Page 1

Prairie Public

cue

Prairie Public

Fall 2019

Dakota Datebook

cue

Fall 2019

Teachers across the region are benefiting from Prairie Public’s education activities. You can, too. Visit prairiepublic.org/education to find a wealth of tools, including professional development opportunities, peer webinars, and links to lesson plans that can integrate your classroom with the digital world.

–a new series focus, and a book!

Explore the

history of a uniquely American art form and learn how country music evolved over the course of the twentieth century with this tuneful new documentary from Ken Burns. The series features never-before-seen footage and photographs, plus interviews with more than 80 country music artists. Tune in September 15-18 and September 22-25, 7-9 pm Q&A with Country Music filmmakers Ken Burns, Dayton Duncan, and Julie Dunfey Q: Why was it important for you to tell the story of country music? We think it fits into the tapestry of American history we’ve been weaving in our films for decades. Its story is filled with a lot of fascinating people, many of whom rose from the most abject poverty but dreamed big dreams, and through their determination— and especially their talent— created great art.

Q: What was the most

surprising thing that you discovered during production? Probably the biggest revelation was how diverse country music’s roots are and how many branches of music it sprouted. It is not—and it never was—one style of music. It’s a complicated chorus of American voices joining together to tell a complicated American story, one song at a time.

Q: The series features interviews with musicians who aren’t traditionally in the realm of country music such as Paul Simon, Elvis Costello, and Jack White. Why? Comments from artists from other genres adds a depth and perspective to understanding country music, as well as its tangled relationship to those other types of American music. Wynton Marsalis, who was our main Q: What story do you on-camera guide, says, share in the series that you ‘There’s a truth in the music.’ would like to viewers to look ‘And it’s too bad that we as a out for? culture have not been able to One story that always amazes address that truth. The art tells people is in episode five, when more of a tale of us coming together.’ Loretta Lynn begins coming out with self-written songs. The same year, the National Organization for Women was founded, and the year the phrase ‘women’s liberation’ was first used, Loretta released her first number-one single: ‘Don’t Come A Drinkin’ With Lovin’ on Your Mind.’ It was a brash statement. And when Loretta wrote ‘The Pill,’ her label held back releasing it for two years; when it was finally released, some stations refused to play it.

Find Prairie Public’s television schedules at prairiepublic.org!

Cue-2019-03-Fall-2.indd 1

T

he effort for women’s suffrage roiled North Dakota for years, along with the rest of the country. It’s been one hundred years since the federal change finally went through, so it’s a good time to look back at the characters, their arguments and actions, the defeats, close calls, and victories. Listen for the special Dakota Datebook series “100 Years of Women Voting” in Dakota Datebook’s regular timeslots, and visit prairiepublic.org to read the entire collection.

P

rairie Public’s beloved radio series, Dakota Datebook, has been compiled into a book with a nugget of North Dakota history for each day of the year! Students in a UND practicum prepared the book for publication—and selected their favorite essays from all the Dakota Datebooks written over the years. You can get your own copy as a ‘thank-you’ gift during our upcoming radio membership drive September 6-13, or purchase one (or more!) online at shopprairiepublic.org.

Gems

you don’t want to miss T

ake five minutes out of your busy day for a short poetic pause with The Slowdown, hosted by U.S. Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith, Monday-Thursday at 9:01 pm. “Poems call our attention to moments when the ordinary nature of experience changes,” she says. “When the things we think we know flare into brighter colors, starker contrasts, strange and intoxicating possibilities.”

Prairie Public Music News is a conversational recap of stories from the world of roots, rock, and alternative music—a two-minute journey of news about some of the genres of music you hear on Prairie Public every day. Download the podcast, and Prairie Public’s Erik Deatherage will give you the scoop on new releases so you can get wise to artists you’ll be talking about tomorrow.

Prairie Public

cue

We’re seeking junior journalists Prairie Public is always

welcoming college students to work as unpaid radio interns in the Fargo and Bismarck studios. We’ll design meaningful experiences that match our needs with the intern’s interests and skills—writing, audio production, web work, and real-world journalism. Interested? Contact Director of Radio Bill Thomas at bthomas@ prairiepublic.org.

Have you met our friend, Karli? She’s a new Muppet in foster care. Her name comes from the word for “strength” in German, and her foster parents are Dalia (“strong branch”) and Clem (“mild, merciful”). Explore this topic, and many more family topics, at sesamestreetincommunities.org.

Buck is celebrating 20 years on Prairie Public! Artist and educator Buck Paulson will be in Prairie Public’s downtown Fargo studio on Friday, September 20, 6-8 pm, to demonstrate some of his painting techniques—and to celebrate the 20th year of Painting with Paulson. Stop by for refreshments and painting inspiration. This event is free, and no registration is required.

Come out to see us at one of these upcoming events • Greenway Takeover Festival in Grand Forks on September 8 • The premiere of the Downton Abbey movie at the Fargo Theatre on September 20 • EdCamp for teachers at Carl Ben Middle School in Fargo on October 17 • A screening of Basketball, Water and the Lost City of Elbowoods at the NEA Big Read in Dickinson on November 19 Visit the community section of prairiepublic.org for information about Prairie Public events, and to add your event to our statewide events calendar.

Keep in touch Sign up for our radio and television e-newsletters to get weekly updates about programming and events! Look for the “Email Newsletters” link at prairiepublic.org.

Fall 2019

8/14/19 2:45 PM


nk . nd es

Prairie Public

cue

Fall 2019

Prairie Public

cue

You’ve heard the radio show ... sometimes the stories are hilarious, and sometimes they’re heartbreaking. But they’re always entertaining. Now, The Moth is coming to Fargo for a one-night-only event at the Fargo Theatre on November 14.

Dayna and her friend Ellen meet Mary Berry.

Why do you support Prairie Public? “As an ardent fan of The Great British Baking Show, I was thrilled to take the recent opportunity to have afternoon tea with Mary Berry on a restored 1930s Belmond train from London to Kent and back again. I am also an ardent supporter of Prairie Public and delight in being able to enjoy all that it has to offer. The network broadcasts television programming that brings the world to my doorstep, celebrates the arts and encourages me to (try to) bake great cakes! We are lucky to have Prairie Public in our own back yard, and I thank you for supporting their incredible programming, too.” Dayna Del Val

The Prairie Public board of directors

will meet Friday, October 25, in Fargo. All meetings are open to Prairie Public members and to the public. For more information, contact Tina Young at 800-359-6900.

Travel with us to the Wonders of England

Prairie Public is hosting a trip to experience the Wonders of England August 25-September 3, 2020. Join us for excursions to filming locations including Les Misérables, Mr. Selfridge, The Crown, Poldark, Call the Midwife, and Sherlock. We’ll tour Highclere Castle, made famous in Downton Abbey, and we’ll visit the picturesque fishing village where Doc Martin is filmed. Stonehenge, Agatha Christie’s summer vacation home, and Windsor Castle, are also on the itinerary. The tour includes airfare, deluxe motorcoach transportation, nine nights accommodations, 14 meals, activity admissions, and a professional tour manager. Proceeds partially benefit Prairie Public. For complete information about this exciting trip, contact Troy Davis at 701-239-7510 or RSVP for one of these informational meetings: • Fargo studio, September 24, 1 pm, 5:30 pm • Bismarck studio, September 25, 1 pm

Fall 2019

GET YOUR TICKETS FROM TICKETS300.COM

Are Your Ducks in a Row? Whatever your stage in life, it is a good idea to think about and plan for how your affairs will be handled. A few simple steps today can give you peace of mind tomorrow by ensuring that you and your loved ones are well protected.

cue FA L L

A quarterly newsletter for members and friends of Prairie Public

2 0 1 9

Women Behind the Plow Thursday, September 26, at 7 pm

Hear the compelling stories of the determined women who settled the North Dakota prairie and of the new generations who continue to work on the farm.

Inspired by the book of the same name written and edited by Sue Balcom, the television documentary is the 10th in a series of award-winning documentaries produced by Prairie Public and the NDSU Libraries’ Germans from Russia Heritage Collection.

Contact Troy Davis, Director of Development, at 800-359-6900, ext 510, or email him at tdavis@ prairiepublic.org for a FREE Personal Estate Planning Guide.

NATIONAL ESTATE PLANNING AWARENESS WEEK OCTOBER 21-27, 2019

Please remember Prairie Public Broadcasting in your will, trust, or general estate plans. We value your membership in Prairie Public and strive to provide you with excellent service. Switchboard hours at Prairie Public are Monday— Friday, 8 am to 5 pm CT. After hours, you may leave a message and your call will be returned. Call us at 701-241-6900 or 800-359-6900. Fax us at 701-239-7650 or use a TTY in North Dakota at 800-366-6888. E-mail your questions and comments to info@prairiepublic.org and find Prairie Public on the web at prairiepublic.org

Prairie Public Broadcasting is a member of the Public Broadcasting Service, a private, nonprofit corporation. PBS provides quality television programming and related services to Prairie Public Broadcasting. Prairie Public is also a member of NPR, a network owned by its member stations.

Many Prairie Public productions are funded in part by the following: Minnesota Arts & Cultural Heritage Fund with money from the voters on November 4, 2008, North Dakota Council on the Arts, North Dakota Humanities Council, and by the members of Prairie Public. Thank you!

Cue-2019-03-Fall-2.indd 2

8/14/19 2:45 PM

Profile for Prairie Public Broadcasting

Prairie Public Cue Fall 2019  

A newsletter for members of Prairie Public

Prairie Public Cue Fall 2019  

A newsletter for members of Prairie Public

Advertisement