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EDITOR’S letter

ARE YOU FOLLOWING US? EUGENIE KELLY Editor-in-Chief

@BAZAARAUSTRALIA

Twitter, Snapchat and Instagram

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H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019

Welcome to our

BEAUTY ISSUE 77

TINA TYRELL. STYLED BY CARINE ROITFELD. EDITOR’S PORTRAIT: KRISTINA SOLJO. HAIR AND MAKEUP BY SAMANTHA POWELL AT UNION

WENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO, when I scored my first magazine beauty editor job, the beauty world was a very different place. The wellness/athleisure boom hadn’t happened yet, hence a woman’s workout wardrobe was marle. There was no Instagram; to become a famous makeup artist and score a lucrative cosmetics contract, you actually needed years of experience under your belt. The founders of some of today’s biggest beauty brands — Kylie Jenner and Emily Weiss of Glossier — either hadn’t been born or had just started school. And no one talked much about diversity or inclusivity in beauty, because no matter how vocal women were, without the communities we have been able to create through social media, those concerns largely weren’t being heard. What a shift. Now in 2019, it’s nothing special for a cosmetics brand to boast a foundation range with 50 shades in its line-up. Racial inclusivity has become one of the most important dialogues going on in the beauty industry right now (disturbing as it is to think that the discussion has only just kicked off). We’ve got so far to go — and hopefully BAZAAR can contribute to the conversation. On page 42, social commentator and Arrernte woman Celeste Liddle shares her experiences of growing up outside the woefully narrow parameters of the long-held Australian beauty ‘ideal’ of blonde hair and blue eyes. Liddle’s reflections on her childhood and her thoughts on the future make us realise how far we still have to go. “I don’t believe the answer lies in making beauty more accessible to nonwhite women,” she writes. “I think it lies in freeing all women — black and white — from the constant pressures of having to be aesthetically appealing.” Not feeling the crushing need to adhere to an unattainable beauty ideal is something all of us should experience, but my guess is things will only become more complicated, especially when you consider what’s ahead. Within this issue’s dedicated Future Beauty section (page 141), we take a close look at the wave of incredible innovation the beauty industry is riding right now, particularly around ‘try-on technology’. Robot makeup artists; mirrors that virtually apply makeup to your reflection; apps that appraise your face and advise on whether investments such as eyelash extensions are worth it … this technology is set to revolutionise how we shop for beauty in the future. And I thought I was totally streets ahead of everyone else with my jade roller and my Dyson Airwrap … Sigh.


*Offer available at all LancĂ´me Myer counters in Australia. While stocks last. Offer consists of 1x1.2ml of La vie est belle original fragrance or 1x1.2ml La Vie Est belle en rose (stock permitting). 1 per customer. Sample not exchangeable or redeemable for cash and not for resale.

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CONTENTS

Fashion & Features 77 PORTRAIT OF A BRIDE The eternal romance of couture. Styled by CARINE ROITFELD Photographed by TINA TYRELL

94 LEAP OF FAITH Alicia Vikander is soaring. Photographed by MARIANO VIVANCO By ANDREW BEVAN

102 DREAM WEAVER Elevated craft for autumn. Photographed by SYLVÈ COLLESS

114 ELLE ENCHANTED This is Elle Fanning, with a twist. Photographed by JASON KIBBLER By KALEEM AFTAB

Beauty & Health 119 FRESH TAKE Josephine Langford showcases the best new beauty looks. 128 PRETTY IN PUNK Cara Delevingne on style, shaving her head and bleaching those brows. 130 BEAUTY DIARIES Karen Elson & Jesinta Franklin share their tips and tricks. 134 SMOKE SIGNALS A fragrant ode to oud, amber and incense. 136 ME & MY GURU Julia Ashwood learns to silence negative thoughts with Jasson Salisbury. 137 THE EDIT Your autumn skincare, sorted.

142 PRETTY SMART What’s next in skintelligence. 146 ONE-HIT WONDER The $400 cult cream. 147 BE DAZZLED Modern-day tooth fairies. 148 FASHION STOLE MY SMILE When did looking happy become so passé? 150 BUDDING RIVALS Introducing bakuchiol, the plant giving retinol a run for its money.

Regulars 22 EDITOR’S LETTER 30 MASTHEAD 31 CONTRIBUTORS 40 ONLINE 54 & 76 SUBSCRIPTIONS 176 HOROSCOPES 177 BUYLINES &

77

PRIVACY NOTICE

178 LAST WORD

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H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019

TINA TYRELL. STYLED BY CARINE ROITFELD. RAVYANSHI MEHTA WEARS GIAMBATTISTA VALLI HAUTE COUTURE DRESS; TIA MAZZA VEIL, BOTH PRICE ON APPLICATION. ESTÉE LAUDER PURE COLOR ENVY SHADOWPAINT IN JADED, $40. PRICE APPROXIMATE. SEE BUYLINES FOR STOCKISTS

138 WORRIED SICK Toxic shock syndrome: are we panicking for nothing?


CONTENTS

32 34 36 38

The A-list

COVER LOOK Alicia Vikander. WISH LIST Celebrity makeup artist Gucci Westman. THE LIST Orange crush. WAIT LIST A Gucci bag’s call to adventure.

Viewpoint 42 THE PROBLEM WITH PRETTY Celeste Liddle laments narrow definitions of beauty.

Style 46 SUPPORT THE GIRLS The ladies leading the lingerie revolution. 48 SAY MY NAME Brand worship reaches fever pitch. 50 THE PIECE THAT LAUNCHED OUR BRAND Aje.’s Edwina Forrest and Adrian Norris on the Isabelli blouse.

The Bazaar 56 57 58 59

SASHA KNYSH Master street style. REBECCA LONGENDYKE Shift into neutral. SORA CHOI Suit yourself. RIANNE VAN ROMPAEY Layer up for autumn.

BAZAAR at Work

102

61 BUSINESS SWEET How Estée Lauder executive Jane Hertzmark Hudis gets it done. 64 IF IT’S BROKE … Why the well paid can feel so poor. 66 MY OFFICE Maison Balzac’s medieval HQ. 67 LET ME TELL YOU A SECRET Business lessons from the women who’ve been there, done that.

The Buzz 72 ONCE UPON A DOUBLE TAP Tomo Koizumi is a fashion fairytale come true. 74 LEE RADZIWILL IN 16 QUESTIONS The style icon’s final interview. 75 GRAND DESIGNS Meet the National Designer Award winners.

Culture 160 SHAPING THE NARRATIVE Carol Crawford’s sculpture as storytelling. 162 BRIGHT YOUNG THING Lee Broom’s design evolution. 163 SORRY NOT SORRY The art of the apology. 164 LEAVING THE PARTY Aldous Harding sees the light. 165 BAZAAR DIARY Your cultural calendar for the month.

167 WELL HEELED Shoe designer Sophia Webster’s converted church is a whimsical wonderland. 171 THE SUPER-STEALTH SUV Test-driving the new Maserati Levante.

119

Escape

173 THE POWER OF PURITY Deprived and loving it at Vivamayr Altaussee in Austria.

SYLVÈ COLLESS; HOLLY WARD

A Fashionable Life


FA S H I O N Fashion Editor CAROLINE TRAN Market Editor SAMANTHA WONG Fashion Office Co-ordinator NICHHIA WIPPELL

F E AT U R E S Features Director HANNAH JAMES Fashion Features Director GRACE O’NEILL Culture Director ELLE McCLURE Beauty Writer KATE LANCASTER Beauty & Features Assistant CHRISTOPHER XI

COPY Copy Director TOM LAZARUS Acting Copy Director ALEXANDRA ENGLISH

ART Art Editor MICHELLE JACKSON Contributing Designer ALICE IERACE

ONLINE HARPERSBAZAAR.COM.AU

Digital Content Director SUSANNAH GUTHRIE Digital Managing Editor MAHALIA CHANG Senior Editorial Co-ordinator KATE SULLIVAN

CONTRIBUTORS Fashion Editor-at-Large KARLA CLARKE US Contributing Fashion Editor ILONA HAMER European Editor DIVYA BALA New York NATASHA SILVA-JELLY Paris DANA THOMAS

EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000. Tel: (02) 9282 8703 Email: bazaar@bauer-media.com.au. MELBOURNE OFFICE: Building 8, 658 Church Street, Richmond, VIC 3121. Tel: (03) 9823 6333

B AU E R M E D I A G R O U P Chief Executive Officer PAUL DYKZEUL Chief Marketing Officer PAUL WEAVING Chief Financial Officer ANDREW STEDWELL General Manager, Publishing & Digital Operations SARAH-BELLE MURPHY Associate Publisher SHANE SUTTON Commercial Director, Australia PAUL GARDINER General Manager, Media Solutions JANE WATERHOUSE Marketing Director LOUISE CANKETT Senior Marketing Manager JILLIAN HOGAN Brand Manager SARAH WEBSTER General Manager, Subscriptions & E-Commerce SEAN McLINTOCK Senior Subscriptions Campaign Manager ELLIE XUEREB Research Director, Publishing CATHERINE ROSS Business Analyst MARGARET CLANTIN

A DV E R T I S I N G Luxury Commercial Manager KATE HERISSON (02) 9282 8589 Brand Executive JENNIFER BURKE (02) 9288 9145 Ad Production Manager KATE ORSBORN (02) 9282 8364 Senior Events Manager CATE GAZAL (02) 8116 9342 Creative Director CLARE CATT (02) 8116 9341 Creative Studio Manager WILLIAM YORK (02) 9282 8064 New South Wales: Director of Sales KAREN HOLMES (02) 9282 8733 Victoria, South Australia & Western Australia: Director of Sales JACLYN CLEMENTS (03) 9823 6341 Victoria: Head of Direct Sales WILL JAMISON (03) 9823 6301 Queensland: Head of Sales JUDY TAYLOR (07) 3101 6636 General Manager, Production Services IAN McHUTCHISON (02) 9282 8342 Production Controller SALLY JEFFERYS (02) 8116 9385 Production Advertising Controller DOMINIC ROY (02) 9282 8691 Overseas Advertising Representatives: Europe Magazine International SRL +39 02 796 451

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H E A R S T M AG A Z I N E S I N T E R N AT I O N A L Senior Vice-President/General Manager & Managing Director, Asia & Russia SIMON HORNE Senior Vice-President/Editorial & Brand Director KIM ST. CLAIR BODDEN Executive Editor ELÉONORE MARCHAND

I N T E R N AT I O N A L E D I T I O N S & E D I T O R S Arabia, Argentina – LUCY LARA, Brazil – PATRICIA CARTA, Chile, China – SIMONA SHA, Czech Republic – NORA GRUNDOVA, Germany – KERSTIN SCHNEIDER, Greece – ELENI PATERAKI, Hong Kong – XAVEN MAK, India – NONITA KALRA, Indonesia – RIA LIRUNGAN, Japan – KAORI TSUKAMOTO, Kazakhstan – LARISSA AZANOVA, Korea – SEKYUNG CHO, Latin America – LUCY LARA, Malaysia – NATASHA KRAAL, Netherlands – MILUSKA VAN ‘T LAM, Poland – ANNA ZALESKA, Romania – ANDREI IOVU, Russia – DARIA VELEDEEVA, Serbia – PETAR JANOSEVIC, Singapore – KENNETH GOH, Spain – YOLANDA SACRISTÁN, Taiwan – ELAINE LIAO, Thailand – DUANG POSHYANONDA, Turkey – GULEN YELMEN, Ukraine – ANNA ZEMSKOVA, United Kingdom – JUSTINE PICARDIE, United States – GLENDA BAILEY, Vietnam – TRAN NGUYEN THIEN HUONG, Global Fashion Director – CARINE ROITFELD

Harper’s BAZAAR is published by Hearst/Bauer Media ABN 76 309 301 177, a joint venture between HMI Australia, LLC and Bauer Media Pty Limited, 54 Park Street, Sydney, NSW 2000 (GPO Box 4088, Sydney, NSW 2001), by permission of Hearst Communications Inc, New York, 10019, USA. © Copyright 2019 Hearst/Bauer Media. All rights reserved. Printed by Ovato, 31 Heathcote Road, Moorebank NSW 2170. Distributed by Gordon and Gotch Australia Pty Ltd., 1300 650 666. All prices quoted in Harper’s BAZAAR include GST and are approximate and in A$ unless otherwise stated. Hearst/Bauer Media accepts no responsibility for damage or loss of material submitted for publication. Please keep duplicates of text and illustrative material. Bauer Media Customer Service Centre: for all subscription and sales enquiries, visit www.magshop.com.au; email: magshop@magshop.com.au; or phone 136 116 between 8am and 6pm (EST) Monday to Friday. Correspondence should be addressed to: Magshop, GPO Box 4967, Sydney, NSW 2001. ISSN 1839-4566.

EDWARD URRUTIA. STYLED BY CHRISTOPHER XI. ESTÉE LAUDER PURE COLOR DESIRE ROUGE EXCESS LIPSTICKS IN (FROM TOP ) DON’T STOP, GIVE IN AND SEDUCE, $60 EACH. PRICE APPROXIMATE

E U G E N I E K E L LY Editor-in-Chief Creative Director HUW REYNOLDS Fashion Director NAOMI SMITH Beauty & Wellness Director JANNA JOHNSON O’TOOLE


CONTRIBUTORS

Gucci Westman

The celebrity makeup artist gives Alicia Vikander her golden glow for our cover shoot on page 94. “I don’t believe in this over-the-top Instagram look. For my clients, I like to make skin look like skin,” Westman says. She also shares the key beauty and fashion pieces she’s eyeing on page 34. My introduction to wellness was … “growing up with vegetarian parents. I was very aware of what I ate in terms of ingredients and chemicals. I’ve applied this awareness to using beauty products, too.” My favourite beauty product is … “my Vital Skin Foundation Stick. In the past couple of years I developed rosacea, so I wanted a foundation with effective ingredients and professional-tier quality. Thus I selfishly created one that is exactly that.”

Celeste Liddle

The Arrernte woman and feminist writer believes the most important part of her career is being able to contribute to public discourse. “Australia has a lot to learn from engaging in Indigenous debate — despite how the media frequently frames us, we don’t all think the same,” Liddle says. On page 42, she reveals the struggles of growing up in a society riddled with beauty stereotypes. My strongest concerns are … “racism, sexism and the struggles of Aboriginal women. We’re far too criminalised and frequently ignored. I want to put an end to all of that.” I’m writing … “to educate others. I keep track of the news and do my research so that when I do write an opinion piece, it assists in raising the consciousness of others.”

Effie Zahos

The former editor of Money magazine, Bauer Media Group’s finance editor, commentator and financial literacy campaigner, and author of A Real Girl’s Guide to Money: From Converse to Louboutins explains to BAZAAR why even a successful professional earning six figures can feel strapped for cash. “Whether you’re earning $200,000 or $60,000, there are some very simple reasons you may be feeling broke, and money may actually have nothing to do with it,” Zahos says. If this is you, turn to page 64 to read her advice. I believe money can buy happiness … “but only to a certain point. If you took Sarah (a multimillionaire) and Anne (who is doing nicely but is no multimillionaire) and instantly doubled their wealth, who do you think would be happier?”

Janna Johnson O’Toole COURTESY OF WESTMAN ATELIER; EFFIE ZAHOS: ANDREW FINLAYSON/ BAUER PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIOS. COMPILED BY CHRISTOPHER XI

BAZAAR’s beauty and wellness director packs the annual Beauty Issue with high-tech trends including new apps that predict how our skin will age (page 142), as well as the new $400 cult cream, and whether we should shift from synthetic retinol to a plant-based alternative such as bakuchiol (page 150). Beauty is exciting because … “now you can direct message or tweet a brand and get a quick response, whether it be about the safety of an ingredient or the sustainability of their packaging. This accountability will only make the industry stronger and more authentic.” What’s next for the industry? “Cannabidiol (CBD) is massive overseas, and once it gets the legal green light here, I expect the market to be flooded with everything from CBD-laced skincare to ingestibles.”

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H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019


The A - L I S T Photographed by Mariano Vivanco. Styled by Miguel Enamorado. Alicia Vikander wears Louis Vuitton dress and necklace, both price on application. Hair by Joey George; makeup by Gucci Westman; manicure by Melissa Crosbie for Savannah Day Spa. Prices approximate. See Buylines for stockists.

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Estée Lauder Pure Color Envy Hi-Lustre Light Sculpting Lipstick in Naked Truth, $52.

Tiffany & Co. earrings, $8600, tiffany.com.au.

Philosophy di Lorenzo Serafini dress, $970, net-a-porter.com.

Louis Vuitton bracelet, $905, au. louisvuitton.com.

ALICIA VIKANDER

Alighieri necklace, $2387, alighieri.co.uk.

Louis Vuitton bag, $6150, au.louisvuitton.com.

Louis Vuitton boots, price on application, au.louisvuitton.com.

Alexander McQueen bag, $2776, farfetch.com.

GET ALICIA’S BEAUTY LOOK with Estée Lauder. On face: The Illuminator; Double Wear Stay-In-Place Makeup in Cashew; on cheeks: Bronze Goddess Highlighting Powder Gelée in Heatwave; Pure Color Envy Sculpting Blush in Sensuous Rose; on eyes: Pure Color Envy Sculpting EyeShadow 5-Color Palette in Defiant Nude; Sumptuous Extreme Lash Multiplying Volume Mascara; on brow: Volumizing Brow Tint in Brunette; on lips: Pure Color Envy Hi-Lustre Lipstick in Naked Truth.

Louis Vuitton Attrape-Rêves eau de parfum, $350 (100ml).

32

Givenchy dress, $11,980, matchesfashion.com. Estée Lauder Sumptuous Extreme Lash Multiplying Volume Mascara in Extreme Black, $50.

H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019

MARIANO VIVANCO; STILL LIFE: CHRIS JANSEN. STYLED BY NICHHIA WIPPELL. COMPILED BY CHRISTOPHER XI. TEXT BY GRACE O’NEILL. PRICES APPROXIMATE. SEE BUYLINES FOR STOCKISTS

Attico dress, $1918, theattico.com.

SWEDISH BEAUTY Alicia Vikander burst onto the world’s radar with her Oscar-winning turn in 2016’s The Danish Girl — creating an iconic red-carpet style moment with her puff-of-cream custom Louis Vuitton gown in the process. Aside from her ethereal beauty and formidable acting talent (she’s played everything from a robot in Ex Machina to feminist Vera Brittain to a reprisal of Angelina Jolie’s role as Lara Croft in Tomb Raider), Vikander is a trained ballerina, speaks six languages and runs her own film production company, Vikarious Productions. She leads a notoriously private home life with husband Michael Fassbender, but when she does hit the red carpet, Vikander is likely to opt for a structured gown by LV, a brand for which she’s been an ambassador since 2015. “[Nicolas Ghesquière’s clothes] are like my armour!” she tells BAZAAR.


The A - L I S T

Balmain blazer, $2500, stylebop.com.

MY STYLE I like dressing up, but I also just like being comfortable; I’m a little TOMBOY and PREPPY, but add in FEMININE accents, so I gravitate to brands such as Sonia Rykiel, Chanel and Balmain for jackets, Loewe for handbags and Tory Burch for skirts and tops. I also love the CLASSIC SILHOUETTES from Brock Collection; I just ordered a few tweed jackets from their A/W 2019 range. I try to invest in items I will love for years. I love GOOD TRAINERS, like Axel Arigato, and in winter I live in Isabel Marant wedge boots. I also wear a lot of old Celine ankle boots. For ACCESSORIES and jewellery, I prefer chunkier pieces from Chanel, like the Coco Crush collection, as well as Cartier and vintage Hermès.

Loewe bag, $2390, loewe.com.

“I formulated [my own products] to be more than just makeup; they have serious skincare benefits.” Chanel ring, $4750, 1300 242 635.

Tory Burch shirt, $1010, and skirt, $1680, toryburch.com.

David Mallett tt Shampoo oo No.1 L’Hy Hydration, $62.

BEAUTY

Dr Hauschka Rose Day Cream is always in my bag and I love the SK-II Facial Treatment Oil. I sometimes mix the two. I have pretty SENSITIVE SKIN, so I stick to products that I know I won’t react to. I swear by David Mallett for my hair; his shampoo and masks are lovely. I had an INCREDIBLE TREATMENT recently at Amara Wellness Centre in Melbourne, an EndermoTherapie massage for lymphatic drainage — it was really invigorating. I also LOVE FACIALS. Luckily I have some friends who are incredible facialists, including Anastasia Achilleos in London. A treatment with her is divine. Every day I use my own products from WESTMAN ATELIER. I formulated them to be more than just makeup; they have serious SKINCARE BENEFITS. They can help with issues such as inflammation, while balancing the skin pH and providing long-term hydration thanks to ingredients like vegetable-derived squalene, grape seed oil, camellia oil … the list goes on! The foundation and the blush, in the shade Petal, which is named after my baby girl, are my must-haves. The highlighter is another favourite — we can’t keep it in stock. Westman Atelier Baby Cheeks Blush Stick in Petal, $76.

34

GUCCI WESTMAN The celebrity makeup artist shares her preppy, timeless aesthetic WELLNESS Feeling good is important to me, so I am REALLY MINDFUL about what I eat. I travel with almond butter and homemade gluten-free bread and almond milk — I take that to Europe from New York in a cooler in my suitcase. I take a lot of supplements; I like a mix called Madame Ovary by Goop, which is good for hormones. EVERY MORNING I make a smoothie with WelleCo’s Peruvian Chocolate Nourishing Plant Protein powder. I add in Moon Juice Probiotics and Vanilla Mushroom Adaptogenic Protein.When I’m home in New York, I do HOT YOGA at Pure Yoga and go for runs when it’s not too cold.

H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019

TRAVEL

I love my Google Play Books app and log into our Nest app, so I can check the baby monitor when I’m not home. My DREAM HOLIDAY is an EXPERIENCE — I’m not one to bake in the sun. I really loved Italy for the AMAZING FOOD and South Africa was just exceptional — being that close to the animals was incredible. Next, I’m taking my family skiing in Austria.

PORTRAIT: COURTESY OF WESTMAN ATELIER; GETTY IMAGES; SEVAK BABAKHANI. AS TOLD TO JANNA JOHNSON O’TOOLE. STYLED AND COMPILED BY NICHHIA WIPPELL. PRICES APPROXIMATE. SEE BUYLINES FOR STOCKISTS

Westman Atelier Vital Skin Foundation Stick, $104.

Axel Arigato shoes, $306, farfetch.com.

Positano, Italy.

WelleCo Peruvian Chocolate Nourishing Plant Protein, from $36.


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J.W .An der son bag , $1 120 , jw and ers on. com .

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Loewe jumper, $785, loewe.com.

The

LIST

Take your orange crush to the next level: obsession

Attico dress, $1757, net-a-porter.com.

Jacquemus swimsuit, $280, modaoperandi.com.

Dries Van Noten shoes, $1490, driesvannoten.com.

36

Acne S tudios b ag, $85 0, acne studios .com. H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019

STYLED BY NICHHIA WIPPELL. PRICES APPROXIMATE. SEE BUYLINES FOR STOCKISTS

ffman dress, $ Ho 714 a ar , M

shion.com esfa . ch t a m


The

BAZAAR

FLASHPACKER Whether you’re hiking in the wilderness or stalking the urban jungle,

EDWARD URRUTIA. STYLED BY CAROLINE TRAN. PRICES APPROXIMATE. SEE BUYLINES FOR STOCKISTS

Gucci’s Alessandro Michele has your back

Gucci bag, $5025, gucci.com.

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H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019


L O T U S C O L L E C T I O N — F I N E J E W E L L E R Y B Y C H A R L O T T E LY N G G A A R D

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I SAID YES

A rose quartz facial roller.

Engagement on the horizon? Our Bride section has gemstone forecasts, styling suggestions and celebrity inspiration. A real bride’s wedding at the National Gallery of Victoria.

Amanda Seyfried at the 2018 Met Gala.

BEAUTY DEBUNKED

MET MANIA

Ahead of fashion’s favourite event, the BAZAAR team looks back on the best (and most outrageous) Met Gala looks.

ALL-WEATHER WORKOUTS

Beach season may be fading, but the need to stay fit remains.We explore A-list exercise plans and new workout trends.

Crystal rollers, DIY microneedling, LED light treatments — before you fork out for the latest beauty fad, our breakdowns sort fact from fiction. One Hot Yoga & Pilates, Sydney.

Doutzen Kroes on a family trip in Ibiza.

KIDS ON TOUR

For those escaping to family holidays abroad, a frequent flyer sets out her guide for travelling with kids (almost) fuss-free in our Travel section.

WEEKEND CHECKLIST

Cafes made for Instagram and exquisite yoga studios worth the matsyasana: find your new favourite haunt in Culture.

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SEVAK BABAKHANI; WEDDING: ERIN & TARA PHOTOGRAPHY; GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF INSTAGRAM/@ONEHOTYOGA. TEXT BY SUSANNAH GUTHRIE

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THE PROBLEM WITH

PRETTY

ENTIRE LIFE, I have felt as if I’m under microscope. For as long as I can remember, eople have always felt it has been their ight to comment openly about my appearnce — and that imposes an enormous mount of pressure. It has been constant, rom when I was tiny, right up to now, with areer in commentary seems to attract. From a young age, I absorbed the message that I was never elegant enough, thin enough or feminine enough. I resented being put into dresses and then told I couldn’t sit certain ways because it wasn’t “ladylike”. I loathed having long hair and having to sit still while it was combed for knots or pulled back into braids and ponytails. My first memories of getting comments about my weight and shape are from when I was about seven. My “duck’s bottom” and my “solid” build would be freely remarked upon and I found it incredibly upsetting. Even now, all these years later, I can be paranoid about my size. When I was in Year 8, I was told by a couple of boys in my year that I had been voted the “ugliest girl in the class”. I pretended it didn’t bother me, but in reality, it cut deep. I had spent most of that year wanting to hide away, but due to my background and my awkwardness, I always stood out like a sore thumb. Attempting to instil some confidence in me, my mother enrolled me in a modelling course when I was about 15, but it only succeeded in making me feel even more self-conscious. It reinforced that society expected me to focus solely on my appearance, and then it put me on a catwalk so others could judge me too. My intelligence and my talents were irrelevant to the society I grew up in. Most people preferred to reduce my being to an object to be admired — or not. Much of this is standard misogyny, a common experience for many women. But unfortunately, it’s only the start of the criticism habitually levelled at Aboriginal women. Not only were people judging my appearance as a woman, but they have also judged my appearance as an Aboriginal person. Though I have never been mistaken for white, I have been told more times than I care to remember, “You don’t look Aboriginal.” I’ve even been asked what “percentage Aboriginal” I am. People have carved my humanity into fractions so they can understand why I do not fit their limited understanding of Aboriginality. Never mind the fact that for decades we had policies in this country that led to fairer-skinned children being taken away from their parents. People have very definite ideas about what Aboriginal people should look like and when we don’t fit that model, they feel entitled to tell us how. It’s rude, invasive and undeniably ignorant. When I was at university, I went on a college pub crawl. I was sitting with a group of friends when a man said to me, “You’re the most beautiful Aboriginal woman I’ve seen.” He seemed to believe he was complimenting me. At the time, I didn’t know how to respond to his comment — I was so used to negative reinforcement

42

by then that perhaps for a split second I believed it to be a compliment. It was anything but. Apart from objectifying me, he had told me that he felt Aboriginal women were generally ugly — that in his eyes, I was an exception to the rule and I should be congratulated. We grow up in this country surrounded by whiteness. The white ideal was continually reinforced to me via the media, by advertising and by everything and everyone around me. The epitome of feminine beauty was a slim white woman with long hair. Not only was I never going to be white, but I also was never going to conform to any sort of feminine ideal. And what’s more, I wasn’t entirely sure I wanted to. The business of beauty seemed awkward, painful and time-consuming. I was 16 when I proclaimed myself to be a feminist. That, coupled with gaining more pride in my Aboriginality, was a turning point for me. It gave me the knowledge to start to question certain assumptions and break free from them. I never really got into makeup, for example. Back then, there wasn’t much available in the way of foundation and concealer for someone of my skin tone. This used to bother me, but feminism gave me the power to ask myself why I was looking for it in the first place. Why was I trying to adhere to some unattainable beauty ideal? Why should I try to cover everything up when the average white man could just walk out his front door and society would accept him as is? I was always going to resent being judged on my appearance, both as a woman and as an Aboriginal person, and so I saw my best shot at survival was to push back against it rather than toe the line. Thankfully, things have shifted. Not only have new brands like Fenty based their philosophy on creating cosmetics for a wider range of skin tones, but classic brands such as Maybelline and L’Oréal have also broadened their horizons, meaning we see more images where Aboriginal women are represented as beautiful. There were almost no Aboriginal models when I was growing up, but now I see many, from Samantha Harris to Magnolia Maymuru. I also see dedicated modelling agencies, fashion shows, magazines for women of colour. I see Aboriginal women gracing our stages and screens: Miranda Tapsell, Jessica Mauboy, Nakkiah Lui, Brooke Boney, Matilda Brown, Madeleine Madden and so many more. There are more opportunities than ever for Aboriginal women who want to get involved in the beauty, fashion and entertainment industries. As for me, at 40, I am finally comfortable in my own skin. More than anything, I would prefer a world where people respect Aboriginal women’s strength, their dignity and their independence without question, a world where they aren’t constantly judged by whether they are black enough and pretty enough. I want Aboriginal women to know they are a crucial part of society, just as they are. I don’t believe the answer lies in making beauty more accessible to nonwhite women. I think it lies in freeing all women — black and white — from the constant pressures of having to be aesthetically appealing. In my eyes, we are all beautiful, inside and out.

H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019

TRAVIS RATHBONE/TRUNK ARCHIVE/SNAPPER IMAGES

Arrernte woman and author C eleste l iddle says there’s more to inclusivity than the number of shades in a foundation range


V I E W point

“He felt Aboriginal women were generally ugly ...

in his eyes, I was an exception to the rule

and I should be congratulated.�


Gregory Jewellers Ambassador Monika Rad & Alesandro Ljubicic

C E L E B R AT E L O V E S Y D N E Y | M E L B O U R N E | 1 3 0 0 70 0 9 5 0 | G R EG O RYJ E W E L L E R S . C O M . AU


Backstage at Fendi S/S 2019.

PERSONAL BRAND Logo mania; the female-led lingerie revolution; and the blouse that made Aje.

ST LE

JASON LLOYD-EVANS

Edited by

GRACE O’NEILL

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H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019


STYLE

O

n June 12, 1977, the doors to Victoria’s Secret opened for business. You may remember the story of its humble beginnings from the soliloquy delivered by Justin Timberlake’s character in The Social Network: a man can’t go shopping for lingerie for his wife without feeling like a bit of a perve, so decides to create a new kind of store, an inviting space where men could buy titillating underthings free from judgement. “I was faced with racks of terry-cloth robes and ugly floral-print nylon nightgowns,” that man, Roy Raymond, told Newsweek in 1981. “I always had the feeling the department store saleswomen thought I was an unwelcome intruder.” It’s unlikely he knew it at the time, but Raymond had orchestrated a drastic shift in the way women consume lingerie. Victoria’s Secret’s original premise of making lingerie buying easier for men gave way to a larger purpose: taking any sense of shamefulness away from the shopping experience. Unabashed sex appeal was, and still is, front and centre at VS, typified by the iconic Fashion Shows that began in 1995 and continue to be a global phenomenon to this day (the brand is now valued at approximately $4.5 billion). Now, however, that paradigm is shifting again. This past year has felt like a watershed moment for the lingerie industry as a cohort of female-led underwear labels touting a broader definition of beauty have taken off. New Zealand-based lingerie label Lonely is leading the charge. Its 2016 campaign fronted by Girls creator/star Lena Dunham and her co-star Jemima Kirke went viral and became an industry-wide sensation because the shots were wholly unretouched. Elsewhere, plus-size model Paloma Elsesser gazes lovingly at her lingerie-clad body in the mirror of a dimly lit bathroom, and 56-year-old Mercy Brewer Skimpy creations that pushed reclines on a bed in an intricate lace underwear set. and pinched were once the “We embrace change,” says Helene Morris, the of Lonely. “We feel it’s important in an hallmark of on-trend lingerie. co-founder industry that is famously obsessed with flawlessness. M ADELEINE W OON finds that’s Through our imagery, we not only acknowledge but celebrate the changes brought to our bodies through all set to change, thanks to motherhood, surgery, ageing — the life of a woman.” The recent demise of the push-up bra tolls the death the women behind the bras knell for brands that are unwilling to compromise on a narrow interpretation of ‘sexy’. While push-up bras and their cleavage-engineering powers ruled the lingerie market for decades, those with naturally ample chests were curiously excluded from the conversation. Lingerie brands seemed to favour women who wanted the appearance of a full bosom, not those already in ownership of one. CUUP, an underwear label that launched late last year, has a few ideas as to why this might be. “A D-cup or larger [is] the very size where supportive construction becomes expensive and complicated,” it says on its website.

SUPPORT THE GIRLS

Left, from top: Victoria’s Secret Fashion Shows. Above and right: Lonely. Far right: Pansy.


YUMNA AL-ARASHI; NASTASSIA BRÜCKIN; GETTY IMAGES; FABIEN MONTIQUE; NICHOLAS PRAKAS; HARRY WERE

“It’s easier and cheaper to make a bra that doesn’t require a considered foundation. The industry wants you to believe that you are ‘too big’ or ‘too small’. Perhaps you’ve heard a salesperson reply with, ‘Sorry we don’t make it in that size.’ Why? Because it’s easier and cheaper to squeeze you into the 15–20 sizes typically offered than produce the 30+ sizes you need.” The designers at CUUP aim to create innovative and beautiful bras for all manner of body types, and their efforts, combined with a slew of other new size-inclusive, female-fronted brands, such as Rihanna’s Savage x Fenty, ThirdLove and Chromat, are giving larger-busted women something they’ve historically been denied: options. Rather than squishing into fashion-forward yet ill-fitting styles or resigning themselves to the back corners of a department store’s intimate apparel sections, buxom women are now part of the conversation. The former pièce de résistance is now being edged out by the soft-cup. Araks Yeramyan has been a leading proponent of the bralette since launching her New York-based label in 2000. “I wanted something that was cotton but colourful, and something that might show but in a really simple way, almost like an accessory,” she says of her eponymous brand, which is stocked at Matchesfashion.com. “I wanted my bras to be an everyday luxury … If the first thing you put on is beautiful, it sets the tone for the day.” With a range of soft-cup bras and high-waisted briefs cut from organic cotton and catering to sizes XS-XXL, Laura Schoorl’s label Pansy is another brand championing a new approach to smalls. Her ‘aha’ moment? “There was a revelation for me when I was 19 and my friend was like, ‘Your breast shape is beautiful! You don’t need to shift it with this added layer,’ and I was like, ‘Oh, you’re right — breasts are beautiful!’” Schoorl recalls. “That changed everything for me. I never went back [to padded bras]. Our bras are really comfortable for bigger busts, which is very rare. I wear a size L in underwear and our

Les Boys Les Girls. Above: Pansy. Below: Araks.

“I wanted my bras to be an everyday luxury … If the first thing you put on is beautiful, it sets the tone for the day.” – A rAks Y erAmYAn

47

biggest bra, so I’m designing for my body type, which is a lot of women’s body type.” It was a telling moment, too, when Serena Rees, co-founder of Agent Provocateur, opted for soft-cup, cotton and mesh lingerie for her new venture, a gender-neutral lingerie line called Les Girls Les Boys. It was an immediate sensation with stockists including Net-aPorter and Selfridges. Rees defines the brand as “unpretentious, honest and progressive”. The G-string is meeting a similar fate to the push-up bra. David Jones’s senior lingerie buyer, Angela Favaloro, says sales of the underpants that reigned in the ’00s have “plateaued” and there is a “big growth in full briefs”. Asked whether the body positivity movement has influenced her approach to buying, she says it’s definitely made her more aware. “People are embracing their curves and going out there and getting something that fits them correctly and that they feel comfortable in.” So, what’s the future of the industry? “Companies seeing their customers for who they really are — individuals and not metrics — is a good start,” Morris believes. “Society needs more companies that are brave enough to be able to stand for what they believe to be right.” At a time when definitions of ‘femininity’ are more vastly varied than ever, it’s fitting that women are eschewing traditional definitions of ‘sexy’ and instead embracing a kind of luxury that puts comfort front and centre. The proof is in the padding — or lack thereof.

H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019


STYLE

SAY MY

HAT’S IN A LOGO? In 2019, a lot. Three or four years ago, at the height of fashion’s minimalist mania, it was considered somewhat naff to be seen in something obviously branded — a hangover from the Paris Hilton/Von Dutch era. in full force: laden with irony and unequivocally chic again. Logo T-shirts staged a major comeback in 2018, and the Fendi Baguette and Dior Saddle bags — ’90s staples covered in unabashed insignia — became the new must-have arm candy. Saint Laurent, despite the name change, brandished its ‘YSL’ monogram, selling stockings with diamante versions stitched to the ankles. Balenciaga’s knife-point mules were covered in ‘B’s, and shrunken jumpers had the brand name splashed across the front. Even masters of restraint Valentino created silk-twill playsuits and cashmere jumpers with the logo repeated ad infinitum and styled chunky ‘V’ belts on day dresses. So why the shift? In the era of the Personal Brand — when social media accounts are curated to be tools of self-marketing —

it was perhaps inevitable that overt branding would re-enter the fray in clothes. Also, fashion is cyclical — a constant fight between action and reaction — and the only way to break free of our understated shackles is to slap on a pair of track pants covered in interlocking Gucci ‘G’s. It’s little surprise, given the musicalchairs-like swapping of creative directors among the major labels a couple of years ago, that many have unveiled bold new logos. Hedi Slimane made headlines with his subtle removal of Celine’s acute accent, but it was Riccardo Tisci who really went for it, logo-wise. He signalled his new role at Burberry by replacing its heritage logo and introducing a graphic of interlocking ‘T’s and ‘B’s (a testament to the brand’s founder, Thomas Burberry) in a palette of white, beige and orange. The new look is the brainchild of Peter Saville, the celebrated British art director who has created album artwork for Joy Division, New Order and Roxy Music — a man, like Tisci, highly adept at tapping into the mood of today’s youth culture. Tisci also unveiled a font change for the logo, replacing the vintage-style branding with block sans-serif lettering. Online punters spotted the synchronicity between the

H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019

JASON LLOYD-EVANS

NAME

As fashion houses unveil major rebrands, logomania is reaching fever pitch. Grace O’Neill investigates what label worship looks like in 2019

48

Clockwise from top left: Fendi S/S 2019; Fendi A/W 2018; Christian Dior S/S 2019.


“How to compete with the Burberrys and Balenciagas if you don’t have strong name recognition? The next generation tion of designerrs are gettingg experimental.”

pared-back new Burberry logo and those unveiled by Celine, Balenciaga and Balmain, among others, which spawned a short-lived meme and op-eds in The Business of Fashion, Hypebeast and elsewhere. There is an insinuation that the trend of simplified logos hints at a new homogeneity in the industry. But the perceived similarities in branding aren’t a sign that brands are trying to look the same as one another, but rather evidence that heritage houses are focused on updating their offering by stripping things back. “This house has such a long story, but my job is to modernise it and make it appealing to the customer we have today,” Demna Gvasalia said of Balenciaga. Echoes Maria Grazia Chiuri of Dior, “If you are a brand with such a huge history, you have to maintain the codes. But the brand has to be contemporary.” Gvasalia’s and Chiuri’s comments hint at why their respective tenures have been among the most commercially and critically successful of the major fashion houses (not coincidentally, both brands have found mass appeal via logo-heavy pieces). The message: the new era of high fashion is about going back to basics, prompting a fresh chapter for labels steeped in history. How to compete with the Burberrys and Balenciagas if you don’t have strong name recognition? The next generation of designeers are getting experimental with branding to distinguish themselves in an oversaturated market. Take Marine Serre, the French designer making m waves with in-the-know style obsessives, who forewent a tradiitional logo in favour of a crescent moon print, which has now beccome min ubiquitous via her brand of avant-garde cool (everyone from Yasm Sewell to Kendall Jenner is a fan). Tomo Koizumi, a Tokyo-baseed costumer turned designer, creates rainbow-hued, puff-of-tulle designs so distinctive that a logo would be laughably redundant he (see page 72 for our interview with him). And at Sies Marjan, th brand’s signature use of colour — rich tones of lavender, blush h and lemon — work in place of a logo. “Everything starts with colour,” creative director Sander Lak tells BAZAAR. “We don’t work with inspiration — we don’t like to be limited by a singlee theme or idea … The colours decide where the collection goes.” Susie Cave, founder of the cult label The Vampire’s Wife, alsoo d avoided branding on her line of ultra-feminine dresses and accessories, but her modern twist on the Victorian silhouette is so individual that each piece is immediately identifiable. But back to logomania and, more importantly, how to wear it. Far from a rally cry to embrace a splashy, ‘look what I can afford’ aesthetic, this is a trend that lives and dies by restraint. It’s sheer Prada knee-high socks worn with simple black leather Mary Janes — or a Gucci logo print trouser worn with a crisp white shirt and a barely-there sandal. There’ss a tongue-in-cheek, irony-laden sensibility that needs to bbe harnessed to pull it off — an official invitation to start taking your wardrobe a little less seriously. In a moment when everything feels so utterly serious, who wouldn’t want in on that?

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H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019

Clockwise from top left: B Balenciaga A/W 2018; Chanel S S/S 2019; Burberry S/S 2019; Chanel S/S 2019; Burberry S/S C 2019; Valentino S/S 2019; Gucci S/S 2019; Chanel S/S 2019; Fendi A/W 2018.


STYLE

The piece that launched

WEAR IT WITH … Aje.’s bestselling Isabelli blouse lends itself to fashion’s newfound love for bourgeoisie-inspired dressing

OUR BRAND

Nanushka blazer, $869, farfetch.com.

Bottega Veneta skirt, $4800, bottegaveneta.com.

Aje.’s Edwina Forrest, wearing Aje. blouse, $295, and pants, $395, and Adrian Norris, in his own clothes.

E

DWINA and I felt so connected to the landscapes we grew up in on the Sunshine Coast [in Queensland], and felt there needed to be a brand that bridged coastal and urban style,” says Adrian Norris, one half of fashion duo Aje.. The brand is celebrating its 10th anniversary this year in style, with the best friends invited to open Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Australia in May. “To inaugurate the second decade of Aje. by opening fashion week makes us so proud,” co-founder Edwina Forrest says. Forrest and Norris credit the voluminous ‘Isabelli’ blouse with sky-rocketing Aje. into the Australian fashion consciousness back in 2015. “The Isabelli was featured in a dozen top-tier magazines in Australia and internationally when it launched,” Norris recalls. “It’s a piece that perfectly embodies the style of our brand — we reinterpret it in each new collection.” It’s also a piece Forrest still turns to in her own wardrobe. “When paired with a more structured piece like a leather skirt, blazer or denim, it encapsulates a kind of tough femininity that I love,” she says.

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H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019

Aje. ‘Isabelli’ blouse, $295, a-j-e.com.au.

DANIEL GOODE. STYLED BY CAROLINE TRAN. HAIR BY KOH AT VIVIEN’S CREATIVE; MAKEUP BY NAOMI McFADDEN AT UNION; DANIEL GOODE IS REPRESENTED BY THE ARTIST GROUP. PRICES APPROXIMATE. SEE BUYLINES FOR STOCKISTS. AS TOLD TO GRACE O’NEILL

The Row boots, $2593, matchesfashion.com.


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BAZAA The

E

SAMAN

STREETS AHEAD Autumn inspiration from four

GETTY IMAGES

off-duty models-on-the-rise

Sasha Knysh at Paris fashion week.

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H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019


The

BAZAAR

ACNE STUDIOS JACKET, $2600, ACNESTUDIOS.COM.

ACNE STUDIOS PANTS, PRICE ON APPLICATION, ACNESTUDIOS.COM. ROGER VIVIER BAG, $3330, (02) 9221 8888.

CHANEL BRACELETS, $2940 FOR SET, 1300 242 635.

DIOR DIORIFIC LIPSTICK IN DIORISSIMO, $58.

Y CH EN V I G

YBELLINE VOLUM MA ’

BO TT E (0 BAG GA 2) , 92 $3 VEN 39 24 E 01 0, TA 88 .

IES MASCA R A ALS ,$ EF 20 TH .

ACNE STUDIOS JUMPER, $580, ACNESTUDIOS.COM.

BAL LY BAL SHOE LY.C S, $9 9 OM. AU. 0,

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H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019

EX PR S ES

RT EXPE OVER4. RRY C 9 BY TE SPF 15, $

FENDI TOP, $990, FENDI.COM.

BALENCIAGA SHIRT, $1605, BALENCIAGA.COM.

MM6 MAISON MARGIELA JACKET, $2022, NET-A-PORTER.COM.

PORTRAITS: FRANCESCO GILI; STILL LIFE: CHRIS JANSEN. STYLED BY SAMANTHA WONG. PRICES APPROXIMATE. SEE BUYLINES FOR STOCKISTS

CELINE BY HEDI SLIMANE BRACELET, $1300, (02) 9232 7051.

G, . BA 00 6 OR 4 DI 229 N IA ) 9 ST (02 I R , CH 900 4 $

GIVENCHY JUMPER, $1850, NET-A-PORTER.COM.

TIBI SKIRT, $1915, AU.TIBI.COM.

The Ukrainian model makes a case for putting your own spin on streetwear: layered leather, flashes of silver hardware and a not-so-subtle logo or two.Wear with attitude.

M. .CO R E T OR A-P T E 0, N 120 $ , S OE SH


S, M. OE O SH A.C GA AG IA CI NC EN LE AL BA 0, B 25 $1

TOTÊME JEANS, $250, NET-A-PORTER.COM.

L

IN

AL

$23. RE, A B

STILA ST AY

ONCEALER RE YC FIL L DA BRUNELLO CUCINELLI SKIRT, $2020, NET-A-PORTER.COM.

ACNE STUDIOS TOP, $490, ACNESTUDIOS.COM.

W RO YB , M , $43. LEY CIS DIUM PRE 3 ME CS ETI L IN SM NCI CO PE FIT ROW NE BE EYEB

N J JI EC IL S LS K A A LA N N C D D E, ER ER $ .C 39 O 5, M .

T PU IN I $52. K , IC IST OU ULT ON Y M L ILIA SPEL A

HOURGLASS A FIBRE GEL IN RCH BROW VOLUMIZIN G SOFT BRUN ETTE, $43.

G, $2095, MU LB BA ER

EMPORIO ARMANI BOOTS, $1050, ARMANI.COM. DRIES VAN NOTEN PANTS, $1130, NET-A-PORTER.COM.

A CN ES TU DIO S.COM.

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H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019

IT, NANUSHKA JUMPSU M. $573, NANUSHKA.CO

, 50 $8 S, E ST OT UDIOS BO

, 150 , $4 . G A DI B .COM FENFENDI

CHRISTIAN DIOR EARRINGS, $750, (02) 9229 4600.

AC N

BLAZÉ MILANO JACKET, $2600, BLAZE-MILANO.COM.

HAIDER ACKERMANN PANTS, $2204, HAIDERACKERMANN.COM.

RY

ACNE STUDIOS JACKET, $1200, ACNESTUDIOS.COM.

M. .CO RY

MU LB ER

STEL LA M c MATC CARTNE Y HESF ASHIOSHOES, $ 682, N.CO M.

This biomedical engineering student, who was scouted over Facebook, is tthe picture of sophistication in neutral tones with gold accents. Keep the makeup simple, hair flip and go.


The

CH AN E

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R BEHR HAIR C IFE L I P, NN $2 JE

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G, I BAM. AN RM I.CO IO ARMAN RG GIO 100, A $3

ATTICO SHOES, $1120, THEATTICO.COM.

KHAITE PANTS, $715, MATCHESFASHION.COM.

COACH 1941 DRESS, $1595, COACHAUSTRALIA.COM.

L

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ALEXANDER M cQUEEN JACK ET, $7907, ALEXANDERM CQUEEN.COM.

S, , G N IN TIO . RR ICA AU EA L . R PP M IE A .CO RT ON IER CACE RT I A PR C

JASON WU DRESS, $688, JASONWUSTUDIO.COM.

S W TILA EY ATE STA EL RP Y IN RO A BL ER I OF LL D AC N I LI AY K, NT QU $3 EN ID 4. SE

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H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019

CO VEST, $1025, CO-COLLECTIONS.COM.

ALEXANDER McQUEEN CORSET, $2375, ALEXANDERMCQUEEN.COM.

PORTRAIT: FRANCESCO GILI; STILL LIFE: VINCENT DE LA FAILLE; CHRIS JANSEN. STYLED BY SAMANTHA WONG

As one of fashion’s most in-demand faces, this South Korean stunner is a master of doing classic without looking conservative. An untucked oversized shirt is elevated by a bold lip and on-trend pearls.


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An icon of Italian elegance


BAZAAR Work at

BUSINESS SWEET Estée Lauder executive J ANE H ERTZMARK H UDIS brings a sleek, curatorial eye to her penthouse apartment on New York’s Upper East Side. By J ESSICA M ATLIN

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Photographed by DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN

Hudis in the dining room under a Derick Pobell mobile. Oscar de la Renta dress, price on application; Manolo Blahnik shoes, $928 (worn throughout); her own watch. Styled by JOANNA HILLMAN

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“A clean space is conducive to clear thinking.”

o understand Jane Hertzmark Hudis, all you need to do is take a peek inside her fridge. In the glow of her Sub-Zero sit rows of Saratoga Spring Water (labels facing forward), racks of champagne, Ladurée macarons, and neatly stacked Iittala glass cubes filled with fresh-cut fruit, all arranged like a De Stijl painting. The onetime art history student hetics — her home is bursting with modern art — but she’s equally obsessed with rigour. “I’m very disciplined,” she says, smiling. She has to be: the self-described brand-builder runs Estée Lauder, Bobbi Brown, Aerin, Darphin, Aveda, La Mer, Bumble and bumble and Origins. Here’s how she gets it done. AM ROUTINE “When I was a baby, my parents couldn’t get me to sleep — I didn’t want to miss out. I’m still like that today. I wake up at 5am to my Tiffany clock. I’ll go on email and Instagram for an hour, and if it’s nice out I’ll walk to work in my Le Monde Beryl flats. Aerin [Lauder] introduced me to them. They’re the most comfortable things in the entire world. I’m at the office by 7.30am. I like to be the first person there so I can respond to email (my inbox is my to-do list) and set the agenda for the day.” OFFICE UNIFORM “People always tell me when they see a piece that’s ‘very Jane’. That means it’s modern, elegant and simple — and it’s usually a dress. Right now, I’m long on Oscar [de la Renta]. My jewellery is very classic: I wear my wedding band and a Cartier watch. I bought it 15 years ago as a gift for myself. My go-to heels are black Manolos. I keep three different pairs in the office, both suede and leather, with 90-millimetre heels. I carry everything in a [Hermès] Birkin.” BEAUTY REGIMEN “I use Estée Lauder Advanced Night Repair morning and night. Then I apply La Mer The Moisturizing Soft Cream and La Mer The Eye Concentrate. When it comes to makeup, I wear a lot of neutrals. I have 25 lipsticks in rotation, but most days I wear the same nude lipstick. For an important meeting, I up the ante. I want to look professional and powerful; I’m selling what we do. That means thicker liner and a deeper lip.” PERSONAL TOUCH “In my office, I have a file called ‘Nice Notes’ — emails and cards I’ve received over the years. In today’s world with all the tech, there’s nothing like a beautiful handwritten note, and, honestly, I learnt that from the Lauder family. I have a cabinet full of stationery.” EVENING ESCAPE “There’s a tranquillity to this apartment. I worked on it very closely with [architect and interior designer] Lee Mindel. It’s a real indoor-outdoor space. When I get home, I sit in the bath with my Jo Malone oil, look out at the skyline and process the day. Sometimes I’ll have a glass of wine with my husband, Cliff, on the terrace. On weekends I watch Law & Order and On the Case with Paula Zahn — I love crime shows.”

A Line Vautrin Folie mirror and limed-oak mirrored screens by Lee Mindel, fabricated by Atelier Prelati.

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DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN. STYLED BY JOANNA HILLMAN. HAIR AND MAKEUP BY ALEXA RODULFO, ALEXARODULFO.COM. PRICES APPROXIMATE. SEE BUYLINES FOR STOCKISTS

B A Z A A R at Work


Her evening ritual: relaxing in the bath under a Timo Sarpaneva mobile.

Hudis adores luxe skincare and feminine fragrances.

Valentino dress, $7500; Cartier ring, price on application.

E X E C U T I V E

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Tiffany & Co. alarm clock, $925, tiffany.com.

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H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019

Le Monde shoes, $440, lemondeberyl.com.

Cartier watch, $38,200, cartier.com.au.


MOSCHINO A/W 2019.

B A Z A A R at Work

MY GREATEST FEAR is being retired, wearing a shapeless polyester outfit and drinking cask wine — all because I haven’t saved enough to afford the lifestyle to which I’m accustomed. This isn’t a baseless fear: the lack of money women have in retirement is a big issue. Living in poverty is a very real prospect for millions of women aged 55 and older. Research by Australia’s Superannuation Industry (ASFA) shows just 18 per cent of women aged between 55 and 59 have saved more than $200,000 for their retirement (although 37 per cent of men have managed it). There are a number of reasons women face an uphill battle: we’re time-poor and often juggling work, families and ageing parents, more likely to run a single-parent household after a divorce, typically earn less than men, and yet we live longer. Add to this the fact that superannuation was never really designed for women, and we’re facing a toxic stew of inequality.

story, though: it had happened 10 years earlier and since then, she had reskilled and found a job, all while raising her son, and was now at the expo planning to buy her first home. I don’t think she coined the saying “a man is not a plan”, but it was the first time I’d heard it, and I found it inspirational. Interestingly, the lessons that have stuck with me most are the simple ones, like: there’s more to money than money. Let me explain. I drive a 2009 Volkswagen Touareg, which I bought new. It wasn’t perhaps the smartest money move, but I believe just once in your life you should be able to enjoy that new-car smell. I didn’t need to borrow any money for it and I intend to run it into the ground. But when I drive to school sports on Saturdays and park my car, I feel as though I’ve entered a luxury car dealership. Some seriously wealthy people go to my kids’ schools, and I park among Maseratis, BMWs, Mercs, Teslas, Porsches and even the odd Ferrari. I’ll be honest and say that sometimes I feel a little poor — but am I? While living longer is nothing to complain about, I do worry As I was watching a game, one mother came up to me and said about how I’m going to fund these extra golden years. I’m not sure she had just purchased a book about saving and making money. where that fear of running out of money has come from, but I asked why she would need to read such a book: she is a lawyer strangely, I’m thankful for it, because it and I believe her husband is a senior has driven me to do the best I can with figure in the finance industry. Her what money I do have — and that’s the response was simple: “We can’t save a key. It really doesn’t matter what you cent!” As she drove out of the car park earn; what matters is what you spend. in the latest Porsche Cayenne, it got Money magazine’s chairman and chief me thinking that earning a six-figure commentator, Paul Clitheroe, taught salary may be a sign of status and me this little gem when he offered me success, but it doesn’t mean you’re a job to move from banking into TV immune from financial woes. Whether You’re making $200,000 a year on half my salary.At the time, dropping you’re earning $200,000 or $60,000, yet are always desperate for my wage by such a drastic amount there are some very simple reasons you seemed like the worst thing I could do, may be feeling broke, and money may payday. Finance editor and but it turned out to be the best money actually have nothing to do with it. commentator EffiE Zahos move I ever made. I still don’t consider One of the chapters in my new myself a financial guru,but after 20-odd book, A Real Girl’s Guide to Money, explains why, and what to do years working on Money and being a covers this: you earn $200k, so why the regular money commentator for TV, hell do you still feel broke? radio and expos, I’ve picked up some money gems worth sharing. I understand how somebody on $50k may be able to save as I’ve also heard just about everything when it comes to people’s much as somebody on $100k. On $50k, they’re probably young money woes. Like the woman who racked up $60,000 on her and starting with no debt — or at least not as much as a 40-year-old credit card, sent the statements to a private PO box and wondered with two kids. And if they’re like most twentysomethings who are if her husband would find out when they were applying for a home serious about saving, they’re quite happy to share accommodation, loan. Or the lady who had to start all over again at the age of 40 maybe even rent a couch and live on two-minute noodles. and didn’t even know which bank her accounts were with. Without But assuming we are talking about two people of similar age, any warning, the latter woman came up to me at a property expo stage and circumstance, how is it possible for the lower-income and blurted out: “He left me for his secretary.” This was no sob earner to be able to save more? When I asked behavioural

IF IT’S

BROKE ...

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FRESH WAYS TO SLASH YOUR EXPENSES

GETTY IMAGES

Uber, UberEats, Deliveroo,Afterpay, Zip Pay,Tipple … they’re handy, but they add up.Whatever your app of choice, grab a copy of your purchase history (it’s all online) and if you’re shocked about how much you’re spending, delete that app.

economist and psychologist Phil Slade this question, he said, “A fascinating psychological phenomenon comes into play here — FOLLOW A 5:2 MONEY DIET it’s a problem of relativity; it’s a struggle with You’ve heard of the 5:2 intermittent loss aversion.” Basically, if someone on fasting diet, where you eat normally $50,000 (that’s $961.54 a week) considers for five days but only eat 500-600 spending $500, the pain of the loss relative calories on the other two days. The 5:2 money diet is similar, but to their income is much greater than the loss opposite.Try not to indulge in any felt by the person on $100,000 (who’s discretionary spending Monday to earning $1923.08 per week) when considFriday — that means no coffees, ering the same $500 purchase. Therefore, bottled water, takeaways and so on because a large part of our spending consists — and on the weekends resume of many smaller purchases, the person on spending as usual. $100,000 is likely to spend more because it doesn’t feel so painful when each ‘loss’ seems DON’T HIDE BEHIND THE CPW small relative to their overall income (rather The cost-per-wear formula is an than the immediate state of their bank easy answer to “Should I buy it?” account). This can have the effect of making But although Louboutins at just $2.64 per day would be a bargain, money more fluid and harder to save. The no one wears the same pair of person on $50,000 feels more pain for every shoes for 365 days. CPW is a false small purchase, making money less fluid and economy. Stick to high-quality therefore easier to track and save. pieces and work the wardrobe you The solution is simple. Divide your money already own. It may even be between buckets and label them. You’ll find worth paying a stylist to sort your it’s a lot harder to dip into a bucket that’s wardrobe if it stops you from marked “home loan deposit” if you want it wasting cash on unworn purchases. for a trip to New York. Another gem is to understand the power ASK FOR A DISCOUNT of compound interest. As Albert Einstein is If you’re spending on dry cleaning or grooming, for example, tell your reported to have said: “Compound interest provider why they should give is the eighth wonder of the world. He who you a discount. If you’re a regular understands it, earns it ... he who doesn’t ... customer, they don’t want to lose pays it.” In short, compound interest is you. By showing them how much where you earn interest on your interest. For business you give them, a discount example, if you saved $10,000 for five years of five to 10 per cent is a no-brainer at five per cent per year and the interest was for them to keep you. calculated at the end of the term, you’d have less than if you’d saved the same amount at IF YOU ONLY DO ONE THING: the same rate for the same amount of time, Pay yourself $12 every time you take but had interest added monthly. your lunch to work. Set up an online This explains why, if you saved from the saver and call it “EAT ME”.Transfer $12 into it just before you have a bite age of 25 to 35 and then stopped, you would of your homemade lunch. If you’ve still have more than somebody who started at forgotten to bring your lunch to 35 and saved until they were 65. Hard to work, do not use this money to pay believe, perhaps, but it’s true. Of course, the for it.Assuming you’re 25, with a rate of return plays a big part in who comes return of three per cent a year you’ll out in front. Let’s assume a seven per cent have more than $115,000 in that annual return. Dial down the return, say, to account by the time you hit 50. six per cent, and you’ll find the person who started saving at 35 until 65 would be better off. But still, when it comes to portfolios, the 35-year-old’s is made up of significantly more investment return than the 65-year-old’s. And finally, if you’re not already doing it, salary-sacrifice into super. There are probably a million pressing money issues you have

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to deal with right now and super might be last on your list. But super is (for most of us) one of the most tax-effective wealth-creation strategies for the future. Let me explain why: on a 39 per cent marginal tax rate (including two per cent Medicare) you’d pay $390 tax on $1000. However, if you salary-sacrifice the $1000 into super, you’d pay just $150, because super contributions are taxed at 15 per cent. Why give the tax office an extra $140 when you can “pay yourself forward” by putting it into your super fund? A Real Girl’s Guide to Money: From Converse to Louboutins, by Effie Zahos (Bauer Publishing), $25. MOSCHINO A/W 2019.

“It really doesn’t matter what you earn; what matters is what you spend.”

DELETE AT LEAST ONE APP FROM YOUR PHONE:


B A Z A A R at Work

Her office is the largest room in the house, the formal living room. In front of her 1950s wooden desk, she and Chappelli have set up a sitting area with a marble coffee table from the ’60s, two Elise Pioch Balzac at her desk, with Christiane green velvet armchairs that came with the house and a curved Spangsberg’s poster for leather lounge found in an antique store. A large chandelier hangs the Copenhagen Jazz above her work area, which is lit by several lamps and filled with Festival framed behind. fresh flowers, reference books and samples from upcoming Maison Balzac collections. “I love lamps and can’t stop accumulating them,” she says, “which is why I ended up with at least three in the office. I keep my desk very clean, otherwise I cannot think clearly, and I surround myself with all the samples and prototypes as it’s a way to live with them and decide whether they suit our collection.” Working in a south-facing mansion with plenty of natural sunlight and direct views of a garden filled with flowers may sound idyllic, but the reality of managing a head office based in Sydney from rural France is not without its challenges. “Without emails, it would be impossible,” Balzac says. “While Sydney is sleeping, I work on emails and vice versa, so our office is open 24 hours a day six days a week. We do phone calls at 10.30pm my time, which is 8.30am Sydney time, and we love sharing documents on Google Docs.” Relocating to France has allowed Balzac, the great-granddaughter of the famous French playwright and novelist Honoré de Balzac, to ex and the international distribution for her candles. They’re sold around the world by retailers including Bergdorf Goodman in New York and Selfridges in London. “I’ve created a new business in France, which takes care of the distribution of Maison Balzac in the Northern Hemisphere, so I focus on that, the artistic direction and brand development, and the Sydney team focuses on manufacWhether in the heart turing, production and marketing,” she says. With its ornate plaster cornices and mouldof Sydney or a LISE PIOCH BALZAC works ings, and a mix of ’60s furniture with 19th-cenfrom a maison de maître (master’s tury architecture, Balzac’s office is a more medieval village in house) built in 1890 in the heart subdued take on her all-time dream space. “The France, the founder of the village of Murviel-Lèsoffice of Mr Oizo and his puppet, Flat Eric, in Béziers in the South of France. “Flat Beat”, by Quentin Dupieux, is my biggest M aison B alzac of Renowned for its wineries, frominspiration,” she says. But while the video for the ucolic life, the pretty medieval fuses history with the song (look it up on YouTube), shot in a historic village is now also home to Balzac’s luxury candle apartment a few hundred metres from Versailles, latest tech gizmos. business, Maison Balzac. Together with her has Flat Eric using old-school technology such as husband, Pablo Chappelli, and daughter, Loulou, a rotary dial telephone and a vinyl turntable, By G eorGina s afe the French-born businesswoman relocated from Balzac prefers a contemporary take on gadgets. Sydney to France in 2018. “We lived in Australia “We’ve recently equipped the house for 14 years, but it was becoming harder and harder to with Woox [smart] plugs, which are With Maison Balzac live away from our families,” she says. Balzac spent two connected to our phones and voices candles and coloured painstaking years searching for a property that would glass vessels. so we can turn on and off lights, allow her to be closer to her parents in nearby Béziers music, heating or a computer in a and Chappelli’s family in Kent, England, before simple command. I never thought deciding on Murviel-Lès-Béziers. it would make my workspace so “We were looking for an unrestored house exactly comfortable and functional — like this, online from Sydney, and we asked my parents I highly recommend them!” to visit the ones we liked,” Balzac says. “It was difficult to find homes with original features, enough space to “Nothing seemed live and work in, and that fitted our budget.” too difficult for him The country mansion they finally secured would have originally been the home of a squire. Chappelli, an when it came to industrial designer, led an extensive renovation. “Pablo the renovation, and did everything from removing wallpaper to mending furniture,” Balzac says. “Nothing seemed too difficult it helps that we have for him when it came to the renovation, and it helps that we have the same taste.” the same taste.”

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PABLO CHAPPELLI

MY OFFICE


Let me tell you

A SECRET …

Does your inner leader need inspiring? Other women’s experiences can help teach us how to deal with the complex challenges female leaders face, so we asked industry experts to share their best success strategies ON WORK & WELLBEING “Try a digital detox — this can be anything from reading a book for an hour before bed to spending a weekend away from your device in order to reduce stress levels.” DR TARA SWART, neuroscientist and leadership coach

“In our age of overload, my number-one hack is to treat your diary like your body. You wouldn’t let anything be put into your body without permission, and the same goes for your calendar — you have to own it.” JULIA HOBSBAWM, writer and speaker

“If you prioritise one activity in your life, it should be sleep. Just one night with fewer than six or seven hours is the equivalent to drinking two glasses of red wine: your learning ability, creativity, communication, decisionmaking and memory all suffer.” VICKI CULPIN, professor of organisational behaviour at Ashridge Executive Education

“It takes a lot of willpower to switch off. Find something you’re passionate about — in my case, it’s baking cookies — that will force you to focus on something other than work.” AMY BROWN, head of creative strategy, events & experiences for Google in EMEA

THE FINANCIAL PENALTY OF BEING FEMALE “Continue asking for what you believe you’re worth. Industry leaders are acutely aware that women are underrepresented at the top of everything, so hang in there. If you’re good, you will be rewarded.” FIONA SHACKLETON, lawyer

“UBS research shows that women, who already lose out because of the gender pay gap, are more risk-averse when it comes to investing, more likely to work flexibly and take breaks to care for parents and children, and tend to live longer, all of which contribute to a greatly reduced lifetime’s wealth compared with their male counterparts. To counteract this, you must arm yourself, educate yourself and make yourself financially competent.” SHONA BAIJAL, managing director of UBS UK

SPEAKING TRUTH TO POWER “With social innovation, when everything is on a small scale, you’re very much feted, but the minute your ideas might affect power or systems, nobody likes it quite so much and you’re a ‘dangerous person’. It can be very shocking. But you only go though it once. After you’ve been through that fire, you realise that nothing touches you.” HILARY COTTAM, social activist

“Evidence is armour. If someone claims something isn’t right, I’ll say, ‘I’m sorry, here are 300 references for you to go and read.’” GINA RIPPON, neuroscientist

“I think congratulating each other and saying ‘well done’ is very important. If you see another woman doing well, reach out and say that. When you’re getting negativity, kindness helps you keep going.” GINA MILLER, political campaigner

VOICES OF AUTHORITY “I had just been promoted into my first leadership job when one of my colleagues gave me some feedback. ‘When you come in and you say “hello” it makes us feel great, but when you come in looking stressed, we all feel it,’ he said. That was the moment I realised that to these people I was a plot device called ‘boss’, and what I was doing was having an impact on them.” ANTONIA ROMEO, permanent secretary of the Department for International Trade, UK

“In the ’90s I was offered a promotion and I said, ‘no — I’m not good enough.’ A female manager told me, ‘We have confidence in you, so you should believe that we are making the right assessment.’ I attended a course on assertiveness that completely transformed me. I took the job, grew in confidence and since then I’ve been unrecognisable from when I was younger.” INGA BEALE, former CEO of Lloyds of London

“Negotiation is at the heart of being able to access what you need and want. Make sure you are not relying on other people to do the asking for you.” NATALIE REYNOLDS, CEO of AdvantageSpring

A LESSON IN PUBLIC SPEAKING “When I was writing my book How to Own the Room: Women and the Art of Brilliant Speaking, I examined dozens of great female orators, and I realised that the most important thing is to find your own style. Michelle Obama is hugely inspirational because she has what I call ‘happy high status’ — when you are powerful but you feel relaxed about it. It is about being comfortable with who you are and being able to talk to the Queen and a homeless person in exactly the same way. Theresa May is a less obvious example. She can sound nervous at the beginning of every speech and there’s rarely any emotion in what she says. She is imperfect and awkward, but still she clings onto her power. I find her strangely inspiring, too — she shows women the range of styles that are available. You don’t have to be as good as Michelle Obama — you can be Theresa May! You can find your own way.” VIV GROSKOP, comedian

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Tomo Koizumi A/W 2019.

LARGER THAN LIFE

Fashion’s breakout star Tomo Koizumi; winning new labels to shop now; and style icon Lee Radziwill’s final interview

Z

Edited by

GETTY IMAGES

GRACE O’NEILL

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The B U Z Z

From swoon-inducing gowns to a fairy godmother, Japanese designer Tomo Koizumi’s story is a modern fashion fairytale, finds D IVYA B ALA

‘GILESDEACON_ STARTED FOLLOWING YOU.’ In 2019, the modern fairytale opens not with ‘Once upon a time’, but with the approval of an influential personality on Instagram. It’s not a stretch to call Tomo Koizumi’s past six months a fashion fantasy come true. Few have burst onto the scene with as much pomp and circumstance (and Instagram coverage) as the Japanese designer did after his breakout New York fashion week show in February, where his rainbow-hued explosions of tulle and taffeta debuted to a global audience. But let’s backtrack a little. It was the designer Giles Deacon who set off the chain reaction that led Koizumi to fashion week. After discovering him on Instagram, the British couturier raved about Koizumi to his friend the mega stylist Katie Grand, the fairy godmother in this tale. Soon, Koizumi and Grand were texting and, within an hour, had hatched a plan to showcase Koizumi’s designs at New York fashion week — just three weeks away. “It felt unreal,” he reflects. In fact, this wasn’t his first brush with stardom. In 2016, Lady Gaga wore one of Koizumi’s cloudlike creations, accessorising it with a “VOTE” badge during the US elections, a monumental shift in exposure level from his usual stage of Japanese theatre and pop musicians. “It was a big moment for me,” he says. Flash forward two years, and Grand pulled some formidable fashion strings for the emerging designer, securing him a space at Marc Jacobs’s Madison Avenue store, makeup giant Pat McGrath backstage and a line-up of money-can’t-buy modelling talent, including Emily Ratajkowski, Joan Smalls, Bella Hadid, Taylor Hill and Karen Elson. Koizumi was born in Chiba prefecture, a largely rural area of Japan just outside Tokyo. The designer didn’t study fashion; as a teenager, he stumbled on a picture from a 2004 runway show of John Galliano’s Dior and simply began creating. He majored in art education while studying in Tokyo and, in his spare time, sewed and assisted stylists and costume designers, harbouring an aspiration to be the editor of a fashion magazine. He even managed to squeeze in a year in Sydney, in 2013, before returning to Tokyo to design full-time. Back in his home base of Tokyo a few days after February’s show, the designer is still digesting his whirlwind breakout. “I’d only

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Tomo Koizumi.

PON U E C A N

UBLE TAP DO

O

All images: Tomo Koizumi A/W 2019.


been to New York once, eight years ago, when I was in university. So it was my second time there and I held a shoow,” Koizumi marvels, before revealing he recruited seamstresses and various show helpers via Instagram. The colours of the collection n were inspired by anime character Sailor Moon, he explains. “Wh “When I was young, I was so drawn to her. And I was inspired by shape of some of the Buddhist statues in Shintoism. It was quite random and mixed.” Koizumi’s creations are immense. In his debut, the largest gown took 200 metres of Japanese polyester organza and the better part of a week to put together. His final look was an assembly of seven individual pieces piled up and over one another, layered kimono-style and brought to life by glamazon Gwendoline Christie, whose steady walk down a staircase in the elaborate creation inspired a thousand memes (think: “When my friends say dress casual …”). After the show, the global fashion media blew up, clamouring to post pictures of Koizumi’s frothy organza stylings on Instagram. In pop culture, actor Sophie Turner wore one of his designs in the highfashion music video for the Jonas Brothers’ single “Sucker”, while Miley Cyrus posted six back-to-back photographs of herself wearing a Koizumi-designed two-piece, amassing about five million Instagram likes. Despite the whirlwind of activity around his debut — three weeks to put together a collection, four days in New York before the show, a global frenzy in the aftermath — Koizumi remained calm and collected throughout. “It wasn’t that stressful,” he says, nonchalantly. “I was kind of relaxed before the show.” The biggest shock for him came later, when fashion buyers so bombarded him that he had no time to enjoy any downtime for “Koizumi’s cultural hot-spotting in New York. “I thought that after the show I would have more time to go to museums and hang out, but creations are buyers texted me a lot, and editors contacted me to see my immense. In his debut, clothes, so I had to have a showroom day,” he says. In the wake of the show, trending #TomoKoizumi the largest gown took 200 posts on Instagram have set a new course for the designer. “I [hadn’t thought] about selling before metres of Japanese that,” he admits. Now that he is, the future is polyester organza and the looking as bright and lively as his unique creations. Now that’s what we call a better part of a week to happily ever after.

put together.”

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The B U Z Z Clockwise from left: Lee Radziwill with Truman Capote in 1969; a portrait from 1962; at Giorgio Armani’s S/S 1988 presentation at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles; with her son, Anthony, in Ravello, Italy, in 1962; at home in New York in 1976; with ballet dancer Rudolf Nureyev in the late ’60s; in New York in 1972.

The late style icon, Capote swan, sister of Jackie O, and one of the most alluring women ever, told us a thing or two before she passed away in February at the age of 85. By D eborah N eeDlemaN

Lee RadziwiLL

IN

QUESTIONS

WHO WAS A PERSON WHO HAD A BIG INFLUENCE ON YOU? The great Renaissance art historian Bernard

Berenson, whom I met when I was 18. He created the terms “life-enhancing” and “life-diminishing” to describe people. It’s so true — people are either one or the other. WHICH PERSON ALIVE TODAY DO YOU MOST ADMIRE? Myself. WHY? I think I’ve gotten through

an awful lot completely alone.

WHICH PHOTOGRAPHER BEST CAPTURES WHO YOU ARE? The pictures Bert Stern took of me are sensational

— he was the best for me, and for Marilyn Monroe. WHY? For their sense of laughter and freedom.

WHO IS THE SEXIEST MAN YOU’VE EVER KNOWN?

David Somerset, the late Duke of Beaufort. The sexiest and most elegant. DID YOU HAVE AN AFFAIR WITH HIM?

None of your business. Let’s say it was a flirtation. WHICH OF YOUR HOMES WAS YOUR FAVOURITE?

I loved each of them while I was there. WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE SPOT IN YOUR HOME NOW? My bed. WHY? I designed it, and it’s the perfect

length and width. The whole room, including the bed, is fuchsia, my favourite colour. There’s a great picture of me with Andy Warhol over the desk. WHAT IS YOUR FAVOURITE PLACE IN THE WORLD? The Amalfi Coast. WHAT WAS THE BEST TRIP YOU EVER MADE?

My first trip to Europe. I went with my sister when I was 18 and she was 22. When we got back we wrote and illustrated a book about it called One Special Summer.

Wide Sargasso Sea, by Jean Rhys. WHAT’S YOUR FAVOURITE BUILDING? The cathedral in Mantua, Italy. The painting in the dome is breathtaking. DO YOU HAVE A PASSION OR TALENT? Many. TELL US ONE? Painting watercolours.

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GETTY IMAGES

WHAT’S YOUR FAVOURITE BOOK?


Christian Kimber

WINNER, NATIONAL D E S I G N E R AWA R D

This image and left: Christian Kimber A/W 2019. Inset: the designer.

Sometimes it takes an outsider to spur innovation. Such was the case with Christian Kimber, the Londoner turned Melburnian who took out the coveted National Designer Award for his eponymous menswear label, joining the likes of Dion Lee, Romance Was Born and Toni Maticevski. Upon arriving in Australia eight years ago, Kimber realised Australian designers weren’t representing a certain strand of menswear. “In America, you think about Ralph Lauren and how he defined a whole genre of how men dress. Paul Smith did the same in the UK and Brunello Cucinelli did it in Italy,” Kimber says. “My dream is to redefine what we do in Australia. People see us as being all about boardshorts and singlets, but we’re actually very contemporary, and the way men dress is very specific.” So what does that look like? It’s a soft-tailored cotton blazer that transitions from afternoon meetings to after-work drinks, or a fresh twist on the Oxford shirt realised in Italian denim. And, yes, if you’re already wondering, women are fans of the brand too. “There’s a lot of ‘Get that because I’m going to steal it!’ in our stores,” Kimber says, laughing. “Or women will buy men’s designs in a smaller size. I love this idea of stealing your partner’s closet — pairing an oversized men’s shirt with heels.”

GRAND DESIGNS

The winners of the Virgin Australia Melbourne Fashion Festival’s National Designer Award represent the changing face of local fashion. G RACE O’N EILL gets acquainted

Arnsdorf

CHRISTIAN KIMBER MAX CRUSE; LUCAS DAWSON; ARNSDORF: TASHA TYLEE

HONOURABLE MENTION FOR SUSTAINABILITY

Jade Sarita Arnott’s classic-with-a-twist designs were a hit among Melbourne’s fashion crowd from the moment Arnsdorf launched in 2006, but it wasn’t until Arnott relaunched in 2017 (after a five-year hiatus) that the rest of the fashion world really took notice. “We decided to throw out the rule book of how a brand should operate,” she says. This included creating all pieces in-house, offering bespoke alterations for garments and sticking to limited seasonal drops, rather than huge bi-annual collections. They also instigated a strict ‘no sales’ rule. “I feel that slashing prices at the end of each season devalues the materials and the craftsmanship,” Arnott explains. “We want someone to buy a pair of our suit trousers, then come back three seasons later and buy the matching jacket — it’s design that is timeless and is made to last.” Taking out the Honourable Mention for Sustainability, Arnott says the recognition of Arnsdorf is a sign the industry is moving in the right direction. “It’s great validation for us, but it’s also great that the industry is recognising that there are so many customers out there who are willing to spend that little bit extra to support ethically made clothes.”

From far left: Arnsdorf S/S 2019; Jade Sarita Arnott; an Arnsdorf suit.


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PORTRAIT of a BRIDE BY CARINE ROITFELD

PHOTOGRAPHED BY TINA TYRELL CREATIVE DIRECTION BY KSTUDIO TAYLOR HILL WEARS VALENTINO HAUTE COUTURE SKIRT, HOOD, TIGHTS AND SHOES; AMATO GLOVES. ALL CLOTHING AND ACCESSORIES, PRICE ON APPLICATION. LANCÔME BROW DENSIFY POWDER-TO-CREAM ($50)


OPPOSITE PAGE: INDIRA SCOTT WEARS CHANEL HAUTE COUTURE SWIMSUIT AND VEIL; HARRY WINSTON RING. DIOR ROUGE DIOR ULTRA ROUGE IN ULTRA NIGHT ($53) GRACE ELIZABETH WEARS ARMANI PRIVÉ DRESS; LYZ OLKO T-SHIRT; TIA MAZZA VEIL; STYLIST’S OWN GLOVES; FARAONE MENNELLA NECKLACE. ESTÉE LAUDER PURE COLOR DESIRE ROUGE EXCESS LIPSTICK IN RISK IT ($60)


CHUNJIE LIU WEARS BALMAIN COUTURE COAT; VEX CLOTHING GLOVES AND STOCKINGS; GIANVITO ROSSI SHOES. L’ORÉAL PARIS INFALLIBLE BLACK VELVET LINER ($28) OPPOSITE PAGE: HIANDRA MARTINEZ WEARS GIVENCHY HAUTE COUTURE TOP; TIA MAZZA VEIL; HARRY WINSTON EARRINGS. CHANEL LE VERNIS IN ARANCIO VIBRANTE ($41)


OPPOSITE PAGE: GRACE ELIZABETH WEARS Q HOUSE OF BASICS T-SHIRTS; VEX CLOTHING GLOVES. ESTÉE LAUDER DOUBLE WEAR LIGHT SOFT MATTE HYDRA MAKEUP ($58) HANNAH FERGUSON WEARS DIOR HAUTE COUTURE DRESS, CAP AND FACE VEIL. CLINIQUE HIGH IMPACT CUSTOM BLACK KAJAL IN BLACKENED BLACK ($36)


OPPOSITE PAGE: UGBAD ABDI WEARS ARMANI PRIVÉ DRESS AND VEIL; VEX CLOTHING GLOVES. YVES SAINT LAURENT ROUGE PUR COUTURE THE SLIM MATTE LIPSTICK IN RED ENIGMA ($59) HIANDRA WEARS GIVENCHY HAUTE COUTURE TOP, BODYSUIT, SKIRT, STOCKINGS AND SHOES. MAYBELLINE NEW YORK THE BURGUNDY BAR EYESHADOW PALETTE ($27)


OPPOSITE PAGE: TAYLOR WEARS ALEXANDRE VAUTHIER COUTURE TOP, PANTS AND SCARF. LANCÔME L’ABSOLU GLOSS IN CAFÉ CRÈME ($36) HIANDRA WEARS DIOR HAUTE COUTURE JACKET, SHIRT, CAP AND FACE VEIL; HARRY WINSTON RING. GIVENCHY LE VERNIS IN NOIR INTERDIT ($36)


HANNAH WEARS WOLFORD BODYSUIT; TIA MAZZA VEIL; VEX CLOTHING GLOVES; HARRY WINSTON NECKLACE. SISLEY PARIS PHYTO-EYE TWIST IN BLACK DIAMOND ($55)


OPPOSITE PAGE: GRACE ELIZABETH WEARS VALENTINO HAUTE COUTURE CAPE AND JUMPSUIT. ESTÉE LAUDER DOUBLE WEAR ZERO-SMUDGE LIQUID EYELINER IN BLACK ($42) HIANDRA WEARS GIAMBATTISTA VALLI HAUTE COUTURE CAPE, DRESS AND SHOES; HARRY WINSTON EARRINGS. BY TERRY BAUME DE ROSE BODY CREAM ($132) MODEL WEARS LOVESHACKFANCY DRESS; ROGER VIVIER SHOES.


HANNAH WEARS ATELIER VERSACE WEDDING GOWN; STYLIST’S OWN BOW; PORTOLANO PRODUCTS GLOVES; HARRY WINSTON EARRINGS, BRACELET AND RING. ESTÉE LAUDER PURE COLOR ENVY LASH MULTI EFFECTS MASCARA ($50) OPPOSITE PAGE: INDIRA WEARS GIVENCHY HAUTE COUTURE JACKET, DRESS, BODYSUIT AND BACKPACK WITH BOW; WING + WEFT GLOVES; HARRY WINSTON EARRINGS. ESTÉE LAUDER PURE COLOR ENVY MATTE SCULPTING LIPSTICK IN VOLATILE ($52) SITTINGS EDITORS: RON HARTLEBEN AND DANIEL GAINES CASTING DIRECTOR: EVELIEN JOOS HAIR: LUCAS WILSON MAKEUP: GRACE AHN MANICURES: MEI KAWAJIRI PRODUCER: HANNAH HUFFMAN SET DESIGNER: ANDREA STANLEY DIGITAL TECHNICIAN: MATTHEW SHRIER FASHION ASSISTANT: LAUREN FERN PHOTO ASSISTANTS: CHAD MEYER, DARIN BURCH AND EDUARDO SILVA PRODUCTION MANAGER: BILL GALUSHA LOCATION: PIER59 STUDIOS, NYC ALL PRICES APPROXIMATE. SEE BUYLINES FOR STOCKISTS.


leap faith

of

In life — and in fashion — ALICIA VIKANDER refuses to play it safe. By A ndrew B evAn Photographed by MARIANO VIVANCO


HIGH-SPIRITED LOUIS VUITTON cape and dress, both price on application, and shoes, $1370. Styled by MIGUEL ENAMORADO


WANT TO BE HER, MOMMY!” shouts an elated little girl standing in a cluster of kids who have gathered spontaneously in Forsyth Park in Savannah, Georgia. With heads craned towards the sky, they are gobsmacked, rooted in place as if they’ve spotted a bona fide superhero. And in a way they have. On the crisp but sunny Saturday morning of her BAZAAR cover shoot, Alicia Vikander is literally floating on air, pirouetting with balletic grace in a Louis Vuitton gown 15 metres above the mossy green. The Swedish actor seems preternaturally at ease and visibly in control, often calling the shots — politely — to the stunt co-ordinators and photography crew from midair. Remaining nonplussed in the face of extreme bodily risk is all in a day’s work for Vikander, who has made a career out of shape-shifting seamlessly into radically strong female characters in thoughtful indie films and commercial blockbusters alike. Onscreen and in person, the 30-year-old star exudes a cool, timeless charm that calls to mind a young Ingrid Bergman. She is as unassuming as she is captivating — a badass with delicate poise and a hushed, confident cadence. Back on terra firma, Vikander, dressed in Goldsign jeans, a black Isabel Marant blouse and Jimmy Choo flats with her hair tied in a messy knot, is sitting in a cocktail bar across the street from the park. “In this industry, you must be willing to throw yourself out there, which I enjoy,” she says. She has just ordered a vodka martini, and kindly instructed the bartender to dump the vermouth after just a swish around the glass. “I’m good at hiding all those nerves inside. Something I’ve heard all my life is, ‘Oh, you seem so tough.’ I think one of the main things I do well is to not show that I’m shitting my pants.” That stoic facade is easier to maintain without a lick of an online footprint. “I realised early on that social media was not good for me — I personally didn’t find the joy in it,” declares the actor, who tried Instagram for a month before Marie Kondo–ing it out of her life. Also easier to maintain without an Instagram account: privacy. Vikander has been quietly married to the Irish actor Michael Fassbender since 2017. The A-list couple keep a deliberately low profile, residing in Lisbon, Portugal, where they relish languid early mornings filled with ocean dips and yoga. “I was brought up in a very cold, dark country, and Portugal is the opposite,” Vikander says of her adopted home. “My husband loves to surf, so we like being close to the sea.” At times Vikander appears delightfully unaware of her own celebrity status. “Every time I do press, I’m suddenly met with the reality of my fame,” she explains. “I sometimes forget how my life has changed.” When she was starting out, Vikander didn’t anticipate having a viable acting career, let alone becoming an international fashion plate. She was rejected from drama school three times (“part of me felt like I didn’t belong,” she confesses). In fact, she was a week away from starting law school when she was cast in Lisa Langseth’s 2010 drama, Pure, for which she won the Swedish equivalent of an Oscar. At that point she never looked back. The year after her breakthrough role as an emancipated robot in 2015’s Ex Machina, the actor won an Oscar for her performance in The Danish Girl. Since then, she has pumped iron to portray the Tomb Raider reboot’s shredded Lara Croft and learnt to speak Japanese for the upcoming murder mystery Earthquake Bird, which takes place in Tokyo. Also in the works? A starring turn in Julie Taymor’s much buzzed-about Gloria Steinem biopic, The Glorias: A Life on the Road, in which both she and Julianne Moore portray the legendary feminist. “Alicia and I are thousands of miles and five decades apart, yet we both grew up wanting to be first a ballet dancer and then a lawyer — a combination of art and activism,” says the real-life Steinem. “I think we would have been friends as children, and it’s a miracle that we’re meeting now, across continents and time. We both found work that we love — writing and acting — and we use it to make the invisible visible.” In addition to her many screen roles, Vikander has also emerged as a major style icon in recent years, thanks in part to Louis Vuitton artistic director Nicolas Ghesquière, who tapped the actor as his muse, dressing her in youthful, rule-breaking looks as she promoted The Danish Girl. “Nicolas is a risk taker,” she says of her decision to join forces with the designer. “His work is fashion-forward but relatable. I feel cool and feminine in his clothes. They’re like my armour.”

“I REALISED EARLY ON THAT SOCIAL MEDIA WAS NOT GOOD FOR ME.”

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DANCING ON AIR LOUIS VUITTON dress, belt, boots and earrings, all price on application.


FLY GIRL LOUIS VUITTON dress, price on application, bag, $3800, shoes, $1370, and earrings, price on application. OPPOSITE PAGE: LOUIS VUITTON dress, price on application, bag, $3250, shoes, $1370 (worn throughout), and earrings, price on application. FRAGRANCE NOTE: Louis Vuitton Attrape-Rêves eau de parfum.


Ghesquière, likewise, has no trouble explaining what drew him to Vikander. “Alicia has a strong sense of self and style,” he says. “Her life and career have been on a very fast trajectory, and yet she has remained the same determined, confident and beautiful young woman since the beginning.” The designer is also quick to applaud Vikander’s integrity: “I am always impressed by people who don’t make compromises. She can transform herself without betraying herself.” Growing up with a single mother in a modest household in Gothenburg, Sweden, Vikander viewed high fashion as more of a pipe dream than a reality. “My mum was an actor, and we never had the money for things that weren’t purely functional,” she recalls. “I remember when I bought my first magazine — it was a window into a world that seemed very far away from mine.” The paucity of resources made her more creative. “I did a lot of high street and secondhand shopping,” she says. “I loved having someone ask me where I got something, and I would say, ‘I got it at H&M.’ ” Adds Vikander, who pursued a ballet career as an adolescent but eventually quit due to injuries, “I enjoyed using my clothes as another tool to express who I am.” That’s not to say there weren’t fashion faux pas along the way. “In my teens, I went through a full-on hip-hop period. I would wear huge hoop earrings, baggy trousers and this reversible velvet adidas jacket that I spent a lot of money on because I thought it was an investment piece at the time,” she reveals. “I’m not going to show you photos of that!” These days, her off-duty wardrobe is mostly black, and “very Scandinavian” (she’s a loyal fan of hip labels from her homeland such as Acne Studios, Rodebjer, and Totême), partly due to the influence of Langseth. The Swedish director not only cast the 20-year-old Vikander in her first film, but also became a professional — and a stylistic — mentor. “I tried so many different looks until I met Lisa, who was in her thirties,” says Vikander, who worked with the director again in 2017’s Euphoria. “She plays with being slightly androgynous and rock’n’roll, but also exudes femininity.” That’s when Vikander realised that it wasn’t always necessary to go to sartorial extremes to make an impact. “I think I just started to find my own style. I am very classic and have a lot of pieces in my wardrobe that I know I will have for a long time,” she says, tugging at her sculptural Ana Khouri earring. “I’ve started to wear a lot of blazers and simple-cut jeans. I love jewellery and coats. Shoes and bags also mean a lot to me. I like being able to just put on a T-shirt and jeans but then make an outfit with accessories.” As we continue to sip our martinis, the conversation about style takes a more serious turn. I ask Vikander about the deep-rooted history of women and girls dressing for the acceptance of other women, or the approval of men, rather than for themselves. “My dad is a psychiatrist, and he told me that often his job is to tell patients that how they think others perceive them is actually far from the truth,” she says. “I think people are finally getting to a point where they care less about what others think and feel more comfortable playing with different versions of themselves. Brands that were once associated exclusively with upper-class, middle-aged women are now what teens want to wear.” And vice versa: “I love to see that CEOs of companies can wear streetwear.” Her eyes widen with excitement. “Michelle Obama is breaking convention by wearing thigh-high sparkly Balenciaga boots — she’s a woman who will always surprise me! I’m happy that we are getting to a point where people don’t need to stick to any category of age or social ladder.” Vikander is adamant fashion and feminism “go hand in hand”, and that they’re pivotal to a woman’s freedom of expression. Which brings us back to her role in The Glorias. “I was just overwhelmed by what Gloria has done in her lifetime and how much difficulty she must have had growing up in that time. I’m so curious what made her have the strength to confront what was so unbalanced in our society.” The actor herself is actively pushing for change amid the watershed #MeToo/#TimesUp movements. In 2017, she signed an open letter calling out Sweden’s film and theatre industries for failing to protect women against sexual predators. And today, Vikander is optimistic about the future: “It’s sad that a lot of us women haven’t had the opportunity to work together because not enough women were being hired. Suddenly we found a way not only of reaching out and getting to know each other, but forging relationships that lead to creative collaborations. I’m working on several projects right now with girls I met over the past year. That in itself is wonderful proof that a big change has happened.”

“I LOVE TO SEE THAT CEOS OF COMPANIES CAN WEAR STREETWEAR.”

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Model: Giacomo Cavalli. Hair by Joey George; makeup by Gucci Westman; manicure by Melissa Crosbie for Savannah Day Spa; production by Sabine MaĂąas for Ghibli Media Productions Inc. Special thanks to Mansion on Forsyth Park and Savannah Day Spa, Savannah, Georgia.

LADDER OF SUCCESS LOUIS VUITTON dress and earrings, both price on application.


The lull between summer’s heat and winter’s chill calls for crochet, tactile knits and retro patterns that conjure a cosy, homespun luxury Photographed by SYLVÈ COLLESS

LOEWE dress, $4450; CHLOÉ bracelets, $240 each. Styled by CAROLINE TRAN


Opposite page: ALTUZARRA top, $1685, skirt, $1685, bra, $415, briefs, $495, and earrings, price on application; MOUNSER bracelet, $299. This page: GUCCI shirt, $810, and pants, $1790; TIFFANY & CO. necklace, $535.


AMBUSH jumper, $480; CHRISTIAN DIOR jumpsuit, $1150, and skirt, $16,000. Opposite page: LOUIS VUITTON dress and embroidered dress, both price on application.


Opposite page: CHANEL dress and top, both price on application, pants, $1990, and belt, $6360; DINOSAUR DESIGNS earrings, $360. This page: SALVATORE FERRAGAMO dress, $16,600; HARLEQUIN MARKET belt, $420. BEAUTY NOTE: Yves Saint Laurent Dessin Du Regard Stylo Waterproof Eyeliner in Noir Ivresse.


BASSIKE cardigan, $695; SPORTMAX top, $710; BALLY pants, $930.


STELLA McCARTNEY jumper, $1645, and shorts, $830. Opposite page: CHLOÉ dress, $6835, bra, $625, briefs, $625, and earrings, $865; ALBUS LUMEN necklaces (tied together and worn as belt), $250 and $300. Prices approximate. Model: Franzi Stegemann at Chic Management. Hair by Koh at Vivien’s Creative; makeup by Peter Beard at The Artist Group. Sylvè Colless is represented by Assembly Agency. See Buylines for stockists.


Elle Fanning wears MIU MIU top, $1210, skirt, $2520, headband, $840, belt, $770 (worn throughout), socks, $230 (worn throughout), and shoes, $1470. Opposite page: MIU MIU dress, $3420, headband, $840, and shoes, $2350. BEAUTY NOTE: L’Oréal Paris Voluminous Lash Paradise Liquid Eyeliner. Styled by JOANNA HILLMAN


ELLE ENCHANTED With a new fragrance campaign and a revelatory vocal performance in the pop-powered movie Teen Spirit, ELLE FANNING is on the rise. By K aleem a ftab Photographed by JASON KIBBLER


FRAGRANCE NOTE: Miu Miu Twist eau de parfum.

HER FIRST MOVIE ROLE, at age three, Elle Fanning might have played a younger version Dakota’s, character, but she didn’t stay in the shadow of her sibling for long. As she turns 21 on ing has already racked up an impressive array of performances in her young career, variously playing a fairytale princess, a punk-rock alien and a fashion victim in more than 30 films. “At first I would get mistaken for my sister,” she says. “Of course, to us we look nothing alike — we have completely different noses!” Besides her film roles, Fanning has been garnering a lot of attention of late for her newest career move: in January, she was named the face of Miu Miu’s new fragrance, Twist. The scent combines sweet, effervescent top notes with a sensuous base of pink amber. “It’s hard and soft, which “I feel very I quite like,” Fanning says. Somewhat appropriately, part of the campaign for Twist — a short film, shot by the artist collective Canada, that traces a movie star’s chameleonic comfortable being routine through multiple roles — plays on her seemingly limitless capacity for reinvention. on the red On camera she may recede into her roles, but at five-foot-nine, the statuesque actor is built to stand out. “I feel very comfortable being on the red carpet because Hollywood carpet because embraces my quirkiness,” she muses. “I always felt like it was a safe place to be — it was Hollywood actually more like home than high school was.” As a grade-schooler, Fanning, who still lives with her mother and grandmother in Los Angeles when she’s not working, enrolled embraces my at a prep school and did her best to have a normal life. But her daring fashion sense quirkiness. routinely drew stares. “I always felt like an outsider,” she recalls. “I remember once in seventh grade I got a pink shirt at Opening Ceremony that had Big Bird printed all over I always felt it, and I wore it with flared pants and wedges even though I was already quite tall.” In the fashion world, however, that extra height has proved to be a bonus. A regular in the like it was a safe front row at fashion week, Fanning was at Los Angeles International Airport last year waiting place to be.” for a flight to take her to the Miu Miu show in Paris when she got a surprise. “I got a call saying, ‘Mrs Prada wants you to open and close the show,’” she says. “I was like, What?!” Meanwhile, Fanning continues to push boundaries in her acting career, starting with a film that sees her stepping into pop-star territory. In Max Minghella’s Teen Spirit, she channels her inner Ariana Grande to play a shy British teen who dreams of escaping her small town on the Isle of Wight by entering a televised singing competition. As for using film as a springboard to a real-life music career, Fanning won’t rule out recording an album. “Why not?” she says. “I couldn’t say no to that.” Teen Spirit is in cinemas this month.

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Opposite page: MIU MIU dress, $3820, hair clip, $330, shoes, $2350, and necklace, $1630. This page: MIU MIU coat, $7440, headband, $240, sunglasses, price on application, socks, $230, and shoes, $1470. Prices approximate. Hair by Kei Terada; makeup by Mary Greenwell; manicure by Jessica Scholten; production by KOÂ Collective; set design by Louis Gibson. See Buylines for stockists.


Available at selected Myer and David Jones stores.


HAIR BY ALAN WHITE AT M.A.P; MAKEUP BY LINDA JEFFERYES AT THE ARTIST GROUP; MANICURE BY JOCELYN PETRONI. PRICES APPROXIMATE. SEE BUYLINES FOR STOCKISTS

BEAUT

F R E S H

JANNA JOHNSON O’TOOLE

TA K E

Actor J osephine L angford lends her cool edge to beauty’s classic looks Photographed by HOLLY WARD

VALENTINO dress, $7500; BULGARI ring, $3150 (worn throughout), and necklace, $4000. Styled by NAOMI SMITH

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BEAUTY

L A S H

TA C T I C S

Layers of mascara create a sexy, smudgy lived-in look, but brushed-up brows and a hit of highlighter at the inner corners of the eye ensure the look feels considered. Try Maybelline New York The Falsies Volum’ Express Mascara, $20.

PRADA shirt, $1590; BULGARI rings, $3150 each.

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C O O L

B L U E

Swap predictable carbon-hued shadow for navy — the blue tone will actually make eyes look wider and brighter by counteracting any redness. Multitasking at its finest. Try Clinique All About Shadow Quads in Smoke and Mirrors, $63.

GIVENCHY dress, $9650, and cape, $1850; BULGARI necklace, $7950.


BEAUTY


R E D

A L E R T

Structured power shoulders demand a commanding beauty look that can hold its own. Double down on bold crimson with a matt lip and shiny nail — the juxtaposition in finishes keeps the shade interesting. Try By Terry Lip-Expert Matte Liquid Lipstick in My Red, $52, and O.P.I Infinite Shine Long-Wear Lacquer in I Love You Just Be-Cusco, $24.

CELINE BY HEDI SLIMANE jacket, $3950; SAINT LAURENT BY ANTHONY VACARELLO T-shirt, $639, from David Jones; BULGARI earrings, $16,200, and bangle, $21,500.

ET ON A FLIGHT in 24 hours and we’re oing this big month-long tour of Europe. We’re isiting a lot of places I’ve never been to before, o I’m really excited,” says Josephine Langford, 1, over the phone from her hometown of Perth. e gleeful anticipation of setting out on a new dventure is palpable; but so are the unspoken s that loom. This could be an exciting trip exploring new places (Spain and Portugal top her list) or it could be the trip that pushes her into new territory, from up-and-coming actor to front-and-centre star. The raison d’être for the tour is to promote her forthcoming feature film, After, which hits theatres worldwide early April (though Australia will have to wait until June 6). Langford stars as Tessa, the lead character in the book of the same title by Anna Todd from which the movie is adapted. A runaway hit in the young adult category, After has sold more than 10 million copies worldwide, and became a number-one bestseller across Europe. “There was just this energy about Tessa that I felt I could connect with — I could understand the way she thinks,” Langford says. “She has a very helpful inner dialogue in the story and when I read it, I had this intense feeling of really wanting to make sure she wasn’t portrayed as a caricature of a ‘good girl’. I really liked the journey that she goes on being a young woman exploring her sexuality, and to have that be the story, to see that from her perspective, there was just something about it that I thought was very empowering and very important.” While After will find favour among millennials, Langford isn’t plotting her career to own that lucrative space. “I would say I’m winging it,” she says with a laugh. “I don’t think you can really shape a career, it just happens. I’m focused on finding characters I connect with.” Langford’s approach to beauty is equally laidback. Blessed by the killer combo of youth and good genes (her older sister is actor Katherine Langford), her day-to-day routine is all about the basics — “I’m still on the hunt for the perfect moisturiser and SPF, but I love lip balm. I have at least four on me at all times” — and she’s happy to enjoy that for as long as possible. “I haven’t felt industry pressure to look a certain way — at least not yet,” she says. “Once paparazzi become a reality, then things change because you become more conscious of photos.” But being in front of the camera and experimenting with different makeup looks is an opportunity in which Langford revels. “If I’m doing an editorial or if I’m doing a shoot, I will wear anything and I’ll do anything,” she says. Unlike some starlets who are quite protective of their image, Langford doesn’t shy away from the glossy eye or red lip on our shoot — adding her own edge to the classic looks. “I feel good in makeup, and it helps create a character. If I’m going to an audition and the character is a bit of a badass, then I’ll do a smoky eye — it’s fun.” By the time this issue hits stands, Langford will be wrapping up her trip. When and where she ultimately lands remains uncertain, but big things are on the horizon and no matter where her final destination may be, she’s proud to always have Australia in her rear view. “The land, the weather, my family — I love everything about it here.” – J anna J ohnson o’T oole


BEAUTY

I

D E W

Contrast a luminous complexion with a dramatic lustrous eye. Forget any reservations: a purpose-built formula isn’t tacky or sticky. Try Kevyn Aucoin Diamond Eye Gloss in Galaxy, $58.

VALENTINO dress, $7500; BULGARI earrings, $16,200, and rings (from top), $6550 and $6850.

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“I feel good in makeup, and it helps create a character. If I’m going to an audition and the character is a bit of a badass, then I’ll do a smoky eye — it’s fun.”

N E W

WAV E

Coax out tousled, undone texture with a next-gen styling spray that not only creates movement, but also imbues strands with radiant shine. Try R+Co Trophy Shine + Texture Spray, $42. CELINE BY HEDI SLIMANE dress, $25,100; BULGARI rings (from left), $7250 and $2730. Prices approximate. Hair by Alan White at M.A.P; makeup by Linda Jefferyes at The Artist Group; manicure by Jocelyn Petroni. See Buylines for stockists.


BEAUTY

E T R TY P IN

PUNK Actor, model and now Dior Addict Stellar Shine face CARA DELEVINGNE talks to E ugEniE K Elly about courageous characters, pre-show nerves and makeup as war paint

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JEAN-BAPTISTE MONDINO/COURTESY OF DIOR. STYLED BY MARIEL HAENN. MAKEUP BY PETER PHILIPS, USING DIOR ADDICT SHINE IN BE DIOR; HAIR BY BEN SKERVIN; MANICURE BY AMA QUASHIE; SET DESIGN: ANDY HILLMAN. STILL LIFE: SEVAK BABAKHANI. PRICE APPROXIMATE

ARA DELEVINGNE is pacing the floor of the penthouse suite of Paris’s Le Bristol hotel, understandably perturbed. Her sister Poppy has just FaceTimed to inform her that their security team is questioning the identity of an uninvited house guest who has materialised in the Hollywood Hills home the girls co-own. The 26-year-old model’s trademark bold brows rise and fall at an alarming rate. “I didn’t invite anyone to stay!” she assures her sister. “It could be a stalker. Who is in my house?” Delevingne drifts off to a corner to continue the conversation in private, then hands her phone to an assistant, who promises to take care of the situation. “Sorry about that!” she apologises to me, pulling herself together. Game face on, she snaps herself back to business. It’s a bit of a dramatic start, but that’s part and parcel of Cara Delevingne. This effervescent personality meant she was destined to be more than a model. She burst onto the fashion scene in 2011 when Christopher Bailey appointed her a face of Burberry, and the rest is history. Her natural talent as a performer saw her quickly expand her CV to include acting, taking on ambitious roles in Paper Towns and the blockbuster Pan in 2015; Suicide Squad in 2016; and Luc Besson’s Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets and Justin Chadwick’s Tulip Fever in 2017. A frenetic work schedule and intense tabloid scrutiny saw her pull back from modelling during these years, but in 2018 she returned to the runway for Bailey’s last Burberry show, and these days she fronts campaigns for a select few, namely Balmain, TAG Heuer and now Dior’s new lipstick, Addict Stellar Shine. “To me, the campaign is about lust for life,” Delevingne tells me about the latter. “We shot [it] in just one day in New York over four different locations. The day encapsulated what I feel Dior Addict is all about. It’s strength. It’s fun. It’s daring. The crew had set up this stage that was backlit and said, ‘Perform!’ It was like it was my own little concert and I was a rock star. I got to dive into a crowd of boys and strut alongside Central Park. People were pointing and saying, ‘Ooh, she’s taking herself a bit too seriously.’ I loved it!” It actually sounds like a G-rated scene (if there is one) from Delevingne’s next film, Her Smell, which is set in the 1990s and stars Elisabeth Moss (The Handmaid’s Tale) as a punk rock singer struggling with sobriety. The cast includes Delevingne’s rumoured girlfriend, Ashley Benson, the pair apparently having met on set. Delevingne clearly embraced her character’s bleached, jagged pixie crop and piercings. “I’m a chameleon,” she says. “When it comes to personal style, I’m so varied. I can have a shaved head and keep things really natural, or embrace the full hair, makeup and gown brief. I travel the whole spectrum. And that’s how it should be. Everyone should use makeup as war paint. To hide or to express yourself.”

Of all the trends she has tried, what has been the most daring? Aside from the lion she had tattooed onto her finger at the age of 20, and fronting up to Princess Eugenie’s wedding wearing a tuxedo and a top hat while chewing on a toothpick? “Shaving my head, definitely. For me, I thought that to be a woman and be beautiful, you had to have long hair. That was what femininity was. But I learnt that beauty can also be ‘masculine’, too. She admits she still hasn’t found her signature style. And probably won’t. “It constantly adapts,” she says. “I work with great brands who inspire me. I like to change things up a lot, and as an actress you experience different characters. I love being able to explore that.” Working with the top hair and makeup experts in the world is a serious perk of the job, but Delevingne doesn’t always do as she’s told. “The best beauty advice I ever ignored was people telling me not to shave my head, as it would stop me from getting parts. I’m so glad I didn’t listen. And everyone still tries to bleach my eyebrows! Are you crazy? They’d fall out!” She does take the word of Dior Makeup creative and image director Peter Philips as gospel, though: “I never say no to Peter’s makeup. He is an artist, so I let him use my face as a canvas. I would never tell him how to model. Because I’ve had so many famous people do my makeup, I’ve actually become really lazy. I now have to bribe my friends to do it rather than do it myself. That said, Stellar Shine is something I can do as it’s so comfortable. You actually want to put it on. And you can really explore and experiment with the huge range of pink shades. Pink is punk!” Delevingne gets to expand her repertoire of fantasy looks further with her next role, in Carnival Row, an Amazon Prime Video fantasy-noir series co-starring Orlando Bloom, slated for release in the next few months. “I play an extremely strong woman who has to deal with all these tensions around an immigrant refugee crisis.” Delevingne’s candidness and courage when it comes to pushing boundaries has made her an idol and advocate to many young women, if her 41.5 million Instagram followers are anything to go by. For example, she happily admits fashion shows still terrify her. “No matter how much older and more comfortable with myself I become, nothing scares me like that anticipation I get just before stepping onto the runway. As soon as I step out, it goes, but I find it tricky. But the more experiences I have, the more I know I’ll grow as a person and feel comfortable. And improve! I can’t wait to turn 30.”

“I can have a shaved head and keep things really natural, or embrace the full hair, makeup and gown brief. I travel the whole spectrum. And that’s how it should be.”

Dior Addict Stellar Shine in (from left) D-Sparkle, Diorcharm and Bohémienne, $53 each.


BEAUTY Diary

KAREN ELSON

Elson loves the scent of roses, found in her favourite perfume.

The model and singer goes easy on diets and heavy on skincare

Skin

“If getting a little tweak here and there makes me feel good, I’m not going to say no.” DERMATOLOGIST: David Colbert in New York. “I’ll go in saying, ‘Oh, I feel haggard and old — do everything!’ And he’s like, ‘Get out of here, I’m not going to do that to you.’ He’s amazing.” FACIAL TREATMENT: “The Triad Facial [at Colbert’s], and I’ll add a microcurrent, which stimulates the muscles.” CLEANSER: Eve Lom Cleanser. TONER: Mario Badescu Glycolic Acid Toner. MOISTURISER: La Mer. “It’s tried-and-true.” SPF SECRET: “Linda Evangelista turned me on to Coolibar. We did a shoot and she was wearing their massive hat. I need one because I live in Nashville and it gets really hot there.”

Jo Malone London Red Roses Cologne, $98.

Fragrance

“I’m a proper perfume girl.”

THE SCENT OF LOVE:

“Jo Malone London Red Roses. I’ve never met a person who doesn’t love the way it smells.” LOVE LESSON : “My children have taught me everything [about love]. When you’re up at 3am with a child who’s throwing up and you’re seeing double, you realise, This is what love is. When it comes to men, the buck stops pretty quickly for me, but with my kids, it’s unconditional.”

La Mer The Perfecting Treatment, $340.

Pat McGrath Labs MatteTrance Lipstick in Elson, $60.

Mario Badescu Glycolic Acid Toner, $28.

Makeup & hair

“I love the way it smells.”

M.A.C. Haute & Naughty N Lash Mascara, $42.

Fitness & diet

“Working out is something I do for myself.” CURRENT ROUTINE: “In New York, I do Ballet Beautiful. In Nashville, I hike and do Pilates.” EATING EPIPHANY: “I’m not going to deny myself anything. It’s about finding a balance.” MODEL EXAMPLE: “Having a daughter really changes your perspective on self-image. If there was ever a moment when she looked in the mirror and didn’t feel beautiful, or she compared herself to me and said, ‘Mommy’s been on a juice cleanse,’ I would be setting a bad example.” ON HER BEDSIDE TABLE: Intuitive Eating, by Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resch. “I’ve encountered pressure to stay a certain size, and this book has helped me love my body as it is.” – As told to Jessica Matlin Ballet is one of her favourite ways to stay fit.

Rahua Color Full Shampoo, $55.

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PORTRAIT: GETTY IMAGES; STILL LIFE: SORINA ARMEANCA; SEVAK BABAKHANI; J MUCKLE. PRICES APPROXIMATE

“I never want to feel like I’m morphing into a different version of myself.” FOUNDATION: By Terry Sheer-Expert Liquid Foundation. EYELINER: Tom Ford Eye Kohl Intense. “I smudge it so it’s not an obvious line.” MASCARA: “M.A.C., the double-wanded one.” LIPSTICK: Pat McGrath Labs in Elson and Elson 2. “Pat dabs it on with her fingers so your lips look full and the colour is diffused.” BEAUTY FAIL: “Sometimes I’ll accidentally leave lipstick on my finger and then there’s a smudge on my face somewhere!” HAIRCARE: Rahua.


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After*

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BEAUTY Diary

Tom Ford Bronzing Powder, $105.

JESINTA FRANKLIN The model and Olay ambassador shares her no-fuss approach to beauty

Makeup & fragrance

“I always have a red lipstick in my handbag in case I have to go to a meeting — I slap it on for a bit of French-girl chic. Charlotte Tilbury’s is my go-to.” EVERYDAY FACE: “You won’t find me in makeup on my days off, but if I’m going out to dinner I’ll do my brows with an Hourglass pencil, a bit of Marc Jacobs mascara, some Nude by Nature powder and Tom Ford bronzer.” LIP CARE: “Dior Addict Lip Glow is my favourite for everyday wear. I also love the Dior Addict Lip Sugar Scrub to keep my lips soft and smooth.” NAIL COLOUR: “I usually go for Don’t Burst My Bubble from O.P.I. It’s a nudey-pink and it goes with every outfit I wear.” SCENT OF CHOICE: “I rotate between scents depending on my mood. If I’m feeling really girly, then I love Joy by Dior, but if I want something a little more smoky and masculine, I go for Aēsop’s Marrakech.”

Aēsop Marrakech Intense eau de toilette, $85 (50ml).

Hourglass Arch Brow Sculpting Pencil in Dark Brunette, $52.

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“Going platinum was fun but too high-maintenance. Anything that’s fussy or takes too much of my time just doesn’t work for me, hence I chopped all my hair off — I was sick of styling it!” HAIR FLIP: “Now that my hair is short, I run some serum through the ends, flip it to one side and then the other, and it’s done.” GOING OUT: “If I’ve got something on, I’ll slick my hair back with Oribe’s Balm — it’s lightweight and nourishing. But when I don’t have anything on hand, I’ll just Oribe Balm run some coconut oil through d’Or, $64. it.” STYLE SAVANT: “Diane Gorgievski at Koda Cutters is the woman who gave me the confidence to get a fringe. Then we chopped all my hair off, dyed it platinum, and now we’ve gone for a beachy-blonde pixie cut. Having a hairdresser you trust is key when you’re trying new things.” COLOUR SAVER: “I keep my colour bright with Oribe shampoo and conditioner.”

Skin & body

Diet & fitness

“I don’t think I’ve ever exercised in the afternoon. If I don’t do it in the morning then I just totally lose motivation.” DAILY BROTH: “I drink bone broth every day — it’s said to be good for the skin, and I notice such a difference. I buy it in big glass jars from a larder in Bronte [in Sydney] to take home and heat up on the stove with some fresh chilli, lemon and parsley.” INDULGENCE: “I treat myself with a bit of chocolate, some red wine or cheese — I love a cheese and meat platter.” EARLY RISER: “I wake up naturally between 5 and 6am, even when I’m on holidays. I like to go for a long walk and put a podcast on, particularly true crime investigations — I was really into The Teacher’s Pet.” STRESS LESS: “Cardio is a big stress reliever for me, especially boxing. I also love a swim in the ocean or an Epsom salt bath with lavender or rose geranium essential oils. I’ve also recently started meditating, which is amazing.”

Hair

Red wine is a treat, while boxing is stress relief.

Olay Luminous Whip Face Moisturiser, $49.

“I’ve really worked on my skin over the years, so my routine is very simple and easy. I always make sure I’m eating well and getting enough sleep, too.” WAKE UP: “I use Olay Total Effects Cream Cleanser in the morning, then moisturise with Olay Luminous Whip, which doubles as a primer. It also has eight-hour wear, so you don’t get shiny or greasy throughout the day.” EVENING ROUTINE: “Before bed, I double cleanse and follow with Olay Total Effects [7-in-One] Night Cream. Then I dab Olay Regenerist [Revitalising] Eye Serum around my eyes — it’s great for fine lines.” TOP TREATMENTS: “Crown Melbourne’s spa is almost good enough to fly down for a visit! I love the body scrubs and massages, plus their facials are incredible.” SCRUB UP: “I’m a big fan of exfoliation because it always makes my skin feel Crown Spa, really smooth. After, I’ll Melbourne. slather on some coconut Epsom salts oil.” – As told to Janna for relaxation. Johnson O’Toole

H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019

PORTRAIT: DON ARNOLD; STILL LIFE: GETTY IMAGES; SEVAK BABAKHANI; SASIMOTO; WORAPHON NUSEN. PRICES APPROXIMATE

O.P.I Nail Polish in Don’t Burst My Bubble, $20.


BRAND PROMOTION

WHITE HERE, WHITE NOW GONE ARE THE DAYS OF UNCOMFORTABLE RETAINERS FILLED WITH AWFUL-TASTING GELS: THIS IS AT-HOME TEETH WHITENING, WITH A TWIST

Forget what you think you know about at-home teeth whitening. Alison Egan, founder and head tooth fairy of Sparkling White Smile, is revolutionising the industry with a mobile cosmetic whitening service that can lighten teeth up to 14 shades, all from the comfort of your home and at about half the price of a dental treatment. Sparkling White Smile boasts a team of qualified cosmetic teeth whitening technicians — many of whom are registered and dental nurses — and the latest in teeth whitening technology. There are two treatments on offer: The Triple Treatment (one sitting broken into three 20 minute sessions, recommended for first-time clients) or The Ultra White Treatment (the premiere treatment, recommended for coffee drinkers or smokers). Egan says the secret to Sparkling White Smile’s success is a combination of years of research, the highest level peroxide gels available (aside from at dental surgeries), a laser accelerator lamp that rapidly activates the whitening gel and, of course, the highly

trained technicians. Sparkling White Smile’s service is private and completely bespoke, with technicians customising the treatment to meet each person’s needs. And if you’re looking for a new way to bond with your friends (coffee dates and red wine afternoons are so over), you can host a teeth-whitening party — with a group discount, of course. Sparkling White Smile began in 2014, while Egan was studying to be a nurse and “had a dream I was having my teeth whitened”, she recalls. But once she woke and did some research into the procedure, she found that in Australia, it was only available at the dentist and came with a hefty price tag. Go-getter that she is, Egan imported a cosmetic teeth whitening system from the UK that utilises “the very best” Australian-made LED, and now has about 250-400 clients per week. This is the brand trusted by brides, influencers, models, television hosts — anyone who knows the importance of a bright smile. Let them be your guide.

For more information, visit SPARKLINGWHITESMILE.COM.AU or find us on Instagram @SPARKLINGWHITESMILE


BEAUTY

Clockwise from top left: Maison Francis Kurkdjian Oud Silk Mood eau de parfum, $340 (70ml); Armani Privé La Collection Bois d’Encens eau de parfum, $318 (100ml); Frédéric Malle Noir Epices eau de parfum, $420 (100ml); By Terry Terryfic Oud L’Eau eau de parfum, $328 (100ml); Gucci Guilty Oud eau de parfum, $205 (90ml).


M AN AUTUMNAL BEING. Spring bustin’ out all pepper tree), cedar and vetiver. It is stark, raw, profound. The same ver does nothing for me. Come the balmy days of cannot be said of Etat Libre d’Orange’s Rien, one of perfume’s great ummer, I can be found fantasising about velvet and cash- misnomers, in which nothingness is a front for everything. Incense ere, willing not an Indian summer, but that first crisp blends with rose petals, leather and patchouli to yield a heady exotatch within the air and the falling of leaves. For autumn icism, the plush depths of its base notes issuing from amber, black rings the scent of bonfires: the cosy domestic hearth, the pepper and opium. It mesmerises all; Rien Intense still more so. smoulder of burning leaves and the heady rush of cordite. Oud, resin from fragrant agarwood, flourishes in Middle Eastern All fragrance started in smoke, as the name suggests: per fumum perfumes but can fail to take flight in Western scents. meaning ‘through smoke’, an offering of incense shooting straight Creed’s Royal Oud has a clean, almost astringent quality that to the gods. When we veil ourselves in smoky vapours, we engage those repelled by oud’s feral aspect will enjoy; ditto Gucci Guilty with perfume’s very essence, as something immanent, sublime. Oud, which has a blackberry fruitiness that eliminates any elements Perfumers deploy myriad sleight-of-hand techniques to create of ‘something nasty in the woodshed’. By Terry’s Terryfic Oud smokiness, using resins such as labdanum L’Eau feminises matters, adding an airiness and opoponax, and the potent, earthy fixabuilt of citrus and lavender notes; compare tive isobutyl quinoline. As a consequence, Christine Nagel’s Agar Ébène for Hermès, smoke scents also encompass wood, moss, in which balsam fir softens the agarwood. tobacco, oud, leather, incense, balsams, Maison Francis Kurkdjian is likewise a patchouli, vetiver and the tang of hungry surprise; romantic with rose absolute from flames. This lends them a thrillingly ambigBulgaria and bergamot from Calabria. uous aspect: on the one hand, they convey For others, smoke can only mean the ancient sanctuary of the fireplace; on tobacco. Caron’s Tabac Blond was the origWafts of oud, amber and the other, danger, sex and death. inal flapper scent, launched after World For smoke proper, Miller Harris’s La War I to celebrate the cigarette-wielding incense stir fond Fumée Intense encapsulates the per fumum woman: a tumultuous combination of iris memories of autumnal heritage: spicy and resinous in its mystical and clovelike carnation at its heart. The ascent. Serge Lutens’ headily voluptuous orris-rich oriental Tiempe Passate by pleasures past. Ambre Sultan is justly notorious: a raw, Antonia’s Flowers is no less voluptuous, vegetal amber that is the smell of the souk; By H ANNAH B ETTS albeit in a minor key: the aroma of the spiritual, while beguilingly illicit. morning after, when your skin smells salty The sandalwood temple offerings in with drinking, dancing and sin. Diptyque’s Tam Dao transport us to the sacred forests of north The Marlboro Man influenced Le Labo’s Santal 33: a cowboy and Vietnam. Bangkok’s Pryn Parfum boasts Morah (named after a his horse silent in front of the campfire, on a great plain under femme fatale of Thai folklore), a fusion of exotic flowers, dense evening skies. Jean-Paul Guerlain explained to me that his Vetiver spice, aromatic champaca leaf and opium. Nasomatto’s was a portrait of a gardener’s cord jacket with a pipe in it. Kilian’s Nudiflorum is a jasmine in which the flower becomes almost Light My Fire marks a tribute to the finest cigar tobacco; Ormonde unrecognisably soft and loamy with a sweet smokiness, and Jayne’s skin scent Montabaco is cigar smoke on sun-warmed flesh; Frédéric Malle’s Noir Epices (or Black Spices) blends rose and while Beat Café by Dominique Ropion for Jusbox conjures leathgeranium with a heady mix of cloves, pepper, cedarwood and er-jacketed beatniks drinking Cognac at a Left Bank comptoir. sandalwood in an exotic unisex offering. As for fireworks, Trudon’s Révolution by Lyn Harris recreates Giorgio Armani Privé’s Bois d’Encens situates us firmly within the smoke, sweat and oil of 1789, while Tonnerre, Beaufort’s the Catholic Church. As with true faith, it has a disarming evocation of the Battle of Trafalgar, is all thunderous cannonballs simplicity: two types of incense plus schinus molle (a kind of — Guy Fawkes, and then some.

WI

WO D L

OD

OPPOSITE PAGE: PAUL ZAK. EUCALYPTUS FROM FLOWERBX, FLOWERBX.COM. THIS PAGE: LUCKY IF SHARP. PRICES APPROXIMATE

SMOKE SIGNALS

From left: Hermès Agar Ébène eau de toilette, $340 (100ml); Bottega Veneta Parco Palladiano XII Quercia eau de parfum, $450 (100ml); Chanel Les Exclusifs de Chanel Sycomore eau de parfum, $470 (200ml); Creed Royal Oud eau de parfum, $449 (100ml); Serge Lutens Ambre Sultan eau de parfum, $313 (100ml); Miller Harris La Fumée Intense eau de parfum, $304 (100ml).

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HEALTH

Me &

MY GURU

J

asson came into my life as a dear friend. He and his beautiful wife, Mia — who my husband had met through the arts community — came to stay at our home in Byron Bay and I fell in love with them both instantly. They exude a special energy, which, once felt, is completely contagious. I reached out to Jas when my daughter, DeeDee, was born in 2016. As a new mum, I felt like I experienced a bit of an identity crisis, which a lot of mums can probably relate to. All of a sudden I’d gone from high-flying professional and independent woman to … mum. And although being a mother is the most important role in the world, sometimes it can feel as though you’re alone. We chatted about things like cancelling out what I called white noise, or negative thoughts, and worked on channelling my energy into the next phase of weaving my career and lifestyle into motherhood. I try to attend weekly group mediations led by Jasson, either at his home or at [wellness studio] Nimbus & Co. in Byron Bay, though I’m certainly guilty of not meditating as much as I would

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like now that I have two children. Each session is different, but it always ends with a great chat over herbal tea. I really connect with Jas because he also has kids. I love his methodoloJulia Ashwood with gies on how to deal with stress on the her daughter, Delilah home front. More than anything, he Bee. Right: with is completely relatable: he breaks his Jasson Salisbury and her son, Alby. teaching down into bite-sized pieces of information, which everyone can understand. He has a gift for communicating the practice to make it work for anyone and any lifestyle. Meditation is how I ground myself. I’m a huge thinker; I always have zany, crazy and wild ideas, so taking 20 minutes to unplug allows me to rest my ticking mind. I find that afterwards, I can catalogue my thoughts more concisely: I know what is most important and put less emphasis on issues that are not. It generally makes me more focused, less anxious and more connected. It’s influenced how I make decisions for my business as well. I let ideas sit with me a while; I almost sift them through a filter to acknowledge whether they are the right move and can come at them from what I call a heart space. Parenting and meditation go hand in hand for my husband and me. We can both tell when either of us has slipped up or dropped off the program. It’s important to encourage each other and create space and time for each other to do their practice. Of course, some days are harder than others, but once the tools have been learnt, you can always revisit and continue where you left off.

H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019

MATT RABBIDGE; COURTESY OF JULIA ASHWOOD. AS TOLD TO JANNA JOHNSON O’TOOLE

The author of family travel website The Vista drowns out the white noise with meditation sessions led by J asson s alisbury


Inspired by wild trees lining the banks of winding rivers, JO MALONE LONDON Willow & Amber Cologne, $98, is made with notes of cashmere wood and smoky vetiver, making it the quintessential autumnal blend.

SUSANNE K AUFMANN Detox

Oil Scrub, $280, is the definitive answer to ‘How do I bathe better?’ A gentle massage with this poppyseed scrub exfoliates and stimulates blood flow, while its generous blend of sesame seed oil leaves skin feeling well cleansed and nourished.

DR. BARBARA STURM’S

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THE

EDIT

Decadent, rich and luxurious creams, serums and scrubs for your autumn skin regimen. By C HRISTOPHER X I

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AĒSOP Gentle Facial

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WORRIED

SICK

It’s rare, but if it does happen to you, the effects can be devastating. So how much should we be concerned about toxic shock syndrome? A lexAndrA e nglish investigates

E’RE LIVING IN A PERIOD POSITIVE MOMENT. The tampon

tax was abolished in January after an 18-year campaign by several organisations, including the publisher of this magazine, to have it removed; an influx of period trackers such as the apps Clue and Moody Month, and even your Fitbit, allow you to track everything from your mood to the intensity of your cramps to give greater insight into your health; initiatives such as The Period Project donate pads and tampons to homeless women; and Woolworths has partnered with the charity Share the Dignity to donate five cents from every sanitary item sold to help women in poverty. Our health is centre stage like never before, and yet, when it comes to menstrual-related toxic shock syndrome, women are still suffering — even dying — and most of us don’t know why. We’ve all been there: you use a tampon, forget about it for a little too long (ironically, the magic of the little cotton bullets) and no matter how old you are, the voice of your mother and every PE teacher you’ve ever had comes booming into your head: You’re going to get toxic shock syndrome and you’re going to die. But the warnings about TSS have been simplified to the point that they leave out one crucial message: there’s more to TSS than leaving a tampon in. For most women, their closest encounter with TSS is knowing a friend-of-a-friend-of-a-friend who had it. So mysterious is it that one of my friends tells me she thinks the condition is made up. She’s not alone in that. When I google TSS, I trip into a rabbit hole of Big Pharma conspiracy theories and conflicting science. Mostly, though, there are stories about women being hospitalised, losing limbs and dying from TSS, with an emphasis on how long they left their tampons in. This is perhaps the first and most terrifying myth about TSS: that something so banal (your mind slips) automatically leads to something so catastrophic (amputations, death).

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It’s while I’m climbing my way out of this information vortex that I come across the story of Peyton Caples from Ventura, California, who survived TSS as a teenager, and decide to ask her about the reality of TSS. In 2013, when Caples was 15, she used a tampon after showering and immediately felt ill. “I got dizzy, nauseous and thought I was going to pass out,” she says. Caples didn’t see a connection between her tampons and feeling sick, so she continued to change them regularly throughout the week. “It got worse. I couldn’t eat. Everything hurt. I had a fever of 104 [40 degrees Celsius] that wouldn’t break.” Caples was taken to hospital after collapsing for a second time and was transferred to ICU. “I was put on all forms of life support except ventilation,” she recalls. “My kidneys, liver and heart were failing.” Luckily, an antibiotic kicked in and Caples started to recover. “I felt a lot better, but it hurt to walk. Since I’ve had toxic shock syndrome, I’ve developed tons of allergies, an autoimmune disease and asthma.” Dr Rebecca Deans is a general and adolescent gynaecologist at Sydney’s Royal Hospital for Women, one of Australia’s leading hospitals. When I ask her where the TSS panic came from, she tells me it all started with a tampon called Rely, made by Procter & Gamble, which was introduced into the US market in 1978. “It was super absorbent and the idea was you could leave it in for your whole period,” she explains. While other products were made from cotton, Rely’s proud point of difference was its synthetic materials: polyester foam cubes and chips of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) gel. While the company did extensive research on the tampon’s materials, not enough was known then about how the body’s bacteria would react to a foreign object. Women would leave these tampons in for longer, not knowing that the CMC gel acted like a petri dish for bacteria, while the foam cubes increased the surface area for proliferation. In a 2011 study from the University of Illinois, Dr Sharra L. Vostral wrote that in 1980, of the 890 known cases of TSS, 91 per cent were associated with menstruation.

H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019


HEALTH

GUY AROCH/TRUNK ARCHIVE/SNAPPER IMAGES; GETTY IMAGES

“I was put on all forms of life support except ventilation. My kidneys, liver and heart were failing.” – P EYTON C APLES The incidence of TSS began to fall after Rely was taken off the shelves, and while it was never sold in Australia, other super-absorbent products were implicated in the message that the tampon’s materials cause TSS. Welcome to myth number two. A deep dive into research on the relationship between tampon material and TSS brings up results that are — surprise! — conflicting. Philip Tierno, professor of microbiology and pathology at the New York University School of Medicine, has been researching TSS for 30 years and in 2016 told The Guardian, “There is no doubt that cotton tampons are the safest.” But research from the University of Lyon in France last year disputes this. The study, led by Gérard Lina, compared tampons made of cotton, rayon, viscose and a combination of all of the above to see if the bacteria multiplied and produced TSS-causing toxins. The results indicated that cotton isn’t inherently safer: it wasn’t the material but the amount of air between the fibres that seemed to increase bacterial growth. But in another turn, Brittney Davis, a TSS survivor who lives in Washington state in the US, tells me a synthetic tampon was implicated in her case, but not because of the components or how long she left it in. Rather, it was the sharp fibres that caused microscopic scratches, giving the bacteria easy access to her bloodstream. “I was in a medically induced coma that stretched on for weeks,” Davis says. “I had organ failure and was placed on dialysis. My chance of survival was 30 per cent.” Once she woke from her coma, Davis spent months in hospital, struggling through organ failure and pneumonia; she also developed a heart murmur and a benign pituitary tumour from the trauma. The damage to her feet was so severe that doctors initially thought she would be a double amputee. “I fought hard to keep as much of myself as I could,” she says. Davis lost part of one foot and her toes, and had to learn to walk again. It’s stories like these that (understandably) made women rethink tampons and opt instead for what seemed like a safer alternative: the silicone menstrual cup. Hello, myth number three. In 2015, doctors in Canada reported the first confirmed case of TSS from a menstrual cup: a 37-year-old woman who was using one for the first time. “Anytime you’re housing a pool of blood in your body in an area where there is bacteria, you’re increasing the risk,” Dr Deans says. Lina’s study also found that cups carry slightly more risk than a tampon because of the amount of oxygen that enters the body along with the cup. “Menstrual cups, cotton tampons and organic tampons aren’t any different to other tampons,” it concluded. At this point, it’s easy to see why so many women are so confused. If leaving a tampon in doesn’t necessarily cause TSS, nor does d i it necessarily come from the materials in the tampon, and a cup isn’t a safer option, what is going on? Dr Deans comes to the rescue with a fact that should be shouted from the roofftops: to get TSS, the bacteria must already be in your body. A quick science lesson: Staphylococcus aureus (Staph) or the group A Streptococcus (Strep) bacteria are usually harmlesss and it’s normal to have them on our skin. “It’s when it goes to a place in the body where it’s not supposed to be, or when it grows in one particular location that it becomes a problem,” Dr Deans says. In 95 per cent of menstruation-related TSS, Staph is the culprit. It goes out of bounds and releases toxins t that cause your immune system to go haywire, shuttingg down organs in an attempt to preserve the heart and brain. It’s often referred to as ‘period disease’ because, for the bacteria to multiply they need a place to hang out, like a tampon.

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Maegan Boutot, an epidemiologist and content writer for Clue, explains it this way: “A person without exposure to the bacteria won’t get TSS, but having the bacteria doesn’t mean you will develop TSS.” She says the elements needed to contract TSS are like a perfect storm: “You have to have a lot of the bacteria, the bacteria needs to produce the toxin and the toxin needs to enter your bloodstream at a high enough level to make you sick.” These days, TSS is classified as a rare condition that affects about three people per 100,000 each year in Australia. Dr Deans footnotes that with the fact TSS isn’t a notifiable disease here, so the numbers of those incidences that are related to tampon use are unclear. In an ideal world, people who carry Staph would know they are at risk and could make better choices about their products, but, according to Dr Vostral, there’s no standardised check to see whether Staph is permanent or transient for some women. So how about vaccination? In 2016, researchers from the Medical University of Vienna’s Department of Clinical Pharmacology developed a vaccine. Dr Deans is doubtful it would be beneficial. “When you do a vaccine, you eradicate the bacteria from the entire body, which wouldn’t necessarily be a good thing. What’s bad for one part of the body is good for another.” What about the tampon monitor being developed by My.flow, a startup that, in 2016, unveiled a tampon that pings your phone when it needs to be changed? “Cool concept,” she says, “but everybody’s got a brain.” So, is the panic about TSS justified? It depends. Yes, it’s real, but as long as you’re using tampons and cups correctly and keeping an eye out for symptoms, Dr Deans says you should be safe. This means using the lowest absorbency tampon possible and changing it every four to eight hours. She says it’s fine to sleep with a tampon in, as long as you insert it right before bed and take it out as soon as you wake up. As for cups, Lina’s study found that Staph can gather on them in the form of a water-resistant biofilm. To reduce the risk of reinserting a contaminated cup, have two on rotation so you can boil one while you use the other. Cups should be removed after a maximum of 10–12 hours. If you left in a tampon for longer than recommended and experience a high fever, vomiting, diarrhoea, dizziness or a flat, sunburn-like rash (usually on the palms of your hands or the soles of your feet), call your doctor and make sure you tell them where you’re at in your cycle. While the condition is rare and the concern perhaps a touch overwrought, the stories of women such as Caples and Davis should not be discounted. Nor should we become complacent. The key is educat . The Royal is the only women’s hospital in New South Wales with a gynaecologist dedicated to adolescents, which Dr ns says is pertinent for young women who need to learn Dean about menstrual health. And thanks to this era of period positivi gone are the days of girls educating themselves solely via teen magazines; now they can get information on TSS straight from someone who has experienced it. “Social media has helped raise a ton of awareness for TSS,” Caples says. “I will get a messaage from a girl asking what she should do if she thinks she TSS, and I’ve had people thank me for educating them.” has T Drr Deans agrees. “In the past, we tended to cover up. We did talk about periods, we didn’t talk about toxic shock, but there’s a medium now. Social media is fantastic for opening up awarenesss, as long as it doesn’t cause alarm where there doesn’t need to be an Remember, there isn’t a surge of toxic shock at the moment.” So the staate of play is: be alert but not alarmed? “Exactly.”

H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019


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FUTUR

ON O’TOOLE

FLORIAN SOMMET/TRUNK ARCHIVE/SNAPPER IMAGES

The cult cream with a surprising past; a hands-free

BEAUTY makeup marvel; and sheet masks with couture-worthy customisation

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Future BEAUTY

Pretty

SMART

3D-printed sheet masks and makeup, an app that predicts the way your skin will age, and the high-tech hair salon that simulates your best colours and cuts — welcome to the future of beauty. By K ate L ancaster

THE TRIED AND TRUE ROUTINE of cleanse, tone launched its first wearable skin sensor, My UV Patch. With and moisturise no longer satisfies a generation obsessed the dangers of sun damage becoming ever more well-known, with self-care. We change our products and routines at La Roche-Posay created a smaller sensor that delivers infora faster rate than our skin-cell turnover and invest in an mation about the wearer’s sun exposure to an app, which army of serums, lotions, masks and essences in an effort then provides individualised sun protection advice. “Our to reach complexion nirvana. But without the dermatolog- research has long indicated the need for better consumer ical know-how, fashionable ingredients and conflicting infor- understanding of personal UV exposure,” said Guive mation can leave us in the dark about what our skin really requires. Balooch, global vice-president and head of parent company Beauty brands are now catering to this need, powering up their products L’Oréal’s Technology Incubator. “We created this batterywith the latest technology to offer a personalised approach to skincare. free sensor to seamlessly integrate into the lives and daily Last year, Neutrogena entered the digital customisation space with routines of those using it to make smart, sun-safe choices.” the introduction of Skin360, a user-friendly skin-scanning device. This year, the brand continues to experiment with Connecting the tool to a smartphone enables the magnifying camera to sensors, but the focus is now on skin pH levels. Experts analyse your skin health, then the app recommends products and ingre- believe an accurate pH reading can provide insight into dients suited to your needs. Now, the company has taken the technology skin cell function, as well as the overall health of the skin one step further, unveiling its companion product: MaskiD, a barrier. When pH balance is compromised, it can trigger 3-D-printed sheet mask. Areej Nassar, marketing manager for inflammatory responses including dryness, eczema and Neutrogena’s parent company, Johnson & Johnson, says the tools aim atopic dermatitis. Previously, these levels have proven diffito satisfy consumers’ growing desire to explore the individual aspects of cult to measure outside of a dermatology clinic, but you only their skin. “Women’s complexions are just as unique as their finger- need to wear the My Skin Track pH sensor on your arm for prints, so they’re looking for personalised products,” she says. 15 minutes for it to collect and analyse minute amounts of “Skin360 and MaskiD provide consumers clinical efficacy that they sweat and give a pH level estimate. can use in the comfort of their own home.” On the retail side of things, the skincare boom is driving First, you’ll need a smartphone with 3-D photography capability. beauty brands to up the in-store experience. Last year, SK-II Take a selfie using the MaskiD app and then attach the Skin360 launched its Future X Smart Store pop-up in Tokyo, where shopscanner to analyse pore size, fine lines and moisture levels. From pers could have their skin analysed by state-of-the-art tools such here, the app uses precise details about the position of your eyes, as facial recognition software and artificial intelligence, to recomnose and lips to create a map of your face and determine the size mend a customised routine. parameters (say goodbye to fussy overhang). The Skin360 app Olay is also making moves into in-store skin analytics with The will make recommendations about specific ingredients — such Future You simulation app, which offers you a glimpse of your future as hyaluronic acid and vitamin C — so you can tailor the face, thanks to an algorithm that ages your photograph. But unlike mask to suit your concerns. It’s a bit like multi-masking, but those ageing filters we see on social media, this simulation is the real of a more potent sheet variety. Place your order through the deal. Olay surveyed more than 1000 women of varying ethnicities and MaskiD app and it’s shipped to your door. life stages to obtain data about the way we age (our lips get thinner, our With Neutrogena’s tools working to address external faces become rounder and less defined in appearance) and collated the concerns, La Roche-Posay has chosen to focus on what results into an extensive image database. Take just one selfie and the simulies beneath the surface. In 2016, the company lated virtual mirror can pinpoint exactly how your skin type will fare in 20

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FLORIAN SOMMET/TRUNK ARCHIVE/SNAPPER IMAGES

Skin


years’ time. A warning: if you regularly skip applying sunscreen, the result can be quite confronting, but think of it as constructive feedback; the app offers advice on products that can help to futureproof your complexion such as sun protection, targeted serums and moisturisers. It’s currently only available at counters in Asia, but the brand has plans for international expansion. If a glimpse into the future is a little too much too soon, Olay also offers an at-home option designed to assist with your current routine. Olay Labs, another of the brand’s latest forays into the skin tech space, offers products formulated to suit your skin. Customised formulas aren’t new — brands such as Australia’s Hop

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& Cotton have been doing it for years. But where many companies base their personalised formulations on the answers given during a skin questionnaire, Olay Labs goes beyond that to employ scanning software that scrutinises skin quality. You’ll still complete a short quiz (just nine questions), but you’ll also be asked to submit a photo of your face, which is then analysed for texture, blemishes, fine lines and pigmentation. (Selfies are deleted every 24 hours.) Everything from your diet, sleep and stress levels to the climate in which you live is taken into account by the technicians interpreting your results. Your personalised four-week, five-step skincare solution is then delivered to your door.

H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019


Future BEAUTY

Makeup

FLORIAN SOMMET/TRUNK ARCHIVE/SNAPPER IMAGES

“Women’s complexions are just as unique as their fingerprints, so they’re looking for personalised products.”

WHEN THE LARGEST beauty company in the world invests heavily in virtual reality technology, it’s a big indicator of what’s to come for the industry. L’Oréal, parent company to a number of cosmetic giants such as Maybelline and Giorgio Armani, has solidified its commitment to augmented reality with the acquisition of the Canadian tech company ModiFace. The company produces apps similar to those makeup filters you see on Instagram Stories that superimpose makeup and hair onto your photo — but with far more nuance and a wider range of beauty categories with which to experiment. Whatever your cosmetic whim, there’s probably a ModiFace app for that. Want to know whether eyelash extensions are worth the investment? Not sure whether to commit to that platinum blonde ’do? ModiFace apps can show you a lifelike result that moves with your reflection in real time. Late last year, the company even extended into the – A reej N AssAr nail category with the Virtual Nail Salon app, in which users can toggle between lacquers to find the best shade to suit their skintone, outfit, Instagram palette or mood. SADLY, YOUR Even the bricks-and-mortar stores are not holding back with HAIRSTYLIST is try-on technology. Bourjois recently integrated a tech station at its Paris still only available in boutique, where, rather swiping through digital options, you stand in front corporeal form (for now), of the mirror while holding a lipstick and the shade is virtually applied to your but salons are getting a reflection. Say goodbye to messy swatch tests on your hand. whole lot smarter with cuts These apps remain in their infancy for now, but the growing number of beauty and colours. When it comes to brands turning to AI suggests try-on technology is set to become commonplace. regrets, bad hair decisions are right The makeup design process is becoming increasingly digitised too. Last year, up there with accidental email replies Chanel became one of the first major cosmetics companies to embrace 3-D and delaying exercise until two weeks printing in their manufacturing process. Purported to be the first of its kind, before beach season. Perhaps that baby Chanel’s patented Le Volume Révolution de Chanel mascara boasts a 3-D-printed fringe looked chic on the S/S 2019 wand. As opposed to the traditional moulding of a mascara brush, 3-D printing runways, but in reality, it might be far from offers greater capability for precision. This means Chanel can give the bristles flattering on your face shape and require a granular texture for better coating, and add micro-cavities to the centre of the significantly more styling than you’re willing to wand that allow more mascara to be collected on the brush. As more compacommit to. That’s where Piiq’s new mirror steps nies adopt 3-D printing in their manufacturing and design processes, we can in. The app replaces the regular reflective glass at anticipate products performing as never before. your hair salon with a digital interface that revoluIt’s not only the major players gaining access to this technology. Advancements tionises the client consultation process. in at-home 3-D printing are set to majorly disrupt the industry in years to On your first interaction with the mirror, you’re come by allowing consumers to become cosmetics manufacturers themselves. asked to fill out a brief visual questionnaire that aims While presently a niche item in the beauty world, these printers are becoming to capture everything from your working environment increasingly accessible and offer a DIY production process that’s completely to your individual hair habits. Piiq’s mirror then utilises controlled by you. New York-based startup Mink is currently working on facial recognition software to analyse your face shape and plans to begin selling desktop 3-D printers that can identify a colour from eye colour, and matches you to celebrities who most any image and turn it into a product. So that sold-out lipstick you’ve been closely share your features. Once you choose the celebrity hunting down? It can be mimicked and manufactured at your convenistyles you like, Piiq renders a 360-degree simulation of your ence, all from a snapshot on your smartphone. These advancements will new look to help identify the most flattering styles and appeal to the increasingly ingredients-conscious consumer wanting shades. Piiq can also retain your colour, cut and styling prefcomplete control over the composition of their cosmetics. erences for subsequent appointments, and offer product Alternatively, we could soon be ditching conventional makeup recommendations for at-home maintenance, completely products altogether. Instead, you might have looks printed directly customised to your hair type and style. onto your face by Moda’s digital makeup artist, courtesy of the Wella Professionals has also dabbled in the simulated salon tech gurus behind Foreo. A smartphone app offers the user a space, launching a new colour try-on mirror earlier this year, range of celebrity makeup looks to choose from, with the look while Schwarzkopf has constructed an entire virtual salon. then transmitted to the Moda device. From there, the system With substantial focus on hair health, infrared lights and sensors uses facial scanning software and a biometric lens to determine in the brand’s SalonLab Analyzer examine the hair’s core to the characteristics of your face and their precise orientation, identify its moisture levels and true colour, informed ensuring makeup is printed only onto the exact areas it’s by thousands of reference measurements gathered meant to. That’s when more than 2000 ultra-fine nozzles by the brand. Colour consultations are conducted begin to dispense mineral makeup ‘ink’ onto the skin, via a try-on app to determine the perfect hue, starting with a layer of SPF and primer, followed by and once your hair is coloured and cut, foundation, contouring and highlighting, and finishing Schwarzkopf ’s SalonLab Customizer blends a with eye, lip and cheek colour — all in less than 30 shampoo made according to the specifications seconds. No brushes, no products and no need for provided by your hair scan. Genius. skill? Now that’s one to waitlist.

Hair

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Rosier has an idea: “Somebody who can turn burned skin into perfect skin can probably cure wrinkles. So I went to him and said, ‘Can you do an anti-wrinkle cream that works?’ And his reply was, ‘Yes, why?’” Rosier spends another two years making visits to Leipzig to convince Bader of the market potential of a truly effective anti-wrinkle cream. Unknown to him, however, Bader is already testing a cream with his private patients, who come to him for infusions that encourage micro-environmental repair in the body. Bader has developed the cream with a philosophy similar to the one behind the hydrogel: give the skin what it needs to initiate its own repair. In the case of the cream, it was TFC8 (TFC stands for Trigger Factor Complex). The ingredients don’t sound terribly unusual at first: a mix of vitamins, minerals, amino acids and peptides. But, Bader says, sounding like a Michelin-starred chef, the key to using the best ingredients is “not to provide in abundance but in just the right concentration”. When you’re able to do that, he says, you can influence epigenetic factors that enable the body to “fix your skin according to your own needs”, be they acne, pigment problems, wrinkles or all of the above. The idea is the cream is all you need (aside from cleanser and sunscreen), so there are only two products in the line. They are identical in active ingredients, but one has a richer texture, for drier skin types. An early tester of Bader’s cream was a patient from California, actor Melanie Griffith. “He’s the sweetest man ever,” Griffith says. “All he cares about is helping people.” Within five days of trying the cream, she says, her skin was so dramatically changed she he story opens with a German became an investor (as did her ex-husband, scientist, Augustinus Bader, actor Don Johnson, and singer Carla Bruni). director and professor of Griffith, along with stylist Elizabeth applied stem cell biology Sulcer, told Cassandra Grey (of luxury and cell technology at the online beauty store Violet Grey) about the University of Leipzig, who How did a super-pricey cream last year. “A lot of products are not on to heal children who anti-ageing cream concocted revolutionary, though they’re called revoluhave suffered serious burns. In 2008 he tionary,” Grey says. “This one was.” Soon develops a landmark cure, a hydrogel by an unknown German the cream was available at 10 Corso Como in that repairs traumatic wounds by recruiting doctor achieve cult status? Milan, and a flagship Paris boutique was born. the body’s own dormant stem cells, thus Influential makeup artists such as Daniel eliminating the need for skin grafts. The good By J AMIE R OSEN Martin and Pati Dubroff became converts. Dubroff, doctor holds more than 200 patents, but faces along with actor Diane Kruger, was recently named a one big obstacle: a lack of funds to carry on his research brand ambassador. Skin therapist Melanie Grant sings its properly. The solution? A luxury skin cream using similar technology but marketed to women willing to pay $400 a bottle for its praises and Victoria Beckham has featured it on her social media. The buzz continues to spread. wound-healing (and wrinkle-smoothing) benefits. About 40,000 bottles have now been sold and Even that finely woven tale barely explains how Bader’s eponymous miracle cream (a modern-day La Mer story if ever there was 10 per cent of profits go to the Augustinus Bader one) wound up not just in the hands of every starlet, stylist and Foundation to fund his medical work. The makeup artist in Hollywood, but also on the lust list of every skin- mission, Rosier says, has become larger than care junkie. The birth of the latest buzzy beauty product really goes selling skin cream. “Like everyone, we look for something that is bigger than back to Bader’s introduction to biotech investor Charles Rosier. The two are first put in touch in 2011 by mining billionaire us. I could not imagine something Robert Friedland. Two years go by and they meet again. Bader more meaningful for my life.” wants to license his hydrogel technology in the hope of funding Augustinus Bader The Cream a clinical trial. (The dream, Rosier says, is for it to be accessible to (pictured) and The Rich Cream, organisations such as the Red Cross and Doctors Without Borders.) $404 each, augustinusbader.com.

HIT WONDER

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TOM SCHIRMACHER/TRUNK ARCHIVE/SNAPPER IMAGES; STILL LIFE: SEVAK BABAKHANI. PRICE APPROXIMATE

Future BEAUTY


Be DAZZLED

JASON LLOYD-EVANS

A designer smile can be yours by dinnertime. Cutting-edge tech is transforming cosmetic dentistry, one ultra-white tooth at a time. By Kate Lancaster

HE FASHION INDUSTRY might not flash them all that much, but that doesn’t mean we care any less about our teeth. In fact, recent research suggests we’re actually spending more than we ever have on improving them. Globally, ental industry is predicted to reach an estimated market value of $39 billion by 2024. The once clearly defined line between dental procedures and beauty treatments has also become blurred, with Emanuel Ungaro S/S 2019. a growing amount of cosmetic procedures on offer for the sole purpose of enhancing and showcasing a knock-out smile. So why the sudden fixation? As with most modern phenomena, the answer is likely tied to your smartphone. If you can cast your mind back to a time before Instagram, or even the pixelated JPEGs of MySpace, having a good set of teeth was important, but perhaps less so than now. Our faces, and therefore our teeth, are now always on display and it’s impacting the way we see ourselves. It’s a trend that Dr Gamer Verdian Etro A/W 2019. recognises in a growing number of patients at his Sydney practice, Dental Lounge, where a common request emerges during consultations. “Patients are asking for whiter teeth specifically for the selfies they’re posting on social media,” he says. “We call it the Insta-smile phenomenon.” However that makes you feel, it’s an undeniable factor in the industry’s growth, and dental technology has kept pace with an increasingly smile-conscious consumer. Whitening, which remains the most popular cosmetic treatment, has taken cues from the sun-safe generation and ditched potentially dangerous UV lamps for LEDs. This introduction has also made Roksanda A/W 2019. the procedure more comfortable, with clinics now able to adjust the intensity of the LED output according to a patient’s sensitivity. The brief has changed, too. According to Dr Verdian, would-be whitening patients are asking for results that are discreet rather than dazzling. And if you can’t get to the clinic? Teeth whitening has wheels. Sparkling White Smile offers a mobile service with a range of professional treatments, complete with a full consultation, aftercare and follow-up service for each client. But while whitening has undoubtedly advanced, it’s cosmetic veneers that are experiencing the biggest boom in 2019. Once the Stella Jean S/S 2019. domain of models and celebrities, veneers have

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over the past 10 years gone mainstream. Sure, the process of bonding a thin layer of porcelain over the teeth is still a confronting concept for some, but new advances in technology allow for complete customisation and control over the outcome. “We’re now able to create a 3-D rendition of what a patient will look like when the veneers are completed, which allows us to be incredibly accurate in the design process,” Dr Verdian says. “Facial mapping technology digitally scans the face to provide us with a full 3-D working model of the patient, including eye position, head shape, jawline, nose positioning and lip movements.” The software can even spotlight facial imperfections, such as a slightly crooked nose, which instructs the dentist on how to best position the teeth for optimum facial harmony. Once the scan is complete, the veneers are digitally designed and 3-D printed with digital milling units. In some instances, this can all occur within the same day. “If the teeth are prepared and scanned in the morning, we can design and make the veneers before fitting them in the afternoon,” Dr Verdian explains. The veneers themselves are also thinner, longer-lasting and require minimal, if any, removal of any of the tooth. But teeth aren’t always the issue. A smile has many components, including the visibility of the gums. “A gummy smile is most often caused by the muscle that attaches to the maxilla bone and the skin at the base of the nose,” explains Natalie Abouchar, a registered nurse and the founder of Privée Clinic. “Excessive contraction of this muscle can cause the lip to raise and show too much gum when smiling.” A gummy smile can be treated by injecting a neurotoxin into the muscle at the base of the nose, which reduces the pull, resulting in less gum on show. Lip fillers can also help to enhance the volume of the upper lip, giving gums better coverage. If you’re not up for fillers, there’s a new smile-enhancing technique on the rise that’s more discreet. Known as the Lip Flip, it can be helpful for patients with a disappearing top lip. “In certain individuals, the orbicularis oris muscle can contract, causing the lip to roll under when smiling,” Abouchar says. “We can inject the muscle with a small amount of toxin to evert the lip outwards, which results in the lip showing more vermillion when smiling. It typically lasts two to three months.” Now, whether or not you choose to put it to good use is entirely up to you.

H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019


Future B E A U T Y

Fashion stole my

SMILE

Backstage at Coach 1941 A/W 2019.


JASON LLOYD-EVANS

From left: Chanel A/W 2019; backstage at Victoria Beckham A/W 2019; Fendi A/W 2019.

There is nothing more disarming than someone with a beautiful smile, but in the world of high fashion, who needs happy when you can have haughty? By K irstie C lements

NLESS YOU ARE Julia Roberts, there’s an under- notions of power, social class standing in the vast fashion circle — encompassing and perhaps bad teeth. Looking celebrities, models, designers, editors, stylists et al. at European artworks up until — that smiling is gauche. You could be having the the 18th century, the subjects time of your life at a party, but should a camera painted with smiles were generally depicted as lower class or fools. appear, it’s decorous to stare at the lens with stone- A smile could also be interpreted as bawdy or lustful, which is one st, or if you’re feeling generous, a smirk. Toothy of the reasons Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa (1503) became so iconic. Her grins are reserved for infomercial hosts flogging steam mops. upturned half smile both attracted and baffled the viewer: will she Smiling is anything but high-fashion — something for shopping or won’t she? Is she encouraging attention or shutting it down? Had centre parades, not Parisian runways. she been painted with an open smile, Lisa It has long been thought that a fake smile Gherardini may not have the fame she has today; “There are millions could be distinguished by a lack of crinkling she would have lost her aristocratic air of mystery. around the eyes. The most genuine of grins is Throughout history, portraiture was, in most of people all around called the Duchenne smile, which is when the cases, reserved for rich and entitled kings, presithe world, myself orbicularis oculi muscles are activated, raising dents and the like, and so an air of moral serithe cheeks and scrunching the eyes. But not ousness and solemnity prevailed. Sitting for included, who feel everyone likes the way they look when they a painted portrait or early photograph was a a very real sense Duchenne smile (Victoria Beckham is the laborious process during which people had to patron saint of this syndrome). There are hold a pose for an extended period, which could of dread when millions of people all around the world, myself explain the pained and joyless facial expressions. someone pulls out included, who feel a very real sense of dread Then again, there is a resemblance in Kim when someone pulls out their phone camera bathroom selfies. their phone camera Kardashian’s and directs their subjects to “Smile!” Fast-forward to the modern world of the and directs their The idea that a withering look of disdain is camera phone, when every waking moment of more attractive on a woman than a smile seems people’s lives is documented and a natural, subjects to ‘Smile!’” to dominate the fashion world, but in the real unselfconscious smile can be captured in an world, the one where only children pout, it is instant. Social media and street style photothe very opposite. There is a flood of scientific evidence proving the graphs certainly promote a spontaneous smile as a fetching acceshealth benefits of smiling. Each time you smile, a rush of neuro- sory, but in the glossiest of glossies and the most haute of runways, transmitters such as dopamine, serotonin and endorphins are the look du jour will always be I can’t believe I got out of bed for released, producing an instant feelgood effect. Smiling can quite this. Designers still put up signs backstage telling the models not literally make you happy. And according to numerous studies, men to smile as they stride down the catwalk — to look strong, confirate a woman who is smiling as more physically attractive than her dent and fierce like a fembot. Even the recent Tommy HilfigerxZendaya show, which was refreshingly upbeat, still had presumably po-faced rival. Bless them. Like we care. But fashion isn’t entirely to blame for this poker-faced phenom- its fair share of severe, stone-faced strutting. Old habits die hard enon. The accepted stance that a subject should appear serious in and grim ennui is always on point. But do visit your dentist regua formal portrait stretches back centuries and is rooted in the larly … just in case someone says something funny.

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1. Ole Henriksen Glow Cycle Retin-Alt Power Serum, $78. 2. Bybi Bakuchiol Booster, $29. 3. Omorovicza Miracle Facial Oil, $158. 4. Liberty Belle Rx Dream Team, $138.

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3 2

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“There has been so much innovation with facial oils, the results and sophistication are remarkable.”

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FLORIAN SOMMET/TRUNK ARCHIVE/SNAPPER IMAGES; STILL LIFE: SEVAK BABAKHANI. PRICES APPROXIMATE

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in the International Journal of Cosmetic Science and the results were impressive: bakuchiol held its own, showing “significant improvement in lines and wrinkles, pigmentation, elasticity, firmness and overall reduction in photo-damage”, the study’s authors wrote. “We are constantly searching for exciting ingredients, particularly those that are natural,” says Margaret de Heinrich de Omorovicza, co-founder of skincare brand Omorovicza. The early-adopter label laced its recent launch, Miracle Facial Oil, with the extract. “There has been so much innovation with facial oils, the results and overall sophistication are remarkable. We wanted to ensure that if we entered such an exciting stream of products that we had something unique to say. That is why we were so excited to use bakuchiol.” Despite its impressive similarities to retinol, bakuA growing backlash against synthetics has created a chiol’s X-factor is what sets it apart: it doesn’t increase photosensitivity or cause irritation. “As much as retimarket for plant-based alternatives, and retinol is nols are clinically proven to offer impressive anti-ageing the latest target — but can anything compare to beauty’s benefits, the drawback is it frequently makes skin red, dry, scaly and irritated,” Henriksen says. “That never most beloved (and scientifically proven) ingredient? happens from bakuchiol because it’s also known for its By J ANNA J OHNSON O’T OOLE anti-inflammatory benefits. As it does its magic as an anti-ageing extract, it never, ever irritates the skin.” f ever there was a modern-day magic potion, a fountain of Not everyone is so convinced. Dr Moss believe that as it’s a youth, quality-vitamin-A-ripe retinol (and retinoids) would newcomer to the skincare scene, long-term research is needed to be it. With more than 25 years of medical research supporting solidify bakuchiol’s place in top-tier regimens. “From what we its impressive cell-renewing, skin-smoothing, DNA-repairing know, bakuchiol is a plant extract that has been shown in a laboraabilities, retinol has solidified its place as all-star MVP, tory study to have a number of chemical effects similar to retinol,” enjoying a starring role in thousands of products from sheet masks he says. “But chemical effects shown in laboratory experiments are to luxurious eye creams. “It’s referred to by many as the gold not evidence of consistent and significant clinical benefits in real standard in anti-ageing cosmeceuticals,” says patients’ skin appearance. Track record of Melbourne plastic surgeon Dr Chris Moss. efficacy and safety should be considered.” “Retinol can really combat and help prevent so When creating his own retinol product, many skin concerns and it delivers real improveLiberty Belle Rx Dream Team, Dr Moss ments at both a cellular and molecular level.” selected the most advanced option — a Yet the beauty industry suffers from magpie stabilised, encapsulated retinol that gradusyndrome: always on the hunt for the next shiny ally releases the active into the skin at low new ingredient. The latest to catch its attention concentrations over a longer period of time. is bakuchiol, a powerful extract found in the “This delivery mechanism minimises the seeds and leaves of the babchi plant (a favourite change of excessive flaking or redness,” he ingredient in Chinese and Indian medicine). says. “It’s very well tolerated by our clients.” A recent report by Pinterest shows that in the past year, searches Though not yet available in our market, Lancer Advanced Retinol for bakuchiol have increased by 275 per cent around the globe. Treatment has been developed by famed Hollywood dermatologist “Bakuchiol is a potent herbal extract that works below the skin’s Dr Harold Lancer, who married both retinol and bakuchiol into the surface and dramatically stimulates the skin’s cell turnover rate,” topical offering, proving the benefits of each are complementary. says Ole Henriksen, founder of his eponymous skincare line. “It So, should you swap your go-to retinol for bakuchiol? Not necesrefines and reduces the look of pores, lines and wrinkles, and is sarily. As they say, if it ain’t broke ... But if you’ve been burned (literclinically proven to enhance skin tone, firmness and elasticity.” ally or figuratively) by the potent active in the past, consider bakuIndeed, a study comparing bakuchiol and retinol was published chiol a worthy alternative; it may just be your magic cure, magpie.


D O M AY N E P R E S E N T S

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ULTURE

ELLE McCLURE

KRISTINA SOLJO. STYLED BY SAMANTHA WONG. HAIR AND MAKEUP BY ELSA MORGAN AT RELOAD AGENCY

Inside sculptor Carol Crawford’s studio sanctuary; interior designer Lee Broom’s bright future; and Aldous Harding gets serious about joy

LET THERE BE LIGHT

Carol Crawford in her Sydney studio.

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SHAPING THE NARRATIVE Sculptor C arol C rawford ’ s creations are a labour of love — and storytelling, as E llE M C C lurE discovers

’m sitting in Carol Crawford’s whitewashed Sydney studio, where light gushes in through large, low windows, dappled by the trees that line the street outside. It shines fondly on the sculptures — both finished and nearly-there — she has displayed carefully around the room. As we walk through the space, she considers each piece, y talking about its meaning and the origins of the stone. “I do what the stone tells me,” she says humbly. “I’m very good at interpreting what it wants to do. I’m sort of a stone psychologist. That can be your headline!” A shelf to one side is lined with stones in various stages of shaping, sanding blocks, and pots and bottles filled with unidentified mixtures. In the corner, a picture of Georgia O’Keeffe is tacked to the wall above prints of some of the late artist’s landscape paintings. Crawford later tells me she counts O’Keeffe among her inspirations (along with Barbara Hepworth, Isamu Noguchi and Michelangelo), for her “bold, feminine creations”. Much like O’Keeffe, Crawford’s personal style is notably singular: a rotation of mostly black Comme des Garçons, Yohji Yamamoto, Acne Studios and bassike, with trademark round spectacles and platform sneakers (“the chunkier, the better”). Crawford came to sculpting late in life, she tells me in her soft and assured voice. Though she studied art history at The University of Sydney and had dabbled in life drawing, she was busy raising

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her children and working in the family rag-trade business. When her youngest son was five, she enrolled in a workshop led by Tom Bass AM, one of Australia’s foremost sculptors. He was then in his eighties, and Crawford was keen to seize the opportunity to work with him “before it was too late”. She studied under him from 2002 until his death in 2010 at the age of 93, and she considers him a mentor. “He was a really special man,” she says, “quite a philosopher. I would just listen to him talk — I was quiet a lot.” She makes no secret of Bass’s exacting nature. “He was a very firm taskmaster — he had very high standards,” she recalls. “Sometimes I would have tears streaming ... But it focused me,” she says, adding: “I definitely learnt from the best.” At first, Crawford would buy stones from a sculpture supply store in Manhattan while visiting her daughter — now a food photographer based in Berlin — and bring them home to Sydney in her suitcase. As her appetite for sculpture grew, so did the size of the stones she was drawn to. When they became too heavy to pack in her luggage, she began to ship them back. Though she’s previously carved works from soapstone and marble, Crawford is often drawn to alabaster — a soft, smooth, fine-grained mineral — in no small part for its “affinity” with light. “When it comes in the windows, the sculptures light up and change appearance,” she says. Crawford sources her off-white, orange, red and, occasionally, blue alabaster from Italy, the US and Spain. “I remember where each stone has come from,” she says. “Those connections are very important to me.” Her process involves first cutting away the segments of stone she doesn’t need, then filing and polishing, completely by hand, in a process that can take anywhere from a few days to a few months. “It’s very gentle, slow and physical. I move my tool in a very rounded way — it’s almost like choreography,” she explains. Crawford tends to steer away from working with marble, as it requires a hammer and chisel, which she considers more “aggressive” than the hand-shaping she enjoys with alabaster. “It’s me imposing force — it’s a bit more masculine.”

H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019


KRISTINA SOLJO. STYLED BY SAMANTHA WONG. HAIR AND MAKEUP BY ELSA MORGAN AT RELOAD AGENCY

Carol Crawford in her Sydney studio among various finished sculptures and works in progress.

When finished, she has to “feel satisfied with [the work] in a visceral way. It’s very hard to describe, but I know when a sculpture is complete. I can breathe easy.” She often collects bases to mount her pieces on while out walking the dog. “I got some beautiful red gum from someone cutting down their tree,” she recalls. In times of emotional distress, Crawford gravitates to sculpting, hence many pieces are tied up with acutely personal moments and have deep metaphorical meaning. One of her first works, Genesis I, was created just after her father had passed in 2010. It consists of three interlocking pieces. She explains, “They create a beautiful whole when interlocked, but when separate, they fall to the ground. It’s a metaphor: with the support and love of family, we are whole.” She points across the room to another of her works, which appears to be milky white alabaster, with brown markings on one side and black markings on the other. “I did that when my sister was very sick. I discovered it had different-coloured veins me into their home and showed me where it on each side, but it’s one piece of stone, so the “I love dealing with was going to go. That made me very happy.” metaphor is that from one set of DNA you can She’s now working on a portrait commishave two different people. It’s special to me.” the imperfections of sion — a clay model sculpture that will evenCharacteristically bulbous, her pieces can be the stone. I see it as a tually be cast in bronze, which will take most ambiguous, but the curves hint at humanness and, further, femininity. She acknowledges this, metaphor for life. We of the year. Previously, she’s sculpted portraits of two Australian cricket captains, Barry noting how two mounds on one piece “look are not all perfect. Jarman and Monty Noble, as well as her like hips”. She tells me: “My pieces are feminine father. She says it’s less about creating an because they are an extension of my inner being From ugliness can “exact copy of their face” as it is “capturing the … I don’t know if a man could do these. come beauty.” “I love dealing with the imperfections of the essence” of a person. “Tom taught us not to stone,” Crawford adds. “I see it as a metaphor make things up — you have to really think for life. We are not all perfect. From ugliness can come something about their personality. And you never do a portrait with an open beautiful and appealing, feminine and soft.” mouth! All the great, beautiful portraits are with a closed mouth.” In an ironic upshot, she notes that their shapely nature can leave She runs weekend annual workshops, usually 14–16 people. But her pieces open to more, let’s say, manly readings. “They always she finds exhibiting to be daunting: “It’s like singing in public. have this phallic overtone,” she muses, “so I have to think about Opening up your inner being and showing everyone what you are the angles in photos. I often send them to the family WhatsApp really like.” She also chairs the Tom Bass Sculpture Studio School in group before I post them on Instagram.” Sydney’s inner west, which was founded by Bass in 1947 and offers Crawford frequently sells pieces to people she knows, and will workshops for various skill levels. “I feel privileged to help spread the always try to meet with a potential buyer, largely due to the senti- love of sculpture,” Crawford says. “It may surprise people, but Tom mental value the works hold. “They’re like children — they’ve all believed everyone had the ability to sculpt. It’s learning to ‘see’ things got names. They’re almost part of the family. I had one piece that and not just ‘look’ which is the most difficult. That and patience!” sold through a curator and the person who bought it actually took carolcrawfordsculpture.net

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BRIGHT YOUNG THING

hile Lee Broom may have started out as a child actor, more than a decade after founding his eponymous design brand, he now reserves the theatrics for the elaborate and immersive exhibitions that have become his signature; his opulent, high-shine creations — often in crystal, marble, brass and glass — bringing a certain London-bred, ns-honed freshness to the interiors game. Last month, he eschewed design hubs Milan, New York and London to transform an underground carpark in Sydney into a labyrinthine wonderland for Park Life, his largest exhibition yet. We spoke to him about bringing it to life, and his charmed beginning and very bright future. Tell us a little about how you started out. I was a professional child theatre actor from the age of seven until I was 17, and a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company. But I also had a passion for design, especially fashion. I entered a fashion design competition when I was 17, which was judged byVivienne Westwood. I won and I got to meet her — I actually asked her for her autograph, which was really lame. But she wrote her phone number down and said that if I wanted to learn more about the industry I should come to her studio. So I went, and spent the two days just shadowing her. I ended up staying as an intern for 10 months. Not bad for your first internship. No, especially for someone who couldn’t sew. We went to the shows in Paris and I dressed the models — it was the mid-’90s when all the supermodels did her shows. I decided I wanted a career in fashion, so I went to Central Saint Martins and did my degree in fashion design. How did you segue into light and furniture design? At university I’d set up a business

to pay for my tuition, doing odd jobs in interiors for bars and restaurants.When I graduated I was asked to design a whole venue, which I did with a friend. It won awards and we got asked to design more venues. Because that business was already there and the startup costs were far less than for fashion, I decided to move into interiors. In 2007 I set up Lee Broom. How do you feel those origins now feed into your work? My acting background definitely informs the presentations I put on, and the theatricality of the shows. Fashion has informed the way I approach my designs — looking back to how things were done historically, and how that can be interpreted and modernised. With the collections, I try to change and develop materials and silhouettes every year, while keeping the overarching house style present.That is more synonymous with fashion than with interiors. Your latest exhibition, Park Life, in Sydney, was a real coup. Can you tell us a bit about how it came to be? In a sense it was quite classically Broom, but bigger than

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anything we’d ever done before. It included work that spanned 10 years, so it was important to present pieces that had been seen before in a different way. I’d wanted to do a maze for a long time because I think it is an interesting way to present a journey. It was a nod to the pleasure gardens of the 18th century where aristocracy, the middle classes, even prostitutes and street people would gather — it was a melting pot. I wanted to have an essence of that architecture but presented in a modern way with my lights. What does the foreseeable future entail for Lee Broom? We are working on a show for next year, as well as a new collection and another for the year after.We work two years ahead because the pieces take that long to put into production.We have some new products coming out later on this year that are more like lifestyle pieces, and then next year we will be releasing more furniture, which is exciting. [Up until now] it has felt too early and I think I have managed to now hit the nail on the head in getting it spot on, just at the right time. It is not good in design to be too early or too late.You have got to be in the right moment. It seems like a slow burn ... When you compare it to fashion, it feels like such a long time, but you’re creating products that are going to be in people’s homes for potentially the rest of their lives.Though I guess you could say the same thing about a Balenciaga jacket!

CRAIG WALL

A pivotal fashion internship at just 17 saw him shadow the inimitable Vivienne Westwood, but in the decades since, British lighting and furniture designer LEE BROOM has catapulted his own brand of sought-after creations into the limelight. By E llE M c c lurE


SORRY, NOT SORRY

ZHANG JINGNA/TRUNK ARCHIVE/SNAPPER IMAGES

As grandiose public apologies become de rigueur, are we honing the art of atoning for our sins, or have we lost sight of their purpose completely? By E llE M c c lurE S I WRITE THIS, a Google search for ‘public apology’ yields news pieces on myriad high-profile mea culpas, following missteps from the likes of model bootcamp Skinny Bitch Collective, for apparently using Maasai people as ‘props’ in a workout; nes, for kicking a passenger off a flight whom staff perceived to have a potentially contagious rash (in actuality, a noninfectious skin condition); and K-pop singer Jung Joon-young, for filming and sharing intimate videos of women without consent. Public apologies — often from celebrities, politicians and companies who’ve committed sins of various degrees, or simply missed the mark of our collective standard — are far from a new thing, but in a post-#MeToo world, and when the every action of those with a profile (and often, those without) is immortalised and endlessly op-eded about, they’re more common than ever. They’re also more elaborate, pored over by PR professionals and sent out via press releases, essays and even publicity campaigns of their own. But is all this actually yielding better apologies, or just creating more to be sorry for? The origin of the word is the Greek word apologia, meaning ‘defence’, which is often the approach taken by those doing the least to apologise, resulting in a token statement that barely scrapes the surface of their wrongs and instead screams “my lawyer advised me to”. In the case of many — such as celebrity chef Mario Batali, who in the wake of being accused by four women of sexual misconduct offered a paltry apology via an email newsletter (which he signed off with a recipe for his cinnamon rolls) — often saying nothing at all would be the ideal. According to Edwin Battistella, a professor at Southern Oregon University and the author of Sorry About That: The Language of Public Apology, a sound apology needs to accomplish two things. Firstly, the person apologising should name in no vague terms what they did wrong and how it was hurtful or detrimental to the greater good. “It’s important to show that they actually [understand] and acknowledge the harm they did,” he notes. What’s more, Battistella says, they should “repair the harm done by restoring something or by committing to new behaviour”. When a video surfaced of Travis Kalanick, the now ousted CEO of Uber, showing him yelling at one of the company’s drivers on a trip he took, his apology at least stood out for the onus he placed on his own behaviour. “It’s clear this video is a reflection of me — and the criticism we’ve received is a stark reminder that I must fundamentally change as a leader and grow up. This is the first time I’ve been willing to admit I need leadership help and I intend to get it,” he said. Kalanick’s June 2017 resignation at the request of the company’s biggest investors, though, suggests he never got that help.

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Battistella admits “a perfect apology is very tough,” but says they succeed when specific and direct. They fail “when they resort to excuse-making, verbal judo … [and] putting the onus on others” — he cites Roseanne Barr’s feeble attempt at an apology after making a racial slur about Obama advisor Valerie Jarrett via Twitter. In the days and weeks following, Barr made a series of elusive excuses, claiming she was “Ambien tweeting”, and stating, convolutedly, “I apologise to anyone who thought, or felt offended and who thought that I meant something that I, in fact, did not mean.” Likewise, when apologising to Taylor Swift for his now infamous VMAs stage-storming, Kanye West made reference to having been drinking beforehand, and “never taking time off”. When it comes to shifting the blame onto sleeping pills, alcohol or some other mitigating factor, the transparent evasion is almost as insulting as the offending comments themselves, in large part because, as Daniel Mendelsohn wrote in Town & Country, “More often than not you suspect such utterances do, in fact, reflect the speakers’ truest selves — as things we say in the heat of emotion, or inebriation, tend to be.” Equally disappointing can be when more thought-out responses still fall short. Last year, Lena Dunham crafted an entire Hollywood Reporter guest editor letter around an apology to Aurora Perrineau, the actor who had accused Girls writer Murray Miller of sexual assault, for initially defending Miller against the claims. While Dunham’s piece had the elements of a sound apology — she acknowledged her wrongs and showed an effort to rectify them — a considerable amount of effort was given to prefacing the apology with context that appeared to shift the focus away from Dunham, and included lyrical prose that smacked of performance. “To Aurora: You have been on my mind and in my heart every day this year. I love you. I will always love you … I see you, Aurora. I hear you, Aurora. I believe you, Aurora.” What’s more, much of Dunham’s letter felt painfully navelgaze-y (“you have made me a better woman and a better feminist”) in the way many modern apologies are; as much a self-congratulatory effort as a mea culpa for its recipient, an attempt to both curb damage to our all-important public personae and invite praise for our display of radical honesty and transparency. The curse of public apologies, Battistella says, is that “because they’re made at a distance, it’s hard to judge sincerity”. What’s more, that distance “makes it easy for the person apologising to assume they are more effective than they are”. Unfortunately for us, that one-way conversation means the apologiser can’t tell when they need to take a pause and let meaning be derived from brevity. As time goes on, such apologies are likely to become more involute, increasingly minimising the role of the recipient and bolstering the self-image of the apologiser. And that’s a sorry state of affairs.

H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019


CULTURE

A ldous H Arding , the moniker of 28-year-old New Zealand singer songwriter Hannah Harding, talks to E llE M c c lurE about her third album and the surprisingly bearable lightness of being the surface, Aldous Harding ppears to be the kind of usician who doesn’t reveal too uch. Her singular strain of othic-folk music is complex and ayered, poetic to the point of nd her performances can feel enigmatic at least, haunting at most. Her ex-boyfriend the musician Marlon Williams spoke in interviews of their separation, but from Harding there was purposeful silence. While her 2017 sophomore record, Party, wasn’t a breakup album per se, it was created in the wake of a trajectory-altering relationship. That is to say that if you listen closely, it’s all there for the taking. She isn’t afraid of her feelings, whether laying them out in lyrical gut-punches or something a little more relenting. Her new album, Designer, falls into the latter category, perhaps because, as she tells me over the phone from Wales on the cusp of another world tour, she’s resigned to the idea that “they’re just thoughts … they’re just thoughts.” Can you talk to us about how Designer came together? I wrote four of the songs while I was on tour for Party [in 2018]. I said to John [Parish, the album’s producer], “I think I want to do a record before the end of the year. Do you wanna do that?” He asked if I had all the songs and I lied and said yes. I had good intentions —

Aldous Harding. Designer is out April 26; aldousharding.com.

I knew I would have them, because I had said that I would. After that, I wrote “The Barrel”, “Designer” and “Treasure”. It wasn’t until then that I realised what was happening. The songs were lighter. I wasn’t trying to write them like that, that’s just how they were happening. Why do you think that is? I remember saying after I did Party that I was feeling much better and more positive and felt like I had a better grasp on things, and that’s true for this album as well. I think I’ve just grown up and calmed down, which is … it’s nice. The sound is evolving as it should. I’m evolving as I should. I just wanted to make something that was a little bit lighter, you know? I’m not pure now or anything like that, it’s still the same stuff — it’s just a different approach. It doesn’t have to have this heaviness to be serious. You can be serious about your joy, serious about your vitality. Your live performances have such a singular style and feeling. What was that born from? When I was starting out, I was shy. It was like a new relationship, and few enter a new relationship and know exactly what their place is, or what they want to do in that place and how much they want to let go. You know, Will I get hurt if I show you these things? The more I did it, the more I let go and allowed the things I’m good at to really come out and be a part of what I was doing. I allowed myself to experiment. I have different levels of being, and I don’t hide those when I perform. I try to embrace them. I’d considered it as more of a performative thing rather than a form of expression. Oh, but it’s both, it’s both. I’m always aware it’s a performance. In any job, you have to perform to a degree. You know when to turn a certain charm on and off, and as long as you can handle that, I think that’s perfectly OK. It’s a strong advantage if you are in control of all those different parts of yourself. Even if you’re not in control, that’s part of it, too. That’s what’s quite freeing about [performing]; there is no right or wrong way to do it. People either get it and wanna come along or they don’t, and that’s totally fine with me. Does being away from home writing and touring affect you? Going back this time, I realised that, of course, spending time with my mother and being around familiar things is important. I didn’t really allow myself to go there for a while, because I knew that wasn’t my life. There might come a time when I can afford to disappear for a while, but for now it’s what’s to be done. I’m really just starting. It still feels very new.

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Three new reads for this month’s book club

INVENTED LIVES

When a young illustrator flees Soviet Leningrad for Australia in the mid-’80s, she’s befriended by an older couple and their son. She quickly becomes entangled in their family, discovering each has an inner life she couldn’t have anticipated.

Andrea Goldsmith (Scribe), $33.

SPRING

While very much rooted in present-day Britain, this instalment of Ali Smith’s seasonal quartet is absurdist and transcendental, and Smith covers life, death, art and the human condition in a way that’s drawn comparisons to Charles Dickens. Ali Smith (Hamish

Hamilton), $30.

FRANKISSSTEIN

This is Frankenstein reimagined for 2019. The tale touches on the omnipresence of AI, as well as sex-bots and cryogenics. It’s far from Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit, but compelling all the same.

Jeanette Winterson (Jonathan Cape), $28, out May 21.

PORTRAIT: REBEKAH CAMPBELL. COURTESY OF JONATHAN CAPE/HAMISH HAMILTON/SCRIBE. PRICES APPROXIMATE

LEAVING THE PARTY

NOVEL IDEAS


Edited by ALEXANDRA ENGLISH

BRISBANE ART DESIGN The Museum of Brisbane is pushing the boundaries of contemporary art and design with a 17-day program of exhibitions, installations, artist talks, studio visits and tours. Brisbane Art Design — or BAD — is centred on a major exhibition at the museum that includes commissions by Craig & Karl, Justene Williams and Susan Hawkins, among others. BAD runs from May 10 to 26, with the major exhibition continuing until August 11. (brisbaneartdesign.com.au) Triptych, 2018, by Craig & Karl. Above: costume detail of A Metal Cry, 2017, by Justene Williams. Prudence Harridene (played by Hayley Magnus) and Nancy Pickett (played by Amanda Woodhams).

THE DRESSMAKER

Go behind the seams of The Dressmaker at Canberra’s National Film and Sound Archive. Curated by Marion Boyce, the exhibition features haute couture pieces and vintage fashion worn in the film by Kate Winslet, Liam Hemsworth, Rebecca Gibney and Hugo Weaving. (April 18–August 18; nfsa.gov.au)

BEN KING; COURTESY OF CRAIG & KARL; HARRY MARK; COURTESY OF JUSTENE WILLIAM/ SARAH COTTIER GALLERY, SYDNEY; RÉMI CHAUVIN; COURTESY OF ROSSLYND PIGGOTT

SYDNEY WRITERS’ FESTIVAL The theme of this year’s festival is ‘Lie to me’, an examination of the untruths we tell ourselves, each other and our children. Headliners include Meg Wolitzer (The Female Persuasion), Kristen Roupenian (You Know You Want This: Cat Person and Other Stories) and Jane Harper (The Lost Man), to name a few. (April 29–May 5; swf.org.au)

Above: a rabbit dish by Vince Trim. Right: sea urchin spaghetti by Christine Manfield at MONA.

SEMI PERMANENT returns to Carriageworks as part of the Vivid Ideas program from May 23 to 25. For its 17th year, the quintessential design-industry festival brings heavy hitters such as Erica Dorn, the lead designer behind Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs, and Ian Spalter, head of design at Instagram, centrestage. (semipermanent.com)

Predictably, Museum of Old and New Art’s Eat The Problem is a totally unpredictable experience. Described by the creator, Kirsha Kaechele, as an “outrageously glamorous feast for the Ki nses”, the immersive and performative exhibition invites sen visitors to experience a fusion of sound, colour and visito emotion through an exploration of art and food. MONA’s executive chef,Vince Trim, has developed M a menu that progresses through the full colour spectrum, with associations between colours and emotions: the yellow course is uplifting; the purple, peaceful; and the brown, well, let’s just say the response to this course is meant to be digestive.To say that it will mess with your senses is an understatement.To find out more, visit mona.net.au. (April 13–September 2)

Most Beautiful Plant, 1989, by Rosslynd Piggott.

ROSSLYND PIGGOTT

Carby Tuckwell, creative director and co-founder of Deus Ex Machina motorcycles, will speak at Semi Permanent.

A survey of Rosslynd Piggott’s artworks will be held at the National Gallery of Victoria more than 20 years after her first NGV exhibition. I SenseYou But I Cannot SeeYou includes more than 100 paintings, drawings, sculptures and installations traversing the themes Piggott has spent four decades exploring: surrealism, dream states, synaesthesia, sensory perception and the beauty of the natural world. (April 12–August 18; ngv.vic.gov.au)


A U S T R A L I A N

L A N D S CA PE D E S I G N E R S

On Sale Now ONLY $69.99

AVAILABLE WHERE ALL GOOD BOOKS ARE SOLD AND AT MAGSHOP.COM.AU


A FASHIONABLE Edited by

ELLE McCLURE

EELE H L

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WEL S OPHIA W EBSTER ’ S wardrobe is as bright and bold as her London home — and her delightful shoe designs. By L UCY H ALFHEAD

Sophia Webster in her living room beneath a Keith Haring artwork, wearing her own Peter Jensen dress and shoes from her label.

Photographed by HARRY CROWDER

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IFE IS SHORT. Buy the shoes!’ reads a cushion resting on the bed of the British accessory designer Sophia Webster. It’s just one of the many playful touches in her east London house that reflects her mission to put the fun back into luxury fashion. Paper lanterns shaped like ice-creams hang from the den and a half-eaten chocolate cake made to resemble a Disney princess in a frothy yellow ballgown bears witness to her daughter Bibi Blossom’s third birthday party the day before. Webster is wearing a cat-print jumper that reaches down to her knees (she’s a dainty 155 centimetres tall) and bright pink fluffy slippers, while Bibi is clearly still in a party mood as she runs around in a bright-pink flamingo onesie. Yet there is no doubt about the seriousness with which Webster approaches her business. Combining exuberantly feminine designs with a strong sense of sophistication, she not only produces eight adult shoe collections every year, but also brings out two more for children, as well as four handbag lines, and bridal pieces. “I love adding different product categories, but it has to be the right timing. I designed kids’ shoes when I was pregnant and they’ve been a huge success. But really, I was just being selfish because I wanted cute shoes to put Bibi in,” she says, laughing. Webster’s first love was not fashion, but dance. With her older sister, Claudia, she would travel up and down the country for freestyle disco competitions. “I wanted to stand out on the dance floor,” she says, “so we used to have sparkly costumes covered in diamantés. I think my penchant for crystals and embellishment probably comes from back then.” Her grandmother was another early influence. “I used to go to Nanny Peggy’s house after school most nights. She always wore glamorous outfits and would leave a trail of glitter everywhere she went.” Webster studied art and sculpture at Camberwell College of Arts before one particular life-drawing class sparked her passion for footwear. “The model brought in a big bag of clothes,” she says, “and it was then that I found myself really focused on sketching her shoes.” This led to a four-year degree course at the prestigious

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Clockwise from top left: Webster wearing her own House of Holland jacket and Mary Katrantzou jumper and skirt, holding a clutch bag from her label; the shoe collection on the landing; Bibi’s playroom; a sketch by Webster.


A Fashionable L I F E

Clockwise from left: a stained glass window; a cushion on Webster’s bed; Bibi’s bedroom; Webster’s late grandmother’s vanity set; Webster on the balcony wearing her own Mira Mikati jacket and shoes from her collection.

“It was unusual for an unknown designer to sell out like that, so we knew there was something magical about [the shoes].” shoemaking college Cordwainers, followed by a master’s in womenswear at London’s Royal College of Art. There, she met designer Nicholas Kirkwood, whom she subsequently assisted for three years. “It was a long road,” she says. “Shoes are very technical — I could have become a surgeon in that time!” After founding her eponymous label in 2012, Webster travelled to Brazil to find out more about the manufacturing process for her designs. “That year, I went for the whole summer to get to know the suppliers and the tanneries,” she says. “I only speak a bit of Portuguese, but I did learn the most-used phrase in the factory, Ai Sophia! E muito complicada!” While the factory workers may have found her whimsical designs challenging to make, their efforts caught the eye of the Browns co-founder Joan Burstein, who spotted Webster’s Chiara butterfly-appliqué sandals and decided to stock them; they flew out of the shop. “That was an incredible turning point for me,” Webster says. “It was unusual for an unknown designer to sell out like that, so we knew there was something magical about them.” After winning several coveted accolades, including the British Fashion Award for Emerging Accessories Designer, in 2016 Webster opened her flagship store on Mount Street in Mayfair, London, where her neighbours include Christopher Kane, Roksanda and Loewe. In part, she credits savvy use of social media for her stratospheric rise. “We noticed very early on that people would share photos of their shoes on Instagram, and we decided to dedicate a page to them on our website, showing how real women buy and style the shoes in different ways. It has been really instrumental in the growth of the brand.” In just five years, Webster has garnered more than one million Instagram followers and her shoes have been worn by Scarlett Johansson, Beyoncé and Gwen Stefani. “I was so made up when Gwen wore them,” Webster says. “When I was younger I was obsessed with her and I think that’s why I dress like a glamorous tomboy now.”


A Fashionable L I F E

By day, you’ll find her dressed casually in jeans, a sequined or slogan T-shirt from Markus Lupfer under a House of Holland jumper, and a pair of her own Riko trainers. By night, she prefers vibrant print dresses from Mary Katrantzou. “I’m a bit of a chameleon,” she says. “I love bold colours and statement pieces, but since becoming a mum, I’ve bought a lot more dungarees and denim, and I definitely wear more flat shoes.” A similar aesthetic is evident in her home, a converted church, where she lives with her husband, Bobby Stockley, a former electrical engineer who has been involved in the business from the beginning and is now CEO. The interiors are part baroque, part Barbie, with wood panelling, pastel-coloured walls and shearling rugs. Webster says she doesn’t like buying new furniture — “You’re more likely to find me getting into a bidding war for Art Deco lighting on eBay at four in the morning” — and she has filled the house with unique pieces, including prints from Hattie Stewart and the street artist Pure Evil. The upstairs corridor is dedicated to 200 pairs of shoes displayed on shelves and a neon ice-cream sign by Electric Confetti from one of her London fashion week presentations. But it’s a handwritten sign on the blackboard in the playroom that is her all-time favourite piece. “Be like a pineapple: stand tall, wear a crown, be sweet on the inside.” For the Webster household, it’s the perfect motto to live by…

“You’re more likely to find me getting into a bidding war on eBay at four in the morning.”

Bibi in her bedroom. Left: Webster in the garden. Right: the Electric Confetti ice-cream sign.

Sophia Webster clutch bag, $625, sophiawebster.com.

Sophia Webster shoes, $755, sophiawebster.com.

S O P H I A’ S WORLD Webster with her eldest daughter, Bibi. She also has twin girls, Roses and Lilou, born in 2018.

Webster with her husband, Bobby Stockley, at the 2018 British Fashion Awards.

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Avène XeraCalm A.D Lipid-Replenishing Cream, $38.

HARRY CROWDER; COURTESY OF INSTAGRAM/@SOPHIAWEBSTER. PRICES APPROXIMATE. SEE BUYLINES FOR STOCKISTS

Alex Monroe necklace, $305, alexmonroe.com.


Katarina Kroslakova.

all the first-world problems that come with the ough gig of reviewing luxury cars for a living, aying goodbye is the hardest. It can be emotionally raumatic to return a vehicle after it’s been yours for few days, not to mention the questioning and that comes from your offspring: “Where’s Mum’s new big grey car gone?” (Sorry, Bambino, you’re not going to like the answer.) For the purpose of this review, I shall refer to the 2019 Maserati Levante as “My Maserati”. It only feels right. The reason Maserati’s first SUV is so appealing and so damn enjoyable to drive is that you don’t actually feel like you’re driving an SUV at all. It’s when I pack accoutrements into every available inch of space that it becomes apparent that My Maserati is a “have your cake and eat it, too” kind of proposition: it looks sexy, it’s very spacious and yet it still handles like a sports car. When Maserati introduced the Levante to its range in 2016, it was responding to a boom in the SUV sector. It was a shrewd, well-timed move by a heritage Italian car maker traditionally known for performance-driven sleek sports cars with racing engines in its sedans and coupés. The Levante was not only the brand’s highest seller that year, but it also brought valuable female clientele to the typically male marque. Due to its lower price point, it addressed a new area The Maserati Levante. of the market, with 90 per cent of Levantes sold to first-time Maserati purchasers. Maserati is now offering a new 2019 entryVITAL level variant to open those hallowed Maserati gates STATISTICS a little wider for those happy to spend upwards of NEED FOR SPEED: $125,000 for their dream Italian SUV. Not that 0–100km/h in 6 seconds, these Italians ever want to be mainstream: the with top speed 251 km/h quantities remain limited, with total sales for the ENGINE & TRANSMISSION: year projected at 500 units. So what does the Petrol, V6 twin turbo, Q4 driver get for $125,000, and what has been left intelligent all-wheel-drive, out? The Ferrari-built engine has been detuned: eight-speed automatic gearbox BEST BITS: the previous Levante S offered 316kW/580Nm, Sleek design, comfort for all as opposed to the new entry-level’s torque of passengers, boot capacity, 257kW/500nM. What those numbers basically Ferrari-built engine mean is My Maserati’s reduced power output WORST BITS: makes the car less aggressive, but, conveniently, it Some ergonomic challenges, extras add up also makes it a tad more economical. COMPETITORS: Not that we’re pretending My Maserati — or Porsche Cayenne, Range any Maserati — is a fuel-efficient vehicle. Each Rover Sport, BMW X5, time you switch to Sports mode, open those Mercedes-Benz GLE exhaust valves and revel in the aural signature of HOW MUCH: From $125,000 the brand, the petrol cost is pretty much your

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Clockwise from far left: Valentino scarf, $867, farfetch.com; Louis Vuitton City Guide: Rome, $44, au.louisvuitton.com; Prada key ring, $225, matchesfashion.com; Fendi sunglasses, $680, (02) 9540 0500.

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DANIEL GOODE. STYLED BY CAROLINE TRAN. KATARINA KROSLAKOVA WEARS SCANLAN THEODORE DRESS, $1600, SCANLANTHEODORE.COM. HAIR BY KOH AT VIVIEN’S CREATIVE; MAKEUP BY NAOMI MCFADDEN AT UNION. DANIEL GOODE IS REPRESENTED BY THE ARTIST GROUP. CAR: DEJAN SOKOLOVSKI. STILL LIFE STYLED BY SAMANTHA WONG. PRICES APPROXIMATE. SEE BUYLINES FOR STOCKISTS

Maserati’s new Levante — at once luxurious, thrilling and practical — is setting a new standard for SUVs. By K ATARINA K ROSLAKOVA

T R AV E L

THE SUPER STEALTH SUV

weekly coffee budget right there. Is it worth it? Absolutely. Life is too short to drive boring cars. Standard features in My Maserati include front and rear parking sensors, blind-spot alert, rear camera, keyless entry and dual-zone climate control. Adjustable air suspension and Skyhook shock absorbers ensure an even ride, and the all-wheel-drive system is almost daring you to put it to the test on tough terrain. A significant improvement in the 2019 model is the Integrated Vehicle Control (IVC), which doesn’t just correct vehicle instability — it helps prevent it. The driver experience is almost flawless. The seats are comfortable, plush (heated, of course) and adjustable in 12 directions. The strict Maserati standards of perfection have been maintained with hand-stitched leather, an intuitive dashboard and soft-close doors. Frustrations: the indicator and high-beam lever require my left hand to leave the steering wheel and reach behind the paddle. My (Italian) husband shrugged when I complained. “Ah, the Italians. They’ve never been good at ergonomics. They make amazing engines.” I also reverted to Google Maps for more up-to-date sat nav, and I’m a bit of a greedy bugger with extras such as head-up display and rear window shading, so as my wishlist grew, so did the price tag. But without a doubt, the best feature of the Levante, which made most frustrations disappear, is its magnificent booty. Not only are those rear curves deliciously styled, but the capacity and flexibility made a critical milestone even more memorable. In the 10 days of testing, we packed My Maserati with an enormous Alex Perry wedding dress, a tuxedo, a high chair, travel cots, toys, half a pantry, presents, champagne, a steamer and much much more. Oh, and two adults and two kids. If a car can make packing fun, then this is a Maserati for modern times.

H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019

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COLLECTION HEAVEN SCENT Tory Burch signature eau de parfum captures classic elements with a touch of the unexpected. Floral peony and tuberose blend with crisp citrus notes of grapefruit and neroli, anchored by earthy vetiver. $155 (50ml), $195 (100ml), available in select David Jones stores.

THRILL RIDE Elegant design, exceptional workmanship and a choice of turbo engine: the new Mazda CX-5 really is a cut above. Add Apple CarPlay or Android Auto to sync with your smartphone and you’re ready for your next adventure. mazda.com.au.

SEAL WITH A KISS

FIRST RESORT Secluded in the heart of the Whitsundays, Daydream Island Resort has newly reopened with signature dining concepts, relaxed bars and waterfront suites, as well as its iconic Living Reef. daydreamisland.com.

Anton’s Initial Icon collection is for those not afraid of public displays of affection. Send an 18-karat yellow gold and diamond kiss to someone you love, or as a well-deserved gift to self. Necklace and earrings, $995 each, shop.antonjewellery.com.

THE COLLAB

SMOOTH MOVE

The latest in Tommy Hilfiger’s series of iconic collaborators is Zendaya. The new TommyxZendaya capsule collection reflects the actor and singer’s unique style and the brand’s spirit of breaking with convention and championing diversity. $600, au.tommy.com.

Laser treatment for hair removal means fast, reliable and permanent hair reduction via leading-edge technology. For more information, visit Laser Clinics Australia at laserclinics.com.au.

NEW FACE

LAP OF LUXURY

Reveal radiant skin in four weeks with Prevage Progressive Renewal Treatment, four unique formulas with increasing levels of hydroxy acids infused with supercharged antioxidant idebenone. $205, davidjones.com.

Crafted from 100 per cent genuine leather, the HP Spectre Folio is the PC reinvented. Three distinct positions — laptop, tablet and ‘tent’ — cleverly adapt the device to the occasion. Available in Cognac Brown, from $2999, at Harvey Norman, JB Hi-Fi and hp.com.au.


E

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PEAK The Austrian retreat taking detoxes to the next level

GETTY IMAGES

WELLNESS

Lake Altaussee and Mount Dachstein, Austria.

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ESCAPE

THE POWER OF PURITY Avril MAir chews, cleanses and purges her way to wellness at Austria’s Vivamayr Altaussee

From top: Lake Altaussee; the interiors are spare but luxurious; the spa’s pool.

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OME TO MY SENSES deep in a snowdrift, having omehow strayed off the narrow path that winds its way icturesquely around Lake Altaussee and ended up mbedded in several feet of pristine, crystalline powder. e air is cold and crisp, the pine trees are hanging low ith ice and I am stuck in a hole with dusk falling. For worth, I’m also starving. I could die out here, I think. Is the pursuit of wellness really worth it? To explain: I’m at Vivamayr in Austria, perhaps the world’s leading centre for detoxification, where the emphasis is on strict cleansing of the digestive system and re-education of eating habits. What this means in practice is an enforced diet of dry bread and herbal tea, relentless chewing — 40 times per mouthful — and the unfortunate effects of taking what are euphemistically called passage salts before breakfast (that is, if you’re allowed breakfast). Also, gentle exercise. Which is why I am ravenously hungry while trying to walk for several miles in the middle of winter. This is less of a spa trip, more self-flagellation. But oh, it works. Those of a sensitive disposition may want to stop reading now. For the rest, Vivamayr — two medical spas in Austria, with day clinics in London and Vienna — follows the Mayr method, a treatment pioneered in the 1930s by the encouragingly long-lived Dr F. X. Mayr, who believed that the secret to a happy, healthy life was down to happy, healthy digestion. The basics are simple: eat slowly, consciously and seasonally; mindfully consume three meals a day that are made, where possible, from fresh, local ingredients; drink plenty of water; and stay active. And, it turns out, spend a great deal of time in the bathroom. It was radical in its day, this focus on the relation between diet and disease, but now we all know about gut health — and its importance for both body and mind — Mayr has come into its own, though it is underpinned by reassuringly modern medical science. It’s a lovely place to be, Vivamayr Altaussee, with its glorious views over lake and mountains, carpeted in snow and soundtracked by a faint jangle of cowbells. If one chooses to be deprived,

H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019


ALAMY; ALEX GRETTER; MICHAEL KOENIGSHOFE; REINHARD ÖHNER

Clockwise from top left: the restaurant; the menu adheres to a strictly prescribed alkalising diet; a guest bathroom, bedroom and balcony; loungers by the lake.

depressed and — let’s face it — demented, there’s nowhere more beautiful to do so. The original Mayr Clinic could best be described as chalet-style, but this newer outpost is surprisingly streamlined and chic — though the waitresses at dinner do still wear dirndls. In summer, it’s quite the social scene, with notable names in fashion returning every year — the power PR Karla Otto, the designer Alber Elbaz, the editor and consultant Caroline Issa, the makeup artist Lisa Eldridge — but when winter nights close in, it somehow becomes more serious. They stop serving food, such as it is, at 6.30pm. Lights go down soon after. Besides the scenery, the star attraction is the clinic’s medical director, Dr Sepp Fegerl, trained as both a conventional and alternative doctor, whose cheery dynamism means that he can be giving your stomach a painfully deep massage (this is a regular thing at Mayr), conveying his unease at the condition of your liver and pointing out the absurdity of living in a stressful city like London, while still displaying understanding and kindness. Weight loss is a side effect of the journey to better health here, rather than an end in itself — it is always emphasised, but Dr Fegerl’s daily sessions turn into a sort of therapy as well as healing, which means both somehow become as one. Exhaustive mastication aside, there’s something deeply restorative about a week spent focusing only on oneself — every table in the diningroom has a sign showing a mobile phone and tablet with a thick red line through them, meaning outside distractions are forbidden; though there’s Wi-Fi and TV in the rooms, you are encouraged to shut down the world at large while you come to terms with the one within. So despite the three kilos dropped in five days, it’s the other stuff that will make me come back to Vivamayr Altaussee: the space to detox and destress, stripping back everything to find a new energy and a mind that’s as cleansed as the body. Maybe next time, though, I’ll make do without the hikes. vivamayr.com.

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“There’s something deeply restorative about a week spent focusing only on oneself.”

H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019


HOROSCOPES By ORLI LYSEN

TAURUS (April 21–May 21)

GEMINI (May 22–June 21)

CAPRICORN (December 22–January 20)

“I think it’s always good to take on things that at first seem bigger than you. Then you just try to surmount them.”

Too much pressure? If you’ve been driving yourself too hard, you can take your foot off the accelerator now as motivator Mars moves out of your sign and into your finance zone. Earning and saving go into overdrive instead, with your home and long-term security in mind as Mars meets love- and money-attractor Venus. This month’s full moon encourages you to succeed with a health aim too, and with the sun energising your sign, a gentle detox of your wellbeing and work routines could be all it takes to achieve peak fitness.

that be you, especially while your ruler, Mercury, is leaving your finance, social media and career zones open to scrutiny this month. Mars urges you to fight for your dreams now, and distant opportunities may get closer with unruly Uranus influencing foreign interests, spirituality and training.

CANCER (June 22–July 22)

LIBRA (September 24–October 23)

You could make some dreams come true this month, though they might not be the ones you’d hoped or expected to take off. With crazy Uranus in the mix, it’s best to go with the cosmic flow, but rest assured, with Mars in your sign, you have control over the ambitions and collaborations that need to move forward. Love could emerge in your friends zone now thanks to Venus, and with a full moon suggesting that attraction is less about lust and more about shared pleasures, a harmonious hook-up could occur when someone familiar is seen in a new light. LEO (July 23–August 23)

It’s less about home and more about work for you this month as a full moon suggests that a significant lifestyle shake-up could be in order. Both love and money link to your career now, and thanks to unruly Uranus changing the rules, there may be an element of surprise involved here, too. A recent dynamic phase with friends begins to tail off as mighty Mars moves into your mind zone, ensuring you investigate your plans before manifesting them. VIRGO (August 24–September 23)

A full moon in your communications zone suggests that too much has already been said. Gaps in conversation encourage others to fill the silence, which means they often reveal more than they intended. Don’t let

– CATE BLANCHETT actor and Taurean

All the creative cosmic action is occurring in your deepest, darkest zone of power plays, passion and finance this month. Your ruler, Venus, will be in residence here along with wild card planet Uranus, so surprising gains, attractions or breakthroughs are likely, though a full moon urges caution and a need to source better ways to curate your cash. Mercury expands your options when it comes to being heard and seen, and you won’t hold back as feisty Mars makes you a force to be reckoned with at work. SCORPIO (October 24–November 22)

A full moon in your sign urges you to accept that you’ve not failed, you’ve just ruled out another path that you no longer need to follow. You’re giving in rather than giving up. Partnerships get a breath of fresh air now, and you might even find common ground with an archrival. Expand your empire — that’s the message from your cosmic co-ruler Mars this month, as being able to see the bigger picture is a significant part of your destiny now. SAGITTARIUS (November 23–December 21)

It’s your month to get even more gorgeous. Any health kick you begin now has the potential to bring lasting results that enhance you inside and out, thanks to Venus in the mix. Whatever’s been blocking your emotions gets the cosmic heave-ho as a

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Venus moves out of your home zone now to influence your creative life, and feeling indulgent, artistic and decadent comes with the territory, so share the muse with others who are totally on your wavelength. A full moon may cool down friendships and ambitions, but business or love partnerships could seriously heat up thanks to Mars in your relationship zone until July. Expect some fireworks, but be aware that this extra energy is what makes alchemy happen: close connections transform from meh to marvellous. AQUARIUS (January 21–February 18)

Love where you live this month. You’ll feel appreciated and rewarded chez vous with Venus bringing beauty into your home and your ruler Uranus bringing flashes of creative brilliance. You’ll be the voice of reason now, thanks to Mercury helping you to speak the language of love. A full moon may heighten emotions around your career, but as Mars pumps up the volume with your wellbeing and energy, it’s the best time in a long while to commit to a work goal. PISCES (February 19–March 20)

The sun lights up your home zone now with Mars in the house. This suggests you may be laying down the law to those who share your living space. You’re keen to make things happen, but you’ll get more co-operation with honey than with vinegar, so allow Mercury to help you sweet-talk your way into and out of anything. As Mars moves into your romance zone mid-month for a lengthy stay, passion is your primary motivator for both caring connections and artistic collaborations. ARIES (March 21–April 20)

Make the most of your attributes and assets this month. The new moon makes this an ideal time for investments, while a full moon urges you to clear debts and prioritise what and whom you value most. It’s a fast-talking month with Mercury on the move, and the more research you put into plans the further they’ll take you. A recent intense career phase wanes now, so explore work that enriches you experientially as well as financially. As your ruler, Mars, stokes your home zone, a change in your decor or lifestyle beckons.

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After much pondering and some major emotional healing, you’re ready to start afresh with love now. This could seal the deal with a long-term love or put you in the driver’s seat if you’re searching for a soulmate. Mars puts a passionate slant on connecting, and conversations that click could be the clue that romance is back on the menu, so keep things vocal and local. You’re more inventive with investments this month, too, so put schemes into action now while you’re a cosmic money magnet.

full moon detoxes negative thinking and memories of past hurts. A recent fiery phase with love or work eases, so go into your needs in depth now while Mars highlights financial security and Mercury favours frank and fair discussions.


BUYLINES

77 PORTRAIT OF A BRIDE

VALENTINO HAUTE COUTURE jumpsuit, cape, and shoes, all price on application.

ACNE STUDIOS:

BLAZÉ MILANO:

EMPORIO ARMANI:

LE MONDE:

acnestudios.com AJE.: a-j-e.com.au

blaze-milano.com

armani.com FENDI: fendi.com

lemondeberyl.com LOEWE: loewe.com

(02) 9239 0188, bottegaveneta.com

GIANVITO ROSSI:

LOUIS VUITTON:

albuslumen.com

gianvitorossi.com

ALEXANDER McQUEEN:

BRUNELLO CUCINELLI:

GIORGIO ARMANI:

alexandermcqueen.com

armani.com/au

altuzarra.com

brunellocucinelli.com; net-a-porter.com BULGARI: (02) 9233 3611; bulgari.com CARTIER: 1800 130 000, cartier.com.au

1300 883 880, louisvuitton.com

AMATO:

CELINE BY HEDI SLIMANE:

amatonewyork.com

ALBUS LUMEN:

TINA TYRELL. STYLED BY CARINE ROITFELD. MODEL: GRACE ELIZABETH. MAKEUP BY GRACE AHN; MANICURE BY MEI KAWAJIRI

BOTTEGA VENETA:

ALEXANDRE VAUTHIER:

alexandrevauthier.com ALIGHIERI: alighieri.co.uk ALTUZARRA:

armani.com

(02) 9232 7051, celine.com CHANEL: 1300 242 635, chanel.com CHLOÉ: chloe.com; parlourx.com

ATELIER VERSACE:

CHOPARD:

versace.com ATTICO: attico.com; net-a-porter.com

(02) 8197 6007, chopard.com

AMBUSH:

ambushdesign.com ARMANI PRIVÉ:

(07) 5631 4594, givenchy.com; net-a-porter.com GUCCI: 1300 442 878, gucci.com/au

CHRISTIAN DIOR:

(02) 9229 4600, dior.com CO: co-collections.com COACH: coachaustralia.com

BALENCIAGA:

DINOSAUR DESIGNS:

balenciaga.com BALLY: bally.com.au BALMAIN: balmain.com; shopbop.com BASSIKE: bassike.com

dinosaurdesigns.com.au

MANOLO BLAHNIK:

manoloblahnik.com MARA HOFFMAN:

marahoffman.com; matchesfashion.com MIU MIU: (02) 9223 1688, miumiu.com

SAINT LAURENT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO:

ysl.com SALVATORE FERRAGAMO:

ferragamo.com SPORTMAX:

world.sportmax.com STELLA McCARTNEY:

MM6 MAISON MARGIELA:

harlequinmarket.com

maisonmargiela.com; net-a-porter.com NANUSHKA:

TIFFANY & CO.:

nanushka.com

1800 731 131, tiffany.com

OSCAR DE LA RENTA:

TORY BURCH:

oscardelarenta.com philosophyofficial.com; net-a-porter.com

toryburch.com TOTEME: toteme-studio. com; net-a-porter.com VALENTINO: valentino.com VEX: vexcollection.com

PORTOLANO:

WING + WEFT:

portolano.com PRADA: (02) 9223 1688, prada.com

WOLFORD:

haiderackermann.com HARRY WINSTON:

harrywinston.com jacquemus.com; modaoperandi.com JASON WU:

jasonwustudio.com JENNIFER BEHR:

jenniferbehr.com JIL SANDER: jilsander.com J.W.ANDERSON:

(02) 9229 4600, dior.com

jwanderson.com KHAITE: khaite.com; matchesfashion.com

driesvannoten.com

loveshackfancy.com

(02) 9221 8888, rogiervivier.com

HARLEQUIN MARKET:

HAIDER ACKERMANN:

DIOR FINE JEWELLERY: DRIES VAN NOTEN:

LOVESHACKFANCY:

ROGER VIVIER:

stellamccartney.com; matchesfashion.com THE ROW: therow.com; matchesfashion.com TIA MAZZA: tiamazza.com TIBI: au.tibi.com

JACQUEMUS:

axelarigato.com; farfetch.com

AXEL ARIGATO:

GIVENCHY:

qhouseofbasics.com

PHILOSOPHY DI LORENZO SERAFINI:

Q HOUSE OF BASICS:

wingweftgloves.com (02) 9232 0008, wolfordshop.net

PRIVACY NOTICE This issue of Harper’s BAZAAR is published by Hearst/Bauer Media (Bauer). Bauer may use and disclose your information in accordance with our Privacy Policy, including to provide you with your requested products or services and to keep you informed of other Bauer publications, products, services and events. Our Privacy Policy is located at www.bauer-media.com.au/privacy/. It also sets out how you can access or correct your personal information and lodge a complaint. Bauer may disclose your personal information offshore to its owners, joint venture partners, service providers and agents located throughout the world, including in New Zealand, USA, the Philippines and the European Union. In addition, this issue may contain Reader Offers, being offers, competitions or surveys. Reader Offers may require you to provide personal information to enter or to take part. Personal information collected for Reader Offers may be disclosed by us to service providers assisting Bauer in the conduct of the Reader Offer and to other organisations providing special prizes or offers that are part of the Reader Offer. An opt-out choice is provided with a Reader Offer. Unless you exercise that opt-out choice, personal information collected for Reader Offers may also be disclosed by us to other organisations for use by them to inform you about other products, services or events or to give to other organisations that may use this information for this purpose. If you require further information, please contact Bauer’s Privacy Officer either by email at privacyofficer@bauer-media.com.au or mail at Privacy Officer, Bauer Media Pty Ltd, 54 Park Street, Sydney NSW 2000.

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LITTLE WONDER

The micro handbag trend keeps getting

Louis Vuitton case, $1740, au.louisvuitton.com.

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H A R P E R S B A Z A A R . C O M . A U May 2019

bigger — and smaller

EDWARD URRUTIA. STYLED BY CAROLINE TRAN. PHOTOGRAPHED AT TAMSIN JOHNSON STUDIO, SYDNEY. ALSO SHOWN: DIOR DIORIFIC LIPSTICK IN GLORY, $58. PRICES APPROXIMATE. SEE BUYLINES FOR STOCKISTS

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