Page 1

Portfolio

Lee M. Pouliot

Master of Landscape Architecture 2010 122 clark street chicopee, ma 01013 413-265-3788 www.issuu.com/PouliotLM


Design Approach Philosophy

ENVIRONMENT

Concatenation: “...a series of inter-connected or inter-dependant things...”

“...to connect or link in a series or chain...”

Landscapes are not static; they are created, destroyed and/or re-created through chain reactions.

COMMUNITY

ECONOMY

To catalyze new relationships between ecology, economy and community is to intervene in a landscape’s evolution. By re-imagining these relationships through the actions of revelation and adaptation, an altered process results which leads to an enhanced, inter-connected landscape.


Design Projects Adaptation San Diego, CA - 2010 ULI/Gerald D. Hines Student Urban Design Competition

Rust Renewed Philadelphia, PA - 1st Place Entry: 2009 Ed Bacon Student Design Competition H.E.A.L Chicopee Chicopee, MA - Capstone Studio / Community Design Process Scenes in the City New York, NY - The High Line Evolution Ithaca, NY - The Commons Radial Rhythm Ithaca, NY - Cornell Plantations Botanic Gardens

sequence

Technical Projects Cornell Agricultural Quad Ithaca, NY - Construction Documents

NYS DEC Regiona 3 Headquarters New Paltz, NY - Planting Plan Grading Plan Fictional Site - Hypothetical Road Design


Adaptation

A D A P TAT I O N Integration

SCALE 1” = 150’

Catalyst: Evolution

D

MASTER PLAN

District Identities

Pre-Development: Low-Rise Deesert P

8 13

2010

11

To otal Population: E Education: O Office: R Residential:

(IRWI3JJMGIW ([IPPMRKW 1SHIVR%VGLMXIGXYVI +VIIR4EXLW 4SGOIX4EVOW 6IXEMP 'MZMG 8VSPPI]8VERWMX7XST 'SRRIGXMSRXS+EWPEQT3JJMGIW 8S+EWPEQT'MZMG'IRXIV

12

Phase I: Creative Class and a Destinationn

4

14

9

Build High Performance Infrastructure ENVIRONMENT

Objectives

9

2

2015-2019

Families feel out of place do owntown as most units are studios or on ne bedroom apartments. Furthermore, ameenities whicch families have grown accustomeed to, such as quality schools and open spaces, botth public and private, are absen nt from th he current product mix. Iconic arcchitecture,, a variety of unit sizes averagging 1300sf, plenty of private and public open spacce, large sidewalks with tree buffers, and a new elementry school will atttract younng families to the neighborhood as a hip alternative to the suburbs.

13

C

green space; promote pedestrian and bike mobility.

Establish Strong District Identity

Economic Catalyst: Community Shopping Center

12

COMMUNITY

and families through local amenities, jobs and mobility network;

ECONOMY

7

10

E

Catalyze Development

6

Establish an eco-innovation core; advance connection

Context

accommodate 2,250 employees.

13

8

5

DOWNTOWN

REGIONAL

A

3 B

5

1 5

2019-Beyond

As Downtown grows, the office secto or along C Street and Broadwayy will blen nd seemlessly with residential where th he trolly turns south towards Peetco Park. A unique work environment caapitalizes on ure researcch high performance infrastructu and development as well as proximity to schools, Balboa Park and easy access to State Route 94 and Interstate 5. Restarants will allow for business lunchhes and fo or pre-game entertainment after work beforre jumping on the trolly for a Pad dre game.

between green infrastructure, education and work force;

A - Green Freeway Lids B - Park St. Retail / Commercial Corridor C - Redevelopment Zone D - San Diego City College E - The New School of Architecture

East Village

Downtown Commercial Employment Residential

ECONOMY

Co ost:

$480, 699, 400

Green Space

Trolley

Transit Node

1EVOIX 7XVIIX 1EVOIX7XVIIX

6IWMHIRXMEP(MWXVMGX

7MRKPI *EQMP]([IPPMRKW 8IVVEGIH7XVYGXYVIW 1E\MQM^IH:MI[W 0SGEP7IVZMGIW 6IXEMP 2IMKLFSVLSSH+VIIR[E] )PIQIRXEV]7GLSSP 4VMZEXI%VIEWJSV1SWX9RMXW

1

GEOLOGY REVEALED: Reactive Form

3

RESPONSIVE NEIGHBORHOOD: Integrated Greenway + Solar Oriented Architecture

2

RECYCLED ELEMENTS: People, Materials, Form

704 240 <10 min.

9’

28’

Adaptation embodies the notion that intelligent infrastructure must be ever acclimating to support local needs. As a catalyst infusing the northern corner of East Village, Adaptation articulates an integrated high-performance infrastructure that forms the foundation of a sustained, economically viable community.

14’

9‘

10’

Petco Park

Park-to-Bay Greenway Residential Centers

Final team submission: 22” x 51” Project boundaries & surrounding context

10’ e ap sc ns et re stria e st de ov pe pr f r Im fo

14’

St

d an ping sin ca ba ds fff er t lan runo wat an se m rb or so crea ab de

5’

e ap s sc et list reee cyc e st r bi ov fo f pr ty f Im safe d an

WATER

2120

Eco-Roof

rain water black water vegetation solar panel

ad

14’

of er ing wat apping d ca ds lan

d ater an w rs th face te w suf il fil gro us io al so root rv Pe ctur s in stru d aid an

10’

DISTRICT IDENTITY THROUGH DESIGN AND DENSITY

COMMUNITY Recycled + reused water will reduce total wastewater Greenway network will increase pedestrian + bike mobility Increased vegetation will improve site air quality Reduction in auto dependency through mixed use development + greenway system

Bioswale

gray water

5’ sh

an ize ent nt im ax em ie M paav efffic

Canopy cover in the development will exceed 22 acres Solar Panels will offset electricity for 220 people. 50% recycled water will reduce the amount of wastewater Native plant species will thrive in semi-arid, drought-prone climate Bioswales + greenroofs will reduce stormwater runoff

Greenway

Structural Soil

purifed water

12’

PROJECTED OUTCOMES

Permeable Pavement

Greywater

80% imported from N. California and Colorado Aqueducts Distant sources from as far as 444 miles away Evaporation occurs in transport San Diegans use 150 gallons of water per person per day Impervious surfaces increase stormwater runoff

12’

This high-performance infrastructure is an evolving, adjusting network of mini-systems. The master plan adapts its greenways to fault lines and the architecture takes advantage of solar orientation. Students from nearby educational institutions will utilize this infrastructure and ecosystem as a training ground. In essence those living and working in the East Village will simultaneously learn from, benet from and impact continued innovation and development.

ENVIRONMENT

Rainfall Solar Panel Blackwater Municipal Water

Electricity/gas

Canopy cover is approximately 1 acre of site Site is approximately 95% impervious surfaces

Mall & Entertainment: Restaurant, Apparel, Bar Business Centers

ENERGY

VEGETATION

Local: Grocery, General Merchandice and Other Stores

8 - Connections to Golden Hill, East Village, Logan Heights and Downtown 9 - Fault Line Greenways 10 - Public Plaza / Living Machine (For Blackwater Treatment) 11 - Courtyards - Bio-diverse and Native 12 - Preserved Street Grid for Continuity with Downtown 13 - Rooftop Greenspace and Solar Capture (PV and Water Heating) 14 - Family Focused Neighborhood Development

INTEGRATED WATER + SOLAR + GREEN NETWORK

CLIMATE

Greenway

Site Horton Plaza

More than 10,000 cars per day

13th Street intersection 13th Street proposed

PROPOSED 1 - Public School 2 - Retail Anchor: Target 3 - Albertsons 4 - Police Station 5 - Affordable Housing Targeting Teachers / Artists 6 - Neighborhood Center 7 - Electrical Substation

$480, 699, 400

Impetus

13th Street intersection current

EXISTING

High Performance Infrastructure

CURRENT CONDITIONS

ENVIRONMENT

Semi-Arid, drought-prone climate 9.9” Rainfall Per Year 263 Days of Sunshine per year 71 degrees average temperature Conditions increase frequency and intensity of wildfires

Social Service Locations

5.2 acres 3,375 0 3,375 1,089

Major Thoroughfares

8S + 7XVIIX +7XVIIX

2

Total o Project Cost: $1,357,796,633 Le evered IRR: 16.38%

Street Evolution 10’

0SGEP7GLSSPW

Oppen Space: To otal Population: O Office: R Residential: To otal Units: Unnits w/ View & P Private Area: Occean Views: Maaximum Walk to SSchool:

Co ost:

C CONTEXT

10 Miles

$480, 699, 400

Oppen Space: 0.9 acres To otal Population: 2,753 O Office: 743 R Residential: 2,009 To otal “Third Places”: 76

8

MASTER PLAN KEY

COMMUNITY

Co ost:

6IWXEYVERXW 6IXEMP %VXMWX0SJXW +EPPIVMIW +EWPEQT'SVVMHSV'SRRIGXMSR 1M\IH9WI 6ITYVTSWMRK)\MWXMRK1EXIVMEPW

3 * 7XVIIX *7XVIIX

Phase III: A Crossroads of Workk and Playy

attract 7,500 residents with diverse housing.

Analysis

Open Space: 3.3 acres To otal Population: 4,926 E Education: 722 O Office: : 1,444 R Residential: 2,128 GA AFO Retail Spending 55-Mile Ring: $301,858,724 Neearest Multi-Anchor Retail Center:: R Liberty Station (4.1mi) Suuggested Anchor:: Target

&VSEH[E] & H ]

1

Phase II: A Home With a View

Capture and reuse waste water; generate

energy on site from abundant sunlight; increase multi-purpose

Create an environment friendly to artists, students

;EVILSYWI(MWXVMGX

2011-2014

Residential growth in downtow wn outpaceed n communiity the needs of the city. An urban retail center will catalyze devellopment an nd satiate the needs not only off East Villagge, but also of Logan Heights, Golden Hill an nd Downtown whose residentts currenttly frequent Liberty Station or Mission Valley for one stop shopping. High demand for low income housing for artistss and peopple nts in transitional stages of life, like studen and the rehibilitated, is also addressed in udPhase I with 465 low income units inclu ing artist loft space and studen nt housing..

ARCHITECTURE - GREENWAYS - ARTERIALS

&YWMRIWW(MWXVMGX

~350 ~200 ~50 ~100

4EVO&PZH 4EVO &PZH   XL XL7 L 7XX L

The original sub uburrb of San Dieego is now home ho me tto o a vaccum of la land nd uuse sess. First hom me to refugees of the Mexican Revvolution annd later home to a communityy of artistts, higher rents from developmeent pressurre have pushed them out leavin ng the areea undefined and deactivated. A growin ng homeless population, a few sttudents annd some industrial uses occupy this northeastern corner of East Village.

8

Municipal Water

Arrives via distant aqueducts Purified + stored in underground cisterns Utilized by entire community Becomes blackwater or greywater

Greywater

Used water from sinks, showers + washing machines Returns to underground cistern Purified for non-potable uses Piped back out for reuse

ECONOMY Blackwater

Used non-potable water Piped out to living water system Purified then recycled Utilized for on-site irrigation + other non-potable uses

Green Network + Rainfall

Eco-gardens, bioswales + greenways increase canopy cover Low maintenance eco-roofs + bioswales capture rainfall Pervious surfaces filter rainfall + decrease stormwater runoff Structural soil filters water + aids in root growth

Solar Energy

Rooftop solar panels capture abundant sunlight Reduction in overall electricity use nergy consumtion consumtio Passive solar water heating reduces energy Site planning + architecture maximizess winter exposure Shading features minimize direct summer sunlight

2120

Advanced high performance infrastructure will establish eco-innovation core Local institutions will utilize the site for research, job training + pilot projects

20

2010 ULI/Gerald D. Hines Student Urban Design Competition - top 30 designation East Village Neighborhood - San Diego, CA Project Length: 2 weeks Competition Challenge: “...select an area of the East Village and propose a full redevelopment of the site that improves economic activity and creates a use that will brand the neighborhood and attract further investment...” Goals: - “...achievement of highest and best sustainable use...” - “...generation of new economic activity...” - “...inclusion of a catalytic component that will give the East Village an identity and help trigger broader redevelopment...” Collaboration: Tyler Grooms, MPS-RE; Julie Johnstone, MRP; Brendan Ledley, MLA; Sara Lepori, MRP Faculty Advisors: Jamie Vanucchi, Landscape Architecture & Pike Oliver, Program in Real Estate


The original suburb of San Diego is now

Pre-Development: Desert home to a vaccumLow-Rise of land uses. First home

to the Mexican Revolution and Therefugees originalof suburb of San Diego is now later home to aLow-Rise community of artists, home to a vaccum of land uses. First home Pre-Development: Desert higher rentsoffrom development pressure to refugees the Mexican Revolution and The of Sanleaving Diegoofthe is now have original pushed them out area later home suburb to a community artists, home torents a vaccum of land uses.AFirst home undefined and growing higher fromdeactivated. development pressure to refugees of the Mexican Revolution and homeless population, a few students have pushed them out leaving the area later home to auses community of growing artists, some industrial occupy A this northundefined and deactivated. higher rents from development pressure eastern corner of East homeless population, aVillage. few students and have them leavingthisthenortharea some pushed industrial usesout occupy undefined and ofdeactivated. eastern corner East Village. A growing homeless population, a few students and some industrial uses occupy this northPhase I: Creative a Destination eastern corner Class of Eastand Village. Residential growth in downtown outpaced

Phase Creative andurban a Destination theI:needs of theClass city. An community

Blackwater Municipal Water Greywater Bioswale Structural Soil

retail centergrowth will catalyze development and Residential in downtown outpaced satiate theofneeds notAn only East Village, theI:needs theClass city. urban community Phase Creative and a of Destination but of Logan Heights,development Golden Hill and and retailalso center will catalyze Residential in downtown outpaced Downtown whose residents currently satiate the growth needs not only of East Village, the needs ofLogan the city. An urban community frequent Station orGolden Mission Valley but also ofLiberty Heights, Hill and retail center catalyze development and for one stopwill shopping. High demand for Downtown whose residents currently satiate the needs notforonly East low income housing artists and Village, people frequent Liberty Station or of Mission Valley but also of Logan Heights, Golden Hill in transitional stages of life, like students for one stop shopping. High demand and for Downtown whose residents currently and the rehibilitated, is also addressed in low income housing for artists and people frequent Liberty Station or Mission Valley Phase I with 465 low income unitsstudents includin transitional stages of life, like for one stop shopping. High addressed demand ing artist loft space andis student housing.for and the rehibilitated, also in low income artistsunits and people Phase I with housing 465 lowfor income includPhase II: A Homestages WithandaofView in life, likehousing. students ingtransitional artist loft space student and the rehibilitated, is also addressed in Families feel 465 out low of place as Phase units includPhase II: AI with Home With aincome Viewdowntown most units studios or one housing. bedroom ing artist loftare space and student apartments. which Families feelFurthermore, out of placeamenities downtown as families have grown accustomed to, such as Phase II: A Home With a View most units are studios or one bedroom quality schools and open spaces, which both apartments. Furthermore, amenities Families feelprivate, out ofaccustomed place downtown as public and are absent from families have grown to, suchthe as most units are studios or architecture, one bedroom current product mix. quality schools and Iconic open spaces, botha apartments. Furthermore, amenities which variety and of private, unit sizes 1300sf, public are averaging absent from the families have grown accustomed to, such asa plenty of private and publicarchitecture, open space, current product mix. Iconic quality schools and open spaces,1300sf, botha large buffers, and varietysidewalks of unit with sizestree averaging public and private, arepublic absent from the new school will attract young plentyelementry of private and open space, current product mix. Iconic architecture, families to the neighborhood as a hip large sidewalks with tree buffers, and aa variety of tounit sizes will averaging alternative theschool suburbs. new elementry attract 1300sf, young plenty and public open familiesoftoprivate the neighborhood as space, a hip Phase III: sidewalks A Crossroads of Work and and Play a large tree buffers, alternative to thewith suburbs. new elementry school will attract young As III: Downtown office families the grows, neighborhood as sector aPlay hip Phase AtoCrossroads ofthe Work and along C Street Broadway will blend alternative to theand suburbs. seemlessly withgrows, residential wheresector the As Downtown the office trolly turns south towards Petco Park. A Phase III: A Crossroads of Work and Play along C Street and Broadway will blend unique workwith environment on seemlessly residentialcapitalizes where the As Downtown grows, the Petco officeresearch sector high performance infrastructure trolly turns south towards Park. A along Cwork Streetenvironment and will blend and development as Broadway well ascapitalizes proximity to unique on seemlessly withPark residential the schools, Balboa and easywhere access to high performance infrastructure research trolly turns 94 south Park.to A Statedevelopment Route andastowards Interstate 5. Restarants and well asPetco proximity unique work capitalizes on will allow forenvironment business and for schools, Balboa Park andlunches easy access to high research pre-game entertainment after 5. work before State performance Route 94 and infrastructure Interstate Restarants and development as well as proximity to jumping on the trolly for a Padre game. Rainfall will allow for business lunches and for schools, Park and easy access to pre-gameBalboa entertainment after work before Permeable Pavement State Route 94 and Interstate 5. Restarants jumping on the trolly for a Padre game. will allow for business lunches and for Greenway pre-game entertainment after work before jumping on the trolly for a Padre game. Eco-Roof

2010

Total Population: Education: Office: Total Population: Residential: Education: Office: Total Population: Residential: Education: Office: Residential:

2010 2010

2011-2014

2011-2014

rain water

2015-2019

vegetation solar panel

2019-Beyond

site rfaces

Open Space: 0.9 acres Total Population: 2,753 699, 400 Cost: $480, Office: 743acres Open Space: 0.9 Residential: 2,009 Total Population: 2,753 Total “Third Places”: 76 Office: 743 Open Space: 0.9 acres Residential: 2,009 Total Population: Total “Third Places”: 2,753 76 Office: 743 Residential: 2,009 Cost: $480, 699, 400 Total “Third Places”: 76 Total Project Cost: $480, $1,357,796,633 Cost: 699, 400 Levered IRR: 16.38% Total Project Cost: $1,357,796,633 Cost: $480, 699, 400 Levered IRR: 16.38%

2019-Beyond 2019-Beyond

CURRENT CONDITIONS CLIMATE

FÊÊStreet ToÊ94

Blackwater Municipal Water

Electricity/gas

VEGETATION

Municipal Water

80% imported from N. California and Colorado Aqueducts Distant sources from as far as 444 miles away Rainfall Evaporation occurs in transport San Diegans use 150 gallons of water per person per day Impervious surfaces increase Permeable stormwaterPavement runoff

Solar Panel VEGETATION Greenway 1 acre of site Blackwater Blackwater Canopy cover is approximately Used water from sinks, showers + Site washing machines Eco-Roofsurfaces Usedimpervious non-potable water is approximately 95% Returns to underground cisternWater Piped out to living water system Municipal

Eco-Roof

purifed water

Canopy cover is approximately 1 acre of site Site is approximately 95% impervious surfaces

Greywater

rain water gray water black water vegetation

Bioswale

solar panel

rain water gray water black water

vegetation Purified then recycled solar panel Utilized for on-site irrigation + other non-potable uses

ÊÊSingleÊ&ÊÊFamilyÊDwellings ÊÊTerracedÊStructures ÊÊMaximizedÊViewsÊÊ ÊÊLocalÊServicesÊ&ÊRetail ÊÊNeighborhoodÊGreenway ÊÊElementaryÊSchool ÊÊPrivateÊAreasÊforÊMostÊUnits

Green Space

Trolley

Transit Node

PROJECTED OUTCOMES ENVIRONMENT

Canopy cover in the development will exceed 22 acres Solar Panels will offset electricity for 220 people. 50% recycled water will reduce the amount of wastewater Native plant species will thrive in semi-arid, drought-prone climate Bioswales + greenroofs will reduce stormwater runoff

COMMUNITY

Municipal Water Green Network + Rainfall Arrives via distant aqueducts

Eco-gardens, bioswales + greenways canopycisterns cover Purified + stored inincrease underground Low maintenanceUtilized eco-roofs bioswales capture rainfall by + entire community Pervious surfaces Becomes filter rainfall + decrease stormwater runoff blackwater or greywater Structural soil filters water + aids in root growth

Bioswale

Recycled + reused water will reduce total wastewater Greenway network will increase pedestrian + bike mobility Increased vegetation will improve site air quality Reduction in auto dependency through mixed use development + greenway system

Permeable Pavement Greenway Eco-Roof

PROJECTED OUTCOMES ENVIRONMENT Green Network + Rainfall

Eco-gardens, bioswales + greenways increase canopy cover Low maintenance eco-roofs + bioswales capture rainfall Pervious surfaces filter rainfall + decrease stormwater runoff Structural soil filters water + aids in root growth

Municipal Water

Arrives via distant aqueducts Purified + stored in underground cisterns Utilized by entire community Becomes blackwater or greywater

Structural Soil

purifed water

MarketÊStreet

ResidentialÊDistrict

Greywater

Greywater

Electricity/gas

GÊÊStreet

Rainfall Solar Panel

WATER

WATER

Purified for non-potable uses Piped back out for reuse Greywater

5

Total Project Cost: $1,357,796,633 Levered IRR: 16.38%

ENERGY

ENERGY

r person per day r runoff

Major Thoroughfares

80% imported from Blackwater N. California Rainfall and Colorado Aqueducts Bioswale 9.9” Rainfall Per Year Distantmachines sources fromUsed as far as 444 miles away Arrives via distant aqueducts Used water from sinks, showers + washing non-potable water Permeable Pavement Purified + stored in underground Returns to underground cistern 263 Days of Sunshine per year cisterns Evaporation occurs in transport Piped out to living water system Structural Soil Solar Utilized by entire community Purified for non-potable usesPanel San Diegans use 150Purified 71 degrees average temperature gallons of water per person per day then recycled Greenway Becomes blackwater greywaterand intensityPiped back out for reuse Conditions increaseorfrequency of wildfires increaseforstormwater runoff on-site irrigation + other non-potable uses Blackwater Impervious surfaces Utilized

black water

olorado Aqueducts away

ToÊGaslamp/CivicÊCenter

High Performance Infrastructure

gray water

Broadway

ÊÊRestaurantsÊ&ÊRetail ÊÊArtistÊLoftsÊ&ÊGalleries ÊÊGaslampÊCorridorÊConnection ÊÊMixedÊUseÊ ÊÊRepurposingÊExistingÊMaterials

2015-2019

sity of Greywater wildfires

ns

ÊÊDenseÊOfficesÊ&ÊDwellings ÊÊModernÊArchitecture ÊÊGreenÊPathsÊ&ÊPocketÊParks ÊÊRetailÊ&ÊCivic ÊÊTrolleyÊTransitÊStop ÊÊConnectionÊtoÊGaslampÊOffices

Open Space: 3.3 acres Total Population: 4,926 Education: 722acres Open Space: 3.3 Office: 1,444 Total Population: 4,926 Residential: 2,128 Education: 722 Open Space: acres GAFO Retail Spending3.3 Office: 1,444 Total Population: 4,926 5-Mile Ring: $301,858,724 Residential: 2,128 Education: Nearest Multi-Anchor GAFO Retail Spending722 Office: 1,444 Retail Liberty Station 5-Mile Center: Ring: $301,858,724 Residential: (4.1mi) Nearest Multi-Anchor 2,128 GAFO SpendingTarget Suggested Anchor: Retail Retail Center: Liberty Station 5-Mile Ring: $301,858,724 (4.1mi) Nearest Cost: Multi-Anchor $480, Suggested Anchor: Target699, 400 Retail Center: Liberty Station (4.1mi)699, 400 Cost: $480, Suggested Anchor: Target Open Space: 5.2 acres Total 3,375 Cost:Population: $480, 699, 400 Office: 0 Open Space: 5.2 acres Residential: 3,375 Total Population: 3,375 Total Units: 1,089 Office: 0 Open Space: 5.2 acres Units w/ View & Residential: 3,375 Total Population: 3,375 Private Area: 704 Total Units: 1,089 Office: 0240 Ocean Views: Units w/ View & Residential: 3,375 Maximum Walk to Private Area: 704 Total Units: 1,089 School: <10 min. Ocean Views: 240 Units w/ View Maximum Walk& to Private 704 School: Area: <10 min. Ocean 240 Cost: Views: $480, 699, 400 Maximum Walk to School: <10 min. Cost: $480, 699, 400

Semi-Arid, drought-prone climate 9.9” Rainfall Per Year 263 Days of Sunshine per year 71 degrees average temperature Conditions increase frequency and intensity of wildfires

CLIMATE Semi-Arid, climate Municipaldrought-prone Water

BusinessÊDistrict

WarehouseÊDistrict

2015-2019

CURRENT CONDITIONS purifed water

Economic Catalyst: Community Shopping EconomicCenter Catalyst: Community Shopping Center Economic Catalyst: Community Shopping Center

2011-2014

~350 ~200 ~50 ~350 ~100 ~200 ~50 ~350 ~100 ~200 ~50 ~100

Greywater Solar Used waterEnergy from sinks, showers + washing machines

Canopy cover in the development will exceed 22 acres Solar Energy Solar Panels will offset electricity for 220 people. Rooftop solar panels capture abundant sunlight 50% recycled water will reduce the amount of wastewater Reduction in overall electricity use plant species will thrive in semi-arid, drought-prone Passive solar water heating reduces energyNative consumtion climate Site planning + architecture maximizes winter exposure + greenroofs will reduce stormwater runoff Shading features minimize direct summer Bioswales sunlight

Greywater

COMMUNITY

Blackwater

Increased vegetation will improve site air quality Reduction in auto dependency through mixed use development + greenway system

Used non-potable water Rooftop solar panels capture Returns to underground cistern abundant sunlight Piped out to living water system Reduction in overall electricity use Purified for non-potable uses Purified then recycled Passive water heating reduces energy consumtion Piped backsolar out for reuse Site planning + architecture maximizes winter exposure Utilized for on-site irrigation + other non-potable uses Shading features minimize direct summer sunlight

Advanced high performance infrastructure will establish

Green Network + Rainfall eco-innovation core

Eco-gardens, bioswales + greenways increase canopy cover Local institutions will utilize the site for research, Low maintenance eco-roofs + bioswales capture rainfall job training pilot projects Pervious surfaces filter+rainfall + decrease stormwater runoff Structural soil filters water + aids in root growth

rain water gray water black water vegetation solar panel

Municipal Water

Arrives via distant aqueducts Purified + stored in underground cisterns Utilized by entire community Becomes blackwater or greywater

Greywater

Used water from sinks, showers + washing machines Returns to underground cistern Purified for non-potable uses Piped back out for reuse

Green Network + Rainfall

Eco-gardens, bioswales + greenways increase canopy cover Low maintenance eco-roofs + bioswales capture rainfall Pervious surfaces filter rainfall + decrease stormwater runoff Structural soil filters water + aids in root growth

Solar Energy

Rooftop solar panels capture abundant sunlight Reduction in overall electricity use Passive solar water heating reduces energy consumtion Site planning + architecture maximizes winter exposure Shading features minimize direct summer sunlight

Structural Soil

purifed water

ENVIRONMENT

Canopy cover in the develop Solar Panels will offset elect 50% recycled water will red Native plant species will thr climate Bioswales + greenroofs will

Advanced high performance infrastructure will establish eco-innovation core Local institutions will utilize the site for research, job training + pilot projects

ECONOMY Blackwater

PROJECTED OUTCOMES

ECONOMY

Used water from sinks, showers + washingRecycled machines + reused Usedwater non-potable water total wastewater will reduce Returns to underground cistern Piped will out to living water system + bike Greenway network increase pedestrian Purified for non-potable uses Purified then recycled mobility Piped back out for reuse Utilized for on-site irrigation + other non-potable uses

Solar Energy

Used non-potable water Piped out to living water system Purified then recycled Utilized for on-site irrigation + other non-potable uses

Green Network + Rainfall

Eco-gardens, bioswales + greenways increase canopy cover Low maintenance eco-roofs + bioswales capture rainfall Pervious surfaces filter rainfall + decrease stormwater runoff Structural soil filters water + aids in root growth

Solar Energy

Rooftop solar panels capture abundant sunlight Reduction in overall electricity use Passive solar water heating reduces energy consumtion Site planning + architecture maximizes winter exposure Shading features minimize direct summer sunlight

COMMUNITY

Recycled + reused water wi PROJECTED Rooftop solar panels OUTCOMES capture abundant sunlight

Greenway network will incr Reduction in overall electricity use ENVIRONMENT mobility Passive solar water heating reduces energy consumtion Canopy cover inmaximizes the development will exceed Site planning + architecture winter exposure Increased vegetation will 22 imp Shading features minimizewill direct summer sunlight for Solar Panels offset electricity 220dependen people. Reduction in auto

development 50% recycled water will reduce the amount + ofgre wa ECONOMY Native plant species will thrive in semi-arid, drou Advanced high performance climate eco-innovation corr Bioswales + greenroofs will reduce stormwater

COMMUNITY

Local institutions will utilize training + pilot pro

Recycled + reused water will reduce total wastew Greenway network will increase pedestrian + bik mobility Increased vegetation will improve site air quality Reduction in auto dependency through mixed use development + greenway system

ECONOMY Blackwater

urban infill, urban design, sustainability, infrastructure, identities, evolving network, ecosystem services, economic catalyst

Pre-Development: Low-Rise Desert

Solar Panel

Adaptation

District Identities

ParkÊBlvdÊ/Ê12thÊSt.

ts

Phasing Plan

Advanced high performance infrastructure will es eco-innovation core Local institutions will utilize the site for research, training + pilot projects


Adaptation Master Plan

D

Master Plan Key

8

13

11

12

4

14

Context A - Green Freeway Lids B - Park St. Retail / Commercial Corridor C - Redevelopment Zone D - San Diego City College E - The New School of Architecture 1 - Public School 2 - Retail Anchor: Target 3 - Albertsons 4 - Police Station 5 - Affordable Housing Targeting Teachers / Artists 6 - Neighborhood Center 7 - Electrical Substation - Connections to Golden Hill, East Village, Logan Heights & Downtown - Fault Line Greenways 0 - Public Plaza / Living Machine (For Blackwater Treatment) - Courtyards - Bio-diverse and Native - Preserved Street Grid for Continuity with Downtown - Rooftop Greenspace and Solar Capture (PV and Water Heating) - Family Focused Neighborhood Development

9

9 C

13 2

12

7

10

6

13

8 A

3 5

1 5

8


GEOLOGY REVEALED: Reactive form in the Business District

DISTRICT IDENTITY: Design + Density

Adaptation

RECYCLED ELEMENTS: People + Materials + Form in the Warehouse District


Rust Renewed

Final team submission: 2, 24” x 26” boards

Sustainability Elements Community • • • •

Blue Collar “Green” Jobs New Recreation Space and Parks Reconnection with the Schuylkill Strong Connection to Grays Ferry and Forgotten Bottom Neighborhoods

Environment • • • • • • •

Brownfield Remediation Development of a disturbed site Integrated Stormwater Management “Green Jobs” New Parks and Open Space Energy Efficient Buildings Walkability

Economy • • • • •

“Green” Job Opportunities Strong Highway and Rail Visibility New Tax Revenue for City Covers Remediation Cost Integration with UPenn

History

• Return of Historically Blue Collar jobs • New Industrial Museum • Preserved Dupont Building

2010 Ed Bacon 4th Annual Student Design Competition - first place entry Grays Ferry Crescent & DuPont Marshal Laboratory - South Philadelphia, PA Project Length: 4 weeks Competition Challenge: “Brown to Green” challenged students to create a new vision for South Philadelphia’s Grays Ferry Crescent. With the industrial DuPont Marshall Laboratory complex closing and the Schuylkill River Development Corporation extending its riverfront park trail along the edge of the site, this area offers strong potential, but also great challenges. The competition gave students the opportunity to push the envelope on cutting-edge ideas for transforming brownfields of an industrial past into sustainable environs for a green future.” Objectives: Address issues including: an abandoned site, the future of industrial land, contamination, sustainability, neighborhood connectivity, connectivity with assets, maximizing new riverfront trail, community design, questions of equity and historical memory Collaboration: Zac Boggs, MLA; Maureen Bolton, MLA; Tyler Grooms, MPS-RE, Dan Kelleher, MRP; Chris Koenig, MRP Faculty Advisors: Jamie Vanucchi, Landscape Architecture & Pike Oliver, Program in Real Estate


The Life of a Trichloroethene (TCE) Plume

Remediation Strategy and Phasing

Phasing

Existing Conditions Existing on The Crescent are a number of potentially harmful chemical plumes that can adversely affect human and environmental health. The intensive remediation of the site is a legal precursor to long-term development.

Phase I - Remediation The use of mobile tents to contain the on-site TERRALAVAR-MOBILE remediation activities allow for building to occur simultaneously with the remediation and re-use of the soil. As the tents strategically move across the site, new construction will follow. The remediated soil will be cleaned on-site, and re-used on-site.

Phase II - Employment A Waste Management research and development facility is established to bring quality green jobs back to the area. This R&D facility will study integrated community waste treatment systems. Initial office space is also built out and begins to bring people back to the site for employment. Tented remediation is beginning to wrap-up as people come onto the site.

Phase III - Civic Retail usage at the intersection of Grays Ferry Ave. and South 34th Street utilizes the siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strong visibility. A new hotel and conference center is also sited along the Schuylkill River Trail and maintains frontage on the new promenade. This phase also includes the new Industrial Heritage Museum that is connected to a preserved Dupont building. Heritage Park is also constructed during this phase.

Phase IV - Residential The central axis terminates at the stilted Ecological Learning Center that educates people on the brownfield remediation process and the affects of soil contamination on communities. With final remediation complete, residents can now return to live along the Schuylkill. The Crescent respects the 100year floodplain by returning that portion of the site to a natural wetland area.

urban vacancy, sustainability, stormwater, solar energy, remediation, pollution, industrial legacy, floodplain, brownfield

Industrial Legacy

Rust Renewed


Rust Renewed Master Plan F

D

C

2

3

4

1

10

10

9 11

D

D

13 5 6

12

B

8

12

B

B

7

B

D

A E

Land Use

Legend 1 Heritage Park

8 Specialty Grocer

A Proposed Marina

2 Water Taxi Dock

9 Hotel Convention

B Redevelopment Zone

3 Ecological Learning Center

10 Schuylkill River Park

C UPenn Dormitories

4 Filtration Wetland

11 Green R and D

D Trail Improvements

5 DuPont Square

12 Light Rail Stop

E Proposed Park

6 Industrial Heritage Museum

13 Green Roofs

F Woodlands Cemetery

7 Pedestrian Gateway Bridge

Residential

Retail

Lab / Flex

Park

Office / Institutional

Open Space

Civic


Rust Renewed

Sutainability

Grays Ferry is reconnected to the Schuylkill and new park space by a green promenade that terminates at the intersection of Grays Ferry Avenue and South 34th Street. Sustainability at The Crescent involves integrated design solutions where stormwater and solar energy are The Schuylkill River Trail interconnects with new park space at The Crescent. The green promenade and park system are resources, not nuisances. anchored by the Ecology Learning Center which rises on stilts above the floodplain. Blue roofs hold stormwater which is transferred to cisterns for building use & irrigation.

Sun

Solar panels align with the Sun’s path maximizing ‘green’ energy production.

Precipitation

In-accessible roofs are planted to filter stormwater prior to cistern collection & reuse. Rooftop courtyards utilize stormwater while increasing open space for residents. Permeable pavements and structural soil allow for stormwater infiltration and improved plant growth.

A vapor intrusion mitigation system vents the residual plume, allowing people to safely re-inhabit the site.

Structural soil On-site remediated fill

Cistern Concrete cap Residual plume


H.E.A.L Chicopee

H.E.A.L Chicopee - A Strategic Plan for Factory Village Former Facemate / Uniroyal Properties - Chicopee, MA Spring 2010 - Capstone Studio, Professor Deni Ruggeri Project Length: In progress Challenge: The former Facemate / Uniroyal properties have been vacant for the past 30 years. The city has recently gained ownership of the 70 acres of former industrial land and is moving forward with site preparations for redevelopment. Currently there little to no market pressure existing for redevelopment, liability & accountability issues regarding brownfield challenges and a desire to demolish all structures Goals: The development of a strategic plan that integrates the elements of Health, Ecology, Activity and Legacy (H.E.A.L.). These elements are important in defining Chicopee’s identity as well as successfully re-envisioning a former industrial site in its new context. The strategic plan strives to create a framework into which community identified programming can be interwoven with areas that are ‘landbanked’ for future development should the market demand such additions. Collaboration: Christian Gruber, MLA; Christopher Hardy, MLA; Christopher Horton, MLA; Declan Keane, MLA

Project boundaries & surrounding context

City-wide Survey: selected results Future Activities

The goal of this section of the survey was to determine what Chicopee’s citizens think the city needs. These questions were divided up into two sections: outdoor recreational programs and built programs. 60% 50%

0.4 0.35 0 35 0.3

40% 30%

0.25 0 25 0.2 0.15

20% 10% 0%

0.1 0.05 0

This diagram was generated using Wordle.com. The size of the words reflect the number of times they were used in total from all survey respondents. This reflects key ideas and what subjects were most often repeated.


Lessons were developed to introduce students to Chicopeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history, the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s industrial legacy and the concepts of sustainability.

Student Activities: City Seal Visioning Exercise

Based on the lessons, students were asked to imagine a new city seal that represented the elements they thought important to the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future.

activity, community, design, ecology, education, health, legacy, participation, programming, visioning

Student Activities: Lesson Plans

H.E.A.L Chicopee


Scenes in the City

Scenes in the City: ephemeral experience The High Line - New York, NY Fall 2008 - Composition & Theory - Professors Andrea Hammer, Deni Ruggeri & Peter Trowbridge Project Length: 2 weeks Challenge: Compose a conceptual framework that envisions the High Line as an elevated parkway threading through a number of different Manhattan neighborhoods.

Diagram: conceptual development

Concept: Manhattan is composed of various neighborhoods, landmarks, sounds and everyday destinations overlapping one another to define the city as a whole. The High Line acts as a microcosm of Manhattan, composing ‘frames’ that hold the various city ‘scenes’ together.

Conceptual Plan

Scene Elements: 2, 3, 6

1 2

3 4 5

Scene Legend 1. Hudson River Greenway 2. New Technology 3. The Fashion District 4. Typical Manhattan 5. Theatre District 6. City Art 7. The Industrial Past

6 7


Evolution: art into nature - nature into art The Commons - Ithaca, NY

Evolution

Spring 2008 - Composition & Theory - Professor Dan Krall Challenge: Ithaca Commons, constructed during the Urban Renewal movement of the 1970’s, continues as one of the more successful pedestrian malls in the country. Described at the ‘emotional and commercial heart’ of Ithaca, the city is planning to renovate the space. Concept: Ithaca Commons is evolving. This public space must respond to present social and economic pressures. Weaving together natural and artistic elements, the Commons will continue to be the heart of Ithaca’s business district while allowing for increased artistic expression.

The Commons, existing conditions

Master Plan

Axonometric: bank alley

conceptual development, schematic design, visioning

Project Length: 4 weeks


Radial Rhythm

Radial Rhythm: a melody of gardens Cornell Plantations Botanical Gardens - Cornell University, Ithaca, NY Spring 2008 - Composition & Theory - Professor Dan Krall Project Length: 8 weeks Challenge: With plans for the construction of a new visitorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s center, Cornell Plantations realized the opportunity to re-imagine the botanic collections on the proposed construction site. Emphasis was placed on relocating existing collections within a new site framework.

Project boundaries & surrounding context

Analysis

Existing circulation

Desired circulation

Parti

Concept: From Comstock Knoll, the botanic gardens ring out to fulfill the educational goals of Cornell Plantations. Each ring takes on a distinct purpose; pathways serve as transitional spaces linking each garden to the next. Individual areas become individual movements in the siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rhythm, a rhythm that provides distinct and memorable experiences.

Conceptual Layout


conceptual development, schematic design, visioning

Master Plan

Radial Rhythm


Cornell Agricultural Quad College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Cornell University - Ithaca, NY

Spring 2009 - Site Construction - Professor Peter Trowbridge Project Length: 14 weeks Focus: With the college beginning a conversation regarding a possible renovation of the quad, students were asked to envision a new layout for the space then to develop appropriate construction documents and details for the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s implementation.

Site Layout


Wall Details

Cornell Agricultural Quad


NYS DEC Region 3 Headquarters

Department of Environmental Conservation - New Paltz, NY Spring 2009 - Integrating Theory & Practice - Professor Jamie Vanucchi Project Length: 14 weeks Challenge: With the construction of an office addition to the existing DEC building, the opportunity arose for the site to exhibit stormwater management techniques that visitors from the surrounding area could learn about and implement on their own properties. Concept: The final plan divided the site into 7 distinct garden areas to be implements over time. Each garden showcases different stormwater management techniques and planting strategies based on environmental conditions including amount of stormwater collected, sun/shade patterns, wind patterns, soil conditions & regionally native plant communities.

Planting Schedule: shade rain garden


Fictional Site

Grading Plan

Fall 2008 - Site Engineering II - Professor Deni Ruggeri Project Length: 6 weeks Focus: Students were tasked with designing a new road through the given site. Parameters including design speed, horizontal alignment, vertical alignment and minimizing cut & fill operations were predetermined.

Final Plan


Portfolio  

Desgin Portfolio through Spring 2010 academic semester.

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