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+ PUBLISHED 4 JULY, 2014

Established: OCTOBER 1989 – CELEBRATING 24 YEARS OF PUBLISHING HISTORY!

ponsonbynews.co.nz

JULY 2014

VIVE LA FRANCE - P27 CELEBRATING ALL THINGS FRENCH

THE FIREBOLTS OF THE WESTERN SPRINGS ASSOCIATION FOOTBALL CLUB, WITH JASON HICKS AND MANNY MUSCAT OF THE WELLINGTON PHOENIX FOOTBALL CLUB - P88


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P27; Vive La France; Frenchie in Ponsonby Road is planning a special menu to celebrate Bastille Day. P48; Peter Carleton, General Manager of Greater Auckland Motors, photographed with the new Lexus CT200h F Sport. The dealership sponsored Santos Café Ponsonby, where football fans could watch the games live. P88; The Firebolts at Western Springs Association Football Club enjoyed play with Jason Hicks and Manny Muscat of the Wellington Phoenix Football Club. uer coLexus CT200h F Sport.

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR FROM THE EDITOR DAVID HARTNELL: ONE MINUTE INTERVIEW SHALE CHAMBERS: WAITEMATA LOCAL BOARD MIKE LEE NIKKI KAYE, AUCKLAND CENTRAL MP JACINDA ARDERN: LABOUR LIST MP AUCKLAND JOHN ELLIOTT: LOCAL NEWS VIVE LA FRANCE GREY LYNN NEWS

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U3A PONSONBY EAT, DRINK AND BE MERRY LAURAINE JACOBS: THE SEASONED PALATE PONSONBY NEWS READERS ARE EVERYWHERE FASHION + STYLE ANGELA LASSIG: LETTERS FROM MAUDIE HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY LIVING, THINKING + BEING JOHN APPLETON ON HEALTH SHEENA SHUVANI: STARDUST ASTROLOGY

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FUTURE GENERATION COVER STORY SIDELINE WITH GEORGE BERRY PONSONBY PEOPLE & THEIR PETS LOOK WHO IS IN THE ZOO HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS JAY PLATT: WE CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT STREET NAMES ARTS + CULTURE PONSONBY PINK PAGES COVER PHOTOGRAPHY: Michael McClintock

PONSONBY NEWS+ is published monthly, excluding January by ALCHEMY MEDIA LIMITED, 11/386 RICHMOND ROAD, GREY LYNN POSTAL: P.O. BOX 47-282 Ponsonby, Auckland 1144. www.ponsonbynews.co.nz T: 09 378 8553 or 09 361 3356 Editor/Publisher Associate Publisher & Ad Manager Deputy Editor Operations Manager Contributing Fashion Editor Contributing Editor Contributing Editor Proof Readers Layout Designer Designer

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Views in Ponsonby News reflect the author’s, and not those of Alchemy Media. www.twitter.com/Ponsonby_News

LETTERS + EMAILS Sustainability and Ponsonby News So the Sustainability issue arrived today. Wrapped in plastic. Isn’t it time we did away with needless packaging like this? If the delivery person is careful, surely the mag can be delivered intact and without the excess waste created by the wrapping? JULIA NEWALL, Herne Bay. FROM THE EDITOR Our hand delivered copies are delivered in eco-friendly degradable plastic. During winter, if you were a paying advertiser, I’m sure you’d be happy to hear this. Stick to the Rules The Grey Lynn Business Association (GLBA) called an urgent meeting on Monday, 23 June to discuss a proposed seven-storey apartment development at 367-375 Great North Road. Community groups represented at the meeting included the GLBA, Arch Hill Residents Incorporated Society, the newly formed Grey Lynn and Arch Hill Residents Community Group, and Grey Lynn Urban Environment. Two members of the Waitemata Local Board, Pippa Coom and Chris Dempsey, also attended. The proposed apartment does not comply with the District Plan’s rules for the area: it exceeds the height restriction by more than eight metres and the floor area is double that allowed. The community representatives agreed that the proposed apartment development is too high and intensive for the neighbourhood. A great deal of time and effort was devoted to developing the Unitary Plan and Grey Lynn residents were prolific in their responses in the consultation process. Grey Lynn people care. A resolution was passed at the meeting urging the Waitemata Local Board to strongly recommend full notification of the development application for the following reasons: 1. We are greatly concerned that the effects which are more than minor, created by this application, will set a precedent for other sites in Great North Road affecting the wider community. 2. We are also concerned that planners appear to be acting contrary to the District Plan and the direction-setting Unitary Plan. JENNIFER NORTHOVER, Grey Lynn Business Association chairperson www.glba.co.nz

FROM THE HISTORY ARCHIVES THE MAORI NAME FOR THE PONSONBY RIDGE IS TE RIMU TAHI, 'THE LONE RIMU Tree', referring to an old prominent tree formerly standing at what is now the PN intersection of Ponsonby Road and Karangahape Road. F

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FROM THE EDITOR WE ARE DELIGHTED TO HAVE THE FIREBOLTS OF the Western Springs Association Football Club, as our cover stars this month. There has been football fever in our area with the FIFA World Cup and Anne Sim, owner of Santos café, installed big screens so locals could watch the games while enjoying a coffee or a meal. Greater Auckland Motors - Lexus organised sponsorship and they customised the uber cool Lexus CT200h F sport, which was seen in and around Ponsonby. IN FRANCE, LE QUATORZE JUILLET (14 JULY) IS a public holiday, usually called Bastille Day in English. Although it’s not a public holiday in New Zealand, this day gives us a good excuse to celebrate all things French in our Vive La France feature this month. WE WERE SAD WHEN OUR NEIGHBOUR, THE LITTLE Grocer, closed its doors last month. A 60-seater café and roastery is planned for that site. The local resident’s group against this development have ensured that the resource consent will now be fully notified.

photography: Jane Blundell @ Kloser

REST IN PEACE; JAMES BLACKMAN; 5 APRIL 1947 - 18 June 2014. We were sad to lose Jim Blackman, founder of Triangle Television (now Face TV) to cancer last month. We send our condolences to his partner Aaron, his family and former work colleagues.

Gwynne Davenport, Jay Platt with Jack, Julie Roulston, Martin Leach and Jo Barrett

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THIS OCTOBER WILL BE THE 25TH ANNIVERSARY OF Ponsonby News. For the first 15 years we were the Ponsonby Community Newsletter. We changed our name when I took over the publication in 2004. (MARTIN LEACH) F PN

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DAVID HARTNELL’S: ONE MINUTE INTERVIEW John Pan’s alter ego is the iconic and much loved drag illusionist Ling Ling who has performed at Caluzzi for the past 12 years. What was your childhood like? I grew up having fun times in a Chinese neighbourhood in Kuala Lumpur, a happy childhood and teenage life in an environment where there was no hint of drag - it just wasn’t the thing. Your inspirations for your stage costumes? They are a combination of fashion and show biz creations, most of which I make myself. It’s an opportunity to go overboard with plenty of bling! How did you come up with your stage name Ling Ling? Not my creation really. Fellow stars gave me the name and I think it was because of my Chinese background and, of course, I didn’t mind when I realised it rhymes with ‘bling’! Do you dress as a woman away from the stage? No! The ‘other wardrobe is all male’, smart casual without a trace of glitter! TV series would you never miss? ‘Fashion Police’ - boutiques and bitchiness mix very nicely. Best thing you have brought back from an overseas trip? Stage costumes, wigs, shoes and jewellery, all of which guarantees there’ll be excess baggage charges on the way home. The greatest love of your life? Easy - John would say Ling Ling and Ling Ling would say John. It’s almost as if we are one! How would you like to be remembered? Ling and her bling! What do you love most about your age? Wisdom that comes with age, and forgiving others when (so often in our business!) egos get in the way. Last time you turned off your cell phone? In March this year, it was off for the 12 hour flight to and from Malaysia. Something that you really disapprove of? Put-downs that are meant to hurt. It’s bullying, really. What song makes you happy? Celine Dion’s ‘The Power of Love’ does it for me. Your comfort food? Rice, in the infinite ways it can be cooked and combined with other ingredients and foods to make scrumptious dishes - I was brought up with it as a staple. What motivates you? Love in all its meanings, emotions and expectations. I have found putting a little love in everything you do will always be rewarded. Your favourite movie? “Priscilla, Queen of the Desert” because the storyline’s close to home, it has some terrific music and for many moviegoers the film broke the ice about artistes. When is the last time you cried? In 2010 when my father died in Kuala Lumpur, and I was in Auckland. I found it very difficult trying to bridge that gap between New Zealand and my grieving family at home. Who would play you in the movie of your life? Lucy Liu, American star (Charlie’s Angels, X Files etc). Her parents are Chinese, she speaks mandarin and, even better, she’s already been cast as Ling... Ling Woo, specially created for her in Ally McBeal. Add bling, perfect! Which item of clothing can’t you live without? My ‘diamond’ encrusted off-the-shoulder, closely-fitting, three-quarter-length number in white. It’s indispensable for the often-requested number “Diamonds are a Girl’s Best Friend”.

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Favourite time of the day? Makeup, lights, music, (adjust the anatomy), and... action. Showtime! What do you love about your life right now? My wide circle of show biz and other friends. I am lucky to mix it with a wide range of valued friends and acquaintances. What are you insecure about? Getting the words right to the songs I perform. It isn’t easy, sometimes, when English is your second language. Something very few people know about you? Served time as a mechanic fixing heavy machinery, cranes and big rigs during my youth! What is your idea of perfect happiness? Appreciative, genuine, prolonged applause after a show. Heaven! Your greatest fear? Biggest worries are on-stage - breaking a high heel, sudden sagging tits, losing a wig and any other dreadful tragedies that spoil the show. Change one thing about yourself? A few centimetres taller would be great. It might give me longer dancer’s legs. What cliché do you most abhor? It’s a question, actually. “Are you really a male?” What gizmo can you simply not live without? The secret’s out. Until recently I would have said my mobile phone. These days it’s an elasticised gizmo without any moving parts often worn by older women, designed to, um, shall we say minimise matters. But it does the trick. I think they called it a corset. Handshake or a hug kind of person? Show biz hugs, darling, for sure. Do you have a party trick? Of course I do! It’s a trademark of mine and part of the Caluzzi performance. I’m upset you should have to ask ‘cos I thought it was soooo well known! (DAVID HARTNELL) F PN CALUZZI, 462 Karangahape Road T: 09 357 0778 www.caluzzi.co.nz PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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SHALE CHAMBERS: WAITEMATA LOCAL BOARD REPORT IT’S FANTASTIC TO SEE PONSONBY’S iconic council-owned and run Artstation Toi Tu entering a new phase of life with the creative precinct now being known as Studio One Toi Tu. This month the creative precinct is celebrating its relaunch and there’s a lot more on offer than ever before. Located at 1 Ponsonby Road, Studio One underwent a local board-initiated extensive refurbishment late last year, and now a new look! It now includes new galleries and has spaces available that can be hired for exhibitions, meetings and workshops. Studio One will be hosting a wide range of exhibitions, talks and creative courses including screen writing as part of its Term 3 programme. There are courses for children and teenagers on everything from creative writing and multimedia to creating clay monsters. The Waitemata Local Board engaged a collective of local artists to help develop the new identity for Studio One. The precinct has been at the centre of Ponsonby for nearly 30 years and these changes make it an even better working community space. Be sure to stop in if you’re passing by and look into the details of what’s on offer. Or visit the Auckland Council website, aucklandcouncil.govt.nz, for information. The local board also continues to work to ensure the 1885 crown endowment heritage property at 3 Ponsonby Road is removed from council’s potential property sale list to guarantee its future as part of this unique creative precinct. And consultation dear to our hearts in our entertainment precinct of Ponsonby Road... new proposals currently out for feedback are a chance to give your views

on when, where and how alcohol is sold. The Draft Auckland Council Local Alcohol Policy aims to provide a balance between reducing alcohol harm and making sure Auckland is an exciting place for residents and visitors to enjoy. The policy will control where and how many new alcohol licences are allowed. It will also control when bars, restaurants and nightclubs can be open and when bottle shops and supermarkets can sell alcohol. For the Ponsonby commercial area, the main change proposed is a temporary freeze on granting new offlicences for two years from the date the policy comes into force. That would mean no new supermarkets could sell alcohol and no new bottle stores could be opened. It’s also proposed that the hours alcohol is sold in off -licences be shortened and the closing hours of bars and nightclubs is brought forward one hour to 3am. These proposed changes also apply to the city centre and Newton commercial area. You can have your say on the policy online at shapeauckland.co.nz until 16 July 2014. During July we’ll also be asking for your feedback on our draft Local Board Plan and our draft plan to become a low-carbon community. Our draft Local Board Plan sets out what we propose to do over the next three years to improve our area. We’ve developed this plan with community input and there are a lot of projects in there planned for Ponsonby and the surrounding neighbourhoods. Through our low-carbon community plan, we will focus on taking action locally to reduce our emissions and energy use. And we’ll look at how we can better use our resources, encourage more sustainable transport

options and produce more food locally. This plan contributes to the Auckland Plan target of achieving a 40 per cent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2040. It also complements initiatives in our draft Local Board Plan to focus on becoming low-carbon and improve our environment. One such initiative is the development of an inner-city recycling centre. We are working on this project jointly with Albert-Eden and Puketapapa local boards to encourage the reuse of materials and reduce the amount going to landfill. This is something the board is a huge supporter of. With a lot of pressure on our environment and natural resources, this is a way for us to contribute to creating better neighbourhoods for ourselves and for future generations. We welcome your views on what we are proposing and encourage you to read the full plans. The plans are available online for feedback between 7 July and 6 August at shapeauckland.co.nz. We’re heading into a new financial year and it’s the time of year again when the board is calling for applications for community grants. Funding and partnerships are some of the main ways we support our valuable community, arts, sporting groups and local events. Applications are open until 31 July for local board grants. We have had lots of wonderful locals campaigning to keep the six mature pohutukawa trees on Great North Road opposite Motat. We don’t want them felled either and have declined all consent to date for Auckland Transport PN to do anything but trim them! (SHALE CHAMBERS) F Contact me: shale.chambers@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz

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MIKE LEE

What next? A $1.5m ‘state house’ for Queens Wharf Last month, we learned from Bernard Orsman of the New Zealand Herald of leaked proposals to build two, three-storey office and car park buildings at the Quay Street end of Queens Wharf.

The work by Michael Parekowhai is a two-thirds sized sculpture of a state house. A state house? People of our parents’ and grandparents’ generations would be intrigued to learn that this ‘state house’ will cost over $1.5m. $1m will come as a gift from Barfoot and Thompson, as a birthday present to celebrate the real estate agent’s 90th birthday. The balance, it appears, will be coming out of your rates. For the life of me, I just don’t get the logic of an oversized sculpture of a state house being plonked at the end of Queens Wharf. The artist himself seems to have in mind an entirely new role for his ‘state house’, ‘signalling a safe harbour, welcoming to all.’ But why not then sculpt a lighthouse? It gets even more bizarre. To provide lighting for this ‘state house’, there will be a 45-tonne, Venetian, hand-blown, crystal chandelier costing $750,000. Such extravagance may be artistic but it’s rather insensitive given real state house tenants find it hard to pay their light bills, and many currently are under threat of eviction - including in this ward. This is also completely out of keeping with the maritime environment and history of Queens Wharf. The Waitemata Local Board considers the proposal a case of ‘good art but in the wrong place.’ To be fair, I can’t comment on its artistic merits because I have never seen it. But it is certainly in the wrong place. Public art should be relevant and in harmony with its setting. Most of all it should be democratic and have the support of the people who will be paying for it. Obviously the executives of Barfoot and Thompson who presumably know more about location, location, location than public art, are happy to take this prime spot on Queens Wharf, though the idea of the location apparently came from council

photography: John Hong

This month the news is that Auckland Council art bureaucrats, with the support of the mayor, are trying to impose a $1.5m artwork at the northern, seaward end of Queens Wharf.

PM and ARC Chairman announce purchase of Queens Wharf bureaucrats. But what about the other funders, the people of Auckland, who are once again to be shut out of the process? Queens Wharf was purchased by the former Auckland Regional Council and the government for all Aucklanders. Maximising views out over the harbour from the city and leaving space for future generations for their ideas and their needs was a key consideration at the time. We should resist Queens Wharf being cluttered and privatised by present day opportunists with more money than taste. Queens Wharf is also for future generations, which we hope and pray might regain the civic-mindedness and good PN taste of Auckland’s earlier generations. (MIKE LEE) F Councillor for Waitemata & Gulf www.mikelee.co.nz

CIRCABILITY LEASE AT VICTORIA PARK The Circability Trust are thrilled to announce the launch of their social art programmes with an open day at the former Campbell Free Kindergarten on Sunday 27 July. The Waitemata Local Board approved the community lease last July and the lease for this historic building is now finalised. The open day will start with a formal blessing for the new venture at 11am, with demonstrations, exhibitions, workshops and music from 12-4pm. Everyone is welcome. “Since starting a series of test classes in May we have had fantastic feedback from the public who are thrilled to see the building filled with life again” says Programme Director Thomas Hinz. Circability has already started running programmes with weekly free Family Circus Sunday afternoons and Tuesday night open sessions, as well as programmes for children and disabled people. Circability specialise in circus for all ages and abilities and won the 2013 Arts Access Aotearoa Community Partnership Award for their show Circolina’s Leap. They have teamed up with the Toi Ora Live Arts Trust and Hohepa Auckland who are also running weekly sessions. The centre is available for hire from community and cultural groups. Cirque du Soleil are doing a benefit concert for Circability on 18 September gifting 100 tickets to support youth and family programmes. F PN For more information contact Frances on T: 09 361 3801 www.communitycircus.co.nz

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NIKKI KAYE: AUCKLAND CENTRAL MP

Making a difference for Aucklanders I believe the relationship between the Government and Auckland Council is in good heart. While we do not agree on every project, we are making significant progress in key areas - which is what Aucklanders deserve. Last month, I took part in the Auckland Local Government forum, where the future direction on a range of issues affecting our city was discussed - from housing, accommodating growth, to protecting our heritage, and our natural environments. These forums are a chance for both the Government and the council to get together and work out real solutions to the issues facing the city. At this last forum a number of cabinet ministers were at the table with the mayor, deputy mayor and the Auckland Council. I am incredibly proud of the progress we have made in regards to decades-old issues like housing and transport that have been plaguing the city for years. The most recent announcement around housing has seen 63 Special Housing Areas (SHAs) announced and a possible 33,500 homes across the region. The housing market continues to be hugely challenging in Auckland, particularly for first-home buyers. However, through our partnership with local government we are making strong progress to deliver more housing choices sooner. The first quality homes within these SHAs will be ready for people to move into by the end of this year. Not all of the SHAs will deliver all of the housing within the three-year term of the Accord - some projects may take up to 10 years to complete. That is why the council and Government are continuing to work on many more SHAs, with the next tranche planned for next month. It’s great to see that there were 3599 new sections created and dwellings consented in the first four months of the Accord from October 2013 to January 2014 - this means we are on track to achieve our first-year target of 9000. I also hear often from parents who are concerned about the capacity of local schools to handle the large projected population growth.

The Government is actively planning to meet the needs of schools and students, and already we are investing more in local schools for new classrooms and school buildings. This includes $2.1 million development of seven new classrooms at Ponsonby Primary school, and Freemans Bay School confirmed for $10 million redevelopment. A number of local schools will also benefit from improved funding for special programmes offered to out-of-zone children, including bi-lingual programmes. We also need to ensure Auckland is a liveable environment, and a great place to call home. I’ve been working closely with ministers and agencies to unlock the potential of our waterfront, including plans to develop the Wynyard Quarter as a business and entertainment hub. The close relationship between the Government and council has also ensured we’ve been able to make progress on transport plans that have sat on the shelves for years - including giving the green light to the City Rail Link and a second harbour crossing. These are part of a $10 billion package for next generation Auckland transport projects. Both the Newmarket Viaduct and the Victoria Park tunnel are open and reducing congestion on our roads, and the electrification of the rail network will make public transport more accessible. It’s great to be able to work in partnership with local body politicians to make a real difference on the big issues for Auckland. We still have a way to go but we are making significant progress. (NIKKI KAYE) F PN HON NIKKI KAYE, MP for Auckland Central www.nikkikaye.co.nz

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JACINDA ARDERN: LABOUR LIST MP AUCKLAND

Time for less ‘what ifs’ with universal KiwiSaver Politics is one of those occupations that causes you to constantly look at the past and wonder “what if”. That is certainly the case when it comes to our current pool of savings in New Zealand. Robert Muldoon’s decision to ditch Norman Kirk’s superannuation fund was a massive loss to New Zealand, especially when you compare ourselves to Australia which now has $1.5 trillion in their universal work place savings. It’s no wonder they own their own banks (and most of ours)! But rather than lamenting a lost opportunity, it’s time to make our own. That’s why it’s time to make KiwiSaver universal. The uptake of KiwiSaver has been fantastic, but there are still around half a million wage earners who aren’t members, and who are missing out on up to $520 a year in government support for their savings, as well as employer contributions. We know that these are predominantly people on low incomes, and that by leaving them behind, we risk creating a group of retirees who have much less to fall back on when they can no longer work. I have been asked whether this policy will hurt the very people we want to help - those who can’t afford to make contributions to KiwiSaver. It’s a fair question, especially when we do have such low wages in our economy at present. That’s why we will build in a threshold, so people who are earning under a certain amount will not be automatically enrolled.

But equally, we cannot simply accept that low wages are something we need to just work around, when that is a problem in itself. That’s why we need to do things like lift the minimum wage, and keep driving the living wage, while looking to restructure our economy. Savings policy is not something that we should look at in isolation though. We also need to make sure that if we do have an expanded pool of domestic savings (which this will provide) that it’s going into productive and innovative businesses and not an over heated housing market. That’s what our capital gains tax is all about. Add that to our policy on research and development tax credits to ecourage innovation, accelerated depreciation for the forestry industry (with a view to looking beyond just this sector) and you can see that we are really trying to drive development and growth using all the tools we have. It’s time we stopped wondering ‘what if’ and started making the big changes we need. Perhaps then we won’t lament the short sighted view of politics, and maybe, just maybe, we will leave a decent legacy along the way. (JACINDA ARDERN) F PN JACINDA ARDERN, Labour List MP based in Auckland Central www.jacinda.co.nz

DAVID HARTNELL: Appointed an Ambassador of Prostate Cancer Foundation of NZ Our columnist David Hartnell MNZM, has recently been appointed as an Ambassador to the Prostate Cancer Foundation of New Zealand. He was delighted to take up the appointment, as he says that he has a real understanding and empathy for those who have been diagnosed with prostate cancer from the journey he shared with his friend of 53 years, theatre director/choreographer Robert Young. David was with Robert throughout his diagnosis, treatment, and with him when he passed away on 1 December last year. Graeme Woodside, Chief Executive of the Prostate Cancer Foundation of New Zealand said, “The role of David as an ambassador is an important role for the Foundation. As well as giving support to prostate cancer sufferers, it is to build greater awareness of this disease and the need for men to be checked regularly as part of their overall health checks. David is passionate about this and we look forward to him helping to build this awareness in the community - we are looking forward to working with David.” F PN

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David Hartnell presenting Robert Young with his Scroll of Honour from the Variety Artists Club of New Zealand, for his work in the theatre as a choreographer/director both here and overseas.

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JOHN ELLIOTT: LOCAL NEWS

How communities thrive or fail We now live in such a selfish, individualistic, materialistic world, that our sense of community is becoming very weak. The arch neo-liberal Margaret Thatcher once said there was no such thing as ‘community’ just ‘ individuals’. The physical act of slicing a new motorway through the middle of a community is a sure way to break that community in half. But there are other more subtle ways in which communities lose their sense of identity and their rich cultural and ethnic mix. Our beloved Grey Lynn is a community under threat. Groups like Grey Lynn 20-30 have done much in recent years to foster a strong sense of community, with farmers markets, car boot sales, pushing for affordable housing, bike lanes, slower speed limits, and many other actions to boost social capital in Grey Lynn. Now we have government intentions to sell off state houses, we have lost the Grey Lynn Post Office, we have sky rocketing house prices, aided and abetted by the absence of a capital gains tax, and other developer incentives, which are driving the old, the young, the sick and the underprivileged out of Grey Lynn. Our community is becoming more and more homogeneous by the week. We are chasing our young away because they cannot afford to live in the community where they were brought up, and where they can make such an energetic and positive contribution to the ‘hood’ they love. The Auckland Council wants population intensification in the City to prevent urban sprawl, and I support that. We don’t want the infrastructural costs (let alone loss of good agricultural land) of covering acres of Kumeu, Taupaki, and Whitford, with concrete, creating yet another tarseal jungle. One of the things we need if we are to save the likes of Grey Lynn from becoming boring and socially excluding communities, and wish them to be a vibrant and forward looking, socially inclusive communities, is intensive affordable housing. The council seems hell bent on four to seven storey apartment blocks on the likes of Great North Rd and Jervois Rd, hard up against century old villas. This satisfies the desire for intensification, but at the expense of privacy, and other amenity factors. Good opportunities for sensible intensification are going begging. It is a crying shame that the council did not, or could not, stop the proposed Bunnings ‘Big Box’ development on Great North Rd. All residents agreed that intensive terrace-style affordable housing would be ideal on that site. There could be small convenience businesses on the ground floor, possibly facing Great North Rd, with apartments above on the second, third, and perhaps, even fourth floors. The replacement McMansions where Bethany was on Dryden Street, are disappointing to say the least. One huge house just sold with features on the real estate hoarding blurb listing, “ fashioned without compromise.”

41 Regina Street, Cox’s Bay Housing New Zealand needs to come clean about its intentions for our neighbourhood. What are they doing with the large empty house at 51 Norfolk Street, Ponsonby? Why did they sell off four units at 41 Regina Street, Cox’s Bay, to a private owner who will build two four bedroom apartments on the site (far too expensive for the pensioners who need local accommodation) What is their intention for 34 Surrey Crescent? The Government just says ‘send them to Mangere, or wherever there is a unit - never mind their circle of friends and visitors who will be lost to them.’ But much of this sell-off is being done by stealth. Housing Minister, Nick Smith, has allegedly admitted privately that he wants a sell off, but denies it publicly. I can just imagine the chat around the National Party caucus room. “We must not openly admit to a sell off, but we can do it by telling people we will prefer iwi groups, and charities like the Baptist Church’s Community of Refuse Trust”. It is good that there are community organisations helping in housing, but the government has an obligation to the old, the young, the sick, and the underprivileged, something the current Government barely gives lip service to. As The Right Honourable Sir Edmund Thomas said in his Bruce Jesson Memorial Lecture late last year, New Zealand will never again be a fair or just society until it is rid of the last vestiges of neo-liberalism. This National Government is unashamedly neo liberal. The free market rules. It’s hard enough to build a sense of community at any time, but with the kind of political philosophy of the current Government, it is nigh on impossible. I thought I heard the roar of the zoo lions the other night, but it may have been a bunch of developers gnashing their teeth in anticipation of greater and greater profits at our PN community’s expense. (JOHN ELLIOTT) F

Number 37 Dryden features four bedrooms, two bathrooms, and on the concrete inside the monitored gate, a fizz boat called ‘Chianti’. I bet they won’t be drinking lion red on the Waitemata anytime soon! There is another huge house at Number 33, with a bare section in between at Number 35. Ponsonby News gossip suggests locals surrounding Bethany objected to an intensive group of affordable apartments on that site, which might have devalued their million dollar homes. Now adjacent to 2 or 3 million dollar Mc Mansions, their properties might be worth 1½ million, at the expense of young couples, or downsizing empty nesters, who would have liked to remain in the neighbourhood, who realised it made no sense to swap a million dollar villa for a million dollar apartment, let alone a 2 million dollar house with bedrooms to spare, and bathrooms never used by just two people. And, as highlighted in recent Ponsonby News articles, Housing New Zealand is not helping the housing crisis. They are hell bent, presumably under Government instructions, to sell off as many state units as possible. This neo-liberal National Government has a philosophical objection to state ownership of anything it can flog off to private enterprise.

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JOHN ELLIOTT: LOCAL NEWS

Ashes scattered At Kelmarna Gardens without permission The Framework trust, which administers Kelmarna Organic Gardens in Herne Bay, has been facing a very challenging situation. Without reference to their team leader or any senior Framework staff, the family of a deceased Kelmarna client was given permission by the garden’s staff to bury the ashes along with a memorial tree at the gardens. Had permission been sought, it would have been turned down, as such an interment is incompatible with the tenure of the land, use of the site, and is culturally inappropriate. What actually occurred was that, unsupervised by staff, some of the ashes were buried and some were scattered over a number of the garden beds. The scattering of the ashes on the garden has compromised the site, which is especially difficult for Maori, making the site tapu. Framework CEO, Dr Colin Hayes, told Ponsonby News that he discussed the issue firstly with the Framework Kaumatua and subsequently with the Auckland Council. Framework was advised that the staff and clients not work on the site until the situation was resolved. Staff, clients and their whanau were fully informed of the situation and while not at Kelmarna continued to be supported from Framework’s Kingsland site. Since then Framework and the Kelmarna Gardens Trust have worked collaboratively with the Kaumatua, the council and local board representatives to resolve the situation. This

has included the removal of all vegetation in the areas affected by the ashes. These areas will for some time not be used for growing food.The vegetation removed is being respectfully and permanently transferred to a non-food growing part of the Kelmarna Gardens’ site. The gardens are now open again for full service, although some areas on the site will not be used for gardening for the foreseeable future. Framework’s Colin Hayes told us they regret the difficulty that the situation has created, and “we appreciate the effort that has been put into the resolution of it by all concerned.” Framework, the Kelmarna Gardens Trust and the Auckland Council all stress that this situation should not be repeated as the gardens area is not an appropriate place for the scattering of ashes. Ponsonby News has been assured that a sensitive issue has been satisfactorily resolved, and our popular local vegetable source will continue to provide good organically grown food for sale, while providing useful work for Framework mental health clients. PN (JOHN ELLIOTT) F

New Zealand’s inequality worse than any time since 1920s Why is equality is better for everyone? Why don’t New Zealanders seem to care? Many New Zealanders have now read, or at least heard about, ‘The Spirit Level’, a book by British professors Wilkinson and Pickett. Wilkinson and Pickett gave a series of rousing lectures in the Sir Douglas Robb memorial lectures recently at Auckland University. Their book presents graphs showing how inequality inside nations translates into shocking social and health statistics, from life expectancy to mental illness, violence to illiteracy. They conclude that societies with a bigger gap between rich and poor are bad for everyone in them - including the well-off. The evidence is irrefutable that the gap between rich and poor widened in New Zealand dramatically in the two decades 1985 to 2005. The great financial crisis of 2007/08, slowed the march of inequality somewhat, but as financial markets have recovered, CEO bonuses restored, and the Wall Streets of the world began again to rort the whole economic system, inequality is accelerating away again, including in New Zealand. It is a disgrace that New Zealand, once a proud egalitarian country, has regressed so far. Only three or four countries, United States, United Kingdom, Singapore and Portugal are more unequal internally than New Zealand. We are about on a par with Australia. Wilkinson and Picketts’ study was of 31 of the world’s richest countries, taken from World Bank figures. Here were some of the appalling statistics for New Zealand. Only three countries had worse mental health occurrences than New Zealand. Only Australia had higher illegal drug use. Only United States had higher infant death rates. Only the United Kingdom and United States had higher teenage birth rates. Only four countries had higher prison percentages than New Zealand. Only four countries had a higher level of health and social problems. And as well as those appalling figures New Zealand rated poorly on a number of other statistics. Now, when challenged, the National Government is denying that the gap has widened in the last decade. The evidence Ponsonby News has gathered would indicate a slowing of the widening during the GFC, but an increasing of the pace of inequality since 2010.

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A Reuters report in March 2014 said that the richest Americans are increasing their ranks and putting the recession of 2008-2009 behind them. There is evidence the same phenomenon is occurring in New Zealand. And now, in June 2014, the governor of the Bank of England, Mark Carney, has come out with some startling observations. Carney warned in a recent speech that for markets to sustain their legitimacy they need to be not only effective but fair. There is a sense, Carney said, that the basic social contract made up of relative equality of outcomes, equality of opportunity and fairness across generations is breaking down. “Few would disagree that a society that provides opportunity to all of its citizens is more likely to thrive than one which favours an elite”, Carney is quoted by Brian Fallow as saying. Carney goes on to say there has developed “an almost religious belief in the power of the markets.” Apparently New Zealand’s own Bank Governor, Graeme Wheeler, agrees with Carney. As Fallow says in his Herald article, “Carney’s argument, in short, is that if financial capitalism comes to be widely perceived as merely a mechanism by which the rich rip off the rest of us and capture almost all the gains from economic growth, then a powerful engine for delivering investment, innovation and prosperity is at risk.” An important, but weighty tome, on income inequality is ‘The price of Inequality’, by Joseph Stiglitz. Stiglitz is an American economist, a Nobel prize winner, and former Chief Economist for the World Bank. He argues that unfettered markets are neither efficient nor stable, and will tend to accumulate money and power in the hands of the few rather than engender competition. Stiglitz demonstrates how government policies, far from countering these trends, often enhance them, and that politics frequently shapes markets in ways that advantage the richest over the rest. New Zealanders must be vigilant to not only recognise inequality, but to fight to counter its insidious nature. The current Government is in denial about inequality, but it would be wouldn’t it, inequality lines the pockets of its friends. (JOHN ELLIOTT) F PN

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LOCAL NEWS READY TO VOTE IN 2014? CHECK YOUR MAILBOX TO SEE One of 2014’s biggest mailouts starts today, as the Electoral Commission launches its campaign to make sure all eligible New Zealanders are ready to take part in the 2014 General Election on 20 September. “Over three million enrolled voters are being sent an enrolment update pack this week,” says Murray Wicks, National Manager, Enrolment Services. Being correctly enrolled is critical to being able to vote in the general election, so check your mailbox this week for your pack.” “This is your opportunity to check that your details are correct and up to date, or to make any changes. We ask that everyone open their pack to ensure their details are correct, and if not, to fill in the form and send it back.” With just three months to go until election day, the Electoral Commission wants to ensure that people don’t miss out on the chance to vote. “Make sure your details are correct now - it means that you’ll be sent more information about voting closer to election day, and that you’ll be able to vote more easily on the day,” says Wicks. People who do not receive their enrolment update pack by Friday 27 June will need to complete a new enrolment form. People can enrol or update their details online at www.elections.org.nz, or get a form by freetexting their name and address to 3676, calling 0800 36 76 56 or by visiting any PostShop. They can also get information at www.facebook.com/ivotenz. “We can’t say it strongly enough - the only way to vote in this year’s General Election is PN to be enrolled, so get ready for it now” says Wicks. F

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DEIRDRE TOHILL: LANDMARK BUILDINGS

Former Auckland Gas Company offices and workshops Ngati Paoa has been described by early settlers as “a powerful and wealthy tribe” and “the finest race seen in New Zealand.” It once occupied strategic land holdings in much of the upper North Island, including the land purchased under much pressure in 1840 in order to create a colonial capital at Auckland. The former Maori settlement, previously used for fishing and trading was called Freemans Bay and developed into an industrial working class suburb, the workforce engaged in brick making, saw milling and timber milling. The land which would eventually be occupied by the Gas Company offices was a waterfront site and part of a Crown Grant to Alexander Thomson. The holding had several owners before being purchased by the Auckland Gas Company in 1881. The pioneer company was founded in 1862 when gas first became an important utility in New Zealand for shop window displays, street lighting and lamps on the outside of businesses such as public houses. Notable politician and businessman, Sir Frederick Whitaker, was its chairman for most of its first 30 years. The business was one of New Zealand’s first joint-stock companies, with shares taken up by a broad range of investors, including prominent members of Auckland’s business community. Such companies during the period mostly provided services which needed significant capital due to large scale operations or the need for expensive plant beyond the financial resources of individual entrepreneurs. The looming depression probably delayed construction on Beaumont Street because an 1885 illustration depicts only open paddocks on the site. Nevertheless, in spite of difficult economic times the demand for gas increased significantly in the 1890s partly because gas was popular for cooking as well as for heating instead of electricity. Consequently, in 1897 the Gas Company started to replace the former Nelson Street works with a larger plant on Beaumont Street. At the time it was apparently the fourth largest gas producer in Australasia. Unlike Nelson Street, the land was not on a lease that was under local councils’ control so the company had financial security. A tender for excavations was issued to remove a sizeable incline at the site which would also help reclaim a large part of Freemans Bay waters which the Auckland Council agreed should be converted into a public park. In 1894, the contractor, Daniel Fallon, oversaw the removal of material that was then loaded into tip-wagons and taken by rail to the reclamation. In the same year plans were drawn up for the layout of the new complex. Chenery Suggate, the company’s engineer, may have designed the building. Before arriving in New Zealand he had experience in manufacturing and managing gas

plants at Sheffield and Plymouth. It’s been suggested Edward Mahoney and Sons, a prolific architectural practice that was prominent in New Zealand, was also involved in the building’s construction and later designed extensions to the Beaumont Street Offices in 1910. Externally the building was influenced by 19th century Italianate style and incorporated palazzo elements used to provide light and many storeys. The main elevation incorporates four bays on either side of a central main entrance and the use of the logo ‘AG Co Ltd’ on the central front door’s glasswork indicated the building’s identity. The upper storey was reached from a large staircase in the main lobby and from a smaller set of stairs inside the general store. The business expanded, with gas production doubling between 1901 and 1910 and internally the building had space for office work on the ground floor and a counter for serving customers in the southeast corner. There were also facilities for a clerk, fitter and telephones along the western wall. The northern part housed a general store and a lobby off the main entrance provided access to a pay office, strong room and a lavatory. Extensions between 1910 and 1912 housed workshops, a cart dock, a pattern store and shops for joiners, smiths and fitters. But the golden days were threatened by the formation of the Auckland Electric Power Board in 1921. The first Labour Government used electricity in all state houses and by 1997 the Auckland Gas Company ceased to exist. Much of its land was redeveloped for residential housing when the offices and workshops were demolished. The remainder of the structure was conserved in 2001-3 and has since been used for retail activity and forms the main surviving remnant of the former Auckland Gas Company. (DEIRDRE TOHILL) F PN

AUCKLAND COUNCIL TO PUBLISH OVERVIEW OF CITY CENTRE AND WATERFRONT DEVELOPMENTS Auckland Council last month confirmed that it will publish an overview of key city centre and waterfront developments, to give the public and decision-makers a clear picture of the programme of work underway to transform Auckland’s CBD. Councillors received an update recently on planning and project implementation for the city centre and waterfront.

with the agencies to bring together a clear overview and guide progress as we move into the delivery phase.

Deputy Mayor and Development Committee Chair Penny Hulse said, “As part of delivery of the Auckland Plan, there is significant work underway to transform Auckland’s city centre and waterfront. This includes work to improve our public spaces, enhance pedestrian access and transform the retail experience.

“As we move through this work we will be seeking input from Aucklanders on any key decisions or developments.”

“Auckland Council is guiding the overall work programme through the Auckland Development Committee. Over the past six months in particular, we have worked closely

Penny Hulse also confirmed that the future vision for Queens Wharf will include public consultation. “The Wharf is jointly owned by the government and Waterfront Auckland and will remain in public ownership.” The overview of projects will be published next month. F PN

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NIKI WRIGHT: LEYS INSTITUTE LIBRARY NEWS

Parlez-vous français mon ami? French conversation at the Leys Institute library Every Monday from 12 noon to 1pm the French conversation group meets in the downstairs reading room of the Leys Institute Library. The French conversation group is for people with some knowledge of French who are interested in practicing conversational French with an informal and friendly group of likeminded people. Interested? Just turn up at 12pm on a Monday and join the conversation. There is no charge for this group. Did you know we also have a collection of French, Spanish, German and Italian books available to all customers? The collection includes children’s books, fiction and nonfiction titles.

eMagazine features include: • Always available - no hold queues, download and read straight away. • No checkout periods - you keep the eMagazines for as long as you want. • No limit to the number of eMagazines you can check out. • A wide variety of topics including travel, decorating, cooking and more. • A range of audiences with eMagazines for children, teens, men, and women. • Popular titles include: New York Review of Books, Vogue Living, Elle, Cosmopolitan, Martha Stewart Living, Oprah, Organic Gardening, Rolling Stone, Peppermint, The Economist, Woman and Home, Delicious and National Geographic. More titles are being added on a regular basis. If you are not sure how to access eMagazines please pop into the library and we will be happy to show you. New philosophy discussion group at Leys Institute Library Wayne Brittenden, host of Counterpoint on National Radio, will be hosting a fortnightly philosophy discussion group in the Reading Room at the Leys Institute Library. The purpose of this group is to provide a forum for locals to discuss matters of social, political and cultural significance to New Zealanders from a philosophical point of view. The first meeting will be 2.00-3.30pm Saturday 5 July. The topic for discussion this month is - ‘Is New Zealand anti-intellectual?’ All welcome. Wild July school holiday events Saturday 5 July - Sunday 20 July Come along to the Leys Institute Library these school holidays and join our fun and exciting events based around the theme of Wild. Activities and events include story times, working with clay, biscuit decorating, costume making, film making and a 3D printing and brushbot creature making workshop. All ages welcome.

eMagazines Exciting news - you can now access over 600 eMagazines on the Auckland Libraries website. They can be downloaded to your computer, laptop, tablet, iPad or smartphone.

For a full list of activities please pick up a flyer in the library or check the Auckland Libraries website www.aucklandlibraires.govt.nz (NIKI WRIGHT RLIANZA) F PN LEYS INSTITUTE LIBRARY, 20 St Mary’s Road T: 09 374 1315 www.facebook.com/LeysInstituteLibraryPonsonby

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VIVE LA FRANCE BASTILLE DAY AT FRENCH BISTRO FRENCHIE Un petit coin de France in Ponsonby! Restaurateurs, Alex Roux (ex Bouchon and Pastis) the convivial Gaulois and Philippe Vachias, the convivial Auvergnat, have opened their latest bistro, Frenchie, formerly La Cantine located on Ponsonby Road in Three Lamps. Frenchie is your new local bar, serving traditional French food and tapas from the black board menu. To complement this true example of classic French bistro cooking, choose any one of the French wines from their extensive wine list. On Saturday 12 July and Monday 14 July, they propose a Bastille Day special of $49.50 per person. For this you get a three course set menu consisting of a delicious assiett francaise cassoulet and boeuf bourguignon, with a vegetarian option and for dessert a lemon tart (wine not included). To celebrate Bastille Day come dressed in your favourite French costume and be entertained by Tracey Collins playing accordion! Vive la revolution! F PN Frenchie is open Tuesday to Saturday for dinner and Friday for lunch. FRENCHIE, 265 Ponsonby Road T: 09 376 2516 www.frenchie.co.nz

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VIVE LA FRANCE GRANGE - LES MEUBLES DE FAMILLE With over 100 years in the business of designing, manufacturing and distributing exquisite French furniture, GRANGE is now revisiting styles of the past. Over the years, the company has built up its Meubles de Famille concepts, identifying GRANGE as a creator of furniture for the family home. GRANGE’s global reputation is based on its cabinet making expertise and on its talent for translating styles into warm, contemporary interiors.

Pictured: Jacob coffee table by Grange.

GRANGE draws on inspiration from chateau furniture and delights in adapting pieces drawn from provincial French homes, conveying an atmosphere of quiet serenity. GRANGE has chosen to retain its manufacturing base in France and more particularly in the Monts du Lyonnais. Each piece is rubbed down, stained, lacquered, waxed and polished by hand. As each stage unfolds, the finish develops, builds up, and is then enriched and blended at the hands of GRANGE cabinetmakers. Their skill brings out the warmth of the wood; their virtuosity accentuates the depth of the grain. It is their savoirfaire which gives the furniture its translucency, silkiness and distinctive satin-touch finish. GRANGE chooses to moderate its versions of period styles, adapting them to current tastes and, in so doing, fulfils today’s practical and aesthetic requirements. GRANGE signals in its collections a desire to embrace the period, putting forward its own vision and reworking the comfort features. New sources of inspiration, discovering different styles, beautiful workmanship, noble PN woods and fine patinas make it possible to appeal to the customers’ dream. F GRANGE @ DOMO CLASSICAL, 139 Carlton Gore Road T: 09 524 2505 www.domoclassical.co.nz

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VIVE LA FRANCE LIGNE ROSET; AVAILABLE EXCLUSIVELY AT DOMO Some people think a job which involves regular travel would be a perk. And it is for many. Frenchman Bernard Vinson is the export director for French brand Ligne Roset. The business now has a presence in over 60 countries, servicing 204 exclusive shops and a staggering 500 stores, within a store. He tells Ponsonby News that he spends one third of the year travelling and he flies all over the world. And still loves his job. Bernard Vinson was in Auckland last month to spend time at Domo in Parnell, where owners Nigel and Karen Robertson have devoted 50% of their showroom to Ligne Roset. Bernard joined the company in September1989 and during his career, he has spent 25 years growing and developing the many international opportunities.

I asked Bernard to reveal some of his stand out pieces from the latest collection? “We work with 70 designers, from time to time. There are probably 10 we work with regularly. The Bouroullec brothers are Philippe Stark’s top designers of the 21st century. They are inseparable. The brothers (Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec) have established a unique design workshop based in Paris. They take a highly intuitive approach to their design work and have a strong penchant for refined crafts, traditions and excellent quality. But in fact, it all begins with a lot of creative drawings made with pencil and crayons. The Outdoor is one of their designs. It has the look of the outdoors, but can only be used indoors. One of the biggest selling pieces overall is the Togo sofa, designed by Michel Ducaroy over 30 years ago, which we have sold over 1.3 million! Another designer we work a lot with is Philippe Nigro, who has been awarded Best Designer in the Red Dot awards. He has created three new pieces for the new collection. The Confluences sofa, a floor standard lamp and the Fold coffee table. He’s very talented and has also produced a small collection for Hermes.”

photography: Martin Leach

He loves spending time in this part of the world and he is off to Australia next. The brand which acts more like a fashion brand, rather than a furniture business, has been around since the 1860s... and is a fifth generation family business. “There is always a story behind each piece. We love hearing new ideas, new concepts and discovering new talent.”

Bernard Vinson of Ligne Roset and Nigel Robertson of Domo Do you have a favourite overall piece? “My house is like a Ligne Roset showroom and if I had to choose just one piece it would have to be the Maly bed, which is German designed and was first launched in 1983. It has been reshaped for the new collection which will be available in Auckland next October.” (MARTIN LEACH) F PN LIGNE ROSET @ DOMO, 106 St Georges Bay Road, Parnell T: 09 921 5574 www.domo.co.nz

Pictured above: Ruche Inga Sempe; below: Confluences Sofa

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VIVE LA FRANCE FRENCH MIME LAURENT DECOL TO PERFORM IN AUCKLAND The Alliance Française Auckland and TAPAC are thrilled to host world-acclaimed French mime Laurent Decol as part of his New Zealand Tour 2014. “He is the worthy successor to Charles Chaplin, Marcel Marceau or Buster Keaton. An incredibly talented artist that makes us smile and moves us to laughter and tears.” The New York Times, 12/12/2010 Laurent Decol has completed over 2000 performances and workshops in nearly 100 countries. He was privileged to be the student of Marcel Marceau of worldwide fame. New York City has declared 18 March ‘Marcel Marceau Day’ and Michael Jackson once admitted using some of Marceau's techniques in his own dance steps! Laurent graduated from both Marcel Marceau Paris International School of Mimodrama and the Institute for Researching the Actor in Holstebro, Denmark. He was then Professor at the Marcel Marceau Paris International School of Mimodrama. He is also an actor and is director of a theatre company.

TAKE ME TO PARIS! If a dream trip to Paris is not on the cards then pay a visit to Le Garde-Manger, it really is the next best thing! Soak up the French atmosphere for the ultimate local ‘Parisian experience’. Le Garde-Manger in Queen Street with its traditional set menu and daily blackboard specials is an ideal place for dinner before going to the movies, the theatre or taking in a night at the opera.

In the language of gesture and mime the mono-performance ‘Words of Silence’ is a reflection on 12 of the existential human issues such as love, life and creativity. Since no speech is involved, communication is universal. This is a unique opportunity for both adults and children to experience the magic of a world-class mime show. Laurent Decol will be offering workshops and will be performing.

There is a private function room available for up to 40 people, with no hire fee for the room, simply a set menu from $40 per head.

Monday 7 to Friday 11 July Workshops for kids aged 6 to 14, includes performance as opening act on 13 July and free entrance to the show.

Just 10 minutes walk from Eden Park or a short five minute drive from Ponsonby, Le Garde-Manger in Kingsland is the perfect spot for a pre-match bite to eat or a leisurely dinner before heading out to enjoy the night. There is cosy indoor dining or outdoor dining in a romantic garden setting, and live music with Lynn Lorkin and the French Toast trio every Thursday at 7pm.

Performance: Sunday 13 July at 4.00pm at TAPAC (tickets $25 / $15 concessions)

THE ALLIANCE FRANÇAISE D’AUCKLAND - a not for profit organisation celebrating and promoting French language and culture worldwide. It offers French language tuition at all levels, in group or private classes, to all age groups, with professionally qualified French native speakers, supported by an extensive library of French books and DVDs. Cultural events include entertainment, presentations, celebration of traditional French festivals, films, concerts and exhibitions. Monday 7 July 6.30pm: Berkeley Cinema, Takapuna, ‘Tour de Force’, a hilarious comedy about an amateur cyclist’s antics at the Tour de France.

Le Garde-Manger Queen Street is open seven days 11am to 3pm for lunch and 5pm till late for dinner.

Located where Bouchon restaurant used to be and opposite the Kingsland train station, Le Garde-Manger Kingsland is open seven days, 11am to 3pm for lunch Monday to Friday, 8.30am to 3pm Saturday and Sunday and 5pm till late every day. “Come and celebrate Bastille Day with us.” Indulge in gorgeous French cuisine, French chanson and accordion music on Saturday 12 July in Kingsland and Sunday 13 July in PN Queen Street. F LE GARDE-MANGER, 466 Queen Street, T: 09 362 0655, 479 New North Road, T: 09 8451680 bookings@legardemanger.co.nz www.legardemanger.co.nz

Monday 7 - Friday 11 July: TAPAC Performing Arts Centre, Motions Road, Western Springs. Laurent Decol presents children’s workshops, which give free rein to their imagination to express themselves in mime, often with music. Sunday 13 July 4.00pm: TAPAC, The Laurent Decol Show with special guest JP the Clown. Monday 14 - Friday 18 July: Children’s Cooking Workshops at the Alliance Francaise. Monday 21 - Friday 24 July: Adults Language and Cultural Workshops. Open Day at the Alliance from 12pm to 3pm Saturday 19 July. Ten minute fun workshops provide a taste of French language and culture. Test your own level of French, meet teachers and students. Enrol for next term’s classes and receive a 10% discount. For further details visit THE ALLIANCE FRANÇAISE D’AUCKLAND, 9A Kirk Street, T: 09 376 0009 E: information@alliance-francaise.co.nz www.alliance-francaise.co.nz

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VIVE LA FRANCE EUROPEAN ANTIQUES MIRROR SALE FOUR MEN AND A PARFAIT L’Authentique adds truffle and mushroom parfait to their range of charcuterie. The storming of the Bastille, a Parisian fortress, by the people of Paris in 1789 marks the annual Bastille Day commemorations the world over. With 14 July approaching, New Zealand charcuterie company L’Authentique is celebrating the French national day with a launch of its Truffle and Mushroom Parfait - abundant in flavours which are far from stormy. Its smooth texture and earthy taste comes from porcini and fresh Portobello mushroom, accented with luxurious truffle oil. Like L’Authentique’s range of sausage and terrines, the moreish parfait is made from quality cuts of free range New Zealand meat to create authentic French products. In true French style, Phillippe Arregui, L’Authentique head charcutier, romantically describes the Truffle and Mushroom Parfait. “It’s a duet of duck and chicken with more than a hint of porcini to be reminiscent of a traditional French autumn forest harvest,” he says. 1

2 For one week only from 7 - 14 July, local antique expert Meredith Lee of European Antiques is having a mirror sale. 1. One of a pair of 19th century French silver gilded mirrors with cherub cartouche c.1880. 2. Antique French gilt mirror with wave frame c.1900. 3. Louis Philippe antique silver and gilded mirror c.1860.

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EUROPEAN ANTIQUES, 21 Ariki Street T: 360 9858 www.europeanantiques.co.nz

HACHIS PARMENTIER WITH TOULOUSE 500g L’Authentique Toulouse mince or sausages (casing removed) 2 shallots (thinly sliced) 1 kg agria potato 150ml full cream 75g unsalted butter 150 grated comte cheese 1 x 20cm square ovenproof pie dish

Since 2006, L’Authentique’s traditional charcuterie has been made in New Zealand by four imported Frenchmen - Phillippe, Benjamin, Guillaume, and another Phillippe. The quartet manufactures fine meat products by selecting the best free range and New Zealand fresh meats to craft hearty and true products. Their aim is to make the very best meat products using only meat with no fillers, nitrates or artificial casings. Phillippe, originally from Basque country is the son of a charcutier and was trained in making the celebrated Bayonne ham. In New Zealand he is on a mission to show Kiwi cooks there’s more to serving pate than in its tub next to a loaf of bread, or cooking a sausage on the barbeque. “We like to serve our parfaits on sliced and toasted baguette atop caramelized onions, or under rocket leaves and sprouts for an interesting texture. It’s quick to do, and when we have prepared this for our families and guests, they truly appreciate the combination of new flavours and the presentation. “Our sausages are made from fresh, quality meat free of gluten and preservatives. It’s a perfect ingredient for family meals and we all know children love to eat sausages. So we encourage parents to use our sausage meat, removed from the casings, as a base for a simple and flavourful meat sauce. Children have told us versions of this recipe are delicious. We post new recipes every week on Facebook.” L’Authentique Truffle and Mushroom Parfait 80g has a RRP$5.99 and is available from Farro Fresh, Nosh, good local butchers and newly opened Wilder and Hunt on MacKelvie Street. F PN www.lauthentique.co.nz

To Prepare To a saucepan on a medium heat add a tablespoon of olive oil, the shallots and the Toulouse mince. Sautee for 10-15 minutes until the onions are caramelised and the mince is nicely browned. Place in the bottom of the pie dish, spreading out evenly. Peel and chop the potatoes into roughly the same size and place in a pot covered with water on a gentle simmer until they are cooked through. Drain and then return to the pot. Add in the butter and half the cream and mash the potatoes thoroughly. Season with salt and pepper. At this stage check the consistency of the mash. You want it to be smooth and spreadable, so add the remaining cream until you reach the desired consistency. Spread the potatoes over the top of the mince, smooth out, grate over the Comte cheese and place into a 175°C oven for 15 minutes. Remove and serve with crusty bread. www.lauthentique.co.nz

34 PONSONBY NEWS+ July 2014

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


VIVE LA FRANCE The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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WHAT’S HOT AT SABATO FROMAGE FRANÇAIS The French are famous for many fabulous foodie things and one that we are most grateful for is their incredible talent for cheese. Hard or soft, blue or white, stinky or subtle, there is a French cheese for everyone - here are some of our favourites... Raclette - Made in the Alps near the Franco-Swiss border, raclette is mild, milky and sweetly nutty, washed with white wine as it ages to develop a golden rind. Gloriously gooey when melted this is the ultimate comfort cheese for winter weather, traditionally melted in front of the fire and enjoyed with potatoes, cured meats and pickles. Brillat Savarin Affiné - Silky smooth, enriched with cream, buttery and nutty with a bloomy white rind - Brillat Savarin is the definition of decadence. This divine cheese takes its name from the man who is known today as ‘the father of modern cooking’, Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin. Mimolette - A striking cheese characterised by its bright orange interior and unusual ‘lunar landscape’ rind. As it ages over two years it slowly hardens and dries, developing a deliciously nutty flavour and a deep orange colour that makes it a very attractive addition to a cheeseboard. Pico Affiné - A charming goat’s cheese camembert traditionally made in the centre of Perigold, South West France. Tangy flavour and grassy sweetness with the delicate creaminess of camembert.

Barista Selena and new French chef, Guillaume Fiol with Delphine de Rouvroy

A DREAM COME TRUE The number five has a special significance for Delphine and Guillaume de Rouvroy. Eighteen months ago, the owners of L’Escabeau French Kitchen on Richmond Road moved to New Zealand with their five daughters, Charline (22), Margot (21), Toscane (18), Colombe (16) and Olympe (14).

Blue d’Auvergne - the underdog of French blues. Named after its place of origin, this balanced farmhouse blue is mild and creamy, despite a pungent aroma.

Their little French café offers something to please the five senses. L’Escabeau means ‘stepladder’ in French and it’s an apt symbol for the de Rouvroy family, says Toscane. -“L’escabeau is about going up, aiming for something you want to reach and achieving a goal,” explains Toscane. “The five steps on the ladder also correspond to the five daughters, and the strength and warmth of the wood it’s made from is like the close bond we all have.”

Visit our cheesemonger instore and discover our tempting range of French cheese, plus PN many more from across Europe and New Zealand. F

The family also shares a sense of adventure and a flexible outlook that’s seen them live all around the world.

SABATO Limited, 57 Normanby Road T: 09 630 8751 www.sabato.co.nz

“Our parents love travelling and have shared this passion with us,” says Toscane. “They’ve always been adventurous, but ensure that we’re safe and happy wherever we are.” The de Rouvroys lived in France before moving to French-speaking Reunion Island. After two years in Japan, they returned to Europe for a year in Corsica and another two in France. It was in 2009, during their time in Tokyo, that they visited New Zealand for a two-week campervan tour and fell in love with the country. “We’ve always loved islands, mountains and beaches, sport, barbecues... and running barefoot. New Zealand was the perfect spot!” For over a decade Delphine and Guillaume had dreamed of starting their own hospitality business, and thought Auckland would be the ideal place. But making it happen involved two years of planning and paperwork, carried out from 18,500km away in France. Delphine and Guillaume even returned to Auckland during winter to ensure the climate suited them. They loved it even more, says Toscane. “When they spoke about New Zealand, they just couldn’t hold still. They were so excited! Moving here was such a perfect opportunity for them - and for us. My two younger sisters were looking forward to an English-based school system,” says Toscane. Charline is now in Canada and Margot in France, both pursuing university studies. Delphine and Guillaume run L’Escabeau, with help from Toscane, and Delphine’s goal of one day selling her chocolate fondants, cakes and quiche in a little shop is now a reality. As if their almond croissants, croque-monsieurs and mouth-watering salted-butter caramel crêpes weren’t already enough, the couple are making constant improvements at L’Escabeau. They’ve added French specialties such as boeuf bourguignon and coq au vin to the menu with free delivery within Herne Bay, Ponsonby and Grey Lynn. L’Escabeau celebrated its first birthday in June, and with Bastille Day this month, visitors can enjoy even more delicious French and Kiwi fare, as well as games and prizes. From PN September 1, L’Escabeau will be open seven days a week. (DEIRDRE COLEMAN) F To find out more visit www.lescabeau.co.nz

36 PONSONBY NEWS+ July 2014

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


LIZ WHEADON: WINE, GLORIOUS WINE

French wine explained As the French celebrate Bastille Day with full French flair in July and the Tour de France takes off, it seems timely to take a look at France. With a few basics we’ll make you an expert (or seemingly so) in no time at all. Bordeaux Bordeaux, located in France’s south west, has for many years been the centre of the world’s fine wine trade, a historic region producing exceptionally long lived wines. The five red varieties of Bordeaux red wines - Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Petit Verdot and Malbec. White wines are made from Sauvignon and Semillon. The top producers make outstanding wines year in, year out; in great vintages they require a good part of your lifetime in the cellar whilst the tougher vintages are usually earlier drinking. The years 2009 and 2010 were called unanimously in the trade, the greatest vintages ever! Now that’s a big call; the wines fortunately have no difficulty pulling themselves up to these great heights and deliver from top to entry level. Burgundy The romantic region of Burgundy starts with Chablis in the north and finishes with Beaujolais in the south. Wines from Chablis are made from 100% Chardonnay; from the heart of Burgundy, whites are also from Chardonnay, whilst reds are made from Pinot Noir. Right in the south, the grape variety of Beaujolais is Gamay.

Loire Valley There are numerous wines produced in the Loire; we choose to focus on the areas of Sancerre, Pouilly Fume and Vouvray. Sancerre is produced around the town by the same name and is made from Sauvignon Blanc. Pouilly Fume (not to be confused with Pouilly Fuisse from Burgundy) are also made from Sauvignon; the term Fume not referring to a smoked flavour in the wine but rather to the mist that rolls into the region. The wines of Vouvray are grown on top of the steep Chalk slopes alongside the Loire River. Vouvray’s are made from Chenin Blanc and in a wide array of styles from dry to very sweet. The South Lumped together it’s a big generalisation and a big area to cover. The South coast of France produces the most diverse collection of styles in France. Starting in the west, close to the Spanish border, there’s rich and robust reds like the wines of Madiran and Banylus; moving to the east and across the sun drenched beaches of the Mediterranean where all the delights of Côtes de Provence will hit you. (LIZ WHEADON) F PN www.glengarrywines.co.nz

Alsace The region of Alsace makes it a little easier for understanding by putting the variety on the label. The five noble varieties grown here are: Pinot Gris, Riesling, Gewürztraminer, Pinot Blanc and Muscat. The classification system is also a little simpler (perhaps the addition of a little German efficiency has helped this small northern region) there’s AOC - Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée and Grand Cru. Rhône Distinctly broken into two sections, the Northern and Southern Rhône, and stretching itself over 800km from just south of Lyon to Avignon in the South. The Northern Rhône is home to the great Syrah of France, rich and superbly textured. The white superstar of the north is Viognier grown in and around the village of Condrieu. The Southern Rhône is home to Grenache and the great blended wines of the Rhône.

OCTOBER 1989 - OCTOBER 2014 + CELEBRATES

Years

For more information or to book your advertising contact: Jo Barrett on 021 324 510 or t: 09 361 3356 or 09 378 8553 e: joannebarrett@xtra.co.nz w: www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

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PONSONBY U3A: JUNE 2014 GREY LYNN NEWS WILTON STREET COMMUNITY GARDEN A very special era has come to an end at the Wilton Street Community Garden. Sarah Guppy who took over coordinating the garden from founder Mandy McMullin writes about why the time has come to move on from this wonderful community hub. For over five years the Wilton Street Community garden has transformed a piece of land behind the Gypsy Tea Room in West Lynn. All good things come to an end, and like the seasons, this garden is preparing for the next chapter. I’ve decided to move on from the garden after many wonderful years. Energy, time, desire, community, all these things are needed to keep the garden going. If the garden could talk it would make a fascinating book, or a long fireside conversation. During the flourishing of the garden many communities used the space for meetings, birthday parties, Christmas gatherings, workshops on compost making, council discussion on compost and community gardens, fruit tree plans for Grey Lynn Park, soil testing, campaign rallies, the children’s garden for butterflies and lizards, barbeques for anniversaries, and the devotion of 100s of hours of volunteer gardening. These are some of the activities undertaken through goodwill and community support: • ‘Closed for Good’ BNZ Community project (volunteers helped clear the site) • Picket fence donated by Silver Fern Landscapes • Water tank donated by ‘Tanks a lot’ • Downpipe diverter given by John and Brenda to bring water from the Gypsy Tea Room roof to the water tank • Two macrocarpa boxes for raised bed made and installed by Peter Nuske • Pallets collected and made into compost stalls • Bricks given from a chimney for making beds • Wood chips donated from a tree fella • Food waste regularly brought to the community compost from local cafes and residents • Western Bays Community Board funding for picnic tables and plants • Grass clippings from lawn mowing man for compost • Plants donated by strangers • Wilton Street Community Garden honey sold at the Grey Lynn Farmers Market During our time there was only one event of vandalism. A banana tree was uprooted and thrown into the street some years ago. We planted it again, and not only did it take root, but this summer it produced the most beautiful lemon tasting bananas! I would like to acknowledge the dedication of the founders, Mandy McMulllin and Dave Gilbert who gave tirelessly to establish a special place for all creatures great and small. Thanks to the friends who worked in the garden Adele, Margo, Peter, Vonney, Angela, Kate, Jane, Sally, Dean, Terry, Tom, Ruben, Carol and her bees and many people travelling and passing through who visited to learn from the community. The new owners of the old Wine Vault shop and Brett from Gypsy Tea Room generously allow the garden to continue on their land. Plans are underway for the next chapter to involve local children in the joy of gardening. Volunteers are always welcome. PN (SARAH GUPPY) F goldensguppy@gmail.com

If we thought that all the Auckland Theatre Company did was to mount a number of plays each year, we soon had our eyes opened to the scope of activities and programmes undertaken by New Zealand’s leading theatre company, when artistic director Colin McColl spoke at the June meeting of Ponsonby U3A. He explained that the Auckland Theatre Company was born out of the ashes of the Mercury Theatre 23 years ago. When Simon Praast started the company, he aimed for a small, portable and tight company which would use various theatres around the city. Its popularity and range of activities grew over the years to the stage that Auckland Theatre Company now needs its own space. It uses the Maidment Theatre, but some other venues are too small to make it viable. The Waterfront Theatre project was initiated and now with $35 million raised, and another $10 million coming from the Auckland City Council, the dream is to become reality. Construction will soon start on the new Auckland Theatre Company complex at the Wynyard Quarter on the waterfront. It will provide an exciting home for ATC and a world class facility for Auckland. Colin stressed that supporting our own writers is important and during his time as artistic director he has enjoyed finding hidden gems, such as the current production of Maurice Shadbolt’s ‘Once on Chunuk Bair.’ The 10 minute speaker, U3A member Lillian Carroll entitled her talk ‘Life Can Change at 40.’ She traced her career from the time she started work in an area that took her away from New Zealand for lengthy periods. This year marks the 20th anniversary of Ponsonby U3A. A celebratory luncheon will be held in July to mark the event. Ponsonby U3A meets monthly on the second Friday morning of the month at the Leys Institute. Visitors and guests are welcome to attend meetings. As well as the monthly meeting with speakers, there are 12 special interest groups, which meet mainly in members’ homes. The groups are: Antiques and Collectibles, Armchair Travellers, Art History, Classical Studies, Current Affairs, Dining Out, Gallery Visits, Green Fingers, Music Appreciation, New Zealand History, Ramblers (interesting day trips) and Scrabble. Next month’s speaker will be Raewyn Butler, Public Relations Coordinator - Northern, The Salvation Army. She will give a brief history of the Salvation Amy and an overview of current work and services provided by the Salvation Army. There will be a 10 minute presentation from Ponsonby U3A members of the Marvellous PN Group of actors - actors over the age of 65. (PHILIPPA TAIT) F NEXT MEETING:

9.45am, Friday 11 July 2014, Leys Institute, 20 St Marys Bay Road.

ENQUIRIES:

Jane Jones, President, Ponsonby U3A. T: 09 378 7628

Colin McColl, artistic director, Auckland Theatre Company was guest speaker at the Ponsonby U3A June meeting. He is pictured with U3A members Rosalie Williams, Kathy Walker and Lillian Carroll

38 PONSONBY NEWS+ July 2014

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY THE BOTANIST The Botanist is the latest eatery to open in the uber-cool City Works Depot, alongside Ugly Bagel, Food Truck Garage, and Brothers Brewery. Situated in Shed 13 - formerly an underground car park - the site has a pleasant outlook across Freemans Bay to Ponsonby and enjoys all afternoon sun. The use of Scandinavian timber, light colours and soft lighting creates a feeling of space, whilst flowers and plants from the on-site florist bring the softness of greenery and colour. Head Chef Sara Simpson has over 20 years’ experience in head chef roles at The Tasting Shed, Tribeca and Terroir at Craggy Range as well as sous-chef at Clooney. Barista Jacob Matthews has most recently worked at The Depot and Quay Street Café, whilst florist Eden Hessell is known for her wonderful floral creations at Sugarsnap. The Botanist’s food philosophy is taking fresh, seasonal and local ingredients and combining them in a simple uncluttered way that brings the flavours through. Brunch is served from 7am weekdays and 8am on weekends, with modern takes on bubble and squeak, sweet and savoury waffles and a breakfast ramen. Lunch is served from 11 and changes daily, with five or more freshly prepared salads, two hot main meal choices, wraps, pizza and soup. Sara’s combination of Beetroot, Charred Brussels Sprouts and Miso Yogurt must be Auckland’s most talked about salad. Juices and smoothies are freshly made to order. In the evenings 20 plus wines are poured by the glass along with selection of PN sophisticated share plates. F THE BOTANIST, Shed 13, City works Depot, 90 Wellesley Street West, T: 09 308 9494

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JULIE BONNER: NEWS FROM FROG POND FARM

What a start to winter! Mild weather, bright blue skies with the odd cloud puff and a couple of visits by Jack Frost to keep us on our toes. Well, my toes were actually okay as they were thrust into wool-lined gummies. It was my hands that were the problem, and by the time I finally found my gloves it was like shoving popsicles into them! I have probably mentioned before that I have two rather plump Dorpa x sheep, Poppy and Lucy. These gals are food motivated; they will jump through hoops for some tasty treats (slight exaggeration). So, imagine how they must have felt when ambling down the hill they spied the gate to my prized veggie patch wide open. They must have thought they had died and gone to sheep heaven. Of course when I saw them some time later, standing nibbling long grass in the gateway, my heart started to pound. It never ceases to amaze me how quickly I can run up a steep hill, frantically waving my arms - I don’t recall hollering at the time, but I bet I did. Sheep aren’t really all that stupid either, they spotted me coming, casually leant down for another couple of mouthfuls of tasty greenery and then trotted off up the hill, no doubt dreaming of my brassicas en route. Banging the gate shut and cursing under my breath I peered over the gateway. Sorrel gone, further up the hill is my broccoli, cabbage and kale, hmm, six of those munched. Quick get me a tissue! If my prized brassica bed further up the hill had copped it, I would have thrown in my gardening towel. Oh incidentally, I didn’t talk much to hubby that night. What’s happening in my winter garden? Well, the garlic is doing famously as are the red onions and those tasty Egyptian walking onions. Our salad garden is still providing and we are finally enjoying our own broccoli steamed or sautéed with mushies and yes, a dollop of butter too. It was time finally to say goodbye to those fiery chilli plants, so habanero, cayenne and a Thai fire all were removed along with their summer neighbours. This bed was quickly replenished with composted horse poo and coffee grounds before more wonderful home-grown garlic was stuffed into the dirt. Bring it on! We have finally started pruning our olive trees, which is a big task - probably something to do with the fact that we have 50 of them. The bulk of them need the middle cut out and a general tidy up, which will make harvesting olives so much easier next year. At least the feijoa trees are all done, one less job to do. With all the outdoor activity the pile of fruit tree trimmings, corn and sunflower stalks was growing, so it was time to wheel out our trusty wood chipper. As I had dug out a massive old lavender bush from a raised bed (sorry bees), this needed chipping too. This is always a big job and often leads to the workers (hubby and I) having a few words on ‘how best to do things’ - know what I mean? Well the good news is that on completion of the rather large pile, I then tucked in my garlic garden with some rather sweet smelling mulch... heaven. Our new rooster Colin and his pals have settled in nicely, although they are still looking over their shoulder at meal times waiting for the imminent attack from one of the old girls. And mentioning those chickens, as it is wintertime they are having their annual spell from egg laying and fair enough too, based on the size of some of those eggs! Oh, as I’m sitting here typing, I’m cooking up those chillies with a host of other good stuff and making a very hot sauce, not for the faint hearted. I hope that your winter veggie garden is producing - there is something so special about growing your own and when it’s organic, that’s just a double bonus! Happy gardening! (JULIE BONNER) F PN www.frogpondfarm.co.nz

40 PONSONBY NEWS+ July 2014

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


PHIL PARKER: WHOSE WINE IS IT ANYWAY?

Northland snapshot - the wineries of Northland There is a rich wine history in New Zealand’s Far North region. In 1819 Anglican Missionary the Rev Samuel Marsden planted the very first vines in Kerikeri’s rich soils, and in the late 1830s, Official British Resident James Busby produced the first recorded example of wine made in New Zealand. In the late 1800s Croatian gum diggers settled in the far north, bringing their family cultural tradition of winemaking and establishing some of New Zealand’s first commercial wineries. North of Auckland City there are a few wineries spread along the island, sprinkled from Matakana, Mangawhai, Whangarei, and Russell to Kaitaia. Northland is still a marginal wine region; sub-tropical summer temperatures and humidity make it difficult to grow many varieties. We recently took an opportunity to head up north to stay in Russell for a long weekend and to explore a few of the wineries in the region. Omata Estate, Aucks Road, Russell T: 09 403 8007 www.omata.co.nz Omata is a historic area, purchased from local Maori in 1831, by Captain John Wright. This land was passed down through generations and then in 1994 the land was developed to make today’s Omata Estate where Chardonnay, Merlot and Syrah are grown. It is now owned by the Cashmore family, with winemaking by Rod McIvor and vineyard management by viticulturalist Bruce Soland. Notable wines - Deux Blanc $27 Blended medium sweet, fruity white wine. Marsden Estate, Wiroa Road, Kerikeri T: 09 407 9398 www.marsdenestate.co.nz Nearly 20 years ago, Rod and Cindy McIvor named their vineyard after Samuel Marsden who planted the first grapes in Northland in 1819. Their vineyards, with 3.5 Ha (9 acres) of vines are planted in Pinot Gris, Chardonnay, Merlot, Malbec, Pinotage, Tempranillo and

Chambourcin (a French/American hybrid red). Annual production is around 4,000 cases. Notable wines - Chambourcin $28, dark and intense with spice and blackberry flavours. Cottle Hill Winery, State Highway 10 T: 09 407 5203 www.cottlehill.co.nz Californians Michael and Barbara Webb, sailed to New Zealand aboard their 10 metre yacht from San Diego, and fell in love with the Kerikeri region. They decided to stay on, and established Cottle Hill Winery in 1996. On their home vineyard they grow Chardonnay, Chambourcin and Dolcetto. Gisborne and Hawkes Bay contract growers supply other grapes. The Cellar Door offers spectacular views from the highest peak in Kerikeri. Notable wines - Tawny Port $28, classic tawny with raisin caramel flavours. Paroa Bay Winery, 31 Otamarua Road, Paroa Bay, Russell T: 09 403 7928; M: 027 875 1094 www.tarapunga.com/paroa-bay-winery Paroa Bay winery is part of a large luxury accommodation estate near Russell, with stunning elevated views into the Bay of Islands. They are associated with organic Urlar Martinborough winery and have some of these for tasting at the cellar door - alongside their own Sauvignon Blanc and Chardonnay. The cellar door is a simple square modern building, furnished with hot pink lamps and chairs, adjacent to gardens, a lake and a putting green. Notable wines - Chardonnay $27, crisp and fruity with light oak. (PHIL PARKER) F PN Read Phil’s blog at nzwineblogger.blogspot.co.nz Phil Parker is a wine writer and operates Fine Wine & Food Tours in Auckland. www.insidertouring.co.nz

NZ WINE INDUSTRY GETS WISE A world leading sustainability scorecard and reporting tool is being launched to New Zealand wineries and grape-growers. WiSE (Wine Industry Sustainability Engine) will be used by around 2000 wineries and vineyards from Northland to Otago. It will record and manage winery and vineyard activities to ensure they meet international sustainability standards required by Sustainable Winegrowing New Zealand. The New Zealand wine industry is already seen as a driving force in sustainability with over 94% of the vineyard producing area certified under an independently audited sustainability programme, and WiSE is set to bolster this reputation. “This marks another step forward for the industry” says Philip Manson, General Manager Sustainability, New Zealand Winegrowers. “New Zealand wineries and grape-growers are committed to growing grapes and making wine in an environmentally and socially responsible way, and have been for a long time. WiSE will make it easier for members of Sustainable Winegrowing New Zealand to record, manage and report on their sustainable activities, and continue to improve their practices.” Sustainable Winegrowing New Zealand is a world leading sustainability programme and is celebrating its 20th year. F PN The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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GARY STEEL: VEG FRIENDLY

Spice of life IT CAN BE SO CONFUSING READING ABOUT THE PROS AND CONS OF DIFFERENT FOODS and beverages. Take eggs. First we’re told that eggs have dangerously high levels of cholesterol and we should have no more than two per week; then, a few years later, they discover that it’s a safe type of cholesterol, so no problem, have scrambled on Monday, poached on Tuesday... heck, try a different egg concoction for every day of the week if you like! For years, we’re indoctrinated with the idea that there is only one kind of fat, and that fat is bad. Hence, a plethora of food and drink products shouting out lines like ‘98 % fat free!’ as if the world depended on it. Now that the supermarket shelves are groaning with otherwise abominable, pointless and definitely unhealthy snack foods that carry the fat free mantra, we’re being told that no, fat is actually good for you: it’s the type of fat that matters! Eat as many avocados or nuts or as much good cold pressed oil as you want, because your body actually needs fat; just avoid the chip fat and the other saturated fats - especially those that come from slaughtered animal carcasses. Then there’s the kind of news reports that seem to contradict themselves week after week. How many times, for instance, have you read about the benefits of red wine, only to come across a story that counters the ‘healthy wine in moderation’ argument, and insists with missionary zeal that there’s scientific evidence that all wine is bad for you. So, it’s with pleasure that I can report that SPICES ROCK, and despite extensive testing, there’s not a shred of evidence to suggest that any of those pernicious rumours about tumours and the eating away of our stomachs by hot peppers are valid in any way! In fact, spices cover a huge array of food condiments and many of them add a flavour punch rather than that ‘am I going to die tonight?’ fear when we bite into a hot chili pepper. Spices have been integral to food from around the world for centuries, but especially Asian countries, where traditionally the food is based around the mild flavour of rice, and where delicate blends of spices have been created to enhance the flavour and texture of certain vegetables. It’s India to which we look for the most advanced spice culture on earth, and there’s a good reason for that. Thousands of years ago, India was the first nation to build into their culture a reverence for animals, and to develop a truly vegetarian cuisine. Dirt poor by our standards, it’s easy to understand how they had to think outside the square to dress up very ordinary (if nutritious) ingredients like rice and lentils and make them tasty and moreish. With at least 50% of India vegetarian all the time, and the rest either light meat eaters or observing certain vegetarian eating festivals, India has the most advanced understanding of the complementary nature of herbs and spices in food for both health and a happy palate. It’s depressing to see so many New Zealand-based Indians converting to meatbased diets, or finding that when they start an Indian restaurant here, usually with at least 50% of the menu vegetarian-based, that the locals only want the meat, with the emphasis on butter chicken, and more butter chicken. By the same token, it’s been incredible over the past decade to witness a rebirth of vegetarian Indian cuisine in Auckland, especially in less salubrious fringe-city suburbs like Mt Roskill and Sandringham, where a person can get a bellyful of incredible Indian street food for the price of a couple of lattes in a Ponsonby café. Venues like Jai Jalaram Khaman, Mumbai Chaat and Sasuma aren’t flash, there’s no espresso, and they’re not licensed for alcohol. The quality of the food, however, belies the presentation: get stuck into a selection of the menu items at any of these places, and you’ll be amazed at the taste sensations. And the nice people are usually happy to recommend and explain these exotic concoctions. Most vegetarian Indian restaurants will prepare vegan versions of some dishes, but dairy, and especially Indian cheese and ghee (clarified butter), are pretty central to the Indian vegetarian aesthetic. I guess when sacred cows were wandering around the streets, humans could just ‘borrow’ milk without having to murder their poor wee calves, but in a New Zealand context, with our industrial-strength dairy industry, that does seem PN rather ironic. (GARY STEEL) F Gary Steel is an Auckland-based journalist who runs online vegetarian resource www.doctorfeelgood.co.nz. He can be contacted via beautmusic@gmail.com

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY CUISINE CROWNS NEW ZEALAND’S BEST RESTAURANTS Sidart takes top honour at 2014 Cuisine NZ Good Food Awards Auckland fine-diner Sidart is Cuisine’s Restaurant of the Year 2014, heading off a string of strong contenders in the highest restaurant count in the 10-year history of the awards. Winners of the prestigious Cuisine NZ Good Food Awards, held in association with Vittoria Coffee, were announced last month at a glitzy who’s who of the restaurant industry at St-Matthew-in-the-City. Sidart also took out the title of Sanpellegrino Best Metropolitan Restaurant, with head judge Kerry Tyack describing the degustation-only menu of inspirational and innovative chef Sid Sahrawat as “art on a plate”. The picture-perfect presentation of superbly flavoured dishes, a complementary drinks list and seamless service made dining at Sidart an experience to be savoured in every way, Tyack says. “Good chefs never stand still - they continuously experiment, evolve and adjust. Over the past year, Sid Sahrawat’s food at Sidart has come into its own and truly excelled.” Adds Cuisine editor Sarah Nicholson, “This year it’s been tougher than ever before to create a dining experience that stands out from the exceptional group of restaurants in New Zealand. Sid Sahrawat’s food is clever and technical, and looks amazing, but at the end of the day it is absolutely delicious, and that is the most important thing.” Sixteen new eateries made the cut in the nationwide awards this year, with the total number of coveted chef’s hats increasing to 30 from 20 in 2013.

The Grove, plus its buzzing new Italian offspring Baduzzi, earned executive chef Benjamin Bayly the title of Vittoria Coffee Chef of the Year. Baduzzi was crowned American Express Best Specialist Restaurant, with Wellington’s popular Ortega Fish Shack & Bar the runner-up. Nic Watts’ chic Japanese eatery Masu at Auckland’s SkyCity was named Electrolux Best New Restaurant, with the intimate Roots in Lyttelton as runner-up. The KitchenAid Best Regional Restaurant title went to the smart, laid-back Chim Choo Ree in Hamilton, with North Otago’s awards stalwart Riverstone Kitchen the runner-up. The House of Travel Best Winery Restaurant was Hawke’s Bay’s elegant Elephant Hill, with Central Otago’s picturesque Amisfield Bistro the runner-up. Proprietor Chris Upton’s long-standing dedication to wine service earned Auckland’s O’Connell Street Bistro the Negociants New Zealand Best Wine Experience award, a new category this year, and the captivating Mojo Horiuchi, manager-sommelier at Auckland’s Kazuya, was named European Foods Restaurant Personality of the Year. Find full profiles of the winners and other successful restaurants in the Cuisine NZ Good Food Awards 2014 on cuisinegoodfoodguide.co.nz, or get the Cuisine Good Food PN Guide 2014 free with the July issue of Cuisine, on sale 16 June 2014. F

LIBERTINE Sean Marshall takes one of Auckland’s most stylish establishments in an exciting new direction. Libertine, one of Auckland’s most stunning restaurant and bars, has welcomed Sean Marshall as its new Executive Chef, a move set to breathe culinary life into the Victoria Park precinct. In partnership with Mark Keddell, CEO of Pack & Company and one of New Zealand’s leading hospitality industry figures, Marshall is adding his no nonsense approach to food, rounding out the complete drinking and dining experience that Libertine offers. Born over many coffees and conversations about their shared love of food, and even some good old fashioned foraging up at Keddell’s Dairy Flat farm, Keddell and Marshall have developed a mutual respect and a passion to create an exceptional restaurant. Libertine’s new menu, which will continually evolve in line with Marshall’s ethos of seasonality and provenance, features some signature Marshall dishes, including a slow poached egg sourced fresh from Keddell’s farm and the Plate of Pig, which embraces the nose-to-tail style respect he learned from a young age. Marshall then honed his skills in fine dining restaurants around New Zealand, winning many local and international accolades including the World Junior Chef title, before working in award winning restaurants around the world in Sydney, the United Kingdom and Melbourne.

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“I’m not lying when I say it’s my favourite restaurant space in Auckland and I think we’ve got an opportunity to create something really special here. There are no gimmicks, this isn’t about trends, it’s about serving seriously good food in a comfortable environment, where people can come for a cocktail and bar snacks, or a full meal and leave having had an amazing experience. The simple goal is bistro dining at its best,” says Marshall. His menu will continue to evolve and with other changes on the horizon, including a new wine list developed alongside the menu, Libertine is establishing its place as a leader in Auckland’s restaurant scene. Open Tuesday to Saturday 4pm until late. LIBERTINE, 37 Drake Street, Freemans Bay T: 09 929 2790 info@libertine.co.nz www.libertine.co.nz

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY LONGROOM'S FIFTH BIRTHDAY Longroom turns ‘Five’ this August and lines itself up with other great hospitality icons on Ponsonby Road. “Our objective was always to provide a product and experience that stood the test of time,” says co-owner Richard Bagnall. “Like many other bar and restaurant businesses, we’ve adapted to market conditions and trends and made subtle changes to our physical appearance to keep up with customer needs. We originally transformed quite a derelict courtyard into a large open useable space, then 18 months ago we added structure, colour and texture to make it more attractive, comfortable, inviting and relaxing. And after nearly a year of operating with our glass ‘atrium style’ roof, we are benefitting through increased patronage during the cooler winter months and keeping our customers dry 95% of the time. “We’ve recently added a rear north facing deck which has become a popular lunchtime and after work drinks destination. This has also allowed us to create some more comfortable internal spaces including a lounge area with a fireplace, and provides a great dance floor for our party crowd late on Friday and Saturday nights.” “Having plenty of space and spaces allows us to cater for large corporate or private functions, or a number of smaller ones at any one time, we have certainly seen an increase in demand for these areas,” says Richard. Longroom has also been very focused on its menu offering, morphing from a traditional bistro menu (starters, platters, mains and desserts) to a comprehensive offering of shared plates, platters, salads, pizzas and bistro staples, all perfectly accompanied by a great range of beverages. Longroom is currently running ‘Happy Hours’ weekdays from 4-7pm and is now open for brunch from 10am Saturdays, PN Sundays and public holidays. F LONGROOM, 114 Ponsonby Road T: 09 360 8803 www.longroom.co.nz

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LAURAINE JACOBS: THE SEASONED PALATE

Lauraine Jacobs eats at Loop At a time when huge budgets for restaurant openings and big named chefs abound throughout the city it is heartening to see an enthusiastic young team embark on a modest new restaurant project that gains instant acclaim. A brother and sister team, Hailey Boock Rodger and Elliot Boock, who grew up in neighbouring Grey Lynn, together with Hailey’s chef husband Craig Rodger, have already attracted favourable reviews for their new venture, Loop in Kingsland. Kingsland is almost door-to-door eating establishments these days, although it seems that most of the places have their eyes firmly fixed on watering the football and cricket crowds who flow through the Kingsland train station to adjacent Eden Park. So it is great to see young people who put food first and foremost operating this genuine restaurant, albeit one that is casual and a tad quirky. When the team moved in they stripped out most of the fittings; what remains is a glorious white-tiled kitchen, a feature in itself, and it looks to be a serious centre for the creation of some interesting fare. It is openly viewed from most points in the large airy space of the dining area, and at the rear there is a huge photographic portrait of chef Craig Rodger’s favourite culinary hero, Marco Pierre White. That’s interesting hero worship, for Rodger is serious and shy, unlike the brassy bad boy of the British culinary scene. The connection I believe is that both are genuinely passionate about food. So what about other little bits of quirkiness? Well. I loved the industrial lights, specially imported from IKEA in Oz, the very comfortable and generous white chairs and the odd jugs of flowers decorating a few of the wooden tables. The walls are vast and high, and at the top of each side of the restaurant are the original painted advertisements running the length of the room, giving a clue to the idea that maybe these premises originally housed a grocery store. But even better, the art is fascinating. A friend of the Boock-Rodgers, Tyrone Lane, painted two of the collection of interesting pictures that adorn the walls. The large one is a busy pedestrian scene at the Queen and Wellesley Street intersection in Auckland’s downtown and it’s filled with people all crossing the streets. Look carefully and you might spot Lorde and Taylor Swift walking together, or some of the artist’s mates. I thought I identified Elliot. And if that’s not enough, on the facing wall is a smaller painting of the Laundromat on Karangahape Rd and who is that lurking outside? Would-be-if-he-could -be political influencer Kim Dotcom and his former wife Mona. Very funny indeed. The food too is a tad quirky and I like that. My two favourite items on the menu are ‘bacon and eggs’ and ‘pineapple lumps.’ Neither are to be missed. The bacon and eggs (see the photo) make a fabulous starter. Chef Craig Rodger hails from Scotland where he enjoyed a classic Europe training. His play on bacon and eggs is beautifully crafted; a Scotch quail’s egg juxtaposed with a couple of squares of meaty pork belly, garnished with wonderful triangles of crisp paper-thin crackling, pea shoots and celeriac.

to reflect the seasons. Even though that number of choices may seem limiting, you just sense everything is going to be fresh and invigorating. When it came to main course choices, I was impressed at the simplicity. My slow braised daube of beef had been in the oven for 24 hours and literally melted in my mouth, as it should. The accompaniments were lovely; butternut and ginger, cucumber, coriander and a spiced coconut emulsion. Just the right amount of flavour hits for a cold wintry night. The market fish (kingfish) was stacked with good old fashioned braised carrots and lots of lovely greens and fresh and deliciously light. Vegetarians are thoughtfully catered for; rosemary and brown butter gnocchi to start and a complex main dish of rolled aubergine and mushroom with couscous, harissa, butternut, macadamia and roasted broccoli. And wouldn’t you know it, every single one of those dietary codes were satisfied by that one dish! Praise on high! There are lots of sides to choose for those who feel the need, including some rather wicked twice cooked chips with parmesan aioli and rosemary salt, or the terribly trendy kale slaw with far too many healthy components for me. And lovely desserts, especially that pineapple lump plate and that old favourite, a Baileys affogato. The wine list is concise and interesting with some of the usual suspects that diners are comfortable with, but also a nice selection of French wines from Maison Vauron (and their delicious imported French cheese too). A few craft beers enhance a predictable choice of tap beers, and for those waiting or on their own there’s a cute little bar with a display of quirky Scotch whisky jars the Boock’s grandfather gifted them. Of course, service by the owners is never going to be a problem as the commitment to this restaurant shows from the steady stream of food that arrives promptly from the kitchen to the warm interested welcome diners get from the front of house team. PN (LAURAINE JACOBS) F www.laurainejacobs.co.nz LOOP, 462 New North Road T: 09 849 4448 www.loopdining.co.nz

His pineapple lump dessert is new on the menu. Fascinated with those delicious chocolate covered pineapple marshmallow chunks of deliciousness we all grew up with, chef Craig did some research and discovered they were the creation of Charles Diver at the Regina Confectionery Company in Oamaru in the early 50s. He spotted an early handwritten recipe and was inspired to de-construct the pineapple lump, as chefs do. This glorious dessert centres on a long sticky slice of chocolate terrine, surrounded by blocks of pineapple marshmallow and a wedge of glace style fresh pineapple. I love a thinking chef! Hailey and Craig are committed to a healthy diet and this is reflected in the overall menu. I felt like a spy when I read it for the first time as there are endless codes to decipher. They prove to be useful however as LCHF is low carb high fat, GF gluten free, V vegetarian and DF dairy free. (Goodness me, where are all these people coming from that a restaurant has to turn to this?) Do not fear. Be that as it may, the menu is jolly good and filled with things that will please most people whether they worry about these requirements or not. I loved the afore mentioned bacon and eggs, and a chunky coq au vin terrine that has since been replaced by a rich duck liver parfait with beetroot puree, roast artichoke, pistachios, quince and bread (you can ditch the bread and the dish becomes LCHF if you must). There are just five entrees and five mains which change out every 8-10 weeks

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Owner, Hailey, her brother Elliot behind the bar and the chef, Hailey’s husband Craig PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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photography: Martin Leach

EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY

LEXUS SPONSORS SANTOS CAFÉ FOOTBALL We love our great friend, Peter Carleton, General Manager of Greater Auckland Motors, seen pictured with the uber cool, Lexus CT200h F Sport. This new model has been customised for a nice bit of local sponsorship - to celebrate the 2014 FIFA World Cup. Santos, our local café invited fans and locals to watch the games live. F PN

KUMARA AND CHICKPEA SOUP This one-step soup is lovely on a cold wintry day and it’s a soup that the kids (on holiday) can easily make, too. Serves 4 Time to make 25 minutes 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 onion, chopped 1 large golden kumara, diced 1 tablespoon Moroccan spice mix 400g can no-added-salt chopped tomatoes 400g can no-added-salt chickpeas, drained, rinsed 2 cups liquid no-added-salt chicken stock Step 1 Heat oil in a large saucepan. Add onion and kumara and cook for 5 minutes until onion has softened. Add spice and stir well. Cook for 1 minute. Stir in tomatoes, chickpeas and stock. Bring to the boil and simmer for 10 minutes or until kumara is soft. If you like, at this stage, purée part of the soup or leave it chunky. Serve with parsley and grainy bread. Nutrition: low kilojoule, high fibre Recipe: Niki Bezzant Photography: Louise Lister Recipe reprinted from Healthy Food Guide magazine with permission from Healthy Life Media Ltd. Find more delicious soup recipes - as well as a bonus slow cooker recipe feature - in the July 2014 issue of Healthy Food Guide magazine ($5.90), on sale in supermarkets and bookstores or subscribe at www.healthyfood.co.nz F PN

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EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY IN THE MOOD FOR GOOD FOOD DON’T MISS THE FOOD SHOW! The Food Show Auckland will explode into delicious life from Thursday 31 July to Sunday 3 August at the ASB Showgrounds. Don’t miss out on New Zealand’s biggest culinary event and home to a truly astonishing selection of food, drink, kitchen equipment, and special features. This year you can choose from three distinct tiers of ticketing - General Admission, Preview Day, and the brand new VIP Premium Experience - depending on how much pampering you feel you deserve. Every year The Food Show Auckland serves up an unrivalled menu of special features to delight and amaze you, and this year is no exception. There’s the Whirlpool Cooking Theatre, home to free cooking demos from top celebrity chefs, and the Kenwood and De’Longhi stand offering free coffee plus Kenwood’s New Generation Game, a game show with fantastic prizes from Kenwood and De’Longhi. Check out the Good Magazine Healthy Living Zone, a special area featuring products to help you live well and nourish your body, and don’t forget the Selaks New Zealand Roast Day, an opportunity to celebrate the Kiwi roast accompanied by Selaks wines. The Nespresso Masterclass Series will introduce you to the unique range of Nespresso Grands Crus, and the Craft Quarter offers top-notch antipasto ingredients all in one place. All this, plus hundreds of exhibitors, thousands of products, amazing show-only specials, new products, demos, competitions and more. Buy your tickets online immediately at www.foodshow.co.nz and go in the draw to win a 12-day Intrepid Travel ‘Real Food Adventure’ gourmet holiday for two to Vietnam. F PN

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CREPES A GO GO EMMANUELLE AND MARCO ANGELINO arrived in New Zealand in 2008 with a dream of sharing French street food with New Zealanders. Originally from Marseille and Aix-en-Provence but in love with Brittany, the couple started in Wellington with the Manners Mall shop, a petite ‘hole in the wall’ stand decorated in traditional French Art Nouveau style. From businessmen to students, locals to strolling tourists, everybody adopted the concept, making Manners Mall a very popular place at lunchtime. Two years later they opened a larger shop in Petone, Lower Hutt, and then began to look north for other opportunities. That opportunity came in the form of a corner of Ponsonby Central’s Produce Market. Marco and Emmanuelle packed up their life, and with their two year old son Atlas, moved swiftly to Auckland. Crêpes a Go Go opened in Ponsonby Central in May and they haven’t looked back.

DUCT TAPE WORKSHOP

Already sourcing most of their ingredients either locally or nationally; organic buckwheat flour from the South Island, free-range eggs, top quality New Zealand cheddar cheese and free-farmed ham to name a few, the couple were thrilled to be right in amongst great suppliers like Ceres, Neat Meat and The Dairy.

Who is Duct Tape Workshop? Duct Tape is the brainchild of electrical engineer Guang Han. Together with his team of experts, the aim is to change the way phones and tablets are fixed; creating a workshop where the customer can actually see the repair work being done.

“Overall we try using the highest quality local ingredients we can; we use Cadbury’s chocolate, we make our own caramel, but there are some things we still choose to import directly from France, such as the Blue D’Auvergne” explains Marco.

What is Duct Tape Workshop's philosophy? “Fixing devices with express, care and quality”. Duct Tape Workshop is a result of doing what we love; working with electronics. For us consumer electronics are much more than just objects, they're things that people develop a relationship with, these pieces of amazing innovation have changed our lives so much over the last decade, and we want to reflect that in our philosophy and approach to our work.

This is used to create the Blue Rendez-Vous; a savoury gallette (the term for the gluten free buckwheat crêpe) with a delicious combination of blue cheese, cheddar, sliced mushrooms, and a drizzle of olive oil. Another savoury standout is the Norwegian Catch; smoked salmon, cream cheese and chives, and there’s any number of sweet crêpes to choose from. From the classic lemon and sugar to the extravagant Strawberry Love (pictured). From the composition of the traditional sweet and savoury batter recipes, to the time and température of cooking, Marco and Emmanuelle do their very best to provide the ultimate crêpe. You can even buy a six pack of pre-packed crêpes to take home and impress. www.crepesagogo.co.nz www.facebook.com/crepesgogo.nz

L to R: Joel Garman, Jia Han, Alexis Mahdali, Peter Wang and Guang Han

How are you different to other repair stores out there? Duct Tape Workshop is about more than just repairing phones and computers. We've set our focus on building a perfectly executed and above all enjoyable customer experience. Our team is always there to offer advice and opinion on the latest devices and software, to spend time explaining the latest update, or simply to show you how to change a few settings; it’s all part of the service. The appreciation we get back is well worth the time put in. What's new at Duct Tape? Our website www.ducttape.co.nz! We wanted to evolve the customer's in-store relationship to an online one, and launched our cool new website in June. Our aim was to create an easy-to-use online repair booking tool, so you can order and pay for same day repairs and services. Everyone who uses our online service is offered free courier pick up and delivery in Central Auckland and free return for all other areas. So the customer experience of our service is easy, fast, convenient, and hassle free; and you don’t even need to leave home or the office. Is there any advice you can share? Apparently dropping your phone in a puddle is more common than you think, water damage is a major issue for personal devices and unfortunately there is a lot of misleading information on the internet. Putting your water damaged phone or tablet in a bag of rice definitely doesn't work to dry it out, it may work for a week or a month, but eventually corrosion will destroy the interior connections. Taking it to a professional repairer to get it cleaned out is the best way to save it!

Emmanuelle and Marco Angelino

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www.ducttape.co.nz T: 09 361 1234 PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


EAT, DRINK + BE MERRY DEAR JERVOIS IT’S ALL ABOUT GOOD FOOD ‘Dear Jervois’ is an expression of endearment for the community of Herne Bay. Just like their counterpart Little King, nestled in the heart of Milford and now much loved by the locals, owner David Lee wanted to pay homage to the urbanites across the bridge. So with Coffee Supreme on their list they knew the next thing was to simply offer good food. They designed the menu with consideration for vegans and vegetarians as well as creating plenty of gluten free, dairy free and wheat free options. Their eggs, bacon and chicken are free range, while Be Good Organics is just one of their suppliers that provide them with organic, top quality ingredients for their smoothies, fast becoming the breakfast pick-me-up for locals. At Dear Jervois there are also a number of other dishes to over indulge in from a range of waffles (with gluten free mix) - always high in demand - or sweet goodies from the cabinet: organic cakes from The Raw Kitchen and award winning cookies from Andre’s Kitchen. Special to Dear Jervois are dishes like the Be Good Vegan and the Tofu Croquette and Soba Noodle Salad - made with super food ingredients and a taste experience that won’t disappoint. So come in for some seriously good food, a feel-good smoothie or the daily single origin on offer, brewed just right every time. DEAR JERVOIS, 234 Jervois Road, T: 09 376 7278 www.dearjervois.com

BE GOOD VEGAN - vegetarian and gluten free. Quinoa, brown rice, beetroot, kimchi, pumpkin, coriander, sesame seeds, drizzled with cashew aioli

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PONSONBY NEWS READERS ARE EVERYWHERE

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2 1. Shale Chambers, Chair of the Waitemata Local Board is in Europe having a well deserved break. He writes, “A familiar (and rather hot) Ponsonby News reader and contributor photo for your consideration. This is me earlier this week at ancient Delphi, the hillside tribute to the God Apollo in central GREECE.”

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Dear readers please keep sending us your holiday snaps reading your favourite magazine, we love getting them! Photos need to be in high resolution (300dpi), so please email them to info@ponsonbynews.co.nz without reducing the size.

2. Glenn White sent us several shots and told us: “This is the Chabo restaurant Shizuoka - The restaurant only seats 16 people so we had it to ourselves”. How exclusive ‘our lovely Good Witch!’ 3. Our lovely Good Witch, Glenn White, wrote, “I am sending you some photos from JAPAN and a quick update on fun and work. My copy of Ponsonby News is getting quite tatty as it has been read by all the staff at the clinic and now they insist we take it out every night for photos in every restaurant, bar and saki bar we visit in Shizuoka. This photo shows staff at the Duckling Dental clinic in Shizuoka, the owner Masaaki Shioda sits on my left and his daughter Arisa on my right.”

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ANY PAGE IN PONSONBY NEWS IS A GOOD PLACE TO BE SEEN

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TRAVEL BREAKS: THE NEW THERAPY!

THE CANALS OF FRANCE By Kate Gohar, Director, World Journeys There is no better way to reach the cultural heart of France than through wine and cuisine, amidst ancient villages, centuries old vineyards and picturesque waterways. Take a luxury barge cruise along the tranquil canals of France, and experience life from a truly unique perspective. Transformed from working vessels into intimate ‘floating hotels’, these barges offer private cabins, a sun deck, often a spa pool, and a full crew including tour guide and master chef! Sit back, relax, and enjoy gourmet cuisine, fine wines, and the company of fellow passengers. Tour historic castles, chateaux, vineyards and markets, and spend time in local villages. One of the best regions for barging is Burgundy, home to some of the world's finest wines and arguably the prettiest canal in France. Sitting on the deck of a luxury barge, sipping a glass of Cote de Nuits whilst cruising through vineyards of Pinot Noir grapes is the perfect holiday for a wine lover. Your captain is a wine expert and will take you to Clos de Vougeot, headquarters of the esteemed Chevaliers du Tastevin, and to Beaune's oldest winery. Wines aside, the fascinating history and architecture of the region can also be explored, from the 13th century Chateau de Commarin, home of 26 generations of French aristocracy, to the fortified outpost of Chateauneuf en Auxois.

fortifications and famed vineyards. Lined with plane trees and crossed by pretty arched bridges, the Mediterranean weather and pace of life is relaxed and lulls you into unwinding as you cruise sedately along. Perfect for cycling or walking along scenic canals, or simply watching the scenery pass by, in the distance you can see the Pyrenees, whereas closer to hand are vineyards and chateaux offering private wine tastings. A visit to the walled city of Carcassonne, the most complete medieval fortified city in existence, adds historical flavour to the journey. Cuisine en route is obviously a highlight, and can be a delicious combination of both Provencal and traditional flavours. Fresh seafood and regional specialities with the excellent local Corbieres and Minervois wines produce an unforgettable repertoire of meals.

The upper Burgundy Canal offers pleasant cruising between the classic towns of Tonnerre and Venarey. Accompany the master chef to the market and meet the locals who are so proud of their produce, or visit L'Abbaye de Fontenay for a taste of history. Then taste the wine at Saint Bris le Vineaux after touring the Chablis vineyards where it was grown.

Barging is also available in the Loire Valley, Gascony, Bordeaux and beyond, with week -long cruises departing from May to October. As barges accommodate from 6 to 12 passengers, you can simply book a cabin, or charter the whole barge for family or a small group of friends.

Also perfect for barging is the 300 year old Canal du Midi which skirts the sun-drenched shores of the Mediterranean before meandering inland through small villages, Roman

So go barging, and discover a side of France the coach tours don’t! F PN

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ROSS THORBY: SEA FEVER

Pisco sours and Chilean maidens We recently celebrated Waitangi Day, New Zealand’s National holiday. Unlike Australia Day, there were no great parties held in the Wintergarden and no great hordes of drunken Aussies running berserk throughout the ship. We are more sedate, us Kiwis, a quiet nod to our country’s coming of age and perhaps a whispered toast in the Midships bar amongst compatriots... for there are only six of us on board. Tomorrow the ship will dock in Valparaiso Chile and our leg across the Pacific will begin in earnest. Yesterday was one of the last chances to experience the hospitality and friendliness of the Chileans in Puerto Montt. It didn’t disappoint. I did a ship excursion to the Petrohue Falls and Lake Esmeralda, which also included a lunch at Lake Llanquihue. We were met at the port gates by our guide Pellar, a compact but perfectly formed example of local womanhood. She immediately assailed us with the self-depreciating humour of the Chileans and we were entertained on the long drive to the lake with stories of her country’s past, the gold rush, the Conquistadors, and the gauchos of the region, all while she lamented the sad lack of ‘talent’ amongst local men and cast predatory eyes over us, her charges for the next seven hours.

Guide Pellar and Ross Thorby at Esmeralda Lake

The “attached” male members of our group found themselves clutched tighter by their respective spouses and those few of us single ones gave considerable attention to whatever was passing by the window whenever she glanced in our direction. A big local feature of the area is a huge volcano, think Mount Fujiyama but more impressive. That is, if you could see it. It would appear that the brochures and tourist information about this mountain are misleading. They all feature beautiful photographs of it glowing in the sun. Sadly, it spends 90% of its time cloaked in a layer of cloud and today appeared to be no exception. Lake Esmeralda turned out to be a beautiful luminescent green, its waters rich in copper and we were treated to a scenic catamaran ride around its shores admiring the large private cribs lining it and a beautiful forest filling the landscape as it extended into the upper reaches of the fjord. The waterfalls, although not Brazil’s Iguaco, were impressive and we watched the ship’s crew fill up a jet boat and fly up and down the rapids; not something for the fainthearted.

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Of course hanging over us was the ever threatening and omniscient presence of the volcano behind the clouds and every so often there would be a small break and we would be treated to a tantalising glimpse of a snow covered peak; just enough for a quick grab of the camera only to have the shot snatched away before you could capture it. All the time, Pellar bounded about the bus complimenting the men and doing a quick tally of age, profession and bank balance, whilst managing to keep up the banter, local legends, local heroes and still, sadly, the lack of local talent and the difficulty of finding any man to settle down with. We sped along the highway on to our lunch at a beautiful town impersonating a Bavarian alpine village set on the edges of a lake, Puerto Vallas. We were driven to the large German Schloss on the hill overlooking the area for a spectacular Chilean lunch. Unfortunately, as we entered the premises a large ‘Pisco Sour’ was settled in our hands and that was where it started... or finished for a number of us. Made of fermented grape skins and lime juice and worshipped as the national drink in Chile, I discovered to my horror later, that after three of these things your legs didn’t work and four? I suspect Pellar could have been shopping for a wedding dress. Maybe that was the plan. As we sped along the highway on our return to the ship, my drunken slumber was disturbed by a cry from the rear of the bus and I looked out of the window to see the volcano summit completely clear of cloud. We all fell off the vehicle to stare in wonder without a moment to spare before it quickly disappeared again. Later we again felt further honoured, for it seemed the whole city had turned out to see the ship depart. Amongst the flashing of many cameras and the band playing on the waterfront we started for Valparaiso. Alas, standing amongst them was Pellar. I suspect PN her search for a foreign husband is set to continue. (ROSS THORBY) F

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PONSONBY NEWS READERS ARE EVERYWHERE 4. Glenn White, better known as The Good Witch of Ponsonby spent time last month in JAPAN... and he has sent us some snaps! This one is at Yoshinozushi - sushi restaurant in Shizuokka. The owner, Oshio, tells Glenn, the restaurant opened 70 years ago and is the best sushi restaurant in Japan - who am I to argue? Says Glenn, “It was certainly the best sushi and sashimi I have ever eaten by a mile.” 5. Manjyu at his café Spice cafe Modhaju in Shizuoka, JAPAN. Manjyu is originally from Sri Lanka. PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


TRAVEL BREAKS: THE NEW THERAPY!

THE RIDGE COUNTRY LODGE FOR SALE If you enjoy food and entertaining then this is an opportunity for you to escape the rat race and own a boutique country lodge. The Ridge Country Lodge is in a private location set high on a ridge above the historic village of Puhoi with views over hundreds of acres of native bush and out to the ocean. Over the last 10 years the current owners have established a reputation for exceptional food and hosting, with just three suites and dining for eight it’s a great place to meet new people from all over the world in an informal atmosphere of understated luxury. The lodge was purpose built and comprises of three guest bedrooms, all with en-suites, a large lounge with an open fire, dining room and a chefs kitchen, upstairs there is a private owners apartment comprising of a lounge, bedroom, bathroom and office. The business is being sold as a going concern - effectively a ‘turnkey’ operation so there is everything down to the tea spoons included in the sale. As the business has been run solely as a lifestyle business there is a huge opportunity to grow the turnover should the new owner wish to do so.

ANOTHER MOTHER’S LOVE LAUNCHED AT THE WOMEN’S BOOKSHOP THE LATE JUNE LAUNCH OF KAREN SCOTT’S HEART-WRENCHING BOOK, ANOTHER Mother’s Love, detailing her arduous experience of foster parenting, was a fitting tribute and denouement to a long and emotional journey for Karen and her family.

The asking price for the property and business chattels is $1,195,000 plus GST if any, for a GST registered buyer the purchase would be GST zero rated. For more information about this unique opportunity and to arrange a viewing call Ian PN Bateman on M: 0275 999 077 or email: relax@theridge.co.nz F THE RIDGE COUNTRY LODGE www.theridge.co.nz

Held just one week after the embargo lifted on Karen’s book and a flurry of prime-time media interviews had sparked an overwhelming level of positive feedback from the New Zealand public, the mood at The Women’s Bookshop was one of respect and admiration for author and publisher. After her hearty, inimitable welcome, Women’s Bookshop owner Carole Beu said how proud she was to host the launch for such an important book. Debra Millar, Publishing Manager from Penguin Group NZ, spoke of her company’s decision to publish Karen’s book, despite the difficult subject matter and the issues of privacy it presented. Debra felt that Karen’s story needed to be told, to highlight the difficulties faced by foster parents in their attempts to nurture children often deeply troubled by past events in their short lives. At the launch Karen read out some moving responses she had received from other foster parents who had undergone similar experiences. Immediately prior to the book being published and as a courtesy, Debra Millar sent copies of Another Mother’s Love to the Minister for Social Development, Paula Bennett, in the hope that Karen’s story would provide a greater understanding of the real issues faced by CYF children and caregivers. F PN

L to R: Karen Scott, author of Another Mother’s Love; Lisa Fitzpatrick, Penguin NZ Marketing Manager; Lindsey Kilgour The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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FASHION + STYLE RETAIL SUPERSTAR Melinda Hikuroa MOOCHI CONSERVATORY, PONSONBY ROAD How did you come to be a retail salesperson? I was always interested in fashion and started out working casually at moochi over summer. I love being able to help people feel more confident and I enjoy the fast paced nature of retail. It’s constantly changing and evolving, so, no day is the same for me. What brought you to moochi? My gorgeous flatmate manages our High Street store. She was always saying what an amazing company moochi is to work for and the position became available. I had major wardrobe envy and really wanted a new challenge so I went for it. What do you love about your store? I love the vibe at conservatory. The store is smaller which allows us to offer a more personal, one-on-one shopping experience and our team is passionate about styling and building a rapport with our customers. What makes a standout retail salesperson? Someone who is genuine about helping you find the right pieces to suit your style and lifestyle plus willing to go that little bit further to make it happen.

JOIN A FASHIONABLE CULT Fashionistas and budding designers, ready your needles - entries for Cult Couture are now open. Now in its 13th year, Cult Couture is a runway show and fashion awards event celebrating creative and innovative fashion design in Aotearoa. The 2014 theme, Fabrik Navigators has five categories: Recycled Revolution, Formally Yours, Flight of Fantasy, ‘I’dentity and Urbanesia. Designer entries should be original pieces and students, graduates, emerging artists and designers are eligible to enter. The total prize pool is $9,500 with the Supreme Award winner also winning a manufacturing contract with Equinox Apparel Ltd. to support their blossoming fashion career. With last year’s record number of entries the bar has been set high for 2014 and this year’s judges, Doris de Pont (NZ Fashion Museum), Lindah Lepou (Pacific Couture Designer) and Dan Ahwa (Canvas Magazine, NZ Herald) will have their work cut out for them. Visit www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz for more information on categories and how to PN submit your details. F

Tell us about a memorable sale you’ve made this year.. Working with brides-to-be is always memorable. It can be quite stressful choosing bridesmaids’ dresses but our store makes it easy and I love being a part of that process. We offer a private consultation to view our bridesmaid collection and the group all gets to enjoy a glass of bubbles while they view and try.

Competition dates: Friday 1 August - entries close Friday 21 November - runway and fashion awards

If you could wave your wand and have anyone in the world walk into your store right now, who would it be? Pip Edwards [Australian designer, stylist and street-style Instagrammer]. I am obsessed with her effortless style and ability to juggle being a fashion industry powerhouse and single mum.

DEBUT EARRING COLLECTION FROM CATHY POPE

If you could wave your wand and have anyone in greater Ponsonby walk into your store right now, who would it be? My sister! She works at the Jervois Steakhouse and even though we work just minutes from each other life can be so busy. Where do you shop/enjoy shopping? moochi of course! I also love the diversity of shops in Ponsonby - I love browsing through Flotsam & Jetsam for hidden gems as well as the great variety of homeware and fashion boutiques Name someone you think is a great greater Ponsonby retail salesperson... The team at Little Bird’s unbakery. Their service is always amazing; super friendly staff and great food. F PN

With ball season in full swing, a beautiful yet realistically priced piece of jewellery is on the radar of many women. Cathy Pope Jewellery has recently released a new line of earrings in a myriad of lush jewel tones, set in gold and silver. The earrings' antique design was inspired by a pair Cathy inherited many years ago. Her own interpretation is designed in oval-clawed settings with amethyst, onyx, citrine, green amethyst and green quartz. Simple, bold, modern and timeless, the debut earring collection is priced from $189. F PN CATHY POPE JEWELLERY www.cathypope.co.nz

MOOCHI CONSERVATORY, 282 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 9 378 7577 www.moochi.co.nz

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taylor at Audi’s The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

BMW MD Nina Englert, Dan Gosling, Dame Pieter Stewart and Josh Emmett with the NZFW New Gen Designers DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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ANGELA LASSIG: LETTERS FROM MAUDIE The monthly jottings of a free-spirited Ponsonby dressmaker of the 1920s, as imagined by Angela Lassig. VERMONT STREET, PONSONBY 15 JULY 1925

Dearest Mabs, Thank you for your letter and especially for the gossip about Alice! What a minx for getting herself so entangled! Mabs dear... I’m not so sure that it was such a good idea to include that clipping from the Sydney paper. As a consequence, I’ve spent quite a few hours daydreaming about what it might be like living in a ‘dinky’ houseboat on a lake in Kashmir. I really love the description of being on the lake in the evenings... all the little boats lit up, the water lapping, sounds of distant singing and the delightful scent of exotic flowers... it sends shivers up my spine thinking about it![i] Of course the grey drizzly days don’t help in dispelling the fantasy! Perhaps you and I should investigate the idea further? I won’t tell Rupert about our fantasy if you promise not to tell George! One day we’ll simply disappear for a month and come home with armfuls of exotic fabrics and jewels and perhaps a rajah in tow! I mentioned the idea to the Mulvany sisters, both intrepid travellers, and they were most encouraging. Of course I wasn’t really serious, but they were! Speaking of the Mulvanys, I must tell you that I did end up ordering some tweed from Sybil Mulvany to make a coat for mother’s birthday. Sybil took only three days to weave just the amount I needed and allowed me to select the colours. I think I told you I was keen on a heathery pink? I eventually decided on a pale mushroom pink with a nut-brown fleck and it looks quite lovely made up. I know mother was delighted and I think a little astonished that I’d actually put some thought and planning into her present this year. When I went in to pick up the tweed, Sybil’s sister Josephine was weaving a length of brown and pink striped silk destined to be stoles. The stripes are uneven in width with no stripe wider than one inch, the narrowest being only an eighth of an inch. Jo could see that I was tempted and offered me not only a generous discount, but the opportunity to pay it off over two months... as a thank you, she said, for inspiring the colour combination. How could I refuse? My stole should be ready in a week but I shan’t be able to give it an outing until the spring... which gives me time to make a frock to do it justice.

rather busy this month with his cabinetmaking business. Word seems to have spread that he’s finished his apprenticeship and is now fully able to work on things by himself. His father is always on hand to assist with tricky projects but he seems to be doing well for himself. Sadly I don’t think that he’ll have time to make trifles for me anymore but it’s better for him to be paid for his efforts in money (rather than fudge!) I need to have the front garden tidied by next Saturday as my friend Harriett[ii], a music teacher, has talked me into hosting a little musical evening for a few acquaintances so she can hone her performance skills. She wants to start playing in public again and is a little nervous about it so I’ve assembled a friendly little group for her to impress. I’ve invited my milliner friends the Nankervis[iii] sisters and Mary and Jenny Bremner[iv] who are both dressmakers. I’ll put on a little supper after which we shall be serenaded by a selection of lovely violin pieces to soothe our rattled nerves. I’m quite looking forward to it. I was going to bake something nice for the supper but as I know I won’t have time or inclination when Saturday comes, I’m going to order two delicious cakes from Adams Bell,[v] one of which most certainly will be a chocolate cake. Oh dear, Tiger has just rushed into the house with very muddy paws. During this hideous weather I’ve been shutting him out on the verandah during the day to avoid this very problem but I must have left the door open when I came in to make a cup of tea. At least the hall carpets will be safe... I laid old sheets over them just in case this very thing happened! I’m now being prodded and nuzzled by Tiger who has also just dropped his ball at my feet. I think he’s trying to tell me something! Well dearest, until next time,

How’s your garden? Mine is a shambles with all the wet weather. I have bones protruding where bulbs should be emerging - thanks to Tiger - and I haven’t had time to cut back my roses and other shrubs yet. I shall have to bribe George to spend this weekend tidying up things... he doesn’t seem to mind if I make him a nice lunch and have a few treats on hand to have with his tea. He’s been

+ July NEWS NEWS 2014 + 58 PONSONBY PONSONBY PARISH

Love Maudie xx [i] Lovely letter by Dorothy MacGillivray ‘From a Houseboat at Kashmir’, published in the Sydney Morning Herald, Friday 24 July 1925, p. 5 (see http://trove.nla.gov.au to read in full) [ii] Miss Harriett Camilla Goodwin, 4 Bella Vista Road, Ponsonby (in 1925) [iii] Misses Nankervis, 265 Ponsonby Road (in 1925) [iv] Misses M. & J. Bremner, 210 Jervois Road, Ponsonby (in 1925) [v] Adams, Bell & Co Ltd, cake shop, Ponsonby Building, Ponsonby Road

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)

illustration: Michael McClintock

Speaking of spring... I’m already starting to jot down ideas as I work on my winter orders. My sample gowns for winter were so successful that I’m going to repeat the idea for spring. The coats and suits were especially popular and I’ve quite a few orders to get through before the end of the month. Have you given any thought to doing this yourself ? After the spring I’ll sit down and actually work out whether this extra effort is worth it financially. By the way I’ll be sending your coat in a fortnight. I have one more customer who wishes to see the samples but I suspect she’ll decide that it’s too late to order another ensemble. Hopefully you’ll still get a lot of wear out of it, not that I’m wishing a longer winter on you!


FASHION + STYLE the renewed sense of optimism around the industry. Sylvester comments, “It’s so great to be showing again this year. We love doing shows and this being our 21st birthday, we really want to celebrate, not just ourselves but the industry that has nurtured and supported us.”

Kate Sylvester, Australian Fashion Week, 2009

KATE SYLVESTER TO RETURN TO NEW ZEALAND FASHION WEEK KATE SYLVESTER HAS CONFIRMED HER RETURN TO NEW ZEALAND FASHION WEEK IN August this year (Monday 25 August - Sunday 1 September). The designer’s involvement is significant after a five year absence from the event and reflective, organisers say, of

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

NZFW Managing Director Dame Pieter Stewart is excited about having Kate Sylvester back on board this year. “Kate Sylvester is one of New Zealand fashion’s heavy hitters showing during the week... her distinctive signature style of modern femininity attracts a very loyal customer and her show is sure to be one of the highlights of this year’s event.” Kate Sylvester will show her Autumn Winter 2015 collection at a private catwalk show for Fashion Week delegates and buyers on Wednesday 27 August. The fashion loving public will have the chance to see Kate Sylvester on the catwalk at the Resene Designer Selection Shows and at the Friday afternoon group DS show and Corporate Lunch. Public sales to a packed schedule of entertainment throughout the weekend of NZFW will be available from early July. F PN

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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FASHION + STYLE: JULIE ROULSTON

A la française French fashion: always beautifully made from good quality fabric, elegantly put together and often styled with a note of humour or individuality. Inspired by this month’s Vive la France theme we asked Ponsonby fashion designers and retailers to share their best French and French-inspired fashion, in-store now.

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7 1. tkstore Pentagon Suit available in black or navy (French Navy naturellement): Blazer $469 Pant $289; 2. Clare Vivier ‘Julie’ bag $349; 3. taylor Focus Dress $657 (instore late July); 4. Workshop Mens Brushed Flannel Striped Overshirt $298; 5. Lanvin sunglasses $450; 6. etre Cecile sweat $189; 7. twenty-seven names ‘i’m lost’ applique sweater (je suis perdu is French for ‘I’m lost’)” $350; 8. Lacoste Live sweat $165; 9. Workshop Denim Merino Breton Dress $289 Stockists: Clare Vivier www.superette.co.nz; etre cecile www.superette.co.nz; Lacoste Live www.superette.co.nz; Lanvin sunglasses www.sunglasshut.com; www.taylorboutique.co.nz; www.tkstore.com; www.twentysevennames.co.nz; www.workshop.co.nz

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FASHION + STYLE THE GEMSTONE FOR JULY Donna Mills, owner of Jewels and Gems, introduces us to the qualities of the gemstone, Amethyst. The information comes from the scientifically conducted trials of German stone specialist Michael Gienger. Amethyst is, to my mind, the most powerful stone on earth, the king of crystals. It grows inside the pockets left by boiling lava after a volcanic eruption. The deepest purple colour comes from Uruguay. Amethyst encourages spirituality and insight, imbuing justness and honesty. It helps quiet the mind, bringing peace and allowing our inner wisdom and intuition to guide us. It is the best stone for sadness, loss and grief. By helping to clear the inner world of busy impressions, it aids in a deeper, more refreshing sleep. It heightens concentration and awareness, helping us to think and act more consciously, and overcome blocks which cause uncontrolled or addictive behaviour. Physically, it is a supernova, healing the nervous system, pain, tension, headaches, injuries, bruises, swellings, respiratory tract, skin, intestines. It regulates the flora of the large intestine, encouraging digestion and re-absorption of water. It can be worn over a long period, as a bead necklace or pendant next to the skin. PN Everyone should have one! I never travel without it. F JEWELS AND GEMS, 54 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 378 4389 www.jewelsandgems.co.nz

ANY PAGE IN PONSONBY NEWS IS A GOOD PLACE TO BE SEEN

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FASHION + STYLE TRELISE COOPER SUMMER 2015 MEDIA LAUNCH MONDAY 16 JUNE, MEEKONG BABY Trelise Cooper held a morning show of her Trelise Cooper, Cooper and COOP ranges with the phrase of the day being ‘maximalism.’ The Trelise Cooper Summer 2015 collection takes its cues from the iconic Diana Vreeland, swapping effortlessness and restraint for lavish and inspiring. Guests included Dame Pieter Stewart of New Zealand Fashion Week, and singer Elizabeth Marvelly. F PN

Dame Trelise Cooper and models

L to R: Dame Pieter Stewart and Leigh Matheson; Caitlin Harrison and Lulu Wilcox; Lizzie Marvelly and Rachel Ramsay

ANY PAGE IN PONSONBY NEWS IS A GOOD PLACE TO BE SEEN

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FASHION + STYLE MANDYB - WINTER COLLECTION 2014 Mandy Barker is proud to showcase her new MandyB collection now in-store. Since her debut into fashion with the MandyB label in 2011, Mandy has continued to present clean, simple and modern designs with a twist, all proudly designed and manufactured in New Zealand. The new winter collection is warm and vibrant with its rich colours and luxurious wools and silks. As always, Mandy’s focus on good fit, form and function comes through in these pieces, they are all very easy to wear and have a smart, sophisticated feel about them. The collection includes some beautifully tailored jackets and wool and faux fur cardigans but still keeps a classic element with the Diana pant and timeless dress. MandyB is available online and from a selection of boutiques nationwide - including the MANDYB flagship store at Thread Design in Grey Lynn. F PN www.mandyb.co.nz

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COPY DEADLINE: Sunday, 20 July PUBLISHED: Friday, 1 August

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TO BOOK ADVERTISING: ask about our special positions! Jo Barrett on 021 324 510 or t: 09 361 3356 or 09 378 8553 e: joannebarrett@xtra.co.nz w: www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

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HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY

Caring for your skin over winter... from the ankles down I always have various foot creams and balms on hand to massage in post-bath and pre-bed, usually when I’m glued to the couch watching rubbish telly, a glass of pinot noir in hand. It is amazing the difference that the - healthy - habit has made to my tootsies, and it is a ritual that really amps up over winter when soft woolly socks come into the equation - pure heaven! As well as a right treat, regularly using a quality foot cream makes beauty sense: I figure when you’re shelling out serious money for a professional to ensure your toes look great every few weeks, why let the side down with manky old heels? One of the most luxurious formulas I’ve tried of late comes from Guinot in the form of Longue Vie Pieds foot cream - the legendary French brand’s first beauty cream made to protect, soften, and soothe feet. It contains an incredible 56 biological active ingredients that deeply penetrate the skin to help stimulate cell renewal and repair cracked, dry, and blistered feet, and it smells like pure heaven. It also leaves no greasy residue, making it easy to get in bed or put on shoes immediately after use. From what I’ve experienced it leaves feet looking and feeling better after just one application too, which gets two thumbs up from me. Its key ingredients are Liposkin to nourish and rebuild the skin’s hydrolipidic film (the foot’s natural protective barrier), while D-Panthenol strengthens nails and a combination of sweet almond oil and shea butter nourish and hydrate. Last up, Microcidine deodorises and sanitises, and Allantoin relieves blistered feet. Magnifique! I have to admit that there are a lot of foot-related products out there claiming a lot more than they deliver, as well. Thankfully, one of the best value numbers on the market - Manuka Doctor ApiNourish Foot & Heel Cream - is not one of them! Harnessing the skin rewarding, all good powers of UMF 18+ manuka honey, this tube of foot-loving goodness from Manuka Doctor is a super rich and beautiful to use moisture rich formula that pretty much instantly nourishes the skin on your feet. Great when lathered on at the end of the day, ApiNourish Foot & Heel Cream has a cooling effect from the addition of peppermint to its formula, whilst moisturising shea butter and avocado oil leave feet feeling soft, supple and just plain soothed. It’s definitely a winner in my book, and at $19.75 for 75ml won’t break the bank.

At the more luxe end of the market, Jo Malone’s Vitamin E Gel - $190 for 30ml - is a little steeper on the price front but by golly, she’s a joy to use. It is a nourishing moisturiser for dry, dehydrated skin that can be used wherever and whenever, and contains natural conditioners - wheat germ oil, sweet almond oil and apricot kernel oil - as well as highly emollient, vitamin-packed avocado oil to help replenish and smooth. The gel also works as a barrier to help protect the skin against further environmental damage. Clinique’s Deep Comfort Body Lotion is also another multi-use product that definitely delivers, with a super lightweight yet moisturising formula that amps up the hydration levels and lasts all day. Smooth to the touch, it’s a deliciously milky lotion that spreads easily and absorbs quickly too, making it a winner when it comes to dressing straight after application. The formula includes vitamin C and vitamin E to help protect skin from external irritants, plus Murumuru Butter to help rebuild the skin’s protective barrier so it can defend itself against external assaults and retain more of its natural moisture. For something completely different, Mecca Cosmetica stocks Talika Feet Therapy Socks, which have an RRP of $110.00, can be reused up to 30 times and are quite the handy pair to have around. The French company’s Feet Therapy Socks soften, heal and condition dry, calloused feet simply by slipping them on for 20 minutes per day. The lightweight bamboofibre booties are lined with a very clever gel matrix polymer, which slowly releases encapsulated ingredients and allows their gradual absorption into the skin. The formula contains nutrients like vitamin E, ceramides, and botanical oils such as jojoba, grapeseed, avocado, olive, almond, and brazil nut, which work together to deliver quite the result. For an extra intense treatment you can apply a favourite cream before slipping on Talika Feet Therapy Socks, which conveniently have anti-skid soles so you can walk around during the treatment or simply relax. So, keep up the good work over winter and just in time for sandal season you’ll be sporting the best pair of pieds in town… or when you hit some tropical locale during the winter months you’ll go sneaker PN free with pride! (HELENE RAVLICH) F

OCTOBER 1989 - OCTOBER 2014

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Years For more information or to book your advertising contact: Jo Barrett on 021 324 510 or t: 09 361 3356 or 09 378 8553 e: joannebarrett@xtra.co.nz w: www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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CLARE CALDWELL: THE ART OF LIVING EVERY SO OFTEN I COME ACROSS A PERSON IN MY HOSPICE WORK who epitomises and encapsulates one of the basic tenets of art and art therapy - that art is a primal and eloquent expression from deep within us, unfettered, unapologetic and healing, transcending everything else we are and helping us redefine ourselves as humans. I first met Peter Ralph or “Scruff” following a phone call asking me if I’d come in and talk with a patient who was an artist, because we “speak the same language.” What followed was an extraordinary exchange of creative energy, empathy and ideas as Scruff showed me some examples of his art. Later that week he discharged himself and I went to his flat to see other and bigger versions of his work. His photographs are huge and saturated with seductively beautiful sweeps of colour. Taken throughout his years as artist and performer, and as roadie and minder for such celebrities as Blondie and David Bowie, they capture a life lived on the road, filled with musicians, lightshows and endless concerts. But these are not just snapshots. In these Scruff plays with light and colour, moving, merging, blurring, utilising the laws of chance, capturing the transience of moments in time, and, more poignantly now, of life itself. These images have a dream-like quality, some so abstracted as to become pure form and colour. I was blown away by the innate power and subtlety of an expression of ideas beyond words. This work takes us out of the limitations of just mind, word and thought, and into the realm of the unspoken, the indefinable, the primal impulse: our subconscious. While much of his earlier life was spent involved in violent crime, prison time and the practice of the occult, Scruff found the deeper he probed into the dark, the arcane, the more he felt enlightened by another contradictory experience... a surreal calling, like a bucket being lowered down to drag him out of the well of hate and darkness he had fallen into. So emerged the shaman, the healer, guide and minder. In this period of contradiction and uncertainty he chose a new direction and found his new anchors and vehicles of expression - art and music. Mercy Hospice Auckland is currently organising a major exhibition of Scruff’s work at the actual hospice which unfortunately, by the time this issue of Ponsonby News comes out, will be over. He is however planning to try and have two huge books of his photographs published before he passes away and is seeking funding accordingly. I hope many of you managed to come and see Scruff’s wonderful work and to meet the equally wonderful man himself - he’s every bit as colourful as his artwork! (CLARE CALDWELL) F PN Clare (Claudie) Caldwell is a creative arts therapist who runs a small private practice from home. She is voluntary team leader of creative arts as therapy at Mercy Hospice Auckland, College Hill, where she has worked for the last 10 years. She is also a freelance artist.

BIRD OF THE MONTH The blue duck (whio) is one of few fast flowing stream ducks in the world. They have evolved a unique suite of features that make them capable of inhabiting their exclusive and complex territories. Whio are found in the forested upper catchments of New Zealand rivers. They are one of our most endangered waterfowl with possibly fewer than 2000 individuals remaining. Streamlined heads and large webbed feet allow the blue ducks to feed in and inhabit the fast moving rivers. Forested streams are the perfect environment for them, having high quality water, stable banks and a diverse and healthy invertebrate community. Blue ducks also require boulders as well as the other river attributes and because of this the ducks are often indicators of river health, as their presence implies that many of these features are present in adequate quantities. Blue ducks were once plentiful throughout New Zealand but are now considerably less widespread, with a small number of unmodified catchments remaining. The high requirements of the species mean that few rivers still remain healthy enough to facilitate blue duck breeding and territories. The remaining populations of blue duck are fragmented and isolated from one another. There is also a continuing decline in these areas of suitable habitats. On top of this is the difficulty of breeding and nest building for fast flowing river species like blue duck. Nests are built in log-jams or in riverside vegetation, and made from twigs, grass and down, meaning they are at risk of flooding. Stoats and other predators also harm whio populations and competition with introduced fowl may have pushed them further upriver into the less ideal habitats of upper river catchments. Unlike other waterfowl, blue ducks spend their entire lives in their home rivers - including raising their young. They have webbed feet and solid claws that allow control in fast water and on rough banks and boulders. The young are born with large feet and strong legs to equip them to a tough early life in fast flowing rivers and on large rocks and debris. They can appear similar to numerous non-native duck species, at a distance they are dull, grey and of a similar size to mallards or grey ducks. But upon further investigation they are easily identified by their single colour and red/brown chest or if they are on the water by an upwards tilted tail. They form long-term pairs and defend their territories aggressively against other blue ducks or species. Perhaps the best place to see blue duck (apart from Auckland Zoo) is at the Blue Duck Station in the Ruapehu District. It is situated on the banks of the Whanganui and Retaruke rivers and is within the grounds of the Whanganui National Park. The station has one of the largest populations of whio relative to its size in New Zealand and it is dedicated to increasing the population of these birds. They are home to bats, kiwi and weta and are actively improving the environment, including forest regeneration and water quality enhancement. They have numerous activities and walks to interest the PN whole family. (FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT) F

photography: Herb Christophers, Department of Conservation

Enquiries: T: 09 836 3618; M: 021 293 3171; E: clare.e.caldwell@gmail.com

The blue duck (whio)

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JOHN APPLETON: ON HEALTH

Our genes and the role they play in our lives RECENTLY I MET A MAN WHO HAD DIFFICULTY WALKING due to pain from arthritis. Despite ongoing ‘encouragement’ from his wife he told me that he didn’t see any need to change his lifestyle because ‘the problem is genetic so regardless of what I do, I won’t see any benefit.’

Gene expression is influenced by many factors - the environment - emotions - stresses - infections - injuries and experiences, but perhaps the most important factor is nutrition. Nutrition is the most important of these because we have the most control over what we put into our mouths every day.

It occurred to me that there might be many others who think along similar lines and accept chronic illness and toxic drugs as a fact of life, choosing to blame their state of health on their genes which they believe they have no control over.

While some of our genes are hard wired (those that determine say hair or eye colour) and we can be born with genetic disorders that can’t be changed, many of our genes are in reality quite flexible and they can respond favourably or unfavourably depending on how we control the many factors that influence their ‘behaviour’.

I think it is important therefore that we all learn a little bit about our genes, what they are, how they influence our lives and what we can do to influence them. When we ‘dive’ inside one of our (70 trillion) cells we find a clearly defined structured called the nucleus which is a bit like the pip in a cherry. If we peek inside the nucleus we will find our genetic instructions (our individual blueprint) organised on 23 pairs of chromosomes, 23 of these coming from the male sperm and 23 from the female egg. Zooming in on our 46 chromosomes we can see that they are divided into 21,000 segments called genes each of which contains a special code for making a single protein (enzyme), a chemical signal that could have either a positive or negative influence on our life. Gene comes from the Greek word ‘genea’ meaning generation. Using an even stronger looking glass we would see that each gene consists of double strands of genetic material known as DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid). DNA was first discovered by scientists in the 1890s but it wasn’t until 1953 when Drs James Watson and Francis Crick discovered that the two strands of DNA formed a double helix containing a ‘readable’ genetic code. We should think of our genetic blueprint much like that of a blueprint that is used to build a house. It is very important to understand that by themselves genes are inactive, remaining ‘quiet’ until something prompts their activity literally turning them on and causing them to perform their function of making the specific protein (enzyme) that they are pre-programmed to do. This is known as gene expression.

It would be great if we were all born with a perfect blueprint free of errors, but for most of us this is not the case and mutations in our genetic code are common with some being inherited e.g. mutations in BRCA 1 (breast cancer 1 and 2) genes and many others but most of the problems that come about are not inherited. Approximately 90% of all breast cancers are not related to inherited gene mutations but to mutations (somatic mutations) that are acquired during our lifetime. BRCA genes (we all have them) are in fact tumour suppressor genes that when working normally protect us from cancer developing. If these genes malfunction due to inherited mutations there is however a much greater risk of cancer developing (breast and ovarian in females and breast and prostate in males). Most of us will have read about Angelina Jolie and her decision to have her breasts removed after discovering a BRCA issue. Many ask if there is anything that can be done to prevent cancer if there is a family history or if gene mutations are discovered (testing which can cost around $3,000). There is a lot of research being conducted into the role of nutritional interventions and three studies that I have read recently explore the use of vitamin D - selenium and multi-vitamins in offsetting issues associated with gene mutations. Selenium was given to women with BRCA mutations and the outcome was compared with women who did not have the mutations. The scientists discovered that the selenium all but negated the impact of the mutation. I have copies of these studies if anyone is interested.

A large study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association reported that 130,000 cancer deaths can be prevented by taking a multivitamin. Jasper Rine - Professor of Molecular and Cell Biology (University of California Berkeley) said, “there are many genetic differences that make people’s enzymes less efficient than normal and simple supplementation with vitamins can often restore some of these deficient enzymes to full working order.” In my humble opinion this is where the focus of research into cancer should be directed - I am not confident that it will ever be possible to find a drug that will ‘trump’ the environmental and dietary/lifestyle factors that are clearly involved to a significant extent in cancer. To advise someone which way to turn when it comes to the sort of decision that Angelina Jolie made is not easy and this decision should always be left to the individual. There is no right or wrong way to act. It is however becoming widely recognised that regardless of the genes we are born with, if a particular health issue ‘runs’ in the family, it doesn’t necessarily mean that it will ‘run’ in you; unless it is triggered by the many factors that influence your life. The importance of diet cannot be over emphasised. Science writer Matt Ridley said “Nurture is reversible nature is not”. In his book ‘Nature Via Nurture’ he says “genes are designed to take their cue from nurture”. It is not difficult to see that many of the health problems that afflict western civilisation are due to a confrontation between ancient genes and a modern diet of processed foods that are devoid of essential nutrients. The bottom line is this: We can’t easily limit exposure to toxic environmental chemicals, especially with city living. We can however control what we put in our mouths. It’s never too late to ‘Feed Your Genes Right’ (the title of a fascinating book by Jack Challem). In this book the author says, “when our diet is built around foodstuffs that did not exist until recently, our ancient genes receive unfamiliar chemical signals. The response of genes to unfamiliar foods is almost always abnormal.” (JOHN APPLETON) F PN APPLETON ASSOCIATES, T: 09 489 9362 john@johnappleton.co.nz www.johnappleton.co.nz

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MICHELLE OWEN: POSTURE TO PERFORMANCE

JOHN APPLETON: ON HEALTH

Taking the pain out of getting relief Where should you go for help when you have hurt yourself or woken with a crick in your neck? It can be confusing to know where to start among the styles of practitioners. Many have a large crossover of skills so this is just a simple overview. A physiotherapist will treat the soft tissue, muscles, tendons and ligaments of the painful area. An osteopath will do the same. Sometimes they will address the spinal joints as well. A chiropractor focuses more on the alignment of vertebrae to allow the nervous system to work properly. They are predominantly dealing with the spinal joints. Acupuncture can help reduce pain with needles going deep into muscles to stop spasms or break pain circuits. This is based on Chinese medicine and meridian points. Massage will help relieve and soothe sore spots. Sometimes you need a mixture of all these treatmens to get better. Most practitioners will get you out of pain, but then you will find the pain comes back. Many try different practitioners in isolation but still find there are issues to deal with. Quite often, these people have had surgeries on knees or hips, disc injuries, hernia repairs, prolapsed bowels or bladders. Many have had cortisone injections and are on pain relief treatments. So, why so many practitioners, doctors, surgeons and trainers, yet so few getting better? The confusion can come when people go to only one modality. For example, chiropractic work is powerful but the body needs some preparation to hold the adjustments. Muscle imbalance will keep pulling spinal joints out of alignment, so discomfort persists. Preparation would consist of loosening tight musculature. The rib cage/thoracic spine (upper back) can get rigid and stuck, keeping the spinal joints from stabilising. If you don’t prepare the tissue - prepare to fail. Awareness of new body positions, muscle imbalance and internal stability must also be addressed. Think long term Apart from accident or trauma, most people’s problems stem from how they hold their bodies and poor movement patterns alongside weakness and tightness. I only need to watch someone sit, stand and walk to know why they are in pain, which has generally been there for years. Accumulation over the years amplifies the pain or discomfort. A better body I teach immaculate exercise that is prescribed for individuals depending on their muscular imbalances, desire to get better, movement awareness and ability, health, time and much more. There is no use doing immaculate exercise at home or in the gym if you can’t integrate it into your life and work. Most people hurt themselves doing simple things such as emptying the dishwasher, vacuuming, lifting suitcases or gardening. Skilled training should mimic human movement and function. Once the basic foundation positions are learnt with exercise, then it is imperative to mimic them in life. An example is that to learn a dead-lift (lifting pattern) you must practice lifting and moving objects correctly so you are not only getting strong but have a new ability not to hurt yourself. Of course, the more active you want to be, the stronger and more immaculate you must make your movement patterns. Everything is a commitment. A commitment to running around town getting treatment for pain. Or a commitment to looking long term and getting your body structurally sound for years to come. (MICHELLE OWEN) F PN MICHELLE OWEN, Level 2, 10 New North Road M: 021 770 153 www.michelleowen.co.nz www.fitness-n-function.co.nz

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CARING UP CLOSEPROFESSIONAL AND PERSONAL Ilaijia Matai Gaunavinaka, N&A Barbershop Iliajia Matai Gaunavinaka was born in Waitabu Lakeba in Fiji. He came to New Zealand when he was one year old and grew up in West Auckland’s Henderson where he went to Liston College. Iliajia gained a diploma in special FX at Cut Above Academy 2004 and followed in 2005 with a certificate in barbering. “I’ve been barbering for more than nine years,” he says, “and I’m currently Senior Barber/Manager of N&A Barbershop in Grey Lynn.”

photography: Martin Leach

How did you come to be a barber? Before doing a course in barbering at Cut Above Academy back in 2005, I practiced cutting from the garage at home like most of the other barbers around. Cousins and friends and anybody that would let me cut their hair - I would just go for it and give it a try, I really appreciated all those practice cuts. Then after the course I started working at Kim’s Cuts out west, and the senior barbers there taught me everything else that I needed to know inside the barbershop, handing down secrets of the trade and the fine tuning of techniques. Jeffrey Ahkuoi is the owner of N&A Barbershop and a big thank you to him and his family for this opportunity. What do you love about your job? Every day is different, from different haircuts to the different people I meet. Being able to create art. Being able to give back to the community in some little way. Every time a person walks out happier than they came in just because of a haircut is buzzy to me. What do you find challenging? Keeping up with the styles and designs people want.

How do you differ from other barbers? I think the way I was taught from my course - knowing all the basics and theory - helped a lot before learning from the senior barbers at Kim’s Cuts. I can do most styles of haircut, lines/tracks, designs, lineups, fades, old-school haircuts to the modern day haircuts, and a full face wet shave with a razor. The friendly atmosphere at our shop makes it different also. What do you do to stay at the top of your field? I try keeping up with the trends and new styles that come into fashion, especially with the young fullas. So many different cuts now, from fades to undercuts. I go online and look up new styles and techniques, and learn from other great barbers - just practicing my craft and sticking with it. Can you tell us about a standout haircut? There have been so many over the years, but the standout haircut would be giving my oldest daughter Amelia-Jade her first ever haircut at age five. It went from lower back length to shoulder length. What do you do to care for your own hair? Funny enough, I don’t do much apart from shave it and line up my beard. My beard’s more of a hassle to manage. What's your advice to people seeking a great haircut or other barber services? I say just trial and error. Taking a risk and trying different barbers until you find the one that suits you - or just come to our shop, we can do it all. F PN N&A BARBERSHOP, 505 Great North Road, Grey Lynn T: 09 378 9792

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HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY

Setting the scene: home fragrance for winter I’m all for staying in over the colder months, and making your home into a haven expressly for the purpose of rest, relaxation and serious hibernation. The best way I’ve found to do this is by purchasing a snuggly rug or two and investing in an array of beautiful home fragrances. One range I love is the collection of locally crafted Aroha Healing Candles, which are created in-house at Aroha Healing by their internationally trained fragrance expert Rosanna Marks and lovingly hand poured by Rosanna and her partner, Benton Day at their Grey Lynn premises. “Our candles are blessed with karakia, reiki and much aroha,” Rosanna tells me, “and we use a natural soy wax base, pure cotton, paper braided wicks, pure essential oils and fragrance blends. They affect the energy of an environment in a positive way, nourishing the chakras and enhancing meditation practice via our olfactory system.” The candles come in three sizes and their latest creation is the Huhuatanga Hotoke (winter abundance) candle especially designed for this season. It is a rich, warming floral blend of vanilla, ylang ylang, neroli, rose, orange and a hint of cinnamon and available in medium and large sizes. Rosanna and Ben also actively encourage the recycling of any Aroha Healing candle jars, “bring them back and we take $5.00 off your next medium or large size candle purchase!”

Another favourite in-house fragrancing choice of mine is anything - and everything by Jo Malone. Shopping at a Jo Malone London boutique anywhere in the world is an undeniably sensual experience: all that soft lighting, cool cream and glass decor, rows and rows of tantalisingly sparkling square-cut bottles and, of course, delicious scents at every breath. There’s the deep satisfaction - of seeing your precious purchase amidst a froth of tissue and ribbon and then swathed in the brand’s signature beautiful cream and black box. As well as colognes, body creams and bath oils, their collection includes home fragrances and scented candles that will transform a house into a home and leave guests lingering for more. A perfect scent for winter is the Pomegranate Noir Home Collection, a dark and enigmatic little number created using pomegranate, raspberry and plum spiked with pink pepper and laced with Casablanca lily and spicy woods. You can get a candle, scent surround diffuser or scent surround room spray, all of which are guaranteed to work some serious magic in your home. A Jo Malone candle on high rotate in my house right now is the beautiful Incense & Embers, which is a seriously sensual, unisex scent with napa leather on a base of vetiver and golden amber.

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Also at the luxe end of the market are some beautiful offerings from Mecca Cosmetica that will allow you to indulge - without breaking the bank too much. Diptyque Feu de Bois candle is one of their best sellers and was design specifically to be burned throughout the long winter days. The Diptyque Figuier Hourglass Diffuser is another great option if you want the brand’s much loved scent to stick around whilst you’re not home, and looks seriously incredible sitting pretty anywhere within your house. With a scent diffusion process that uses no heat but just relying on gravity and osmotic action, the hourglass diffuser preserves the originality and integrity of the Figuier scent as it slowly, subtly, and delicately releases its inimitable notes into the air. Simply turn the object over to begin a fragrance cycle of about 20 minutes and sit back and enjoy. The fragrance is also available as a room spray for lovers of that method of scent diffusion. Last up, for an easy way to transform your cosy villa with a touch of the tropics in one simple step, invest in Kai’s Room and Linen Spray, also available at Mecca Cosmetica. It’s packed with the exotic scent of Kai’s signature perfume oil - a delicate mix of gardenia and white exotics that is absolutely to die for - that has been expertly blended into a home fragrance and packaged in an exquisite Italian glass bottle, for a luxurious gift or self indulgence that will fill your surroundings with the aura of the tropics. Use in any room that you want to feel like Tahiti in an instant, or spray between or on sheets whenever the mood takes you. Last up you can’t go past the line up of beautiful candles from Ecoya at Redcurrent, which are affordable eco luxe at its finest. My favourite is Vanilla Bean - warm, dense and almost good enough to eat. Vanilla is constantly at the top of the list when it comes to the world’s most popular fragrances with good reason. In 1991, the Sloan -Kettering Cancer Centre in New York tested the effects of five fragrances on 85 patients undergoing an MRI scan. Of the fragrances tested, a vanilla-like aroma, heliotropin, was rated the most relaxing. Patients exposed to the heliotropin reported 63% less anxiety and claustrophobia than those were not exposed to fragrance. The study even prompted Sloan-Kettering to include vanilla fragrances as a standard part of an MRI, so imagine PN what it could do for your home! (HELENE RAVLICH) F

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING GRACIOUS HAIR AND MAKEUP If you’re looking to try somewhere new for fabulous hair treatments or stunning makeup, we’d recommend heading over to Claude Road in Epsom where you’ll find the gorgeous boutique salon Gracious Hair and Makeup.

LORDE POPS IN TO M.A.C BRITOMART DUBBED ‘POP’S COOLEST INGENUE,’ LORDE VISITED THE M.A.C PRO BRITOMART STORE late last month to celebrate the launch of her Limited Edition Makeup collaboration with the brand. The hero product is a deep plum lipstick called ‘Pure Heroine’ - like the singer’s accolade-reaping debut album.

Gracious opened its doors just last year, revealing a superb fit out by Richard Furze Design and a warm, relaxed atmosphere. You’ll be able to check out their amazing specially commissioned Flox mural while you’re enjoying an espresso coffee, tea, wine and even chocolates. With its three creative owners all having previously worked in busy city establishments, Jo May, Rebecca Furze and Harumi Umezu are all loving the village atmosphere of the Claude Road area. “It reminds us of Ponsonby, but perhaps a bit more laid back!” says Rebecca, who started her career in Ponsonby some time ago at Jo’s very successful Ridgididdy Didge salon. Joined late last year by member of the Redken New Zealand Artistic team, Chantelle Kitt, these experienced and highly professional stylists have received a number of awards over the years and are constantly evolving their techniques and service. As well as providing the full range of hair salon options and exclusively using Redken colour and the brand’s new ammonia-free Chromatics range, they also offer hair and makeup for weddings and special occasions. At Gracious, the service is of the highest standard, the parking is easy and the team are all enthusiastic. By all accounts, it’s hard to look past this hair and makeup gem. PN Open Tuesday to Saturday with late nights on Tuesday and Thursday. F

GRACIOUS HAIR AND MAKEUP, 2/2 Claude Road, Epsom T: 09 623 0701 www.gracioushair.co.nz M.A.C Senior Artist Amber D and Lorde

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SHEENA SHUVANI STARDUST ASTROLOGY (23 June to - 23 July) ♋ CANCER Element of air. Symbol: the crab. Quality: Cardinal (= activity) Planetary ruler: Moon. Character A balanced Cancer is wonderful! Career minded, hardworking, responsible; a skilled communicator with empathy, intelligence and very intuitive. It’s the unbalanced that get bad press! (but they are in a minority). To understand the Crab first understand the word cancer is Latin for crab and the word lunatic comes from the Latin ‘luna’ (for moon). Cancer people are moody and influenced by the mysterious phases of the moon, the same powerful, luminous influences that cause the ebb and flow of ocean tides. Thus it is feelings all the way - romantic, sensitive, sentimental, nostalgic, yearning, vulnerable, reproachful, remorseful, tearful, doting and funny, batty, psychic, possessive, jealous, laughing, weeping and emoting. Entrepreneurial skills, a capable money manager, home-loving hoarder, grumbling, crabby, cranky, stingy, but will share and won’t waste. Will nip, blame, and won’t let go. Huge romantic highs and lows of drama, tantrums and waterworks. Career Find your niche: arts, law, business, politics, landlord, the Crab is canny, creates from the heart, collects antiques, hoards vintage stuff, nests, honours tradition. Is a capable manager of money, owner of real estate. Love and sexuality “I love you/I don’t love you.” Highly inconsistent, but has a secret desire to be loved and accepted unconditionally by a sexy, beautiful lover! Possessive of people and can hold grudges. Past directions Talking incessantly about your feelings, black moods, angry outbursts, tantrums and blaming have bored and alienated the less understanding. Emotional blackmail and watery drama is ill received by your significant other. Helpful advice Your tantrums cause fatigue. Learn to master mood management then you’ll be wonderful and empowered and everyone will love you. Have more fun!

BEAUTIFUL AROHA HEALING CANDLES MADE WITH LOVE Aroha Healing Candles are chemistry, art, imagination, and magic rolled into one and each candle has its own unique story. What makes Aroha Healing’s candle collection so special? There is nothing quite like them - anywhere. With specific essential oils, some that are infused with kowhai and kauri leaves or with pounamu chips, or the divine Wahine and Tane candles that are poured under the full moon each month, where else can you find candle blends that encompass an energetic quality and are so unique? Aroha Healing Candles are a creation from Aroha Healing’s in-house, internationally trained fragrance expert, Rosanna Marks and her partner, Benton Day. The dynamic duo’s candle creations and are lovingly hand poured at their Grey Lynn premises. Aroha Healing Candles are blessed with karakia, reiki and much aroha. Using a natural soy wax base, pure cotton, paper braided wicks, pure essential oils and fragrance blends. Aroha Healing Candles affect the energy of an environment in a positive way, nourishing the chakras and enhancing meditation practice via our olfactory system. Their candles are wonderful for focus, self healing, love, sensuality, abundance and good positive energy! The partners pour so much of ‘themselves’ into each candle that they know they just can’t be duplicated. Aroha Healing’s logo was created to inspire aroma (love) in all people, to reflect Rosanna’s heritage and each Aroha Healing Candle is blessed with karakia (Maori blessing), reiki (energy healing), and much aroha (love). Aroha Healing Candles are a wonderful tool and peaceful reminder that once you walk in the front door after a long day at work, you can light this candle to create a peaceful, loving ambiance and just breathe in the love. With three sizes to choose from and 12 beautifully fragrant Maori inspired offerings, there is an Aroha Healing Candle for everyone. F PN AROHA HEALING, 3 Maidstone Street T: 0800 mindbody www.arohahealing.co.nz

Your lucky number According to Cheiro, (the world’s most famous seer), the date of the day of your birth is the luckiest of all numbers for you! Favoured precious stones Pearl, moonstone. Favoured metals Silver and gold. Favoured colours Luminous silver, sea green and blue. (SHEENA SHUVANI) F PN

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING OUT IN THE ‘HOOD Fionna Hill sent in these shots which show a mini community swap library, attached to the top of a fence of a private home in Richmond Road.

photography: Fionna Hill

It’s a similar idea to reusing old phone boxes in the United Kingdom. The second shot shows the kindess of strangers in Grey Lynn towards our pets.

The kindness of strangers in Grey Lynn

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HELENE RAVLICH: NATURAL BEAUTY

Local beauty: Enrich Massage Therapy’s Olivia Van Lierop I’m a huge fan of massage and try to indulge in one whenever I can. Swedish, Thai, ayurvedic or Balinese, you name it, I’ve had a bash at it at least once. In an age of technical and at times impersonal medicine, massage offers a drug-free, non-invasive and humanistic approach based on the body's natural ability to heal itself, and that’s what makes it one of my first ports of call when I’m feeling run down. I love a massage as much for the relaxation aspect as its boost to my general well-being. Experts estimate that upwards of 90% of disease is stress related, and perhaps nothing ages us faster, internally and externally, than high stress. While eliminating anxiety and pressure altogether in this fast-paced world may be idealistic, massage can, without a doubt, help manage it, and having a great massage therapist is as important to me as a great doctor. As well as helping with my permanently dodgy back and shoulders that are tight beyond belief, a good massage leaves me feeling energised and focused, and as relaxed as they come. An absolute gem of a massage therapist who I’ve discovered of late is the wonderful Olivia Van Lierop from Jervois Road haven Enrich Massage Therapy. A recent arrival back in New Zealand, Olivia left the country nine years ago after completing a Bachelor of Therapeutic and Sports Massage. “I was always super intrigued by the body and the way it works when I was younger,” Olivia tells me, “and I imagined I would go into physiotherapy or something like that but with a more holistic approach. My mother was involved in healing and was a huge influence on me from a very young age.” Olivia started her career in podiatry, but grew frustrated with “only treating problems from the hips down,” and wanted to work in a way that encompassed the whole body. Cue: massage, and a trip down south to train in different modalities. After completing her training in massage she moved to Australia to work as a sports masseuse for a leading Australian clinic working with top athletes. From there she explored the idea of working on yachts in Europe, landing a position just two weeks later in Greece as a private masseuse, beautician and yoga instructor on one of the most prestigious luxury yachts in the world. “I was sent to qualify as a beauty therapist in London and it gave me a whole different approach to my work as a massage therapist,” she explains, “and I added more of a pampering, relaxing aspect to what I do as opposed to just taking a sports massage approach.” Looking for further challenges, she travelled to many beautiful parts of the world, completing her yoga teacher training in Bali and then returning to New Zealand, where she combined her talents to establish Enrich. She incorporates both a therapeutic and pampering aspect into almost every massage that she does, even sending some clients away with yoga poses to practice to keep their bodies in check. “I’m trying to make my unique combination of the technical and the relaxation aspect of massage integral to what I do,” says Van Lierop, “because it seems like you have to go to a sports massage clinic to get a deep tissue-type massage to treat the likes of chronic pain and a spa to get something really warm and pampering. I think you should be able to go for a very technical, therapeutic massage but still feel like you’ve had some ‘me’ time.” Even if she has to do something “a bit brutal”, she likes to start with a soothing foot massage before moving on to the tough stuff, “and then finish with a facial massage to really release the tension before someone leaves the room. I also like to incorporate some hot stone work if someone is keen on that, it just makes such a difference.” Along with her work from Enrich at 37 Jervois Road, Ponsonby, Olivia will be filling in as a yoga teacher for some classes at the wonderful Urban Ashram in Brown Street, and hopes to develop this area into private yoga sessions in the long term. With all the talents she has on board and an incredibly serene vibe about her to boot, I for one can’t PN wait to see what unfolds. (HELENE RAVLICH) F ENRICH MASSAGE, 37 Jervois Road M: 021 822 184 www.enrichmassageponsonby.co.nz

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ORGANIC COCONUT OIL SKINCARE FROM SAMOA Soft, glowing, healthy skin is at your fingertips with Mailelani organic coconut oil skincare from Samoa. Mailelani skincare products are naturally made with organic coconut oil (or suau’u popo as we call it here in Samoa) and other tropical ingredients. Handmade from virgin coconut oil, this range of pure skincare products is full of natural goodness. Your skin will feel smooth and supple, with a lingering tropical fragrance. Our virgin coconut oil is ethically sourced from farmers and villagers in Samoa and handmade by our small local team. The coconut oil used in Mailelani skincare products is certified organic. Virgin coconut oil is luxuriously nourishing and easily absorbed by your skin, helping it look youthful, soft and glowing. When you buy Mailelani handmade coconut oil skincare, you know you’re not only doing something good for your skin - farmers, villagers and workers in Samoa all benefit from the ethical production of this local treasure! MORE THAN A BUSINESS, MORE THAN SKINCARE Mailelani is more than a business and our products are more than just pure natural skincare.

took us to many countries over the years, we always knew we would one day return to Samoa and open a business, to give back to the people we love. We tried a number of ideas, but the enthusiastic response to our first coconut oil soap made it clear that this was the right way to go. Kitiona taught himself how to make soaps. The first Mailelani organic coconut soap was released in 2000. Experimenting with other local ingredients, we added fresh papaya, koko Samoa, honey, noni juice, lime, lau ti, avocado and tamanu oil to our products. Everything is handmade and packaged in Samoa. Working with the technical assistance of a chemist in New Zealand, Mailelani now offers a wide range of organic coconut oil skincare products. SKINCARE BENEFITS OF COCONUT OIL Being such a natural product, Mailelani handmade, organic coconut oil is gentle on your hair and skin. Its natural glycerine moisturises and leaves your skin silky smooth. Coconut oil skin benefits include:

Of course the product quality has to be great - we’ll never compromise on that. We want you to love these natural skincare products, to enjoy the health benefits of coconut oil on skin.

• Excellent hydration, as it’s readily absorbed and doesn’t leave a greasy coat.

The team at Mailelani are inspired to share the pure natural qualities of our organic coconut oil with people everywhere. To let you enjoy the skincare benefits of coconut oil as well as the delightful fragrances of our tropical flowers and spices. Exporting Mailelani skincare products is our way to promote our beautiful islands to the world.

• Resistance against wrinkles and sagging of skin by preventing dryness and keeping your skin supple.

At the same time, we want to help the people of our islands earn a sustainable living, ethically creating a product that is true to its origins as well as respectful of nature. That’s why we only use natural processes. That’s why every Mailelani product is handmade. That’s why we don’t do everything ourselves - we let the local people do what they know best.

• Gentle, effective makeup removal.

The coconuts are ethically sourced from farmers on the Samoan islands of Upolu and Savaii. The key production step of extracting the virgin coconut oil is also performed in the rural areas of these islands by people working in their own homes and villages. As a way to share the bounty of Mailelani, we buy the organic coconut oil from them and simply perform the final step of turning their raw products into natural skincare products. The villagers receive maximum benefits for their product. It offers a sustainable source of income and better living standards.

• Treatment for various skin problems, including psoriasis, dermatitis and eczema.

• A safe, effective moisturiser for all skin types with no adverse side effects.

• Protection against stretch marks.

• Relief from sunburn and itching. • Helps the healing of bruises and scratches.

Coconut oil also cleans, nourishes, protects and beautifies your hair! THE NATURAL ANSWER FOR YOUR BODY, THE SIMPLE WAY. Retail enquiries welcome; M: 027 227 7945 kathynz@mailelani-samoa.com www.mailelani-samoa.co.nz

TWO PEOPLE, ONE DREAM Mailelani is the life work of Kitiona and Sylvie Salanoa - one a native of Samoa, the other from Switzerland. We met through misson work overseas, a match made in heaven. While our life and work The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING

HAPPINESS? TRY MEDITATION Meditation is the theme of a free workshop series on offer at the Grey Lynn community centre throughout July. The four consecutive Thursday evenings will cover the ABCs of setting up a home programme and offer a practical overview of different methods of meditation. photography: Fionna Hill

Workshop organiser Jogyata Dallas, a tutor with Auckland’s Sri Chinmoy Centre, describes the class series as a response to the World Health Organisation’s prediction that by 2020, depression will be the second leading cause of mental and physical disability worldwide.

LAST MONTH’S STORM DAMAGE WHAT A STORM - THERE WERE TREES AND POWER LINES DOWN ALL OVER THE Western Bays. St Mary’s Road was partly blocked and a tree fell outside the Grey Lynn Community Library. Most of the damage has now been cleared, although there are still PN a few giant trees down in Jaggers Bush Reserve. F

“One of the very common things that most of us are finding today is that we are living in a more and more cluttered and complicated world, with rising levels of stress and quite often shrinking levels of happiness and personal space. The balance between our outer life of constant activity, and our inner life of peacefulness and calm, is often not too healthy. “Meditation is a life skill that teaches us how to step back a bit, find some quiet space, reconnect with a deeper part of our being where our mind is calm, our thoughts have slowed down, and where we can rediscover an inner happiness and peacefulness. This inner place of stillness and silence is immensely important in our search for happiness.” Jogyata has also started a popular, free workplace programme called ‘An Hour of Peace’, which offers morning or lunchtime ‘beat stress’ courses to staff and employees in the local area. “Workplace stress is on the rise - ‘An Hour of Peace’ involves an experienced instructor teaching the ABCs of simple and proven meditation techniques at your place of work. And it’s all free!”

photography: Jay Platt

The Grey Lynn Thursday evening courses runs on 3, 10, 17, 24 July from 7:30pm - 9:00pm. Admission is free but registration is required by simply phoning PN T: 09 309 1136 or visiting www.meditationauckland.co.nz F

BEAUTIFUL MAILELANI SUAU’U POPO SKIN CARE PRODUCTS Mailelani skincare products are naturally made with organic coconut oil (or suau’u popo as it’s called in Samoa) and other tropical ingredients. Handmade from virgin coconut oil, this range of pure skincare products are full of natural goodness leaving your skin feeling smooth and supple, with a lingering tropical fragrance. Available in a men’s and women’s range. F PN Retail enquiries welcome: M: 0272 277 945 kathynz@mailelani-samoa.com www.mailelani-samoa.co.nz

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LIVING, THINKING + BEING The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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LANI LOPEZ: HEALTHY LIVING

Magnesium to maximise your magnificent well-being A crucial nutrient at the heart of an astonishing amount of crucial body functions, magnesium is now being revealed as a key contributor to fitness and muscle-building exercise. United States research has shown the general population is chronically deficient in magnesium, a pattern of scarcity researchers believe is evident across the Western world. This deficiency can have long-lasting negative health effects. On the other hand, ensuring adequate magnesium intake benefits long-term well-being and can impact immediately on energy, lessening fatigue. Are you deficient? As you’d expect with such an important nutrient, magnesium can be found throughout the body in blood, bone, muscles and tissue. So it’s important to ensure we have enough in our system. Signs you may be suffering from magnesium deficiency include migraines, headaches, muscle tension, low moods, sore back, teeth grinding, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, fatigue, and weakness. As magnesium deficiency worsens, people may experience numbness, tingling, muscle contractions and cramps, seizures, abnormal heart rhythms, low levels of calcium in the blood (hypocalcemia) and can lead to low potassium in the blood (hypokalemia).

training hard or working through a health challenge, then magnesium supplementation is a worthwhile investment in well-being. (LANI LOPEZ) F PN Main health benefits of magnesium: • Hinders headaches and manages migraines • Regulates high blood pressure • Manages diabetes • Lowers Alzheimers onset risk • Healthy bones • Better sleep, less anxiety and helps fight depression • Manages asthma Lani Lopez BHSc AdvDipNatHealth is a Naturopath, Clinical Nutritionist and top-selling author. Founder of lanilopez.com, find her and talk well-being on facebook.com/ lanilopez.com

As ever, age is a factor and as we get older our need for magnesium increases. However, throughout life a number of health conditions are associated with magnesium deficiency, and these include: Diabetes, Crohn’s disease, gluten sensitivity, gastro-intestinal conditions, chronically low blood levels of potassium and calcium, as well as alcoholism, asthma, hypertension and cardio-vascular disease. Get the full benefit Recent studies have revealed new information on magnesium’s role in well-being and its wide ranging specific health benefits - from better sleep to improved work-outs and weight control. In recent studies, low magnesium levels have been linked to excessive elevated heart rate response to exercise. They suggest that adequate magnesium in the body increases testosterone and fights obesity. Contrastingly, adequate magnesium levels have been shown to support sleep, have a role in prevention and management of Alzheimer’s disease, and as it regulates a key receptor in the brain, magnesium also supports memory and learning. Make a meal of magnesium A good healthy diet, especially one centered on fresh green leafy vegetables and with lots of GI friendly legumes, will provide most of us with an adequate daily supply of magnesium. Rich food sources for magnesium are: Silverbeet, spinach, avocado, potato, apple, raisins, banana, almonds, cashews, peanuts and walnuts, sesame seeds. Beans: soy, black-eye, pinto, lentils, baked beans, kidney beans. Yoghurt, milk, cheese, bread, whole-wheat, wheat bran, wheat germ, bran flakes, oatmeal, shredded wheat, raisin bran. If you are especially active or affected by any of the conditions listed above, you may want to consider supplementing with magnesium. You need to ensure a supplement meets a number of key criteria. Firstly, it needs to supply your recommended dietary allowance, or RDA. For magnesium this is 400mg in men and 300 to 320mg in women, ages 19 to 30. The RDA is 420mg in men and 320mg in women over 31. The daily RDA for pregnant women, depending on age, is 350 to 400mg. A quick look at the bottle will tell you how much is included in each capsule, powder, or tablet. Look for chelated magnesium. When magnesium is chelated, it can be absorbed by the body more readily than in other forms, such as in salt (as magnesium chloride). Magnesium used in dietary supplements is better if it is chelated to other beneficial compounds such as amino acids. Chelation is common in naturally occurring chemicals. It also can be used for producing substances like magnesium for use in dietary supplements. The word chelation is sourced from the Greek for claw. When magnesium is chelated, it is held chemically in place by a larger molecule, much like a claw clutches hold. If life is busy and you are

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FUTURE GENERATION AT KING’S SCHOOL, WE UNDERSTAND BOYS FOLLOWING THE RECENT RESEARCH ON BOYS’ EDUCATION BY THE NEW ZEALAND Council for Educational Research, Headmaster of King’s School Tony Sissons spoke of his determination to continue to focus on how boys learn. “There has been much discussion about the recent research that has highlighted that boys do better in single sex schools than their counterparts in co-educational schools. At King’s we know how boys learn. We allow them to be boys, both in and out of the classroom, and we have a high number of male teachers who act as their role models. We encourage our students to be self-motivated, to strive to do their best in everything they do and to have the confidence to take risks. “The decision to send your boy to King’s School is a choice, but it is a choice that shapes his future. We have a responsibility to ensure he reaches his full potential. Jim Blackman

REST IN PEACE; JAMES BLACKMAN 5 April 1947 - 18 June 2014 We were sad to loose Jim Blackman, founder of Triangle Television (now Face TV) to cancer late last month. We send our condolences to his family and former work colleagues. F PN

“As Headmaster I have a clear belief that every boy should have the opportunity to be nurtured to reach his full potential. I believe strongly that the school has a responsibility to care for each individual and to create an environment which acknowledges and celebrates boys’ successes - developing a culture where it is great to succeed and where the boys are encouraged to develop strong self-esteem. “Ultimately, we are responsible for creating responsible citizens of the future, and so we must create an environment for boys to build self-esteem and do well. This will continue to be my focus going forward.” F PN KING’S SCHOOL, 258 Remuera Road, T: 09 520 7770 www.kings.school.nz

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MEET THE TEACHER Sue Meltzer Deputy Principal and Year 7 and 8 teacher Kadimah School How did you come to be a primary school teacher? Actually I really wanted to be a vet, so teaching was my second choice. Where did you train? Auckland University. What brought you to Kadimah? I am Jewish so when a position came up at Kadimah it was a very comfortable fit for me. What is your favourite thing about being a teacher? It is lots of fun! Highlight of your teaching career? When past pupils recognise me, even decades later and stop to have a chat to fill me in on what they have been doing. Low point of your teaching career? When a child in the school community became very sick. It is very sad and stressful for the whole school. How would your principal describe you? This is what he wrote: “caring, hardworking, dedicated, engaging, committed, enquiring, striving for continuous improvements.” How would other teachers describe you? A good listener with an open viewpoint, supportive in professional and social situations. How would your students describe you? “Subtle when she is strict but always gets the message through, adds a bright side to it and ends it in a joke. Other words to describe her are: helpful, understanding, thoughtful, good communication skills, clever in many ways other than smarts and makes learning fun for all.”

Sue Meltzer, Kadimah School Deputy Principal

If you could wave a magic wand in your classroom... I would outfit the classroom so that it was a comfortable and bright e-learning space. Five tips for mums and dads of Year 7/8 school kids 1. Keep them busy with positive activities 2. Keep talking to them 3. Do fun things together and keep engaged with what they are doing at school 4. Where possible let them have a pet 5. Keep lots of healthy food in the fridge as they need refuelling all the time. KADIMAH SCHOOL www.kadimah.school.nz

CHILDREN’S BOOK REVIEW Curioseum Collected stories of the odd and marvellous by A Jansen. Te Papa Press, $29.99. What happens when you take 22 of New Zealand's best children's story writers and let them loose 'backstage' at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa? We invited authors from around the country to choose one of the museum's taonga (treasures) as a starting point for an imaginative journey. The result is a truly original compendium of stories and poems for children with spirited, original illustrations from the award-winning Sarah Laing. F PN DOROTHY BUTLER CHILDREN’S BOOKSHOP, 1 Jervois Road T: 09 376 7283 www.childrensbookshop.co.nz

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FUTURE GENERATION AUCKLAND’S YOUNG FILMMAKERS GIVEN ONE MINUTE TO SHAPE 10 YEARS Auckland’s under 25s could win a share of $7000 prize money through Auckland Council’s latest youth video challenge. The videos must be under one minute and say what Auckland needs to invest in to become the world’s most liveable city. Filmmakers have until midnight 20 July to submit their video. Finalist’s videos will be put on YouTube, with the winners being those with the most views. First place will receive a $3000 prize. “Auckland is preparing for its biggest ever investment in its future. There are plans for better ways to get around, how we treat our environment, events and things that will make our neighbourhoods safer, and also things that will create new opportunities for young people,” says Auckland Council’s youth advocate, Councillor Linda Cooper. “This is our chance to hear from our young people about what’s most important to them - for their local areas as well as Auckland as a whole.”

The rules to enter are: 1. You have until 20 July to make your video, answering the question: “What should Auckland spend money on to become the world's most liveable city?” 2. Videos must be one minute or less. 3. You can use a mobile phone or whatever you want to make it. But you must send it to Auckland Council in .mp4 or .mov format. 4. You can make one by yourself, one with your friends or both - and you can enter as PN many times as you want. F

Councillor Cooper says, “It doesn’t matter what you use to film it - a mobile phone is fine. What’s important is the thinking behind it and taking a chance to have your say and shape Auckland’s future; to say what sort of city you want to live in.” The top videos will be used through the coming year to help encourage other Aucklanders to get engaged in choices around Auckland’s 10-year spending plan, the Long-term Plan 2015-2025, which sets out how much the council will spend, what on, where and when. Videos can cover local issues or those affecting Auckland as a whole. Entrants can check out visions and ideas for local areas when local board plans are launched for consultation on 7 July. There is also regional pride at stake, with Wellington City Council set to run a similar competition later in July. For more information on the video competition, visit shapeauckland.co.nz

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BILLY HARRIS: KIDS IN THE COMMUNITY

Marist Herne Bay’s exercise programme overrunning with kids If you find yourself driving through the streets of Herne Bay, Ponsonby, Grey Lynn, or Cox’s Bay between 8.00am and 8.45am on a Tuesday morning, you might see the rather surprising sight of primary school kids out on their early morning run. It’s like a scene from an African documentary, in which large groups of children run 10 or 20km to school, with a few differences of course. For one, the Kiwi kids aren’t running quite as far. And they’re wearing shoes. And the scenery is a little different to the African countryside. But still, there’s something uplifting about a whole bunch of kids of differing ages out running, especially when they show the commitment to do it whether it’s sunny, raining, or freezing cold. Yes, whatever the weather, Tuesday is run day, when a committed group from Marist Catholic School Herne Bay, plus a fair sprinking of siblings and parents, run for fun, health and happiness. One of the parents behind the programme is Stacey Mowbray. She borrowed the idea from St Heliers Primary and she was thrilled by how enthusiastically the kids have jumped on board. “After getting approval from the school, we booked in our first run the next Tuesday,” Stacey said. “I thought that if just two families turn up to join my three boys, we would have fun. That first morning at 8am sharp, 53 kids turned up. I was blown away, especially considering we’re a school of just 200 kids. “On our best day so far, we had 70. There are brothers and sisters joining in too, some as young as four, and there’s huge parental support. That’s good for the little ones, because some of them need a piggy back now and then. “We started off running about 2km but now tend to run just over 3km (one of our main courses is 3.4km) with the faster runners getting in an extra 500 metres or kilometre to extend them.” The programme runs with almost military precision. Stacey maps out different routes to give the kids variety, routes that feature short cuts back to school for those who need it, and that involve as few road crossings as possible. On Tuesdays the kids sign in before the run begins to make sure no one goes awol. Parents are stationed at various points around the course to show the way, and with the car being the danger to our children that the carnivore is to the African kids, parents also act as crossing guards, holding up traffic to allow the kids to cross the road.”

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Stacey records who turns up, and how far they’ve run, and students will get certificates when they hit milestones such as 100km. “We have a key leader, Frank Pakenham, who is one of the dads,” says Stacey. “He’s a passionate runner and a great source of expertise. He’s there every Tuesday and leads the group out front - allowing our fast runners to really challenge themselves. I check courses with him and get his input. Other parents stay back with the more leisurely runners and encourage them along which, as you can imagine, can be a job in itself.” The feedback has been overwhelmingly positive, and confirms Stacey’s feeling that early morning exercise is great for a number of reasons. “I believe that morning exercise is a great way to start the day for everyone, both physically and mentally,” says Stacey. “I think after exercise kids are in a much better space to learn. They’ve kick started their brains into action. I’ve seen exercise have a massive impact on emotions - my kids are always happier starting the day if we walk or ride to school. It’s the same or even better with the run. The kids are buzzing afterwards - physically exhausted but ready to learn. “All the kids doing the run are developing healthy exercise habits. The positive experience is important for their lifelong relationship with health and exercise. “Some of the kids are really excelling as runners, pushing themselves, and being extremely competitive, which puts them in great stead for not only school cross country but life beyond. At the other end of the scale we have some awesome kids who haven’t really run at all and they’re proving to themselves that when they set their mind to it, they can keep running. This gives them a huge sense of satisfaction and pride. “And for the parents making time to run with their kids, in today’s super fast world, is an achievement that we should be proud of. Afternoons are usually filled up with other things, so making use of the morning seemed like a good idea,” says Stacey. It’s a great way to connect with your kid and do something positive for your health. Everyone is just PN so positive after each run and ready to start their day.” (BILLY HARRIS) F

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FUTURE GENERATION The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

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SIDELINE WITH GEORGE BERRY

Football takes hold in Western Springs As much as it pains me to admit, it’s pretty easy to see why football's referred to as ‘the beautiful game’ when you’re watching it at the highest level, the FIFA Football World Cup in Brazil. The players’ skill and grace, ability to slide a rocket past the goal keeper on the volley like Australian Tim Cahill did against Germany was simply magnificent, there was something very beautiful about that series of play. And as annoying as Uruguayan striker Luis Suarez can often be, when he’s on form his play is, without question, a work of art. I also now see why people call it ‘football fever’ this flashy football seems to have also gripped the nation, people like me who struggle to watch 10 minutes of football let alone a game who have been drawn in, on the street and right around my office people are talking about nothing but football. People who haven’t mentioned the word football for the past four years have been first in line for the sweepstakes and keen to be involved as much as possible. Outside the office the interest has been just as high and it is now one of the fastest growing sports in the country with more juniors taking up football every year than any of the other major codes such as rugby, netball or hockey. In Ponsonby the Western Springs Football Club has grown so much over the past five years it’s now New Zealand’s largest soccer club. Located on Meola Road in Westmere, the Western Springs Club has seen over 44% growth in membership since the last Football World Cup. The decision to invest in new fully fenced artificial pitches has also spurred on this growth to where they can be used both day and night for training and games. Like the blue and black of the Ponsonby Rugby club the distinctive green and white ‘Springs’ kit worn by over 2000 players, 400 volunteer coaches, managers and helpers at the club often spill out in large volumes as they refuel at cafés around Ponsonby both on the weekends and following trainings during the week.

The Wellington Phoenix squad were in Auckland in advance of the Football United Tour in July, which sees them take on English Premier League teams Newcastle United and All Whites captain Winston Reid’s West Ham United. The Phoenix who are New Zealand’s only professional team compete in the A-League and go head to head with West Ham at Eden Park on Wednesday July 23rd. F PN

photography: Michael McClintock

And while it’s somewhat sad not to be able to watch the All Whites competing at the World Cup in Brazil the club and loads of football fans did get the chance to see them up close in May training ahead of their match against South Africa, and got a double dose of excitement when the Wellington Phoenix took over from some of the coaches

at Western Springs to train with the junior teams. With over 300 teams playing on a Saturday morning, the grounds swelled to their maximum as the kids showed off their skills to their New Zealand football heroes.

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SIDELINE WITH GEORGE BERRY

Ponsonby Rugby Club’s 140th celebrated on an international scale When I heard the England rugby side were going to tour New Zealand for the first time since their failed Rugby World Cup campaign in 2011, I must admit to feeling slightly worried. I spent five weeks with England and Pool D during that tournament and it was little more than an exhausting elongated stag do. Players were there for themselves rather than the team, they constantly played up, partied, enjoyed places like Queenstown and Dunedin before making the most of Auckland and Waiheke Island, and the rugby they played was below average at the best of times. It may have had something to do with the poor attitude of the longer standing members in their squad but it unfortunately turned out to be a sad demise for a number of their players rather than a winning swan song prior to retirement. But as soon as they stepped off the plane in Auckland the other week you got the sense this English side was different, and that this tour would be something other than a holiday for the 45 players in the squad. They smiled at the public, embraced their fans and didn’t seem worried about chatting to the media without receiving scorn from their peers. Their new coach Stuart Lancaster’s objective around leaving New Zealand with a better reputation than when they arrived had obviously been taken on board by the players this time around. “We want to give something back. We want to show people from New Zealand that they have a perception of us that is perhaps wrong. We want to change that perception and show that we’re good ambassadors for our country,” said Lancaster. Their charm offensive continued at Ponsonby Rugby Club's 140th jubilee celebrations as hundreds of the clubs juniors linked up with many of England’s stars and the bulk of their Under 20s side during a training day at the start of the weekend’s festivities. It seems club legend and Ponsonby’s Director of Rugby, Bryan Williams, has a similar philosophy to the English coach hoping the players gained just as much from the day as the juniors did themselves. “In the professional era, the young players need to get out and about in the community and rub shoulders with the people who really make things happen. It keeps their feet on the ground. The thing is, your career at the top is relatively fleeting and this is eventually where you end up, so I think they’d be wise to keep that in mind.”

And as of 2014 with nearly half the population of New Zealand, two million registered rugby players in England, Williams’ thoughts have probably never been truer. Those sort of numbers proving just how much pressure the England players have on them, not only to maintain their team’s standards, but also to hold on to their place in the national side. “It’s been good to get our boys out of the hotel and come and see what a rugby club in New Zealand is really like, for our boys to volunteer for this and stick their names down is great - it wasn’t hard to get the volunteers to come out."

Bryan Williams

It might have been the presence of the England stars that gave the Ponsonby Premiers a bit of a lift that weekend too, taking on previously unbeaten competition leaders Pakuranga, Ponsonby crossed for a last gasp converted try to pip Pakuranga 26 points PN to 24 after being down 13-3 at half time. F

Wheeling their way back to the top With a name like murder-ball you’d think one would have to be slightly crazy to even contemplate playing the game. But for many of the New Zealand Wheel Blacks their definition of crazy is sitting by and watching life go by, giving up and admitting defeat to whatever injury or illness has seen them confined to a wheelchair.

important as being able to take your opponent out. “The old bull in the china shop sort of opens you up for errors so it’s a matter of finding that balance between slow and controlled and exerting that physical ability,” said Taylor.

Since winning Gold at the Athens Paralympics in 2004 the Wheel Blacks have pretty much fallen into the abyss, they’re now ranked as low as 10th in the world and have struggled even getting to competitions since their funding was pulled post the Beijing Olympics.

Daniel Buckingham is another who now calls Auckland home and is lending his experience to the team. Buckingham was part of the side that won Gold in Athens and is determined to see the team get back to their best, starting with last month’s Canada Cup and then the World Champs in Denmark in August. “It’s been a rebuilding phase for a few years now, but we look like we’ve got the numbers again to compete. Some of the European teams have sprung onto the scene over the past few years, some like Denmark who we’ve never played before, but I’m pretty confident we can be the team we were back then. Everybody struggled against us in the early 2000s.”

However, their road to recovery is starting to look brighter thanks to a group of honorary Aucklanders. Originally from Whakatane, Maia Amia is one of the Wheel Blacks' new secret weapons. She’s only the third female to represent New Zealand and has quickly become one of the teams linchpins. “She’s fast, oh so fast,” said captain Shoto Taylor. “She’s deceptively quick and has quite a lot of power also,” he went on to say. The ability to out pace her opponents is also one of the key reasons why Amia has been drawn into the sport as well. “I just love beating my opponents, if I can get around them they start to think twice the next time.” You’d be forgiven for thinking the key objective in this game was to smash and crash into your opposite number. While I’m not saying there aren't big smashes during a match, Amia and the rest of the Wheel Blacks have come to realise speed and agility is just as The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

Buckingham has also seen the other side of the sport in recent years, working as a TV presenter for Attitude TV at both the London Summer Olympics and Sochi Winter Olympics. He says he’s hoping people get to see the sport for what it is, people, athletes competing as hard as they can for their country, and hopes that it rubs off on a few interested parties as they search for new sponsorship too. The sport is hoping to qualify a team for the 2016 Rio Paralympics after failing to do so at the London Games in 2012. Along with Buckingham and Amia, Barney Konoferenisi, Tainafi Lefono, Phil Spring, Adam Wakeford and co captian Gavin Rolton round out the strong Auckland contingent in the Wheel Blacks squad. F PN DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

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PONSONBY PEOPLE + THEIR PETS

AIMEE RALFINI AND EDWARD GOREY SAVE A LIFE THESE SCHOOL HOLIDAYS! Aimee Ralfini has been working in media, advertising and design for over a decade both here and internationally. A recent project is Aimee’s curation of The Artists Dinner, which was held for the second year at The Golden Dawn, on 26 August. She says, “I love discovering new and brilliant artists and their groups of artist friends on the other side of the world.” Aimee’s pet is Edwood Gorey, a griffin/toy poodle cross. He’s 18 months old and she’s had him since he was a puppy. Aimee says, “I chose Edwood because he looked like he had a big character in a strange and gangly body. He charmed me with his awkwardness.” Edwood is named after Aimee’s favourite Illustrator - Edward Gorey, “with various references in the spelling of his name to Ed Wood, Johnny Depp and Tim Burton.” Aimee says that her puppy also looks very much like an Edward Gorey Illustration. He loves to eat green tripe patties and bully sticks. The pair’s favourite thing to do together is sleep and cuddle. Edwood has three pet PN friends; Missy, Hermies and Shayne Carter. And two pet frienemies: Brutas and Lulu. F

The school holidays are a great time to adopt a pet. You can welcome a new pet into your family, and then you have the whole school holidays to bond and get to know each other. There are lots of great reasons why a rescue pet from SPCA Auckland would make the perfect addition to your family: • Caring - interacting with a pet helps kids learn to be gentle with living creatures. • Responsibility - older children can take over feeding and cleaning tasks, which helps them learn to be responsible and gives them a chance to earn pocket money. • Empathy - kids will often try to play with a pet in different ways. If the pet doesn’t like what they’re trying to do, their reaction helps kids learn to be sensitive to the needs and feelings of other living things. • Play - a pet can provide hours of fun for you and your kids, which can be a bonus during holiday time. • Love - pets are indiscriminate about sharing the love and that rubs off on everyone in the household, helping everyone feel closer and more relaxed. Rabbits make especially loving pets - check out Tom and Sesame, who have lived together at SPCA Auckland most of their lives. Tom has been with us since October last year - nearly one-third of his short life! Can you give this cuddly pair of bunnies a good home? If you’ve got the time and the love, SPCA Auckland has got a pet to suit your family. Plus, the bond your family and your new pet forms will not only save a life, it’ll last a lifetime. F PN Check out all the animals for adoption at www.spca.org.nz

TAKE YOUR DOG TO WORK INTERNATIONAL TAKE YOUR DOG TO WORK DAY took place on 20 June, with locals like Platform 29’s Hamish Imrie - owner of schnack Rudy - joining the movement and taking their pets to the office. Research has shown that pets in the office can increase morale and productivity, create happier employees, lower absentee rates and improve relationships between co-workers. Generally once dogs settle into the working routine, they are happy as Larry curled up under their owners’ desks.

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For those who would like to take their dogs to work and extend the benefits beyond a single day a year, pet food company Purina supplied some tips: • A quick walk at lunchtime is the perfect mid-day refresher for your pup and yourself. Nothing beats a bout of fresh air to get the brain ticking and there’s no better reminder to get outside than an eagerly awaiting puppy face. • Make sure you have an area set up with a big water bowl for the office dog/s, and show them where it is at the beginning of the day. • Regular toilet breaks outside are a must to avoid any “little accidents”. • Do a walk around the office with your dog at the beginning of the day, to make sure they’ve met everyone in the office and feel happy and comfortable - especially if your dog can be a bit timid with new people. • If your dog is an escape artist, make sure everyone in the office knows not to leave any doors open - especially if you’re by a busy road. • If more than one dog is coming to the office, make sure you give them an opportunity to have a sniff of one another and become friends. F PN

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PONSONBY PEOPLE + THEIR PETS ASK ALEX Each month Dr Alex Melrose answers readers’ pet related issues. Email yours to: alex@vetcare.net.nz

Q:

I’m hoping you can clear something up for me. I’m a bit of a wandering minstrel with my dogs. I’ve seen you guys and other vets nearby as well as the raw food guys, and had conflicting advice about how often my two Chihuahuas need to be vaccinated and with what exactly. I’ve also heard you can arrange blood tests to find out if my dogs need booster shots or not.

Pedro and Pepe also go to kennels regularly when I travel for work and the kennel’s advice has just clouded things for me even further. I don’t want to give them injections they may not need, but I need them to be safe and also to not get turned away from the kennel. Please let me know what is best for me and my little monsters. SALLY, Grey Lynn. Great questions. The root cause of any confusion is the change in licensing of the vaccines themselves. The Vanguard P5 vaccine we use here at our clinic is now licensed to provide three years of protection (previously one year) against parvovirus, distemper and its other three core components. This change has occurred as more recent studies have shown its efficacy over this longer period. Some brands of similar vaccine do not have this same registered period of effectiveness, adding to the varying advice being given to you.

A:

Up until recently all kennels and day-cares have continued to require yearly parvo vaccinations, erring on the side of caution in a ‘high challenge’ environment pathogen -wise. The blood tests you have heard of have now become available to check antibody titre levels, and thereby prove active immunity against various canine diseases. Many kennels have begun to request these bloods be done for dog owners who wish to vaccinate less often. Pepe and Pedro would still require yearly leptospirosis and canine cough vaccinations as these do not provide more than one year’s protection. Let us know if you wish to get some titre blood tests done. (DR ALEX MELROSE, BVSC, MRCVS) F PN VETCARE GREY LYNN, 408 Great North Road T: 09 361 3500 www.vetcare.net.nz F PN SPCA cats, kittens, puppies and dogs all wanting a home

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LOOK... WHO IS IN THE ZOO!

The golden lion tamarin gets its name from its impressive mane, similar to Africa’s majestic big cat, and is regarded as the most beautiful of the four tamarin species.

Long fingers help golden lion tamarins stay aloft and snare insects, fruit, lizards and birds.

LITTLE LIONS FROM THE BRONX AND SOUTH CAROLINA Auckland Zoo has just welcomed two golden lion tamarins from New York’s Bronx Zoo and South Carolina’s Riverbanks Zoo, as part of an international breeding programme for this endangered species. While they come with a big sounding name, these tiny New World monkeys weigh no more than 400-800gm, and have more in common with their fellow monkeys than any feline. Six-year-old male Eastside and four-year-old female Frida will complete quarantine and move into the Zoo’s Rainforest exhibit by the end of July - so be sure to check them out when you visit. Acting primate team leader Carly Day says it is hoped the pair will successfully breed as part of a zoos-based insurance population for a species that’s doing it tough in the wild. The wild population, which is found along the Atlantic coast of Brazil, has suffered from habitat loss and fragmentation, along with illegal capture for pets and trade. The IUCN (International Union for the Conservation of Nature) estimates this species’ population to be currently over 1000. Another 500 live in zoos around the world.

Saturday 5 - Sunday 20 July Race into Auckland Zoo with the kids and join the amazing Hunt for Zoo Loot these July school holidays. Pick up your very own treasure map, follow the clues, and fill in answers as you go. You'll earn fantastic zoo loot and go in the draw to win awesome prizes. As you journey around the zoo be sure to get along to our animal encounters - from giraffe and orangutan to otter, our native reptiles and the Tasmanian devil! Normal zoo admission prices apply. Friends of the Zoo, free. PN Visit www.aucklandzoo.co.nz F

That’s an improvement compared to earlier decades, and the result of nearly 30 years of conservation efforts from a range of facilities states the ICUN. Family orientated “Golden lion tamarins are very family orientated and when they do breed, generally have twins. The whole whanau helps to take care of young ones, but it’s the dad who usually does most of the work, and often carries his young on his back in between feedings,” says Carly. Carly describes these endearing tiny tamarins as highly strung creatures who often emit high-pitched squeals when nervous. “They’re also incredibly quick moving, brilliant jumpers and climbers, and expend a lot of energy, so they need to eat often. Insects in particular, provide them with a great source of protein.” The zoo’s other two golden lion tamarins, female Gabrielle and male Janeiro - an older pair who are both post-reproductive, have a home in the tamarin exhibit, close to The Tropics. It’s a home they share with the zoo’s lone family agouti, Pico. Fast Facts • Golden lion tamarins are omnivores and eat fruit, insects and small lizards • A group of golden lion tamarins is called a ‘troop’ • In the wild, the main predators for golden lion tamarins are cats, raptors and large snakes • Average life span in the wild: 15 years • IUCN Red List status: Endangered. Hunt for Zoo loot these holidays!

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PONSONBY PROFESSIONALS: LOGAN GRANGER

TRUST AND ESTATE PLANNING In this article I am going to briefly cover some recent topical issues that may be of interest to readers with trusts or assets held in trust. For simplicity’s sake I will skip some of the variations and technicalities and just cover a basic approach. Many of you may have a trust that holds your family home or property. I have found that clients often don’t really understand what it means or how assets are held in a trust. For the most part a trust is formed by a settlor, who may or may not be the original owner of the assets, let’s just say a house in our example. A couple forms a trust and decides to put a house they own into the trust. The trust is formed by a written deed, the deed sets out the rules and governance of the trust and who are to be the trustees and beneficiaries. The settlors need to find someone to be the independent trustee, this is the person who independently administers the trust assets according to the rules of trust deed for the benefit of the beneficiaries of the trust. The beneficiaries of the trust are normally specified, they can be the settlors and the settlors’ children and grandchildren, or other people or charities. At this point it is important to remember that the trust now holds the assets not the individuals, the individuals no longer control the assets, the trustees do. The assets are now required to be managed for the beneficiaries, not the orginal owners. In order to get the house asset into the trust, the settlors may in their personal name be owed a debt for the value of the property put into the trust. This debt can be gifted to the trust. Once the debt is completely gifted away to the trust, the settlors are no longer owed money by the trust.

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This is a very important point. While the trust still owes a debt to the settlors, they may be able to call funds back if required with relative ease because the money is still owed to them. If the debt is gifted away then it is now part of trust capital and, in my view, much greater scrutiny is placed on the trust capital and the use of trust capital. Essentially the settlors, if they want some money back out of the trust, are now calling on it as a beneficiary and not as a repayment of a loan or advance to the trust. My point is that when creating a trust for asset protection purposes and putting your assets in the trust, you are seeding control of those assets to the trustees of the trust, it is no longer your personal asset to control. Therefore considering the appointment of trustees, the rules of the trust, access to the trust funds, and how you should structure and maintain any advances and loans between you and the trust are very important considerations to make. There have been a number of recent cases relating to the management of trusts, the keeping of proper trust records and decision making by trustees. In regard to the management of trusts, it is now more important than ever that if you have a trust you actually understand the implications of having one, and what the various roles and responsibilities are. If you would like to discuss any aspect of the accounting and record keeping side of a trust please give me a call on T: 09 361 2762. Disclaimer - while all care has been taken, Johnston Associates Chartered Accountants Ltd and its staff accept no liability for the content of this article; always see your professional advisor before taking any action that you are unsure about. JOHNSTON ASSOCIATES, 202 Ponsonby Road T: 09 361 6701 www.jacal.co.nz F PN

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PONSONBY PROFESSIONALS: METROLAW GOT A LEGAL QUESTION? ASK MICHAEL@METROLAW.CO.NZ

Email Michael with your question and include PONSONBY NEWS in the subject line. Michael Hemphill, a partner of the firm will answer one topical question each month. I live in an apartment building on Richmond Road, I have been having problems with my neighbours on the floor above mine. They are boisterous young professionals whose evening activities have been getting more -and-more raucous and less-and-less confined to the weekend since moving in. Last Saturday I was kept up until the early hours of the morning by a particularly noisy party. Please advise me as to what my best options going forward with this issue are and how I can put a stop to my neighbours’ noisy behaviour. CLIVE, Grey Lynn.

Q:

First off, disputes with neighbours can easily become acrimonious and affect the enjoyment of your property. It is worth considering making a polite approach in the first instance before you escalate the matter. It is always good to give people the opportunity to be reasonable before you begin issuing ultimatums.

A:

Once when I was living in the middle of Ponsonby we received a handwritten letter from a student neighbour inviting us to her party and apologising in advance about the excessive noise which she anticipated. It would have been difficult for us to complain when she had been so nice. It allowed us to organise an evening out so we were not inconvenienced. If a polite approach falls on deaf ears then your most ready remedy is the council. Your best option is to make a noise complaint while the noise is taking place, so that a noise control officer can investigate the matter. The officer will then take into account the time of day in assessing the reasonableness of the noise. If you feel a noise is excessive and want to make a complaint, call Auckland Council at any time on T: 09 301 0101. They will record your name so they can keep track of the issue, but don’t worry your name won’t be given out. Excessive noise has been defined by s. 326 of the Resource Management Act as: noise that is under human control and interferes with the peace, comfort and convenience of any person. Note that there is no set time or decibel level but it seems to apply to your situation, in that the noise is unreasonable. The general reason to make a complaint is; a stereo, party, musical instrument or machinery. If the officer finds that the noise is excessive, an excessive noise notice is issued, prohibiting excessive noise for up to 72 hours effective immediately. The test is totally subjective and they don’t use monitoring equipment. If the noise then continues within that time, notify Auckland Council again and they will determine if any written direction has been breached. If the written direction has been found to be breached the officer and Police may seize equipment or issue an infringement fee of $500. If you have any more queries or concerns, don’t hesitate to get in touch with any of our PN Metro Law staff. (MICHAEL HEMPHILL) F Disclaimer - This article is for general information purposes only. If you have a legal problem you should seek advice from a lawyer. Metro Law does not accept any liability other than to its clients and then only when advice is sought on specific matters.

METROLAW, Level 2, 36 Williamson Avenue T: 09 929 0800 www.metrolaw.co.nz

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PONSONBY PROFESSIONALS SYSTEMISE YOUR WAY TO SUCCESS Kristin Moolman of Revisit Solutions is a certified implementation partner for Infusionsoft, Xero and WorkflowMax and advises on and implements a number of other software applications in the Xero community. Xero and its add-on community of role-based software applications are well known for the benefits they can bring to businesses. Infusionsoft is a cloud based software system that is bringing the benefits of automation to smaller businesses around the world and includes a CRM, email marketing tools, sales pipeline management and business process automation. Starting with a good website and a CRM (customer relationship management system) is a great way to get going. So what is a CRM? A CRM keeps all your customer information, supplier information and sales process in one place. A great CRM allows you to segment your contacts into groups, enabling you to deliver more targeted messages to specific groups of people. Email marketing is heavily under-utilised in New Zealand businesses and is one of the most effective ways to reach your audience. With the right CRM and integrated email marketing tool, it is also a brilliant way to gather further information about your audiences’ preferences, enabling yet further targeted messaging which has the overall effect of increasing sales. Let’s combine more sales with greater efficiencies in your workflow processes; do you think this might make a difference to your business? The rise of cloud software applications built for small businesses enables you to systemise with ease. There are many different CRM and workflow solutions out there that vary slightly. Helping you understand which one is best for your business is where we specialise. www.revisitsolutions.co.nz F PN

SMART MONEY # 6 Many Happy Returns… Happy New Year KiwiSaver

More so, it is expected to expand its importance and we expect will follow in the footsteps of our Aussie neighbours where employer contributions are now at a healthy 9.5% of salary (and projected to rise to 12% in the short term). So our message is this... this is the month of the year to invest in knowing more about your KiwiSaver strategy. So here are some tips to assist in the success of your KiwiSaver New Year resolution: Make an educated choice around your portfolio allocations. Please! Do not treat the choice of investment mix like a dart board. Beyond the decision to ‘be in’, the most critical choice is not the scheme provider but your choice of a suitable mix of income and growth assets. This decision forms the major determinant of your return. Hold your scheme provider accountable by reviewing independent research on fees and performances. Research is readily available from our firm.

The KiwiSaver New Year runs from July 1 to 30 June and perhaps now is a time to resolve to pay closer attention to this financial building block? With over half the New Zealand population, some 2.1 million people and $19 billion of funds invested, its importance within our personal financial framework, in our view deserves closer attention. KiwiSaver is here to stay. Despite the inevitable tinkering that may continue to occur as governments place their stamp on the scheme, KiwiSaver, alongside its core principles, is undoubtedly here to stay. The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

Stay tuned, gain online access and monitor your inputs and progress. Get the best of what the government offers; make the most of the Member Tax Credit by ensuring you put in, savings of $1,042.86 annually (if possible). Do not chase last year’s returns; chasing high returns from the past is like driving while looking in the rear view mirror. Check out the consistency of performance and research before you decide.

Jocelyn Weatherall

Richard Knight

Adopt a ‘steady as she goes’ attitude, do not swap allocations or providers without some consideration of the impacts and facts. Seek facts in lieu of sales talk! Surf the sites. There is a multitude of publically available information, two are: New Zealand Government KiwiSaver: www.kiwisaver.govt.nz, Commission for Financial Literacy and Retirement Income www.sorted.org.nz/home/sorted-sections/kiwisaver Lucky last, seek clarity. Needing guidance? Feel free to speak with us! www.rutherfordrede.co.nz T: 09 361 3670 Jocelyn jweatherall@rutherfordrede.co.nz and Richard rknight@rutherfordrede.co.nz Advice is of a general nature, specific advice is recommended to be sought before action is taken. Disclosure Statement(s) relating to our advisers are available on request and free of charge.

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS

CELEBRATE NZ DESIGN WITH FIREFLY COSY COLLABORATION Looking for somewhere you can go to view some of the latest and best NZ lighting, furniture and fabric design under one roof? Through the month of July Firefly Light & Design will be showcasing the best pieces from a range of New Zealand designers, including familiar favourites and new releases. This is your chance to encounter the skill and craftsmanship that goes into each piece close up: you’ve seen these designs in magazines and on the internet, now you can view them ‘in the flesh’. Firefly has been steadily building a reputation as a source of quality designer lighting and furniture for eight years. If you are looking to add a piece of striking New Zealand design to your home you can browse a variety of items, and take advantage of special offers for the month of July. If you are looking for a bespoke piece of lighting or furniture they can help with that too! Designers featured include lighting designers David Trubridge, Rebecca Asquith, Tim Wigmore and local bespoke lighting company Epsilon, as well as furniture by Montreux and Kovacs (Christchurch), and Best Design Award Winners Treology along with craftsman Robin Cuff, among others. New Zealand textile designs by Ingrid Anderson, Penny Stotter and Hemptech will also be on display, if you are looking for fabrics with a New Zealand twist, search no further. Drop into Firefly Light & Design to experience PN some of the best designer pieces New Zealand has produced. F

Witty homewares brand Citta Design has teamed up with iconic knitwear label Standard Issue and come down with quite a wonderful case of knits! The collaborative range is crafted in pure New Zealand merino and 100% Italian cashmere in New Zealand by Standard Issue for Citta, and is available until sold out. Citta Design Marketing and Retail Manager Katrina Glenday told Ponsonby News, “This has been a lovely collaboration to bring to our customers, with such a respected New Zealand brand. The quality and attention to detail are impeccable.” The capsule collection offers two styles. The crew cardigan comes in navy or ash grey merino and in oatmeal cashmere, while a V-neck fills out the range nicely, in navy and ash grey merino, and the same exquisitely textured oatmeal cashmere. Lurex contrast detailing makes a subtle appearance on the inside of each neckband: silver on grey, black on navy, and gold on oatmeal. The crew neck is a more classic ‘smart’ fit, while the V-neck is more relaxed - the team at Citta Design recommends going up a size for a slouchy 'boyfriend' look (Merino $259, Cashmere $394). F PN CITTA DESIGN, CITTA DESIGN, 34 Westmoreland Street West T: 09 972 9293 www.cittadesign.com

FIREFLY LIGHT & DESIGN, 22 Wynyard Street, Devonport T: 09 446 0934 www.fireflynnz.com

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UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL Matt O’Rourke and Ryan Harding

A.K.A ‘Matt and Ryan’ or ‘The Lads’ Barfoot and Thompson - Grey Lynn Matt and Ryan first met when embarking on their certificate in Real Estate sales at Unitec two and a half years ago. They have been working as a team right from day one at Barfoot and Thompson Grey Lynn. With different backgrounds - Matt an ex-builder from Christchurch and Ryan a former European Contiki tour director from Auckland - they’ve found they still have a lot in common - “more than just being a couple of straight up 35 year old blokes!” Because of this the pair cover a wide range of clients and customer personality types. “By working together we complement one another, bringing different skills and attributes to the table,” they say. Do you have a partner? Ryan: Megan, who works in marketing for Genesis Energy Matt: Too early to say... Neither of us have children but we have become professional baby sitters for our friends and family since entering our 30s. How do you keep fit? Ryan likes to beat up the squash court at 6am on a Tuesday morning with an old school mate and tries to hit the gym on two other days. Matt prefers tennis and Anytime Fitness on Williamson Avenue. Your best friend would say of you... Matt: Laid back, loyal, too honest and loves a laugh. Ryan: He’s a perfectionist and a loyal Virgo. Your mother would say of you... Matt: Nothing is ever a problem for my boy, I’m very proud. Ryan: Thanks for encouraging us to take the plunge for the next phase of our lives. What are your virtues? Matt: Loyalty, integrity, generosity, sense of humor, patience. Ryan: Sense of humor, dedicated, committed, logical and loyal. And your vices? Matt: Chocolate, eating leftovers. Ryan: Procrastination, eating beyond full, not flexible! Who's your ultimate rock icon? Matt: Tom Petty. Ryan: Dave Grohl. What’s your secret passion? Matt: Antiques and old stuff (my favourite piece is a Second World War desk fan). Ryan: City and landscape photography.

Where do you spend your holidays? Matt: Christchurch and Broadbeach. Ryan: Whangamata. What's your perfect Sunday? Matt: Brunch with mates, hanging out with my niece and nephew, a beer in the sun and a BBQ/home cooked meal. Ryan: Reading the motoring section in the sun with homemade eggs Bene followed by an amazing on-site auction result and Sunday roast with the folks. What were you going to be when you grew up? Matt: Batman and/or architect. Ryan: Fighter pilot. How did you come to be a Real Estate Agent? Matt: An old injury prevented me from building and I really enjoy dealing with people and helping them with regard to real estate. Ryan: My brother said to me you’re still looking for a house even though you just bought one, why don’t you become a Real Estate agent? If you weren’t a Real Estate Agent you’d be..? Matt: I’d earn my skipper license and work on superyachts. Ryan: Running my own business on the fringe of the real estate industry. What’s your favourite Ponsonby Café? Matt: Kokako. Ryan: The Williamson. And your favourite Ponsonby restaurant? Matt: Blue Breeze. Ryan: Farina.

Ryan - Dakota - Stereophonics. Old School. The Alchemist. What websites do you bookmark? Matt: TradeMe, Facebook, sports websites, old watches. Ryan: TradeMe, Facebook, Top Gear, Contemporary Architecture, NZ Herald, Condé Nast Traveller. “I'd be lost without my...” Matt: Laptop, desk fan, unconditional S&P agreements! Ryan: Laptop, external disc drive (photos), Megan. One thing you have learned about life is..? Matt: Be true to yourself and others, look on the bright side and make it enjoyable. Ryan: Be real, otherwise people can tell.

Your favourite Ponsonby store? Matt: The Vitrine. Ryan: McLaren.

What was your standout sale of the last 12 months? Matt - 10 Turakina Street, Grey Lynn - 3 bed renovated villa, $1,996,000.

What’s your favourite Ponsonby fashion label? Matt: Working Style. Ryan: Nicholas Jermyn Shirts.

Ryan - 48 Esmeralda Avenue, Avondale - 2 bedrooms, $806,000 under the hammer!

Share your best kept Ponsonby secret... Matt: Afternoon sun at Bonita Bar. Ryan: The Sky Tower view from the bus stop outside Nosh!

What’s your advice to Ponsonby sellers? Choose an agent you trust (gut feeling) and one you can imagine sitting down and enjoying a drink with once it's actually sold! Not all companies/agencies are created equal. Find out how and why their business model can get you more money at the end of the day.

What's inspired you recently? Matt: Dad, beating cancer.

What's your secret talent? Matt: Rolling my stomach Ryan: Throwing the javelin in 1994!

Ryan: Australian Real Estate Convention - Aron Ralston (cut his own arm off after 127 hours of being wedged between a rock and a hard place).

Where do you live? Matt: Garnet Road, Westmere. Ryan: Rona Avenue, Grey Lynn.

Your desert island distractions: song? movie and/or TV show?/book? Matt - L.A. Woman - The Doors. The Bourne series.

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Matt O’Rourke and Ryan Harding

And your advice to Ponsonby buyers? Go to every single open home and pester agents for the selling prices if you can't attend the auctions in person. Attend as many auctions as you can, in person. Learn how to bid and how different companies operate their auctions. Align yourself with a great agent in your area and put your faith in their advice when it comes to advice and negotiations.

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THE BOYS’ BOOK CLUB WHAT WE’RE READING

These include books us blokes on the Ponsonby News team have recently enjoyed. We love reading in the bath, or in bed. A real stress buster!

MARTIN LEACH Flight MH370: The Mystery By Nigel Cawthorne (John Blake) A top true-crime journalist takes on a confounding current mystery offering up a new theory with international implications. I worked in the airline business in both London and Sydney during the late 70s/80s and like many people in the aviation industry, I’ve been troubled by this mystery. On 8 March, 2014, at 41 minutes past midnight, Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 took off from Kuala Lumpur International Airport. At 1.19am, the plane and its 227 passengers vanished from the skies. No trace has been found. The disappearance of Flight MH370 has horrified people across the globe. In an age where a stolen smartphone can be pinpointed to any location on earth, the vanishing of a Boeing 777 and 227 passengers is the greatest mystery since the Marie Celeste. Experienced author and journalist Nigel Cawthorne has researched with incredible swiftness and thoroughness to reveal the most compelling explanations behind the mystery gripping the world. Nigel Cawthorne is the author of over a hundred books, from serious political works such as The Iron Cage to lightweight comic romps such as Sex Lives of the Popes. Sex Lives of the Presidents got him on the Joan Rivers Show. He was hauled in front of a Senate Select Committee for The Bamboo Cage. And “Read this book” was the last line of the Washington Post’s review of his book Takin’ Back My Name: The Confessions of Ike Turner.

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JAY PLATT The Defence of the Realm by Christopher Andrew (Penguin Group) An unprecedented publishing event to mark the centenary of its foundation, the British Security Service, MI5, has for the first time opened its archives to an independent historian. The book reveals the precise role of the Security Service in 20th century British history, from its foundation by Captain Kell of the British Army in October 1909, through two world wars, up to and including its present roles in counterespionage and counterterrorism. The book describes how MI5 has been managed, what its relationship has been with government, where it has triumphed, and where it has failed. In all of this, no restriction has been placed on the judgments made by the author. The Defence of the Realm also adds significantly to our knowledge of many celebrated events and notorious individuals and definitively lays to rest a number of persistent myths. Above all, it shows the place of this previously extremely secretive organisation within the United Kingdom. Few books could make such an immediate and extraordinary increase to our understanding of British history over the past century.

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MY FAVOURITE ROOM

Robert Key, RK & Co Leatherware Designer Robert Key lives in Grey Lynn, working as a freelancer in the television industry designing sets and props, and has recently launched RK&Co as a vehicle for his leatherware design. Robert moved from suburbia at 13 years of age in 1975 to live with his dad and ‘a great bunch of idealistic teachers’ who wanted to live communally in a house they bought in Herne Bay for $30,000. He says that back then, Herne Bay was a sleepy hollow full of large boarding houses and old folks’ homes; and that back then an extra-thick thickshake from the local diary at the top of Wallace Street meant more ice-cream... Since then, Robert explains he’s had an ongoing relationship with this neck of the woods, flatting in Wanganui Avenue, Norfolk Street, Turakina Street and above shops in Karangahape Road and Richmond Road.

Nowadays Robert lives in Grosvenor Street with his partner Nikki Walker and their two children, Lola and Theo. The couple renovated their Grosvenor Street house 10 years ago, building a large space under the house. Robert says, “It has been the room for many things... currently it’s the ‘studio’ place we run our business from. It’s my favourite space because I create things in it and the garage door opens up to frame a leafy view of Grey Lynn park. My favourite objects are the old steel hand-press my dad used for his bookbinding hobby and my industrial sewing machine I use for leatherware.” F PN RK&CO, www.rkandco.com

photography: Martin Leach

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Vanessa Beirne, Joanne Rae, James & Charlotte Marshall (the new owners) and Robert Tulp

OWNERSHIP CHANGES AT HARCOURTS PONSONBY Charlton Realty have recently taken over Harcourts Ponsonby. They invited us to meet the new owners. We were impressed they'd arranged for their space to be blessed.

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THE PERFECT SEATING ARRANGEMENT 1. Kent Chair - With its tubular sleigh base and simple design, the Kent chair looks great in any space. Available in any fabric or leather of your choice.

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2. Hudson - A timeless classic with a contemporary twist. The subtle buttoning and soft seat cushion make this chair a stunning and inviting feature piece. 3. Manox - This design is deep and luxurious. With an extra feather cushion on each seat and big proportions, this sofa is made for comfort! Available in sofa and corner suite configurations. F PN FORMA, 51-53 The Strand Parnell, T: 09 368 7694 www.forma.co.nz www.facebook.com/formafurniturenz 3

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REAL ESTATE UPDATE: KAREN SPIRES

Giving back is food for the soul As a real estate salesperson I have the privilege of being one of the first to meet newcomers to our community. When helping them to put down roots in their chosen neighbourhood I am often reminded of how lucky we are to live in such a thriving and active community. In an age when many people don’t even know the names of their next door neighbours, Ponsonby and its surrounding suburbs has seemed to retain some of that old fashioned neighbourly spirit. Having lived in Herne Bay with my family now for many years, I feel like we have become part of the local furniture so to speak, and therefore have an unspoken duty to put something back into our community. This is also part and parcel of the Bayleys philosophy. As a group Bayleys supports countless national and local organisations, schools, sports clubs, charities and not-for -profit events. For the past 10 years, Bayleys has been the principal sponsor of Blind Foundation Guide Dogs and has raised more than $2.6 million towards the training of guide dog puppies. From May 13-27 Bayleys coordinated one of the country’s biggest ever online fundraisers, The Great Guide Dog Online Auction, in support of the Blind Foundation. The campaign raised $213,000 through the sale of more than 1300 items on trademe.co.nz. The Bayleys Ponsonby team alone came through with 13 auction items collected from kind-hearted local businesses and individuals, contributing almost $2000 to the final tally. We were thrilled with the end result and humbled by the generosity of everyone who helped us get there. Myself and the team here at Bayleys Ponsonby are also big supporters of Ponsonby Primary School. Last month we got behind the annual Taste of Ponsonby event and our national commercial and industrial auctioneer Richard Valintine led a fundraising auction that helped to raise around $43,000 for the school. We are also back on board as joint sponsors of the Inner City School Arts Programme with Master Kelwin Flooring, the Westmere Kids’ Try and the Western Springs Associated Football Club. Although somewhat cliché, there truly is no better feeling than when you help others; however big or small the gesture may be. To those reading this, I encourage you to give back in some way today, tomorrow, or whenever you remember. Your soul and your PN community will thank you for it. (KAREN SPIRES) F Karen Spires is a Bayleys Real Estate ‘Top Achiever’ - placing her sales data among the top five percent of salespeople within the company.

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JAY PLATT: WE CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT...

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1. Lumira hand poured soy candles, Balinese Ylang Ylang $75 and Lumira Tahitian Cocunut travel candle $25 (exclusive to Askew in New Zealand) @ Askew www.askew.co.nz; 2. Odette fruit stand by Borek Sipek for Driade $1950 @ Indice www.indice.co.nz; 3. Woof Woof dog bowl $68 and Miaow cat bowl $45 @ Tessuti www.tessuti.co.nz; 4. Staub ‘Pumpkin’ Cocotte $499 @ Millys Kitchen www.millyskitchen.co.nz; 5. Silver Globe $159 @ Republic www.republichome.com; 6. Tower Salt Grinder $115 and Tower Pepper Grinder $130 by Tom Dixon @ Simon James Concept Store www.store.simonjamesdesign.com

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1. Fornasetti ‘Mano’ ceramic tray $395 @ Design 55 www.design55.co.nz; 2. Scientific round bottom flask essential oil burner (by Page Thirty Three) $249 @ Father Rabbit www.fatherrabbit.com; 3. Julius the Monkey by Paul Frank Cup with straw $24, Drinking bottle $20, Cup $11.50, Mini container $9.90 and Lunchbox $29 @ Askew www.askew.co.nz; 4. Jet Set Kit by Aesop $53 @ Simon James Concept Store www.store.simonjamesdesign.com; 5. Small glass jug $24 and Provence glasses by Duralex France 160ml $6 each and 250ml $7.50 each @ Tessuti www.tessuti.co.nz; 6. Penhaligons of London Lily of the Valley eau de toilette $259 @ Askew www.askew.co.nz; 7. Mediterranean style ‘Aqus’ vase $238 @ Republic www.republichome.com F PN STYLING: Jay Platt PHOTOGRAPHY: Danilo Santana David, Fisher Santana.

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MILLY NOLAN: DESIGNER GIFTS

French twist As we celebrate Bastille Day this July, we pay homage to homeware that is a little bit French by nature although more nouveau than provincial. Here are a few of our favourites.

Robert Gordon Studio Jug, $127 Rustic in shape yet modern in treatment, this ceramic jug has been half-dipped in white, charcoal or ivory paint.

Aura Wide Striped Euro Pillowsham, $48 The classic French stripe re-emerges in the bedroom with this black and cream Euro pillowsham, which offers a modern yet sophisticated look.

French Country Vintage Jar, $180 Large in diameter and tall in height, this lovely glass Vintage Jar can be used as a vase or as a vessel to house whatever decorative objects take your fancy.

Citta Guarida Metal Table Lamp, $199 With its nod to industrial chic, this table lamp comes with either a white or grey metal shade and is suitable for any room in the home.

Le Creuset Round Casserole Dish, $420 Ideal for casseroles, pot roasts and stews as well as preparing soups and rice dishes, this casserole dish is the essential kitchen classic from iconic French company, Le Creuset, 20cm.

French Country Iron Drum Table, $399 Made of iron, this quaint drum-shaped side table can be used next to the sofa or the bed.

French Country Melon Cut Brandy Glass Set, $60 Perfect for entertaining, this set of four wide-rimmed glasses can be used for drinking your favourite brandy or rouge.

Citta Etiquette Cereal Bowl Set, $80 The hint of navy blue around the edges of this fine bone china cereal bowl gives it PN a distinctive French appeal. (MILLY NOLAN) F All products available from www.mildredandco.com

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GOODWIN PROPERTY MANAGEMENT DELIVERING EXCELLENCE Founded by Local Resident, Ashley Goodwin, in 1991, Goodwin Realty was last month awarded Property Management Company of the Year at the Leading Property Managers of New Zealand 2014 Awards for Excellence. General Manager of Goodwin’s, Catherine Goodwin, was also awarded national winner of the Excellence in Business Development Award. Announced at a gala dinner in Queenstown in May, and competing against businesses big and small from the length and breadth of New Zealand, it was a very proud moment for Ashley, Catherine, and their whole team. During four of the past five years, Goodwin Property Management has been named a finalist in the Real Estate Institute of New Zealand’s Awards of Excellence, but never quite ‘cracked to win’ the top award! Eleven of Goodwin’s team of 17 were there to share in the celebrations. This independent agency is now dedicated exclusively to the service of property management and rentals since a decision to sell its sales agency took effect in 2011.

Ashley and Catherine Goodwin at the IPMAZ Awards 2014 A decision that both Ashley and Catherine are confident has set this privately owned and operated family business on the right path to now establish the name, ‘Goodwin’ at the forefront of property management services across Auckland. Accomplishing intergenerational success, and the transition to a new team is now at the heart of Goodwin’s business plan. Operating from three branch offices in Auckland and holding a solid market share across the Western Bays and Central Auckland suburbs including Ponsonby, Herne Bay, Westmere, Grey Lynn, and Kingsland this is a business that hugely values its very deep PN connections with our local community. F GOODWIN PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, T: 0800 GOODWIN www.goodwinrealty.co.nz

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ASK AN ARCHITECT: PAUL LEUSCHKE Each month Grey Lynn resident and architect Paul Leuschke of Leuschke Kahn answers readers’ property related questions. Email yours to jane@leuschkekahn.co.nz

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My wife and I have now built, renovated or had architectural consultants on five projects (one in Italy) and yet still remain unclear as to the ownership of the design detail.

My understanding is that the standard architectural contract that has prevailed on three of the projects states that the design work can be used on the specific project only and that the physical drawings belong to the client but the underlying raw design detail remains the intellectual property of the architect. Is this correct? Secondly, if the designer is not a registered architect and no contract is in place what is the score? On occasion after the design work has been paid for and finished we have subsequently wished to modify the design. This has been brought about by wanting to get an initial design and build concept and living with the concept for a while before wishing to apply modifications, but not wishing to involve more design costs. While a PDF has been sent to us we find reluctance on behalf of the contractor to release native CAD files that we can then alter. In both scenarios we have been left feeling somewhat cheated, feeling we have paid for all the detail involved in that project and that we should have clear ownership. We understand that the detail should be project specific and not used on another site unless that was in the brief. I suspect that your advice may be to sort this intellectual ownership problem out prior to engagement but somehow we always seem to get caught up in the moment and have not done so. The issue has only become a problem for me since the advent of the digital age. As a client I would like to be able to access the raw CAD files for subsequent reworking by whomever I direct. Phew, that’s a lot of questions! Firstly, yes your understanding is correct, under the standard NZIA contract the intellectual property (the design) remains the property of the architect and the client is licensed to use that intellectual property for that specific project site unless otherwise agreed. Simply put, you can’t pay for one design and then go and build that house all over Auckland.

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Secondly, as I have always used a contract, I have no idea what the situation would be if there is no contract. In New Zealand there is an automatic copyright protection for intellectual property so I would assume this would take precedence if there was no written contract. Design and build usually refers to you engaging a builder who provides you with a design and cost to build the project. In this case the designer would work for the builder. I am guessing you mean you want a concept or preliminary design to then consider over time. Your statement, wishing to modify while not incurring costs, I assume means you want to change the design yourselves and wanting to use a CAD package to do so. Depending on your ability I doubt this would save much in fees, as any competent architect would check the changes made to the drawings to make sure everything was correct PDF drawings are just the same as hand drawings which you got in the pre digital age and seemed happy with, so I am guessing you want to have CAD files and pass these on to a second architect to continue the project. For architects the issue here is liability. Designing a house is a process and during that process more information is gathered and assumptions clarified. Concept or preliminary drawings can be modestly incorrect. A professional needs to be very careful what information is released to the client, the amateur, because the information can be misunderstood or taken as gospel and leading to litigation. An example would be stairs shown on the drawing, which may not be correct but close enough to sort out as the project proceeds. Should you pass this information on to a third party and they don’t check that information, that could mean litigation. Building consent drawings are another matter, where raw files with the architects name and logo on them can be modified by anybody incorrectly and lead to litigation. If you wish to obtain a concept and then proceed with another architect and you have paid the fee, I personally see no problem with forwarding CAD files, minus the architect’s logo, but you do need to accept the information is preliminary. I did this recently but I did find out first who the information was going to. And yes, you are correct again, sort the intellectual property and contract first! (PAUL LEUSCHKE) www.leuschkekahn.co.nz F PN

WHAT’S HOT AT TRENZSEATER The Mayfair Sideboard is a stunning new design from TRENZSEATER. This design is made in New Zealand from solid American Oak and features a beautiful scalloped detail to the front of the doors and sits on a powder-coated steel base. The Mayfair is available in various sizes and stain colours. Custom sizes are available on request as well. Come into TRENZSEATER today at 80 Parnell Road to view this outstanding new design or go online to PN www.trenzseater.com F

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SONG - A POP UP STORE OFFERING INDIAN TEXTILE CRAFTS From 12 August, song pop up store will be offering a selection of handmade natural products originating in India with a focus on textiles that follow ancient traditions. When travelling in India with friends, Claire Croskery discovered and fell in love with the exquisitely beautiful vintage kantha quilts. Kantha quilts are made from vintage silk and cotton sari cloth that has been hand stitched together. The hand stitching can use a wide variety of patterns and motifs. “I bought a lot as each quilt is utterly unique,” says Claire, “and when I got them home they looked even more beautiful back here. So, I went back to India to look for more and discovered many other textile traditions. This is the genus of song. I am now on my fifth trip, travelling to India biannually and exploring different regions hoping to find extraordinary textile crafts and meet the people who make them. Connecting with the craftsperson - mostly women and buying directly from them is a privilege.” Claire has expanded the range, mainly textile with quilts and rugs but also copperware, jewellery, bags, silk and wool scarves. Focusing on handmade products using natural materials and following ancient traditions, there as an abundance of colour. She will also have floral sprays and natural herbal sachets. “The true joy for me is exploring the different regions of India, discovering the extraordinary PN crafts that exist there. All available at song, I look forward to seeing you there.” F SONG, 453 Richmond Road www.songstore.co.nz

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PORTUGUESE SERVINGWARE NOW AT CORSO DE’ FIORI With its rich green beautifully glazed finish and detailed textured surface, this eye-catching range is sure to be the talking point around your table. Part of the kitchenware range designed by renowned Portuguese artist, Rafael Bordallo Pinheiro, the cabbage is a symbol of rural life found in every kitchen garden across Portugal and is a national dish in the form of Caldo Verde, a cabbage soup. Prices range from $9 - $79 F PN CORSO DE’ FIORI, The Foundation Building, 8 George Street, Newmarket www.corso.co.nz

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS NOSTALGIC FORM AND CONSTRUCTED DESIGN AT DAWSON’S Quintessentially Timothy Oulton, the Union Jack Bensington is a playful celebration of royal Britannia. Its bold, graphic print of the Union Jack is a modern salute to the jubilant history of the nation. Featuring hand-dyed canvas and hand stitched detail, the sofa’s construction retains all the elements of a traditionally crafted piece, while the juxtaposition of the vibrant, graphic print with the nostalgic form of the Bensington is a modern, humorous take on a classic silhouette.

The Zig Zag table lamp features delicate spheres of optical grade glass around an intricate metal skeleton. The carefully constructed design forms exquisite, almost kaleidoscope-like patterns when looking through the light. Part of a unique, stunning collection which includes floor lamps, sconces, table lamps and chandeliers.

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Union Jack Bensington and Zig Zag by Timothy Oulton are available exclusively in New Zealand from: DAWSON’S FURNITURE, 1/1 Holder Place, Rosedale, T: 09 476 1121 www.dawsonsfurniture.co.nz

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THE HISTORICAL BOROUGH OF PONSONBY AND GREY LYNN: STREET NAMES

COCKBURN STREET Admiral George Cockburn, pronounced Coe-burn, was born in 1772, the second son of wealthy parents descended from minor nobility. His father, Sir James Cockburn mismanaged his finances disastrously to such an extent he was declared bankrupt. By 1786 he was in such dire straits he managed to gain an appointment as secretary to the Prussian minister in London which gained him diplomatic immunity and saved him from debtor’s prison. George was destined for a life on the ocean waves, having been entered into the books of the 28-gun frigate, HMS Resource in his ninth year. At the age of 14 his first position at sea was as servant to Captain Rowley Bulteel on HMZ Termagant. Despite his father’s misfortune he came under Admiral Hood’s patronage which resulted in an expedition to map islands in the Indian Ocean aboard the 18-gun sloop, HMS Ariel as Captain Robert Moorsom’s servant. In spite of being under the statutory age of 20, in 1791 he passed his lieutenant’s examination and three years later was posted to the 32-gun frigate HMS Meleager and became one of Nelson’s favourites during operations in the Mediterranean. After his promotion to captain of the HMS Minerve he assisted at the blockade of Leghorn and performed gallant action in taking the Spanish frigate, Sabina. In 1809 as commander of the naval force on shore, he contributed significantly to Martinique’s surrender and signed the capitulation by which the island was handed over to the English. For his services on this occasion he received thanks from the House of Commons. Subsequently he was assured of assignments that progressively carried greater responsibility. He was made rear-admiral in 1812 and in 1813-14 took a prominent part in the American war. A larger fleet under Sir Alexander Cochrane’s command returned from wintering in Bermuda and the two admirals proved an effective team with Cochrane administering the campaign and Cockburn handling engagement tactics. The British quickly occupied Tangier Island from where they conducted numerous raids into southern Maryland. The island also became a sanctuary for escaped slaves who accepted Cochcrane’s offer to be “received as Free Settlers into some of His Majesty’s colonies”. Cockburn’s advance was eventually slowed down by Admiral Joshua Barney’s flotilla of small gunboats that able Chesapeake watermen moved into Patuxent’s shallow waters where the larger frigates couldn’t enter. The British soon received reinforcements enabling Cockburn to push forward and attack Washington. With the capital in danger Barney’s flotilla was forced to disband or face capture. Cockburn, supported by a detachment of marines, marched into Washington and set fire to many public buildings including the abandoned White House. Naturally he incurred a great deal of hatred from Americans including the many militiamen who defended their homes and property. He was scornful of “those inhabitants who fired on the British from behind lurking places on their farms or from their houses” and consequently “would have their property treated as a place of arms and their persons as military prisoners of war”. A point of interest is that Cockburn, on his way through the area confiscated the letter ‘C’ from print shops so they couldn’t spell his name! Early in 1815 he received the Order of the Bath and the same year he carried out Bonaparte’s deportation to St Helena. He went on to receive the Grand Cross of his order and was made lord of the admiralty in 1818. That same year he entered politics and was elected Tory Member of Parliament and appointed Junior Naval Lord in the Liverpool ministry. He managed to force the resignation of the Duke of Clarence as Lord High Admiral for acting without the Board of the Admiralty’s authority and was elevated to First Naval Lord in the Wellington Ministry. In this capacity he sought to improve the standards of gunnery in the fleet. He also ensured that the navy had the latest steam and screw technology and emphasised the need to manage seamen without resorting to physical punishment. While regarded by some as the worst type of reactionary, he nevertheless did much to improve the conditions of service for British sailors and was a significant figure in the Royal Navy’s history. In 1851 he was made admiral of the fleet and in 1852 inherited the PN family baronetcy from his elder brother just a year before his death. F (DEIRDRE TOHILL)

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THE WARDROBE COMPANY FOR BESPOKE STORAGE SOLUTIONS Old home or new, The Wardrobe Company will solve those storage dilemmas for you! Whether you’re building a new home or renovating an existing one, you’ll want to incorporate the sophisticated bespoke wardrobes and other superior storage solutions that The Wardrobe Company team can design, manufacture, and install specifically to your needs; there’s no place for a ‘one size fits all’ philosophy when it comes to your home and at The Wardrobe Company they understand that your storage requirements are as individual as you are. And they’ve got the expertise to satisfy all your storage needs - wardrobes and dressing rooms, home office fit-outs, laundries, garage storage, entertainment units and more. One of their experienced design consultants will visit your home to discuss your requirements and then develop a design to suit you. It will then be manufactured in their factory and installed in your home by their trade-qualified craftsmen. And, they stand by their products and workmanship with a comprehensive 10 year warranty. The Wardrobe Company works closely with its clients (including many leading interior designers and architects) to provide bespoke wardrobes and storage solutions that delight the most discerning home owner. No matter what age and style of home, the talented team at The Wardrobe Company will take full responsibility for designing and creating the storage spaces you’ve always wanted. Their high level of repeat and referral business is testament to the reputation they have built up over 20 plus years as the leaders in their field. F PN www.thewardrobecompany.co.nz

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NATURALLY, IT’S NEST Well known fact: Pure washed linen sheets and duvets are beautiful to sleep in. Lesser known fact: Linen bedding is the most eco-friendly option for your bed. Nest has developed an exclusive range of sheets, pillowcases, and duvet covers in a wonderful stonewashed 100% pure linen. From this ancient fibre they have created the most sought after, contemporary bed-wear in delicious shades of charcoal, coral pink, and ethereal blues from sky through to dreamy duck egg. And there’s no ironing! The softly rumpled look of freshly washed and line-dried linen adds to the charm and wonderful hand-feel. Great quality linen bedding is produced by working on the fibre itself, no oils or chemicals are used. The best linen flax is grown in Europe - France, the Netherlands and Belgium to be exact - and throughout you find family owned businesses that have been growing linen flax for generations. The process of drawing the linen fibres to be woven into the finest linen fabric has remained the same for generations. There are no tricks in the production, no chemical processes: It is a natural and honest method of producing a quality product that lasts. These beautiful European fibres are woven by the best linen weavers in India exclusively for nest. Also nest offers a wide range of stylish and useful homewares for everyday living. Shop online or visit their chic industrial warehouse-style shop in Newton. F PN

LOCAL REAL ESTATE COMPANY JOINS BIKE RIDE FOR POVERTY CYCLE For the third year in a row Unlimited Potential Real Estate Company is joining a charity bike ride to raise funds to help TEAR Fund rescue girls held in bondage in Southeast Asia. The money raised last year with the aid of Unlimited Potential, helped to rescue 39 girls held in bondage in Southeast Asia, prosecuted 12 offenders and enabled TEAR Fund partners to move into a new community in Nepal deemed at risk from trafficking. Managing director, and co-owner of Unlimited Potential, Grant Lynch, is passionate about their involvement. Grant is a dedicated cyclist himself and will lead the six member UP team. Around 30 teams will line up for the six laps of a 20km circuit. Lynch says all members have daughters and they are keen to play their part in helping to curb this horrific trafficking in young human lives. The kidnapping and trafficking of young girls, largely for sex purposes, is larger than drugs - billions of dollars Grant told Ponsonby News. Every 30 seconds a child is trafficked somewhere in the world. “We want to do our bit to help stamp it out, and as we are very competitive, we hope to win again for the third year in a row.” Money is raised by corporate donations, and individual sponsorship of cycle teams. Grant Lynch told us it is a great day out - kid’s activities, food and a well earned beer at the end of the ride. Poverty Cycle - a very worthwhile cause, enthusiastically embraced by local real estate company Unlimited Potential. (JOHN ELLIOTT) F PN

NEST, 35 Dacre Street, T: 09 302 5704 www.nest-direct.com

FATHER RABBIT'S KITCHEN ARSENAL FATHER RABBIT is constantly fine tuning and updating his arsenal of kitchen products. This Herne Bay store at 232 Jervois Road is full of those simple, practical kitchen tools that once you have, you don’t understand how you ever quite did without. Whether you’re cutting, containing, cooking or serving - pick from timeless products sourced both locally and abroad, such as Falconware Enamel, Duralex Glassware, Fog Linen, and Pallares Knives. F PN FATHER RABBIT, 232 Jervois Road Herne Bay T: 09 360 2573 www.fatherrabbit.com

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IS THIS THE NEW FACE OF COMMUNITY BASED SPORTING FACILITIES? Win win for all parties - the Ponsonby Bowling Club will live again. Staring down the barrel of the closure of the Ponsonby Bowling Club due to a reduced membership and a club facility that was in need of urgent repair, a unique solution was required. For the second oldest sporting club in Auckland, and an iconic part of our community, the thought of closing forever was a troubling one. However, due to an innovative solution, the new Ponsonby Bowling Club will open again before Christmas this year, surrounded by 15 new high end apartments to be known as the Vert apartments. Longstanding real estate developer, Location Group, has employed architect Kerry Avery, of Avery Team Architects, to conceive and deliver what could become the most sustainable solution for the integration of residential development with community based sporting facilities. Sporting clubs are now having to take some radical action to survive. By throwing away the old rule book of how they have needed to operate in the past, they are now looking at how the large tracts of land they operate from can be unlocked to retain the amenity, but also realise what could potentially be a revenue earning saviour for clubs in similar positions. This is probably just the start as planners and developers adapt to the new Auckland City Council Unitary Plan, where higher density housing and the need for more integrated community facilities will be required. The single biggest advantage of retaining the large bowling greens on the north side of the apartments will be the creation of a large and sheltered open space where all day

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Kerry Avery is pretty fired up about finishing his latest project in Herne Bay. sun for the Vert apartment owners will be protected from any activities on neighbouring sites. As part of the agreement with the bowling club, the developer, Location Group is delivering back a brand new bowling facility. Included will be two new greens; one artificial green for year round bowling and the other, an international standard turf green. The new club rooms, changing rooms and administration facility will be situated on the ground floor towards the eastern end of the complex on Jervois Road. An operational agreement between the bowling club and the owners of the apartments will ensure a harmonious relationship between both parties. While the new club has a bar and kitchen, strict controls will restrict hours of operation, noise and the extent/timing of planned events whilst still allowing the club an opportunity to derive much needed revenue to fund its community activities. An open day is planned on-site for Sunday 13 July between 1-3pm as an opportunity for the community to come and see the quality of this development, the balance of apartments still available for sale and the rebirth of the historic Ponsonby Bowling Club. www.vert.co.nz

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HOME: WHERE THE HEART IS

FOR A SUPREME CLEAN GET IT WITH JET At Jet Cleaning clients demand results and so the ‘full service, first class’ approach offered by Jet Cleaning ensures their clients are not disappointed. Founded over 25 years ago by the energetic, charismatic and entrepreneurial Mike Booth, Jet Cleaning embodies everything the man stands for. With its head office based in Newton, Jet Cleaning is positioned to deliver a fast, efficient and excellent service right to your doorstep. Jet Cleaning offers the full spectrum of commercial cleaning services including general cleaning, carpet and upholstery cleaning, window cleaning, water blasting, floor care, consumables, washroom services, VIP residential cleaning and pest management. Every one of these services is delivered by competent, experienced and well trained staff using the best cleaning equipment and products available. That is why Jet Cleaning now serves over 200 different clients throughout Auckland, including popular names such as Euro, the Jervois Steakhouse, Foodstore, Ostro, O’Hagans, Tyler Street Garage, the Giltrap Group, and many more names that have certainly stood the test of time. Jet Cleaning invites you and your friends to share in what so many business owners have been raving about. For this month only they are offering new clients professional carpet cleaning free of charge when they sign up with Jet Cleaning to help with their regular cleaning needs. Call them today to arrange your free quotation, and experience the best in service that Auckland has to offer. F PN JET CLEANING, T: 09 302 1536 or Free phone 0800 JET CLEANING or visit www.jetcleaning.co.nz

THE PERFECT BALANCE Translating into English as Cocoon, the name Koza evokes feelings of comfort, manifested using the highest grade cotton and bamboo fabrics. Drawing on a long line of traditions and looming craftsmanship, Koza brings specialist design, comfort and beauty into New Zealand households. Style - Designs and patterns that are timeless, discerning and rich in tradition. Beauty - Using only the finest cotton and colours, which reflect the vibrant heritage of the Mediterranean lifestyle. Practicality - Their collection is sustainable, lightweight and functional. The bath and beach collections are highly absorbent, fast drying and easily transportable for families on the go. Shop online at the Koza website and there you will find a wide range of bath towels, hand towels, beach towels and throws to choose from. Use a little piece of smart Turkish PN tradition to dry you and your family. F KOZA TRADING LTD, www.koza.co.nz

BMW X1 PLUS BMW has released the perfect city-size solution for drivers who demand both performance and practicality from an SUV. Boasting outstanding manoeuvrability, a command-style seating position giving clear and unimpeded visibility, the BMW X1 is what many consider to be the ultimate urban SUV and is perfect for negotiating the inner-city.

The Jet Cleaning team

In the same breath, it also doubles as the perfect weekend-escape vehicle, capable of carrying up to five people in comfort and style. To further enhance the undoubted appeal of this dynamic and aesthetically captivating model, BMW has added more than $9,000 of value to the limited release ‘X1 Plus.’ In addition to BMW’s renowned driving dynamics and a powerful yet fuel efficient diesel engine, the overall value of the X1 Plus is further enhanced with additional specification. On-board navigation will help you find your way to your favourite store or restaurant, while front and rear parking sensors - working in tandem with a rear view camera - help ensure that both kerbs and obscured objects are avoided while parking when you reach your destination. For those longer journeys to out of the way places, the load carrying ability of the X1 is exemplary. A panoramic glass roof adds to the style and sophistication of the limited release model, while leather accent seats enhance the premium feel inside the vehicle. The overall look is topped off with 19-inch alloy wheels and bi-xenon headlights. And on those chilly mornings, heated driver and front passenger seats also help ensure the journey, whether short or long, is enjoyed in supreme comfort.

The new BMW X1 Plus

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As with all New Zealand-new BMW models available for sale locally, the X1 Plus comes with a premium segment leading five year warranty, plus three year no-cost servicing as well as five year roadside assistance - providing even greater peace of mind than ever before. Available from $69,900 including registration, a free tank of gas and all other PN www.bmw.co.nz/x1 costs to drive-away. F PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


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ARTS + CULTURE SHOWING AT WHITESPACE Two exceptional New Zealand artists 8 - 26 July Rebecca Harris; “We can call ‘beautiful’ only that which suggests the existence of an ideal order; supra-terrestrial, harmonious and logical that yet bears within itself, like the brand of an original sin, the drop of poison, the rogue element of incoherence, the grain of sand that will foul up the entire system.” - Charles Baudelaire A tussie mussie is a small bouquet of flowers. In the Victorian times they gained a new dimension through floriography, the art of sending messages through flowers. Each and every flower and colour of flower had a meaning and a thought behind it, something that made the composition of a bouquet a complex and time-consuming process. Even the way a bunch of flowers was presented held a coded message, which could be of acute importance when the aim was to express feelings for a loved one. “My recent works are an interpretation through a painterly method of the tussie mussie”, says Rebecca. “Initially attractive, my intention is to draw in my viewer, almost like a carnivorous flowers beckons the insect, into an uneasy world of dark and subversive elements. In here a 'the drop of poison' resides. The decaying foliage and luscious flowers are expressive of a carnal world. Rebecca has a Master of Fine Art with distinction in painting from Canterbury University. Lily Aitua Laita; This artist has achieved widespread recognition as both an accomplished artist and art educator. Her works are characteristically expressive in style, featuring vivid colour and layering of line and form. Her abstracted subjects explore an ambiguous sense of space and time, communicating an interaction between dreams, Pacific mythology, journeys and notions of intuitive and learned knowledge.

Lily Laita, Illumination I Le Lumanai 3

Lily's paintings often express personal narratives, which reflect her mixed ancestry of New Zealand Pakeha, Maori (Ngati Raukawa) and Samoan descent. Lily's works attempt to address the various ways that cultures communicate and record knowledge and how art can become a vehicle for discussion and discourse. The inclusion of Samoan, Maori and English text invests her paintings with another dimension of understanding and 'reading the narratives', highlighting the significance of Polynesian mythology and oratory traditions. WHITESPACE, 12 Crummer Road. T: 09 361 6331 www.whitespace.co.nz

Rebecca Harris, Tussie Mussie - oil on board

A FAMILY CLASSIC COMES TO NEWMARKET FOR THE SCHOOL HOLIDAYS Opera Factory presents ‘Hansel & Gretel’ a short opera by Engelbert Humperdink based on the children’s fairy tale by the Brothers Grimm. Suitable for all ages, this easily accessible holiday production is on stage at The Factory Theatre, 7 Eden Street Newmarket from 9 to 12 July with performances Wednesday to Friday at 11am and 3pm plus Saturday at 3pm and 7.30pm. Featuring highly talented emerging singers and a young chorus this is the perfect informal theatre experience. Humperdink’s opera is full of simple folk tunes and lush romantic music so it is easy to listen to and enjoy, yet the catchy tunes are deceptive and the roles are amongst the most musically demanding in the operatic repertoire.

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For something different this school holidays try something new. Follow the children’s journey through the forest; meet the Sandman and the Dew Fairy; enjoy the witch’s broomstick ride and her house made of sweets and gingerbread. Spot the trick Hansel and Gretel play on the witch to reunite their family and save all the other lost children. After the show, Opera Factory invites the audience and especially youngsters to tour the stage and meet the cast. This experience provides an excellent introduction to opera and what better way to introduce your family to the magic of theatre and music. Further information: T: 09 921 7801 or www.operafactory.com Book online www.iticket.co.nz or T: 09 361 1000 PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


ARTS + CULTURE COLLECT - AN EXCITING NEW POP-UP SHOP FOR PONSONBY photography: Haruhiko Sameshima

This new space inside Whitespace gallery features a selection of exceptional museum-quality handmade objects - open from 29 June until 28 September. July’s exhibition showcases the extraordinary jewellery of Jason Hall. Handcrafted from bone, silver and jade, these pieces are future heirlooms. Jason has a Bachelor of Visual Arts; his work is featured in New Zealand and international public and private collections. Melissa Anderson shows exquisite jewellery from oxidised sterling silver with semi -precious gems, pearls and found objects. For Melissa the notion of dark evokes a sense of history or antiquity within a piece of jewellery that serves as a reminder of a memory associated with a person, place or even the making of and inspiration behind the piece. Melissa is inspired by Victorian jewellery, particularly memento mori due to the importance and sentimentality, that is placed upon each piece.

Jason Hall

Also in July, Studio of Potters presents Salt Glaze, a selection of beautiful salt glazed pots by Peter Lange, Suzy Dünser, Charade Honey, Duncan Shearer, Andrew van der Putten and Mark Goody. Peter Lange and Suzy Dünser will present a floor talk on Saturday 12 July at 3pm - all welcome. Other invited artists include: Melissa Anderson - Jeweller Carmen Simmonds - Glass Nathan Savill - Blacksmith Peter Collis - Ceramics Jason Hall - Jeweller Sue Hawker - Glass Lauren Lysaght - Object maker

Mia Hamilton - Ceramics Nadine Spalter - Ceramics Rebecca Harris - Ceramics Niki Hastings McFall - Object maker Neke Moa - Jeweller Scott McFarlane - Ceramics Adam Webb - Wood

Melissa Anderson

COLLECT @ WHITESPACE, 12 Crummer Road T: 09 361 6331 www.collect.net.nz

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ARTS + CULTURE SHOWING AT TOI ORA LIVE ARTS TRUST GALLERY TOI HUAREWA, Until 1 August Toi Huarewa is Toi Ora's homage to one of the pou of community art in Tamaki Makaurau. The Harakeke exhibition celebrates Don Soloman's passionate and lifelong service as a community art educator. For more than 60 years Don Tukariri-Soloman (Nga Puhi and Ngati Porou) has shared his expertise, encouragement and vision with generations of Aucklanders. A practise that represents some fundamentals about Don's lifelong achievements and contribution, trend breaking as a male harakeke practitioner and trend setting in advocating arts accessibility and respect for harakeke. Toi Huarewa references the Tawhaki legends, the vine or spiders web to climb upwards on his quest to the realm of the deities, a guide rail to the hard stuff of climbing up. The exhibition is mostly of unprocessed harakeke sourced from the many pa harakeke gardens from the city area. The work carefully and often painstakingly formed by students past and present also features a collective work, te whare pungawerewere by current Toi Ora students. The web is a combination of muka fibre from within harakeke leaves and whenu-strips of harakeke. The transformation requires multiple skills and PN a mind for pattern and the abstract - it’s hard work. F

SHOWING AT OREXART DYLAN LIND - ‘LOGIC AND REASON’ Until 12 July Orexart has said it before, but it bears repeating: Dylan Lind really is proving to be an extraordinarily versatile and exciting young painter with an appetite for new and varied source material. In the works of Logic and Reason, his seventh solo show at Orexart, you will witness the ways he is able to combine his love of materials with his growing skills in creating the boldest of painterly effects. This is an urban vision, a vigorous explosion of energy. Since graduating from Elam School of Arts, and travelling through Spain and South America, Lind has gradually been searching for his own painterly language. This body of work displays his growing confidence in both his earlier geometric painting, which referenced his Rarotongan roots, to this energetic abstraction. F PN OREXART, 15 Putiki Street Arch Hill, T: 09 378 0588. For more info visit www.orexart.co.nz or contact: rex@orexart.co.nz

TOI ORA LIVE ART TRUST, 6 Putiki Street T: 09 360 4171 www.toiora.org.nz

Don Tukariri-Soloman

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Untitled, acrylic, oil, spray paint on canvas, 1820mm x 1520mm

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ARTS + CULTURE

FOSTERING COLLABORATIVE THINKING AND CREATION IN PONSONBY Studio One Toi Tu, Auckland Council’s first creative precinct, opened on 26 March this year after much anticipation. Formerly known as Artstation, the changes to the historic Ponsonby Road building is the first step in a region wide plan to have collaborative, multi-use community spaces. With a vision of becoming the world’s most liveable city, Auckland Council and the Waitemata Local Board is focused on providing the right space, in the right place, at the right time. Over recent years it became clear that this space needed to be used for more than just traditional visual arts. The community wanted to create a place for artists, creative businesses, and community organisations to meet, work, rehearse and exhibit in the heart of the city. Studio One Toi Tu will also provide rooms and resources to host courses, programmes and events. This greater interaction between groups and individuals mean more vibrant and connected communities. The reveal of the new precinct is complemented by decals temporarily displayed over the building façade. Designed to alert all and sundry to the exciting new chapter starting at Studio One Toi Tu, the work, by artist Clem Devine of Alt Group, is made up of paint drips symbolising the creativity flowing through the precinct and seeping out into the community. PN Drop in any time to chat with the staff and residents, or discover new offerings at the Studio One Toi Tu - Open Day on Saturday 5 July, 10am-4pm. F

STUDIO ONE TOI TU, 1 Ponsonby Road T: 09 376 3221 www.studioone@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz Facebook.com/StudioOneToiTu

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FINN MCLENNAN-ELLIOTT

The Auckland Old Folks Association Building The Auckland Old Folks Association building is a well-known fixture in the Auckland central area. An old building, but hardly devoid of character or the affection of its patrons, I attended a wonderful late afternoon concert there a few months back and was impressed with the site as one of our local music venues. It was an intimate affair, acoustic music with very little amplification and it managed to capture the essence of the hall - welcoming and inclusive. The hall itself is very run down and in need of a new coat of paint, one of the primary tasks for the next few months, but they have no desire to turn the space into a pristine, perfect hall. There is no need to make it more than it already is, a very flexible space that caters to all manner of the arts. Many of the fittings are a link to its original purpose as an old folk’s association hall - they have the original trowel used on the building displayed as well as numerous plaques dedicated to previous members and committees. The space has a small stage, as well as numerous back rooms. The floor is old wood and is of a size to fit dancers, stage performances, music concerts and any other activity that a hall could hope to be used for. They have a sliding scale for hiring, something which is important to capture the essence of the place because this allows a large range of people to have access to the hall. In keeping with the independence of the space, they are open to anyone who approaches them. They currently have an artist who has taken over a room for one of his projects and have had artists use part or all, of the hall for installations. This independence and openness allows them to be open for projects that couldn’t happen elsewhere and don’t fit into the current ‘market’. The Old Folks Association allows people to negotiate between the mainstream markets and institutions and the pressure to quickly establish a career. This allows people to take it slowly and doesn’t restrict their creativity. Artists can use the space to bring forward this differing creativity and performance and make careers in a way that isn’t dominated by general understandings of ‘value’ and ‘worth’. Many of the artists and musicians that use the hall need this space because their work requires time, space and an investment from the people they perform to, all of which can be found in the Old Folks Association hall. The original use of the hall was coming to an end about 10 years ago and an ongoing conversation was being had about what would happen to it. The Auckland Old Folks Association had been founded in 1945 but its membership had slowly declined until about five years ago when a new committee were tasked to rejuvenate the hall and open it up to the community and pay a more active role in the area. The Old Folks Association had been one of the first providers of public service for the elderly and had been 2500 strong in its heyday. It was very important to the new committee to continue in the image of the original purpose - continue the club mentality and preserve its strong history. The building has a place in Auckland history - despite its simple appearance. It was designed by one of New Zealand’s foremost modernist architects, Henry Kulka. He had escaped the Second World War from Vienna and was from the modernist clique that had developed. It will remain the Auckland Old Folks Association, they have no intention of rebranding or closing their doors to any activities. The only word that has been changed in the constitution was the joining age, reflecting a new ethos of intergenerational PN projects. (FINN McLENNAN-ELLIOTT) F Finn McLennan-Elliott is studing for a Bachelor of Science Honours Degree, specialising in human geography at Auckland University. In his spare time, Finn plays the clarinet and guitar. He has a great appreciation of all types of music. E: finn.huia@gmail.com

Michael Goldwater's Music Factory It’d been over four years since I last had a lesson from Michael Goldwater and as I’ve realised over the last few years, there aren’t many saxophonists or clarinetists from Ponsonby who haven’t learnt from Michael at some point. It was a blast from the past to walk into his office and see that not much had changed. He currently teaches exclusively from home as Westmere School redevelops its library - his regular teaching location. He has a different approach to most other music teachers. He focuses intently on being a music teacher of clarinet and saxophone and it isn’t ‘on the side’ of another career; focusing intently on furthering his students. At times there are 50 different students learning from Michael, ranging from the very young seven-year-old on clarineo, to numerous adult students. His motto is that he wishes to achieve the very best possible standard that any student is capable of, and importantly, to have as much fun along the way. Although he does stress that it’s a tough balancing act between developing technique and fun. I recall unhappily a few of the very necessary ‘technique’ based lessons that I had with him over my many years of lessons. Looking back I am more than thrilled that he took me through those, and we touch on this before both agreeing that it becomes more fun the better your technique gets. The perfect student will do as they are told because Michael will know best, with over 30 years’ experience teaching that doesn’t come as a surprise and I’m certain all his alumni will attest to the importance of listening to Michael’s instructions. He’s going through generations now, and he hopes to teach some of the children of his first students. Among these students include some who have been with him for 15 years, all who make progress while maintaining the very high standards that Michael expects from his students. End of year recitals are an amazing testament to his teaching as students get up year after year and consistently perform with more emotion and technical ability. He teaches both clarinet and saxophone (including the less common varieties) and has two tutor books for each. These have been developed over many years and are dedicated to a more holistic approach to teaching. As opposed to a linear, step by step path that focuses on learning a technique and then learning another in order, holistic learning focuses more on a spiral path. This path continuously turns in on itself and allows a consolidation and building of the core foundation of techniques while also spiralling outward and adding new skills. To this end Michael writes many beginner pieces that are both interesting for new players but allow a development of core skills. Discussions between Michael and his students often don’t differ much between new and advanced students because a large part of learning an instrument comes down to the foundation techniques and having a strong platform of knowledge to learn further from. He has a pedagogical approach to teaching, the holistic spiral of learning at its core, and he has started visually representing some of his ideas and teaching methods to help display the whole picture to his students. Many methods of learning tend to contain what knowledge students have access to, what he refers to as a ‘peephole’ approach, and he believes that this doesn’t allow the learner to see how it all works and comes together. If you teach them the whole thing then a slow accretion of skills and fundamentals can occur, which will eventually allow for the solid base he believes is so important. To those students of his in the Ponsonby area, remember that the most important part of learning an instrument is practice. Progress is time plus practice, but the more you practice the better you will get, and, most importantly, the more fun you will have. If you’d like to contact Michael, he can be found at www.musicfactory.co.nz PN (FINN McLENNAN-ELLIOTT) F

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ARTS + CULTURE CELEBRATING GRASS ROOTS PUBLISHING ZINE FEST: 18 - 20 July 24-HOUR ZINE-MAKING CHALLENGE: 11 - 12 July 6pm Self-publishing is the new black. The invention of blogs and electronic books has delivered a global audience to the doorstep of closet writers and illustrators far and wide and ‘wannabe’ publicists have responded to the opportunity with zeal. But, while the wonders of technology have seduced one group of aspiring writers and artists, another is opting to remain loyal to more tried and true methods of selfexpression. Pen, paper, scissors and typewriters are the tools of choice for participants in Auckland Zinefest 2014 - a not-for-profit community festival which caters to creatives with a home-grown approach to publishing.

HAVE YOUR SAY ON AUCKLAND’S ARTS AND CULTURE Calling all arts aficionados, cultural connoisseurs and anyone interested in arts and culture - it’s time to have your say on how Auckland’s arts and culture can develop over the next decade. The Draft Arts and Culture Strategic Action Plan, which aims to deliver on the Auckland Plan’s vision to ‘integrate arts and culture into our everyday lives’, has opened for public consultation. The draft action plan sets out a 5 to 10 year strategic direction for the planning and delivery of arts and cultural activities in Auckland. It identifies six goals and supporting key actions to meet the challenges of Auckland’s continued growth, changing demographics and increasing international competitiveness in the creative sector, with a focus on making arts and culture accessible to everyone. The draft action plan was approved by the Arts, Culture and Events Committee last month with committee members in agreement that the plan provides a sound base for further discussion with Aucklanders. Chair of the committee, Councillor Alf Filipaina says the draft responds to the Auckland Plan statement: ‘Auckland expects that our arts and culture will thrive, unite, delight, challenge and entertain, and also drive wealth and prosperity for individuals and for Auckland.’ “During engagement for the Auckland Plan, arts and culture featured in its power to deliver on the transformational shifts required to make Auckland the world’s most liveable city,” he says.

The festival celebrates a hands-on approach to self-publishing with hand-rendered illustrations, self-typed musings and small runs of Xeroxed works being the order of the day for participants. “It’s really about creative freedom and doing it yourself,” says zine-maker and festival spokesperson Linda Lew. The six-year-old festival has already attracted a record number of participants, an expected 50 stall holders will be setting up shop in Newton’s Old Folks Association hall in Gundry Street having necessitated a move from the event’s former home of St Kevin’s Arcade on K’ Road. Following an opening party on Friday night, the public are invited to a programme of talks and workshops taking place alongside stall displays on Saturday. Attendees will hear how comic artist Li Chen morphed from being a student magazine contributor to the self-published author of three volumes of comics. Li will also give a run down on using online crowd-funding vehicle Kick Starter to finance their publishing endeavours. Stall displays will range from the professional offerings of publishers Square Planet and Compound Press, to a group student display from Media Design School to first -time participants airing their etchings. Guest stallholders Luke Sinclair (aka LukeYou), and whimsical illustrator Sarah McNeil will be coming from Australia for the event, while further stallholders will be hailing from Hamilton. A Best of the Fest Awards ceremony is scheduled to take place at the festival after-party on Saturday night at The Whammy Bar and Sunday will see staff at Auckland Library encouraging children to take part in a collaborative zine-making workshop. “It’s a showcase for a group of individuals who are still trying to carry the craft and maintain the spirit of physically creating your own work,” says Linda, who maintains “there’s still charm in making zines.” The event is sponsored by Auckland Council, PN K’ Road Business Association and Phantom Billstickers. F AUCKLAND ZINE FEST 2014, Old Folks Association Hall, 8 Gundry Street www.aucklandzinefest.org www.facebook.com/aklzinefest

“To reach all parts of our region, both urban and rural, inner city and suburbs, and to make arts and culture programmes relevant to the different communities who live here requires a focused plan.” Filipaina says the ‘whole of Auckland’ plan will be delivered in partnership with other key stakeholders in the arts and culture sector. To date, the Ministry for Culture and Heritage, Creative New Zealand, Creative Coalition, ASB Community Trust, Independent Maori Statutory Board, and Pacific People Advisory Panel have worked with the council to develop the draft. Aucklanders are encouraged to head to shapeauckland.co.nz to read the draft action plan and to share their thoughts through an online submission. The public consultation period ends at 5pm on Thursday 24 July 2014. F PN

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ARTS + CULTURE SHOWING AT STUDIO ONE THROUGH DIFFERENT EYES - GROUP SHOW 6 - 28 August Opening night: 6 August from 5pm Through Different Eyes gathers together the work of five artists who approach representation of the human figure and how we interact with space in diverse ways. The audience is offered a range of perspectives from which to consider the subject matter through the different painting styles of the artists - from realistic and minimal, to biomorphic and semi-abstract. Guy Howard Smith, Natalie Tozer, Andrew Rankin, Sean Mc Donnell, Michael Mitchell. F PN STUDIO ONE, 1 Ponsonby Road, T: 09 376 3221 www.studioone@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz Facebook.com/StudioOneToiTu

THE GREAT ART SALE IS BACK! 31 July - 31 August Opening: 30 July 5 - 7pm Every year the Lake House Arts Centre holds the Great Art Sale - an opportunity for artists to sell their wares and for the Auckland community to view, buy and experience some truly wonderful art works. Last year’s sale was hugely successful with hundreds of art works being entered for sale and display and a marvellous range of genres represented - from works on paper, oil paintings, acrylics on canvas, original prints and mixed media to sculptures in wood, metal, ceramics, glass and fibre. Lake House is offering the artists the option of pre-registering this year to secure a place in the final sale. For receiving dates, an entry form and more information on how to pre-register your artworks please visit our website www.lakehousearts.org.nz or email the manager on manager@lakehousearts.org.nz THE LAKE HOUSE ARTS CENTRE, 37 Fred Thomas Drive, Takapuna (easy access just after the bridge) www.lakehousearts.org.nz

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Sean Mc Donnell ‘The past is present’ oil paint on wood

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


ARTS + CULTURE UPTOWN ART SCENE The brick building at 1 Ponsonby Road has undergone another change. Once the Auckland Police Barracks, then Outreach, to Art Station, and now Studio One Toi Tu opened last month. Continuing its tradition of supporting community-based visual arts, Studio One offers art classes, artists’ work spaces, and galleries for casual hire.

Studio One offers art classes, artists’ work spaces, and galleries for casual hire

There are very few available platforms for fresh artists to get their work seen (Silver in Crummer Road and the artist-run galleries mentioned in last month’s Uptown Art Scene are about all there is), so Studio One should see plenty of new student work showcased in their three galleries variously sized to suit different work and approaches, these spaces are affordable, attractive, and all on street-level to entice the public in. The dripping paint logo on the front of the building references all the painting going on at Studio One’s art classes, although they also offer printmaking, bookbinding, photography and more. There are more art classes available just down Great North Road at Browne School of Art, run by well-respected artist and tutor Matthew Browne. This has more of a serious art-school feel to it, with year-long classes offered at varied levels, alongside weekend workshops and term-long night classes. Matthew studied at Camberwell in London, where this type of art school is blossoming as high fees and a lack of emphasis on methodology has art students looking for alternatives. Making art is a satisfaction in itself, and one needn’t become a high-level art star to enjoy it. As our world fills with more digital images that refuse to be touched, there’s a lot of pleasure in pushing one colour across another, feeling the drag of charcoal on rough paper, and making ink explode in a puddle of water. Local art classes make it easy to set aside the time for these pleasures. F PN WILL PAYNT, STUDIO ART SUPPLIES

The bright spacious studio at Browne School of Art

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HOROSCOPES: MISS PEARL NECLIS

What your stars hold this month ♋

Cancer (the Crab): 22 June - 22 July You might want to share the effort if you’re about to go into any sort of negotiations this month, but if you want to feel like you have control over others your ambitions might be thwarted, remain alert.

Leo (the Lion): 23 July - 21 August If you can, avoid any sort of argument this month, because what might seem like a big deal at the time will show itself to be trivial and unimportant. Instead try and show a more caring side, with hindsight you will realise this is the best option.

♍ Virgo (the Virgin): 22 August - 23 September

You might try and bury your head in the sand but this won’t make your problems go away. If you face up and deal with them now, and be logical about it, any obstacle that presents itself in the future will be dealt with.

♎ Libra (the Scales): 24 September - 23 October

If you take a chance with someone this month it could lead you into doing something creative and daring. Taking the opportunity will let you realise your full potential and could take your life in a new direction.

Scorpio (the Scorpion): 24 October - 22 November Be careful not to offend anyone this month as it may mean some of your secrets might be spilled, any anger and upset should be avoided as someone close could overreact.

♐ Sagittarius (the Archer): 23 November - 22 December

Money seems to slip through your fingers this month and I don’t mean you’re overspending, take stock of your finances and decide what’s important to you. Make sure you’re happy and don’t worry about anybody else, they can take care of themselves.

PONSONBY NEWS OUTLETS FREEMANS BAY Glengarry, Corner Sale and Wellesley Streets Kellands Real Estate, 4 Drake Street New World, Victoria Park Sale St, 7 Sale Street

GREY LYNN Barfoot & Thompson, 533 Great North Road Barkley Manor, 400 - 402 Great North Road Grey Lynn Community Centre, 520 Richmond Road Grey Lynn Community Library, 474 Great North Road Raw Essentials, 401B Richmond Road Ripe, 172 Richmond Road Tapac, 100 Motions Road Vetcare, 408 Great North Road

HERNE BAY Herne Bay Post & Stationers, 240 Jervois Road Five Loaves & 2 Fish, 206 Jervois Road Icing on the Cake, 188 Jervois Road Momentum, 182 Jervois Road

KINGSLAND Atomic, 420c New North Road

MT EDEN Citta Outlet Store, Corner Enfield & Normanby Road Sabato, 57 Normanby Road

♑ Capricorn (the Goat): 23 December - 20 January

Be prepared to negotiate a fair deal this month as the effort you have put in will start to flourish. Look back at your history, you might find a solution and put your current situation into perspective.

♒ Aquarius (the Water Carrier): 21 January - 19 February

You must demonstrate solid accomplishment this month otherwise that likeable and exceedingly charming persona of yours may not be enough, by all means live for the moment but remember it is just a moment.

♓ Pisces (the Fish): 20 February - 20 March

You might consider replacing that melting pot of ideas you have for a couple of solid objectives, choose your direction and take inspiration, you will make it pay off.

♈ Aries (the Ram): 21 March - 20 April

If you plan your work and fulfil your responsibilities early on this month you will feel great satisfaction, it will also mean that you will have more time to enjoy the fruits of your labour.

♉ Taurus (the Bull): 21 April - 21 May

You may find that cutting corners isn’t always the answer especially with your well-being. It might be time to take two steps back now and one step forward, assess your situation and make some positive decisions. You know that the direction you make now will have a positive influence on your future.

Gemini (the Twins): 22 May - 21 June You know it can take more than facts and figures to get your point across and right now you will have the best chance of making your voice heard, say what is on your mind - that will be the best way to influence others.

NEWMARKET Planet Ayurveda, 41 Gillies Avenue Studio Italia, 96 Carlton Gore Road Taylor Boutique, 1 Teed Street

NEWTON Benediction Café, 30 St Benedicts Street Design 55, 55 Upper Queen Street

NORTH SHORE

Ponsonby News is published on the first Friday of each month excluding January. Copies go quickly so be quick to collect yours from any of the following outlets. The issue is also published on our website www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

Rug Direct, Wairau Park Dawson’s Furniture, Mairangi Bay Nose To Tail Dog Wash, Albany

PARNELL Jane Daniels, 2 Birdwood Crescent Parnell Community Centre, 545 Parnell Road

PONSONBY Artstation, 1 Ponsonby Road Barfoot & Thompson, 184 Ponsonby Road Chapel Bar, 147 Ponsonby Road Fitness Trainer, 36 Jervois Road Harcourts, 89 Ponsonby Road Leys Institute, 20 St Mary’s Road The Longroom, 114 Ponsonby Road Mag Nation, 123 Ponsonby Road Ponsonby Community Centre, 20 Ponsonby Terrace Spa Ayurda, 213 Ponsonby Road Whitespace, 12 Crummer Road

WESTMERE Glengarry, 164 Garnet Road

130 PONSONBY NEWS+ July 2014

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)


THE PONSONBY PINK PAGES

The World Belongs to the Dissatisfied

DEADLINE - 20TH OF THE MONTH

PONSONBY NEWS+ July 2014

131


OCTOBER 1989 - OCTOBER 2014

+ CELEBRATES

Years BRINGING LOCAL NEWS AND VIEWS TO THE GREATER PONSONBY AREA AND ITS SURROUNDS. Be a part of our special celebratory October

2014 issue. There will be a limited number

of bound advertisement inserts available plus special positions and regular run of paper.

SPECIAL FEATURES: + Three Lamps + Gardens & Outdoor Living + Home Renovations + High Summer Fashion + NZ Fashion Week

BE SURE TO SECURE YOUR ADVERTISING SPACE. For more information or to book your advertising contact: Jo Barrett on 021 324 510 or t: 09 361 3356 or 09 378 8553 e: joannebarrett@xtra.co.nz w: www.ponsonbynews.co.nz

132 PONSONBY NEWS+ July 2014

PUBLISHED FIRST FRIDAY EACH MONTH (except January)

PONSONBY NEWS - JULY'14  

Ponsonby. Anyone not heard of us. We are Auckland's most talked about part of town.

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