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Vida de Oro Volume 1, Issue 6

Connecting Communities, Promoting Excellence SACRAMENTO EDITION

Always FREE!

January 5, 2012

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Illustration: Felipe Davalos Copyright


Suddenly, it is Valentine’s Day. Sure stores are going to convince you to buy something imported, but why not make that special someone a handcrafted gift or buy a collectible item that’s already made? At Mina’s Treasures we help you make handcrafted specialty items using a variety of materials including vintage fabrics, trims and lace. From broaches to fashionable hats and from beaded bracelets to wrist corsages, you can either make your own design or purchase those made from local crafters. Come by and join us for tea.

Classes taught every Saturday...call us to reserve your spot at (916) 705-5129

Minaʼs Treasures 1901 A Del Paso Blvd. Sacramento, CA 95815 minaperez@minastreasures.com www.minastreasures.com

Weʼre a Latina, Disabled, Woman owned small business


Volume 1, Issue 6

SACRAMENTO EDITION

January 5, 2012

PUBLISHER’S NOTE... Happy New Year! I want to wish you the best and most prosperous year in 2012. Sure many of us have made resolutions, but the hardest part is keeping to them. So let me share how I keep mine every year: 1) Understand that a resolution is in fact an effort to fix something. If yours is to lose weight, you are fixing your health; 2) Be sure its attainable without too much effort. If it is too difficult or cumbersome, you’ll lose focus or interest after a few weeks; 3) Tikal - “Place of Many Voices” Take inventory of your resources to make your resolution a reality. If you understand what it takes to make your Vida de Oro resolution a reality, including surrounding yourself with Mina Perez, Owner friends and relatives that will help you stick to your Adrian Perez, Publisher resolution, it will make it easier for you to be successful. Mark Brodie, Advertising Overall, have fun and let’s look at 2012 with a fresh eye. Mariah Resendez, Graphics Ricardo Perez, Research Chania Brodie, Special Events Julia Marin, Photojournalist Jonny Perez, Writer

Poster of the Week

Abrazos/Hugz, Adrian Perez, Publisher info@vidadeoro.com Table of Contents: Cover Story: Welcome 2012 Beliefs and Predictions .... Page 4 The Tragic Story of a Latina Poet .... Page 6 Poinsettias: A gift to Christmas From the Aztec Gods .... Page 8 A Latina Photojournalist Breaks Through “The Steel Curtain” .... Page 10 Mexican Consulate and PG&E Work To Help Disadvantaged Mexicans .... Page 14 Vida de Oro Awards Coming In May .... Page 14

About Vida de Oro Vida de Oro is published bi-monthly. For comments, information, or submit articles, write to: POP-9 Communications, 1901 A Del Paso Blvd, Sacramento, CA 95815 or email us at info@vidadeoro.com Vida de Oro is owned by Mina’s Treasures and published by POP-9 Communications, a private for-profit concern. Any article and/or opinions expressed therein do not necessarily reflect the views of Vida de Oro or POP-9 Communications, but remain solely those of the author(s). Vida de Oro is copyrighted and its contents may not be copied or used without prior written consent by POP-9 Communications. Copyright 2011. All rights reserved.

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Volume 1, Issue 6

SACRAMENTO EDITION

January 5, 2012

A year of hope, achievement, surprise, and desire...or the end of the world Each of us have beliefs or predictions of what may happen after each New Years day. Some are bold enough to put them on paper, while others now use social media to share their beliefs or predictions. We thought it fun to share the top 10 beliefs and predictions printed or posted for the 2012 New Year:

5. California will experience its great earthquake - this predication has been validated by scientists even though no one can predict when an earthquake will strike. (They also predict the Central Valley will flood with ocean waters...Placerville could become a coastal city?) 6. Contacts with beings from another galaxy 1. The world will end December 21, 2012 - a will be made public - As UFO sightings belief established by expert linguists who increase this year, governments will be interpreted the Mayan Calendar. (It’s also forced to come clean to the public. (The possible their interpretation is mistaken.) sale of ray-guns and light-sabers will also 2.The Great Biblical Rapture will occur in 2012 increase.) this annual prediction has been holding on 7. Gold to clear $2,000 - This prediction is since at least 1968. (The Bible says that no being made by major trade and human should try to predict the end of days.) investment houses in the U.S. and 3.The U.S. economy will experience a rebound Europe. (Time to get rid of that gold you this federal government belief is based on less stopped using 10 years ago.) people filing for unemployment benefits. 8. Nothing happens - It is possible that (Unfortunately, less people are filing because nothing will happen in 2012, meaning the it’s too difficult to continue filing and not same old thing. (Sounds like a political because they found jobs.) prediction.) 4.Gun sales in the U.S. will increase - as local 9. The Paradigm Shift - A natural evolution law enforcement faces budget and personnel of humans that takes us into higher levels cuts, people are taking the law into their own of capacity. (Government speak.) hands. (The sale of guns increased 10. President Obama defeated - This is a dramatically in the last two years. In fact, prediction being made by political 129,000 new guns were sold to American scholars across the globe. (Only the consumers on “Black Friday” alone.) voters can make this call.) - Vida 4


Volume 1, Issue 4

SACRAMENTO EDITION

December 5, 2011

“El Dorado” Gold in the Sacramento Region Featuring: • • • • • • • •

Los Machetes Gala Dinner “El Dorado” Art Exhibit Latinos In Baseball Day Story Telling Founders’ Day Parade 4th Annual Folk Art Festival Vida de Oro Awards Latin Jazz Fest 2012 April 14 thru May 31, 2012 For More Information www.vidadeoro.com 5


Volume 1, Issue 6

SACRAMENTO EDITION

January 5, 2012

The tragic story of a revered Latina poet By Adrian Perez NEW YORK, NEW YORK - It’s not

too often Latino poets are honored with museums, cultural centers, schools, and streets are named after them.  One such person was Puerto Rican born Julia de Burgos, whose poetry to date, continues to inspire poets, feminists, poetry aficionados, and even politicians.  To further honor Julia’s powerful literary art, the United States Postal Service released a stamp in her honor in 2010 during National Hispanic Heritage Month.  But, who Julia de Burgos is Julia de Burgos and why is she so famous? Julia was born on February 17, 1914 and grew up to be perhaps the greatest poet from Puerto Rico and is considered one of the greatest poets from Latino American, along side of Gabriela Mistral.  As the youngest of 13 children, Julia’s family was very poor, with six of her siblings dying of malnutrition.  Through her determination to succeed, she attained a scholarship at age 13 to attend the University of Puerto Rico.  Julia graduated from the University at age 19 with a degree in teaching and immediately began to work as an elementary teacher as well as a writer for a children’s public radio program.  It was 1933, when she also met Ruben Rodriguez Beauchamp, a man she married that same year.  She was soon fired from the radio program when it was learned that Julia was consorting with a militant group called the “Daughters of Freedom,” a Nationalist group.  This is also when Julia began to write poetry, with her most noted work “Rio Grande de Loiza.” Julia left teaching to focus on her marriage and writing, of which some of her work was published in journals and newspapers.  While her writing grew, her marriage began to suffer as she spent more time with the activist group.  She and Ruben divorced in 1937.  6

That same year, Julia published her first book “Poemas Exactos de Mi Misma.”  A year later, she published her second book “Poema en Veinte Surcos.”  To promote her books, Julia traveled around the Island, conducting book readings and drawing the attention of critics.   Three years later, she moved to New York City. In New York, Julia got by working as a journalist.  It was here where she met Dr. Juan Isidro Jimeses Grullon, whom they say she fell madly in love with, although they never married. Dr. Jimses Grullon took Julia to Cuba where she studied at the University of Havana.  Their relationship fell sour and two years later, in 1942, Julia returned to New York by herself, without much money.


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Working as a receptionist then as a secretary, Julia did not write any longer, instead turning to alcohol to relieve her heartache until a year later, in 1943, when she met and married Armando Marin, a musician.  It is not clear what caused their marriage to dissolve, but this second divorce in 1947 pushed Julia into a deeper depression and serious alcoholism. Not having been heard from since June 28, 1953, Julia’s family and friends initiated a search and found she had been buried in New York’s potter’s field.  In backtracking what happened to her, it was found that on July 26, 1953, Julia had collapsed on a sidewalk in Spanish Harlem and taken to the hospital where she later In 1987, Julia de Burgos died of pneumonia.  She was only was granted a doctorate in 39. Human Letters and Arts. Some believe Julia had The U.S. has also predicted her death in the only honored Julia’s legacy with English poem she wrote in the Julia de Burgos Latino August of 1953, “Farewell In Center at Yale University, Welfare Island” which read:  “It the Julia de Burgos Cultural has to be from here, right this Arts Center in Harlem, and instance, my cry into the world. numerous other centers and My cry that is no more mine, but schools bare her name.  hers and his forever, the comrades Now, the United States of my silence, the phantoms of Postal Services will be my grave.” honoring Julia with a stamp Upon discovering Julia’s baring her image, which tragic death, the people of Puerto will be unveiled in Rico created a commission to September 2010, in time for bring her remains back to the CLICK HERE TO ORDER Hispanic Heritage Month. Island in September of 1953, There is no question where she was given a hero’s today that this Latina burial.    Since then, the city of San Juan, Puerto continues to reach the old, the young, the Rico has named schools and avenues after the famous poet.   A shelter for physically abused feminist, and the inspired.  Some of her famous works can be women bares her name and the Julia de Burgos Museum of Arts and Sciences was also established. found here. 7


Volume 1, Issue 6

SACRAMENTO EDITION

January 5, 2012

Poinsettias: A Gift From The Aztec Gods It

has become an American Christmas tradition of decorating homes and offices with poinsettias. The beautiful green and red leaf shrub is commonly sold at variety stores including drugstores, hardware stores and supermarkets. Had it not been for an American Ambassador to Mexico, the shrubs given as gifts to office coworkers, families and friends may have never been. Called “Cuetlaxochitl” (quet-la-so-chill) by the Aztecs, poinsettias bloomed wildly each December in the lower lands of what is now central Mexico. The shrub was harvested for Aztec royalty where the sap was used to control fevers among the ill and the red leaves were used to make red dye. It was not until the early 1900's when the Paul Ecke family of Southern California began growing poinsettias for use as landscape plants and as cut flowers, did the public begin to take notice. Recognizing that they only bloomed in late-fall season and the colors accented the red and green associated with Christmas, poinsettias became an American tradition. Today, the Ecke family grows 80 percent of the poinsettias sold, which are priced according to the number of blooms (the more blooms, the more expensive). In nature, this perennial shrub can grow up to ten feet tall and the red, white, and pink colors many believe are flowers, are actually leaves. There are over 100 varieties of this non-poisonous shrub, making it safe to have around kids and house pets. In Mexico, December 12 of each year is known as El Dia de la Virgen de Guadalupe 8

(Day of the Virgin of Guadalupe), a day commonly celebrated with red roses. But in the U.S. it is known as National Poinsettia Day, where the over $220 million dollar business takes hold for an average of six weeks. Red Poinsettias are favored by 74 percent of Americans, followed by white (8 percent) and pink (6 percent). Women 40 and older are the most common purchasers of the plant (80 percent). Not to be out done, the NCCA has an annual Bowl game in San Diego named…the Poinsettia Bowl. Network and local television production sets are typically decorated with dozens of poinsettias, at times encircling the TV announcers and guests. Poinsettias are also used on the display windows of major retail stores like Macy’s. - Vida


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January 5, 2012

Poinsettia farm in Mexico

The Ecke Poinsettia Farm

White Poinsettia

Statute of Poinsette in So. Carolina

Enjoy Past Issues of Vida de Oro! CLICK HERE TO READ

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Volume 1, Issue 6

SACRAMENTO EDITION

January 5, 2012

A Latina photojournalist breaks through the “Steel Curtain” By Julia Marin, Photojournalist

Being

a California native of Mexican-American descent, and where millions of Latinos live, I grew up watching American football, baseball and basketball, enjoying the sweet victories of watching my favorite teams triumph over their rivals. The first football game I ever watched was the 1980 Super Bowl between the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Los Angeles Rams at our neighbor’s house, the Marquez family, because they asked us to watch the game with them. They were cheering on the Los Angeles Rams and I chose to root for the Steelers, which prevailed over the Rams, 31 to 19. Soon after that, in 1984, the San Francisco 49ers attained their second Super Bowl victory against the Miami Dolphins, only to become one of northern Punter Daniel Sepulveda California's and my family's most beloved football team. But I have stuck to my Steelers since that Super Bowl in 1980. Today, and now with children of my own, I find myself almost a "loner in the local sports society " due to the overwhelming high number of 49er fans compared to local Steeler fans in Sacramento. As a Latina, I found this to be especially true in highly condensed Latino neighborhoods where some would think that I would be cheering for either Las Chivas or Las Americas in "fútbol." Instead, I’m among a growing fan base that follows the Steelers, the number one most followed NFL team in Mexico. They love them, and so do I! As a vowed Steelers’ fan, I know the players and quickly noticed their very talented punter Daniel Sepulveda (#9), a Latino who 10

arrived to the team via Baylor University. The 2007 Steelers draft pick bested Mike Barr for the punting duties and has been their starter since. Sepulveda is the only college player to have won the Ray Guy Award twice. Latino professional football players are rare in the NFL with the most prominent being New York Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez and Dallas Cowboys’ Tony Romo, both teams are located in cities with large Latino populations. Now we have a Latino player in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, which is more (Continued on page 12 - Steelers)


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Volume 1, Issue 6

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January 5, 2012

(Steelers - from page 10)

than any team in California. In 2010, Pittsburg’s Latino population was 2.3% according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Compared to California’s population where in 2010 nearly 40% of the State's population is Latino, you’d figure the NFL teams in the state would have Latino players. But, I found none! San Francisco has 15% Latino population, yet the 49ers don’t have any Latino players. This increased my dedication to the Steelers and when I learned that game #15 would be played in in San Francisco (only 100 miles away) against my Steelers, I was especially excited. During the NFL season, my Sunday’s of nearly every weekend are spent at Steve's Pizza in Elk Grove, home to the northern California chapter of the “Steel City Mafia Fan Club.” However, I wanted 2011 to be different, so as a photojournalist, I decided that my new years’ resolution would be to cover a Steelers game. I began my quest by convincing my editor of allowing me to cover the Pittsburgh Steelers vs. 49ers game for Vida de Oro, the Journal on Latino Americans and Marin Photo Chronicles. Week after week, I watched quarterback, Ben Roethlisberger (#7) throw pass after pass and do many ball hand offs to an amazing set of teammates which include wide receivers Antonio Brown (#84), Mike Wallace (#17) and Hines Ward (#86), along with running backs Isaac Redman (#33) and Rashard Mendenhall (#34). The more I saw them play, the more my desire to photograph and cover, live, my favorite team from the sidelines of Candlestick Park grew. So, how easy or difficult, would it be to get a sideline press credential? In early July 2011, I began to inquire about obtaining an NFL media credential for the scheduled December 19th game. Given that the NFL lockout was still in full swing, there was great possibility that the NFL season would be delayed, if not cancelled, should an agreement between the owners and the NFL Players Association not be reached. I was ecstatic to learn that by the last week of July an agreement had been reached, however, it left very little time to acquire a media credential for that game since many are 12

assigned a year in advance. Considering that I've been a longtime Steelers fan and a credentialed member of the press, I decided to approach the Steelers anyway. I was told that since it was a west coast game the credentialing request needed to go through the 49ers organization, which to my surprise (not), I was told by the 49ers organization that I needed to contact the Pittsburgh Steelers in order to obtain credentialing because I was seeking to cover the Steelers for that particular game.


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After submitting my written request to the Steelers organization and after several phone calls, not to mention the weeks that went flying by, it seemed as if the hopes for this California Latina/Steelers fan/photojournalist of ever getting onto that field seemed far fetched. So, I purchased tickets for the December 19th game in case I wouldn’t be able to attend as press. After all, I was not about to miss seeing my favorite team for the first time ever, live and in action, for that game. Does being a Steelers fan in an area where I am out-numbered 10 to 1 among 49ers

January 5, 2012

fans pay off? Do dreams come true? Well, for this Steelers Chica, it sure did! I received notification early Monday (12/19) morning that my media credential would be waiting for me at the Media Will-Call window at Candlestick Park! I had attained my 2011 New Years resolution. Despite the outcome of the game, I had the time of my life, the best seat in the house and above all, much love for the Steelers organization that made this all possible for me! It was the first NFL game that I'd ever attended, the first time I'd ever seen my favorite team playing live and the first time I had ever covered a profootball game! Unfortunately, due to recent knee surgery, Daniel Sepulveda (#9Punter), did not travel with the team. But still, for almost four hours, I was on the sideline as a photojournalist representing Vida de Oro, the Journal on Latino Americans and Marin Photo Chronicles. Through these photos, and with permission from the Pittsburg, Steelers and the NFL, I am sharing my experience with you. Ciao. -Vida 13


Volume 1, Issue 6

SACRAMENTO EDITION

January 5, 2012

From the Mexican Consulate:

PG&E teams with SABEResPODER and the Mexican Consulate for energy savings program Monica Tell (PG&E) and General Counsel Gutierrez (Mexican Consulate)

Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) has teamed up with SABEResPODER and the Sacramento Mexican Consulate to reach out and inform Spanish speaking consumers of ways they can save on their energy bill. The outreach campaign, comprised of educational pamphlets and videos, is designed to increase awareness of what the Hispanic community can do to reduce energy use and save on their energy bill. “This is an important campaign that will help the Spanish speaking community save in these trying times,” says Carlos

Guiterrez, Mexican General Counsel in Sacramento. “The winter months are long and cold and many families will be using more energy to keep their homes warm.” The campaign is also designed to increase awareness among Hispanics of protecting the earth’s natural resources through conservation. For more information about the campaign, visit www.pge.com/ energysavings or www.saberespoder.com.

Coming May 17, 2012

The

The Tikal

Categories: •Music •Art •Dance •Theater •Fashion 14

Vida de Oro Awards A Formal Affair Tickets:

$45 per person $75 for two

Includes:

No-host Reception Dinner Photo ops

Call for more info: (916) 550-0516


Est. 1983 ...serving the freshest juices and licuados in town, nothing frozen or concentrated. Our menu also includes sandwiches, salads, our famous quesadilla, fresh-ground coffee, mochas and other espresso drinks. A nice selection of beer and wine is also offered. Enjoy it all in the comfortable atmosphere of Luna's, one of this area's original cafe galleries. Or call in your order and we will have it ready for take-out. Luna's is available for meetings, fundraisers and catering your office luncheons. Breakfast is served Monday through Saturday. Featuring music and entertainment Wednesday through Saturday evenings. Dinner served starting at 5pm.

(916) 441-3931 1414 16th Street Sacramento, CA 95814

Hours:     Monday: 9am-4pm, and 6:30pm-10pm Tuesday: 9am-4pm Wednesday: 9am-4pm, and 6pm-10pm Thursday: 9am-4pm, and 6pm-11pm Friday: 9am-4pm*, and 6pm-Midnight Saturday: 6:30pm to Midnight Sunday: Closed * We are closed for most holidays and Furlough Fridays between 8am-4pm


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AMERICAN EXILE is a documentary film about two brothers, Valente and Manuel

Valenzuela, both decorated veterans who volunteered and fought in Vietnam.  Now, forty years later the Department of Homeland Security is trying to deport them to Mexico, a country they have not been to since childhood. For over sixty years they lived in the United States.  They went to elementary school and played on the high school football team.  They got married and had kids, then grandkids.  They worked, bought homes and started their own construction business.  Manuel opened a martial arts school.  They joined veteran’s organizations and for decades they dawned their uniforms and marched in parades on Veteran’s day and the Fourth of July.  Then came 9/11 and the Valenzuela brothers lives were forever changed.  The government began checking people they believed were resident aliens for criminal records in an attempt to snare potential terrorists.  They discovered Valente had been sentenced to take an anger management course because he got into a fight.  Manuel’s name came up because he had been convicted of resisting arrest almost a decade ago and had paid a $350 fine. About a year and a half ago they both got notices of deportation.  They were shocked.  They thought it was a mistake.  After all, their mother was American, born and brought up in New Mexico, and their father was a naturalized citizen.  Both brothers were raised in Redford, Texas along the U.S.Mexico border and both had volunteered to serve in the military when many of their peers were fleeing to Canada and Mexico.   The Department of Homeland Security countered that Valente and Manuel were actually born across the Rio Grande river in Palomas, Mexico and they are therefore in the country illegally. Confused, the brothers started using the internet to connect with and get advice from other veterans.  They were astonished to discover they are not alone.  Many veterans are facing deportation or in their words, “exile.” Now comes the opportunity to tell all of there stories. But, to do that, we need your support. Please take a moment and make the donation you can to make this important film.


Jan 5 2012 Vida de Oro