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SUMMER 2018


TABLE OF CONTENTS

SUMMER 2018 COVER

BACK COVER

DESIGN

PRINTING

Photography by Harry Kraushaar

Photography by Kaleb Brook

Z&R Design www.znrdesign.com Zlata Nikonovskaya

Marketlink XL Signal Hill CA www.marketinkgroup.com

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PCA-LA LEADERSHIP

SOCIAL MEDIA & CREDITS

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

MESSAGE FROM THE EDITOR

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PETERSEN PERFECT

PORSCHE CLUB CAPE TOWN

THE VIEW FROM THE PASSENGER SEAT

A DAY AT THE RACES

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UPCOMING DRIVING TOURS AND EVENTS

COMPLEXITIES OF REPLACING COMPONENTS ON YOUR CAR

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PORSCHE & PARKS 2 DRIVING TOUR

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ROAD READS

NEW MEMBERS

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ANNIVERSARIES


PCA-LA LEADERSHIP TEAM

BOARD PRESIDENT VICE PRESIDENT

MARIANA SMALL president@la.pca.org DAVID HEENAN vicepresident@la.pca.org

TREASURER

LAURA HOUSTON treasurer@la.pca.org

SECRETARY

TAM RETTIG secretary@la.pca.org

TECHNICAL DIRECTOR ACTIVITIES DIRECTOR MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR & SOCIAL CHAIR CHIEF DRIVING INSTRUCTOR

FOLLOW US:

TONY CALLAS tech@la.pca.org

W W W. FAC E B O O K . C O M / P O R S C H EC LU B LA

RAJ NALLAPOTHOLA activities@la.pca.org DONNA J. SLATTON membership@la.pca.org

W W W. I NSTAGRAM . C O M / P O R S C H EC LU B LA

RANDY BLAESI randy.blaesi@la.pca.org T WI T TER . C O M / P O R S C H EC LU B LA

APPOINTMENTS SPONSOR CHAIR & MEMBER-AT-LARGE

MARK BILFIELD sponsors@la.pca.org

PORSCHERAMA EDITOR

HARRY KRAUSHAAR editor@la.pca.org

SOCIAL MEDIA CHAIR

REGISTRAR

W W W.YO U T U B E . C O M / P O R S C H EC LU B LA

SAS LARI socialMedia@la.pca.org

P O R S C H EC LU B LA. M OTO R S P O R T R EG. C O M

KEVIN RICE registrar@la.pca.org

ADVERTISING MANAGER

ANGELIQUE CHACON advertising@la.pca.org

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

ZLATA NIKONOVSKAYA creative@la.pca.org

CONTACT US: H E LLO @ LA. P CA. O R G P CALO SANGE LES . O R G

MOPHOTODESIGN.COM

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Letter from the President

PHOTOGRAPH BY

CLUB HAPPENINGS!!

(SPEED EXCLUSIVE)

THE YEAR IS IN FULL SWING! It is almost half over, and we have already had a fantastic slew of events, ranging from The Porsche Effect to the tour of Singer Automotive Design. As I write this, we have just held Wheels To Water IV and are just about ready to Drive to Arrowhead in June and also in June view David Lee’s private exotic car collection.

We are very excited about upcoming developments. Our 57th Concours d’Elegance, which will be held at the Petersen Automotive Museum, is in the planning stages, and we are thrilled to share that we have been receiving tremendous interest and response from sponsors and future participants. We thank Mark Bilfield for spearheading

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these efforts and count on each and every one of you to help us spread the word. We welcome Raj Nallapothola as our new Activities Director, taking over for Claudio Gouveia. Raj has been instrumental in setting up many of our recent drives and we’re delighted to welcome his enthusiasm, operational know-how and drive to make the Club events even better. We thank Claudio for his many contributions to the Club and the dedication he had to generating corporate interest and support from Sponsors. Finally, and I do mean finally, we are working hard to update our web site. We will roll it out along with the redesign of all our visuals being worked on by Z&R Design. The Spring Issue of Porscherama featured the first look at our new visuals and more are coming. In the meantime, Kevin Rice has been doing a tremendous job keeping our existing site updated and managing the content in motorsportreg. com, which enables our event registration. As Spring turns into Summer, days get longer and the roads beckon us to explore, consider including visits to neighboring Porsche Clubs, both here in

MASON KUEHLER

the United States and abroad, and taking part in some of their activities. You’ll find out that there are many more likeminded, wonderful people than just in our region. In this issue you’ll read about my recent trip to Cape Town, South Africa and beautiful drive through their wine country which I hope compels you to include a visit to a Club on your next adventure. You can search for Clubs in the United States by visiting the directory section at PCA.org and Clubs around the world by visiting the international section of Porsche.com. Safe travels, and we look forward to seeing you at our events!

Letter from the Editor

SO FEW PAGES….. Honestly, I never thought I would write these words: We had too much content for this issue of Porscherama. I had to defer an article or two until future issues. I am so excited about that. I fervently hope to be in the same position issue after issue. I thank all our contributors. Rich Scimeca, who wrote a great piece about last year’s National Parks tour. Eileen Walpole-Scanlon, who wrote a (mostly) tongue in cheek piece about the view from the other side (of the car), which crystalizes the feelings of the navigator on our drives. Mariana Small, who besides being our amazing leader, wrote a lovely piece about her experience driving with the Cape Town Porsche Club chapter. Tony Callas, our Technical Director, along with Tom Prine, wrote another great technical article about the dos and don’ts of replacing components in our cars. I thank Zlata Nikonovskaya, PCA-LA Creative Director and partner in Z&R Design, for continuing to do such a tremendous job making all the elements of Porscherama look so good each issue.

MARIANA SMALL PRESIDENT, PCA LA

I cannot thank PCA-LA member, Ulf Henriksson, enough. His company, The Scenic Route, worked closely with The Petersen Automotive Museum to define, create, and implement The Porsche Effect, arguably one of the best Porsche exhibits in the world. I first met Ulf

on a day following a rainstorm. The unobstructed view of downtown was unbelievable. The result is the cover photo. I think the effect of the car with the downtown skyline in the background is striking. I hope you do, too.

at the PCA-LA Breakfast Meeting in December, before the exhibit opened. I thoroughly enjoyed learning about Ulf and his passion for Porsches that morning. After the hoopla surrounding the opening of the exhibit abated a bit, I had the good fortune to spend some time on the phone with him and Brittanie Kinch, the curator of the exhibit, discussing The Porsche Effect and the process they went through to conceive it and bring it to life. Petersen Perfect, the end result of that conversation, is in this issue. I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed speaking with Ulf and Brittanie and writing it. I love this issue’s cover photograph. I should. I took it. It is my car, an 89 Carrera Targa. Those facts have nothing to do with why I put the picture on the cover. I was invited to visit a friend’s spectacular property above Benedict Canyon

Speaking of photographs and photographers, I met Kaleb Brook for the second time at Luftgekühlt 5. I met him for the first time at a Beverly Hills Police Cars & Coffee about a year ago. Kaleb loves Porsches. Both times I met Kaleb, he was accompanied by his dad, Gavin, a PCA-LA member. Kaleb is five years old. He is being raised right. I see a PCA membership in his future. Hopefully, Gavin

has gotten him a PCA Juniors membership. He deserves one, and besides, they are free. When I saw Kaleb and Gavin at Luft 5, Kaleb was using his iPad to take pictures of just about everything. Two of Kaleb’s shots are featured in this edition. If you have any thoughts, comments, or, most importantly, content, drop me a note at editor@la.pca.org. I look forward to hearing from you.

HARRY KRAUSHAAR EDITOR, PCA LA

Where your ideas take flight.

An award-winning creative company. www.znrdesign.com | info@znrdesign.com

Z&R DESIGN

PORSCHERAMA/SUMMER ‘18

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UPCOMING EVENTS & DRIVING TOURS JUNE

JULY

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22

HING WA LEE PRESENTS CARS & CHRONOS WITH PCA-LA

PORSCHE CARS & COFFEE, AND MEMBERSHIP DRIVE AT THE MUSEUM OF FLYING

JULY

AUGUST

28

19

TECH SESSION: THE PRE-PURCHASE INSPECTION

PCA-LA SOUTH BAY BREWTOUR

AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

25

23

MEMBER’S MONTHLY BREAKFAST LOCATION TBD.

PCA-LA CONCOURS D’ELEGANCE

SAVE THE DATE!! PORSCHE CLUB OF AMERICA, LOS ANGELES REGION

57 ANNUAL CONCOURS D’ELEGANCE TH

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER, 23 2018 AT THE PETERSEN AUTOMOTIVE MUSEUM

Insurance. Valuation. Membership. DriveShare™ SEPTEMBER

27-30 RENNSPORT REUNION VI (NON-PCA)

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Drive with us. 800-922-4050 | Local Agent | hagerty.com

FOR THE MOST UP-TO-DATE INFORMATION ON EVENTS, PLEASE VISIT

Proud to be a Sponsor of the PCA LA Concours d’Elegance on September 23 at the Petersen Museum.

PCALOSANGELES.COM/SCHEDULE-EVENTS Vehicle make and model names and logos are property of their respective owners and their inclusion does not imply sponsorship of or affiliation with Hagerty or any of its products or services. Hagerty Insurance Agency, LLC, provides insurance and determines final risk acceptance. Membership and DriveShare are provided by non-insurance affiliates of The Hagerty Group, LLC. Hagerty, the H Gear Shift Logo, HAGERTY. FOR PEOPLE WHO LOVE CARS, and DRIVESHARE BY HAGERTY are registered or common law trademarks of The Hagerty Group, LLC. ©2018 The Hagerty Group, LLC.

PORSCHERAMA/SUMMER ‘18


ITINERARY

PORSCHE & PARKS 2 DRIVING TOUR Story by Rich Scimeca. Photography by David Heenan and Rich Scimeca

IN MARCH, 2017 my wife, Hannah, and I went on the Porsche & Parks 2 Driving Tour, which was sponsored by the PCA San Diego Region. The tour started at Hoehn Porsche in Carlsbad. We were joined by David and Betty Heenan of the LA Region, and Paul and Susan Novotne of the South Coast Region. In all, more than 30 Porsches and 72 people headed out for a driving tour of several National Parks in Arizona and Utah. Prior to joining this tour, the longest drives we participated in were weekend getaways. Those drives had been fantastic experiences, but they did not

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compare to this one. Upon arrival we immediately realized that this event was superbly organized. There was a wide variety of food for breakfast, name badges for all, annual National Park passes for each couple, and a spiral bound book detailing our day-by-day adventure. The book included maps and the locations, miles and drive times for each day. It also included a description of each place we were to visit with a bit of history as well. In all, the driving tour would last nine days and cover approximately fifteen hundred miles.

We drove with this group for more than a week and logged many miles. It was such a pleasure that it far exceeded our expectations. Besides visiting beautiful parks, we drove winding desert roads that appeared to go on forever. We drove narrow mountain roads, with drop-offs over a thousand feet. We drove our cars at exhilarating speeds that I won't admit to on paper. This was a wonderful experience, an experience that will stand out for a long time. We hope most PCA-LA members are fortunate enough to experience a tour like this.

HIGHLIGHTS

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CARLSBAD

Coachella, Quartzsite, Prescott

400

Prescott had a small town feel

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PRESCOTT

Jerome, Sedona

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Watch for Jerome's speed law

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SEDONA

Flagstaff, Grand Canyon Village

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Dined at El Tovar Restaurant

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GRAND CANYON

Antelope Canyon, Moab

399

We drove thru Monument Valley

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MOAB

Arches, Dead Horse Point State Park., Canyon Lands

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Stunning sights to see

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MOAB

Green River, Bryce Canyon

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Bryce with a snowfall

BRYCE

Zion National Park

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Rain and waterfalls

ZION

Las Vegas

162

Stayed at the Mirage Hotel

LAS VEGAS

Hoover Dam, Home

350

End of a fantastic adventure!

The tour was lots of fun, and we saw so many wonderful sights, far too many to recount in this article. A few of the most meaningful highlights were: People, Porsches, Experiences.: 1,500 miles in nine days in my Porsche. What fun, even for my navigator, though we had to be a little creative in packing. Nine days with an amazing group of people. We thoroughly enjoyed meeting members from other PCA Regions. We had so much more in common than our cars. We ate together, conversed

and played games. This was an experience we will remember for the rest of our lives. Day One’s Drive to Prescott: Eight hours and 400 miles of driving as a growling group of Porches. This was a wonderful driving experience on which we saw great towns and set the stage for the remaining tour. The Town of Jerome: Very highaltitude town, and its town motto deals with getting high at high altitudes. In other words, it's a place where marijuana is very popular. A note to drivers leaving Jerome. Be very aware of the 20 mph speed limit. Another driver and myself failed to notice the speed limit sign, which is the only one in town. As I drove behind the other cars, I saw the flashing red lights of the patrol car behind me. After stopping, I was curious and asked the officer what violation I had committed. I was floored when he said I was speeding! I know that I have driven some speeds I won't admit to in my Porsche, but to be stopped for 33mph, I was both surprised and a bit embarrassed. I was fortunate enough to receive only a warning. At the next stop for gas, I spoke with the other driver who was stopped. We were stopped by the same officer, but he was cited for driving 36mph. When he asked me why I was only issued a warning, I explained that 35mph must have been the cut-off. I didn't have the heart to tell him

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to four inches of snow and, thankfully, properly plowed and drivable roads. Bryce Canyon, which is always gorgeous, was a stunning winter wonderland. We went on to Zion National Park where the rain and snowfall created beautiful waterfalls almost everywhere we looked. After the rain stopped, we went horseback riding through the forest. The scenery was breathtaking.

to see the mule deer. We were thankful we did, as it was an amazing experience.

I was a retired law enforcement officer and received some professional courtesy. The Grand Canyon: This was our first time visiting the Grand Canyon's south rim, and yes, it is Grand! My hobby is photography, and I can't tell you how many photos I took there. We had dinner with Dennis and Marta from the San Diego Region. After a great dinner we spent the rest of the evening gazing at stars then woke early

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Moab: What a great place. Two National Parks and a State Park in close proximity. As I couldn't wait to see Arches National Park, David Heenan told me that we must see Dead Horse Point State Park. We took his advice. We first drove through Arches with the convertible top down and completed two hikes, including the Delicate Arch hike. What a beautiful place! Then we drove to Dead Horse. The farther in we drove, the more stunning the views became. David was right. This was one of the highlights of the driving tour. We raced the sun and got to Canyonlands to watch the sunset. Snow in Bryce: Snow forecast upon arrival. Most of us hate to drive our Porsches in the rain. Imagine the dinner conversation that night with snow in the forecast! We awoke

Las Vegas and Home: Hannah and I added a day to our tour and visited Hoover Dam. The most popular tour was booked solid, but learning the history was fascinating. Summary: This was a great trip. I cannot stress just how great it was. I am convinced that every PCA member should participate in at least one of these tours. To paraphrase Magnus Walker, one of the most iconic Porsche aficionados in the world, “Get Out and Drive a Multi-Day PCA Tour!”

ROAD READS 1

2000 BOXSTER S

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2007 CAYMAN S

MEMBER: ANGELIQUE CHACON

MEMBER: KEITH KIMBLE

INSPRIATION/BACKGROUND: Angelique found a great way to combine her love of the ocean with the word devotion.

INSPRIATION/BACKGROUND: Cayman or caiman mean alligator. Hence the gator reference in the plate.

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2017 911 GTS CABRIOLET

1984 911 CABRIOLET

MEMBER: MICHAEL HADLEY EPSTEIN

MEMBER: LOUIS YECIES

INSPRIATION/BACKGROUND: Michael is telling the world that what they say about guys driving Porsches is simply not true.

INSPRIATION/BACKGROUND: 84CBRL ... 1984 cabriolet .

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1978 930 TURBO

MEMBER: KEITH KIMBLE

INSPRIATION/BACKGROUND: Mach Schnell. Means, depending on context, "make haste," "move along," "hurry up.".

1987 CARRERA COUPE

MEMBER: BRUCE FRASCO

INSPRIATION/BACKGROUND: Describes year of car. PORSCHERAMA/SUMMER ‘18

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have. Thankfully, Brittanie Kinch, in conjunction with the Petersen’s curatorial staff, did.

the overall concept and how to deliver the best visitor experience. He loves to be immersed in the entirety of that experience. He is dedicated to determining how each artifact is displayed, how it is perched in the appropriate setting, how it sits on the appropriate hardware, how it is enhanced by the use of video and music. He is driven to achieve this. Ulf expresses it like this, “To me it’s all about creating a perfect balance between the story to be told, the artifacts on display and the environment in which it all takes place. All of the pieces

Ironically, Brittanie Kinch was not a Porsche person when she began working on the Porsche Effect. While she likes cars, her automotive roots are steeped in Chevys powering down a straight quarter mile, not Porsches navigating the Porsche curves or the Mulsanne straight on the Circuit de la Sarthe. That is not to say she does not like Porsches. She does. And now she knows more about them than 99% of the Porschephiles in the world.

PETERSEN PERFECT Story by Harry Kraushaar. Photographs by ted7.com

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IMAGINE if you had to tell a story over a hundred years in the making. Imagine if you had to convey something unique about a subject that has had countless stories told about it. Imagine if the subject was already one of the greatest media darlings in history. Imagine if it was something so well known that everyone thought they knew all about it already. Imagine if you had to capture the essence of it in a small space with a limited budget. After your Xanax wore off, would you have come up with the Porsche Effect Exhibit which is currently drawing rave reviews at the Petersen Automotive Museum? I know I would not

As car enthusiasts, we are very fortunate to have the Petersen in Los Angeles. It is one of the greatest automotive museums anywhere in the world, and it has been since its founding in 1994. Most car enthusiasts have been there at least once, and many have been there multiple times. The Petersen continues to provide great reasons for recurring visits. It has featured exhibits showcasing a wide range of motor vehicles from Indian and Harley motorcycles to Low Riders to American Supercars to Hot Rods and Customs. This was its first Porsche centric exhibit. As Porsche enthusiasts, we are very fortunate to have Ulf Henriksson living in Los Angeles. He is a passionate Porsche person, having owned them for over 40 years, and he is a member of PCA-LA. More importantly, his company, The Scenic Route, produces, among other things, exhibits for museums, including the Petersen. He has worked with them before, conceiving the new museum

interiors that were completely redone during the renovation of the museum in 2015. It was his goal to bring a Porsche exhibit to the Petersen one day, though it had to be just right. He wanted the Petersen interiors to be the correct setting to present such an exhibit, and he wanted to make sure that the experience would satisfy the very passionate and very knowledgeable enthusiast he knew would come. I had the opportunity to discuss the Porsche Effect exhibit with both of them. Brittanie Kinch is a curator. She works for Ulf. Together, along with Bryan Stevens, the Creative Director at the Petersen, and other members of the museum staff, they orchestrated the creation of the Porsche Effect. The Porsche Effect was a massive undertaking. 50 people spent over six months making it happen. At its heart, and most likely like all museum exhibits, it was a collaboration on a world wide

scale. Ulf, Brittanie and their team worked with subject matter experts, such as Jeff Zwart, Pete Stout, Randy Leffingwell, Kerry Morse, Dave Engelman, Jens Torner and Dieter Gross. They were supported by Porsche Cars North America, the Porsche Museum, Porsche Club of America, Porsche Design and Studio F.A. Porsche. They spent time in the PCA archives and worked with PCA

Executive Director, Vu Nguyen. They worked with Petersen board members Peter Mullin and Bruce Meyer and Petersen Executive Director Terry Karges. They worked with collectors. The list goes on and on. At the heart of it all, though, were Ulf, Brittanie and their team. All shared an incredible passion for the Exhibit. Ulf focused on

have to work together in perfect harmony. If they do, the visitors will feel very positive about the experience, but if you ask them why, they will have a difficult time to point out exactly why… I believe that we accomplished this with the new interiors of the Petersen and also with the new Porsche Effect exhibit.” And what a story Brittanie, Bryan

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and the rest of the team have told. A story that was made possible, and unbelievably successful, by the rich collaboration of the team members. The Porsche Effect is not a chronology. Brittanie had no interest in creating one, as the chronology has been told many, many times by organizations, like the Porsche Museum, which are better equipped and funded to tell it. Instead, she opted to take a thematic approach to the subject, feeling and believing that the nuance she needed to focus on was how Porsche became more than a car, how it became imbued in pop culture, how it became synonymous with an affluent, sporting, desirable lifestyle, how the silhouette of the 911 became the standard by which all sports cars are measured. As she said to me when we spoke about why she chose this approach, she said, “It is the right story to tell and the right time to tell it.” There is no doubt that she is right. The interest and demand for the exhibit are off the charts. As I write this in early March, just a month after the exhibit opened, there have been close to 2 BILLION media hits relating to it. The Porsche Effect is one of the Petersen’s largest undertakings. It is also one of its most successful. The attendance at the Petersen is at record numbers, and visitors are already coming back for a second or third look at the exhibit. I cannot imagine the amount of research that went into bringing this story to life. Brittanie, along with Bryan and Leslie Kendall from the Petersen Museum, travelled the world to gather information.

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Reverently, she told me, “I was able to hold the original 901 drawings when I visited the archives in the Porsche Museum.” She went on to equally reverently discuss how the current generation of 911s have evolved, maintaining a fair amount of DNA from the Type 64 and the Beetle, propelling them to become the giant killers of the automotive landscape. Once the concept was created and the research completed, veritable mountains of information had to be synthesized, conclusions had to be drawn and artifacts had to be identified, selected, located and borrowed. Brittanie and Ulf both made the point that the cars on display where not necessarily the most important cars in the 50 year history of the 911 but were the most important ones in terms of telling the story about the effect that Porsches have had on the psyche of the world. Putting the display together was, in itself, a work of art. Many craft

people spent months getting everything ready. It did not take me many brain cells to get that the Porsche Effect was a labor of love for Ulf, maybe more so than on any other project on which he has worked. I am so thankful that Ulf and Brittanie took the time to speak with me. Besides being unbelievably interesting and knowledgeable, they were open and easy to speak with. But more than that, they gave me insight into their world, a world of storytelling about which I have never given much thought. I have been to the Porsche Effect Exhibit. I went with PCA-LA just after it opened. I loved it, and I thought I had “gotten it.” After speaking with them, I realized I had not even scratched the surface. The Porsche Effect is deep, and I cannot wait to get back to the Petersen to dive more deeply into it.


A DRIVE ON THE N2 WITH THE PORSCHE CLUB CAPE TOWN Story and photographs by Mariana Small.

A DRIVE ON THE N2 from Cape Town to Oak Valley Estate is nothing short of good fun. This incredibly scenic road, with its breathtaking views, is one of 18 official wine routes in South Africa, all of which happen to be on the Western Cape and boast very nicely conditioned surfaces and easy to read signposts. The only challenging factor is the left-hand drive…

reservoirs, vineyards abound, and even the hop-on hop-off vintage Franschhoek Wine Tram which stops at 48 different wineries (six tram lines visiting 8 wineries each). But what was truly breathtaking was our arrival into Oak Valley, home to over 4,000 oak trees covering 30 hectares of farm production of high-quality, cool-climate wines.

On a recent visit to Cape Town, South Africa, Jane Plit, Porsche Club Cape Town President, was kind enough to allow me to tag along on their Club’s Sunday drive through the beautiful South African wine country to the Oak Valley Estate. Founded in 1898 this expansive vineyard is situated among pear and apple orchards in the Groenlandberg Mountain Range and falls into the UNESCO protected Kogelberg Biosphere Reserve..

kick-off location. There we split into two groups – the fast group and the faster group (they even had someone scout the road for police shortly before we kicked off). Accompanied by my trusty co-pilot and long-time Captonian friend Yolande Badenhorst, who I must thank for her repeated enthusiastic reminders to “Keep left, left, left!” as I gravitated towards the right, I mean wrong, side of the road, we headed off in single-file.

Following a format very similar to Porsche Club LA, we met at Wimpy’s, a restaurant/gas station which served as our

The drive was easy enough as the roads are very well maintained, giving an autobahn-experience feeling as we passed by

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After about an hour and a half, we concluded the drive with lunch at the Pool Room restaurant of the Oak Valley Estate. In true Porsche Club fashion, the Cape Town Club had reserved an area around the pool and terrace of the Pool Room restaurant, which overlooks a turquoise swimming pool with views of the Groenland Mountain. Much like our Club, the conversation centered around our love of Porsches, how we became involved with the Club, on the adventures our Porsches have taken us and the wonderful community that is fostered by our love for the brand. It is so much fun sharing experiences with wonderful, dedicated and

like-minded people. Lunch included a charcuterie platter of dry-cured meats crafted by Richard Bosman followed by a melt-in-your-mouth Wagyu burger and delectable apple pie all prepared by Head Chef Gordon Manuel. Complementing the lunch courses were fresh and crisp local wines. Prior to returning to Cape Town we detoured to Peregrine Farm Stall, a popular Café and Bakery famous for their locally sourced artisanal goods and responsibly farmed, fresh produce. We drove away with a few liters of fresh, unfiltered apple cider and multiseed bread, although if I were living or spending more time there, I’m sure the car would have been stockpiled with the rest of their sumptuous goods.

After Peregrine, we stopped to explore Franschhoek (Dutch for "French Corner"), within the Stellenbosch Municipality (wine-drinkers may recognize the name) and one of the oldest towns of South Africa. Often described as the as the "food and wine capital" of South Africa and home to one of the top 50 restaurants in the world, this quaint town lent itself nicely to a late-afternoon meander through art galleries, award-winning restaurants, and wine tasting rooms. My only lament was not having a bit more time in the region to take Karl Illenberger, Porsche Club Port Elizabeth’s President’s, recommendation to drive the

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THE VIEW FROM THE PASSENGER SEAT (OR…HOW TO AVOID THE NAVIGATOR BLUES) by Eileen Walpole-Scanlon. Photography by Harry Kraushaar.

WE’VE ALL READ ARTICLES about the thrill of driving Porsches over the mountain roads from the driver’s perspective. The more cur ves and speed the better. But what about those of us who spend most of our time as navigators? What do we experience? More thrills? More chills?

Garden Route from Cape Town to Port Elizabeth. This 200-mile stretch of road was repeatedly highly recommended as it takes visitors on a picturesque journey through lagoons and lakes, rolling hills and eventually the mountains of the Outeniqua and Tsitsikamma ranges. Ten nature reserves embrace the varied ecosystems of the area as well as unique marine reserves, home to soft coral reefs, dolphins, seals and a host of other marine life. I guess I’ll have to plan another trip to beautiful South Africa to explore more of this incredible land. A warm-hearted thank you

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to Graham Du Toit, President of Porsche Club Durban, for coordinating introductions and making this amazing visit possible. Next time you take a trip, whether nationally or internationally, contact the local Porsche Club and try to participate in an event with them. You will be glad you did. If you do, do not forget to share your experience with the rest of us. That way we can all enjoy it.

Driving the twisties takes concentration. Most drivers focus solely on navigating the turns and may not notice the effects on their navigators. After a run, I’ve stiffly exited the vehicle with an occasional bruise from being buffeted around the car. In extreme circumstances, the queasiness brought on by the drive can affect my ability to enjoy the lunch at the final destination. I have to admit that there were a few times when I’ve squeaked in alarm while whizzing around a blind corner or thought to myself,

1.

The most important advice I can give is to make sure the driver doesn’t take off before you know where you’re going. Nothing more frustrating than the driver taking off and you don’t know if they should be turning left or right. This is especially embarrassing if you have 10 cars following you in circles. If you’re on a rally, this is key to keeping on time.

2. “Too fast! Too fast!” How many of us acting as navigators have felt the pressure of leading a group only to discover we’ve led them astray? Despite the potential pitfalls, I choose to sit on the right side of the car. Here is some advice on how I sur vive as a navigator in a Porsche going full blast down the highway.

When things get too scar y, instead of causing potential hard feelings, repress those screams and just close your eyes. There have been drives where I had my eyes closed for miles. It is difficult to navigate with your eyes closed, however, so peeking ever y once in a while to make sure you’re on route is imperative. Deep breathing helps as well.

3.

If you don’t have time to program the route into your phone or GPS, just having the GPS on helps to know when the next turn is coming up. Since I have vision issues, hunting for those street signs is a challenge. The GPS takes the guesswork out of it.

4.

Ultimately, the main thing is that you trust your driver’s skills to get you through it. I can’t speak for the OTHER drivers on the road with you, though. Frankly, I enjoy being the navigator rather than the driver. I get to take in the beautiful scenic views and can (mostly) relax rather than laboring over shifting around the cur ves or tr ying to keep up with the leaders. As most navigators are the driver’s significant other or family member, I’m hopeful that these tips will make the run as pleasant as possible and save you money on family counseling. Here’s looking for ward to the next run!

PORSCHERAMA/SUMMER ‘18

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ANGELIQUE CHACON

one of them had done a drive in the same area. He provided the route the other club used. PCA-LA Vice President, David Heenan, took it from there. He did the hard work for us by scouting the route before he set us loose on it. He generously drove ever y bit of it, and he prepared the route instructions. The route was really, really nice. We met in Glendora for a chat session before the drive. I am a native Los Angelino, and I have to admit that I had never been in Glendora before. I was ver y pleasantly surprised.

A DAY AT THE RACES By Harry Kraushaar. THANKFULLY, St. Patrick’s day dawned bright and sunny. PCA-LA had a big day planned, including a forty plus mile drive through the San Gabriel Mountains and a full day of activities at the storied Santa Anita Racetrack. PCA-LA member, Dennis Levine, organized the day at

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PORSCHERAMA/SUMMER ‘18

Santa Anita. He put a lot of work into planning the day, and he did a great job. We parked in a section reser ved exclusively for our cars. We were treated to a great lunch in the Director’s Room. We had the opportunity to view the horses as their trainers were preparing them for a race. Lastly, we hung out

down on the track and took a great group picture in the Winners Circle. Dennis had also organized a tour of the entire facility, but, unfortunately, that had to be cancelled due to the rain earlier in the week. That said, we all had a fantastic time, and, to top it off, there were even some successful bettors in attendance. We really enjoyed our time at Santa Anita, but for many of us, the best part was not the track itself, but getting there in the least expeditious, twistiest route possible. Dennis was instrumental in planning this aspect of the day, too. He belongs to at least one other car club, and

to wander down memor y lane, as I had not been by the Huntington Librar y since 1967, when I was in Sixth Grade. I was amazed at Huntington Drive – four lanes each way with no traffic. It is probably the most majestic suburban street in the entire LA area.

The route took us west on Sierra Madre Avenue before connecting onto Glendora Mountain Road. Glendora Mountain Road is fun to drive. It featured nice twisties and exquisite views. We stayed on it for about 15 miles before transitioning onto East Fork road for another six miles of fun. Finally, we turned onto San Gabriel Canyon Road, where we enjoyed the views and turns before turning onto Foothill Boulevard and eventually Huntington Drive before entering the Santa Anita Parking Lot. I enjoyed the day, and I also enjoyed the ride home. I opted to take the scenic route, staying on Huntington Drive and then taking surface streets thru Arcadia and Pasadena before getting onto the 110. It gave me a chance

Ever yone had a great time at the event. And I am pretty sure most would do it again. I know would.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY HARRY KRAUSHAAR, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED BENOIT PHOTO

PORSCHERAMA/SUMMER ‘18

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COMPLEXITIES OF REPLACING COMPONENTS ON YOUR CARS By Tony Callas and Tom Prine

A CUSTOMER recently came in slightly perplexed at some work he performed on his own 2006 997 Carrera S. The initial problem was that the passenger side electric window began to slow and strain when closing the window, finally the motor stopped working completely. The customer purchased a new factory window motor, installed it and to his surprise discovered that the motor would not operate at all. By the time he came to see us he was more than a little frustrated, his demeanor changed when he found out that there was nothing wrong with the new window motor or even the way it was installed, it just had to be coded to the car. In today’s world of increasingly complex automotive electronic systems, one of the realities is that components on the car must be recognized by its intended control system in order to communicate and function normally. This is simply known as a “handshake” between controllers. Another interesting fact is that various electrical consumers (a consumer is an electrical device) will share one module, as in the case of the window motor. The window motor and other items share a single module, often called the “Door Control Module”. The

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PORSCHERAMA/SUMMER ‘18

customer did not know this and did not possess the means to code the new motor and controller into the system. However, today professional Porsche repair facilities must have the electronic diagnostic equipment with the correct software designed to talk to the onboard systems of the car. These electronic diagnostic tools make it possible to program new components into their operational role in the car. Unfortunately, the cost and complexity of owning and using these diagnostic scan tools make it unrealistic for most vehicle owners to purchase and operate them. Once the new component is installed and wired, the coding can take place. With the electronic scan tool connected to the car, there are about eight choices to perform during the coding procedure for the window motor. Once the coding is complete, the motor will be ready to operate, but in the case of the windows, they will also have to be initialized. This is the process of setting the operational limits of the window motors. The window initialization is done by moving the window all the way to its upper and lower stops via the window switch. Once the window reaches the upper stop,

continue to hold the window switch in the up position request for approximately an additional 3 seconds. Then push the window switch to lower the window, when the window reaches the lower stop, continue to hold the window switch in the lower request position again for about 3 seconds. Repeat as needed until the one touch activation works. The passenger window will not have one touch until the window reaches approximately 65% of the up position for the 997’s. The sunroof assembly requires a completely different process for initialization following the completion of all repairs. You push the sunroof switch to the vent or up position and hold the switch in this position until the entire initialization is completed. The sunroof should open to the vent position and stop, nothing may happen for some time but as you continue to hold the switch in the vent position, the initialization phase should start and the sunroof will begin to operate, continue holding the switch in the this position. The sunroof will fully open and fully close thus completing the sunroof initialization process; you can then release the sunroof switch. The sunroof initialization might take a few attempts to get the process completed.

Another point to consider is the car’s system voltage when diagnosing, testing or performing an initialization. When an engine is running, the alternator is tasked with producing voltage to charge the battery and power all the electrical consumers in the car. Normally the alternator will produce in the neighborhood of 13.5-14.5 Volts and the electrical consumers and circuits are designed to operate in this voltage window to perform properly. However, this voltage is not available when the engine is not running and the key is turned on for diagnostic and testing purposes. During this testing,

there is a heavy load against the battery due to all the electrical consumers operating, it is highly recommended to have a Power Supply connected to the car to achieve the correct voltage and avoid draining the battery. A Power Supply (not a battery charger) will provide a constant and stable voltage feed at high amperage output and without stray A/C voltage being emitted. With the Power Supply connected the electrical system of the car, you will see the same conditions as if the engine/alternator were operating.

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ANNIVERSARIES [45]

JON R. WINTHROP

[40]

RICHARD E. PARR

[35]

JEFFREY L. BEAR

[30]

STEPHEN TOSHIYUKI

[25]

PAUL CAMARATA BRUCE L. GOLDSMITH BERTRAM P. JAYASEKERA CURTIS R. KAUFMAN

[20]

TRENT ANDERSON ROBERT BLOOMINGDALE MICHAEL E. FOURNEY ANDRES HAINER STEVEN NAGELBERG JAY D. PATRICK RAYMOND PEREZ PETER J. PUGNALE

[15]

GRAHAM D. HOPPER DAVID KINDER JOHN E. MCINTYRE RICHARD P. PORTNOY TED B. STOLMAN

[10]

M Y. ALMANZA LUIS MARTIN ALVAREZ STEPHEN BOLTON ROBERT BUCHHEIT MICHAEL A. CAMPION OTIS E. HACKETT STEVEN L. HANSEN MICHAEL L. JORDAN KEVIN RICE GERALD J. SCAIFE ROGER N. THORNTON

[5]

MARITZA AGUILAR GARETT CARLSON WILLIAM F. CLARK MICHAEL DANCEY EDWARD DAVID ROB DICKINSON COLIN DONAHOE MICHAEL S. FELBER MARK GENIS JAMES M. HANSEN MICHAEL HEAYN BARRETT LOOSE THOMAS MAO WILLIAM F. MATCHETT JOHN B. MCDONALD GUILLERMO MOSSO SALVATORE A. PERRI DEBORAH B. POLLACK JOSEPH REED ED VARON DOUG H. YOUNG JEANY ZHAO

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