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Canada’s Premier Magazine for Professional Photographers

2016 AWARDS ISSUE + LINDSAY ADLER + HYBRID PHOTOGRAPHY + PROPERTY RELEASES F.A.Q. ISSUE 13 • SUMMER 2016


ISSUE 13 // SUMMER 2016 // THE AWARDS ISSUE

CONTENTS 7

24

National Image Awards

PROPERTY RELEASES

The million dollar question. When do you need a property release?

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HYBRID PHOTOGRAPHY

Jason DiMichele takes us into the world of mixing stills photography with sound and video, and the technology available to us.

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DRESS ON FIRE

In this tutorial Lindsay Adler outlines the step-by-step process that went into creating an image with the illusion of movement, by combining the use of strobes and constant lighting.

PHOTO BY ALLAN BAILEY, MPA

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POSING FAMILIES

Posing families is like composing music, according to family portrait master photographer Drake Busath.

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NATIONAL IMAGE AWARDS

The 2016 National Image Award results are in. See the images named best in their class. Plus, the winners of the Master Class Award and Student Awards.

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PHOTOGRAPHERS OF THE YEAR Allen Bailey and Tracy Grabowski named Photographic Artist and Commercial Photographer of the Year.

DEPARTMENTS 4 35 36 37 38

Letter From The Chair PPOC Prestigious Awards PPOC Designations Commercial Partners Concept To Cover

COVER PHOTO BY ALPH LEYDON. READ MORE ABOUT THIS PHOTO ON PAGE 38.

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MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR PPOC continues to be at the leading edge of photography in Canada both in photographic innovation and education.  Our members are diverse and their talents are showcased around the world with recent exhibitions in China and participation in the World Photographic Cup. In the ever-changing photography market, belonging to Canada’s largest and most recognized professional photography association gives photographers a distinct advantage. The photographers who make up PPOC’s membership share a community in which they connect and share not only technical information, but ideas

TINA WELTZ, MPA PPOC National Chair

GALLERIE is the premier magazine for professional photographers across Canada. Each issue features award-winning images, editorial information, technical and feature articles, advertising, and member services. All photographers are welcome to view the digital versions on our website. Gallerie is published three times annually; February (on-line issue) June/July (print and on-line) October (on-line issue) INTERIM EDITOR Jillian Chateauneuf, MPA SPA 604-551-9751 - editor@ppoc.ca DESIGNER Kevin Patrick Robbins

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SUBSCRIPTION All PPOC members receive the printed issue directly to their doorstep. On-line issues are available to all photographers. To be added to our email mailing list please contact the PPOC office (info@ppoc.ca) indicating your province of residence. Additional printed copies of Galllerie are $6.95, plus postage. Please contact the the PPOC Office.

for marketing, resolving issues with clients, quoting on assignments, and more. Having access to this wealth of experience and knowledge is invaluable. There are many benefits to PPOC but camaraderie is the one that stands out for me personally. We welcome you to attend a local meeting, or our 2017 Canadian Imaging Conference, taking place April 29 through May 2, 2017 in Ottawa. We hope you enjoy this edition of Gallerie, and the small sampling of outstanding imagery produced by our very talented membership for our recent National Image Competition. We invite you to check out our past Salon galleries at www.ppoc.ca

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PPOC Trade members receive a 20% discount. To reserve your ad, contact the advertising manager. SUBMISSIONS Articles and member stories are welcome, please submit them to the editor for consideration.

ADVERTISING MANAGER Brad Kelly, MPA advertising@ppoc.ca


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LEGAL FAQ PROPERTY RELEASES

PHOTO BY CHRISTOPHE BENARD

BY DAN POLLOCK

DAN POLLOCK LAW

This article only addresses general principles that apply in North America and does not constitute legal advice. What is a property release? A property release says that the owner of private property – objects, animals, buildings, works of art, houses, cars, furniture, etc. – has provided you with consent to take and use images of their property. When do you need a property release? The million dollar question. In general, only if you are planning to license or sell images for commercial purposes. You should get a property release if your images include works protected by copyright such

as sculptures, art and even graffiti. You generally do not need a property release for photographs taken from a public vantage point that do not focus on easily identifiable private property. It gets trickier for images of private property. If the private property can be closely identified with a specific person, such as a private residence or a pet, it is advisable to get a release. Unlike model releases and publicity/ privacy rights, there is no legal concept that applies directly to property releases — it is really based on a “better safe than sorry” approach and not a specific legal principle. My recommendation is that if you are planning on licensing images of recognizable private property for commercial use — especially through third party agencies — you should get a property release. It will make it easier to license your images. The same principles apply if you are creating prints or greeting cards of your images that include recognizable private

property, but there is less exposure to risk because the image will not be distributed as widely in all likelihood and it does not raise the same marketability issues as an image that is being licensed commercially. So what is the legal basis for needing a property release? I have not seen a statute or court decision that mandates the use of a property release in certain situations, but there are two legal theories underlying the recommendation to get a property release. The first is the theory of association, which can apply in the commercial or editorial context. For example, let’s say that you take a picture of a private residence and you license the image to an organization that is trying to prevent some form of illicit conduct. If the use creates an association that the house (and its owner) is involved in such conduct, it could a create claim for defamation. If you Summer 2016

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had a release for any use (including if it’s objectionable), the owner would have waived their right to object and you could point to the release to defeat the claim. The second and more common theory is referred to as conversion — this means that you used someone else’s property for personal gain without permission. An example of conversion is using someone else’s car without permission and picking up fares through a service like Uber. But it is not 100% clear if conversion would apply to a picture of that car since the picture itself is not the car owner’s tangible property. What about pets? The need to get a property release for pets is based on the same principles set out above — there is no special law or rule requiring a release for pets. Again, if you are in the business of commercially licensing images of other people’s pets, getting a property release is recommended to help make it easier to license your images. You should definitely try to get a release if you want to commercially license images of zoo or circus animals or of recognizable animals such as race

horses, but you might not be able to get such a release. Are trademarks covered by property releases? No. Trademarks are a separate issue and you would need separate permission. For example, if you took a picture of your friend’s Volkswagen and your friend signed a property release, it would cover your friend’s rights in the car but not the Volkswagen trademark. In general, editorial use of a trademark is fine – for example, an article about Volkswagen that includes a Volkswagen trademark. It will come down to the details for commercial use, but a key issue will be whether the use of the image with a trademarked symbol causes confusion or harms the trademark owner’s reputation. For example, if you license an image with the BMW trademark to use in an ad for driving gloves, BMW might object because it creates an impression that BMW is endorsing that product. It also depends on the approach taken by the trademark owner — some companies might see it as free promotion and not object while other companies might take a more protective approach to the use

of the their trademarks. What should my property release include? You should work with a lawyer to prepare a standard property release, but some basics include your name and contact information, the name of the owner and their contact information, the date and location of the shoot, and a picture of the property with the release. It should include a release of all claims relating to you or your licensee’s use of the image and an acknowledgement that the owner is not entitled to any additional compensation. If you plan on commercially licensing your images through third parties, I recommend including language about the owner not being allowed to raise a claim even if the use of the image is objectionable to the owner. DAN POLLACK is a Toronto-based lawyer who primarily focuses on copyright and contract law, helping creators such as photographers, filmmakers, musicians and writers protect and gain value from their creations. Dan is admitted to practice in Ontario and California. He can be reached at dan@danpollacklaw.com and through his website at www.danpollacklaw.com.

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Photography Š Johan Sorensen


HAVE YOU TRIED HYBRID PHOTOGRAPHY? WORDS AND PHOTOS

BY JASON DiMICHELE

Every so often there is a new technology, or way of combining existing technologies, that captivates the imagination of creative minds and provides a stimulating experience for viewers. Hybrid photography has been around for a little while but is still in its infancy and new to many creatives. For those not familiar with hybrid photography, it is a technique in which stills, video and audio are used together to create effective and engaging content. One of the great things about hybrid photography is that it’s very accessible to most people that have a relatively current camera (or camera integrated into a mobile device). As long as your camera has the ability

to shoot video, you are able to create hybrid content Since your creation will be displayed on TVs and high resolution devices, you’ll want a camera that can at least shoot HD video. However, what has really put hybrid photography into the industry limelight is the power and quality of the mirrorless camera systems and ultra high resolution 4K video / photo (3840x2160 or 8.3 megapixels). There are a lot of powerful features on cameras that offer 4K technology, as

well as reasons to shoot 4K; the major one being futureproofing your work. Some of the 4K features and benefits (not all features on all cameras) include the ability to select the focus point after capture and save that frame (thus the ability to also focus stack them), shooting speeds of up to 30 frames per second and getting much higher HD video quality when scaled down. With the introduction of 4K video / photo, hybrid photography has now truly become a professional tool. The process of creating

hybrid photographic content can be as simple, or as complicated, as your final product requires. Some cameras have features which allow you to do some editing through the in-camera features but to get the most out of the final product you’ll need to use photo/video editing software. There are many of these editing applications on the market to choose from, both free and commercial. The whole concept of hybrid photography is that content is created to be viewed on as many devices as possible. Considering mobile technologies such as phones and tablets are mainstream devices and account for the majority of online interaction and purchasing, there is a huge benefit to creating multidevice targeted media. Some examples of where hybrid photography can be used to enhance the excitement and delivery of a product, service or event include artist’s portfolios, product advertising, real estate listings, training content and important life events. The main techniques for delivering this content are through slideshows and cinemagraphs. Most people are aware of what slideshows are, but when combining stills, video and audio interchangeSummer 2016

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ably, there is a significantly higher impact than just a photo only presentation. Using hybrid photography techniques in your slideshows allows you to not only show the general scene but to also incorporate detail shots to fluidly immerse the viewer into fully appreciating your story. The term cinemagraph may be new to many but they are gaining some real traction in the industry. You have most likely seen an example of a cinemagraph. At first glance a cinemagraph appears to be just a static single image, until you notice portions of the image are actually moving. This is the effect of combining a still image, such as a frame grab from a video clip, with a video loop in a selected portion of the image. Cinemagraphs often have a surreal effect with plenty of impact. Cinemagraphs can also be created with photo/video editing software and there is also dedicated software for assembling them.

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Hybrid photography has begun to have a real impact on the industry. It is a technique that is not only highly capable of generating attention and sales for your organization but also one that is enjoyable. The ability to shoot video on still cameras has been around for a long time but there are still many photographers who are unaware of this capability. Why not try your hand at creating some hybrid photographic content? It’s beneficial to become familiar with this technology and it may help push you out of your creative comfort zone. The reason most of us got into this industry is for the love of creativity. Investing some time into enhancing your creative vision and portfolio can have many long-lasting rewards.

JASON DiMICHELE is a Fine Art Photographer and Panasonic Lumix Storyteller who lives in Milton, ON. You can see his work at jasondimichele.com

HYBRID PHOTOGRAPHY CAN BE USED TO ENHANCE THE EXCITEMENT AND DELIVERY OF A PRODUCT, SERVICE OR EVENT


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Heritage and Innovation Do you remember the feeling you had when you used your first all-manual film SLR? The robust feel of the metallic body, the dedicated dials and the specific sound of the shutter? In the past years, we’ve seen quite a few camera makers playing the retro card in designing their products. Few were able to offer us that taste of the past and also deliver modern digital capabilities that could meet the image quality standard set by DSLR. Fujifilm is one of those who succeeded in fuelling that urge to pick up a camera and shoot, to channel that nostalgia in an outstanding line of products. Any photographer who ever shot a roll of film from Fujifilm knows the special look it can have. This heritage is not lost in the transition to digital. That specific rendition of colours, the quality of all skin-tones and the reliability are still there. Now, more then ever, the company is looking forward to a bright future of innovation by relying specifically on this long history and tradition. Fujifilm brought this tradition with it when it was time to take the digital step. The rendition of colours (especially skin-tones) that its sensor provides is aligned with the heritage and expertise of the company in the past century. Shooting with one of their mirrorless cameras is getting the same excitement you had with your first analog SLR with groundbreaking modern technology. Just by looking at the aesthetic of the X series, you can clearly see what

NOTHING GETS IN THE WAY OF A GOOD IMAGE AND THAT’S PRECISELY THE GOAL. Fujifilm is trying to achieve. The cameras are reminiscent of the last century 35mm bodies with controls as intuitive as possible. With these cameras, nothing gets in the way of a good image and that’s precisely the goal. Three settings, a simple way to choose them, and you’re good to go! The company keeps the passion for photography at the heart of every development to make sure that you don’t perceive their camera as a tool

but as a natural way to push yourself to shoot more, to shoot better. The company is now one step closer to its goal of bridging the gap between DSLR and mirrorless cameras. It produces high quality lenses and astonishing in-camera image processing with film simulation and dynamic range control. Recently, it even added the renowned fine-grain, black and white film Acros to the list of looks that you can choose in the camera. By


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using the APS-C format, Fujifilm can offer small cameras without compromising on the high ISO capabilities or speed. You only need a few seconds to set a camera from the X series: it is designed with efficiency in mind. For Fujifilm, being involved in an association such as the PPOC is an important asset in the progression of its products. It relies on professional photographers to provide feedback and insight for the cameras to come. The Fujifilm X Photographers are the first line with regards to providing crucial information about the capabilities of the cameras and what they wish to see upgraded. Also, consumers look up to us professionals, when the time to choose a system comes, our expertise could play a role in their final decision. Educating photographers on their new products is therefore really important for Fujifilm. Being regarded more and more as a brand of choice by professionals, the company knows that service must meet the specific needs of a working photographer. Already offering fast turnaround time for repairs (with the possibility to request a loaner), Fujifilm is planning to set up a North American professional service by the end of this year. One more reason to consider Fujifilm for reliable professional gear!

“I love everything about the Fuji camera system; from the image quality, the feel, and the mechanics of it, to how it makes me think as a photographer. If you are in a creative plateau, how could you break out of it? I would definitely suggest that you experiment with equipment as one way of potentially breaking the mold. You may just discover a whole new approach to photography and the way you see light, lines and composition.� BRYAN CAPORICCI , MPA (PPOC Member)


LINDSAY ADLER’S

DRESS ON FIRE WORDS AND PHOTOS

BY LINDSAY ADLER The goal of this studio lighting setup is to infuse energy and motion into the frame by mixing one constant light, one studio strobe and a long exposure. The end result will help this dress and the scene to come to life, making the dress appear as if it’s on fire.

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Light gives you such control in the studio. You have the control to flatter your subject, set the mood, and even create ‘special effects’. When I first began photography I spent years trying to master traditional lighting including my desire to really understand the direction of light, quality of light, and how to flatter my subject. Eventually, however, I wanted to get a bit more creative and advanced. Seeking to take my lighting up a notch, I start to research advanced tutorials on creative lighting and I really didn’t find very much. This is why I’ve spent the last several months to create my brand new ebook, The Creative Studio Lighting Guide with 30 creative studio setups. Whether you have one light, 4 lights, or unusual modifiers, it is going to help introduce you to entirely new worlds in the studio. For this article I’d like to share one of the lighting setups you can find in this guide, and how mixing constant light and studio strobes can create stunning results. This setup is in the sample section of the guide that has 5 completely free creative lighting tutorials to get you started on your path to creativity in the studio!

Let’s take a look step-by-step at considerations for building this twolight setup filled with movement and drama!

STEP 1

You’ll want to begin by completely removing all ambient light in the shooting space. Be sure no light is coming through the windows and that overhead lights are turned off. This will affect the look of the final photograph.

STEP 2

Next, you’ll start with your main light. Place a strobe with a beauty dish with a grid as the main light illuminating your subject’s face. The beauty dish will create crisp but glowing light on the face. The grid will

focus the light primarily around the subject’s face and torso. As you can see in Figure 1, by adding the grid the entire lower half of her body is completely in shadow. Since grids focus light and create more rapid fall-off of light, this is going to be perfect for adding the next element of the scene.

STEP 3

Next, you need to add a second light pointed at the lower half of the subject’s body. For this light you will turn OFF the strobe capabilities and only use the modeling light. Here I have used a zoom reflector with barn doors and a red gel for creative effects. This light will be used to illuminate the dress, and I use the barn doors to make sure this light does not hit the subject’s face. This is one of the benefits of placing gels on barn doors: you can control the spill of light more precisely. Now that the strobe capabilities are turned off and the ambient light in the room is eliminated, be sure the modeling light of this second light is turned up to its fullest power. If you take a photograph while shooting at a ‘normal’ studio shutter speed (around 1/200 sec) you will see almost no light added to the bottom of the dress. This is because your exposure does not let in enough ambient light to record the color of the dress. In the next step, we will change this.

STEP 4

In order to see color/detail on the bottom of the dress, you will need to use a long shutter speed (aka ‘dragging the shutter’) to allow the background light to register in your exposure. By using a longer shutter speed, in this case 1/4 sec or 1/8 sec, you leave the shutter open long enough to pick up the light from the modeling light. With the longer exposure, you can see the red illumination registering on the bottom of the dress in Figure 3.

STEP 5

FIGURE 1

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FIGURE 2

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Now is the time to get creative in this shot. Because of the long exposure, you now have the opportunity to add movement to your scene. In these


LIGHTING GEAR USED: 2 Profoto D1 Air 500 Watt OTHER GEAR USED: FIGURE 3

FIGURE 4

examples I have thrown the dress in the air to create movement in the frame that registers through the long exposure. The moving fabric combined with the red gel results in the fiery appearance of the dress, as seen in Figure 4. Try zooming your lens in or out, moving your camera left and right, or physically moving your body in and out during the long exposure. Each will produce different creative results.

a long exposure you can create truly striking and creative studio results. By dragging your shutter you are able to move your camera and/or subject to create interesting blurs and shimmers to your images that open up endless creative opportunities with just two light sources.

TAKEAWAYS

By combining the constant light of a modeling light, a studio strobe, and

If you’d like to see more from my Creative Studio Lighting Guide, check out the link to download five free setups, or check out the full guide of 30 creative studio setups available at http://learn.lindsayadlerphotography. com/creative-studio-lighting-guide.

Rosco gel kit Avenger D600 boom arm LIGHT 1: Profoto Softlight Reflector (beauty dish) + Grid Distance from subject: 32 inches Distance off center: 9 inches Height above eye level: 12 inches Power (Fstops): F/9 LIGHT 2: Profoto zoom reflector with barn doors + gels (modeling light only) Distance from subject: 52 inches Distance off center: 20 inches Height above floor: 24 inches Power (Fstops): F/3.5

HOT TIP Once you get all your settings right, you may want to turn off the modeling light on the beauty dish. During the long exposure the constant light from the modeling light may register on the subject’s face and create unwanted motion blur. One thing to keep in mind for this shoot is that the subject’s wardrobe choice will make an impact on the final image. The subject will need to be wearing a clothing/ items to pick up the light from the constant light (modeling light). In this case a shimmery dress is perfect for the effect. You’ll want to avoid dark colors or matte fabrics. Sequins, light coloured clothing, or anything that shimmers will best showcase this effect.

CAMERA GEAR & SETTINGS: Camera: Canon 5D III Lens: Canon 24-70mm 2.8 II at 24mm ISO: 100 Shutter Speed: 1/4 sec Aperture: F/9 WB: Flash

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THE MELODIC

FAMILY PORTRAIT WORDS AND PHOTOS

BY DRAKE BUSATH, M.PHOTOG.CR.

There is simply no greater photographic challenge than creating an artful family portrait, especially with larger groups. The variables are enormous and the attention-span constraints we work under make this the final frontier for artistic photography.  In this article I want to share a few posing tools I’ve learned to create more graceful and meaningful family portraiture every day.

MELODIC POSING

When arranging a group, it’s helpful to place people’s heads first and worry about body positions second. The organization of heads in a group can either give it a rigid, military feel,

(if they are all lined up in rows and columns), or a much softer appearance if the faces flow like melodic notes on a musical score.   In fact, great visual compositions often have a lot in common with musical compositions. Think of any catchy melody, and as you sing it, picture the heads in a family like notes in the melody line. Doe, a deer, a female deer… would

make a wonderful portrait. Imagining faces as musical notes, I tend to stagger them in a melodic way that may start low on one side, build to a high curve, dipping and then rising to a crescendo at the end of the “phrase.” Never anymore do I build a pyramid, which would look like someone playing scales on the piano. Nor do I play chopsticks by lining people up in even rows.

RHYTHM

In a similar way, heads in a family portrait establish a rhythm. I generally start a grouping by spacing the heads evenly, say in quarter notes.  But they don’t stay that way long, because all quarter notes would make for a boring rhythm (take it from an ex-drummer). Just before the shutter starts flying, I need to coax heads together here and there to syncopate the rhythm and add a ‘beat’ to the grouping. Think of it as adding 1/8 notes as accents to spice up the song. 

THE STANDING GROUP

Recently, I’m drawn to standing groupings for the way they seem less affected and often more flattering, especially to large people whose bodies don’t fold up well into chairs.   Standing groups allow me to “shuffle” the group quickly and easily until a pleasing arrangement of clothing and body shapes emerges. Staggering the group by a couple of feet forward and back, I can partially block people, evening out body sizes and hiding overly bright or patterned outfits. 

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STANDING COMPOSITE PORTRAITS

We’ve chosen standing poses for our composite three-generation portraits (called Seamless Generational Portraits) because it allows us to bring faces very close together in a comfortable way. This way we can create a “close up” view of a large group, not wasting any precious real estate on the print. Even close-knit, our composite portraits are typically 70 to 80 inches wide.

RAISING CHILDREN

With standing families in mind, we need a way to get the children up to the parent’s level. In the studio we employ sofa tables, and end tables to sit and stand children on to “raise them up.” In our gardens we have built mid-level walls with wide tops to do the same thing. A wall or pillar about 40 inches tall, with a broad, flat top allows the parents to stand elegantly behind a contained and seated child. Everybody wins. Even the photographer, who no longer has to struggle up and down off the ground.   

LITTLE HAND GESTURES THAT CONNECT THE FAMILY, CAN ADD A FINAL DIMENSION OF LOVE TO A PORTRAIT. CONNECTIONS AND GESTURE

In the final seconds of a family session, the photographer can become a hero by encouraging connections. In musical terms, we syncopate the rhythm of the group by bringing two heads closer together here and there. More importantly, we’re adding love to the image in these last seconds. “Sheryl, can you pull Thomas close to you? Yes, almost get your chin in his hair,” and “Brittany, would you and Ellie pair up for me, almost cheek to cheek?” Of course these last minute pairings have to be authentic. The youngest sibling next to one of the oldest for instance, is a good bet. Observing the family’s interactions as they prepare for the session is essential for the photographer to add honest connections. I had a client comment that “It’s not a Busath until someone is hold-

ing hands.” Subtle little hand gestures that connect the family, can add a final dimension of love to a portrait. However, people don’t often volunteer these gestures in front of cameras, so it’s our job to encourage them. “John, lets have you reach around and touch her elbows softly.”  “Susan, could you just drape an arm over onto Jim’s knee for me?” A graceful portrait with a melodic arrangement, connected with authentic pairings and hand gestures is a rare thing. It will gain value over the decades and speak to the next generations about the love they were born to. That’s why I choose to be a family portrait photographer.

Drake Busath will be speaking at the 2017 Canadian Imaging Conference in Ottawa.

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NATIONAL IMAGE AWARDS PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHERS OF CANADA BEST IN CLASS AWARDS

PYTHAGORAS RE-IMAGINED Ross Outerbridge, CPA

A DANGEROUS HOOD Jay Terry, MPA

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ARCHITECTURE Sponsored by Harvard Western Insurance & Northbridge Insurance

ICE BLUE John Wills, CPA

CONCEPTUAL ILLUSTRATION Sponsored by Beau Photo

PRIVATE CHARTER Kristian Bogner

FASHION Sponsored by Panasonic

PRODUCT ILLUSTRATION Sponsored by PhotoCoach International


BEST IN CLASS AWARDS

COMPLEMENTARITY Louise Simone, MPA

PRECISION AND STRENGTH Paul Wright, MPA

PRESS Sponsored by Nikon Canada

EXPERIMENTAL/UNCLASSIFIED Sponsored by Harvard Western Insurance & Northbridge Insurance

DON’T COME HOME FROM DRINKING WITH LOVIN’ ON YOUR MIND T. Kirk Saint, MPA

IN THE SPOTLIGHT Raph Nogal

WEDDING PORTRAIT Sponsored by Technicare Imaging

ANIMALS Sponsored by Panasonic Summer 2016

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BEST IN CLASS AWARDS

SPRAY IT, DON’T SAY IT Melissa Welsh, CPA

INDUSTRIAL Sponsored by Vistek

PLACE OF WORSHIP Alph Leydon

PHANTOM OF THE STORM Tina Richardson

PRISTINE ASCENT Paul Wright, MPA

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Sponsored by Panasonic

FINE ART Sponsored by Panasonic

EDITORIAL Sponsored by Panasonic

ppoc.ca

PICTORIAL / FLORAL

FIVE GENERATIONS Carmen Matthews, MPA

GROUP PORTRAIT Sponsored by Fujifilm Canada


BEST IN CLASS AWARDS

NO ONE TO PLAY WITH Kamini Le Capelain

CHILD PORTRAIT Sponsored by Panasonic

SCULPTED REACH Nicole Noyce, MPA FIGURE STUDY Sponsored by AGT Photomount Company

SITTING AT THE DOCK OF THE BAY Claude Brazeau, MPA

PORTRAIT Sponsored by White House Custom Colour Summer 2016

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BEST IN CLASS AWARDS

PARTY IN THE HARBOUR Mike Vinson, CPA WEDDING GROUP Sponsored by Beau Photo

TAKE GOOD CARE OF MY BABY Marlene Palamarek PHOTOJOURNALISTIC WEDDING Sponsored by Nikon Canada

JASON & JOANNA Mike Vinson, CPA WEDDING ALBUM Sponsored by Technicare Imaging.

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PPOC MASTERS AWARD

STRAY Allan Bailey, MPA, Sponsored by Technicare Imaging.

PPOC STUDENT AWARDS Sponsored by Lee Filters

PAINTING PETALS Racha Ayaso Humber College

THE SOUND Joel Gale Humber College

JUST BEE YOURSELF Courtney Naesgaard Langara College

COMMERCIAL & OVERALL

PORTRAIT

GENERAL Summer 2016

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PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTIST OF THE YEAR

ALLAN BAILEY, MPA BY ALICIA KINGSLAND

Allan Bailey has been creating things ever since he was a child and first discovered he liked to draw. Drawing led to painting, woodworking and building things with his hands. He says he feels that photography was really a natural progression for him; another way for him to create. It certainly makes sense that photography was a field Bailey would find himself in, given that his father had an interest in it as well. There was even a darkroom in the house. In high school, Bailey began taking a class that included a photography unit and it was then he began to think about making photography his career. After graduation he went to NAIT (Northern Alberta Institute of Technology) and completed a twoyear program in photography. Currently, he has been a member of the PPOC for just over five years. “I don’t really do a lot of things traditionally,” Bailey states, when asked about his style of photography, “even in portraits, I don’t do traditional lighting.” He feels this is why the Photographic Artist category fits him so well, because it allows him to take risks and try things in his photos that would generally be considered to be against the rules. “It really fits how my brain works and how my camera works,” Bailey explains. “There was a time when doing fine art photography and experimental stuff wasn’t that popular, but it’s awesome that the PPOC has

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ALLAN BAILEY, MPA

recognition for this kind of work.” Bailey has been entering images in the image competition since 2011 and has found that just the opportunity to enter his images has really helped him to improve his art. He always gets the audio critique of his images to listen to, because he stresses the importance of being critiqued. Sometimes, the critique is a validation, where the judges will confirm that a decision he has made is a good one. But sometimes, he feels, the critique is a valuable lesson as to where boundaries can be pushed and where they cannot. “One thing I have learned,” Bailey says, “is that even though there are definite things the judges are looking for, go with your gut, enter your best work and you will be rewarded eventually.”

“Enter your best work and you will be rewarded eventually.”

The Photographic Artist of the Year Award is sponsored by EPSON CANADA.


SOLITUDE Allan Bailey, MPA

OUT ON A LIMB Allan Bailey, MPA

VAPOR Allan Bailey, MPA

TRIANGULATE Allan Bailey, MPA

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COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR

TRACY GRABOWSKI, MPA SPA BY ALICIA KINGSLAND

Tracy Grabowski has had an interest in photography since she got her first camera at the age of thirteen. By the time she was 20 years old, she was working as a make-up artist for a glamour photographer in Los Angeles, California; and while watching the photographer, decided it was something she wanted to pursue professionally. Grabowski made the move back to Edmonton, Alberta and set to work upgrading her courses so she could enrol in the two-year photography program at NAIT (Northern Alberta Institute of Technology). She graduated in 1993. “I have never looked back,” she says. Two years after her graduation, Grabowski started her own business. She has worked in many styles of photography, from portraits to industrial to nature, because, as she says, “Creativity doesn’t have a category.” In 1999, she joined PPOC because she was looking for an association that would help her to grow her skills and continue learning, and she feels the PPOC has helped her do just that. “I always had a few mentors and people who were willing to share information,” she says. Now, Grabowski herself mentors new members and new photographers, passing on what she has learned in her years of competition and as a professional photographer. Fashion photography has always been a favourite for Grabowski. When discussing her accepted images this year, Grabowski relates a particularly

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CIRCULAR TANGENT Tracy Grabowski, MPA SPA

interesting story behind her fashion photo. For this particular image she had the opportunity to go to Paris, France, for Phabrik Magazine; which would make the image special enough on its own. However, on her second day in Paris, Grabowski had all her luggage stolen, “so all the lighting and such I had brought was gone,” she explains, “so I had to adapt for that. I bought a reflector for a car window off a cab driver — and I still use it today.” Her adaptability has clearly paid off, as has her determination. While she has won best fashion image a few times before, this is her second time having all four images accepted. “But I’ve never given up,” She says, “I’ve just consistently kept working at it and entering.”

“Creativity doesn’t have a category.”

The Commercial Photographer of the Year Award is sponsored by NIKON CANADA.


TOP LEFT:

WHEN THE BACK MATTERS Tracy Grabowski, MPA SPA ABOVE:

ALLURE Tracy Grabowski, MPA SPA LEFT:

FROZEN Tracy Grabowski, MPA SPA

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PRESTIGIOUS AWARDS NATIONAL CITATION OF SERVICE PETER GOLD, MPA SPA

PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHERS OF CANADA (PPOC) is a diversified group of creative artists dedicated to the highest standards in professional imaging. We welcome photographers of all genres to join our community of dedicated professionals. PPOC offers photographers a way to rise to professional status. Educational opportunities, networking, direct member benefits and the ability to earn awards and designations will assist in your potential for growth and economic improvement. Meet new friends and mentors and take advantage of the wealth of experience and knowledge. Once an accredited member, your personal area of specialty and images are promoted on our website so clients and other photographers making referrals know who to contact. CONTACT 1-888-643-PPOC (7762) Phone: 519-537-2555 Info@ppoc.ca www.ppoc.ca MAILING ADDRESS: 209 Light St. Woodstock, ON N4S 6H6 Canada

The National Citation of Service expresses sincere appreciation for services generously given to the Association and to the profession. This award may be presented to a company or an individual who, over a number of years, has rendered outstanding service to PPOC for the advancement of professional photography. Names of nominees are submitted to the Awards Committee, along with a documented resume listing the services rendered. Only one National Citation for Service may be given to any company or individual.

YOUSUF KARSH AWARD DAPHNE CARLYLE, MPA SPA The Yousuf Karsh Lifetime Achievement Award recognizes photographic excellence amongst PPOC members. The award was established by the Professional Photographers of Canada in 2002 and first awarded in 2003 to commemorate the legacy of Canadian Photographer, the late Yousuf Karsh. The Yousuf Karsh Award is presented annually to the member with the highest number of print merits in excess of 4000. Members of PPOC are able to earn “print merits� by demonstrating outstanding photographic ability through the annual national image competition and accreditation. The Yousuf Karsh Lifetime Achievement Award is one of the greatest achievements that can be earned by a member of the Professional Photographers of Canada and speaks directly to the outstanding photographic talent of the recipient. The award can be received only once in a career. Summer 2016

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PPOC DESIGNATIONS Craftsman, Master and Service of Photographic Arts are honours bestowed upon its members by the Professional Photographers of Canada and denote proven photographic ability and commitment to the association and its regions. CPA CRAFTSMAN OF PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS

MPA BARS

BACK ROW: (L-R) Wayne Carlton, Len Grinke, Pierre-André Ouellet, Ross Outerbridge, Peter C. Mather. FRONT ROW: (L-R) Vanessa Dewson, Karyn Lee, Nathalie Lamy.

BACK ROW: (L-R) Corla Rokochy (guest), Tina Cyr (guest), Jarron Childs, Tina Weltz, Jay Terry, Cam Colclough, Mark Laurie. FRONT ROW: (L-R) Alison Berk, Jillian Chateauneuf, Gertie Hala (on behalf of Brenda Hala), Ian Grant, Edith VanderKloot, Peter Gold, Shelley Vandervelde, Louise Simone

Wayne Carlton...................................................................................................................BC Vanessa Dewson.............................................................................................................. ON Len Grinke............................................................................................................................BC Nathalie Lamy................................................................................................................... ON Karyn Lee..............................................................................................................................AB Arley Mackinnon..............................................................................................................MB Peter C. Mather................................................................................................................ ON Pierre-André Ouellet.......................................................................................................AB Ross Outerbridge.............................................................................................................BC Mike Vinson........................................................................................................................ ON

MPA MASTER OF PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS

Alison Berk 1st Bar...........................................................................................................SK Cindi-Lee Campbell 1st Bar......................................................................................... NB Jillian Chateauneuf 1st Bar..........................................................................................BC Jarron Childs 1st Bar...................................................................................................... ON David Custodio 1st Bar...................................................................................................BC Brenda Hala 1st Bar..........................................................................................................BC Brad Kelly 1st Bar............................................................................................................. ON Jay Terry 1st Bar............................................................................................................... ON Edith Vanderkloot 1st Bar.............................................................................................AB Claude Brazeau 2nd Bar................................................................................................ ON Peter Gold 2nd Bar............................................................................................................AB Ian Grant 2nd Bar...............................................................................................................AB Shelley Vandervelde 2nd Bar.......................................................................................AB Tina Weltz 2nd Bar........................................................................................................... ON Louise Simone 3rd Bar................................................................................................... QC Cam Colclough 6th Bar...................................................................................................AB Mark Laurie 10th Bar.......................................................................................................AB

SPA SERVICE OF PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS

BACK ROW: (L-R) Lavonne Gorrill, Nicole Noyce, Terrill Bodner, Linda Senychych, Berni Wood. FRONT ROW: (L-R) Frank Commisso, Michael Shandro. Terrill Bodner......................................................................................................................BC Frank Commisso.............................................................................................................. ON Deborah de Ville............................................................................................................... ON Lavonne Gorrill...................................................................................................................SK Nicole Noyce.......................................................................................................................SK Linda Senchych SPA........................................................................................................AB Michael Shandro...............................................................................................................AB Cheryl Struss....................................................................................................................MB Berni Wood..........................................................................................................................PE

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FROM LEFT: Louise Vessey, Tracey Harper. Tracey Harper MPA...........................................................................................................BC Louise Vessey MPA..........................................................................................................PE Brian Boyle HLM MPA 5th Bar...................................................................................... ON


PPOC COMMERCIAL PARTNERS These photographic commercial partners support the Professional Photographers of Canada and its members. Look to them for quality products and professional service.

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CONCEPT TO COVER

ISO 100, f/11, 1/250s Nikon D800, 16-35mm f/4 at 16mm Fill flash at 2/3

WORDS AND PHOTOS BY ALPH LEYDON

Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque in Abu Dhabi is the largest in the UAE, The structure alone covers an area greater than 30 acres and is one of the most magnificent mosques in the world. The sky was bright and heavily tex-

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tured this day, perfect for bringing out the detail in the white Carrara marble. I had been shooting the exterior and finding it overwhelming in its enormity. I was looking for something more intimate that would contain, yet communicate, the essence and scale of this place of worship. When I found the arches framing the view of the minaret tower and domes, I knew I had found my shot. The challenge was capturing the full 30-foot-high arch in this confined interior space; no tripods permitted. I consider what I capture in the

field to be pure data, which I will manipulate in postproduction, and I shoot keeping this in mind. In this case I was looking for plenty of image area to work with and a well-balanced histogram. From there I knew I could develop my vision back home. The elements used to create this image included: perspective control, cropping and preliminary tone, contrast and vibrance adjustments in Lightroom; micro contrast adjustments in NIK filters; final edits, cloning, contrast, sharpening and finishing in Photoshop.


The full-frame, FX-format Nikon D810 is the ideal match for the professional photographer. Count on impeccable image quality, meticulous detail and rich tonality in virtually any light, rendered awlessly in 36.3 megapixels. If you’re seeking the ultimate in DSLR performance, this is the one for you. For more information, visit Nikon.ca or your Authorized Nikon Canada Dealer. Made for Generation Image.

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Take your photography to a new Hi. Hi-Sync opens up a world of creative possibilities. Whether you are involved in capturing portraits or action sports, inside or outside of the studio, you can elevate your photography with Elinchrom’s Hi-Sync lighting tools. Hi-Sync gives you the ability to sync flash at shutter speeds above your normal sync speed – up to 1/8,000th second – offering more versatility than any other flash option on the market. With Hi-Sync you can freeze action, overpower the sun, darken backgrounds, and shoot at large apertures for shallow depth of field. Best of all, Elinchrom’s Hi-Sync lighting kit is perfectly portable! It’s small and light enough to carry comfortably over your shoulder. To find out how Elinchrom’s Hi-Sync lighting tools can take your photography to an all-new Hi, talk to an Elinchrom lighting specialist at Vistek.

Elinchrom ELB 400 battery pack, Quadra HS flash head, and Skyport Plus HS transmitter.

PHOTO | V I DEO | D IG ITA L | S A L E S | R E N TA LS | SERV ICE TORONTO • M I SSI SS A U G A • OT TAWA • C A L G A RY • ED M ON TON

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PPOC Gallerie Magazine 2016 Summer Issue