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SPECIAL EDITION EDITOR & DESIGNER Kristie Webster COVER Photographer: Caitlin Worthington CONTACT Email: ponyanarchy@gmail.com Website: www.ponyanarchy.com Facebook: facebook.com/ ponyanarchymagazine Twitter: @ponyanarchy Instagram: instagram.com/ponyanarchymag Copyright is reserved. Reproduction in whole or part is prohibited. Email addresses are published for professional communications only.


CONTENTS PAGE 4 PAGE 5 PAGE 6 PAGE 10 PAGE 12 PAGE 14 PAGE 20 PAGE 22 PAGE 24 PAGE 28 PAGE 30 PAGE 32 PAGE 38 PAGE 40 PAGE 42 PAGE 48 PAGE 50 PAGE 52 PAGE 58 PAGE 60 PAGE 62 PAGE 76 PAGE 70 PAGE 72 PAGE 78 PAGE 80 PAGE 82 PAGE 86 PAGE 88 PAGE 90 PAGE 96 PAGE 98 PAGE 100 PAGE 106 PAGE 108 PAGE 110 PAGE 116

EDITORS NOTE FUN FINDS TUESDAYS CHILD LILLY PIRI CAITLIN WORTHINGTON HEART, HEART, DARLING EMMA LOUISE CASPER&PEARL THESE ARE PLACES I REMEMBER JUSTIN WILLIAMS HSIAO-RON CHENG FLOWER DESERT VICTORIA GARCIA SASHIKO YUEN A KIND OF STROLL HANNA KRISTINA MELISSA CHAIB TIME TO WANDER DENISE NESTOR MARINA REFUR DIAMOND EYES JENNIFER DAVIS SIMON FILIP BANANA MILKSHAKE JOEL PENKMAN AMY HARRITY TIME FLIES THE PAPER KITES CLAIRE A YOUNG I THINK I’M IN LOVE TINPAN ORANGE LAUREN CARNEY PAPER VIRGIN JEANNIE PHAN STEPHANIE-LEE MOULIN LACE & LOVE IZMAY OZGA


EDITORS NOTE This special edition of PONY ANARCHY combines all of my favourite editorials and interviews from all previously released issues into one big issue of cololourful goodness. Featured contributors include Hanna Kristina, Lilly Piri, Caitlin Worthington, Ingela Furustig, Emma Louise, Stacey Hendrickson, Sisilia Piring, Justin Williams, Hsiao-ron Cheng, Victoria Garcia, Sashiko Yuen, Gloria Marigo, Melissa Chaib, Erika Astrid, Denise Nestor, Marina Refur, Sofie Olejnik, Jennifer Davis, Simon Filip, Francesco Ormando, Joel Penkman, Amy Harrity, The Paper Kites, Claire Alice Young, Sara Mautone, Tinpan Orange, Lauren Carney, Hana Haley, Jeannie Phan, Stepahnie-Lee Moulin, Andrea Hubner, Vivienne Mok and Ismay Ozga. Love. Kristie x


KELSEY GENNA is a handmade label based in New Zealand. The label is independently run with all garments being made to measure and in limited quantities.

SO LITTLE TIME CO. sell wearable necklaces and cute brooches. Created with a whole lot of love and a lick of paint, each piece is individual and one of a kind.

I LOVE MONA is an independent fashion label from Tel Aviv Yaffo, Israel. Run by Moriah Hemed, Ilovemona offers unique feminine pieces inspired by decades past

OHHH LULU is a Canadian lingerie label by Sarah Elaine. All garments are inspired by delicate fabrics, feminine prints, and vintage patterns.

www.kelseygenna.com

www.solittletimeco.etsy.com

www.ilovemona.etsy.com

www.ohhhlulu.etsy.com

SPRING FLAVOR is a Japanese accessories label run by designer, Haruka Sasaki. Haruka’s beautiful vintage-inspired coin purses and bags are 100% handmade.

PRETTY PARCEL is an independent clothing and accessories label inspired by vintage design, run by Melbourne based fashion designer Shannon McAlpine

EMILY GREEN is a Melbourne based designer and artist well known for her vibrant hand-formed polymer clay jewellery and watercolour prints.

APOM is a Melbourne based label run by Ka jsa Kvernmo and Kate Brook. The duo make beautiful wearable clothing inspired by narrative and the natural world.

www.springflavor.etsy.com

www.prettyparcel.com.au

www.emilygreen.net

www.apom.net.au


TUESDAY’S CHILD PHOTOGRAPHER - HANNA KRISTINA MODEL - LIZZIE @ PROFILE MODEL MANAGEMENT MAKEUP ARTIST - CARLEY BURKE


Lilly Piri we chat to brisbane artist lilly piri about her crazy cute work and what she has planned for the future. Three words that describe you? Quiet, curious, dreamer. Three words that describe your work? Flora, fauna, pastels. When did you first become interested in art? I don’t remember a point where I decided I was interested in art. Growing up, art was just something that was a normal part of life to me. My grandparents had a house full of beautiful paintings, and a few of my family members are artistic. What inspires you? Art museums, vintage toys, flora, fauna, beetles, stories, and natural history museums. I also love books, and have many art books, vintage children’s books and classic novels. Are you working on anything exciting

at the moment? Yes, but it’s still under wraps! Hopefully I can talk about it soon. I can say that I’ll be entering more juried shows this year, and working on things for those. Fingers crossed I get into some of them! You’ve been involved in a variety of projects over the years. Do you have any favourites? Recently, I really loved working with A Happy Death on the wild-west-cats-themed greeting cards. Other favourites were designing a Poketo wallet, and seeing my work printed on hoodies for Iron Fist clothing. Have you had any memorable or amusing responses to your work? I once saw a young girl look through my drawings and scream when she saw “Death on the Triangle”! And at Finders Keepers, I had a young lady ask me to sign her sketchbook, which was very amusing! (Hi, if you’re reading!) What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? Draw from life. What’s coming up next on your calendar? I’m not sure, yet, or not at liberty to say! I will put updates on my blog/Facebook/twitter though, for those wanting to know more. Visit www.littlegalaxie.com to see more of Lilly’s work.


caitlin worthington emerging fashion photographer, caitlin worthington chats to us about her work & passion for photography.

myself. Are there any particular things or people that have had an influence on your art practice? Definitely my childhood, I strive on many memories that I have from my childhood and try to devolve it into my work. Having so much imagination over the simplest of things, I always want to hold onto that somehow and through my art is how I have done so. Tell us a little about your thought/ creative process when it comes to organising a shoot. Sometimes it can be a team effort, so ideas can come from other creatives and we can put our heads together, exchange inspirational images and go from there. I may sometimes just be lying in bed and an idea will just pop into my head, its frustrating because then I can’t sleep because I brainstorm off the original idea for a while. Then I’ll try find images similar to show others so we can shoot it. What are you working on at the moment? I’m mainly working on fashion projects now, which is great, it’s a good way to earn money whilst still being able to have that creative flexibility. I’m wanting to do more candid photography with children, my younger brothers and sisters have grown up now, but I would love to get back into that side of photography, it reminds me of when I first started… I’m a little nostalgic about it I guess, but I love that. Best advice you’ve ever been given? That’s tough, I’ve been given many a good advice from many different people. All of which are of equal importance… I often remember this one - “Always shoot the way you want, don’t ever let someone tell you how or what to shoot, you are your own style and you work for you, if they don’t like it then tough” That’s probably not the exact words but close enough.

Tell us a little about yourself? I’m a 23 year-old photographer living in Perth, Western Australia. I love coffee on cold, rainy days, long macchiato’s are my favourite. I love listening to Radiohead and the Pixies. Cooking is great too, I mainly like making my own pizza, I really love pizza and chilli. Oooh and I love my little black cat, Kitty. What do you love the most about photography? Hmm I never know how to answer this question in words that will truly describe why I do love it so much. I love, love, love light. All the different aspects of it, the patterns, colours and textures it’s able to create Being able to create another world is pretty neat to, I love that you can create your own little escape and allow people to see into it, the dreams that go on inside your head and how everyone’s little dream is different in its own way, it’s so interesting! Is there any message or ideas you’d like to convey through your work? I love passion. It may sound corny or cliche or whatever, but when someone is driven by passion in what ever it may be that they love, from something as simple as collecting nuts and bolts to creating a beautiful dress. I don’t know, I just find it so inspiring and empowering… It’s really beautiful. So I guess you could say I like to convey that passion in my work, that I see in others and To see more of Caitlin’s work visit www.caitlinworthington.com


HEART, HEART, DARLING PHOTOGRAPHER - INGELA FURUSTIG STYLIST - ASHLEIGH KELLY MODEL - YANI BOTHA @ VIVENS


emma louise we chat to emma louise, a pint-sized singer with a beautiful voice that we just can’t get enough of.

also just something I love to do, making art with music is fun. Are there any particular (and possibly hilarious) gigs or moments that you’ll never forget? I think I’m still waiting for that massively funny thing to happen to me on stage that I will always remember when people ask me this haha. Favourite song of all time? Hmmmm. I really love a song called Rubber and Soul by Ane Brun. What should we expect from your debut album? I think it’s a good and interesting mixture of rawness, emotion and a new more soft electronic side of my music. I’m having lots of fun making it and am so happy with what we’ve made so far. What do you think you’d be doing if you weren’t making music? Probably something to do with animals. Maybe like a Vet Nurse or something. I’ve done a bit of work in a few shelters and vet clinics and stuff. I LOVE animals. Best advice you’ve been given? Don’t compare yourself to other people. Just keep doing what you’re doing and be original.

Tell us a little about yourself. I’m 20 and live in Brisbane. I spend most of my time doing musical stuff; playing guitar, writing songs, going to gigs, recording, jamming. I think I need to get some kind of hobby to entertain another side of my mind haha. Your debut single ‘Jungle’ had a really great response here in Australia and overseas, how did it feel to have thousands of people singing along to your song? Yeah it feels awesome! Before last year I had never played a gig where people know the words to my songs, so it was a great feeling to hear people singing along. I totally didn’t expect such an awesome response. What inspires you to keep writing songs? I write songs to express my feelings. It’s a good way to deal with certain things happening in my life. It’s For more info and tunes visit www.emmalouise.net


casper&pearl Meet Stacey Hendrickson, the extremely talented designer behind casper&pearl.

happy. What’s the best thing about your job? Ah, everything. It’s just a great feeling to be able to get up in the morning and do what you love all day! It definitely doesn’t feel like work at all. My favourite part of the job is when a customer tells me how good they felt wearing one of my pieces and how many compliments they got, I also love it when they send me photos! This part definitely makes up for all of the nitty gritty book work I have to do! Are there any designers that influence you? My favourite label is Chloe, I can always look to that brand for a ma jor inspiration rush, as well as Jill Stuart and Alexander Wang. I also adore Alice McCall and aim for casper&pearl to be that popular and sought after one day. What’s next for casper&pearl? I’m taking every day as it comes, and taking every opportunity that I get. I have great things planned for my label and hope that I can make all of my wildest dreams come true. Where can the ladies snap up some of your beautiful pieces? They can have a flick through the Facebook page where they will see all of my newest designs, then email me at casperandpearl@hotmail.com with their order and we can go from there! I also stock in some pretty great boutiques in Australia and the USA, details can be found on the website

How did casper&pearl come about? I have always loved making my own clothing and jewellery so it was just a natural progression after I realised I could make a living off of it. I began reproducing my designs for my friends, and then their friends, and then at the start of this year I had a market stall under the name of casper&pearl, after that there was no turning back. What’s the latest collection all about? My collections are very small collections made of vintage or vintage inspired fabrics. They are mostly one offs or very few offs, and I make these collections especially for upcoming events like festivals or concerts, or sometimes especially for a store. At the moment I’m busying myself with our first official collection for S/S 2012/2013, but I’m keeping the details a bit secret for now. What inspires you to keep creating? Definitely my customers and stockists, they are always wanting more and more from me, which I think is great motivation. I’m aiming pretty high and want to be very successful in the industry so you have to keep on creating new and exciting ideas to get noticed and to keep your customers Check out stacey’s designs at www.casperandpearl.com


THERE ARE PLACES I REMEMBER PHOTOGRAPHER - SISILIA PIRING MODEL - SHANNON ROXANNE


justin williams we chat to artist & illustrator justin williams about his amazing work and creative process.

it will have, so I’m stoked as I have never been that organised. What inspires you? My partner D, my dog, my surroundings, other artists, lots of normal kinds of things - Ijust try to look at them in a different way. How important is your studio and location for your creative process? Living in a forest must be sweet! It’s the best, I love the forest! We live in such a romantic setting, it’s so dark and dreamy, and it can be kind and also brutal. But I don’t think I can leave here, it has a kind of hold on me, I think I’ll move around as much as I can, but always return. I’m not all that interested in what is going on in the city, so it’s great. I do a lot of my smaller works and ideas all at the house, and then I am lucky enough to have a large factory, down off the mountain in the industrial area where I put together all my larger paintings and drawings. It is such a contrast to my home, but I love it too. There are no other artists around; it’s just filled with other trades, like steel guys, welders, full on hard core guys. But I love that environment and I try to just approach my paintings in the same way a panel beater would work, not so much in terms of beating the shit out of a painting, but in the same way that you show up and work, have a lunch break, and don’t fuck around too much. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? “If you can’t draw, don’t draw!” One of my design teachers told me that I should not draw as I was basically shit. I guess it wasn’t like a teenage thing of fuck you I’m going to prove that I can draw and paint and be an artist, it was more that I really respected this particular teachers advice… so to hear that kind of threw me. But later on I realised that it was a lesson and you have to have your own thoughts and stay true to them.

3 words that describe your work? Insecure, thoughtful, peaceful. When did you first become interested in art?I studied graphic design for three years then moved into fine art. I’m so glad that I went down that path first, as I think it helped me to have a good work ethic, I understood the time spent on design, showing up and working on something that is creative, and some of those same things cross over into my own work. I don’t do any design work anymore, I was never all that good at it, I was way too messy and obsessed with making some that just looked ok on its own, before you tweak at it with computers. But I have always been interested in drawing and painting, I just can’t go a day without doing something along those lines, if I don’t get to get in the studio, I find myself getting so angry and pissed at every one around me. I think it’s nice to have somewhere to hide and be alone in your own world and work. What are you working on at the moment? I just finished collaborating on a range of garments for Sydney designer, Therese Rawsthorne. We had all my water colours printed on silk, they look beautiful and I was so happy with the final product, it was really fun to work on the range. Apart from that I am working on a small book, full of water colour paintings and ink drawings that should be out in a few weeks. My main thing for the year at this stage is a solo exhibition at MR KITLY. It’s such an amazing space, and I’m so looking forward to showing. It’s not until November, but I have completed mapped out how the show will look and what To see more of Justin’s work visit www.justinleewilliams.net


Hsiao-Ron Cheng Meet Hsiao-Ron Cheng, a Taiwanese artist with a talent for creating surreal & beautiful imagery.

creepy and cute. Can you give us a little insight into your process? What materials do you use? Is each work pre-planned or created intuitively? Most of my works are digital and most of them are usually pre-planned. I always start with detailed sketch in digital to help me organize my idea at the beginning; and paint a base layer to decide the whole general tone (usually I use pastel colors as a base layer) in my computer, then use different opacity per layer and stack them together little by little. I like everything step-bystep. However, I do work intuitively to create pieces sometimes... when I feel so frustrated with my original plan! Which other artists, designers or creative people are you most inspired by at the moment? Henry Darger, Yuko Shimizu, Kondoh Akino and Olaf Ha jek. they all are wonderful storytellers! What do you love most about being an artist? The greatest thing about being an artist is I can do what I’m always passionate about! Being able to see rather than just look at things. I could allow myself to see the world with a sensitive, honest eye and then transfer what I saw into my works. What’s coming up next for you? I’ll participate some shows Internationally in the upcoming months. In addition, I just joined a couple of illustration agencies this year and hope to get some exiting commission jobs or collaboration in the future!

Tell us a little about your background – What path led you to becoming an artist, and to creating the style of work you are currently making? I was born in December, 26, 1986, Taipei, Taiwan. I’ve started to paint with traditional mediums since I was an art school student. However, I didn’t find my own style during the period of schooling and felt pretty frustrated about it. Fortunately, after starting to use digital medium, I felt I gradually began to find my own style cause I could try any style and subject-matter boldly without wasting a single paper in the computer. Before I became a freelance artist, I had a job from an animation studio as concept artist, but I always desire to paint more freely. During that time, I had worked very hard on creating my personal painting after work and every holidays. A year later, I started getting a little attention through the internet, so I thought it’s time for me to fulfill my wishes and become a freelance artist. How would you describe your work? What I’ve made are stories with images. I’m simply an image maker, an illustrator. My stories are just more personal, To see more of Hsiao-Ron’s work visit www.hsiaoroncheng.com


FLOWER DESERT PHOTOGRAPHER - CAITLIN WORTHINGTON MODEL - SOPHIE @ ALPHA MODELS STYLIST - HANNAH MCGRATH HAIR & MAKEUP - CONSTANCE BOWLES


victoria garcia we chat to sydney’ based artist victoria garcia about her recent art installation ‘surrocodelia’.

fearlessly. I think things in reality that we take for granted can be extremely surreal and inspiring - the fact that things merely exist is endlessly fascinating. I love natural history, art history, patterns and science. Tell us a little about your beautiful art installation, Surrocodelia. What’s it about? Surrocodelia is an amalgamation of the art and aesthetic movements – Surrealism, Rococo and Psychedelia. I strive to combine these elements together. I am inspired by the idea of a Wunderkammer or Cabinet of Curiosity , thought to be the precursors to natural history museums. They were fully immersive environments that aimed to reflect and record the wonder of the world, in a time before modern taxonomy and science. In this sense ‘Surrocodelia’ is my personal Cabinet of Curiosity. For the installation I covered a room with some very labor intensive drawings. I am fascinated by the ‘natural’ world, and our ideas about our relationship to it. To me, the installation is about complexity, life and death, pattern, infinity and everyday banality against a ‘natural’ world. I like that everybody has a different reaction and interpretation of the work when they see it. Are there any mediums you’d like to explore but haven’t? I have touched on the bare basics of animation but haven’t gotten around to fully realizing a proper project. I’d also like to explore painting more one day. What’s your ultimate goal in terms of your art and designs? I am finding my place between art and design and ideally I would like to be somewhere in the middle. I love the way a strong vision or idea can manifest itself through many different mediums and I just hope to stay curious and keep creating.

Tell us a little about yourself. My name is Victoria and I am an artist, illustrator and designer. I currently live and work in Sydney, Australia. What do you do and why do you do it? I focus my time making art, and I also work as a textiles fashion print designer and illustrator. It can be difficult to separate these activities into categories because they all intertwine at times. There is something magic about being able to transform a thought, idea or feeling you have into another form and I think this process and element of mystery is exciting and motivating for a lot of creative people, you never know exactly what you will or can create and you can’t stop – it’s a feeling that your work will never be complete. You’ve designed prints for Karen Walker, Peter Alexander and Lisa Ho. How does it feel to have worked with such big names in fashion, this early in your career? It’s pretty exciting and a bit strange to see an image you have drawn or created on a catwalk or fashion shoot. I’ve walked down the street or have been out and have seen people wearing prints that I’ve drawn or painted! I feel extremely fortunate to have experienced working in a great studio surrounded by talented people, and all my experiences have inspired me to continue pushing forward. What inspires you to keep creating? There are too many inspiring things and people around to not keep going – I admire people who have had a vision and stuck with it To see more of Victoria’s work visit www.surrocodelia.com


Sashiko Yuen we chat to lA based illustrator sashiko Yuen about her quirky art & what inspires her.

up ideas for a more solid body of work. I’m aiming to snag a solo show somewhere and I feel like what I’ve created so far is barely tapping at the surface. I’ll be working with themes of violence, rage, eroticism, and liberty all under a candy coated exterior. It’ll be fun. What inspires you to keep creating? It’s a compulsion to interact, meditate on, and explore things I’m thinking about or inspired by. I constantly feed my mind with books, film, conversations, music, and colors. Creating something with your own hands is also a very satisfying feeling. Are there any mediums you’d like to explore but haven’t? Originally I didn’t see myself as an artist, although I was drawing all the time. I wanted to be a fashion designer, but through some issues I wound up studying art instead. I still constantly design outfits in my head but now I like to interject them into my art. I’d love to explore fashion, creating textiles with my own illustrations on them. Perhaps when I get the time and funding for it. Do you have any specific messages or ideas you’d like to convey through your work? There’s nobody better to be but yourself and it’s okay to feel whatever you’re feeling. Don’t let anybody lead you to believe differently. Do you have any fabulous dreams you’d like to see come true? The biggest part of my dream is just to be drawing and painting everyday. Which I’m mostly doing already. Now I’d just like to be able spend more hours each day doing personal work, working towards gallery shows or selfdriven illustration projects. I’d love to be able travel at least twice a year, somewhere far. And like I said before, I’d like to be more involved with fashion. If Betsey Johnson, Miu Miu, Marc Jacobs or Spank! contacted me to do art for them, I’d be beyond ecstatic!

Tell us a little about yourself. I’m a girl in her early twenties who loves fashion, sub-culture, horror, travel, tea drinking, and smelling books. Oh, and I’ve had a life-long love affair with art. What do you do and why do you do it? I’d imagine I’m some sort of babe machine. I create images of girls as a visual expression of whatever I’m going through at that point in life. They’re symbols and metaphors for more complex thoughts and feelings. It’s also as simple as seeing something I want and can’t have. So naturally I’ll imagine what kind of girl has it. Kind of a collection of my interests and desires. I start to imagine these dames as girls I’d be friends with, having adventures or sitting down for afternoon tea. It’s a comforting impulse to create and share them. What does “art” mean to you? As a kid I grew up in a military family, moving around pretty often. I was an outsider, so creating art became the only consistent thing in life. Now it’s a means to express something that transcends words and a way to connect to others. What are you working on at the moment? Lately I’ve been pretty busy working on doing a lot of unconventional portraits. Turning people into 1950s princesses or 1970s punk rock queens. Underneath all of that I’ve been creating art for group shows. One of them is a pizza themed art show at the Pony Club gallery that I’m pretty stoked about! Even further beyond that I’ve been slowly building Check out more of Sashiko’s work at www.wishcandy.net


A KIND OF STROLL PHOTOGRAPHER - GLORIA MARIGO MODEL - ELZE K @MP MANAGEMENT STYLIST -SABRINA DE MERCURIO MAKEUP & HAIR STYLIST - ELY MAKE UP


hanna Kristina Meet Hanna Kristina, a young photographer from England with big dreams & high hopes.

or shooting magazine submissions, client work or personal work. You’ve established a pretty good fan base online and you’ve been featured in a variety of publications. How does that make you feel? I am so grateful for the support I get online! It’s nice to know that people enjoy what I do and it gives me the motivation to continue. What inspires you to create? Anything! Music, books, dreams, clothes, nature, magazines, poems, models, drawings. What are you looking forward to in the next few months? I have some magazine submissions I will be shooting into the New Year which I am looking forward to. I am also collaborating with some up and coming clothing designers and clothing companies to create Look Books with some very exciting concepts! What has been the best advice you’ve been given? “Be yourself.” Where would you like to be in 10 years? I would love to have been in many more magazines and publications. I would also love to have been signed by a photographic agency so I get to work with some amazing clients!

Tell us a little about yourself. I am Hanna, a twenty-year-old photographer based in the South East of England. I am currently studying in my second year at university towards a photography degree. I use both digital and film to capture bright souls. What do you love about photography? Ultimately the creative freedom, and the way I can convey emotion and mood in so many different ways. The way I can capture natural beauty and use beautiful clothing in the process. Getting to work with brilliant creative teams and meeting a lot of different people. What does a normal day in Hanna’s life involve? At the moment I am studying at university so during the week I am attending lectures or workshops and working towards my degree. At the weekends I am either planning You can see moe of Hanna’s work at www.hannakristina.co.uk


MELISSA CHAIB Mexican illustrator melissa chaib chats about her quirky work and gives us some helpful advice. Tell us a little about yourself. I’m Melissa, an illustrator and letterer. I spend pretty much all of my time making art or thinking about art. I wish my life was like a John Hughes movie. I am also obsessed with Woody Allen. Three words that describe you? Colourful, creative and obsessive. Three words that describe your work? Semi-autobiographical, quirky and feminine. When did you first become interested in art? I have always drawn. I always knew that I never wanted to do anything else, and with time and freedom I began learning how to refine my drawing skills and develop a more personal style, practicing and not giving up. What inspires your drawings? I tend to draw inspiration from stuff thats going on in my life… Music is a pretty good source of inspiration too. I listen to a lot of 80s new wave while I am working, and traveling

helps me a lot too. What are you doing when you’re not making your art? Drawing and making things is pretty much all I do. Even on a Saturday night you will find me sitting quietly at my desk with tons of paper, watercolors and a light turned on all night long. But when I am not doing these things I am sleeping or watching movies. Do you have any weird creative rituals or routines? If so, what are they? I keep a notebook full of quotes, ideas, images, so I usually start by reading through that. I’ve always had a tendency to lock into something for a period of time – a song, film, people and when I go through phases of being excited by things I cannot stop working. What are you working on at the moment? I’m working on a couple of blog headers and lots of new exciting things for my shop (stickers, tattoos) I’m also trying to finish a bunch of illustrations. Do you have any advice or inspiring words for others looking to start a career in the art world? Turn off the TV. Experiment. Work hard and sleep less. Indulge in your obsessions. Be positive and free and always make things that you are happy with and most importantly, have confidence in yourself. To see more of Melissa’s work head to www.melissachaib.com


TIME TO WANDER PHOTOGRAPHER - ERIKA ASTRID MODEL - CASSANDRA HAYES STYLING - ASUYETA MAKEUP ARTIST - CAMILLA OROSCO


Desnise Nestor we chat to Melbourne based artist, Denise Nestor about her intricate work & creative practice. Tell us a little about your background – What path led you to becoming an artist, and to creating the style of work you’re currently making? I’ve always wanted to be an artist or illustrator, but I genuinely never thought I could make a living from it, I felt that it was something I’d have to do on the side. I studied Graphic Design in college, loved it and I still work part time as a designer, but art and illustration will always come first for me. I think I may have been too cautious when I was younger because it’s entirely possible to have a stable career doing what I do and I’m loving every minute of it. How would you describe your work? I would describe it as being quite subtle work, largely inspired by nature, animal symbolism and mythology. Can you give us a little insight into your process? What materials do you use? I usually begin by researching reference imagery based on an idea I’ve had, it’s a rough way of ‘sketching’ it out and attempting to form the initial visuals. I then roughly Photoshop different images together to get a better idea of the composition and to plan the drawing out. I then map out the whole piece lightly with pencil and then begin to work in the detail section by section with pencil. I usually begin with 5H, then work up to HB, then B, then 2B and then 4B for the darker areas. It’s a slow build up. It can take me a whole week of work to complete a single drawing. Are there any other artists that

have had a significant influence on you and your work? There are so many artists that inspire me, every day I come across someone new. I love Jenny Morgan’s work. I also love Talitta Hoffman and Pamela Wilson at the moment. Klimt and Schiele were big influences on me when I was younger and still are in lots of ways. Your work often includes animal imagery, why is that? Ever since I was a kid I’ve always drawn animals and birds. I grew up in the countryside so nature has always been an inspiration to me. Now I use animals and birds in a more symbolic way, referencing their symbolism in mythology and also in the metaphorical sense. As well as that I really enjoy the technical aspect of trying to capture their varying textures and details, it seems like there’s a never ending supply of inspiration for me when it comes to nature so I think it will always be part of my work. What do you love most about being an artist? The thing I love most about being an artist is the satisfaction of realizing an idea, being able to recreate an image or thought that you have in your head. It feels so rewarding to actually see it manifest itself on paper and to be able to preserve it in that way and share it with other people. I love being able to slow things down and make an otherwise fleeting thought or idea feel more tangible. Best advice you’ve been given? I’m sure someone must have told me at some point that hard work pays off. I’ve thrown away far more failed drawings than I’ve ever completed, and that can be really discouraging, but you just have to keep working at it and you eventually find your own stlye and a level of confidence in what you’re doing. What inspires you to keep creating? I thoroughly enjoy what I do, it rarely feels like a chore and I feel lucky that I have an outlet like this, I find it so rewarding. See more of Denise’s work at www.denisenestorillustration.com


Marina Refur we chat to German photographer Marina Refur about her nostalgic & surreal photography

perhaps wouldn’t have crossed my mind in other circumstances. Do you have any creative routines or rituals? Whenever I have an idea I write it down in a little scrapbook along with drawings, photos etc. to build a “mood board” that helps me to get back into the emotion that I aim to express. Furthermore there’s also no editing without listening to music. Do you normally shoot spontaneously or do you take your time and plan your photos? That depends on what is required for the shoot. For example, the series “The courage of others” was planned because I needed to make sure I could shoot on a Sunday so that nobody was around the parking lot where I arranged all of the shopping carts. But there are plenty of other pictures on my portfolio that were taken spontaneously such as the “Stone Roses” series. The flowers I used for these photo were the last remnants of a bouquet my grandma gave me for my birthday and the time from having the idea to editing the pictures was less than an hour. What do you do when you’re not photographing? I’m working hard to get everything sorted to start my own business as a photographer and graphic designer during this year. When it comes to free time activities I love to listen to music and to go to concerts, hang out with friends, visit the flea market. Pretty random things! What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? Listen to your heart. It’s more about emotion and expression than about technical perfection. What tips do you have for other aspiring photographers like yourself? I don’t know whether I’m qualified for giving advice but what has helped me was not to back off from any idea that crossed my mind. Even if it seemed totally weird or just not realizable at all it was worth a try and I’ve been absolutely stunned more than one time what is possible.

Tell us a little about your background – What path led you to becoming a photographer, and to creating the style of work you’re currently making? Ever since I was a child I had a strong affinity for all kind of creative expression. I’ve been taking snap shots with a simple digicam for around 10 years but it was in the middle of 2010 when I completely fell in love with photography. I started a so called “365 project” which means to take a picture a day for one year and this is how the story started. Shooting constantly helped a lot to improve my photography skills and to keep the creative process going. It’s been really challenging to come up with a new idea every day and even though I quit the project at around 200 pictures it became clear to me that photography is the means of creative expression that I feel the most comfortable with. Describe your style in three words. Sensitive, mystical, enchanting. What inspires you? I seek inspiration from music, other photographers as well as from daily life or past experiences. Actually almost everything can become an inspiration and that’s one of the things I like about photography or being an artist in general – you never know what will be the next thing that crosses your mind. Is there anything in particular that has influenced you and your creative process? I haven’t really talked about this before but I’ve been dealing with health problems for years that make it nearly impossible to shoot sometimes. On the other hand, the situation I’m living through wakes emotions and ideas that To see more of Marina’s work visit marinarefur.paspartout.com


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jennifer davis we chat to minneapolis based drawer & painter, jennifer davis about her creative practice. What are you working on at the moment? I am working on a bunch of custom pet portraits and starting work on my next big gallery show- at GrayDuck Gallery in Austin, TX this spring. Do you have a particular favourite artwork that you’ve done? My favorites come and go but recently I’ve felt a great kinship with the guy in my painting “Lucky.” What does “being creative” mean to you? Creativity is not just for making art. It is a way of living… looking at things with an innocent eye and being bold enough to do things differently. Besides drawing and painting, are there any other mediums you’d like to explore? I’m getting more and more interested in painting on 3D objects so maybe sculpture is around the corner for me. I love to try new mediums so I’d “never say

never” to anything. Do you have any creative rituals or routines? If so, what are they? I try to paint everyday or as often as possible. I really can’t sit down to work until I have cleared the rest of my todo list and set aside a good chunk of time to work uninterrupted. This sounds like a procrastination technique but it works for me. What are you doing when you’re not painting? I love watching films, reading, walking around the lake by my house, going to art shows, eating, drinking and being merry. Favourite film? I generally favor dark and twisted things. I love “Blood Meridian” by Cormac McCarthy. I am a film fanatic so could never pick just one. What inspires you? People who follow their passion. Favourite quote or saying? “Finish every day and be done with it. You have done what you could. Some blunders and absurdities crept in. Forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new day; you should begin it serenely and with too high a spirit to be encumbered with your old nonsense.” - Ralph Waldo Emerson To see more of Jennifer’s work visit www.jenniferdavisart.com


simon filip we chat to californian photographer simon filip about his whimsical & dreamy imagery.

I have a hard time describing my style of imagery since it’s simply my naturally developed style, but I try to tell a subtle story with each shoot. It’s always nice to get people wondering and to see someone explaining their own idea of what fantasy a photo is telling. My imagery is usually commented on having a whimsical and dreamy feel. What inspires you to keep shooting and creating? Other than the fact that I will always love shooting in general, the simple act of creating something is enough to keep me going. I’ve been shooting only film for a while now, and that is something that adds to the excitement of shooting a story. My mind has lately been a bit scattered, but anything like a good movie or a good song can click me into an inspired mood to create, which lately has resulted in concept ideas to store for later, or creating new ways to work on color. Do you prefer spontaneous shoots or preplanned ones? I’d say I like a bit of both. Most of what we’ve done has been spontaneous when it comes to locations and placement, but I’d like to get more into pre-planned shoots. There are so many possibilities creatively when setting up a shot, and I feel like I’ve taken a big step in the preparation process lately. The fact that I now feel like I’m progressing a lot in the act of writing concepts is something that I am happy about. So I’d like to put that to the test soon. I think spontaneous shoots have a nice feeling to them, but pre-planned shoots always have a better outcome. Between yourself and your sister Becky, you’ve got a whole bundle of talent tucked away. Is all of your family creative? Thank you! Yes, my whole family is either musically talented or artistically talented in some way. Do you have any advice for other aspiring creatives? I’m not the best at giving advice, but I’d say never stop learning, even if you think you’ve got everything figured out. There’s always more to discover.

Tell us a little about yourself. My name is Simon Filip. I’m 20 years old, I was born in California of English and Romanian descent, and I’m obsessed with photography and colour. When and why did you first decide to pursue photography? There was never a specific point in time that I can remember deciding to seriously pursue photography. I always enjoyed taking pictures and having a camera around, but practicing nature shots and joining online communities very gradually got me into taking it seriously. I actually started out with the thought that maybe one day I could shoot nature for something like National Geographic, which is a funny thought now. I quickly developed an interest in portrait and fashion photography after much practice and experimentation. It also helped to have a sister willing to model all the time. What do you love the most about it? Fashion photography was never something I saw myself getting into, but I really love how easy it is to tell a story through an editorial. I see myself as a visual person, so the fact that I can create stories simply through images would have to be the best part about it. Are you working on anything exciting at the moment? I am, but it’s a bit of a strange and completely random project. I have lately been into experimenting with color processing, and I decided to create an iPhone application for image processing with filters and textures with my own editing style. It will be available later in the year. It has sadly pushed back a few exciting collaboration editorials, but hopefully I can get going on those later in the year. How would you describe your imagery? To see more of Simon’s photography visit www.simonfilip.com


BANANA MILKSHAKE PHOTOGRAPHER - FRANCESCO ORMANDO STYLIST - KLARA MORANTE MODEL - ANASTASIA @ TREND MODELS MAKEUP & HAIR - MARIA LASTOCHKA


Joel Penkman We chat to UK-based artist & graphic designer Joel Penkman about her mouth-watering still life paintings.

you’d like to explore but haven’t? I would really like to try some of the different printmaking techniques. Do you have any creative routines or rituals? Not sure if it’s a ritual but I quite like looking around the supermarket for inspiration. What has been your biggest hurdle artistically and how did you overcome it? Having time to make things. It is really hard to make time for art when you have a paying job doing something else. But an opportunity came and I decided painting was something I really wanted to do and resigned myself to having no income for a while. Of course this wouldn’t have been possible without my supportive husband. What do you do when you’re not painting? Gardening, and we are just about to renovate our old kitchen. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? I really don’t know. I have been told to decide where I want to be, it’s good to have a direction. What tips do you have for other aspiring artists like yourself? You should be making what you want to make, things seem to turn out better that way. What are you currently working on, and what do you have planned next? A bag of apples, and next maybe some ice creams.

Tell us a little about your background – What path led you to becoming an artist, and to creating the style of work you’re currently making? I studied fine art at Canterbury University in New Zealand, specialising in graphic design. While I was working as a freelance designer I had a little more spare time so started painting and taught myself to use egg tempera paint, a medium I had wanted to try. From there I’ve just built on the opportunities that have come along and I have been lucky. I think the simplicity and style of my work is strongly influenced by my graphic design background. Describe your style in three words. Simple, humorous, nostalgic. What inspires you? Food, familiar objects, colour, light Is there anything in particular that has influenced you and your creative process? Maybe moving countries, living in different places shows you what makes each unique. Are there any mediums Check out more of Joel’s work at www.joelpenkman.com


amy harrity We chat to young photographer AMy Harrity about her passion for photography and what inspires her work.

spontaneous or mistakes. What inspires you? New places, new people, new experiences. That sense of discovery you can only get while stumbling upon something new. Are there any particular photographers you’re really into at the moment? Tim Barber and JUCO. What does Photography mean to you? God that’s a hard question. Everything really. It’s been so definitive for me. It’s given me a purpose, it’s given me a reason to stop and look around and reflect and realize what’s in front of me. It’s given me a reason to trust my instincts and follow my dreams and push myself. I know that all sounds so cheesy, but it’s true. If I don’t pick up my camera for week I become restless, unhappy, and moody. I know it’s because I have this thing inside that I simply have to pursue for my own sanity. It’s one of the only things I feel 100% sure about. What has been your biggest hurdle photographically and how did you overcome it? The pure cost of pursuing this career and I don’t know if I’ve overcome it, I just make it work. I’ve gotten creative and been super scrappy at times. What do you do when you’re not taking photos? A mix of hermitting away in my home, hiking around outdoors, and drinking in bars What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? Don’t worry about what gear you have, work with what you’ve got. Show only what you want to shoot. Use every shoot - even the worst ones, as an learning experience to try something new while you’re behind the camera. If you keep pursuing something, something’s bound to happen.

Tell us a little about your background – What path led you to photography, and to creating the style of work you’re currently making? I relocated from Louisville, KY to San Francisco when I was 21 years old. I always had an interest in cameras but never really got my hands on them until I moved out West. I purchased my first SLR and a few film and toy cameras and started to document the world around me. Leaving the world I knew behind and documenting the new place I was in through photography truly helped me find who I was. It created an outlet of introspection I had never experienced before. I began shooting friends and the way we were living which lead me down a path to shooting lifestyle photography. How would you describe your style? Free spirited and open. I like to make photos that you can’t differentiate whether they were staged or real. How much preparation do you put into taking a photograph? Do you plan ahead or work spontaneously? It really depends on the shoot. A lot of times I go into a shoot with an image in my head. Sometimes that image looks great, sometimes I get there and realize its not going to work but I continue to play with the original concept. Some of my favorite photographs have been To view more of Amy’s work head to www.amyharrity.com


TIME FLIES PHOTOGRAPHER - ANDREA HÜBNER MODEL - HANNAH MAKEUP ARTIST - NATHALIE TYRELL


The paper kites We chat to The Paper Kites bassist, Sam Rasmussen about the bands latest Ep ‘Young North’ & what’s next.

of shenanigans going on. It’s unavoidable when your travelling the country with some of your best friends, isn’t it!? Have there been any hilarious moments whilst on previous tours, that you’ll always remember? There are plenty! One Personal favourite took place backstage in Adelaide. I managed to defeat Josh Pyke in a freestyle rap battle. A very proud moment for me! Do you find playing gigs in Melbourne a little more special than other cities, because it’s your home? Yeah we really do. Melbourne has been SO supportive of us. That said, we always feel really nervous at the shows, because so many of our friends and family members turn up. You Would think this would be comforting, but it’s quite the opposite. Give me a crowd of strangers any day! Do you have any pre-show or post-show rituals that you partake in? There is a song. It’s a bit of a tradition that started some time ago (I can’t actually remember how) it’s to the tune of Cotton Eye Joe. That’s all I’ll say about that one! We’re hanging out for an album – any idea when that might happen? At this stage all attention is on the E.P and the upcoming tour. Best advice you’ve ever been given? Write the songs you want to write. Aside from your tour, what do you guys have planned for the rest of the year? Well, the tour winds up in November and I think we’re all planning a bit of a break until January when we are back on the road to support Bombay Bicycle Club.

Describe The Paper Kites in three words? The Paper Kites. Young North sounds a little more mature than your earlier songs. Would you say that’s true? Well yes. It’s been Just over a year since our last release, which is a long time for a developing band. We’ve spent that year touring, and rehearsing solidly, and feel we have matured significantly along the way. Where did the title of the EP come from? Originally ‘Young’ and ‘North’ where 2 different songs. One day Sam B saw them written next to each other and loved how it sounded. Since then it’s taken on more meaning, surrounding the theme of naive innocence together with travelling forward on a journey. Your lyrics are quite nostalgic and beautiful where do you guys usually gather song writing inspiration? Whilst writing for the E.P Sam B spent allot of time in a little old shack in the country. It was amongst nature that he was able to reflect on life, and experiences. As a band, We develop our songs over time spent in close proximity, experimenting with sounds, structures and ideas. You’re about to head on a national tour with support acts, Art of Sleeping and Battleships – are you expecting some crazy shenanigans to go down? There are always some kinds To check out The Paper Kites head to www.thepaperkites.com.au


claire a. young emerging fashion photographer, Claire Alice Young chats to us about her work & passion for photography.

What does photography mean to you? Photography is my way of communicating, it is how I express my thoughts and ideas. I’ve never been very good with words so instead I take pictures. Where do you find your creative inspiration? Everywhere and anywhere, I think I am most inspired when I am travelling. I always take my little black notebook with me so that I can scribble down my ideas whenever they appear, on a sunset train ride, or a long car journey through the winding countryside, or watching the sleeping clouds through a plane window. Are there any other photographers or creatives you’re really into at the moment? I will always be inspired by the online photographic community that is made up of so many talented young photographers; Nirrimi Firebrace, Julia Trotti, Caitlin Worthington, Eleanor Hardwick. I also love the work of Tim Walker, Sally Mann and Annie Leibovitz. If you could work alongside any one photographer who would it be? I’ve always had a secret dream to meet and assist Tim Walker. He has the ability to create entirely new worlds within his pictures, his imagination must be endless. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? When my mother realised that photography wasn’t just a hobby for me, she told me to always follow my heart. ‘Do something that you love everyday, find a way to make that your career.’ I think it all comes down to this: happiness is greater than money, you will always be wealthy if you are happy. What tips do you have for other aspiring photographers like yourself? Practice! Don’t let a day go by that you haven’t picked up your camera or edited a picture or even scribbled down an idea you’d like to create. Give yourself completely to your passion, don’t let anything stand in your way. You need to take risks to receive results.

Tell us a little about yourself and how you first became interested in photography? I’m a twenty-year young photographer who made the move to bustling Melbourne from my hometown Adelaide to pursue my burning passion. I live in a ramshackle cottage in a seaside suburb with my love (who conveniently doubles as my personal chef) and our little rascally rabbit, Arnie. We have big dreams of selling our possessions and beginning a life of endless travel, living on the road with a little van as our home. I first became interested in photography at age fourteen, sitting cross-legged in the middle of the night with only the glow of my computer screen for company. I had discovered the work of young photographers through DeviantArt and I was feeling endlessly inspired. I have always felt the need to create, whether it be painting or sculpting or drawing, but I was always disappointed that I couldn’t create the images exactly how I saw them in my mind. I saved enough money to buy an old second hand DSLR and I’ve never looked back. How would you describe your photographic style? Soft, feminine and full of life. I am trying to capture the moments in between, when the subject is blissfully unaware of my camera. What do you do when you’re not shooting? I’m always creating! Right now I am making sea glass pendants and hand-made dream catchers. I also spend my days sewing and recycling vintage clothes, there is always a creative task going on in my house! To view more of Claire’s work, head to www.clairealiceyoung.com


I THINK I’M IN LOVE PHOTOGRAPHER - SARA MAUTONE MODEL - ADRIANNA Z @WHYNOT STYLISTS - IRENE GHILLANI & PRISCA MAIZZI HAIR STYLIST - MICHELE DI GIOVANNI MAKEUP - MARINA BERNACCHIONI


tinpan orange We chat to Emily Lubitz, frontwoman of Melbourne indie-folk band Tinpan Orange about their new album. 3 words that describe Tinpan Orange? Adventurous, nostalgic and mellifluous. It’s been a few years now since your last album The Bottom of the Lake was released. What have you guys been up too between now and then? A lot of touring. We’ve been to most corners of the country a number of times; we’ve toured Europe and Canada quite extensively, and played many festivals all over the place. We took some time off because I had a baby last year. We were recording a big chunk of this album when I was 7 months pregnant and we were back doing shows when he was 2 and a half months so I guess you could say, despite not putting out any records, we’ve been keeping busy. We’re excited about the new album here at Pony Anarchy. What should we expect from Over The Sun? It’s different to our older stuff. I feel like my song writing has come a long way. We also worked with producer, Steven Schram, who is a very fearless man. He was not afraid to put our songs in a blender and watch them swirl! Were there any particular influences or inspiration behind this album? Nancy Sinatra meets Edith Piaf who has breakfast with the Beachboys who goes surfing with Martin Scorceses who shares an ice-cream with Leonard Cohen.. Do you have any personal favourites on the album yet? How could you ask such a question? It’s like asking me to choose my favourite child! But I’ll say this, Barcelona makes me

happy, Supergirl makes me feel strong, Round the Twist makes me smile and the title track makes me feel sad but in a good way. How has your music evolved since Tinpan Orange first began? Well we started off as a brother and sister playing break up songs on acoustic guitars.. Then we met Alex Burkoy who is an absolute force of nature when it comes to anything with strings.. Then we met Harry Angus who is a mad professor when it comes to most instruments and song writing in general (and the love of my life) then we met Daniel Farrugia, who plays drums like a motherfucker (in the most incredibly complimentary Miles Davis way...) and that brings us to the present day. What do you love about making music? I love playing live. I love listening to my band play, connecting with an audience, jumping around on stage and forgetting about what’s going on outside of this dark room... Are there any particular and possibly hilarious gigs or moments that you’ll never forget? When we were first starting out we played in a tin shed bar in Darwin where they would announce over the very loud loudspeaker when the meals were ready to collected from the kitchen.. We’d be halfway into one of our acoustic guitar, break up songs and we’d hear ‘Order 24!.. Order 24!!!’ crashing down from tin shed heavens. Some hungry punter was happy to hear it I guess. Best advice you’ve ever been given? “If you keep thinking about the worst possible scenario and then it happens, it means you’ve lived it twice”. Actually that guy from Back To The Future said it but I wish I had. Check out Tinpan Orange at www.tinpanorange.com


lauren carney we chat to brisbane illustrator lauren carney about finding inspiration in her inner dork.

the fellows are always adorably dorky with bow ties and glasses! Are there any mediums or other creative avenues you’d like to explore but haven’t? I would really LOVE to get into murals. I have such a great respect for artists that work on a large scale, and spray painting just seems to blow my mind. I’d definitely love to try my hand at it, with a Master Jedi of the street art world (Like Ghostpatrol, Pierre Lloga or Ceepy) to teach me the tricks of the trade. Are there any other artists or individuals that have had a significant influence on your practice? Dave Collinson has always been my Art hero, and probably always will be. That kid taught me everything I know on Photoshop, and I wouldn’t have been able to shape up without his help during my early days. I also adore everything that Charmaine Olivia, Audrey Kawasaki and Brittany Lee have created. What’s your ultimate goal in terms of your art and designs? Well, to be honest – I’d really like to see my t-shirt label take off on an international scale (sounds a little ambiguous of me, but hey, a goal is a goal, why not aim high?) and to become a resident in Japan for some time, and continue exhibiting and creating over there. What do you enjoy the most about being an artist? I love what I do. Why not get paid to do something that you enjoy? But it would definitely be the way my work impacts on people. There is nothing more delightful then gauging a person’s reaction when they see your art. It sparks a little bit of curiosity at first then a giggle. It’s nice to know that my work can connect with people in that sense.

Tell us a little about yourself. I am a Brisbane based Illustrator, who enjoys the company of young trendies, and viewing old Kurt Russell Films. I spend my time doing fancy drawings whilst sipping copious amounts of tea. Three words that describe your art. Whimsical, colourful, lovely. What mediums do you generally work with? Moleskin Art Diary, A 0.005 Art-line Pen, Watercolour paints and different textured papers. Then I move to the digital stage, where I scan everything and colour away in Adobe Photoshop. Have you always fancied art? Yes – from when I was about 4 I would draw outrageous pictures, and mini zines, it’s only 20 years on that you can actually make out what the drawings are. Your characters are ridiculously adorable and somewhat cheeky, where do you draw inspiration from? Your own personality perhaps? Hah, I hope this doesn’t come across as pretentious, but I like to think there is a little part of me in every character I create. I can embrace being awkward, messy, nerdy and a little bit odd. It’s something that lots of people can relate to. I want my images to convey a sense of nostalgia, and show qualities that people can connect with upon first glance. I’m on the small side of things, so like to draw my people that way. The girls are cheeky with tiny boobs, and To check out Lauren’s work visit www.laurencarneyart.com


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jeannie phan We chat to Canadian artist Jeannie Phan about her work & the importance of creating. Tell us a little about yourself?. I am 21 year old illustrator, craftmaker and zinester from Toronto, Canada. What does “being creative” mean to you? To me, it really does mean to be fearless, a fearlessness that is fuelled by having a constant passion and drive to make things. Creativity is a great thing to have whenever you’re in a rut and feel aimless; it leads you back into a better state of mind. What are you working on at the moment? I’m working on a new series of painted illustrations that is based around coping with paradise. It’s a fun new experience! I’m also trying to squeeze in time to finish up the second issue of my comic “Indigestion” where everything starts to unravel. Dun, dun, dun! Do you have a particular favourite work that you’ve done? At the moment I’m fond of my “Hair is Dead” series but my favourite piece within it always fluctuates as new work always replaces the old so I can never decide! I don’t like to get hung up on only one piece. Do you have any creative rituals or routines? Unfortunately, nothing wacky. I’ve only recently managed to condition myself to work with others around me (usually I could only work when completely isolated). I

prefer working in the early afternoon to late evening when natural sunlight is out and shining on my face. A few podcasts softly playing in the background is a nice addition. What are you doing when you’re not creating? I’m kind of a nerd. I love video games, though I try not to get too thoroughly involved because I fear of what I could become. Strategy games and adventure games really capture my heart and allow me to get away from my work and relax myself into a new realm. Favourite book and film? Like everyone else, I am a huge Hayao Miyazaki fan, amongst his works I really enjoy “Howl’s Moving Castle.” It’s so fantastical! With books, I actually prefer reading self-published zines than novels. I can connect with the writer and artists on a much more intimate and completely uncensored level. What inspires you? Biology. I am so unbelievably inspired by how the human body can manage to function despite the abuse we put it through. Learning about different organisms and their own worlds really gives me a lot to think about in regards to my own. Favourite quote or saying? “I have no special talent. I am only passionately curious.”-Albert Einstein. Do you have any tips or inspiring words for others? Constantly create; which I know is something a lot of people say. It is sound advice though. Don’t let the fear of having a lack of technical talent stop you because you can always learn it. It’s most important to keep a constant flow of creative juices going, don’t ever be ashamed of your ideas. To check out more of Jeannie’s work visit www.jeanniephan.com


STephanie-Lee Moulin We chat to Emerging photographer & designer, Stephanie-Lee Moulin about her love for photography.

whatever pops into my mind or view on that given day. What’s your favourite thing to photograph? Pretty light. I get so excited at that ‘golden hour’ each day. Most memorable shoot? A couple of years back I did conceptual portraiture shoot a few km’s up the road from home. I hadn’t taken any photographs for a while and my love had been on my case to keep shooting to get myself out of said creative rut. A few weeks prior, I had stumbled across an old house where all that was left was the facade- a great location! So, one stormy afternoon, my love arrived at my door eager and willing to be a part of well, anything, provided it involved me taking photos, and we headed up to the half house. I was without a lot of hope that this would be a success in the heavy rain, but to my utter amazement, five minutes later the sun broke through the blackened clouds and shone the most amazing yellow beam of light into the house. I had my David stand there with his red umbrella held above his head in the door way, and took the photograph before the sky closed again. To this day, it is one of my favourite photographs and reminds me why I continue to shoot. Do you prefer film or digital? Digital. But I generally process my work with a filmic quality. I truly wish I took more time to work with film though, there’s just something you can’t imitate with a digital sensor. If you could work alongside any photographer, who would you choose? Annie Leibovitz, Jonas Peterson, Tamara Dean, or Viktor Gardsater… it would be a shame to have to choose! What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? As an aspiring commercial photographer: “Always remember to take the photos you like, as well as those the client wants”

Tell us a little about yourself. I’m Stephanie and I’m a twenty-two year old photographer from Melbourne. I like pretty things and I hoard photographs, illustrations and words – there’s generally a lot of paper on my enormous pin boards. For the most part, I suppose I would be considered a self-portraiture artist- not by conscious choice, but by ease of access and habit as it’s what I’ve always done. I’m an only child, and a bit of a dreamer which I think is obvious in my work; whimsicality and curiosity, loneliness and mystery tainting each photograph. When did you first become interested in Photography? Probably during the various times throughout my childhood when I would sit on the floor of my bedroom, flipping through our few family albums and get lost in the nostalgia that old photographs evoke. Aside from that, when I was about fifteen I picked up my first PENTAX K1000 in my photography class, loaded it with some ilford hp4 and took some really horribly exposed photographs of the school grounds. After that I was in love. What inspires you to take photographs? The people around me, the changing seasons, and the way the light moves throughout the day. Just life in general. Are you working on anything in particular at the moment? I’ve actually joined the 365 project bandwagon for fear of becoming estranged from my camera since graduating. So between my part time work at a local pharmacy, I’m shooting To see more of Stephanie’s work visit missmoulin.4ormat.com


LACE & LOVE PHOTOGRAPHER - VIVIENNE MOK MODEL - EMMA @STUDIO KRLP STYLIST & MUA - VIVIENNE MOK


ismay ozga Emerging fashion illustrator, ismay ozga chats to us about her work and passion for creating.

What does photography mean to you? Photography is my way of communicating, it is how I express my thoughts and ideas. I’ve never been very good with words so instead I take pictures. Where do you find your creative inspiration? Everywhere and anywhere, I think I am most inspired when I am travelling. I always take my little black notebook with me so that I can scribble down my ideas whenever they appear, on a sunset train ride, or a long car journey through the winding countryside, or watching the sleeping clouds through a plane window. Are there any other photographers or creatives you’re really into at the moment? I will always be inspired by the online photographic community that is made up of so many talented young photographers; Nirrimi Firebrace, Julia Trotti, Caitlin Worthington, Eleanor Hardwick. I also love the work of Tim Walker, Sally Mann and Annie Leibovitz. If you could work alongside any one photographer who would it be? I’ve always had a secret dream to meet and assist Tim Walker. He has the ability to create entirely new worlds within his pictures, his imagination must be endless. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve been given? When my mother realised that photography wasn’t just a hobby for me, she told me to always follow my heart. ‘Do something that you love everyday, find a way to make that your career.’ I think it all comes down to this: happiness is greater than money, you will always be wealthy if you are happy. What tips do you have for other aspiring photographers like yourself? Practice! Don’t let a day go by that you haven’t picked up your camera or edited a picture or even scribbled down an idea you’d like to create. Give yourself completely to your passion, don’t let anything stand in your way. You need to take risks to receive results.

Tell us a little about yourself and how you first became interested in photography? I’m a twenty-year young photographer who made the move to bustling Melbourne from my hometown Adelaide to pursue my burning passion. I live in a ramshackle cottage in a seaside suburb with my love (who conveniently doubles as my personal chef) and our little rascally rabbit, Arnie. We have big dreams of selling our possessions and beginning a life of endless travel, living on the road with a little van as our home. I first became interested in photography at age fourteen, sitting cross-legged in the middle of the night with only the glow of my computer screen for company. I had discovered the work of young photographers through DeviantArt and I was feeling endlessly inspired. I have always felt the need to create, whether it be painting or sculpting or drawing, but I was always disappointed that I couldn’t create the images exactly how I saw them in my mind. I saved enough money to buy an old second hand DSLR and I’ve never looked back. How would you describe your photographic style? Soft, feminine and full of life. I am trying to capture the moments in between, when the subject is blissfully unaware of my camera. What do you do when you’re not shooting? I’m always creating! Right now I am making sea glass pendants and hand-made dream catchers. I also spend my days sewing and recycling vintage clothes, there is always a creative task going on in my house! To view more of Ismay’s work head to www.ismayozga.com


Claire huish Emerging fashion Photographer, Claire Huish chats to us about her work & love for cinema.

happiest memories of crazy long days shooting just me and her, somehow pulling the make-up and styling together. One of these images I took of her won the Young Fashion Photographer of the Year award in December 2009, and that’s still one of my proudest moments! Even today, I like to work in the smallest teams possible as I like to keep that intimate feeling, and rarely shoot with a team larger than four or five. Do you have any creative rituals or routines? I don’t think so - most of what I do is very intuitive, but I do always like creating moodboards prior to contacting a creative team about a shoot. I always shoot with natural light, so maybe that’s a creative ritual! What are you doing when you’re not photographing? Thinking about photographing, and getting inspired by the world around me! My favourite thing ever is going to the cinema, I love watching films on a big screen and getting fully immersed in another world. And as I mentioned, I love fashion, does collecting clothes count as a hobby? My collection is totally out of hand! Favourite quote or saying? “Whatever you can do or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power and magic in it.” - Goethe. To me it means, don’t sit and think about what you want to do or be, just do it! Do you have any tips or inspiring words for others? I don’t feel like I’m really equipped to answer that question because really I’m only just starting out myself - but I would say try and stay true to your own vision and don’t be too influenced by what other people are doing. Nothing is truly original anymore, but by accepting your influences, and then focussing on your own imagination and trying to channel that, I think you’ve got a shot at regurgitating something that’s already been done, but with a streak of originality and your own personality coming through.

Tell us a little about yourself. My name is Claire Huish, a twentyone year old fashion photographer currently based between Bournemouth & Oxford but soon to be based in London. I work digitally and I’m currently starting to experiment with the moving image and fashion film, too. What are you working on at the moment? I’m currently working on a personal project called Never Let Me Go which is a series about nostalgia, of which I’m producing a limited edition run of 10 books. I’ve finished shooting fashion until 2012 but I’m already plotting my S/S shoots! I also have various upcoming publications featuring editorials I’ve been working on over the last four months. What inspires you? Colour, films, clothes, lines in songs, light, certain sentences in books or poems, classic fashion photography, illustrators like Arthur Rackham and Erte, PreRaphaelite paintings, the natural world, but above all, I’m inspired by my fleeting memories and nostalgic feelings for my childhood, and always trying to capture something of that. What does being “creative” mean to you? Being creative to me is never switching off - even though it’s probably a little unhealthy, I think about what my imagination can create next from the moment I wake up to the moment I go to sleep, and I try and shoot as often as possible, too, juggling editorial and client shoots alongside the final year of my degree. Do you have a favourite image you’ve taken? I can’t pin it down - but I am eternally grateful to my friend Vic who I shot a lot when I was getting started, because she was something of a muse for me, and allowed me to experiment with my style - I have the To see more of Claire’s work visit www.clairehuish.co.uk


PONY ANARCHY MAG - SPECIAL EDITION  

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