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MARCH MARCH 2015 2015

VIVA ITALIA: ITALIAN INFLUENCES IN AND AROUND PONSONBY 22 years on the Ponsonby strip - Chris Rupe talks about his iconic restaurant loved by so many locals


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P34; Viva Italia: Emma Denney, Nicola DiLernia and Courtney Rupe outside SPQR. P87; ‘Music On the Field’ is Bayfield School’s biennial fundraising concert and a special day out for the whole family.

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR FROM THE EDITOR DAVID HARTNELL: ONE MINUTE INTERVIEW SHALE CHAMBERS: WAITEMATA LOCAL BOARD LANDMARK BUILDINGS JOHN ELLIOTT: LOCAL NEWS U3A PONSONBY MIKE LEE, COUNCILLOR FOR WAITEMATA & GULF JACINDA ARDERN: LABOUR LIST MP AUCKLAND VIVA ITALIA

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JAY PLATT: WE CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT EAT, DRINK AND BE MERRY THE VEG FRIENDLY CHALLENGE LAURAINE JACOBS: THE SEASONED PALATE PONSONBY NEWS READERS ARE EVERYWHERE FASHION + STYLE ANGELA LASSIG: LETTERS FROM MAUDIE HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY LIVING, THINKING + BEING JOHN APPLETON ON HEALTH

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SHEENA SHUVANI: STARDUST ASTROLOGY FUTURE GENERATION EMPLOYMENT & EDUCATION SIDELINE WITH GEORGE BERRY PONSONBY PEOPLE & THEIR PETS LOOK WHO IS IN THE ZOO HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS HEIDI PADAIN: ENTERTAINMENT IN YOUR GARDEN STREET NAMES ARTS + CULTURE COVER PHOTOGRAPHY: Michael McClintock

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LETTERS + EMAILS Botulism at Western Springs Due to the amalgamation of the council an icon of Auckland, Western Springs, is being much neglected. Currently there is an outbreak of botulism there. The new council has virtually tossed Western Springs lakeside to the edge of nothing. There is no full-time care of this area anymore and it is a way too important feature of Auckland to be treated in such a manner. There has been no barley straw put in the lake for a few years. Currently the dumping of domestic birds is rife there and if they are not illegally caught for someone’s dinner table then they are falling victim to the botulism at Western Springs (botulism is a type of food poisoning and it is extremely painful for the birds). The public would do well, to ensure they don’t throw bread into the water and it would be of great benefit if the public could voice the importance of looking after our iconic Western Springs, lakeside. EVELYN MACDONALD, QSM, New Zealand Bird Rescue Charitable Trust Searching for living relatives of William and Nora Brearley I am the great nephew of one William Brearley. My late grandfather, James Brearley was Williams’s brother. William Brearley was born in Nelson, Lancashire, England, in 1890, and worked as a weaver in the local textile mills. William married Nora Tempest in Nelson on 28 January 1911, and they had a child, Florrie Brearley, later on in 1911. Shortly after the outbreak of the 1914-1918 war, William joined up with the East Lancashire Regiment. However, in December 1914, William was transferred to the Army Cycling Corp. There is evidence that William participated in the Dardenelles Campaign. In any event, it would seem that in 1916, William was invalided out of the army on account of acute asthma contracted whilst on active service. He was eventually awarded a small pension. After the war the Ministry of Defence was trying to contact William to pass certain war medals onto him and at that stage William’s father-in-law, one John Tempest, informed the ministry that William had emigrated to New Zealand and his current address there was 13 Hargreaves Street, Ponsonby, Auckland. I, myself, live just outside Nelson - in a village called Barrowford. I believe that Nelson has a fairly strong connection with New Zealand by reason of the textile industry. Indeed, it may be true that your larger New Zealand Nelson may have acquired its name from our Lancashire Nelson, which now has a population of some 25,000 people. There are still a couple of textile mills operating in Nelson. I would be interested to hear from anyone who might have any information. I wonder if there are any living relatives of William and Nora Brearley or, indeed, their daughter, Florrie Brearley, and if so, I wonder if they might contact me. GEOFFREY RODWELL, E: gandjrodwell37@outlook.com New Western Park toilets We are grandparents who along with our two grandchildren aged five and three, love to visit the playground and explore the wonderful open spaces in Western Park when they come to stay. We always take morning tea and sit at one of the tables under the trees by the play area to enjoy this. We used to have the most wonderful view up the valley of Western Park. Now we look straight into the toilet block. We too wonder who made the decision to build the new toilet block in its current position. The old block just needed an upgrade and regular cleaning. It was easily accessible by us and our grandchildren. Perhaps the council can enlighten us. JUDY WEBB, Ponsonby Rabbit Hole Cafe closure I thought you may be in the know about what has happened to our local café the Rabbit Hole on the corner of Jervois and Clifton Roads in Herne Bay? It has been closed for months now so just wondering if anyone knows what the story is? MARGARET BEUTH, Herne Bay FROM THE EDITOR: We were wondering ourselves. Their answerphone simply says sorry for the inconvenience we are closed until further notice.

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Views in Ponsonby News reflect the author’s, and not those of Alchemy Media. www.twitter.com/Ponsonby_News A public letter to Melissa Lee regarding the Auckland Pride Parade Dear Melissa, I saw you marching in this year’s Auckland Pride Parade and I have to say it made me angry. I’m not sure why you were there, given you voted against the Marriage Equality Bill in 2013. Perhaps you think we’ve forgotten or forgiven. Well I for one haven’t. I recall after voting against the legislation in 2013 you told me this: “I represent the Korean community and they are 100% against this. What am I supposed to do?” My response to that is mixed. I am sure politically it could have been very difficult for you when you identify yourself as being Korean and representing the Korean community is your priority. But the Marriage Equality Bill was a conscience vote, and I think you could have shown some real leadership on that issue. For instance, you have always insisted that you have lots of gay and lesbian friends and that you have always been supportive of us. So I’d like to know what you said to the 100% of Korean people you spoke to who said “don’t do this.” Did you passionately debate the issue with them? Did you explain how important law reform, diversity, acceptance and tolerance are in this country? Did you outline the proud history of Aotearoa New Zealand that has introduced countless laws outlawing discrimination? Because that’s the thing Melissa - you, yourself have benefitted from those laws and so have the Korean immigrants you say you represent. You are a Member of Parliament in this country because courageous people stood up to orthodoxy and changed the law so women could vote. The Race Relations Act and the Human Rights Act mean it is illegal to discriminate on the grounds of race, gender, sexual orientation and many other grounds. So did you explain all that to your constituency? Did you tell them that it is only fair to extend protections to all members of society even if we personally don’t like them? I hope you did, but that takes courage, just like it took courage for me to march in the streets in 1985 for homosexual law reform. I was young, gay and just out, and I could have been imprisoned for having sex with another man, but I outed myself for the fight. That was a fight in which thousands of LGBT people joined in and were supported by an even bigger number of straight people. All of them having the courage to stand up to what seemed like a huge anti-gay orthodoxy and demand our rights. There has been a magnificent progression of human rights in this country since then. Something to be proud of, but I think that has been lost on you. Not long after you voted against marriage equality you stated on Facebook how proud you were that South Korea had progressed so far as to vote a woman as President - the irony was not lost on me. I have another question for you: Do you know why we have the Pride Festival and Parade? It’s not just about having a good time, it’s about visibility, and solidarity and it began as a means of showing the world (and our vulnerable youth) that we exist and we belong. You marched in this year’s parade but you have never given a public explanation to us as to why you voted against marriage equality. You have never apologised, and never given us a chance to tell you how we feel about that. Well, I’ll tell you how I feel - betrayed! I want you to know that by voting against equality you sent a message to countless vulnerable queer kids that their futures don’t count. What counts to you is the opinion of a very small number of people. You’ve invalidated those kids and you’ve invalidated the relationships of my husband and me, and all the other loving couples in the Rainbow Communities. So, if you want to march in next year’s parade, how about an explanation Melissa - or (if you have the courage) a public apology. Maybe then, you’ll be forgiven. ANDREW WHITESIDE, www.gaytalktonight.com

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FROM THE EDITOR

LIKE US! www.facebook.com/ponsonbynews AS WE WENT TO PRESS WE HEARD THAT MORE Queensland fruit flies have been found, probably from the same source, in Grey Lynn. Two male fruit flies have been found, taking the total to seven, including a single female.

photography: Michael McClintock

The latest flies were found in separate traps. The Ministry for Primary Industries said DNA testing of the first five flies showed they were genetically similar to the larvae found in fruit at the affected property at the centre of the control zone. That meant it was likely that all the flies were from a single incursion. “Field work continues to focus on the surveillance trapping system, which aims to capture any male fruit flies present in the area, and ultimately inform us that the eradication is successful,” MPI said. Insecticide bait was being applied throughout the control zones. We pray this outbreak will be resolved. We can’t think of many countries which have influenced our daily lives more than Italy - especially in food and design. This month we say “Viva Italia” and celebrate all things Italian and Italian influenced. SPQR is an iconic Ponsonby restaurant with a wonderful Italian inspired menu. We are delighted to have Chris Rupe as our cover star.

With summer still with us we were delighted to have nice weather for last month’s Auckland Pride Parade.

directors for siding with the 2271 people who signed our petition to save the trees.” Nothing like people power.

There were fewer gaps this year and it was great to see so many locals out enjoying the sights on Ponsonby Road.

Back in London I published several human resources magazines, this month we look at Employment and Education because we know how crucial people are to any business.

At a board meeting last month, Auckland Transport directors announced they would save the six giant 80-year-old pohutukawa trees that were destined to make way for more traffic lanes. John Reynolds said, “We congratulate AT’s

One of the productions from the Auckland Fringe Theatre was ‘I wanna be na nah na nah nah - memories of 1980s Ponsonby’. We jumped on the Ponsonby bus (thanks to the Ponsonby Business Association) at The Basement Theatre and were dropped off on Ponsonby Road in a guided group and given headsets. The four actors kept us entertained for almost two hours. (MARTIN LEACH) F PN

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Gwynne Davenport, Jo Barrett, Jay Platt, Martin Leach and Jessie Kollen

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DAVID HARTNELL’S: ONE MINUTE INTERVIEW Candy Lane QSM has her own dance studio in Mt Eden. I first met her in her early teens when I was a judge for the Miss Ballroom Queen, far too long ago for either of us to put a year to it. This month she opens up on her inner thoughts on life. What where you thoughts when you were awarded the QSM? Overwhelmed and grateful. I think such recognition for our achievements and work is something we would all love but don’t expect to get, so it was a wonderful surprise and I felt it was a gift for my mother as much as myself. Did you have a happy childhood? It was very happy and very Kiwi, with summer holidays at our bach at Clarks Beach, my brother Brett and I racing around the Mt Eden neighbourhood on our bikes. I danced every day after school. Did you come from a dancing background? Not really, but I grew up with entertainers, my god parents Jeanne and Bob Sell owned restaurants and nightclubs here in Auckland and my parents would often have parties at our house which included many singers, magicians, entertainers of the time. So I had some pretty awesome entertainers at my birthdays as a kid. Also my dad played saxophone and clarinet and mum was a natural dancer, there was always music playing at home, it’s rubbed off as I have to have music on as soon as I wake up. What were your thoughts when they dumped Dancing with the Stars? Disappointing and a surprise as it was such a high-rating popular show. I had already had the go ahead to start looking at talent and music, (etc), for the next series then I got the phone call! But it was a dream job and I am grateful to have had those five years, I met some wonderful people and made some lifelong friends. Your dream holiday? For me it would be a holiday somewhere warm that didn’t have a return date on the airplane ticket. The thought of not having to get up in the morning with an endless list of things to be done sounds like heaven. What do you love about the age you are now? Not much actually but aging beats the alternative! What’s your biggest disappointment? Not being able to do centre splits! And losing my dad too soon!

What can’t you live without? Black Trousers. What do you love about your life right now? That I spend every day sharing my passion for dance with young and old. I feel good that I can look back and know I have fitted as much as I can into it so far and have dear friends that are still sharing it with me. Dream home? It would overlook water; have lots of rooms for my family and friends to stay, and a fab entertaining area! What are you insecure about? I’m a woman so to be honest that would be my appearance. Something people don’t know about you? I have double jointed arms! Your Favourite Hero? Wonder Woman, she is brave and strong and I could so rock her costume! Change one thing about yourself? To not be so driven, and to not measure my worth through work. Which talent would you most like to have? To sing like Christina Aguilera. A person you most admire? My mother, she is 94 this year and even though she can drive me nuts, she has an inner strength and resilience that is enviable! Any straight acting aspirations? Not so much straight acting, but I have played the lead roles in Westend musicals in London and I loved the acting within the shows. Recurring dreams? I dream a lot about dancing and wake up counting five, six, seven, eight! Pretty boring. But I had one once where I was Mel Gibson’s girlfriend! This was a while ago before he went crazy, but it was so real.

Your favourite movie? Beaches. It had it all, friendship, jealousy, love, death and Bette Midler.

Do you have any party tricks? I used to lift my arms up and pop my boobs out the top of my evening dress, I’d do it at posh parties so quickly that people didn’t know if I’d done it or not!

How do you chill out? On the deck at Waiheke, munching on cheese, crackers with Jenny’s Waiheke chutney, a jug of my green cocktails (Japanese Sippers) and good friends.

Best holiday? A family holiday in Fiji when my kids were small, they grow too quickly and these days they would rather holiday with friends I think! (DAVID HARTNELL) F PN

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SHALE CHAMBERS: WAITEMATA LOCAL BOARD REPORT

A story of how people power took on Auckland Transport and won If you have travelled down Great North Road recently you will have noticed the St Lukes interchange works as the Waterview Motorway improvements reach a critical stage. You may also have noted the stand of six pohutukawa trees opposite Motat, adorned with signs pleading for the trees to be saved, and installed by the community group: Save the Western Springs Pohutukawa; a genuine coalition of community groups who had been leading a determined campaign to save the trees. These notable, majestic, heritage trees provide a range of environmental services and amenity values. They soften the impacts of the roading infrastructure; provide shade and protection; as well as being an iconic inner-city landscape feature in their own right. It was hard to find anyone who wished to see them lost. The trees were under imminent threat to provide for an additional slip lane onto the St Lukes motorway onramp. An improvement our local board accepted as desirable and was generally in support of, subject to the amenity and environmental benefits of the site being maintained, and ensuring active modes of transport and public transport were properly supported.

Auckland Transport maintained that there was no alternative to the trees being lost, and late last year won approval from an independent hearing panel, in a deeply flawed process that saw all but 10 of 64 submissions disallowed on technical grounds. The local board, backed up with expert evidence maintained that an equivalent providing for a second slip lane, and which saved the trees, was available. The basis for this option being rejected seemed centred solely on the flexibility to manage the network in relation to non-typical incidents. Auckland is not planned this way elsewhere. We believed history would be on our side, and that Auckland Transport’s solution was outdated thinking. Auckland Transport, the ultimate decision-maker, had until 20 February to decide whether to accept the panel’s recommendations. To Auckland Transport management, it was a no brainer. In a meeting packed with people there to send a message to Auckland Transport, the Auckland Transport board met on the eve of the decision being required. Management maintained its position. The board were discussing the matter for the first time. The board chair, Dr Lester Levy, had received over 1400 emails pleading for the trees to be saved. Jolisa Gracewood for Save the Western Springs Pohutukawa coalition, and myself for the Waitemata Local Board were invited to speak. We argued for the recommendation to be rejected, the second slip lane project paused and the plan reconsidered. Another way should be found. Auckland Transport’s reputation was at risk. New traffic modelling following the opening of Waterview could then be taken into account as well as finding a solution that is more appropriate for Auckland’s goal of being the world’s most liveable city.

photography: Patrick Reynolds

At earlier stages of the project, Waitemata Local Board with full support of its parks staff, refused consent for Auckland Transport to cut down the trees and challenged Auckland Transport to come up with a genuine multi-modal solution that both kept the trees but also provided better outcomes for public transport, pedestrians and cyclists, and not just cars, and took into account the location of the intersection within the wider Western Springs precinct. When Auckland Transport came back a second time with their earlier proposal the local board took the unprecedented step of hiring a lawyer and opposed the proposal at the Notice of Requirement hearing.

have given new faith to many by showing people can make a difference. Not just with commitment and effort, but through rational debate and application, outcomes can be changed. Lastly, it was a proud day for the Waitemata Local Board. We worked hard as a real team to help achieve this outcome. There is still work to be done. Four of the trees are to face up to 30% pruning of their canopy on the roadward side over Easter to provide a 5m vehicle clearance to allow for the roadway to be raised to meet the higher level of the St Lukes overbridge. This was part of the original consent, intended to save the trees, before Auckland Transport came back for a second crack. But this will now be in the knowledge that this is not the first stage of the trees being removed. Enjoy the rest of Auckland’s summer and all Auckland has to offer. (SHALE CHAMBERS) Contact me: shale.chambers@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

The Auckland Transport board deliberated in private, and agreed! Dr Lester Levy, Mike Lee and the rest of the board voted unanimously to reject the hearing panel’s recommendation. No doubt tough questions of management were asked behind closed doors. Another way would be found. The board had stepped up. People power, the board’s advocacy and common sense had prevailed. Auckland Transport are doing some great work. They are showing real leadership and courage to make rational but bold decisions, like investigating ways to bring modern light rail to over-crowded bus routes, and quickly rolling out long overdue bus lanes on arterials. Perhaps Great North Road will prove a last hurrah on outdated thinking and a turning point. The Auckland Transport board has certainly indicated their expectation. Well done. Well done also Jolisa Gracewood, Patrick Reynolds, Christine Rose and Tricia Reade, and the many participants in the Save the Western Springs Pohutukawa Trees campaign. You

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Photography: Geoff Beynon www.digipro.co.nz

DEIRDRE TOHILL: LANDMARK BUILDINGS

Hopetoun Alpha in 2008, the building was the setting for Ponsonby’s Top 10 Entrepreneurs Awards Dinner

Hopetoun Alpha Built in1875 this Greek Doric building was designed for the Beresford Street Congregational Independents by Philip Herapath. Many examples of his buildings are still standing such as the Pitt Street Methodist Church. He had emigrated from England, arriving in Auckland, May 1857 and worked as an architect, a civil engineer, a surveyor and painter, (as in artist). It’s been said he was on occasion, a painting companion of JC Richmond and John Gully.

decline in attendance and became financially compromised. The nearby Presbyterian church in Union Street burnt down in 1965 and the two congregations, finding their differences were no longer irreconcilable, combined and the Beresford Street Church was renamed St James.

The congregational churches are Protestant Christian churches where each congregation independently runs its own affairs. The first one in New Zealand was established in Auckland in 1851 and the movement here grew so rapidly that by 1870 the Independents required a building in the upper part of the city. They initially wanted a masonry building but cost constraints led them to choose a radical new material, namely poured concrete.

With the motorway construction in the 60s, the inner city population dropped dramatically and St James, along with several other churches, had to cope with an ageing building and a much reduced membership. It was over a hundred years old and in urgent need of repair. Earthquake strengthening expense was beyond the limited congregation’s resources and eventually it was decided to relocate and put the building up for sale.

Josiah Clifton Firth was a prominent member of the congregation and noted for constructing two concrete castles - one in Mount Eden called Clifton House and another in Matamata where he had considerable land holdings and was nicknamed ‘the Duke of Matamata’. He recommended the use of concrete and Hopetoun Alpha was probably the first poured-concrete church in New Zealand.

The building had no heritage protection at the time so it was lucky an Auckland businessman and philanthropist, Ashton Wylie purchased it with preservation in mind. Otherwise it was bound to have fallen to the developers’ hammer. He proceeded to renovate the unique and stunning architectural gem to an exceptionally high standard and named it Hopetoun Alpha.

Captain William Daldy became involved in the project and made major financial contributions towards its construction. Being an austere Protestant denomination, the building, unlike many churches, had no additional decorative details. The windows were of plain frosted glass and the interior had very little ornamentation. There was no fixed altar, the pulpit and lectern taking precedence, a manifestation that God’s word was more important than ritual.

Ashton Wylie had a wide range of other interests, some of which unfortunately were unable to be fully developed before his untimely death in late 1999.

The church opening was described in the Southern Cross 19 March 1876. Three hundred people attended the ceremony led by Sir George Grey and the pastor, Rev J W Davies. Noted for its excellent acoustics, it seated 850 people. A church hall was also constructed next door and a residence in further off Hopetoun Street provided accommodation for the minister.

At his death Hopetoun Alpha was bestowed to the trust. The name Hopetoun comes from adjacent Hopetoun Street that was named after the Earl of Hopetoun who was the first Governor General of Australia in 1902.

The 1902 second volume of the New Zealand Cyclopedia describes the church as “one of the prettiest places of worship in the colony”. By the 1950s it experienced a slow

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In his will, he directed that a Charitable Trust be formed “for the principal purpose of assisting people to become more perfectly loving by bringing the creative quality of love and relating positive activities and qualities into their relationships and their experience”.

Literally translated it means ‘Town of Hope’. Alpha is the Greek word for beginning and combines well Hopetoun and the trust’s objectives which are new beginnings with hope and positivity. (DEIRDRE TOHILL) F PN

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JOHN ELLIOTT: LOCAL NEWS

HOBANZ - the voice of the consumer in housing Local organisation Home Owners and Buyers Association of New Zealand Inc based in College Hill, has, in just a few years, become the first group in New Zealand to provide services around a whole range of consumer interests in housing and construction. The highest profile one of these interests, and the original focus for HOBANZ has been the leaky homes debacle This has entailed shepherding owners through the maze of legislation and regulation, advising them how to deal with lawyers and the council, and which experts to trust. HOBANZ advice has been invaluable to the owners of Summerfield Villa’s apartments in Grey Lynn, who are about to embark on a reclad at a cost of more than $10 million. Both HOBANZ principals, Roger Levie and John Gray, had personally had leaky homes of their own. John Gray had built up a public profile through his involvement with the Leaky Homes Action Group, and had been in lots of discussions with government about amending various acts of parliament, particularly the Unit Titles Act. John and Roger decided to set up a not-for-profit organisation because there was very little sound, independent advice or guidance available. They are now the voice of the consumer. Other organisations are industry based, with the inevitable prejudices. HOBANZ has broadened its focus beyond leaky and defective homes, and they are now able to point people to lawyer Lisa Gerrard, who has set up a new company, HOBANZ Law, to give legal advice to individual owners and bodies corporate. HOBANZ continues to lobby for changes to legislation. They consult on the Building Act, The Unit Titles Act, The Real Estate Agent Act. In partnership with the Real Estate Institute of NZ, Levie and Gray have been involved in educating real estate agents keen to serve their customers better. But as Levie and Gray told Ponsonby News, they have little faith that legislative change necessary will protect consumers. Change must now be consumer led. As Auckland moves more and more towards apartment living, prospective purchasers need to beware of various potential pitfalls. The whole premise and promise of apartment buying is that people will get affordable living. Often the entry price may be affordable, but buyers need to be aware of long-term ownership costs. Pain around poor governance will destroy some people, HOBANZ believes. They need to know about their unit title, the long-term maintenance plan (if any), and have a clear idea how body corporate fees work and are assessed.

a pre-purchase inspection report, but that report had not been prepared by a qualified or reputable person. There were problems with decks and balconies, and this couple needed the best advice they could get or they were in danger of making a dreadful mistake. This is the sort of situation HOBANZ can assist with. One of the controversial rules in the Building Act is the 10-year limitation clause. After 10 years a builder can not be held responsible for their work. HOBANZ says cynical developers only have to make their buildings perform for 10 years and one day, and they can wipe their hands of any responsibility. It makes a joke of the code compliance certificates issued by council which require a home to last for at least 50 years. HOBANZ is a true social purpose organisation. They are building a base of membership, so they have the strength to drive positive change and can offer discounts to members, and advise on who they should go to with their building problems. Their focus is widening to include the land and the environment. They are helping people with matters related to geo-tech issues, height to boundary questions, and are working to promote sustainable communities. As Roger Levie says, “As we develop and grow we will be able to support owners in a wider variety of ways - where they need legal advice, how to deal with council, how to handle developers. Whatever the issue we will either be able to help them ourselves or introduce them to one of our trusted providers.” HOBANZ already has a reputation for independence and integrity. John Gray and Roger Levie are fearless in their support of the small consumer, especially when they are getting a rough deal from a large company, the council, or an unscrupulous lawyer. This local enterprise with a strong social conscience is a decided asset to home owners PN and buyers throughout Auckland and indeed New Zealand. (JOHN ELLIOTT) F

There are examples where owners have been bankrupted while trying to pay body corporate fees, maintenance charges and exorbitant repair costs. Sometimes a small water leak can require inexpensive repair, but it could also be the tip of the iceberg with deep-seated rot not visible to the naked eye. HOBANZ is able to give valuable advice to owners and potential purchasers, and to introduce them to a variety of trusted providers. Another wing of HOBANZ armoury of consumer support is HOBANZ Home Assessment Services. John Gray told us of a young couple who were very keen to buy a house which they knew was a leaker. They had

GREY LYNN ASB IS CLOSING! ASB have today announced that their branch in Great North Road will be closing on 27 March 2015. Their spokesman, Logan Munro says, "This is a decision that has been influenced by the increasing number of our customers who choose to conduct their banking through our digital channels, reducing transactions in our branches. You don't need to do anything, as this won't affect your bank account in any way. "Other local banking options are available. You're always welcome to visit any ASB branch to do your banking, and the existing ATM that you currently use at Grey Lynn will stay at this location. A nearby option for full branch services is our Ponsonby branch, located at 309 Ponsonby Road, Ponsonby and open Monday - Friday 9.00am - 4.30pm." F PN

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LOCAL NEWS GREY LYNN COMMUNITY CENTRE’S ANNUAL JAM ON TOAST There’s fun for all the family at the Grey Lynn Community Centre’s annual Jam on Toast open day. The event kicks off at 10am on Sunday 29 March with continuous action until 2pm. There will be music, family friendly activities and more. It’s the popular event on the community centre’s calendar. “It’s all about community - a day of celebration and festivities for families and Grey Lynn locals to enjoy and be part of their community centre,” says manager Cath Bathe Taylor. “Every month over 7000 people visit the community centre and the events of our Jam on Toast day demonstrate the activities that take place here. Many of our regulars will be showcasing their classes and workshops and people will be amazed at the quality and variety on offer for both children and adults. The programme includes everything from Jumping Beans to burlesque.” There will also be prizes and giveaways on the day. Cath suggests tuning into BaseFM 107.3 for giveaways prior to the event. “Our fabulous local businesses have shown their support of Jam on Toast by giving us a range of exciting gifts from Presentz as well as cafe vouchers,” says Cath. “And Grey Lynn Farmers Market stallholders will be there, of course, serving their usual range of delicious food.” This year’s event coincides with the celebration of Neighbours Day Aotearoa 2015 on 28-29 March, when thousand of Kiwis all over New Zealand go one step further in getting to know their neighbours. Children are especially catered for at the community centre with fitness, dance, art and music, educational and fun activities. All are popular, but none more so than the acclaimed Grey Lynn Kids Playgroup. Co-ordinator James Doyle runs a happy funfilled ship for the littlies. And the word has got out with children from well outside our area now attending. The playgroup for children under five years old is now on five days a week from 9.30am - 11.30am. Parents, grandparents or carers attend with the children, bringing fruit for a shared morning tea. The fee is $5 per session. James has had 35 years in early childhood education with children from infants to 14 years and when he moved to Auckland the Grey Lynn Community Centre snapped him up. He is also involved with the school holiday programme. Two other child-centred services are currently under consideration and Cath would like to hear from families to gauge their interest. There has long been a suggestion that an after school programme be run at the community centre. Qualified staff would run the group, as happens with the centre’s well-attended school holiday programme. A second suggestion is the establishment of a two-hour drop-off crèche in the afternoons. Because of regulations there is a fairly long lead-up time when starting new programmes. The first step though is to gauge the need and interest and Cath would very much like to hear from interested parents in this regard. She can be contacted at the community centre from Monday to Thursday. A short questionnaire regarding the after school programme is PN available from the office. (PHILIPPA TAIT) F

PONSONBY U3A: FEBRUARY 2015 EIGHT NEW MEMBERS AND GUESTS ATTENDED PONSONBY U3A’S FIRST MEETING for the year. U3A members always enjoy welcoming and getting to know new faces amongst us and telling them about our group and its activities. U3A provides educational stimulus, social interaction and leisure activities for those in the Third Age, that of retirement or semi-retirement. Anyone who is thinking of joining U3A is welcome to attend a U3A meeting to see what we are about. Meetings are held monthly, on the morning of the second Friday of the month at the Leys Institute in St Marys Road. There are two speakers at each monthly meeting - one from within the membership and an invited guest speaker. February’s guest speaker was Theresa Sjoquist, writer of the biography, Yvonne Rust: Maverick Spirit. “Yvonne Rust was an inspirational teacher who taught art and life to generations of New Zealanders,” said Theresa. “She taught people how to really live, to express themselves and to experience life to full potential.” She outlined Yvonne Rust’s life and achievements from her early childhood in the far north, where her father was a native school headmaster and she the only white child in the area. From her young Maori companions she absorbed a perception of the natural world imbued with spirit, which stayed with her for the rest of her days and came out in her work as a teacher, artist and potter.” Yvonne Rust set up the first National Pottery School in 1956. She moved to Greymouth in 1966 and introduced pottery as a new income stream to the West Coast. In 1971 she moved to Whangarei where she constructed an earth house resulting in her instigating the Earth-Building Code. In 1981 she set up the Quarry Arts Centre in Whangarei as an arts resource centre where experimentation was carried out of NZ’s raw materials and natural resources. She finally moved back to Greymouth in 1998 and set up the Yvonne Rust West Coast Arts Trust. She died in Greymouth in 2002. She was awarded a Queens Service Medal in 1983 and in 1989 Life Membership of the Crafts Council for her contribution to arts and crafts education. Theresa explained the ways she researched and wrote about Yvonne Rust’s life and work. Lois Denbury’s ten minute talk entitled ‘Who am I? What is my family history?’ stemmed from a school project she became involved in with her 13-year-old grandson. She described the fascinating and detailed process of investigating her family background through her mother’s maiden name of Stanton. Some of the family history was uncovered in a book written by the Kaitaia Museum. The search for family information showed both her and her grandson the importance of museums, books and historians when doing family research. Ponsonby U3A has 13 special interest groups, which are the life blood of the organisation. A wide range of interests is catered for providing mental stimulation and learning as well as social activity. The special interest groups are: Antiques and Collectables, Armchair Travellers, Art History, Classical Studies, Current Events, Dining Out, Gallery Visits, Green Fingers, Music Appreciation, New Zealand History, Petanque, Ramblers and Scrabble. Guest speaker for the March meeting will be Auckland Zoo volunteer Marie Vanderkolk. PN The 10-minute speaker will be U3A member Mary Goldson. (PHILIPPA TAIT) F NEXT MEETING: ENQUIRIES:

9.45am, Friday 13 March. First Floor, Leys Institute, St Marys Road. Annie Webster, President, Ponsonby U3A. T: 09 376 2902

GREY LYNN COMMUNITY CENTRE, 510 Richmond Road, T: 09 378 498; www.greylynn.org.nz

Playgroup co-ordinator James Doyle with Theo Massey (1) and his mother Lizzy Massey.

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U3A guest speaker Theresa Sjoquist with her biography of potter and artist Yvonne Rust. PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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LOCAL NEWS QUEENSLAND FRUIT FLIES FOUND IN GREY LYNN AREA As we went to press we heard that more Queensland fruit flies have been found, probably from the same source in Grey Lynn. Two male fruit flies have been found, taking the total to seven, including a single female. The latest flies were found in separate traps. The Ministry for Primary Industries said DNA testing of the first five flies showed they were genetically similar to the larvae found in fruit at the affected property at the centre of the control zone. That meant it was likely that all the flies were from a single incursion. “Field work continues to focus on the surveillance trapping system, which aims to capture any male fruit flies present in the area, and ultimately inform us that the eradication is successful,” MPI said. Insecticide bait was being applied throughout the control zones. Detailed maps of the controlled area and a full description of the boundaries are available at www.biosecurity.govt.nz/pests/queensland-fruit-fly MPI and its partners have deployed investigators in the affected area. They will be laying traps and checking fruit trees, vegetable gardens and rubbish bins for any signs of fruit flies. We hope this outbreak will soon be resolved. F PN

VANDALS SMASH UP THE GAYTM IN PONSONBY The ANZ bank in Ponsonby was the target of vandalism last month in what has been described as “pinkwashing”.

AUCKLAND DOMAIN HOSTS NEW ZEALAND’S FIRST THEMED PARTY RUN 10,000 party goers are expected to descend on Auckland Domain on Friday 27 March for New Zealand’s first ever themed night party run. RUN THE NIGHT is a 5km party on the move, the likes of which have not been seen before on our shores, but are fast gaining a cult following overseas. Event Director, Scott Rice, describes the new genre as a ‘party on the move’. Rice expects party goers to consist of 18 - 35 year olds but anyone over 16 is welcome to attend this alcohol-free event. “It’s all about grabbing some mates and dancing or running your way around a themed 5km course that will be loaded with electrifying music and incredible lighting. We’re talking over 100 concert-quality speakers and thousands of lights which will transform the Domain into an incredible party venue,” he says. Music is integral to the event with ticket holders given the opportunity to have input into the party playlist. The after-party will include a 90 min DJ set from NZ’s hottest indie R&B duo, Jupiter Project. Massey University, the principal sponsor for the new event, was quick to jump on-board; “We are thrilled to support a fun, new to New Zealand event like this which provides young people with a truly unique experience,” says Tracy Pleasants, Marketing Manager, Massey University. Marty, from Jupiter Project, says: “We’ve heard about these gigs overseas, so when ZM invited us to be part of the entertainment line up we didn’t hesitate. We’ve had a sneak peak at what’s planned for RUN THE NIGHT and let’s just say this is going to be one hell of a party!” PN Tickets are now on sale from www.runthenight.co.nz and start at $59.90 F

The damage was initially billed as homophobic vandalism. However a group called ‘Queers Against Injustice’ has since taken responsibility for defacing the GAYTM. The group claimed the bank had “co-opted” gay symbolism for commercial purposes, using it to obscure their business practises and treatment of workers. F PN

WOMEN'S OUTDOOR PURSUITS Do you enjoy the bush and would like to improve or refresh your skills in the outdoors, then join our WOP's Introductory Course running on two Saturdays 16 and 23 May. Wop's is open to women of all ages throughout the Auckland area. Experienced trampers or beginners are welcome. Upon completion of the course, tramping trips are available to members on Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday. To enrol or for more information visit www.wops.co.nz F PN

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MIKE LEE: COUNCILLOR FOR WAITEMATA & GULF

Ports of Auckland and Auckland Council – ‘Roger politics’ alive and well The last month has seen a series of unhappy incidents that remind us that the neo-liberal reforms of the 80s and 90s still have a baleful influence on our public life - even in our ‘most liveable’ super city. We rightly associate ‘Rogernomics’, with the privatisation of publicly owned assets. But there is much more to it than that. Neo-liberalism isn’t just about privatisation, it is about the wholesale colonisation of the public sector by the private. At a basic level in the council this means work that was originally carried out by council works and parks staff is now invariably contracted out to private businesses. When the bright sparks in Wellington first brought in this policy they argued it would mean council costs would come down. That didn’t happen - after the laying-off of the council works staff, trucks and bulldozers and years of local knowledge and know-how, costs to ratepayers sky-rocketed and continue to do so. But there is also a mental colonisation where all too often ‘busy-friendly’ councils place the interests of big business and developers ahead of the public interest. There is yet another aspect to Rogernomics - what Professor Richard Mulgan famously called ‘Roger politics’. By this Mulgan meant public bodies that were once governed by democratically elected people, harbour boards, power boards, water and wastewater utilities and the like being replaced by corporatised entities. The argument from the reformers in Wellington of the time was that as these entities were revenue earning they would be better off run by private business people (and suites of high-powered managers - and eventually privatised). Auckland Transport was the brainchild of the architects of the super city, Steven Joyce and Rodney Hide. They argued in 2009 that even though public transport is not revenue earning (in fact it costs ratepayers and taxpayers a lot of money), it needed to be corporatized - become a ‘council controlled organisation’, or CCO. However, in response to widespread criticisms voiced in the select committee process, pointing out that over 50% of council rates go into public transport, the government gave ground. As a concession it made provision in the legislation for two elected councillors to be appointed to the board of Auckland Transport. Councillor Chris Fletcher and myself were nominated by the mayor on the basis of our experience in public transport. This arrangement, a board comprising a mixture of commercial people and councillors has been in place since 2010. However, early in February I learned via the media that the deputy mayor, Penny Hulse, was recommending that councillors should be removed

from the board of Auckland Transport. This on the alleged grounds that councillors (representing the ratepayers), have an innate ‘conflict of interest’. This is complete nonsense of course and the idea raised a media storm - it was postponed and remains to be resolved politically. Following hard on that ideological flatulence, came the shock disclosure that the council-owned CCO, Ports of Auckland acting like a rogue private company, had wangled non-notified consents from council bureaucrats to build two massive wharves extending 100m into the harbour from the present Bledisloe reclamation. Then, as revealed in the Herald, (though it was meant to be a secret meeting) councillors were persuaded to back down on provisions in the Unitary Plan that would have made it tougher for Ports of Auckland to extend reclamations into the harbour. This, the Herald reported was on the advice of a senior council planning officer that the policy was legally undefendable. However, I was shocked to learn from the same Herald article that legal advice commissioned by the council but never shown to the councillors states the opposite. That in fact the original policy, strongly supported by the public, was indeed legally sound. It appears that critical information was knowingly withheld from the councillors by council officers who appear to be putting the demands of the port company and its lawyers ahead of those of the wishes of the public. If this wasn’t bad enough, a few days later, the port company revealed it had began to demolish the historic Marsden Wharf, obviously to up the ante on its demands for more cargo (car parking) space. However, I can end my article on a happy note. I am proud to say the board of Auckland Transport rejected the advice of its management and the recommendation of the planning commissioner and voted to save the Great North Road pohutukawa trees. Congratulations to those concerned Aucklanders and the Waitemata Local Board who campaigned tirelessly to save these trees - and to my Auckland Transport director colleagues for their wise decision. Destroying six pohutukawa trees for another lane of roadway was an ill-conceived, foolish idea - but it pales compared to the plans now underway by Ports of Auckland to reclaim vast areas of the Waitemata Harbour to park PN more cars. (MIKE LEE) F Councillor for Waitemata and Gulf www.mikelee.co.nz

I WANNA BE NA NAH NA NAH NAH - MEMORIES OF 1980S PONSONBY PART OF THE AUCKLAND FRINGE Festival, ‘I wanna be na nah na nah nah’ took theatre patrons to another Ponsonby, before neighbourhood fences and fashionable bars, when the future of this working-class melting-pot was anything but certain.

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photography: Jo Barrett and Martin Leach

Theatre makers Stephen Bain and Tessa Mitchell wove drama, interviews and images, set to a darkly pulsing 80s soundtrack. The free bus, provided by Ponsonby Business Association, took us from The Basement to Ponsonby Road, guided by a headphone soundtrack and four performers. These true stories begin in 1983 and twist their way through backyards and alleyways PN in search of the present. F PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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RACHAEL TE AOTONGA: LEYS INSTITUTE LIBRARY NEWS Who still thinks of libraries as rooms of dusty shelves full of books? Well, you haven’t visited any of the 55 Auckland libraries recently then! Along with our delightful, extensive physical collections, Aucklanders have a vast virtual collection available to them in a few clicks through our digital library. Search article databases, online newspapers, reference books, encyclopedias, eBooks, eAudiobooks, online exhibitions, photographic collections, music and historic newspaper archives from anywhere, anytime. Let me share features of this collection. Ebooks and eAudiobooks Read or listen to thousands of eBooks and eAudiobooks on your phone, tablet, laptop, computer or eReader. These websites have got something for everyone - from popular fiction and international bestsellers to New Zealand fiction, kids’ books, travel guides, cook books, language titles and study guides. Zinio Discover hundreds of popular eMagazines online on your PC/Mac or download for offline viewing with handy mobile apps. If a magazine you love is missing, you can even suggest new titles to be added. With over 600 eMagazines available, no hold queues and no time limits, this collection is perfect for the magazine lover. To top it off, there is no limit to the number of eMagazines you can check out. Zinio contains many popular titles with a wide variety of topics including: travel, technology, politics, cooking, and more that will appeal to a range of audiences including children, teens, men, and women. I was so impressed with Zinio I rushed out and bought myself a tablet. Online exhibitions We even feature online exhibitions showcasing images, manuscripts, maps and other treasures from our special collections. You will be amazed by what this collection holds. As the largest library system in Australasia, we can be very proud of the taonga preserved expertly for our communities’ enjoyment. Check out the magnificent ‘Coming Home’ exhibition’ which commemorates the 90th anniversary of the First World War armistice. The ‘Old favourites’: famous Children’s Books exhibition is full of delightful illustrations for classic favourites - some of these books may have originated from this library! Sir George Grey Website In 1887, Sir George Grey gave Auckland citizens a range of precious heritage material that is today known as the Grey Collection. This gift forms a significant part of the Sir George Grey Special Collections: Ta Hori Kerei - Nga kohinga taonga whakahirahira at Auckland libraries. View a selection of items from the collection including: rare books, medieval manuscripts, Shakespeare’s First Folio and other highlights. Family history eResources For the budding genealogist, we have some world-class eResources and databases for researching family history available in the digital library. This collection contains around 50 websites, some that can be accessed from home. The Ancestry ‘Library Edition’ and Find my Past can be used here in the library. These are very popular sites; The Ancestry Library attracted 8887 hits last month. Combined search databases For the students and researchers out there, you will benefit greatly from referring to the citations, abstracts and full-text articles found in our online databases. Topics include: arts, music and literature, business, general topics, health, history and biography, New Zealand, science and technology and social sciences. These databases hold excellent, reliable information that you won’t find on Google!

GREY LYNN NEIGHBOURS DAY CELEBRATION - 28/29 MARCH 2015 Everybody from our neighbourhood is cordially invited to participate in the nationally celebrated ‘Neighbours Day’ event which promotes good relationships between neighbours. A range of fun activities such as music, dance, art and culture workshops, markets and food are being planned. Also a picnic with your neighbours in Francis Street Reserve. Javier Egusquiza from the Neighbours Day Grey Lynn Community group and ambassador for Grey Lynn is helping organise this event with the support of Neighbours Day Aotearoa. The theme of this year’s Neighbours Day is to link and encourage neighbours to meet each other and enjoy socialising together in a friendly and spontaneous way. Thank you to Ponsonby News for helping to promote this event and make it successful. We hope to have another even better Neighbours Day event next year.

Javier Egusquiza

Events in Grey Lynn/West Lynn 28 March 2015 • ‘To the Castle’ Art Exhibition (open all day) at 3 Castle Street, Grey Lynn. • Picnic in Francis Reserve with an ‘Umbrella Parade’ if it rains. • Why not have a BBQ in your street to meet neighbours and enjoy the atmosphere? 29 March 2015 • ‘To the Castle’ continues - see facebook Javier Egusquiza for details. • ‘Jam on Toast’ hosted by Grey Lynn Community Centre, 510 Richmond Road. www.greylynn.org.nz • Grey Lynn Farmers Market - organic produce. www.greylynnfarmersmarket.co.nz For contact details for what’s on in West Lynn, contact Javier Egusquiza, M: 021 100 4309, E: neighbourdaysgreylynn@gmail.com or facebook ‘To the Castle’. Contact local organisations that may have plans for their own events such as CAB, Grey Lynn Business Association, Grey Lynn Residents Association, Grey Lynn Law Centre, Community Police, and Grey Lynn Library, Neighbours Day Aotearoa www.neighboursday.org.nz F PN

If you are curious about this fabulous collection and need help exploring it, we are always happy to help. Just drop by and visit, or contact us to take advantage of our Book a Librarian service. Happy discovering! (RACHAEL TE AOTONGA) F PN LEYS INSTITUTE, 20 St Marys Road, T: 09 374 1315, www.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz

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LOCAL NEWS NEW PUBLIC ARTWORK BY MISERY UNVEILED IN BERESFORD SQUARE AND K’ROAD This is Misery’s first permanent work, two bronze commissions in public space in Auckland rendering her quirky characters in 3D for the kids to enjoy and interact with. The stories behind the works are also gorgeous and very locally relevant: Inspired by Karangahape Road during the 50s and 60s when considered Auckland's high-fashion district and number one shopping destination. Filled with glamorous boutiques, tea rooms and theatre. The artist wanted to create artworks that children especially would find enchanting and also reflect the characters and magic of K’Road during this period. Twist (girl and baby elephant in Beresford Square) is based on a wonderful story Misery learnt via Denis O'Connor who, during the mid-1960s, took his first job at the former George Court Department Store. During the summer holiday’s the famous George Court roof top playground was transformed into the Rigeway Circus. This particular summer a baby elephant was to be the star attraction. Kept in the George Court basement store room for the duration of the circus. Twice daily O'Connor guided the elephant into the goods elevator and lifted him to the roof top where he'd make his grand appearance for a swam of excitable screaming children. Chubby Checker's 'Do The Twist' was played through loud speakers and the elephant would lift his feet swaying from side to side, dancing with the children. Thief (boy and the pig outside the old Rendalls store) is inspired by early K’Road, when the district consisted mostly of farmlands. The very first shops to open along K’Road were greengrocers selling local produce. Store owners had great problems with livestock escaping the neighbouring farms and helping themselves to a smorgasbord of delicious fruit and vegetables on display at PN the front of the stores. F

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JACINDA ARDERN: LABOUR LIST MP AUCKLAND So, we’re in quarantine then. A circle marks out on a map a whole chunk of Grey Lynn, Ponsonby and Westmere that is in said quarantine. It might be the case that the circle only tells us that we cannot move whole fresh food and vegetables out of the area, but it’s an indication of something small but potentially really damaging and could affect us all. The Queensland fruit fly is an example of the kind of threat to our biosecurity we just can’t afford, and it’s not the first time we’ve had this problem. We faced two similar incursions last year, one of which lead to a surveillance programme and a controlled area that cost the tax payer $1.6 million. But the cost to industry of these pests establishing themselves here is even greater. Horticulture is a $6 billion industry, and as our spokesperson has said, fruit fly is to them what foot and mouth is to the farming sector. It’s extremely serious and extremely worrying. We’re not completely helpless. Good border control and response mechanisms can help. Unfortunately though, when the first two incursions came into the country, the Ministry for Primary Industry was unable to establish its origin. That means we simply can’t assume that this more recent find is a one-off. I certainly don’t think that the ministry and all of the people working hard within it have neglected their duty - I have no doubt they are devastated by this find and are working around the clock to do all they can to get to the bottom of it. But all public servants have constraints, and the Ministry for Primary Industry is no different. Biodiversity systems have been under extreme pressure of late through constant restructuring of the former Ministry of Agriculture and now the Ministry for Primary Industries. That hasn’t just meant people moving desks, it has meant losing good and experienced staff, exactly the kind of people we need when we hit situations like this. If that had been better managed, perhaps we would have seen the identification of the gaps in our border control system and, hopefully, an end to these scares to such a critical industry. Let’s hope sincerely that by the time this goes to print, that big round quarantine spot will be a distant memory, and the incident an isolated one. But here’s hoping that we learn the lesson that the things that appear to be small and minor can have a devastating PN effect - if we’re not careful. (JACINDA ARDERN) F JACINDA ARDERN, Labour List MP based in Auckland Central. www.jacinda.co.nz

DEIRDRE THURSTON

Is this progress? A subjective little word, progress. What it is to one, screams regression to another. A moving back, going away from. glass half full versus glass half empty. At the forefront of my mind, in mulling over progress, is the sale for removal or demolition of the imposing white villa with scary-blue painted sills (circa 1905) standing proud yet defeated on the corner of Jervois Road and Lawrence Street, Herne Bay. The villa has been home to Erawan Thai Restaurant for the last 20 years. I have climbed the old wooden stairs and eaten in the cavernous dining area many times with family and friends. I have to admit that renovation would be daunting and cost a fortune but I feel sad another piece of main-street, Herne Bay history is disappearing. My hope is the house will be removed, not demolished, by some kind soul who will settle it in a daisy studded, green, grassy lea surrounded by fat cows, gambolling lambs and fruit trees galore. A glittering swimming pool and a tennis court wouldn’t hurt either. The building’s own Garden of Eden where it can happily see out its days. Herne Bay is a charming kind of old fashioned, kind of sophisticated spot. For me it is full of memories. I’ve had many lives there, beginning with the inordinate amount of times my mother and I drove through it from our home further west. My father was a mad, keen yachtsman and we practically lived at Westhaven when I was a child. Mum and I were forever dropping Dad off Friday night at whichever yacht he was crewing on and, if not joining him, picking him up Sunday evening. We used to meet him up in the Ponsonby Cruising Club while he downed “one for the road” as he would tell Mum. I have great memories of sitting at a pokie machine in the club feeding sixpences into the slot. And there was never a short supply of them from Dad’s sailing cronies eager to keep the party going. Mum would finally prise Dad out of there and we’d get home to a dried out dinner. Wonderful times. As an adult, I flatted in Kelmarna Avenue and, over the years, bought houses in Sentinel Road, Trinity Street, Argyle Street and finally I find myself in Hamilton Road. New apartments have been built on the site of the old bowling club in Jervois Road and corner of Hamilton Road. More progress. I loved that we had a local bowling club on the main road but the apartments are now in situ and life goes on. I would hate Herne Bay to lose its village feel. Ponsonby is the glamourous, sparkly sister full of retail and cafes and bars. People spilling out onto the pavements. I love it. The buzz, the vibe. We need the contrast of Herne Bay’s more subdued persona for balance. An oasis of calm. Otherwise everywhere everything is the same. Like Briscoe’s has ruined sales for me. Everything is always on proverbial sale. Dull. No quickened heartbeat at the lure of “toasters half price today!” Meh - they’ll be there tomorrow. As unhappy as I am to lose the villa from my hood, I’ve decided to embrace whatever the site morphs into (perhaps with a few exceptions!) and have no regrets because, in the end, it is what it is and regrets are pointless. They anchor us to the past, which, no matter how precious, is gone.

photography: John Elliott

In the not too distant future the big, old white villa with the scary-blue painted sills will be a mere memory to some, entirely forgotten by others. And by others still, never known. Progress. Can’t live with it, can’t live without it - depending on who you are. Enjoy your PN meadow, Erawan villa. (DEIRDRE THURSTON) F

Protesters gather outside the Erawan Thai villa in 2012

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LOCAL NEWS MEET YOUR SPIRITUAL PERSONAL ASSISTANT

NEW KELMARNA GARDEN TRUSTEES REQUIRED FOR EXCITING NEW PHASE

Emma Mildon is attracting global attention as a ‘PA for the Soul’ with global speaking engagements through the United States, New Zealand and Australia.

Kelmarna Garden Community Trust would like to thank everyone for the great turnout at the public meeting at the end of January. They had over a hundred people in attendance and it was wonderful to hear such positive feedback and recognition of Kelmarna as a highly valued sanctuary for people from many walks of life.

With the release of her international book ‘The Soul Searchers Handbook’- set for release in October with American publishing giant Simon & Schuster USA, Beyond Words Press - the stage is set for New Zealand’s next big new thought thinker, and she is not afraid to share her thoughts...

Her talks have been described as straight-up and her books are a fun, interactive introduction to spiritual and soulful living. Mildon calls herself a ‘Spiritual PA’ because she has done all the research, fact finding, trial and error testing in her road to spiritual enlightenment for the reader giving the reader easy access to everything from spiritual scriptures across all religions, to different types of yoga to explore, crystals, feng shui right down to how to work out your astrology and numerology. “I like to call it spirituality at your fingertips,” Mildon laughs.

Kelmarna Garden Community Trust urgently requires new trustees including a secretary and treasurer. The trust is keen to recruit members with a range of skills including those with legal and business knowledge. If you possess skills you believe would be useful to the trust and you are keen to make a commitment to help on this journey to preserve Kelmarna’s future please get in touch. photography: Kenrick Rhys Photorgraphy

“When someone talks to you, and you don’t reply it’s considered rude right? So the way I see it is if the universe speaks to you, and you don’t reply you are not just rude, you’re a rude idiot!” Mildon shares her humorous, no-nonsense approach to holistic thinking.

The trust are currently seeking expressions of interest and starting on a journey to find a long term, financially sustainable solution for the garden that best serves the community as well as being true to the garden’s values.

To discuss the role in confidence and express your interest in becoming a trust member please phone our chairperson, Mary Paul, as soon as possible on T: 09 378 4502 or M: 022 173 7280, E: M.Paul@massey.ac.nz F PN

“If Louise Hay or JC is your jam, I might not be for you,” she honestly shares. “I speak to the next generation of spiritualists, the hipsters that call themselves spiritual, less religious and are open to all beliefs, open to exploring all spiritual avenues and custom -build a belief system that works for them.” “My talks and books are like a smorgasbord for the soul, take what you like, leave what you don’t, but ultimately leave with a satisfied soul. Making it easy for you to eat up all the wisdom you seek to digest.”

See Emma Mildon talk for FREE at Lululemon Athletic Ponsonby, Thursday 12 March at 6pm. Limited spaces, first in, first served. www.emmamildon.com

photography: Sally Tagg

“I am honored to be representing New Zealand on the world stage, and am excited that more Kiwis are beginning to explore spiritually through yoga, organic and holistic living and generally becoming more spirituality curious.” Mildon humbly shares: “I have nothing to prove, and everything to share, and I couldn’t be more excited about the PN journey I am on.” F

Dr Shiva Vandana Shiva photographed last month in Kelmarna Gardens, Herne Bay

DR VANDANA SHIVA, A RECENT VISITOR TO KELMARNA ORGANIC GARDENS Activist Dr Vandana Shiva, recently photographed by local resident Sally Tagg in Kelmarna Gardens, says the dependence on chemicals and fossil fuels that enable large-scale agriculture is a threat to the planet. Dr Shiva is advocating for a global change in the practice and paradigms of agriculture, and the food it creates. F PN

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PONCENTRIC: LIVING THE GOOD LIFE IN PONSONBY This is my first column for Ponsonby News and the followers of my blog will be surprised because, for a change, it’s not all about food! And it’s a VOP (Venturing Outside Ponsonby). As it turns out, it was the most interesting and inspiring two hours I’ve spent in a long while! The invitation from Martin Leach from Ponsonby News said, “Be inspired and visit sustainable businesses in the Grey Lynn community.” And it was hugely inspiring. The Grey Lynn Business Association organised a walking tour last month aimed at showcasing successful and like-minded Grey Lynn businesses who embrace sustainable business practices. So I arrived at Bread & Butter Café (34 Westmoreland Street next to Farro Fresh) at 4.30pm not quite sure what to expect. A group of 50 fellow walkers was treated to an interesting presentation from Isobel, a co-director of Bread & Butter and so the journey began. With a reputation for being at the forefront of sustainability and organics Bread & Butter only use certified organic ingredients, unbleached flours, wholemeal flours, nuts and seeds that have not been chemically aged or heavily sprayed with insecticides or fertilisers. They do not use additives, premixes, stabilisers and other artificially altered ingredients. For those of us not completely tuned in to the sustainability-organic ethos it was a bit of an eye opener! Next stop on the walk was Nature Baby at 433 Richmond Road in the West Lynn village. They specialise in natural and organic products which nurture both parent and baby. Nature Baby is a family business established in 1998 by Jacob and Georgia Faull, who had a vision where their children could grow up in a pure, beautiful, chemical-free community. More inspiration for us all. Just love the passion.

The bonus at this, our last stop, was the food and refreshments - much needed, especially by Martin Leach from Ponsonby News and I, after the uphill walk! Thank you to Kokako Cafe (just across the road in the old Grey Lynn Post Office building) for providing the fantastic dips and bread - the basil pesto was awesome. Interesting how the numbers on the walk grew significantly at the fuelling stop. At this stop we heard from Mike about the history of Kokako and the philosophy behind his business. Next up was Simon from All Good Organics who have completely embraced the Fairtrade ethos. Wendyl Nissen, well-known magazine editor in a previous life, talked about ‘Wendyl’s’ range of products which are all handmade at their Grey Lynn shop and 100% natural. They have all their ingredients listed and contain no fillers, chemicals or synthetics. They all use simple ingredients like baking soda, soda ash, borax, vinegar and oxygen bleach. Finally Grey Lynn Business Association Chair Jennifer Northover thanked everyone for attending what was for me the most interesting two hours I have spent in a long time. So in two hours I went from novice to convert. Inspired by the commitment and passion of the individuals and businesses that have embraced the ethos of sustainability, organic ingredients and fairtrade principles I will have a very different view in future of what I buy, where I buy it and what’s in it. These businesses are making a real difference. You can too by buying right. PN For more photos - p144 (GEOFF LAWSON) F www.poncentric.com

photography: Clare Gemima

A slight detour off Richmond Road to the Wilton Picnic Patch (formerly the Wilton Street Community Garden) had the group absorbed in the history of the garden and able to sight the fruits (and veggies) of the labour of a dedicated group of volunteers led by well-known gardener and author Fionna Hill (‘How To Grow Microgreens, Nature’s own Superfood’ and ‘A Green Granny’s Garden - the Confessions of a Novice Urban Gardener’). Much needed refreshments at this stop were provided by Simon from All Good Organics whose Karma Cola, Lemmy Lemonade and Gingerella really hit the spot.

From the garden to the roaster, our next stop was at Kokako Coffee Roastery located at 606 Great North Road. Eight years ago owner Mike Murphy purchased a rundown coffee roastery and turned it into a hugely successful business that has sustainability as its primary focus. Mike and his team are strong advocates for Fairtrade and the ethical procurement of their green beans, cocoa and sugar. All Kokako coffee and drinking chocolate has ‘third party verification’ from both Fairtrade and Biogro NZ to ensure it meets stringent Fairtrade and organic certification standards.

Jacob Faull of Nature Baby specialising in natural and organic products; approximately 50 locals joined the first Grey Lynn Sustainable Walk The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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LOCAL NEWS MR PONCENTRIC IS LIVING THE GOOD LIFE IN PONSONBY Geoff Lawson and his wife moved to Ponsonby in 2007, after their children were grown up. Geoff’s wife Debra is a teacher at Grey Lynn School. He absolutely loves Ponsonby and has started his own blog, Poncentric, where he is able to write about all the things he loves about this part of town. What in particular inspired you to move to Ponsonby? We had been regular visitors to Ponsonby over the years. Actually we have some quite strong family connections to the area. In the 1950s my grandfather was Postmaster of the Newton Post Office that was located at the top of Newton Gully near the intersection of Karangahape Road and Ponsonby Road. My aunt lived at 3 Arthur Street and we used to visit her when I was a kid. Also going way back, another aunt had a fruit and veg shop on Ponsonby Road on the site currently occupied by the very fine restaurant Orphan’s Kitchen. So our connection is strong and goes way back.

What do you love most about Ponsonby? We are completely in love with Ponsonby. We see it as a village really. We walk up to Ponsonby Road and there is everything we want. We try to only use Ponsonby shops and services. We love the market atmosphere with Ponsonby Central, Nosh and Farro providing the opportunity to market shop almost on a daily basis - it’s very European in that respect. We love the Ponsonby Market Days with the street stalls, colour and live entertainment. What are your favourite cafes/restaurants? They are all our favourites really but starting from Three Lamps we are regulars at Gusto Italiano, Dizengoff, Prego, Yuzu, Mexico, Foxtrot Parlour, Burger Burger and Thai House. Good One on Douglas Street does great Supreme coffee and their brioches could feed a family of four! And we’ve got Ripe a few metres away from our house. I use YQ to order (and pay for) my coffee and by the time I walk there my coffee is ready. The other place we love going to is the Ponsonby Food Court (corner of Ponsonby Road and Pollen Street). Excellent food, very reasonably priced, buzzing and bustling. Favourites are the Roti Canai at Kampung Malaysia, the Bung Ga (lemon grass chicken salad) from Mekong Vietnamese and the kebabs from Papa Tasty Kebabs. And there is an excellent range of wine, beer, soft drinks and fabulous fresh juice from Ponsonby Friends. Not to be under-rated as a dining experience! What would an ideal day be like? An ideal day for us would be all about walking. We’d start with a walk to Dizengoff or Good One for coffee followed by a walk through to Three Lamps to check out what’s happening down that end. The exciting and energising thing about Ponsonby is that there are always new things happening. I tend to be a great ‘window shopper’ of all things to do with food so am quite happy to walk the length of Ponsonby Road to suss things out. My blog Poncentric is all about ‘living the good life in Ponsonby’ so my walks constantly yield new things to celebrate and it seems new places to eat.

photography: Clare Gemima

At the time we moved from a big old family house in Greenlane to Ponsonby our daughter lived here, we loved the vibe and bustle so it was an easy decision and one we haven’t regreted for one second. We did think that with the children leaving home we wouldn’t need as much space. Wrong! They kept coming back - and we love it!

Geoff Lawson pictured at Kokako’s Roastery, following the Grey Lynn Sustainable Business Walk Tell us about your stint as Ponsonby Dad on George FM… I did a stint as Ponsonby Dad on Nick D’s morning show on George FM at the beginning of last year. My children were connected to Nick and someone thought it would be a good idea to get me on to talk about Poncentric. It was a fun thing to do and I was surprised at the following it had given that I’m in a slightly older demographic! Any favourite columns in Ponsonby News? I love Ponsonby News and think Martin and the team do a fantastic job in promoting our wonderful community. Not surprisingly the Eat, Drink + Be Merry section is one of my favourite columns! And the latest (February) edition features a terrific review of Dizengoff - one of my absolute favourite cafes. The rest of PN presents an eclectic smorgasbord of interesting and tasty morsels; people, places, pets and politics all feature prominently. Can’t wait for it to arrive - I read it from cover to cover. In my view Ponsonby News adds significant value to our community. We are so fortunate to have such a high-quality celebration of living the good life in Ponsonby. F PN www.poncentric.com

The walking will have inevitably generated an appetite so lunch at somewhere like Ponsonby Central with its wonderful choices would be next on the agenda. On the way we would also pause at the intersection of Ponsonby Road and Anglesea Street/Norfolk Street for that fabulous view back to the city with Sky Tower as the centrepiece - just love it. Favourite green spaces in Ponsonby? We are absolutely spoilt for choice when it comes to green spaces. We live a few minutes’ walk from Grey Lynn Park and the Vermont Street playground. Western Park is fabulous and we love going to 'Art in the Dark' there. There’s also a lovely little green space between Norfolk Street and Douglas Street and one between Brown Street and Richmond Road adjacent to Ponsonby Central.

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“Western Park is fabulous and we love going to Art in the Dark” PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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LOCAL NEWS ANZAC DAY COMMEMORATIONS AT GREY LYNN RSC Last month local Grey Lynn artist Dan Tippett and artist DLT, began the transformation of the Grey Lynn RSC in time for Anzac Day. The work took several weeks and the pair have included aspects of the local community and have drawn inspiration from inside the clubrooms and the local area. F PN www.greylynnrsc.org.nz

THE PETTICOAT MEN READING IN THE WOMEN’S BOOKSHOP What a treat last month to have Barbara Ewing reading chapter one of her new novel, 'The Petticoat Men' in the Women's Bookshop. Kiwi born Barbara Ewing is a United Kingdom-based actress, playwright and novelist, who graduated from Victoria University with a BA in English and Maori. She headed off to London in the mid 60s and has lived there for 50 years.

photography: Martin Leach

Barbara Ewing is the author of eight novels - the latest is ‘The Petticoat Men’. Set in London, in 1870. The Petticoat Men is an entertaining historical novel, with plenty of factual detail to help create an authentic feel. Ewing has done a great deal of research surrounding this real-life trial and has created a rich and compelling story that demonstrates just how far-reaching the effects of such a case could be. The alternating points of view are convincingly portrayed and Ewing manages to quite sensitively tell a story that could have quite easily succumbed to abject sensationalism. The television role for which she is best remembered is that of Bradley Hardacre's mistress in the 80s comedy series Brass. More recent TV appearances have included episodes of Casualty, Doctors and Holby City on the BBC, and The Bill and Peak Practice on ITV, as well as appearances in various adaptations of Ruth Rendell Mysteries. THE WOMEN’S BOOKSHOP, 105 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 376 4399 www.womensbookshop.co.nz www.barbaraewing.com

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Carole Beu and Barbara Ewing in the Women’s Bookshop, Ponsonby PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


THE PONSONBY PHILOSOPHER Is the pursuit of happiness making us sad? The quest for happiness is one of the driving forces of mankind. It is increasingly sought at the shopping mall by an ever more materialistic society. But anyone will tell you that you can’t buy happiness. True happiness is elusive but can often be found through one’s actions and experiences, and through the pursuit of a meaningful life. Recent studies around the world have also made it quite clear that if you want to be happy, don’t aim to be rich. Psychologist Tim Kasser in his ‘The High Price of Materialism’ documents that materialistic values are the stuff of unhappiness, low life satisfaction, depression and anxiety. We can go right back to the Greek philosopher Aristotle to learn about three approaches to wellbeing - the pleasant life, the good life and the meaningful life. The pleasant life, or a life of pleasure, is one motivated by hedonism - the desire to maximise the number of emotional and physical highs. This is the signature of modern capitalism. Look to the outside world to provide every source of satisfaction - that new car, another pair of shoes, a few more wines. Most commentators would suggest that greater and more potent fixes will become necessary to keep happiness afloat if hedonism is the only pursuit. The second approach is the good life. This is a life dedicated to fulfilling one’s potential, developing and refining one’s capabilities. Among the characteristics of the good life are purposeful engagement, positive emotions, social connectedness, environmental concern and continued personal growth. The meaningful life, the third approach to living, is similar to the good life in so far as it develops one’s strengths, but whereas the pursuit of the good life can be self-focused, the meaningful life entails a commitment to something greater than oneself, a higher cause. Those committed to a meaningful life are not, in fact, committed to their own lives, but to social improvement. This life is about the pursuit of virtue, or selfless moral principles.

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

Frustration at the elusiveness of happiness at times overwhelms us. It would seem productive and sufficient for a reasonably happy life, or for reasonable wellbeing, to try to live a good life, engaging in community activities, helping someone less fortunate than ourselves, being a good neighbour, a good parent and a good partner. Having a loving family and good friends is almost always associated with a happier existence. In the 2012 Happy Planet Index, in a self ranking exercise, the top five countries are Belize, Costa Rica, Indonesia, Jamaica and Vietnam. New Zealand ranks 24th, the United Kingdom 39th, Australia 69th. The United States comes in just behind Ethiopia at 104th out of 151 countries. So our report card might read ‘could do better’, but we have much to be happy about compared with how other countries see themselves, and we rank well above United States and Australia. Finally, a quote from the great Aristotle: “Happiness, whether consisting in pleasure or virtue, or both, is more often found with those who are highly cultivated in their minds and in their character, and have only a moderate share of external goods, than among those who possess external goods to a useless extent but are deficient in higher qualities.” Times may change, but the means to achieving happiness are unchanged over centuries. Neither happiness nor virtue have ever been easily obtainable. They are, however, well PN worthy of attainment. (JOHN ELLIOTT) F

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VIVA ITALIA SPQR - 22 YEARS ON THE PONSONBY STRIP Ponsonby News asked Chris Rupe to tell us about his iconic restaurant loved by so many locals - SPQR. The letters stand for senatus, populusque romanus, meaning the Senate and people of Rome. It was at the ripe age of 18 that Chris left school and completed a five year Hotel Management Diploma under the guidance of Jim Joe Low at Rose Park Hotel, Auckland. Chris travelled extensively overseas and worked in restaurants in London, United States and Australia. SPQR was established 22 years ago in November 1992 by Stuart Dryburgh, Dorthe Scheffmann and Johnny Caracciolo. A film industry background meant that SPQR manifested in the form of a movie set, and still looks today as it did back then. “During its early days there was more emphasis on alcohol and wine,” says Chris. “These days we focus more on a casual dining fare, although you are welcome to pop in just for a glass of wine.” At SPQR they love simplicity. “After travelling through Italy many times we soon realised that fresh ingredients, combined with seasonal freshness, timing and the cooking method is what makes Italian cooking so exciting.” When asked about his favourite Italian regional food Chris says, “All regions of Italy have beautiful food in their own right. If I had to choose one, I would choose the Italian Riviera because of its fresh seafood and the lemons that come from Sorrento and Capri. However, because the various regions of Italy have their own specialties, and those specialties complement each other, that is what makes the Italian food so fresh and simple.” Some examples of the freshness and flavour at SPQR are the vine-ripened tomatoes, fresh buffalo mozzarella, lots of basil, peppery green extra virgin olive oil, salty Stewart Island Bluff oysters, fresh snapper, cockles with white wine and garlic, or

even thin slices of salmon gravlax cured in Hendricks’s gin. As far as presentation goes - the white plate is the canvas and the food is the picture that comes to life with flavour. Chris is a seafood lover, so his favourite SPQR dish is the scampi linguini, fresh New Zealand paddle crab, seafood stew and the pork belly confit. “And to finish off with,” says Chris, “The SPQR raspberry and vanilla crème brulee.” A great meal can be so amazing that it stays in the memory for years, and for Chris a standout dish was one cooked by the famous Chef Pierre Gagnair. “Hare was poached in its own blood with a myriad of seasoning. Quite out of this world really, and very memorable!” laughs Chris. “However, when it comes down to it, my most favourite dish of all is the simple, organic roast chicken with seasonal greens (no carbs) cooked by my friend Anne Thorp.” Over the years the kitchen has always had the leading influence of Italian and French chefs. “I must say the kitchen staff work very hard and very consistently and they love to have the music up loud while cooking which seems to inspire them,” says Chris. Most have been at SPQR for a long time. “Many started as kitchen hands and have worked their way through - they are now chef de partie and sous chefs,” says Chris. “Our kitchen space is quite small, in fact minute compared to most other commercial kitchens!” From the very beginning SPQR has always had an extensive offer of wine by the glass - and it is still that way today. James Hall, SPQR bar manager, specialises in selecting wines that complement the food dishes and he is continually sourcing beverages.

WHAT’S HOT AT SABATO ITALIAN INSPIRATION... Food is an integral part of Italian culture, with many hours spent enjoying long meals with friends and family. At Sabato they love Italian food and are constantly inspired by their incredible passion for good food and never-ending repertoire of delicious recipes. However, we often find ourselves too busy to spend an entire day in the kitchen, simmering sauces for hours, and need a quick and easy but tasty dinner or a quick fix for entertaining unexpected guests. This is where the range of Sabato sauces, pastes and pestos is called upon - for authentic Italian with just moments of preparation required. For a stunningly simple supper cook some of your favourite Rustichella pasta until just al dente, and toss through one of our gourmet pasta sauces - think puttanesca, basil, porcini or ricotta forte for a little something special. Shave over fresh parmigiano reggiano and transport yourself to Italy with a mouthful. Use the Sabato pestos and pastes as a quick party pleaser. Spread over crostini and dot with tomato, cheese or an anchovy fillet - try spicy pronto rosso with crumbled feta, or traditional pesto alla genovese with fresh tomato and a basil leaf. The Sabato bruschetta range is also great to have on hand to top crostini - pepperoni is divine with an Albo sardine, try tomato with a curl of prosciutto, or spread porcini over sliced ciabatta topped with buffalo mozzarella and grill to perfection. Buon Appetito! Find many more easy-eating recipes and ideas the Sabato website www.sabato.co.nz or visit the store - taste the range for yourself and take home recipes to cook up an PN Italian feast in a flash. F SABATO Limited, 57 Normanby Road, T: 09 630 8751, www.sabato.co.nz

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VIVA ITALIA Emma Denney, Nicola DiLernia and Courtney Rupe outside SPQR “In general New Zealand wines are quite complex, these days (the trend is) towards favouring European and international wines,” explains Chris. “We find them to be easy drinking table wines.” Feedback from friends and customers is that the ambience and lighting at SPQR is still wonderful. However, a change of colour in the dining room may not be far away. The low lighting with the table lamps have been a recent addition that reflects all the beautiful faces around the restaurant and has been well received. At SPQR there are an abundance of specials every day. Chris says he is enjoying the Working Lunch Special at the moment, $37.50 for two courses and includes a glass of wine. “We are about to be honoured with the arrival of the Bluff oyster season,” advises Chris. “Watch out for these! There is also a lunch BYO on Sundays - providing the three course set menu for $59.” Chris says he is honoured by the support and patronage of greater Ponsonby locals and regulars - they have been loyal to SPQR for quite some time now. “We always endeavour PN to provide exciting, tasty and great value dishes now and in the future.” F

photography: Michael McClintock

SPQR, 150 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 360 1710, www.spqrnz.co.nz

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STUDIO ITALIA’S INSPIRATIONAL NEW SHOWROOM Studio Italia has recently moved into a new showroom at 25 Nugent Street, Grafton. The first of its kind in New Zealand. “The idea of the new showroom came from one of our visits to Milano,” says co-owner Valeria Carbonaro, “we wanted to create an inspirational space like when you visit a showroom in Milano, New York or Paris. Giving our supplier their own space to design, to create their own identity within our showroom.”

“We really couldn’t be happier with the results. Not just because it showcases our products in a beautiful way but also because we love the space, it is dynamic and full of light and energy!” F PN STUDIO ITALIA, 25 Nugent Street, T: 09 523 2105, www.studioitalia.co.nz

This has worked very well, in fact the showroom is divided into many areas each one having a different look and feel. Architect Lawrence Sumich has been involved with Studio Italia since the beginning, continues Valeria Carbonaro: “It was very important to us having a fusion between our Italian manufactured furniture, wardrobe and kitchens and the local architecture. Lawrence Sumich has given our space his magic touch and he understood our brief to perfection.

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PICCOLI PIATTI - LITTLE PLATES OF ITALIAN GOODNESS “Piccoli Piatti has just celebrated its first birthday, but really it began many years ago. We grew up in a neighbourhood that had a lot of Italian people,” says Joanna King, co-owner of Piccoli Piatti restaurant in Herne Bay. “My sister Lynda and I had a nonna [grandmother] who lived next door and we grew up roasting coffee beans in her backyard, eating homegrown radicchio and, of course, our nonna’s ragu. This began our passion for Italian food and we have loved our first year of serving our regulars and those who visit from further afield.”

“Our Italian wines are very popular,” says Jo, “And we are also one of the few restaurants in Auckland to offer the famed Champagne Billecart-Salmon Brut Rose by the glass and half bottle - which is perfect for those who like to indulge in one of the world’s finest champagnes but not a whole bottle.”

Sisters and co-owners, Jo and Lynda King, wanted to give Auckland a taste of what great Italian food can be, using fresh, seasonal produce, clean and simple flavours - and without a chicken parmigiana in sight! They wanted to offer small plates so that diners could enjoy a variety of dishes to share Italian style - the pasta, risotto and gnocchi are all offered as either an entrée or main size for ease of sharing.

The interior of Piccoli Piatti is rustic with a modern polish and has a feeling of intimacy, but still with several dining areas; al fresco dining, a mixture of banquette seating and high tables with stools in the main dining room and more banquette seating and tables and chairs in the rear dining room which can be booked exclusively for functions, as can the entire restaurant.

Head chef Rob Richardson has worked for some of New Zealand’s leading kitchens (Icon at Te Papa, Martin Bosley’s, Kermadec, Molten), Rob has a passion for Italian and Mediterranean food and the flavours at Piccoli Piatti are inspired by the seasonal and regional changes in Italian food. In summer the food is based on that of the south of Italy - tomatoes, eggplants, peppers, seafood. In winter the menu heads to the north - slow-cooked meat, filled pastas and ragus.

Open for lunch only on Fridays, enjoy the full menu or the Friday lunch special with two courses for $30, from a selection of entrée, main or dessert - available between 12-2:30pm. The main menu is available all day.

“Emilia-Romagna is my favourite Italian region,” says Jo. “The city of Bologna is the hometown of tortellini, tagliatelle and ragu, you can’t beat a great ragu!” While Lynda says, “Each region has its own specialities, but if I had to pick one it would be Sicily.” When asked to describe her favourite Piccoli Piatti dishes, Lynda laughs, “All of them! But yes, to start with, fried white anchovies with courgette, shaved fennel and baby gem, the anchovies being white are delicate in flavour and perfectly balanced when eaten with the salad. “Next it would have to be pici al nero di seppia with nduja, crayfish and braised baby octopus. Pici is hand rolled spaghetti, nero di seppia means there is squid ink in the spaghetti, making it black in colour and a hint of the ocean in the pasta. Nduja is a spicy sausage, paired together with the crayfish, baby octopus and crunchy pangrattato on top, it’s a hard one to go past!

Tuesday-Saturday between 5pm and 6pm diners can enjoy an antipasti platter for two, a selection of five of the small plates and two glasses of prosecco, house wine, beer or cider for $50, a great way to wind down, or start your evening. The children’s bolognese is served with the kitchen's handmade pasta - a delicious healthy meal, loved by all the smaller customers and quite a few of their parents! Once a month on a Sunday, Piccoli Piatti “goes to a different region of Italy for dinner”, offering a set menu for the evening during which regional Italian food is showcased and, where possible, wines are sourced from the same area. These evenings are a sell out and it’s a great night, with course after course of food rolling out and everyone having a fantastic time. F PN PICCOLI PIATTI, 170 Jervois Road, Herne Bay, T: 09 376 5367, www.piccolipiatti.co.nz

“To finish I would have our vanilla panna cotta with roasted summer fruit, it’s one of the best panna cottas I have tried - so smooth and delicious it has been known to convert people into panna cotta lovers!”

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VIVA ITALIA COCO’S COMMUNITY DAY BRINGS LOCALS TOGETHER FOR CONVERSATION, CUISINE AND SOCIAL CONSCIENCE Karangahape Road Italian eatery Coco’s Cantina is a favourite for gatherings, frequented by business people, local politicians and students alike. Serving dishes full of seasonal produce as well as free-range eggs, chicken and pork, Coco’s has made a commitment to ethical food. Doing good as a business doesn’t end at their menu, however, and this year Coco’s staff have made a commitment to supporting a local organisation that helps Auckland’s most vulnerable. On 1 March, Coco’s hosted a community day, a market-like gathering that brought people together to enjoy fun, family friendly activities, delicious food and locally made goods, and raise awareness of their staff’s support of Lifewise. Lifewise, who operates community cafe Merge, one of Coco’s nearby neighbours, supports Aucklanders affected by a number of social issues - one of its key areas of focus being ending homelessness. This year, a team of Coco’s Cantina staff are fundraising for Lifewise and running in support of its work in the popular Round the Bays event on 8 March. Long -time staff member Anna McLiver chose to support Lifewise after observing K’Road’s inhabitants. “I work on K’Road every day, so I constantly see people struggling with homelessness, mental illness or addiction,” she says. “I’d talked to other staff members about how we wanted to improve our fitness, and when I found out that Lifewise was calling for runners to support it, it just seemed like the perfect fit.” Coco’s community days are held every six months, and started as a mini-garage sale for staff to sell their old clothes. “All the girls had far too many,” Anna laughs. “So we set up an event to sell them, and the community

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days have grown since then. People come and have breakfast, hang out and learn about what’s happening in the area. We’ve got local fashion stores like selling their stock and delicious food and drink on offer.” F PN Find out more about supporting Lifewise and the Coco’s Cantina’s runners at www.aucklandroundthebays2015.everydayhero.com/nz/lifewise

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VIVA ITALIA

Poderi Crisci vineyard and restaurant

PODERI CRISCI A LITTLE BIT OF ITALY ON WAIHEKE Italy is just a ferry ride away at Poderi Crisci Vineyard and Restaurant. Traditional Italian food matched with handcrafted wines, served in a location more reminiscent of Tuscany than New Zealand. Enjoy al fresco dining all year round in this stunning location looking across the valley, the west-facing restaurant captures the final rays of the setting sun. This is the perfect time to enjoy a digestif following the highly acclaimed ‘Long Lunch’ or to an aperitivo prior to an evening degustation meal. All Poderi Crisci wines are lovingly handcrafted, and bottled on site. Wines that emulate Italian style - crisp, dry whites and cheeky rosés, finely balanced and structured reds. The perfect complement to the delights offered up daily by the talented kitchen team. The menu changes daily and the ‘Fiducia Dello Chef’ (Trust the Chef) menu option is the best way to experience the flavours and that unmistakeable Italian zest for which Poderi Crisci is renowned.

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The perfectly manicured gardens and surrounds provide the freshest possible produce for the kitchen as well as an ideal place to wander and unwind. As a proud participant in the Waiheke Vintage Festival, this year running from 12 - 16 March, Poderi Crisci will be again hosting some fantastic events not to be missed. Almost a gala event, ‘Opera in the Cellar’ will again be a sellout. Three tenors accompanied by a full degustation dinner expertly matched with Poderi Crisci estate wines, in what is possibly the prettiest cellar room on the island. For those of a more gastronomic interest, classes in the fine art of mozzarella making and a Pasta Master Class are also on offer. Throughout the vintage festival Poderi Crisci will be hosting a number of other events also, from music in the vines to vineyard tours. Consult www.podericrisci.co.nz/calendar for more info. F PN

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JAY PLATT: WE CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT...

BARI BOLOGNA

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PARMA ROMA A SIENA 1. Stella McCartney sunglasses by Luxoticca, Cream $460, Black $460 and Tortoiseshell $410 @ Occhiali Optical www.occhiali.co.nz; 2. Fornasetti ‘Bocca’ tray $875 @ Design 55 www.design55.co.nz; 3. Missoni multi ‘Patch’ pouf 40x30 $986 @ Tessuti www.tessuti.co.nz; 4. Alessi ‘Bunny & Carrot’ kitchen roll holder $119 @ Askew www.askew.co.nz; 5. Ruffoni Copper Risotto pan with curved handle $599.95 @ Millys www.millyskitchen.co.nz; 6. Alessi ‘Merdolino’ toilet brush $119 @ Askew www.askew.co.nz

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PARMA ROMA A SIENA 1. Missoni multi ‘Patch’ cushion 60x60 $768 @ Tessuti www.tessuti.co.nz; 2. Bitossi ceramic vase $349 @ Askew www.askew.co.nz; 3. Norma suspension light by Borek Sipek for Driade $5995 @ Indice www.indice.co.nz; 4. Vinoteque blown crystal pinot noir glasses $39.95 a pair @ Millys www.millyskitchen.co.nz; 5. ‘A Lotus Leaf’ by Yung Ho Chang for Alessi $319 @ Askew www.askew.co.nz; 6. Colonna Granverde EVOO with the natural zest of organic lemons $64.90 @ Sabato www.sabato.co.nz F PN STYLING: Jay Platt PHOTOGRAPHY: Danilo Santana David, Fisher Santana. The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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WE CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT

BARI BOLOGNA


ITALY’S NORTHERN LAKES By Brett Barclay, Director, World Journeys

It is no wonder Italy is called Il Bel Paese - the beautiful country! From the northern snow-capped peaks of the alps and the idyllic hilltop villages of the renowned central Tuscany and Umbria area, to the rugged southern shores of Sicily, lies a plethora of distinctive regions and people. To my mind the northern Italian lakes offer some of the most spectacular scenery in Italy - placid waters, centuries old villas draped with bougainvillea, charming villages, wonderful restaurants and the snow-capped alps in the distance. Just north of the fashion capital of Milan are Lake Maggiore and Lake Como - my absolute favourites. Shorelines dotted with picturesque villages, and a very peaceful, laidback atmosphere make this a very relaxed Italian experience. On Lake Maggiore is Pescatori Island, named after the fishermen who made the area their home. With simple houses, narrow lanes and stone portals, you can be sure to find a local cafe with the freshest of fish on the menu. For grander experience, stop in at Isola Bella to visit the Borromeo Palace with its magnificent gardens. Lake Como has been a popular hangout for the rich and famous for centuries, and some of the most beautiful villas are (or have been) home to the likes of George Clooney, Gianni Versace, Richard Branson and Ronaldinho. Some built in Roman times, the gardens are always spectacular, as the Mediterranean-like climate allows tropical and sub-tropical plants to grow year-round. Some of the villas are now museums and galleries, allowing visitors a glimpse of an elegant and opulent era. A favourite is the 17th century Villa Carlotta in the village of Tremezzo. The gardens here are best in spring when the colours of age-old orange trees, rhododendrons, azaleas and camellias are at their peak. The waterfront villa itself is richly adorned with paintings, sculptures, tapestries and period furniture. I recently returned to Lake Como and stayed at the stunning little village of Bellagio which is wonderfully located in the central lake area. After a leisurely breakfast on the hotel terrace we strolled to the ferry pier and bought a ferry pass for the day. That day

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we decided we would have a progressive lunch - one course at each of four villages on the lake. We enjoyed antipasti at Varenna Mon Amour in Varenna, enjoyed homemade pasta at Il Ristorante di Paolo in Menaggio, dined on freshly caught fish at Ristorante Belle Isole in Cadennabia and finally a fabulous gelato at Gelateria Helvetica in Tremezzo. We caught our final ferry back to Bellagio very happy and very sated and yet again believing Italian cuisine to be some of the world’s best! From Menaggio you can even take a day’s excursion to St Moritz, Switzerland, driving to Tirano then taking the spectacular Bernina Express train to St Moritz. And of course, when in Switzerland, lunch at a chalet is a must! Delightful boutique accommodation, charming villages, delicious Italian cuisine, and absolutely stunning scenery PN make the Northern lakes my idea of Il Bel Paese. F

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VIVA ITALIA BAMBINA PONSONBY - FRESH, BE ENTERTAINED! UNCOMPLICATED FOOD MADE WITH LOVE They say you learn a lot about people when you work in the At Bambina Ponsonby, owners Sarah and Pete Wren, spend a lot of time sourcing the best possible ingredients. They love fresh balanced flavours and textures, soft and crisp, smooth and tart. “The freshest high quality ingredients need little or no cooking,” says Pete. “Very often we happily eat raw.” At Bambina the food is all about inspired combinations, not complicated cooking methods. It is simply fresh.

hospitality industry - the good the bad and crazy. The people at Gina’s have learnt that Aucklanders like to party. They work hard and they play hard. So Gina’s have brought back ‘dinner, dancing and entertainment’ - Italian style.

“Our menu ideas often come from our loving home kitchen,” explains Sarah. “Ideas may be sparked from a picture in a magazine or a meal on holiday. We call our family kitchen Bambina Kitchenette. We are very excited to be launching our blog titled Bambina Kitchenette very soon. There is so much to share with you.” F PN

They call it their Lady G Parties & Entertainment. You get a group of friends together for dinner at Ginas, and arrange for one of the Gina’s ‘stud ‘ hosts to come and entertain you for the evening; games, pranks, even dancing if the night takes you there. Your wish is their pleasure.

BAMBINA PONSONBY, 268 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 360 4000 www.bambinaponsonby.co.nz

The Lady G Parties & Entertainment have absolutely taken off and weekend bookings are super busy. The feedback has been amazing - why has it taken so long!

This silky smooth Salmon Crudo is plated with crisp baby cos, radish and fennel. Fresh lemon pieces and pomegranate seeds add a zingy contrast to the salmon. The dressing, is simply lashings of Salvagno olive oil.

Come on along to Gina’s, you will enjoy wonderful Italian food in a joyful and lively atmosphere packed with generous Italian hospitality! To find out more about the Lady G parties either send an email or visit their website. F PN GINA’S ITALIAN KITCHEN, 161 Symonds Street, T: 09 302 2061 info@ginas.co.nz www.ginas.co.nz

Salmon Crudo is plated with crisp baby cos, radish and fennel

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ITALIAN INSPIRED DESIGN ENHANCES HOME DECOR Vimar inhabits spaces in an original way, but with a dash of essential design. EAL Electric is delighted to introduce you to the Vimar range of Italian inspired, designed and produced electrical accessories. Vimar products are stylish and elegant and designed to enhance the home owner’s individuality. Vimar utilises a wide selection of materials ranging from wood, metal, silk and technopolymer which are all available in a wide range of colours. Cover plates with warm and classic colours, or with sophisticated hues and bright shades to match your style. A variety of modules are available, including switches, dimmers, smoke-gas detectors, push buttons, timers, clocks, TV outlets, coax outlets, dimmers, USB, HDMI, phone and Ethernet outlets and many more options. Vimar is a modular product that gives the home owner the greatest freedom of design choice, so now even your electrical accessories can be matched to your home dÊcor style. Vimar is easily installed into any residential or commercial situation and is priced extremely competitively compared to other options available in New Zealand. The Vimar collection is available exclusively from EAL Electric and is on display at their showroom.

VIVA ITALIA A LOCAL SLICE OF ITALY What better way to spend an evening than enjoying a delicious meal at Pane e Vino restaurant? The warm energy, the passion, the fun atmosphere and the amazing effect on your taste buds - you will feel as if you are in Italy. What makes Pane e Vino so popular is the regional Italian cuisine served in an al fresco setting. With classic antipasti, pasta dishes, traditional mains, original thin crusted pizzas plus popular Italian desserts all made with fresh ingredients you have the perfect destination for your next night out. Each day the food is lovingly prepared and like all restaurants in Italy they offer freshly baked bread along with extra virgin olive oil from the south of Italy. Pane e Vino is open for lunch, Monday to Friday and dinner is served seven nights a week. With over five years at Pane e Vino Italian pizzeria, owner Tito and pizza maker Matteo know how Aucklanders like their pizza and toppings, so they have plans to open another pizzeria - Rosso Pomodoro. Their vision for the pizzeria is to become known as the local take out woodfire pizzeria, serving pizzas that satisfy at affordable prices. Pane e Vino is actively involved with local organisations Youth Town and other community centres and they hold school holiday programmes with Pizza Day plus three course Italian cooking classes. For the past 18 months Tito has appeared as a regular on the Good Morning show in cooking demonstration segments and continues to bring his passion for Italian food to Aucklanders. This year Pane e Vino was voted best seafood restaurant stall at the 2015 Auckland Seafood Festival. F PN PANE E VINO, 20 Williamson Avenue, T: 09 360 0263 www.paneevino.co.nz

EAL ELECTRIC, 19 Halsey Street, Freemans Bay T: 09 379 7958 www.ealelectric.co.nz

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY THE VEG FRIENDLY CHALLENGE Finalist: Dear Jervois It’s the great Ponsonby News Veg Friendly Challenge, in which Ponsonby-area cafes and restaurants line up to be judged on their vegetarian friendliness. What does that mean? Simply this: it’s a new day in food-land, what with an increasing number of restaurants offering a complete vegetarian menu, and a more ‘green’ perspective to eating generally. It’s possible to be nutritious and delicious, and we’re going to name the cafes and restaurants that cater well to vegetarians and vegans, whether or not they’ve also got meat on their menus. Each month, we’ll review one of our favourite ‘veg friendly’ eateries, and at the end of it all, we’ll name an overall winner, and our coveted Veg Friendly Challenge Top 10. We first visited Dear Jervois some months back shortly after it had opened its welcoming doors, and we were well impressed, raving effusively about its pleasant ambience and gastronomic delights and vowing to go back soon. The Ponsonby News cafe beat is a large one however, and we got distracted by a myriad of other new openings along the main drag and elsewhere. So here we are, some six months later, turning up at 10am on a Friday for a late breakfast or an early lunch (did someone say there was a name for that?) and already it’s so busy that we can’t get a table. No matter, we’ll sit on the stools and eat on the window bench with a view of the passing traffic. Mmm, exhaust.

The signature Dear Jervois herbivorous dish, the Be Good Vegan

It’s an odd spot in the last block of shops on Jervois Road; one that has seen many restaurants and cafes fail. Kudos then to Dear Jervois for making this venue, which is perched on an awkward bend in the road, work wonders. The menu reveals straightaway that Dear Jervois is a contender for the Veg Friendly Challenge. While there are meat dishes, and some of the veg dishes you can choose to add meat to, there’s a real balance here that for once doesn’t assume that carnivores should necessarily always hog (so to speak) the dominant position. In fact, right at the top the menu does what all discerning cafe management should: it clearly points to which items are free range, vegetarian, gluten free, dairy free and wheat free. This is, of course, fantastic for those with allergies or specific food requirements. By my count (and admittedly, I failed School C maths spectacularly) well over half the menu is vegetarian, so we were happy from the get-go. Choice, isn’t that amazing? Not yet on the Dear Jervois online menu is the Zucchini Fritter with beetroot, micro watercress, pine nuts, freshly chopped herbs, grated pecorino and lemon sour cream - $19 - and Martin just couldn’t resist its allure. His unerring instinct for the top choice proved faultless as this summer dish was sensational. The fritters were hidden under salad and were just the right portion size. I couldn’t help ogling at the amazing-looking Superfood Cruesli that a young chap had ordered (house toasted muesli, poached pear and rhubarb, Greek yoghurt and house made berry compote - $14) but my constitution demands savoury dishes in the morning, so I went for the signature Dear Jervois herbivorous dish, the Be Good Vegan ($17). Consisting of quinoa, brown rice, beetroot, pumpkin, coriander, sesame seeds, topped with kimchi and drizzled with cashew aioli, it’s a pretty spiffing concoction. And it’s got edible flowers to pretty it up as well!

The Zucchini Fritter with beetroot, micro watercress, pine nuts, freshly chopped herbs, grated pecorino and lemon sour cream Do you run a cafe or restaurant in the Ponsonby/Grey Lynn area that does vegetarian really well? If so, let me know on the email below. We’ll be sure to check out your eatery. And don’t be shy, okay? Gary Steel is an Auckland-based journalist who runs online vegetarian resource www.doctorfeelgood.co.nz. He can be contacted via beautmusic@gmail.com

It’s worth pointing out that Dear Jervois features five delicious and healthful, organic super food smoothies, several of which are vegan, and that they range from $8 to $9 each. They also go a bit further than most in making available not just regular and soymilk coffees, but also rice milk and organic almond milk. I’m not game to try those but hey, it takes all kinds! They also have a range of vegan cakes from their ‘raw kitchen’. Dear Jervois largely lived up to its reputation, but during our visit the service was rather glum and chaotic. We waited ages to place our order, and then they forgot Martin’s kombucha... and by that time they had run out! The service was vastly different (smiling and proficient) when I last visited, so I hope this was just a temporary glitch. (GARY STEEL) F PN * Dear Jervois, 234 Jervois Road, Herne Bay, T: 09 376 7278. Open Mon-Fri 7am-4pm, Sat-Sun 8am-4pm. Closed Tuesdays.

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GARY STEEL: VEG FRIENDLY

Baa-baa dead sheep. All about the year of the lamb... Years ago, I fell head over heels for a young woman and in the throes of springtime amour, we headed out on a day trip to New Zealand’s green and pastoral land. A rural interlude saw us watching little lambs frolicking. Relishing in their youthful energy, the woolly bundles of cuteness were doing that indescribable run-boing-run-boing jumping bean routine that seems to express the very joy of being alive. After a few moments, the object of my affections turned to me and, licking her lips and making like the bad wolf, said: “And then we eat then up! Yum-yum!” I fell out of love that second, and the trip back to the city was a desultory experience: I knew it was over. Of all the symbols of our twisted relationship with animals, the spring lamb probably takes the cake: symbolic of new life, cute as a button, but we seemingly see no contradiction in the mass slaughter that must occur for lamb to then land on our dinner plates. Last month, New Zealand celebrated its first National Lamb Day, and for a moment I thought that perhaps the occasion might actually be some kind of tribute to the humble sheep. Next minute, I was duly informed that National Lamb Day was an initiative of the local meat industry. It was all about celebrating the ‘important’ lamb export industry, which currently contributes $8.5 billion to our economy. This new national day, promoted by a profit-driven industry, was supported by the New Zealand government. Primary industries Minister Nathan Guy was quoted as saying: “A National Lamb Day is a great way to acknowledge our history and promote red meat.” Indeed, our history wades in the blood of countless butchered sheep. National Lamb Day coincided with the 133rd anniversary of New Zealand’s first shipment of 5000 sheep carcasses from Port Chalmers to London. The Mother Country has been chowing down on New Zealand lamb ever since, but these days, lamb consumption in the colonies has fallen drastically. Apparently, that’s because lamb exports have gone through the roof to new, hungry markets like China. And where strong export markets exist, local prices shoot up.

The first sheep were released in New Zealand in 1773, and sheep farming was well established here by the 1850s, with meat and wool accounting for more than a third of exports. By 1982, there was a gobsmacking 70 million sheep here, although by the beginning of the 21st century, numbers had shrunk to about half that. But even if we chew through a mere 35 million sheep each year, shared between exports and local consumption, well... can you comprehend that many sheep, and that many individual lives lost? We do feel at least a little bit guilty though. Why else would we build up such an armory of defenses? Sheep are commonly considered to be woolly morons, which makes it so much easier to eat them. But is stupidity a defense against ill treatment? Do we treat an intellectually impaired human with any less sensitivity than one with all its mental faculties? And are sheep really, truly dumb? Well no, actually, thanks for asking. Characterised as dumb because of their natural herding instinct (their only defense against predators), sheep can recognise up to 50 other sheep, and retain that memory for up to two years. In fact, a study in Nature magazine found that they may be nearly as good as humans at recognising faces in a crowd. Sheep, like most animals, are capable of forming friendships, and in one test at the University of Cambridge, sheep were found to have advanced learning abilities, and that “they were able to navigate the challenges in the same way as humans and primates”. In this Year Of The Sheep/Goat/Whatever, let’s think for a change not about the ways in which we continue to exploit them, but the fact that sheep, just like any animal, experience life to the fullest when given the chance to do so; and that every single sheep that goes to slaughter feels the pain of their life being summarily extinguished. It’s a howl of despair that PN will reverberate through time. (GARY STEEL) F Gary Steel is an Auckland-based journalist who runs online vegetarian resource. www.doctorfeelgood.co.nz. He can be contacted via beautmusic@gmail.com

The irony for those who grew up in New Zealand prior to the intensification of the dairy industry is that sheep were everywhere, and as cheap as chips. In fact, sheep were practically our unofficial national symbol, and a rite of passage for any expat Kiwi was weathering the inevitable sheep shagging jokes.

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JULIE BONNER: NEWS FROM FROG POND FARM I can feel a chill in the air at night; the seasons are slowly starting to change. To be honest, I don’t mind at all, I enjoy autumn and watching the trees lose their leaves and the ground become peppered with hues of brown and gold... it’s a special time. January and most of February were so very dry with only a few days of much needed rain, an eye to the sky when it did as there is nothing better than a dousing from above! It never ceases to amaze me how quickly everything greens up and lushness returns. There has been a lot happening at Frog Pond Farm! Family has come to stay, which is brilliant as they are familiar with lending a hand. My brother John is back and busy in the garden, pruning, weeding and visiting the orchard to report on the pest status. More often than not he has a pair of secateurs cradled in his hand - a family trait for sure. Then there’s Bill, hubby’s Dad, who is such a great bloke and a star in the kitchen. He soon becomes chief jam and jelly maker stocking up our pantry with jars for the winter months ahead - damson jam, crabapple jelly, and jars and jars of preserved peaches. How lucky am I? I even surprised myself the other day by making a particularly yummy peach and plum Indian pickle. Think spicy hot. There is something so special about growing your own. Whizzing out to the garden and hauling out baby carrots munching as I go, snipping off New Zealand spinach for juices and cucumbers and lettuce leaves for salads, herbs for Africa and standing back and staring at the bean trellis laden with beans. Let’s not even mention the zucchini production line. Tomatoes? Have you guessed yet? I’m still grumbling as my Cherokee toms grown from seed were unceremoniously hauled from the dirt the other day, with only a couple of green toms hanging forlornly on the shrivelled plants. Blight I’m thinking is the culprit here, due to our rather damp start to summer, my over planting and Auckland’s humid environ. And I must fess up, I’ve chucked the toys from the cot and decided I won’t grow them again next year. Oh dear! I love growing flowers in my garden though, which makes my brother scratch his head in wonder. Flowers in a veg garden? And looking at my chilli bed I might have to agree with him! The flowers in this space look amazing. Beautiful zinnias, marigold, alyssum and geranium doing their best at enticing beneficial insects and hogging the bed with their splendour. I just wish that my chilli plants, which are healthy and bushy, would grow some chillies! Interesting that they are in the same family as tomatoes (I’m still wiping a tear) and potatoes, of which we have two raised beds that just happen to be growing like mad! Yay. Something to do with the TLC they have been getting - think smelly homemade fertiliser, mulch and lots of water. We have opted now to leave our spuds in the dirt and dig them up when needed and you can’t get any fresher than that. Our orchard has been providing us with lots of juicy peaches, plums, damsons, lemons, and the feijoas and figs are slowly starting to swell. We had to net trees in the orchard, which has acted as a deterrent to some of the wildlife. I need to also grab pen and paper and get cracking on my winter planting plan. It’s time to decide on what goes where and with whom. I’m a fan of rotating crops, which is important to lessen the likelihood of pests and disease and to help with soil fertility and structure by alternating light and heavy feeders and legumes. It’s also good to think about planting green manure crops that provide food for the garden when they are ‘dug back in’. I shall grab my seed box from the fridge with pencil in hand and start jotting down seeds that need replenishing. Oh what fun. I loathe finishing on a sad note and I ummed and ahhed about mentioning this. But for all those that have been following my blog and enjoyed the antics of my gorgeous black, naughty chicken called Sally, I’m so sorry to say that she died last week. Sometimes it is PN just so hard saying goodbye. Missing that chook! (JULIE BONNER) F If you are interested in more madness from our place, or perhaps some gardening tips, then check out my blog. www.frogpondfarm.co.nz

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PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


AT CAKE & CO, PONSONBY ROADS’ NEWEST cakery, they believe life is about indulging - and more often than not, this involves scrummy, sweet, delectable morsels that ignite all the senses and make us feel decadent. Whilst they understand that indulgence is an important part of the eating experience, they offer gorgeous cakes and sweet treats with a focus on the ever increasing need for special dietary requirements; gluten free, refined sugar free, dairy free, soy free and egg free. Anything is possible and it is all just a little bit good for you. Their emphasis is on using only the best natural ingredients, unrefined sugars, free range eggs from happy chooks, natural colours and flavours, spelt, rye and wholemeal flours along with their own special blend of gluten-free flour. Cake & Co make cakes and treats for all occasions - beautiful celebration cakes to indulge someone special, wedding cakes, colourful cake pops, mini cakes and meringues for party tables, delicious slices and baby cakes all perfectly partnered with gorgeous Fair Trade Organic Kokako coffee, All Good drinks and Be Spa teas. As well they have a wonderful array of healthy granolas, cookies, low sugar jams, jellies and preserves packaged in beautiful retail packs. Call in and see them to discuss your needs, try some samples or email them your requests. Opening Hours: Tuesday - Friday 9am - 4pm, Saturday 9.30am - 4pm, and PN Sunday 11am - 4pm. Closed Mondays. F CAKE & CO, 2/175 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 376 3479 E: jackie@cakeandco.co.nz orders@cakeandco.co.nz www.cakeandco.co.nz

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photography: Aaron McLean

EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY SWEET TREATS WITH A NATURAL TWIST


PHIL PARKER: WHOSE WINE IS IT ANYWAY?

By Jove, it’s sangiovese (a cautionary tale) Heron’s Flight pioneered sangiovese about 17 years ago in the clay soils of Matakana. The first vines were planted in the late 1980s by couple David Hoskins and Mary Evans, starting off with chardonnay, cabernet and merlot. Then in 1994 David’s infatuation with Italian wines led him to plant sangiovese. Since then, all the other vines have been pulled out and replaced with either sangiovese or latterly, northern Italian grape dolcetto. Sangiovese translates as ‘the blood of Jupiter’ and is the variety from which the famous Brunello di Montancino red wine is made. I was first introduced to the wine by David and Mary about 14 years ago when I started my wine tour business. Since then I have got to know David and Mary and watched their wine develop to gain the attention of some of our top critics. On a recent visit, David handed me a bottle of the brand new 2013 release and said, “Here. See what you think.” So, I tucked the bottle inside a carry bag and popped it in the rear of the tour coach. All very well. On arrival at home, sadly ‘some items had moved during transit’ and when I opened the hatch, horrors - the carry bag slid out of the coach and landed in the gutter with a loud crack. I immediately thought, “Oh no. I can’t ask David for a second bottle. Plus I won’t be up that way for several weeks. Golly.” Thus, the sight of a 50ish man, furtively drinking red wine from a Pt Chevalier gutter with a teaspoon did occur some time in the second week of February. Luckily, I soon got another Matakana tour booking and David supplied me with my second sample bottle. It tasted a whole lot better. I also opened a bottle of the 2012 second tier sangiovese for comparison. Heron’s Flight Matakana Sangiovese 2012 $30.00 This is a second tier wine, made in years when David feels the quality is not quite up

to premium level. Yet after three years bottle age, this wine is drinking very nicely. Earthy, smoky and black cherry aromas. Ripe flavours of blackberry, liquorice and sour cherry, with a gently rustic long finish. Heron’s Flight Matakana Sangiovese 2013 $60.00 Literally a few weeks in the bottle, this is very much a youngster but shows huge promise. Purple crimson colour. Aromas of ripe plum, spice and herbs. Opens out after decanting with rich ripe flavours of black cherry, dark berry fruit, spice and chocolate with a long finish. Fantastic. I won’t drop another bottle of this one. (PHIL PARKER) F PN Heron’s Flight Vineyard, 9 Sharp Road, T: 09 950 6643 or M: 021 0258 8203 E: contact@heronsflight.co.nz www.heronsflight.co.nz Open seven days from 9.00am. Don’t miss their pizza on summer weekends!

Read Phil’s blog at nzwineblogger.blogspot.co.nz www.insidertouring.co.nz Phil Parker is a wine writer and operates Fine Wine & Food Tours in Auckland.

THE BOX - RIPE RECIPES Ripe Deli has done it again! This time in the shape of a recipe box. Following the success of their two recipe books ‘Ripe Recipes’ and ‘A Fresh Batch’, Angela Redfern and her team have brought us ‘The Box - Ripe Recipes’, a modern incarnation of your mother or grandmother’s recipe box. Angela says, “I hope this becomes a well-loved box with an inspiring collection of recipes that can be passed down through the generations to come. I still have fond memories of inheriting my grandparents’ recipes and treasure them dearly.” The Box’s design is clean and uncluttered to suit any kitchen, with four lid colour options - Ripe Red, Ripe Green, Vibrant Yellow and French White - to fit any colour scheme. The Box is made here in New Zealand out of New Zealand radiata pine (a sustainable wood source) and aluminium. It comes flat packed for ease of long distance gifting, and is simple to assemble.

blank recipe cards to personalise your own box. Each season Ripe will be adding new recipe packs ($15) to collect.

So what’s in The Box? The Starter Set ($60) comes with 16 summer recipe cards, a Festive recipe 16 card pack, recipe tabs, top tips, and conversion charts as well as 20

THE BOX - RIPE RECIPES, Ripe Deli, 172 - 174 Richmond Road, T: 09 360 6159 www.ripedeli.co.nz

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Other custom options (basic Box alone; recipe packs alone; additional blank recipe cards) are available on request. You can buy The Box - Ripe Recipes online from the Ripe website, or from Ripe Deli itself. Latest updates to The Box - Ripe Recipes will be shared via subscription to the emailing list on Ripe Deli’s home page. F PN

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY MA CHERIE THE REAL FRENCH EXPERIENCE For over 17 years, French Patissier Guillaume Nicoli worked in France for top chocolatier Fauchon, Maestro Thierry Mulhaupt and other one and three Michelin star restaurants. Since living in New Zealand, he has been a guest judge on Master Chef season two when Nadia Lim won and has appeared on the Good Morning Show. Guillaume has also created Ma Cherie, an authentique French pastry brand which has become a leading wholesaler supplying macarons, mille feuilles, éclair and tarts to gourmet stores Farro, Nosh, La Cigale, C’est Fromage plus many hotels and finedining restaurants. For the first time you can now try the full range of pastries and delicacies designed by Guillaume in a gorgeous cafe setting located in a cosy courtyard near All Saints Church on Ponsonby Road. His sweet treats are created using traditional French recipes and seasonal local products. Guillaume says, “When creating my pastries I only use highquality ingredients, I believe we can only do good, with good.’’ For those who prefer savoury, they have a French-style breakfast and lunch menu with a selection of savouries - galette, croque monsieur and french rolls. So whether its pastries, croissants, chocolates, or bread baked fresh each day you desire or simply ordering a birthday cake or gateaux, call in to Ma Cherie for a real French experience; food, music and a French chef who loves to talk with his customers about his product. Children and pets are welcome to relax in the safety of the courtyard. PN Open: Tuesday to Friday 7am until 4pm, Saturday and Sunday 8am until 4.30pm. F

MA CHERIE, Shop 12, 282 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 376 1822 E: info@macherie.co.nz www.macherie.co.nz

GARLIC-GINGER VEG STIR-FRY Do your taste buds and heart health a favour - ditch the salt but not the flavour! Serves 4 (as a side) Time to make 15 minutes. 2 onions, diced or chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger 1 medium-sized red chilli, deseeded, chopped 8 cups mixed vegetables such as bok choy, broccolini, snow peas, mushrooms, bean sprouts 1 lime, juiced ½ cup chopped fresh coriander, to serve Step 1 Heat a large, lightly oiled frying pan or wok to a high heat. Add onions. Cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Step 2 Add garlic, ginger and chilli. Cook for 2 more minutes until softened. Step 3 Add remaining vegetables and stir-fry until tender-crisp. Serve with lime juice and coriander. Recipe: Georgia Rickard Photography: Ian Wallace Recipe reprinted from Healthy Food Guide magazine with permission from Healthy Life Media Ltd. Find more recipes that boost flavour without salt in the March 2015 issue of Healthy Food Guide ($5.90), on sale in supermarkets and bookstores or subscribe at www.healthyfood.co.nz. F PN

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NEWS FROM GREY LYNN FARMERS’ MARKET

SOPHIE WILLIAMSON, POPPY AND OLIVE What’s your favourite thing about making nut butter? It’s not so much the actual making of it, but my favourite thing is how versatile they are. I love experimenting with recipes and incorporating them into our meals. How long have you been making nut butter? I’ve been making nut butter for years at home, but decided to try and turn it into a business about 18 months ago. If you could sum up your food philosophy in one sentence... Fresh, whole foods with the occasional treat. Where did you grow up? Tauranga. What’s the biggest business challenge you’ve had to face? Trying to upscale my production so I can grow my business - currently still trying to climb this hurdle!

photography: Rachel Alford

What’s your favourite New Zealand holiday spot? Glenorchy - a tiny town at the head of Lake Wakatipu (just above Queenstown). So beautiful and peaceful. Spent two great summers working at the infamous Glenorchy pub during my uni holidays. What’s your favourite thing about coming to the Grey Lynn Farmers’ Market? The amazing fresh produce and local artisan foods on offer. Poppy and Olive are at the market on the first and third Sunday of the month. F PN

EMMA GREENSLADE, KRAUT COUTURE What’s your favourite thing about making sauerkraut? When I make sauerkraut I go into a meditative zone. It’s a process that has to be completed from start to finish, which is really good for me as I have had years of being distracted by kids! I love choosing what other ingredients I’m going to flavour it with because what you add makes such a difference to the end result. I love listening to jazz while making it, we dance together, the cabbages and I. Where did you grow up? I am blessed to have grown up in Bayswater, where we enjoyed freedom and opportunity. We lived in the same house my whole childhood. If you could sum up your food philosophy in one sentence... With food I love complexity, mixing fresh, real, vibrant, seasonal and wild caught. What’s the biggest business challenge you’ve had to face? My biggest challenge is and continues to be my labels. Sauerkraut is a living food and ferments a bit faster when it’s out of the fridge, so it expands in the jar, and can sometimes leak. Because it’s raw it can’t be heat sealed or you will lose the beneficial microbes. What’s your favourite way to relax after work? I love to swim at the beach, last year one of my good friends inspired me to swim right through the winter, and I will definitely do that again this year! It’s the best pick-me-up! What’s your favourite thing about coming to the Grey Lynn Farmers’ Market? The kids, because the market has an intimate feel, being small and family orientated. It’s great to see them wandering around confidently and I love watching their faces when they sample the sauerkraut. You never can guess who will love it and who will screw up their little face.

ANY PAGE IN PONSONBY NEWS IS A GOOD PLACE TO BE SEEN

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Kraut Couture are at the market on the first and third Sunday of the month. F PN www.glfm.co.nz Follow us on twitter: www.twitter.com/GLFM Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/GreyLynnFarmersMarket PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


GYPSY HEAVEN – SHEENA SHUVANI THE DAIRY - GET YOUR GRILL ON With her flaming red hair, gentle manner and jewelled hands, Sheena is Ponsonby Central’s resident clairvoyant, and certainly looks the part.

A restaurant specialising in grilled cheese sandwiches sounds like a childhood dream, but unlike visions of x-ray glasses and jetpacks, this one has come true.

I find her at Gypsy Heaven, a specially constructed little booth in a corridor off The Lane. The exterior is covered with mysterious signs and charts, and a tray of gemstones sits outside the door. Inside it is an oasis of calm; low lit, velvet chairs and a table clustered with books, tarot cards and a crystal ball.

This busy little eatery is not just for kids though and offers a menu far more elevated than what Mum made on sick days.

“Ponsonby Central was just a building site when I started reading here, she says in her softly Irish accent. I love having my own place but I can do what I do anywhere, I have travelled the world with it!” Sheena discovered her gift at the age of six and was trained in the art of tarot and palmistry by her aunt. Descended from a long line of gifted fortune tellers on both sides, she is part Irish part Romany gypsy. Sheena has done tarot card readings from Melbourne’s Queen Victoria Market, to Palo Alto in San Francisco, from Dublin to Covent Garden, and Portobello Market in London and has been the psychic of choice to countless fascinating characters along the way.

With the best New Zealand cheese available sitting on shelves right there inside the specially designed and built ‘affinage’ or cheese maturing room you would not be surprised to hear that The Dairy are already developing a cult following for their mouth-watering Grilled Cheese Toasties. Tara Brogan Tucked in tight amongst the wonderful food offerings at Ponsonby Central they are already a major destination for their yummy ‘ice cream sandwiches’. Now they are fast becoming a must visit for their new menu GCT’s (Grilled Cheese Toasties).

“I’ve read the palms of many famous people in my time. Ravi Shankar, in the Paddington markets, Barry Humphreys (he has the philosophical hand), Jamie Oliver in London, and the late Sir Edmond Hilary,” she adds.

“You can go a lot of different directions with a grilled cheese... It’s really just a starting point,” says Tara Brogan, chef and owner. “Everyone is familiar with cheddar but the menu features a blue from Mahoe and a gruyere from Banks Peninsula.”

Apparently Jamie and Sir Ed both had the ‘spatulate’ hand, which signifies dynamic action and innovation. That does not surprise me and I wonder what other similarities she saw? “Big hearts, wonderful people skills and an adventurous spirit,” she responds.

“Made with slow-roasted pork, Kaikoura labneh and chipotle aioli, ‘The Cuban’ is my current favourite though. But the ‘Dairy Rueben’ with homemade corned beef and maasdam from Meyer in the Waikato is also becoming a real crowd puller.”

Celebrities aside, who are the people who come to see Sheena on a day to day basis? It seems they come from all walks of life and for a myriad of reasons. Some come for a fun reading after a social lunch, others are at a crucial turning point in their life and in need of direction. Sheena sees her role as guiding people in their life’s journey, and will always try to help as best she can.

Headed by the multi talented Tara Brogan (also of Foxtrot Parlour) The Dairy offers a compact but scrumptious menu that will not only satisfy your hunger cravings but also educate as you become more familiar with the exciting New Zealand specialty cheeses and the delicious combinations on offer at The Dairy. Go get your grill on now!

T: 09 378 0484 and A/H T: 09 376 2799

tara@the-dairy.co.nz T: 09 378 7268

Sheena Shuvani The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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LIZ WHEADON: WINE, GLORIOUS WINE

The changing styles of chardonnay This month at Glengarry we explore the changing styles of chardonnay. Chardonnay’s an old, reliable, faithful friend - right? You know what you are getting and it’s consistently the same style. That may have been the case in the past, but not today. All too often chardonnay from around the world is lumped together, stereotyped into being a particular style. Australian chardonnay confined to golden yellow and like chewing on an oak tree; American chardonnay too over blown and hidden behind American oak and New Zealand, too, all peaches and cream. Things have changed and the diversity of chardonnay being produced expanded. Chardonnay has always been a versatile variety though traditionally there’s been to some extent a style that you could pigeon hole into a particular region or countries around the world. No longer. Styles are changing and it’s a great thing. Recently I took a set of 24 wines and put them in front of four of our experienced team members. I asked them first whether the groupings I had put them in were right - just from their knowledge of that producer’s style and not from tasting. They all declared it wrong and then started tasting - soon discovering and rediscovering old friends had changed in style. So to avoid you the same confusion after purchasing your favourite old foe and finding it has changed its clothes, we have tasted through and broken the chardonnay that we stock into four groupings. It is rather hard to pin them all down into just four groups and sure you could have many more groupings, but these four seem to fit and will at the very least stop you ending up from buying one extreme and expecting the other. To further assist we’ve added helpful little icons onto our website and our wineletter. So which four groupings did we settle on?

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Oak-lite (lean, mean and minerally inclined): think chablis, northern Burgundy where there’s a tonne of limestone, chalk and it’s rather cold, the acidity pronounced. Oak ageing is present with some of these but nothing too obvious, the oak used is more to give texture and structure than oak character. This group of wines is all about the fruit; these veer on the leaner, bright and lively end of the spectrum. Deep and meaningful (rich, textural and rather trendy): rich textural and rather trendy; this is new school, or perhaps more accurately the old school techniques interpreted in the new world - Cote d’Or meets the New World. Textural and rich but not buttery and bold, these are mineral and complex but not lean and austere. This group of wines are a trendy style that the New World producers are doing well and making quite a scene on the international stage with these wines. Peaches and cream (Soft ‘n’ fruity - gently does it, Mr Oak): looking for the perfect function wine - these are them. Everything is here, these are complete and excellent wines; though they don’t push the boat out in terms of oak, minerality or toast, they do everything gently - and perfectly. Don’t be fooled by their subtle minimalist approach, these are great quality wines. Fat cats (big, bold and butterscotch): you’d have thought that these would be easy to find - in the past they would, sadly for our many customers who love these wines, they are not all that easy to find anymore. Never fear, we have tasted, tasted and tasted until we found big, bold chardonnay, with plenty of toasty oak characters, a smattering of butterscotch and an expansive enduring finish. During March we have a series of in-store tastings in all stores putting these wines beside each other and giving you the opportunity to try them and see just which suits your preferences. (LIZ WHEADON) F PN Check out the details at www.glengarry.co.nz/tastings

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY

AUTUMN AT THE BOTANIST Food: They are committed to fresh, local, seasonal food. Their amazing chef Sara Simpson has prepared a new menu featuring the flavours of late summer and autumn, including: • House made crumpet, poached pear, chocolate, hazelnut, whiskey maple syrup. • Dashimaki Tamagi - Japanese dashi omelette, seaweed, mushroom and coriander. • Shakshuka - Poached eggs, smoky tomato ragout, Turkish bread, hummus. Flowers: It’s a busy time for their creative floral genius Eden Hessell, with summer wedding and entertaining season in full flight. Late summer is simply the best time for flowers, with zinnias, roses, raspberries coming in, and the last of the hydrangeas still with us. In fashion at the present time are dahlias, lisianthus and the comeback queen: carnations. Come see Eden for all your floral needs. Evenings: The beautiful summer we’ve been enjoying has kept the sun streaming into The Botanist through into the evening. They have happy hour drink specials from 5 - 7pm with beer and wine from $6 and a delicious bar menu starting at $8. On Friday PN nights DJs Guy and Maxwell spin old-school favourites on vinyl. F THE BOTANIST, City Works Depot Shed 13, www.botanist.co.nz

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PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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LAURAINE JACOBS: THE SEASONED PALATE

Lauraine Jacobs reveals the perfect wine bar... Apero in K’Road The highlight of my summer was not the perfect weather that stretched on and on and dried my lawn so it’s now a crisp golden desert, or the leisurely swims in the balmy ocean, or the endless barbecues with delicious smoky food grilled on the deck in our amazing Kamado Joe cooker. What stole my heart was a wonderful evening at the astonishing Apero in Karangahape Road. I cannot think of another place where everything comes together with such ease, such class and yet is so understated I fear to recommend it in case punters looking for fireworks and fizz miss the point. Apero is the new baby of a lovable hospo couple, Ismo Koski and Leslie Hottiaux. They have impeccable credentials to take into this first venture on their own. Koski, known as ‘Mo’, is the knowledgeable wine lover and maitre d’ who fronted Sidart and then Meredith’s, while Hottiaux recently cooked at The Grove and Baduzzi. Those top spots in the city are known for their passion for food, wine and service. What none of them have is Apero’s delightful casualness and informality that is totally charming, endearing and possibly addictive, delivered by this pair who are working their hearts out while having fun. Apero is a wine bar. The definitive wine bar is a destination for enjoying well selected wines while snacking on some accompanying treats matched accordingly. It should be comfortable, intimate and well thought out. Apero does exactly that, going a step further as everything emerging from the kitchen is to die for, filled with flavour and thought. Hottiaux grew up near Toulouse in France, a city known for its fabulous sausage, charcuterie and everything to do with meat. Although she didn’t ever make sausages and charcuterie while she lived there, she certainly acquired the taste and know how for everything that is great to eat from that region. And Koski’s passion for wine knows no bounds. Sitting on the bar that runs through half of the back part of the narrow exposed brick walled room is a gleaming leg of Iberico ham, so what better way to start an evening? Slices of this dark rosy European specialty are hand carved to order to accompany that first glass of house champagne, a properly made and delivered kir royale, or one of those deliciously dry European style aperitifs like campari, pastis, and manzanilla or oloroso sherry. The menu is a tight little exploration of superb meat and vegetables. Do not go there expecting to follow the conventional plan of restaurant eating where starters and entrees are followed by a main course that you dive into by yourself. This food is all about sharing and my advice is to go first time with three or four mates who are keen to try everything on the menu. Hottiaux’s menu cries out to be savoured, discussed and relished at length, and yet it also provides some exemplary little items that could be enjoyed pre-dinner with a glass or two of wine. After that sweet and salty Iberico ham, grab the ‘bag of bread and butter’. This is not house made, but is possibly the best that can be sourced in the city. Tetsuya of Voie Française is the baker who supplies gorgeous little rolls and crusty bread to accompany a slab of Lewis Road creamy butter. Other little treats to kick start are a small bowlful of warm marinated olives (compulsory if you’re on the sherry) and some light as a feather little goat cheese croquettes coated in almond crumbs and serve with Kamahi honey. There’s no doubt that provenance is foremost in Hottiaux’s mind when composing her menu.

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Moving on to more serious stuff, the influence from her days in Toulouse shines. A plate of charcuterie had a generous slab of rillettes as the centrepiece, which was rich, fatty and so flavoursome I could have devoured it alone. Accompanying that were an assortment of pickles and vegetables, some sinfully luxurious duck liver pate, stunning salamis and little quenelles of walnut mustard. The house-made sausage is ordered by the quarter metre, and it arrives curled up like a sleeping snail, deliciously moist, very porky and tender. There’s a rib eye of beef at 750g for $100, but there was so much interest and intrigue in the vegetable selection we passed on that, this time. Ah those vegetables! It’s the season for tomatoes and the kitchen’s arrangement of ripe heirloom varieties was perfectly matched to creamy burrata, olive oil and basil making it a caprese for grownups. The roasted mushrooms were so flavoursome their taste lingered with me for days and - as for the greens - a pile of tender young green beans dressed with olive oil and tarragon. Who would have thought of that? Hottiaux obviously loves her veggies to take this much care with them. “Something fish...” the menu claimed. On our visit it was tuatuas, steamed and served in a beautiful herby buttery broth that we all dipped the tuatua shells in to get every last drop. Other nights, Mo told us proudly, Hottiaux takes the best of what the market has to offer and fashions into something gorgeous - be it kingfish, trevally or some other form of shellfish. The wine list offers plenty of choice by the glass from a tight but thoughtful list of some exceptional, unusual and even familiar bottles. And don’t you like this: “If there is a glass of wine that you would like to try and is not listed by the glass, just ask... Maybe the wine gods are smiling.” Be sure to just ask about wine as Mo is seriously into the subject, enthusiastically bringing bottles to the table to try. It is a list divided by To Begin, The Fizzy Ones, The White Ones, The Red Ones and To Finish. New Zealand wines are well represented, but there’s also a grand selection of wines from around the world to challenge and tempt the tastebuds. My favourites? The silky Mount Edward gruner veltliner, the bold Wolftrap white blend from Boekenhoutskloof in South Africa and a lovely fragrant Gustave Lorentz muscat from Alsace. To end there’s the favourite cheeses, chosen each week and a lovely little madeleine or maybe a sweet treat like the tiny chocolatey, caramelly bites we finished with. Apero is a seriously good addition to the city’s web of restaurants and bars, perfectly positioned in an unusual but funky part of town. Get there soon if you are serious about wine and lovely food to accompany it. Open daily from 4pm. Lunch Friday only. Closed on Tuesdays. APERO, 280 Karangahape Road, T: 09 373 4778, www.apero.co.nz (LAURAINE JACOBS MNZM) F PN www.laurainejacobs.co.nz

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


PONSONBY NEWS READERS ARE EVERYWHERE

1 1. Bruce Hopkins from Action Actors tells us, “I took time to browse the Ponsonby News, while MC-ing ‘TheOneLastParty’ in HOLLYWOOD the night before the Oscars. It was the final party hosted by the massive online community TheOneRing.net honouring Tolkien’s work and Peter Jackson’s films.” 2. St Mary’s Bay residents Gerard Hall and Allan Horner tell us, “We don’t recall ever seeing a review in the Ponsonby News of this wonderful restaurant, but if you are ever travelling up north, make sure you divert of SH1 into WAIPU township and enjoy the food and atmosphere at The Pizza Barn. “Ponsonby News readers wanting a day at the beach could explore the many BREAM BAY beaches which are less than a two hour drive from Ponsonby, have a scrummy lunch at The Pizza Barn and enjoy the scenery along the coastal road on the return journey. The Pizza Barn is also open for dinners and is constantly full, but with a super efficient team running the restaurant you won’t have to wait too long for your meals. “The small size gourmet pizzas are an ideal meal size for an adult and at only $12, great value for money. They have many other food options other than pizza. “If you get the chance for a days, outing or perhaps a weekend away up there, you will not be disappointed.” 3. Westmere resident Don Mathewson tells us, “While on my family sponsored Father’s Day trip, I had a read of your magazine during a quiet spell, while attending a ‘Australian Breweriana Swap meet CANvention’ in January. Ninety attendees from all over AUSTRALIA and New Zealand came together to trade cans and hotelware at the North Queensland event in a very hot town called Caboolture.”

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PONSONBY NEWS READERS ARE EVERYWHERE Dear readers please keep sending us your holiday snaps reading your favourite magazine. We love getting them! Photos need to be in high resolution (300dpi), so please email them to info@ponsonbynews.co.nz without reducing the size.

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ROSS THORBY: SEA FEVER Leaning precariously out from the lower promenade decks of the new Queen Elizabeth, those of us dislodged early enough from our bunks to watch the daybreak entry into Honolulu’s port were rewarded by the sight of a large pod of the island’s spinner dolphins surfing over and through our bow wake. A lively welcome back to Oahu after far too many years that signalled another fantastic day in paradise amongst a perfect climate, a tropical landscape and, even more importantly, more cheap Mai Tais than you could shake one of those little paper umbrellas at. Looming ahead of us and silhouetted against the orange glow of dawn’s early light was Honolulu’s Aloha Tower standing tall and proud. Hawaii’s version of the Statue of Liberty has stood sentry over its harbour since 1926 when it was completed at the earth shattering cost of $160,000 and billed then as Hawaii’s tallest building. Built originally as a lighthouse, its own guiding status was used against the “friendly islands on a date which will live in infamy” as cited by Franklin D Roosevelt. On the morning of 7 December 1941, it stood perilously close to danger as the then United States territory’s morning peace and harmony was destroyed by the low drone of Japanese dive-bombers invading the clear blue skies and bringing terror and death in the form of an aggressive act of war by the Japanese imperial airforce. The tower was one of the few surviving tall buildings in the aftermath of that day, and was soon to find itself painted in camouflage colours to help protect it should the anticipated Japanese invasion eventuate. It did, but not for another 30 years and with far happier consequences for all concerned. Fortunately today, it is no longer dressed in fatigues and the building is again a beacon for the cruise ships that berth alongside now creating a colourful welcome of hula skirts and aloha shirts and a vast army of guides offering tours together with tempting excursions to Waikiki’s stunning beaches, helicopter rides and even a tour of Magnum PI’s filming locations; a particular tour that was extremely appealing and far more enticing than I care to admit. Now you must appreciate that I’m not obsessed with ships, no truly I’m not, well maybe just a little, so today I had to forsake the tempting call of Magnum and Higgins in favour of an opportunity too good to miss. I had my sights set on the ships of Pearl Harbour and Roosevelt’s infamous hell. All week our ship’s lecturers had delivered us a steady stream of rhetoric and discussions, describing the events of the day. The movie theatre being regularly filled with the cries of “Tora! Tora! Tora!” After a short taxi ride from the Aloha Port, I was quickly aboard a vessel then ferried through the working naval port and across to the USS Arizona Memorial. Bridging over the hulk of one of America’s finest, still lying where it was submerged on that day after being struck by four separate bombs and consumed by fires which burned for two days. Some of the bodies of the 1102 fated crew still lie entombed in the fallen leviathan and all are remembered on the walls of the bridge straddling the superstructure. Some who survived the initial bombing have had their remains scattered at the wreck to be alongside their compatriots and the previous day there had been one such ceremony. Standing on the shrine looking down at the exposed gun turret of the once mighty warship, its bulk just below the surface of the water, you can still see rising to the surface small globules of oil containing the essence of the ship and its crew, bridging across time and connecting you to their past. Accessed by over two million tourists each year, the atmosphere reminded me of my visit to Gallipoli a few years ago when I was struck by the age of the visitors who are commemorating such sites. Here like the beaches of Anzac Cove, they are surprisingly young, or maybe I’m just getting old. Groups of Gen X and Y who come here to see for themselves and to continue holding the flame for those who fought for their freedom. There is much in the islands to see and do, no matter what your inclination. That’s the great thing about Hawaii, so small and compact yet that night at dinner, everyone had PN vastly different experiences and stories to tell. Mahalo! (ROSS THORBY) F

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FASHION + STYLE CALLING ALL SHOE LOVERS! Since 2003, Yvonne Bennetti has been delighting her clientele with custom-made shoes. Many have said that wearing a pair of Yvonne Bennetti shoes feels like wearing your favourite pair of slippers, while still feeling and looking stylish, fashion forward and comfortable - a shoe lover’s dream come true! No wonder the likes of Rachel Hunter and Lucy Tang are loyal customers. Former assistant designer to Trelise Cooper, Yvonne opened her Herne Bay flagship store 12 years ago - Yvonne began her career in textiles in Hong Kong, and after living there for more than a decade she returned to New Zealand. Right on the (high) heels of her shoe collection, a new clothing line is set to launch in mid-March. This collaboration, christened ‘Martini & Jam’, aspires to reflect the ‘real’ New Zealand woman. The martini represents the sophistication that all women enjoy (and that Yvonne does so well). The jam, to represent our daily lives, taking care of partners, kids, pets, careers and all the rest. The limited edition line offers what are sure to become go-to pieces; classic pieces infused with just the right ‘pzazz’ and nothing over $550. With the opening of the shoe store in Herne Bay, Yvonne is introducing a full line of allleather, handmade shoes. This collection has a delightful array of options such as the best-selling gold-studded trainer, a street chic black snakeskin boot with gold-chain detail and three gorgeous stilettos with Yvonne’s sassy signature red heel, just to name a few. With the prices ranging between $220-500 your wallet will be as happy as your feet! Visit the gorgeous new store, located at Jervois Road, or for more instant gratification you can now find the entire collection online at the Yvonne Bennetti website and shopVIVA today. F PN YVONNE BENNETTI SHOES, 216 Jervois Road, Herne Bay, T: 09 360 9327 www.yvonnebennetti.com

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FASHION + STYLE RETAIL SUPERSTAR Alejandra Salazar, Jane Daniels Ponsonby How did you come to be a retail salesperson? I love fashion and I wanted to do something I enjoy. What brought you to Jane Daniels? I liked the fact that Jane is a New Zealand fashion designer and that she is exclusive; also that her pieces are all unique and have stories behind them.

MM6 MAISON MARGIELA AT THE SHELTER Monday 16 February Vicki Taylor, Mark Thomson and guests celebrated the arrival of MM6 - the diffusion line from iconoclastic, avant-garde fashion house Maison Margiela, at The Shelter.

What do you love about your store? I like the environment. The minimalistic, industrial design complements her unique designs well. What makes a standout retail salesperson? My priority is not to sell the customers something but to offer a personalised experience and to see them walking out of the store happy with either an item they bought or the service they received. Tell us about a memorable sale you’ve made this year... I had this lovely customer who was looking for an outfit for her daughter’s wedding. She had been to Melbourne and many places in New Zealand and wasn’t satisfied with what she had found. After a couple of hours we had found her an outfit that looked amazing on her and she was so so happy. If you could wave your wand and have anyone in the world walk into your store right now, who would it be? “Ummm that’s a hard question. I really like Olivia Palermo, her style is amazing, I can just picture her wearing our new season ‘cut away vest’ and the culottes. Where do you enjoy shopping? I’m obsessed with Weekend Trader in Ponsonby Central, but I’ve got a fully furnished apartment so what I have room for is limited. Name someone you think is a great greater Ponsonby retail salesperson... The girls at Ruby, they’re always super friendly and helpful. F PN

Mark Thomson, Vicki Taylor, Rachael Churchward and Grant Fell

JANE DANIELS, 63 Ponsonby Road Auckland, T: 09 361 6333 www.janedaniels.co.nz

The crowd at the Shelter MM6 launch

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FASHION + STYLE 1000 TEES FOR 1000 WOMEN photography: Anna Kidman

The New Zealand Breast Cancer Foundation has launched a fundraising campaign in tribute to the 1000 women - an average of eight women diagnosed every day - who will be diagnosed with breast cancer this summer. Liz Mitchell

1000 Tees for 1000 Women will raise funds to create a new, tailored counselling service for women with breast cancer. 1000 t-shirts numbered one to 1000 will be available to purchase for the dollar value of their individual number. The NZBCF aims to raise $500,000 from their sale.

“Providing personalised support is overwhelmingly important. The 1000 women diagnosed this summer will be at different stages in their lives, and will want support in different ways,” says Rebecca Wadey, official ambassador of 1000 Tees for 1000 Women, breast cancer survivor and journalist.

photography: Olivia Hemus

Funds will go toward a free, tailored professional counselling programme for women affected by breast cancer.

Rebecca Lawson

“Each tee is a tribute to one of the 1000 women diagnosed with breast cancer this summer... and a symbol of the generosity of the wearer,” says Evangelia Henderson, CEO NZBCF. New Zealanders can show their support for 1000 Tees for 1000 Women and New PN Zealand women with breast cancer by purchasing a t-shirt and wearing it proudly. F

photography: Anna Kidman

www.1000women.co.nz

Clarke Gayford

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FASHION + STYLE THE GEMSTONE FOR MARCH Donna Mills, owner of Jewels and Gems introduces us to the qualities of calcite. The information comes from the scientifically conducted trials of German stone specialist Michael Gienger. Calcite is very often formed from sediments or mineral deposits of sea creatures which have extracted calcium from sea water to form their shells or exoskeletons. When they die they form reefs which over time become chalk hills and mountains. Chalk is simply calcite. Given sufficient space and time, calcite will form crystals and compact structures in white, yellow, orange, red, green and blue. Calcite is a carbonate of calcium and stimulates the metabolism of calcium in our bodies. It promotes the uptake of calcium in the bowel and strengthens the flora in the gut, ensuring good digestion and preventing build up of substances harmful to bones. Even when applied externally, calcite stimulates the metabolism of calcium from food and the uptake of calcium into the skeleton. Calcite also stimulates the mineralization processes that integrate calcium into the body’s structures, thus helping the biological processing of minerals that have been absorbed. In this way it promotes the regeneration of bones and cartilage. A stone for old and young, calcite can help with osteoporosis, arthrosis, arthritis, rheumatism, meniscus and disc problems, and a range of back, knee and joint complaints. It may even help to accelerate the healing of broken bones. It certainly encourages the healing of tissue and bone. Calcite also promotes bone growth and overall development in children. It alleviates skin and intestinal complaints, stimulates blood clotting and strengthens and normalises the rhythm of the heart. Mentally and emotionally it brings stability, resilience, confidence and vigour, helping us to be more energetic, industrious and successful. It helps us transform ideas into actions. Each strong, warm colour has its own unique healing qualities. Looking at the colours of calcite, I often find myself just wanting to eat them like lollies, or hug them close to my heart. F PN JEWELS AND GEMS, 54 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 378 4389 www.jewelsandgems.co.nz

DRESS FOR SUCCESS: LIZ MITCHELL FOR ZIERA SHOES In an initiative to raise funds for women’s charity Dress for Success, Ziera Shoes has commissioned fashion designer Liz Mitchell to design a Ziera shopping bag. The bag will be sold through Ziera stores in both Australia and New Zealand as of 1 March for $2.95, with the proceeds to go to Dress for Success in both countries. The design inspiration for the shopping bag was the Z of Ziera. “Liz has captured the brief perfectly creating a stylish and fashionable bag that we know women will want, and that they will repurpose over and over again,” says Group Marketing Manager Nicky Dunn. The mission of Dress for Success is to “promote the economic independence of disadvantaged women by providing professional attire, a network of support and the career development tools to help women thrive in work and in life”. Since launching in New Zealand in 1999, it has assisted nearly 30,000 women in this country. Ziera currently donates hundred of pairs of new shoes to Dress for Success annually, and is a key partner. F PN DRESS FOR SUCCESS www.dressforsuccess.org LIZ MITCHELL www.lizmitchell.co.nz ZIERA SHOES www.zierashoes.com

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10 YEARS FOR JIMMY D As fashion designer James Dobson releases his 21st Season for Autumn/Winter 2015, Reality Bytes, he also celebrates his 10th year in business. There will a celebration at The Shelter - where James’ store within a store, Children of Vision, is located - on 18 March. The Shelter’s window will be filled with a retrospective of key Jimmy D looks from the past. Instore installations featuring a press archive, runway video, design inspiration and ephemera will be up for two weeks from celebration day. Jimmy D’s new season is a matrix of internet spam - pop-up windows, ads for Russian brides, and invitations to rate or like; the 90s - asymmetric tops paired with long skirts and dresses, gothic grunge, androgynous skirted shorts and pants; and sportswear - printed elastic bands on underwear, crop tops and skirts as well as ‘jdxl’-emblazoned socks with an athletic attitude. In brief: photoshop + spam + jdxl (‘a new wonder drug’) + health goth + 90s internet + geeks + porn + captchas = Jimmy D Reality Bytes AW15! F PN

FASHION + STYLE SILLS + CO OPENS IN HERNE BAY There’s a new kid on the block… Sills + Co opens its doors in Herne Bay. The renowned fashion label, Caroline Sills, was created by designer and entrepreneur Caroline Sills in 1982. With a sharp eye for beautiful design, and originally specialising in knitwear, she and her husband Lloyd Sills developed the company into a multi-million dollar fashion force in less than a decade. Sills’ quick success was through sheer determination and unwavering high standards in quality - still the backbone of the company today. It has over 100 loyal wholesale accounts in New Zealand, Australia and South Africa who can testify to the quality and innovation of Caroline Sills. Sills takes a mentoring role in the organisation these days, leaving the responsibility of the brand to the next generation, Ange Todd who heads the design department and Sills’ daughters Toni and Christina looking after sales, marketing and retail with Rebecca Garcia taking care of all things online. Ange says, “We’re lucky to have Caroline, an absolute matriarch of the industry and all round incredible woman. As a mentor she provides us with a creative environment that nurtures the best in us, and she doesn’t mince words if it isn’t!” With a signature look that’s urban and luxurious, only the finest yarns and fabrications from around the world are used. Luxe cashmere and silk are perennial staples - like Sills herself, the Caroline Sills consumer is stylish, sophisticated and well travelled with an eye for quality, humour and the finer things in life. Visit the beautiful new store, Sills + Co at PN Jervois Road, Herne Bay. F SILLS + CO, 220 Jervois Road, T: 09 376 2835 www.sills-and-co.com

JIMMY D @ Children of Vision, The Shelter, 78 Mackelvie Street, T: 09 3766544 www.theshelter.co.nz

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ANGELA LASSIG: LETTERS FROM MAUDIE The monthly jottings of a free-spirited Ponsonby dressmaker of the 1920s, as imagined by Angela Lassig. VERMONT STREET, PONSONBY 15 MARCH 1925

Dearest Alma, Thank you for the brocade, which arrived safely yesterday. You said it was special but I did not expect it to be so astonishingly beautiful! And such a goodly length too. If I cut it carefully, I might just be able to squeeze a very smart evening frock out of it. I would dearly love to keep it... the trouble is that I never get invited anywhere really posh so it would just sit in my wardrobe pining for attention. Such a stunning fabric needs to be shown off. Perhaps I’d better save it for one of my smart young things. It would be just the thing to wear for dinner at Claridges, don’t you think? I’m astonished that your customer didn’t want the rest of her fabric back and completely understand that it’s useless to you in Gore. Alma, I’m so pleased that you liked the Indian silk samples I sent you and see that you’ve settled on the pale lemon. As I have plenty of that and also too much of the pale green that you also liked, I shall send you six yards of each. With my customers now looking to autumnal tones I can easily spare these. Both colours were never really popular - I’m not sure why. The lemon is divine isn’t it? I hope you consider this these a fair exchange for the brocade, which I could never possibly hope to ever find in the Auckland shops.

She’s promised to show me her stock of Hungarian braids and trims that her sister sends her from Budapest. Alida’s older sister didn’t come to New Zealand as she has a very successful millinery salon, which she was loath to give up. She’s also engaged and wants to live with her future husband in Hungary. Perhaps Alida might allow me to purchase some bits and pieces to use for some Autumn blouses I’ve got in mind. I’m thinking of a simple straight cut tunic style with low wide neck, long flared sleeves and slits at the lower sides. I’ve set aside three velvets especially for these - in deep russet, rich forest green and a dark orange-brown colour. The edges would really suit being trimmed in a rich woven braid. I’m hoping that Alida has some of the lovely wide peasant style braids that I’ve seen in the French magazines. If she has enough, I’d like to use the same braid to made velvet-lined belts that could be worn loosely with tunics and simply tied into a soft knot at the hip. Do you get the picture? I’ll offer to make one for Alida - she’d really suit the style. Another lovely person I met at the gathering was Gabriella Astrella, whose mother makes the most delicious ice cream in all of Ponsonby! She uses some old Italian family recipe as the basis for her ices. Early in the summer she created a delightful strawberries and cream recipe that I had far too much of ! Anyway, Gabriella is apprenticed to Maisy and Lizzie Nankervis [1 ] and I hear she is a real natural. After only a year they are allowing her to cut patterns from their best cloths. She also has a flair for design it seems.

We, the unmarried dressmakers of Ponsonby, had an impromptu party on the Ponsonby wharf last Saturday evening. It was our own version of the St Catherine’s Day festivities that our French sisters celebrate each November. Following tradition, we all made silly hats which we wore down Ponsonby Road on our way to the wharf, attracting, as you can imagine, quite a few quizzical faces! We each brought with us two paper lanterns, a plate of sandwiches, a plate of sweet treats, a blanket and a soft drink. In all there were ten of us. We placed the lanterns in a circle around us at the end of the wharf, ready to light at dusk, and spread out our blankets. We set up our feast in the middle and the party began. Happily it was a still, warm evening. When we lit the lanterns, the end of the wharf was transformed into a softly glowing island. We attracted quite a few curious onlookers after the lanterns were lit but we didn’t mind one little bit as we were having such a lovely time! It might have done us some good actually, as most of the gawkers didn’t know that there were so many of us working locally. We did experience the ire of a few unsympathetic fishermen who grumbled under their breaths about ‘bloody wimmin’ ruining their evening of ‘fishin’. And such a perfect night for snapper apparently... something about the moon and the tide. They didn’t stay around to argue their point though!

George came down at eight to walk me home but as it was such a delightful evening we lingered for a while... but only a short while... as the displaced fishermen grumbled their way down the jetty to their ‘lucky’ spots on the wharf. What a lovely summer Alma! I really think that it has had an effect on my whole being as I feel truly happy. I hope that you are being treated to as nice a season as we’re having. Well my dear, do write soon and tell me all your news. Perhaps you might organize your own St Catherine’s Day picnic. We’re definitely having another next March.

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Maudie xx The Misses Nankervis are listed as dressmakers and milliners at 265 Ponsonby Road (christian names are fictional) [1 ]

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illustration: Michael McClintock

With fondest wishes, I had such a wonderful time and made some new friends. One of them, Alida, is Hungarian. She arrived in Auckland only five years ago with her parents. Her father is an engineer and her mother is a music teacher. Like me she has a workroom set in the garden, of her parent’s house. They live in one of the big houses up on the hill near the wharf. I’m going to visit her on Saturday.


FASHION + STYLE TRAVEL FOR INSPIRATION - JANE DANIELS WINTER 2015 Each season Jane Daniels creates a unique colour palette inspired by her travel. “Exotic travel exposes you to new ways of seeing colour. The winter palette is anchored by my exploration of Oman and Zanzibar," says Jane. “Frankincense is the ‘gold’ of Oman: the origin of the ancient trail. Inspiration came from the contrast of the golden green foliage against the dark purple mountains, the endless burnt orange desert of the Wahiba sands and the unusual colour combinations of the hand painted ceilings of the Jabrin castle. “Zanzibar revealed brilliantly coloured spices, Princess Salme’s elaborate costumes, the deep blues and violets of the tanzanite gemstone and the enticing aquamarine water of the lagoon around Mnemba Island.” Jane Daniels is sophisticated clothing with intelligent design, ensuring you are always at your best. They pride themselves on their top level of service and can provide styling services within their stores. F PN JANE DANIELS PONSONBY STORE, 63 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 361 6333 www.ponsonby@janedaniels.co.nz

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FASHION + STYLE: JULIE ROULSTON

Get them while they’re hot New season fashion pieces to snap up before they sell out: it’s worth getting your wallet out sooner rather than later for these beautiful items, be they investment pieces to own for a long time, or standout seasonal options.

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1. Ruby ‘Sakura’ cocktail dress $299 2. Jimmy D ‘Japandroid’ kimono $740 3. Andrea Moore ‘Swarovski Wink Wink’ merino sweater $298 4. Cooper ‘Love Bomb’ jacket $749 5. Moochi ‘Sphere’ dress $329.99 6. Taylor ‘Trapeze’ shirt $397 7. Karen Walker ‘Planter’ trench $1240 and ‘Starburst’ frames $369 8. Shen fitted leather dress $600 9. Blak Luxe ‘Awakening’ coat $499 10. Liam ‘Chiaroscuro’ top $229 11. Marc by Marc Jacobs ‘Luna Trap’ crossbody bag $398 12. Workshop Denim ‘Girlfriend’ coat $649 13. State of Grace ‘Cherished Poems’ top $345 14. Ruby ‘Shiro’ culottes $289 15. Sergeant Pretty cashmere/wool tweed pants $295 and wool v neck boyfriend sweater $230 16. Salasai ‘Bones’ tee $125 and ‘Feminist’ skirt $299

WHERE TO BUY IN GREATER PONSONBY Andrea Moore www.andreamoore.co.nz Blak Luxe @ Blak Chaos www.blakchaos.com Jimmy D @ The Shelter www.theshelter.co.nz Karen Walker www.karenwalker.com Liam @ Ruby www.rubynz.com Marc by Marc Jacobs @ Workshop www.workshop.co.nz moochi www.moochi.co.nz Ruby www.rubynz.com Salasai @ Staple and Cloth www.stapleandcloth.co.nz Sergeant Pretty www.sergeant-pretty.myshopify.com Shen www.shenclothing.com State of Grace www.stateofgrace.co.nz taylor @ The Shelter www.theshelter.co.nz Trelise Cooper www.trelisecooperonline.com

PRECISION CUTS AT CHANTAL LANDAIS “A precision haircut will sit properly, you never have to worry about it, the hair will fall in the right way,” says Kate Harding. Chantal Landais Hair Studio on Jervois Road has welcomed Kate Harding to the team to work alongside Chantal herself and Iryna who has been with the studio for some years - and has a great following. Kate has recently returned from Melbourne where she ran her own hair studio in Albert Park, and shares with Chantal a dedication to the industry and customer service, as well as the core training of Vidal Sassoon and Toni & Guy. “I used to work at TV3 in the early years, one minute I would be doing 60 Minutes, next minute the styling on the Prime Minister and jumping in a helicopter to chase after somebody else,” laughs Kate. “For me it’s about precision cutting and cross checking and really feeling the hair,” she says. Kate’s energy and creativity fits right into the culture of the hair studio and the dynamics of the new team promise some great hairdressing ahead. Chantal and Kate have noticed an over-texturising and what Kate calls ‘shredding’ the hair. “Traditional blunt cutting and all those fantastic techniques that actually protect the hair - that’s what we want to do. Not only cut your hair, but protect it,” says Kate. “For us it is about great blow waves, precision cuts and professional finishing to the hair,” says Kate. “You can still have beautiful, messy, sexy hair, but it’s cut well and it’s styled well.” F PN CHANTAL LANDAIS, 128 Jervois Road, Herne Bay, T: 09 376 4402 www.chantalandais.co.nz

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Iryna K, Chantal Landais and Kate Harding at the Chantal Landais Hair Studio on Jervois Road DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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HELENE RAVLICH: LOCAL BEAUTY

Local beauty: Macayla Chapman, Bird and Knoll Many years ago now I worked for RCM Clothing, the legendary home of New Zealand fashion labels Helen Cherry, Workshop and Workshop Denim. I worked with some truly wonderful and talented people who went on to create some pretty amazing things all of their own, and one of those people was the lovely Macayla Chapman. Westmere resident Macayla went on work as a fashion editor before moving to Sydney several years ago, where she met photographer Natalie Knoll. The pair hit it off famously and in a true meeting of a fashion mind and creative eye, the luxury accessories brand Bird and Knoll was born. In just over a year the carefully considered, highly desirable brand (I own more of their scarves than I’d dare to disclose!) has appeared in fashion mags both here and across the ditch (Harper’s Bazaar Australia called their scarves the “perfect travel accessory”) and is constantly smashing frequently shifted goals. Their point of difference is most definitely their creative approach, which gives their brand a bespoke, luxurious feel. You feel pretty damn special wearing one their scarves is all I can say, and their versatility means that no two are worn the same. Nomadic, South African born Knoll - who now calls Sydney home - came up with the idea whilst lying on a sun lounger in Hawaii. Wanting to merge her passion for photography and travel, she came up with the idea of printing her favourite images on accessories. This is where Macayla came in, and the pair quickly got to work on their new business with Natalie’s talent behind the camera and Macayla’s creative business background meeting somewhere in the middle. The trans-Tasman collaboration now focuses on combining tactile, quality textiles and finishes with distinct photographic images to create a beautiful brand of luxe accessories, for a woman who is “confident in her style and, being well-travelled, not afraid to step out of her comfort zone and experiment with new, under-the-radar labels like Bird and Knoll”. Working on either side of the Tasman has not phased the duo. “I think working simultaneously in two different markets really works for us”, says Knoll. “We have launched successfully into both Australia and New Zealand as a result of us being able to nurture the brand firsthand in both countries.” Macayla is passionate about what she does, and tells me that the art of choosing the perfect scarf shade is a tricky one, as it is worn directly next to the face. “Shades like navy as opposed to black next to most skin tones just makes more sense,” she explains, and with so many, multi-hued Bird and Knoll pieces to choose from there really is something for everyone.

Bird and Knoll’s Macayla Chapman and Natalie Knoll The latest offering in store for the brand is called ‘Icebergs and Piña Coladas’, and takes us around the world on an exotic and inspired travel-themed journey, captured through the lens of Knoll’s camera. The thought of juxtaposition has inspired the stunning new collection of digitally printed, cashmere-blend scarves, which although designed for winter wear are directly informed by the likes of the famous Bondi Icebergs pool, a Parisian carousel and the tropical skies of Maui. Their signature travel images printed onto the surprisingly durable “canvas” of cashmere and modal, also showcase the colourful street life of San Francisco, Thailand’s serene island bays and the hustle and bustle of Hong Kong’s thriving alleyways. The pair will also be launching what she calls a “sub collection” later in the year entitled The Pixel Collection, will be made up of smaller scarves that feature specific elements of three of the designs from the collection that have been closely zoomed in on. “They will be square and look more like a block colour from afar, but with detail and variation when close up,” says Macayla, “and we’re going to continue doing that from this collection forwards.” The Pixel Collection will also be integral to the brand’s further move into the American market this year, “as they always need something fresh and new, frequent drops, resort collections and that kind of thing,” she adds. She also gives me a sneak peek at Fernweh, the pair’s collection to be released in August named after a German term that loosely translates as a wanderlust, a desire to travel, a longing for far-off places. It is to die for as per, and I for one am already compiling a shopping list of scarves I may not need... but just have to have. Macayla is passionate about scarves, and her passion is infectious. She enthuses that they are “just such a versatile product, you can really use them for anything. In one day on Waiheke over summer I used mine to shade myself from the sun eating lunch, as a head scarf after a swim, to dress up my outfit for dinner and then over my daughter on the way home as blanket”. Need further convincing? I didn’t, and have become a raving fan of this wonderful young brand. You can find Bird and Knoll at the Simon James Concept store and online at www.birdandknoll.com (HELENE RAVLICH) F PN

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HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY

For the love of candles Anyone who knows me well will tell you that I have a veritable fetish for scented candles, and they are the perfect accompaniment to pretty much any situation. I have a ‘wardrobe’ of candles that I like to choose from, dependant on mood and time of day, and am constantly on the hunt for new additions. I am known to drop major coin on my candles at times, and so take caring for them pretty seriously. I’ve invested in the likes of a candle snuffer and wick trimmer, and always follow instructions when burning a new brand. No one likes soot blackened glass and uneven mounds of wax, and Jackie Ashley, founder and co-owner of Ashley & Co, has happily shared some of her top tips for getting the most out of your candle every time with me, which I’m happy to pass on. 1. First, equip yourself. Candle care isn’t rocket science, but you will need a few items to get the job done including a wick trimmer and long matches.

I am new to the Ashley & Co candle collection - which they refer to as ‘waxed perfume’ - but have long used their hand wash and the like, which is absolutely beautiful. Their top selling candles are Tui & Kahili and Blossom & Gilt, and I’m currently burning Once Upon A Time - a heady mix of fig and black gardenia that is impossible not to love. All of their products are gleefully made here in New Zealand, and they are available the length and breadth of Ponsonby at the likes of Superette and Coast. A brand I have long loved for both its luxuriousness and affordability is Australasian fragrance house ECOYA, who have just added the latest Limited Edition fragrance, Oriental Lily & Patchouli, to their diffusion collection of natural soy wax candles, Botanicals by ECOYA.

2. Trim your wick to the ideal length - 6mm - ensuring none of the trimmings remain in the wax.

The new fragrance has a luxurious aroma of oriental lilies and jasmine melded with the rich essence of patchouli and sultry musks, and is an amazing trans-seasonal candle choice for when the evenings start to cool (told you I was obsessed by candles).

That pesky black soot on the inside edge of the glass is caused by the flame flickering too high, usually as a result of debris left in the glass.

Housed in a hand painted cut glass, the soy wax candle has a burn time of up to 55 hours and is available until the end of August, 2015.

3. Starting right - The initial burn of a candle is crucial and often overlooked. Wax has a memory, so it’s important to let the wax pool to the edge on the initial burn, then it should burn evenly for the rest of its delicious-smelling life. It also pays to keep the waxed perfume away from airstreams like heap pumps, windows or fans.

Also available for a very limited time is Jo Malone’s newest collection - and the perfect way to kick off the year - entitled My Wanderlust. Curated by Charlotte Stockdale, Jo Malone’s style editor, the My Wanderlust home collection is jam packed with luxurious essentials that will have you browsing the airline websites and planning your next overseas jaunt before you know it.

4. If it doesn’t burn to the edges on the first burn, it will begin to tunnel and won’t burn evenly each time. But never fear - if help didn't arrive in time and you’re already suffering from ‘tunnelling’, Jackie has a few suggestions to even out your beautiful waxed perfume. If the tunnelling isn’t too bad, lay the candle on its side, use your lighter to melt the wax away from the wick and pour it into the trash. Next, chisel out the wax that is above the level of the wick with a butter knife. Use a cotton ball or paper towel to remove the wax after it has melted. 5. In a perfect world, candles should be burned for four hours each time, and not more than once every 24 hours. This prolongs the life of the waxed perfume. 6. If you ever see smoke or soot burning off your candle, it’s likely happened because a small carbon deposit - like a mushroom on the tip of the wick - has formed from it being burnt for more than four hours. 7. Lastly, old stockings work perfectly to give your candle a general clean as they catch all of the dust and leave no residue behind - who knew?

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Each scent from the collection was crafted out of Stockdale’s love for travel and the places she has explored, and the stellar line up includes a candle, home scent, linen spray, soap and a diffuser. I’ve been burning the Cardamom & Moroccan Rose home candle throughout the holidays, which has to be sniffed to be believed. Reportedly inspired by the vast foothills of the Atlas Mountains, the scent has dominant notes of aromatic cardamom, sweet Moroccan rose and honeyed spice with hints of fresh ginger and chamomile - resulting in expansive yet luscious floral facets with a truly exotic result. Morocco has long been on the top of my bucket list and this wee treat has got my own wanderlust peaking - it really is that good. So, stick to Jackie’s tips and treat yourself to a new candle... and go forth and burn, baby burn! (HELENE RAVLICH) F PN

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HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY

Winter hair - it’s all about care and repair I get it, you love summer. Your hair? Not so much. As your tan fades and autumn makes its approach, chances are your sun streaked summer hair could use a little love, as well as a brand new direction for the cooler months. Naturally the people to turn to in times of need are the experts, so I’ve tracked down a few of my faves from the neighbourhood and racked their brains about all things hair - care and repair.

delivers high-gloss shades to enhance natural colour and add an unbelievable amount of shine and gloss. “ Colour-wise he says that he and his team “Love shiny, glossy hair, deep golden brunettes or vibrant burnt toffee copper tones are my favourite.”

Danny Pato from D&M hair design is one of the country’s top stylists - and with good reason. As well as constantly innovative and just plain excited about his industry, he’s also a seriously fun person to be around and his passion for fashion and beauty is beyond compare. When I ask him if he is seeing many clients coming in with damaged hair post-summer holidays he immediately says, “Yes, especially as the Kiwi summer was such a beautiful one. Our sun is pretty intense; combine that with ocean swimming and being outside most of the day, and you've got a recipe for dry and damaged hair.” So, does this mean that the only solution is to cut the whole lot off and start again? “If you've got damaged hair then a wee trim is probably on the cards, yes,” says Danny, “But there are also some incredible masks and treatments out there to restore your hair back to its former glory. A good start is to pop into a salon for a professional restructuring treatment then use a thick conditioning mask at home in place of your conditioner.” Some key products he recommends to give hair back some love are a dynamic duo that begins with Moroccanoil Restorative Hair Mask. “It is a fantastic protein mask to repair damage and make your hair strong again,” says the super stylist, “Then if you’re looking to restore moisture and elasticity as well, a quick spritz of Naturaltech Replumping Hair Filler Superactive from Davines will do the trick beautifully.” To revitalise your style for winter Pato says that a colour change is always good, with some of the freshest shades taking their cues from celebrity locks. “I love the bronze blonde that Jennifer Lopez, Jessica Biel and Beyonce do so well,” explains the stylist, “Along with rose gold tones on Emma Stone and Christina Hendricks and golden brown on Miranda Kerr.” He adds that the red carpet-friendly choppy, textured bob - as sported by Karlie Kloss, Jourdan Dunn et al - is a definite frontrunner for cut of the season. His favourite? “Sienna Miller on the red carpet at the Golden Globes - there was more talk about her hair than her film roles!” The always-charming, ridiculously talented Matt Benns, creative and salon director at Stephen Marr, embraces what summer does to hair and is definitely Team Go With It. “Pretty much 95 per cent of our clientele are coming in with post-summer damaged hair but I’m usually happy about it,” he says. “Firstly because it usually means they’ve had a very enjoyable summer break, and secondly the elements - whether it be the sun or ocean - create the most beautiful texture in the hair, and I love to play on that.”

Last but by no means least, I sat down to talk with the lovely Katie Harris from Loxy’s on Ponsonby Road. She agrees that “The amazing summer has definitely taken its toll on hair, and our clients are all about long, healthy hair. One of our most popular treatments is the Fabuloso Shine treatment, which really sells itself as it keeps long hair looking and feeling incredible.” She says that a lot of clients book in for a Fabuloso and a blow wave in between regular services as a top up, “As it really makes a difference and is a great colour refresher too”. She says that taking hair darker will up the shine factor, “But we see a lot of blondes at Loxy’s who really don’t want to do anything too drastic. We suggest they add some copper or add a lowlight to take things down a notch over winter.”

He says the answer for him is to “embrace it! With just a bit of colour - hints of various subtle tonal changes - you can really change the overall feeling of the hair. It can make the beachiest of waves look even better, or you can play with texture - braiding your hair the night before is another way of quickly throwing something together.”

Style-wise she says that the “clavicle length and even above the ear length bob is growing in popularity, although as an extensions salon we see a lot of long hair.” Her favourite look at the moment is model Rosie Huntington-Whitely’s freshly cut long bob, “it’s a dirty blonde and has a bit more edginess than the usual long, model hair.”

He says that his hero product this season is Nourishing Ultra Plus, “A multifunctional, leave in treatment that is gold. Original & Mineral also have a product called CCT liquid that

Last up, her product pick for home care over the next few months? “If I had to choose just one it would have to be ELEVEN Miracle Hair, it is a multitasker that pretty much does PN everything, and is good for protection and maintaining great hair.” (HELENE RAVLICH) F

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING NOT ALL BARRE CLASSES ARE CREATED EQUAL! Barrefigure is a chic new boutique fitness studio in Ponsonby, offering targeted body-sculpting classes that fuse principles of ballet barre, Pilates, yoga and strength conditioning to unlock your inner strength. Barrefigure might be the new kid on the block, but with its roots in the pre-eminent studios of New York and London this workout is set to take Auckland by storm. Founder and owner Marysa Dalton is a real life ballerina, with more than 10 years of professional dancing experience in the Royal New Zealand Ballet and companies in Australia and New York. After taking some barre classes in New York, Marysa discovered she loved the similarities to dancing, such as the precision, poise and concentration required, and coupled with the remarkable results the discipline had on her body, she was addicted! Bringing barre to Auckland is a dream come true for Marysa. She has combined her experience of professional ballet dancing and teaching in New York and London to create her own style of barre classes. Whether you are a once-a-week ‘and make it count’ type or an everyday junkie, Barrefigure’s Signature class will get you the results you have only ever dreamed of. What to expect; a low impact, dynamic and invigorating workout which works each muscle group to exhaustion then subsequently stretches out for relief. Barrefigure improves posture, muscle definition, increases flexibility and creates a highly sought after barre body. With a gorgeous studio conveniently located on Richmond Road (next to Ripe) and with PN a new client special of two classes for only $28 there really is nothing to lose. F BARREFIGURE, 166 Richmond Road, T: 09 361 2083, www.barrefigure.co.nz

CLARE CALDWELL: THE ART OF LIVING Balancing the life/work scenario is never easy, especially for people in the arts. All too often writers, painters, sculptors or photographers have been portrayed as solitary and driven, struggling to achieve a singular vision of life and its meaning. In reality, artists rarely live in a vacuum of complete isolation. They need the sustenance of a significant other to nurture, support and validate this most difficult of journeys. In the still predominantly chauvinistic arts climate of the early to mid 20th century, men continued to have relationships with ‘significant others’ as caregivers, muses, lovers, wives and as mothers to their children. Sadly, very few women were taken seriously as artists then, and to have a career in the arts the sacrifice seemed to be that one had to forego motherhood. As a young artist in the 70s and 80s, I made the decision that I didn’t want to forego the experience of parenthood for the sake of my art. Male artists didn’t have to. Why should we? I wanted both! I wanted to be a mother. I wanted to experience the miracle of feeling a tiny life stirring inside me; the agony and ecstasy of natural childbirth; to feed my newborn infant with milk made from my own body and watch and guide my child over the years as they grew into adulthood. I wanted to have the primordial function of being a human female as part of my more extensive human experience as an artist. My relationship with my daughter Sarah’s father ended when she was six months and I remained on my own until I met my present husband. Being a single mum had its advantages. I was able to devote time between my child and my art pretty evenly without the added responsibilities and commitments of a loving relationship with a partner. But I was lonely. Humans need love to thrive. So how do we thrive and find a workable balance within the demands of relationship and the solitude of being an artist - the one being so altruistic and the other so necessarily egotistical? Inspiration doesn’t neatly fall into place in the uninterrupted spaces we have between commitments to family and friends. James K Baxter put this dichotomy so succinctly: “...[the problem] comes from having two minds - the one, careful, considerate and awake to necessary obligations; the other, egotistical, erratic and much at the mercy of feelings... It is difficult to whittle down egotism when one’s line of country in art requires a close, even solitary preoccupation with one’s own feelings” (‘Between the Lines - Partners in Art.’ Edited by Deborah Shephard). Many creative people, be they couples or singles, grapple with this challenge - some more successfully than others. I have the ongoing sustenance of a significant other - my beautiful and wonderful husband, Sean, who nurtures, supports and validates me as an artist and a partner, and who puts my creativity ahead of chores or domestic obligations. PN For this, I count myself truly lucky. (CLARE CALDWELL) F

Clare (Claudie) Caldwell is a creative arts therapist who runs a small private practice from home. She is voluntary team leader of creative arts as therapy at Mercy Hospice Auckland, College Hill, where she has worked for the last 10 years. She is also a freelance artist. Enquiries: T: 09 836 3618; M: 021 293 3171; clare.e.caldwell@gmail.com

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CARING PROFESSIONAL JOHN GILMOUR - PHYSIOTHERAPIST John Gilmour was educated at Auckland University of Technology and graduated as a physiotherapist. Following graduation John continued studies to become a qualified manipulative physiotherapist. He joined the Physiotherapy Clinic in Jervois Road, Herne Bay and was mentored by a leading educator and manual therapist, Jean Buswell. On Jean’s retirement in 1988 John bought the practice and has provided physiotherapy services to the local community and wider-Auckland population ever since. What made you choose to become a physiotherapist? It’s not an uncommon story for physiotherapists; I was involved in rugby and sailing at school and damaged myself playing 1st XV rugby for Takapuna Grammar. I had treatment, was immediately interested and pursued physiotherapy as a career from there. What do you love about your job? The last 10 years have been very exciting. I’ve been working on research, which has now been published, that reports the systems we use in the practice for helping people with very disabling back and neck pain. What do you find challenging? It is distressing to see people in a compromised state. To balance that we have worked hard in the practice to make sure, where possible, that a good outcome is achieved. How do you differ from other physiotherapists? Rather than differing, I have a particular interest in the combination of specific physical findings when I assess a patient with low back pain. The treatment plan for the patient is based on this.

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Can you tell us about a stand out case? It’s very rewarding to see people come back to enjoy a full life from the brink of spinal surgery, though it may not always happen. A recent global study reported that low back pain is the leading cause of years lived in less than ideal health. What do you do to care for yourself? I am passionate about fishing, I love to chase marlin, I enjoy fly fishing and diving. Being outdoors and on the water is a great way for me to get balance and enjoyment in my life. I have had interesting experiences at sea recently with a trip from Noumea to Auckland, fishing off the back of Great Barrier and fly fishing in the Central Plateau. What is your advice to people seeking physiotherapy? Some physiotherapists do have specialist skills. Do your research to find someone with expertise related to your problem. F PN GILMOUR & ASSOCIATES PHYSIOTHERAPY, 134 Jervois Road, T: 09 376 4500 www.gilmourphysio.co.nz

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MICHELLE OWEN: POSTURE TO PERFORMANCE

Posture correction In last month’s Ponsonby News my editorial, ‘What is a postural assessment’ explained what a postural assessment is all about and who might need one. A postural assessment tells me exactly what I need to teach you to correct your posture and from the assessment a specific tailored plan is written and the coaching begins. Re-correction starts with learning where your body should be in space. We must know how to organise and stack our body up correctly, just like bricks stack on top of each other. At first these new positions feel very foreign and it is hard to hold them for any length of time, but with consistent reinforcement, education and practise of the specific exercises over time you will have a fabulous new position that is no longer hard to hold.

Do I need a gym? Your programme is developed to suit you and your lifestyle. If you are gym based we will utilise that, if not, you can work out from home with a Swiss ball.

This is a big learning curve, an adventure and a re-education of your body in all planes of movement - much more than just standing up straight. We have all heard we need to put our shoulders back or stand up straight. Not only are these the wrong cues, it is it not something we can hold for more than a few seconds. Old patterns die hard and expert help is needed regularly to make sustainable change.

Will I have exercises to do by myself? You will be working on specific exercises the moment you start your coaching, you will have great tools to back up your education. A detailed online programme as well as each exercise videoed on your phone so you have all instructions to practise at home or at the gym.

Below are questions frequently asked about posture correction.

No matter what exercise or sport you are doing, correcting your posture will help. If you don’t know exactly where your body position should be you cannot possibly train it to stay there.

Can I correct my posture? Yes, you can definitely correct your posture if you are willing to do the work that is required - if you do decide to put in the time and effort you will have better posture than ever before. What are the benefits of posture correction? Postural aches and drag on your neck, back and shoulders diminish. Joints can rest easy in their optimal position. Tightness and tension melts away over time.

How does poor posture happen? Our bodies have been in poor position for many years. From childhood we slouch at our desks, carry heavy bags, fall off bikes or receive other knocks and bangs. Most of us have never learned how to hold and move our bodies and this get worse as we age. PN (MICHELLE OWEN) F MICHELLE OWEN, Level 2, 10 New North Road, M: 021 770 153 www.michelleowen.co.nz www.fitness-n-function.co.nz

You can breathe with ease as the diaphragm and ribcage are not tight and collapsed. Your nervous system can work freely to supply power to your body. Your organs can rest in their correct places. Your energy is not under constant strain. You know how to move, lift and bend correctly so you don’t keep hurting yourself. You know how to exercise in optimal position to continue correcting your posture. Your sport will improve. You will look 10 years younger with all curves in the right place. You will stand out from the crowd. You will look confident. You will become injury free. You sleep better. How long will it take to correct my posture? Correcting posture is a long-term project not a quick fix. If you were learning a language, you could learn it quickly or spread it out over a longer time - you might be happy with just a few words or you might want to be fluent. Learning to correct posture is the same. It is in the early phase of learning that you need more tuition to change strongly ingrained patterns, and over time you will do more on your own. The more attention you give your new skills and exercises and integrate them into your daily life, the faster the changes will take place. I have many clients making amazing changes very quickly when they have the desire, dedication and discipline. It is such a pleasure to see.

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PLANET AYURVEDA: ASK DOCTOR AJIT

Q: A:

I recently had a massage at your spa in Ponsonby and while I liked the treatment very much, I couldn’t get over the amount of oil that was used in treatment. Is there a reason for this? You are not alone in your thinking. Clients are regularly surprised by the amount of oil used in an Ayurvedic therapeutic massage. No other massage therapy uses as much oil so it’s not unreasonable to ask why.

In Ayurvedic massage, oil serves a number of therapeutic functions: Firstly, it provides a lubrication layer between the client’s skin and the therapist’s hands, preventing friction from building from the massage strokes and damaging skin tissue. Secondly, it acts as a carrier. In traditional Ayurvedic massage, the therapist uses medicated oil, which is not like an essential oil where the concentrate is mixed in the bottle with the massage oil. The preparation of Ayurvedic oils is a very complex process where up to 45 herbs are selected according to their qualities and actions on various tissues and organs. All the herbs used in these oils have particular fragrances depending on their qualities and it is these that give Ayurvedic massage oil their distinct fragrance. It is this medicated oil that is the key ingredient in an Ayurvedic massage and its main point of difference. Other massage treatments use pressure to try to dislodge toxins from muscle tissue but Ayurveda believes that force causes tissue to tense and hold on to its waste. Instead, it is the medicated oil that does the important work of dislodging toxins from the body. The massage strokes move the oil into the body and stimulate the lymphatic system so these toxins can be flushed away. The most commonly used oil in Ayurvedic massage is cold pressed sesame oil. Within the Ayurvedic tradition, sesame oil is viewed as ‘tri-doshic’ meaning it is able to stablise all three doshas, not only at the physical but also on a mental level.

• Research shows that it is a potent antioxidant, reducing the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles; • The vitamin E in sesame oil makes it a very good emollient and moisturiser, maintaining the permeability of the cellular membrane, keeping a balance between intra and inter-cellular fluid. When used regularly the skin feels soft, hydrated and nourished; • Sesame oil can also act as a natural sunscreen, preventing tanning and other damages caused by the harmful UV rays; • The soothing and healing properties of the oil also proves useful in the repair of damaged skin cells. Application of sesame oil to the skin improves blood circulation which helps repair damaged skin cells and gives the skin a healthy glow; • Used on baby skin, sesame seed oil will protect the tender skin against rashes caused by the acidity of body wastes; • For school children, who are exposed to colds and flu during winter, sesame oil swabbed in the nose can protect against airborne viruses and bacteria; • Topical application of sesame oil is also known to be beneficial in the treatment and cure of skin disorders like psoriasis and eczema; • It nourishes and feeds the scalp to control dry scalp dandruff and to kill dandruff causing bacteria; So next the next time you or your Ayurvedic therapist applies sesame oil to the skin, know that apart from it being a relaxing experience, it is doing you some good. (DR AJIT) F PN

It also has a number of other remarkable properties: • It is a rich source of zinc, magnesium, phosphorus, iron and calcium;

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PLANET AYURVEDA, 41 Gillies Avenue, T: 09 522 5390, www.planetayurveda.co.nz

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JOHN APPLETON: ON HEALTH

Magnesium deficiency a common and potentially life threatening problem A front page article in the New Zealand Herald caught my eye recently. “Auckland triathlete’s heart stop still a mystery”. The article tells the story of an Auckland triathlete who was seriously injured after crashing off his cycle when his heart ‘stopped’. Fortunately doctors were on hand to administer life-saving CPR and in this instance a life was not lost. The article states, “Doctors are at a loss to explain what caused the sudden medical event. The patient has no known underlying medical condition or heart disease, did not suffer a heart attack and has no evident impairment to normal heart function such as blocked arteries or heart valves.” The first thought that came to me when I read this article was magnesium deficiency. I wondered if they had tested the man’s red blood cell magnesium level. RBC magnesium is a reliable means of assessing magnesium reserves in the body. This test may have taken some of the ‘mystery’ out of the equation. When we train hard, particularly in hot humid conditions, we sweat out minerals, and magnesium is very easily lost through excessive sweating. Without optimal magnesium, the extremely complex electrical signalling system which controls the heart can be disrupted resulting in a ‘short circuit’. This can literally stop the heart. A link between magnesium deficiency and sudden death is suggested by a substantial number of studies over

the past three decades and it’s something that should be top of mind for all doctors and those competing in gruelling events. Dr Julian Whitaker, a high profile doctor in California, tells the story of a cyclist who was brought to his clinic suffering from severe ventricular arrhythmia which is a potentially lethal rhythm of the heart. Dr Whitaker states, “Because he was such a serious exerciser I suspected magnesium deficiency and treated him accordingly. He was back in his bike in less than a week.” A good friend of mine who was competing in the London marathon collapsed (i.e. his heart stopped) during the event. He was fortunate to be very close to a defibrillating station and he survived to tell the tale. I suspected magnesium deficiency. Magnesium has a huge role to play in cardiovascular health. It’s first on my list for high blood pressure and to control irregular heartbeats. A study involving 200 people given intravenous magnesium after a heart attack showed a lowering of the death rate by 74% - a very impressive statistic. Dr. Mildred Seelig in the United States. who is one of the world’s leading authorities on magnesium, suggests that 80-90% of the population is deficient in magnesium. With a health system that is totally focused on dispensing drugs it’s easy to understand how this situation could arise. No one wants to talk about simple nutrients that can’t be patented.

Magnesium is responsible for the biological function of at least 360 enzymes in the body so a deficiency can result in disturbances to nearly every organ system. The human body contains approximately 25g of magnesium and most of it (around 65%) is in our bones with the balance being in muscles. Muscle cramps and migraines are often an indication of magnesium deficiency. Many imagine that we should be able to obtain sufficient magnesium from our diet. The problem is that if magnesium is not in the soil, it won’t end up in our food. In New Zealand our vegetables are grown in soils fertilised with nitrogen phosphorous and potassium so where does the magnesium come from? In addition to strenuous exercise, there are other ways we can exacerbate issues with retaining magnesium. Alcohol and caffeine have a dramatic effect on magnesium levels. Both promote urinary excretion of magnesium. Some pharmaceutical drugs such as those commonly prescribed for reflux can do the same while some drugs can inhibit absorption. As I see it, the easiest way to stay ahead of the game and give the body the tools it needs to do its job is to take an optimal dose of magnesium every day. I take 400mg of magnesium malate powder after dinner in a glass of water. Not such a pleasant taste but it’s a very PN well absorbed form. (JOHN APPLETON) F APPLETON ASSOCIATES, T: 09 489 9362 john@johnappleton.co.nz www.johnappleton.co.nz

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ADRENAL FATIGUE - TAKE BACK YOUR ENERGY AT BALANCED WELLBEING “So I’m not crazy? Or lazy? I can have more energy and get my life back?” A new concept programme in fatigue recovery has come to Ponsonby. Kaytee Boyd from Balanced Wellbeing has created a monthly clinic where small groups of adrenal fatigue clients can learn how to take back their energy in a structured yet informal environment. The concept works to speed up the recovery process and minimise cost. Conventional medicine still does not recognise, adequately diagnose or treat this debilitating fatigue and stress syndrome. Symptoms include difficulty getting out of bed in the morning, fatigued all day, depression, decreased tolerance and ability to handle stress, low libido, low motivation, memory less accurate, gut issues, diarrhoea to constipation, worsening PMS, anxiety, fibromyalgia, candida, allergies, hypothyroidism - to name just a few. The secret of Kaytee’s great results is a pathology and clinical diagnosis. Kaytee offers diet, lifestyle and supplementation programmes. All treatment is monitored and personalised for each client depending on underlying health conditions.

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“It’s the first time I've ever heard anyone talk about all of my symptoms right down to the constipation and low libido with a plan of attack that I am already blown away with. Finally, after all of these years to find the answers, thank you! Makes me teary thinking of my journey until I met you.” - FG, Ponsonby Visit the website or call for more information or clinic appointments, Kaytee Boyd, B Sc B PN PhEd CHEK NLC II. F BALANCED WELLBEING, M: 021 440341 www.balancedwellbeing.co.nz

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SHEENA SHUVANI STARDUST ASTROLOGY (February 20 - March 20) ♓ PISCES Element of water. Symbol: Two Fish

Quality: Mutable = flexibility Planetary ruler Neptune and Jupiter.

Character Gentle day dreamer, your natural, effortless Piscean charm and considerate ways causes others to relax in your delightful company. Sensitive, intuitive, perceptive, creative and adaptable, that’s you. You love music and art as much as you avoid housework. Your memory is usually excellent and you are impressionable and receptive to outside influences. Flirty and romantic, you see the world through rose-coloured glasses but can surprise with your unexpectedly perceptive and caustic wit. Career Pisces are not particularly materialistic, gravitating often towards poetry, music, dancing and acting. They will study to learn about and enter the swim of their chosen vocation. Shy, modest, non-competitive, you can be lured to the spotlight and shine, encouraged by recognition, admiration and applause. Although self-doubting, Pisceans offer dutiful service as nurses, beauty therapists, hospitality or even as street cleaners. Love and sexuality Romantic and sensuous, ever on the lookout for the intense connection of truly deep emotion. Lifelong love addicts, you desire a magical union of tender caresses and intimacy, celebrated in a steaming love-dance display. However, a romantic set back can really churn up the waters, plunging Pisces into despondency which can settle into bitterness and cynicism (temporarily) until your tides rise once more. At these times the sympathy of friends or a therapist will help heal a broken heart. Helpful advice Be as kind and encouraging to yourself as you already are to others. Say the positive affirmation “I can do it!” daily to empower yourself. Believe in yourself. Don’t overindulge in rich foods and wines.

AROHA HEALING WELCOMES MARCH WITH A PROMOTION AND A NEW CANDLE Our theme is collective harmony. World wide love, peace and harmony begins with inner love, peace and harmony. By taking the first steps and committing to creating love, peace and harmony within oneself (the small universe), we can create the change we want to see in the world (the big Universe). Aroha Healing Candles have a new whanau member; our Aio (peace) amethyst encrusted candle evokes a strong sense of calm, peacefulness and harmony. Hand poured with the intention of bringing all into balance in our lives, thus we can assist to balance those around us. This beautiful, rich and vibrant white floral with violet, spices, vanilla and light musk blend supports meditation practice, creating a harmonious environment and reminds us that peace comes from within. May this candle bring peace and true happiness into your world. In this time of global unrest we feel it most fitting to create harmony. Our autumn-winter promotion this year focuses on our second chakra (svadisthana). The colour of this chakra reminds us of the orange hues and tones autumn brings and awakens our sense of taste. For $149 treat yourself to a nurturing 75 minute Aroha Healing signature massage with our new Aio Candle that comes with a beautiful gift an olive wood branch peace dove necklace. Check out our Aroha Healing and Aroha Healing Candles Facebook pages for images. “Thousands of candles can be lit from a single candle, and the life of the candle will not be shortened. Happiness never decreases by being shared.” - Buddha. PN (ROSANNA MARKS) F AROHA HEALING, 3 Maidstone Street, T: 0800 646 326 www.arohahealing.co.nz www.arohahealingcandles.co.nz info@arohahealing.co.nz

Your lucky number According to Cheiro (the world’s most famous seer) the day of your birth is the luckiest of all numbers for you! Your deepest desires Lifelong friendships. Lifelong union with your soulmate. Favoured precious stones Diamonds, moonstone, amethyst. Favoured flowers Waterlily, lotus. Favoured colours Aquamarine, turquoise blue, lavender, sea greens (paua shell colours). Favoured metal Silver. (SHEENA SHUVANI) F PN

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING NEW ZEALAND CELEBRITIES HELP SHINE A LIGHT ON DOMESTIC ABUSE New Zealand stars have shown their support for national domestic abuse charity Shine by starring in a series of commercials for the organisation’s annual appeal month in March. Toni Street, Jesse Mulligan, Hinewehi Mohi, Kerre McIvor, Manu Vatuvei, Sam Rapira and Scotty Stevenson are among the well-known Kiwis who have lent their star power to the cause by promoting Shine’s fundraising initiatives. Every six minutes New Zealand police attend a domestic abuse incident and provisional police figures released to Radio New Zealand show New Zealand is making little progress in the battle to prevent domestic violence. The shocking statistic highlights the prevalence of violence in Kiwi homes and it is Shine’s mission to stop the abuse and make homes in New Zealand safe and violence-free. Shine relies on donations to operate the numerous services it offers to victims of abuse and the abusers themselves. Currently every month, Shine is referred hundreds more victims than they are able to support. Funds raised during this appeal month will help to increase the number of victims that Shine is able to help get free of domestic violence. The series of TV ads sponsored by Spoon asks the public to get behind Shine during its annual fundraising appeal in March. The Kiwis who star in the commercials are role models to many New Zealanders and it is hoped that their influence and support for the cause will drive people to donate and support the charity. F PN TV ads: Orange Friday www.youtube.com/watch?v=k2LKISDiP1o Star Charms: www.youtube.com/watch?v=eErKt6OrEaI To find out more about Shine or to donate visit www.2shine.org.nz

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MEET THE TEACHER Bev Brockelbank St Mary’s College (and Rangitoto College, Long Bay College, Carmel College, Birkenhead College, Takapuna Grammar). Currently teaching: Primary-Music, years 7-13 - about 350-400 students. How did you come to be a music teacher? I was interested in lots of different subjects and really liked the intermediate age students. I was working as a music teacher as a part-time job while I was a student and came to realise that teaching was something I really enjoyed and could see myself doing long term.

THE BOOK WITH NO PICTURES by B J Novak, Puffin, $26.00 Have you heard about this book from your children or seen the Youtube viral hit clip? If not, you are definitely in for a treat. A picture book without the pictures! This is an interactive tour-de-force for both the writer and the reader - there is no holding back here. The person reading the book must do as the writer instructs... and if they are reading out loud it will delight their audience. This is a very difficult book to read with a straight face. Be prepared to re-read it many times - every night! For ages three and upward. F PN DOROTHY BUTLER CHILDREN’S BOOKSHOP, 1 Jervois Road, T: 09 376 7283 www.childrensbookshop.co.nz

Where did you train? Auckland College of Education in Epsom and Auckland University School of Music. What are your favourite things about being a teacher? I really enjoy working with and getting to know young people and seeing the excitement in their eyes as they master something or discover the joy in something that I am passionate about. Highlight of your teaching career? Primary teaching: exploding science experiments and helping young ones discover what they are good at or overcoming a hurdle. Having young people come back and say, “Thank you for believing in me,” (had a little cry over that). Music teaching: as a group, having everything that you have worked on for ages come together in a performance - what a buzz! Low point of your teaching career? Primary teaching: seeing young ones every day who had difficulties and needs I wasn’t trained or equipped to deal with. Music teaching: I am sad that sometimes music is only viewed as something that will look good on your CV when you apply to do medicine or engineering. How would your principal describe you? Some wouldn’t know who I was! Others have thanked me for my hard work and passion for excellence in music (blush). How would other teachers describe you? Hard working, they like my positivity... dangerous around chocolate. How would your students describe you? On their side and interested in them. Once they said I was “Different, good different.” If you could wave a magic wand in your classroom... I would have a class of students who all came to school ready and able to learn. Five tips for mums and dads: 1. Love your kid no matter what - everyone needs someone on their side. 2. Let them organise their gear a bit, make mistakes and learn from consequences. Please don’t do everything for them and try to bail them out. 3. With the younger ones, go easy on the extra activities and homework. Childhood is so short and magical and kids need to get out, create, imagine, move and play! 4. Therefore I really like screen time limits. 5. If you have any worries or concerns to do with school, just ask! I think it takes teachers and parents working together to get the best education for a child. I always used to say to my parents at Meet the Teacher Night “If you believe 70% of what you hear about me, I will believe 70% of what I hear about you!”

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FUTURE GENERATION BAYFIELD GETS ITS GROOVE ON AGAIN! Music on the Field is Bayfield School’s biennial fundraising concert and a special day out for the whole family. Involving an array of famous local musicians and entertainers, the event has become an iconic part of Bayfield School’s special character. With live local music, entertainment for the children, fabulous food and fine wine, Music on the Field is an opportunity for you to support local children at a local school.

This year the musical line-up includes Hello Sailor, Illegal Music DJ’s K-One and Peter T and Brooke Duff, with more announced soon!

Originally created back in 1999 by ex-Bayfield parent Dave Dobbyn, the event continues to be a day of celebration, inspiration and enjoyment for the whole community.

Why not hire a corporate tent for the family or clients for the duration of the event? Positioned with prime view to the stage area, the cost of the tent includes seating, the right to ‘dress’ the tent as you wish with branding and signage, acknowledgment as a supporter, beverages and platter for up to eight people.

Music on the Field attracts residents and friends from the immediate Herne Bay area and surrounds including Ponsonby, Grey Lynn, Westmere, and Freemans Bay.

So get the date in your diary now, Saturday 21 March, midday till 5.30pm. You sure won’t want to miss it! F PN Purchase tickets or find out more at www.musiconthefield.co.nz

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BILLY HARRIS: KIDS IN THE COMMUNITY

The boys who like to play indoors Jude and Max Beullens are packing a lot into their young sporting lives. The futsal (indoor football)playing brothers are fresh back from starring for Auckland at the Australian Futsal Nationals in Sydney in January. After a long tournament played in sweltering conditions, the Auckland 10th Grade As qualified for the final, where the rigours of eight round robin games and a semi final finally caught up with the exhausted Kiwis and they went down in a pool of sweat to Victoria Metro. Kiwis? Well, most of the team were. Jude and Max are Australians who moved from Melbourne to Auckland two and a half years ago. Although futsal is growing in New Zealand, in Australia it’s more established and the boys played it as their main sport. Eleven-year-old Jude started when he was six, and eightyear-old Max has been playing for four years. Fortunately for the boys they were exposed to great coaches from Brazil, Argentina and England, not to mention Melbourne coaches who won the World Club Cup last year. And here in Auckland, the head futsal coach who works with the boys captained China’s World Cup team. All that passion for futsal has, had a most positive brain-washing effect on the two protégés. They’re football and futsal nuts, and have a knowledge befitting devotees far older. For instance, Jude lists among his favourite football players Franz Beckenbauer, a German legend of the 1970s, and Garrincha, a dazzling Brazilian who won the World Cup in 1958 and 1962. Max displays an equally sepia-toned appreciation of football when he names, among others, Brazilian legend Pele, Dutch superstar of the 80s and 90s Marco van Basten, and the great Danish goalkeeper of last century Peter Schmeichel.

Jude and Max with their futsal coaches Leandro and Jiong Victoria Metro, who’d already beaten them in pool play. Unfortunately there was no Rockystyle turnaround, and Auckland wilted 6-1. The Beullens more than played their part. Max, despite being two years the junior of most of his team mates and opponents, finished the tournament as third top scorer with 13 goals, and Jude, whose rock-solid defence didn’t stop him contributing eight goals of his own, was recognised for his outstanding contribution by being named in the Tournament All Star 5, a theoretical team selected by all the coaches. Jude catches the eye for more than just his ability. At 2pm on Febrary 20, but with the day not yet over, he was 172.5cm, so he could fairly be described as ‘strapping’. So tall in fact that his parents are used to raised eyebrows from parents on the opposition sideline wondering if the boy standing head and shoulders above everyone else fits under the age limit. At this rate, Jude will one day scale 6’8” (2.03m for younger readers), which will make him a formidable unit whatever sport he plays.

It’s common in sporting families for the siblings to end up watching each other play, and, sometimes, for a younger one to fill in for an older one’s team if they’re short of players. So it is with the Beullens boys, but Max does way more than just make up the numbers. At the Aussie Nationals, for instance, Max was to play a starring role.

With the jet-setting over for the time being, Max, who attends Ponsonby Primary, and Jude, who’s starting at St Kents, are back to normality. Of sorts. With two competitive brothers under one roof, life is seldom dull. Whether it’s futsal, football, cricket, Aussie Rules (you can take the boy out of Australia...), music (they both play a couple of instruments), playstation or fantasy league, there’s always something to get the competitive juices flowing. However, once they step outside the door, the brothers are tight as a drum.

With the oppressive heat a concern (the venue, with its tin roof and no air conditioning was more sauna than stadium) Auckland had to manage their health carefully. That meant water guns, ice towels and almost non stop drinking. They negotiated the round robin section with six wins and two losses, and a 65-16 goal difference, which took them into the semi final. There they comfortably beat New South Wales Country 5-2 to set up a final with

So what are the boys’ goals for the future? Here it gets complicated somewhat by the lads’ ancestry. Their grandfather is Belgian and their dad Damian did a year’s service to attain his Belgian citizenship. That could give the boys quite a headache one day, as should they go on to fulfil their dream of playing international football, they’ll be eligible to play for PN Belgium, Australia and New Zealand! Paper, scissors, rock anyone? (BILLY HARRIS) F

THE PLASTIC BOTTLE KAYAK CREW BUILDING KAYAKS AT MOTAT THE INTREPID ENVIRONMENTAL ADVENTURERS, THE PLASTIC BOTTLE KAYAK, ARE preparing for their next expedition; to build and paddle a fleet of kayaks made from thousands of plastic bottles (and more than a dash of Kiwi ingenuity) through the pristine coastal areas of Abel Tasman National Park from 22 - 24 March. These passionate youths are on a mission to raise awareness of plastic pollution in New Zealand and educate others on the importance of sustainability through their adventures.

Based around this project, The Plastic Bottle Kayak team have designed an education programme in conjunction with Enviroschools. The programme allows students to learn about sustainability, design, and even initiate a community project with the help of The Plastic Bottle Kayak team. Once the expedition has been completed the team will also be visiting schools to talk about what they have learned and help classes create sustainable projects to aid their own communities.

The Museum of Transport and Technology is supporting the project leaders with showcasing of their work as they finalise the four kayaks needed for the expedition. From late last month, visitors to the museum will be able to find out more and watch the crew in action while they design and build their fleet. MOTAT CEO, Michael Frawley says “This is a unique opportunity for the public to get involved with an exciting waste positive project which will inspire other young people to creatively use technology and innovation to become the future custodians of our natural environment.”

Teachers and schools interested in this educational opportunity can find out more by going to www.plasticbottlekayak.org/education

Following a successful 100km adventure through the rapids of the Whanganui River in 2013, The Plastic Bottle Kayak once again unites a team of dedicated young people from across the country’s largest youth organisations. Even local celebrities are onboard with popular singer and songwriter Jamie McDell getting involved with the initiative. As they paddle and experience the stunning Abel Tasman reserve first-hand, the crew aims to share the adventure with Kiwis everywhere - to engage them with the beauty of New Zealand and the exciting possibilities that sustainability brings to society.

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FUTURE GENERATION LIFE INSPIRES, BRINGING HOPE AND A PLACE TO CALL HOME LIFE is a local church and community organisation, with a heart for reaching people. They see the needs of those in our community as a priority, their mission is to help those facing real challenges in a heartfelt and practical way through increased resources and effective partnerships. LIFE believe that attending church on a regular basis, spending time with others, and investing who you are into God’s priorities is a pathway to reach the potential that God has for you. People catching up after one of LIFE’s Sunday services

As a church they meet in three campuses across Auckland - Mt Eden, Albany and Mangere - as well as in Warkworth and in Melbourne, Australia. Regionally they meet throughout the week with community connection and pastoral support at a local level. LIFE is a family, a place to call home, whatever your age or stage of life - there is something for you. They have an amazing kids and youth programme that runs every Sunday and on Friday nights, LOUD for young adults, their women’s ministry - Sistahood and for those with a passion for business, they run various events and mentoring programmes throughout the year. LIFE TV with Paul de Jong screens weekly on TV3 and Prime with content that will inspire and bring hope. Full episodes and life stories can be viewed online at www.lifenz.org/life-tv

Christmas Box packing, one of LIFE’s community initiatives

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For more information on LIFE, please visit their mobile-friendly website at www.lifenz.org or like them on Facebook/LIFENZ F PN

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FUTURE GENERATION A SMALL SCHOOL WHERE ANYONE CAN ACHIEVE ANYTHING Mt Hobson Middle School opened in a villa on Remuera Road, Newmarket in 2003. With a maximum of 48 students across Years 7-10, it is a boutique school offering exceptional education with a different approach to learning. This includes a project-based curriculum that integrates the core subjects of English, maths, social studies, science and technology. It also has a unique day structure that helps students to be focused and engaged - mornings are for academic work and afternoons are for art, music, sports and community learning. “Our philosophy is that intelligence is not a fixed entity, but able to be developed in every child,” says academic manager and founder, Alwyn Poole. “Our teaching staff share the belief that if you provide an outstanding opportunity, anyone can achieve anything.” Mt Hobson Middle School has a foundation in Christian values and is an ideal “oost model” for students of any ability level. “It’s inspiring what students achieve during their time with us. The middle school years can be a tricky time for children - in the ages from 10-15. We give them an opportunity to really love learning again.” Teachers keep in contact with students as they progress through the senior high school years and beyond. Over 13 years, this has confirmed that the learning model is ideal in preparing students to meet the needs and challenges of the 21st century. F PN MT HOBSON MIDDLE SCHOOL, 131 Remuera Road, T: 09 523 1241 www.mthobson.school.nz

HEALTHY OPTIONS FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY CapriLac goat milk and milk processing facilities are owned by two farming families. The partners in the company have extensive experience in milk processing, food technology and dairy farming throughout Australia and New Zealand. The goat dairy farms in both countries are also owned by the partners. The product Range includes CapriLac Fresh Goat Milk, CapriLac Goat Yoghurts, CapriLac Milk Powder and Alpine Dairy Free Coconut Yoghurt. CapriLac goats are fed a mixture of food, most of which is grown on the farm. Home grown pasture, silage and hay form the majority of the goats’ diet. They do not use feed modifiers or antibiotics in any feeds and all their foods are GMO free. CapriLac goat yoghurts are made from 100% full cream goat milk and come in a range of flavours in a 500g tub. The probiotic goat yoghurt is carefully cultured using fresh milk, the best fruit ingredients and all natural products to give a smooth, rich texture and creamy flavour. CapriLac fresh pasteurised whole milk is bottled direct from the farm. It has a deliciously smooth flavour and is available in 1L bottles. They take the utmost care to ensure you get milk that is not only good for you, but tastes fantastic too! Alpine coconut yoghurt is a new coconut milk yoghurt product it’s 100% dairy free and fully cultured natural yoghurt. It has a tangy taste and smooth texture, ideal for breakfast, lunch, dinner and dessert meals. Available at Nosh stores Auckland wide, New World Victoria Park, Bhana Brothers and PN The Dairy, Ponsonby Central. F www.caprilac.com

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FUTURE GENERATION PLAYCENTRES SUPPORT WORKING PARENTS Playcentre is in Amy Mansfield’s blood. Her grandfather helped set up the Eden-Epsom Playcentre and her mum attended in the 1970s with Amy and her sister. She then joined Freemans Bay Playcentre with her first son, Archie. But when arts manager Amy went back to work part-time after having her second son, Lewis, she didn’t want him to miss out on the playcentre experience. That’s where her dad John stepped in. “Playcentre is about diversity and working parents are part of that picture,” says Amy. “Centres these days have the flexibility to accommodate many working parents.” Now, both John and Amy alternate attending with one-year-old Lewis and, until recently, with Archie, who has just started school. “The really important thing about playcentre is the whole idea of community. It’s not temporary either. “My mum is still really close friends with all of her friends she met when my sister and I were kids at playcentre,” says Amy. Learning through play is what a playcentre is all about. But it’s more than a playgroup - Playcentre is a licensed early childhood education provider, receiving funding from the Ministry of Education. Parents and other caregivers are the educators, staying in session and playing alongside their children while also taking responsibility for the wellbeing and learning of all enrolled pre-schoolers. For Ursula Bernauer of Westmere, returning to work as a nurse after having her two children was made easier with the support of both her husband Carl and mother-in-law Vivienne. All three adults attend Herne Bay Playcentre one day a week each, sharing the job of caring for Aliana, 4, and Benji, 3.

Westmere three-year-old Benji attends Herne Bay Playcentre with his grandmother Vivienne

“I see it like a house - the more walls you have, the stronger the house will be, which is why I think we’re so fortunate we can have our children’s grandparents involved,” says Ursula, who hopes the arrangement will continue when her third child arrives in June. “Playcentre used to be just for stay-at-home mums but we have many mums and dads who work part-time,” Ursula says. Both local playcentres offer free, no-obligation visits for families to come and see what the centres are all about. F PN FREEMANS BAY PLAYCENTRE, T: 09 376 1492; HERNE BAY PLAYCENTRE, T: 09 360 0890.

John Mansfield assists his grandson Lewis with carpentry at Freemans Bay Playcentre

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FUTURE GENERATION GREY LYNN MUSIC TEACHER Having started as a music teacher when he was 17-years-old, Karl Benton became fascinated with the practice of teaching as an art - how to capture and help the student discover their own ‘inner musician’, which Karl says can often prove highly instructive for the teacher too! He draws on a variety of disciplines - classical tradition for the fundamentals of course, but also jazz and contemporary pop music when the student is ready to discover their own creative spark. He works with many young people - from beginners through to artist development for young musicians and budding songwriters. Coming from a background of many musical styles, Karl has had ongoing musical relationships with a variety of artists, from 80s and 90s funk heroes Ardijah to baritone legend John Rowles and Latin icons Kantuta. You will often find Karl with the Latin quartet Manteca down at Sky City’s Bellota and around town with a neo-soul outfit TaylorMade. Karl has been itinerant teacher at Dilworth College, Excel School of Performing Arts and teaching privately in Grey Lynn for the last seven or eight years. He has represented New Zealand musically on numerous occasions in Thailand, Australia the Pacific, most recently in South Africa where Ardijah played at the famous Jazz on the Rocks Festival in Cape Town. Karl also produces music with Jason Eli at Groovadelic Records, cooking up some deep-dish delicious dance-floor treats for the local progressive dance scene. If you are looking to find that ‘inner musician’ or want a fun and engaging teacher for your child, look no further. F PN KARL BENTON, M: 021 084 59753, karlbenton821@gmail.com

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EMPLOYMENT & EDUCATION FINDING A SATISFYING VOCATION WITH PERSONALITY CONSULTING Why do we get on with some people more easily than others? How do we know which working environment will suit us best? Can I survive in the corporate world as an introvert? How can we figure out a way to communicate with people more effectively? These are interesting questions. With over 15-years of career and people development work behind her and a passion for working with the concepts borne from Jungian theory and MBTI® (more commonly known as Myers-Briggs Type Indicator®) local Ponsonby resident Ali Lawrie has established PersonAlity Consulting to help individuals and groups answer these questions. This service is personalised and tailored to meet the needs of her clients.

experience, conversation, language, activities and tools such as the Personality Puzzle™ to facilitate the learning experience. Working with a group Ali can give insight into how to develop a cohesive working team in a fun and effective way.

Having worked within the education, government, hospitality and corporate sectors Ali has an extensive knowledge of a range of working environments and the challenges presented within teams. Recognising the differences in personality and gaining insight into how to bridge the gaps begins with self understanding and this is where the work begins.

Finding a satisfying vocation is a challenge at any age as we are faced with financial, family and environmental constraints. Ali feels incredibly fortunate to have had the opportunity to work with and assist so many people from secondary school through to retirement age find their direction or even just facilitate the change in perspective that opens up the space to move toward a new pathway.

The MBTI® is used globally as a valid and reliable assessment tool developed with the foresight of Isabel Myers and her mother Catherine Briggs. Originally intended to help women entering the workforce during the war to find a satisfying employment environment, today the MBTI® is used by over two million people every year within organisations keen to improve leadership, team work, career direction and productivity. Ali has found that in today’s fast paced environment people’s toes tend to curl at the thought of a 90 point assessment form and often these questions are not answered in the most effective way. Giving due respect to the work of Isabel Myers, Ali uses

“Seeing people get those ‘aha’ moments is where I get my good buzz from,” she says. What Ali is offering are individual sessions, or group workshops that are tailored for teams of people of all ages in all stages of education and work. The team work can also include sports or social groups, it’s great learning with takeaways for everyone.

For Businesses: Team Building - Diversity of Communications workshops. For Adults: Personality work, communication strategies, career direction, employment skills. For Teenagers: Career direction, personality work, employment skills, finding that first part time job. Get in touch with Ali at PersonAlity Consulting today on M: 0275 426 720 E: ali@personalitytype.co.nz W: www.personalitytype.co.nz Facebook page: www.facebook.com/personalityconsult

ANY PAGE IN PONSONBY NEWS IS A GOOD PLACE TO BE SEEN

IT OPPORTUNITIES ABOUND Moving into 2015 the Auckland technology sector has never been so buoyant and there are a multitude of opportunities for skilled individuals across a wide range of IT areas. It is fortunate that there are large numbers of highly successful software exporters with large development teams based here in Auckland who are taking global markets by storm and the demand for programmers with experience in Java, .Net, Android and iOS is constant. However it isn’t just programmers that are in high demand here currently. There are opportunities within the corporate arena for experienced business analysts, project managers, development managers and test/QA analysts. Accessing great talent is the ongoing struggle all companies face, and it will only get more challenging as demand increases. The team at Lloyd Executive believe it is important that clients have a robust recruitment process that allows them to look outside the square and also consider their own value proposition when trying to attract that talent - it’s highly competitive out there. On the other side of the recruitment equation, it is also essential that candidates research and consider the opportunities available to them, and their own value-add to

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those organisations. Being prepared for and confident in interviews is also essential for success. Lloyd Executive service both the client and candidate side of this equation. If you need assistance with any aspect of your employment situation, whether you are looking for technology talent, or your next career option, call their experienced team of consultants PN today in confidence. F LLOYD EXECUTIVE, 41 Crummer Road, T: 09 377 8545, www.lloydexecutive.co.nz PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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EMPLOYMENT & EDUCATION TOP SCHOOL CELEBRATES WORLD-CLASS EXAM RESULTS Everyone wants the best for their children. For many parents, that means providing their child with the opportunity to go to university or on to further study once they leave school. Diocesan School is celebrating exam success after its students achieved outstanding results in 2014, in NCEA, International Baccalaureate and scholarship. Students not only out-performed national results, but also the results of students in schools in the same decile band across New Zealand. Even though the standard for University Entrance was harder to achieve in 2014, Diocesan’s pass rate remained consistently high with 99% of students continuing to access university or tertiary institutions each year. For Diocesan student, Sarah Holland, the world is now her playground thanks to her academic achievements and the encouragement and support she received while at school. With offers from a number of Ivy League colleges, Sarah has accepted a place at Princeton University which will allow her to follow her passions of field hockey and photography while she studies. "Our Ethics and Leadership programmes help students to develop confidence and a belief in themselves as leaders and this in turn supports their outstanding achievements in sport, arts and academic learning," says Principal Heather McRae. “At Diocesan you will see students who are open to challenge, are willing to develop their abilities, enjoy learning and take risks. We encourage them to follow their passions and support them to achieve their personal best.

KRISTIN’S NEW EXECUTIVE PRINCIPAL - MR TIM OUGHTON The start of any school year is an exciting time, filled with fresh faces and new beginnings. This has particularly been the case at Kristin where the school community has welcomed a new executive principal for the start of Term 1. Mr Tim Oughton has come to Kristin from Scotch College in Adelaide, one of Australia’s leading independent schools, where he was principal for eight years. Previously, he was the headmaster of Scots College in Wellington, Acting Rector of St Andrew’s College in Christchurch and a senior lecturer in science education at the Christchurch College of Education (University of Canterbury). As well as his significant experience in educational leadership and teacher education, Oughton is a passionate sportsman and Tim Oughton, Principal Kristin has been a successful rugby coach and referee, both in New Zealand and Australia. He holds a B.Sc(Hons) and an M.ScEd(Distinction) from the University of Canterbury and has had a national profile as a leading chemistry educator. A fifth-generation teacher, Oughton is excited to join Kristin and he is well versed in the culture that makes the school unique. “Kristin has been part of my vocabulary for 30 years. It is a fabulous school and I’m enormously excited about the opportunities ahead. I can see so much synergy between my personal philosophy and the way in which Kristin operates.” Relocating to Auckland has been a happy decision for Oughton who has made the transition with Heather Oughton, his wife of 36 years. Both share a wealth of experience in education and pastoral care and always work closely together, believing that relationships and community are important parts of school life.

“For the graduates in 2014 now heading on to new tertiary adventures, the lessons they have learnt at Diocesan will stand them in good stead as they take another step towards achieving their dreams.” F PN

“A critical part of any school is family and community, and I like to model that,” he says. “My family has always been a part of any school community I’ve been in, especially my wife and life-long partner Heather. We work together as a team and I think, particularly in schools that have a connected community, that makes a big difference.” F PN

DIOCESAN SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, Clyde Street, Epsom, T: 09 520 0221 www.diocesan.school.nz

KRISTIN SCHOOL, 360 ALBANY HIGHWAY, AUCKLAND, T: 09 415 9566, www.kristin.school.nz

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EMPLOYMENT & EDUCATION SCHOOL-WIDE SCHOLARSHIPS INTRODUCED AT KRISTIN From Term 1 2016, Kristin will be offering a range of new scholarship positions to students from Years 5 to 11. The announcement marks one of the most significant changes in the school’s approach to accessible education since the establishment of the Kristin Foundation Scholarship Programme in 2011. While the school currently supports a small number of scholarship students in the middle and senior schools, the introduction of almost 30 new awards will create opportunities for younger students, academic high-achievers and those who demonstrate excellence across a wide range of activities to benefit from a Kristin education.

achievers, but to be compassionate and creative people. This is something all young people should have the chance to learn and as leading educators it is our responsibility to ensure we make these opportunities available to those who would otherwise not have access to independent education.”

Executive Principal Tim Oughton believes wholeheartedly in the quality education offered at Kristin and says that the introduction of this comprehensive scholarship programme is a long-term commitment to the local community. “Our students learn not only to be great

The new scholarship programme includes a range of grants for new students entering into Years 5, 7, 9 and 11 at Kristin. These awards range from 30% of tuition fees for Academic and General Excellence Scholarships to 50% for Foundation Scholarships.

Academic Scholarships Academic Scholarships are awarded based on the results of previous school reports, performance in the entrance examination and an interview: Year 5 (up to 2 years) Year 7 (up to 2 years) Year 9 (up to 5 years) Year 11 (up to 3 years)

General Excellence Scholarships General Excellence Scholarships are awarded using information provided in previous school reports, performance in the entrance examination, evidence of excellence in co-curricular activities or interests, and an interview:

Foundation Scholarships Kristin’s Foundation Scholarships are awarded to students who demonstrate a high standard of academic and co-curricular achievement. Financial need is a prerequisite for these scholarships.

Year 5 (up to 2 years) Year 7 (up to 2 years) Year 9 (up to 5 years) Year 11 (up to 3 years)

Year 5 (up to 2 years) Year 7 (up to 2 years) Year 9 (up to 5 years) Year 11 (up to 3 years)

Applications for enrolment are currently open for 2016, with scholarship applications closing at 2pm on Thursday 2 April. For more information please contact the school’s registrar, Linda Teagle on 09 415 9566 Ext 2324.

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SIDELINE WITH GEORGE BERRY

Cricket on show Amazing! What an experience! It has been described as a once in a generation experience, and given I was only nine the last time the Cricket World Cup was in New Zealand then I guess there’s some truth to the statement. While it started in the South Island, Auckland is about to get a full on taste of it, the Ponsonby and Mt Eden bars will be packed, the fan trail will be bulging at the seams and the happy-go-lucky feeling will be spread throughout the hood. As they say, when New Zealand sports teams are doing well, so is the rest of the country. After experiencing the Black Caps opening World Cup win over Sri Lanka in Christchurch tournament fever has well and truly bitten me. The subsequent performances of the beautiful sunny day victory over Scotland in Dunedin and the sheer destruction of old foes England in Wellington have reinforced the feeling even further. Within the World Cup there’s all sorts of battles and matches worth watching for all sorts of reasons. Possibly number one on the list will have to be the match against Australia at Eden Park, made extra special for the simple fact that they haven’t played here since... well ages ago. To sweeten the offering, it’s as if the stars have aligned perfectly, we both have two of the in-form teams in world cricket and this match at Eden Park could have a big impact on the rest of the tournament. For me and many other cricket enthusiasts just the thought of it has seen a path to the water cooler become well-trodden, the constant discussion about cricket has been next to overwhelming.

The Black Caps have been setting record after record during the tournament which in the England demolition alone resulted in Brendon McCullum now holding the record for the fastest 50 during a World Cup, off just 18 balls. The Black Caps now hold the record for the fastest 100 as a team in just 6.4 overs or 40 balls and Tim Southee’s seven for 33 gives him the World Cup’s best ever bowling figures from a Kiwi. Something that even Sir Richard Hadlee was quick to pay tribute to. Old 1992 World Cup jerseys are being found in the back of many closets around the country and proudly worn as if they’re the latest from Prada. McCullum and his band have certainly given the nation plenty of reasons to watch cricket this summer and, if nothing else, the fact that it’s a World Cup in New Zealand, a once in a generation experience should have you logging on to Ticketek to snap up any remaining tickets, even if you can’t get one to a Black Caps match. (GEORGE BERRY) F PN

Other than watching Brendon McCullum, possibly one of the world’s best batsmen in perhaps the form of his life, there are many other reasons to get excited too, like Dan Vettori back playing for what is guaranteed to be his last time in a New Zealand one day jersey, or seeing Trent Boult fire down quicks befitting his $814,000 Indian Premier League price tag. And from a batting point of view as Brendon McCullum told me, the chance to witness the player he sees as potentially New Zealand’s best ever batsman, Kane Williamson, be truly tested against world class opposition is as much a once in a generation offering, as the tournament itself.

THE HUSTLERS ARE BACK IN ACTION! And we’re back! Needless to say we’re ecstatic to be back on these fine pages to share some updates on the mighty Herne Bay Hustlers. After many months of over indulgence, a lot of the boys are looking like heavyweights rather than cruiserweights. However, we’re now pounding the pavement, with multiple runs up Bullock Track now a common sight. Utility reserve forward James Oliver certainly seems to have enjoyed himself in the off-season. So much so he was sent to London for a gruesome fitness programme which entailed twice-daily wrestles with an old acquaintance. Giovanni Poliko has done fine job supporting the Ponsonby hospitality trade, rumours persist that he has used his Auckland rep status to demand free feeds from the local Ponsonby establishments. We kindly ask that they cut these offers back to once a week.

has a WOF, but the question of whether it will get another one is like asking, “will Stephen Donald get another call up?” Comes with a no leak guarantee for life, if you ever have a leak the former owner will be over in under 24 hours to bog her up, $300 ono. Please call George on M: 021 243 3889 at any time. If you are interested in playing or being involved in sponsorship of the Herne Bay Hustlers please email Nathan@conbrio-it.com Training: Wednesday 6:15pm at Western Springs. (NATHAN LAWRENCE) F PN

Many Hustlers are dropping knees, congratulations to Tim Kerr, George Young, Jason Ghinnis, Nick Thompson and Nathan Lawrence on successful proposals. In mind of this, most of the team are tied up, so it would be unsustainable as in prior years to run a monthly bachelor: Instead this month we are going to raise some much needed funds for the Hustler kitty. George has kindly donated his beloved van for this cause: Year: 1996; Make: Mitsubishi L300; Mileage: 210,000; Rust: minor to major; WOF: Current; Rego: June ’15; Fuel: petrol or diesel, seems to run the same on both. Description: Formally known as the ‘White Pearl’, this gem looks more like a whale covered in barnacles. As much bog as original metal, she runs like 80-year-old on Viagra, i.e. she works but she can’t go on forever. Comes equipped with a lovely mattress in the back, which we would recommend covering with a new sheet. Currently

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SIDELINE WITH GEORGE BERRY

It’s simple really

Golden recruit for Ponsonby netball

With cricket lovers the country over currently struck down with a dose of cricket fever and many wives and girlfriends being abandoned for the country’s favourite summer game during the Cricket World Cup, I thought I’d write a piece to make it easier for everyone to understand the game.

Passion for the game is the simple reason former Silver Fern April Ieremia is back, gym shoes and all, coaching the Ponsonby Premiers netball team.

And just as I was sitting down thinking about how I would explain cricket to those less interested, the below explanation popped up on my Facebook feed. When I read it the first time I felt, quite simply, that I couldn’t actually do it any better myself. I’m not 100% sure where this came from and I have done my best to trace its origins with very little success. So, all I can say is congratulations to the man or woman who first explained cricket in this very simple way. You have two sides, one out in the field and one in. Each man that’s in the side that’s in goes out, and when he’s out he comes in and the next man goes in until he’s out. When they are all out, the side that’s out comes in and the side that’s been in goes out and tries to get those coming in, out. Sometimes you get men still in and not out. When a man goes out to go in, the men who are out try to get him out, and when he is out he goes in and the next man in goes out and goes in. There are two men called umpires who stay out all the time and they decide when the men who are in are out. When both sides have been in and all the men have been out, and both sides have been out twice after all the men have been in, including those who PN are not out, that is the end of the game. Simple. (GEORGE BERRY) F

The Ponsonby Club, led by India Thorp and Ange Sorenson is now in its second year of competition and approached the first time coach to help out; helping out has now turned into full on coaching. Ieremia who won gold at the Glasgow Netball world Championships in 1987 and silver in Sydney and Birmingham during the following tournaments before going on to establish a successful sports broadcasting career including hosting what is now the ANZ Championship, says she’s found a rejuvenated love for the game, so much so it now dominates her week almost as much as it did when she was playing, much to the displeasure of her young son Alexander. Ieremia describes her return as being as comfortable as putting on a “second skin” and thinks “It could easily be something she could do on a more regular or even full time basis.” “At this stage I’m really enjoying it. Both what I’m getting out of it and also watching the girls develop.” The Ponsonby club boasts two teams, a premier side and another with a slightly more social focus. The premier side is filled with a good bunch of experienced players along with a handful with serious ambitions to represent Auckland and potentially strive to follow in Ieremia’s footsteps with national honours. Ieremia’s week also now consists of coaching her daughter Atlanta’s school team and she recently coached an Auckland under 17 development side which won the National under 17 title this year.

Volvo Ocean Race; well worth the stop over There has been plenty of chatter about Americas Cup sailing the last few weeks; but don’t get lost in the wash and forget one of the best sailing events in the world is about to slide into the City of Sails. Even though New Zealand doesn’t have a boat in this edition of the Volvo Ocean race there are still a few Kiwis dotted about the crews, and just to see the boats full of Kiwis of not reach New Zealand - doesn’t make their achievements and the race any less interesting. Darly Wislang, who was on board Team New Zealands entry Camper last edition is on board Abu Dhabi this time around, and Tony Rae and Rob Salthouse, both Wislangs former team mates, are on board Team Vestas Winds, the boat that is currently undergoing repair after running aground in the Indian ocean.

She says she had some extremely good coaches during her playing days and when she rattled off a few of them off, like Leigh Gibbs, Yvonne Willering and Lois Muir, it’s hard not to think the Ponsonby Premier side are in the best hands possible and that those who wish to strive for higher honours couldn’t have chosen a better club or person to have at the helm to learn off. Ieremia’s Samoan heritage has meant she’s fitted straight into the Ponsonby sporting environment also. The club was paid a visit a few weeks back by Ponsonby Rugby stalwart and former All Black Bryan BG Williams who called in just to lend his support to the team and the new club. And while it might be a bit of a squeeze to join the Ponsonby premier side in time for this season which runs from April, starting at Easter weekend, through to August, there is always a spot on the more social team. And who knows, after growing to two teams in just two years it’s fairly safe to say there’s PN plenty of room for a few more blue teams in the future. (GEORGE BERRY) F

Aside from an experience like that, nine months away from their family, at sea, chasing winds and tides that change on a dime make this possibly the toughest race of any kind anywhere in the world. Leg four from Sanya in China to Auckland then Leg 5 from Auckland to Itajai in Brazil are two legs that have been known to break both boats and crew. All the yachts in the race are of the same design, everything on board each of the seven boats has been made exactly the same. So this time around it’s all about just how well your crew works together, how well you pick those winds and tides and simply how many or few mistakes you make compared to everyone else. There’s all sorts of displays on in the race village next to the Viaduct during the stop over from some time in late February or early March through to 14 March when the next stage starts. There are in port races too, so find a spot to watch these magnificent pieces of equipment and meticulous design glide through the Waitemata Harbour. Getting along to PN see some of this is highly recommended. (GEORGE BERRY) F The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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PONSONBY PEOPLE + THEIR PETS

Macayla Chapman and Broccoli Macayla Chapman is the founder of Bird and Knoll, a luxury accessories brand that creates limited edition digitally printed cashmere blend scarves. She’s also the owner of Broccoli the lop eared rabbit (and two other fur babies, Tonkinese cats Chico and Lola), and mother of two delightful kids. How old is Broccoli? One and a half years old - our baby! We’ve had him since he was three months old. We didn’t set out to buy a rabbit, but on a rainy day trip to Grey Lynn Animates my persistent three year old saw the bunnies and instantly fell in love. She was so crazy about him and he was so cute we couldn’t leave the pet store without him! How did you come to chose Broccoli? My daughter Indie stated that he was perfect as his eyes (pink) were her favourite colour - clearly a match made in heaven. Indie named him Broccoli - as that is what he likes to eat! What is your favourite thing to do together? Broccoli is a free-range bunny. He hops in and out of the house and around the garden as he pleases. He spends quite a bit of his time ‘playing,’ which means being put in Indie’s prams, baskets, and bags or being carried around like a baby, being fed blueberries or strawberries which makes us laugh as we watch his puffy little cheeks and nubby little teeth furiously devour the berries. He is super snuggly and will lie next to you on the couch and lick you when he is happy. Does Broccoli have any friends? Broccoli thinks he is one of the cats. He follows Chico and Lola around, they hang out like a posse of three and he even chases birds! What else does Broccoli like to eat? Spinach, snow peas, carrots, blueberries, strawberries, coriander and peanut butter toast crusts are his favourites. He has also been known to eat the odd iPhone charger cord if left in reach. F PN BIRD AND KNOLL www.birdandknoll.com

THE TRUE AND ONLY SLIGHTLY EXAGGERATED TALES OF CHESTER PONSONBY Episode Five Chester, my recycled cat, has continued to enjoy the summer, wandering round greater Ponsonby. I was given a tip-off, so I went looking for him - no sign, so I questioned a couple of small boys nearby, about a black and white cat. They had not seen him just then, but asked if it was Chester, as he’d been at their Richmond Road School, earlier in the day. World famous in Ponsonby now! He appears strangely unfazed by loud noises, like vacuum cleaners, chain saws which may explain his disregard for traffic. Carelessly he crossed Franklin Road to wait in the house of some welcoming people. A Douglas Street resident commented he obviously recognises the sound of his car. A College Hill apartment visit is a mystery how did he get upstairs, through a gated entrance? Also, how did he enter the locked Napier Street townhouse when the mother and daughter were out? Like many local residents, he enjoys an early café breakfast; today at 5 Loaves, Jervois Road. A caller had to sit several metres away from her partner because their dog was frightened of Chester. He was dropped off the next day at the top of Vermont Street from an Ardmore Road house, where he had made himself at home, quite unperturbed by their dog. Later, I found that someone had dressed him up with a gold ribbon and bow round his neck before he reached Flying Fish, Ponsonby Road. Despite that exercise insisted in the evening on walking up the street. I received a charming present from Unichem Pharmacy (previously Amcal), for the ‘media darling’ (Martin Leach), a set of Chester passport photos (source of gold ribbon), “In case he ventures beyond Ponsonby.” Chester delights in leaping and running after a toy mouse on a stretchy cord and stick. His skills are not transferred to catching real rodents, but moths and geckos are fair game. Nor is he immune to the prospects offered by bird noises, though he is taunted regularly by a particular blackbird who steals his food when possible. Two old goldfish have died within days of each other, but another just disappeared... I saw next-door’s cat hovering over the remaining six in the pond. Just sayin’. He limped home one night and was confined to four days’ bed rest: Gareth, at Ponsonby Veterinary Centre, Williamson Avenue, was convinced the cat had broken his leg, because he was so wobbly and obviously in pain, but X-rays were negative... perhaps an altercation with a car? Torn ligament? Cage rest prescribed - for Chester? I passed on that advice to a similarly afflicted friend - unimpressed. The orthopaedic vet thought a piece of cartilage in the knee had broken off. Anti-inflammatories and the compromise of mostly small room confinement. More ‘cat on a leash’. The hospital cattery care over the holidays left him with just a slight limp, but it was recommended he stay inside for two more weeks. Small room rest indeed: Houdini managed to escape from a scarcely opened window upstairs. On the loose: first port of call was a bean bag at Cook the Books. Next day they rescued him crossing Richmond Road. He’d followed people in Cockburn Street from the Grey Lynn Farmers’ Market - although not usefully carrying fresh plums or strawberries for me. So, undeterred by his injury, Chester is still out and about, but hopefully he PN seems to be returning home more frequently by himself. (PAM TARULEVICZ) F

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PONSONBY PEOPLE + THEIR PETS ASK ALEX

HELP SPCA AUCKLAND SAVE AN ADULT CAT TODAY! MANY PEOPLE WHO ADOPT CATS LOOK NO FURTHER than the cute kittens, but have you considered giving an adult cat a forever home? SPCA Auckland receives many adult cats into our care, sometimes when their owners can no longer care for them, when the owner moves to a house unsuitable for cats, or occasionally when their lifelong owners pass away. Often, adult cats are bewildered by being moved from their current, comfortable life to an uncertain future. SPCA Auckland cares for them in the meantime, but what each cat really needs is a loving home again. Why would you adopt an adult cat? Adult cats have established personalities and tend to be more settled and better behaved. They are often much less demanding than kittens and make great companion animals. SPCA has many adult cats of varying ages. For example, Manuka is a playful five-year-old sweetheart who was rescued by the fire brigade with her kittens from the roof of a house. She is very smoochy and loves to snuggle up on your lap! Their oldest cat, Minky, is a charming, quiet-natured fellow aged 10 years young. His owners brought him in to the SPCA after Minky became very unsettled at home. He has a heart of gold and just needs someone to give him the love he deserves. Together Manuka, Minky and many other lovely cats wait for a caring forever home - can you help? View all the cats online at www.spca.org.nz or www.facebook.com/SPCAFriends PN or visit SPCA, 50 Westney Road, Mangere. Open 7 days from 10am to 4pm. F

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

Each month Dr Alex Melrose answers readers’ pet related issues. Email yours to: alex@vetcare.net.nz I really enjoy hearing your segment on George FM. My question is related to my cat and relocating to Australia. We live on a quiet street and she has a front and a back garden to run about in as well as roaming the quiet street and other people’s gardens. From what I can find online for somewhere to live in Melbourne it is all units with teeny courtyards or apartments. Because of the life she has had here, will this move really disrupt her wellbeing or can a cat adapt to be more of an inside cat and get used to a paved courtyard instead of a garden? Kristina, by email.

Q: A:

Thanks, it’s a lot of fun doing Breakfast radio with Thane and Kara. Please keep listening online when you move! Yours is a great question about lifestyle changes, relevant to many of our clients even when moving around locally in central Auckland.

It’s much more common to have indoor cats in Australia, plus they have compulsory micro-chipping for cats. Their aim is to try and create a scenario that’s safer for the cats (so many poisonous creatures to avoid) and safer for the wildlife (Gareth Morgan would be slightly happier). Although no cats are great fans of change, she will be probably be very happy after a period of adjustment. The key will be to enrich her environment as much as possible with climbing frames, toys, and laser pointer chase games. Reducing her food intake is probably also wise to match her likely reduction in activity levels. We even found a cool cat exercise wheel that we are getting for our cattery. So spend up and enrich the home and courtyard and enjoy having her with you sharing your PN adventures. (DR ALEX MELROSE, BVSC, MRCVS) F VETCARE GREY LYNN & UNITEC, 408 Great North Road, T: 09 361 3500 www.vetcare.net.nz F PN

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LOOK... WHO IS IN THE ZOO!

The little cub is a welcome addition to Auckland Zoo’s red panda family

Pitter patter of tiny red fluffy feet The first birth for 2015 at Auckland Zoo was a very cute and fluffy Nepalese red panda cub - an important addition to the international breeding programme. The little one was discovered at 2.45pm Tuesday 20 January and team leader of carnivores Lauren Booth says the cub is on the larger size of the spectrum for red panda cubs. Mum Bo gave birth to the yet-to-be-named cub in her indoor area, which is unusual as both her previous births have taken place in the outside nest boxes. Keeper Lauren says it is most likely Bo came indoors because the weather this summer has been so hot and she wanted to be cooler. This is the fourth offspring from five-year-old Bo and 14-year-old Sagar, with the pair parenting twins Kesari and Sundar over a year ago, and Pabu two years ago.

The whio is a threatened New Zealand species. Auckland Zoo is involved in a coordinated DOC breeding programme to provide young for release programmes.

It is not expected the cub will be venturing far from its nest box until it is at least 12 weeks old, so keep an eye on Auckland Zoo’s website and social media for updates. Lauren says, “The arrival of this cub is wonderful, both for Australasia and for the wider Global Species Management Plan through which red panda are managed. We’re absolutely delighted Bo has had such a healthy cub and that she’s proving once again, to be such a confident and attentive mother.” The IUCN Red List classifies the red panda as ‘vulnerable’. It is threatened by illegal hunting and deforestation. Remaining populations are fast becoming fragmented and isolated from each other. The Auckland Zoo Conservation Fund supports the Red Panda Network in Nepal, having had its keeper Anneke Haworth recently return from working with them. The Red Panda Network is working to save the red panda in the wild and preserve habitat through education and empowering local communities. Visit: www.redpandanetwork.org Encounters: red panda encounters are 2.30pm every Tuesday at Auckland Zoo. Visit www.aucklandzoo.co.nz for more information and encounters.

Whio Weekend; 21-22 March In celebration of New Zealand’s iconic whio (blue duck) Auckland Zoo will have special whio encounters in The High Country in Te Wao Nui. There’ll also be the anticipated annual blue duck race - where 500 rubber ducks are raced down the zoo stream! Proudly supported by Genesis Energy, Whio Forever and the Department of Conservation. Normal zoo admission prices apply.

Add $1 campaign helps the Warehouse Zoofari expand

Students are asked to put their ‘zoo-noculars’ on

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In January, Auckland Zoo joined forces with The Warehouse stores in Auckland and Northland to roll out an add $1 campaign in support of The Warehouse School Zoofari programme. Thanks to the campaign collecting over $67,000, as well as the extension of an innovative partnership between Auckland Zoo and The Warehouse, and support from Ritchies Transport, thousands of students from low decile schools in Auckland and Northland will now be able to experience a free zoo education experience in terms two and three of 2015. PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


FURRY AND FABULOUS - $500 PRIZE ANGELA BEER: ANIMAL LOVER Welcome to our new column Furry and Fabulous celebrating Ponsonby people who aren’t in the least bit feral. People who challenge the crazy cat person stereotype, showing you can be furry and fabulous at the same time. Meet Marie Dyhrberg - Marie is known for her work defending criminals. The Queen’s Counsel has a busy law practice on Ponsonby’s Franklin Road and works long and often erratic hours. She finds the company of her affectionate canine clan helps her to balance her work and private life. Her two dogs Ping and Charlie often go to work with her in the Franklin Road Chambers. Marie finds the company of her two pups and their best friends Isis and Duke complement her busy working life caring for the need of others. www.mariedyhrberg.co.nz If you know someone who is a local animal lover, email us at angela@petsandpats.com. The monthly winner will receive a fabulous photoshoot and pet services worth $500.00. Furry and Fabulous brought to you by animal lovers: Angela Beer, owner of www.petsandpats.com Ponsonby’s premium petcare service and doggie daycare and Fiona Tomlinson, photographer of pets and people www.fionatomlinson.co.nz

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‘ONE OF LIFE’S ESSENTIALS YOUR VERY OWN FINANCIAL PLAN’ Helping shape your financial future is the very essence of what we do. Before we get remotely close to offering you an investment solution for accumulating and protecting family wealth, we will always prepare a written financial plan. We prepare plans for individuals, couples and trustees. We strongly believe that without a written plan you are simply not going to enjoy the retirement you imagine. It is vital to focus on a retirement date or age and to then work backwards to 2015 to determine what needs to be achieved in your accumulating years. For those approaching retirement or in fact down that track already, a plan is also a critical document to ensure that you do not run out of capital, or are on the right path to leaving behind the capital sum you desire. A personal financial plan is one of those vital documents that sits alongside your will, powers of attorney, trust deed, and any legal document(s) essential to the protection of your well being. Typically a financial plan will cover all aspects of your financial life moving forward. It begins with an analysis of existing investment assets, it contemplates your risk profile (attitude to risk and return), adequate diversification, considers your family income levels and therefore savings capability, adequacy of insurance cover, status of legal affairs and then it swings into retirement planning. So we encourage you to contemplate your desired age to slow down and when you want options as to whether you work or not. Then we map out what the next 20, 30 or 40 years will look like, based upon your dreams and aspirations and our overlay of experience and investment knowledge.

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

Jocelyn Weatherall

Phil Ashton

Richard Knight

At the heart of your plan is our recommendation as to how to build an effective investment portfolio. We set out the rules and parameters we use to assist you to accumulate and/or protect wealth. These investment rules are crucial to ensure you avoid the traps that most fall into: Trap 1 Trap 2 Trap 3 Trap 4 Trap 5 Trap 6

Greed - being driven by the best promised performance Too focused on one asset - diversify, diversify, diversify Betting on the latest fad - check there is a track record Thinking you can make money quickly - take a long view Listening to friends - get knowledgeable advice Every investment in New Zealand - we live on a fault-line.

Avoid the traps, come and pick our brains at 52 College Hill. Rutherford Rede (Akld) Limited, www.rutherfordrede.co.nz Phone 09 361 3670

Jocelyn jweatherall@rutherfordrede.co.nz Phil pashton@rutherfordrede.co.nz or Richard rknight@rutherfordrede.co.nz Opinions are of a general nature and are not to be considered financial advice, specific advice is recommended to be sought before action is taken. Disclosure Statement(s) relating to our advisers are available on request and free of charge.

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PONSONBY PROFESSIONALS: METROLAW GOT A LEGAL QUESTION? ASK MICHAEL@METROLAW.CO.NZ

Email Michael with your question and include PONSONBY NEWS in the subject line. Michael Hemphill, a partner of the firm, will answer one topical question each month.

Q: A:

A close friend of mine died recently. His Facebook page remains visible and continues to exist as if he was still alive. I want to know what happens to Facebook accounts once their users have died and what can be done to these accounts? Also, I don’t think my friend had a will, what will happen to his estate? You have raised two issues which I will deal with separately.

What happens to your Facebook account when you die? There are two options available, either you can get Facebook to delete the account or you can request the account be turned into a memorial. A request will need to be sent to Facebook, whereby proof of the person’s death can be given. As Facebook is a web-based company with more than a billion users, it can be incredibly difficult to contact Facebook at all. Nevertheless, a form is required to be filled in requesting either a memorialisation or deletion of the person’s account. If you choose to delete the account, then all the information stored on the account will be deleted. If you choose memorialisation, Facebook will change the account so that no one is allowed to log into the account, the content cannot be altered and no further friends can be added. The memorialised accounts no longer appear in ‘public spaces’ such as birthday reminders or ‘people you may know’. Friends are able to share memories on the memorialised timeline, depending on the account holder’s privacy settings. As older users sign up to various personal online accounts, dealing with the accounts of deceased persons will become an increasing issue. If you want a family member to deal with your digital information, it may be a good idea to make a list of log-on names and passwords, these details could be put in a private memorandum available at your death. What happens if you die without a will? Dying intestate (without a will), can create significant problems to the family members of the deceased. The deceased’s estate will be distributed in accordance with the Administration Act 1969 and/or the Property (Relationships) Act 1976. Many people incorrectly assume that if their partner dies without a will, then they will inherit everything. However, this is only the case if they die leaving behind no parents or children. The Administration Act 1969 states that the spouse or de facto of the deceased will get a majority share of the deceased’s estate and their personal chattels. The remaining share of the estate will go to one of the following classes (in order of priority); children, parents or siblings. If the deceased leaves behind no spouse or de facto partner nor any close relatives upon their death, then the estate will go to the govenment. The close relatives of those who die intestate also need to decide on the funeral arrangements, which can cause added stress during an already emotional time. Having written wishes gives those close to the deceased comfort that they are following their wishes. If you have underage children then it is vital that you appoint guardians in your will. If you do not leave clear instructions someone would need to apply to the court to be PN appointed as a guardian. (MICHAEL HEMPHILL) F Disclaimer - This article is for general information purposes only. If you have a legal problem you should seek advice from a lawyer. Metro Law does not accept any liability other than to its clients and then only when advice is sought on specific matters.

METROLAW, Level 2, 36 Williamson Avenue, T: 09 929 0800, www.metrolaw.co.nz

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PONSONBY PROFESSIONALS: LOGAN GRANGER

Tax and the IRDs focus for 2015? As a business owner I know that tax plays a huge part in any business, and as such business owners look to minimise their tax liability to assist with their cashflow and any future expansion plans. However, all business owners should be aware that the IRD has extended its powers to limit the various methods of tax minimisation. This includes the following: 1. Establishing networks with overseas revenue authorities - thereby increasing the database of information on overseas trading.

• Property development and the gains from the sale of developing and selling these properties are still liable for tax (if you are deemed to be a developer), this is an area the IRD is looking at closely. If you are unsure it is best to seek advice, to ensure you get it right.

With that in mind, here are some of the key areas we feel you should be wary of when planning your tax affairs:

• Mixed use assets, such as renting out your holiday home and the rules around claiming the running costs as deductions for tax have been changed. There are new rules limiting the tax deductions available relating to the private use portion. Previously, all expenses could be deducted and offset against other income. Now, you must treat most of these costs as private expenditure.

• The use of company and trust ownership structures is still an area of interest to the IRD. The trust and top marginal tax rates are aligned at 33%, while the company tax rates are 28% resulting in a potential tax saving of 5%. While this is an attractive option, a careful approach is required when deciding on which type of entity to use.

When approaching your tax planning for 2015 and beyond, it is best to review the tax advice you have received previously and ensure it is still correct. Tax rules can change very quickly and keeping abreast of any changes to avoid unnecessary tax risk and penalties is important.

• Drawing a professional salary from your business: this salary must be reflective of current market salary for your industry or profession. Generally 80% of the business profits is the acceptable level for a salary, this is however difficult to ascertain at the beginning of the year. If you have estimated the salary level, a review should regularly be carried out to ensure the salary set is still a justifiable market level.

Be cautious and make sure to get good advice to keep up with the any changes to the relevant tax law. (LOGAN GRANGER) F PN

2. Release of annual Compliance Focus report - detailing IRD focus areas for likely audit.

Disclaimer - While all care has been taken, Johnston Associates Chartered Accountants Ltd and its staff accept no liability for the content of this article; always see your professional advisor before taking any action that you are unsure about .

JOHNSTON ASSOCIATES, 202 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 361 6701 www.jacal.co.nz

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS

WANT TO BUILD OR RENOVATE? CHECK IF YOU NEED CONSENT Before launching into a new building project there are some key rules you need to be aware of. Your architect and builder will be familiar with these, but here’s a simple guide to the process. Building and environmental controls are common in most developed countries but sometimes people new to New Zealand or new to the building process may not be familiar with local laws. In a nutshell, every building project must comply with the Resource Management Act, which protects the environment, and the Building Act and Building Code, which make sure buildings are structurally sound and meet required standards of health and safety. Resource consents Finding out whether you need a resource consent comes first. If your activity is permitted under the relevant rules, you may proceed with the work. If not, you will require a resource consent as formal approval that any environmental effects of your project are well managed and meet the aims of the RMA. You will need to provide an assessment of environmental effects. “Usually the process involves only council staff, but sometimes the council will require the project to be notified to neighbours or other interested parties, leading to a possible hearing of objections or support before independent hearings commissioners,” says Councillor Linda Cooper, chair of the council’s hearings committee. Building consents Most building work requires a building consent. It covers the construction, alteration, demolition and maintenance of new and existing buildings. If a consent is required, construction will be inspected by the council at key stages to ensure work meets the required standard. “Both resource consent and building consent applications can be processed within 20 working days, but resource consents are often complex and can take longer. The work you or your specialist advisers do in preparing applications will save time, money and worry,” says Cooper. “Incomplete applications are the main cause of delays.” At the end of the project, if you’ve met all the requirements, your building will receive a Code Compliance Certificate. This means all the work complies with the building code. A CCC is a valuable asset, particularly for insurance purposes and when you want to sell your property. “Confirmation a building has a CCC is often the first thing a prospective buyer will seek as assurance any building work has been done to appropriate standards,” says Cooper. The council is happy to advise you at the start of your project and you can find detailed information at aucklandcouncil.govt.nz Rules around what you can build and where, are currently being reviewed under the Proposed Auckland Unitary Plan. This will replace the district and regional plans of eight councils that were amalgamated into one Auckland Council. These rules are still in force. “Submissions on the proposed Unitary Plan are being heard by a government-appointed independent hearings panel. The plan is not likely to come into effect until 2016, after which there will be one set of regulatory rules for all Auckland,” says Cooper. “This will speed the development process, reduce costs and give certainty on what can be done where, whether it’s a major housing development or a home owner’s renovation project.” If you’re looking for design ideas or more information on the building process, visit the council’s unique and recently updated Auckland Design Manual for some inspiring ideas, aucklanddesignmanual.co.nz Things to do before you start work: 1. Confirm whether you will need a resource consent or building consent. 2. Be prepared with the necessary paperwork. An incomplete application may delay your project. 3. If in doubt, check with the council first on T: 09 301 0101. F PN

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS WHERE TO START WHEN CHOOSING TILES These days there is huge variety in tiles. Modern printing techniques have given rise to incredibly realistic wood, marble and stone-look tiles, while decorative designs are getting more imaginative and interesting than ever. It can be a bit daunting at first, but really it’s easy to narrow down your choice if you consider the following: • The style of your house and your personal style. • The light in the room, both natural and artificial. For example, a gloss tile will suit a dark space as it reflects more light than a lighter colour. • The size and layout of the room. Large module tiles make a small room look larger, as does the direction of the lay when using a rectangular tile. Using the same tile on the floor and walls will make the space look more cohesive. • Grout colour makes a huge difference. Contrasting grout will make the design pop but can add tension to the space by emphasising the lines; while colour matched grout will make the pattern more subtle. More expensive tiles generally have a more sophisticated and natural looking design, due to increased depth of surface, more variation and better texture. However you can still get a beautiful effect with a cheaper tile, especially if you use a good tiler. For some great moderately priced options, it’s worth have a look at our extensive RAK range. Our tiles are from Italy, Spain, United Arab Emirates, Asia and South America, all our tiles come with a 10-year guarantee. At Tile Space we have qualified design consultants in every store, who can help you through the points listed above and also with site visits, samples and even recommending PN a good tiler. Come and see us to start creating your dream space. (EMMA FOOTE) F

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MY FAVOURITE ROOM Paula Murphy Paula Murphy describes herself as “magpie, tinkerer, leather lover and daily horoscope reader.” She also designs a collection of luxury basics for women under the label Hideseekers, specialising in leather, cotton, cashmere and silk, which she sells online and from pop -up retail spaces. Early this month Hideseekers will be Shop 8, the old DJ booth within Ponsonby Central. Paula tells Ponsonby News, “I live with my husband, two kids (plus any number of extras from the neighbourhood), and a nutty little dog.” “My first ever flat was in Pompallier Terrace in Ponsonby, which turned out to be a stone’s throw away from my grandfather’s family home on John Street. My great-grandfather and grandfather owned a trucking business called Carter Carrying Company, and kept the trucks parked up in a big shed out the back of the property. Mum fondly reminisces about visiting the ‘big old house’ in John Street, and having sodas on the front porch with her ‘pop’.” “I also have some fairly hairy memories of working my first part-time bar job, upstairs at The Gluepot back in the day, risking life and limb crawling around in complete darkness collecting glasses during live gigs. I think they were somewhat surprised when I kept turning back up for work. Initiation survived, it was soon decided I was probably better suited to working downstairs in the Corner Bar on Sunday afternoons, serving mulled wine and watching a bit of sport with the locals.” “My favourite room is my front hallway, the entrance to our home. It’s used for Arrivals, Departures and Transit lounge for visitors, couriers, scooters, bikes and clothing racks. Although not technically a room, the entranceway to our home - with its old brick floor, and long panelled windows - sold me on the house the moment I walked in the front door. It’s got character, and a great mash up of textures that aren’t at all precious. It’s a well lived in kind of house - like it’s got some stories to tell.” “I’m going through a bit of a 70s indoor plant and macrame wall-hangings phase at the moment, so I’m loving all my hanging plants and pots in the front entrance. I also love the rosy golden glow from the beaten copper lights we brought back from a recent trip to Bali. The Blacklist ‘Paradise’ print brings it all together, hanging on the end wall.” F PN HIDESEEKERS, www.hideseekers.com

METHVEN AURAJET™ - A THING OF BEAUTY New Zealand’s global designer and manufacturer of premium showers and tapware for over 125 years, Methven launched their latest and perhaps greatest innovation - the Aurajet™ showerhead - at Kelliher Estate on Puketutu Island in late February. The breathtakingly stylish showerhead behaves like no other shower you have seen or experienced. The Aurajet™ is part of the new ‘Aio’ range, and has a unique halo-shaped showerhead of the like only seen in Dyson fans. Hidden nozzles generate individual jets of water that collide against angled surfaces, creating a fan of dense droplets. This new technology means better spray coverage on your skin, more water force, better nerve stimulation and ultimately, they say, the world’s most luxurious showering experience. Thousands of hours of consumer research provided inspiration for the Aurajet™ design. Methven also worked with Pantone (the worldwide leading experts in colour) to offer a beautiful choice of face plate colours to match every bathroom. A range of luxurious taps, made from lead-free Eco Brass®, will complement the new Aurajet™ shower range. Methven will be the first to use Eco Brass® in their tapware range here. Methven now owns two of the five global shower spray patents - Satinjet and Aurajet™. Launching in stores in the United Kingdom, Australia and New Zealand on 12 March, Aurajet™ looks set to become this country’s ‘Next Big Thing’ in the export PN of our clever IP and local manufacturing prowess. F METHVEN, www.methven.com

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ORBITSOUND BRINGS SMART AUDIO DESIGNS TO ASKEW Award-winning British company Orbitsound has recently opened a New Zealand office. Established in 2005, Orbitsound is the first audio brand to use airSOUNDTM technology; a unique, patented sound technology developed by Ted Fletcher. Ted is a musician and renowned audio electronics designer and music producer with more than four decades of experience in the music recording industry. He has worked with industry notables such as Pete Townshend, The Who, The Eagles and Yes. Being an accomplished musician himself, Fletcher has a profound understanding of how musical performance should be recorded. His thorough understanding, combined with a sound engineer’s strive for perfectionism in sound quality, is what makes airSOUNDTM powered products successful and different from the competition. A visit to Askew shows the amazing selection of Universal lifestyle audio products. All products are made of wood - so the audio quality resonates very well. Designer speakers with a big sound have a minimalist and simple look - there are even beautiful bamboo versions. The good news is that the full range of Orbitsound’s products are now available at Askew, Ponsonby. Askew has been around for 24 years and is known for great staff, product knowledge and back up service. F PN ASKEW, 2b Jervois Road, T: 09 378 1414, www.askew.co.nz/collections/orbit-sound

Check out the new Orbitsound range at Askew, Ponsonby

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AUCKLAND RENTS INCREASE IN LINE EUROPEAN INFLUENCES WITH DOCTOR VISITS AND BEER FROM FORMA The average weekly rent in Auckland over the past five years has increased less than the price of petrol, and increased only marginally more than a glass of beer or a visit to the doctor. “The average weekly rent in Auckland in 2014 was $488, compared with $388 in 2009, which is an increase of 26 percent,” said Kiri Barfoot, a director of Barfoot & Thompson. “According to the Government publication New Zealand In Profile, in the same period a litre of 91 octane petrol has increased by 32 percent, while a 400ml glass of beer and an adult visit to the doctor have both increased by 22 percent.”

Proudly designed and handmade in New Zealand, Forma integrates European influences with New Zealand lifestyle. The Anna D is light, comfortable and great for both commercial and residential situations. A timeless retro feature chair available in a selection of fabrics and colours. F PN FORMA CONTEMPORARY FURNITURE, 51 - 53 the Strand, Parnell T: 09 368 7694 www.forma.co.nz

With the average Auckland house price increasing by 38% in the same period, it means that tenants are not paying over the top in terms of weekly rentals, and that landlords are not recovering in full the current purchase price of properties. “Based on our data, the average gross return being made on rental accommodation by landlords is 3.5 percent,” said Kiri. Given that rental accommodation is in short supply, it means landlords are not taking advantage of the situation to push rentals higher. “When we surveyed landlords late last year, less than 20 percent said that they intended to increase rents in the next 12 months, and of that group, the maximum rental increase they thought reasonable in the current market was 5 percent. It’s interesting to note that the average rent in Auckland is 68 percent or $198 higher that the average weekly rent for all of New Zealand,” Kiri explained. “It highlights the disparity that Aucklanders are paying in terms of house prices and for PN rental accommodation.” F

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ASK AN ARCHITECT: DANIEL MARSHALL Each month architect Daniel Marshall answers readers’ property related questions.

Projects in heritage areas can be challenging... We are just about to embark on a substantial addition and alteration to our villa in Grey Lynn. Can you give me advice as to how to start the process? Do I call an architect, a builder, or an interior designer? Who else would I need to be involved in the early stages of a project?

a reasonably small alteration to an existing house in a heritage zone.

Because of the complexity of an inner city project, particularly in terms of the planning regulations it is advisable to consult an architect first. Architecture is one of the last generalist professions, an old joke by builders is that architects learn less and less about more and more until they know nothing about everything, and this can be true.

Land Surveyor

A:

However, if they do not know the answers they will be able to advise on which consultants will be required for a project. Architects act as your agent and help you engage the consultants, typically known as separate consultants, that you will need to get the project through all the red tape. And there is a lot of that! Pretty much any project that has an exterior alteration in most of Ponsonby and Grey Lynn will require a resource consent, so you need a team that understands the process. There is actually a mind boggling number of consultants needed to complete the various reports that the council needs as part of the resource consent process, even for

Included in this list could be: Architect photography: Patrick Reynolds

Q:

Consultant Planner Arborist - if there are any protected trees affected. Landscape Architect Geotechnical Engineer - if there are any signs or recorded site instability. Stormwater Consultant - if there are any issues connecting stormwater to the existing stormwater and sewer network. Heritage Architect - to write a report on the effect of your proposed exterior alteration. Traffic Engineer - if there are any issues around driveways or car parking.

And the Government wonders why building costs are so high! The good news is that if the situation is reasonably straight forward, an architect can take on the role of most of these consultants and so save you considerable costs. If they can’t do it, they know who to talk to and will co-ordinate the various bits of information so that the planning process goes as smoothly as possible. (DANIEL MARSHALL) F PN DANIEL MARSHALL ARCHITECTS, 472 Karangahape Road, T: 09 354 3587 www.marshall-architect.co.nz

WORLD-CLASS SOLAR RESOURCE NOW ACCESSIBLE TO THOUSANDS A recent Auckland University study identified Ponsonby as having a world-class solar resource equivalent to that of Barcelona and Los Angeles.[1] Thousands of local homeowners can now take advantage of this thanks to the launch of solarZero, a plan from solarcity that provides to homes solar power with no panel costs. Ponsonby is confirmed as one of the first roll-out zones with the rest of the country set to go live in the upcoming months. solarZero is a new offer that’s switching up the solar game, letting homeowners purchase solar power for a fixed monthly rate (at a price below what they’re currently paying for retail power) while also removing the barrier of panel and installation costs. Andrew Booth, founder and chief executive of solarcity says, “You see headlines about power price increases every other week. In fact, I read power prices in Ponsonby are set to rise (again!) on 1 April. For Central Auckland solarZero couldn’t have come at a better time. Homeowners should make the most of this natural resource, reduce reliance on grid power and instead lock in a fixed price for power. Best of all solarcity maintain and monitor the system over the products’ lifetime to ensure optimum production.” Two weeks ago, solarcity completed their first solarZero installation on Henderson homeowner Depak Desousa’s house. Desousa was thrilled to help New Zealand take its first steps towards a sustainable energy future. Homeowners in Ponsonby can register now with solarcity to lock in certainty around their power bills for the next 20 years. For further information visit www.solarcity.co.nz or call T: 0800 11 66 55 to talk to a solar expert. [1] https://cdn.auckland.ac.nz/assets/creative/about/research/Transforming-Cities/Publications/ Solar-potential-booklet.pdf

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THE BOYS’ BOOK CLUB WHAT WE’RE READING Here are some books us blokes on the Ponsonby News team have recently enjoyed. We love reading in the bath or in bed. A real stress buster!

MARTIN LEACH

Rotten by John Lydon (Picador) How time flies... John Lydon, also known by his former stage name Johnny Rotten, is about to turn 60. He is an English singer, songwriter, and musician, best known as the lead singer of punk rock band the Sex Pistols from 1975 until 1978, and again for various revivals during the 1990s and 2000s. He is the lead singer of the post-punk band Public Image Ltd, which he founded and fronted from 1978 until 1993, and again since 2009. The son of an Irish crane operator, John Lydon was the consummate outsider: He suffered spinal meningitis at an early age, loved his mother dearly, dyed his hair green, and preferred Oscar Wilde to Rimbaud or Baudelaire. Contemptuous of the herding instincts of the English, he developed his own style and fashions, which he says designer Vivienne Westwood stole. Westwood owned a boutique with Malcolm McLaren, who invited Lydon to audition as lead singer in a band he managed, the Sex Pistols. Lydon had never sung before but got the job and became Johnny Rotten. What followed is punk rock legend. Cultivating controversy and bad press, the Pistols became notorious and developed a following - the lemming types Lydon so detested. The band hit with ‘God Save the Queen’ and ‘Anarchy in the UK,’ made a harrowing United States tour, and broke up in disarray. Lydon sued McLaren and formed another band, but he couldn’t use the name Johnny Rotten (McLaren owned rights to it) until the suit was settled years later. Still angry, Lydon contests McLaren’s claim to have

BOOK REVIEW:

VOYAGE AROUND A RIVER: THE HOKIANGA by Peter Shadbolt (Steele Roberts & Associates)

Shadbolt tells of the bar where many a ship was wrecked, of ship yards where the mighty kauri was cut to build ships that travelled the world. Generously he relives the history of local Tangata Whenua, their importance in the story of the Hokiainga and their myths and love. Many pakeha families have a long association with the Hokiainga and the Shadbolts are one of them. Peter was there to record the story of Opo the friendly dolphin which captured the nation’s imagination in the late 1950s and her sad death over which a nation shed tears. The Hokianga Harbour is one of the most historic in New Zealand. Many Aucklanders spend time there, some to explore, others join with French tourists in following Pompallier’s footsteps. Many of us go to enjoy those hot sticky days of the long summer and especially the stunning sunsets and the cool breeze that relieves some of that stickiness.

masterminded the punk scene and challenges other takes on the era in a repetitive, sloppy account that’s still indispensable.

JAY PLATT The Great Zoo of China by Matthew Reilly (Macmillan) Some might say the Chinese have been envious of much of the western world for some time, and now they are ready to unveil something that will astonish everyone. It’s a secret the Chinese government has been keeping for 40 years. They have discovered that dragons do exist, now all they have to do now is to train them. A landmark discovery no one could ever believe is real, and a scientific revelation that will amaze the world. Now the Chinese are ready to unveil their astonishing findings within the greatest zoo ever constructed. A small group of VIPs and journalists have been brought under the utmost secrecy to the zoo deep within China to see these fabulous creatures for the first time. Among them are Dr Cassandra Jane Cameron, CJ to those that know her, an expert on reptiles, especially crocodiles, who has been asked to write a piece for National Geographic Magazine. She is joined by her brother Hamish an expert photographer who is also the one person who didn’t walk away after her accident. The visitors are assured by their Chinese hosts that they will be struck with wonder at these beasts, that the dragons are perfectly safe, and that nothing can go wrong. But of course this a Matthew Reilly novel and before you know it all hell breaks loose.

WE CAN’T STOP LISTENING TO NICK CAVE & THE BAD SEEDS We asked some local music lovers to tell us their favourite track from Nick Cave’s album released in February 2013. ‘Push the sky away’ Helene Ravlich: Being asked to choose my favourite track from this album is - to use a well-worn cliché - akin to being asked to name a favourite child! If I had to pick one however, I would have to say the title track; it has an uncharacteristically weightless, eerie and atmospheric sound... but still all of the underlying menace of the Cave that I know and love.

Other folk spend longer periods of time and hold jobs or make significant contributions in the local communities that dot the harbour.

Martin Leach: ‘Push the Sky Away’. I will never forget Cave’s live show last year. He sang many of the songs live. "If you got everything and you don't want no more. You’ve got to just keep on pushing, keep on pushing. Push the sky away.” I love this track, but it almost makes me teary.

Peter Shadbolt, brother of Maurice and uncle of Tim has written this documentary sequence of poems entitled Voyage around a River: The Hokianga. Recently published by Steele Roberts it is beautiful book in prose and poetry beautifully designed with reproductions of old paintings, drawings and photographs.

John Maher: ‘Jubilee Street’. This song, carrying a touch of melancholy, gives me goosebumps with its melody; as it questions the protagonists (and all our) integrity, before then methodically rising to a strangely energising but mournful crescendo that lingers in your head!

This book is a worthy gift and a great addition to the bookshelf of anyone with a love of PN the wild Hokianga. (GERRY HILL) F

Arna Martin: ‘Jubilee Street’ is a masterpiece slowly building into a wonderous wall of fantastical sound - with clever, witty lyrics that stay with you long after the song has finished!

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REAL ESTATE UPDATE: KAREN SPIRES

Greener pastures back home There is a lot of truth to the saying ‘home is where the heart is’. The growing number of Kiwi expats returning to New Zealand is testament to the unprecedented lifestyle we enjoy here. Ponsonby, Herne Bay and St Mary’s Bay are high on the list of neighbourhoods in demand from returning expats and migrants alike. Typically they are looking to make their home somewhere with a metropolitan feel akin to the big international cities they have come from, but coupled with the quintessential laid back lifestyle of New Zealand, good schools and wide open spaces. Many expats are flying home having built up a considerable nest egg with earnings in a strong foreign currency. They are looking to settle down, start a family and continue their career with their advanced skillset and newfound earning potential. They are seeking property within close proximity to the CBD, but removed enough to enjoy a home life separated from the hustle and bustle of the big city. Last year more than a quarter of long term arrivals were New Zealanders returning home. Our country’s unemployment rate is the lowest it has been since 2009, while many overseas countries are battling with the opposite trend. Herne Bay and St Mary’s Bay property is a wise investment. Our suburbs are relatively small geographically when compared to other inner-city neighbourhoods and the limited housing stock ensures there will always be strong competition for properties when they hit the market. Over the past five years we have seen some exciting developments that have helped to cement Ponsonby and its surrounding areas as attractive global neighbourhoods. They are on par with many larger metropolitan districts such as Soho in New York, Shibuya in Tokyo, Fitzroy in Melbourne and Shoreditch in London. It is draw cards like these that contribute to strong residential property sales and high values. The median house price in Auckland has jumped 16% since last year to $660,000, as has the number of sales. Auckland recorded the shortest median time to sell in January at just 34 days.

NEW URBAN LIVING EXPERIENCE WITH SPECTACULAR VIEWS SKHY presents a luxurious new way to experience urban living in Auckland in an extraordinarily central location. Envisioned by Cheshire Architects and brought to life by Lamont & Co, the apartments at SKHY offer extraordinary elevated city living, saturated in some of the most exclusive and best-protected views of this city. These carefully crafted, generous-sized apartments share a spectacular outlook over Auckland city and its parks and harbours and the distant Waitakere ranges. The over-height ceilings, soft plasters and warm timbers of the building are lit by sunshine from sunrise to sunset. Each space features superb, high-quality fittings combined with tall, open-plan living and exposed concrete beams, marrying the strength of the building’s past life with the elegance of its new one. Huge sheltered outdoor living rooms and new high-performance windows have been designed to celebrate the solid mass of the concrete that frames them. The absence of any nearby towers make these views exceptionally private, and council planning controls - introduced after the tower was built - now prevent any others joining PN it in this privileged position. F For more information contact Brendon Poole on M: 021 813 255, Craig Watkins on M: 021 308 021 or register your interest on www.SKHY.org

Anecdotal evidence from the Bayleys Ponsonby office matches these observations. We are currently run off our feet with buyer enquiry and our stock is quick off the mark to sell. I have noticed a strong correlation between the offers of attractive interest rates on fixed term mortgages and the number of buyers entering the market. The sunny weather is also having a positive effect, keeping spirits high and ensuring a good level of foot traffic through our open homes. If you are looking to sell, it is wise to take these factors into consideration. There is much debate over the threat of the so-called property bubble bursting, but we are sceptical that the bubble exists at all. Evidence suggests the run of high buyer demand looks set PN to continue for some time yet. (KAREN SPIRES) F Karen Spires is a Bayleys Real Estate ‘Top Achiever’ - placing her sales data among the top 5% of salespeople within the company.

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A GREAT HIGH PROFILE INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY A mixed use Ponsonby property which has been owned and operated by two generations of a family business is up for sale for the first time in 70 years offering an add value opportunity for an investor or owner occupier. Located on a 483sq m freehold site at 129-131 Ponsonby Road, the building comprises 183sq m of ground floor retail space with sought after frontage to Ponsonby Road with four, two-to-five bedroom residential apartments above. It is being marketed by Alan Haydock and Damien Bullick, Bayleys Auckland by tender closing 17 March, 2015. “The property houses the iconic Bhana Brothers' green grocers store established back in the early 1940s,” says Haydock. “The building was originally constructed in the 1920s and had two retail shops with a residential flat above but after the Bhana family acquired it they reconfigured the ground floor into one shop for their business. “Ownership of the business and the property has been passed down to the next generation of the family, who while they have retained fresh fruit and vegetables as the basis of the business, have also increased the popularity of the store by transforming it into something of a gourmet mini market, with a wide range of specialty items, and by building up a very successful floristry outlet as well. “To diversify their income stream, they also developed the rear of the property in the late 1990s, adding new apartments. They have now decided they wish to capitalise that expenditure and make the most of the current strong demand for this type of well located mixed use property, particularly in a sought after location like Ponsonby. However, they are offering to lease back the ground floor for a year to give the next owner time to firm up future plans for that space.” The property is therefore being offered for sale fully leased at a total net rental income of approximately $250,000 p.a. The Bhana Bros lease back of their premises will be at a rental of $125,000 + GST p.a. and the fully occupied apartments are producing an approximate net rental of $125,000 p.a. The two-bedroom apartment is currently rented at $500 a week, two three-bedroom apartments are producing $550 to $570 a week and the five-bedroom apartment, which the original flat forms part of, is generating weekly rent of $850. Bullick says the apartments are well presented, with the majority offering panoramic north facing vistas of the CBD and Waitemata Harbour, with decks to maximise the views. The apartments also benefit from four secure basement car parks, in addition to two uncovered car parks at the rear of the property, accessed via a service lane on its western side which offers rear access to the ground floor retail space. “With a 50/50 income split between the retail and residential components of the property, it offers a new owner a good spread of risk across two sectors of the market,” says Bullick. “The ground floor could also easily be reconfigured into two retail outlets once again which would provide an investor with the opportunity to maximise the income return from this space. The property could also appeal to an owner occupier wanting to secure a retail position in this popular part of Ponsonby Road and who could use the income from the apartments, and possibly also part of the ground floor space, to help fund the acquisition of the property.” Bullick says the property is in a high profile position on Ponsonby Road, Franklin Road and Picton Street, in one of Auckland's premier shopping and hospitality strips. “It is located across the road from SPQR and Ponsonby Central, a popular new boutique retail and food and beverage complex created out of an industrial building by developer Andy Davies. “It is also close to the Ponsonby Village International Food Court which, as anyone who has been there will know, is one of Auckland’s busiest eating places. There are numerous other bars and restaurants and boutique shops located close by as well.” www.bayleys.co.nz

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BIRD OF THE MONTH

THE KEA The kea is the only true alpine parrot in the world and it quickly gained notoriety amongst early settlers for attacking sheep and stock. Not much has changed in the last 150 years except that the target for attack has now become vehicles - although I’m sure livestock are still harassed by kea. They are found only in the South Island and are a main feature of many ski-fields, mountain huts, lodges and hiking paths. They are an innately curious bird. This can provide both positive and negative outcomes, as their attraction to humans, our tools and machines allows new play opportunities but can lead to new threats. The increased threat was extremely prevalent between 1860 and 1970 when over 150,000 birds were shot to protect sheep. This was finally outlawed in 1971, long after many other species had been granted protection, and full protection was established in 1986. Threats still remain to kea, although their survival displays their resilience and breeding success. Similar threats, as with most of our native species, range from mammalian predators (although I daresay kea can fight off more of these than our smaller birds can), to habitat destruction and conflicts with humans brought upon themselves through curiosity. The kea is a large parrot, very strong flying and has iconic underwings that are a brilliant red. They are many shades of olive green are best seen when flying, flashing their underwings - an evolutionary trait sure to terrify members of their ecosystem. Considered extremely intelligent, especially compared to other birds, they have been known to solve logic puzzles, and can work together to complete tasks and have been seen using tools. They are a highly adaptable bird, something that has contributed to their survival in the face of humans in New Zealand. They have benefited from a large number of our projects, activities and habitats. They scavenge dead deer and other prey shot down by hunters, and kea are found in pine forests or pasture digging for grubs, not to mention their sheer pleasure when faced with a car windscreen wiper. Appropriately, a gathering of kea is called a circus. This shouldn’t come as a surprise to individuals who have been surrounded by groups of kea in parking lots... (FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT) F PN

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HEIDI PADAIN: ENTERTAINMENT IN YOUR GARDEN If you have walked in the bush often enough, I’m sure you would have had the experience of startling the typically silent kereru. Once a kereru is comfortably resting somewhere, it seems to remain remarkably quiet compared to most other bird species. They do, however, occasionally utter what sounds like a surprised, and slightly enquiring “ooh?” A little while back, I noticed that one of our regular visitors, a lone kereru, seemed to have a scheduled food path on our property. I almost always know where to look at various times of the day. Once the gorging is complete, this bird will sit all puffed up in one of the trees facing our house. Aside from occasionally blinking to observe the other bird activity on the deck, this kereru will happily doze away for hours. Over time, this bird has become more and more curious, and will suddenly make unexpected appearances. For example, I was up on a ladder painting the outer edge of the roof eave, when a bright red beak appeared, followed by an enquiring eye, and colourful plumage... “ooh?” Following this event came a huge step up in our communication. I was sitting on the deck reading, when I noticed some of the branches moving in the manuka tree, not that this is unusual, birds often make their way onto the deck from this tree. However, the branches appeared slightly bowed down, and it seemed to me that there was a bit more weight on these branches than usual. I watched in amazement as the kereru climbed up from the lower branches of the tree onto the deck rail. The kereru then calmly walked along the rail and stopped to closely examine the fruit. No doubt the kereru had observed other birds eating the fruit, and

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curiosity finally took over. The kereru had no interest in partaking in the fruit, but clearly, wishing to continue on this adventure, climbed from the deck rail on to the topmost part of a nearby chair. The kereru, appearing very relaxed, peered over my shoulder into the book I was reading, lost interest, promptly puffed up, and dozed off right there and then. In recent weeks, my kereru friend has been in engaged in what can only be described as a rather manic game of kiss chase. Presumably my regular visitor is a male kereru, and he is finally in hot pursuit of his own kind. I know this because the two of them have been orbiting around our house for the past week or so. Just yesterday lady kereru landed in the manuka tree and he quickly followed. His landing added significant weight to her poorly chosen and somewhat flimsy branch. I feared it would snap beneath them. He held no such fears and promptly set about trying to impress her. I observed him doing something I have never seen a bird do before, aside from perhaps of the parrot species. He bobbed his head, up and down, up and down, as if in complete agreement and empathy, his bulky body following closely behind. This repetitive dance-like movement caused the branch to bounce up and down in response. Observing the two of them floating up and down precariously was all too much for me, and I struggled to stifle my laughter. Almost at a loss for words I simply uttered... “ooh?” (HEIDI PADAIN) F PN To see more of Heidi’s photographic work go to www.flickr.com and type Heidi Padain into the search box.

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UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL Julia Fong Fashion designer Julia Fong holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts and trained in patternmaking and garment construction. Julia’s industry training was with respected designer Marilyn Sainty and she has enjoyed many years of experience working in the fashion industry. Julia recently joined the Citta Design team as a clothing and textile designer (her first collection for Citta being ‘Paris Winter 2015’), and before that established her own label ‘Julia Fong,’ making high end women’s clothing. Do you have a partner? My partner is Tim Fitzpatrick and he works as a landscape architect. At the moment he is working on exciting projects transforming our fair city. Do you have any children? I have three lovely boys who attend Westmere School and Ponsonby Intermediate. Your best friend would say of you... He would say I am loyal, laid back and have an offbeat sense of humour, bit like his. What are your virtues? I am compassionate and I love to help people. And your vices? Hmm, I doubt I have any. What’s your secret talent? Drawing cartoon creatures. Some of them are weird. Where do you live? Westmere. What’s your perfect Sunday? It’s definitely sunny and the day does not fly by. I’m hanging out with my boys exploring a beach for creatures, some of them are weird. How did you come to be a fashion designer? Wondering what to do with myself after my training I realised I could combine my knack for the three dimensional with my love of clothing... light bulb moment. Favourite Ponsonby cafe? Bread and Butter for their choc and almond croissants. Favourite Ponsonby store? Ok, so perhaps not technically Ponsonby, but we dig the kind boys at N and A Barbers in Grey Lynn who always look after my kids so well. Favourite Ponsonby fashion store? Scotties in Blake Street. What’s inspired you recently? My son’s year 4 teacher Robyn who goes the extra mile for her students. Thank you Robyn.

The house is on fire and your family is safe - what do you save? The children’s cards they have drawn for me. Plus my beautiful Andrew Swann engagement ring. “I’d be lost without my...” Sewing machine. One thing you have learned about life is..? It can be summed up in this poem: This Time This time is not for wasting looking back or standing still This time is for embracing with gratitude and purpose This time Your advice to Ponsonby fashion shoppers? Don’t talk yourself into clothes that don’t suit you (we’ve all done it). Always wear comfortable shoes, that way it’s easier to smile. Relish your individual style and wear what you want to! F PN CITTA DESIGN, 34 Westmoreland Street West, Grey Lynn T: 09 972 9293 www.cittadesign.com

DON’T MISS THE APRIL PONSONBY NEWS+ DEADLINE COPY DEADLINE: Friday 20 March PUBLISHED: Friday 3 April

APRIL SPECIAL FEATURES + PLANNING WEDDINGS + REAL ESTATE + FASHION - AUTUMN/WINTER PREMIUM POSITIONS AVAILABLE

TO BOOK ADVERTISING: Jo Barrett on 021 324 510 or Jessie Kollen on 021 166 2002 t: 09 361 3356 or 09 378 8553 e: joannebarrett@xtra.co.nz e: jessiekollen@gmail.com w: www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

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UNITING PURE LINES AND METAL DETAILING The Lam Dining Table by Calligaris combines the best of contemporary design and innovative in a dining table which is stylish and durable in equal measures. An extensive collection of Calligaris chairs are available to accompany Lam, making it extremely versatile to suit the preferred dining area in your home. The two-tone Lam is the result of the combination of two materials with different properties: wood and metal. Metal is used for the structural components, whilst durable wood veneer is used for the tabletop due to its comforting sensory properties. Choose from three versatile, modern finish options: natural/ matt optic white, grey/mat grey, or smoke/matt black. The Lam Dining Table’s integrated system is concealed in the frame: the legs slide to one side allowing the 60cm extension leaf, in the same colour as the top, to be positioned into place. Available exclusively from DAWSON’S FURNITURE, 1/1 Holder Place, North Shore T: 09 476 1121 www.dawsonsfurniture.co.nz

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THE HISTORICAL BOROUGH OF PONSONBY AND GREY LYNN: STREET NAMES

Fitzroy Street Captain Robert FitzRoy had more aristocratic connections than the heroes in Georgette Heyer’s regency novels. His father, Augustus Henry, the third Duke of Grafton was a direct descendant of Charles II and Barbara Villiers. His mother was the eldest daughter of the Marquis of Londonderry and his half-brother, Sir Charles Augustus FitzRoy was governor of New South Wales from 1846 to 1855. All these privileged connections instilled a sense of service to the nation in the young FitzRoy who, after having lived in a Palladian-style mansion since he was four, entered the Royal Naval College in Portsmouth when he was nearly 13 years old. He entered the Royal Navy in 1819 and completed a course which included mathematics, the Classics, history, geography, English, French, sketching, navigation, fencing and dancing with great distinction and on leaving the college he was promoted to lieutenant with ‘full numbers’, which was a first in naval history. In 1828 he was given his first command, the Beagle, which was surveying the coasts of Patagonia, Tierra del Fuego and the Straits of Magellan. Later the Beagle continued the survey with young Charles Darwin aboard. During this second voyage FitzRoy visited the Bay of Islands and suggested there be a regular naval presence in the young colony. He was now an excellent navigator, a sound surveyor, and recognised as a man of science. On returning to Britain he played a major role in writing and editing two of the three volume narrative named ‘His Majesty’s Ships of Adventure’, Darwin competing the third and in 1837 was awarded the premium gold medal by the Royal Geographical Society. He began a short-lived parliamentary career as the Tory member for Durham but in 1843 he replaced Hobson, who had died suddenly of a stroke, as governor of New Zealand. FitzRoy inherited a host of problems that beset a now bankrupt colony and had experienced its first inter-racial conflict on the Wairau plains, and was threatened by hostilities in the Bay of Islands. The Wairau skirmish resulted from a fraudulent land deal instigated by Captain Arthur Wakefield who had bought it from a whaler’s widow who falsely claimed ownership. When a group of settlers, including Wakefield tried to clear Maori off the land a clash resulted, the first since the signing of the Treaty. FitzRoy, instead of avenging the settlers, blamed them for the so-called ‘massacre’ that had ensued. His decision met with approval from the Colonial Office, but engendered the New Zealand Company’s permanent hostility. Meanwhile, a more serious situation was brewing in the north sparked off by the Bay of Islands chief Hone Heke who had been the first to sign the Treaty. When the government moved to Auckland, the Far North’s importance diminished and the region also suffered economically. Heke, full of resentment, repeatedly cut down the Union Jack flagstaff in Russell and FitzRoy found himself having to deal with New Zealand’s first racial war. The English government was not prepared to provide funds, troops or a warship so lack of money was a major problem. FitzRoy then offered a reward for Heke’s capture and restricted action to establishing a military presence in Kororareka. Having insufficient money to pay the militia and the Colonial Office regarding his call for troops from New South Wales unjustifiable, the engagements continued for 18 months. Finally FitzRoy’s despatches were not sufficiently explicit about what was happening because of reluctance to incur official disapproval, so Charles Buller, representing the New Zealand Company confronted the House with information about the true state of affairs. The man first regarded as ideal for the post was recalled, but before leaving he co-operated generously with his successor, Grey, and gave him a wealth of useful information even while aware Grey had double the parliamentary grant and had determined the settlers’ interests be paramount. There were no honours accorded him once back in England but for a year or two Grey’s despatches were referred to him for comment. He refused to admit failure and wrote a pamphlet defending his administration and pointing out the British Government was faced with a problem that required more time and money, which view was supported by Bishop Selwyn. History has put him down as an ineffectual governor but his determination that Maori should be treated with fairness, while European settlers should lead their lives in peace and harmony, constituted a major contribution to the new colony. In the end his failure was down to the Colonial Office rather than his governance. (DEIRDRE TOHILL) F PN

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ALEXANDRA PARK INVITES PONSONBY LOCALS Registrations are now open for one, two and three-bedroom apartments and terraces at Alexandra Park’s 223 Green Lane West residential and retail development. Alexandra Park CEO, Dominique Dowding, says best practice urban design and master planning will be at the heart of 223 Green Lane West, complete with good walking distance to amenities and public spaces, including Cornwall Park. As well as 231 beautifully appointed apartments and terraces, there’ll also be great high-end boutique retail stores, restaurants, food and beverages - making it a real lifestyle destination. “Interest is hot, with our apartments and terraces appealing to the likes of empty nesters, young urban professionals and families wanting the much sought after double grammar zone. We’re also reaching out to the discerning Ponsonby market,” says Dominique. Pete Evans of Colliers International says low interest rates, rising rents and unrelenting Auckland housing demand are all contributing to record levels of interest. “With the average Auckland house price on the march, people are looking at Alexandra Park as

a great value for money opportunity given the huge emphasis we’re putting on quality and urban design along with retail amenities,” says Evans. The development is marketed by Colliers International, and those interested in finding out more about Auckland’s newest new urban village development can check out www.apliving.co.nz or call T: 0800 275 484. Prices for the spacious, architecturally designed apartments range from $500,000 to $5 million and will be sold as freehold unit titles. What’s more, people can pay a visit. From this month a replica of a completed village apartment will open on site, enabling people to experience just how stunning the apartments and terraces will be. The massive transformation of part of Alexandra Park’s existing car-park is all going to happen very quickly with successful buyers set to PN move in by late next year. www.apliving.co.nz F

ARE YOU SELLING YOUR BIGGEST ASSET? ‘you can’t sell a secret... good property marketing makes a difference every time’ www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

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ARTS + CULTURE UPTOWN ART SCENE Studio One Toi Tu at 1 Ponsonby Road features a suite of galleries that can be used by artists and community groups for non-dealer exhibitions. Last month, as part of Pride Month, the Rainbow Youth collective ‘artistRY’ held a group exhibition of young LGBTI artists exploring the interactions of sexuality, history and community. Over three gallery spaces there was a strong showing of painting, drawing, photography, sculpture and moving image. Madeleine Beasley opened her exhibition ‘Asylum - after Diane Arbus’ in another of Studio One’s galleries. Although the paintings are inspired from photographs taken at an English psychiatric hospital in the 1950s, the images have a party-feel to them, like a quiet carnival.

Madeleine Beasley opened her exhibition - Asylum

Art spills into the community with visiting American artist Kelsey Montague painting her large signature wings on the Brown Street side of Ponsonby Central. While around 4m high, they’re positioned so you can ‘wear’ them while being photographed, and if you Instagram #ponsonbycentral you could win yummy treats at Ponsonby Central (ends 11 March). The best way to see art is in a gallery - you see the true colours and size, the marks and how it sits in space. With so much going on, it’s easy to miss some shows, so the best way to find them is at www.artsdiary.co.nz Photographer Sait Akkirman has been recording art events in Auckland since 2010, once covering 10 in a single evening via public transport! Artsdiary has become an invaluable archive with around 1700 openings on the site. The images used here are courtesy of Sait Akkirman and Artsdiary - that’s for being such an art fan, Sait! PN (WILL PAYNT, STUDIO ART SUPPLIES) F

Rainbow Youth

SHOWING AT NO.1 PARNELL RAWENE Kia Toitu He Kauri - Keep Kauri Standing 7 March - 1 April Opening: 7 March 10.30am As part of the collaborative effort across regions to address the potentially devastating issue of kauri dieback, No.1 Parnell Gallery, Rawene, is holding an exhibition which shares the title of the national campaign, Kia Toitu He Kauri - Keep Kauri Standing. Kauri dieback is the deadly disease caused by Phytophthora taxon Agathis. It is specific to New Zealand kauri and can kill trees of all ages. In the past 10 years, kauri dieback has killed thousands of kauri in New Zealand. Kia Toitu He Kauri - Keep Kauri Standing, celebrates the majesty of kauri and its part in defining Aotearoa New Zealand’s national identity. Painting, sculpture, installations and other art forms will be exhibited and a poster design workroom will be open throughout the exhibition where people are able to participate in communicating the message about our endangered icon. Together we can work to protect and save our beloved kauri. For further information contact Dawn Harris at No.1 Parnell, number1parnell@gmail.com F PN Check out the kauri dieback website for more information and regional initiatives. www.kauridieback.co.nz

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ARTS + CULTURE EVAN WOODRUFFE WORKS ON MASSIVE SCALE The biggest problem for local artist Evan Woodruffe’s second solo exhibition ‘Hypnic Jerks’ at Paul Nache Gallery in Gisborne was getting one massive painting measuring nearly 2m by 3m down there. Hypnic Jerks opened on Waitangi Day, taking its title from the twitches that our bodies sometimes experience as we lay in the liminal state between waking and sleeping, often as a half-dream of falling or tripping up. Taking advantage of the long weekend, friends and whanau from Auckland and Wellington joined with locals to celebrate the opening in fine Gisborne style.

Evan Woodruffe with Lorena and Montana Donaldson

The giant canvas ‘13th January 2015’, which the artist had to reassemble in the gallery space, provided a popular backdrop for photographs. Shots of the exhibition along with a video interview with Evan can be seen on www.paulnache.com Evan has had a busy couple of years, while managing Studio Art Supplies in Crummer Road, he completed his MFA through AUT and Elam, University of Auckland; held four solo exhibitions; taught summer school at Browne School of Art in Grey Lynn and Corbans Estate Art Centre; and heads the board of Ponsonby-based arts organisation the Artists Alliance. Not shrinking from big problems, Evan’s next project is a 3m by 3m painting on glass at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery on 14 March. Images courtesy of Tom Teutenberg @2TEN F PN

ADVENTURIST ARTISTS WANTED Writers, film-makers and composers, choreographers and visual artists are invited to apply for the council’s Auckland regional parks artist in residence programme. This year, the successful artist will have the option of living and working at the newly opened bach within Waitawa Regional Park or at a beachside cottage in Duder Regional Park. Programme manager Michelle Edge says the mix of landscapes, habitats and heritage sites at these southern parks is sure to provide plenty of stimulation and inspiration for their creations. She says the residency programme has influenced previous residents in significant ways. “It has encouraged some artists to change mediums and even where they live and work. For others it has led to awareness, appreciation and interest in a whole new subject matter,” she says. “It’s a win-win arrangement, where artists to work in stunning surroundings and we get fresh insights into the parks we visit and care for and which we can share with park visitors.” Proposals could focus on small details, a significant natural or man-made feature, or on something grander or conceptual. The selection panel will looking for innovative and park-specific proposals. F PN For further information and application forms: www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/arts The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

YOUTH MENTORSHIP PROGRAMME SEEKS EMERGING YOUNG WRITERS Three secondary school students will each have the opportunity to be mentored by one of New Zealand’s best professional authors in order to develop their craft and hone their writing skills. The NZSA Youth Mentorship Programme 2015 offers aspiring young writers (aged 15-18) a 12.5 hour mentorship, giving them the opportunity to gain valuable skills and knowledge. Previous recipient Sophie Rose van Waardenberg of Auckland was partnered with Dunedin-based poet Sue Wootton for her 2014 mentorship. She had this to say of her mentorship experience: “I feel like my progress has been both practical, in my use of words and the crafting of my work, and in terms of confidence. I’ve grown in my ability to share work in progress, to take criticism as useful and not hurtful, and to feel encouraged rather than discouraged about the potential that my work could have. My mentor was such a good fit for me as she writes poetry that I find myself falling in love with over and over, and take a lot of inspiration from.” The intent of the mentor programme is to foster and develop emerging writing talent with the support of established authors. The NZSA has run a highly successful mentoring programme for writers since 1999, thanks to support from Creative New Zealand. F PN Deadline: 2 April 2015 For further information contact the National Office: PO Box 7701, Wellesley Street, Auckland 1141, T: 09 379 4801, E: office@nzauthors.org.nz DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT

Ponsonby Market Day - our musicians Ponsonby Market Days are a much loved fixture on the calendar for Ponsonby Road business owners and locals. They are also a lovely gig for numerous bands and solo musicians; many have been performing on the main stretch for a number of years. I got in touch with a few of the bands that will be performing on 21 March at the next Market Day. You’ll find links to their websites and social media pages at the end of the article, so get your thinking cap on for other events that these brilliant bands could perform at in the Ponsonby 2015 calendar. First I will briefly mention the Hipstamatics as they are frequent performers at the Market Days but unfortunately won’t be playing on 21 March. Keep your eyes peeled for a full interview and article with them over the coming months. For me one of the bands I always recognise and remember is the Queen City Big Band. They plant themselves outside the All Saints Church on the lawn and MD John Callesen recalls only one cancelled concert since 2009, commending the Market Day as a very important part of their annual calendar. The Big Band is made up of 20 musicians and vocalists and exists to develop and train young jazz musicians from around Auckland. They were established in 1979 and combine powerful brass, sax and rhythm sections with young, talented vocalists to perform an impressive repertoire of music ranging from swing, through funk, jazz and rock.

AKSamba are an innovative world percussion band based in Auckland, their music style fuses Brazilian rhythms, drum and bass, and hip hop with dance. They perform with up to 40 members. I’m sure they will be easy to find on the strip, we’ll certainly hear them. I’m pleased to say my own band, Adventures with Rhubarb, will be performing. We are a three piece folk band, with influences that span Americana, jazz, rock and blues. We’ll be performing with other friends, building our numbers to include percussion. We feature violins, clarinet, banjo and numerous stringed instruments. The Matecito Latin Band was formed by Gerardo Torres after he returned to New Zealand from Peru in 2000. During his career as an entertainer, Gerardo has performed for many of Peru’s diplomats and presidents. After emigrating to New Zealand, Gerardo was introduced to local musician Brian Hodges, who was the leader of the Garden City Big Band at that time. Gerardo and Brian went on to form ‘Mambo Jambo’, which was New Zealand’s largest Latin band at that time consisting of 14 members. Gerardo realised that a smaller band would be a more affordable choice for regular gigs, so he also formed a five piece Latin band which is made up of five members of the larger band. This smaller band is known as the ‘Matecito Latin Band’. Both play a variety of Latin music including salsa, merengue, cumbia, cha cha and latin rock. The 14 piece band has a unique live brass section, whereas the smaller band uses backing tracks for the brass. You’ll find the Matecito Latin Band on the corner of Williamson and Ponsonby Road. PN (FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT) F

photography: Michael McClintock

DeSotos are a successful, well established touring band. They’ve already spent the summer playing a number of festivals and outdoor concerts, including the Taranaki Festival of Lights, at Cornwall Park and the Coopers Creek winery. They are playing at the Market Day as the Acoustic DeSotos, toning down the Americana Blues by bringing in congas and acoustic guitar to replace full drum kit and telecasters. Frontman Paul Gurney has been a Ponsonby resident since 1998 and has strong connections with both the Market Days and the suburb and says it’s a great way of staying in touch with the local community and always enjoys seeing familiar faces on the strip while they play.

Rootsy covers of Neil Young and Robert Plant sit in with band originals. You can find the Acoustic DeSotos on the corner of Ponsonby Road and Franklin Road sometime just after midday.

AKSamba are regulars at Ponsonby Market Day. Their music style fuses Brazilian rhythms, drum and bass, hip hop with dance. Finn McLennan-Elliott has a Bachelor of Science Honours degree specialising in human geography at Auckland University. In his spare time, Finn plays clarinet and guitar in an orchestra and a folk music group. He is hosting ‘Folk at the Old Folks’ on the first Sunday of every month at the Auckland Old Folks Association Hall, an intimate afternoon concert of folk music.

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FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT

White Night - Auckland Arts Festival Auckland Arts Festival’s iconic event, White Night, is back in 2015 - and it’s bigger than ever before! Last Festival’s White Night drew an estimated 22,000 visits to 81 locations across 14 suburbs Auckland-wide. This year, on 14 March, more than 100 venues and locations from Devonport to Otara, Titirangi to the CBD, will boast free visual art, dance, music, poetry, and video events from 6pm until midnight. This year, White Night 2015’s new web app, available at www.whitenight.aaf.co.nz, is your new best friend. It will enable you to search and filter by venue, time or theme and ensure you don’t miss out on the events that interest you. It is an exciting evening and Ponsonby is placed right in the thick of it! The Auckland Arts Festival 2015 artistic director, Carla van Zon, had this to say about Ponsonby’s involvement in White Night. “White Night interweaves Auckland’s diverse suburbs in a vibrant tapestry of creative energy and activity - and Ponsonby is no exception. Paerau Corneal, one of the artists whose work features in Uku Rere, an exhibition that is the first major survey of contemporary Maori ceramics and will be at Object Space. While Fale Ula artist Niki Hastings-McFall presents Flock at Whitespace. This truly is a rare glimpse into the beating heart of our city’s creative scene and the wonderful intertwining that is at play.” On top of this, Black Asterisk Gallery features its first Festival of Photography with a fine selection of photographic works by both established and upcoming New Zealand photographers. Studio One will feature a hands-on workshop creating traditional Solomon Island body adornments with sister artists Molana and Reina Sutton. “White Night 2015 includes performances within a broad range of linguistic and cultural contexts, including Maori, New Zealand European, Indian, Fijian, Samoan, Japanese, Solomon Islands and more. It’s an incredible snapshot, not just of the arts scene in Auckland, but of the cultural landscape as well,” says van Zon. There is a return of highlights from the last White Night in 2013 including NZ Trio, to the Auckland Art Gallery - their concerts last festival were so popular they had to schedule in an extra performance. Bodyphonics dancers and music students from the University of Auckland will perform in public spaces around the city. This enchanting team of emerging performing artists will be popping up all over the city, connecting attendees with different venues and leaving a trail of delight in their wake. Meanwhile, Manukau Institute of Technology creative writing students will be on the move, recording and sharing their wordy snapshots. Free buses are on hand to take people between hubs and venues. Dancer and arts laureate Louise Potiki-Bryant will be joined by clay artist Paerau Corneal and musician Paddy Free at Q Theatre Loft in the CBD for three performances of Kiri. Down at Silo Park, Auckland Museum will take White Night outside the museum walls this year, presenting Fijian performance artists Vou. The company’s mesmerising dance work will be projected onto Silo 7 while spoken word artists transport the audience to another, haunting realm. Afterwards, visual art works by our very own New Zealand-based artists will be on display inside the silos for audiences to browse and enjoy. Hum Salon, the wonderful old house on the corner of Grafton Bridge, will be home to Rabbitsongs, an intimate folk festival, run by Second Hand News, Auckland’s new folk music website. This will feature soloists and duos from the diverse folk music community that Auckland is home to and an exclusive art exhibition. Visit www.aucklandfestival.co.nz for a full list of venues, times and to make full use of the new White Night web app. While you’re there, be sure to take a look at some of the fabulous events happening throughout the month of March as part of Auckland Arts Festival 2015. Finally, don’t forget to follow White Night on Twitter @WhiteNightAKL. (FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT) F PN

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ARTS + CULTURE SHOWING AT THE KEEP Surface Expressions until 14 March Local artist Shelley Jacobson’s new series of photographs and accompanying book entitled Surface Expressions, is now showing at the K’Road project space, The Keep. Surface Expressions is a study of the Wairakei geothermal area in the central North Island. The photographs draw attention to the region’s unique natural features and to the human forces that have formed its current state. The photographs are reproduced in the accompanying book. In the Victorian era Wairakei was a world-renowned and exotic geothermal tourist destination. In the mid 20th century it was radically transformed by its conversion to a site for generating electricity. Through this intervention, the underlying geothermal system was irrevocably altered, the spectacular Geyser Valley was extinguished, the steaming craters of Karapiti were revealed. More recently, a man-made geyser has come to accompany the power station in this disrupted landscape. The photographs in Surface Expressions offer glimpses of the land forms of Wairakei today. The publication takes a wider view, incorporating found text from the late 19th century through to the present day. The newspaper clippings, advertising materials and Trip Advisor ratings speak in the vernacular of their respective times and frame social ideas and expectations of tourist attractions.

Artist Shelley Jacobson with Crater #3, Wairakei, one of 17 photographs of land forms of the Wairakei geothermal area, currently showing at The Keep

FAT FREDDY @ THE ZOO Saturday 14 February Fat Freddy’s Drop played their only New Zealand summer headline show - a sellout - at Auckland Zoo on Valentine’s Day, before returning to their Wellington home town to PN continue recording a new album. F

Shelley graduated with an MFA from Massey University in Welington in 2009 and has a Diploma of Publishing from Whitireia New Zealand. In her work she is interested primarily in cultural geography. She maintains a research based practice focused on this area. She is also involved with PhotoForum, New Zealand’s publishing programme, and recently guest edited a double issue of its members’ magazine. The Keep open studio and concept store works closely with the local artistic community and hosts a schedule of art, design and craft exhibitions. (PHILIPPA TAIT) F PN The Keep, 504 Karangahape Road, T: 09 555 7099, www.shelleyjacobson.co.nz

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PLAYING AT GARNET STATION TINY THEATRE The Memory Shelf 6 and 7 March - 8pm, $25/$20 A new play fresh from the Fringe, The Memory Shelf is about chance meetings, secrets, and self-preservation. Ever been to Arohanui? It’s that town with the great tea-rooms owned by those twin sisters. You know the one? Population 250. Jess is a long-time Arohanui resident. She’s got a lot to hide but a random encounter with a runaway could be exactly what she needs. Directed by Renee Lyons (Nick, Verbatim) created and performed by Saraid Cameron and Amelia Reynolds.

Andrew McLennan & The Underminers 13 and 27 March, 10 and 24 April - 8pm, $10 Many years ago Andrew McLennan turned his back on the music business but creativity is like water, you can’t stop it flowing. So for the past six months Andrew and three other musicians have been practicing his original songs. This is the band’s first season in the Tiny Theatre. It’s a live music first for Garnet Station too and they’ll wine and dine you with tapas and wood fired pizza before the shows. The Underminers are: on piano Michael Larsen, ex Jan Hellriegel, on percussion Gary Hunt, ex Terrorways and new to the scene on guitar and vocals Piri Heihei, affectionately called ‘a bastard’ for his amazing ability to harmonise. Singer songwriter Andrew was vocalist for Pop Mechanix and Coconut Rough in the 80s. Andrew will spice things up by introducing guest artists like Dani T, “an astonishingly good vocalist from the band Black Rose. And to give the night an extra Moro bar we’re bringing in a small choir called The Midlife Crisis Unit.” These six women have embraced Andrew’s left of field request for them to do an early vintage Bowie song, plus a song from the cult 70s band Mott the Hoople! F PN GARNET STATION TINY THEATRE, 85 Garnet Road, bookings essential T: 09 360 3397 (plenty of free street parking) www.garnetstation.com

ARTS + CULTURE WOMEN FOR EQUALITY Fern Mercier and Linley Scott are planning to write a book about the part their group, Women for Equality, played in the early 70s and 80s. A recent publication about Freemans Bay in former times makes no mention of their efforts in trying to effect social change. Rather than having their contribution written out of history, they feel motivated to have it archived so it won’t be lost in the mists of time. With this project in mind, they decided to have a reunion on 31 January this year in the very same house, 8 Winn Road where about 10 founding members of ‘Women for Equality’ lived communally from 1971 to 1985. The purpose of this celebration was to stimulate memories and recall anecdotes. Fern had written a Linley Scott has her arm round chapter in a book entitled ‘Changing our Fern Mercier Lives’ which was about the early days of women’s liberation, and she found the best way to recall memories was to brainstorm with others who were also involved in the movement. Nearly a hundred people from all over the country attended the reunion and many recollections of those early days were recounted. The original group comprised of men, women and children who had been living in a communal house in Williamson Ave when 8 Wiinn Road came up for sale. It was one of the first farmhouses in the area and Fern says that according to an urban legend, Goldie once lived there. The group could not get a loan from a bank in those days but luckily the owner decided to leave money in it for the co-operative, which purchased the property for only $14,000. Freemans Bay was a poor suburb back then and the house was not the only one there with no water and an outside toilet. The house was a complete mess but the four couples, along with their children, set to and made it habitable. They had all sorts of aims and ideals and the whole point of living together was to put those concepts into practice. In fact, there were a number of communes flourishing in this part of town back then; two in Picton Street and, almost next door, another at 12 Winn Road that was set up by a feminist group which was the first to establish women’s refuges. On one occasion a woman in number 12 got so mad with her partner she threw all his clothes outside onto the pavement. He gathered them up and shouted, “I’m going to Waiheke,” and trekked off down Anglesea Street. A few minutes later she calmed down and decided to give him a lift to the ferry. When she drew up alongside him she wound down her window and called out, “I’ll run you down.” He took the words literally and scarpered off as fast as he could! They had a roster of duties, a printing press and used to go out into factories to distribute leaflets about equal pay, abortion and childcare. They were very focussed on their political work and their most significant achievement was consciousness raising, particularly among working class women and some other political groups as well. They also did a lot of work on how to conduct meetings. But it wasn’t all toil and no play. They had get-togethers with like minded socialists, went on picnics and had lunches for out of town visitors. Share holders came and went over the 15 years but the original ideology remained intact. Nevertheless the good times came to an inevitable end. Interest rates in the 70s were exorbitant and they had never tried to reduce the mortgage on the house. People who replaced shareholders just paid a minimal rent so the group had quite a debt to service. Also while one loves one’s friends, one doesn’t necessarily love their partners, so everyone eventually returned to a ‘nuclear family’ setup. One of the positives of the reunion was listening to the younger generation talk of how happy they were living communally and the freedom and fun they enjoyed. Fern and Linley observed how those grown children practice the same ideology and have passed them down to their own children. Linley describes how those memories are like a book full of adventure and wonderful characters that she and Fern can dip into for the rest of their lives. Most significantly, attendees at the reunion all agreed their time at Winn Road produced PN wonderful adults. (DEIRDRE TOHILL) F

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ARTS + CULTURE SHOWING AT WHITESPACE Flock - Niki Hastings-McFall 10 - 28 March Saturday 14 March open until 9pm for White Night Our very own Westie, Niki Hastings-McFall’s work features strongly in Auckland in 2015, her solo show Flock at Whitespace heads up an exhausting number of exhibitions around the city, including a major installation as part of the Auckland Festival at Aotea Square and culminating in a group exhibition; Wunderruma at the Auckland Art Gallery, due to tour nationally after winning critical acclaim in Munich. Niki’s work is instantly recognisable thanks to its originality and spanning of genres - including jewellery, sculpture, mixed media assemblage and installations - and because it draws on aspects of our cultural landscape in disarming and provocative ways.

COLLECT @ WHITESPACE In March Whitespace features New Zealand ceramic artist Nadine Spalter. Nadine works mostly with high-fired porcelain, the white providing a perfect canvas for exploration into colour. Nadine uses a combination of stains and stoneware glazes and fire in both reduction and oxidation atmospheres to achieve the desired results. Nadine’s work has been featured in many exhibitions, including The Portage Ceramic awards, The Wallace Awards and ASP annual awards. Meet the maker: Nadine Spalter will present an informal talk about her work on 21 March at 3pm. F PN COLLECT @ WHITESPACE, 12 Crummer Road, T: 09 361 6331, www.collect.net.nz

Using sound and moving image is just the latest innovation for an artist whose career spans more than 20 years. During that time her work has featured in numerous exhibitions and installations - and is held in collections - throughout Europe, America, Australasia and the Pacific. “I enjoy giving objects a second life. I am intrigued by the story within an object, how something inanimate can record and encode emotion, information and history. Objects have a power to generate warmth and connection.” The continued international attention surrounding Niki Hastings-McFall is indicative of her status as one of the foremost significant artists of Aotearoa. Niki makes work that defines her experience as an artist of the 21st century, culturally diverse, connected with her communities and engaged with social and environmental issues. Her talent lies in continually presenting work that is perceptive, bold and visually spectacular. F PN WHITESPACE, 12 Crummer Road, T: 09 361 6331, www.whitespace.co.nz

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ARTS + CULTURE SHOWING AT RAILWAY ST STUDIOS Recent Collaborations by Ellen Johansen and M G Walker 13 March - 3 April New work by Ellen Johansen and M G Walker, who have been regular finalists in both the New Zealand Painting and Printmaking Award and the Walker & Hall Art Award, sees these two New Zealand artists further exploring their approaches to collaboration. While both have independent careers as artists, a strand of their recent practice involves the intriguing mix of Ellen’s painted expanses of luscious colour with Michael’s intricate, often sexual and blackly humorous line drawings. These drawings include figures engaged in an infinite range of complex and quirky narratives that involve both human and mythical figures.

AMANDA KIRK, A SOPRANO PROUD TO BE A ST MARY’S OLD GIRL Twenty-four-year-old Amanda Kirk is a soprano and a former pupil of St Mary’s Ponsonby. Amanda talked to Ponsonby News about her background and career.

For them, these conglomerate images are about transformation and change. In their artist’s statement they note that ‘all are naked’ in the face of inevitable change and that line and colour may suggest personal meaning but may also point to the process of transformation itself. F PN RAILWAY ST STUDIOS, 8 Railway Street, Newmarket, M: 021 419 292 www.railwaystreetstudios.co.nz www.mgdwalker.com www.ellenjohansen.com

How long have you been singing? I first remember singing in primary school actually. I have always loved singing and as a kid used to find myself singing to myself (yes, I was an only child at the time)! I sung in my first production when I was in year 6 at primary school and remember being so excited for having the lead role in our community-based musical, playing the Pied Piper of Hamelin. I spent primary school singing in choirs and pretty much singing anywhere and everywhere I could. I didn't start having singing lessons until I started at St Mary’s College, and I would have been about year 8 at the time. So the short answer, is I have been singing for most of my life! Tell us about your time at St Mary’s College? My time at St Mary’s College has to be some of the best years of my life so far. I started St Mary’s in 2001 as a year 7 student coming from Mangere Bridge each day. St Mary’s was a very small school at the time with a roll of about 400. I was definitely involved in the music department quite a lot all the way through school, and if it wasn't for St Mary’s I don't think my love for music, and especially classical music, would have been anywhere near close to the extent that it is today. I remember joining the senior orchestra in year 8 and going on my first overseas trip to Brisbane - which was definitely fun as a 12-year-old. The exposure to the music department at St Mary’s and the opportunities we were given were awesome! I will never forget our amazing orchestra trip to China in 2005 where we performed at the Beijing Arts Festival. I am so proud to be a St Mary’s 'Old Girl' and I definitely don't think I would be the woman I am today if it wasn't for my time there! Do you have any favourite pieces? To be honest I enjoy singing a bit of everything! I love singing in Italian and my ultimate favourite aria to sing is 'Ebben ne andro lontana' from Catalani's opera 'La Wally'. Normally I enjoy all the pieces I sing and perform as they each have their own story that the composer is trying to get across, so each one is different and interesting in their own, very special way.

Pilgrimage (detail) by Ellen Johansen and M G Walker

Any inspirations? Singing, and in particular classical (opera) singing is a very tough industry, and is definitely something I have had to get used to, and to an extent am still getting used to. Having inspiration is therefore a necessity to help keep you on track and focussed and willing to follow through on your dream. My inspirations are other international opera divas such as Cecilia Bartolli, Lesley Garret, Kiri Te Kanawa and Katherine Jenkins. Have you done any other overseas work? I have been extremely fortunate to be a vocal soloist (and violinist) for the Aotea Youth Symphony in the past. Travelling with them on their international tours I have been able to sing to audiences in all over China and Tahiti. As I write this I have also just confirmed an audition time for a school in London in about three weeks time too, so fingers crossed! (as told to MARTIN LEACH) F PN The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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ARTS + CULTURE OPEN - A WEEKEND OF CREATIVITY The OPEN weekend event will showcase the vibrant and exciting creative industries that are prevalent on the North Shore and ‘open’ for all to enjoy and discover. OPEN will include North Shore performance venues, art galleries and arts organisations as well as local museums, heritage buildings, historic sites and independent practitioners (artist studios and private galleries/performances). OPEN is a regional event proudly supported by the Devonport-Takapuna Local Board and Lake House Arts Centre.

Nanette Randall - Lake House Arts; ‘Felicity Swann’ - Northart Gallery

A sample below of ‘what’s on’ or for the full programme go to: www.lakehousearts.org.nz/OPEN OPEN day - 28 March 10am - 3pm. FREE Art and craft stalls and demonstrations - painting, calligraphy, wood turning, free kids’ art activities, North Shore Youth Choir and Orchestra, kite displays, exhibitions and much more! LAKE HOUSE ARTS CENTRE 37 Fred Thomas Drive, Takapuna, www.lakehousearts.org.nz/OPEN

Eion Bryant ‘Domain’ Acrylic on canvas

White works/White night - 28 - 29 March 10am - 4pm. FREE An exhibition of various works in celebration of ‘White Night’ - painting, collage, photography, ceramic and object art. NORTHART GALLERY, Norman King Square, Ernie Mays Street, Northcote Town Centre www.northart.co.nz Eion Bryant - Artist’s Studio - Opera and Art! FREE 28 March Artist’s Studio open: 10am - 12pm and 1.30 - 4pm Opera performance: 2 - 2.15 pm 29 March Artist’s Studio open: 10am - 12pm and 2 - 4pm Opera performance 2.30 - 2.45 pm ARTIST’S STUDIO, 21 Gazelle Avenue, Beach Haven, T: 09 483 6703 www.eionbryant.com

Warwick Brown 2015 ‘White Relief’ Mixed media 750mm x 500mm x 100mm

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ARTS + CULTURE SHOWING AT TOI ORA GALLERY The Outsider Art exhibition 10 March - 30 April Opening: 10 March 5-7pm In celebration of Auckland Arts Festival, Toi Ora welcomes you to the Outsider Art exhibition. This follows on from the inaugural Outsider Art Fair in 2014, and includes, Andrew Blythe in association with Tim Melville Gallery, James King, Victoria White woodcut print Anita Whosoever, Paul Noffke, Selwyn Vercoe, Louise Williams, Patrick Te Ariki, Kama, guest artist Reece Tong and artists represented by Creativity Explored (San Francisco.) Take this opportunity to invest in quality Outsider Art. White Night 14 March 6pm - midnight Easy to be motivated during the buzz of White Night, Toi Ora Gallery opens its door and welcomes the arts masses to view from a fresh perspective, collectible Outsider Art. Printmaking workshop (Koha) 14 March 6 - 9pm Walk through the Toi Ora Gallery and join a printmaking workshop in our creative art studio - make a unique print using the mono-print or woodcut technique with tutor Mira Glisic-Milojev. F PN TOI ORA, 6 Putiki Street, T: 09 360 417 info@toiora.org.nz www.toiora.org.nz

WHAT’S ON AT THE MARITIME MUSEUM Ocean voyaging waka, the fastest yachts on the planet and dancers on the water: It’s all hands on deck at the Maritime Museum with an action packed month of events. 7-8 March Start by climbing on board an ocean going waka all the way from Hawaii and meet the crew who are sailing around the world to spread the message of ocean conservation. Find out how they’re using ancient navigation techniques to pick their path and visit the marine research station at a special open weekend. 14 March For something completely different, explore the museum after dark this White Night. Climb aboard an historic vessel for a magical twilight sailing, be captivated by live theatre and dance performances from Prayas Theatre Company and Java Dance Company, and keep the kids entertained with Love the Sea themed activities. All month Viaduct Harbour is temporarily home to the fastest yachts on the planet for the Auckland stop over of the Volvo Ocean Race. Experience the highs and lows of one of the toughest events on earth at 40 Years, 40 Faces; the official Volvo Ocean Race photography exhibition at the Maritime Museum. While you’re there, take on the museum’s Volvo Adventure Trail or set out on a special sailing to watch the race yachts depart. Best of all, entry to the Maritime Museum is free for Aucklanders, so head down to the waterfront to experience a piece of New Zealand’s maritime history for yourself. F PN To find our more visit www.maritimemuseum.co.nz

Reece Tong - America

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ARTS + CULTURE SHOWING AT OREXART Matthew Browne 3- 21 March Matthews Browne works within the traditions of painting and sculpture. He has a Bachelor of Arts in painting from Camberwell College of Arts, London, also a Master of Fine Arts from Elam School of Fine Arts, Auckland. Browne has exhibited his work widely throughout New Zealand and the United Kingdom. His work is represented in private collections internationally. Public collections include the Parliamentary Collection, Wellington, The Royal Overseas League, London and The James Wallace Charitable Arts Trust, Auckland. In 2005 he was the joint winner of the ‘People’s Choice Award’ at The Wallace Art Awards and in 2009 was awarded a ‘Merit’ for his painting ‘Wonder’ at the New Zealand Painting and Printmaking Awards. He has consecutively been selected as a finalist in the annual Wallace Art Awards since 2000. Browne says “I see my painting and sculpture as a way to encourage and make visible those metaphorical images and sensations that normally reside deep in the unconscious.” Please contact rex@orexart.co.nz for details. F PN OREXART, 15 Putiki Street, Arch Hill, T: 09 378 0588 www.orexart.co.nz

PASIFIKA FESTIVAL ON THE MOVE Pasifika Festival will have a new temporary home for 2015, with Hayman Park in Manukau set to be transformed into an enchanting array of Pacific Island villages on 14 -15 March. Now in its 23rd year, Pasifika Festival is the biggest celebration of Pacific Island culture and heritage in the world with over 1,000 performers and 300 stalls. The festival forms part of the Auckland’s non-stop summer of events, and is being delivered this year by Orange Productions on behalf of Auckland Tourism, Events and Economic Development and Auckland Council. Pasifika Festival 2015 was originally scheduled to take place at Western Springs Park, but has been moved following the discovery of a localised small population of Queensland fruit flies in the Grey Lynn area. The Ministry for Primary Industries is taking urgent action to eradicate the Queensland fruit fly - a serious insect pest of fruit and vegetable crops - and is confident of success given the resources and expertise involved. As part of these efforts, MPI has placed restrictions on the movement of whole fresh fruit and some vegetables out of a 1.5km exclusion zone which includes the Pasifika Festival site at Western Springs Park. Pasifika Festival 2015 will include over 230 food and craft stalls, many of which will serve fresh fruit - a staple of many traditional Pacific Island cuisines. ATEED and Orange Productions have been in close contact with MPI regarding the potential impact that these restrictions might have on Pasifika Festival. MPI has advised of the high risk of hosting Pasifika Festival at Western Springs Park, with an estimated crowd of 40,000 people per day likely to attend. As a result, all parties have reached an agreement to move Pasifika to Hayman Park, which is outside of the exclusion zone, to mitigate and manage the risk that the Queensland fruit fly presents. Mayor Len Brown says: “Auckland Council is working closely with MPI on the Queensland fruit fly eradication operation, including providing resources and staff expertise. We appreciate the need to act swiftly and decisively. “To minimise the risk of spreading this devastating insect pest and working on MPI advice, our ATEED team and event organisers Orange Productions have been working hard to find an alternative venue for this year’s Pasifika Festival. “Hayman Park will be a good temporary home for Pasifika Festival. It offers the right size, scale and accessibility - with excellent links to public transport - to accommodate the cultural performances, food and craft which make Pasifika one of Auckland’s most loved cultural events.

Noumena 6, 2012 vinyl tempera on canvas 555 x 455mm

“It also has a similar feel to Western Springs Park, with mature trees and a layout that lends itself to the village format that Pasifika Festival is famous for - I am looking forward to another great Pasifika Festival.” Pasifika Festival would like to acknowledge the support of its sponsors and supporters including Stuff.co.nz, Frucor, MaiFM, Tip Top, Pacific Media Network, Globug, Unitec, More PN FM, the United States Embassy, Air New Zealand and more. F To find out more about Pasifika Festival 2015 visit www.aucklandnz.com/pasifika.

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photography: Michael McClintock

ARTS + CULTURE

Last year’s Pasifika Festival at Western Springs

PLAYING AT LIFE CENTRAL - HIS STORY, MY STORY Easter Sunday 5 April, 6pm and 8pm Since the beginning of January, hints of Easter could be seen throughout supermarkets and shopping centres. It seems like Easter has started just as early for LIFE, a local church in Mt Eden, as much as it has for bakers and check out operators. As Easter approaches, the creative team at LIFE has been hard at work creating, finalising and rehearsing for its Easter presentation, ‘His Story, My Story’. Written by Vicki Millar who is a part of their creative team, the presentation is shaping up to be original, creative and thought provoking. With rehearsals and planning in full swing, they’re getting ready for the multi-media event, with an exciting and creative combination of live music, spoken word, theatre and dance.

individuals thousands of years later. As it traces Jesus and His love for humanity, the presentation looks at creation, Jesus’ life and our story today. The presentation is set to be a welcomed addition in the long weekend, with a varied and creative style that will prove to entertain all. With two showings on Easter Sunday, tickets will no doubt sell out fast. In between the baked goods and Easter eggs, why not treat yourself to a little inspiration, creativity and entertainment this Easter. Tickets can be purchased from LIFE Central offices throughout PN the week, 8.30am to 5pm. No online sales available. F LIFE CENTRAL, 95 Mt Eden Road, T: 09 306 4222, www.lifenz.org/easter

As you might expect around Easter, the presentation focuses around the story of Jesus, but sheds fresh light on the story as we see how it continues to affect lives and

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ARTS + CULTURE VIOLINIST SIMONE ROGGEN PERFORMING WITH ST MATTHEW’S CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 15 March - 2.30pm The New Zealand Listener said, “Awe is the only word to describe such a performance. There were no technical problems (and) a vitality that yielded exhilarating results.” Simone was born in Auckland and as a pre-schooler, started violin lessons with her twin brother. She completed her Masters at the University of Auckland with Mary O’Brien in 2004 and was awarded the senior prize for the highest postgraduate mark. She won the National Chamber Music Competition twice, was concertmaster of various youth orchestras from the age of 11, appeared on National Radio and television, and performed most of the major violin concertos as a soloist. Simone has lived in Switzerland for the last 10 years, working with several highly ranked orchestras, and has been primaria of the Faust Quartet since 2012 which toured New Zealand last year. St Matthew’s Chamber Orchestra produces the kind of music that is magic. Excellence is their only option. The concerts are highly recommended - all six of the 2014 concerts played to full houses. Make sure you get there early for the 2015 concerts. Tickets: Door sales, cash or cheque. Adults: $25 Concessions: $20 and children under 12 free. F PN ST MATTHEW-IN-THE-CITY CHURCH, corner Wellesley and Hobson Streets, www.smco.org.nz

AUCKLAND PINUP GIRL TAKES ON NEW ZEALAND’S BEST The New Zealand vintage community is gearing up for its biggest event of the year, and one Auckland Pinup girl is ready to take on the best. Charlotte Lightbody, better known as Miss Charlotte Cake is an Auckland pinup girl with a difference. Miss Charlotte Cake, aged 26, began developing her love for all things vintage when she was about 12-yearsold, and during her late teens figured out that vintage clothing was going to be a passion of hers. “I have always loved ‘old’ things. Betty Boop, Elvis and Johnny Cash were my first real exposure into the world of vintage culture and it kind of just grew from there.” Combining her love of vintage style and culture with her obsession for baking, Miss Charlotte Cake developed her persona within the New Zealand pinup scene as the baking pinup, hence her name. Baking for vintage events and her friends, Charlotte has developed her own style with a rustic vintage feel. It has long been a dream for Miss Charlotte Cake to be a finalist in the Miss Pinup New Zealand competition, and that dream has become a reality for the 2015 competition. Now one of the 10 finalists, Charlotte is ready to take on the competition. Even though it is a serious competition, Miss Charlotte Cake is friends with many of the girls competing. “For me, one of the most important aspects of this competition is that it is not only showcasing passion and love for all things vintage, it’s also about promoting body confidence in women of all shapes and sizes and encouraging them to be proud of who they are,” says Charlotte.

photography: Zandy J Photography

The 4th Annual Miss Pinup New Zealand competition takes place at The Very Vintage Day Out, New Zealand’s largest gathering of vintage lovers who come together to celebrate a bygone era with all day entertainment, high tea, networking and shopping. The event takes place at Alexandra Park Raceway, Auckland. www.misscharlottecake.com F PN

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ARTS + CULTURE

photography: Clare Gemima

Above L to R: The crowd at Studio One Toi Tu; Diana and Priscilla Wong; Michael; Ash, Echo and Stace

Above L to R: Paul Stevens Photographic Work; Rueben, Laura and Peter

RAINBOW YOUTH EXHIBITION @ STUDIO ONE TOI TU, PONSONBY, WEDNESDAY 11 FEBRUARY

NEW ZEALAND’S LARGEST INDEPENDENT COMIC, GRAPHIC AND ANIMATION ARTS FESTIVAL OPENS IN APRIL Chromacon, New Zealand’s biggest celebration of homegrown comic art, graphic and gaming design, and animation is returning to Auckland’s Aotea Centre 18 and 19 April. Chromacon is an indie festival of visual arts that celebrates creative innovation, artistic excellence and community within the realms of graphic art and design. Free to the public, this unique event connects lovers of these contemporary art genres with nearly 100 of the best homegrown illustrators, comic artists, designers, animators and video game developers from emerging to established practitioners. Artists exhibiting at Chromacon 2015 include Dylan Horrocks, Ema Frost, Faction Comics, Tim Gibson, Sam Orchard, Ben Senbeck (of Hellboy fame), WETA artists Paul Tobin, Nick Keller, Jeremy Hanna and Stuart Thomas, and Toby Morris. The intimate nature of Chromacon means attendees can meet and connect with artists they may already admire as well as discovering many others. New this year is the one-day industry symposium Chroma-connect, taking place Friday, 17 April at the Aotea Centre. Chroma-connect facilitates professional development,

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

emergent innovation and entrepreneurial opportunities for New Zealand’s creative sector, through workshops, panel discussions, education and networking activities. Then, on Saturday 18 and Sunday 19 April, the free two-day exhibition of original artwork and creative projects opens. Attendees are able to purchase self-published work such as prints, art books, comics and even originals from the artists directly. Throughout the weekend there will also be live events, demos, gaming opportunities and discussions. Festival Director Allan Xia, says, “I’m very excited about the diversity of artists in our curated Chromacon exhibition. Whether illustrative, sequential, animated or interactive, their works represent the most innovative examples of visual storytelling PN in New Zealand today. ” F For more information, please visit www.chromacon.co.nz

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OUT + ABOUT

Above L to R: Isabel Pasch, breadmaker and co-director of Bread & Butter Bakery and Cafe; Fionna Hill and her garden helpers at Wilton Picnic Patch, Wilton Street; Kevin, compositing and packaging expert

photography: Clare Gemima

Above L to R: Mike Murphy of Kokako, with his culty cold brew and Rodger Holmes; Louise Carr-Neil from Grey Lynn Farmers Market; Megan Rees and Delly Rees

Above L to R: Lucy-Mae Goffe Robertson and Steven; Wendyl Nissen; Magic Ginmaker - Rouge Society

GREY LYNN SUSTAINABLE WALK, THURSDAY 12 FEBRUARY

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Above L to R: Happy Customer; Steve Rogers; Urzila Carlson, Luke Bird, Cassie Roma; Rainbow Tick Approval

Above L to R: Big turnout; Gerry Hill, Colin Mathura-Jeffree and Sally James; Horst Knoff and Desiree

photography: Clare Gemima

Above L to R: Ian Pattison, Jill Morrow and Paul Patton; Jose Taiapa, Baz Bloomfield and Tom Noonan; Liz Maguire, Gav Hyde and Wayne Lockward; Liz Maguire, Keren Roberts, Mel Biss and Astrud Burgess

Above L to R: Richard Kittelty, Rachel Brebner, Paul Stevens and Toni Duder; Richard Neame, Michael Moore and Andrew Gelonese; Matt Pickering, Eric Chuah and Nick Bulmer

GAYTM ATM LAUNCH @ ANZ, PONSONBY, THURSDAY 5 FEBRUARY The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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OUT + ABOUT

Above L to R: Alison Fitzpatrick and Peggy Link with Beatrice; Claudine Lim and Virgin; Judges Anita Wigl’it, Jacinda Ardern and Te Radar with organiser Steven Oates and Ruby

Above L to R: Judges Te Radar, Jacinda Ardern and Anita Wigl’it with Sean Walton and Xsara - Best Fem and Best in Show; Alli Smith and Sophie Stanford of Auckland Puppy Rescue, with Ralph; Heather Straka and Jeanne Clayton with Mila and Orlando

Above L to R: Natsumi Sasaki with Toto - Best Dressed Dog and Smallest Dog; Judges Te Radar, Anita Wigl’it and Jacinda Ardern; Neil Bartlett and Stuart Hobbs with Finlay

photography: Gwynne Davenport

Above L to R: Some of the entrants for WOOF!

Above L to R: Winner - Best Dressed and Smallest Dog; entrant; Winner - Best Butch

WOOF! THE AUCKLAND PRIDE DOG SHOW @ WESTERN PARK, SUNDAY 15 FEBRUARY

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Above L to R: Entrant; Winner - Biggest Dog; Entrant

Above L to R: Entrants

Above L to R: Winner - Best Fem and Best in Show; Contestant - Best Owner Dog Lookalike; Entrants

photography: Gwynne Davenport

Above L to R: Pooch on the obstacle course; Ralph of Auckand Puppy Rescue; Rob Sykes and Otto

Above L to R: Rosie Oliver and Wilma take to the obstacle course; Rosie Oliver and Wilma; The Finalists

WOOF! THE AUCKLAND PRIDE DOG SHOW @ WESTERN PARK, SUNDAY 15 FEBRUARY The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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OUT + ABOUT

Above L to R: Alexander Ingham and Dakota Vegas; Darren and Shaniqka; Melanie, Eve, and Michelle of Auckland Roller Derby

Above L to R: Dee, Patrick, Rueben and Amy; Amanda and Joe of AUT; Melanie Pain

Above L to R: Miriam Saphira and Theery Weerts; Angel and Devil; Dyane and Victoria

photography: Clare Gemima

Above L to R: Festival Goers; Anna Williams, Sophie Kaulima, Pamela Anderson from Youth Horizons; Nikita and her team

Above L to R: Ossian, Simon, Alex and Damien; Art Space Tent; Festival goers

BIG GAY OUT @ COYLE PARK, SUNDAY 8 FEBRUARY

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Above L to R: Best posers of the day; Festival Goers; let’s PAARTTY!

Above L to R: Jason, Aj, Rochelle, Phill and Luca and Bryony; Trevor, Lisa Michelle and Tony; Kay and Trish From AVON

Above L to R: Cobus and Rodger; lads and pups; Patrick, Damien and Crew

photography: Clare Gemima

Above L to R: Lea, Patrick; Cole; Rainbow Cape Crew

Above L to R: Mardi Gras Party Team; Sebastian, Flick, Victoria and Wade; Dance Tent

BIG GAY OUT @ COYLE PARK, SUNDAY 8 FEBRUARY The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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OUT + ABOUT

Above L to R: GO GREEN; GO LABOUR; golden boys

Above L to R: Golden boys and girls - the Gods; golden boys and girls; Hamilton Pride

Above L to R: Karakia for opening ceremony

photography: Clare Gemima

Above L to R: Waka Ama; official opening with Len Brown

Above L to R: Miss Ribena with Suzanne Paul; more Greens fans; New Zealand Police Force

AUCKLAND PRIDE PARADE 2015, PONSONBY ROAD, 21 FEBRUARY

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Above L to R: AIDS Awareness Float; Alison and Chrissy; amazing bag pipers

Above L to R: St Johns Ambulance; Amnesty International

Above L to R: Art Space; Auckland Community Church

photography: Clare Gemima

Above L to R: beautiful statues; Brass Bandits

Above L to R: Designer Final; Dykes on Bikes; Youthline

AUCKLAND PRIDE PARADE 2015, PONSONBY ROAD, 21 FEBRUARY The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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OUT + ABOUT

Above L to R: Mikey, Frank, Stewie and Ronan; OUT @ AUT; Over watch

Above L to R: Pasifika LGBT Float; pedalling ladies

Above L to R: Police and horses; Police kiwi; Ponsonby Road packed

photography: Clare Gemima

Above L to R: ZM Float; Rainbow Families; Rainbow Tick Float

Above L to R: Rainbow Youth; Ronald Andreassend (Reveled) and Lindsey; Roller Derby Auckland

AUCKLAND PRIDE PARADE 2015, PONSONBY ROAD, 21 FEBRUARY

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Above L to R: Rotorua Float; Securing the Scottish Marching Band; Supporting women with HIV

Above L to R: Supporting women with HIV; Team Auckland Swimmers; the crew who made it all possible

Above L to R: The dryland swimmers float; UNIQ Waikato; UNITEC

photography: Clare Gemima

Above L to R: Unitec dancers; fantastic singer; Waiheke Island Float

Above L to R: Waiheke Island Float; Miss Buckwheat; Westpac

AUCKLAND PRIDE PARADE 2015, PONSONBY ROAD, 21 FEBRUARY The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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HOROSCOPES: MISS PEARL NECLIS

What your stars hold for March ♓ Pisces (the Fish): 20 February - 20 March

You have been feeling trapped and even your thoughts have been suppressed recently. That feeling is about to be lifted - you can relax and breathe normally again. The reason for this change could be that your enthusiasm for life has returned, so enjoy it.

♈ Aries (the Ram): 21 March - 20 April

You have always been a dreamer and now that some of those dreams have become reality it’s time you started setting yourself goals. Try not to over think a project, just persist and all the pieces will slot together nicely.

♉ Taurus (the Bull): 21 April - 21 May

You’re occasionally hit by bouts of uncertainty as to whether you’re living the life you really want. You have a great life now, providing you don’t make any unrealistic decisions or demands on yourself.

Gemini (the Twins): 22 May - 21 June At times you confuse what’s real and what’s going on in your head and the two can overlap somewhat. You really need to take things slowly and stop any impulsive actions before you start making mistakes.

♍ Virgo (the Virgin): 22 August - 23 September

Being the life and soul of the party can be emotionally draining as not only are you a source of inspiration you are also looked upon for guidance. If you trust your instincts whatever you do next will be an inspiration for your friends and colleagues to branch out on their own.

♎ Libra (the Scales): 24 September - 23 October

You are being asked to make a decision that could change everything and you are struggling to accept that you are now of an age where you have to be sensible about life. This is a good thing because there is a new realm of possibilities when you are an adult.

Scorpio (the Scorpion): 24 October - 22 November Your ability to change a dire situation into something fortunate and full of possibilities is quite uncanny. Providing that what you do is ‘cut like crystal’ and you always stick to the truth, your positive attitude will be contagious.

♐ Sagittarius (the Archer): 23 November - 22 December

Try not to be too separated from reality as you go about your daily life this month. You do have a lot of responsibilities, and are usually full of plans and projects, but you feel that you are carrying too much on your shoulders. However, you have proved in the past that you can be productive and your ideas do make sense.

♑ Capricorn (the Goat): 23 December - 20 January

♒ Aquarius (the Water Carrier): 21 January - 19 February

Cancer (the Crab): 22 June - 22 July You have always been able to cope on your own by creating a safe place to be comfortable in. So it really doesn’t matter what obstacles are presented to you, you’ll always have the ability to manage. Leo (the Lion): 23 July - 21 August Your enthusiasm has returned and everything seems to be back on track. The opportunities are there now for you to grab with both hands. Take a leap of faith and let go of any worries you might have.

Usually your communication skills are top notch and you could never be accused of having a grudge or bad feeling towards anyone or anything. However, this month your patience is tested to the limit as you are facing some big changes in your life.

You have always been able to have fun dancing in and out of fantasy and reality. Of course occasionally the two can be confused and will at some point clash. As long as you are aware of what’s real and what isn’t then you can continue dancing for as long as you want.

PONSONBY NEWS OUTLETS FREEMANS BAY

NEWMARKET

Ecostore, 1 Scotland Street Glengarry, Corner Sale and Wellesley Streets Kellands Real Estate, 4 Drake Street New World, Victoria Park Sale St, 7 Sale Street

Planet Ayurveda, 41 Gillies Avenue Studio Italia, 96 Carlton Gore Road Taylor Boutique, 1 Teed Street

GREY LYNN Barfoot & Thompson, 533 Great North Road Barkley Manor, 400 - 402 Great North Road Grey Lynn Community Centre, 520 Richmond Road Grey Lynn Community Library, 474 Great North Road Raw Essentials, 401B Richmond Road Ripe, 172 Richmond Road Tapac, 100 Motions Road Vetcare, 408 Great North Road

HERNE BAY Herne Bay Post & Stationers, 240 Jervois Road Five Loaves, 206 Jervois Road Icing on the Cake, 188 Jervois Road Momentum, 182 Jervois Road

KINGSLAND Atomic, 420c New North Road

MT EDEN Citta Outlet Store, Corner Enfield & Normanby Road Sabato, 57 Normanby Road

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NORTH SHORE Rug Direct, Wairau Park Dawson’s Furniture, Mairangi Bay Nose To Tail Dog Wash, Albany

Ponsonby News is published on the first Friday of each month excluding January. Copies go quickly so be quick to collect yours from any of the following outlets. The issue is also published on our website www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

PARNELL Jane ns, 2 Birdwood Crescent Parnell Community Centre, 545 Parnell Road

PONSONBY Barfoot & Thompson, 184 Ponsonby Road Fitness Trainer, 36 Jervois Road Harcourts, 89 Ponsonby Road Leys Institute, 20 St Mary’s Road The Longroom, 114 Ponsonby Road Mag Nation, 123 Ponsonby Road Ponsonby Community Centre, 20 Ponsonby Terrace Spa Ayurda, 213 Ponsonby Road Studio One, 1 Ponsonby Road Whitespace, 12 Crummer Road

WESTMERE Glengarry, 164 Garnet Road

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


THE PONSONBY PINK PAGES

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PONSONBY NEWS - MARCH'15  

Ponsonby. Anyone not heard of us. We are Auckland's most talked about part of town .

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