk assessments (FR As) for new developments and existing infrastructure. FR As identify whether assets are located within high, medium or low f lood risk zones and the extent and depth of f looding. J. B. Barry and Partners Limited, an Irish owned company located in Dublin, Cork & Mayo have been providing consultancy services on f lood alleviation schemes for over 50 years and have a large portfolio of experience covering all sectors. We have built a reputation for delivering high quality, cost effective & innovative solutions, to both public and private clients in Ireland and overseas, and can offer a fully serviced solution to your company. We provide a range of f lood risk assessment services to suit the needs of each client. All of our f lood risk assessments are undertaken by highly qualified and experienced teams who

offer a combination of local knowledge, expert technical skills, and guidance through all of the steps involved in f lood risk assessment.

By making use of our local knowledge we can offer real value by ensuring that the f lood risk assessment is proportionate to the risk and appropriate to the scale, nature and location of your new development or existing infrastructure. We have been involved in many f lood risk assessment schemes throughout Ireland thus giving us an in depth knowledge of Ireland’s high risk areas and the required solutions. This extensive knowledge allows us

to bring value and best-practice and help to protect developments from f looding. The services we offer include: • Hydrological analysis • One-dimensional and twodimensional f lood modelling • Defence overtopping and breach analysis • Analysis of climate change • Culvert blockage • Urban drainage modelling • Sustainable drainage systems design • Flood resilience measures and development layout • Flood extent mapping • Mitigation measures


I EXHIBITION

Resource Ireland 2012 – 17th18th October – RDS Dublin Resource Ireland 2012 incorporates two co-located exhibitions - The Irish Water Exhibition and The Irish Recycling & Waste Exhibition. esource Ireland is the leading exhibition for the Irish water, waste and sustainable business sectors making it a must-attend event for those who want to stay abreast with developments in the Irish market. Resource Ireland 2012 takes place on the 17th and 18th of October 2012, at Simmonscourt RDS Dublin. Featuring an extensive seminar programme with high profile speakers and panel discussions, the event provides excellent best practice learning and networking opportunities over the two days. With leading experts in the environment, water, recycling and waste sectors attending, the event creates the ideal setting for sharing industry knowledge and inspiration. The last exhibition in 2010 attracted over 1,600 attendees. Resource Ireland's comprehensive free seminar programme, paired with leading suppliers of environmental products and services, offers a great opportunity to find out about new products, learn about industry best practice and keep up-to-date with industry. Comprising of the Irish Water Exhibition and the Irish Recycling & Waste Exhibition, Resource Ireland covers all main aspects of water and waste management.

R

treatment, MBT and waste-toenergy technologies to name but a few. Waste is seen as a resource which is recovered to energy or raw materials which can be used to manufacture new products. The Irish Recycling & Waste Exhibition reflects this changed approach to waste management. Since its launch in 2000, the show has continuously grown and today provides the only all-island platform for waste professionals of its size. Waste professionals use the show year on year to network, find out about new waste solutions and technologies and to benefit from free CPD training in seminars running at the show. Irish suppliers are joined by European companies introducing waste technologies to the Irish market that have been successfully used in other European countries. I

The Irish Water Exhibition Clean water in Europe is no longer taken for granted but seen as a scarce resource, which needs to be protected in terms of limiting wastage and preventing contamination. Source protection and leakage control have become important points on the agenda of European countries, including the island of Ireland. The Irish Water Exhibition looks at this development in the water and environmental sector and provides a platform for environmental professionals to network, share experience and find out about latest developments in technologies and legislation.

The Irish Water Exhibition has been held in Dublin since 1973 under the name Irish Water Waste & Environment (IWWE), starting as a small road show and growing to become the largest water and environment exhibition on the island of Ireland. The show continues to bring together buyers and suppliers of environmental products and services. The seminar programme at the show provides an opportunity for free professional development as well as a forum for the industry to discuss developments and express concerns. The Irish Recycling and Waste Exhibition Waste management today involves separation of waste streams, efficient collection of separated waste, recycling, composting, organic waste ENVIRONMENT & ENERGY MANAGEMENT, SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012

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ENVIRONMENT & ENERGY MANAGEMENT, SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012


ENVIRONMENT & ENERGY MANAGEMENT, SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012

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I RENEWABLE ENERGY

Edina Makes a Significant Impact on Emerging Anaerobic Digestion Market ince being established in 1985 Edina has S grown and developed into one of the leading renewable power generation specialists, providing international coverage from bases in Dublin, Cork, Lisburn and Manchester (UK). Edina is the sole distributor in the UK and Ireland for MWM, the world’s oldest manufacturer of gas-powered engines. With individual Gas Powered generator sets from 400–4400kWe Edina provides complete turnkey installations, supplying electricity, hot water, steam and absorption chilling. These modules have electrical efficiencies of currently up to 44%, overall efficiencies of up to 90% and have excellent performance on all forms of gas including, Natural Gas, Landfill Gas and Bio-Gas. Edina has gained vast experience in the gas generator sector since installing its first Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plant at Dublin Airport in 1994, and with now over

Biogas CHP Unit and gas storage facility installed by Edina at Kerry Ingredients.

300MWe installed capacity in Ireland and the UK, the company has become the obvious choice to supply the power generation element of the Anaerobic Digestion (AD) plant, and has already made a significant impact in the emerging AD market. With a number of biogas CHP units in

Ireland, ranging from 250kWe to 600kWe, supplied to various AD developers and end users with sites in Armagh and Portadown in Northern Ireland, and Kerry and Limerick in the Republic of Ireland, Edina is quickly becoming the leading CHP/gas generator supplier to the AD sector. From service bases in Dublin, Cork, Lisburn and Derry and directly employing 20 dedicated Service Engineers, Edina provides comprehensive service coverage throughout the island of Ireland. Edina has also achieved great success in the UK having supplied over 50 units to the Biogas sector, supported by a further team of 30 Engineers. Service support is provided for each installation throughout its life with Edina’s ‘state of the art’ remote telemetry and engine diagnostic management software. This enables Edina’s dedicated maintenance team to consistently achieve some of the highest availability figures in the industry. I

Europes Leading Supplier of Efficient Gas EngineTechnology for AD Proven Track Record :

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Sole Distributor in the UK & Ireland for

ENVIRONMENT & ENERGY MANAGEMENT, SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012


E N E R G Y

P O I N T

I RENEWABLE ENERGY

EU Reaches 100 GW Wind Power Milestone The European Union has passed the milestone of 100 GigaWatts (GW) of installed wind power capacity, according to the European Wind Energy Association (EWEA). 100 GW of wind power can generate electricity over a year to meet the total consumption of 57 million households, equivalent to the power production of 39 nuclear power plants. It took the European wind energy sector some twenty years to get the first 10 GW grid connected. It only needed 13 years to add an additional 90 GW. Half of the total European wind power capacity has been installed over the past six years. “It would require burning 72 million tonnes of coal annually in coal fired power plants to match Europe's annual wind energy production. Loading that amount of coal on trains would require 750,000 wagons with a combined length of 11,500 kilometres - the dis-

tance from Brussels to Buenos Aires, Argentina,” says Christian Kjaer, chief executive of EWEA. “Despite only utilising a tiny fraction of Europe's vast domestic wind energy resources, wind power is having a substantial impact on Europe's energy security and environment, and benefits us hugely in creating green jobs and technology exports,” he adds. Recent wind turbine installations contributing to the 100 GW milestone include: • Anholt offshore wind farm, 400 MW developed by DONG off the coast of Denmark; • Linowo, 48 MW developed by EDF Energies Nouvelles Polska in Poland; • Ausumgaard, 12 MW developed by a private landowner in Denmark (west Jutland); • Akoumia, 7.2 MW developed by Greek power company PPCR on the island of Crete.

I RENEWABLE ENERGY

Energy-smart Plaza For Dublin City Centre Through Ace Project

650 Advanced Gasification Power Plants to be Built in Europe by 2030 CHO Power, a specialist in the waste and biomass to energy sector, has completed a detailed market study that shows that 650 new advanced gasification power plants will have to be built in Europe by 2030 to meet EU renewable energy targets. Biomass, from mixed solid waste to wood pellets, is the greatest primary energy source in the mix of renewables.

The growth of this market in recent years has been limited by the lack of appropriate technologies. Thanks to the use of efficient gasification technologies, the proportion of electricity produced from waste and biomass is set to grow in the years to come. The study shows that in Europe, this additional renewable electricity capacity to be installed between 2015 and 2030 is estimated at 19,649 MWe; from which 6,501 MWe will be produced by advanced gasification technologies such as CHO Power. The United Kingdom will represent more than 16% of this market with 1,083 MWe advanced gasification capacity to be installed by 2030, representing 107 reasonably sized power plants adapted to a typical 100150,000 inhabitants area, assuring an effective territorial network to meet the demand. This ranks the UK as one of the most attractive markets in Europe sustained by landfill costs and the virtuous Renewable Obligation system which has recently confirmed its support to the gasification technology.

Sustainable energy adviser Codema and Dublin City Council have announced details of a unique design competition

The competition will be open to all members of the public and will challenge designers, planners, ICT professionals, creative thinkers and visual communicators alike to come up with a oneof-a-kind concept to inform and inspire citizens about sustainable energy in a thought-provoking way.

Scottish Government Provides Guidance For Wind Planning Applications to develop an energy-smart plaza in the city centre. The smart feature will engage the public on the benefits of renewable energy and will be created through the Ace project. Dublin City Council will invest Eur150,000 in the energy-smart plaza as part of Ace project, which aims to promote the uptake of renewable energy throughout North-West Europe. Dublin city is leading the project through Codema. In total, Eur1.5 million will be invested in Dublin through Ace, 50 per cent of which will be covered through the EU INTERREG IVB programme.

ENVIRONMENT & ENERGY MANAGEMENT, SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012

The Scottish Government has launched guidance designed to make planning applications for wind energy developments run more smoothly for developers, planning authorities and the communities affected. The guidance is a result of the GP Wind Project, a Scottish-Government led EU project which looked at the barriers to development of wind energy and ways of reconciling renewable energy objectives with environmental concerns, and actively involving communities in the planning process. The guidelines were developed in partnership with a wide range of interested parties, 29


E N E R G Y

P O I N T

I POWER SUPPLY

ESB Networks Launches ‘PowerCheck’ App ESB Networks has launched its new ‘PowerCheck’ app and website which provide real time information to customers regarding planned and unplanned power supply interruptions, including projected restoration times. Paul Mulvaney, head of Distribution and Customer Services with ESB Networks, says: “Interruptions to power supplies are rare, but when they do occur, customers want to find out quickly and easily when their power will be restored. We are still happy to hear from customers by phone, but PowerCheck provides an alternative for people who would prefer to access this information online or through their Smartphones.” He adds: “Over the past decade, ESB has invested heavily in upgrading the Irish electricity network and we now have one of the most reliable and efficient systems in the world. Since 2001, we have succeeded in reducing unplanned interruptions by 62 percent, with the average customer now experiencing just over an hour of lost supply per year as a result of network faults,” The free app is accessible through Smartphones (iPhones and Android), and the website (www.esb.ie/esb-networks/powercheck/).

including the RSPB, Comhairle nan Eilean Siar, SSE and Scottish Power Renewables. The Scottish Government has also announced an “onshore wind taskforce”, which will look at ways to improve the planning consent process for onshore wind while keeping communities involved, consulted and informed, by bringing key players in the planning system including the Scottish Government, developers and statutory consultees (including Scottish Natural Heritage, SEPA, and planning authorities) together to critically examine current procedures. Energy Minister Fergus Ewing says. “We have set an ambitious, but achievable, renewable energy target and we are determined to ensure that communities all over Scotland benefit from our renewable energy revolution, which is already bringing jobs and

investment. But we are determined that this should be done in an sustainable way, sympathetic to the needs of communities and protecting the environment and our fantastic natural heritage.” David Gardner, director of SSE Renewables (onshore), says: “Many other countries across Europe will benefit from Scotland demonstrating a leading role in delivering good practice in renewable energy development, but we can always learn to do better, and sharing good practice across the industry in this way is a very positive step."

World-first in Marine Renewables The world’s first communityowned tidal turbine will be made and deployed in Scotland, under a fabrication contract between Scottish firms Steel Engineering and Nova Inno-vation. The two companies had reached agreement to manufacture a tidal turbine that will be connected to the grid and provide electricity to people in one of the most remote parts of Scotland. The Nova-30 device, to

Brothers Darren and Adrian Larkin at the launch of the app. They are pictured with Paul Mulvaney, head of Distribution and Customer Service, ESB Networks.

be used by the North Yell community in Shetland to power a local ice plant and industrial estate, will be fabricated for Leith-based Nova Innovation in Steel Engineering’s newly expanded Renfrew facility. The new premises will help the firm meet its ambition to create 120 new jobs. The Nova-30 (30kW) tidal turbine employs a horizontal axis, three-bladed rotor to extract reliable and predictable energy from the tides. The turbine, which will be deployed in the Bluemull Sound between the islands of Yell and Unst, will be owned by the North Yell community, which received a grant of £150,000 from the Scottish Government to help its development. It will help regenerate the fragile economy of North Yell – one of Europe’s most remote communities, providing valuable income and

ENVIRONMENT & ENERGY MANAGEMENT, SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012

supporting local jobs.

I GREEN TRANSPORT

World’s First Integrated Wind-Powered Electric Vehicle Charging Station US-based renewable energy group Urban Green Energy and GE have unveiled the world’s first integrated wind-powered electric vehicle charging station. The innovative Sanya Skypump pairs UGE’s cutting-edge vertical wind turbines with GE’s electric vehicle (EV) charging technology to offer completely clean energy to power electric vehicles. Installed by UGE Iberia, the Spanish branch of New Yorkbased UGE, the first wind-powered EV charging station is located at Cespa’s global headquarters near Barcelona. Cespa is the environmental services subsidiary of Ferrovial Servicios, the world’s largest private transportation infrastructure investor. More Sanya Skypumps will be installed later this year in the US and Australia at shopping malls, universities and other locations. The integrated system incorporates both the energy production capacity of UGE’s 4K wind turbine and the EV charging 31


E N E R G Y

P O I N T

I ENERGY EFFICIENCY

EU Energy Efficiency Directive – Billions to be Made in Savings Mandatory energy-saving measures, including renovating public buildings, energy-saving schemes for utilities, and energy audits for all large firms, will be required by an EU energy efficiency directive which has just been approved by the European Parliament. Cutting energy consumption by 20% could save the EU Eur50 billion per year. The directive will require member states to renovate 3% of the total floor area of "heated and/or cooled buildings owned and occupied by their central government" (administrative departments whose responsibilities cover the entire territory of a member state). This will apply to buildings with a "total useful floor area" of more than 500 sq m, and as from July 2015, of more than 250 sq m. However, member states will also be able to use alternative means to achieve equivalent energy savings. Energy companies covered by the directive will have to achieve a "cumulative enduse energy savings target" by 2020. This target will have to be at least equivalent to achieving new savings, each year, from 2014 to 2020, of 1.5% of annual energy sales to final customers, by volume, and averaged over the most recent three-year period before the directive takes effect. Sales of energy used in transport could be excluded and alternative ways to achieve equivalent energy savings would be permitted, provided that equivalence is maintained. All large enterprises will be required to undergo an energy audit. These audits will need to start within three years of the directive's entry into force and should be carried out every four years by qualified and accredited experts. Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) will be excluded from this obligation.

capability of the GE Durastation in a single unit, with all required electrical systems located within the tower. Designed for commercial and government customers, the Sanya Skypump combines environmental benefits with a strong statement to customers and the public.

I ROAD FUELS

UK Probe into Petrol and Diesel Prices The Office of Fair Trading has issued a call for information on the UK petrol and diesel sector. The UK retail road fuels sector is estimated to be worth around £32 billion. Petrol prices rose by 38 per cent between June 2007 and June 2012, and diesel prices by 43 per cent over the same period. In light of continuing public concern about pump prices, the OFT wants to identify whether or not there are competition 32

problems that it can tackle in the sector. It is inviting the industry, motoring groups and consumer bodies to submit information. The OFT will explore a number of claims about how the road fuels sector in the UK is functioning, including: • whether reductions in the price of crude oil are being reflected in falling pump prices • whether supermarkets' and major oil companies' practices may be making it more difficult for independent retailers to compete with them • whether there is a lack of competition between fuel retailers in some remote communities in the UK, and • whether concerns about price co-ordination and the structure of road fuels markets identified by other national competition authorities are

relevant in the UK. The OFT plans to publish its findings in January 2013.

I ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Lack of Workplace Responsibility Threatens Energy Saving For Small Businesses Small and medium-sized businesses (SMEs) are missing out on crucial savings because owners and their staff are not taking responsibility for energy efficiency in the workplace, according to new research from energy company E.ON. In the study on workplace habits, just one in ten workers acknowledged energy efficiency as their role, with the results revealing that employees frequent "pass the buck" when it comes to taking responsibility for saving energy at work: many junior executives believed it was the role of the office manager, while many office managers said it was the responsibility of the owner or more senior managers. Owners or chief executives accepted most responsibility overall, with 22 per cent accepting it was their role to ensure the office was energy

ENVIRONMENT & ENERGY MANAGEMENT, SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2012

efficient. But many bosses are failing to set an example, with a quarter (24 per cent) admitting they rarely think about the issue, and a further one in 10 (11 per cent) taking no measures at all to be more energy efficient. Only 28 per cent think regularly about energy efficiency at work, compared to 55 per cent when at home. The E.ON study suggests a lack of communication is playing a decisive role in this, with nearly two thirds (57 per cent) of employees receiving no clear company guidelines about energy efficiency. As part of its campaign to raise greater awareness E.ON offers a range of advice tailored to small businesses, which can help SME staff to manage responsibilities and achieve a greater standard of efficiency across the workplace.


Contact: Rachel or Ronan Premier Business Media 1, JKL Street, Edenderry, Co.Offaly. Tel: + 353 46 9773434 Email: ronan@premierbusinessmedia.com

IRELAND - WATER UTILITIES Water Abstraction and Treatment MAY 2012 Compiled, Designed and Produced by La Tene Maps, Station House, Shankill, Co. Dublin, Ireland.

Distributed to over 5,000 senior management in water treatment facilities throughout Ireland, this unique business tool provides service & technology suppliers to the water industry with the opportunity to reach their potential clients within both the public and private sectors.

La Tene Maps. T: +353-1-2847914 E: enquiries@latene.com W: www.latene.com

Ballyliffen Carndonagh LOUGH SWILLY

Carndonagh

40

Downings

Greencastle Bushmills

Portrush

Ballycastle

North Coast Craigtownmore

Portstewart

Moville No. 1

Carrigart

Dunfanaghy/Portnablagh

Benone Coleraine

Falcarragh

Armoy

Buncrana

Gortahork

LOUGH FOYLE

Rathmullan No.1 + 2 Milford

Ballymoney

Limavady

Glenstall

Limavady

Ramelton Kilmacrennan

Culmore

04

Aghanloo 1+ 2

Donneybrewer

Cushendall

RED BAY

ANTRIM

Ballykelly

LONDONDERRY

Dunglow

38

DONEGAL

Newtowncunningham Manorcunningham Letterkenny

39

Dunglow

Carnlough

Drumahoe Kilrea

02

Dungiven

Claudy Fintown

The 2013 Water Abstraction & Treatment map is a comprehensive display of:

LONDONDERRY

Raphoe

Larne Tullaghgarley

Maghera

Lifford

Strabane

Ballybofey/Stranorlar Castlefinn Killygordon

Glenties

Portglenone Ballymena

Convoy Naran

Portnoo

Draperstown

Sion Mills

North Western International River Basin District Ardara

Atlantic

NORTHERN 03

37

Killybegs

01

Donegal Town No. 1

TYRONE

Cookstown

Ballyrickard Newtownbreda Dunmurry Moneyreagh Lisburn

Dungannon

Moygashel Moy

Craigavon

Clogher

Kiltyclogher

Lurganboy

Rosses Point North Sligo

SLIGO BAY

Easky

KILLALA BAY

FERMANAGH

ARMAGH

Castlewellan

Keady

Monaghan

DUNDRUM BAY

Newcastle Newry

Newbliss

MONAGHAN Ballybay

490

Scotshouse

Riverstown

Bonniconlon

06

Castleblayney

Rockorry

Ballyconnell

Ballyfarnan

Belturbet

Ballymote

Cootehill

Warrenpoint

Annalong

Omeath

Liscalgot

Lough Egish

Kilkeel

Kilkeel

Castlebaldwin

34

Laharduan Doogort

Castlehill Dooagh

Inniskeen

LEITRIM

Louth

ROSCOMMON

Castlebellingham

Kilmainhamwood

Virginia

MAYO

Strokestown

Tulsk

Castlerea

Ballyhaunis

Newtowncashel

Ballinlough

Carlanstown

Tarmonbarry

Shannon International River Basin District

Claremorris

Oldcastle Oldcastle

Finea

Longford

07

LONGFORD

Clonmellon Ballinalack

Ballinrobe

Tullycross

Cong

Maum

Ballygar Caherlistrane

Moylough Recess Cashel

Headford

Maam Cross

31

Roundstone

Oughterard

Monksland

OF

Athlone Moate

Annaghdown

Rhode

Lullymore

Kilmeague

Newbridge

Banagher

Clonaslee

Kilcormac

Portarlington

IRELAND

Kinvara Portumna Lorrha

14

Mountmellick

Kinnitty

Birr

Greystones Ballymore Eustace

Nurney Newcastle Dunlavin Milltown

Terryglass

Woodford

Ballitore

Mountrath

Shinrone

Stradbally

Stradbally

Castletown

Borrisokane

LAOIS

Ocean

Mortarstown Templemore

Kilkishen Caherea

Newmarket-on-Fergus

Creegh

Killard

27

Birdhill

Cratloe

Killadysert

Kilrush

Ballysteen

Killimer

Pallaskenry

Kilkenny

Callan

Tullohea Galbally

Cahir

Camp

Dunquin

18

Rathmore

Castletownroche

19

Clondrohid

Clynacantan

Macroom

Portmagee

Blarney Dripsey Coachford

Lee Rd. Cork Ballincollig New

Ballingeary

Sneem

Cork City

Coornagillagh

Parknasilla

21

Caherdaniel

Tacumshane

Kilmore Quay

Dunmore East Bunmahon

Deelish/Ballinacourty

Ring/Helvick/Ballinagoul

Killeagh

Youghal

Ardmore

YOUGHAL BAY

Midleton Carrigtohill Castlemartyr Passage/Monkstown Cobh

Garryvoe

Cloyne

Shanagarry

Celtic

Crosshaven CORK HARBOUR

Bandon

Sea

Dunmanway Kinsale

20

Bantry Derryginagh Castletownbere

Clonakilty

Drinking Water Purification

Courtmacsherry

> 10 00 < 100 000

Butlerstown

Ballydehob

Glandore

Skibbereen

Drinking Water Abstraction from Rivers

Rosscarbery/Owenahincha

> 100 000

Skibbereen Skull

Toormore

Drinking Water

< 10 000

Timoleague

Durrus Ahakista

LEGEND Capacity of Waste Water Treatment Plant in litres per day

Kilbrittarn

Drimoleague

BANTRY BAY

DUNMANUS BAY

Rosslare Bridgetown

Fetherd-on-Sea

Dungarvan

Carrigalin Innishannon

Glengarriff

Eyeries

Rerrin

Rosslare

Ballycotton

KENMARE RIVER

Castletownbere Allihies

Duncannon

Piercetown

Ballinroad

Rivertown

Cloughroe

Kenmare

An Baile Mr

Tahilla

17

Tramore

13

Carrig-On-Bannow

Watergrasshill

KERRY

Waterville

LCB Ballyhane

Tallow

Rathcormac

Breanlee

Cahersiveen Knight’s Town

Ballinskelligs

Lismore

Conna

CORK

Millstreet

Cappoquin

Kilworth Fermoy Ballyhooley Killavullen

Dromahane

Killarney

Island View, Knockboy

Lemybrien

Colligan

Arthurstown

Ballynakill Kilmacthomas

Banteer Mallow

22

Glenbeigh

WATERFORD

Glanworth Ballyclough Olivers Cross

South Western River Basin District Killorglin Caragh Lake

DINGLE BAY

Abbey Waterford

Doneraile

Kanturk

WEXFORD HARBOUR

Wexford

Mooncoin

rford Wate ur Harbo

Farranfore Inch

Dingle

Castlebridge

Portlaw Ballymacarbry

Ballyporeen

Kildorrery

Buttevant Newmarket

Baile an Lochaigh

Ferrycarrig

Taghmon

Ardfinnan Clogheen

Castleisland

An Fheothanach

Curracloe

Adamstown

WEXFORD Dunganstown

Carrick-on-Suir Piltown

Burncourt

Mitchelstown

Churchtown

Kilmalkedar Ballyferriter

Kilfinnane

Bronsa

Ballymurn

New Ross

Kilsheelan Clonmel

Charleville

Tralee

Windmill

TRALEE BAY

Tullaghought

Ballyclerihan

Kilmallock

Blackwater

Clonroche

KILKENNY

LIMERICK

Ardfert Ardfert South Lisloose Fenit Castlegregory

Enniscorthy

Inistioge

Fethard

Ardfert North

Kilcummin

Drummin

Mullinahone

16

Bansha

24

Graignamanagh Thomastown

Cashel Limerick Junction

Hospital

Tipperary

Abbeyfeale

11

Ferns Kiltealy

Croom

Ballingarry

Newcastle

23

Courtown/Riverchapel

Borris

Stonyford

Rathkeale Ardagh

Glenderry Ballyheigue

Gorey Bunclody

CARLOW

Gowran Bennettsbridge Killenaule

Athea

Listowel

Carnew

Paulstown Ballinkillen

Thurles

Dundrum

Ballybunion

Ballon

Muinebheag

Littleton

Adare

Glin

Tarbert

Scarnagh

Murroe Cappamore Cahercornlish

Ballylongford

Arklow

Tinahealy

Myshal

Limerick City

Askeaton

Foynes

Lakyle

Beal

12

Shillelagh Leighlinbridge

Kilkennz Holycross

Inch Milestone

Castletroy Querrin

Tullow

Ballyragget

Johnstown

South Eastern River Basin District

Twomile Borris

TIPPERARY

Tradaree Newport

Feeard

15

Urlingford

Borrisoleigh

Sixmilebridge

Shannon

Kilmihil

Avoca Aughrim

Hacketstown

Clogh-Moneenroe Castlecomer

Dolla

Ballina

Ardanairy

Palatine Carlow

Durrow Killaloe

Ballinaclash Redcross

Castledermot

Ballickmoyler

Rathdowney

Quin Broadford

Baltinglass

Ballylinan

The Swan

Rathvilly

New Nenagh

Clarecastle

Ashford Rathnew Wicklow

Rathdrum Abbeyleix

Ennis South

Kilkee

Timahoe

Borris in Ossory

Moneygall

Newtown

Tulla

Ennis North

Ballyroan

10

Laragh

WICKLOW

Stratford

Timolin Moone

Athy

Roscrea

25

Mountshannon

Scarriff

CLARE

Annamoe Glendalough

Ballinderry

Flagmount

Inagh

Roundwood

KILDARE

Portlaoise

Doolin

Enniskerry

Blessington

Kildare Town Monasterevin

Gort Lisdoonvarna

28

Bray

Naas

Loughrea

Ballyvaughan

Corofin

Shanganagh

Osberstown Rathangan

Blue Ball

Cloghan

29

Stillorgan Reservoir Coliemore

Ballyboden

Kill

Geashill

Craughwell

Ennistymon Lahinch

09

Robertstown

OFFALY

Mucklagh

Furbogh

Killimor

Atlantic

DUBLIN BAY

DUBLIN Coill Dubh

Daingean

Tullamore

Ferbane

GALWAY BAY

Malahide

Leixlip Ringsend

New Inn

Galway

GALWAY

Barna Spiddal

Toberburr

Maynooth

Edenderry Derrinturn

Clara

Ballinasloe

Portrane

Dunboyne

Johnstown Bridge

Eastern River Basin District

Killbeggan

Moycullen Athenry

Newbridge

Sword

Longwood

Rochfortbridge

Tyrellspass

GALWAY

Inveran

Castletown/Tara

Kinnegad

Moycullen

Teeranea

Ratoath

Summerhill

WESTMEATH

Oughterard

Loughshinny

Dunshaughlin

Killucan

Ballymore

Skerries

Barnageeragh (Skerries)

MEATH

Ballivor

Glassan

Mountbellew

Rosmuck Kilkieran

Carna

Trim

Mullingar

Balbriggan

08

Kilmessan

Tuam

Clifden

Ballyconneely

Stamullen Kentstown

Kildalkey

Ballynacarrigy

Ballymahon

Leacarrow

Julianstown

Duleek

Navan

Athboy Delvin

REPUBLIC

Kilkerrin

Shrule

Multyfarnham

Kenagh

Glennamaddy

30

Finny

Clonbur

Roscommon

Dunmore

Western River Basin District

Leenane

Mornington Sea Outfall Drogheda Donore Staleen

Castlepollard

Delphi

Rinvyle

Slane Tullyalle

Crossakeel

Edgeworthstown Mostrim

Sea

Termonfeckin

Wilkinstown

Kells

Cloondara

26

Ballyleague

Ballymoe

Cloonfad

Clogherhead

Collon

Newtownforbes

Srah

LOUTH

Mullagh

Ballinalee

Irish

Dunleer

Nobber

Drumlish

Granard

Louisbourgh

Greenmount Ardee

Dromod

Elphin Roosky

Ballindine

Kingscourt Drumconrath

Knock

Cleggan

Blackrock DUNDALK BAY Dromiskin

Bailieborough

Ballyjamesduff

Balla

Carrowkennedy

CAVAN

Moyne

Frenchpark

Kiltimagh

32

Ballinagh

Arvagh

Mohill Tibohine

CLEW BAY

Belcarra

Carrickmacross

Carrick on Shannon

Ballaghaderreen

Westport

Cavan

Carrigallen

Boyle

Charlestown Knock Airport Kilkelly Castlebar

CARLINGFORD LOUGH

Dundalk

Cavan

Leitrim Village South Leitrim

Swinford

Newport

Ballytoohy

Carlingford

Ballinafad

Gurteen

Strade

Mallaranny

Ballyhaise Killeshandra

Foxford

Pontoon

Ballinamore

Drumshanbo

Tubbercurry

Srahmore

Bolinglanna

Ardglass

Rathfriland

Smithboro Clones

Swanlinbar

Collooney

35

SLIGO

Ballina

Crossmolina

Shranamanragh Br.

Achill Island Central

Downpatrick

Clough

Ballisadare

Bangor Erris

33

Downpatrick

DOWN

Markethill

Knockaconny

Lisnaskea Dromahair

Lough Gill (Caims Hill)

Enniscrone

Drumaness

Banbridge

Glaslough Scotstown Ballinode

Portavogie

Killyleagh Portaferry

Tandragee

Emyvale

36

Strandhill

Killala

Ballynahinch

North Eastern River Basin District

Gilford

Armagh

Silverhill Enniskillen

Blacklion

Carry Bridge

Barnatra

Geesala

Manorhamilton

Sligo

Aughris

Glenamoy

Dromore

Richill

Ballygowan Saintfield

05

Waringstown

Portadown

Fivemiletown

Ballyconnell

Portacloy

Fallmore

Seagoe

Neagh Bann International River Basin District

Killadeas

Augher

These are shown for the whole island against a backdrop of the River Basin Districts (RBD's), Hydrometic areas and the Irish River Systems.

Donaghadee

Northdownards

New Holland Maghaberry Bullays Hill Moira Ballynacor Hillsborough Lurgan

Buncrana

Fintona

Irvinestown

Kinlough

Kilcummin

Belfast

Coalisland

IRELAND

Bellee

Derrygonnelly

Belmullet

Crumlin

Ballintra

Ballyshannon No. 1-3

Ballycastle

Bangor

Kinnegar Ardboe

Bundoran

Mullaghmore

Belderrig

BELFAST LOUGH

Whitehouse

Omagh DONEGAL BAY

Aghadoon

Carrickfergus

Antrim

Moneymore

Dunkineeley

Kilcar

Ballyclare

Randalstown Milltown

Newtownstewart

Castlederg

Ocean – Water Treatment Facilities – Water Abstraction Facilities – Waste Water Treatment Facilities

Whitehead

Killyneese

Magherafelt

Glencolumbkille

Castletownshend

Drinking Water Abstraction from Lakes

Goleen

IRELAND - WATER UTILITIES

Baltimore

Water Abstraction and Treatment

Crookhaven ROARINGWATER

BAY

Lissamona

1st pdf Edition - May 2012 Researched, Designed and Produced by La Tene Maps La Tene Maps: Station House, Shankill, Co. Dublin Ireland. Tel: +353-1-2847914, Fax: +353-1-2826311 Email: enquiries@latene.com Website: www..latene.com Copyright © 2012 La Tene Maps

Type of Water Treatment

There are limited advertising/sponsorship opportunities around the 2013 Water Abstraction & Treatment map. As a supplier to this sector I hope you agree this is an excellent opportunity to reach potential clients throughout Ireland.

1. Whilst every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this map, La Tene Maps, are not liable for any errors or omissions whatsoever. 2. All data used in this map is publically available.

County Borders

Secondary Treatment

River Basin Districts

Primary Treatment

3. Drinking water abstraction points and treatment plants are not shown for Northern Ireland 4. Group Water Schemes and Water distribution schemes are not shown . 5. Any errors or omissions notified to us will be corrected in the next edition. Corrections/changes should be e-mailed to: enquiries@latene.com .

International Borders

Tertiary Treatment

Notes:

Hydrometric Areas 12 Mile Zone

Insufficient Treatment Urban Areas Towns

Copyright © 2012 La Tene Maps

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