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TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH

WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE DECEMBER 2016


PORTLAND PARKS AND RECREATION The Olmsted Legacy Design Principles

VISION

Portland’s parks, public places, natural areas, and recreational opportunities give life and beauty to our city. These essential assets connect people to place, self, and others. Portland’s residents treasure and care for this legacy, building on the past to provide for future generations.

A Genius of Place

The design should take advantage of unique characteristics of the site, even its disadvantages. The design should be developed and refined with intimate knowledge of the site.

Unified Composition

All elements of the landscape design should be made subordinate to an overarching design purpose. The design should avoid decorative treatment of plantings and structures so that the landscape experience will ring organic and true.

Orchestration of Movement

The composition should subtly direct movement through the landscape. There should be separation of ways, as in parks and parkways, for efficiency and amenity of movement, and to avoid collision or the apprehension of collision, between different kinds of traffic.

MISSION

The mission of Portland Parks & Recreation is to help Portlanders play - providing the safe places, facilities, and programs which promote physical, mental, and social activity. We get people, especially kids, outside, active, and connected to the community. As we do this, there will be an increase in the wellness of our residents and the livability of our city. We accomplish this through: • • •

Establishing, safeguarding and restoring the parks, natural areas, public places, and urban forest of the city, ensuring that these are accessible to all; Developing and maintaining excellent facilities and places for public recreation and community building; Providing dynamic recreation programs and services that promote health and well-being for all;

Partnering with the community we serve.

EQUITY STATEMENT

We recognize, understand, and encourage celebration of the differences that surround us. Diversity and equity are vital to Portland Parks & Recreation’s ideals and values. Improving access to parks and recreation programs, thereby expanding equitable outcomes, is key to building a healthy community.

Orchestration of Use

The composition should artfully insert a variety of uses into logical precincts, ensuring the best possible site for each use and preventing competition between uses.

Sustainable Design and Environmental Conservation

The design should allow for long-term maintenance and ensure the realization and perpetuation of the design intent. Plant materials should thrive, be non-invasive, and require little maintenance. The design should conserve the natural features of the site to the greatest extent possible and provide for the continued ecological health of the area.

A Comprehensive Approach

The composition should be comprehensive and seek to have a healthful influence beyond its boundaries. In the same way, the design must acknowledge and take into consideration what surrounds it. It should create complimentary effects. When possible, public grounds should be connected by greenways and boulevards so as to extend and maximize park spaces. (National Association for Olmsted Parks)

“Washington Park is one of the crown jewels of our nationally-recognized Portland Parks & Recreation system. The park suffers from problems, which have been widely recognized for two decades. Now is the time to face these challenges to ensure that Washington Park remains a Portland treasure for many generations to come. Neighbors and park visitors have long recognized serious challenges, including: • • • • • • • • •

Poor access Insufficient parking during peak times Limited park-wide coordination among attractions Serious congestion issues Safety concerns related to vehicle and pedestrian conflicts Deteriorating infrastructure in the park Visitor and vehicle impacts in adjacent neighborhoods Lack of incentives to utilize MAX, in spite of the publicly-funded MAX station No single source of consolidated information on transportation options and parking availability” -Mike Abbaté, Director of Parks Amanda Fritz, City Commissioner Portland Parks & Recreation October 8, 2013

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CONTENTS INTRODUCTION 4 5 6 7

Region

Park Character

Park Development

How the Report is Organized

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION

PROJECT TEAM PLACE JLA Public Involvement Kittelson & Associates, Inc Works Progress, LLC Geotechnical Resources, Inc. KPFF Consulting Engineers Equilibrium Engineers LLC The Bookin Group LLC DCW Cost Management

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LAND

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PEOPLE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016

History

Geotechnical & Resiliency

Stormwater & Utilities

Land Use

Structures Circulation

Public Outreach & Visitor Experience

Recreation & Culture

Park Landscape

Operations & Maintenance

CONSIDERATIONS 54

Issues & Opportunities

APPENDIX 62

WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

Resources TABLE OF CONTENTS 3


INTRODUCTION

REGION

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Washington Park Washington Park, one of Portland’s oldest parks, is a 450-acre urban park with international reach. Its hilly topography includes almost 300 acres of natural areas and over 15 miles of trails, some of which are part of the 40-mile loop, a trail system that links the region with state and national trail systems providing access to a wide variety of recreational opportunities. The park itself is prominently positioned within walking distance to downtown and offers views of the city, the river and the natural landscape and mountains beyond.

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Purpose of a Master Plan

Due to growth in our region and the pressures that increased numbers of visitors put on the park, the Master Plan Update is necessary. The Portland region, Multnomah, Clackamas and Washington counties, in 2016, has 2.4 million residents, and is growing at a rate of 1.7% annually per the US Census Bureau. The city of Portland itself has about 600,000 residents. The last master plan for Washington Park was completed in 1981, when our Portland population was 400,000.

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Washington Park serves many roles to many people. It is both a neighborhood and local park offering traditional park experiences, and it attracts the broader regional community, including national and international visitors to Portland, for its unique, world-class offerings. A distinctive aspect of the park is that it contains both native landscapes and international plants, roses and animals that speak to global conservation and sustainability.

The purpose of this Master Plan Update is to maintain and enhance the visitor experience through design, improvements to infrastructure and the addition of needed amenities, and assure its long-term vitality. The Master Plan Update will create a set of clear guidelines by which future decisions about the environmental, cultural, economic and social aspects of the park are made in the best interest of current and future generations. It will make recommendations that both build upon and strengthen Washington Park’s legacy, beauty and assets, and address the conflicts and challenges that exist today.

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Process The first step in the process of developing a master plan is to understand the existing conditions, the issues, challenges and opportunities. This report summarizes the PLACE team’s thorough technical investigation and the results of the first public outreach effort. It will form the basis for the development of the Washington Park Master Plan Update. The public will continue to have a significant role through the planning process.

Technical Investigation

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Refine to a single MP option

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Park Management Areas

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Hoyt Arboretum and International Rose Test Garden Owned & Managed by Portland Parks & Recreation Oregon Zoo & Zoo Train Owned & Managed by Metro, Train Station & corridor land leased from PP&R

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Washington Park MAX Station

MAX train station Owned & Managed by TriMet

Washington Park Boundary Hoyt Arboretum Boundary

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Reservoirs Managed by the Portland Water Bureau

Oregon Zoo Boundary 40 Mile Loop Regional Trail

SW Fairview Boulevard and SW Cascade Drive Owned & Managed by Portland Bureau of Transportation (PBOT)

Reservoirs

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Portland Children’s Museum, World Forestry Center, and Portland Japanese Garden Leased from PP&R

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INTRODUCTION 5


INTRODUCTION

PARK DEVELOPMENT

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Many of the issues identified in the 1981 Master Plan still exist today, thirty-five years later. In 1981, the directive was to: encourage multi-mode transportation to and through the park, define the park entrances, create a pedestrian path to link the two ends of the park, provide better accessibility, maintain Kingston as a scenic roadway by improving scenic turnouts, reopening obscured views and improving its surface and structure as a primary transit road for cars and bicycles between north and south areas, and solve parking problems.

PARK EXPANSION HISTORIC LAND ADDITIONS Historic City Park 1871 60 Acre Addition 1890

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The 1981 Master Plan says “The 109-year history of Washington Park is a tribute to past foresight. It has thus become not only a valuable cultural and recreational resource to people living in the region, but an important historical example of park development in the Northwest.”

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Washington Park developed over time, as opportunity and interest made itself known and the population grew. In 1870, the year before the park land was purchased by city leaders, the population in Portland was 8,293. In 1890, when 60 additional acres were acquired for the park, the population had grown to 46,385. In 1910, two years before its name was changed from City Park to Washington Park, the population had increased to 207,214! At the time of the 1981 Master Plan, there had been more modest growth in the city of Portland, to under 400,000 residents. The two most significant formal planning efforts that helped to guide the development of the park were:

In 1903, the Olmsted Brothers toured Portland and made profound written recommendations to the Park Board about designing a system of parks to benefit the growth of the city and the health of its citizens. For Washington Park, known as City Park at the time, they advised moving the main entrance from West Burnside (Stearns) to SW Park Place, restoring some of the formally planted areas in the park to their natural beauty with native shrubs and ground cover, and changing the name from City Park to one of more distinction. They were early proponents of separating vehicular traffic from pedestrian traffic, advising that “all roads be accompanied by pathways as it was neither agreeable nor appropriate to mix the different modes of traffic”. The Olmsted Plan set the foundation for the development of Portland’s parks.

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Arboretum 1928

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Soccer Field & Archery Range 1960s

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Historic City Park 1871 World Forestry Center 1971

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60 Acre Addition 1909 MASTER PLAN 1981 Country Poor Farm Portland Population 400,000 Addition 1922 Portland Children’s Museum 2001

West Hills Golf Course 1920’s - 30’s Tax Lot 38 & 39 Addition 1941

ACQUISITIONS

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INTRODUCTION

HOW THE REPORT IS ORGANIZED The Washington Park South Entry Vision, 2012

Current Construction Projects

This study was commissioned by METRO and PP&R on behalf of the Washington Park Alliance, now Explore Washington Park, to look at how to enhance the arrival sequence and meet the collective needs of all the cultural institutions in the park. The plan enhances the entire visitor entry experience with a gracious roadway system and expanded park landscaping to eliminate the large surface parking lot. Most parking is consolidated into a parking structure behind the TriMet MAX station. Each institution is made more notable with attractive green space, dropoff zones and small parking areas. Aesthetics, pedestrian connections, bike paths and way-finding are safe and clear.

There are many active capital construction improvement projects occurring within Washington Park that will benefit all park users with additional opportunities for access, learning and connecting to nature. Each cultural institution in the park tracks and anticipates their own attendance and growth and plans accordingly. Their growth will impact amenities, circulation and the overall visitor experience throughout the park.

The Portland Japanese Garden (PJG) was originally designed in the 1960’s for 30,000 visitors. The Cultural Crossing Project (CCP) is an effort to expand the garden to accommodate the more than 300,000 users it currently sees, while adding capacity for future growth and programming. When complete, the project will enhance one of the premier Japanese Gardens in the United States.

WORLD FORESTRY CENTER PORTLAND CHILDREN’S MUSEUM

Proposed Parking Structure OREGON ZOO

Explore Washington Park Explore Washington Park was formed as a Transportation Management Association and operates as a 501(c)3 non-profit with a license agreement with the City of Portland for transportation management in the park. Their goals are to improve the visitor experience by ensuring all have a safe, smooth positive experience by giving visitors access to better information and ways to get around the park, and by providing responsive customer support and guidance. Their free shuttle buses loop through the park and stop at all the major attractions and the TriMet MAX station. The shuttle is entirely paid for by parking meter revenue raised in the park.

Current and 5-10 Year Projected Attendance Portland Japanese Garden World Forestry Center

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Portland Water Bureau Reservoirs 3 and 4 May 2016 – June 2024

• Near term – 0-10 years • Long term – 11-25 years • Ongoing These considerations inform the next phase of work in the conceptual development of the Master Plan. They are collectively presented in the report’s final section, CONSIDERATIONS, with diagrams and discussion. The Appendix contains a list and links to the supporting documentation used to research and prepare this report.

Considerations Diagrams: At the end of each section of this report is a considerations diagram that summarizes major issues and opportunities in Washington Park. The legend is as follows:

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Portland Water Bureau (PWB) is complying with a federal mandate to cover drinking water supply. Due to the landmark status of the existing reservoirs, PWB will build two reflecting pools in place of the existing reservoirs. Only Reservoir 3 will be rebuilt as a large underground holding tank. Most of the historic structures on the PWB site (dam, pump stations, stair cases) will remain, but will be renovated. There will be extensive tree removal on PWB property due to the extent of the construction efforts, and disruption/rerouting of traffic and temporary removal of parking during construction. The newly built reflecting pools will be accessible to the public via a new trail loop.

As part of the 2008 $125 million Oregon Zoo Bond, the new Education Center reconfigures the drop-off area to improve bus parking and pedestrian circulation in coordination with the South Entry Vision planning project.

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WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

The successful 2014 Parks Replacement Bond included funds to address ADA deficiencies in the park system, and some of these funds will be used to repair and upgrade the parking area ramp past the Garden Store and main promenade in the International Rose Test Garden (Rose Garden). Repairs are targeted for completion prior to the Rose Garden’s centennial celebration in 2017.

Oregon Zoo Education Center May 2014 – January 2017

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Oregon 2016 Zoo 2021 2026

International Rose Test Garden / Americans with Disability Act (ADA) Accessibility July 2015 - May 2017

Each specific section of research and study within the LAND and the PEOPLE is concluded with recommendations, or “considerations”. They are described both by diagram and in the following terms:

KEY Near Term

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Portland 2016 Children’s 2021 Museum

Portland Japanese Garden Expansion September 2015 - Fall 2017

This Technical Investigation and Public Outreach Report is organized by the two aspects that shape the park: the LAND and the PEOPLE. The multiple critical forces on and uses of the LAND are summarized through mapping and narrative, as are how PEOPLE use, manage and feel about the park.

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Tri-Met is planning signage and general improvements on the Washington Park MAX station platform. INTRODUCTION 7


LAND

HISTORY GEOTECHNICAL & RESILIENCY STORMWATER & UTILITIES LAND USE STRUCTURES CIRCULATION


HISTORY

CULTURAL HISTORY Willamette Valley The human occupation of the Willamette Valley did not begin until the Missoula Floods (15,000 to 13,000-BCE) receded and regional indigenous tribes and language groups began to settle the area. The principle native groups included the Chinook, peoples speaking dialects of the Chinookan language, which included the Kathlamet, Wasco and Wishram, Clatsop, and Clackamas nations. Locally, this included the Multnomah, Chafan and Tualatin. The nature of the indigenous inhabitants around the Paleo-Indian Era (10,000 – BCE) was that of a Stone Age culture of nomadic hunters. By the Archaic-Period (7000 – BCE) people built basic shelters and made stone tools and weapons. In Oregon and the Portland West Hills, these groups fished and traded along the Columbia and Willamette rivers and gathered berries, wapato and other root vegetables. The nearby Tualatin Plains provided prime hunting grounds as did what would become the Hoyt Arboretum, with its many creeks and swales; this area was likely a good hunting ground for game of all types. By the 16th century, Oregon was home to many Native American groups, including the Bannock, Chasta, Chinook, Kalapuya, Klamath, Molalla, Nez Perce, Takelma, and Umpqua. The Spanish exploration team lead by Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo sighted southern Oregon off the Pacific coast in 1543. In 1592, Juan de Fuca undertook detailed mapping and studies of the pacific coast currents. Stops along these trips included Oregon as well as the strait now bearing his name. Exploration was retaken routinely in 1774, starting with the expedition of frigate, Santiago, by Juan José Pérez Hernández. Soon the coast of Oregon became the valuable trading route to Asia. British explorer James Cook sailed the Oregon Coast in 1778 in search of the Northwest Passage. Beginning in the late 1780s many ships from Britain, America, and other countries sailed to the Pacific Northwest to engage in the region’s emerging maritime fur trade. American sea captain Robert Gray entered the Columbia in 1792, and was soon followed by a ship under the command of George Vancouver, a British captain, who also explored Puget Sound and claimed it for Britain.

CHINOOK CHIEF

CALLAPUYA INDIAN

According to Thomas Jefferson himself, one goal was to find “the most direct and practicable water communication across this continent, for the purposes of commerce.” Jefferson also placed special importance on declaring U.S. sovereignty over the land occupied by the many different tribes of Native Americans along the Missouri River, and getting an accurate sense of the resources in the recently completed Louisiana Purchase. The Lewis and Clark Expedition traveled through the region during their expedition to explore the Louisiana Purchase. They built their winter fort at Fort Clatsop, near the mouth of the Columbia River. Exploration by Lewis and Clark (1804–1806) and the United Kingdom’s David Thompson, who extensively explored the Columbia River from 1807–1811, publicized the abundance of fur-bearing animals in the area. The site of the future city of Portland, Oregon, was known to American, Canadian, and British traders, trappers and settlers of the 1830s and early 1840s as “The Clearing” a small clearing in the woods stopping place along the west bank of the Willamette River used by travelers enroute between Oregon City and Fort Vancouver. As early as 1840, Massachusetts sea captain John Couch logged an encouraging assessment of the river’s depth adjacent to “The Clearing”, noting its promise of accommodating large ocean-going vessels, which could not ordinarily travel up-river as far as Oregon City, the largest Oregon settlement at the time. In 1843, Tennessee pioneer William Overton and Asa Lovejoy, a lawyer from Boston, Massachusetts, filed a 640-acre land claim with Oregon’s provisional government that encompassed “The Clearing” and nearby waterfront and timber land. In 1852, Amos and Melinda King filed a Donation Land Claim (DLC) for 512 acres in the area now known as Arlington Heights and Washington Park. Soon after, the Kings began to sell-off parcels of their DLC to help meet the growing demands of a increasing population. On February 20, 1871, they sold 40.78 acres of their DLC to the City of Portland for $32,624. At this time the site remained a complex array of rough terrain with fallen trees and dense undergrowth, and was virtually inaccessible. By the late 1880’s, clearing had begun at the future park site and access trails and roads began to appear.

The above images depict two of the many indigenous people and language groups of the Willamette Valley and Columbia River environments. The image on the left is a representation of a Chinook chief from Warm Spring Reservation circa 1886. The image on the right is of a Callapuya Indian circa 1841 from the Oregon Historical Society.

LEWIS AND CLARK

Chinook people meet the Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery on the Lower Columbia, October 1805. Image by Charles Marion Russell, c. 1905

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HISTORY

PARK HISTORY BEAR PIT 1899

ENTRANCE AT WEST BURNSIDE 1907

CHIMING FOUNTAIN 1910

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COMING OF THE WHITE MAN 1904

GOATS NEAR THE RESERVOIR 1907

JEFFERSON ENTRANCE 1931

When, in1871 the City of Portland purchased the 40.78 acres for $32,624, it was deemed a fair and reasonable price, a critical point for calming the concerns of many in the populace who thought the purchase was not prudent given that the city was already surrounded by woodland. Ultimately the City was correct and the purchase was justified when the site was made accessible in the 1880’s; it was very popular and even crowded on warm summer weekends. Between 1871 and 1971, City Park, renamed Washington Park in 1912, had grown to over 400-acres. By 1968 the park included two open air reservoirs, an arboretum, international rose test garden, zoo, forestry center, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) and, an internationally recognized Japanese garden. Several other developments also began to fill a perceived recreation void in what was considered as the crown jewel of the city’s park system. These developments were not straight forward but involved a constant evolution of uses to get to what we now see at Washington Park, including the construction of a small golf course, land for the school district, a county poor farm, ball fields, an archery range, residential developments and roads. As the park evolved, so did the perception of what the park was and how those various aspects required easy access and redefined entrances. The issues of the 1903 city park system land acquisition and entrance scenarios in City Park were also brought up in the 1903 master plan proposal by John Charles Olmsted as he understood the value of this site in the larger context of park development. He not only addressed an 18-point discussion of what a park system should be but also identified 36 specific park lands for acquisition and development. For City Park he also noted “Already the capacity of City Park is taxed to its utmost upon holidays and pleasant Sundays in summer”. He also commented on what had evolved through the European influences of the first park manager, Charles Meyer, as a Victorian Era “pleasure ground” of ornamental planting beds, animal menagerie and a hodge-podge of folly and fancy. What Olmsted envisioned was a more naturalistic landscape consistent with the principals of the City Beautiful Movement and the Olmsted Brothers firm’s approach to landscape design. Between 1908 and 1914 these principals were further developed and incorporated by Emanuel T. Mische, first superintendent of Portland Parks and a protégé of the Olmsted’s. The developmental history of Washington Park through time is a key factor in understanding the long standing concern that the park lacks a focus and connectivity, externally and internally, as the history of development is more a matter of opportunities taken and lost then a focused strategic plan.

HISTORY LAND 11


HISTORY

AREAS OF SIGNIFICANCE There are six key districts that reflect the most significance cultural resources within the park and there are also a number of significant elements within each potential district site that further enhances our understanding of the park’s heritage. These are discussed in further detail in the sections that address each district site. The six primary sites reviewed for this master plan update are: City Park historic core, Hoyt Arboretum, International Rose Test Garden, Reservoirs #3 & #4, the Portland Japanese Garden, and Kingston Drive. Further mention should also be given to sites noted in the city’s 1984 Historic Resources Inventory (HRI) however; these sites are not fully discussed in this section of the master plan update. The sites are; Oregon (Washington Park) Zoo, World Forestry Center and, Oregon Zoo Railroad. A full HRI list for Washington Park is attached in the appendix.

CITY PARK HISTORIC CORE 1902

RESERVOIR 1910

INTERNATIONAL ROSE TEST GARDEN 1921

HOYT ARBORETUM 1922

DRIVE IN CITY PARK 1909

PORTLAND JAPANESE GARDEN 1962

Significant Sites: •

City Park (1871): The original 40.78-acre site of the park is the first property in Portland to be acquired specifically for park purposes by the city government. Over the years the original site went from “pleasure grounds” with ornamental plantings and menagerie to later being developed in the City Beautiful style of the Olmsted Brothers landscape architecture firm. Reservoirs #3 & #4 (1893-94): The reservoirs are the result of a governmentbusiness paradigm for public works, funding the creation of Portland’s Bull Run water system, a landmark process for Oregon’s legislature that illustrated a commitment to public health and an adequate supply of high quality water using a cost effective delivery. The reservoirs are listed in the National Register of Historic Places as of 2003. International Rose Test Garden (1917): The 5.12 acre garden was established for the outdoor scientific testing of new roses and development of existing varieties. It is one of the finest test gardens nationwide. In 1915, rose hobbyist and trustee of the American Rose Society, Jesse A. Curry, convinced city fathers to inaugurate a rose test garden to serve as a safe haven during WWI for hybrid roses grown in Europe. The site includes several display gardens, paths, and an amphitheater. Hoyt Arboretum (1922): The property is primarily significant for its collection of over 200 plant families and 2,068 species - 63 of which are listed globally vulnerable or endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. It also features 230 distinct species of conifers, generally believed to be the largest collection in the United States. Kingston Road (1967): The development of SW Kingston Drive, between the Japanese Garden and the Oregon Zoo, served a key function in the growth and circulation within the park. The intent of the road was to not only relieve traffic on SW Fairview but to connect two key aspects of Washington Park. Portland Japanese Garden (1962): Portland’s Japanese Garden has been proclaimed the most authentic Japanese garden outside of Japan as noted in 1988 by His Excellency Nobuo Matsunaga, Ambassador from Japan to the United States. The design is a combination of the Meiji Period (1868–1912) and Showa Period (1926 to 1988). This design reflects a fusion of Japanese and western influences. The Meiji Period saw a modernization of Japan with the re-opening to the West while post WWII gardens became an extension of the architecture of the building and often used modern building materials, such as concrete.

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Considerations Near Term

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Rehabilitate pedestrian trails and stone/concrete stairways in the City Park Historic Core. Conceal or replace chain-link fence with diaphanous landscape architectural fencing along Kingston Road. Selectively open the landscape understory along Kingston Road to reveal viewsheds of the city to the east and remove invasive vegetation.

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Establish an Olmstedian parkway along SW Kingston Drive. Rehabilitate the Bear House if feasible, or demolish and build new use. Rehabilitate Restroom/Concessions for integrity or expanded uses. Rehabilitate the Chiming Fountain.

Maintain the historic naturalistic aesthetic and overall site defining characteristics of Hoyt Arboretum, including trails and bridges. Implement improvements to maintain the overall original character defining features and design intent of the International Rose Test Garden. Preserve the charm and integrity of the Rose Garden Restroom & Curator’s Office as required. Pay careful attention to protect the enveloping flora. Preserve the original character defining features of the original design of the Portland Japanese Garden.

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ESTABLISH OLMSTEDIAN PARKWAY

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Introduction Significant areas within Washington Park are at a 1:1 slope (45 degrees) or steeper. The elevation ranges from 200 feet to 900 feet. The contact between the Portland Hills Silt and the underlying unweathered basalt represents a plane of weakness that is associated with landslides.

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1. An ancient landslide occupies a significant portion of the park. The scarp, (the uphill extent of the landslide), follows SW Fairview Boulevard and the scarp flank, (the steeply sloping area at the side or top of the landslide), extends to just above the Rose Garden. Ancient landslide deposits extend as far east as SW 19th Avenue. The Historic Washington Park landslide, initiated by excavation for the 1890’s reservoirs, is within this larger ancient landslide. Monitoring stations adjacent to the reservoirs indicate approximately 0.125-inches per year of movement. 2. The area near the South Entry from SW Fairview to Highway 26 is the site of another ancient landslide. Excavation for the highway at the toe, (the downhill extent of the landslide debris), of the ancient deposit is the source of movement, and stabilization efforts include drainage systems and buttressing to slow the landslide creep. Inclinometers at the toe of the slide area indicate movement of less than .025-inches per year. 3. An ancient landslide north of SW Fairview Boulevard within the Hoyt Arboretum is home to recent shallow landslide activity. This is the smallest Ancient Landslide Deposit field in the park.

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Three areas of Ancient Landslide activity originate within Washington Park.

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Landslide Hazards

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Deep-seated Landslides - slow moving, ancient landslides that span large areas and cause gradual damage to infrastructure. Shallow Landslides - quick moving landslides that affect relatively small areas and deposit debris in stream channels which obstruct culverts and ditches. c h e r Ln

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There are two types of landslides in the park:

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Landslide Susceptibility • • •

Existing landslides are shown as “very high” susceptibility on the Earthquake & Landslide Susceptibility diagram. Most of the park area outside known landslides is classified as “high” to “moderate” susceptibility. Areas within the park that area classified as “low” susceptibility to landslides are generally large flat areas, such as the archery range, the soccer field and the maintenance facility.

LANDSLIDE HAZARDS Landscape Scarp Ancient Landslide Scarp Flank Ancient Landslide Deposits

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Historic Washington Park Landslide 1890’s 2800’

14 LAND GEOTECHNICAL & RESILIENCY

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WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

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GEOTECHNICAL & RESILIENCY

%

SUSCEPTIBILITY

Considerations

Landslide Geology

Earthquake & Landslide Susceptibility

Near Term

DEEP-SEATED LANDSLIDES

• •

The contact between silt soil and decomposed basalt (clay) is commonly associated with deepseated landslides

SILT

Long Term

SILT

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SHALLOW LANDSLIDES

High Earthquake Susceptibility

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Landslide Susceptibility Very High High Moderate

BASALT ROCK

Eliminate on-site infiltration of stormwater. Direct all water collected on roofs and paved surfaces toward the city stormwater collection system. Develop evacuation plans in the event of a natural disaster.

Water collects on top of low-permeability layer in soil causing landslide

• •

Limit new building construction to stable zones, and stay out of landslide zones. Limit fill placement to backfill of excavations. Limit road widening to cuts on uphill side of roadway.

• •

Evaluate all areas of significant cut or fill on a case-by-case basis. Design mat foundations for new buildings.

Keep stormwater culverts, ditches, and storm sewer inlets clear of debris.

Ongoing

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Resiliency

Earthquake Susceptibility

CLAY Seismically-induced slope movements should be anticipated in landslide zones and on steep slopes. • Lateral movement of about 2 feet could occur within the Historic Washington Park landslide and the landslide zone at the South Entry during a design-level earthquake. • Liquefaction (loss of soil strength caused by earthquake shaking) is unlikely to be a significant concern due to the underlying fine-grained soil. • The above-ground reservoirs at Hoyt Arboretum are adjacent to the Ancient Landslide Scarp Flank and are unlikely to have been founded onBASALT landslide debris. Rupture ROCK of water mains serving the reservoirs is a more likely scenario during an earthquake. Water mains can be fitted with seismically activated shutoff valves. • Exit Route - Roads in Washington Park may be damaged during an earthquake, as they will be throughout the city. The park’s evacuation plan has not yet been developed.

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Storm Susceptibility

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Storm intensity has increased as an effect of climate change. More intense storms will continue to decrease slope stability within the park. Minor landslides and erosion in ravines transport debris to creeks, which in turn can wash downstream and clog culverts, leading to further erosion or landslides.

Forest Fires The City of Portland has published the Portland Wildfire Readiness Assessment (2009), and Portland Parks & Recreation developed the Forest Park Wildlife Risk Reduction Plan to mitigate impacts of a potential forest fire in Forest Park. To-date no plan has been adopted to mitigate potential effects of a forest fire within Washington Park.

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WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

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GEOTECHNICAL & RESILIENCY LAND 15


STORMWATER & UTILITIES

CONTEXT

Existing Drainage

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Washington Park lies within the Lower Willamette Sub basin of the Willamette River Basin. The headwaters of the historic Tanner Creek combine at the park and used to flow northeast in an open creek to the Willamette. A 1,000 foot long remnant of Tanner Creek still remains just east of the Oregon Zoo, but the rest was replaced with a pipe network as the creek was filled to accommodate the development of downtown Portland. Natural topography and historic improvements in the park have created five primary drainage catchment areas that connect to the city’s conveyance network. These are identified on the SITE WATER map on the following page: • •

Tanner Creek Drainage - three drainage areas convey stormwater toward the north via the Tanner Creek storm system network and outfall to the Willamette 30 5 River at the Centennial Mills site. Westside Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) Tunnel - the other two drainage areas convey runoff from both natural and improved areas in the same pipe network providing sewer service to the park amenities that enter the combined sewer system network and are routed to the Westside CSO Tunnel and wastewater treatment plant.

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STORMWATER & UTILITIES 1. BUILT Historical/landuse/structural

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4. GEOLOGIC Geotech

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5. STORMWATER Stormwater&Utilities

Stormwater infrastructure is primarily natural drainage channels, conveyance 6. SOCIALbasins, VIsitor Experience/Recreation ditches, culverts, channels, catch and pipes along roadways and in developed areas. Several grass areas do not drain and remain soggy after rain events. These areas are identified as “Seepage” on the SITE WATER ISSUES map. SW Park Pl

The age and condition of the stormwater infrastructure varies significantly with some components from the original park development, and others from subsequent improvements or repair projects. A comprehensive field investigation must be completed to develop a complete inventory of existing infrastructure to quantify and evaluate the age, condition, and capacity of the systems. There are limited stormwater quality facilities within the park. The Portland Japanese Garden and Oregon Zoo have recently installed water quality facilities. Stormwater management is critical in any future development and will have to abide by the City development code and the BES SWMM regulations at the time of the permit application. Stormwater management strategies will have to identify alternatives compatible with site soil and geologic limitations based on geotechnical observations. Current geotechnical recommendations advise to not infiltrate stormwater on future projects within the park. The recommendation is for future projects to utilize filtration facilities with liners and underdrains in accordance with BES standards.

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Sanitary Sewer The sanitary sewer systems are limited to the improved areas in the historic City Park area, the South Entry, and the Hoyt Arboretum Visitor Center, with four connections to the combined sewer. The existing condition and pipe capacity of these lines are largely unknown. Before any new development occurs, these lines should be confirmed with additional field investigations and surveys.

SITE WATER

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Stormwater and Drainage

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3. HABITAT Natural resources

Open Channel / Stream

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Stormwater Culvert

Reservoir

In the fiscal year 2016-17 budget, the City approved $1,000,000 to re-line the 4000+ lineal feet of sanitary and stormwater pipe in Washington Park to extend its life. The failing piping is causing sewage spills, backed-up restroom facilities, and contamination issues. Each sewage spill has violated DEQ regulations. The most recent failure caused sewage flow below the International Rose Test Garden, which will be celebrating its centennial in 2017. The Sewer/Stormwater Pipe project will be accomplished over a 3-year period.

Compromised Natural Channel

Water Supply

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Stormwater Pipe Combined Stormwater Sewer System Open Concrete Channel

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Drainage Ditch Sanitary Pipe Storm Sewer Outfall Sanitary Release Location

Information regarding water line infrastructure throughout Washington Park is limited. Due to security reasons, the Portland Water Bureau (PWB) is unable to provide public water mapping for pipes larger than 8-inches The park has nine known connections to PWB’s main. These are identified on the SITE WATER map on this page. Future water service and capacity is unknown due to the inability to obtain water main routing information.

Sanitary Sewer Connection Water Main Connection

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Aging infrastructure, incomplete location maps and not enough staff to maintain, are the primary deficiencies identified within the park. Additional investigations and pipe inspections should be done to develop a catalog of existing infrastructure and further assess the need for maintenance or repair. A robust maintenance program of existing utilities can mitigate future large capital expenditures. STORMWATER & UTILITIES LAND 17


STORMWATER & UTILITIES

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Considerations Near Term • •

Repair and plant the SW Kingston Drive embankment to reduce erosion and sediment runoff to the train tracks below. Improve Zoo train corridor drainage. Repair SW Kingston culvert and drainage system on steep downhill slopes. Improve Stearns Canyon embankment to reduce erosion.

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• •

Evaluate sanitary service for each future development project. Explore infrastructure expansion as connecting to the existing sanitary system may not be feasible due to limited connection locations, distance to, or capacity. Address water service and capacity in any future development. Future development must abide by the City’s Development Code and the BES’ Stormwater Management Manual requirements. Stormwater strategies for any proposed development must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Geotechnical recommendations are for no on-site stormwater infiltration to mitigate landslides. Treatment can occur with flow through planters in accordance with BES standards. Keep stormwater culverts, ditches, and storm sewer inlets clear of debris.

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Ongoing

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REPAIR SURFACE RUNOFF

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SITE WATER ISSUES Debris/Sediment

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Extensive Sediment Erosion

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Ongoing

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Sewer Backup

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Sink hole

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Subsurface Drainage

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2800’ 18 LAND STORMWATER & UTILITIES

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WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016


LAND USE

ZONING

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Zoning Washington Park is entirely designated as Open Space (OS) in the city’s zoning code. The Open Space zone is intended to preserve and enhance the public and private open, natural, and improved park and recreation areas as identified in the city’s Comprehensive Plan (Updated 2016). These areas serve the following functions:

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• Provide opportunities for outdoor recreation; • Preserve scenic qualities; • Protect sensitive or fragile environmental areas; • Enhance and protect the values and functions of the urban forest; • Provide pedestrian and bicycle transportation connections. Permitted by right in an Open Space zone are parks, arboretums, botanical gardens, nature preserves, hiking trails, and accessory uses, such as offices, maintenance facilities and restrooms.

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Park maintenance facilities are allowed as accessory uses in Open Space zone (OS) under the Portland Zoning Code (Section 33.920.460 B). Efforts are underway to revise the Zoning Code in the next few years to clarify and provide detail on this allowed use.

Overlay Zones There are four overlay zones within Washington Park. Overlay zones consist of regulations that address specific subjects in particular areas of the city. • • • •

Environmental Protection zone overlay (p): This is the highest level of protection for the most important resources and functional values. Development within the “p zone” will be approved only in rare and unusual circumstances. Environmental Conservation zone overlay (c): These areas conserve important resources and functional values while still allowing environmentally sensitive urban development. Scenic Resource zone overlay (s): Height limits are placed on view corridors to protect significant views to preserve and enhance identified scenic resources. In some areas these overlay zones overlap and both overlays apply. For example, within Washington Park there are areas where the Scenic Resource zone overlay and the Environmental Conservation zone overlay both apply. When new development occurs, the environmental review must include consideration of the scenic resources as well. Historic resource protection overlay zone: The area around the Washington Park Reservoirs is designated as a historic district. The reservoirs were listed on the National Historic Registry on January 15, 2004.

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Certain “allowed” uses require conditional land use approval because of the potential adverse impacts of traffic, parking, noise and natural resource incursion. The following uses may be approved as conditional uses: parking areas, swimming pools and recreational fields for organized sports; retail sales/services such as food service and museum stores; community service uses such as libraries, museums, community centers and youth clubs; commercial outdoor recreation uses such as amusement parks, theme parks, golf driving ranges, miniature golf facilities, and zoos: and basic utilities, such as the water reservoirs.

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ZONING OVERLAY OS Open Space OSp Environmental Protection Overlay OSc Environmental Conservation Overlay OScs Environmental Conservation and Scenic Resource Overlay OSs Scenic Resource Overlay

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Protected View Historic District 2800’ 1400’ 700’ 350’ 0’ WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016


LAND USE

ZONING & VIEWS VIEW 1

VIEW 2

Views In a dynamic park set within a growing city, views are challenging to protect. The cityscape is ever-changing, and trees grow to block views. Five existing views within the park are protected as a result of an Economic, Social, Environmental and Energy (ESEE) policy decision to limit building and vegetation height near viewpoints. Several Scenic Resource overlay zones pass through the park. The Central City Scenic Resources Protection Plan (CCSRPP) contains policies that describe the approach toward view protection and creation of viewpoints in and around the Central City, including Washington Park. Views of Mountains, Central City Skyline and West Hills, Willamette River Bridges, Unique Neighborhoods, and Developed and Frequently Visited Viewpoints are priorities. Within Washington Park the following areas are protected with Scenic Resource overlay zones:

Vietnam Veterans of Oregon Memorial From the top of the Memorial site, an internal vegetated view opens up to a view of Mt. Hood.

VIEW 3

International Rose Test Garden The telescopes at the Rose Garden area focus views towards downtown Portland and Mt. Hood.

Zoo Train Station This internal view to the north provides views back towards the Rose Garden area and historical views of Mt. St. Helens.

VIEW 6

Lewis & Clark Monument The view from top stairs at the SW Park Place entrance historically offered expansive views of downtown Portland and Mt. Hood.

SW Fisher Lane through the Hoyt Arboretum - views of the unique tree collection and natural under-story plantings. • SW Fairview Boulevard from SW Fisher Lane to SW Knights Boulevard - views of Hoyt Arboretum and windows of views toward the downtown Portland skyline and Mt. Hood beyond. • SW Rose Garden Way - picturesque views of historic planting beds, the International Rose Test Garden, and Washington Park Reservoirs. The CCSRPP prohibits development of conflicting uses from designated viewpoints in the park including: 1. Vietnam Veterans of Oregon Memorial - the view of Mt. Hood has been compromised by overgrown vegetation. 2. Portland Japanese Garden - manage vegetation to maintain view of Mt. Hood. 3. Washington Park Train Station - the area historically offered views of Mt. St. Helens and the downtown skyline; the skyline is no longer visible. Building heights are not an issue, but vegetation growth threatens the view of Mt. St. Helens. 4. Rose Garden Telescopes - Views of city skyline have been compromised by tall trees. Manage vegetation to restore view of Mt. Hood. 5. International Rose Test Garden - view of Mt. Adams should be protected by managing vegetation. 6. International Rose Test Garden top of stairs above gazebo - view of Mt. Hood should be protected by managing vegetation. 7. International Rose Test Garden top of stairs near telescopes - view of Mt. Hood should be protected by managing vegetation and limiting building heights. 8. International Rose Test Garden North side at picnic tables - view of Mt. Hood should be protected by managing vegetation. 9. SW Sherwood Blvd above Reservoir 4 - Develop a formal viewpoint with a bench and marker, and managing vegetation to provide view of Vista Bridge and the Central City Skyline. 10. Lewis & Clark Memorial - The view of Mt. Hood has been compromised by development.

Considerations Near Term • • •

Identify areas outside of Environmental Preservation overlay zones that are suitable for development. Preserve and enhance views and scenic resources within the Scenic Resources overlay zone. Revise zoning in recently added areas of the park to reflect a change from Residential (R) zoning to Open Space (OS) zoning.

Long Term •

Create new development within Washington Park that will showcase characteristics unique to Portland and the Pacific Northwest.

Ongoing •

Maintain vegetation to preserve existing designated views.

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WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016

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STRUCTURES

EXISTING BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES

There are eleven PP&R owned and operated buildings in Washington Park. They provide basic park functions such as restrooms, information, concessions, covered picnic shelters, maintenance, and storage. Their ages and conditions vary. According to input from PP&R staff and the public response to the online survey, there are needs for additional restrooms and public amenities throughout the park, as well as improved and expanded maintenance and storage space to meet current maintenance staff requisites. The other buildings shown on the map are not maintained and operated by PP&R and so were not assessed here.

HOYT ARBORETUM VISITOR CENTER/ MAINTENANCE SHOP

STEVENS PAVILION

RESTROOM/CONCESSION BUILDING

#151/152 | Built 1995 | 1500 sf | 1.90 S Score The Visitor Center houses an information desk, gift shop, library/meeting room, public restrooms, offices, and separate maintenance facility.

#153 | Built 1995 | 1600 sf | 2.90 S Score The A-frame picnic shelter provides an outdoor covered area for picnics. It can be rented for private events.

#406 | Built 1924 | 400 sf | 1.00 S Score This building originally served visitors recreating on the open lawns of ‘City Park.’ The restrooms have since been renovated and the concession area is now used for storage.

ZOO BEAR HOUSE

ELEPHANT HOUSE

ZOO RAILWAY BUILDING

#407 | Built 1927 | 2300 sf | 0.70 S Score The lower level housed bears in the original zoo. It is currently used for Maintenance, and storage for Events and the Gift Shop.

#409 | Built 1954 | 1600 sf | 1.50 S Score Built to house the zoo’s Rosy the elephant, it now serves as a picnic shelter with restrooms and storage. It can be rented for private events.

#419 | Built 1950 | 1125 sf | 2.90 S Score The station is currently closed. It was originally used for ticket sales and boarding of the zoo train back to the Oregon Zoo. It is leased by Metro for this purpose.

WESTSIDE MAINTENANCE FACILITY

ROSE GARDEN STORE/RESTROOM

ROSE GARDEN RESTROOM & CURATORS OFFICE

#421 | Built 2000 | 4680 sf | 2.00 S Score The metal pre-fab maintenance office and storage building was built in 2000.

#425/426 | Built 2000 | 790 sf + 840 sf | 3.8 S Score The Rose Garden Store and Restroom buildings were designed under the 1997 building code, have viable, intact structural systems, and are in good physical condition.

#431 | Built 1925 | 450 sf | 1.00 S Score The most photographed building in the park is maintained to retain its original purpose and character.

Seismic Vulnerability For this report, the eleven park buildings were assessed and scored for seismic vulnerability per FEMA P‐154 Rapid Visual Screening (RVS) of Buildings for Seismic Hazards: A Handbook. SCORE: The basis for the calculation of a score that is an indication of the expected seismic performance of a building, or “S” score. A final “S” score of 3 implies that there is a 1:1,000 chance that the building will collapse if a “design basis” earthquake occurs; an “S” score of 2 implies a 1:100 chance that the building will collapse. The lower the “S” score, the higher the chance of collapse in the event of a significant earthquake. Three of the oldest and most historic buildings stand out as being seismically vulnerable, and have “S” scores of 1 or lower: #407-Zoo Bear House, Rose Garden Restroom & Curator’s Office (431), and Restroom/Concession Building (406). 1. Zoo Bear House (407) has many readily visible structural deficiencies and vulnerabilities, including pre‐code vintage, deteriorating concrete basement walls, dry rotted wood framing, steeply sloped site and a soft story irregularity, resulting in a score “S” of 0.70. Given the condition of its structural system and its location on a steep hillside, there is a likelihood that a relatively minor earthquake could render significant damage to the building. Currently, the building is leaning slightly downhill, which could be a sign that the slope has moved or that soils are settling under the structure. Since a trail passes in front of the building on the downhill side, park visitors could be in harm’s way during an earthquake. 2. Rose Garden Restroom & Curator’s Office (431) is in need of seismic upgrade to improve seismic resiliency. The “S” score is 1. 3. Restroom/Concession Building (406) also received a “S” score of 1 and is in definite need of seismic upgrade to improve seismic resiliency. 4. In the Westside Maintenance Facility (421) and the shop area at the Hoyt Arboretum (151/152), fuel and other flammable or hazardous materials are stored in open, tall, unbraced cabinets and heavy landscape maintenance equipment is stored on tall unbraced racks that are not anchored to the floor slab. In a moderate earthquake, these elements could collapse, spilling their contents and creating a significant and hazardous impediment to building occupants trying to leave the building. The remaining buildings assessed currently pose moderate to low risk to the public and would require relatively minimal or no structural upgrades to improve their seismic resiliency.

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Develop a program to determine the number of public amenities needed in the park and the best locations to serve the most visitors. Consider the potential for #407-Zoo Bear House site for new uses, and whether to perform seismic upgrades, repair and renovate the building, or to demolish it and build a new facility. Perform seismic upgrades to buildings #431-Rose Garden Restroom & Curator’s Office and #406-Restroom/Concession Building. Perform a detailed seismic assessment of #409-Elephant House to evaluate its seismic vulnerabilities. Mitigate the non‐structural deficiencies in building #421‐Westside Maintenance Facility and #151/152 Hoyt Arboretum Visitors Center shop area including adding proper, safe storage of flammable or hazardous materials and anchorage and bracing of storage racks and their contents.

Ongoing •

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EXISTING BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES Considerations

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Perform regular maintenance on existing buildings and mitigate nonstructural hazards to preserve the building’s structural integrity and safety of the occupants.

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UPGRADE STRUCTURES

421 Westside Maintenance Facility 425 Rose Garden Store

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Note: The Building #’s are from PP&R’s GIS data.

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431 Rose Garden Restroom & Curator’s Office 2800’

WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016

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0’ STRUCTURES LAND 23


ACCESS

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Walking/Hiking - Two segments of the 40-Mile Loop, a regional trail that encircles Portland, connect to Washington Park and pass through Hoyt Arboretum. The 4T/ Marquam Trail spans from the Vietnam Veterans of Oregon Memorial to Council Crest Park, and the Wildwood Trail passes Pittock Mansion from Forest Park to Hoyt Arboretum. From NW 23rd, sidewalks connect to trails in Stearns Canyon. From the Kings Heights MAX station, sidewalks along Park and Sacajawea Blvd link to the MAC Trail. Residents of Arlington Heights can use connector trails to enter the park, but many of the adjacent roadways lack sidewalks.

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Biking - There are no paths or bicycle lanes that connect directly to the park. However, many people who work in the park commute by bicycle, and people of all ages bicycle in the park for recreation. Explore Washington Park encourages those visiting by bicycle to use MAX to access the park. The Stearns Canyon entrance almost connects to an eastbound cycle track on NW Everett through Northwest Portland to downtown. Other than the old roadways in Stearns Canyon, bicycles are not allowed on any trails within Washington Park.

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Transit Riding - In addition to the Washington Park MAX station, three additional MAX stops, ‘Providence Park’, ‘Kings Hill/SW Salmon’, and ‘Goose Hollow/SW Jefferson’, are within a 30-minute walk to the Rose Garden area – closer than the Washington Park MAX station. TriMet’s line 63 runs from Providence Park through the park seven days per week, hourly. Three additional bus routes, line 51 on SW Vista , and lines 18 and 20 on W Burnside run near park entrances. Of these, only line 20 operates on weekends. Hourly service for the line 20 is available all days west of SW 23rd along W Burnside to and from the Beaverton Transit Center.

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Driving - Visitors arriving by car via W Burnside must follow small signs through the Kings Heights neighborhood to the Lewis and Clark entrance or through the Arlington Heights neighborhood or Hoyt Arboretum to the entrances off of SW Fairview. Exit 72 - ‘Oregon Zoo/Forestry Center’, off Hwy 26, does not announce ‘Washington Park’. In addition to park visitors, commuters use SW Knights Blvd to cut through the Park and connect to downtown when the highway is congested.

Other TriMet Bus Routes MAX Station - Entrance

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MAX Route - Underground

2800’ Source: Explore Washington Park Visitor Survey (2015)

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Getting to Washington Park

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Washington Park is within 30 minutes of most of the Portland Metro region. Highway 26 borders the park to the south and provides direct access to the park’s South Entry. Fairview Blvd (via Tichner), SW Fischer Ln, and SW Stearns Dr/Stearns Canyon, provide entry to the north edge of the park from W Burnside, a major east-west thoroughfare. The Red and Blue MAX lines stop in Washington Park in an underground station adjacent to the South Entry venues. While access within the park by bike or on foot can be challenging, primarily due to topography, the City’s robust bicycle network, sidewalks, and trails are generally well-connected to over a dozen park entrances.

Drive Transit Walk Bike Other

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WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016


ACCESS POINT 1. South Entry

2. SW Madison Ct / Madison Trail 3. Lewis and Clark Entrance

4. SW Stearns Dr / Stearns Canyon 5. SW Wright Ave 6. SW Park Pl 7. SW Marconi Ave 8. SW Parkside Dr 9. SW Kingston North 10. Wildwood Trail - Burnside 11. SW Fischer Ln 12. Wildwood Trail - Fairview 13. SW Cascade Dr 14. SW Upper Cascade Dr 15. Hoyt Arboretum Visitor Center 16. SW Knights Blvd 17. White Pine Trail - Fairview 18. SW Fairview Blvd

19. MAX Station Washington Park

CIRCULATION

USERS SERVES Oregon Zoo, World Forestry Center, Portland Children’s Museum, Vietnam Veterans of Oregon Memorial, 4T Trail/40 Mile Loop, Bicycle commuters North end of Washington Park, Reservoirs, Neighborhoods, MAX (Goose Hollow Stop), Free Shuttle North end of Washington Park, Int’l Rose Test Garden, Portland Japanese Garden, Reservoirs, Washington Park Amphitheater, Oregon Holocaust Memorial, Neighborhoods, TriMet #63 Bus, Free Shuttle Oregon Holocaust Memorial, Neighborhoods Neighborhoods Oregon Holocaust Memorial, Neighborhoods, TriMet #63 Bus, Free Shuttle Neighborhoods Neighborhoods Washington Park Amphitheater, Portland Japanese Garden, Neighborhoods, International Rose Test Garden, Tennis Courts, TriMet #63 Bus, Free Shuttle Hoyt Arboretum Hoyt Arboretum Hoyt Arboretum, Portland Japanese Garden, North end of Washington Park Neighborhoods Neighborhoods

ACCESS

Travel to Washington Park in 30 Minutes DRIVING

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WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016

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Hoyt Arboretum, Washington Park Free Shuttle, TriMet #63 Bus, Free Shuttle Bicycle commuters, Portland Children’s Museum, Hoyt Arboretum, Vietnam Veterans of Oregon Memorial, World Forestry Center, Oregon Zoo Hoyt Arboretum, Wildwood Trail/40 Mile Loop Portland Children’s Museum, Hoyt Arboretum, Portland Japanese Garden, International Rose Test Garden, North end of Washington Park, Vietnam Veterans of Oregon Memorial, World Forestry Center, WPS, Wildwood Trail/40 Mile Loop, Oregon Zoo, TriMet #63 Bus, Free Shuttle Bicycle commuters, Portland Children’s Museum, Hoyt Arboretum, Vietnam Veterans of Oregon Memorial, World Forestry Center, Oregon Zoo, Free Shuttle

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CIRCULATION LAND 25


CIRCULATION

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600 with accessible spaces

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Gravel lot, about 30 spaces

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SW Kingston Ave

123 with accessible spaces

Lot H

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On-Street

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On-Street

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As park visitor numbers have grown, the number of days when parking demand exceeds available capacity continues to increase. PP&R implemented a pay-to-park system in 2014 in an effort to reduce parking demand and to fund improvements within Washington Park. Visitors can pay hourly or daily for parking using pay stations or an app on their mobile phone. Explore Washington Park encourages the venues to coordinate event timing and to maximize opportunities for dropoff/pick-up areas. Explore Washington Park also publishes a calendar of projected parking availability to encourage park visitors to plan ahead for their visit or use alternative modes of travel to decrease park congestion.

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Personal vehicles are the prevalent mode of travel, particularly for families or small groups coming to the park together. Vehicles are allowed on a limited network of narrow roads. Historically, the park was able to accommodate vehicles; however, over the past 30 years, park roads have become increasingly congested and the condition of the roads is degrading.

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Park Circulation

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CIRCULATION - INTERNAL CARS & PARKING Entrance - Vehicles Zoo Train - Partially Closed Maintenance Access

Explore Washington Park (EWP), the Transportation Management Association (TMA) for Washington Park, works with the venues and PP&R to improve access to and within the park. EWP surveys park visitors and employees annually and publishes their survey information to track trends in transportation changes. The Mode Split, above, is from the 2015 visitor survey. Trends from 2016 indicate that fewer park visitors are choosing to drive their personal vehicle to Washington Park. Gradually, more and more park visitors are choosing alternate modes. Currently, ride share is becoming more common; “other”, above is predominately those choosing to travel via ride share services such as Uber or Lyft. For 2016, this number is closer to 7-8% of park visitors.

26 LAND CIRCULATION

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2800’ 1400’ 700’ 350’ 0’ WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016


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Visitors to the park can choose to bike, however, the experience is currently not suitable for riders of all ages and abilities. Bicycles are not allowed on natural surface trails within the park, and the paved trails are limited to park roads now closed to car traffic in Stearns Canyon and SW Madison Court near the reservoirs. Both SW Fairview and SW Kingston Dr. are narrow and lack designated bicycle facilities or shoulders, but are designated “Shared Roadways” in the Portland bicycle network. However, neither street includes shared lane markings or signs. These streets are popular with recreational cyclists and commuters since they provide valuable links to popular training rides and bicycle routes in western Portland and Washington County.

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The Washington Park Free Shuttle, operated by Explore Washington Park, has reduced the number of park visitors who drive in the park between venues. The Shuttle operates May through October, providing weekend service in May, September, and October, and 7 day/week service from Memorial Day to Labor Day. It stops in 11 locations, arriving every 15 minutes. The clockwise loop takes approximately 30 minutes to complete. On busy days, arrivals range from 1525 minutes, with high demand often causing standing room only for Shuttle passengers.

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Trails The existing trail network includes over 15 miles of trails within Washington Park, which is discussed in detail on pages 40-42.

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Explore Washington Park identifies a series of trails that provide the shortest route between the Washington Park MAX station and the International Rose Test Garden. New wayfinding signs are being added to this route to simplify wayfinding along the route. There is a paved, accessible trail from the MAX station to the Hoyt Arboretum Visitor Center. Visitors who rely on Google Maps, or a similar online mapping tool, will be directed to walk along SW Knights Blvd. and SW Kingston Dr., and not directed to the trails.

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CIRCULATION - INTERNAL ACTIVE MODES Entrance - Pedestrians

Park visitors hiking on the regional 40-Mile Loop Trail (Wildwood Trail and Marquam Trail) through Washington Park will have a challenging time staying on the 40-Mile Loop through the maze of trails through Hoyt Arboretum. New wayfinding signs installed by the Arboretum and trail signs help, but these signs are often damaged or missing at key intersections and there are no other visual cues that identify the 40-Mile Loop as a more prominent facility than the local Hoyt Arboretum trails.

Entrance - Bicycles Paved - Bike/Pedestrian Path Regional Trail - 40 Mile Loop Soft Surface Connector Trail

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Accessible pedestrian connections within the park are challenging for several reasons:

On-Street Bicycle Route

• •

Free Park Shuttle Loop Free Shuttle Stop

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2800’ WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016

Zoo Train - Partially Closed

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Sidewalk network between parking areas and venues is incomplete. Pedestrian facilities are lacking along the two main park roads, SW Kingston and SW Fairview. Wayfinding is not intuitive for visitors and the signage network is incomplete. Terrain throughout the park is steep. CIRCULATION LAND 27


CIRCULATION

CONFLICTS

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1. Main park entrances are challenging to find or identify. 2. Parking along SW Sherwood Blvd and SW Washington Park Way is underutilized even on busy days. 3. Intersections in the north end of the park are confusing. Irregular intersection geometry and one way streets contribute to this confusion. 4. Parking lots immediately adjacent to popular venues fill quickly or experience a high rate of turnover. 5. Traffic is very congested along SW Sherwood Blvd near the playground. Parallel parking along both sides of SW Sherwood, drivers waiting for parking a parking space to become available, and drivers dropping off passengers all contribute to significant delays. 6. The Zoo Train is currently inoperable. The corridor could be considered for a variety of modes of improved park circulation. 7. Pedestrians, bicyclists, and drivers often all share several busy roads through Washington Park including: SW Fairview Blvd, SW Knights Blvd, and SW Kingston Dr. The lack of separation creates a circulation network that is not safe for more vulnerable users. 8. The Wildwood Trail crossing of W Burnside is unsafe. Plans have been developed for a grade separated crossing, and the Portland Parks Foundation is working to fund construction of this bridge. 9. On-street parking along SW Fairview Blvd shoulders is heavily utilized because there, it is free of charge. 10. The lots in the South Entry fill quickly and circulation and wayfinding are challenging. The enlarged map provides more information about this location. 11. The South Entry is challenging for pedestrians and cyclists. SW Canyon Ct has bike lanes and there are bike lanes along SW Knights Blvd, but there is a gap in the area immediately adjacent to the Highway 26 intersection. The Marquam Trail crosses Highway 26, but there are no existing crosswalks or pedestrian crossing signs.

d Cla an s i S Lew SW

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Circulation conflicts within Washington Park can be distilled to a few key challenges. Two areas, the northern part of Washington Park near the intersection of SW Kingston Dr and SW Sherwood Blvd and the South Entry, have more complex challenges and are illustrated in more detail on the following pages. Park-wide conflicts that were noted as part of the technical investigation include:

SW Marconi Ave

Park Wide Conflicts

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CITY PARK/ROSE GARDEN

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CIRCULATION CONFLICTS 1 7

Entrance Underutilized Parking

3

Confusing Intersection Heavily Used Parking Traffic Congestion

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Underutilized Train Corridor Roadway Conflicts

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3 Ca nyo nC t

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Parking Lot Issues SOUTH ENTRY

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28 LAND CIRCULATION

Challenging Entry for Cyclists and Pedestrians Connector Trail Regional Trail - 40 Mile Loop Zoo Train - Partially Closed 2800’ 1400’ 700’ 350’ 0’ WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016


ay n

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&

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ay kW

2. CIRCULATION

4. GEOLOGIC Geotech City Park/Rose Garden Area Conflicts

Le

STORMWATER Stormwater&Utilities The enlarged map highlights 5.many of the existing conflicts in the Rose Garden and historic City Park areas. 6. SOCIAL VIsitor Experience/Recreation

Pedestrians are faced with large gaps in the sidewalk network with no option other than to travel in the road at times. Parking areas along SW Sherwood Blvd and SW Sacajawea Blvd do not connect to adjacent attractions or venues, and user trails have developed over time. The MAC Trail is in Fair to Poor condition (see “Trails”) and does not connect popular destinations such as the Rose Garden area and Children’s Playground. Due to changes in Park layout, old roads have been converted to trails, and paths that used to exist no longer exist, but staircases remain. This makes navigation for pedestrians confusing. Finally, steep terrain means that even when sidewalks do exist, they’re often steep, unpaved, or include stairs. Families with strollers, those with balance challenges, or pedestrians who use mobility assistance devices face a series of obstacles if they chose to get around the park without driving between attractions.

SW Park Pl

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ood Blvd Sherw

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AMPHITHEATRE

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Bicycle routes through Washington Park are poorly marked and cyclists were observed riding the wrong way or using sidewalks to avoid out of direction travel. Biking north from SW Kingston Dr. to northwest Portland, riders follow SW Sherwood Blvd to the intersection with SW Sacajawea Blvd. At this point, cyclists either turn left on Sacajawea and then right onto the sidewalk past the restrooms, or they continue straight and briefly ride the wrong way on SW Lewis and Clark Way and then turn left on SW Washington Way to access SW Stearns Dr toward W Burnside. Alternately, those biking toward Goose Hollow turn right onto SW Sacajawea and can then turn right onto SW Madison Ct, no longer open to vehicles, which connects to SW Jefferson St or SW Madison St.

t yS

LEGEND

Two intersections are particularly confusing for drivers: the Rose Garden intersection (SW Kingston Dr/SW Kingston Ave/SW Sherwood Blvd/SW Rose Garden Way) and the old City Park “interchange” (SW Lewis and Clark Way/SW Sacajawea Blvd/SW Washington Way/SW Sherwood Blvd and SW Rose Garden Way/SW Wright/SW Sacajawea). At both intersections drivers are forced to make a quick decision about which way they should turn using small park signs with lists of several venues and attractions. One way streets and intersections with confusing geometry further complicate the decision making process and cause delays.

Downhill Stairs

MAC Tra il

TENNIS COURTS

Vehicle Travel

ROSE GARDEN

Shuttle stop

?

Bollards No Sidewalks Unclear Trail No Pedestrian Connection Water Bureau Boundary

SW

Accessibility Challenge

r on D t s g K in

Missing Crosswalk Confusing Intersection Tight Turning Radius Challenge for Busses

ZOO TRAIN STATION

Vehicular Challenges 400’

WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016

CONFLICTS

3. HABITAT Natural resources

LEWIS & CLARK MONUMENT

RESERVOIRS

CIRCULATION

1. BUILT Historical/land use/structural

is

to ing

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a SW W sh

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SW Kingston Ave

SW Marconi Ave

CITY PARK/ROSE GARDEN AREA CONFLICTS

300’

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Dropping passengers off is a challenge for cars and buses. The drop off area above the International Rose Test Garden is insufficient to accommodate the number of cars trying to drop off or pick up passengers on busy days. Once drivers do unload passengers, if they are not able to find a parking space in the small lot immediately adjacent to the Rose Garden, understanding how to find additional parking and then return to meet the rest of their party is unclear. Tour buses are not able to access the bus loading zone near the Rose Garden if they arrive from Highway 26 and follow SW Kingston Dr or if they enter the park via SW Tichner/ SW Kingston Ave. Buses enter the parking lot traveling north and are not able to make the U-turn required to continue on SW Rose Garden Way. Once buses drop passengers off, they are supposed to continue to parking spaces along SW Washington Way. Finally, the Free Shuttle is often delayed by up to 30-minutes in congestion on SW Sherwood. Shuttle riders are often unsure about where to board the shuttle and the existing Rose Garden shuttle stop is not ADA accessible.

0’ CIRCULATION LAND 29


CONFLICTS

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As with the rest of Washington Park, the primary challenge for pedestrian circulation is a lack of sidewalks. There are no sidewalks through the parking lots and SW Knight Blvd is missing sidewalks on at least one side. Hikers following the 4T Trail through the South Entry Area must navigate a series of roadway crossings that are unmarked and unsigned.

Wi

ld w

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WORLD FORESTRY CENTER TRIMET

Oregon Zoo Entry

LEGEND

Those who enter Washington Park in a car via the South Entry are met with delays and confusing decision points. On busy days in the summer, for $4 Tuesdays at the Oregon Zoo, and for Zoo Lights, Exit 72 backs up and causes delays on Highway 26. Parking lots fill very quickly, and off-site parking lots are regularly used during the summer months, weekends, and during special events and concerts. Lot C is often overlooked, though, and spaces can be found even on busy days while other drives are circling Lots A and B waiting for a parking space to become available.

No Sidewalks Delivery Zone Visitor Drop Off Zone LOT B

Drop Off Zone Multiple Confusing Decision Points

Marquam Tra i l

Drop off zones for each of the venues are insufficient to meet demand. The Oregon Zoo has a system for accommodating school buses with large groups, but often buses will show up unscheduled or will enter the lot from the wrong direction. The visitor drop off zone for the Zoo is situated south of Lot B in front of the newly completed education building, but most visitors do not notice this zone and instead proceed to Lot B and drop guests off in the bus loading zones. The drop off zones for the World Forestry Center and the Portland Children’s Museum require that drivers know to approach SW Knights Blvd in the southbound direction. Drivers have been observed unloading students from the northbound lane which causes delays and is also unsafe for passengers.

OREGON ZOO

Bike Lane Improve Marquam Trail Crossing PORTLAND CHILDREN’S MUSEUM

any on C t

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Challenging Bike Connection Traffic Backup HWY 26

Disorienting Light Rail Entry Underutilized Parking

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Traffic Delay

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Loading zones pose a challenge to delivery drivers. There are two loading zones adjacent to the main Zoo entrance. During the site investigation phases, we observed vehicles traveling against traffic to avoid delays when accessing these zones. Drivers also must back up across busy sidewalks to make deliveries to the Zoo.

30 LAND CIRCULATION

Tr

LOT C

SW Knights Blvd is not wide enough to accommodate bike lanes in both the southbound and northbound direction. A bike lane for northbound cyclists passes through Lots B and C immediately in front of the main entry to the Oregon Zoo. On busy days, the bike lane is frequently blocked by school buses and groups of people. Cyclists choose to avoid conflicts in the parking lots by riding in the automobile lane on SW Knights Blvd.

The Washington Park MAX station is situated between Lots B and C near the World Forest Center and Oregon Zoo. The underground loading platform requires MAX riders choose an elevator at either the east or west end of the plaza. Existing signage at the elevator is often confusing, particularly for MAX riders that choose the elevator at the opposite end of the plaza from their intended destination. TriMet is currently developing plans for upgrades to the loading platform and is working with Explore Washington Park’s board to improve wayfinding in the tunnel.

Ki

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The enlarged map highlights many of the existing conflicts in Washington Park in the South Entry area. Two previously published studies document most of the existing challenges for motor vehicles in the South Entry area, the 2014 “Washington Park Traffic Control Plan”, and the 2009 “How Will You Get Here? Transportation Solutions for Washington Park”.

SW

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VIETNAM WAR MEMORIAL

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Recommended Access Closure Missing Crosswalk 300’ 400’ 200’ 100’ 0’ WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016


Circulation

considerations

SOUTH ENTRY CONGESTION

Near Term • • • • •

The South Entry is a challenge for motorists, bicyclists, and pedestrians. Vehicles frequently back up to Highway 26 on busy days and during events at Washington Park. Bike lanes are incomplete through the conflict zones. Crosswalks are missing through intersections with roadways, and the Marquam Trail and 4T route through the intersection is confusing.

SW KINGSTON DRIVE

• • • • • • •

Develop wayfinding hierarchy for the park including a standardized signage system and map design for the park. Improve Marquam Trail (40-Mile Loop) and 4T Trail crossing of Highway 26. Safely expand paid parking to include on-street parking along SW Fairview. Reduce Washington Park visitor parking on adjacent neighborhood streets through implementation of a parking permit system. Improve conditions for bicycles and pedestrians on SW Kingston Dr. and SW Fairview by adding sidewalks, improved paving, traffic calming, and shared lane markings. Change the Highway 26 exit sign to “Washington Park” rather than displaying only a few of the venues within the park. Reconfigure the South Entry arrival sequence, circulation, and parking to improve wayfinding, efficiency and safety. Enhance intersection configurations near the International Rose Test Garden and Oregon Holocaust Memorial. Improve mode split to reflect the Transportation Management Plan Goals. EWP is currently adding Uber/Lyft/ride share drop-off and pick-up zones to the park. Monitor the success of these zones and continue to shift locations or expand as appropriate. Host Car Free weekends where the internal park roads are closed to motor vehicles. Develop one trail map for the entire park that includes information about topography and trail surface. This map should be available at all venues and information stations within Washington Park.

• •

(allow riders to use the railroad without purchasing a Zoo admission ticket), or by developing a paved trail that uses this corridor. Develop a method of circulating visitors through the park that is a destination in and of itself (i.e., the aerial tram). Make real time parking information available.

Ongoing •

• •

Continue to use technology and encouragement programs to communicate transportation options and parking conditions with visitors prior to their arrival in the park and within the park to encourage active transportation and transit use. Events and seasons drive the peak parking and circulation needs - continue to improve programming by distributing events and expanding the options to utilize off-site parking facilities and mass transit. Park circulation should be a positive part of the visitor experience.

W Burnside

St

Long Term SW Kingston Dr is narrow and unsafe for Washington Park visitors. Motorists use SW Kingston Dr to cut through Washington Park and avoid delays on Highway 26. Cyclists try to avoid paving in poor condition by riding in the opposite lane. There are no sidewalks along SW Kingston Dr and pedestrians frequently walk in the road or along the road where there is space.

WASHINGTON PARK MAX STATION

Due in part to the efforts of Explore Washington Park, the number of visitors who choose to take public transportation, primarily the MAX, to Washington Park increases every year. Improvements are being made to the subterranean loading platforms that will help direct visitors toward the elevators and their destinations. WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016

• • • •

• • • •

Implement improvements recommended in the Washington Park South Entry Vision Study (2012). Improve existing park roads or add parallel facilities to accommodate multiple modes of transportation. Develop a hierarchical trail system with easily identifiable trail heads. Communicate circulation priorities through physical design. In a park setting: ▪▪ the most comfortable mode of visitor travel should be walking, hiking, or strolling; ▪▪ the most efficient way for visitors to travel should be walking, bicycling or taking the free park shuttle; ▪▪ physical design and maintenance priorities should reinforce these modes rather than relying on communication, encouragement, and passive wayfinding signs alone. Explore the use of demand-based parking to inspire mode splits at peak times. Planning for future transportation technology shifts (i.e., driverless cars). Enhance circulation routes to better serve bus traffic and improve coordination of bus visits. Utilize the Zoo Railroad corridor as a connection between the north and south ends of the park either by repairing the tracks and re-opening rail service

RESOLVE CONFLICTS

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Ongoing

CIRCULATION LAND 31


WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016


PEOPLE

WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016

PUBLIC OUTREACH & VISITOR EXPERIENCE RECREATION & CULTURE PARK LANDSCAPES OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE


TAT Natural resources

NOTE: PUBLIC OUTREACH & VISITOR EXPERIENCE Scale all data/references to 20% A DAY IN WASHINGTON PARK

LOGIC Geotech

RMWATER Stormwater&Utilities

AL VIsitor Experience/Recreation

Visitor Stories

Outreach

There are as many ways to use Washington Park as there are visitors each year. The graphic and stories below illustrate a three typical scenarios based on public input as part of this project, Explore Washington Park visitor surveys compiled annually, and project stakeholder interviews.

The team developed an online and intercept survey to gain insight on how the public uses the park and how they perceive the park. Staff spent over 120 hours talking to people in the community about the Washington Park Master Plan Update. Intercept surveys were administered over eight days and asked what people value about the park and what improvements they suggest. Most intercept surveys were done in Washington Park, primarily around the Rose Garden and playgrounds. A team of 2-3 surveyors worked in the following three locations on the following days: • • •

NEIGHBOR (21% of visitors) returns home from work walks dog on 2 mile loop through Hoyt Arboretum

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1400’

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TOURIST (16% of visitors) takes MAX lightrail from bed and breakfast in NE Portland arrives at Washington Park MAX station gets on free Washington Park shuttle gets off shuttle at International Rose Test Garden walks to the Portland Japanese Garden attends a traditional tea ceremony and spends the afternoon strolling the Garden takes shuttle back to Washington Park MAX station

34 PEOPLE PUBLIC OUTREACH & VISITOR EXPERIENCE

Grand Floral Rose Parade (June 11) Washington Park (June 25, July 10, July 16, July 17, July 29) Peninsula Park (July 23 and July 24)

The team created a project website for the Master Plan Update that went live in early June. The site provided a link to an online version of the intercept survey in English, Spanish, Vietnamese and Russian. Parks staff sent an email to a list of 160 addresses, the team sent postcards to 652 addresses collected by PP&R from previous activities related to Washington Park, and 19 local community newspapers and newsletters were contacted. These mailings included a short description of the project and an invitation to participate in the online survey. The email list included individuals and organizations who had been previously or are currently involved in projects at Washington Park. The list also included organizations and individuals who represent underserved communities that rarely or never visit Washington Park. In addition, 5 park banners were hung in the park for 2 weeks to solicit participation in the online survey. The online survey was taken by 523 participants, mostly from their home computers. The team also looked at data collected by Explore Washington Park. Some of their 2015 survey data is illustrated on the following pages. They conduct an annual visitor intercept survey for 4 days in August at six locations representing the major park attractions. Their goal is to identify the “mode split”, or how people travel to the park. The survey also asks where people came from, number of people in the vehicle, parking location, free shuttle use, public transit use, and demographics. In 2015, 867 visitor, 417 employee, and 490 volunteer surveys were collected, giving a snapshot of conditions in the park during peak season. The 2016 data is currently being compiled and will be made available to the team, thought isn’t included in this report.

COMMUTER (41% of visitors) drives from Gresham to Zoo parking lot arrives at the Oregon Zoo with family spends the afternoon walking through the exhibits at the Zoo

WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016


PUBLIC OUTREACH & VISITOR EXPERIENCE

SURVEY FINDINGS - WHO, WHEN, WHAT, WHY NOT?

WHO visits Washington Park?

0.0% 0.0% 29.0% 21.0% 23.0% 20.0% 0.0%

5.0% Other 6.0% 1.0% Hispanic Black 9.0% Asian 79.0% White

65.4%

SUMMER

33.8%

90.0%

34.6% Groups with children under age 7

50.7% Adults

86.0% 68.8% 56.6% 51.6% 48.4% 34.8% 34.2% 23.3% 2.6% 9%

Enjoy nature and be outdoors Visits specific venues Socialize with family and friends Exercise Attend special events, performance, or... Picnic, eat a snack or a meal Be alone Walk my dog (s) Drive through the park Other

Is there another park in the City where you enjoy similar activities?

Visiting Patterns by Day Weekday 21%

25%

20%

12%

12%

49% NO

51% YES

10%

14.7% Groups with children ages 7-17 Explore Washington Park survey data.

10 am 2 pm 6 pm Weekend

Never Every day Once or twice a week Once or twice a month A few times a year

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016

Never

27% 23%

12% 3%

3%

10 am 2 pm 6 pm WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

All Day

32%

WHEN do people visit?

175

WINTER

73.5%

Explore Washington Park survey data.

Under 16 years old 16-24 years old 25-34 years old 35-44 years old 45-59 years old 60-79 years old 80 and over

1.3% 12.3% 19.2% 22.2% 45.0%

When I come to Washington Park, I like to...

SPRING

White Hispanic or Latino Some other Race Asian Black or African American 1.9% American Indian/ Alaskan Native 0.6% Slavic/Eastern European Immigrant 0.4% Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander

FALL

85.3% 6.3% 4.1% 3.7% 3.0%

WHAT do visitors do?

Visiting Patterns by Season

All Day

WHY not visit?

Other Far away Crowded Difficult to get there It’s expensive Doesn’t offer the activities I want It’s dangerous

47.2% 28.8% 27.2% 19.2% 8.8% 4.7% 2.9%

Never 175

PUBLIC OUTREACH & VISITOR EXPERIENCE PEOPLE 35


PUBLIC outreach & visitor experience

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WILDWOOD TRAIL - BURNSIDE

Per the Washington Park Traffic Control Plan prepared by Lancaster for Explore Washington Park (EWP) in June 2014, the majority of park visitors arrive via Highway 26 or SW Canyon Court and enter traveling northbound on SW Knights Boulevard. EWP staff estimated as many as 90% of vehicles enter the site from this direction.

WILDWOOD TRAIL - FAIRVIEW

SW FISCHER LN 78.0%

18.0%

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1.0%

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3.0% Explore Washington Park survey data.

Drive Transit Walk Bike

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16.0%

S W Rose Garden Way

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of respondents arrive SW PARK PL via City Park and Rose Garden SW Park Pl

SW

21.0% 5.0%

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HOW do visitors arrive?

Drive Transit Walk Bike

38%

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The following data was collected from August 24-28, 2016 by Quality Counts, LLC. LOCATION

TRAFFIC DIRECTION AVERAGE WEEKDAY TRAFFIC

SW Kingston Ave - North

Northbound and Southbound

1,486 vehicles per day

1,584 vehicles per day

SW Knights Blvd at Park Boundary, south of SW Fairview Blvd

Northbound and Southbound

982 vehicles per day

1,205 vehicles per day

SW Park Pl at Park Boundary

Eastbound and Westbound

3,407 vehicles per day

3,490 vehicles per day

SW Wright Ave between Park Pl and SW Rose Garden Way

Eastbound and Westbound

817 vehicles per day

1,089 vehicles per day

South Entry

Northbound and Southbound

6,549 vehicles per day

8,422 vehicles per day

36 PEOPLE PUBLIC outreach & visitor experience

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AVERAGE WEEKEND TRAFFIC

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40% SOUTH ENTRY

of respondents arrive via South Entry

2800’ 1400’ 700’ 350’ 0’ WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016


public outreach & visitor experience

Stakeholder perspectives

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Perspectives on Washington Park SW Kingston Ave

I have visited the following places...

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Parking - This is the limiting factor during peak times – summer, concerts, events. The Oregon Zoo’s events and visitors dominate the available parking, limiting visitor attendance and events at the other venues at the South Entry. Eliminate/ reduce surface parking by constructing a garage – on or off site. Difficulty with parking is one of the major reasons people don’t visit the park.

INTERNATIONAL ROSE TEST GARDEN

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A total of 17 stakeholder interviews were held with individuals who represented different interests, and have a personal relationship, in the park. They represented venues, ran training/education programs, or brought cultural events to the park. Everyone interviewed mentioned the uniqueness and importance of this beautiful natural resource within a short distance of downtown Portland. One person called it an economic driver for the city, and one compared it to Central Park in New York City. They recognize it as a horticultural gem. It offers something for everyone, and adds to the quality of life in the City of Portland. Major themes were:

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Multi-modal Travel - Improve travel to and through the park for bicyclists and pedestrians. Provide continuous sidewalks or trails and crosswalks and consistent wayfinding signage. Continue to improve shuttle frequency within the park. Develop a park and ride concept that shuttles people to the park. Encourage increased use of MAX, including looking at family fares. Think about how people will access the park in the future.

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Branding - A unifying factor for the park and venues is if they all focus on conservation/preservation – cultural, habitat and education. Create an inclusive sense of place within the park that includes all the venues. Think of the park as Portland’s backyard; it is one of the most visited parks. Recreation of our bodies, mind and spirits, and connecting with nature, in many forms, are common themes.

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Amenities - Improve the Amphitheater with a shell covering, a backstage area, enlarged stage and some formal seating for more musical offerings. Improve the archery range with an ADA path from the parking lot, improved drainage, and a covered firing range for archery competitions. Improve and provide more restrooms and picnic areas/shelters at the Rose Garden and Lewis & Clark Circle. Add a winter garden. Maintain iconic and historic views. Provide more dining opportunities, especially in the area near the International Rose Test Garden.

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ARCHERY RANGE

Recreation - Evaluate present recreational activities to see what needs improvement or additions, and if any can be eliminated or moved elsewhere in the park or off‐site.

WORLD FORESTRY CENTER

Operations and Maintenance - Determine and fund staffing needs to maintain the park – horticultural, natural areas, Hoyt Arboretum, maintenance and enforcement; and needed infrastructure improvements – roads, drainage, sewage, water, trails. Safety - Additional enforcement is needed to ensure staff and visitor safety. Visibility of Park Rangers is a positive. Resiliency and emergency planning is needed.

VENUE USAGE PORTLAND CHILDREN’S MUSEUM

Several times a year

OREGON ZOO

Once a year Less than once a year

26 S. Hwy

U.

Never

WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016

2800’

1400’

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Public Outreach & visitor experience PEOPLE 37


RECREATION & CULTURE

FACILITIES & AMENITIES

Amenities

Drinking Fountains (14): Clustered around the International Rose Test Garden and the Hoyt Arboretum Visitor Center.

Food Services (3): Washington Park offers only three food service options. Two of these three options provide a dining experience: the Cascade Grill at the Oregon Zoo, which offers soups, burgers, and salads; and the Cafe at the Portland Children’s Museum, which offers a similar variety of soups, salads, and sandwiches. The rest of the park is serviced by a food cart near the International Rose Test Garden that offers hot dogs, snacks, and drinks. Restrooms (7): The public restrooms are condensed at the east and west ends of the park. The Rose Garden/Concessions and Rose Garden Restrooms & Curator’s Office are open from April to October and the remaining restrooms are open all year round. Rental Opportunity(4): There are two in the Hoyt Arboretum and two at the east end of the park. The locations offer opportunities for gatherings and weddings. Picnic Areas (6): The picnic areas contain multiple picnic tables and can be reserved.

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Visitor Information (2): Located at the Hoyt Arboretum and at the east end of the Max Station.

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FACILITIES & AMENITIES

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Soccer Fields (1): This facility is the only one of it’s kind in the park, yet it is rarely used. This area is very isolated and underdeveloped, and has poor surface quality with low recreational value. Tennis Courts (6): These courts are heavily used by many organizations including; Portland Interscholastic League, Skyhawks youth tennis, Lincoln High School, among others. One is being used for construction staging for the Portland Japanese Garden. City Park Playground (1): This aging playground has a low recreational value with outdated equipment and design. It is closed because of lead paint hazard. Children’s Playground (1): When constructed it was the premiere playground of its kind, but has now become antiquated as design philosophies and materials have advanced. Archery Range (1): The newly improved archery range is heavily used, especially on weekends. It is a unique facility in that it is the only public outdoor range in the county.

Facilities Tennis Courts Soccer Field Playground Archery Range

Trail

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Venues Washington Park Hoyt Arboretum Oregon Zoo World Forestry Center

Portland Children’s Museum Portland Japanese Garden

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International Rose Test Garden

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Rental Opportunity Picnic Area

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Facilities •

Visitor Information Drinking Fountain

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The review broadly examines recreation conditions, opportunities, additive amenities and the Park’s ability to continue to serve as a regional destination and local park for the surrounding neighborhood. The recreational amenities are diverse in both typology, character and scale. Their distribution through the landscape is a defining characteristic of Washington Park and may also be one of the factors which leads many visitors to be confused with park boundaries and park identity.

SW Kingston Ave

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1400’

700’

350’

0’

WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016


PORTLAND JAPANESE GARDEN

RECREATION & CULTURE

INTERNATIONAL ROSE TEST GARDEN

FACILITIES & AMENITIES

Considerations Near Term • • 1962 | 5.5 acres The Portland Japanese Garden, designed by Professor Takuma Tono, is world renowned for its subtleness, natural beauty, moderation and human scale. The garden is composed of five distinct garden styles; the Flat Garden, Strolling Pond Garden, Tea Garden, Natural Garden, and Sand and Stone Garden.

1917 | 5.12 acres The International Rose Test Garden is a major international attraction, created as a safe haven for many hybrid roses during WWI. The scientific rose testing continues today with new hybrid varieties in the main garden, a Miniature Rose Test Garden and the Shakespeare Rose Test Garden.

PORTLAND CHILDREN’S MUSEUM

WORLD FORESTRY CENTER

2001 The Portland Children’s Museum took over the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) building to expand their programs and develop an outdoor adventure exhibit. The museum offers many programs and exhibits that promote exploration and learning.

1971 The World Forestry Center was inspired by the Lewis and Clark Exposition, showcasing the timber industry, and now educates the general public about local and global forests. It operates three programs; the Forest Discovery Center Museum, demonstration tree farms, and the World Forest Institute.

OREGON ZOO

HOYT ARBORETUM

Long Term •

• 1888 | 64 acres The Oregon Zoo started by Richard Knight with the grizzly bear exhibit in City Park was the impetus of the world-class center for wildlife preservation and field research. The zoo is comprised of five major exhibit areas: Great Northwest, Fragile Forests, Asia, Pacific Shores and Africa. WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016

1922 | 214 acres Hoyt Arboretum’s landscape is planned to create both a sense of unity and mystery, alternating open meadows and groves of trees, all appearing relatively natural. At the same time, the trees are presented in taxonomically organized groups, surrounded by other members of their same genus family.

Physical design should actively address Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design CPTED especially in parking areas Programming, picnicking, and organized gatherings are key activities within the park. Expanded opportunities for covered space picnic area or rentable zones could expand the opportunity for events and provide revenue. Explore options to add these amenities at sites near the Archery Range, Rose Garden Concessions, and Children’s Playground. Consider utilizing technology to enhance visitor experience like adding wifi hot spots in key locations. The tennis courts location and quantity should be studied further to address the need. The City Park playground contains led paint and is going to be closed. Consider designing a neighborhood playground using contemporary strategies like nature play. Evolving usage patterns including extended stays, multi-modal transit, and Portland’s culinary reputation have influenced the need/opportunity for expanded services. • Food and beverage services could improve/diversify the experience, expand the opportunity for rental income, and support extended visits. • Extended visits require restrooms; the Rose Garden area needs additional capacity to fill current and future needs. • Lack of cover from extreme weather – provide shelter at key gathering points • Add drinking fountains throughout the park. Washington Park is a regional destination and a neighborhood park. Achieving a balance between serving the smaller scale needs and international tourism needs to be achieved. Balancing the investment in the everyday amenities with venue-based tourism will need to be accomplished. Under-utilized areas of the park offer more opportunities for added recreation or redistribution of activities. Explore improved use of the front of the archery range, the soccer fields, meadow along Kingston, and parking at the International Rose Test Garden. Play spaces are limited in their distribution and appropriateness due to age or quality. Add play areas that engage on multiple levels such as nature-play, inclusive-play and traditional play spaces. Consider the addition of a low-key play area in the Hoyt Arboretum. The Children’s Playground is in a prime location and should be enhanced to become the premiere playground it once was. Consider offering inclusive, creative, and more challenging play opportunities.

Ongoing •

The cleanliness and quantity of restrooms needs improvement to service the entire park.

RECREATION & CULTURE PEOPLE 39


RECREATION AND CULTURE

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Washington Park has commanding views to the surrounding mountains and cityscape. The original park was laid out to align select view corridors with Mt. Hood and subsequent development also keyed on iconic mountain views. Now as trees continue to grow the view corridors have been eclipsed or are threatened with blockage. The views marked are currently unprotected by Economic, Social, Environmental and Energy policy. 1. Mt. St. Helens - view from the Overlook trail is an iconic and historic view where many locals viewed and took photos of the eruption. There is currently educational signage related to Mt. St. Helens at this view point. 2. Hoyt Arboretum - view off of the Overlook trail provides an open expanse towards the south overlooking the Arboretum and hills to the west and south. 3. SW Kingston Drive - scenic resource that winds through the park revealing internal and city/Mt. Hood views. The turnouts along Kingston provide the opportunity to restore some of the historic internal and city views. 4. Coming of the White Man - historic view from the statue with north eastern views of the city. This view has been diminished as vegetation has grown. 40 PEOPLE RECREATION & CULTURE

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Memorials and Public Art Washington Park is home to eight memorials and public art works that enrich the cultural landscape and have become destinations themselves. A. Loyal B. Stearns Memorial Fountain - honors the former Oregon judge. B. Coming of the White Man (1904) - Bronze sculpture by H.A. MacNeil depicts Chief Multnomah. C. Oregon Holocaust Memorial (2004) - commemorates the people who died in the WWII Holocaust who have surviving relatives in our region. D. Chiming Fountain - Renaissance fountain central to the historic City Park. E. Sacajawea and Jean-Baptiste (1905) - The bronze sculpture by Alice Cooper honors the Shoshone Native American who guided the Lewis and Clark expedition. F. Lewis & Clark Memorial - honors the discovery of the Northwest. G. Frank E. Beach Memorial Fountain - water sculpture, designed and built by local Oregon artist Lee Kelly. H. Vietnam Veterans of Oregon Memorial (1987) - honors the Oregon residents who died in Vietnam or are missing-in-action.

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WASHINGTON PARK AMPHITHEATER

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The Washington Park Amphitheater has been more actively used in the past than it is today with concerts, cultural events and even touring national shows. Currently it is used for the Washington Park Summer Festival, which presents a variety of nightly concerts free to the thousands who attend, from local musicians to international opera singers. The capacity is between 3,0004,000. It is also available as one of PP&R’s larger venue rentals, and is used for wedding receptions and other private events. The tiered grass amphitheater, next to the International Rose Test Garden, provides a unique and beautiful setting for families to picnic and enjoy music outdoors. Oregon Zoo Concert Lawn: In 1979 the Oregon Zoo began hosting summer concert events which has become a major draw to Washington Park. They host fifteen shows, seating 4,000 people between June and September, showcasing world-renowned artists.

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RECREATION - CULTURE Event Space

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OREGON ZOO CONCERT LAWN

Statue/Memorial View

2800’ 1400’ 700’ 350’ 0’ WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016


A. STEARNS MEMORIAL FOUNTAIN

B. COMING OF THE WHITE MAN

C. HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL

D. CHIMING FOUNTAIN

recreation and culture

culture

Considerations Near Term •

1941 | Artist: Roi Morin Fountain constructed to honor Loyal B. Stearns, an influential Oregon Judge.

F. LEWIS & CLARK MEMORIAL

1904 | Hermon Atkins MacNeil Statue donated by David P. Thompson features two native Americans looking off to the east. The older of the two is Chief Multnomah.

G. FRANK E BEACH MEMORIAL FOUNTAIN

2004 | Atlas Landscape Architects Memorial that simulates a town square with dispersed bronze everyday objects. Names of the people who died in the six killing centers are engraved on the cobble stone wall.

1891 | Hans Staehli Named because of the sound the water made when falling, the renaissance fountain originally had a statue of a boy carrying a staff, but was damaged in the 20’s.

E. SACAJAWEA

H. VIETNAM VETERANS OF OREGON MEMORIAL

Long Term •

1903 | Dedicated by Theodore Roosevelt The memorial column was built for the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition to highlight the explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark.

1975 | Lee Kelly A memorial to Frank E. Beach, a prominent business man of the early 20th century, who is said to have invented the Rose Festival.

1905 | Alice Cooper Bronze Statue unveiled for the 1905 Lewis & Clark Exposition depicts the infamous Native American woman who helped guide the Lewis and Clark Expedition through the mountain pass.

1987 | Walker Macy Memorial that highlights the Oregon residents who died in Vietnam or who are missing in action. It includes a symbolic bosque of pear trees, water element and a circular passage.

Tree growth continues to reshape the view sheds from the park to the surrounding mountain and city landscapes. Evaluate the re-opening of key iconic views originally arranged in the City Park and Rose Garden development. Specific views of Mt. Hood from the Rose Garden concessions area are in danger of being lost and others have already been eclipsed.

A balance should be explored to determine the benefit of restoring or protecting views at the cost of managing the associated vegetation. Areas of high habitat value should be protected and alternative view corridors should be explored when possible. At the amphitheater a full enclosure concert shell would be a benefit acoustically and address sunlight and rain impacts on sensitive and expensive instruments, and would allow for lighting and nighttime shows. A modest, but professional backstage arrangement for performers, with a restroom, would be desirable. Future park plans should consider an approach to preserving, enhancing and expanding existing recreational opportunities by acknowledging the current needs, burgeoning trends and retaining flexibility for adaptation. Key input from the community, defined needs and acknowledged patterns establish a set of opportunities for the park’s continued evolution. Passive and active recreation pursuits can be thoughtfully co-mingled to maintain a diversity of appeal and patronage.

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AMPHITHEATER

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Oregon Zoo - near elephant habitat The concert lawn host fifteen events during the summer concert series. It seats 4,000 people.

North of Rose Garden The amphitheater hosts many summer concerts and weddings and is heavily used especially during the summer park festival. It seats 3,000-4,000 people.

WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016

Hoyt Arboretum | Looking North West Off of the Wildwood trail there is a clear view of Mt. St. Helens with educational signage.

SW Kingston Dr | Looking North West Historic views along Kingston opened up to the city skyline and Mt. Hood.

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CREATE & LINK RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES U.S

Long Term

Ongoing

RECREATION & CULTURE PEOPLE 41


RECREATION & CULTURE

TRAILS

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There is no multi-use pathway or trail that extends the length of the entire park. Currently there are no opportunities for cyclists to ride without sharing the road with vehicles. Hiking trails, and the MAC trail is a prominent example, become maintenance roads or rely on narrow connections that parallel park roads. These conditions are not safe for trail users of all ages and abilities and limit the experience for families and those with mobility challenges. There are no opportunities for looped hikes in the northern portion of Washington Park. One or two easy to follow loops would ease some of the burden on the more popular areas of the park. It may also reduce the dependency park users have on their cars once they enter the park. There is a gap in the paved accessible trail network between the Hoyt Arboretum Visitor’s Center and the Bristlecone Pine Trail. The Overlook Trail is paved from the MAX station to the Arboretum, but due to steep slopes a route to connect the Overlook Trail and Bristlecone Pine Trail has not been identified. There are no paved accessible trails in the northern portion of Washington Park. Upgrades to the accessibility of the Rose Garden are underway, but the sidewalk to the nearby accessible Children’s Playground is narrow and steep. There are missing crosswalks at trail roadway crossings. PP&R has been filling in the gaps, and most of the intersections are signed, but there are a few missing crosswalks or crossings where curb ramps are missing. Visible crossings improve safety for trail users, but also heighten the visibility of the trail system for all park visitors. Missing curb ramps create barriers for trail users who rely on mobility devices. Trailheads are often absent in visible locations such as road crossings or near parking areas. Maps and information about trail condition including slope, terrain, and distance to any obstacles should be available at every trailhead. Clearly marked parking at trailheads will encourage dispersed use of the trail network.

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Trail connectivity in Washington Park is excellent if the intended goal is to spend a day hiking and observing nature. However, if the goal is to provide a network between the individual venues and amenities within Washington Park and to provide experiences for trail users of all ages and abilities, there are several gaps.

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There are just over 15 miles of trails within Washington park. Except for old roadbeds in Stearns Canyon (SW Stearns Dr) and SW Madison Ct which are now both closed to vehicles and function as paved bicycle, walking, and skating trails, and the Bristlecone Pine and Overlook trails which are hard surface trails, all the trails are soft surface hiking trails. Most of these hiking trails, approximately 12 miles, are within Hoyt Arboretum. Intercept survey results, conducted as part of the Technical Investigation, indicated that most park users who regularly visit Washington Park use the trails for hiking, birding, looking at nature, escaping the city, and running. PP&R’s Parks 2020 Vision (2001) noted that trails are Portland’s most popular recreation resource.

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RECREATION - TRAILS Regional Trail - 40 Mile Loop 1/4-Mile Marker Soft Surface Trail - Ped. Only Accessible Paved Trail Paved - Sidewalk 4T Tra il

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42 PEOPLE RECREATION & CULTURE

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WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016


RECREATION & CULTURE 1. BUILT Historical/landuse/structural

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Trails within the Hoyt Arboretum are typically in Fair to Good condition and are maintained by Hoyt Arboretum staff and volunteer crews.

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There is no obvious hierarchy in the current trail network. Even visitors who frequently use the trails in Washington Park reported occasionally getting lost or disoriented. New trail wayfinding signs were recently installed in the Hoyt Arboretum, and beyond trail names, also include destinations such as the Hoyt Arboretum Visitor’s Center. Most of the trail intersections along the Wildwood Trail and MAC trail include at least directional information and the names of intersecting trails. The 4 T Trail includes pavement markers and directional signs between the MAX station and Highway 26 crossing within the park. However, beyond signs, it should be more intuitive which trails are major connectors between destinations and park entrances and which trails are more minor spurs or recreational routes.

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TRAIL CONDITIONS Fair Condition Poor Condition Needs Improvement Regional Trail - 40 Mile Loop

The 40-Mile Loop regional trail route is challenging to follow. At the north end of the park, where the Wildwood Trail crosses West Burnside from Forest Park into Washington Park, walkers and runners must negotiate crossing a major arterial without the benefit of a crosswalk or signal. The Portland Parks Foundation is fundraising for a pedestrian bridge that will provide a safe crossing. At the southern entrance, crossing Highway 26 on the Marquam Trail requires walking on the shoulder of the on-ramp and crossing three unmarked intersections.

1/4-Mile Marker Soft Surface Trail- Ped. Only Accessible Paved Trail Paved - Sidewalk 4T Tra il

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WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016

4. GEOLOGIC Geotech

Wildwood Trail – milepost 0 to just north of milepost 3 at the intersection with W Burnside • Marquam Trail – Wildwood trail to SW Canyon Court • MAC Trail – Wildwood trail to the service road just east of the Rose Garden • Fairview Trail – between SW Fairview Blvd and the Japanese Garden Trail • Portland Japanese Garden Trail – Fairview Trail to the Wildwood trail • Cloud Forest Trails – network of unnamed trails above W Burnside The majority of the trails are in Good condition. Trails found to be in Fair or Poor condition are noted on the Trail Conditions map.

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3. HABITAT Natural resources

All of the trails within Washington Park Stormwater&Utilities were designed and are maintained to 5. STORMWATER meet PP&R’s Trail Design Guidelines (2009). Natural or soft surface trails are 6. SOCIAL VIsitor Experience/Recreation constantly changing and are typically constructed and maintained to a set of guidelines developed from best practices rather than strict design standards. PP&R’s Soft Surface Trails staff recently completed an assessment of all of the trails in Washington Park outside of Hoyt Arboretum. Each segment of trail assessed was given a rating of Poor, Fair, or Good. Sections of trail that are in Poor condition typically have multiple items that are out of compliance with PP&R’s standards and in a condition that is currently unsustainable. Trail segments that are rated in Fair condition require maintenance and will continue to degrade, but may not require immediate attention. Good condition means that the trail segment is in compliance and does not have any immediate maintenance needs. The assessment was completed for the following trails:

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RECREATION & CULTURE PEOPLE 43


RECREATION & CULTURE

TRAILS

Trail Counts # OF PEDESTRIANS 16,000 # OF PEDESTRIANS

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16,000 14,000 14,000 12,000

Upper Madison Trail Upper Wildwood Madison at MAC Trail Wildwood at MAC

12,000 10,000 10,000 8,000 8,000 6,000

Explore Washington Park highlights the recommended walking route between the Washington Park MAX station and the Rose Garden in online and printed materials, but without the map available the route can be challenging to follow and includes five different named trails that roughly parallel SW Kingston Dr.

Hoyt Arboretum advertises four hikes of varying duration and challenge levels on printed maps. Each of these loops combines portions of different named trails, and the newly installed wayfinding signs do not reinforce the routes recommended on printed maps, so visitors need to keep the printed map available to refer to at trail junctions.

WAYFINDING SIGNS

6,000 4,000 4,000 2,000

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Rose Upper GardenMadison Pedestrian TrailTrail Upper Madison Trail

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Add a paved shared use pathway that parallels SW Kingston Dr. Develop a paved accessible trail in the northern end of Washington Park. Improve the MAC trail connection between the Children’s Playground and Rose Garden area. Bridge the crossing of West Burnside for the 40-Mile Loop Trail (Wildwood Trail) to provide safe trail access for park users. Reroute the 4 T Trail to follow the Marquam Trail within Washington Park and improve the Marquam Trail crossing of Highway 26.

Explore Washington Park installed automated trail counters in 2014. Trail counts provide valuable information about how many people use individual trails and help to prioritize improvements. The counts are particularly valuable to demonstrate changes in user numbers based on trail conditions. For instance, if a bridge is closed, counts may drop; conversely if a key improvement is made that closes a gap in the trail network, counts may increase. Trail counts are also collected by Metro annually and used to obtain not just individual project funding, but region-wide federal funding. Because Explore Washington Park’s primary focus is transportation, downloading the data and calibrating the counters has been a low priority. During interviews with project stakeholders, it was suggested that transferring the responsibility of monitoring and calibrating the counters to PP&R’s Soft Surface Trail staff may be more appropriate.

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44 PEOPLE RECREATION & CULTURE

• • •

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Trail Wayfinding Signs Two examples of typical wayfinding signs at a trail junction in Washington Park. Signs like the example on the left provide more information for park visitors at each junction than the example on the right.

Stearns Canyon

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August August 20152015

July 2014 July 2014

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Sign and stripe all trail roadway crossings within the Park. Install curb ramps where applicable. Implement a wayfinding sign plan for the entire Washington Park trail network and upgrade trailheads to improve the trail user experience. Improve the condition of the MAC Trail by implementing re-routes to reduce the trail slope, trimming vegetation to open up the trail corridor, and repairing damaged structures. Transfer responsibility of trail counts and trail counters to PP&R Soft Surface Trails team.

Complete a paved accessible trail between the Overlook Trail and Bristlecone Pine Trail in Hoyt Arboretum. Implement trail hierarchy improvements for the 40-Mile Loop and the trail connection between the MAX station and Rose Garden so these two trail connections can be clearly followed by Park visitors even without the aid of a map.

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WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

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PARK LANDSCAPES

CONTEXT

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Park landscape areas within Washington Park serve a variety of functions: • Habitat for wildlife and pollinators • Stormwater filter • Air purification for the dense urban area • Special plant collections to showcase unique species • Recreation areas for hiking/trail running/walking • Observation of wildlife • Laboratories for outdoor learning and ecological function Washington Park is part of a larger system of natural areas that have been strategically acquired by PP&R. Specifically, the park is part of the Westside Wildlife Corridor that connects Forest Park to Tryon Creek State Natural Area. This corridor forms the backdrop of forest for Portland’s skyline. The Westside Wildlife Corridor is a target area for land acquisition with goals of creating a continuous wildlife migration corridor from Forest Park south along the west hills, providing neighborhood access to trails, and protecting headwater streams. While it is not a regional target, acquiring properties within the corridor is a priority for PP&R.

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Landscape Areas Within Washington Park, there are roughly four broad landscape types: Special Collections – Three special collections, Hoyt Arboretum, the International Rose Test Garden, and the Portland Japanese Garden have designated maintenance staff. The Portland Japanese Garden is managed independently on land leased from PP&R. • Developed Areas – In developed areas of the original City Park, the parking lots at the South Entry, and areas adjacent to SW Kingston Dr., PP&R staff are continuing to refine Best Management Practices (BMPs) to increase soil and plant health and minimize water consumption, fertilizers, herbicides, and labor needs per the Ecologically Sustainable Landscape Initiative (2015). In recent years, some areas have been converted from traditional planted beds to pollinator gardens. Areas immediately adjacent to Park entries, entry drives, memorials, and immediately adjacent to the International Rose Test Garden are the highest priority. Landscape areas along paths between popular areas and areas that will draw visitors out of the International Rose Test Garden are the next highest priority, and shrubs in non-irrigated areas with popular trails (Stearns Canyon) are a lower priority. • Natural Areas – Forested areas north and south of SW Kingston Dr. More visible natural areas, such as those immediately adjacent to popular trails, receive the most maintenance attention. Most of the focus is on removal of invasive species and removal of snags and branches that pose a hazard. • Hybrid Areas – The Vietnam Veterans of Oregon Memorial is jointly managed by PP&R natural areas team and the park lands team that maintains the developed areas of Washington Park. Both the natural areas and developed areas included tracts of mown grass. In some cases, these grass areas are maintained as a prairie and allowed to grow taller to provide habitat for ground birds and only mowed one to two times per year to suppress fire danger. The other grass areas used for recreation, such as the Archery Range or the Soccer Field, or for leisure, such as the areas adjacent to

FAIRVIEW 405

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46 PEOPLE PARK LANDSCAPES

BEAVERTON

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PORTLAND CITY LIMITS

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WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016


PARK LANDSCAPES

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picnic areas, are mowed regularly and may be irrigated. Efforts are made in these areas to keep the canopy open to allow solar penetration for the health of the turf below. 1. BUILT Historical/landuse/structural

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Natural areas maintenance is prioritized based on a combination of ecological (Poor/Severely Degraded, Fair, Healthy/Good) and natural resource function (Low, Medium, High). This information was obtained from the Natural 5. STORMWATER Stormwater&Utilities Resource Restoration Plan (PP&R, updated March 2015). Overall, the natural areas within Washington Park are currently classified as “Fair” overall. Because the 6. SOCIAL VIsitor Experience/Recreation natural resource function and value is rated “Low” due in part to being part of a larger hybrid park landscape, few resources are currently devoted to improving the ecological health of these natural areas.

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WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016

1400’

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In addition to keeping high priority areas in excellent condition, there are opportunities of focus within both the natural and developed areas of Washington Park. In natural areas, isolated patches of landscape in “Poor” or “Severely Degraded” ecological health should be improved. Several of these areas are in high visibility locations and restoration could provide an interpretive opportunity. In the developed areas, ecological health can be improved by continuing to increase the native vegetation and biological diversity of understory plantings, establishing new pollinator gardens, and communicating both the condition of the landscape and PP&R’s strategies for improving BMPs to the public to increase social acceptance. Efforts such as the “Himalayan Cloud Forest” near the Bear House, an area formerly overgrown with English Ivy and Holly and now a Rhododendron species display garden, can be expanded to adjacent areas of the park. Areas currently maintained as mowed lawn near the archer range and train tracks along SW Kingston Dr. could be converted to meadow display gardens. PARK LANDSCAPES PEOPLE 47


PARK LANDSCAPES

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Continue refining BMPs for landscape areas and communicate these BMPs to the public. Establish pollinator gardens. Refine lists of successful plants for use in park landscapes.

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Convert underutilized developed areas to habitat patches by restoring understory plantings. Improve the condition of “Poor” and “Severely Degraded” natural areas by diversifying plantings and by removing invasive vines.

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Complete the ecological inventory of the park and develop a vegetation management plan. Convert mown turf areas adjacent to the archery range and below the International Rose Test Garden to prairie landscapes that are less intensively maintained.

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WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016


OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE

PERSONNEL & FACILITIES Staff

Landscape Maintenance

Washington Park includes developed areas, natural areas, areas of special plant collections, and areas leased from PP&R and maintained by others. Generally, maintenance is underfunded and understaffed within PP&R, and Washington Park is no exception. Staff from three different departments work together to maintain Washington Park. A staff of 28 full time employees (FTEs) in the Parklands division maintain and manage developed areas for both Washington Park and other parks in Downtown Portland. Six of these FTEs are designated to Washington Park, mostly within the International Rose Test Garden. The Parklands team for Downtown parks is based in Washington Park just east of the Soccer Field. Thirteen FTEs, 3.5 dedicated solely to Hoyt Arboretum and the natural areas in Washington Park, work for Natural Areas and split their time between Washington Park and LAND STEWARDSHIP other natural areas in West Portland. The Parklands and Natural Areas staff work together to maintain the Vietnam Veterans of Oregon Memorial, and both groups report this strategy is working well. There are two FTEs dedicated to working on soft surface trails for PP&R, and while these employees are based at the Hoyt WESTSIDE MANAGER Arboretum, they spend very little timeLANDS devoted to the trails in Washington Park.

In some areas of the park, particularly the natural areas immediately adjacent to SW Kingston Dr, it is unclear which crews should take the lead on maintenance and what the desired end condition is. As discussed in the Park Landscape section, the natural areas of Washington Park are not currently a high priority for PP&R. There are no fish bearing streams within the park, and the natural areas are incongruous and score low in terms of natural resource function. In addition, there is no vegetation management plan for Washington Park. Such a plan would outline the desired end condition and areas of focus, and help provide guidance for maintenance staff as well as measurable goals and time frames for completing the goals. Natural Areas crews priorities are guided by the Natural Areas Restoration Plan (2010, updated 2015) with a goal of improving ecological health while acknowledging limited staff resources.

Maintenance Staff Organization LAND STEWARDSHIP NATURAL AREAS

PARKLANDS

WESTSIDE LANDS MANAGER SOFT SURFACE TRAILS

NATURAL AREAS

PARKLANDS

SOFT SURFACE TRAILS

Maintenance Staffing

Natural Areas Parkland

STAFF BASED IN STAFF DEDICATED IDEAL NUMBER OF WASHINGTON TO WASHINGTON STAFF DEDICATED TO WASHINGTON PARK PARK PARK 13 3.5 5.5-6, including a dedicated ecologist for West Side

8 - 10, including a permanent arborist STAFF BASED IN STAFF DEDICATED IDEAL NUMBER OF Soft Surface WASHINGTON 2 0 — STAFF DEDICATED TO TO WASHINGTON Trails WASHINGTON PARK PARK PARK Natural 13 3.5 5.5-6, including a Areas dedicated ecologist for West Side 50 PEOPLE OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE Parkland

28

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Parklands maintenance priorities within the developed areas of the park differ from the Natural Areas priorities. Parklands manages the developed lands using the following priorities, ranked from highest to lowest: • Type A – areas that should always look nice (park entries, entry drives, memorials, Rose Garden). • Type B – areas that are along paths between popular areas, and areas that will draw visitors out of the Rose Garden. • Type C – shrubs in non-irrigation areas with popular trails; focus on maintaining older plantings (areas below the Rose Garden, adjacent to the MAC trail, SW Madison Ct, Stearns Canyon). • Type D – focus on managing invasive plants along park roads; this work is often done with inmate work crews and large volunteer groups. While areas designated as Type A have dedicated staff and are touched several times per week, daily in some cases, areas designated as Type D may be touched once per year or less. Instead of being able to make headway on creating meaningful landscape nodes that are high functioning, staff is at best able to keep invasive plants from spreading further and choking out existing native vegetation. There is no master plan for Washington Park plantings. Horticultural staff works with an annual plant material budget of $2,000, and relies heavily on donations of plant materials. The primary focuses for plantings in developed areas are: • • • • • • •

Reducing maintenance requirements Blooming plants that encourage pollinators Experimenting with plants that will work well in all Portland Parks Woody plants – ferns, natural plantings, some natives Natural-looking plants, beyond just natives Layering groundcovers and shrubs More blooms – expand the range of blooms beyond just spring and increase interest in areas beyond the International Rose Test Garden

Hardscape and Infrastructure

In addition to the landscape areas, Parklands staff is responsible for maintaining PP&R-owned paved areas (primarily roads and sidewalks), play equipment, lighting, irrigation and drinking fountains, trash collection, and other facilities. In recent years, the amount of garbage collected in the downtown parks has more than doubled due to food cart waste and a larger homeless population, and this

increase in garbage has impacted the amount of staff time and PP&R expense associated with waste removal. Most infrastructure within Washington Park is aging and nearing the end of (or past the end of, in some cases) its functional life. Irrigation systems and underground utilities are particularly problematic. The irrigation within the Rose Garden constantly leaks, and the result is frequent flooding in the base of the amphitheater. There are other areas where underground pipes leak and result in swampy seeps. Refer to the Stormwater & Utilities section for further discussion. Finally, PP&R roads within Washington Park are in poor condition. The sub-bases are poor and were never designed to carry the volume or weight of vehicles using the park today. Typically, road maintenance is contracted out to private crews. The only area within Washington Park that has been re-built is a small area near the Oregon Holocaust Memorial.

Buildings and Outdoor Storage Several buildings and outdoor storage areas are dispersed throughout Washington Park. Parklands maintenance staff are based in the Westside Maintenance building (43,600 sf ) and yard adjacent to the Soccer Field just east of Sherwood Boulevard. A feasibility study was completed in 2006 that recommended an expansion to 62,400 square feet. Based on review of this study and interviews with staff, current facility needs, and challenges are: • • • • • •

Staff parking need exceeds the available space. Grounds lack an equipment washing station, greenhouse, adequate desk space, and changing facilities. No direct access to downtown without driving through Washington Park. There is a lack of a sufficient back-up generator and frequent power outages in the building. Outdoor storage extends beyond the limit of the existing fence. Site drainage is an ongoing challenge.

Natural resources maintenance staff and Hoyt Arboretum staff share space in the Hoyt Arboretum Visitor Center on Fairview Blvd. The number of crew vehicles parked at the facility exceeds the capacity of the storage yard and vehicles occupy paid parking space in the Visitor Center lot during the day. Desk space is beyond capacity and there is no designated meeting room on-site. Natural Areas and Hoyt crews also utilize remote outdoor storage areas dispersed throughout the Arboretum and have an area for mulch and vegetation debris just south of Fischer Lane. Additional buildings in the park are utilized for maintenance storage including: • • • • •

The Bear House Restrooms near the Oregon Holocaust Memorial Rose Garden curator’s office – formerly used as a restroom Small sheds near the Rose Garden and tennis courts Train Station building above the Rose Garden

WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016


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OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE PEOPLE 51


WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

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CONSIDERATIONS issues & Opportunities

WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016


CONSIDERATIONS

CONCLUSIONS

The results of the technical investigation and public outreach have clarified the issues that need to be addressed in the Washington Park Master Plan Update. Three of those issues emerged as overarching: Identity, Circulation and Visitor Experience. They are briefly summarized here and are supported by all the near term, long term and ongoing considerations and diagrams which are consolidated in this final section. They will be referenced and addressed throughout the next phase of planning.

CITY PARK & GARDENS

The three accompanying graphics speak broadly to the importance of these overarching issues, and represent how the planning team will approach the master plan concept development phase of work.

Identity

ARBORETUM

It is important to recognize that Washington Park is viewed as an incredible asset for our residents and our region with worldwide ties to the global collections, ecological systems, and international visitors. Though it provides a unique mix of cultural beauty, access to nature, destination attractions, and to a great diversity of recreational opportunities and natural conditions, many visitors find it challenging to define its character and its physical boundaries. It is at the same time Portland’s grandest park and most ambiguous. Defining its identity through unifying form, materiality, and wayfinding is a key step forward.

Circulation With ever increasing visitor rates and a demand to provide high quality recreational experiences, one of the park’s greatest needs will be to balance the increased patronage while improving the overall visitor experience. Many of the public’s comments about the park had to do with circulation, congestion and confusion. The challenges are varied but can be distilled into the basics of efficiently getting visitors to and into the park, moving through the park with clarity, and doing so in a landscape environment that is culturally and naturally wonderful. Time spent in the park becomes enriched when frustration and confusion are not longer part of one’s experience. Improving park facilities to allow for broader, safer multi-modal travel and connectivity throughout the park is essential.

Visitor Experience People engage the park differently based on where one lives, how one recreates, and one’s individual value set. Over the last 100 years, the core recreational value of connecting with nature has remained constant, but the method of that engagement has evolved. Future improvements should look to address the associated needs to maintain and enhance the visitor experience. Transportation, equitable access, food & services, specialized recreation and the park’s natural trail system are key points of on-going change. At this time no additional venues are planned for the park.

CITY PARK & GARDENS

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SOUTH ENTRY & VENUES

ARBORETUM

Park Zones Because of its topography and historic development, the Washington Park we know today is made up of four distinct zones that define its character. Through the concept development phase of the Master Plan, this existing understanding of the park will be challenged, and either changed or reinforced. City Park and Gardens - The area of the original City park is defined by its more traditional character consisting of informal and formal entries, statues, Chiming Fountain, reservoirs, the International Rose Test Garden and amphitheater, the Portland Japanese Garden, tennis courts, soccer field, playgrounds and open green space for picnics and recreation.

SOUTH ENTRY & VENUES

Washington Parkway - The forested natural area and roadway connection between the north and south ends of the park includes trails, passive green space, the archery range and the zoo train corridor. Arboretum - The northwestern land expanse contains the Hoyt Arboretum, extensive trail systems, and the Vietnam Veterans of Oregon Memorial. South Entry & Venues - Defined by the HWY 26 entrance, the MAX station and the expansive parking lots at the south end of the park, this part of Washington Park includes The Children’s Museum, the World Forestry Center, and the Oregon Zoo.

54 CONSIDERATIONS

WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

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CONSIDERATIONS

CONCLUSIONS

ACCESS TO THE PARK

UNIFY THE PARK

LINK THE EXPERIENCES

Bring increasing numbers of visitors to the park through greater mode splits, expanded access points, and improved wayfinding. Expand transportation to the park from a distance via transit and flexible peak parking options.

Tie the park’s varied recreational opportunities, landscape typologies, and physical extremities together via an improved circulation route. Reinforce the park’s diverse character by distilling its qualities into a definable identity.

Establish clear connectivity within the park by reinforcing internal circulation options between the South Entry Venues and the City Park and Gardens. Engage the Kingston corridor as the primary element of a unifying parkway in the role of a new natural venue, offering varied and positive visitor experiences along the way.

WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

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CONSIDERATIONS 55


CONSIDERATIONS History

Geothechnical and Resiliency

Stormwater

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Eliminate on-site infiltration of stormwater. Direct all water collected on roofs and paved surfaces toward the city stormwater collection system. Develop evacuation plans in the event of a natural disaster.

• •

Rehabilitate pedestrian trails and stone/concrete stairways in the City Park Historic Core. Conceal or replace chain-link fence with diaphanous landscape architectural fencing along Kingston Road. Selectively open the landscape understory along Kingston Road to reveal viewsheds of the city to the east and remove invasive vegetation.

Long Term

• • • •

Establish an Olmstedian parkway along SW Kingston Drive. Rehabilitate the Bear House if feasible, or demolish and build new use. Rehabilitate Restroom/Concessions for integrity or expanded uses. Rehabilitate the Chiming Fountain.

• • • •

Limit new building construction to stable zones, and stay out of landslide zones. Limit fill placement to backfill of excavations. Limit road widening to cuts on uphill side of roadway. Evaluate all areas of significant cut or fill on a case-by-case basis. Design mat foundations for new buildings.

Ongoing

Ongoing

Maintain the historic naturalistic aesthetic and overall site defining characteristics of Hoyt Arboretum, including trails and bridges. Implement improvements to maintain the overall original character defining features and design intent of the International Rose Test Garden. Preserve the charm and integrity of the Rose Garden Restroom & Curator’s Office as required. Pay careful attention to protect the enveloping flora. Preserve the original character defining features of the original design of the Portland Japanese Garden.

Keep stormwater culverts, ditches, and storm sewer inlets clear of debris.

Long Term

• • •

56 CONSIDERATIONS

Near Term

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Repair and plant the SW Kingston Drive embankment to reduce erosion and sediment runoff to the train tracks below. Improve Zoo train corridor drainage. Repair SW Kingston culvert and drainage system on steep downhill slopes. Improve Stearns Canyon embankment to reduce erosion.

Ongoing

• •

Evaluate sanitary service for each future development project. Explore infrastructure expansion as connecting to the existing sanitary system may not be feasible due to limited connection locations, distance to, or capacity. Address water service and capacity in any future development. Future development must abide by the City’s Development Code and the BES’ Stormwater Management Manual requirements. Stormwater strategies for any proposed development must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Geotechnical recommendations are for no on-site stormwater infiltration to mitigate landslides. Treatment can occur with flow through planters in accordance with BES standards. Keep stormwater culverts, ditches, and storm sewer inlets clear of debris.

WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

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wy

Ongoing

Ongoing

Near Term

Identify areas outside of Environmental Preservation overlay zones that are suitable for development. Preserve and enhance views and scenic resources within the Scenic Resources overlay zone. Revise zoning in recently added areas of the park to reflect a change from Residential (R) zoning to Open Space (OS) zoning.

Long Term Create new development within Washington Park that will showcase characteristics unique to Portland and the Pacific Northwest.

• • • •

Ongoing •

U

H .S.

Ongoing

26

Long Term

Ongoing

Near Term

Near Term

26

U wy

H .S.

KEY H .S.

U

Long Term

UPGRADE STRUCTURES

Maintain vegetation to preserve existing designated views.

Develop a program to determine the number of public amenities needed in the park and the best locations to serve the most visitors. Consider the potential for 407-The Bear House site for new uses, and whether to perform seismic upgrades, repair and renovate the building, or to demolish it and build a new facility. Perform seismic upgrades to buildings #431-Rose Garden Restroom & Curator’s Office and #406-Restroom/Concession Building. Perform a detailed seismic assessment of #409-The Elephant House to evaluate its seismic vulnerabilities. Mitigate the non‐structural deficiencies in building #421‐Westside Maintenance Facility and the Hoyt Arboretum Visitors Center shop area including adding proper, safe storage of flammable or hazardous materials and anchorage and bracing of storage racks and their contents.

Ongoing •

WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016

Perform regular maintenance on existing builidngs and mitigate nonstructural hazards to preserve the building’s structural integrity and safety of the occupants.

CONSIDERATIONS 57


CONSIDERATIONS Recreation & Culture

Circulation W Burnside

St

RESOLVE CONFLICTS

ADD PARKING

• •

e St

CREATE PARKWAY CONNECTION

wy

REDEVELOP ENTRY IMPROVE HWY 26 CROSSING

U

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U.S

y Hw

26

• •

KEY Near Term

26

Long Term

• • •

Ongoing

Near Term • • • • • • • • • • •

Develop wayfinding hierarchy for the park including a standardized signage system and map design for the park. Improve Marquam Trail (40-Mile Loop) and 4T Trail crossing of Highway 26. Safely expand paid parking to include on-street parking along SW Fairview. Reduce Washington Park visitor parking on adjacent neighborhood streets through implementation of a parking permit system. Improve conditions for bicycles and pedestrians on SW Kingston Dr. and SW Fairview by adding sidewalks, improved paving, traffic calming, and shared lane markings. Change the Highway 26 exit sign to “Washington Park” rather than displaying only a few of the venues within the park. Reconfigure the South Entry arrival sequence, circulation, and parking to improve wayfinding, efficiency and safety. Enhance intersection configurations near the International Rose Test Garden and Oregon Holocaust Memorial. Improve mode split to reflect the Transportation Management Plan Goals. EWP is currently adding Uber/Lyft/ride share drop-off and pick-up zones to the park. Monitor the success of these zones and continue to shift locations or expand as appropriate. Host Car Free weekends where the internal park roads are closed to motor vehicles.

58 CONSIDERATIONS

PRESERVE AND REOPEN VIEWSHEDS

Long Term

W Burnsid

H .S.

e St

W Burnsid

Develop one trail map for the entire park that includes information about topography and trail surface. This map should be available at all venues and information stations within Washington Park.

• •

Implement improvements recommended in the Washington Park South Entry Vision Study (2012). Improve existing park roads or add parallel facilities to accommodate multiple modes of transportation. Develop aNear hierarchical Term trail system with easily identifiable trail heads. Communicate circulation priorities through physical design. In a park setting: ▪▪ the most comfortable mode of visitor travel should be walking, hiking, or strolling; Long Term ▪▪ the most efficient way for visitors to travel should be walking, bicycling or taking the free park shuttle; ▪▪ physical design and maintenance priorities should reinforce these modes rather Ongoing than relying on communication, encouragement, and passive wayfinding signs alone. Explore the use of demand-based parking to inspire mode splits at peak times. Planning for future transportation technology shifts (i.e., driverless cars). Enhance circulation routes to better serve bus traffic and improve coordination of bus visits. Utilize the Zoo Railroad corridor as a connection between the north and south ends of the park either by repairing the tracks and re-opening rail service (allow riders to use the railroad without purchasing a Zoo admission ticket), or by developing a paved trail that uses this corridor. Develop a method of circulating visitors through the park that is a destination in and of itself (i.e., the aerial tram). Make real time parking information available.

Ongoing •

• •

Continue to use technology and encouragement programs to communicate transportation options and parking conditions with visitors prior to their arrival in the park and within the park to encourage active transportation and transit use. Events and seasons drive the peak parking and circulation needs - continue to improve programming by distributing events and expanding the options to utilize off-site parking facilities and mass transit. Park circulation should be a positive part of the visitor experience.

e St

W Burnsid

KEY Near Term 6

2 wy

.H

U.S

CREATE & LINK RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

wy

.H

U.S

26

Long Term

Ongoing

Facilities and Amenities Near Term • •

• • • •

Physical design should actively address Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design CPTED especially in parking areas Programming, picnicking, and organized gatherings are key activities within the park. Expanded opportunities for covered space picnic area or rentable zones could expand the opportunity for events and provide revenue. Explore options to add these amenities at sites near the Archery Range, Rose Garden Concessions, and Children’s Playground. Consider utilizing technology to enhance visitor experience like adding wifi hot spots in key locations. The tennis courts location and quantity should be studied further to address the need. The City Park playground contains led paint and is going to be closed. Consider designing a neighborhood playground using contemporary strategies like nature play. Evolving usage patterns including extended stays, multi-modal transit, and Portland’s culinary reputation have influenced the need/opportunity for expanded services. • Food and beverage services could improve/diversify the experience, expand the opportunity for rental income, and support extended visits. • Extended visits require restrooms; the Rose Garden area needs additional capacity to fill current and future needs. WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016


CONSIDERATIONS • •

Lack of cover from extreme weather – provide shelter at key gathering points Add drinking fountains throughout the park.

Trails

Washington Park is a regional destination and a neighborhood park. Achieving a balance between serving the smaller scale needs and international tourism needs to be achieved. Balancing the investment in the everyday amenities with venue-based tourism will need to be accomplished. Under-utilized areas of the park offer more opportunities for added recreation or redistribution of activities. Explore improved use of the front of the archery range, the soccer fields, meadow along Kingston, and parking at the International Rose Test Garden. Play spaces are limited in their distribution and appropriateness due to age or quality. Add play areas that engage on multiple levels such as nature-play, inclusive-play and traditional play spaces. Consider the addition of a low-key play area in the Hoyt Arboretum. The Children’s Playground is in a prime location and should be enhanced to become the premiere playground it once was. Consider offering inclusive, creative, and more challenging play opportunities.

66 22 wyy . Hw .SH

U. U.S

CONNECT NORTH AND SOUTH ENDS OF THE PARK

Tree growth continues to reshape the view sheds from the park to the surrounding mountain and city landscapes. Evaluate the re-opening of key iconic views originally arranged in the City Park and Rose Garden development. Specific views of Mt. Hood from the Rose Garden concessions area are in danger of being lost and others have already been eclipsed.

A balance should be explored to determine the benefit of restoring or protecting views at the cost of managing the associated vegetation. Areas of high habitat value should be protected and alternative view corridors should be explored when possible. At the amphitheater a full enclosure concert shell would be a benefit acoustically and address sunlight and rain impacts on sensitive and expensive instruments, and would allow for lighting and nighttime shows. A modest, but professional backstage arrangement for performers, with a restroom, would be desirable. Future park plans should consider an approach to preserving, enhancing and expanding existing recreational opportunities by acknowledging the current needs, burgeoning trends and retaining flexibility for adaptation. Key input from the community, defined needs and acknowledged patterns establish a set of opportunities for the park’s continued evolution. Passive and active recreation pursuits can be thoughtfully co-mingled to maintain a diversity of appeal and patronage.

WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016

Long Term

Long Term

Ongoing Ongoing

Near Term •

Long Term •

KEY Near Term

Trails

Monitor trail conditions and update the trail assessment on an annual basis. Review trail counts on an annual basis.

Near Term

IMPROVE ACCESSIBILITY

Culture

Near Term

• •

e St

The cleanliness and quantity of restrooms needs improvement to service the entire park.

Bridge the crossing of West Burnside for the 40-Mile Loop Trail (Wildwood Trail) to provide safe trail access for park users. Reroute the 4 T Trail to follow the Marquam Trail within Washington Park and improve the Marquam Trail crossing of Highway 26.

Ongoing

W Burnsid

Ongoing •

CREATE LOOP TRAILS OPPORTUNITIES

Long Term •

e St

W Burnsid

• • •

Complete a paved accessible trail between the Overlook Trail and Bristlecone Pine Trail in Hoyt Arboretum. Implement trail hierarchy improvements for the 40-Mile Loop and the trail connection between the MAX station and Rose Garden so these two trail connections can be clearly followed by Park visitors even without the aid of a map. Sign and stripe all trail roadway crossings within the Park. Install curb ramps where applicable. Implement a wayfinding sign plan for the entire Washington Park trail network and upgrade trailheads to improve the trail user experience. Improve the condition of the MAC Trail by implementing re-routes to reduce the trail slope, trimming vegetation to open up the trail corridor, and repairing damaged structures. Transfer responsibility of trail counts and trail counters to PP&R Soft Surface Trails team.

Long Term • • •

Add a paved shared use pathway that parallels SW Kingston Dr. Develop a paved accessible trail in the northern end of Washington Park. Improve the MAC trail connection between the Children’s Playground and Rose Garden area. CONSIDERATIONS 59


CONSIDERATIONS Park Landscape

Maintenance W Burnside

St

e St

W Burnsid

W

IMPROVE ECOLOGICAL HEALTH

Burnside St

e St

W Burnsid

Near Term

Near Term

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U.S

y Hw

EXPAND MAINTENANCE AREAS

KEY

26

Long Term

Near Term

wy

.H

U.S

. U.S

26

6

y2

Hw

wy

.H

U.S

Long Term

KEY Near Term

26

Long Term

Ongoing

Ongoing

PROTECT AND ENHANCE HABITAT CORRIDOR

Ongoing

Ongoing

Near Term

Near Term

Complete the ecological inventory of the park and develop a vegetation management plan. Convert mown turf areas adjacent to the archery range and below the International Rose Test Garden to prairie landscapes that are less intensively maintained.

• •

Long Term

Convert underutilized developed areas to habitat patches by restoring understory plantings. Improve the condition of “Poor” and “Severely Degraded” natural areas by diversifying plantings and by removing invasive vines.

Ongoing • • •

Continue refining BMPs for landscape areas and communicate these BMPs to the public. Establish pollinator gardens. Refine lists of successful plants for use in park landscapes.

60 CONSIDERATIONS

Long Term

Reduce the amount of time work crews spend waiting in traffic congestion. Transfer maintenance of natural areas within Washington Park to Natural Areas crews.

Long Term

Increase number of staff by 6 FTEs (Developed Areas) and 3.5 FTEs (Natural Areas). Identify opportunities for expanded facilities or another centralized facility for equipment storage.

Ongoing •

Improve coordination between developed areas and natural areas maintenance.

WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016


“WE BELIEVE WASHINGTON PARK IS AN OPPORTUNITY FOR PORTLANDERS TO EXPERIENCE THE WORLD AND FOR THE WORLD TO EXPERIENCE PORTLAND.”

WASHINGTON PARK MASTER PLAN UPDATE

TECHNICAL INVESTIGATION & PUBLIC OUTREACH, DEC 2016

Profile for Portland Parks & Recreation

Washington Park Master Plan Update - Technical Investigation and Public Outreach Report  

Washington Park Master Plan Update - Technical Investigation and Public Outreach Report