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By Poramit Thantapalit

SUN, BLUE & PRINT ALTERNATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY


CONTENTS Introduction Photogram Cyanotype Cyanotype Process Digital negatives Paper & fabric Cyanotype Toning Van Dyke Brown Mixed media & cyanotype His working process About artist

3 8 10 11 24 26 30 34 36 38 40

Cyanotype of foam and wires

Cyanotype of stitching threads on paper board. (two different light exposure time and coating emulsion) 2

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Cyanotype of illustration digital negative on inkjet paper

INTRODUCTION SUN, BLUE & PRINT

Cyanotype of stitching threads on paper board.

ALTERNATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY photos & design by Poramit Thantapalit (2013)

Sun, Blue & Print is a collection of Poramit Thantapalit始s alternative photgraphy prints during his study at National Academy School of Fine Arts in 2012-2013. He has gained experiences in alternative photographic processes from artist and instructor Karen Lindsay at the National Academy School. His artwork in this book include various cyanotypes, photograms and Van Dyke brown images that were created from found objects, drawing and painting on acetate, paper negative, digtial negative film on different kinds of paper and fabric. Cyanotype of illustration digital negative SUN, BLUE & PRINT 3


Photogram of shredded paper and stitched threads on paper board.

(left page) Cyanotype of digital negatives, paper negatives, painted/drawing on plastic sheet, found objects, drawing on acetate and tracing paper Photogram of painted plastic food containers.

Photogram of painted plastic food containers

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Cyanotype of digital negatives, paper negatives, found objects, drawing on acetate and tracing paper

Cyanotype of digital negative

Photogram of shredded paper 6

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Photogram of shredded cardboard on inkjet paper

Photogram of cut plastic bottles on inkjet paper


PHOTOGRAM A photogram is a photographic image made without a camera by placing objects directly onto the surface of a light-sensitive material such as photographic paper and then exposing it to light. The usual result is a negative shadow image that shows variations in tone that depends upon the transparency of the objects used. Areas of the paper that have received no light appear white; those exposed through transparent or semi-transparent objects appear grey.(1)

Cyanotype of shredded cardboard, drawing and burnt holes on tracing paper

Cyanotype of shredded cardboard, drawing and burnt holes on tracing paper 8

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Photogram of shredded paper and wires


CYANOTYPE Cyanotype is a photographic printing process that gives a cyan-blue print. The process was popular in engineering circles well into the 20th century. The simple and low-cost process enabled them to produce largescale copies of their work, referred to as blueprints.(2)


Cyanotype of stitching threads on painted plastic food containers

CYANOTYPE

PROCESS

In a typical procedure, equal volumes of an 8.1% (w/v) solution of potassium ferricyanide and a 20% solution of ferric ammonium citrate are mixed. This mildly photosensitive solution is then applied to a receptive surface (such as paper or cloth) and allowed to dry in a dark place. Cyanotypes can be printed on any surface capable of soaking up the iron solution. Although watercolor paper is a preferred medium, cotton, wool and even gelatin sizing on nonporous surfaces have been used. Care should be taken to avoid alkaline-buffered papers which will cause degradation of the image over time. Cyanotype of stitching threads on paper board. SUN, BLUE & PRINT 11


Photogram of shredded paper and plastic bottle on inkjet paper

A positive image can be produced by exposing it to a source of ultraviolet light (such as sunlight) through a contact negative (which can be produced by any suitable means, e.g. a conventional photographic negative or a print on acetate film made using photo-processing software to invert a positive monochrome digital image). The UV light reduces the

Photogram of found objects on inkjet paper 12

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iron(III) to iron(II). This is followed by a complex reaction of the iron(II) complex with ferricyanide. The result is an insoluble, blue dye (ferric ferrocyanide) known as Prussian blue.

Upon exposure to ultraviolet light (such as that in sunlight), the iron in the exposed areas will reduce, turning the paper a steel-greyblue color. The extent of color change is dependent on the amount of UV light, but acceptable re- Photogram of shredded cardboard sults are usually obtained after 10-20 minute exposures on a dark, gloomy day. The highlight values should appear overexposed as the water wash will reduce the final print values. Prints can be made with large format negatives and lithography film, or everyday objects can be used to make photograms.

Photogram of video tape film

After exposure, developing of the picture involves the yellow unreacted iron solution being rinsed off with running

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Cyanotype of pastel drawing on tracing paper

(right page) Photogram of cardboard negative on watercolor paper

water. Although the blue color darkens upon drying, the effect can be accelerated by soaking the print in a 6% solution of 3% (household) hydrogen peroxide. The water-soluble iron(III) salts are washed away, while the non-water-soluble Prussian blue remains in the paper. This is what gives the picture its typical blue color. The overall contrast of the sensitizer solution can be increased with the addition of approximately 6 drops of 1% solution potassium dichromate for every 2 ml of sensitizer solution.(2)

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Cyanotype of drawing on tracing paper and plastic chewing gum pacgkages


Cyanotype of digital negative, drawing on acetate and tracing paper

Photogram of shredded paper

Photogram of plastic bottles 16

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Cyanotype of paper negative on inkjet paper


Cyanotype of letter metal plates

Photogram of washers and screws

Photogram of found object, rope, plastic bag, plier and drawing on tracing paper

Cyanotype of pastel drawing on tracing paper SUN, BLUE & PRINT 17


Cyanotype of digital negative (right page) Photogram of plastic, wires and washers

Cyanotype of digital negative, paper negative, found objects, drawing on acetate and tracing paper

Photogram of rice, plastic, wires and washers 18

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Photogram of wires and sand on inkjet paper

Cyanotype of digital negative (photo of wall hooks) 20

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Cyanotype of x-ray negative film on inkjet paper

Photogram of stones, shredded paper & tea strainer


Photogram from painted chewing gum packages

Cyanotype from acrylic painted on plastic sheet

Photogram of found objects; saw blade, spoon, fork, fishing net and plastic chewing gum package SUN, BLUE & PRINT 21


Photogram of painted plastic chewing gum package

Photogram on top of xerox lithography Photogram of plastic containers

Photogram of found objects; wire, stone, plastic container and dried flowers

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Photogram of plastic bottles

Cyanotype of magic marker drawing on tracing paper

Cyanotype of scanned pencil drawing digital negative

Cyanotype of drawing on plastic chewing gum package

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CYANOTYPE USING

DIGITAL NEGATIVES

Cyanotype of digital negative

Cyanotype of digital negative 24

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Cyanotype of digital negative on inkjet paper

Cyanotype of digital negative

Cyanotype of digital negative on watercolor paper SUN, BLUE & PRINT 25


CYANOTYPE USING

VARIOUS PAPER & FABRIC

Photogram of shredded cardboard on brown paper

BROWN WRAPPING PAPER Cyanotype of drawing on plastic sheet

Photogram of steel ball chain on brown paper

Photogram of ash tray, wires and plastic plate mat on gray paper 26

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Photogram of stitching threads on brown wrapping paper

RICE PAPER

Photogram of found objects on rice paper

CORRUGATED CARDBOARD

Photogram of bottle caps on corrugated cardboard SUN, BLUE & PRINT 27


Photogram of plastic placemat (cut into small pieces)

FABRIC WALL PAPER

Photogram of plastic placemat (cut into small pieces)

Photogram of plier on embossed wall paper 28

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Photogram of steel ball chain on raw canvas

RAW CANVAS

Photogram of plasic bottles

Cyanotype of digital negative on raw canvas

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CYANOTYPE

TONING

In a cyanotype, a blue is usually the desired color; however, there are a variety of effects that can be achieved. These fall into three categories: reducing, intensifying and toning.

Reducing is the process of reducing the intensity of the blue. Sodium carbonate, ammonia, Clorox, TSP, borax, Dektol and other reagents can be used to do this. A good easily obtained reducer is Sunlight laundry detergent. When using a reducer it is important to pull the cyanotype out of the weak solution and put the cyanotype into a water bath to arrest the bleaching process.

Toning cyanotype with tea of digital negative, paper negative, found objects, drawing on acetate and tracing paper

Toning cyanotype with tea of pastel painted on tracing paper and clear tape 30

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(left) Cyanotype of found objects (wires, plastic bottles) and drawing on plexiglass; (right) Toning cyanotype with tea.

Intensifying is the strengthening of the blue effect. These reagents can also be used to expedite the oxidation process the cyanotype undergoes. These reagents are Hydrogen Peroxide, Citric Acid, Lemon Juice, and Vinegar. Toning is the process used to change the color of the iron in the print cyanotype. The colour change varies with the reagent used. There are a variety of elements that can be used, including tannic acid, oolong tea, wine, cat urine, and pyrogallic acid.(2)

Toning cyanotype of drawing on plastic sheet and tracing paper

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Toning cyanotype of paintined plastic container and toy soldiers

(right page) Toning cyanotype of dried leaves and drawing on tracing paper

Toning cyanotype of digital negative (photo of wall hooks)

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VAN DYKE BROWN Printing with Van Dyke Brown requires the use of a large format negative in the size of the desired print, a suitable substrate for coating and subsequent printing, and a UV light source, either sunlight or suitable bulbs. The substrate can be almost anything that the solution will adhere to. Watercolor paper is a good first choice, but trickier substrates such as metal, glass or tile can be first 'sized' with gelatin or arrowroot to facilitate coating. The substrate is coated with solution under tungsten light, air dried, and coated a second time if desired for a stronger image. The negative is placed on the thoroughly dried coated substrate, and is then weighted with a piece of glass. Frequent printers often use a printing frame to ease the checking of printing progress without disturbing the registration, or alignment, of the negative on the paper. These

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printing frames also ease the printing of a second coat over the same image.

The glass-negative-substrate 'sandwich' is exposed to a source of UV light. UV bulbs offer more control and consistency of light than sunlight, but at greatly increased cost. Standard daylight fluorescents produce some UV light, but printing times may be very long. A good starting point for printing time is to check a region of your photo that is very light but should still show some tone or detail (a highlight), and note how long it takes to register this detail, and print as long again. The latent image now appears, although flat and lacking substantial shadow tones.(3)

Van Dyke Brown of digital negative

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MIXED MEDIA & CYANOTYPE

These are samples of Poramit始s artwork using cyanotype prints to combine with other mediums and materials such as printmaking, paper collage, sculpture and mixed media.

Monotype & cyanotype

Toning cyanotype & xerox lithography

Printmaking & cyanotype Cyanotype & mixed media artwork


cyanotype on newspaper

Monotype & cyanotype

Color stencil & cyanotype

Cyanotype & van dyke brown SUN, BLUE & PRINT 37


HIS WORK PROCESS, STUDY AND EXHIBITION

This section shows how Poramit produced his work from start to finish, his practice and study in the studio, class critique and showcasing his works in the gallery.

The process starts from painted light-sensitive emulsion onto a paper, making the exposure using the UV light box or sunlight and developing the final prints.

My large scale cyanotype (56 x 42 in.) Alternative photographic process class of 2013 with Karen Lindsay

“Creative Mischief� Exhibition National Academy Museum

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Contact print frame for digital negative Taking the class at National Academy School gave me opportunities to produce quality works by using the effective tools such as a dark room, UV light box and contact print frames.

“Printed Echoes� Exhibition at National Academy School

It also let me exchange ideas and experiences with other artists.

Central Park is my favorite spot for making the sunlight exposure.

Contact print frame

Developing the final prints

My favorite negative, using recycle materials, threading and painted plastic packages.

printmaking studio at National Academy School

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ABOUT ARTIST

A native of Thailand, Poramit Thantapalit graduated with a bachelor始s degree in journalism. He worked as a video producer and in television for three years before he decided to continue studies in US. He received his master始s degree in computer graphics from New York Institute of Technology. He worked as a graphic designer for a popular health and fitness magazine in NYC for over 10 years. He now works as an artist in various mediums such as painting, drawing, printmaking, mixed media, photography and multimedia arts.

SUN, BLUE & PRINT ALTERNATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY

40 pages, 2013 Photography and design by Poramit Thantapalit 漏 2013 All right reserved References (1) Photogram http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Photogram (2) Cyanotype http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyanotype (3) Van dyke brown http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_dyke_brown

Sun, Blue & Print  

Over 120 photographs of cyanotype prints by Poramit Thantapalit

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