Page 1

December 2017


Porscherama December 2017

Porscherama, December 2017 Contents 3

Contents

4

PCA Leadership

5

Social Media & Credits

6

Message From the President

7

Message From the Editor

8

Events

9

Concours d’Elegance

10, 11 13

Concours d’Elegance Sponsors Breakfast At the Waldorf

14, 15

Improve Your “P” Car Photos, Part 2

16, 17

Picture This

18, 19

Automotive Lubricants

21, 22

New Members & Anniversaries

3


4

Porscherama December 2017

PCA-LA Leadership Mariana Small

PRESIDENT

David Heenan

VICE PRESIDENT

Laura Houston

TREASURER

Brandon Stahl

SECRETARY

sponsors@la.pca.org

Claudio Gouveia

ACTIVITIES DIRECTOR & SPONSORSHIP CO- CHAIR

Tony Callas

TECHNICAL DIRECTOR

membership@la.pca.org

Donna J. Slatton

MEMBERSHIP DIRECTOR & SOCIAL COMMITTEE CHAIR

Randy Blaesi

CHIEF DRIVING INSTRUCTOR

Mark.Bilfield@la.pca.org

Mark Bilfield

MEMBER-AT-LARGE, AND SPONSOR CO-CHAIR

Harry Kraushaar

PORSCHERAMA EDITOR

president@la.pca.org

vicepresident@la.pca.org

treasurer@la.pca.org

secretary@la.pca.org

tech@la.pca.org

Randy.blaesi@la.pca.org

editor@la.pca.org


Porscherama December 2017

Social Media facebook.com/PorscheClubLA/ instagram.com/porscheclubla/ twitter.com/porscheclubla hello@la.pca.org pcalosangeles.motorsportreg.com

Credits Thanks to: Cover Photograph by Joe Barnet, Barnet Photography Back Cover Photograph by Harry Kraushaar Our designers IT Soluciones Our printer, Marketlink XL, Signal Hill

pcalosangeles.com

Photgraph by David Heenan

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Porscherama December 2017

Letter from the President

Another year passes and what an incredible year it was for the Club! From the volume of activities to the enthusiasm, proactivity and willingness of member-volunteers to support the Club, 2017 was certainly a year to remember. Thanks to the efforts of our member-volunteers the Club has blossomed and expanded its offerings. I want to thank all of you who have worked so hard; we greatly appreciate it.

extremely pleased to see such enthusiastic and dedicated members on the ballot. Tam Rettig, who along with her husband Chuck Rettig were instrumental in the Volunteer Coordination at this year’s Concours, is on the ballot for Secretary. Claudio Gouveia is on the ballot for Activities Director. Claudio was the Sponsorship Chair seeking out and securing new partnerships and financial support for the Club allowing us to subsidize activities. Donna J. Slatton is on the ballot for Membership Director. Donna started as Social Coordinator ensuring we had great, well-organized locations where to meet.

I also want to say a tremendous thank you to our 2016/2017 Directors: Brandon Stahl, Secretary; Randy Blaesi, Activities Director; and, Patrick Sayer, Membership Director. Your dedication to the Club and contribution of time, effort and enthusiasm are what makes the Club come to life. We also give thanks to Bill Kelley, former Porscherama Editor, for bringing Porscherama back to life.

The planning for 2018 has started early and over the next couple of months we will be sharing our plans for the year, including the 2018 Concours and much more. We will also be reaching out to you, our members, for support with projects to improve the processes in the Club as well as creating fun new activities. Don’t be shy; step up, volunteer and help us make 2018 another banner year!

Nominations were taken for the upcoming elections, and we are

Happy New Year, safe travels and here’s to a great 2018!

Mariana Small

PRESIDENT, PCA-LA

Photgraph by David Heenan


Porscherama December 2017

7

Letter from the Editor

Harry Kraushaar EDITOR, PCA-LA

Welcome to Porscherama. Before you dive into the rest of the issue, I hope you take a few minutes to read my inaugural comments. I am happy to take on the role of Editor of Porscherama, though it is somewhat of a daunting task. I want to thank Bill Kelley for his tireless efforts to get the most recent issues into your hands. Bill did a great job resurrecting it, and he has left me with big tire tracks to fill. Porscherama has evolved over the past couple of years, and going forward this trend will continue. Historically, Porscherama has been THE way PCA-LA communicated with all of its members. Technology is changing that. PCA-LA has been working hard to rebuild its website, and by the time you read this, the new website should be live. PCA-LA is using email much more frequently to communicate with its membership, and it has expanded its social media presence – be sure to follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter at @PorscheClubLA!

So where does that leave Porscherama? What role should it fulfill? How often should it be published? Porscherama is the flagship publication of the region. It is the high touch mini-magazine that is published at least quarterly in paper form. Over time we will be publishing issues electronically, in an effort to keep publication costs in check. Porscherama’s mission is to provide content to our members. Content that is more detailed and more formally presented than what is on the website, what is posted on social media or what is communicated via email correspondence. Porscherama will not be a standalone publication. It will be more integrated with the website and social media. Speaking of content, we need more of it - a lot more of it! And we need a broader base of contributors. Content can be as simple as a paragraph describing a fun outing you had with your Porsche. Or how you feel when you are driving it, washing it, or looking at it. Or it can be about why you bought it, restored it, or sold it. It can be about how or why you want to modify it. It can be about your experience at one of our events. It can be about you or another member. You

get the point. As long as it is related to Porsches and our members, it is relevant. The cover photo really spoke to me. It grabbed me from the moment I saw it. I hope you feel the same way. Joe Barnet, who runs Barnet Photography and is a member of PCA, took the picture at the Concours. He loved it, too. Earlier in his career Joe spent over a decade with Rockwell as a corporate photographer, shooting pictures of the B-1 Bomber, the Space Shuttle and other aircraft. He loves Porsches, and he loves taking pictures of planes. Joe has contributed quite a lot to this issue, including several pictures from the Concours and part 2 of his article on automotive photography, and we appreciate all his efforts on behalf of the Club. This issue contains a range of articles relating to photography, lubricants, sponsors and some of the great events we held over the summer. I hope you enjoy it. If you have any thoughts, comments, or, most importantly, content, drop me a note at editor@la.pca.org. I look forward to hearing from you.


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Porscherama December 2017

Upcoming Driving Tours

Upcoming Events December, 2017

Temecula Run & Lunch

1/6

A scenic drive from Diamond Bar through Corona, Perris, and Hemet before reaching Temecula. The route will avoid freeways and travel rural roads that are both scenic and interesting. We will have lunch at the Monte De Oro Winery in Temecula.

Paradise Cove Run & Brunch

2/24

Our annual and most popular run from Calabasas through the Santa Monica Mountains for brunch at the Paradise Cove Café. The route will start on the Mulholland Highway and wind through the canyons and mountains of Malibu to arrive along the Pacific Coast Highway

A Day at Santa Anita Park

3/17

An extraordinary day at the race track. Beginning with a scenic run through the mountains to Santa Anita Park where we park in a designed area monitored by an attendant. Then we are treated to a guided tour of the entire facilities including the stables, paddocks, and even the living quarters of park personnel. A lunch buffet in the private Director’s Room will be served overlooking the entire park. One of the races will be dedicated to our club, and we will be invited to the winner’s circle to meet the winning jockey and horse.

Porsche Preview/LA Auto Show (PCA)

12/1

7:00 AM – 9:30 AM

Tech Tactics (PCA)

12/2

All Day

Tech Tactics (PCA)

12/3

All Day

PCA-LA Holiday Party (PCA)

12/6

6:30 PM – 11:30 PM

PCA-LA Mid-Month Meet Up (PCA)

12/13

6:30 PM – 8:00 PM

PCA-LA Member Breakfast Meeting at Ollo (PCA)

12/2

8:00 AM - 10:30 AM

PCA-LA Mid-Month Meet Up (PCA)

1/10

6:30 PM – 8:00 PM

Zone 8 Concours Awards & Year End Banquet (PCA)

1/20

All Day

PCA-LA Tent Breakfast at PEC (PCA)

1/27

8:00 AM– 11:00 AM

Samy’s Camera Demo at PEC (PCA)

1/27

11:00 AM – 2:00 PM

Samy’s Photograhy Class (PCA)

2/3

7:00 AM – 9:30 AM

PCA-LA Mid-Month Meet Up (PCA)

2/14

6:30 PM – 8:00 PM

PCA-LA Member Breakfast Meeting(PCA)

2/24

8:00 AM - 10:30 AM

PCA-LA Mid-Month Meet Up (PCA)

3/14

6:30 PM – 8:00 PM

PCA-LA Member Breakfast Meeting(PCA)

3/24

8:00 AM - 10:30 AM

January, 2017

February, 2017

March, 2017

For the most up-to-date information on events, please visit pcalosangeles.com/schedule-events


Porscherama December 2017

PCA Los Angeles Concours d’Elegance By Harry Kraushaar, Photograph by Joe Barnet, Barnet Photography On Sunday, September 10, 2017 the PCA Los Angeles region held its 56th annual Concours d’Elegance at The Museum of Flying. By any measure, the event was hugely successful. Attendance was up. The number of cars entered in the various classes was up. Sponsorship was up. Led by 911R #001, the uniqueness of the cars on display was up. The competition was up. To sum it up, it was a great day, and PCA Los Angeles is already looking forward to next year’s event. In the meantime, here are a few photographs to remind us all of just how special it was.

PCA Los Angeles Concours d’Elegance Results Division

Owner

Region

Car

Year

Full Concours

Wadman, Pat & Betsy

GER

911

1973

Street

Nedza, Joe & Karen

OCR

356

1963

Unrestored

Talamon, Bruce

GPX

911

1997

Ubergang

Clevenger, Bill

GPX

Boxster

2011

Wash & Shine

Witteried, David & Janice

CAI

Boxster

2003

Special Categories

Pendleton, Pen

LAR

Thewes

1963

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Porscherama December 2017

Concours d’Elegance Sponsors!! Story by Mark Bilfield Most likely the 56th Annual Concours d’Elegance is a distinct, but slightly distant, memory, though it should not be. The Concours was a smash success for a very simple reason – everyone involved was excited about the event, as it provided an outlet for us to share our passion for the our cars and the Porsche marque. Putting it together was a lot of work, and all involved deserve a great deal of credit, including PCA-LA leadership, PCA-LA volunteers, volunteers from other PCA Regions, owners of the cars that were judged and displayed, the Museum of Flying, the 1,000+ attendees with their 250+ Porsche’s, and, last but by no means least, our sponsors. While not the focus of the event, our sponsors enable us to put on the Concours, and they deserve all the credit we can bestow upon them. Without them, we would be hard pressed to fund the Concours. Our sponsors fill a critical void, and we would be remiss in not thanking them sufficiently. Our sponsors also

benefit from their involvement in the Concours, as a significant portion of the products/services we use on a regular basis are purchased from our Title Sponsor, Beverly Hills Porsche, Presenting Sponsor, P-Zero World/Pirelli Tires and the many independent firms who participated in this year’s Concours. Our members enjoy other activities that are not automotive specific. Photography is a great example of that. Samy, the owner of Samy’s Camera, loves Porsche’s. Samy’s was a great addition to our sponsor group this year, as Samy understands the mind set of our members and realizes the benefit of participating in our events In addition to thanking our sponsors for helping us hold the event, we thank them for helping us give back to the community. At the time of the Concours Hurricanes Harvey and Irma were wreaking havoc in Texas and Florida. Knowing that thousands of people needed help, we contacted the Red Cross of America, Los Angeles Region and

offered to donate all the money from our Concours Raffle Ticket sales to the Red Cross Hurricane Relief Fund. Red Cross was thrilled with the idea and immediately sent their representatives to the Concours to showcase all their great work. When we told our sponsors about the idea to help the Red Cross, they volunteered over $9,000 in additional fantastic raffle prizes, including a $1,000 gift certificate to the Porsche Experience Center. Because our sponsors stepped up, we were able

to increase raffle ticket sales by over 250% and donate $3,730 to the Red Cross, driving home the point that PCA is as much about the people as it is about the cars. We are already thinking about next year’s Concours. To make it even more enjoyable we hope to attract additional automotive and non-automotive sponsors that provide products that are interesting to our members. As such, we welcome all suggestions.


Porscherama December 2017

2017 Concours d’Elegance Sponsors and Contributors Bentley Publishers Beverly Hills Porsche Callas Rennsport Crash Jewelry Dr. Colorchip Exclusive Option Gi Automotive Group Griots Garage Hagerty Insurance International AERO McKenna Porsche Nethercutt Museum Pelican Parts Petersen Automotive Museum P Zero World/Pirelli Tires Porsche-Design Porsche North America Red Cross Los Angeles Region RM Sotheby’s Samy’s Camera Sierra Madre Collection Sayre Stitch Ultimate Shield Photograph by Joe Barnet, Barnet Photography

XPEL Technologies

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Porscherama December 2017

13

Breakfast at the Waldorf By Harry Kraushaar, Photograph by David Heenan

The location for the September PCA Los Angeles Region monthly breakfast was the Waldorf Astoria in Beverly Hills. It was arguably the best, most relaxed, most pleasant location for a breakfast that I have ever attended. Jill and Steve Petty did a fantastic job organizing and arranging this breakfast, and on behalf of the entire LA Region, I just want to say THANKS. The Waldorf really turned up the charm for us. Their team, led by Luc Delafosse, Managing Director of the Waldorf Astoria, Diego Ruiz De Porras, General Manager, and Brook Snyder, Catering Manager, all went out of their way to ensure that our needs were met and that we, including our cars, were well taken care of. They succeeded in spades. There was room for 24 Porsches in the car port area just outside the main entrance to the hotel. That area filled up fast, as there were 59 members and guests in attendance. As I was pulling in, I noticed a Lamborghini, being moved off the main level to make room for our

Porsches. I really got a kick out of that. Members self-parked their cars in an area reserved for Porsches after the outside area was full. All parking was complimentary. Though I am a resident of Beverly Hills, I had not had the chance to visit the Waldorf before the breakfast. Truth be told, I was not a fan of building this hotel, as even though I did not frequent it often, I liked Trader Vic’s and was sorry to see it razed to make room for the Waldorf. This, though, was a wonderful way to get my first glimpse of the Waldorf. The half hour or so in the car port area was great. Lots of great cars were on display, and my favorite was the fully restored 1973 911T owned by Peter Norman, which was just magnificent. Peter, unfortunately, could not stay for breakfast and left just as we were about to take a group picture. Just after that a white Cabriolet pulled in and proceeded to maneuver into the space vacated by the 1973 911T. The driver, Keith

Guyot, did a masterful job parallel parking while all of us looked on. I would have been pretty intimidated trying to do that with an audience. Breakfast was excellent. We ate in the Jean Georges Restaurant on the ground floor. There was complimentary coffee, tea and pastries. There was also the option of ordering off the a la carte breakfast menu, which I took advantage of and enjoyed tremendously. The outdoor patio was secluded and quiet and enabled conversation without lots of

background noise. Mariana Small, our president, did a masterful job as she introduced our special guests Amber Blonigan of the Gi Automotive Group and Nate White of Beverly Hills Porsche. She also introduced Luc Delafosse to us, and he spoke to us briefly and welcomed us all to the hotel. After breakfast several of us, including Mark Bilfield and David and Betty Heenan, just to name a few, checked out the roof top bar and restaurant and view, which was spectacular, and I expect to be dining there in the future.


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Porscherama December 2017


Porscherama December 2017

Techniques and tips to improve your “P” Car Photograph – Part 2 Story and Photograph by Joe Barnet, Barnet Photography

Now, for “real” camera images… If you have been cursed with the love of photography as well as Porsches (like me), and are not a professional photographer, you have a difficult choice in how to spend your “hobby money”. I have heard (and been part of) this argument many times before… "But honey, I can take great pictures of the kids at the beach with this 7.5 pound, $7,000 Nikon (or Canon) 200 to 400 f4 lens”… This is, by the way, in my humble opinion, the very best, and most versatile, cars-on-track lens available, if, you have access and can get right on the fence…. But I digress…

First, a little about DSLR cameras… If you’re looking for a Digital Single Lens Reflex Camera (DSLR), in my opinion you have two brand choices, Nikon or Canon. Full disclosure... I have been a Nikon shooter my entire career and the Nikon folks are very good to us. I personally think Nikon is a better choice. In my opinion the autofocus is faster and more accurate, the camera’s functions, menus and controls are more intuitive and easier to master and I think black lenses are prettier than white lenses… OK, that’s a cheap shot, but I really think they look better and attract less attention. Of course, it’s not the camera, but the photographer that creates the image. I have owned and am familiar with Canon gear. Many great photographers prefer Canon to Nikon, either would be an excellent choice. One of the reasons you want to go with one of these two brands is that if you ever want to rent that big 200 to 400 f4 zoom, or any other “super glass” to shoot a race, those are pretty much the only two brands available to rent. DSLR cameras, Mirrorless too, come in many levels and prices. One of the major choices to make is: Full frame or cropped frame sensor… Full frame means that the sensor is the same size as a frame of 35mm film. Yes that old film thing with all the little holes on top and bottom. Generally speaking, a full frame sensor will have more and larger pixels, capable of better dynamic range and low light capabilities. All professional DSLR bodies are full frame. This also means that lenses will behave the same way (same reach) as they did on a film camera and will be able to achieve

15

a desirable shallower depth of field (blurry backgrounds). Most prosumer and consumer DSLR’s have a smaller “cropped” sensor. Several recent cropped-sensor cameras like the Nikon D500 are excellent in every respect and are widely used professionally. They are less expensive, and because they only use the center area of the lens, they will have a longer apparent “reach”. This means that a 200 mm lens on a full frame camera will behave like a 300 mm lens on a cropped sensor body. Great for shooting car races! A word about Mirrorless… These cameras have come a long way! Especially Sony and Fuji, (I prefer Fuji) they’re small, light, and great for travel photography, architectural and some portrait work. I have friends that are using them professionally, but when it comes to sports, especially automotive, I don’t think they’re ready, and they offer a much narrower line of lenses and accessories, necessary for sport photography. Many of the techniques I mentioned regarding phone photography apply to DSLR work, like getting closer, choosing a different angle, selecting a good, non-distracting, complementary background, and rendering it out of focus to keep it from competing with your subject. But, working with a DSLR opens up many more possibilities.


16

Porscherama December 2017

Picture This Story by Harry Kraushaar, Photographs by Charlie Martin As opposed to Joe Barnet, I am a hack photographer. I take lots of pictures, mainly of cars in various poses. I have two cars, and, of course, I have two cameras, not counting my iPhone. I use them as most of us use them. I point, zoom, autofocus and click. Voila, I have a picture. I either like it or I don't. I take the lighting as an unchangeable constant. The only time I fiddle with the mode selector on the camera is when it randomly moves off automatic, and I reset it. That is, until today. Today I, along with 20 or so PCA Los Angeles Porsche buddies, took a photography class from the legendary Al Satterwhite. The class, which was conceived by PCA-LA member Mark Bilfield, was sponsored by Samy's Camera, and it was held at the Petersen Automotive Museum. The class was aimed at teaching serious photographic skills. The subject matter was taking pictures of, what else, cars generally and Porsches specifically. I went because I could not resist taking more pictures of Porsches, though I really should have been in a class where the teacher taught entry level photographic concepts. This was made abundantly clear to me at one point in the class when Al gently suggested to me that I read the manual that came with the camera. More about that later.


Porscherama December 2017

Al Satterwhite is the real deal. He has been a professional photographer for decades, shooting motor sports, print ads, magazines, and even motion pictures. He was a joy to listen to, even if I only understood him in concept and could not begin to understand how to implement what he was discussing. But that was okay. I enjoy listening to experts. Our class started with some classroom time. Al showed us a video montage of many of his automotive shots. To say they were spectacular would be an understatement. After he showed us the video, he put several shots on the screen and explained what he wanted in the shot, how he took the shot and how he prepared for it. Apparently there is much more to this than point, zoom, autofocus and click. According to Al, shooting cars, or any metal object, outside is very difficult because of hot spots and glare. He said, “The best times are 20 minutes after the sun comes up or 20 minutes before it goes down.” After Al finished lecturing, we went into the "cove," a special room in the Petersen with overhead lighting and rounded corners and walls designed

17

for photography. We had a good time wandering around and taking pictures, as most of us will never have the opportunity to shoot in that environment very often. Then we went outside to take pictures of our models, PCA-LA member Charlie Martin's yellow Cayman GT4 and my red 1989 911 Targa. Al explained that he liked to shoot cars against interesting backgrounds, like solid walls or near other objects. He stressed that he really liked primary colors. So he must have just loved our cars. We took pictures, and Al showed us how he set up his camera on a tripod connected to his laptop with a hood so he could clearly see the exact shot he would be taking. He stressed that he likes to compose his shots in the viewfinder and use Photoshop for only minor adjustments. We moved the cars from the direct sun into various places in the shade. Al explained how to angle the car to minimize the hot spots or the glare and the reflections from backlit shots. After that we spent time shooting frontlit shots. It was during this exercise that my lack of photographic skills became glaring. We were supposed to shoot into the

light and change the shutter speed to enable the camera to focus on the primary object and blur, or white out, the background. Needless to say, my automatic mode failed miserably. Al said, "Put it in manual mode and change the shutter speed." My response was, "How?" Because Mark Bilfield was nearby he showed me how to put the camera into manual mode and how to change the shutter speed. When I retook the picture, the difference was unbelievable. The object in the foreground was clear. The background was a blur. Al graciously only made one comment. He said, "You might want to read the manual."

Then we moved up one flight of stairs to shoot down at the cars from above, providing some interesting angles and perspectives. Though it was not the perfect time of day to position the cars to Al’s exacting specifications, we had fun shooting them anyway. I took my first photography class. I enjoyed it, more because of the chance to listen to Al and hang out with my PCA-LA buddies than for the improvement in my photographic skills. For that I will need to take a beginner class. Hopefully, I will remember all of Al's comments when I have the skills to implement them.


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Porscherama December 2017

Automotive Lubricants Story and photographs by Tony Callas and Tom Prine

Since the introduction of synthetic lubricants, automotive maintenance has changed drastically. Some automotive manufacturers have recommended oil change intervals in the

15k and even 20k mile realm, but this does not mean that these are the best recommendations for your engine’s health and extended life. The modern Porsches (e.g. the 986-987’s, 996-997’s and even more so the 981-991’s) require a more vigorous engine oil change schedule. We suggest that you change your engine oil and filter every 3-5k miles or annually (whichever

comes first) based on how your car is driven to ensure clean internal engine component operation. For cars driven primarily shorter distances (under 10 miles) and/or in stop and go traffic a few times (or more) per week, a shorter oil change interval is recommended. Cars driven longer distances regularly will do fine with the slightly longer oil change interval. While these service intervals may seem conservative, it is important to recognize that modern synthetic engine lubricants rarely wear out in these shorter intervals. Instead, they become contaminated with combustion byproducts and water condensation (which worsens in periodic short distance driving). In the case of extended intervals, viscosity and anti-wear additives wear out sooner than the engine oil’s base stock. Changing the oil more frequently will help to protect against the potential problem areas with these cars, such as the failure of the intermediate shaft bearing, cylinder liners, timing chains and chain tensioners. A good practice when changing your oil and filter is to cut your oil filter open to inspect it for any wear metals and plastic debris. Wear metals and debris in the oil filter can be the early signs of an internal engine problem. There are also quite a few ancillary items that require clean engine oil to operate properly such as the Vario-Cam and Vario-Cam Plus control solenoids, chain adjusters, camshaft vane cell adjusters and hydraulic valve lifters just to name a few. These components all have very small oil passages and galleries which can get clogged with even the smallest particles of dirt and


Porscherama December 2017

debris. Engine oil is no longer just a lubricant and cooling medium. It’s now also a hydraulic fluid! The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has mandated that engine oil manufacturers reduce the high pressure/anti wear additive named Zinc dialkyldithiophosphate (ZDDP) contained in their products. The whole reason for this mandate is to help prolong Catalytic Converter life and efficiency. Modern Porsche engines, which are all of flat tappet design, require a substantial amount of ZDDP additive in the engine oil to protect and lubricate all the valve train components. Today we see many engines with camshaft pitting and lobe erosion at a relatively low mileage. These issues are a direct result of utilizing oils with reduced levels of ZDDP. We highly recommend that you stick with one of the higher quality, but smaller, “Boutique type” engine oil lubricants such as Driven, Motul, Redline, Swepco and Brad Penn, which all have ZDDP levels above 1,250PPM to combat high pressure wear issues. These oils are a little more expensive and may even be difficult to obtain, but they will save you significantly over time in repairs you will not have to perform.

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Porscherama December 2017

Welcome new members!

Photograph by Joe Barnet, Barnet Photography

Allen, David

9/28

Lim, Paul

9/21

Ames, Brian

8/27

Llado, Francito

10/1

Andre, John

8/29

Marks, Shanon

9/21

Austin, Donald

8/23

Miletich, Dusan

9/9

Bacich, Michael

10/6

Molhem, Jason

9/11

Ball, Michael

9/9

Nayebdadash, Ali

8/25

Belina, Adrian

10/11

Nunez, Jonathan

10/5

Bojic, Bojan

10/29

O'Connor, Tim

9/10

Borokhovich , Emil

10/27

O'Donnell, Daniel

9/24

Carter, Jerry

9/23

okamoto, wayne

8/28

Cervantes, Michael

10/12

Olson, Trevor

10/16

Cohen, Jon

11/3

Pandey, Siddharth

11/2

Connell, Brian

8/30

Pine, Alan

8/22

Datta, Anuj

9/10

Rivera, Gilda

9/3

DePauk, Debbie

9/7

Rosenblatt, Adam

9/21

Foenander , Keith

10/30

Rucker, Ron

10/18

Garcia, Resham

9/24

Schultz, Andrew

10/24

Gilles, Charles

9/13

Schuster, Don

9/23

Gleeson, Mark

10/23

Sciabarrasi, Luigi

8/22

Grant, Stuart

10/13

Shah, Phil

11/6

Grose, William

10/13

Skaggs, David

8/30

Holbrook, Chuck

9/13

Taylor, Fenton

10/2

Humphrey, Ted

9/4

Tiangha, Manuel

10/28

Jebian, Simon

10/14

Toscher, Steve

10/23

Kao, Henry

8/23

Watson, Michael

9/11

Lamberty, Todd

11/6

White, Brandon

10/10

Layman, Andy

9/11

Williamson, James

10/29

Li, Feng

10/19

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22 Porscherama December 2017

Anniversaries Akly, Charles Geza

(50)

Fink, JoAnne

(5)

Cordes, Karen

(50)

Hammond, Paul L.

(5)

Altemus, David E.

(40)

Hansen, Michael J.

(5)

Altemus, Janice

(40)

Larrivee, Donna

(5)

Horacek, Ernest J.

(35)

Larrivee, Gary A.

(5)

Horacek, Pamela

(35)

Luti, Anthony N.

(5)

Rustin, Robby J.

(35)

Mabbutt, Kevan

(5)

Goldberg, Jayne

(25)

Mabbutt, Sue

(5)

Goldberg, Michael

(25)

Ochinero, Tomoya

(5)

Magnusson, Carl G.

(25)

Onorato, Anthony

(5)

Magnusson, Oliver Marco

(25)

Onorato, Michael

(5)

Pate, Larry

(25)

Salahoddin, Sharelle

(5)

Faulkner, Fred

(20)

Steiner, Allen E.

(5)

Faulkner, Tambra

(20)

Torossian, Moe

(5)

Soliman, Hanaa

(20)

Volkan, Kevin

(5)

Soliman, Karim A.

(20)

Whamond, Kathy

(20)

Whamond, Michael

(20)

Gourlay, Brian R.

(15)

Shapiro, Steven L.

(15)

Tan, Brent

(15)

Tan, Harry H.

(15)

Wald, Alex

(15)

Church, Carol

(10)

Church, Lawrence

(10)

Tan, Arty

(10)

Tan, Peter

(10)

Diaz, Gina

(5)

Photograph by Joe Barnet, Barnet Photography


Porsche Club of America, Los Angeles Region P.O. Box 152 Santa Monica, CA 90401

PRSRT STD U.S. Postage PAID Long Beach, CA Permit #368

Profile for Porsche Club of America, Los Angeles Region

Porscherama 2017 Winter  

Porscherama 2017 Winter  

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