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The case for maximizing your space Sometimes, renovation or expansion makes more sense than new construction.

BY RAEANN SLAYBAUGH

In 2011, Sequoyah Hills Baptist Church in Tulsa, OK — a 55-year-old facility — received a complete renovation. This included transforming an outdated library and conference room to an inviting lobby and reception area. (Photos courtesy of Churches by Daniels Construction)

Right now, construction and design experts will tell you that among their church clients, renovation or expansion of existing spaces is very common. Experts like Rodney C. James, business manager / director of finance at Daniels & Daniels Construction in Broken Arrow, OK, say there’s a good reason for this: “A church that has established an identity in the community often is hindered by relocating rather than changing who they are, where they are.”

To this end, Craig Krawczyk, architect/principal at LIVE Design Group in Birmingham, AL, says the majority of his firm’s projects have a renovation component, now. “It’s typical that a church builds a new worship facility adjacent an existing facility and repurposes that existing space.” His colleague, Aubrey Garrison, AIA — founding principal of the firm — agrees. These days, he says, church clients often reimagine their outgrown space as a youth sanctuary and children’s space. >> 01-02/2014 | CHURCH EXECUTIVE | 23

Profile for Power Trade Media

Church Executive Digital Edition, Jan/Feb 2014  

Helping Leaders Become Better Stewards

Church Executive Digital Edition, Jan/Feb 2014  

Helping Leaders Become Better Stewards