Page 1

Five cool f l a v o u r s for one

hot summer FREE! JULY 2014

3 GLACIERS  12 ASTROLOGICAL VACATIONS  13 BLOGS  51 YEARS OF SEA FAIR


This spring, 45 tree planters just finished their work: planting 533,000 seedlings for Western Forest Products’ Stillwater Forest Operation at Powell River. This equates to approximately two trees being planted for every tree that is harvested. Local staff invest their time and skills caring for these seedlings achieving close to a 100% survival success. Forestry is a renewable resource and the Douglas-fir, western red cedar, yellow cedar, western hemlock, and red alder that were planted will grow and be part of our healthy and diverse working forest. Anyone who has worked planting seedlings knows how intense the job is: digging, bending, carefully adjusting the roots, and then pressing the soil in place for each new tree. The Stillwater Forest Operation would like to thank the 2014 tree planting crews for another job well done and their assistance in ensuring we have sustainable forests, now and into the future.

X

K

Q D N Z

U

S

T

Q W G

G

T

S

J

F

D T

M U R

E

E

S

T

A

R

A

U

T

M Z

V

V

W B

X

O K

L

K

O Z

C

R

Z

X

L

E

M O M X

X

J

Z

X

S

U

T

Y

E

N X

C

O K

Z

R

S

E

E

D L

O T

W E

K

H S

G

T

P

V

R

C

H K

O E

P

T

H F

J

J

S

R

R

M H R

S

Y

I

D W F

R

M J

L

J

F

V

O B

N P

A

V

S

T

V

U

E

R

W T

P

I

Q W Z

O H I

B

L

O A

W F

Q U

K

L

I

L

B

L

B

Z

S

T

O S

S

S

R

Q B

L

Y

L

B

X

R

G

E

H P

E

E

T

U

E

E

Y

A

E

R

O F

N Z

E

X

T

O B

G

U

V

X

C

R

V

L

T

G

A

T

A

T

M B

C

I

Z

N R

L

F

S

U

V

N O P

I

O U

B

R

J

C

S

M T

T

C

T

T

A

Y

N S

I

B

W Z

A

D V

K

A

P

L

L

L

G

Q Q U

P

O I

I

D W O P

C

S

D Z

I

S

I K E

D X

D S

9am –2pm July 1

*Swim Lessons July 7—18

Tue 1

CANADA DAY Celebrations Larry Gouthro Park

L

E

W W P

A

R

S

K

L

D V

U

B

E

Z

L

F

L

B

E

N

M T

W S

S

K

E

D U

H U

U

Z

J

B

M L

I

V

R

O O Y

M R

H S

Q I

O E

T

A

O P

I

B

P

B

L

E

N M A

M V

C

A

V

E

R

R

T

H S

R

R

V

E

S

N E

O O T

J

Y

R

R

F

X

T

J

L

E

S

E

I

A

S

K

T

E

M Z

I

R S

Q E

O C

F

X

T

N G

R

H H F

F

S

A

S

Y

C

Y

Q D L

J

T

C

G

G

Y

S

N S

N D Q C

J

S

B

P

H A

Z

S

C

X

E

F

Q N

W Q M R

B

J

O D F

N E

E

F

R

L

U

E

G

Z

L

I

X

P

E

R

E

I

X

D M I

R

W F

R

I

Z

T

D T

N A

S

A

F

C

A

S

G

M I

Y

Y

Y

D N E

F

R

J

D Y

A

S

U

L

Z

U

F

N F

X

B

M M J

V

B

D L

E

F

I

A

O C

I

R

I

E

I

Z

F

D O

U

G

J

A

T

J

V

H K

R

S

O Y

U

L

Y

M P

I

R

R

R

V

R

U

U

S

C

P

N I

I

H O X

A

E

U

M J

X

T

E

T

A

Z

A

E

C

L

H F

J

N I

N V

S

P

A

D E

I

M R

K

L

renewable planting bags cold storage seedlot microsite nursery

Wed 2 Kathaumixw Choral Festival July 1—5

A

H D Z

Y

soil texture moisture tree planters caulk boots safety first trees

Take a Look and Come take Part Fri

Thu 3

4

Sat 5

Closing Ceremony

July 2—4 @ 10am—12:30pm FREE Park & Play

@ 12 noon—5pm 8

7

G

Information or Registration (604) 485-2891

For ages 6—12

Old Fashioned Picnic 6

V

C

L

July 2014

Mon BC Bike race Willingdon beach

D I

Y

O S

www.powellriver.ca

Sun

X

G

N Q S

silviculture western red cedar Douglas fir seedling spade fertilizer

Happenings at the Recreation Complex

I

I

M Z

T

L

Silviculture

Seedling Season

9

Location: Larry Gouthro Park

10

11

12

17

18

19

July 7—11 Full Day Camp—* Around the World For ages 6—12 14

13

15

16

July 14—18 Full Day Camp—*Powell-ympics Sports

Mini Camp *Rhymes & Fairytales For ages 3—5

For ages 6—12 21

21 *Swim Lessons July 21—August 1

Powell River Rec. Com

22

July 21—25 Full Day Camp—*Mad Scientist Top 27

28

Sea Fair Weekend

29

www.PRLiving.ca

24

For ages 3—5 30

25

*British Soccer Camps 2014 For ages 3—16

Mini Camp *Super Scientists

July 28—August 2 Full Day Camp—*Endless Summer Sleepover For ages 6—12

2•

23

31

26 Sea Fair Weekend July 25, 26 & 27

*Please register early for classes and camps marked with a * Don’t be disappointed


Top Ten Reasons To Wear A Pollen Sweater 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

No pop bottles were hurt making Pollen Sweaters. You’ll be helping sheep stay cool in summer.

Non-itchy, and soft enough to wear next to sensitive skin. Machine washable and dryer safe at moderate temperature. We put the label on the inside where it belongs. Designed to layer smoothly under or over other garments. If it ever wears out compost it. Makes you 50 to 90% more handsome. (results may vary) Gluten free!

PollenSweatersInc. Made in Lund, BC, Canada since 1986

1-800-667-6603 604-483-4401 pollensweaters.com carla@pollensweaters.com

The store above Nancy’s Bakery Open daily in Lund 9 am – 5 pm

Powell

River

Public

Library

Summer Reading Club

D

oes your kid’s summer need a boost? Meet Sarah, club maestro extraordinare. Register for programs at the Library, phone 604-485-8625, or email sbartonbridges@ powellriverlibrary.ca

FunnyBiz Book Club

Battle of the Books

For Grades 3 to 6. This year, we’ll read A Wrinkle in Time, by Madeline L’Engle in part at the Library, Thursdays July 10 to 24, 10:30 to noon.

Grab your reading record at the kickoff event July 3, and prizes at the wrapup July 31. Both events are 10:30 to noon at the Library.

Storytime Saturdays

LEGO Bootcamp

Join Deb Zagwyn for puppets, songs and stories each Saturday at 10:30, at the Open Air Market.

A different theme each Friday July 4 to August 1. 10:30 to noon at the United Church. Bring your LEGOs!

Travelling Puppets! – Aug 7-9 – Details TBA More info at powellriverlibrary.ca

For children July 5: Make a FunnyBiz Picture Book 10:30 to noon at the United Church. July 12: Read to Dogs 10:30 to noon at the Library. July 19: FunnyBiz Hotel 10:30 to noon at the United Church. July 26: BIG Map, BIG Honkin’ Trucks. 10:30 to noon at the United Church. August 2: FunnyBiz ShowBiz It’s Showtime 10:30-Noon at United Church.

For teens July 10 - 11: Flip Video Workshop 9am5pm at the United Church. To register: szagwyn@powellriverlibrary.ca, 604-4858663

ng s i go am On ogr pr

For adults July 11: GRIEFWALKER: Film screening and talk with Stephen Jenkinson @ the Evergreen Theatre 7 pm (doors open at 6:30); free. July 12: The Tangled Garden of Wisdom and Grief: A workshop with Stephen Jenkinson @ the Recreation Complex 10 am to 3 pm. To register: stonn@ powellriverlibrary.ca, or 604-485-8667.

POWELL RIVER LIVING • july 2014 •

3


CONTENTS • JULY 2014

5 In this issue

Hobnob for a memorable summer

6 Gold, Glory and Ghosts

Texada Museum’s new exhibit

8 Cool flavours, hot summer

Local foodies celebrate the season

10 Spot Prawn photo winners Horses, whales and dogs

11 I Made the Move

Craft beer draws folks near

Volume 9, Number 6 MURIEL CARRIERE is a retired Kindergarten teacher who receives great joy from seeing the accomplishments of her former students, one of whom is Powell River Living’s Sean Percy. She enjoys travel, gardening and golf but most importantly quality family time.

12 Astrological Vacation

ISSN 1718-8601

Publisher & Managing Editor

Isabelle Southcott Associate Publisher & Sales Manager

Sean Percy Sales & Marketing

Suzi Wiebe

Plan your summer... with the stars

Special Projects Coordinator & Graphics

14 Hungry Birds

Pieta Woolley

Hummingbirds invade

16 Marine Avenue Map Send your guests!

20 Townsite Map

Send your guests!

of Texada Island is a freelance writer/photographer, sailor, and motorcyclist. He is a family man, married to his childhood sweetheart; had careers in the corporate world, and owned a real estate company; but writing has always been his passion.

GARY GRIECO

21 A growing concern

Powell River Living is published by Southcott Communications, and is a member of the Magazine Association of BC and the Community Magazines Association.

Kiwis... the fruit not the bird.

22 Prayer Shawls

Knitters send their love

23 Salute to Sea Fair

Former Miss Sea Fair takes the reins

26 Tend, grow, eat

Edible Garden Tour coming up

27 Business Connections 28 Hiking with Children

Bribes, buddies and the Trinket Trail

30 Community Calendar 31 What’s Up

MICHAEL MOONBEAM Michael Moonbeam and Amanda Panda have been studying the fabric of reality together for 32 years, sometimes it helps.

Ask me, I’m a local.

34 Trek of a lifetime

Glaciers on the South Powell Divide

ON THE COVER Jessyca Van Belle sells ice pops at community events and fairs. Her creations are one of our featured flavours.. Photo by Pieta Woolley

e

VERIFIED

We welcome feedback from our readers. Email your comments to isabelle@prliving.ca, or mail to Powell River Living, 7053E Glacier Street, Powell River, BC V8A 5J7 Tel 604.485.0003

Who and what’s new

Jammin’ in July

agazin

k wor et

Lost purse ends well

M ty ni

N

25 Mystery at Mile Zero

Many local hikers shared their knowledge and safety equipment with JANET MAY and enabled her trek. Clarke Slootweg shared his GPS mapfile and many hints. Back-country good citizens improved the road access and marked the trail up to Center Lakes. Rob Higgin and his family drove them to the trail head. Janet thanks everyone for their help in achieving her dream.

m u

Mom takes memories digital

Co m

15 Blogging a scrapbook

Dee is the Executive Director of the Powell River Brain Injury Society, but in fact it was Penny Mebs who formed the original support group with Eunice Boser around 1991 and then was on the hiring committee that hired Debbie in 2003 to form the Society. Also, she is no longer the president of the Model Community project.

No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior written consent of the publisher. While every effort has been made to ensure accuracy, the publisher cannot be held responsible for any errors or omissions that may occur. © 2014 Southcott Communications. We reserve the right to refuse any submission or advertisement.

Complete issues are available online at:

www.prliving.ca

CORRECTION: Debbie

Re: Young Aces Ace It: PR Girls Serve up Silver at Western Nationals Great article Isabelle! Thank you for all.

Laurie Yule

International Student Coordinator, SD47

Powell River Living is supported entirely by our advertisers. We encourage you to choose the businesses that you see in these pages. We do.

Re: Adrenalin Rush: Sending the City to Boarding School (Longboarding) Great story, well done. Gets all the points across.  Thanks so much for doing that!

Maggie Hathaway

City of Powell River Councillor

4•

www.PRLiving.ca


Memories are made in the unexpected Yahoo…it’s summer! I love everything about this time of year. Blue skies, sunshine, warm breezes, swimming, boating, camping, barbecues, family time, vacation, ice cream, drinks on the deck. Even those darn mozzies can’t dampen my spirits! It’s time to recharge our batteries. Time to slow down and savour the moment. We spend so much of our day running from one thing to the next with work, kids, activities, chores, and so on, that it is all too easy to forget what is really important in life. They say that ‘love’ is spelled T-I-M-E. The older I get, the more I realize this. It is the time we spend with our loved ones that is so important. Life isn’t about stuff, it’s about creating special moments. I remember family camping trips, particularly one at Kejimkujik National Park in Nova Scotia where I grew up. I was 12 and it was sweltering hot. I put on my brand new red and white polka dot bikini and jumped in the lake. When I came out, I looked down at my leg and screamed! A leech was stuck to my ankle. My father raced to my rescue and quickly removed it. I was traumatized and wouldn’t go swimming for the rest of the trip. Every summer as we get ready to go camping, I think of this trip. I think of how Dad bested the leech. This issue of Powell River Living is all about summer. Need help planning your activities? Texada’s own Michael Moonbeam offers an astrological guide to your star sign’s most fulfilling

warm-weather ventures (pages 12 & 13). Thanks to the foodies featured on pages 8 & 9, your 2014 campfires may get a tasty, locavore makeover. – including smokies, beer and icy treats And hiking season is upon us – whether that means toddlers in tow (pages 28 & 29) or alpine and glaciers to conquer in the back country (pages 32 to 34). Summer in Powell River brings a serious tidal wave of events. Texada shines in July, with celebrations such as the Sandcastle Weekend and the Fly-In – and while you’re on-island, be sure to check out the additions to the museum (pages 6 & 7.) Powell River’s Sea Fair, on July 25 to 27, is captained this year by a highly-skilled former Miss Sea Fair, bringing us new rides, a canoe race, volleyball tourney, a new Kidzone, and much more. With far too many events to list here, both the Visitor Centre and the Powell River Public Library are offering oodles of July events for all ages, listed on the Community Calendar on Page 30. And for parents looking for free and inexpensive activities this summer, the calendar contains treasures. I do not wish you a leech this summer. But memories are made in the unexpected, and that means getting out, hobnobbing with your neighbours, and reveling in the great range of what this region offers: from edible gardens to shopping strolls. See you out there! Isabelle Southcott, Publisher • isabelle@prliving.ca

! p u r e ‘ l Fil Valley is your source for all sorts of TANKS! All sizes and styles Up to 5000 gallons Drinking water Rain water or catchment Septic tanks and more

POWELL RIVER LIVING • july 2014 •

5


Gold, glory and ghosts of the past Texada Museum brings mining to life TEXADA TREASURE: Pete Styles strikes a pose by the anvil, in the Texada Island Museum blacksmith shop. Photo by Gary Grieco

By Gary Grieco

I

n 1871, it was as if Mother Nature flicked a switch in the Strait of Georgia when fisherman Harry Trim sailed into Welcome Bay and saw iron ore stains on the cliff face. This singular event propelled a calm and quiet evergreen island named Texada into an unparalleled era of prosperity and greed. Texada Heritage Museum has a new exhibit which brings Texada’s 1896 gold and copper boom vividly to life. A blacksmith shop with glowing forge; assay office stacked with ore samples; a mine entrance with ore wagon on steel rails from the Little Billie mine, all create the illusion of stepping back in time over one hundred years.

Thanks for the help with Soap Box Derby THE KIWANIS CLUB OF POWELL RIVER WOULD LIKE TO THANK

our co-sponsors Quality Foods (Guy Sigouin), Soap Box coordinator Ken Gordon, Clean By Ken, Powell River Town Centre Mall and the City of Powell River. Huge thanks also to our crew, volunteers and our unsung heroes. Without you, we couldn’t have done it.

WE WOULD ALSO LIKE TO THANK:

Alterra Power Corp Arts Council ATV Club (Reed English, Gord Keedy, Jim Massullo) Augusta Recyclers A&W BMO CJMP 90.1FM Canadian Tire Coast Realty Crystal Clear Engraving City Parks (Paul) Roads (Larry) Big O Tires Goat Lake Forest Products Julie’s Airport Café

Eagle Radio 97.3 Economy Rentals (John) First Credit Union First Aid - Head to Toe Impact Signs Island Farms Kelly Creek Community School Association (Laurie Lee & Kevin Austin) Nicole’s Embroidery & Design Otago Rugby Club (Chris & Jonathan Bakker) The Peak Pictures by Jessica Lambert

SILVER SPONSORS

Lois Lumber Massullo Motors Mother Nature

GOLD SPONSORS

Powell River Living Powell River Sea Cadets Quality Foods Staff Rangers Search & Rescue River City Music (Mike Lang) Shaw Cable Shell Gas Bar Storage (Ray Peters) SUN FM 95.7 TMS Moving & Storage The Sweet Shoppe (Carol) Goat Lake Forest Products Roger Skorey Peter’s Plumbing Powell River Tatoo Sound Attraction

Adam’s Concrete Coast Realty

First Credit Union RONA

Springtime Garden Centre Vintage Car Club of Canada Wal-Mart

Don Allen Joyce Allman Lorraine & Sid Allman Holly Kliauga Ted Lloyd

Lions Club of Powell River (Marilyn Brooks, Cliff & Lena Gerhart) Lois Millar Laura Moffat

Reg Mooney Lloyd Otiguam Brian Salter Donna Tanke Betty Tosoff

THANKS ALSO TO:

Nellie Valente Ken Williamson and the Lois Street residents!

Thank you to all the racers, young and old, and their support teams! We apologize if we have missed anyone.

All funds stayed locally! Proceeds to Kiwanis Club of Powell River Watch for next year’s Race Posters!

6•

www.PRLiving.ca

In this exhibit, displays of old photos help conjure up images of yester-year in Texada City and Van Anda. Indirect lighting causes flickering shadows to come alive on the boardwalk, and ghosts from the past seem to lurk behind dimly lit storefront windows. The once-rich mines of Van Anda are covered and hidden, now but a faded memory. But, if you concentrate as you stroll through the exhibit, scenes may appear in the corner of your mind’s eye—hazy visions of the Opera House, a pretty white church, or husky bearded miners standing about on the boardwalk in front of the old store. A horse drawn wagon loaded heavily with equipment creaks down the dusty main street, while a lone policeman pauses to chat with one of the boys. Lurid posters on the side of a building announce the coming of a new dancer from Vancouver, along with a special boat sailing for the event. The images grow dim, and then fade, like the boom days of Texada City and Van Anda. Designed and built by local builder and artisan, Lorrie Pirart, aided by lighting consultant Joseph Scott, this creative display has been designated the ‘Clarence Wood’ room.

Farrier

n-retires

hoofwrangler@shaw.ca • 30+ years of experience • 15 years professional practice in the Lower Mainland • Kwantlen Farrier College 1982 Old, bald, bad back, worse knees, but patient and professional.

Brandy Peterson Reliable answers to your real estate questions

604 344-1234 direct 1-877-485-4231 toll free powellriverrealestate.net brandypeterson@shaw.ca 4766 Joyce Ave


Clarence Wood, one of the original curators and exhibit builders of the now famous living museum town of Barkerville, brought his knowledge and passion to building the first exhibits for Texada’s fledgling museum. No one disturbed him when he sat in a chair in the middle of an empty room—just imagining and visualizing. “Museums were Clarence’s life, and he thought the Texada Museum could one day be world class,” said his widow Pastor Karen May. Clarence Wood passed away in 2012 and this special room will be dedicated by his widow, Karen, at the July 5 reopening of the museum. Texada has the mother lode of rich history, and mining has always been king. By the turn of the century, the small historic Van Anda district was a red hot, lively mining town. It bustled with miners from the Copper Queen, Little Billie, Marble Bay, and Cornell Mines; miners chasing their gold and copper fortunes. What had started as two prospectors’ camps was now a community of 450 people, and would grow to a town of 3,000,

with three hotels complete with saloons, an opera house and hospital, all crammed into a small historic district measuring only five blocks long and two blocks wide. Second only to San Francisco, it was the envy of Powell Riverites who chugged across in gas boats to partake of the high life. The future looks rosy for the Texada Heritage Society according to president, Ken Barton. “Ten years ago the Museum consisted of two filing cabinets, and now we have something to be proud of.” Curator Doug Paton’s goal is to make sure the rest of BC knows how involved Texada was in the building of the province. “The Klondike got the glory, while Texada had its own gold rush that few know about.” Heritage Society members are enthusiastic and have the momentum to fulfill Clarence’s dream. Lorrie Pirart’s fervor, fascination, and devotion to this project are evident. Plans for expansion include opening the wall behind the mine entrance and constructing a replica working drift gold mine along the lines of the Little

Texada Island Heritage Society

Museum

Summer hours: Thursday through Sunday, 11 to 3 Reopens July 5 Dedication of the Clarence Wood Room is at 1:30 pm Tea and treats 1 to 3 pm Call Doug Paton 604-486-7109 or Ken Barton 604-486-0044 Billie. Visitors will get a sense of miners’ gloomy underground working conditions lit by carbide, kerosene, and electric lighting, with old mining equipment — some of which is still being used in the industry today — to drill and blast new tunnels and drifts for copper or gold. I can imagine the presence of Clarence Wood strolling quietly through his room to his favourite chair, smiling with approval, and nodding with pleasure at the great honour bestowed on him by his fellow Texada ‘museum men.’ • buy local • eat local • be local •

Willingdon Beach

CAMPSITE

Over 120 businesses on board!

Dedication of “Clarence Wood Room” 1:30 pm Tea and Treats 1:00 to 3:00 pm For more info: Doug Paton 604-486-7109 or Ken Barton 604-486-0044

texadaheritagesociety.com

PERKS and DEALS!

• buy local • eat local • be local •

Museum Re-opening July 5th, 2014

SAVE MONEY with unlimited

• buy local • eat local • be local •

Texada Island Heritage Society

A rewards program for building a thriving community

Paradise by the Sea! 4845 Marine Avenue Reservations • 604.485.2242

Perk Directory & sign-up:

www.locallogic.ca

www.WillingdonBeach.ca

Formerly the Powell River Sustainability Stakeholders

TEXADA ARTISTS STUDIO TOUR 2014 AUGUST 9th & 10th 10:00 am – 4:00 pm www.texadaart.com POWELL RIVER LIVING • july 2014 •

7


Five cool flavours If you’re a traveller, you know that each city has its own distinct smells, sounds and tastes. What are Powell River’s? We rounded up five locals who are enriching this city’s palate: influenced by Mexico, Italy and Belgium, the coastal rainforest, the Salish Sea, and West Coast fusion and innovation.

Mexican-style fresh fruit popsicles Bursting with real fruit, the oversized frozen treats come in raspberry-lemon; orange and strawberry creamsicle; mango ginger lime; 32 Lakes mocha fudgesicle; summer berry lemonade, etc. Price: $4 each Find them at: Pirate Paleta’s chopper bicycle on beaches and in parks around Powell River… and at Ecossentials. The woman in charge: After spending four months as a waitress in Mexico, Jessyca Van Belle, 27, returned to BC with a business idea ready: paletas – Mexician-style popsicles. But food vending licenses in Vancouver, where she lived, were prohibitively expensive. So when she returned to her hometown of Powell River, she knew exactly what she wanted to do. Now, she can be found at the Open Air Market, and at beaches and parks around town on her bicycle, selling the cold, sweet treats. “In Mexico, people would come up to me on the beach to sell me a popsicle, and I was always so excited to see them,” said Jessyca, who has

perfected the art of chatting over 12 years as a server and bartender, here and away. “People don’t approach other people enough here. But we have this beautiful little city, a little petrie dish, with the perfect amount of people. It’s a place where you really can work less, spend less and live more.”

Beach Glass Candy Looks just like the real thing, but tastes like strawberry, lemon, lime, black cherry, blackberry and root beer. Lightly dusted with icing sugar for that tide-softened look. Price: $2 to $5 in plastic, slightly more in a souvenir glass jar. Find it at: Velma’s Candy (4660B Marine), and at farmers markets and festivals around town this summer. The woman in charge: Velma Richmond, locally famous for her line of delicious traditional caramels, Turkish delights and pillow mints, says she enjoys making the candies appear “weathered.”

West Coast Cuisine w i t h a E u r o p e a n To u c h

Enjoy our two patios, ocean-side or street-side All summer long

Sunday dining entertainment with Scotty Turner Full-service banquet room up to 80 guests; call Marika

Refreshingly Different

Reservations recommended • 4603 Marine Ave • 604-485-0010 • www.treefrogbistro.com Brides Hair extensions Cuts & colours Make-up Gel nails ing Manicures d d e n w ble! Pedicures catio ila On lo ices ava Threading v r se

8•

www.PRLiving.ca

Get gorgeous at Afterglow Hair Lounge for your big day! Pedicures are $49 until July 31! Fridays after 3 pm get a wash and style for only $20!

#105-7075 Alberni St (604) 485-2075 www.afterglowhairlounge.com


one hot summer Smokies Hand-made, by-product-free pork and beef naturally-smoked sausages, ready for the campfire. Flavours include regular and sweet and hot – a cheddar cheese smokie is in development. Price: $9.99 for four. Find them at: The Chopping Block, 4741 Marine Ave. The man in charge: Craig Simmons, 19, didn’t plan to work in his family’s 49-year-old butcher shop – but without a solid plan after high school, he enrolled in

Thompson Rivers University’s 10-month meat cutting program. He’s glad he did. Since he returned to Powell River from Kamloops last year, the shop added a smoker, and he developed a line of artisan smokies. “I think about camping when I think about summer in Powell River,” he said, mentioning that the smokies are fantastic over a campfire. “They remind me of trips my family used to take up Powell Lake when I was younger.”

Kathaumixw, 7800 Saison, and Blackberry Festivale beers From the infamous Townsite Brewing, these three limited-edition summer beers offer refreshment and complexity. Kathaumixw comes out just before its namesake festival starts, and will likely be gone by its end. Saison 7800 will be released in July, and Blackberry Festivale – which won first place in the BC Beer Awards 2012 for fruit beers – in August. Price: $5.90/ 650-ml bottle at the Brewery retail store. Find them at: Townsite Brewing and var-

ious establishments around town. Plus festivals including the newest one: Beer on the Pier, August 22 and 23. The woman in charge: Chloe Smith, 37, is the general manager of Townsite Brewing, and a big fan of 7800 Saison. “We initially brewed it to celebrate the birth of our son, so it has a special place in our heart,” she said. The “biere de garde” is a pale ale, brewed using several grains including rye, spelt, barley and wheat.

Blackberry Gelato Made in-store from locally-sourced blackberries. Team it up on your cone with other fresh flavours. Price: $3.25 for a scoop, $5.25 for a large, or take it in a container to go. Find it at: Rene’s Pasta, 4701 Marine Avenue.

The man in charge: French-trained chef Rene Glangeaud was inspired to make a line of gelato after his daughter returned from a school trip to Rome – and had fallen in love with the Italian treat. The blackberry flavour is so popular, he sold 80 litres of it last year during Blackberry Fest, and went through 300 lbs of local berries in 2013.

For a limited time, so enjoy it now!

Open at 7 am, 7 days a week 4696 Joyce Ave • 604 485-6277

POWELL RIVER LIVING • july 2014 •

9


Spot Prawn Festival Photo Contest Winners First place winners

top right: Flora and Fauna: Bruce Waites this image: People by the Sea: Holly Russell below right: Dawn and Dusk: Linda Cross below left: Sand and Sea: Linda Cross

Honourable mentions

bottom left: People by the Sea: Leah Laurie bottom right: Flora and Fauna: Bruce Waites

Dr Ryan Sinotte DMD General Dentistry 604.485.2930

NEW PATIENTS WELCOME 4621 Joyce Avenue Powell River, BC

RELATIONSHIP TBI buys specialty ingredients at Ecossentials for some of their seasonal beers. WHAT MELISSA CALL OF ECOSSENTIALS SAYS ABOUT WORKING WITH TOWNSITE:

WHAT CEDRIC SAYS ABOUT WORKING WITH ECOSSENTIALS:

“We are so pleased that Townsite Brewing supports our values of using local and organic ingredients when possible and we love having a craft brewery in our town.”

“Its a big relief to be able to buy certain things here in town that my malt supplier doesn’t always have like the Spelt I added to my 7800 Saison and Star Anise for the Biere D’Hiver.”

604.485.7000 www.ecossentials.ca

604.483.2111 www.townsitebrewing.com

10 •

www.PRLiving.ca


Because of the brewery

J

ust over a year ago, registered psychiatric nurse Paddy Treavor and his family moved to Powell River from Vancouver. Paddy, who is heavily involved in the BC craft beer community as an advocate, started a branch of the Campaign for Real Ale BC here in Powell River and already, he has more than 60 paid members! He also writes a regular column, called “Craft on the Coast,” which appears in the BC Craft Beer News. Blanca sells her Mexican-style salsas at the Powell River Farmers’ Market. She is from Acapulco, Mexico, and the couple met when she was in Vancouver on vacation in 2007 and married in 2008. They have a four-yearold daughter. Blanca “We just recently bought our first house, in Wildwood,” says Paddy.

Why did you choose to move to Powell River? • We wanted to escape

the high cost of living, stressful lifestyle and increasing crime in Vancouver and we wanted to raise our daughter in a smaller, safer community. We have several friends who relocated up here over the past four or five years.

When? Where from? • We moved from

the Commercial Drive area of Vancouver. We lived about 1 minute walk from Vancouver’s busiest transit hub, Broadway and Commercial Skytrain Station, so the change of pace here has been huge! I would see more people in an hour on Commercial Drive than I see here in a month!

What surprised you about Powell River once you moved here? • We

were surprised by the multi-cultural aspect of Powell River. My wife, Blanca, is from Acapulco, Mexico, and we have found a large Spanish-speaking community up here and made friends with people from Colombia, Nicaragua, Mexico and Argentina which has helped Blanca adjust to living in a small community. We have also met and made friends with people from

France, Belgium, England, Indonesia, and Korea. We were not expecting to find such diversity here. I even have rekindled a friendship with a friend from Scotland who now lives in Powell River. In the early 1990s, he was the bartender at my local pub when I lived on the Isle of Skye and now we are going to be neighbours in Wildwood. I had not seen him for close to 20 years until we bumped into each other at a craft beer event at the Old Courthouse Inn. What a small world! As well, we have been surprised by the great arts and culture scene here. It is wonderful to live in such a creative community which will open up opportunities for our daughter, as she grows, to be more easily exposed to so much in a more relaxed atmosphere than Vancouver offers. Lastly, we have been very surprised at how quickly we have been accepted into the community and how full our social lives are here. We already have a huge social circle, many of whom we consider family and close friends even after just a year, and we are busier here than we were in Vancouver.

What made you decide to move to Powell River? • Many of the reasons list-

ed above. Inevitably, our daughter made us decide to move here. We felt she would have a much fuller upbringing and better opportunities growing up in the safer environment a small town offers compared to the big city. And, of course, I knew about Townsite Brewery, as I am heavily involved in the BC craft beer community, and I have to tell you, having great beer available was a big selling point for me.

Where is your favourite place in Powell River? • As a family, Savary

Island is fantastic and we are lucky to have friends who own a place over there. We also like going for family outings to Donkersley Beach.

How did you first hear about Powell River? • I had been up here as a kid, with my family camping and I had done a few bicycle trips up here in recent years so I

Bill Bailey There’s no place like home. 604 223-0811 billbailey@coastrealty.com blog: privbillbailey.wordpress.com/

was aware of the area. As well, I had a few friends who had relocated from both Vancouver and Squamish up here and they all were very happy they made the move.

What would make Powell River a nicer community? • I think if we could

create more opportunities for young people to get employment and stay in the community it would really help improve Powell River. Other than that, I pretty much feel like I have landed in paradise.

If you were a fly, which wall in town would you like to inhabit? • The wall of the room where my wife and all her Latin friends are hanging out in on one of their “girls nights out”! I am sure it is a very lively and interesting conversation.

If you know of someone we should feature in “I Made the Move” please email isabelle@prliving.ca with your idea!

Reclaim your view! Call for a free estimate.

TREE SERVICES LTD. • Industrial and Residential Falling • Danger Tree Removal • Topping, Limbing, Pruning • Clean Up/Chipper Available • On-Site Milling

SAM RICHARDS Certified Faller

604 414-9864

www.fullscopefalling.com

POWELL RIVER LIVING • july 2014 •

11


Plan your vacation... Aries

March 21/22 - April 19/20 Arriving first in the zodiac and first in the fire trinity; symbol of budding plants, new life, springtime, youth, desire, and self integrity. Ignite the fuel for a fresh start by hiking, biking, ATV or 4x4 up to the Bunster Hills on top of the Sunshine Coast. Drink in the potential as you experience the panorama at 2,400 feet of Georgia Straight, the Malaspina Peninsula and Okeover Inlet.

Inspiration, connection, and new energy: summer should deliver on all of these. Let Texada Island astrologer Michael Moonbeam guide you to your ultimate Powell River vacation destination:

Most rooted of the earth signs you are the sacred place where we develop our own sense of value and worth. Expressed in concrete terms, lush gardens, beautiful sculpture, artwork, or the perfect couch. Tantalize then satisfy your yearning for flavour with organic produce at the Powell River Farmers’ Market, Saturday 10:3012:30, Sunday 12:30-2:30 or the Texada Island Farmers’ Market Sunday 12:00-1:30.

July 23/24 - August 22/23

As the mutable air sign, your mind is quicksilver, the ever-adaptable communicator, occasional trickster and myna bird of the zodiac. Combine a birding and canoe trip by circumnavigating the Powell River Canoe Route and learn to mimic songbirds.

Cancer

Taurus

April 20/21 - May 20/ 21

Leo

Gemini

May 21/22 - June 20 /22

June 21/22 - July 22/23 First of the water trinity; associated with childhood, vulnerability, magic, memory, food, emotions, acceptance and home. Refresh your emotional connection to spirit by kayaking from Lund to Savary Island. Enjoy a smoked salmon lunch on the warm golden sand. Stroll through the unique hobbit town of island homes. Remember the time when time didn’t matter and you felt like you belonged.

Your fixed fire and performance orientation light up the room with laughter and playful creativity. You put the fun in romance and your luminosity integrates the purpose of all growth towards the divine solar self. Bask in the charisma of the five-day Kathaumixw choral festival or transcend this mortal coil at the 12-day Pacific Region International Summer Music Academy (PRISMA).

Virgo

August 23/24 - September 22/23 The mutable, earthy, worker bee of the zodiac; efficient, ordered, wise in ways that matter, pruning the output of every sign into a workable whole is your gift of service. Roll down your sleeves and harvest some wild blackberries or pay to pick plump blueberries, tart raspberries, and

Happy hour x 2! Wed-S at 3-5 OPEN Sunday - Tuesday 7 am – 3 pm Wednesday – Saturday 7 am – 8 pm

604-483-9114

6762 Cranberry Street

JULY 2014

SCHEDULE

Celebrating 10 years in business 2004-2014

12 •

Planning a wedding? Reunion? Any event where you need transportation? The 15 passenger Heather Tours bus is available for charter! “Summer afternoon, summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language.” - Henry James

www.PRLiving.ca

Mind Over Matters Hypnotherapy Intuitive tarot card reading & guided meditation Summer special $60 Kick back, relax and enjoy the future!

July 5-6 “The Price is Right” River Rock Casino Resort

tel: 604.483.3345 We would love to have you join us! cell: 604.483.1408 www.heathertours.com

Breakfast - Lunch - Dinner All made from Scratch magpiesdiner.ca

BC Reg. No. 30400

Teresa Harwood-Lynn, CHt Clinical Hypnotherapist 604 485-5620 teresaann@telus.net

mindovermattershypnotherapy.ca


with the help of the stars! sweet strawberries for their potent antioxidant power. Or for a real superfood treat in the early spring, gather young stinging nettles leaves and steam them in seawater.

Libra

September 23/24 - October 22/24 Being the cardinal air sign of partnership, fairness, harmony, proportion, beauty, and balance (or imbalance). Infuse your thoughtful sensibilities with the visceral and intellectual abundance of artistic forms forged from one end of this peninsula to the other in every manner of material from silver and clay to canvas and glass. Galleries, gift shops, studios, studio tours (August on Texada), art crawls (but not this year) all mirror the stunning spiritual depth and natural power of the wild coast.

Scorpio

October 23/24 - November 21/22 The sign of fixed water, known for your emotional courage, and psychological depth. Your feelings are intense and your radar is true. Find your inner peace by scuba diving the “Emerald Princess,” a bronze statue in the waters off Mermaid Cove Provincial Park. Or if you are up for a real challenge, climb the granite walls of the Eldred Valley.

Sagittarius

Aquarius

November 22/23 - December 21/22 The sign of mutable fire, you are the storyteller of the zodiac. Sag expands our mind with culture, travel, and the vibrancy of nature. Kindred spirit to all wild things, old growth trees and wide open spaces. As the archer you can be found either hunting, fishing or protecting wildlife and green space. Whether with mule deer at Freda Lake, mountain goats on Diadem Mountain or black bears in the Bunster Hills, bathe your inner centaur in the serene waters of Goat Lake.

Capricorn

January 20/21 - February 18/19 The fixed air sign. Known for your contrarian sense of freedom and your brilliant intuitive comprehension of systems; associated with airplanes, aliens, high-tech, revolutions and a personal need to be an individual. Celebrate your free spirit at one of our regions many festivals, Seafair, Sunshine Coast Music Festival, Texada Sandcastle, Diversity (not this year) and the Blackberry Festival. Spin the centre of the human mandala.

Pisces

December 22/23 - January 19/20 The cardinal earth sign connected with business and organization, you posses the determination to set long range goals and build lasting structures. Your penchant for the past and classic tradition will be inspired with a visit to the historic Townsite area of Powell River. Featuring one of the few intact pockets of Arts and Crafts Movements architecture where you can also marvel at the industrial challenge of building a paper mill on the rugged west coast.

February 19/20 - March 20/21 Mutable, watery, and naturally mystical; being the wettest of the water signs often associated with the sea, glamour, movies, the astral plane, fantasy and consciousness itself. Cleanse the ventricles of your heart’s boundless imagination with a boat trip to Desolation Sound. Remember your connection to the infinite. Or stand on the beach in Sliammon (Tla’amin) and thank the shamanic presence of the First Nations ancestors whose children still flourish in this magical land by the sea.

Did you know that Marine Avenue boasts well over 40 small businesses? Leave your car behind & enjoy a stroll along Powell River‛s spectacular waterfront. Coffee • Books • Food • Art • Gifts • Soap • Jewellery • Outdoor Gear Wool • Clothing • Bowling • Cafes • Restaurants & Much Much More! Support Loaal Businesses!

EL’s

LTD.

Certified

604 485-7003 7050 Alberni Street

Complete Auto Repair C Any Make & Model

Follow Powell River Marine Stroll

Complete Family Hair Care & Healing

Hair cuts Styles Color Perms

Waxing Massage Reflexology Infrared Sauna

urbanrootsalon.ca 604 487-4000

POWELL RIVER LIVING • july 2014 •

13


Hungry Birds

By Maria Glaze

T

his spring the Rufous hummingbirds arrived in huge numbers and by the first week of April they were buzzing around like a swarm of bees. Every evening my husband and I watched the show, laughing out loud as they zipped over our heads and zoomed inches from our faces. These tiny birds have big appetites and I cooked four cups of nectar a day to keep up. In early May I watched a female gather fluff from the cattails and fly up into the cedar trees; her teeny beak full of nesting material. I couldn¹t believe it when I discovered her wee nest about 14 feet off the ground attached to a cedar bough. I put an extension ladder against a nearby tree and over the next few weeks spent many minutes a day perched on a rung with my camera. It was such a gift to be able watch this little miracle unfold in the trees, although it took a few days to get over my “empty nest syndrome” when the young ones finally flew away!

Sewing Machine Service & Repair deep cleaning • timing • oiling

Scissor & Knife Sharpening seamstress • quilter • sportsman Pick-up & delivery available

the ECCENTRIC CAM Providing dignified service to the region since 1969 Visit our website at www.stubberfieldfh.com to view obituaries and send condolences online

7221 Duncan Street, Powell River, BC

604 485-4112

Cam Bailey 7081 Huntingdon Street 604-485-2937 eccentric_cam@shaw.ca

Come for a visit ... stay for a lifetime. Bringing Knowledge and Expertise to buying & selling your home.

604 483 1568 | info@carlamckamey.com | carlamckamey.com

14 •

www.PRLiving.ca


Digital devotion

Blogger creates digital scrapbook for her daughters By Kristin Parkin Powell River blogs

Two obstacles held me back from beginning blogging years ago. The first: I didn’t know what I should write about. A blog needs a topic. A niche. A vision. I didn’t have one. The second: I knew nothing about digital technology. I had zero experience with blog design and I had no idea what writing code was. Code for what? I was more than a little intimidated but I knew I couldn’t let that stop me. Flash forward a few years. After we had two little daughters, I finally decided what to write about. I collect things for my girls to find online when they’re older. Like an old-fashioned scrap book, hope chest or recipe box, this is my 21st century place to write memories, share advice, discuss philosophy, teach life lessons, post recipes and crafts, hints and tips. I imagine them discovering it when they’re older and what a resource it will be for them. I am excited about creating it for our girls and every post will have them in mind. I was still left with one problem. I didn’t know where to begin, technologically. After a brief conversation with a friend on the topic, I went online and did some research, apparently there are websites that exist specifically to make this easy! I found a simple drag and drop style site builder that looked to be the most user friendly and professional looking, so I signed up and got started. My lack of knowledge became pretty apparent when I realized that I hadn’t actually started a blog, but an entire website! Instead of one page to manage, I now have five including a blog. There has been a steep learning curve for me with figuring out all this, and luckily I have a good friend who doesn’t seem to mind helping me when I get stuck. I now know what code can be used for, and what an URL is. I’m excited that I can spend years learning about website design and continually improve and add to my site. I’m looking forward to the challenge! After all, I have two of the cutest little inspirations that I get to spend my days with. I even carry a little notebook around with me so that when inspiration hits, I can write things down right away.

E Kristin Parkin’s mommy blog: dearmydaughters.com Powell River Climbing: prclimbing.blogspot.ca/ Powell River Garden Club: powellrivergardenclubblog.blogspot.ca/ Powell River Tugboats: prtugboats.blogspot.ca/ Powell River Books Blog: powellriverbooks.blogspot.ca/ Mommy blog: coastmomma.com Powell River Vanishing history: vanishinghistory.ca/ Eco-parenting: sweetmadeleine.ca/ MLA Nicholas Simons blog: nicholassimons.com Politics and opinion: powellriverpersuader.blogspot.ca Local news powellriverdailynews.com Powell River Kings hockey blog: kingsofthecastle.wordpress.com Jobs blog: careerlinkbc.wordpress.com My next challenge is finding the time to work on it while our little daughters are fast asleep. I’ve discovered that there are, in fact, many bloggers here in Powell River. There are blogs about gardening, tug boats, hiking, rock climbing, and eco friendly living. There our blogs from local artists, other moms, hockey teams and restaurants. Even our own MLA, Nicholas Simons has one. Although I’m the proud new owner of my own website, dearmydaughters.com, I would love to encourage people to search out other local blogs, too. There is so much to discover in the online universe. There truly is something for everyone, and although I’m creating mine for those two precious girls, I think it’s worth sharing with everyone online to enjoy.

NEW!

Malicious Intent by Gwen Enquist

The concluding novel in The Bonnard Family Series Available at Breakwater Books

POWELL RIVER LIVING • july 2014 •

15


French Pastries –Fresh Daily!

Ask about Gift certificates Mobile Service Available

Beez Bakery Coffee • Latte • Cappuccino Tea • Smoothies

q

9-5 Monday to Friday

Marie Eve Barnes

Ask about Custom Cakes! 4735 Marine Avenue

604 414-9772

1$ e

See our ad on Page 35

See our ad on Page 35

Willingdon Beach

Historical Museum y 101) a w h g i nue (H e v A ine r a M

CAMPSITE

2(

Paradise by the Sea! 604.485.2242

See our ad on Page 7

Eve Stegenga

604 414-5991

Marine Area Businesses Welcome You!

Mini Golf 604-485-5750

w

4680 Willingdon Avenue

604-483-5162

Call 604 485-5611 4703 Marine Avenue trevor@aaronservice.com

Reiki Zen shiatsu Reflexology Aromatherapy Couples massage Four hands massage Pre and post natal massage Swedish & deep tissue massage

str i D r ic isto

ite s n ow ic t T

lH a n atio N he Willingdon to t

Forestry Museum

2(

Visitors get memberships

r

more info @

for only $12

Get your card at

ea ch

Members save money at over 120 local businesses!

The B

<---

Willingdon Beach Park Beach il a Campground Tr

locallogic.ca

The Beach Trail

4691 Marine Avenue

Welcome First Time Customer

Find out why so many customers have made us their pharmacy. We invite you to experience the Medicine Shoppe Pharmacy difference - you’ll be glad you did!

Dirk de Villiers pharmacist/owner

Your health. Our priority. Unit E - 4670 Marine Ave • 604-485-5530 9:30 am to 5 pm • Monday to Friday

16 •

www.PRLiving.ca

t

Breakwater & Fishing Dock


Stop in for lunch or take it to go

NEW

!

Soup Sandwiches Pasta Porchetta

Custom Cuts & Family Packs We welcome specialty orders

MEAT • DELI • SEAFOOD GROCERIES

y

1!

4741 Marine Ave 604 485-4838

r Albe

e venu A a m Algo

u y

q

o nue 1@ arine Ave M e

r w

2& 1$

n Avenue o d g n i Will

Marine Area Businesses Welcome You!

u

Summer Sale CLOTHING • SHOES • JEWELRY • PURSES

As usual, the unusual

Up to 60% off

≈ Westcoast & Local Gifts ≈ Cool Canadiana ≈ First Nations Jewelry & Art

GUESS • DEX • SANDWICH ROXY • STEVE MADDEN

“A must-see when visiting Powell River.”

t Visit us a 202 – 4741 Marine Avenue

604-485-9796

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • 604 485-2512 Open Mon – Sat

Royal Canadian Legion

Alexander Street

treet ni S

2#

1)1! i t 1#

i

4670C Marine Avenue

Open Mon Sat 9:30 – 5:30 PAGANI &– SONS

9:30 – 5:30

SHOES & REPAIRS “the fit specialist since 1956” Natural Health & Beauty – Organic Health Foods Vitamins, Minerals & Herbs – Homeopathic Remedies Beer & Wine Making Supplies – Special Customer Orders

o

4706C Marine Avenue Powell River, B.C. V8A 2L4 604.485.5550 Open Mon – Sat

9:30 – 5:30

Great Balls of Wool ✴ Best selection of Wool, Yarns, Tools and Inspiration ✴ Knit and crochet on-going– Organic Health Foods Naturalclasses Healthare & Beauty Vitamins, Herbs –and Homeopathic ✴ Locally-sourced andMinerals produced&handspun dyed wool Remedies Beer & Wine Making Supplies – Special Customer Orders ✴ “Olla a H’Aon Boutique” Knit-by-our-Hands Art Wear 4706C Marine Avenue Open seven days a week: Powell River, B.C. V8A 2L4 Monday to Saturday, 10 to 5; Sunday, noon to 4. 604.485.5550

1@

www.greatballsofwool.blogspot.com 4722A Marine Ave 604-485-4859 Open Mon – Sat 9:30 – 5:30

Natural Health & Beauty – Organic Health Foods Vitamins, Minerals & Herbs – Homeopathic Remedies Beer & Wine Making Supplies – Special Customer Orders

4706C Marine Avenue Powell River, B.C. V8A 2L4 604 485-5110 604.485.5550 4670A Marine Avenue

The Cut Open Mon – Sat

1)

9:30 – 5:30

1#

Hairstyling

Natural Health & Beauty – Organic Health Foods Vitamins, Minerals & Herbs – Homeopathic Remedies Beer & Wine Making Supplies – Special Customer Orders

July 4706C Marine Avenue Product Powell River, B.C. V8A 2L4 604.485.5550 485-6412 ✳ 4660 Marine POWELL RIVER604 LIVING • july 2014 • Ave 17 Sale Open Mon – Sat

9:30 – 5:30


2@ Fresh + Local + Sustainable

Serving globally-inspired casual fare in a warm West Coast room

1(

Monday – Thursday 11:30 am - late Friday - Saturday 11:30 am - even later 4553 Marine Avenue 604-485-5568

2* nue 1( Marine Ave 2@ 2! 2) 1%1^ 1& 1* Burton Street

Courtenay Street

Bu rn ab yS tre et

4578 Marine Ave 604-414-7463 www.costadelsollatincuisine.com

Willingdon Avenue

Marine Area Businesses Welcome You!

1^

Authentic Greek Cuisine Try our Famous Pizza

1*

Lunchtime Smorgasboard 11:30am to 2 pm, Mon to Fri Enjoy our Ocean view Patio Monday to Friday 11:30 to 10pm Saturday & Sunday 4pm to 10pm 604-485-8441 or 604-485-8400 E 4591 Marine Ave.

2)

Twitter: @Taws_Cycle 604-485-2555

See our ad on Page 26

West Coast Cuisine

Our summer sale is on now!

w i t h a E u r o p e a n To u c h

Barristers & Solicitors

1% See our ad on Page 8

2# Opening July 16 See the schedule on the web:

wellnessenergyservices.com

www.PRLiving.ca

We’re the legal solution you’re looking for. 604 485-2771 4571 Marine Avenue

604-485-0010 www.treefrogbistro.com

4573B Marine Ave www.fitstoat.ca

18 •

Cycle & Sport

2!

See our ad on Page 27

spring is in the air

DAILY SPECIALS Sandwiches • Salads Hot Bowls • Soup or Chili

1&

Open for Breakfast & Lunch (all-day breakfast) Eat in or Take Out 4593 Marine Ave • 604 485-9118

OPEN Mon to Sat 9 am – 5 pm


ar m F to

2$

>

t --

ke

ar M

Marine Area Businesses Welcome You!

er

’s

2% Ma

Wharf Street

2^ ue n e v A Willingdon

2* rin e

Ave t y ---> o Saltery Ba

Seawalk

Ferry Terminal

North Harbour & Boat Launch

South “Transient” Harbour

Wharf at Westview & Spirit Square

Fer r Pizza Baked Goods Soups & Salads Sandwiches Coffee, cappucinos, lattes and more!

PR Harbour Guesthouse Across from Westview Ferry Terminal

2^

4454 Willingdon Ave, Powell River, BC tel 604 485 9803 / toll-free 1 877 709 7700 www.prhostel.ca • prhostel@gmail.com International hostel with fully equipped kitchen, private and dorm rooms, laundromat, internet and gorgeous ocean views. The friendliest place for the right price on the waterfront.

Deutsch • Italiano • Français

nicholas.simons.mla@leg.bc.ca www.NicholasSimons.ca 4675 Marine Ave, Powell River 604 485-1249

4471 Marine Avenue

Welcome to Powell River!

604-485-9111

2&

We hope you enjoy our beautiful community and area.

POWELL RIVER LIVING • july 2014 •

19

Island ox Ferry to Com

Free WiFi Open 7 days a week 6:30 am – 5:30 pm

da Texa

2%

to

2$

y


DRINKS DESSERT SOUP AND SALAD APPETIZERS BURGERS

Townsitehere it’s at! is w <-- T o

The Shinglemill Pub & Bistro

W da woo ild

We source locally whenever possible. Come taste the difference!

Place

Across from the Patricia Theatre in Townsite

nd

daily 6 o t sday ur 4

Powe ll

Open before and after every movie!

Lu

d

n

y Tue late y ho Happ night ever t from 4 til

Wing s, desser k r, drin Dinne

Sam Hurrie in concert July 11, 18 & 25 6-9pm Breakfast: Wed to Mon 7 – 2 pm Tues 7 – 9 am Lunch: Mon & Wed to Sat 11 – 2 pm Dinner: Thurs to Sat 5–9 pm 6243 Walnut Street • 604.483.EDIE (3343)

5814 Ash Ave 604-483-4130

6275 Marine Ave 604-483-2228 Open 4 pm to late

local76@unifor76.ca

Check Facebook & Twitter for upcoming music and art events

AT THE LAKE IN JULY

Bow To Stern

It’s Summer Time!

Fiberglass Repair

PUB 604 483-3545

Large & Small Boats

Warm? Enjoy the view from our beautiful deck Too warm? Come inside and let the a/c keep you cool

RESTAURANT 604 483-2001

Bottom paint Fiberglass repair • Colour matching Epoxy • Gel coats • Transoms Outboard Corrosion Repair Complete overhauls

Just two more reasons to come to The Shingle Mill.

info@shinglemill.ca www.shinglemill.ca

Tickets 604 485-9633 www.MaxCameronTheatre.ca

Proud Member of the PR Chamber of Commerce

COME VISIT the Townsite, the only National Historic District in Western Canada. More than 400 original buildings contained within the borders of the 1910 town plan remain Ce intact. Dine, stay, take in a show at the country’s oldest da rS operating theatre, and be sure to stop in at the tHenderson Heritage House interpretive centre to learn more.

Powell River Dam

Oa k

604.483.9345

St

Martin Brager

Po pla

rS t

www.PatriciaTheatre.com

Henderson Playground & Dog Park

Av e

Arb u

tus

Av e

mckjb@telus.net 604.223.4440 • 604.485.4984

As h

Under One Roof As pe

s Ave

Catalyst Paper

Dwight Hall

e Ave

Rodmay Hotel

Marin

www.PowellRiverTownsite.com

20 Rooms Liquor Store Diner Hair Salon

Willow Ave

604 483-3901 6211 Walnut Street thetownsite@shaw.ca

Arbu tu

Henderson Heritage House

• • • •

nA ve

Townsite Island View Granada Grocery Motel Restaurant Hub 101 Bistro Patricia Theatre Old Courthouse Inn Edie Rae’s Cafe Wal nut Str Townsite ee t Brewing

Birch St

ve ardy A Lomb

Maple Ave

Remodelled Rms. w. private bath $75 – $125

to Westv

www.PRLiving.ca

iew —>

20 •

Advance Booking – 10% OFF Two-day Stay – 10% OFF Lawn Bowling & Tennis Courts

Chestnut St

6251 Yew St

604.483.7715

www.RodmayHeritageHotel.com


A growing concern By Jonathan van Wiltenburg • edenhort@gmail.com

W

henever I garden-chat (popular past time in Powell River) about kiwi fruit I usually get a similar reaction: “I didn’t know you can grow kiwis here?” You can, and with great success. This past winter we were lucky enough to get 40 lbs from neighbours who had too many and they were so delicious and worthwhile that I thought I would try to convince you to plop a few vines into the ground. Originally called the ‘Chinese gooseberry’ until the Americans rebranded it in the 60’s the kiwi was first discovered by Europeans in the late 19th century in temperate southern China. It was not until the 1930’s that New Zealand began growing it as a commercial crop, where it spread from there. Currently Vancouver Island touts the only commercial farms in Canada, with about four hectares under production in Saanichton. Italy, New Zealand and Chile are the world’s top producers, which we are likely to see on our supermarket shelves. Growing a kiwi vine is not difficult, but it is definitely not low maintenance. Pruning is the bulk of the work required. A little bit of thought and planning will make the pruning chore much easier. Kiwi fruit grows on a strong twining vine that produces egg-sized fuzzy brown fruit with a sweet green inner flesh. They are most often eaten fresh, and are a wonderful addition to salads and desserts. More recently, the kiwi has secured a ride as a “superfood” with countless claims of health boosting benefits. Whether or not you subscribe to the superfood hype, the kiwi fruit is undoubtedly high in Vitamin C, antioxidants, and is an excellent source of dietary fibre (especially if you eat the skin). Either way, eating a few kiwi will provide ample enjoyment in the taste bud department and they may just be very good for you too.

50% off select water features & pond supplies

Cultivation The modern commercial kiwi hails from temperate regions of southern China, where humidity is high, summers are warm and winters are mild. Kiwis prefer a sunny location with free draining slightly acid soil with good organic matter content. They need shelter from wind and regular water. The vines are hardy to -15C. The kiwi vine is diecious, meaning there are both male vines and female vines. Each sex is needed for fruit to set. Commercially, eight females are planted to every male to ensure there is enough pollen to go around. Because kiwi vines flower in early spring, pollination via bees and other insects can be intermittent depending on the seasonal conditions.

Pruning Due to the vigorous nature of the kiwi vine, pruning can be labourious. Warning: if you let your vine go wild you will have a huge job on your hands! So it is best to stay on top of them and prune regularly. The majority of the pruning should be completed in winter when vines are dormant, however, new shoots can be nipped back in summer to stop the vine from swallowing up your yard. Female vines are pruned in the winter and produce fruit on last year’s wood so it is very important that at least some of last years new growth is left behind to provide fruit for the following year. Male vines can be pruned as soon as they are finished flowering, and they too need some of last years wood to supply pollen flowers for next year. This also lets you keep a handle on which vine is male and which are the

producing females. Once growing, it can be difficult to tell the difference between the two. Vines are usually trained up a sturdy pergola, much as you would train a grape vine (except way more load bearing!) with a permanent older wood scaffold.

Harvesting Harvest your kiwi fruit after a light frost, usually sometime in October. Store them in a cool dry place and pull out fruit some every week to ripen in the warmer part of the house. The fruit should last for months if kept cool.

Pests and Disease Kiwi vines tend to be disease and pest free. Young plants are more susceptible to pests such as cats and slugs, but once established in adequate location and conditions, vines are usually trouble free.

Who knows better than Mother Nature? until July 31, 2014

Visit our website for up-to-date info facebook/MotherNaturePowellRiver www.mother-nature.ca

garden & home decor • lawns • pets • plants

We’re on Duncan Street

604.485.9878

er oth d n a sh Koi pondinfistore!

POWELL RIVER LIVING • july 2014 •

21


Got a knit knack? If you know of someone who would appreciate receiving a prayer shawl, or if you would like to be part of the knitting group (you can also knit from home and donate shawls) you can contact Laurie Heron at (604)485-2336 or email her at laurettaheron5@gmail.com.

Prayer shawl Like a great, big hug

By Terri Beck

I

first learned of prayer blankets when our dog, Buddy, had an operation on his spine after a ruptured disc paralyzed his hind end. You may remember our story - he ended up with wheels and we were in the May 2011 issue of Powell River Living magazine. When Buddy came home from the hospital in Vancouver my neighbour Laurie Heron brought over a prayer blanket for him. The blanket came from a group of knitters who give their time to create prayer shawls and blankets to support people during hardships in their lives. It was the first prayer blanket that one of the women had knit and she was going to rip it apart because her blanket had holes in it. Laurie said “no, don’t rip it apart, I know the perfect recipient!” We received the blanket, complete with holes (hugs) and a wonderful prayer card attached. We kept that prayer blanket with Buddy

during his recovery and with his bed afterward. We were very touched by this gesture. The group is called Hugs and Stitches. The hugs are the holes which sometimes appear, which are full of love. This past March my Mom had to have an operation. Laurie asked if I would like a prayer shawl to take to my Mom. I thought that would be a wonderful gift as she went to the hospital. I had no idea at the time how much that shawl would be used and appreciated. That shawl covered my Mom’s back when she was sitting up in bed with her hospital gown flapping open. It snuggled her into bed at all times of the day and night when the bed sheets didn’t quite make it up to the top of the bed. It travelled with us from Salmon Arm, where the original surgery was to take place, in the ambulance to the Kamloops emergency ward (there were complications) to the ICU (Mom made it through fine) and back home with her. It provided warmth and comfort every step of the way.

In May I had a cousin pass away suddenly, leaving his wife and eight-year old daughter. While talking to Laurie, she suggested that his wife and daughter might like to have prayer shawls to bring them comfort and remind them of their husband and father. When I delivered the prayer shawls, his little girl said “I need this - I’m cold” and wrapped herself in the shawl. These are only my personal stories of the comfort and support that the Hugs and Stitches knitters have brought to my family. They have given away more than 120 shawls and have shipped them all over the world. They make shawls for women and men, boys and girls, and babies. It is a non-denominational group that meet every Friday morning at Kiwanis Manor to create these wonderful shawls. Some are rectangles, some are triangles, but all are knit with love (and some with extra hugs). All shawls are prayed over before they are delivered, with a prayer card enclosed for the recipient.

F ly o n i n t o

Beyond the Bed

Your hometown grocery store Serving Powell River since 1946 5687 Manson Avenue

@ Crossroads Village Mon-Fri 9:30 – 5:30 • Sat 10 – 5 • (604) 485-6422 • beyondthebed.com

22 •

www.PRLiving.ca


Sea Fair 2014 Rides, kidzone, canoe races, wheels & wings

Miss Sea Fair takes the reins for charity, it’s all very positive.” By Isabelle Southcott Sea Fair starts at 3 pm on Friday July 25 isabelle@prliving.ca with live music all evening and a head-

W

ith her hair blowing in the warm July breeze, Jenny Garden smiled and waved to people along Marine Avenue from her float in the Sea Fair parade. The year was 1999, and Jenny was Miss Sea Fair. Today, Jenny now captains the volunteer Sea Fair fleet as their president. “I still have my Miss Sea Fair sash somewhere,” laughs Jenny. Three years ago Jenny joined the Sea Fair committee. “I like being involved in a festival and it’s a great way to contribute to the culture of Powell River. I mean, who wouldn’t want to host a festival where the whole town is invited?” With a background in business and event planning, plus a degree in marketing, Jenny is able to tackle Sea Fair. “I tell everyone I meet, that all the information is on the website,” she explains. “Every event has its own page, which makes it easy for people get information and sign-up for things.” Jenny and her crew invite everyone to come check out Sea Fair this year. “We have new rides beginning at 3 pm Friday when it opens and going till 6 pm Sunday when it closes. The rides will run the same hours as Sea Fair all weekend long.” As well, on Saturday and Sunday Sea Fair is featuring the First Kidzone children’s play area. “It’s going to be such a great time for kids, we will have bouncers and crafts as well as clowns doing performances, face painting and balloon animals,” says Sea Fair secretary, Mara Decker “and we will be collecting donations

See you at Sea Fair July 25-27 www.powellriverseafair.ca To volunteer with Sea Fair call Jenny at 604 414-8811 or email volunteer@powellriverseafair.ca And when Sea Fair is over, check out the Filberg Festival in Comox!

line performance and light show by Vancouver band Rainbow Bridge at 9:30 pm. On Saturday, Sea Fair begins with the parade at 10 am which travels along Joyce then down Alberni and finishes on Marine. “We are trying to get 100 vintage cars in the parade and the vintage car club is doing a draw for prizes worth a total of $500,” says parade organizer Dave Sarnowski. “After the parade they are encouraged to display their cars up at the airport.” The Wheels and Wings car show and fly-in hosted by the Westview Flying Club and the Vintage Car Club at the airport will be running all afternoon. The flying simulator from Texada Arts Culture and Tourism Society will be on site and there will also be an air demonstration. Saturday, the beach will be busy with live entertainment and a corporate challenge outrigger canoe race, ending with fireworks at 10:30 pm. Sea Fair is still going strong on Sunday with a pancake breakfast at 9 am and a beach volleyball tournament all day, and a talent contest at 3 pm and the fishing derby weigh in at 5 pm. The derby is presented by Powell River Salmon Society and sponsored by Valley Building Supplies for the $1000 grand prize. “Don’t forget that at the end of Sea Fair we will be the drawing the prizes for the Sea Fair raffle on stage,” adds Jenny “the grand prize is a BC Lions package that includes flights to Vancouver and a nights accommodation, plus lots of other great prizes!” As Sea Fair gets closer the committee will be looking to the community for support. “We are looking for teams for the volleyball tournament, teams for the canoe race, talent contest entrants, fishing derby entrants, and a large amount of volunteers” says Jenny. “With all the goings on during Sea Fair we need a lot of help and we are hoping people will be willing to spend a few hours of their time to volunteer.” Check powellriverseafair.ca for volunteer postings.

POWELL RIVER LIVING • july 2014 •

23


Texada Art Tour Free look at island exhibitions

T

hough Texada Island is home to many creative artists, often inspired by the rugged beauty of their surroundings, it’s rare to get a look at much of their work. But the biennial Texada Island Art Studio Tour August 9 & 10 will give art lovers that chance. The tour will feature 19 Texada artists, crafters, stitchers, photographers and more. Some are exhibiting for the first time, while others are seasoned veterans of the art world. Most produce one-of-a-kind works. Tour director Sandy McCormick says organizers have been working for many months to put together the show. “It takes many hands to put together a show of this magnitude! We could not do it without the help of the many volunteers,” says Sandy. “Texada is so often the forgotten stepsister of the arts and tourism universes. We’re hard to get to and a bit rough around the edges, but a dedicated team of volunteers who believe in the future of our island home have worked very hard to plan and pull off an artists studio tour which is on par with any art tour anywhere.” Guests can travel between studios in their own vehicles, or can take advantage of driver escorts who can pick them up from the ferry and return them there after the tour. Lunch at the Texada Arts, Culture and Tourism Centre will be available both days with live music and artists to talk to. Admission is free. Details, including a list of artists, a map and a printable tour guide are online at www.texadaart.com.

Councillor Doug Hockley District of Sechelt

Area Forester, WFP Stillwater Forest Operation

Ice • Pop • Snacks Giftware • Gift Certificates

Keeping it cool for you this summer! Check out our walk-in cooler!

www.PRLiving.ca

Great publication .... and long overdue too.  It’s refreshing to see a resurgence of a balanced perspective towards our forest resource that literally built our province.  

Rudi van Zwaaij

Fantastic selection of wines and craft beers!

24 •

Book your ad in Ferns & Fallers 2015 now to get in at 2014 prices: sean@prliving.ca

My congratulations to your staff in publishing an excellent magazine on our local forests. I have passed it on to the Association of BC Forest Professionals as well, as I believe they should read it. Well done,

its r i sp & elow t r s! n b e Be t or nme rice a v e r re p go sto r uo liq

Capone’s encourages everyone to please drink responsibly this summer.

Aw, shucks

604 485-9343 9 am to 11 pm Seven days a week! Corner of Duncan & Joyce

We enjoyed the first, hopefully of many, edition of Ferns & Fallers. It was excellent and we appreciate the the varied content. This type of publication/information is badly needed to provide factual information to the community at large concerning our forests.... Hope to see more in the future. Great job! Thanks

Trent & Kim Meyer Congratulations on the new issue and the fantastic and educational Ferns & Fallers! Really great reading and nice pictures too :)

Anna May Bennett (F&F’s cover artist) I love the insert, so well done. Thank-you.

Maggie Poole Reading Ferns & Fallers and enjoying every word. Melding different points of view, within different uses of our forests and giving a positive spin to all makes this magazine one of the most enjoyable to read.

Terry Hollo


Mystery of the disappearing purse Powell River shines after a mishap at Mile Zero By Muriel Carriere When visitors travel to Powell River, a trip to Lund is usually the norm. For a visitor from Germany’s Black Forest, a picture taken at the Highway 101 Mile Zero cairn was also on the to-do list. We’d taken our guest Gisela Guenther to Lund, seen the sights, picked up the latest edition of Powell River Living at the Lund Grocery Store but we couldn’t leave Lund without that Mile Zero picture! The purple bag disappears Unfortunately, Gisela encountered a camera problem at the cairn, so we walked away from the site trying to fix the camera. Within a five-minute span Gisela’s friend, Joann Heringer realized she didn’t have her purple cloth shoulder bag. When she returned to the spot where she had put it down for the Mile Zero picture taking – the purple bag was nowhere to be seen! Panic set in because these ladies had to return to New Westminster on the 7:25 am ferry the next day. No wallet, no driver’s license, no credit cards. What were they to do?

This never happens in Lund We spoke to the staff at the desk at the Lund Hotel and to employees at the grocery store. A most helpful gentleman from the hotel suggested that we ask at each nearby business in case someone had turned in the missing purple bag. We did, but no one had seen it, so at each location our friend’s cellphone and our home phone number was left. As well, at each stop we heard the same statement: “Things like this NEVER happen in Lund!”

Happiness lost The happiness with which we had driven to Okeover and Lund was lost on our return trip to Powell River. Although Joann’s truck keys and cellphone likely were on the counter in our house, one doesn’t drive without a driver’s license or money. We decided to stop at the bank so that the missing credit card could be cancelled. Ah ha, next to the bank was the camera shop! My husband took our German guest and her Canadian friend into the camera shop and although the camera could not be fixed, great support was offered by the proprietor and local post cards were purchased for memories of the trip. Upon returning home, we found our phone message machine beeping. How ecstatic we were to hear that THE PURPLE BAG had been found and was at a residence in Cranberry!

Because of Powell River Living In the purple bag there were copies of Powell River Living magazine for May and June 2014. When the folks who picked up the bag were trying to determine to whom it belonged, the first items they encountered were the two different copies of Powell River Living magazine. After the bag was back at our house, it was explained to our guests that the couple (Linda Rose and Michael Bridger and their dog Suki) on the cover of the May edition of Powell River Living coincidently were the people whose guest had picked up the purple bag thinking it belonged to his hostess when they had

CASE CLOSED: When a guest from the Black Forest in Germany visited Powell River recently, Len and Muriel Carriere (centre) took her and her Canadian friend on a trip to Lund. Unfortunately, Canadian Joann Heringer (far right) lost her purple bag containing her credit cards and wallet and driver’s license. Without that bag, the women would not have been able to leave Powell River! Joann’s friend, Gisela Guenther, was terribly supportive during this ordeal. Read the story to find out what happened in the mystery at Mile Zero.

stopped for picture taking, too. Now how is that for an unusual circumstance? Usually the previous editions of Powell River Living no longer remain on the rack! Of course, I just had to relate this incredible story to Isabelle Southcott, owner of Powell River Living. We found it hard to comprehend how our guest had picked up two different copies of the magazine. Our faith in human kind was restored because the wonderful folks who were featured on the cover of the May 2014 edition had called the Lund Hotel to ask if anyone was missing a purple bag. Our German visitor left Powell River with a June 2014 copy of Powell River Living and our old camera into which her camera card fit so she could continue taking pictures for the rest of her Canadian adventure. Also, she has a heartwarming story to share about her visit to our green forest, and the adventure she had after having her picture taken at the Mile Zero cairn in Lund.

POWELL RIVER LIVING • july 2014 •

25


Tend Grow Eat Wildwood whirlwind: from turf to homestead in two years flat

J

ulia Adam and Rob Hughes already have their hands full taking care of life’s ordinary duties: two full-time jobs, a young daughter, a property and a house. But in the evenings, you’ll probably find them out tending the enormous, 100’ x 40’ food garden they’ve created at their idyllic home in Wildwood.  In 2009, the duo moved to Powell River to start Routes to Roots Edibles, their edible gardening business. In 2012, they moved to Wildwood with the dream of developing their own homestead. Just two years later, they’ve transformed their formerly-turf lot into a thriving oasis. There’s fruit, vegetables, nuts, flowers and herbs. There’s chickens and ducks. There’s experiments happenings with bokashi composting, and exciting new features such as blue flax and amaranth.  And, if you’d like to see what’s possible in two years, they’re new on the Powell River Edible Garden Tour this year.  “Anyone can do it, if you’re into it,” said Julia. Transforming a lot into a sustenance garden “doesn’t have to cost a lot. We make weed teas, and use permaculture principals to rely on mother nature as much as we can.” In the growing season, they spend three to four hours a day working in the garden — time shared between the two of them. They could automate it more, but as Rob says, “we appreciate the balance between creating an efficient food production system and the process of learning, experimenting and observing.”

THE FARMER TAKES THE KID: Julia Adam’s family homestead is the newest addition to the Edible Garden Tour, coming up August 3.

Edible Garden Tour 2014

Pickle-ball??? Only at Taws!

ands All these great br

only at

!! No ferry required c I ❤ shopping at home! Twitter: @Taws_Cycle 4597 Marine Avenue 604-485-2555

26 •

www.PRLiving.ca

The sixth annual Edible Garden Tour will take place on Sunday August 3, 2014. As always, this Edible Garden Tour is free and self-guided. Ten food-growing gardens of all kinds in the Cranberry and Wildwood areas will be show-cased this year. In addition to the garden owners themselves, Master Gardeners will be available to answer your food-growing questions, with information and demonstrations taking place at some sites. The PDF guidebook will explain what is happening where, and will be available in mid-July; Look for it at www.prfoodsecurity.org/ or “Powell River Edible Garden Tour” on Facebook.


By Kim Miller • office@powellriverchamber.com Will Sturgeon, a farrier with more than 30 years experience, is heating up his forge in Powell River. Having moved here in 2009, he decided to un-retire after he and his wife sold their sailboat. Will was a graduate of the early Kwantlen Farrier College in 1982. With his mobile shop, he offers hot, cold, remedial, and therapeutic shoeing for horses. He says his 15 years of 10-hour days bent over “dancing with hooves” have killed his back, so he takes things a little slower, but he loves horses and takes hoof care seriously. You can reach Will at 604-223-2300 or hoofwrangler@shaw.ca. The Brick has moved to the Town Centre Mall from its previous location on Franklin Avenue. It is across from Shopper’s Drug Mart beside Armitage Men’s Wear. Belinda Fogarty has opened Beez Bakery at 4735 Marine Avenue next BMO and Paperworks. Open 9-5 Monday to Friday, she offers fresh French Pastries, coffee, lattes, cappuccino, tea and smoothies, as well as a variety of goodies. She also specializes in custom cakes. You can reach Belinda at 604-483-5162 or on Facebook at fb.com/pages/Beez-Bakery. Dr. John Wyse is the new owner/operator of Powell River Optometry Clinic, taking over from the husband-wife optometry team of Dr. Asif Ahmed and Dr. Sonia Heffernan. Dr. Ahmed will serve patients one day a week for the next four months. Dr. Wyse, who has lived in several cities across the country and overseas, says he’s happy to be making Powell River his family’s permanent home. He is joined by his wife Carrie and sons Kale and Latham. The clinic can be reached at 604-485-7115. Base Camp, a new café at 4548-B Marine Avenue featuring coffee, food and art, is now open. The business is Colin MacRae’s enterprise, a multi-talented local who makes music and metal sculpture, among other things. Base Camp is managed by Roy Spittle, a new-arrival from Victoria where he managed the famous downtown bistro, Pagliacci’s Restaurant. The menu here is still in development, he said, but they’re serving sandwiches, paninis, salads, and baked goods. “It’s basic upscale camp

food,” said Roy. “We’re trying to go really locally sourced, as fresh as possible.” The full coffee bar includes hot chocolate and mochas with a dark chocolate smoked whipped cream. “It’s wild,” he said. Thick is a new west coast influenced shop and brand that promotes the backcountry in Powell River, Sunshine Coast and Vancouver Island with an action sport and adventure focus. Owned by Jeanette Kangas, the shop is located at 4484 Marine Avenue. Jeanette, has her own brand called Swamp Lilies for girls and Dirty Lizard for boys as well as artwork, photography, printed clothing brands and interior décor.

with

Leave your cares behind as you enjoy an afternoon of comfort and relaxation. Cruise with us on our 37-foot tri-cabin yacht while viewing the spectacular scenery & wildlife of our protected waters.

❧ 2 - hour Copeland Islands cruise $69/person ❧ 5 - hour Desolation Sound Lunch cruise $135/person ❧ 6 - hour Mitlenatch Island Lunch cruise $145/person By popular request, we now offer dinner cruises! ❧ 3½-hour Dinner Cruise for 4 or more $115/person Special occasion, custom day cruises & extended excursions also available.

We’re the legal solution you’re looking for. Barristers & Solicitors

Ian Fleming B.A., LL.B. Laura A. Berezan B.A., LL.B.

• Corporate Law • Family Law • ICBC & Personal Injury claims • Wills & Estate Planning 604 485-2771 • 4571 Marine Avenue

Beach toys and inflatable fun. Stock up for summer!

Below McDonald’s • 4801 Joyce Ave • 604 485-8251 • Mon – Thur 9 am – 6 pm • Friday 9 am – 9 pm • Saturday 9 am – 6 pm • Sunday 10 am – 5 pm

POWELL RIVER LIVING • july 2014 •

27


Hiking h t i W ren d l i h C By Pieta Woolley

...AND CARRY A BIG STICK: Ocean Cowan, 8, and David Woolley, 7, ready to roll.

My boy likes to hike, but my girl does not. This grieves me. We live in Powell River, land of 1,000 hikes. The trails helped convince us to move here. But until last month, our little excursions were punctuated by “My legs hurt;” “My legs can’t lift’;” “I want to go home;” and my personal favourite, “Mom, carry me.” Abi is four. But due to some strong Scotch-German genes, she’s built like a barrel-chested trucker. Lugging this future bodybuilder up Valentine Mountain and around the Duck Lake region un-did any bliss that the trails may have offered. Thankfully, we were offered some great advice, and now hiking is back on our summer schedule. So here are my three top tips for hiking with young kids.

1. Bribe them with Smarties This gem was given to me by a local who has hiked the 75-km West Coast Trail with his preteen son. “Did your son always like hiking?” I asked. “No!” he said, laughing. He explained that, when his son was young, they’d take a box of Smarties along on their hikes. He’d point to a tree in the distance and promise a single candy when he hiked to that tree — no whining or complaining allowed. Then he’d do it again. Voila, hiking. For parenting purists, a bribe may be off-putting. But I can now say from experience — this is genius! It works. And if the choice is enjoying a pleasant family hike in the coastal rainforest where we live, or feeling superior about my bribe-free parenting style, well, that’s an easy choice. How many boxes do you think we’d need for the Sunshine Coast Trail?

A garden needs one inch of rain or water each week.

Is yours getting enough? We have what you need to keep your garden healthy. Formerly Rainbow Valley Pet & Farm Supplies

PET • FEED • GARDEN • FARM 4480 Manson Avenue (Corner of Duncan) 604 485 2244

rain

njur y

• Sprinklers • Grass Seed • Drip lines

• Garden Tools • Fertilizer • Soil

oc t ie

y

Inch by inch  row by row The Powell River Brain Injury Society is gonna make a garden grow!

life

beyond acquired brain injury

We’re looking for seeds, plants and gardening tools. Have extras? Please drop them off at 7020 Duncan St.

28 •

www.PRLiving.ca

• Hoses • Moss Killer • Lime

Powell River BRAIN INJURY SOCIETY tel 604 485-6065 info@ braininjurysociety.ca www.braininjurysociety.ca


3. Trinket Trail, or How To trade your Dragon Thanks to the Visitor Centre on Joyce for suggesting this hike, which we’d never heard of before. Just north of Sliammon, Trinket Trail is part of the Theodosia Trails, en route to Bunster Bluffs. The deal is this: gather up a handful of old toys, knick knacks or other detritus, and hike about a kilometre in. You’ll reach a sign for Trinket Trail, and then the fun begins. Placed throughout the trail were hundreds of little things - My Little Ponies, a tree covered with logging boots and ballet slippers, a Chipmunks Christmas cassette tape, seashells, etcetera. At the end is a

fairy ring featuring the crown jewel of the affair: a plastic big bird on a swing, hanging from a tree. If you leave a new object, you can take an object. This is kiddie heaven. Complaints: nil. Judging from the condition of the trinkets, this trail is under-used. But the more people use it, the more new stuff will get left on the trail, the greater the motivation to get our kids moving. So head on out!

2. Dogs and friends During a particularly onerous springtime hike to David Lam Falls, we passed a family with not one, but three preschoolers, happily traipsing through the woods. We stopped and asked them how they did it. The mom pointed out that they were two families, and were hiking with dogs. “Get a dog,” she said. Um… not quite yet, thanks. But when our friends came to visit this weekend, and brought their mutt, we tried out the tactic. It worked again! No complaining.

cmaakarate.com New Location!

Same great food.

Escape to Savary Island today! Serving Savary island & Surrounding Areas DAily Scheduled runs to Savary island Please phone for reServAtionS & schedule Phone Hours • 8 am – 8 pm

Charters Available

Find us at the Edgehill Store on Manson Ave.

POWELL RIVER LIVING • july 2014 •

29


July 10 Inclusion Powell River annual picnic Everyone is invited. Larry Guthro Park from 11:30 to 2 pm. RVSP by June 7 to clp@pracl.ca.

July 11 Fun in the Sun

July 1 to July 5 Kathaumixw

Family Place at Willingdon Beach 10:30 to noon.

July 10 & 11 Flip Video Workshop

July 3 Battle of the Books kick-off The Powell River Public Library’s Summer Reading Club for grades 3 to 6. Grab your reading record at the Battle of the Books Kickoff event July 3. Each Thurs, July 3 to 24. 10:30 to noon @ the Library.

Library invites you to write, perform, and produce a mini movie, start to finish, in just two days! Free! For youth 12+. szagwyn@gmail.com 604485-8663 9 to 5 each day, at the United Church.

Toonie Tours Discover Powell River is offering several walking tours around town for just $2! Learn about the region’s local heritage, ghosts, murals and other insider info. See the Discover Powell River facebook page, or drop in to the Visitor Information Centre, for schedules and more.

the Library. Registration is free.

July 12 to 13 Texada Sandcastle Weekend July 12

July 3 Psychic Mirrors Art Opening and Gallery Salon at the new improved Artique Gallery. Paintings of Blake Drezet and over 25 local artists. Music by Skyelight.

Pride 2014

July 4 Lego Bootcamp

Show your pride July 17 at 1 pm, starting with a pride flag raising event at city hall, followed by a march down to Willingdon Beach on the sidewalk for some more fun at the beach. This is Powell River’s third annual pride, and is organized by the local chapter of the BC Rainbow Alliance.

Library Summer Reading Club: 10:30 to noon at the United Church. All ages. Different theme every week July 4 to August 1 Registration is free.

July 5 Kiwanis Giant Book & Misc Sale At the Kiwanis Annex.

July 5 First Library storytime at the Market In July and August on Market Saturdays, Deb Zagwyn offers puppetry, action rhymes, songs and the best-of-the-best-of book-tales. 10:30 to 11am.

July 5 Seniors BBQ and ATV raffle July 5 Texada TACT open house See art and the newly renovated spaces. Free refreshments. 11 to 2 pm.

July 5 Texada Museum open house Opening of the Clarence Wood room, with afternoon tea (at 2). 1 to 4 pm.

July 5 Open Mic Café 7 pm at the TACT Centre.

July 8 Worm Bin Composting Workshop Part of the Family Place Sprouts Family Gardening program. 1 to 3 pm at the Community Resource Centre garden. Drop in or call 604-485-2706.

10:30 to noon. “Your Baby and Toddler.”

July 17 Sam Hurrie in concert. The Hub 101 @ 8 pm.

July 18 Fun in the Sun Family Place at Willingdon Beach 10:30 to noon.

July 19 Funnybiz Hotel Library Summer Reading Club: Fill the windows of a hotel with characters. Registration is free. 10:30 to noon at the United Church.

July 20 Texada Annual Fly-In Plane n’ car show n’ shine 9:30 to 3:30 at the Texada Island Airport.

July 11 “GRIEFWALKER” Film Screening and Talk with Stephen Jenkinson The Powell River Public Library presents the NFB documentary, “Griefwalker.” 7 pm at the Evergreen Theatre. Doors open at 6:30.

Noon to 2, Cranberry Seniors Centre.

July 15 Orca Bus visits Family Place

powellriverpride@gmail.com

July 5 Make a FunnyBiz Picture Book Library Summer Reading Club: all ages can draw, colour and collage characters. Registration is free. 10:30 to noon at the United Church.

“Walk for Truth” - Asbestos Awareness Walk. Signin starts at 1:30 pm.

July 11 Musical comedian Kenny Shaw 7 pm at the Community Centre, 7480 Nootka. Tickets: $15 at the door.

July 12 Tangled Garden of Wisdom and Grief A workshop sponsored by the Powell River Public Library. Join Stephen Jenkinson for a deep discussion on how dying can be learned and what should be at the root of caring for dying people. No admission, but registration is required. stonn@ powellriverlibrary.ca 10 to 3, Recreation Complex.

July 12 Read to Dogs

July 24 Permaculture for young kids Orca Bus and Townsite Sprouts Family Gardening present a workshop for families at the Sycamore Commons garden at St. David and St. Paul Church. 10 to 11:30. Call 485-2706 for more info.

July 26 Big Map, Big Honkin’ Trucks Library Summer Reading Club: Chart your own town. Link roads to make one vast map. Bring your own car. 10:30 to noon, United Church.

July 25 to 27 Powell River Seafair July 27 Fun in the Sun Family Place, at SeaFair’s Kids Zone.

August 2 FunnyBiz ShowBiz: It’s Showtime! Laugh, act, dance and play as you put on a show. 10:30 to noon, United Church.

Library Summer Reading Club. 10:30 to noon. At

This page sponsored by:

Performance is Our Responsibility. Next day, damage-free delivery. WWW.CITYTRANSFER.COM

30 •

www.PRLiving.ca

POWELL RIVER | SUNSHINE COAST | VANCOUVER

CALL TODAY to schedule your next delivery

310-CITY (2489)


from Saltery Bay to Lund. GPS coordinates are posted on the “Tourism Powell River” Facebook page and at the Visitor Information Center.

Visit Texada this month! Don’t miss Texada Island’s Sandcastle weekend July 12 and 13. This weekend of family fun, activities and entertainment kicks off at 11 am Saturday with a parade at Gillies Bay. There’s chalk drawing, a bouncy castle, stride, ride and slide, water fun and bed races. Food and craft vendors are at the ball field in Gillies Bay, along with a soft ball tournament and bingo Saturday afternoon and a roast pork dinner that evening. There’s also a lip sync contest, moonbags on the tide and a laser light show at Shelter Point Saturday night. A pancake breakfast kicks off Sunday morning at the community hall in Gillies Bay then the sandcastle competition at the beach. The sixth annual Skull Skates Skim Jam takes place the same weekend from 11 am to 3 pm on July 12 and from noon to 3:30 pm on July 13 at Gillies Bay Beach. Cost is $5 to borrow a board or get a lesson from the Skull Skates Spanish Flyers. Lots of prizes and lots of fun!

Grants awarded The Powell River Community Foundation awarded several grants recently. The recipients are: Powell River Film Festival Society; Malaspina Art Society; Canadian Red Cross; 22nd Red Knight Squadron Royal Air Cadets; Powell River Diversity Initiative Society; Sierra Club of BC Federation; Powell River Model Community Society; Powell River Therapeutic Riding; and Inclusion Powell River.

Sunset Stroll Plan to attend the Sunset Stroll for cancer research and awareness on Saturday August 9 at the track in the Townsite from 5 to 9 pm. Organizer Bill Hopkins, who is now 10 years cancer free, says he created this

new event because so many people have been touched by cancer. Breast cancer survivor Laura Passek has been busy fundraising for this event. And Rocco, the Kings mascot, did a 20-kilometre walk to raise funds. There’ll be food and entertainment and people will be able to write a message to someone who has died or a message of encouragement to someone touched by cancer. Every cent raised will remain in Powell River with some funds going to the oncology department at the Powell River General Hospital.

Students win gold

Powell River Digital Film School students won gold at the Nationals recently. “They were to demonstrate knowledge of composition, story, camera movement, and sound at the two day competition,” said instructor Tony Papa. “Winning gold was a very rewarding experience,” said student Annabelle Foss who shared the honor with Michael Stevantoni.

Chinn earns Canada Cord Catherine Chinn was presented with the Canada Cord: the highest award a Pathfinder can earn, on June 14. “It takes a lot of hard work like planning events, earning certain badges and pins, and completing certain programs,” says Catherine. After one completes their three years of Pathfinders, which is part of the Girl Guide program, the Canada Cord can be earned. “The Canada Cord is a pretty big deal as it will also provide me with a few high school credits and will look very good on a resume for when I need to apply for something. I love being in guiding. I have made lots of friends and have many happy memories.”

Geocache treasure hunt Tourism Powell River is having its first Geocache Treasure Hunt. Ten different caches (mini treasure boxes) have been hidden in trails along the shoreline

ASK ME! Tourism Powell River’s new “ASK ME, I’m a local!” campaign coincides with roaming ambassadors who will help tourists visiting Powell River. Buttons for the new campaign will make visitors feel more at ease in approaching locals and asking for information about Powell River. “The more people we have available to visitors the more visitors will remember

the friendly atmosphere of our city,” says Visitor Information Counsellor Morgan Gamborski. Buttons cost $3 and are available at the Visitor Centre.

POWELL RIVER LIVING • july 2014 •

31


Trek of a lifetime on the South Powell Divide Approaching the alpine

By Janet May

M

y husband and I are not mountaineers, but we found ourselves among alpine tarns and boulder fields on the trek of a lifetime, not seventy kilometers from our backdoor. The South Powell Divide took us into the august company of glaciers, the three A’s: Alfred, Alexander and Albert. It also tested our nerve and our endurance. My dream to walk the South Powell Divide began when I heard of the wonderful ridge-way route that follows the high ground between Centre and Emma Lakes and beyond. That was ten years ago, and I have been sniffing around the idea ever since. Five years ago we tried to find the trailhead, but ended up camping in the river valley north of the ridge. We had fun: my family got to know my workplace as a silviculture surveyor, a 15-year-old yellow cedar and hemlock plantation: but the alpine hung above us, un-accessed that holiday, and my anticipation built. I have watched with bemusement as family and friends train for triathlons and marathons. I was not interested in doing such things, until I realized that the South Powell Divide was my marathon, my obsession. Then I became more determined to achieve the goal. I pushed my partner to commit time off. I pored over maps and GPS routes. I found a friend to take us to the trailhead. By the time we started hiking that September morning, I felt I was as logistically, physically, and mentally prepared as any marathon runner.

SunLund By-The-Sea RV Park & Cabins

The trail goes straight up in places; it broke in our thighs. We sloshed through blueberry bushes: each leaf holding a mosaic of tiny droplets which soaked my pants and drained into my boots. My toes were sloshing in wet sponge-socks as we passed under narrowing tree crowns of the sub-alpine. By noon we were at Little Crater Lake, a sapphire among meadows and rocks. At first we were dazzled by Alfred and delighted by hanging gardens; pools and stone steps as if placed by Japanese gardeners. But by the time we spotted Big Crater Lake, I was tired and impatient at the trail, which after teasing you with a view, veers away from the lakeshore and seems to go on and on. We finally reached the outflow creek, and a large flat ledge beside the Big Crater Lake, camp #2. I found a lovely shallow shelving rock and sand beach for a swim. The next morning we watched the sun yellowing the trees along the cliff edge opposite our camp. Today’s route took us straight up between a rock slide and a steep wall. This had the advantage of taking us above the boulders’ natural fall line. As I waited, to avoid climbing too closely behind David, a pika came out from between rocks. I could see his big naked c-shaped ear and little black eye looking intently down to the lake. When David called he zipped into the rocks again. Centre Lake’s turquoise and azure water is set in harsher terrain than her sub-alpine sister lakes. The real route begins here, past the Centre Lakes recreation area and into the alpine. No more pink ribbons now. I was expecting a clear ridge and easy shelving rock. There are some, and they appear in

Think Real Estate.

One of the best investments in your future.

In Lund, BC

Clean showers, washrooms & laundromat Full hook ups GriffithsProperties.com val@griffithsproperties.com

Free WiFi Campsites open May 1 – Sept 30 • Cabins available year-round by reservation

604-483-9220

32 •

www.PRLiving.ca

www.sunlund.ca

direct line: 604 483-6930 4766 Joyce Avenue 1-877-485-4231 toll free


The 2nd Annual PRMOS Community Walk-About was a huge success thanks to the excitement and enthusiasm of all participants THANK-YOU to the awesome teams:

encouraging photographs, but more often we were faced with rough granite rocks scattered among boulders as big as houses. With heavy backpacks it was not fun to pick over and between them. It was hairy scary. The next kilometre and a half took us two and a half hours.

Pain and exhaustion And so began the uncertainly which took the edge off my pleasure. We needed to move slowly. Hasty decisions could make us go the wrong route and waste time. Also in many places we had to focus on steady, careful movement. “Don’t look down, that will scare you, just look at where you are going to put your next footstep.” The GPS cheerfully calculated our travel as five kilmetres between camps, without considering elevation loss and gain or the torturous path we took around boulder fields, cliffs and other obstacles. Our time was balanced between worries and irritations, midges, blisters, exhaustion, and the grandeur of the place: the blue vertical crevasses gashing Alfred’s glacier, the constant soundtrack of the long stream spilling down his talus. In the night, as I lay on a granite slab under stunning stars, I heard a thudding rumble of ice peeling off Alfred’s glacier, and then a rushing swell in the stream.

Reaping the rewards As we moved, we saw Alfred from different angles and Mount Albert came into view. At first, I didn’t recognise Albert. On the twenty year-old map I was using, Albert’s peak is covered in one big glacier with a long horizontal tongue. Now the tongue is melted away, his peak is exposed, and there are two smaller glaciers hanging

above long strips of grey rubble. At the summit of Wessex Peak we were exalted. We saw Alfred from a new southerly angle. Mount Victoria and the Alexander glaciers came out from behind him. Wessex is where the “Divide” really begins: one side is Powell River Regional District, the other side, Sechelt. Our journey, the northern part of the Divide, was taking us in a U-shape around B-valley. From the peak we stared at the next mountain, Burh Peak, and worked out which series of its snow chutes we would go up. We drank in fabulous views in all directions. The elation of Wessex Peak ended as we started down the other side. It looked impossible. The route from Wessex Peak (1827 m) to the saddle (1517 m) is a long series of sloping heather ledges and exposed granite bluffs, punctuated by a 10 m cliff we had to lower ourselves down by rope.

More pain & now confusion We knew we were not going to achieve our planned distance that day. We had been walking over sheer rock and boulders for eight hours and we were not really thinking straight. We actually started climbing a snowchute up to Burh Peak until it was obvious that we were past our best. At 5 pm, we camped where we were, on a tiny sloping pad of saxifrage and alpine grass, bracketed by sharp white stones: camp #4. My notes from the Wessex day are a series of rants and ideas reflecting our slightly stunned state. We ate rehydrated Moroccan stew by lifting our bug veils, and watched another apricot sunset creep across the glaciers.

Team Howe Sound A Team Howe Sound B Team Garden Gate Team Costa Del Sol Team Del Mistro Dunn Team Canadian Martial Arts Academy Team Garnet Rock Resort Team Safeway Team Health-Care Auxiliary Team Coast Realty Team Camber College Team Jody Team Sound Attraction Team Therapeutic Riding Team Becky Team Native Northwest (Vancouver) Team RONA Team Tourism Powell River Team Powell River Regional District Team 95.7 SunFM Team Inclusion Powell River Team Oceanside Resort & Wellness Centre Team BC Bike Race (We INVITE you to join us on a hike this season! See www.prmos.org/programs to see when and where we go in the trails.)

THANK-YOU for loaning your tents: Quality Foods Tim Hortons

Coast Realty First Credit Union

THANK-YOU to our amazing volunteers: Joy Lambeth Sara Blum Alison Tapley Nellie Swistak

Carol Hamilton Kevin Wilson Maurice Lavoie

THANK-YOU to our incredible photographers & videographers who captured those great shots: Steve Grover Gerry Chabot Pat Solway

Tristan Bellmane Claudia Medina

Special THANK-YOU for the media coverage: 95.7 SunFM Powell River Living The PEAK

And THANK-YOU to all who made donations that day. Donations are always appreciated and can be made to the Powell River Mobility Opportunities Society (PRMOS) through our website at www.prmos.org - Tax Receipts are available for all online donations

ww w.prmos.org

POWELL RIVER LIVING • july 2014 •

33


The truth about the South Powell Divide route is that there is no definitive route. One finds the best way based on the conditions, which in our case were about as good as they get, dry rock and excellent visibility. The most satisfying part is the main ridge between Burh and Basing peaks, a granite causeway decorated with bonsai mountain hemlock and granite pools and falling away either side into dramatic chasms. Peaks and snowfields layer all the way to Whistler. I had thought it was all going to be cream like that. The air was so clear. But it is not always so. I had been warned not to accidently carry on to Mount Alice, to the left of Basing Peak. That would have been a 180 degree mistake, and hard to imagine. But the iron in the rocks around Alice will confuse a magnetic compass, and I would not want to be on that ridge when the clouds come down.

A blissful exit We stopped early at our final camp. I call it Hidden Pond, because it is not on the map and some hikers I spoke to had missed it. We swam in its smooth water. Mount Alfred, our constant companion, was reflected on one side of the pool and on the other side, the steep wall reflected a playful echo. But somehow the place welcomed peace, and we were reluctant to make noise. We had become used to the soundscape of falling snowmelt water but the south side of B-valley was still and dry. On our last day we sought our drinking water from variously muddy melt puddles. The going was not difficult, just up and down the bumpy spine toward Canada Ridge and Emma Lake. The smell of ripe blueberries accompanied us, and we feasted on them in the shade of venerable hemlocks. We did not have time to visit Emma, though I would have loved to add our notes to the log book at the cabin. Instead we took the steep and familiar trail past Maria Lake. As we approached the logged plantation we heard voices, and met Clarke Slootweg. It was wonderful to be greeted by the man

If yo u dr ink & 604.485.7676 4487 Franklin Avenue pinetreeauto@shaw.ca

34 •

www.PRLiving.ca

who had helped so much in our route planning, and for him to see that we had made it. We felt extraordinary. For five days we had lived among rocks and mountain hemlock. David and I had shared the thrill, the tent, and the challenges. We had done what perhaps a hundred people

have done. We were pooped, and proud. Too weary and dusty to celebrate, we trudged down to our waiting vehicle and drove fifty km down the mainline as it darkened. By the time we hit the pavement we were ordinary people again. We could just be driving home from the ferry.

Horses of Tanglewood Tug-Guhm GALLERY & STUDIO Woodland, beach or lake rides... A cool thing to do on a hot day Rides tailored to your interest and ability.

Tug-guhm... “sun” in coastal Salish, is also the name of Debra Bevaart’s studio gallery. The gallery is a showcase for more than 40 local artists, with a theme of strong coastal imagery. Debra’s own stone sculptures are brought to life on-site.

10 am to 6 pm daily Reservations required

www.horsesoftanglewood.com horsesoftanglewood @shaw.ca 604 487-0535

1436 101 Hwy, in the Historic Lund Hotel 604 414-0474 • aartcreations@shaw.ca

driv e, s eeing us will b ms e the least of your proble


INTERIOR DESIGN STUDIO

101 4675 MARINE AVE 604.485.5750 pebblebeachbc.com

Family owned for over 34 years • Helping Make Powell River a Little Greener

Quality products and exceptional customer service is our focus, providing bottled water, food service, paper products and innovative solutions w for sustainable, ethical water treatment technologies for commercial and residential applications.

! s t c u d o r ! e p l o b i a B t s o p m o C Aaron Service and Supply is eco-conscious. We provide products for your home, office and restaurant

45% OFF

HUNTER DOUGLAS CUSTOM WINDOW COVERINGS

Patio shades - Designer screens 2 & 21/2” wood blinds - Applause honeycomb shades Save energy - save your furnishings - and save money Serving Powell River, coastal islands and private retreats. 30 NOW THROUGH JULY 15TH

Congratulations on providing outstanding customer service!

PAPER PRODUCTS

from paper towels • paper bags • toilet paper to compostable take-out containers & cutlery

CLEANING & JANITORIAL

Dispensers & environmentally responsible cleaners

COFFEE, TEA & WATER

Organic, Fair Trade Coffee: whole bean or ground OneCoffee Single Serve Pods • Bottled Water Numi Organic Tea • Two Leaves and a Bud • Stash Tea

SMOOTHIE SUPPLIES

Dr. Smoothie fruit concentrate (Just add ice, yogurt or milk. Cheaper & easier than frozen fruit.)

Call 604 485-5611

Smile! Service Awards are presented by Tourism Powell River, and sponsored in part by Powell River Living.

Had a great customer service experience?

i e

35

r

POWELL RIVER LIVING • july 2014 •

e

A W A R D

c

S E R V I C E

n

Nominate someone for a Smile! Service Award by emailing the person’s first name and business name to info@discoverpowellriver.com or visit Facebook, or nominate them in person at the Visitor Centre at 4760 Joyce Ave.

S

4703 Marine Avenue trevor@aaronservice.com

Crystal Mitchell (left) gives remarkable customer service to the locals and to the tourists out at the Lund Hotel Pub. She is so memorable that one of them came in to the Visitor’s Centre to nominate her for a Smile! Service Award. Danica Belyea (centre) was glowing when she got her smile balloon and certificate at Simply Bronze. Mike Russell (right) went above and beyond at River City Auto, to earn a Smile! Service Award. Last month, we incorrectly identified where Joy Brown works. She brings her smiles to Quality Foods. Sorry for the error!


Yes you can.

Love living here...

(We live here. You can, too.)

... because it’s beautiful

$284,900 ... because it’s affordable

Is it realistic to own your own home in Powell River? Yes! I’ve helped lots of people make their home ownership dream come true, even though they thought it could never happen. Ask me how I can help you make your dream a reality.

... because it’s friendly

I’m Brandy Peterson, a full time REALTOR® committed to providing outstanding client services.

...because it’s safe Let’s talk! 604 344-1234 direct • 1-877-485-4231 toll-free • www.PRLiving.ca powellriverrealestate.net • brandypeterson@shaw.ca • 4766 Joyce Avenue

36

Powell River Living - July 2014  

Summer flavours in Powell River. Plus hiking local glaciers, local bloggers, Sea Fair, and planning your Powell River vacation by the stars.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you