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Vintage queen Pearl Lowe’s rose footstool

A stylish summer beret

new projects

Kid crafts

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M A G A Z I N E

G uide

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S E L L I N G

 Pop-up books  Dreamcatchers  Belle & Boo’s Explorer Satchel

 Crochet bee Pincushion rings   Wet-felted paperweights

Animal magic SEW YOUR OWN WOODLAND FINGER PUPPETS

TO STITCH & CROCHET

Quick makes

Retro iPod & iPad cases with Lauren Guthrie

M A G A Z I N E

39

sew

crochet

upcycle

How to stand out at craft fairs

Learn The art of visible mending

Toot, toot! ISSUE 05 / UK £4.99 Printed in the UK

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WELCOME

TO Crafty

S

o here we are at Crafty issue 5 and boy, is it jam-packed with lots of interesting makes for you to try your hand at. I’ve been busy these past four weeks embroidering lots of lampshades (I’m still learning and have got a bit tired of stitching on handkerchiefs and pillow cases), but I’m ditching the lamps in favour of some of the projects we’ve got in store for you this month. First up on my to-make list is the Belle & Boo Explorer Satchel, which I think would suit my nephew perfectly (once he’s old enough to walk and, you know, explore) and then I’ll be giving the crochet pebbles a go. I’ve just about got to grips with knitting but am still a tad wary of crochet patterns, and these little projects look perfect for a novice to try. Then there’s the dreamcatchers, Lauren Guthrie’s tablet and smartphone covers, and who could fail to be inspired by Pearl Lowe’s upcycled footstool? I hope I can get it all done before Crafty issue 6 is out! But it is summer after all so don’t forget to pack up your projects in your old craft bag and head outside for a spot of fresh air. I recommend a day trip to the delightful coastal town of Whitstable – we’ve just been (see page 72) and can safely say the oysters are particularly fine at this time of year.

editor’s fave to start “I cannot wait tty little na is th making page 30 to beret. Turn to ing it” join me in knitt

I love that mending doesn’t have to be a chore any more. These ideas for creative darning will make even the most holey of clothes beautiful again. page 40 I’ve never tried wet felting before but I reckon these gorgeous pebble covers are what’s going to convince me to give it a go. page 57 Sarah Adie

We’ve set up an Angel Policy for all projects.

Editor

Unless otherwise stated, please assume that all

sarah.adie@practicalpublishing.co.uk

designs are for personal use only, are protected by copyright and are not for commercial use.

Crafty Magazine

@crafty_magazine

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@crafty_magazine EDITOR’S LET TER

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What’s

inside

Projects 18 Up tails all!

COVER

Sew your own Ratty, Mole, Badger, Toad and Weasel finger puppets. Marvellous!

MAKE

28 You busy bee It’s summer and that can only mean one thing: bees! Here’s how to crochet a beautiful bumbly clothes pin.

30 How smart Reach for your crochet hooks – Purl Alpaca’s Cagney Beret is one of our must-makes this month.

34 Sweet dreams Rest easy after sewing our dreamcatchers.

40 VISIBLE MENDING Find out how to mend your holey clothes in a rather beautiful way.

44 The Obelisk clock Here’s how to update a humdrum plastic clock using Post-its!

e Willows Check out our Wind in th t your cover stars! You’d better ge sewing kit out!

46 When dinosaurs ruled the earth 18

Find out how to make a pop-up book.

50 Flying high

CONTENTS

How to upcycle a birdcage into a lamp.

53 The heat is on Try out some embroidery techniques with our summer-inspired pattern.

57 Pretty in pebbles Here’s how to make pebbles even more beautiful than they already are.

30

64 Go-go, gadget! Look after your tablets and mobiles by sewing our retro-inspired gadget cases.

69 Penny for them Favourite cashmere jumper shrunk in the wash? Use it to make a penny mat!

77

77 Sweet gypsy rose Pearl Lowe’s upcycled gypsy rose footstool is another absolute must-make this issue.

82 pIns & needles Keep your pins close at hand with our fun pincushion rings.

84 An explorer’s satchel 40

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If your kids love the great outdoors, then this Belle & Boo project is a must for you.

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These are the best pot holders we’ve ever seen!

PEOPLE 6 Meet your makers Wave hello to everyone whose helped make Crafty this month.

12 All aboard the Craftevan Julie Nixon runs a travelling craft shop out of a restored caravan. Watch out for her at craft fairs this summer!

16 Good reads All our favourite books for the month, plus a chat with Amy Azzarito – author of Past & Present.

22 The Crochet Bloke

92

Craft author Theo Sundh shows us around his divinely retro home – and yes, there’s lots of crochet!

40 oh, darn it!

34

All you need to know about the trend for giving your mending a creative twist.

72 Wonderful Whitstable Oysters truly are an aphrodisiac – just one taste of Whitstable’s famous shellfish and we’re head over heels for the town.

89 At the craft fair Designer-maker Charlotte Farmer shares her top tips for craft fair success.

57

92 the Barbé shop We talk shop with textile designer, blogger and photographer Karen Barbé.

98 X-rated 69

REGULARS 7N  ews Everything that’s going on in the craft world and beyond.

How Mr X Stitch is changing the world, one cross stitch at a time.

How cute are these little wooden bobbins? Love!

13 Competition We’ve got two pairs of tickets to Goodwood Revival up for grabs, worth £150.

14 Save the date Your cut-out-and-keep calendar for September.

97 Next issue Find out what’s coming next in Crafty!

13 7

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WHAT’S INSIDE

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MEETmYOUR akers

Cover star 18

50

82

Crafty Magazine Practical Publishing International Ltd Suite G2 St Christopher House, 217 Wellington Road South, Stockport SK2 6NG info@practicalpublishing.co.uk Tel: 0844 561 1202 Fax: 0161 474 6961 www.practicalpublishing.co.uk EDITORIAL Editor Sarah Adie sarah.adie@practicalpublishing.co.uk Tel: 0161 474 6994 Editorial Assistant Hugh Metcalf hugh.metcalf@practicalpublishing.co.uk Creative Art Editor Mat Biggs mat.biggs@practicalpublishing.co.uk Photographers Rachel Burgess, Andy Sawyer, Dan Walmsley Illustrator Daren Newman Sub-Editors Becky Higgins, Justine Moran, Ashleigh Morgan CONTRIBUTORS Fausta Babenskaite, Bay Rock Jewellery, Belle & Boo, Jamie Chalmers, Sarah Corbett, Purl Alpaca, Elizabeth Healey, Kim Searle, Catherine Greenslade, Lou Tonkin, Tom van Deijnen

Laura Clempson

Tom Robinson

Jo Watkins

Laura would happily spend most of the day drinking fancy tea, drawing and eating cake. But between juggling two little children, an author husband and a start-up business, she’s lucky if she gets a cup of tea that’s hot! Check out her website

Jo runs Darn It & Stitch, Oxford's favourite haberdashery, and Pinworks School of Stitching while attempting to complete all the half-finished projects stashed around her house. Her past projects have involved knitting the contents of a TV together.

cupcakesforclara.typepad.com

Tom’s a solid gold electrician who uses his sparky skills in all sorts of interesting and madcap ways. It’s not all fixing little old ladies’ lights, you know. When he can’t be found working on submarines, he’s most likely helping his girlfriend with home renovations. That or playing World of Warcraft.

53

34

62

darnitandstitch.com

PUBLISHING & ADVERTISING Publishing Assistant Janice Whitton Advertising Sales Executive Ruth Walker ruth.walker@practicalpublishing.co.uk Tel: 0844 826 0615 Advertising Sales Executive Noune Sarkissian noune.sarkissian@practicalpublishing.co.uk Tel: 0844 826 0612 Advertising Co-ordinator Rachael Edmunds HR Manager Karen Battrick Marketing Manager Carol Jones Group Sales Manager Kevin Edwards Publisher Gavin Burrell Publishing Director Dave Cusick Managing Director Danny Bowler Group Managing Director Robin Wilkinson DISTRIBUTION Newstrade COMAG Magazine Distribution Craft Trade Distribution Practical Publishing International Ltd Craft Store Distribution Executive Lauren Schofield lauren.schofield@practicalpublishing.co.uk Tel: 0844 826 0616 Crafty Magazine is published by Practical Publishing International Ltd. All material © Practical Publishing International Ltd. The style and mark of Crafty Magazine is used under licence from Practical Publishing International Holdings Ltd. No material in whole or in part may be reproduced without the express consent of Practical Publishing International Ltd.

Monique Jivram

Bridgeen Gillespie

Lauren Guthrie

Monique creates vibrant handdrawn illustrations with a nostalgic feel, using urban embroidery or vintage fabrics. Inspiration comes from antiques markets and her Latin American heritage. Her use of commonplace objects prompts a sense of familiarity.

Bridgeen is an illustrator with a passion for creating textile designs and embroidery art. She references pop culture in her work, and grew up on comics, David Bowie and cult 90s TV shows. She also has the ability to change her hairstyle at will.

Lauren has loved keeping busy with creative projects since she was a child when she would make little handbags from the scraps of her mum's sewing projects. She now owns a haberdashery, fabric and yarn store in Birmingham.

moniquejivram.com

cherryandcinnamon.com

guthrie-ghani.co.uk

CONTRIBUTORS

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The publisher welcomes contributions from readers. All such contributions and submissions to the magazine are sent to and accepted by the publisher on the basis of a non-exclusive transferable worldwide licence unless otherwise agreed in writing prior to first publication. Such submissions are also subject to being used, reproduced, modified, published, edited, translated, distributed and displayed in any media or medium, or any form, format or forum now known or hereafter developed, for any purpose, in perpetuity. The views expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the publisher. Every care is taken to ensure that the contents of the magazine are accurate, but the publisher accepts no responsibility for errors. While reasonable care has been taken when accepting advertisements, the publisher cannot accept responsibility for any resulting unsatisfactory transactions, but will investigate any written complaints made.

Crafty Magazine (ISSN 2051-6568) Published by Practical Publishing International Ltd

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Wrag Wrap 

Wrapping paper costs the earth (and by that we mean both trees and our wallets), so we love the idea of Wrag Wrap. Giving your present in one of these cloth wrappers means your friends won’t just crumple it up and throw it away. If you’re lucky, they might even give you it back! Check out all the designs at wragwrap.com

What’s

new Keep up to date with all the latest news and trends

ST ITC HIN ’ SH AD E but until we’re ade makes us happy, This cross stitch lampsh te to find out ish to traverse the websi fluent enough in Swed inspiration. DIY ve to settle for major where to buy it, we’ll ha lam pg us taf.se

1

ISSUE 3 IN FABRIC 1 Make a matching cushion for your birdcage lamp (page 50) in this bird-enhanced chevron cotton by Lottie Frank. £12 per yard, spoonflower.com 2 We’ve got coastal longings after a trip to Whitstable, no better summed up than in this printed linen from Mini Moderns. £54 per metre, minimoderns.com

2

3 You’ll impress in your handmade vintage-inspired dress at the Goodwood Revival if you head to The Polished Button for your fabric fix. £4 per metre, thepolishedbutton.co.uk

3 007

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WHAT’S NEW

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What’s

new

BARTER TO GET SMARTER

editor’s fave

idea! I’m “What a great ng about ki already thin t to pick an w I s what skill t should I up. Now, wha ” swap them for?

What’s

new

We’ve got an unending thirst for picking up new skills but pockets that, quite frankly, end too soon to be able to enrol in every class we like the look of. This isn’t the only reason we’re in love with the idea of the Trade School though. It works like this: someone with a skill to teach proposes a class and asks for barter items in return from students. You might want to teach a class making butter and ask for anything from jars and bread to music tips or help finding an apartment. It’s a co-operative system and sure to bring people together to learn and make collaboratively. There are already Trade Schools in London, Edinburgh and Glasgow, but if there isn’t one in your area, take a look on the website and help to set one up. tradeschool.coop

rewind, recycle Sonic fabric... that’s a thing now. This “sonorously imbued” material is woven from cassette tape by artist Alyce Santoro and, even when made into something like this tie, can still be played with the help of a specially modified Walkman. It does sound “like scratching five records backwards at once” though... alycesantoro.com

Kits for Kids 

Made for beginners with sticky pattern pieces (no pinning needed!) and all the fabric and trimmings you’ll need in one bundle, Little Dress Kits are perfect for new mums who want to give the gift of something handmade to their newborn. We’ve got two sets of dungarees to give away – sweet hearts and cars. For your chance to win visit ppjump.com/littledresskits

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folding seat We love the design of this origami footstool available from cool design shop Pretty Dandy. At £180, it’s a little steep so we’ll have to save up for it, but at least it’s inspired us to get folding our fabric to reimagine this amazing geometric swallow. prettydandy.co.uk

Lamp Love  Billing itself as the “first physical social network”, the Goodnight Lamp is a lovely bit of British design. A family of internet-connected lamps, you can flick a switch on the big papa lamp to turn the smaller ones on and off, wherever they may be in the world. We think it’s perfect for when you’re away from the kids and you can pre-order it now at goodnightlamp.com

TIC TAIL run a for the handmaker to y wa ly on the ’t Etsy isn ‘the ed bb import Tictail. Du business: meet Swedish ing om d-c -an up ’, Tictail is an Tumblr of ecommerce g alin pe ap an s ha , which free platform for selling easily. d lise na rso pe be n ca and stripped-back design like Jess es are using it already, ess sin bu ft cra of s Lot her shop for lls do tiful wooden Hunt who creates beau u at yo for t righ it’s if see Hinter folk, but you can om l.c tic tai

THE WORKING ARTISAN’S CLUB Surf and skate magazine Huck has teamed up with O’Neill for an event celebrating those who have taken things into their own hands and make a living from what they, well, make. But these aren’t your everyday crafts, rather hand-making skateboards and bikes, screen-printing, tattooing and more. We particularly loved reading about Elsie Pinniger, who hand-makes her surf wetsuits on a vintage Singer sewing machine down in Cornwall... pretty cool, no? The series of profiles culminates in September with a week-long exhibition in London. Keep an eye on the magazine to meet some more inspirational makers on show and for further details of time and place. huckmagazine.com

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WHAT’S NEW

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What’s

new type tasting Forget flying to Kenya to see the big five, all the action is in a ‘type safari’. It’s a workshop exploring fonts and typography from the people at Type Tasting and consists of a tour of London absorbing the history of its signage and creating a ransom note-esque word using your very own camera. typetastingnews.com

Wooden Wonders 

When we came across Sophie Tilley’s doll-inspired creations on her website, we fell in love and were especially taken by these ribbon bobbins you can hand-paint yourself! Sophie’s kindly agreed to give us four sets of bobbins for Crafty readers to win. Enter online at ppjump.com/sophietilley

Bird Bul b Make your bare lightbulb beautifu l with this metal bird from Swedish design house Hommin Stud io. Now that ’s what we call a lampshade! And don’t forg et to check out our birdcage lampshade over on page 50. hom min .big car tel. com

OLD SCHOOL London’s Battersea has a new home for craft and it’s called The Old School Club. Long and short courses and workshops in furniture DIY, printing your own paper and fabric, dressmaking and embroidery are all scheduled for the summer term. That’s a timetable we can get on board with! There’s also a co-crafting workspace for the local community where you can meet, make and share ideas, and there’s a small haberdashery as well. If you need to stock up on craft supplies in an emergency, this is the place to be. Check out the curriculum: theoldschoolclub.co.uk

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Sarah Corbett

FIGHT THE GOOD FIGHT Sarah Corbett of the Craftivist Collective will be here each month to prove that craft and politics go hand in hand ILLUSTRATION DAREN NEWMAN

I

love the beauty and creativity that comes from fashion, as do most craftivists in the Craftivist Collective. We love the fact that we can express ourselves through clothes and feel confident in what we wear. But as a fashion-lover I feel deeply saddened, shocked and angry by the news that this summer over 1,000 people were killed in the collapse of a building in Bangladesh, which housed factories making clothes for Benetton, Primark, Matalan, Mango and other major brands.

Beautiful bows We love these cute knitted bows by accessories designer Catherine Tough. Wear them on your jacket, in your hair or even as a little bow tie! They’re also great inspiration for a summery knitting fix too, so reach for your needles and yarn and make sure you send us photos of your dickie bow creations. Email them to craftymag@practical publishing.co.uk and we’ll feature our faves on the blog! £14, catherinetough.co.uk.

Sadly, the clothes we buy often come at a terrible human cost. Millions of workers around the world suffer poverty and exploitation, producing cheap fashion for our shops as they push for a profit-driven fast fashion industry. There is an ugly, unethical side of the fashion industry we shouldn’t ignore, especially because as consumers we have a lot of power over the shops that produce the clothes that we wear. We have the power to put pressure on those brands to change their practices and stop putting profit before wages and welfare. The Bangladesh factory disaster must surely stir us to say that we won’t stand for sweatshops existing in the 21st century.

It’s wrong to think that we don’t have any power to change this ugly side of fashion. Please join us in celebrating our love of fashion and fighting for an industry without an ugly side, with no sweatshops. Let’s fight together for that reality one stitch at a time!

WANT MORE ? Find out more about the War on Want campaign lovefashionhate sweatshops.org

Our provocative mini protest banners can help us reflect on the issue of sweatshops and what we can do as an individual. By hanging your banner in public, you can engage others in fighting for a world without sweatshops and help support War on Want’s Love Fashion Hate Sweatshops campaign. So come and join us, craft author Perri Lewis, craft bloggers such as Tilly & the Buttons, Women’s Institute groups such

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as Manchester WI, Borough Belles and Shoreditch Sisters, craft and craftivist groups to support War on Want this summer in the lead up to London Fashion Week. We’re in the middle of creating a patchwork of photographs where people have put up their banners somewhere in the world, which will be displayed at the Knitting and Stitching Show’s Upcycling Academy in London in autumn this year.

WHAT’S NEW

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What’s

new

Julie Nixon

ALL ABOARD THE CRAFTEVAN PHOTOGRAPHY & WORDS KIM SEARLE

J

ulie Moto Guzzi Nixon has two main passions in her life: classic cars and crafts. She can often be found under the bonnet of a vintage car or at a sewing machine turning old curtains into something fantastic. As the daughter of a seamstress, she’s been sewing for as far back as she can remember, and her father named her after an Italian motorcycle manufacturer, instilling in her an early love of all things mechanical. After visiting many craft fairs and classic car shows Julie thought of a fantastic way to combine her passions: the Craftevan. She recently got her hands on an old caravan that had fallen into disrepair, and has been painstakingly stripping it out, fixing it up, and making it into the most gorgeous mobile craft shop just in time for summer. Julie has been working non-stop, making things to sell with themes of travel, automobiles and wanderlust. From tote bags to notebooks, hot-air balloon

WHAT’S NEW

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necklaces to cycle-themed buttons, the Craftevan is set to be a treasure trove of fantastic handmade goodness. As well as her own work, she’ll also be stocking the work of other artists and crafters making things related to travel. Crafty entrepreneurs often can’t afford static shops, so sometimes have to resort to something more creative. Julie has taken this idea and run with it, making a beautiful craft shop that can come and find you! “I love pretending I’m in a nostalgic time when driving round in a classic car. I like a good drive out and pretending I’m in the 60s trundling in a Mini. I’m inspired by British nostalgia and have been for most of my life,” she says. “The Craftevan is a combination of my biggest passions – classic cars, crafts and travelling. I decided on a caravan for practical reasons: I can’t afford a shop and they’re exciting, like a little house on wheels. So why not a little shop?”

Julie is no stranger to DIY, and you may have seen her working on the Channel 4 TV show, George Clarke’s Amazing Spaces, building a log cabin with her partner. The show encouraged her to be creative with small spaces, and a caravan full of rust and mould was no obstacle to her creative vision. With the help of friends and family, the Craftevan was finished and ready to go in just four months, and Julie will now be taking it to car shows, festivals and craft fairs in the UK over the summer. Keep an eye out for her wherever you go! Follow the Craftevan’s adventures on craftevan.com, on Facebook and on Tumblr at craftevan.tumblr.com

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Competition

c k i t e t s to n i W

WORTH ♥

£150

Goodwood Revival goodwood.com/revival

Oh, how Goodwood Revival stokes the fires of our love for vintage! For three days each September, the Goodwood Motor Circuit rewinds the clocks to become a capsule of 1940s, 50s and 60s automobile style in the midst of the Chichester countryside and we’ve got two pairs of tickets worth over £75 each to give away to two of you lucky Craftyreading vintage lovers. You’ll get to spend a dreamy day in the romantic world of yesteryear – not only admiring glorious Grand Prix cars from the golden age of racing, but revelling in vintage fashion, music and much, much more. While these are anything but ordinary cars (we could spend hours cooing over them), if you find yourself drifting off from the motorsports, you can flex your credit card and do some vintage shopping in the Revival Market, get your hair pinned up in victory curls in

13th – 15th September

the Vintage Hair Lounge or dine out in a style befitting a resident of mid-century Britain. It’s the attention to detail that’ll really astound, and with no modern day vehicles allowed inside the circuit’s perimeter, you might just find yourself forgetting that it’s 2013. After all, taking period style in your stride is encouraged (though not compulsory) at the event. We may just want to stay in the revival bubble forever! Sound like your idea of a good old-fashioned time? Then head over to ppjump.co.uk/goodwoodrevival and answer this question for your chance to win:

Q

 hat’s the name of the W vintage-inspired hat project in this issue of Crafty?

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The closing date for this competition is 16th August 2013. The prize offer is four adult admission tickets to Goodwood Revival on Friday 13th September. Prizes are non-transferable and there is no cash alternative. Goodwood reserves the right to substitute prizes of equal or greater value at any time. Prizes are awarded at Goodwood’s discretion and no prizes will be awarded as a result of improper actions by or on behalf of any entrant. Entrants must be 18 and over and may be asked to show proof of age. You must be able to attend the dates specified above. Employees of Practical Publishing and contributing companies and their families are not permitted to enter. Winner’s name is available on request. The judge’s decision is final. By entering this competition, you acknowledge that your details may be passed on to a third party.

COMPETITION

05/07/2013 17:33


save the date

September 3rd City to Countryside walk

13th-21st The Jane Austen Festival

14th-22nd London Design Festival

A six-mile guided walk of the Bath skyline. Wear sensible shoes, please!

Concerts, dancing, walks and Regency costume fashion shows at this annual Bath festival. janeausten.co.uk

Tent London is hosting its first four-day Craft Market at this year’s festival.

13th-15th The Cake & Bake Show

18th-22nd The Moscow State Circus

Tastebud tantalising fun at the Autumn Harvest this year. brightonfoodfestival.com

Brilliant baking is back in London’s Earl’s Court. Keep your eyes open for The Fabulous Baker Brothers! thecakeandbakeshow.co.uk

Cheshire’s Tatton Park hosts five days of flying, juggling, back-flipping and roller-skating performances. tattonpark.org.uk

6th-8th Newquay Fish Fest 2013

14th Bristol Doors Open Day

21st Go Go Granny Squares!

Cooking demonstrations from local chefs, lots of tasty food and crafts all make up this event.

Bristol’s historically significant buildings open their doors to the public – for free!

newquayfishfestival.co.uk

visitbristol.co.uk

Embrace granny chic at Darn It & Stitch in Oxford and learn to make your own granny squares. pinworks.co.uk

7th The Great River Race

14th-28th St Ives September Festival

21st fabric lampshade class

Serious sports, charity events and fancy dress at the London boat championship.

A Cornwall celebration of music, art, walks, talks, exhibitions, poetry... the list goes on!

Manchester’s Ministry of Craft shows you how to make your own fabric lampshade. Lovely!

greatriverrace.co.uk

stivesseptemberfestival.co.uk

ministryofcraft.co.uk

visitbath.co.uk

5th-15th Brighton & Hove Food & Drink Festival

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londondesignfestival.com

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V- J Day

8 Literacy day

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Roald Dahl day

Lace making day

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Talk like a pirate day

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Download your FREE tutorial to make this stunning Kumihimo Bracelet Now with a brand new purpose built teaching studio, the team at Tuffnell Glass run classes for beginners, intermediate and advanced glass bead making. Czech Glass Strands £2.50 each

Turquoise Butterflys £4.95 Strand

Tutti Fruity Kumihimo Kit £15.95

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What’s

new

reads GOOD

WANT MORE ? Read more of Amy’s writing about the history of decorative art at designsponge.com

Jump in the DeLorean with Amy Azzarito, managing editor of the Design*Sponge blog, to take a look at the DIY projects inspired by the greatest moments in design history from her book, Past & Present

I wanted to learn more about who made those colours instead. I discovered a degree in the history of decorative arts and it seemed like the perfect fit, but I didn’t want to just be in the academic world, I wanted to be part of the conversation on design, and that was happening online. When I graduated from school, I moved over full time to Design*Sponge.

Where did the idea for Past & Present come from? Past & Present began as a column on Design*Sponge. I had just finished my Master’s Degree in the History of Decorative Arts and Design at Parsons and wanted to share what I had learned with a larger audience. I presented my idea to Grace Bonney, Design*Sponge founder, who loved the idea but suggested that we find a way to connect it to our readers’ present-day lives with a product round-up or DIY project. In addition to honouring makers of the past, I wanted to highlight makers of the present. What interests you about the history of decorative arts? I graduated from college with a BA in Journalism and moved from Chicago to New York to enrol in Library School. I figured that I liked to research so I should just try it. When I graduated I got a position at the New York Public Library as a librarian. I knew that it wasn’t something I wanted to do forever, but it paid the bills while I figured out what I did want to do. I was interested in interior design, but after an internship I realised that I didn’t want to fight with someone over paint colours,

GOOD READS

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Which moment in design history most inspired you to make the book? When I was in school, I spent two weeks in Paris studying 18th century France. We went to Versailles and while I was certainly awestruck by the grandeur, I was most inspired by the smaller parallel rooms where royalty would try to create a private existence amid their public lives. I wrote about this moment in Past & Present – about how after the royal bedding ceremony, Marie Antoinette would sneak back to the tiny rooms hidden just behind the public spaces. She had a private library, a private dressing room and a private bedroom. If you had to live in a different era, purely on design merit, which would you choose? The problem with choosing a

different era to live in is that design wasn’t concerned with comfort until the 18th century. Even if I’d love to live in a Palladian villa, it might be a little draughty, so I think I would choose the Weiner Werkstätte – which is all about luxury with minimal lines and geometric shapes. And I love a black and white space! What’s the most interesting snippet of information you uncovered while creating Past & Present? The book is filled with little facts that I find personally interesting, like that Empress Josephine imported a chef from Naples whose sole responsibility was to make ice cream or that Louis XV had a private kitchen installed in Versailles where he learned the art of pastry making. What were the biggest challenges you faced with the book? One of the biggest was co-ordinating the 24 artists and designers who contributed projects. They are all professionals who graciously agreed to do the project, but it was tough to work out so many schedules. The other big challenge was in doing the research for the essays. Each essay is so different that it was like doing research for 24 different books.

The Review

d, learning is infectious an Amy Azzarito’s love of in ch mu d We’ve not rea boy, are we sick with it! we t bu e, for be tor y texts terms of decorative his tas exciting and un-pu all y’re the ine can’t imag y of tor his the in son les a downable as this. When e s a greenhouse coffe greenhouses become fun a le sty Art Deco table and an essay on to attention. sits ne ryo eve , ata piñ Cr af t STC £1 6.9 9,

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The Essential A-Line

Jona Giammalva It’s a nice feeling to have mastery over a certain project, and with The Essential A-Line in hand, we’re ready to tackle anything an A-line skirt can throw at us. Jona Giammalva’s book has 17 patterns for “flirty skirts” with every detail from pockets to patchwork and pleats covered. It’s always good to look past fabric choice that might not be to your liking to the actual sewing, and these A-lines look A+. The Take 10 (from the cover) and Sailor skirts are vintage classics and readymade for our wardrobes – that is when we get around to making them – and whether we love the fabric or not, we’ve got some great ideas for knocking up the other 15. Maybe not one for those who like a range of projects in their craft books, but hey, a girl can never have too many skirts! £23.99 Stash Books

Storyl and Cross Stitch Sophie Simpson Storyland Cross Stitch is a magical adventure into needlecraft. Sophie Simpson’s first book is gorgeous – to hold, to look at and to stitch from. The projects and patterns inside are beautifully detailed and executed perfectly. There are almost too many highlights to mention, but the Wise Owl Cushion is on our to-make list and our editor’s pick is a very cool cross stitch cat mask. £14.99, Collins & Brown

“No matter the season there’s a skir t in here for ever y occasion. There’re just so many to sew I don’t know w here to start!

The Vanity of Small Differences Grayson Perry The result of a project to examine class culture in England, Grayson Perry’s woven tapestries The Vanity of Small Differences is craft with something to say for itself. This book goes behind the work, looking at the people the artist met while developing ideas for his tableaus and offering access to his sketchbook. We can’t help admiring the needlecraft format he chose to express himself in. £17.99, Hayward Publishing

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editor’s fave

GOOD READS

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Make it

UP TAILS all !

Finger puppets are all the rage right now and we’re super happy that they are! Make ours and re-enact all your favourite scenes from Kenneth Grahame’s classic book, The Wind in the Willows PHOTOGRAPHY rachel burgess

Materials

wool felt in various colours cotton thread black embroidery thread fabric glue freezer paper (optional) needle scissors iron

"B

elieve me, my young friend, there is nothing – absolutely nothing – half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats.” Well, Ratty might have a point there, but given that the great English weather is, to put it politely, ever so slightly unpredictable, heading outside to mess about in boats quite often gets rained off.

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PROJECT LAURA CLEMPSON

We think that getting our craft on is just as much fun, and definitely as much worth doing as punting along the river, so we’ve got a sweet tutorial to show you how to make the characters from Kenneth Grahame’s The Wind in the Willows – as finger puppets, no less! We love how cheeky Toad looks and Mole looks exactly how we pictured him when reading the book – and look at those incredibly tiny buttons on their waistcoats! If you loved the book as a child as much as we in the Crafty office did, you’ll be reaching for your sewing kit and felt right now. And if you haven’t read the book yet, you really do need to – the characters are so brilliantly realised, you’ll feel as if you’ve known them for years.

(although you should definitely do the cutting out!) or to make for them as a present. We can just imagine all the little puppet shows being put on here, there and everywhere by adults and young’uns alike. Just try not to fight over who gets to be which character. We know you all want to be Toad. After all, he is such a clever Toad.

This is a great make for young kids, either to get them sewing for the first time

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COVER ♥

MAKE

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Make it

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how to

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Copy the patterns onto freezer paper then iron each pattern piece onto your chosen felt colour. Carefully cut out each segment. The freezer paper will help give the felt stability while you’re cutting out such tiny pieces. It isn’t essential but it definitely makes things a little easier.

2

Layer the outfit pieces and facial features onto the front body piece, using a little fabric glue to hold them all in place.

3

Sew the face on using black embroidery thread. Simple running or satin stitches work well for the eyes.

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Details such as tiny buttons can be used to embellish the clothes and can be added with stitched lines. Voilà! A whole bundle of adorable finger puppet friends!

like this... For a YouTube video showing you how to make a puppet theatre out of cardboard and wrapping paper, head to ppjump.com/theatre  If you don’t like the puppets idea, turn them into brooches instead by gluing a pin on the back

4

Carefully begin hand-stitching each of the felt layers onto the body piece. Do the smallest stitches you can manage.

5

Place the completed front piece onto the back body. Stitch together around the edges, remembering to leave the bottom open.

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WANT MORE ? Laura runs craft business Cupcakes for Clara cupcakesforclara. typepad.com

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Badger Mole

TEMPLATES Blow up to desired size

Ratty Mr Toad Weasel

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Behind the scenes

Bloke

Think only girls crochet? Guess again! We’ve had a nosey around crocheter Theo Sundh’s home to find out that this is certainly not the case PHOTOGRAPHY ANDY SAWYER

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WORDS SARAH ADIE

ou’d be forgiven if you walked past publisher Theo Sundh’s Oxford home without looking twice. From the outside, it is particularly unassuming – one of several identical little houses on an estate in Cowley that you might rethink passing after dark – but once you cross the threshold it’s an entirely different (and very eclectic!) story.

at the ripe old age of five, and this is undoubtedly where his fascination with colour and pattern stems from. From the green living room carpet to the kitchen’s bright yellow walls, Theo’s house – which he shares with friend Jo – is vibrant to say the very least, and you could literally spend hours pootling around, checking out his reclaimed treasures... and you still wouldn’t have time to discover them all!

In contrast to its grey exterior, Theo’s home may well be the most colourful one we’ve ever seen – and filled with every kind of retro charity shop knickknack going. Theo himself is known in woolly circles around Europe as The Crochet Bloke, having picked up the craft from his mother and grandmother

Retro kitsch is definitely the order of the day for The Crochet Bloke, who works as the publisher for the University of Oxford’s Students Union. As a bit of a treasure seeker, Theo is perfectly suited to life in Oxford, which is home to some seriously good charity shops (day trip out to Abingdon, Summertown or Cowley shopping centre for a spot of bargain hunting), and as a result his shelves, walls, tables and windowsills are covered with plunder of all sorts, from SwedishScandinavian pottery, monkey-shaped spice jars, maracas, Peruvian tablecloths, cushions by Swedish 10 (an artists’ collective, whose cushions apear in lots of Swedish homes)... it’s endless! “I think you become aware of a certain style,”

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1 Theo’s first book will hopefully be out in the UK soon!

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COME ON OVER If you want to see your home in Crafty, email craftymag@practical publishing.co.uk

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Behind the scenes

“I’m a real snob when it comes to wool so I wouldn’t use anything that has acrylic in it”

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Theo says. “I know what this SwedishScandinavian pottery looks like so I can easily spot it. I love pretty things and bright colours so I accumulate a lot and I get that from my mum who does exactly the same thing. Crochet is bright and kitschy, especially if you’re looking through the old crochet patterns, and crochet was so popular in the 1960s in general as well.” Chintz aside, Theo’s home – nestled in what was once the farmers’ area of Oxford in the 50s and 60s, and built to house workers from the Mini factory – is covered in one other thing that should come as no surprise given his chosen moniker: yarn! There are balls of the stuff everywhere and what isn’t in a ball is

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either on a crochet hook being turned into a doily (a special request for a friend’s wedding) or already a coaster, potholder or bathmat. But does he have a favourite yarn? Something of a seasonal crocheter, Theo plumps for cotton in the summer and alpaca in the winter, but the latter really does hold a special place in his heart thanks to its softness and inherent quality: “I’m a real snob when it comes to wool so I wouldn’t use anything that has acrylic in it.” He puts this down to being brainwashed by his mother and grandmother, however, and can see the value in acrylic wool – namely because it’s easy to find in any town or city. “My whole family are crocheters, including my

sisters,” he adds. “My parents own a house in the country as well as a town house, so when we’re there and there’s pretty much nothing to do in a little red

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cabin in the Swedish woods, we all sit around and crochet.”

WANT MORE ? Check out Theo’s blog over at

crochetbloke.blogspot.co.uk

Not content with just crocheting merrily away in the Swedish woods, Theo is busy helping spread the woolly word and brought out his first book Crochet for Men in Sweden last year. Focused on stereotypes, it offers fun patterns with different audiences in mind, from the man about town to hipsters. There are shoelaces, skulls and a boobie stress release ball, but Theo’s favourite is the pink bow tie (which he dons now and again – although he does say it’s not for everyday wear!). “I did the whole book,” he says. “I did the illustrations, the photos, the patterns – that’s what you get from having a publishing degree.” When it comes to creativity, Theo’s up there with the best. After all, this is a man who, when he can’t find coffee filters in the cupboard, simply makes his own out of some muslin he has lying around. As well as Crochet for Men, he’s also contributed to another stitch ‘n’ bitchesque book and is now writing his second, this one a cookery book of jams and chutneys. In keeping with his penchant for making, Theo is also busy growing his own ingredients for it, with chilli plants growing on his living room

2 Lovely Scandinavian pottery – found in a UK charity shop! 3 Gorgeous glass. Another charity shop find 4 One of the patterns in Theo’s book, not out yet in the UK. Only a matter of time!

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Behind the scenes

In a fire, Theo’d save...

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His teddy bear, Mr Icy, who has stuck with him through thick and thin His mother’s painting of him as a child. She’d kill him if he didn’t save it so there’d be no point running out of the house without it!

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His basket of wool, which belonged to his nan and is where he keeps his next crochet projects

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windowsill – and a whole heap more to be found outside in the garden – something else you wouldn’t expect to see after surveying the exterior of his house. “Jo’s growing lots of rhubarb, we have strawberries in pots so the snails don’t eat them, there are blackcurrants, apple trees and we have fennel over there. I’ve cooked with all of it.” But there’s no denying that crochet is Theo’s first love – and one that he takes everywhere he goes. “I do it on the train,” he admits. “I was once waiting for some friends in a bar and I took my crochet out. People aren’t used to seeing men crocheting so everybody was looking and then lots started coming up and saying how relaxing it looked. Which it is – in the 1930s and 40s they used crochet after the war to help soldiers recuperate because it’s so stress relieving.” Although to crafty outsiders a man with a crochet

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hook is something to wonder at, the discipline actually originated with fishermen and shepherds, and it wasn’t until the first and second World Wars that it was marketed towards women as something they could do for the war effort. And Theo certainly isn’t the only male out there enjoying a bit of wool – there’s One Man Crochet in Cardiff (onemancrochet.blogspot.co.uk), The Crochet Dude in America whose former marine father was also a crocheter (thecrochetdude.com), and don’t forget Crafty favourite, artist Nathan Vincent, who’s renowned for crocheting things like swords and guns (nathanvincent.com). Theo’s in excellent company indeed!

Theo’s top crochet tips Don’t think that the first thing you make will be great – and don’t get discouraged. Think of it as a process  Start with a square that you can make into a potholder so you can practise your tension by going back and forth  Small projects are good for beginners so they don’t get bored with what they’re making  Charity shops are great places to

5 Perhaps not for everyday wear – but the bowtie

go for needles and yarn

does look great on! 6 A Peruvian tablecloth brought back by Theo’s sister

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YOU BUSY bee Here’s a quick little make that really evokes a sense of summer – a lovely crocheted bumblebee pin PHOTOGRAPHY HOlly JOlliffe & Anthony Bailey

Materials

a ny crochet thread 20 in black (A) & yellow (B) e mbroidery thread in silver, using two strands worked together (C) 0 .75mm (UK5:US12) crochet hook t iny amount of toy stuffing s ewing needle  P VA glue s mall paintbrush s tick pin & stick pin protector

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ven though they pack a mighty sting, we love bumblebees here at Crafty. They make us think of lazy summer days in the park and now, thanks to Vanessa Mooncie, you can sun worship while crocheting your very own bumblebee pin. Bumblebees are in decline in the UK, but with this make you’ll always have one with you, however you choose to wear it.

how to

The striped body is worked in continuous rounds with shaping to the abdomen and head. The pin is inserted through the back of the body from the inside before stuffing. The lower and upper wings are crocheted in one piece for each side, stiffened with layers of PVA glue and attached to the finished body.

Body Using the 0.75mm hook and A, make 4 ch and join with sl st to first ch to form a ring. Rnd 1: Ch1 (does not count as st), 6 dc into ring. 6 sts Rnd 2 (inc): Join in B, (dc2inc) 6 times. 12 sts Rnd 3 (inc): With A, (dc2inc, 2 dc) 4 times. 16 sts Rnd 4: With B, 1 dc in each st. Rnd 5 (dec): With A, (dc2dec, 2 dc) 4 times. 12 sts

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PROJECT Vanessa Mooncie

Rnd 6: As round 4.

Shape head Rnd 7 (dec): With A, (dc2dec, 4 dc) twice. 10 sts Rnds 8–9: With A, 1 dc in each st. Fasten off, leaving a long length of thread. Slip the pin through the centre back of the bee from the inside, so it appears between rounds 4 and 5 on the outside of the work. It may need a bit of jiggling to get it in place. Put the protector onto the end of the pin before continuing. Holding the top of the pin so the pad sits flat against the inside, stuff the body firmly, pushing the stuffing in.

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Make it

Work a running stitch around the opening at the head, draw up to close and fasten off.

Upper wing

Pull into shape and paint the backs of the wings carefully with a little PVA glue. Leave to dry completely.

Using C and 0.75mm hook, make 6Â ch. Rnd 1: 1 dc into 2nd ch from hook, 1 dc in next 3 ch, 3 dc in end ch, 1 dc down other side of foundation ch to end. 11 sts Rnd 2: 2 ch, 1 dc, 1 htr, 1 tr, 1 htr, 3 dc, 1 htr, 1 tr, 1 htr, 1 dc, sl st to 2 ch sp. Do not fasten off.

Making up

Lower wing

Repeat for the second set of wings to mirror the first and stitch to the other side. Paint another coat of glue on the underside of the wings and again leave to dry completely.

Make 8 ch. Rnd 1: 1 dc into 2nd ch from hook, 1 dc in next 3 ch, 3 dc in next ch, miss out last 2 ch, work 1 dc in each ch down opposite side of foundation ch. 11 sts Rnd 2: 2 ch, 1 dc, 1 htr, 1 tr, 1 htr, 1 dc, sl st to next st. Fasten off, leaving a long length and weave in the shorter end.

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Position the lower wing so it sits at an angle below the larger upper wing and, using the long length of thread left, secure with a couple of stitches before attaching the wings to the side of the bee.

save the bees! Why not make lots of the little critters and hand them out to people to remind them of the plight of the bumblebee and suggest ways they can help prevent them from dying out? There are all sorts of things you can do, from making your own wild bee house, becoming a beekeeper and planting bee-friendly plants to lobbying your MP and signing petitions banning pesticides. bumblebeeconservation.org

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tension Not important

sizing Actual measurements: 1.5cm in length with a wingspan of 2.25cm

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Lower wing Upper wing

abbreviations Chain (ch)

Slip stitch (sl st)

Double crochet (dc)

PATTERNS

dc2inc

dc2dec

8 9 7 2 1

3

4

5

6

half treble (htr)

treble (tr)

Eureka! There are further instructions on how to crochet a bee necklace in Vanessa Mooncie’s Crocheted Accessories

the book Crocheted Accessories by Vanessa Mooncie is published by GMC Publications £14.99 gmcbooks.com

Body

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Make it

How

SMART This absolutely gorgeous crochet Cagney beret from Purl Alpaca is a total must make here in the Crafty office – and it’s perfect for those summer evenings outside once the sun’s gone down PHOTOGRAPHY & PROJECT purl alpaca

Materials

P url Alpaca Fine Yarn [100% Alpaca, 50g]: Ladies: 2 balls of MC, 1 ball of CC for the pompom OR 2 balls if only one colour is used. Child & Toddler: 1 ball of MC, 1 ball of CC OR 2 balls if only one colour is used 5 mm crochet hook (for head) & 4mm crochet hook (for band) – change hook size if needed to obtain

W

e’ve been obsessing over Purl Alpaca’s Cagney beret for quite some time over here at Crafty HQ. The company itself has always been a firm favourite, not just because its designs are all gorgeous and it puts on all sorts of knitting workshops to help us out when we’ve forgotten how to seed stitch, but also because of how very green it is.

correct tension lockable stitch marker t apestry needle s cissors  waste yarn c ardboard or pompom maker b eret blocker/25cm plate

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It tries to keep its carbon footprint down by sourcing the majority of its alpaca fleeces from within a 15-mile radius of the shop in Cambridge and all its packaging is from sustainable development providers, so you know you’re not only getting great quality yarn, but you’re helping to protect the environment as well. If you want to know more about how Tracy and Kari-Helene

turn fluffy alpaca fleeces into beautiful pieces of knitwear, make sure you check out the website (purlalpacadesigns. com), as there is a very interesting slideshow that takes you through the process, from the breeding of the animals through to the shearing, bagging and spinning. It’s worth a look just so you can see how hilarious alpacas look without their fluffy fleece! So – when Tracy and Kari-Helene said we could put the pattern for the Cagney beret in Crafty, we jumped at the chance! We love how stylish it is (you’ll look amazing any time of year) and the fact that it’s a beginner pattern means you can all look this good. What we love most about it though is just how much we’ll feel like we’re in The Railway Children when we wear it. Could it be any more Bobbie Waterbury?

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WANT MORE ? Get the kit to make this hat from Purl Alpaca purlalpacadesigns.com

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Make it

how to Beret

tension 8 dc rnds (working from Rnd 1 of hat pattern) to measure 1Ocm diameter/5cm radius. Tension is crucial – additional yarn may be required if it is not achieved.

sizing Ladies (child, toddler) To fit circumference: 56 (53, 51) cm Finished measurements Circumference: 54 (52, 49) cm (after blocking)

abbreviations

Using MC and a 5mm hook, leave a long tail and make an adjustable loop. Slip stitch to secure. Rnd 1: Ch1, work 6 dc into the ring, sl st to first dc to join. Pull tail to tighten adjustable loop. 6 dc Rnd 2: Ch1 (does not count as a st now and throughout), 2 dc in each st around, sl st to first dc to join. 12 dc Rnd 3: Ch1, *2 dc in next st, 1 dc; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc to join. 18 dc Rnd 4: Ch1, *2 dc in next st, 2 dc; rep from * to end, sl st to first dc to join. 24 dc Continue increasing in this manner (adding one dc between each 2 dc increase) until you are working 20 (17, 14) dc between each increase. 132, 114, 96 dc Next rnd: Ch1, dc(blo) around, sl st to first dc to join. Repeat rnd two more times (three times in total). Next rnd: Ch1, *dc2tog(blo), 20 (17, 14) dc(blo); rep from *around, sl st to first dc to join. Next rnd: Ch1, *dc2tog, 19 (16, 13) dc; rep from * around, sl st to first dc to join. Continue decreasing in this manner (subtracting one dc between each 2 dc increase) until you are working 13 (10, 7) dc between each decrease. 84, 66, 48 dc Next rnd: Switch to the 4mm hook. 3ch (counts as 1tr now and throughout), tr(blo) around, sl st to 3rd ch of t-ch to join. Next rnd: 3ch, 1(2,2)RtrB, 2(3,3)RtrF, *2(3,3)RtrB, 2(3,3)RtrF; rep from *around, sl st to 3rd ch of t-ch to join. Repeat previous rnd two more times (three times in total). Fasten off.

Dc[tr](blo) Double [or treble] crochet (back loop only) Work a dc[tr] in the back loop only of the required stitch  RtrB Raised Treble Back – Yrh, insert hook from back to front in the

Pompom Cut two 4cm diameter circles (with 2cm diameter circles in the middle) from the cardboard (or use a 4cm pompom maker). Place the two pieces of card together. Using two metre strands (for ease of wrapping) of CC, begin to wrap around the circle, packing tightly for a full pompom and moderately for a looser pompom. There is no need to tie the strands when using a new length – the edges can be neatened when finishing.

gap before the required tr of the row below and out the other side of the st, yrh and pull up a loop, yrh, pull through two loops, yrh, pull through remaining

When satisfied with the density, begin to cut the yarn at the outer edge of the circle, taking the scissors between the two pieces of card to keep the edges even. Wrap a separate length of CC several times between the two pieces of card and tie off securely. Plump out the pompom and snip off any uneven ends to shape.

two loops.  RtrF Raised Treble Front – Yrh,

FINISHING Weave in all ends, apart from the long tail for the adjustable loop.

insert hook from front to back in the gap before the required tr of the row below and out the other side of the st, yrh and pull up a loop, yrh, pull through two loops, yrh, pull through remaining two loops.  Adjustable loop Wrap yarn twice around finger and remove the yarn, pinching the circle closed. Insert hook into the centre of the circle, pull up a loop, sl st to secure.

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TO BLOCK / Immerse in cold water. Place on a towel and gently remove excess water. Thread the waste yarn through the band of the beret. / Place the beret on a beret blocker or stretch out over a 25 (22,20) cm plate, pull the waste yarn to gather the band in and tie loosely. Leave to dry. / When dry, remove from the plate or beret blocker and take out the waste yarn. Secure the pompom to the centre of the beret, using the tail of the adjustable loop. / Using CC, make a chain long enough to go around the circumference of the band, with extra length to make a bow. Do not weave in the ends yet. / Using the tapestry needle and one tail from the chain length, thread it through the band. Weave in the ends and tie in a bow. / The bow can be either sewn in place, or the chain length can be used to give a tighter fit if required.

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CM05 (Page 33)_PE 04/07/2013 09:14 Page 33

Proud to stock Purl Alpaca and other beautiful yarns With yarns to suit every budget, 1000’s of Patterns, Books, Needles, Notions, Baskets, Bags and Buttons. We offer friendly service in a relaxed atmosphere. • Debbie Bliss Classes available for • Bergere de France both Knitters and • Noro Crocheters • Louisa Harding • Mirasol • Artesano • Rowan • Sirdar • King Cole • Twilleys • Rico

83 - 85 Rosemount Place, Aberdeen, AB25 2YE Tel: 01224 643 738 Email: info@woolforewe.com

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www.sheepshopcambridge.co.uk

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Make it

sweets dream

Make our embroidery hoop dreamcatchers and you’ll sleep easy for ever more PHOTOGRAPHY dan walmslEy

Materials

embroidery hoops (3, 4 & 8”) colourful fabrics colourful embroidery thread fabric glue

PROJECT BRIDGEEN GILLESPIE

popular during the 70s) has us doing skips of joy every now and again as we walk down the street on our way to work.

craft glue scissors sewing needles pipe cleaners wooden beads seed beads feathers lightbox (optional)

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ative American traditions always fascinate us here at Crafty, from rain dances to Kachina dolls (spirits who return with the clouds to help their tribe), so the discovery that dreamcatchers are enjoying a bit of a revival again (having been pretty

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The first tribe to use the dreamcatcher – a handmade willow hoop covered by a net and decorated with sacred bits and bobs like beads and feathers – as a way of ensnaring nightmares was the Ojibwa people, but the Pan-Indian movement in the 60s and 70s saw lots more adopting the practice. It was believed that the night air was full of good and bad dreams that got caught in the net while you slept. The good dreams were able to pass through the net and slide down the feathers easily but the bad dreams got tangled and perished when the sun came up. The way the beads and feathers are used also has special meaning. A single

bead sewn in the middle signifies a spider on its web and a feather hung from the middle is a symbol of air or breath, while scattered beads across the net can mean lots of good dreams. Making your own dreamcatchers using embroidery hoops means you can customise them in all sorts of ways with beads, real feathers and the fabric colours of your choice. It’s been such a long dreary spring that our colour inspiration was sunshine on a rainy day! The patterns at their present size fit 3, 4 and 8” hoops respectively. Stitch an affirmation that means something to you into the centre and hang an arrangement of different-sized dreamcatchers on your bedroom wall. You’ll never have a bad night’s sleep again!

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PRESENT IDEA Spread good dreams around by giving these to your friends

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Make it

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how to

1

Transfer the design onto your fabric using a lightbox or window. Position the pattern, tape it into place then lay the fabric on top with the right side facing up. Trace directly onto the fabric.

2

Add seed beads then stitch over the design using your choice of thread, with two strands doubled over for smaller details and three strands doubled over for strong lines and the lettering. We used a combination of split stitch for the web and chain stitch for the lettering. The stitches are interchangeable and create a lovely raised line which stands out.

3

Wrap the embroidery hoops with 1” strips of fabric to add colour and texture to the dreamcatcher. Tearing or rough cutting the strips as a raw edge is quite attractive – just be careful not to make them too bulky or they might not close when you go to frame your design. Remove the outer embroidery ring (the one with the screw) and dab some craft glue all the way along the outside edge. Leave to get a bit tacky then wind the strips of fabric around until you cover the hoop. Leave to dry.

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7

4

For the tassles, create fabric strips that match the hoop you’ve just covered, and use pipe cleaners, wooden beads (with a wide opening) and feathers. Cut the pipe cleaners as long as the width of the hoop and the fabric twice the length of the pipe cleaner.

5

Tie a knot in one end of your fabric strip 1” before the end, then tuck one pipe cleaner into the knot. Dab glue along the length of the pipe cleaner, then carefully roll wrap the fabric diagonally down its length. Twist as tight as you can at the end and let the glue dry a little. The trick is to not let the glue set hard, as you’ll need to trim the excess fabric off and tuck the pointy end into the wooden bead. Dab more glue into the bead to secure it. Dip your feather’s stalk in glue and tuck into the open end of the bead. Be sure to match the way the feather is facing with the knot at the top of your tassel – they should both be front facing.

around, ½” in from the edge, then pull like a drawstring and secure.

7

Pick three points to attach your tassels. We recommend one at the bottom centre and two on either side at 45 or 90° angles.

8

Make sure your tassel faces outwards before you pin, and the knot and feather are front facing with your embroidery, with the knot appearing just below your hoop. Once in position, use a small running or back stitch to tack your tassel in place.

Eureka! You can make an iron-on transfer using the reverse image of your design. Trace over the lines with a heat-transfer pencil or pen, then place the pattern right side down on the fabric and press firmly with a dry iron to transfer 

6

At the back of your embroidery, gather in the loose fabric and trim off any excess, leaving 1-2”. Knot a thread and work a running stitch all the way

When stitching the dreamcatcher outlines, try randomly adding a seed bead here and there to catch the light

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WANT MORE ? Check out Bridgeen’s blog

cherryandcinnamon.com

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Make it

BITS & BLOGS

TEMPLATES Not for commercial use

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What’s hot

OH, There’s a hot new trend in town that’s less about crafting and more about mending – so you can finally wear your holes with some serious pride PHOTOGRAPHY TOM VAN DEIJNeN & LOU TONKIN

E

ven the most hardcore of crafters can baulk at the thought of the mending pile. It never seems to get any smaller, does it, and no matter how much you love sewing, there’s nothing duller than fixing holes in endless pairs of threadbare jumpers. Or is there? Some pioneering makers out there believe otherwise – that darning doesn’t have to be something you procrastinate over, rather something that you can take immense joy in doing while exercising your creative muscles and saving your clothes from relegation to the recycling centre. Self-taught knitter and mender Tom van Deijnen – who also goes by the name Tom of Holland – runs The Visible Mending Programme, which aims to emphasise the art behind repairing clothes and its relevance in today’s throw-away culture by holding darning workshops and encouraging people to wear their clothes for longer, with darned patches as a badge of honour. “As interests in sustainability, make do and mend, and reduce, reuse, recycle are slowly becoming the norm in all sorts of areas of life, mending is becoming more acceptable – and it’s a fun way to show that these values are important to you,” he says.

OH, DARN IT!

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WORDS SARAH ADIE

Through his blog (tomofholland.com), workshops and repair commissions, Tom – who once fixed a pair of running shoes by knitting new soles from thick hemp rope – strives to provide mending skills and inspiration so that old clothes become cherished once again and people experience a deeper connection with shop-bought garments. “The darn can be used as a starting point to think about how the garment was acquired, the occasions it was worn and the motivation behind repair,” he adds. “A visible mend highlights that something was once broken and has a history. In my darning work, I trace that narrative and am therefore particularly drawn to making repairs that show traces of the defect being mended.” There are a number of techniques you can employ with creative mending, from the classic stocking darn using a darning mushroom and long needle which creates a woven patch of fabric, to Scottish darning that fills in the hole with a needlework method and Swiss darning, which embroiders over existing stitches to copy the fabric. “The act of mending makes people stop and think, and not just about their clothes – thoughts often turn to other areas in their life where they had to mend, repair, or

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heal. I think it’s a beautiful process to facilitate,” Tom says. Someone else who uses their craft skills to make do and mend is textile artist and print-maker Lou Tonkin, doctor of The Jumper Surgery, who takes in worn clothes and gives them a new lease of life for her customers by felting wool and making very beautiful hedgerow-inspired patches of swallows, butterflies and flowers to cover any holes. She explains just how sentimental people can be about their clothes, saying: “Lots keep familiar old jumpers for years, or they might have a jumper belonging to someone else that holds particular memories for them. Textiles are so tactile and keep a wonderful ease about them, which can be very comforting.”

DARNING 101 Tom’s next darning class takes place in Brighton on Saturday 10th August

For Lou, the joy of repairing old garments is the history behind the textiles – and it doesn’t have to just be clothes either. “I love to find a second-hand blanket that needs some repair,” she adds. “I like to imagine who owned it before me – did they use it for picnics? Trips to the beach? Or for keeping warm on cold evenings?” We’ve got two tutorials from Tom and Lou to help you get started with your creative mending, covering darning and felting so you can choose which one suits your particular crafting style the best. We’d love to see what you come up with so don’t forget to email photos of your fixed-up clothes to craftymag@practicalpublishing.co.uk

top darning tips Match your wool or thread to the fabric of your holey jumper  Experiment with different colours and see what you can come up with  Don’t wait for holes to develop. It’s better to darn as soon as the fabric gets a bit thin

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What’s hot

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WANT MORE ? Get your wool tops from World of Wool

worldofwool.co.uk

how to

1 2

Place your foam pad or felting mat under the hole you wish to repair.

PROJECT LOU TONKIN

Make sure you check out Lou’s lovely blog, loutonkin.com, and follow her on Facebook: facebook.com/Lou-Tonkin-Art-Graft

Materials

 f oam pad or felting mat  n eedle felting tool  wool tops (ask for Merino or native breed)  o ld woollen fabric/jumper

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Choose a colour from your wool tops (this can be Merino wool available from felting suppliers or local wool you have collected from hedgerows and given a little wash).

3

“Textiles are so tactile and keep a wonderful ease about them, which can be very comforting”

Place the wool over the hole and cover with the needle felting tool, pressing into the wool tops and jumper until flat. Keep removing it from the mat as you work so it doesn’t become stuck to it. Add more wool at any time.

4 5

Cut out a shape from an old jumper or fabric to further cover your hole.

Using more of your wool tops, attach the wool fabric shape in the same way using your needle felting tool.

6

Add more details to really give your jumper a bit of pizzazz.

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how to

1

A stocking darn is worked from the wrong side. Put the darning mushroom behind the hole and pull the fabric over it. Starting at the lower left corner, pick up alternate purl bumps, working your way up, using a column of purl bumps ‘pointing up’. Put all the loops on the needle before pulling it through. Leave a short tail.

PROJECT TOM VAN DEIJNeN

Visit his blog: tomofholland.com Follow Tom on Twitter or Instagram: @tomofholland He’s also on Facebook: facebook.com/tomofholland

Materials

DARN IT HERE!

2

Select the column next to the previous one, with purl bumps ‘pointing down’. Pick up alternate bumps, opposite the previous ones. Don’t pull through too far and leave a small loop at the turning point to prevent puckering.

3

Continue until you reach the hole, enlarging the area where you pick up the purl bumps. When you get to the hole, pick up any live loops, span the hole with the needle and pick up the purl bumps on the other side.

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4

Continue until you reach the other side of the area to be darned. By making sure the area has an octagonal rather than a square shape, any strain on the fabric will be evenly distributed.

 d arning mushroom  d arning thread or yarn  d arning needle

5

Start working across. This time, you only have to pick up the darning thread, and again, pick up alternate strands. There’s no need to cover the whole area, just one or two strands outside the hole will suffice.

6

When finished, cut the thread, leaving a small tail. There’s no need to weave in any ends or knot them.

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ma ke Re sto re, Re viv e, Re to one ng alo ts Bring your projec sions. ses ing sew n hto of these Brig making and ice adv , tips for Great new friends! ca sca de sty le. co .uk

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05/07/2013 17:44


Make it

the OBELISK clock Past & Present is a wonderful book that puts a modern twist on design concepts throughout history. There are lots of marvellous projects to ooh and aah over but the neon Post-it notes on this clock really had us at hello PHOTOGRAPHY ELLEN SILVERMAN

Materials

clock with a plastic face & removable plastic cover ½” Post-it Arrow Flags flathead screwdriver painter’s tape X-ACTO knife

O

ur captivation with ancient Egypt continues to this day and obelisks still pop up frequently in modern décor (usually in the form of bookends or mantel decorations). Obelisks also appear in more unexpected ways, like on the clocks shown here. Designer Timothy Liles uses pointed obelisk-shaped Post-it flags in neon colours to create a decorative element across clock faces. The clock itself, which marks the movement of the sun, is a little nod to the obelisk’s original purpose: to honour the Sun God, Ra.

THE OBELISK CLOCK

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PROJECT TIMOTHY LILES

how to

1

There are usually three or four tabs holding a clock’s cover in place. Pry them back with the head of the screwdriver until the cover comes free. It’s not necessary to remove the hands or ticking mechanism – as you attach the flags, you can simply move the clock hands out of your way as needed.

2

Your design will be based on a straight line. To create this line, lay down a strip of painter’s tape anywhere on the clock’s face. This will establish a consistent first row of stickers on which you can build the rest of the pattern.

3

Attach a lengthwise row of stickers along the edge of the tape, keeping the spacing as even as possible (because you’ll need to eyeball the spacing, it won’t be perfect, but the naked eye won’t pick up discrepancies in the finished piece). When you get to the end of the row, the last sticker may

go beyond the edge of the clock face. Trim it carefully with the X-ACTO knife so that it perfectly meets at the edge of the clock’s face or the plastic rim.

4

When the first row is complete, remove the painter’s tape. For the next row of stickers, reverse the direction in which the arrows point. Keep ¼” of spacing between the rows. Continue laying down successive rows of stickers, alternating colour, direction and varying the spacing if it looks good to you. When thinking about your design, make sure to consider which parts of the numbered clock face you want to show and how much you want to cover up.

5

When you finish placing the stickers, set the hands of the clock back to 12. This will ensure that when the clock starts ticking again, everything will move at the proper rate. Snap the plastic cover back into place, and you’re done!

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WANT MORE ? You can get your wall clock and paper arrow stickers from viking-direct.co.uk

the& book Past Present by Amy Azzarito is available from Chronicle Books chroniclebooks.com ÂŁ16.99

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Make it

WANT MORE ? To find out more about pop-up books and to see how to make one, visit ppjump.com/pop-up

when dinosaurs Paper cutting is huge news right now, so if you want to get in on the trend, have a bit of a practise making your own pop-up book. It’s nowhere near as hard as you might think! PHOTOGRAPHY rachel burgess

WHEN DINOSAURS RULED THE EARTH

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PROJECT LAURA CLEMPSON

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1

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Materials

thick paper white card scalpel ruler

double-sided tape or glue

P

aper cutting is really coming into its own these days, thanks in large part to amazing designermakers like Rob Ryan (a Crafty fave) and Bovey Lee (who does very impressive cuttings on rice paper). Mastering the basics isn’t that tricky and you don’t need much in the way of equipment to get started. Just arm yourself with a sheet of A4, a scalpel and a cutting mat. To show you just how easy it is, we’ve got a great tutorial for making your own prehistoric pop-up book.

T-rex skeleton

1

Draw your dinosaur design onto the back of the thick paper, remembering to reverse the design (otherwise it’ll be backwards). Leave tabs at the bottom of the design as shown. These will attach to the card to form the pop-up.

2

Score along the centre line and the two lines at the top of the tabs. This will make your folds cleaner and sharper.

3

Carefully cut out your design using a very sharp scalpel, taking your time. For any particularly thin areas like the legs, glue on extra strips of paper for additional strength.

4

Fold your piece of card in half and draw a line down the centre. The centre line is particularly important when making pop-ups as everything works

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from this. Draw a line on one side of the centre line that is approximately 60° from the centre.

5

Put double-sided tape or glue onto the front of one tab on your cut out. Glue this tab to the card along the 60° line you’ve just drawn. Keep the dinosaur folded flat against the card.

6

Tape or glue the other tab, then very carefully fold the card closed so it closes against the glue on the tab. This will ensure that the other tab sticks at exactly the same angle as the first one. It is essential that the tabs are attached to two sides of the card at the same angle, otherwise your dinosaur won’t fold down properly when the card is closed. Leave the glue to dry and then test out your pop-up!

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Make it

Triceratops scene

1 2

Follow steps 1-7 of the T-Rex skeleton pop-up.

Eureka! Check out Robert Sabuda’s pop-up book, Encyclopedia Prehistorica Dinosaurs, for more sharp-toothed action

To create an entire scene of Triceratops, enlarge or reduce the pattern as you wish. Keep the angles the same when drawing the tabs.

 Add in clippings from old magazines or bits

PRESENT IDEA Making pop-up books is so easy that you’ll be making them for all your friends and family from now on!

of fabric for a different look  Laura is the mastermind behind Cupcakes for

3

Attach each row of your design in exactly the same way, working from front to back so that each row doesn’t stick to the other when you’re gluing the second sides. Leave to dry and voilà!

Clara, which sells sewing kits, paper dolls and a whole heap more cupcakesforclara.typepad.com

WANT MORE ? Find our diplodocus pop-up tutorial online

TEMPLATES Blow up to desired size

craftymag.com

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Make it

FLYING

high

Did you know you can quite easily turn an actual birdcage into a lamp and you don’t need any electrical skills to do so? Well, you can! PHOTOGRAPHY rachel burgess

W

e’re rather partial to a birdcage or two here at the Crafty office and if we can’t get them into our makes whenever possible, we’re not quite as happy bunnies as we usually are. When it comes to our choice of fabric, we’re typically swayed by a lovely birdcage or two, and when it comes to adding in our own motifs – whether it’s screen printing or cross stitching – you can bet your bottom dollar there’ll be a metal cage in there somewhere. But! We’ve never actually got our craft on using a real life birdcage before, so we decided it was high time we saw the error of our ways and set about the notas-tricky-as-you-might-first-think task of turning a birdcage into a floor lamp.

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PROJECT TOM ROBINSON

Our cage is actually a leftover from a Harry Potter party (which also featured homemade golden snitches and a massive papier-mâché and chicken wire Sorting Hat). We’ve been scratching our little heads for ages over what we could use it for – a lamp was the perfect solution!

Materials

birdcage

floor lamp (ours was £5 from Homebase) Washi tape dark blue & white felt lampshade of similar diameter to birdcage hot glue gun

Even better, you don’t need to be an electrician or have lots of tools in your toolbox to be able to achieve great success with this project, and you can decorate the bottom of it to fit in with whatever decorating choices you’ve made in your living room or bedroom.

spray paint (optional) cotton wire cutters metal file lightbulb

Once finished, it really does look beautiful (albeit in an industrial way), and we know you’ll get lots of compliments on it. In the words of Anchorman’s Brick Tamland, “we love lamp!”

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BITS & BLOGS

WANT MORE ? To see the step-by-step photos head to craftymag.com

lies to Use up your old linen doi just like p, lam make a ver y beautiful e ous ildh Sch Emily em my lizz y.b log spo

how to

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Remove the canvas from the lampshade. Cut the three supporting bars on the shade, leaving the central hole with three prongs coming off it in a triangular shape. Position the triangular metal support from the shade inside the birdcage so that the circular centre is in line with the centre of the cage, approximately halfway up.

3

Using the cotton, tie the three metal prongs to the bars of the birdcage and trim them back so they’re just proud of the cage. Attach using the hot glue gun. Leave to dry.

4

Spray paint the cage and lamp fittings so they’re uniform in colour. Washi tape the stand – it’s easier if two people do it, with one holding the tape and the other turning the lamp stand.

Draw around the base of the stand on your dark blue felt and cut out. Cut towards the middle until the felt circle fits snugly around the stand then glue down. Draw and cut out three swallows and glue in position.

r our own Blogger Beth is a girl afte ater to swe old hearts, upcycling an p lam r floo ky fun make a un ski nn yb op py. co m

Tidy up the ends of the prongs with a file, reattach the cage to the stand, add a lightbulb and there you have it!

Eureka! Collect lots of birdcages, take them outside and hang them from a tree as interesting garden decorations  You could also put them on some tables and fill them with candles – trés romantic, non?  eBay has lots of birdcages up for sale so you’ll definitely find one you like

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h Murray ’s We love blogger Debora over on out it eck ruffled lamp. Ch wh ath ap pen sne xt.t

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Head online for exclusive tutorials, interviews & free downloads

Visit our brand-new Crafty Magazine website to get the latest fashion tips in our Style File (and even be featured on the site itself by sending us snaps of you in your favourite outfits), discover men who make in The Man Cave, download free printables and lots of fun mini makes in the DIY section, and find all sorts of foodie inspiration for growing (and cooking) your own! What’s more, if you join our Craft Club, you’ll also be able to keep up to date with all our latest posts and offers, so you know you’ll never miss out on any of the Crafty fun.

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PRESENT IDEA Make this for a pal and you’ll be best buds for life

THE HEAT on

is

Summertime means the bugs come out, but even though wasps might pack an almighty sting, they certainly suit being embroidered, don’t they? PHOTOGRAPHY rachel burgess

E

mbroidery is one craft that, when done well, looks seriously beautiful, and when it comes to embellishing things like napkins, pillowcases and handkerchiefs, it’s really second to none. Which is why we think it’s such a shame that it’s so often used on smaller items and less as an art form in its own right, shown off in all its stitched-up glory on a larger scale. It’s certainly tricky enough to master, but picking up the basic stitches isn’t as tricky as you might think – which is why we love it so much. It’s a craft that anyone can have a go at and see results pretty quickly. That and learning all the different stitches and how thread can be used for different effects is really very interesting. As much as we love an embroidered handkerchief here at Crafty, we’re keen

to show you all how to use these skills to make something a bit bigger that you can hang in pride of place in your home, so we’ve come up with this gorgeous summer-inspired embroidered canvas for you to make. Wasps have a bit of a reputation as the bad boys of the insect world, neglected by us crafters who prefer the rather more approachable aesthetic of the rotund bumblebee, but we think they’re just as beautiful and deserve to be stitched up just as much.

Materials

 e mbroidery needle m asking tape D MC embroidery thread, in your choice of colours  e mbroidery hoop s tretched canvas frame s oft pencil p ale (non-stretchy) lightweight fabric  i ron s taple gun s cissors  e mbroidery template p illowcase

If you haven’t embroidered anything before, don’t worry. This design doesn’t use any hugely tricky stitches and there’s a helpful stitch guide on page 55 to help you if you do get stuck. And! We haven’t neglected our bumblee chums either – turn to page 27 and you’ll find a honeysweet crocheted bee pin to try.

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PROJECT MONIQUE JIVRAM

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Make it

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how to

1

Photocopy the embroidery template to fit your canvas. Tape the photocopy to a window, then place your fabric right side up on top of the template and trace the image with pencil. The marks you make will be permanent, so try to keep the line light.

2

Secure the fabric in an embroidery hoop, making sure it is taut but not too tight, as this will distort the image.

3

Select your thread colours and use any stitches you like. We’ve used split and back stitches, and included some tutorials on page 55 to help you get to grips with them.

4

Tie a knot close to one end of the thread and place the other end through the needle. Choose where you want to start and bring the threaded needle from the back to the front side of the fabric. Cover all your pencil marks.

THE HEAT IS ON

THE HEAT IS ON.indd 54

5

When you’ve finished your embroidery, you’re ready to stretch it. Iron your finished work on the back using a pillowcase as a protective layer, being careful not to apply too much pressure as this will flatten the stitches. Lay your embroidery on top of your canvas frame and decide where you want it to go.

Eureka! The bigger the template is, the easier it will be to complete  When tracing patterns, don’t use anything too sharp and trace lightly so your lines are easy to cover up with stitching. Take extra care not to let your design move while you’re tracing it

6

Gently flip your work and canvas over. Fold your fabric over one side of the frame and staple it into place. Move to the opposite side, fold your fabric over and while pulling it very tight, staple it into place. By pulling it you are stretching the fabric and easing out creases. Do the same to the two other sides you haven’t stapled. Start adding staples from the middle out. Every time you add a staple, pull the fabric tight on the opposite side.

 For transferring images you can also use transfer paper, disappearing ink fabric pens, lightboxes, watererasable embroidery pens or carbon transfer paper  Use a maximum thread length of 45cm. Thread your needle and use the top of your hand to your elbow as a measure  Smaller hoops can be easier to work with. When you put your fabric in the embroidery hoop, aim to make it taut like a drum

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STITCH GUIDE SPLIT STITCH

1

2

3

4

Make a stitch.

From behind, bring the needle

Once the first stitch is split, pull

An example of split stitch.

up through the middle of the first

your thread through and make a

stitch, splitting the threads.

second stitch. Repeat steps 1 and 2.

BACK STITCH

1

2

3

4

Make a stitch.

From behind, come up about a

Going backwards, go down

An example of back stitch.

stitch length away.

directly next to the end of your stitch and repeat.

TEMPLATE

The pattern and images contained in this project are for personal use only.

Blow up to desired size

WANT MORE ? See more of Monique’s gorgeous work over at her website, moniquejivram.com

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CM05 (Page 56)_PE 03/07/2013 12:23 Page 56

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PRETTY IN s e l b b pe Some scoff at the trend for prettifying pebbles, but we think it’s a fun one, particularly as you can learn all sorts of different craft techniques in the process. Try your hand at jewellery making, crochet, wet felting and painting... here’s how! PHOTOGRAPHY dan walmsley

W

e love a pebble or two, we do – they're very intriguing shades of colour, have a beautifully smooth surface, and when it comes to skimming across ponds and lakes, they’re second to none (our record’s five, what’s yours?) – so what better way to show our appreciation than by getting a little arts and craftsy?

There are all sorts of things you can do with a pebble (although we should say – please don’t nick them from the beach as it’s illegal and we don’t want to see you thrown in the slammer, no matter how crafty the cause), whether you use lots of tiny ones to make a placemat, crochet a cute cover for a fancy paperweight or find funny-shaped ones and paint silly faces on them for a laugh. Whatever you do, have fun!

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Make it

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FELT FANCIES

PROJECT CATHERINE GREENSLADE

Materials

smooth pebble, around 6cm long  M erino wool roving or tops – approximately 5g per pebble water spray bottle  f ine curtain or tutu netting measuring at least 30cm²  o live soap flakes/liquid soap or washing up liquid  water-tolerant work surface /large tray

1

Give your pebble a thorough scrub and check that it is fairly smooth all over so your fibres won’t snag on rough or chipped areas.

2

Fill your spray bottle with 500ml boiling water and add a dessert spoon of soap flakes or a squirt of liquid soap. Don’t shake the bottle. Spread out your netting on a waterproof surface and place your pebble off-centre on it.

3

Gently tease out three 8-10cm long and 1cm wide lengths of wool, then carefully prise each length apart so it will thinly cover the top of your pebble with a little hanging over the edges. You will be able to see through these fine pieces.

4

Layer your three pieces on top of the pebble, alternating warp and weft so that each layer lies at a 90° angle to the one below it. Fold the loose ends under the pebble. Taking care not to disturb the fibres, wrap the net over the top of the pebble and lift the net with the pebble inside. Keeping the pebble fibre-covered side up, pinch and twist the net tightly beneath it to keep the fibres in place. Spray the fibres through the net with your hot water and soap solution until they are thoroughly wet, but not dripping.

5

Still holding the net in place, rub the fibres gently through the net with your fingertips using small circular motions. Take care not to rub too vigorously as this may cause bald patches. Continue rubbing all over for 1-2 minutes. Remove

the pebble from the net, gently freeing any trapped fibres. The first layers should now be loosely matted together around your pebble. If not, replace the net and continue rubbing for another minute or so. Remove the net and turn the pebble over.

6

Repeat steps 4 and 5 on the reverse of the pebble, ensuring that the layers are covering the sides as well as the top of the pebble. Your pebble should now be completely, but quite thinly, covered. If there are any holes or very sparse areas, cover them up as in Step 5.

7

Repeat steps 4 and 5 on both sides of the pebble to give full coverage. If adding stripes or veins to your pebble, do so with this second layer, before felting.

Once your pebble is tightly encased with a smooth, firm finish, wrap it in the net and run it under a cold tap, squeezing gently to remove the soap and excess water.

11

Remove the pebble from the net, smooth it with your fingertips and leave to dry. A wire cake rack is useful for drying as the air can circulate all around the pebble, but it will also dry if left on a tea towel, turning once the top side is dry.

Eureka! If your fibres begin to bobble whilst felting, add more soap solution  Felted pebbles in rainbow or natural colours make pretty,

8

As you rub the fibres all over the pebble, remove the net occasionally to release any trapped strands and check that all loose ends are smoothed down against the pebble before replacing the net. Keep the pebble wet and, as the Merino begins to felt together more firmly, gradually increase the pressure.

9

Once the fibres around your pebble are no longer moving, remove the net and check the felted surface. If there are any loose fibres, you can rub these gently with your fingertips to help them felt, remembering to wet the surface if it starts to dry out.

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decorative bowl fillings and gifts while larger stones make fantastic, unique paperweights

WANT MORE ? See Catherine's other work in her Etsy shop, Three Silver Trees

PRET TY IN PEBBLES

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Make it

ROCK ON

PROJECT HUGH METCALF

Materials

pebbles

Posca markers  b ox photo frame (at least as deep as your pebbles) Super Glue white cardstock glue stick

how to

1

Give the stones a wash and buff to remove all dirt, especially if you’ve taken them out of the garden.

2

Use your marker pens to personalise your pebbles as you please. We’ve taken our design inspiration from different fonts – and cave paintings too! If you’re using a lighter colour pen, you may want to let one coat dry and then go over it again.

Eureka! Why not use a photo as the background for your frame for double the personalised charm?

3

Using a glue stick, coat the back of the frame and layer with white cardstock to make a background.

pick it up Posca markers are the best for the job as they can pretty much write

4

Place the inside of the box frame over the back and arrange the pebbles inside. Glue each one down, hold in place for five seconds while the glue dries, then reassemble the frame.

IN CUFFS

PROJECT LINDSAY HODDER

Materials

2 smooth, flat pebbles strong adhesive (like E6000) dish soap cufflink blanks

WANT MORE ? Bay Rock Jewelery has ocean-inspired pieces for you to choose from etsy.com/shop/ BayRockJewelery

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on anything and keep their colour well. You can see the full range at posca.com or get them from Hobbycraft hobbycraft.co.uk

how to

1

It’s important to find pebbles with a smooth, flat side. Whether you find stones that match in terms of colour, shape or rock type is a personal choice.

2

Once you’ve selected your pebbles, clean off the dirt and salt-water residue with a light dish soap and dry thoroughly. This will ensure a good bond to the cufflink finding.

3

You will need to choose a strong, commercial grade adhesive (such as E6000). Whichever glue you use, be sure to follow the directions carefully. Apply adhesive to the pebbles and stick to the blanks. Leave the pieces to dry for the specified time. Be careful to wipe away any excess for clean presentation.

Eureka! You can always use your pebbles to make necklaces instead. Jewellery findings are readily available from places like Hobbycraft

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1

WANT MORE ? Find Fausta's crochet lace doilies in her Folksy shop, Faustapink900

COASTAL CROCHET PROJECT Fausta babenskaite

Materials

2

PATTERN 3

pattern 2

Note: Turning chain counts as 1tr throughout. Join each round with a slip stitch.

pebbles

1.7mm crochet hook Anchor Perle Crochet Cotton, size 8 (your choice of colours)

pattern 1

Note: Turning chain counts as 1tr throughout. Join each round with a slip stitch. Rnd 1: Ch3, work 2tr, ch1, [3tr, ch1] 5 times, into a magic ring. (18tr) Increase Rnd: Sl st across to 1st ch-sp, (ch3, 2tr, ch1, 3tr, ch1,) into ch-sp, *(3tr, ch1, 3tr, ch1) into next ch-sp; rep from * to end. Work Increase Rnd until the pebble is half covered. Decrease Rnd: Ignoring ch sps, ch3, miss 1tr, *1tr, miss 1tr; rep from * to end. Work Decrease Rnd until about 10 sts remain, inserting pebble into work before hole becomes too small. Break yarn, weave end through remaining sts, pull tight and fasten off.

Rnd 1: Ch3, work 14tr into magic ring. (15tr) Rnd 2: Ch4, (1tr, ch1) in each tr around. Rnd 3: Ch5, (1tr, ch2) in each tr around. Rnd 4: Ch6, (1tr, ch3) in each tr around. Rnd 5: Ch7, (1tr, ch4) in each tr around.

craftymag.com

abbreviations Ch Chain

Insert the pebble into the crochet. If about half the pebble has been covered, remove pebble and begin to decrease as follows. If the pebble is larger continue to increase in the same way, by adding an extra chain each round. If you do this then you will need to work 1tr for each chain in the chain space on the next round and work more Decrease Rnds.

 Yo Yarn over  Sc Single crochet  Dc Double crochet  Sl st

Next Rnd: Ch3, [4tr into ch-sp, miss tr] 14 times, 4tr into last ch-sp. (61)

Slip stitch  St

Decrease Rnd: Ch3, *miss 1tr, 1tr in next tr, rep from * to end.

Stitch  Tr

Work Decrease Rnd until 15 sts remain or until stone is covered. Break yarn, insert pebble, weave end through remaining sts, pull tight and fasten off.

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Head to our website to find the pattern for a third pebble

Treble stitch

PRET TY IN PEBBLES

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05/07/2013 19:31


Make it

GO go ! t e g d a g Snuggle your gadgets up in our 1950s-inspired tablet and mobile cases and you’ll never cry over spilt anything again PHOTOGRAPHY RACHEL BURGESS

W

e’re not overly materialistic here at Crafty and don’t believe that having the latest techno toys affords us any particular status – if it weren’t for things like Facebook and Instagram, we’d happily swap our smartphones for an old 1990s Nokia brick. After all, you really just need them to make calls, right? That said, the few gadgets we do have we like to look after as best we can, particularly if it means we can get our craft on and make a few things to give them an extra layer of protection against glasses of water or keys at the bottom of our handbags.

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PROJECT lauren guthrie

With that in mind, we turned to the lovely Lauren Guthrie – whose name you’ll definitely recognise from this year’s inaugural Great British Sewing Bee, where she narrowly missed out on claiming victory – and asked her if she could whip us up some cases to help look after our phones and tablets so we can live to tweet another day.

hanging on the telephone Materials

 2 0x15cm main outer fabric (we used Chateau Rouge Stone by French General for Moda Fabrics)  2 0x20cm lining fabric (we used Linen Grey by Stof)

Lauren’s taken inspiration from the TVs and radios of yesteryear and given her case designs a bit of a 1950s aesthetic, which we think goes just perfectly with our little mod cons. We like them so very much that we might go out and invest in a few more gadgets – just so we can keep on crafting!

interfacing fabric & felt scraps for the radio sewing machine free machine embroidery foot iron sharp chalk pencil pins

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how to

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2

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3

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Measure your mobile width and lengthways, then cut out the fabric and interfacing using the templates on page 68, leaving ½” seam allowances for the lining and main outer fabric. Iron the interfacing onto the wrong side of the outer fabric, following the manufacturer’s instructions.

Pin the striped fabric for the speaker onto the radio base, stitch it on with a series of straight lines, trim off any excess threads and neaten the edges.

4

Pin the radio onto the right side of the outer fabric and stitch around, taking care to curve the line at the corners.

5

Place the felt circle onto the radio and stitch a series of circles using the machine embroidery foot. Alternatively, you could hand embroider this.

6

Using a sharp chalk pencil, write ‘radio’ onto the radio and draw a line in the top right for the aerial. Using the machine embroidery foot, embroider over your chalk markings.

Pin then stitch the lining to the outer fabric with the right sides together along the stitch line marked on the template. Repeat for the back pieces. Press the lining back away from the main outer fabric, then press over the top so that the wrong sides of the lining and outer fabric are together. This will give you a crease line along the top. Fold the lining back again so that the right sides of the lining and outer fabric are facing, but this time line up the bottom edges so the fabric overlaps at the top. Stitch four short lines between the fold at the top and where the original line of stitching is that joined the lining and outer fabric.

10

Open out the lining away from the main fabric and place the right sides of the main outer fabric together and the right sides of the lining together. This will create a little flap on each side.

12

Press the section edges inwards and slip stitch close to the edge by hand or machine. Push the lining back into the outer fabric and press the seams flat.

Eureka! If you really want to go to town, print an image onto some fabric to make the TV

11

Stitch around the edge of the outer fabric with a ½” seam, making sure you reverse at the

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beginning and end. Repeat for the lining but leave a gap at the bottom. Turn the right way out.

screen look like it’s turned on

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Make it

1

2

3

7

8

9

on the gogGle box Materials

 5 0x30cm main outer fabric (we used Linen Grey by Stof)  5 0x35cm lining fabric (we used Old Glory Gatherings Blue Time by Primitive Gatherings for Moda Fabrics)  5 0x30cm wadding, plus a small scrap for the TV screen  felt scraps for the TV  s ewing machine  f ree machine embroidery foot  p ins

1

Measure your tablet or eReader width and lengthways, then cut out all the fabric, felt and wadding using the templates on page 68, leaving ½” seam allowances for the lining and main fabric. Pin the TV base onto the right side of the outer fabric using the placement lines and attach using a machine and straight stitches on the stitching lines.

2 3

Place the screen frame on top and stitch around the edge.

Finger press (press a crease using your fingers) a ¼” to the wrong side of the screen piece of fabric and pin in place on top of the wadding.

4 WANT MORE ? Get all the fabric you need from Beyond Fabrics. beyond-fabrics.co.uk

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how to

Hand-appliqué the screen on, taking care to curve the corners by taking smaller stitches. Change to a machine embroidery foot and lower the feed dogs. Machine embroider three buttons onto the TV using the template as a guide.

5

Cut four small sausage shapes from scraps of felt and round one edge.

Place under your TV as the legs and trim the tops. Machine-stitch around the edge. Alternatively, do this by hand.

6

Transfer ‘Tiny TV’ onto the main outer fabric and stitch on using a machine embroidery foot or by hand.

7

Pin then stitch the lining to the outer fabric with the right sides together along the stitch line marked on the template. Repeat for the back pieces.

8

Press the lining back away from the main outer fabric, then press over the top so that the wrong sides of the lining and outer fabric are together. This will give you a crease line along the top. Fold the lining back again so that the right sides of the lining and outer fabric are facing, but this time line up the bottom edges so the fabric overlaps at the top.

9

Stitch four short lines between the fold at the top and where the original line of stitching is that joined the lining and outer fabric.

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6

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Open out the lining away from the main fabric and place the right sides of the main outer fabric together and the right sides of the lining together. This will create a little flap on each side.

WANT MORE ?

11

Lauren runs the Guthrie & Ghani haberdashery in Birmingham

Stitch around the edge of the outer fabric with a ½” seam, reverse stitching at the beginning and end. Repeat for the lining but leave a gap at the bottom so it can be turned the right way out. Trim the seam allowances, notch the corners and trim the top edges where the lining and wadding meet. Turn the right way out.

guthrie-ghani.co.uk

12

Press the section edges inwards and slip stitch close to the edge by hand or machine. Push the lining back into the outer fabric and press the seams flat.

Eureka! When attaching your TV screen, make sure that you stitch all the way though the layers of fabric and don’t just appliqué it onto the felt as the felt can stretch and pull away

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GO-GO GADGET!

05/07/2013 19:43


Make it

STITCH LINE FOR ATTACHING LINING

IPHONE COVER LINING CUT 2

TV PLACEMENT LINES

GRAIN LINE

GRAIN LINE

IPAD LINING CUT 2

STITCH LINES

RADIO

TV TEMPLATE CUT 1 STITCH LINE

IPHONE COVER SCREEN FRAME TEMPLATE CUT 1 OUTER FABRIC CUT 2 SPEAKER PANEL

DIAL

GO-GO GADGET!

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SCREEN TEMPLATE CUT 1

PATTERN PIECES 068

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PRESENT IDEA Whip up one of these as a unique house-warming present

penny for them Turn a shrunken cashmere top into a penny mat and give it a new lease of life as a table runner instead! PHOTOGRAPHY rachel burgess

Materials

 s turdy, pre-worn fabrics like berets, school blazers, old blankets, hats or suits 3 c ircle templates of varying sizes (we used a 2p piece, an egg cup & a mug) embroidery thread embroidery needle 505 fabric adhesive or pins pen

T

he epitome of thrifty homemaking, penny mats first became popular during the American Civil War. Women would save scraps from army

blankets and old clothes and, using pennies as templates, cut circles from the fabrics and sew them together using blanket stitches. Often, pennies were left in the rugs to help them lie flat, and if an area became worn, more felt pennies were simply added to cover the holes. Old canvas, burlap or humble feed sacks were usually the backing of choice as the mats had to be robust enough to withstand beatings and being regularly trampled on. Since then, penny mats have become a popular form of folk art. The colours tend to be vibrant, while both the design and embroidery are far more elaborate than the originals. Initially, they were intended to be doormats (with the stacked circles

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PROJECT elizabeth healey

providing enough texture to scrape mud off boots), but these days penny mats are made as decorative items – think wall hangings or table runners – so there’s no need to worry about muddy footprints ruining your handiwork! The one shown here takes its inspiration from lichencovered pebbles found at the beach, but seed heads or other natural themes would lend themselves just as well. If you find that the stitching slightly distorts the shape of your circles, don’t worry! After all, you’re working with recycled bulky fabrics, not perfectly massproduced kits sewn by machine. Part of the charm of the original penny mats is that you can see they are handmade – and are all the better for it.

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Make it

how to

1

Work out your design and select your fabrics accordingly – we went for greys, stones and creams for our pebble beach theme. Try to choose fabrics that are the same thickness and weight as this will result in a less bulky mat with an even pile.

2

Find three circle templates. American 19th century pennies were much bigger than modern British pennies, so you’ll need to scale up. On the reverse of your fabrics, draw around the templates and cut them out. Divide the pennies into stacks of one small, one medium and one large circle, ready for sewing.

3

Start by sewing your penny stacks together before doing any embroidery. Keeping the circles as concentric as possible, sew through the centre of all three circles, finishing with a French knot in the middle of the smallest. Blanket stitch around the edges of all the circles, so you have one firm circle rather than three floppy ones. Repeat for all penny stacks.

4

To decorate, start with a focal point for your penny (like a flower or wheel), then work out from the centre. Embellish further with clusters of French knots, circles of bullion stitch, or use seed stitch and chain stitch to fill entire areas. Be experimental and don’t feel restricted to only using the stitches we have. The more you embroider your pennies, the flatter and sturdier they will become.

5

When you’ve finished decorating your pennies, arrange them onto a backing fabric larger than you need (you’ll trim it to size in the next step). When happy with your design, spray the back of each penny with 505 adhesive to hold the pennies in place until you’re ready to sew.

6

Sew the pennies to the backing cloth, keeping your stitches neat and hidden in the bottom layers of fabric. Trim your backing to the desired shape and decorate the edges using blanket stitching. Doing this now rather than earlier means you can alter the backing design to accommodate any irregularities in the shape of the pennies. To finish, add more decorative stitching to any gaps between the pennies.

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Eureka! Laundry accidents and items that have shrunk in the wash are ideal for penny mats, as long as they have been properly felted and won’t fray when cut into  Appliquéd patterns were also traditionally used on penny mats. Try animals, people, homes, festive scenes and floral motifs  If you don’t have any suitable fabrics, pick up one of Rag-a-Muffin Collectibles’s penny mat kits available on its Etsy shop, etsy.com/shop/ragamuffin2006  Use your penny mats as candle holders, wall hangings or table runners

pick it up Ray Stitch stocks 505 fabric adhesive spray if you don’t have any already raystitch.co.uk

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The stitches WANT MORE ? Make sure you check out Elizabeth’s blog, elizabethsquarters. blogspot.co.uk

For excellent tutorials on any of the following stitches used on our penny mat, go to needlenthread.com French knot A little bobble is made by wrapping thread around a needle before you pull it all the way out of the fabric. You then pull the needle through and slide the wraps along the thread and towards the fabric before taking the needle back into the fabric next to where it came out Blanket stitch The traditional stitch used to decorate edges of penny mats. We also used it as a filler stitch Whipped wheel Work around a French knot, creating a series of spokes with running stitch. Next, bring the needle up at the centre and start to cover the spokes by taking the thread under two spokes, then over and under the last one (basically two steps forward, one step back) Bullion stitch Similar to a French knot but you wind the thread around the needle several times and take it back into your work a short distance to where it came up Chain stitch A very simple loop stitch that can also be used as a filler stitch

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PENNY FOR THEM

05/07/2013 17:55


On our travels

e l b a t s t i h W Whitstable in Kent sets the mark for how the British seaside should be done. That is, of course, with a deliciously crafty undercurrent PHOTOGRAPHY & WORDS HUGH METCALF

The overwhelming support for this mantra is the only explanation for the miracle that is Whitstable. In times of recession and with an ever-growing number of empty shops prophesising the death of the great British high street, this town thrives with largely independent shops and boutiques. Although we’re always hopeful, there aren’t many town centres that can count a wool, a fabric and a

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sewing machine shop at the very heart of its busiest street, but Whitstable has all three. We start by browsing the stacks of yarn at Buzz 4 Wool (soon to become KnitWhits), before heading down the road to The Fabric Shop for a textile and trimming fix and to stare longingly at the vintage Singers and high-tech sewing machines in the window of Barchams. For magpie-eyed treasure seekers, Whitstable is something of a playground. Walking along the high street, vintage furniture and other curios spill out from shop doors onto the pavement. A Crafty favourite, Valentines, is always on the to-visit list and this time, too long is spent umming and ahhing over a cult 1960s coffee table, reclaimed school chairs (complete with original compass etchings of ‘bored’ on the seats) and back issues of The Face. Valentines is

Map: Courtesy of Google Maps

S

tanding watch over the entrance to Whitstable’s high street is the Banksy-esque figure of a deep sea diver holding two shopping bags painted on the railway bridge. When you see the words ‘shop local’ scrawled above him, you realise that this isn’t just a piece of graffiti, but an artistic reflection of the community whose world you’re about to step into.

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quite neatly arranged inside by comparison – it’s in some of the other curiosity shops that you’ll find yourself digging about in vintage cameras, ships in bottles and driftwood art to pick up something amazing. Whether you’re looking for a shop dedicated to cupcakes, cheese, cool art prints or beautiful bicycles, you’re pretty much covered. It’s important to say that the ‘shop local’ slogan doesn’t manifest itself in a League of Gentleman sort of way. There’s no sense of “this is a local shop for local people” – just an attempt to maintain the integrity of their high street (the fuss

1 Catch of the day at Whitstable Harbour! 2 Yarnbombed bikes are a permanent fixture outside the local bike shop

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WONDERFUL WHITSTABLE

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On our travels

kicked up when a branch of frozen foods store Iceland opened up is something of a legend in these here parts). After all, it’s the blessing and the curse of a seaside town to be a bit fair weather. The streets are full in the summer season when Britain’s inland inhabitants yearn for the beach, while in the winter they become eerily empty. It may still be much the case for Whitstable, but this town remains a must-visit destination regardless of beach-worthy weather.

“There aren’t many town centres that can count a wool, fabric and sewing machine shops at their heart” But, of course, it’s all go in the summer months. Almost every weekend there’s a craft or farmer’s market held in St Mary’s Church, which floods with people looking to pick up some local, homemade lovelies. Whitstable Harbour Village is another essential stop. The little hamlet of beach huts holds some amazing handmade businesses and opens on a Saturday and Sunday to bring a little joie de vivre to your stroll along the beach. It’s on this stroll that you’ll discover what makes Whitstable famous – oysters. At

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the mouth of the Thames estuary, the waters of Whitstable are ripe with the shellfish and it’s the produce that has defined and shaped the town into what it is today. Whether you plump for the fish market or a fancy restaurant to get yours, it’s a rite of passage when visiting. The piles of shells on the beach ready to be recycled and sent back to the oyster beds only go to demonstrate the local appetite for them. Oysters also provide the proverbial backbone of the town’s big summer celebrations. Whitstable Oyster Festival is held this year between 27th July and 2nd August and is the perfect time to head down to the shore to join in the celebrations. Parades, food fairs and special markets are all part of the festivities, so you’re sure to catch the best of Whitstable all in one go, without having to search too hard.

across the sea have to fight for your attention with the line of lust-worthy beach facing homes. It’s as though the owners here have made a deal with us beach walkers. There are no walls or fences, so as you traverse the beach enjoying the views you’re half in their gardens, while also taking in their coastal-influenced interiors with holiday envy. We talk to an owner who tells us about the dilapidated beach hut next door. It’s owned by a shipping company, so no one has the rights to spruce it up or tear it down, but thanks to a little guerrilla bunting, he’s come to love it all the same. It’s a relationship that sums up the spirit of Whitstable – open, friendly and based on trust and respect for its residents and visitors alike.

top oyster picks Wheelers Oyster Bar The oldest restaurant in Whitstable boasts a dedicated Oyster Parlour that won’t break the bank. There’s also a seafood cookery school! wheelersoysterbar.com Whitstable Oyster Company This company’s been in operation since the 1400s so it’s fair to say it really does know its oysters! Perfect for a civilised night out in Whitstable. whitstableoystercompany.com Whitstable Fish Market Here you can get your oysters on a paper plate and head off to munch them on the beach. This is the Crafty way.

3 Spoilt for choice in fabric, trimmings and patterns at The Fabric Shop 4 Valentine’s has some wonderful vintage curios on its shopfloor!

Something you’ll definitely come away with is seaside inspiration. The views out

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www.rainbow-craft.co.uk

01227 364310 90-94 High Street, Herne Bay, Kent, CT6 5LG

Free Demo Day 1st Saturday Month. Imagination Sparkle (August) Papercraft Specialists Your Local independent stockist of Tim Holtz – Do Crafts – Martha Stewart – Crafters Companion – Cuttle Bug – Rubber Stamps – Deco Patch

Workshops – Cardmaking, Scrapbooking, Jewellery Making

Call in for a look around

THE FABRIC SHOP 46 Harbour Street, Whitstable, Kent CT5 1AH Tel: 01227 273 272 This well established business continues to offer a warm and friendly welcome to all its customers, both old and new. The Fabric Shop is an ideal place to come whether you are searching for inspiration for your next creative project or simply looking for the tools to 'make do and mend'. By continually updating its wide range of beautiful fabrics along with its extensive range of haberdashery and crafting accessories it strives to meet all the requirements of an incredibly diverse clientele.

To advertise HERE please call Noune on 0844 826 0612 or Ruth on 0844 826 0615

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craftymag.com www.craftymag.com

SWEET GYPSY When we discovered that Pearl Lowe was into DIY we nearly died of happiness. Renowned for her sense of style, we knew some very beautiful makes were just over the horizon – and how right we were. Here’s how she upcycled a footstool with a gypsy rose-inspired makeover PHOTOGRAPHY debi treloar

077 079

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PROJECT pearl lowe

SWEET SWEET GYPSY GYPSY ROSE ROSE

05/07/2013 17:57


Make it

Materials

old footstool

 s andpaper & paint of your choice (optional)  4 oz density polyester quilting wadding (optional) spray glue/ hot glue gun pins  v intage linen, measuring approximately 1m square  3 0x17cm piece of 14-count soluble canvas 15cm embroidery hoop (optional) cross stitch pattern cotton embroidery threads towel staple gun  fabric (enough to back the underside of the footstool) heavyweight fusible interfacing iron bowl of lukewarm water

B

eing able to relax and put your feet up after a long day is one of life’s little luxuries, and this footstool will help you do just that. Here, a gypsy roseinspired design is cross stitched onto vintage linen – copy this design or create one of your own. And don’t feel that you need to use this on a footstool. You can do it on curtains, chairs or pillows – anything you like!

SWEET GYPSY ROSE

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how to

1

On a work surface, turn the footstool upside down and remove the feet, old fabric and backing together with any nails and staples from the woodwork. If your footstool is old and battered, you might want to give it a lick of paint. If necessary, cut out some new wadding to fit the top and stick it in place using spray glue or a hot glue gun.

canvas has dissolved and you are left with just your stitches. Leave the linen to dry naturally, laying it flat on a towel.

6

Once dry, turn your embroidery face down on a towel and iron on the back to ensure you don’t crush your stitches.

2

7

3

8

Lay the linen on a flat surface and mark with pins where you want the pattern to appear. Pin and tack the soluble canvas onto the linen in the same place. If using an embroidery hoop, place it around the soluble canvas and gently pull the fabric taut.

Cross-stitch the pattern following the chart. You will only need to use two strands of the thread when stitching. To separate them, cut a length of embroidery thread from the skein roughly twice the length of your forearm and gently separate the strands by running your thumb down the thread, holding the two groups tightly.

4

When you have finished stitching, remove the hoop and the tacking stitches.

5

Soak the embroidered material in a bowl of clean, lukewarm water for around 10 minutes until all the soluble

Lay the linen over the top of the footstool, ensuring the pattern is positioned correctly. Holding the fabric firmly in place, flip the footstool top over and use the staple gun to fix the fabric in place. Work on one edge at a time, always starting in the centre and working out to the edges, keeping the fabric taut. Cut off excess fabric at the corners and place staples along the remaining edges, keeping the tension even. Trim any excess material.

9

Cut the backing fabric to the same size as the back of the stool and add 2cm to each dimension. Finish the backing by covering it with the fusible interfacing following the manufacturer’s instructions. Press in 1cm on each edge and glue to the underside of the stool, hiding the staples and raw edges of the embroidered fabric.

10

Screw the feet back on, turn the stool over and put your feet up!

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COLOUR KEY

Pearl Lowe Rose Chart

= DMC : 3328 = DMC : 3712 = DMC : 760 = DMC : 761 = DMC : 3713 = DMC : 728 = DMC : 677 = DMC : 3865 = DMC : 3829 = DMC : 825 = DMC : 826 = DMC : 827 = DMC : 890 = DMC : 3346 = DMC : 3347 = DMC : 3348 Eureka! Want to really get your teeth into upcycling? Why not turn an old drawer into a footstool?  Old jumpers can also be turned into coverings for your furniture quite easily

the book Pearl Lowe’s Vintage Craft is published by HarperCollins £20 hardback harpercollins.co.uk

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Make it

WANT MORE ? Jo owns haberdashery Darn It & Stitch darnitandstitch.com

s e l d e ne

pins &

Keep your pins at the ready with these cute little pincushion rings PHOTOGRAPHY rachel burgess

PINS & NEEDLES

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PROJECT jo watkins

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Say it with flowers

1

2 2

3

3

4

Materials

needle

 e mbroidery thread – black & white for the ladybird, any colour for the flower  red felt for the ladybird & any cotton fabric for the flower ring base with a flat top handful of toy stuffing  1 large flat button for both designs & 1 small button for the flower Super Glue

W

e once read a really horrifying story in the paper about a lady who used to keep her pins in her mouth as she sewed, and then one day, merrily stitching away, she inhaled one and had to take a trip to hospital. That was scary reading for people who like to do lots of sewing and who have, on occasion, kept their pins in their mouths, so we got to thinking – what could we make that would help us keep our pins (literally) to hand and not potentially kill us? The answer was simple – a pincushion ring! Here are two fun little makes, just for you.

4

how to

1

Cut a circle of felt that measures approximately 8cm in diameter. Using the embroidery thread, sew a running stitch all the way around the circle about ½cm in from the edge. Leave both ends of the thread long to use as a drawstring.

1

Follow steps 1 and 2 for the ladybird pincushion but use patterned cotton fabric.

2

2

3

3

Pop the stuffing in the centre of the circle, draw up the thread so that the fabric closes around it into a ball and tie a knot in the thread nice and tightly. Snip the ends of the thread.

To make the body, use three long stitches in a ‘Y’ shape to divide the ball into the body sections. You might have to squish the circle into more of an oval at this point. Using the black thread, embroider the spots using satin stitch and use small stitches for the eyes. For authenticity, use a little bit of white thread for the facial spots!

4

Turn the ladybird over and glue the button to the back to create the base. Attach the button so that the flattest side is on the outside and glue the flat ring top to the button. Voilà! A mini pincushion ring!

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how to

Once you’ve made the basic shape with the circle of fabric and stuffing, bring your thread up through the centre of the ball.

Use long stitches to divide the ball into six equal segments, making sure you pull the thread tightly so it pulls the fabric in at the sides to make a gentle petal shape.

4

Secure your thread underneath and stitch a small button in the centre for decoration – the smaller the better!

5

To finish, follow step 4 for the ladybird design, and there you go – one very sweet little pincushion.

PINS & NEEDLES

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Make it

EXPLoRER'S There’s nothing sweeter than girl and bunny duo Belle & Boo and we just know you’re going to love this satchel sewing tutorial inspired by the plucky pair’s many adventures PHOTOGRAPHY laura edwards

Materials

 150x60cm cotton poplin in Classic Belle & Boo or Pirate Games print (for the lining) 150x60cm furnishing-weight fabric roll of bias binding (for the edging) 10cm of 2cm-wide tape 5 2cm D-rings air erasable fabric pen 1m of 2.5cm-wide webbing matching sewing thread basic sewing kit sewing machine

W

hen we heard The Belle & Boo Book of Craft was coming out, we couldn’t wait to see what utterly lovely makes would be included. Out of all the projects, the Explorer’s Satchel is our favourite. There are lots of slightly tricky things to tackle, but it’ll be worth the effort – we promise!

EXPLORER’S SATCHEL

SATCHEL.indd 84

PROJECT belle & Boo

how to ASSEMBLING THE LARGE POCKET

1

Neaten the top edges of both main fabric front pockets using bias binding. Open out one side of the bias binding and stitch the raw edge of the binding along the raw top edge of the pockets. Fold the binding over the edge to enclose and stitch in place. Fold back, press and tack down a 1cm turning along the other edges of the pockets.

2

To prepare both pocket flaps, fold a 2cm length of tape through a D-ring and tack the raw ends of the tape to the right side of the main fabric pocket flap at the centre of the bottom edge. With right sides facing, line up with the pocket flap lining and tack along the two short sides and bottom edge. Using the zip foot, machine-stitch 6mm in from the edge and down the short sides and

bottom, leaving the top edge open. Clip each corner on the diagonal within 2mm of the stitch line then turn right side out.

3

Bias-bind the top edge of the large pocket. Pin and tack the front pockets 3cm up from the bottom edge and 3cm in from the sides, then machinestitch close to the folds. Work a few extra stitches at the top of the seams to reinforce the join.

4

With right sides facing, tack the top edge of the pocket flaps just above and in line with the top of the front pockets. Sew in place using a zigzag stitch to cover the raw edges. Fold the flaps over the top of the front pockets and press the seam flat. Tack the large pocket to the bag front.

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PRESENT IDEA This satchel would make a really lovely birthday present for someone special

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EXPLORER’S SATCHEL

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Make it

cutting out From lining fabric x1 30x30cm front x1 30x30cm back x1 30x30cm flap x2 30x10cm sides x1 30x10cm base x1 30x20cm inside pocket x2 7x12cm pocket flaps x2 12x13cm front pockets From furnishing fabric x1 30x30cm front x1 30x30cm back x1 30x30cm flap x2 30x10cm sides x1 30x10cm base x1 30x20cm large pocket x2 7x12cm pocket flaps x2 12x13cm front pockets x2 15x10cm side pockets x1 5cmx20cm zip pocket top x1 15x20cm zip pocket front x1 20x20cm zip pocket back x2 2.5x5cm tabs

EXPLORER’S SATCHEL

SATCHEL.indd 86

SEWING THE SIDES

5

Stitch a looped D-ring to the middle of the top edge of one side pocket as before. Bias-bind the top edge of both side pockets, covering the raw edge of the D-ring loop. Using an air erasable fabric pen, mark two lines on the other pocket parallel to and 3.5cm in from the side edges. Leaving a 6mm seam allowance, stitch the sides and bottom of the pockets in line with the two bag sides, then stitch over the lines to make the pencil slots.

ASSEMBLING THE BAG

6

With right sides facing, tack the bottom edges of both side pieces to the short ends of the base. Machinestitch 1cm from the edge, sewing along one edge at a time and leaving 1cm unstitched at each end of both seams. With right sides facing, pin the front of the bag to both side pieces and a long side of the base. Stitch in place 1cm from the edge.

7

Sew the back piece to the open sides and the base in the same way as the front to complete the main bag. Diagonally clip the corners within 2mm of the stitch line, turn right side out and press lightly.

8

With right sides facing, pin and tack the flap lining to the flap around both sides and the bottom edge. Leave the top open. Machine-stitch, leaving a 1cm seam allowance around each edge, then diagonally clip the corners to within 2mm of the stitch line and turn right side out. With the right sides facing, pin the top edge centrally to the top edge of the bag back and sew the two together, leaving a 6mm seam allowance.

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FURNISHING FABRIC BACK

FRONT

FLAP

POCKET FLAP

POCKET FLAP

FRONT POCKET

FRONT POCKET

SIDE

SIDE

SIDE

TAB X2

ZIP POCKET TOP SIDE SIDE POCKET POCKET ZIP POCKET FRONT

ZIP POCKET BACK

CUTTING GUIDES LINING FABRIC BACK

FRONT

LARGE POCKET

MAKING UP THE LINING

9

Bias-bind the top edge of the inside pocket, then press it in half widthways. Unfold the pocket, line it up and pin it to the bottom edge of the front lining piece. Machine-stitch along the crease to divide the pocket in half.

10

Sew the top and bottom of the zip pocket front to each side of the zip to enclose. With right sides facing, line up and pin on the pocket back. Machine-stitch both sides and the bottom edge, leaving the top open. Clip the corners and turn right side out. Sew the top edges together, leaving a 6mm seam. Stitch the pocket centrally to the top edge of the back lining piece.

11

Assemble the lining in the same order and using the same method as the main bag (see steps 6–8), stitch 1cm seam allowances throughout.

FLAP

POCKET FLAP

POCKET FLAP

FRONT POCKET

FRONT POCKET

PUTTING THE SATCHEL TOGETHER

12

Slip the lining inside the main bag so that the zip pocket is next to the flap at the back. Match up the seams then tack all around the top edge to hold in place. Sew the two together, leaving a 1cm seam, then trim the seam allowance back to 5mm. Bias-bind the top edges to neaten.

SIDE

SIDE

SIDE

like this... Personalise your bag by choosing your favourite Belle & Boo fabric for the lining and vary the details – for example, swap the binding for tape or change the colours of the D-rings  Belle & Boo also has some really lovely badges on its website (belleandboo.com), which would look great on the satchel strap. Our

13

Securely stitch a D-ring onto each end of the webbing strap. Press back a 15mm seam along each side edge of both tabs. You can use a 10cm length of tape instead of the tabs if you wish. Thread a tab through a D-ring and stitch the folded raw ends to one side of the bag on the inside edge. Join the other end of the strap to the other side of the inside of the bag in the same way.

favourite is the Cowboys & Indians set!

the book The Belle & Boo Book of Craft by Belle & Boo, is published by Quadrille Publishing (£14.99) Readers of Crafty Magazine can buy The Belle & Boo Book of Craft at the special price of £10.99, with free P&P. To order, please call 01256 302699 quoting reference 8XF and your credit card details.

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the

M A G A Z I N E

G u ide

to

S EL L I N G

AT THE CRAFT FAIR WITH CHARLOTTE FARMER, INDEPENDENT STALL HOLDER INTERVIEW SARAH ADIE

I

llustrator and screen printer Charlotte Farmer is old hat when it comes to craft fairs, having been to at least 10 of the things, as well as several open house and studio weekends, so she’s certainly well versed in getting up at the crack of sparrows and hot-footing it to various venues to sell her beautiful wares. If you’re thinking about taking the next step as a designermaker and are keen to spread the word about what it is you do by having stalls at craft fairs, her words of wisdom could really help you see success at your very first fair.

anyone else. Having originally done a degree in fine art specialising in printmaking I then did an MA in illustration. The combination of drawing and printing has proved very useful in creating my own products.

What inspired you to set up a creative business? I wanted to do something that used my creative skills and I didn’t want to work for

What challenges have you faced as a creative freelancer? The biggest challenge is always financial. I mainly work as an illustrator

Have you always been a crafter? I’ve always enjoyed drawing and making prints, which I’ve been showing in galleries for about three years now, but it’s only in the last couple of years after doing a course in fabric printing that I’ve really started to make printed bags and so on to sell.

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BUSINESS.indd 89

at craft fairs, and screen printing fits in around that, but you never really know how busy you’re going to be. I also find it hard to keep up with admin-type work – it’s not my strong point so I always seem to be rushing around doing everything at the last minute! What was your first fair like? The first fair I did was in London, run by a magazine – so it was a pretty big one for my first time! I persuaded a friend to help and we caught a train bright(ish) and very early, then wheeled our giant cases (packed with far too much stuff) along Archway Road looking for the venue. Once we found it (a church hall next to a newsagent and what appeared to be a gun shop), we set up our display, which involved stringing tea towels around the

AT THE CR AF T FAIR

05/07/2013 18:01


Crafty Business

WANT MORE ? Don’t forget to check out Charlotte’s goodies on her website charlotte-farmer.co.uk

edge of the table and using old suitcases to display prints, bags and cards. Once the doors opened, it was crazily busy all day – I even spotted Linda Barker and a semi-celebrity chef! What do you need to do to prepare before heading off to a craft fair? For my tea towels, I spend ages ironing and tying them up with string. There’s always a late night scramble and panic, making sure I have enough prints wrapped and cards in bags as well as tracking down my business cards and postcards. I tend to attach price labels when I get there otherwise they can get a bit bent in transit. How do you go about setting up your stall and display? The display my friend and I created for the first fair has served as a bit of a blueprint. I start with the tablecloth, which is just a large piece of plain white fabric, then I pin tea towels or bags around the edge. After that, it’s a matter of arranging the cases of prints, tea towels and cards depending on the size of the table and trying to balance bags on top. I also have a small case full of all the things I might need like scissors, string, pegs, safety pins, drawing pins, Blu-tack, luggage labels and Washi tape.

AT THE CR AF T FAIR

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What sort of props do you need to take? I’ve collected a few useful props over time and I’m lucky that there’s a crazy antique shop on my walk home. I’ve got old leather suitcases, wooden crates, biscuit tins, a wire in-tray and small blackboards. I had a rubberstamp made that I stamp onto small luggage labels. The size of your table can vary hugely, so be prepared to adapt. How much stock should you take? It’s really hard to predict, although I now know which of my bags sell best and that there’s not much point in taking large expensive prints. It can also depend on how you’re travelling. What about pricing? I stick my labels on with colourful Washi tape or tie them on with string when I get there. It’s always a last-minute rush and I write a general price list on a small blackboard too, although I have noticed that people prefer to be able to pick something up and find a price on it. It’s good to have a range of prices so people can always buy a card if they don’t want to spend too much. I have to be careful with prints as I sell them in galleries too and don’t want to undercut them by too much, so I tend to take 20%

off. You just have to bear in mind your costs and time – my things aren’t super cheap but they are good quality! Do you advertise about the fact you’re doing a craft fair? As I said before, admin isn’t my strong point so I usually manage a last-minute post on my blog. I joined Twitter this year so I tweet a week or two beforehand if I remember. I don’t set a good example on this side of things! How essential is it for creative business owners to go to craft fairs? It’s a good way to boost sales and it also gets your work seen by a wider audience. You never know who might buy something, so make sure your name or web address is on everything!

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“You never know who might buy something, so make sure your name or web address is on everything!”

Charlotte Farmer’s top 3 craft fair tips

1

2

3

Take

a float and have small change! And take a friend to help if you’ve got someone willing to sit for ages keeping your spirits up and getting you cake (there’s always cake to be found somewhere). Time

of year is most important – the fairs in the run-up to Christmas are always the best and, as people are usually more organised than I am with their Christmas shopping, ones in late October and November tend to be the best. Make sure your work is of the best quality you can produce. Attention to detail is really important, so use good paper or materials and think about how you package things too. Make an eye-catching display and stand out from the crowd.

AT THE CR AF T FAIR

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Crafty business

é b r a B e Th

shop

Karen Barbé’s handmade textiles have reached a worldwide market through her beautiful blog and social media-appeasing photography. We talk to her about global threads, perfect pictures and being a one-woman operation PHOTOGRAPHY Karen Barbé

THE BARBÉ SHOP

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WORDS HUGH METCALF

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WANT MORE ? Karen’s gorgeous homewares and blog can be found at karenbarbe.com

I

t’s a constant source of amazement that the work of a textile artist from Santiago, Chile could end up on a kitchen counter in Surrey, direct from the designer. The handmade market is a global beast that has no singular tongue, and as Karen Barbé says: “embroidery, weaving and screen-printing are the creative languages I use.” Karen’s blog (blog.karenbarbe.com) has been an instrumental tool in spreading her work worldwide, especially, she thinks, as it’s written in English. “Had I chosen to write only in Spanish, the scope of my work would have probably been limited to Latin America and Spain.” Undoubtedly, it helps the textile artist engage with a more global audience, but we certainly can’t see language as a barrier to appreciating what she makes.

“The key to making handmade businesses sustainable is making products the consumer is emotionally attached to” Her aesthetic, while still referencing the visual culture of her home, is stripped back to its roots. Traditional crafts and

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Crafty business

Quickfire Q&A with Karen Barbé How can other creative entrepreneurs work towards a better level of photography?

folklore may be among her influences, but she describes her design fancies as “anything simple and unpretentious”. It’s a style that extends beyond borders, something that’s particularly important in this brave, new world. “Today it’s all about pinnable, likeable or shareable images. So while creating original content and an interesting story is still paramount, the potential social network effectiveness of pictures is key to marketing my work.” Looking at her blog, you can understand her success on these platforms. Her photography is deliciously muted, rustic, and, most importantly, showcases the detail in her textile work to its full potential – but don’t be disheartened if you’re a beginner photographer as Karen is completely self-taught. In reality, what Karen Barbé Textileria is selling isn’t just potholders and tote bags, but the entire handmade lifestyle. This is why her blog and photography are so important to her products. Spending her days stitching beautiful things in between passing on her skills to eager students... Yes, she’s pretty much living our dream and we want a slice of her life. “I believe the key to making handmade businesses sustainable is making products that the consumer is emotionally attached to. Fair Trade, organic, natural materials... it all loses its meaning if the product ends up on a landfill.” While sustainability is all well and good, what about growing your business?

THE BARBÉ SHOP

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Scaling up is always a challenge for hand-makers as, well, everything has to be made by hand. A business like Karen’s is a one-woman affair – defiantly so – and she’s behind every aspect of the products. With quality control a key part of her textiles’ success, there’s no easy solution. “I don’t sell wholesale because I haven’t been able to handle larger productions and on top of that offer a reduced price.” Which way to go from here is something of a mystery to Karen.

My photography started as a way of showcasing my work on the blog but it wasn’t long before it became an artistic expression in its own right. I had to learn a lot in the process. I started with a point-andshoot camera and then moved to a DSLR. I struggled with aperture, shutter speed and ISO values but, at the same time, I learned about the quintessence of photography – seeing light. Where do you do your

No doubt it’ll be a journey she enjoys. Her passion for textiles has been with her since childhood when she was surrounded by yarns, fabric and colour as her mother spent her days on crochet, knitting or sewing projects, yet her biggest epiphany is only a few months old. “Not only do I want to create crafts but I want to communicate them too. Once you become conscious that you have a deep reason for doing things, you stop looking for formal inspiration sources and begin working towards your idea.” Her classroom, teaching students the basics of embroidery, weaving and screenprinting, is one such place for her to communicate her craft, but by writing about and photographing her explorations with a needle and thread on a blog, she has the opportunity to communicate it on a much wider scale. After all, if you’ve got something important to share, the world will listen.

creative work? Somewhere between my brain and my studio. I chew over my future projects for a long time before they see the light of day. Only when I’m ready to start working with my hands do I head to the studio. How do you keep the passion for making alive? When I get trapped by the ugly side of work (paperwork!) I force myself to sit down at my working table and do something. Making things lets me feel fresh and full of ideas again. I try not to make a differentiation between what’s work and what’s a personal project. That’s the key to feeling like you’re not actually working.

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CM05 (Page 95)_PE 03/07/2013 12:31 Page 95

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KN24 House advert_pp 05/07/2013 17:20 Page 98

ISSUE 24 on sale 25th JULY 2013

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Brighten up y our living room by sewin g up our fruity cushio ns

Feeling foxy

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Roald Dahl’s Fantastic Mr Fox was the inspiration for our amazing knitted handbag. It even has a detachable tail!

Make our gardening kit, complete with an apron, planter and these upcycled garden markers

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Here’s what you can do using your free coaster kit. You don’t just have to make coasters!

August issue is on sale from 29 AUGUST  SUBSCRIBE TO CRAFTY MAGAZINE TODAY 

Order online at www.practicalsubs.com/A005 Call now on 0844 561 1203 (quote code A005)

NEXT MONTH.indd 97

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Mr X S titch

X-RATED

Superhero of arts and crafts Mr X Stitch swoops in every month to dispel the myth that stitching’s just for girls ILLUSTRATION DAREN NEWMAN

O

ne of the things I love about cross stitch is its remarkable healing powers. That might sound like a bold claim, but within those tiny crosses lies an inner peace that is increasingly important in this day and age.

THOUGHTS? Get in touch with Mr X Stitch and make your views known mrx@craftymag.com

I recently did a workshop at a school in Essex, working with 30 young people between the ages of 12 and 15. As you might expect from an exuberant bunch, it was quite a lively session, and for many of them it was their first foray into the wonderful world of embroidery. You do expect some to struggle to grasp the art of cross stitch but, thanks to my particular brand of teaching (think snappy phrases and the occasional wisecrack), before too long each of them was producing their first embroidered pieces of work and you could see that some were discovering just how wonderful cross stitch can be. When you teach cross stitch, there’s a steep learning curve as people discover the stitches that are required and the methods for starting and stopping. However, while it may be steep, it is also very short, and I tend to find that within five minutes an entire group will have picked up the idea and will be happily stitching along at their own pace. It’s at this point that a noticeable change happens, as an entire room full of budding stitchers suddenly goes quiet. The pace of the stitching slows them down, and a semi-meditative state starts to take over as people become absorbed by the process of stitching and the act of creating. A bit of gentle prompting and friendly conversation begins to take place, underpinned by a fundamental happiness that is quite hard to explain. You won’t necessarily understand what

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I mean unless you try it for yourself, but there’s no denying that people who stitch in the company of others will end up talking about topics that they might not have otherwise. Cross stitch provides a creative space and a comfortable pace, where the experience of stitching and making something new reconnects us with a fundamental pleasure that is impossible to measure. Anyone who has ever done it will understand what I mean and I can’t urge you strongly enough to try it for yourself. It really could change your life.

“Cross stitch provides a creative space and a comfortable pace, where the experience of stitching and making something new reconnects us with a fundamental pleasure”

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CM05 (Page 100) OBC_PE 03/07/2013 12:33 Page 100


Craft room

Exclusive

u by Brought to yo ine Craft y Magaz issue 5

m a k e s

12

s t c je o r p y s a e & k ic qu ce craft spa to PERSONALISE your

Creative gifts for crafters – or treats for yourself! Pin cushions / storage boxes / notebooks /sewing kits / knitting bags & more SUPP_COVER.indd 1

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Contents

It’s every maker’s dream to have the perfect craft room, but just what should you put in it once you’ve done the decorating? We’ve got lots of lovely little ideas here to help you finish off your creative space and have lots of fun making in the process. Enjoy!

Cover image by Alex Farnum from So Pretty! Felt by Amy Palanjian, published by Chronicle Books

4 Hanging pockets Get those knitting needles out to make a brilliant organiser that you can hang on the wall or door. 6 Mosaic pincushion Bust your felt stash and make a beautiful pincushion into the bargain. 8 Foam-stamped journals & wrapped pencils How to make your own stamps to funk up some DIY notebooks, with matching pencils.

Perfect for flowers or craft materials!

11 Geometric mat Give your craft table a bit of style with this gorgeous little mat. 14 Crochet pen holder You’ll need something to keep all your pens and scissors in – and this little number will more than do the trick. 16 Pocket full of posies You should always keep plants and flowers close by – easily done with these linen and vintage fabric vase covers. 20 Woodland storage boxes Bring the outside in with these beautifully designed storage boxes – great for yarn, fabric and thread. 24 Sewing kit in a jar Keep your craft room tidy and all you need to sew close to hand with this clever use for an old jar. 26 Sewing box book Hide your sewing kit away in this very clever book-turned-box. 28 Knitting bag This gorgeous bag will keep your yarn safe and sound in the house – and ready to be whisked outside at a moment’s notice. 30 Spirograph bookends These bookends are the perfect – and beautiful – solution to propping up your many, many craft books.

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Make it

hangings pocket If you find you’re always short of storage space then this knitted organiser will prove the perfect method for decluttering your house PHOTOGRAPHY penny wincer

Materials

 5 50g balls of Debbie Bliss cotton DK in Mink (A) & 1 ball in each of Duck Egg (B) & Avocado (C)

PROJECT debbie bliss

how to Lower pocket ** With 3.75mm needles and A, cast-on 63 sts.

 p air (each) of 3.75mm & 4mm knitting needles 36x71cm (14¼x28”) piece of fabric

Moss st row k1, [p1, k1] to end. Rep this row three times more.

 31x66cm (12¼x26”) piece of pelmet weight buckram sewing thread  4 3cm (17”) length of wooden dowel to fit through the hanging loops

T

he key to the perfect craft room is organisation – and if you knit yourself these hanging pockets you’ll be able to find things quickly and easily as and when you want them. And they look quite nice too! All these hanging pockets need is a hook, so they can be placed on the back of a door or even on a wall.

HANGING POCKETS

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Change to 4mm needles and work in patt as follows: 1st patt row (right side): [K1, p1] twice, k to last 4 sts, [p1, k1] twice. 2nd patt row: K1, p1, k1, p to last 3 sts, k1, p1, k1. These two rows form the main patt and are repeated.

Patt two rows Dec row: [k1, p1] twice, ssk, k to last 6 sts, k2tog, [p1, k1] twice. 61 sts. Beg with a 2nd row, work 13 rows in patt. Dec row: [k1, p1] twice, ssk, k to last 6 sts, k2tog, [p1, k1] twice. 59 sts.

Beg with a 2nd row, work 21 rows in patt. Work four rows in moss st. ** Fold line row (right side): P to end.

Backing ** Next row: k1, p1, k1, p to last 3 sts, k1, p1, k1. Next row: [k1, p1] twice, k to last 4 sts, [p1, k1] twice. Rep the last two rows until the piece measures 65cm from **, ending with a wrong side row. Work four rows in moss st across all sts, ending with a wrong side row.

Hanging loops Next row: Moss st 13 sts, * cast-off next 10 sts in moss st, with one st on needle after cast-off, moss st the next 12 sts; rep from * once more.

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To make up Working on the last group of 13 sts and leaving rem two groups of sts on the needle, moss st 27 rows, then cast-off these 13 sts in moss st. *** With wrong side facing, rejoin yarn to next group of 13 sts, work 27 rows in moss st, then cast-off in moss st. Rep from *** for last group of 13 sts.

Middle pocket Work as lower pocket from ** to **, using B. Cast-off in moss st.

Top pocket Work as lower pocket from ** to **, using C. Cast-off in moss st.

Fold the lower pocket onto the right side of the backing, along the fold line. Join the pocket to the backing along the side edges. Arrange the middle and top pockets evenly spaced on the backing and join the pocket sides and lower edge to the backing, making sure that the cast-on edge forms the top edge of the pockets. Fold each hanging loop in half and sew the cast-off edge to the wrong side of the moss st top edge.

To finish Using sewing thread, hand-stitch vertical lines through the backing and pockets to divide into sections. Lay the fabric on the buckram, then fold and tape the excess onto the wrong side. Topstitch around the outside edge to keep the fabric in place. Hand-sew the knitted piece to the covered buckram around the edges.

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Knits for You and Your Home by Debbie Bliss, published by Quadrille. Photos Š Penny Wincer £18.99 quadrille.com

tension 20 sts & 28 rows to 10cm square over St st using 4mm needles.

sizing Approximately 31x66cm

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Make it

MOSAICn o i h s u pinc The mosaic design on this pincushion is a great way to use up small pieces of felt left over from other projects PHOTOGRAPHY alex farnum

Materials

23x30.5cm sheet of grey wool felt  6 5x5cm pieces of wool felt, in six different colours  s ewing thread, in co-ordinating colours  felt/fabric scraps or polyfill, for stuffing disappearing fabric marker scissors ruler sheet of paper sewing needle

PROJECT amy palanjian

how to

1

Trace two 9.5cm diameter circles onto grey felt and cut out; this will form the top and bottom of the pincushion. Cut out a 30.5x4.5cm rectangle of grey felt for the sides of the pincushion.

2

Trace four 3x1.3cm diamonds onto each of the six shades of felt and cut them out to create a total of 24 diamonds. Be sure to cut the diamonds as accurately as possible to ensure that the mosaic design fits together properly.

3

N

o craft room is complete without at least one pincushion, and the mosaic design on this one really is quite lovely. Because it’s made of felt it won’t be too tricky to sew up and the finished piece won’t fray, so it should last you a long time. Have fun making it!

MOSAIC PINCUSHION

PINCUSHION.indd 6

Place the diamonds on a sheet of paper and arrange them in different compositions until you’re happy with the colourful design.

4

Transfer and sew the diamonds to one of the grey felt circles, starting with the eight centre diamonds. Use matching thread and small whipstitches to sew each one in place. Make sure the points of the diamonds meet neatly. This will be the top of the pincushion.

5

With matching thread, sew the top circle and rectangle together using small whipstitches, turning the circle gradually as you sew the edges together. When you’ve sewn all the way around the circle, trim any excess felt from the rectangle so that the short ends just about meet each other. Sew up the side seam and fix the bottom felt circle in place using small whipstitches, stopping three-quarters of the way around to leave an opening for stuffing. Don’t cut the thread.

6

Stuff the pincushion with felt/fabric scraps or polyfill. Use your fingers to press the stuffing into the pincushion until it’s firmly and evenly stuffed and has a nice shape.

7

Whipstitch the opening closed, knot the thread and cut off any excess.

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the book So Pretty! Felt by Amy Palanjian, published by Chronicle Books, £14.99 chroniclebooks.com

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MOSAIC PINCUSHION

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Make it

foam stamped journals & pencils wrapped

Bookbinding is incredibly fun and can be surprisingly easy. Once you have all the materials set up, it’ll be a breeze to make several journals at one time PHOTOGRAPHY MARIANNE PARASKEVA

Materials

 p rinting foam sheet such as Inovart’s Presto Foam template tape pencil  b lock printing ink, water-soluble, assorted colours brayer & inking plate cardstock, assorted colours 22x28cm or 23x30cm sketchpad

PROJECT MEaGAN LEWIS

W

e love stationery but it can be jolly expensive, so if you’d rather make than buy your own, follow this fun tutorial and learn how to do a little bit of bookbinding. After all, every craft room needs notebooks – how will you write down all your ideas as they come to you otherwise?

paper cutter/knife or scissors ruler bone folder long-reach stapler round pencils foam brush glue

Once you’ve made your stamp you can use it on absolutely anything you like as well. We think the wood effect would look lovely stamped on some kraft paper, which can then be used as gift wrap for a birthday present.

rubber bands

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how to

1

To make the stamp, photocopy and cut out the template on page 10 and place on top of the printing foam. Secure the template in place using a few pieces of tape. With a pencil, trace the template, allowing the pressure of the tip of the pencil to create an impression on the foam. Use a slightly dull pencil so that it won’t tear your template when you trace it. Once you have finished tracing, cut the foam to size.

2

Put a strip of ink on the inking plate and roll it out with the brayer to an even consistency. Roll the ink onto the printing foam until it is sufficiently inked.

3

Before printing, establish the grain of the cardstock – you should arrange the prints on the cardstock so that the central fold between the two prints runs parallel to the grain. Place the foam inked side down onto one half of the cardstock. Each cover requires two prints side by side to create the front and back of the journal. Gently press and rub the back of the foam with your hand to transfer the ink to the cardstock. Carefully pick up the foam, re-ink it and make another print directly next to the first.

4

For each journal and pencil set, print one piece of cardstock in the opposite direction to the printed covers. This will be the piece that gets wrapped around the pencils. The reason for printing in the opposite direction is so the grain will run parallel to the pencil, making it easier to wrap and glue. Leave the printed pieces to dry for a few hours.

5

Establish the grain of the sketch paper. You will want to cut the paper so that when folded, the fold, or spine, runs parallel to the grain. Trim each piece of paper to 20x13cm. Each journal will have five sheets. To make five journals, cut 25 sheets of paper. To make 10 journals, cut 50 sheets of paper.

6 7

Score and fold each piece of paper in half.

Gather five sheets of paper by placing each sheet into the fold of the next. Repeat for all sheets until you have several stacks of folded paper, five sheets each. Set aside.

8

Once the printed covers have dried, trim them down to 21x13 cm pieces using scissors or a paper cutter.

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Make it

9 10

Score and fold the covers in half.

Place one folded five-sheet stack of papers inside a cover. Take this stack and open it flat, being sure to keep the papers aligned. With the cover facing up so that the solid edge of the staples is on the outside of the journal, insert the stack into the long-reach stapler and staple twice along the spine.

11

Fold the journal back together and reinforce the fold of the spine using your bone folder. If you would like to round the journal’s corners, use a paper knife or scissors to do so; otherwise, your journal is complete.

13

With the foam brush, apply glue to the inside of the paper and wrap it around a pencil. Secure with a rubber band until dry. Repeat for the remaining pencils.

14

The finished journals and pencils can be tied together or placed in a gift box.

the book Put Your Stamp On It by Meagan Lewis, published by Apple Press ÂŁ12.99 apple-press.com

12

For the pencils, trim the cardstock to the length of the pencils and wide enough to wrap around one pencil.

TEMPLATE

FOAM STAMPED JOURNALS & WR APPED PENCILS

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GEOMETRIC mat Sew this lovely mat for your craft room and really sit down to making in style PHOTOGRAPHY KEIKO OIKAWA

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PROJECT CHRISTINE LEECH

GEOMETRIC MAT

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Make it

TEMPLATE

Materials

thin paper

2 20x20cm pieces of brown felt 19x19cm piece of yellow felt 8x2.5cm piece of yellow felt cutting mat small metal ruler craft knife spray adhesive yellow sewing thread needle pins damp cloth

F

elt is a great material to use for this pattern as it cuts easily and doesn’t fray. This mat has no specific use but you could try using it as a coaster, placemat or plant pot stand in your craft space. Whatever you do end up using it for, it’ll look gorgeous no matter what.

GEOMETRIC MAT

GEOMETRIC.indd 12

1

how to

Transfer the template onto thin paper. Fix it to one of the brown squares of felt using a fine mist of spray adhesive. Place onto a cutting mat and, carefully following the template lines, use the ruler and craft knife to cut along each line and completely cut out and remove each grey V. Once finished, peel off the template paper.

2

Following the annotated template, fold each V marked with an A or B back on itself – the As should point downwards and the Bs should point upwards. Where the points overlap, tuck the A and B pieces underneath the smaller, static triangles. Press the folds with a damp cloth to hold.

4

Place the two squares on top of the remaining piece of brown felt and pin together. To make the tab, fold the rectangle of yellow felt in half widthways. Insert the open ends about 1.5cm into one corner of the mat, between the sheets of felt. Pin. Machine-sew the sheets and tab together, about 5mm from the edges of the square. Press.

the book Felt Sew Good by Christine Leech, published by Quadrille. Photos ©Keiko Oikawa £12.99 quadrille.com

3

Place this piece of cut felt on top of the yellow felt square and position it in the centre so that there is a 5mm edging of brown felt all the way around. Pin in place at the corners. Stitch a small cross-stitch through both layers at the tip of each V to hold it down.

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GEOMETRIC MAT

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Make it

CROCHET r e d l o h pen You can never have enough storage pots, especially for your crafty notions, so why not get your hook out and whip up this useful container? PHOTOGRAPHY yuki sugiura

PROJECT sara sinaguglia

Materials

1 50g ball Rowan Fine Milk Cotton, shade 501 Sepia 1 10g ball Anchor Pearl Cotton, no. 8, shade 265 (for trimming) 2 .25mm &1.25mm crochet hooks t apestry needle a t least 21cm-square piece of lining material, such as hessian t hread to match lining s ewing needle

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craftymag.com

Base Rnd 1: Using the larger hook and Milk Cotton, make a slip ring, 3 ch (counts as 1 tr), 11 tr into ring, ss into top of 3 ch. 12 sts Rnd 2: Working into the back loop only of each st, 3 ch (counts as 1 tr), 1 tr into same st, 2 tr into each st, ss into top of 3 ch. 24 sts Rnd 3: As round 2. 48 sts Rnd 4: Working into the back loop only of each st, 3 ch (counts as 1 tr), 1 tr into same st, * 1 tr into each of next 3 sts, 2 tr into following st *, repeat from * to *, ending 1 tr into each of last 3 sts, ss into top of 3 ch. 60 sts

Sides Rnd 5: Working into the back loop only of each st, 3 ch (counts as 1 tr), 1 tr into each of next 2 sts, 5 tr into next st, ss behind the 5 tr into the back loop only of the first of the 5 tr to form a bobble, * 1 tr into each of next 3 sts, 1 bobble into following st *, repeat from * to *, ss into top of 3 ch. Rnd 6: 1 ch, 1 dc into top of 3 ch, 1 dc into each of next 2 tr, 1 dc over ss at back of bobble, * 1 dc into each of next 3 tr, 1 dc over ss at back of bobble *, repeat from * to *, ss into 1 ch. Rnd 7: 3 ch, * 1 bobble into next st, 1 tr into each of following 3 sts *, repeat from * to *, ending 1 bobble into next st, 1 tr

into each of last 2 sts, ss into top of 3 ch. Rnd 8: 1 ch, 1 dc into top of 3 ch, * 1 dc over ss at back of bobble, 1 dc into each of next 3 tr *, repeat from * to *, ending 1 dc over ss at back of bobble, 1 dc into each of last 2 tr, ss into 1 ch. Rnd 9: As round 5, but working into both loops of each st. Repeat rounds 6–9 twice, then work round 6 again. Fasten off. If you would like to make your pot taller, simply add more rounds. (Of course, you will need to adjust the lining measurements.)

To make the lining From the lining fabric, cut one piece to measure 21x11cm and a disc about 8cm in diameter. (Draw around an object of this size such as a tin or around a pattern cut from paper.) Stitch the shorter ends of the rectangle together, with a 1cm seam allowance, to form a cylinder. Press the seam open. Turn 1cm to the wrong side along one free edge and press. Snip into the edge of the disc to a depth of about 5mm, at intervals of about 2cm. Pin the disc into the remaining edge of the cylinder and hand sew into place using small running stitches or backstitch, again taking a 1cm seam allowance. Snip around the edge seam allowance of the cylinder to make it flexible.

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To make up With wrong sides together, place the lining in the pot, pushing the lower seam well down inside it. Using the smaller hook and Pearl Cotton, work 1 dc into each st around the top of the pot, passing the hook and yarn through the lining fabric to fix it in place. Finish with a final round of 1 dc into each st. Cut the thread and sew it into the work with a tapestry needle.

tension 39 tr & 12 rows to 10cm

sizing The pot measures about 9cm tall and 6.5cm in diameter

the book Simple Crochet by Sara Sinaguglia, published by Mitchell Beazley, ÂŁ16.99 octopusbooks.co.uk

CROCHET PEN HOLDER

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Make it

POCKETS

FULL ies

s o p f o

Pick up some gorgeous vintage linen and lace and make something truly beautiful to keep your pens, pencils and scissors in PHOTOGRAPHY yuki sugiura

W

Materials

hen I was young, my family and I lived along a winding river, our house tucked up on a hillside in the woods. I remember that all of my free time was spent wandering in those woods. I knew every trail, every secret spot, and every place that the wild flowers grew. I would come home from my adventures with my arms full and decorate our house with flowers in every nook and cranny. I love these Pockets Full of Posies made from linen and bits of vintage finery – perfect for wild flowers. They also provide wonderful storage for pens, pencils or paintbrushes in a workspace.

25x36cm linen scraps for the outer shell (approx) 25x36cm cotton scraps for the lining (approx) light- or medium-weight fusible interfacing e mbellishments such as vintage linen napkins, doilies & ribbon t hread b uttons (one per pocket) jam jar, glass bottle or other waterproof vessel c urtain or towel rod, for hanging s traight edge/quilter’s ruler p encil/fabric marker

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PROJECT Alexandra Smith

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Make it

a

c

d

b

g

e

how to

1

Prepare the pieces Cut one 25x18cm (10x7”) rectangle each from the linen, cotton and interfacing. These will become the vase. Cut one 8x18cm (3x7”) rectangle each from the linen, cotton and interfacing. These will become the handle. In this example, I cut a corner triangle from a vintage linen napkin for embellishment. You could use a sweet vintage hankie, a bit of doily, embroidery, ribbon or buttons – anything that takes your fancy, really. Following the manufacturer’s instructions, fuse the corresponding interfacing to the wrong side of each of your lining pieces, then set aside.

2

Embellish the piece Take your large linen rectangle and your embellishments, choose one long edge to be the top of your fabric vase and sew the embellishments to your linen piece. Set aside. (a)

3

Sew the handle Place the smaller linen and lining

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f

pieces right sides together, matching the raw edges. Pin in place. Stitch around three sides with a 1cm seam allowance, leaving one narrow end of the rectangle open. Trim the seam allowance and clip the corners. Turn the handle right side out and press. Top stitch 5mm around the three sewn edges. Create a buttonhole centred on the sewn end of the handle to the appropriate size of your button. (b)

4

Sew the outer vase To create the vase, take your embellished linen rectangle and fold it in half, short sides matching and right sides together. Pin. Stitch along the raw edges taking a 1cm seam allowance. Press the seam open and fold the vase in order to centre the seam. This seam will be the back of your vase. Stitch along the bottom edge of your piece using a 1cm seam allowance. Clip the corners and press the seam open. (c)

This next stage is a little like origami and can seem a bit tricky if you’ve never done boxed corners before – just take a deep breath and let it come naturally. Working with the bottom seam of the vase, pinch/pull the corners into triangles, making sure they are even and centred, then press the triangles so they are nice and crisp. Fold the bottom of your vase into a kind of square, making sure everything is centred properly. (d) Using a pencil or fabric marker, make a mark 2.5cm (1”) in from the corners on the bottom seam at both ends. Using a straight edge or quilter’s ruler, draw a line through your markings. (e) Secure your triangles with pins and stitch along the lines you have drawn. Trim off the excess of the triangle near the stitch line and press.

5

Sew the lining Take your large interfaced lining rectangle and fold it in half, with short

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h

i

j

sides matching and right sides together. Pin. Stitch along the raw edges with a 1cm seam allowance, making sure to leave a 5cm (2�) opening in the seam for turning. Continue sewing the lining piece, following Step 4 instructions for the outer vase. Turn right side out.

6

Finish the vase With the outer vase the wrong side out, centre the handle inside on the back seam, matching the raw edges. Pin and tack in place. (f) Tuck the lining, with the right side out, into the outer vase, aligning the back seams and matching the raw edges. Pin the lining in place. Stitch 1cm around the raw edges. (g) Turn the vase the right side out through the lining opening. Stitch the opening closed using your preferred method. Tuck the lining down into the outer vase and press it neatly. (h)

k

Measure and mark approx. 9cm down from the top of the vase on the back seam. (i) Stitch your button in place on the mark. (j)

Use a rolled-up hand towel inside tight spaces to help with pressing

the book Simple Sewing with Lola Nova

Place a jam jar, glass bottle or other waterproof vessel inside the fabric shell and you have your finished fabric wall vase! Using a curtain or towel rod attached to the wall, hang your vase by the handle and button up. Use two or three in a row for a dramatic effect. All that is left to do is to fill your vase with some lovely flowers and enjoy!

by Alexandra Smith, published by Mitchell Beazley ÂŁ16.99

7

Variation If you would like to make a posy vase to hang on a hook instead of a curtain rod, bypass making the handle and replace it with a length of ribbon folded into a loop. Attach it in the same way you would the handle (see Step 6). (k)

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Eureka!

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Make it

WOODLAND s e x o b e g a r o st These boxes have an infinite number of uses, but are particularly perfect for storing your ribbons, fabric bundles and yarns PHOTOGRAPHY keiko oikawa

Materials

PROJECT christine leech

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For the embroidery

hat’s more important than storage boxes when you have a lot of wool, thread, needles and who knows what else floating around? If you want to make sure that your crafty goodies are well looked after and not kept on the floor, then this is most definitely the project for you.

30cm diameter embroidery hoop  A nchor Soft Cotton thread in: Beige 386, Cream 391 (use the whole skein as this thread is a twisted cotton & doesn’t easily divide into plies) water-soluble pen (optional) tailor’s carbon paper air-erasable pen damp cloth

For the boxes

Making your craft room pretty and inviting is particularly important – after all, if your work space is uninspiring, how can you expect to be inspired when you’re in it? The detail on these fun boxes is beautiful and the little owl motif will ensure you make all sorts of wise crafting decisions as you work.

 150x50cm thick calico or cotton twill, for lining  150x50cm plain cotton twill for the outer fabric (make sure it’s not too thick or you won’t be able to embroider through it)  c ardboard, if you wish to further stiffen your boxes tailor’s chalk sewing machine

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Make it

how to

1

To make the box lining Cut a 22cm square in calico or thick cotton (this includes a 1cm seam allowance) and an 84x22cm rectangle (also includes a 1cm seam allowance). Fold the rectangle in half lengthways to find the centre then make a little mark using tailor’s chalk. Fold the square in half and make another mark. Line up the two marks and pin together, right sides facing inwards.

2

Pin the rest of the rectangle to the square base, then tack the base to the sides. The box sides will join in the middle of the far side edge. Tack up the short side.

3

Machine-stitch the sides in place. It’s easiest to do this if you keep the sides of the box uppermost. Leave a 10cm turning hole in one of the base’s sides (this will be easier if it’s not the one with the join). Remove the tacking threads. Turn right side out so the raw edges are inside the box then press.

6

Place the fabric in the embroidery hoop and follow the stitch guide on page 23. When finished, press the fabric and use a damp cloth to remove any carbon paper or pen marks.

7

To complete the box Trim the fabric to the drawn line. Cut out a 22cm square from the outer fabric and make up the box using the instructions for making the box lining (steps 1-3), without leaving a turning hole.

10

Hand-stitch the turning hole closed. To strengthen the box and enable it to keep its shape better, oversew each side of the box using blanket stitch, sewing through the outer fabric and the lining of the box. Now find your boxes a home where they can be seen and admired, and get organising!

8

Place the lining box inside the outer box that is still inside out (so the right sides of the boxes are facing each other). Line up the two rear seams then pin the top of the boxes together. Sew around the box top. (If you want to reinforce the box sides, you can cut four 20cm squares of cardboard and insert them into the box through the turning hole – you will need to leave a larger hole and insert the card at Step 10).

4

To embroider the design For the embroidered outer box mark an 84x22cm rectangle on the reverse of your fabric. Find the centre of the rectangle by folding in half lengthways, then measure 11cm either side of this and mark using tailor’s chalk or a watersoluble pen – this forms the square panel that you will embroider. Cut around the rectangle leaving a 10cm fabric allowance all around it so it fits securely in your embroidery hoop.

the book Little Sew & Sew by Christine Leech, published by Quadrille. Photos ©Keiko Oikawa £12.99 quadrille.com

9

Turn the box the right way round through the turning hole. Press the top of the box with a damp cloth then press the four sides of the box – it’s easiest to do this from the base of the box upwards, making sure the line pressed is at right angles to the base of the box.

5

Choose the pattern you wish to embroider and trace onto thin paper. Transfer the pattern onto the fabric using tailor’s carbon paper. If the resulting pattern isn’t quite clear enough, go over the lines with an air-erasable pen.

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Make it

SEWING jaKIT r a in A sewing kit in a large preserving jar makes a fantastic gift for a friend who likes to sew – but we think it would look lovely on the shelf of any craft room PHOTOGRAPHY holly jolliffe

Materials felt, measuring about 30cm square  c otton fabric, measuring about 30cm square scissors  g lass preserving jar, with a screw top and a metal or glass lid insert pencil or tailor’s chalk pinking shears  s aucer, roughly twice the diameter of the lid (to use as a template)

PROJECT juliette goggin and stacy sirk

W

hat better use for an old jar is there than turning it into a sewing kit? When you’re busy in your craft room trying to find your scissors but you can’t because you’ve buried them under mounds of material and rickrack, you’ll wish you had one of these, where everything’s together and easy to find.

pins  s mall amount of cotton batting (wadding), or similar needle & thread  a ll-purpose glue, white or transparent toothpick  r ibbon, about ½” (1cm) wide and 12”(30cm) long sewing machine

And don’t forget to make lots of little things to put in it as well. We’ve got an extra tutorial here for making a very sweet little needlecase that’ll fit right inside. This is easily customisable as well so if you’re making it for a friend, why not embroider their name onto it as an extra special little touch? So quick, start making!

the book Junk Genius by Juliette Goggin and Stacy Sirk, published by CiCO Books, £19.99, call 01256 302699 quoting GLR7PU to purchase a copy for £17.99 including free P&P, cicobooks.co.uk

iron decorative button

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the needlecase The needlecase is really just a tiny fabric book, made like a sandwich with three small rectangles of fabric.

1

Cut out a rectangle, about 8x15cm, from felt and cotton using pinking shears for the pages of the book. Cut out a second rectangle, slightly bigger all around, for the cover.

2

Sew the ribbon down the middle of the cover lengthwise. Position the ribbon so the extra length hangs evenly off both ends, then machine-sew along both edges of the ribbon for a neat finish.

3

Lay the piece of cotton fabric right side up on the inside of the cover, then lay the second felt layer on top. Pin together, then fold in half and mark the spine of the book with two pins. Sew this line to join all three pieces together, taking care to keep your ribbon ties out of the way!

4 how to

1

Cut the squares of felt and cotton fabric into two. Remove the glass lid of the preserving jar from the screw ring. Place the lid in the centre of the felt and draw around it. Cut out with pinking shears and put the felt aside.

2

Lay out the cotton fabric and place the saucer upside down on top. Draw around the saucer then cut out. Place the glass lid face down in the centre of the cotton circle with the reverse side of the fabric facing up. Fold the fabric around the glass, pinning as you go, to cover the glass. Don’t worry if the fabric is slightly loose, as it will need to be to form the pincushion top.

3

Loosen one or two of the pins and carefully stuff in some batting (wadding), making a mound in the centre of the lid. Re-pin and stitch all the ends together to tighten the fabric.

4

Spread a very thin layer of glue in the middle of the felt circle and place it over the back of the pincushion to hide the stitching.

5

Dab a very tiny amount of glue around the inside of the jar screw top, just on the top inside edge where the lid makes contact with the glass. A toothpick works well for this. Press the pincushion into position in the lid, screw onto the jar and put aside to dry.

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When you fold the book in half, the ribbon will be on the outside. If you just give the book a quick touch with a cool iron, the back spine will flatten. You can then sew one more seam along the length of the book, just slightly in from the spine, to complete the book.

5

A decorative button is a lovely way to finish off the case. The best place to put it is on the ribbon, just by the cover edge. You can then angle-trim your ribbons and use them to tie the case closed, keeping your needles secure inside.

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Make it

SEWING BOOK x

bo

This clever storage box is an ideal place for sewists to stash all their little tools. Special sections keep needles and bobbins organised! PHOTOGRAPHY THAYER ALLYSON GOWDY

Materials

 h ardcover book (ring binder optional) Note: If you would like to store spools of thread, you’ll need a ring binder book at least 2” thick  12x12” sheet of decorative paper, to line the inside cover (optional)  a n old sewing pattern, to line the compartments  4” length of 2‑6” wide, 1/8”-thick balsa wood

PROJECT LISA OCCHIPINTI

S

ometimes it’s necessary to not let it look like our craft habit takes over our whole lives (though in reality it kind of does). That’s why we love this secretive book sewing box. Not only does it hold all the notions a maker could need, but we could also fill a whole book shelf with crafty bits and bobs without anyone being any the wiser!

 a crylic paint (to co-ordinate with book)  1/8 yard cotton fabric (to co-ordinate with book) fiberfil craft knife cutting mat white glue & glue brush pencil metal ruler glue gun & glue sticks toothpicks awl (for books with ring binder only)  t hin yarn & upholstery needle (for books with ring binder only) small, flat paintbrush with a ¼” tip scissors  t hread in co-ordinating colour & sewing needle

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1 2

Using a craft knife, remove the book block and set aside.

I chose not to recover the endpapers of the book shown here as they featured a great photo. If you don’t like the endpapers on the book you’re using, cover them with decorative paper.

3

On the inside back cover of the book, use a ruler and pencil to measure and mark 1/8” from all four edges. This rectangle will be the outer perimeter of the storage box. Divide the height of the box into even thirds and mark these measurements using a pencil. Divide the upper row and lower row into thirds, again marking these with a pencil. To determine the depth of the “walls”

used for your box, measure the width of the book’s spine and subtract 1/8”.

4

Using the craft knife and ruler, cut four strips of balsa: two strips measuring the height of the book x the depth of the “walls” and two strips measuring the width of the book x the depth of the “walls”. Beginning with the left side wall (the one closest to and parallel with the spine), run hot glue along the bottom edge of the balsa strip and press along the pencil line. Hold in place while the glue sets. Glue the other three outer walls in the same way. If the wood fits together too snugly, trim the balsa to fit. To strengthen the corners where the wood strips meet, add a drop of hot glue and push it into the corners using a toothpick. For Books with Binder Rings Only: Once you have glued the walls in place, use an awl to pierce two holes in the wall closest to the binder rings, aligning the holes with the top and bottom rings. Thread an upholstery needle with yarn and draw the needle through a hole and around the binder ring three times. Knot the ends of the yarn on the outside of the compartments. Repeat for the hole

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how to

at the other end of the spine. For extra strength, add a droplet of hot glue over the knot.

5

Measure the width across the box, from “wall” to “wall”. Using the craft knife and ruler, cut two strips of balsa wood measuring the box width x the depth of the “walls”. Affix the balsa strips in place along the pencil lines using hot glue and allow to set. Measure the distance between the top of the box and the dividing wall below it, then measure the distance between the bottom of the box and the dividing wall just above it (these should be the same measurement). Using a craft knife and ruler, cut four strips of balsa measuring the length of the compartment x the depth of the “walls”. Adhere each piece in place along the pencil lines using hot glue and allow to set.

6

Paint the top edges of each compartment with acrylic paint and a small brush. Allow to dry before closing

the cover of the book. Cut four pieces from the sewing pattern paper to cover the exterior walls of the box. Brush glue onto the exterior balsa wall and cover with a co-ordinating piece of pattern paper, smoothing into place with your fingers. Repeat for all four outer walls. Note: if you are using a book with binder rings, you will only cover the top, bottom and outer walls.

7

Measure the dimensions of one of the inner compartments. Cut a square of cotton fabric 2½ times this size. Fold the fabric into quadrants, with the folded edges at the bottom and left, then cut an arc from the lower right corner up to the upper left corner. Open the fabric circle. Leaving a 3” tail and beginning on the right side of the fabric, stitch around the circumference of the circle, about ¼” in from the edge. When you’ve stitched around the entire circle, bring the needle through to the right side of the fabric. Remove the needle from the thread and pull both thread tails to

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gather the fabric into a round pouch. Don’t cinch completely closed — through a small opening, stuff the pouch with fiberfil, being sure not to make it too dense. Pull the thread tails and knot the ends. Hot glue the cushion into its compartment with the knotted side down.

the book The Repurposed Library

by Lisa Occhipinti, published by Stewart, Tabori & Chang £16.99 abramsbooks.co.uk

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Make it

KNITTING bag Stitch up your own knitting or needlework bag to keep your crafty supplies safe from the cat and accidental beverage spills PROJECT jazz domino holly

Materials

 91x56cm fabric 1 pair of handles p ins m atching threads s ewing machine

how to

1

Fold the fabric rectangle in half widthwise with wrong sides together. Pin the side seams, stopping when you get about a quarter of the way from the top, then stitch down using a straight stitch.

the book Queen of Crafts by Jazz Domino Holly, published by Penguin Books, £16.99 penguin.co.uk

2

Trim off a triangle from the point where you stopped stitching to the top edge at a 45° angle on both sides. Turn down a 6mm seam, press and stitch down using a straight stitch.

K

nitting and needlework bags are invaluable. You’ll only really find out quite how much when you leave what you’re working on out on the sofa or the kitchen table and the cat gets its little claws into it, or someone spills coffee everywhere. And grab yourself a pair of handles for when you want to take it out of the house: haberdasheries sell a good selection.

KNIT TING BAG

KNITTING BAG.indd 28

3

Fold the top edges over 6mm on to the wrong side of the fabric on both sides and press. Readers of Crafty Magazine can buy

4

Turn the work the right way round and get your handles ready. Fold the top seam on one side over the handle and pin in place. Slip stitch to sew the seam with the 6mm pressed hem down on to the wrong side of the fabric. The fabric should gather around the handle as you stitch. Repeat for the other handle.

Queen of Crafts at the special price of £13.99, inc. free P&P. To order, call 0843 060 0021, referencing CraftyJazz and the ISBN number, 9781905490752. The offer is subject to availability. Customers should allow up to 14 days for delivery. Offer open to UK residents only.

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Make it

SPIROGRAPH s d n e k boo We loved spirographs when we were kids, but this project by Abbey Hendrickson is a little more grown up! PHOTOGRAPHY gary mACLennan

Materials

 wood

s mall copper nails 3 skeins of embroidery thread in different colours p encil r uler h ammer s cissors s aw s andpaper s afety glasses d rill with a small bit c lear nail polish  c ircle template

K

eep all your craft books in order with this fun set of bookends. They look beautiful, are really easy to make – and once you get the hang of it, why not try making a giant version that you can hang on the wall? A definite talking point when people come over.

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PROJECT abbey hendrickson

how to

1

Wearing safety glasses, saw the wood into a 12x12cm square and sand down the rough edges.

2

On the back of the wood, mark a point at the centre, 2.5cm from the top, and drill a hole at the mark, being careful not to drill through the wood. Sand down any rough edges.

3

Photocopy the template and enlarge it so that it measures 11.5cm in diameter.

4

Flip the wood over, place the template in the centre of the square and lightly trace around it, marking the 36 dots along its edge.

5

Hammer a nail at each mark, being careful not to drive any nails through the wood.

7

From nail #1, bring the thread to nail #24, wrap it around that nail and bring it to nail #2. Go from there to #25, then to #3, then to #26, etc, in a clockwise direction. Knot at #1 when you’ve completed the first thread colour.

8

Select the next thread colour and tie it to nail #1. Bring to nail #26, then to nail #2, then nail #27, etc, knotting when finished.

9

Select the final thread colour and tie it to nail #1. Bring to nail #28, etc, knotting at the end.

10 11

Secure each knot with a drop of nail polish and allow to dry. Carefully trim any long threads as close to the knots as possible.

6

Select the first thread colour and tie a knot around the top nail (nail #1).

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the book You Are Awesome by Abbey Hendrickson, published by Cicada Books, £9.95 cicadabooks.co.uk

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